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Sample records for 4g cellular systems

  1. Radio Resource Allocation on Complex 4G Wireless Cellular Networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Psannis, Kostas E.

    2015-09-01

    In this article we consider the heuristic algorithm which improves step by step wireless data delivery over LTE cellular networks by using the total transmit power with the constraint on users’ data rates, and the total throughput with the constraints on the total transmit power as well as users’ data rates, which are jointly integrated into a hybrid-layer design framework to perform radio resource allocation for multiple users, and to effectively decide the optimal system parameter such as modulation and coding scheme (MCS) in order to adapt to the varying channel quality. We propose new heuristic algorithm which balances the accessible data rate, the initial data rates of each user allocated by LTE scheduler, the priority indicator which signals delay- throughput- packet loss awareness of the user, and the buffer fullness by achieving maximization of radio resource allocation for multiple users. It is noted that the overall performance is improved with the increase in the number of users, due to multiuser diversity. Experimental results illustrate and validate the accuracy of the proposed methodology.

  2. A Dynamic Mobile Grid System for 4G Networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abdelkader, Manel; Boudriga, Mohamed Hamdi Noureddine

    Future networks specially International Mobile Telecommunications-advanced, better known as 4G, will come up with a panoply of services so as to provide a comprehensive and secure IP-based solution where facilities such as voice, data and stremed multimedia will be provided to users anywhere at anytime. This solution will also provide much higher data rates compared to previous generations. More importantly, the 4G architecture will strongly promote ubiquitous computing, which involves many computational devices and systems simultaneously. Such devices and systems can even be unaware that they are contributing to computational process.

  3. Improving Handover Quality in 4G Mobile Systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Dongwook; Lee, Hanjin; Kim, Namgi; Yoon, Hyunsoo

    In this paper, we propose a new handover algorithm to guarantee handover quality in 4G mobile systems. The proposed algorithm limits the handover interruption time by improving the HARQ retransmission latency of the first packet transmitted from new serving cell. Through the simulations, we proved that our algorithm meets the requirement of handover interruption time for TCP services with high rate.

  4. VizieR Online Data Catalog: S4G galaxy morphologies in the CVRHS system (Buta+, 2015)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Buta, R. J.; Sheth, K.; Athanassoula, E.; Bosma, A.; Knapen, J. H.; Laurikainen, E.; Salo, H.; Elmegreen, D.; Ho, L. C.; Zaritsky, D.; Courtois, H.; Hinz, J. L.; Munoz-Mateos, J.-C.; Kim, T.; Regan, M. W.; Gadotti, D. A.; Gil de, Paz A.; Laine, J.; Menendez-Delmestre, K.; Comeron, S.; Erroz-Ferrer, S.; Seibert, M.; Mizusawa, T.; Holwerda, B.; Madore, B. F.

    2015-05-01

    Our final list has 2412 galaxies, 60 more than the extended S4< sample. All of the additional galaxies are companions or in the same area as an S4G sample galaxy. Of the selected galaxies, ~600 had already been observed by Spitzer for other projects, and thus images were already available. New data were collected for the ~1750 remaining sample galaxies. The CVRHS system is a modified version of the de Vaucouleurs (1959HDP....53..275D) revised Hubble-Sandage (VRHS) system that is described in the de Vaucouleurs Atlas of Galaxies (dVA, Buta et al. 2007dvag.book.....B). (4 data files).

  5. Integrated cellular systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Harper, Jason C.

    integrate cells and direct their behaviors. This process permits, for the first time, the selection and in situ isolation of a single target cell from a population of cells with mixed phenotypes, and the subsequent monitoring of its behavior, and that of its progeny, under well defined conditions. These techniques promise a new means to integrate biomolecules with nanostructures and macroscale systems, and to manipulate cellular behavior at the individual cell level, having significant implications towards development of practical and robust integrated cellular systems.

  6. Application of 4G wireless network-based system for remote diagnosis and nursing of stomal complications

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Xiulian; Cao, Yingjuan; Luan, Xiaorong

    2014-01-01

    Background: This study aims to apply 4G wireless network in the remote diagnosis of stoma complications for the first time. Background: Remote diagnosis and nursing care for a variety of illnesses are urgently needed in clinical settings. Objectives: Combining with relevant clinical manifestations, an Android phone-based intelligent diagnosis system was designed to construct a universe, easy access to exploitation and human-computer interaction database and exploitation environment for applications and programs. Methods: “Production rule” and forward reasoning method were utilized to design arborescence structures and logic reasoner associated with stoma complications. Stoma physicians were responsible for delivering evaluation scores on patients’ health status using analytic hierarchy process. The emphasis of this study is to exploit an “Android phone-based system for remote diagnosis of stoma”, which is of certain universe usage. Results: Such system was tested in the Medicine Information Center of Qilu Hospital of Shandong University and initially applied in the city of De Zhou, Shandong province, China. Conclusions: These results collectively demonstrated that the system is easy to carry, of high utility and free from the limitations of wire network environment, etc. It provides clinical evidence for establishing a novel type model for the exchange between patients and physicians. PMID:25550986

  7. Cellular-based preemption system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bachelder, Aaron D. (Inventor)

    2011-01-01

    A cellular-based preemption system that uses existing cellular infrastructure to transmit preemption related data to allow safe passage of emergency vehicles through one or more intersections. A cellular unit in an emergency vehicle is used to generate position reports that are transmitted to the one or more intersections during an emergency response. Based on this position data, the one or more intersections calculate an estimated time of arrival (ETA) of the emergency vehicle, and transmit preemption commands to traffic signals at the intersections based on the calculated ETA. Additional techniques may be used for refining the position reports, ETA calculations, and the like. Such techniques include, without limitation, statistical preemption, map-matching, dead-reckoning, augmented navigation, and/or preemption optimization techniques, all of which are described in further detail in the above-referenced patent applications.

  8. Integration of mobile satellite and cellular systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Drucker, Elliott H.; Estabrook, Polly; Pinck, Deborah; Ekroot, Laura

    1993-01-01

    By integrating the ground based infrastructure component of a mobile satellite system with the infrastructure systems of terrestrial 800 MHz cellular service providers, a seamless network of universal coverage can be established. Users equipped for both cellular and satellite service can take advantage of a number of features made possible by such integration, including seamless handoff and universal roaming. To provide maximum benefit at lowest posible cost, the means by which these systems are integrated must be carefully considered. Mobile satellite hub stations must be configured to efficiently interface with cellular Mobile Telephone Switching Offices (MTSO's), and cost effective mobile units that provide both cellular and satellite capability must be developed.

  9. MILLIMETER-WAVE EMISSIVITY OF CELLULAR SYSTEMS

    EPA Science Inventory

    A general analysis has been presented of the millimeter-wave and farinfrared spectroscopic properties of in vivo cellular systems, and of the boson radiative equilibrium with steady-state nonequilibrium molecular systems. The frequency threshhold of spectroscopic properties assoc...

  10. Cellular Manufacturing Internet Performance Support System

    SciTech Connect

    Bohley, M.C.; Schwartz, M.E.

    1998-03-04

    The objective of this project was to develop an Internet-based electronic performance support system (EPSS) for cellular manufacturing providing hardware/software specifications, process descriptions, estimated cost savings, manufacturing simulations, training information, and service resources for government and industry users of Cincinnati Milacron machine tools and products. AlliedSignal Federal Manufacturing and Technologies (ASFM and T) used expertise in the areas of Internet design and multimedia creation to develop a performance support system (PSS) for the Internet with assistance from CM's subject matter experts from engineering, manufacturing, and technical support. Reference information was both created and re-purposed from other existing formats, then made available on the Internet. On-line references on cellular manufacturing operations include: definitions of cells and cellular manufacturing; illustrations on how cellular manufacturing improves part throughput, resource utilization, part quality, and manufacturing flexibility; illustrations on how cellular manufacturing reduces labor and overhead costs; identification of critical factors driving decisions toward cellular manufacturing; a method for identifying process improvement areas using cellular manufacturing; a method for customizing the size of cells for a specific site; a simulation for making a part using cellular manufacturing technology; and a glossary of terms and concepts.

  11. Cellular Automata Generalized To An Inferential System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Blower, David J.

    2007-11-01

    Stephen Wolfram popularized elementary one-dimensional cellular automata in his book, A New Kind of Science. Among many remarkable things, he proved that one of these cellular automata was a Universal Turing Machine. Such cellular automata can be interpreted in a different way by viewing them within the context of the formal manipulation rules from probability theory. Bayes's Theorem is the most famous of such formal rules. As a prelude, we recapitulate Jaynes's presentation of how probability theory generalizes classical logic using modus ponens as the canonical example. We emphasize the important conceptual standing of Boolean Algebra for the formal rules of probability manipulation and give an alternative demonstration augmenting and complementing Jaynes's derivation. We show the complementary roles played in arguments of this kind by Bayes's Theorem and joint probability tables. A good explanation for all of this is afforded by the expansion of any particular logic function via the disjunctive normal form (DNF). The DNF expansion is a useful heuristic emphasized in this exposition because such expansions point out where relevant 0s should be placed in the joint probability tables for logic functions involving any number of variables. It then becomes a straightforward exercise to rely on Boolean Algebra, Bayes's Theorem, and joint probability tables in extrapolating to Wolfram's cellular automata. Cellular automata are seen as purely deductive systems, just like classical logic, which probability theory is then able to generalize. Thus, any uncertainties which we might like to introduce into the discussion about cellular automata are handled with ease via the familiar inferential path. Most importantly, the difficult problem of predicting what cellular automata will do in the far future is treated like any inferential prediction problem.

  12. Dynamical Systems Perspective of Wolfram's Cellular Automata

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Courbage, M.; Kamiński, B.

    2013-01-01

    Leon Chua, following Wolfram, devoted a big effort to understand deeply the wealth of complexity of the rules of all elementary one-dimensional cellular automata from the point of view of the nonlinear dynamicist. Here we complete this point of view by a dynamical system perspective, extending them to the limit of infinite number of sites.

  13. System and method for monitoring cellular activity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bearman, Gregory H. (Inventor); Fraser, Scott E. (Inventor); Lansford, Russell D. (Inventor)

    2002-01-01

    A system and method for monitoring cellular activity in a cellular specimen. According to one embodiment, a plurality of excitable markers are applied to the specimen. A multi-photon laser microscope is provided to excite a region of the specimen and cause fluorescence to be radiated from the region. The radiating fluorescence is processed by a spectral analyzer to separate the fluorescence into respective wavelength bands. The respective bands of fluorescence are then collected by an array of detectors, with each detector receiving a corresponding one of the wavelength bands.

  14. System and method for monitoring cellular activity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bearman, Gregory H. (Inventor); Fraser, Scott E. (Inventor); Lansford, Russell D. (Inventor)

    2004-01-01

    A system and method for monitoring cellular activity in a cellular specimen. According to one embodiment, a plurality of excitable markers are applied to the specimen. A multi-photon laser microscope is provided to excite a region of the specimen and cause fluorescence to be radiated from the region. The radiating fluorescence is processed by a spectral analyzer to separate the fluorescence into respective wavelength bands. The respective bands of fluorescence are then collected by an array of detectors, with each detector receiving a corresponding one of the wavelength bands.

  15. Literature Review on Dynamic Cellular Manufacturing System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nouri Houshyar, A.; Leman, Z.; Pakzad Moghadam, H.; Ariffin, M. K. A. M.; Ismail, N.; Iranmanesh, H.

    2014-06-01

    In previous decades, manufacturers faced a lot of challenges because of globalization and high competition in markets. These problems arise from shortening product life cycle, rapid variation in demand of products, and also rapid changes in manufcaturing technologies. Nowadays most manufacturing companies expend considerable attention for improving flexibility and responsiveness in order to overcome these kinds of problems and also meet customer's needs. By considering the trend toward the shorter product life cycle, the manufacturing environment is towards manufacturing a wide variety of parts in small batches [1]. One of the major techniques which are applied for improving manufacturing competitiveness is Cellular Manufacturing System (CMS). CMS is type of manufacturing system which tries to combine flexibility of job shop and also productivity of flow shop. In addition, Dynamic cellular manufacturing system which considers different time periods for the manufacturing system becomes an important topic and attracts a lot of attention to itself. Therefore, this paper made attempt to have a brief review on this issue and focused on all published paper on this subject. Although, this topic gains a lot of attention to itself during these years, none of previous researchers focused on reviewing the literature of that which can be helpful and useful for other researchers who intend to do the research on this topic. Therefore, this paper is the first study which has focused and reviewed the literature of dynamic cellular manufacturing system.

