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Sample records for 4fe-4s clusters fa

  1. Chloroplast HCF101 is a scaffold protein for [4Fe-4S] cluster assembly

    PubMed Central

    Schwenkert, Serena; Netz, Daili J. A.; Frazzon, Jeverson; Pierik, Antonio J.; Bill, Eckhard; Gross, Jeferson; Lill, Roland; Meurer, Jörg

    2009-01-01

    Oxygen-evolving chloroplasts possess their own iron-sulfur cluster assembly proteins including members of the SUF (sulfur mobilization) and the NFU family. Recently, the chloroplast protein HCF101 (high chlorophyll fluorescence 101) has been shown to be essential for the accumulation of the membrane complex Photosystem I and the soluble ferredoxin-thioredoxin reductases, both containing [4Fe-4S] clusters. The protein belongs to the FSC-NTPase ([4Fe-4S]-cluster-containing P-loop NTPase) superfamily, several members of which play a crucial role in Fe/S cluster biosynthesis. Although the C-terminal ISC-binding site, conserved in other members of the FSC-NTPase family, is not present in chloroplast HCF101 homologues using Mössbauer and EPR spectroscopy, we provide evidence that HCF101 binds a [4Fe-4S] cluster. 55Fe incorporation studies of mitochondrially targeted HCF101 in Saccharomyces cerevisiae confirmed the assembly of an Fe/S cluster in HCF101 in an Nfs1-dependent manner. Site-directed mutagenesis identified three HCF101-specific cysteine residues required for assembly and/or stability of the cluster. We further demonstrate that the reconstituted cluster is transiently bound and can be transferred from HCF101 to a [4Fe-4S] apoprotein. Together, our findings suggest that HCF101 may serve as a chloroplast scaffold protein that specifically assembles [4Fe-4S] clusters and transfers them to the chloroplast membrane and soluble target proteins. PMID:19817716

  2. Identification of two [4Fe-4S]-cluster-containing hydro-lyases from Pyrococcus furiosus.

    PubMed

    van Vugt-Lussenburg, Barbara M A; van der Weel, Laura; Hagen, Wilfred R; Hagedoorn, Peter-Leon

    2009-09-01

    The hyperthermophilic archaeon Pyrococcus furiosus is a strict anaerobe. It is therefore not expected to use the oxidative tricarboxylic acid (TCA) cycle for energy transduction. Nonetheless, its genome encodes more putative TCA cycle enzymes than the closely related Pyrococcus horikoshii and Pyrococcus abyssi, including an aconitase (PF0201). Furthermore, a two-subunit fumarase (PF1755 and PF1754) is encoded on the Pyr. furiosus genome. In the present study, these three genes were heterologously overexpressed in Escherichia coli to enable characterization of the enzymes. PF1755 and PF1754 were shown to form a [4Fe-4S]-cluster-containing heterodimeric enzyme, able to catalyse the reversible hydratation of fumarate. The aconitase PF0201 also contained an Fe-S cluster, and catalysed the conversion from citrate to isocitrate. The fumarase belongs to the class of two-subunit, [4Fe-4S]-cluster-containing fumarate hydratases exemplified by MmcBC from Pelotomaculum thermopropionicum; the aconitase belongs to the aconitase A family. Aconitase probably plays a role in amino acid synthesis when the organism grows on carbohydrates. However, the function of the seemingly metabolically isolated fumarase in Pyr. furiosus has yet to be established.

  3. Dispensability of the [4Fe-4S] cluster in novel homologues of adenine glycosylase MutY.

    PubMed

    Trasviña-Arenas, Carlos H; Lopez-Castillo, Laura M; Sanchez-Sandoval, Eugenia; Brieba, Luis G

    2016-02-01

    7,8-Dihydro-8-deoxyguanine (8oG) is one of the most common oxidative lesions in DNA. DNA polymerases misincorporate an adenine across from this lesion. Thus, 8oG is a highly mutagenic lesion responsible for G:C→T:A transversions. MutY is an adenine glycosylase, part of the base excision repair pathway that removes adenines, when mispaired with 8oG or guanine. Its catalytic domain includes a [4Fe-4S] cluster motif coordinated by cysteinyl ligands. When this cluster is absent, MutY activity is depleted and several studies concluded that the [4Fe-4S] cluster motif is an indispensable component for DNA binding, substrate recognition and enzymatic activity. In the present study, we identified 46 MutY homologues that lack the canonical cysteinyl ligands, suggesting an absence of the [4Fe-4S] cluster. A phylogenetic analysis groups these novel MutYs into two different clades. One clade is exclusive of the order Lactobacillales and another clade has a mixed composition of anaerobic and microaerophilic bacteria and species from the protozoan genus Entamoeba. Structural modeling and sequence analysis suggests that the loss of the [4Fe-4S] cluster is compensated by a convergent solution in which bulky amino acids substitute the [4Fe-4S] cluster. We functionally characterized MutYs from Lactobacillus brevis and Entamoeba histolytica as representative members from each clade and found that both enzymes are active adenine glycosylases. Furthermore, chimeric glycosylases, in which the [4Fe-4S] cluster of Escherichia coli MutY is replaced by the corresponding amino acids of LbY and EhY, are also active. Our data indicates that the [4Fe-4S] cluster plays a structural role in MutYs and evidences the existence of alternative functional solutions in nature.

  4. On the Role of Additional [4Fe-4S] Clusters with a Free Coordination Site in Radical-SAM Enzymes

    PubMed Central

    Mulliez, Etienne; Duarte, Victor; Arragain, Simon; Fontecave, Marc; Atta, Mohamed

    2017-01-01

    The canonical CysXXXCysXXCys motif is the hallmark of the Radical-SAM superfamily. This motif is responsible for the ligation of a [4Fe-4S] cluster containing a free coordination site available for SAM binding. The five enzymes MoaA, TYW1, MiaB, RimO and LipA contain in addition a second [4Fe-4S] cluster itself bound to three other cysteines and thus also displaying a potentially free coordination site. This review article summarizes recent important achievements obtained on these five enzymes with the main focus to delineate the role of this additional [4Fe-4S] cluster in catalysis. PMID:28361051

  5. The [4Fe4S] cluster of human DNA primase functions as a redox switch using DNA charge transport.

    PubMed

    O'Brien, Elizabeth; Holt, Marilyn E; Thompson, Matthew K; Salay, Lauren E; Ehlinger, Aaron C; Chazin, Walter J; Barton, Jacqueline K

    2017-02-24

    DNA charge transport chemistry offers a means of long-range, rapid redox signaling. We demonstrate that the [4Fe4S] cluster in human DNA primase can make use of this chemistry to coordinate the first steps of DNA synthesis. Using DNA electrochemistry, we found that a change in oxidation state of the [4Fe4S] cluster acts as a switch for DNA binding. Single-atom mutations that inhibit this charge transfer hinder primase initiation without affecting primase structure or polymerization. Generating a single base mismatch in the growing primer duplex, which attenuates DNA charge transport, inhibits primer truncation. Thus, redox signaling by [4Fe4S] clusters using DNA charge transport regulates primase binding to DNA and illustrates chemistry that may efficiently drive substrate handoff between polymerases during DNA replication.

  6. Electrochemistry of the [4Fe4S] Cluster in Base Excision Repair Proteins: Tuning the Redox Potential with DNA.

    PubMed

    Bartels, Phillip L; Zhou, Andy; Arnold, Anna R; Nuñez, Nicole N; Crespilho, Frank N; David, Sheila S; Barton, Jacqueline K

    2017-03-02

    Escherichia coli endonuclease III (EndoIII) and MutY are DNA glycosylases that contain [4Fe4S] clusters and that serve to maintain the integrity of the genome after oxidative stress. Electrochemical studies on highly oriented pyrolytic graphite (HOPG) revealed that DNA binding by EndoIII leads to a large negative shift in the midpoint potential of the cluster, consistent with stabilization of the oxidized [4Fe4S](3+) form. However, the smooth, hydrophobic HOPG surface is nonideal for working with proteins in the absence of DNA. In this work, we use thin film voltammetry on a pyrolytic graphite edge electrode to overcome these limitations. Improved adsorption leads to substantial signals for both EndoIII and MutY in the absence of DNA, and a large negative potential shift is retained with DNA present. In contrast, the EndoIII mutants E200K, Y205H, and K208E, which provide electrostatic perturbations in the vicinity of the cluster, all show DNA-free potentials within error of wild type; similarly, the presence of negatively charged poly-l-glutamate does not lead to a significant potential shift. Overall, binding to the DNA polyanion is the dominant effect in tuning the redox potential of the [4Fe4S] cluster, helping to explain why all DNA-binding proteins with [4Fe4S] clusters studied to date have similar DNA-bound potentials.

  7. Arabidopsis thaliana Nfu2 accommodates [2Fe-2S] or [4Fe-4S] clusters and is competent for in vitro maturation of chloroplast [2Fe-2S] and [4Fe-4S] cluster-containing proteins†

    PubMed Central

    Gao, Huanyao; Subramanian, Sowmya; Couturier, Jérémy; Naik, Sunil; Kim, Sung-Kun; Leustek, Thomas; Knaff, David B.; Wu, Hui-Chen; Vignols, Florence; Huynh, Boi Hanh; Rouhier, Nicolas; Johnson, Michael K.

    2013-01-01

    Nfu-type proteins are essential in the biogenesis of iron-sulfur (Fe-S) clusters in numerous organisms. A number of phenotypes including low levels of Fe-S cluster incorporation are associated with deletion of the gene encoding a chloroplast-specific Nfu-type protein, Nfu2 from Arabidopsis thaliana (AtNfu2). Here we report that recombinant AtNfu2 is able to assemble both [2Fe-2S] and [4Fe-4S] clusters. Analytical data and gel filtration studies support cluster/protein stoichiometries of one [2Fe-2S] cluster/homotetramer and one [4Fe-4S] cluster/homodimer. The combination of UV-visible absorption and circular dichroism, resonance Raman and Mössbauer spectroscopies has been employed to investigate the nature, properties and transfer of the clusters assembled on Nfu2. The results are consistent with subunit-bridging [2Fe-2S]2+ and [4Fe-4S]2+ clusters coordinated by the cysteines in the conserved CXXC motif. The results also provided insight into the specificity of Nfu2 for maturation of chloroplastic Fe-S proteins via intact, rapid and quantitative cluster transfer. [2Fe-2S] cluster-bound Nfu2 is shown to be an effective [2Fe-2S]2+ cluster donor for glutaredoxin S16, but not glutaredoxin S14. Moreover, [4Fe-4S] cluster-bound Nfu2 is shown to be a very rapid and efficient [4Fe-4S]2+ cluster donor for adenosine 5′-phosphosulfate reductase (APR1) and yeast two-hybrid studies indicate that APR1 forms a complex with Nfu2, but not with Nfu1 and Nfu3, the two other chloroplastic Nfu proteins. This cluster transfer is likely to be physiologically relevant and is particularly significant for plant metabolism as APR1 catalyzes the second step in reductive sulfur assimilation which ultimately results in the biosynthesis of cysteine, methionine, glutathione, and Fe-S clusters. PMID:24032747

  8. Spectroscopic Studies on the [4Fe-4S] Cluster in Adenosine 5′-Phosphosulfate Reductase from Mycobacterium tuberculosis

    PubMed Central

    Bhave, Devayani P.; Hong, Jiyoung A.; Lee, Michael; Jiang, Wei; Krebs, Carsten; Carroll, Kate S.

    2011-01-01

    Mycobacterium tuberculosis adenosine 5′-phosphosulfate reductase (MtAPR) is an iron-sulfur protein and a validated target to develop new antitubercular agents, particularly for the treatment of latent infection. The enzyme harbors a [4Fe-4S]2+ cluster that is coordinated by four cysteinyl ligands, two of which are adjacent in the amino acid sequence. The iron-sulfur cluster is essential for catalysis; however, the precise role of the [4Fe-4S] cluster in APR remains unknown. Progress in this area has been hampered by the failure to generate a paramagnetic state of the [4Fe-4S] cluster that can be studied by electron paramagnetic resonance spectroscopy. Herein, we overcome this limitation and report the EPR spectra of MtAPR in the [4Fe-4S]+ state. The EPR signal is rhombic and consists of two overlapping S = ½ species. Substrate binding to MtAPR led to a marked increase in the intensity and resolution of the EPR signal and to minor shifts in principle g values that were not observed among a panel of substrate analogs, including adenosine 5′-diphosphate. Using site-directed mutagenesis, in conjunction with kinetic and EPR studies, we have also identified an essential role for the active site residue Lys-144, whose side chain interacts with both the iron-sulfur cluster and the sulfate group of adenosine 5′-phosphosulfate. The implications of these findings are discussed with respect to the role of the iron-sulfur cluster in the catalytic mechanism of APR. PMID:21075841

  9. The methanogenic CO2 reducing-and-fixing enzyme is bifunctional and contains 46 [4Fe-4S] clusters.

    PubMed

    Wagner, Tristan; Ermler, Ulrich; Shima, Seigo

    2016-10-07

    Biological methane formation starts with a challenging adenosine triphosphate (ATP)-independent carbon dioxide (CO2) fixation process. We explored this enzymatic process by solving the x-ray crystal structure of formyl-methanofuran dehydrogenase, determined here as Fwd(ABCDFG)2 and Fwd(ABCDFG)4 complexes, from Methanothermobacter wolfeii The latter 800-kilodalton apparatus consists of four peripheral catalytic sections and an electron-supplying core with 46 electronically coupled [4Fe-4S] clusters. Catalysis is separately performed by subunits FwdBD (FwdB and FwdD), which are related to tungsten-containing formate dehydrogenase, and subunit FwdA, a binuclear metal center carrying amidohydrolase. CO2 is first reduced to formate in FwdBD, which then diffuses through a 43-angstrom-long tunnel to FwdA, where it condenses with methanofuran to formyl-methanofuran. The arrangement of [4Fe-4S] clusters functions as an electron relay but potentially also couples the four tungstopterin active sites over 206 angstroms.

  10. The [4Fe-4S] clusters of Rpo3 are key determinants in the post Rpo3/Rpo11 heterodimer formation of RNA polymerase in Methanosarcina acetivorans.

    PubMed

    Jennings, Matthew E; Lessner, Faith H; Karr, Elizabeth A; Lessner, Daniel J

    2017-02-01

    Subunits Rpo3 and Rpb3/AC40 of RNA polymerase (RNAP) from many archaea and some eukaryotes, respectively, contain a ferredoxin-like domain (FLD) predicted to bind one or two [4Fe-4S] clusters postulated to play a role in regulating the assembly of RNAP. To test this hypothesis, the two [4Fe-4S] cluster Rpo3 from Methanosarcina acetivorans was modified to generate variants that lack the FLD or each [4Fe-4S] cluster. Viability of gene replacement mutants revealed that neither the FLD nor the ability of the FLD to bind either [4Fe-4S] cluster is essential. Nevertheless, each mutant demonstrated impaired growth due to significantly lower RNAP activity when compared to wild type. Affinity purification of tagged Rpo3 variants from M. acetivorans strains revealed that neither the FLD nor each [4Fe-4S] cluster is required for the formation of a Rpo3/11 heterodimer, the first step in the assembly of RNAP. However, the association of the Rpo3/11 heterodimer with catalytic subunits Rpo2' and Rpo1″ was diminished by the removal of the FLD and each cluster, with the loss of cluster 1 having a more substantial effect than the loss of cluster 2. These results reveal that the FLD and [4Fe-4S] clusters, particularly cluster 1, are key determinants in the post Rpo3/11 heterodimer assembly of RNAP in M. acetivorans.

  11. (4Fe-4S)-cluster-depleted Azotobacter vinelandii ferredoxin I: a new 3Fe iron-sulfur protein

    SciTech Connect

    Stephens, P.J.; Morgan, T.V.; Devlin, F.; Penner-Hahn, J.E.; Hodgson, K.O.; Scott, R.A.; Stout, C.D.; Burgess, B.K.

    1985-09-01

    Fe(CN)6T oxidation of the aerobically isolated 7Fe Azotobacter vinelandii ferredoxin I, (7Fe)FdI, is a degradative reaction. Destruction of the (4Fe-4S) cluster occurs first, followed by destruction of the (3Fe-3S) cluster. At a Fe(CN)6T /(7Fe)FdI concentration ratio of 20, the product is a mixture of apoprotein and protein containing only a (3Fe-3S) cluster, (3Fe)FdI. This protein mixture, after partial purification, has been characterized by absorption, CD, magnetic CD, and EPR and Fe x-ray absorption spectroscopies. EPR and magnetic CD spectra provide strong evidence that the (3Fe-3S) cluster in (3Fe)FdI is essentially identical in structure to that in (7Fe)FdI. Analysis of the extended x-ray absorption fine structure (EXAFS) of (3Fe)FdI finds Fe scattering at an average Fe...Fe distance of approx. =2.7 A. The structure of the oxidized (3Fe-3S) cluster in solutions of oxidized (3Fe)FdI, and, by extension, of oxidized (7Fe)FdI, is thus different from that obtained by x-ray crystallography on oxidized (7Fe)FdI. Possible interpretations of this result are discussed.

  12. A PAS domain with an oxygen labile [4Fe-4S](2+) cluster in the oxygen sensor kinase NreB of Staphylococcus carnosus.

    PubMed

    Müllner, Martin; Hammel, Oliver; Mienert, Bernd; Schlag, Steffen; Bill, Eckhard; Unden, Gottfried

    2008-12-30

    The cytoplasmic histidine sensor kinase NreB of Staphylococcus carnosus responds to O(2) and controls together with the response regulator NreC the expression of genes of nitrate/nitrite respiration. nreBC homologous genes were found in Staphylococcus strains and Bacillus clausii, and a modified form was found in some Lactobacillus strains. NreB contains a sensory domain with similarity to heme B binding PAS domains. Anaerobically prepared NreB of S. carnosus exhibited a (diamagnetic) [4Fe-4S](2+) cluster when assessed by Mossbauer spectroscopy. Upon reaction with air, the cluster was degraded with a half-life of approximately 2.5 min. No significant amounts of Mossbauer or EPR detectable intermediates were found during the decay, but magnetic Mossbauer spectra revealed formation of diamagnetic [2Fe-2S](2+) clusters. After extended exposure to air, NreB was devoid of a FeS cluster. Photoreduction with deazaflavin produced small amounts of [4Fe-4S](+), which were degraded subsequently. The magnetically perturbed Mossbauer spectrum of the [4Fe-4S](2+) cluster corroborated the S = 0 spin state and revealed uniform electric field gradient tensors of the iron sites, suggesting full delocalization of the valence electrons and binding of each of the Fe ions by four S ligands, including the ligand to the protein. Mutation of each of the four Cys residues inactivated NreB function in vivo in accordance with their role as ligands. [4Fe-4S](2+) cluster-containing NreB had high kinase activity. Exposure to air decreased the kinase activity and content of the [4Fe-4S](2+) cluster with similar half-lives. We conclude that the sensory domain of NreB represents a new type of PAS domain containing a [4Fe-4S](2+) cluster for sensing and function.

  13. Aspartate 141 Is the Fourth Ligand of the Oxygen-sensing [4Fe-4S]2+ Cluster of Bacillus subtilis Transcriptional Regulator Fnr*

    PubMed Central

    Gruner, Ines; Frädrich, Claudia; Böttger, Lars H.; Trautwein, Alfred X.; Jahn, Dieter; Härtig, Elisabeth

    2011-01-01

    The Bacillus subtilis redox regulator Fnr controls genes of the anaerobic metabolism in response to low oxygen tension. An unusual structure for the oxygen-sensing [4Fe-4S]2+ cluster was detected by a combination of genetic experiments with UV-visible and Mössbauer spectroscopy. Asp-141 was identified as the fourth iron-sulfur cluster ligand besides three Cys residues. Exchange of Asp-141 with Ala abolished functional in vivo complementation of an fnr knock-out strain by the mutagenized fnr gene and in vitro DNA binding of the recombinant regulator FnrD141A. In contrast, substitution of Asp-141 with Cys preserved [4Fe-4S]2+ structure and regulator function. PMID:21068385

  14. Spectroscopic and functional properties of novel 2[4Fe-4S] cluster-containing ferredoxins from the green sulfur bacterium Chlorobium tepidum.

    PubMed

    Yoon, K S; Bobst, C; Hemann, C F; Hille, R; Tabita, F R

    2001-11-23

    Two distinct ferredoxins, Fd I and Fd II, were isolated and purified to homogeneity from photoautotrophically grown Chlorobium tepidum, a moderately thermophilic green sulfur bacterium that assimilates carbon dioxide by the reductive tricarboxylic acid cycle. Both ferredoxins serve a crucial role as electron donors for reductive carboxylation, catalyzed by a key enzyme of this pathway, pyruvate synthase/pyruvate ferredoxin oxidoreductase. The reduction potentials of Fd I and Fd II were determined by cyclic voltammetry to be -514 and -584 mV, respectively, which are more electronegative than any previously studied Fds in which two [4Fe-4S] clusters display a single transition. Further spectroscopic studies indicated that the CD spectrum of oxidized Fd I closely resembled that of Fd II; however, both spectra appeared to be unique relative to ferredoxins studied previously. Double integration of the EPR signal of the two Fds yielded approximately approximately 2.0 spins per molecule, compatible with the idea that C. tepidum Fd I and Fd II accept 2 electrons upon reduction. These results suggest that the C. tepidum Fd I and Fd II polypeptides each contain two bound [4Fe-4S] clusters. C. tepidum Fd I and Fd II are novel 2[4Fe-4S] Fds, which were shown previously to function as biological electron donors or acceptors for C. tepidum pyruvate synthase/pyruvate ferredoxin oxidoreductase (Yoon, K.-S., Hille, R., Hemann, C. F., and Tabita, F. R. (1999) J. Biol. Chem. 274, 29772-29778). Kinetic measurements indicated that Fd I had approximately 2.3-fold higher affinity than Fd II. The results of amino acid sequence alignments, molecular modeling, oxidation-reduction potentials, and spectral properties strongly indicate that the C. tepidum Fds are chimeras of both clostridial-type and chromatium-type Fds, suggesting that the two Fds are likely intermediates in the evolutional development of 2[4Fe-4S] clusters compared with the well described clostridial and chromatium types.

  15. The conserved protein Dre2 uses essential [2Fe-2S] and [4Fe-4S] clusters for its function in cytosolic iron-sulfur protein assembly.

    PubMed

    Netz, Daili J A; Genau, Heide M; Weiler, Benjamin D; Bill, Eckhard; Pierik, Antonio J; Lill, Roland

    2016-07-15

    The cytosolic iron-sulfur (Fe-S) protein assembly (CIA) machinery comprises 11 essential components and matures Fe-S proteins involved in translation and genome maintenance. Maturation is initiated by the electron transfer chain NADPH-diflavin reductase Tah18-Fe-S protein Dre2 that facilitates the de novo assembly of a [4Fe-4S] cluster on the scaffold complex Cfd1-Nbp35. Tah18-Dre2 also play a critical role in the assembly of the diferric tyrosyl radical cofactor of ribonucleotide reductase. Dre2 contains eight conserved cysteine residues as potential co-ordinating ligands for Fe-S clusters but their functional importance and the type of bound clusters is unclear. In the present study, we use a combination of mutagenesis, cell biological and biochemical as well as UV-visible, EPR and Mössbauer spectroscopic approaches to show that the yeast Dre2 cysteine residues Cys(252), Cys(263), Cys(266) and Cys(268) (motif I) bind a [2Fe-2S] cluster, whereas cysteine residues Cys(311), Cys(314), Cys(322) and Cys(325) (motif II) co-ordinate a [4Fe-4S] cluster. All of these residues with the exception of Cys(252) are essential for cell viability, cytosolic Fe-S protein activity and in vivo (55)Fe-S cluster incorporation. The N-terminal methyltransferase-like domain of Dre2 is important for proper Fe-S cluster assembly at motifs I and II, which occurs in an interdependent fashion. Our findings further resolve why recombinant Dre2 from Arabidopsis, Trypanosoma or humans has previously been isolated with a single [2Fe-2S] instead of native [2Fe-2S] plus [4Fe-4S] clusters. In the presence of oxygen, the motif I-bound [2Fe-2S] cluster is labile and the motif II-bound [4Fe-4S] cluster is readily converted into a [2Fe-2S] cluster.

  16. NsrR from Streptomyces coelicolor Is a Nitric Oxide-sensing [4Fe-4S] Cluster Protein with a Specialized Regulatory Function*

    PubMed Central

    Crack, Jason C.; Munnoch, John; Dodd, Erin L.; Knowles, Felicity; Al Bassam, Mahmoud M.; Kamali, Saeed; Holland, Ashley A.; Cramer, Stephen P.; Hamilton, Chris J.; Johnson, Michael K.; Thomson, Andrew J.; Hutchings, Matthew I.; Le Brun, Nick E.

    2015-01-01

    The Rrf2 family transcription factor NsrR controls expression of genes in a wide range of bacteria in response to nitric oxide (NO). The precise form of the NO-sensing module of NsrR is the subject of controversy because NsrR proteins containing either [2Fe-2S] or [4Fe-4S] clusters have been observed previously. Optical, Mössbauer, resonance Raman spectroscopies and native mass spectrometry demonstrate that Streptomyces coelicolor NsrR (ScNsrR), previously reported to contain a [2Fe-2S] cluster, can be isolated containing a [4Fe-4S] cluster. ChIP-seq experiments indicated that the ScNsrR regulon is small, consisting of only hmpA1, hmpA2, and nsrR itself. The hmpA genes encode NO-detoxifying flavohemoglobins, indicating that ScNsrR has a specialized regulatory function focused on NO detoxification and is not a global regulator like some NsrR orthologues. EMSAs and DNase I footprinting showed that the [4Fe-4S] form of ScNsrR binds specifically and tightly to an 11-bp inverted repeat sequence in the promoter regions of the identified target genes and that DNA binding is abolished following reaction with NO. Resonance Raman data were consistent with cluster coordination by three Cys residues and one oxygen-containing residue, and analysis of ScNsrR variants suggested that highly conserved Glu-85 may be the fourth ligand. Finally, we demonstrate that some low molecular weight thiols, but importantly not physiologically relevant thiols, such as cysteine and an analogue of mycothiol, bind weakly to the [4Fe-4S] cluster, and exposure of this bound form to O2 results in cluster conversion to the [2Fe-2S] form, which does not bind to DNA. These data help to account for the observation of [2Fe-2S] forms of NsrR. PMID:25771538

  17. Reconstitution of the [4Fe-4S] cluster in FNR and demonstration of the aerobic-anaerobic transcription switch in vitro.

    PubMed Central

    Green, J; Bennett, B; Jordan, P; Ralph, E T; Thomson, A J; Guest, J R

    1996-01-01

    The FNR protein of Escherichia coli is a redox-responsive transcription regulator that activates and represses a family of genes required for anaerobic and aerobic metabolism. Reconstitution of wild-type FNR by anaerobic treatment with ferrous ions, cysteine and the NifS protein of Azotobacter vinelandii leads to the incorporation of two [4Fe-4S]2+ clusters per FNR dimer. The UV-visible spectrum of reconstituted FNR has a broad absorbance at 420 nm. The clusters are EPR silent under anaerobic conditions but are degraded to [3Fe-4S]+ by limited oxidation with air, and completely lost on prolonged air exposure. The association of FNR with the iron-sulphur clusters is confirmed by CD spectroscopy. Incorporation of the [4Fe-4S]2+ clusters increases site-specific DNA binding about 7-fold compared with apo-FNR. Anaerobic transcription activation and repression in vitro likewise depends on the presence of the iron-sulphur cluster, and its inactivation under aerobic conditions provides a demonstration in vitro of the FNR-mediated aerobic-anaerobic transcriptional switch. PMID:8670167

  18. UV radiation effects on a DNA repair enzyme: conversion of a [4Fe-4S](2+) cluster into a [2Fe-2S] (2+).

    PubMed

    Folgosa, Filipe; Camacho, Inês; Penas, Daniela; Guilherme, Márcia; Fróis, João; Ribeiro, Paulo A; Tavares, Pedro; Pereira, Alice S

    2015-03-01

    Organisms are often exposed to different types of ionizing radiation that, directly or not, will promote damage to DNA molecules and/or other cellular structures. Because of that, organisms developed a wide range of response mechanisms to deal with these threats. Endonuclease III is one of the enzymes responsible to detect and repair oxidized pyrimidine base lesions. However, the effect of radiation on the structure/function of these enzymes is not clear yet. Here, we demonstrate the effect of UV-C radiation on E. coli endonuclease III through several techniques, namely UV-visible, fluorescence and Mössbauer spectroscopies, as well as SDS-PAGE and electrophoretic mobility shift assay. We demonstrate that irradiation with a UV-C source has dramatic consequences on the absorption, fluorescence, structure and functionality of the protein, affecting its [4Fe-4S] cluster and its DNA-binding ability, which results in its inactivation. An UV-C radiation-induced conversion of the [4Fe-4S](2+) into a [2Fe-2S](2+) was observed for the first time and proven by Mössbauer and UV-visible analysis. This work also shows that the DNA-binding capability of endonuclease III is highly dependent of the nuclearity of the endogenous iron-sulfur cluster. Thus, from our point of view, in a cellular context, these results strengthen the argument that cellular sensitivity to radiation can also be due to loss of radiation-induced damage repair ability.

  19. [3Fe-4S] <--> [4Fe-4S] cluster interconversion in Desulfovibrio africanus ferredoxin III: properties of an Asp14 --> Cys mutant.

    PubMed Central

    Busch, J L; Breton, J L; Bartlett, B M; Armstrong, F A; James, R; Thomson, A J

    1997-01-01

    The 8Fe ferredoxin III from Desulfovibrio africanus is a monomeric protein which contains two [4Fe-4S]2+/1+ clusters, one of which is labile and can readily and reversibly lose one Fe under oxidative conditions to yield a [3Fe-4S]1+/0 cluster. This 4Fe cluster has an S = 3/2 ground sping state insteaed of S = 1/2 in the reduced +1 state [George, Armstrong, Hatchikian and Thomson (1989) Biochem. J. 264, 275-284]. The co-ordination to this cluster is unusual in that an aspartate (Asp14, D14, is found where a cysteine residue normally occurs. Using a mutant protein obtained from the overexpression in Escherichia coli of a synthetic gene in which Asp14, the putative ligand to the removable Fe, has been changed to Cys, we have studied the cluster interconversion properties of the labile cluster. Analysis by EPR and magnetic-circular-dichroism spectroscopies showed that the Asp14 --> Cys (D14C) mutant contains two [4Fe-4S]2+/1+ clusters, both with S = 1/2 in the reduced state. Also, unlike in native 8Fe D. africanus ferredoxin III, the 4Fe <--> 3Fe cluster interconversion reaction was found to be sluggish and did not go to completion. It is inferred that the reversibility of the reaction in the native protein is due to the presence of the aspartate residue at position 14 and that this residue might protect the [3Fe-4S] cluster from further degradation. PMID:9173907

  20. [3Fe-4S] <--> [4Fe-4S] cluster interconversion in Desulfovibrio africanus ferredoxin III: properties of an Asp14 --> Cys mutant.

    PubMed

    Busch, J L; Breton, J L; Bartlett, B M; Armstrong, F A; James, R; Thomson, A J

    1997-04-01

    The 8Fe ferredoxin III from Desulfovibrio africanus is a monomeric protein which contains two [4Fe-4S]2+/1+ clusters, one of which is labile and can readily and reversibly lose one Fe under oxidative conditions to yield a [3Fe-4S]1+/0 cluster. This 4Fe cluster has an S = 3/2 ground sping state insteaed of S = 1/2 in the reduced +1 state [George, Armstrong, Hatchikian and Thomson (1989) Biochem. J. 264, 275-284]. The co-ordination to this cluster is unusual in that an aspartate (Asp14, D14, is found where a cysteine residue normally occurs. Using a mutant protein obtained from the overexpression in Escherichia coli of a synthetic gene in which Asp14, the putative ligand to the removable Fe, has been changed to Cys, we have studied the cluster interconversion properties of the labile cluster. Analysis by EPR and magnetic-circular-dichroism spectroscopies showed that the Asp14 --> Cys (D14C) mutant contains two [4Fe-4S]2+/1+ clusters, both with S = 1/2 in the reduced state. Also, unlike in native 8Fe D. africanus ferredoxin III, the 4Fe <--> 3Fe cluster interconversion reaction was found to be sluggish and did not go to completion. It is inferred that the reversibility of the reaction in the native protein is due to the presence of the aspartate residue at position 14 and that this residue might protect the [3Fe-4S] cluster from further degradation.

  1. Bacillus cereus Fnr binds a [4Fe-4S] cluster and forms a ternary complex with ResD and PlcR

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Bacillus cereus is a facultative anaerobe that causes diarrheal disease in humans. Diarrheal syndrome may result from the secretion of various virulence factors including hemolysin BL and nonhemolytic enterotoxin Nhe. Expression of genes encoding Hbl and Nhe is regulated by the two redox systems, ResDE and Fnr, and the virulence regulator PlcR. B. cereus Fnr is a member of the Crp/Fnr family of iron-sulfur (Fe-S) proteins. Only its apo-form has so far been studied. A major goal in deciphering the Fnr-dependent regulation of enterotoxin genes is thus to obtain and characterize holoFnr. Results Fnr has been subjected to in vitro Fe-S cluster reconstitution under anoxic conditions. UV-visible and EPR spectroscopic analyses together with the chemical estimation of the iron content indicated that Fnr binds one [4Fe-4S]2+ cluster per monomer. Atmospheric O2 causes disassembly of the Fe-S cluster, which exhibited a half-life of 15 min in air. Holo- and apoFnr have similar affinities for the nhe and hbl promoter regions, while holoFnr has a higher affinity for fnr promoter region than apoFnr. Both the apo- and holo-form of Fnr interact with ResD and PlcR to form a ternary complex. Conclusions Overall, this work shows that incorporation of the [4Fe-4S]2+ cluster is not required for DNA binding of Fnr to promoter regions of hbl and nhe enterotoxin genes or for the formation of a ternary complex with ResD and PlcR. This points to some new unusual properties of Fnr that may have physiological relevance in the redox regulation of enterotoxin gene regulation. PMID:22731107

  2. Magnetic interactions between a [4Fe-4S]1+ cluster and a flavin mononucleotide radical in the enzyme trimethylamine dehydrogenase: A high-field electron paramagnetic resonance study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fournel, Andre; Gambarelli, Serge; Guigliarelli, Bruno; More, Claude; Asso, Marcel; Chouteau, Gerard; Hille, Russ; Bertrand, Patrick

    1998-12-01

    Trimethylamine dehydrogenase is a bacterial enzyme which contains two redox centers: a flavin mononucleotide (FMN) group which constitutes the active site and a [4Fe-4S]1+,2+ cluster which transfers the electrons provided by the FMN to an electron-transferring flavoprotein. According to the x-ray crystal structure, the center-to-center distance is equal to 12 Å and the nearest atoms of the two centers are separated by a 4 Å gap. Although this arrangement does not appear especially favorable for mediating strong magnetic interactions, a triplet state electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) spectrum arising from the intercenter magnetic coupling is observed at X band (9 GHz) when the enzyme is reduced by its substrate. In earlier work, the temperature dependence of this spectrum and its analysis based on a triplet state spin Hamiltonian were used to propose the range (0.8-100 cm-1) for the parameter J0 of the isotropic interaction J0SA.SB, but neither the magnitude of J0 nor its sign could be further specified [R. C. Stevenson, W. R. Dunham, R. H. Sands, T. P. Singer, and H. Beinert, Biochim. Biophys. Acta 869, 81 (1986)]. In the present work, we have studied the interaction EPR spectrum in the range 9-340 GHz. Numerical simulations based on a spin Hamiltonian describing a system of two S=1/2 interacting spins allowed us to determine the full set of parameters describing the magnetic interactions between the FMN radical and the [4Fe-4S]1+ cluster. In particular, our study demonstrates that the coupling is antiferromagnetic with J0=+0.72 cm-1. Although this value corresponds to the lower limit of the range proposed previously, it still appears markedly larger than those measured in biological systems in which a similar arrangement of two paramagnetic centers is found.

  3. Insights into eukaryotic DNA priming from the structure and functional interactions of the 4Fe-4S cluster domain of human DNA primase

    SciTech Connect

    Vaithiyalingam, Sivaraja; Warren, Eric M.; Eichman, Brandt F.; Chazin, Walter J.

    2010-10-19

    DNA replication requires priming of DNA templates by enzymes known as primases. Although DNA primase structures are available from archaea and bacteria, the mechanism of DNA priming in higher eukaryotes remains poorly understood in large part due to the absence of the structure of the unique, highly conserved C-terminal regulatory domain of the large subunit (p58C). Here, we present the structure of this domain determined to 1.7-{angstrom} resolution by X-ray crystallography. The p58C structure reveals a novel arrangement of an evolutionarily conserved 4Fe-4S cluster buried deeply within the protein core and is not similar to any known protein structure. Analysis of the binding of DNA to p58C by fluorescence anisotropy measurements revealed a strong preference for ss/dsDNA junction substrates. This approach was combined with site-directed mutagenesis to confirm that the binding of DNA occurs to a distinctively basic surface on p58C. A specific interaction of p58C with the C-terminal domain of the intermediate subunit of replication protein A (RPA32C) was identified and characterized by isothermal titration calorimetry and NMR. Restraints from NMR experiments were used to drive computational docking of the two domains and generate a model of the p58C-RPA32C complex. Together, our results explain functional defects in human DNA primase mutants and provide insights into primosome loading on RPA-coated ssDNA and regulation of primase activity.

  4. Structure of C42D Azotobacter vinelandii FdI. A Cys-X-X-Asp-X-X-Cys motif ligates an air-stable [4Fe-4S]2+/+ cluster.

    PubMed

    Jung, Y S; Bonagura, C A; Tilley, G J; Gao-Sheridan, H S; Armstrong, F A; Stout, C D; Burgess, B K

    2000-11-24

    All naturally occurring ferredoxins that have Cys-X-X-Asp-X-X-Cys motifs contain [4Fe-4S](2+/+) clusters that can be easily and reversibly converted to [3Fe-4S](+/0) clusters. In contrast, ferredoxins with unmodified Cys-X-X-Cys-X-X-Cys motifs assemble [4Fe-4S](2+/+) clusters that cannot be easily interconverted with [3Fe-4S](+/0) clusters. In this study we changed the central cysteine of the Cys(39)-X-X-Cys(42)-X-X-Cys(45) of Azotobacter vinelandii FdI, which coordinates its [4Fe-4S](2+/+) cluster, into an aspartate. UV-visible, EPR, and CD spectroscopies, metal analysis, and x-ray crystallography show that, like native FdI, aerobically purified C42D FdI is a seven-iron protein retaining its [4Fe-4S](2+/+) cluster with monodentate aspartate ligation to one iron. Unlike known clusters of this type the reduced [4Fe-4S](+) cluster of C42D FdI exhibits only an S = 1/2 EPR with no higher spin signals detected. The cluster shows only a minor change in reduction potential relative to the native protein. All attempts to convert the cluster to a 3Fe cluster using conventional methods of oxygen or ferricyanide oxidation or thiol exchange were not successful. The cluster conversion was ultimately accomplished using a new electrochemical method. Hydrophobic and electrostatic interaction and the lack of Gly residues adjacent to the Asp ligand explain the remarkable stability of this cluster.

  5. A Geometric and Electrostatic Study of the [4Fe-4S] Cluster of Adenosine-5´-Phosphosulfate Reductase from Broken Symmetry Density Functional Calculations and Extended X-ray Absorption Fine Structure Spectroscopy

    PubMed Central

    Bhave, Devayani P.; Han, Wen-Ge; Pazicni, Samuel; Penner-Hahn, James E.; Carroll, Kate S.; Noodleman, Louis

    2011-01-01

    Adenosine-5’-phosphosulfate reductase (APSR) is an iron-sulfur protein that catalyses the reduction of adenosine-5’-phosphosulfate (APS) to sulfite. APSR coordinates to a [4Fe-4S] cluster via a conserved CC-X~80-CXXC motif and the cluster is essential for catalysis. Despite extensive functional, structural and spectroscopic studies, the exact role of the iron-sulfur cluster in APS reduction remains unknown. To gain an understanding into the role of the cluster, density functional theory (DFT) analysis and extended X-ray fine structure spectroscopy (EXAFS) have been performed to reveal insights into the coordination, geometry and electrostatics of the [4Fe-4S] cluster. XANES data confirms that the cluster is in the [4Fe-4S]2+ state in both native and substrate-bound APSR while EXAFS data recorded at ~0.1 Å resolution indicates that there is no significant change in the structure of the [4Fe-4S] cluster between the native and substrate-bound forms of the protein. On the other hand, DFT calculations provide an insight into the subtle differences between the geometry of the cluster in the native and APS-bound forms of APSR. A comparison between models with and without the tandem cysteine pair coordination of the cluster suggests a role for the unique coordination in facilitating a compact geometric structure and ‘fine-tuning’ the electronic structure to prevent reduction of the cluster. Further, calculations using models in which residue Lys144 is mutated to Ala confirm the finding that Lys144 serves as a crucial link in the interactions involving the [4Fe-4S] cluster and APS. PMID:21678934

  6. Single-Crystal 57Fe Q-Band ENDOR Study of the 4 Iron-4 Sulfur Cluster in its Reduced [4Fe-4S] 1+ State

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moriaud, Fabrice; Gambarelli, Serge; Lamotte, Bernard; Mouesca, Jean-Marie

    2001-12-01

    57Fe Q-band ENDOR has been used to study the [4Fe-4S]1+ state created by γ irradiation of single crystals of the synthetic model compound [N(C2H5)4]2[Fe4S4(SCH2C6H5)4] enriched in 57Fe. This compound is an excellent biomimetic model of the active sites of many 4 iron-4 sulfur proteins, enabling detailed and systematic studies of its oxidized [4Fe-4S]3+ and reduced [4Fe-4S]1+ paramagnetic states. Taking advantage of the fact that Q-band ENDOR, in contrast with X-Band ENDOR, allows for a very good separation of the 57Fe transitions from those of the protons, the complete hyperfine tensors of the four iron atoms for the [4Fe-4S]1+ species has been measured with precision. For each iron atom, the electron orbital and electron spin isotropic contributions have been determined separately. Moreover, it is remarkable that two 57Fe hyperfine tensors attributed to the ferrous pair of iron atoms are very different. In effect, one tensor presents a much larger anisotropic part and a much smaller isotropic part than those of the other. This difference has been interpreted in terms of a differential electron orbital hyperfine interaction among the two ferrous ions.

  7. Cfr and RlmN contain a single [4Fe-4S] cluster, which directs two distinct reactivities for S-adenosylmethionine: methyl transfer by SN2 displacement and radical generation.

    PubMed

    Grove, Tyler L; Radle, Matthew I; Krebs, Carsten; Booker, Squire J

    2011-12-14

    The radical SAM (RS) proteins RlmN and Cfr catalyze methylation of carbons 2 and 8, respectively, of adenosine 2503 in 23S rRNA. Both reactions are similar in scope, entailing the synthesis of a methyl group partially derived from S-adenosylmethionine (SAM) onto electrophilic sp(2)-hybridized carbon atoms via the intermediacy of a protein S-methylcysteinyl (mCys) residue. Both proteins contain five conserved Cys residues, each required for turnover. Three cysteines lie in a canonical RS CxxxCxxC motif and coordinate a [4Fe-4S]-cluster cofactor; the remaining two are at opposite ends of the polypeptide. Here we show that each protein contains only the one "radical SAM" [4Fe-4S] cluster and the two remaining conserved cysteines do not coordinate additional iron-containing species. In addition, we show that, while wild-type RlmN bears the C355 mCys residue in its as-isolated state, RlmN that is either engineered to lack the [4Fe-4S] cluster by substitution of the coordinating cysteines or isolated from Escherichia coli cultured under iron-limiting conditions does not bear a C355 mCys residue. Reconstitution of the [4Fe-4S] cluster on wild-type apo RlmN followed by addition of SAM results in rapid production of S-adenosylhomocysteine (SAH) and the mCys residue, while treatment of apo RlmN with SAM affords no observable reaction. These results indicate that in Cfr and RlmN, SAM bound to the unique iron of the [4Fe-4S] cluster displays two reactivities. It serves to methylate C355 of RlmN (C338 of Cfr), or to generate the 5'-deoxyadenosyl 5'-radical, required for substrate-dependent methyl synthase activity.

  8. 4-Demethylwyosine synthase from Pyrococcus abyssi is a radical-S-adenosyl-L-methionine enzyme with an additional [4Fe-4S](+2) cluster that interacts with the pyruvate co-substrate.

    PubMed

    Perche-Letuvée, Phanélie; Kathirvelu, Velavan; Berggren, Gustav; Clemancey, Martin; Latour, Jean-Marc; Maurel, Vincent; Douki, Thierry; Armengaud, Jean; Mulliez, Etienne; Fontecave, Marc; Garcia-Serres, Ricardo; Gambarelli, Serge; Atta, Mohamed

    2012-11-30

    Wybutosine and its derivatives are found in position 37 of tRNA encoding Phe in eukaryotes and archaea. They are believed to play a key role in the decoding function of the ribosome. The second step in the biosynthesis of wybutosine is catalyzed by TYW1 protein, which is a member of the well established class of metalloenzymes called "Radical-SAM." These enzymes use a [4Fe-4S] cluster, chelated by three cysteines in a CX(3)CX(2)C motif, and S-adenosyl-L-methionine (SAM) to generate a 5'-deoxyadenosyl radical that initiates various chemically challenging reactions. Sequence analysis of TYW1 proteins revealed, in the N-terminal half of the enzyme beside the Radical-SAM cysteine triad, an additional highly conserved cysteine motif. In this study we show by combining analytical and spectroscopic methods including UV-visible absorption, Mössbauer, EPR, and HYSCORE spectroscopies that these additional cysteines are involved in the coordination of a second [4Fe-4S] cluster displaying a free coordination site that interacts with pyruvate, the second substrate of the reaction. The presence of two distinct iron-sulfur clusters on TYW1 is reminiscent of MiaB, another tRNA-modifying metalloenzyme whose active form was shown to bind two iron-sulfur clusters. A possible role for the second [4Fe-4S] cluster in the enzyme activity is discussed.

  9. A Cysteine-Rich CCG Domain Contains a Novel [4Fe-4S] Cluster Binding Motif As Deduced From Studies With Subunit B of Heterodisulfide Reductase From Methanothermobacter Marburgensis

    SciTech Connect

    Hamann, N.; Mander, G.J.; Shokes, J.E.; Scott, R.A.; Bennati, M.; Hedderich, R.

    2009-06-01

    Heterodisulfide reductase (HDR) of methanogenic archaea with its active-site [4Fe-4S] cluster catalyzes the reversible reduction of the heterodisulfide (CoM-S-S-CoB) of the methanogenic coenzyme M (CoM-SH) and coenzyme B (CoB-SH). CoM-HDR, a mechanistic-based paramagnetic intermediate generated upon half-reaction of the oxidized enzyme with CoM-SH, is a novel type of [4Fe-4S]{sup 3+} cluster with CoM-SH as a ligand. Subunit HdrB of the Methanothermobacter marburgensis HdrABC holoenzyme contains two cysteine-rich sequence motifs (CX{sub 31-39}CCX{sub 35-36}CXXC), designated as CCG domain in the Pfam database and conserved in many proteins. Here we present experimental evidence that the C-terminal CCG domain of HdrB binds this unusual [4Fe-4S] cluster. HdrB was produced in Escherichia coli, and an iron-sulfur cluster was subsequently inserted by in vitro reconstitution. In the oxidized state the cluster without the substrate exhibited a rhombic EPR signal (g{sub zyx} = 2.015, 1.995, and 1.950) reminiscent of the CoM-HDR signal. {sup 57}Fe ENDOR spectroscopy revealed that this paramagnetic species is a [4Fe-4S] cluster with {sup 57}Fe hyperfine couplings very similar to that of CoM-HDR. CoM-{sup 33}SH resulted in a broadening of the EPR signal, and upon addition of CoM-SH the midpoint potential of the cluster was shifted to values observed for CoM-HDR, both indicating binding of CoM-SH to the cluster. Site-directed mutagenesis of all 12 cysteine residues in HdrB identified four cysteines of the C-terminal CCG domain as cluster ligands. Combined with the previous detection of CoM-HDR-like EPR signals in other CCG domain-containing proteins our data indicate a general role of the C-terminal CCG domain in coordination of this novel [4Fe-4S] cluster. In addition, Zn K-edge X-ray absorption spectroscopy identified an isolated Zn site with an S{sub 3}(O/N){sub 1} geometry in HdrB and the HDR holoenzyme. The N-terminal CCG domain is suggested to provide ligands to the Zn

  10. A Cysteine-Rich CCG Domain Contains a Novel [4Fe-4S] Cluster Binding Motif As Deduced from Studies with Subunit B of Heterodisulfide Reductase from Methanothermobacter marburgensis†

    PubMed Central

    Hamann, Nils; Mander, Gerd J.; Shokes, Jacob E.; Scott, Robert A.; Bennati, Marina; Hedderich, Reiner

    2013-01-01

    Heterodisulfide reductase (HDR) of methanogenic archaea with its active-site [4Fe-4S] cluster catalyzes the reversible reduction of the heterodisulfide (CoM-S-S-CoB) of the methanogenic coenzyme M (CoM-SH) and coenzyme B (CoB-SH). CoM-HDR, a mechanistic-based paramagnetic intermediate generated upon half-reaction of the oxidized enzyme with CoM-SH, is a novel type of [4Fe-4S]3+ cluster with CoM-SH as a ligand. Subunit HdrB of the Methanothermobacter marburgensis HdrABC holoenzyme contains two cysteine-rich sequence motifs (CX31–39CCX35–36CXXC), designated as CCG domain in the Pfam database and conserved in many proteins. Here we present experimental evidence that the C-terminal CCG domain of HdrB binds this unusual [4Fe-4S] cluster. HdrB was produced in Escherichia coli, and an iron–sulfur cluster was subsequently inserted by in vitro reconstitution. In the oxidized state the cluster without the substrate exhibited a rhombic EPR signal (gzyx= 2.015, 1.995, and 1.950) reminiscent of the CoM-HDR signal. 57Fe ENDOR spectroscopy revealed that this paramagnetic species is a [4Fe-4S] cluster with 57Fe hyperfine couplings very similar to that of CoM-HDR. CoM-33SH resulted in a broadening of the EPR signal, and upon addition of CoM-SH the midpoint potential of the cluster was shifted to values observed for CoM-HDR, both indicating binding of CoM-SH to the cluster. Site-directed mutagenesis of all 12 cysteine residues in HdrB identified four cysteines of the C-terminal CCG domain as cluster ligands. Combined with the previous detection of CoM-HDR-like EPR signals in other CCG domain-containing proteins our data indicate a general role of the C-terminal CCG domain in coordination of this novel [4Fe-4S] cluster. In addition, Zn K-edge X-ray absorption spectroscopy identified an isolated Zn site with an S3(O/N)1 geometry in HdrB and the HDR holoenzyme. The N-terminal CCG domain is suggested to provide ligands to the Zn site. PMID:17929940

  11. A Bridging [4Fe-4S] Cluster and Nucleotide Binding Are Essential for Function of the Cfd1-Nbp35 Complex as a Scaffold in Iron-Sulfur Protein Maturation*

    PubMed Central

    Netz, Daili J. A.; Pierik, Antonio J.; Stümpfig, Martin; Bill, Eckhard; Sharma, Anil K.; Pallesen, Leif J.; Walden, William E.; Lill, Roland

    2012-01-01

    The essential P-loop NTPases Cfd1 and Nbp35 of the cytosolic iron-sulfur (Fe-S) protein assembly machinery perform a scaffold function for Fe-S cluster synthesis. Both proteins contain a nucleotide binding motif of unknown function and a C-terminal motif with four conserved cysteine residues. The latter motif defines the Mrp/Nbp35 subclass of P-loop NTPases and is suspected to be involved in transient Fe-S cluster binding. To elucidate the function of these two motifs, we first created cysteine mutant proteins of Cfd1 and Nbp35 and investigated the consequences of these mutations by genetic, cell biological, biochemical, and spectroscopic approaches. The two central cysteine residues (CPXC) of the C-terminal motif were found to be crucial for cell viability, protein function, coordination of a labile [4Fe-4S] cluster, and Cfd1-Nbp35 hetero-tetramer formation. Surprisingly, the two proximal cysteine residues were dispensable for all these functions, despite their strict evolutionary conservation. Several lines of evidence suggest that the C-terminal CPXC motifs of Cfd1-Nbp35 coordinate a bridging [4Fe-4S] cluster. Upon mutation of the nucleotide binding motifs Fe-S clusters could no longer be assembled on these proteins unless wild-type copies of Cfd1 and Nbp35 were present in trans. This result indicated that Fe-S cluster loading on these scaffold proteins is a nucleotide-dependent step. We propose that the bridging coordination of the C-terminal Fe-S cluster may be ideal for its facile assembly, labile binding, and efficient transfer to target Fe-S apoproteins, a step facilitated by the cytosolic iron-sulfur (Fe-S) protein assembly proteins Nar1 and Cia1 in vivo. PMID:22362766

  12. ChlR Protein of Synechococcus sp. PCC 7002 Is a Transcription Activator That Uses an Oxygen-sensitive [4Fe-4S] Cluster to Control Genes involved in Pigment Biosynthesis*

    PubMed Central

    Ludwig, Marcus; Pandelia, Maria-Eirini; Chew, Chyue Yie; Zhang, Bo; Golbeck, John H.; Krebs, Carsten; Bryant, Donald A.

    2014-01-01

    Synechococcus sp. PCC 7002 and many other cyanobacteria have two genes that encode key enzymes involved in chlorophyll a, biliverdin, and heme biosynthesis: acsFI/acsFII, ho1/ho2, and hemF/hemN. Under atmospheric O2 levels, AcsFI synthesizes 3,8-divinyl protochlorophyllide from Mg-protoporphyrin IX monomethyl ester, Ho1 oxidatively cleaves heme to form biliverdin, and HemF oxidizes coproporphyrinogen III to protoporphyrinogen IX. Under microoxic conditions, another set of genes directs the synthesis of alternative enzymes AcsFII, Ho2, and HemN. In Synechococcus sp. PCC 7002, open reading frame SynPCC7002_A1993 encodes a MarR family transcriptional regulator, which is located immediately upstream from the operon comprising acsFII, ho2, hemN, and desF (the latter encodes a putative fatty acid desaturase). Deletion and complementation analyses showed that this gene, denoted chlR, is a transcriptional activator that is essential for transcription of the acsFII-ho2-hemN-desF operon under microoxic conditions. Global transcriptome analyses showed that ChlR controls the expression of only these four genes. Co-expression of chlR with a yfp reporter gene under the control of the acsFII promoter from Synechocystis sp. PCC 6803 in Escherichia coli demonstrated that no other cyanobacterium-specific components are required for proper functioning of this regulatory circuit. A combination of analytical methods and Mössbauer and EPR spectroscopies showed that reconstituted, recombinant ChlR forms homodimers that harbor one oxygen-sensitive [4Fe-4S] cluster. We conclude that ChlR is a transcriptional activator that uses a [4Fe-4S] cluster to sense O2 levels and thereby control the expression of the acsFII-ho2-hemN-desF operon. PMID:24782315

  13. A de novo designed 2[4Fe-4S] ferredoxin mimic mediates electron transfer.

    PubMed

    Roy, Anindya; Sommer, Dayn Joseph; Schmitz, Robert Arthur; Brown, Chelsea Lynn; Gust, Devens; Astashkin, Andrei; Ghirlanda, Giovanna

    2014-12-10

    [Fe-S] clusters, nature's modular electron transfer units, are often arranged in chains that support long-range electron transfer. Despite considerable interest, the design of biomimetic artificial systems emulating multicluster-binding proteins, with the final goal of integrating them in man-made oxidoreductases, remains elusive. Here, we report a novel bis-[4Fe-4S] cluster binding protein, DSD-Fdm, in which the two clusters are positioned within a distance of 12 Å, compatible with the electronic coupling necessary for efficient electron transfer. The design exploits the structural repeat of coiled coils as well as the symmetry of the starting scaffold, a homodimeric helical protein (DSD). In total, eight hydrophobic residues in the core of DSD were replaced by eight cysteine residues that serve as ligands to the [4Fe-4S] clusters. Incorporation of two [4Fe-4S] clusters proceeds with high yield. The two [4Fe-4S] clusters are located in the hydrophobic core of the helical bundle as characterized by various biophysical techniques. The secondary structure of the apo and holo proteins is conserved; further, the incorporation of clusters results in stabilization of the protein with respect to chemical denaturation. Most importantly, this de novo designed protein can mimic the function of natural ferredoxins: we show here that reduced DSD-Fdm transfers electrons to cytochrome c, thus generating the reduced cyt c stoichiometrically.

  14. Cfr and RlmN Contain a Single [4Fe-4S] Cluster, which Directs Two Distinct Reactivities for S-Adenosylmethionine: Methyl Transfer by SN2 Displacement and Radical Generation

    PubMed Central

    Grove, Tyler L.; Radle, Matthew I.; Krebs, Carsten; Booker, Squire J.

    2012-01-01

    The radical SAM (RS) proteins RlmN and Cfr catalyze methylation of carbons 2 and 8, respectively, of adenosine 2503 in 23S rRNA. Both reactions are similar in scope, entailing the synthesis of a methyl group partially derived from S-adenosylmethionine (SAM) onto electrophilic sp2-hybridized carbon atoms via the intermediacy of a protein S-methylcysteinyl (mCys) residue. Both proteins contain five conserved Cys residues, each of which is required for turnover. Three cysteines lie in a canonical RS CxxxCxxC motif and coordinate a [4Fe–4S]-cluster cofactor. The remaining two cysteines are at opposite ends of the polypeptide. Herein we show that each protein contains only the one “radical SAM” [4Fe–4S] cluster, and that the two remaining conserved cysteines do not coordinate additional iron-containing species. In addition, we show that while wild-type RlmN bears the C355 mCys residue in its as-isolated state, RlmN that is either engineered to lack the [4Fe–4S] cluster by substitution of the coordinating cysteines, or isolated from Escherichia coli cultured under iron-limiting conditions, does not bear a C355 mCys residue. Reconstitution of the [4Fe–4S] cluster on wild-type apo RlmN followed by addition of SAM results in rapid production of S-adenosylhomocysteine (SAH) and the mCys residue, while treatment of apo RlmN with SAM affords no observable reaction. These results indicate that in Cfr and RlmN, SAM bound to the unique iron of the [4Fe–4S] cluster displays two reactivities. It serves to methylate C355 of RlmN (C338 of Cfr), or it serves to generate the 5’-deoxyadenosyl 5’-radical, required for substrate-dependent methyl synthase activity. PMID:21916495

  15. De novo design of an artificial bis[4Fe-4S] binding protein.

    PubMed

    Roy, Anindya; Sarrou, Iosifina; Vaughn, Michael D; Astashkin, Andrei V; Ghirlanda, Giovanna

    2013-10-29

    In nature, protein subunits containing multiple iron-sulfur clusters often mediate the delivery of reducing equivalents from metabolic pathways to the active site of redox proteins. The de novo design of redox active proteins should include the engineering of a conduit for the delivery of electrons to and from the active site, in which multiple redox active centers are arranged in a controlled manner. Here, we describe a designed three-helix protein, DSD-bis[4Fe-4S], that coordinates two iron-sulfur clusters within its hydrophobic core. The design exploits the pseudo two-fold symmetry of the protein scaffold, DSD, which is a homodimeric three-helix bundle. Starting from the sequence of the parent peptide, we mutated eight leucine residues per dimer in the hydrophobic core to cysteine to provide the first coordination sphere for cubane-type iron-sulfur clusters. Incorporation of two clusters per dimer is readily achieved by in situ reconstitution and imparts increased stability to thermal denaturation compared to that of the apo form of the peptide as assessed by circular dichroism-monitored thermal denaturation. The presence of [4Fe-4S] clusters in intact proteins is confirmed by UV-vis spectroscopy, gel filtration, analytical ultracentrifugation, and electron paramagnetic resonance spectroscopy. Pulsed electron-electron double-resonance experiments have detected a magnetic dipole interaction between the two clusters ~0.7 MHz, which is consistent with the expected intercluster distance of 29-34 Å. Taken together, our data demonstrate the successful design of an artificial multi-iron-sulfur cluster protein with evidence of cluster-cluster interaction. The design principles implemented here can be extended to the design of multicluster molecular wires.

  16. A Nitrogen-Fixing Subunit Essential for Accumulating 4Fe-4S-Containing Photosystem I Core Proteins1[OPEN

    PubMed Central

    Nath, Krishna; Wessendorf, Ryan L.

    2016-01-01

    Nitrogen-fixation-subunit-U (NFU)-type proteins have been shown to be involved in the biogenesis of iron-sulfur clusters. We investigated the molecular function of a chloroplastic NFU-type iron-sulfur scaffold protein, NFU3, in Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana) using genetics approaches. Loss-of-function mutations in the NFU3 gene caused yellow pigmentation in leaves, reductions in plant size, leaf size, and growth rate, delay in flowering and seeding, and decreases in seed production. Biochemical and physiological analyses indicated that these defects are due to the substantial reductions in the abundances of 4Fe-4S-containing photosystem I (PSI) core subunits PsaA (where Psa stands for PSI), PsaB, and PsaC and a nearly complete loss of PSI activity. In addition to the substantial decreases in the amounts of PSI core proteins, the content of 3Fe-4S-containing ferredoxin-dependent glutamine oxoglutarate aminotransferases declined significantly in the nfu3 mutants. Furthermore, the absorption spectrum of the recombinant NFU3 protein showed features characteristic of 4Fe-4S and 3Fe-4S clusters, and the in vitro reconstitution experiment indicated an iron-sulfur scaffold function of NFU3. These data demonstrate that NFU3 is involved in the assembly and transfer of 4Fe-4S and 3Fe-4S clusters and that NFU3 is required for the accumulation of 4Fe-4S- and 3Fe-4S-containing proteins, especially 4Fe-4S-containing PSI core subunits, in the Arabidopsis chloroplast. PMID:27784767

  17. Differentiated, Promoter-specific Response of [4Fe-4S] NsrR DNA Binding to Reaction with Nitric Oxide*

    PubMed Central

    Crack, Jason C.; Svistunenko, Dimitri A.; Munnoch, John; Thomson, Andrew J.; Hutchings, Matthew I.; Le Brun, Nick E.

    2016-01-01

    NsrR is an iron-sulfur cluster protein that regulates the nitric oxide (NO) stress response of many bacteria. NsrR from Streptomyces coelicolor regulates its own expression and that of only two other genes, hmpA1 and hmpA2, which encode HmpA enzymes predicted to detoxify NO. NsrR binds promoter DNA with high affinity only when coordinating a [4Fe-4S] cluster. Here we show that reaction of [4Fe-4S] NsrR with NO affects DNA binding differently depending on the gene promoter. Binding to the hmpA2 promoter was abolished at ∼2 NO per cluster, although for the hmpA1 and nsrR promoters, ∼4 and ∼8 NO molecules, respectively, were required to abolish DNA binding. Spectroscopic and kinetic studies of the NO reaction revealed a rapid, multi-phase, non-concerted process involving up to 8–10 NO molecules per cluster, leading to the formation of several iron-nitrosyl species. A distinct intermediate was observed at ∼2 NO per cluster, along with two further intermediates at ∼4 and ∼6 NO. The NsrR nitrosylation reaction was not significantly affected by DNA binding. These results show that NsrR regulates different promoters in response to different concentrations of NO. Spectroscopic evidence indicates that this is achieved by different NO-FeS complexes. PMID:26887943

  18. The O2 sensitivity of the transcription factor FNR is controlled by Ser24 modulating the kinetics of [4Fe-4S] to [2Fe-2S] conversion

    PubMed Central

    Jervis, Adrian J.; Crack, Jason C.; White, Gaye; Artymiuk, Peter J.; Cheesman, Myles R.; Thomson, Andrew J.; Le Brun, Nick E.; Green, Jeffrey

    2009-01-01

    Fumarate and nitrate reduction regulatory (FNR) proteins are bacterial transcription factors that coordinate the switch between aerobic and anaerobic metabolism. In the absence of O2, FNR binds a [4Fe-4S]2+ cluster (ligated by Cys-20, 23, 29, 122) promoting the formation of a transcriptionally active dimer. In the presence of O2, FNR is converted into a monomeric, non-DNA-binding form containing a [2Fe-2S]2+ cluster. The reaction of the [4Fe-4S]2+ cluster with O2 has been shown to proceed via a 2-step process, an O2-dependent 1-electron oxidation to yield a [3Fe-4S]+ intermediate with release of 1 Fe2+ ion, followed by spontaneous rearrangement to the [2Fe-2S]2+ form with release of 1 Fe3+ and 2 S2− ions. Here, we show that replacement of Ser-24 by Arg, His, Phe, Trp, or Tyr enhances aerobic activity of FNR in vivo. The FNR-S24F protein incorporates a [4Fe-4S]2+ cluster with spectroscopic properties similar to those of FNR. However, the substitution enhances the stability of the [4Fe-4S]2+ cluster in the presence of O2. Kinetic analysis shows that both steps 1 and 2 are slower for FNR-S24F than for FNR. A molecular model suggests that step 1 of the FNR-S24F iron–sulfur cluster reaction with O2 is inhibited by shielding of the iron ligand Cys-23, suggesting that Cys-23 or the cluster iron bound to it is a primary site of O2 interaction. These data lead to a simple model of the FNR switch with physiological implications for the ability of FNR proteins to operate over different ranges of in vivo O2 concentrations. PMID:19261852

  19. Cloning, expression, and molecular characterization of the gene encoding an extremely thermostable [4Fe-4S] ferredoxin from the hyperthermophilic archaeon Pyrococcus furiosus.

    PubMed Central

    Heltzel, A; Smith, E T; Zhou, Z H; Blamey, J M; Adams, M W

    1994-01-01

    The gene for ferredoxin from the hyperthermophilic archaeon Pyrococcus furiosus was cloned, sequenced, and expressed in Escherichia coli. The coding region confirmed the determined amino acid sequence. Putative archaeon-type transcriptional regulatory elements were identified. The fdxA gene appears to be an independent transcriptional unit. Recombinant ferredoxin was indistinguishable from the protein purified from P. furiosus in its thermal stability and in the potentiometric and spectroscopic properties of its [4Fe-4S] cluster. PMID:8045914

  20. Heterologous overproduction of 2[4Fe4S]- and [2Fe2S]-type clostridial ferredoxins and [2Fe2S]-type agrobacterial ferredoxin.

    PubMed

    Huang, Haiyan; Hu, Liejie; Yu, Wenjun; Li, Huili; Tao, Fei; Xie, Huijun; Wang, Shuning

    2016-05-01

    Ferredoxins are small, acidic proteins containing iron-sulfur clusters that are widespread in living organisms. They play key roles as electron carriers in various metabolic processes, including respiration, photosynthesis, fermentation, nitrogen fixation, carbon dioxide fixation, and hydrogen production. However, only several kinds of ferredoxins are commercially available now, greatly limiting the investigation of ferredoxin-related enzymes and metabolic processes. Here we describe the heterologous overproduction of 2[4Fe4S]- and [2Fe2S]-type clostridial ferredoxins and [2Fe2S]-type agrobacterial ferredoxin. Adding extra iron and sulfur sources to the medium in combination with using Escherichia coli C41(DE3) harboring pCodonplus and pRKISC plasmids as host greatly enhanced iron-sulfur cluster synthesis in the three ferredoxins. After induction for 12 h in terrific broth and purification by affinity chromatography and anion exchange chromatography, approximately 3.4 mg of streptavidin (Strep)-tagged and 3.7 mg of polyhistidine (His)-tagged clostridial 2[4Fe4S] ferredoxins were obtained from 1 l of culture. Excitingly, after induction for 24 h in terrific broth, around 40 mg of His-tagged clostridial [2Fe2S] and 23 mg of His-tagged agrobacterial [2Fe2S] ferredoxins were purified from 1 l of culture. The recombinant ferredoxins apparently exhibited identical properties and physiological function to native ferredoxins. No negative impact of two different affinity tags on ferredoxin activity was found. In conclusion, we successfully developed a convenient method for heterologous overproduction of the three kinds of ferredoxins with satisfactory yields and activities, which would be very helpful for the ferredoxin-related researches.

  1. Structural principles for computational and de novo design of 4Fe-4S metalloproteins.

    PubMed

    Nanda, Vikas; Senn, Stefan; Pike, Douglas H; Rodriguez-Granillo, Agustina; Hansen, Will A; Khare, Sagar D; Noy, Dror

    2016-05-01

    Iron-sulfur centers in metalloproteins can access multiple oxidation states over a broad range of potentials, allowing them to participate in a variety of electron transfer reactions and serving as catalysts for high-energy redox processes. The nitrogenase FeMoCO cluster converts di-nitrogen to ammonia in an eight-electron transfer step. The 2(Fe4S4) containing bacterial ferredoxin is an evolutionarily ancient metalloprotein fold and is thought to be a primordial progenitor of extant oxidoreductases. Controlling chemical transformations mediated by iron-sulfur centers such as nitrogen fixation, hydrogen production as well as electron transfer reactions involved in photosynthesis are of tremendous importance for sustainable chemistry and energy production initiatives. As such, there is significant interest in the design of iron-sulfur proteins as minimal models to gain fundamental understanding of complex natural systems and as lead-molecules for industrial and energy applications. Herein, we discuss salient structural characteristics of natural iron-sulfur proteins and how they guide principles for design. Model structures of past designs are analyzed in the context of these principles and potential directions for enhanced designs are presented, and new areas of iron-sulfur protein design are proposed. This article is part of a Special issue entitled Biodesign for Bioenergetics--the design and engineering of electronic transfer cofactors, protein networks, edited by Ronald L. Koder and J.L Ross Anderson.

  2. Structural principles for computational and de novo design of 4Fe-4S metalloproteins

    PubMed Central

    Nanda, Vikas; Senn, Stefan; Pike, Douglas H.; Rodriguez-Granillo, Agustina; Hansen, Will; Khare, Sagar D.; Noy, Dror

    2017-01-01

    Iron-sulfur centers in metalloproteins can access multiple oxidation states over a broad range of potentials, allowing them to participate in a variety of electron transfer reactions and serving as catalysts for high-energy redox processes. The nitrogenase FeMoCO cluster converts di-nitrogen to ammonia in an eight-electron transfer step. The 2(Fe4S4) containing bacterial ferredoxin is an evolutionarily ancient metalloprotein fold and is thought to be a primordial progenitor of extant oxidoreductases. Controlling chemical transformations mediated by iron-sulfur centers such as nitrogen fixation, hydrogen production as well as electron transfer reactions involved in photosynthesis are of tremendous importance for sustainable chemistry and energy production initiatives. As such, there is significant interest in the design of iron-sulfur proteins as minimal models to gain fundamental understanding of complex natural systems and as lead-molecules for industrial and energy applications. Herein, we discuss salient structural characteristics of natural iron-sulfur proteins and how they guide principles for design. Model structures of past designs are analyzed in the context of these principles and potential directions for enhanced designs are presented, and new areas of iron-sulfur protein design are proposed. PMID:26449207

  3. Electron spin-lattice relaxation of the (4Fe-4S) ferredoxin from B. stearothermophilus. Comparison with other iron proteins

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bertrand, Patrick; Gayda, Jean-Pierre; Rao, K. Krishna

    1982-05-01

    The temperature dependence of the electron spin-lattice relaxation time T1 of the (4Fe-4S) ferredoxin from Bacillus stearothermophilus is studied in the range 1.2 to 40 K. This dependence is similar to that observed for the (2Fe-2S) ferredoxin from Spirulina maxima and can be interpreted with the same relaxation processes [J.P. Gayda, P. Bertrand, A. Deville, C. More, G. Roger, J.F. Gibson, and R. Cammack, Biochim. Biophys. Acta 581, 15 (1979)]. In particular, between 4 and 15 K, the data are well fitted by a second-order Raman process involving three-dimensional phonons, with a Debye temperature of about 60 K (45 cm-1). This would give an estimation of the highest frequency of the vibrations which can propagate through the three-dimensional proteinic medium. In the highest temperature range (T≳30 K) the results are interpreted with an Orbach process involving an excited level of energy 120 cm-1. This process could be induced by the localized vibrations of the active site. Finally, these results are compared to those recently reported for some hemoproteins [H.J. Stapleton, J.P. Allen, C.P. Flynn, D.G. Stinson, and S.R. Kurtz, Phys. Rev. Lett. 45, 1456 (1980)]. Below 15 K, the temperature dependence of T1 for these samples is similar to that observed for the iron-sulfur proteins and may be interpreted in the same way. Our interpretation is compared to the fractal model proposed by Stapleton et al.

  4. Clustering PPI data by combining FA and SHC method

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Clustering is one of main methods to identify functional modules from protein-protein interaction (PPI) data. Nevertheless traditional clustering methods may not be effective for clustering PPI data. In this paper, we proposed a novel method for clustering PPI data by combining firefly algorithm (FA) and synchronization-based hierarchical clustering (SHC) algorithm. Firstly, the PPI data are preprocessed via spectral clustering (SC) which transforms the high-dimensional similarity matrix into a low dimension matrix. Then the SHC algorithm is used to perform clustering. In SHC algorithm, hierarchical clustering is achieved by enlarging the neighborhood radius of synchronized objects continuously, while the hierarchical search is very difficult to find the optimal neighborhood radius of synchronization and the efficiency is not high. So we adopt the firefly algorithm to determine the optimal threshold of the neighborhood radius of synchronization automatically. The proposed algorithm is tested on the MIPS PPI dataset. The results show that our proposed algorithm is better than the traditional algorithms in precision, recall and f-measure value. PMID:25707632

  5. Clustering PPI data by combining FA and SHC method.

    PubMed

    Lei, Xiujuan; Ying, Chao; Wu, Fang-Xiang; Xu, Jin

    2015-01-01

    Clustering is one of main methods to identify functional modules from protein-protein interaction (PPI) data. Nevertheless traditional clustering methods may not be effective for clustering PPI data. In this paper, we proposed a novel method for clustering PPI data by combining firefly algorithm (FA) and synchronization-based hierarchical clustering (SHC) algorithm. Firstly, the PPI data are preprocessed via spectral clustering (SC) which transforms the high-dimensional similarity matrix into a low dimension matrix. Then the SHC algorithm is used to perform clustering. In SHC algorithm, hierarchical clustering is achieved by enlarging the neighborhood radius of synchronized objects continuously, while the hierarchical search is very difficult to find the optimal neighborhood radius of synchronization and the efficiency is not high. So we adopt the firefly algorithm to determine the optimal threshold of the neighborhood radius of synchronization automatically. The proposed algorithm is tested on the MIPS PPI dataset. The results show that our proposed algorithm is better than the traditional algorithms in precision, recall and f-measure value.

