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Sample records for 4e10-resistant hiv-1 isolated

  1. 4E10-Resistant HIV-1 Isolated from Four Subjects with Rare Membrane-Proximal External Region Polymorphisms

    PubMed Central

    Nakamura, Kyle J.; Gach, Johannes S.; Jones, Laura; Semrau, Katherine; Walter, Jan; Bibollet-Ruche, Frederic; Decker, Julie M.; Heath, Laura; Decker, William D.; Sinkala, Moses; Kankasa, Chipepo; Thea, Donald; Mullins, James; Kuhn, Louise; Zwick, Michael B.; Aldrovandi, Grace M.

    2010-01-01

    Human antibody 4E10 targets the highly conserved membrane-proximal external region (MPER) of the HIV-1 transmembrane glycoprotein, gp41, and has extraordinarily broad neutralizing activity. It is considered by many to be a prototype for vaccine development. In this study, we describe four subjects infected with viruses carrying rare MPER polymorphisms associated with resistance to 4E10 neutralization. In one case resistant virus carrying a W680G substitution was transmitted from mother to infant. We used site-directed mutagenesis to demonstrate that the W680G substitution is necessary for conferring the 4E10-resistant phenotype, but that it is not sufficient to transfer the phenotype to a 4E10-sensitive Env. Our third subject carried Envs with a W680R substitution causing variable resistance to 4E10, indicating that residues outside the MPER are required to confer the phenotype. A fourth subject possessed a F673L substitution previously associated with 4E10 resistance. For all three subjects with W680 polymorphisms, we observed additional residues in the MPER that co-varied with position 680 and preserved charged distributions across this region. Our data provide important caveats for vaccine development targeting the MPER. Naturally occurring Env variants described in our study also represent unique tools for probing the structure-function of HIV-1 envelope. PMID:20352106

  2. HERV-K–specific T cells eliminate diverse HIV-1/2 and SIV primary isolates

    PubMed Central

    Jones, R. Brad; Garrison, Keith E.; Mujib, Shariq; Mihajlovic, Vesna; Aidarus, Nasra; Hunter, Diana V.; Martin, Eric; John, Vivek M.; Zhan, Wei; Faruk, Nabil F.; Gyenes, Gabor; Sheppard, Neil C.; Priumboom-Brees, Ingrid M.; Goodwin, David A.; Chen, Lianchun; Rieger, Melanie; Muscat-King, Sophie; Loudon, Peter T.; Stanley, Cole; Holditch, Sara J.; Wong, Jessica C.; Clayton, Kiera; Duan, Erick; Song, Haihan; Xu, Yang; SenGupta, Devi; Tandon, Ravi; Sacha, Jonah B.; Brockman, Mark A.; Benko, Erika; Kovacs, Colin; Nixon, Douglas F.; Ostrowski, Mario A.

    2012-01-01

    The genetic diversity of HIV-1 represents a major challenge in vaccine development. In this study, we establish a rationale for eliminating HIV-1–infected cells by targeting cellular immune responses against stable human endogenous retroviral (HERV) antigens. HERV DNA sequences in the human genome represent the remnants of ancient infectious retroviruses. We show that the infection of CD4+ T cells with HIV-1 resulted in transcription of the HML-2 lineage of HERV type K [HERV-K(HML-2)] and the expression of Gag and Env proteins. HERV-K(HML-2)–specific CD8+ T cells obtained from HIV-1–infected human subjects responded to HIV-1–infected cells in a Vif-dependent manner in vitro. Consistent with the proposed mode of action, a HERV-K(HML-2)–specific CD8+ T cell clone exhibited comprehensive elimination of cells infected with a panel of globally diverse HIV-1, HIV-2, and SIV isolates in vitro. We identified a second T cell response that exhibited cross-reactivity between homologous HIV-1-Pol and HERV-K(HML-2)-Pol determinants, raising the possibility that homology between HIV-1 and HERVs plays a role in shaping, and perhaps enhancing, the T cell response to HIV-1. This justifies the consideration of HERV-K(HML-2)–specific and cross-reactive T cell responses in the natural control of HIV-1 infection and for exploring HERV-K(HML-2)–targeted HIV-1 vaccines and immunotherapeutics. PMID:23143309

  3. Neutralization of multiple laboratory and clinical isolates of human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) by antisera raised against gp120 from the MN isolate of HIV-1.

    PubMed Central

    Berman, P W; Matthews, T J; Riddle, L; Champe, M; Hobbs, M R; Nakamura, G R; Mercer, J; Eastman, D J; Lucas, C; Langlois, A J

    1992-01-01

    Vaccines prepared from the envelope glycoprotein, gp120, of the common laboratory isolate of human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) (IIIB/LAV-1) elicit antibodies that neutralize the homologous virus but show little if any cross-neutralizing activity. This may be because the principal neutralizing determinant (PND) of gp120 is highly unusual in the IIIB/LAV-1 strain and is not representative of those found in the majority of field isolates. We have now examined the immunogenicity of recombinant gp120 prepared from the MN strain of HIV-1 (MN-rgp120), whose PND is thought to be representative of approximately 60% of the isolates in North America. Our results show that MN-rgp120 is a potent immunogen and elicits anti-gp120 titers comparable to those found in HIV-1-infected individuals. While both MN-rgp120 and IIIB-rgp120 induced antibodies able to block gp120 binding to CD4, strain-specific and type-common blocking antibodies were detected. Finally, antibodies to MN-rgp120 but not to IIIB-rgp120 were effective in neutralizing a broad range of laboratory and clinical isolates of HIV-1. These studies demonstrate that susceptibility or resistance to neutralization by antibodies to gp120 correlates with the PND sequence and suggest that the problem of antigenic variation may not be insurmountable in the development of an effective AIDS vaccine. PMID:1602554

  4. Antigenicity and Immunogenicity of a Trimeric Envelope Protein from an Indian Clade C HIV-1 Isolate*

    PubMed Central

    Sneha Priya, Rangasamy; Veena, Menon; Kalisz, Irene; Whitney, Stephen; Priyanka, Dhopeshwarkar; LaBranche, Celia C.; Sri Teja, Mullapudi; Montefiori, David C.; Pal, Ranajit; Mahalingam, Sundarasamy; Kalyanaraman, Vaniambadi S.

    2015-01-01

    Human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) isolates from India mainly belong to clade C and are quite distinct from clade C isolates from Africa in terms of their phylogenetic makeup, serotype, and sensitivity to known human broadly neutralizing monoclonal antibodies. Because many of these properties are associated with the envelope proteins of HIV-1, it is of interest to study the envelope proteins of Indian clade C isolates as part of the ongoing efforts to develop a vaccine against HIV-1. To this end, we purified trimeric uncleaved gp145 of a CCR5 tropic Indian clade C HIV-1 (93IN101) from the conditioned medium of 293 cells. The purified protein was shown to be properly folded with stable structure by circular dichroism. Conformational integrity was further demonstrated by its high affinity binding to soluble CD4, CD4 binding site antibodies such as b12 and VRC01, quaternary epitope-specific antibody PG9, and CD4-induced epitope-specific antibody 17b. Sera from rabbits immunized with gp145 elicited high titer antibodies to various domains of gp120 and neutralized a broad spectrum of clade B and clade C HIV-1 isolates. Similar to other clade B and clade C envelope immunogens, most of the Tier 1 neutralizing activity could be absorbed with the V3-specific peptide. Subsequent boosting of these rabbits with a clade B HIV-1 Bal gp145 resulted in an expanded breadth of neutralization of HIV-1 isolates. The present study strongly supports the inclusion of envelopes from Indian isolates in a future mixture of HIV-1 vaccines. PMID:25691567

  5. The gp120 Protein Is a Second Determinant of Decreased Neurovirulence of Indian HIV-1C Isolates Compared to Southern African HIV-1C Isolates

    PubMed Central

    Rao, Vasudev R.; Neogi, Ujjwal; Eugenin, Eliseo; Prasad, Vinayaka R.

    2014-01-01

    Regional differences in neurovirulence have been documented among subtype/clade-C HIV-1 isolates in India and Southern Africa. We previously demonstrated that a C31S substitution in Clade-C Tat dicysteine motif reduces monocyte recruitment, cytokine induction and direct neurotoxicity. Therefore, this polymorphism is considered to be a causative factor for these differences in neurovirulence. We previously reported on the genotypic differences in Tat protein between clade-C and rest of the clades showing that approximately 90% of clade-C HIV-1 Tat sequences worldwide contained this C31S polymorphism, while 99% of non-clade C isolates lacked this Tat polymorphism at C31 residue (Ranga et al. (2004) J Virol 78∶2586–2590). Subsequently, we documented intra-clade-C differences in the frequency of Tat dicysteine variants between India and Southern Africa, as the basis for differential disease severity and showed the importance of the Tat dicysteine motif for neuropathogenesis using small animal models. We have now examined if determinants of neurovirulence besides Tat are different between the clade-C HIV-1 isolates from Southern Africa and India. Envelope glycoprotein gp120 is a well-documented contributor to neurotoxicity. We found that gp120 sequences of HIV-1 isolates from these two regions are genetically distinct. In order to delineate the contribution of gp120 to neurovirulence, we compared direct in vitro neurotoxicity of HIV-infected supernatants of a representative neurovirulent US clade-B isolate with two isolates each from Southern Africa and India using primary human neurons and SH-SY5Y neuroblastoma cells. Immunodepletion of gp120 of both US clade B and the Southern African clade C isolates revealed robust decreases in neurotoxicity, while that of the Indian isolates showed minimal effect on neurotoxicity. The gp120 as a cause of differential neurotoxicity was further confirmed using purified recombinant gp120 from HIV isolates from these regions. We

  6. Functional characteristics of the natural polymorphisms of HIV-1 gp41 in HIV-1 isolates from enfuvirtide-naïve Korean patients.

    PubMed

    Shin, YoungHyun; Yoon, Cheol-Hee; Yang, Hyo-Jin; Lim, Hoyong; Choi, Byeong-Sun; Kim, Sung Soon; Kang, Chun

    2016-06-01

    HIV-1 gp41 plays a key role in viral entry. The insertion of Thr at position 4 and Met/Val/Phe substitutions at position 7 are frequently observed in the fusion peptide (FP) motif of gp41 without major enfuvirtide resistance associated with mutation in heptad repeats 1/2 (HR1/2) of HIV-1 isolates from Korean patients. Here, the influence of these mutations on their biological function was evaluated by employing HIV-1 variants with mutant FPs as shown previously and with recombinant HIV-1 using the env genes of 20 HIV-1 isolates from Korean patients. In an infectivity assay, all FP mutants showed lower infectivity than the wild-type NL4-3. In particular, the substitutions at position 7 led to much greater reductions in infectivity than the insertions at position 4. Nevertheless, the replication kinetics of most mutants were similar to those of the wild type, except that the FP mutants with an Ile insertion at position 4 and a Phe substitution at position 7 showed reduced replication. Moreover, most point mutants showed lower IC50 values for enfuvirtide than the wild type, whereas the L7M substitution resulted in a slightly increased IC50 value. The infectivity using the HIV-1 env recombinant viruses decreased in 14 cases but increased slightly in six cases compared with the wild type. Most recombinants were more susceptible to enfuvirtide than the wild type, except for three recombinants that showed slight resistance. Our findings may help to explain the potential mechanisms corresponding to the natural polymorphism of gp41 and to predict the efficiency of enfuvirtide in treatment of HIV-1-infected patients in Korea.

  7. Evolution of an Attenuated HIV-1 Isolate in an Elite Suppressor

    PubMed Central

    Salgado, Maria; Gandhi, Shiv; Buckheit, Robert W.; Berkenblit, Gail V.

    2014-01-01

    Abstract Elite controllers or suppressors (ES) control viral replication without antiretroviral therapy. While many ES are infected with replication-competent virus, others have evidence of infection with attenuated isolates. Here we report a case of an ES infected with an HIV-1 isolate that contained a 38-base pair deletion in nef that led to a reading frame shift and a premature stop codon. Interestingly, clones amplified from plasma or cultured from CD4+ T cells between 2006 and 2008 contained one of two separate compensatory deletions that restored the reading frame. A new insertion generated by duplication of adjacent sequences was found in isolates obtained in 2010 and this evolution was accompanied by the development of low level viremia. This article provides evidence of the evolution of an attenuated HIV-1 isolate toward greater virulence in an elite suppressor. PMID:24117037

  8. Successful Isolation of Infectious and High Titer Human Monocyte-Derived HIV-1 from Two Subjects with Discontinued Therapy

    PubMed Central

    Zhu, Haiying; Andrus, Thomas; Ivanov, Sergei B.; Pan, Charlotte; Dolores, Jazel; Dann, Gregory C.; Zhou, Michael; Forte, Dominic; Yang, Zihuan; Holte, Sarah; Corey, Lawrence; Zhu, Tuofu

    2013-01-01

    Background HIV-1 DNA in blood monocytes is considered a viral source of various HIV-1 infected tissue macrophages, which is also known as “Trojan horse” hypothesis. However, whether these DNA can produce virions has been an open question for years, due to the inability of isolating high titer and infectious HIV-1 directly from monocytes. Results In this study, we demonstrated successful isolation of two strains of M-HIV-1 (1690 M and 1175 M) from two out of four study subjects, together with their in vivo controls, HIV-1 isolated from CD4+ T-cells (T-HIV-1), 1690 T and 1175 T. All M- and T- HIV-1 isolates were detected CCR5-tropic. Both M- HIV-1 exhibited higher levels of replication in monocyte-derived macrophages (MDM) than the two T- HIV-1. Consistent with our previous reports on the subject 1175 with late infection, compartmentalized env C2-V3-C3 sequences were identified between 1175 M and 1175 T. In contrast, 1690 M and 1690 T, which were isolated from subject 1690 with relatively earlier infection, showed homogenous env C2-V3-C3 sequences. However, multiple reverse transcriptase (RT) inhibitor resistance-associated variations were detected in the Gag-Pol region of 1690 M, but not of 1690 T. By further measuring HIV DNA intracellular copy numbers post-MDM infection, 1690 M was found to have significantly higher DNA synthesis efficiency than 1690 T in macrophages, indicating a higher RT activity, which was confirmed by AZT inhibitory assays. Conclusions These results suggested that the M- and T- HIV-1 are compartmentalized in the two study subjects, respectively. Therefore, we demonstrated that under in vitro conditions, HIV-1 infected human monocytes can productively release live viruses while differentiating into macrophages. PMID:23741458

  9. HIV-1 sequence variation between isolates from mother-infant transmission pairs

    SciTech Connect

    Wike, C.M.; Daniels, M.R.; Furtado, M.; Wolinsky, M.; Korber, B.; Hutto, C.; Munoz, J.; Parks, W.; Saah, A.

    1991-01-01

    To examine the sequence diversity of human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) between known transmission sets, sequences from the V3 and V4-V5 region of the env gene from 4 mother-infant pairs were analyzed. The mean interpatient sequence variation between isolates from linked mother-infant pairs was comparable to the sequence diversity found between isolates from other close contacts. The mean intrapatient variation was significantly less in the infants' isolates then the isolates from both their mothers and other characterized intrapatient sequence sets. In addition, a distinct and characteristic difference in the glycosylation pattern preceding the V3 loop was found between each linked transmission pair. These findings indicate that selection of specific genotypic variants, which may play a role in some direct transmission sets, and the duration of infection are important factors in the degree of diversity seen between the sequence sets.

  10. HIV-1 sequence variation between isolates from mother-infant transmission pairs

    SciTech Connect

    Wike, C.M.; Daniels, M.R.; Furtado, M.; Wolinsky, M.; Korber, B.; Hutto, C.; Munoz, J.; Parks, W.; Saah, A.

    1991-12-31

    To examine the sequence diversity of human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) between known transmission sets, sequences from the V3 and V4-V5 region of the env gene from 4 mother-infant pairs were analyzed. The mean interpatient sequence variation between isolates from linked mother-infant pairs was comparable to the sequence diversity found between isolates from other close contacts. The mean intrapatient variation was significantly less in the infants` isolates then the isolates from both their mothers and other characterized intrapatient sequence sets. In addition, a distinct and characteristic difference in the glycosylation pattern preceding the V3 loop was found between each linked transmission pair. These findings indicate that selection of specific genotypic variants, which may play a role in some direct transmission sets, and the duration of infection are important factors in the degree of diversity seen between the sequence sets.

  11. Virulence factors of Candida albicans isolates from the oral cavities of HIV-1-positive patients.

    PubMed

    Menezes, Tatiany O A; Gillet, Luciana C S; Menezes, Sílvio A F; Feitosa, Rosimar N M; Ishak, Marluísa O G; Ishak, Ricardo; Marques-da-Silva, Sílvia H; Vallinoto, Antonio C R

    2013-06-01

    The present study assessed the phenotypic aspects of oral-cavity Candida albicans isolates from 300 HIV-1- positive patients, relating the most commonly investigated virulence factors (enzyme typing and germ-tube formation) to the most common morphotypes. The samples were seeded into specific media for isolation and subsequent identification using the automated Vitek 2 system. The following assays were performed for phenotypic characterization: morphotyping, germ-tube formation and enzyme typing. Out of 300 collected samples, 144 tested positive for yeasts of the Candida genus, 98 (32.7 %) of which were identified as C. albicans. The latter samples were attributed to seven different morphotypes; the three most common morphotypes were 7208 (49 %), 7308 (14.3 %) and 3208 (13.3 %). All of the C. albicans isolate samples formed germ tubes and produced the enzymes proteinase and phospholipase, with an activity classified as intermediate to high. Due to the identification of virulence factors among the analyzed samples, monitoring of HIV-1-positive patients colonized by different morphotypes must be established because these morphotypes are extremely pathogenic and can trigger severe fungal infections.

  12. Isolation of Exosomes from the Plasma of HIV-1 Positive Individuals.

    PubMed

    Konadu, Kateena Addae; Huang, Ming Bo; Roth, William; Armstrong, Wendy; Powell, Michael; Villinger, Francois; Bond, Vincent

    2016-01-05

    Exosomes are small vesicles ranging in size from 30 nm to 100 nm that are released both constitutively and upon stimulation from a variety of cell types. They are found in a number of biological fluids and are known to carry a variety of proteins, lipids, and nucleic acid molecules. Originally thought to be little more than reservoirs for cellular debris, the roles of exosomes regulating biological processes and in diseases are increasingly appreciated. Several methods have been described for isolating exosomes from cellular culture media and biological fluids. Due to their small size and low density, differential ultracentrifugation and/or ultrafiltration are the most commonly used techniques for exosome isolation. However, plasma of HIV-1 infected individuals contains both exosomes and HIV viral particles, which are similar in size and density. Thus, efficient separation of exosomes from HIV viral particles in human plasma has been a challenge. To address this limitation, we developed a procedure modified from Cantin et. al., 2008 for purification of exosomes from HIV particles in human plasma. Iodixanol velocity gradients were used to separate exosomes from HIV-1 particles in the plasma of HIV-1 positive individuals. Virus particles were identified by p24 ELISA. Exosomes were identified on the basis of exosome markers acetylcholinesterase (AChE), and the CD9, CD63, and CD45 antigens. Our gradient procedure yielded exosome preparations free of virus particles. The efficient purification of exosomes from human plasma enabled us to examine the content of plasma-derived exosomes and to investigate their immune modulatory potential and other biological functions.

  13. Epidemiology and genetic characterization of HIV-1 isolates in the general population of Djibouti (Horn of Africa).

    PubMed

    Maslin, Jérôme; Rogier, Christophe; Berger, Franck; Khamil, Mohamed Ali; Mattera, Didier; Grandadam, Marc; Caron, Mélanie; Nicand, Elizabeth

    2005-06-01

    During a national survey in 2002 in Djibouti, serum samples were collected using a valid sampling scheme from 2423 Djiboutians representing the general population of urban and rural districts. The HIV-1 seroprevalence was 2%. The HIV-1 polymerase gene from 53 untreated patients was amplified. Phylogenetic analysis of 34 isolates revealed a majority of subtype C (73%) as well as other subtypes, including CRF02_AG recombinants (18%), subtype D (6%), and subtype A (3%).

  14. Multivalent dendrimeric compounds containing carbohydrates expressed on immune cells inhibit infection by primary isolates of HIV-1

    SciTech Connect

    Rosa Borges, Andrew; Wieczorek, Lindsay; Johnson, Benitra; Benesi, Alan J.; Brown, Bruce K.; Kensinger, Richard D.; Krebs, Fred C.; Wigdahl, Brian; Blumenthal, Robert; Puri, Anu; McCutchan, Francine E.; Birx, Deborah L.; Polonis, Victoria R.; Schengrund, Cara-Lynne

    2010-12-05

    Specific glycosphingolipids (GSL), found on the surface of target immune cells, are recognized as alternate cell surface receptors by the human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) external envelope glycoprotein. In this study, the globotriose and 3'-sialyllactose carbohydrate head groups found on two GSL were covalently attached to a dendrimer core to produce two types of unique multivalent carbohydrates (MVC). These MVC inhibited HIV-1 infection of T cell lines and primary peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC) by T cell line-adapted viruses or primary isolates, with IC{sub 50}s ranging from 0.1 to 7.4 {mu}g/ml. Inhibition of Env-mediated membrane fusion by MVC was also observed using a dye-transfer assay. These carbohydrate compounds warrant further investigation as a potential new class of HIV-1 entry inhibitors. The data presented also shed light on the role of carbohydrate moieties in HIV-1 virus-host cell interactions. -- Research Highlights: {yields}Multivalent carbohydrates (MVCs) inhibited infection of PBMCs by HIV-1. {yields}MVCs inhibited infection by T cell line-adapted viruses. {yields}MVCs inhibited infection by primary isolates of HIV-1. {yields}MVCs inhibited Env-mediated membrane fusion.

  15. [HIV-1 subtype distribution determined by phylogenetic analysis of pol gene sequences and automated subtyping tools among HIV-1 isolates from the Aegian Region of Turkey].

    PubMed

    Uluer Biçeroğlu, Servet; Altuğlu, Imre; Nazli Zeka, Arzu; Gökengin, Deniz; Yazan Sertöz, Rüçhan

    2014-07-01

    Human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) exhibiting remarkable genetic variability, includes two genotypes namely HIV-1 (group M, N, O and P) and HIV-2 (group A-H). HIV-1 group M, which is mainly the cause of the AIDS pandemic, is divided into nine pure subtypes, more than 45 circulating recombinant forms (CRF) and numerous unique recombinant forms (URF). According to the documents of Turkish Government of Health, among a total of 6802 HIV-positive cases, 1096 of them were defined as AIDS as of June 2013 in Turkey. Although subtype B is the predominant subtype, recent studies indicate higher proportion of CRFs similar to their increasing role in the HIV pandemic. The aim of this study was to determine the subtype distribution of HIV-1 strains isolated from 70 patients (61 male, 9 female; age range: 16-73 yrs, mean age: 39.6 yrs) who presented to our institution between April 2008-June 2013. HIV-1 strains were subtyped by phylogenetic analysis of the pol gene region and commonly used automated subtyping tools namely, Stanford HIV db v6.2.0 and Rega v3.0. Pol sequences retrieved from the Los Alamos database and from GeneBank, were trimmed from full-length genomes. Phylogenetic analysis of the 1302 base pair of the pol gene region was performed using Mega v5.2 software. The sequences were aligned using Muscle and phylogenetic distances between sequences were estimated by using Kimura two-parameter model (transition/transversion ratio: 2.0). Tree topology was obtained using neighbour-joining method and bootstrap value was set at 1000. Sixty-one (87.1%) patients were antiretroviral treatment (ART)-naive and nine were on different ART regimens. The subtypes of the isolates according to phylogenetic analysis were found as follows; 31 (44.2%) subtype B, 24 (34.2%) CRF42_BF, 6 (8.5%) B/CRF02_AG recombinants, 5 (7.1%) sub-subtype A1, 1 (1.4%) sub-subtype F1, 1 (%1.4) CRF 25_cpx, 1 (1.4%) CRF02_AG and 1 (1.4%) CRF01_AE. Rega v3.0 subtyping tool produced five discrepant results (4 B

  16. Close phylogenetic relationship between Angolan and Romanian HIV-1 subtype F1 isolates

    PubMed Central

    Guimarães, Monick L; Vicente, Ana Carolina P; Otsuki, Koko; da Silva, Rosa Ferreira FC; Francisco, Moises; da Silva, Filomena Gomes; Serrano, Ducelina; Morgado, Mariza G; Bello, Gonzalo

    2009-01-01

    Background Here, we investigated the phylogenetic relationships of the HIV-1 subtype F1 circulating in Angola with subtype F1 strains sampled worldwide and reconstructed the evolutionary history of this subtype in Central Africa. Methods Forty-six HIV-1-positive samples were collected in Angola in 2006 and subtyped at the env-gp41 region. Partial env-gp120 and pol-RT sequences and near full-length genomes from those env-gp41 subtype F1 samples were further generated. Phylogenetic analyses of partial and full-length subtype F1 strains isolated worldwide were carried out. The onset date of the subtype F1 epidemic in Central Africa was estimated using a Bayesian Markov chain Monte Carlo approach. Results Nine Angolan samples were classified as subtype F1 based on the analysis of the env-gp41 region. All nine Angolan sequences were also classified as subtype F1 in both env-gp120 and pol-RT genomic regions, and near full-length genome analysis of four of these samples confirmed their classification as "pure" subtype F1. Phylogenetic analyses of subtype F1 strains isolated worldwide revealed that isolates from the Democratic Republic of Congo (DRC) were the earliest branching lineages within the subtype F1 phylogeny. Most strains from Angola segregated in a monophyletic group together with Romanian sequences; whereas South American F1 sequences emerged as an independent cluster. The origin of the subtype F1 epidemic in Central African was estimated at 1958 (1934–1971). Conclusion "Pure" subtype F1 strains are common in Angola and seem to be the result of a single founder event. Subtype F1 sequences from Angola are closely related to those described in Romania, and only distantly related to the subtype F1 lineage circulating in South America. Original diversification of subtype F1 probably occurred within the DRC around the late 1950s. PMID:19386115

  17. Novel two-round phenotypic assay for protease inhibitor susceptibility testing of recombinant and primary HIV-1 isolates.

    PubMed

    Puertas, Maria C; Buzón, Maria J; Ballestero, Mònica; Van Den Eede, Peter; Clotet, Bonaventura; Prado, Julia G; Martinez-Picado, Javier

    2012-12-01

    Antiretroviral drug susceptibility tests facilitate therapeutic management of HIV-1-infected patients. Although genotyping systems are affordable, inaccuracy in the interpretation of complex mutational patterns may limit their usefulness. Currently available HIV-1 phenotypic assays are based on the generation of recombinant viruses in which the specific viral gene of interest, derived from a patient plasma sample, is cloned into a susceptible genetic viral backbone prior to in vitro drug susceptibility evaluation. Nevertheless, in the case of protease inhibitors, not only are mutations in the HIV-1 protease-coding region involved in resistance, but the role of Gag in drug susceptibility has also recently been reported. In order to avoid the inherent limitations resulting from partial cloning of the viral genome, we designed and evaluated a new experimental strategy to test the in vitro susceptibility of primary viral isolates to protease inhibitors. Our protocol, which is based on a two-round infection protocol using the reporter TZM-bl cell line, showed a good correlation with genotypic resistance prediction and with the Antivirogram phenotypic assay, in both protease-recombinant viruses and primary viral isolates. The protocol is suitable for any HIV-1 subtype and enables rapid in-house measurement of protease inhibitor susceptibility, thus making it possible to evaluate the concomitant effects of both patient-derived gag and protease-coding regions.

  18. Functional stability of unliganded envelope glycoprotein spikes among isolates of human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1).

    PubMed

    Agrawal, Nitish; Leaman, Daniel P; Rowcliffe, Eric; Kinkead, Heather; Nohria, Raman; Akagi, Junya; Bauer, Katherine; Du, Sean X; Whalen, Robert G; Burton, Dennis R; Zwick, Michael B

    2011-01-01

    The HIV-1 envelope glycoprotein (Env) spike is challenging to study at the molecular level, due in part to its genetic variability, structural heterogeneity and lability. However, the extent of lability in Env function, particularly for primary isolates across clades, has not been explored. Here, we probe stability of function for variant Envs of a range of isolates from chronic and acute infection, and from clades A, B and C, all on a constant virus backbone. Stability is elucidated in terms of the sensitivity of isolate infectivity to destabilizing conditions. A heat-gradient assay was used to determine T(90) values, the temperature at which HIV-1 infectivity is decreased by 90% in 1 h, which ranged between ∼40 to 49°C (n = 34). For select Envs (n = 10), the half-lives of infectivity decay at 37°C were also determined and these correlated significantly with the T(90) (p = 0.029), though two 'outliers' were identified. Specificity in functional Env stability was also evident. For example, Env variant HIV-1(ADA) was found to be labile to heat, 37°C decay, and guanidinium hydrochloride but not to urea or extremes of pH, when compared to its thermostable counterpart, HIV-1(JR-CSF). Blue native PAGE analyses revealed that Env-dependent viral inactivation preceded complete dissociation of Env trimers. The viral membrane and membrane-proximal external region (MPER) of gp41 were also shown to be important for maintaining trimer stability at physiological temperature. Overall, our results indicate that primary HIV-1 Envs can have diverse sensitivities to functional inactivation in vitro, including at physiological temperature, and suggest that parameters of functional Env stability may be helpful in the study and optimization of native Env mimetics and vaccines.

  19. Genetic analysis and natural polymorphisms in HIV-1 gp41 isolates from Maputo City, Mozambique.

    PubMed

    Ismael, Nália; Bila, Dulce; Mariani, Diana; Vubil, Adolfo; Mabunda, Nedio; Abreu, Celina; Jani, Ilesh; Tanuri, Amilcar

    2014-06-01

    Enfuvirtide was the first fusion inhibitor approved by the Food and Drug Administration (FDA) in 2003 for HIV-1 infection in treatment-experienced patient. It is the first approved antiviral agent to attack the HIV life cycle in its early stages. For HIV fusion to occur, the HR1 and HR2 domains in the gp41 region need to interact. Enfuvirtide is a synthetic peptide that corresponds to 36 amino acids of the HR2, which competitively binds to HR1 inhibiting the interaction with the HR2 domain thus preventing fusogenic conformation and inhibiting viral entry into host cells. Resistance to enfuvirtide is conferred by mutations occurring in the HR1 region involving residues 36-45. Mozambique, a sub-Saharan country, with an HIV prevalence of 11.5%, provides first line and second line antiretroviral therapy (ART)-based treatment. In poor resource settings such as Mozambique the lack of adequate infrastructures, the high costs of viral load tests, and the availability of salvage treatment have hindered the intended objective of monitoring HIV treatment, suggesting an important concern regarding the development of drug resistance. The general aim of this study was to evaluate naturally occurring polymorphisms and resistance-associated mutations in the gp41 region of HIV-1 isolates from Mozambique. The study included 78 patients naive to ARV treatment and 28 patients failing first line regimen recruited from Centro de Saúde Alto-Maé situated in Maputo. The gp41 gene from 103 patients was sequenced and resistance-associated mutations for enfuvirtide were screened. Subtype analysis revealed that 96% of the sequences were classified as subtype C, 2% as subtype G, 1% as subtype A1, and the other 1% as a mosaic form composed of A1/C. No enfuvirtide resistance-associated mutations in HR1 of gp41 were detected. The major polymorphisms in the HR1 were N42S, L54M, A67T, and V72I. This study suggests that this new class of antiviral drug may be effective as a salvage therapy in

  20. Neutralizing antibody and anti-retroviral drug sensitivities of HIV-1 isolates resistant to small molecule CCR5 inhibitors

    SciTech Connect

    Pugach, Pavel; Ketas, Thomas J.; Michael, Elizabeth; Moore, John P.

    2008-08-01

    The small molecule CCR5 inhibitors are a new class of drugs for treating infection by human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1). They act by binding to the CCR5 co-receptor and preventing its use during HIV-1-cell fusion. Escape mutants can be raised against CCR5 inhibitors in vitro and will arise when these drugs are used clinically. Here, we have assessed the responses of CCR5 inhibitor-resistant viruses to other anti-retroviral drugs that act by different mechanisms, and their sensitivities to neutralizing antibodies (NAbs). The rationale for the latter study is that the resistance pathway for CCR5 inhibitors involves changes in the HIV-1 envelope glycoproteins (Env), which are also targets for NAbs. The escape mutants CC101.19 and D1/85.16 were selected for resistance to AD101 and vicriviroc (VVC), respectively, from the primary R5 HIV-1 isolate CC1/85. Each escape mutant was cross-resistant to other small molecule CCR5 inhibitors (aplaviroc, maraviroc, VVC, AD101 and CMPD 167), but sensitive to protein ligands of CCR5: the modified chemokine PSC-RANTES and the humanized MAb PRO-140. The resistant viruses also retained wild-type sensitivity to the nucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitor (RTI) zidovudine, the non-nucleoside RTI nevirapine, the protease inhibitor atazanavir and other attachment and fusion inhibitors that act independently of CCR5 (BMS-806, PRO-542 and enfuvirtide). Of note is that the escape mutants were more sensitive than the parental CC1/85 isolate to a subset of neutralizing monoclonal antibodies and to some sera from HIV-1-infected people, implying that sequence changes in Env that confer resistance to CCR5 inhibitors can increase the accessibility of some NAb epitopes. The need to preserve NAb resistance may therefore be a constraint upon how escape from CCR5 inhibitors occurs in vivo.

  1. Neutralizing antibody and anti-retroviral drug sensitivities of HIV-1 isolates resistant to small molecule CCR5 inhibitors

    PubMed Central

    Pugach, Pavel; Ketas, Thomas J.; Michael, Elizabeth; Moore, John P.

    2008-01-01

    The small molecule CCR5 inhibitors are a new class of drugs for treating infection by human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1). They act by binding to the CCR5 co-receptor and preventing its use during HIV-1-cell fusion. Escape mutants can be raised against CCR5 inhibitors in vitro and will arise when these drugs are used clinically. Here, we have assessed the responses of CCR5 inhibitor-resistant viruses to other anti-retroviral drugs that act by different mechanisms, and their sensitivities to neutralizing antibodies (NAbs). The rationale for the latter study is that the resistance pathway for CCR5 inhibitors involves changes in the HIV-1 envelope glycoproteins (Env), which are also targets for NAbs. The escape mutants CC101.19 and D1/85.16 were selected for resistance to AD101 and vicriviroc (VVC), respectively, from the primary R5 HIV-1 isolate CC1/85. Each escape mutant was cross resistant to other small molecule CCR5 inhibitors (aplaviroc, maraviroc, VVC, AD101 and CMPD 167), but sensitive to protein ligands of CCR5: the modified chemokine PSC-RANTES and the humanized MAb PRO 140. The resistant viruses also retained wild-type sensitivity to the nucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitor (RTI) zidovudine, the non-nucleoside RTI nevirapine, the protease inhibitor atazanavir and other attachment and fusion inhibitors that act independently of CCR5 (BMS-806, PRO-542 and enfuvirtide). Of note is that the escape mutants were more sensitive than the parental CC1/85 isolate to a subset of neutralizing monoclonal antibodies and to some sera from HIV-1-infected people, implying that sequence changes in Env that confer resistance to CCR5 inhibitors can increase the accessibility of some NAb epitopes. The need to preserve NAb resistance may therefore be a constraint upon how escape from CCR5 inhibitors occurs in vivo. PMID:18519143

  2. Entry inhibitor-based microbicides are active in vitro against HIV-1 isolates from multiple genetic subtypes

    SciTech Connect

    Ketas, Thomas J.; Schader, Susan M.; Zurita, Juan; Teo, Esther; Polonis, Victoria; Lu Min; Klasse, Per Johan; Moore, John P. . E-mail: jpm2003@med.cornell.edu

    2007-08-01

    Inhibitors of viral entry are under consideration as topical microbicides to prevent HIV-1 sexual transmission. Small molecules targeting HIV-1 gp120 (BMS-378806) or CCR5 (CMPD167), and a peptide fusion inhibitor (C52L), each blocks vaginal infection of macaques by a SHIV. A microbicide, however, must be active against multiple HIV-1 variants. We therefore tested BMS-C (a BMS-378806 derivative), CMPD167, C52L and the CXCR4 ligand AMD3465, alone and in combination, against 25 primary R5, 12 X4 and 7 R5X4 isolates from subtypes A-G. At high concentrations (0.1-1 {mu}M), the replication of most R5 isolates in human donor lymphocytes was inhibited by > 90%. At lower concentrations, double and triple combinations were more effective than individual inhibitors. Similar results were obtained with X4 viruses when AMD3465 was substituted for CMPD167. The R5X4 viruses were inhibited by combining AMD3465 with CMPD167, or by the coreceptor-independent compounds. Thus, combining entry inhibitors may improve microbicide effectiveness.

  3. Isolation and characterization of HIV-1 envelope glycoprotein specific B cell from immortalized human naïve B cell library.

    PubMed

    Sun, Zehua; Lu, Shiqiang; Yang, Zheng; Li, Jingjing; Zhang, Meiyun

    2017-01-10

    With the recent development of single B cell cloning techniques, an increasing number of HIV-1-specific broadly neutralizing antibodies (bNAbs) have been isolated since 2009. However, knowledge regarding HIV-1-specific B cells in vivo is limited. In this study, an HIV-1-specific B cell line has been established using healthy PBMC donors by the highly efficient EBV transformation method to generate immortalized human naïve B cell libraries. The enrichment of HIV-1 envelope-specific B cells was observed after four rounds of cell panning with the HIV-1 envelope glycoprotein. An HIV-1 envelope-specific stable B cell line (LCL-P4) was generated. Although this cell line acquired a lymphoblastic phenotype, no expression was observed for activation-induced cytidine deaminase (AID), an enzyme responsible for initiating somatic hypermutation and class switch recombination in B cells. This study describes a method that enables fast isolation of HIV-1-specific B cells, and this approach may extend to isolating other B cell-specific antigens for further experiments.

  4. Comparative studies on neutralisation of primary HIV-1 isolates by human sera and rabbit anti-V3 peptide sera.

    PubMed

    Lawoko, A L; Johansson, B; Hjalmarsson, S; Christensson, B; Ljungberg, B; Al-Khalili, L; Sjölund, M; Pipkorn, R; Fenyö, E M; Blomberg, J

    1999-10-01

    IgG binding to V3 peptides and serum neutralising responses were studied in four HIV-1 infected individuals with progressive disease over a period of 31-70 months. The 18-20 mer peptides comprised residues 299-317 (numbering of HIV1 MN) in the N-terminal half of the V3 loop of the envelope glycoprotein gp120 and were derived from the sequences of autologous, as well as heterologous isolates. All four individuals studied lacked anti-V3 IgG binding to at least one autologous V3 sequence. V3 peptides to which autologous sera lacked binding IgG were all immunogenic in rabbits and induced antisera that were broadly cross-reactive by EIA and broadly cross-neutralising to primary HIV-1 isolates. This indicates that the peptides are immunogenic per se and that the respective human hosts have selective defects in recognising the corresponding V3 sequences. Despite the absence of antibody binding to autologous V3 peptides, the human sera had neutralising antibodies to autologous (three out of four cases), as well as heterologous isolates (all cases). Moreover, in vitro exposure of the patients' isolates to autologous neutralising serum or the homologous rabbit antiserum selected for variants with amino acid substitutions close to the crown of the V3 loop or in regions outside the sequence corresponding to peptides used for immunisation. The amino acid exchanges affected V3 positions known to be antigenic and which are also prone to change successively in infected persons. It is likely that neutralising antibodies recognise both linear and conformational epitopes in the V3 loop. Apparently, there are several, but restricted, numbers of ways for this structure to change its conformation and thereby give rise to neutralisation resistant viruses.

  5. In vitro anti-HIV-1 activities of kaempferol and kaempferol-7-O-glucoside isolated from Securigera securidaca.

    PubMed

    Behbahani, M; Sayedipour, S; Pourazar, A; Shanehsazzadeh, M

    2014-01-01

    Previously, we reported that the kaempferol and kaempferol-7-O-glucoside isolated from Securigera securidaca showed potent anti-HSV activity. In the present study the anti-HIV-1 activities of kaempferol and kaempferol-7-O-glucoside are investigated at different concentrations (100, 50, 25 and 10 μg/ml) using HIV-1 p24 Antigen kit. Real-time Polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) assay was also used for quantification of full range of virus load observed in treated and untreated cells. According to the results of RT- PCR, tested compounds at a concentration of 100 μg/ml exerted potent inhibitory effect. Time of drug addition experiments demonstrated that these compounds exerted their inhibitory effects on the early stage of HIV infection. The results also showed potent anti-HIV-1 reverse transcriptase activity. Antiviral activity of kaempferol-7-O-glucoside was more pronounced than that of kaempferol. These findings demonstrate that kaempferol-7-O-glucoside could be considered as a new potential drug candidate for the treatment of HIV infection which requires further assessments.

  6. Similar Replicative Fitness Is Shared by the Subtype B and Unique BF Recombinant HIV-1 Isolates that Dominate the Epidemic in Argentina

    PubMed Central

    Rubio, Andrea E.; Abraha, Awet; Carpenter, Crystal A.; Troyer, Ryan M.; Reyes-Rodríguez, Ángel L.; Salomon, Horacio; Arts, Eric J.; Tebit, Denis M.

    2014-01-01

    The HIV-1 epidemic in South America is dominated by pure subtypes (mostly B and C) and more than 7 BF and BC recombinant forms. In Argentina, circulating recombinant forms (CRFs) comprised of subtypes B and F make up more than 50% of HIV infections. For this study, 28 HIV-1 primary isolates were obtained from patients in Buenos Aires, Argentina and initially classified into subtype B (n = 9, 32.1%), C (n = 1, 3.6%), and CRFs (n = 18, 64.3%) using partial pol and vpu-env sequences, which proved to be inconsistent and inaccurate for these phylogenetic analyses. Near full length genome sequences of these primary HIV-1 isolates revealed that nearly all intersubtype BF recombination sites were unique and countered previous “CRF” B/F classifications. The majority of these Argentinean HIV-1 isolates were CCR5-using but 4 had a dual/mixed tropism as predicted by both phenotypic and genotypic assays. Comparison of the replicative fitness of these BF primary HIV-1 isolates to circulating B, F, and C HIV-1 using pairwise competitions in peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) indicated a similarity in fitness of these BF recombinants to subtypes B and F HIV-1 (of the same co-receptor usage) whereas subtype C HIV-1 was significantly less fit than all as previously reported. These results suggest that the multitude of BF HIV-1 strains present within the Argentinean population do not appear to have gained replicative fitness following recent B and F recombination events. PMID:24727861

  7. Evolution of HIV-1 isolates that use a novel Vif-independent mechanism to resist restriction by human APOBEC3G.

    PubMed

    Haché, Guylaine; Shindo, Keisuke; Albin, John S; Harris, Reuben S

    2008-06-03

    The human APOBEC3G protein restricts the replication of Vif-deficient HIV-1 by deaminating nascent viral cDNA cytosines to uracils, leading to viral genomic strand G-to-A hypermutations. However, the HIV-1 Vif protein triggers APOBEC3G degradation, which helps to explain why this innate defense does not protect patients. The APOBEC3G-Vif interaction is a promising therapeutic target, but the benefit of the enabling of HIV-1 restriction in patients is unlikely to be known until Vif antagonists are developed. As a necessary prelude to such studies, cell-based HIV-1 evolution experiments were done to find out whether APOBEC3G can provide a long-term block to Vif-deficient virus replication and, if so, whether HIV-1 variants that resist restriction would emerge. APOBEC3G-expressing T cells were infected with Vif-deficient HIV-1. Virus infectivity was suppressed in 45/48 cultures for more than five weeks, but replication was eventually detected in three cultures. Virus-growth characteristics and sequencing demonstrated that these isolates were still Vif-deficient and that in fact, these viruses had acquired a promoter mutation and a Vpr null mutation. Resistance occurred by a novel tolerance mechanism in which the resistant viruses packaged less APOBEC3G and accumulated fewer hypermutations. These data support the development of antiretrovirals that antagonize Vif and thereby enable endogenous APOBEC3G to suppress HIV-1 replication.

  8. CD4 and MHC class I down-modulation activities of nef alleles from brain- and lymphoid tissue-derived primary HIV-1 isolates

    PubMed Central

    Gray, Lachlan R.; Gabuzda, Dana; Cowley, Daniel; Ellett, Anne; Chiavaroli, Lisa; Wesselingh, Steven L.; Churchill, Melissa J.; Gorry, Paul R.

    2015-01-01

    HIV-1 nef undergoes adaptive evolution in the CNS, reflecting altered requirements for HIV-1 replication in macrophages/microglia and brain-specific immune selection pressures. The role of Nef in HIV-1 neurotropism and the pathogenesis of HIV-associated dementia (HAD) is unclear. In this study, we characterized 82 nef alleles cloned from brain, CSF, spinal cord and blood/lymphoid tissue-derived HIV-1 isolates from 7 subjects with HAD. CNS isolate-derived nef alleles were genetically compartmentalized and had reduced sequence diversity compared to those from lymphoid tissue isolates. Defective nef alleles predominated in a brain-derived isolate from one of the 7 subjects (MACS2-br). The ability of Nef to down-modulate CD4 and MHC class 1 (MHC-1) was generally conserved among nef alleles from both CNS and lymphoid tissues. However, the potency of CD4 and MHC-1 down-modulation was variable, which was associated with sequence alterations known to influence these Nef functions. These results suggest that CD4 and MHC-1 down-modulation are highly conserved functions among nef alleles from CNS- and lymphoid tissue-derived HIV-1 isolates that may contribute to viral replication and escape from immune surveillance in the CNS. PMID:21165790

  9. In vitro selection and characterization of human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) isolates with reduced sensitivity to hydroxyethylamino sulfonamide inhibitors of HIV-1 aspartyl protease.

    PubMed

    Partaledis, J A; Yamaguchi, K; Tisdale, M; Blair, E E; Falcione, C; Maschera, B; Myers, R E; Pazhanisamy, S; Futer, O; Cullinan, A B

    1995-09-01

    Human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) variants with reduced sensitivity to the hydroxyethylamino sulfonamide protease inhibitors VB-11,328 and VX-478 have been selected in vitro by two independent serial passage protocols with HIV-1 in CEM-SS and MT-4 cell lines. Virus populations with greater than 100-fold-increased resistance to both inhibitors compared with the parental virus have been obtained. DNA sequence analyses of the protease genes from VB-11,328- and VX-478-resistant variants reveal a sequential accumulation of point mutations, with similar resistance patterns occurring for the two inhibitors. The deduced amino acid substitutions in the resistant protease are Leu-10-->Phe, Met-46-->Ile, Ile-47-->Val, and Ile-50-->Val. This is the first observation in HIV protease resistance studies of an Ile-50-->Val mutation, a mutation that appears to arise uniquely against the sulfonamide inhibitor class. When the substitutions observed were introduced as single mutations into an HIV-1 infectious clone (HXB2), only the Ile-50-->Val mutant showed reduced sensitivity (two- to threefold) to VB-11,328 and VX-478. A triple protease mutant infectious clone carrying the mutations Met-46-->Ile, Ile-47-->Val, and Ile-50-->Val, however, showed much greater reduction in sensitivity (14- to 20-fold) to VB-11,328 and VX-478. The same mutations were studied in recombinant HIV protease. The mutant protease Ile-50-->Val displays a much lower affinity for the inhibitors than the parent enzyme (< or = 80-fold). The protease triply mutated at Met-46-->Ile, Ile-47-->Val, and Ile-50-->Val shows an even greater decrease in inhibitor binding (< or = 270-fold). The sulfonamide-resistant HIV protease variants remain sensitive to inhibitors from other chemical classes (Ro 31-8959 and L-735,524), suggesting possibilities for clinical use of HIV protease inhibitors in combination or serially.

  10. In vitro selection and characterization of human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) isolates with reduced sensitivity to hydroxyethylamino sulfonamide inhibitors of HIV-1 aspartyl protease.

    PubMed Central

    Partaledis, J A; Yamaguchi, K; Tisdale, M; Blair, E E; Falcione, C; Maschera, B; Myers, R E; Pazhanisamy, S; Futer, O; Cullinan, A B

    1995-01-01

    Human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) variants with reduced sensitivity to the hydroxyethylamino sulfonamide protease inhibitors VB-11,328 and VX-478 have been selected in vitro by two independent serial passage protocols with HIV-1 in CEM-SS and MT-4 cell lines. Virus populations with greater than 100-fold-increased resistance to both inhibitors compared with the parental virus have been obtained. DNA sequence analyses of the protease genes from VB-11,328- and VX-478-resistant variants reveal a sequential accumulation of point mutations, with similar resistance patterns occurring for the two inhibitors. The deduced amino acid substitutions in the resistant protease are Leu-10-->Phe, Met-46-->Ile, Ile-47-->Val, and Ile-50-->Val. This is the first observation in HIV protease resistance studies of an Ile-50-->Val mutation, a mutation that appears to arise uniquely against the sulfonamide inhibitor class. When the substitutions observed were introduced as single mutations into an HIV-1 infectious clone (HXB2), only the Ile-50-->Val mutant showed reduced sensitivity (two- to threefold) to VB-11,328 and VX-478. A triple protease mutant infectious clone carrying the mutations Met-46-->Ile, Ile-47-->Val, and Ile-50-->Val, however, showed much greater reduction in sensitivity (14- to 20-fold) to VB-11,328 and VX-478. The same mutations were studied in recombinant HIV protease. The mutant protease Ile-50-->Val displays a much lower affinity for the inhibitors than the parent enzyme (< or = 80-fold). The protease triply mutated at Met-46-->Ile, Ile-47-->Val, and Ile-50-->Val shows an even greater decrease in inhibitor binding (< or = 270-fold). The sulfonamide-resistant HIV protease variants remain sensitive to inhibitors from other chemical classes (Ro 31-8959 and L-735,524), suggesting possibilities for clinical use of HIV protease inhibitors in combination or serially. PMID:7636964

  11. Different Pathogenesis of CCR5-Using Primary HIV-1 Isolates from Non-Switch and Switch Virus Patients in Human Lymphoid Tissue Ex Vivo

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Iarlsson, Ingrid; Grivel, Jean-Charles; Chen. Silvia; Karlsson, Anders; Albert, Jan; Fenyol, Eva Maria; Margolis, Leonid B.

    2005-01-01

    CCR5-utilizing HIV-1 variants (R5) typically transmit infection and dominate its early stages, whereas emergence of CXCR4-using (X4 or R5X4) HIV-1 is often associated with disease progression. However, such a switch in co-receptor usage can only be detected in approximately onehalf of HIV-infected patients (switch virus patients), and progression to immunodeficiency may also occur in patients without detectable switch in co-receptor usage (non-switch virus patients). Here, we used a system of ex vivo-infected tonsillar tissue to compare the pathogenesis of sequential primary R5 HIV-1 isolates from the switch and non-switch patients. Inoculation of ex vivo tissue with these R5 isolates resulted in viral replication and CCR5(+)CD4(+) T cell depletion. The levels of such depletion by HIV-1 isolated from non-switch virus patients were significantly higher than those by R5 HIV-1 isolates from switch virus patients. T cell depletion seemed to be controlled by viral factors and did not significantly vary between tissues from different donors. In contrast, viral replication did not correlate with the switch status of the patients; in tissues fiom different donors it varied 30-fold and seemed to be controlled by a combination of viral and tissue factors. Nevertheless, replication-level hierarchy among sequential isolates remained constant in tissues from various donors. Viral load in vivo was higher in switch virus patients compared to non-switch virus patients. The high cytopathogenicity of CCR5(+)CD4(+) T cells by R5 HIV-1 isolates from non-switch virus patients may explain the steady decline of CD4(+) T cells in the absence of CXCR4 using virus; elimination of target cells by these isolates may limit their own replication in vivo.

  12. Infection of human and non-human cells by a highly fusogenic primary CD4-independent HIV-1 isolate with a truncated envelope cytoplasmic tail

    SciTech Connect

    Saha, Kunal . E-mail: sahak@pediatrics.ohio-state.edu; Yan Hui; Nelson, Julie A.E.; Zerhouni-Layachi, Bouchra

    2005-06-20

    Truncation of the envelope cytoplasmic tail has enabled FIV, SIV, and some laboratory HIV-1 strains to acquire broader cellular tropism and enhanced fusogenicity. Here we have characterized a primary CD4-independent HIV-1 isolate (92UG046-T8) with a truncated cytoplasmic tail that was able to infect and induce syncytia in primary lymphocytes from human, chimpanzee, and monkey, as well as CD4-negative cell lines from human and monkey. Increased syncytia were also noticeable with 293 cells expressing the cloned envelope from the 92UG046-T8 isolate suggesting envelope-mediated cellular fusion. Except pooled serum from HIV-1-infected individuals, monoclonal anti-envelope antibodies or antibodies/antagonists against CD4, CXCR4, and CCR5 were not able to prevent infection by the 92UG046-T8 isolate. This is the first report showing a primary HIV-1 variant with truncated cytoplasmic tail which is highly fusogenic and can infect a broad range of cells from human and non-human origins. In vivo evolution of similar HIV-1 mutants may have important implications in AIDS pathogenesis.

  13. Evolution of CCR5 Antagonist Resistance in an HIV-1 Subtype C Clinical Isolate

    PubMed Central

    Henrich, Timothy J.; Tsibris, Athe M.N.; Lewine, Nicolas R.P.; Konstantinidis, Ioannis; Leopold, Kay E.; Sagar, Manish; Kuritzkes, Daniel R.

    2011-01-01

    Objectives We previously reported vicriviroc (VCV) resistance in an HIV-infected subject and used deep sequencing and clonal analyses to track the evolution of V3 sequence forms over 28 weeks of therapy. Here, we test the contribution of gp120 mutations to CCR5 antagonist resistance and investigate why certain minority V3 variants emerged as the dominant species under drug pressure. Methods 19 site-directed HIV-1 mutants were generated that contained gp120 VCV-resistance mutations. Viral sensitivities to VCV, maraviroc, TAK-779 and HGS004 were determined. Results Three patterns of susceptibilities were observed: sigmoid inhibition curves with IC50s similar to pre-treatment virus (07J-week 0 [W0]), single mutants with decreased IC50s compared to 07J-W0, and mutants that contained ≥5 of 7 VCV-resistance mutations with flattened inhibition curves and decreased or negative percent maximal inhibition. Substitutions such as S306P, which sensitized virus to CCR5 antagonists when present as single mutations, were not detected in the baseline virus population but were necessary for maximal resistance when incorporated into V3 backbones that included pre-existing VCV resistance mutations. Conclusion CCR5 antagonist resistance was reproduced only when a majority of V3 mutations were present. Minority V3 loop variants may serve as a scaffold upon which additional mutations lead to complete VCV resistance. PMID:20856130

  14. Characterization of Gp41 polymorphisms in the fusion peptide domain and T-20 (Enfuvirtide) resistance-associated regions in Korean HIV-1 isolates.

    PubMed

    Jang, Dai-Ho; Yoon, Cheol-Hee; Choi, Byeong-Sun; Chung, Yoon-Seok; Kim, Hye-Young; Chi, Sung-Gil; Kim, Sung Soon

    2014-03-01

    HIV-1 gp41 is an envelope protein that plays an essential role in virus entry. The mutation of gp41 affects HIV-1 entry and susceptibility to the fusion inhibitor T-20. Therefore, we analyzed the natural polymorphism of gp41 of 163 HIV-1 isolates from T-20-naïve Koreans infected with HIV-1. This study of gp41 polymorphisms showed that insertions in the fourth threonine (74.8%) and L7M substitutions (85.3%) were more frequent in the fusion peptide motif in Korean HIV-1 isolates compared with those from other countries. Minor T-20 resistance mutations such as L45M (1.2%), N126K (1.2%), and E137K (6.7%) were detected, but the critical T-20 resistance mutations were not detected in the gp41 HR1 and HR2 regions. In addition, the N42S mutation (12.9%) associated with T-20 hypersusceptibility was detected at a high frequency. These results may serve as useful data for studies considering T-20 for use in the development of a more effective anti-retroviral treatment in Korea.

  15. Accurate Quantification of Episomal HIV-1 Two-Long Terminal Repeat Circles by Use of Optimized DNA Isolation and Droplet Digital PCR

    PubMed Central

    Malatinkova, Eva; Kiselinova, Maja; Bonczkowski, Pawel; Trypsteen, Wim; Messiaen, Peter; Vermeire, Jolien; Verhasselt, Bruno; Vervisch, Karen; De Spiegelaere, Ward

    2014-01-01

    Episomal HIV-1 two-long terminal repeat (2-LTR) circles are considered markers for ongoing viral replication. Two sample processing procedures were compared to accurately quantify 2-LTR in patients by using droplet digital PCR (ddPCR). Here, we show that plasmid isolation with a spiked non-HIV plasmid for normalization enables more accurate 2-LTR quantification than genomic DNA isolation. PMID:25502524

  16. Modulation of NKG2D-mediated cytotoxic functions of natural killer cells by viral protein R from HIV-1 primary isolates.

    PubMed

    Pham, Tram N Q; Richard, Jonathan; Gerard, Francine C A; Power, Christopher; Cohen, Éric A

    2011-12-01

    HIV-1 viral protein R (Vpr) from laboratory-adapted virus strains activates the DNA damage/stress sensor ATR kinase and induces cell cycle arrest at the G(2)/M phase through a process that requires Vpr to engage the DDB1-CUL4A (VprBP/DCAF-1) E3 ligase complex. Activation of this DNA damage/stress checkpoint in G(2) by Vpr was shown to modulate NKG2D-dependent NK cell effector functions via enhancing expression of NKG2D ligands, notably ULBP2. However, it is unknown whether Vpr from HIV-1 primary isolates (groups M, N, O, and P) could modulate NKG2D-mediated cytotoxic functions of NK cells. Here, we report that Vpr from most HIV-1 primary isolates can upregulate ULBP2 expression and induce NKG2D-dependent NK cell killing. Importantly, these activities were always accompanied by an active G(2) cell cycle arrest function. Interestingly, Vpr variants from group P and a clade D isolate of group M were defective at enhancing NKG2D-mediated NK cell lysis owing to their inability to augment ULBP2 expression. However, distinct mechanisms were responsible for their failure to do so. While Vpr from group P was deficient in its ability to engage the DDB1-CUL4A (VprBP/DCAF-1) E3 ligase complex, the Vpr variant from group D was unable to properly localize to the nucleus, underlining the importance of these biological properties in Vpr function. In conclusion, the ability of Vpr from HIV-1 primary isolates to regulate NK cell effector function underscores the importance of this HIV-1 accessory protein in the modulation of the host's innate immune responses.

  17. Prothymosin α Variants Isolated From CD8+ T Cells and Cervicovaginal Fluid Suppress HIV-1 Replication Through Type I Interferon Induction

    PubMed Central

    Teixeira, Avelino; Yen, Benjamin; Gusella, Gabriele Luca; Thomas, Albert G.; Mullen, Michael P.; Aberg, Judith; Chen, Xintong; Hoshida, Yujin; van Bakel, Harm; Schadt, Eric; Basler, Christopher F.; García-Sastre, Adolfo; Mosoian, Arevik

    2015-01-01

    Soluble factors from CD8+ T cells and cervicovaginal mucosa of women are recognized as important in controlling human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) infection and transmission. Previously, we have shown the strong anti-HIV-1 activity of prothymosin α (ProTα) derived from CD8+ T cells. ProTα is a small acidic protein with wide cell distribution, to which several functions have been ascribed, depending on its intracellular or extracellular localization. To date, activities of ProTα have been attributed to a single protein known as isoform 2. Here we report the isolation and identification of 2 new ProTα variants from CD8+ T cells and cervicovaginal lavage with potent anti-HIV-1 activity. The first is a splice variant of the ProTα gene, known as isoform CRA_b, and the second is the product of a ProTα gene, thus far classified as a pseudogene 7. Native or recombinant ProTα variants potently restrict HIV-1 replication in macrophages through the induction of type I interferon. The baseline expression of interferon-responsive genes in primary human cervical tissues positively correlate with high levels of intracellular ProTα, and the knockdown of ProTα variants by small interfering RNA leads to downregulation of interferon target genes. Overall, these findings suggest that ProTα variants are innate immune mediators involved in immune surveillance. PMID:25404520

  18. Prothymosin α variants isolated from CD8+ T cells and cervicovaginal fluid suppress HIV-1 replication through type I interferon induction.

    PubMed

    Teixeira, Avelino; Yen, Benjamin; Gusella, Gabriele Luca; Thomas, Albert G; Mullen, Michael P; Aberg, Judith; Chen, Xintong; Hoshida, Yujin; van Bakel, Harm; Schadt, Eric; Basler, Christopher F; García-Sastre, Adolfo; Mosoian, Arevik

    2015-05-01

    Soluble factors from CD8(+) T cells and cervicovaginal mucosa of women are recognized as important in controlling human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) infection and transmission. Previously, we have shown the strong anti-HIV-1 activity of prothymosin α (ProTα) derived from CD8(+) T cells. ProTα is a small acidic protein with wide cell distribution, to which several functions have been ascribed, depending on its intracellular or extracellular localization. To date, activities of ProTα have been attributed to a single protein known as isoform 2. Here we report the isolation and identification of 2 new ProTα variants from CD8(+) T cells and cervicovaginal lavage with potent anti-HIV-1 activity. The first is a splice variant of the ProTα gene, known as isoform CRA_b, and the second is the product of a ProTα gene, thus far classified as a pseudogene 7. Native or recombinant ProTα variants potently restrict HIV-1 replication in macrophages through the induction of type I interferon. The baseline expression of interferon-responsive genes in primary human cervical tissues positively correlate with high levels of intracellular ProTα, and the knockdown of ProTα variants by small interfering RNA leads to downregulation of interferon target genes. Overall, these findings suggest that ProTα variants are innate immune mediators involved in immune surveillance.

  19. Comparative evaluation of trimeric envelope glycoproteins derived from subtype C and B HIV-1 R5 isolates

    SciTech Connect

    Srivastava, Indresh K. Kan, Elaine; Sun Yide; Sharma, Victoria A.; Cisto, Jimna; Burke, Brian; Lian Ying; Hilt, Susan; Biron, Zohar; Hartog, Karin; Stamatatos, Leonidas; Cheng, R. Holland; Ulmer, Jeffrey B.; Barnett, Susan W.

    2008-03-15

    We previously reported that an envelope (Env) glycoprotein immunogen (o-gp140{delta}V2SF162) containing a partial deletion in the second variable loop (V2) derived from the R5-tropic HIV-1 isolate SF162 partially protected vaccinated rhesus macaques against pathogenic SHIV{sub SF162P4} virus. Extending our studies to subtype C isolate TV1, we have purified o-gp140{delta}V2TV1 (subtype C {delta}V2 trimer) to homogeneity, performed glycosylation analysis, and determined its ability to bind CD4, as well as a panel of well-characterized neutralizing monoclonal antibodies (mAb). In general, critical epitopes are preserved on the subtype C {delta}V2 trimer; however, we did not observe significant binding for the b12 mAb. The molecular mass of subtype C {delta}V2 trimer was found to be 450 kDa, and the hydrodynamic radius was found to be 10.87 nm. Our data suggest that subtype C {delta}V2 trimer binds to CD4 with an affinity comparable to o-gp140{delta}V2SF162 (subtype B {delta}V2 trimer). Using isothermal titration calorimetric (ITC) analysis, we demonstrated that all three CD4 binding sites (CD4-BS) in both subtype C and B trimers are exposed and accessible. However, compared to subtype B trimer, the three CD4-BS in subtype C trimer have different affinities for CD4, suggesting a cooperativity of CD4 binding in subtype C trimer but not in subtype B trimer. Negative staining electron microscopy of the subtype C {delta}V2 trimer has demonstrated that it is in fact a trimer. These results highlight the importance of studying subtype C Env, and also of developing appropriate subtype C-specific reagents that may be used for better immunological characterization of subtype C Env for developing an AIDS vaccine.

  20. HLA-B*57 Elite Suppressor and Chronic Progressor HIV-1 Isolates Replicate Vigorously and Cause CD4+ T Cell Depletion in Humanized BLT Mice

    PubMed Central

    Salgado, Maria; Swanson, Michael D.; Pohlmeyer, Christopher W.; Buckheit, Robert W.; Wu, Jin; Archin, Nancie M.; Williams, Thomas M.; Margolis, David M.; Siliciano, Robert F.

    2014-01-01

    ABSTRACT Elite controllers or suppressors (ES) are HIV-1-infected patients who maintain undetectable viral loads without antiretroviral therapy. The mechanism of control remains unclear, but the HLA-B*57 allele is overrepresented in cohorts of these patients. However, many HLA-B*57 patients develop progressive disease, and some studies have suggested that infection with defective viruses may be the cause of the lack of high levels of virus replication and disease progression in ES. We therefore performed a comprehensive comparative in vivo and in vitro characterization of viruses isolated from well-defined ES. For this purpose, we first performed full-genome sequence analysis and in vitro fitness assays on replication-competent isolates from HLA-B*57 ES and HLA-B*57 chronic progressors (CPs). Under our experimental conditions, we found that isolates from ES and CPs can replicate in vitro. However, since inherently these assays involve the use of unnaturally in vitro-activated cells, we also investigated the replication competence and pathogenic potential of these HIV isolates in vivo using humanized BLT mice. The results from these analyses demonstrate that virus isolates from ES are fully replication competent in vivo and can induce peripheral and systemic CD4 T cell depletion. These results provide the first direct in vivo evidence that viral fitness does not likely determine clinical outcome in HLA-B*57 patients and that elite suppressors can control replication-competent, fully pathogenic viruses. A better understanding of the immunological bases of viral suppression in ES will serve to inform novel approaches to preventive and therapeutic HIV vaccine design. IMPORTANCE Elite suppressors are HIV-1-infected patients who have undetectable levels of viremia despite not being on antiviral drugs. One of the most fundamental questions about this phenomenon involves the mechanism of control. To address this question, we isolated virus from elite suppressors and from

  1. Seroprevalence and molecular epidemiology of HTLV-1 isolates from HIV-1 co-infected women in Feira de Santana, Bahia, Brazil.

    PubMed

    de Almeida Rego, Filipe Ferreira; Mota-Miranda, Aline; de Souza Santos, Edson; Galvão-Castro, Bernardo; Alcantara, Luiz Carlos

    2010-12-01

    HTLV-1/HIV-1 co-infection is associated with severe clinical manifestations, marked immunodeficiency, and opportunistic pathogenic infections, as well as risk behavior. Salvador, the capital of the State of Bahia, Brazil, has the highest HTLV-1 prevalence (1.74%) found in Brazil. Few studies exist which describe this co-infection found in Salvador and its surrounding areas, much less investigate how these viruses circulate or assess the relationship between them. To describe the epidemiological and molecular features of HTLV in HIV co-infected women. To investigate the prevalence of HTLV/HIV co-infection in surrounding areas, as well as the molecular epidemiology of HTLV, a cross sectional study was carried out involving 107 women infected with HIV-1 from the STD/HIV/AIDS Reference Center located in the neighboring City of Feira de Santana. Patient samples were submitted to ELISA, and HTLV infection was confirmed using Western Blot and Polymerase Chain Reaction (PCR). Phylogenetic analysis using Neighbor-Joining (NJ) and Maximum Likelihood (ML) was performed on HTLV LTR sequences in order to gain further insights about molecular epidemiology and the origins of this virus in Bahia. Four out of five reactive samples were confirmed to be infected with HTLV-1, and one with HTLV-2. The seroprevalence of HTLV among HIV-1 co-infected women was 4.7%. Phylogenetic analysis of the LTR region from four HTLV-1 sequences showed that all isolates were clustered into the main Latin American group within the Transcontinental subgroup of the Cosmopolitan subtype. The HTLV-2 sequence was classified as the HTLV-2c subtype. It was also observed that four HTLV/HIV-1 co-infected women exhibited risk behavior with two having parenteral exposure, while another two were sex workers. This article describes the characteristics of co-infected patients. This co-infection is known to be severe and further studies should be conducted to confirm the suggestion that HTLV-1 is spreading from

  2. UV and X-ray structural studies of a 101-residue long Tat protein from a HIV-1 primary isolate and of its mutated, detoxified, vaccine candidate.

    PubMed

    Foucault, Marine; Mayol, Katia; Receveur-Bréchot, Véronique; Bussat, Marie-Claire; Klinguer-Hamour, Christine; Verrier, Bernard; Beck, Alain; Haser, Richard; Gouet, Patrice; Guillon, Christophe

    2010-05-01

    The 101-residue long Tat protein of primary isolate 133 of the human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1), wt-Tat(133) displays a high transactivation activity in vitro, whereas the mutant thereof, STLA-Tat(133), a vaccine candidate for HIV-1, has none. These two proteins were chemically synthesized and their biological activity was validated. Their structural properties were characterized using circular dichroism (CD), fluorescence emission, gel filtration, dynamic light scattering, and small angle X-ray scattering (SAXS) techniques. SAXS studies revealed that both proteins were extended and belong to the family of intrinsically unstructured proteins. CD measurements showed that wt-Tat(133) or STLA-Tat(133) underwent limited structural rearrangements when complexed with specific fragments of antibodies. Crystallization trials have been performed on the two forms, assuming that the Tat(133) proteins might have a better propensity to fold in supersaturated conditions, and small crystals have been obtained. These results suggest that biologically active Tat protein is natively unfolded and requires only a limited gain of structure for its function.

  3. Comparative clonal analysis of human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV- 1)-specific CD4+ and CD8+ cytolytic T lymphocytes isolated from seronegative humans immunized with candidate HIV-1 vaccines

    PubMed Central

    1992-01-01

    The lysis of infected host cells by virus-specific cytolytic T lymphocytes (CTL) is an important factor in host resistance to viral infection. An optimal vaccine against human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) would elicit virus-specific CTL as well as neutralizing antibodies. The induction by a vaccine of HIV-1-specific CD8+ CTL in humans has not been previously reported. In this study, CTL responses were evaluated in HIV-1-seronegative human volunteers participating in a phase I acquired immune deficiency syndrome (AIDS) vaccine trial involving a novel vaccine regimen. Volunteers received an initial immunization with a live recombinant vaccinia virus vector carrying the HIV-1 env gene and a subsequent boost with purified env protein. An exceptionally strong env-specific CTL response was detected in one of two vaccine recipients, while modest but significant env-specific CTL activity was present in the second vaccinee. Cloning of the responding CTL gave both CD4+ and CD8+ env-specific CTL clones, permitting a detailed comparison of critical functional properties of these two types of CTL. In particular, the potential antiviral effects of these CTL were evaluated in an in vitro system involving HIV-1 infection of cultures of normal autologous CD4+ lymphoblasts. At extremely low effector-to-target ratios, vaccine-induced CD8+ CTL clones lysed productively infected cells present within these cultures. When tested for lytic activity against target cells expressing the HIV-1 env gene, CD8+ CTL were 3-10-fold more active on a per cell basis than CD4+ CTL. However, when tested against autologous CD4+ lymphoblasts acutely infected with HIV-1, CD4+ clones lysed a much higher fraction of the target cell population than did CD8+ CTL. CD4+ CTL were shown to recognize not only the infected cells within these acutely infected cultures but also noninfected CD4+ T cells that had passively taken up gp120 shed from infected cells and/or free virions. These results were

  4. HIV-1 replication.

    PubMed

    Freed, E O

    2001-11-01

    surface (SU) Env glycoprotein gp120 and the transmembrane (TM) glycoprotein gp41. gp120 contains the determinants that interact with receptor and coreceptor, while gp41 not only anchors the gp120/gp41 complex in the membrane (Fig. 2), but also contains domains that are critical for catalyzing the membrane fusion reaction between viral and host lipid bilayers during virus entry. Comparison of env sequences from a large number of virus isolates revealed that gp120 is organized into five conserved regions (C1-C5) and five highly variable domains (V1-V5). The variable regions tend to be located in disulfide-linked loops. gp41 is composed of three major domains: the ectodomain (which contains determinants essential for membrane fusion), the transmembrane anchor sequence, and the cytoplasmic tail. In addition to the gag, pol, and env genes, HIV-1 also encodes a number of regulatory and accessory proteins. Tat is critical for transcription from the HIV-1 LTR and Rev plays a major [figure: see text] role in the transport of viral RNAs from the nucleus to the cytoplasm. Vpu, Vif, Vpr and Nef have been termed "accessory" or "auxiliary" proteins to reflect the fact that they are not uniformly required for virus replication. The functions of these very interesting proteins will be discussed in more detail at the end of this chapter. HIV replication proceeds in a series of events that can be divided into two overall phases: "early" and "late" (Fig. 3). Although some events occur in a concerted or simultaneous fashion, the replication cycle can be viewed most simply as proceeding in an ordered, step-wise manner. In this chapter, each step in virus replication will be considered; additional information can be obtained from the more detailed reviews and primary references that are cited.

  5. Psychoneuroimmunology and HIV-1.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Antoni, Michael H.; And Others

    1990-01-01

    Presents evidence describing benefits of behavioral interventions such as aerobic exercise training on both psychological and immunological functioning among high risk human immunodeficiency virus-Type 1 (HIV-1) seronegative and very early stage seropositive homosexual men. HIV-1 infection is cast as chronic disease for which early…

  6. Characterization of a Large Panel of Rabbit Monoclonal Antibodies against HIV-1 gp120 and Isolation of Novel Neutralizing Antibodies against the V3 Loop

    PubMed Central

    Qin, Yali; Shi, Heliang; Banasik, Marisa; Lin, Feng; Rohl, Kari; LaBranche, Celia; Montefiori, David C.; Cho, Michael W.

    2015-01-01

    We recently reported the induction of potent, cross-clade neutralizing antibodies (nAbs) against Human Immunodeficiency Virus type-1 (HIV-1) in rabbits using gp120 based on an M-group consensus sequence. To better characterize these antibodies, 93 hybridomas were generated, which represent the largest panel of monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) ever generated from a vaccinated rabbit. The single most frequently recognized epitope of the isolated mAbs was at the very C-terminal end of the protein (APTKAKRRVVEREKR), followed by the V3 loop. A total of seven anti-V3 loop mAbs were isolated, two of which (10A3 and 10A37) exhibited neutralizing activity. In contrast to 10A3 and most other anti-V3 loop nAbs, 10A37 was atypical with its epitope positioned more towards the C-terminal half of the loop. To our knowledge, 10A37 is the most potent and broadly neutralizing anti-V3 loop mAb induced by vaccination. Interestingly, all seven anti-V3 loop mAbs competed with PGT121, suggesting a possibility that early induction of potent anti-V3 loop antibodies could prevent induction of more broadly neutralizing PGT121-like antibodies that target the conserved base of the V3 loop stem. PMID:26039641

  7. Development of prophylactic vaccines against HIV-1.

    PubMed

    Schiffner, Torben; Sattentau, Quentin J; Dorrell, Lucy

    2013-07-17

    The focus of most current HIV-1 vaccine development is on antibody-based approaches. This is because certain antibody responses correlated with protection from HIV-1 acquisition in the RV144 phase III trial, and because a series of potent and broad spectrum neutralizing antibodies have been isolated from infected individuals. Taken together, these two findings suggest ways forward to develop a neutralizing antibody-based vaccine. However, understanding of the correlates of protection from disease in HIV-1 and other infections strongly suggests that we should not ignore CTL-based research. Here we review recent progress in the field and highlight the challenges implicit in HIV-1 vaccine design and some potential solutions.

  8. HIV-1 target cells in the CNS.

    PubMed

    Joseph, Sarah B; Arrildt, Kathryn T; Sturdevant, Christa B; Swanstrom, Ronald

    2015-06-01

    HIV-1 replication in the central nervous system (CNS) is typically limited by the availability of target cells. HIV-1 variants that are transmitted and dominate the early stages of infection almost exclusively use the CCR5 coreceptor and are well adapted to entering, and thus infecting, cells expressing high CD4 densities similar to those found on CD4+ T cells. While the "immune privileged" CNS is largely devoid of CD4+ T cells, macrophage and microglia are abundant throughout the CNS. These cells likely express CD4 densities that are too low to facilitate efficient entry or allow sustained replication by most HIV-1 isolates. Examination of CNS viral populations reveals that late in disease the CNS of some individuals contains HIV-1 lineages that have evolved the ability to enter cells expressing low levels of CD4 and are well-adapted to entering macrophages. These macrophage-tropic (M-tropic) viruses are able to maintain sustained replication in the CNS for many generations, and their presence is associated with severe neurocognitive impairment. Whether conditions such as pleocytosis are necessary for macrophage-tropic viruses to emerge in the CNS is unknown, and extensive examinations of macrophage-tropic variants have not revealed a genetic signature of this phenotype. It is clear, however, that macrophage tropism is rare among HIV-1 isolates and is not transmitted, but is important due to its pathogenic effects on hosts. Prior to the evolution of macrophage-tropic variants, the viruses that are predominately infecting T cells (R5 T cell-tropic) may infect macrophages at a low level and inefficiently, but this could contribute to the reservoir.