  16. 47 CFR 22.923 - Cellular system configuration.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 2 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Cellular system configuration. 22.923 Section... MOBILE SERVICES Cellular Radiotelephone Service § 22.923 Cellular system configuration. Mobile stations... directly or through cellular repeaters. Auxiliary test stations may communicate with base or...

  17. Mediator-free direct Z-scheme photocatalytic system: BiVO4/g-C3N4 organic-inorganic hybrid photocatalyst with highly efficient visible-light-induced photocatalytic activity.

    PubMed

    Tian, Na; Huang, Hongwei; He, Ying; Guo, Yuxi; Zhang, Tierui; Zhang, Yihe

    2015-03-01

    We disclose the fabrication of a mediator-free direct Z-scheme photocatalyst system BiVO4/g-C3N4 using a mixed-calcination method based on the more reliable interfacial interaction. The facet coupling occurred between the g-C3N4 (002) and BiVO4 (121), and it was revealed by X-ray diffraction (XRD), X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) and transmission electron microscope (TEM). The crystal structure and optical properties of the as-prepared samples have also been characterized by Fourier-transform infrared (FTIR), scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and UV-vis diffuse reflectance spectra (DRS) in details. The photocatalytic experiments indicated that the BiVO4/g-C3N4 composite photocatalysts display a significantly enhanced photocatalytic activity pertaining to RhB degradation and photocurrent generation (PC) compared to the pristine BiVO4 and g-C3N4. This remarkably improved photocatalytic performance should be attributed to the fabrication of a direct Z-scheme system of BiVO4/g-C3N4, which can result in a more efficient separation of photoinduced charge carriers than band-band transfer, thus endowing it with the much more powerful oxidation and reduction capability, as confirmed by the photoluminescence (PL) spectra and electrochemical impedance spectra (EIS). The Z-scheme mechanism of BiVO4/g-C3N4 heterostructure was verified by a series of combined techniques, including the active species trapping experiments, NBT transformation and terephthalic acid photoluminescence probing technique (TA-PL) over BiVO4/g-C3N4 composites and the pristine samples. The present work not only furthered the understanding of mediator-free Z-scheme photocatalysis, but also shed new light on the design of heterostructural photocatalysts with high-performance. PMID:25635354

  18. Fluorescent sensing of fluoride in cellular system.

    PubMed

    Jiao, Yang; Zhu, Baocun; Chen, Jihua; Duan, Xiaohong

    2015-01-01

    Fluoride ions have the important roles in a lot of physiological activities related with biological and medical system, such as water fluoridation, caries treatment, and bone disease treatment. Great efforts have been made to develop new methods and strategies for F(-) detection in the past decades. Traditional methods for the detection of F(-) including ion chromatography, ion-selective electrodes, and spectroscopic techniques have the limitations in the biomedicine research. The fluorescent probes for F(-) are very promising that overcome some drawbacks of traditional fluoride detection methods. These probes exhibit high selectivity, high sensitivity as well as quick response to the detection of fluoride anions. The review commences with a brief description of photophysical mechanisms for fluorescent probes for fluoride, including photo induced electron transfer (PET), intramolecular charge transfer (ICT), fluorescence resonance energy transfer (FRET), and excited-state intramolecular proton transfer (ESIPT). Followed by a discussion about common dyes for fluorescent fluoride probes, such as anthracene, naphalimide, pyrene, BODIPY, fluorescein, rhodamine, resorufin, coumarin, cyanine, and near-infrared (NIR) dyes. We divide the fluorescent probes for fluoride in cellular application systems into nine groups, for example, type of hydrogen bonds, type of cleavage of Si-O bonds, type of Si-O bond cleavage and cylization reactions, etc. We also review the recent reported carriers in the delivery of fluorescent fluoride probes. Seventy-four typical fluorescent fluoride probes are listed and compared in detail, including quantum yield, reaction medium, excitation and emission wavelengths, linear detection range, selectivity for F(-), mechanism, and analytical applications. Finally, we discuss the future challenges of the application of fluorescent fluoride probes in cellular system and in vivo. We wish that more and more excellent fluorescent fluoride probes will be

  19. Fluorescent Sensing of Fluoride in Cellular System

    PubMed Central

    Jiao, Yang; Zhu, Baocun; Chen, Jihua; Duan, Xiaohong

    2015-01-01

    Fluoride ions have the important roles in a lot of physiological activities related with biological and medical system, such as water fluoridation, caries treatment, and bone disease treatment. Great efforts have been made to develop new methods and strategies for F- detection in the past decades. Traditional methods for the detection of F- including ion chromatography, ion-selective electrodes, and spectroscopic techniques have the limitations in the biomedicine research. The fluorescent probes for F- are very promising that overcome some drawbacks of traditional fluoride detection methods. These probes exhibit high selectivity, high sensitivity as well as quick response to the detection of fluoride anions. The review commences with a brief description of photophysical mechanisms for fluorescent probes for fluoride, including photo induced electron transfer (PET), intramolecular charge transfer (ICT), fluorescence resonance energy transfer (FRET), and excited-state intramolecular proton transfer (ESIPT). Followed by a discussion about common dyes for fluorescent fluoride probes, such as anthracene, naphalimide, pyrene, BODIPY, fluorescein, rhodamine, resorufin, coumarin, cyanine, and near-infrared (NIR) dyes. We divide the fluorescent probes for fluoride in cellular application systems into nine groups, for example, type of hydrogen bonds, type of cleavage of Si-O bonds, type of Si-O bond cleavage and cylization reactions, etc. We also review the recent reported carriers in the delivery of fluorescent fluoride probes. Seventy-four typical fluorescent fluoride probes are listed and compared in detail, including quantum yield, reaction medium, excitation and emission wavelengths, linear detection range, selectivity for F-, mechanism, and analytical applications. Finally, we discuss the future challenges of the application of fluorescent fluoride probes in cellular system and in vivo. We wish that more and more excellent fluorescent fluoride probes will be developed

  20. Multichamber Multipotentiostat System for Cellular Microphysiometry.

    PubMed

    Lima, Eduardo A; Snider, Rachel M; Reiserer, Ronald S; McKenzie, Jennifer R; Kimmel, Danielle W; Eklund, Sven E; Wikswo, John P; Cliffel, David E

    2014-12-01

    Multianalyte microphysiometry is a powerful technique for studying cellular metabolic flux in real time. Monitoring several analytes concurrently in a number of individual chambers, however, requires specific instrumentation that is not available commercially in a single, compact, benchtop form at an affordable cost. We developed a multipotentiostat system capable of performing simultaneous amperometric and potentiometric measurements in up to eight individual chambers. The modular design and custom LabVIEW™ control software provide flexibility and allow for expansion and modification to suit different experimental conditions. Superior accuracy is achieved when operating the instrument in a standalone configuration; however, measurements performed in conjunction with a previously developed multianalyte microphysiometer have shown low levels of crosstalk as well. Calibrations and experiments with primary and immortalized cell cultures demonstrate the performance of the instrument and its capabilities. PMID:25242863

  1. Multichamber Multipotentiostat System for Cellular Microphysiometry

    PubMed Central

    Lima, Eduardo A.; Snider, Rachel M.; Reiserer, Ronald S.; McKenzie, Jennifer R.; Kimmel, Danielle W.; Eklund, Sven E.; Wikswo, John P.

    2014-01-01

    Multianalyte microphysiometry is a powerful technique for studying cellular metabolic flux in real time. Monitoring several analytes concurrently in a number of individual chambers, however, requires specific instrumentation that is not available commercially in a single, compact, benchtop form at an affordable cost. We developed a multipotentiostat system capable of performing simultaneous amperometric and potentiometric measurements in up to eight individual chambers. The modular design and custom LabVIEW™ control software provide flexibility and allow for expansion and modification to suit different experimental conditions. Superior accuracy is achieved when operating the instrument in a standalone configuration; however, measurements performed in conjunction with a previously developed multianalyte microphysiometer have shown low levels of crosstalk as well. Calibrations and experiments with primary and immortalized cell cultures demonstrate the performance of the instrument and its capabilities. PMID:25242863

  2. Cellular solidification in a monotectic system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kaukler, W. F.; Curreri, P. A.

    1987-01-01

    Succinonitrile-glycerol, SN-G, transparent organic monotectic alloy is studied with particular attention to cellular growth. The phase diagram is determined, near the monotectic composition, with greater accuracy than previous studies. A solidification interface stability diagram is determined for planar growth. The planar-to-cellular transition is compared to predictions from the Burton, Primm, Schlichter theory. A new technique to determine the solute segregation by Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy is developed. Proposed models that involve the cellular interface for alignment of monotectic second-phase spheres or rods are compared with observations.

  3. Modems for emerging digital cellular-mobile radio system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Feher, Kamilo

    1991-01-01

    Digital modem techniques for emerging digital cellular telecommunications-mobile radio system applications are described and analyzed. In particular, theoretical performance, experimental results, principles of operation, and various architectures of pi/4-QPSK (pi/4-shifted coherent or differential QPSK) modems for second-generation US digital cellular radio system applications are presented. The spectral/power efficiency and performance of the pi/4-QPSK modems (American and Japanese digital cellular emerging standards) are studied and briefly compared to GMSK (Gaussian minimum-shift keying) modems (proposed for European DECT and GSM cellular standards). Improved filtering strategies and digital pilot-aided (digital channel sounding) techniques are also considered for pi/4-QPSK and other digital modems. These techniques could significantly improve the performance of digital cellular and other digital land mobile and satellite mobile radio systems. More spectrally efficient modem trends for future cellular/mobile (land mobile) and satellite communication systems applications are also highlighted.

  4. Cellular Particle Dynamics simulation of biomechanical relaxation processes of multi-cellular systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McCune, Matthew; Kosztin, Ioan

    2013-03-01

    Cellular Particle Dynamics (CPD) is a theoretical-computational-experimental framework for describing and predicting the time evolution of biomechanical relaxation processes of multi-cellular systems, such as fusion, sorting and compression. In CPD, cells are modeled as an ensemble of cellular particles (CPs) that interact via short range contact interactions, characterized by an attractive (adhesive interaction) and a repulsive (excluded volume interaction) component. The time evolution of the spatial conformation of the multicellular system is determined by following the trajectories of all CPs through numerical integration of their equations of motion. Here we present CPD simulation results for the fusion of both spherical and cylindrical multi-cellular aggregates. First, we calibrate the relevant CPD model parameters for a given cell type by comparing the CPD simulation results for the fusion of two spherical aggregates to the corresponding experimental results. Next, CPD simulations are used to predict the time evolution of the fusion of cylindrical aggregates. The latter is relevant for the formation of tubular multi-cellular structures (i.e., primitive blood vessels) created by the novel bioprinting technology. Work supported by NSF [PHY-0957914]. Computer time provided by the University of Missouri Bioinformatics Consortium.

  5. Immunoisolation Patch System for Cellular Transplantation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wang, Taylor G. (Inventor)

    2014-01-01

    An immunoisolation patch system, and particularly a patch system comprising multiple immunoisolation microcapsules, each encapsulating biological material such as cells for transplantation, which can be used in the prophylactic and therapeutic treatment of disease in large animals and humans without the need for immunosuppression.

  6. Cellular monitoring systems for the assessment of space environmental factors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hellweg, C. E.; Arenz, A.; Meier, M. M.; Baumstark-Khan, C.