  6. Characterization of the genome region encoding an fdxH-type ferredoxin and a new 2[4Fe-4S] ferredoxin from the nonheterocystous, nitrogen-fixing cyanobacterium Plectonema boryanum PCC 73110.

    PubMed Central

    Schrautemeier, B; Cassing, A; Böhme, H

    1994-01-01

    A genomic DNA region with four consecutive open reading frames, including an fdxH-type gene, has been sequenced and initially characterized for the nonheterocystous nitrogen-fixing cyanobacterium Plectonema boryanum PCC 73110. The fdxH gene encodes a [2Fe-2S]-type ferredoxin, 98 amino acids in length, with a deduced molecular mass of 10.9 kDa. Conserved residues include two characteristic lysines at positions 10 and 11, shown recently to be important for interaction with nitrogenase reductase (S. Schmitz, B. Schrautermeier, and H. Böhme, Mol. Gen. Genet. 240:455-460, 1993). The gene is transcribed only under anaerobic nitrogenase-inducing conditions, whereas the Plectonema petF gene, encoding a different (type 1) [2Fe-2S] ferredoxin, is only transcribed in cultures growing with combined nitrogen. The fdxH gene was expressed in Escherichia coli as a holoprotein. The purified protein was able to effectively donate electrons to cyanobacterial nitrogenase, whereas PetF from the same organism was not. The occurrence of FdxH in the nonheterocystous genus Plectonema demonstrates for the first time that FdxH-type ferredoxins are not exclusively expressed within heterocysts, as is true for cyanobacteria differentiating these cells for nitrogen fixation under aerobic growth conditions. Two open reading frames that precede fdxH have high similarity to those found at a corresponding location in Anabaena sp. strain PCC 7120. In the latter organism, they are transcribed only under nitrogen-fixing conditions, but the functions of their gene products remain unclear (D. Borthakur, M. Basche, W. J. Buikema, P. B. Borthakur, and R. Haselkorn, Mol. Gen. Genet. 221:227-234, 1990). An fdxB-type gene encoding a 2[4Fe-4S] ferredoxin not previously identified in cyanobacteria is located immediately downstream of fdxH in P. boryanum. Images PMID:8106314

  7. Spectroscopic and functional characterization of iron-sulfur cluster-bound forms of Azotobacter vinelandii (Nif)IscA.

    PubMed

    Mapolelo, Daphne T; Zhang, Bo; Naik, Sunil G; Huynh, Boi Hanh; Johnson, Michael K

    2012-10-16

    The mechanism of [4Fe-4S] cluster assembly on A-type Fe-S cluster assembly proteins, in general, and the specific role of (Nif)IscA in the maturation of nitrogen fixation proteins are currently unknown. To address these questions, in vitro spectroscopic studies (UV-visible absorption/CD, resonance Raman and Mössbauer) have been used to investigate the mechanism of [4Fe-4S] cluster assembly on Azotobacter vinelandii(Nif)IscA, and the ability of (Nif)IscA to accept clusters from NifU and to donate clusters to the apo form of the nitrogenase Fe-protein. The results show that (Nif)IscA can rapidly and reversibly cycle between forms containing one [2Fe-2S](2+) and one [4Fe-4S](2+) cluster per homodimer via DTT-induced two-electron reductive coupling of two [2Fe-2S](2+) clusters and O(2)-induced [4Fe-4S](2+) oxidative cleavage. This unique type of cluster interconversion in response to cellular redox status and oxygen levels is likely to be important for the specific role of A-type proteins in the maturation of [4Fe-4S] cluster-containing proteins under aerobic growth or oxidative stress conditions. Only the [4Fe-4S](2+)-(Nif)IscA was competent for rapid activation of apo-nitrogenase Fe protein under anaerobic conditions. Apo-(Nif)IscA was shown to accept clusters from [4Fe-4S] cluster-bound NifU via rapid intact cluster transfer, indicating a potential role as a cluster carrier for delivery of clusters assembled on NifU. Overall the results support the proposal that A-type proteins can function as carrier proteins for clusters assembled on U-type proteins and suggest that they are likely to supply [2Fe-2S] clusters rather than [4Fe-4S] for the maturation of [4Fe-4S] cluster-containing proteins under aerobic or oxidative stress growth conditions.

  8. Active photosynthesis in cyanobacterial mutants with directed modifications in the ligands for two iron-sulfur clusters on the PsaC protein of photosystem I.

    PubMed Central

    Mannan, R M; He, W Z; Metzger, S U; Whitmarsh, J; Malkin, R; Pakrasi, H B

    1996-01-01

    The PsaC protein of the Photosystem I (PSI) complex in thylakoid membranes coordinates two [4Fe-4S] clusters, FA and FB. Although it is known that PsaC participates in electron transfer to ferredoxin, the pathway of electrons through this protein is unknown. To elucidate the roles of FA and FB, we created two site-directed mutant strains of the cyanobacterium Anabaena variabilis ATCC 29413. In one mutant, cysteine 13, a ligand for FB was replaced by an aspartic acid (C13D); in the other mutant, cysteine 50, a ligand for FA was modified similarly (C50D). Low-temperature electron paramagnetic resonance studies demonstrated that the C50D mutant has a normal FB center and a modified FA center. In contrast, the C13D strain has normal FA, but failed to reveal any signal from FB. Room-temperature optical studies showed that C13D has only one functional electron acceptor in PsaC, whereas two such acceptors are functional in the C50D and wild-type strains. Although both mutants grow under photoautotrophic conditions, the rate of PSI-mediated electron transfer in C13D under low light levels is about half that of C50D or wild type. These data show that (i) FB is not essential for the assembly of the PsaC protein in PSI and (ii) FB is not absolutely required for electron transfer from the PSI reaction center to ferredoxin. PMID:8617228

  9. Redox control of the DNA damage-inducible protein DinG helicase activity via its iron-sulfur cluster.

    PubMed

    Ren, Binbin; Duan, Xuewu; Ding, Huangen

    2009-02-20

    The Escherichia coli DNA damage-inducible protein DinG, a member of the superfamily 2 DNA helicases, has been implicated in the nucleotide excision repair and recombinational DNA repair pathways. Combining UV-visible absorption, EPR, and enzyme activity measurements, we demonstrate here that E. coli DinG contains a redox-active [4Fe-4S] cluster with a midpoint redox potential (E(m)) of -390 +/- 23 mV (pH 8.0) and that reduction of the [4Fe-4S] cluster reversibly switches off the DinG helicase activity. Unlike the [4Fe-4S] cluster in E. coli dihydroxyacid dehydratase, the DinG [4Fe-4S] cluster is stable, and the enzyme remains fully active after exposure to 100-fold excess of hydrogen peroxide, indicating that DinG could be functional under oxidative stress conditions. However, the DinG [4Fe-4S] cluster can be efficiently modified by nitric oxide (NO), forming the DinG-bound dinitrosyl iron complex with the concomitant inactivation of helicase activity in vitro and in vivo. Reassembly of the [4Fe-4S] cluster in NO-modified DinG restores helicase activity, indicating that the iron-sulfur cluster in DinG is the primary target of NO cytotoxicity. The results led us to propose that the iron-sulfur cluster in DinG may act as a sensor of intracellular redox potential to modulate its helicase activity and that modification of the iron-sulfur cluster in DinG and likely in other DNA repair enzymes by NO may contribute to NO-mediated genomic instability.

  10. Crystal Structures of the Iron–Sulfur Cluster-Dependent Quinolinate Synthase in Complex with Dihydroxyacetone Phosphate, Iminoaspartate Analogues, and Quinolinate

    SciTech Connect

    Fenwick, Michael K.; Ealick, Steven E.

    2016-07-12

    The quinolinate synthase of prokaryotes and photosynthetic eukaryotes, NadA, contains a [4Fe-4S] cluster with unknown function. We report crystal structures of Pyrococcus horikoshii NadA in complex with dihydroxyacetone phosphate (DHAP), iminoaspartate analogues, and quinolinate. DHAP adopts a nearly planar conformation and chelates the [4Fe-4S] cluster via its keto and hydroxyl groups. The active site architecture suggests that the cluster acts as a Lewis acid in enediolate formation, like zinc in class II aldolases. The DHAP and putative iminoaspartate structures suggest a model for a condensed intermediate. The ensemble of structures suggests a two-state system, which may be exploited in early steps.

  11. Proton Coupled Electronic Rearrangement within the H-Cluster as an Essential Step in the Catalytic Cycle of [FeFe] Hydrogenases.

    PubMed

    Sommer, Constanze; Adamska-Venkatesh, Agnieszka; Pawlak, Krzysztof; Birrell, James A; Rüdiger, Olaf; Reijerse, Edward J; Lubitz, Wolfgang

    2017-02-01

    The active site of [FeFe] hydrogenases, the H-cluster, consists of a [4Fe-4S] cluster connected via a bridging cysteine to a [2Fe] complex carrying CO and CN(-) ligands as well as a bridging aza-dithiolate ligand (ADT) of which the amine moiety serves as a proton shuttle between the protein and the H-cluster. During the catalytic cycle, the two subclusters change oxidation states: [4Fe-4S]H(2+) ⇔ [4Fe-4S]H(+) and [Fe(I)Fe(II)]H ⇔ [Fe(I)Fe(I)]H thereby enabling the storage of the two electrons needed for the catalyzed reaction 2H(+) + 2e(-) ⇄ H2. Using FTIR spectro-electrochemistry on the [FeFe] hydrogenase from Chlamydomonas reinhardtii (CrHydA1) at different pH values, we resolve the redox and protonation events in the catalytic cycle and determine their intrinsic thermodynamic parameters. We show that the singly reduced state Hred of the H-cluster actually consists of two species: Hred = [4Fe-4S]H(+) - [Fe(I)Fe(II)]H and HredH(+) = [4Fe-4S]H(2+) - [Fe(I)Fe(I)]H (H(+)) related by proton coupled electronic rearrangement. The two redox events in the catalytic cycle occur on the [4Fe-4S]H subcluster at similar midpoint-potentials (-375 vs -418 mV); the protonation event (Hred/HredH(+)) has a pKa ≈ 7.2.

  12. Role of Nfu1 and Bol3 in iron-sulfur cluster transfer to mitochondrial clients

    PubMed Central

    Melber, Andrew; Na, Un; Vashisht, Ajay; Weiler, Benjamin D; Lill, Roland; Wohlschlegel, James A; Winge, Dennis R

    2016-01-01

    Iron-sulfur (Fe-S) clusters are essential for many cellular processes, ranging from aerobic respiration, metabolite biosynthesis, ribosome assembly and DNA repair. Mutations in NFU1 and BOLA3 have been linked to genetic diseases with defects in mitochondrial Fe-S centers. Through genetic studies in yeast, we demonstrate that Nfu1 functions in a late step of [4Fe-4S] cluster biogenesis that is of heightened importance during oxidative metabolism. Proteomic studies revealed Nfu1 physical interacts with components of the ISA [4Fe-4S] assembly complex and client proteins that need [4Fe-4S] clusters to function. Additional studies focused on the mitochondrial BolA proteins, Bol1 and Bol3 (yeast homolog to human BOLA3), revealing that Bol1 functions earlier in Fe-S biogenesis with the monothiol glutaredoxin, Grx5, and Bol3 functions late with Nfu1. Given these observations, we propose that Nfu1, assisted by Bol3, functions to facilitate Fe-S transfer from the biosynthetic apparatus to the client proteins preventing oxidative damage to [4Fe-4S] clusters. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.15991.001 PMID:27532773

  13. Structure of the nucleotide-binding domain of a dipeptide ABC transporter reveals a novel iron-sulfur cluster-binding domain.

    PubMed

    Li, Xiaolu; Zhuo, Wei; Yu, Jie; Ge, Jingpeng; Gu, Jinke; Feng, Yue; Yang, Maojun; Wang, Linfang; Wang, Na

    2013-02-01

    Dipeptide permease (Dpp), which belongs to an ABC transport system, imports peptides consisting of two or three L-amino acids from the matrix to the cytoplasm in microbes. Previous studies have indicated that haem competes with dipeptides to bind DppA in vitro and in vivo and that the Dpp system can also translocate haem. Here, the crystal structure of DppD, the nucleotide-binding domain (NBD) of the ABC-type dipeptide/oligopeptide/nickel-transport system from Thermoanaerobacter tengcongensis, bound with ATP, Mg(2+) and a [4Fe-4S] iron-sulfur cluster is reported. The N-terminal domain of DppD shares a similar structural fold with the NBDs of other ABC transporters. Interestingly, the C-terminal domain of DppD contains a [4Fe-4S] cluster. The UV-visible absorbance spectrum of DppD was consistent with the presence of a [4Fe-4S] cluster. A search with DALI revealed that the [4Fe-4S] cluster-binding domain is a novel structural fold. Structural analysis and comparisons with other ABC transporters revealed that this iron-sulfur cluster may act as a mediator in substrate (dipeptide or haem) binding by electron transfer and may regulate the transport process in Dpp ABC transport systems. The crystal structure provides a basis for understanding the properties of ABC transporters and will be helpful in investigating the functions of NBDs in the regulation of ABC transporter activity.

  14. Rhodobacter capsulatus magnesium chelatase subunit BchH contains an oxygen sensitive iron-sulfur cluster.

    PubMed

    Sirijovski, Nick; Mamedov, Fikret; Olsson, Ulf; Styring, Stenbjörn; Hansson, Mats

    2007-12-01

    Magnesium chelatase is the first unique enzyme of the bacteriochlorophyll biosynthetic pathway. It consists of three subunits (BchI, BchD, and BchH). Amino acid sequence analysis of the Rhodobacter capsulatus BchH revealed a novel cysteine motif (393CX2CX3CX14C) that was found in only six other proteobacteria (CX2CX3CX11-14C). The cysteine motif is likely to coordinate an unprecedented [Fe-S] cluster. Purified BchH demonstrated absorbance in the 460 nm region. This absorbance was abolished in BchH proteins with alanine substitutions at positions Cys396 and Cys414. These modified proteins were also EPR silent. In contrast, wild type BchH protein in the reduced state showed EPR signals resembling those of a [4Fe-4S] cluster with rhombic symmetry and g values at 1.90, 1.93, and 2.09, superimposed with a [3Fe-4S] cluster centered at g = 2.02. The [3Fe-4S] signal was observed independently of the [4Fe-4S] signal under oxidizing conditions. Mg-chelatase activity assays showed that the cluster is not catalytic. We suggest that the [4Fe-4S] and [3Fe-4S] signals originate from a single coordination site on the monomeric BchH protein and that the [4Fe-4S] cluster is sensitive to oxidation. It is speculated that the cluster participates in the switching between aerobic and anaerobic life of the proteobacteria.

  15. Identification of FeS clusters in the glycyl-radical enzyme benzylsuccinate synthase via EPR and Mössbauer spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Hilberg, Markus; Pierik, Antonio J; Bill, Eckhard; Friedrich, Thorsten; Lippert, Marie-Luise; Heider, Johann

    2012-01-01

    The anaerobic degradation pathway of toluene is initiated by the addition of the methyl group of toluene to the double bond of fumarate. This reaction is catalyzed by a novel glycyl-radical enzyme, (R)-benzylsuccinate synthase (BSS). The enzyme consists of three subunits, α, β, and γ, and differs from most other glycyl-radical enzymes in having additional cofactors. We have purified a Strep-tagged nonactivated BSS from recombinant Escherichia coli and identified the additional cofactors as FeS clusters by UV/vis, EPR, and Mössbauer spectroscopy. Analysis of the metal content as well as the EPR and Mössbauer spectra indicated that BSS contains magnetically coupled low-potential [4Fe-4S] clusters. Several enzyme preparations showed differing amounts of [3Fe-4S] clusters that could be reconstituted to [4Fe-4S] clusters, indicating that they arise from partial decay of the initial [4Fe-4S] clusters. The most likely location of these FeS clusters in the enzyme are the small β and γ subunits, which are unique for the BSS subfamily of glycyl-radical enzymes and contain conserved cysteines as potential ligands.

  16. Pseudomonas aeruginosa IscR-Regulated Ferredoxin NADP(+) Reductase Gene (fprB) Functions in Iron-Sulfur Cluster Biogenesis and Multiple Stress Response

    PubMed Central

    Romsang, Adisak; Duang-nkern, Jintana; Wirathorn, Wilaiwan; Vattanaviboon, Paiboon; Mongkolsuk, Skorn

    2015-01-01

    P. aeruginosa (PAO1) has two putative genes encoding ferredoxin NADP(+) reductases, denoted fprA and fprB. Here, the regulation of fprB expression and the protein’s physiological roles in [4Fe-4S] cluster biogenesis and stress protection are characterized. The fprB mutant has defects in [4Fe-4S] cluster biogenesis, as shown by reduced activities of [4Fe-4S] cluster-containing enzymes. Inactivation of the gene resulted in increased sensitivity to oxidative, thiol, osmotic and metal stresses compared with the PAO1 wild type. The increased sensitivity could be partially or completely suppressed by high expression of genes from the isc operon, which are involved in [Fe-S] cluster biogenesis, indicating that stress sensitivity in the fprB mutant is partially caused by a reduction in levels of [4Fe-4S] clusters. The pattern and regulation of fprB expression are in agreement with the gene physiological roles; fprB expression was highly induced by redox cycling drugs and diamide and was moderately induced by peroxides, an iron chelator and salt stress. The stress-induced expression of fprB was abolished by a deletion of the iscR gene. An IscR DNA-binding site close to fprB promoter elements was identified and confirmed by specific binding of purified IscR. Analysis of the regulation of fprB expression supports the role of IscR in directly regulating fprB transcription as a transcription activator. The combination of IscR-regulated expression of fprB and the fprB roles in response to multiple stressors emphasizes the importance of [Fe-S] cluster homeostasis in both gene regulation and stress protection. PMID:26230408

  17. Crystal structure of an Fe-S cluster-containing fumarate hydratase enzyme from Leishmania major reveals a unique protein fold.

    PubMed

    Feliciano, Patricia R; Drennan, Catherine L; Nonato, M Cristina

    2016-08-30

    Fumarate hydratases (FHs) are essential metabolic enzymes grouped into two classes. Here, we present the crystal structure of a class I FH, the cytosolic FH from Leishmania major, which reveals a previously undiscovered protein fold that coordinates a catalytically essential [4Fe-4S] cluster. Our 2.05 Å resolution data further reveal a dimeric architecture for this FH that resembles a heart, with each lobe comprised of two domains that are arranged around the active site. Besides the active site, where the substrate S-malate is bound bidentate to the unique iron of the [4Fe-4S] cluster, other binding pockets are found near the dimeric enzyme interface, some of which are occupied by malonate, shown here to be a weak inhibitor of this enzyme. Taken together, these data provide a framework both for investigations of the class I FH catalytic mechanism and for drug design aimed at fighting neglected tropical diseases.

  18. Crystal structure of an Fe-S cluster-containing fumarate hydratase enzyme from Leishmania major reveals a unique protein fold

    PubMed Central

    Drennan, Catherine L.; Nonato, M. Cristina

    2016-01-01

    Fumarate hydratases (FHs) are essential metabolic enzymes grouped into two classes. Here, we present the crystal structure of a class I FH, the cytosolic FH from Leishmania major, which reveals a previously undiscovered protein fold that coordinates a catalytically essential [4Fe-4S] cluster. Our 2.05 Å resolution data further reveal a dimeric architecture for this FH that resembles a heart, with each lobe comprised of two domains that are arranged around the active site. Besides the active site, where the substrate S-malate is bound bidentate to the unique iron of the [4Fe-4S] cluster, other binding pockets are found near the dimeric enzyme interface, some of which are occupied by malonate, shown here to be a weak inhibitor of this enzyme. Taken together, these data provide a framework both for investigations of the class I FH catalytic mechanism and for drug design aimed at fighting neglected tropical diseases. PMID:27528683

  19. Identification of a catalytic iron-hydride at the H-cluster of [FeFe]-hydrogenase

    SciTech Connect

    Mulder, David W.; Guo, Yisong; Ratzloff, Michael W.; King, Paul W.

    2016-12-14

    Hydrogenases couple electrochemical potential to the reversible chemical transformation of H2 and protons, yet the reaction mechanism and composition of intermediates are not fully understood. In this Communication we describe the biophysical properties of a hydride-bound state (Hhyd) of the [FeFe]-hydrogenase from Chlamydomonas reinhardtii. The catalytic H-cluster of [FeFe]-hydrogenase consists of a [4Fe-4S] subcluster ([4Fe-4S]H) linked by a cysteine thiol to an azadithiolate-bridged 2Fe subcluster ([2Fe]H) with CO and CN- ligands. Mossbauer analysis and density functional theory (DFT) calculations show that Hhyd consists of a reduced [4Fe-4S]H+ coupled to a diferrous [2Fe]H with a terminally bound Fe-hydride. The existence of the Fe-hydride in Hhyd was demonstrated by an unusually low Mossbauer isomer shift of the distal Fe of the [2Fe]H subcluster. As a result, a DFT model of Hhyd shows that the Fe-hydride is part of a H-bonding network with the nearby bridging azadithiolate to facilitate fast proton exchange and catalytic turnover.

  20. Identification of a catalytic iron-hydride at the H-cluster of [FeFe]-hydrogenase

    DOE PAGES

    Mulder, David W.; Guo, Yisong; Ratzloff, Michael W.; ...

    2016-12-14

    Hydrogenases couple electrochemical potential to the reversible chemical transformation of H2 and protons, yet the reaction mechanism and composition of intermediates are not fully understood. In this Communication we describe the biophysical properties of a hydride-bound state (Hhyd) of the [FeFe]-hydrogenase from Chlamydomonas reinhardtii. The catalytic H-cluster of [FeFe]-hydrogenase consists of a [4Fe-4S] subcluster ([4Fe-4S]H) linked by a cysteine thiol to an azadithiolate-bridged 2Fe subcluster ([2Fe]H) with CO and CN- ligands. Mossbauer analysis and density functional theory (DFT) calculations show that Hhyd consists of a reduced [4Fe-4S]H+ coupled to a diferrous [2Fe]H with a terminally bound Fe-hydride. The existence ofmore » the Fe-hydride in Hhyd was demonstrated by an unusually low Mossbauer isomer shift of the distal Fe of the [2Fe]H subcluster. As a result, a DFT model of Hhyd shows that the Fe-hydride is part of a H-bonding network with the nearby bridging azadithiolate to facilitate fast proton exchange and catalytic turnover.« less

  1. Modulation of cluster incorporation specificity in a de novo iron-sulfur cluster binding peptide.

    PubMed

    Sommer, Dayn Joseph; Roy, Anindya; Astashkin, Andrei; Ghirlanda, Giovanna

    2015-07-01

    iron-sulfur cluster binding proteins perform an astounding variety of functions, and represent one of the most abundant classes of metalloproteins. Most often, they constitute pairs or chains and act as electron transfer modules either within complex redox enzymes or within small diffusible proteins. We have previously described the design of a three-helix bundle that can bind two clusters within its hydrophobic core. Here, we use single-point mutations to exchange one of the Cys ligands coordinating the cluster to either Leu or Ser. We show that the mutants modulate the redox potential of the clusters and stabilize the [3Fe-4S] form over the [4Fe-4S] form, supporting the use of model iron-sulfur cluster proteins as modules in the design of complex redox enzymes.

  2. Cysteine as a ligand platform in the biosynthesis of the FeFe hydrogenase H cluster.

    PubMed

    Suess, Daniel L M; Bürstel, Ingmar; De La Paz, Liliana; Kuchenreuther, Jon M; Pham, Cindy C; Cramer, Stephen P; Swartz, James R; Britt, R David

    2015-09-15

    Hydrogenases catalyze the redox interconversion of protons and H2, an important reaction for a number of metabolic processes and for solar fuel production. In FeFe hydrogenases, catalysis occurs at the H cluster, a metallocofactor comprising a [4Fe-4S]H subcluster coupled to a [2Fe]H subcluster bound by CO, CN(-), and azadithiolate ligands. The [2Fe]H subcluster is assembled by the maturases HydE, HydF, and HydG. HydG is a member of the radical S-adenosyl-L-methionine family of enzymes that transforms Fe and L-tyrosine into an [Fe(CO)2(CN)] synthon that is incorporated into the H cluster. Although it is thought that the site of synthon formation in HydG is the "dangler" Fe of a [5Fe] cluster, many mechanistic aspects of this chemistry remain unresolved including the full ligand set of the synthon, how the dangler Fe initially binds to HydG, and how the synthon is released at the end of the reaction. To address these questions, we herein show that L-cysteine (Cys) binds the auxiliary [4Fe-4S] cluster of HydG and further chelates the dangler Fe. We also demonstrate that a [4Fe-4S]aux[CN] species is generated during HydG catalysis, a process that entails the loss of Cys and the [Fe(CO)2(CN)] fragment; on this basis, we suggest that Cys likely completes the coordination sphere of the synthon. Thus, through spectroscopic analysis of HydG before and after the synthon is formed, we conclude that Cys serves as the ligand platform on which the synthon is built and plays a role in both Fe(2+) binding and synthon release.

  3. Stepwise [FeFe]-hydrogenase H-cluster assembly revealed in the structure of HydA(DeltaEFG).

    PubMed

    Mulder, David W; Boyd, Eric S; Sarma, Ranjana; Lange, Rachel K; Endrizzi, James A; Broderick, Joan B; Peters, John W

    2010-05-13

    Complex enzymes containing Fe-S clusters are ubiquitous in nature, where they are involved in a number of fundamental processes including carbon dioxide fixation, nitrogen fixation and hydrogen metabolism. Hydrogen metabolism is facilitated by the activity of three evolutionarily and structurally unrelated enzymes: the [NiFe]-hydrogenases, [FeFe]-hydrogenases and [Fe]-hydrogenases (Hmd). The catalytic core of the [FeFe]-hydrogenase (HydA), termed the H-cluster, exists as a [4Fe-4S] subcluster linked by a cysteine thiolate to a modified 2Fe subcluster with unique non-protein ligands. The 2Fe subcluster and non-protein ligands are synthesized by the hydrogenase maturation enzymes HydE, HydF and HydG; however, the mechanism, synthesis and means of insertion of H-cluster components remain unclear. Here we show the structure of HydA(DeltaEFG) (HydA expressed in a genetic background devoid of the active site H-cluster biosynthetic genes hydE, hydF and hydG) revealing the presence of a [4Fe-4S] cluster and an open pocket for the 2Fe subcluster. The structure indicates that H-cluster synthesis occurs in a stepwise manner, first with synthesis and insertion of the [4Fe-4S] subcluster by generalized host-cell machinery and then with synthesis and insertion of the 2Fe subcluster by specialized hydE-, hydF- and hydG-encoded maturation machinery. Insertion of the 2Fe subcluster presumably occurs through a cationically charged channel that collapses following incorporation, as a result of conformational changes in two conserved loop regions. The structure, together with phylogenetic analysis, indicates that HydA emerged within bacteria most likely from a Nar1-like ancestor lacking the 2Fe subcluster, and that this was followed by acquisition in several unicellular eukaryotes.

  4. Bacterial iron-sulfur cluster sensors in mammalian pathogens

    PubMed Central

    Miller, Halie K.; Auerbuch, Victoria

    2015-01-01

    Iron-sulfur clusters act as important cofactors for a number of transcriptional regulators in bacteria, including many mammalian pathogens. The sensitivity of iron-sulfur clusters to iron availability, oxygen tension, and reactive oxygen and nitrogen species enables bacteria to use such regulators to adapt their gene expression profiles rapidly in response to changing environmental conditions. In this review, we discuss how the [4Fe-4S] or [2Fe-2S] cluster-containing regulators FNR, Wbl, aconitase, IscR, NsrR, SoxR, and AirSR contribute to bacterial pathogenesis through control of both metabolism and classical virulence factors. In addition, we briefly review mammalian iron homeostasis as well as oxidative/nitrosative stress to provide context for understanding the function of bacterial iron-sulfur cluster sensors in different niches within the host. PMID:25738802

  5. A Redox Active [2Fe-2S] Cluster on the Hydrogenase Maturase HydF.

    PubMed

    Shepard, Eric M; Byer, Amanda S; Betz, Jeremiah N; Peters, John W; Broderick, Joan B

    2016-06-28

    [FeFe]-hydrogenases are nature's most prolific hydrogen catalysts, excelling at facilely interconverting H2 and protons. The catalytic core common to all [FeFe]-hydrogenases is a complex metallocofactor, referred to as the H-cluster, which is composed of a standard [4Fe-4S] cluster linked through a bridging thiolate to a 2Fe subcluster harboring dithiomethylamine, carbon monoxide, and cyanide ligands. This 2Fe subcluster is synthesized and inserted into [FeFe]-hydrogenase by three maturase enzymes denoted HydE, HydF, and HydG. HydE and HydG are radical S-adenosylmethionine enzymes and synthesize the nonprotein ligands of the H-cluster. HydF is a GTPase that functions as a scaffold or carrier for 2Fe subcluster production. Herein, we utilize UV-visible, circular dichroism, and electron paramagnetic resonance spectroscopic studies to establish the existence of redox active [4Fe-4S] and [2Fe-2S] clusters bound to HydF. We have used spectroelectrochemical titrations to assign iron-sulfur cluster midpoint potentials, have shown that HydF purifies with a reduced [2Fe-2S] cluster in the absence of exogenous reducing agents, and have tracked iron-sulfur cluster spectroscopic changes with quaternary structural perturbations. Our results provide an important foundation for understanding the maturation process by defining the iron-sulfur cluster content of HydF prior to its interaction with HydE and HydG. We speculate that the [2Fe-2S] cluster of HydF either acts as a placeholder for HydG-derived Fe(CO)2CN species or serves as a scaffold for 2Fe subcluster assembly.

  6. TtcA a new tRNA-thioltransferase with an Fe-S cluster.

    PubMed

    Bouvier, Denis; Labessan, Natty; Clémancey, Martin; Latour, Jean-Marc; Ravanat, Jean-Luc; Fontecave, Marc; Atta, Mohamed

    2014-07-01

    TtcA catalyzes the post-transcriptional thiolation of cytosine 32 in some tRNAs. The enzyme from Escherichia coli was homologously overexpressed in E. coli. The purified enzyme is a dimer containing an iron-sulfur cluster and displays activity in in vitro assays. The type and properties of the cluster were investigated using a combination of UV-visible absorption, EPR and Mössbauer spectroscopy, as well as by site-directed mutagenesis. These studies demonstrated that the TtcA enzyme contains a redox-active and oxygen-sensitive [4Fe-4S] cluster, chelated by only three cysteine residues and absolutely essential for activity. TtcA is unique tRNA-thiolating enzyme using an iron-sulfur cluster for catalyzing a non-redox reaction.

  7. Escherichia coli biotin synthase produces selenobiotin. Further evidence of the involvement of the [2Fe-2S]2+ cluster in the sulfur insertion step.

    PubMed

    Tse Sum Bui, Bernadette; Mattioli, Tony A; Florentin, Dominique; Bolbach, Gérard; Marquet, Andrée

    2006-03-21

    Biotin synthase, a member of the "radical SAM" family, catalyzes the final step of the biotin biosynthetic pathway, namely, the insertion of a sulfur atom into dethiobiotin. The as-isolated enzyme contains a [2Fe-2S](2+) cluster, but the active enzyme requires an additional [4Fe-4S](2+) cluster, which is formed in the presence of Fe(NH(4))(2)(SO(4))(2) and Na(2)S in the in vitro assay. The role of the [4Fe-4S](2+) cluster is to mediate the electron transfer to SAM, while the [2Fe-2S](2+) cluster is involved in the sulfur insertion step. To investigate the selenium version of the reaction, we have depleted the enzyme of its iron and sulfur and reconstituted the resulting apoprotein with FeCl(3) and Na(2)Se to yield a [2Fe-2Se](2+) cluster. This enzyme was assayed in vitro with Na(2)Se in place of Na(2)S to enable the formation of a [4Fe-4Se](2+) cluster. Selenobiotin was produced, but the activity was lower than that of the as-isolated [2Fe-2S](2+) enzyme in the presence of Na(2)S. The [2Fe-2Se](2+) enzyme was additionally assayed with Na(2)S, to reconstitute a [4Fe-4S](2+) cluster, in case the latter was more efficient than a [4Fe-4Se](2+) cluster for the electron transfer. Indeed, the activity was improved, but in that case, a mixture of biotin and selenobiotin was produced. This was unexpected if one considers the [2Fe-2S](2+) center as the sulfur source (either as the ultimate donor or via another intermediate), unless some exchange of the chalcogenide has taken place in the cluster. This latter point was seen in the resonance Raman spectrum of the reacted enzyme which clearly indicated the presence of both the [2Fe-2Se](2+) and [2Fe-2S](2+) clusters. No exchange was observed in the absence of reaction. These observations bring supplementary proof that the [2Fe-2S](2+) cluster is implicated in the sulfur insertion step.

  8. GPM Video of In-fa

    NASA Video Gallery

    On Nov. 19 GPM saw a few towering storms in In-fa's eye wall were reaching heights of up to 17.3 km (10.7 miles). The most intense precipitation was measured in In-fa's eye wall by DPR where it was...

  9. Mycobacterium tuberculosis WhiB1 is an essential DNA-binding protein with a nitric oxide sensitive iron-sulphur cluster

    PubMed Central

    Smith, Laura J.; Stapleton, Melanie R.; Fullstone, Gavin J. M.; Crack, Jason C.; Thomson, Andrew J.; Le Brun, Nick E.; Hunt, Debbie M.; Harvey, Evelyn; Adinolfi, Salvatore; Buxton, Roger S.; Green, Jeffrey

    2010-01-01

    Mycobacterium tuberculosis is a major pathogen that has the ability to establish, and emerge from, a persistent state. Wbl family proteins are associated with developmental processes in actinomycetes, and M. tuberculosis has seven such proteins. Here it is shown that the M. tuberculosis H37Rv whiB1 gene is essential. The WhiB1 protein possesses a [4Fe-4S]2+ cluster that is stable in air but reacts rapidly with eight equivalents of nitric oxide to yield two dinuclear dinitrosyl-iron thiol complexes. The [4Fe-4S] form of WhiB1 did not bind whiB1 promoter DNA, but the reduced and oxidized apo-WhiB1, and nitric oxide-treated holo-WhiB1 did bind to DNA. Mycobacterium smegmatis RNA polymerase induced transcription of whiB1 in vitro; however in the presence of apo-WhiB1 transcription was severely inhibited, irrespective of the presence or absence of the CRP protein Rv3676, which is known to activate whiB1 expression. Footprinting suggested that autorepression of whiB1 is achieved by apo-WhiB1 binding at a region that overlaps the core promoter elements. A model incorporating regulation of whiB1 expression in response to nitric oxide and cAMP is discussed with implications for sensing two important signals in establishing M. tuberculosis infections. PMID:20929442

  10. Mycobacterium tuberculosis WhiB1 is an essential DNA-binding protein with a nitric oxide-sensitive iron-sulfur cluster.

    PubMed

    Smith, Laura J; Stapleton, Melanie R; Fullstone, Gavin J M; Crack, Jason C; Thomson, Andrew J; Le Brun, Nick E; Hunt, Debbie M; Harvey, Evelyn; Adinolfi, Salvatore; Buxton, Roger S; Green, Jeffrey

    2010-12-15

    Mycobacterium tuberculosis is a major pathogen that has the ability to establish, and emerge from, a persistent state. Wbl family proteins are associated with developmental processes in actinomycetes, and M. tuberculosis has seven such proteins. In the present study it is shown that the M. tuberculosis H37Rv whiB1 gene is essential. The WhiB1 protein possesses a [4Fe-4S]2+ cluster that is stable in air but reacts rapidly with eight equivalents of nitric oxide to yield two dinuclear dinitrosyl-iron thiol complexes. The [4Fe-4S] form of WhiB1 did not bind whiB1 promoter DNA, but the reduced and oxidized apo-WhiB1, and nitric oxide-treated holo-WhiB1 did bind to DNA. Mycobacterium smegmatis RNA polymerase induced transcription of whiB1 in vitro; however, in the presence of apo-WhiB1, transcription was severely inhibited, irrespective of the presence or absence of the CRP (cAMP receptor protein) Rv3676, which is known to activate whiB1 expression. Footprinting suggested that autorepression of whiB1 is achieved by apo-WhiB1 binding at a region that overlaps the core promoter elements. A model incorporating regulation of whiB1 expression in response to nitric oxide and cAMP is discussed with implications for sensing two important signals in establishing M. tuberculosis infections.

  11. TRIM.FaTE Evaluation Report

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    The TRIM.FaTE Evaluation Report is composed of three volumes. Volume I presents conceptual, mechanistic, and structural complexity evaluations of various aspects of the model. Volumes II and III present performance evaluation.

  12. Nuclear resonance vibrational spectroscopy reveals the FeS cluster composition and active site vibrational properties of an O2-tolerant NAD+-reducing [NiFe] hydrogenase

    DOE PAGES

    Lauterbach, Lars; Wang, Hongxin; Horch, Marius; ...

    2014-10-30

    Hydrogenases are complex metalloenzymes that catalyze the reversible splitting of molecular hydrogen into protons and electrons essentially without overpotential. The NAD+-reducing soluble hydrogenase (SH) from Ralstonia eutropha is capable of H2 conversion even in the presence of usually toxic dioxygen. The molecular details of the underlying reactions are largely unknown, mainly because of limited knowledge of the structure and function of the various metal cofactors present in the enzyme. Here, all iron-containing cofactors of the SH were investigated by 57Fe specific nuclear resonance vibrational spectroscopy (NRVS). Our data provide experimental evidence for one [2Fe2S] center and four [4Fe4S] clusters, whichmore » is consistent with the amino acid sequence composition. Only the [2Fe2S] cluster and one of the four [4Fe4S] clusters were reduced upon incubation of the SH with NADH. This finding explains the discrepancy between the large number of FeS clusters and the small amount of FeS cluster-related signals as detected by electron paramagnetic resonance spectroscopic analysis of several NAD+-reducing hydrogenases. For the first time, Fe–CO and Fe–CN modes derived from the [NiFe] active site could be distinguished by NRVS through selective 13C labeling of the CO ligand. This strategy also revealed the molecular coordinates that dominate the individual Fe–CO modes. The present approach explores the complex vibrational signature of the Fe–S clusters and the hydrogenase active site, thereby showing that NRVS represents a powerful tool for the elucidation of complex biocatalysts containing multiple cofactors.« less

  13. Nuclear resonance vibrational spectroscopy reveals the FeS cluster composition and active site vibrational properties of an O2-tolerant NAD+-reducing [NiFe] hydrogenase

    SciTech Connect

    Lauterbach, Lars; Wang, Hongxin; Horch, Marius; Gee, Leland B.; Yoda, Yoshitaka; Tanaka, Yoshihito; Zebger, Ingo; Lenz, Oliver; Cramer, Stephen P.

    2014-10-30

    Hydrogenases are complex metalloenzymes that catalyze the reversible splitting of molecular hydrogen into protons and electrons essentially without overpotential. The NAD+-reducing soluble hydrogenase (SH) from Ralstonia eutropha is capable of H2 conversion even in the presence of usually toxic dioxygen. The molecular details of the underlying reactions are largely unknown, mainly because of limited knowledge of the structure and function of the various metal cofactors present in the enzyme. Here, all iron-containing cofactors of the SH were investigated by 57Fe specific nuclear resonance vibrational spectroscopy (NRVS). Our data provide experimental evidence for one [2Fe2S] center and four [4Fe4S] clusters, which is consistent with the amino acid sequence composition. Only the [2Fe2S] cluster and one of the four [4Fe4S] clusters were reduced upon incubation of the SH with NADH. This finding explains the discrepancy between the large number of FeS clusters and the small amount of FeS cluster-related signals as detected by electron paramagnetic resonance spectroscopic analysis of several NAD+-reducing hydrogenases. For the first time, Fe–CO and Fe–CN modes derived from the [NiFe] active site could be distinguished by NRVS through selective 13C labeling of the CO ligand. This strategy also revealed the molecular coordinates that dominate the individual Fe–CO modes. The present approach explores the complex vibrational signature of the Fe–S clusters and the hydrogenase active site, thereby showing that NRVS represents a powerful tool for the elucidation of complex biocatalysts containing multiple cofactors.

  14. Characterization by electron paramagnetic resonance of the role of the Escherichia coli nitrate reductase (NarGHI) iron-sulfur clusters in electron transfer to nitrate and identification of a semiquinone radical intermediate.

    PubMed Central

    Magalon, A; Rothery, R A; Giordano, G; Blasco, F; Weiner, J H

    1997-01-01

    We have used Escherichia coli cytoplasmic membrane preparations enriched in wild-type and mutant (NarH-C16A and NarH-C263A) nitrate reductase (NarGHI) to study the role of the [Fe-S] clusters of this enzyme in electron transfer from quinol to nitrate. The spectrum of dithionite-reduced membrane bound NarGHI has major features comprising peaks at g = 2.04 and g = 1.98, a peak-trough at g = 1.95, and a trough at g = 1.87. The oxidized spectrum of NarGHI in membranes comprises an axial [3Fe-4S] cluster spectrum with a peak at g = 2.02 (g(z)) and a peak-trough at g = 1.99 (g(xy)). We have shown that in two site-directed mutants of NarGHI which lack the highest potential [4Fe-4S] cluster (B. Guigliarelli, A. Magalon, P. Asso, P. Bertrand, C. Frixon, G. Giordano, and F. Blasco, Biochemistry 35:4828-4836, 1996), NarH-C16A and NarH-C263A, oxidation of the NarH [Fe-S] clusters is inhibited compared to the wild type. During enzyme turnover in the mutant enzymes, a distinct 2-n-heptyl-4-hydroxyquinoline-N-oxide-sensitive semiquinone radical species which may be located between the hemes of NarI and the [Fe-S] clusters of NarH is observed. Overall, these studies indicate (i) the importance of the highest-potential [4Fe-4S] cluster in electron transfer from NarH to the molybdenum cofactor of NarG and (ii) that a semiquinone radical species is an important intermediate in electron transfer from quinol to nitrate. PMID:9260944

  15. GPM Video of In-fa

    NASA Video Gallery

    On Nov. 23, GPM saw In-fa dropping rain at an extreme rate of over 266 mm (10.5 inches) per hour in storms just to the northwest of the typhoon's eye where thunderstorms reached altitudes of over 1...

  16. JPRS Report Science & Technology Japan Future Prospects of FA-From FA to IMS

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2007-11-02

    STATEMENT A Approved lor public release; . Distribution Unlimited aa "lbAoa iaod sszs £0T 5S3D0ad sNiib 51? inzz 19980701 126 DTIC QUALITY INSPECTED...5 4. Tasks and Future Prospects of FA 13 5. Proposals 21 6. "Status of FA" Survey and Analysis 24 7.FA-related Vocabulary 31...came to about ¥ 13 trillion. This plant investment included such things as investment in new operations and R&D investment; investment for the purpose

  17. Far-red light photoacclimation (FaRLiP) in Synechococcus sp. PCC 7335: I. Regulation of FaRLiP gene expression.

    PubMed

    Ho, Ming-Yang; Gan, Fei; Shen, Gaozhong; Zhao, Chi; Bryant, Donald A

    2017-02-01

    Far-red light photoacclimation (FaRLiP) is a mechanism that allows some cyanobacteria to utilize far-red light (FRL) for oxygenic photosynthesis. During FaRLiP, cyanobacteria remodel photosystem (PS) I, PS II, and phycobilisomes while synthesizing Chl d, Chl f, and far-red-absorbing phycobiliproteins, and these changes enable these organisms to use FRL for growth. In this study, a conjugation-based genetic system was developed for Synechococcus sp. PCC 7335. Three antibiotic cassettes were successfully used to generate knockout mutations in genes in Synechococcus sp. PCC 7335, which should allow up to three gene loci to be modified in one strain. This system was used to delete the rfpA, rfpB, and rfpC genes individually, and characterization of the mutants demonstrated that these genes control the expression of the FaRLiP gene cluster in Synechococcus sp. PCC 7335. The mutant strains exhibited some surprising differences from similar mutants in other FaRLiP strains. Notably, mutations in any of the three master transcription regulatory genes led to enhanced synthesis of phycocyanin and PS II. A time-course study showed that acclimation of the photosynthetic apparatus from that produced in white light to that produced in FRL occurs very slowly over a period 12-14 days in this strain and that it is associated with a substantial reduction (~34 %) in the chlorophyll a content of the cells. This study shows that there are differences in the detailed responses of cyanobacteria to growth in FRL in spite of the obvious similarities in the organization and regulation of the FaRLiP gene cluster.

  18. Two Fe-S clusters catalyse sulfur insertion by Radical-SAM methylthiotransferases

    PubMed Central

    Forouhar, Farhad; Arragain, Simon; Atta, Mohamed; Gambarelli, Serge; Mouesca, Jean-Marie; Hussain, Munif; Xiao, Rong; Kieffer-Jaquinod, Sylvie; Seetharaman, Jayaraman; Acton, Thomas B.; Montelione, Gaetano T.

    2014-01-01

    How living organisms create carbon-sulfur bonds during biosynthesis of critical sulphur-containing compounds is still poorly understood. The methylthiotransferases MiaB and RimO catalyze sulfur insertion into tRNAs and ribosomal protein S12, respectively. Both belong to a sub-group of Radical-SAM enzymes that bear two [4Fe-4S] clusters. One cluster binds S-Adenosylmethionine and generates an Ado• radical via a well- established mechanism. However, the precise role of the second cluster is unclear. For some sulfur-inserting Radical-SAM enzymes, this cluster has been proposed to act as a sacrificial source of sulfur for the reaction. In this paper, we report parallel enzymological, spectroscopic and crystallographic investigations of RimO and MiaB, which provide the first evidence that these enzymes are true catalysts and support a new sulfation mechanism involving activation of an exogenous sulfur co-substrate at an exchangeable coordination site on the second cluster, which remains intact during the reaction. PMID:23542644

  19. SufA from Erwinia chrysanthemi. Characterization of a scaffold protein required for iron-sulfur cluster assembly.

    PubMed

    Ollagnier-de Choudens, Sandrine; Nachin, Laurence; Sanakis, Yiannis; Loiseau, Laurent; Barras, Frederic; Fontecave, Marc

    2003-05-16

    SufA is a component of the recently discovered suf operon, which has been shown to play an important function in bacteria during iron-sulfur cluster biosynthesis and resistance to oxidative stress. The SufA protein from Erwinia chrysanthemi, a Gram-negative plant pathogen, has been purified to homogeneity and characterized. It is a homodimer with the ability to assemble rather labile [2Fe-2S] and [4Fe-4S] clusters as shown by Mössbauer spectroscopy. These clusters can be transferred to apoproteins such as ferredoxin or biotin synthase during a reaction that is not inhibited by bathophenanthroline, an iron chelator. Cluster assembly in these proteins is much more efficient when iron and sulfur are provided by holoSufA than by free iron sulfate and sodium sulfide. We propose the function of SufA is that of a scaffold protein for [Fe-S] cluster assembly and compare it to IscA, a member of the isc operon also involved in cluster biosynthesis in both prokaryotes and eukaryotes. Mechanistic and physiological implications of these results are also discussed.

  20. Mapping cellular Fe-S cluster uptake and exchange reactions - divergent pathways for iron-sulfur cluster delivery to human ferredoxins.

    PubMed

    Fidai, Insiya; Wachnowsky, Christine; Cowan, J A

    2016-12-07

    Ferredoxins are protein mediators of biological electron-transfer reactions and typically contain either [2Fe-2S] or [4Fe-4S] clusters. Two ferredoxin homologues have been identified in the human genome, Fdx1 and Fdx2, that share 43% identity and 69% similarity in protein sequence and both bind [2Fe-2S] clusters. Despite the high similarity, the two ferredoxins play very specific roles in distinct physiological pathways and cannot replace each other in function. Both eukaryotic and prokaryotic ferredoxins and homologues have been reported to receive their Fe-S cluster from scaffold/delivery proteins such as IscU, Isa, glutaredoxins, and Nfu. However, the preferred and physiologically relevant pathway for receiving the [2Fe-2S] cluster by ferredoxins is subject to speculation and is not clearly identified. In this work, we report on in vitro UV-visible (UV-vis) circular dichroism studies of [2Fe-2S] cluster transfer to the ferredoxins from a variety of partners. The results reveal rapid and quantitative transfer to both ferredoxins from several donor proteins (IscU, Isa1, Grx2, and Grx3). Transfer from Isa1 to Fdx2 was also observed to be faster than that of IscU to Fdx2, suggesting that Fdx2 could receive its cluster from Isa1 instead of IscU. Several other transfer combinations were also investigated and the results suggest a complex, but kinetically detailed map for cellular cluster trafficking. This is the first step toward building a network map for all of the possible iron-sulfur cluster transfer pathways in the mitochondria and cytosol, providing insights on the most likely cellular pathways and possible redundancies in these pathways.

  1. The Nitrogenase FeMo-Cofactor Precursor Formed by NifB Protein: A Diamagnetic Cluster Containing Eight Iron Atoms.

    PubMed

    Guo, Yisong; Echavarri-Erasun, Carlos; Demuez, Marie; Jiménez-Vicente, Emilio; Bominaar, Emile L; Rubio, Luis M

    2016-10-04

    The biological activation of N2 occurs at the FeMo-cofactor, a 7Fe-9S-Mo-C-homocitrate cluster. FeMo-cofactor formation involves assembly of a Fe6-8 -SX -C core precursor, NifB-co, which occurs on the NifB protein. Characterization of NifB-co in NifB is complicated by the dynamic nature of the assembly process and the presence of a permanent [4Fe-4S] cluster associated with the radical SAM chemistry for generating the central carbide. We have used the physiological carrier protein, NifX, which has been proposed to bind NifB-co and deliver it to the NifEN protein, upon which FeMo-cofactor assembly is ultimately completed. Preparation of NifX in a fully NifB-co-loaded form provided an opportunity for Mössbauer analysis of NifB-co. The results indicate that NifB-co is a diamagnetic (S=0) 8-Fe cluster, containing two spectroscopically distinct Fe sites that appear in a 3:1 ratio. DFT analysis of the (57) Fe electric hyperfine interactions deduced from the Mössbauer analysis suggests that NifB-co is either a 4Fe(2+) -4Fe(3+) or 6Fe(2+) -2Fe(3+) cluster having valence-delocalized states.

  2. Wickerhamiella brachini f.a., sp. nov., Wickerhamiella pterostichi f.a., sp. nov. and Wickerhamiella qilinensis f.a., sp. nov., three yeast species isolated from insects.

    PubMed

    Liu, Xiao-Jing; Wang, Yun; Ren, Yong-Cheng; Hui, Feng-Li

    2016-10-01

    Eight strains representing three novel yeast species were isolated from insects distributed in three localities in Nanyang, Henan Province, Central China during 2014 and 2015. Sequence analysis of the D1/D2 domains of the large subunit (LSU) rRNA gene revealed that these species are members of the Wickerhamiella clade. These three novel species have a greater than 2.5 % difference from each other or their closest known species in the D1/D2 sequences. The three yeast species can also be separated from their closest known species in terms of physiological characteristics. Moreover, a sexual state could not be found in these three novel yeast species on various sporulation media. Therefore, the three novel species are described as Wickerhamiella brachini f.a., sp. nov. (type strain, NYNU 15885T=CICC 33092T=CBS 14176T), Wickerhamiellapterostichi f.a., sp. nov. (type strain, NYNU 15896T=CICC 33093T=CBS 14177T) and Wickerhamiellaqilinensis f.a., sp. nov. (type strain, NYNU 146103T=CICC 33062T=CBS 13929T). The MycoBank numbers of Wickerhamiella brachini f.a., sp. nov., Wickerhamiellapterostichi f.a., sp. nov. and Wickerhamiellaqilinensis f.a., sp. nov. are MB 816962, MB 816963 and MB 816964, respectively.

  3. Mass spectrometry of the lithium adducts of diacylglycerols containing hydroxy FA in castor oil and two normal FA

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Castor oil can be used in industry. The molecular species of triacylglycerols containing hydroxy fatty acids (FA) in castor oil have been identified. We report here the identification of twelve diacylglycerols (DAG) containing hydroxy FA in castor oil using positive ion electrospray ionization mass ...

  4. Liver oxidation and inflammation in Fa/Fa rats fed glucomannan/spirulina-surimi.

    PubMed

    Vázquez-Velasco, Miguel; González-Torres, Laura; López-Gasco, Patricia; Bastida, Sara; Benedí, Juana; Sánchez-Reus, María Isabel; González-Muñoz, María José; Sánchez-Muniz, Francisco J

    2014-09-15

    The effect of high-fat squid-surimi diets enriched in glucomannan or glucomannan-spirulina on lipemia, liver glutathione status, antioxidant enzymes and inflammation biomarkers was determined in Zucker Fa/Fa rats. Groups of eight rats each received for 7weeks the squid-surimi control (C), glucomannan-enriched squid-surimi (G) and glucomannan-spirulina enriched squid-surimi (GS). Liver weight, cytochrome P450 7A1 expression and cholesterolemia were decreased in G and GS vs. C, improving glutathione red-ox index (p<0.05). G also showed increased glutathione reductase (GR) levels vs. C, but reduced the endothelial (eNOS) and increased the inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS) and tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-α) levels (p<0.05). The GS diet improved superoxide dismutase, catalase, glutathione peroxidase and GR activities and eNOS, iNOS and TNF-α levels (p<0.05). The glucomannan enriched surimi-diet induced hypocholesterolemic, antioxidant and proinflammatory effects, while the addition of 3g/kg spirulina kept those hypocholesterolemic and antioxidant effects but reduced the inflammation observed.

  5. Epigenetics and development of food allergy (FA) in early childhood.

    PubMed

    Hong, Xiumei; Wang, Xiaobin

    2014-09-01

    This review aims to highlight the latest advance on epigenetics in the development of food allergy (FA) and to offer future perspectives. FA, a condition caused by an immunoglobulin (Ig) E-mediated hypersensitivity reaction to food, has emerged as a major clinical and public health problem worldwide in light of its increasing prevalence, potential fatality, and significant medical and economic impact. Current evidence supports that epigenetic mechanisms are involved in immune regulation and that the epigenome may represent a key "missing piece" of the etiological puzzle for FA. There are a growing number of population-based epigenetic studies on allergy-related phenotypes, mostly focused on DNA methylation. Previous studies mostly applied candidate-gene approaches and have demonstrated that epigenetic marks are associated with multiple allergic diseases and/or with early-life exposures relevant to allergy development (such as early-life smoking exposure, air pollution, farming environment, and dietary fat). Rapid technological advancements have made unbiased genome-wide DNA methylation studies highly feasible, although there are substantial challenge in study design, data analyses, and interpretation of findings. In conclusion, epigenetics represents both an important knowledge gap and a promising research area for FA. Due to the early onset of FA, epigenetic studies of FA in prospective birth cohorts have the potential to better understand gene-environment interactions and underlying biological mechanisms in FA during critical developmental windows (preconception, in utero, and early childhood) and may lead to new paradigms in the diagnosis, prevention, and management of FA and provide novel targets for future drug discovery and therapies for FA.

  6. Advantages of clustering in the phase classification of hyperspectral materials images.

    PubMed

    Stork, Christopher L; Keenan, Michael R

    2010-12-01

    Despite the many demonstrated applications of factor analysis (FA) in analyzing hyperspectral materials images, FA does have inherent mathematical limitations, preventing it from solving certain materials characterization problems. A notable limitation of FA is its parsimony restriction, referring to the fact that in FA the number of components cannot exceed the chemical rank of a dataset. Clustering is a promising alternative to FA for the phase classification of hyperspectral materials images. In contrast with FA, the phases extracted by clustering do not have to be parsimonious. Clustering has an added advantage in its insensitivity to spectral collinearity that can result in phase mixing using FA. For representative energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy materials images, namely a solder bump dataset and a braze interface dataset, clustering generates phase classification results that are superior to those obtained using representative FA-based methods. For the solder bump dataset, clustering identifies a Cu-Sn intermetallic phase that cannot be isolated using FA alone due to the parsimony restriction. For the braze interface sample that has collinearity among the phase spectra, the clustering results do not exhibit the physically unrealistic phase mixing obtained by multivariate curve resolution, a commonly utilized FA algorithm.

  7. F/A-18 FAST Offers Advanced System Test Capability

    NASA Video Gallery

    NASA's Dryden Flight Research Center has modified an F/A-18A Hornet aircraft with additional research flight control computer systems for use as a Full-scale Advanced Systems Test Bed. Previously f...

  8. F/A-18 Automated Aerial Refueling (AAR) Phase 1

    NASA Video Gallery

    Engineers at NASA's Dryden Flight Research Center are evaluating the capability of an F/A-18A aircraft as an in-flight refueling tanker to develop analytical models for an automated aerial refuelin...

  9. NASA Researches the 'FaINT' Side of Sonic Booms

    NASA Video Gallery

    As the latest in a continuing progression of NASA supersonics research projects aimed at reducing or mitigating the effect of sonic booms, the Farfield Investigation of No Boom Threshold, or FaINT,...

  10. Total Risk Integrated Methodology (TRIM) - TRIM.FaTE

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    TRIM.FaTE is a spatially explicit, compartmental mass balance model that describes the movement and transformation of pollutants over time, through a user-defined, bounded system that includes both biotic and abiotic compartments.

  11. TRIM.FaTE Public Reference Library Documentation

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    TRIM.FaTE is a spatially explicit, compartmental mass balance model that describes the movement and transformation of pollutants over time, through a user-defined, bounded system that includes both biotic and abiotic compartments.

  12. Xanthohumol lowers body weight and fasting plasma glucose in obese male Zucker fa/fa rats.

    PubMed

    Legette, Leecole L; Luna, Arlyn Y Moreno; Reed, Ralph L; Miranda, Cristobal L; Bobe, Gerd; Proteau, Rosita R; Stevens, Jan F

    2013-07-01

    Obesity contributes to increased risk for several chronic diseases including cardiovascular disease and type 2 diabetes. Xanthohumol, a prenylated flavonoid from hops (Humulus lupulus), was tested for efficacy on biomarkers of metabolic syndrome in 4 week old Zucker fa/fa rats, a rodent model of obesity. Rats received daily oral doses of xanthohumol at 0, 1.86, 5.64, and 16.9 mg/kg BW for 6 weeks. All rats were maintained on a high fat (60% kcal) AIN-93G diet for 3 weeks to induce severe obesity followed by a normal AIN-93G (15% kcal fat) diet for the last 3 weeks of the study. Weekly food intake and body weight were recorded. Plasma cholesterol, glucose, insulin, triglyceride, and monocyte chemoattractant protein-1 (MCP-1) levels were assessed using commercial assay kits. Plasma and liver tissue levels of XN and its metabolites were determined by liquid-chromatography tandem mass spectrometry. Plasma and liver tissue levels of xanthohumol were similar between low and medium dose groups and significantly (p<0.05) elevated in the highest dose group. There was a dose-dependent effect on body weight and plasma glucose levels. The highest dose group (n=6) had significantly lower plasma glucose levels compared to the control group (n=6) in male but not female rats. There was also a significant decrease in body weight for male rats in the highest dose group (16.9 mg/kg BW) compared to rats that received no xanthohumol, which was also not seen for female rats. Plasma cholesterol, insulin, triglycerides, and MCP-1 as well as food intake were not affected by treatment. The findings suggest that xanthohumol has beneficial effects on markers of metabolic syndrome.

  13. The bacterial Entner-Doudoroff pathway does not replace glycolysis in Saccharomyces cerevisiae due to the lack of activity of iron-sulfur cluster enzyme 6-phosphogluconate dehydratase.

    PubMed

    Benisch, Feline; Boles, Eckhard

    2014-02-10

    Replacement of the glycolytic pathway of Saccharomyces cerevisiae by a bacterial Entner-Doudoroff pathway (EDP) would result in lower ATP production and therefore a lower biomass yield is expected that would further allow higher products yields in the fermentation of sugars. To establish catabolism of glucose via the EDP in S. cerevisiae requires expression of only two additional enzyme activities, 6-phosphogluconate dehydratase (PGDH) and KDPG aldolase. In this work, KDPG aldolase from Escherichia coli could be successfully expressed in the yeast cytosol with very high enzyme activity. Nevertheless, simultaneous expression of KDPG aldolase and a codon optimized PGDH gene of E. coli could not replace glycolysis or the pentose phosphate pathway in growth experiments. It could be shown that this was due to the very low enzyme activity of PGDH. This bacterial enzyme is a [4Fe-4S] iron-sulfur cluster protein. Several attempts to improve the availability of iron-sulfur clusters or iron in the yeast cells, to attract the iron-sulfur cluster assembly machinery to Leu1-PGDH fusion proteins or to localize the PGDH in the mitochondria did not result in improved enzyme activities. From our results we conclude that establishing functional expression of iron-sulfur cluster enzymes will be a major task for the integration of the EDP and other biochemical pathways in yeast.

  14. Importance of Hydrogen Bonding in Fine Tuning the [2Fe-2S] Cluster Redox Potential of HydC from Thermotoga maritima.

    PubMed

    Birrell, James A; Laurich, Christoph; Reijerse, Edward J; Ogata, Hideaki; Lubitz, Wolfgang

    2016-08-09

    Iron-sulfur clusters form one of the largest and most diverse classes of enzyme cofactors in nature. They may serve as structural factors, form electron transfer chains between active sites and external redox partners, or form components of enzyme active sites. Their specific role is a consequence of the cluster type and the surrounding protein environment. The relative effects of these factors are not completely understood, and it is not yet possible to predict the properties of iron-sulfur clusters based on amino acid sequences or rationally tune their properties to generate proteins with new desirable functions. Here, we generate mutations in a [2Fe-2S] cluster protein, the TmHydC subunit of the trimeric [FeFe]-hydrogenase from Thermotoga maritima, to study the factors that affect its redox potential. Saturation mutagenesis of Val131 was used to tune the redox potential over a 135 mV range and revealed that cluster redox potential and electronic properties correlate with amino acid hydrophobicity and the ability to form hydrogen bonds to the cluster. Proline scanning mutagenesis between pairs of ligating cysteines was used to remove backbone amide hydrogen bonds to the cluster and decrease the redox potential by up to 132 mV, without large structural changes in most cases. However, substitution of Gly83 with proline caused a change of HydC to a [4Fe-4S] cluster protein with a redox potential of -526 mV. Together, these results confirm the importance of hydrogen bonding in tuning cluster redox potentials and demonstrate the versatility of iron-sulfur cluster protein folds at binding different types of clusters.

  15. Dark-operative protochlorophyllide oxidoreductase generates substrate radicals by an iron-sulphur cluster in bacteriochlorophyll biosynthesis

    PubMed Central

    Nomata, Jiro; Kondo, Toru; Mizoguchi, Tadashi; Tamiaki, Hitoshi; Itoh, Shigeru; Fujita, Yuichi

    2014-01-01

    Photosynthesis converts solar energy to chemical energy using chlorophylls (Chls). In a late stage of biosynthesis of Chls, dark-operative protochlorophyllide (Pchlide) oxidoreductase (DPOR), a nitrogenase-like enzyme, reduces the C17 = C18 double bond of Pchlide and drastically changes the spectral properties suitable for photosynthesis forming the parental chlorin ring for Chl a. We previously proposed that the spatial arrangement of the proton donors determines the stereospecificity of the Pchlide reduction based on the recently resolved structure of the DPOR catalytic component, NB-protein. However, it was not clear how the two-electron and two-proton transfer events are coordinated in the reaction. In this study, we demonstrate that DPOR initiates a single electron transfer reaction from a [4Fe-4S]-cluster (NB-cluster) to Pchlide, generating Pchlide anion radicals followed by a single proton transfer, and then, further electron/proton transfer steps transform the anion radicals into chlorophyllide (Chlide). Thus, DPOR is a unique iron-sulphur enzyme to form substrate radicals followed by sequential proton- and electron-transfer steps with the protein folding very similar to that of nitrogenase. This novel radical-mediated reaction supports the biosynthesis of Chl in a wide variety of photosynthetic organisms. PMID:24965831

  16. Dark-operative protochlorophyllide oxidoreductase generates substrate radicals by an iron-sulphur cluster in bacteriochlorophyll biosynthesis.

    PubMed

    Nomata, Jiro; Kondo, Toru; Mizoguchi, Tadashi; Tamiaki, Hitoshi; Itoh, Shigeru; Fujita, Yuichi

    2014-06-26

    Photosynthesis converts solar energy to chemical energy using chlorophylls (Chls). In a late stage of biosynthesis of Chls, dark-operative protochlorophyllide (Pchlide) oxidoreductase (DPOR), a nitrogenase-like enzyme, reduces the C17 = C18 double bond of Pchlide and drastically changes the spectral properties suitable for photosynthesis forming the parental chlorin ring for Chl a. We previously proposed that the spatial arrangement of the proton donors determines the stereospecificity of the Pchlide reduction based on the recently resolved structure of the DPOR catalytic component, NB-protein. However, it was not clear how the two-electron and two-proton transfer events are coordinated in the reaction. In this study, we demonstrate that DPOR initiates a single electron transfer reaction from a [4Fe-4S]-cluster (NB-cluster) to Pchlide, generating Pchlide anion radicals followed by a single proton transfer, and then, further electron/proton transfer steps transform the anion radicals into chlorophyllide (Chlide). Thus, DPOR is a unique iron-sulphur enzyme to form substrate radicals followed by sequential proton- and electron-transfer steps with the protein folding very similar to that of nitrogenase. This novel radical-mediated reaction supports the biosynthesis of Chl in a wide variety of photosynthetic organisms.

  17. Characterization of two dissimilatory sulfite reductases from sulfate-reducing bacteria

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huynh, B. H.; Moura, I.; Lino, A. R.; Moura, J. J. G.; Legall, J.

    1988-02-01

    Mössbauer, EPR, and biochemical techniques were used to characterize two dissimilatory sulfite reductases: desulforubidin from Desulfovibrio baculatus strain DSM 1743 and desulfoviridin from Desulfovibrio gigas. For each molecule of desulforubidin, there are two sirohemes and four [4Fe-4S] clusters. The [4Fe-4S] clusters are in the diamagnetic 2+ oxidation state. The sirohemes are high-spin ferric (S=5/2) and each siroheme is exchanged-coupled to a [4Fe-4S]2+ cluster. Such an exchange-coupled siroheme-[4Fe-4S] unit has also been found in the assimilatory sulfite reductase from Escherichia coli/1/ and in a low-molecular weight sulfite reductase from Desulfovibrio vulgaris/2/. For each molecule of defulfoviridin, there are two tetrahydroporphyrin groups and four [4Fe-4S]2+ clusters. To our surprise, we discovered that about 80% of the tetrahydroporphyrin groups, however, do not bind iron.

  18. Ligand binding at the A-cluster in full-length or truncated acetyl-CoA synthase studied by X-ray absorption spectroscopy

    PubMed Central

    Schrapers, Peer; Ilina, Julia; Gregg, Christina M.; Mebs, Stefan; Jeoung, Jae-Hun; Dau, Holger; Dobbek, Holger; Haumann, Michael

    2017-01-01

    Bacteria integrate CO2 reduction and acetyl coenzyme-A (CoA) synthesis in the Wood-Ljungdal pathway. The acetyl-CoA synthase (ACS) active site is a [4Fe4S]-[NiNi] complex (A-cluster). The dinickel site structure (with proximal, p, and distal, d, ions) was studied by X-ray absorption spectroscopy in ACS variants comprising all three protein domains or only the C-terminal domain with the A-cluster. Both variants showed two square-planar Ni(II) sites and an OH- bound at Ni(II)p in oxidized enzyme and a H2O at Ni(I)p in reduced enzyme; a Ni(I)p-CO species was induced by CO incubation and a Ni(II)-CH3- species with an additional water ligand by a methyl group donor. These findings render a direct effect of the N-terminal and middle domains on the A-cluster structure unlikely. PMID:28178309

  19. Ligand binding at the A-cluster in full-length or truncated acetyl-CoA synthase studied by X-ray absorption spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Schrapers, Peer; Ilina, Julia; Gregg, Christina M; Mebs, Stefan; Jeoung, Jae-Hun; Dau, Holger; Dobbek, Holger; Haumann, Michael

    2017-01-01

    Bacteria integrate CO2 reduction and acetyl coenzyme-A (CoA) synthesis in the Wood-Ljungdal pathway. The acetyl-CoA synthase (ACS) active site is a [4Fe4S]-[NiNi] complex (A-cluster). The dinickel site structure (with proximal, p, and distal, d, ions) was studied by X-ray absorption spectroscopy in ACS variants comprising all three protein domains or only the C-terminal domain with the A-cluster. Both variants showed two square-planar Ni(II) sites and an OH- bound at Ni(II)p in oxidized enzyme and a H2O at Ni(I)p in reduced enzyme; a Ni(I)p-CO species was induced by CO incubation and a Ni(II)-CH3- species with an additional water ligand by a methyl group donor. These findings render a direct effect of the N-terminal and middle domains on the A-cluster structure unlikely.

  20. Marine lipid-based liposomes increase in vivo FA bioavailability.

    PubMed

    Cansell, Maud; Nacka, Fabienne; Combe, Nicole

    2003-05-01

    Liposomes made from an extract of natural marine lipids and containing a high n-3 PUFA lipid ratio were envisaged as oral route vectors for FA supplements in order to increase PUFA bioavailability. The absorption of FA in thoracic lymph duct-cannulated rats, after intragastric feeding of dietary fats in the form of liposomes or fish oil, was compared. Lipid and FA analyses were also performed on feces. Five mole percent alpha-tocopherol was added to fish oil and incorporated into the liposome membrane. The influence of alpha-tocopherol on FA lymph recovery was also investigated. In vivo, FA absorption in rats was favored by liposomes (98 +/- 1%) compared to fish oil (73 +/- 6%). In the same way, the DHA proportion in lymph was higher after liposome ingestion (78%) than after fish oil ingestion (47%). However, phospholipid (PL) concentration in lymph was not affected by the kind of dietary fat ingested, suggesting a PL regulation due to de novo TAG synthesis. The influence of the intramolecular distribution of n-3 PUFA in dietary lipids (TAG and PL) on the intramolecular FA distribution in TAG of chylomicrons was also investigated. The results obtained showed that the distribution of n-3 PUFA esterified on the sn-2 position of chylomicron TAG depended on the lipid source administered. All these results correlated, at least partly, with in vitro liposome behavior under conditions that mimic those of the gastrointestinal tract. As a whole, this study pointed out that marine PL may constitute an attractive material for the development of liposomes as oral PUFA supplements.

  1. Birth order and male androphilia in Samoan fa'afafine

    PubMed Central

    Vasey, Paul L; VanderLaan, Doug P

    2007-01-01

    The manner in which male androphilia is publicly expressed varies cross-culturally. As such, it is unclear whether distinct or common underlying causal processes characterize male androphilia in different cultures. Establishing the existence of cross-cultural universals in male androphilia is one means of ascertaining whether common biological bases underlie this phenomenon despite its culturally distinct forms. The evidence that the number of older biological brothers increases the odds of androphilia in later-born males has been well documented for Western samples (i.e. the fraternal birth order effect); but there is little evidence for this effect in non-Western samples. Here, we compare the birth order of androphilic males (i.e. fa'afafine) and gynephilic males from the politically autonomous Polynesian nation of Independent Samoa. Results indicate that relative to gynephilic males, fa'afafine tend to have more siblings and are generally later born when birth order is quantified using Slater, fraternal and sororal indices. More specifically, fa'afafine tend to have a greater number of older brothers, older sisters and younger brothers. We discuss the observed effects in relation to the differing reproductive patterns exhibited by the mothers of fa'afafine and gynephilic males, and to existing social and biological theories for sexual orientation. PMID:17412683

  2. "What D'ya Mean, Project SOL-FA?"

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hardman, Olga S.

    1981-01-01

    Since 1977, Project Sol-fa, funded with an ESEA Title IV-C grant has provided Harrison County primary teachers with inservice training in the Kodaly method of music education. This article provides information on program funding, costs, and accomplishments. Evaluation forms and the inservice syllabus are appended. (SJL)

  3. Spectroscopic classification of ASASSN-14ew and ASASSN-14fa

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Takats, K.; Bufano, F.; Pignata, G.; Prieto, J. L.

    2014-08-01

    We report the spectroscopic classification of ASASSN-14ew (ATel #6367) and ASASSN-14fa (ATel #6372). The optical spectra (range 450-880 nm) were obtained on August 11.2 and 11.3 UT, respectively, with the SOAR telescope (+ Goodman Spectrograph).

  4. IRAC F/A-18 RFCS on NASA 853

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pahle, Joseph

    2009-01-01

    F/A-18 testbed development and flight research are highlighted in this presentation. The current focus is on stability, specifically adaptive flight control, but soon the focus will move towards stability and maneuverability, examining flight planning and guidance, adaptive flight control, engine control and airframe and structures. Later research will additionally review V and V methods. Current and future IRAC plans are highlighted.

  5. A thermostable hybrid cluster protein from Pyrococcus furiosus: effects of the loss of a three helix bundle subdomain.