  9. HIV-1 target cells in the CNS

    PubMed Central

    Joseph, Sarah B.; Arrildt, Kathryn T.; Sturdevant, Christa B.; Swanstrom, Ronald

    2014-01-01

    HIV-1 replication in the central nervous system (CNS) is typically limited by the availability of target cells. HIV-1 variants that are transmitted and dominate the early stages of infection almost exclusively use the CCR5 coreceptor and are well adapted to entering, and thus infecting, cells expressing high CD4 densities similar to those found on CD4+ T cells. While the “immune privileged” CNS is largely devoid of CD4+ T cells, macrophage and microglia are abundant throughout the CNS. These cells likely express CD4 densities that are too low to facilitate efficient entry or allow sustained replication by most HIV-1 isolates. Examination of CNS viral populations reveals that late in disease the CNS of some individuals contains HIV-1 lineages that have evolved the ability to enter cells expressing low levels of CD4 and are well-adapted to entering macrophages. These macrophage-tropic (M-tropic) viruses are able to maintain sustained replication in the CNS for many generations, and their presence is associated with severe neurocognitive impairment. Whether conditions such as pleocytosis are necessary for macrophage-tropic viruses to emerge in the CNS is unknown, and extensive examinations of macrophage-tropic variants have not revealed a genetic signature of this phenotype. It is clear, however, that macrophage tropism is rare among HIV-1 isolates and is not transmitted, but is important due to its pathogenic effects on hosts. Prior to the evolution of macrophage-tropic variants, the viruses that are predominately infecting T cells (R5 T cell-tropic) may infect macrophages at a low level and inefficiently, but this could contribute to the reservoir. PMID:25236812

  10. HIV-1 Vpr reactivates latent HIV-1 provirus by inducing depletion of class I HDACs on chromatin

    PubMed Central

    Romani, Bizhan; Kamali Jamil, Razieh; Hamidi-Fard, Mojtaba; Rahimi, Pooneh; Momen, Seyed Bahman; Aghasadeghi, Mohammad Reza; Allahbakhshi, Elham

    2016-01-01

    HIV-1 Vpr is an accessory protein that induces proteasomal degradation of multiple proteins. We recently showed that Vpr targets class I HDACs on chromatin for proteasomal degradation. Here we show that Vpr induces degradation of HDAC1 and HDAC3 in HIV-1 latently infected J-Lat cells. Degradation of HDAC1 and HDAC3 was also observed on the HIV-1 LTR and as a result, markers of active transcription were recruited to the viral promoter and induced viral activation. Knockdown of HDAC1 and HDAC3 activated the latent HIV-1 provirus and complementation with HDAC3 inhibited Vpr-induced HIV-1 reactivation. Viral reactivation and degradation of HDAC1 and HDAC3 was conserved among Vpr proteins of HV-1 group M. Serum Vpr isolated from patients or the release of virion-incorporated Vpr from viral lysates also activated HIV-1 in latently infected cell lines and PBMCs from HIV-1 infected patients. Our results indicate that Vpr counteracts HIV-1 latency by inducing proteasomal degradation of HDAC1 and 3 leading to reactivation of the viral promoter. PMID:27550312

  11. Isolation of a Monoclonal Antibody That Targets the Alpha-2 Helix of gp120 and Represents the Initial Autologous Neutralizing-Antibody Response in an HIV-1 Subtype C-Infected Individual ▿

    PubMed Central

    Gray, Elin S.; Moody, M. Anthony; Wibmer, Constantinos Kurt; Chen, Xi; Marshall, Dawn; Amos, Joshua; Moore, Penny L.; Foulger, Andrew; Yu, Jae-Sung; Lambson, Bronwen; Abdool Karim, Salim; Whitesides, John; Tomaras, Georgia D.; Haynes, Barton F.; Morris, Lynn; Liao, Hua-Xin

    2011-01-01

    The C3-V4 region is a major target of autologous neutralizing antibodies in HIV-1 subtype C infection. We previously identified a Center for AIDS Program of Research in South Africa (CAPRISA) participant, CAP88, who developed a potent neutralizing-antibody response within 3 months of infection that targeted an epitope in the C3 region of the HIV-1 envelope (P. L. Moore et al., PLoS Pathog. 5:e1000598, 2009). Here we showed that these type-specific antibodies could be adsorbed using recombinant gp120 from the transmitted/founder virus from CAP88 but not by gp120 made from other isolates. Furthermore, this activity could be depleted using a chimeric gp120 protein that contained only the C3 region from the CAP88 viral envelope engrafted onto the unrelated CAP63 viral envelope (called 63-88C3). On the basis of this, a differential sorting of memory B cells was performed using gp120s made from 63-88C3 and CAP63 labeled with different fluorochromes as positive and negative probes, respectively. This strategy resulted in the isolation of a highly specific monoclonal antibody (MAb), called CAP88-CH06, that neutralized the CAP88 transmitted/founder virus and viruses from acute infection but was unable to neutralize CAP88 viruses isolated at 6 and 12 months postinfection. The latter viruses contained 2 amino acid changes in the alpha-2 helix of C3 that mediated escape from this MAb. One of these changes involved the introduction of an N-linked glycan at position 339 that occluded the epitope, while the other mutation (either E343K or E350K) was a charge change. Our data validate the use of differential sorting to isolate a MAb targeting a specific epitope in the envelope glycoprotein and provided insights into the mechanisms of autologous neutralization escape. PMID:21613396

  12. Origin of HIV-1 in the chimpanzee Pan troglodytes troglodytes.

    PubMed

    Gao, F; Bailes, E; Robertson, D L; Chen, Y; Rodenburg, C M; Michael, S F; Cummins, L B; Arthur, L O; Peeters, M; Shaw, G M; Sharp, P M; Hahn, B H

    1999-02-04

    The human AIDS viruses human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) and type 2 (HIV-2) represent cross-species (zoonotic) infections. Although the primate reservoir of HIV-2 has been clearly identified as the sooty mangabey (Cercocebus atys), the origin of HIV-1 remains uncertain. Viruses related to HIV-1 have been isolated from the common chimpanzee (Pan troglodytes), but only three such SIVcpz infections have been documented, one of which involved a virus so divergent that it might represent a different primate lentiviral lineage. In a search for the HIV-1 reservoir, we have now sequenced the genome of a new SIVcpzstrain (SIVcpzUS) and have determined, by mitochondrial DNA analysis, the subspecies identity of all known SIVcpz-infected chimpanzees. We find that two chimpanzee subspecies in Africa, the central P. t. troglodytes and the eastern P. t. schweinfurthii, harbour SIVcpz and that their respective viruses form two highly divergent (but subspecies-specific) phylogenetic lineages. All HIV-1 strains known to infect man, including HIV-1 groups M, N and O, are closely related to just one of these SIVcpz lineages, that found in P. t. troglodytes. Moreover, we find that HIV-1 group N is a mosaic of SIVcpzUS- and HIV-1-related sequences, indicating an ancestral recombination event in a chimpanzee host. These results, together with the observation that the natural range of P. t. troglodytes coincides uniquely with areas of HIV-1 group M, N and O endemicity, indicate that P. t. troglodytes is the primary reservoir for HIV-1 and has been the source of at least three independent introductions of SIVcpz into the human population.

  13. Hyperthermia Stimulates HIV-1 Replication

    PubMed Central

    Roesch, Ferdinand; Meziane, Oussama; Kula, Anna; Nisole, Sébastien; Porrot, Françoise; Anderson, Ian; Mammano, Fabrizio; Fassati, Ariberto; Marcello, Alessandro; Benkirane, Monsef; Schwartz, Olivier

    2012-01-01

    HIV-infected individuals may experience fever episodes. Fever is an elevation of the body temperature accompanied by inflammation. It is usually beneficial for the host through enhancement of immunological defenses. In cultures, transient non-physiological heat shock (42–45°C) and Heat Shock Proteins (HSPs) modulate HIV-1 replication, through poorly defined mechanisms. The effect of physiological hyperthermia (38–40°C) on HIV-1 infection has not been extensively investigated. Here, we show that culturing primary CD4+ T lymphocytes and cell lines at a fever-like temperature (39.5°C) increased the efficiency of HIV-1 replication by 2 to 7 fold. Hyperthermia did not facilitate viral entry nor reverse transcription, but increased Tat transactivation of the LTR viral promoter. Hyperthermia also boosted HIV-1 reactivation in a model of latently-infected cells. By imaging HIV-1 transcription, we further show that Hsp90 co-localized with actively transcribing provirus, and this phenomenon was enhanced at 39.5°C. The Hsp90 inhibitor 17-AAG abrogated the increase of HIV-1 replication in hyperthermic cells. Altogether, our results indicate that fever may directly stimulate HIV-1 replication, in a process involving Hsp90 and facilitation of Tat-mediated LTR activity. PMID:22807676

  14. Enrichment of intersubtype HIV-1 recombinants in a dual infection system using HIV-1 strain-specific siRNAs

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Intersubtype HIV-1 recombinants in the form of unique or stable circulating recombinants forms (CRFs) are responsible for over 20% of infections in the worldwide epidemic. Mechanisms controlling the generation, selection, and transmission of these intersubtype HIV-1 recombinants still require further investigation. All intersubtype HIV-1 recombinants are generated and evolve from initial dual infections, but are difficult to identify in the human population. In vitro studies provide the most practical system to study mechanisms, but the recombination rates are usually very low in dual infections with primary HIV-1 isolates. This study describes the use of HIV-1 isolate-specific siRNAs to enrich intersubtype HIV-1 recombinants and inhibit the parental HIV-1 isolates from a dual infection. Results Following a dual infection with subtype A and D primary HIV-1 isolates and two rounds of siRNA treatment, nearly 100% of replicative virus was resistant to a siRNA specific for an upstream target sequence in the subtype A envelope (env) gene as well as a siRNA specific for a downstream target sequence in the subtype D env gene. Only 20% (10/50) of the replicating virus had nucleotide substitutions in the siRNA-target sequence whereas the remaining 78% (39/50) harbored a recombination breakpoint that removed both siRNA target sequences, and rendered the intersubtype D/A recombinant virus resistant to the dual siRNA treatment. Since siRNAs target the newly transcribed HIV-1 mRNA, the siRNAs only enrich intersubtype env recombinants and do not influence the recombination process during reverse transcription. Using this system, a strong bias is selected for recombination breakpoints in the C2 region, whereas other HIV-1 env regions, most notably the hypervariable regions, were nearly devoid of intersubtype recombination breakpoints. Sequence conservation plays an important role in selecting for recombination breakpoints, but the lack of breakpoints in many conserved

  15. HIV-1 subtypes in Yugoslavia.

    PubMed

    Stanojevic, Maja; Papa, Anna; Papadimitriou, Evagelia; Zerjav, Sonja; Jevtovic, Djordje; Salemovic, Dubravka; Jovanovic, Tanja; Antoniadis, Antonis

    2002-05-01

    To gain insight concerning the genetic diversity of HIV-1 viruses associated with the HIV-1 epidemic in Yugoslavia, 45 specimens from HIV-1-infected individuals were classified into subtypes by sequence-based phylogenetic analysis of the polymerase (pol) region of the viral genome. Forty-one of 45 specimens (91.2%) were identified as pol subtype B, 2 of 45 as subtype C (4.4%), 1 of 45 as CRF01_AE (2.2%), and 1 as CRF02_AG recombinant (2.2%). Nucleotide divergence among subtype B sequences was 4.8%. Results of this study show that among HIV-1-infected patients in Yugoslavia subtype B predominates (91.5%), whereas non-B subtypes are present at a low percentage, mostly related to travel abroad.

  16. Characterization of a dual-tropic human immunodeficiency virus (HIV-1) strain derived from the prototypical X4 isolate HXBc2.

    PubMed

    Xiang, Shi-hua; Pacheco, Beatriz; Bowder, Dane; Yuan, Wen; Sodroski, Joseph

    2013-03-30

    Human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) coreceptor usage and tropism can be modulated by the V3 loop sequence of the gp120 exterior envelope glycoprotein. For coreceptors, R5 viruses use CCR5, X4 viruses use CXCR4, and dual-tropic (R5X4) viruses use either CCR5 or CXCR4. To understand the requirements for dual tropism, we derived and analyzed a dual-tropic variant of an X4 virus. Changes in the V3 base, which allow gp120 to interact with the tyrosine-sulfated CCR5 N-terminus, and deletion of residues 310/311 in the V3 tip were necessary for efficient CCR5 binding and utilization. Thus, both sets of V3 changes allowed CCR5 utilization with retention of the ability to use CXCR4. We also found that the stable association of gp120 with the trimeric envelope glycoprotein complex in R5X4 viruses, as in X4 viruses, is less sensitive to V3 loop changes than gp120-trimer association in R5 viruses.

  17. Candidate antibody-based therapeutics against HIV-1.

    PubMed

    Gong, Rui; Chen, Weizao; Dimitrov, Dimiter S

    2012-06-01

    Antibody-based therapeutics have been successfully used for the treatment of various diseases and as research tools. Several well characterized, broadly neutralizing monoclonal antibodies (bnmAbs) targeting HIV-1 envelope glycoproteins or related host cell surface proteins show sterilizing protection of animals, but they are not effective when used for therapy of an established infection in humans. Recently, a number of novel bnmAbs, engineered antibody domains (eAds), and multifunctional fusion proteins have been reported which exhibit exceptionally potent and broad neutralizing activity against a wide range of HIV-1 isolates from diverse genetic subtypes. eAds could be more effective in vivo than conventional full-size antibodies generated by the human immune system. Because of their small size (12∼15 kD), they can better access sterically restricted epitopes and penetrate densely packed tissue where HIV-1 replicates than the larger full-size antibodies. HIV-1 possesses a number of mechanisms to escape neutralization by full-size antibodies but could be less likely to develop resistance to eAds. Here, we review the in vitro and in vivo antiviral efficacies of existing HIV-1 bnmAbs, summarize the development of eAds and multispecific fusion proteins as novel types of HIV-1 inhibitors, and discuss possible strategies to generate more potent antibody-based candidate therapeutics against HIV-1, including some that could be used to eradicate the virus.

  18. HIV-1 envelope glycoprotein immunogens to induce broadly neutralizing antibodies.

    PubMed

    Sliepen, Kwinten; Sanders, Rogier W

    2016-01-01

    The long pursuit for a vaccine against human immunodeficiency virus 1 (HIV-1) has recently been boosted by a number of exciting developments. An HIV-1 subunit vaccine ideally should elicit potent broadly neutralizing antibodies (bNAbs), but raising bNAbs by vaccination has proved extremely difficult because of the characteristics of the HIV-1 envelope glycoprotein complex (Env). However, the isolation of bNAbs from HIV-1-infected patients demonstrates that the human humoral immune system is capable of making such antibodies. Therefore, a focus of HIV-1 vaccinology is the elicitation of bNAbs by engineered immunogens and by using vaccination strategies aimed at mimicking the bNAb maturation pathways in HIV-infected patients. Important clues can also be taken from the successful subunit vaccines against hepatitis B virus and human papillomavirus. Here, we review the different types of HIV-1 immunogens and vaccination strategies that are being explored in the search for an HIV-1 vaccine that induces bNAbs.

  19. Trichomonas vaginalis-Induced Epithelial Monolayer Disruption and Human Immunodeficiency Virus Type 1 (HIV-1) Replication: Implications for the Sexual Transmission of HIV-1

    PubMed Central

    Guenthner, Patricia C.; Secor, W. Evan; Dezzutti, Charlene S.

    2005-01-01

    The objective of this study was to evaluate potential mechanisms of Trichomonas vaginalis involvement in human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) transmission. Polarized monolayer integrity of primary cervical and prostate epithelial cells or cell lines cultured with T. vaginalis was measured by monitoring transepithelium resistance. The effect of T. vaginalis isolates on HIV-1 passage through polarized epithelial cell monolayers was evaluated for HIV-1 p24gag in the basolateral supernatants. Coincubation with T. vaginalis isolates induced disruption of monolayer integrity and resulted in passage of virus to the basolateral side of the monolayer. Furthermore, there was isolate variability in which two isolates induced greater monolayer damage and increased HIV-1 passage than did the other two isolates. Coincubation of T. vaginalis isolates with acutely HIV-1-infected peripheral blood mononuclear cells enhanced HIV-1 replication. This enhancement was associated with cellular proliferation and activation, as well as with tumor necrosis factor alpha production. In contrast to the monolayer disruption, the effect of T. vaginalis on HIV-1 replication was not isolate dependent. Thus, two mechanisms have been identified that could contribute to the epidemiologic association of trichomoniasis with the sexual transmission of HIV-1. (i) T. vaginalis disruption of urogenital epithelial monolayers could facilitate passage of HIV-1 to underlying layers. (ii) Activation of local immune cells by T. vaginalis in the presence of infectious HIV-1 might lead to increased viral replication. Collectively, these data suggest the need for more vigilant efforts in the diagnosis and treatment of T. vaginalis in women and men, especially in countries with a high prevalence of HIV-1. PMID:15972505

  20. Trichomonas vaginalis-induced epithelial monolayer disruption and human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) replication: implications for the sexual transmission of HIV-1.

    PubMed

    Guenthner, Patricia C; Secor, W Evan; Dezzutti, Charlene S

    2005-07-01

    The objective of this study was to evaluate potential mechanisms of Trichomonas vaginalis involvement in human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) transmission. Polarized monolayer integrity of primary cervical and prostate epithelial cells or cell lines cultured with T. vaginalis was measured by monitoring transepithelium resistance. The effect of T. vaginalis isolates on HIV-1 passage through polarized epithelial cell monolayers was evaluated for HIV-1 p24gag in the basolateral supernatants. Coincubation with T. vaginalis isolates induced disruption of monolayer integrity and resulted in passage of virus to the basolateral side of the monolayer. Furthermore, there was isolate variability in which two isolates induced greater monolayer damage and increased HIV-1 passage than did the other two isolates. Coincubation of T. vaginalis isolates with acutely HIV-1-infected peripheral blood mononuclear cells enhanced HIV-1 replication. This enhancement was associated with cellular proliferation and activation, as well as with tumor necrosis factor alpha production. In contrast to the monolayer disruption, the effect of T. vaginalis on HIV-1 replication was not isolate dependent. Thus, two mechanisms have been identified that could contribute to the epidemiologic association of trichomoniasis with the sexual transmission of HIV-1. (i) T. vaginalis disruption of urogenital epithelial monolayers could facilitate passage of HIV-1 to underlying layers. (ii) Activation of local immune cells by T. vaginalis in the presence of infectious HIV-1 might lead to increased viral replication. Collectively, these data suggest the need for more vigilant efforts in the diagnosis and treatment of T. vaginalis in women and men, especially in countries with a high prevalence of HIV-1.

  1. Transplanting Supersites of HIV-1 Vulnerability

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Yongping; Gorman, Jason; Ofek, Gilad; Srivatsan, Sanjay; Druz, Aliaksandr; Lees, Christopher R.; Lu, Gabriel; Soto, Cinque; Stuckey, Jonathan; Burton, Dennis R.; Koff, Wayne C.; Connors, Mark; Kwon, Peter D.

    2014-01-01

    One strategy for isolating or eliciting antibodies against a specific target region on the envelope glycoprotein trimer (Env) of the human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) involves the creation of site transplants, which present the target region on a heterologous protein scaffold with preserved antibody-binding properties. If the target region is a supersite of HIV-1 vulnerability, recognized by a collection of broadly neutralizing antibodies, this strategy affords the creation of “supersite transplants”, capable of binding (and potentially eliciting) antibodies similar to the template collection of effective antibodies. Here we transplant three supersites of HIV-1 vulnerability, each targeted by effective neutralizing antibodies from multiple donors. To implement our strategy, we chose a single representative antibody against each of the target supersites: antibody 10E8, which recognizes the membrane-proximal external region (MPER) on the HIV-1 gp41 glycoprotein; antibody PG9, which recognizes variable regions one and two (V1V2) on the HIV-1 gp120 glycoprotein; and antibody PGT128 which recognizes a glycopeptide supersite in variable region 3 (glycan V3) on gp120. We used a structural alignment algorithm to identify suitable acceptor proteins, and then designed, expressed, and tested antigenically over 100-supersite transplants in a 96-well microtiter-plate format. The majority of the supersite transplants failed to maintain the antigenic properties of their respective template supersite. However, seven of the glycan V3-supersite transplants exhibited nanomolar affinity to effective neutralizing antibodies from at least three donors and recapitulated the mannose9-N-linked glycan requirement of the template supersite. The binding of these transplants could be further enhanced by placement into self-assembling nanoparticles. Essential elements of the glycan V3 supersite, embodied by as few as 3 N-linked glycans and ∼25 Env residues, can be segregated

  2. HIV-1 Epidemiology, Genetic Diversity, and Primary Drug Resistance in the Tyumen Oblast, Russia

    PubMed Central

    Astakhova, Ekaterina M.; Gashnikova, Mariya P.; Bocharov, Evgeniy F.; Petrova, Svetlana V.; Pun'ko, Olga A.; Popkov, Alexander V.; Totmenin, Aleksey V.

    2016-01-01

    Introduction. Specific molecular epidemic features of HIV infection in Tyumen Oblast (TO), Russia, were studied. Methods. The genome sequences encoding HIV-1 protease-reverse transcriptase, integrase, and major envelope protein were examined for 72 HIV-1 specimens isolated from the TO resident infected in 2000–2015. Results. The recorded prevalence of HIV-1 subtype A (A1) is 93.1%; HIV-1 subtype B continues to circulate in MSM risk group (1.4%). Solitary instances of HIV-1 recombinant forms, CRF63_02A1 (1.4%) and CRF03_AB (1.4%), were detected as well as two cases of HIV-1 URF63_A1 (2.8%). Phylogenetic analysis showed no HIV-1 clustering according to the duration of infection and risk groups but revealed different epidemic networks confirming that HIV infection spread within local epidemic foci. A high incidence of CXCR4-tropic HIV-1 variants and a higher rate of secondary mutations influencing the virus fitness (K20R, L10V, and I) are observed among the virus specimens isolated from newly infected individuals. Conclusions. The current HIV-1 epidemic in TO develops within the local epidemic networks. Similar to the previous period, HIV-1 subtype A is predominant in TO with sporadic cases of importation of HIV-1 recombinant forms circulating in adjacent areas. PMID:27957489

  3. HIV-1 Epidemiology, Genetic Diversity, and Primary Drug Resistance in the Tyumen Oblast, Russia.

    PubMed

    Gashnikova, Natalya M; Astakhova, Ekaterina M; Gashnikova, Mariya P; Bocharov, Evgeniy F; Petrova, Svetlana V; Pun'ko, Olga A; Popkov, Alexander V; Totmenin, Aleksey V

    2016-01-01

    Introduction. Specific molecular epidemic features of HIV infection in Tyumen Oblast (TO), Russia, were studied. Methods. The genome sequences encoding HIV-1 protease-reverse transcriptase, integrase, and major envelope protein were examined for 72 HIV-1 specimens isolated from the TO resident infected in 2000-2015. Results. The recorded prevalence of HIV-1 subtype A (A1) is 93.1%; HIV-1 subtype B continues to circulate in MSM risk group (1.4%). Solitary instances of HIV-1 recombinant forms, CRF63_02A1 (1.4%) and CRF03_AB (1.4%), were detected as well as two cases of HIV-1 URF63_A1 (2.8%). Phylogenetic analysis showed no HIV-1 clustering according to the duration of infection and risk groups but revealed different epidemic networks confirming that HIV infection spread within local epidemic foci. A high incidence of CXCR4-tropic HIV-1 variants and a higher rate of secondary mutations influencing the virus fitness (K20R, L10V, and I) are observed among the virus specimens isolated from newly infected individuals. Conclusions. The current HIV-1 epidemic in TO develops within the local epidemic networks. Similar to the previous period, HIV-1 subtype A is predominant in TO with sporadic cases of importation of HIV-1 recombinant forms circulating in adjacent areas.

  4. Chimpanzee reservoirs of pandemic and nonpandemic HIV-1.

    PubMed

    Keele, Brandon F; Van Heuverswyn, Fran; Li, Yingying; Bailes, Elizabeth; Takehisa, Jun; Santiago, Mario L; Bibollet-Ruche, Frederic; Chen, Yalu; Wain, Louise V; Liegeois, Florian; Loul, Severin; Ngole, Eitel Mpoudi; Bienvenue, Yanga; Delaporte, Eric; Brookfield, John F Y; Sharp, Paul M; Shaw, George M; Peeters, Martine; Hahn, Beatrice H

    2006-07-28

    Human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1), the cause of human acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (AIDS), is a zoonotic infection of staggering proportions and social impact. Yet uncertainty persists regarding its natural reservoir. The virus most closely related to HIV-1 is a simian immunodeficiency virus (SIV) thus far identified only in captive members of the chimpanzee subspecies Pan troglodytes troglodytes. Here we report the detection of SIVcpz antibodies and nucleic acids in fecal samples from wild-living P. t. troglodytes apes in southern Cameroon, where prevalence rates in some communities reached 29 to 35%. By sequence analysis of endemic SIVcpz strains, we could trace the origins of pandemic (group M) and nonpandemic (group N) HIV-1 to distinct, geographically isolated chimpanzee communities. These findings establish P. t. troglodytes as a natural reservoir of HIV-1.

  5. A multifaceted analysis of HIV-1 protease multidrug resistance phenotypes

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Great strides have been made in the effective treatment of HIV-1 with the development of second-generation protease inhibitors (PIs) that are effective against historically multi-PI-resistant HIV-1 variants. Nevertheless, mutation patterns that confer decreasing susceptibility to available PIs continue to arise within the population. Understanding the phenotypic and genotypic patterns responsible for multi-PI resistance is necessary for developing PIs that are active against clinically-relevant PI-resistant HIV-1 variants. Results In this work, we use globally optimal integer programming-based clustering techniques to elucidate multi-PI phenotypic resistance patterns using a data set of 398 HIV-1 protease sequences that have each been phenotyped for susceptibility toward the nine clinically-approved HIV-1 PIs. We validate the information content of the clusters by evaluating their ability to predict the level of decreased susceptibility to each of the available PIs using a cross validation procedure. We demonstrate the finding that as a result of phenotypic cross resistance, the considered clinical HIV-1 protease isolates are confined to ~6% or less of the clinically-relevant phenotypic space. Clustering and feature selection methods are used to find representative sequences and mutations for major resistance phenotypes to elucidate their genotypic signatures. We show that phenotypic similarity does not imply genotypic similarity, that different PI-resistance mutation patterns can give rise to HIV-1 isolates with similar phenotypic profiles. Conclusion Rather than characterizing HIV-1 susceptibility toward each PI individually, our study offers a unique perspective on the phenomenon of PI class resistance by uncovering major multidrug-resistant phenotypic patterns and their often diverse genotypic determinants, providing a methodology that can be applied to understand clinically-relevant phenotypic patterns to aid in the design of novel inhibitors that

  6. High levels of divergent HIV-1 quasispecies in patients with neurological opportunistic infections in China.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Yulin; Wei, Feili; Liang, Qi; Ding, Wei; Qiao, Luxin; Song, Fengli; Liu, Lifeng; Yang, Sufang; Jin, Ronghua; Gu, Jianhua; Li, Ning; Chen, Dexi

    2013-08-01

    Despite the fact that the survival of people infected with human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) has improved worldwide because of the increasingly powerful and highly active antiretroviral therapy, opportunistic infections (OIs) of the central nervous system (CNS) remain a serious burden. HIV-1 is capable of entering the CNS through infected peripheral monocytes, but its effect on OIs of CNS remains unclear. In this study, we investigated the characteristics of HIV-1 in acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (AIDS) patients with CNS OIs. A total of 24 patients with CNS OIs and 16 non-CNS OIs (control) cases were selected. These AIDS patients were infected with HIV-1 by paid blood donors in China. HIV-1 loads in plasma and cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) were detected using RT-PCR, and the C2-V5 region of HIV-1 envelope gene was amplified from viral quasispecies isolated from CSF using nested PCR. The CSF HIV-1 load of CNS OIs was higher than that of non-CNS OIs, but plasma HIV-1 load of CNS OIs was not higher than that of non-CNS OIs. The nucleotide sequence of C2-V5 region of the HIV-1 quasispecies isolated from the CSF of CNS OIs had a high diversity, and the HIV-1 quasispecies isolated from the CSF of CNS OIs revealed R5 tropism as 11/25 charge rule. These results suggest that high levels of divergent HIV-1 quasispecies in the CNS probably contribute to opportunistic infections.

  7. Authentic HIV-1 integrase inhibitors

    PubMed Central

    Liao, Chenzhong; Marchand, Christophe; Burke, Terrence R; Pommier, Yves; Nicklaus, Marc C

    2010-01-01

    HIV-1 integrase (IN) is indispensable for HIV-1 replication and has become a validated target for developing anti-AIDS agents. In two decades of development of IN inhibition-based anti-HIV therapeutics, a significant number of compounds were identified as IN inhibitors, but only some of them showed antiviral activity. This article reviews a number of patented HIV-1 IN inhibitors, especially those that possess high selectivity for the strand transfer reaction. These compounds generally have a polar coplanar moiety, which is assumed to chelate two magnesium ions in the binding site. Resistance to those compounds, when given to patients, can develop as a result of IN mutations. We refer to those compounds as authentic IN inhibitors. Continued drug development has so far delivered one authentic IN inhibitor to the market (raltegravir in 2007). Current and future attention will be focused on the development of novel authentic IN inhibitors with the goal of overcoming viral resistance. PMID:21426159

  8. Structured antiretroviral treatment interruptions in chronically HIV-1-infected subjects

    PubMed Central

    Ortiz, Gabriel M.; Wellons, Melissa; Brancato, Jason; Vo, Ha T. T.; Zinn, Rebekah L.; Clarkson, Daniel E.; Van Loon, Katherine; Bonhoeffer, Sebastian; Miralles, G. Diego; Montefiori, David; Bartlett, John A.; Nixon, Douglas F.

    2001-01-01

    The risks and benefits of structured treatment interruption (STI) in HIV-1-infected subjects are not fully understood. A pilot study was performed to compare STI with continuous highly active antiretroviral therapy (HAART) in chronic HIV-1-infected subjects with HIV-1 plasma RNA levels (VL) <400 copies per ml and CD4+ T cells >400 per μl. CD4+ T cells, VL, HIV-1-specific neutralizing antibodies, and IFN-γ-producing HIV-1-specific CD8+ and CD4+ T cells were measured in all subjects. STIs of 1-month duration separated by 1 month of HAART, before a final 3-month STI, resulted in augmented CD8+ T cell responses in all eight STI subjects (P = 0.003), maintained while on HAART up to 22 weeks after STI, and augmented neutralization titers to autologous HIV-1 isolate in one of eight subjects. However, significant decline of CD4+ T cell count from pre-STI level, and VL rebound to pre-HAART baseline, occurred during STI (P = 0.001 and 0.34, respectively). CD4+ T cell counts were regained on return to HAART. Control subjects (n = 4) maintained VL <400 copies per ml and stable CD4+ T cell counts, and showed no enhancement of antiviral CD8+ T cell responses. Despite increases in antiviral immunity, no control of VL was observed. Future studies of STI should proceed with caution. PMID:11687611

  9. Specific sequences commonly found in the V3 domain of HIV-1 subtype C isolates affect the overall conformation of native Env and induce a neutralization-resistant phenotype independent of V1/V2 masking.

    PubMed

    Salomon, Aidy; Krachmarov, Chavdar; Lai, Zhong; Honnen, William; Zingman, Barry S; Sarlo, Julie; Gorny, Miroslaw K; Zolla-Pazner, Susan; Robinson, James E; Pinter, Abraham

    2014-01-05

    Primary HIV-1 isolates are relatively resistant to neutralization by antibodies commonly induced after infection or vaccination. This is generally attributed to masking of sensitive epitopes by the V1/V2 domain and/or glycans situated at various positions in Env. Here we identified a novel masking effect mediated by subtype C-specific V3 sequences that contributes to the V1/V2-independent and glycan-independent neutralization resistance of chimeric and primary Envs to antibodies directed against multiple neutralization domains. Positions at several conserved charged and hydrophobic sites in the V3 crown and stem were also shown to affect neutralization phenotype. These results indicated that substitutions typically present in subtype C and related V3 sequences influence the overall conformation of native Env in a way that occludes multiple neutralization targets located both within and outside of the V3 domain, and may reflect an alternative mechanism for neutralization resistance that is particularly active in subtype C and related isolates.

  10. Phenotypic Correlates of HIV-1 Macrophage Tropism

    PubMed Central

    Arrildt, Kathryn T.; LaBranche, Celia C.; Joseph, Sarah B.; Dukhovlinova, Elena N.; Graham, William D.; Ping, Li-Hua; Schnell, Gretja; Sturdevant, Christa B.; Kincer, Laura P.; Mallewa, Macpherson; Heyderman, Robert S.; Van Rie, Annelies; Cohen, Myron S.; Spudich, Serena; Price, Richard W.; Montefiori, David C.

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT HIV-1 is typically CCR5 using (R5) and T cell tropic (T-tropic), targeting memory CD4+ T cells throughout acute and chronic infections. However, viruses can expand into alternative cells types. Macrophage-tropic (M-tropic) HIV-1 variants have evolved to infect macrophages, which have only low levels of surface CD4. Most M-tropic variants have been isolated from the central nervous system during late-stage chronic infection. We used the HIV-1 env genes of well-defined, subject-matched M-tropic and T-tropic viruses to characterize the phenotypic features of the M-tropic Env protein. We found that, compared to T-tropic viruses, M-tropic viruses infect monocyte-derived macrophages (MDMs) on average 28-fold more efficiently, use low-density CD4 more efficiently, have increased sensitivity to soluble CD4 (sCD4), and show trends toward sensitivity to some CD4 binding site antibodies but no difference in sensitivity to antibodies targeting the CD4-bound conformation. M-tropic viruses also displayed a trend toward resistance to neutralization by monoclonal antibodies targeting the V1/V2 region of Env, suggesting subtle changes in Env protein conformation. The paired M- and T-tropic viruses did not differ in autologous serum neutralization, temperature sensitivity, entry kinetics, intrinsic infectivity, or Env protein incorporation. We also examined viruses with modestly increased CD4 usage. These variants have significant sensitivity to sCD4 and may represent evolutionary intermediates. CD4 usage is strongly correlated with infectivity of MDMs over a wide range of CD4 entry phenotypes. These data suggest that emergence of M-tropic HIV-1 includes multiple steps in which a phenotype of increased sensitivity to sCD4 and enhanced CD4 usage accompany subtle changes in Env conformation. IMPORTANCE HIV-1 typically replicates in CD4+ T cells. However, HIV-1 can evolve to infect macrophages, especially within the brain. Understanding how CCR5-using macrophage-tropic viruses

  11. HIV-1 RNAs are Not Part of the Argonaute 2 Associated RNA Interference Pathway in Macrophages

    PubMed Central

    Kishore, Shivendra; Jaskiewicz, Lukasz; Hall, Jonathan; Günthard, Huldrych F.; Beerenwinkel, Niko; Metzner, Karin J.

    2015-01-01

    Background MiRNAs and other small noncoding RNAs (sncRNAs) are key players in post-transcriptional gene regulation. HIV-1 derived small noncoding RNAs (sncRNAs) have been described in HIV-1 infected cells, but their biological functions still remain to be elucidated. Here, we approached the question whether viral sncRNAs may play a role in the RNA interference (RNAi) pathway or whether viral mRNAs are targeted by cellular miRNAs in human monocyte derived macrophages (MDM). Methods The incorporation of viral sncRNAs and/or their target RNAs into RNA-induced silencing complex was investigated using photoactivatable ribonucleoside-induced cross-linking and immunoprecipitation (PAR-CLIP) as well as high-throughput sequencing of RNA isolated by cross-linking immunoprecipitation (HITS-CLIP), which capture Argonaute2-bound miRNAs and their target RNAs. HIV-1 infected monocyte-derived macrophages (MDM) were chosen as target cells, as they have previously been shown to express HIV-1 sncRNAs. In addition, we applied small RNA deep sequencing to study differential cellular miRNA expression in HIV-1 infected versus non-infected MDMs. Results and Conclusion PAR-CLIP and HITS-CLIP data demonstrated the absence of HIV-1 RNAs in Ago2-RISC, although the presence of a multitude of HIV-1 sncRNAs in HIV-1 infected MDMs was confirmed by small RNA sequencing. Small RNA sequencing revealed that 1.4% of all sncRNAs were of HIV-1 origin. However, neither HIV-1 derived sncRNAs nor putative HIV-1 target sequences incorporated into Ago2-RISC were identified suggesting that HIV-1 sncRNAs are not involved in the canonical RNAi pathway nor is HIV-1 targeted by this pathway in HIV-1 infected macrophages. PMID:26226348

  12. Potent Intratype Neutralizing Activity Distinguishes Human Immunodeficiency Virus Type 2 (HIV-2) from HIV-1

    PubMed Central

    Özkaya Şahin, Gülşen; Holmgren, Birgitta; da Silva, Zacarias; Nielsen, Jens; Nowroozalizadeh, Salma; Esbjörnsson, Joakim; Månsson, Fredrik; Andersson, Sören; Norrgren, Hans; Aaby, Peter

    2012-01-01

    HIV-2 has a lower pathogenicity and transmission rate than HIV-1. Neutralizing antibodies could be contributing to these observations. Here we explored side by side the potency and breadth of intratype and intertype neutralizing activity (NAc) in plasma of 20 HIV-1-, 20 HIV-2-, and 11 dually HIV-1/2 (HIV-D)-seropositive individuals from Guinea-Bissau, West Africa. Panels of primary isolates, five HIV-1 and five HIV-2 isolates, were tested in a plaque reduction assay using U87.CD4-CCR5 cells as targets. Intratype NAc in HIV-2 plasma was found to be considerably more potent and also broader than intratype NAc in HIV-1 plasma. This indicates that HIV-2-infected individuals display potent type-specific neutralizing antibodies, whereas such strong type-specific antibodies are absent in HIV-1 infection. Furthermore, the potency of intratype NAc was positively associated with the viral load of HIV-1 but not HIV-2, suggesting that NAc in HIV-1 infection is more antigen stimulation dependent than in HIV-2 infection, where plasma viral loads typically are at least 10-fold lower than in HIV-1 infection. Intertype NAc of both HIV-1 and HIV-2 infections was, instead, of low potency. HIV-D subjects had NAc to HIV-2 with similar high potency as singly HIV-2-infected individuals, whereas neutralization of HIV-1 remained poor, indicating that the difference in NAc between HIV-1 and HIV-2 infections depends on the virus itself. We suggest that immunogenicity and/or antigenicity, meaning the neutralization phenotype, of HIV-2 is distinct from that of HIV-1 and that HIV-2 may display structures that favor triggering of potent neutralizing antibody responses. PMID:22072782

  13. Mother-to-Child HIV-1 Transmission Events Are Differentially Impacted by Breast Milk and Its Components from HIV-1-Infected Women.

    PubMed

    Shen, Ruizhong; Achenbach, Jenna; Shen, Yue; Palaia, Jana; Rahkola, Jeremy T; Nick, Heidi J; Smythies, Lesley E; McConnell, Michelle; Fowler, Mary G; Smith, Phillip D; Janoff, Edward N

    2015-01-01

    Breast milk is a vehicle of infection and source of protection in post-natal mother-to-child HIV-1 transmission (MTCT). Understanding the mechanism by which breast milk limits vertical transmission will provide critical insight into the design of preventive and therapeutic approaches to interrupt HIV-1 mucosal transmission. However, characterization of the inhibitory activity of breast milk in human intestinal mucosa, the portal of entry in postnatal MTCT, has been constrained by the limited availability of primary mucosal target cells and tissues to recapitulate mucosal transmission ex vivo. Here, we characterized the impact of skimmed breast milk, breast milk antibodies (Igs) and non-Ig components from HIV-1-infected Ugandan women on the major events of HIV-1 mucosal transmission using primary human intestinal cells and tissues. HIV-1-specific IgG antibodies and non-Ig components in breast milk inhibited the uptake of Ugandan HIV-1 isolates by primary human intestinal epithelial cells, viral replication in and transport of HIV-1- bearing dendritic cells through the human intestinal mucosa. Breast milk HIV-1-specific IgG and IgA, as well as innate factors, blocked the uptake and transport of HIV-1 through intestinal mucosa. Thus, breast milk components have distinct and complementary effects in reducing HIV-1 uptake, transport through and replication in the intestinal mucosa and, therefore, likely contribute to preventing postnatal HIV-1 transmission. Our data suggests that a successful preventive or therapeutic approach would require multiple immune factors acting at multiple steps in the HIV-1 mucosal transmission process.

  14. Curcumin derivatives as HIV-1 protease inhibitors

    SciTech Connect

    Sui, Z.; Li, J.; Craik, C.S.; Ortiz de Montellano, P.R.

    1993-12-31

    Curcumin, a non-toxic natural compound from Curcuma longa, has been found to be an HIV-1 protease inhibitor. Some of its derivatives were synthesized and their inhibitory activity against the HIV-1 protease was tested. Curcumin analogues containing boron enhanced the inhibitory activity. At least of the the synthesized compounds irreversibly inhibits the HIV-1 protease.

  15. Bioorthogonal mimetics of palmitoyl-CoA and myristoyl-CoA and their subsequent isolation by click chemistry and characterization by mass spectrometry reveal novel acylated host-proteins modified by HIV-1 infection.

    PubMed

    Colquhoun, David R; Lyashkov, Alexey E; Ubaida Mohien, Ceereena; Aquino, Veronica N; Bullock, Brandon T; Dinglasan, Rhoel R; Agnew, Brian J; Graham, David R M

    2015-06-01

    Protein acylation plays a critical role in protein localization and function. Acylation is essential for human immunodeficiency virus 1 (HIV-1) assembly and budding of HIV-1 from the plasma membrane in lipid raft microdomains and is mediated by myristoylation of the Gag polyprotein and the copackaging of the envelope protein is facilitated by colocalization mediated by palmitoylation. Since the viral accessory protein NEF has been shown to alter the substrate specificity of myristoyl transferases, and alter cargo trafficking lipid rafts, we hypothesized that HIV-1 infection may alter protein acylation globally. To test this hypothesis, we labeled HIV-1 infected cells with biomimetics of acyl azides, which are incorporated in a manner analogous to natural acyl-Co-A. A terminal azide group allowed us to use a copper catalyzed click chemistry to conjugate the incorporated modifications to a number of substrates to carry out SDS-PAGE, fluorescence microscopy, and enrichment for LC-MS/MS. Using LC-MS/MS, we identified 103 and 174 proteins from the myristic and palmitic azide enrichments, with 27 and 45 proteins respectively that differentiated HIV-1 infected from uninfected cells. This approach has provided us with important insights into HIV-1 biology and is widely applicable to many virological systems.

  16. Fucoidans as potential inhibitors of HIV-1.

    PubMed

    Prokofjeva, Maria M; Imbs, Tatyana I; Shevchenko, Natalya M; Spirin, Pavel V; Horn, Stefan; Fehse, Boris; Zvyagintseva, Tatyana N; Prassolov, Vladimir S

    2013-08-19

    The antiviral activity of different structure fucoidans (α-l-fucans and galactofucans) was studied using two model viral systems based on a lentiviral vectors and a replication competent Moloney murine leukemia virus (Mo-MuLV). It was found that investigated fucoidans have no cytotoxic effects on Jurkat and SC-1cell at the concentration range of 0.001-100 µg/mL. Fucoidans with different efficiency suppressed transduction of Jurkat cell line by pseudo-HIV-1 particles carrying the envelope protein of HIV-1 and infection of SC-1 cells by Mo-MuLV. According to our data, all natural fucoidans can be considered as potential anti-HIV agents regardless of their carbohydrate backbone and degree of sulfating, since their activity is shown at low concentrations (0.001-0.05 µg/mL). High molecular weight fucoidans isolated from Saccharina cichorioides (1.3-α-l-fucan), and S. japonica (galactofucan) were the most effective inhibitors.

  17. Suppression of HIV-1 replication by microRNA effectors

    PubMed Central

    Chable-Bessia, Christine; Meziane, Oussama; Latreille, Daniel; Triboulet, Robinson; Zamborlini, Alessia; Wagschal, Alexandre; Jacquet, Jean-Marc; Reynes, Jacques; Levy, Yves; Saib, Ali; Bennasser, Yamina; Benkirane, Monsef

    2009-01-01

    The rate of HIV-1 gene expression is a key step that determines the kinetics of virus spread and AIDS progression. Viral entry and gene expression were described to be the key determinants for cell permissiveness to HIV. Recent reports highlighted the involvement of miRNA in regulating HIV-1 replication post-transcriptionally. In this study we explored the role of cellular factors required for miRNA-mediated mRNA translational inhibition in regulating HIV-1 gene expression. Here we show that HIV-1 mRNAs associate and co-localize with components of the RNA Induced Silencing Complex (RISC), and we characterize some of the proteins required for miRNA-mediated silencing (miRNA effectors). RCK/p54, GW182, LSm-1 and XRN1 negatively regulate HIV-1 gene expression by preventing viral mRNA association with polysomes. Interestingly, knockdown of RCK/p54 or DGCR8 resulted in virus reactivation in PBMCs isolated from HIV infected patients treated with suppressive HAART. PMID:19272132

  18. Cocaine enhances HIV-1-induced CD4(+) T-cell apoptosis: implications in disease progression in cocaine-abusing HIV-1 patients.

    PubMed

    Pandhare, Jui; Addai, Amma B; Mantri, Chinmay K; Hager, Cynthia; Smith, Rita M; Barnett, Louis; Villalta, Fernando; Kalams, Spyros A; Dash, Chandravanu

    2014-04-01

    Substance abuse is a major barrier in eradication of the HIV epidemic because it serves as a powerful cofactor for viral transmission, disease progression, and AIDS-related mortality. Cocaine, one of the commonly abused drugs among HIV-1 patients, has been suggested to accelerate HIV disease progression. However, the underlying mechanism remains largely unknown. Therefore, we tested whether cocaine augments HIV-1-associated CD4(+) T-cell decline, a predictor of HIV disease progression. We examined apoptosis of resting CD4(+) T cells from HIV-1-negative and HIV-1-positive donors in our study, because decline of uninfected cells plays a major role in HIV-1 disease progression. Treatment of resting CD4(+) T cells with cocaine (up to 100 μmol/L concentrations) did not induce apoptosis, but 200 to 1000 μmol/L cocaine induced apoptosis in a dose-dependent manner. Notably, treatment of CD4(+) T cells isolated from healthy donors with both HIV-1 virions and cocaine significantly increased apoptosis compared with the apoptosis induced by cocaine or virions alone. Most important, our biochemical data suggest that cocaine induces CD4(+) T-cell apoptosis by increasing intracellular reactive oxygen species levels and inducing mitochondrial depolarization. Collectively, our results provide evidence of a synergy between cocaine and HIV-1 on CD4(+) T-cell apoptosis that may, in part, explain the accelerated disease observed in HIV-1-infected drug abusers.

  19. Rare HIV-1 Subtype J Genomes and a New H/U/CRF02_AG Recombinant Genome Suggests an Ancient Origin of HIV-1 in Angola.

    PubMed

    Bártolo, Inês; Calado, Rita; Borrego, Pedro; Leitner, Thomas; Taveira, Nuno

    2016-08-01

    Angola has an extremely diverse HIV-1 epidemic fueled in part by the frequent interchange of people with the Democratic Republic of Congo (DRC) and Republic of Congo (RC). Characterization of HIV-1 strains circulating in Angola should help to better understand the origin of HIV-1 subtypes and recombinant forms and their transmission dynamics. In this study we characterize the first near full-length HIV-1 genomic sequences from HIV-1 infected individuals from Angola. Samples were obtained in 1993 from three HIV-1 infected patients living in Cabinda, Angola. Near full-length genomic sequences were obtained from virus isolates. Maximum likelihood phylogenetic tree inference and analyses of potential recombination patterns were performed to evaluate the sequence classifications and origins. Phylogenetic and recombination analyses revealed that one virus was a pure subtype J, another mostly subtype J with a small uncertain region, and the final virus was classified as a H/U/CRF02_AG recombinant. Consistent with their epidemiological data, the subtype J sequences were more closely related to each other than to other J sequences previously published. Based on the env gene, taxa from Angola occur throughout the global subtype J phylogeny. HIV-1 subtypes J and H are present in Angola at low levels since at least 1993. Low transmission efficiency and/or high recombination potential may explain their limited epidemic success in Angola and worldwide. The high diversity of rare subtypes in Angola suggests that Angola was part of the early establishment of the HIV-1 pandemic.

  20. In Vitro Reactivation of Replication-Competent and Infectious HIV-1 by Histone Deacetylase Inhibitors

    PubMed Central

    Banga, Riddhima; Procopio, Francesco Andrea; Cavassini, Matthias

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT The existence of long-lived HIV-1-infected resting memory CD4 T cells is thought to be the primary obstacle to HIV-1 eradication. In the search for novel therapeutic approaches that may reverse HIV-1 latency, inhibitors of histone deacetylases (HDACis) have been tested to reactivate HIV-1 replication with the objective of rendering HIV-1-infected cells susceptible to elimination either by HIV-specific CD8 T cells or through virus-mediated cytopathicity. In the present study, we evaluated the efficiency of HDACis to reactivate HIV-1 replication from resting memory CD4 T cells isolated from aviremic long-term-treated HIV-1-infected subjects. We demonstrate that following prolonged/repeated treatment of resting memory CD4 T cells with HDACis, HIV-1 replication may be induced from primary resting memory CD4 T cells isolated from aviremic long-term-treated HIV-1-infected subjects. More importantly, we demonstrate that HIV-1 reactivated in the cell cultures was not only replication competent but also infectious. Interestingly, givinostat, an HDACi that has not been investigated in clinical trials, was more efficient than vorinostat, panobinostat, and romidepsin in reversing HIV-1 latency in vitro. Taken together, these results support further evaluation of givinostat as a latency-reversing agent (LRA) in aviremic long-term-treated HIV-1-infected subjects. IMPORTANCE The major barrier to HIV cure is the existence of long-lived latently HIV-1-infected resting memory CD4 T cells. Latently HIV-1-infected CD4 T cells are transcriptionally silent and are therefore not targeted by conventional antiretroviral therapy (ART) or the immune system. In this context, one strategy to target latently infected cells is based on pharmacological molecules that may force the virus to replicate and would therefore render HIV-1-infected cells susceptible to elimination either by HIV-specific CD8 T cells or through virus-mediated cytopathicity. In this context, we developed an

  1. Maternal HIV-1 envelope–specific antibody responses and reduced risk of perinatal transmission

    PubMed Central

    Permar, Sallie R.; Fong, Youyi; Vandergrift, Nathan; Fouda, Genevieve G.; Gilbert, Peter; Parks, Robert; Jaeger, Frederick H.; Pollara, Justin; Martelli, Amanda; Liebl, Brooke E.; Lloyd, Krissey; Yates, Nicole L.; Overman, R. Glenn; Shen, Xiaoying; Whitaker, Kaylan; Chen, Haiyan; Pritchett, Jamie; Solomon, Erika; Friberg, Emma; Marshall, Dawn J.; Whitesides, John F.; Gurley, Thaddeus C.; Von Holle, Tarra; Martinez, David R.; Cai, Fangping; Kumar, Amit; Xia, Shi-Mao; Lu, Xiaozhi; Louzao, Raul; Wilkes, Samantha; Datta, Saheli; Sarzotti-Kelsoe, Marcella; Liao, Hua-Xin; Ferrari, Guido; Alam, S. Munir; Montefiori, David C.; Denny, Thomas N.; Moody, M. Anthony; Tomaras, Georgia D.; Gao, Feng; Haynes, Barton F.

    2015-01-01

    Despite the wide availability of antiretroviral drugs, more than 250,000 infants are vertically infected with HIV-1 annually, emphasizing the need for additional interventions to eliminate pediatric HIV-1 infections. Here, we aimed to define humoral immune correlates of risk of mother-to-child transmission (MTCT) of HIV-1, including responses associated with protection in the RV144 vaccine trial. Eighty-three untreated, HIV-1–transmitting mothers and 165 propensity score–matched nontransmitting mothers were selected from the Women and Infants Transmission Study (WITS) of US nonbreastfeeding, HIV-1–infected mothers. In a multivariable logistic regression model, the magnitude of the maternal IgG responses specific for the third variable loop (V3) of the HIV-1 envelope was predictive of a reduced risk of MTCT. Neutralizing Ab responses against easy-to-neutralize (tier 1) HIV-1 strains also predicted a reduced risk of peripartum transmission in secondary analyses. Moreover, recombinant maternal V3–specific IgG mAbs mediated neutralization of autologous HIV-1 isolates. Thus, common V3-specific Ab responses in maternal plasma predicted a reduced risk of MTCT and mediated autologous virus neutralization, suggesting that boosting these maternal Ab responses may further reduce HIV-1 MTCT. PMID:26053661

  2. Maternal HIV-1 envelope-specific antibody responses and reduced risk of perinatal transmission.

    PubMed

    Permar, Sallie R; Fong, Youyi; Vandergrift, Nathan; Fouda, Genevieve G; Gilbert, Peter; Parks, Robert; Jaeger, Frederick H; Pollara, Justin; Martelli, Amanda; Liebl, Brooke E; Lloyd, Krissey; Yates, Nicole L; Overman, R Glenn; Shen, Xiaoying; Whitaker, Kaylan; Chen, Haiyan; Pritchett, Jamie; Solomon, Erika; Friberg, Emma; Marshall, Dawn J; Whitesides, John F; Gurley, Thaddeus C; Von Holle, Tarra; Martinez, David R; Cai, Fangping; Kumar, Amit; Xia, Shi-Mao; Lu, Xiaozhi; Louzao, Raul; Wilkes, Samantha; Datta, Saheli; Sarzotti-Kelsoe, Marcella; Liao, Hua-Xin; Ferrari, Guido; Alam, S Munir; Montefiori, David C; Denny, Thomas N; Moody, M Anthony; Tomaras, Georgia D; Gao, Feng; Haynes, Barton F

    2015-07-01

    Despite the wide availability of antiretroviral drugs, more than 250,000 infants are vertically infected with HIV-1 annually, emphasizing the need for additional interventions to eliminate pediatric HIV-1 infections. Here, we aimed to define humoral immune correlates of risk of mother-to-child transmission (MTCT) of HIV-1, including responses associated with protection in the RV144 vaccine trial. Eighty-three untreated, HIV-1-transmitting mothers and 165 propensity score-matched nontransmitting mothers were selected from the Women and Infants Transmission Study (WITS) of US nonbreastfeeding, HIV-1-infected mothers. In a multivariable logistic regression model, the magnitude of the maternal IgG responses specific for the third variable loop (V3) of the HIV-1 envelope was predictive of a reduced risk of MTCT. Neutralizing Ab responses against easy-to-neutralize (tier 1) HIV-1 strains also predicted a reduced risk of peripartum transmission in secondary analyses. Moreover, recombinant maternal V3-specific IgG mAbs mediated neutralization of autologous HIV-1 isolates. Thus, common V3-specific Ab responses in maternal plasma predicted a reduced risk of MTCT and mediated autologous virus neutralization, suggesting that boosting these maternal Ab responses may further reduce HIV-1 MTCT.

  3. Restricted isotype, distinct variable gene usage, and high rate of gp120 specificity of HIV-1 envelope-specific B cells in colostrum compared with those in blood of HIV-1-infected, lactating African women.

    PubMed

    Sacha, C R; Vandergrift, N; Jeffries, T L; McGuire, E; Fouda, G G; Liebl, B; Marshall, D J; Gurley, T C; Stiegel, L; Whitesides, J F; Friedman, J; Badiabo, A; Foulger, A; Yates, N L; Tomaras, G D; Kepler, T B; Liao, H X; Haynes, B F; Moody, M A; Permar, S R

    2015-03-01

    A successful HIV-1 vaccine must elicit immune responses that impede mucosal virus transmission, though functional roles of protective HIV-1 Envelope (Env)-specific mucosal antibodies remain unclear. Colostrum is a rich source of readily accessible mucosal B cells that may help define the mucosal antibody response contributing to prevention of postnatal HIV-1 transmission. To examine the HIV-1 Env-specific colostrum B-cell repertoire, single B cells were isolated from 17 chronically HIV-infected, lactating women, producing 51 blood and 39 colostrum HIV-1 Env-specific B-cell antibodies. All HIV-1 Env-specific colostrum-derived antibodies were immunoglobulin (Ig)G1 isotype and had mean heavy chain complementarity-determining region 3 (CDR3) lengths and mutation frequencies similar to those isolated from blood. However, variable heavy chain (VH) gene subfamily 1(∼)69 usage was higher among colostrum than blood HIV-1 Env-reactive antibodies (49% vs. 20%, P=0.006, Fisher's exact test). Additionally, more HIV-1 Env-specific colostrum antibodies were gp120 specific than those isolated from blood (44% vs. 16%, P=0.005, Fisher's exact test). One cross-compartment HIV-1 Env-specific clonal B-cell lineage was identified. These unique characteristics of colostrum B-cell antibodies suggest selective homing of HIV-1-specific IgG1-secreting memory B cells to the mammary gland and have implications for targeting mucosal B-cell populations by vaccination.

  4. Ex vivo production of autologous whole inactivated HIV-1 for clinical use in therapeutic vaccines.

    PubMed

    Gil, Cristina; Climent, Núria; García, Felipe; Hurtado, Carmen; Nieto-Márquez, Sara; León, Agathe; García, M Teresa; Rovira, Cristina; Miralles, Laia; Dalmau, Judith; Pumarola, Tomás; Almela, Manel; Martinez-Picado, Javier; Lifson, Jeffrey D; Zamora, Laura; Miró, José M; Brander, Christian; Clotet, Bonaventura; Gallart, Teresa; Gatell, José M

    2011-08-05

    This study provides a detailed description and characterization of the preparation of individualized lots of autologous heat inactivated HIV-1 virions used as immunogen in a clinical trial designed to test an autologous dendritic-cell-based therapeutic HIV-1 vaccine (Clinical Trial DCV-2, NCT00402142). For each participant, ex vivo isolation and expansion of primary virus were performed by co-culturing CD4-enriched PBMCs from the HIV-1-infected patient with PBMC from HIV-seronegative unrelated healthy volunteer donors. The viral supernatants were heat-inactivated and concentrated to obtain 1 mL of autologous immunogen, which was used to load autologous dendritic cells of each patient. High sequence homology was found between the inactivated virus immunogen and the HIV-1 circulating in plasma at the time of HIV-1 isolation. Immunogens contained up to 10⁹ HIV-1 RNA copies/mL showed considerably reduced infectivity after heat inactivation (median of 5.6 log₁₀), and were free of specified adventitious agents. The production of individualized lots of immunogen based on autologous inactivated HIV-1 virus fulfilling clinical-grade good manufacturing practice proved to be feasible, consistent with predetermined specifications, and safe for use in a clinical trial designed to test autologous dendritic cell-based therapeutic HIV-1 vaccine.

  5. Macrophages and HIV-1: An Unhealthy Constellation.

    PubMed

    Sattentau, Quentin J; Stevenson, Mario

    2016-03-09

    Lentiviruses have a long-documented association with macrophages. Abundant evidence exists for in vitro and, in a tissue-specific manner, in vivo infection of macrophages by the primate lentiviruses HIV-1 and SIV. However, macrophage contribution to aspects of HIV-1 and SIV pathogenesis, and their role in viral persistence in individuals on suppressive antiretroviral therapy, remains unclear. Here we discuss recent evidence implicating macrophages in HIV-1-mediated disease and highlight directions for further investigation.

  6. Identification of dual-tropic HIV-1 using evolved neural networks.

    PubMed

    Fogel, Gary B; Lamers, Susanna L; Liu, Enoch S; Salemi, Marco; McGrath, Michael S

    2015-11-01

    Blocking the binding of the envelope HIV-1 protein to immune cells is a popular concept for development of anti-HIV therapeutics. R5 HIV-1 binds CCR5, X4 HIV-1 binds CXCR4, and dual-tropic HIV-1 can bind either coreceptor for cellular entry. R5 viruses are associated with early infection and over time can evolve to X4 viruses that are associated with immune failure. Dual-tropic HIV-1 is less studied; however, it represents functional antigenic intermediates during the transition of R5 to X4 viruses. Viral tropism is linked partly to the HIV-1 envelope V3 domain, where the amino acid sequence helps dictate the receptor a particular virus will target; however, using V3 sequence information to identify dual-tropic HIV-1 isolates has remained difficult. Our goal in this study was to elucidate features of dual-tropic HIV-1 isolates that assist in the biological understanding of dual-tropism and develop an approach for their detection. Over 1559 HIV-1 subtype B sequences with known tropisms were analyzed. Each sequence was represented by 73 structural, biochemical and regional features. These features were provided to an evolved neural network classifier and evaluated using balanced and unbalanced data sets. The study resolved R5X4 viruses from R5 with an accuracy of 81.8% and from X4 with an accuracy of 78.8%. The approach also identified a set of V3 features (hydrophobicity, structural and polarity) that are associated with tropism transitions. The ability to distinguish R5X4 isolates will improve computational tropism decisions for R5 vs. X4 and assist in HIV-1 research and drug development efforts.

  7. The HIV-1 epidemic in South Africa.

    PubMed

    Puren, A J

    2002-01-01

    The first reported cases of HIV-1 infection in South Africa occurred in 1982. Two distinct HIV-1 epidemic patterns were recognized. Initially the infection was prevalent in white males who had sex with males. The HIV-1 clade B was associated with this group. By 1989, the second epidemic was recognized primarily in the black population. Infections in this case were mainly heterosexual in origin. The HIV-1 clade involved was mainly C. The national HIV-1 sero-prevalence in antenatal attendees was less than 1% in 1990 and by 1994 this figure had risen to 7.5%. The most recent antenatal surveillance for HIV-1 sero-prevalence in 1999 revealed the following. The national prevalence rate for 1999 was 22.4% compared with the 1998 rate of 22.8%. The data highlighted the profound effect the epidemic had and will have on the disease burden in South Africa and by extension on the social and economic fronts. This view was emphasised by the impact HIV-1 infection had on tuberculosis. For example, sentinel surveys have attributed 44% of tuberculosis cases to HIV-1 infection. Moreover, the high prevalence of sexually transmitted infections will certainly exacerbate the HIV-1 epidemic.

  8. B-cell-lineage immunogen design in vaccine development with HIV-1 as a case study.

    PubMed

    Haynes, Barton F; Kelsoe, Garnett; Harrison, Stephen C; Kepler, Thomas B

    2012-05-07

    Failure of immunization with the HIV-1 envelope to induce broadly neutralizing antibodies against conserved epitopes is a major barrier to producing a preventive HIV-1 vaccine. Broadly neutralizing monoclonal antibodies (BnAbs) from those subjects who do produce them after years of chronic HIV-1 infection have one or more unusual characteristics, including polyreactivity for host antigens, extensive somatic hypermutation and long, variable heavy-chain third complementarity-determining regions, factors that may limit their expression by host immunoregulatory mechanisms. The isolation of BnAbs from HIV-1-infected subjects and the use of computationally derived clonal lineages as templates provide a new path for HIV-1 vaccine immunogen design. This approach, which should be applicable to many infectious agents, holds promise for the construction of vaccines that can drive B cells along rare but desirable maturation pathways.

  9. HIV-1 protease-induced apoptosis

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Apoptosis is one of the presumptive causes of CD4+ T cell depletion during HIV infection and progression to AIDS. However, the precise role of HIV-1 in this process remains unexplained. HIV-1 protease (PR) has been suggested as a possible factor, but a direct link between HIV-1 PR enzymatic activity and apoptosis has not been established. Results Here, we show that expression of active HIV-1 PR induces death in HeLa and HEK-293 cells via the mitochondrial apoptotic pathway. This conclusion is based on in vivo observations of the direct localization of HIV-1 PR in mitochondria, a key player in triggering apoptosis. Moreover, we observed an HIV-1 PR concentration-dependent decrease in mitochondrial membrane potential and the role of HIV-1 PR in activation of caspase 9, PARP cleavage and DNA fragmentation. In addition, in vitro data demonstrated that HIV-1 PR mediates cleavage of mitochondrial proteins Tom22, VDAC and ANT, leading to release of AIF and Hsp60 proteins. By using yeast two-hybrid screening, we also identified a new HIV-1 PR interaction partner, breast carcinoma-associated protein 3 (BCA3). We found that BCA3 accelerates p53 transcriptional activity on the bax promoter, thus elevating the cellular level of pro-apoptotic Bax protein. Conclusion In summary, our results describe the involvement of HIV-1 PR in apoptosis, which is caused either by a direct effect of HIV-1 PR on mitochondrial membrane integrity or by its interaction with cellular protein BCA3. PMID:24886575

  10. Epitope-vaccine strategy against HIV-1: today and tomorrow.

    PubMed

    Liu, Zuqiang; Xiao, Yi; Chen, Ying-Hua

    2003-01-01

    Vaccines play important roles in preventing infectious diseases caused by different pathogens. However, some pathogens such as HIV-1 challenge current vaccine strategy. Poor immunogenicity and the high mutation rate of HIV-1 make great difficulties in inducing potent immune responses strong enough to prevent infection via vaccination. Epitope-vaccine, which could intensively enhance predefined epitope-specific immune responses, was suggested as a new strategy against HIV-1 and HIV-1 mutation. Epitope-vaccines afford powerful approaches to elicit potent, broad and complete immune protection against not only primary homologous viral isolates but also heterologous viral mutants. Although most studies are still preliminary now, epitope-vaccine as a novel strategy against the AIDS epidemic has great developmental potential. To trigger T-cell-dependent IgG antibody responses and improve affinities of the epitope-specific antibodies, approaches such as recombinant multi-epitope-vaccination and prime-boosting vaccination were suggested. Cellular immune responses, especially CTL responses, could also be elicited and enhanced in addition to humoral immune responses. Developed epitope-vaccines activating both arms of the immune system would benefit prevention and immunotherapy not only against HIV but also other chronic infections.

  11. Cocaine Enhances HIV-1–Induced CD4+ T-Cell Apoptosis

    PubMed Central

    Pandhare, Jui; Addai, Amma B.; Mantri, Chinmay K.; Hager, Cynthia; Smith, Rita M.; Barnett, Louis; Villalta, Fernando; Kalams, Spyros A.; Dash, Chandravanu

    2015-01-01

    Substance abuse is a major barrier in eradication of the HIV epidemic because it serves as a powerful cofactor for viral transmission, disease progression, and AIDS-related mortality. Cocaine, one of the commonly abused drugs among HIV-1 patients, has been suggested to accelerate HIV disease progression. However, the underlying mechanism remains largely unknown. Therefore, we tested whether cocaine augments HIV-1–associated CD4+ T-cell decline, a predictor of HIV disease progression. We examined apoptosis of resting CD4+ T cells from HIV-1–negative and HIV-1–positive donors in our study, because decline of uninfected cells plays a major role in HIV-1 disease progression. Treatment of resting CD4+ T cells with cocaine (up to 100 μmol/L concentrations) did not induce apoptosis, but 200 to 1000 μmol/L cocaine induced apoptosis in a dose-dependent manner. Notably, treatment of CD4+ T cells isolated from healthy donors with both HIV-1 virions and cocaine significantly increased apoptosis compared with the apoptosis induced by cocaine or virions alone. Most important, our biochemical data suggest that cocaine induces CD4+ T-cell apoptosis by increasing intracellular reactive oxygen species levels and inducing mitochondrial depolarization. Collectively, our results provide evidence of a synergy between cocaine and HIV-1 on CD4+ T-cell apoptosis that may, in part, explain the accelerated disease observed in HIV-1–infected drug abusers. PMID:24486327

  12. HIV-1-induced AIDS in monkeys.

    PubMed

    Hatziioannou, Theodora; Del Prete, Gregory Q; Keele, Brandon F; Estes, Jacob D; McNatt, Matthew W; Bitzegeio, Julia; Raymond, Alice; Rodriguez, Anthony; Schmidt, Fabian; Mac Trubey, C; Smedley, Jeremy; Piatak, Michael; KewalRamani, Vineet N; Lifson, Jeffrey D; Bieniasz, Paul D

    2014-06-20

    Primate lentiviruses exhibit narrow host tropism, reducing the occurrence of zoonoses but also impairing the development of optimal animal models of AIDS. To delineate the factors limiting cross-species HIV-1 transmission, we passaged a modified HIV-1 in pigtailed macaques that were transiently depleted of CD8(+) cells during acute infection. During adaptation over four passages in macaques, HIV-1 acquired the ability to antagonize the macaque restriction factor tetherin, replicated at progressively higher levels, and ultimately caused marked CD4(+) T cell depletion and AIDS-defining conditions. Transient treatment with an antibody to CD8 during acute HIV-1 infection caused rapid progression to AIDS, whereas untreated animals exhibited an elite controller phenotype. Thus, an adapted HIV-1 can cause AIDS in macaques, and stark differences in outcome can be determined by immunological perturbations during early infection.

  13. GADD45 proteins inhibit HIV-1 replication through specific suppression of HIV-1 transcription.

    PubMed

    Liang, Zhibin; Liu, Ruikang; Zhang, Hui; Zhang, Suzhen; Hu, Xiaomei; Tan, Juan; Liang, Chen; Qiao, Wentao

    2016-06-01

    GADD45 proteins are a group of stress-induced proteins and participate in various cellular pathways including cell cycle regulation, cell survival and death, DNA repair and demethylation. It was recently shown that HIV-1 infection induces the expression of GADD45 proteins. However, the effect of GADD45 on HIV-1 replication has not been studied. Here, we report that overexpression of GADD45 proteins reduces HIV-1 production through suppressing transcription from the HIV-1 LTR promoter. This inhibitory effect is specific to HIV-1, since GADD45 proteins neither inhibit the LTR promoters from other retroviruses nor reduce the production of these viruses. Knockdown of endogenous GADD45 modestly activates HIV-1 in the J-Lat A72 latency cell line, which suggests GADD45 proteins might play a role in maintaining HIV-1 latency.

  14. Correlation of Naturally Occurring HIV-1 Resistance to DEB025 with Capsid Amino Acid Polymorphisms

    PubMed Central

    Gallay, Philippe A.; Ptak, Roger G.; Bobardt, Michael D.; Dumont, Jean-Maurice; Vuagniaux, Grégoire; Rosenwirth, Brigitte

    2013-01-01

    DEB025 (alisporivir) is a synthetic cyclosporine with inhibitory activity against human immunodeficiency virus type-1 (HIV-1) and hepatitis C virus (HCV). It binds to cyclophilin A (CypA) and blocks essential functions of CypA in the viral replication cycles of both viruses. DEB025 inhibits clinical HIV-1 isolates in vitro and decreases HIV-1 virus load in the majority of patients. HIV-1 isolates being naturally resistant to DEB025 have been detected in vitro and in nonresponder patients. By sequence analysis of their capsid protein (CA) region, two amino acid polymorphisms that correlated with DEB025 resistance were identified: H87Q and I91N, both located in the CypA-binding loop of the CA protein of HIV-1. The H87Q change was by far more abundant than I91N. Additional polymorphisms in the CypA-binding loop (positions 86, 91 and 96), as well as in the N-terminal loop of CA were detected in resistant isolates and are assumed to contribute to the degree of resistance. These amino acid changes may modulate the conformation of the CypA-binding loop of CA in such a way that binding and/or isomerase function of CypA are no longer necessary for virus replication. The resistant HIV-1 isolates thus are CypA-independent. PMID:23524389

  15. Adenoviral gene delivery for HIV-1 vaccination.

    PubMed

    Vanniasinkam, T; Ertl, H C J

    2005-04-01

    The AIDS epidemic continues to spread throughout nations of Africa and Asia and is by now threatening to undermine the already frail infrastructure of developing countries in Sub-Saharan Africa that are hit the hardest. The only option to stem this epidemic is through inexpensive and efficacious vaccines that prevent or at least blunt HIV-1 infections. Despite decades of pre-clinical and clinical research such vaccines remain elusive. Most anti-viral vaccines act by inducing protective levels of virus-neutralizing antibodies. The envelope protein of HIV-1, the sole target of neutralizing antibodies, is constantly changing due to mutations, B cell epitopes are masked by heavy glycosylation and the protein's structural unfolding upon binding to its CD4 receptor and chemokine co-receptors. Efforts to induce broadly cross-reactive virus-neutralizing antibodies able to induce sterilizing or near sterilizing immunity to HIV-1 have thus failed. Studies have indicated that cell-mediated immune responses and in particular CD8+ T cell responses to internal viral proteins may control HIV-1 infections without necessarily preventing them. Adenoviral vectors expressing antigens of HIV-1 are eminently suited to stimulate potent CD8+ T cell responses against transgene products, such as antigens of HIV-1. They performed well in pre-clinical studies in rodents and nonhuman primates and are currently in human clinical trials. This review summarizes the published literature on adenoviral vectors as vaccine carriers for HIV-1 and discusses advantages and disadvantages of this vaccine modality.

  16. Blocking HIV-1 entry by a gp120 surface binding inhibitor

    PubMed Central

    Tsou, Lun K.; Chen, Chin-Ho; Dutschman, Ginger E.

    2012-01-01

    We report the mode of action of a proteomimetic compound that binds to the exterior surface of gp120 and blocks HIV-1 entry into cells. Using a one cycle time-of-addition study and antibody competition binding studies, we have determined that the compound blocks HIV-1 entry through modulation of key protein-protein interactions mediated by gp120. The compound exhibits anti-HIV-1 replication activities against several pseudotype viruses derived from primary isolates and the resistant strains isolated from existing drug candidates with equal potency. Together, these data provide evidence that the proteomimetic compound represents a novel class of HIV-1 viral entry inhibitor that functions through protein surface recognition in analogy to an antibody. PMID:22487177

  17. Neuroinflammation and Behavior in HIV-1 Transgenic Rats Exposed to Chronic Adolescent Stress.

    PubMed

    Rowson, Sydney A; Harrell, Constance S; Bekhbat, Mandakh; Gangavelli, Apoorva; Wu, Matthew J; Kelly, Sean D; Reddy, Renuka; Neigh, Gretchen N

    2016-01-01

    Highly active antiretroviral therapy (HAART) has improved prognosis for people living with HIV (PLWH) and dramatically reduced the incidence of AIDS. However, even when viral load is controlled, PLWH develop psychiatric and neurological disorders more frequently than those living without HIV. Adolescents with HIV are particularly susceptible to the development of psychiatric illnesses and neurocognitive impairments. While both psychiatric and neurocognitive disorders have been found to be exacerbated by stress, the extent to which chronic stress and HIV-1 viral proteins interact to impact behavior and relevant neuroinflammatory processes is unknown. Determination of the individual contributions of stress and HIV to neuropsychiatric disorders is heavily confounded in humans. In order to isolate the influence of HIV-1 proteins and chronic stress on behavior and neuroinflammation, we employed the HIV-1 transgenic (Tg) rat model, which expresses HIV-1 proteins with a gag and pol deletion, allowing for viral protein expression without viral replication. This Tg line has been characterized as a model of HAART-controlled HIV-1 infection due to the lack of viral replication but continued presence of HIV-1 proteins. We exposed male and female adolescent HIV-1 Tg rats to a mixed-modality chronic stress paradigm consisting of isolation, social defeat and restraint, and assessed behavior, cerebral vascularization, and neuroinflammatory endpoints. Stress, sex, and presence of the HIV-1 transgene impacted weight gain in adolescent rats. Female HIV-1 Tg rats showed decreases in central tendency during the light cycle in the open field regardless of stress exposure. Both male and female HIV-1 Tg rats exhibited decreased investigative behavior in the novel object recognition task, but no memory impairments. Adolescent stress had no effect on the tested behaviors. Microglia in female HIV-1 Tg rats exhibited a hyper-ramified structure, and gene expression of complement factor B was

  18. Tailored enrichment strategy detects low abundant small noncoding RNAs in HIV-1 infected cells

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background The various classes of small noncoding RNAs (sncRNAs) are important regulators of gene expression across divergent types of organisms. While a rapidly increasing number of sncRNAs has been identified over recent years, the isolation of sncRNAs of low abundance remains challenging. Virally encoded sncRNAs, particularly those of RNA viruses, can be expressed at very low levels. This is best illustrated by HIV-1 where virus encoded sncRNAs represent approximately 0.1-1.0% of all sncRNAs in HIV-1 infected cells or were found to be undetected. Thus, we applied a novel, sequence targeted enrichment strategy to capture HIV-1 derived sncRNAs in HIV-1 infected primary CD4+ T-lymphocytes and macrophages that allows a greater than 100-fold enrichment of low abundant sncRNAs. Results Eight hundred and ninety-two individual HIV-1 sncRNAs were cloned and sequenced from nine different sncRNA libraries derived from five independent experiments. These clones represent up to 90% of all sncRNA clones in the generated libraries. Two hundred and sixteen HIV-1 sncRNAs were distinguishable as unique clones. They are spread throughout the HIV-1 genome, however, forming certain clusters, and almost 10% show an antisense orientation. The length of HIV-1 sncRNAs varies between 16 and 89 nucleotides with an unexpected peak at 31 to 50 nucleotides, thus, longer than cellular microRNAs or short-interfering RNAs (siRNAs). Exemplary HIV-1 sncRNAs were also generated in cells infected with different primary HIV-1 isolates and can inhibit HIV-1 replication. Conclusions HIV-1 infected cells generate virally encoded sncRNAs, which might play a role in the HIV-1 life cycle. Furthermore, the enormous capacity to enrich low abundance sncRNAs in a sequence specific manner highly recommends our selection strategy for any type of investigation where origin or target sequences of the sought-after sncRNAs are known. PMID:22458358

  19. Neuroinflammation and Behavior in HIV-1 Transgenic Rats Exposed to Chronic Adolescent Stress

    PubMed Central

    Rowson, Sydney A.; Harrell, Constance S.; Bekhbat, Mandakh; Gangavelli, Apoorva; Wu, Matthew J.; Kelly, Sean D.; Reddy, Renuka; Neigh, Gretchen N.

    2016-01-01

    Highly active antiretroviral therapy (HAART) has improved prognosis for people living with HIV (PLWH) and dramatically reduced the incidence of AIDS. However, even when viral load is controlled, PLWH develop psychiatric and neurological disorders more frequently than those living without HIV. Adolescents with HIV are particularly susceptible to the development of psychiatric illnesses and neurocognitive impairments. While both psychiatric and neurocognitive disorders have been found to be exacerbated by stress, the extent to which chronic stress and HIV-1 viral proteins interact to impact behavior and relevant neuroinflammatory processes is unknown. Determination of the individual contributions of stress and HIV to neuropsychiatric disorders is heavily confounded in humans. In order to isolate the influence of HIV-1 proteins and chronic stress on behavior and neuroinflammation, we employed the HIV-1 transgenic (Tg) rat model, which expresses HIV-1 proteins with a gag and pol deletion, allowing for viral protein expression without viral replication. This Tg line has been characterized as a model of HAART-controlled HIV-1 infection due to the lack of viral replication but continued presence of HIV-1 proteins. We exposed male and female adolescent HIV-1 Tg rats to a mixed-modality chronic stress paradigm consisting of isolation, social defeat and restraint, and assessed behavior, cerebral vascularization, and neuroinflammatory endpoints. Stress, sex, and presence of the HIV-1 transgene impacted weight gain in adolescent rats. Female HIV-1 Tg rats showed decreases in central tendency during the light cycle in the open field regardless of stress exposure. Both male and female HIV-1 Tg rats exhibited decreased investigative behavior in the novel object recognition task, but no memory impairments. Adolescent stress had no effect on the tested behaviors. Microglia in female HIV-1 Tg rats exhibited a hyper-ramified structure, and gene expression of complement factor B was

  20. Antiretroviral (HIV-1) activity of azulene derivatives.

    PubMed

    Peet, Julia; Selyutina, Anastasia; Bredihhin, Aleksei

    2016-04-15

    The antiretroviral activity of azulene derivatives was detected for the first time. A series of eighteen diversely substituted azulenes was synthesized and tested in vitro using HIV-1 based virus-like particles (VLPs) and infectious HIV-1 virus in U2OS and TZM-bl cell lines. Among the compounds tested, the 2-hydroxyazulenes demonstrated the most significant activity by inhibiting HIV-1 replication with IC50 of 2-10 and 8-20 μM for the VLPs and the infectious virus, respectively. These results indicate that azulene derivatives may be potentially useful candidates for the development of antiretroviral agents.