    Harmful environmental factors - namely ionizing radiation - will continue to influence future manned space missions. The Cellular Biodiagnostic group at the German Aerospace Center (DLR) develops cellular monitoring systems, which include bacterial and mammalian cell systems capable of recognizing DNA damage as a consequence of the presence of genotoxic conditions. Such bioassay or biosensor systems will complement the physical detector systems used in space, insofar as they yield intrinsically biologically weighted measures of cellular responses. Furthermore, synergistic mutagenic and cancerogenic impacts of the radiation environment together with other potentially genotoxic constituents of the space habitat can be quantified using such systems, whose signals are especially relevant for the molecular damage to the DNA or the chromosomes. The experiment Cellular Responses to Radiation in Space (CERASP) has been selected by NASA to be performed on the International Space Station. It will supply basic information on the cellular response to radiation applied in microgravity. One of the biological end-points under investigation will be survival reflected by radiation-dependent reduction of constitutive expression of the enhanced variant of green fluorescent protein (EGFP), originally isolated from the bioluminescent jellyfish Aequorea victoria. A second end-point will be gene activation by space flight conditions in mammalian cells, based on fluorescent promoter reporter systems using the destabilized EGFP variant (d2EGFP). The promoter element to be investigated will reflect the activity of the NF-kB stress response pathway as an anti-apoptotic radiation response. DNA damage will be measured by fluorescent analysis of DNA unwinding (FADU). The systems have worked properly for terrestrial applications during the first experiments. Experiments using accelerated particles produced at the French heavy ion accelerator GANIL have given insights into cellular mechanisms

  7. Effects of lanthanum in cellular systems. A review.

    PubMed

    Das, T; Sharma, A; Talukder, G

    1988-12-01

    Lanthanum belongs to the group of elements known as "lanthanons," which also includes cerium, europium, promethium, and thulium. It is the most electropositive element of the rare earth group, is uniformly trivalent, and is similar in its chemical properties to the alkaline earth elements. The effects of this element and its compounds on cellular systems are of considerable interest because of their increasing use in industry and as a substitute or antagonist for calcium in a variety of cellular reactions. Lanthanum is also being employed extensively in studying anatomical barriers, membrane structure, and subcellular transport systems, particularly the calcium pathway. PMID:2484565

  8. A high-efficiency cellular extraction system for biological proteomics

    PubMed Central

    Dhabaria, Avantika; Cifani, Paolo; Reed, Casie; Steen, Hanno; Kentsis, Alex

    2015-01-01

    Recent developments in quantitative high-resolution mass spectrometry have led to significant improvements in the sensitivity and specificity of biochemical analyses of cellular reactions, protein-protein interactions, and small molecule drug discovery. These approaches depend on cellular proteome extraction that preserves native protein activities. Here, we systematically analyzed mechanical methods of cell lysis and physical protein extraction to identify those that maximize the extraction of cellular proteins while minimizing their denaturation. Cells were mechanically disrupted using Potter-Elvehjem homogenization, probe or adaptive focused acoustic sonication, and in the presence of various detergents, including polyoxyethylene ethers and esters, glycosides, and zwitterions. Using fluorescence spectroscopy, biochemical assays, and mass spectrometry proteomics, we identified the combination of adaptive focused acoustic (AFA) sonication in the presence of binary poloxamer-based mixture of octyl-β-glucoside and Pluronic F-127 to maximize the depth and yield of proteome extraction while maintaining native protein activity. This binary poloxamer extraction system allowed native proteome extraction, comparable in coverage to proteomes extracted using denaturing SDS or guanidine containing buffers, including efficient extraction of all major cellular organelles. This high-efficiency cellular extraction system should prove useful for a variety of cell biochemical studies, including structural and functional proteomics. PMID:26153614

  9. A High-Efficiency Cellular Extraction System for Biological Proteomics.

    PubMed

    Dhabaria, Avantika; Cifani, Paolo; Reed, Casie; Steen, Hanno; Kentsis, Alex

    2015-08-01

    Recent developments in quantitative high-resolution mass spectrometry have led to significant improvements in the sensitivity and specificity of the biochemical analyses of cellular reactions, protein-protein interactions, and small-molecule-drug discovery. These approaches depend on cellular proteome extraction that preserves native protein activities. Here, we systematically analyzed mechanical methods of cell lysis and physical protein extraction to identify those that maximize the extraction of cellular proteins while minimizing their denaturation. Cells were mechanically disrupted using Potter-Elvehjem homogenization, probe- or adaptive-focused acoustic sonication, and were in the presence of various detergents, including polyoxyethylene ethers and esters, glycosides, and zwitterions. Using fluorescence spectroscopy, biochemical assays, and mass spectrometry proteomics, we identified the combination of adaptive focused acoustic (AFA) sonication in the presence of a binary poloxamer-based mixture of octyl-β-glucoside and Pluronic F-127 to maximize the depth and yield of the proteome extraction while maintaining native protein activity. This binary poloxamer extraction system allowed for native proteome extraction comparable in coverage to the proteomes extracted using denaturing SDS or guanidine-containing buffers, including the efficient extraction of all major cellular organelles. This high-efficiency cellular extraction system should prove useful for a variety of cell biochemical studies, including structural and functional proteomics. PMID:26153614

  10. Cellular Phone Face Recognition System Based on Optical Phase Correlation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Watanabe, Eriko; Ishikawa, Sayuri; Ohta, Maiko; Kodate, Kashiko

    We propose a high security facial recognition system using a cellular phone on the mobile network. This system is composed of a face recognition engine based on optical phase correlation which uses phase information with emphasis on a Fourier domain, a control sever and the cellular phone with a compact camera for taking pictures, as a portable terminal. Compared with various correlation methods, our face recognition engine revealed the most accurate EER of less than 1%. By using the JAVA interface on this system, we implemented the stable system taking pictures, providing functions to prevent spoofing while transferring images. This recognition system was tested on 300 women students and the results proved this system effective.

  11. Modulation of cellular redox homeostasis by the endocannabinoid system

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    The endocannabinoid system (ECS) and reactive oxygen species (ROS) constitute two key cellular signalling systems that participate in the modulation of diverse cellular functions. Importantly, growing evidence suggests that cross-talk between these two prominent signalling systems acts to modulate functionality of the ECS as well as redox homeostasis in different cell types. Herein, we review and discuss evidence pertaining to ECS-induced regulation of ROS generating and scavenging mechanisms, as well as highlighting emerging work that supports redox modulation of ECS function. Functionally, the studies outlined reveal that interactions between the ECS and ROS signalling systems can be both stimulatory and inhibitory in nature, depending on cell stimulus, the source of ROS species and cell context. Importantly, such cross-talk may act to maintain cell function, whereas abnormalities in either system may propagate and undermine the stability of both systems, thereby contributing to various pathologies associated with their dysregulation. PMID:27248801

  12. Towards a continuum theory of movement in interacting cellular systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Newman, Timothy

    2003-10-01

    Interacting cellular systems form the basis of all higher organisms, and are fundamental to the understanding of embryogenesis, organ function, and neoplasms. I will describe a stochastic model of cell interactions which can be applied to these problems, and present some of our recent results on chemotactic response.

  13. Cellular structure of detonation utilized in propulsion system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, XuDong; Fan, BaoChun; Gui, MingYue; Pan, ZhenHua

    2012-10-01

    How to confine a detonation in a combustor is a key issue of detonation applications in propulsion systems. Based on achieving schemes, detonations applied in the combustor, including pulse detonation wave (PDW), oblique detonation wave (ODW) and rotating detonation wave (RDW), are different from that described by the classic CJ theory in fine structures and its self-sustaining mechanisms. In this work, the cellular structures and flow fields of ODW and RDW were obtained numerically, and the fundamental characteristics and self-sustaining mechanisms of the detonations were analyzed and discussed. ODW front consists of three parts: the ZND-like front, the single-headed triple point front and the dual-headed triple point front. Cellular structures of RDW are heterogeneous, and the cell size near the outer wall is smaller than that near the inner wall.

  14. Cellular monitoring systems for the assessment of space environmental factors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hellweg, Christine E.; Arenz, Andrea; Meier, Matthias M.; Baumstark-Khan, Christa

    Detrimental environmental factors - namely ionizing radiation - will continue to affect future manned space missions. The Cellular Biodiagnostics group at the German Aerospace Center (DLR) develops cellular monitoring systems, which include bacterial and mammalian cell systems capable of responding to DNA damage as a consequence of the presence of genotoxic conditions. Such bioassays will complement the physical detector systems used in space, insofar as they yield intrinsically biologically weighted measures of cellular responses. Furthermore, synergistic toxic impacts of the radiation environment together with other potentially genotoxic constituents of the space habitat can be quantified using such systems. The biological end-point under investigation in this work is the gene activation by radiation in mammalian cells, based on fluorescent promoter reporter systems using the destabilized enhanced green fluorescent protein variant (d2EGFP). The promoter element to be investigated reflects the activity of the nuclear factor κB (NF-κB) pathway. The NF-κB family of proteins plays a major role in the inflammatory and immune response, cell proliferation and differentiation, apoptosis and tumorigenesis. After exposure to X-rays, an increase in NF-κB activation was seen only with high doses. Experiments using accelerated argon ions (95 MeV/u, LET ˜230 keV/μm) produced at the French heavy ion accelerator GANIL have shown activation of the NF-κB pathway with doses greater than 1 × 10 6 particles cm -2 (P cm -2), reaching its maximal activation at 2 × 10 7 P cm -2. These results suggest that the exceptional radiation field in space may activate the NF-κB pathway in human cells.

  15. Evidences of the static magnetic field influence on cellular systems.

    PubMed

    Albuquerque, Wendell Wagner Campos; Costa, Romero Marcos Pedrosa Brandão; Fernandes, Thiago de Salazar E; Porto, Ana Lúcia Figueiredo

    2016-05-01

    Efforts to elucidate the doubtful character of the static magnetic field (SMF) influence on living cells have been made, although the topic still faces controversies because confusing reports in the scientific literature. This study intended to collect the most relevant issues separated by different topics (relating the SMF to its action on cellular systems) and analyze how the many field intensities, cell types and exposure time would affect the cell or intracellular structures. The analysis was based in the search in online databases aiming to give a general view of how the data can show conformity. It is proposed that scientists have been searching for linearity in what is actually a well characterized nonlinear system and two outputs are considered: the high sensitivity of parameters in which specific cell responses are generated and also the complexity and particularity of each cellular system. It is possible to trigger effects from a SMF, however in a stochastic way and depending on the cell system. PMID:26975790

  16. Cellular Biotechnology Operations Support System Fluid Dynamics Investigation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2003-01-01

    Aboard the International Space Station (ISS), the Tissue Culture Medium (TCM) is the bioreactor vessel in which cell cultures are grown. With its two syringe ports, it is much like a bag used to administer intravenous fluid, except it allows gas exchange needed for life. The TCM contains cell culture medium, and when frozen cells are flown to the ISS, they are thawed and introduced to the TCM through the syringe ports. In the Cellular Biotechnology Operations Support System-Fluid Dynamics Investigation (CBOSS-FDI) experiment, several mixing procedures are being assessed to determine which method achieves the most uniform mixing of growing cells and culture medium.

  17. Cellular phenotype database: a repository for systems microscopy data

    PubMed Central

    Kirsanova, Catherine; Brazma, Alvis; Rustici, Gabriella; Sarkans, Ugis

    2015-01-01

    Motivation: The Cellular Phenotype Database (CPD) is a repository for data derived from high-throughput systems microscopy studies. The aims of this resource are: (i) to provide easy access to cellular phenotype and molecular localization data for the broader research community; (ii) to facilitate integration of independent phenotypic studies by means of data aggregation techniques, including use of an ontology and (iii) to facilitate development of analytical methods in this field. Results: In this article we present CPD, its data structure and user interface, propose a minimal set of information describing RNA interference experiments, and suggest a generic schema for management and aggregation of outputs from phenotypic or molecular localization experiments. The database has a flexible structure for management of data from heterogeneous sources of systems microscopy experimental outputs generated by a variety of protocols and technologies and can be queried by gene, reagent, gene attribute, study keywords, phenotype or ontology terms. Availability and implementation: CPD is developed as part of the Systems Microscopy Network of Excellence and is accessible at http://www.ebi.ac.uk/fg/sym. Contact: jes@ebi.ac.uk or ugis@ebi.ac.uk Supplementary information: Supplementary data are available at Bioinformatics online. PMID:25861964

  18. Decisions on the fly in cellular sensory systems

    PubMed Central

    Siggia, Eric D.; Vergassola, Massimo

    2013-01-01

    Cells send and receive signals through pathways that have been defined in great detail biochemically, and it is often presumed that the signals convey only level information. Cell signaling in the presence of noise is extensively studied but only rarely is the speed required to make a decision considered. However, in the immune system, rapidly developing embryos, and cellular response to stress, fast and accurate actions are required. Statistical theory under the rubric of “exploit–explore” quantifies trade-offs between decision speed and accuracy and supplies rigorous performance bounds and algorithms that realize them. We show that common protein phosphorylation networks can implement optimal decision theory algorithms and speculate that the ubiquitous chemical modifications to receptors during signaling actually perform analog computations. We quantify performance trade-offs when the cellular system has incomplete knowledge of the data model. For the problem of sensing the time when the composition of a ligand mixture changes, we find a nonanalytic dependence on relative concentrations and specify the number of parameters needed for near-optimal performance and how to adjust them. The algorithms specify the minimal computation that has to take place on a single receptor before the information is pooled across the cell. PMID:24019464