    PubMed

    Overeijnder, Marieke L; Hagen, Wilfred R; Hagedoorn, Peter-Leon

    2009-06-01

    Pyrococcus furiosus hybrid cluster protein (HCP) was expressed in Escherichia coli, purified, and characterized. This is the first archaeal and thermostable HCP to be isolated. Compared with the protein sequences of previously characterized HCPs from mesophiles, the protein sequence of P. furiosus HCP exhibits a deletion of approximately 13 kDa as a single amino acid stretch just after the N-terminal cysteine motif, characteristic for class-III HCPs from (hyper)thermophilic archaea and bacteria. The protein was expressed as a thermostable, soluble homodimeric protein. Hydroxylamine reductase activity of P. furiosus HCP showed a K(m) value of 0.40 mM and a k(cat) value of 3.8 s(-1) at 70 degrees C and pH 9.0. Electron paramagnetic resonance spectroscopy showed evidence for the presence of a spin-admixed, S = 3/2 [4Fe-4S](+) cubane cluster and of the hybrid cluster. The cubane cluster of P. furiosus HCP is presumably coordinated by a CXXC-X(7)-C-X(5)-C motif close to the N-terminus, which is similar to the CXXC-X(8)-C-X(5)-C motif of the Desulfovibrio desulfuricans and Desulfovibrio vulgaris HCPs. Amino acid sequence alignment and homology modeling of P. furiosus HCP reveal that the deletion results in a loss of one of the two three-helix bundles of domain 1. Clearly the loss of one of the three-helix bundles of domain 1 does not diminish the hydroxylamine reduction activity and the incorporation of the iron-sulfur clusters.

  6. Beta-cell hypertrophy in fa/fa rats is associated with basal glucose hypersensitivity and reduced SNARE protein expression.

    PubMed

    Chan, C B; MacPhail, R M; Sheu, L; Wheeler, M B; Gaisano, H Y

    1999-05-01

    In normal isolated beta-cells, the response to glucose is heterogeneous and characterized by an increasing number of secretory cells as glucose concentration rises (Pipeleers DG, Kiekens R, Ling Z, Wilikens A, Schuit F: Physiologic relevance of heterogeneity in the pancreatic beta-cell population. Diabetologia 37 (Suppl. 2):S57-S64, 1994). We hypothesized that fasting hyperinsulinemia in obesity might be explained by altered beta-cell heterogeneity of signal transduction mechanisms, possibly involving exocytotic proteins. Insulin secretion from individual beta-cells sorted according to the size of the islet donor (<125 microm, >250 microm, and intermediate diameter) was measured by reverse hemolytic plaque assay. Beta-cells from fa/fa rats were hypertrophied 25-40%, independent of donor islet size. This was accompanied by an increased proportion of secretory cells (recruitment) at 5.5-11.0 mmol/l glucose, increased secretion per cell at 2.8 mmol/l glucose, and decreased insulin content after acute glucose exposure without an increase in secretion per cell. Decreased expression of exocytotic (soluble N-ethylmaleimide-sensitive fusion protein receptor [SNARE]) proteins, vesicle-associated membrane protein isoform 2 (VAMP-2), synaptosomal protein of 25 kDa (SNAP-25), and syntaxin-1 and -2 in fa/fa beta-cells may contribute to the failure to sustain excessive plaque size at higher glucose concentrations. Fasting hyperinsulinemia may be maintained by increased recruitment and an exaggerated secretory response in all fa-derived islet populations. Glucose regulates beta-cell responsiveness in the short term, and these effects may involve altered expression of SNARE proteins.

  7. Fe-S cluster biogenesis in isolated mammalian mitochondria: coordinated use of persulfide sulfur and iron and requirements for GTP, NADH, and ATP.

    PubMed

    Pandey, Alok; Pain, Jayashree; Ghosh, Arnab K; Dancis, Andrew; Pain, Debkumar

    2015-01-02

    Iron-sulfur (Fe-S) clusters are essential cofactors, and mitochondria contain several Fe-S proteins, including the [4Fe-4S] protein aconitase and the [2Fe-2S] protein ferredoxin. Fe-S cluster assembly of these proteins occurs within mitochondria. Although considerable data exist for yeast mitochondria, this biosynthetic process has never been directly demonstrated in mammalian mitochondria. Using [(35)S]cysteine as the source of sulfur, here we show that mitochondria isolated from Cath.A-derived cells, a murine neuronal cell line, can synthesize and insert new Fe-(35)S clusters into aconitase and ferredoxins. The process requires GTP, NADH, ATP, and iron, and hydrolysis of both GTP and ATP is necessary. Importantly, we have identified the (35)S-labeled persulfide on the NFS1 cysteine desulfurase as a genuine intermediate en route to Fe-S cluster synthesis. In physiological settings, the persulfide sulfur is released from NFS1 and transferred to a scaffold protein, where it combines with iron to form an Fe-S cluster intermediate. We found that the release of persulfide sulfur from NFS1 requires iron, showing that the use of iron and sulfur for the synthesis of Fe-S cluster intermediates is a highly coordinated process. The release of persulfide sulfur also requires GTP and NADH, probably mediated by a GTPase and a reductase, respectively. ATP, a cofactor for a multifunctional Hsp70 chaperone, is not required at this step. The experimental system described here may help to define the biochemical basis of diseases that are associated with impaired Fe-S cluster biogenesis in mitochondria, such as Friedreich ataxia.

  8. North façade, entrance. The square tower has the remains of ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    North façade, entrance. The square tower has the remains of a sign, Kaiser Foundation Hospital. Horizontal ribbon windows continue on this façade. - Richmond Field Hospital, 1330 Cutting Boulevard, Richmond, Contra Costa County, CA

  9. Opuntia ficus indica (nopal) attenuates hepatic steatosis and oxidative stress in obese Zucker (fa/fa) rats.

    PubMed

    Morán-Ramos, Sofía; Avila-Nava, Azalia; Tovar, Armando R; Pedraza-Chaverri, José; López-Romero, Patricia; Torres, Nimbe

    2012-11-01

    Nonalcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) is associated with multiple factors such as obesity, insulin resistance, and oxidative stress. Nopal, a cactus plant widely consumed in the Mexican diet, is considered a functional food because of its antioxidant activity and ability to improve biomarkers of metabolic syndrome. The aim of this study was to assess the effect of nopal consumption on the development of hepatic steatosis and hepatic oxidative stress and on the regulation of genes involved in hepatic lipid metabolism. Obese Zucker (fa/fa) rats were fed a control diet or a diet containing 4% nopal for 7 wk. Rats fed the nopal-containing diet had ∼50% lower hepatic TG than the control group as well as a reduction in hepatomegaly and biomarkers of hepatocyte injury such as alanine and aspartate aminotransferases. Attenuation of hepatic steatosis by nopal consumption was accompanied by a higher serum concentration of adiponectin and a greater abundance of mRNA for genes involved in lipid oxidation and lipid export and production of carnitine palmitoyltransferase-1 and microsomal TG transfer proteins in liver. Hepatic reactive oxygen species and lipid peroxidation biomarkers were significantly lower in rats fed nopal compared with the control rats. Furthermore, rats fed the nopal diet had a lower postprandial serum insulin concentration and a greater liver phosphorylated protein kinase B (pAKT):AKT ratio in the postprandial state. This study suggests that nopal consumption attenuates hepatic steatosis by increasing fatty acid oxidation and VLDL synthesis, decreasing oxidative stress, and improving liver insulin signaling in obese Zucker (fa/fa) rats.

  10. Ligand Binding to the FA3-FA4 Cleft Inhibits the Esterase-Like Activity of Human Serum Albumin

    PubMed Central

    Ascenzi, Paolo; Leboffe, Loris; di Masi, Alessandra; Trezza, Viviana; Fanali, Gabriella; Gioia, Magda; Coletta, Massimo; Fasano, Mauro

    2015-01-01

    The hydrolysis of 4-nitrophenyl esters of hexanoate (NphOHe) and decanoate (NphODe) by human serum albumin (HSA) at Tyr411, located at the FA3-FA4 site, has been investigated between pH 5.8 and 9.5, at 22.0°C. Values of Ks, k+2, and k+2/Ks obtained at [HSA] ≥ 5×[NphOXx] and [NphOXx] ≥ 5×[HSA] (Xx is NphOHe or NphODe) match very well each other; moreover, the deacylation step turns out to be the rate limiting step in catalysis (i.e., k+3 << k+2). The pH dependence of the kinetic parameters for the hydrolysis of NphOHe and NphODe can be described by the acidic pKa-shift of a single amino acid residue, which varies from 8.9 in the free HSA to 7.6 and 7.0 in the HSA:NphOHe and HSA:NphODe complex, respectively; the pK>a-shift appears to be correlated to the length of the fatty acid tail of the substrate. The inhibition of the HSA-Tyr411-catalyzed hydrolysis of NphOHe, NphODe, and 4-nitrophenyl myristate (NphOMy) by five inhibitors (i.e., diazepam, diflunisal, ibuprofen, 3-indoxyl-sulfate, and propofol) has been investigated at pH 7.5 and 22.0°C, resulting competitive. The affinity of diazepam, diflunisal, ibuprofen, 3-indoxyl-sulfate, and propofol for HSA reflects the selectivity of the FA3-FA4 cleft. Under conditions where Tyr411 is not acylated, the molar fraction of diazepam, diflunisal, ibuprofen, and 3-indoxyl-sulfate bound to HSA is higher than 0.9 whereas the molar fraction of propofol bound to HSA is ca. 0.5. PMID:25790235

  11. This NASA Dryden F/A-18 is participating in the Automated Aerial Refueling (AAR) project. F/A-18 (No

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2002-01-01

    A NASA Dryden F/A-18 is participating in the Automated Aerial Refueling (AAR) project. F/A-18 (No. 847) is acting as an in-flight refueling tanker in the study to develop analytical models for an automated aerial refueling system for unmanned vehicles. A 300-gallon aerodynamic pod containing air-refueling equipment is seen beneath the fuselage. The hose and refueling basket are extended during an assessment of their dynamics on the F/A-18A.

  12. FaPOD27 functions in the metabolism of polyphenols in strawberry fruit (Fragaria sp.)

    PubMed Central

    Yeh, Su-Ying; Huang, Fong-Chin; Hoffmann, Thomas; Mayershofer, Mechthild; Schwab, Wilfried

    2014-01-01

    The strawberry (Fragaria × ananassa) is one of the most preferred fresh fruit worldwide, accumulates numerous flavonoids but has limited shelf life due to excessive tissue softening caused by cell wall degradation. Since lignin is one of the polymers that strengthen plant cell walls and might contribute to some extent to fruit firmness monolignol biosynthesis was studied in strawberry fruit. Cinnamoyl-CoA reductase (CCR), cinnamyl alcohol dehydrogenase (CAD), and a peroxidase (POD27) gene were strongly expressed in red, ripe fruit whereas a second POD gene was primarily expressed in green, immature fruit. Moreover, FaPOD27 transcripts were strongly and constitutively induced in fruits exposed to Agrobacterium infection. Gene expression levels and enzymatic activities of FaCCR and FaCAD were efficiently suppressed through RNAi in FaCCR- and FaCAD-silenced strawberries. Besides, significantly elevated FaPOD transcript levels were detected after agroinfiltration of pBI-FaPOD constructs in fruits. At the same time, levels of G-monomers were considerably reduced in FaCCR-silenced fruits whereas the proportion of both G- and S-monomers decisively decreased in FaCAD-silenced and pBI-FaPOD fruits. Development, firmness, and lignin level of the treated fruits were similar to pBI-intron control fruits, presumably attributed to increased expression levels of FaPOD27 upon agroinfiltration. Additionally, enhanced firmness, accompanied with elevated lignin levels, was revealed in chalcone synthase-deficient fruits (CHS−), independent of down- or up-regulation of individual and combined FaCCR. FaCAD, and FaPOD genes by agroinfiltration, when compared to CHS−/pBI-intron control fruits. These approaches provide further insight into the genetic control of flavonoid and lignin synthesis in strawberries. The results suggest that FaPOD27 is a key gene for lignin biosynthesis in strawberry fruit and thus to improving the firmness of strawberries. PMID:25346738

  13. Characteristics of F/A-18 vertical tail buffeting

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sheta, E. F.; Huttsell, L. J.

    2003-03-01

    A time-accurate computational analysis of vertical tail buffeting of full F/A-18 aircraft is conducted at typical flight conditions to identify the buffet characteristics of fighter aircraft. The F/A-18 aircraft is pitched at wide range of high angles of attack at Mach number of 0.243 and Reynolds number of 11 millions. Strong coupling between the fluid and structure is considered in this investigation. Strong coupling occurs when the inertial effect of the motion of the vertical tail is fed back into the flow field. The aerodynamic flow field around the F/A-18 aircraft is computed using the Reynolds-averaged full Navier-Stokes equations. The dynamical structural response of the vertical tail is predicted using direct finite-element analysis. The interface between the fluid and structure is applied using conservative and consistent interfacing methodology. The motion of the computational grid due to the deflection of the vertical tail is computed using transfinite interpolation module. The investigation revealed that the vertical tail is subject to bending and torsional responses, mainly in the first modes of vibrations. The buffet loads increase significantly as the onset of vortex breakdown moves upstream of the vertical tails. The inboard surface of the vertical tail has more significant contribution in the buffet excitation than the outboard surface. In addition, the pressure on the outboard surface of the vertical tail is less sensitive to the angle of attack than the pressure on the inboard surface. The buffet excitation peaks shift to lower frequency as the angle of attack increases. The computational results are compared, and they are in close agreement, with several flight and experimental data.

  14. Biochemical and spectroscopic studies of epoxyqueuosine reductase: A novel iron-sulfur cluster and cobalamin containing protein involved in the biosynthesis of queuosine

    PubMed Central

    Miles, Zachary D.; Myers, William K.; Kincannon, William M.; Britt, R. David; Bandarian, Vahe

    2015-01-01

    Queuosine is a hypermodified nucleoside present in the wobble position of tRNAs with a 5′-GUN-3′ sequence in their anticodon (His, Asp, Asn, and Tyr). The 7-deazapurine core of the base is synthesized de novo in prokaryotes from guanosine-5′-triphosphate in a series of eight sequential enzymatic transformations, the final three occurring on tRNA. Epoxyqueuosine reductase (QueG), catalyzes the final step in the pathway, which entails the 2-electron reduction of epoxyqueuosine to form queuosine. Biochemical analyses reveal that this enzyme requires cobalamin and two [4Fe-4S] clusters for catalysis. Spectroscopic studies show that the cobalamin appears to bind in a base-off conformation, whereby the dimethylbenzimidazole moiety of the cofactor is removed from the coordination sphere of the cobalt but not replaced by an imidazole sidechain, which is a hallmark of many cobalamin-dependent enzymes. The bioinformatically-identified residues are shown to have a role in modulating the primary coordination sphere of cobalamin. These studies provide the first demonstration of the cofactor requirements for QueG. PMID:26230193

  15. The dam replacing gene product enhances Neisseria gonorrhoeae FA1090 viability and biofilm formation.

    PubMed

    Kwiatek, Agnieszka; Bacal, Pawel; Wasiluk, Adrian; Trybunko, Anastasiya; Adamczyk-Poplawska, Monika

    2014-01-01

    Many Neisseriaceae do not exhibit Dam methyltransferase activity and, instead of the dam gene, possess drg (dam replacing gene) inserted in the leuS/dam locus. The drg locus in Neisseria gonorrhoeae FA1090 has a lower GC-pairs content (40.5%) compared to the whole genome of N. gonorrhoeae FA1090 (52%). The gonococcal drg gene encodes a DNA endonuclease Drg, with GmeATC specificity. Disruption of drg or insertion of the dam gene in gonococcal genome changes the level of expression of genes as shown by transcriptome analysis. For the drg-deficient N. gonorrhoeae mutant, a total of 195 (8.94% of the total gene pool) genes exhibited an altered expression compared to the wt strain by at least 1.5 fold. In dam-expressing N. gonorrhoeae mutant, the expression of 240 genes (11% of total genes) was deregulated. Most of these deregulated genes were involved in translation, DNA repair, membrane biogenesis and energy production as shown by cluster of orthologous group analysis. In vivo, the inactivation of drg gene causes the decrease of the number of live neisserial cells and long lag phase of growth. The insertion of dam gene instead of drg locus restores cell viability. We have also shown that presence of the drg gene product is important for N. gonorrhoeae FA1090 in adhesion, including human epithelial cells, and biofilm formation. Biofilm produced by drg-deficient strain is formed by more dispersed cells, compared to this one formed by parental strain as shown by scanning electron and confocal microscopy. Also adherence assays show a significantly smaller biomass of formed biofilm (OD570 = 0.242 ± 0.038) for drg-deficient strain, compared to wild-type strain (OD570 = 0.378 ± 0.057). Dam-expressing gonococcal cells produce slightly weaker biofilm with cells embedded in an extracellular matrix. This strain has also a five times reduced ability for adhesion to human epithelial cells. In this context, the presence of Drg is more advantageous for N. gonorrhoeae biology than

  16. The dam replacing gene product enhances Neisseria gonorrhoeae FA1090 viability and biofilm formation

    PubMed Central

    Kwiatek, Agnieszka; Bacal, Pawel; Wasiluk, Adrian; Trybunko, Anastasiya; Adamczyk-Poplawska, Monika

    2014-01-01

    Many Neisseriaceae do not exhibit Dam methyltransferase activity and, instead of the dam gene, possess drg (dam replacing gene) inserted in the leuS/dam locus. The drg locus in Neisseria gonorrhoeae FA1090 has a lower GC-pairs content (40.5%) compared to the whole genome of N. gonorrhoeae FA1090 (52%). The gonococcal drg gene encodes a DNA endonuclease Drg, with GmeATC specificity. Disruption of drg or insertion of the dam gene in gonococcal genome changes the level of expression of genes as shown by transcriptome analysis. For the drg-deficient N. gonorrhoeae mutant, a total of 195 (8.94% of the total gene pool) genes exhibited an altered expression compared to the wt strain by at least 1.5 fold. In dam-expressing N. gonorrhoeae mutant, the expression of 240 genes (11% of total genes) was deregulated. Most of these deregulated genes were involved in translation, DNA repair, membrane biogenesis and energy production as shown by cluster of orthologous group analysis. In vivo, the inactivation of drg gene causes the decrease of the number of live neisserial cells and long lag phase of growth. The insertion of dam gene instead of drg locus restores cell viability. We have also shown that presence of the drg gene product is important for N. gonorrhoeae FA1090 in adhesion, including human epithelial cells, and biofilm formation. Biofilm produced by drg-deficient strain is formed by more dispersed cells, compared to this one formed by parental strain as shown by scanning electron and confocal microscopy. Also adherence assays show a significantly smaller biomass of formed biofilm (OD570 = 0.242 ± 0.038) for drg-deficient strain, compared to wild-type strain (OD570 = 0.378 ± 0.057). Dam-expressing gonococcal cells produce slightly weaker biofilm with cells embedded in an extracellular matrix. This strain has also a five times reduced ability for adhesion to human epithelial cells. In this context, the presence of Drg is more advantageous for N. gonorrhoeae biology than

  17. Identification and characterization of PshB, the dicluster ferredoxin that harbors the terminal electron acceptors F(A) and F(B) in Heliobacterium modesticaldum.

    PubMed

    Heinnickel, Mark; Shen, Gaozhong; Golbeck, John H

    2007-03-06

    The Type I homodimeric photosynthetic reaction center found in anaerobic gram-positive bacteria of the genus Heliobacteriaceae incorporates FA- and FB-like iron-sulfur clusters similar to those found in Photosystem I as terminal electron acceptors. We recently isolated the PshB protein that harbors the iron-sulfur clusters from the reaction centers of Heliobacterium modesticaldum. Here, we report the cloning of a candidate gene and the properties of its product. Genuine PshB was dissociated from the reaction center with 1 M NaCl and purified using an affinity strategy. After acquiring its N-terminal amino acid sequence, an fd2-like gene encoding a 5.5-kDa dicluster ferredoxin was identified as a candidate for PshB. The Fd2-like apoprotein was expressed in Escherichia coli with a His tag, and the Fe/S clusters were inserted using inorganic reagents. The optical absorbance and EPR spectra of the Fd2-like holoprotein were similar to those of genuine PshB. The Fd2-like holoprotein was coeluted with P798-FX cores on both G-75 gel filtration and Ni affinity columns. Consistent with binding, the EPR resonances at g = 2.067, 1.933, and 1.890 from [FA/FB]- were restored after illumination at 15 K, and the long-lived, room-temperature charge recombination kinetics between P798+ and [FA/FB]- reappeared on a laser flash. These characteristics indicate that the long-sought gene and polypeptide harboring the FA- and FB-like clusters in heliobacteria have been identified. The amino acid sequence of PshB indicates an entirely different mode of binding with the reaction center core than PsaC, its counterpart in Photosystem I.

  18. Depositional Environment of Permian Tak Fa Formation, Nakhonsawan, Northern Thailand

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ketwetsuriya, Chatchalerm; Nützel, Alexander; Kanjanapayont, Pitsanupong

    2016-04-01

    The carbonate rocks of the study area at Amphoe Tak Fa and Amphoe Takhli, Changwat Nakhon Sawan belong to the Tak Fa Formation, Saraburi Group. This formation crops out in the Khao Khwang Platform and consists of late Palaeozoic carbonate platform deposits. It reaches a thickness of 900 meters and crops out in a vast area. The exposures have been measured and samples were collected for petrographic study. The rock consists of limestones, argillaceous limestones, mudstones and dolomites with nodular and banded cherts, which comprise many invertebrate fossils such as fusulinids, ammonoid, pelecypod, gastropod, coral and bryozoa. Many of the fossils are silicified. The gastropod assemblage is currently under study and represents one of the most diverse faunas reported from SE Asia. The age of the rock is Yakhtashian or Artinskian (late Early Permian) to Midian or Capitanian (late Middle Permian). The study of carbonate facies and fauna indicates that the depositional environment was on shelf lagoon within the carbonate platform varying from shallow marine to barrier bar.

  19. Far-red light photoacclimation (FaRLiP) in Synechococcus sp. PCC 7335. II.Characterization of phycobiliproteins produced during acclimation to far-red light.

    PubMed

    Ho, Ming-Yang; Gan, Fei; Shen, Gaozhong; Bryant, Donald A

    2017-02-01

    Phycobilisomes (PBS) are antenna complexes that harvest light for photosystem (PS) I and PS II in cyanobacteria and some algae. A process known as far-red light photoacclimation (FaRLiP) occurs when some cyanobacteria are grown in far-red light (FRL). They synthesize chlorophylls d and f and remodel PS I, PS II, and PBS using subunits paralogous to those produced in white light. The FaRLiP strain, Leptolyngbya sp. JSC-1, replaces hemidiscoidal PBS with pentacylindrical cores, which are produced when cells are grown in red or white light, with PBS with bicylindrical cores when cells are grown in FRL. This study shows that the PBS of another FaRLiP strain, Synechococcus sp. PCC 7335, are not remodeled in cells grown in FRL. Instead, cells grown in FRL produce bicylindrical cores that uniquely contain the paralogous allophycocyanin subunits encoded in the FaRLiP cluster, and these bicylindrical cores coexist with red-light-type PBS with tricylindrical cores. The bicylindrical cores have absorption maxima at 650 and 711 nm and a low-temperature fluorescence emission maximum at 730 nm. They contain ApcE2:ApcF:ApcD3:ApcD2:ApcD5:ApcB2 in the approximate ratio 2:2:4:6:12:22, and a structural model is proposed. Time course experiments showed that bicylindrical cores were detectable about 48 h after cells were transferred from RL to FRL and that synthesis of red-light-type PBS continued throughout a 21-day growth period. When considered in comparison with results for other FaRLiP cyanobacteria, the results here show that acclimation responses to FRL can differ considerably among FaRLiP cyanobacteria.

  20. Occurrence of Far-Red Light Photoacclimation (FaRLiP) in Diverse Cyanobacteria

    PubMed Central

    Gan, Fei; Shen, Gaozhong; Bryant, Donald A.

    2014-01-01

    Cyanobacteria have evolved a number of acclimation strategies to sense and respond to changing nutrient and light conditions. Leptolyngbya sp. JSC-1 was recently shown to photoacclimate to far-red light by extensively remodeling its photosystem (PS) I, PS II and phycobilisome complexes, thereby gaining the ability to grow in far-red light. A 21-gene photosynthetic gene cluster (rfpA/B/C, apcA2/B2/D2/E2/D3, psbA3/D3/C2/B2/H2/A4, psaA2/B2/L2/I2/F2/J2) that is specifically expressed in far-red light encodes the core subunits of the three major photosynthetic complexes. The growth responses to far-red light were studied here for five additional cyanobacterial strains, each of which has a gene cluster similar to that in Leptolyngbya sp. JSC-1. After acclimation all five strains could grow continuously in far-red light. Under these growth conditions each strain synthesizes chlorophylls d, f and a after photoacclimation, and each strain produces modified forms of PS I, PS II (and phycobiliproteins) that absorb light between 700 and 800 nm. We conclude that these photosynthetic gene clusters are diagnostic of the capacity to photoacclimate to and grow in far-red light. Given the diversity of terrestrial environments from which these cyanobacteria were isolated, it is likely that FaRLiP plays an important role in optimizing photosynthesis in terrestrial environments. PMID:25551681

  1. Effects of intracerebroventricularly and intraperitoneally administered growth hormone on body weight and food intake in fa/fa Zucker rats.

    PubMed

    Schulz, Carla; Wieczorek, Ingo; Reschke, Kirsten; Lehnert, Hendrik

    2002-01-01

    Growth hormone (GH) possesses multiple metabolic effects, in particular with regard to glucose and lipid homeostasis. Studies on the effects of GH on body weight and food and water intake are scarce and have yielded controversial results. We investigated the effects of different modes of GH administration on the parameters of body weight and food intake as well as on insulin and leptin concentrations in fa/fa Zucker rats. In control experiments, aqua pro injection was given. GH was administered over a time period of 11 days at a daily dose of 250 microg intraperitoneally (i.p.) and 25 microg intracerebroventricularly (i.c.v.). While both food intake and body weight were found to be unaltered in the four groups after this observation period, there was an enhanced food intake and consecutively an increase in body weight over the day period when compared to the night period in the groups of rats that received GH i.c.v. or i.p. This tendency was also shown for water intake. Insulin and leptin concentrations were similar in all groups. Thus, injection of GH appears to modify food intake-related behavior, since the periods of enhanced food and water intake were shifted from night- to daytime. Thus, while in general the metabolic parameters remained unchanged, the activity pattern was clearly modified.

  2. Controlled Expression and Functional Analysis of Iron-Sulfur Cluster Biosynthetic Components within Azotobacter vinelandii▿

    PubMed Central

    Johnson, Deborah C.; Unciuleac, Mihaela-Carmen; Dean, Dennis R.

    2006-01-01

    A system for the controlled expression of genes in Azotobacter vinelandii by using genomic fusions to the sucrose catabolic regulon was developed. This system was used for the functional analysis of the A. vinelandii isc genes, whose products are involved in the maturation of [Fe-S] proteins. For this analysis, the scrX gene, contained within the sucrose catabolic regulon, was replaced by the contiguous A. vinelandii iscS, iscU, iscA, hscB, hscA, fdx, and iscX genes, resulting in duplicate genomic copies of these genes: one whose expression is directed by the normal isc regulatory elements (Pisc) and the other whose expression is directed by the scrX promoter (PscrX). Functional analysis of [Fe-S] protein maturation components was achieved by placing a mutation within a particular Pisc-controlled gene with subsequent repression of the corresponding PscrX-controlled component by growth on glucose as the carbon source. This experimental strategy was used to show that IscS, IscU, HscBA, and Fdx are essential in A. vinelandii and that their depletion results in a deficiency in the maturation of aconitase, an enzyme that requires a [4Fe-4S] cluster for its catalytic activity. Depletion of IscA results in a null growth phenotype only when cells are cultured under conditions of elevated oxygen, marking the first null phenotype associated with the loss of a bacterial IscA-type protein. Furthermore, the null growth phenotype of cells depleted of HscBA could be partially reversed by culturing cells under conditions of low oxygen. Conserved amino acid residues within IscS, IscU, and IscA that are essential for their respective functions and/or whose replacement results in a partial or complete dominant-negative growth phenotype were also identified using this system. PMID:16936042

  3. α1-Tubulin FaTuA1 plays crucial roles in vegetative growth and conidiation in Fusarium asiaticum.

    PubMed

    Hu, Weiqun; Zhang, Xiaoping; Chen, Xiang; Zheng, Jingwu; Yin, Yanni; Ma, Zhonghua

    2015-04-01

    The filamentous ascomycete Fusarium asiaticum contains two homologous genes FaTUA1 and FaTUA2 encoding α-tubulins. In this study, we found that FaTUA2 was dispensable for vegetative growth and sporulation in F. asiaticum. The deletion of FaTUA1 however led to dramatically reduced mycelial growth, twisted hyphae and abnormal nuclei in apical cells of hyphae. The FaTUA1 deletion mutant (ΔFaTuA1-5) also showed a significant decrease in conidiation, and produced abnormal conidia. Pathogenicity assays showed that ΔFaTuA1-5 exhibited decreased virulence on wheat head. Unexpectedly, the deletion of FaTUA1 led to resistance to high temperatures. In addition, ΔFaTuA2 showed increased sensitivity to carbendazim. Furthermore, increased FaTUA2 expression in ΔFaTuA1-5 partially restored the defects of the mutant in mycelial growth, conidial production and virulence, vice versa, increased FaTUA1 expression in the FaTUA2 deletion mutant also partially relieved the defect of the mutant in the delay of conidial germination. Taken together, these results indicate that FaTuA1 plays crucial roles in vegetative growth and development, and the functions of FaTuA1 and FaTuA2 are partially interchangeable in F. asiaticum.

  4. Cluster Headache

    MedlinePlus

    Cluster headache Overview By Mayo Clinic Staff Cluster headaches, which occur in cyclical patterns or clusters, are one of the most painful types of headache. A cluster headache commonly awakens you ...

  5. Remarkable features of ovarian morphology and reproductive hormones in insulin-resistant Zucker fatty (fa/fa) rats

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background Zucker fatty (fa/fa) rats are a well-understood model of obesity and hyperinsulinemia. It is now thought that obesity/hyperinsulinemia is an important cause of endocrinological abnormality, but to date there have been no reports on the changes in ovarian morphology or the ovarian androgen profile in rat models of obesity and insulin resistance. Methods In this study we investigated the effects of obesity and hyperinsulinemia on ovarian morphology and the hormone profile in insulin-resistant Zucker fatty rats (5, 8, 12 and 16 weeks of age, n = 6-7). Results Ovaries from 5-week-old fatty rats had significantly greater total and atretic follicle numbers, and higher atretic-to-total follicle ratios than those from lean rats. Ovaries from 12- and 16-week-old fatty rats showed interstitial cell hyperplasia and numerous cysts with features of advanced follicular atresia. In addition, serum testosterone and androstenedione levels significantly declined in fatty rats from age 8 to 16 weeks, so that fatty rats showed significantly lower levels of serum testosterone (12 and 16 weeks) and androstenedione (all weeks) than lean rats. This may reflect a reduction of androgen synthesis during follicular atresia. Serum adiponectin levels were high in immature fatty rats, and although the levels declined significantly as they matured, it remained significantly higher in fatty rats than in lean rats. On the other hand, levels of ovarian adiponectin and its receptors were significantly lower in mature fatty rats than in lean mature rats or immature fatty rats. Conclusions Our findings indicate that ovarian morphology and hormone profiles are significantly altered by the continuous insulin resistance in Zucker fatty rats. Simultaneously, abrupt reductions in serum and ovarian adiponectin also likely contribute to the infertility seen in fatty rats. PMID:20576113

  6. Yamadazyma insecticola f.a., sp. nov. and Yamadazyma epiphylla f.a., sp. nov., two novel yeast species.

    PubMed

    Jindamorakot, Sasitorn; Am-In, Somjit; Kaewwichian, Rungluk; Limtong, Savitree

    2015-04-01

    Two yeast strains representing two novel yeast species were isolated from frass of an unidentified insect (ST-78(T)) and the external surfaces of rice leaves (YE170(T)) collected in Thailand. The two strains were genetically, morphologically and phenotypically distinct from recognized species and were found to represent two novel species of the genus Yamadazyma although formation of ascospores was not observed. In terms of pairwise sequence similarity of the D1/D2 region of the large subunit rRNA gene, the closest relative of strain ST-78(T) was Candida lessepsii CBS 9941(T) but with 3.8% nucleotide substitutions, while the closest relative of strain YE170(T) was strain ST-78(T) but with 4.3% nucleotide substitutions. Analysis of the sequences of the internal transcribed spacer 1 and 2 (ITS1-2) regions revealed that strain ST-78 differed from C. lessepsii CBS 9941(T) by 8.8% nucleotide substitutions and from strain YE170(T) by 9.4% nucleotide substitutions. The result of pairwise sequence similarity of the D1/D2 and ITS1-2 regions together with phylogenetic analysis indicated that strains ST-78(T) and YE170(T) represented two novel species within the Yamadazyma clade. The names Yamadazyma insecticola f.a., sp. nov. (type strain ST-78(T) = BCC 8314(T) = NBRC 110421(T) = CBS 13382(T); MycoBank no. MB810546) and Yamadazyma epiphylla f.a., sp. nov. (type strain YE170(T) = BCC 63466(T) = NBRC 110423(T) = CBS 13384(T); MycoBank no. MB810547) are proposed for the two novel yeast species.

  7. The carboxyl terminus of FANCE recruits FANCD2 to the Fanconi Anemia (FA) E3 ligase complex to promote the FA DNA repair pathway.

    PubMed

    Polito, David; Cukras, Scott; Wang, Xiaozhe; Spence, Paige; Moreau, Lisa; D'Andrea, Alan D; Kee, Younghoon

    2014-03-07

    Fanconi anemia (FA) is a genome instability syndrome characterized by bone marrow failure and cellular hypersensitivity to DNA cross-linking agents. In response to DNA damage, the FA pathway is activated through the cooperation of 16 FA proteins. A central player in the pathway is a multisubunit E3 ubiquitin ligase complex or the FA core complex, which monoubiquitinates its substrates FANCD2 and FANCI. FANCE, a subunit of the FA core complex, plays an essential role by promoting the integrity of the complex and by directly recognizing FANCD2. To delineate its role in substrate ubiquitination from the core complex assembly, we analyzed a series of mutations within FANCE. We report that a phenylalanine located at the highly conserved extreme C terminus, referred to as Phe-522, is a critical residue for mediating the monoubiquitination of the FANCD2-FANCI complex. Using the FANCE mutant that specifically disrupts the FANCE-FANCD2 interaction as a tool, we found that the interaction-deficient mutant conferred cellular sensitivity in reconstituted FANCE-deficient cells to a similar degree as FANCE null cells, suggesting the significance of the FANCE-FANCD2 interaction in promoting cisplatin resistance. Intriguingly, ectopic expression of the FANCE C terminus fragment alone in FA normal cells disrupts DNA repair, consolidating the importance of the FANCE-FANCD2 interaction in the DNA cross-link repair.

  8. FaRP cell distribution in the developing CNS suggests the involvement of FaRPs in all parts of the chromatophore control pathway in Sepia officinalis (Cephalopoda).

    PubMed

    Aroua, Salima; Andouche, Aude; Martin, Madeleine; Baratte, Sébastien; Bonnaud, Laure

    2011-04-01

    The FMRFamide-related peptide (FaRP) family includes a wide range of neuropeptides that have a role in many biological functions. In cephalopods, these peptides intervene in the peculiar body patterning system used for communication and camouflage. This system is particularly well developed in the cuttlefish and is functional immediately after hatching (stage 30). In this study, we investigate when and how the neural structures involved in the control of body patterning emerge and combine during Sepia embryogenesis, by studying the expression or the production of FaRPs. We detected FaRP expression and production in the nervous system of embryos from the beginning of organogenesis (stage 16). The wider FaRP expression was observed concomitantly with brain differentiation (around stage 22). Until hatching, FaRP-positive cells were located in specific areas of the central and peripheral nervous system (CNS and PNS). Most of these areas were implicated in the control of body patterns, suggesting that FaRPs are involved in all parts of the neural body pattern control system, from the 'receptive areas' via the CNS to the chromatophore effectors.

  9. RfpA, RfpB, and RfpC are the Master Control Elements of Far-Red Light Photoacclimation (FaRLiP)

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Chi; Gan, Fei; Shen, Gaozhong; Bryant, Donald A.

    2015-01-01

    Terrestrial cyanobacteria often occur in niches that are strongly enriched in far-red light (FRL; λ > 700 nm). Some cyanobacteria exhibit a complex and extensive photoacclimation response, known as FRL photoacclimation (FaRLiP). During the FaRLiP response, specialized paralogous proteins replace 17 core subunits of the three major photosynthetic complexes: Photosystem (PS) I, PS II, and the phycobilisome. Additionally, the cells synthesize both chlorophyll (Chl) f and Chl d. Using biparental mating from Escherichia coli, we constructed null mutants of three genes, rfpA, rfpB, and rfpC, in the cyanobacteria Chlorogloeopsis fritschii PCC 9212 and Chroococcidiopsis thermalis PCC 7203. The resulting mutants were no longer able to modify their photosynthetic apparatus to absorb FRL, were no longer able to synthesize Chl f, inappropriately synthesized Chl d in white light, and were unable to transcribe genes of the FaRLiP gene cluster. We conclude that RfpA, RfpB, and RfpC constitute a FRL-activated signal transduction cascade that is the master control switch for the FaRLiP response. FRL is proposed to activate (or inactivate) the histidine kinase activity of RfpA, which leads to formation of the active state of RfpB, the key response regulator and transcription activator. RfpC may act as a phosphate shuttle between RfpA and RfpB. Our results show that reverse genetics via conjugation will be a powerful approach in detailed studies of the FaRLiP response. PMID:26635768

  10. RfpA, RfpB, and RfpC are the master control elements of far-red light photoacclimation (FaRLiP)

    DOE PAGES

    Zhao, Chi; Gan, Fei; Shen, Gaozhong; ...

    2015-11-25

    Terrestrial cyanobacteria often occur in niches tha tare strongly enriched in far-redlight (FRL; λ > 700nm). Some cyanobacteria exhibit a complex and extensive photoacclimation response, known as FRLphotoacclimation(FaRLiP).During the FaRLiP response, specialized paralogous proteins replace 17 core subunits of the three major photosynthetic complexes: Photosystem (PS)I, PSII,and the phycobilisome. Additionally, the cells synthesize both chlorophyll (Chl) f and Chl d.Using biparental mating from Escherichia coli, we constructed null mutants of three genes, rfpA, rfpB,and rfpC, in the cyanobacteria Chlorogloeopsis fritschii PCC 9212 and Chroococcidiopsis thermalis PCC 7203.The resulting mutants were no longer able to modify their photosynthetic apparatus to absorbmore » FRL, were no longer able to synthesize Chl f, in appropriately synthesized Chl d in white light,and were unable to transcribe genes of the FaRLiP gene cluster. We conclude that RfpA, RfpB, and RfpC constitute a FRL-activated signal transduction cascade that is the master control switch for the FaRLiP response. FRL is proposed to activate (or inactivate) the histidine kinase activity of RfpA, which leads to formation of the active state of RfpB, the key response regulator and transcription activator. RfpC may act as a phosphate shuttle between RfpA and RfpB. Our results show that reverse genetics via conjugation will be a powerful approach in detailed studies of the FaRLiP response.« less

  11. RfpA, RfpB, and RfpC are the master control elements of far-red light photoacclimation (FaRLiP)

    SciTech Connect

    Zhao, Chi; Gan, Fei; Shen, Gaozhong; Bryant, Donald A.

    2015-11-25

    Terrestrial cyanobacteria often occur in niches tha tare strongly enriched in far-redlight (FRL; λ > 700nm). Some cyanobacteria exhibit a complex and extensive photoacclimation response, known as FRLphotoacclimation(FaRLiP).During the FaRLiP response, specialized paralogous proteins replace 17 core subunits of the three major photosynthetic complexes: Photosystem (PS)I, PSII,and the phycobilisome. Additionally, the cells synthesize both chlorophyll (Chl) f and Chl d.Using biparental mating from Escherichia coli, we constructed null mutants of three genes, rfpA, rfpB,and rfpC, in the cyanobacteria Chlorogloeopsis fritschii PCC 9212 and Chroococcidiopsis thermalis PCC 7203.The resulting mutants were no longer able to modify their photosynthetic apparatus to absorb FRL, were no longer able to synthesize Chl f, in appropriately synthesized Chl d in white light,and were unable to transcribe genes of the FaRLiP gene cluster. We conclude that RfpA, RfpB, and RfpC constitute a FRL-activated signal transduction cascade that is the master control switch for the FaRLiP response. FRL is proposed to activate (or inactivate) the histidine kinase activity of RfpA, which leads to formation of the active state of RfpB, the key response regulator and transcription activator. RfpC may act as a phosphate shuttle between RfpA and RfpB. Our results show that reverse genetics via conjugation will be a powerful approach in detailed studies of the FaRLiP response.

  12. Yacon diet (Smallanthus sonchifolius, Asteraceae) improves hepatic insulin resistance via reducing Trb3 expression in Zucker fa/fa rats

    PubMed Central

    Satoh, H; Audrey Nguyen, M T; Kudoh, A; Watanabe, T

    2013-01-01

    Objective: Yacon is a perennial plant forming a clump of >20 big, edible underground tubers. Yacon, which originates from South America, has become increasingly popular in the Japanese diet for tubers have a lower caloric value and a high fiber content. Recent studies have suggested that yacon feeding ameliorates diabetes as indicated by reduced blood glucose. Methods: We fed male Zucker fa/fa rats for 5 weeks with isocaloric normal chow diet containing from 6.5% control aroid or 6.5% yacon. Insulin sensitivity was evaluated by euglycemic-hyperinsulinemic clamp study. Results: Body weight was comparable between yacon- and aroid-fed rats. In the basal state, yacon feeding had an effect to lower fasting glucose levels from 184.1±4.1 to 167.8±2.7 mg dl−1 (P<0.01), as well as basal hepatic glucose output (HGO) from 9.9±0.4 to 7.4 ± 0.2 mg kg−1 per min (P<0.01). During the clamp studies, the glucose infusion rate required to maintain euglycemia was increased by 12.3% in yacon-fed rat. The insulin suppression of HGO was also increased in yacon-fed rats compared with control rats (85.3±2.4% vs 77.0±3.0% P<0.05), whereas the glucose disposal rate was not different between the two groups. Consistent with the clamp data, the insulin-stimulated phosphorylation of Akt was significantly enhanced in liver but not in skeletal muscle. Furthermore, tribbles 3 (Trb3) expression, which is a negative regulator of Akt activity, was markedly reduced in the liver of yacon-fed rats compared with control rats. Conclusion: These results indicate that the effect of yacon feeding to reduce blood glucose is likely due to its beneficial effects on hepatic insulin sensitivity in the insulin resistant state. PMID:23712282

  13. Arsenic exposure disrupts the normal function of the FA/BRCA repair pathway.

    PubMed

    Peremartí, Jana; Ramos, Facundo; Marcos, Ricard; Hernández, Alba

    2014-11-01

    Chronic arsenic exposure is known to enhance the genotoxicity/carcinogenicity of other DNA-damaging agents by inhibiting DNA repair activities. Interference with nucleotide excision repair and base excision repair are well documented, but interactions with other DNA repair pathways are poorly explored so far. The Fanconi anemia FA/BRCA pathway is a DNA repair mechanism required for maintaining genomic stability and preventing cancer. Here, interactions between arsenic compounds and the FA/BRCA pathway were explored by using isogenic FANCD2(-/-) (FA/BRCA-deficient) and FANCD2(+/+) (FA/BRCA-corrected) human fibroblasts. To study whether arsenic disrupts the normal FA/BRCA function, FANCD2(+/+) cells were preexposed to subtoxic concentrations of the trivalent arsenic compounds methylarsonous acid (MMA(III)) and arsenic trioxide (ATO) for 2 weeks. The cellular response to mitomicin-C, hydroxyurea, or diepoxybutane, typical inducers of the studied pathway, was then evaluated and compared to that of FANCD2(-/-) cells. Our results show that preexposure to the trivalent arsenicals MMA(III) and ATO induces in corrected cells, a cellular FA/BRCA-deficient phenotype characterized by hypersensitivity, enhanced accumulation in the G2/M compartment and increased genomic instability--measured as micronuclei. Overall, our data demonstrate that environmentally relevant arsenic exposures disrupt the normal function of the FA/BRCA activity, supporting a novel source of arsenic co- and carcinogenic effects. This is the first study linking arsenic exposure with the FA/BRCA DNA repair pathway.

  14. Complete Genome Sequence of Pseudomonas aeruginosa FA-HZ1, an Efficient Dibenzofuran-Degrading Bacterium

    PubMed Central

    Ali, Fawad; Hu, Haiyang; Xu, Ping

    2017-01-01

    ABSTRACT Pseudomonas sp. FA-HZ1, an efficient dibenzofuran-degrading bacterium, was isolated from landfill leachate. Here, we present the complete genome sequence of strain FA-HZ1, which contains only one circular chromosome. The complete genome sequence will be essential for revealing the molecular mechanisms of dibenzofuran degradation. PMID:28209830

  15. Exterior building details of Building D, east façade: painted concrete ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Exterior building details of Building D, east façade: painted concrete east face façade, main entry has flat cement plaster surround, double door six light over panels, two light transom over double door; westerly view - San Quentin State Prison, Building 22, Point San Quentin, San Quentin, Marin County, CA

  16. Blood compatibility of a ferulic acid (FA)-eluting PHBHHx system for biodegradable magnesium stent application.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Erlin; Shen, Feng

    2015-01-01

    Magnesium stent has shown potential application as a new biodegradable stent. However, the fast degradation of magnesium stent limited its clinic application. Recently, a biodegradable and drug-eluting coating system was designed to prevent magnesium from fast degradation by adding ferulic acid (FA) in poly (3-hydroxybutyrate-co-3-hydroxyhexanoate) (PHBHHx) by a physical method. In vitro study has demonstrated that the FA-eluting system exhibited strong promotion to the endothelialization, which might be a choice for the stent application. In this paper, the hemolysis rate, the plasma recalcification time (PRT), the plasma prothrombin time (PT) and the kinetic clotting time of the FA-eluting films were investigated and the platelet adhesion was observed in order to assess the blood compatibility of the FA-eluting PHBHHx films in comparison with PHBHHx film. The results have shown that the addition of FA had no influence on the hemolysis, but prolonged PRT, PT and the clotting time and reduced the platelet adhesion and activation, displaying that the FA-eluting PHBHHx exhibited better blood compatibility than PHBHHx. In addition, the effect of alkali treatment on the blood compatibility of FA-eluting PHBHHx was also studied. It was indicated that alkali treatment had no effect on the hemolysis and the coagulation time, but enhanced slightly the platelet adhesion. All these demonstrated that FA-eluting PHBHHx film had good blood compatibility and might be a candidate surface coating for the biodegradable magnesium stent.

  17. Lipase-catalyzed hydrolysis of TG containing acetylenic FA.

    PubMed

    Jie, Marcel S F Lie Ken; Fua, Xun; Lau, Maureen M L; Chye, M L

    2002-10-01

    Hydrolysis of symmetrical acetylenic TG of type AAA [viz., glycerol tri-(4-decynoate), glycerol tri-(6-octadecynoate), glycerol tri-(9-octadecynoate), glycerol tri-(10-undecynoate), and glycerol tri-(13-docosynoate)] in the presence of eight microbial lipases was studied. Novozyme 435 (Candida antarctica), an efficient enzyme for esterification, showed a significant resistance in the hydrolysis of glycerol tri-(9-octadecynoate) and glycerol tri-(13-docosynoate). Hydrolysis of acetylenic TG with Lipolase 100T (Humicola lanuginosa) was rapidly accomplished. Lipase PS-D (Pseudomonas cepacia) showed a fair resistance toward the hydrolysis of glycerol tri-(6-octadecynoate) only, which reflected its ability to recognize the delta6 positional isomer of 18:1. Lipase CCL (Candida cylindracea, syn. C. rugosa) and AY-30 (C. rugosa) were able to catalyze the release of 10-undecynoic acid and 9-octadecynoic acid from the corresponding TG, but less readily the 13-docosynoic acid in the case of glycerol tri-(13-docosynoate). The two lipases CCL and AY-30 were able to distinguish the small difference in structure of fatty acyl moieties in the TG substrate. To confirm this trend, three regioisomers of mixed acetylenic TG of type ABC (containing one each of delta6, delta9, and delta13 acetylenic FA in various positions) were prepared and hydrolyzed with CCL and AY-40. The results reconfirmed the observation that AY-30 and CCL were able to distinguish the slight differences in the molecular structure (position of the acetylenic bond and chain length) of the acyl groups in the TG during the hydrolysis of such TG substrates.

  18. Biosynthesis of the [FeFe] Hydrogenase H Cluster: A Central Role for the Radical SAM Enzyme HydG.

    PubMed

    Suess, Daniel L M; Kuchenreuther, Jon M; De La Paz, Liliana; Swartz, James R; Britt, R David

    2016-01-19

    Hydrogenase enzymes catalyze the rapid and reversible interconversion of H2 with protons and electrons. The active site of the [FeFe] hydrogenase is the H cluster, which consists of a [4Fe-4S]H subcluster linked to an organometallic [2Fe]H subcluster. Understanding the biosynthesis and catalytic mechanism of this structurally unusual active site will aid in the development of synthetic and biological hydrogenase catalysts for applications in solar fuel generation. The [2Fe]H subcluster is synthesized and inserted by three maturase enzymes-HydE, HydF, and HydG-in a complex process that involves inorganic, organometallic, and organic radical chemistry. HydG is a member of the radical S-adenosyl-l-methionine (SAM) family of enzymes and is thought to play a prominent role in [2Fe]H subcluster biosynthesis by converting inorganic Fe(2+), l-cysteine (Cys), and l-tyrosine (Tyr) into an organometallic [(Cys)Fe(CO)2(CN)](-) intermediate that is eventually incorporated into the [2Fe]H subcluster. In this Forum Article, the mechanism of [2Fe]H subcluster biosynthesis is discussed with a focus on how this key [(Cys)Fe(CO)2(CN)](-) species is formed. Particular attention is given to the initial metallocluster composition of HydG, the modes of substrate binding (Fe(2+), Cys, Tyr, and SAM), the mechanism of SAM-mediated Tyr cleavage to CO and CN(-), and the identification of the final organometallic products of the reaction.

  19. CLUSTER CHEMISTRY

    SciTech Connect

    Muetterties, Earl L.

    1980-05-01

    Metal cluster chemistry is one of the most rapidly developing areas of inorganic and organometallic chemistry. Prior to 1960 only a few metal clusters were well characterized. However, shortly after the early development of boron cluster chemistry, the field of metal cluster chemistry began to grow at a very rapid rate and a structural and a qualitative theoretical understanding of clusters came quickly. Analyzed here is the chemistry and the general significance of clusters with particular emphasis on the cluster research within my group. The importance of coordinately unsaturated, very reactive metal clusters is the major subject of discussion.

  20. Bactrian camel nanobody-based immunoassay for specific and sensitive detection of Cry1Fa toxin.

    PubMed

    Wang, Pingyan; Li, Guanghui; Yan, Junrong; Hu, Yonghong; Zhang, Cunzheng; Liu, Xianjin; Wan, Yakun

    2014-12-15

    The variable domain of the heavy-chain-only antibody (VHH) or nanobody (Nb), derived from camelids, begins to play an important role on the detection of protein markers. In this study, we constructed a phage-displayed library of VHHs against Cry1Fa by immunizing a healthy Bactrian camel with Cry1Fa toxin. After a series of bio-panning and screening by phage display technology, three anti-Cry1Fa nanobodies (Nbs) with great difference in complementarity determining region 3 (CDR3) were obtained and they were highly specific to Cry1Fa as well as showed full of activity when exposed to 70 °C for 3 h. Through modifying Nbs with Horseradish Peroxidase (HRP) and biotin, two Nbs which can recognize the different epitopes of Cry1Fa were determined and they were used to establish a novel sandwich immune ELISA based on biotin-SA interaction for Cry1Fa detection. The immunoassay exhibited a linear range from 1 to 100 ng/mL with a detection limit of 0.88 ng/mL. The recoveries from spiked corn and soybean samples were ranged from 83.33 to 117.17%, with a coefficient of variation (C.V) less than 6.0%. All together, the proposed immunoassay will be a promising way for sensitive and accurate determination of Cry1Fa toxin.

  1. Molecular Characterization of a Strawberry FaASR Gene in Relation to Fruit Ripening

    PubMed Central

    Jiang, Yue-ming; Zhao, Ming-lei; Shan, Wei; Kuang, Jian-fei; Lu, Wang-jin

    2011-01-01

    Background ABA-, stress- and ripening-induced (ASR) proteins have been reported to act as a downstream component involved in ABA signal transduction. Although much attention has been paid to the roles of ASR in plant development and stress responses, the mechanisms by which ABA regulate fruit ripening at the molecular level are not fully understood. In the present work, a strawberry ASR gene was isolated and characterized (FaASR), and a polyclonal antibody against FaASR protein was prepared. Furthermore, the effects of ABA, applied to two different developmental stages of strawberry, on fruit ripening and the expression of FaASR at transcriptional and translational levels were investigated. Methodology/Principal Findings FaASR, localized in the cytoplasm and nucleus, contained 193 amino acids and shared common features with other plant ASRs. It also functioned as a transcriptional activator in yeast with trans-activation activity in the N-terminus. During strawberry fruit development, endogenous ABA content, levels of FaASR mRNA and protein increased significantly at the initiation of ripening at a white (W) fruit developmental stage. More importantly, application of exogenous ABA to large green (LG) fruit and W fruit markedly increased endogenous ABA content, accelerated fruit ripening, and greatly enhanced the expression of FaASR transcripts and the accumulation of FaASR protein simultaneously. Conclusions These results indicate that FaASR may be involved in strawberry fruit ripening. The observed increase in endogenous ABA content, and enhanced FaASR expression at transcriptional and translational levels in response to ABA treatment might partially contribute to the acceleration of strawberry fruit ripening. PMID:21915355

  2. Desalination of Walls and Façades

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wedekind, W.; Jáuregui Arreola, K.; Siegesmund, S.

    2012-04-01

    For large monumental objects like walls and façades, the common technique of applying poultices for desalination often are not effective. This practice is neither cost effective nor does it lead to the desired result of desalination. To manage the conservation and desalination of these kinds of objects, several sprinkling techniques are known and have been applied on historical objects. For example, in the wooden warship Vasa, which was excavated from the sea bottom in Stockholm/Sweden, a sprinkling method was applied in 1961 for conservation and desalination. A sprinkling method to desalinate porous mineral materials will be presented using three different case studies: the rock cut monument no. 825 in Petra/Jordan, the medieval monastary church of the former Franziscan convent in Zeitz/Germany and the baroque monastary church Santa Monica in Guadalajara/Mexico. Before to start with practical conservation, the material- and petropysical properties, focoussed on water transport properties, like porosity, pore size distribution, water uptake and drying rate were investigadet. Diagnostic investigations on the objects included the mapping of deterioration, moister content measurements and salt accumulation determined by borehole cuts samples at depth. In the sprinkling method water is sprayed onto the wall surface through nozzels arranged in a modular grid. Depending on the sprinkling duration, a small or a large amount of water seeps into the porous materials, whereby the depth penetration can be adjusted accordingly. The water not absorbed by the stone runs off the facade and can be collected in liter amounts and tested by electrical conductivity with respect to the dissolved substances. After the drying of the wall's surface and the accumulation of salt at the material's surface, the procedure is repeated. For each subsequent washing a lower content of salt should be brought to the surface. Step by step the salt concentration will eventually decrease to almost

  3. Exterior building details of Building B, east façade: ca. 1914 ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Exterior building details of Building B, east façade: ca. 1914 covered porch with an asphalt singled low-hipped roof; southwesterly view - San Quentin State Prison, Building 22, Point San Quentin, San Quentin, Marin County, CA

  4. Georgia Power Co. Quantities for F.A. P. 425G (Bridge) Contract ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Georgia Power Co. Quantities for F.A. P. 425G (Bridge) Contract No. 1 and 2 - Tallulah Falls Bridge, Spanning Tallulah Falls River on U.S. Highway 23/State Route 15, Tallulah Falls, Habersham County, GA

  5. Perspective view of main entrance, north façade with two story ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Perspective view of main entrance, north façade with two story square tower, Note medical cross made of wood on tower, originally there were four. - Richmond Field Hospital, 1330 Cutting Boulevard, Richmond, Contra Costa County, CA

  6. Exterior building details of Building A; north façade: iron latticed ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Exterior building details of Building A; north façade: iron latticed gate dungeon entrance, granite base; southerly view - San Quentin State Prison, Building 22, Point San Quentin, San Quentin, Marin County, CA

  7. NASA Videographer Captures X-51 from F/A-18 Chase

    NASA Video Gallery

    A tiny dashcam video camera records NASA Dryden videographer Lori Losey capturing the historic launch of the Air Force's X-51 Waverider hypersonic vehicle from the rear cockpit of a NASA F/A-18 flo...

  8. East façade, Burton Park Club House, with Amphitheater in foreground, ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    East façade, Burton Park Club House, with Amphitheater in foreground, view to north from Amphitheater stage (90 mm lens). - Burton Park, Club House & Amphitheater, Adjacent ot south end of Chestnut Avenue, San Carlos, San Mateo County, CA

  9. Nearly monotonic problems: A key to effective FA/C distributed sensor interpretation?

    SciTech Connect

    Carver, N.; Lesser, V.; Whitehair, R.

    1996-12-31

    The functionally-accurate, cooperative (FA/C) distributed problem-solving paradigm is one approach for organizing distributed problem solving among homogeneous, cooperating agents. A key assumption of the FA/C model has been that the agents` local solutions can substitute for the raw data in determining the global solutions. This is not the case in general, however. Does this mean that researchers` intuitions have been wrong and/or that FA/C problem solving is not likely to be effective? We suggest that some domains have a characteristic that can account for the success of exchanging mainly local solutions. We call such problems nearly monotonic. This concept is discussed in the context of FA/C-based distributed sensor interpretation.

  10. North façade of crucible steel building; looking southwest Bethlehem ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    North façade of crucible steel building; looking southwest - Bethlehem Steel Corporation, South Bethlehem Works, Crucible Steel Plant, Along Lehigh River, North of Fourth Street, West of Minsi Trail Bridge, Bethlehem, Northampton County, PA

  11. NASA F/A-18 Flight-Tests Mars Science Lab Radar

    NASA Video Gallery

    A NASA F/A-18 put the Jet Propulsion Laboratory's Mars Science Laboratory landing radar to the test during recent flights over Edwards Air Force Base, Calif. With the test radar housed in a pod und...

  12. East and north elevations (rear façade) of quarters no. 2, ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    East and north elevations (rear façade) of quarters no. 2, looking southwest. - Sacramento National Wildlife Refuge, Headquarters Complex, Quarters No. 2, 752 County Road 99W, Willows, Glenn County, CA

  13. Exterior building details of Building B, east façade: second floor ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Exterior building details of Building B, east façade: second floor entrance with cement plaster profiled surround and embedded wood beam end; westerly view - San Quentin State Prison, Building 22, Point San Quentin, San Quentin, Marin County, CA

  14. Generation and application of rules for quality dependent façade reconstruction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Becker, Susanne

    Frequently, terrestrial LiDAR and image data are used to extract high resolution building geometry like windows, doors and protrusions for three-dimensional (3D) façade reconstruction. However, such a purely data driven bottom-up modelling of façade structures is only feasible if the available observations meet considerable requirements on data quality. Errors in measurement, varying point densities, reduced accuracies, as well as incomplete coverage affect the achievable correctness and reliability of the reconstruction result. While dependence on data quality is a general disadvantage with data driven bottom-up approaches, model based top-down reconstructions are much more robust. Algorithms introduce knowledge about the appearance and arrangement of objects. Thus, they cope with data uncertainty and allow for a procedural modelling of building structures in a predefined architectural style, which is inherent in grammar or model descriptions. We aim at a quality sensitive façade reconstruction which is on the one hand robust against erroneous and incomplete data, but on the other hand not subject to prespecified rules or models. For this purpose, we combine bottom-up and top-down strategies by integrating automatically inferred rules into a data driven reconstruction process. Façade models reconstructed during a bottom-up method serve as a knowledge base for further processing. Dominant or repetitive features and regularities as well as their hierarchical relationship are detected from the modelled façade elements and automatically translated into rules. These rules together with the 3D representations of the modelled façade elements constitute a formal grammar. It holds all the information which is necessary to reconstruct façades in the style of the given building. The paper demonstrates that the proposed algorithm is very flexible towards different data quality and incomplete sensor data. The inferred grammar is used for the verification of the fa

  15. Exterior building details of Building B, east façade: ellshaped south ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Exterior building details of Building B, east façade: ell-shaped south facing concrete staircase with decorative pipe railing, second floor entrance with cement plaster profiled surround, dentil course cornice, truncated embedded wood beams, cream colored plaster-finished exterior façade, closed off window well with protruding vent; northwesterly view - San Quentin State Prison, Building 22, Point San Quentin, San Quentin, Marin County, CA

  16. Architectural Kansei of ‘Wall’ in The Façade Design by Le Corbusier

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sendai, Shoichiro

    The purpose of this paper is to discuss the modern architect Le Corbusier's architectural Kansei (sensibility) on wall in site environment through the analysis of his façade design, using Œuvres complètes (1910-1965, 8 vols., Les éditions d'architecture, Artemis, Zurich) and Le Corbusier Archives (1982-1984, 32 vols., Garland Publishing, Inc. and Fondation Le Corbusier, New York, London, Paris). At first, I arrange five façade types, according to the explanation by Le Corbusier ; ‘fenêtre en longueur (strip window)’, ‘pan de verre (glass wall)’, ‘brise-soleil (sun-breaker)’, ‘loggia’ and ‘claustra’. Through the analysis of the relationship between these types and the design process of each building, we find that Le Corbusier's façade design includes the affirmation and the negation of the ‘wall’ at the same time. In fact, the nature of façade modification during design process is divers: increase in transparency, decrease in transparency and spatialization of façade. That means, Le Corbusier studied the environmental condition by these façade types, and tried to realize the phenomenal openness. This trial bases on the function of architectural Kansei as correspondence between body and environment beyond the physical design.

  17. Detection of the synthetic drug 4-fluoroamphetamine (4-FA) in serum and urine.

    PubMed

    Röhrich, J; Becker, J; Kaufmann, T; Zörntlein, S; Urban, R

    2012-02-10

    4-Fluoroamphetamine (4-FA) was detected in the blood and urine of two individuals suspected for driving under the influence (DUI). The test for amphetamines in urine subjected to immunoassay screening using the CEDIA DAU assay proved positive. Further investigations revealed a 4-FA cross-reactivity of about 6% in the CEDIA amphetamine assay. 4-FA was qualitatively detected in a general unknown screening for drugs using GC/MS in full scan mode. No other drugs or fluorinated phenethylamines were detected. A validated GC/MS method was established in SIM mode for serum analysis of 4-FA with a limit of detection (LOD) of 1 ng/mL and a lower limit of quantification (LLOQ) of 5 ng/mL. Intra-assay precision was approx. 4% and inter-assay precision approx. 8%. Applying this method, the 4-FA serum concentrations of the two subjects were determined to be 350 ng/mL and 475 ng/mL, respectively. Given the pharmacological data of amphetamine, 4-FA psychoactive effects are to be expected at these serum levels. Both subjects exhibited sympathomimetic effects and psychostimulant-like impairment accordingly.

  18. FANCI Regulates Recruitment of the FA Core Complex at Sites of DNA Damage Independently of FANCD2.

    PubMed

    Castella, Maria; Jacquemont, Celine; Thompson, Elizabeth L; Yeo, Jung Eun; Cheung, Ronald S; Huang, Jen-Wei; Sobeck, Alexandra; Hendrickson, Eric A; Taniguchi, Toshiyasu

    2015-10-01

    The Fanconi anemia (FA)-BRCA pathway mediates repair of DNA interstrand crosslinks. The FA core complex, a multi-subunit ubiquitin ligase, participates in the detection of DNA lesions and monoubiquitinates two downstream FA proteins, FANCD2 and FANCI (or the ID complex). However, the regulation of the FA core complex itself is poorly understood. Here we show that the FA core complex proteins are recruited to sites of DNA damage and form nuclear foci in S and G2 phases of the cell cycle. ATR kinase activity, an intact FA core complex and FANCM-FAAP24 were crucial for this recruitment. Surprisingly, FANCI, but not its partner FANCD2, was needed for efficient FA core complex foci formation. Monoubiquitination or ATR-dependent phosphorylation of FANCI were not required for the FA core complex recruitment, but FANCI deubiquitination by USP1 was. Additionally, BRCA1 was required for efficient FA core complex foci formation. These findings indicate that FANCI functions upstream of FA core complex recruitment independently of FANCD2, and alter the current view of the FA-BRCA pathway.

  19. The cathepsin B inhibitor, z-FA-CMK is toxic and readily induced cell death in human T lymphocytes

    SciTech Connect

    Liow, K.Y.; Chow, S.C.

    2013-11-01

    The cathepsin B inhibitor, benzyloxycarbonyl-phenylalanine-alanine-chloromethylketone (z-FA-CMK) was found to be toxic and readily induced cell death in the human T cell line, Jurkat, whereas two other analogs benzyloxycarbonyl-phenylalanine-alanine-fluoromethylketone (z-FA-FMK) and benzyloxycarbonyl-phenylalanine-alanine-diazomethylketone (z-FA-DMK) were not toxic. The toxicity of z-FA-CMK requires not only the CMK group, but also the presence of alanine in the P1 position and the benzyloxycarbonyl group at the N-terminal. Dose–response studies showed that lower concentrations of z-FA-CMK induced apoptosis in Jurkat T cells whereas higher concentrations induced necrosis. In z-FA-CMK-induced apoptosis, both initiator caspases (-8 and -9) and effector caspases (-3, -6 and -7) were processed to their respective subunits in Jurkat T cells. However, only the pro-form of the initiator caspases were reduced in z-FA-CMK-induced necrosis and no respective subunits were apparent. The caspase inihibitor benzyloxycarbonyl-valine-alanine-aspartic acid-(O-methyl)-fluoromehylketone (z-VAD-FMK) inhibits apoptosis and caspase processing in Jurkat T cells treated with low concentration of z-FA-CMK but has no effect on z-FA-CMK-induced necrosis and the loss of initiator caspases. This suggests that the loss of initiator caspases in Jurkat T cells during z-FA-CMK-induced necrosis is not a caspase-dependent process. Taken together, we have demonstrated that z-FA-CMK is toxic to Jurkat T cells and induces apoptosis at low concentrations, while at higher concentrations the cells die of necrosis. - Highlights: • z-FA-CMK is toxic and induce cell death in the human T cells. • z-FA-CMK toxicity requires the CMK group, alanine and the benzyloxycarbonyl group. • z-FA-CMK induced apoptosis at low concentration and necrosis at high concentration.

  20. Cluster headache

    MedlinePlus

    Histamine headache; Headache - histamine; Migrainous neuralgia; Headache - cluster; Horton's headache; Vascular headache - cluster ... be related to the body's sudden release of histamine (chemical in the body released during an allergic ...

  1. Berberine-induced anticancer activities in FaDu head and neck squamous cell carcinoma cells.

    PubMed

    Seo, Yo-Seob; Yim, Min-Ji; Kim, Bok-Hee; Kang, Kyung-Rok; Lee, Sook-Young; Oh, Ji-Su; You, Jae-Seek; Kim, Su-Gwan; Yu, Sang-Joun; Lee, Gyeong-Je; Kim, Do Kyung; Kim, Chun Sung; Kim, Jin-Soo; Kim, Jae-Sung

    2015-12-01

    In the present study, we investigated berberine‑induced apoptosis and the signaling pathways underlying its activity in FaDu head and neck squamous cell carcinoma cells. Berberine did not affect the viability of primary human normal oral keratinocytes. In contrast, the cytotoxicity of berberine was significantly increased in FaDu cells stimulated with berberine for 24 h. Furthermore, berberine increased nuclear condensation and apoptosis rates in FaDu cells than those in untreated control cells. Berberine also induced the upregulation of apoptotic ligands, such as FasL and TNF-related apoptosis-inducing ligand, and triggered the activation of caspase-8, -7 and -3, and poly(ADP ribose) polymerase, characteristic of death receptor-dependent extrinsic apoptosis. Moreover, berberine activated the mitochondria‑dependent apoptotic signaling pathway by upregulating pro-apoptotic factors, such as Bax, Bad, Apaf-1, and the active form of caspase-9, and downregulating anti-apoptotic factors, such as Bcl-2 and Bcl-xL. In addition, berberine increased the expression of the tumor suppressor p53 in FaDu cells. The pan-caspase inhibitor Z-VAD-fmk suppressed the activation of caspase-3 and prevented cytotoxicity in FaDu cells treated with berberine. Interestingly, berberine suppressed cell migration through downregulation of vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF), matrix metalloproteinase (MMP)-2, and MMP-9. Moreover, the phosphorylation of extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK1/2) and p38, components of the mitogen-activated protein kinase pathway that are associated with the expression of MMP and VEGF, was suppressed in FaDu cells treated with berberine for 24 h. Therefore, these data suggested that berberine exerted anticancer effects in FaDu cells through induction of apoptosis and suppression of migration. Berberine may have potential applications as a chemotherapeutic agent for the management of head and neck squamous carcinoma.

  2. Meaningful Clusters

    SciTech Connect

    Sanfilippo, Antonio P.; Calapristi, Augustin J.; Crow, Vernon L.; Hetzler, Elizabeth G.; Turner, Alan E.

    2004-05-26

    We present an approach to the disambiguation of cluster labels that capitalizes on the notion of semantic similarity to assign WordNet senses to cluster labels. The approach provides interesting insights on how document clustering can provide the basis for developing a novel approach to word sense disambiguation.

  3. Novel bioactive Co-based alloy/FA nanocomposite for dental applications

    PubMed Central

    Fathi, Mohammadhossein; Ahmadian, Mehdi; Bahrami, Mojgan

    2012-01-01

    Background: Dental cobalt base alloys are biocompatible dental materials and have been widely used in dentistry. However, metals are bioinert and may not present bioactivity in human body. Bioactivity is the especial ability to interact with human body and make a bonding to soft and hard tissues. The aim of the present research was fabrication and bioactivity evaluation of novel cobalt alloy/Fluorapatite nanocomposite (CoA/FaNC) with different amounts of Fluorapatite (FA) nanopowder. Materials and Methods: Co-Cr-Mo alloy (ASTM F75) powder was prepared and mixed in a planetary ball mill with different amounts of FA nanopowders (10, 15, 20% wt). Prepared composite powders were cold pressed and sintered at 1100°C for 4 h. X-ray diffraction (XRD), scanning electron microscopy and transition electron microscopy techniques were used for phase analysis, crystallite size determination of FA and also for phase analysis and evaluation of particle distribution of composites. Bioactivity behavior of prepared nanocomposites was evaluated in simulated body fluid (SBF) for 1 up to 28 days. Materials and Methods: Co-Cr-Mo alloy (ASTM F75) powder was prepared and mixed in a planetary ball mill with different amounts of FA nanopowders (10, 15, 20% wt). Prepared composite powders were cold pressed and sintered at 1100°C for 4 h. X-ray diffraction (XRD), scanning electron microscopy and transition electron microscopy techniques were used for phase analysis, crystallite size determination of FA and also for phase analysis and evaluation of particle distribution of composites. Bioactivity behavior of prepared nanocomposites was evaluated in simulated body fluid (SBF) for 1 up to 28 days. Results: Results showed that nucleus of apatite were formed on the surface of the prepared CoA/FaNC during 1 up to 28 days immersion in the SBF solution. On the other hand, CoA/FaNC unlike Co-base alloy possessed bone-like apatite-formation ability. Conclusion: It was concluded that bioinert Co

  4. Reduced PAK1 activity sensitizes FA/BRCA-proficient breast cancer cells to PARP inhibition.

    PubMed

    Villamar Cruz, Olga; Prudnikova, Tatiana Y; Araiza-Olivera, Daniela; Perez-Plasencia, Carlos; Johnson, Neil; Bernhardy, Andrea J; Slifker, Michael; Renner, Catherine; Chernoff, Jonathan; Arias-Romero, Luis E

    2016-11-22

    Cells that are deficient in homologous recombination, such as those that have mutations in any of the Fanconi Anemia (FA)/BRCA genes, are hypersensitive to inhibition of poly(ADP-ribose) polymerase (PARP). However, FA/BRCA-deficient tumors represent a small fraction of breast cancers, which might restrict the therapeutic utility of PARP inhibitor monotherapy. The gene encoding the serine-threonine protein kinase p21-activated kinase 1 (PAK1) is amplified and/or overexpressed in several human cancer types including 25-30% of breast tumors. This enzyme controls many cellular processes by phosphorylating both cytoplasmic and nuclear substrates. Here, we show that depletion or pharmacological inhibition of PAK1 down-regulated the expression of genes involved in the FA/BRCA pathway and compromised the ability of cells to repair DNA by Homologous Recombination (HR), promoting apoptosis and reducing colony formation. Combined inhibition of PAK1 and PARP in PAK1 overexpressing breast cancer cells had a synergistic effect, enhancing apoptosis, suppressing colony formation, and delaying tumor growth in a xenograft setting. Because reduced PAK1 activity impaired FA/BRCA function, inhibition of this kinase in PAK1 amplified and/or overexpressing breast cancer cells represents a plausible strategy for expanding the utility of PARP inhibitors to FA/BRCA-proficient cancers.

  5. Reduced PAK1 activity sensitizes FA/BRCA-proficient breast cancer cells to PARP inhibition

    PubMed Central

    Araiza-Olivera, Daniela; Perez-Plasencia, Carlos; Johnson, Neil; Bernhardy, Andrea J.; Slifker, Michael; Renner, Catherine; Chernoff, Jonathan; Arias, Luis E.