  1. The global spread of HIV-1 subtype B epidemic.

    PubMed

    Magiorkinis, Gkikas; Angelis, Konstantinos; Mamais, Ioannis; Katzourakis, Aris; Hatzakis, Angelos; Albert, Jan; Lawyer, Glenn; Hamouda, Osamah; Struck, Daniel; Vercauteren, Jurgen; Wensing, Annemarie; Alexiev, Ivailo; Åsjö, Birgitta; Balotta, Claudia; Gomes, Perpétua; Camacho, Ricardo J; Coughlan, Suzie; Griskevicius, Algirdas; Grossman, Zehava; Horban, Anders; Kostrikis, Leondios G; Lepej, Snjezana J; Liitsola, Kirsi; Linka, Marek; Nielsen, Claus; Otelea, Dan; Paredes, Roger; Poljak, Mario; Puchhammer-Stöckl, Elizabeth; Schmit, Jean Claude; Sönnerborg, Anders; Staneková, Danica; Stanojevic, Maja; Stylianou, Dora C; Boucher, Charles A B; Nikolopoulos, Georgios; Vasylyeva, Tetyana; Friedman, Samuel R; van de Vijver, David; Angarano, Gioacchino; Chaix, Marie-Laure; de Luca, Andrea; Korn, Klaus; Loveday, Clive; Soriano, Vincent; Yerly, Sabine; Zazzi, Mauricio; Vandamme, Anne-Mieke; Paraskevis, Dimitrios

    2016-12-01

    Human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) was discovered in the early 1980s when the virus had already established a pandemic. For at least three decades the epidemic in the Western World has been dominated by subtype B infections, as part of a sub-epidemic that traveled from Africa through Haiti to United States. However, the pattern of the subsequent spread still remains poorly understood. Here we analyze a large dataset of globally representative HIV-1 subtype B strains to map their spread around the world over the last 50years and describe significant spread patterns. We show that subtype B travelled from North America to Western Europe in different occasions, while Central/Eastern Europe remained isolated for the most part of the early epidemic. Looking with more detail in European countries we see that the United Kingdom, France and Switzerland exchanged viral isolates with non-European countries than with European ones. The observed pattern is likely to mirror geopolitical landmarks in the post-World War II era, namely the rise and the fall of the Iron Curtain and the European colonialism. In conclusion, HIV-1 spread through specific migration routes which are consistent with geopolitical factors that affected human activities during the last 50years, such as migration, tourism and trade. Our findings support the argument that epidemic control policies should be global and incorporate political and socioeconomic factors.

  2. Human Mucosal Mast Cells Capture HIV-1 and Mediate Viral trans-Infection of CD4+ T Cells

    PubMed Central

    Jiang, Ai-Ping; Jiang, Jin-Feng; Wei, Ji-Fu; Guo, Ming-Gao; Qin, Yan; Guo, Qian-Qian; Ma, Li; Liu, Bao-Chi; Wang, Xiaolei; Veazey, Ronald S.

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT The gastrointestinal mucosa is the primary site where human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) invades, amplifies, and becomes persistently established, and cell-to-cell transmission of HIV-1 plays a pivotal role in mucosal viral dissemination. Mast cells are widely distributed in the gastrointestinal tract and are early targets for invasive pathogens, and they have been shown to have increased density in the genital mucosa in HIV-infected women. Intestinal mast cells express numerous pathogen-associated molecular patterns (PAMPs) and have been shown to combat various viral, parasitic, and bacterial infections. However, the role of mast cells in HIV-1 infection is poorly defined. In this study, we investigated their potential contributions to HIV-1 transmission. Mast cells isolated from gut mucosal tissues were found to express a variety of HIV-1 attachment factors (HAFs), such as DC-SIGN, heparan sulfate proteoglycan (HSPG), and α4β7 integrin, which mediate capture of HIV-1 on the cell surface. Intriguingly, following coculture with CD4+ T cells, mast cell surface-bound viruses were efficiently transferred to target T cells. Prior blocking with anti-HAF antibody or mannan before coculture impaired viral trans-infection. Cell-cell conjunctions formed between mast cells and T cells, to which viral particles were recruited, and these were required for efficient cell-to-cell HIV-1 transmission. Our results reveal a potential function of gut mucosal mast cells in HIV-1 dissemination in tissues. Strategies aimed at preventing viral capture and transfer mediated by mast cells could be beneficial in combating primary HIV-1 infection. IMPORTANCE In this study, we demonstrate the role of human mast cells isolated from mucosal tissues in mediating HIV-1 trans-infection of CD4+ T cells. This finding facilitates our understanding of HIV-1 mucosal infection and will benefit the development of strategies to combat primary HIV-1 dissemination. PMID:26719250

  3. Drug-Induced Reactivation of Apoptosis Abrogates HIV-1 Infection

    PubMed Central

    Hanauske-Abel, Hartmut M.; Saxena, Deepti; Palumbo, Paul E.; Hanauske, Axel-Rainer; Luchessi, Augusto D.; Cambiaghi, Tavane D.; Hoque, Mainul; Spino, Michael; Gandolfi, Darlene D'Alliessi; Heller, Debra S.; Singh, Sukhwinder; Park, Myung Hee; Cracchiolo, Bernadette M.; Tricta, Fernando; Connelly, John; Popowicz, Anthony M.; Cone, Richard A.; Holland, Bart; Pe’ery, Tsafi; Mathews, Michael B.

    2013-01-01

    HIV-1 blocks apoptosis, programmed cell death, an innate defense of cells against viral invasion. However, apoptosis can be selectively reactivated in HIV-infected cells by chemical agents that interfere with HIV-1 gene expression. We studied two globally used medicines, the topical antifungal ciclopirox and the iron chelator deferiprone, for their effect on apoptosis in HIV-infected H9 cells and in peripheral blood mononuclear cells infected with clinical HIV-1 isolates. Both medicines activated apoptosis preferentially in HIV-infected cells, suggesting that the drugs mediate escape from the viral suppression of defensive apoptosis. In infected H9 cells, ciclopirox and deferiprone enhanced mitochondrial membrane depolarization, initiating the intrinsic pathway of apoptosis to execution, as evidenced by caspase-3 activation, poly(ADP-ribose) polymerase proteolysis, DNA degradation, and apoptotic cell morphology. In isolate-infected peripheral blood mononuclear cells, ciclopirox collapsed HIV-1 production to the limit of viral protein and RNA detection. Despite prolonged monotherapy, ciclopirox did not elicit breakthrough. No viral re-emergence was observed even 12 weeks after drug cessation, suggesting elimination of the proviral reservoir. Tests in mice predictive for cytotoxicity to human epithelia did not detect tissue damage or activation of apoptosis at a ciclopirox concentration that exceeded by orders of magnitude the concentration causing death of infected cells. We infer that ciclopirox and deferiprone act via therapeutic reclamation of apoptotic proficiency (TRAP) in HIV-infected cells and trigger their preferential elimination. Perturbations in viral protein expression suggest that the antiretroviral activity of both drugs stems from their ability to inhibit hydroxylation of cellular proteins essential for apoptosis and for viral infection, exemplified by eIF5A. Our findings identify ciclopirox and deferiprone as prototypes of selectively cytocidal

  4. Improved quantification of HIV-1-infected CD4+ T cells using an optimised method of intracellular HIV-1 gag p24 antigen detection.

    PubMed

    Yang, Hongbing; Yorke, Elisabeth; Hancock, Gemma; Clutton, Genevieve; Sande, Nellia; Angus, Brian; Smyth, Redmond; Mak, Johnson; Dorrell, Lucy

    2013-05-31

    The capacity of CD8+ T cells to inhibit HIV-1 replication in vitro strongly correlates with virus control in vivo. Post-hoc evaluations of HIV-1 vaccine candidates suggest that this immunological parameter is a promising benchmark of vaccine efficacy. Large-scale analysis of CD8+ T cell antiviral activity requires a rapid, robust and economical assay for accurate quantification of HIV-1 infection in primary CD4+ T cells. Detection of intracellular HIV-1 p24 antigen (p24 Ag) by flow cytometry is one such method but it is thought to be less sensitive and quantitative than p24 Ag ELISA. We report that fixation and permeabilisation of HIV-infected cells using paraformaldehyde/50% methanol/Nonidet P-40 instead of a conventional paraformaldehyde/saponin-based protocol improved their detection across multiplicities of infection (MOI) ranging from 10(-2) to 8×10(-5), and by nearly two-fold (p<0.001) at the optimal MOI tested (10(-2)). The frequency of infected cells was strongly correlated with p24 Ag release during culture, thus validating its use as a measure of productive infection. We were also able to quantify infection with a panel of HIV-1 isolates representing the major clades. The protocol described here is rapid and cost-effective compared with ELISA and thus could be a useful component of immune monitoring of HIV-1 vaccines and interventions to reduce viral reservoirs.

  5. HIV-1 Eradication: Early Trials (and Tribulations).

    PubMed

    Spivak, Adam M; Planelles, Vicente

    2016-01-01

    Antiretroviral therapy (ART) has rendered HIV-1 infection a manageable illness for those with access to treatment. However, ART does not lead to viral eradication owing to the persistence of replication-competent, unexpressed proviruses in long-lived cellular reservoirs. The potential for long-term drug toxicities and the lack of access to ART for most people living with HIV-1 infection have fueled scientific interest in understanding the nature of this latent reservoir. Exploration of HIV-1 persistence at the cellular and molecular level in resting memory CD4(+) T cells, the predominant viral reservoir in patients on ART, has uncovered potential strategies to reverse latency. We review recent advances in pharmacologically based 'shock and kill' HIV-1 eradication strategies, including comparative analysis of early clinical trials.

  6. Design and characterization of a peptide mimotope of the HIV-1 gp120 bridging sheet.

    PubMed

    Schiavone, Marco; Fiume, Giuseppe; Caivano, Antonella; de Laurentiis, Annamaria; Falcone, Cristina; Masci, Francesca Fasanella; Iaccino, Enrico; Mimmi, Selena; Palmieri, Camillo; Pisano, Antonio; Pontoriero, Marilena; Rossi, Annalisa; Scialdone, Annarita; Vecchio, Eleonora; Andreozzi, Concetta; Trovato, Maria; Rafay, Jan; Ferko, Boris; Montefiori, David; Lombardi, Angela; Morsica, Giulia; Poli, Guido; Quinto, Ileana; Pavone, Vincenzo; de Berardinis, Piergiuseppe; Scala, Giuseppe

    2012-01-01

    The Bridging Sheet domain of HIV-1 gp120 is highly conserved among the HIV-1 strains and allows HIV-1 binding to host cells via the HIV-1 coreceptors. Further, the bridging sheet domain is a major target to neutralize HIV-1 infection. We rationally designed four linear peptide epitopes that mimic the three-dimensional structure of bridging sheet by using molecular modeling. Chemically synthesized peptides BS3 and BS4 showed a fair degree of antigenicity when tested in ELISA with IgG purified from HIV(+) broadly neutralizing sera while the production of synthetic peptides BS1 and BS2 failed due to their high degree of hydrophobicity. To overcome this limitation, we linked all four BS peptides to the COOH-terminus of GST protein to test both their antigenicity and immunogenicity. Only the BS1 peptide showed good antigenicity; however, no envelope specific antibodies were elicited upon mice immunization. Therefore we performed further analyses by linking BS1 peptide to the NH2-terminus of the E2 scaffold from the Geobacillus Stearothermophylus PDH complex. The E2-BS1 fusion peptide showed good antigenic results, however only one immunized rabbit elicited good antibody titers towards both the monomeric and oligomeric viral envelope glycoprotein (Env). In addition, moderate neutralizing antibodies response was elicited against two HIV-1 clade B and one clade C primary isolates. These preliminary data validate the peptide mimotope approach as a promising tool to obtain an effective HIV-1 vaccine.

  7. Broadly Neutralizing Antibodies against HIV-1 As a Novel Aspect of the Immune Response.

    PubMed

    Shcherbakov, D N; Bakulina, A Y; Karpenko, L I; Ilyichev, A A

    2015-01-01

    The human immunodeficiency virus-1 (HIV-1) has the ability to evade the adaptive immune response due to high mutation rates. Soon after the discovery of HIV-1, it was originally proposed that neutralizing of antibodies to the virus occurs rarely or cannot be elicited at all. In the 1990s, there appeared reports that sera of select HIV-1-infected individuals contained antibodies capable of neutralizing different virus subtypes. Such antibodies were named broadly neutralizing antibodies (bNAbs). Since 2009, the development of new cell technologies has intensified research efforts directed at identifying new bNAbs with a neutralization potency of over 90% of primary HIV-1 isolates. These antibodies have unique characteristics which include high levels of somatic mutations and unusually long variable loops that penetrate through the glycan shield of HIV-1 Env to contact the protein surface. In this review, we will attempt to summarize the latest data on bNAbs against HIV-1 in terms of their interactions with the sites of vulnerability on HIV-1 glycoproteins.

  8. Natural Plant Alkaloid (Emetine) Inhibits HIV-1 Replication by Interfering with Reverse Transcriptase Activity.

    PubMed

    Chaves Valadão, Ana Luiza; Abreu, Celina Monteiro; Dias, Juliana Zanatta; Arantes, Pablo; Verli, Hugo; Tanuri, Amilcar; de Aguiar, Renato Santana

    2015-06-22

    Ipecac alkaloids are secondary metabolites produced in the medicinal plant Psychotria ipecacuanha. Emetine is the main alkaloid of ipecac and one of the active compounds in syrup of Ipecac with emetic property. Here we evaluated emetine's potential as an antiviral agent against Human Immunodeficiency Virus. We performed in vitro Reverse Transcriptase (RT) Assay and Natural Endogenous Reverse Transcriptase Activity Assay (NERT) to evaluate HIV RT inhibition. Emetine molecular docking on HIV-1 RT was also analyzed. Phenotypic assays were performed in non-lymphocytic and in Peripheral Blood Mononuclear Cells (PBMC) with HIV-1 wild-type and HIV-harboring RT-resistant mutation to Nucleoside Reverse Transcriptase Inhibitors (M184V). Our results showed that HIV-1 RT was blocked in the presence of emetine in both models: in vitro reactions with isolated HIV-1 RT and intravirion, measured by NERT. Emetine revealed a strong potential of inhibiting HIV-1 replication in both cellular models, reaching 80% of reduction in HIV-1 infection, with low cytotoxic effect. Emetine also blocked HIV-1 infection of RT M184V mutant. These results suggest that emetine is able to penetrate in intact HIV particles, and bind and block reverse transcription reaction, suggesting that it can be used as anti-HIV microbicide. Taken together, our findings provide additional pharmacological information on the potential therapeutic effects of emetine.

  9. Broadly Neutralizing Antibodies against HIV-1 As a Novel Aspect of the Immune Response

    PubMed Central

    Shcherbakov, D. N.; Bakulina, A. Y.; Karpenko, L. I.; Ilyichev, A. A.

    2015-01-01

    The human immunodeficiency virus-1 (HIV-1) has the ability to evade the adaptive immune response due to high mutation rates. Soon after the discovery of HIV-1, it was originally proposed that neutralizing of antibodies to the virus occurs rarely or cannot be elicited at all. In the 1990s, there appeared reports that sera of select HIV-1-infected individuals contained antibodies capable of neutralizing different virus subtypes. Such antibodies were named broadly neutralizing antibodies (bNAbs). Since 2009, the development of new cell technologies has intensified research efforts directed at identifying new bNAbs with a neutralization potency of over 90% of primary HIV-1 isolates. These antibodies have unique characteristics which include high levels of somatic mutations and unusually long variable loops that penetrate through the glycan shield of HIV-1 Env to contact the protein surface. In this review, we will attempt to summarize the latest data on bNAbs against HIV-1 in terms of their interactions with the sites of vulnerability on HIV-1 glycoproteins. PMID:26798488

  10. Substance abuse, HIV-1 and hepatitis.

    PubMed

    Parikh, Nirzari; Nonnemacher, Michael R; Pirrone, Vanessa; Block, Timothy; Mehta, Anand; Wigdahl, Brian

    2012-10-01

    During the course of human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) disease, the virus has been shown to effectively escape the immune response with the subsequent establishment of latent viral reservoirs in specific cell populations within the peripheral blood (PB) and associated lymphoid tissues, bone marrow (BM), brain, and potentially other end organs. HIV-1, along with hepatitis B and C viruses (HBV and HCV), are known to share similar routes of transmission, including intravenous drug use, blood transfusions, sexual intercourse, and perinatal exposure. Substance abuse, including the use of opioids and cocaine, is a significant risk factor for exposure to HIV-1 and the development of acquired immune deficiency syndrome, as well as HBV and HCV exposure, infection, and disease. Thus, coinfection with HIV-1 and HBV or HCV is common and may be impacted by chronic substance abuse during the course of disease. HIV- 1 impacts the natural course of HBV and HCV infection by accelerating the progression of HBV/HCV-associated liver disease toward end-stage cirrhosis and quantitative depletion of the CD4+ T-cell compartment. HBV or HCV coinfection with HIV-1 is also associated with increased mortality when compared to either infection alone. This review focuses on the impact of substance abuse and coinfection with HBV and HCV in the PB, BM, and brain on the HIV-1 pathogenic process as it relates to viral pathogenesis, disease progression, and the associated immune response during the course of this complex interplay. The impact of HIV-1 and substance abuse on hepatitis virus-induced disease is also a focal point.

  11. HIV-1 transmission linkage in an HIV-1 prevention clinical trial

    SciTech Connect

    Leitner, Thomas; Campbell, Mary S; Mullins, James I; Hughes, James P; Wong, Kim G; Raugi, Dana N; Scrensen, Stefanie

    2009-01-01

    HIV-1 sequencing has been used extensively in epidemiologic and forensic studies to investigate patterns of HIV-1 transmission. However, the criteria for establishing genetic linkage between HIV-1 strains in HIV-1 prevention trials have not been formalized. The Partners in Prevention HSV/HIV Transmission Study (ClinicaITrials.gov NCT00194519) enrolled 3408 HIV-1 serodiscordant heterosexual African couples to determine the efficacy of genital herpes suppression with acyclovir in reducing HIV-1 transmission. The trial analysis required laboratory confirmation of HIV-1 linkage between enrolled partners in couples in which seroconversion occurred. Here we describe the process and results from HIV-1 sequencing studies used to perform transmission linkage determination in this clinical trial. Consensus Sanger sequencing of env (C2-V3-C3) and gag (p17-p24) genes was performed on plasma HIV-1 RNA from both partners within 3 months of seroconversion; env single molecule or pyrosequencing was also performed in some cases. For linkage, we required monophyletic clustering between HIV-1 sequences in the transmitting and seroconverting partners, and developed a Bayesian algorithm using genetic distances to evaluate the posterior probability of linkage of participants sequences. Adjudicators classified transmissions as linked, unlinked, or indeterminate. Among 151 seroconversion events, we found 108 (71.5%) linked, 40 (26.5%) unlinked, and 3 (2.0%) to have indeterminate transmissions. Nine (8.3%) were linked by consensus gag sequencing only and 8 (7.4%) required deep sequencing of env. In this first use of HIV-1 sequencing to establish endpoints in a large clinical trial, more than one-fourth of transmissions were unlinked to the enrolled partner, illustrating the relevance of these methods in the design of future HIV-1 prevention trials in serodiscordant couples. A hierarchy of sequencing techniques, analysis methods, and expert adjudication contributed to the linkage

  12. Exosomes: Implications in HIV-1 Pathogenesis.

    PubMed

    Madison, Marisa N; Okeoma, Chioma M

    2015-07-20

    Exosomes are membranous nanovesicles of endocytic origin that carry host and pathogen derived genomic, proteomic, and lipid cargos. Exosomes are secreted by most cell types into the extracellular milieu and are subsequently internalized by recipient cells. Upon internalization, exosomes condition recipient cells by donating their cargos and/or activating various signal transduction pathways, consequently regulating physiological and pathophysiological processes. The role of exosomes in viral pathogenesis, especially human immunodeficiency virus type 1 [HIV-1] is beginning to unravel. Recent research reports suggest that exosomes from various sources play important but different roles in the pathogenesis of HIV-1. From these reports, it appears that the source of exosomes is the defining factor for the exosomal effect on HIV-1. In this review, we will describe how HIV-1 infection is modulated by exosomes and in turn how exosomes are targeted by HIV-1 factors. Finally, we will discuss potentially emerging therapeutic options based on exosomal cargos that may have promise in preventing HIV-1 transmission.

  13. Exosomes: Implications in HIV-1 Pathogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Madison, Marisa N.; Okeoma, Chioma M.

    2015-01-01

    Exosomes are membranous nanovesicles of endocytic origin that carry host and pathogen derived genomic, proteomic, and lipid cargos. Exosomes are secreted by most cell types into the extracellular milieu and are subsequently internalized by recipient cells. Upon internalization, exosomes condition recipient cells by donating their cargos and/or activating various signal transduction pathways, consequently regulating physiological and pathophysiological processes. The role of exosomes in viral pathogenesis, especially human immunodeficiency virus type 1 [HIV-1] is beginning to unravel. Recent research reports suggest that exosomes from various sources play important but different roles in the pathogenesis of HIV-1. From these reports, it appears that the source of exosomes is the defining factor for the exosomal effect on HIV-1. In this review, we will describe how HIV-1 infection is modulated by exosomes and in turn how exosomes are targeted by HIV-1 factors. Finally, we will discuss potentially emerging therapeutic options based on exosomal cargos that may have promise in preventing HIV-1 transmission. PMID:26205405

  14. Sialoadhesin Expressed on IFN-Induced Monocytes Binds HIV-1 and Enhances Infectivity

    PubMed Central

    Rempel, Hans; Calosing, Cyrus; Sun, Bing; Pulliam, Lynn

    2008-01-01

    Background HIV-1 infection dysregulates the immune system and alters gene expression in circulating monocytes. Differential gene expression analysis of CD14+ monocytes from subjects infected with HIV-1 revealed increased expression of sialoadhesin (Sn, CD169, Siglec 1), a cell adhesion molecule first described in a subset of macrophages activated in chronic inflammatory diseases. Methodology/Principal Findings We analyzed sialoadhesin expression on CD14+ monocytes by flow cytometry and found significantly higher expression in subjects with elevated viral loads compared to subjects with undetectable viral loads. In cultured CD14+ monocytes isolated from healthy individuals, sialoadhesin expression was induced by interferon-α and interferon-γ but not tumor necrosis factor-α. Using a stringent binding assay, sialoadhesin-expressing monocytes adsorbed HIV-1 through interaction with the sialic acid residues on the viral envelope glycoprotein gp120. Furthermore, monocytes expressing sialoadhesin facilitated HIV-1 trans infection of permissive cells, which occurred in the absence of monocyte self-infection. Conclusions/Significance Increased sialoadhesin expression on CD14+ monocytes occurred in response to HIV-1 infection with maximum expression associated with high viral load. We show that interferons induce sialoadhesin in primary CD14+ monocytes, which is consistent with an antiviral response during viremia. Our findings suggest that circulating sialoadhesin-expressing monocytes are capable of binding HIV-1 and effectively delivering virus to target cells thereby enhancing the distribution of HIV-1. Sialoadhesin could disseminate HIV-1 to viral reservoirs during monocyte immunosurveillance or migration to sites of inflammation and then facilitate HIV-1 infection of permissive cells. PMID:18414664

  15. Bone marrow plasma cells are a primary source of serum HIV-1-specific antibodies in chronically infected individuals.

    PubMed

    Montezuma-Rusca, Jairo M; Moir, Susan; Kardava, Lela; Buckner, Clarisa M; Louie, Aaron; Kim, Leo J Y; Santich, Brian H; Wang, Wei; Fankuchen, Olivia R; Diaz, Gabriella; Daub, Janine R; Rosenzweig, Sergio D; Chun, Tae-Wook; Li, Yuxing; Braylan, Raul C; Calvo, Katherine R; Fauci, Anthony S

    2015-03-15

    Several potent and broadly neutralizing Abs to HIV-1 have been isolated recently from peripheral blood B cells of infected individuals, based on prescreening of Ab activity in the serum. However, little is known regarding the cells that make the Abs that circulate in the blood. Accordingly, we investigated the most likely source, the bone marrow, of chronically HIV-1-infected individuals who were not receiving antiretroviral therapy. Increased frequencies of plasma cells, as well as B cell precursors, namely preB-I and preB-II, and decreased frequencies of mature B cells were observed in bone marrow aspirates of these individuals compared with HIV-negative counterparts. Increased frequencies of bone marrow plasma cells are consistent with known hallmarks of HIV-1 infection, namely hypergammaglobulinemia and increased frequencies of peripheral blood plasmablasts. Levels of HIV-1 envelope (Env)-binding and HIV-1-neutralizing Abs were measured in serum, and corresponding frequencies of Ab-secreting or Env-binding cells were measured in the blood (plasmablasts and memory B cells) and in the bone marrow (plasma cells). A strong correlation was observed between serum HIV-1-specific Abs and Env-specific bone marrow-derived plasma cells, but not circulating plasmablasts or memory B cells. These findings demonstrate that, despite HIV-1-induced phenotypic and functional B cell dysregulation in the peripheral blood and secondary lymphoid tissues, bone marrow plasma cells remain a primary source for circulating HIV-1-specific Abs in HIV-1-infected individuals.

  16. In vitro anti-HIV-1 activity of fucoidan from Sargassum swartzii.

    PubMed

    Dinesh, Subramaniam; Menon, Thangam; Hanna, Luke E; Suresh, V; Sathuvan, M; Manikannan, M

    2016-01-01

    Sargassum swartzii, a marine brown algae with wide range of biological properties belongs to the family Sargassaceae. Bioactive fucoidan fractions (CFF, FF1 and FF2) were isolated from S. swartzii and characterized by linear gradient anion-exchange chromatography and FT-IR. The characterized fucoidan fractions contained mainly sugars, sulfate and uronic acid. In the present study, anti-HIV-1 property of the fucoidan fractions was investigated. Fraction FF2 was found to exhibit significant anti-HIV-1 activity at concentrations of 1.56 and 6.25 μg/ml as observed by >50% reduction in HIV-1 p24 antigen levels and reverse transcriptase activity. Fucoidan fractions have no cytotoxic effects on PBMCs at the concentration range of 1.56-1000 μg/ml. These results suggest that fucoidan fractions could have inhibitory activity against HIV and has potential as an anti-HIV-1 agent.

  17. Co-evolution of a broadly neutralizing HIV-1 antibody and founder virus.

    PubMed

    Liao, Hua-Xin; Lynch, Rebecca; Zhou, Tongqing; Gao, Feng; Alam, S Munir; Boyd, Scott D; Fire, Andrew Z; Roskin, Krishna M; Schramm, Chaim A; Zhang, Zhenhai; Zhu, Jiang; Shapiro, Lawrence; Mullikin, James C; Gnanakaran, S; Hraber, Peter; Wiehe, Kevin; Kelsoe, Garnett; Yang, Guang; Xia, Shi-Mao; Montefiori, David C; Parks, Robert; Lloyd, Krissey E; Scearce, Richard M; Soderberg, Kelly A; Cohen, Myron; Kamanga, Gift; Louder, Mark K; Tran, Lillian M; Chen, Yue; Cai, Fangping; Chen, Sheri; Moquin, Stephanie; Du, Xiulian; Joyce, M Gordon; Srivatsan, Sanjay; Zhang, Baoshan; Zheng, Anqi; Shaw, George M; Hahn, Beatrice H; Kepler, Thomas B; Korber, Bette T M; Kwong, Peter D; Mascola, John R; Haynes, Barton F

    2013-04-25

    Current human immunodeficiency virus-1 (HIV-1) vaccines elicit strain-specific neutralizing antibodies. However, cross-reactive neutralizing antibodies arise in approximately 20% of HIV-1-infected individuals, and details of their generation could provide a blueprint for effective vaccination. Here we report the isolation, evolution and structure of a broadly neutralizing antibody from an African donor followed from the time of infection. The mature antibody, CH103, neutralized approximately 55% of HIV-1 isolates, and its co-crystal structure with the HIV-1 envelope protein gp120 revealed a new loop-based mechanism of CD4-binding-site recognition. Virus and antibody gene sequencing revealed concomitant virus evolution and antibody maturation. Notably, the unmutated common ancestor of the CH103 lineage avidly bound the transmitted/founder HIV-1 envelope glycoprotein, and evolution of antibody neutralization breadth was preceded by extensive viral diversification in and near the CH103 epitope. These data determine the viral and antibody evolution leading to induction of a lineage of HIV-1 broadly neutralizing antibodies, and provide insights into strategies to elicit similar antibodies by vaccination.

  18. Relative resistance of HIV-1 founder viruses to control by interferon-alpha

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Following mucosal human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) transmission, type 1 interferons (IFNs) are rapidly induced at sites of initial virus replication in the mucosa and draining lymph nodes. However, the role played by IFN-stimulated antiviral activity in restricting HIV-1 replication during the initial stages of infection is not clear. We hypothesized that if type 1 IFNs exert selective pressure on HIV-1 replication in the earliest stages of infection, the founder viruses that succeed in establishing systemic infection would be more IFN-resistant than viruses replicating during chronic infection, when type 1 IFNs are produced at much lower levels. To address this hypothesis, the relative resistance of virus isolates derived from HIV-1-infected individuals during acute and chronic infection to control by type 1 IFNs was analysed. Results The replication of plasma virus isolates generated from subjects acutely infected with HIV-1 and molecularly cloned founder HIV-1 strains could be reduced but not fully suppressed by type 1 IFNs in vitro. The mean IC50 value for IFNα2 (22 U/ml) was lower than that for IFNβ (346 U/ml), although at maximally-inhibitory concentrations both IFN subtypes inhibited virus replication to similar extents. Individual virus isolates exhibited differential susceptibility to inhibition by IFNα2 and IFNβ, likely reflecting variation in resistance to differentially up-regulated IFN-stimulated genes. Virus isolates from subjects acutely infected with HIV-1 were significantly more resistant to in vitro control by IFNα than virus isolates generated from the same individuals during chronic, asymptomatic infection. Viral IFN resistance declined rapidly after the acute phase of infection: in five subjects, viruses derived from six-month consensus molecular clones were significantly more sensitive to the antiviral effects of IFNs than the corresponding founder viruses. Conclusions The establishment of systemic HIV-1 infection by

  19. Semen Bacterial Concentrations and HIV-1 RNA Shedding Among HIV-1–Seropositive Kenyan Men

    PubMed Central

    Srinivasan, Sujatha; Huang, Dandi; Ko, Daisy L.; Sanders, Eduard J.; Peshu, Norbert M.; Krieger, John N.; Muller, Charles H.; Coombs, Robert W.; Fredricks, David N.; Graham, Susan M.

    2017-01-01

    Introduction: HIV-1 is transmitted through semen from men to their sexual partners. Genital infections can increase HIV-1 RNA shedding in semen, but shedding also occurs in the absence of typical pathogens. We hypothesized that higher bacterial concentrations in semen would be associated with higher HIV-1 RNA levels. Methods: We analyzed semen samples from 42 HIV-1–seropositive Kenyan men using quantitative polymerase chain reaction (PCR) to assess bacterial concentrations and real-time PCR to measure HIV-1 RNA levels. Generalized estimation equations were used to evaluate associations between these 2 measures. Broad-range 16S rRNA gene PCR with pyrosequencing was performed on a subset of 13 samples to assess bacterial community composition. Results: Bacteria were detected in 96.6% of 88 samples by quantitative PCR. Semen bacterial concentration and HIV-1 RNA levels were correlated 0.30 (P = 0.01). The association between bacterial concentration and HIV-1 RNA detection was not significant after adjustment for antiretroviral therapy (ART) (adjusted odds ratio: 1.27, 95% CI: 0.84 to 1.91). Factors associated with semen bacterial concentration included insertive anal sex (adjusted beta 0.92, 95% CI: 0.12 to 1.73) and ART use (adjusted beta: −0.77, 95% CI: −1.50 to 0.04). Among 13 samples with pyrosequencing data, Corynebacterium spp., Staphylococcus spp., and Streptococcus spp. were most frequently detected. Conclusion: Most of these HIV-1–infected men had bacteria in their semen. ART use was associated with undetectable semen HIV-1 RNA and lower semen bacterial concentrations, whereas insertive anal sex was associated with higher bacterial concentrations. Additional studies evaluating the relationship between semen bacteria, inflammation, mucosal immunity, and HIV-1 shedding are needed to understand implications for HIV-1 transmission. PMID:27861240

  20. Cyclophilin A is required for the replication of group M human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) and simian immunodeficiency virus SIV(CPZ)GAB but not group O HIV-1 or other primate immunodeficiency viruses.

    PubMed Central

    Braaten, D; Franke, E K; Luban, J

    1996-01-01

    The human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) Gag polyprotein binds to cyclophilin A and incorporates this cellular peptidyl prolyl-isomerase into virions. Disruption of cyclophilin A incorporation, either by gag mutations or by cyclosporine A, inhibits virion infectivity, indicating that cyclophilin A plays an essential role in the HIV-1 life cycle. Using assays for packaging of cyclophilin A into virions and for viral replication sensitivity to cyclosporine A, as well as information gleaned from the alignment of Gag residues encoded by representative viral isolates, we demonstrate that of the five lineages of primate immunodeficiency viruses, only HIV-1 requires cyclophilin A for replication. Cloned viral isolates from clades A, B, and D of HIV-1 group M, as well as a phylogenetically related isolate from chimpanzee, all require cyclophilin A for replication. In contrast, the replication of two outlier (group O) HIV-1 isolates is unaffected by concentrations of cyclosporine A which disrupt cyclophilin A incorporation into virions, indicating that these viruses are capable of replicating independently of cyclophilin A. These studies identify the first phenotypic difference between HIV-1 group M and group O and are consistent with phylogenetic studies suggesting that the two HIV-1 groups were introduced into human populations via separate zoonotic transmission events. PMID:8676442

  1. N6-methyladenosine of HIV-1 RNA regulates viral infection and HIV-1 Gag protein expression

    PubMed Central

    Tirumuru, Nagaraja; Zhao, Boxuan Simen; Lu, Wuxun; Lu, Zhike; He, Chuan; Wu, Li

    2016-01-01

    The internal N6-methyladenosine (m6A) methylation of eukaryotic nuclear RNA controls post-transcriptional gene expression, which is regulated by methyltransferases (writers), demethylases (erasers), and m6A-binding proteins (readers) in cells. The YTH domain family proteins (YTHDF1–3) bind to m6A-modified cellular RNAs and affect RNA metabolism and processing. Here, we show that YTHDF1–3 proteins recognize m6A-modified HIV-1 RNA and inhibit HIV-1 infection in cell lines and primary CD4+ T-cells. We further mapped the YTHDF1–3 binding sites in HIV-1 RNA from infected cells. We found that the overexpression of YTHDF proteins in cells inhibited HIV-1 infection mainly by decreasing HIV-1 reverse transcription, while knockdown of YTHDF1–3 in cells had the opposite effects. Moreover, silencing the m6A writers decreased HIV-1 Gag protein expression in virus-producing cells, while silencing the m6A erasers increased Gag expression. Our findings suggest an important role of m6A modification of HIV-1 RNA in viral infection and HIV-1 protein synthesis. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.15528.001 PMID:27371828

  2. Specific Elimination of Latently HIV-1 Infected Cells Using HIV-1 Protease-Sensitive Toxin Nanocapsules

    PubMed Central

    Wen, Jing; Yan, Ming; Liu, Yang; Li, Jie; Xie, Yiming; Lu, Yunfeng; Kamata, Masakazu; Chen, Irvin S. Y.

    2016-01-01

    Anti-retroviral drugs suppress HIV-1 plasma viremia to undetectable levels; however, latent HIV-1 persists in reservoirs within HIV-1-infected patients. The silent provirus can be activated through the use of drugs, including protein kinase C activators and histone deacetylase inhibitors. This “shock” approach is then followed by “kill” of the producing cells either through direct HIV-1-induced cell death or natural immune mechanisms. However, these mechanisms are relatively slow and effectiveness is unclear. Here, we develop an approach to specifically target and kill cells that are activated early in the process of virus production. We utilize a novel nanocapsule technology whereby the ricin A chain is encapsulated in an inactive form within a polymer shell. Specificity for release of the ricin A toxin is conferred by peptide crosslinkers that are sensitive to cleavage by HIV-1 protease. By using well-established latent infection models, J-Lat and U1 cells, we demonstrate that only within an HIV-1-producing cell expressing functional HIV-1 protease will the nanocapsule release its ricin A cargo, shutting down viral and cellular protein synthesis, and ultimately leading to rapid death of the producer cell. Thus, we provide proof of principle for a novel technology to kill HIV-1-producing cells without effects on non-target cells. PMID:27049645

  3. Specific Elimination of Latently HIV-1 Infected Cells Using HIV-1 Protease-Sensitive Toxin Nanocapsules.

    PubMed

    Wen, Jing; Yan, Ming; Liu, Yang; Li, Jie; Xie, Yiming; Lu, Yunfeng; Kamata, Masakazu; Chen, Irvin S Y

    2016-01-01

    Anti-retroviral drugs suppress HIV-1 plasma viremia to undetectable levels; however, latent HIV-1 persists in reservoirs within HIV-1-infected patients. The silent provirus can be activated through the use of drugs, including protein kinase C activators and histone deacetylase inhibitors. This "shock" approach is then followed by "kill" of the producing cells either through direct HIV-1-induced cell death or natural immune mechanisms. However, these mechanisms are relatively slow and effectiveness is unclear. Here, we develop an approach to specifically target and kill cells that are activated early in the process of virus production. We utilize a novel nanocapsule technology whereby the ricin A chain is encapsulated in an inactive form within a polymer shell. Specificity for release of the ricin A toxin is conferred by peptide crosslinkers that are sensitive to cleavage by HIV-1 protease. By using well-established latent infection models, J-Lat and U1 cells, we demonstrate that only within an HIV-1-producing cell expressing functional HIV-1 protease will the nanocapsule release its ricin A cargo, shutting down viral and cellular protein synthesis, and ultimately leading to rapid death of the producer cell. Thus, we provide proof of principle for a novel technology to kill HIV-1-producing cells without effects on non-target cells.

  4. Platelets and erythrocyte-bound platelets bind infectious HIV-1 in plasma of chronically infected patients.

    PubMed

    Beck, Zoltan; Jagodzinski, Linda L; Eller, Michael A; Thelian, Doris; Matyas, Gary R; Kunz, Anjali N; Alving, Carl R

    2013-01-01

    Chronic HIV-1 infection is associated with persistent viremia in most patients, but it remains unclear how free virus may survive the potential hostile effects of plasma. We investigated whether sites might exist on the surfaces of circulating blood cells for protection of infectious HIV-1 particles. Red blood cells (RBC) either from blood of uninfected normal individuals, or from blood obtained without EDTA from chronically infected HIV-1 patients, invariably contained a small number of RBC having attached platelets as determined by flow cytometry, light microscopy, and immunofluorescence microscopy. After mixing normal RBC with platelet-rich plasma, discrete populations of RBC, platelets, and complexes of platelets attached to RBC were purified by fluorescence-activated cell sorting. Upon incubation of purified cells or platelets with HIV-1 followed by washing and co-incubation with CD4-positive peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC), platelets, and platelet-RBC complexes, but not platelet-free RBC, caused infection of PBMC. Infection was prevented by pre-treating the platelet-RBC complexes with EDTA. Plasma and RBC (comprising a RBC/platelet-RBC mixture) from chronically infected patients with low viral loads were also co-incubated with PBMC ex vivo to determine the presence of infectious HIV-1. All freshly isolated plasmas from the HIV-1-infected donors, obtained in the absence of anticoagulant, were noninfectious. Interestingly, the RBC from most of the patients caused cell-cell infection of PBMC that was prevented by stripping the RBC with EDTA. A monoclonal antibody to DC-SIGN partially inhibited cell-cell HIV-1 infection of PBMC by normal RBC pre-incubated with platelets and HIV-1. We conclude: (a) platelet-free EDTA-free plasma from chronically infected HIV-1 patients, although containing viral RNA, is an environment that lacks detectable infectious HIV-1; (b) platelets and platelet-RBC complexes, but not purified RBC, bind infectious HIV-1; (c) DC

  5. Initial antibodies binding to HIV-1 gp41 in acutely infected subjects are polyreactive and highly mutated

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Xi; Munshaw, Supriya; Zhang, Ruijun; Marshall, Dawn J.; Vandergrift, Nathan; Whitesides, John F.; Lu, Xiaozhi; Yu, Jae-Sung; Hwang, Kwan-Ki; Gao, Feng; Markowitz, Martin; Heath, Sonya L.; Bar, Katharine J.; Goepfert, Paul A.; Montefiori, David C.; Shaw, George C.; Alam, S. Munir; Margolis, David M.; Denny, Thomas N.; Boyd, Scott D.; Marshal, Eleanor; Egholm, Michael; Simen, Birgitte B.; Hanczaruk, Bozena; Fire, Andrew Z.; Voss, Gerald; Kelsoe, Garnett; Tomaras, Georgia D.; Moody, M. Anthony; Kepler, Thomas B.

    2011-01-01

    The initial antibody response to HIV-1 is targeted to envelope (Env) gp41, and is nonneutralizing and ineffective in controlling viremia. To understand the origins and characteristics of gp41-binding antibodies produced shortly after HIV-1 transmission, we isolated and studied gp41-reactive plasma cells from subjects acutely infected with HIV-1. The frequencies of somatic mutations were relatively high in these gp41-reactive antibodies. Reverted unmutated ancestors of gp41-reactive antibodies derived from subjects acutely infected with HIV-1 frequently did not react with autologous HIV-1 Env; however, these antibodies were polyreactive and frequently bound to host or bacterial antigens. In one large clonal lineage of gp41-reactive antibodies, reactivity to HIV-1 Env was acquired only after somatic mutations. Polyreactive gp41-binding antibodies were also isolated from uninfected individuals. These data suggest that the majority of gp41-binding antibodies produced after acute HIV-1 infection are cross-reactive responses generated by stimulating memory B cells that have previously been activated by non–HIV-1 antigens. PMID:21987658

  6. Macrophage polarization and HIV-1 infection.

    PubMed

    Cassol, Edana; Cassetta, Luca; Alfano, Massimo; Poli, Guido

    2010-04-01

    Polarization of MP into classically activated (M1) and alternatively activated (M2a, M2b, and M2c) macrophages is critical in mediating an effective immune response against invading pathogens. However, several pathogens use these activation pathways to facilitate dissemination and pathogenesis. Viruses generally induce an M1-like phenotype during the acute phase of infection. In addition to promoting the development of Th1 responses and IFN production, M1 macrophages often produce cytokines that drive viral replication and tissue damage. As shown for HIV-1, polarization can also alter macrophage susceptibility to infection. In vitro polarization into M1 cells prevents HIV-1 infection, and M2a polarization inhibits viral replication at a post-integration level. M2a cells also express high levels of C-type lectins that can facilitate macrophage-mediated transmission of HIV-1 to CD4(+) T cells. Macrophages are particularly abundant in mucosal membranes and unlike DCs, do not usually migrate to distal tissues. As a result, macrophages are likely to contribute to HIV-1 pathogenesis in mucosal rather than lymphatic tissues. In vivo polarization of MP is likely to span a spectrum of activation phenotypes that may change the permissivity to and alter the outcome of HIV-1 and other viral infections.

  7. HIV-1 Entry Inhbitors: An Overview

    PubMed Central

    Kuritzkes, Daniel R.

    2009-01-01

    Purpose of review This review provides an overview of HIV-1 entry inhibitors, with a focus on chemokine receptor antagonists. Recent findings Entry of HIV-1 into target cells is an ordered multi-step process involving attachment, co-receptor binding and fusion. Inhibitors of each step have been identified and shown to have antiviral activity in clinical trials. Phase 1-2 trials of monoclonal antibodies and small-molecule attachment inhibitors have demonstrated activity in HIV-1-infected subjects, but none has progressed to later phase clinical trials. The post-attachment inhibitor ibalizumab has shown activity in phase 1 and 2 trials; further studies are anticipated. The CCR5 antagonists maraviroc (now been approved for clinical use) and vicriviroc (in phase 3 trials) have shown significant benefit in controlled trials in treatment-experienced subjects; additional CCR5 antagonists are in various stages of clinical development. Targeting CXCR4 has proven to be more challenging. Although proof of concept has been demonstrated in phase 1-2 trials of two compounds, neither proved suitable for chronic administration. Little progress has been reported in developing longer acting or orally bioavailable fusion inhibitors. Summary ACCR5 antagonist and a fusion inhibitor are approved for use as HIV-1 entry inhibitors. Development of drugs targeting other steps in HIV-1 entry is ongoing. PMID:19339945

  8. Modulation of HIV-1 immunity by adjuvants

    PubMed Central

    Moody, M. Anthony

    2014-01-01

    Purpose of review To summarize the role of adjuvants in eliciting desirable antibody responses against HIV-1 with particular emphasis on both historical context and recent developments. Recent findings Increased understanding of the role of pattern recognition receptors such as Toll-like receptors in recruiting and directing the immune system has increased the variety of adjuvant formulations being tested in animal models and humans. Across all vaccine platforms, adjuvant formulations have been shown to enhance desirable immune responses such as higher antibody titers and increased functional activity. Although no vaccine formulation has yet succeeded in eliciting broad neutralizing antibodies against HIV-1, the ability of adjuvants to direct the immune response to immunogens suggests they will be critically important in any successful HIV-1 vaccine. Summary The parallel development of adjuvants along with better HIV-1 immunogens will be needed for a successful AIDS vaccine. Additional comparative testing will be required to determine the optimal adjuvant and immunogen regimen that can elicit antibody responses capable of blocking HIV-1 transmission. PMID:24670321

  9. HIV-1 associated dementia: symptoms and causes

    PubMed Central

    Ghafouri, Mohammad; Amini, Shohreh; Khalili, Kamel; Sawaya, Bassel E

    2006-01-01

    Despite the use of highly active antiretroviral therapy (HAART), neuronal cell death remains a problem that is frequently found in the brains of HIV-1-infected patients. HAART has successfully prevented many of the former end-stage complications of AIDS, however, with increased survival times, the prevalence of minor HIV-1 associated cognitive impairment appears to be rising among AIDS patients. Further, HIV-1 associated dementia (HAD) is still prevalent in treated patients as well as attenuated forms of HAD and CNS opportunistic disorders. HIV-associated cognitive impairment correlates with the increased presence in the CNS of activated, though not necessarily HIV-1-infected, microglia and CNS macrophages. This suggests that indirect mechanisms of neuronal injury and loss/death occur in HIV/AIDS as a basis for dementia since neurons are not themselves productively infected by HIV-1. In this review, we discussed the symptoms and causes leading to HAD. Outcome from this review will provide new information regarding mechanisms of neuronal loss in AIDS patients. PMID:16712719

  10. Unusual Fusion Proteins of HIV-1

    PubMed Central

    Langer, Simon; Sauter, Daniel

    2017-01-01

    Despite its small genome size, the Human Immunodeficiency Virus 1 (HIV-1) is one of the most successful pathogens and has infected more than 70 million people worldwide within the last decades. In total, HIV-1 expresses 16 canonical proteins from only nine genes within its 10 kb genome. Expression of the structural genes gag, pol, and env, the regulatory genes rev and tat and the accessory genes vpu, nef, vpr, and vif enables assembly of the viral particle, regulates viral gene transcription, and equips the virus to evade or counteract host immune responses. In addition to the canonically expressed proteins, a growing number of publications describe the existence of non-canonical fusion proteins in HIV-1 infected cells. Most of them are encoded by the tat-env-rev locus. While the majority of these fusion proteins (e.g., TNV/p28tev, p186Drev, Tat1-Rev2, Tat^8c, p17tev, or Ref) are the result of alternative splicing events, Tat-T/Vpt is produced upon programmed ribosomal frameshifting, and a Rev1-Vpu fusion protein is expressed due to a nucleotide polymorphism that is unique to certain HIV-1 clade A and C strains. A better understanding of the expression and activity of these non-canonical viral proteins will help to dissect their potential role in viral replication and reveal how HIV-1 optimized the coding potential of its genes. The goal of this review is to provide an overview of previously described HIV-1 fusion proteins and to summarize our current knowledge of their expression patterns and putative functions. PMID:28119676

  11. MAS NMR of HIV-1 protein assemblies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Suiter, Christopher L.; Quinn, Caitlin M.; Lu, Manman; Hou, Guangjin; Zhang, Huilan; Polenova, Tatyana

    2015-04-01

    The negative global impact of the AIDS pandemic is well known. In this perspective article, the utility of magic angle spinning (MAS) NMR spectroscopy to answer pressing questions related to the structure and dynamics of HIV-1 protein assemblies is examined. In recent years, MAS NMR has undergone major technological developments enabling studies of large viral assemblies. We discuss some of these evolving methods and technologies and provide a perspective on the current state of MAS NMR as applied to the investigations into structure and dynamics of HIV-1 assemblies of CA capsid protein and of Gag maturation intermediates.

  12. Evidence of at Least Two Introductions of HIV-1 in the Amerindian Warao Population from Venezuela

    PubMed Central

    Rangel, Héctor R.; Maes, Mailis; Villalba, Julian; Sulbarán, Yoneira; de Waard, Jacobus H.; Bello, Gonzalo; Pujol, Flor H.

    2012-01-01

    Background The Venezuelan Amerindians were, until recently, free of human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infection. However, in 2007, HIV-1 infection was detected for the first time in the Warao Amerindian population living in the Eastern part of Venezuela, in the delta of the Orinoco river. The aim of this study was to analyze the genetic diversity of the HIV-1 circulating in this population. Methodology/Principal Findings The pol genomic region was sequenced for 16 HIV-1 isolates and for some of them, sequences from env, vif and nef genomic regions were obtained. All HIV-1 isolates were classified as subtype B, with exception of one that was classified as subtype C. The 15 subtype B isolates exhibited a high degree of genetic similarity and formed a highly supported monophyletic cluster in each genomic region analyzed. Evolutionary analyses of the pol genomic region indicated that the date of the most recent common ancestor of the Waraos subtype B clade dates back to the late 1990s. Conclusions/Significance At least two independent introductions of HIV-1 have occurred in the Warao Amerindians from Venezuela. The HIV-1 subtype B was successfully established and got disseminated in the community, while no evidence of local dissemination of the HIV-1 subtype C was detected in this study. These results warrant further surveys to evaluate the burden of this disease, which can be particularly devastating in this Amerindian population, with a high prevalence of tuberculosis, hepatitis B, among other infectious diseases, and with limited access to primary health care. PMID:22808212

  13. An efficient procedure for the expression and purification of HIV-1 protease from inclusion bodies.

    PubMed

    Nguyen, Hong-Loan Thi; Nguyen, Thuy Thi; Vu, Quy Thi; Le, Hang Thi; Pham, Yen; Trinh, Phuong Le; Bui, Thuan Phuong; Phan, Tuan-Nghia

    2015-12-01

    Several studies have focused on HIV-1 protease for developing drugs for treating AIDS. Recombinant HIV-1 protease is used to screen new drugs from synthetic compounds or natural substances. However, large-scale expression and purification of this enzyme is difficult mainly because of its low expression and solubility. In this study, we constructed 9 recombinant plasmids containing a sequence encoding HIV-1 protease along with different fusion tags and examined the expression of the enzyme from these plasmids. Of the 9 plasmids, pET32a(+) plasmid containing the HIV-1 protease-encoding sequence along with sequences encoding an autocleavage site GTVSFNF at the N-terminus and TEV plus 6× His tag at the C-terminus showed the highest expression of the enzyme and was selected for further analysis. The recombinant protein was isolated from inclusion bodies by using 2 tandem Q- and Ni-Sepharose columns. SDS-PAGE of the obtained HIV-1 protease produced a single band of approximately 13 kDa. The enzyme was recovered efficiently (4 mg protein/L of cell culture) and had high specific activity of 1190 nmol min(-1) mg(-1) at an optimal pH of 4.7 and optimal temperature of 37 °C. This procedure for expressing and purifying HIV-1 protease is now being scaled up to produce the enzyme on a large scale for its application.

  14. Anti-phospholipid human monoclonal antibodies inhibit CCR5-tropic HIV-1 and induce β-chemokines

    PubMed Central

    Liao, Hua-Xin; Alam, S. Munir; Scearce, Richard M.; Plonk, M. Kelly; Kozink, Daniel M.; Drinker, Mark S.; Zhang, Ruijun; Xia, Shi-Mao; Sutherland, Laura L.; Tomaras, Georgia D.; Giles, Ian P.; Kappes, John C.; Ochsenbauer-Jambor, Christina; Edmonds, Tara G.; Soares, Melina; Barbero, Gustavo; Forthal, Donald N.; Landucci, Gary; Chang, Connie; King, Steven W.; Kavlie, Anita; Denny, Thomas N.; Hwang, Kwan-Ki; Chen, Pojen P.; Thorpe, Philip E.; Montefiori, David C.

    2010-01-01

    Traditional antibody-mediated neutralization of HIV-1 infection is thought to result from the binding of antibodies to virions, thus preventing virus entry. However, antibodies that broadly neutralize HIV-1 are rare and are not induced by current vaccines. We report that four human anti-phospholipid monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) (PGN632, P1, IS4, and CL1) inhibit HIV-1 CCR5-tropic (R5) primary isolate infection of peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) with 80% inhibitory concentrations of <0.02 to ∼10 µg/ml. Anti-phospholipid mAbs inhibited PBMC HIV-1 infection in vitro by mechanisms involving binding to monocytes and triggering the release of MIP-1α and MIP-1β. The release of these β-chemokines explains both the specificity for R5 HIV-1 and the activity of these mAbs in PBMC cultures containing both primary lymphocytes and monocytes. PMID:20368576

  15. Distribution of HIV-1 Infection in Different T Lymphocyte Subsets: Antiretroviral Therapy-Naïve vs. Experienced Patients

    PubMed Central

    Perez, Raul; Gibson, Sonia; Lopez, Pablo; Koenig, Ellen; De Castro, Marisol

    2011-01-01

    Abstract Memory CD4 T cells are the primary targets of HIV-1 infection, which then subsequently spreads to other T lymphocyte subsets. Antiretroviral therapy (ART) alters the pattern of HIV-1 distribution. Blood samples were collected from ART-naïve or -experienced HIV-1 patients, and the memory and naïve subsets of CD4+ and CD8+ T lymphocytes, respectively, were isolated by cell sorting. DNA was extracted and the HIV-1 env C2/V3 region PCR amplified. Amplicons were cloned and sequenced, and genetic relatedness among different HIV-1 compartments was determined by the phylogenetic analysis of clonal sequences. The viral V3 sequence of HIV-1 in each compartment was analyzed by using webPSSM to determine CCR5 or CXCR4 coreceptor binding property of the virus. The direction of viral migration among involved compartments was determined by using the MacClade program. In ART-naïve patients, HIV-1 was generally confined to the memory CD4 T (mT4) cell compartment, even though in a few cases, naïve CD4 T (nT4) cells were also infected. When this occurred, the HIV-1 gene migrated from nT4 to mT4. In contrast, HIV-1 was detected in nT4 and mT4 as well as in the memory CD8 T (mT8) compartments of ART-experienced patients. However, no clear pattern of directional HIV-1 gene flow among the compartments could be determined because of the small sample size. All HIV-1–infected T cell compartments housed the virus that used either CCR5 or CXCR4 as the coreceptor. PMID:21054214

  16. Limited HIV-1 Reactivation in Resting CD4+ T cells from Aviremic Patients under Protease Inhibitors

    PubMed Central

    Kumar, Amit; Abbas, Wasim; Bouchat, Sophie; Gatot, Jean-Stéphane; Pasquereau, Sébastien; Kabeya, Kabamba; Clumeck, Nathan; De Wit, Stéphane; Van Lint, Carine; Herbein, Georges

    2016-01-01

    A latent viral reservoir that resides in resting CD4+ T cells represents a major barrier for eradication of HIV infection. We test here the impact of HIV protease inhibitor (PI) based combination anti-retroviral therapy (cART) over nonnucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitor (NNRTI)-based cART on HIV-1 reactivation and integration in resting CD4+ T cells. This is a prospective cohort study of patients with chronic HIV-1 infection treated with conventional cART with an undetectable viremia. We performed a seven-year study of 47 patients with chronic HIV-infection treated with cART regimens and with undetectable plasma HIV-1 RNA levels for at least 1 year. Of these 47 patients treated with cART, 24 were treated with a PI-based regimen and 23 with a NNRTI-based regimen as their most recent treatment for more than one year. We evaluated the HIV-1 reservoir using reactivation assay and integrated HIV-1 DNA, respectively, in resting CD4+ T cells. Resting CD4+ T cells isolated from PI-treated patients compared to NNRTI-treated patients showed a limited HIV-1 reactivation upon T-cell stimulation (p = 0·024) and a lower level of HIV-1 integration (p = 0·024). Our study indicates that PI-based cART could be more efficient than NNRTI-based cART for limiting HIV-1 reactivation in aviremic chronically infected patients. PMID:27922055

  17. National survey of prevalent HIV strains: limited genetic variation of Korean HIV-1 clade B within the population of Korean men who have sex with men.

    PubMed

    Kim, Gab Jung; Nam, Jeong-Gu; Shin, Bo Gyeong; Kee, Mee Kyeong; Kim, Eun-Jin; Lee, Joo-Shil; Kim, Sung Soon

    2008-06-01

    The evolution of HIV is the result of an explosive combination of factors-a high rate of mutation, replication dynamics, frequent recombination, and natural selection. To understand the evolution of the distinctive Korean HIV-1 B clade, we investigated the characteristics of the genetic variation of the HIV-1 subtype B env gene within the group of Korean men who have sex with men (MSM). From 1985 to 2005, 700 HIV-1-infected Koreans were sequenced at the V1 to V5 region of the HIV-1 env gene. In the phylogenetic analysis, 560 isolates were identified as HIV-1 subtype B, and 489 of the 560 isolates were HIV-1 Korean clade B. Based on epidemiologic investigation, 249 of 700 HIV-1-infected patients were HIV-1 subtype B-infected MSM. Interestingly, the proportion of the GPGS motif in MSM infected by Koreans was 1.6 times higher than in MSM infected by foreigners, and the genetic expansions of diversity and divergence for HIV-1 subtype B in Korean MSM were 2.1% and 2.5%, respectively. This was much lower than those observed in other countries. Therefore, our findings imply that the HIV strains in this group were closely related. This result may be helpful for understanding the evolution of the distinct HIV-1 Korean B clade.

  18. Analysis of infectious virus clones from two HIV-1 superinfection cases suggests that the primary strains have lower fitness

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background Two HIV-1 positive patients, L and P, participating in the Amsterdam Cohort studies acquired an HIV-1 superinfection within half a year from their primary HIV-1 infection (Jurriaans et al., JAIDS 2008, 47:69-73). The aim of this study was to compare the replicative fitness of the primary and superinfecting HIV-1 strains of both patients. The use of isolate-specific primer sets indicated that the primary and secondary strains co-exist in plasma at all time points after the moment of superinfection. Results Biological HIV-1 clones were derived from peripheral blood CD4 + T cells at different time point, and identified as the primary or secondary virus through sequence analysis. Replication competition assays were performed with selected virus pairs in PHA/IL-2 activated peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC's) and analyzed with the Heteroduplex Tracking Assay (HTA) and isolate-specific PCR amplification. In both cases, we found a replicative advantage of the secondary HIV-1 strain over the primary virus. Full-length HIV-1 genomes were sequenced to find possible explanations for the difference in replication capacity. Mutations that could negatively affect viral replication were identified in the primary infecting strains. In patient L, the primary strain has two insertions in the LTR promoter, combined with a mutation in the tat gene that has been associated with decreased replication capacity. The primary HIV-1 strain isolated from patient P has two mutations in the LTR that have been associated with a reduced replication rate. In a luciferase assay, only the LTR from the primary virus of patient P had lower transcriptional activity compared with the superinfecting virus. Conclusions These preliminary findings suggest the interesting scenario that superinfection occurs preferentially in patients infected with a relatively attenuated HIV-1 isolate. PMID:20646276

  19. Phosphorylation of HIV-1 Tat by CDK2 in HIV-1 transcription

    PubMed Central

    Ammosova, Tatyana; Berro, Reem; Jerebtsova, Marina; Jackson, Angela; Charles, Sharroya; Klase, Zachary; Southerland, William; Gordeuk, Victor R; Kashanchi, Fatah; Nekhai, Sergei

    2006-01-01

    Background Transcription of HIV-1 genes is activated by HIV-1 Tat protein, which induces phosphorylation of RNA polymerase II (RNAPII) C-terminal domain (CTD) by CDK9/cyclin T1. Earlier we showed that CDK2/cyclin E phosphorylates HIV-1 Tat in vitro. We also showed that CDK2 induces HIV-1 transcription in vitro and that inhibition of CDK2 expression by RNA interference inhibits HIV-1 transcription and viral replication in cultured cells. In the present study, we analyzed whether Tat is phosphorylated in cultured cells by CDK2 and whether Tat phosphorylation has a regulatory effect on HIV-1 transcription. Results We analyzed HIV-1 Tat phosphorylation by CDK2 in vitro and identified Ser16 and Ser46 residues of Tat as potential phosphorylation sites. Tat was phosphorylated in HeLa cells infected with Tat-expressing adenovirus and metabolically labeled with 32P. CDK2-specific siRNA reduced the amount and the activity of cellular CDK2 and significantly decreased phosphorylation of Tat. Tat co-migrated with CDK2 on glycerol gradient and co-immunoprecipitated with CDK2 from the cellular extracts. Tat was phosphorylated on serine residues in vivo, and mutations of Ser16 and Ser46 residues of Tat reduced Tat phosphorylation in vivo. Mutation of Ser16 and Ser46 residues of Tat reduced HIV-1 transcription in transiently transfected cells. The mutations of Tat also inhibited HIV-1 viral replication and Tat phosphorylation in the context of the integrated HIV-1 provirus. Analysis of physiological importance of the S16QP(K/R)19 and S46YGR49 sequences of Tat showed that Ser16 and Ser46 and R49 residues are highly conserved whereas mutation of the (K/R)19 residue correlated with non-progression of HIV-1 disease. Conclusion Our results indicate for the first time that Tat is phosphorylated in vivo; Tat phosphorylation is likely to be mediated by CDK2; and phosphorylation of Tat is important for HIV-1 transcription. PMID:17083724

  20. HIV-1 Capsid: The Multifaceted Key Player in HIV-1 infection

    PubMed Central

    Campbell, Edward M.; Hope, Thomas J.

    2016-01-01

    In a mature, infectious HIV-1 virion, the viral genome is housed within a conical capsid core comprised of the viral capsid (CA) protein. The CA protein, and the structure into which it assembles, facilitate virtually every step of infection through a series of interactions with multiple host cell factors. This review describes our understanding of the interactions between the viral capsid core and several cellular factors that enable efficient HIV-1 genome replication, timely core disassembly, nuclear import and the integration of the viral genome into the genome of the target cell. We then discuss how elucidating these interactions can reveal new targets for therapeutic interactions against HIV-1. PMID:26179359

  1. Comparison of Antibody-Dependent Cell-Mediated Cytotoxicity and Virus Neutralization by HIV-1 Env-Specific Monoclonal Antibodies

    PubMed Central

    von Bredow, Benjamin; Arias, Juan F.; Heyer, Lisa N.; Moldt, Brian; Le, Khoa; Robinson, James E.; Burton, Dennis R.

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Although antibodies to the human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) envelope glycoprotein have been studied extensively for their ability to block viral infectivity, little data are currently available on nonneutralizing functions of these antibodies, such as their ability to eliminate virus-infected cells by antibody-dependent cell-mediated cytotoxicity (ADCC). HIV-1 Env-specific antibodies of diverse specificities, including potent broadly neutralizing and nonneutralizing antibodies, were therefore tested for ADCC against cells infected with a lab-adapted HIV-1 isolate (HIV-1NL4-3), a primary HIV-1 isolate (HIV-1JR-FL), and a simian-human immunodeficiency virus (SHIV) adapted for pathogenic infection of rhesus macaques (SHIVAD8-EO). In accordance with the sensitivity of these viruses to neutralization, HIV-1NL4-3-infected cells were considerably more sensitive to ADCC, both in terms of the number of antibodies and magnitude of responses, than cells infected with HIV-1JR-FL or SHIVAD8-EO. ADCC activity generally correlated with antibody binding to Env on the surfaces of virus-infected cells and with viral neutralization; however, neutralization was not always predictive of ADCC, as instances of ADCC in the absence of detectable neutralization, and vice versa, were observed. These results reveal incomplete overlap in the specificities of antibodies that mediate these antiviral activities and provide insights into the relationship between ADCC and neutralization important for the development of antibody-based vaccines and therapies for combating HIV-1 infection. IMPORTANCE This study provides fundamental insights into the relationship between antibody-dependent cell-mediated cytotoxicity (ADCC) and virus neutralization that may help to guide the development of antibody-based vaccines and immunotherapies for the prevention and treatment of HIV-1 infection. PMID:27122574

  2. HIV-1 vaccines: challenges and new perspectives.

    PubMed

    Excler, Jean-Louis; Robb, Merlin L; Kim, Jerome H

    2014-01-01

    The development of a safe and effective preventive HIV-1 vaccine remains a public health priority. Despite scientific difficulties and disappointing results, HIV-1 vaccine clinical development has, for the first time, established proof-of-concept efficacy against HIV-1 acquisition and identified vaccine-associated immune correlates of risk. The correlate of risk analysis showed that IgG antibodies against the gp120 V2 loop correlated with decreased risk of HIV infection, while Env-specific IgA directly correlated with increased risk. The development of vaccine strategies such as improved envelope proteins formulated with potent adjuvants and DNA and vectors expressing mosaics, or conserved sequences, capable of eliciting greater breadth and depth of potentially relevant immune responses including neutralizing and non-neutralizing antibodies, CD4+ and CD8+ cell-mediated immune responses, mucosal immune responses, and immunological memory, is now proceeding quickly. Additional human efficacy trials combined with other prevention modalities along with sustained funding and international collaboration remain key to bring an HIV-1 vaccine to licensure.

  3. HIV-1 transcription and latency: an update

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Combination antiretroviral therapy, despite being potent and life-prolonging, is not curative and does not eradicate HIV-1 infection since interruption of treatment inevitably results in a rapid rebound of viremia. Reactivation of latently infected cells harboring transcriptionally silent but replication-competent proviruses is a potential source of persistent residual viremia in cART-treated patients. Although multiple reservoirs may exist, the persistence of resting CD4+ T cells carrying a latent infection represents a major barrier to eradication. In this review, we will discuss the latest reports on the molecular mechanisms that may regulate HIV-1 latency at the transcriptional level, including transcriptional interference, the role of cellular factors, chromatin organization and epigenetic modifications, the viral Tat trans-activator and its cellular cofactors. Since latency mechanisms may also operate at the post-transcriptional level, we will consider inhibition of nuclear RNA export and inhibition of translation by microRNAs as potential barriers to HIV-1 gene expression. Finally, we will review the therapeutic approaches and clinical studies aimed at achieving either a sterilizing cure or a functional cure of HIV-1 infection, with a special emphasis on the most recent pharmacological strategies to reactivate the latent viruses and decrease the pool of viral reservoirs. PMID:23803414

  4. Reactivation Kinetics of HIV-1 and Susceptibility of Reactivated Latently Infected CD4+ T Cells to HIV-1-Specific CD8+ T Cells

    PubMed Central

    Walker-Sperling, Victoria E. K.; Cohen, Valerie J.; Tarwater, Patrick M.

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT The “shock and kill” model of human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) eradication involves the induction of transcription of HIV-1 genes in latently infected CD4+ T cells, followed by the elimination of these infected CD4+ T cells by CD8+ T cells or other effector cells. CD8+ T cells may also be needed to control the spread of new infection if residual infected cells are present at the time combination antiretroviral therapy (cART) is discontinued. In order to determine the time frame needed for CD8+ T cells to effectively prevent the spread of HIV-1 infection, we examined the kinetics of HIV transcription and virus release in latently infected cells reactivated ex vivo. Isolated resting, primary CD4+ T cells from HIV-positive (HIV+) subjects on suppressive regimens were found to upregulate cell-associated HIV-1 mRNA within 1 h of stimulation and produce extracellular virus as early as 6 h poststimulation. In spite of the rapid kinetics of virus production, we show that CD8+ T cells from 2 out of 4 viremic controllers were capable of effectively eliminating reactivated autologous CD4+ cells that upregulate cell-associated HIV-1 mRNA. The results have implications for devising strategies to prevent rebound viremia due to reactivation of rare latently infected cells that persist after potentially curative therapy. IMPORTANCE A prominent HIV-1 cure strategy termed “shock and kill” involves the induction of HIV-1 transcription in latently infected CD4+ T cells with the goal of elimination of these cells by either the cytotoxic T lymphocyte response or other immune cell subsets. However, the cytotoxic T cell response may also be required after curative treatment if residual latently infected cells remain. The kinetics of HIV-1 reactivation indicate rapid upregulation of cell-associated HIV-1 mRNA and a 5-h window between transcription and virus release. Thus, HIV-specific CD8+ T cell responses likely have a very short time frame to eliminate

  5. Enhanced clearance of HIV-1-infected cells by broadly neutralizing antibodies against HIV-1 in vivo.

    PubMed

    Lu, Ching-Lan; Murakowski, Dariusz K; Bournazos, Stylianos; Schoofs, Till; Sarkar, Debolina; Halper-Stromberg, Ariel; Horwitz, Joshua A; Nogueira, Lilian; Golijanin, Jovana; Gazumyan, Anna; Ravetch, Jeffrey V; Caskey, Marina; Chakraborty, Arup K; Nussenzweig, Michel C

    2016-05-20

    Antiretroviral drugs and antibodies limit HIV-1 infection by interfering with the viral life cycle. In addition, antibodies also have the potential to guide host immune effector cells to kill HIV-1-infected cells. Examination of the kinetics of HIV-1 suppression in infected individuals by passively administered 3BNC117, a broadly neutralizing antibody, suggested that the effects of the antibody are not limited to free viral clearance and blocking new infection but also include acceleration of infected cell clearance. Consistent with these observations, we find that broadly neutralizing antibodies can target CD4(+) T cells infected with patient viruses and can decrease their in vivo half-lives by a mechanism that requires Fcγ receptor engagement in a humanized mouse model. The results indicate that passive immunotherapy can accelerate elimination of HIV-1-infected cells.

  6. Picomolar dichotomous activity of gnidimacrin against HIV-1.

    PubMed

    Huang, Li; Ho, Phong; Yu, Jie; Zhu, Lei; Lee, Kuo-Hsiung; Chen, Chin-Ho

    2011-01-01

    Highly active antiretroviral therapy (HAART) has offered a promising approach for controlling HIV-1 replication in infected individuals. However, with HARRT, HIV-1 is suppressed rather than eradicated due to persistence of HIV-1 in latent viral reservoirs. Thus, purging the virus from latent reservoirs is an important strategy toward eradicating HIV-1 infection. In this study, we discovered that the daphnane diterpene gnidimacrin, which was previously reported to have potent anti-cancer cell activity, activated HIV-1 replication and killed persistently-infected cells at picomolar concentrations. In addition to its potential to purge HIV-1 from latently infected cells, gnidimacrin potently inhibited a panel of HIV-1 R5 virus infection of peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) at an average concentration lower than 10 pM. In contrast, gnidimacrin only partially inhibited HIV-1 ×4 virus infection of PBMCs. The strong anti-HIV-1 R5 virus activity of gnidimacrin was correlated with its effect on down-regulation of the HIV-1 coreceptor CCR5. The anti-R5 virus activity of gnidimacrin was completely abrogated by a selective protein kinase C beta inhibitor enzastaurin, which suggests that protein kinase C beta plays a key role in the potent anti-HIV-1 activity of gnidimacrin in PBMCs. In summary, these results suggest that gnidimacrin could activate latent HIV-1, specifically kill HIV-1 persistently infected cells, and inhibit R5 viruses at picomolar concentrations.

  7. [Mutation frequencies in HIV-1 subtype-A genome in regions containing efficient RNAi targets].

    PubMed

    Kravatsky, Y V; Chechetkin, V R; Fedoseeva, D M; Gorbacheva, M A; Kretova, O V; Tchurikov, N A

    2016-01-01

    The development of gene-therapy technology using RNAi for AIDS/HIV-1 treatment is a prospective alternative to traditional anti-retroviral therapy. RNAi targets could be selected in HIV-1 transcripts and in CCR5 mRNA. Previously, we experimentally selected a number of efficient siRNAs that target HIV-1 RNAs. The viral genome mutates frequently, and RNAi strength is very sensitive, even for a single mismatches. That is why it is important to study nucleotide sequences of targets in clinical isolates of HIV-1. In the present study, we analyzed mutations in 6 of about 300-bp regions containing RNAi targets from HIV-1 subtype A isolates in Russia. Estimates of the mean frequencies of mutations in the targets were obtained and the frequencies of mutations in the different codon positions were compared. The frequencies of mutations in the vicinity of the targets and directly within the targets were also compared and have been shown to be approximately the same. The frequencies of indels in the chosen regions have been assessed. Their frequencies have proved to be two to three orders of magnitude less compared to that for mutations.

  8. The HIV-1 Entry Process: A Stoichiometric View.

    PubMed

    Brandenberg, Oliver F; Magnus, Carsten; Regoes, Roland R; Trkola, Alexandra

    2015-12-01

    HIV-1 infection starts with fusion of the viral and the host cell membranes, a process mediated by the HIV-1 envelope glycoprotein trimer. The number of trimers required to complete membrane fusion, referred to as HIV-1 entry stoichiometry, remains under debate. A precise definition of HIV-1 entry stoichiometry is important as it reflects the efficacy of the viral entry process and steers the infectivity of HIV-1 virion populations. Initial estimates suggested a unanimous entry stoichiometry across HIV-1 strains while recent findings showed that HIV-1 strains can differ in entry stoichiometry. Here, we review current analyses of HIV-1 entry stoichiometry and point out future research directions to further define the interplay between entry stoichiometry, virus entry fitness, transmission, and susceptibility to antibody neutralization.

  9. Development of HIV-1 fusion inhibitors targeting gp41.

    PubMed

    Lu, K; Asyifah, M R; Shao, F; Zhang, D

    2014-06-01

    The HIV-1 envelope protein glycoprotein 41 (gp41) is crucial in the HIV-1 infection process, therefore gp41 has emerged as an attractive target for drug design against AIDS. During the past few decades, tremendous efforts have been made on developing inhibitors that can prevent the HIV-1 entry process via suppressing functional gp41. In this review, the development of HIV-1 fusion inhibitors targeting gp41 including peptide inhibitors, small molecule inhibitors, vaccines and neutralized antibodies will be discussed.

  10. Primary Human Mammary Epithelial Cells Endocytose HIV-1 and Facilitate Viral Infection of CD4+ T Lymphocytes ▿

    PubMed Central

    Dorosko, Stephanie M.; Connor, Ruth I.

    2010-01-01

    The contribution of mammary epithelial cells (MEC) to human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) in breast milk remains largely unknown. While breast milk contains CD4+ cells throughout the breast-feeding period, it is not known whether MEC directly support HIV-1 infection or facilitate infection of CD4+ cells in the breast compartment. This study evaluated primary human MEC for direct infection with HIV-1 and for indirect transfer of infection to CD4+ target cells. Primary human MEC were isolated and assessed for expression of HIV-1 receptors. MEC were exposed to CCR5-, CXCR4- and dual-tropic strains of HIV-1 and evaluated for viral reverse transcription and integration and productive viral infection. MEC were also tested for the ability to transfer HIV to CD4+ target cells and to activate resting CD4+ T cells. Our results demonstrate that MEC express HIV-1 receptor proteins CD4, CCR5, CXCR4, and galactosyl ceramide (GalCer). While no evidence for direct infection of MEC was found, HIV-1 virions were observed in MEC endosomal compartments. Coculture of HIV-exposed MEC resulted in productive infection of activated CD4+ T cells. In addition, MEC secretions increased HIV-1 replication and proliferation of infected target cells. Overall, our results indicate that MEC are capable of endosomal uptake of HIV-1 and can facilitate virus infection and replication in CD4+ target cells. These findings suggest that MEC may serve as a viral reservoir for HIV-1 and may enhance infection of CD4+ T lymphocytes in vivo. PMID:20702626

  11. Cell-type specific requirements for thiol/disulfide exchange during HIV-1 entry and infection

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background The role of disulfide bond remodeling in HIV-1 infection is well described, but the process still remains incompletely characterized. At present, the data have been predominantly obtained using established cell lines and/or CXCR4-tropic laboratory-adapted virus strains. There is also ambiguity about which disulfide isomerases/ reductases play a major role in HIV-1 entry, as protein disulfide isomerase (PDI) and/or thioredoxin (Trx) have emerged as the two enzymes most often implicated in this process. Results We have extended our previous findings and those of others by focusing on CCR5-using HIV-1 strains and their natural targets - primary human macrophages and CD4+ T lymphocytes. We found that the nonspecific thiol/disulfide exchange inhibitor, 5,5'-dithiobis(2-nitrobenzoic acid) (DTNB), significantly reduced HIV-1 entry and infection in cell lines, human monocyte-derived macrophages (MDM), and also phytohemagglutinin (PHA)-stimulated peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC). Subsequent studies were performed using specific anti-PDI or Trx monoclonal antibodies (mAb) in HIV-1 envelope pseudotyped and wild type (wt) virus infection systems. Although human donor-to-donor variability was observed as expected, Trx appeared to play a greater role than PDI in HIV-1 infection of MDM. In contrast, PDI, but not Trx, was predominantly involved in HIV-1 entry and infection of the CD4+/CCR5+ T cell line, PM-1, and PHA-stimulated primary human T lymphocytes. Intriguingly, both PDI and Trx were present on the surface of MDM, PM-1 and PHA-stimulated CD4+ T cells. However, considerably lower levels of Trx were detected on freshly isolated CD4+ lymphocytes, compared to PHA-stimulated cells. Conclusions Our findings clearly demonstrate the role of thiol/disulfide exchange in HIV-1 entry in primary T lymphocytes and MDM. They also establish a cell-type specificity regarding the involvement of particular disulfide isomerases/reductases in this process and may provide an

  12. Biochemical and Biologic Characterization of Exosomes and Microvesicles as Facilitators of HIV-1 Infection in Macrophages1

    PubMed Central

    Kadiu, Irena; Narayanasamy, Prabagaran; Dash, Prasanta K.; Zhang, Wei; Gendelman, Howard E.

    2013-01-01

    Exosomes and microvesicles are cell membranous sacs originating from multivesicular bodies and plasma membranes that facilitate long-distance intercellular communications. Lipidomic, proteomic and cell biologic approaches uncovered processes by which the human immunodeficiency virus type-1 (HIV-1) can use exosomes and MV to facilitate its dissemination. Macrophage MV and exosomes were isolated by immunoaffinity and sucrose cushion centrifugation and characterized by morphologic, biochemical and molecular assays. HIV-1 was “entrapped” in exosome aggregates. Robust HIV-1 replication followed infection with exosome-enhanced fractions isolated from infected cell supernatants. MV and exosomes facilitated viral infection that was affected by a range of cell surface receptors and adhesion proteins. HIV-1 readily completed its life cycle in human monocyte-derived macrophages but not in CD4 negative cells. The data support a significant role for exosomes as facilitators of viral infection. PMID:22711894

  13. Therapeutics for HIV-1 reactivation from latency.

    PubMed

    Sgarbanti, Marco; Battistini, Angela

    2013-08-01

    Intensive combined antiretroviral therapy successfully suppresses HIV-1 replication and AIDS disease progression making infection manageable, but it is unable to eradicate the virus that persists in long-lived, drug-insensitive and immune system-insensitive reservoirs thus asking for life-long treatments with problems of compliance, resistance, toxicity and cost. These limitations and recent insights into latency mechanisms have fueled a renewed effort in finding a cure for HIV-1 infection. Proposed eradication strategies involve reactivation of the latent reservoir upon induction of viral transcription followed by the elimination of reactivated virus-producing cells by viral cytopathic effect or host immune response. Several molecules identified by mechanism-directed approaches or in large-scale screenings have been proposed as latency reversing agents. Some of them have already entered clinical testing in humans but with mixed or unsatisfactory results.