  19. Quality control mechanisms in cellular and systemic DNA damage responses

    PubMed Central

    Ermolaeva, Maria A.; Dakhovnik, Alexander; Schumacher, Björn

    2016-01-01

    The maintenance of the genome is of pivotal importance for the functional integrity of cells and tissues. The gradual accumulation of DNA damage is thought to contribute to the functional decline of tissues and organs with ageing. Defects in multiple genome maintenance systems cause human disorders characterized by cancer susceptibility, developmental failure, and premature ageing. The complex pathological consequences of genome instability are insufficiently explained by cell-autonomous DNA damage responses (DDR) alone. Quality control pathways play an important role in DNA repair and cellular DDR pathways. Recent years have revealed non-cell autonomous effects of DNA damage that impact the physiological adaptations during ageing. We will discuss the role of quality assurance pathways in cell-autonomous and systemic responses to genome instability. PMID:25560147

  20. MID-INFRARED GALAXY MORPHOLOGY FROM THE SPITZER SURVEY OF STELLAR STRUCTURE IN GALAXIES (S{sup 4}G): THE IMPRINT OF THE DE VAUCOULEURS REVISED HUBBLE-SANDAGE CLASSIFICATION SYSTEM AT 3.6 {mu}m

    SciTech Connect

    Buta, Ronald J.; Sheth, Kartik; Aravena, Manuel; Hinz, Joannah L.; Gil de Paz, Armando; Munoz-Mateos, Juan-Carlos; Laurikainen, Eija; Salo, Heikki; Gadotti, Dimitri A.; Athanassoula, E.; Bosma, Albert; Elmegreen, Debra M.; Masters, Karen L.; Comeron, Sebastien

    2010-09-15

    Spitzer Space Telescope Infrared Array Camera imaging provides an opportunity to study all known morphological types of galaxies in the mid-IR at a depth significantly better than ground-based near-infrared and optical images. The goal of this study is to examine the imprint of the de Vaucouleurs classification volume in the 3.6 {mu}m band, which is the best Spitzer waveband for galactic stellar mass morphology owing to its depth and its reddening-free sensitivity mainly to older stars. For this purpose, we have prepared classification images for 207 galaxies from the Spitzer archive, most of which are formally part of the Spitzer Survey of Stellar Structure in Galaxies (S{sup 4}G), a Spitzer post-cryogenic ('warm') mission Exploration Science Legacy Program survey of 2331 galaxies closer than 40 Mpc. For the purposes of morphology, the galaxies are interpreted as if the images are blue light, the historical waveband for classical galaxy classification studies. We find that 3.6 {mu}m classifications are well correlated with blue-light classifications, to the point where the essential features of many galaxies look very similar in the two very different wavelength regimes. Drastic differences are found only for the most dusty galaxies. Consistent with a previous study by Eskridge et al., the main difference between blue-light and mid-IR types is an {approx}1 stage interval difference for S0/a to Sbc or Sc galaxies, which tend to appear 'earlier' in type at 3.6 {mu}m due to the slightly increased prominence of the bulge, the reduced effects of extinction, and the reduced (but not completely eliminated) effect of the extreme population I stellar component. We present an atlas of all of the 207 galaxies analyzed here and bring attention to special features or galaxy types, such as nuclear rings, pseudobulges, flocculent spiral galaxies, I0 galaxies, double-stage and double-variety galaxies, and outer rings, that are particularly distinctive in the mid-IR.

  1. Regulation of System xc− by Pharmacological Manipulation of Cellular Thiols

    PubMed Central

    Albano, Rebecca; Raddatz, Nicholas J.; Hjelmhaug, Julie; Baker, David A.; Lobner, Doug

    2015-01-01

    The cystine/glutamate exchanger (system xc−) mediates the transport of cystine into the cell in exchange for glutamate. By releasing glutamate, system xc− can potentially cause excitotoxicity. However, through providing cystine to the cell, it regulates the levels of cellular glutathione (GSH), the main endogenous intracellular antioxidant, and may protect cells against oxidative stress. We tested two different compounds that deplete primary cortical cultures containing both neurons and astrocytes of intracellular GSH, L-buthionine-sulfoximine (L-BSO), and diethyl maleate (DEM). Both compounds caused significant concentration and time dependent decreases in intracellular GSH levels. However; DEM caused an increase in radiolabeled cystine uptake through system xc−, while unexpectedly BSO caused a decrease in uptake. The compounds caused similar low levels of neurotoxicity, while only BSO caused an increase in oxidative stress. The mechanism of GSH depletion by these two compounds is different, DEM directly conjugates to GSH, while BSO inhibits γ-glutamylcysteine synthetase, a key enzyme in GSH synthesis. As would be expected from these mechanisms of action, DEM caused a decrease in intracellular cysteine, while BSO increased cysteine levels. The results suggest that negative feedback by intracellular cysteine is an important regulator of system xc− in this culture system. PMID:25949770

  2. Regulation of System xc(-) by Pharmacological Manipulation of Cellular Thiols.

    PubMed

    Albano, Rebecca; Raddatz, Nicholas J; Hjelmhaug, Julie; Baker, David A; Lobner, Doug

    2015-01-01

    The cystine/glutamate exchanger (system xc (-)) mediates the transport of cystine into the cell in exchange for glutamate. By releasing glutamate, system xc (-) can potentially cause excitotoxicity. However, through providing cystine to the cell, it regulates the levels of cellular glutathione (GSH), the main endogenous intracellular antioxidant, and may protect cells against oxidative stress. We tested two different compounds that deplete primary cortical cultures containing both neurons and astrocytes of intracellular GSH, L-buthionine-sulfoximine (L-BSO), and diethyl maleate (DEM). Both compounds caused significant concentration and time dependent decreases in intracellular GSH levels. However; DEM caused an increase in radiolabeled cystine uptake through system xc (-), while unexpectedly BSO caused a decrease in uptake. The compounds caused similar low levels of neurotoxicity, while only BSO caused an increase in oxidative stress. The mechanism of GSH depletion by these two compounds is different, DEM directly conjugates to GSH, while BSO inhibits γ-glutamylcysteine synthetase, a key enzyme in GSH synthesis. As would be expected from these mechanisms of action, DEM caused a decrease in intracellular cysteine, while BSO increased cysteine levels. The results suggest that negative feedback by intracellular cysteine is an important regulator of system xc (-) in this culture system. PMID:25949770

  3. Cellular Manufacturing System with Dynamic Lot Size Material Handling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khannan, M. S. A.; Maruf, A.; Wangsaputra, R.; Sutrisno, S.; Wibawa, T.

    2016-02-01

    Material Handling take as important role in Cellular Manufacturing System (CMS) design. In several study at CMS design material handling was assumed per pieces or with constant lot size. In real industrial practice, lot size may change during rolling period to cope with demand changes. This study develops CMS Model with Dynamic Lot Size Material Handling. Integer Linear Programming is used to solve the problem. Objective function of this model is minimizing total expected cost consisting machinery depreciation cost, operating costs, inter-cell material handling cost, intra-cell material handling cost, machine relocation costs, setup costs, and production planning cost. This model determines optimum cell formation and optimum lot size. Numerical examples are elaborated in the paper to ilustrate the characterictic of the model.

  4. Cellular mechanisms underlying the interaction between cannabinoid and opioid system.

    PubMed

    Parolaro, D; Rubino, T; Viganò, D; Massi, P; Guidali, C; Realini, N

    2010-04-01

    Recently, the presence of functional interaction between the opioid and cannabinoid system has been shown in various pharmacological responses. Although there is an increasing interest for the feasible therapeutic application of a co-administration of cannabinoids and opioids in some disorders (i.e. to manage pain, to modulate immune system and emotions) and the combined use of the two drugs by drug abusers is becoming largely diffuse, only few papers focused on cellular and molecular mechanisms underlying this interaction. This review updates the biochemical and molecular underpinnings of opioid and cannabinoid interaction, both within the central nervous system and periphery. The most convincing theory for the explanation of this reciprocal interaction involves (i) the release of opioid peptides by cannabinoids or endocannabinoids by opioids, (ii) the existence of a direct receptor-receptor interaction when the receptors are co-expressed in the same cells, and (iii) the interaction of their intracellular pathways. Finally, the cannabinoid/opioid interaction might be different in the brain rewarding networks and in those accounting for other pharmacological effects (antinociception, modulation of emotionality and cognitive behavior), as well as between the central nervous system and periphery. Further insights about the cannabinoid/opioid interaction could pave the way for new and promising therapeutic approaches. PMID:20017730

  5. Traffic Dimensioning and Performance Modeling of 4G LTE Networks

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ouyang, Ye

    2011-01-01

    Rapid changes in mobile techniques have always been evolutionary, and the deployment of 4G Long Term Evolution (LTE) networks will be the same. It will be another transition from Third Generation (3G) to Fourth Generation (4G) over a period of several years, as is the case still with the transition from Second Generation (2G) to 3G. As a result,…

  6. The Tumorigenic Roles of the Cellular REDOX Regulatory Systems

    PubMed Central

    Castaldo, Stéphanie Anaís; Freitas, Joana Raquel; Conchinha, Nadine Vasconcelos; Madureira, Patrícia Alexandra

    2016-01-01

    The cellular REDOX regulatory systems play a central role in maintaining REDOX homeostasis that is crucial for cell integrity, survival, and proliferation. To date, a substantial amount of data has demonstrated that cancer cells typically undergo increasing oxidative stress as the tumor develops, upregulating these important antioxidant systems in order to survive, proliferate, and metastasize under these extreme oxidative stress conditions. Since a large number of chemotherapeutic agents currently used in the clinic rely on the induction of ROS overload or change of ROS quality to kill the tumor, the cancer cell REDOX adaptation represents a significant obstacle to conventional chemotherapy. In this review we will first examine the different factors that contribute to the enhanced oxidative stress generally observed within the tumor microenvironment. We will then make a comprehensive assessment of the current literature regarding the main antioxidant proteins and systems that have been shown to be positively associated with tumor progression and chemoresistance. Finally we will make an analysis of commonly used chemotherapeutic drugs that induce ROS. The current knowledge of cancer cell REDOX adaptation raises the issue of developing novel and more effective therapies for these tumors that are usually resistant to conventional ROS inducing chemotherapy. PMID:26682014

  7. Cellular and System Biology of Memory: Timing, Molecules, and Beyond.

    PubMed

    Korte, Martin; Schmitz, Dietmar

    2016-04-01

    The storage of information in the mammalian nervous systems is dependent on a delicate balance between change and stability of neuronal networks. The induction and maintenance of processes that lead to changes in synaptic strength to a multistep process which can lead to long-lasting changes, which starts and ends with a highly choreographed and perfectly timed dance of molecules in different cell types of the central nervous system. This is accompanied by synchronization of specific networks, resulting in the generation of characteristic "macroscopic" rhythmic electrical fields, whose characteristic frequencies correspond to certain activity and information-processing states of the brain. Molecular events and macroscopic fields influence each other reciprocally. We review here cellular processes of synaptic plasticity, particularly functional and structural changes, and focus on timing events that are important for the initial memory acquisition, as well as mechanisms of short- and long-term memory storage. Then, we cover the importance of epigenetic events on the long-time range. Furthermore, we consider how brain rhythms at the network level participate in processes of information storage and by what means they participating in it. Finally, we examine memory consolidation at the system level during processes of sleep. PMID:26960344

  8. The Tumorigenic Roles of the Cellular REDOX Regulatory Systems.

    PubMed

    Castaldo, Stéphanie Anaís; Freitas, Joana Raquel; Conchinha, Nadine Vasconcelos; Madureira, Patrícia Alexandra

    2016-01-01

    The cellular REDOX regulatory systems play a central role in maintaining REDOX homeostasis that is crucial for cell integrity, survival, and proliferation. To date, a substantial amount of data has demonstrated that cancer cells typically undergo increasing oxidative stress as the tumor develops, upregulating these important antioxidant systems in order to survive, proliferate, and metastasize under these extreme oxidative stress conditions. Since a large number of chemotherapeutic agents currently used in the clinic rely on the induction of ROS overload or change of ROS quality to kill the tumor, the cancer cell REDOX adaptation represents a significant obstacle to conventional chemotherapy. In this review we will first examine the different factors that contribute to the enhanced oxidative stress generally observed within the tumor microenvironment. We will then make a comprehensive assessment of the current literature regarding the main antioxidant proteins and systems that have been shown to be positively associated with tumor progression and chemoresistance. Finally we will make an analysis of commonly used chemotherapeutic drugs that induce ROS. The current knowledge of cancer cell REDOX adaptation raises the issue of developing novel and more effective therapies for these tumors that are usually resistant to conventional ROS inducing chemotherapy. PMID:26682014

  9. 47 CFR 90.672 - Unacceptable interference to non-cellular 800 MHz licensees from 800 MHz cellular systems or part...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 5 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Unacceptable interference to non-cellular 800 MHz licensees from 800 MHz cellular systems or part 22 Cellular Radiotelephone systems, and within the 900 MHz Business/Industrial Land Transportation Pool. 90.672 Section 90.672 Telecommunication FEDERAL COMMUNICATIONS COMMISSION (CONTINUED)...