    2016-01-01

    Cells that are deficient in homologous recombination, such as those that have mutations in any of the Fanconi Anemia (FA)/BRCA genes, are hypersensitive to inhibition of poly(ADP-ribose) polymerase (PARP). However, FA/BRCA-deficient tumors represent a small fraction of breast cancers, which might restrict the therapeutic utility of PARP inhibitor monotherapy. The gene encoding the serine-threonine protein kinase p21-activated kinase 1 (PAK1) is amplified and/or overexpressed in several human cancer types including 25-30% of breast tumors. This enzyme controls many cellular processes by phosphorylating both cytoplasmic and nuclear substrates. Here, we show that depletion or pharmacological inhibition of PAK1 down-regulated the expression of genes involved in the FA/BRCA pathway and compromised the ability of cells to repair DNA by Homologous Recombination (HR), promoting apoptosis and reducing colony formation. Combined inhibition of PAK1 and PARP in PAK1 overexpressing breast cancer cells had a synergistic effect, enhancing apoptosis, suppressing colony formation, and delaying tumor growth in a xenograft setting. Because reduced PAK1 activity impaired FA/BRCA function, inhibition of this kinase in PAK1 amplified and/or overexpressing breast cancer cells represents a plausible strategy for expanding the utility of PARP inhibitors to FA/BRCA-proficient cancers. PMID:27740936

  6. Analysis and Assessment of Strength Development in Compressed FaL-G Blocks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nagendra Prasad, K.; Vijaya Bhaskar, S.; Narasimhulu, M. L.; Manohara Reddy, R.

    2014-09-01

    Of the several options explored in large scale utilization of fly ash, such as production of blended cements, high volume fly ash cement concretes, fly ash, lime and gypsum (FaL-G) combinations, alkali activated fly ash mortars and concretes are of recent innovations. The last two are non-traditional cementing materials, since no cement is used in processing of these materials. This investigation deals with analysis and assessment of strength development in compressed FaL-G blocks. FaL-G chemistry provides a strong scientific base for understanding the mechanisms of interaction. But an equally strong technological base in the production of FaL-G blocks is the need of the hour. In this investigation, analysis has been made to advance a phenomenological model to arrive at the combinations of the ingredients to produce compressed blocks to meet the strength development desired at specified age, based on carefully planned experimental data generated. The analysis of test results has been done within the framework of Abrams' law, which is extensively used in concrete technology. The validity has been examined with an independent set of experimental data. With incorporation of more data covering still wider spectrum of materials the phenomenological model can further be reinforced as a viable tool in the production of compressed FaL-G blocks.

  7. About the Clusters Program

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    The Environmental Technology Innovation Clusters Program advises cluster organizations, encourages collaboration between clusters, tracks U.S. environmental technology clusters, and connects EPA programs to cluster needs.

  8. Both FA- and mPEG-conjugated chitosan nanoparticles for targeted cellular uptake and enhanced tumor tissue distribution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hou, Zhenqing; Zhan, Chuanming; Jiang, Qiwei; Hu, Quan; Li, Le; Chang, Di; Yang, Xiangrui; Wang, Yixiao; Li, Yang; Ye, Shefang; Xie, Liya; Yi, Yunfeng; Zhang, Qiqing

    2011-10-01

    Both folic acid (FA)- and methoxypoly(ethylene glycol) (mPEG)-conjugated chitosan nanoparticles (NPs) had been designed for targeted and prolong anticancer drug delivery system. The chitosan NPs were prepared with combination of ionic gelation and chemical cross-linking method, followed by conjugation with both FA and mPEG, respectively. FA-mPEG-NPs were compared with either NPs or mPEG-/FA-NPs in terms of their size, targeting cellular efficiency and tumor tissue distribution. The specificity of the mPEG-FA-NPs targeting cancerous cells was demonstrated by comparative intracellular uptake of NPs and mPEG-/FA-NPs by human adenocarcinoma HeLa cells. Mitomycin C (MMC), as a model drug, was loaded to the mPEG-FA-NPs. Results show that the chitosan NPs presented a narrow-size distribution with an average diameter about 200 nm regardless of the type of functional group. In addition, MMC was easily loaded to the mPEG-FA-NPs with drug-loading content of 9.1%, and the drug releases were biphasic with an initial burst release, followed by a subsequent slower release. Laser confocal scanning imaging proved that both mPEG-FA-NPs and FA-NPs could greatly enhance uptake by HeLa cells. In vivo animal experiments, using a nude mice xenograft model, demonstrated that an increased amount of mPEG-FA-NPs or FA-NPs were accumulated in the tumor tissue relative to the mPEG-NPs or NPs alone. These results suggest that both FA- and mPEG-conjugated chitosan NPs are potentially prolonged drug delivery system for tumor cell-selective targeting treatments.

  9. Both FA- and mPEG-conjugated chitosan nanoparticles for targeted cellular uptake and enhanced tumor tissue distribution

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Both folic acid (FA)- and methoxypoly(ethylene glycol) (mPEG)-conjugated chitosan nanoparticles (NPs) had been designed for targeted and prolong anticancer drug delivery system. The chitosan NPs were prepared with combination of ionic gelation and chemical cross-linking method, followed by conjugation with both FA and mPEG, respectively. FA-mPEG-NPs were compared with either NPs or mPEG-/FA-NPs in terms of their size, targeting cellular efficiency and tumor tissue distribution. The specificity of the mPEG-FA-NPs targeting cancerous cells was demonstrated by comparative intracellular uptake of NPs and mPEG-/FA-NPs by human adenocarcinoma HeLa cells. Mitomycin C (MMC), as a model drug, was loaded to the mPEG-FA-NPs. Results show that the chitosan NPs presented a narrow-size distribution with an average diameter about 200 nm regardless of the type of functional group. In addition, MMC was easily loaded to the mPEG-FA-NPs with drug-loading content of 9.1%, and the drug releases were biphasic with an initial burst release, followed by a subsequent slower release. Laser confocal scanning imaging proved that both mPEG-FA-NPs and FA-NPs could greatly enhance uptake by HeLa cells. In vivo animal experiments, using a nude mice xenograft model, demonstrated that an increased amount of mPEG-FA-NPs or FA-NPs were accumulated in the tumor tissue relative to the mPEG-NPs or NPs alone. These results suggest that both FA- and mPEG-conjugated chitosan NPs are potentially prolonged drug delivery system for tumor cell-selective targeting treatments. PMID:22027239

  10. Detecting blind building façades from highly overlapping wide angle aerial imagery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Burochin, Jean-Pascal; Vallet, Bruno; Brédif, Mathieu; Mallet, Clément; Brosset, Thomas; Paparoditis, Nicolas

    2014-10-01

    This paper deals with the identification of blind building façades, i.e. façades which have no openings, in wide angle aerial images with a decimeter pixel size, acquired by nadir looking cameras. This blindness characterization is in general crucial for real estate estimation and has, at least in France, a particular importance on the evaluation of legal permission of constructing on a parcel due to local urban planning schemes. We assume that we have at our disposal an aerial survey with a relatively high stereo overlap along-track and across-track and a 3D city model of LoD 1, that can have been generated with the input images. The 3D model is textured with the aerial imagery by taking into account the 3D occlusions and by selecting for each façade the best available resolution texture seeing the whole façade. We then parse all 3D façades textures by looking for evidence of openings (windows or doors). This evidence is characterized by a comprehensive set of basic radiometric and geometrical features. The blindness prognostic is then elaborated through an (SVM) supervised classification. Despite the relatively low resolution of the images, we reach a classification accuracy of around 85% on decimeter resolution imagery with 60 × 40 % stereo overlap. On the one hand, we show that the results are very sensitive to the texturing resampling process and to vegetation presence on façade textures. On the other hand, the most relevant features for our classification framework are related to texture uniformity and horizontal aspect and to the maximal contrast of the opening detections. We conclude that standard aerial imagery used to build 3D city models can also be exploited to some extent and at no additional cost for facade blindness characterisation.

  11. Birth order and avuncular tendencies in Samoan men and fa'afafine.

    PubMed

    Vanderlaan, Doug P; Vasey, Paul L

    2013-04-01

    Androphilia refers to sexual attraction and arousal to males whereas gynephilia refers to sexual attraction and arousal to females. In Samoa, transgendered androphilic males are known locally as fa'afafine. Previous research has shown that, compared to Samoan gynephilic men, fa'afafine report greater willingness to invest time and money toward nieces and nephews (i.e., greater avuncular tendencies) and also have greater numbers of older brothers and older sisters. The present study examined whether the Samoan male sexual orientation difference in avuncular tendencies could be accounted for by these parallel differences in numbers of older brothers and older sisters. The sample included 204 fa'afafine and 272 Samoan gynephilic men from our Samoan data archive for whom we had concurrent information on (1) a measure of willingness to invest time and money in nieces and nephews (i.e., avuncular tendencies) and (2) numbers of older and younger biological brothers and sisters. Among fa'afafine, but not Samoan gynephilic men, number of older brothers and number of older sisters were both significantly positively associated with avuncular tendencies. When controlling for number of older brothers, the magnitude of the male sexual orientation difference in avuncular tendencies was lowered, but remained statistically significant. In contrast, when controlling for number of older sisters, the male sexual orientation difference in avuncular tendencies ceased to exist. Discussion detailed how these findings help hone in on the proximate basis of elevated avuncular tendencies among fa'afafine. In addition, discussion focused on how particular evolutionary and cultural factors might relate to the avuncularity of fa'afafine.

  12. Explication of Definitional Description and Empirical Use of Fraction of Orally Administered Drugs Absorbed From the Intestine (Fa) and Intestinal Availability (Fg): Effect of P-glycoprotein and CYP3A on Fa and Fg.

    PubMed

    Tanaka, Yuta; Kitamura, Yoshiaki; Maeda, Kazuya; Sugiyama, Yuichi

    2016-02-01

    Conventionally, it is believed that the fraction of orally administered drugs absorbed from the intestine (Fa) and intestinal availability (Fg) are independently determined by the apical membrane permeation and intestinal metabolism, respectively. However, the validity of this belief has not been well discussed, and Fa and Fg are often used without careful definition. In this review, Fa and Fg are mathematically described based on their definitions under the linear kinetics of metabolism and transport. Even considering with different models, intestinal metabolic enzymes such as cytochrome P450 3A affected both Fa and Fg, whereas apical efflux transporters including P-glycoprotein had no influence on Fg at least under the linear condition. To determine whether Fa and Fg calculated using different clinical methods are identical, empirical Fa and Fg were mathematically described based on "feces method" and "grapefruit juice method" and compared with their definitions. Fa and Fg obtained by the feces method corresponded with their definitions whereas the grapefruit juice method provided smaller Fa and larger Fg particularly for dual substrates of P-glycoprotein and cytochrome P450 3A with low membrane permeability. Our analyses suggest that the definitions and calculation methods of Fa and Fg should be considered when we intend to separately determine these values.

  13. Doppler Global Velocimetry Measurements of the Vortical Flow Above an F/A-18

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lee, Joseph W.; Meyers, James F.; Cavone, Angelo A.; Suzuki, Karen E.

    1993-01-01

    A Doppler global velocimeter was used to investigate the vortical flow above an F/A-18 model at 25-degrees angle of attack. The measurements indicate that the flow had the same characteristics as the vortical flow above a standard delta wing. The flow pattern indicating transition from stable to burst conditions found above the delta wing was also found at the 440 station above the F/A-18. Measurements downstream at the 524 station found that the flow velocity varied considerably, with standard deviations reaching 30 percent of free stream. However, individual data images indicated that the flow was spatially coherent, and not chaotic as expected.

  14. Data Clustering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wagstaff, Kiri L.

    2012-03-01

    On obtaining a new data set, the researcher is immediately faced with the challenge of obtaining a high-level understanding from the observations. What does a typical item look like? What are the dominant trends? How many distinct groups are included in the data set, and how is each one characterized? Which observable values are common, and which rarely occur? Which items stand out as anomalies or outliers from the rest of the data? This challenge is exacerbated by the steady growth in data set size [11] as new instruments push into new frontiers of parameter space, via improvements in temporal, spatial, and spectral resolution, or by the desire to "fuse" observations from different modalities and instruments into a larger-picture understanding of the same underlying phenomenon. Data clustering algorithms provide a variety of solutions for this task. They can generate summaries, locate outliers, compress data, identify dense or sparse regions of feature space, and build data models. It is useful to note up front that "clusters" in this context refer to groups of items within some descriptive feature space, not (necessarily) to "galaxy clusters" which are dense regions in physical space. The goal of this chapter is to survey a variety of data clustering methods, with an eye toward their applicability to astronomical data analysis. In addition to improving the individual researcher’s understanding of a given data set, clustering has led directly to scientific advances, such as the discovery of new subclasses of stars [14] and gamma-ray bursts (GRBs) [38]. All clustering algorithms seek to identify groups within a data set that reflect some observed, quantifiable structure. Clustering is traditionally an unsupervised approach to data analysis, in the sense that it operates without any direct guidance about which items should be assigned to which clusters. There has been a recent trend in the clustering literature toward supporting semisupervised or constrained

  15. Avuncular tendencies and the evolution of male androphilia in Samoan fa'afafine.

    PubMed

    Vasey, Paul L; VanderLaan, Doug P

    2010-08-01

    The kin selection hypothesis for male androphilia holds that genes for male androphilia can be maintained in a population if the fitness costs of not reproducing directly are offset by enhancing indirect fitness. Kin share some proportion of genes identical by virtue of descent. Theoretically speaking, androphilic males can increase their fitness indirectly by allocating altruistic behavior toward kin, which, in turn, allows kin to increase their reproductive success. Research conducted in Independent Samoa has shown that androphilic males (known locally as fa'afafine) report significantly higher avuncular tendencies relative to gynephilic men. Here, we replicate this sexual orientation difference, using a larger, independent sample, suggesting that the documented sexual orientation difference in avuncular tendencies in Independent Samoa is genuine. We also extend previous research by showing that fa'afafine exhibit significantly higher avuncular tendencies even when compared to a more closely matched control group that also lacks direct parental care responsibilities (i.e., gynephilic men with no children). Although the greater avuncular tendencies of fa'afafine relative to gynephilic men are consistent with the predictions of the kin selection hypothesis for male androphilia, further research is needed before deeming male androphilia an adaptation for promoting elevated avuncularity. Likewise, more research is needed before deeming elevated avuncularity in fa'afafine an evolved adaptation for promoting indirect fitness. We discuss these findings in the context of alternative evolutionary explanations for male androphilia (i.e., an evolved by-product of an adaptation).

  16. Missionaries and Tonic Sol-fa Music Pedagogy in 19th-Century China

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Southcott, Jane E.; Lee, Angela Hao-Chun

    2008-01-01

    In the 19th century, Christian missionaries in China, as elsewhere, used the Tonic Sol-fa method of music instruction to aid their evangelizing. This system was designed to improve congregational singing in churches, Sunday schools and missions. The London Missionary Society and other evangelical groups employed the method. These missionaries took…

  17. Exterior building details of Building A; east façade: concrete staircase, ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Exterior building details of Building A; east façade: concrete staircase, profiled cement, plaster door surround, recessed panel inscribed "1859", historic window opening with concrete sill above door, cement plaster dentil course and cornice truncated wood beam ends, plaster finished brick wall, granite base; westerly view - San Quentin State Prison, Building 22, Point San Quentin, San Quentin, Marin County, CA

  18. Exterior building details of Building C, east façade: brick quoins, ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Exterior building details of Building C, east façade: brick quoins, brick lintels, brick window sills, decorative metal grilles, scored cement finished brick wall; westerly view - San Quentin State Prison, Building 22, Point San Quentin, San Quentin, Marin County, CA

  19. Exterior building details of Building A; east façade: profiled cement ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Exterior building details of Building A; east façade: profiled cement plaster door surround, black mesh gate protects a two-light transom atop non-original metal door; westerly view - San Quentin State Prison, Building 22, Point San Quentin, San Quentin, Marin County, CA

  20. Exterior building details of Building A; east façade: recessed panel ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Exterior building details of Building A; east façade: recessed panel inscribed "1859", historic window opening with concrete sill above door, cement plaster dentil course and cornice, truncated wood beam ends, plaster finished brick wall, granite base; westerly view - San Quentin State Prison, Building 22, Point San Quentin, San Quentin, Marin County, CA

  1. Exterior building details of Building C, east façade: historic six ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Exterior building details of Building C, east façade: historic six light entry double door with three light transom, historic six light door with a one light transom, arch brick lintels and quoins, scored cement plaster finished brick walls; westerly view - San Quentin State Prison, Building 22, Point San Quentin, San Quentin, Marin County, CA

  2. 75 FR 27489 - Airworthiness Directives; Pratt & Whitney Canada Corp. PW615F-A Turbofan Engines

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-05-17

    ... Canada Corp. PW615F-A Turbofan Engines AGENCY: Federal Aviation Administration (FAA), DOT. ACTION: Notice... Metering Unit (FMU), resulting in fuel flow drop and subsequent power reduction. Pratt & Whitney Canada... Pratt & Whitney Canada Corp. has confirmed similar dormant failure of worn through poppets of...

  3. Exterior building details of Building A; east façade: fixed fiveoverfive ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Exterior building details of Building A; east façade: fixed five-over-five wood windows with five-light hoppers with concrete sills; westerly view - San Quentin State Prison, Building 22, Point San Quentin, San Quentin, Marin County, CA

  4. Expression of crylFa in bahiagrass enhances resistance to fall armyworm

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Bahiagrass (Paspalum notatum var. Flugge) is the predominant forage grass in Florida and in subtropical regions worldwide. To improve pest resistance against fall armyworm (Spodoptera frugiperda J. E. Smith), an optimized cry1Fa gene encoding a '-endotoxin from Bacillus thuringiensis was synthesized...

  5. Consumption of fa cai Nostoc soup: a potential for BMAA exposure from Nostoc cyanobacteria in China?

    PubMed

    Roney, Britton R; Renhui, Li; Banack, Sandra Anne; Murch, Susan; Honegger, Rosmarie; Cox, Paul Alan

    2009-01-01

    Grown in arid regions of western China the cyanobacterium Nostoc flagelliforme--called fa cai in Mandarin and fat choy in Cantonese--is wild-harvested and used to make soup consumed during New Year's celebrations. High prices, up to $125 USD/kg, led to overharvesting in Inner Mongolia, Ningxia, Gansu, Qinghai, and Xinjiang. Degradation of arid ecosystems, desertification, and conflicts between Nostoc harvesters and Mongol herdsmen concerned the Chinese environmental authorities, leading to a government ban of Nostoc commerce. This ban stimulated increased marketing of a substitute made from starch. We analysed samples purchased throughout China as well as in Chinese markets in the United States and the United Kingdom. Some were counterfeits consisting of dyed starch noodles. A few samples from California contained Nostoc flagelliforme but were adulterated with starch noodles. Other samples, including those from the United Kingdom, consisted of pure Nostoc flagelliforme. A recent survey of markets in Cheng Du showed no real Nostoc flagelliforme to be marketed. Real and artificial fa cai differ in the presence of beta-N-methylamino-L-alanine (BMAA). Given its status as a high-priced luxury food, the government ban on collection and marketing, and the replacement of real fa cai with starch substitutes consumed only on special occasions, it is anticipated that dietary exposure to BMAA from fa cai will be reduced in the future in China.

  6. NEW CHEMICAL ALTERNATIVE FOR OZONE-DEPLETING SUBSTANCES: HFC-236FA

    EPA Science Inventory

    The report gives results of a preliminary evaluation of a new hydrofluorocarbon (HFC)--HFC-236fa or 1,1,1,3,3,3-hexafluoropropane--as a possible alternative for chlorofluorocarbon (CFC)-114 (1,2-dichloro-1,1,2,2-tetrafluoroethane) refrigerant for chillers and as a possible fire s...

  7. Genome Sequence of the Alkaline-Tolerant Cellulomonas sp. Strain FA1

    DOE PAGES

    Cohen, Michael F.; Hu, Ping; Nguyen, My Vu; ...

    2015-06-18

    We present the genome of the cellulose-degrading Cellulomonas sp. strain FA1 isolated from an actively serpentinizing highly alkaline spring. Knowledge of this genome will enable studies into the molecular basis of plant material degradation in alkaline environments and inform the development of lignocellulose bioprocessing procedures for biofuel production.

  8. Genome Sequence of the Alkaline-Tolerant Cellulomonas sp. Strain FA1

    SciTech Connect

    Cohen, Michael F.; Hu, Ping; Nguyen, My Vu; Kamennaya, Nina; Brown, Natasha; Woyke, Tanja; Kyrpides, Nikos; Holman, Hoi-Ying; Torok, Tamas

    2015-06-18

    We present the genome of the cellulose-degrading Cellulomonas sp. strain FA1 isolated from an actively serpentinizing highly alkaline spring. Knowledge of this genome will enable studies into the molecular basis of plant material degradation in alkaline environments and inform the development of lignocellulose bioprocessing procedures for biofuel production.

  9. Detail, typical window fenestrations, east façade, view to westnorthwest (135mm ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Detail, typical window fenestrations, east façade, view to west-northwest (135mm lens). Note "timber" header, adobe bench in front of window. - Burton Park, Club House & Amphitheater, Adjacent ot south end of Chestnut Avenue, San Carlos, San Mateo County, CA

  10. Automatic modelling of building façade objects via primitive shapes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hetti Arachchige, N.; Perera, S.

    2014-08-01

    This paper presents a new approach to recognize individual façade objects and to reconstruct such objects in 3D using MLS point clouds. Core of the approach is a primitive shape based algorithm, which introduces building primitives, to identify the façade objects separately from other irrelevant objects and then to model the correct topology. The primitive shape is identified against defined different primitive shapes by using the Douglas-Peucker algorithm. The advantage of this process is that it offers an ability not only to model correct geometric shapes but also to remove occlusion effects from the final model. To evaluate the validity of the proposed approach, experiments have been conducted using two types of street scene point clouds captured by Optech Lynx Mobile Mapper System and Z+F laser scanner. Results of the experiments show that the completeness, correctness, and quality of the reconstructed building façade objects are well over 90 %, proving the proposed method is a promising solution for modelling 3D façade objects with different geometric shapes.

  11. FaSTR DNA: a new expert system for forensic DNA analysis.

    PubMed

    Power, Timothy; McCabe, Brendan; Harbison, Sally Ann

    2008-06-01

    The automation of DNA profile analysis of reference and crime samples continues to gain pace driven in part by a realisation by the criminal justice system of the positive impact DNA technology can have in aiding in the solution of crime and the apprehension of suspects. Expert systems to automate the profile analysis component of the process are beginning to be developed. In this paper, we report the validation of a new expert system FaSTR DNA, an expert system suitable for the analysis of DNA profiles from single source reference samples and from crime samples. We compare the performance of FaSTR DNA with that of other equivalent systems, GeneMapper ID v3.2 (Applied Biosystems, Foster City, CA) and FSS-i(3) v4 (The Forensic Science Service((R)) DNA expert System Suite FSS-i(3), Forensic Science Service, Birmingham, UK) with GeneScan Analysis v3.7/Genotyper v3.7 software (Applied Biosystems, Foster City, CA, USA) with manual review. We have shown that FaSTR DNA provides an alternative solution to automating DNA profile analysis and is appropriate for implementation into forensic laboratories. The FaSTR DNA system was demonstrated to be comparable in performance to that of GeneMapper ID v3.2 and superior to that of FSS-i(3) v4 for the analysis of DNA profiles from crime samples.

  12. South façade, view to north from center of Elk Grove ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    South façade, view to north from center of Elk Grove Boulevard. Drew-Sherwood Tank House. (HABS No. CA-2610-B) visible at left of house. - Drew-Sherwood Farm, House, 7927 Elk Grove Boulevard, Elk Grove, Sacramento County, CA

  13. The Arabic Hyperbolic Pattern "Fa??al" in Two Recent Translations of the Qur'an

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    El-Zawawy, Amr M.

    2014-01-01

    The present study addresses the problem of rendering the ?? ?? 'fa??al' hyperbolic pattern into English in two recent translations of the Qur'an. Due to the variety of Qur'an translations and the large amount of hyperbolic forms of Arabic verbs recorded in the Qur'an, only two translations of the Qur'an are consulted and analyzed: these two…

  14. Difficulties Encountered by Bilingual Arab Learners in Translating Arabic "fa" into English

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Saeed, Aziz Thabit; Fareh, Shehdeh

    2006-01-01

    This study investigates the problems that translators and Arab learners of English encounter in translating Arabic sentences containing the Arabic discourse marker "fa" into English. Several types of texts were surveyed in order to identify the salient functions that this marker has in Arabic discourse. Five major functions were identified:…

  15. Exterior building details of Building C, east façade: historic fouroverfour ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Exterior building details of Building C, east façade: historic four-over-four window, brick lintel, brick quoins, corbelled brick cornice, spiral metal staircase to inclined stairs rising to second floor cantilever wooden walkway; westerly view - San Quentin State Prison, Building 22, Point San Quentin, San Quentin, Marin County, CA

  16. Exterior building details of Building C, east façade: inscribed date ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Exterior building details of Building C, east façade: inscribed date panel "hospital 1885", corbelled brick belt course, parapet, second floor historic four-over-four window with brick lintels, quoins and decorative metal grilled, cantilever wooden walkway; westerly view - San Quentin State Prison, Building 22, Point San Quentin, San Quentin, Marin County, CA

  17. General view looking west, showing the eastern façade with square ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    General view looking west, showing the eastern façade with square towers and pyramidal roofs. This style is duplicated on the general office building (Haer No. PA-271-C), the machine shop, and the Electrical Department & Boiler House (Haer No. Pa-271-B). - Johnson Steel Street Rail Company, Drawing Room & Laying-Out Floor Building, 525 Central Avenue, Johnstown, Cambria County, PA

  18. Exterior building details of Building A; north façade: two threelight ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Exterior building details of Building A; north façade: two three-light wood casement windows flank a three-light fixed wood window with concrete sill; southerly view - San Quentin State Prison, Building 22, Point San Quentin, San Quentin, Marin County, CA

  19. MISCIBILITY, SOLUBILITY, VISCOSITY, AND DENSITY MEASUREMENTS FOR R-236FA WITH POTENTIAL LUBRICANTS

    EPA Science Inventory

    The report gives results of miscibility, solubility, viscosity, and density measurements for refrigerant R-236fa and two potential lubricants . (The data are needed to determine the suitability of refrigerant/lubricant combinations for use in refrigeration systems.) The tested oi...

  20. HEAT TRANSFER EVALUATION OF HFC-236FA IN CONDENSATION AND EVAPORATION

    EPA Science Inventory

    The report gives results of an evaluation of the shell-side heat transfer performance of hydrofluorocarbon (HFC)-236fa, which is considered to be a potential substitute for chlorofluorocarbon (CFC)-114 in Navy shipboard chillers, for both conventional finned [1024- and 1575-fpm (...

  1. Leaching of biocides from façades under natural weather conditions.

    PubMed

    Burkhardt, M; Zuleeg, S; Vonbank, R; Bester, K; Carmeliet, J; Boller, M; Wangler, T

    2012-05-15

    Biocides are included in organic building façade coatings as protection against biological attack by algae and fungi but have the potential to enter the environment via leaching into runoff from wind driven rain. The following field study correlates wind driven rain to runoff and measured the release of several commonly used organic biocides (terbutryn, Irgarol 1051, diuron, isoproturon, OIT, DCOIT) in organic façade coatings from four coating systems. During one year of exposure of a west oriented model house façade in the Zurich, Switzerland area, an average of 62.7 L/m(2), or 6.3% of annual precipitation came off the four façade panels installed as runoff. The ISO method for calculating wind driven rain loads is adapted to predict runoff and can be used in the calculation of emissions in the field. Biocide concentrations tend to be higher in the early lifetime of the coatings and then reach fairly consistent levels later, generally ranging on the order of mg/L or hundreds of μg/L. On the basis of the amount remaining in the film after exposure, the occurrence of transformation products, and the calculated amounts in the leachate, degradation plays a significant role in the overall mass balance.

  2. Influence of dietary long-chain PUFA on premature baboon lung FA and dipalmitoyl PC composition.

    PubMed

    Chao, Angela Chueh; Ziadeh, Bassem I; Diau, Guan-Yeu; Wijendran, Vasuki; Sarkadi-Nagy, Eszter; Hsieh, Andrea T; Nathanielsz, Peter W; Brenna, J Thomas

    2003-04-01

    One of the major survival challenges of premature birth is production of lung surfactant. The lipid component of surfactant, dipalmitoyl PC (DPPC), increases in concentration in the period before normal term birth via a net shift in FA composition away from unsaturates. We investigated the influence of dietary DHA and arachidonic acid (AA) on lung FA composition and DPPC concentration in term and preterm baboons. Pregnant animals/neonates were randomized to one of four groups: breast-fed (B), term formula-fed (T-, preterm formula-fed (P-, and preterm fed formula supplemented with DHA-AA (P+). Breast milk contained 0.68%wt DHA and the P+ group formula contained 0.61%wt DHA. In the preterm groups (P- and P+), pregnant females received a course of antenatal corticosteroids. At the adjusted age of 4 wk, neonate lung tissue was harvested, and FA composition and DPPC were analyzed. Palmitate was approximately 28%wt of lung total FA and no significant differences were found among the four treatment groups. In contrast, DPPC in the B group lung tissue was significantly greater than DPPC in the unsupplemented groups, but not compared with the P+ group. The B and P+ groups were not significantly different in DHA and AA, but were different compared with the unsupplemented (T, P-) groups. These results indicate that LCP supplementation increases lung DHA and AA, without compromising overall lung 16:0 or DPPC. The shift in FA composition toward greater unsaturation in the groups consuming LCP supported improved surfactant lipid concentration in preterm neonate lungs.

  3. Slicing Method for curved façade and window extraction from point clouds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Iman Zolanvari, S. M.; Laefer, Debra F.

    2016-09-01

    Laser scanning technology is a fast and reliable method to survey structures. However, the automatic conversion of such data into solid models for computation remains a major challenge, especially where non-rectilinear features are present. Since, openings and the overall dimensions of the buildings are the most critical elements in computational models for structural analysis, this article introduces the Slicing Method as a new, computationally-efficient method for extracting overall façade and window boundary points for reconstructing a façade into a geometry compatible for computational modelling. After finding a principal plane, the technique slices a façade into limited portions, with each slice representing a unique, imaginary section passing through a building. This is done along a façade's principal axes to segregate window and door openings from structural portions of the load-bearing masonry walls. The method detects each opening area's boundaries, as well as the overall boundary of the façade, in part, by using a one-dimensional projection to accelerate processing. Slices were optimised as 14.3 slices per vertical metre of building and 25 slices per horizontal metre of building, irrespective of building configuration or complexity. The proposed procedure was validated by its application to three highly decorative, historic brick buildings. Accuracy in excess of 93% was achieved with no manual intervention on highly complex buildings and nearly 100% on simple ones. Furthermore, computational times were less than 3 sec for data sets up to 2.6 million points, while similar existing approaches required more than 16 hr for such datasets.

  4. A case report and literature review of Fanconi Anemia (FA) diagnosed by genetic testing.

    PubMed

    Solomon, Ponnumony John; Margaret, Priya; Rajendran, Ramya; Ramalingam, Revathy; Menezes, Godfred A; Shirley, Alph S; Lee, Seung Jun; Seong, Moon-Woo; Park, Sung Sup; Seol, Dodam; Seo, Soo Hyun

    2015-05-08

    Fanconi anemia (FA) is a genetically heterogeneous rare autosomal recessive disorder characterized by congenital malformations, hematological problems and predisposition to malignancies. The genes that have been found to be mutated in FA patients are called FANC. To date 16 distinct FANC genes have been reported. Among these, mutations in FANCA are the most frequent among FA patients worldwide which account for 60- 65%. In this study, a nine years old male child was brought to our hospital one year ago for opinion and advice. He was the third child born to consanguineous parents. The mutation analyses were performed for proband, parents, elder sibling and the relatives [maternal aunt and maternal aunt's son (cousin)]. Molecular genetic testing [targeted next-generation sequencing (MiSeq, Illumina method)] was performed by mutation analysis in 15 genes involved. Entire coding exons and their flanking regions of the genes were analysed. Sanger sequencing [(ABI 3730 analyzer by Applied Biosystems)] was performed using primers specific for 43 coding exons of the FANCA gene. A novel splice site mutation, c.3066 + 1G > T, (IVS31 + 1G > T), homozygote was detected by sequencing in the patient. The above sequence variant was identified in heterozygous state in his parents. Further, the above sequence variant was not identified in other family members (elder sibling, maternal aunt and cousin). It is concluded that genetic study should be done if possible in all the cases of suspected FA, including siblings, parents and close blood relatives. It will help us to plan appropriate treatment and also to select suitable donor for hematopoietic stem cell transplantation and to plan for genetic counseling. In addition to the case report, the main focus of this manuscript was to review literature on role of FANCA gene in FA since large number of FANCA mutations and polymorphisms have been identified.

  5. The yeast genus Tortispora gen. nov., description of Tortispora ganteri sp. nov., Tortispora mauiana f.a., sp. nov., Tortispora agaves f.a., sp. nov., Tortispora sangerardonensis f.a., sp. nov., Tortispora cuajiniquilana f.a., sp. nov., Tortispora starmeri f.a., sp. nov. and Tortispora phaffii f.a., sp. nov., reassignment of Candida caseinolytica to Tortispora caseinolytica f.a., comb. nov., emendation of Botryozyma, and assignment of Botryozyma, Tortispora gen. nov. and Trigonopsis to the family Trigonopsidaceae fam. nov.

    PubMed

    Lachance, M-A; Kurtzman, C P

    2013-08-01

    We describe the yeast genus Tortispora gen. nov., an early-diverging lineage in the Saccharomycetales that displays the formation of helical ascospores. The genus is based on 16 strains resembling Candida caseinolytica that were isolated from necrotic plant tissue in warm regions of the New World. Based on sequences of the D1/D2 domains of the nuclear large subunit rRNA gene, as well as other data, the strains are assigned to eight distinct species. The species are nutritionally specialized and share the unusual ability to hydrolyse casein and to grow on 1-butanol as sole carbon source. One species of the proposed new genus produces a simple ascus with a helical ascospore, whereas other species of the clade have failed to form ascospores. All species in the clade, including C. caseinolytica, are assigned to Tortispora gen. nov. The new binomials are Tortispora ganteri sp. nov., type species of the genus (SUB 86-469.5(T) = CBS 12581(T) = NRRL Y-17035(T)), Tortispora caseinolytica f.a., comb. nov. (UCD-FST 83-438.3(T) = CBS 7781(T) = NRRL Y-17796(T)), Tortispora mauiana f.a., sp. nov. (UWOPS 87-2430.3(T) = CBS 12803(T) = NRRL Y-48832(T)), Tortispora agaves f.a., sp. nov. (UWOPS 94-257.6(T) = CBS 12794(T) = NRRL Y-63662(T)), Tortispora sangerardonensis f.a., sp. nov. (UWOPS 00-157.1(T) = CBS 12795(T) = NRRL Y-63663(T)), Tortispora cuajiniquilana f.a., sp. nov. (UWOPS 99-344.4(T) = CBS 12796(T) = NRRL Y-63664(T)), Tortispora starmeri f.a., sp. nov. (G 91-702.5(T) = CBS 12793(T) = NRRL Y-63665(T)) and Tortispora phaffii f.a., sp. nov. (UWOPS 91-445.1(T) = CBS 12804(T) = NRRL Y-48833(T)). In addition, species formerly assigned to the genus Ascobotryozyma are reassigned to the genus Botryozyma. The genera Trigonopsis, Botryozyma and Tortispora are assigned to the family Trigonopsidaceae fam. nov.

  6. Quintuplet Cluster

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1999-01-01

    Penetrating 25,000 light-years of obscuring dust and myriad stars, NASA's Hubble Space Telescope has provided the clearest view yet of one of the largest young clusters of stars inside our Milky Way galaxy, located less than 100 light-years from the very center of the Galaxy. Having the equivalent mass greater than 10,000 stars like our sun, the monster cluster is ten times larger than typical young star clusters scattered throughout our Milky Way. It is destined to be ripped apart in just a few million years by gravitational tidal forces in the galaxy's core. But in its brief lifetime it shines more brightly than any other star cluster in the Galaxy. Quintuplet Cluster is 4 million years old. It has stars on the verge of blowing up as supernovae. It is the home of the brightest star seen in the galaxy, called the Pistol star. This image was taken in infrared light by Hubble's NICMOS camera in September 1997. The false colors correspond to infrared wavelengths. The galactic center stars are white, the red stars are enshrouded in dust or behind dust, and the blue stars are foreground stars between us and the Milky Way's center. The cluster is hidden from direct view behind black dust clouds in the constellation Sagittarius. If the cluster could be seen from earth it would appear to the naked eye as a 3rd magnitude star, 1/6th of a full moon's diameter apart.

  7. 75 FR 51657 - Airworthiness Directives; Pratt & Whitney Canada Corp. (P&WC) PW615F-A Turbofan Engines

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-08-23

    ...-06] RIN 2120-AA64 Airworthiness Directives; Pratt & Whitney Canada Corp. (P&WC) PW615F-A Turbofan... adding the following new AD: 2010-17-06 Pratt & Whitney Canada Corp. (formerly Pratt & Whitney Canada.... Applicability (c) This AD applies to Pratt & Whitney Canada Corp. PW615F-A turbofan engines with fuel/oil...

  8. Mixed compared with single-source proteins in high-protein diets affect kidney structure and function differentially in obese fa/fa Zucker rats.

    PubMed

    Devassy, Jessay G; Wojcik, Jennifer L; Ibrahim, Naser H M; Zahradka, Peter; Taylor, Carla G; Aukema, Harold M

    2017-02-01

    Questions remain regarding the potential negative effects of dietary high protein (HP) on kidney health, particularly in the context of obesity in which the risk for renal disease is already increased. To examine whether some of the variability in HP effects on kidney health may be due to source of protein, obese fa/fa Zucker rats were given HP (35% of energy from protein) diets containing either casein, soy protein, or a mixed source of animal and plant proteins for 12 weeks. Control lean and obese rats were given diets containing casein at normal protein (15% of energy from protein) levels. Body weight and blood pressure were measured, and markers of renal structural changes, damage, and function were assessed. Obesity alone resulted in mild renal changes, as evidenced by higher kidney weights, proteinuria, and glomerular volumes. In obese rats, increasing the protein level using the single, but not mixed, protein sources resulted in higher renal fibrosis compared with the lean rats. The mixed-protein HP group also had lower levels of serum monocyte chemoattractant protein-1, even though this diet further increased kidney and glomerular size. Soy and mixed-protein HP diets also resulted in a small number of damaged glomeruli, while soy compared with mixed-protein HP diet delayed the increase in blood pressure over time. Since obesity itself confers added risk of renal disease, an HP diet from mixed-protein sources that enables weight loss but has fewer risks to renal health may be advantageous.

  9. An Evaluation Technique for an F/A-18 Aircraft Loads Model Using F/A-18 Systems Research Aircraft Flight Data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Olney, Candida D.; Hillebrandt, Heather; Reichenbach, Eric Y.

    2000-01-01

    A limited evaluation of the F/A-18 baseline loads model was performed on the Systems Research Aircraft at NASA Dryden Flight Research Center (Edwards, California). Boeing developed the F/A-18 loads model using a linear aeroelastic analysis in conjunction with a flight simulator to determine loads at discrete locations on the aircraft. This experiment was designed so that analysis of doublets could be used to establish aircraft aerodynamic and loads response at 20 flight conditions. Instrumentation on the right outboard leading edge flap, left aileron, and left stabilator measured the hinge moment so that comparisons could be made between in-flight-measured hinge moments and loads model-predicted values at these locations. Comparisons showed that the difference between the loads model-predicted and in-flight-measured hinge moments was up to 130 percent of the flight limit load. A stepwise regression technique was used to determine new loads derivatives. These derivatives were placed in the loads model, which reduced the error to within 10 percent of the flight limit load. This paper discusses the flight test methodology, a process for determining loads coefficients, and the direct comparisons of predicted and measured hinge moments and loads coefficients.

  10. Glucomannan- and glucomannan plus spirulina-enriched pork affect liver fatty acid profile, LDL receptor expression and antioxidant status in Zucker fa/fa rats fed atherogenic diets

    PubMed Central

    González-Torres, Laura; Matos, Cátia; Vázquez-Velasco, Miguel; Santos-López, Jorge A.; Sánchez-Martínez, Iria; García–Fernández, Camino; Bastida, Sara; Benedí, Juana; Sánchez-Muniz, Francisco J.

    2017-01-01

    ABSTRACT We evaluated the effects of glucomannan or glucomannan plus spirulina-restructured pork (RP) on liver fatty acid profile, desaturase/elongase enzyme activities and oxidative status of Zucker fa/fa rats for seven weeks. Control (C), glucomannan (G) and glucomannan/spirulina (GS)-RP; HC (cholesterol-enriched control), HG and HGS (cholesterol-enriched glucomannan and glucomannan/spirulina-RP) experimental diets were tested. Increased metabolic syndrome markers were found in C, G and GS rats. Cholesterol feeding increased liver size, fat, and cholesterol and reduced antioxidant enzyme levels and expressions. Cholesterolemia was lower in HG and HGS than in HC. GS vs. G showed higher stearic but lower oleic levels. SFA and PUFA decreased while MUFA increased by cholesterol feeding. The arachidonic/linoleic and docosahexaenoic/alpha-linolenic ratios were lower in HC, HG, and HGS vs. C, G, and GS, respectively, suggesting a delta-6-elongase-desaturase system inhibition. Moreover, cholesterol feeding, mainly in HGS, decreased low-density-lipoprotein receptor expression and the delta-5-desaturase activity and increased the delta-9-desaturase activity. In conclusion, the liver production of highly unsaturated fatty acids was limited to decrease their oxidation in presence of hypercholesterolaemia. Glucomannan or glucomannan/spirulina-RP has added new attributes to their functional properties in meat, partially arresting the negative effects induced by high-fat-high-cholesterol feeding on the liver fatty acid and antioxidant statuses. PMID:28325998

  11. Premature cardiac senescence in DahlS.Z-Lepr(fa)/Lepr(fa) rats as a new animal model of metabolic syndrome.

    PubMed

    Takahashi, Keiji; Takatsu, Miwa; Hattori, Takuya; Murase, Tamayo; Ohura, Sae; Takeshita, Yuuri; Watanabe, Shogo; Murohara, Toyoaki; Nagata, Kohzo

    2014-02-01

    Aging is accelerated by metabolic and cardiovascular diseases, and the risk of these diseases increases with age. Obesity is an important risk factor for many age-related diseases and is linked to reduced telomere length in white blood cells. We investigated whether cardiac senescence might be enhanced in DahlS.Z-Lepr(fa)/Lepr(fa) (DS/obese) rats, which we recently established as a new animal model of metabolic syndrome. The heart of DS/obese rats was compared with that of homozygous lean littermates (DahlS.Z-Lepr+/Lepr+, or DS/lean, rats). DS/obese rats manifested hypertension as well as left ventricular hypertrophy, fibrosis, and diastolic dysfunction at 18 weeks of age. Myocardial oxidative stress and inflammation were increased in DS/obese rats compared with DS/lean rats. Telomere length in myocardial cells did not differ between the two rat strains, whereas telomerase activity and expression of the telomerase reverse transcriptase gene were increased in DS/obese rats. Expression of the senescence-associated genes for checkpoint kinase 2 (Chk2), p53, and p21 as well as that of genes related to the renin-angiotensin-aldosterone system were also up-regulated in the DS/obese rat heart. Our results indicate that DS/obese rats undergo premature cardiac senescence as well as cardiac remodeling in association with the development of diastolic dysfunction in these animals.

  12. Spitzer Clusters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krick, Kessica

    This proposal is a specific response to the strategic goal of NASA's research program to "discover how the universe works and explore how the universe evolved into its present form." Towards this goal, we propose to mine the Spitzer archive for all observations of galaxy groups and clusters for the purpose of studying galaxy evolution in clusters, contamination rates for Sunyaev Zeldovich cluster surveys, and to provide a database of Spitzer observed clusters to the broader community. Funding from this proposal will go towards two years of support for a Postdoc to do this work. After searching the Spitzer Heritage Archive, we have found 194 unique galaxy groups and clusters that have data from both the Infrared array camera (IRAC; Fazio et al. 2004) at 3.6 - 8 microns and the multiband imaging photometer for Spitzer (MIPS; Rieke et al. 2004) at 24microns. This large sample will add value beyond the individual datasets because it will be a larger sample of IR clusters than ever before and will have sufficient diversity in mass, redshift, and dynamical state to allow us to differentiate amongst the effects of these cluster properties. An infrared sample is important because it is unaffected by dust extinction while at the same time is an excellent measure of both stellar mass (IRAC wavelengths) and star formation rate (MIPS wavelengths). Additionally, IRAC can be used to differentiate star forming galaxies (SFG) from active galactic nuclei (AGN), due to their different spectral shapes in this wavelength regime. Specifically, we intend to identify SFG and AGN in galaxy groups and clusters. Groups and clusters differ from the field because the galaxy densities are higher, there is a large potential well due mainly to the mass of the dark matter, and there is hot X-ray gas (the intracluster medium; ICM). We will examine the impact of these differences in environment on galaxy formation by comparing cluster properties of AGN and SFG to those in the field. Also, we will

  13. Galaxy Clusters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miller, Christopher J. Miller

    2012-03-01

    There are many examples of clustering in astronomy. Stars in our own galaxy are often seen as being gravitationally bound into tight globular or open clusters. The Solar System's Trojan asteroids cluster at the gravitational Langrangian in front of Jupiter’s orbit. On the largest of scales, we find gravitationally bound clusters of galaxies, the Virgo cluster (in the constellation of Virgo at a distance of ˜50 million light years) being a prime nearby example. The Virgo cluster subtends an angle of nearly 8◦ on the sky and is known to contain over a thousand member galaxies. Galaxy clusters play an important role in our understanding of theUniverse. Clusters exist at peaks in the three-dimensional large-scale matter density field. Their sky (2D) locations are easy to detect in astronomical imaging data and their mean galaxy redshifts (redshift is related to the third spatial dimension: distance) are often better (spectroscopically) and cheaper (photometrically) when compared with the entire galaxy population in large sky surveys. Photometric redshift (z) [Photometric techniques use the broad band filter magnitudes of a galaxy to estimate the redshift. Spectroscopic techniques use the galaxy spectra and emission/absorption line features to measure the redshift] determinations of galaxies within clusters are accurate to better than delta_z = 0.05 [7] and when studied as a cluster population, the central galaxies form a line in color-magnitude space (called the the E/S0 ridgeline and visible in Figure 16.3) that contains galaxies with similar stellar populations [15]. The shape of this E/S0 ridgeline enables astronomers to measure the cluster redshift to within delta_z = 0.01 [23]. The most accurate cluster redshift determinations come from spectroscopy of the member galaxies, where only a fraction of the members need to be spectroscopically observed [25,42] to get an accurate redshift to the whole system. If light traces mass in the Universe, then the locations

  14. Star clusters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Labhardt, Lukas; Binggeli, Bruno

    Star clusters are at the heart of astronomy, being key objects for our understanding of stellar evolution and galactic structure. Observations with the Hubble Space Telescope and other modern equipment have revealed fascinating new facts about these galactic building blocks. This book provides two comprehensive and up-to-date, pedagogically designed reviews on star clusters by two well-known experts in the field. Bruce Carney presents our current knowledge of the relative and absolute ages of globular clusters and the chemical history of our Galaxy. Bill Harris addresses globular clusters in external galaxies and their use as tracers of galaxy formation and cosmic distance indicators. The book is written for graduate students as well as professionals in astronomy and astrophysics.

  15. Occupational Clusters.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pottawattamie County School System, Council Bluffs, IA.

    The 15 occupational clusters (transportation, fine arts and humanities, communications and media, personal service occupations, construction, hospitality and recreation, health occupations, marine science occupations, consumer and homemaking-related occupations, agribusiness and natural resources, environment, public service, business and office…

  16. Cluster generator

    DOEpatents

    Donchev, Todor I.; Petrov, Ivan G.

    2011-05-31

    Described herein is an apparatus and a method for producing atom clusters based on a gas discharge within a hollow cathode. The hollow cathode includes one or more walls. The one or more walls define a sputtering chamber within the hollow cathode and include a material to be sputtered. A hollow anode is positioned at an end of the sputtering chamber, and atom clusters are formed when a gas discharge is generated between the hollow anode and the hollow cathode.

  17. Practical Person-Fit Assessment with the Linear FA Model: New Developments and a Comparative Study.

    PubMed

    Ferrando, Pere J; Vigil-Colet, Andreu; Lorenzo-Seva, Urbano

    2016-01-01

    Linear factor analysis (FA) is, possibly, the most widely used model in psychometric applications based on graded-response or more continuous items. However, in these applications consistency at the individual level (person fit) is virtually never assessed. The aim of the present study is to propose a simple and workable approach to routinely assess person fit in FA-based studies. To do so, we first consider five potentially appropriate indices, of which one is a new proposal and the other is a modification of an existing index. Next, the effectiveness of these indices is assessed by using (a) a thorough simulation study that attempts to mimic realistic conditions, and (b) an illustrative example based on real data. Results suggest that the mean-squared lico index and the personal correlation work well in conjunction and can function effectively for detecting different types of inconsistency. Finally future directions and lines of research are discussed.

  18. Practical Person-Fit Assessment with the Linear FA Model: New Developments and a Comparative Study

    PubMed Central

    Ferrando, Pere J.; Vigil-Colet, Andreu; Lorenzo-Seva, Urbano

    2016-01-01

    Linear factor analysis (FA) is, possibly, the most widely used model in psychometric applications based on graded-response or more continuous items. However, in these applications consistency at the individual level (person fit) is virtually never assessed. The aim of the present study is to propose a simple and workable approach to routinely assess person fit in FA-based studies. To do so, we first consider five potentially appropriate indices, of which one is a new proposal and the other is a modification of an existing index. Next, the effectiveness of these indices is assessed by using (a) a thorough simulation study that attempts to mimic realistic conditions, and (b) an illustrative example based on real data. Results suggest that the mean-squared lico index and the personal correlation work well in conjunction and can function effectively for detecting different types of inconsistency. Finally future directions and lines of research are discussed. PMID:28082929

  19. Speaker Clustering for a Mixture of Singing and Reading (Preprint)

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2012-03-01

    References [1] J. Makhoul, F. Kubala, T. Leek, D. Liu, L. Nguyen, R. Schwartz, and A. Srivastava, “Speech and language technologies for audio indexing ...DATES COVERED (From - To) 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE SPEAKER CLUSTERING FOR A MIXTURE OF SINGING AND READING (PREPRINT) 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER FA8750-09...based on reading and singing speech samples for each speaker. As a speaking style, singing introduces changes in the time-frequency structure of a

  20. Preference for User Experience on the Part of Army FA 97 Contracting Officers

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1993-12-01

    contracting personel in an attempt to determine whether there should be more FA 97 positions coded to require branch, or branch-type, specific officers, as...where the AAC population would be drawn. Second, they had to devise a plan for employing the population within the AAC. In essence, PERSCOM had to...the cognizant Contracting Officer? 3. What was the rationale behind the development of the basic branch coding in the current fielding plan of the

  1. Exterior building details of Building A; west façade: white painted ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Exterior building details of Building A; west façade: white painted brick wall of road and second level, road level: paired four-light casement window and a small single-light wood casement window; second level: four-over-four wood double-hung window and a six-light horizontal pivot over a three-light fixed window; easterly view - San Quentin State Prison, Building 22, Point San Quentin, San Quentin, Marin County, CA

  2. Zebrafish Cacna1fa is required for cone photoreceptor function and synaptic ribbon formation

    PubMed Central

    Jia, Sujuan; Muto, Akira; Orisme, Wilda; Henson, Hannah E.; Parupalli, Chaithanyarani; Ju, Bensheng; Baier, Herwig; Taylor, Michael R.

    2014-01-01

    Mutations in the human CACNA1F gene cause incomplete congenital stationary night blindness type 2 (CSNB2), a non-progressive, clinically heterogeneous retinal disorder. However, the molecular mechanisms underlying CSNB2 have not been fully explored. Here, we describe the positional cloning of a blind zebrafish mutant, wait until dark (wud), which encodes a zebrafish homolog of human CACNA1F. We identified two zebrafish cacna1f paralogs and showed that the cacna1fa transcript (the gene mutated in wud) is expressed exclusively in the photoreceptor layer. We demonstrated that Cacna1fa localizes at the photoreceptor synapse and is absent from wud mutants. Electroretinograms revealed abnormal cone photoreceptor responses from wud mutants, indicating a defect in synaptic transmission. Although there are no obvious morphological differences, we found that wud mutants lacked synaptic ribbons and that wud is essential for the development of synaptic ribbons. We found that Ribeye, the most prominent synaptic ribbon protein, was less abundant and mislocalized in adult wud mutants. In addition to cloning wud, we identified synaptojanin 1 (synj1) as the defective gene in slacker (slak), a blind mutant with floating synaptic ribbons. We determined that Cacna1fa was expressed in slak photoreceptors and that Synj1 was initially expressed wud photoreceptors, but was absent by 5 days postfertilization. Collectively, our data demonstrate that Cacna1fa is essential for cone photoreceptor function and synaptic ribbon formation and reveal a previously unknown yet critical role of L-type voltage-dependent calcium channels in the expression and/or distribution of synaptic ribbon proteins, providing a new model to study the clinical variability in human CSNB2 patients. PMID:24419318

  3. Exterior building details of Building B, east façade: embedded wood ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Exterior building details of Building B, east façade: embedded wood beams and interrupted dentil course cornice resulting from the removal of the third floor tuberculosis ward, yard level paneled Dutch door, second level two a typical six-light wood casement windows over a single-panel wood door with four light exits to fire escape; westerly view - San Quentin State Prison, Building 22, Point San Quentin, San Quentin, Marin County, CA

  4. Design and Implementation of Digital Filters for Analysis of F/A-18 Flight Test Data

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1992-05-01

    International Follow On Structural Test Program ( IFOSTP ), and in 1989 a series of flight trials were performed at the Aerospace Engineering...effort between Canada and Australia to perform a full-scale structural fatigue test on the F/A- 18 Hornet aircraft is currently underway. This project is...1) STOP END 22 APPENDIX E A Fortran Program For Studying The Effects of FIR Bandpass Filtering on Pulse-Type Transients The following

  5. FaCSI: A block parallel preconditioner for fluid-structure interaction in hemodynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Deparis, Simone; Forti, Davide; Grandperrin, Gwenol; Quarteroni, Alfio

    2016-12-01

    Modeling Fluid-Structure Interaction (FSI) in the vascular system is mandatory to reliably compute mechanical indicators in vessels undergoing large deformations. In order to cope with the computational complexity of the coupled 3D FSI problem after discretizations in space and time, a parallel solution is often mandatory. In this paper we propose a new block parallel preconditioner for the coupled linearized FSI system obtained after space and time discretization. We name it FaCSI to indicate that it exploits the Factorized form of the linearized FSI matrix, the use of static Condensation to formally eliminate the interface degrees of freedom of the fluid equations, and the use of a SIMPLE preconditioner for saddle-point problems. FaCSI is built upon a block Gauss-Seidel factorization of the FSI Jacobian matrix and it uses ad-hoc preconditioners for each physical component of the coupled problem, namely the fluid, the structure and the geometry. In the fluid subproblem, after operating static condensation of the interface fluid variables, we use a SIMPLE preconditioner on the reduced fluid matrix. Moreover, to efficiently deal with a large number of processes, FaCSI exploits efficient single field preconditioners, e.g., based on domain decomposition or the multigrid method. We measure the parallel performances of FaCSI on a benchmark cylindrical geometry and on a problem of physiological interest, namely the blood flow through a patient-specific femoropopliteal bypass. We analyze the dependence of the number of linear solver iterations on the cores count (scalability of the preconditioner) and on the mesh size (optimality).

  6. Development and Characterization of a High Sensitivity Segmented Fast Neutron Spectrometer (FaNS-2)

    PubMed Central

    Langford, T.J.; Beise, E.J.; Breuer, H.; Heimbach, C.R.; Ji, G.; Nico, J.S.

    2016-01-01

    We present the development of a segmented fast neutron spectrometer (FaNS-2) based upon plastic scintillator and 3He proportional counters. It was designed to measure both the flux and spectrum of fast neutrons in the energy range of few MeV to 1 GeV. FaNS-2 utilizes capture-gated spectroscopy to identify neutron events and reject backgrounds. Neutrons deposit energy in the plastic scintillator before capturing on a 3He nucleus in the proportional counters. Segmentation improves neutron energy reconstruction while the large volume of scintillator increases sensitivity to low neutron fluxes. A main goal of its design is to study comparatively low neutron fluxes, such as cosmogenic neutrons at the Earth's surface, in an underground environment, or from low-activity neutron sources. In this paper, we present details of its design and construction as well as its characterization with a calibrated 252Cf source and monoenergetic neutron fields of 2.5 MeV and 14 MeV. Detected monoenergetic neutron spectra are unfolded using a Singular Value Decomposition method, demonstrating a 5% energy resolution at 14 MeV. Finally, we discuss plans for measuring the surface and underground cosmogenic neutron spectra with FaNS-2. PMID:27226807

  7. Wavelet Analyses of F/A-18 Aeroelastic and Aeroservoelastic Flight Test Data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brenner, Martin J.

    1997-01-01

    Time-frequency signal representations combined with subspace identification methods were used to analyze aeroelastic flight data from the F/A-18 Systems Research Aircraft (SRA) and aeroservoelastic data from the F/A-18 High Alpha Research Vehicle (HARV). The F/A-18 SRA data were produced from a wingtip excitation system that generated linear frequency chirps and logarithmic sweeps. HARV data were acquired from digital Schroeder-phased and sinc pulse excitation signals to actuator commands. Nondilated continuous Morlet wavelets implemented as a filter bank were chosen for the time-frequency analysis to eliminate phase distortion as it occurs with sliding window discrete Fourier transform techniques. Wavelet coefficients were filtered to reduce effects of noise and nonlinear distortions identically in all inputs and outputs. Cleaned reconstructed time domain signals were used to compute improved transfer functions. Time and frequency domain subspace identification methods were applied to enhanced reconstructed time domain data and improved transfer functions, respectively. Time domain subspace performed poorly, even with the enhanced data, compared with frequency domain techniques. A frequency domain subspace method is shown to produce better results with the data processed using the Morlet time-frequency technique.

  8. Aeroservoelastic Modeling and Validation of a Thrust-Vectoring F/A-18 Aircraft

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brenner, Martin J.

    1996-01-01

    An F/A-18 aircraft was modified to perform flight research at high angles of attack (AOA) using thrust vectoring and advanced control law concepts for agility and performance enhancement and to provide a testbed for the computational fluid dynamics community. Aeroservoelastic (ASE) characteristics had changed considerably from the baseline F/A-18 aircraft because of structural and flight control system amendments, so analyses and flight tests were performed to verify structural stability at high AOA. Detailed actuator models that consider the physical, electrical, and mechanical elements of actuation and its installation on the airframe were employed in the analysis to accurately model the coupled dynamics of the airframe, actuators, and control surfaces. This report describes the ASE modeling procedure, ground test validation, flight test clearance, and test data analysis for the reconfigured F/A-18 aircraft. Multivariable ASE stability margins are calculated from flight data and compared to analytical margins. Because this thrust-vectoring configuration uses exhaust vanes to vector the thrust, the modeling issues are nearly identical for modem multi-axis nozzle configurations. This report correlates analysis results with flight test data and makes observations concerning the application of the linear predictions to thrust-vectoring and high-AOA flight.

  9. Development and characterization of a high sensitivity segmented Fast Neutron Spectrometer (FaNS-2)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Langford, T. J.; Beise, E. J.; Breuer, H.; Heimbach, C. R.; Ji, G.; Nico, J. S.

    2016-01-01

    We present the development of a segmented fast neutron spectrometer (FaNS-2) based upon plastic scintillator and 3He proportional counters. It was designed to measure both the flux and spectrum of fast neutrons in the energy range of few MeV to 1 GeV. FaNS-2 utilizes capture-gated spectroscopy to identify neutron events and reject backgrounds. Neutrons deposit energy in the plastic scintillator before capturing on a 3He nucleus in the proportional counters. Segmentation improves neutron energy reconstruction while the large volume of scintillator increases sensitivity to low neutron fluxes. A main goal of its design is to study comparatively low neutron fluxes, such as cosmogenic neutrons at the Earth's surface, in an underground environment, or from low-activity neutron sources. In this paper, we present details of its design and construction as well as its characterization with a calibrated 252Cf source and monoenergetic neutron fields of 2.5 MeV and 14 MeV. Detected monoenergetic neutron spectra are unfolded using a Singular Value Decomposition method, demonstrating a 5% energy resolution at 14 MeV. Finally, we discuss plans for measuring the surface and underground cosmogenic neutron spectra with FaNS-2.

  10. Differential Protection of Cry1Fa Toxin against Spodoptera frugiperda Larval Gut Proteases by Cadherin Orthologs Correlates with Increased Synergism

    PubMed Central

    Rahman, Khalidur; Abdullah, Mohd Amir F.; Ambati, Suresh; Taylor, Milton D.

    2012-01-01

    The Cry proteins produced by Bacillus thuringiensis (Bt) are the most widely used biopesticides effective against a range of crop pests and disease vectors. Like chemical pesticides, development of resistance is the primary threat to the long-term efficacy of Bt toxins. Recently discovered cadherin-based Bt Cry synergists showed the potential to augment resistance management by improving efficacy of Cry toxins. However, the mode of action of Bt Cry synergists is thus far unclear. Here we elucidate the mechanism of cadherin-based Cry toxin synergism utilizing two cadherin peptides, Spodoptera frugiperda Cad (SfCad) and Manduca sexta Cad (MsCad), which differentially enhance Cry1Fa toxicity to Spodoptera frugiperda neonates. We show that differential SfCad- and MsCad-mediated protection of Cry1Fa toxin in the Spodoptera frugiperda midgut correlates with differential Cry1Fa toxicity enhancement. Both peptides exhibited high affinity for Cry1Fa toxin and an increased rate of Cry1Fa-induced pore formation in S. frugiperda. However, only SfCad bound the S. frugiperda brush border membrane vesicle and more effectively prolonged the stability of Cry1Fa toxin in the gut, explaining higher Cry1Fa enhancement by this peptide. This study shows that cadherin fragments may enhance B. thuringiensis toxicity by at least two different mechanisms or a combination thereof: (i) protection of Cry toxin from protease degradation in the insect midgut and (ii) enhancement of pore-forming ability of Cry toxin. PMID:22081566

  11. Evaluation of Carbohydrate-Derived Fulvic Acid (CHD-FA) as a Topical Broad-Spectrum Antimicrobial for Drug-Resistant Wound Infections

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2014-10-01

    molecular mechanisms during wound healing with CHD-FA. Figure 5. Wound images of rats infected with A. baumannii (ATCC BAA-747) and treated with CHD-FA...host gene expression profiling to better assess the cellular and molecular mechanisms during wound healing with CHD-FA. 13 Figure 6. Wound...expression profiling will be performed to better assess the cellular and molecular mechanisms during wound healing with CHD-FA. 20 Figure 5

  12. Classification of Air Force Jobs into Aptitude Clusters

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1988-09-01

    icat org Specialist. Nuirt. lable CxCi- [A~td f urom A ppcndix A. l--l 4. Raw-Score Regression Weights ror Six Clusters Cluster GS AR WK PC No (’S AS MK...FA!IRI( ’Al ION AND) IARA ( 󈧏)111 SI’E;( IA! IS!I 1)1 Ml (’II 42734 124 I; MI ’?AIS I’Ro( )(I ’SSIN( i SPI T(IAITINI 1II0 MI:(’I 1 42735 12319 1 A I

  13. A modified F/A-18 in a distinctive red, white and blue paint scheme was showcased during formal roll

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2002-01-01

    A modified F/A-18 in a distinctive red, white and blue paint scheme was showcased during formal rollout ceremonies for the Active Aeroelastic Wing flight research program at NASA's Dryden Flight Research Center on March 27, 2002.

  14. Purification and Characterization of Botulinum Neurotoxin FA from a Genetically Modified Clostridium botulinum Strain

    PubMed Central

    Pellett, Sabine; Tepp, William H.; Bradshaw, Marite; Kalb, Suzanne R.; Dykes, Janet K.; Lin, Guangyun; Nawrocki, Erin M.; Pier, Christina L.; Barr, John R.; Maslanka, Susan E.

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Botulinum neurotoxins (BoNTs), produced by neurotoxigenic clostridial species, are the cause of the severe disease botulism in humans and animals. Early research on BoNTs has led to their classification into seven serotypes (serotypes A to G) based upon the selective neutralization of their toxicity in mice by homologous antibodies. Recently, a report of a potential eighth serotype of BoNT, designated “type H,” has been controversial. This novel BoNT was produced together with BoNT/B2 in a dual-toxin-producing Clostridium botulinum strain. The data used to designate this novel toxin as a new serotype were derived from culture supernatant containing both BoNT/B2 and novel toxin and from sequence information, although data from two independent laboratories indicated neutralization by antibodies raised against BoNT/A1, and classification as BoNT/FA was proposed. The sequence data indicate a chimeric structure consisting of a BoNT/A1 receptor binding domain, a BoNT/F5 light-chain domain, and a novel translocation domain most closely related to BoNT/F1. Here, we describe characterization of this toxin purified from the native strain in which expression of the second BoNT (BoNT/B) has been eliminated. Mass spectrometry analysis indicated that the toxin preparation contained only BoNT/FA and confirmed catalytic activity analogous to that of BoNT/F5. The in vivo mouse bioassay indicated a specific activity of this toxin of 3.8 × 107 mouse 50% lethal dose (mLD50) units/mg, whereas activity in cultured human neurons was very high (50% effective concentration [EC50] = 0.02 mLD50/well). Neutralization assays in cells and mice both indicated full neutralization by various antibodies raised against BoNT/A1, although at 16- to 20-fold-lower efficiency than for BoNT/A1. IMPORTANCE Botulinum neurotoxins (BoNTs), produced by anaerobic bacteria, are the cause of the potentially deadly, neuroparalytic disease botulism. BoNTs have been classified into seven serotypes

  15. Monoubiquitination-dependent chromatin loading of FancD2 in silkworms, a species lacking the FA core complex.

    PubMed

    Sugahara, Ryohei; Mon, Hiroaki; Lee, Jae Man; Kusakabe, Takahiro

    2012-06-15

    The Fanconi anemia (FA) pathway is required for activation and operation of the DNA interstrand cross-link (ICL) repair pathway, although the precise mechanism of the FA pathway remains largely unknown. A critical step in the FA pathway is the monoubiquitination of FANCD2 catalyzed by a FA core complex. This modification appears to allow FANCD2 to coordinate ICL repair with other DNA repair proteins on chromatin. Silkworm, Bombyx mori, lacks apparent homologues of the FA core complex. However, BmFancD2 and BmFancI, the putative substrates of the complex, and BmFancL, the putative catalytic E3 ubiquitin ligase, are conserved. Here, we report that the silkworm FancD2 is monoubiquitinated depending on FancI and FancL, and stabilized on chromatin, following MMC treatment. A substitution of BmFancD2 at lysine 519 to arginine abolishes the monoubiquitination, but not the interaction between the FancD2 and FancI. In addition, we demonstrated that depletion of BmFancD2, BmFancI or BmFancL had effects on cell proliferation in the presence of MMC. These results suggest that the FA pathway in B. mori works in the same manner as that in vertebrates.

  16. Birth order and recalled childhood gender nonconformity in Samoan men and fa'afafine.

    PubMed

    Semenyna, Scott W; VanderLaan, Doug P; Vasey, Paul L

    2017-04-01

    Having a greater than average number of older biological brothers is a robust correlate of male androphilia (i.e., sexual attraction and arousal to adult males). Previous investigations have sought to understand whether this fraternal birth order (FBO) effect is also systematically related to recalled indicators of childhood gender nonconformity (CGN). However, these investigations have relied on data from low-fertility Western populations in which expressions of femininity in male children are routinely stigmatized and consequently, suppressed. The present study examined the FBO effect (among other sibship characteristics) and recalled indicators of CGN in Samoa, a high-fertility population, whose members are relatively tolerant of male femininity. Indeed, Samoans identify feminine androphilic males as belonging to an alternative gender category, known locally as fa'afafine. The present study compared the sibship characteristics of 231 fa'afafine and 231 opposite-sex attracted men from Samoa, as well as how these characteristics related to recalled CGN. Results replicated the well-established FBO effect for predicting male sexual orientation, with each older brother increasing the odds of being androphilic by 21%. However, no relationship was found between the number of older brothers (or other siblings) a participant had and their recalled CGN. Although fa'afafine reported significantly more CGN than Samoan men, CGN did not mediate the FBO effect, nor did the FBO effect and CGN interact to predict male sexual orientation. These findings are consistent with previous studies suggesting that the FBO effect is associated with male sexual orientation, but not childhood female-typical gender expression among androphilic males.

  17. Water tunnel flow visualisation of vortex breakdown over the F/A-18

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thompson, D. H.

    1990-12-01

    Vortex flow patterns over models of the F/A-18 aircraft were visualized using dye and hydrogen bubble techniques in a water tunnel. The axial position of vortex breakdown in the leading-edge extension (LEX) vortices was measured, and was found to be insensitive to Reynolds number, to flap setting, and to small variations in model cross-section shape. Engine inlet flow did alter the vortex breakdown position, at flow rates that might be encountered under flight conditions. The fitting of fences on the LEX upper surface did not affect the axial position of vortex breakdown, but did alter the vortex structure. These alterations were examined in some detail.

  18. Bridging the Gap: Extending the Life of Marine Corps F/A-18 Hornets

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2011-04-28

    probation and moved the F-358 to the third priority behind the F-35A and F-35C. Due to the original expected IOC of the F-35B, an alternate aircraft...year probation with the threat of program cancellation if testing problems are not rectified and was moved from the first priority to the third...interest as a parallel of the F/A-18, the Air Force is proceeding with an F-16Service Life Extension Program that is directly linked to the continuing

  19. Cluster bulleticity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Massey, Richard; Kitching, Thomas; Nagai, Daisuke

    2011-05-01

    The unique properties of dark matter are revealed during collisions between clusters of galaxies, such as the bullet cluster (1E 0657-56) and baby bullet (MACS J0025-12). These systems provide evidence for an additional, invisible mass in the separation between the distributions of their total mass, measured via gravitational lensing, and their ordinary 'baryonic' matter, measured via its X-ray emission. Unfortunately, the information available from these systems is limited by their rarity. Constraints on the properties of dark matter, such as its interaction cross-section, are therefore restricted by uncertainties in the individual systems' impact velocity, impact parameter and orientation with respect to the line of sight. Here we develop a complementary, statistical measurement in which every piece of substructure falling into every massive cluster is treated as a bullet. We define 'bulleticity' as the mean separation between dark matter and ordinary matter, and we measure the signal in hydrodynamical simulations. The phase space of substructure orbits also exhibits symmetries that provide an equivalent control test. Any detection of bulleticity in real data would indicate a difference in the interaction cross-sections of baryonic and dark matter that may rule out hypotheses of non-particulate dark matter that are otherwise able to model individual systems. A subsequent measurement of bulleticity could constrain the dark matter cross-section. Even with conservative estimates, the existing Hubble Space Telescope archive should yield an independent constraint tighter than that from the bullet cluster. This technique is then trivially extendable to and benefits enormously from larger, future surveys.

  20. Yamadazyma kitorensis f.a., sp. nov. and Zygoascus biomembranicola f.a., sp. nov., novel yeasts from the stone chamber interior of the Kitora tumulus, and five novel combinations in Yamadazyma and Zygoascus for species of Candida.

    PubMed

    Nagatsuka, Yuka; Ninomiya, Shinya; Kiyuna, Tomohiko; Kigawa, Rika; Sano, Chie; Sugiyama, Junta

    2016-04-01

    Analysis of D1/D2 large-subunit (LSU) rRNA gene sequences predicted that 17 yeast isolates, mainly from viscous gels (biofilms) taken from the stone chamber interior of the Kitora tumulus in Nara, Japan, were placed in the Yamadazyma and Zygoascus clades. Polyphasic characterization, including morphological, physiological and chemotaxonomic characteristics, multigene sequence divergence and DNA-DNA hybridization, strongly suggested the assignment of one novel species to each of the clades; these are Yamadazyma kitorensis f.a., sp. nov., with the type strain JCM 31005T (ex-type CBS 14158T=isolate K8617-6-8T), and Zygoascus biomembranicola f.a., sp. nov., with the type strain JCM 31007T (ex-type CBS 14157T=isolate K61208-2-11T). Furthermore, the transfer of five known species of the genus Candida as novel combinations to the genera Yamadazyma and Zygoascus is proposed; these are Yamadazyma olivae f.a., comb. nov. (type strain CBS 11171T=ATCC MYA-4568T), Yamadazyma tumulicola f.a., comb. nov. (type strain JCM 15403T=ex-type CBS 10917T=isolate T6517-9-5T), Yamadazyma takamatsuzukensis f.a., comb. nov. (type strain JCM 15410T=CBS 10916T = isolate T4922-1-1T), Zygoascus polysorbophila f.a., comb. nov. (type strain NRRL Y-27161T=CBS 7317T) and Zygoascus bituminiphila f.a., comb. nov. (type strain CBS 8813T=MUCL 41424T).

  1. Stability analysis of an F/A-18 E/F cable mount m odel

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Thompson, Nancy; Farmer, Moses

    1994-01-01

    A full-span F/A-18 E/F cable mounted wind tunnel model is part of a flutter clearance program at the NASA Langley Transonic Dynamics Tunnel. Parametric analysis of this model using GRUMCBL software was conducted to assess stability for wind tunnel tests. Two configurations of the F/A-18 E/F were examined. The parameters examined were pulley-cable friction, mach number, dynamic pressure, cable geometry, center of gravity location, cable tension, snubbing the model, drag, and test medium. For the nominal cable geometry (Cable Geometry 1), Configuration One was unstable for cases with higher pulley-cable friction coefficients. A new cable geometry (Cable Geometry 3) was determined in which Configuration One was stable for all cases evaluated. Configuration Two with the nominal center of gravity position was found to be unstable for cases with higher pulley-cable friction coefficients; however, the model was stable when the center of gravity moved forward 1/2. The model was tested using the cable mount system during the initial wind tunnel entry and was stable as predicted.