  14. Nanochemistry-based immunotherapy for HIV-1.

    PubMed

    Lori, F; Calarota, S A; Lisziewicz, J

    2007-01-01

    Highly active antiretroviral treatment (HAART), i.e. the combination of three or more drugs against human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1), has greatly improved the clinical outcome of HIV-1-infected individuals. However, HAART is unable to reconstitute HIV-specific immunity and eradicate the virus. Several observations in primate models and in humans support the notion that cell-mediated immunity can control viral replication and slow disease progression. Thus, besides drugs, an immunotherapy that induces long-lasting HIV-specific T-cell responses could play a role in the treatment of HIV/AIDS. To induce such immune responses, DermaVir Patch has been developed. DermaVir consists of an HIV-1 antigen-encoding plasmid DNA that is chemically formulated in a nanoparticle. DermaVir is administered under a patch after a skin preparation that supports the delivery of the nanoparticle to Langerhans cells (LC). Epidermal LC trap and transport the nanomedicine to draining lymph nodes. While in transit, LC mature into dendritic cells (DC), which can efficiently present the DNA-encoded antigens to naïve T-cells for the induction of cellular immunity. Pre-clinical studies and Phase I clinical testing of DermaVir in HIV-1-infected individuals have demonstrated the safety and tolerability of DermaVir Patch. To further modulate cellular immunity, molecular adjuvants might be added into the nanoparticle. DermaVir Patch represents a new nanomedicine platform for immunotherapy of HIV/AIDS. In this review, the antiviral activity of DermaVir-induced cellular immunity is discussed. Furthermore, the action of some cytokines currently being tested as adjuvants are highlighted and the adjuvant effect of cytokine plasmid DNA included in the DermaVir nanoparticle is reviewed.

  15. Punica granatum (Pomegranate) juice provides an HIV-1 entry inhibitor and candidate topical microbicide

    PubMed Central

    Neurath, A Robert; Strick, Nathan; Li, Yun-Yao; Debnath, Asim K

    2004-01-01

    Background For ≈ 24 years the AIDS pandemic has claimed ≈ 30 million lives, causing ≈ 14,000 new HIV-1 infections daily worldwide in 2003. About 80% of infections occur by heterosexual transmission. In the absence of vaccines, topical microbicides, expected to block virus transmission, offer hope for controlling the pandemic. Antiretroviral chemotherapeutics have decreased AIDS mortality in industrialized countries, but only minimally in developing countries. To prevent an analogous dichotomy, microbicides should be: acceptable; accessible; affordable; and accelerative in transition from development to marketing. Already marketed pharmaceutical excipients or foods, with established safety records and adequate anti-HIV-1 activity, may provide this option. Methods Fruit juices were screened for inhibitory activity against HIV-1 IIIB using CD4 and CXCR4 as cell receptors. The best juice was tested for inhibition of: (1) infection by HIV-1 BaL, utilizing CCR5 as the cellular coreceptor; and (2) binding of gp120 IIIB and gp120 BaL, respectively, to CXCR4 and CCR5. To remove most colored juice components, the adsorption of the effective ingredient(s) to dispersible excipients and other foods was investigated. A selected complex was assayed for inhibition of infection by primary HIV-1 isolates. Results HIV-1 entry inhibitors from pomegranate juice adsorb onto corn starch. The resulting complex blocks virus binding to CD4 and CXCR4/CCR5 and inhibits infection by primary virus clades A to G and group O. Conclusion These results suggest the possibility of producing an anti-HIV-1 microbicide from inexpensive, widely available sources, whose safety has been established throughout centuries, provided that its quality is adequately standardized and monitored. PMID:15485580

  16. Anti-HIV-1 Activity of Eight Monofloral Iranian Honey Types

    PubMed Central

    Behbahani, Mandana

    2014-01-01

    Monofloral Iranian honeys from eight floral sources were analyzed to determine their anti-HIV-1 activities as well as their effects on lymphocyte proliferation. The Peripheral Blood Mononuclear Cells (PBMCs) used in this study were prepared from five healthy volunteers who were seronegative for HIV, HCV, HBV and TB. The anti-HIV-1 activity of eight different honeys was performed by quantitative polymerase chain reaction (PCR) assay and high pure viral nucleic acid kit. The results demonstrated that monofloral honeys from Petro selinum sativum, Nigella sativa, Citrus sinensis, Zataria multiflora, Citrus aurantium and Zizyphus mauritiana flowers had potent anti-HIV-1 activity with half maximal effective concentration (EC50) values of 37.5, 88, 70, 88, 105 and 5 µg/ml respectively. However, monofloral Iranian honeys from Astragalus gummifer and Chamaemelum nobile flowers had weak anti-HIV-1 activity. The frequency and intensity of CD4 expression on PBMCs increased in the presence of all honey types. CD19 marker were also increased after the treatment with monofloral honeys from Z.multiflora and N. sativa. The anti-HIV-1 agent in monofloral honeys from P.sativum, N. sativa, Z. multiflora and Z. mauritiana flowers was detected by spectroscopic analysis as methylglyoxal. Time of drug addition studies demonstrated that the inhibitory effect of methylglyoxal is higher on the late stage of HIV-1 infection. The result demonstrated that methylglyoxal isolated from monofloral honey types is a good candidate for preclinical evaluation of anti-HIV-1 therapies. PMID:25333699

  17. Inhibition of HIV-1 entry by antibodies: potential viral and cellular targets

    PubMed Central

    Phogat, S.; Wyatt, R. T.; Hedestam, G. B. Karlsson

    2008-01-01

    Phogat S, Wyatt RT, Karlsson Hedestam GB (National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases, National Institutes of Health, Bethesda, MD, USA; Department of Microbiology Tumor and Cell Biology, Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm; and the Swedish Institute for Infectious Disease Control, Solna, Sweden). Inhibition of HIV-1 entry by antibodies: potential viral and cellular targets (Review). Vaccine-induced antibodies that interfere with viral entry are the protective correlate of most existing prophylactic vaccines. However, for highly variable viruses such as HIV-1, the ability to elicit broadly neutralizing antibody responses through vaccination has proven to be extremely difficult. The major targets for HIV-1 neutralizing antibodies are the viral envelope glycoprotein trimers on the surface of the virus that mediate receptor binding and entry. HIV-1 has evolved many mechanisms on the surface of envelope glyco-proteins to evade antibody-mediated neutralization, including the masking of conserved regions by glycan, quaternary protein interactions and the presence of immunodominant variable elements. The primary challenge in the development of an HIV-1 vaccine that elicits broadly neutralizing antibodies therefore lies in the design of suitable envelope glycoprotein immunogens that circumvent these barriers. Here, we describe neutralizing determinants on the viral envelope glyco-proteins that are defined by their function in receptor binding or by rare neutralizing antibodies isolated from HIV-infected individuals. We also describe the nonvariable cellular receptors involved in the HIV-1 entry process, or other cellular proteins, and ongoing studies to determine if antibodies against these proteins have efficacy as therapeutic reagents or, in some cases, as vaccine targets to interfere with HIV-1 entry. PMID:17598813

  18. Evaluation of performance across the dynamic range of the Abbott RealTime HIV-1 assay as compared to VERSANT HIV-1 RNA 3.0 and AMPLICOR HIV-1 MONITOR v1.5 using serial dilutions of 39 group M and O viruses.

    PubMed

    Swanson, Priscilla; Huang, Shihai; Abravaya, Klara; de Mendoza, Carmen; Soriano, Vincent; Devare, Sushil G; Hackett, John

    2007-04-01

    Performance of the Abbott m2000 instrument system and the Abbott RealTime HIV-1 assay was evaluated using a panel of 37 group M (subtypes A-D, F, G, CRF01_AE, CRF02_AG and unique recombinant forms) and 2 group O virus isolates. Testing was performed on 273 sample dilutions and compared to VERSANT HIV-1 RNA 3.0 (bDNA) and AMPLICOR HIV-1 MONITOR v1.5 (Monitor v1.5) test results. RealTime HIV-1, bDNA, and Monitor v1.5 tests quantified 87%, 78%, and 81% of samples, respectively. RealTime HIV-1 detected an additional 31 samples at < 40 copies/mL. For group M, RealTime HIV-1 dilution profiles and viral loads were highly correlated with bDNA and Monitor v1.5 values; 87% and 89% of values were within 0.5 log(10) copies/mL. In contrast, the group O viruses were not detected by Monitor v1.5 and were substantially underquantified by approximately 2 log(10) copies/mL in bDNA relative to the RealTime HIV-1 assay. Sequence analysis revealed that RealTime HIV-1 primer/probe binding sites are highly conserved and exhibit fewer nucleotide mismatches relative to Monitor v1.5. The automated m2000 system and RealTime HIV-1 assay offer the advantages of efficient sample processing and throughput with reduced "hands-on" time while providing improved sensitivity, expanded dynamic range and reliable quantification of genetically diverse HIV-1 strains.

  19. Population genomics of intrapatient HIV-1 evolution

    PubMed Central

    Zanini, Fabio; Brodin, Johanna; Thebo, Lina; Lanz, Christa; Bratt, Göran; Albert, Jan; Neher, Richard A

    2015-01-01

    Many microbial populations rapidly adapt to changing environments with multiple variants competing for survival. To quantify such complex evolutionary dynamics in vivo, time resolved and genome wide data including rare variants are essential. We performed whole-genome deep sequencing of HIV-1 populations in 9 untreated patients, with 6-12 longitudinal samples per patient spanning 5-8 years of infection. The data can be accessed and explored via an interactive web application. We show that patterns of minor diversity are reproducible between patients and mirror global HIV-1 diversity, suggesting a universal landscape of fitness costs that control diversity. Reversions towards the ancestral HIV-1 sequence are observed throughout infection and account for almost one third of all sequence changes. Reversion rates depend strongly on conservation. Frequent recombination limits linkage disequilibrium to about 100bp in most of the genome, but strong hitch-hiking due to short range linkage limits diversity. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.11282.001 PMID:26652000

  20. HIV-1 Transmission Networks Across South Korea.

    PubMed

    Ahn, Mi Young; Wertheim, Joel O; Kim, Woo Joo; Kim, Shin-Woo; Lee, Jin Soo; Ann, Hea Won; Jeon, Yongduk; Ahn, Jin Young; Song, Je Eun; Oh, Dong Hyun; Kim, Yong Chan; Kim, Eun Jin; Jung, In Young; Kim, Moo Hyun; Jeong, Wooyoung; Jeong, Su Jin; Ku, Nam Su; Kim, June Myung; Smith, Davey M; Choi, Jun Yong

    2017-03-27

    Molecular epidemiology can help clarify the properties and dynamics of HIV-1 transmission networks in both global and regional scales. We studied 143 HIV-1-infected individuals recruited from four medical centers of three cities in South Korea between April 2013 and May 2014. HIV-1 env V3 sequence data were generated (337-793 bp) and analyzed using a pairwise distance-based clustering approach to infer putative transmission networks. Participants whose viruses were ≤2.0% divergent according to Tamura-Nei 93 genetic distance were defined as clustering. We collected demographic, risk, and clinical data and analyzed these data in relation to clustering. Among 143 participants, we identified nine putative transmission clusters of different sizes (range 2-4 participants). The reported risk factor of participants were concordant in only one network involving two participants, that is, both individuals reported homosexual sex as their risk factor. The participants in the other eight networks did not report concordant risk factors, although they were phylogenetically linked. About half of the participants refused to report their risk factor. Overall, molecular epidemiology provides more information to understand local transmission networks and the risks associated with these networks.

  1. In vivo SELEX of single-stranded domains in the HIV-1 leader RNA.

    PubMed

    van Bel, Nikki; Das, Atze T; Berkhout, Ben

    2014-02-01

    The 5' untranslated leader region of the human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) RNA genome is a strongly conserved sequence that encodes several regulatory motifs important for viral replication. Most of these motifs are exposed as hairpin structures, including the dimerization initiation signal (DIS), the major splice donor site (SD), and the packaging signal (Ψ), which are connected by short single-stranded regions. Mutational analysis revealed many functions of these hairpins, but only a few studies have focused on the single-stranded purine-rich sequences. Using the in vivo SELEX (systematic evolution of ligands by exponential enrichment) approach, we probed the sequence space in these regions that is compatible with efficient HIV-1 replication and analyzed the impact on the RNA secondary structure of the leader RNA. Our results show a strong sequence requirement for the DIS hairpin flanking regions. We postulate that these sequences are important for the binding of specific protein factors that support leader RNA-mediated functions. The sequence between the SD and Ψ hairpins seems to have a less prominent role, despite the strong conservation of the stretch of 5 A residues in natural isolates. We hypothesize that this may reflect the subtle evolutionary pressure on HIV-1 to acquire an A-rich RNA genome. In silico analyses indicate that sequences are avoided in all 3 single-stranded domains that affect the local or overall leader RNA folding. IMPORTANCE Many regulatory RNA sequences are clustered in the untranslated leader domain of the HIV-1 RNA genome. Several RNA hairpin structures in this domain have been proposed to fulfill specific roles, e.g., mediating RNA dimer formation to facilitate HIV-1 recombination. We now focus on the importance of a few well-conserved single-stranded sequences that connect these hairpins. We created libraries of HIV-1 variants in which these segments were randomized and selected the best-replicating variants. For two

  2. Nup153 and Nup98 bind the HIV-1 core and contribute to the early steps of HIV-1 replication

    SciTech Connect

    Di Nunzio, Francesca; Fricke, Thomas; Miccio, Annarita; Valle-Casuso, Jose Carlos; Perez, Patricio; Souque, Philippe; Rizzi, Ermanno; Severgnini, Marco; Mavilio, Fulvio; Charneau, Pierre; Diaz-Griffero, Felipe

    2013-05-25

    The early steps of HIV-1 replication involve the entry of HIV-1 into the nucleus, which is characterized by viral interactions with nuclear pore components. HIV-1 developed an evolutionary strategy to usurp the nuclear pore machinery and chromatin in order to integrate and efficiently express viral genes. In the current work, we studied the role of nucleoporins 153 and 98 (Nup153 and Nup98) in infection of human Jurkat lymphocytes by HIV-1. We showed that Nup153-depleted cells exhibited a defect in nuclear import, while depletion of Nup 98 caused a slight defect in HIV integration. To explore the biochemical viral determinants for the requirement of Nup153 and Nup98 during HIV-1 infection, we tested the ability of these nucleoporins to interact with HIV-1 cores. Our findings showed that both nucleoporins bind HIV-1 cores suggesting that this interaction is important for HIV-1 nuclear import and/or integration. Distribution analysis of integration sites in Nup153-depleted cells revealed a reduced tendency of HIV-1 to integrate in intragenic sites, which in part could account for the large infectivity defect observed in Nup153-depleted cells. Our work strongly supports a role for Nup153 in HIV-1 nuclear import and integration. - Highlights: ► We studied the role of Nup98 and Nup153 in HIV-1 infection. ► Nup98 binds the HIV-1 core and is involved in HIV-1 integration. ► Nup153 binds the HIV-1 core and is involved in HIV-1 nuclear import. ► Depletion of Nup153 decreased the integration of HIV-1 in transcriptionally active sites.

  3. Sequence determinants of breakpoint location during HIV-1 intersubtype recombination.

    PubMed

    Baird, Heather A; Galetto, Román; Gao, Yong; Simon-Loriere, Etienne; Abreha, Measho; Archer, John; Fan, Jun; Robertson, David L; Arts, Eric J; Negroni, Matteo

    2006-01-01

    Retroviral recombination results from strand switching, during reverse transcription, between the two copies of genomic RNA present in the virus. We analysed recombination in part of the envelope gene, between HIV-1 subtype A and D strains. After a single infection cycle, breakpoints clustered in regions corresponding to the constant portions of Env. With some exceptions, a similar distribution was observed after multiple infection cycles, and among recombinant sequences in the HIV Sequence Database. We compared the experimental data with computer simulations made using a program that only allows recombination to occur whenever an identical base is present in the aligned parental RNAs. Experimental recombination was more frequent than expected on the basis of simulated recombination when, in a region spanning 40 nt from the 5' border of a breakpoint, no more than two discordant bases between the parental RNAs were present. When these requirements were not fulfilled, breakpoints were distributed randomly along the RNA, closer to the distribution predicted by computer simulation. A significant preference for recombination was also observed for regions containing homopolymeric stretches. These results define, for the first time, local sequence determinants for recombination between divergent HIV-1 isolates.

  4. Sequence determinants of breakpoint location during HIV-1 intersubtype recombination

    PubMed Central

    Baird, Heather A.; Galetto, Román; Gao, Yong; Simon-Loriere, Etienne; Abreha, Measho; Archer, John; Fan, Jun; Robertson, David L.; Arts, Eric J.; Negroni, Matteo

    2006-01-01

    Retroviral recombination results from strand switching, during reverse transcription, between the two copies of genomic RNA present in the virus. We analysed recombination in part of the envelope gene, between HIV-1 subtype A and D strains. After a single infection cycle, breakpoints clustered in regions corresponding to the constant portions of Env. With some exceptions, a similar distribution was observed after multiple infection cycles, and among recombinant sequences in the HIV Sequence Database. We compared the experimental data with computer simulations made using a program that only allows recombination to occur whenever an identical base is present in the aligned parental RNAs. Experimental recombination was more frequent than expected on the basis of simulated recombination when, in a region spanning 40 nt from the 5′ border of a breakpoint, no more than two discordant bases between the parental RNAs were present. When these requirements were not fulfilled, breakpoints were distributed randomly along the RNA, closer to the distribution predicted by computer simulation. A significant preference for recombination was also observed for regions containing homopolymeric stretches. These results define, for the first time, local sequence determinants for recombination between divergent HIV-1 isolates. PMID:17003055

  5. Prevalence of HIV-1 resistant strains in recent seroconverters.

    PubMed

    Balotta, C; Berlusconi, A; Pan, A; Violin, M; Riva, C; Gori, A; Corvasce, S; Mazzucchelli, R; Facchi, G; Velleca, R; Senese, D; Dehò, L; Galli, M; Rusconi, S; Moroni, M

    2000-01-01

    Twenty-nine HIV-1 recently infected subjects were retrospectively studied to investigate both the prevalence of nucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitors (NRTI)-related mutations at primary infection and the proportion of naturally occurring mutations in protease inhibitor (PI)-naive patients. Neither HIV-1 plasma viremia nor CD4 absolute count at baseline could distinguish patients with NRTI pre-existing mutations from those with wild-type virus. An increasing proportion of ZDV-related mutations was observed over time with an overall frequency of 20.7% in the study period. Only 1 out of 6 patients (16.7%) with ZDV-related mutations showed a phenotypically ZDV resistant isolate. A striking proportion of polymorphic changes was present in the protease region of pol gene in newly infected individuals. As many as 80% of seroconverters presented at least one naturally occurring substitution. Some PI-associated substitutions, thought to be compensatory in protease enzymatic function, could confer intermediate to high PI-resistance. Their role following PI administration remains to be elucidated. Our data suggest that the choice of drugs should be oriented by both genotypic and phenotypic evaluations to tailor individual regimens in seroconverters.

  6. Suppression of HIV-1 Infectivity by Human Glioma Cells.

    PubMed

    Hoque, Sheikh Ariful; Tanaka, Atsushi; Islam, Salequl; Ahsan, Gias Uddin; Jinno-Oue, Atsushi; Hoshino, Hiroo

    2016-05-01

    HIV-1 infection to the central nervous system (CNS) is very common in AIDS patients. The predominant cell types infected in the brain are monocytes and macrophages, which are surrounded by several HIV-1-resistant cell types, such as astrocytes, oligodendrocytes, neurons, and microvascular cells. The effect of these HIV-1-resistant cells on HIV-1 infection is largely unknown. In this study, we examined the stability of HIV-1 cultured with several human glioblastoma cell lines, for example, NP-2, U87MG, T98G, and A172, to determine whether these HIV-1-resistant brain cells could enhance or suppress HIV-1 infection and thus modulate HIV-1 infection in the CNS. The HIV-1 titer was determined using the MAGIC-5A indicator cell line as well as naturally occurring CD4(+) T cells. We found that the stability of HIV-1 incubated with NP-2 or U87MG cells at 37°C was significantly shorter (half-life, 2.5-4 h) compared to that of HIV-1 incubated with T98G or A172 cells or in culture medium without cells (half-life, 8-18 h). The spent culture media (SCM) of NP-2 and U87MG cells had the ability to suppress both R5- and X4-HIV-1 infection by inhibiting HIV-1 attachment to target cells. This inhibitory effect was eliminated by the treatment of the SCM with chondroitinase ABC but not heparinase, suggesting that the inhibitory factor(s) secreted by NP-2 and U87MG cells was chiefly mediated by chondroitin sulfate (CS) or CS-like moiety. Thus, this study reveals that some but not all glioma cells secrete inhibitory molecules to HIV-1 infection that may contribute in lowering HIV-1 infection in the CNS in vivo.

  7. Quantification of the epitope diversity of HIV-1-specific binding antibodies by peptide microarrays for global HIV-1 vaccine development

    DOE PAGES

    Stephenson, Kathryn E.; Neubauer, George H.; Reimer, Ulf; ...

    2014-11-14

    An effective vaccine against human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) will have to provide protection against a vast array of different HIV-1 strains. Current methods to measure HIV-1-specific binding antibodies following immunization typically focus on determining the magnitude of antibody responses, but the epitope diversity of antibody responses has remained largely unexplored. Here we describe the development of a global HIV-1 peptide microarray that contains 6564 peptides from across the HIV-1 proteome and covers the majority of HIV-1 sequences in the Los Alamos National Laboratory global HIV-1 sequence database. Using this microarray, we quantified the magnitude, breadth, and depth ofmore » IgG binding to linear HIV-1 sequences in HIV-1-infected humans and HIV-1-vaccinated humans, rhesus monkeys and guinea pigs. The microarray measured potentially important differences in antibody epitope diversity, particularly regarding the depth of epitope variants recognized at each binding site. Our data suggest that the global HIV-1 peptide microarray may be a useful tool for both preclinical and clinical HIV-1 research.« less

  8. Quantification of the epitope diversity of HIV-1-specific binding antibodies by peptide microarrays for global HIV-1 vaccine development

    SciTech Connect

    Stephenson, Kathryn E.; Neubauer, George H.; Reimer, Ulf; Pawlowski, Nikolaus; Knaute, Tobias; Zerweck, Johannes; Korber, Bette T.; Barouch, Dan H.

    2014-11-14

    An effective vaccine against human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) will have to provide protection against a vast array of different HIV-1 strains. Current methods to measure HIV-1-specific binding antibodies following immunization typically focus on determining the magnitude of antibody responses, but the epitope diversity of antibody responses has remained largely unexplored. Here we describe the development of a global HIV-1 peptide microarray that contains 6564 peptides from across the HIV-1 proteome and covers the majority of HIV-1 sequences in the Los Alamos National Laboratory global HIV-1 sequence database. Using this microarray, we quantified the magnitude, breadth, and depth of IgG binding to linear HIV-1 sequences in HIV-1-infected humans and HIV-1-vaccinated humans, rhesus monkeys and guinea pigs. The microarray measured potentially important differences in antibody epitope diversity, particularly regarding the depth of epitope variants recognized at each binding site. Our data suggest that the global HIV-1 peptide microarray may be a useful tool for both preclinical and clinical HIV-1 research.

  9. Identifying the Important HIV-1 Recombination Breakpoints

    PubMed Central

    Fan, Jun; Simon-Loriere, Etienne; Arts, Eric J.; Negroni, Matteo; Robertson, David L.

    2008-01-01

    Recombinant HIV-1 genomes contribute significantly to the diversity of variants within the HIV/AIDS pandemic. It is assumed that some of these mosaic genomes may have novel properties that have led to their prevalence, particularly in the case of the circulating recombinant forms (CRFs). In regions of the HIV-1 genome where recombination has a tendency to convey a selective advantage to the virus, we predict that the distribution of breakpoints—the identifiable boundaries that delimit the mosaic structure—will deviate from the underlying null distribution. To test this hypothesis, we generate a probabilistic model of HIV-1 copy-choice recombination and compare the predicted breakpoint distribution to the distribution from the HIV/AIDS pandemic. Across much of the HIV-1 genome, we find that the observed frequencies of inter-subtype recombination are predicted accurately by our model. This observation strongly indicates that in these regions a probabilistic model, dependent on local sequence identity, is sufficient to explain breakpoint locations. In regions where there is a significant over- (either side of the env gene) or under- (short regions within gag, pol, and most of env) representation of breakpoints, we infer natural selection to be influencing the recombination pattern. The paucity of recombination breakpoints within most of the envelope gene indicates that recombinants generated in this region are less likely to be successful. The breakpoints at a higher frequency than predicted by our model are approximately at either side of env, indicating increased selection for these recombinants as a consequence of this region, or at least part of it, having a tendency to be recombined as an entire unit. Our findings thus provide the first clear indication of the existence of a specific portion of the genome that deviates from a probabilistic null model for recombination. This suggests that, despite the wide diversity of recombinant forms seen in the viral

  10. Focused Evolution of HIV-1 Neutralizing Antibodies Revealed by Structures and Deep Sequencing

    SciTech Connect

    Wu, Xueling; Zhou, Tongqing; Zhu, Jiang; Zhang, Baoshan; Georgiev, Ivelin; Wang, Charlene; Chen, Xuejun; Longo, Nancy S.; Louder, Mark; McKee, Krisha; O’Dell, Sijy; Perfetto, Stephen; Schmidt, Stephen D.; Shi, Wei; Wu, Lan; Yang, Yongping; Yang, Zhi-Yong; Yang, Zhongjia; Zhang, Zhenhai; Bonsignori, Mattia; Crump, John A.; Kapiga, Saidi H.; Sam, Noel E.; Haynes, Barton F.; Simek, Melissa; Burton, Dennis R.; Koff, Wayne C.; Doria-Rose, Nicole A.; Connors, Mark; Mullikin, James C.; Nabel, Gary J.; Roederer, Mario; Shapiro, Lawrence; Kwong, Peter D.; Mascola, John R.

    2013-03-04

    Antibody VRC01 is a human immunoglobulin that neutralizes about 90% of HIV-1 isolates. To understand how such broadly neutralizing antibodies develop, we used x-ray crystallography and 454 pyrosequencing to characterize additional VRC01-like antibodies from HIV-1-infected individuals. Crystal structures revealed a convergent mode of binding for diverse antibodies to the same CD4-binding-site epitope. A functional genomics analysis of expressed heavy and light chains revealed common pathways of antibody-heavy chain maturation, confined to the IGHV1-2*02 lineage, involving dozens of somatic changes, and capable of pairing with different light chains. Broadly neutralizing HIV-1 immunity associated with VRC01-like antibodies thus involves the evolution of antibodies to a highly affinity-matured state required to recognize an invariant viral structure, with lineages defined from thousands of sequences providing a genetic roadmap of their development.

  11. Influence of mutation and recombination on HIV-1 in vitro fitness recovery.

    PubMed

    Arenas, Miguel; Lorenzo-Redondo, Ramon; Lopez-Galindez, Cecilio

    2016-01-01

    The understanding of the evolutionary processes underlying HIV-1 fitness recovery is fundamental for HIV-1 pathogenesis, antiretroviral treatment and vaccine design. It is known that HIV-1 can present very high mutation and recombination rates, however the specific contribution of these evolutionary forces in the "in vitro" viral fitness recovery has not been simultaneously quantified. To this aim, we analyzed substitution, recombination and molecular adaptation rates in a variety of HIV-1 biological clones derived from a viral isolate after severe population bottlenecks and a number of large population cell culture passages. These clones presented an overall but uneven fitness gain, mean of 3-fold, respect to the initial passage values. We found a significant relationship between the fitness increase and the appearance and fixation of mutations. In addition, these fixed mutations presented molecular signatures of positive selection through the accumulation of non-synonymous substitutions. Interestingly, viral recombination correlated with fitness recovery in most of studied viral quasispecies. The genetic diversity generated by these evolutionary processes was positively correlated with the viral fitness. We conclude that HIV-1 fitness recovery can be derived from the genetic heterogeneity generated through both mutation and recombination, and under diversifying molecular adaptation. The findings also suggest nonrandom evolutionary pathways for in vitro fitness recovery.

  12. Argonaute proteins regulate HIV-1 multiply spliced RNA and viral production in a Dicer independent manner.

    PubMed

    Eckenfelder, Agathe; Ségéral, Emmanuel; Pinzón, Natalia; Ulveling, Damien; Amadori, Céline; Charpentier, Marine; Nidelet, Sabine; Concordet, Jean-Paul; Zagury, Jean-François; Paillart, Jean-Christophe; Berlioz-Torrent, Clarisse; Seitz, Hervé; Emiliani, Stéphane; Gallois-Montbrun, Sarah

    2016-12-20

    Argonaute (Ago) proteins associate with microRNAs (miRNAs) to form the core of the RNA-induced silencing complex (RISC) that mediates post-transcriptional gene silencing of target mRNAs. As key players in anti-viral defense, Ago proteins are thought to have the ability to interact with human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) RNA. However, the role of this interaction in regulating HIV-1 replication has been debated. Here, we used high throughput sequencing of RNA isolated by cross-linking immunoprecipitation (HITS-CLIP) to explore the interaction between Ago2 and HIV-1 RNA in infected cells. By only considering reads of 50 nucleotides length in our analysis, we identified more than 30 distinct binding sites for Ago2 along the viral RNA genome. Using reporter assays, we found four binding sites, located near splice donor sites, capable of repressing Luciferase gene expression in an Ago-dependent manner. Furthermore, inhibition of Ago1 and Ago2 levels in cells expressing HIV-1 led to an increase of viral multiply spliced transcripts and to a strong reduction in the extracellular CAp24 level. Depletion of Dicer did not affect these activities. Our results highlight a new role of Ago proteins in the control of multiply spliced HIV-1 transcript levels and viral production, independently of the miRNA pathway.

  13. Genetic and structural analyses of affinity maturation in the humoral response to HIV-1.

    PubMed

    Kepler, Thomas B; Wiehe, Kevin

    2017-01-01

    Most broadly neutralizing antibodies (BNAbs) elicited in response to HIV-1 infection are extraordinarily mutated. One goal of HIV-1 vaccine development is to induce antibodies that are similar to the most potent and broad BNAbs isolated from infected subjects. The most effective BNAbs have very high mutation frequencies, indicative of the long periods of continual activation necessary to acquire the BNAb phenotype through affinity maturation. Understanding the mutational patterns that define the maturation pathways in BNAb development is critical to vaccine design efforts to recapitulate through vaccination the successful routes to neutralization breadth and potency that have occurred in natural infection. Studying the mutational changes that occur during affinity maturation, however, requires accurate partitioning of sequence data into B-cell clones and identification of the starting point of a B-cell clonal lineage, the initial V(D)J rearrangement. Here, we describe the statistical framework we have used to perform these tasks. Through the recent advancement of these and similar computational methods, many HIV-1 ancestral antibodies have been inferred, synthesized and their structures determined. This has allowed, for the first time, the investigation of the structural mechanisms underlying the affinity maturation process in HIV-1 antibody development. Here, we review what has been learned from this atomic-level structural characterization of affinity maturation in HIV-1 antibodies and the implications for vaccine design.

  14. Antibody 10-1074 suppresses viremia in HIV-1-infected individuals.

    PubMed

    Caskey, Marina; Schoofs, Till; Gruell, Henning; Settler, Allison; Karagounis, Theodora; Kreider, Edward F; Murrell, Ben; Pfeifer, Nico; Nogueira, Lilian; Oliveira, Thiago Y; Learn, Gerald H; Cohen, Yehuda Z; Lehmann, Clara; Gillor, Daniel; Shimeliovich, Irina; Unson-O'Brien, Cecilia; Weiland, Daniela; Robles, Alexander; Kümmerle, Tim; Wyen, Christoph; Levin, Rebeka; Witmer-Pack, Maggi; Eren, Kemal; Ignacio, Caroline; Kiss, Szilard; West, Anthony P; Mouquet, Hugo; Zingman, Barry S; Gulick, Roy M; Keler, Tibor; Bjorkman, Pamela J; Seaman, Michael S; Hahn, Beatrice H; Fätkenheuer, Gerd; Schlesinger, Sarah J; Nussenzweig, Michel C; Klein, Florian

    2017-02-01

    Monoclonal antibody 10-1074 targets the V3 glycan supersite on the HIV-1 envelope (Env) protein. It is among the most potent anti-HIV-1 neutralizing antibodies isolated so far. Here we report on its safety and activity in 33 individuals who received a single intravenous infusion of the antibody. 10-1074 was well tolerated and had a half-life of 24.0 d in participants without HIV-1 infection and 12.8 d in individuals with HIV-1 infection. Thirteen individuals with viremia received the highest dose of 30 mg/kg 10-1074. Eleven of these participants were 10-1074-sensitive and showed a rapid decline in viremia by a mean of 1.52 log10 copies/ml. Virologic analysis revealed the emergence of multiple independent 10-1074-resistant viruses in the first weeks after infusion. Emerging escape variants were generally resistant to the related V3-specific antibody PGT121, but remained sensitive to antibodies targeting nonoverlapping epitopes, such as the anti-CD4-binding-site antibodies 3BNC117 and VRC01. The results demonstrate the safety and activity of 10-1074 in humans and support the idea that antibodies targeting the V3 glycan supersite might be useful for the treatment and prevention of HIV-1 infection.

  15. DC-SIGN plays a stronger role than DCIR in mediating HIV-1 capture and transfer.

    PubMed

    Jin, Wei; Li, Chang; Du, Tao; Hu, Kai; Huang, Xin; Hu, Qinxue

    2014-06-01

    The C-type lectin receptors (CLRs) expressed on dendritic cells (DCs), in particular DC-SIGN and DCIR, likely play an important role in HIV-1 early infection. Here, we systematically compared the capture and transfer capability of DC-SIGN and DCIR using a wide range of HIV-1 isolates. Our results indicated that DC-SIGN plays a stronger role than DCIR in DC-mediated HIV-1 capture and transfer. This was further strengthened by the data from transient and stable transfectants, showing that DC-SIGN had better capability, compared with DCIR in HIV-1 capture and transfer. Following constructing and analyzing a series of soluble DC-SIGN and DCIR truncates and chimeras, we demonstrated that the neck domain, but not the CRD, renders DC-SIGN higher binding affinity to gp120 likely via the formation of tetramerization. Our findings provide insights into CLR-mediated HIV-1 capture and transfer, highlighting potential targets for intervention strategies against gp120-CLR interactions.

  16. HIV-1 Phylogenetic analysis shows HIV-1 transits through the meninges to brain and peripheral tissues

    PubMed Central

    Lamers, Susanna L.; Gray, Rebecca R.; Salemi, Marco; Huysentruyt, Leanne C.; McGrath, Michael

    2010-01-01

    Brain infection by the human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) has been investigated in many reports with a variety of conclusions concerning the time of entry and degree of viral compartmentalization. To address these diverse findings, we sequenced HIV-1 gp120 clones from a wide range of brain, peripheral and meningeal tissues from five patients who died from several HIV-1 associated disease pathologies. High-resolution phylogenetic analysis confirmed previous studies that showed a significant degree of compartmentalization in brain and peripheral tissue subpopulations. Some intermixing between the HIV-1 subpopulations was evident, especially in patients that died from pathologies other than HIV-associated dementia. Interestingly, the major tissue harboring virus from both the brain and peripheral tissues was the meninges. These results show that 1) HIV-1 is clearly capable of migrating out of the brain, 2) the meninges are the most likely primary transport tissues, and 3) infected brain macrophages comprise an important HIV reservoir during highly active antiretroviral therapy. PMID:21055482

  17. The function and affinity maturation of HIV-1 gp120-specific monoclonal antibodies derived from colostral B cells

    PubMed Central

    Jeffries, Thomas L; Sacha, CR; Pollara, Justin; Himes, Jon; Jaeger, Frederick H; Dennison, S Moses; McGuire, Erin; Kunz, Erika; Eudailey, Joshua A; Trama, Ashley M; LaBranche, Celia; Fouda, Genevieve G; Wiehe, Kevin; Montefiori, David C; Haynes, Barton F; Liao, Hua-Xin; Ferrari, Guido; Alam, S Munir; Moody, M Anthony; Permar, Sallie R

    2015-01-01

    Despite the risk of transmitting HIV-1, mothers in resource-poor areas are encouraged to breastfeed their infants due to beneficial immunologic and nutritional factors in milk. Interestingly, in the absence of antiretroviral prophylaxis, the overwhelming majority of HIV-1-exposed, breastfeeding infants are naturally protected from infection. To understand the role of HIV-1 Envelope (Env)-specific antibodies in breast milk in natural protection against infant virus transmission, we produced 19 HIV-1 Env-specific monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) isolated from colostrum B cells of HIV-1-infected mothers and investigated their specificity, evolution and anti-HIV-1 functions. Despite the previously reported genetic compartmentalization and gp120-specific bias of colostrum HIV Env-specific B cells, the colostrum Env-specific mAbs described here demonstrated a broad range of gp120 epitope specificities and functions, including inhibition of epithelial cell binding and dendritic cell mediated virus transfer, neutralization, and antibody-dependent cellular cytotoxicity. Interestingly, we also identified divergent patterns of colostrum Env-specific B cell lineage evolution with respect to cross-reactivity to gastrointestinal commensal bacteria, indicating that commensal bacterial antigens play a role in shaping the local breast milk IgG repertoire. Maternal vaccine strategies to specifically target this breast milk B cell population may be necessary to achieve safe breastfeeding for all HIV-1-exposed infants. PMID:26242599

  18. Near Full-Length Identification of a Novel HIV-1 CRF01_AE/B/C Recombinant in Northern Myanmar.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Yan-Heng; Chen, Xin; Liang, Yue-Bo; Pang, Wei; Qin, Wei-Hong; Zhang, Chiyu; Zheng, Yong-Tang

    2015-08-01

    The Myanmar-China border appears to be the "hot spot" region for the occurrence of HIV-1 recombination. The majority of the previous analyses of HIV-1 recombination were based on partial genomic sequences, which obviously cannot reflect the reality of the genetic diversity of HIV-1 in this area well. Here, we present a near full-length characterization of a novel HIV-1 CRF01_AE/B/C recombinant isolated from a long-distance truck driver in Northern Myanmar. It is the first description of a near full-length genomic sequence in Myanmar since 2003, and might be one of the most complicated HIV-1 chimeras ever detected in Myanmar, containing four CRF01_AE, six B segments, and five C segments separated by 14 breakpoints throughout its genome. The discovery and characterization of this new CRF01_AE/B/C recombinant indicate that intersubtype recombination is ongoing in Myanmar, continuously generating new forms of HIV-1. More work based on near full-length sequence analyses is urgently needed to better understand the genetic diversity of HIV-1 in these regions.

  19. The function and affinity maturation of HIV-1 gp120-specific monoclonal antibodies derived from colostral B cells.

    PubMed

    Jeffries, T L; Sacha, C R; Pollara, J; Himes, J; Jaeger, F H; Dennison, S M; McGuire, E; Kunz, E; Eudailey, J A; Trama, A M; LaBranche, C; Fouda, G G; Wiehe, K; Montefiori, D C; Haynes, B F; Liao, H-X; Ferrari, G; Alam, S M; Moody, M A; Permar, S R

    2016-03-01

    Despite the risk of transmitting HIV-1, mothers in resource-poor areas are encouraged to breastfeed their infants because of beneficial immunologic and nutritional factors in milk. Interestingly, in the absence of antiretroviral prophylaxis, the overwhelming majority of HIV-1-exposed, breastfeeding infants are naturally protected from infection. To understand the role of HIV-1 envelope (Env)-specific antibodies in breast milk in natural protection against infant virus transmission, we produced 19 HIV-1 Env-specific monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) isolated from colostrum B cells of HIV-1-infected mothers and investigated their specificity, evolution, and anti-HIV-1 functions. Despite the previously reported genetic compartmentalization and gp120-specific bias of colostrum HIV Env-specific B cells, the colostrum Env-specific mAbs described here demonstrated a broad range of gp120 epitope specificities and functions, including inhibition of epithelial cell binding and dendritic cell-mediated virus transfer, neutralization, and antibody-dependent cellular cytotoxicity. We also identified divergent patterns of colostrum Env-specific B-cell lineage evolution with respect to crossreactivity to gastrointestinal commensal bacteria, indicating that commensal bacterial antigens play a role in shaping the local breast milk immunoglobulin G (IgG) repertoire. Maternal vaccine strategies to specifically target this breast milk B-cell population may be necessary to achieve safe breastfeeding for all HIV-1-exposed infants.

  20. Semi-synthesis of oxygenated dolabellane diterpenes with highly in vitro anti-HIV-1 activity.

    PubMed

    Pardo-Vargas, Alonso; Ramos, Freddy A; Cirne-Santos, Claudio Cesar; Stephens, Paulo Roberto; Paixão, Izabel Christina Palmer; Teixeira, Valeria Laneuville; Castellanos, Leonardo

    2014-09-15

    Research on dolabellane diterpenes of brown algae Dictyota spp. has shown that these diterpenoids have strong anti-HIV-1 activity, but there are not data about antiviral activity of dolabellane diterpenes isolated from octocorals, which are antipodes of those isolated from the brown algae. Dolabellanes 13-keto-1(R),11(S)-dolabella-3(E),7(E),12(18)-triene (1) and β-Araneosene (2) were isolated from the Caribbean octocoral Eunicea laciniata, and both showed low anti-HIV-1 activity and low toxicity. Since it was shown that oxygenated dolabellanes from algae have better anti-HIV-1 activity, in this work some derivatives of the main dolabellane of E. laciniata1 were obtained by epoxidation (3), epoxide opening (4), and allylic oxidation (5). The derivatives showed significant improvement in the anti-HIV-1potency (100-fold), being compounds 3 and 5 the most active ones. Their high antiviral activities, along with their low cytotoxicity, make them promissory antiviral compounds; and it is worth noting that the absolute configuration at the ring junction in the dolabellane skeleton does not seem to be determinant in the antiviral potency of these diterpeneoids.

  1. HIV-1 VACCINES. HIV-1 neutralizing antibodies induced by native-like envelope trimers.

    PubMed

    Sanders, Rogier W; van Gils, Marit J; Derking, Ronald; Sok, Devin; Ketas, Thomas J; Burger, Judith A; Ozorowski, Gabriel; Cupo, Albert; Simonich, Cassandra; Goo, Leslie; Arendt, Heather; Kim, Helen J; Lee, Jeong Hyun; Pugach, Pavel; Williams, Melissa; Debnath, Gargi; Moldt, Brian; van Breemen, Mariëlle J; Isik, Gözde; Medina-Ramírez, Max; Back, Jaap Willem; Koff, Wayne C; Julien, Jean-Philippe; Rakasz, Eva G; Seaman, Michael S; Guttman, Miklos; Lee, Kelly K; Klasse, Per Johan; LaBranche, Celia; Schief, William R; Wilson, Ian A; Overbaugh, Julie; Burton, Dennis R; Ward, Andrew B; Montefiori, David C; Dean, Hansi; Moore, John P

    2015-07-10

    A challenge for HIV-1 immunogen design is the difficulty of inducing neutralizing antibodies (NAbs) against neutralization-resistant (tier 2) viruses that dominate human transmissions. We show that a soluble recombinant HIV-1 envelope glycoprotein trimer that adopts a native conformation, BG505 SOSIP.664, induced NAbs potently against the sequence-matched tier 2 virus in rabbits and similar but weaker responses in macaques. The trimer also consistently induced cross-reactive NAbs against more sensitive (tier 1) viruses. Tier 2 NAbs recognized conformational epitopes that differed between animals and in some cases overlapped with those recognized by broadly neutralizing antibodies (bNAbs), whereas tier 1 responses targeted linear V3 epitopes. A second trimer, B41 SOSIP.664, also induced a strong autologous tier 2 NAb response in rabbits. Thus, native-like trimers represent a promising starting point for the development of HIV-1 vaccines aimed at inducing bNAbs.

  2. Productive replication and evolution of HIV-1 in ferret cells.

    PubMed

    Fadel, Hind J; Saenz, Dyana T; Guevara, Rebekah; von Messling, Veronika; Peretz, Mary; Poeschla, Eric M

    2012-02-01

    A rodent or other small animal model for HIV-1 has not been forthcoming, with the principal obstacles being species-specific restriction mechanisms and deficits in HIV-1 dependency factors. Some Carnivorans may harbor comparatively fewer impediments. For example, in contrast to mice, the domestic cat genome encodes essential nonreceptor HIV-1 dependency factors. All Feliformia species and at least one Caniformia species also lack a major lentiviral restriction mechanism (TRIM5α/TRIMCyp proteins). Here we investigated cells from two species in another carnivore family, the Mustelidae, for permissiveness to the HIV-1 life cycle. Mustela putorius furo (domesticated ferret) primary cells and cell lines did not restrict HIV-1, feline immunodeficiency virus (FIV), equine infectious anemia virus (EIAV), or N-tropic murine leukemia virus (MLV) postentry and supported late HIV-1 life cycle steps comparably to human cells. The ferret TRIM5α gene exon 8, which encodes the B30.2 domain, was found to be pseudogenized. Strikingly, ferret (but not mink) cells engineered to express human HIV-1 entry receptors supported productive spreading replication, amplification, and serial passage of wild-type HIV-1. Nevertheless, produced virions had relatively reduced infectivity and the virus accrued G→A hypermutations, consistent with APOBEC3 protein pressure. Ferret cell-passaged HIV-1 also evolved amino acid changes in the capsid cyclophilin A binding loop. We conclude that the genome of this carnivore can provide essential nonreceptor HIV-1 dependency factors and that ferret APOBEC3 proteins with activity against HIV-1 are likely. Even so, unlike in cat cells, HIV-1 can replicate in ferret cells without vif substitution. The virus evolves in this novel nonprimate cell adaptive landscape. We suggest that further characterization of HIV-1 adaptation in ferret cells and delineation of Mustelidae restriction factor repertoires are warranted, with a view to the potential for an HIV-1

  3. Bispecific Antibodies Targeting Different Epitopes on the HIV-1 Envelope Exhibit Broad and Potent Neutralization

    PubMed Central

    Asokan, M.; Rudicell, R. S.; Louder, M.; McKee, K.; O'Dell, S.; Stewart-Jones, G.; Wang, K.; Xu, L.; Chen, X.; Choe, M.; Chuang, G.; Georgiev, I. S.; Joyce, M. G.; Kirys, T.; Ko, S.; Pegu, A.; Shi, W.; Todd, J. P.; Yang, Z.; Bailer, R. T.; Rao, S.; Kwong, P. D.; Nabel, G. J.

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT The potency and breadth of the recently isolated neutralizing human monoclonal antibodies to HIV-1 have stimulated interest in their use to prevent or to treat HIV-1 infection. Due to the antigenically diverse nature of the HIV-1 envelope (Env), no single antibody is highly active against all viral strains. While the physical combination of two broadly neutralizing antibodies (bNAbs) can improve coverage against the majority of viruses, the clinical-grade manufacturing and testing of two independent antibody products are time and resource intensive. In this study, we constructed bispecific immunoglobulins (IgGs) composed of independent antigen-binding fragments with a common Fc region. We developed four different bispecific IgG variants that included antibodies targeting four major sites of HIV-1 neutralization. We show that these bispecific IgGs display features of both antibody specificities and, in some cases, display improved coverage over the individual parental antibodies. All four bispecific IgGs neutralized 94% to 97% of antigenically diverse viruses in a panel of 206 HIV-1 strains. Among the bispecific IgGs tested, VRC07 × PG9-16 displayed the most favorable neutralization profile. It was superior in breadth to either of the individual antibodies, neutralizing 97% of viruses with a median 50% inhibitory concentration (IC50) of 0.055 μg/ml. This bispecific IgG also demonstrated in vivo pharmacokinetic parameters comparable to those of the parental bNAbs when administered to rhesus macaques. These results suggest that IgG-based bispecific antibodies are promising candidates for the prevention and treatment of HIV-1 infection in humans. IMPORTANCE To prevent or treat HIV-1 infection, antibodies must potently neutralize nearly all strains of HIV-1. Thus, the physical combination of two or more antibodies may be needed to broaden neutralization coverage and diminish the possibility of viral resistance. A bispecific antibody that has two different

  4. HIV-1 Accessory Proteins: Vpu and Vif

    PubMed Central

    Andrew, Amy; Strebel, Klaus

    2014-01-01

    HIV-1 Vif and Vpu are accessory factors involved in late stages of viral replication. Vif regulates viral infectivity by preventing virion incorporation of APOBEC3G and other members of the family of cytidine deaminases, while Vpu causes degradation of CD4 and promotes virus release by functionally inactivating the host factor BST-2. This chapter described techniques used for the characterization of Vif and Vpu and their functional interaction with host factors. Many of the techniques are, however, applicable to the functional analysis of other viral proteins. PMID:24158820

  5. Combination of the CCL5-Derived Peptide R4.0 with Different HIV-1 Blockers Reveals Wide Target Compatibility and Synergic Cobinding to CCR5

    PubMed Central

    Secchi, Massimiliano; Vassena, Lia; Morin, Sébastien; Schols, Dominique

    2014-01-01

    R4.0, a synthetic CCL5/RANTES-derived peptide, exerts potent anti-HIV-1 activity via its nonactivating interaction with CCR5, the major HIV-1 coreceptor. CCR5 chronic activation may promote undesirable inflammatory effects and enhance viral infection; thus, receptor antagonism is a necessary requisite. HIV-1 gp120, CCL5, and maraviroc dock on CCR5 by sharing two receptor sites: the N terminus and the second extracellular loop. In combination studies, R4.0, CCL5, and maraviroc exhibited concomitant interactions with CCR5 and promoted synergic inhibition of HIV-1 in acute-infection assays. Furthermore, various degrees of additive/synergic HIV-1 inhibition were observed when R4.0 was tested in combination with drugs and lead compounds directed toward different viral targets (gp120, gp41, reverse transcriptase, and protease). In combination with tenofovir, R4.0 provides cross-clade synergic inhibition of primary HIV-1 isolates. Remarkably, an in vitro-generated maraviroc-resistant R5 HIV-1 strain was inhibited by R4.0 comparably to the wild-type strain, suggesting the presence of viral resistance barriers similar to those reported for CCL5. Overall, R4.0 appears to be a promising lead peptide with potential for combination in anti-HIV-1 therapy and in microbicide development to prevent sexual HIV-1 transmission. PMID:25114130

  6. Combination of the CCL5-derived peptide R4.0 with different HIV-1 blockers reveals wide target compatibility and synergic cobinding to CCR5.

    PubMed

    Secchi, Massimiliano; Vassena, Lia; Morin, Sébastien; Schols, Dominique; Vangelista, Luca

    2014-10-01

    R4.0, a synthetic CCL5/RANTES-derived peptide, exerts potent anti-HIV-1 activity via its nonactivating interaction with CCR5, the major HIV-1 coreceptor. CCR5 chronic activation may promote undesirable inflammatory effects and enhance viral infection; thus, receptor antagonism is a necessary requisite. HIV-1 gp120, CCL5, and maraviroc dock on CCR5 by sharing two receptor sites: the N terminus and the second extracellular loop. In combination studies, R4.0, CCL5, and maraviroc exhibited concomitant interactions with CCR5 and promoted synergic inhibition of HIV-1 in acute-infection assays. Furthermore, various degrees of additive/synergic HIV-1 inhibition were observed when R4.0 was tested in combination with drugs and lead compounds directed toward different viral targets (gp120, gp41, reverse transcriptase, and protease). In combination with tenofovir, R4.0 provides cross-clade synergic inhibition of primary HIV-1 isolates. Remarkably, an in vitro-generated maraviroc-resistant R5 HIV-1 strain was inhibited by R4.0 comparably to the wild-type strain, suggesting the presence of viral resistance barriers similar to those reported for CCL5. Overall, R4.0 appears to be a promising lead peptide with potential for combination in anti-HIV-1 therapy and in microbicide development to prevent sexual HIV-1 transmission.

  7. Methamphetamine inhibits HIV-1 replication in CD4+ T cells by modulating anti-HIV-1 miRNA expression.

    PubMed

    Mantri, Chinmay K; Mantri, Jyoti V; Pandhare, Jui; Dash, Chandravanu

    2014-01-01

    Methamphetamine is the second most frequently used illicit drug in the United States. Methamphetamine abuse is associated with increased risk of HIV-1 acquisition, higher viral loads, and enhanced HIV-1 pathogenesis. Although a direct link between methamphetamine abuse and HIV-1 pathogenesis remains to be established in patients, methamphetamine has been shown to increase HIV-1 replication in macrophages, dendritic cells, and cells of HIV transgenic mice. Intriguingly, the effects of methamphetamine on HIV-1 replication in human CD4(+) T cells that serve as the primary targets of infection in vivo are not clearly understood. Therefore, we examined HIV-1 replication in primary CD4(+) T cells in the presence of methamphetamine in a dose-dependent manner. Our results demonstrate that methamphetamine had a minimal effect on HIV-1 replication at concentrations of 1 to 50 μmol/L. However, at concentrations >100 μmol/L, it inhibited HIV-1 replication in a dose-dependent manner. We also discovered that methamphetamine up-regulated the cellular anti-HIV-1 microRNAs (miR-125b, miR-150, and miR-28-5p) in CD4(+) T cells. Knockdown experiments illustrated that up-regulation of the anti-HIV miRNAs inhibited HIV-1 replication. These results are contrary to the paradigm that methamphetamine accentuates HIV-1 pathogenesis by increasing HIV-1 replication. Therefore, our findings underline the complex interaction between drug use and HIV-1 and necessitate comprehensive understanding of the effects of methamphetamine on HIV-1 pathogenesis.

  8. Methamphetamine Inhibits HIV-1 Replication in CD4+ T Cells by Modulating Anti–HIV-1 miRNA Expression

    PubMed Central

    Mantri, Chinmay K.; Mantri, Jyoti V.; Pandhare, Jui; Dash, Chandravanu

    2015-01-01

    Methamphetamine is the second most frequently used illicit drug in the United States. Methamphetamine abuse is associated with increased risk of HIV-1 acquisition, higher viral loads, and enhanced HIV-1 pathogenesis. Although a direct link between methamphetamine abuse and HIV-1 pathogenesis remains to be established in patients, methamphetamine has been shown to increase HIV-1 replication in macrophages, dendritic cells, and cells of HIV transgenic mice. Intriguingly, the effects of methamphetamine on HIV-1 replication in human CD4+ T cells that serve as the primary targets of infection in vivo are not clearly understood. Therefore, we examined HIV-1 replication in primary CD4+ T cells in the presence of methamphetamine in a dose-dependent manner. Our results demonstrate that methamphetamine had a minimal effect on HIV-1 replication at concentrations of 1 to 50 μmol/L. However, at concentrations >100 μmol/L, it inhibited HIV-1 replication in a dose-dependent manner. We also discovered that methamphetamine up-regulated the cellular anti–HIV-1 microRNAs (miR-125b, miR-150, and miR-28-5p) in CD4+ T cells. Knockdown experiments illustrated that up-regulation of the anti-HIV miRNAs inhibited HIV-1 replication. These results are contrary to the paradigm that methamphetamine accentuates HIV-1 pathogenesis by increasing HIV-1 replication. Therefore, our findings underline the complex interaction between drug use and HIV-1 and necessitate comprehensive understanding of the effects of methamphetamine on HIV-1 pathogenesis. PMID:24434277

  9. The impact of HIV-1 genetic diversity on the efficacy of a combinatorial RNAi-based gene therapy.

    PubMed

    Herrera-Carrillo, E; Berkhout, B

    2015-06-01

    A hurdle for human immunodeficiency virus (HIV-1) therapy is the genomic diversity of circulating viruses and the possibility that drug-resistant virus variants are selected. Although RNA interference (RNAi) is a powerful tool to stably inhibit HIV-1 replication by the expression of antiviral short hairpin RNAs (shRNAs) in transduced T cells, this approach is also vulnerable to pre-existing genetic variation and the development of viral resistance through mutation. To prevent viral escape, we proposed to combine multiple shRNAs against important regions of the HIV-1 RNA genome, which should ideally be conserved in all HIV-1 subtypes. The vulnerability of RNAi therapy to viral escape has been studied for a single subtype B strain, but it is unclear whether the antiviral shRNAs can inhibit diverse virus isolates and subtypes, including drug-resistant variants that could be present in treated patients. To determine the breadth of the RNAi gene therapy approach, we studied the susceptibility of HIV-1 subtypes A-E and drug-resistant variants. In addition, we monitored the evolution of HIV-1 escape variants. We demonstrate that the combinatorial RNAi therapy is highly effective against most isolates, supporting the future testing of this gene therapy in appropriate in vivo models.

  10. Zinc coupling potentiates anti-HIV-1 activity of baicalin.

    PubMed

    Wang, Qian; Wang, Yu-Tian; Pu, Shao-Ping; Zheng, Yong-Tang

    2004-11-12

    Baicalin (BA) has been shown with anti-HIV-1 activity. Zinc is a nutrient element. The anti-HIV-1 activity of zinc complex of baicalin (BA-Zn) in vitro was studied and compared with the anti-HIV-1 activities between BA and BA-Zn in the present study. Our results suggested that BA-Zn has lower cytotoxicity and higher anti-HIV-1 activity compared with those of BA in vitro. The CC50s of BA-Zn and BA were 221.52 and 101.73 microM, respectively. The cytotoxicity of BA-Zn was about 1.2-fold lower than that of BA. The BA and BA-Zn inhibited HIV-1 induced syncytium formation, HIV-1 p24 antigen and HIV-1 RT production. The EC50s of BA-Zn on inhibiting HIV-1 induced syncytium formation (29.08 microM) and RT production (31.17 microM) were lower than those of BA (43.27 and 47.34 microM, respectively). BA-Zn was more effective than BA in inhibiting the activities of recombinant RT and HIV-1 entry into host cells. Zinc coupling enhanced the anti-HIV-1 activity of baicalin.

  11. High Degree of HIV-1 Group M (HIV-1M) Genetic Diversity within Circulating Recombinant Forms: Insight into the Early Events of HIV-1M Evolution.

    PubMed

    Tongo, Marcel; Dorfman, Jeffrey R; Martin, Darren P

    2015-12-09

    The existence of various highly divergent HIV-1 lineages and of recombination-derived sequence tracts of indeterminate origin within established circulating recombinant forms (CRFs) strongly suggests that HIV-1 group M (HIV-1M) diversity is not fully represented under the current classification system. Here we used a fully exploratory screen for recombination on a set of 480 near-full-length genomes representing the full known diversity of HIV-1M. We decomposed recombinant sequences into their constituent parts and then used maximum-likelihood phylogenetic analyses of this mostly recombination-free data set to identify rare divergent sequence lineages that fall outside the major named HIV-1M taxonomic groupings. We found that many of the sequence fragments occurring within CRFs (including CRF04_cpx, CRF06_cpx, CRF11_cpx, CRF18_cpx, CRF25_cpx, CRF27_cpx, and CRF49_cpx) are in fact likely derived from divergent unclassified parental lineages that may predate the current subtypes, even though they are presently identified as derived from currently defined HIV-1M subtypes. Our evidence suggests that some of these CRFs are descended predominantly from what were or are major previously unidentified HIV-1M lineages that were likely epidemiologically relevant during the early stages of the HIV-1M epidemic. The restriction of these divergent lineages to the Congo basin suggests that they were less infectious and/or simply not present at the time and place of the initial migratory wave that triggered the global epidemic.IMPORTANCE HIV-1 group M (HIV-1M) likely spread to the rest of the world from the Congo basin in the mid-1900s (N. R. Faria et al., Science 346:56-61, 2014, http://dx.doi.org/10.1126/science.1256739) and is today the principal cause of the AIDS pandemic. Here, we show that large sequence fragments from several HIV-1M circulating recombinant forms (CRFs) are derived from divergent parental lineages that cannot reasonably be classified within the nine

  12. High Degree of HIV-1 Group M (HIV-1M) Genetic Diversity within Circulating Recombinant Forms: Insight into the Early Events of HIV-1M Evolution

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT The existence of various highly divergent HIV-1 lineages and of recombination-derived sequence tracts of indeterminate origin within established circulating recombinant forms (CRFs) strongly suggests that HIV-1 group M (HIV-1M) diversity is not fully represented under the current classification system. Here we used a fully exploratory screen for recombination on a set of 480 near-full-length genomes representing the full known diversity of HIV-1M. We decomposed recombinant sequences into their constituent parts and then used maximum-likelihood phylogenetic analyses of this mostly recombination-free data set to identify rare divergent sequence lineages that fall outside the major named HIV-1M taxonomic groupings. We found that many of the sequence fragments occurring within CRFs (including CRF04_cpx, CRF06_cpx, CRF11_cpx, CRF18_cpx, CRF25_cpx, CRF27_cpx, and CRF49_cpx) are in fact likely derived from divergent unclassified parental lineages that may predate the current subtypes, even though they are presently identified as derived from currently defined HIV-1M subtypes. Our evidence suggests that some of these CRFs are descended predominantly from what were or are major previously unidentified HIV-1M lineages that were likely epidemiologically relevant during the early stages of the HIV-1M epidemic. The restriction of these divergent lineages to the Congo basin suggests that they were less infectious and/or simply not present at the time and place of the initial migratory wave that triggered the global epidemic. IMPORTANCE HIV-1 group M (HIV-1M) likely spread to the rest of the world from the Congo basin in the mid-1900s (N. R. Faria et al., Science 346:56–61, 2014, http://dx.doi.org/10.1126/science.1256739) and is today the principal cause of the AIDS pandemic. Here, we show that large sequence fragments from several HIV-1M circulating recombinant forms (CRFs) are derived from divergent parental lineages that cannot reasonably be classified within the

  13. Cloning and Expression of Soluble Recombinant HIV-1 CRF35 Protease-HP Thioredoxin Fusion Protein

    PubMed Central

    Azarnezhad, Asaad; Sharifi, Zohreh; Seyedabadi, Rahmatollah; Hosseini, Arshad; Johari, Behrooz; Sobhani Fard, Mahsa

    2016-01-01

    Background: As a drug target and an antigenic agent, HIV-1 protease (HIV-1 PR) is at the center of attention for designing anti-AIDS inhibitors and diagnostic tests. In previous studies, the production of the recombinant protease has been faced with several difficulties; therefore, the aims of this study were the easy production, purification of the soluble form of protease in E. coli and investigation of its immunoreactivity. Methods: Protease coding region was isolated from the serum of an infected individual, amplified by RT-PCR and cloned into PTZ57R using TA-cloning. Protease coding frame was isolated by PCR and cloned in pET102/D. TOPO expression vector and cloned protease was expressed in Escherichia coli (E. coli) BL21. Produced recombinant protein was purified by affinity Ni-NTA column and protein concentration was checked by BCA protein assay kit. Subsequently, immunoreactivity of recombinant protease (rPR) was assayed by Western blotting and ELISA. Results: Cloning of the HIV protease by TOPO cloning system in pET102/D.TOPO was confirmed with PCR and sequencing. The concentration range of purified recombinant protein was 85 to 100 μg/ml. Immunogenicity of rPR was confirmed by Western blotting and ELISA. Conclusion: Soluble production of recombinant HIV-1 protease (HIV-1 rPR) was performed successfully. This recombinant protein disclosed 86% specificity and 90% sensitivity in immunoassay tests. PMID:27920885

  14. Identification of a small-molecule inhibitor of HIV-1 assembly that targets the phosphatidylinositol (4,5)-bisphosphate binding site of the HIV-1 matrix protein.

    PubMed

    Zentner, Isaac; Sierra, Luz-Jeannette; Fraser, Ayesha K; Maciunas, Lina; Mankowski, Marie K; Vinnik, Andrei; Fedichev, Peter; Ptak, Roger G; Martín-García, Julio; Cocklin, Simon

    2013-03-01

    The development of drug resistance remains a critical problem for current HIV-1 antiviral therapies, creating a need for new inhibitors of HIV-1 replication. We previously reported on a novel anti-HIV-1 compound, N(2)-(phenoxyacetyl)-N-[4-(1-piperidinylcarbonyl)benzyl]glycinamide (14), that binds to the highly conserved phosphatidylinositol (4,5)-bisphosphate (PI(4,5)P(2)) binding pocket of the HIV-1 matrix (MA) protein. In this study, we re-evaluate the hits from the virtual screen used to identify compound 14 and test them directly in an HIV-1 replication assay using primary human peripheral blood mononuclear cells. This study resulted in the identification of three new compounds with antiviral activity; 2-(4-{[3-(4-fluorophenyl)-1,2,4-oxadiazol-5-yl]methyl})-1-piperazinyl)-N-(4-methylphenyl)acetamide (7), 3-(2-ethoxyphenyl)-5-[[4-(4-nitrophenyl)piperazin-1-yl]methyl]-1,2,4-oxadiazole (17), and N-[4-ethoxy-3-(1-piperidinylsulfonyl)phenyl]-2-(imidazo[2,1-b][1,3]thiazol-6-yl)acetamide (18), with compound 7 being the most potent of these hits. Mechanistic studies on 7 demonstrated that it directly interacts with and functions through HIV-1 MA. In accordance with our drug target, compound 7 competes with PI(4,5)P(2) for MA binding and, as a result, diminishes the production of new virus. Mutation of residues within the PI(4,5)P(2) binding site of MA decreased the antiviral effect of compound 7. Additionally, compound 7 displays a broadly neutralizing anti-HIV activity, with IC(50) values of 7.5-15.6 μM for the group M isolates tested. Taken together, these results point towards a novel chemical probe that can be used to more closely study the biological role of MA and could, through further optimization, lead to a new class of anti-HIV-1 therapeutics.

  15. Nucleoprotein complex intermediates in HIV-1 integration

    PubMed Central

    Li, Min; Craigie, Robert

    2012-01-01

    Integration of retroviral DNA into the host genome is an essential step in the viral replication cycle. The viral DNA, made by reverse transcription in the cytoplasm, forms part of a large nucleoprotein complex called the preintegration complex (PIC). The viral integrase protein is the enzyme within the PIC that is responsible for integrating the viral DNA into the host genome. Integrase is tightly associated with the viral DNA within the PIC as demonstrated by functional assays. Integrase protein catalyzes the key DNA cutting and joining steps of integration in vitro with DNA substrates that mimic the ends of the viral DNA. Under most in vitro assay conditions the stringency of the reaction is relaxed; most products result from “half-site” integration in which only one viral DNA end is integrated into one strand of target DNA rather than concerted integration of pairs of DNA as occurs with PICs and in vivo. Under these relaxed conditions catalysis appears to occur without formation of the highly stable nucleoprotein complexes that is characteristic of the association of integrase with viral DNA in the PIC. Here we describe methods for the assembly of nucleoprotein complex intermediates in HIV-1 DNA integration from purified HIV-1 integrase and substrates that mimic the viral DNA ends. PMID:19232539

  16. Cyclophilin B enhances HIV-1 infection

    SciTech Connect

    DeBoer, Jason; Madson, Christian J.; Belshan, Michael

    2016-02-15

    Cyclophilin B (CypB) is a member of the immunophilin family and intracellular chaperone. It predominantly localizes to the ER, but also contains a nuclear localization signal and is secreted from cells. CypB has been shown to interact with the Gag protein of human immunodeficiency type 1 (HIV-1). Several proteomic and genetic studies identified it as a potential factor involved in HIV replication. Herein, we show that over-expression of CypB enhances HIV infection by increasing nuclear import of viral DNA. This enhancement was unaffected by cyclosporine treatment and requires the N-terminus of the protein. The N-terminus contains an ER leader sequence, putative nuclear localization signal, and is required for secretion. Deletion of the N-terminus resulted in mislocalization from the ER and suppression of HIV infection. Passive transfer experiments showed that secreted CypB did not impact HIV infection. Combined, these experiments show that intracellular CypB modulates a pathway of HIV nuclear import. - Highlights: • CypB has been identified in several proteomic studies of HIV-1 infection. • CypB expression is upregulated in activated and infected T-cells. • Over-expression of CypB enhances HIV nuclear import and infection. • The N-terminus of CypB is necessary for these effects.

  17. Hydroxytyrosol: a new class of microbicide displaying broad anti-HIV-1 activity

    PubMed Central

    Bedoya, Luis M.; Beltrán, Manuela; Obregón-Calderón, Patricia; García-Pérez, Javier; de la Torre, Humberto E.; González, Nuria; Pérez-Olmeda, Mayte; Auñón, David; Capa, Laura; Gómez-Acebo, Eduardo; Alcamí, José

    2016-01-01

    Objective: To investigate the toxicity and activity against HIV of 5-hydroxytyrosol as a potential microbicide. Design: The anti-HIV-1 activity of 5-hydroxytyrosol, a polyphenolic compound, was tested against wild-type HIV-1 and viral clones resistant to nucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitors (NRTIs), non-nucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitors (NNRTIs), protease inhibitors and integrase inhibitors. In addition to its activity against founder viruses, different viral subtypes and potential synergy with tenofovir disoproxil fumarate, lamivudine and emtricitabine was also tested. 5-Hydroxytyrosol toxicity was evaluated in vivo in rabbit vaginal mucosa. Methods: We have cloned pol gene from drug-resistant HIV-1 isolated from infected patients and env gene from Fiebeg III/IV patients or A, C, D, E, F and G subtypes in the NL4.3-Ren backbone. 5-Hydroxytyrosol anti-HIV-1 activity was evaluated in infections of MT-2, U87-CCR5 or peripheral blood mononuclear cells preactivated with phytohemagglutinin + interleukin-2 with viruses obtained through 293T transfections. Inhibitory concentration 50% and cytotoxic concentration 50% were calculated. Synergy was analysed according to Chou and Talalay method. In-vivo toxicity was evaluated for 14 days in rabbit vaginal mucosa. Results: 5-Hydroxytyrosol inhibited HIV-1 infections of recombinant or wild-type viruses in all the target cells tested. Moreover, 5-hydroxytyrosol showed similar inhibitory concentration 50% values for infections with NRTIs, NNRTIs, protease inhibitors and INIs resistant viruses; founder viruses and all the subtypes tested. Combination of 5-hydroxytyrosol with tenofovir was found to be synergistic, whereas it was additive with lamivudine and emtricitabine. In-vivo toxicity of 5-hydroxytyrosol was very low even at the highest tested doses. Conclusion: 5-Hydroxytyrosol displayed a broad anti-HIV-1 activity in different cells systems in the absent of in-vivo toxicity, therefore supporting its

  18. Reviewing the history of HIV-1: spread of subtype B in the Americas.

    PubMed

    Junqueira, Dennis Maletich; de Medeiros, Rúbia Marília; Matte, Maria Cristina Cotta; Araújo, Leonardo Augusto Luvison; Chies, Jose Artur Bogo; Ashton-Prolla, Patricia; Almeida, Sabrina Esteves de Matos

    2011-01-01

    The dispersal of HIV-1 subtype B (HIV-1B) is a reflection of the movement of human populations in response to social, political, and geographical issues. The initial dissemination of HIV-1B outside Africa seems to have included the passive involvement of human populations from the Caribbean in spreading the virus to the United States. However, the exact pathways taken during the establishment of the pandemic in the Americas remain unclear. Here, we propose a geographical scenario for the dissemination of HIV-1B in the Americas, based on phylogenetic and genetic statistical analyses of 313 available sequences of the pol gene from 27 countries. Maximum likelihood and bayesian inference methods were used to explore the phylogenetic relationships between HIV-1B sequences, and molecular variance estimates were analyzed to infer the genetic structure of the viral population. We found that the initial dissemination and subsequent spread of subtype B in the Americas occurred via a single introduction event in the Caribbean around 1964 (1950-1967). Phylogenetic trees present evidence of several primary outbreaks in countries in South America, directly seeded by the Caribbean epidemic. Cuba is an exception insofar as its epidemic seems to have been introduced from South America. One clade comprising isolates from different countries emerged in the most-derived branches, reflecting the intense circulation of the virus throughout the American continents. Statistical analysis supports the genetic compartmentalization of the virus among the Americas, with a close relationship between the South American and Caribbean epidemics. These findings reflect the complex establishment of the HIV-1B pandemic and contribute to our understanding between the migration process of human populations and virus diffusion.

  19. Alkyl Amine Bevirimat Derivatives Are Potent and Broadly Active HIV-1 Maturation Inhibitors

    PubMed Central

    Urano, Emiko; Ablan, Sherimay D.; Mandt, Rebecca; Pauly, Gary T.; Sigano, Dina M.; Schneider, Joel P.; Martin, David E.; Nitz, Theodore J.; Wild, Carl T.

    2015-01-01

    Concomitant with the release of human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) particles from the infected cell, the viral protease cleaves the Gag polyprotein precursor at a number of sites to trigger virus maturation. We previously reported that a betulinic acid-derived compound, bevirimat (BVM), blocks HIV-1 maturation by disrupting a late step in protease-mediated Gag processing: the cleavage of the capsid-spacer peptide 1 (CA-SP1) intermediate to mature CA. BVM was shown in multiple clinical trials to be safe and effective in reducing viral loads in HIV-1-infected patients. However, naturally occurring polymorphisms in the SP1 region of Gag (e.g., SP1-V7A) led to a variable response in some BVM-treated patients. The reduced susceptibility of SP1-polymorphic HIV-1 to BVM resulted in the discontinuation of its clinical development. To overcome the loss of BVM activity induced by polymorphisms in SP1, we carried out an extensive medicinal chemistry campaign to develop novel maturation inhibitors. In this study, we focused on alkyl amine derivatives modified at the C-28 position of the BVM scaffold. We identified a set of derivatives that are markedly more potent than BVM against an HIV-1 clade B clone (NL4-3) and show robust antiviral activity against a variant of NL4-3 containing the V7A polymorphism in SP1. One of the most potent of these compounds also strongly inhibited a multiclade panel of primary HIV-1 isolates. These data demonstrate that C-28 alkyl amine derivatives of BVM can, to a large extent, overcome the loss of susceptibility imposed by polymorphisms in SP1. PMID:26482309

  20. HIV-1 Integrates Widely throughout the Genome of the Human Blood Fluke Schistosoma mansoni

    PubMed Central

    Mann, Victoria H.; Dubrovsky, Larisa; Yan, Hong-bin; Huckvale, Thomas; Protasio, Anna V.; Pushkarsky, Tatiana; Iordanskiy, Sergey; Bukrinsky, Michael I.

    2016-01-01

    Schistosomiasis is the most important helminthic disease of humanity in terms of morbidity and mortality. Facile manipulation of schistosomes using lentiviruses would enable advances in functional genomics in these and related neglected tropical diseases pathogens including tapeworms, and including their non-dividing cells. Such approaches have hitherto been unavailable. Blood stream forms of the human blood fluke, Schistosoma mansoni, the causative agent of the hepatointestinal schistosomiasis, were infected with the human HIV-1 isolate NL4-3 pseudotyped with vesicular stomatitis virus glycoprotein. The appearance of strong stop and positive strand cDNAs indicated that virions fused to schistosome cells, the nucleocapsid internalized and the RNA genome reverse transcribed. Anchored PCR analysis, sequencing HIV-1-specific anchored Illumina libraries and Whole Genome Sequencing (WGS) of schistosomes confirmed chromosomal integration; >8,000 integrations were mapped, distributed throughout the eight pairs of chromosomes including the sex chromosomes. The rate of integrations in the genome exceeded five per 1,000 kb and HIV-1 integrated into protein-encoding loci and elsewhere with integration bias dissimilar to that of human T cells. We estimated ~ 2,100 integrations per schistosomulum based on WGS, i.e. about two or three events per cell, comparable to integration rates in human cells. Accomplishment in schistosomes of post-entry processes essential for HIV-1replication, including integrase-catalyzed integration, was remarkable given the phylogenetic distance between schistosomes and primates, the natural hosts of the genus Lentivirus. These enigmatic findings revealed that HIV-1 was active within cells of S. mansoni, and provided the first demonstration that HIV-1 can integrate into the genome of an invertebrate. PMID:27764257

  1. HIV-1 Integrates Widely throughout the Genome of the Human Blood Fluke Schistosoma mansoni.

    PubMed

    Suttiprapa, Sutas; Rinaldi, Gabriel; Tsai, Isheng J; Mann, Victoria H; Dubrovsky, Larisa; Yan, Hong-Bin; Holroyd, Nancy; Huckvale, Thomas; Durrant, Caroline; Protasio, Anna V; Pushkarsky, Tatiana; Iordanskiy, Sergey; Berriman, Matthew; Bukrinsky, Michael I; Brindley, Paul J

    2016-10-01

    Schistosomiasis is the most important helminthic disease of humanity in terms of morbidity and mortality. Facile manipulation of schistosomes using lentiviruses would enable advances in functional genomics in these and related neglected tropical diseases pathogens including tapeworms, and including their non-dividing cells. Such approaches have hitherto been unavailable. Blood stream forms of the human blood fluke, Schistosoma mansoni, the causative agent of the hepatointestinal schistosomiasis, were infected with the human HIV-1 isolate NL4-3 pseudotyped with vesicular stomatitis virus glycoprotein. The appearance of strong stop and positive strand cDNAs indicated that virions fused to schistosome cells, the nucleocapsid internalized and the RNA genome reverse transcribed. Anchored PCR analysis, sequencing HIV-1-specific anchored Illumina libraries and Whole Genome Sequencing (WGS) of schistosomes confirmed chromosomal integration; >8,000 integrations were mapped, distributed throughout the eight pairs of chromosomes including the sex chromosomes. The rate of integrations in the genome exceeded five per 1,000 kb and HIV-1 integrated into protein-encoding loci and elsewhere with integration bias dissimilar to that of human T cells. We estimated ~ 2,100 integrations per schistosomulum based on WGS, i.e. about two or three events per cell, comparable to integration rates in human cells. Accomplishment in schistosomes of post-entry processes essential for HIV-1replication, including integrase-catalyzed integration, was remarkable given the phylogenetic distance between schistosomes and primates, the natural hosts of the genus Lentivirus. These enigmatic findings revealed that HIV-1 was active within cells of S. mansoni, and provided the first demonstration that HIV-1 can integrate into the genome of an invertebrate.

  2. Broadly neutralizing antibodies: An approach to control HIV-1 infection.

    PubMed

    Yaseen, Mahmoud Mohammad; Yaseen, Mohammad Mahmoud; Alqudah, Mohammad Ali

    2017-01-02

    Although available antiretroviral therapy (ART) has changed human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)-1 infection to a non-fatal chronic disease, the economic burden of lifelong therapy, severe adverse ART effects, daily ART adherence, and emergence of ART-resistant HIV-1 mutants require prospecting for alternative therapeutic modalities. Indeed, a growing body of evidence suggests that broadly neutralizing anti-HIV-1 antibodies (BNAbs) may offer one such feasible alternative. To evaluate their therapeutic potential in established HIV-1 infection, we sought to address recent advances in pre-clinical and clinical investigations in this area of HIV-1 research. In addition, we addressed the obstacles that may impede the success of such immunotherapeutic approach, suggested strategic solutions, and briefly compared this approach with the currently used ART to open new insights for potential future passive immunotherapy for HIV-1 infection.