  10. Stochastic simulations of minimal self-reproducing cellular systems.

    PubMed

    Mavelli, Fabio; Ruiz-Mirazo, Kepa

    2007-10-29

    This paper is a theoretical attempt to gain insight into the problem of how self-assembling vesicles (closed bilayer structures) could progressively turn into minimal self-producing and self-reproducing cells, i.e. into interesting candidates for (proto)biological systems. With this aim, we make use of a recently developed object-oriented platform to carry out stochastic simulations of chemical reaction networks that take place in dynamic cellular compartments. We apply this new tool to study the behaviour of different minimal cell models, making realistic assumptions about the physico-chemical processes and conditions involved (e.g. thermodynamic equilibrium/non-equilibrium, variable volume-to-surface relationship, osmotic pressure, solute diffusion across the membrane due to concentration gradients, buffering effect). The new programming platform has been designed to analyse not only how a single protometabolic cell could maintain itself, grow or divide, but also how a collection of these cells could 'evolve' as a result of their mutual interactions in a common environment. PMID:17510021

  11. Challenges in Characterizing and Controlling Complex Cellular Systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wikswo, John

    2011-03-01

    Multicellular dynamic biological processes such as developmental differentiation, wound repair, disease, aging, and even homeostasis can be represented by trajectories through a phase space whose extent reflects the genetic, post-translational, and metabolic complexity of the process - easily extending to tens of thousands of dimensions. Intra- and inter-cellular sensing and regulatory systems and their nested, redundant, and non-linear feed-forward and feed-back controls create high-dimensioned attractors in this phase space. Metabolism provides free energy to drive non-equilibrium processes and dynamically reconfigure attractors. Studies of single molecules and cells provide only minimalist projections onto a small number of axes. It may be difficult to infer larger-scale emergent behavior from linearized experiments that perform only small amplitude perturbations on a limited number of the dimensions. Complete characterization may succeed for bounded component problems, such as an individual cell cycle or signaling cascade, but larger systems problems will require a coarse-grained approach. Hence a new experimental and analytical framework is needed. Possibly one could utilize high-amplitude, multi-variable driving of the system to infer coarse-grained, effective models, which in turn can be tested by their ability to control systems behavior. Navigation at will between attractors in a high-dimensioned dynamical system will provide not only detailed knowledge of the shape of attractor basins, but also measures of underlying stochastic events such as noise in gene expression or receptor binding and how both affect system stability and robustness. Needed for this are wide-bandwidth methods to sense and actuate large numbers of intracellular and extracellular variables and automatically and rapidly infer dynamic control models. The success of this approach may be determined by how broadly the sensors and actuators can span the full dimensionality of the phase space

  12. Peptide-Mediated Interference of PB2-eIF4G1 Interaction Inhibits Influenza A Viruses' Replication in Vitro and in Vivo.

    PubMed

    Yuan, Shuofeng; Chu, Hin; Ye, Jiahui; Hu, Meng; Singh, Kailash; Chow, Billy K C; Zhou, Jie; Zheng, Bo-Jian

    2016-07-01

    Influenza viruses are obligate parasites that hijack the host cellular system. Previous results have shown that the influenza virus PB2 subunit confers a dependence of host eukaryotic translation initiation factor 4-γ 1 (eIF4G1) for viral mRNA translation. Here, we demonstrated that peptide-mediated interference of the PB2-eIF4G1 interaction inhibited virus replication in vitro and in vivo. Remarkably, intranasal administration of the peptide provided 100% protection against lethal challenges of influenza A viruses in BALB/c mice, including H1N1, H5N1, and H7N9 influenza virus subtypes. Mapping of the PB2 protein indicated that the eIF4G1 binding sites resided within the PB2 cap-binding domain. Virtual docking analysis suggested that the inhibitory peptide associated with the conserved amino acid residues that were essential to PB2 cap-binding activity. Overall, our results identified the PB2-eIF4G1 interactive site as a druggable target for influenza therapeutics. PMID:27626099

  13. T-4G Methodology: Undergraduate Pilot Training T-37 Phase.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Woodruff, Robert R.; And Others

    The report's brief introduction describes the application of T-4G methodology to the T-37 instrument phase of undergraduate pilot training. The methodology is characterized by instruction in trainers, proficiency advancement, a highly structured syllabus, the training manager concept, early exposure to instrument training, and hands-on training.…

  14. The similia principle: results obtained in a cellular model system.

    PubMed

    Wiegant, Fred; Van Wijk, Roeland

    2010-01-01

    This paper describes the results of a research program focused on the beneficial effect of low dose stress conditions that were applied according to the similia principle to cells previously disturbed by more severe stress conditions. In first instance, we discuss criteria for research on the similia principle at the cellular level. Then, the homologous ('isopathic') approach is reviewed, in which the initial (high dose) stress used to disturb cellular physiology and the subsequent (low dose) stress are identical. Beneficial effects of low dose stress are described in terms of increased cellular survival capacity and at the molecular level as an increase in the synthesis of heat shock proteins (hsps). Both phenomena reflect a stimulation of the endogenous cellular self-recovery capacity. Low dose stress conditions applied in a homologous approach stimulate the synthesis of hsps and enhance survival in comparison with stressed cells that were incubated in the absence of low dose stress conditions. Thirdly, the specificity of the low dose stress condition is described where the initial (high dose) stress is different in nature from the subsequently applied (low dose) stress; the heterologous or 'heteropathic' approach. The results support the similia principle at the cellular level and add to understanding of how low dose stress conditions influence the regulatory processes underlying self-recovery. In addition, the phenomenon of 'symptom aggravation' which is also observed at the cellular level, is discussed in the context of self-recovery. Finally, the difference in efficiency between the homologous and the heterologous approach is discussed; a perspective is indicated for further research; and the relationship between studies on the similia principle and the recently introduced concept of 'postconditioning hormesis' is emphasized. PMID:20129172

  15. Whole-Organism Cellular Pathology: A Systems Approach to Phenomics.

    PubMed

    Cheng, K C; Katz, S R; Lin, A Y; Xin, X; Ding, Y

    2016-01-01

    Phenotype is defined as the state of an organism resulting from interactions between genes, environment, disease, molecular mechanisms, and chance. The purpose of the emerging field of phenomics is to systematically determine and measure phenotypes across biology for the sake of understanding. Phenotypes can affect more than one cell type and life stage, so ideal phenotyping would include the state of every cell type within the context of both tissue architecture and the whole organism at each life stage. In medicine, high-resolution anatomic assessment of phenotype is obtained from histology. Histology's interpretative power, codified by Virchow as cellular pathology, is derived from its ability to discern diagnostic and characteristic cellular changes in diseased tissues. Cellular pathology is observed in every major human disease and relies on the ability of histology to detect cellular change in any cell type due to unbiased pan-cellular staining, even in optically opaque tissues. Our laboratory has shown that histology is far more sensitive than stereomicroscopy for detecting phenotypes in zebrafish mutants. Those studies have also shown that more complete sampling, greater consistency in sample orientation, and the inclusion of phenotypes extending over longer length scales would provide greater coverage of common phenotypes. We are developing technical approaches to achieve an ideal detection of cellular pathology using an improved form of X-ray microtomography that retains the strengths and addresses the weaknesses of histology as a screening tool. We are using zebrafish as a vertebrate model based on the overlaps between zebrafish and mammalian tissue architecture, and a body size small enough to allow whole-organism, volumetric imaging at cellular resolution. Automation of whole-organism phenotyping would greatly increase the value of phenomics. Potential societal benefits would include reduction in the cost of drug development, a reduction in the

  16. Systems and Photosystems: Cellular Limits of Autotrophic Productivity in Cyanobacteria

    PubMed Central

    Burnap, Robert L.

    2014-01-01

    Recent advances in the modeling of microbial growth and metabolism have shown that growth rate critically depends upon the optimal allocation of finite proteomic resources among different cellular functions and that modeling growth rates becomes more realistic with the explicit accounting for the costs of macromolecular synthesis, most importantly, protein expression. The “proteomic constraint” is considered together with its application to understanding photosynthetic microbial growth. The central hypothesis is that physical limits of cellular space (and corresponding solvation capacity) in conjunction with cell surface-to-volume ratios represent the underlying constraints on the maximal rate of autotrophic microbial growth. The limitation of cellular space thus constrains the size the total complement of macromolecules, dissolved ions, and metabolites. To a first approximation, the upper limit in the cellular amount of the total proteome is bounded this space limit. This predicts that adaptation to osmotic stress will result in lower maximal growth rates due to decreased cellular concentrations of core metabolic proteins necessary for cell growth owing the accumulation of compatible osmolytes, as surmised previously. The finite capacity of membrane and cytoplasmic space also leads to the hypothesis that the species-specific differences in maximal growth rates likely reflect differences in the allocation of space to niche-specific proteins with the corresponding diminution of space devoted to other functions including proteins of core autotrophic metabolism, which drive cell reproduction. An optimization model for autotrophic microbial growth, the autotrophic replicator model, was developed based upon previous work investigating heterotrophic growth. The present model describes autotrophic growth in terms of the allocation protein resources among core functional groups including the photosynthetic electron transport chain, light-harvesting antennae, and the

  17. Future Prospects of Health Management Systems Using Cellular Phones

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Hun-Sung; Hwang, Yunji; Lee, Jae-Ho; Oh, Hye Young; Kim, Yi-Jun; Kwon, Hyeon Yoon; Kang, Hyoseung; Kim, Hyunah; Park, Rae Woong

    2014-01-01

    Abstract Background: Cellular phones enable communication between healthcare providers and patients for prevention, diagnosis, and treatment of diseases. However, few studies have examined the user-friendliness or effectiveness of cellular phone-based medical informatics (CPBMI) for healthcare. Materials and Methods: This study investigated the use of CPBMI to identify its current status within the medical field, advantages and disadvantages, practicability, clinical effectiveness, costs, and cost-saving potential. Results: CPBMI was validated in terms of practicality and provision of medical benefits. It is critical to use CPBMI in accordance with the different features of each disease and condition. Use of CPBMI is expected to be especially useful for patients with chronic disease. Conclusions: We discussed the current status of the clinical use, benefits, and risks of CPBMI. CPBMI and information technology–based health management tools are anticipated to become useful and effective components of healthcare management in the future. PMID:24693986

  18. A unique cellular scaling rule in the avian auditory system.

    PubMed

    Corfield, Jeremy R; Long, Brendan; Krilow, Justin M; Wylie, Douglas R; Iwaniuk, Andrew N

    2016-06-01

    Although it is clear that neural structures scale with body size, the mechanisms of this relationship are not well understood. Several recent studies have shown that the relationship between neuron numbers and brain (or brain region) size are not only different across mammalian orders, but also across auditory and visual regions within the same brains. Among birds, similar cellular scaling rules have not been examined in any detail. Here, we examine the scaling of auditory structures in birds and show that the scaling rules that have been established in the mammalian auditory pathway do not necessarily apply to birds. In galliforms, neuronal densities decrease with increasing brain size, suggesting that auditory brainstem structures increase in size faster than neurons are added; smaller brains have relatively more neurons than larger brains. The cellular scaling rules that apply to auditory brainstem structures in galliforms are, therefore, different to that found in primate auditory pathway. It is likely that the factors driving this difference are associated with the anatomical specializations required for sound perception in birds, although there is a decoupling of neuron numbers in brain structures and hair cell numbers in the basilar papilla. This study provides significant insight into the allometric scaling of neural structures in birds and improves our understanding of the rules that govern neural scaling across vertebrates. PMID:26002617

  19. Statistical analysis of nanoparticle dosing in a dynamic cellular system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Summers, Huw D.; Rees, Paul; Holton, Mark D.; Rowan Brown, M.; Chappell, Sally C.; Smith, Paul J.; Errington, Rachel J.