  2. F/A-18 Performance Benefits Measured During the Autonomous Formation Flight Project

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vachon, M. Jake; Ray, Ronald J.; Walsh, Kevin R.; Ennix, Kimberly

    2003-01-01

    The Autonomous Formation Flight (AFF) project at the NASA Dryden Flight Research Center (Edwards, California) investigated performance benefits resulting from formation flight, such as reduced aerodynamic drag and fuel consumption. To obtain data on performance benefits, a trailing F/A-18 airplane flew within the wing tip-shed vortex of a leading F/A-18 airplane. The pilot of the trail airplane used advanced station-keeping technology to aid in positioning the trail airplane at precise locations behind the lead airplane. The specially instrumented trail airplane was able to obtain accurate fuel flow measurements and to calculate engine thrust and vehicle drag. A maneuver technique developed for this test provided a direct comparison of performance values while flying in and out of the vortex. Based on performance within the vortex as a function of changes in vertical, lateral, and longitudinal positioning, these tests explored design-drivers for autonomous stationkeeping control systems. Observations showed significant performance improvements over a large range of trail positions tested. Calculations revealed maximum drag reductions of over 20 percent, and demonstrated maximum reductions in fuel flow of just over 18 percent.

  3. Overview of HATP Experimental Aerodynamics Data for the Baseline F/A-18 Configuration

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hall, Robert M.; Murri, Daniel G.; Erickson, Gary E.; Fisher, David F.; Banks, Daniel W.; Lanser, Wendy, R.

    1996-01-01

    Determining the baseline aerodynamics of the F/A-18 was one of the major objectives of the High-Angle-of-Attack Technology Program (HATP). This paper will review the key data bases that have contributed to our knowledge of the baseline aerodynamics and the improvements in test techniques that have resulted from the experimental program. Photographs are given highlighting the forebody and leading-edge-extension (LEX) vortices. Other data representing the impact of Mach and Reynolds numbers on the forebody and LEX vortices will also be detailed. The level of agreement between different tunnels and between tunnels and flight will be illustrated using pressures, forces, and moments measured on a 0.06-scale model tested in the Langley 7- by 10-Foot High Speed Tunnel, a 0.16-scale model in the Langley 30- by 60-Foot Tunnel, a full-scale vehicle in the Ames 80- by 120-Foot Wind Tunnel, and the flight F/A-18 High Alpha Research Vehicle (HARV). Next, creative use of wind tunnel resources that accelerated the validation of the computational fluid dynamics (CFD) codes will be described. Lastly, lessons learned, deliverables, and program conclusions are presented.

  4. Aerostructural Vortical Flow Interactions with Applications to F/A-18 and F-117 Tail Buffet

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kandil, Osama A.; Massey, Steven J.; Sheta, Essam F.

    1996-01-01

    The buffet response of the flexible twin-tail configuration of the F/A-18 and a generic F-111 aircraft are computationally simulated and experimentally validated. The problem is a multidisciplinary one which requires the sequential solution of three sets of equations on a multi-block grid structure. The first set is the unsteady, compressible, full Navier-Stokes equations. The second set is the aeroelastic equations for bending and torsional twin-tail responses. The third set is the grid-displacement equations which are used to update the grid coordinates due to the tail deflections. The computational models consist of a 76 deg. swept back, sharp edged delta wing of aspect ratio of one and a swept-back F/A-18 or F-117 twin-tail. The configuration is pitched at 30 deg. angle-of-attack. The problem is solved for the initial flow conditions with the twin tails kept rigid. Next, the aeroelastic equations of the tails are turned on along with the grid-displacement equations to solve for the bending and torsional tails responses due to the unsteady loads produced by the vortex breakdown flow of the leading-edge vortex cores of the delta wing. Several spanwise locations of the twin tails are investigated. The computational results are validated using several existing experimental data.

  5. Noise cancellation for CELP voice encoders in an F/A-18 noise environment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Heide, David A.

    1994-03-01

    Because of the severe noise environment in the Navy's F/A-18 jet aircraft, it has always been very difficult to achieve highly intelligible speech using low data rate voice encoders such as the 2.4 kbps LPC-10. As a result, all voice encoding has been done with a high data rate 16.0 kbps CVSD algorithm. The main focus of this research was to develop a technique that could retain the acceptable intelligibility of the high rate encoders while still significantly lowering the data rate required. To achieve these results, a noise cancellation preprocessor was developed to be used in tandem with the new 4.8 kbps CELP encoder that is being implemented in the STU-3. While many noise reduction techniques were investigated, the best results were accomplished by first reducing the noise through spectral subtraction and then enhancing the important resonant formants of the speech. The results indicated that when the noise cancellation preprocessor was added to the CELP encoder, the DRT intelligibility scores were improved by a significant 5.0 points, making the speech much more acceptable for possible use in the F/A-18.

  6. F/A-18 forebody vortex control. Volume 1: Static tests

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kramer, Brian R.; Suarez, Carlos J.; Malcolm, Gerald N.; Ayers, Bert F.

    1994-01-01

    A wind tunnel test was conducted on a six percent model of the F/A-18 at the NASA Ames 7 X 10-Foot Low Speed Wind Tunnel. The primary objective of the test was to evaluate several forebody vortex control configurations at high angles of attack in order to determine the most effective method of obtaining well behaved yawing moments, in preparation for the rotary balance test. Both mechanical and pneumatic systems were tested. Single and dual rotating nose tip strakes and a vertical nose strake were tested at different sizes and deflections. A series of jet blowing configurations were located at various fuselage stations, azimuth angles, and pointing angles ranging from straight aft to 60 deg canted inboard. Slot blowing was investigated for several slot lengths and fuselage stations. The effect of blowing rate was tested for both of these pneumatic systems. The most effective configurations were then further tested with a variation of both sideslip angle and Reynolds number over a range of angles of attack from 0 to 60 deg. It was found that a very robust system can be developed that provides yawing moments at angles of attack up to 60 deg that significantly exceeds that available from 30 deg of rudder deflection (F/A-18 maximum) at 0 deg angle of attack.

  7. Positional distribution of FA in TAG of enzymatically modified borage and evening primrose oils.

    PubMed

    Senanayake, S P J Namal; Shahidi, Fereidoon

    2002-08-01

    Stereospecific analysis was carried out to establish positional distribution of FA in the TAG of DHA, EPA, and (EPA + DHA)-enriched oils. In this study, TAG of enzymatically modified oils were purified using a silicic acid column. The TAG were then subjected to positional distribution analysis using a modified procedure involving reductive cleavage with Grignard reagent. The results showed that in DHA-enriched borage oil (BO), DHA was randomly distributed over the three positions of TAG, whereas gamma-linolenic acid (GLA) was mainly esterified at the sn-2 and -3 positions. In DHA-enriched evening primrose oil (EPO), however, DHA and GLA were concentrated in the sn-2 position. In EPA-enriched BO, EPA was randomly distributed over the three positions of TAG, similar to that observed for DHA. In EPA-enriched EPO, however, this FA was mainly located at the primary positions (sn-1 and sn-3) of TAG. In both oils, GLA was preferentially esterified at the sn-2 position. In (EPA + DHA)-enriched BO, EPA and DHA were mainly esterified at the sn-1 and -3 positions of TAG, whereas GLA was mainly located at the sn-2 position. In (EPA + DHA)-enriched EPO, GLA was mainly located at the sn-2 and -3 positions; EPA was preferentially esterified at the sn-1 and -3 positions, and DHA was found mainly at the sn-3 position.

  8. F/A-18D (RC)/ATARS flight test update

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    White, P. S.; Gallo, Lori A. M.; Borland, Robert; De Groh, William B.; Minor, John L.

    1995-09-01

    In June 1994, the U.S. Navy and U.S. Marine Corps restructured the F/A-18D (RC) ATARS program. McDonnell Douglas Aerospace was selected as the prime contractor responsible for overall program management and integration of the ATARS with the F/A-18D (RC) weapon system. Loral Fairchild Systems (LFS) was selected as the subcontractor responsible for ATARS subsystem development and integration. The first part of the restructured program was called Element One and was a ten month risk reduction program ending in April 1995. The primary objective of Element One was to resolve the critical ATARS anomalies found during previous flight testing. In order to resolve these anomalies, MDA and LFS concurred that additional flight test data was required. In November/December 1994, eight flights were flown with a high fidelity instrumentation system to gather the additional data required for evaluation of the anomalies. Using this data, along with previously collected data, design 'fixes' were implemented to correct several of the system anomalies. In April 1995 and May 1995, approximately four flight tests were conducted to evaluate the performance of these design 'fixes.' A period of two months for flight tests was planned for July-August 1995 to complete this evaluation. This presentation describes the testing and results through May 1995 of the Element One flight test program.

  9. Ultrathin Fluidic Laminates for Large-Area Façade Integration and Smart Windows.

    PubMed

    Heiz, Benjamin P V; Pan, Zhiwen; Lautenschläger, Gerhard; Sirtl, Christin; Kraus, Matthias; Wondraczek, Lothar

    2017-03-01

    Buildings represent more than 40% of Europe's energy demands and about one third of its CO2 emissions. Energy efficient buildings and, in particular, building skins have therefore been among the key priorities of international research agendas. Here, glass-glass fluidic devices are presented for large-area integration with adaptive façades and smart windows. These devices enable harnessing and dedicated control of various liquids for added functionality in the building envelope. Combining a microstructured glass pane, a thin cover sheet with tailored mechanical performance, and a liquid for heat storage and transport, a flat-panel laminate is generated with thickness adapted to a single glass sheet in conventional windows. Such multimaterial devices can be integrated with state-of-the-art window glazings or façades to harvest and distribute thermal as well as solar energy by wrapping buildings into a fluidic layer. High visual transparency is achieved through adjusting the optical properties of the employed liquid. Also secondary functionality, such as chromatic windows, polychromatism, or adaptive energy uptake can be generated on part of the liquid.

  10. Ultrathin Fluidic Laminates for Large‐Area Façade Integration and Smart Windows

    PubMed Central

    Heiz, Benjamin P. V.; Pan, Zhiwen; Lautenschläger, Gerhard; Sirtl, Christin; Kraus, Matthias

    2016-01-01

    Buildings represent more than 40% of Europe's energy demands and about one third of its CO2 emissions. Energy efficient buildings and, in particular, building skins have therefore been among the key priorities of international research agendas. Here, glass–glass fluidic devices are presented for large‐area integration with adaptive façades and smart windows. These devices enable harnessing and dedicated control of various liquids for added functionality in the building envelope. Combining a microstructured glass pane, a thin cover sheet with tailored mechanical performance, and a liquid for heat storage and transport, a flat‐panel laminate is generated with thickness adapted to a single glass sheet in conventional windows. Such multimaterial devices can be integrated with state‐of‐the‐art window glazings or façades to harvest and distribute thermal as well as solar energy by wrapping buildings into a fluidic layer. High visual transparency is achieved through adjusting the optical properties of the employed liquid. Also secondary functionality, such as chromatic windows, polychromatism, or adaptive energy uptake can be generated on part of the liquid. PMID:28331790

  11. Offspring Production among the Extended Relatives of Samoan Men and Fa'afafine

    PubMed Central

    VanderLaan, Doug P.; Forrester, Deanna L.; Petterson, Lanna J.; Vasey, Paul L.

    2012-01-01

    Androphilia refers to sexual attraction to adult males, whereas gynephilia refers to sexual attraction to adult females. Male androphilia is an evolutionary paradox. Its development is at least partially influenced by genetic factors, yet male androphiles exhibit lower reproductive output, thus raising the question of how genetic factors underlying its development persist. The sexual antagonism hypothesis posits that the fitness costs associated with genetic factors underlying male androphilia are offset because these same factors lead to elevated reproduction on the part of the female relatives of androphilic males. Western samples drawn from low fertility populations have yielded inconsistent results when testing this hypothesis. Some studies documented elevated reproduction among the matrilineal female kin of androphilic males, whereas others found such effects in the paternal line. Samoa is a high-fertility population in which individuals reproduce closer to their maximum capacities. This study compared the reproductive output of the paternal and maternal line grandmothers, aunts, and uncles of 86 Samoan androphilic males, known locally as fa'afafine, and 86 Samoan gynephilic males. Reproductive output was elevated in the paternal and maternal line grandmothers, but not aunts or uncles, of fa'afafine. These findings are consistent with the sexual antagonism hypothesis and suggest that male androphilia is associated with elevated reproduction among extended relatives in both the maternal and paternal line. Discussion focuses on how this study, in conjunction with the broader literature, informs various models for the evolution of male androphilia via elevated reproduction on the part of female kin. PMID:22558342

  12. Composting of food waste subjected to hydrothermal pretreatment and inoculated with Paecilomyces sp. FA13.

    PubMed

    Nakasaki, Kiyohiko; Mimoto, Hiroshi; Tran, Quyen Ngoc Minh; Oinuma, Akiko

    2015-03-01

    Food waste collected from restaurants, convenience stores, and food-processing factories was mixed with sawdust and subjected to hydrothermal pretreatment at 180°C for 30min to prepare compost raw material. Furan compounds such as 5-HMF (5-hydroxymethyl furfural) and furfural were produced at concentration levels of approximately 8 and 0.5mg/g-ds, respectively, through hydrothermal pretreatment. The furan compounds inhibited the activity of composting microorganisms, thus delaying the start of organic matter degradation during composting. A newly identified fungus, Paecilomyces sp. FA13, which possesses the ability to degrade furan compounds, was isolated and used as an inoculum for the composting of the raw material prepared by hydrothermal pretreatment. By inoculating the FA13 into the compost raw material at 10(5)CFU/g-ds, the degradation of furan compounds was accelerated. As a result, bacterial activity, which contributed to composting, was enhanced, significantly promoting the start of vigorous degradation of organic materials.

  13. Adaptive Augmenting Control Flight Characterization Experiment on an F/A-18

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    VanZwieten, Tannen S.; Orr, Jeb S.; Wall, John H.; Gilligan, Eric T.

    2014-01-01

    This paper summarizes the Adaptive Augmenting Control (AAC) flight characterization experiments performed using an F/A-18 (TN 853). AAC was designed and developed specifically for launch vehicles, and is currently part of the baseline autopilot design for NASA's Space Launch System (SLS). The scope covered here includes a brief overview of the algorithm (covered in more detail elsewhere), motivation and benefits of flight testing, top-level SLS flight test objectives, applicability of the F/A-18 as a platform for testing a launch vehicle control design, test cases designed to fully vet the AAC algorithm, flight test results, and conclusions regarding the functionality of AAC. The AAC algorithm developed at Marshall Space Flight Center is a forward loop gain multiplicative adaptive algorithm that modifies the total attitude control system gain in response to sensed model errors or undesirable parasitic mode resonances. The AAC algorithm provides the capability to improve or decrease performance by balancing attitude tracking with the mitigation of parasitic dynamics, such as control-structure interaction or servo-actuator limit cycles. In the case of the latter, if unmodeled or mismodeled parasitic dynamics are present that would otherwise result in a closed-loop instability or near instability, the adaptive controller decreases the total loop gain to reduce the interaction between these dynamics and the controller. This is in contrast to traditional adaptive control logic, which focuses on improving performance by increasing gain. The computationally simple AAC attitude control algorithm has stability properties that are reconcilable in the context of classical frequency-domain criteria (i.e., gain and phase margin). The algorithm assumes that the baseline attitude control design is well-tuned for a nominal trajectory and is designed to adapt only when necessary. Furthermore, the adaptation is attracted to the nominal design and adapts only on an as-needed basis

  14. Synergistic effect of chemo-photothermal for breast cancer therapy using folic acid (FA) modified zinc oxide nanosheet.

    PubMed

    Vimala, Karuppaiya; Shanthi, Krishnamurthy; Sundarraj, Shenbagamoorthy; Kannan, Soundarapandian

    2017-02-15

    Modern therapies for malignant breast cancer in clinics are not efficacious and often result in deprived patient compliance owing to squat therapeutic effectiveness and strong systemic side effects. In order to overcome this, we combined chemo-photothermal targeted therapy of breast cancer within one novel multifunctional drug delivery system. Folic Acid-functionalized polyethylene glycol coated Zinc Oxide nanosheet (FA-PEG-ZnO NS), was successfully synthesized, characterized and introduced to the drug delivery field for the first time. A doxorubicin (DOX)-loaded FA-PEG-ZnO NS based system (DOX-FA-PEG-ZnO NS) showed stimulative effect of heat, pH responsive and sustained drug release properties. Cytotoxicity experiments confirmed that combined therapy mediated the maximum rate of death in breast cancer cells compared to that of single chemotherapy or photothermal therapy. In vivo toxicity evaluation showed that the DOX-FA-PEG-ZnO NS contains minimum systemic toxicity in the mice model system. The findings of the present study provided an ideal drug delivery system for breast cancer therapy due to the advanced chemo-photothermal synergistic targeted therapy and good drug release properties of DOX-FA-PEG-ZnO NS, which could effectively avoid frequent and invasive dosing and improve patient compliance. Thus, functionalized-ZnO NS could be used as a novel nanomaterial for selective chemo-photothermal therapy.

  15. The Relationship between Adult Occupational Preferences and Childhood Gender Nonconformity among Samoan Women, Men, and Fa'afafine.

    PubMed

    Semenyna, Scott W; Vasey, Paul L

    2016-09-01

    Previous research has found that sex differences in occupational preferences are both substantial and cross-culturally universal. Androphilic males tend to display "gender-shifted" occupational preferences, with relatively female-typical interests. Past research has overwhelmingly relied on Western samples; this article offers new insights from a non-Western setting. Known locally as fa'afafine, androphilic males in Samoa occupy a third-gender category. Data were collected in Samoa from 103 men, 103 women, and 103 fa'afafine regarding occupational preferences and recalled childhood gender nonconformity (CGN). A substantial sex difference was observed in the occupational preferences of men and women (d = 2.04). Interestingly, women and fa'afafine did not differ in their preferences (p = 0.89), indicating a complete gender inversion of occupational preferences in the latter. Although there was no correlation between women's CGN and masculine occupational preferences, there was a significant correlation (r = -0.62) between these variables in both men and fa'afafine. Among males (both men and fa'afafine), increased CGN was associated with preference for feminine occupations. The present research corroborates past findings and furnishes support for the conclusion that female-typical occupational preferences are a cross-culturally invariant aspect of male androphilia.

  16. An enhanced functional ability questionnaire (faVIQ) to measure the impact of rehabilitation services on the visually impaired

    PubMed Central

    Wolffsohn, James Stuart; Jackson, Jonathan; Hunt, Olivia Anne; Cottriall, Charles; Lindsay, Jennifer; Gilmour, Richard; Sinclair, Anne; Harper, Robert

    2014-01-01

    AIM To develop a short, enhanced functional ability Quality of Vision (faVIQ) instrument based on previous questionnaires employing comprehensive modern statistical techniques to ensure the use of an appropriate response scale, items and scoring of the visual related difficulties experienced by patients with visual impairment. METHODS Items in current quality-of-life questionnaires for the visually impaired were refined by a multi-professional group and visually impaired focus groups. The resulting 76 items were completed by 293 visually impaired patients with stable vision on two occasions separated by a month. The faVIQ scores of 75 patients with no ocular pathology were compared to 75 age and gender matched patients with visual impairment. RESULTS Rasch analysis reduced the faVIQ items to 27. Correlation to standard visual metrics was moderate (r=0.32-0.46) and to the NEI-VFQ was 0.48. The faVIQ was able to clearly discriminate between age and gender matched populations with no ocular pathology and visual impairment with an index of 0.983 and 95% sensitivity and 95% specificity using a cut off of 29. CONCLUSION The faVIQ allows sensitive assessment of quality-of-life in the visually impaired and should support studies which evaluate the effectiveness of low vision rehabilitation services. PMID:24634868

  17. Field-Evolved Mode 1 Resistance of the Fall Armyworm to Transgenic Cry1Fa-Expressing Corn Associated with Reduced Cry1Fa Toxin Binding and Midgut Alkaline Phosphatase Expression

    PubMed Central

    Jakka, Siva R. K.; Gong, Liang; Hasler, James; Banerjee, Rahul; Sheets, Joel J.; Narva, Kenneth; Blanco, Carlos A.

    2015-01-01

    Insecticidal protein genes from the bacterium Bacillus thuringiensis (Bt) are expressed by transgenic Bt crops (Bt crops) for effective and environmentally safe pest control. The development of resistance to these insecticidal proteins is considered the most serious threat to the sustainability of Bt crops. Resistance in fall armyworm (Spodoptera frugiperda) populations from Puerto Rico to transgenic corn producing the Cry1Fa insecticidal protein resulted, for the first time in the United States, in practical resistance, and Bt corn was withdrawn from the local market. In this study, we used a field-collected Cry1Fa corn-resistant strain (456) of S. frugiperda to identify the mechanism responsible for field-evolved resistance. Binding assays detected reduced Cry1Fa, Cry1Ab, and Cry1Ac but not Cry1Ca toxin binding to midgut brush border membrane vesicles (BBMV) from the larvae of strain 456 compared to that from the larvae of a susceptible (Ben) strain. This binding phenotype is descriptive of the mode 1 type of resistance to Bt toxins. A comparison of the transcript levels for putative Cry1 toxin receptor genes identified a significant downregulation (>90%) of a membrane-bound alkaline phosphatase (ALP), which translated to reduced ALP protein levels and a 75% reduction in ALP activity in BBMV from 456 compared to that of Ben larvae. We cloned and heterologously expressed this ALP from susceptible S. frugiperda larvae and demonstrated that it specifically binds with Cry1Fa toxin. This study provides a thorough mechanistic description of field-evolved resistance to a transgenic Bt crop and supports an association between resistance and reduced Cry1Fa toxin binding and levels of a putative Cry1Fa toxin receptor, ALP, in the midguts of S. frugiperda larvae. PMID:26637593

  18. Poly(3-Hydroxybutyrate) Synthesis Genes in Azotobacter sp. Strain FA8

    PubMed Central

    Pettinari, M. Julia; Vázquez, Gustavo J.; Silberschmidt, Daniel; Rehm, Bernd; Steinbüchel, Alexander; Méndez, Beatriz S.

    2001-01-01

    Genes responsible for the synthesis of poly(3-hydroxybutyrate) (PHB) in Azotobacter sp. FA8 were cloned and analyzed. A PHB polymerase gene (phbC) was found downstream from genes coding for β-ketothiolase (phbA) and acetoacetyl-coenzyme A reductase (phbB). A PHB synthase mutant was obtained by gene inactivation and used for genetic studies. The phbC gene from this strain was introduced into Ralstonia eutropha PHB-4 (phbC-negative mutant), and the recombinant accumulated PHB when either glucose or octanoate was used as a source of carbon, indicating that this PHB synthase cannot incorporate medium-chain-length hydroxyalkanoates into PHB. PMID:11679365

  19. Aeroelastic modeling for the FIT (Functional Integration Technology) team F/A-18 simulation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zeiler, Thomas A.; Wieseman, Carol D.

    1989-01-01

    As part of Langley Research Center's commitment to developing multidisciplinary integration methods to improve aerospace systems, the Functional Integration Technology (FIT) team was established to perform dynamics integration research using an existing aircraft configuration, the F/A-18. An essential part of this effort has been the development of a comprehensive simulation modeling capability that includes structural, control, and propulsion dynamics as well as steady and unsteady aerodynamics. The structural and unsteady aerodynamics contributions come from an aeroelastic mode. Some details of the aeroelastic modeling done for the Functional Integration Technology (FIT) team research are presented. Particular attention is given to work done in the area of correction factors to unsteady aerodynamics data.

  20. Aeroelastic modeling for the FIT team F/A-18 simulation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zeiler, Thomas A.; Wieseman, Carol D.

    1989-01-01

    Some details of the aeroelastic modeling of the F/A-18 aircraft done for the Functional Integration Technology (FIT) team's research in integrated dynamics modeling and how these are combined with the FIT team's integrated dynamics model are described. Also described are mean axis corrections to elastic modes, the addition of nonlinear inertial coupling terms into the equations of motion, and the calculation of internal loads time histories using the integrated dynamics model in a batch simulation program. A video tape made of a loads time history animation was included as a part of the oral presentation. Also discussed is work done in one of the areas of unsteady aerodynamic modeling identified as needing improvement, specifically, in correction factor methodologies for improving the accuracy of stability derivatives calculated with a doublet lattice code.

  1. F/A-18 E/F flutter clearance model in the Langley TDT

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1994-01-01

    An 18 percent aeroelastically-scaled, full span F/A-18 E/F model was tested during multiple wind-tunnel entries in the Langley Transonic Dynamics Tunnel. The primary purpose of these entries was to assist in clearing the flight vehicle design of flutter within its operating envelope. The wind-tunnel model was tested on a string and on a cable-mount system (as shown). All lifting surfaces were flutter cleared up to M=1.2 with the model string mounted. The model was then flutter cleared on the cable-mount system to assess the influence of rigid-body dynamics and fuselage flexibility on flutter. Several configuration parametric studies were also completed, including many external store configurations.

  2. Recurrent idiopathic painless shoulder weakness in a Navy F/A-18 aviator.

    PubMed

    Walsh, John C; Irwin, Matthew S; Weiss, Zachary D

    2013-12-01

    Brachial plexopathies of various etiologies are commonly discussed in the literature; however, recurrent painless shoulder weakness is an uncommon event, especially in an otherwise healthy adult man. A designated Naval F/A-18 E/F aviator presented with acute right-sided, painless shoulder girdle weakness that initially presented 2 yr earlier in a similar fashion. Extensive medical workups during both episodes did not reveal any identifiable cause. This case report discusses the most common etiologies of shoulder weakness. Additionally, we discuss the aviator's most recent presentation and evaluation for acute shoulder weakness. Lastly, we propose a hypothesis as to the cause of the patient's symptoms based on a review of the literature.

  3. Navier-Stokes Solutions about the F/A-18 Forebody-LEX Configuration

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ghaffari, Farhad; Bates, Brent L.; Luckring, James M.; Thomas, James L.

    1989-01-01

    Three-dimensional viscous flow computations are presented for the F/A-18 forebody-LEX geometry. Solutions are obtained from an algorithm for the compressible Navier-Stokes equations which incorporates an upwind-biased, flux-difference-splitting approach along with longitudinally-patched grids. Results are presented for both laminar and fully turbulent flow assumptions and include correlations with wind tunnel as well as flight-test results. A good quantitative agreement for the forebody surface pressure distribution is achieved between the turbulent computations and wind tunnel measurements at Mach number of 0.6. The computed turbulent surface flow patterns on the forebody qualitatively agree well with in-flight surface flow patterns obtained on an F/A-fS aircraft at Mach number of 0.34.

  4. Worst-Case Flutter Margins from F/A-18 Aircraft Aeroelastic Data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lind, Rick; Brenner, Marty

    1997-01-01

    An approach for computing worst-case flutter margins has been formulated in a robust stability framework. Uncertainty operators are included with a linear model to describe modeling errors and flight variations. The structured singular value, micron, computes a stability margin which directly accounts for these uncertainties. This approach introduces a new method of computing flutter margins and an associated new parameter for describing these margins. The micron margins are robust margins which indicate worst-case stability estimates with respect to the defined uncertainty. Worst-case flutter margins are computed for the F/A-18 SRA using uncertainty sets generated by flight data analysis. The robust margins demonstrate flight conditions for flutter may lie closer to the flight envelope than previously estimated by p-k analysis.

  5. Control Law-Control Allocation Interaction: F/A-18 PA Simulation Test - Bed

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Durham, Wayne; Nelson, Mark

    2001-01-01

    This report documents the first stage of research into Control Law - Control Allocation Interactions. A three-year research effort was originally proposed: 1. Create a desktop flight simulation environment under which experiments related to the open questions may be conducted. 2. Conduct research to determine which aspects of control allocation have impact upon control law design that merits further research. 3. Conduct research into those aspects of control allocation identified above, and their impacts upon control law design. Simulation code was written utilizing the F/A-18 airframe in the power approach (PA) configuration. A dynamic inversion control law was implemented and used to drive a state-of-the-art control allocation subroutine.

  6. F/A-18 and F-16 forebody vortex control, static and rotary-balance results

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kramer, Brian; Smith, Brooke

    1994-01-01

    The results from research on forebody vortex control on both the F/A-18 and the F-16 aircraft will be shown. Several methods of forebody vortex control, including mechanical and pneumatic schemes, will be discussed. The wind tunnel data includes both static and rotary balance data for forebody vortex control. Time lags between activation or deactivation of the pneumatic control and when the aircraft experiences the resultant forces are also discussed. The static (non-rotating) forces and pressures are then compared to similar configurations tested in the NASA Langley and DTRC Wind Tunnel, the NASA Ames 80'x120' Wind Tunnel, and in flight on the High Angle of Attack Research Vehicle (HARV).

  7. Wing Torsional Stiffness Tests of the Active Aeroelastic Wing F/A-18 Airplane

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lokos, William A.; Olney, Candida D.; Crawford, Natalie D.; Stauf, Rick; Reichenbach, Eric Y.

    2002-01-01

    The left wing of the Active Aeroelastic Wing (AAW) F/A-18 airplane has been ground-load-tested to quantify its torsional stiffness. The test has been performed at the NASA Dryden Flight Research Center in November 1996, and again in April 2001 after a wing skin modification was performed. The primary objectives of these tests were to characterize the wing behavior before the first flight, and provide a before-and-after measurement of the torsional stiffness. Two streamwise load couples have been applied. The wing skin modification is shown to have more torsional flexibility than the original configuration has. Additionally, structural hysteresis is shown to be reduced by the skin modification. Data comparisons show good repeatability between the tests.

  8. Investigation of the Vortical Flow Above an F/A-18 Using Doppler Global Velocimetry

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Meyers, James F.; Lee, Joseph W.; Cavone, Angelo A.; Suzuki, Karen E.

    1993-01-01

    The flow above an F/A-18 model, set to 25-degrees angle of attack, was measured using a Doppler global velocimeter, (DGV). The investigation indicated that the complex flow contained many similarities to the vortical flow above a simple delta wing set to a high-angle of attack, including flow standard deviations greater than 30-percent of free- stream. These standard deviation levels were also comparable to results found during a previous investigation of the vortical flow above a YF-17 using fringe-type laser velocimetry. The global measurement capability of the DGV provided the first evidence that the burst vortices above the model were structured. These structures were found to maintain their spatial coherence while the flow varied in an overall sense.

  9. Thyromimetic actions of tetrabromobisphenol A (TBBPA) in steatotic FaO rat hepatoma cells.

    PubMed

    Grasselli, E; Cortese, K; Fabbri, R; Smerilli, A; Vergani, L; Voci, A; Gallo, G; Canesi, L

    2014-10-01

    Tetrabromobisphenol A (2,2-bis(3,5-dibromo-4-hydroxyphenyl propane-TBBPA) is the most produced brominated flame retardant, detected in the environment and in biological samples. TBBPA shares structural similarities with thyroid hormones (THs), and it has been shown to interfere with different aspects of TH physiology, this raising concern on its possible effects as an endocrine disruptor in humans and wildlife. THs play a major role in lipid metabolism, with the liver representing one of their main target tissues. At the cellular level, THs act through interactions with TH receptors (TRs), as well as through TR-independent mechanisms. Rat hepatoma FaO cells (a liver cell line defective for functional TRs) overloaded with lipids have been utilized as a model to investigate the anti-steatotic effects of THs in the hepatocyte. In this work, the possible effects of TBBPA in steatotic FaO cells were investigated. Exposure to TBBPA for 24 h reduced triglyceride (TAG) content and the size of lipid droplets (LDs); similar effects were obtained with equimolar doses (10(-6) M) of T3 (3,3',5-L-triiodothyronine). TBBPA and T3 showed common effects on transcription of genes involved in lipid homeostasis. In particular, TBBPA mainly up-regulated mRNA levels for LD-associated oxidative tissue-enriched PAT protein (OXPAT), peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor (PPAR) isoform β/δ, and the mitochondrial uncoupling protein 2 (UCP2). The results demonstrate that TBBPA can decrease lipid accumulation in steatotic cells through stimulation of oxidative pathways. These data identify novel thyromimetic actions of TBBPA at the cellular level.

  10. Rapid evaluation and quality control of next generation sequencing data with FaQCs

    DOE PAGES

    Lo, Chien -Chi; Chain, Patrick S. G.

    2014-12-01

    Background: Next generation sequencing (NGS) technologies that parallelize the sequencing process and produce thousands to millions, or even hundreds of millions of sequences in a single sequencing run, have revolutionized genomic and genetic research. Because of the vagaries of any platform's sequencing chemistry, the experimental processing, machine failure, and so on, the quality of sequencing reads is never perfect, and often declines as the read is extended. These errors invariably affect downstream analysis/application and should therefore be identified early on to mitigate any unforeseen effects. Results: Here we present a novel FastQ Quality Control Software (FaQCs) that can rapidly processmore » large volumes of data, and which improves upon previous solutions to monitor the quality and remove poor quality data from sequencing runs. Both the speed of processing and the memory footprint of storing all required information have been optimized via algorithmic and parallel processing solutions. The trimmed output compared side-by-side with the original data is part of the automated PDF output. We show how this tool can help data analysis by providing a few examples, including an increased percentage of reads recruited to references, improved single nucleotide polymorphism identification as well as de novo sequence assembly metrics. Conclusion: FaQCs combines several features of currently available applications into a single, user-friendly process, and includes additional unique capabilities such as filtering the PhiX control sequences, conversion of FASTQ formats, and multi-threading. The original data and trimmed summaries are reported within a variety of graphics and reports, providing a simple way to do data quality control and assurance.« less

  11. The polygalacturonase FaPG1 gene plays a key role in strawberry fruit softening.

    PubMed

    García-Gago, Juan A; Posé, Sara; Muñoz-Blanco, Juan; Quesada, Miguel A; Mercado, José A

    2009-08-01

    The loss of firm texture is one of the most characteristic physiological processes that occur during the ripening of fleshy fruits. It is generally accepted that the disassembly of primary cell wall and middle lamella is the main factor involved in fruit softening. In this process, polygalacturonase (PG) has been implicated in the degradation of the polyuronide network in several fruits. However, the minor effect of PG downregulation on tomato softening, reported during the nineties, minimized the role of this enzyme in softening. Further works in other fruits are challenging this general assumption, as is occurring in strawberry. The strawberry (Fragaria x ananassa) fruit undergoes an extensive and fast softening that limit its shelf life and postharvest. Traditionally, it has also been considered that PG plays a minor role on this process, due to the low PG activity found in ripened strawberry fruits. Transgenic strawberry plants expressing an antisense sequence of the ripening-specific PG gene FaPG1 have been generated to get an insight into the role of this gene in softening. Half of the transgenic lines analyzed yielded fruits significantly firmer than control, without being affected other fruit parameters such as weight, color or soluble solids. The increase on firmness was maintained after several days of posharvest. In these firmer lines, FaPG1 was silenced to 95%, but total PG activity was only minor reduced. At the cell wall level, transgenic fruits contained a higher amount of covalently bound pectins whereas the soluble fraction was diminished. A microarray analysis of genes expressed in ripened receptacle did not show any significant change between control and transgenic fruits. Thus, contrary to the most accepted view, it is concluded that PG plays a key role on pectin metabolism and softening of strawberry fruit.

  12. Fasa Registry on Acute Myocardial Infarction (FaRMI): Feasibility Study and Pilot Phase Results

    PubMed Central

    Askari, Alireza; Zakeri, Habib; Farjam, Mojtaba; Dehghan, Azizallah; Zendehdel, Kazem

    2016-01-01

    Background Myocardial infarction (MI) is the leading cause of death in Iran. Every attempt to improve treatment patterns and patient outcomes needs a surveillance system to both consider the efficacy and safety measures. Fasa Registry on Myocardial Infarction (FaRMI) is the first population-based registry for acute MI in Iran targeted to provide meticulous description of patients’ characteristics, to explore the management patterns of these patients, to discover the degree of adherence to the practice guidelines, and to investigate the determinants of poor in-hospital and later outcomes. Methods A diagnosis of acute MI (type I, II and III) was made upon the accepted criteria by the attending cardiologists and types IV and V MI were excluded. Two registrar nurses gathered data on demographics, place of residence and ethnicity, past medical history, risk factors, and the clinical course. Management patterns in the pre-hospital setting, during the hospital stay and at the discharge time were recorded. Routine laboratory results and cardiac biomarkers on three consecutive days were registered. Results pilot phase included the first 95 patients, 63.5% of whom were men and 31.5% were women. With a mean age of 62.89±13.75 years among participants, the rate of premature MI was 31.8%. ST segment elevation MI accounted for 68.2% cases and inferior wall was the most prevalent region involved followed by anterior and posterior walls. Discussion Obtained data on the characteristics of patients suffering an MI event revealed the major determinants of delay in initiation of therapies and contributors of poor outcome. Completeness of data was guaranteed upon involvement of multiple checkpoints and data quality was secured by means of automatic validation processes in addition to weekly physicians’ roundups. Conclusion Execution of FaRMI in the form presented is feasible and it will build up a comprehensive population-based registry for MI in the region. PMID:27907128

  13. Rapid evaluation and quality control of next generation sequencing data with FaQCs

    SciTech Connect

    Lo, Chien -Chi; Chain, Patrick S. G.

    2014-12-01

    Background: Next generation sequencing (NGS) technologies that parallelize the sequencing process and produce thousands to millions, or even hundreds of millions of sequences in a single sequencing run, have revolutionized genomic and genetic research. Because of the vagaries of any platform's sequencing chemistry, the experimental processing, machine failure, and so on, the quality of sequencing reads is never perfect, and often declines as the read is extended. These errors invariably affect downstream analysis/application and should therefore be identified early on to mitigate any unforeseen effects. Results: Here we present a novel FastQ Quality Control Software (FaQCs) that can rapidly process large volumes of data, and which improves upon previous solutions to monitor the quality and remove poor quality data from sequencing runs. Both the speed of processing and the memory footprint of storing all required information have been optimized via algorithmic and parallel processing solutions. The trimmed output compared side-by-side with the original data is part of the automated PDF output. We show how this tool can help data analysis by providing a few examples, including an increased percentage of reads recruited to references, improved single nucleotide polymorphism identification as well as de novo sequence assembly metrics. Conclusion: FaQCs combines several features of currently available applications into a single, user-friendly process, and includes additional unique capabilities such as filtering the PhiX control sequences, conversion of FASTQ formats, and multi-threading. The original data and trimmed summaries are reported within a variety of graphics and reports, providing a simple way to do data quality control and assurance.

  14. Inhibitory Effects of Verrucarin A on Tunicamycin-Induced ER Stress in FaO Rat Liver Cells.

    PubMed

    Bae, Eun Young; Lee, Seung Woong; Seong, Sin; Cho, Wonjun; Ahn, Jong Seog; Cho, Hyun-Sug

    2015-05-19

    Endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress is linked with development and maintenance of cancer, and serves as a therapeutic target for treatment of cancer. Verrucarin A, isolated from the broth of Fusarium sp. F060190, showed potential inhibitory activity on tunicamycin-induced ER stress in FaO rat liver cells. In addition, the compound decreased tunicamycin-induced GRP78 promoter activity in a dose dependent manner without inducing significant inhibition of luciferase activity and cell growth for 6 and 12 h. Moreover, the compound decreased the expression of GRP78, CHOP, XBP-1, and suppressed XBP-1, and reduced phosphorylation of IRE1α in FaO rat liver cells. This evidence suggests for the first time that verrucarin A inhibited tunicamycin-induced ER stress in FaO rat liver cells.

  15. Aerobiologic particle sampling by a new personal collector (Partrap FA52) in comparison to the Hirst (Burkard) sampler.

    PubMed

    Fiorina, A; Scordamaglia, A; Mincarini, M; Fregonese, L; Canonica, G W

    1997-10-01

    A new personal portable sampler of biologic particles (Partrap FA52, Coppa, Biella, Italy) was used for pollen sampling in comparison with Hirst's (Burkard) fixed device. The aerobiologic samplings were carried out simultaneously outdoors with the two devices coupled on the same axis, during the daytime of 10 dry, nonconsecutive spring days. The total amount and the percentages of the pollens most often trapped by the two collectors were compared by Student's t-test for paired samples. The Partrap FA52 showed a highly significant efficacy, quite comparable to that of the Burkard device, in pollen trapping for both the total number (P < 0.0001) and the percentages of Parietaria (P < 0.0001), pine (P < 0.002), and grass (P < 0.0001) pollens. Therefore, Partrap FA52 proved to be highly effective in obtaining quantitative and qualitative aerobiologic samples in comparison with the commonly used fixed samplers.

  16. Comparing the performance of FA, DFA and DMA using different synthetic long-range correlated time series

    PubMed Central

    Shao, Ying-Hui; Gu, Gao-Feng; Jiang, Zhi-Qiang; Zhou, Wei-Xing; Sornette, Didier

    2012-01-01

    Notwithstanding the significant efforts to develop estimators of long-range correlations (LRC) and to compare their performance, no clear consensus exists on what is the best method and under which conditions. In addition, synthetic tests suggest that the performance of LRC estimators varies when using different generators of LRC time series. Here, we compare the performances of four estimators [Fluctuation Analysis (FA), Detrended Fluctuation Analysis (DFA), Backward Detrending Moving Average (BDMA), and Centred Detrending Moving Average (CDMA)]. We use three different generators [Fractional Gaussian Noises, and two ways of generating Fractional Brownian Motions]. We find that CDMA has the best performance and DFA is only slightly worse in some situations, while FA performs the worst. In addition, CDMA and DFA are less sensitive to the scaling range than FA. Hence, CDMA and DFA remain “The Methods of Choice” in determining the Hurst index of time series. PMID:23150785

  17. Entropy-driven rearrangement of the water network at the hydrated amide group of the trans-formanilide-water cluster in the gas phase.

    PubMed

    Sakota, Kenji; Shimazaki, Yuiga; Sekiya, Hiroshi

    2011-04-14

    Photoionization-induced rearrangement of the water network in the trans-formanilide 1:4 cluster, FA-(H(2)O)(4), has been investigated by using IR-photodissociation spectroscopy and quantum chemical calculations. The IR spectrum of FA-(H(2)O)(4) in the S(0) state shows that the observed cluster has a cyclic hydrogen-bonded structure where the CO group and the NH group of FA are bridged with four water molecules, consistent with the reported structure [E. G. Robertson, Chem. Phys. Lett., 2000, 325, 299]. However, the corresponding cyclic hydrogen-bonded structure in the D(0) state of [FA-(H(2)O)(4)](+) is a minor product arising from photoionization via the S(1)-S(0) origin of FA-(H(2)O)(4). The dominant product has an extended H-bonded structure, where the intermolecular hydrogen bond between the hydrogen of the OH group of a water molecule and the CO group is dissociated. This is the first observation of a photoionization-induced rearrangement of the water network in [FA-(H(2)O)(4)](+). Through DFT calculations, we conclude that the rearrangement occurs due to entropic effects.

  18. Characterisation of the Dynamic Behaviour of Laminated Sheet Glass in Steel-Glass Façades

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Segura, C. Colomer; Feldmann, M.

    The use of steel-glass façades has become a very standard feature in modern design of buildings, very often including laminated sheet glass panes as a load bearing element. While these elements are essentially subjected to dynamic loading due to wind, its design is still based on static load assumptions. A more exact approach is not possible due to the uncertainties regarding the transfer function of the glass panes to the structure. In this paper, basic modal identification techniques are used to characterise the dynamic behaviour of laminated sheet glass and to give a first approach to account for dynamic effects on steel-glass façades.

  19. Cluster headache

    PubMed Central

    Leroux, Elizabeth; Ducros, Anne

    2008-01-01

    Cluster headache (CH) is a primary headache disease characterized by recurrent short-lasting attacks (15 to 180 minutes) of excruciating unilateral periorbital pain accompanied by ipsilateral autonomic signs (lacrimation, nasal congestion, ptosis, miosis, lid edema, redness of the eye). It affects young adults, predominantly males. Prevalence is estimated at 0.5–1.0/1,000. CH has a circannual and circadian periodicity, attacks being clustered (hence the name) in bouts that can occur during specific months of the year. Alcohol is the only dietary trigger of CH, strong odors (mainly solvents and cigarette smoke) and napping may also trigger CH attacks. During bouts, attacks may happen at precise hours, especially during the night. During the attacks, patients tend to be restless. CH may be episodic or chronic, depending on the presence of remission periods. CH is associated with trigeminovascular activation and neuroendocrine and vegetative disturbances, however, the precise cautive mechanisms remain unknown. Involvement of the hypothalamus (a structure regulating endocrine function and sleep-wake rhythms) has been confirmed, explaining, at least in part, the cyclic aspects of CH. The disease is familial in about 10% of cases. Genetic factors play a role in CH susceptibility, and a causative role has been suggested for the hypocretin receptor gene. Diagnosis is clinical. Differential diagnoses include other primary headache diseases such as migraine, paroxysmal hemicrania and SUNCT syndrome. At present, there is no curative treatment. There are efficient treatments to shorten the painful attacks (acute treatments) and to reduce the number of daily attacks (prophylactic treatments). Acute treatment is based on subcutaneous administration of sumatriptan and high-flow oxygen. Verapamil, lithium, methysergide, prednisone, greater occipital nerve blocks and topiramate may be used for prophylaxis. In refractory cases, deep-brain stimulation of the hypothalamus and

  20. Formation of Cluster Complexes by Cluster-Cluster-Collisions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ichihashi, Masahiko; Odaka, Hideho

    2015-03-01

    Multi-element clusters are interested in their chemical and physical properties, and it is expected that they are utilized as catalysts, for example. Their properties critically depend on the size, composition and atomic ordering, and it should be important to adjust the above parameters for their functionality. One of the ways to form a multi-element cluster is to employ a low-energy collision between clusters. Here, we show characteristic results obtained in the collision between a neutral Ar cluster and a size-selected Co cluster ion. Low-energy collision experiment was accomplished by using a newly developed merging-beam apparatus. Cobalt cluster ions were produced by laser ablation, and mass-selected. On the other hand, argon clusters were prepared by the supersonic expansion of Ar gas. Both cluster beams were merged together in an ion guide, and ionic cluster complexes were mass-analyzed. In the collision of Co2+ and ArN, Co2Arn+ (n = 1 - 30) were observed, and the total intensity of Co2Arn+ (n >= 1) is inversely proportional to the relative velocity between Co2+ and ArN. This suggests that the charge-induced dipole interaction between Co2+ and a neutral Ar cluster is dominant in the formation of the cluster complex, Co2+Arn.

  1. Controlled clinical comparison of plastic and glass bottles of BacT/ALERT FA medium for culturing organisms from blood of adult patients.

    PubMed

    Petti, Cathy A; Mirrett, Stanley; Woods, Christopher W; Reller, L Barth

    2005-04-01

    A new, clear-plastic nonvented aerobic FA bottle, designed to prevent breakage, has been developed for the BacT/ALERT blood culture system. We assessed the new plastic FA bottle by comparing its performance with that of the current glass FA bottle for recovery of microorganisms and time to detection of growth in blood samples obtained for culture from adult patients with suspected bloodstream infections. We conclude that the BacT/ALERT plastic and glass FA bottles are comparable for recovery of microorganisms and that the safety advantage of plastic bottles can be achieved without compromising performance.

  2. The cleaner, the greener? Product sustainability assessment of the biomimetic façade paint Lotusan(®) in comparison to the conventional façade paint Jumbosil(®).

    PubMed

    Antony, Florian; Grießhammer, Rainer; Speck, Thomas; Speck, Olga

    2016-01-01

    Background: The debate on the question whether biomimetics has a specific potential to contribute to sustainability is discussed among scientists, business leaders, politicians and those responsible for project funding. The objective of this paper is to contribute to this controversial debate by presenting the sustainability assessment of one of the most well-known and most successful biomimetic products: the façade paint Lotusan(®). Results: As a first step it has been examined and verified that the façade paint Lotusan(®) is correctly defined as a biomimetic product. Secondly, Lotusan(®) has been assessed and compared to a conventional façade paint within the course of a detailed product sustainability assessment (PROSA). For purposes of comparison, the façade paint Jumbosil(®) was chosen as reference for a conventional paint available on the market. The benefit analysis showed that both paints fulfil equally well the requirements of functional utility. With respect to the symbolic utility, Lotusan(®) has a particular added aesthetic value by the preservation of the optical quality over the life cycle. Within the social analysis no substantial differences between the two paints could be found regarding the handling and disposal of the final products. Regarding the life-cycle cost, Lotusan(®) is the more expensive product. However, the higher investment cost for a Lotusan(®)-based façade painting are more than compensated by the longer life time, resulting in both reduced overall material demand and lower labour cost. In terms of the life-cycle impact assessment, it can be ascertained that substantial differences between the paints arise from the respective service life, which are presented in terms of four scenario analyses. Conclusion: In summary, the biomimetic façade paint Lotusan(®) has been identified as a cost-effective and at the same time resource-saving product. Based on the underlying data and assumptions it could be demonstrated that

  3. The cleaner, the greener? Product sustainability assessment of the biomimetic façade paint Lotusan® in comparison to the conventional façade paint Jumbosil®

    PubMed Central

    Antony, Florian; Grießhammer, Rainer; Speck, Thomas

    2016-01-01

    Background: The debate on the question whether biomimetics has a specific potential to contribute to sustainability is discussed among scientists, business leaders, politicians and those responsible for project funding. The objective of this paper is to contribute to this controversial debate by presenting the sustainability assessment of one of the most well-known and most successful biomimetic products: the façade paint Lotusan®. Results: As a first step it has been examined and verified that the façade paint Lotusan® is correctly defined as a biomimetic product. Secondly, Lotusan® has been assessed and compared to a conventional façade paint within the course of a detailed product sustainability assessment (PROSA). For purposes of comparison, the façade paint Jumbosil® was chosen as reference for a conventional paint available on the market. The benefit analysis showed that both paints fulfil equally well the requirements of functional utility. With respect to the symbolic utility, Lotusan® has a particular added aesthetic value by the preservation of the optical quality over the life cycle. Within the social analysis no substantial differences between the two paints could be found regarding the handling and disposal of the final products. Regarding the life-cycle cost, Lotusan® is the more expensive product. However, the higher investment cost for a Lotusan®-based façade painting are more than compensated by the longer life time, resulting in both reduced overall material demand and lower labour cost. In terms of the life-cycle impact assessment, it can be ascertained that substantial differences between the paints arise from the respective service life, which are presented in terms of four scenario analyses. Conclusion: In summary, the biomimetic façade paint Lotusan® has been identified as a cost-effective and at the same time resource-saving product. Based on the underlying data and assumptions it could be demonstrated that Lotusan®-based fa

  4. Low-potential iron-sulfur centers in photosystem I: an X-ray absorption spectroscopy study.

    PubMed

    McDermott, A E; Yachandra, V K; Guiles, R D; Britt, R D; Dexheimer, S L; Sauer, K; Klein, M P

    1988-05-31

    We have measured the X-ray absorption spectra of Fe in photosystem I (PS I) preparations from spinach and a thermophilic cyanobacterium, Synechococcus sp., to characterize structures of the Fe complexes that function as electron acceptors in PS I. These acceptors include centers A and B, which are probably typical [4Fe-4S] ferredoxins, and X. The structure of X is not known, but its electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) spectrum has generated the suggestions that it is either a [2Fe-2S] or [4Fe-4S] ferredoxin or an Fe-quinone species. The iron X-ray absorption K-edge and iron extended X-ray absorption fine structure (EXAFS) spectra reveal that essentially all of the 11-14 Fe atoms present in the reaction center are present in the form of Fe-S centers and that not more than 1 atom out of 12 could be octahedral or oxygen-coordinated Fe. This suggests that, besides A and B, additional Fe-S clusters are present which are likely to be X. Our EXAFS spectra cannot be simulated adequately by a mixture of [4Fe-4S] ferredoxins with typical bond lengths and disorder parameters because the amplitude of Fe backscattering is small; however, excellent simulations of the data are consistent with a mixture of [2Fe-2S] ferredoxins and [4Fe-4S] ferredoxins, or with unusually distorted [4Fe-4S] clusters. We presume that the [2Fe-2S] or distorted [4Fe-4S] centers are X. The X-ray absorption spectra of PS I preparations from Synechococcus and spinach are essentially indistinguishable.

  5. Genetic Analysis of Strawberry Fruit Aroma and Identification of O-Methyltransferase FaOMT as the Locus Controlling Natural Variation in Mesifurane Content1[C][W][OA

    PubMed Central

    Zorrilla-Fontanesi, Yasmín; Rambla, José-Luis; Cabeza, Amalia; Medina, Juan J.; Sánchez-Sevilla, José F.; Valpuesta, Victoriano; Botella, Miguel A.; Granell, Antonio; Amaya, Iraida

    2012-01-01

    Improvement of strawberry (Fragaria × ananassa) fruit flavor is an important goal in breeding programs. To investigate genetic factors controlling this complex trait, a strawberry mapping population derived from genotype ‘1392’, selected for its superior flavor, and ‘232’ was profiled for volatile compounds over 4 years by headspace solid phase microextraction coupled to gas chromatography and mass spectrometry. More than 300 volatile compounds were detected, of which 87 were identified by comparison of mass spectrum and retention time to those of pure standards. Parental line ‘1392’ displayed higher volatile levels than ‘232’, and these and many other compounds with similar levels in both parents segregated in the progeny. Cluster analysis grouped the volatiles into distinct chemically related families and revealed a complex metabolic network underlying volatile production in strawberry fruit. Quantitative trait loci (QTL) detection was carried out over 3 years based on a double pseudo-testcross strategy. Seventy QTLs covering 48 different volatiles were detected, with several of them being stable over time and mapped as major QTLs. Loci controlling γ-decalactone and mesifurane content were mapped as qualitative traits. Using a candidate gene approach we have assigned genes that are likely responsible for several of the QTLs. As a proof of concept we show that one homoeolog of the O-methyltransferase gene (FaOMT) is the locus responsible for the natural variation of mesifurane content. Sequence analysis identified 30 bp in the promoter of this FaOMT homoeolog containing putative binding sites for basic/helix-loop-helix, MYB, and BZIP transcription factors. This polymorphism fully cosegregates with both the presence of mesifurane and the high expression of FaOMT during ripening. PMID:22474217

  6. A NASA F/A-18, participating in the Automated Aerial Refueling (AAR) project, flies over the Dryden

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2002-01-01

    A NASA F/A-18 is participating in the Automated Aerial Refueling (AAR) project. The 300-gallon aerial refueling store seen on the belly of the aircraft carries fuel and a refueling drogue. This aircraft acts as a tanker in the study to develop an aerodynamic model for future automated aerial refueling, especially of unmanned vehicles.

  7. Water-tunnel study results of a TF/A-18 and F/A-18 canopy flow visualization

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Johnson, Steven A.; Fisher, David F.

    1990-01-01

    A water tunnel study examining the influence of canopy shape on canopy and leading edge extension flow patterns was initiated. The F/A-18 single-place canopy model and the TF/A-18 two place canopy model were the study subjects. Plan view and side view photographs showing the flow patterns created by injected colored dye are presented for 0 deg and 5 deg sideslip angles. Photographs taken at angle of attack and sideslip conditions correspond to test departure points found in flight test. Flight experience has shown that the TF/A-18 airplane departs in regions where the F/A-18 airplane is departure-resistant. The study results provide insight into the differences in flow patterns which may influence the resulting aerodynamics of the TF/A-18 and F/A-18 aircraft. It was found that at 0 deg sideslip, the TF/A-18 model has more downward flow on the sides of the canopy than the F/A-18 model. This could be indicative of flow from the leading edge extension (LEX) vortexes impinging on the sides of the wider TF/A-18 canopy. In addition, the TF/A-18 model has larger areas of asymmetric separated and unsteady flow on the LEXs and fuselage, possibly indicating a lateral and directional destabilizing effect at the conditions studied.

  8. Production Support Flight Control Computers: Research Capability for F/A-18 Aircraft at Dryden Flight Research Center

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Carter, John F.

    1997-01-01

    NASA Dryden Flight Research Center (DFRC) is working with the United States Navy to complete ground testing and initiate flight testing of a modified set of F/A-18 flight control computers. The Production Support Flight Control Computers (PSFCC) can give any fleet F/A-18 airplane an in-flight, pilot-selectable research control law capability. NASA DFRC can efficiently flight test the PSFCC for the following four reasons: (1) Six F/A-18 chase aircraft are available which could be used with the PSFCC; (2) An F/A-18 processor-in-the-loop simulation exists for validation testing; (3) The expertise has been developed in programming the research processor in the PSFCC; and (4) A well-defined process has been established for clearing flight control research projects for flight. This report presents a functional description of the PSFCC. Descriptions of the NASA DFRC facilities, PSFCC verification and validation process, and planned PSFCC projects are also provided.

  9. The strawberry transcription factor FaMYB1 inhibits the biosynthesis of proanthocyanidins in Lotus corniculatus leaves.

    PubMed

    Paolocci, Francesco; Robbins, Mark P; Passeri, Valentina; Hauck, Barbara; Morris, Phil; Rubini, Andrea; Arcioni, Sergio; Damiani, Francesco

    2011-01-01

    Proanthocyanidins (PAs) are agronomically important biopolymers in higher plants composed primarily of catechin and epicatechin units. The biosynthesis of these natural products is regulated by transcription factors including proteins of the R2R3MYB class. To gain insight into the genetic control of the catechin and epicatechin branches of the PA pathway in forage legumes, here the effects of the expression of FaMYB1, a flavonoid R2R3MYB repressor from strawberry, in Lotus corniculatus (birdsfoot trefoil), were tested. It was found that in leaves of T(0) transgenic lines the degree of PA inhibition correlated with the level of FaMYB1 expression. These effects were heritable in the transgene-positive plant T(1) generation and were tissue specific as the suppression of proanthocyanidin biosynthesis was most pronounced in mesophyll cells within the leaf, whereas other flavonoid and phenolic compounds were substantially unaltered. The data suggest that FaMYB1 may counter-balance the activity of the endogenous transcriptional MYB-bHLH-WD40 (MBW) complex promoting proanthocyanidin biosynthesis via the catechin and epicatechin branches and that FaMYB1 does not interfere with the expression levels of a resident R2R3MYB activator of PAs. It is proposed that in forage legumes leaf cell commitment to synthesize proanthocyanidins relies on the balance between the activity of activator and repressor MYBs operating within the MBW complex.

  10. Induction of the fatty acid 2-hydroxylase (FA2H) gene by Δ(9)-tetrahydrocannabinol in human breast cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Takeda, Shuso; Harada, Mari; Su, Shengzhong; Okajima, Shunsuke; Miyoshi, Hiroko; Yoshida, Kazutaka; Nishimura, Hajime; Okamoto, Yoshiko; Amamoto, Toshiaki; Watanabe, Kazuhito; Omiecinski, Curtis J; Aramaki, Hironori

    2013-01-01

    To investigate gene(s) being regulated by ∆(9)-tetrahydrocannabinol (∆(9)-THC), we performed DNA microarray analysis of human breast cancer MDA-MB-231 cells, which are poorly differentiated breast cancer cells, treated with ∆(9)-THC for 48 hr at an IC50 concentration of approximately 25 µM. Among the highly up-regulated genes (> 10-fold) observed, fatty acid 2-hydroxylase (FA2H) was significantly induced (17.8-fold). Although the physiological role of FA2H has not yet been fully understood, FA2H has been shown to modulate cell differentiation. The results of Oil Red O staining after ∆(9)-THC exposure showed the distribution of lipid droplets (a sign of the differentiated phenotype) in cells. Taken together, the results obtained here indicate that FA2H is a novel ∆(9)-THC-regulated gene, and that ∆(9)-THC induces differentiation signal(s) in poorly differentiated MDA-MB-231 cells.

  11. Study of the degradation activity and the strategies to promote the bioavailability of phenanthrene by Sphingomonas paucimobilis strain 20006FA.

    PubMed

    Coppotelli, Bibiana M; Ibarrolaza, Agustin; Dias, Romina L; Del Panno, Maria T; Berthe-Corti, Luise; Morelli, Irma S

    2010-02-01

    The present study describes the phenanthrene-degrading activity of Sphingomonas paucimobilis 20006FA and its ability to promote the bioavailability of phenanthrene. S. paucimobilis 20006FA was isolated from a phenanthrene-contaminated soil microcosm. The strain was able to grow in liquid mineral medium saturated with phenanthrene as the sole carbon source, showing high phenanthrene elimination (52.9% of the supplied phenanthrene within 20 days). The accumulation of 1-hydroxy-2-naphthoic acid and salicylic acid as major phenanthrene metabolites and the capacity of the strain to grow with sodium salicylate as the sole source of carbon and energy indicated that the S. paucimobilis 20006FA possesses a complete phenanthrene degradation pathway. However, under the studied conditions, the strain was able to mineralize only the 10% of the consumed phenanthrene. Investigations on the cell ability to promote bioavailability of phenanthrene showed that the S. paucimobilis strain 20006FA exhibited low cell hydrophobicity (0.13), a pronounced chemotaxis toward phenanthrene, and it was able to reduce the surface tension of mineral liquid medium supplemented with phenanthrene as sole carbon source. Scanning electron micrographs revealed that: (1) in suspension cultures, cells formed flocks and showed small vesicles on the cell surface and (2) cells were also able to adhere to phenanthrene crystals and to produce biofilms. Clearly, the strain seems to exhibit two different mechanisms to enhance phenanthrene bioavailability: biosurfactant production and adhesion to the phenanthrene crystals.

  12. The optimization of FA/O barrier slurry with respect to removal rate selectivity on patterned Cu wafers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yi, Hu; Yan, Li; Yuling, Liu; Yangang, He

    2016-02-01

    Because the polishing of different materials is required in barrier chemical mechanical planarization (CMP) processes, the development of a kind of barrier slurry with improved removal rate selectivity for Cu/barrier/TEOS would reduce erosion and dishing defects on patterned Cu wafers. In this study, we developed a new benzotriazole-free barrier slurry named FA/O barrier slurry, containing 20 mL/L of the chelating agent FA/O, 5 mL/L surfactant, and a 1:5 concentration of abrasive particles. By controlling the polishing slurry ingredients, the removal rate of different materials could be controlled. For process integration considerations, the effect of the FA/O barrier slurry on the dielectric layer of the patterned Cu wafer was investigated. After CMP processing by the FA/O barrier slurry, the characteristics of the dielectric material were tested. The results showed that the dielectric characteristics met demands for industrial production. The current leakage was of pA scale. The resistance and capacitance were 2.4 kω and 2.3 pF, respectively. The dishing and erosion defects were both below 30 nm in size. CMP-processed wafers using this barrier slurry could meet industrial production demands. Project supported by the Special Project Items No. 2 in National Long-Term Technology Development Plan (No. 2009ZX02308), the Natural Science Foundation of Hebei Province (No. F2012202094), and the Doctoral Program Foundation of Xinjiang Normal University Plan (No. XJNUBS1226).

  13. Behind the Façade of Fee-Free education: Shadow Education and Its Implications for Social Justice

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bray, Mark; Kwo, Ora

    2013-01-01

    Most governments, at an official level, espouse the principles of the 1948 Universal Declaration of Human Rights. Among its statements is that education shall be free, at least in the elementary and fundamental stages. Yet while the façade of government education systems presents an image that instruction is free of charge, families across the…

  14. Evaluation of F/A-18A HARV inlet flow analysis with flight data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smith, C. Frederic; Podleski, Steve D.; Barankiewicz, Wendy S.; Zeleznik, Susan Z.

    1995-01-01

    The F/A-18A aircraft has experienced engine stalls at high angles-of-attack and yaw flight conditions which were outside of its flight envelope. Future aircraft may be designed to operate routinely in this flight regime. Therefore, it is essential that an understanding of the inlet flow field at these flight conditions be obtained. Due to the complex interactions of the fuselage and inlet flow fields, a study of the flow within the inlet must also include external effects. Full Navier-Stokes (FNS) calculations on the F/A-18A High Alpha Research Vehicle (HARV) inlet for several angles-of-attack with sideslip and free stream Mach numbers have been obtained. The predicted forebody/fuselage surface static pressures agreed well with flight data. The surface static pressures along the inlet lip are in good agreement with the numerical predictions. The major departure in agreement is along the bottom of the lip at 30 deg and 60 deg angle-of-attack where a possible streamwise flow separation is not being predicted by the code. The circumferential pressure distributions at the engine face are in very good agreement with the numerical results. The variation in surface static pressure in the circumferential direction is very small with the exception of 60 angle-of-attack. Although the simulation does not include the effect of the engine, it appears that this omission has a second order effect on the circumferential pressure distribution. An examination of the unsteady flight test data base has shown that the secondary vortex migrates a significant distance with time. In fact, the extent of this migration increases with angle-of-attack with increasing levels of distortion. The effects of the engine on this vortex movement is unknown. This implies that the level of flow unsteadiness increases with increasing distortion. Since the computational results represent an asymptotic solution driven by steady boundary conditions, these numerical results may represent an arbitrary point

  15. Environmental and health effects of nanomaterials in nanotextiles and façade coatings.

    PubMed

    Som, Claudia; Wick, Peter; Krug, Harald; Nowack, Bernd

    2011-08-01

    Engineered nanomaterials (ENM) are expected to hold considerable potential for products that offer improved or novel functionalities. For example, nanotechnologies could open the way for the use of textile products outside their traditional fields of applications, for example, in the construction, medical, automobile, environmental and safety technology sectors. Consequently, nanotextiles could become ubiquitous in industrial and consumer products in future. Another ubiquitous field of application for ENM is façade coatings. The environment and human health could be affected by unintended release of ENM from these products. The product life cycle and the product design determine the various environmental and health exposure situations. For example, ENM unintentionally released from geotextiles will probably end up in soils, whereas ENM unintentionally released from T-shirts may come into direct contact with humans and end up in wastewater. In this paper we have assessed the state of the art of ENM effects on the environment and human health on the basis of selected environmental and nanotoxicological studies and on our own environmental exposure modeling studies. Here, we focused on ENM that are already applied or may be applied in future to textile products and façade coatings. These ENM's are mainly nanosilver (nano-Ag), nano titanium dioxide (nano-TiO(2)), nano silica (nano-SiO(2)), nano zinc oxide (nano-ZnO), nano alumina (nano-Al(2)O(3)), layered silica (e.g. montmorillonite, Al(2)[(OH)(2)/Si(4)O(10)]nH(2)O), carbon black, and carbon nanotubes (CNT). Knowing full well that innovators have to take decisions today, we have presented some criteria that should be useful in systematically analyzing and interpreting the state of the art on the effects of ENM. For the environment we established the following criteria: (1) the indication for hazardous effects, (2) dissolution in water increases/decreases toxic effects, (3) tendency for agglomeration or sedimentation

  16. High-intensity running in English FA Premier League soccer matches.

    PubMed

    Bradley, Paul S; Sheldon, William; Wooster, Blake; Olsen, Peter; Boanas, Paul; Krustrup, Peter

    2009-01-15

    The aims of this study were to (1) determine the activity profiles of a large sample of English FA Premier League soccer players and (2) examine high-intensity running during elite-standard soccer matches for players in various playing positions. Twenty-eight English FA Premier League games were analysed during the 2005-2006 competitive season (n=370), using a multi-camera computerised tracking system. During a typical match, wide midfielders (3138 m, s=565) covered a greater distance in high-intensity running than central midfielders (2825 m, s= 73, P=0.04), full-backs (2605 m, s=387, P < 0.01), attackers (2341 m, s=575, P < 0.01), and central defenders (1834 m, s=256, P < 0.01). In the last 15 min of a game, high-intensity running distance was approximately 20% less than in the first 15-min period for wide midfielders (467 m, s=104 vs. 589 m, s=134, P < 0.01), central midfielders (429 m, s=106 vs. 534 m, s=99, P < 0.01), full-backs (389 m, s=95 vs. 481 m, s=114, P < 0.01), attackers (348 m, s=105 vs. 438 m, s=129, P < 0.01), and central defenders (276 m, s=93 vs. 344 m, s=80, P < 0.01). There was a similar distance deficit for high-intensity running with (148 m, s=78 vs. 193 m, s=96, P < 0.01) and without ball possession (229 m, s=85 vs. 278 m, s=97, P < 0.01) between the last 15-min and first 15-min period of the game. Mean recovery time between very high-intensity running bouts was 72 s (s=28), with a 28% longer recovery time during the last 15 min than the first 15 min of the game (83 s, s=26 vs. 65 s, s=20, P < 0.01). The decline in high-intensity running immediately after the most intense 5-min period was more evident in attackers (216 m, s=50 vs. 113 m, s=47, P < 0.01) and central defenders (182 m, s=26 vs. 96 m, s=39, P < 0.01). The results suggest that high-intensity running with and without ball possession is reduced during various phases of elite-standard soccer matches and the activity profiles and fatigue patterns vary among playing positions. The

  17. PARC3D calculations of the F/A-18A HARV inlet vortex generators

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Podleski, Steve D.

    1995-01-01

    NASA Lewis Research Center is currently engaged in a research effort as a team member of the High Alpha Technology Program within the NASA agency. This program uses a specially-equipped F/A-18A aircraft called the High Alpha Research Vehicle (HARV), in an effort to improve the maneuverability of high performance military aircraft at low-subsonic-speed, high-angle-of-attack conditions. The overall objective of the NASA Lewis effort is to develop inlet analysis technology towards efficient airflow delivery to the engine during these maneuvers. One portion of this inlet analysis technology uses computational fluid dynamics to predict installed inlet performance. Most of the F/A-18A HARV geometry, which includes the ramp/splitter plate, side diverter and slot, inlet lip and upper diverter, and deflected leading-edge flap has been modeled. The empennage and rear fuselage have not. A pair of vortex generators located on the bottom wall of the inlet were not modeled initially. These vortex generators were installed to alleviate any flow separation that may be induced by the wheel well protrusion into the inlet wall. Calculations completed with the PARC3D code showed that the pressure recovery has been underpredicted and the flow distortion over-predicted. To improve the correlation of PARC3D predictions with flight and wind tunnel tests, the vortex generators were included in the grid geometry and the results are presented in this report. The grid totals 27 blocks or 1.3 million grid points for the half model, which includes the vortex generator grid blocks. Two flight cases were calculated, a high speed case with a Mach number of 0.8 and angle of attack of 3.4; and a low speed case with a Mach number of 0.43 and angle of attack of 32.2. The vortex generators have a significant effect on the inlet boundary layers at high speed, low angle of attack; and have no effect at low speed, high angle of attack.

  18. Comparative recovery of microorganisms from BacT/ALERT plastic and glass FA and FN blood culture bottles.

    PubMed

    Riley, J A; Heiter, B J; Bourbeau, P P

    2005-07-01

    bioMerieux, Inc., has recently introduced plastic bottles to replace glass bottles for use in the BacT/ALERT blood culture system. We compared the performance of the plastic to the glass bottles in a large clinical evaluation. Two blood cultures were collected from each patient, one using glass FA (aerobic) and FN (anaerobic) bottles and one using plastic FA and FN bottles. Of the 4,040 sets of four bottles collected, 3,110 contained the recommended 8 to 12 ml of blood, yielding 524 microorganisms with 359 judged to be clinically significant. Of the 359 significant organisms, 255 were recovered in either one or two bottles from both pairs of bottles in a set while 56 organisms were recovered only from the glass bottles and 48 were recovered only from the plastic bottles (P, not significant [NS]). Of the 286 significant organisms recovered only in the FA bottles (glass and plastic), 180 were recovered in both bottles, 57 in the plastic bottles only, and 49 in the glass bottles only (P, NS). Of the 303 significant organisms recovered in the FN bottles only (glass and plastic), 212 were recovered in both bottles, 46 in the plastic bottles only, and 45 in the glass bottles only (P, NS). For individual organisms, the only significant difference in recovery was obtained for Escherichia coli, with more isolates recovered in the FN plastic than in the FN glass bottles (P = 0.02). These data suggest that recovery of microorganisms with plastic FA/FN bottles is at least equal to that with glass FA/FN bottles while offering greater safety for users.

  19. Papiliotrema siamense f.a., sp. nov., a yeast species isolated from plant leaves.

    PubMed

    Surussawadee, Janjira; Khunnamwong, Pannida; Srisuk, Nantana; Limtong, Savitree

    2014-09-01

    Two strains representing a novel species were isolated from the external surface of a sugar cane leaf (DMKU-SP85(T)) and tissue of a rice leaf (DMKU-RE97) collected in Thailand. On the basis of morphological, biochemical, physiological and chemotaxonomic characteristics, and sequence analysis of the D1/D2 region of the large subunit (LSU) rRNA gene and the internal transcribed spacer (ITS) region, the two strains were determined to represent a novel species of the genus Papiliotrema although sexual reproduction was not observed. The sequences of the D1/D2 region of the LSU rRNA gene and ITS region of the two strains were identical, but differed from those of the type strain of Cryptococcus nemorosus by 0.6 % nucleotide substitutions (four nucleotide substitutions out of 597 nucleotides) in the D1/D2 region of the LSU rRNA gene and 1.8 % nucleotide substitutions (nine nucleotide substitutions out of 499 nucleotides) in the ITS region. The name Papiliotrema siamense f.a., sp. nov. is proposed. The type strain is DMKU-SP85(T)( = BCC 69499(T) = CBS 13330(T)).

  20. Induced Moment Effects of Formation Flight Using Two F/A-18 Aircraft

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hansen, Jennifer L.; Cobleigh, Brent R.