  3. The V3 Loop of HIV-1 Env Determines Viral Susceptibility to IFITM3 Impairment of Viral Infectivity.

    PubMed

    Wang, Yimeng; Pan, Qinghua; Ding, Shilei; Wang, Zhen; Yu, Jingyou; Finzi, Andrés; Liu, Shan-Lu; Liang, Chen

    2017-04-01

    Interferon-inducible transmembrane proteins (IFITMs) inhibit a broad spectrum of viruses, including HIV-1. IFITM proteins deter HIV-1 entry when expressed in target cells and also impair HIV-1 infectivity when expressed in virus producer cells. However, little is known about how viruses resist IFITM inhibition. In this study, we have investigated the susceptibilities of different primary isolates of HIV-1 to the inhibition of viral infectivity by IFITMs. Our results demonstrate that the infectivity of different HIV-1 primary isolates, including transmitted founder viruses, is diminished by IFITM3 to various levels, with strain AD8-1 exhibiting strong resistance. Further mutagenesis studies revealed that HIV-1 Env, and the V3 loop sequence in particular, determines the extent of inhibition of viral infectivity by IFITM3. IFITM3-sensitive Env proteins are also more susceptible to neutralization by soluble CD4 or the 17b antibody than are IFITM3-resistant Env proteins. Together, data from our study suggest that the propensity of HIV-1 Env to sample CD4-bound-like conformations modulates viral sensitivity to IFITM3 inhibition.IMPORTANCE Results of our study have revealed the key features of the HIV-1 envelope protein that are associated with viral resistance to the IFITM3 protein. IFITM proteins are important effectors in interferon-mediated antiviral defense. A variety of viruses are inhibited by IFITMs at the virus entry step. Although it is known that envelope proteins of several different viruses resist IFITM inhibition, the detailed mechanisms are not fully understood. Taking advantage of the fact that envelope proteins of different HIV-1 strains exhibit different degrees of resistance to IFITM3 and that these HIV-1 envelope proteins share the same domain structure and similar sequences, we performed mutagenesis studies and determined the key role of the V3 loop in this viral resistance phenotype. We were also able to associate viral resistance to IFITM3

  4. HSV-2- and HIV-1- permissive cell lines co-infected by HSV-2 and HIV-1 co-replicate HSV-2 and HIV-1 without production of HSV-2/HIV-1 pseudotype particles

    PubMed Central

    LeGoff, Jérôme; Bouhlal, Hicham; Lecerf, Maxime; Klein, Christophe; Hocini, Hakim; Si-Mohamed, Ali; Muggeridge, Martin; Bélec, Laurent

    2007-01-01

    Background Herpes simplex virus type 2 (HSV-2) is a major cofactor of human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) sexual acquisition and transmission. In the present study, we investigated whether HIV-1 and HSV-2 may interact at the cellular level by forming HIV-1 hybrid virions pseudotyped with HSV-2 envelope glycoproteins, as was previously reported for HSV type 1. Methods We evaluated in vitro the production of HSV-2/HIV-1 pseudotypes in mononuclear CEM cells and epithelial HT29 and P4P cells. We analyzed the incorporation into the HIV-1 membrane of HSV-2 gB and gD, two major HSV-2 glycoproteins required for HSV-2 fusion with the cell membrane, in co-infected cells and in HIV-1-infected P4P cells transfected by plasmids coding for gB or gD. Results We show that HSV-2 and HIV-1 co-replicated in dually infected cells, and gB and gD were co-localized with gp160. However, HIV-1 particles, produced in HIV-1-infected cells expressing gB or gD after transfection or HSV-2 superinfection, did not incorporate either gB or gD in the viral membrane, and did not have the capacity to infect cells normally non-permissive for HIV-1, such as epithelial cells. Conclusion Our results do not support the hypothesis of HSV-2/HIV-1 pseudotype formation and involvement in the synergistic genital interactions between HIV-1 and HSV-2. PMID:17207276

  5. HIV-1 variants in South and South-East Asia.

    PubMed

    Tsuchie, H; Saraswathy, T S; Sinniah, M; Vijayamalar, B; Maniar, J K; Monzon, O T; Santana, R T; Paladin, F J; Wasi, C; Thongcharoen, P

    1995-01-01

    HIV spread in South and South-East Asia is most alarming, and genetic variability of HIV-1 is an important consideration in vaccine development. In this study, we examined the third variable (V3) region of env gene of HIV-1 variants prevalent in Thailand, Malaysia, India, and the Philippines. By phylogenetic tree analyses, an HIV-1 variant from an injecting drug user (IDU) in Thailand belonged to subtype B, and HIV-1 variants from 2 IDUs in Malaysia were classified into 2 subtypes, B and E. One HIV-1 variant from a male homosexual in the Philippines belonged to subtype B. Out of 8 HIV-1 variants from sexually transmitted disease patients in India, 7 belonged to subtype C, and one to subtype A. Although the total number of individuals examined in this study was limited, 4 HIV-1 subtypes were found in South and South-East Asia and large international movements of HIV-1-infected individuals in this region could induce global dissemination of these HIV-1 variants.

  6. Broad activation of latent HIV-1 in vivo

    PubMed Central

    Barton, Kirston; Hiener, Bonnie; Winckelmann, Anni; Rasmussen, Thomas Aagaard; Shao, Wei; Byth, Karen; Lanfear, Robert; Solomon, Ajantha; McMahon, James; Harrington, Sean; Buzon, Maria; Lichterfeld, Mathias; Denton, Paul W.; Olesen, Rikke; Østergaard, Lars; Tolstrup, Martin; Lewin, Sharon R.; Søgaard, Ole Schmeltz; Palmer, Sarah

    2016-01-01

    The ‘shock and kill' approach to cure human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) includes transcriptional induction of latent HIV-1 proviruses using latency-reversing agents (LRAs) with targeted immunotherapy to purge infected cells. The administration of LRAs (panobinostat or vorinostat) to HIV-1-infected individuals on antiretroviral therapy induces a significant increase in cell-associated unspliced (CA-US) HIV-1 RNA from CD4+ T cells. However, it is important to discern whether the increases in CA-US HIV-1 RNA are due to limited or broad activation of HIV-1 proviruses. Here we use single-genome sequencing to find that the RNA transcripts observed following LRA administration are genetically diverse, indicating activation of transcription from an extensive range of proviruses. Defective sequences are more frequently found in CA HIV-1 RNA than in HIV-1 DNA, which has implications for developing an accurate measure of HIV-1 reservoir size. Our findings provide insights into the effects of panobinostat and vorinostat as LRAs for latent HIV-1. PMID:27605062

  7. Genome editing strategies: potential tools for eradicating HIV-1/AIDS

    PubMed Central

    Khalili, Kamel; Gordon, Jennifer; Cosentino, Laura; Hu, Wenhui

    2015-01-01

    Current therapy for controlling HIV-1 infection and preventing AIDS progression has profoundly decreased viral replication in cells susceptible to HIV-1 infection, but it does not eliminate the low level of viral replication in latently infected cells which contain integrated copies of HIV-1 proviral DNA. There is an urgent need for the development of HIV-1 genome eradication strategies that will lead to a permanent or “sterile” cure of HIV-1/AIDS. In the past few years, novel nuclease-initiated genome editing tools have been developing rapidly, including ZFNs, TALENs, and the CRISPR/Cas9 system. These surgical knives, which can excise any genome, provide a great opportunity to eradicate the HIV-1 genome by targeting highly conserved regions of the HIV-1 long terminal repeats or essential viral genes. Given the time consuming and costly engineering of target-specific ZFNs and TALENs, the RNA-guided endonuclease Cas9 technology has emerged as a simpler and more versatile technology to allow permanent removal of integrated HIV-1 proviral DNA in eukaryotic cells, and hopefully animal models or human patients. The major unmet challenges of this approach at present include inefficient nuclease gene delivery, potential off-target cleavage, and cell-specific genome targeting. Nanoparticle or lentivirus-mediated delivery of next generation Cas9 technologies including nickase or RNA-guided FokI nuclease (RFN) will further improve the potential for genome editing to become a promising approach for curing HIV-1/AIDS. PMID:25716921

  8. Antiretroviral Therapy Fails to Restore Levels of HIV-1 Restriction miRNAs in PBMCs of HIV-1-infected MSM

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Man-Qing; Zhao, Min; Kong, Wen-Hua; Peng, Jin-Song; Wang, Fang; Qiu, Hong-Yan; Zhu, Ze-Rong; Tang, Li; Sang, Ming; Wu, Jian-Guo; Ho, Wen-Zhe; Zhou, Wang

    2015-01-01

    Abstract A number of cellular microRNAs (miRNAs) have been identified to have the ability to inhibit HIV-1 replication. In this study, we examined the impact of combination antiretroviral therapy (cART) on the expression of HIV-1 restriction miRNAs in peripheral blood mononuclear cells of HIV-1–infected men who have sex with men (MSM). Compared with male healthy donors, HIV-infected MSM had significantly lower levels of 9 HIV-1 restriction miRNAs. The treatment of HIV-1–infected MSM with cART, however, failed to restore the levels of these miRNAs in peripheral blood mononuclear cells. These observations suggest that the suppression of the cellular restriction miRNAs by HIV-1 may attribute to the virus latency during cART. PMID:26579828

  9. Antiretroviral Therapy Fails to Restore Levels of HIV-1 Restriction miRNAs in PBMCs of HIV-1-infected MSM.

    PubMed

    Liu, Man-Qing; Zhao, Min; Kong, Wen-Hua; Peng, Jin-Song; Wang, Fang; Qiu, Hong-Yan; Zhu, Ze-Rong; Tang, Li; Sang, Ming; Wu, Jian-Guo; Ho, Wen-Zhe; Zhou, Wang

    2015-11-01

    A number of cellular microRNAs (miRNAs) have been identified to have the ability to inhibit HIV-1 replication. In this study, we examined the impact of combination antiretroviral therapy (cART) on the expression of HIV-1 restriction miRNAs in peripheral blood mononuclear cells of HIV-1-infected men who have sex with men (MSM). Compared with male healthy donors, HIV-infected MSM had significantly lower levels of 9 HIV-1 restriction miRNAs. The treatment of HIV-1-infected MSM with cART, however, failed to restore the levels of these miRNAs in peripheral blood mononuclear cells. These observations suggest that the suppression of the cellular restriction miRNAs by HIV-1 may attribute to the virus latency during cART.

  10. Transcriptional Bursting from the HIV-1 Promoter is a Significant Source of Stochastic Noise in HIV-1 Gene Expression

    SciTech Connect

    Singh, A; Razooky, B; Cox, Chris D.; Simpson, Michael L; Weinberger, Leor S.

    2010-01-01

    Analysis of noise in gene expression has proven a powerful approach for analyzing gene regulatory architecture. To probe the regulatory mechanisms controlling expression of HIV-1, we analyze noise in gene-expression from HIV-1 s long terminal repeat (LTR) promoter at different HIV-1 integration sites across the human genome. Flow cytometry analysis of GFP expression from the HIV-1 LTR shows high variability (noise) at each integration site. Notably, the measured noise levels are inconsistent with constitutive gene expression models. Instead, quantification of expression noise indicates that HIV-1 gene expression occurs through randomly timed bursts of activity from the LTR and that each burst generates an average of 2 10 mRNA transcripts before the promoter returns to an inactive state. These data indicate that transcriptional bursting can generate high variability in HIV-1 early gene products, which may critically influence the viral fate-decision between active replication and proviral latency.

  11. [Sensitivity of the COBAS AmpliScreen™ HIV-1 test v1.5 for HIV-1 detection].

    PubMed

    Gomez, Lucía P; Balangero, Marcos C; Castro, Gonzalo; Kademian, Silvia; Mangeaud, Arnaldo; Barbas, María G; Cudolá, Analía; de León, Juan F; Carrizo, Horacio; Gallego, Sandra V

    2014-01-01

    The introduction of nucleic acid amplification techniques (NAT) in blood banks was intended to reduce the residual risk of transfusion-transmitted infections. Co-circulation of a great diversity of HIV-1 variants in Argentina portrays the need to assess the sensitivity of serological and molecular assays available for their detection. In this study, we evaluated the sensitivity of the COBAS AmpliScreen™ HIV-1 Test, version 1.5 (Roche) for the detection of HIV-1 RNA in plasma samples of infected individuals from Argentina. The results of this study reveal that this technique has high sensitivity for the detection of HIV-1 RNA under assay conditions: using mini-pool testing, pools ≥ 50 RNA copies per ml achieved ≥ 92 % sensitivity, whereas in the standard procedure, samples ≥ 207 RNA copies/ml achieved 100 % sensitivity. Moreover, the COBAS AmpliScreen™ HIV-1 Test, version 1.5 (Roche) is suitable for detecting prevailing HIV-1 variants.

  12. Novel pseudosymmetric inhibitors of HIV-1 protease

    SciTech Connect

    Faessler, A.; Roesel, J.; Gruetter, M.; Tintelnot-Blomley, M.; Alteri, E.; Bold, G.; Lang, M.

    1993-12-31

    Taking into account the unique C-2 symmetric nature of the HIV-1 protease homodimer, the authors have designed and synthesized novel inhibitors featuring an almost symmetric structure. Compounds containing the easily accessible Phe[CH(OH)CH{sub 2}N(NH)]Cha dipeptide isostere as a nonhydrolyzable replacement of the scissile amide bond of the natural substrate are potent inhibitors in vitro with IC{sub 50} values of 9 to 50 nM. The antiviral activity depends mainly on the nature of the anylated valine residues linked to the dipeptide mimic. In this series, CGP 53820 combines both high potency and excellent specificity. Its predicted symmetric binding pattern is illustrated by the X-ray structure analysis performed with the corresponding enzyme-inhibitor complex.

  13. Allosteric inhibition of HIV-1 integrase activity

    PubMed Central

    Engelman, Alan; Kessl, Jacques J.; Kvaratskhelia, Mamuka

    2013-01-01

    HIV-1 integrase is an important therapeutic target in the fight against HIV/AIDS. Integrase strand transfer inhibitors (INSTIs), which target the enzyme active site, have witnessed clinical success over the past 5 years, but the generation of drug resistance poses challenges to INSTI-based therapies moving forward. Integrase is a dynamic protein, and its ordered multimerization is critical to enzyme activity. The integrase tetramer, bound to viral DNA, interacts with host LEDGF/p75 protein to tether integration to active genes. Allosteric integrase inhibitors (ALLINIs) that compete with LEDGF/p75 for binding to integrase disrupt integrase assembly with viral DNA and allosterically inhibit enzyme function. ALLINIs display steep dose response curves and synergize with INSTIs ex vivo, highlighting this novel inhibitor class for clinical development. PMID:23647983

  14. Selection of Peptide Mimics of HIV-1 Epitope Recognized by Neutralizing Antibody VRC01

    PubMed Central

    Chikaev, Anton N.; Bakulina, Anastasiya Yu.; Burdick, Ryan C.; Karpenko, Larisa I.; Pathak, Vinay K.; Ilyichev, Alexander A.

    2015-01-01

    The ability to induce anti-HIV-1 antibodies that can neutralize a broad spectrum of viral isolates from different subtypes seems to be a key requirement for development of an effective HIV-1 vaccine. The epitopes recognized by the most potent broadly neutralizing antibodies that have been characterized are largely discontinuous. Mimetics of such conformational epitopes could be potentially used as components of a synthetic immunogen that can elicit neutralizing antibodies. Here we used phage display technology to identify peptide motifs that mimic the epitope recognized by monoclonal antibody VRC01, which is able to neutralize up to 91% of circulating primary isolates. Three rounds of biopanning were performed against 2 different phage peptide libraries for this purpose. The binding specificity of selected phage clones to monoclonal antibody VRC01 was estimated using dot blot analysis. The putative peptide mimics exposed on the surface of selected phages were analyzed for conformational and linear homology to the surface of HIV-1 gp120 fragment using computational analysis. Corresponding peptides were synthesized and checked for their ability to interfere with neutralization activity of VRC01 in a competitive inhibition assay. One of the most common peptides selected from 12-mer phage library was found to partially mimic a CD4-binding loop fragment, whereas none of the circular C7C-mer peptides was able to mimic any HIV-1 domains. However, peptides identified from both the 12-mer and C7C-mer peptide libraries showed rescue of HIV-1 infectivity in the competitive inhibition assay. The identification of epitope mimics may lead to novel immunogens capable of inducing broadly reactive neutralizing antibodies. PMID:25785734

  15. Vascular oxidative stress and nitric oxide depletion in HIV-1 transgenic rats are reversed by glutathione restoration

    PubMed Central

    Kline, Erik R.; Kleinhenz, Dean J.; Liang, Bill; Dikalov, Sergey; Guidot, David M.; Hart, C. Michael; Jones, Dean P.; Sutliff, Roy L.

    2008-01-01

    Human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)-infected patients have a higher incidence of oxidative stress, endothelial dysfunction, and cardiovascular disease than uninfected individuals. Recent reports have demonstrated that viral proteins upregulate reactive oxygen species, which may contribute to elevated cardiovascular risk in HIV-1 patients. In this study we employed an HIV-1 transgenic rat model to investigate the physiological effects of viral protein expression on the vasculature. Markers of oxidative stress in wild-type and HIV-1 transgenic rats were measured using electron spin resonance, fluorescence microscopy, and various molecular techniques. Relaxation studies were completed on isolated aortic rings, and mRNA and protein were collected to measure changes in expression of nitric oxide (NO) and superoxide sources. HIV-1 transgenic rats displayed significantly less NO-hemoglobin, serum nitrite, serum S-nitrosothiols, aortic tissue NO, and impaired endothelium-dependent vasorelaxation than wild-type rats. NO reduction was not attributed to differences in endothelial NO synthase (eNOS) protein expression, eNOS-Ser1177 phosphorylation, or tetrahydrobiopterin availability. Aortas from HIV-1 transgenic rats had higher levels of superoxide and 3-nitrotyrosine but did not differ in expression of superoxide-generating sources NADPH oxidase or xanthine oxidase. However, transgenic aortas displayed decreased superoxide dismutase and glutathione. Administering the glutathione precursor procysteine decreased superoxide, restored aortic NO levels and NO-hemoglobin, and improved endothelium-dependent relaxation in HIV-1 transgenic rats. These results show that HIV-1 protein expression decreases NO and causes endothelial dysfunction. Diminished antioxidant capacity increases vascular superoxide levels, which reduce NO bioavailability and promote peroxynitrite generation. Restoring glutathione levels reverses HIV-1 protein-mediated effects on superoxide, NO, and vasorelaxation

  16. HIV-1 and Human PEG10 Frameshift Elements Are Functionally Distinct and Distinguished by Novel Small Molecule Modulators

    PubMed Central

    Sleebs, Brad E.; Lackovic, Kurt; Parisot, John P.; Moss, Rebecca M.; Crowe-McAuliffe, Caillan; Mathew, Suneeth F.; Edgar, Christina D.; Kleffmann, Torsten; Tate, Warren P.

    2015-01-01

    Frameshifting during translation of viral or in rare cases cellular mRNA results in the synthesis of proteins from two overlapping reading frames within the same mRNA. In HIV-1 the protease, reverse transcriptase, and integrase enzymes are in a second reading frame relative to the structural group-specific antigen (gag), and their synthesis is dependent upon frameshifting. This ensures that a strictly regulated ratio of structural proteins and enzymes, which is critical for HIV-1 replication and viral infectivity, is maintained during protein synthesis. The frameshift element in HIV-1 RNA is an attractive target for the development of a new class of anti HIV-1 drugs. However, a number of examples are now emerging of human genes using −1 frameshifting, such as PEG10 and CCR5. In this study we have compared the HIV-1 and PEG10 frameshift elements and shown they have distinct functional characteristics. Frameshifting occurs at several points within each element. Moreover, frameshift modulators that were isolated by high-throughput screening of a library of 114,000 lead-like compounds behaved differently with the PEG10 frameshift element. The most effective compounds affecting the HIV-1 element enhanced frameshifting by 2.5-fold at 10 μM in two different frameshift reporter assay systems. HIV-1 protease:gag protein ratio was affected by a similar amount in a specific assay of virally-infected cultured cell, but the modulation of frameshifting of the first-iteration compounds was not sufficient to show significant effects on viral infectivity. Importantly, two compounds did not affect frameshifting with the human PEG10 element, while one modestly inhibited rather than enhanced frameshifting at the human element. These studies indicate that frameshift elements have unique characteristics that may allow targeting of HIV-1 and of other viruses specifically for development of antiviral therapeutic molecules without effect on human genes like PEG10 that use the same

  17. Influence of sequence identity and unique breakpoints on the frequency of intersubtype HIV-1 recombination

    PubMed Central

    Baird, Heather A; Gao, Yong; Galetto, Román; Lalonde, Matthew; Anthony, Reshma M; Giacomoni, Véronique; Abreha, Measho; Destefano, Jeffrey J; Negroni, Matteo; Arts, Eric J

    2006-01-01

    Background HIV-1 recombination between different subtypes has a major impact on the global epidemic. The generation of these intersubtype recombinants follows a defined set of events starting with dual infection of a host cell, heterodiploid virus production, strand transfers during reverse transcription, and then selection. In this study, recombination frequencies were measured in the C1-C4 regions of the envelope gene in the presence (using a multiple cycle infection system) and absence (in vitro reverse transcription and single cycle infection systems) of selection for replication-competent virus. Ugandan subtypes A and D HIV-1 env sequences (115-A, 120-A, 89-D, 122-D, 126-D) were employed in all three assay systems. These subtypes co-circulate in East Africa and frequently recombine in this human population. Results Increased sequence identity between viruses or RNA templates resulted in increased recombination frequencies, with the exception of the 115-A virus or RNA template. Analyses of the recombination breakpoints and mechanistic studies revealed that the presence of a recombination hotspot in the C3/V4 env region, unique to 115-A as donor RNA, could account for the higher recombination frequencies with the 115-A virus/template. Single-cycle infections supported proportionally less recombination than the in vitro reverse transcription assay but both systems still had significantly higher recombination frequencies than observed in the multiple-cycle virus replication system. In the multiple cycle assay, increased replicative fitness of one HIV-1 over the other in a dual infection dramatically decreased recombination frequencies. Conclusion Sequence variation at specific sites between HIV-1 isolates can introduce unique recombination hotspots, which increase recombination frequencies and skew the general observation that decreased HIV-1 sequence identity reduces recombination rates. These findings also suggest that the majority of intra- or intersubtype A

  18. Amino Acid Changes in the HIV-1 gp41 Membrane Proximal Region Control Virus Neutralization Sensitivity.

    PubMed

    Bradley, Todd; Trama, Ashley; Tumba, Nancy; Gray, Elin; Lu, Xiaozhi; Madani, Navid; Jahanbakhsh, Fatemeh; Eaton, Amanda; Xia, Shi-Mao; Parks, Robert; Lloyd, Krissey E; Sutherland, Laura L; Scearce, Richard M; Bowman, Cindy M; Barnett, Susan; Abdool-Karim, Salim S; Boyd, Scott D; Melillo, Bruno; Smith, Amos B; Sodroski, Joseph; Kepler, Thomas B; Alam, S Munir; Gao, Feng; Bonsignori, Mattia; Liao, Hua-Xin; Moody, M Anthony; Montefiori, David; Santra, Sampa; Morris, Lynn; Haynes, Barton F

    2016-10-01

    Most HIV-1 vaccines elicit neutralizing antibodies that are active against highly sensitive (tier-1) viruses or rare cases of vaccine-matched neutralization-resistant (tier-2) viruses, but no vaccine has induced antibodies that can broadly neutralize heterologous tier-2 viruses. In this study, we isolated antibodies from an HIV-1-infected individual that targeted the gp41 membrane-proximal external region (MPER) that may have selected single-residue changes in viral variants in the MPER that resulted in neutralization sensitivity to antibodies targeting distal epitopes on the HIV-1 Env. Similarly, a single change in the MPER in a second virus from another infected-individual also conferred enhanced neutralization sensitivity. These gp41 single-residue changes thus transformed tier-2 viruses into tier-1 viruses that were sensitive to vaccine-elicited tier-1 neutralizing antibodies. These data demonstrate that Env amino acid changes within the MPER bnAb epitope of naturally-selected escape viruses can increase neutralization sensitivity to multiple types of neutralizing antibodies, and underscore the critical importance of the MPER for maintaining the integrity of the tier-2 HIV-1 trimer.

  19. SEROPREVALENCE OF HTLV IN A POPULATION OF HIV1-INFECTED PATIENTS IN MIDWESTERN BRAZIL

    PubMed Central

    KOZLOWSKI, Aline Garcia; de MATOS, Márcia Alves Dias; CARNEIRO, Megmar Aparecida dos Santos; LOPES, Carmen Luci Rodrigues; TELES, Sheila Araújo; VICENTE, Carolina Paulo; MARTINS, Regina Maria Bringel

    2016-01-01

    SUMMARY Human T-cell lymphotropic virus (HTLV) may affect the clinical course of human immunodeficiency virus 1 (HIV1). Both infections are common in endemic areas because these viruses share similar routes of transmission. The aim of this study was to estimate the seroprevalence of HTLV1/2 in a population of HIV1-infected patients in the state of Goiás, Midwestern Brazil. Of the 505 studied patients, four (0.79%) were positive for anti-HTLV1/2 by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA), with HTLV1 infection confirmed by line immunoassay (LIA) and polymerase chain reaction (PCR) in all of the ELISA-positive samples. No cases of HTLV2 infection were observed. The prevalence of HTLV1/HIV1 coinfection was 0.79% (4/505; 95% CI: 0.25-2.16). All the coinfected patients reported sexual risk behaviors and only one reported intravenous drug use. Sequencing of the viral long terminal repeat (LTR) region and phylogenetic analysis revealed that the four HTLV1 isolates belonged to the Transcontinental a subgroup of the Cosmopolitan (1a) subtype, the most frequent subgroup detected in Brazil. This study shows a low prevalence of HTLV1/2 in HIV1-infected patients in Midwestern Brazil. PMID:27828621

  20. On the role of four small hairpins in the HIV-1 RNA genome

    PubMed Central

    Knoepfel, Stefanie A.; Berkhout, Ben

    2013-01-01

    An RNA secondary structure model for the complete HIV-1 genome has recently been published based on SHAPE technology. Several well-known RNA motifs such as TAR and RRE were confirmed and numerous new structured motifs were described that may play important roles in virus replication. The 9 kb viral RNA genome is densely packed with many RNA hairpin motifs and the collective fold may play an important role in HIV-1 biology. We initially focused on 16 RNA hairpin motifs scattered along the viral genome. We considered conservation of these structures, despite sequence variation among virus isolates, as a first indication for a significant function. Four relatively small hairpins exhibited considerable structural conservation and were selected for experimental validation in virus replication assays. Mutations were introduced into the HIV-1 RNA genome to destabilize individual RNA structures without affecting the protein-coding properties (silent codon changes). No major virus replication defects were scored, suggesting that these four hairpin structures do not play essential roles in HIV-1 replication. PMID:23535706

  1. Immunogenicity and specificity of the candidate multi-epitope-vaccines against HIV-1.

    PubMed

    Lu, Y; Ding, J; Chen, Y H

    2001-11-01

    The failure of some candidate HIV-1 vaccines may result from inducing very weak neutralization activity against representative primary viral isolates. Based on our hypothesis that epitope-vaccine may be a new strategy to induce high levels of neutralizing antibodies against HIV-1, we designed two candidate multi-epitope-vaccines, EP1 [C-G-(ELDKWA-GPGRAFY)2-K] and EP2 (CG-GPGRAFY-G-ELDKWA-G-RILAVERYLKD), containing three neutralizing epitopes (GPGRAFY, ELDKWA and RILAVERYLKD) on HIV-1 envelope protein, and expected them to induce epitope-specific antibodies of predefined epitope-specificity. The two peptides were conjugated to carrier protein bovine serum albumin (BSA) and used for immunization of rabbits. Proteins were purified from the rabbit sera induced by both candidate multi-epitope-vaccines (EP1-BSA and EP2-BSA) through affinity chromatography with epitope-peptide-conjugated sepharose-column, and identified as antibodies in silver-staining and immunoblotting. These antibodies were demonstrated to recognize three neutralizing epitopes on peptides and the recombinant gp41 in ELISA-assay and immunoblotting. These results indicated that both candidate multi-epitope-vaccines could induce high levels of antibodies of predefined epitope-specificity which recognized a few of neutralizing epitopes on peptides and protein, providing experimental evidence for the new strategy to develop an effective neutralizing-antibody-based multi-epitope-vaccine against HIV-1.

  2. On the role of four small hairpins in the HIV-1 RNA genome.

    PubMed

    Knoepfel, Stefanie A; Berkhout, Ben

    2013-04-01

    An RNA secondary structure model for the complete HIV-1 genome has recently been published based on SHAPE technology. Several well-known RNA motifs such as TAR and RRE were confirmed and numerous new structured motifs were described that may play important roles in virus replication. The 9 kb viral RNA genome is densely packed with many RNA hairpin motifs and the collective fold may play an important role in HIV-1 biology. We initially focused on 16 RNA hairpin motifs scattered along the viral genome. We considered conservation of these structures, despite sequence variation among virus isolates, as a first indication for a significant function. Four relatively small hairpins exhibited considerable structural conservation and were selected for experimental validation in virus replication assays. Mutations were introduced into the HIV-1 RNA genome to destabilize individual RNA structures without affecting the protein-coding properties (silent codon changes). No major virus replication defects were scored, suggesting that these four hairpin structures do not play essential roles in HIV-1 replication.

  3. Complexity in human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) co-receptor usage: roles of CCR3 and CCR5 in HIV-1 infection of monocyte-derived macrophages and brain microglia.

    PubMed

    Agrawal, Lokesh; Maxwell, Christina R; Peters, Paul J; Clapham, Paul R; Liu, Sue M; Mackay, Charles R; Strayer, David S

    2009-03-01

    CCR3 has been implicated as a co-receptor for human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1), particularly in brain microglia cells. We sought to clarify the comparative roles of CCR3 and CCR5 in the central nervous system (CNS) HIV-1 infection and the potential utility of CCR3 as a target for manipulation via gene transfer. To target CCR3, we developed a single-chain antibody (SFv) and an interfering RNA (RNAi), R3-526. Coding sequences for both were cloned into Tag-deleted SV40-dervied vectors, as these vectors transduce brain microglia and monocyte-derived macrophages (MDM) highly efficiently. These anti-CCR3 transgenes were compared to SFv-CCR5, an SFv against CCR5, and RNAi-R5, an RNAi that targets CCR5, for the ability to protect primary human brain microglia and MDM from infection with peripheral and neurotropic strains of HIV-1. Downregulation of CCR3 and CCR5 by these transgenes was independent from one another. Confocal microscopy showed that CCR3 and CCR5 co-localized at the plasma membrane with each other and with CD4. Targeting either CCR5 or CCR3 largely protected both microglia and MDM from infection by many strains of HIV-1. That is, some HIV-1 strains, isolated from either the CNS or periphery, required both CCR3 and CCR5 for optimal productive infection of microglia and MDM. Some HIV-1 strains were relatively purely CCR5-tropic. None was purely CCR3-tropic. Thus, some CNS-tropic strains of HIV-1 utilize CCR5 as a co-receptor but do not need CCR3, while for other isolates both CCR3 and CCR5 may be required.

  4. Computational Prediction of Broadly Neutralizing HIV-1 Antibody Epitopes from Neutralization Activity Data

    PubMed Central

    Ferguson, Andrew L.; Falkowska, Emilia; Walker, Laura M.; Seaman, Michael S.; Burton, Dennis R.; Chakraborty, Arup K.

    2013-01-01

    Broadly neutralizing monoclonal antibodies effective against the majority of circulating isolates of HIV-1 have been isolated from a small number of infected individuals. Definition of the conformational epitopes on the HIV spike to which these antibodies bind is of great value in defining targets for vaccine and drug design. Drawing on techniques from compressed sensing and information theory, we developed a computational methodology to predict key residues constituting the conformational epitopes on the viral spike from cross-clade neutralization activity data. Our approach does not require the availability of structural information for either the antibody or antigen. Predictions of the conformational epitopes of ten broadly neutralizing HIV-1 antibodies are shown to be in good agreement with new and existing experimental data. Our findings suggest that our approach offers a means to accelerate epitope identification for diverse pathogenic antigens. PMID:24312481

  5. Striking HIV-1 Entry by Targeting HIV-1 gp41. But, Where Should We Target?

    PubMed

    Teixeira, Cátia; Barbault, Florent; Couesnon, Thierry; Gomes, José R B; Gomes, Paula; Maurel, François

    2016-01-01

    HIV-1 gp41 facilitates the viral fusion through a conformational switch involving the association of three C-terminal helices along the conserved hydrophobic grooves of three N-terminal helices coiled-coil. The control of these structural rearrangements is thought to be central to HIV-1 entry and, therefore, different strategies of intervention are being developed. Herewith, we describe a procedure to simulate the folding of an HIV-1 gp41 simplified model. This procedure is based on the construction of plausible conformational pathways, which describe protein transition between non-fusogenic and fusogenic conformations. The calculation of the paths started with 100 molecular dynamics simulations of the non-fusogenic conformation, which were found to converge to different intermediate states. Those presenting defined criteria were selected for separate targeted molecular dynamics simulations, subjected to a force constant imposing a movement towards the gp41 fusogenic conformation. Despite significant diversity, a preferred sequence of events emerged when the simulations were analyzed in terms of the formation, breakage and evolution of the contacts. We pointed out 29 residues as the most relevant for the movement of gp41; also, 2696 possible interactions were reduced to only 48 major interactions, which reveals the efficiency of the method. The analysis of the evolution of the main interactions lead to the detection of four main behaviors for those contacts: stable, increasing, decreasing and repulsive interactions. Altogether, these results suggest a specific small cavity of the HIV-1 gp41 hydrophobic groove as the preferred target to small molecules.

  6. Striking HIV-1 Entry by Targeting HIV-1 gp41. But, Where Should We Target?

    PubMed Central

    Teixeira, Cátia; Barbault, Florent; Couesnon, Thierry; Gomes, José R. B.; Gomes, Paula; Maurel, François

    2016-01-01

    HIV-1 gp41 facilitates the viral fusion through a conformational switch involving the association of three C-terminal helices along the conserved hydrophobic grooves of three N-terminal helices coiled-coil. The control of these structural rearrangements is thought to be central to HIV-1 entry and, therefore, different strategies of intervention are being developed. Herewith, we describe a procedure to simulate the folding of an HIV-1 gp41 simplified model. This procedure is based on the construction of plausible conformational pathways, which describe protein transition between non-fusogenic and fusogenic conformations. The calculation of the paths started with 100 molecular dynamics simulations of the non-fusogenic conformation, which were found to converge to different intermediate states. Those presenting defined criteria were selected for separate targeted molecular dynamics simulations, subjected to a force constant imposing a movement towards the gp41 fusogenic conformation. Despite significant diversity, a preferred sequence of events emerged when the simulations were analyzed in terms of the formation, breakage and evolution of the contacts. We pointed out 29 residues as the most relevant for the movement of gp41; also, 2696 possible interactions were reduced to only 48 major interactions, which reveals the efficiency of the method. The analysis of the evolution of the main interactions lead to the detection of four main behaviors for those contacts: stable, increasing, decreasing and repulsive interactions. Altogether, these results suggest a specific small cavity of the HIV-1 gp41 hydrophobic groove as the preferred target to small molecules. PMID:26785380

  7. Control of HIV-1 replication in vitro by vaccine-induced human CD8+ T cells through conserved subdominant Pol epitopes

    PubMed Central

    Ahmed, Tina; Borthwick, Nicola J.; Gilmour, Jill; Hayes, Peter; Dorrell, Lucy; Hanke, Tomáš

    2016-01-01

    Objective The specificity of CD8+ T cells is critical for early control of founder/transmitted and reactivated HIV-1. To tackle HIV-1 variability and escape, we designed vaccine immunogen HIVconsv assembled from 14 highly conserved regions of mainly Gag and Pol proteins. When administered to HIV-1-negative human volunteers in trial HIV-CORE 002, HIVconsv vaccines elicited CD8+ effector T cells which inhibited replication of up to 8 HIV-1 isolates in autologous CD4+ cells. This inhibition correlated with interferon-γ production in response to Gag and Pol peptide pools, but direct evidence of the inhibitory specificity was missing. Here, we aimed to define through recognition of which epitopes these effectors inhibit HIV-1 replication. Design CD8+ T-cells from the 3 broadest HIV-1 inhibitors out of 23 vaccine recipients were expanded in culture by Gag or Pol peptide restimulation and tested in viral inhibition assay (VIA) using HIV-1 clade B and A isolates. Methods Frozen PBMCs were expanded first using peptide pools from Gag or Pol conserved regions and tested on HIV-1-infected cells in VIA or by individual peptides for their effector functions. Single peptide specificities responsible for inhibition of HIV-1 replication were then confirmed by single-peptide expanded effectors tested on HIV-1-infected cells. Results We formally demonstrated that the vaccine-elicited inhibitory human CD8+ T cells recognized conserved epitopes of both Pol and Gag proteins. We defined 7 minimum epitopes, of which 3 were novel, presumably naturally subdominant. The effectors were oligofunctional producing several cytokines and chemokines and killing peptide-pulsed target cells. Conclusions These results implicate the use of functionally conserved regions of Pol in addition to the widely used Gag for T-cell vaccine design. Proportion of volunteers developing these effectors and their frequency in circulating PBMC are separate issues, which can be addressed, if needed, by more efficient

  8. Impact of HIV-1 Backbone on Neutralization Sensitivity: Neutralization Profiles of Heterologous Envelope Glycoproteins Expressed in Native Subtype C and CRF01_AE Backbone

    PubMed Central

    Sanders-Buell, Eric; Wesberry, Maggie; Towle, Teresa; Pillis, Devin M.; Molnar, Sebastian; McLinden, Robert; Edmonds, Tara; Hirsch, Ivan; O’Connell, Robert; McCutchan, Francine E.; Montefiori, David C.; Ochsenbauer, Christina; Kappes, John C.; Kim, Jerome H.; Polonis, Victoria R.; Tovanabutra, Sodsai

    2013-01-01

    Standardized assays to assess vaccine and antiviral drug efficacy are critical for the development of protective HIV-1 vaccines and drugs. These immune assays will be advanced by the development of standardized viral stocks, such as HIV-1 infectious molecular clones (IMC), that i) express a reporter gene, ii) are representative of globally diverse subtypes and iii) are engineered to easily exchange envelope (env) genes for expression of sequences of interest. Thus far, a subtype B IMC backbone expressing Renilla luciferase (LucR), and into which the ectodomain of heterologous env coding sequences can be expressed has been successfully developed but as execution of HIV-1 vaccine efficacy trials shifts increasingly to non-subtype B epidemics (Southern African and Southeast Asia), non-subtype B HIV-1 reagents are needed to support vaccine development. Here we describe two IMCs derived from subtypes C and CRF01_AE HIV-1 primary isolates expressing LucR (IMC.LucR) that were engineered to express heterologous gp160 Envs. 18 constructs expressing various subtypes C and CRF01_AE Envs, mostly acute, in subtype-matched and –unmatched HIV backbones were tested for functionality and neutralization sensitivity. Our results suggest a possible effect of non-env HIV-1 genes on the interaction of Env and neutralizing antibodies and highlight the need to generate a library of IMCs representative of the HIV-1 subtype spectrum to be used as standardized neutralization assay reagents for assessing HIV-1 vaccine efficacy. PMID:24312165

  9. Novel HIV-1 Therapeutics through Targeting Altered Host Cell Pathways

    PubMed Central

    Coley, William; Kehn-Hall, Kylene; Van Duyne, Rachel; Kashanchi, Fatah

    2009-01-01

    The emergence of drug-resistant human immunodeficiency virus type I (HIV-1) strains presents a challenge for the design of new drugs. Anti-HIV compounds currently in use are the subject of advanced clinical trials using either HIV-1 reverse-transcriptase, viral protease, or integrase inhibitors. Recent studies show an increase in the number of HIV-1 variants resistant to anti-retroviral agents in newly infected individuals. Targeting host cell factors involved in the regulation of HIV-1 replication might be one way to combat HIV-1 resistance to the currently available anti-viral agents. A specific inhibition of HIV-1 gene expression could be expected from the development of compounds targeting host cell factors that participate in the activation of the HIV-1 LTR promoter. Here we will discuss how targeting the host can be accomplished either by using small molecules to alter the function of the host’s proteins such as p53 or cdk9, or by utilizing new advances in siRNA therapies to knock down essential host factors such as CCR5 and CXCR4. Finally, we will discuss how the viral protein interactomes should be performed to better design therapeutics against HIV-1. PMID:19732026

  10. HTLV-1 Tax activates HIV-1 transcription in latency models.

    PubMed

    Geddes, Victor Emmanuel Viana; José, Diego Pandeló; Leal, Fabio E; Nixon, Douglas F; Tanuri, Amilcar; Aguiar, Renato Santana

    2017-04-01

    HIV-1 latency is a major obstacle to HIV-1 eradication. Coinfection with HTLV-1 has been associated with faster progression to AIDS. HTLV-1 encodes the transactivator Tax which can activate both HTLV-1 and HIV-1 transcription. Here, we demonstrate that Tax activates HIV transcription in latent CD4(+) T cells. Tax promotes the activation of P-TEFb, releasing CDK9 and Cyclin T1 from inactive forms, promoting transcription elongation and reactivation of latent HIV-1. Tax mutants lacking interaction with the HIV-1-LTR promoter were not able to activate P-TEFb, with no subsequent activation of latent HIV. In HIV-infected primary resting CD4(+) T cells, Tax-1 reactivated HIV-1 transcription up to five fold, confirming these findings in an ex vivo latency model. Finally, our results confirms that HTLV-1/Tax hijacks cellular partners, promoting HIV-1 transcription, and this interaction should be further investigated in HIV-1 latency studies in patients with HIV/HTLV-1 co-infection.

  11. Antiviral Therapy by HIV-1 Broadly Neutralizing and Inhibitory Antibodies.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Zhiqing; Li, Shaowei; Gu, Ying; Xia, Ningshao

    2016-11-18

    Human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) infection causes acquired immune deficiency syndrome (AIDS), a global epidemic for more than three decades. HIV-1 replication is primarily controlled through antiretroviral therapy (ART) but this treatment does not cure HIV-1 infection. Furthermore, there is increasing viral resistance to ART, and side effects associated with long-term therapy. Consequently, there is a need of alternative candidates for HIV-1 prevention and therapy. Recent advances have discovered multiple broadly neutralizing antibodies against HIV-1. In this review, we describe the key epitopes on the HIV-1 Env protein and the reciprocal broadly neutralizing antibodies, and discuss the ongoing clinical trials of broadly neutralizing and inhibitory antibody therapy as well as antibody combinations, bispecific antibodies, and methods that improve therapeutic efficacy by combining broadly neutralizing antibodies (bNAbs) with latency reversing agents. Compared with ART, HIV-1 therapeutics that incorporate these broadly neutralizing and inhibitory antibodies offer the advantage of decreasing virus load and clearing infected cells, which is a promising prospect in HIV-1 prevention and treatment.

  12. Serum IgD behaviour in HIV-1 infected patients.

    PubMed

    Raiteri, R; Albonico, M; Deiana, R; Marietti, G; Sinicco, A

    1991-01-01

    From September 1987 to February 1990, repeated tests were performed in 325 HIV-1 infected subjects at different clinical stages using a radial immunodiffusion method to determine serum IgD behaviour in HIV-1 infection. Four patients had acute HIV-1 infection, 72 asymptomatic infection, 163 PGL, 49 ARC and 37 AIDS. During the study, 57 seropositive patients developed AIDS. The correlation between serum IgD and the clinical stage of HIV-1 infection, CD4+ and CD8+ lymphocyte levels, CD4+/CD8+ ratio, HIV-1 (p24) antigenemia and reactivity to core proteins, IgG, IgA, IgM isotypes and serum beta 2-microglobulin concentration. A significant correlation was noted between HIV-1 (p24) antigenemia, the disappearance of the antibodies reactivity to core proteins and IgD levels in ARC patients. A progressive increase of serum IgD before the occurrence of the symptomatic stage of HIV-1 infection was observed in HIV-1 infected patients who developed AIDS.

  13. Antiviral Therapy by HIV-1 Broadly Neutralizing and Inhibitory Antibodies

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Zhiqing; Li, Shaowei; Gu, Ying; Xia, Ningshao

    2016-01-01

    Human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) infection causes acquired immune deficiency syndrome (AIDS), a global epidemic for more than three decades. HIV-1 replication is primarily controlled through antiretroviral therapy (ART) but this treatment does not cure HIV-1 infection. Furthermore, there is increasing viral resistance to ART, and side effects associated with long-term therapy. Consequently, there is a need of alternative candidates for HIV-1 prevention and therapy. Recent advances have discovered multiple broadly neutralizing antibodies against HIV-1. In this review, we describe the key epitopes on the HIV-1 Env protein and the reciprocal broadly neutralizing antibodies, and discuss the ongoing clinical trials of broadly neutralizing and inhibitory antibody therapy as well as antibody combinations, bispecific antibodies, and methods that improve therapeutic efficacy by combining broadly neutralizing antibodies (bNAbs) with latency reversing agents. Compared with ART, HIV-1 therapeutics that incorporate these broadly neutralizing and inhibitory antibodies offer the advantage of decreasing virus load and clearing infected cells, which is a promising prospect in HIV-1 prevention and treatment. PMID:27869733

  14. Iron chelators ICL670 and 311 inhibit HIV-1 transcription

    SciTech Connect

    Debebe, Zufan; Ammosova, Tatyana; Jerebtsova, Marina; Kurantsin-Mills, Joseph; Niu, Xiaomei; Charles, Sharroya; Richardson, Des R.; Ray, Patricio E.; Gordeuk, Victor R.; Nekhai, Sergei

    2007-10-25

    HIV-1 replication is induced by an excess of iron and iron chelation by desferrioxamine (DFO) inhibits viral replication by reducing proliferation of infected cells. Treatment of cells with DFO and 2-hydroxy-1-naphthylaldehyde isonicotinoyl hydrazone (311) inhibit expression of proteins that regulate cell-cycle progression, including cycle-dependent kinase 2 (CDK2). Our recent studies showed that CDK2 participates in HIV-1 transcription and viral replication suggesting that inhibition of CDK2 by iron chelators might also affect HIV-1 transcription. Here we evaluated the effect of a clinically approved orally effective iron chelator, 4-[3,5-bis-(hydroxyphenyl)-1,2,4-triazol-1-yl]-benzoic acid (ICL670) and 311 on HIV-1 transcription. Both ICL670 and 311 inhibited Tat-induced HIV-1 transcription in CEM-T cells, 293T and HeLa cells. Neither ICL670 nor 311 induced cytotoxicity at concentrations that inhibited HIV-1 transcription. The chelators decreased cellular activity of CDK2 and reduced HIV-1 Tat phosphorylation by CDK2. Neither ICL670A or 311 decreased CDK9 protein level but significantly reduced association of CDK9 with cyclin T1 and reduced phosphorylation of Ser-2 residues of RNA polymerase II C-terminal domain. In conclusion, our findings add to the evidence that iron chelators can inhibit HIV-1 transcription by deregulating CDK2 and CDK9. Further consideration should be given to the development of iron chelators for future anti-retroviral therapeutics.

  15. Generation of Rhesus Macaque-Tropic HIV-1 Clones That Are Resistant to Major Anti-HIV-1 Restriction Factors

    PubMed Central

    Nomaguchi, Masako; Yokoyama, Masaru; Kono, Ken; Nakayama, Emi E.; Shioda, Tatsuo; Doi, Naoya; Fujiwara, Sachi; Saito, Akatsuki; Akari, Hirofumi; Miyakawa, Kei; Ryo, Akihide; Ode, Hirotaka; Iwatani, Yasumasa; Miura, Tomoyuki; Igarashi, Tatsuhiko

    2013-01-01

    Human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) replication in macaque cells is restricted mainly by antiviral cellular APOBEC3, TRIM5α/TRIM5CypA, and tetherin proteins. For basic and clinical HIV-1/AIDS studies, efforts to construct macaque-tropic HIV-1 (HIV-1mt) have been made by us and others. Although rhesus macaques are commonly and successfully used as infection models, no HIV-1 derivatives suitable for in vivo rhesus research are available to date. In this study, to obtain novel HIV-1mt clones that are resistant to major restriction factors, we altered Gag and Vpu of our best HIV-1mt clone described previously. First, by sequence- and structure-guided mutagenesis, three amino acid residues in Gag-capsid (CA) (M94L/R98S/G114Q) were found to be responsible for viral growth enhancement in a macaque cell line. Results of in vitro TRIM5α susceptibility testing of HIV-1mt carrying these substitutions correlated well with the increased viral replication potential in macaque peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) with different TRIM5 alleles, suggesting that the three amino acids in HIV-1mt CA are involved in the interaction with TRIM5α. Second, we replaced the transmembrane domain of Vpu of this clone with the corresponding region of simian immunodeficiency virus SIVgsn166 Vpu. The resultant clone, MN4/LSDQgtu, was able to antagonize macaque but not human tetherin, and its Vpu effectively functioned during viral replication in a macaque cell line. Notably, MN4/LSDQgtu grew comparably to SIVmac239 and much better than any of our other HIV-1mt clones in rhesus macaque PBMCs. In sum, MN4/LSDQgtu is the first HIV-1 derivative that exhibits resistance to the major restriction factors in rhesus macaque cells. PMID:23966385

  16. AIDS in rural Africa: a paradigm for HIV-1 prevention.

    PubMed

    Hudson, C P

    1996-07-01

    Networks of concurrent sexual partnerships may be the primary cause of epidemic spread of HIV-1 in parts of sub-Saharan Africa. This pattern of sexual behaviour increases the likelihood that individuals experiencing primary HIV-1 infection transmit the virus to other persons. Networks of concurrent partnerships are likely to be important in both the early ('epidemic') and late ('endemic') phases of HIV-1 transmission. Interventions should aim to break the sexual networks, whatever the stage of the epidemic. However, prevention of transmission in the endemic phase also requires a greater awareness of early clinical manifestations of HIV-1 infection in the general population. Such awareness, coupled with the availability of condoms and access to HIV-1 testing facilities, may reduce transmission in discordant couples.

  17. HIV-1 seroprevalence in an inner-city public hospital.

    PubMed Central

    Nagachinta, T.; Brown, C. P.; Cheng, F.; Temple, W.; Kerndt, P. R.; Janssen, R. S.

    1994-01-01

    In a hospital-based seroprevalence survey for human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) infection, a stratified sampling method based on age and gender was used to collect 5429 blood samples at an inner-city hospital. Sentinel Hospital Surveillance System (SHSS) criteria developed by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention were used to classify patient diagnoses into two categories by the likelihood of being associated with HIV-1 infection. The two categories were those with high likelihood of association with HIV-1 (SHSS-ineligible) and those with low likelihood of association with HIV-1 infection (SHSS-eligible). Of the 5429 blood samples, 4262 were SHSS-eligible and 1167 were SHSS-ineligible. After personal identifies were removed, specimens were tested by ELISA and confirmed by Western blot analysis. The overall prevalence rate of HIV-1 infection was 0.98%. The seroprevalence rate was almost 2.6 times higher in high-association patients compared with low-association patients (1.89% versus 0.73%, P < .001). Results from this study indicate a high unsuspected HIV-1 seroprevalence rate in a subpopulation (SHSS-eligible) considered to have diagnoses with low likelihood of association with HIV-1 infection. These patients may better approximate HIV-1 seroprevalence in the general population of the area served by the hospital than would a sample of all patients. Monitoring HIV-1 seroprevalence in the SHSS-eligible group will be a useful measure for community serosurveillance for HIV-1 infection. PMID:8046762

  18. Sexually Transmitted Infections among HIV-1-Discordant Couples

    PubMed Central

    Guthrie, Brandon L.; Kiarie, James N.; Morrison, Susan; John-Stewart, Grace C.; Kinuthia, John; Whittington, William L. H.; Farquhar, Carey

    2009-01-01

    Introduction More new HIV-1 infections occur within stable HIV-1-discordant couples than in any other group in Africa, and sexually transmitted infections (STIs) may increase transmission risk among discordant couples, accounting for a large proportion of new HIV-1 infections. Understanding correlates of STIs among discordant couples will aid in optimizing interventions to prevent HIV-1 transmission in these couples. Methods HIV-1-discordant couples in which HIV-1-infected partners were HSV-2-seropositive were tested for syphilis, chlamydia, gonorrhea, and trichomoniasis, and HIV-1-uninfected partners were tested for HSV-2. We assessed sociodemographic, behavioral, and biological correlates of a current STI. Results Of 416 couples enrolled, 16% were affected by a treatable STI, and among these both partners were infected in 17% of couples. A treatable STI was found in 46 (11%) females and 30 (7%) males. The most prevalent infections were trichomoniasis (5.9%) and syphilis (2.6%). Participants were 5.9-fold more likely to have an STI if their partner had an STI (P<0.01), and STIs were more common among those reporting any unprotected sex (OR = 2.43; P<0.01) and those with low education (OR = 3.00; P<0.01). Among HIV-1-uninfected participants with an HSV-2-seropositive partner, females were significantly more likely to be HSV-2-seropositive than males (78% versus 50%, P<0.01). Conclusions Treatable STIs were common among HIV-1-discordant couples and the majority of couples affected by an STI were discordant for the STI, with relatively high HSV-2 discordance. Awareness of STI correlates and treatment of both partners may reduce HIV-1 transmission. Trial Registration ClinicalTrials.gov NCT00194519 PMID:20011596

  19. Tat is required for efficient HIV-1 reverse transcription.

    PubMed Central

    Harrich, D; Ulich, C; García-Martínez, L F; Gaynor, R B

    1997-01-01

    The ability of human immunodeficiency virus-1 (HIV-1) to undergo efficient reverse transcription is dependent on a number of parameters. These include the binding of the tRNA(3)(Lys) to the HIV-1 primer binding site and the subsequent interaction with the heterodimeric reverse transcriptase. Recently, we demonstrated that TAR RNA was also necessary for efficient HIV-1 reverse transcription. Given the fact that the Tat protein is involved in the activation of HIV-1 gene expression in conjunction with TAR, we wished to determine whether Tat might also be involved in the control of HIV-1 reverse transcription. HIV-1 virions deleted in the tat gene were unable to initiate reverse transcription efficiently upon infection of peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs). This defect was not due to decreased amounts of genomic RNA, reverse transcriptase or other HIV-1 proteins which were incorporated into the virion. Following transfection of wild-type but not mutant tat genes into cell lines producing HIV-1 lacking tat, the virions produced could be complemented for defects in reverse transcription upon subsequent infection of PBMCs. In contrast, the defect in reverse transcription seen with HIV-1 lacking the tat gene could not be complemented when the target cells rather than the producer cells contained tat. Viruses lacking tat were also defective in endogenous assays of reverse transcription, although these viruses contained similar levels of reverse transcriptase. These results indicate that the Tat protein, in addition to regulating the level of gene expression, is also important for efficient HIV-1 reverse transcription. PMID:9135139

  20. Adaptation of HIV-1 to its human host.

    PubMed

    Wain, Louise V; Bailes, Elizabeth; Bibollet-Ruche, Frederic; Decker, Julie M; Keele, Brandon F; Van Heuverswyn, Fran; Li, Yingying; Takehisa, Jun; Ngole, Eitel Mpoudi; Shaw, George M; Peeters, Martine; Hahn, Beatrice H; Sharp, Paul M

    2007-08-01

    Human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) originated from three independent cross-species transmissions of simian immunodeficiency virus (SIVcpzPtt) infecting chimpanzees (Pan troglodytes troglodytes) in west central Africa, giving rise to pandemic (group M) and non-pandemic (groups N and O) clades of HIV-1. To identify host-specific adaptations in HIV-1 we compared the inferred ancestral sequences of HIV-1 groups M, N and O to 12 full length genome sequences of SIVcpzPtt and four of the outlying but closely related SIVcpzPts (from P. t. schweinfurthii). This analysis revealed a single site that was completely conserved among SIVcpzPtt strains but different (due to the same change) in all three groups of HIV-1. This site, Gag-30, lies within p17, the gag-encoded matrix protein. It is Met in SIVcpzPtt, underwent a conservative replacement by Leu in one lineage of SIVcpzPts but changed radically to Arg on all three lineages leading to HIV-1. During subsequent diversification this site has been conserved as a basic residue (Arg or Lys) in most lineages of HIV-1. Retrospective analysis revealed that Gag-30 had reverted to Met in a previous experiment in which HIV-1 was passaged through chimpanzees. To examine whether this substitution conferred a species specific growth advantage, we used site-directed mutagenesis to generate variants of these chimpanzee-adapted HIV-1 strains with Lys at Gag-30, and tested their replication in both human and chimpanzee CD4+ T lymphocytes. Remarkably, viruses encoding Met replicated to higher titers than viruses encoding Lys in chimpanzee T cells, but the opposite was found in human T cells. Taken together, these observations provide compelling evidence for host-specific adaptation during the emergence of HIV-1 and identify the viral matrix protein as a modulator of viral fitness following transmission to the new human host.

  1. Connectivity and HIV-1 infection: role of CD4(+) T-cell counts and HIV-1 RNA copy number.

    PubMed

    Padierna-Olivos, L; Moreno-Altamirano, M M; Sánchez-Colón, S; Massó-Rojas, F; Sánchez-García, F J

    2000-12-01

    Following primary infection with human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)-1, antibodies against specific HIV-1 epitopes are elicited. However, non-HIV-1 specific antibodies, including autoantibodies, also arise. In fact, it has been proposed that such autoantibodies have an important role in the pathogenesis of HIV-1 infection. Because an imbalance in connectivity has been associated with autoimmune processes, we investigated the connectivity status of HIV-1-infected individuals. Moreover, we tested the possible role of viral load and CD4(+) T-cell counts, in connectivity, because these parameters appear to be important in the prognosis of HIV-1 infection. Results show that indeed, there is an alteration in connectivity in these patients, both for immunoglobulin (Ig)G and IgM, which is an immune alteration not previously identified in HIV-1 infection. In addition, our results show that viral load and CD4(+) T-cell counts are both equally important in defining the characteristic pattern of connectivity in HIV-1-infected individuals, and that neither is independently responsible for alterations in patient connectivity status.

  2. Activation of latent HIV-1 expression by protein kinase C agonists. A novel therapeutic approach to eradicate HIV-1 reservoirs.

    PubMed

    Sánchez-Duffhues, Gonzalo; Vo, Minh Q; Pérez, Moisés; Calzado, Marco A; Moreno, Santiago; Appendino, Giovanni; Muñoz, Eduardo

    2011-03-01

    The persistence of latent HIV-infected cellular reservoirs represents the major hurdle to virus eradication in patients treated with highly active antiretroviral therapy. The molecular mechanisms by which integrated HIV-1 is repressed during latency have been partially identified in different models of HIV-1 latency, and the involvement of multiple processes has been demonstrated. Therefore, several molecular targets amenable to pharmacological manipulation have emerged to antagonize HIV-1 latency in the viral reservoirs. In this context, it has been suggested that successful depletion of such latent reservoirs will require a combination of therapeutic agents that can specifically and efficiently act on cells harbouring latent HIV-1 provirus. HIV-1 reactivation therapy is a potential therapeutic option to purge the viral reservoirs. The goal of this therapy is to enhance the transcriptional activity of the latent HIV-1 without inducing the polyclonal activation of non-infected cells. In this sense natural or semisynthetic protein kinase C agonists lacking tumour-promoter activities clearly fulfil this criterion, thereby opening new research avenues to purge HIV-1 reservoirs. In this review article, we have succinctly summarized the known effects of "natural products", focusing on phorboids like prostratin and ingenols, macrolides like bryostatin 1, and macrocyclic polyesters like ingols and jatrophanes. A comprehensive view on the molecular mechanisms underlying the principle of HIV-1 reactivation from latency is provided, discussing the combination of "natural products" with other experimental or conventional therapeutics.

  3. Natural polymorphisms and unusual mutations in HIV-1 protease with potential antiretroviral resistance: a bioinformatic analysis

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background The correlations of genotypic and phenotypic tests with treatment, clinical history and the significance of mutations in viruses of HIV-infected patients are used to establish resistance mutations to protease inhibitors (PIs). Emerging mutations in human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) protease confer resistance to PIs by inducing structural changes at the ligand interaction site. The aim of this study was to establish an in silico structural relationship between natural HIV-1 polymorphisms and unusual HIV-1 mutations that confer resistance to PIs. Results Protease sequences isolated from 151 Mexican HIV-1 patients that were naïve to, or subjected to antiretroviral therapy, were examined. We identified 41 unrelated resistance mutations with a prevalence greater than 1%. Among these mutations, nine exhibited positive selection, three were natural polymorphisms (L63S/V/H) in a codon associated with drug resistance, and six were unusual mutations (L5F, D29V, L63R/G, P79L and T91V). The D29V mutation, with a prevalence of 1.32% in the studied population, was only found in patients treated with antiretroviral drugs. Using in silico modelling, we observed that D29V formed unstable protease complexes when were docked with lopinavir, saquinavir, darunavir, tipranavir, indinavir and atazanavir. Conclusions The structural correlation of natural polymorphisms and unusual mutations with drug resistance is useful for the identification of HIV-1 variants with potential resistance to PIs. The D29V mutation likely confers a selection advantage in viruses; however, in silico, presence of this mutation results in unstable enzyme/PI complexes, that possibly induce resistance to PIs. PMID:24629078

  4. Germlining of the HIV-1 broadly neutralizing antibody domain m36

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Weizao; Li, Wei; Ying, Tianlei; Wang, Yanping; Feng, Yang; Dimitrov, Dimiter S.

    2015-01-01

    Engineered antibody domains (eAds) have emerged as a novel class of HIV-1 inhibitors and are currently under preclinical testing as promising drug candidates for prevention and therapy of HIV-1 infection. Reverse mutation of antibodies to germline sequences (germlining) could not only identify less mutated variants with lower probability of immunogenicity and other improved properties but also help elucidate their mechanisms of action. In this study, we sequentially reverted the framework (FRs) and complementary determining regions (CDRs) of m36, a human antibody heavy chain variable domain-based eAd targeting the coreceptor binding site of the viral envelope glycoprotein gp120, back to germline sequences. Two types of amino acid mutations and one region in the antibody V segment were identified that are critical for HIV-1 neutralization. These include four mutations to acidic acid residues distributed in the CDR1 and CDR2, two mutations to hydrophobic residues in the FR3 and CDR3, and partial FR2 and FR3 sequences flanking the CDR2 that are derived from a different gene family. An m36 variant with all five mutations in the FRs reverted back to germline showed slightly increased neutralizing activity against two HIV-1 isolates tested. Another variant with seven of twelve mutations in the V segment reverted retained potency within three-fold of that of the mature antibody. These results, together with an analysis of m36-gp120-CD4 docking structures, could have implications for the further development of m36 as candidate therapeutics and elucidation of its mechanism of potent and broad HIV-1 neutralization. PMID:25676867

  5. Medroxyprogesterone acetate increases HIV-1 infection of unstimulated peripheral blood mononuclear cells in vitro

    PubMed Central

    Sampah, Maame Efua S.; Laird, Gregory M.; Blankson, Joel N.; Siliciano, Robert F.; Coleman, Jenell S.

    2015-01-01

    Objective Several observational studies suggest that medroxyprogesterone acetate (MPA) injectable contraception may increase a woman’s risk of sexual HIV-1 acquisition. In vitro studies are conflicting, mainly due to differences in the type of progestin studied or activation status of the primary cells. We sought to determine if MPA increases infection of unstimulated peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC). Methods Freshly isolated PBMC from normal blood donors were treated with physiologic MPA concentrations ranging from 0.003 ng/mL to 5 ng/mL and infected with GFP-tagged R5-tropic or X4-tropic HIV-1 pseudoviruses by spinoculation. The infection was limited to a single cycle. Cells were stained with CD3, CD8, and CD14. Infection was quantified as the percentage of GFP+ cells by flow cytometry. Results Absolute infection was greater among unstimulated MPA-treated CD3+CD8− T cells versus untreated cells across MPA concentrations of 0.003 to 3 ng/mL using R5 (P <0.003) and 0.03 to 0.3 ng/mL using X4 pseudovirus (P < 0.005). There was increased relative infection of CD3+CD8− T cells in MPA-treated whole PBMC cultures but not after monocytes were depleted (P<0.02). HIV-1 infection of stimulated PBMC showed no differences in R5 or X4 infection across all MPA concentrations (P > 0.5). Conclusions CD3+CD8− T cell population of MPA-treated unstimulated PBMC were more susceptible to HIV-1 infection than untreated cells. The increased infection was partly due to monocytes and was lost when PBMC were exogenously stimulated. These data provide confirmation of a biological association between MPA exposure and increased susceptibility to HIV-1 infection, particularly among women who inject drugs. PMID:26035316

  6. High prevalence of human T-lymphotropic virus type 1 (HTLV-1) in immigrant male-to-female transsexual sex workers with HIV-1 infection.

    PubMed

    Zehender, Gianguglielmo; Colasante, Chiara; De Maddalena, Chiara; Bernini, Flavia; Savasi, Valeria; Persico, Tiziana; Merli, Stefania; Ridolfo, Annalisa; Santambrogio, Sara; Moroni, Mauro; Galli, Massimo

    2004-10-01

    Human T-lymphotropic virus type 1 and 2 (HTLV-1 and HTLV-2) infections in Europe are limited to intravenous drug users and migrants coming from areas in which they are endemic. A survey was undertaken of HTLV-1 and HTLV-2 infections in 393 recent immigrants: 167 HIV-1 positive subjects (including 52 male-to-female transsexual sex workers) and 226 pregnant HIV-1 negative women. The prevalence of HTLV-1 was 3.6% in the HIV-1 positive group and 0.9% in the HIV-1 negative group. The highest HTLV-1 prevalence in both groups was found in persons from Latin America, particularly those born in Peru (up to 26% in the HIV-1 positive group). All of the HIV-1/HTLV-1 co-infected individuals were male-to-female transsexual sex workers in whom the overall prevalence of HTLV-1 infection was 11.5%. HTLV-2 was only found in the HIV-1 positive group (prevalence 1.2%); all of the infected subjects were transsexual sex workers from Brazil (overall prevalence 6.4%). Phylogenetic analysis showed that all of the HTLV-1 isolates were of the cosmopolitan type, clustering with other strains circulating in the patients' birthplaces; the HTLV-2 isolates were of subtype 2a, and clustered significantly with other Brazilian strains. These results suggest the independent origin of each infection in the patient's birthplace. The data raise concerns about the further spread of HTLV infections mainly through the sexual route.

  7. Cell signaling pathways and HIV-1 therapeutics.

    PubMed

    He, Johnny J

    2011-06-01

    Host-virus interactions permeate every aspect of both virus life cycle and host response and involve host cell macromolecular machinery and viral elements. It is these intimate interactions that mandate the outcomes of the infection and pathogenesis. It is also these intimate interactions that lay the foundation for the development of pharmaceutical interventions. HIV-1 is no exception in these regards. In the first two decades, HIV/AIDS research has led to the successful development of a number of antiviral inhibitors and the landmark formulation of the suppressive therapy. It has become apparent that this therapy does not offer a complete solution to cure and eradicate the virus. Meanwhile, this therapy has changed the overall landscape of HIV-associated neurological disorders to a more common and prevalent form so-called minor cognitive motor disorder. Thus, there is an important and continued need for new anti-HIV therapeutics. We believe that this is an excellent opportunity to compile and present the latest works being done during the last few years in this exciting field of HIV-host interactions, particularly cell signaling pathways. We hope that this special issue composed of one brief report, eight thematic reviews, and two original articles will serve to foster the exchange of new scientific ideas on HIV-host interactions and anti-HIV therapy and eventually contribute to HIV/AIDS eradication.

  8. Possible applications for replicating HIV 1 vectors

    PubMed Central

    Das, Atze T; Jeeninga, Rienk E; Berkhout, Ben

    2010-01-01

    Since its discovery some 25 years ago, much has been learned about HIV type 1 and the molecular details of its replication cycle. This insight has been used to develop lentiviral vector systems that have advantages over conventional retroviral vector systems. For safety reasons, the lentiviral vector systems are replication incompetent and the risk of generating a replication competent virus has been minimized. Nevertheless, there may be certain applications for replication competent HIV based vector systems, and we will review our activities in this particular field. This includes the generation of a conditionally replicating HIV 1 variant as a safe live attenuated virus vaccine, the construction of mini HIV variants as cancer selective viruses for virotherapy against leukemia, and the use of a conditionally live anti HIV gene therapy vector. Although safety concerns will undoubtedly remain for the use of replication competent HIV based vector systems, some of the results in cell culture systems are very promising and warrant further testing in appropriate animal models. PMID:20582153

  9. Inhibition of HIV-1 by fusion inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Eggink, Dirk; Berkhout, Ben; Sanders, Rogier W

    2010-01-01

    The envelope glycoprotein complex (Env) is responsible for entry of the human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) into cells by mediating attachment to target cells and subsequent membrane fusion. Env consists of three gp120 subunits that mediate receptor and co-receptor attachment and three gp41 subunits responsible for membrane fusion. Several steps of the entry process can serve as drug targets. Receptor antagonists prevent attachment of gp120 to the receptor or co-receptor and conformational changes within gp41 required for membrane fusion can be inhibited by fusion inhibitors. Enfuvirtide (T20, Fuzeon) is a peptide based on the gp41 sequence and is the only approved fusion inhibitor. It prevents membrane fusion by competitively binding to gp41 and blocking the formation of the post-fusion structure. New generations of T20-like peptides have been developed with improved potency and stability. Besides T20 and derivatives, other fusion inhibitors have been developed that target different domains of gp41. Here we discuss the development of fusion inhibitors, their mode of action and their potential for incorporation in future drug regimens.

  10. Possible applications for replicating HIV 1 vectors.

    PubMed

    Das, Atze T; Jeeninga, Rienk E; Berkhout, Ben

    2010-05-01

    Since its discovery some 25 years ago, much has been learned about HIV type 1 and the molecular details of its replication cycle. This insight has been used to develop lentiviral vector systems that have advantages over conventional retroviral vector systems. For safety reasons, the lentiviral vector systems are replication incompetent and the risk of generating a replication competent virus has been minimized. Nevertheless, there may be certain applications for replication competent HIV based vector systems, and we will review our activities in this particular field. This includes the generation of a conditionally replicating HIV 1 variant as a safe live attenuated virus vaccine, the construction of mini HIV variants as cancer selective viruses for virotherapy against leukemia, and the use of a conditionally live anti HIV gene therapy vector. Although safety concerns will undoubtedly remain for the use of replication competent HIV based vector systems, some of the results in cell culture systems are very promising and warrant further testing in appropriate animal models.

  11. Quantitative Analysis of HIV-1 Preintegration Complexes

    PubMed Central

    Engelman, Alan; Oztop, Ilker; Vandegraaff, Nick; Raghavendra, Nidhanapati K.

    2009-01-01

    Retroviral replication proceeds through the formation of a provirus, an integrated DNA copy of the viral RNA genome. The linear cDNA product of reverse transcription is the integration substrate and two different integrase activities, 3′ processing and DNA strand transfer, are required for provirus formation. Integrase nicks the cDNA ends adjacent to phylogenetically-conserved CA dinucleotides during 3′ processing. After nuclear entry and locating a suitable chromatin acceptor site, integrase joins the recessed 3′-OHs to the 5′-phosphates of a double-stranded staggered cut in the DNA target. Integrase functions in the context of a large nucleoprotein complex, called the preintegration complex (PIC), and PICs are analyzed to determine levels of integrase 3′ processing and DNA strand transfer activities that occur during acute virus infection. Denatured cDNA end regions are monitored by indirect end-labeling to measure the extent of 3′ processing. Native PICs can efficiently integrate their viral cDNA into exogenously added target DNA in vitro, and Southern blotting or nested PCR assays are used to quantify the resultant DNA strand transfer activity. This study details HIV-1 infection, PIC extraction, partial purification, and quantitative analyses of integrase 3′ processing and DNA strand transfer activities. PMID:19233280

  12. HIV-1 molecular epidemiology among newly diagnosed HIV-1 individuals in Hebei, a low HIV prevalence province in China

    PubMed Central

    Lu, Xinli; Kang, Xianjiang; Liu, Yongjian; Cui, Ze; Guo, Wei; Zhao, Cuiying; Li, Yan; Chen, Suliang; Li, Jingyun; Zhang, Yuqi; Zhao, Hongru

    2017-01-01

    New human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) diagnoses are increasing rapidly in Hebei. The aim of this study presents the most extensive HIV-1 molecular epidemiology investigation in Hebei province in China thus far. We have carried out the most extensive systematic cross-sectional study based on newly diagnosed HIV-1 positive individuals in 2013, and characterized the molecular epidemiology of HIV-1 based on full length gag-partial pol gene sequences in the whole of Hebei. Nine HIV-1 genotypes based on full length gag-partial pol gene sequence were identified among 610 newly diagnosed naïve individuals. The four main genotypes were circulating recombinant form (CRF)01_AE (53.4%), CRF07_BC (23.4%), subtype B (15.9%), and unique recombinant forms URFs (4.9%). Within 1 year, three new genotypes (subtype A1, CRF55_01B, CRF65_cpx), unknown before in Hebei, were first found among men who have sex with men (MSM). All nine genotypes were identified in the sexually contracted HIV-1 population. Among 30 URFs, six recombinant patterns were revealed, including CRF01_AE/BC (40.0%), CRF01_AE/B (23.3%), B/C (16.7%), CRF01_AE/C (13.3%), CRF01_AE/B/A2 (3.3%) and CRF01_AE/BC/A2 (3.3%), plus two potential CRFs. This study elucidated the complicated characteristics of HIV-1 molecular epidemiology in a low HIV-1 prevalence northern province of China and revealed the high level of HIV-1 genetic diversity. All nine HIV-1 genotypes circulating in Hebei have spread out of their initial risk groups into the general population through sexual contact, especially through MSM. This highlights the urgency of HIV prevention and control in China. PMID:28178737

  13. Anti-HIV-1 Activity of Flavonoid Myricetin on HIV-1 Infection in a Dual-Chamber In Vitro Model

    PubMed Central

    Pasetto, Silvana; Pardi, Vanessa; Murata, Ramiro Mendonça

    2014-01-01

    HIV infection by sexual transmission remains an enormous global health concern. More than 1 million new infections among women occur annually. Microbicides represent a promising prevention strategy that women can easily control. Among emerging therapies, natural small molecules such as flavonoids are an important source of new active substances. In this study we report the in vitro cytotoxicity and anti-HIV-1 and microbicide activity of the following flavonoids: Myricetin, Quercetin and Pinocembrin. Cytotoxicity tests were conducted on TZM-bl, HeLa, PBMC, and H9 cell cultures using 0.01–100 µM concentrations. Myricetin presented the lowest toxic effect, with Quercetin and Pinocembrin relatively more toxic. The anti-HIV-1 activity was tested with TZM-bl cell plus HIV-1 BaL (R5 tropic), H9 and PBMC cells plus HIV-1 MN (X4 tropic), and the dual tropic (X4R5) HIV-1 89.6. All flavonoids showed anti-HIV activity, although Myricetin was more effective than Quercetin or Pinocembrin. In TZM-bl cells, Myricetin inhibited ≥90% of HIV-1 BaL infection. The results were confirmed by quantification of HIV-1 p24 antigen in supernatant from H9 and PBMC cells following flavonoid treatment. In H9 and PBMC cells infected by HIV-1 MN and HIV-1 89.6, Myricetin showed more than 80% anti-HIV activity. Quercetin and Pinocembrin presented modest anti-HIV activity in all experiments. Myricetin activity was tested against HIV-RT and inhibited the enzyme by 49%. Microbicide activities were evaluated using a dual-chamber female genital tract model. In the in vitro microbicide activity model, Myricetin showed promising results against different strains of HIV-1 while also showing insignificant cytotoxic effects. Further studies of Myricetin should be performed to identify its molecular targets in order to provide a solid biological foundation for translational research. PMID:25546350

  14. Nonneutralizing Antibodies Induced by the HIV-1 gp41 NHR Domain Gain Neutralizing Activity in the Presence of the HIV Fusion Inhibitor Enfuvirtide: a Potential Therapeutic Vaccine Strategy.

    PubMed

    Wang, Qian; Bi, Wenwen; Zhu, Xiaojie; Li, Haoyang; Qi, Qianqian; Yu, Fei; Lu, Lu; Jiang, Shibo

    2015-07-01

    A key barrier against developing preventive and therapeutic human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) vaccines is the inability of viral envelope glycoproteins to elicit broad and potent neutralizing antibodies. However, in the presence of fusion inhibitor enfuvirtide, we show that the nonneutralizing antibodies induced by the HIV type 1 (HIV-1) gp41 N-terminal heptad repeat (NHR) domain (N63) exhibit potent and broad neutralizing activity against laboratory-adapted HIV-1 strains, including the drug-resistant variants, and primary HIV-1 isolates with different subtypes, suggesting the potential of developing gp41-targeted HIV therapeutic vaccines.

  15. Phosphorothioate 2' deoxyribose oligomers as microbicides that inhibit human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) infection and block Toll-like receptor 7 (TLR7) and TLR9 triggering by HIV-1.

    PubMed

    Fraietta, Joseph A; Mueller, Yvonne M; Do, Duc H; Holmes, Veronica M; Howett, Mary K; Lewis, Mark G; Boesteanu, Alina C; Alkan, Sefik S; Katsikis, Peter D

    2010-10-01

    Topical microbicides may prove to be an important strategy for preventing human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) transmission. We examined the safety and efficacy of sequence-nonspecific phosphorothioate 2' deoxyribose oligomers as potential novel microbicides. A short, 13-mer poly(T) phosphorothioate oligodeoxynucleotide (OPB-T) significantly inhibited infection of primary peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC) by high-titer HIV-1(Ba-L) and simian immunodeficiency virus mac251 (SIV(mac251)). Continuous exposure of human vaginal and foreskin tissue explants to OPB-T showed no toxicity. An abasic 14-mer phosphorothioate 2' deoxyribose backbone (PDB) demonstrated enhanced anti-HIV-1 activity relative to OPB-T and other homo-oligodeoxynucleotide analogs. When PDB was used to pretreat HIV-1, PDB was effective against R5 and X4 isolates at a half-maximal inhibitory concentration (IC(50)) of <1 μM in both PBMC and P4-R5 MAGI cell infections. PDB also reduced HIV-1 infectivity following the binding of virus to target cells. This novel topical microbicide candidate exhibited an excellent in vitro safety profile in human PBMC and endocervical epithelial cells. PDB also retained activity in hydroxyethylcellulose gel at pH 4.4 and after transition to a neutral pH and was stable in this formulation for 30 days at room temperature. Furthermore, the compound displayed potent antiviral activity following incubation with a Lactobacillus strain derived from normal vaginal flora. Most importantly, PDB can inhibit HIV-1-induced alpha interferon production. Phosphorothioate 2' deoxyribose oligomers may therefore be promising microbicide candidates that inhibit HIV-1 infection and also dampen the inflammation which is critical for the initial spread of the virus.