    2011-03-01

    The delivery of nanoparticles into cells is important in therapeutic applications and in nanotoxicology. Nanoparticles are generally targeted to receptors on the surfaces of cells and internalized into endosomes by endocytosis, but the kinetics of the process and the way in which cell division redistributes the particles remain unclear. Here we show that the chance of success or failure of nanoparticle uptake and inheritance is random. Statistical analysis of nanoparticle-loaded endosomes indicates that particle capture is described by an over-dispersed Poisson probability distribution that is consistent with heterogeneous adsorption and internalization. Partitioning of nanoparticles in cell division is random and asymmetric, following a binomial distribution with mean probability of 0.52-0.72. These results show that cellular targeting of nanoparticles is inherently imprecise due to the randomness of nature at the molecular scale, and the statistical framework offers a way to predict nanoparticle dosage for therapy and for the study of nanotoxins.

  20. A Cellular System for Spatial Signal Decoding in Chemical Gradients.

    PubMed

    Hegemann, Björn; Unger, Michael; Lee, Sung Sik; Stoffel-Studer, Ingrid; van den Heuvel, Jasmin; Pelet, Serge; Koeppl, Heinz; Peter, Matthias

    2015-11-23

    Directional cell growth requires that cells read and interpret shallow chemical gradients, but how the gradient directional information is identified remains elusive. We use single-cell analysis and mathematical modeling to define the cellular gradient decoding network in yeast. Our results demonstrate that the spatial information of the gradient signal is read locally within the polarity site complex using double-positive feedback between the GTPase Cdc42 and trafficking of the receptor Ste2. Spatial decoding critically depends on low Cdc42 activity, which is maintained by the MAPK Fus3 through sequestration of the Cdc42 activator Cdc24. Deregulated Cdc42 or Ste2 trafficking prevents gradient decoding and leads to mis-oriented growth. Our work discovers how a conserved set of components assembles a network integrating signal intensity and directionality to decode the spatial information contained in chemical gradients. PMID:26585298

  1. Statistical analysis of nanoparticle dosing in a dynamic cellular system.

    PubMed

    Summers, Huw D; Rees, Paul; Holton, Mark D; Brown, M Rowan; Chappell, Sally C; Smith, Paul J; Errington, Rachel J

    2011-03-01

    The delivery of nanoparticles into cells is important in therapeutic applications and in nanotoxicology. Nanoparticles are generally targeted to receptors on the surfaces of cells and internalized into endosomes by endocytosis, but the kinetics of the process and the way in which cell division redistributes the particles remain unclear. Here we show that the chance of success or failure of nanoparticle uptake and inheritance is random. Statistical analysis of nanoparticle-loaded endosomes indicates that particle capture is described by an over-dispersed Poisson probability distribution that is consistent with heterogeneous adsorption and internalization. Partitioning of nanoparticles in cell division is random and asymmetric, following a binomial distribution with mean probability of 0.52-0.72. These results show that cellular targeting of nanoparticles is inherently imprecise due to the randomness of nature at the molecular scale, and the statistical framework offers a way to predict nanoparticle dosage for therapy and for the study of nanotoxins. PMID:21258333

  2. 32 CFR 1630.45 - Class 4-G: Registrant exempted from service because of the death of his parent or sibling while...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 32 National Defense 6 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Class 4-G: Registrant exempted from service... Regulations Relating to National Defense SELECTIVE SERVICE SYSTEM CLASSIFICATION RULES § 1630.45 Class 4-G... Forces or whose parent or sibling is in a captured or missing in action status. In Class 4-G shall...

  3. 32 CFR 1630.45 - Class 4-G: Registrant exempted from service because of the death of his parent or sibling while...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 32 National Defense 6 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Class 4-G: Registrant exempted from service... Regulations Relating to National Defense SELECTIVE SERVICE SYSTEM CLASSIFICATION RULES § 1630.45 Class 4-G... Forces or whose parent or sibling is in a captured or missing in action status. In Class 4-G shall...

  4. Tensegrity, cellular biophysics, and the mechanics of living systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ingber, Donald E.; Wang, Ning; Stamenović, Dimitrije

    2014-04-01

    The recent convergence between physics and biology has led many physicists to enter the fields of cell and developmental biology. One of the most exciting areas of interest has been the emerging field of mechanobiology that centers on how cells control their mechanical properties, and how physical forces regulate cellular biochemical responses, a process that is known as mechanotransduction. In this article, we review the central role that tensegrity (tensional integrity) architecture, which depends on tensile prestress for its mechanical stability, plays in biology. We describe how tensional prestress is a critical governor of cell mechanics and function, and how use of tensegrity by cells contributes to mechanotransduction. Theoretical tensegrity models are also described that predict both quantitative and qualitative behaviors of living cells, and these theoretical descriptions are placed in context of other physical models of the cell. In addition, we describe how tensegrity is used at multiple size scales in the hierarchy of life—from individual molecules to whole living organisms—to both stabilize three-dimensional form and to channel forces from the macroscale to the nanoscale, thereby facilitating mechanochemical conversion at the molecular level.

  5. Tensegrity, cellular biophysics, and the mechanics of living systems.

    PubMed

    Ingber, Donald E; Wang, Ning; Stamenovic, Dimitrije

    2014-04-01

    The recent convergence between physics and biology has led many physicists to enter the fields of cell and developmental biology. One of the most exciting areas of interest has been the emerging field of mechanobiology that centers on how cells control their mechanical properties, and how physical forces regulate cellular biochemical responses, a process that is known as mechanotransduction. In this article, we review the central role that tensegrity (tensional integrity) architecture, which depends on tensile prestress for its mechanical stability, plays in biology. We describe how tensional prestress is a critical governor of cell mechanics and function, and how use of tensegrity by cells contributes to mechanotransduction. Theoretical tensegrity models are also described that predict both quantitative and qualitative behaviors of living cells, and these theoretical descriptions are placed in context of other physical models of the cell. In addition, we describe how tensegrity is used at multiple size scales in the hierarchy of life—from individual molecules to whole living organisms—to both stabilize three-dimensional form and to channel forces from the macroscale to the nanoscale, thereby facilitating mechanochemical conversion at the molecular level. PMID:24695087

  6. Tensegrity, cellular biophysics, and the mechanics of living systems

    PubMed Central

    Ingber, Donald E.; Wang, Ning; Stamenović, Dimitrije

    2014-01-01

    The recent convergence between physics and biology has led many physicists to enter the fields of cell and developmental biology. One of the most exciting areas of interest has been the emerging field of mechanobiology that centers on how cells control their mechanical properties, and how physical forces regulate cellular biochemical responses, a process that is known as mechanotransduction. In this article, we review the central role that tensegrity (tensional integrity) architecture, which depends on tensile prestress for its mechanical stability, plays in biology. We describe how tensional prestress is a critical governor of cell mechanics and function, and how use of tensegrity by cells contributes to mechanotransduction. Theoretical tensegrity models are also described that predict both quantitative and qualitative behaviors of living cells, and these theoretical descriptions are placed in context of other physical models of the cell. In addition, we describe how tensegrity is used at multiple size scales in the hierarchy of life — from individual molecules to whole living organisms — to both stabilize three-dimensional form and to channel forces from the macroscale to the nanoscale, thereby facilitating mechanochemical conversion at the molecular level. PMID:24695087

  7. Clinical impact of PAI 1 4G/5G gene polymorphism in colorectal carcinoma patients.

    PubMed

    Halamkova, J; Kiss, I; Pavlovsky, Z; Tomasek, J; Jarkovsky, J; Cech, Z; Bednarova, D; Tucek, S; Hanakova, L; Moulis, M; Zavrelova, J; Man, M; Benda, P; Robek, O; Kala, Z; Penka, M

    2013-01-01

    Plasminogen activator ihnibitor (PAI 1) belongs to the plasminogen activator system, which is part of the metastatic cascade and significantly contributes to invasive growth and angiogenesis of malignant tumors. Its plasma level is normally low but 4G/4G homozygotes have higher concentrations of PAI 1. This genotype may be associated with worse prognosis and proximal location of colorectal cancer than 5G/5G homozygotes. In our prospective evaluation we examined plasma level PAI 1 (using photometric microplate method ELISA) pre-surgery and, subsequently, 6-8 weeks later, from 80 patients. For the PAI 1 rs1799889 -675 4G/5G polymorphism test the PCR amplification was used.Analysis of collected data was confirmed that significantly higher plasma levels of PAI 1 were found in patients before starting therapy, which decreased (p=0.004) after initiation of treatment. Patients with higher plasma level PAI 1 before (p=0.013) and after therapy (p=0.004) had significantly shorter survival. We found no relationship between polymorphisms of PAI 1 (-675 4G/5G) in relation to stage, survival or tumor location. PAI 1 is useful as a negative marker of prognosis and could be advantageous when planning adjuvant treatment of patients with colorectal carcinoma. Although opinions on the importance of polymorphisms of PAI 1 in relation to the prognosis are not uniform, it does seem that their role in the prognosis of patients with colorectal cancer is not essential. PMID:23259783

  8. Eukaryotic Initiation Factor eIFiso4G1 and eIFiso4G2 Are Isoforms Exhibiting Distinct Functional Differences in Supporting Translation in Arabidopsis.

    PubMed

    Gallie, Daniel R

    2016-01-15

    The eukaryotic translation initiation factor (eIF) 4G is required during protein synthesis to promote the assembly of several factors involved in the recruitment of a 40S ribosomal subunit to an mRNA. Although many eukaryotes express two eIF4G isoforms that are highly similar, the eIF4G isoforms in plants, referred to as eIF4G and eIFiso4G, are highly divergent in size, sequence, and domain organization but both can interact with eIF4A, eIF4B, eIF4E isoforms, and the poly(A)-binding protein. Nevertheless, eIF4G and eIFiso4G from wheat exhibit preferences in the mRNAs they translate optimally. For example, mRNA containing the 5'-leader (called Ω) of tobacco mosaic virus preferentially uses eIF4G in wheat germ lysate. In this study, the eIF4G isoform specificity of Ω was used to examine functional differences of the eIF4G isoforms in Arabidopsis. As in wheat, Ω-mediated translation was reduced in an eif4g null mutant. Loss of the eIFiso4G1 isoform, which is similar in sequence to wheat eIFiso4G, did not substantially affect Ω-mediated translation. However, loss of the eIFiso4G2 isoform substantially reduced Ω-mediated translation. eIFiso4G2 is substantially divergent from eIFiso4G1 and is present only in the Brassicaceae, suggesting a recent evolution. eIFiso4G2 isoforms exhibit sequence-specific differences in regions representing partner protein and RNA binding sites. Loss of any eIF4G isoform also resulted in a substantial reduction in reporter transcript level. These results suggest that eIFiso4G2 appeared late in plant evolution and exhibits more functional similarity with eIF4G than with eIFiso4G1 during Ω-mediated translation. PMID:26578519

  9. Development of Cellular Absorptive Tracers (CATs) for a Quantitative Characterization of Microbial Mass in Flow Systems

    SciTech Connect

    Saripalli, Prasad; Brown, Christopher F.; Lindberg, Michael J.

    2005-03-16

    We report on a new Cellular Absorptive Tracers (CATs) method, for a simple, non-destructive characterization of bacterial mass in flow systems. Results show that adsorption of a CAT molecule into the cellular mass results in its retardation during flow, which is a good, quantitative measure of the biomass quantity and distribution. No such methods are currently available for a quantitative characterization of cell mass.