    2002-01-01

    Previous investigations into formation flight have shown the possibility for significant fuel savings through drag reduction. Using two F/A-18 aircraft, NASA Dryden Flight Research Center has investigated flying aircraft in autonomous formation. Positioning the trailing airplane for best drag reduction requires investigation of the wingtip vortex effects induced by the leading airplane. A full accounting of the vortex effect on the trailing airplane is desired to validate vortex-effect prediction methods and provide a database for the design of a formation flight autopilot. A recent flight phase has mapped the complete wingtip vortex effects at two flight conditions with the trailing airplane at varying distances behind the leading one. Force and moment data at Mach 0.56 and an altitude of 25,000 ft and Mach 0.86 and an altitude of 36,000 ft have been obtained with 20, 55, 110, and 190 ft of longitudinal distance between the aircraft. The moments induced by the vortex on the trailing airplane were well within the pilot's ability to control. This report discusses the data analysis methods and vortex-induced effects on moments and side force. An assessment of the impact of the nonlinear vortex effects on the design of a formation autopilot is offered.

  1. Melter feed tank operating map from the FA-10.02 test data

    SciTech Connect

    Spatz, T.L.

    1994-08-01

    The operability of the Melter Feed Tank (MFT) feed loops has been tested during the DWPF-FA-10.02 test. The ability to feed the melter at three distinct melter feed rates (0.20, 0.45, and 0.90 gpm), two distinct agitator speeds (65 and 130 rpm), varying liquid levels, and varying slurry rheologies was tested. This report correlates the operability of the feed loops with the above mentioned variables. The data are presented in the form of operating maps, Figs. 1 through 4, which are plots of the liquid level versus the wt% total solids (and yield stress) for two agitator speeds. The maps are divided into regions of acceptable feed loop operation and unacceptable feed loop operation. This report does not consider how closely the compositions of the MFT, the melter feed lines, and the Hydragard samples agree. The significant observations in this report are as follows: Both feed loops satisfy the operability criteria down to a liquid level below the upper impeller blade at low speed agitation (65 rpm). Under high speed agitation (130 rpm), feed loop No. 2 operates much more poorly than feed loop No. 1. The uncertainty associated with the wt% total solids of a slurry sample is larger than the current design basis range for total solids. The dilution of slurry due to pump priming is shown graphically in the chronological presentation of wt% total solids.

  2. Adaptive Augmenting Control Flight Characterization Experiment on an F/A-18

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    VanZwieten, Tannen S.; Gilligan, Eric T.; Wall, John H.; Orr, Jeb S.; Miller, Christopher J.; Hanson, Curtis E.

    2014-01-01

    The NASA Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC) Flight Mechanics and Analysis Division developed an Adaptive Augmenting Control (AAC) algorithm for launch vehicles that improves robustness and performance by adapting an otherwise welltuned classical control algorithm to unexpected environments or variations in vehicle dynamics. This AAC algorithm is currently part of the baseline design for the SLS Flight Control System (FCS), but prior to this series of research flights it was the only component of the autopilot design that had not been flight tested. The Space Launch System (SLS) flight software prototype, including the adaptive component, was recently tested on a piloted aircraft at Dryden Flight Research Center (DFRC) which has the capability to achieve a high level of dynamic similarity to a launch vehicle. Scenarios for the flight test campaign were designed specifically to evaluate the AAC algorithm to ensure that it is able to achieve the expected performance improvements with no adverse impacts in nominal or nearnominal scenarios. Having completed the recent series of flight characterization experiments on DFRC's F/A-18, the AAC algorithm's capability, robustness, and reproducibility, have been successfully demonstrated. Thus, the entire SLS control architecture has been successfully flight tested in a relevant environment. This has increased NASA's confidence that the autopilot design is ready to fly on the SLS Block I vehicle and will exceed the performance of previous architectures.

  3. Strain Gage Loads Calibration Testing of the Active Aeroelastic Wing F/A-18 Aircraft

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lokos, William A.; Olney, Candida D.; Chen, Tony; Crawford, Natalie D.; Stauf, Rick; Reichenbach, Eric Y.; Bessette, Denis (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    This report describes strain-gage calibration loading through the application of known loads of the Active Aeroelastic Wing F/A-18 airplane. The primary goal of this test is to produce a database suitable for deriving load equations for left and right wing root and fold shear; bending moment; torque; and all eight wing control-surface hinge moments. A secondary goal is to produce a database of wing deflections measured by string potentiometers and the onboard flight deflection measurement system. Another goal is to produce strain-gage data through both the laboratory data acquisition system and the onboard aircraft data system as a check of the aircraft system. Thirty-two hydraulic jacks have applied loads through whiffletrees to 104 tension-compression load pads bonded to the lower wing surfaces. The load pads covered approximately 60 percent of the lower wing surface. A series of 72 load cases has been performed, including single-point, double-point, and distributed load cases. Applied loads have reached 70 percent of the flight limit load. Maximum wingtip deflection has reached nearly 16 in.

  4. Comparison of thermal testing of MS9001FA type GTPs at shatura and nizhnevartovsk GRES

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ol'khovskii, G. G.

    2016-11-01

    Domestic power plants use combined-cycle plants in which a gas-turbine plant (GTP) and a steam turbine rotate a common electric generator. In this instance, it is impossible to measure the power of each of them, so we have to resort to some assumptions. We have succeeded to check the validity of these assumptions and possible errors of their application testing combined-cycle plants (CCP) with the same GTP and a steam turbine but operating each on its own electrical generator. Comparative tests of a MS901FA GTP of the PGU-400 power-generating unit commissioned at Shatura GRES (a thermal power station) and a GTP of the same type installed at Nizhnevartovsk GRES were performed. As a result of these tests, dependences of the electric power of both gas-turbine plants and a turbine outlet temperature on the inlet temperature were obtained. A relation of the GTP efficiency, heat and air rate on the load are determined, and characteristics of compressors and turbines of both GTPs are defined. The performed tests have confirmed the accuracy of the determined characteristics of the two GTPs using both a direct measurement of net power (Nizhnevartovsk GRES) and an indirect measurement (Shatura GRES).

  5. F/A-18 1/9th scale model tail buffet measurements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Martin, C. A.; Glaister, M. K.; Maclaren, L. D.; Meyn, L. A.; Ross, J.

    1991-01-01

    Wind tunnel tests were carried out on a 1/9th scale model of the F/A-18 at high angles of attack to investigate the characteristics of tail buffet due to bursting of the wing leading edge extension (LEX) vortices. The tests were carried out at the Aeronautical Research Laboratory low-speed wind tunnel facility and form part of a collaborative activity with NASA Ames Research Center, organized by The Technical Cooperative Program (TTCP). Information from the program will be used in the planning of similar collaborative tests, to be carried out at NASA Ames, on a full-scale aircraft. The program covered the measurement of unsteady pressures and fin vibration for cases with and without the wing LEX fences fitted. Fourier transform methods were used to analyze the unsteady data, and information on the spatial and temporal content of the vortex burst pressure field was obtained. Flow visualization of the vortex behavior was carried out using smoke and a laser light sheet technique.

  6. Early-life study of the FA409 full-depth asphalt-concrete pavement sections

    SciTech Connect

    Hill, H.J.

    1988-01-01

    The Illinois Department of Transportation (IDOT) is currently implementing a mechanistic thickness-design procedure for full-depth asphalt-concrete pavements. This thesis is an early design-life investigation of full-depth asphalt-concrete pavements, constructed on FA409 near Carlyle, Illinois in 1986. Included in the study are: sampling and testing of paving and subgrade materials; extensive non-destructive testing (NDT) using the Falling Weight Deflectometer (FWD); development of techniques for interpreting NDT data; determination of as-built structural characteristics of the various pavement sections; evaluation of subsurface drainage and lime-treated soil behavior; and examination of the validity of the ILLI-PAVE computer model. The simplicity of a full-depth asphalt-concrete pavement allows useful information regarding pavement structure to be determined from FWD surface-deflection data. The ILLI-PAVE model was used in conjunction with statistical methods to quantify, in the form of regression equations or algorithms, the relationship between pavement structure (Tac, Eac, and Eri) and pavement response to FWD loading. Testing of pavement and subgrade material samples as used to validate these algorithms.

  7. The aerodynamic characteristics of vortex ingestion for the F/A-18 inlet duct

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Anderson, Bernhard H.

    1991-01-01

    A Reduced Navier-Stokes (RNS) solution technique was successfully combined with the concept of partitioned geometry and mesh generation to form a very efficient 3D RNS code aimed at the analysis-design engineering environment. Partitioned geometry and mesh generation is a pre-processor to augment existing geometry and grid generation programs which allows the solver to (1) recluster an existing gridlife mesh lattice, and (2) perturb an existing gridfile definition to alter the cross-sectional shape and inlet duct centerline distribution without returning to the external geometry and grid generator. The present results provide a quantitative validation of the initial value space marching 3D RNS procedure and demonstrates accurate predictions of the engine face flow field, with a separation present in the inlet duct as well as when vortex generators are installed to supress flow separation. The present results also demonstrate the ability of the 3D RNS procedure to analyze the flow physics associated with vortex ingestion in general geometry ducts such as the F/A-18 inlet. At the conditions investigated, these interactions are basically inviscid like, i.e., the dominant aerodynamic characteristics have their origin in inviscid flow theory.

  8. Twist Model Development and Results from the Active Aeroelastic Wing F/A-18 Aircraft

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lizotte, Andrew M.; Allen, Michael J.

    2007-01-01

    Understanding the wing twist of the active aeroelastic wing (AAW) F/A-18 aircraft is a fundamental research objective for the program and offers numerous benefits. In order to clearly understand the wing flexibility characteristics, a model was created to predict real-time wing twist. A reliable twist model allows the prediction of twist for flight simulation, provides insight into aircraft performance uncertainties, and assists with computational fluid dynamic and aeroelastic issues. The left wing of the aircraft was heavily instrumented during the first phase of the active aeroelastic wing program allowing deflection data collection. Traditional data processing steps were taken to reduce flight data, and twist predictions were made using linear regression techniques. The model predictions determined a consistent linear relationship between the measured twist and aircraft parameters, such as surface positions and aircraft state variables. Error in the original model was reduced in some cases by using a dynamic pressure-based assumption. This technique produced excellent predictions for flight between the standard test points and accounted for nonlinearities in the data. This report discusses data processing techniques and twist prediction validation, and provides illustrative and quantitative results.

  9. Twist Model Development and Results From the Active Aeroelastic Wing F/A-18 Aircraft

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lizotte, Andrew; Allen, Michael J.

    2005-01-01

    Understanding the wing twist of the active aeroelastic wing F/A-18 aircraft is a fundamental research objective for the program and offers numerous benefits. In order to clearly understand the wing flexibility characteristics, a model was created to predict real-time wing twist. A reliable twist model allows the prediction of twist for flight simulation, provides insight into aircraft performance uncertainties, and assists with computational fluid dynamic and aeroelastic issues. The left wing of the aircraft was heavily instrumented during the first phase of the active aeroelastic wing program allowing deflection data collection. Traditional data processing steps were taken to reduce flight data, and twist predictions were made using linear regression techniques. The model predictions determined a consistent linear relationship between the measured twist and aircraft parameters, such as surface positions and aircraft state variables. Error in the original model was reduced in some cases by using a dynamic pressure-based assumption and by using neural networks. These techniques produced excellent predictions for flight between the standard test points and accounted for nonlinearities in the data. This report discusses data processing techniques and twist prediction validation, and provides illustrative and quantitative results.

  10. Inlet Flow Characteristics During Rapid Maneuvers for an F/A-18A Airplane

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Steenken, William G.; Williams, John G.; Walsh, Kevin R.

    1999-01-01

    The F404-GE-400 engine powered F/A-18A High Alpha Research Vehicle (HARV) was used to examine the characteristics of inlet airflow during rapid aircraft maneuvers. A study of the degree of similarity between inlet data obtained during rapid aircraft maneuvers and inlet data obtained at steady aerodynamic attitudes was conducted at the maximum engine airflow of approximately 145 Ibm/sec using a computer model that was generated from inlet data obtained during steady aerodynamic maneuvers. Results show that rapid-maneuver inlet recoveries agreed very well with the recoveries obtained at equivalent stabilized angle-of-attack conditions. The peak dynamic circumferential distortion values obtained during rapid maneuvers agreed within 0.01 units of distortion over the 10 - 38 degree angle of attack range with the values obtained during steady aerodynamic maneuvers while similar agreement was found for the peak dynamic radial distortion values up to 29 degrees angle-of-attack. Exceedences of the rapid-maneuver peak dynamic circumferential distortion values relative to the peak distortion model values at steady attitudes occurred only at low or negative angles of attack and were inconsequential from an engine-stability assessment point of view. The results of this study validate the current industry practice of testing at steady aerodynamic conditions to characterize inlet recovery and peak dynamic distortion levels.

  11. A Fundamental Equation of State for 1,1,1,3,3-Pentafluoropropane (R-245fa)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Akasaka, Ryo; Zhou, Yong; Lemmon, Eric W.

    2015-03-01

    A new fundamental equation of state explicit in the Helmholtz energy is presented for 1,1,1,3,3-pentafluoropropane (R-245fa), based on recent experimental data for vapor pressures, densities, and sound speeds. The functional form uses Gaussian bell-shaped terms, according to recent trends in the development of accurate equations of state. The independent variables of the equation of state are temperature and density. The equation is valid for temperatures between the triple point (170.0 K) and 440 K, and for pressures up to 200 MPa. Estimated uncertainties in this range are 0.1% for vapor pressures, 0.1% for saturated liquid densities, 0.1% for liquid densities below 70 MPa, 0.2% for densities at higher pressures, 0.3% for vapor densities, 0.3% for liquid sound speeds, and 0.1% for vapor sound speeds. The uncertainties in the critical region are higher for all properties except vapor pressures. The equation shows reasonable extrapolation behavior at extremely low and high temperatures, and at high pressures.

  12. Aeroservoelastic Model Validation and Test Data Analysis of the F/A-18 Active Aeroelastic Wing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brenner, Martin J.; Prazenica, Richard J.

    2003-01-01

    Model validation and flight test data analysis require careful consideration of the effects of uncertainty, noise, and nonlinearity. Uncertainty prevails in the data analysis techniques and results in a composite model uncertainty from unmodeled dynamics, assumptions and mechanics of the estimation procedures, noise, and nonlinearity. A fundamental requirement for reliable and robust model development is an attempt to account for each of these sources of error, in particular, for model validation, robust stability prediction, and flight control system development. This paper is concerned with data processing procedures for uncertainty reduction in model validation for stability estimation and nonlinear identification. F/A-18 Active Aeroelastic Wing (AAW) aircraft data is used to demonstrate signal representation effects on uncertain model development, stability estimation, and nonlinear identification. Data is decomposed using adaptive orthonormal best-basis and wavelet-basis signal decompositions for signal denoising into linear and nonlinear identification algorithms. Nonlinear identification from a wavelet-based Volterra kernel procedure is used to extract nonlinear dynamics from aeroelastic responses, and to assist model development and uncertainty reduction for model validation and stability prediction by removing a class of nonlinearity from the uncertainty.

  13. Update: HFC 245fa Blown Foam Development with External Tank Spray Foams

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Davis, S.

    2001-01-01

    The Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC) Thermal Protection Systems (TPS) Materials Research Laboratory is currently investigating environmentally friendly blowing agents for use in the insulations of the Space Shuttle's External Tank. The original TPS foam materials of the External Tank were blown with chlorofluorocarbon 11, which is now regulated because of its high Ozone Depletion Potential (ODP). Hydrochlorofluorocarbons (HCFCs), with an ODP that is one tenth that of CFCs, have been widely adopted as an interim blowing agent in urethane insulations. In FY96, Lockheed Martin completed the production qualification and validation of HCFC 141b blown insulations. Because of the expected limited commercial lifetime of HCFC 141b, research efforts are underway to identify and develop alternatives with zero ODP. HFC245fa (1,1,1,3,3-pentaflouropropane) has been chosen by the manufacturer as a third-generation blowing agent to be marketed commercially. Preliminary work evaluating this third-generation candidate has demonstrated promising material mechanical property data. Favorable results from small-scale spray activities have justified evaluations using production foam processing spray parameters. With the scale-up of the spray equipment, however, additional processing issues have been identified. This paper will present data collected to date regarding the use of this blowing agent in External Tank spray foams.

  14. Spatial Characteristics of the Unsteady Differential Pressures on 16 percent F/A-18 Vertical Tails

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Moses, Robert W.; Ashley, Holt

    1998-01-01

    Buffeting is an aeroelastic phenomenon which plagues high performance aircraft at high angles of attack. For the F/A-18 at high angles of attack, vortices emanating from wing/fuselage leading edge extensions burst, immersing the vertical tails in their turbulent wake. The resulting buffeting of the vertical tails is a concern from fatigue and inspection points of view. Previous flight and wind-tunnel investigations to determine the buffet loads on the tail did not provide a complete description of the spatial characteristics of the unsteady differential pressures. Consequently, the unsteady differential pressures were considered to be fully correlated in the analyses of buffet and buffeting. The use of fully correlated pressures in estimating the generalized aerodynamic forces for the analysis of buffeting yielded responses that exceeded those measured in flight and in the wind tunnel. To learn more about the spatial characteristics of the unsteady differential pressures, an available 16%, sting-mounted, F-18 wind-tunnel model was modified and tested in the Transonic Dynamics Tunnel (TDT) at the NASA Langley Research Center as part of the ACROBAT (Actively Controlled Response Of Buffet-Affected Tails) program. Surface pressures were measured at high angles of attack on flexible and rigid tails. Cross-correlation and cross-spectral analyses of the pressure time histories indicate that the unsteady differential pressures are not fully correlated. In fact, the unsteady differential pressure resemble a wave that travels along the tail. At constant angle of attack, the pressure correlation varies with flight speed.

  15. Active Control of F/A-18 Vertical Tail Buffeting using Piezoelectric Actuators

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sheta, Essam F.; Moses, Robert W.; Huttsell, Lawerence J.; Harrand, Vincent J.

    2003-01-01

    Vertical tail buffeting is a serious multidisciplinary problem that limits the performance of twin-tail fighter aircraft. The buffet problem occurs at high angles of attack when the vortical flow breaks down ahead of the vertical tails resulting in unsteady and unbalanced pressure loads on the vertical tails. This paper describes a multidisciplinary computational investigation for buffet load alleviation of full F/A-18 aircraft using distributed piezoelectric actuators. The inboard and outboard surfaces of the vertical tail are equipped with piezoelectric actuators to control the buffet responses in the first bending and torsion modes. The electrodynamics of the smart structure are expressed with a three-dimensional finite element model. A single-input-single-output controller is designed to drive the active piezoelectric actuators. High-fidelity multidisciplinary analysis modules for the fluid dynamics, structure dynamics, electrodynamics of the piezoelectric actuators, fluid-structure interfacing, and grid motion are integrated into a multidisciplinary computing environment that controls the temporal synchronization of the analysis modules. Peak values of the power spectral density of tail tip acceleration are reduced by as much as 22% in the first bending mode and by as much as 82% in the first torsion mode. RMS values of tip acceleration are reduced by as much as 12%.

  16. F/A-18 forebody vortex control. Volume 2: Rotary-balance tests

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kramer, Brian R.; Suarez, Carlos J.; Malcolm, Gerald N.; Ayers, Bert F.

    1994-01-01

    A rotary-balance wind tunnel test was conducted on a six percent model of the F/A-18 at the NASA Ames 7 X 10-Foot Low Speed Wind Tunnel. The data reduction was specially written for the test in National Instruments' LabVIEW. The data acquisition, reduction and analysis was performed with a Macintosh computer. The primary objective of the test was to evaluate the effectiveness of several forebody vortex control configurations in a rotary flow field. The devices that were found to be the most effective during the static tests (Volume 1) were investigated and included both mechanical and pneumatic configurations. The mechanical systems evaluated were small, single and dual, rotating nose tip strakes and a vertical nose strake. The jet blowing configuration used nozzles canted inboard 60 degrees. A two segment tangential slot was also evaluated. The different techniques were evaluated at angles of attack of 30 degrees, 45 degrees, 51 degrees, and 60 degrees. Sideslip and Reynolds number were varied for some of the configurations. All of the techniques proved to be effective in the rotating flow field. The vertical nose strake had the largest 'envelope' of effectiveness. Forebody vortex control provides large, robust yawing moments at medium to high angles of attack, even during combat maneuvers such as loaded roll.

  17. Deflection-Based Structural Loads Estimation From the Active Aeroelastic Wing F/A-18 Aircraft

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lizotte, Andrew M.; Lokos, William A.

    2005-01-01

    Traditional techniques in structural load measurement entail the correlation of a known load with strain-gage output from the individual components of a structure or machine. The use of strain gages has proved successful and is considered the standard approach for load measurement. However, remotely measuring aerodynamic loads using deflection measurement systems to determine aeroelastic deformation as a substitute to strain gages may yield lower testing costs while improving aircraft performance through reduced instrumentation weight. This technique was examined using a reliable strain and structural deformation measurement system. The objective of this study was to explore the utility of a deflection-based load estimation, using the active aeroelastic wing F/A-18 aircraft. Calibration data from ground tests performed on the aircraft were used to derive left wing-root and wing-fold bending-moment and torque load equations based on strain gages, however, for this study, point deflections were used to derive deflection-based load equations. Comparisons between the strain-gage and deflection-based methods are presented. Flight data from the phase-1 active aeroelastic wing flight program were used to validate the deflection-based load estimation method. Flight validation revealed a strong bending-moment correlation and slightly weaker torque correlation. Development of current techniques, and future studies are discussed.

  18. FaNTOmM: Fabry Perot of New Technology for the Observatoire du mont Megantic

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hernandez, Olivier; Gach, Jean-Luc; Carignan, Claude; Boulesteix, Jacques

    2003-03-01

    We present a third generation instrument using a photon counting camera (IPCS) based on an GaAs photo cathode that can achieve quantum efficiency up to 28%, comparable to a thick CCD, but without readout noise. This system is 10 times more sensitive at the Hα wavelength than previous Fabry Perot system used at the Observatoire du mont Mégantic. In terms of S/N ratio, the system outperforms CCD for extremely faint fluxes, included AR coated low noise thin CCDs. This system offers up to 1k x 1k pixels which is the largest monolithic IPCS. An original cooling system is used for camera based on a Ranque-Hilsh vortex tube. The real-time centering is done by a scalable DSP board. FaNTOmM is the association of a focal reducer (PANORAMIX: the 1.6m mont Mégantic OmM telescope focal reducer), a Fabry Perot etalon and an IPCS. Preliminary results obtained with the 1.6m mont Mégantic telescope are presented.

  19. A Phasin with Many Faces: Structural Insights on PhaP from Azotobacter sp. FA8

    PubMed Central

    Mezzina, Mariela P.; Wetzler, Diana E.; Catone, Mariela V.; Bucci, Hernan; Di Paola, Matias; Pettinari, M. Julia

    2014-01-01

    Phasins are a group of proteins associated to granules of polyhydroxyalkanoates (PHAs). Apart from their structural role as part of the PHA granule cover, different structural and regulatory functions have been found associated to many of them, and several biotechnological applications have been developed using phasin protein fusions. Despite their remarkable functional diversity, the structure of these proteins has not been analyzed except in very few studies. PhaP from Azotobacter sp. FA8 (PhaPAz) is a representative of the prevailing type in the multifunctional phasin protein family. Previous work performed in our laboratory using this protein have demonstrated that it has some very peculiar characteristics, such as its stress protecting effects in recombinant Escherichia coli, both in the presence and absence of PHA. The aim of the present work was to perform a structural characterization of this protein, to shed light on its properties. Its aminoacid composition revealed that it lacks clear hydrophobic domains, a characteristic that appears to be common to most phasins, despite their lipid granule binding capacity. The secondary structure of this protein, consisting of α-helices and disordered regions, has a remarkable capacity to change according to its environment. Several experimental data support that it is a tetramer, probably due to interactions between coiled-coil regions. These structural features have also been detected in other phasins, and may be related to their functional diversity. PMID:25077609

  20. Functional characterization of FaNIP1;1 gene, a ripening-related and receptacle-specific aquaporin in strawberry fruit.

    PubMed

    Molina-Hidalgo, Francisco J; Medina-Puche, Laura; Gelis, Samuel; Ramos, José; Sabir, Farzana; Soveral, Graça; Prista, Catarina; Iglesias-Fernández, Raquel; Caballero, José L; Muñoz-Blanco, Juan; Blanco-Portales, Rosario

    2015-09-01

    Strawberry fruit (Fragaria × ananassa) is a soft fruit with high water content at ripe stage (more than 90% of its fresh weight). Aquaporins play an important role in plant water homeostasis, through the facilitation of water transport and solutes. We report the role played by FaNIP1;1 in the receptacle ripening process. The analysis by qRT-PCR of FaNIP1;1 showed that this gene is mainly expressed in fruit receptacle and has a ripening-related expression pattern that was accompanied by an increase in both the abscisic acid and water content of the receptacle throughout fruit ripening. Moreover, FaNIP1;1 was induced in situations of water deficit. Additionally, we show that FaNIP1;1 expression was positively regulated by abscisic acid and negatively regulated by auxins. The water transport capacity of FaNIP1;1 was determined by a stopped-flow spectroscopy in yeast over-expressing FaNIP1;1. Glycerol, H2O2 and boron transport were also demonstrated in yeast. On the other hand, GFP-FaNIP1;1 fusion protein was located in plasma membrane. In conclusion, FaNIP1;1 seems to play an important role increasing the plasma membrane permeability, that allows the water accumulation in the strawberry fruit receptacle throughout the ripening process.

  1. Hypomorphic mutations in the gene encoding a key Fanconi anemia protein, FANCD2, sustain a significant group of FA-D2 patients with severe phenotype.

    PubMed

    Kalb, Reinhard; Neveling, Kornelia; Hoehn, Holger; Schneider, Hildegard; Linka, Yvonne; Batish, Sat Dev; Hunt, Curtis; Berwick, Marianne; Callen, Elsa; Surralles, Jordi; Casado, Jose A; Bueren, Juan; Dasi, Angeles; Soulier, Jean; Gluckman, Eliane; Zwaan, C Michel; van Spaendonk, Rosalina; Pals, Gerard; de Winter, Johan P; Joenje, Hans; Grompe, Markus; Auerbach, Arleen D; Hanenberg, Helmut; Schindler, Detlev

    2007-05-01

    FANCD2 is an evolutionarily conserved Fanconi anemia (FA) gene that plays a key role in DNA double-strand-type damage responses. Using complementation assays and immunoblotting, a consortium of American and European groups assigned 29 patients with FA from 23 families and 4 additional unrelated patients to complementation group FA-D2. This amounts to 3%-6% of FA-affected patients registered in various data sets. Malformations are frequent in FA-D2 patients, and hematological manifestations appear earlier and progress more rapidly when compared with all other patients combined (FA-non-D2) in the International Fanconi Anemia Registry. FANCD2 is flanked by two pseudogenes. Mutation analysis revealed the expected total of 66 mutated alleles, 34 of which result in aberrant splicing patterns. Many mutations are recurrent and have ethnic associations and shared allelic haplotypes. There were no biallelic null mutations; residual FANCD2 protein of both isotypes was observed in all available patient cell lines. These analyses suggest that, unlike the knockout mouse model, total absence of FANCD2 does not exist in FA-D2 patients, because of constraints on viable combinations of FANCD2 mutations. Although hypomorphic mutations arie involved, clinically, these patients have a relatively severe form of FA.

  2. Finland Air Force F/A-18 Moving-Map Composer (MMC) Version 3.4P, Software User’s Manual

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2006-05-31

    owned) Z GRANNY NRL, Stennis, MS (F/A-18-owned) X HARPO NRL, Stennis, MS (FiAF F/A-18-owned) cccccc = a composition ID (000001 through 999999...of FAF_DTED (where is a unique number ranging from 500-999). Otherwise, MMC will not process the data. The FiAF DTED producer is responsible

  3. Suppression of Human T Cell Proliferation Mediated by the Cathepsin B Inhibitor, z-FA-FMK Is Due to Oxidative Stress.

    PubMed

    Rajah, Tanuja; Chow, Sek Chuen

    2015-01-01

    The cathepsin B inhibitor, benzyloxycarbonyl-phenylalanine-alanine-fluoromethyl ketone (z-FA-FMK) readily inhibits anti-CD3-induced human T cell proliferation, whereas the analogue benzyloxycarbonyl-phenylalanine-alanine-diazomethyl ketone (z-FA-DMK) had no effect. In contrast, benzyloxycarbonyl-phenylalanine-alanine-chloromethyl ketone (z-FA-CMK) was toxic. The inhibition of T cell proliferation mediated by z-FA-FMK requires not only the FMK moiety, but also the benzyloxycarbonyl group at the N-terminal, suggesting some degree of specificity in z-FA-FMK-induced inhibition of primary T cell proliferation. We showed that z-FA-FMK treatment leads to a decrease in intracellular glutathione (GSH) with a concomitant increase in reactive oxygen species (ROS) levels in activated T cells. The inhibition of anti-CD3-induced T cell proliferation mediated by z-FA-FMK was abolished by the presence of low molecular weight thiols such as GSH, N-acetylcysteine (NAC) and L-cysteine, whereas D-cysteine which cannot be metabolised to GSH has no effect. The inhibition of anti-CD3-induced up-regulation of CD25 and CD69 expression mediated by z-FA-FMK was also attenuated in the presence of exogenous GSH. Similar to cell proliferation, GSH, NAC and L-cysteine but not D-cysteine, completely restored the processing of caspase-8 and caspase-3 to their respective subunits in z-FA-FMK-treated activated T cells. Our collective results demonstrated that the inhibition of T cell activation and proliferation mediated by z-FA-FMK is due to oxidative stress via the depletion of GSH.

  4. GLUCOMANNAN AND GLUCOMANNAN PLUS SPIRULINA-ENRICHED SQUID-SURIMI ADDED TO HIGH SATURATED DIET AFFECT GLYCEMIA, PLASMA AND ADIPOSE LEPTIN AND ADIPONECTIN LEVELS IN GROWING FA/FA RATS.

    PubMed

    Vázquez-Velasco, Miguel; González-Torres, Laura; Méndez, María Teresa; Bastida, Sara; Benedí, Juana; González-Muñoz, M José; Sánchez-Muniz, Francisco J

    2015-12-01

    Type 2 diabetes is a very prevalent chronic disease. Among dietary factors for its prevention and treatment, interest has grown in satiating fibre (konjac glucomannan) and spirulina. Our previous studies suggest that glucomannan itself and/or in conjunction to spirulina displayed hypolipemic and antioxidant effects when incorporated to squid surimi as functional ingredients. The present study aims to determine whether glucomannan- enriched or glucomannan plus spirulina-enriched squid-surimi improve plasma glucose and insulin levels in Zucker fa/fa rats fed a high saturated fat diet. Twenty four growing rats, divided into three groups, were given modified AIN-93M diets for seven weeks: 30% squid-surimi control diet (C), 30% glucomannan-enriched squid-surimi diet (G) and 30% glucomannan plus spirulina-enriched squid-surimi diet (GS). All rats became hyperglycemics and hyperinsulinemics, but G and GS diets induced significantly lower glucose levels (20%; p < 0.05) but did not modify insulinemia with respect to C diet. GS animals showed higher HOMA-D (p < 0.05) than C ones suggesting increased insulin availability. Plasma leptin and adiponectin decreased in G and GS vs. C group (p < 0.05). Adipose adiponectin increased significantly in G and GS vs. C rats (16-20 times, p < 0.01). Leptin in adipose tissue was higher in GS vs. G group (p < 0.05). In conclusion, both glucomannan-diets were able to reduce hyperglycemia and increase adipose tissue adiponectin levels in fa/fa rats, suggesting an anti-hypertrophic and insulin-sensitizing adipokine effect in this tissue. Spirulina inclusion increased insulin availability. Although results are promising, the utility of consuming glucomannan surimis as part of usual diets demands future studies.

  5. Transonic Unsteady Aerodynamics of the F/A-18E at Conditions Promoting Abrupt Wing Stall

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schuster, David M.; Byrd, James E.

    2003-01-01

    A transonic wind tunnel test of an 8% F/A-18E model was conducted in the NASA Langley Research Center (LaRC) 16-Foot Transonic Tunnel (16-Ft TT) to investigate the Abrupt Wing Stall (AWS) characteristics of this aircraft. During this test, both steady and unsteady measurements of balance loads, wing surface pressures, wing root bending moments, and outer wing accelerations were performed. The test was conducted with a wide range of model configurations and test conditions in an attempt to reproduce behavior indicative of the AWS phenomenon experienced on full-scale aircraft during flight tests. This paper focuses on the analysis of the unsteady data acquired during this test. Though the test apparatus was designed to be effectively rigid. model motions due to sting and balance flexibility were observed during the testing, particularly when the model was operating in the AWS flight regime. Correlation between observed aerodynamic frequencies and model structural frequencies are analyzed and presented. Significant shock motion and separated flow is observed as the aircraft pitches through the AWS region. A shock tracking strategy has been formulated to observe this phenomenon. Using this technique, the range of shock motion is readily determined as the aircraft encounters AWS conditions. Spectral analysis of the shock motion shows the frequencies at which the shock oscillates in the AWS region, and probability density function analysis of the shock location shows the propensity of the shock to take on a bi-stable and even tri-stable character in the AWS flight regime.

  6. Navier-Stokes, flight, and wind tunnel flow analysis for the F/A-18 aircraft

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ghaffari, Farhad

    1994-01-01

    Computational analysis of flow over the F/A-18 aircraft is presented along with complementary data from both flight and wind tunnel experiments. The computational results are based on the three-dimensional thin-layer Navier-Stokes formulation and are obtained from an accurate surface representation of the fuselage, leading-edge extension (LEX), and the wing geometry. However, the constraints imposed by either the flow solver and/or the complexity associated with the flow-field grid generation required certain geometrical approximations to be implemented in the present numerical model. In particular, such constraints inspired the removal of the empennage and the blocking (fairing) of the inlet face. The results are computed for three different free-stream flow conditions and compared with flight test data of surface pressure coefficients, surface tuft flow, and off-surface vortical flow characteristics that included breakdown phenomena. Excellent surface pressure coefficient correlations, both in terms of magnitude and overall trend, are obtained on the forebody throughout the range of flow conditions. Reasonable pressure agreement was obtained over the LEX; the general correlation tends to improve at higher angles of attack. The surface tuft flow and the off-surface vortex flow structures compared qualitatively well with the flight test results. To evaluate the computational results, a wind tunnel investigation was conducted to determine the effects of existing configurational differences between the flight vehicle and the numerical model on aerodynamic characteristics. In most cases, the geometrical approximations made to the numerical model had very little effect on overall aerodynamic characteristics.

  7. PREFACE: Nuclear Cluster Conference; Cluster'07

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Freer, Martin

    2008-05-01

    The Cluster Conference is a long-running conference series dating back to the 1960's, the first being initiated by Wildermuth in Bochum, Germany, in 1969. The most recent meeting was held in Nara, Japan, in 2003, and in 2007 the 9th Cluster Conference was held in Stratford-upon-Avon, UK. As the name suggests the town of Stratford lies upon the River Avon, and shortly before the conference, due to unprecedented rainfall in the area (approximately 10 cm within half a day), lay in the River Avon! Stratford is the birthplace of the `Bard of Avon' William Shakespeare, and this formed an intriguing conference backdrop. The meeting was attended by some 90 delegates and the programme contained 65 70 oral presentations, and was opened by a historical perspective presented by Professor Brink (Oxford) and closed by Professor Horiuchi (RCNP) with an overview of the conference and future perspectives. In between, the conference covered aspects of clustering in exotic nuclei (both neutron and proton-rich), molecular structures in which valence neutrons are exchanged between cluster cores, condensates in nuclei, neutron-clusters, superheavy nuclei, clusters in nuclear astrophysical processes and exotic cluster decays such as 2p and ternary cluster decay. The field of nuclear clustering has become strongly influenced by the physics of radioactive beam facilities (reflected in the programme), and by the excitement that clustering may have an important impact on the structure of nuclei at the neutron drip-line. It was clear that since Nara the field had progressed substantially and that new themes had emerged and others had crystallized. Two particular topics resonated strongly condensates and nuclear molecules. These topics are thus likely to be central in the next cluster conference which will be held in 2011 in the Hungarian city of Debrechen. Martin Freer Participants and Cluster'07

  8. Design and development of an F/A-18 inlet distortion rake: A cost and time saving solution

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yuhas, Andrew J.; Ray, Ronald J.; Burley, Richard R.; Steenken, William G.; Lechtenberg, Leon; Thornton, Don

    1995-01-01

    An innovative inlet total pressure distortion measurement rake has been designed and developed for the F/A-18 A/B/C/D aircraft inlet. The design was conceived by NASA and General Electric Aircraft Engines personnel. This rake has been flight qualified and flown in the F/A-18 High Alpha Research Vehicle at NASA Dryden Flight Research Center, Edwards, California. The eight-legged, one-piece, wagon wheel design of the rake was developed at a reduced cost and offered reduced installation time compared to traditional designs. The rake features 40 dual-measurement ports for low- and high-frequency pressure measurements with the high-frequency transducer mounted at the port. This high-frequency transducer offers direct absolute pressure measurements from low to high frequencies of interest, thereby allowing the rake to be used during highly dynamic aircraft maneuvers. Outstanding structural characteristics are inherent to the design through its construction and use of lightweight materials.

  9. Marbles in the façade of the "Certosa di Pavia": a physico-chemical study.

    PubMed

    Ferloni, Paolo; Chierichetti, Andrea; Tomasi, Corrado; Ricci, Oronzo

    2005-01-01

    In the framework of an interdisciplinary research project on the well known monastery "Certosa di Pavia", the thermal and structural properties of marbles employed in the construction of the façade of the basilica were investigated in order to detect the main decomposition phenomena occurring on the monument surface. The results obtained by means of thermogravimetric and differential thermal analyses, as well as by means of X-ray diffraction and IR spectroscopy, allowed one to characterize samples taken from various sculptures of the façade and to bring out the degradation phenomena occurring in some of them, in particular the formation of "black crusts" with a high content in gypsum. The present findings are in fair agreement with those reported by other research groups which also studied with different techniques the construction materials of this monument.

  10. An H-Infinity Approach to Control Synthesis with Load Minimization for the F/A-18 Active Aeroelastic Wing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lind, Rick

    1999-01-01

    The F/A-18 Active Aeroelastic Wing research aircraft will demonstrate technologies related to aeroservoelastic effects such as wing twist and load minimization. This program presents several challenges for control design that are often not considered for traditional aircraft. This paper presents a control design based on H-infinity synthesis that simultaneously considers the multiple objectives associated with handling qualities, actuator limitations, and loads. A point design is presented to demonstrate a controller and the resulting closed-loop properties.

  11. A NASA F/A-18, participating in the Automated Aerial Refueling (AAR) project, flies over the Dryden

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2002-01-01

    A NASA F/A-18 flies over the Dryden Flight Research Center and Rogers Dry Lake on December 11, 2002. The aircraft is participating in the Automated Aerial Refueling (AAR) project. The 300-gallon aerial refueling store seen on the belly of the aircraft carries fuel and a refueling drogue. This aircraft acts as a tanker in the study to develop an aerodynamic model for future automated aerial refueling, especially of unmanned vehicles.

  12. International Perspectives of the Impact of Export Control and Technology Transfer Regimes: The F/A-18 Case Study

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2011-04-30

    of Export Control and Technology Transfer Regimes: The F/A-18 Case Study Raymond Franck , Ira Lewis, Bernard Udis, NPS Published: 30 April 2011... James B. Greene, RADM, USN, (Ret.) Acquisition Chair Graduate School of Business and Public Policy Naval Postgraduate School 555 Dyer Road, Room...and acknowledge its generous contributions in support of this Symposium. James B. Greene, Jr. Keith F. Snider, PhD Rear Admiral, U.S. Navy

  13. Statistical Analysis of Naval Aviation Depot Repair Cycle Time Reduction for the F/A-18 C/D Aircraft

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2001-06-01

    carcass deficiencies. A greater benefit, perhaps, was the 12-day reduction in average retrograde time ( Mueck , 2001). It is reasonable to anticipate...short supply in the F/A-18 supply system ( Mueck , 2001): 28 1. Carcass constrained items. Insufficient carcasses to induct into the maintenance...Operation Research, Naval Postgraduate School, 1993. Mueck , A., Electronic Mail between Author and LCDR Mueck , SC, USN, Assistant Customer

  14. Curcumin reverses cisplatin resistance in cisplatin-resistant lung caner cells by inhibiting FA/BRCA pathway.

    PubMed

    Chen, Ping; Li, Jian; Jiang, He-Guo; Lan, Ting; Chen, Yong-Chang

    2015-05-01

    Cisplatin (DDP) is the most widely used chemotherapy agent for treatment of malignancies including lung cancer. However, the effectiveness of DDP is often weakened by acquired resistance of tumor cells. DDP kills cancer cells primarily by creating intrastrand and interstrand DNA cross-links, which block DNA replication. The Fanconi anemia (FA)/BRCA pathway is a DNA cross-link damage repair pathway, which regulates cellular resistance to DNA cross-link agents, such as DDP. Some study has shown that natural compound curcumin sensitize human ovarian and breast cancer cells to DDP. However, whether curcumin may reverse resistance to DDP in DDP-resistant lung cancer cells has not been understood. In this study, we showed that curcumin enhanced the proliferation inhibitory effect of DDP and promote DDP-induced apoptosis in A549/DDP cells (DDP-resistant lung adenocarcinoma cells). Moreover, we observed that FA/BRCA pathway DNA damage repair processes, such as DDP-induced FANCD2 monoubiquitination and nuclear foci formation were downregulated in the presence of curcumin, suggesting that curcumin enhanced sensitivity to DDP in A549/DDP cells through the inhibition of FA/BRCA pathway. Furthermore, the calculation of q value and apoptosis analyses revealed that curcumin in combination with DDP could exert a synergistic cytotoxic effect in A549/DDP cells, further demonstrating that curcumin can reverse cisplatin resistance of A549/DDP cells. In conclusion, by suppressing the FA/BRCA pathway DNA repair, curcumin potentiates DDP-induced proliferation inhibitory effect and apoptosis in A549/DDP cell, indicating that curcumin may serve as a chemosensitizer to cross-link-inducing anticancer drugs DDP.

  15. A water tunnel flow visualization study of the vortex flow structures on the F/A-18 aircraft

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sandlin, Doral R.; Ramirez, Edgar J.

    1991-01-01

    The vortex flow structures occurring on the F/A-18 aircraft at high angles of attack were studied. A water tunnel was used to gather flow visualization data on the forebody vortex and the wing leading edge extension vortex. The longitudinal location of breakdown of the leading edge vortex was found to be consistently dependent on the angle of attack. Other parameters such as Reynolds number, model scale, and model fidelity had little influence on the overall behavior of the flow structures studied. The lateral location of the forebody vortex system was greatly influenced by changes in the angle of sideslip. Strong interactions can occur between the leading edge extension vortex and the forebody vortex. Close attention was paid to vortex induced flows on various airframe components of the F/A-18. Reynolds number and angle of attack greatly affected the swirling intensity, and therefore the strength of the studied vortices. Water tunnel results on the F/A-18 correlated well with those obtained in similar studies at both full and sub scale levels. The water tunnel can provide, under certain conditions, good simulations of realistic flows in full scale configurations.

  16. Active Aeroelastic Wing Aerodynamic Model Development and Validation for a Modified F/A-18A Airplane

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cumming, Stephen B.; Diebler, Corey G.

    2005-01-01

    A new aerodynamic model has been developed and validated for a modified F/A-18A airplane used for the Active Aeroelastic Wing (AAW) research program. The goal of the program was to demonstrate the advantages of using the inherent flexibility of an aircraft to enhance its performance. The research airplane was an F/A-18A with wings modified to reduce stiffness and a new control system to increase control authority. There have been two flight phases. Data gathered from the first flight phase were used to create the new aerodynamic model. A maximum-likelihood output-error parameter estimation technique was used to obtain stability and control derivatives. The derivatives were incorporated into the National Aeronautics and Space Administration F-18 simulation, validated, and used to develop new AAW control laws. The second phase of flights was used to evaluate the handling qualities of the AAW airplane and the control law design process, and to further test the accuracy of the new model. The flight test envelope covered Mach numbers between 0.85 and 1.30 and dynamic pressures from 600 to 1250 pound-force per square foot. The results presented in this report demonstrate that a thorough parameter identification analysis can be used to improve upon models that were developed using other means. This report describes the parameter estimation technique used, details the validation techniques, discusses differences between previously existing F/A-18 models, and presents results from the second phase of research flights.

  17. Fetal antigen 1 (FA1), a circulating member of the epidermal growth factor (EGF) superfamily: ELISA development, physiology and metabolism in relation to renal function.

    PubMed

    Jensen, C H; Krogh, T N; Støving, R K; Holmskov, U; Teisner, B

    1997-12-10

    We describe an ELISA technique for quantification of fetal antigen 1 (FA1), a glycoprotein belonging to the EGF-superfamily. The ELISA is based on immunospecifically purified polyclonal antibodies and has a dynamic range of 0.7-5.3 ng/ml, intra- and inter-assay C.V.s of less than 3.2% and an average recovery of 105% in serum and 98% in urine. Comparison of FA1 in amniotic fluid, serum and urine revealed parallel titration curves, identical elution volumes following size chromatography, immunological identity and similar profiles when analysed by MALDI-MS. The reference interval for serum FA1 was 12.3-46.6 ng/ml and the levels were 10 times higher in patients with renal failure. FA1 showed no diurnal variation, no variation during the menstrual cycle and was not influenced by the acute phase reaction. In humans (n = 10) the renal clearance of FA1 was 11 ml/min and an identical high renal clearance was found in rats when expressed per 100 g body weight. In rats the initial increase in serum FA1 was 10 ng/ml/h following bilateral nephrectomy, explaining the increased serum concentrations of FA1 observed in patients with renal failure.

  18. Cluster Physics with Merging Galaxy Clusters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Molnar, Sandor

    Collisions between galaxy clusters provide a unique opportunity to study matter in a parameter space which cannot be explored in our laboratories on Earth. In the standard ΛCDM model, where the total density is dominated by the cosmological constant (Λ) and the matter density by cold dark matter (CDM), structure formation is hierarchical, and clusters grow mostly by merging. Mergers of two massive clusters are the most energetic events in the universe after the Big Bang, hence they provide a unique laboratory to study cluster physics. The two main mass components in clusters behave differently during collisions: the dark matter is nearly collisionless, responding only to gravity, while the gas is subject to pressure forces and dissipation, and shocks and turbulence are developed during collisions. In the present contribution we review the different methods used to derive the physical properties of merging clusters. Different physical processes leave their signatures on different wavelengths, thus our review is based on a multifrequency analysis. In principle, the best way to analyze multifrequency observations of merging clusters is to model them using N-body/HYDRO numerical simulations. We discuss the results of such detailed analyses. New high spatial and spectral resolution ground and space based telescopes will come online in the near future. Motivated by these new opportunities, we briefly discuss methods which will be feasible in the near future in studying merging clusters.

  19. High-altitude searches for vulcanoids: Observations from F/A-18B aircraft

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Durda, D. D.; Stern, S. A.

    2003-05-01

    We have conducted a high-altitude observing campaign to search for vulcanoids, a population of small, asteroid-like bodies hypothesized to reside in the dynamically stable region interior to Mercury's orbit (i.e., orbits with aphelia <0.21 AU). This airborne search campaign utilized our versatile and highly capable SWUIS-A (Southwest Universal Imaging System - Airborne) instrument flown with SwRI flight astronomers to an altitude of 49,000 ft MSL aboard NASA F/A-18B aircraft in order to obtain darker twilight conditions for near-Sun observing than are possible from the ground. The first observing run (3 nights) was successfully completed at NASA's Dryden Flight Research Center during the March/April 2002 vernal equinox observing opportunity; the second observing run (3 nights) was completed during the September 2002 autumnal equinox observing opportunity. On each of the three evening and three morning twilight flights we recorded image data covering 250 square degrees of sky centered on the ecliptic from solar elongations of 6-18 deg. Reduction of the Mar/Apr and Sep 2002 data sets demonstrates that we are reliably detecting objects to magnitude V = 9.5-11 at 15-20 degrees solar elongation. This is significantly fainter than the instrument would have performed from the ground and comparable to the faintest stars visible in our space-based SOHO LASCO C3 coronagraph vulcanoids search (Durda et al. 2000; Icarus 148, 312-315). The SWUIS-A instrument itself is capable of imaging objects as faint as magnitude V = 13, corresponding to vulcanoids less than 10 km across, with a sufficiently dark sky background. For reference, V = 10 corresponds to a 18-km diameter object 1 AU from Earth and 0.15 AU from the sun with a Mercury-like geometric albedo of 14%. No vulcanoid candidates have been detected in the 49,000-ft altitude airborne observations to date. We thank NASA research pilots Rick Searfoss, Frank Batteas, Craig Bomben, and Dana Purifoy. This research is supported by

  20. Gold-bismuth clusters.

    PubMed

    Martínez, Ana

    2014-08-07

    Metal clusters have interesting characteristics, such as the relationship between properties and size of the cluster. This is not always apparent, so theoretical studies can provide relevant information. In this report, optimized structures and electron donor-acceptor properties of AunBim clusters are reported (n + m = 2-7, 20). Density functional theory calculations were performed to obtain optimized structures. The ground states of gold clusters formed with up to seven atoms are planar. The presence of Bi modifies the structure, and the clusters become 3-D. Several optimized geometries have at least one Bi atom bonded to gold or bismuth atoms and form structures similar to NH3. This fragment is also present in clusters with 20 atoms, where the formation of Au3Bi stabilizes the structures. Bismuth clusters are better electron donors and worse electron acceptors than gold clusters. Mixed clusters fall in between these two extremes. The presence of Bi atoms in gold clusters modifies the electron donor-acceptor properties of the clusters, but there is no correlation between the number of Bi atoms present in the cluster and the capacity for donating electrons. The effect of planarity in Au19Bi clusters is the same as that in Au20 clusters. The properties of pure gold clusters are certainly interesting, but clusters formed by Bi and Au are more important because the introduction of different atoms modifies the geometry, the stability, and consequently the physical and chemical properties. Apparently, the presence of Bi may increase the reactivity of gold clusters, but further studies are necessary to corroborate this hypothesis.

  1. Folic acid-Pluronic F127 magnetic nanoparticle clusters for combined targeting, diagnosis, and therapy applications.

    PubMed

    Lin, Jia-Jyun; Chen, Jenn-Shing; Huang, Shih-Jer; Ko, Jyun-Han; Wang, Yu-Ming; Chen, Ting-Lung; Wang, Li-Fang

    2009-10-01

    Superparamagnetic iron oxides possess specific magnetic properties in the presence of an external magnetic field, which make them an attractive platform as contrast agents for magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and as carriers for drug delivery. In this study, we investigate the drug delivery and the MRI properties of folate-mediated water-soluble iron oxide incorporated into micelles. Pluronic F127 (PF127), which can be self-assembled into micelles upon increasing concentration or raising temperatures, is used to decorate water-soluble polyacrylic acid-bound iron oxides (PAAIO) via a chemical reaction. Next, the hydrophobic dye Nile red is encapsulated into the hydrophobic poly(propylene oxide) compartment of PF127 as a model drug and as a fluorescent agent. Upon encapsulation, PAAIO retains its superparamagnetic characteristics, and thus can be used for MR imaging. A tumor-specific targeting ligand, folic acid (FA), is conjugated onto PF127-PAAIO to produce a multifunctional superparamagnetic iron oxide, FA-PF127-PAAIO. FA-PF127-PAAIO can be simultaneously applied as a diagnostic and therapeutic agent that specifically targets cancer cells that overexpress folate receptors in their cell membranes. PF127-PAAIO is used as a reference group. Based on FTIR and UV-vis absorbance spectra, the successful synthesis of PF127-PAAIO and FA-PF127-PAAIO is realized. The magnetic nanoparticle clusters of PF127-PAAIO and FA-PF127-PAAIO are visualized by transmission electron microscope (TEM). FA-PF127-PAAIO, together with a targeting ligand, displays a higher intracellular uptake into KB cells. This result is confirmed by laser confocal scanning microscopy (CLSM), flow cytometry, and atomic absorption spectroscopy (AAS) studies. The hysteresis curves, generated by using a superconducting quantum interference device (SQUID) magnetometer analysis, demonstrate that the magnetic nanoparticles are superparamagnetic with insignificant hysteresis. The MTT assay explains the negligible

  2. Cysteine Methylation Controls Radical Generation in the Cfr Radical AdoMet rRNA Methyltransferase

    PubMed Central

    Challand, Martin R.; Salvadori, Enrico; Driesener, Rebecca C.; Kay, Christopher W. M.; Roach, Peter L.; Spencer, James

    2013-01-01

    The ‘radical S-adenosyl-L-methionine (AdoMet)’ enzyme Cfr methylates adenosine 2503 of the 23S rRNA in the peptidyltransferase centre (P-site) of the bacterial ribosome. This modification protects host bacteria, notably methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA), from numerous antibiotics, including agents (e.g. linezolid, retapamulin) that were developed to treat such organisms. Cfr contains a single [4Fe-4S] cluster that binds two separate molecules of AdoMet during the reaction cycle. These are used sequentially to first methylate a cysteine residue, Cys338; and subsequently generate an oxidative radical intermediate that facilitates methyl transfer to the unreactive C8 (and/or C2) carbon centres of adenosine 2503. How the Cfr active site, with its single [4Fe-4S] cluster, catalyses these two distinct activities that each utilise AdoMet as a substrate remains to be established. Here, we use absorbance and electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) spectroscopy to investigate the interactions of AdoMet with the [4Fe-4S] clusters of wild-type Cfr and a Cys338 Ala mutant, which is unable to accept a methyl group. Cfr binds AdoMet with high (∼ 10 µM) affinity notwithstanding the absence of the RNA cosubstrate. In wild-type Cfr, where Cys338 is methylated, AdoMet binding leads to rapid oxidation of the [4Fe-4S] cluster and production of 5'-deoxyadenosine (DOA). In contrast, while Cys338 Ala Cfr binds AdoMet with equivalent affinity, oxidation of the [4Fe-4S] cluster is not observed. Our results indicate that the presence of a methyl group on Cfr Cys338 is a key determinant of the activity of the enzyme towards AdoMet, thus enabling a single active site to support two distinct modes of AdoMet cleavage. PMID:23861844

  3. Nuclear Clusters in Astrophysics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kubono, S.; Binh, Dam N.; Hayakawa, S.; Hashimoto, H.; Kahl, D.; Wakabayashi, Y.; Yamaguchi, H.; Teranishi, T.; Iwasa, N.; Komatsubara, T.; Kato, S.; Khiem, Le H.

    2010-03-01

    The role of nuclear clustering is discussed for nucleosynthesis in stellar evolution with Cluster Nucleosynthesis Diagram (CND) proposed before. Special emphasis is placed on α-induced stellar reactions together with molecular states for O and C burning.

  4. Matlab Cluster Ensemble Toolbox

    SciTech Connect

    Sapio, Vincent De; Kegelmeyer, Philip

    2009-04-27

    This is a Matlab toolbox for investigating the application of cluster ensembles to data classification, with the objective of improving the accuracy and/or speed of clustering. The toolbox divides the cluster ensemble problem into four areas, providing functionality for each. These include, (1) synthetic data generation, (2) clustering to generate individual data partitions and similarity matrices, (3) consensus function generation and final clustering to generate ensemble data partitioning, and (4) implementation of accuracy metrics. With regard to data generation, Gaussian data of arbitrary dimension can be generated. The kcenters algorithm can then be used to generate individual data partitions by either, (a) subsampling the data and clustering each subsample, or by (b) randomly initializing the algorithm and generating a clustering for each initialization. In either case an overall similarity matrix can be computed using a consensus function operating on the individual similarity matrices. A final clustering can be performed and performance metrics are provided for evaluation purposes.

  5. [Pathophysiology of cluster headache].

    PubMed

    Donnet, Anne

    2015-11-01

    The aetiology of cluster headache is partially unknown. Three areas are involved in the pathogenesis of cluster headache: the trigeminal nociceptive pathways, the autonomic system and the hypothalamus. The cluster headache attack involves activation of the trigeminal autonomic reflex. A dysfunction located in posterior hypothalamic gray matter is probably pivotal in the process. There is a probable association between smoke exposure, a possible genetic predisposition and the development of cluster headache.

  6. Clustering algorithm studies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Graf, Norman A.

    2001-07-01

    An object-oriented framework for undertaking clustering algorithm studies has been developed. We present here the definitions for the abstract Cells and Clusters as well as the interface for the algorithm. We intend to use this framework to investigate the interplay between various clustering algorithms and the resulting jet reconstruction efficiency and energy resolutions to assist in the design of the calorimeter detector.

  7. Glucomannan and glucomannan plus spirulina added to pork significantly block dietary cholesterol effects on lipoproteinemia, arylesterase activity, and CYP7A1 expression in Zucker fa/fa rats.

    PubMed

    González-Torres, Laura; Vázquez-Velasco, Miguel; Olivero-David, Raúl; Bastida, Sara; Benedí, Juana; González, Rafaela Raposo; González-Muñoz, Ma José; Sánchez-Muniz, Francisco J

    2015-12-01

    Zucker fa/fa rats easily develop dyslipidemia and obesity. Restructured pork (RP) is a suitable matrix for including functional ingredients. The effects of glucomannan- RP or glucomannan plus spirulina-enriched RP on plasma lipid/lipoprotein levels, cytochrome P450 7A1 (CYP7A1) expression, and arylesterase activity in growing fa/fa rats fed high-energy, high-fat cholesterol-enriched diets were tested. Groups of six rats each received diet containing 15% control-RP (C), 15% glucomannan-RP diet (G), 15% glucomannan + spirulina-RP diet (GS), and same diets enriched with 2.4% cholesterol and 0.49% cholic acid (cholesterol-enriched control (HC), cholesterol-enriched glucomannan (HG), and cholesterol-enriched glucomannan + spirulina (HGS) diets) over a 7-week period. C diet induced obesity, severe hyperglycemia, moderate hypercholesterolemia, and hypertriglyceridemia. Those facts were not significantly modified by G or GS diets. G diet increased CYP7A1 expression but decreased the total cholesterol/high density lipoproteins (HDL)-cholesterol ratio (p < 0.05) vs. C diet. GS vs. G diet increased (p < 0.05) CYP7A1 expression. HC vs. C diet reduced food intake, body weight gain, and plasma glucose (p < 0.01) but increased cholesterolemia (p < 0.01), lipidemia (plasma cholesterol plus triglycerides) (p < 0.001), cholesterol/triglyceride ratio in very low density lipoproteins (VLDL), and HDL (p < 0.05), cholesterol transported by VLDL and intermediate density lipoproteins (IDL) + low density lipoproteins (LDL), total cholesterol/HDL-cholesterol ratio and CYP7A1 expression (at least p < 0.05). HG and HGS diets vs. HC noticeably reduced lipidemia (p < 0.001), normalized VLDL and IDL + LDL lipid composition, and increased CYP7A1 expression (p < 0.01) but did not modify the cholesterol/HDL-cholesterol ratio. HGS vs. HG decreased triglyceridemia, the triglyceride-glucose (TyG) index and increased arylesterase/HDL-cholesterol activity (p < 0

  8. A modified F/A-18A sporting a distinctive red, white and blue paint scheme is the test aircraft for

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2001-01-01

    A modified F/A-18A sporting a distinctive red, white and blue paint scheme is the test aircraft for the Active Aeroelastic Wing (AAW) project at NASA's Dryden Flight Research Center, Edwards, California.

  9. This modified F/A-18A with its distinctive red, white and blue paint scheme is the test aircraft for

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2001-01-01

    This modified F/A-18A with its distinctive red, white and blue paint scheme is the test aircraft for the Active Aeroelastic Wing (AAW) project at NASA's Dryden Flight Research Center, Edwards, California.

  10. With a long flight data probe extending from its nose, this F/A-18A has been modified to conduct fli

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2001-01-01

    With a long flight data probe extending from its nose, this F/A-18A has been modified to conduct flight research in the Active Aeroelastic Wing (AAW) project at NASA's Dryden Flight Research Center, Edwards, California.

  11. "Near-bottom sonar mapping along the Eastern Lau Spreading Center and Valu Fa Ridge"

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sleeper, J. D.; Martinez, F.; Edwards, M.; Dunn, R.; Baker, E. T.

    2009-12-01

    We present results from high resolution sidescan sonar mapping at the Ridge 2000 Lau Integrated Studies Site, a back-arc spreading center in the Southwest Pacific. The survey covered segments of the Eastern Lau Spreading Center (ELSC) and Valu Fa Ridge (VFR), which exhibit strong contrasts in geologic and geophysical characteristics, including variations in ridge morphology, volcanic and tectonic structures, lava composition and texture, magma production, and spreading rate. The bulk of the data were collected in 2008 aboard R/V Kilo Moana (KM0804), using the deep-towed IMI120 (DSL120A) sonar, with an array of miniature autonomous plume recorder's (MAPR's) tethered to the tow cable to detect hydrothermal plume signatures in the water column. The ELSC survey covered an area ~10 km wide by 100 km long centered on the spreading axis, with tracks spaced ~1 km apart, but as close as ~500 m in the vicinity of the ABE hydrothermal vent field, and also included the Tow Cam and Kilo Moana vent fields. The VFR survey covered a ~5 km wide by 100 km long area with ~700 m-spaced tracks, including the Vai Lili, Mariner, and Tui Malila vent sites. The IMI120 has a resolution of ~1-2 meters, giving the first detailed view of the on- and off-axis structures in the two focus regions. Navigational corrections to the sidescan data were made through feature-matching between the deep-towed data and a lower resolution background ship bathymetry grid, using software developed by the Hawaiian Mapping and Research Group. Background bathymetry and lower resolution (~100 m) sidescan data were compiled from previous cruises on R/V Kilo Moana, and an early-2009 seismic survey on R/V Marcus G. Langseth (L-SCAN). Hydrothermal plume data collected with the MAPR's are coregistered with the deep-towed sidescan data to illuminate correlations between seafloor structures and plume signatures. The axis of the VFR in the south forms a peaked ridge, inflated by abundant melt supply, and draped with

  12. Hydrothermal Plume Distributions Along the Valu Fa Ridge and East Lau Spreading Center, Lau Backarc Basin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baker, E. T.; Walker, S. L.; Resing, J. A.; Massoth, G. J.; Martinez, F.; Taylor, B.; de Ronde, C. E.

    2004-12-01

    Extensive studies along midocean ridges (MORs) from ultraslow- to superfast-spreading find a robust correlation, at the multi-segment scale, between the incidence of hydrothermal plumes (ph) and the spreading rate, a proxy for the long-term melt supply. On the segment and sub-segment scales, these studies likewise find a good correlation between ph and cross-axial inflation, a proxy for higher frequency variability in the melt supply. To test the validity of these correlations in a backarc setting, where complex tectonics may weaken the connection between spreading rate and melt supply, we conducted multiple surveys of the hydrothermal plume distribution along three geophysically and morphologically distinct ridge sections in the Lau backarc basin: Valu Fa Ridge (VFR, 22.7-21.43° S), southern East Lau Spreading Center (S-ELSC, 21.43-20.53° S), and N-ELSC (20.53-19.3° S). On the TELVE cruise in March 2003 we used an optical sensor on CTDO tow-yos to map plumes on the southern 88 km of the VFR. In April 2004, on the initial cruise of the RIDGE ISS Lau project, we used both CTDO tow-yos and a vertical array of optical/temperature sensors (MAPRs) on the DSL-120 sidescan vehicle to conduct multiple surveys of the entire VFR/ELSC. The VFR/ELSC complex is distinctly different than typical MORs in several ways: (1) spreading rate more than doubles from 39 to 96 mm/yr over just 400 km between the southern end of the VFR and the northern end of the ELSC; (2) cross-axial inflation and axial depth are inversely correlated with spreading rate, decreasing northward from +5 km2 and ˜1800 m, respectively, to -5 km2 and ˜3000 m; and (3) geophysical studies suggest that melt production is also inversely correlated with spreading rate, owing to increasing distance from the melt-rich arc front from south to north along the ridge complex. Our surveys found >20 hydrothermal plume areas, ranging from <1 km to >20 km in axial extent, and rising as high as 500 m above the seafloor

  13. GNRs@SiO2-FA in combination with radiotherapy induces the apoptosis of HepG2 cells by modulating the expression of apoptosis-related proteins

    PubMed Central

    GAO, BIN; SHEN, LEI; HE, KE-WU; XIAO, WEI-HUA

    2015-01-01

    The aim of the present study was to examine the apoptosis of the hepatocellular carcinoma cell line, HepG2, induced by treatment with folic acid-conjugated silica-coated gold nanorods (GNRs@SiO2-FA) in combination with radiotherapy, and to determine the involvement of apoptosis-related proteins. An MTT colorimetric assay was used to assess the biocompatibility of GNRs@SiO2-FA. The distribution of GNRs@SiO2-FA into the cells was observed using transmission electron microscopy (TEM). HepG2 cells cultured in vitro were divided into the following 4 groups: i)the control group (untreated), ii) the GNRs@SiO2-FA group, iii) the radiotherapy group (iodine 125 seeds) and iv) the combination group (treated with GNRs@SiO2-FA and iodine 125 seeds) groups. The apoptosis of the HepG2 cells was detected by flow cytometry. The concentration range of <40 µg/ml GNRs@SiO2-FA was found to be safe for the biological activity of the HepG2 cells. GNRs@SiO2-FA entered the cytoplasm through endocytosis. The apoptotic rates of the HepG2 cells were higher in the GNRs@SiO2-FA and radiotherapy groups than in the control group (P<0.05). The apoptotic rate was also significantly higher in the combination group than the GNRs@SiO2-FA and radiotherapy groups (P<0.05). Taken together, these findings demonstrate that the combination of GNRs@SiO2-FA and radiotherapy more effectively induces the apoptosis of HepG2 cells. These apoptotic effects are achieved by increasing the protein expression of Bax and caspase-3, and inhibiting the protein expression of Bcl-2 and Ki-67. The combination of GNRs@SiO2-FA and radiotherapy may thus prove to be a new approach in the treatment of primary liver cancer. PMID:26648274

  14. A new clustering strategy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Feng, Jian-xin; Tang, Jia-fu; Wang, Guang-xing

    2007-04-01

    On the basis of the analysis of clustering algorithm that had been proposed for MANET, a novel clustering strategy was proposed in this paper. With the trust defined by statistical hypothesis in probability theory and the cluster head selected by node trust and node mobility, this strategy can realize the function of the malicious nodes detection which was neglected by other clustering algorithms and overcome the deficiency of being incapable of implementing the relative mobility metric of corresponding nodes in the MOBIC algorithm caused by the fact that the receiving power of two consecutive HELLO packet cannot be measured. It's an effective solution to cluster MANET securely.

  15. Star cluster dynamics.

    PubMed

    Vesperini, Enrico

    2010-02-28

    Dynamical evolution plays a key role in shaping the current properties of star clusters and star cluster systems. A detailed understanding of the effects of evolutionary processes is essential to be able to disentangle the properties that result from dynamical evolution from those imprinted at the time of cluster formation. In this review, I focus my attention on globular clusters, and review the main physical ingredients driving their early and long-term evolution, describe the possible evolutionary routes and show how cluster structure and stellar content are affected by dynamical evolution.

  16. Participation of the iron-sulphur cluster and of the covalently bound coenzyme of trimethylamine dehydrogenase in catalysis.

    PubMed

    Steenkamp, D J; Singer, T P

    1978-02-01

    Bacterial trimethylamine dehydrogenase contains a novel type of covalently bound flavin mononucleotide and a tetrameric iron-sulphur centre. The dehydrogenase takes up 1.5mol of dithionite/mol of enzyme and is thereby converted into the flavin quinol-reduced (4Fe-4S) form, with the expected bleaching of the visible absorption band of the flavin and the emergence of signals of typical reduced ferredoxin in the electronparamagnetic-resonance spectrum. On reduction with a slight excess of substrate, however, unusual absorption and electron-paramagnetic-resonance spectra appear quite rapidly. The latter is attributed to extensive interaction between the reduced (4Fe-4S) centre and the flavin semiquinone. The species of enzyme arising during the catalytic cycle were studied by a combination of rapid-freeze e.p.r. and stopped-flow spectophotometry. The initial reduction of the flavin to the quinol form is far too rapid to be rate-limiting in catalysis, as is the reoxidation of the substrate-reduced enzyme by phenazine methosulphate. Formation of the spin-spin-interacting species from the dihydroflavin is considerably slower, however, and it may be the rate-limiting step in the catalytic cycle, since its rate of formation agrees reasonably well with the catalytic-centre activity determined in steady-state kinetic assays. In addition to the interacting form, a second form of the enzyme was noted during reduction by trimethylamine, differing in absorption spectrum, the structure of which remains to be determined.

  17. Unconventional methods for clustering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kotyrba, Martin

    2016-06-01

    Cluster analysis or clustering is a task of grouping a set of objects in such a way that objects in the same group (called a cluster) are more similar (in some sense or another) to each other than to those in other groups (clusters). It is the main task of exploratory data mining and a common technique for statistical data analysis used in many fields, including machine learning, pattern recognition, image analysis, information retrieval, and bioinformatics. The topic of this paper is one of the modern methods of clustering namely SOM (Self Organising Map). The paper describes the theory needed to understand the principle of clustering and descriptions of algorithm used with clustering in our experiments.

  18. Clinical comparison of the Bactec Mycosis IC/F, BacT/Alert FA, and BacT/Alert FN blood culture vials for the detection of candidemia.

    PubMed

    Ericson, Eva-Lena; Klingspor, Lena; Ullberg, Måns; Ozenci, Volkan

    2012-06-01

    The present study analyzed the performance of Bactec Mycosis IC/F, BacT/Alert FA, and BacT/Alert FN vials in detection and time to detection (TTD) of Candida spp. in 179 simultaneous blood cultures. The Mycosis IC/F, BacT/Alert FA, and BacT/Alert FN vials could detect Candida spp. in 144 (80.45%) of 179, 149 (83.24%) of 179, and 8 (4.47%) of 179 samples, respectively. With the presence of antifungal therapy, the numbers of positive vials were higher in BacT/Alert FA compared to Mycosis IC/F, 87/99 versus 73/99, respectively (P < 0.05). TTD (SD) for C. albicans was shorter in Mycosis IC/F than in BacT/Alert FA vials without antifungal therapy, 20.89 (9.33) versus 28.26 (9.77), respectively (P < 0.01). The detection of Candida spp., with concomitant bacteremia, was higher in Mycosis IC/F than in BacT/Alert FA vials, 28/30 and 19/30, respectively (P = 0.01). The present data show that the use of Bactec Mycosis IC/F together with BacT/Alert FA vials might improve the detection of Candida spp.

  19. Potent in vitro synergism of fusidic acid (FA) and berberine chloride (BBR) against clinical isolates of methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA).

    PubMed

    Liang, Rong-mei; Yong, Xiao-lan; Duan, Yu-qin; Tan, Yong-hong; Zeng, Ping; Zhou, Zi-ying; Jiang, Yan; Wang, Shi-hua; Jiang, Yun-ping; Huang, Xiao-chun; Dong, Zhao-hui; Hu, Ting-ting; Shi, Hui-qing; Li, Nan

    2014-11-01

    It was found in the present study that combined use of fusidic acid (FA) and berberine chloride (BBR) offered an in vitro synergistic action against 7 of the 30 clinical methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) strains, with a fractional inhibitory concentration (FIC) index ranging from 0.5 to 0.19. This synergistic effect was most pronounced on MRSA 4806, an FA-resistant isolate, with a minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC) value of 1,024 μg/ml. The time-kill curve experiment showed that FA plus BBR yielded a 4.2 log10 c.f.u./ml reduction in the number of MRSA 4806 bacteria after 24-h incubation as compared with BBR alone. Viable count analysis showed that FA plus BBR produced a 3.0 log10 c.f.u./ml decrease in biofilm formation and a 1.5 log10 c.f.u./ml decrease in mature biofilm in viable cell density as compared with BBR alone. In addition, phase contrast micrographs confirmed that biofilm formation was significantly inhibited and mature biofilm was obviously destructed when FA was used in combination with BBR. These results provide evidence that combined use of FA and BBR may prove to be a promising clinical therapeutic strategy against MRSA.

  20. Evidence for a positive regulatory role of strawberry (Fragaria x ananassa) Fa WRKY1 and Arabidopsis At WRKY75 proteins in resistance.

    PubMed

    Encinas-Villarejo, Sonia; Maldonado, Ana M; Amil-Ruiz, Francisco; de los Santos, Berta; Romero, Fernando; Pliego-Alfaro, Fernando; Muñoz-Blanco, Juan; Caballero, José L

    2009-01-01

    Knowledge of the molecular basis of plant resistance to pathogens in species other than Arabidopsis is limited. The function of Fa WRKY1, the first WRKY gene isolated from strawberry (Fragaria x ananassa), an important agronomical fruit crop, has been investigated here. Fa WRKY1 encodes a IIc WRKY transcription factor and is up-regulated in strawberry following Colletotrichum acutatum infection, treatments with elicitors, and wounding. Its Arabidopsis sequence homologue, At WRKY75, has been described as playing a role in regulating phosphate starvation responses. However, using T-DNA insertion mutants, a role for the At WRKY75 and Fa WRKY1 in the activation of basal and R-mediated resistance in Arabidopsis is demonstrated. At wrky75 mutants are more susceptible to virulent and avirulent isolates of Pseudomonas syringae. Overexpression of Fa WRKY1 in At wrky75 mutant and wild type reverts the enhanced susceptible phenotype of the mutant, and even increases resistance to avirulent strains of P. syringae. The resistance phenotype is uncoupled to PATHOGENESIS-RELATED (PR) gene expression, but it is associated with a strong oxidative burst and glutathione-S-transferase (GST) induction. Taken together, these results indicate that At WRKY75 and Fa WRKY1 act as positive regulators of defence during compatible and incompatible interactions in Arabidopsis and, very likely, Fa WRKY1 is an important element mediating defence responses to C. acutatum in strawberry. Moreover, these results provide evidence that Arabidopsis can be a useful model for functional studies in Rosacea species like strawberry.