  16. Aqueous Extracts of the Marine Brown Alga Lobophora variegata Inhibit HIV-1 Infection at the Level of Virus Entry into Cells

    PubMed Central

    Kremb, Stephan; Helfer, Markus; Kraus, Birgit; Wolff, Horst; Wild, Christian; Schneider, Martha; Voolstra, Christian R.; Brack-Werner, Ruth

    2014-01-01

    In recent years, marine algae have emerged as a rich and promising source of molecules with potent activities against various human pathogens. The widely distributed brown alga Lobophora variegata that is often associated with tropical coral reefs exerts strong antibacterial and antiprotozoal effects, but so far has not been associated with specific anti-viral activities. This study investigated potential HIV-1 inhibitory activity of L. variegata collected from different geographical regions, using a cell-based full replication HIV-1 reporter assay. Aqueous L. variegata extracts showed strong inhibitory effects on several HIV-1 strains, including drug-resistant and primary HIV-1 isolates, and protected even primary cells (PBMC) from HIV-1-infection. Anti-viral potency was related to ecological factors and showed clear differences depending on light exposition or epiphyte growth. Assays addressing early events of the HIV-1 replication cycle indicated that L. variegata extracts inhibited entry of HIV-1 into cells at a pre-fusion step possibly by impeding mobility of virus particles. Further characterization of the aqueous extract demonstrated that even high doses had only moderate effects on viability of cultured and primary cells (PBMCs). Imaging-based techniques revealed extract effects on the plasma membrane and actin filaments as well as induction of apoptosis at concentrations exceeding EC50 of anti-HIV-1 activity by more than 400 fold. In summary, we show for the first time that L. variegata extracts inhibit HIV-1 entry, thereby suggesting this alga as promising source for the development of novel HIV-1 inhibitors. PMID:25144758

  17. Antibodies Elicited by Multiple Envelope Glycoprotein Immunogens in Primates Neutralize Primary Human Immunodeficiency Viruses (HIV-1) Sensitized by CD4-Mimetic Compounds

    PubMed Central

    Madani, Navid; Princiotto, Amy M.; Easterhoff, David; Bradley, Todd; Luo, Kan; Williams, Wilton B.; Liao, Hua-Xin; Moody, M. Anthony; Phad, Ganesh E.; Vázquez Bernat, Néstor; Melillo, Bruno; Santra, Sampa; Smith, Amos B.; Karlsson Hedestam, Gunilla B.; Haynes, Barton

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT The human immunodeficiency virus (HIV-1) envelope glycoproteins (Env) mediate virus entry through a series of complex conformational changes triggered by binding to the receptors CD4 and CCR5/CXCR4. Broadly neutralizing antibodies that recognize conserved Env epitopes are thought to be an important component of a protective immune response. However, to date, HIV-1 Env immunogens that elicit broadly neutralizing antibodies have not been identified, creating hurdles for vaccine development. Small-molecule CD4-mimetic compounds engage the CD4-binding pocket on the gp120 exterior Env and induce Env conformations that are highly sensitive to neutralization by antibodies, including antibodies directed against the conserved Env region that interacts with CCR5/CXCR4. Here, we show that CD4-mimetic compounds sensitize primary HIV-1 to neutralization by antibodies that can be elicited in monkeys and humans within 6 months by several Env vaccine candidates, including gp120 monomers. Monoclonal antibodies directed against the gp120 V2 and V3 variable regions were isolated from the immunized monkeys and humans; these monoclonal antibodies neutralized a primary HIV-1 only when the virus was sensitized by a CD4-mimetic compound. Thus, in addition to their direct antiviral effect, CD4-mimetic compounds dramatically enhance the HIV-1-neutralizing activity of antibodies that can be elicited with currently available immunogens. Used as components of microbicides, the CD4-mimetic compounds might increase the protective efficacy of HIV-1 vaccines. IMPORTANCE Preventing HIV-1 transmission is a high priority for global health. Eliciting antibodies that can neutralize transmitted strains of HIV-1 is difficult, creating problems for the development of an effective vaccine. We found that small-molecule CD4-mimetic compounds sensitize HIV-1 to antibodies that can be elicited in vaccinated humans and monkeys. These results suggest an approach to prevent HIV-1 sexual transmission in

  18. Aqueous extracts of the marine brown alga Lobophora variegata inhibit HIV-1 infection at the level of virus entry into cells.

    PubMed

    Kremb, Stephan; Helfer, Markus; Kraus, Birgit; Wolff, Horst; Wild, Christian; Schneider, Martha; Voolstra, Christian R; Brack-Werner, Ruth

    2014-01-01

    In recent years, marine algae have emerged as a rich and promising source of molecules with potent activities against various human pathogens. The widely distributed brown alga Lobophora variegata that is often associated with tropical coral reefs exerts strong antibacterial and antiprotozoal effects, but so far has not been associated with specific anti-viral activities. This study investigated potential HIV-1 inhibitory activity of L. variegata collected from different geographical regions, using a cell-based full replication HIV-1 reporter assay. Aqueous L. variegata extracts showed strong inhibitory effects on several HIV-1 strains, including drug-resistant and primary HIV-1 isolates, and protected even primary cells (PBMC) from HIV-1-infection. Anti-viral potency was related to ecological factors and showed clear differences depending on light exposition or epiphyte growth. Assays addressing early events of the HIV-1 replication cycle indicated that L. variegata extracts inhibited entry of HIV-1 into cells at a pre-fusion step possibly by impeding mobility of virus particles. Further characterization of the aqueous extract demonstrated that even high doses had only moderate effects on viability of cultured and primary cells (PBMCs). Imaging-based techniques revealed extract effects on the plasma membrane and actin filaments as well as induction of apoptosis at concentrations exceeding EC50 of anti-HIV-1 activity by more than 400 fold. In summary, we show for the first time that L. variegata extracts inhibit HIV-1 entry, thereby suggesting this alga as promising source for the development of novel HIV-1 inhibitors.

  19. The Complex Interaction between Methamphetamine Abuse and HIV-1 pathogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Passaro, Ryan Colby; Pandhare, Jui; Qian, Han-Zhu; Dash, Chandravanu

    2016-01-01

    The global HIV/AIDS pandemic has claimed the lives of an estimated 35 million people. A significant barrier for combating this global pandemic is substance use since it is associated with HIV transmission, delayed diagnosis/initiation of therapy, and poor adherence to therapy. Clinical studies also suggest a link between substance use and HIV-disease progression/AIDS-associated mortality. Methamphetamine (METH) use is one of the fastest-growing substance use problems in the world. METH use enhances high-risk sexual behaviors, therefore increases the likelihood of HIV-1 acquisition. METH use is also associated with higher viral loads, immune dysfunction, and antiretroviral resistance. Moreover, METH use has also been correlated with rapid progression to AIDS. However, direct effects of METH on HIV-1 disease progression remains poorly understood because use of METH and other illicit drugs is often associated with reduced/non adherence to ART. Nevertheless, in vitro studies demonstrate that METH increases HIV-1 replication in cell cultures and animal models. Thus, it has been proposed that METH’s potentiating effects on HIV-1 replication may in part contribute to the worsening of HIV-1 pathogenesis. However, our recent data demonstrate that METH inhibits HIV-1 replication in CD4+ T cells and challenges this paradigm. Thus, the goal of this review is to systematically examine the published literature to better understand the complex interaction between METH abuse and HIV-1 disease progression. PMID:25850893

  20. Defining the roles for Vpr in HIV-1-associated neuropathogenesis.

    PubMed

    James, Tony; Nonnemacher, Michael R; Wigdahl, Brian; Krebs, Fred C

    2016-08-01

    It is increasingly evident that the human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) viral protein R (Vpr) has a unique role in neuropathogenesis. Its ability to induce G2/M arrest coupled with its capacity to increase viral gene transcription gives it a unique role in sustaining viral replication and aiding in the establishment and maintenance of a systemic infection. The requirement of Vpr for HIV-1 infection and replication in cells of monocytic origin (a key lineage of cells involved in HIV-1 neuroinvasion) suggests an important role in establishing and sustaining infection in the central nervous system (CNS). Contributions of Vpr to neuropathogenesis can be expanded further through (i) naturally occurring HIV-1 sequence variation that results in functionally divergent Vpr variants; (ii) the dual activities of Vpr as a intracellular protein delivered and expressed during HIV-1 infection and as an extracellular protein that can act on neighboring, uninfected cells; (iii) cell type-dependent consequences of Vpr expression and exposure, including cell cycle arrest, metabolic dysregulation, and cytotoxicity; and (iv) the effects of Vpr on exosome-based intercellular communication in the CNS. Revealing that the effects of this pleiotropic viral protein is an essential part of a greater understanding of HIV-1-associated pathogenesis and potential approaches to treating and preventing disease caused by HIV-1 infection.

  1. Identification of Siglec-1 null individuals infected with HIV-1.

    PubMed

    Martinez-Picado, Javier; McLaren, Paul J; Erkizia, Itziar; Martin, Maureen P; Benet, Susana; Rotger, Margalida; Dalmau, Judith; Ouchi, Dan; Wolinsky, Steven M; Penugonda, Sudhir; Günthard, Huldrych F; Fellay, Jacques; Carrington, Mary; Izquierdo-Useros, Nuria; Telenti, Amalio

    2016-08-11

    Siglec-1/CD169 is a myeloid-cell surface receptor critical for HIV-1 capture and infection of bystander target cells. To dissect the role of SIGLEC1 in natura, we scan a large population genetic database and identify a loss-of-function variant (Glu88Ter) that is found in ∼1% of healthy people. Exome analysis and direct genotyping of 4,233 HIV-1-infected individuals reveals two Glu88Ter homozygous and 97 heterozygous subjects, allowing the analysis of ex vivo and in vivo consequences of SIGLEC1 loss-of-function. Cells from these individuals are functionally null or haploinsufficient for Siglec-1 activity in HIV-1 capture and trans-infection ex vivo. However, Siglec-1 protein truncation does not have a measurable impact on HIV-1 acquisition or AIDS outcomes in vivo. This result contrasts with the known in vitro functional role of Siglec-1 in HIV-1 trans-infection. Thus, it provides evidence that the classical HIV-1 infectious routes may compensate for the lack of Siglec-1 in fuelling HIV-1 dissemination within infected individuals.

  2. Identification of Siglec-1 null individuals infected with HIV-1

    PubMed Central

    Martinez-Picado, Javier; McLaren, Paul J.; Erkizia, Itziar; Martin, Maureen P.; Benet, Susana; Rotger, Margalida; Dalmau, Judith; Ouchi, Dan; Wolinsky, Steven M.; Penugonda, Sudhir; Günthard, Huldrych F.; Fellay, Jacques; Carrington, Mary; Izquierdo-Useros, Nuria; Telenti, Amalio

    2016-01-01

    Siglec-1/CD169 is a myeloid-cell surface receptor critical for HIV-1 capture and infection of bystander target cells. To dissect the role of SIGLEC1 in natura, we scan a large population genetic database and identify a loss-of-function variant (Glu88Ter) that is found in ∼1% of healthy people. Exome analysis and direct genotyping of 4,233 HIV-1-infected individuals reveals two Glu88Ter homozygous and 97 heterozygous subjects, allowing the analysis of ex vivo and in vivo consequences of SIGLEC1 loss-of-function. Cells from these individuals are functionally null or haploinsufficient for Siglec-1 activity in HIV-1 capture and trans-infection ex vivo. However, Siglec-1 protein truncation does not have a measurable impact on HIV-1 acquisition or AIDS outcomes in vivo. This result contrasts with the known in vitro functional role of Siglec-1 in HIV-1 trans-infection. Thus, it provides evidence that the classical HIV-1 infectious routes may compensate for the lack of Siglec-1 in fuelling HIV-1 dissemination within infected individuals. PMID:27510803

  3. Plausibility of HIV-1 Infection of Oral Mucosal Epithelial Cells

    PubMed Central

    Herzberg, M.C.; Vacharaksa, A.; Gebhard, K.H.; Giacaman, R.A.; Ross, K.F.

    2011-01-01

    The AIDS pandemic continues. Little is understood about how HIV gains access to permissive cells across mucosal surfaces, yet such knowledge is crucial to the development of successful topical anti-HIV-1 agents and mucosal vaccines. HIV-1 rapidly internalizes and integrates into the mucosal keratinocyte genome, and integrated copies of HIV-1 persist upon cell passage. The virus does not appear to replicate, and the infection may become latent. Interactions between HIV-1 and oral keratinocytes have been modeled in the context of key environmental factors, including putative copathogens and saliva. In keratinocytes, HIV-1 internalizes within minutes; in saliva, an infectious fraction escapes inactivation and is harbored and transferable to permissive target cells for up to 48 hours. When incubated with the common oral pathogen Porphyromonas gingivalis, CCR5− oral keratinocytes signal through protease-activated receptors and Toll-like receptors to induce expression of CCR5, which increases selective uptake of infectious R5-tropic HIV-1 into oral keratinocytes and transfer to permissive cells. Hence, oral keratinocytes—like squamous keratinocytes of other tissues—may be targets for low-level HIV-1 internalization and subsequent dissemination by transfer to permissive cells. PMID:21441479

  4. Host SAMHD1 Protein Promotes HIV-1 Recombination in Macrophages*

    PubMed Central

    Nguyen, Laura A.; Kim, Dong-Hyun; Daly, Michele B.; Allan, Kevin C.; Kim, Baek

    2014-01-01

    Template switching can occur during the reverse transcription of HIV-1. Deoxynucleotide triphosphate (dNTP) concentrations have been biochemically shown to impact HIV-1 reverse transcriptase (RT)-mediated strand transfer. Lowering the dNTP concentrations promotes RT pausing and RNA template degradation by RNase H activity of the RT, subsequently leading to strand transfer. Terminally differentiated/nondividing macrophages, which serve as a key HIV-1 reservoir, contain extremely low dNTP concentrations (20–50 nm), which results from the cellular dNTP hydrolyzing sterile α motif and histidine aspartic domain containing protein 1 (SAMHD1) protein, when compared with activated CD4+ T cells (2–5 μm). In this study, we first observed that HIV-1 template switching efficiency was nearly doubled in human primary macrophages when compared with activated CD4+ T cells. Second, SAMHD1 degradation by viral protein X (Vpx), which elevates cellular dNTP concentrations, decreased HIV-1 template switching efficiency in macrophages to the levels comparable with CD4+ T cells. Third, differentiated SAMHD1 shRNA THP-1 cells have a 2-fold increase in HIV-1 template switching efficiency. Fourth, SAMHD1 degradation by Vpx did not alter HIV-1 template switching efficiency in activated CD4+ T cells. Finally, the HIV-1 V148I RT mutant that is defective in dNTP binding and has DNA synthesis delay promoted RT stand transfer when compared with wild type RT, particularly at low dNTP concentrations. Here, we report that SAMHD1 regulation of the dNTP concentrations influences HIV-1 template switching efficiency, particularly in macrophages. PMID:24352659

  5. Genome editing strategies: potential tools for eradicating HIV-1/AIDS.

    PubMed

    Khalili, Kamel; Kaminski, Rafal; Gordon, Jennifer; Cosentino, Laura; Hu, Wenhui

    2015-06-01

    Current therapy for controlling human immunodeficiency virus (HIV-1) infection and preventing acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (AIDS) progression has profoundly decreased viral replication in cells susceptible to HIV-1 infection, but it does not eliminate the low level of viral replication in latently infected cells, which contain integrated copies of HIV-1 proviral DNA. There is an urgent need for the development of HIV-1 genome eradication strategies that will lead to a permanent or "sterile" cure of HIV-1/AIDS. In the past few years, novel nuclease-initiated genome editing tools have been developing rapidly, including zinc finger nucleases (ZFNs), transcription activator-like effector nucleases (TALENs), and the CRISPR/Cas9 system. These surgical knives, which can excise any genome, provide a great opportunity to eradicate the HIV-1 genome by targeting highly conserved regions of the HIV-1 long terminal repeats or essential viral genes. Given the time consuming and costly engineering of target-specific ZFNs and TALENs, the RNA-guided endonuclease Cas9 technology has emerged as a simpler and more versatile technology to allow permanent removal of integrated HIV-1 proviral DNA in eukaryotic cells, and hopefully animal models or human patients. The major unmet challenges of this approach at present include inefficient nuclease gene delivery, potential off-target cleavage, and cell-specific genome targeting. Nanoparticle or lentivirus-mediated delivery of next generation Cas9 technologies including nickase or RNA-guided FokI nuclease (RFN) will further improve the potential for genome editing to become a promising approach for curing HIV-1/AIDS.

  6. Early Combination Antiretroviral Therapy Limits Exposure to HIV-1 Replication and Cell-Associated HIV-1 DNA Levels in Infants

    PubMed Central

    McManus, Margaret; Mick, Eric; Hudson, Richard; Mofenson, Lynne M.; Sullivan, John L.; Somasundaran, Mohan; Luzuriaga, Katherine

    2016-01-01

    The primary aim of this study was to measure HIV-1 persistence following combination antiretroviral therapy (cART) in infants and children. Peripheral blood mononuclear cell (PBMC) HIV-1 DNA was quantified prior to and after 1 year of cART in 30 children, stratified by time of initiation (early, age <3 months, ET; late, age >3 months-2 years, LT). Pre-therapy PBMC HIV-1 DNA levels correlated with pre-therapy plasma HIV-1 levels (r = 0.59, p<0.001), remaining statistically significant (p = 0.002) after adjustment for prior perinatal antiretroviral exposure and age at cART initiation. PBMC HIV-1 DNA declined significantly after 1 year of cART (Overall: -0.91±0.08 log10 copies per million PBMC, p<0.001; ET: -1.04±0.11 log10 DNA copies per million PBMC, p<0.001; LT: -0.74 ±0.13 log10 DNA copies per million PBMC, p<0.001) but rates of decline did not differ significantly between ET and LT. HIV-1 replication exposure over the first 12 months of cART, estimated as area-under-the-curve (AUC) of circulating plasma HIV-1 RNA levels, was significantly associated with PBMC HIV-1 DNA at one year (r = 0.51, p = 0.004). In 21 children with sustained virologic suppression after 1 year of cART, PBMC HIV-1 DNA levels continued to decline between years 1 and 4 (slope -0.21 log10 DNA copies per million PBMC per year); decline slopes did not differ significantly between ET and LT. PBMC HIV-1 DNA levels at 1 year and 4 years of cART correlated with age at cART initiation (1 year: p = 0.04; 4 years: p = 0.03) and age at virologic control (1 and 4 years, p = 0.02). Altogether, these data indicate that reducing exposure to HIV-1 replication and younger age at cART initiation are associated with lower HIV-1 DNA levels at and after one year of age, supporting the concept that HIV-1 diagnosis and cART initiation in infants should occur as early as possible. PMID:27104621

  7. Assessment of Recent HIV-1 Infection by a Line Immunoassay for HIV-1/2 Confirmation

    PubMed Central

    Schüpbach, Jörg; Gebhardt, Martin D; Tomasik, Zuzana; Niederhauser, Christoph; Yerly, Sabine; Bürgisser, Philippe; Matter, Lukas; Gorgievski, Meri; Dubs, Rolf; Schultze, Detlev; Steffen, Ingrid; Andreutti, Corinne; Martinetti, Gladys; Güntert, Bruno; Staub, Roger; Daneel, Synove; Vernazza, Pietro

    2007-01-01

    Background Knowledge of the number of recent HIV infections is important for epidemiologic surveillance. Over the past decade approaches have been developed to estimate this number by testing HIV-seropositive specimens with assays that discriminate the lower concentration and avidity of HIV antibodies in early infection. We have investigated whether this “recency” information can also be gained from an HIV confirmatory assay. Methods and Findings The ability of a line immunoassay (INNO-LIA HIV I/II Score, Innogenetics) to distinguish recent from older HIV-1 infection was evaluated in comparison with the Calypte HIV-1 BED Incidence enzyme immunoassay (BED-EIA). Both tests were conducted prospectively in all HIV infections newly diagnosed in Switzerland from July 2005 to June 2006. Clinical and laboratory information indicative of recent or older infection was obtained from physicians at the time of HIV diagnosis and used as the reference standard. BED-EIA and various recency algorithms utilizing the antibody reaction to INNO-LIA's five HIV-1 antigen bands were evaluated by logistic regression analysis. A total of 765 HIV-1 infections, 748 (97.8%) with complete test results, were newly diagnosed during the study. A negative or indeterminate HIV antibody assay at diagnosis, symptoms of primary HIV infection, or a negative HIV test during the past 12 mo classified 195 infections (26.1%) as recent (≤ 12 mo). Symptoms of CDC stages B or C classified 161 infections as older (21.5%), and 392 patients with no symptoms remained unclassified. BED-EIA ruled 65% of the 195 recent infections as recent and 80% of the 161 older infections as older. Two INNO-LIA algorithms showed 50% and 40% sensitivity combined with 95% and 99% specificity, respectively. Estimation of recent infection in the entire study population, based on actual results of the three tests and adjusted for a test's sensitivity and specificity, yielded 37% for BED-EIA compared to 35% and 33% for the two

  8. Ex vivo gene therapy for HIV-1 treatment.

    PubMed

    Scherer, Lisa J; Rossi, John J

    2011-04-15

    Until recently, progress in ex vivo gene therapy (GT) for human immunodeficiency virus-1 (HIV-1) treatment has been incremental. Long-term HIV-1 remission in a patient who received a heterologous stem cell transplant for acquired immunodeficiency syndrome-related lymphoma from a CCR5(-/-) donor, even after discontinuation of conventional therapy, has energized the field. We review the status of current approaches as well as future directions in the areas of therapeutic targets, combinatorial strategies, vector design, introduction of therapeutics into stem cells and enrichment/expansion of gene-modified cells. Finally, we discuss recent advances towards clinical application of HIV-1 GT.

  9. Gelsolin activity controls efficient early HIV-1 infection

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background HIV-1 entry into target lymphocytes requires the activity of actin adaptors that stabilize and reorganize cortical F-actin, like moesin and filamin-A. These alterations are necessary for the redistribution of CD4-CXCR4/CCR5 to one pole of the cell, a process that increases the probability of HIV-1 Envelope (Env)-CD4/co-receptor interactions and that generates the tension at the plasma membrane necessary to potentiate fusion pore formation, thereby favouring early HIV-1 infection. However, it remains unclear whether the dynamic processing of F-actin and the amount of cortical actin available during the initial virus-cell contact are required to such events. Results Here we show that gelsolin restructures cortical F-actin during HIV-1 Env-gp120-mediated signalling, without affecting cell-surface expression of receptors or viral co-receptor signalling. Remarkably, efficient HIV-1 Env-mediated membrane fusion and infection of permissive lymphocytes were impaired when gelsolin was either overexpressed or silenced, which led to a loss or gain of cortical actin, respectively. Indeed, HIV-1 Env-gp120-induced F-actin reorganization and viral receptor capping were impaired under these experimental conditions. Moreover, gelsolin knockdown promoted HIV-1 Env-gp120-mediated aberrant pseudopodia formation. These perturbed-actin events are responsible for the inhibition of early HIV-1 infection. Conclusions For the first time we provide evidence that through its severing of cortical actin, and by controlling the amount of actin available for reorganization during HIV-1 Env-mediated viral fusion, entry and infection, gelsolin can constitute a barrier that restricts HIV-1 infection of CD4+ lymphocytes in a pre-fusion step. These findings provide important insights into the complex molecular and actin-associated dynamics events that underlie early viral infection. Thus, we propose that gelsolin is a new factor that can limit HIV-1 infection acting at a pre-fusion step

  10. Towards an HIV-1 cure: measuring the latent reservoir.

    PubMed

    Bruner, Katherine M; Hosmane, Nina N; Siliciano, Robert F

    2015-04-01

    The latent reservoir (LR) of HIV-1 in resting memory CD4(+) T cells serves as a major barrier to curing HIV-1 infection. While many PCR- and culture-based assays have been used to measure the size of the LR, correlation between results of different assays is poor and recent studies indicate that no available assay provides an accurate measurement of reservoir size. The discrepancies between assays are a hurdle to clinical trials that aim to measure the efficacy of HIV-1 eradication strategies. Here we describe the advantages and disadvantages of various approaches to measuring the LR.

  11. Staphylococcus aureus Leukocidin LukED and HIV-1 gp120 Target Different Sequence Determinants on CCR5

    PubMed Central

    Tam, Kayan; Schultz, Megan; Reyes-Robles, Tamara; Vanwalscappel, Bénédicte; Horton, Joshua; Alonzo, Francis; Wu, Beili

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Leukocidin ED (LukED) is a bicomponent pore-forming toxin produced by Staphylococcus aureus that lyses host cells by targeting the chemokine receptors CC chemokine receptor type 5 (CCR5), CXCR1, CXCR2, and DARC. In addition to its role as a receptor for LukED, CCR5 is the major coreceptor for primary isolates of human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) and has been extensively studied. To compare how LukED and HIV-1 target CCR5, we analyzed their respective abilities to use CCR5/CCR2b chimeras to mediate cytotoxicity and virus entry. These analyses showed that the second and third extracellular loops (ECL) of CCR5 are necessary and sufficient for LukED to target the receptor and promote cell lysis. In contrast, the second ECL of CCR5 is necessary but not sufficient for HIV-1 infectivity. The analysis of CCR5 point mutations showed that glycine-163 is critical for HIV-1 infectivity, while arginine-274 and aspartic acid-276 are critical for LukED cytotoxicity. Point mutations in ECL2 diminished both HIV-1 infectivity and LukED cytotoxicity. Treatment of cells with LukED did not interfere with CCR5-tropic HIV-1 infectivity, demonstrating that LukED and the viral envelope glycoprotein use nonoverlapping sites on CCR5. Analysis of point mutations in LukE showed that amino acids 64 to 69 in the rim domain are required for CCR5 targeting and cytotoxicity. Taking the results together, this study identified the molecular basis by which LukED targets CCR5, highlighting the divergent molecular interactions evolved by HIV-1 and LukED to interact with CCR5. PMID:27965453

  12. Staphylococcus aureus Leukocidin LukED and HIV-1 gp120 Target Different Sequence Determinants on CCR5.

    PubMed

    Tam, Kayan; Schultz, Megan; Reyes-Robles, Tamara; Vanwalscappel, Bénédicte; Horton, Joshua; Alonzo, Francis; Wu, Beili; Landau, Nathaniel R; Torres, Victor J

    2016-12-13

    Leukocidin ED (LukED) is a bicomponent pore-forming toxin produced by Staphylococcus aureus that lyses host cells by targeting the chemokine receptors CC chemokine receptor type 5 (CCR5), CXCR1, CXCR2, and DARC. In addition to its role as a receptor for LukED, CCR5 is the major coreceptor for primary isolates of human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) and has been extensively studied. To compare how LukED and HIV-1 target CCR5, we analyzed their respective abilities to use CCR5/CCR2b chimeras to mediate cytotoxicity and virus entry. These analyses showed that the second and third extracellular loops (ECL) of CCR5 are necessary and sufficient for LukED to target the receptor and promote cell lysis. In contrast, the second ECL of CCR5 is necessary but not sufficient for HIV-1 infectivity. The analysis of CCR5 point mutations showed that glycine-163 is critical for HIV-1 infectivity, while arginine-274 and aspartic acid-276 are critical for LukED cytotoxicity. Point mutations in ECL2 diminished both HIV-1 infectivity and LukED cytotoxicity. Treatment of cells with LukED did not interfere with CCR5-tropic HIV-1 infectivity, demonstrating that LukED and the viral envelope glycoprotein use nonoverlapping sites on CCR5. Analysis of point mutations in LukE showed that amino acids 64 to 69 in the rim domain are required for CCR5 targeting and cytotoxicity. Taking the results together, this study identified the molecular basis by which LukED targets CCR5, highlighting the divergent molecular interactions evolved by HIV-1 and LukED to interact with CCR5.

  13. Abasic Phosphorothioate Oligomers Inhibit HIV-1 Reverse Transcription and Block Virus Transmission across Polarized Ectocervical Organ Cultures

    PubMed Central

    Fraietta, Joseph A.; Mueller, Yvonne M.; Lozenski, Karissa L.; Ratner, Deena; Boesteanu, Alina C.; Hancock, Aidan S.; Lackman-Smith, Carol; Zentner, Isaac J.; Chaiken, Irwin M.; Chung, Suhman; LeGrice, Stuart F. J.; Snyder, Beth A.; Mankowski, Marie K.; Jones, Natalie M.; Hope, Jennifer L.; Gupta, Phalguni; Anderson, Sharon H.; Wigdahl, Brian

    2014-01-01

    In the absence of universally available antiretroviral (ARV) drugs or a vaccine against HIV-1, microbicides may offer the most immediate hope for controlling the AIDS pandemic. The most advanced and clinically effective microbicides are based on ARV agents that interfere with the earliest stages of HIV-1 replication. Our objective was to identify and characterize novel ARV-like inhibitors, as well as demonstrate their efficacy at blocking HIV-1 transmission. Abasic phosphorothioate 2′ deoxyribose backbone (PDB) oligomers were evaluated in a variety of mechanistic assays and for their ability to inhibit HIV-1 infection and virus transmission through primary human cervical mucosa. Cellular and biochemical assays were used to elucidate the antiviral mechanisms of action of PDB oligomers against both lab-adapted and primary CCR5- and CXCR4-utilizing HIV-1 strains, including a multidrug-resistant isolate. A polarized cervical organ culture was used to test the ability of PDB compounds to block HIV-1 transmission to primary immune cell populations across ectocervical tissue. The antiviral activity and mechanisms of action of PDB-based compounds were dependent on oligomer size, with smaller molecules preventing reverse transcription and larger oligomers blocking viral entry. Importantly, irrespective of molecular size, PDBs potently inhibited virus infection and transmission within genital tissue samples. Furthermore, the PDB inhibitors exhibited excellent toxicity and stability profiles and were found to be safe for vaginal application in vivo. These results, coupled with the previously reported intrinsic anti-inflammatory properties of PDBs, support further investigations in the development of PDB-based topical microbicides for preventing the global spread of HIV-1. PMID:25224013

  14. Diverse antibody genetic and recognition properties revealed following HIV-1 Env immunization

    PubMed Central

    Phad, Ganesh E.; Bernat, Néstor Vázquez; Feng, Yu; Ingale, Jidnyasa; Murillo, Paola Andrea Martinez; O’Dell, Sijy; Li, Yuxing; Mascola, John R.; Sundling, Christopher; Wyatt, Richard T.; Karlsson Hedestam, Gunilla B.

    2015-01-01

    Isolation of monoclonal antibodies (MAbs) elicited by vaccination provides opportunities to define the development of effective immunity. Ab responses elicited by current HIV-1 envelope glycoprotein (Env) immunogens display narrow neutralizing activity with limited capacity to block infection by tier 2 viruses. Intense work in the field suggests that improved Env immunogens are forthcoming and it is therefore important to concurrently develop approaches to investigate the quality of vaccine-elicited responses at a higher level of resolution. Here, we cloned a representative set of MAbs elicited by a model Env immunogen in rhesus macaques and comprehensively characterized their genetic and functional properties. The MAbs were genetically diverse, even within groups of Abs targeting the same sub-region of Env, consistent with a highly polyclonal response. MAbs directed against two sub-determinants of Env, the CD4 binding site (CD4bs) and the V3 region, could in part account for the neutralizing activity observed in the plasma of the animal from which they were cloned, demonstrating the power of MAb isolation for a detailed understanding of the elicited response. Finally, through comparative analyses of MAb binding and neutralizing capacity of HIV-1 using matched Envs, we demonstrate complex relationships between epitope recognition and accessibility, highlighting the protective quaternary packing of the HIV-1 spike relative to vaccine-induced MAbs. PMID:25964491

  15. Persistent HIV-1 replication during antiretroviral therapy

    PubMed Central

    Martinez-Picado, Javier; Deeks, Steven G.

    2016-01-01

    Purpose of review The present review will highlight some of the recent findings regarding the capacity of HIV-1 to replicate during antiretroviral therapy (ART). Recent findings Although ART is highly effective at inhibiting HIV replication, it is not curative. Several mechanisms contribute to HIV persistence during ART, including HIV latency, immune dysfunction, and perhaps persistent low-level spread of the virus to uninfected cells (replication). The success in curing HIV will depend on efficiently targeting these three aspects. The degree to which HIV replicates during ART remains controversial. Most studies have failed to find any evidence of HIV evolution in blood, even with samples collected over many years, although a recent very intensive study of three individuals suggested that the virus population does shift, at least during the first few months of therapy. Stronger but still not definitive evidence for replication comes from a series of studies in which standard regimens were intensified with an integration inhibitor, resulting in changes in episomal DNA (blood) and cell-associated RNA (tissue). Limited drug penetration within tissues and the presence of immune sanctuaries have been argued as potential mechanisms allowing HIV to spread during ART. Mathematical models suggest that HIV replication and evolution is possible even without the selection of fully drug-resistant variants. As persistent HIV replication could have clinical consequences and might limit the efficacy of curative interventions, determining if HIV replicates during ART and why, should remain a key focus of the HIV research community. Summary Residual viral replication likely persists in lymphoid tissues, at least in a subset of individuals. Abnormal levels of immune activation might contribute to sustain virus replication. PMID:27078619

  16. Comparison of the Cepheid GeneXpert and Abbott M2000 HIV-1 real time molecular assays for monitoring HIV-1 viral load and detecting HIV-1 infection.

    PubMed

    Ceffa, Susanna; Luhanga, Richard; Andreotti, Mauro; Brambilla, Davide; Erba, Fulvio; Jere, Haswel; Mancinelli, Sandro; Giuliano, Marina; Palombi, Leonardo; Marazzi, Maria Cristina

    2016-03-01

    Assessing treatment efficacy and early infant diagnosis (EID) are critical issues in HIV disease management. Point-of-care assays may greatly increase the possibility to access laboratory monitoring also in rural areas. Recently two new laboratory tests have been developed by Cepheid (Sunnyvale, California) the Xpert HIV-1 Viral Load for viral load determination and the Xpert HIV-1 Qualitative for early infant diagnosis. We conducted a study in Blantyre, Malawi, comparing the 2 methods versus the Abbott real time quantitative and qualitative assays, for viral load and EID respectively. We tested 300 plasma samples for viral load determination and 200 samples for infant diagnosis. HIV-1 RNA values of the 274 samples quantified by both assays were highly correlated (Pearson r=0.95, R(2)=0.90). In 90.9% of the cases the two methods were concordant in defining the HIV-1 RNA levels as detectable or undetectable. For EID, the Xpert HIV-1 Qualitative assay yielded the same identical results as the Abbott assay. Both the quantitative and the qualitative Xpert assays are promising tools to monitor treatment efficacy in HIV patients receiving treatment and for early diagnosis in HIV-exposed infants.

  17. Hybrid Ty1/HIV-1 elements used to detect inhibitors and monitor the activity of HIV-1 reverse transcriptase

    PubMed Central

    Nissley, Dwight V.; Boyer, Paul L.; Garfinkel, David J.; Hughes, Stephen H.; Strathern, Jeffrey N.

    1998-01-01

    We previously demonstrated that hybrid retrotransposons composed of the yeast Ty1 element and the reverse transcriptase (RT) of HIV-1 are active in the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae. The RT activity of these hybrid Ty1/HIV-1 (his3AI/AIDS RT; HART) elements can be monitored by using a simple genetic assay. HART element reverse transcription depends on both the polymerase and RNase H domains of HIV-1 RT. Here we demonstrate that the HART assay is sensitive to inhibitors of HIV-1 RT. (−)-(S)-8-Chloro-4,5,6,7-tetrahydro-5-methyl-6-(3-methyl-2-butenyl)imidazo[4,5,1-jk][1,4]-benzodiazepin-2(1H)-thione monohydrochloride (8 Cl-TIBO), a well characterized non-nucleoside RT inhibitor (NNRTI) of HIV-1 RT, blocks propagation of HART elements. HART elements that express NNRTI-resistant RT variants of HIV-1 are insensitive to 8 Cl-TIBO, demonstrating the specificity of inhibition in this assay. HART elements carrying NNRTI-resistant variants of HIV-1 RT can be used to identify compounds that are active against drug-resistant viruses. PMID:9811899

  18. A conditionally replicating HIV-1 vector interferes with wild-type HIV-1 replication and spread.

    PubMed Central

    Dropulić, B; Hĕrmánková, M; Pitha, P M

    1996-01-01

    Defective-interfering viruses are known to modulate virus pathogenicity. We describe conditionally replicating HIV-1 (crHIV) vectors that interfere with wild-type HIV-1 (wt-HIV) replication and spread. crHIV vectors are defective-interfering HIV genomes that do not encode viral proteins and replicate only in the presence of wt-HIV helper virus. In cells that contain both wt-HIV and crHIV genomes, the latter are shown to have a selective advantage for packaging into progeny virions because they contain ribozymes that cleave wt-HIV RNA but not crHIV RNA. A crHIV vector containing a triple anti-U5 ribozyme significantly interferes with wt-HIV replication and spread. crHIV vectors are also shown to undergo the full viral replicative cycle after complementation with wt-HIV helper-virus. The application of defective interfering crHIV vectors may result in competition with wt-HIVs and decrease pathogenic viral loads in vivo. Images Fig. 1 Fig. 3 Fig. 4 Fig. 5 Fig. 6 PMID:8855316

  19. Sequence conservation, HLA-E-Restricted peptide, and best-defined CTL/CD8+ epitopes in gag P24 (capsid) of HIV-1 subtype B

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Prasetyo, Afiono Agung; Dharmawan, Ruben; Sari, Yulia; Sariyatun, Ratna

    2017-02-01

    Human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) remains a cause of global health problem. Continuous studies of HIV-1 genetic and immunological profiles are important to find strategies against the virus. This study aimed to conduct analysis of sequence conservation, HLA-E-restricted peptide, and best-defined CTL/CD8+ epitopes in p24 (capsid) of HIV-1 subtype B worldwide. The p24-coding sequences from 3,557 HIV subtype B isolates were aligned using MUSCLE and analysed. Some highly conserved regions (sequence conservation ≥95%) were observed. Two considerably long series of sequences with conservation of 100% was observed at base 349-356 and 550-557 of p24 (HXB2 numbering). The consensus from all aligned isolates was precisely the same as consensus B in the Los Alamos HIV Database. The HLA-E-restricted peptide in amino acid (aa) 14-22 of HIV-1 p24 (AISPRTLNA) was found in 55.9% (1,987/3,557) of HIV-1 subtype B worldwide. Forty-four best-defined CTL/CD8+ epitopes were observed, in which VKNWMTETL epitope (aa 181-189 of p24) restricted by B*4801 was the most frequent, as found in 94.9% of isolates. The results of this study would contribute information about HIV-1 subtype B and benefits for further works willing to develop diagnostic and therapeutic strategies against the virus.

  20. Alkaloids from the Sponge Stylissa carteri Present Prospective Scaffolds for the Inhibition of Human Immunodeficiency Virus 1 (HIV-1).

    PubMed

    O'Rourke, Aubrie; Kremb, Stephan; Bader, Theresa Maria; Helfer, Markus; Schmitt-Kopplin, Philippe; Gerwick, William H; Brack-Werner, Ruth; Voolstra, Christian R

    2016-02-04

    The sponge Stylissa carteri is known to produce a number of secondary metabolites displaying anti-fouling, anti-inflammatory, and anti-cancer activity. However, the anti-viral potential of metabolites produced by S. carteri has not been extensively explored. In this study, an S. carteri extract was HPLC fractionated and a cell based assay was used to evaluate the effects of HPLC fractions on parameters of Human Immunodeficiency Virus (HIV-1) infection and cell viability. Candidate HIV-1 inhibitory fractions were then analyzed for the presence of potential HIV-1 inhibitory compounds by mass spectrometry, leading to the identification of three previously characterized compounds, i.e., debromohymenialdisine (DBH), hymenialdisine (HD), and oroidin. Commercially available purified versions of these molecules were re-tested to assess their antiviral potential in greater detail. Specifically, DBH and HD exhibit a 30%-40% inhibition of HIV-1 at 3.1 μM and 13 μM, respectively; however, both exhibited cytotoxicity. Conversely, oroidin displayed a 50% inhibition of viral replication at 50 μM with no associated toxicity. Additional experimentation using a biochemical assay revealed that oroidin inhibited the activity of the HIV-1 Reverse Transcriptase up to 90% at 25 μM. Taken together, the chemical search space was narrowed and previously isolated compounds with an unexplored anti-viral potential were found. Our results support exploration of marine natural products for anti-viral drug discovery.

  1. Production of Mucosally Transmissible SHIV Challenge Stocks from HIV-1 Circulating Recombinant Form 01_AE env Sequences.

    PubMed

    Tartaglia, Lawrence J; Chang, Hui-Wen; Lee, Benjamin C; Abbink, Peter; Ng'ang'a, David; Boyd, Michael; Lavine, Christy L; Lim, So-Yon; Sanisetty, Srisowmya; Whitney, James B; Seaman, Michael S; Rolland, Morgane; Tovanabutra, Sodsai; Ananworanich, Jintanat; Robb, Merlin L; Kim, Jerome H; Michael, Nelson L; Barouch, Dan H

    2016-02-01

    Simian-human immunodeficiency virus (SHIV) challenge stocks are critical for preclinical testing of vaccines, antibodies, and other interventions aimed to prevent HIV-1. A major unmet need for the field has been the lack of a SHIV challenge stock expressing circulating recombinant form 01_AE (CRF01_AE) env sequences. We therefore sought to develop mucosally transmissible SHIV challenge stocks containing HIV-1 CRF01_AE env derived from acutely HIV-1 infected individuals from Thailand. SHIV-AE6, SHIV-AE6RM, and SHIV-AE16 contained env sequences that were >99% identical to the original HIV-1 isolate and did not require in vivo passaging. These viruses exhibited CCR5 tropism and displayed a tier 2 neutralization phenotype. These challenge stocks efficiently infected rhesus monkeys by the intrarectal route, replicated to high levels during acute infection, and established chronic viremia in a subset of animals. SHIV-AE16 was titrated for use in single, high dose as well as repetitive, low dose intrarectal challenge studies. These SHIV challenge stocks should facilitate the preclinical evaluation of vaccines, monoclonal antibodies, and other interventions targeted at preventing HIV-1 CRF01_AE infection.

  2. Factors Associated With the Control of Viral Replication and Virologic Breakthrough in a Recently Infected HIV-1 Controller.

    PubMed

    Walker-Sperling, Victoria E; Pohlmeyer, Christopher W; Veenhuis, Rebecca T; May, Megan; Luna, Krystle A; Kirkpatrick, Allison R; Laeyendecker, Oliver; Cox, Andrea L; Carrington, Mary; Bailey, Justin R; Arduino, Roberto C; Blankson, Joel N

    2017-02-01

    HIV-1 controllers are patients who control HIV-1 viral replication without antiretroviral therapy. Control is achieved very early in the course of infection, but the mechanisms through which viral replication is restricted are not fully understood. We describe a patient who presented with acute HIV-1 infection and was found to have an HIV-1 RNA level of <100copies/mL. She did not have any known protective HLA alleles, but significant immune activation of CD8+ T cells and natural killer (NK) cells was present, and both cell types inhibited viral replication. Virus cultured from this patient replicated as well in vitro as virus isolated from her partner, a patient with AIDS who was the source of transmission. Virologic breakthrough occurred 9months after her initial presentation and was associated with an increase in CD4+ T cell activation levels and a significant decrease in NK cell inhibitory capacity. Remarkably, CD8+ T cell inhibitory capacity was preserved and there were no new escape mutations in targeted Gag epitopes. These findings suggest that fully replication-competent virus can be controlled in acute HIV-1 infection in some patients without protective HLA alleles and that NK cell responses may contribute to this early control of viral replication.

  3. A cell-free enzymatic activity assay for the evaluation of HIV-1 drug resistance to protease inhibitors

    PubMed Central

    Matsunaga, Satoko; Masaoka, Takashi; Sawasaki, Tatsuya; Morishita, Ryo; Iwatani, Yasumasa; Tatsumi, Masashi; Endo, Yaeta; Yamamoto, Naoki; Sugiura, Wataru; Ryo, Akihide

    2015-01-01

    Due to their high frequency of genomic mutations, human retroviruses often develop resistance to antiretroviral drugs. The emergence of drug-resistant human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) is a significant obstacle to the effective long-term treatment of HIV infection. The development of a rapid and versatile drug-susceptibility assay would enable acquisition of phenotypic information and facilitate determination of the appropriate choice of antiretroviral agents. In this study, we developed a novel in vitro method, termed the Cell-free drug susceptibility assay (CFDSA), for monitoring phenotypic information regarding the drug resistance of HIV-1 protease (PR). The CFDSA utilizes a wheat germ cell-free protein production system to synthesize enzymatically active HIV-1 PRs directly from PCR products amplified from HIV-1 molecular clones or clinical isolates in a rapid one-step procedure. Enzymatic activity of PRs can be readily measured by AlphaScreen (Amplified Luminescent Proximity Homogeneous Assay Screen) in the presence or absence of clinically used protease inhibitors (PIs). CFDSA measurement of drug resistance was based on the fold resistance to the half-maximal inhibitory concentration (IC50) of various PIs. The CFDSA could serve as a non-infectious, rapid, accessible, and reliable alternative to infectious cell-based phenotypic assays for evaluation of PI-resistant HIV-1. PMID:26583013

  4. The Continuing Evolution of HIV-1 Therapy: Identification and Development of Novel Antiretroviral Agents Targeting Viral and Cellular Targets

    PubMed Central

    Hartman, Tracy L.; Buckheit, Robert W.

    2012-01-01

    During the past three decades, over thirty-five anti-HIV-1 therapies have been developed for use in humans and the progression from monotherapeutic treatment regimens to today's highly active combination antiretroviral therapies has had a dramatic impact on disease progression in HIV-1-infected individuals. In spite of the success of AIDS therapies and the existence of inhibitors of HIV-1 reverse transcriptase, protease, entry and fusion, and integrase, HIV-1 therapies still have a variety of problems which require continued development efforts to improve efficacy and reduce toxicity, while making drugs that can be used throughout both the developed and developing world, in pediatric populations, and in pregnant women. Highly active antiretroviral therapies (HAARTs) have significantly delayed the progression to AIDS, and in the developed world HIV-1-infected individuals might be expected to live normal life spans while on lifelong therapies. However, the difficult treatment regimens, the presence of class-specific drug toxicities, and the emergence of drug-resistant virus isolates highlight the fact that improvements in our therapeutic regimens and the identification of new and novel viral and cellular targets for therapy are still necessary. Antiretroviral therapeutic strategies and targets continue to be explored, and the development of increasingly potent molecules within existing classes of drugs and the development of novel strategies are ongoing. PMID:22848825

  5. Alkaloids from the Sponge Stylissa carteri Present Prospective Scaffolds for the Inhibition of Human Immunodeficiency Virus 1 (HIV-1)

    PubMed Central

    O’Rourke, Aubrie; Kremb, Stephan; Bader, Theresa Maria; Helfer, Markus; Schmitt-Kopplin, Philippe; Gerwick, William H.; Brack-Werner, Ruth; Voolstra, Christian R.

    2016-01-01

    The sponge Stylissa carteri is known to produce a number of secondary metabolites displaying anti-fouling, anti-inflammatory, and anti-cancer activity. However, the anti-viral potential of metabolites produced by S. carteri has not been extensively explored. In this study, an S. carteri extract was HPLC fractionated and a cell based assay was used to evaluate the effects of HPLC fractions on parameters of Human Immunodeficiency Virus (HIV-1) infection and cell viability. Candidate HIV-1 inhibitory fractions were then analyzed for the presence of potential HIV-1 inhibitory compounds by mass spectrometry, leading to the identification of three previously characterized compounds, i.e., debromohymenialdisine (DBH), hymenialdisine (HD), and oroidin. Commercially available purified versions of these molecules were re-tested to assess their antiviral potential in greater detail. Specifically, DBH and HD exhibit a 30%–40% inhibition of HIV-1 at 3.1 μM and 13 μM, respectively; however, both exhibited cytotoxicity. Conversely, oroidin displayed a 50% inhibition of viral replication at 50 μM with no associated toxicity. Additional experimentation using a biochemical assay revealed that oroidin inhibited the activity of the HIV-1 Reverse Transcriptase up to 90% at 25 μM. Taken together, the chemical search space was narrowed and previously isolated compounds with an unexplored anti-viral potential were found. Our results support exploration of marine natural products for anti-viral drug discovery. PMID:26861355

  6. Eradicating HIV-1 infection: seeking to clear a persistent pathogen

    PubMed Central

    Archin, Nancie M.; Sung, Julia Marsh; Garrido, Carolina; Soriano-Sarabia, Natalia; Margolis, David M.

    2015-01-01

    Effective antiretroviral therapy (ART) blunts viraemia, which enables HIV-1-infected individuals to control infection and live long, productive lives. However, HIV-1 infection remains incurable owing to the persistence of a viral reservoir that harbours integrated provirus within host cellular DNA. This latent infection is unaffected by ART and hidden from the immune system. Recent studies have focused on the development of therapies to disrupt latency. These efforts unmasked residual viral genomes and highlighted the need to enable the clearance of latently infected cells, perhaps via old and new strategies that improve the HIV-1-specific immune response. In this Review, we explore new approaches to eradicate established HIV-1 infection and avoid the burden of lifelong ART. PMID:25402363

  7. High recombination potential of subtype A HIV-1.

    PubMed

    Nikolaitchik, Olga; Keele, Brandon; Gorelick, Robert; Alvord, W Gregory; Mazurov, Dmitriy; Pathak, Vinay K; Hu, Wei-Shau

    2015-10-01

    Recombination can assort polymorphic alleles to increase diversity in the HIV-1 population. To better understand the recombination potential of subtype A HIV-1, we generated viruses containing sequences from two variants circulating in Russia and analyzed the polymerase gene (pol) of the recombinants after one round of HIV-1 replication using single-genome sequencing. We observed that recombination occurred throughout pol and could easily assort alleles containing mutations that conferred resistance to currently approved antivirals. We measured the recombination rate in various regions of pol including a G-rich region that has been previously proposed to be a recombination hot spot. Our study does not support a recombination hot spot in this G-rich region. Importantly, of the 58 proviral sequences containing crossover event(s) in pol, we found that each sequence was a unique genotype indicating that recombination is a powerful genetic mechanism in assorting the genomes of subtype A HIV-1 variants.

  8. Early Combination Antiretroviral Therapy Limits HIV-1 Persistence in Children.

    PubMed

    Luzuriaga, Katherine

    2016-01-01

    Globally, 240,000 infants are newly infected with HIV-1 each year and 3.2 million children are living with the infection. Combination antiretroviral therapy (cART) has reduced HIV-1-related disease and mortality in children but is not curative owing to the early generation of a latent reservoir of long-lived memory CD4(+) T cells bearing replication-competent HIV-1 provirus integrated into cellular DNA. This review focuses on recent advances in our understanding of the establishment of HIV-1 persistence in children and how early initiation of cART in the setting of the developing infant immune system limits the formation of the long-lived latent CD4(+) cell reservoir that remains a barrier to remission or cure.

  9. Developments in HIV-1 immunotherapy and therapeutic vaccination

    PubMed Central

    Tanner, Helen; Dalgleish, Angus

    2014-01-01

    Since the human immunodeficiency virus (HIV-1) pandemic began, few prophylactic vaccines have reached phase III trials. Only one has shown partial efficacy in preventing HIV-1 infection. The introduction of antiretroviral therapy (ART) has had considerable success in controlling infection and reducing transmission but in so doing has changed the nature of HIV-1 infection for those with access to ART. Access, compliance, and toxicity alongside the emergence of serious non-AIDS morbidity and the sometimes poor immune reconstitution in ART-treated patients have emphasized the need for additional therapies. Such therapy is intended to contribute to control of HIV-1 infection, permit structured treatment interruptions, or even establish a functional cure of permanently suppressed and controlled infection. Both immunotherapy and therapeutic vaccination have the potential to reach these goals. In this review, the latest developments in immunotherapy and therapeutic vaccination are discussed. PMID:24991420

  10. Towards HIV-1 remission: potential roles for broadly neutralizing antibodies

    PubMed Central

    Halper-Stromberg, Ariel; Nussenzweig, Michel C.

    2016-01-01

    Current antiretroviral drug therapies do not cure HIV-1 because they do not eliminate a pool of long-lived cells harboring immunologically silent but replication-competent proviruses — termed the latent reservoir. Eliminating this reservoir and stimulating the immune response to control infection in the absence of therapy remain important but unsolved goals of HIV-1 cure research. Recently discovered broadly neutralizing antibodies (bNAbs) exhibit remarkable breadth and potency in their ability to neutralize HIV-1 in vitro, and recent studies have demonstrated new therapeutic applications for passively administered bNAbs in vivo. This Review discusses the roles bNAbs might play in HIV-1 treatment regimens, including prevention, therapy, and cure. PMID:26752643

  11. Treating HIV-1 Infection: What Might the Future Hold?

    PubMed Central

    Lichterfeld, Mathias; Zachary, Kimon C.

    2011-01-01

    Advances in antiretroviral combination therapy lasting the past two decades have transformed HIV-1 infection from a fatal disease into a chronic medical condition that in many cases does not compromise life quality. There are 25 different antiretroviral agents available currently, allowing for patient-centered, individualized management of HIV-1 infection, and ongoing progress in HIV-1 virology and antiretroviral pharmacology is likely to expand treatment options further in the future. Nevertheless, antiretroviral therapy continues to have limitations, including insufficient immunological reconstitution, selection of drug resistance, ongoing abnormal immune activation despite effective suppression of HIV-1 viremia, and the inability to target latently infected cells that are responsible for long-term viral persistence. Owing to these shortcomings, the theoretical ability of antiretroviral therapy to extend life expectancy to normal levels is not realized in many cases. Strategies to address these limitations are a matter of active ongoing research and will be summarized in this article. PMID:23251756

  12. Achieving HIV-1 Control through RNA-Directed Gene Regulation

    PubMed Central

    Klemm, Vera; Mitchell, Jye; Cortez-Jugo, Christina; Cavalieri, Francesca; Symonds, Geoff; Caruso, Frank; Kelleher, Anthony Dominic; Ahlenstiel, Chantelle

    2016-01-01

    HIV-1 infection has been transformed by combined anti-retroviral therapy (ART), changing a universally fatal infection into a controllable infection. However, major obstacles for an HIV-1 cure exist. The HIV latent reservoir, which exists in resting CD4+ T cells, is not impacted by ART, and can reactivate when ART is interrupted or ceased. Additionally, multi-drug resistance can arise. One alternate approach to conventional HIV-1 drug treatment that is being explored involves gene therapies utilizing RNA-directed gene regulation. Commonly known as RNA interference (RNAi), short interfering RNA (siRNA) induce gene silencing in conserved biological pathways, which require a high degree of sequence specificity. This review will provide an overview of the silencing pathways, the current RNAi technologies being developed for HIV-1 gene therapy, current clinical trials, and the challenges faced in progressing these treatments into clinical trials. PMID:27941595

  13. CCR5 gene disruption via lentiviral vectors expressing Cas9 and single guided RNA renders cells resistant to HIV-1 infection.

    PubMed

    Wang, Weiming; Ye, Chaobaihui; Liu, Jingjing; Zhang, Di; Kimata, Jason T; Zhou, Paul

    2014-01-01

    CCR5, a coreceptor for HIV-1 entry, is a major target for drug and genetic intervention against HIV-1. Genetic intervention strategies have knocked down CCR5 expression levels by shRNA or disrupted the CCR5 gene using zinc finger nucleases (ZFN) or Transcription activator-like effector nuclease (TALEN). In the present study, we silenced CCR5 via CRISPR associated protein 9 (Cas9) and single guided RNAs (sgRNAs). We constructed lentiviral vectors expressing Cas9 and CCR5 sgRNAs. We show that a single round transduction of lentiviral vectors expressing Cas9 and CCR5 sgRNAs into HIV-1 susceptible human CD4+ cells yields high frequencies of CCR5 gene disruption. CCR5 gene-disrupted cells are not only resistant to R5-tropic HIV-1, including transmitted/founder (T/F) HIV-1 isolates, but also have selective advantage over CCR5 gene-undisrupted cells during R5-tropic HIV-1 infection. Importantly, using T7 endonuclease I assay we did not detect genome mutations at potential off-target sites that are highly homologous to these CCR5 sgRNAs in stably transduced cells even at 84 days post transduction. Thus we conclude that silencing of CCR5 via Cas9 and CCR5-specific sgRNAs could be a viable alternative strategy for engineering resistance against HIV-1.

  14. Near full-length genome identification of a novel HIV-1 recombinant form (CRF01_AE/B'/C) among heterosexuals in Jilin, China.

    PubMed

    Li, Xingguang; Ning, Chuanyi; Chen, Yanli; Feng, Yi; Wei, Min; Xing, Hui; Shao, Yiming

    2014-07-01

    Recombinant forms contribute significantly to the genetic diversity of HIV-1. Here we report a novel HIV-1 recombinant form (CRF01_AE/B'/C) detected from a comprehensive HIV-1 molecular epidemiologic study among heterosexuals in Jilin province of northeastern China. Recombinant analyses of the near full-length genome (NFLG) of the novel HIV-1 recombinant isolate (JL.RF01) showed that the backbone of the genome was CRF01_AE, and three insertions of subtype B' (242, 370, and 233 bp) and C (1142, 230, and 271 bp), respectively, were inserted along the genome. Phylogenetic analyses revealed that the novel HIV-1 recombinant form (CRF01_AE/B'/C) more likely originated from Thailand subtype B' and CRF01_AE and India subtype C. We report a unique mosaic structure that is distinct to HIV-1 CRF01_AE/B'/C recombinant viruses reported to date. The emergence of this novel recombinant form (CRF01_AE/B'/C) suggests the increasing significance of heterosexual transmission contributing to the complexity of the HIV-1 epidemic in northeastern China.

  15. Binding of HIV-1 gp120 to the nicotinic receptor.

    PubMed

    Bracci, L; Lozzi, L; Rustici, M; Neri, P

    1992-10-19

    We previously described a significant sequence homology between HIV-1 gp120 and the functional sites responsible for the specific binding of snake curare-mimetic neurotoxins and rabies virus glycoprotein to the nicotinic acetylcholine receptor. Here we report findings about the existence of a mechanism of functional molecular mimicry which could enable the binding of HIV-1 gp120 to nicotinic acetylcholine receptors in muscle cells and neurons.

  16. HIV-1 subtype distribution in the Gambia and the significant presence of CRF49_cpx, a novel circulating recombinant form

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background Detailed local HIV-1 sequence data are essential for monitoring the HIV epidemic, for maintaining sensitive sequence-based diagnostics, and to aid in designing vaccines. Results Reported here are full envelope sequences derived from 38 randomly selected HIV-1 infections identified at a Gambian clinic between 1991 and 2009. Special care was taken to generate sequences from circulating viral RNA as uncloned products, either by limiting dilution or single genome amplification polymerase chain reaction (PCR). Within these 38 isolates, eight were subtyped as A and 18 as CRF02_AG. A small number of subtype B, C, D viruses were identified. Surprising, however, was the identification of six isolates with subtype J-like envelopes, a subtype found normally in Central Africa and the Democratic Republic of the Congo (DRC), with gag p24 regions that clustered with subtype A sequences. Near full-length sequence from three of these isolates confirmed that these represent a novel circulating recombinant form of HIV-1, now named CRF49_cpx. Conclusions This study expands the HIV-1 sequence database from the Gambia and will provide important data for HIV diagnostics, patient care, and vaccine development. PMID:20932333

  17. Potent and Broad Inhibition of HIV-1 by a Peptide from the gp41 Heptad Repeat-2 Domain Conjugated to the CXCR4 Amino Terminus

    PubMed Central

    Haggarty, Beth S.; Duong, Jennifer; Jordon, Andrea P. O.; Romano, Josephine; DeClercq, Joshua J.; Gregory, Philip D.; Riley, James L.; Holmes, Michael C.

    2016-01-01

    HIV-1 entry can be inhibited by soluble peptides from the gp41 heptad repeat-2 (HR2) domain that interfere with formation of the 6-helix bundle during fusion. Inhibition has also been seen when these peptides are conjugated to anchoring molecules and over-expressed on the cell surface. We hypothesized that potent anti-HIV activity could be achieved if a 34 amino acid peptide from HR2 (C34) were brought to the site of virus-cell interactions by conjugation to the amino termini of HIV-1 coreceptors CCR5 or CXCR4. C34-conjugated coreceptors were expressed on the surface of T cell lines and primary CD4 T cells, retained the ability to mediate chemotaxis in response to cognate chemokines, and were highly resistant to HIV-1 utilization for entry. Notably, C34-conjugated CCR5 and CXCR4 each exhibited potent and broad inhibition of HIV-1 isolates from diverse clades irrespective of tropism (i.e., each could inhibit R5, X4 and dual-tropic isolates). This inhibition was highly specific and dependent on positioning of the peptide, as HIV-1 infection was poorly inhibited when C34 was conjugated to the amino terminus of CD4. C34-conjugated coreceptors could also inhibit HIV-1 isolates that were resistant to the soluble HR2 peptide inhibitor, enfuvirtide. When introduced into primary cells, CD4 T cells expressing C34-conjugated coreceptors exhibited physiologic responses to T cell activation while inhibiting diverse HIV-1 isolates, and cells containing C34-conjugated CXCR4 expanded during HIV-1 infection in vitro and in a humanized mouse model. Notably, the C34-conjugated peptide exerted greater HIV-1 inhibition when conjugated to CXCR4 than to CCR5. Thus, antiviral effects of HR2 peptides can be specifically directed to the site of viral entry where they provide potent and broad inhibition of HIV-1. This approach to engineer HIV-1 resistance in functional CD4 T cells may provide a novel cell-based therapeutic for controlling HIV infection in humans. PMID:27855210

  18. HIV-1 increases TLR responses in human primary astrocytes

    PubMed Central

    Serramía, M Jesús; Muñoz-Fernández, M Ángeles; Álvarez, Susana

    2015-01-01

    Astrocytes are the major glial cell within the central nervous system and have a number of important physiological properties related to brain homeostasis. They provide trophic support to neurons and are immune cells with key roles during states-of-inflammation. The potential for production of proinflammatory cytokines and its consequences has been studied in the context of HIV-1 infection of normal human astrocytes (NHA). NHA express TLR3, TLR4, and TLR5. TLR3 ligation induced the strongest proinflammatory polarizing response, characterized by generation of high levels of TNF-α, IL-6, and IL-8. HIV-1 increased the transient production of key inflammatory mediators, and exposure to LPS of HIV-1-infected cells increased significantly the cytokine secretion. We confirmed that it is necessary viral gene expression from the moment of pretreatment with antiretrovirals inhibited totally HIV-1-induced TLR response. The higher response to LPS from HIV-1-infected cells did not correlate with TLR4 or MyD88 increased expression. LPS responsiveness of infected cells parallels MHC class II expression, but not CD14. HIV-1-infected NHA present increased sensitivity to the proinflammatory effects of LPS. If this phenomenon occurs in vivo, it will contribute to the immunopathogenesis of this disease and may ultimately offer novel targets for immunomodulatory therapy. PMID:26671458

  19. Phages and HIV-1: From Display to Interplay

    PubMed Central

    Delhalle, Sylvie; Schmit, Jean-Claude; Chevigné, Andy

    2012-01-01

    The complex hide-and-seek game between HIV-1 and the host immune system has impaired the development of an efficient vaccine. In addition, the high variability of the virus impedes the long-term control of viral replication by small antiviral drugs. For more than 20 years, phage display technology has been intensively used in the field of HIV-1 to explore the epitope landscape recognized by monoclonal and polyclonal HIV-1-specific antibodies, thereby providing precious data about immunodominant and neutralizing epitopes. In parallel, biopanning experiments with various combinatorial or antibody fragment libraries were conducted on viral targets as well as host receptors to identify HIV-1 inhibitors. Besides these applications, phage display technology has been applied to characterize the enzymatic specificity of the HIV-1 protease. Phage particles also represent valuable alternative carriers displaying various HIV-1 antigens to the immune system and eliciting antiviral responses. This review presents and summarizes the different studies conducted with regard to the nature of phage libraries, target display mode and biopanning procedures. PMID:22606007

  20. Negative Feedback Regulation of HIV-1 by Gene Editing Strategy

    PubMed Central

    Kaminski, Rafal; Chen, Yilan; Salkind, Julian; Bella, Ramona; Young, Won-bin; Ferrante, Pasquale; Karn, Jonathan; Malcolm, Thomas; Hu, Wenhui; Khalili, Kamel

    2016-01-01

    The CRISPR/Cas9 gene editing method is comprised of the guide RNA (gRNA) to target a specific DNA sequence for cleavage and the Cas9 endonuclease for introducing breaks in the double-stranded DNA identified by the gRNA. Co-expression of both a multiplex of HIV-1-specific gRNAs and Cas9 in cells results in the modification and/or excision of the segment of viral DNA, leading to replication-defective virus. In this study, we have personalized the activity of CRISPR/Cas9 by placing the gene encoding Cas9 under the control of a minimal promoter of HIV-1 that is activated by the HIV-1 Tat protein. We demonstrate that functional activation of CRISPR/Cas9 by Tat during the course of viral infection excises the designated segment of the integrated viral DNA and consequently suppresses viral expression. This strategy was also used in a latently infected CD4+ T-cell model after treatment with a variety of HIV-1 stimulating agents including PMA and TSA. Controlled expression of Cas9 by Tat offers a new strategy for safe implementation of the Cas9 technology for ablation of HIV-1 at a very early stage of HIV-1 replication during the course of the acute phase of infection and the reactivation of silent proviral DNA in latently infected cells. PMID:27528385

  1. CRISPR-mediated Activation of Latent HIV-1 Expression.

    PubMed

    Limsirichai, Prajit; Gaj, Thomas; Schaffer, David V

    2016-03-01

    Complete eradication of HIV-1 infection is impeded by the existence of cells that harbor chromosomally integrated but transcriptionally inactive provirus. These cells can persist for years without producing viral progeny, rendering them refractory to immune surveillance and antiretroviral therapy and providing a permanent reservoir for the stochastic reactivation and reseeding of HIV-1. Strategies for purging this latent reservoir are thus needed to eradicate infection. Here, we show that engineered transcriptional activation systems based on CRISPR/Cas9 can be harnessed to activate viral gene expression in cell line models of HIV-1 latency. We further demonstrate that complementing Cas9 activators with latency-reversing compounds can enhance latent HIV-1 transcription and that epigenome modulation using CRISPR-based acetyltransferases can also promote viral gene activation. Collectively, these results demonstrate that CRISPR systems are potentially effective tools for inducing latent HIV-1 expression and that their use, in combination with antiretroviral therapy, could lead to improved therapies for HIV-1 infection.

  2. Negative Feedback Regulation of HIV-1 by Gene Editing Strategy.

    PubMed

    Kaminski, Rafal; Chen, Yilan; Salkind, Julian; Bella, Ramona; Young, Won-Bin; Ferrante, Pasquale; Karn, Jonathan; Malcolm, Thomas; Hu, Wenhui; Khalili, Kamel

    2016-08-16

    The CRISPR/Cas9 gene editing method is comprised of the guide RNA (gRNA) to target a specific DNA sequence for cleavage and the Cas9 endonuclease for introducing breaks in the double-stranded DNA identified by the gRNA. Co-expression of both a multiplex of HIV-1-specific gRNAs and Cas9 in cells results in the modification and/or excision of the segment of viral DNA, leading to replication-defective virus. In this study, we have personalized the activity of CRISPR/Cas9 by placing the gene encoding Cas9 under the control of a minimal promoter of HIV-1 that is activated by the HIV-1 Tat protein. We demonstrate that functional activation of CRISPR/Cas9 by Tat during the course of viral infection excises the designated segment of the integrated viral DNA and consequently suppresses viral expression. This strategy was also used in a latently infected CD4+ T-cell model after treatment with a variety of HIV-1 stimulating agents including PMA and TSA. Controlled expression of Cas9 by Tat offers a new strategy for safe implementation of the Cas9 technology for ablation of HIV-1 at a very early stage of HIV-1 replication during the course of the acute phase of infection and the reactivation of silent proviral DNA in latently infected cells.

  3. Impairment of B-cell functions during HIV-1 infection.

    PubMed

    Amu, Sylvie; Ruffin, Nicolas; Rethi, Bence; Chiodi, Francesca

    2013-09-24

    A variety of B-cell dysfunctions are manifested during HIV-1 infection, as reported early during the HIV-1 epidemic. It is not unusual that the pathogenic mechanisms presented to elucidate impairment of B-cell responses during HIV-1 infection focus on the impact of reduced T-cell numbers and functions, and lack of germinal center formation in lymphoid tissues. To our understanding, however, perturbation of B-cell phenotype and function during HIV-1 infection may begin at several different B-cell developmental stages. These impairments can be mediated by intrinsic B-cell defects as well as by the lack of proper T-cell help. In this review, we will highlight some of the pathways and molecular interactions leading to B-cell impairment prior to germinal center formation and B-cell activation mediated through the B-cell receptor in response to HIV-1 antigens. Recent studies indicate a regulatory role for B cells on T-cell biology and immune responses. We will discuss some of these novel findings and how these regulatory mechanisms could potentially be affected by the intrinsic defects of B cells taking place during HIV-1 infection.

  4. Engineering T Cells to Functionally Cure HIV-1 Infection

    PubMed Central

    Leibman, Rachel S; Riley, James L

    2015-01-01

    Despite the ability of antiretroviral therapy to minimize human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) replication and increase the duration and quality of patients' lives, the health consequences and financial burden associated with the lifelong treatment regimen render a permanent cure highly attractive. Although T cells play an important role in controlling virus replication, they are themselves targets of HIV-mediated destruction. Direct genetic manipulation of T cells for adoptive cellular therapies could facilitate a functional cure by generating HIV-1–resistant cells, redirecting HIV-1–specific immune responses, or a combination of the two strategies. In contrast to a vaccine approach, which relies on the production and priming of HIV-1–specific lymphocytes within a patient's own body, adoptive T-cell therapy provides an opportunity to customize the therapeutic T cells prior to administration. However, at present, it is unclear how to best engineer T cells so that sustained control over HIV-1 replication can be achieved in the absence of antiretrovirals. This review focuses on T-cell gene-engineering and gene-editing strategies that have been performed in efforts to inhibit HIV-1 replication and highlights the requirements for a successful gene therapy–mediated functional cure. PMID:25896251

  5. Viral piracy: HIV-1 targets dendritic cells for transmission.

    PubMed

    Lekkerkerker, Annemarie N; van Kooyk, Yvette; Geijtenbeek, Teunis B H

    2006-04-01

    Dendritic cells (DCs), the professional antigen presenting cells, are critical for host immunity by inducing specific immune responses against a broad variety of pathogens. Remarkably the human immunodeficiency virus-1 (HIV-1) subverts DC function leading to spread of the virus. At an early phase of HIV-1 transmission, DCs capture HIV-1 at mucosal surfaces and transmit the virus to T cells in secondary lymphoid tissues. Capture of the virus on DCs takes place via C-type lectins of which the dendritic cell-specific intercellular adhesion molecule-3 (ICAM-3) grabbing nonintegrin (DC-SIGN) is the best studied. DC-SIGN-captured HIV-1 particles accumulate in CD81(+) multivesicular bodies (MVBs) in DCs and are subsequently transmitted to CD4+ T cells resulting in infection of T cells. The viral cell-to-cell transmission takes place at the DC-T cell interface termed the infectious synapse. Recent studies demonstrate that direct infection of DCs contributes to the transmission to T cells at a later phase. Moreover, the infected DCs may function as cellular reservoirs for HIV-1. This review discusses the different processes that govern viral piracy of DCs by HIV-1, emphasizing the intracellular routing of the virus from capture on the cell surface to egress in the infectious synapse.

  6. CRISPR-mediated Activation of Latent HIV-1 Expression

    PubMed Central

    Limsirichai, Prajit; Gaj, Thomas; Schaffer, David V

    2016-01-01

    Complete eradication of HIV-1 infection is impeded by the existence of cells that harbor chromosomally integrated but transcriptionally inactive provirus. These cells can persist for years without producing viral progeny, rendering them refractory to immune surveillance and antiretroviral therapy and providing a permanent reservoir for the stochastic reactivation and reseeding of HIV-1. Strategies for purging this latent reservoir are thus needed to eradicate infection. Here, we show that engineered transcriptional activation systems based on CRISPR/Cas9 can be harnessed to activate viral gene expression in cell line models of HIV-1 latency. We further demonstrate that complementing Cas9 activators with latency-reversing compounds can enhance latent HIV-1 transcription and that epigenome modulation using CRISPR-based acetyltransferases can also promote viral gene activation. Collectively, these results demonstrate that CRISPR systems are potentially effective tools for inducing latent HIV-1 expression and that their use, in combination with antiretroviral therapy, could lead to improved therapies for HIV-1 infection. PMID:26607397

  7. HIV-1 Reservoir Dynamics after Vaccination and Antiretroviral Therapy Interruption Are Associated with Dendritic Cell Vaccine-Induced T Cell Responses

    PubMed Central

    Andrés, Cristina; Plana, Montserrat; Guardo, Alberto C.; Alvarez-Fernández, Carmen; Climent, Nuria; Gallart, Teresa; León, Agathe; Clotet, Bonaventura; Autran, Brigitte; Chomont, Nicolas; Gatell, Josep M.; Sánchez-Palomino, Sonsoles

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT HIV-1-specific immune responses induced by a dendritic cell (DC)-based therapeutic vaccine might have some effect on the viral reservoir. Patients on combination antiretroviral therapy (cART) were randomized to receive DCs pulsed with autologous HIV-1 (n = 24) (DC-HIV-1) or nonpulsed DCs (n = 12) (DC-control). We measured the levels of total and integrated HIV-1 DNA in CD4 T cells isolated from these patients at 6 time points: before any cART; before the first cART interruption, which was at 56 weeks before the first immunization to isolate virus for pulsing DCs; before and after vaccinations (VAC1 and VAC2); and at weeks 12 and 48 after the second cART interruption. The vaccinations did not influence HIV-1 DNA levels in vaccinated subjects. After the cART interruption at week 12 postvaccination, while total HIV-1 DNA increased significantly in both arms, integrated HIV-1 DNA did not change in vaccinees (mean of 1.8 log10 to 1.9 copies/106 CD4 T cells, P = 0.22) and did increase in controls (mean of 1.8 log10 to 2.1 copies/106 CD4 T cells, P = 0.02) (P = 0.03 for the difference between groups). However, this lack of increase of integrated HIV-1 DNA observed in the DC-HIV-1 group was transient, and at week 48 after cART interruption, no differences were observed between the groups. The HIV-1-specific T cell responses at the VAC2 time point were inversely correlated with the total and integrated HIV-1 DNA levels after cART interruption in vaccinees (r [Pearson's correlation coefficient] = −0.69, P = 0.002, and r = −0.82, P < 0.0001, respectively). No correlations were found in controls. HIV-1-specific T cell immune responses elicited by DC therapeutic vaccines drive changes in HIV-1 DNA after vaccination and cART interruption. (This study has been registered at ClinicalTrials.gov under registration no. NCT00402142.) IMPORTANCE There is an intense interest in developing strategies to target HIV-1 reservoirs as they create barriers to curing the disease

  8. Enhanced clearance of HIV-1-infected cells by anti-HIV-1 broadly neutralizing antibodies in vivo

    PubMed Central

    Lu, Ching-Lan; Murakowski, Dariusz K.; Bournazos, Stylianos; Schoofs, Till; Sarkar, Debolina; Halper-Stromberg, Ariel; Horwitz, Joshua A.; Nogueira, Lilian; Golijanin, Jovana; Gazumyan, Anna; Ravetch, Jeffrey V.; Caskey, Marina; Chakraborty, Arup K.; Nussenzweig, Michel C.

    2016-01-01

    Anti-retroviral drugs and antibodies limit HIV-1 infection by interfering with the viral life-cycle. In addition, antibodies also have the potential to guide host immune effector cells to kill HIV-1 infected cells. Examination of the kinetics of HIV-1 suppression in infected individuals by passively administered 3BNC117, a broadly neutralizing antibody (bNAb), suggested that the effects of the antibody are not limited to free viral clearance and blocking new infection, but also include acceleration of infected cell clearance. Consistent with these observations, we find that bNAbs can target CD4+ T cells infected with patient viruses and decrease their in vivo half-lives by a mechanism that requires FcγR engagement in a humanized mouse model. The results indicate that passive immunotherapy can accelerate elimination of HIV-1 infected cells. PMID:27199430

  9. Successful increase in contraceptive uptake among Kenyan HIV-1 serodiscordant couples enrolled in an HIV-1 prevention trial

    PubMed Central

    Ngure, Kenneth; Heffron, Renee; Mugo, Nelly; Irungu, Elizabeth; Celum, Connie; Baeten, Jared

    2016-01-01

    Objective To evaluate a multi-pronged approach to promote dual contraceptive use by women within heterosexual HIV-1 serodiscordant partnerships. Methods For 213 HIV-1 serodiscordant couples in Thika, Kenya participating in an HIV-1 prevention clinical trial, contraceptive promotion was initiated through a multi-pronged intervention that included staff training, couples family planning sessions, and free provision of hormonal contraception on-site. Contraceptive use and pregnancy incidence were compared between two time periods (before versus after June 2007, when the intervention was initiated) and between Thika and other Kenyan trial sites (Eldoret, Kisumu, and Nairobi). Generalized estimating equations and Andersen-Gill proportional hazards modeling were used. Results Non-barrier contraceptive use increased after implementation of the intervention: from 31.5% to 64.7% of visits among HIV-1 seropositive women (odds ratio [OR] 4.0, 95% confidence interval [CI] 3.0–5.3) and from 28.6% to 46.7% of visits among HIV-1 seronegative women (OR 2.2, 95% CI 1.4–3.5). In comparison, at the other Kenyan sites, where the intervention was not implemented, contraceptive use changed minimally, from 15.6% to 22.3% of visits for HIV-1 seropositive women and from 13.6% to 12.7% among HIV-1 seronegative women. Self-reported condom use remained high during follow-up. Pregnancy incidence at the Thika was significantly lower after compared with before June 2007 (hazard ratio [HR] 0.2, 95% CI 0.1–0.6), and was approximately half that at other Kenyan sites during the intervention period (HR 0.5, 95% CI 0.3–0.8). Conclusions A multi-pronged family planning intervention can lead to high non-barrier contraceptive uptake and reduced pregnancy incidence among women in HIV-1 serodiscordant partnerships. PMID:20081393

  10. Kinetics of human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) DNA and RNA synthesis during primary HIV-1 infection.