  10. Micropatterned, multicomponent supported lipid bilayers for cellular systems.

    PubMed

    Dutta, Debjit; Kam, Lance C

    2014-01-01

    Lipid bilayer membranes are a central structural feature of living cells, providing a wide range of functions including partitioning of organelles, mediating cell interaction with the environment, and modulating intracellular signaling processes. By capturing the fluidity of the natural membranes in a reductionist in vitro model, substrate supported lipid bilayers have emerged as a compelling model system for these structures. Furthermore, the ability to control the composition and mobility of this system at micro- and nanoscales inspired several new routes of biological and biotechnological investigation. Here, we describe key methods used to create multicomponent lipid bilayers, discuss design considerations important to making these systems, and demonstrate this process in the specific context of understanding juxtacrine cell signaling. Different fabrication techniques were combined to first pattern a surface with barriers to lipid diffusion and then spatially control the exposure of this surface to lipid vesicles, leading to local formation of bilayers of different composition. This multicomponent system was used as a platform for to mimic the natural organization of T cells and antigen presenting cells by presenting ligands to the T cell receptor and lymphocyte function-associated antigen-1 that are tethered to separate, closely juxtaposed regions of bilayer. Other technologies like using photochemical polymerization of lipids to pattern bilayers have also been discussed. The information gathered from evaluating membrane interactions in patterned lipid bilayers may lead to the development of membrane-based biomedical devices for conducting novel cell-based assays and potentially high-throughput drug screens targeting membranes or membrane-associated components. PMID:24484657

  11. Traffic dynamics of an on-ramp system with a cellular automaton model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Xin-Gang; Gao, Zi-You; Jia, Bin; Jiang, Rui

    2010-06-01

    This paper uses the cellular automaton model to study the dynamics of traffic flow around an on-ramp with an acceleration lane. It adopts a parameter, which can reflect different lane-changing behaviour, to represent the diversity of driving behaviour. The refined cellular automaton model is used to describe the lower acceleration rate of a vehicle. The phase diagram and the capacity of the on-ramp system are investigated. The simulation results show that in the single cell model, the capacity of the on-ramp system will stay at the highest flow of a one lane system when the driver is moderate and careful; it will be reduced when the driver is aggressive. In the refined cellular automaton model, the capacity is always reduced even when the driver is careful. It proposes that the capacity drop of the on-ramp system is caused by aggressive lane-changing behaviour and lower acceleration rate.

  12. The cellular composition of the human immune system is shaped by age and cohabitation.

    PubMed

    Carr, Edward J; Dooley, James; Garcia-Perez, Josselyn E; Lagou, Vasiliki; Lee, James C; Wouters, Carine; Meyts, Isabelle; Goris, An; Boeckxstaens, Guy; Linterman, Michelle A; Liston, Adrian

    2016-04-01

    Detailed population-level description of the human immune system has recently become achievable. We used a 'systems-level' approach to establish a resource of cellular immune profiles of 670 healthy individuals. We report a high level of interindividual variation, with low longitudinal variation, at the level of cellular subset composition of the immune system. Despite the profound effects of antigen exposure on individual antigen-specific clones, the cellular subset structure proved highly elastic, with transient vaccination-induced changes followed by a return to the individual's unique baseline. Notably, the largest influence on immunological variation identified was cohabitation, with 50% less immunological variation between individuals who share an environment (as parents) than between people in the wider population. These results identify local environmental conditions as a key factor in shaping the human immune system. PMID:26878114

  13. Design of mobile telemedicine systems using GSM and IS-54 cellular telephone standards.

    PubMed

    Istepanian, R H; Woodward, B; Gorilas, E; Balos, P A

    1998-01-01

    This paper presents an overview of the design of mobile telemedical systems using cellular telephone channels. A mobile telemedicine communication system was studied using both the GSM and the IS-54 standards, which are the most widely used commercial cellular telephone systems in Europe and North America, respectively. A simulation using a photoplethesmography signal showed successful transmission of data with bit error rates of less than 10(-7) at the receiver for the IS-54 standard and less than 10(-5) for the GSM standard, depending on the mobile channel conditions used. PMID:9640747

  14. Method for analyzing signaling networks in complex cellular systems.

    PubMed

    Plavec, Ivan; Sirenko, Oksana; Privat, Sylvie; Wang, Yuker; Dajee, Maya; Melrose, Jennifer; Nakao, Brian; Hytopoulos, Evangelos; Berg, Ellen L; Butcher, Eugene C

    2004-02-01

    Now that the human genome has been sequenced, the challenge of assigning function to human genes has become acute. Existing approaches using microarrays or proteomics frequently generate very large volumes of data not directly related to biological function, making interpretation difficult. Here, we describe a technique for integrative systems biology in which: (i) primary cells are cultured under biologically meaningful conditions; (ii) a limited number of biologically meaningful readouts are measured; and (iii) the results obtained under several different conditions are combined for analysis. Studies of human endothelial cells overexpressing different signaling molecules under multiple inflammatory conditions show that this system can capture a remarkable range of functions by a relatively small number of simple measurements. In particular, measurement of seven different protein levels by ELISA under four different conditions is capable of reconstructing pathway associations of 25 different proteins representing four known signaling pathways, implicating additional participants in the NF-kappaBorRAS/mitogen-activated protein kinase pathways and defining additional interactions between these pathways. PMID:14745015

  15. Method for analyzing signaling networks in complex cellular systems

    PubMed Central

    Plavec, Ivan; Sirenko, Oksana; Privat, Sylvie; Wang, Yuker; Dajee, Maya; Melrose, Jennifer; Nakao, Brian; Hytopoulos, Evangelos; Berg, Ellen L.; Butcher, Eugene C.

    2004-01-01

    Now that the human genome has been sequenced, the challenge of assigning function to human genes has become acute. Existing approaches using microarrays or proteomics frequently generate very large volumes of data not directly related to biological function, making interpretation difficult. Here, we describe a technique for integrative systems biology in which: (i) primary cells are cultured under biologically meaningful conditions; (ii) a limited number of biologically meaningful readouts are measured; and (iii) the results obtained under several different conditions are combined for analysis. Studies of human endothelial cells overexpressing different signaling molecules under multiple inflammatory conditions show that this system can capture a remarkable range of functions by a relatively small number of simple measurements. In particular, measurement of seven different protein levels by ELISA under four different conditions is capable of reconstructing pathway associations of 25 different proteins representing four known signaling pathways, implicating additional participants in the NF-κBorRAS/mitogen-activated protein kinase pathways and defining additional interactions between these pathways. PMID:14745015

  16. Multicompartmentalized polymeric systems: towards biomimetic cellular structure and function.

    PubMed

    Marguet, Maïté; Bonduelle, Colin; Lecommandoux, Sébastien

    2013-01-21

    The cell is certainly one of the most complex and exciting systems in Nature that scientists are still trying to fully understand. Such a challenge pushes material scientists to seek to reproduce its perfection by building biomimetic materials with high-added value and previously unmatched properties. Thanks to their versatility, their robustness and the current state of polymer chemistry science, we believe polymer-based materials to constitute or represent ideal candidates when addressing the challenge of biomimicry, which defines the focus of this review. The first step consists in mimicking the structure of the cell: its inner compartments, the organelles, with a multicompartmentalized structure, and the rest, i.e. the cytoplasm minus the organelles (mainly cytoskeleton/cytosol) with gels or particular solutions (highly concentrated for example) in one compartment, and finally the combination of both. Achieving this first structural step enables us to considerably widen the gap of possibilities in drug delivery systems. Another powerful property of the cell lies in its metabolic function. The second step is therefore to achieve enzymatic reactions in a compartment, as occurs in the organelles, in a highly controlled, selective and efficient manner. We classify the most exciting polymersome nanoreactors reported in our opinion into two different subsections, depending on their very final concept or purpose of design. We also highlight in a thorough table the experimental sections crucial to such work. Finally, after achieving control over these prerequisites, scientists are able to combine them and push the frontiers of biomimicry further: from cell structure mimics towards a controlled biofunctionality. Such a biomimetic approach in material design and the future research it will stimulate, are believed to bring considerable enrichments to the fields of drug delivery, (bio)sensors, (bio)catalysis and (bio)technology. PMID:23073077

  17. Design mobile satellite system architecture as an integral part of the cellular access digital network

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chien, E. S. K.; Marinho, J. A.; Russell, J. E., Sr.

    1988-01-01

    The Cellular Access Digital Network (CADN) is the access vehicle through which cellular technology is brought into the mainstream of the evolving integrated telecommunications network. Beyond the integrated end-to-end digital access and per call network services provisioning of the Integrated Services Digital Network (ISDN), the CADN engenders the added capability of mobility freedom via wireless access. One key element of the CADN network architecture is the standard user to network interface that is independent of RF transmission technology. Since the Mobile Satellite System (MSS) is envisioned to not only complement but also enhance the capabilities of the terrestrial cellular telecommunications network, compatibility and interoperability between terrestrial cellular and mobile satellite systems are vitally important to provide an integrated moving telecommunications network of the future. From a network standpoint, there exist very strong commonalities between the terrestrial cellular system and the mobile satellite system. Therefore, the MSS architecture should be designed as an integral part of the CADN. This paper describes the concept of the CADN, the functional architecture of the MSS, and the user-network interface signaling protocols.

  18. Molecular and Cellular Designs of Insect Taste Receptor System

    PubMed Central

    Isono, Kunio; Morita, Hiromi

    2010-01-01

    The insect gustatory receptors (GRs) are members of a large G-protein coupled receptor family distantly related to the insect olfactory receptors. They are phylogenetically different from taste receptors of most other animals. GRs are often coexpressed with other GRs in single receptor neurons. Taste receptors other than GRs are also expressed in some neurons. Recent molecular studies in the fruitfly Drosophila revealed that the insect taste receptor system not only covers a wide ligand spectrum of sugars, bitter substances or salts that are common to mammals but also includes reception of pheromone and somatosensory stimulants. However, the central mechanism to perceive and discriminate taste information is not yet elucidated. Analysis of the primary projection of taste neurons to the brain shows that the projection profiles depend basically on the peripheral locations of the neurons as well as the GRs that they express. These results suggest that both peripheral and central design principles of insect taste perception are different from those of olfactory perception. PMID:20617187

  19. Sensitive Optical and Microfluidic Systems for Cellular Analyses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schiro, Perry G.

    Investigating rare cells and heterogeneous subpopulations is challenging for a myriad reasons. This dissertation describes novel techniques to analyze single molecules, synaptic vesicles, and rare circulating tumor cells. The eDAR platform for isolating rare cells in fluids provides a new method to monitor breast cancer status in patients as well as to guide research for personalized treatment and efficacy. In a side-by-side comparison with CellSearch, eDAR detected CTCs in all 20 Stage IV metastatic breast cancer patients while the CellSearch system found CTCs in just 8 patients. The single-molecule capillary electrophoresis technology is a method to characterize an entire sample one molecule at a time, providing detailed information about the absolute number and nature of molecules present in a sample. The nFASS platform has the potential to apply the advantages that currently exist in flow cytometry to the study of items on a much smaller scale such as subcellular organelles and nanometer-sized objects. For example, the isolation of subpopulations of synaptic vesicles will allow for detailed protein quantification and identification in the study of neurological diseases. These tools facilitate fundamental investigation of objects ranging from single molecules to single cells.

  20. Interactions of the interferon system with cellular metabolism

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sonnenfeld, Gerald

    1986-01-01

    The results of studies concerning the interaction of the interferon (Inf) system with the activities of carcinogens, tumor promoters, and cytochrome P-450 are presented. The results show that the addition of a tumor promoter (TPA or 4-O-methyl-TPA) to a tissue culture enhances virus-induced Inf-gamma production, suggesting a potential value of tumor promoters in the biosynthesis of commercial Inf. On the other hand, the carcinogens were reported to inhibit the induction of Inf-alpha/beta in cultured cells and in intact animals (with no effect on the administered or preformed Inf). The demonstration of a correlation between the carcinogenic potential of a compound and its inhibitive effect on Inf production suggests a possible use of the Inf production assay in the evaluation of the carcinogenicity of chemicals. In addition, it was shown that the induction of Inf-alpha/beta as well as the administration of this Inf depresses the levels of rat liver cytochrome P-450 which is responsible for binding lipophilic drugs, steroids, and carcinogens, thus increasing the toxicity of the respective chemical.