  1. Development and verification of real-time controllers for the F/A-18 vertical fin buffet load alleviation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Yong; Viresh, Wickramasinghe; Zimcik, David

    2006-03-01

    Twin-tail fighter aircraft such as the F/A-18 may experience intense buffet loads at high angles of attack flight conditions and the broadband buffet loads primarily excite the first bending and torsional modes of the vertical fin that results in severe vibration and dynamic stresses on the vertical fin structures. To reduce the premature fatigue failure of the structure and to increase mission availability, a novel hybrid actuation system was developed to actively alleviate the buffet response of a full-scale F/A-18 vertical fin. A hydraulic rudder actuator was used to control the bending mode of the fin by engaging the rudder inertial force. Multiple Macro Fiber Composites actuators were surface mounted to provide induced strain actuation authority to control the torsional mode. Experimental system identification approach was selected to obtain a state-space model of the system using open-loop test data. An LQG controller was developed to minimize the dynamic response of the vertical fin at critical locations. Extensive simulations were conducted to evaluate the control authority of the actuators and the performance of the controller under various buffet load cases and levels. Closed-loop tests were performed on a full-scale F/A-18 empennage and the results validated the effectiveness of the real-time controller as well as the development methodology. In addition, the ground vibration test demonstrated that the hybrid actuation system is a feasible solution to alleviate the vertical tail buffet loads in high performance fighter aircraft.

  2. Stepwise microhydration of aromatic amide cations: formation of water solvation network revealed by infrared spectra of formanilide(+)-(H2O)(n) clusters (n ≤ 5).

    PubMed

    Klyne, Johanna; Schmies, Matthias; Fujii, Masaaki; Dopfer, Otto

    2015-01-29

    Hydration of peptides and proteins has a strong impact on their structure and function. Infrared photodissociation spectra (IRPD) of size-selected clusters of the formanilide cation, FA(+)-(H2O)n (n = 1-5), are analyzed by density functional theory calculations at the ωB97X-D/aug-cc-pVTZ level to determine the sequential microhydration of this prototypical aromatic amide cation. IRPD spectra are recorded in the hydride stretch and fingerprint ranges to probe the preferred interaction motifs and the cluster growth. IRPD spectra of cold Ar-tagged clusters, FA(+)-(H2O)n-Ar, reveal the important effects of temperature and entropy on the observed hydration motifs. At low temperature, the energetically most stable isomers are prominent, while at higher temperature less stable but more flexible isomers become increasingly populated because of entropy. In the most stable structures, the H2O ligands form a hydrogen-bonded solvent network attached to the acidic NH proton of the amide, which is stabilized by large cooperative effects arising from the excess positive charge. In larger clusters, hydration bridges the gap between the NH and CO groups (n ≥ 4) solvating the amide group rather than the more positively charged phenyl ring. Comparison with neutral FA-(H2O)n clusters reveals the strong impact of ionization on the acidity of the NH proton, the strength and topology of the interaction potential, and the structure of the hydration shell.

  3. Alternatives to CFC-114 in high-temperature heat pumps: Compressor performance with HFC-236ea and HFC-236fa

    SciTech Connect

    Kazachki, G S; Gage, C L; Hendriks, R V

    1996-01-01

    The paper gives results of comprehensive calorimeter tests on a semihermetic compressor with chlorofluorocarbon (CFC)-114, hydrofluorocarbon (HFC)-236ea, and HFC-236fa over a wide range of temperature test conditions: evaporating temperatures from 0 to 35 C and condensing temperatures from 40 to 110 C. Parameters assessed as criteria for performance evaluation and for reliable performance include: cooling capacity; electric power input, current, and voltage; coefficients of performance; compressor volumetric and isentropic efficiencies; and discharge and oil temperatures. Polyolester oil was used as lubricant in the compressor.

  4. New chemical alternative for ozone-depleting substances: HFC-236fa. Final report, December 1996-April 1997

    SciTech Connect

    Smith, N.D.; Brna, T.G.; Gage, C.L.; Hendriks, R.V.

    1997-07-01

    The report gives results of a preliminary evaluation of a new hydrofluoro-carbon (HFC)--HFC-236fa or 1,1,1,3,3,3-hexafluoropropane--asa possible alternative for chlorofluorocarbon (CFC)-114 (1,2-dichloro-1, 1,2,2-tetrafluoroethane) refrigerant for chillers and asa possible fire suppressant replacement for halon-1301 (bromotrifluoromethane). Evaluation tests included an examination of flammability, stability, atmospheric lifetime, thermophysical properties, lubricant miscibility and solubility, materials compatibility, inhalation toxicity, refrigerant performance, heat transfer characteristics, and flame suppression.

  5. Experimental Gonococcal Infection in Male Volunteers: Cumulative Experience with Neisseria Gonorrhoeae Strains FA1090 and MS11mkC

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2011-05-31

    unpublished data from J. G. Can- non ) and 43 men inoculated with wild-type FA1090 at doses from 1.0× 104 to 3.5× 106 cfu (Cohen et al., 1994 and unpublished...each dose response curve was tested using the Hosmer–Lemeshow statistic (Hosmer and Lemeshow, 2000). A non -significant P value (>0.05) indi- cates a...responses including production of specific anti- bodies are generally thought to require longer exposure than occurs during experimental infection

  6. Dietary t10,c12-CLA but not c9,t11 CLA reduces adipocyte size in the absence of changes in the adipose renin-angiotensin system in fa/fa Zucker rats.

    PubMed

    DeClercq, Vanessa; Zahradka, Peter; Taylor, Carla G

    2010-11-01

    In obesity, increased activity of the local renin-angiotensin system (RAS) and enlarged adipocytes with altered adipokine production are linked to the development of obesity-related health problems and cardiovascular disease. Mixtures of conjugated linoleic acid (CLA) isomers have been shown to reduce adipocyte size and alter the production of adipokines. The objective of this study was to investigate the effects of feeding individual CLA isomers on adipocyte size and adipokines associated with the local adipose RAS. Male fa/fa Zucker rats received either (a) control, (b) cis(c)9,trans(t)11-CLA, or (c) t10,c12-CLA diet for 8 weeks. The t10,c12-CLA isomer reduced adipocyte size and increased cell number in epididymal adipose tissue. RT-PCR and Western blot analysis revealed that neither CLA isomer altered mRNA or protein levels of angiotensinogen or AngII receptors in adipose tissue. Likewise, levels of the pro-inflammatory cytokines TNF-α and IL-6 or the anti-inflammatory cytokine IL-10 were unchanged in adipose tissue. Similarly, neither CLA isomer had any effect on phosphorylation nor DNA binding of NF-κB. Our results suggest that although the t10,c12-CLA isomer had beneficial effects on reducing adipocyte size in obese rats, this did not translate into changes in the local adipose RAS or associated adipokines.

  7. Electrospray Quadrupole Travelling Wave Ion Mobility Time-of-Flight Mass Spectrometry for the Detection of Plasma Metabolome Changes Caused by Xanthohumol in Obese Zucker (fa/fa) Rats

    PubMed Central

    Wickramasekara, Samanthi I.; Zandkarimi, Fereshteh; Morré, Jeff; Kirkwood, Jay; Legette, LeeCole; Jiang, Yuan; Gombart, Adrian F.; Stevens, Jan F.; Maier, Claudia S.

    2013-01-01

    This study reports on the use of traveling wave ion mobility quadrupole time-of-flight (ToF) mass spectrometry for plasma metabolomics. Plasma metabolite profiles of obese Zucker fa/fa rats were obtained after the administration of different oral doses of Xanthohumol; a hop-derived dietary supplement. Liquid chromatography coupled data independent tandem mass spectrometry (LC-MSE) and LC-ion mobility spectrometry (IMS)-MSE acquisitions were conducted in both positive and negative modes using a Synapt G2 High Definition Mass Spectrometry (HDMS) instrument. This method provides identification of metabolite classes in rat plasma using parallel alternating low energy and high energy collision spectral acquisition modes. Data sets were analyzed using pattern recognition methods. Statistically significant (p < 0.05 and fold change (FC) threshold > 1.5) features were selected to identify the up-/down-regulated metabolite classes. Ion mobility data visualized using drift scope software provided a graphical read-out of differences in metabolite classes. PMID:24958146

  8. Design of an effective bifunctional catalyst organotriphosphonic acid-functionalized ferric alginate (ATMP-FA) and optimization by Box-Behnken model for biodiesel esterification synthesis of oleic acid over ATMP-FA.

    PubMed

    Liu, Wei; Yin, Ping; Liu, Xiguang; Qu, Rongjun

    2014-12-01

    Biodiesel production has become an intense research area because of rapidly depleting energy reserves and increasing petroleum prices together with environmental concerns. This paper focused on the optimization of the catalytic performance in the esterification reaction of oleic acid for biodiesel production over the bifunctional catalyst organotriphosphonic acid-functionalized ferric alginate ATMP-FA. The reaction parameters including catalyst amount, ethanol to oleic acid molar ratio and reaction temperature have been optimized by response surface methodology (RSM) using the Box-Behnken model. It was found that the reaction temperature was the most significant factor, and the best conversion ratio of oleic acid could reach 93.17% under the reaction conditions with 9.53% of catalyst amount and 8.62:1 of ethanol to oleic acid molar ratio at 91.0 °C. The research results show that two catalytic species could work cooperatively to promote the esterification reaction, and the bifunctional ATMP-FA is a potential catalyst for biodiesel production.

  9. Fuzzy Subspace Clustering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Borgelt, Christian

    In clustering we often face the situation that only a subset of the available attributes is relevant for forming clusters, even though this may not be known beforehand. In such cases it is desirable to have a clustering algorithm that automatically weights attributes or even selects a proper subset. In this paper I study such an approach for fuzzy clustering, which is based on the idea to transfer an alternative to the fuzzifier (Klawonn and Höppner, What is fuzzy about fuzzy clustering? Understanding and improving the concept of the fuzzifier, In: Proc. 5th Int. Symp. on Intelligent Data Analysis, 254-264, Springer, Berlin, 2003) to attribute weighting fuzzy clustering (Keller and Klawonn, Int J Uncertain Fuzziness Knowl Based Syst 8:735-746, 2000). In addition, by reformulating Gustafson-Kessel fuzzy clustering, a scheme for weighting and selecting principal axes can be obtained. While in Borgelt (Feature weighting and feature selection in fuzzy clustering, In: Proc. 17th IEEE Int. Conf. on Fuzzy Systems, IEEE Press, Piscataway, NJ, 2008) I already presented such an approach for a global selection of attributes and principal axes, this paper extends it to a cluster-specific selection, thus arriving at a fuzzy subspace clustering algorithm (Parsons, Haque, and Liu, 2004).

  10. FANCD2 influences replication fork processes and genome stability in response to clustered DSBs.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Jiayun; Su, Fengtao; Mukherjee, Shibani; Mori, Eiichiro; Hu, Burong; Asaithamby, Aroumougame

    2015-01-01

    Fanconi Anemia (FA) is a cancer predisposition syndrome and the factors defective in FA are involved in DNA replication, DNA damage repair and tumor suppression. Here, we show that FANCD2 is critical for genome stability maintenance in response to high-linear energy transfer (LET) radiation. We found that FANCD2 is monoubiquitinated and recruited to the sites of clustered DNA double-stranded breaks (DSBs) specifically in S/G2 cells after high-LET radiation. Further, FANCD2 facilitated the repair of clustered DSBs in S/G2 cells and proper progression of S-phase. Furthermore, lack of FANCD2 led to a reduced rate of replication fork progression and elevated levels of both replication fork stalling and new origin firing in response to high-LET radiation. Mechanistically, FANCD2 is required for correct recruitment of RPA2 and Rad51 to the sites of clustered DSBs and that is critical for proper processing of clustered DSBs. Significantly, FANCD2-decifient cells exhibited defective chromosome segregation, elevated levels of chromosomal aberrations, and anchorage-independent growth in response to high-LET radiation. These findings establish FANCD2 as a key factor in genome stability maintenance in response to high-LET radiation and as a promising target to improve cancer therapy.

  11. Interaction of Boron Clusters with Oxygen: a DFT Study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Salavitabar, Kamron; Boggavarapu, Kiran; Kandalam, Anil

    A controlled combustion involving aluminum nanoparticles has often been the focus of studies in the field of solid fuel propellants. However very little focus has been given to the study of boron nanoparticles in controlled combustion. In contrast to aluminum nanoclusters, boron nanoclusters (Bn) are known to exhibit a planar geometries even at the size of n = 19 - 20, and thus offer a greater surface area for interaction with oxygen. Earlier experimental studies have shown that boron nanoclusters exhibit different reactivity with oxygen depending on their size and charge. In this poster, we present our recent density functional theory based results, focusing on the reactivity patterns of neutral and negatively charged B5 cluster with On, where n = 1 - 5; and B6 cluster with On (n = 1 - 2). The effect of charge on the reactivity of boron cluster, variation in the stability of product clusters, i e., neutral and negatively charged B5On (n = 1 - 5) and B6On (n = 1 - 2) are also examined. Financial Support from West Chester University Foundation under FaStR grant is acknowledged.

  12. Alkali Metal Cluster Theory.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Jian

    Available from UMI in association with The British Library. Requires signed TDF. In this thesis, we apply the tight-binding Hubbard model to alkali metal clusters with Hartree-Fock self-consistent methods and perturbation methods for the numerical calculations. We have studied the relation between the equilibrium structures and the range of the hopping matrix elements in the Hubbard Hamiltonian. The results show that the structures are not sensitive to the interaction range but are determined by the number of valence electrons each atom has. Inertia tensors are used to analyse the symmetries of the clusters. The principal axes of the clusters are determined and they are the axes of rotational symmetries of clusters if the clusters have any. The eigenvalues of inertia tensors which are the indication of the deformation of clusters are compared between our model and the ellipsoidal jellium model. The agreement is good for large clusters. At a finite temperature, the thermal motion fluctuates the structures. We defined a fluctuation function with the distance matrix of a cluster. The fluctuation has been studied with the Monte-Carlo simulation method. Our studies show that the clusters remain in the solid state when temperature is low. The small values of fluctuation functions indicates the thermal vibration of atoms around their equilibrium positions. If the temperature is high, the atoms are delocalized. The cluster melts and enters the liquid region. The cluster melting is simulated by the Monte-Carlo simulation with the fluctuation function we defined. Energy levels of clusters are calculated from the Hubbard model. Ionization potentials and magic numbers are also obtained from these energy levels. The results confirm that the Hubbard model is a good approximation for a small cluster. The excitation energy is presented by the difference between the original level and excited level, and the electron-hole interactions. We also have studied cooling of clusters

  13. Characterisation and differentiation of pigments employed on the façade of ``Noto's Valley'' monuments (Sicily)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    La Russa, M. F.; Barone, G.; Mazzoleni, P.; Pezzino, A.; Crupi, V.; Majolino, D.

    2008-07-01

    Most of the “Noto’s Valley” monuments façades, located in different towns of Sicily such as Ragusa Ibla, Modica and Noto, present different colours and in many cases the towns themselves are characterized by evident chromatic variations. The knowledge of colour and in particular the characterization of pigments is of utmost importance in the baroque Sicilian buildings, because the peculiarity of the colour is one of the features that makes the “Noto Valley” monuments a World Cultural Heritage site. The present works aim is to characterise and differentiate the pigments used on the façade of monuments and inside the plasters. In particular, we perform a micro-textural and analytical analysis through scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and a mineralogical investigation through the conjunction of optical microscopy and fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FT-IR). All the experimental results have allowed us to clearly classify the pigments into earths rich in clay minerals and earth containing gypsum. Furthermore, we also show that the earths rich in clay minerals from Ragusa and Modica areas have local provenance.

  14. Prompt and Delayed Inelastic Scattering Reactions from Fission Neutron PGAA - First Results of FaNGaS

    SciTech Connect

    Rossbach, M.; Randriamalala, T.; Revay, Zs.; Kudejova, P.; Soelradel, S.; Wagner, F.

    2015-07-01

    The new instrument Fast Neutron Gamma Spectroscopy (FaNGaS) has been installed at the SR10 beam line of the FRM II Research Reactor in Garching and tested successfully. Complimentary to cold neutron PGAA, with FaNGaS inelastic scattering reactions induced by fission neutrons can be studied. Gamma lines from (n,n'γ) reactions up to now have been rarely studied and no adequate compilation of the emitted gamma energies exist. In developing nondestructive analytical techniques using neutron generator based PGAA such data are badly needed for quantification of heavy metals and actinides in e.g. nuclear waste or safeguards samples. A number of elements and relevant actinides have been irradiated in the fast neutron beam SR10 at the FRM II reactor in Garching, Germany. A heavily shielded 50% eff. HPGe detector perpendicular to the beam is looking at the samples exposed to 2.3 E8 cm{sup -2}s{sup -1} fission neutrons. Prompt gamma spectra have been taken and evaluated using the available data in scattered sources. Additional gamma lines have been detected and are being compiled to create a data base for (n,n') reactions. Particular emphasis is given on actinides including {sup 238}U, {sup 232}Th, {sup 237}Np, {sup 242}Pu and {sup 241}Am. Some examples will be given and first results will be discussed in this contribution. (authors)

  15. The mechanisms underlying overgeneral autobiographical memory: An evaluative review of evidence for the CaR-FA-X model

    PubMed Central

    Sumner, Jennifer A.

    2011-01-01

    Overgeneral autobiographical memory (OGM) has been found to be an important cognitive phenomenon with respect to depression and trauma-related psychopathology (e.g., posttraumatic stress disorder), and researchers have been interested in better understanding the factors that contribute to this proposed vulnerability factor. The most prominent model of mechanisms underlying OGM to date is Williams et al.’s (2007) CaR-FA-X model. This model proposes that three processes influence OGM: capture and rumination, functional avoidance, and impaired executive control. The author reviews the current state of support for the CaR-FA-X model by evaluating 38 studies that have examined OGM and one or more mechanisms of the model. Collectively, these studies reveal robust support for associations between OGM and both rumination and impaired executive control. OGM also appears to be a cognitive avoidance strategy, and there is evidence that avoiding the retrieval of specific memories reduces distress after an aversive event, at least in the short term. Important issues that have been left unresolved are highlighted, including the nature of the capture phenomenon, the role of trauma in functional avoidance, and the developmental nature of functional avoidance. Recommendations for future research that will enhance understanding of the factors that contribute to OGM are suggested. PMID:22142837

  16. Multiaxis thrust vectoring using axisymmetric nozzles and postexit vanes on an F/A-18 configuration vehicle

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bowers, Albion H.; Noffz, Gregory K.; Grafton, Sue B.; Mason, Mary L.; Peron, Lee R.

    1991-01-01

    A ground-based investigation was conducted on an operational system of multiaxis thrust vectoring using postexit vanes around an axisymmetric nozzle. This thrust vectoring system will be tested on the NASA F/A-18 High Alpha Research Vehicle (HARV) aircraft. The system provides thrust vectoring capability in both pitch and yaw. Ground based data were gathered from two separate tests at NASA Langley Research Center. The first was a static test in the 16-foot Transonic Tunnel Cold-Jet Facility with a 14.25 percent scale model of the axisymmetric nozzle and the postexit vanes. The second test was conducted in the 30 by 60 foot wind tunnel with a 16 percent F/A-18 complete configuration model. Data from the two sets are being used to develop models of jet plume deflection and thrust loss as a function of vane deflection. In addition, an aerodynamic interaction model based on plume deflection angles will be developed. Results from the scale model nozzle test showed that increased vane deflection caused exhaust plume turning. Aerodynamic interaction effects consisted primarily of favorable interaction of moments and unfavorable interaction of forces caused by the vectored jet plume.

  17. C-axis electrical resistivity of PrO1-aFaBiS2 single crystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nagao, Masanori; Miura, Akira; Watauchi, Satoshi; Takano, Yoshihiko; Tanaka, Isao

    2015-08-01

    The high anisotropy in RO1-aFaBiS2 (R denotes a rare-earth element) superconductors demonstrates their potential use as intrinsic Josephson junctions, considering the weak coupling among BiS2-PrO(F)-BiS2 (superconducting-normal-superconducting) layers along the c-axis. We grew PrO1-aFaBiS2 single crystals using CsCl/KCl flux. The superconducting anisotropies of the grown single crystals were estimated to be approximately 40-50 from the effective mass model. The c-axis transport properties were characterized using single-crystal s-shaped intrinsic Josephson junctions with a focused ion beam. Along the c-axis, the crystals showed zero resistivity at 2.7 K and a critical current density of 1.33 × 103 A/cm2 at 2.0 K. The current-voltage curve along the c-axis displayed hysteresis. The c-axis transport measurements under a magnetic field parallel to the ab-plane revealed a “lock-in” state due to the Josephson vortex flow, indicating that BiS2 superconductors are promising candidates for intrinsic Josephson junctions.

  18. [Effect of the inoculant strain Sphingomonas paucimobilis 20006FA on the bacterial composition of a phenanthrene-degrading consortium].

    PubMed

    Madueño, L; Coppotelli, B M; Morelli, I S

    2009-01-01

    The effect of the inoculant strain Sphingomonas paucimobilis 20006FA on the bacterial composition of a phenanthrene-degrading consortium obtained from a pristine soil in sequencing batch cultures was studied. Inoculated (F200+1) and non-inoculated (F200) phenanthrene-degrading consortia, were obtained. Bacterial diversity of consortia was studied at cultivable (phenotype and genotype characterization) and non-cultivable (PCR-DGGE) levels. During the successive cultures, a loss in the phenanthrene-degrading capacity and a decrease in the bacterial diversity were observed in both consortia. Although inoculation did not produce any significant changes in the consortia phenanthrene-degrading capacity (29.9% F200 and 27.6% F200+1), it did produce changes in the bacterial composition, showing a differential structural dynamics in the DGGE profiles of the inoculated consortium. In both consortia, a dominant band placed at the same position as that of the DNA of the inoculant strain in the DGGE gel could be observed. However, isolated cultures from the consortia which had an identical band position to that of S. paucimobilis 20006FA in the PCR-DGGE profile showed low similarity with respect to the inoculant strain (RAPD).

  19. Transonic Free-To-Roll Analysis of the F/A-18E and F-35 Configurations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Owens, D. Bruce; McConnell, Jeffrey K.; Brandon, Jay M.; Hall, Robert M.

    2004-01-01

    The free-to-roll technique is used as a tool for predicting areas of uncommanded lateral motions. Recently, the NASA/Navy/Air Force Abrupt Wing Stall Program extended the use of this technique to the transonic speed regime. Using this technique, this paper evaluates various wing configurations on the pre-production F/A-18E aircraft and the Joint Strike Fighter (F-35) aircraft. The configurations investigated include leading and trailing edge flap deflections, fences, leading edge flap gap seals, and vortex generators. These tests were conducted in the NASA Langley 16-Foot Transonic Tunnel. The analysis used a modification of a figure-of-merit developed during the Abrupt Wing Stall Program to discern configuration effects. The results showed how the figure-of-merit can be used to schedule wing flap deflections to avoid areas of uncommanded lateral motion. The analysis also used both static and dynamic wind tunnel data to provide insight into the uncommanded lateral behavior. The dynamic data was extracted from the time history data using parameter identification techniques. In general, modifications to the pre-production F/A-18E resulted in shifts in angle-of-attack where uncommanded lateral activity occurred. Sealing the gap between the inboard and outboard leading-edge flaps on the Navy version of the F-35 eliminated uncommanded lateral activity or delayed the activity to a higher angle-of-attack.

  20. The mechanisms underlying overgeneral autobiographical memory: an evaluative review of evidence for the CaR-FA-X model.

    PubMed

    Sumner, Jennifer A

    2012-02-01

    Overgeneral autobiographical memory (OGM) has been found to be an important cognitive phenomenon with respect to depression and trauma-related psychopathology (e.g., posttraumatic stress disorder), and researchers have been interested in better understanding the factors that contribute to this proposed vulnerability factor. The most prominent model of mechanisms underlying OGM to date is Williams et al.'s (2007) CaR-FA-X model. This model proposes that three processes influence OGM: capture and rumination, functional avoidance, and impaired executive control. The author reviews the current state of support for the CaR-FA-X model by evaluating 38 studies that have examined OGM and one or more mechanisms of the model. Collectively, these studies reveal robust support for associations between OGM and both rumination and impaired executive control. OGM also appears to be a cognitive avoidance strategy, and there is evidence that avoiding the retrieval of specific memories reduces distress after an aversive event, at least in the short term. Important issues that have been left unresolved are highlighted, including the nature of the capture phenomenon, the role of trauma in functional avoidance, and the developmental nature of functional avoidance. Recommendations for future research that will enhance understanding of the factors that contribute to OGM are suggested.

  1. Microbial deterioration of artistic tiles from the façade of the Grande Albergo Ausonia & Hungaria (Venice, Italy).

    PubMed

    Giacomucci, Lucia; Bertoncello, Renzo; Salvadori, Ornella; Martini, Ilaria; Favaro, Monica; Villa, Federica; Sorlini, Claudia; Cappitelli, Francesca

    2011-08-01

    The Grande Albergo Ausonia & Hungaria (Venice Lido, Italy) has an Art Nouveau polychrome ceramic coating on its façade, which was restored in 2007. Soon after the conservation treatment, many tiles of the façade decoration showed coloured alterations putatively attributed to the presence of microbial communities. To confirm the presence of the biological deposit and the stratigraphy of the Hungaria tiles, stereomicroscope, optical and environmental scanning electron microscope observations were made. The characterisation of the microbial community was performed using a PCR-DGGE approach. This study reported the first use of a culture-independent approach to identify the total community present in biodeteriorated artistic tiles. The case study examined here reveals that the coloured alterations on the tiles were mainly due to the presence of cryptoendolithic cyanobacteria. In addition, we proved that the microflora present on the tiles was generally greatly influenced by the environment of the Hungaria hotel. We found several microorganisms related to the alkaline environment, which is in the range of the tile pH, and related to the aquatic environment, the presence of the acrylic resin Paraloid B72® used during the 2007 treatment and the pollutants of the Venice lagoon.

  2. Flying Quality Analysis of a JAS 39 Gripen Ministick Controller in an F/A-18 Aircraft

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Carter, John F.; Stoliker, P. C.

    2000-01-01

    NASA Dryden conducted a handling qualities experiment using a small displacement centerstick controller that Saab-Scania developed for the JAS 39 Gripen aircraft. The centerstick, or ministick, was mounted in the rear cockpit of an F/A-18 aircraft. Production support flight control computers (PSFCC) provided a pilot-selectable research control system. The objectives for this experiment included determining whether the mechanical characteristics of the centerstick controller had any significant effect on the handling qualities of the F/A-18, and determining the usefulness of the PSFCCs for this kind of experiment. Five pilots evaluated closed-loop tracking tasks, including echelon and column formation flight and target following. Cooper-Harper ratings and pilot comments were collected for each maneuver. This paper describes the test system, including the PSFCCs, the Gripen centerstick, and the flight test experiment. The paper presents results of longitudinal handling qualities maneuvers, including low order equivalent systems, Neal-Smith, and controls anticipation parameter analyses. The experiment showed that, while the centerstick controller provided a different aircraft feel, few handling qualities deficiencies resulted. It also demonstrated that the PSFCCs were useful for this kind of investigation.

  3. [Enzymatic conversion of cephalosporin C to glutaryl-7-aminocephalosporanic acid using whole cells of the yeast Trigonopsis variabilis FA10].

    PubMed

    Chen, J; Zhu, T B; Zhang, Y F; Yang, Y L; Jiao, R S

    2001-03-01

    A process for the production of glutaryl-7-aminocephalosporanic acid (GL-7ACA) from cephalosporin C(CPC) using permeabilized cells of yeast Trigonopsis variabilis FA10 containing D-amino acid oxidase (DAO) is described. It was found that the bioconversion of CPC to GL-7ACA was interfered by the catalase activity presented in the cells that hydrolyzed the hydrogen peroxide and resulted in the accumulation of alpha-keto-adipyl-7-ACA (AKA-7ACA) and decrease of GL-7ACA yield. the methods to overcome this problem including the addition of extra H2O2 and use of catalase inhibitor, NaN3, were developed and the rate of GL-7ACA from CPC were 73% and 70.1%, respectively. Another alternative method was to incubate the permeabilized FA10 cells at pH10.5-11.0 for 30 minutes at 20 degrees C which served to selectively inactivate the catalase. In the bioconversion of CPC to GL-7ACA using pH10.5-treated cells without catalase activity, the high reaction yield of GL-7ACA(84%) was achieved.

  4. Genetic modifiers of Lepr{sup fa} associated with variability in insulin production and susceptibility to NIDDM

    SciTech Connect

    Chung, W.K.; Zheng, M.; Chua, M.

    1997-05-01

    In an attempt to identify the genetic basis for susceptibility to non-insulin-dependent diabetes mellitus within the context of obesity, we generated 401 genetically obese Lepr{sup fa}/Lepr{sup fa} F2 WKY13M intercross rats that demonstrated wide variation in multiple phenotypic measures related to diabetes, including plasma glucose concentration, percentage of glycosylated hemoglobin, plasma insulin concentration, and pancreatic islet morphology. Using selective genotyping genome scanning approaches, we have identified three quantitative trait loci (QTLs) on Chr. 1 (LOD 7.1 for pancreatic morpholology), Chr. 12 (LOD 5.1 for body mass index and LOD 3.4 for plasma glucose concentration), and Chr. 16 (P < 0.001 for genotype effect on plasma glucose concentration). The obese F2 progeny demonstrated sexual dimorphism for these traits, with increased diabetes susceptibility in the males appearing at approximately 6 weeks of age, as sexual maturation occurred. For each of the QTLs, the linked phenotypes demonstrated sexual dimorphism (more severe affection in males). The QTL on Chr. 1 maps to a region vicinal to that previously linked to adiposity in studies of diabetes susceptibility in the nonobese Goto-Kakizaki rat, which is genetically closely related to the Wistar counterstrain we employed. Several candidate genes, including tubby (tub), multigenic obesity 1 (Mob1), adult obesity and diabetes (Ad), and insulin-like growth factor-2 (Igf2), map to murine regions homologous to the QTL region identified on rat Chr. 1. 60 refs., 5 figs., 4 tabs.

  5. What can the Samoan "Fa'afafine" teach us about the Western concept of gender identity disorder in childhood?

    PubMed

    Vasey, Paul L; Bartlett, Nancy H

    2007-01-01

    This article examines whether gender identity disorder in childhood (GIDC) constitutes a mental disorder as outlined by the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders, 4th edition (DSM-IV-TR). Data were collected in Samoa, a culture that is characterized by a high degree of social tolerance towards feminine males who are known locally as fa'afafine. The study location was chosen because, unlike Western locales, it afforded the opportunity to examine whether gender-atypical behavior, gender-atypical identity, and sex-atypical identity, in and of themselves, cause distress in sex/gender variant individuals, while simultaneously controlling for the confounding effects of extreme societal intolerance towards such individuals. Because of our focus on the DSM-IV-TR's diagnosis of GIDC, we were specifically interested in ascertaining whether adult fa'afafine recalled a strong and persistent cross-gender identification in childhood, a sense of inappropriateness in the male-typical gender role, a discomfort with their sex, or distress associated with any of the above. In addition, we sought to determine whether parental encouragement or discouragement of cross-gender behaviors influence feelings of distress in relation to the behaviors in question. Based on the cross-cultural information presented here, we conclude that the diagnostic category of GIDC should not occur in its current form in future editions of the DSM, as there is no compelling evidence that cross-gender behaviors or identities, in and of themselves, cause distress in the individual.

  6. Information-based clustering

    PubMed Central

    Slonim, Noam; Atwal, Gurinder Singh; Tkačik, Gašper; Bialek, William

    2005-01-01

    In an age of increasingly large data sets, investigators in many different disciplines have turned to clustering as a tool for data analysis and exploration. Existing clustering methods, however, typically depend on several nontrivial assumptions about the structure of data. Here, we reformulate the clustering problem from an information theoretic perspective that avoids many of these assumptions. In particular, our formulation obviates the need for defining a cluster “prototype,” does not require an a priori similarity metric, is invariant to changes in the representation of the data, and naturally captures nonlinear relations. We apply this approach to different domains and find that it consistently produces clusters that are more coherent than those extracted by existing algorithms. Finally, our approach provides a way of clustering based on collective notions of similarity rather than the traditional pairwise measures. PMID:16352721

  7. Clusters of galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vikhlinin, A. A.; Kravtsov, A. V.; Markevich, M. L.; Sunyaev, R. A.; Churazov, E. M.

    2014-04-01

    Galaxy clusters are formed via nonlinear growth of primordial density fluctuations and are the most massive gravitationally bound objects in the present Universe. Their number density at different epochs and their properties depend strongly on the properties of dark matter and dark energy, making clusters a powerful tool for observational cosmology. Observations of the hot gas filling the gravitational potential well of a cluster allows studying gasdynamic and plasma effects and the effect of supermassive black holes on the heating and cooling of gas on cluster scales. The work of Yakov Borisovich Zeldovich has had a profound impact on virtually all cosmological and astrophysical studies of galaxy clusters, introducing concepts such as the Harrison-Zeldovich spectrum, the Zeldovich approximation, baryon acoustic peaks, and the Sunyaev-Zeldovich effect. Here, we review the most basic properties of clusters and their role in modern astrophysics and cosmology.

  8. Chemistry Within Molecular Clusters

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1990-01-01

    DME )nCH3OCH 2 +). We speculate that this is due to the fragments being consumed by an ion-molecule reaction within the cluster. One likely candidate is...the ion-molecule reaction of the fragment cations with a neutral DME , within the bulk cluster to form a trimethyloxonlum cation intermediate. This...the observed products. We therefore speculate that the DME cluster reactions leading to the same products, should involve the same mechanism found to

  9. Chemistry Within Molecular Clusters

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1992-06-01

    and ( DME ).CH 3OCH2+). We speculate that this is due to the fragments being consumed by an ion-molecule reaction within the cluster. A likely candidate...is the ion-molecule reaction of the fragment cations with a neutral DME within the bulk cluster, to form a trimethyloxonium cation intermediate...a trimethyloxonium intermediate as the common intermediate for the observed products. We therefore speculate that the DME cluster reactions leading to

  10. Cluster State Quantum Computation

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2014-02-01

    nearest neighbor cluster state has been shown to be a universal resource for MBQC thus we can say our quantum computer is universal. We note that...CLUSTER STATE QUANTUM COMPUTATION FEBRUARY 2014 FINAL TECHNICAL REPORT APPROVED FOR PUBLIC RELEASE; DISTRIBUTION UNLIMITED STINFO COPY AIR FORCE...TITLE AND SUBTITLE CLUSTER STATE QUANTUM COMPUTATION 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER IN-HOUSE 5b. GRANT NUMBER N/A 5c. PROGRAM ELEMENT NUMBER 62788F 6

  11. Chemical Reactions in Clusters

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1992-11-04

    NH 3)n, n _> 4, clusters has been attributed to the (solvated) naphtholate anion.3a A single picosecond decay measurement has been reported which...vibrational energy in the cluster Sl state. The data are summarized in Table I. A model to explain these decay results can be constructed based on a proton...11 TITLE (Include Security Classification) Chemical Reactions in Clusters 12 PERSONAL AUTHOR(S) Elliot R. Bernstein 13a TYPE OF REPORT 13b TIME COVERED

  12. Star Clusters within FIRE

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Perez, Adrianna; Moreno, Jorge; Naiman, Jill; Ramirez-Ruiz, Enrico; Hopkins, Philip F.

    2017-01-01

    In this work, we analyze the environments surrounding star clusters of simulated merging galaxies. Our framework employs Feedback In Realistic Environments (FIRE) model (Hopkins et al., 2014). The FIRE project is a high resolution cosmological simulation that resolves star forming regions and incorporates stellar feedback in a physically realistic way. The project focuses on analyzing the properties of the star clusters formed in merging galaxies. The locations of these star clusters are identified with astrodendro.py, a publicly available dendrogram algorithm. Once star cluster properties are extracted, they will be used to create a sub-grid (smaller than the resolution scale of FIRE) of gas confinement in these clusters. Then, we can examine how the star clusters interact with these available gas reservoirs (either by accreting this mass or blowing it out via feedback), which will determine many properties of the cluster (star formation history, compact object accretion, etc). These simulations will further our understanding of star formation within stellar clusters during galaxy evolution. In the future, we aim to enhance sub-grid prescriptions for feedback specific to processes within star clusters; such as, interaction with stellar winds and gas accretion onto black holes and neutron stars.

  13. Melting of nickel clusters

    SciTech Connect

    Garzon, I.L.; Jellinek, J.

    1991-12-31

    The meltinglike phenomenon in Ni{sub n}, n = 19,20,55, clusters is studied using microcanonical molecular dynamics simulations. The interaction between the atoms in the clusters is modelled by a size-dependent Gupta-like potential that incorporates many-body effects. The clusters display the ``usual`` stages in their meltinglike transition, which characterize also Lennard-Jones (e.g., noble gas) and ionic clusters. In addition, Ni{sub 20} passes through a so-called premelting stage found earlier also for Ni{sub 14}. 11 ref., 3 figs.

  14. Melting of nickel clusters

    SciTech Connect

    Garzon, I.L. . Inst. de Fisica); Jellinek, J. )

    1991-01-01

    The meltinglike phenomenon in Ni{sub n}, n = 19,20,55, clusters is studied using microcanonical molecular dynamics simulations. The interaction between the atoms in the clusters is modelled by a size-dependent Gupta-like potential that incorporates many-body effects. The clusters display the usual'' stages in their meltinglike transition, which characterize also Lennard-Jones (e.g., noble gas) and ionic clusters. In addition, Ni{sub 20} passes through a so-called premelting stage found earlier also for Ni{sub 14}. 11 ref., 3 figs.

  15. Mini-clusters

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chinellato, J. A.; Dobrigkeit, C.; Bellandifilho, J.; Lattes, C. M. G.; Menon, M. J.; Navia, C. E.; Pamilaju, A.; Sawayanagi, K.; Shibuya, E. H.; Turtelli, A., Jr.

    1985-01-01

    Experimental results of mini-clusters observed in Chacaltaya emulsion chamber no.19 are summarized. The study was made on 54 single core shower upper and 91 shower clusters of E(gamma) 10 TeV from 30 families which are visible energy greater than 80 TeV and penetrate through both upper and lower detectors of the two-story chamber. The association of hadrons in mini-cluster is made clear from their penetrative nature and microscopic observation of shower continuation in lower chamber. Small P sub t (gamma) of hadrons in mini-clusters remained in puzzle.

  16. Testing the CaR-FA-X Model: Investigating the Mechanisms Underlying Reduced Autobiographical Memory Specificity in Individuals With and Without a History of Depression

    PubMed Central

    Sumner, Jennifer A.; Mineka, Susan; Adam, Emma K.; Craske, Michelle G.; Vrshek-Schallhorn, Suzanne; Wolitzky-Taylor, Kate; Zinbarg, Richard E.

    2014-01-01

    Reduced autobiographical memory specificity (AMS) is an important cognitive phenomenon in major depressive disorder (MDD), but knowledge is lacking about its mechanisms. The CaR-FA-X model of Williams and colleagues proposed that three processes contribute to reduced AMS, alone or in interaction: capture and rumination (CaR), functional avoidance (FA), and impaired executive control (X). However, the entire CaR-FA-X model has not been tested. We addressed this gap in the literature by investigating contributions of the CaR-FA-X mechanisms to reduced AMS, alone or in interaction, in a subset of young adults (N=439) from the Northwestern-UCLA Youth Emotion Project. Participants were classified as those with (n=164) and without (n=275) a history of MDD at AMS assessment. They completed measures of: AMS; rumination (the brooding factor; CaR); childhood, adolescent, and early adulthood adversity (FA); avoidant coping (FA); and verbal fluency (X). Using structural equation modeling, we found greatest support for associations between reduced AMS and the capture and rumination, and impaired executive control mechanisms. In those with and without a history of MDD, brooding and verbal fluency interacted to contribute to reduced AMS. For participants without a history of MDD, lower verbal fluency (indicating impaired executive control) was associated with reduced AMS among those high on brooding. For participants with a history of MDD, lower verbal fluency was associated with reduced AMS among those low on brooding. The first finding was consistent with predictions from the CaR-FA-X model but the latter was not. Implications for conceptualizations of reduced AMS and its mechanisms are discussed. PMID:24978693

  17. Testing the CaR-FA-X model: investigating the mechanisms underlying reduced autobiographical memory specificity in individuals with and without a history of depression.

    PubMed

    Sumner, Jennifer A; Mineka, Susan; Adam, Emma K; Craske, Michelle G; Vrshek-Schallhorn, Suzanne; Wolitzky-Taylor, Kate; Zinbarg, Richard E

    2014-08-01

    Reduced autobiographical memory specificity (AMS) is an important cognitive phenomenon in major depressive disorder (MDD), but knowledge about mechanisms is lacking. The CaR-FA-X model of Williams and colleagues (2007) proposed that 3 processes contributed to reduce AMS: capture and rumination (CaR), functional avoidance (FA), and impaired executive control (X). However, the entire CaR-FA-X model has not been tested. We addressed this gap in the literature by investigating contributions of the CaR-FA-X mechanisms to reduced AMS, alone or in interaction, in a subset of young adults (N = 439) from the Northwestern-UCLA Youth Emotion Project. Participants were classified as those with (n = 164) and without (n = 275) a history of MDD at AMS assessment. They completed measures of: AMS; rumination (the brooding factor; CaR); childhood, adolescent, and early adulthood adversity (FA); avoidant coping (FA); and verbal fluency (X). Using structural equation modeling, we found greatest support for associations between reduced AMS and the capture and rumination, and impaired executive control mechanisms. In those with and without a history of MDD, brooding and verbal fluency interacted to contribute to reduced AMS. For participants without a history of MDD, lower verbal fluency (indicating impaired executive control) was associated with reduced AMS among those high on brooding. For participants with a history of MDD, lower verbal fluency was associated with reduced AMS among those low on brooding. The first finding was consistent with the CaR-FA-X model but the latter was not. Implications for conceptualizations of reduced AMS and its mechanisms are discussed.

  18. Clustering versus non-clustering phase synchronizations

    SciTech Connect

    Liu, Shuai; Zhan, Meng

    2014-03-15

    Clustering phase synchronization (CPS) is a common scenario to the global phase synchronization of coupled dynamical systems. In this work, a novel scenario, the non-clustering phase synchronization (NPS), is reported. It is found that coupled systems do not transit to the global synchronization until a certain sufficiently large coupling is attained, and there is no clustering prior to the global synchronization. To reveal the relationship between CPS and NPS, we further analyze the noise effect on coupled phase oscillators and find that the coupled oscillator system can change from CPS to NPS with the increase of noise intensity or system disorder. These findings are expected to shed light on the mechanism of various intriguing self-organized behaviors in coupled systems.

  19. A nonparametric clustering technique which estimates the number of clusters

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ramey, D. B.

    1983-01-01

    In applications of cluster analysis, one usually needs to determine the number of clusters, K, and the assignment of observations to each cluster. A clustering technique based on recursive application of a multivariate test of bimodality which automatically estimates both K and the cluster assignments is presented.

  20. Ferulic acid (FA) abrogates γ-radiation induced oxidative stress and DNA damage by up-regulating nuclear translocation of Nrf2 and activation of NHEJ pathway.

    PubMed

    Das, Ujjal; Manna, Krishnendu; Khan, Amitava; Sinha, Mahuya; Biswas, Sushobhan; Sengupta, Aaveri; Chakraborty, Anindita; Dey, Sanjit

    2017-01-01

    The present study was aimed to evaluate the radioprotective effect of ferulic acid (FA), a naturally occurring plant flavonoid in terms of DNA damage and damage related alterations of repair pathways by gamma radiation. FA was administered at a dose of 50 mg/kg body weight for five consecutive days prior to exposing the swiss albino mice to a single dose of 10 Gy gamma radiation. Ionising radiation induces oxidative damage manifested by decreased expression of Cu, Zn-SOD (SOD stands for super oxide dismutase), Mn-SOD and catalase. Gamma radiation promulgated reactive oxygen species (ROS) mediated DNA damage and modified repair pathways. ROS enhanced nuclear translocation of p53, activated ATM (ataxia telangiectasia-mutated protein), increased expression of GADD45a (growth arrest and DNA-damage-inducible protein) gene and inactivated Non homologous end joining (NHEJ) repair pathway. The comet formation in irradiated mice peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC) reiterated the DNA damage in IR exposed groups. FA pretreatment significantly prevented the comet formation and regulated the nuclear translocation of p53, inhibited ATM activation and expression of GADD45a gene. FA promoted the nuclear translocation of nuclear factor (erythroid-derived 2)-like 2 (Nrf2) and activated NHEJ repair pathway to overcome ROS mediated oxidative stress and DNA damage. Therefore, the current study stated that FA can challenge the oxidative stress by (i) inducing nuclear translocation of Nrf2, (ii) scavenging ROS, and (iii) activating NHEJ DNA repair process.

  1. Photoionization of molecular clusters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Andres, R. P.; Calo, J. M.

    1981-12-01

    An experimental apparatus consisting of a novel multiple expansion cluster source coupled with a molecular beam system and photoionization mass spectrometer has been designed and constructed. This apparatus has been thoroughly tested and preliminary measurements of the growth kinetics of water clusters and the photoionization cross section of the water dimer have been carried out.

  2. Probability and Cancer Clusters

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hamilton-Keene, Rachael; Lenard, Christoper T.; Mills, Terry M.

    2009-01-01

    Recently there have been several news items about possible cancer clusters in the Australian media. The term "cancer cluster" is used when an unusually large number of people in one geographic area, often a workplace, are diagnosed with cancer in a short space of time. In this paper the authors explore this important health issue using…

  3. Coma cluster of galaxies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1999-01-01

    Atlas Image mosaic, covering 34' x 34' on the sky, of the Coma cluster, aka Abell 1656. This is a particularly rich cluster of individual galaxies (over 1000 members), most prominently the two giant ellipticals, NGC 4874 (right) and NGC 4889 (left). The remaining members are mostly smaller ellipticals, but spiral galaxies are also evident in the 2MASS image. The cluster is seen toward the constellation Coma Berenices, but is actually at a distance of about 100 Mpc (330 million light years, or a redshift of 0.023) from us. At this distance, the cluster is in what is known as the 'Hubble flow,' or the overall expansion of the Universe. As such, astronomers can measure the Hubble Constant, or the universal expansion rate, based on the distance to this cluster. Large, rich clusters, such as Coma, allow astronomers to measure the 'missing mass,' i.e., the matter in the cluster that we cannot see, since it gravitationally influences the motions of the member galaxies within the cluster. The near-infrared maps the overall luminous mass content of the member galaxies, since the light at these wavelengths is dominated by the more numerous older stellar populations. Galaxies, as seen by 2MASS, look fairly smooth and homogeneous, as can be seen from the Hubble 'tuning fork' diagram of near-infrared galaxy morphology. Image mosaic by S. Van Dyk (IPAC).

  4. Mixed-Initiative Clustering

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Huang, Yifen

    2010-01-01

    Mixed-initiative clustering is a task where a user and a machine work collaboratively to analyze a large set of documents. We hypothesize that a user and a machine can both learn better clustering models through enriched communication and interactive learning from each other. The first contribution or this thesis is providing a framework of…

  5. Cluster Guide. Accounting Occupations.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Beaverton School District 48, OR.

    Based on a recent task inventory of key occupations in the accounting cluster taken in the Portland, Oregon, area, this curriculum guide is intended to assist administrators and teachers in the design and implementation of high school accounting cluster programs. The guide is divided into four major sections: program organization and…

  6. Marketing Occupations. Cluster Guide.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Oregon State Dept. of Education, Salem.

    This cluster guide, which is designed to show teachers what specific knowledge and skills qualify high school students for entry-level employment (or postsecondary training) in marketing occupations, is organized into three sections: (1) cluster organization and implementation, (2) instructional emphasis areas, and (3) assessment. The first…

  7. Ultrametric Hierarchical Clustering Algorithms.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Milligan, Glenn W.

    1979-01-01

    Johnson has shown that the single linkage and complete linkage hierarchical clustering algorithms induce a metric on the data known as the ultrametric. Johnson's proof is extended to four other common clustering algorithms. Two additional methods also produce hierarchical structures which can violate the ultrametric inequality. (Author/CTM)

  8. [Cluster headache differential diagnosis].

    PubMed

    Guégan-Massardier, Evelyne; Laubier, Cécile

    2015-11-01

    Cluster headache is characterized by disabling stereotyped headache. Early diagnosis allows appropriate treatment, unfortunately diagnostic errors are frequent. The main differential diagnoses are other primary or essential headaches. Migraine, more frequent and whose diagnosis is carried by excess, trigeminal neuralgia or other trigemino-autonomic cephalgia. Vascular or tumoral underlying condition can mimic cluster headache, neck and brain imaging is recommended, ideally MRI.

  9. Targeting Clusters, Achieving Excellence.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rosenfeld, Stuart; Jacobs, Jim; Liston, Cynthia

    2003-01-01

    Suggests that groups, or clusters, of industries form partnerships with community colleges in order to positively impact economic development. Asserts that a cluster-oriented community college system requires innovation, specialized resources and expertise, knowledge of trends, and links to industry. Offers suggestions for developing such a…

  10. Multiple frame cluster tracking

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gadaleta, Sabino; Klusman, Mike; Poore, Aubrey; Slocumb, Benjamin J.

    2002-08-01

    Tracking large number of closely spaced objects is a challenging problem for any tracking system. In missile defense systems, countermeasures in the form of debris, chaff, spent fuel, and balloons can overwhelm tracking systems that track only individual objects. Thus, tracking these groups or clusters of objects followed by transitions to individual object tracking (if and when individual objects separate from the groups) is a necessary capability for a robust and real-time tracking system. The objectives of this paper are to describe the group tracking problem in the context of multiple frame target tracking and to formulate a general assignment problem for the multiple frame cluster/group tracking problem. The proposed approach forms multiple clustering hypotheses on each frame of data and base individual frame clustering decisions on the information from multiple frames of data in much the same way that MFA or MHT work for individual object tracking. The formulation of the assignment problem for resolved object tracking and candidate clustering methods for use in multiple frame cluster tracking are briefly reviewed. Then, three different formulations are presented for the combination of multiple clustering hypotheses on each frame of data and the multiple frame assignments of clusters between frames.

  11. Brightest Cluster Galaxy Identification

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leisman, Luke; Haarsma, D. B.; Sebald, D. A.; ACCEPT Team

    2011-01-01

    Brightest cluster galaxies (BCGs) play an important role in several fields of astronomical research. The literature includes many different methods and criteria for identifying the BCG in the cluster, such as choosing the brightest galaxy, the galaxy nearest the X-ray peak, or the galaxy with the most extended profile. Here we examine a sample of 75 clusters from the Archive of Chandra Cluster Entropy Profile Tables (ACCEPT) and the Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS), measuring masked magnitudes and profiles for BCG candidates in each cluster. We first identified galaxies by hand; in 15% of clusters at least one team member selected a different galaxy than the others.We also applied 6 other identification methods to the ACCEPT sample; in 30% of clusters at least one of these methods selected a different galaxy than the other methods. We then developed an algorithm that weighs brightness, profile, and proximity to the X-ray peak and centroid. This algorithm incorporates the advantages of by-hand identification (weighing multiple properties) and automated selection (repeatable and consistent). The BCG population chosen by the algorithm is more uniform in its properties than populations selected by other methods, particularly in the relation between absolute magnitude (a proxy for galaxy mass) and average gas temperature (a proxy for cluster mass). This work supported by a Barry M. Goldwater Scholarship and a Sid Jansma Summer Research Fellowship.

  12. Geophysical data collected from the St. Clair River between Michigan and Ontario, Canada (2008-016-FA)

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Denny, Jane F.; Foster, D.S.; Worley, C.R.; Irwin, Barry J.

    2011-01-01

    In 2008, the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS), Woods Hole Coastal and Marine Science Center (WHCMSC), in cooperation with the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers conducted a geophysical and sampling survey of the riverbed of the Upper St. Clair River between Port Huron, Mich., and Sarnia, Ontario, Canada. The objectives were to define the Quaternary geologic framework of the riverbed of the St. Clair River to evaluate the relationship between morphologic change of the riverbed and underlying stratigraphy. This report presents the geophysical and sample data collected from the St. Clair River, May 29-June 6, 2008, as part of the International Upper Great Lakes Study, a 5-year project funded by the International Joint Commission of the United States and Canada to examine whether physical changes in the St. Clair River are affecting water levels within upper Great Lakes, to assess regulation plans for outflows from Lake Superior, and to examine the potential effect of climate change on the Great Lakes water levels (http://www.iugls.org). This document makes available the data that were used in a separate report, U.S. Geological Survey Open-File Report 2009-1137, which detailed the interpretations of the Quaternary geologic framework of the region. This report includes a description of the high-resolution acoustic and sediment-sampling systems that were used to map the morphology, surficial sediment distribution, and underlying geology of the Upper St. Clair River during USGS field activity 2008-016-FA (http://quashnet.er.usgs.gov/cgi-bin/datasource/public_ds_info.pl?fa=2008-016-FA). Video and photographs of the riverbed were also collected and are included in this data release. Future analyses will be focused on substrate erosion and its effects on river-channel morphology and geometry. Ultimately, the International Upper Great Lakes Study will attempt to determine where physical changes in the St. Clair River affect water flow and, subsequently, water levels in the Upper Great

  13. Knockdown of μ-calpain in Fanconi Anemia, FA-A, cells by siRNA Restores αII Spectrin levels and Corrects Chromosomal Instability and Defective DNA Interstrand Cross-link Repair†

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Pan; Sridharan, Deepa; Lambert, Muriel W.

    2010-01-01

    We have previously shown that there is a deficiency in the structural protein, nonerythroid α spectrin (αIISp), in cells from patients with Fanconi anemia (FA). These studies indicate that this deficiency is due to reduced stability of αIISp and correlates with decreased repair of DNA interstrand cross-links and chromosomal instability in FA cells. An important factor in the stability of αIISp is its susceptibility to cleavage by the protease, μ-calpain. We hypothesized that increased μ-calpain cleavage of αIISp in FA cells leads to increased breakdown of αIISp and that knocking-down expression of μ-calpain in FA cells should restore levels of αIISp and correct a number of the phenotypic defects observed. The results showed that there is increased μ-calpain activity in FA-A, FA-C, FA-D2, FA-F and FA-G cells which could account for the deficiency in αIISp in these FA cells. Protein interaction studies indicated that FANCA and FANCG bind directly to μ-calpain. We hypothesize that this binding may lead to inhibition of μ-calpain activity in normal cells. Knocking-down μ-calpain by siRNA in FA-A cells restored levels of αIISp to normal and reversed a number of the cellular deficiencies in these cells. It corrected the DNA repair defect and the chromosomal instability observed after exposure to a DNA interstrand cross-linking agent. These studies indicated that FA proteins may play an important role in maintaining stability of αIISp in the cell by regulating its cleavage by μ-calpain. Thus by reducing breakdown of αIISp in FA cells, it may be possible to reverse a number of the cellular deficiencies observed in this disorder. PMID:20518497

  14. Hybridization schemes for clusters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wales, David J.

    The concept of an optimum hybridization scheme for cluster compounds is developed with particular reference to electron counting. The prediction of electron counts for clusters and the interpretation of the bonding is shown to depend critically upon the presumed hybridization pattern of the cluster vertex atoms. This fact has not been properly appreciated in previous work, particularly in applications of Stone's tensor surface harmonic (TSH) theory, but is found to be a useful tool when dealt with directly. A quantitative definition is suggested for the optimum cluster hybridization pattern based directly upon the ease of interpretation of the molecular orbitals, and results are given for a range of species. The relationship of this scheme to the detailed cluster geometry is described using Löwdin's partitioned perturbation theory, and the success and range of application of TSH theory are discussed.

  15. Cool Cluster Correctly Correlated

    SciTech Connect

    Varganov, Sergey Aleksandrovich

    2005-01-01

    Atomic clusters are unique objects, which occupy an intermediate position between atoms and condensed matter systems. For a long time it was thought that physical and chemical properties of atomic dusters monotonically change with increasing size of the cluster from a single atom to a condensed matter system. However, recently it has become clear that many properties of atomic clusters can change drastically with the size of the clusters. Because physical and chemical properties of clusters can be adjusted simply by changing the cluster's size, different applications of atomic clusters were proposed. One example is the catalytic activity of clusters of specific sizes in different chemical reactions. Another example is a potential application of atomic clusters in microelectronics, where their band gaps can be adjusted by simply changing cluster sizes. In recent years significant advances in experimental techniques allow one to synthesize and study atomic clusters of specified sizes. However, the interpretation of the results is often difficult. The theoretical methods are frequently used to help in interpretation of complex experimental data. Most of the theoretical approaches have been based on empirical or semiempirical methods. These methods allow one to study large and small dusters using the same approximations. However, since empirical and semiempirical methods rely on simple models with many parameters, it is often difficult to estimate the quantitative and even qualitative accuracy of the results. On the other hand, because of significant advances in quantum chemical methods and computer capabilities, it is now possible to do high quality ab-initio calculations not only on systems of few atoms but on clusters of practical interest as well. In addition to accurate results for specific clusters, such methods can be used for benchmarking of different empirical and semiempirical approaches. The atomic clusters studied in this work contain from a few atoms to

  16. Galaxy cluster's rotation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Manolopoulou, M.; Plionis, M.

    2017-03-01

    We study the possible rotation of cluster galaxies, developing, testing, and applying a novel algorithm which identifies rotation, if such does exist, as well as its rotational centre, its axis orientation, rotational velocity amplitude, and, finally, the clockwise or counterclockwise direction of rotation on the plane of the sky. To validate our algorithms we construct realistic Monte Carlo mock rotating clusters and confirm that our method provides robust indications of rotation. We then apply our methodology on a sample of Abell clusters with z ≲ 0.1 with member galaxies selected from the Sloan Digital Sky Survey DR10 spectroscopic data base. After excluding a number of substructured clusters, which could provide erroneous indications of rotation, and taking into account the expected fraction of misidentified coherent substructure velocities for rotation, provided by our Monte Carlo simulation analysis, we find that ∼23 per cent of our clusters are rotating under a set of strict criteria. Loosening the strictness of the criteria, on the expense of introducing spurious rotation indications, we find this fraction increasing to ∼28 per cent. We correlate our rotation indicators with the cluster dynamical state, provided either by their Bautz-Morgan type or by their X-ray isophotal shape and find for those clusters showing rotation within 1.5 h^{-1}_{70} Mpc that the significance of their rotation is related to the dynamically younger phases of cluster formation but after the initial anisotropic accretion and merging has been completed. Finally, finding rotational modes in galaxy clusters could lead to the necessity of correcting the dynamical cluster mass calculations.

  17. Monitoring of cycling hypoxia and angiogenesis in FaDu head and neck tumors using a side-firing sensor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yu, Bing; Shah, Amy; Wang, Bingqing; Rajaram, Narasimhan; Wang, Quanli; Ramanujam, Nirmala; Palmer, Gregory M.; Dewhirst, Mark W.

    2013-03-01

    Many studies have found that hypoxia, particularly cycling hypoxia (CH), can lead to enhanced tumor metastasis and resistance to radiation and chemotherapy. It was also reported that tumor total hemoglobin content (THb), which is directly related to tumor angiogenesis, can have significant impact on tumor's response to radiation and neoadjuvant chemotherapy. There is a growing demand for technologies to measure tumor hypoxia and angiogenesis temporally in vivo. In this paper, a side-firing fiber optic sensor based on a multi-wavelength frequency-domain near infrared spectroscopy (FD-NIRS) instrument was used to quantify tumor oxygenation and hemoglobin concentrations in nude rats bearing human FaDu head and neck (H and N) tumors during normoxia and forced hyperoxia and cyclic hypoxia. Significant increase (with carbogen gas inhalation) or decrease (with reduced O2 supply) in tumor oxygenation was observed. The studies demonstrated the feasibility of the technology for longitudinal monitoring of H and N tumor's response to therapy.

  18. Façade Greening: High-rise apartment building in Milan using pre-stressed concrete slab

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, Wenning; Li, Mingxin; Han, Yinong; Wang, Moqi; Ansourian, Peter

    2016-08-01

    In this project, one single level of the Façade Greening was designed and modelled using finite element method in Strand7. A static analysis was performed in order to understand the deflection and the stress due to the extra loads imposed by the soil and plants. The results produced by the linear static solver are compared with the strength of the materials and the European limitations. The maximum tension stress which exceeds the tensile strength in concrete is found in the root of the cantilever balcony. An alternative design of the cantilevered balcony with pre-stressed concrete slab is modelled separately for the balcony. Decrease is found in the tension stress and the significant improvement of deflection of the balcony with pre-stressed concrete slab. The dynamic loads such as wind and earthquake did not suggest significant effect on the pre-stressed concrete slab.

  19. Capability Description for NASA's F/A-18 TN 853 as a Testbed for the Integrated Resilient Aircraft Control Project

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hanson, Curt

    2009-01-01

    The NASA F/A-18 tail number (TN) 853 full-scale Integrated Resilient Aircraft Control (IRAC) testbed has been designed with a full array of capabilities in support of the Aviation Safety Program. Highlights of the system's capabilities include: 1) a quad-redundant research flight control system for safely interfacing controls experiments to the aircraft's control surfaces; 2) a dual-redundant airborne research test system for hosting multi-disciplinary state-of-the-art adaptive control experiments; 3) a robust reversionary configuration for recovery from unusual attitudes and configurations; 4) significant research instrumentation, particularly in the area of static loads; 5) extensive facilities for experiment simulation, data logging, real-time monitoring and post-flight analysis capabilities; and 6) significant growth capability in terms of interfaces and processing power.

  20. Water tunnel flow visualization and wind tunnel data analysis of the F/A-18. [leading edge extension vortex effects

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Erickson, G. E.

    1982-01-01

    Six degree of freedom studies were utilized to extract a band of yawing and rolling moment coefficients from the F/A-18 aircraft flight records. These were compared with 0.06 scale model data obtained in a 16T wind tunnel facility. The results, indicate the flight test yawing moment data exhibit an improvement over the wind tunnel data to near neutral stability and a significant reduction in lateral stability (again to anear neutral level). These data are consistent with the flight test results since the motion was characterized by a relatively slo departure. Flight tests repeated the slow yaw departure at M 0.3. Only 0.16 scale model wind tunnel data showed levels of lateral stability similar to the flight test results. Accordingly, geometric modifications were investigated on the 0.16 scale model in the 30x60 foot wind tunnel to improve high angle of attack lateral stability.

  1. Production of Sophorolipid from an Identified Current Yeast, Lachancea thermotolerans BBMCZ7FA20, Isolated from Honey Bee.

    PubMed

    Mousavi, Fereshteh; Beheshti-Maal, Keivan; Massah, Ahmadreza

    2015-08-01

    Biosurfactants are a family of diverse amphipathic molecules that are produced by several microorganisms such as bacteria, molds, and yeasts. These surface active agents have several applications in agriculture, oil processing, food, and pharmaceutical industries. In this research using YMG and YUG culture media, a native yeast strain, HG5, was isolated from honey bee. The oil spread test as a screening method was used to evaluate biosurfactant production by the yeast HG5 isolate. The 5.8s-rDNA analysis confirmed that the isolated yeast was related to Lachancea thermotolerans. We named this strain Lachancea thermotolerans strain BBMCZ7FA20 and its 5.8s-rDNA sequence was deposited in GenBank, NCBI under accession number of KM042082.1. The best precursor of biosurfactant production was canola oil and the sophorolipid amount was measured for 24.2 g/l. The thin layer chromatography and Fourier Transform Infrared Spectroscopy analysis showed that the extracted biosurfactant from Lachancea thermotolerans was sophorolipid. In conclusion, this is the first report of sophorolipid production by a native yeast Lachancea thermotolerans BBMCZ7FA20 we isolated from the honey bee gut collected from an apiary farm in Saman, Chaharmahal Bakhtiari province, Iran. We suggested that some cost-effective supplements such as canola oil, sunflower oil, and corn oils could be applied for increasing the sophorolipid production by this native yeast strain. According to several applications of biosurfactants in today world, the production of sophorolipid by Lachancea thermotolerans could be considered as a potential in the current industrial microbiology and modern microbial biotechnology.

  2. Document clustering methods, document cluster label disambiguation methods, document clustering apparatuses, and articles of manufacture

    DOEpatents

    Sanfilippo, Antonio; Calapristi, Augustin J.; Crow, Vernon L.; Hetzler, Elizabeth G.; Turner, Alan E.

    2009-12-22

    Document clustering methods, document cluster label disambiguation methods, document clustering apparatuses, and articles of manufacture are described. In one aspect, a document clustering method includes providing a document set comprising a plurality of documents, providing a cluster comprising a subset of the documents of the document set, using a plurality of terms of the documents, providing a cluster label indicative of subject matter content of the documents of the cluster, wherein the cluster label comprises a plurality of word senses, and selecting one of the word senses of the cluster label.

  3. Evolution Properties of Clusters and AXAF Contributions to understanding Clusters

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jones, Christine

    1998-01-01

    Our ROSAT survey for distant clusters of galaxies contains the largest solid angle of all ROSAT pointed surveying and thus has sufficient area to test the previously reported cluster evolution. We find significant negative cluster evolution, i.e,, at high redshifts there are fewer luminous clusters than at present. We compare optical cluster properties for the most distant clusters in the ROSAT survey with those measured for nearby clusters. We also present AXAF capabilities and show how AXAF will significantly extend our understanding of cluster properties and their cosmological evolution.

  4. SPASM and Twitch Domains in S-Adenosylmethionine (SAM) Radical Enzymes*

    PubMed Central

    Grell, Tsehai A. J.; Goldman, Peter J.; Drennan, Catherine L.

    2015-01-01

    S-Adenosylmethionine (SAM, also known as AdoMet) radical enzymes use SAM and a [4Fe-4S] cluster to catalyze a diverse array of reactions. They adopt a partial triose-phosphate isomerase (TIM) barrel fold with N- and C-terminal extensions that tailor the structure of the enzyme to its specific function. One extension, termed a SPASM domain, binds two auxiliary [4Fe-4S] clusters and is present within peptide-modifying enzymes. The first structure of a SPASM-containing enzyme, anaerobic sulfatase-maturating enzyme (anSME), revealed unexpected similarities to two non-SPASM proteins, butirosin biosynthetic enzyme 2-deoxy-scyllo-inosamine dehydrogenase (BtrN) and molybdenum cofactor biosynthetic enzyme (MoaA). The latter two enzymes bind one auxiliary cluster and exhibit a partial SPASM motif, coined a Twitch domain. Here we review the structure and function of auxiliary cluster domains within the SAM radical enzyme superfamily. PMID:25477505

  5. Studies in clustering theory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stell, George

    In recent years the properties of percolation models have been studied intensively. The purpose of our project was to develop a general theory of percolation and clustering between particles of arbitrary size and shape, with arbitrary correlations between them. The goal of such a theory includes the treatment of continuum percolation as well as a novel treatment of lattice percolation. We made substantial progress toward this goal. The quantities basic to a description of clustering, the mean cluster size, mean number of clusters, etc., were developed. Concise formulas were given for the terms in such series, and proved, at least for sufficiently low densities, that the series are absolutely convergent. These series can now be used to construct Pade approximants that will allow one to probe the percolation transition. A scaled-particle theory of percolation was developed which gives analytic approximants for the mean number of clusters in a large class of two and three dimensional percolation models. Although this quantity is essential in many applications, e.g., explaining colligative properties, and interpreting low-angle light-scattering data, no systematic studies of it have been done before this work. Recently carried out detailed computer simulations show that the mean number of clusters is given to high accuracy by several of there approximations. Extensions of this work will allow calculation of the complete cluster size distribution.

  6. Nuclear Star Clusters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Neumayer, Nadine

    2017-03-01

    The centers of galaxies host two distinct, compact components: massive black holes and nuclear star clusters. Nuclear star clusters are the densest stellar systems in the universe, with masses of ~ 107M⊙ and sizes of ~ 5pc. They are almost ubiquitous at the centres of nearby galaxies with masses similar to, or lower than the Milky Way. Their occurrence both in spirals and dwarf elliptical galaxies appears to be a strong function of total galaxy light or mass. Nucleation fractions are up to 100% for total galaxy magnitudes of M B = -19mag or total galaxy luminosities of about L B = 1010 L ⊙ and falling nucleation fractions for both smaller and higher galaxy masses. Although nuclear star clusters are so common, their formation mechanisms are still under debate. The two main formation scenarios proposed are the infall and subsequent merging of star clusters and the in-situ formation of stars at the center of a galaxy. Here, I review the state-of-the-art of nuclear star cluster observations concerning their structure, stellar populations and kinematics. These observations are used to constrain the proposed formation scenarios for nuclear star clusters. Constraints from observations show, that likely both cluster infall and in-situ star formation are at work. The relative importance of these two mechanisms is still subject of investigation.

  7. Antisense down-regulation of the strawberry β-galactosidase gene FaβGal4 increases cell wall galactose levels and reduces fruit softening.

    PubMed

    Paniagua, Candelas; Blanco-Portales, Rosario; Barceló-Muñoz, Marta; García-Gago, Juan A; Waldron, Keith W; Quesada, Miguel A; Muñoz-Blanco, Juan; Mercado, José A

    2016-02-01

    Strawberry softening is characterized by an increase in the solubilization and depolymerization of pectins from cell walls. Galactose release from pectin side chains by β-galactosidase enzymes has been proposed as one reason for the increase in soluble pectins. A putative β-galactosidase gene, FaβGal4, has been identified using a custom-made oligonucleotide-based strawberry microarray platform. FaβGal4 was expressed mainly in the receptacle during fruit ripening, and was positively regulated by abscisic acid and negatively regulated by auxins. To ascertain the role of FaβGal4 in strawberry softening, transgenic plants containing an antisense sequence of this gene under the control of the CaMV35S promoter were generated. Phenotypic analyses were carried out in transgenic plants during three consecutive growing seasons, using non-transformed plants as control. Two out of nine independent transgenic lines yielded fruits that were 30% firmer than control at the ripe stage. FaβGal4 mRNA levels were reduced by 70% in ripe fruits from these selected transgenic lines, but they also showed significant silencing of FaβGal1, although the genes did not share significant similarity. These two transgenic lines also showed an increase in pectin covalently bound to the cell wall, extracted using Na2CO3. The amount of galactose in cell walls from transgenic fruits was 30% higher than in control; notably, the galactose increase was larger in the 1 M KOH fraction, which is enriched in hemicellulose. These results suggest that FaβGal4 participates in the solubilization of covalently bound pectins during ripening, reducing strawberry fruit firmness.

  8. Identification of differentially expressed genes associated with the enhancement of X-ray susceptibility by RITA in a hypopharyngeal squamous cell carcinoma cell line (FaDu)

    PubMed Central

    Luan, Jinwei; Li, Xianglan; Guo, Rutao; Liu, Shanshan; Luo, Hongyu

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Background Next generation sequencing and bio-informatic analyses were conducted to investigate the mechanism of reactivation of p53 and induction of tumor cell apoptosis (RITA)-enhancing X-ray susceptibility in FaDu cells. Materials and methods The cDNA was isolated from FaDu cells treated with 0 X-ray, 8 Gy X-ray, or 8 Gy X-ray + RITA. Then, cDNA libraries were created and sequenced using next generation sequencing, and each assay was repeated twice. Subsequently, differentially expressed genes (DEGs) were identified using Cuffdiff in Cufflinks and their functions were predicted by pathway enrichment analyses. Genes that were constantly up- or down-regulated in 8 Gy X-ray-treated FaDu cells and 8 Gy X-ray + RITA-treated FaDu cells were obtained as RITA genes. Afterward, the protein-protein interaction (PPI) relationships were obtained from the STRING database and a PPI network was constructed using Cytoscape. Furthermore, ClueGO was used for pathway enrichment analysis of genes in the PPI network. Results Total 2,040 and 297 DEGs were identified in FaDu cells treated with 8 Gy X-ray or 8 Gy X-ray + RITA, respectively. PARP3 and NEIL1 were enriched in base excision repair, and CDK1 was enriched in p53 signaling pathway. RFC2 and EZH2 were identified as RITA genes. In the PPI network, many interaction relationships were identified (e.g., RFC2-CDK1, EZH2-CDK1 and PARP3-EZH2). ClueGO analysis showed that RFC2 and EZH2 were related to cell cycle. Conclusions RFC2, EZH2, CDK1, PARP3 and NEIL1 may be associated, and together enhance the susceptibility of FaDu cells treated with RITA to the deleterious effects of X-ray. PMID:27247549

  9. Antisense down-regulation of the strawberry β-galactosidase gene FaβGal4 increases cell wall galactose levels and reduces fruit softening

    PubMed Central

    Paniagua, Candelas; Blanco-Portales, Rosario; Barceló-Muñoz, Marta; García-Gago, Juan A.; Waldron, Keith W.; Quesada, Miguel A.; Muñoz-Blanco, Juan; Mercado, José A.