    PubMed Central

    Graziosi, C; Pantaleo, G; Butini, L; Demarest, J F; Saag, M S; Shaw, G M; Fauci, A S

    1993-01-01

    HIV-1 replication and viral burden in peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC) have been reported to be high in primary infection but generally very low during the prolonged period of clinical latency. It is uncertain precisely when this transition occurs during the HIV-1 infection and what the relationship is between the changes in HIV-1 replication versus the clearance of infected cells in the overall control of viral replication. In the present study, the kinetics of viral burden (i.e., frequency of HIV-1-infected cells) and replication during primary and early-chronic infection were analyzed in PBMC of four acutely infected individuals. High frequencies of HIV-1-infected cells and high levels of virus replication were observed in PBMC after primary HIV-1 infection. Down-regulation of virus replication in PBMC was observed in all four patients coincident with the emergence of HIV-1-specific immune responses. Other parameters of virus replication, such as circulating plasma p24 antigen and plasma viremia showed similar kinetics. In contrast, a significant decline in viral burden in PBMC was observed in only one of four patients. These results indicate that the down-regulation in the levels of virus replication associated with the clinical transition from acute to chronic infection does not necessarily reflect a reduction in viral burden, thus suggesting the involvement of additional factors. Identification of these factors will be important in elucidating the host mechanisms involved in the early control of HIV-1 infection and disease. Images Fig. 1 Fig. 2 Fig. 3 PMID:8341646

  11. HIV-1 drug resistance in HIV-1-infected children in the United Kingdom from 1998 to 2004.

    PubMed

    Chakraborty, Rana; Smith, Colette J; Dunn, David; Green, Hannah; Duong, Trinh; Doerholt, Katja; Riordon, Andrew; Lyall, Hermione; Tookey, Pat; Butler, Karina; Sabin, Caroline A; Gibb, Di; Pillay, Deenan

    2008-05-01

    We reviewed HIV-1 genotypes from 200 of 979 (20%) HIV-infected children in the U.K. Collaborative HIV in Pediatric Study (CHIPS) cohort (343 resistance tests). Three of 44 samples had major primary resistance mutations before antiretroviral therapy. Three-class resistance was noted in 42 samples (14.1%). Our study also highlighted underutilization of testing and the need for prompt genotyping after drug discontinuation which may have lead to an underestimation of HIV-1 resistance.

  12. HIV-1 VACCINES. Diversion of HIV-1 vaccine-induced immunity by gp41-microbiota cross-reactive antibodies.

    PubMed

    Williams, Wilton B; Liao, Hua-Xin; Moody, M Anthony; Kepler, Thomas B; Alam, S Munir; Gao, Feng; Wiehe, Kevin; Trama, Ashley M; Jones, Kathryn; Zhang, Ruijun; Song, Hongshuo; Marshall, Dawn J; Whitesides, John F; Sawatzki, Kaitlin; Hua, Axin; Liu, Pinghuang; Tay, Matthew Z; Seaton, Kelly E; Shen, Xiaoying; Foulger, Andrew; Lloyd, Krissey E; Parks, Robert; Pollara, Justin; Ferrari, Guido; Yu, Jae-Sung; Vandergrift, Nathan; Montefiori, David C; Sobieszczyk, Magdalena E; Hammer, Scott; Karuna, Shelly; Gilbert, Peter; Grove, Doug; Grunenberg, Nicole; McElrath, M Juliana; Mascola, John R; Koup, Richard A; Corey, Lawrence; Nabel, Gary J; Morgan, Cecilia; Churchyard, Gavin; Maenza, Janine; Keefer, Michael; Graham, Barney S; Baden, Lindsey R; Tomaras, Georgia D; Haynes, Barton F

    2015-08-14

    An HIV-1 DNA prime vaccine, with a recombinant adenovirus type 5 (rAd5) boost, failed to protect from HIV-1 acquisition. We studied the nature of the vaccine-induced antibody (Ab) response to HIV-1 envelope (Env). HIV-1-reactive plasma Ab titers were higher to Env gp41 than to gp120, and repertoire analysis demonstrated that 93% of HIV-1-reactive Abs from memory B cells responded to Env gp41. Vaccine-induced gp41-reactive monoclonal antibodies were non-neutralizing and frequently polyreactive with host and environmental antigens, including intestinal microbiota (IM). Next-generation sequencing of an immunoglobulin heavy chain variable region repertoire before vaccination revealed an Env-IM cross-reactive Ab that was clonally related to a subsequent vaccine-induced gp41-reactive Ab. Thus, HIV-1 Env DNA-rAd5 vaccine induced a dominant IM-polyreactive, non-neutralizing gp41-reactive Ab repertoire response that was associated with no vaccine efficacy.

  13. HIV-1 reservoirs in breast milk and challenges to elimination of breast-feeding transmission of HIV-1.

    PubMed

    Van de Perre, Philippe; Rubbo, Pierre-Alain; Viljoen, Johannes; Nagot, Nicolas; Tylleskär, Thorkild; Lepage, Philippe; Vendrell, Jean-Pierre; Tuaillon, Edouard

    2012-07-18

    By compensating for the relative immaturity of the neonatal immune system, breast milk and breast-feeding prevent deaths in children. Nevertheless, transmission of HIV-1 through breast-feeding is responsible for more than half of new pediatric HIV infections. Recent studies of possible HIV-1 reservoirs in breast milk shed new light on features that influence HIV-1 transmission through breast-feeding. The particular characteristics of breast milk CD4(+) T cells that distinguish them from circulating blood lymphocytes (high frequency of cell activation and expression of memory and mucosal homing markers) facilitate the establishment of HIV-1 replication. Breast milk also contains a plethora of factors with anti-infectious, immunomodulatory, or anti-inflammatory properties that can regulate both viral replication and infant susceptibility. In addition, CD8(+) T lymphocytes, macrophages, and epithelial cells in breast milk can alter the dynamics of HIV-1 transmission. Even during efficient antiretroviral therapy, a residual stable, CD4(+) T cell-associated reservoir of HIV-1 is persistently present in breast milk, a likely source of infection. Only prophylactic treatment in infants--ideally with a long-acting drug, administered for the entire duration of breast-feeding--is likely to protect HIV-exposed babies against all forms of HIV transmission from breast milk, including cell-to-cell viral transfer.

  14. Maturation Pathway from Germline to Broad HIV-1 Neutralizer of a CD4-Mimic Antibody

    SciTech Connect

    Bonsignori, Mattia; Zhou, Tongqing; Sheng, Zizhang; Chen, Lei; Gao, Feng; Joyce, M.  Gordon; Ozorowski, Gabriel; Chuang, Gwo-Yu; Schramm, Chaim A.; Wiehe, Kevin; Alam, S.  Munir; Bradley, Todd; Gladden, Morgan A.; Hwang, Kwan-Ki; Iyengar, Sheelah; Kumar, Amit; Lu, Xiaozhi; Luo, Kan; Mangiapani, Michael C.; Parks, Robert J.; Song, Hongshuo; Acharya, Priyamvada; Bailer, Robert T.; Cao, Allen; Druz, Aliaksandr; Georgiev, Ivelin S.; Kwon, Young D.; Louder, Mark K.; Zhang, Baoshan; Zheng, Anqi; Hill, Brenna J.; Kong, Rui; Soto, Cinque; Mullikin, James C.; Douek, Daniel C.; Montefiori, David C.; Moody, Michael A.; Shaw, George M.; Hahn, Beatrice H.; Kelsoe, Garnett; Hraber, Peter T.; Korber, Bette T.; Boyd, Scott D.; Fire, Andrew Z.; Kepler, Thomas B.; Shapiro, Lawrence; Ward, Andrew B.; Mascola, John R.; Liao, Hua-Xin; Kwong, Peter D.; Haynes, Barton F.

    2016-04-01

    Here, we report that antibodies with ontogenies from VH1-2 or VH1-46-germline genes dominate the broadly neutralizing response against the CD4-binding site (CD4bs) on HIV-1. We define with longitudinal sampling from time-of-infection the development of a VH1-46-derived antibody lineage that matured to neutralize 90% of HIV-1 isolates. Structures of lineage antibodies CH235 (week 41 from time-of-infection, 18% breadth), CH235.9 (week 152, 77%), and CH235.12 (week 323, 90%) demonstrated the maturing epitope to focus on the conformationally invariant portion of the CD4bs. Similarities between CH235 lineage and five unrelated CD4bs lineages in epitope focusing, length-of-time to develop breadth, and extraordinary level of somatic hypermutation suggested commonalities in maturation among all CD4bs antibodies. Fortunately, the required CH235-lineage hypermutation appeared substantially guided by the intrinsic mutability of the VH1-46 gene, which closely resembled VH1-2. Lastly, we integrated our CH235-lineage findings with a second broadly neutralizing lineage and HIV-1 co-evolution to suggest a vaccination strategy for inducing both lineages.

  15. RNA Structures Facilitate Recombination-Mediated Gene Swapping in HIV-1

    PubMed Central

    Simon-Loriere, Etienne; Martin, Darren P.; Weeks, Kevin M.; Negroni, Matteo

    2010-01-01

    Many viruses, including retroviruses, undergo frequent recombination, a process which can increase their rate of adaptive evolution. In the case of HIV, recombination has been responsible for the generation of numerous intersubtype recombinant variants with epidemiological importance in the AIDS pandemic. Although it is known that fragments of genetic material do not combine randomly during the generation of recombinant viruses, the mechanisms that lead to preferential recombination at specific sites are not fully understood. Here we reanalyze recent independent data defining (i) the structure of a complete HIV-1 RNA genome and (ii) favorable sites for recombination. We show that in the absence of selection acting on recombinant genomes, regions harboring RNA structures in the NL4-3 model strain are strongly predictive of recombination breakpoints in the HIV-1 env genes of primary isolates. In addition, we found that breakpoints within recombinant HIV-1 genomes sampled from human populations, which have been acted upon extensively by natural selection, also colocalize with RNA structures. Critically, junctions between genes are enriched in structured RNA elements and are also preferred sites for generating functional recombinant forms. These data suggest that RNA structure-mediated recombination allows the virus to exchange intact genes rather than arbitrary subgene fragments, which is likely to increase the overall viability and replication success of the recombinant HIV progeny. PMID:20881047

  16. RNA structures facilitate recombination-mediated gene swapping in HIV-1.

    PubMed

    Simon-Loriere, Etienne; Martin, Darren P; Weeks, Kevin M; Negroni, Matteo

    2010-12-01

    Many viruses, including retroviruses, undergo frequent recombination, a process which can increase their rate of adaptive evolution. In the case of HIV, recombination has been responsible for the generation of numerous intersubtype recombinant variants with epidemiological importance in the AIDS pandemic. Although it is known that fragments of genetic material do not combine randomly during the generation of recombinant viruses, the mechanisms that lead to preferential recombination at specific sites are not fully understood. Here we reanalyze recent independent data defining (i) the structure of a complete HIV-1 RNA genome and (ii) favorable sites for recombination. We show that in the absence of selection acting on recombinant genomes, regions harboring RNA structures in the NL4-3 model strain are strongly predictive of recombination breakpoints in the HIV-1 env genes of primary isolates. In addition, we found that breakpoints within recombinant HIV-1 genomes sampled from human populations, which have been acted upon extensively by natural selection, also colocalize with RNA structures. Critically, junctions between genes are enriched in structured RNA elements and are also preferred sites for generating functional recombinant forms. These data suggest that RNA structure-mediated recombination allows the virus to exchange intact genes rather than arbitrary subgene fragments, which is likely to increase the overall viability and replication success of the recombinant HIV progeny.

  17. A broad HIV-1 inhibitor blocks envelope glycoprotein transitions critical for entry

    PubMed Central

    Herschhorn, Alon; Gu, Christopher; Espy, Nicole; Richard, Jonathan; Finzi, Andrés; Sodroski, Joseph G.

    2014-01-01

    Binding to the primary receptor, CD4, triggers conformational changes in the metastable envelope glycoprotein (Env) trimer (gp1203/gp413) of human immunodeficiency virus (HIV-1) that are important for virus entry into host cells. These changes include an “opening” of the trimer, creation of a binding site for the CCR5 coreceptor, and formation/exposure of a gp41 coiled coil. Here we identify a new compound, 18A (1), that specifically inhibits the entry of a wide range of HIV-1 isolates. 18A does not interfere with CD4 or CCR5 binding, but inhibits the CD4-induced disruption of quaternary structures at the trimer apex and the formation/exposure of the gp41 HR1 coiled coil. Analysis of HIV-1 variants exhibiting increased or reduced sensitivity to 18A suggests that the inhibitor can distinguish distinct conformational states of gp120 in the unliganded Env trimer. The broad-range activity and observed hypersensitivity of resistant mutants to antibody neutralization support further investigation of 18A. PMID:25174000

  18. Maturation Pathway from Germline to Broad HIV-1 Neutralizer of a CD4-Mimic Antibody

    DOE PAGES

    Bonsignori, Mattia; Zhou, Tongqing; Sheng, Zizhang; ...

    2016-04-01

    Here, we report that antibodies with ontogenies from VH1-2 or VH1-46-germline genes dominate the broadly neutralizing response against the CD4-binding site (CD4bs) on HIV-1. We define with longitudinal sampling from time-of-infection the development of a VH1-46-derived antibody lineage that matured to neutralize 90% of HIV-1 isolates. Structures of lineage antibodies CH235 (week 41 from time-of-infection, 18% breadth), CH235.9 (week 152, 77%), and CH235.12 (week 323, 90%) demonstrated the maturing epitope to focus on the conformationally invariant portion of the CD4bs. Similarities between CH235 lineage and five unrelated CD4bs lineages in epitope focusing, length-of-time to develop breadth, and extraordinary level ofmore » somatic hypermutation suggested commonalities in maturation among all CD4bs antibodies. Fortunately, the required CH235-lineage hypermutation appeared substantially guided by the intrinsic mutability of the VH1-46 gene, which closely resembled VH1-2. Lastly, we integrated our CH235-lineage findings with a second broadly neutralizing lineage and HIV-1 co-evolution to suggest a vaccination strategy for inducing both lineages.« less

  19. Cooperation of B cell lineages in induction of HIV-1-broadly neutralizing antibodies.

    PubMed

    Gao, Feng; Bonsignori, Mattia; Liao, Hua-Xin; Kumar, Amit; Xia, Shi-Mao; Lu, Xiaozhi; Cai, Fangping; Hwang, Kwan-Ki; Song, Hongshuo; Zhou, Tongqing; Lynch, Rebecca M; Alam, S Munir; Moody, M Anthony; Ferrari, Guido; Berrong, Mark; Kelsoe, Garnett; Shaw, George M; Hahn, Beatrice H; Montefiori, David C; Kamanga, Gift; Cohen, Myron S; Hraber, Peter; Kwong, Peter D; Korber, Bette T; Mascola, John R; Kepler, Thomas B; Haynes, Barton F

    2014-07-31

    Development of strategies for induction of HIV-1 broadly neutralizing antibodies (bnAbs) by vaccines is a priority. Determining the steps of bnAb induction in HIV-1-infected individuals who make bnAbs is a key strategy for immunogen design. Here, we study the B cell response in a bnAb-producing individual and report cooperation between two B cell lineages to drive bnAb development. We isolated a virus-neutralizing antibody lineage that targeted an envelope region (loop D) and selected virus escape mutants that resulted in both enhanced bnAb lineage envelope binding and escape mutant neutralization-traits associated with increased B cell antigen drive. Thus, in this individual, two B cell lineages cooperated to induce the development of bnAbs. Design of vaccine immunogens that simultaneously drive both helper and broadly neutralizing B cell lineages may be important for vaccine-induced recapitulation of events that transpire during the maturation of neutralizing antibodies in HIV-1-infected individuals.

  20. Design and synthesis of HIV-1 protease inhibitors for a long-acting injectable drug application.

    PubMed

    Kesteleyn, Bart; Amssoms, Katie; Schepens, Wim; Hache, Geerwin; Verschueren, Wim; Van De Vreken, Wim; Rombauts, Klara; Meurs, Greet; Sterkens, Patrick; Stoops, Bart; Baert, Lieven; Austin, Nigel; Wegner, Jörg; Masungi, Chantal; Dierynck, Inge; Lundgren, Stina; Jönsson, Daniel; Parkes, Kevin; Kalayanov, Genadiy; Wallberg, Hans; Rosenquist, Asa; Samuelsson, Bertil; Van Emelen, Kristof; Thuring, Jan Willem

    2013-01-01

    The design and synthesis of novel HIV-1 protease inhibitors (PIs) (1-22), which display high potency against HIV-1 wild-type and multi-PI-resistant HIV-mutant clinical isolates, is described. Lead optimization was initiated from compound 1, a Phe-Phe hydroxyethylene peptidomimetic PI, and was directed towards the discovery of new PIs suitable for a long-acting (LA) injectable drug application. Introducing a heterocyclic 6-methoxy-3-pyridinyl or a 6-(dimethylamino)-3-pyridinyl moiety (R(3)) at the para-position of the P1' benzyl fragment generated compounds with antiviral potency in the low single digit nanomolar range. Halogenation or alkylation of the metabolic hot spots on the various aromatic rings resulted in PIs with high stability against degradation in human liver microsomes and low plasma clearance in rats. Replacing the chromanolamine moiety (R(1)) in the P2 protease binding site by a cyclopentanolamine or a cyclohexanolamine derivative provided a series of high clearance PIs (16-22) with EC(50)s on wild-type HIV-1 in the range of 0.8-1.8 nM. PIs 18 and 22, formulated as nanosuspensions, showed gradual but sustained and complete release from the injection site over two months in rats, and were therefore identified as interesting candidates for a LA injectable drug application for treating HIV/AIDS.

  1. Inhibition of the HIV-1 and HIV-2 proteases by a monoclonal antibody.

    PubMed Central

    Lescar, J.; Brynda, J.; Rezacova, P.; Stouracova, R.; Riottot, M. M.; Chitarra, V.; Fabry, M.; Horejsi, M.; Sedlacek, J.; Bentley, G. A.

    1999-01-01

    The monoclonal antibody 1696, directed against the HIV-1 protease, displays strong inhibitory effects toward the catalytic activity of the enzyme of both the HIV-1 and HIV-2 isolates. This antibody cross-reacts with peptides that include the N-terminus of the enzyme, a region that is well conserved in sequence among different viral strains and which, furthermore, is crucial for homodimerization to the active enzymatic form. This observation, as well as antigen-binding studies in the presence of an active site inhibitor, suggest that 1696 inhibits the HIV protease by destabilizing its active homodimeric form. To characterize further how the antibody 1696 inhibits the HIV-1 and HIV-2 proteases, we have solved the crystal structure of its Fab fragment by molecular replacement and refined it at 3.0 A resolution. The antigen binding site has a deep cavity at its center, which is lined mainly by acidic and hydrophobic residues, and is large enough to accommodate several antigen residues. The structure of the Fab 1696 could form a starting basis for the design of alternative HIV protease-inhibiting molecules of broad specificity. PMID:10631984

  2. Structural and Immunogenicity Studies of a Cleaved, Stabilized Envelope Trimer Derived from Subtype A HIV-1

    PubMed Central

    Kang, Yun (Kenneth); Andjelic, Sofija; Binley, James M.; Crooks, Emma T.; Franti, Michael; Iyer, Sai Prasad N.; Donovan, Gerald P.; Dey, Antu K.; Zhu, Ping; Roux, Kenneth H.; Durso, Robert J.; Parsons, Thomas F.; Maddon, Paul J.; Moore, John P.; Olson, William C.

    2015-01-01

    SOSIP gp140 trimers represent a soluble, stabilized, proteolytically cleaved form of the HIV-1 envelope (Env) glycoproteins. SOSIP gp140 derived from a subtype A HIV-1 isolate, KNH1144, forms exceptionally stable trimers that resemble virion-associated Env in antigenicity and topology. Here, we used electron microscopy to demonstrate that KNH1144 SOSIP gp140 trimers bound three soluble CD4 molecules in a symmetrical orientation similar to that seen for native Env. We compared the immunogenicities of KNH1144 SOSIP gp140 trimers and gp120 monomers in rabbits and found that the trimers were superior at eliciting neutralizing antibodies (NAbs) to homologous virus as well as neutralization-sensitive subtype B and C viruses. The NAb specificities for SOSIP antisera mapped in part to the CD4 binding site on gp120. We also observed adjuvant-dependent induction of antibodies to the residual levels of host cell proteins (HCPs) contained in the purified Env preparations. When present, HCP antibodies enhanced pseudovirus infection. Our findings are relevant for the further development of Env-based vaccines for HIV-1. PMID:19567243

  3. Structural and immunogenicity studies of a cleaved, stabilized envelope trimer derived from subtype A HIV-1.

    PubMed

    Kang, Yun Kenneth; Andjelic, Sofija; Binley, James M; Crooks, Emma T; Franti, Michael; Iyer, Sai Prasad N; Donovan, Gerald P; Dey, Antu K; Zhu, Ping; Roux, Kenneth H; Durso, Robert J; Parsons, Thomas F; Maddon, Paul J; Moore, John P; Olson, William C

    2009-08-13

    SOSIP gp140 trimers represent a soluble, stabilized, proteolytically cleaved form of the HIV-1 envelope (Env) glycoproteins. SOSIP gp140 derived from a subtype A HIV-1 isolate, KNH1144, forms exceptionally stable trimers that resemble virion-associated Env in antigenicity and topology. Here, we used electron microscopy to demonstrate that KNH1144 SOSIP gp140 trimers bound three soluble CD4 molecules in a symmetrical orientation similar to that seen for native Env. We compared the immunogenicities of KNH1144 SOSIP gp140 trimers and gp120 monomers in rabbits and found that the trimers were superior at eliciting neutralizing antibodies (NAbs) to homologous virus as well as neutralization-sensitive subtype B and C viruses. The NAb specificities for SOSIP antisera mapped in part to the CD4 binding site on gp120. We also observed adjuvant-dependent induction of antibodies to the residual levels of host cell proteins (HCPs) contained in the purified Env preparations. When present, HCP antibodies enhanced pseudovirus infection. Our findings are relevant for the further development of Env-based vaccines for HIV-1.

  4. Maturation Pathway from Germline to Broad HIV-1 Neutralizer of a CD4-Mimic Antibody.

    PubMed

    Bonsignori, Mattia; Zhou, Tongqing; Sheng, Zizhang; Chen, Lei; Gao, Feng; Joyce, M Gordon; Ozorowski, Gabriel; Chuang, Gwo-Yu; Schramm, Chaim A; Wiehe, Kevin; Alam, S Munir; Bradley, Todd; Gladden, Morgan A; Hwang, Kwan-Ki; Iyengar, Sheelah; Kumar, Amit; Lu, Xiaozhi; Luo, Kan; Mangiapani, Michael C; Parks, Robert J; Song, Hongshuo; Acharya, Priyamvada; Bailer, Robert T; Cao, Allen; Druz, Aliaksandr; Georgiev, Ivelin S; Kwon, Young D; Louder, Mark K; Zhang, Baoshan; Zheng, Anqi; Hill, Brenna J; Kong, Rui; Soto, Cinque; Mullikin, James C; Douek, Daniel C; Montefiori, David C; Moody, Michael A; Shaw, George M; Hahn, Beatrice H; Kelsoe, Garnett; Hraber, Peter T; Korber, Bette T; Boyd, Scott D; Fire, Andrew Z; Kepler, Thomas B; Shapiro, Lawrence; Ward, Andrew B; Mascola, John R; Liao, Hua-Xin; Kwong, Peter D; Haynes, Barton F

    2016-04-07

    Antibodies with ontogenies from VH1-2 or VH1-46-germline genes dominate the broadly neutralizing response against the CD4-binding site (CD4bs) on HIV-1. Here, we define with longitudinal sampling from time-of-infection the development of a VH1-46-derived antibody lineage that matured to neutralize 90% of HIV-1 isolates. Structures of lineage antibodies CH235 (week 41 from time-of-infection, 18% breadth), CH235.9 (week 152, 77%), and CH235.12 (week 323, 90%) demonstrated the maturing epitope to focus on the conformationally invariant portion of the CD4bs. Similarities between CH235 lineage and five unrelated CD4bs lineages in epitope focusing, length-of-time to develop breadth, and extraordinary level of somatic hypermutation suggested commonalities in maturation among all CD4bs antibodies. Fortunately, the required CH235-lineage hypermutation appeared substantially guided by the intrinsic mutability of the VH1-46 gene, which closely resembled VH1-2. We integrated our CH235-lineage findings with a second broadly neutralizing lineage and HIV-1 co-evolution to suggest a vaccination strategy for inducing both lineages.

  5. In Vivo SELEX of Single-Stranded Domains in the HIV-1 Leader RNA

    PubMed Central

    van Bel, Nikki; Das, Atze T.

    2014-01-01

    ABSTRACT The 5′ untranslated leader region of the human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) RNA genome is a strongly conserved sequence that encodes several regulatory motifs important for viral replication. Most of these motifs are exposed as hairpin structures, including the dimerization initiation signal (DIS), the major splice donor site (SD), and the packaging signal (Ψ), which are connected by short single-stranded regions. Mutational analysis revealed many functions of these hairpins, but only a few studies have focused on the single-stranded purine-rich sequences. Using the in vivo SELEX (systematic evolution of ligands by exponential enrichment) approach, we probed the sequence space in these regions that is compatible with efficient HIV-1 replication and analyzed the impact on the RNA secondary structure of the leader RNA. Our results show a strong sequence requirement for the DIS hairpin flanking regions. We postulate that these sequences are important for the binding of specific protein factors that support leader RNA-mediated functions. The sequence between the SD and Ψ hairpins seems to have a less prominent role, despite the strong conservation of the stretch of 5 A residues in natural isolates. We hypothesize that this may reflect the subtle evolutionary pressure on HIV-1 to acquire an A-rich RNA genome. In silico analyses indicate that sequences are avoided in all 3 single-stranded domains that affect the local or overall leader RNA folding. IMPORTANCE in vivo PMID:24335293

  6. Enhanced HIV-1 neutralization by a CD4-VH3-IgG1 fusion protein

    SciTech Connect

    Meyuhas, Ronit; Noy, Hava; Fishman, Sigal; Margalit, Alon; Montefiori, David C.; Gross, Gideon

    2009-08-21

    HIV-1 gp120 is an alleged B cell superantigen, binding certain VH3+ human antibodies. We reasoned that a CD4-VH3 fusion protein could possess higher affinity for gp120 and improved HIV-1 inhibitory capacity. To test this we produced several human IgG1 immunoligands harboring VH3. Unlike VH3-IgG1 or VH3-CD4-IgG1, CD4-VH3-IgG1 bound gp120 considerably stronger than CD4-IgG1. CD4-VH3-IgG1 exhibited {approx}1.5-2.5-fold increase in neutralization of two T-cell laboratory-adapted strains when compared to CD4-IgG1. CD4-VH3-IgG1 improved neutralization of 7/10 clade B primary isolates or pseudoviruses, exceeding 20-fold for JR-FL and 13-fold for Ba-L. It enhanced neutralization of 4/8 clade C viruses, and had negligible effect on 1/4 clade A pseudoviruses. We attribute this improvement to possible pairing of VH3 with CD4 D1 and stabilization of an Ig Fv-like structure, rather than to superantigen interactions. These novel findings support the current notion that CD4 fusion proteins can act as better HIV-1 entry inhibitors with potential clinical implications.

  7. Mechanisms of HIV-1 subtype C resistance to GRFT, CV-N and SVN

    PubMed Central

    Alexandre, Kabamba B.; Moore, Penny L.; Nonyane, Molati; Gray, Elin S.; Ranchobe, Nthabeleng; Chakauya, Ereck; McMahon, James B.; O’Keefe, Barry R.; Chikwamba, Rachel; Morris, Lynn

    2013-01-01

    We examined the ability of HIV-1 subtype C to develop resistance to the inhibitory lectins, griffithsin (GRFT), cyanovirin-N (CV-N) and scytovirin (SVN), which bind multiple mannose-rich glycans on gp120. Four primary HIV-1 strains cultured under escalating concentrations of these lectins became increasingly resistant tolerating 2 to 12 times their 50% inhibitory concentrations. Sequence analysis of gp120 showed that most had deletions of 1 to 5 mannose-rich glycans. Glycosylation sites at positions 230, 234, 241, 289 located in the C2 region and 339, 392 and 448 in the C3-C4 region were affected. Furthermore, deletions and insertions of up to 5 amino acids in the V4 region were observed in 3 of the 4 isolates. These data suggest that loss of glycosylation sites on gp120 as well as rearrangement of glycans in V4 are mechanisms involved in HIV-1 subtype C escape from GRFT, CV-N and SVN. PMID:24074568

  8. The HIV-1 Vpr Protein: A Multifaceted Target for Therapeutic Intervention

    PubMed Central

    González, María Eugenia

    2017-01-01

    The human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) Vpr protein is an attractive target for antiretroviral drug development. The conservation both of the structure along virus evolution and the amino acid sequence in viral isolates from patients underlines the importance of Vpr for the establishment and progression of HIV-1 disease. While its contribution to virus replication in dividing and non-dividing cells and to the pathogenesis of HIV-1 in many different cell types, both extracellular and intracellular forms, have been extensively studied, its precise mechanism of action nevertheless remains enigmatic. The present review discusses how the apparently multifaceted interplay between Vpr and host cells may be due to the impairment of basic metabolic pathways. Vpr protein modifies host cell energy metabolism, oxidative status, and proteasome function, all of which are likely conditioned by the concentration and multimerization of the protein. The characterization of Vpr domains along with new laboratory tools for the assessment of their function has become increasingly relevant in recent years. With these advances, it is conceivable that drug discovery efforts involving Vpr-targeted antiretrovirals will experience substantial growth in the coming years. PMID:28075409

  9. Fluorescent image analysis of HIV-1 and HIV-2 uncoating kinetics in the presence of old world monkey TRIM5α.

    PubMed

    Takeda, Eri; Kono, Ken; Hulme, Amy E; Hope, Thomas J; Nakayama, Emi E; Shioda, Tatsuo

    2015-01-01

    Uncoating of Human Immunodeficiency Virus type 1 (HIV-1) and type 2 (HIV-2) conical cores is an important early step for establishment of infection. In Old World Monkey (OWM) cells, the TRIM5α cellular factor potently suppresses an early step of infection by HIV-1. Previously, biochemical studies using whole cell lysates of infected cells revealed that OWM TRIM5α accelerates the uncoating of HIV-1, leading to premature reverse transcription. In the present study, we re-evaluated uncoating kinetics of HIV-1 in the presence of OWM TRIM5α by using an in situ uncoating assay, which allowed us to differentiate productive HIV-1 entry from simple (non-productive) endocytosis. Results showed that the uncoating kinetics of HIV-1 was indeed accelerated in the presence of OWM TRIM5α. Furthermore, we adapted an in situ uncoating assay to HIV-2, which showed wide variations in TRIM5α sensitivity among different isolates. HIV-2 isolate GH123, whose infectivity was suppressed by cynomolgus monkey (CM) TRIM5α, showed accelerated uncoating in the presence of CM TRIM5α. In contrast, mutant HIV-2 ASA, whose infectivity was unaltered by CM TRIM5α, showed no change in uncoating kinetics in the presence of CM TRIM5α. These results confirmed and further extended the previous notion that accelerated uncoating is associated with restriction activity of TRIM5α against lentiviruses.

  10. HIV-1, methamphetamine and astrocytes at neuroinflammatory Crossroads

    PubMed Central

    Borgmann, Kathleen; Ghorpade, Anuja

    2015-01-01

    As a popular psychostimulant, methamphetamine (METH) use leads to long-lasting, strong euphoric effects. While METH abuse is common in the general population, between 10 and 15% of human immunodeficiency virus-1 (HIV-1) patients report having abused METH. METH exacerbates the severity and onset of HIV-1-associated neurocognitive disorders (HAND) through direct and indirect mechanisms. Repetitive METH use impedes adherence to antiretroviral drug regimens, increasing the likelihood of HIV-1 disease progression toward AIDS. METH exposure also directly affects both innate and adaptive immunity, altering lymphocyte numbers and activity, cytokine signaling, phagocytic function and infiltration through the blood brain barrier. Further, METH triggers the dopamine reward pathway and leads to impaired neuronal activity and direct toxicity. Concurrently, METH and HIV-1 alter the neuroimmune balance and induce neuroinflammation, which modulates a wide range of brain functions including neuronal signaling and activity, glial activation, viral infection, oxidative stress, and excitotoxicity. Pathologically, reactive gliosis is a hallmark of both HIV-1- and METH-associated neuroinflammation. Significant commonality exists in the neurotoxic mechanisms for both METH and HAND; however, the pathways dysregulated in astroglia during METH exposure are less clear. Thus, this review highlights alterations in astrocyte intracellular signaling pathways, gene expression and function during METH and HIV-1 comorbidity, with special emphasis on HAND-associated neuroinflammation. Importantly, this review carefully evaluates interventions targeting astrocytes in HAND and METH as potential novel therapeutic approaches. This comprehensive overview indicates, without a doubt, that during HIV-1 infection and METH abuse, a complex dialog between all neural cells is orchestrated through astrocyte regulated neuroinflammation. PMID:26579077

  11. Bioinformatic Analysis of HIV-1 Entry and Pathogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Aiamkitsumrit, Benjamas; Dampier, Will; Antell, Gregory; Rivera, Nina; Martin-Garcia, Julio; Pirrone, Vanessa; Nonnemacher, Michael R.; Wigdahl, Brian

    2015-01-01

    The evolution of human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) with respect to co-receptor utilization has been shown to be relevant to HIV-1 pathogenesis and disease. The CCR5-utilizing (R5) virus has been shown to be important in the very early stages of transmission and highly prevalent during asymptomatic infection and chronic disease. In addition, the R5 virus has been proposed to be involved in neuroinvasion and central nervous system (CNS) disease. In contrast, the CXCR4-utilizing (X4) virus is more prevalent during the course of disease progression and concurrent with the loss of CD4+ T cells. The dual-tropic virus is able to utilize both co-receptors (CXCR4 and CCR5) and has been thought to represent an intermediate transitional virus that possesses properties of both X4 and R5 viruses that can be encountered at many stages of disease. The use of computational tools and bioinformatic approaches in the prediction of HIV-1 co-receptor usage has been growing in importance with respect to understanding HIV-1 pathogenesis and disease, developing diagnostic tools, and improving the efficacy of therapeutic strategies focused on blocking viral entry. Current strategies have enhanced the sensitivity, specificity, and reproducibility relative to the prediction of co-receptor use; however, these technologies need to be improved with respect to their efficient and accurate use across the HIV-1 subtypes. The most effective approach may center on the combined use of different algorithms involving sequences within and outside of the env-V3 loop. This review focuses on the HIV-1 entry process and on co-receptor utilization, including bioinformatic tools utilized in the prediction of co-receptor usage. It also provides novel preliminary analyses for enabling identification of linkages between amino acids in V3 with other components of the HIV-1 genome and demonstrates that these linkages are different between X4 and R5 viruses. PMID:24862329

  12. HIV-1 latency in actively dividing human T cell lines

    PubMed Central

    Jeeninga, Rienk E; Westerhout, Ellen M; van Gerven, Marja L; Berkhout, Ben

    2008-01-01

    Background Eradication of HIV-1 from an infected individual cannot be achieved by current drug regimens. Viral reservoirs established early during the infection remain unaffected by anti-retroviral therapy and are able to replenish systemic infection upon interruption of the treatment. Therapeutic targeting of viral latency will require a better understanding of the basic mechanisms underlying the establishment and long-term maintenance of HIV-1 in resting memory CD4 T cells, the most prominent reservoir of transcriptional silent provirus. However, the molecular mechanisms that permit long-term transcriptional control of proviral gene expression in these cells are still not well understood. Exploring the molecular details of viral latency will provide new insights for eventual future therapeutics that aim at viral eradication. Results We set out to develop a new in vitro HIV-1 latency model system using the doxycycline (dox)-inducible HIV-rtTA variant. Stable cell clones were generated with a silent HIV-1 provirus, which can subsequently be activated by dox-addition. Surprisingly, only a minority of the cells was able to induce viral gene expression and a spreading infection, eventhough these experiments were performed with the actively dividing SupT1 T cell line. These latent proviruses are responsive to TNFα treatment and alteration of the DNA methylation status with 5-Azacytidine or genistein, but not responsive to the regular T cell activators PMA and IL2. Follow-up experiments in several T cell lines and with wild-type HIV-1 support these findings. Conclusion We describe the development of a new in vitro model for HIV-1 latency and discuss the advantages of this system. The data suggest that HIV-1 proviral latency is not restricted to resting T cells, but rather an intrinsic property of the virus. PMID:18439275

  13. HIV-1 evades innate immune recognition through specific cofactor recruitment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rasaiyaah, Jane; Tan, Choon Ping; Fletcher, Adam J.; Price, Amanda J.; Blondeau, Caroline; Hilditch, Laura; Jacques, David A.; Selwood, David L.; James, Leo C.; Noursadeghi, Mahdad; Towers, Greg J.

    2013-11-01

    Human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)-1 is able to replicate in primary human macrophages without stimulating innate immunity despite reverse transcription of genomic RNA into double-stranded DNA, an activity that might be expected to trigger innate pattern recognition receptors. We reasoned that if correctly orchestrated HIV-1 uncoating and nuclear entry is important for evasion of innate sensors then manipulation of specific interactions between HIV-1 capsid and host factors that putatively regulate these processes should trigger pattern recognition receptors and stimulate type 1 interferon (IFN) secretion. Here we show that HIV-1 capsid mutants N74D and P90A, which are impaired for interaction with cofactors cleavage and polyadenylation specificity factor subunit 6 (CPSF6) and cyclophilins (Nup358 and CypA), respectively, cannot replicate in primary human monocyte-derived macrophages because they trigger innate sensors leading to nuclear translocation of NF-κB and IRF3, the production of soluble type 1 IFN and induction of an antiviral state. Depletion of CPSF6 with short hairpin RNA expression allows wild-type virus to trigger innate sensors and IFN production. In each case, suppressed replication is rescued by IFN-receptor blockade, demonstrating a role for IFN in restriction. IFN production is dependent on viral reverse transcription but not integration, indicating that a viral reverse transcription product comprises the HIV-1 pathogen-associated molecular pattern. Finally, we show that we can pharmacologically induce wild-type HIV-1 infection to stimulate IFN secretion and an antiviral state using a non-immunosuppressive cyclosporine analogue. We conclude that HIV-1 has evolved to use CPSF6 and cyclophilins to cloak its replication, allowing evasion of innate immune sensors and induction of a cell-autonomous innate immune response in primary human macrophages.

  14. Dimeric RNA recognition regulates HIV-1 genome packaging.

    PubMed

    Nikolaitchik, Olga A; Dilley, Kari A; Fu, William; Gorelick, Robert J; Tai, S-H Sheldon; Soheilian, Ferri; Ptak, Roger G; Nagashima, Kunio; Pathak, Vinay K; Hu, Wei-Shau

    2013-03-01

    How retroviruses regulate the amount of RNA genome packaged into each virion has remained a long-standing question. Our previous study showed that most HIV-1 particles contain two copies of viral RNA, indicating that the number of genomes packaged is tightly regulated. In this report, we examine the mechanism that controls the number of RNA genomes encapsidated into HIV-1 particles. We hypothesize that HIV-1 regulates genome packaging by either the mass or copy number of the viral RNA. These two distinct mechanisms predict different outcomes when the genome size deviates significantly from that of wild type. Regulation by RNA mass would result in multiple copies of a small genome or one copy of a large genome being packaged, whereas regulation by copy number would result in two copies of a genome being packaged independent of size. To distinguish between these two hypotheses, we examined the packaging of viral RNA that was larger (≈17 kb) or smaller (≈3 kb) than that of wild-type HIV-1 (≈9 kb) and found that most particles packaged two copies of the viral genome regardless of whether they were 17 kb or 3 kb. Therefore, HIV-1 regulates RNA genome encapsidation not by the mass of RNA but by packaging two copies of RNA. To further explore the mechanism that governs this regulation, we examined the packaging of viral RNAs containing two packaging signals that can form intermolecular dimers or intramolecular dimers (self-dimers) and found that one self-dimer is packaged. Therefore, HIV-1 recognizes one dimeric RNA instead of two copies of RNA. Our findings reveal that dimeric RNA recognition is the key mechanism that regulates HIV-1 genome encapsidation and provide insights into a critical step in the generation of infectious viruses.

  15. HIV-1: the confounding variables of virus neutralization.

    PubMed

    Nara, Peter L; Lin, George

    2005-06-01

    The development of an effective vaccine against HIV-1 would be greatly facilitated by the ability to elicit potent, high affinity antibodies that are capable of broad neutralization, viral inactivation and protection against infection and/or disease. New insights into the structure and function of the HIV-1 envelope glycoprotein (Env) that mediates viral fusion and entry may ultimately lead to strategies successful in eliciting these protective antibody responses. Insights have been gained regarding HIV-1 Env attachment and receptor engagement, the fusion process and kinetics, and the structural/functional attributes of Env that allow humoral immune evasion. In addition, studies of a limited number of broadly neutralizing human monoclonal antibodies have shed some light as to how antibodies may penetrate the immune evading armor that HIV-1 has evolved. As the elusive goal of generating these types of antibodies emerge and are developed in the context of generating new candidate HIV-1 vaccines, a relevant in vitro measurement of neutralization by these types of antibodies becomes a complex task. This is in part due to a list of confounding variables which include: the physical and genomic nature (amino acid variation) of the infecting virion, the type of target cells, the concentration and clonality of the reactants, assay format and design, the affinity and kinetics of the reaction, receptors/coreceptors and attachment factors, and soluble host factors. This review will focus on the past, current, and future knowledge required to advance the field of HIV-1 humoral immunity as it impacts future HIV-1 vaccine development.

  16. Developmental Pathway of the MPER-Directed HIV-1-Neutralizing Antibody 10E8

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Baoshan; McKee, Krisha; Longo, Nancy S.; Yang, Yongping; Huang, Jinghe; Parks, Robert; Eudailey, Joshua; Lloyd, Krissey E.; Alam, S. Munir; Haynes, Barton F.; Mullikin, James C.; Connors, Mark; Mascola, John R.; Shapiro, Lawrence; Kwong, Peter D.

    2016-01-01

    Antibody 10E8 targets the membrane-proximal external region (MPER) of HIV-1 gp41, neutralizes >97% of HIV-1 isolates, and lacks the auto-reactivity often associated with MPER-directed antibodies. The developmental pathway of 10E8 might therefore serve as a promising template for vaccine design, but samples from time-of-infection—often used to infer the B cell record—are unavailable. In this study, we used crystallography, next-generation sequencing (NGS), and functional assessments to infer the 10E8 developmental pathway from a single time point. Mutational analysis indicated somatic hypermutation of the 2nd-heavy chain-complementarity determining region (CDR H2) to be critical for neutralization, and structures of 10E8 variants with V-gene regions reverted to genomic origin for heavy-and-light chains or heavy chain-only showed structural differences >2 Å relative to mature 10E8 in the CDR H2 and H3. To understand these developmental changes, we used bioinformatic sieving, maximum likelihood, and parsimony analyses of immunoglobulin transcripts to identify 10E8-lineage members, to infer the 10E8-unmutated common ancestor (UCA), and to calculate 10E8-developmental intermediates. We were assisted in this analysis by the preservation of a critical D-gene segment, which was unmutated in most 10E8-lineage sequences. UCA and early intermediates weakly bound a 26-residue-MPER peptide, whereas HIV-1 neutralization and epitope recognition in liposomes were only observed with late intermediates. Antibody 10E8 thus develops from a UCA with weak MPER affinity and substantial differences in CDR H2 and H3 from the mature 10E8; only after extensive somatic hypermutation do 10E8-lineage members gain recognition in the context of membrane and HIV-1 neutralization. PMID:27299673

  17. The Origin and Evolutionary History of HIV-1 Subtype C in Senegal

    PubMed Central

    Jung, Matthieu; Leye, Nafissatou; Vidal, Nicole; Fargette, Denis; Diop, Halimatou; Toure Kane, Coumba; Gascuel, Olivier; Peeters, Martine

    2012-01-01

    Background The classification of HIV-1 strains in subtypes and Circulating Recombinant Forms (CRFs) has helped in tracking the course of the HIV pandemic. In Senegal, which is located at the tip of West Africa, CRF02_AG predominates in the general population and Female Sex Workers (FSWs). In contrast, 40% of Men having Sex with Men (MSM) in Senegal are infected with subtype C. In this study we analyzed the geographical origins and introduction dates of HIV-1 C in Senegal in order to better understand the evolutionary history of this subtype, which predominates today in the MSM population Methodology/Principal Findings We used a combination of phylogenetic analyses and a Bayesian coalescent-based approach, to study the phylogenetic relationships in pol of 56 subtype C isolates from Senegal with 3,025 subtype C strains that were sampled worldwide. Our analysis shows a significantly well supported cluster which contains all subtype C strains that circulate among MSM in Senegal. The MSM cluster and other strains from Senegal are widely dispersed among the different subclusters of African HIV-1 C strains, suggesting multiple introductions of subtype C in Senegal from many different southern and east African countries. More detailed analyses show that HIV-1 C strains from MSM are more closely related to those from southern Africa. The estimated date of the MRCA of subtype C in the MSM population in Senegal is estimated to be in the early 80's. Conclusions/Significance Our evolutionary reconstructions suggest that multiple subtype C viruses with a common ancestor originating in the early 1970s entered Senegal. There was only one efficient spread in the MSM population, which most likely resulted from a single introduction, underlining the importance of high-risk behavior in spread of viruses. PMID:22470456

  18. Multiple Histone Lysine Methyltransferases Are Required for the Establishment and Maintenance of HIV-1 Latency

    PubMed Central

    Nguyen, Kien; Das, Biswajit; Dobrowolski, Curtis

    2017-01-01

    ABSTRACT We showed previously that the histone lysine methyltransferase (HKMT) H3K27me3 (EZH2) is the catalytic subunit of Polycomb repressive complex 2 (PRC2) and is required for the maintenance of HIV-1 latency in Jurkat T cells. Here we show, by using chromatin immunoprecipitation experiments, that both PRC2 and euchromatic histone-lysine N-methyltransferase 2 (EHMT2), the G9a H3K9me2-3 methyltransferase, are highly enriched at the proviral 5′ long terminal repeat (LTR) and rapidly displaced upon proviral reactivation. Clustered regularly interspaced short palindromic repeat(s) (CRISPR)-mediated knockout of EZH2 caused depletion of both EZH2 and EHMT2, but CRISPR-mediated knockout of EHMT2 was selective for EHMT2, consistent with the failure of EHMT2 knockouts to induce latent proviruses in this system. Either (i) knockout of methyltransferase by short hairpin RNA in Jurkat T cells prior to HIV-1 infection or (ii) inhibition of the enzymes with drugs significantly reduced the levels of the resulting silenced viruses, demonstrating that both enzymes are required to establish latency. To our surprise, inhibition of EZH2 (by GSK-343 or EPZ-6438) or inhibition of EHMT2 (by UNC-0638) in the Th17 primary cell model of HIV latency or resting memory T cells isolated from HIV-1-infected patients receiving highly active antiretroviral therapy, was sufficient to induce the reactivation of latent proviruses. The methyltransferase inhibitors showed synergy with interleukin-15 and suberanilohydroxamic acid. We conclude that both PRC2 and EHMT2 are required for the establishment and maintenance of HIV-1 proviral silencing in primary cells. Furthermore, EZH2 inhibitors such as GSK-343 and EPZ-6438 and the EHMT2 inhibitor UNC-0638 are strong candidates for use as latency-reversing agents in clinical studies. PMID:28246360

  19. Peltophorum africanum, a traditional South African medicinal plant, contains an anti HIV-1 constituent, betulinic acid.

    PubMed

    Theo, Andros; Masebe, Tracy; Suzuki, Yasuhiro; Kikuchi, Haruhisa; Wada, Shoko; Obi, Chikwelu Larry; Bessong, Pascal Obong; Usuzawa, Motoki; Oshima, Yoshiteru; Hattori, Toshio

    2009-02-01

    The biodiversity of medicinal plants in South Africa makes them rich sources of leading compounds for the development of novel drugs. Peltophorum africanum (Fabaceae) is a deciduous tree widespread in South Africa. The stem bark has been traditionally employed to treat diarrhoea, dysentery, sore throat, wounds, human immunodeficiency virus/ acquired immune deficiency syndrome (HIV/AIDS), venereal diseases and infertility. To evaluate these ethnobotanical clues and isolate lead compounds, butanol and ethyl acetate extracts of the stem bark were screened for their inhibitory activities against HIV-1 using MAGI CCR5+ cells, which are derived from HeLa cervical cancer cells and express HIV receptor CD4, a chemokine receptor CCR5 and HIV-LTR-beta- galactosidase. Bioassay-guided fractionation using silica gel chromatography was also conducted. The ethyl acetate and butanol extracts of the stem bark of Peltophorum africanum showed inhibitory activity against HIV-1, CXCR4 (X4) and CCR5 (R5) tropic viruses. The ethyl acetate and butanol extracts yielded previously reported anti-HIV compounds, (+)-catechin, a flavonoid, and bergenin, a C-galloylglycoside, respectively. Furthermore, we identified betulinic acid from the ethyl acetate fraction for the first time. The fractions, which contained betulinic acid, showed the highest selective index. We therefore describe the presence of betulinic acid, a not well-known anti-HIV compound, in an African medicinal herb, which has been used for therapy, and claim that betulinic acid is the predominant anti-HIV-1 constituent of Peltophorum africanum. These data suggest that betulinic acid and its analogues could be used as potential therapeutics for HIV-1 infection.

  20. Pokeweed antiviral protein alters splicing of HIV-1 RNAs, resulting in reduced virus production.

    PubMed

    Zhabokritsky, Alice; Mansouri, Sheila; Hudak, Katalin A

    2014-08-01

    Processing of HIV-1 transcripts results in three populations in the cytoplasm of infected cells: full-length RNA, singly spliced, and multiply spliced RNAs. Rev, regulator of virion expression, is an essential regulatory protein of HIV-1 required for transporting unspliced and singly spliced viral transcripts from the nucleus to the cytoplasm. Export allows these RNAs to be translated and the full-length RNA to be packaged into virus particles. In our study, we investigate the activity of pokeweed antiviral protein (PAP), a glycosidase isolated from the pokeweed plant Phytolacca americana, on the processing of viral RNAs. We show that coexpression of PAP with a proviral clone alters the splicing ratio of HIV-1 RNAs. Specifically, PAP causes the accumulation of multiply spliced 2-kb RNAs at the expense of full-length 9-kb and singly spliced 4-kb RNAs. The change in splicing ratio is due to a decrease in activity of Rev. We show that PAP depurinates the rev open reading frame and that this damage to the viral RNA inhibits its translation. By decreasing Rev expression, PAP indirectly reduces the availability of full-length 9-kb RNA for packaging and translation of the encoded structural proteins required for synthesis of viral particles. The decline we observe in virus protein expression is not due to cellular toxicity as PAP did not diminish translation rate. Our results describing the reduced activity of a regulatory protein of HIV-1, with resulting change in virus mRNA ratios, provides new insight into the antiviral mechanism of PAP.

  1. War and peace between microbes: HIV-1 interactions with coinfecting viruses.

    PubMed

    Lisco, Andrea; Vanpouille, Christophe; Margolis, Leonid

    2009-11-19

    HIV-1 disrupts the homeostatic equilibrium between the host and coinfecting microbes, facilitating reactivation of persistent viruses and invasion by new viruses. These viruses usually accelerate HIV disease but occasionally create conditions detrimental for HIV-1. Understanding these phenomena may lead to anti-HIV-1 strategies that specifically target interactions between HIV-1 and coinfecting viruses.

  2. Immunogenic Display of Purified Chemically Cross-Linked HIV-1 Spikes

    PubMed Central

    Leaman, Daniel P.; Lee, Jeong Hyun; Ward, Andrew B.

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT HIV-1 envelope glycoprotein (Env) spikes are prime vaccine candidates, at least in principle, but suffer from instability, molecular heterogeneity and a low copy number on virions. We anticipated that chemical cross-linking of HIV-1 would allow purification and molecular characterization of trimeric Env spikes, as well as high copy number immunization. Broadly neutralizing antibodies bound tightly to all major quaternary epitopes on cross-linked spikes. Covalent cross-linking of the trimer also stabilized broadly neutralizing epitopes, although surprisingly some individual epitopes were still somewhat sensitive to heat or reducing agent. Immunodepletion using non-neutralizing antibodies to gp120 and gp41 was an effective method for removing non-native-like Env. Cross-linked spikes, purified via an engineered C-terminal tag, were shown by negative stain EM to have well-ordered, trilobed structure. An immunization was performed comparing a boost with Env spikes on virions to spikes cross-linked and captured onto nanoparticles, each following a gp160 DNA prime. Although differences in neutralization did not reach statistical significance, cross-linked Env spikes elicited a more diverse and sporadically neutralizing antibody response against Tier 1b and 2 isolates when displayed on nanoparticles, despite attenuated binding titers to gp120 and V3 crown peptides. Our study demonstrates display of cross-linked trimeric Env spikes on nanoparticles, while showing a level of control over antigenicity, purity and density of virion-associated Env, which may have relevance for Env based vaccine strategies for HIV-1. IMPORTANCE The envelope spike (Env) is the target of HIV-1 neutralizing antibodies, which a successful vaccine will need to elicit. However, native Env on virions is innately labile, as well as heterogeneously and sparsely displayed. We therefore stabilized Env spikes using a chemical cross-linker and removed non-native Env by immunodepletion with non

  3. Outer domain of HIV-1 gp120: antigenic optimization, structural malleability, and crystal structure with antibody VRC-PG04.

    PubMed

    Joyce, M Gordon; Kanekiyo, Masaru; Xu, Ling; Biertümpfel, Christian; Boyington, Jeffrey C; Moquin, Stephanie; Shi, Wei; Wu, Xueling; Yang, Yongping; Yang, Zhi-Yong; Zhang, Baoshan; Zheng, Anqi; Zhou, Tongqing; Zhu, Jiang; Mascola, John R; Kwong, Peter D; Nabel, Gary J

    2013-02-01

    The outer domain of the HIV-1 gp120 envelope glycoprotein contains the epitope for broadly neutralizing antibodies directed to the CD4-binding site, many of which are able to neutralize over 90% of circulating HIV-1 isolates. While the outer domain is conformationally more stable than other portions of the HIV-1 envelope, efforts to express the outer domain as an immunogen for eliciting broadly neutralizing antibodies have not been successful, potentially because natural outer domain variants do not bind strongly to antibodies such as VRC01. In this study, we optimized the antigenic properties of the HIV-1 Env outer domain to generate OD4.2.2, from the KER2018 strain of clade A HIV-1, enabling it to bind antibodies such as VRC01 with nanomolar affinity. The crystal structure of OD4.2.2 in complex with VRC-PG04 was solved at 3.0-Å resolution and compared to known crystal structures including (i) the structure of core gp120 bound by VRC-PG04 and (ii) a circularly permutated version of the outer domain in complex with antibody PGT128. Much of the VRC-PG04 epitope was preserved in the OD4.2.2 structure, though with altered N and C termini conformations. Overall, roughly one-third of the outer domain structure appeared to be fixed in conformation, independent of alterations in termini, clade, or ligand, while other portions of the outer domain displayed substantial structural malleability. The crystal structure of OD4.2.2 with VRC-PG04 provides atomic-level details for an HIV-1 domain recognized by broadly neutralizing antibodies and insights relevant to the rational design of an immunogen that could elicit such antibodies by vaccination.

  4. APOBEC4 Enhances the Replication of HIV-1

    PubMed Central

    Hofmann, Henning; Hanschmann, Kay-Martin; Mühlebach, Michael D.; Schumann, Gerald G.; König, Renate; Cichutek, Klaus; Häussinger, Dieter; Münk, Carsten

    2016-01-01

    APOBEC4 (A4) is a member of the AID/APOBEC family of cytidine deaminases. In this study we found a high mRNA expression of A4 in human testis. In contrast, there were only low levels of A4 mRNA detectable in 293T, HeLa, Jurkat or A3.01 cells. Ectopic expression of A4 in HeLa cells resulted in mostly cytoplasmic localization of the protein. To test whether A4 has antiviral activity similar to that of proteins of the APOBEC3 (A3) subfamily, A4 was co-expressed in 293T cells with wild type HIV-1 and HIV-1 luciferase reporter viruses. We found that A4 did not inhibit the replication of HIV-1 but instead enhanced the production of HIV-1 in a dose-dependent manner and seemed to act on the viral LTR. A4 did not show detectable cytidine deamination activity in vitro and weakly interacted with single-stranded DNA. The presence of A4 in virus producer cells enhanced HIV-1 replication by transiently transfected A4 or stably expressed A4 in HIV-susceptible cells. APOBEC4 was capable of similarly enhancing transcription from a broad spectrum of promoters, regardless of whether they were viral or mammalian. We hypothesize that A4 may have a natural role in modulating host promoters or endogenous LTR promoters. PMID:27249646

  5. Neutralizing antibodies decrease the envelope fluidity of HIV-1

    SciTech Connect

    Harada, Shinji Monde, Kazuaki; Tanaka, Yuetsu; Kimura, Tetsuya; Maeda, Yosuke; Yusa, Keisuke

    2008-01-05

    For successful penetration of HIV-1, the formation of a fusion pore may be required in order to accumulate critical numbers of fusion-activated gp41 with the help of fluidization of the plasma membrane and viral envelope. An increase in temperature to 40 {sup o}C after viral adsorption at 25 {sup o}C enhanced the infectivity by 1.4-fold. The enhanced infectivity was inhibited by an anti-CXCR4 peptide, T140, and anti-V3 monoclonal antibodies (0.5{beta} and 694/98-D) by post-attachment neutralization, but not by non-neutralizing antibodies (670-30D and 246-D) specific for the C5 of gp120 and cluster I of gp41, respectively. Anti-HLA-II and an anti-HTLV-I gp46 antibody, LAT27, neutralized the molecule-carrying HIV-1{sub C-2(MT-2)}. The anti-V3 antibodies suppressed the fluidity of the HIV-1{sub C-2} envelope, whereas the non-neutralizing antibodies did not. The anti-HLA-II antibody decreased the envelope fluidity of HIV-1{sub C-2(MT-2)}, but not that of HIV-1{sub C-2}. Therefore, fluidity suppression by these antibodies represents an important neutralization mechanism, in addition to inhibition of viral attachment.

  6. The HIV-1 transgenic rat model of neuroHIV

    PubMed Central

    Vigorito, Michael; Connaghan, Kaitlyn P.; Chang, Sulie L.

    2016-01-01

    Despite the ability of current combination anti-retroviral therapy (cART) to limit the progression of HIV-1 to AIDS, HIV-positive individuals continue to experience neuroHIV in the form of HIV-associated neurological disorders (HAND), which can range from subtle to substantial neurocognitive impairment. NeuroHIV may also influence substance use, abuse, and dependence in HIV-positive individuals. Because of the nature of the virus, variables such as mental health co-morbidities make it difficult to study the interaction between HIV and substance abuse in human populations. Several rodent models have been developed in an attempt to study the transmission and pathogenesis of the HIV-1 virus. The HIV-1 transgenic (HIV-1Tg) rat is a reliable model of neuroHIV because it mimics the condition of HIV-infected patients on cART. Research using this model supports the hypothesis that the presence of HIV-1 viral proteins in the central nervous system increases the sensitivity and susceptibility of HIV-positive individuals to substance abuse. PMID:25733103

  7. Viral loads in dual infection with HIV-1 and cytomegalovirus

    PubMed Central

    Boriskin, Y.; Sharland, M.; Dalton, R.; duMont, G.; Booth, J.

    1999-01-01

    OBJECTIVE—A one year study of the relation between cytomegalovirus (CMV) and human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) viral loads in a cohort of children with vertically acquired HIV-1 infection.
DESIGN—Comparative analysis of viral load measurements for CMV and HIV-1 in peripheral blood leucocytes (PBLs) of individual children in relation to age and clinical staging.
METHODS—Nested polymerase chain reaction (PCR) was used to measure HIV-1 proviral DNA and CMV genomic DNA in PBLs of 56children.
RESULTS—The CMV load was highest in 0-2 year old HIV positive children with stage C disease (range, 1-7143 copies/100 ng DNA; median, 125) and was significantly lower in older children. Although higher in young children, HIV-1 viral load did not show the same marked reduction with age that is seen with CMV. Over a one year period, testing of serial samples for both viruses in a subgroup of children revealed a discordant relation between viral loads for CMV and HIV-1.
CONCLUSIONS—CMV viral load falls much faster than HIV viral load in dually infected children. Screening for clinical CMV disease is most likely to be of benefit in children under 2 years of age with stage C disease. In the few children studied, levels of CMV and HIV replication appear to be independent.

 PMID:10325727

  8. HIV-1 subtype B: Traces of a pandemic.

    PubMed

    Junqueira, Dennis Maletich; Almeida, Sabrina Esteves de Matos

    2016-08-01

    Human migration is a major process that shaped the origin and dissemination of HIV. Within HIV-1, subtype B (HIV-1B) is the most disseminated variant and it is assumed to be the causative agent in approximately 11% of all cases of HIV worldwide. Phylogenetic studies have revealed that HIV-1B emerged in Kinshasa (Africa) and was introduced into the Caribbean region via Haiti in or around 1966 by human migration. After localized dispersion, the virus was brought to the United States of America via homosexual/bisexual contact around 1969. Inside USA, the incidence of HIV-1B infection increased exponentially and it became established in the population, affecting not only homosexual individuals but also heterosexual individuals and injecting drug users. Soon after, the virus was disseminated and became established in other regions, including Europe, Asia, Latin America, and Australia. Recent studies suggest that, in addition to this pandemic clade, several lineages have emerged from Haiti and reached other Caribbean and Latin American countries via short-distance dissemination. Different subtype B genetic variants have also been detected in these epidemics. Four genetic variants have been described to date: subtype B', which mainly circulates in Thailand and other Asian countries; a specific variant mainly found in Trinidad and Tobago; the GPGS variant, which is primarily detected in Korea; and the GWGR variant, which is mainly detected in Brazil. This paper reviews the evolution of HIV-1B and its impact on the human population.

  9. Defective proviruses rapidly accumulate during acute HIV-1 infection.

    PubMed

    Bruner, Katherine M; Murray, Alexandra J; Pollack, Ross A; Soliman, Mary G; Laskey, Sarah B; Capoferri, Adam A; Lai, Jun; Strain, Matthew C; Lada, Steven M; Hoh, Rebecca; Ho, Ya-Chi; Richman, Douglas D; Deeks, Steven G; Siliciano, Janet D; Siliciano, Robert F

    2016-09-01

    Although antiretroviral therapy (ART) suppresses viral replication to clinically undetectable levels, human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) persists in CD4(+) T cells in a latent form that is not targeted by the immune system or by ART. This latent reservoir is a major barrier to curing individuals of HIV-1 infection. Many individuals initiate ART during chronic infection, and in this setting, most proviruses are defective. However, the dynamics of the accumulation and the persistence of defective proviruses during acute HIV-1 infection are largely unknown. Here we show that defective proviruses accumulate rapidly within the first few weeks of infection to make up over 93% of all proviruses, regardless of how early ART is initiated. By using an unbiased method to amplify near-full-length proviral genomes from HIV-1-infected adults treated at different stages of infection, we demonstrate that early initiation of ART limits the size of the reservoir but does not profoundly affect the proviral landscape. This analysis allows us to revise our understanding of the composition of proviral populations and estimate the true reservoir size in individuals who were treated early versus late in infection. Additionally, we demonstrate that common assays for measuring the reservoir do not correlate with reservoir size, as determined by the number of genetically intact proviruses. These findings reveal hurdles that must be overcome to successfully analyze future HIV-1 cure strategies.

  10. HIV-1 neutralization: mechanisms and relevance to vaccine design.

    PubMed

    Zwick, Michael B; Burton, Dennis R

    2007-11-01

    Antibody (Ab) mediated neutralization is a crucial means of host resistance to many pathogens and will most likely be required in the development of a vaccine to protect against HIV-1. Here we examine mechanistic aspects of HIV-1 neutralization with attention to recent studies on the stoichiometric, kinetic and thermodynamic parameters involved. Neutralization of HIV-1, as with any microbe, minimally requires an initial molecular encounter with Ab. Ab occupancy of functional heterotrimers of the envelope glycoproteins, gp120 and gp41 (Env), indeed appears to be the dominant mechanism of neutralization for HIV-1. However, the Ab-binding site, the parameters mentioned above, as well as the stages and duration of vulnerability to Ab recognition, prior to and leading up to viral entry, each have a distinct impact on the mechanism of neutralization for any given Ab specificity. With HIV-1, the problems of mutational variation and neutralization resistance, coupled with the lability and conformational heterogeneity in Env, have stimulated the search for rational approaches to Env immunogen design that are unprecedented in vaccinology.

  11. The macrophage in HIV-1 infection: from activation to deactivation?

    PubMed

    Herbein, Georges; Varin, Audrey

    2010-04-09

    Macrophages play a crucial role in innate and adaptative immunity in response to microorganisms and are an important cellular target during HIV-1 infection. Recently, the heterogeneity of the macrophage population has been highlighted. Classically activated or type 1 macrophages (M1) induced in particular by IFN-gamma display a pro-inflammatory profile. The alternatively activated or type 2 macrophages (M2) induced by Th-2 cytokines, such as IL-4 and IL-13 express anti-inflammatory and tissue repair properties. Finally IL-10 has been described as the prototypic cytokine involved in the deactivation of macrophages (dM). Since the capacity of macrophages to support productive HIV-1 infection is known to be modulated by cytokines, this review shows how modulation of macrophage activation by cytokines impacts the capacity to support productive HIV-1 infection. Based on the activation status of macrophages we propose a model starting with M1 classically activated macrophages with accelerated formation of viral reservoirs in a context of Th1 and proinflammatory cytokines. Then IL-4/IL-13 alternatively activated M2 macrophages will enter into the game that will stop the expansion of the HIV-1 reservoir. Finally IL-10 deactivation of macrophages will lead to immune failure observed at the very late stages of the HIV-1 disease.

  12. HIV-1, human interaction database: current status and new features.

    PubMed

    Ako-Adjei, Danso; Fu, William; Wallin, Craig; Katz, Kenneth S; Song, Guangfeng; Darji, Dakshesh; Brister, J Rodney; Ptak, Roger G; Pruitt, Kim D

    2015-01-01

    The 'Human Immunodeficiency Virus Type 1 (HIV-1), Human Interaction Database', available through the National Library of Medicine at http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/genome/viruses/retroviruses/hiv-1/interactions, serves the scientific community exploring the discovery of novel HIV vaccine candidates and therapeutic targets. Each HIV-1 human protein interaction can be retrieved without restriction by web-based downloads and ftp protocols and includes: Reference Sequence (RefSeq) protein accession numbers, National Center for Biotechnology Information Gene identification numbers, brief descriptions of the interactions, searchable keywords for interactions and PubMed identification numbers (PMIDs) of journal articles describing the interactions. In addition to specific HIV-1 protein-human protein interactions, included are interaction effects upon HIV-1 replication resulting when individual human gene expression is blocked using siRNA. A total of 3142 human genes are described participating in 12,786 protein-protein interactions, along with 1316 replication interactions described for each of 1250 human genes identified using small interfering RNA (siRNA). Together the data identifies 4006 human genes involved in 14,102 interactions. With the inclusion of siRNA interactions we introduce a redesigned web interface to enhance viewing, filtering and downloading of the combined data set.

  13. Anti-APOBEC3G Activity of HIV-1 Vif Protein Is Attenuated in Elite Controllers

    PubMed Central

    Kikuchi, Tadashi; Iwabu, Yukie; Tada, Takuya; Kawana-Tachikawa, Ai; Koga, Michiko; Hosoya, Noriaki; Nomura, Shigeru; Brumme, Zabrina L.; Jessen, Heiko; Pereyra, Florencia; Trocha, Alicja; Walker, Bruce D.; Iwamoto, Aikichi

    2015-01-01

    pathogenesis and mechanisms underpinning this rare phenotype may provide important insights for HIV vaccine design. The EC phenotype is associated with beneficial host immunogenetic factors (such as HLA-B*57) as well as with functions of attenuated viral proteins (e.g., Gag, Pol, and Nef). In this study, we demonstrated that HIV-1 Vif sequences isolated from EC display relative impairments in their ability to counteract the APOBEC3G host restriction factor compared to Vif sequences from normal progressors and acutely infected individuals. This result extends the growing body of evidence demonstrating attenuated HIV-1 protein function in EC and, in particular, supports the idea of the relevance of viral factors in contributing to this rare HIV-1 phenotype. PMID:25717111

  14. The Role of Interleukin-23 in the Early Development of Emphysema in HIV1+ Smokers

    PubMed Central

    Barjaktarevic, Igor Z.; Crystal, Ronald G.

    2016-01-01

    Rationale. Matrix metalloproteinase-9 (MMP-9) expression is upregulated in alveolar macrophages (AM) of HIV1+ smokers who develop emphysema. Knowing that lung epithelial lining fluid (ELF) of HIV1+ smokers contains increased levels of inflammatory cytokines compared to HIV1− smokers, we hypothesized that upregulation of lung cytokines in HIV1+ smokers may be functionally related to increased MMP-9 expression. Methods. Cytokine arrays evaluated cytokine protein levels in ELF obtained from 5 groups of individuals: HIV1− healthy nonsmokers, HIV1− healthy smokers, HIV1− smokers with low diffusing capacity (DLCO), HIV1+ nonsmokers, and HIV1+ smokers with low DLCO. Results. Increased levels of the Th17 related cytokine IL-23 were found in HIV1− smokers with low DLCO and HIV1+ smokers and nonsmokers. Relative IL-23 gene expression was increased in AM of HIV1+ individuals, with greater expression in AM of HIV1+ smokers with low DLCO. Infection with HIV1 in vitro induced IL-23 expression in normal AM. IL-23 stimulation of AM/lymphocyte cocultures in vitro induced upregulation of MMP-9. Lung T lymphocytes express receptor IL-23R and interact with AM in order to upregulate MMP-9. Conclusion. This mechanism may contribute to the increased tissue destruction in the lungs of HIV1+ smokers and suggests that Th17 related inflammation may play a role. PMID:27446965

  15. Structural Basis for Membrane Anchoring of HIV-1 Envelope Spike

    PubMed Central

    Fu, Qingshan; Chen, Jia; Ha, Heather Jiwon; Ghantous, Fadi; Herrmann, Tobias; Chang, Weiting; Liu, Zhijun; Frey, Gary; Seaman, Michael S.; Chen, Bing; Chou, James J.

    2016-01-01

    HIV-1 envelope spike (Env) is a type I membrane protein that mediates viral entry. We use NMR to determine an atomic structure of the transmembrane (TM) domain of HIV-1 Env reconstituted in bicelles that mimic a lipid bilayer. The TM forms a well-ordered trimer that protects a conserved membrane-embedded arginine. An N-terminal coiled-coil and a C-terminal hydrophilic core stabilize the trimer. Individual mutations of conserved residues did not disrupt the TM trimer and minimally affected membrane fusion and infectivity. Major changes in the hydrophilic core, however, altered the antibody sensitivity of Env. These results show how a TM domain anchors, stabilizes and modulates a viral envelope spike and suggest that its influence on Env conformation is an important consideration for HIV-1 immunogen design. PMID:27338706

  16. Overview of the HIV-1 Lentiviral Vector System.

    PubMed

    Ramezani, Ali; Hawley, Robert G

    2002-11-01

    Replication-defective oncoretroviral vectors have been the most widely used vehicles for gene-transfer studies because of their capacity to efficiently introduce and stably express transgenes in mammalian cells. A limitation of oncoretroviral vectors is that cell division is required for proviral integration into the host genome. By comparison, lentiviruses such as human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) have evolved a nuclear-import machinery that allows them to infect nondividing as well as dividing cells. This unique property has led to the development of lentiviral vectors for gene delivery to a variety of nondividing or slowly dividing cells including neurons and glial cells of the central nervous system and others. This unit is intended to provide an overview of HIV-1 molecular biology and an introduction to successive generations of HIV-1-based lentiviral vectors.

  17. HIV-1 integration landscape during latent and active infection

    PubMed Central

    Cohn, Lillian; Silva, Israel T.; Oliveira, Thiago Y.; Rosales, Rafael A.; Parrish, Erica H.; Learn, Gerald H.; Hahn, Beatrice H.; Czartoski, Julie L.; McElrath, M. Juliana; Lehmann, Clara; Klein, Florian; Caskey, Marina; Walker, Bruce D.; Siliciano, Janet D.; Siliciano, Robert F.; Jankovic, Mila; Nussenzweig, Michel C.

    2015-01-01

    SUMMARY The barrier to curing HIV-1 is thought to reside primarily in CD4+ T cells containing silent proviruses. To characterize these latently infected cells, we studied the integration profile of HIV-1 in viremic progressors, individuals receiving antiretroviral therapy, and viremic controllers. Clonally expanded T cells represented the majority of all integrations and increased during therapy. However, none of the 75 expanded T cell clones assayed contained intact virus. In contrast, the cells bearing single integration events decreased in frequency over time on therapy, and the surviving cells were enriched for HIV-1 integration in silent regions of the genome. Finally, there was a strong preference for integration into, or in close proximity to Alu repeats, which were also enriched in local hotspots for integration. The data indicate that dividing clonally expanded T cells contain defective proviruses, and that the replication competent reservoir is primarily found in CD4+ T cells that remain relatively quiescent. PMID:25635456

  18. The role of Siglec-1 in HIV-1/macrophage interaction

    PubMed Central

    Jobe, Ousman; Kim, Jiae; Rao, Mangala

    2016-01-01

    Although CD4 T-cells are a major target for HIV, recent work has demonstrated the ability of macrophages despite expressing relatively low levels of CD4, to be a target of the virus. Our recent study has found that the presence of growth factors not only play a role in the phenotype of these monocyte-derived-macrophages, but also are an important aspect of the permissiveness of these cells to infection. The work utilized cellular and biophysical methods to examine Siglec-1 on macrophages as a primary receptor in HIV-1 infection. These findings support the notion that Siglec-1 and macrophages and their interactions with the HIV-1 envelope should be considered in HIV-1 vaccine development.

  19. Anti-HIV-1 activity of Trim 37.

    PubMed

    Tabah, Azah A; Tardif, Keith; Mansky, Louis M

    2014-04-01

    Trim 5α was the first member of the tripartite motif (TRIM) family of proteins that was identified to potently restrict human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) replication. The breadth of antiretroviral activity of TRIM family members is an active area of investigation. In this study, we demonstrate that human Trim 37 possesses anti-HIV-1 activity. This antiretroviral activity and the manner in which it was displayed were implicated by (1) decreased viral replication upon Trim 37 transient overexpression in virus-producing cells, (2) correlation of the reduction of viral infectivity with Trim 37 virion incorporation, (3) increased HIV-1 replication during siRNA depletion of Trim 37 expression, and (4) reduction in viral DNA synthesis upon Trim 37 transient overexpression. Our findings provide the first demonstration, to our knowledge, of the potent antiviral activity of human Trim 37, and implicate an antiviral mechanism whereby Trim 37 interferes with viral DNA synthesis.

  20. Immunological biomarkers predict HIV-1 viral rebound after treatment interruption

    PubMed Central

    Hurst, Jacob; Hoffmann, Matthias; Pace, Matthew; Williams, James P.; Thornhill, John; Hamlyn, Elizabeth; Meyerowitz, Jodi; Willberg, Chris; Koelsch, Kersten K.; Robinson, Nicola; Brown, Helen; Fisher, Martin; Kinloch, Sabine; Cooper, David A.; Schechter, Mauro; Tambussi, Giuseppe; Fidler, Sarah; Babiker, Abdel; Weber, Jonathan; Kelleher, Anthony D.; Phillips, Rodney E.; Frater, John

    2015-01-01

    Treatment of HIV-1 infection with antiretroviral therapy (ART) in the weeks following transmission may induce a state of ‘post-treatment control' (PTC) in some patients, in whom viraemia remains undetectable when ART is stopped. Explaining PTC could help our understanding of the processes that maintain viral persistence. Here we show that immunological biomarkers can predict time to viral rebound after stopping ART by analysing data from a randomized study of primary HIV-1 infection incorporating a treatment interruption (TI) after 48 weeks of ART (the SPARTAC trial). T-cell exhaustion markers PD-1, Tim-3 and Lag-3 measured prior to ART strongly predict time to the return of viraemia. These data indicate that T-cell exhaustion markers may identify those latently infected cells with a higher proclivity to viral transcription. Our results may open new avenues for understanding the mechanisms underlying PTC, and eventually HIV-1 eradication. PMID:26449164

  1. Dendritic Cells and HIV-1 Trans-Infection

    PubMed Central

    McDonald, David

    2010-01-01

    Dendritic cells initiate and sustain immune responses by migrating to sites of pathogenic insult, transporting antigens to lymphoid tissues and signaling immune specific activation of T cells through the formation of the immunological synapse. Dendritic cells can also transfer intact, infectious HIV-1 to CD4 T cells through an analogous structure, the infectious synapse. This replication independent mode of HIV-1 transmission, known as trans-infection, greatly increases T cell infection in vitro and is thought to contribute to viral dissemination in vivo. This review outlines the recent data defining the mechanisms of trans-infection and provides a context for the potential contribution of trans-infection in HIV-1 disease. PMID:21994702

  2. [Identification and characterization of HIV-1 transmitted /founder viruses].

    PubMed

    Jianyuan, Zhao; Jiwei, Ding; Zeyun, Mi; Tao, Wei; Shan, Cen

    2015-05-01

    During the spread of human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) in the mucosa, the entire genetic diversity of the viruses is significantly reduced. The vast majority of HIV-1 mucosal infections are established by one or a few viruses and ultimately develop into systemic infections, thus the initial virus is called transmitted/founder virus (T/F virus). The study of T/F virus will benefit understanding its key characteristics resulting in successful viral replication in the new host body, which may provide novel strategies for the development of AIDS vaccines, pre-exposure prophylaxis and other therapeutic interventions. In this review, we summarize the discovery and evolutionary characteristics of T/F virus as well as early immune response after HIV-1 infection, which will establish the basis to explore the features of T/F viruses.

  3. Immunological biomarkers predict HIV-1 viral rebound after treatment interruption.

    PubMed

    Hurst, Jacob; Hoffmann, Matthias; Pace, Matthew; Williams, James P; Thornhill, John; Hamlyn, Elizabeth; Meyerowitz, Jodi; Willberg, Chris; Koelsch, Kersten K; Robinson, Nicola; Brown, Helen; Fisher, Martin; Kinloch, Sabine; Cooper, David A; Schechter, Mauro; Tambussi, Giuseppe; Fidler, Sarah; Babiker, Abdel; Weber, Jonathan; Kelleher, Anthony D; Phillips, Rodney E; Frater, John

    2015-10-09

    Treatment of HIV-1 infection with antiretroviral therapy (ART) in the weeks following transmission may induce a state of 'post-treatment control' (PTC) in some patients, in whom viraemia remains undetectable when ART is stopped. Explaining PTC could help our understanding of the processes that maintain viral persistence. Here we show that immunological biomarkers can predict time to viral rebound after stopping ART by analysing data from a randomized study of primary HIV-1 infection incorporating a treatment interruption (TI) after 48 weeks of ART (the SPARTAC trial). T-cell exhaustion markers PD-1, Tim-3 and Lag-3 measured prior to ART strongly predict time to the return of viraemia. These data indicate that T-cell exhaustion markers may identify those latently infected cells with a higher proclivity to viral transcription. Our results may open new avenues for understanding the mechanisms underlying PTC, and eventually HIV-1 eradication.

  4. Immune reconstitution and vaccination outcome in HIV-1 infected children

    PubMed Central

    Cagigi, Alberto; Cotugno, Nicola; Giaquinto, Carlo; Nicolosi, Luciana; Bernardi, Stefania; Rossi, Paolo; Douagi, Iyadh; Palma, Paolo

    2012-01-01

    Current evidence on routine immunization of HIV-1 infected children point out the need for a special vaccine schedule in this population. However, optimal strategies for identifying individuals susceptible to infections, and then offering them sustained protection through appropriate immunization schedule, both in terms of timing and number of vaccine doses, still remain to be elucidated. Understanding the degree of immune recovery after HAART initiation is important in guiding administration of routine vaccination in HIV-1 infected children. Although quantitative measures (e.g., CD4+ T-cell counts and immunoglobulin levels) are frequently performed to evaluate immune parameters, these measures do not fully mirror functional immune recovery. Here, we will review the status of single mandatory and recommended vaccines for HIV-1 infected children in relation to immune recovery after HAART initiation with the aim of identifying new means to help design personalized vaccine schedules for this population. PMID:22906931

  5. Selective elimination of HIV-1-infected cells by Env-directed, HIV-1-based virus-like particles

    SciTech Connect

    Peretti, Silvia; Schiavoni, Ilaria; Pugliese, Katherina; Federico, Maurizio . E-mail: federico@iss.it

    2006-02-05

    We recently showed that both replicating and resting cells cultivated with ganciclovir (GCV) were killed when challenged with vesicular stomatitis virus G glycoprotein pseudotyped HIV-1-based virus-like particles (VLPs) carrying the Nef7 (i.e., an HIV-1 Nef mutant incorporating in virions at high levels)/herpes simplex virus-1 thymidine kinase (HSV-TK) fusion product. On this basis, a novel anti-HIV therapeutic approach based on Nef7/TK VLPs expressing X4 or R5 HIV cell receptor complexes has been attempted. We here report that (CD4-CXCR4) and (CD4-CCR5) Nef7-based VLPs efficiently enter cells infected by X4- or R5-tropic HIV-1 strains, respectively. Importantly, the delivery of the VLP-associated Nef7/TK led to cell death upon GCV treatment. Of interest, VLPs were effective also against non-replicating, HIV-1-infected primary human monocyte-derived macrophages. HIV-targeted VLPs represent a promising candidate for the treatment of persistently HIV-1-infected cells that are part of virus reservoirs resistant to HAART therapies.

  6. Identifying Recombination Hot Spots in the HIV-1 Genome

    PubMed Central

    Smyth, Redmond P.; Schlub, Timothy E.; Grimm, Andrew J.; Waugh, Caryll; Ellenberg, Paula; Chopra, Abha; Mallal, Simon; Cromer, Deborah

    2014-01-01

    ABSTRACT HIV-1 infection is characterized by the rapid generation of genetic diversity that facilitates viral escape from immune selection and antiretroviral therapy. Despite recombination's crucial role in viral diversity and evolution, little is known about the genomic factors that influence recombination between highly similar genomes. In this study, we use a minimally modified full-length HIV-1 genome and high-throughput sequence analysis to study recombination in gag and pol in T cells. We find that recombination is favored at a number of recombination hot spots, where recombination occurs six times more frequently than at corresponding cold spots. Interestingly, these hot spots occur near important features of the HIV-1 genome but do not occur at sites immediately around protease inhibitor or reverse transcriptase inhibitor drug resistance mutations. We show that the recombination hot and cold spots are consistent across five blood donors and are independent of coreceptor-mediated entry. Finally, we check common experimental confounders and find that these are not driving the location of recombination hot spots. This is the first study to identify the location of recombination hot spots between two similar viral genomes with great statistical power and under conditions that closely reflect natural recombination events among HIV-1 quasispecies. IMPORTANCE The ability of HIV-1 to evade the immune system and antiretroviral therapy depends on genetic diversity within the viral quasispecies. Retroviral recombination is an important mechanism that helps to generate and maintain this genetic diversity, but little is known about how recombination rates vary within the HIV-1 genome. We measured recombination rates in gag and pol and identified recombination hot and cold spots, demonstrating that recombination is not random but depends on the underlying gene sequence. The strength and location of these recombination hot and cold spots can be used to improve models of

  7. Genotypic and functional properties of early infant HIV-1 envelopes

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Understanding the properties of HIV-1 variants that are transmitted from women to their infants is crucial to improving strategies to prevent transmission. In this study, 162 full-length envelope (env) clones were generated from plasma RNA obtained from 5 HIV-1 Clade B infected mother-infant pairs. Following extensive genotypic and phylogenetic analyses, 35 representative clones were selected for functional studies. Results Infant quasispecies were highly homogeneous and generally represented minor maternal variants, consistent with transmission across a selective bottleneck. Infant clones did not differ from the maternal in env length, or glycosylation. All infant variants utilized the CCR5 co-receptor, but were not macrophage tropic. Relatively high levels (IC50 ≥ 100 μg/ml) of autologous maternal plasma IgG were required to neutralize maternal and infant viruses; however, all infant viruses were neutralized by pooled sera from HIV-1 infected individuals, implying that they were not inherently neutralization-resistant. All infant viruses were sensitive to the HIV-1 entry inhibitors Enfuvirtide and soluble CD4; none were resistant to Maraviroc. Sensitivity to human monoclonal antibodies 4E10, 2F5, b12 and 2G12 varied. Conclusions This study provides extensive characterization of the genotypic and functional properties of HIV-1 env shortly after transmission. We present the first detailed comparisons of the macrophage tropism of infant and maternal env variants and their sensitivity to Maraviroc, the only CCR5 antagonist approved for therapeutic use. These findings may have implications for improving approaches to prevent mother-to-child HIV-1 transmission. PMID:21843318

  8. Trichomonas Vaginalis Treatment Reduces Vaginal HIV-1 Shedding

    PubMed Central

    KISSINGER, PATRICIA; AMEDEE, ANGELA; CLARK, REBECCA A.; DUMESTRE, JEANNE; THEALL, KATHERINE P.; MYERS, LEANN; HAGENSEE, MICHAEL E.; FARLEY, THOMAS A.; MARTIN, DAVID H.

    2013-01-01

    Background: Vaginal HIV-1 shedding has been associated with Trichomonas vaginalis (TV) infection and could play a role in HIV transmission. The purpose of the study was to examine if effective TV treatment reduces the presence of vaginal HIV-1 RNA. Methods: TV+ women attending an HIV outpatient clinic in New Orleans, LA, who resolved infection (n = 58) and TV-negative controls (n = 92), matched on antiretroviral therapy (ART) were examined and interviewed at baseline, 1, and 3 months. TV status was tested by culture and the amount of cell free HIV-1 RNA in the vaginal fluids was determined by the Amplicor HIV-1 Monitor ultrasensitive assay. Results: Most women (81.3%) were black and the mean age was 37.5 (SD 8.7). At baseline, 46.0% had plasma HIV-1 RNA ≥10,000 copies/mL, 26.4% had CD4<200 cells/μL, 54.7% were taking ART, and only 26.0% had detectable HIV-1 RNA in their vaginal fluids. TV-positive women who were effectively treated for TV were less likely to shed HIV vaginally at 3-months post-treatment compared to baseline (R.R. 0.34, 95% CI: 0.12–0.92, P = 0.03), whereas there was no change for TV-negative women. Conclusion: This study provides additional support that reducing TV infection among HIV-positive women may have an impact on the prevention of HIV transmission. Reasons for the delayed treatment effect and the effect on cervical shedding need further investigation. PMID:19008776

  9. Nationwide Trends in Molecular Epidemiology of HIV-1 in China.

    PubMed

    Li, Xiaoshan; Li, Wei; Zhong, Ping; Fang, Kun; Zhu, Kexin; Musa, Taha Hussein; Song, Yue; Du, Guoping; Gao, Rong; Guo, Yan; Yan, Wenjuan; Xuan, Yang; Wei, Pingmin

    2016-09-01

    To estimate the nationwide and regional distribution of HIV-1 genotypes in China in the past three decades, province-specific HIV-1 molecular epidemiology data were derived from 260 independent studies of HIV molecular prevalence through searching PubMed, VIP Chinese Journal Database (VIP), China National Knowledge Infrastructure, and Wanfang Data from January 1981 to December 2015. The nationwide and regional distribution of HIV-1 genotypes was estimated by weighting the genotype distribution from each province- and risk-specific subpopulation with the number of reported cases in the corresponding subgroups in the relevant periods. A sharp transition of HIV-1 subtypes and recombinant distribution was observed in various risk groups and regions over time. CRF01_AE has rapidly surged among almost all risk groups and in all areas, and it has become dominant among men who have sex with men and heterosexuals. A wide variety of new circulating recombinant forms (CRFs) and unique recombinant forms (URFs) were rapidly appearing in several risk groups and regions. After 2007, CRF01_AE was the most prevalent strain, accounting for 42.5% of all national infections, followed by CRF07_BC (28.9%), subtype B'/B (10.9%), CRF08_BC (10.0%), and subtype C (2.8%). URFs and other CRFs were responsible for 2.6% and fewer than 1% of infections nationwide, respectively. The nationwide and regional distributions of HIV-1 subtypes and recombinants were sharply shifting in China. CRF01_AE and new CRFs played an increasing role in the nationwide or regional HIV pandemic. The nationwide diversity of HIV-1 poses a formidable challenge to HIV vaccine development and disease prevention.

  10. A New Approach to Produce HIV-1 Envelope Trimers

    PubMed Central

    AlSalmi, Wadad; Mahalingam, Marthandan; Ananthaswamy, Neeti; Hamlin, Christopher; Flores, Dalia; Gao, Guofen; Rao, Venigalla B.

    2015-01-01

    The trimeric envelope spike of HIV-1 mediates virus entry into human cells. The exposed part of the trimer, gp140, consists of two noncovalently associated subunits, gp120 and gp41 ectodomain. A recombinant vaccine that mimics the native trimer might elicit entry-blocking antibodies and prevent virus infection. However, preparation of authentic HIV-1 trimers has been challenging. Recently, an affinity column containing the broadly neutralizing antibody 2G12 has been used to capture recombinant gp140 and prepare trimers from clade A BG505 that naturally produces stable trimers. However, this antibody-based approach may not be as effective for the diverse HIV-1 strains with different epitope signatures. Here, we report a new and simple approach to produce HIV-1 envelope trimers. The C terminus of gp140 was attached to Strep-tag II with a long linker separating the tag from the massive trimer base and glycan shield. This allowed capture of nearly homogeneous gp140 directly from the culture medium. Cleaved, uncleaved, and fully or partially glycosylated trimers from different clade viruses were produced. Extensive biochemical characterizations showed that cleavage of gp140 was not essential for trimerization, but it triggered a conformational change that channels trimers into correct glycosylation pathways, generating compact three-blade propeller-shaped trimers. Uncleaved trimers entered aberrant pathways, resulting in hyperglycosylation, nonspecific cross-linking, and conformational heterogeneity. Even the cleaved trimers showed microheterogeneity in gp41 glycosylation. These studies established a broadly applicable HIV-1 trimer production system as well as generating new insights into their assembly and maturation that collectively bear on the HIV-1 vaccine design. PMID:26088135

  11. C-5-Modified Tetrahydropyrano-Tetrahydofuran-Derived Protease Inhibitors (PIs) Exert Potent Inhibition of the Replication of HIV-1 Variants Highly Resistant to Various PIs, including Darunavir

    PubMed Central

    Aoki, Manabu; Hayashi, Hironori; Yedidi, Ravikiran S.; Martyr, Cuthbert D.; Takamatsu, Yuki; Aoki-Ogata, Hiromi; Nakamura, Teruya; Nakata, Hirotomo; Das, Debananda; Yamagata, Yuriko; Ghosh, Arun K.

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT We identified three nonpeptidic HIV-1 protease inhibitors (PIs), GRL-015, -085, and -097, containing tetrahydropyrano-tetrahydrofuran (Tp-THF) with a C-5 hydroxyl. The three compounds were potent against a wild-type laboratory HIV-1 strain (HIV-1WT), with 50% effective concentrations (EC50s) of 3.0 to 49 nM, and exhibited minimal cytotoxicity, with 50% cytotoxic concentrations (CC50) for GRL-015, -085, and -097 of 80, >100, and >100 μM, respectively. All the three compounds potently inhibited the replication of highly PI-resistant HIV-1 variants selected with each of the currently available PIs and recombinant clinical HIV-1 isolates obtained from patients harboring multidrug-resistant HIV-1 variants (HIVMDR). Importantly, darunavir (DRV) was >1,000 times less active against a highly DRV-resistant HIV-1 variant (HIV-1DRVRP51); the three compounds remained active against HIV-1DRVRP51 with only a 6.8- to 68-fold reduction. Moreover, the emergence of HIV-1 variants resistant to the three compounds was considerably delayed compared to the case of DRV. In particular, HIV-1 variants resistant to GRL-085 and -097 did not emerge even when two different highly DRV-resistant HIV-1 variants were used as a starting population. In the structural analyses, Tp-THF of GRL-015, -085, and -097 showed strong hydrogen bond interactions with the backbone atoms of active-site amino acid residues (Asp29 and Asp30) of HIV-1 protease. A strong hydrogen bonding formation between the hydroxyl moiety of Tp-THF and a carbonyl oxygen atom of Gly48 was newly identified. The present findings indicate that the three compounds warrant further study as possible therapeutic agents for treating individuals harboring wild-type HIV and/or HIVMDR. IMPORTANCE Darunavir (DRV) inhibits the replication of most existing multidrug-resistant HIV-1 strains and has a high genetic barrier. However, the emergence of highly DRV-resistant HIV-1 strains (HIVDRVR) has recently been observed in vivo and in

  12. An oligosaccharide-based HIV-1 2G12 mimotope vaccine induces carbohydrate-specific antibodies that fail to neutralize HIV-1 virions.

    PubMed

    Joyce, Joseph G; Krauss, Isaac J; Song, Hong C; Opalka, David W; Grimm, Karen M; Nahas, Deborah D; Esser, Mark T; Hrin, Renee; Feng, Meizhen; Dudkin, Vadim Y; Chastain, Michael; Shiver, John W; Danishefsky, Samuel J

    2008-10-14

    The conserved oligomannose epitope, Man(9)GlcNAc(2), recognized by the broadly neutralizing human mAb 2G12 is an attractive prophylactic vaccine candidate for the prevention of HIV-1 infection. We recently reported total chemical synthesis of a series of glycopeptides incorporating one to three copies of Man(9)GlcNAc(2) coupled to a cyclic peptide scaffold. Surface plasmon resonance studies showed that divalent and trivalent, but not monovalent, compounds were capable of binding 2G12. To test the efficacy of the divalent glycopeptide as an immunogen capable of inducing a 2G12-like neutralizing antibody response, we covalently coupled the molecule to a powerful immune-stimulating protein carrier and evaluated immunogenicity of the conjugate in two animal species. We used a differential immunoassay to demonstrate induction of high levels of carbohydrate-specific antibodies; however, these antibodies showed poor recognition of recombinant gp160 and failed to neutralize a panel of viral isolates in entry-based neutralization assays. To ascertain whether antibodies produced during natural infection could recognize the mimetics, we screened a panel of HIV-1-positive and -negative sera for binding to gp120 and the synthetic antigens. We present evidence from both direct and competitive binding assays that no significant recognition of the glycopeptides was observed, although certain sera did contain antibodies that could compete with 2G12 for binding to recombinant gp120.

  13. The breadth and titer of maternal HIV-1-specific heterologous neutralizing antibodies are not associated with a lower rate of mother-to-child transmission of HIV-1.

    PubMed

    Chaillon, Antoine; Wack, Thierry; Braibant, Martine; Mandelbrot, Laurent; Blanche, Stéphane; Warszawski, Josiane; Barin, Francis

    2012-10-01

    It has been hypothesized that neutralizing antibodies (NAbs) should have broad specificity to be effective in protection against diverse HIV-1 variants. The mother-to-child transmission model of HIV-1 provides the opportunity to examine whether the breadth of maternal NAbs is associated with protection of infants from infection. Samples were obtained at delivery from 57 transmitting mothers (T) matched with 57 nontransmitting mothers (NT) enrolled in the multicenter French perinatal cohort (ANRS EPF CO1) between 1990 and 1996. Sixty-eight (59.6%) and 46 (40.4%) women were infected by B and non-B viruses, respectively. Neutralization assays were carried out with TZM-bl cells, using a panel of 10 primary isolates of 6 clades (A, B, C, F, CRF01_AE, and CRF02_AG), selected for their moderate or low sensitivity to neutralization. Neutralization breadths were not statistically different between T and NT mothers. However, a few statistically significant differences were observed, with higher frequencies or titers of NAbs toward several individual strains for NT mothers when the clade B-infected or non-clade B-infected mothers were analyzed separately. Our study confirms that the breadth of maternal NAbs is not associated with protection of infants from infection.

  14. Constructing the Average Natural History of HIV-1 Infection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Diambra, L.; Capurro, A.; Malta, C. P.

    2007-05-01

    Many aspects of the natural course of the HIV-1 infection remains unclear, despite important efforts towards understanding its long-term dynamics. Using a scaling approach that places progression markers (viral load, CD4+, CD8+) of many individuals on a single average natural course of disease progression, we introduce the concept of inter-individual scaling and time scaling. Our quantitative assessment of the natural course of HIV-1 infection indicates that the dynamics of the evolution for the individual that developed AIDS (opportunistic infections) is different from that of the individual that did not develop AIDS. This means that the rate of progression is not relevant for the infection evolution.

  15. Human cellular restriction factors that target HIV-1 replication

    PubMed Central

    Strebel, Klaus; Luban, Jeremy; Jeang, Kuan-Teh

    2009-01-01

    Recent findings have highlighted roles played by innate cellular factors in restricting intracellular viral replication. In this review, we discuss in brief the activities of apolipoprotein B mRNA-editing enzyme 3G (APOBEC3G), bone marrow stromal cell antigen 2 (BST-2), cyclophilin A, tripartite motif protein 5 alpha (Trim5α), and cellular microRNAs as examples of host restriction factors that target HIV-1. We point to countermeasures encoded by HIV-1 for moderating the potency of these cellular restriction functions. PMID:19758442

  16. HIV-1 elite controllers: beware of super-infections.

    PubMed

    Clerc, Olivier; Colombo, Sara; Yerly, Sabine; Telenti, Amalio; Cavassini, Matthias

    2010-04-01

    Super- and co-infection with HIV-1 are generally associated with accelerated disease progression. We report on the outcome of super-infection in two HIV-1 infected individuals previously known as elite controllers. Both presented an acute retroviral syndrome following super-infection and showed an immuno-virological progression thereafter. Host genotyping failed to reveal any of the currently recognized protective factors associated with slow disease progression. This report indicates that elite controllers should be informed of the risk of super-infection, and illustrates the complexity of mounting broad anti-HIV immunity.

  17. HIV-1 in ethnic Shan migrant workers in northern Thailand.

    PubMed

    Srithanaviboonchai, Kriengkrai; Choi, Kyung-Hee; van Griensven, Frits; Hudes, Esther S; Visaruratana, Surasing; Mandel, Jeffrey S

    2002-04-12

    Northern Thailand has one of the highest rates of HIV-1 infection in Southeast Asia. It is also home to a large number of Burmese migrants, believed to be at high risk of HIV. Our 1999 survey of 429 Burmese migrant workers of Shan ethnic origin in Chiang Mai province found a 4.9% rate of HIV-1 prevalence (5.7% men, 3.8% women). This figure is almost double that of comparable population groups in Chiang Mai, e.g. pregnant women and military recruits. HIV prevention programmes are urgently needed for this vulnerable population.

  18. Antiretroviral Therapy for the Prevention of HIV-1 Transmission

    PubMed Central

    Cohen, Myron S.; Chen, Ying Q.; McCauley, Marybeth; Gamble, Theresa; Hosseinipour, Mina C.; Kumarasamy, Nagalingeswaran; Hakim, James G.; Kumwenda, Johnstone; Grinsztejn, Beatriz; Pilotto, Jose H.S.; Godbole, Sheela V.; Chariyalertsak, Suwat; Santos, Breno R.; Mayer, Kenneth H.; Hoffman, Irving F.; Eshleman, Susan H.; Piwowar-Manning, Estelle; Cottle, Leslie; Zhang, Xinyi C.; Makhema, Joseph; Mills, Lisa A.; Panchia, Ravindre; Faesen, Sharlaa; Eron, Joseph; Gallant, Joel; Havlir, Diane; Swindells, Susan; Elharrar, Vanessa; Burns, David; Taha, Taha E.; Nielsen-Saines, Karin; Celentano, David D.; Essex, Max; Hudelson, Sarah E.; Redd, Andrew D.; Fleming, Thomas R.

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND An interim analysis of data from the HIV Prevention Trials Network (HPTN) 052 trial showed that antiretroviral therapy (ART) prevented more than 96% of genetically linked infections caused by human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) in serodiscordant couples. ART was then offered to all patients with HIV-1 infection (index participants). The study included more than 5 years of follow-up to assess the durability of such therapy for the prevention of HIV-1 transmission. METHODS We randomly assigned 1763 index participants to receive either early or delayed ART. In the early-ART group, 886 participants started therapy at enrollment (CD4+ count, 350 to 550 cells per cubic millimeter). In the delayed-ART group, 877 participants started therapy after two consecutive CD4+ counts fell below 250 cells per cubic millimeter or if an illness indicative of the acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (i.e., an AIDS-defining illness) developed. The primary study end point was the diagnosis of genetically linked HIV-1 infection in the previously HIV-1– negative partner in an intention-to-treat analysis. RESULTS Index participants were followed for 10,031 person-years; partners were followed for 8509 person-years. Among partners, 78 HIV-1 infections were observed during the trial (annual incidence, 0.9%; 95% confidence interval [CI], 0.7 to 1.1). Viral-linkage status was determined for 72 (92%) of the partner infections. Of these infections, 46 were linked (3 in the early-ART group and 43 in the delayed-ART group; incidence, 0.5%; 95% CI, 0.4 to 0.7) and 26 were unlinked (14 in the early-ART group and 12 in the delayed-ART group; incidence, 0.3%; 95% CI, 0.2 to 0.4). Early ART was associated with a 93% lower risk of linked partner infection than was delayed ART (hazard ratio, 0.07; 95% CI, 0.02 to 0.22). No linked infections were observed when HIV-1 infection was stably suppressed by ART in the index participant. CONCLUSIONS The early initiation of ART led to a sustained

  19. Targeting early infection to prevent HIV-1 mucosal transmission.

    PubMed

    Haase, Ashley T

    2010-03-11

    Measures to prevent sexual mucosal transmission of human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)-1 are urgently needed to curb the growth of the acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (AIDS) pandemic and ultimately bring it to an end. Studies in animal models and acute HIV-1 infection reviewed here reveal potential viral vulnerabilities at the mucosal portal of entry in the earliest stages of infection that might be most effectively targeted by vaccines and microbicides, thereby preventing acquisition and averting systemic infection, CD4 T-cell depletion and pathologies that otherwise rapidly ensue.

  20. Genomic Characterization of a Novel HIV-1 Second-Generation Recombinant Form Originated from CRF01_AE and CRF08_BC in Dali Prefecture of Yunnan Province, China.

    PubMed

    Li, Jianjian; Li, Lin; Li, Huiqin; Li, Jingyun; Yang, Shaomin; Zhang, Mi; Ouyang, Hongmei

    2016-06-01

    Yunnan seems to be a "hot spot" region of HIV-1 recombination. CRF01_AE and subtype CRF08_BC are two main HIV-1 clades circulating in Yunnan. We report here a novel HIV-1 second-generation recombinant form originated from CRF01_AE and CRF08_BC. The strain (12YN10551) was isolated from a HIV-positive male infected through heterosexual contact in Dali prefecture of Yunnan province, China. This is the first report of HIV-1 near full-length genomic sequence in Dali. Recombinant analysis shows that 12YN10551 was composed of two well-established circulating recombinant forms (CRF01_AE and CRF08_BC). Two CRF01_AE recombinant fragments were inserted into the CRF08_BC backbone genome in the pol/vif/vpr/tat/rev and nef gene regions, respectively. The discovery and characterization of this new recombinant indicate that intersubtype recombination is continuously generating new forms of HIV-1. More work is needed to better monitor the genetic diversity of HIV-1 in this region.

  1. Antibody Conjugation Approach Enhances Breadth and Potency of Neutralization of Anti-HIV-1 Antibodies and CD4-IgG

    PubMed Central

    Gavrilyuk, Julia; Ban, Hitoshi; Uehara, Hisatoshi; Sirk, Shannon J.; Saye-Francisco, Karen; Cuevas, Angelica; Zablowsky, Elise; Oza, Avinash; Seaman, Michael S.; Burton, Dennis R.

    2013-01-01

    Broadly neutralizing antibodies PG9 and PG16 effectively neutralize 70 to 80% of circulating HIV-1 isolates. In this study, the neutralization abilities of PG9 and PG16 were further enhanced by bioconjugation with aplaviroc, a small-molecule inhibitor of virus entry into host cells. A novel air-stable diazonium hexafluorophosphate reagent that allows for rapid, tyrosine-selective functionalization of proteins and antibodies under mild conditions was used to prepare a series of aplaviroc-conjugated antibodies, including b12, 2G12, PG9, PG16, and CD4-IgG. The conjugated antibodies blocked HIV-1 entry through two mechanisms: by binding to the virus itself and by blocking the CCR5 receptor on host cells. Chemical modification did not significantly alter the potency of the parent antibodies against nonresistant HIV-1 strains. Conjugation did not alter the pharmacokinetics of a model IgG in blood. The PG9-aplaviroc conjugate was tested against a panel of 117 HIV-1 strains and was found to neutralize 100% of the viruses. PG9-aplaviroc conjugate IC50s were lower than those of PG9 in neutralization studies of 36 of the 117 HIV-1 strains. These results support this new approach to bispecific antibodies and offer a potential new strategy for combining HIV-1 therapies. PMID:23427154

  2. The Latent Reservoir for HIV-1: How Immunologic Memory and Clonal Expansion Contribute to HIV-1 Persistence.

    PubMed

    Murray, Alexandra J; Kwon, Kyungyoon J; Farber, Donna L; Siliciano, Robert F

    2016-07-15

    Combination antiretroviral therapy (ART) for HIV-1 infection reduces plasma virus levels to below the limit of detection of clinical assays. However, even with prolonged suppression of viral replication with ART, viremia rebounds rapidly after treatment interruption. Thus, ART is not curative. The principal barrier to cure is a remarkably stable reservoir of latent HIV-1 in resting memory CD4(+) T cells. In this review, we consider explanations for the remarkable stability of the latent reservoir. Stability does not appear to reflect replenishment from new infection events but rather normal physiologic processes that provide for immunologic memory. Of particular importance are proliferative processes that drive clonal expansion of infected cells. Recent evidence suggests that in some infected cells, proliferation is a consequence of proviral integration into host genes associated with cell growth. Efforts to cure HIV-1 infection by targeting the latent reservoir may need to consider the potential of latently infected cells to proliferate.

  3. F(ab')2 fragment of a gp41 NHR-trimer-induced IgM monoclonal antibody neutralizes HIV-1 infection and blocks viral fusion by targeting the conserved gp41 pocket.

    PubMed

    Lu, Lu; Wei, Meili; Chen, Yanxia; Xiong, Weiliang; Yu, Fei; Qi, Zhi; Jiang, Shibo; Pan, Chungen

    2013-11-01

    Using a recombinant protein N46FdFc that mimics the HIV-1 gp41 N-helix trimer to immunize mice, we identified the first IgM monoclonal antibody 18D3 that specifically bound to the conserved gp41 pocket. Its F(ab')2 fragment potently inhibited HIV-1 Env-mediated cell-cell fusion and neutralized infection by laboratory-adapted and primary HIV-1 isolates with different subtypes and tropism, including the T20-resistant variants. This F(ab')2 fragment can be used to develop a bispecific broad neutralizing monoclonal antibody or HIV-1 inactivator as a novel immunotherapeutic for treatment and prevention of HIV-1 infection.

  4. Severe anaemia is not associated with HIV-1 env gene characteristics in Malawian children

    PubMed Central

    Calis, Job CJ; Rotteveel, Hellen P; van der Kuyl, Antoinette C; Zorgdrager, Fokla; Kachala, David; van Hensbroek, Michaël Boele; Cornelissen, Marion

    2008-01-01

    Background Anaemia is the most common haematological complication of HIV and associated with a high morbidity and a poor prognosis. The pathogenesis of HIV-associated anaemia is poorly understood and may include a direct effect of HIV on erythropoiesis. In vitro studies have suggested that specific HIV strains, like X4 that uses the CXCR4 co-receptor present on erythroid precursors, are associated with diminished erythropoiesis. This co-receptor affinity is determined by changes in the hypervariable loop of the HIV-1 envelope genome. In a previous case-control study we observed an association between HIV and severe anaemia in Malawian children that could not be fully explained by secondary infections and micronutrient deficiencies alone. We therefore explored the possibility that alterations in the V1-V2-V3 fragment of HIV-1 were associated with severe anaemia. Methods Using peripheral blood nucleic acid isolates of HIV-infected children identified in the previous studied we assessed if variability of the V1-V2-V3 region of HIV and the occurrence of X4 strains were more common in HIV-infected children with (cases, n = 29) and without severe anaemia (controls, n = 30). For 15 cases bone marrow isolates were available to compare against peripheral blood. All children were followed for 18 months after recruitment. Results Phylogenetic analysis showed that HIV-1 subtype C was present in all but one child. All V1-V2-V3 characteristics tested: V3 charge, V1-V2 length and potential glycosylation sites, were not found to be different between cases and controls. Using a computer model (C-PSSM) four children (7.8%) were identified to have an X4 strain. This prevalence was not different between study groups (p = 1.00). The V3 loop characteristics for bone marrow and peripheral blood isolates in the case group were identical. None of the children identified as having an X4 strain developed a (new) episode of severe anaemia during follow up. Conclusion The prevalence of X4

  5. Development of TNFSF as molecular adjuvants for ALVAC HIV-1 vaccines.

    PubMed

    Liu, Jun; Ostrowski, Mario

    2010-04-01

    A phase III clinical trial finished in Thailand recently showed that an ALVAC HIV-1 vaccine prime-gp120 protein boost vaccination regimen could modestly protect persons from HIV-1 infection, demonstrating that development of an effective and safe HIV-1 preventive vaccine is possible. ALVAC HIV-1 vaccines are candidate HIV-1 vaccines based on canarypox vectors. Previous clinical trials proved that ALVAC HIV-1 vaccines were safe but weak in immunogenicity when used in human subjects. We have been exploring to use tumor necrosis factor superfamily (TNFSF) members as adjuvants to enhance the immunogenicity of ALVAC HIV-1 vaccines. In this commentary, we will summarize our findings in using two TNFSF molecules, CD40L and OX40L, as adjuvants for an ALVAC HIV-1 vaccine in mouse model. We will also briefly discuss the challenges and prospects of using TNFSF molecules as adjuvants for HIV-1 vaccines in humans.

  6. The multi-epitope polypeptide approach in HIV-1 vaccine development.

    PubMed

    Cano, C A

    1999-11-01

    The application of a preventive HIV vaccine is the only hope for most developing countries to halt the AIDS pandemic. A project aimed to develop a preventive AIDS vaccine is being carried out since 1992 by three Cuban research institutions: Centro de Ingeniería Genética y Biotecnologia de La Habana, Instituto de Medicina Tropical 'Pedro Kouri' and Laboratorio de Investigaciones de SIDA de La Habana. The project includes two main strategies: (a) generation of recombinant multi-epitope polypeptides (MEPs) bearing several copies of the V3 loop from different HIV-1 isolates; and (b) development of immunogens capable of inducing a cytotoxic T cell response (CTL) specific for human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) antigens. This article summarizes the work in the first of these strategies. Based on the sequence of the V3 loop of HIV-1 we constructed a series of MEPs and evaluated their immunogenicity in mice, rabbits and macaques. The MEP TAB9, containing six V3 epitopes from isolates LR10, JY1, RF, MN, BRVA and IIIB, was selected together with the oil adjuvant Montanide ISA720 (SEPPIC, France) to perform a Phase I clinical trial in HIV seronegative Cuban volunteers. The trial was double blinded, randomized, and fulfilled all ethical and regulatory requirements. All TAB9 vaccinated volunteers developed a strong immune response and neutralizing antibodies were observed in the 50% of the subjects. However the second and third inoculations of the vaccine were not well tolerated because transient severe local reactions appeared in some individuals. A new formulation of TAB9 is currently in pre-clinical studies and is expected to enter clinical trials in 1999.

  7. Strain-Specific V3 and CD4 Binding Site Autologous HIV-1 Neutralizing Antibodies Select Neutralization-Resistant Viruses.

    PubMed

    Moody, M Anthony; Gao, Feng; Gurley, Thaddeus C; Amos, Joshua D; Kumar, Amit; Hora, Bhavna; Marshall, Dawn J; Whitesides, John F; Xia, Shi-Mao; Parks, Robert; Lloyd, Krissey E; Hwang, Kwan-Ki; Lu, Xiaozhi; Bonsignori, Mattia; Finzi, Andrés; Vandergrift, Nathan A; Alam, S Munir; Ferrari, Guido; Shen, Xiaoying; Tomaras, Georgia D; Kamanga, Gift; Cohen, Myron S; Sam, Noel E; Kapiga, Saidi; Gray, Elin S; Tumba, Nancy L; Morris, Lynn; Zolla-Pazner, Susan; Gorny, Miroslaw K; Mascola, John R; Hahn, Beatrice H; Shaw, George M; Sodroski, Joseph G; Liao, Hua-Xin; Montefiori, David C; Hraber, Peter T; Korber, Bette T; Haynes, Barton F

    2015-09-09

    The third variable (V3) loop and the CD4 binding site (CD4bs) of the HIV-1 envelope are frequently targeted by neutralizing antibodies (nAbs) in infected individuals. In chronic infection, HIV-1 escape mutants repopulate the plasma, and V3 and CD4bs nAbs emerge that can neutralize heterologous tier 1 easy-to-neutralize but not tier 2 difficult-to-neutralize HIV-1 isolates. However, neutralization sensitivity of autologous plasma viruses to this type of nAb response has not been studied. We describe the development and evolution in vivo of antibodies distinguished by their target specificity for V3 and CD4bs epitopes on autologous tier 2 viruses but not on heterologous tier 2 viruses. A surprisingly high fraction of autologous circulating viruses was sensitive to these antibodies. These findings demonstrate a role for V3 and CD4bs antibodies in constraining the native envelope trimer in vivo to a neutralization-resistant phenotype, explaining why HIV-1 transmission generally occurs by tier 2 neutralization-resistant viruses.

  8. LEDGF/p75 interacts with mRNA splicing factors and targets HIV-1 integration to highly spliced genes.

    PubMed

    Singh, Parmit Kumar; Plumb, Matthew R; Ferris, Andrea L; Iben, James R; Wu, Xiaolin; Fadel, Hind J; Luke, Brian T; Esnault, Caroline; Poeschla, Eric M; Hughes, Stephen H; Kvaratskhelia, Mamuka; Levin, Henry L

    2015-11-01

    The host chromatin-binding factor LEDGF/p75 interacts with HIV-1 integrase and directs integration to active transcription units. To understand how LEDGF/p75 recognizes transcription units, we sequenced 1 million HIV-1 integration sites isolated from cultured HEK293T cells. Analysis of integration sites showed that cancer genes were preferentially targeted, raising concerns about using lentivirus vectors for gene therapy. Additional analysis led to the discovery that introns and alternative splicing contributed significantly to integration site selection. These correlations were independent of transcription levels, size of transcription units, and length of the introns. Multivariate analysis with five parameters previously found to predict integration sites showed that intron density is the strongest predictor of integration density in transcription units. Analysis of previously published HIV-1 integration site data showed that integration density in transcription units in mouse embryonic fibroblasts also correlated strongly with intron number, and this correlation was absent in cells lacking LEDGF. Affinity purification showed that LEDGF/p75 is associated with a number of splicing factors, and RNA sequencing (RNA-seq) analysis of HEK293T cells lacking LEDGF/p75 or the LEDGF/p75 integrase-binding domain (IBD) showed that LEDGF/p75 contributes to splicing patterns in half of the transcription units that have alternative isoforms. Thus, LEDGF/p75 interacts with splicing factors, contributes to exon choice, and directs HIV-1 integration to transcription units that are highly spliced.

  9. Development of an Attenuated Tat Protein as a Highly-effective Agent to Specifically Activate HIV-1 Latency

    PubMed Central

    Geng, Guannan; Liu, Bingfeng; Chen, Cancan; Wu, Kang; Liu, Jun; Zhang, Yijun; Pan, Ting; Li, Jun; Yin, Yue; Zhang, Junsong; Huang, Feng; Yu, Fei; Chen, Jingliang; Ma, Xiancai; Zhou, Jie; Kuang, Ersheng; Liu, Chao; Cai, Weiping; Zhang, Hui

    2016-01-01

    Although combined antiretroviral therapy (cART) successfully decreases plasma viremia to undetectable levels, the complete eradication of human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) remains impractical because of the existence of a viral reservoir, mainly in resting memory CD4+ T cells. Various cytokines, protein kinase C activators, and histone deacetylase inhibitors (HDACi) have been used as latency-reversing agents (LRAs), but their unacceptable side effects or low efficiencies limit their clinical use. Here, by a mutation accumulation strategy, we generated an attenuated HIV-1 Tat protein named Tat-R5M4, which has significantly reduced cytotoxicity and immunogenicity, yet retaining potent transactivation and membrane-penetration activity. Combined with HDACi, Tat-R5M4 activates highly genetically diverse and replication-competent viruses from resting CD4+ T lymphocytes isolated from HIV-1-infected individuals receiving suppressive cART. Thus, Tat-R5M4 has promising potential as a safe, efficient, and specific LRA in HIV-1 treatment. PMID:27434587

  10. Lignan, sesquilignans and dilignans, novel HIV-1 protease and cytopathic effect inhibitors purified from the rhizomes of Saururus chinensis.

    PubMed

    Lee, Jisuk; Huh, Myoung Sook; Kim, Young Choong; Hattori, Masao; Otake, Toru

    2010-02-01

    Five lignans were isolated from the ethyl acetate extracts of Saururus chinensis rhizomes and evaluated for anti-HIV-1 activity. Their structures were elucidated as two dilignans, manassantin A (1), manassantin B (2), two sesquilignans, saucerneol B (3) and saucerneol C (4), and a new lignan, saururin B (5) by spectroscopic analysis. Of these components, manassantin A (1) and saururin B (5) showed dose-dependent inhibitory activities on HIV-1 protease with IC(50) values of 38.9 and 5.6 microM. In addition, manassantins A (1), B (2) and saucerneol B (3) inhibited HIV-1-induced cytopathic effects in a human T lymphoblastoid cell line with IC(100) values of 1.0, 1.0 and 0.2 microM, respectively. Of these active constituents, saucerneol B (3) showed the most potent and selective anti-HIV-1 activity (IC(100) of 0.2 microM, CC(0) of >125.0 microM, and SI of >520.8).

  11. Human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) proviral DNA load in purified CD4+ cells by LightCycler® Real-time PCR

    PubMed Central

    Kabamba-Mukadi, Benoît; Henrivaux, Philippe; Ruelle, Jean; Delferrière, Nicole; Bodéus, Monique; Goubau, Patrick

    2005-01-01

    Background The human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) proviral DNA persists in infected cells, even after prolonged successful HAART. In the present study, a relative quantification assay of HIV-1 proviral DNA by LightCycler® real-time PCR based on SYBR Green I detection was developed in comparison to the number of purified CD4+ cells as estimated by the quantification of the β-globin gene. Methods The ability of the designed gag primers to quantify HIV-1 Group M and the PCR efficiency were assessed on HIV-1 reference isolate subtypes A, B, C and D. The 8E5 cell line containing a single defective copy of HIV-1 proviral DNA was used as a standard for both the HIV-1 target gene and the β-globin reference gene. The assay was applied on thirty consecutive patient samples received for RNA viral load determinations and on retrospective samples from fifteen patients undergoing 2 years of structured treatment interruption (STI). Results The lower limit of quantification was 50 HIV-1 DNA proviral copies per CD4+ cell sample. The dynamic range was from 50 to 106 HIV-1 DNA copies per CD4+ cell sample with intra- and inter-assay coefficients of variability ranging from 3.1% to 37.1%. The β-globin reference gene was quantified down to a limit of 1.5 pg of DNA/μl (approximately 5 cells) with intra- and interassay coefficients of variability ranging from 1.8% to 21%. DNA proviral load varies widely among HIV-1 infected patients. Proviral load and plasma viral load rebound were high in STI patients who took longer to achieve an undetectable plasma viral load under therapy. A statistically significant correlation was observed between DNA proviral load and RNA steady state viral load in STI patients (p-value = 0,012). Conclusion We have developed a fast, sensitive and specific relative quantification assay of HIV-1 proviral DNA in purified CD4+ cells. The assay enables the monitoring of HIV-1 proviral load, which may be useful to monitor therapy efficacy especially in

  12. Aspernigrins with anti-HIV-1 activities from the marine-derived fungus Aspergillus niger SCSIO Jcsw6F30.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Xuefeng; Fang, Wei; Tan, Suiyi; Lin, Xiuping; Xun, Tianrong; Yang, Bingjie; Liu, Shuwen; Liu, Yonghong

    2016-01-15

    Two new 2-benzylpyridin-4-one containing metabolites, aspernigrins C (3) and D (4), together with six known compounds (1, 2, and 5-8), were isolated from the marine-derived fungus Aspergillus niger SCSIO Jcsw6F30. The structures of the new compounds were determined by NMR, MS, and optical rotation analyses. All the isolated compounds were evaluated for their inhibitory activities against infection with HIV-1 SF162 in TZM-bl cells. Malformin C (5) showed the strongest anti-HIV-1 activity with IC50 of 1.4±0.06μM (selectivity index, 11.4), meanwhile aspernigrin C (3) also exhibited potent activity with IC50 of 4.7±0.4μM (selectivity index, 7.5).

  13. Establishment and stability of the latent HIV-1 DNA reservoir

    PubMed Central

    Brodin, Johanna; Zanini, Fabio; Thebo, Lina; Lanz, Christa; Bratt, Göran; Neher, Richard A; Albert, Jan

    2016-01-01

    HIV-1 infection cannot be cured because the virus persists as integrated proviral DNA in long-lived cells despite years of suppressive antiretroviral therapy (ART). In a previous paper (Zanini et al, 2015) we documented HIV-1 evolution in 10 untreated patients. Here we characterize establishment, turnover, and evolution of viral DNA reservoirs in the same patients after 3–18 years of suppressive ART. A median of 14% (range 0–42%) of the DNA sequences were defective due to G-to-A hypermutation. Remaining DNA sequences showed no evidence of evolution over years of suppressive ART. Most sequences from the DNA reservoirs were very similar to viruses actively replicating in plasma (RNA sequences) shortly before start of ART. The results do not support persistent HIV-1 replication as a mechanism to maintain the HIV-1 reservoir during suppressive therapy. Rather, the data indicate that DNA variants are turning over as long as patients are untreated and that suppressive ART halts this turnover. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.18889.001 PMID:27855060

  14. HIV-1 Vpr—a still “enigmatic multitasker”

    PubMed Central

    Guenzel, Carolin A.; Hérate, Cécile; Benichou, Serge

    2014-01-01

    Like other HIV-1 auxiliary proteins, Vpr is conserved within all the human (HIV-1, HIV-2) and simian (SIV) immunodeficiency viruses. However, Vpr and homologous HIV-2, and SIV Vpx are the only viral auxiliary proteins specifically incorporated into virus particles through direct interaction with the Gag precursor, indicating that this presence in the core of the mature virions is mainly required for optimal establishment of the early steps of the virus life cycle in the newly infected cell. In spite of its small size, a plethora of effects and functions have been attributed to Vpr, including induction of cell cycle arrest and apoptosis, modulation of the fidelity of reverse transcription, nuclear import of viral DNA in macrophages and other non-dividing cells, and transcriptional modulation of viral and host cell genes. Even if some more recent studies identified a few cellular targets that HIV-1 Vpr may utilize in order to perform its different tasks, the real role and functions of Vpr during the course of natural infection are still enigmatic. In this review, we will summarize the main reported functions of HIV-1 Vpr and their significance in the context of the viral life cycle. PMID:24744753

  15. Differentially-Expressed Pseudogenes in HIV-1 Infection

    PubMed Central

    Gupta, Aditi; Brown, C. Titus; Zheng, Yong-Hui; Adami, Christoph

    2015-01-01

    Not all pseudogenes are transcriptionally silent as previously thought. Pseudogene transcripts, although not translated, contribute to the non-coding RNA pool of the cell that regulates the expression of other genes. Pseudogene transcripts can also directly compete with the parent gene transcripts for mRNA stability and other cell factors, modulating their expression levels. Tissue-specific and cancer-specific differential expression of these “functional” pseudogenes has been reported. To ascertain potential pseudogene:gene interactions in HIV-1 infection, we analyzed transcriptomes from infected and uninfected T-cells and found that 21 pseudogenes are differentially expressed in HIV-1 infection. This is interesting because parent genes of one-third of these differentially-expressed pseudogenes are implicated in HIV-1 life cycle, and parent genes of half of these pseudogenes are involved in different viral infections. Our bioinformatics analysis identifies candidate pseudogene:gene interactions that may be of significance in HIV-1 infection. Experimental validation of these interactions would establish that retroviruses exploit this newly-discovered layer of host gene expression regulation for their own benefit. PMID:26426037

  16. Vpr-host interactions during HIV-1 viral life cycle.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Richard Y; Li, Ge; Bukrinsky, Michael I

    2011-06-01

    Human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) viral protein R (Vpr) is a multifunctional viral protein that plays important role at multiple stages of the HIV-1 viral life cycle. Although the molecular mechanisms underlying these activities are subject of ongoing investigations, overall, these activities have been linked to promotion of viral replication and impairment of anti-HIV immunity. Importantly, functional defects of Vpr have been correlated with slow disease progression of HIV-infected patients. Vpr is required for efficient viral replication in non-dividing cells such as macrophages, and it promotes, to some extent, viral replication in proliferating CD4+ T cells. The specific activities of Vpr include modulation of fidelity of viral reverse transcription, nuclear import of the HIV-1 pre-integration complex, transactivation of the HIV-1 LTR promoter, induction of cell cycle G2 arrest and cell death via apoptosis. In this review, we focus on description of the cellular proteins that specifically interact with Vpr and discuss their significance with regard to the known Vpr activities at each step of the viral life cycle in proliferating and non-proliferating cells.

  17. Psoriasis risk SNPs and their association with HIV-1 control.

    PubMed

    Nititham, Joanne; Gupta, Rashmi; Zeng, Xue; Hartogensis, Wendy; Nixon, Douglas F; Deeks, Steven G; Hecht, Frederick M; Liao, Wilson

    2017-02-01

    Human evolution has resulted in selection for genetic polymorphisms beneficial in the defense against pathogens. However, such polymorphisms may have the potential to heighten the risk of autoimmune disease. Here, we investigated whether psoriasis-associated single nucleotide polymorphisms influence host control of HIV-1 infection. We studied psoriasis and viral immune response variants in three HIV-positive cohorts: (1) HIV-1 controllers and non-controllers in the Study of the Consequences of the Protease Inhibitor Era (SCOPE) cohort (n=366), (2) Individuals with primary HIV infection in the Options cohort (n=675), and (3) HIV-positive injection drug users from the Urban Health Study (UHS) (n=987). We found a strong association of two psoriasis MHC variants, rs9264942 and rs3021366, with both HIV-1 controller status and viral load, and identified another Class III MHC variant rs9368699 to be strongly associated with viral load. A number of genetic variants outside the MHC (SOX5, TLR9, SDC4, PROX1, IL12B, TLR4, MBL-2, TYK2, IFIH1) demonstrated nominal significance. Overall, our data suggest that several psoriasis variants within the MHC have a robust impact on HIV-1 control, while variants outside the MHC require further investigation.

  18. HIV-1 Entry Inhibitors: Recent Development and Clinical Use

    PubMed Central

    Henrich, Timothy J.; Kuritzkes, Daniel R.

    2014-01-01

    Purpose of review This review provides an overview of HIV-1 entry inhibitors, with a focus on drugs in the later stages of clinical development. Recent findings Entry of HIV-1 into target cells involves viral attachment, co-receptor binding and fusion. Antiretroviral drugs that interact with each step in the entry process have been developed, but only two are currently approved for clinical use. The small molecule attachment inhibitor BMS-663068 has shown potent antiviral activity in early phase studies, and phase 2b trials are currently underway. The post-attachment inhibitor ibalizumab has shown antiviral activity in phase 1 and 2 trials; further studies, including subcutaneous delivery of drug to healthy individuals, are anticipated. The CCR5 antagonist maraviroc is approved for use in treatment-naïve and treatment-experienced patients. Cenicriviroc, a small-molecule CCR5 antagonist that also has activity as a CCR2 antagonist, has entered phase 2b studies. No CXCR4 antagonists are currently in clinical trials, but once daily, next-generation injectable peptide fusion inhibitors have entered human trials. Both maraviroc and ibalizumab are being studied for prevention of HIV-1 transmission and/or for use in nucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitor-sparing antiretroviral regimens. Summary Inhibition of HIV-1 entry continues to be a promising target for antiretroviral drug development. PMID:23290628

  19. A novel mechanism for inhibition of HIV-1 reverse transcriptase.

    PubMed

    Skillman, A Geoffrey; Maurer, Karl W; Roe, Diana C; Stauber, Margaret J; Eargle, Dolan; Ewing, Todd J A; Muscate, Angelika; Davioud-Charvet, Elisabeth; Medaglia, Maxine V; Fisher, Robert J; Arnold, Edward; Gao, Hong Qiang; Buckheit, Robert; Boyer, Paul L; Hughes, Stephen H; Kuntz, Irwin D; Kenyon, George L

    2002-12-01

    The human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) epidemic is an important medical problem. Although combination drug regimens have produced dramatic decreases in viral load, current therapies do not provide a cure for HIV infection. We have used structure-based design and combinatorial medicinal chemistry to identify potent and selective HIV-1 reverse transcriptase (RT) inhibitors that may work by a mechanism distinct from that of current HIV drugs. The most potent of these compounds (compound 4, 2-naphthalenesulfonic acid, 4-hydroxy-7-[[[[5-hydroxy-6-[(4-cinnamylphenyl)azo]-7-sulfo-2-naphthalenyl]amino]carbonyl]amino]-3-[(4-cinnamylphenyl)azo], disodium salt) has an IC(50) of 90 nM for inhibition of polymerase chain extension, a K(d) of 40 nM for inhibition of DNA-RT binding, and an IC(50) of 25-100 nM for inhibition of RNaseH cleavage. The parent compound (1) was as effective against 10 nucleoside and non-nucleoside resistant HIV-1 RT mutants as it was against the wild-type enzyme. Compound 4 inhibited HIV-1 RT and murine leukemia virus (MLV) RT, but it did not inhibit T(4) DNA polymerase, T(7) DNA polymerase, or the Klenow fragment at concentrations up to 200 nM. Finally, compound 4 protected cells from HIV-1 infection at a concentration more than 40 times lower than the concentration at which it caused cellular toxicity.

  20. HIV-1 evolution: frustrating therapies, but disclosing molecular mechanisms

    PubMed Central

    Das, Atze T.; Berkhout, Ben

    2010-01-01

    Replication of HIV-1 under selective pressure frequently results in the evolution of virus variants that replicate more efficiently under the applied conditions. For example, in patients on antiretroviral therapy, such evolution can result in variants that are resistant to the HIV-1 inhibitors, thus frustrating the therapy. On the other hand, virus evolution can help us to understand the molecular mechanisms that underlie HIV-1 replication. For example, evolution of a defective virus mutant can result in variants that overcome the introduced defect by restoration of the original sequence or by the introduction of additional mutations in the viral genome. Analysis of the evolution pathway can reveal the requirements of the element under study and help to understand its function. Analysis of the escape routes may generate new insight in the viral life cycle and result in the identification of unexpected biological mechanisms. We have developed in vitro HIV-1 evolution into a systematic research tool that allows the study of different aspects of the viral replication cycle. We will briefly review this method of forced virus evolution and provide several examples that illustrate the power of this approach. PMID:20478891

  1. HIV-1 evolution: frustrating therapies, but disclosing molecular mechanisms.

    PubMed

    Das, Atze T; Berkhout, Ben

    2010-06-27

    Replication of HIV-1 under selective pressure frequently results in the evolution of virus variants that replicate more efficiently under the applied conditions. For example, in patients on antiretroviral therapy, such evolution can result in variants that are resistant to the HIV-1 inhibitors, thus frustrating the therapy. On the other hand, virus evolution can help us to understand the molecular mechanisms that underlie HIV-1 replication. For example, evolution of a defective virus mutant can result in variants that overcome the introduced defect by restoration of the original sequence or by the introduction of additional mutations in the viral genome. Analysis of the evolution pathway can reveal the requirements of the element under study and help to understand its function. Analysis of the escape routes may generate new insight in the viral life cycle and result in the identification of unexpected biological mechanisms. We have developed in vitro HIV-1 evolution into a systematic research tool that allows the study of different aspects of the viral replication cycle. We will briefly review this method of forced virus evolution and provide several examples that illustrate the power of this approach.

  2. Multimodal mechanism of action of allosteric HIV-1 integrase inhibitors

    PubMed Central

    Jurado, Kellie Ann; Engelman, Alan

    2013-01-01

    Integrase (IN) is required for lentivirus replication and is a proven drug target for the prevention of AIDS in HIV-1 infected patients. While clinical strand transfer inhibitors disarm the IN active site, allosteric inhibition of enzyme activity through the disruption of IN-IN protein interfaces holds great therapeutic potential. A promising class of allosteric IN inhibitors (ALLINIs), 2-(quinolin-3-yl) acetic acid derivatives, engage the IN catalytic core domain dimerization interface at the binding site for the host integration co-factor LEDGF/p75. ALLINIs promote IN multimerization and, independent of LEDGF/p75 protein, block the formation of the active IN-DNA complex, as well as inhibit the IN-LEDGF/p75 interaction in vitro. Yet, rather unexpectedly, the full inhibitory effect of these compounds is exerted during the late phase of HIV-1 replication. ALLINIs impair particle core maturation as well as reverse transcription and integration during the subsequent round of virus infection. Recapitulating the pleiotropic phenotypes observed with numerous IN mutant viruses, ALLINIs provide insight into underlying aspects of IN biology that extend beyond its catalytic activity. Therefore, in addition to the potential to expand our repertoire of HIV-1 antiretrovirals, ALLINIs afford important structural probes to dissect the multifaceted nature of the IN protein throughout the course of HIV-1 replication. PMID:24274067

  3. Defective proviruses rapidly accumulate during acute HIV-1 infection

    PubMed Central

    Bruner, Katherine M.; Murray, Alexandra J.; Pollack, Ross A.; Soliman, Mary G.; Laskey, Sarah B.; Capoferri, Adam A.; Lai, Jun; Strain, Matthew C.; Lada, Steven M.; Hoh, Rebecca; Ho, Ya-Chi; Richman, Douglas D.; Deeks, Steven G.; Siliciano, Janet D.; Siliciano, Robert F.

    2016-01-01

    Although antiretroviral therapy (ART) suppresses viral replication to clinically undetectable levels, HIV-1 persists in CD4+ T cells in a latent form not targeted by the immune system or ART1–5. This latent reservoir is a major barrier to cure. Many individuals initiate ART during chronic infection, and in this setting, most proviruses are defective6. However, the dynamics of the accumulation and persistence of defective proviruses during acute HIV-1 infection are largely unknown. Here we show that defective proviruses accumulate rapidly within the first few weeks of infection to make up over 93% of all proviruses, regardless of how early ART is initiated. Using an unbiased method to amplify near full-length proviral genomes from HIV-1 infected adults treated at different stages of infection, we demonstrate that early ART initiation limits the size of the reservoir but does not profoundly impact the proviral landscape. This analysis allows us to revise our understanding of the composition of proviral populations and estimate the true reservoir size in individuals treated early vs. late in infection. Additionally, we demonstrate that common assays for measuring the reservoir do not correlate with reservoir size. These findings reveal hurdles that must be overcome to successfully analyze future HIV-1 cure strategies. PMID:27500724

  4. Polyvalent vaccine approaches to combat HIV-1 diversity

    DOE PAGES

    Korber, Bette; Hraber, Peter Thomas; Wagh, Kshitij; ...

    2017-01-30

    In this study, a key unresolved challenge for developing an effective HIV-1 vaccine is the discovery of strategies to elicit immune responses that are able to cross-protect against a significant fraction of the diverse viruses that are circulating worldwide. Here, we summarize some of the immunological implications of HIV-1 diversity, and outline the rationale behind several polyvalent vaccine design strategies that are currently under evaluation. Vaccine-elicited T-cell responses, which contribute to the control of HIV-1 in natural infections, are currently being considered in both prevention and treatment settings. Approaches now in preclinical and human trials include full proteins in novelmore » vectors, concatenated conserved protein regions, and polyvalent strategies that improve coverage of epitope diversity and enhance the cross-reactivity of responses. While many barriers to vaccine induction of broadly neutralizing antibody (bNAb) responses remain, epitope diversification has emerged as both a challenge and an opportunity. Recent longitudinal studies have traced the emergence of bNAbs in HIV-1 infection, inspiring novel approaches to recapitulate and accelerate the events that give rise to potent bNAb in vivo. In this review, we have selected two such lineage-based design strategies to illustrate how such in-depth analysis can offer conceptual improvements that may bring us closer to an effective vaccine.« less

  5. Is the central nervous system a reservoir of HIV-1?

    PubMed Central

    Gray, Lachlan R.; Roche, Michael; Flynn, Jacqueline K.; Wesselingh, Steve L.; Gorry, Paul R.; Churchill, Melissa J.

    2014-01-01

    Purpose of the review To summarize the evidence in the literature that supports the CNS as a viral reservoir for HIV-1 and to prioritise future research efforts. Recent findings HIV-1 DNA has been detected in brain tissue of patients with undetectable viral load or neurocognitive disorders, and is associated with long-lived cells such as astrocytes and microglia. In neurocognitively normal patients, HIV-1 can be found at high frequency in these cells (4% of astrocytes and 20% of macrophages). CNS cells have unique molecular mechanisms to suppress viral replication and induce latency, which include increased expression of dominant negative transcription factors and suppressive epigenetic factors. There is also evidence of continued inflammation in patients lacking a CNS viral load, suggesting the production and activity of viral neurotoxins (for example Tat). Summary Together, these findings provide evidence that the CNS can potentially act as a viral reservoir of HIV-1. However, the majority of these studies were performed in historical cohorts (absence of cART or presence of viral load) which do not reflect modern day patients (cART-treated and undetectable viral load). Future studies will need to examine patient samples with these characteristics to conclusively determine if the CNS represents a relevant and important viral reservoir. PMID:25203642

  6. The molecular population genetics of HIV-1 group O.

    PubMed Central

    Lemey, Philippe; Pybus, Oliver G; Rambaut, Andrew; Drummond, Alexei J; Robertson, David L; Roques, Pierre; Worobey, Michael; Vandamme, Anne-Mieke

    2004-01-01

    HIV-1 group O originated through cross-species transmission of SIV from chimpanzees to humans and has established a relatively low prevalence in Central Africa. Here, we infer the population genetics and epidemic history of HIV-1 group O from viral gene sequence data and evaluate the effect of variable evolutionary rates and recombination on our estimates. First, model selection tools were used to specify suitable evolutionary and coalescent models for HIV group O. Second, divergence times and population genetic parameters were estimated in a Bayesian framework using Markov chain Monte Carlo sampling, under both strict and relaxed molecular clock methods. Our results date the origin of the group O radiation to around 1920 (1890-1940), a time frame similar to that estimated for HIV-1 group M. However, group O infections, which remain almost wholly restricted to Cameroon, show a slower rate of exponential growth during the twentieth century, explaining their lower current prevalence. To explore the effect of recombination, the Bayesian framework is extended to incorporate multiple unlinked loci. Although recombination can bias estimates of the time to the most recent common ancestor, this effect does not appear to be important for HIV-1 group O. In addition, we show that evolutionary rate estimates for different HIV genes accurately reflect differential selective constraints along the HIV genome. PMID:15280223

  7. HIV-1 low copy viral sequencing-A prototype assay.

    PubMed

    Mellberg, Tomas; Krabbe, Jon; Gisslén, Magnus; Svennerholm, Bo

    2016-01-01

    In HIV-1 patients with low viral burden, sequencing is often problematic, yet important. This study presents a sensitive, sub-type independent system for sequencing of low level viremia. Sequencing data from 32 HIV-1 infected patients with low level viremia were collected longitudinally. A combination of ViroSeq® HIV-1 Genotyping System and an in-house nesting protocol was used. Eight sub-types were represented. The success-rate of amplification of both PR and RT in the same sample was 100% in samples with viral loads above 100 copies/ml. Below 100 copies/ml, this study managed to amplify both regions in 7/13 (54%) samples. The assays were able to amplify either PR or RT in all sub-types included but one sub-type A specimen. In conclusion, this study presents a promising, simple assay to increase the ability to perform HIV-1 resistance testing at low level viremia. This is a prototype assay and the method needs further testing to evaluate clinical performance.

  8. Effects of human SAMHD1 polymorphisms on HIV-1 susceptibility

    SciTech Connect

    White, Tommy E.; Brandariz-Nuñez, Alberto; Valle-Casuso, Jose Carlos; Knowlton, Caitlin; Kim, Baek; Sawyer, Sara L.; Diaz-Griffero, Felipe

    2014-07-15

    SAMHD1 is a human restriction factor that prevents efficient infection of macrophages, dendritic cells and resting CD4+ T cells by HIV-1. Here we explored the antiviral activity and biochemical properties of human SAMHD1 polymorphisms. Our studies focused on human SAMHD1 polymorphisms that were previously identified as evolving under positive selection for rapid amino acid replacement during primate speciation. The different human SAMHD1 polymorphisms were tested for their ability to block HIV-1, HIV-2 and equine infectious anemia virus (EIAV). All studied SAMHD1 variants block HIV-1, HIV-2 and EIAV infection when compared to wild type. We found that these variants did not lose their ability to oligomerize or to bind RNA. Furthermore, all tested variants were susceptible to degradation by Vpx, and localized to the nuclear compartment. We tested the ability of human SAMHD1 polymorphisms to decrease the dNTP cellular levels. In agreement, none of the different SAMHD1 variants lost their ability to reduce cellular levels of dNTPs. Finally, we found that none of the tested human SAMHD1 polymorphisms affected the ability of the protein to block LINE-1 retrotransposition. - Highlights: • Human SAMHD1 single-nucleotide polymorphisms block HIV-1 and HIV-2 infection. • SAMHD1 polymorphisms do not affect its ability to block LINE-1 retrotransposition. • SAMHD1 polymorphisms decrease the cellular levels of dNTPs.

  9. Maternal plasma and breastmilk viral loads are associated with HIV-1-specific cellular immune responses among HIV-1-exposed, uninfected infants in Kenya

    PubMed Central

    Liu, A Y; Lohman-Payne, B; Chung, M H; Kiarie, J; Kinuthia, J; Slyker, J; Richardson, B; Lehman, D; Farquhar, C; John-Stewart, G

    2015-01-01

    Infants exposed to maternal HIV-1 provide an opportunity to assess correlates of HIV-1-specific interferon (IFN)-γ responses and may be informative in the development of HIV-1 vaccines. HIV-1-infected women with CD4 counts 200–500 cells/mm3 were randomized to short-course zidovudine/nevirapine (ZDV/NVP) or highly active anti-retroviral therapy (HAART) between 2003 and 2005. Maternal plasma and breastmilk HIV-1 RNA and DNA were quantified during the first 6–12 months postpartum. HIV-1 gag peptide-stimulated enzyme-linked immunospot (ELISPOT) assays were conducted in HIV-1-exposed, uninfected infants (EU), and correlates were determined using regression and generalized estimating equations. Among 47 EU infants, 21 (45%) had ≥1 positive ELISPOT result during follow-up. Infants had a median response magnitude of 177 HIV-1-specific spot-forming units (SFU)/106 peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC) [interquartile range (IQR) = 117–287] directed against 2 (IQR = 1–3) gag peptide pools. The prevalence and magnitude of responses did not differ by maternal anti-retroviral (ARV) randomization arm. Maternal plasma HIV-1 RNA levels during pregnancy (P = 0·009) and breastmilk HIV-1 DNA levels at 1 month (P = 0·02) were associated with a higher magnitude of infant HIV-1-specific ELISPOT responses at 1 month postpartum. During follow-up, concurrent breastmilk HIV-1 RNA and DNA (cell-free virus and cell-associated virus, respectively) each were associated positively with magnitude of infant HIV-1-specific responses (P = 0·01). Our data demonstrate the importance of antigenic exposure on the induction of infant HIV-1-specific cellular immune responses in the absence of infection. PMID:25652232

  10. Impact of chemotherapy for HIV-1 related lymphoma on residual viremia and cellular HIV-1 DNA in patients on suppressive antiretroviral therapy.

    PubMed

    Cillo, Anthony R; Krishnan, Supriya; McMahon, Deborah K; Mitsuyasu, Ronald T; Para, Michael F; Mellors, John W

    2014-01-01

    The first cure of HIV-1 infection was achieved through complex, multimodal therapy including myeloablative chemotherapy, total body irradiation, anti-thymocyte globulin, and allogeneic stem cell transplantation with a CCR5 delta32 homozygous donor. The contributions of each component of this therapy to HIV-1 eradication are unclear. To assess the impact of cytotoxic chemotherapy alone on HIV-1 persistence, we longitudinally evaluated low-level plasma viremia and HIV-1 DNA in PBMC from patients in the ACTG A5001/ALLRT cohort on suppressive antiretroviral therapy (ART) who underwent chemotherapy for HIV-1 related lymphoma without interrupting ART. Plasma HIV-1 RNA, total HIV-1 DNA and 2-LTR circles (2-LTRs) in PBMC were measured using sensitive qPCR assays. In the 9 patients who received moderately intensive chemotherapy for HIV-1 related lymphoma with uninterrupted ART, low-level plasma HIV-1 RNA did not change significantly with chemotherapy: median HIV-1 RNA was 1 copy/mL (interquartile range: 1.0 to 20) pre-chemotherapy versus 4 copies/mL (interquartile range: 1.0 to 7.0) post-chemotherapy. HIV-1 DNA levels also did not change significantly, with median pre-chemotherapy HIV-1 DNA of 355 copies/106 CD4+ cells versus 228 copies/106 CD4+ cells post-chemotherapy. 2-LTRs were detectable in 2 of 9 patients pre-chemotherapy and in 3 of 9 patients post-chemotherapy. In summary, moderately intensive chemotherapy for HIV-1 related lymphoma in the context of continuous ART did not have a prolonged impact on HIV-1 persistence. Clinical trials registration unique identifier: NCT00001137.

  11. High levels of CC-chemokine expression and downregulated levels of CCR5 during HIV-1/HTLV-1 and HIV-1/HTLV-2 coinfections.

    PubMed

    Oo, Z; Barrios, C S; Castillo, L; Beilke, M A

    2015-05-01

    The human T-cell lymphotropic virus type 1 (HTLV-1) and HTLV-2 are common copathogens among Human Immunodeficiency Virus (HIV)-infected individuals. HTLV-2 may confer a survival benefit among patients with HIV-1/HTLV-2 coinfections, along with lower plasma HIV-1 levels and delayed rates of CD4(+) T-cell decline. These effects have been attributed to the ability of the HTLV-2 viral transactivating Tax2 protein to induce the production of high levels of antiviral CC-chemokines and to downregulate expression of the CCR5 receptor, resulting in impaired entry of HIV-1 into CD4(+) T-cells. This study investigated the innate immunity of coinfected HIV/HTLV individuals by testing the ability of patient PBMCs to produce CC-chemokines in association CCR5 receptor modulation. The cellular proliferative responses of HIV/HTLV coinfected versus HIV monoinfected individuals were also evaluated. Higher levels of MIP-1α, MIP-1β, and RANTES (P < 0.05) were found in HIV-1/HTLV-2 coinfected group compared to HIV-1 monoinfected population. Upregulated levels of RANTES were shown in HIV-1/HTLV-1 after 1 and 3 days of culture (P < 0.05). Lymphocytes from HIV-1/HTLV-2 coinfected individuals showed significant CCR5 downregulation after 1 and 3 days of culture compared to lymphocytes from HIV-1 and uninfected groups (P < 0.05). Lower percentages of CCR5-positive cells were found in HIV-1/HTLV-1 coinfected after 3 days of incubation (P < 0.05). Levels of proliferation were significantly higher in the HIV-1/HTLV-1 group compared to HIV-1 alone (P < 0.05). HTLV-2 and HTLV-1 infections may induce the involvement of innate immunity against HIV-1 via stimulation of CC-chemokines and receptors, potentially modifying CCR5/HIV-1 binding and HIV-1 progression in coinfected individuals.

  12. Impact of Chemotherapy for HIV-1 Related Lymphoma on Residual Viremia and Cellular HIV-1 DNA in Patients on Suppressive Antiretroviral Therapy

    PubMed Central

    Cillo, Anthony R.; Krishnan, Supriya; McMahon, Deborah K.; Mitsuyasu, Ronald T.; Para, Michael F.; Mellors, John W.

    2014-01-01

    The first cure of HIV-1 infection was achieved through complex, multimodal therapy including myeloablative chemotherapy, total body irradiation, anti-thymocyte globulin, and allogeneic stem cell transplantation with a CCR5 delta32 homozygous donor. The contributions of each component of this therapy to HIV-1 eradication are unclear. To assess the impact of cytotoxic chemotherapy alone on HIV-1 persistence, we longitudinally evaluated low-level plasma viremia and HIV-1 DNA in PBMC from patients in the ACTG A5001/ALLRT cohort on suppressive antiretroviral therapy (ART) who underwent chemotherapy for HIV-1 related lymphoma without interrupting ART. Plasma HIV-1 RNA, total HIV-1 DNA and 2-LTR circles (2-LTRs) in PBMC were measured using sensitive qPCR assays. In the 9 patients who received moderately intensive chemotherapy for HIV-1 related lymphoma with uninterrupted ART, low-level plasma HIV-1 RNA did not change significantly with chemotherapy: median HIV-1 RNA was 1 copy/mL (interquartile range: 1.0 to 20) pre-chemotherapy versus 4 copies/mL (interquartile range: 1.0 to 7.0) post-chemotherapy. HIV-1 DNA levels also did not change significantly, with median pre-chemotherapy HIV-1 DNA of 355 copies/106 CD4+ cells versus 228 copies/106 CD4+ cells post-chemotherapy. 2-LTRs were detectable in 2 of 9 patients pre-chemotherapy and in 3 of 9 patients post-chemotherapy. In summary, moderately intensive chemotherapy for HIV-1 related lymphoma in the context of continuous ART did not have a prolonged impact on HIV-1 persistence. Clinical Trials Registration Unique Identifier: NCT00001137 PMID:24638072

  13. HIV-1 Genetic Diversity Among Incident Infections in Mbeya, Tanzania.

    PubMed

    Billings, Erik; Sanders-Buell, Eric; Bose, Meera; Kijak, Gustavo H; Bradfield, Andrea; Crossler, Jacqueline; Arroyo, Miguel A; Maboko, Leonard; Hoffmann, Oliver; Geis, Steffen; Birx, Deborah L; Kim, Jerome H; Michael, Nelson L; Robb, Merlin L; Hoelscher, Michael; Tovanabutra, Sodsai

    2017-04-01

    In preparation for vaccine trials, HIV-1 genetic diversity was surveyed between 2002 and 2006 through the Cohort Development study in the form of a retrospective and prospective observational study in and around the town of Mbeya in Tanzania's Southwest Highlands. This study describes the molecular epidemiology of HIV-1 strains obtained from 97 out of 106 incident HIV-1 infections identified in three subpopulations of participants (one rural, two urban) from the Mbeya area. Near full-genome or half-genome sequencing showed a subtype distribution of 40% C, 17% A1, 1% D, and 42% inter-subtype recombinants. Compared to viral subtyping results previously obtained from the retrospective phase of this study, the overall proportion of incident viral strains did not change greatly during the study course, suggesting maturity of the epidemic. A comparison to a current Phase I-II vaccine being tested in Africa shows ∼17% amino acid sequence difference between the gp120 of the vaccine and subtype C incident strains. Phylogenetic and recombinant breakpoint analysis of the incident strains revealed the emergence of CRF41_CD and many unique recombinants, as well as the presence of six local transmission networks most of which were confined to the rural subpopulation. In the context of vaccine cohort selection, these results suggest distinct infection transmission dynamics within these three geographically close subpopulations. The diversity and genetic sequences of the HIV-1 strains obtained during this study will greatly contribute to the planning, immunogen selection, and analysis of vaccine-induced immune responses observed during HIV-1 vaccine trials in Tanzania and neighboring countries.

  14. HIV-1 Genetic Variants in the Russian Far East

    PubMed Central

    Kazennova, Elena; Laga, Vita; Lapovok, Ilya; Glushchenko, Nataliya; Neshumaev, Dmitry; Vasilyev, Alexander

    2014-01-01

    Abstract A molecular analysis of HIV-1 subtypes and recombinants circulating in cities in the Russian Far East was performed. The study included samples from 201 outpatients from Vladivostok, Khabarovsk, and Blagoveshchensk. In most parts of Russia, patients are infected with HIV-1 subtype A, known as the IDU-A variant. Subtype B, including the IDU-B variant, is rare in Russia but widespread in the Ukraine, and the CRF02_AG is prevalent in Central Asian countries and Siberia, Russia. One of the challenges of this study in the Far East was to determine whether the molecular landscape of HIV infection in this region is influenced by the bordering countries, including China and Japan, where a distinct set of HIV subtypes is circulating, such as B′, C, and CRF01_AE. The distribution of HIV-1 genetic variants in the cities studied was as follows: subtype A (IDU-A), 55.7%; subtype B, 25.3% (IDU-B variant—24.3%); subtype C, 10.0%; CRF02_AG, 1.5%; and CRF63_02A1, 7.5%. A phylogenetic analysis confirmed the relationship of subtype A viruses with the IDU-A variant predominating in Ukraine, Russia and other former Soviet Union (FSU) countries, of subtype B viruses with IDU-B in the Ukraine and of CRF02_AG variants with variants in Uzbekistan, Russia, and other former USSR countries. Subtype C sequences were not uniform, and most clustered between each other and HIV-1 sequences originating from Africa; there was only one sample possibly related to Chinese variants. Thus, despite close cultural and commercial relationships among Russia, China, and Japan, the distribution of HIV-1 subtypes in the Russian Far East is still primarily influenced by contacts with the countries of the former USSR. PMID:24773167

  15. Dicaffeoyltartaric acid analogues inhibit human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) integrase and HIV-1 replication at nontoxic concentrations.

    PubMed

    Reinke, Ryan A; King, Peter J; Victoria, Joseph G; McDougall, Brenda R; Ma, Guoxiang; Mao, Yingqun; Reinecke, Manfred G; Robinson, W Edward

    2002-08-15

    The human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) is a major health problem worldwide. In this study, 17 analogues of L-chicoric acid, a potent inhibitor of HIV integrase, were studied. Of these analogues, five submicromolar inhibitors of integrase were discovered and 13 compounds with activity against integrase at less than 10 microM were identified. Six demonstrated greater than 10-fold selectivity for HIV replication over cellular toxicity. Ten analogues inhibited HIV replication at nontoxic concentrations. Alteration of the linkages between the two bis-catechol rings, including the use of amides, mixed amide esters, cholate, and alkyl bridges, was explored. Amides were as active as esters but were more toxic in tissue culture. Alkyl and cholate bridges were significantly less potent against HIV-1 integrase in vitro and were inactive against HIV-1 replication. Two amino acid derivates and one digalloylderivative of L-chicoric acid (L-CA) showed improved selectivity over L-CA against integration in cell culture. These data suggest that in addition to the bis-catechols and free carboxylic acid groups reported previously, polar linkages are important constituents for optimal activity against HIV-1 integrase and that new derivatives can be developed with increased specificity for integration over HIV entry in vivo.

  16. Resistance to type 1 interferons is a major determinant of HIV-1 transmission fitness

    PubMed Central

    Iyer, Shilpa S.; Bibollet-Ruche, Frederic; Sherrill-Mix, Scott; Learn, Gerald H.; Plenderleith, Lindsey; Smith, Andrew G.; Barbian, Hannah J.; Russell, Ronnie M.; Gondim, Marcos V. P.; Bahari, Catherine Y.; Shaw, Christiana M.; Li, Yingying; Decker, Timothy; Haynes, Barton F.; Shaw, George M.; Sharp, Paul M.; Borrow, Persephone; Hahn, Beatrice H.

    2017-01-01

    Sexual transmission of HIV-1 is an inefficient process, with only one or few variants of the donor quasispecies establishing the new infection. A critical, and as yet unresolved, question is whether the mucosal bottleneck selects for viruses with increased transmission fitness. Here, we characterized 300 limiting dilution-derived virus isolates from the plasma, and in some instances genital secretions, of eight HIV-1 donor and recipient pairs. Although there were no differences in the amount of virion-associated envelope glycoprotein, recipient isolates were on average threefold more infectious (P = 0.0001), replicated to 1.4-fold higher titers (P = 0.004), were released from infected cells 4.2-fold more efficiently (P < 0.00001), and were significantly more resistant to type I IFNs than the corresponding donor isolates. Remarkably, transmitted viruses exhibited 7.8-fold higher IFNα2 (P < 0.00001) and 39-fold higher IFNβ (P < 0.00001) half-maximal inhibitory concentrations (IC50) than did donor isolates, and their odds of replicating in CD4+ T cells at the highest IFNα2 and IFNβ doses were 35-fold (P < 0.00001) and 250-fold (P < 0.00001) greater, respectively. Interestingly, pretreatment of CD4+ T cells with IFNβ, but not IFNα2, selected donor plasma isolates that exhibited a transmitted virus-like phenotype, and such viruses were also detected in the donor genital tract. These data indicate that transmitted viruses are phenotypically distinct, and that increased IFN resistance represents their most distinguishing property. Thus, the mucosal bottleneck selects for viruses that are able to replicate and spread efficiently in the face of a potent innate immune response. PMID:28069935

  17. German-austrian recommendations for HIV1-therapy in pregnancy and in HIV1-exposed newborn - update 2008

    PubMed Central

    2009-01-01

    German-Austrian recommendations for HIV1-therapy in pregnancy - Update 2008 Bernd Buchholz (University Medical Centre Mannheim, Pediatric Clinic), Matthias Beichert (Mannheim, Gynecology and Obstetrics Practice), Ulrich Marcus (Robert Koch Institute, Berlin), Thomas Grubert, Andrea Gingelmaier (Gynecology Clinic of the Ludwig Maximilians University of Munich), Dr. med. Annette Haberl (HIV-Department, J. W. Goethe-University Hospital, Frankfurt), Dr. med. Brigitte Schmied (Otto-Wagner Spital, Wien). In Germany during the last years about 200-250 HIV1-infected pregnant women delivered a baby each year, a