    2016-01-01

    Strawberry softening is characterized by an increase in the solubilization and depolymerization of pectins from cell walls. Galactose release from pectin side chains by β-galactosidase enzymes has been proposed as one reason for the increase in soluble pectins. A putative β-galactosidase gene, FaβGal4, has been identified using a custom-made oligonucleotide-based strawberry microarray platform. FaβGal4 was expressed mainly in the receptacle during fruit ripening, and was positively regulated by abscisic acid and negatively regulated by auxins. To ascertain the role of FaβGal4 in strawberry softening, transgenic plants containing an antisense sequence of this gene under the control of the CaMV35S promoter were generated. Phenotypic analyses were carried out in transgenic plants during three consecutive growing seasons, using non-transformed plants as control. Two out of nine independent transgenic lines yielded fruits that were 30% firmer than control at the ripe stage. FaβGal4 mRNA levels were reduced by 70% in ripe fruits from these selected transgenic lines, but they also showed significant silencing of FaβGal1, although the genes did not share significant similarity. These two transgenic lines also showed an increase in pectin covalently bound to the cell wall, extracted using Na2CO3. The amount of galactose in cell walls from transgenic fruits was 30% higher than in control; notably, the galactose increase was larger in the 1 M KOH fraction, which is enriched in hemicellulose. These results suggest that FaβGal4 participates in the solubilization of covalently bound pectins during ripening, reducing strawberry fruit firmness. PMID:26585222

  10. Allodynia in Cluster Headache.

    PubMed

    Wilbrink, Leopoldine A; Louter, Mark A; Teernstra, Onno Pm; van Zwet, Erik W; Huygen, Frank Jpm; Haan, Joost; Ferrari, Michel D; Terwindt, Gisela M

    2017-03-04

    Cutaneous allodynia is an established marker for central sensitization in migraine. There is debate whether cutaneous allodynia may also occur in cluster headache, another episodic headache disorder. Here we examined the presence and severity of allodynia in a large well-defined nation-wide population of people with cluster headache.Using validated questionnaires we assessed, cross-sectionally, ictal allodynia and comorbid depression and migraine in the nation-wide "Leiden University Cluster headache neuro-Analysis" (LUCA) study. Participants with cluster headache were diagnosed according to the International Classification of Headache Disorders criteria. Multivariate regression models were used, with correction for demographic factors and cluster headache subtype (chronic vs. episodic; recent attacks < 1 month vs. no recent attacks).In total 606/798 (75.9%) participants with cluster headache responded of whom 218/606 (36%) had allodynia during attacks. Female gender (OR 2.05, 95% CI 1.28-3.29), low age at onset (OR 0.98, 95% CI 0.96- 0.99), lifetime depression (OR 1.63; 95% CI 1.06-2.50), comorbid migraine (OR 1.96; 95% CI 1.02-3.79), and having recent attacks (OR 1.80; 95% CI 1.13-2.86), but not duration of attacks and chronic cluster headache, were independent risk factors for allodynia.The high prevalence of cutaneous allodynia with similar risk factors for allodynia as found for migraine suggests that central sensitization, like in migraine, also occurs in cluster headache. In clinical practice, awareness that people with cluster headache may suffer from allodynia can in the future be an important feature in treatment options.

  11. Extending Beowulf Clusters

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Steinwand, Daniel R.; Maddox, Brian; Beckmann, Tim; Hamer, George

    2003-01-01

    Beowulf clusters can provide a cost-effective way to compute numerical models and process large amounts of remote sensing image data. Usually a Beowulf cluster is designed to accomplish a specific set of processing goals, and processing is very efficient when the problem remains inside the constraints of the original design. There are cases, however, when one might wish to compute a problem that is beyond the capacity of the local Beowulf system. In these cases, spreading the problem to multiple clusters or to other machines on the network may provide a cost-effective solution.

  12. Dwarfs in Coma Cluster

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2007-01-01

    [figure removed for brevity, see original site] Click on image for larger poster version

    This false-color mosaic of the central region of the Coma cluster combines infrared and visible-light images to reveal thousands of faint objects (green). Follow-up observations showed that many of these objects, which appear here as faint green smudges, are dwarf galaxies belonging to the cluster. Two large elliptical galaxies, NGC 4889 and NGC 4874, dominate the cluster's center. The mosaic combines visible-light data from the Sloan Digital Sky Survey (color coded blue) with long- and short-wavelength infrared views (red and green, respectively) from NASA's Spitzer Space Telescope.

  13. Magnetization of ferromagnetic clusters

    SciTech Connect

    Onishi, Naoki; Bertsch, G.; Yabana, Kazuhiro

    1995-02-01

    The magnetization and deflection profiles of magnetic clusters in a Stern-Gerlach magnet are calculated for conditions under which the magnetic moment is fixed in the intrinsic frame of the cluster, and the clusters enter the magnetic field adiabatically. The predicted magnetization is monotonic in the Langevin parameter, the ratio of magnetic energy {mu}{sub 0}B to thermal energy k{sub B}T. In low field the average magnetization is 2/3 of the Langevin function. The high-field moment approaches saturation asymptotically as B{sup {minus}1/2} instead of the B{sup {minus}1} dependence in the Langevin function.

  14. H-cluster stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lai, X. Y.; Gao, C. Y.; Xu, R. X.

    2013-06-01

    The study of dense matter at ultrahigh density has a very long history, which is meaningful for us to understand not only cosmic events in extreme circumstances but also fundamental laws of physics. It is well known that the state of cold matter at supranuclear density depends on the non-perturbative nature of quantum chromodynamics (QCD) and is essential for modelling pulsars. A so-called H-cluster matter is proposed in this paper as the nature of dense matter in reality. In compact stars at only a few nuclear densities but low temperature, quarks could be interacting strongly with each other there. That might render quarks grouped in clusters, although the hypothetical quark clusters in cold dense matter have not been confirmed due to the lack of both theoretical and experimental evidence. Motivated by recent lattice QCD simulations of the H-dibaryons (with structure uuddss), we therefore consider here a possible kind of quark clusters, H-clusters, that could emerge inside compact stars during their initial cooling as the dominant components inside (the degree of freedom could then be H-clusters there). Taking into account the in-medium stiffening effect, we find that at baryon densities of compact stars H-cluster matter could be more stable than nuclear matter. We also find that for the H-cluster matter with lattice structure, the equation of state could be so stiff that it would seem to be `superluminal' in the most dense region. However, the real sound speed for H-cluster matter is in fact difficult to calculate, so at this stage we do not put constraints on our model from the usual requirement of causality. We study the stars composed of H-clusters, i.e. H-cluster stars, and derive the dependence of their maximum mass on the in-medium stiffening effect, showing that the maximum mass could be well above 2 M⊙ as observed and that the resultant mass-radius relation fits the measurement of the rapid burster under reasonable parameters. Besides a general

  15. Atomic cluster collisions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Korol, Andrey V.; Solov'yov, Andrey

    2013-01-01

    Atomic cluster collisions are a field of rapidly emerging research interest by both experimentalists and theorists. The international symposium on atomic cluster collisions (ISSAC) is the premier forum to present cutting-edge research in this field. It was established in 2003 and the most recent conference was held in Berlin, Germany in July of 2011. This Topical Issue presents original research results from some of the participants, who attended this conference. This issues specifically focuses on two research areas, namely Clusters and Fullerenes in External Fields and Nanoscale Insights in Radiation Biodamage.

  16. Partially supervised speaker clustering.

    PubMed

    Tang, Hao; Chu, Stephen Mingyu; Hasegawa-Johnson, Mark; Huang, Thomas S

    2012-05-01

    Content-based multimedia indexing, retrieval, and processing as well as multimedia databases demand the structuring of the media content (image, audio, video, text, etc.), one significant goal being to associate the identity of the content to the individual segments of the signals. In this paper, we specifically address the problem of speaker clustering, the task of assigning every speech utterance in an audio stream to its speaker. We offer a complete treatment to the idea of partially supervised speaker clustering, which refers to the use of our prior knowledge of speakers in general to assist the unsupervised speaker clustering process. By means of an independent training data set, we encode the prior knowledge at the various stages of the speaker clustering pipeline via 1) learning a speaker-discriminative acoustic feature transformation, 2) learning a universal speaker prior model, and 3) learning a discriminative speaker subspace, or equivalently, a speaker-discriminative distance metric. We study the directional scattering property of the Gaussian mixture model (GMM) mean supervector representation of utterances in the high-dimensional space, and advocate exploiting this property by using the cosine distance metric instead of the euclidean distance metric for speaker clustering in the GMM mean supervector space. We propose to perform discriminant analysis based on the cosine distance metric, which leads to a novel distance metric learning algorithm—linear spherical discriminant analysis (LSDA). We show that the proposed LSDA formulation can be systematically solved within the elegant graph embedding general dimensionality reduction framework. Our speaker clustering experiments on the GALE database clearly indicate that 1) our speaker clustering methods based on the GMM mean supervector representation and vector-based distance metrics outperform traditional speaker clustering methods based on the “bag of acoustic features” representation and statistical

  17. In-Flight Suppression of a De-Stabilized F/A-18 Structural Mode Using the Space Launch System Adaptive Augmenting Control System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wall, John; VanZwieten, Tannen; Giiligan Eric; Miller, Chris; Hanson, Curtis; Orr, Jeb

    2015-01-01

    Adaptive Augmenting Control (AAC) has been developed for NASA's Space Launch System (SLS) family of launch vehicles and implemented as a baseline part of its flight control system (FCS). To raise the technical readiness level of the SLS AAC algorithm, the Launch Vehicle Adaptive Control (LVAC) flight test program was conducted in which the SLS FCS prototype software was employed to control the pitch axis of Dryden's specially outfitted F/A-18, the Full Scale Advanced Systems Test Bed (FAST). This presentation focuses on a set of special test cases which demonstrate the successful mitigation of the unstable coupling of an F/A-18 airframe structural mode with the SLS FCS.

  18. Combining cluster number counts and galaxy clustering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lacasa, Fabien; Rosenfeld, Rogerio

    2016-08-01

    The abundance of clusters and the clustering of galaxies are two of the important cosmological probes for current and future large scale surveys of galaxies, such as the Dark Energy Survey. In order to combine them one has to account for the fact that they are not independent quantities, since they probe the same density field. It is important to develop a good understanding of their correlation in order to extract parameter constraints. We present a detailed modelling of the joint covariance matrix between cluster number counts and the galaxy angular power spectrum. We employ the framework of the halo model complemented by a Halo Occupation Distribution model (HOD). We demonstrate the importance of accounting for non-Gaussianity to produce accurate covariance predictions. Indeed, we show that the non-Gaussian covariance becomes dominant at small scales, low redshifts or high cluster masses. We discuss in particular the case of the super-sample covariance (SSC), including the effects of galaxy shot-noise, halo second order bias and non-local bias. We demonstrate that the SSC obeys mathematical inequalities and positivity. Using the joint covariance matrix and a Fisher matrix methodology, we examine the prospects of combining these two probes to constrain cosmological and HOD parameters. We find that the combination indeed results in noticeably better constraints, with improvements of order 20% on cosmological parameters compared to the best single probe, and even greater improvement on HOD parameters, with reduction of error bars by a factor 1.4-4.8. This happens in particular because the cross-covariance introduces a synergy between the probes on small scales. We conclude that accounting for non-Gaussian effects is required for the joint analysis of these observables in galaxy surveys.

  19. Structure and Function of 4-Hydroxyphenylacetate Decarboxylase and Its Cognate Activating Enzyme.

    PubMed

    Selvaraj, Brinda; Buckel, Wolfgang; Golding, Bernard T; Ullmann, G Matthias; Martins, Berta M

    2016-01-01

    4-Hydroxyphenylacetate decarboxylase (4Hpad) is the prototype of a new class of Fe-S cluster-dependent glycyl radical enzymes (Fe-S GREs) acting on aromatic compounds. The two-enzyme component system comprises a decarboxylase responsible for substrate conversion and a dedicated activating enzyme (4Hpad-AE). The decarboxylase uses a glycyl/thiyl radical dyad to convert 4-hydroxyphenylacetate into p-cresol (4-methylphenol) by a biologically unprecedented Kolbe-type decarboxylation. In addition to the radical dyad prosthetic group, the decarboxylase unit contains two [4Fe-4S] clusters coordinated by an extra small subunit of unknown function. 4Hpad-AE reductively cleaves S-adenosylmethionine (SAM or AdoMet) at a site-differentiated [4Fe-4S]2+/+ cluster (RS cluster) generating a transient 5'-deoxyadenosyl radical that produces a stable glycyl radical in the decarboxylase by the abstraction of a hydrogen atom. 4Hpad-AE binds up to two auxiliary [4Fe-4S] clusters coordinated by a ferredoxin-like insert that is C-terminal to the RS cluster-binding motif. The ferredoxin-like domain with its two auxiliary clusters is not vital for SAM-dependent glycyl radical formation in the decarboxylase, but facilitates a longer lifetime for the radical. This review describes the 4Hpad and cognate AE families and focuses on the recent advances and open questions concerning the structure, function and mechanism of this novel Fe-S-dependent class of GREs.

  20. Superparamagnetic Nanoparticle Clusters for Cancer Theranostics Combining Magnetic Resonance Imaging and Hyperthermia Treatment

    PubMed Central

    Hayashi, Koichiro; Nakamura, Michihiro; Sakamoto, Wataru; Yogo, Toshinobu; Miki, Hirokazu; Ozaki, Shuji; Abe, Masahiro; Matsumoto, Toshio; Ishimura, Kazunori

    2013-01-01

    Superparamagnetic nanoparticles (SPIONs) could enable cancer theranostics if magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and magnetic hyperthermia treatment (MHT) were combined. However, the particle size of SPIONs is smaller than the pores of fenestrated capillaries in normal tissues because superparamagnetism is expressed only at a particle size <10 nm. Therefore, SPIONs leak from the capillaries of normal tissues, resulting in low accumulation in tumors. Furthermore, MHT studies have been conducted in an impractical way: direct injection of magnetic materials into tumor and application of hazardous alternating current (AC) magnetic fields. To accomplish effective enhancement of MRI contrast agents in tumors and inhibition of tumor growth by MHT with intravenous injection and a safe AC magnetic field, we clustered SPIONs not only to prevent their leakage from fenestrated capillaries in normal tissues, but also for increasing their relaxivity and the specific absorption rate. We modified the clusters with folic acid (FA) and polyethylene glycol (PEG) to promote their accumulation in tumors. SPION clustering and cluster modification with FA and PEG were achieved simultaneously via the thiol-ene click reaction. Twenty-four hours after intravenous injection of FA- and PEG-modified SPION nanoclusters (FA-PEG-SPION NCs), they accumulated locally in cancer (not necrotic) tissues within the tumor and enhanced the MRI contrast. Furthermore, 24 h after intravenous injection of the NCs, the mice were placed in an AC magnetic field with H = 8 kA/m and f = 230 kHz (Hf = 1.8×109 A/m∙s) for 20 min. The tumors of the mice underwent local heating by application of an AC magnetic field. The temperature of the tumor was higher than the surrounding tissues by ≈6°C at 20 min after treatment. Thirty-five days after treatment, the tumor volume of treated mice was one-tenth that of the control mice. Furthermore, the treated mice were alive after 12 weeks; control mice died up to 8 weeks

  1. How Clusters Work

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    Technology innovation clusters are geographic concentrations of interconnected companies, universities, and other organizations with a focus on environmental technology. They play a key role in addressing the nation’s pressing environmental problems.

  2. [Treatment of cluster headache].

    PubMed

    Fabre, N

    2005-07-01

    Remarkable therapeutic improvements have come forward recently for trigemino-autonomic cephalalgias. Attack treatment in cluster headache is based on sumatriptan and oxygen. Non-vasoconstrictive treatments are opening a new post-triptan era but are not yet applicable. Prophylactic treatment of cluster headache is based on verapamil and lithium. The efficacy of anti-epileptic drugs in cluster headache remains to be demonstrated. Surgical treatment aimed at the parasympathetic pathways and at the trigeminal nerve demonstrates a high rate of recurrence and adverse events and questions about the relevance of a "peripheral" target in cluster headache. The efficacy of continuous hypothalamic stimulation in patients with intractable headache constitutes a breakthrough, but must be demonstrated at a larger scale and the benefice/risk ratio must be carefully evaluated. Indomethacin still remains the gold standard in paroxysmal hemicrania treatment. Until recently SUNCT was considered an intractable condition. However there are some reports of complete relief with lamotrigine, topiramate and gabapentin.

  3. Clustered frequency comb.

    PubMed

    Matsko, Andrey B; Savchenkov, Anatoliy A; Huang, Shu-Wei; Maleki, Lute

    2016-11-01

    We show theoretically that it is feasible to generate a spectrally broad Kerr frequency comb consisting of several spectral clusters phase matched due to interplay among second- and higher-order group velocity dispersion contributions. We validate the theoretical analysis experimentally by driving a magnesium fluoride resonator, characterized with 110 GHz free spectral range, with a continuous wave light at 1.55 μm and observing two comb clusters separated by nearly two-thirds of an octave.

  4. Cluster State Quantum Computing

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2012-12-01

    implementation of quantum computation,” Fortschr. Phys. 48, 771 (2000). [Dragoman01] D. Dragoman, “Proposal for a three-qubit teleportation experiment”, Phys...CLUSTER STATE QUANTUM COMPUTING DECEMBER 2012 INTERIM TECHNICAL REPORT APPROVED FOR PUBLIC RELEASE; DISTRIBUTION...From - To) NOV 2010 – OCT 2012 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE CLUSTER STATE QUANTUM COMPUTING 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER IN-HOUSE 5b. GRANT NUMBER N/A 5c

  5. Globular clusters with Gaia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pancino, E.; Bellazzini, M.; Giuffrida, G.; Marinoni, S.

    2017-01-01

    The treatment of crowded fields in Gaia data will only be a reality in a few years from now. In particular, for globular clusters, only the end-of-mission data (public in 2022-2023) will have the necessary full crowding treatment and will reach sufficient quality for the faintest stars. As a consequence, the work on the deblending and decontamination pipelines is still ongoing. We describe the present status of the pipelines for different Gaia instruments, and we model the end-of-mission crowding errors on the basis of available information. We then apply the nominal post-launch Gaia performances, appropriately worsened by the estimated crowding errors, to a set of 18 simulated globular clusters with different concentration, distance, and field contamination. We conclude that there will be 103-104 stars with astrometric performances virtually untouched by crowding (contaminated by <1 mmag) in the majoritiy of clusters. The most limiting factor will be field crowding, not cluster crowding: the most contaminated clusters will only contain 10-100 clean stars. We also conclude that: (i) the systemic proper motions and parallaxes will be determined to 1% or better up to ≃15 kpc, and the nearby clusters will have radial velocities to a few km s-1 ; (ii) internal kinematics will be of unprecendented quality, cluster masses will be determined to ≃10% up to 15 kpc and beyond, and it will be possible to identify differences of a few km s-1 or less in the kinematics (if any) of cluster sub-populations up to 10 kpc and beyond; (iii) the brightest stars (V≃17 mag) will have space-quality, wide-field photometry (mmag errors), and all Gaia photometry will have 1-3% errors on the absolute photometric calibration.

  6. Chemistry within Molecular Clusters

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1992-05-29

    molecule reaction of the fragment cations with a neutral DME within the bulk cluster, to form a trimethyloxonium cation intermediate. Similar ion...trimethyloxonium intermediate as the common intermediate for the observed products. We therefore speculate that the DME cluster reactions leading to the same...1982, 20, 51, Ibid. Kinetics of Ion-Molecule Reactions ; Ausloos, P., Ed.; Plenum, New York, 1979; p. 69. (18) Ono, Y.; Ng, C. Y. J. Am. Chem. Soc. 1982

  7. Wild Duck Cluster

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2005-01-01

    On April 7, 2005, the Deep Impact spacecraft's Impactor Target Sensor camera recorded this image of M11, the Wild Duck cluster, a galactic open cluster located 6 thousand light years away. The camera is located on the impactor spacecraft, which will image comet Tempel 1 beginning 22 hours before impact until about 2 seconds before impact. Impact with comet Tempel 1 is planned for July 4, 2005.

  8. Parallel Wolff Cluster Algorithms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bae, S.; Ko, S. H.; Coddington, P. D.

    The Wolff single-cluster algorithm is the most efficient method known for Monte Carlo simulation of many spin models. Due to the irregular size, shape and position of the Wolff clusters, this method does not easily lend itself to efficient parallel implementation, so that simulations using this method have thus far been confined to workstations and vector machines. Here we present two parallel implementations of this algorithm, and show that one gives fairly good performance on a MIMD parallel computer.

  9. Structural transitions in clusters.

    PubMed

    Hartke, Bernd

    2002-05-03

    If one adds more particles to a cluster, the energetically optimal structure is neither preserved nor does it change in a continuous fashion. Instead, one finds several cluster size regions where one structural principle dominates almost without exception, and rather narrow boundary regions in-between. The structure of the solid is usually reached only at relatively large sizes, after more than one structural transition. The occurrence of this general phenomenon of size-dependent structural transitions does not seem to depend on the nature of the particles, it is found for atomic, molecular, homogeneous, and heterogeneous clusters alike. Clearly, it is a collective many-body phenomenon which can in principle be calculated but not understood in a fully reductionistic manner. Actual calculations with sufficient accuracy are not feasible today, because of the enormous computational expense, even when unconventional evolutionary algorithms are employed for global geometry optimization. Therefore, simple rules for cluster structures are highly desirable. In fact, we are dealing here not just with the academic quest for linkages between cluster structure and features of the potential energy surface, but structural transitions in clusters are also of immediate relevance for many natural and industrial processes, ranging from crystal growth all the way to nanotechnology. This article provides an exemplary overview of research on this topic, from simple model systems where first qualitative explanations start to be successful, up to more realistic complex systems which are still beyond our understanding.

  10. Cluster functional renormalization group

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reuther, Johannes; Thomale, Ronny

    2014-01-01

    Functional renormalization group (FRG) has become a diverse and powerful tool to derive effective low-energy scattering vertices of interacting many-body systems. Starting from a free expansion point of the action, the flow of the RG parameter Λ allows us to trace the evolution of the effective one- and two-particle vertices towards low energies by taking into account the vertex corrections between all parquet channels in an unbiased fashion. In this work, we generalize the expansion point at which the diagrammatic resummation procedure is initiated from a free UV limit to a cluster product state. We formulate a cluster FRG scheme where the noninteracting building blocks (i.e., decoupled spin clusters) are treated exactly, and the intercluster couplings are addressed via RG. As a benchmark study, we apply our cluster FRG scheme to the spin-1/2 bilayer Heisenberg model (BHM) on a square lattice where the neighboring sites in the two layers form the individual two-site clusters. Comparing with existing numerical evidence for the BHM, we obtain reasonable findings for the spin susceptibility, the spin-triplet excitation energy, and quasiparticle weight even in coupling regimes close to antiferromagnetic order. The concept of cluster FRG promises applications to a large class of interacting electron systems.

  11. 76 FR 73760 - In the Matter of the Designation of Imad Fa'iz Mughniyah also Known as Imad Fayiz Mughniyah as a...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-11-29

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF STATE In the Matter of the Designation of Imad Fa'iz Mughniyah also Known as Imad Fayiz Mughniyah as a Specially Designated Global Terrorist Pursuant to Section 1(b) of Executive Order 13224, as Amended In accordance with section 1(b) of Executive Order 13224,...

  12. Determination of ether extract digestibility and energy content of specialty lipids with variable FA and FFA content, and the effect of lecithin, for nursery pigs

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Various specialty lipids are commercially available and used in nursery pig diets, but may have FA profiles and FFA content that affect their caloric value. In each of 2 experiments, 54 barrows (28-d of age) were fed a common diet for 7-d, allotted to dietary treatments and fed their respective expe...

  13. Superparamagnetic Fe3O4-PEG2K-FA@Ce6 Nanoprobes for in Vivo Dual-mode Imaging and Targeted Photodynamic Therapy

    PubMed Central

    Yin, Ting; Huang, Peng; Gao, Guo; Shapter, Joseph G.; Shen, Yulan; Sun, Rongjin; Yue, Caixia; Zhang, Chunlei; Liu, Yanlei; Zhou, Sui; Cui, Daxiang

    2016-01-01

    The development of targeted nanoprobes is a promising approach to cancer diagnostics and therapy. In the present work, a novel multifunctional photo/magnet-diagnostic nanoprobe (MNPs-PEG2K-FA@Ce6) has been developed. This nanoprobe is built using folic acid (FA), bifunctional polyethylene glycol (PEG2K) and photosensitizer chlorin e6 (Ce6). The MNPs-PEG2K-FA@Ce6 nanoprobes are superparamagnetic, can be synthesized on a large scale by a one-pot hydrothermal process without further surface modification and are stable in an aqueous environment for eight months. Compared with free Ce6 nanoprobes in vitro studies, the MNPs-PEG2K-FA@Ce6 nanoprobes significantly enhance cellular uptake efficiency and promote the effectiveness of photodynamic therapy (PDT) with the assistance of 633 nm laser irradiation. The unique nanoprobes show superior penetration and a retention time of more than six days with less accumulation in the liver allowing highly effective tumor recognition and monitoring. Additionally, there was little damage to healthy organs or tissues. These exciting new nanoprobes could be potential building blocks to develop new clinical therapies and translational medicine. PMID:27824072

  14. Deficiency of UBE2T, the E2 Ubiquitin Ligase Necessary for FANCD2 and FANCI Ubiquitination, Causes FA-T Subtype of Fanconi Anemia.

    PubMed

    Rickman, Kimberly A; Lach, Francis P; Abhyankar, Avinash; Donovan, Frank X; Sanborn, Erica M; Kennedy, Jennifer A; Sougnez, Carrie; Gabriel, Stacey B; Elemento, Olivier; Chandrasekharappa, Settara C; Schindler, Detlev; Auerbach, Arleen D; Smogorzewska, Agata

    2015-07-07

    Fanconi anemia (FA) is a rare bone marrow failure and cancer predisposition syndrome resulting from pathogenic mutations in genes encoding proteins participating in the repair of DNA interstrand crosslinks (ICLs). Mutations in 17 genes (FANCA-FANCS) have been identified in FA patients, defining 17 complementation groups. Here, we describe an individual presenting with typical FA features who is deficient for the ubiquitin-conjugating enzyme (E2), UBE2T. UBE2T is known to interact with FANCL, the E3 ubiquitin-ligase component of the multiprotein FA core complex, and is necessary for the monoubiquitination of FANCD2 and FANCI. Proband fibroblasts do not display FANCD2 and FANCI monoubiquitination, do not form FANCD2 foci following treatment with mitomycin C, and are hypersensitive to crosslinking agents. These cellular defects are complemented by expression of wild-type UBE2T, demonstrating that deficiency of the protein UBE2T can lead to Fanconi anemia. UBE2T gene gains an alias of FANCT.

  15. Plekhs1 and Prdx3 are candidate genes responsible for mild hyperglycemia associated with obesity in a new animal model of F344-fa-nidd6 rat

    PubMed Central

    KOTOH, Jun; SASAKI, Daiki; MATSUMOTO, Kozo; MAEDA, Akihiko

    2016-01-01

    Type 2 diabetes is a polygenic disease and characterized by hyperglycemia and insulin resistance, and it is strongly associated with obesity. However, the mechanism by which obesity contributes to onset of type 2 diabetes is not well understood. We generated rat strains with a hyperglycemic quantitative trait locus (QTL) derived from the Otsuka Long-Evans Tokushima Fatty rat and a fa/fa (Lepr–/–) locus derived from the Zucker Fatty rat. Phenotypes for plasma glucose, and insulin levels were measured, and RNA and protein levels were determined using reverse transcription quantitative PCR and Western blot analyses, respectively. Compared with the obese control strain F344-fa (Lepr–/–), plasma glucose levels of the obese F344-fa-nidd6 (Lepr–/– and Nidd6/of) significantly increased, and plasma insulin levels significantly decreased. These phenotypes were not observed in the lean strains, suggesting that the Nidd6/of locus harbors a diabetogenic gene associated with obesity. We measured the expression of 41 genes in the Nidd6/of QTL region of each strain and found that the mRNA expression levels of the two genes significantly differed between the obese strains. The two genes, pleckstrin homology domain-containing, family S member 1 (Plechs1) and peroxiredoxin III (Prdx3), were differentially expressed only in the obese rats, suggesting that these two genes are involved in the mild elevation of blood glucose levels and insulin resistance in obesity. PMID:27523322

  16. Superparamagnetic Fe3O4-PEG2K-FA@Ce6 Nanoprobes for in Vivo Dual-mode Imaging and Targeted Photodynamic Therapy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yin, Ting; Huang, Peng; Gao, Guo; Shapter, Joseph G.; Shen, Yulan; Sun, Rongjin; Yue, Caixia; Zhang, Chunlei; Liu, Yanlei; Zhou, Sui; Cui, Daxiang

    2016-11-01

    The development of targeted nanoprobes is a promising approach to cancer diagnostics and therapy. In the present work, a novel multifunctional photo/magnet-diagnostic nanoprobe (MNPs-PEG2K-FA@Ce6) has been developed. This nanoprobe is built using folic acid (FA), bifunctional polyethylene glycol (PEG2K) and photosensitizer chlorin e6 (Ce6). The MNPs-PEG2K-FA@Ce6 nanoprobes are superparamagnetic, can be synthesized on a large scale by a one-pot hydrothermal process without further surface modification and are stable in an aqueous environment for eight months. Compared with free Ce6 nanoprobes in vitro studies, the MNPs-PEG2K-FA@Ce6 nanoprobes significantly enhance cellular uptake efficiency and promote the effectiveness of photodynamic therapy (PDT) with the assistance of 633 nm laser irradiation. The unique nanoprobes show superior penetration and a retention time of more than six days with less accumulation in the liver allowing highly effective tumor recognition and monitoring. Additionally, there was little damage to healthy organs or tissues. These exciting new nanoprobes could be potential building blocks to develop new clinical therapies and translational medicine.

  17. Dissolution Profile of Mefenamic Acid Solid Dosage Forms in Two Compendial and Biorelevant (FaSSIF) Media.

    PubMed

    Nurhikmah, Wilda; Sumirtapura, Yeyet Cahyati; Pamudji, Jessie Sofia

    2016-01-01

    Mefenamic acid is a non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drug (NSAID) that is widely used for the treatment of mild-to-moderate pain. Mefenamic acid belongs to the Biopharmaceutical Classification System (BCS) class II drug which has lower water solubility but high permeability. There are two different compendial methods available for dissolution tests of mefenamic acid solid dosage forms, i.e. methods of United States Pharmacopeia 37 (USP) and Pharmacopoeia of the People's Republic of China 2010 (PPRC). Indonesian Pharmacopeia V ed. (FI) adopted the USP method. On the other hand, many researches focused on the use of a 'biorelevant' medium to develop the dissolution test method. The aim of this research was to study the dissolution profile of mefenamic acid from its solid dosage forms (caplet and capsule) available in the Indonesian market with three different dissolution medium: USP, PPRC, and biorelevant fasted simulated small intestinal fluid (FaSSIF) media. The tested products consisted of the innovator's product (available only in caplet dosage form, FN caplet) and generic products (available as caplet and capsule). The dissolution test of the drug products in all dissolution media was performed in 900 mL of medium using apparatus II (paddle) at a temperature of 37°C and rotation speed of 75 rpm, except for the capsule product and for USP medium, both of which tests were done using apparatus I (basket) with rotation speed of 100 rpm. The solubility test of mefenamic acid was carried out in all media at temperature of 37°C. The result obtained from the solubility test showed that the the highest solubility of mefenamic acid was obtained in USP medium (approximately 2 mg/mL), followed by PPRC medium (about 0.5 mg/mL), and FaSSIF medium (approximately 0.06 mg/ml). In the dissolution test, percentage of drug dissolved in in the USP and PPRC media after 45 min for all products reached more than 75%, except for the PN caplet in USP medium which reached only about 44

  18. Analysis of F/A-18 Tail Buffet Data Acquired in the 80- by 120-Foot Wind Tunnel

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    James, Kevin D.; Meyn, Larry A.; Schmitz, Fredric H. (Technical Monitor)

    1994-01-01

    Tail buffet studies were conducted on a full-scale, production, F/A-18 fighter aircraft in the 80- by 120-Foot Wind Tunnel of the National Full-Scale Aerodynamic Complex at NASA Ames Research Center at Moffett Field, California. Tail buffet data were acquired over an angle-of-attack range of +20 deg to +40 deg, a side-slip range of -16 deg to + 16 deg, and at wind speeds up to 100 knots. The maximum speed corresponds to a Reynolds number of l2.3 x l0(exp 6) based on mean aerodynamic chord and a Mach number of 0. 15. The port, vertical tail fin was instrumented with ninety-six surface-pressure transducers, arranged in six by eight arrays, on each side of the fin. ne aircraft was also equipped with a removable Leading-Edge Extension (LEX) fence whose purpose is to reduce tail-buffet loads. Current analysis methods for the unsteady aerodynamic pressures and loads are described. Only results for the zero side-slip condition are to be presented, both with and without the LEX fence. Results of the time-averaged, power-spectral analysis are presented for the tail fin bending moments which are derived from the integrated pressure field. Local wave velocities on the tail surfaces are calculated from pressure correlations. It was found that the LEX fence significantly reduces the magnitude of the root-mean-square pressures and bending moments. Scaling and repeatability issues are addressed by comparing the present full scale results for pressures at the 60%-span and 45%-chord location with previous full-scale F/A-18 tail-buffet test in the 80- by 120- Foot Wind Tunnel, and with several small-scale tests. The comparisons show that the tail buffet frequency scales very well with tail chord and free-stream velocity, and that there is good agreement with the previous full-scale test. Root-mean-square pressures and power spectra do not scale as well as the frequency results. Addition of a LEX fence caused tail-buffet loads to be reduced at all model scales.

  19. Behavioral Clustering of School Children.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Huberty, Carl J.; DiStefano, Christine; Kamphaus, Randy W.

    1997-01-01

    How a cluster analysis is conducted, validated, and interpreted is illustrated using a 14-scale behavioral assessment instrument and a national sample of 1,228 elementary school students. Method, cluster typology, validity, cluster structure, and prediction of cluster membership are discussed. (Author/SLD)

  20. Prismatic louver active façades for natural illumination and thermal energy gain in high-rise and commercial buildings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vlachokostas, A.; Volkmann, C.; Madamopoulos, N.

    2013-06-01

    High-rise and commercial buildings in urban centers present a great challenge in terms of their energy consumption. Due to maximization of rentable square footage, the preferred urban façade system over the past 50 years has been the "curtain wall", only a few inches thick and comprised of modular steel or aluminum framing and predominant glass infills. The perceived Achilles heel of these modern glass façade systems is their thermal inefficiency: They are inadequate thermal barriers and exhibit excessive solar gain. The excessive solar gain has a negative impact on lighting and cooling loads of the entire building. This negative impact will be further exacerbated with rising energy costs. However, rather than view the glass façade's uncontrolled solar gain merely as a weakness contributing to higher energy consumption, the condition could indeed be considered as related to an energy solution. These glass façades can be retrofitted to operate as a provider of daylight and energy for the rest of the building, taking advantage of the overexposure to the sun. With today's technology, the sun's abundant renewable energy can be the driving force for the energy transition of these building envelopes. Illumination, thermal energy, and electricity production can be directly supplied from the sun, and when correctly and efficiently managed, they can lead to a significantly less energy-intensive building stock. We propose a multi-purpose, prismatic, louver-based façade to perform both daylight and thermal energy harvesting with a goal of offering a better daylight environment for the occupants, and reduce the energy consumption and carbon footprint of the building. While decentralized air-conditioning units are commonly accepted as façade "plug-ins", such decentralization could be utilized with more benefits by passively managing the interior space conditions, without using any extra power. Just as living organisms respond and adapt to the environmental changes in

  1. Clustered data in sports research.

    PubMed

    Hayen, A

    2006-05-01

    Clustered, or dependent, data, arise commonly in sports medicine and sports science research, particularly in studies of sports injury and biomechanics, particularly in sports injury trials that are randomised at team or club level, in cross-sectional surveys in which groups of individuals are studied and in studies with repeated measures designs. Clustering, or positive correlation among responses, arises because responses and outcomes from the same cluster will usually be more similar than from different clusters. Study designs with clustering will usually required an increased sample size when compared to those without clustering. Ignoring clustering in statistical analyses can also lead to misleading conclusions, including incorrect confidence intervals and p-values. Appropriate statistical analyses for clustered data must be adopted. This paper gives some examples of clustered data and discusses the implications of clustering on the design and analysis of studies in sports medicine and sports science research.

  2. Preparation and evaluation of pH-responsive charge-convertible ternary complex FA-PEI-CCA/PEI/DNA with low cytotoxicity and efficient gene delivery.

    PubMed

    Guo, Aijie; Wang, Yun; Xu, Shaohui; Zhang, Xiao; Li, Min; Liu, Qing; Shen, Yuanyuan; Cui, Derong; Guo, Shengrong

    2017-04-01

    Because the surface of the cationic polymer gene complex is positively charged, it can result in problems such as poor blood stability and cytotoxicity. Therefore, reducing the positive charge of the cationic gene complex without affecting its transfection efficiency is crucial. To achieve this objective, a pH-responsive charge-convertible ternary complex was developed in this study. Modified plyethylenimine (PEI) with two different degrees of substitution of NH2 (plyethylenimine-1,2-cyclohexanedicarboxylic anhydride, PEI-CCA, and folic acid-plyethylenimine-1,2-cyclohexanedicarboxylic anhydride, FA-PEI-CCA) were first obtained by a chemical graft reaction. PEI-CCA and FA-PEI-CCA have significantly lower cytotoxicities and much better blood compatibilities than PEI does, and the former have an undifferentiated compression capability of DNA. The zeta potential values of the as-prepared ternary complexes (PEI-CCA/PEI/DNA and FA-PEI-CCA/PEI/DNA) were negative at pH 7.4 and positive at pH 6.5, with particle sizes of approximately 150nm. MTT assays demonstrated the significantly lower cytotoxicities of the ternary complexes compared to that of PEI/DNA. Moreover, the cytotoxicities of the ternary complexes were lower at pH 7.4 than pH 6.5. Transfection experiments in vitro revealed that the mean fluorescence intensities and transfection efficiencies of the ternary complexes were lower than for PEI/DNA at pH 7.4 but were almost the same at pH 6.5. The ternary complex with a FA group had significantly higher mean fluorescence intensity and transfection efficiency than did the ternary complex without it. In addition, the transfection experiment in 293T cells preliminarily validated the targeting function of the FA group of the ternary complex.

  3. Dust in galaxy clusters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Polikarpova, O. L.; Shchekinov, Yu. A.

    2017-02-01

    The conditions for the destruction of dust in hot gas in galaxy clusters are investigated. It is argued that extinction measurements can be subject to selection effects, hindering their use in obtaining trustworthy estimates of dust masses in clusters. It is shown, in particular, that the ratio of the dust mass to the extinction M d / S d increases as dust grains are disrupted, due to the rapid destruction of small grains. Over long times, this ratio can asymptotically reach values a factor of three higher than the mean value in the interstellar medium in the Galaxy. This lowers dust-mass estimates based on measurements of extinction in galaxy clusters. The characteristic lifetime of dust in hot cluster gas is determined by its possible thermal isolation by the denser medium of gas fragments within which the dust is ejected from galaxies, and can reach 100-300 million years, depending on the kinematics and morphology of the fragments. As a result, the mass fraction of dust in hot cluster gas can reach 1-3% of the Galactic value. Over its lifetime, dust can also be manifest through its far-infrared emission. The emission characteristics of the dust change as it is disrupted, and the ratio of the fluxes at 350 and 850 μm can increase appreciably. This can potentially serve as an indicator of the state of the dust and ambient gas.

  4. Spatio-temporal clustering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kisilevich, Slava; Mansmann, Florian; Nanni, Mirco; Rinzivillo, Salvatore

    Spatio-temporal clustering is a process of grouping objects based on their spatial and temporal similarity. It is relatively new subfield of data mining which gained high popularity especially in geographic information sciences due to the pervasiveness of all kinds of location-based or environmental devices that record position, time or/and environmental properties of an object or set of objects in real-time. As a consequence, different types and large amounts of spatio-temporal data became available that introduce new challenges to data analysis and require novel approaches to knowledge discovery. In this chapter we concentrate on the spatio-temporal clustering in geographic space. First, we provide a classification of different types of spatio-temporal data. Then, we focus on one type of spatio-temporal clustering - trajectory clustering, provide an overview of the state-of-the-art approaches and methods of spatio-temporal clustering and finally present several scenarios in different application domains such as movement, cellular networks and environmental studies.

  5. An Overview of Controls and Flying Qualities Technology on the F/A-18 High Alpha Research Vehicle

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pahle, Joseph W.; Wichman, Keith D.; Foster, John V.; Bundick, W. Thomas

    1996-01-01

    The NASA F/A-18 High Alpha Research Vehicle (HARV) has been the flight test bed of a focused technology effort to significantly increase maneuvering capability at high angles of attack. Development and flight test of control law design methodologies, handling qualities metrics, performance guidelines, and flight evaluation maneuvers are described. The HARV has been modified to include two research control effectors, thrust vectoring, and actuated forebody strakes in order to provide increased control power at high angles of attack. A research flight control system has been used to provide a flexible, easily modified capability for high-angle-of-attack research controls. Different control law design techniques have been implemented and flight-tested, including eigenstructure assignment, variable gain output feedback, pseudo controls, and model-following. Extensive piloted simulation has been used to develop nonlinear performance guide-lines and handling qualities criteria for high angles of attack. This paper reviews the development and evaluation of technologies useful for high-angle-of-attack control. Design, development, and flight test of the research flight control system, control laws, flying qualities specifications, and flight test maneuvers are described. Flight test results are used to illustrate some of the lessons learned during flight test and handling qualities evaluations.

  6. High-Alpha Handling Qualities Flight Research on the NASA F/A-18 High Alpha Research Vehicle

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wichman, Keith D.; Pahle, Joseph W.; Bahm, Catherine; Davidson, John B.; Bacon, Barton J.; Murphy, Patrick C.; Ostroff, Aaron J.; Hoffler, Keith D.

    1996-01-01

    A flight research study of high-angle-of-attack handling qualities has been conducted at the NASA Dryden Flight Research Center using the F/A-18 High Alpha Research Vehicle (HARV). The objectives were to create a high-angle-of-attack handling qualities flight database, develop appropriate research evaluation maneuvers, and evaluate high-angle-of-attack handling qualities guidelines and criteria. Using linear and nonlinear simulations and flight research data, the predictions from each criterion were compared with the pilot ratings and comments. Proposed high-angle-of-attack nonlinear design guidelines and proposed handling qualities criteria and guidelines developed using piloted simulation were considered. Recently formulated time-domain Neal-Smith guidelines were also considered for application to high-angle-of-attack maneuvering. Conventional envelope criteria were evaluated for possible extension to the high-angle-of-attack regime. Additionally, the maneuvers were studied as potential evaluation techniques, including a limited validation of the proposed standard evaluation maneuver set. This paper gives an overview of these research objectives through examples and summarizes result highlights. The maneuver development is described briefly, the criteria evaluation is emphasized with example results given, and a brief discussion of the database form and content is presented.

  7. An Inlet Distortion Assessment During Aircraft Departures at High Angle of Attack for an F/A-18A Aircraft

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Steenken, William G.; Williams, John G.; Yuhas, Andrew J.; Walsh, Kevin R.

    1997-01-01

    The F404-GE-400-powered F/A-18A High Alpha Research Vehicle (HARV) was used to examine the quality of inlet airflow during departed flight maneuvers, that is, during flight outside the normal maneuvering envelope where control surfaces have little or no effectiveness. Six nose-left and six nose-right departures were initiated at Mach numbers between 0.3 and 0.4 at an altitude of 35 kft. The entry yaw rates were approximately 40 to 90 deg/sec. Engine surges were encountered during three of the nose-left and one of the nose-right departures. Time-variant inlet-total-pressure distortion levels at the engine face did not significantly exceed those at maximum angle-of-attack and sideslip maneuvers during controlled flight. Surges caused by inlet distortion levels resulted from a combination of high levels of inlet distortion and rapid changes in aircraft position. These rapid changes indicate a combination of engine support and gyroscopic loads being applied to the engine structure that impact the aerodynamic stability of the compressor through changes in the rotor-to-case clearances. This document presents the slides from an oral presentation.

  8. Correlates of avian building strikes at a glass façade museum surrounded by avian habitat

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kahle, L.; Flannery, M.; Dumbacher, J. P.

    2013-12-01

    Bird window collisions are the second largest anthropogenic cause of bird deaths in the world. Effective mitigation requires an understanding of which birds are most likely to strike, when, and why. Here, we examine five years of avian window strike data from the California Academy of Sciences - a relatively new museum with significant glass façade situated in Golden Gate Park, San Francisco. We examine correlates of window-killed birds, including age, sex, season, and migratory or sedentary tendencies of the birds. We also examine correlates of window kills such as presence of habitat surrounding the building and overall window area. We found that males are almost three times more likely than females to mortally strike windows, and immature birds are three times more abundant than adults in our window kill dataset. Among seasons, strikes were not notably different in spring, summer, and fall; however they were notably reduced in winter. There was no statistical effect of building orientation (north, south, east, or west), and the presence of avian habitat directly adjacent to windows had a minor effect. We also report ongoing studies examining various efforts to reduce window kill (primarily external decals and large electronic window blinds.) We hope that improving our understanding of the causes of the window strikes will help us strategically reduce window strikes.

  9. Scaled Composites' Proteus aircraft and an F/A-18 Hornet from NASA's Dryden Flight Research Center d

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2002-01-01

    Scaled Composites' Proteus aircraft and an F/A-18 Hornet from NASA's Dryden Flight Research Center during a low-level flyby at Las Cruces Airport in New Mexico. The unique Proteus aircraft served as a test bed for NASA-sponsored flight tests designed to validate collision-avoidance technologies proposed for uninhabited aircraft. The tests, flown over southern New Mexico in March, 2002, used the Proteus as a surrogate uninhabited aerial vehicle (UAV) while three other aircraft flew toward the Proteus from various angles on simulated collision courses. Radio-based 'detect, see and avoid' equipment on the Proteus successfully detected the other aircraft and relayed that information to a remote pilot on the ground at Las Cruces Airport. The pilot then transmitted commands to the Proteus to maneuver it away from the potential collisions. The flight demonstration, sponsored by NASA Dryden Flight Research Center, New Mexico State University, Scaled Composites, the U.S. Navy and Modern Technology Solutions, Inc., were intended to demonstrate that UAVs can be flown safely and compatibly in the same skies as piloted aircraft.

  10. Liquid filled prismatic louver façade for enhanced daylighting in high-rise commercial buildings.

    PubMed

    Vlachokostas, A; Madamopoulos, N

    2015-07-27

    A liquid filled prismatic louver (LFPL) façade that can perform daylight and thermal energy harvesting with the potential to offer enhanced natural illumination levels to office spaces and thermally assist secondary thermal driven applications is proposed and analyzed. We focus the present simulation study on the evaluation of daylight enhancement in indoor space by redirecting light from a window opening to the ceiling of the room, and then-after a diffusive reflection from the ceiling-onward to the work plane of the room. Illumination simulations using LightTools, a forward ray tracing illumination simulation software, are performed for an office building space located in New York City. We show that the LFPL system achieves deeper natural light penetration, better uniformity and higher illuminance levels compared to an office space without the LFPL system. We further extend our study to a number of other representative cities in the continental US, covering different climatic zones. The LFPL system achieves good daylight harvesting performance. Finally, we discuss the potential of the LFPL system to capture solar infrared radiation heat within the liquid (e.g., water) volume and use it to assist in secondary thermal energy applications.

  11. Fully automated measurement of field-dependent AMS using MFK1-FA Kappabridge equipped with 3D rotator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chadima, Martin; Studynka, Jan

    2013-04-01

    Low-field magnetic susceptibility of paramagnetic and diamagnetic minerals is field-independent by definition being also field-independent in pure magnetite. On the other hand, in pyrrhotite, hematite and high-Ti titanomagnetite it may be clearly field-dependent. Consequently, the field-dependent AMS enables the magnetic fabric of the latter group of minerals to be separated from the whole-rock AMS. The methods for the determination of the field-dependent AMS consist of separate measurements of each specimen in several fields within the Rayleigh Law range and subsequent processing in which the field-independent and field-dependent AMS components are calculated. The disadvantage of this technique is that each specimen must be measured several times, which is relatively laborious and time consuming. Recently, a new 3D rotator was developed for the MFK1-FA Kappabridge, which rotates the specimen simultaneously about two axes with different velocities. The measurement is fully automated in such a way that, once the specimen is inserted into the rotator, it requires no additional manipulation to measure the full AMS tensor. Consequently, the 3D rotator enables to measure the AMS tensors in the pre-set field intensities without any operator interference. Whole procedure is controlled by newly developed Safyr5 software; once the measurements are finished, the acquired data are immediately processed and can be visualized in a standard way.

  12. A xylanase from Streptomyces sp. FA1: heterologous expression, characterization, and its application in Chinese steamed bread.

    PubMed

    Xu, Yang; Wu, Jing; Zheng, Kaixuan; Wu, Dan

    2016-05-01

    Xylanases (EC 3.2.1.8) are hydrolytic enzymes that have found widespread application in the food, feed, and paper-pulp industries. Streptomyces sp. FA1 xynA was expressed as a secreted protein in Pichia pastoris, and the xylanase was applied to the production of Chinese steamed bread for the first time. The optimal pH and the optimal temperature of XynA were 5.5 and 60 °C, respectively. Using beechwood as substrate, the K m and V max were 2.408 mg mL(-1) and 299.3 µmol min(-1) mg(-1), respectively. Under optimal conditions, a 3.6-L bioreactor produced 1374 U mL(-1) of XynA activity at a protein concentration of 6.3 g L(-1) after 132 h of fermentation. Use of recombinant XynA led to a greater increase in the specific volume of the CSB than could be achieved using commercial xylanase under optimal conditions. This study provides the basis for the application of the enzyme in the baking industry.

  13. Determination of the stability and control derivatives of the NASA F/A-18 HARV using flight data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Napolitano, Marcello R.; Spagnuolo, Joelle M.

    1993-01-01

    This report documents the research conducted for the NASA-Ames Cooperative Agreement No. NCC 2-759 with West Virginia University. A complete set of the stability and control derivatives for varying angles of attack from 10 deg to 60 deg were estimated from flight data of the NASA F/A-18 HARV. The data were analyzed with the use of the pEst software which implements the output-error method of parameter estimation. Discussions of the aircraft equations of motion, parameter estimation process, design of flight test maneuvers, and formulation of the mathematical model are presented. The added effects of the thrust vectoring and single surface excitation systems are also addressed. The results of the longitudinal and lateral directional derivative estimates at varying angles of attack are presented and compared to results from previous analyses. The results indicate a significant improvement due to the independent control surface deflections induced by the single surface excitation system, and at the same time, a need for additional flight data especially at higher angles of attack.

  14. The Financial Management Environment (FaME): A prototype interactive hypertext-based financial planning and reporting system

    SciTech Connect

    Barnes, K.D.; Donato, J.M.; Flanagan, D.M.

    1995-11-01

    It is critical in every government, research, and industrial organization that accurate and timely financial information be made available at all levels so that, project and business decisions can be made within funding constraints. The FaME prototype implemented at Oak Ridge National Laboratory extracts financial data from a legacy system, builds easy-to-understand reports and graphs, and presents them on-line so that people at all levels in an organization can assess the financial status of individual projects or entire organizations. Reports are presented in hypertext and graphical formats that can be read with popular World Wide Web browsers such as NCSA Mosaic or Netscape. All reports are hyper-linked in a natural way to simplify navigation and information retrieval. To protect potentially sensitive information, FAME provides access control so that individuals can retrieve only the information that is required for them to carry out their financial duties. In addition to the reports and graphs, FAME includes budget building tools to provide for financial planning. Another primary feature is that the prototype 1 utilizes equipment that already exists on the user`s desktop. The overall goal of the FAME system is to provide users with precise and meaningful information on the financial status of an organization or project at a glance.

  15. Installed F/A-18 inlet flow calculations at 60 deg angle-of-attack and 10 deg side slip

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Podleski, S. D.

    1993-01-01

    This paper presents the results of PARC3D numerical calculations on a 19.78 percent scale forebody/inlet model of the F/A-18 at a Mach number of 0.20, an angle-of-attack of 60 deg, and a side-slip angle of 10 deg. The main purpose of these calculations is to support an upcoming wind-tunnel test program in the prediction of engine inlet compressor face total pressure recovery and flow distortion. The GRIDGEN system was used to generate a grid which includes the inlet and lip, and other aircraft components which are considered to be important to inlet performance, such as the ramp/splitter plate, the diverter and slot, and the deflected leading edge flap. PARC3D shows complex flow patterns on the fuselage surfaces below the leading edge extensions, on the ramp/splitter plate, inlet lip, and inside the inlet. PARC3D tends to underpredict total pressure recovery and overpredict the flow distortion at the inlet compressor face.

  16. Neutral red uptake inhibition in adhered and adhering rat hepatoma-derived Fa32 cells to predict human toxicity.

    PubMed

    Dierickx, Paul J; Scheers, Ellen M

    2002-01-01

    The cytotoxicity of the MEIC (Multicentre Evaluation of In vitro Cytotoxicity) reference chemicals was investigated by measuring the neutral red uptake inhibition in adhered and adhering rat hepatoma-derived Fa32 cells. The adhered cells were seeded and then treated and the adhering cells were treated simultaneously upon seeding. Five of the 44 test chemicals were twofold more toxic in adhering cells; ethylene glycol was 28-fold more toxic and mercuric chloride was 5.2-fold more toxic than in adhered cells. The cytotoxicity of dithiothreitol was altered in the same way as that of ethylene glycol, probably by interacting with calcium. When the neutral red uptake inhibition was compared with human toxicity, the correlation coefficient for adhering cells was almost identical to that obtained previously in human hepatoma-derived Hep G2 cells and slightly higher for adhered cells. The Hep G2 assay was the best acute in vitro assay for the prediction of human toxicity within the MEIC study. An obviously better correlation was obtained when the strong intoxicant mercuric chloride was withdrawn from the comparison, both for the adhered and the adhering cells. Altogether, the results can be integrated very well with the basal cytotoxicity concept.

  17. In-Flight Wing Pressure Distributions for the NASA F/A-18A High Alpha Research Vehicle

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Davis, Mark C.; Saltzman, John A.

    2000-01-01

    Pressure distributions on the wings of the F/A-18A High Alpha Research Vehicle (HARV) were obtained using both flush-mounted pressure orifices and surface-mounted pressure tubing. During quasi-stabilized 1-g flight, data were gathered at ranges for angle of attack from 5 deg to 70 deg, for angle of sideslip from -12 deg to +12 deg, and for Mach from 0.23 to 0.64, at various engine settings, and with and without the leading edge extension fence installed. Angle of attack strongly influenced the wing pressure distribution, as demonstrated by a distinct flow separation pattern that occurred between the range from 15 deg to 30 deg. Influence by the leading edge extension fence was evident on the inboard wing pressure distribution, but little influence was seen on the outboard portion of the wing. Angle-of-sideslip influence on wing pressure distribution was strongest at low angle of attack. Influence of Mach number was observed in the regions of local supersonic flow, diminishing as angle of attack was increased. Engine throttle setting had little influence on the wing pressure distribution.

  18. A static investigation of the thrust vectoring system of the F/A-18 high-alpha research vehicle

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mason, Mary L.; Capone, Francis J.; Asbury, Scott C.

    1992-01-01

    A static (wind-off) test was conducted in the static test facility of the Langley 16-foot Transonic Tunnel to evaluate the vectoring capability and isolated nozzle performance of the proposed thrust vectoring system of the F/A-18 high alpha research vehicle (HARV). The thrust vectoring system consisted of three asymmetrically spaced vanes installed externally on a single test nozzle. Two nozzle configurations were tested: A maximum afterburner-power nozzle and a military-power nozzle. Vane size and vane actuation geometry were investigated, and an extensive matrix of vane deflection angles was tested. The nozzle pressure ratios ranged from two to six. The results indicate that the three vane system can successfully generate multiaxis (pitch and yaw) thrust vectoring. However, large resultant vector angles incurred large thrust losses. Resultant vector angles were always lower than the vane deflection angles. The maximum thrust vectoring angles achieved for the military-power nozzle were larger than the angles achieved for the maximum afterburner-power nozzle.

  19. Measurement of enhanced heat transfer coefficient with perforated twisted tape inserts during condensation of R-245fa

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khatua, A. K.; Kumar, P.; Singh, H. N.; Kumar, R.

    2016-04-01

    The experimental conductive heat transfer results for flow through inserted perforated twisted tapes in a horizontal tube during condensation of pure R-245fa vapor. The test section consisting of two separate coaxial double pipes assembled in series, acted like a counter flow heat exchanger, where the refrigerant condensed inside the inner tube by rejecting heat to the cooling water flowing inside the outer tube in reversed direction. Data for three perforated twisted tapes having constant twist ratio of 7.1 mm and pitch of perforation as 12.5, 25.0 and 37.5 mm, inserted one by one in full length of test condenser by varying refrigerant mass flux from 100 to 200 kg/m2 s in steps of 50 kg/m2 s for the range of vapor quality from 0.1 to 0.9, were collected together with flow and without insert (plain tube). It has been found that the perforated twisted tape insert having pitch of perforation equal to in order of 12.5 mm gives the highest value of average heat transfer coefficient and is of the order of 37.5 % more than that of the plain one and the correlation predicts the experimental data within an error band of ±15 %.

  20. Clustering granulometric features

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brun, Marcel; Balagurunathan, Yoganand; Barrera, Junior; Dougherty, Edward R.

    2002-05-01

    Granulometric features have been widely used for classification, segmentation and recently in estimation of parameters in shape models. In this paper we study the inference of clustering based on granulometric features for a collection of structuring probes in the context of random models. We use random Boolean models to represent grains of different shapes and structure. It is known that granulometric features are excellent descriptors of shape and structure of grains. Inference based on clustering these features helps to analyze the consistency of these features and clustering algorithms. This greatly aids in classifier design and feature selection. Features and the order of their addition play a role in reducing the inference errors. We study four different types of feature addition methods and the effect of replication in reducing the inference errors.

  1. Friedreich's Ataxia (FA)

    MedlinePlus

    ... About Friedreich’s Ataxia Updated December 2009 Michelle Moffitt Smith Michelle and James Smith at their wedding Dear Friends: W hen I ... for a doctorate. I met my husband, James Smith, through MDA’s magazine, Quest. He also has a ...

  2. Clustering cancer gene expression data by projective clustering ensemble

    PubMed Central

    Yu, Xianxue; Yu, Guoxian

    2017-01-01

    Gene expression data analysis has paramount implications for gene treatments, cancer diagnosis and other domains. Clustering is an important and promising tool to analyze gene expression data. Gene expression data is often characterized by a large amount of genes but with limited samples, thus various projective clustering techniques and ensemble techniques have been suggested to combat with these challenges. However, it is rather challenging to synergy these two kinds of techniques together to avoid the curse of dimensionality problem and to boost the performance of gene expression data clustering. In this paper, we employ a projective clustering ensemble (PCE) to integrate the advantages of projective clustering and ensemble clustering, and to avoid the dilemma of combining multiple projective clusterings. Our experimental results on publicly available cancer gene expression data show PCE can improve the quality of clustering gene expression data by at least 4.5% (on average) than other related techniques, including dimensionality reduction based single clustering and ensemble approaches. The empirical study demonstrates that, to further boost the performance of clustering cancer gene expression data, it is necessary and promising to synergy projective clustering with ensemble clustering. PCE can serve as an effective alternative technique for clustering gene expression data. PMID:28234920

  3. Primary mechanism of apoptosis induction in a leukemia cell line by fraction FA-2-b-ss prepared from the mushroom Agaricus blazei Murill.

    PubMed

    Gao, L; Sun, Y; Chen, C; Xi, Y; Wang, J; Wang, Z

    2007-11-01

    Agaricus blazei Murill is a native Brazilian mushroom which functions primarily as an anticancer substance in transplanted mouse tumors. However, the mechanism underlying this function of A. blazei Murill remains obscure. The present study was carried out to investigate the effect of fraction FA-2-b-ss, an RNA-protein complex isolated from A. blazei Murill, on human leukemia HL-60 cells in vitro. Typical apoptotic characteristics were determined by morphological methods using DNA agarose gel electrophoresis and flow cytometry. The growth suppressive effect of fraction FA-2-b-ss on HL-60 cells in vitro occurred in a dose- (5-80 microg/mL) and time-dependent (24-96 h) manner. The proliferation of HL-60 cells (1 x 10(5) cells/mL) treated with 40 microg/mL of fraction FA-2-b-ss for 24-96 h and with 5-80 microg/mL for 96 h resulted in inhibitory rates ranging from 8 to 54.5%, and from 4.9 to 86.3%, respectively. Both telomerase activity determined by TRAP-ELISA and mRNA expression of the caspase-3 gene detected by RT-PCR were increased in HL-60 cells during fraction FA-2-b-ss treatment. The rate of apoptosis correlated negatively with the decrease of telomerase activity (r = 0.926, P < 0.05), but correlated positively with caspase-3 mRNA expression (r = 0.926, P < 0.05). These data show that fraction FA-2-b-ss can induce HL-60 cell apoptosis and that the combined effect of down-regulation of telomerase activity and up-regulation of mRNA expression of the caspase-3 gene could be the primary mechanism of induction of apoptosis. These findings provide strong evidence that fraction FA-2-b-ss could be of interest for the clinical treatment of acute leukemia.

  4. Health Occupations Cluster.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Walraven, Catherine; And Others

    These instructional materials consist of a series of curriculum worksheets that cover tasks to be mastered by students in health occupations cluster programs. Covered in the curriculum worksheets are diagnostic procedures; observing/recording/reporting/planning; safety; nutrition/elimination; hygiene/personal care/comfort;…

  5. Clustering in Bubble Suspensions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zenit, Roberto

    2000-11-01

    A monidisperse bubble suspension is studied experimentally for the limit in which the Weber number is small and the Reynolds number is large. For this regime the suspension can be modeled using potential flow theory to describe the dynamics of the interstitial fluid. Complete theoretical descriptions have been composed (Spelt and Sangani, 1998) to model the behavior of these suspensions. Bubble clustering is a natural instability that arises from the potential flow considerations, in which bubbles tend to align in horizontal rafts as they move upwards. The appearance of bubble clusters was recently corroborated experimentally by Zenit et al. (2000), who found that although clusters did appear, their strength was not as strong as the predictions. Experiments involving gravity driven shear flows are used to explain the nature of the clustering observed in these type of flows. Balances of the bubble phase pressure (in terms of a calculated diffusion coefficient) and the Maxwell pressure (from the potential flow description) are presented to predict the stability of the bubble suspension. The predictions are compared with experimental results.

  6. FUEL ROD CLUSTERS

    DOEpatents

    Schultz, A.B.

    1959-08-01

    A cluster of nuclear fuel rods and a tubular casing therefor through which a coolant flows in heat-exchange contact with the fuel rods is described. The fuel rcds are held in the casing by virtue of the compressive force exerted between longitudinal ribs of the fuel rcds and internal ribs of the casing or the internal surfaces thereof.

  7. Hydrodynamics of Merging Clusters

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    David,Laurence; Mushotzky, Richard F. (Technical Monitor)

    2004-01-01

    With the Chandra X-Ray Observatory, we observed two clusters of galaxies that are undergoing major mergers . All of the analysis is complete and two papers have been accepted for publication. The abstracts of the two papers are presented in the report.

  8. PVM Support for Clusters

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Springer, P.

    2000-01-01

    The latest version of PVM (3.4.3) now contains support for a PC cluster running Linux, also known as a Beowulf system. A PVM user of a computer outside the Beowulf system can add the Beowulf as a single machine.

  9. Nuclear Cluster Physics

    SciTech Connect

    Kamimura, Masayasu

    2011-05-06

    Predictive power of theory needs good models and accurate calculation methods to solve the Schroedinger equations of the systems concerned. We present some examples of successful predictions based on the nuclear cluster models of light nuclei and hypernuclei and on the calculation methods that have been developed by Kyushu group.

  10. Cluster headaches simulating parasomnias.

    PubMed

    Isik, Ugur; D'Cruz, O 'Neill F

    2002-09-01

    Nocturnal episodes of agitated arousal in otherwise healthy young children are often related to nonrapid eye movement parasomnias (night terrors). However, in patients with acute onset or increased frequency of parasomnias, organic causes of discomfort must be excluded. We report four young children whose parasomnias were caused by nocturnal cluster headaches and who responded to indomethacin dramatically.

  11. Clustered for Success

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brulles, Dina; Winebrenner, Susan

    2012-01-01

    Schools need to address the needs of their students with high ability. Not only does this raise achievement levels schoolwide, it also attracts students from surrounding districts and recaptures advanced learners who left the school because their needs weren't being met. One practical intervention--cluster grouping--provides an inclusive…

  12. Health Occupations Cluster Guide.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Oregon State Dept. of Education, Salem.

    Intended to assist the vocational teacher in designing and implementing a cluster program in health occupations, this guide suggests ideas for teaching the specific knowledge and skills that qualify students for entry-level employment in the health occupations field. The knowledge and skills are applicable to 12 occupations: dental assistant;…

  13. Buckets, Clusters and Dienst

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nelson, Michael L.; Maly, Kurt; Shen, Stewart N. T.

    1997-01-01

    In this paper we describe NCSTRL+, a unified, canonical digital library for scientific and technical information (STI). NCSTRL+ is based on the Networked Computer Science Technical Report Library (NCSTRL), a World Wide Web (WWW) accessible digital library (DL) that provides access to over 80 university departments and laboratories. NCSTRL+ implements two new technologies: cluster functionality and publishing "buckets." We have extended the Dienst protocol, the protocol underlying NCSTRL, to provide the ability to "cluster" independent collections into a logically centralized digital library based upon subject category classification, type of organization, and genres of material. The concept of "buckets" provides a mechanism for publishing and managing logically linked entities with multiple data formats. The NCSTRL+ prototype DL contains the holdings of NCSTRL and the NASA Technical Report Server (NTRS). The prototype demonstrates the feasibility of publishing into a multi-cluster DL, searching across clusters, and storing and presenting buckets of information. We show that the overhead for these additional capabilities is minimal to both the author and the user when compared to the equivalent process within NCSTRL.

  14. Universality of cluster dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McFadden, Carson; Bouchard, Louis-S.

    2010-12-01

    We have studied the kinetics of cluster formation for dynamical systems of dimensions up to n=8 interacting through elastic collisions or coalescence. These systems could serve as possible models for gas kinetics, polymerization, and self-assembly. In the case of elastic collisions, we found that the cluster size probability distribution undergoes a phase transition at a critical time which can be predicted from the average time between collisions. This enables forecasting of rare events based on limited statistical sampling of the collision dynamics over short time windows. The analysis was extended to Lp -normed spaces (p=1,…,∞) to allow for some amount of interpenetration or volume exclusion. The results for the elastic collisions are consistent with previously published low-dimensional results in that a power law is observed for the empirical cluster size distribution at the critical time. We found that the same power law also exists for all dimensions n=2,…,8 , two-dimensional Lp norms, and even for coalescing collisions in two dimensions. This broad universality in behavior may be indicative of a more fundamental process governing the growth of clusters.

  15. Curriculum Guide Construction Cluster.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kline, Ken

    As part of a model construction cluster curriculum development project, this guide was developed and implemented in the Beaverton (Oregon) School District. The curriculum guide contains 16 units covering the following topics: introduction to construction jobs; safety and first aid; blueprint readings; basic mathematics; site work; framing; roofing…

  16. Hybrid cluster identification

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martín-Herrero, J.

    2004-10-01

    I present a hybrid method for the labelling of clusters in two-dimensional lattices, which combines the recursive approach with iterative scanning to reduce the stack size required by the pure recursive technique, while keeping its benefits: single pass and straightforward cluster characterization and percolation detection parallel to the labelling. While the capacity to hold the entire lattice in memory is usually regarded as the major constraint for the applicability of the recursive technique, the required stack size is the real limiting factor. Resorting to recursion only for the transverse direction greatly reduces the recursion depth and therefore the required stack. It also enhances the overall performance of the recursive technique, as is shown by results on a set of uniform random binary lattices and on a set of samples of the Ising model. I also show how this technique may replace the recursive technique in Wolff's cluster algorithm, decreasing the risk of stack overflow and increasing its speed, and the Hoshen-Kopelman algorithm in the Swendsen-Wang cluster algorithm, allowing effortless characterization during generation of the samples and increasing its speed.

  17. Installed F/A-18 inlet flow calculations at 30 degrees angle-of-attack: A comparative study

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smith, C. Frederic; Podleski, Steve D.

    1994-01-01

    NASA Lewis is currently engaged in a research effort as a team member of the High Alpha Technology Program (HATP) within NASA. This program utilizes a specially equipped F/A-18, the High Alpha Research Vehicle (HARV), in an ambitious effort to improve the maneuverability of high-performance military aircraft at low subsonic speed, high angle of attack conditions. The overall objective of the Lewis effort is to develop inlet technology that will ensure efficient airflow delivery to the engine during these maneuvers. One part of the Lewis approach utilizes computational fluid dynamics codes to predict the installed performance of inlets for these highly maneuverable aircraft. Full Navier-Stokes (FNS) calculations on the installed F/A-18 inlet at 30 degrees angle of attack, 0 degrees yaw, and a freestream Mach number of 0.2 have been obtained in this study using an algebraic turbulence model with two grids (original and revised). Results obtained with the original grid were used to determine where further grid refinements and additional geometry were needed. In order to account properly for the external effects, the forebody, leading edge extension (LEX), ramp, and wing were included with inlet geometry. In the original grid, the diverter, LEX slot, and leading edge flap were not included due to insufficient geometry definition, but were included in a revised grid. In addition, a thin-layer Navier-Stokes (TLNS) code is used with the revised grid and the numerical results are compared to those obtained with the FNS code. The TLNS code was used to evaluate the effects on the solution using a code with more recent CFD developments such as upwinding with TVD schemes versus central differencing with artificial dissipation. The calculations are compared to a limited amount of available experimental data. The predicted forebody/fuselage surface static pressures compared well with data of all solutions. The predicted trajectory of the vortex generated under the LEX was

  18. Crystal Structure of the Receptor-Binding Domain of Botulinum Neurotoxin Type HA, Also Known as Type FA or H

    PubMed Central

    Yao, Guorui; Lam, Kwok-ho; Perry, Kay; Weisemann, Jasmin; Rummel, Andreas; Jin, Rongsheng

    2017-01-01

    Botulinum neurotoxins (BoNTs), which have been exploited as cosmetics and muscle-disorder treatment medicines for decades, are well known for their extreme neurotoxicity to humans. They pose a potential bioterrorism threat because they cause botulism, a flaccid muscular paralysis-associated disease that requires immediate antitoxin treatment and intensive care over a long period of time. In addition to the existing seven established BoNT serotypes (BoNT/A–G), a new mosaic toxin type termed BoNT/HA (aka type FA or H) was reported recently. Sequence analyses indicate that the receptor-binding domain (HC) of BoNT/HA is ~84% identical to that of BoNT/A1. However, BoNT/HA responds differently to some potent BoNT/A-neutralizing antibodies (e.g., CR2) that target the HC. Therefore, it raises a serious concern as to whether BoNT/HA poses a new threat to our biosecurity. In this study, we report the first high-resolution crystal structure of BoNT/HA-HC at 1.8 Å. Sequence and structure analyses reveal that BoNT/HA and BoNT/A1 are different regarding their binding to cell-surface receptors including both polysialoganglioside (PSG) and synaptic vesicle glycoprotein 2 (SV2). Furthermore, the new structure also provides explanations for the ~540-fold decreased affinity of antibody CR2 towards BoNT/HA compared to BoNT/A1. Taken together, these new findings advance our understanding of the structure and function of this newly identified toxin at the molecular level, and pave the way for the future development of more effective countermeasures. PMID:28282873

  19. Yarrowia porcina sp. nov. and Yarrowia bubula f.a. sp. nov., two yeast species from meat and river sediment.

    PubMed

    Nagy, Edina; Dlauchy, Dénes; Medeiros, Adriana O; Péter, Gábor; Rosa, Carlos A

    2014-04-01

    Eleven yeast strains representing two hitherto undescribed species were isolated from different kinds of meat samples in Hungary and one from the sediment of a tropical freshwater river in Southeastern Brazil. The analysis of the sequences of their large subunit rRNA gene D1/D2 domain and the internal transcribed spacer (ITS) regions placed the two new species in the Yarrowia clade. Some of the seven strains representing the first new species can mate and give rise to asci and form ascospores embedded in capsular material, which qualifies it as the third teleomorph species of the Yarrowia clade. The name Yarrowia porcina sp. nov. (type strain: NCAIM Y.02100(T) = CBS 12935(T) = NRRL Y-63669(T), allotype strain UFMG-RD131(A) = CBS 12932(A)) is proposed for this new yeast species, which, based on physiological characters, is indistinguishable from Yarrowia lipolytica and some other species of the genus. Considerable intraspecific variability was detected among the sequences of the large subunit rRNA gene D1/D2 domains of the seven strains. The variability among the D1/D2 sequences exceeded the divergence observed among the ITS sequences and in some cases more than 1 % substitution among the D1/D2 sequences was detected. The conspecificity of these strains was supported by the low (0-3 substitutions) sequence divergence among their ITS sequences, the result of a parsimony network analysis utilizing the concatenated ITS and D1/D2 sequences and also by the fingerprint patterns generated by microsatellite primed PCR. No ascospore formation was observed in the group of the other five strains representing the second new species. These strains shared identical D1/D2 and ITS sequences. Yarrowia bubula f.a., sp. nov. (type strain: NCAIM Y.01998(T) = CBS 12934(T) = NRRL Y-63668(T)) is proposed to accommodate these strains.

  20. Wind tunnel investigations of forebody strakes for yaw control on F/A-18 model at subsonic and transonic speeds

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Erickson, Gary E.; Murri, Daniel G.

    1993-01-01

    Wind tunnel investigations have been conducted of forebody strakes for yaw control on 0.06-scale models of the F/A-18 aircraft at free-stream Mach numbers of 0.20 to 0.90. The testing was conducted in the 7- by 10-Foot Transonic Tunnel at the David Taylor Research Center and the Langley 7- by 10-Foot High-Speed Tunnel. The principal objectives of the testing were to determine the effects of the Mach number and the strake plan form on the strake yaw control effectiveness and the corresponding strake vortex induced flow field. The wind tunnel model configurations simulated an actuated conformal strake deployed for maximum yaw control at high angles of attack. The test data included six-component forces and moments on the complete model, surface static pressure distributions on the forebody and wing leading-edge extensions, and on-surface and off-surface flow visualizations. The results from these studies show that the strake produces large yaw control increments at high angles of attack that exceed the effect of conventional rudders at low angles of attack. The strake yaw control increments diminish with increasing Mach number but continue to exceed the effect of rudder deflection at angles of attack greater than 30 degrees. The character of the strake vortex induced flow field is similar at subsonic and transonic speeds. Cropping the strake planform to account for geometric and structural constraints on the F-18 aircraft has a small effect on the yaw control increments at subsonic speeds and no effect at transonic speeds.