  1. GLOBULAR CLUSTER POPULATIONS: FIRST RESULTS FROM S{sup 4}G EARLY-TYPE GALAXIES

    SciTech Connect

    Zaritsky, Dennis; Aravena, Manuel; Athanassoula, E.; Bosma, Albert; Comerón, Sébastien; Laine, Jarkko; Laurikainen, Eija; Salo, Heikki; Elmegreen, Bruce G.; Erroz-Ferrer, Santiago; Knapen, Johan H.; Gadotti, Dimitri A.; Muñoz-Mateos, Juan Carlos; Hinz, Joannah L.; Ho, Luis C.; Holwerda, Benne; Sheth, Kartik

    2015-02-01

    Using 3.6 μm images of 97 early-type galaxies, we develop and verify methodology to measure globular cluster populations from the S{sup 4}G survey images. We find that (1) the ratio, T {sub N}, of the number of clusters, N {sub CL}, to parent galaxy stellar mass, M {sub *}, rises weakly with M {sub *} for early-type galaxies with M {sub *} > 10{sup 10} M {sub ☉} when we calculate galaxy masses using a universal stellar initial mass function (IMF) but that the dependence of T {sub N} on M {sub *} is removed entirely once we correct for the recently uncovered systematic variation of IMF with M {sub *}; and (2) for M {sub *} < 10{sup 10} M {sub ☉}, there is no trend between N {sub CL} and M {sub *}, the scatter in T {sub N} is significantly larger (approaching two orders of magnitude), and there is evidence to support a previous, independent suggestion of two families of galaxies. The behavior of N {sub CL} in the lower-mass systems is more difficult to measure because these systems are inherently cluster-poor, but our results may add to previous evidence that large variations in cluster formation and destruction efficiencies are to be found among low-mass galaxies. The average fraction of stellar mass in clusters is ∼0.0014 for M {sub *} > 10{sup 10} M {sub ☉} and can be as large as ∼0.02 for less massive galaxies. These are the first results from the S{sup 4}G sample of galaxies and will be enhanced by the sample of early-type galaxies now being added to S{sup 4}G and complemented by the study of later-type galaxies within S{sup 4}G.

  2. Application of spectral hole burning to the study of in vitro cellular systems

    SciTech Connect

    Milanovich, Nebojsa

    1999-11-08

    Chapter 1 of this thesis describes the various stages of tumor development and a multitude of diagnostic techniques used to detect cancer. Chapter 2 gives an overview of the aspects of hole burning spectroscopy important for its application to the study of cellular systems. Chapter 3 gives general descriptions of cellular organelles, structures, and physical properties that can serve as possible markers for the differentiation of normal and cancerous cells. Also described in Chapter 3 are the principles of cryobiology important for low temperature spectroscopy of cells, characterization of MCF-10F (normal) and MCF-7 (cancer) cells lines which will serve as model systems, and cellular characteristics of aluminum phthalocyanine tetrasulfonate (APT), which was used as the test probe. Chapters 4 and 5 are previously published papers by the author pertaining to the results obtained from the application of hole burning to the study of cellular systems. Chapter 4 presents the first results obtained by spectral hole burning of cellular systems and Chapter 5 gives results for the differentiation of MCF-10F and MCF-7 cells stained with APT by an external applied electric (Stark) field. A general conclusion is presented in Chapter 6. Appendices A and B provide additional characterization of the cell/probe model systems. Appendix A describes the uptake and subcellular distribution of APT in MCF-10F and MCF-7 cells and Appendix B compares the hole burning characteristics of APT in cells when the cells are in suspension and when they are examined while adhering to a glass coverslip. Appendix C presents preliminary results for a novel probe molecule, referred to as a molecular thumbtack, designed by the authors for use in future hole burning applications to cellular systems.

  3. Development of cellular absorptive tracers (CATs) for a quantitative characterization of microbial mass in flow systems.

    PubMed

    Choi, Jaeyoung; Saripalli, Prasad; Meldrum, Deirdre; Lee, Ju Young

    2007-12-01

    A new method was developed for a simple non-destructive characterization of bacterial mass in flow systems. Results of partition and transport experiments showed that adsorption of a CAT molecule into the cellular mass resulted in its retardation during flow, which was a good measure of the biomass quantity and distribution. Three dyes, acridine orange (AO), toluidine blue (TB), and safranin O (SO), were chosen as CATs to demonstrate their utility to quantitatively characterize the biomass, its location and morphology in flow system. The results clearly demonstrated the applicability of AO, TB, and SO as cellular absorptive tracers in columnar flow experiments. PMID:17329099

  4. An Intergenic Region Shared by At4g35985 and At4g35987 in Arabidopsis thaliana Is a Tissue Specific and Stress Inducible Bidirectional Promoter Analyzed in Transgenic Arabidopsis and Tobacco Plants

    PubMed Central

    Banerjee, Joydeep; Sahoo, Dipak Kumar; Dey, Nrisingha; Houtz, Robert L.; Maiti, Indu Bhushan

    2013-01-01

    On chromosome 4 in the Arabidopsis genome, two neighboring genes (calmodulin methyl transferase At4g35987 and senescence associated gene At4g35985) are located in a head-to-head divergent orientation sharing a putative bidirectional promoter. This 1258 bp intergenic region contains a number of environmental stress responsive and tissue specific cis-regulatory elements. Transcript analysis of At4g35985 and At4g35987 genes by quantitative real time PCR showed tissue specific and stress inducible expression profiles. We tested the bidirectional promoter-function of the intergenic region shared by the divergent genes At4g35985 and At4g35987 using two reporter genes (GFP and GUS) in both orientations in transient tobacco protoplast and Agro-infiltration assays, as well as in stably transformed transgenic Arabidopsis and tobacco plants. In transient assays with GFP and GUS reporter genes the At4g35985 promoter (P85) showed stronger expression (about 3.5 fold) compared to the At4g35987 promoter (P87). The tissue specific as well as stress responsive functional nature of the bidirectional promoter was evaluated in independent transgenic Arabidopsis and tobacco lines. Expression of P85 activity was detected in the midrib of leaves, leaf trichomes, apical meristemic regions, throughout the root, lateral roots and flowers. The expression of P87 was observed in leaf-tip, hydathodes, apical meristem, root tips, emerging lateral root tips, root stele region and in floral tissues. The bidirectional promoter in both orientations shows differential up-regulation (2.5 to 3 fold) under salt stress. Use of such regulatory elements of bidirectional promoters showing spatial and stress inducible promoter-functions in heterologous system might be an important tool for plant biotechnology and gene stacking applications. PMID:24260266

  5. A Protocol for Quantifying Lipid Peroxidation in Cellular Systems by F2-Isoprostane Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Labuschagne, Christiaan F.; van den Broek, Niels J. F.; Postma, Pjotr; Berger, Ruud; Brenkman, Arjan B.

    2013-01-01

    Cellular systems are essential model systems to study reactive oxygen species and oxidative damage but there are widely accepted technical difficulties with available methods for quantifying endogenous oxidative damage in these systems. Here we present a stable isotope dilution UPLC-MS/MS protocol for measuring F2-isoprostanes as accurate markers for endogenous oxidative damage in cellular systems. F2-isoprostanes are chemically stable prostaglandin-like lipid peroxidation products of arachidonic acid, the predominant polyunsaturated fatty acid in mammalian cells. This approach is rapid and highly sensitive, allowing for the absolute quantification of endogenous lipid peroxidation in as little as ten thousand cells as well as damage originating from multiple ROS sources. Furthermore, differences in the endogenous cellular redox state induced by transcriptional regulation of ROS scavenging enzymes were detected by following this protocol. Finally we showed that the F2-isoprostane 5-iPF2α-VI is a metabolically stable end product, which is excreted from cells. Overall, this protocol enables accurate, specific and sensitive quantification of endogenous lipid peroxidation in cellular systems. PMID:24244726

  6. A Low-Cost Cooperative Strategy for Cellular Controlled Short-Range Communication Systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Han, Han; Wang, Hao; Lin, Xiaokang

    This letter is concerned with cellular controlled short-range communication (CCSRC) systems, which can provide a significant performance gain over the traditional cellular systems as shown in the literature. However, to obtain such a gain, CCSRC systems need perfect channel state information (CSI) of all users and the complexity of setting up the optimal cooperative clusters is factorial with respect to the number of potentially cooperative users, which is very unrealistic in practical systems. To solve this problem, we propose a novel cooperative strategy, where CCSRC systems only need the distances between all user pairs and the complexity of setting up the cooperative clusters is relatively low. Simulation results show that the performance of the proposed strategy is close to optimal.

  7. REVIEWS OF TOPICAL PROBLEMS: Study of spatially extended dynamical systems using probabilistic cellular automata

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vanag, Vladimir K.

    1999-05-01

    Spatially extended dynamical systems are ubiquitous and include such things as insect and animal populations; complex chemical, technological, and geochemical processes; humanity itself, and much more. It is clearly desirable to have a certain universal tool with which the highly complex behaviour of nonlinear dynamical systems can be analyzed and modelled. For this purpose, cellular automata seem to be good candidates. In the present review, emphasis is placed on the possibilities that various types of probabilistic cellular automata (PCA), such as DSMC (direct simulation Monte Carlo) and LGCA (lattice-gas cellular automata), offer. The methods are primarily designed for modelling spatially extended dynamical systems with inner fluctuations accounted for. For the Willamowskii-Roessler and Oregonator models, PCA applications to the following problems are illustrated: the effect of fluctuations on the dynamics of nonlinear systems; Turing structure formation; the effect of hydrodynamic modes on the behaviour of nonlinear chemical systems (stirring effects); bifurcation changes in the dynamical regimes of complex systems with restricted geometry or low spatial dimension; and the description of chemical systems in microemulsions.

  8. 47 CFR 90.672 - Unacceptable interference to non-cellular 800 MHz licensees from 800 MHz cellular systems or part...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... Business/Industrial Land Transportation Pool. (a) Definition. Except as provided in 47 CFR 90.617(k... 900 MHz Business/Industrial Land Transportation Pool. 90.672 Section 90.672 Telecommunication FEDERAL... 22 of this chapter, Cellular Radiotelephone systems and within the 900 MHz Business/Industrial...

  9. Cellular and molecular mechanisms of sexual differentiation in the mammalian nervous system.

    PubMed

    Forger, Nancy G; Strahan, J Alex; Castillo-Ruiz, Alexandra

    2016-01-01

    Neuroscientists are likely to discover new sex differences in the coming years, spurred by the National Institutes of Health initiative to include both sexes in preclinical studies. This review summarizes the current state of knowledge of the cellular and molecular mechanisms underlying sex differences in the mammalian nervous system, based primarily on work in rodents. Cellular mechanisms examined include neurogenesis, migration, the differentiation of neurochemical and morphological cell phenotype, and cell death. At the molecular level we discuss evolving roles for epigenetics, sex chromosome complement, the immune system, and newly identified cell signaling pathways. We review recent findings on the role of the environment, as well as genome-wide studies with some surprising results, causing us to re-think often-used models of sexual differentiation. We end by pointing to future directions, including an increased awareness of the important contributions of tissues outside of the nervous system to sexual differentiation of the brain. PMID:26790970

  10. Stochastic extension of cellular manufacturing systems: a queuing-based analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fardis, Fatemeh; Zandi, Afagh; Ghezavati, Vahidreza

    2013-07-01

    Clustering parts and machines into part families and machine cells is a major decision in the design of cellular manufacturing systems which is defined as cell formation. This paper presents a non-linear mixed integer programming model to design cellular manufacturing systems which assumes that the arrival rate of parts into cells and machine service rate are stochastic parameters and described by exponential distribution. Uncertain situations may create a queue behind each machine; therefore, we will consider the average waiting time of parts behind each machine in order to have an efficient system. The objective function will minimize summation of idleness cost of machines, sub-contracting cost for exceptional parts, non-utilizing machine cost, and holding cost of parts in the cells. Finally, the linearized model will be solved by the Cplex solver of GAMS, and sensitivity analysis will be performed to illustrate the effectiveness of the parameters.

  11. PAI-1 4G-4G and MTHFR 677TT in non-hepatitis C virus/hepatitis B virus-related liver cirrhosis

    PubMed Central

    Pasta, Linda; Pasta, Francesca

    2015-01-01

    AIM: To evaluate the different roles of thrombophilia in patients with and without viral etiology. The thrombophilic genetic factors (THRGFs), PAI-1 4G-4G, MTHFR 677TT, V Leiden 506Q and prothrombin 20210A, were studied as risk factors in 1079 patients with liver cirrhosis (LC), enrolled from January 2000 to January 2014. METHODS: All Caucasian LC patients consecutively observed in a fourteen-year period were included; the presence of portal vein thrombosis (PVT) and Budd Chiari syndrome (BCS) was registered. The differences between the proportions of each THRGF with regard to the presence or absence of viral etiology and the frequencies of the THRGF genotypes with those predicted in a population by the Hardy-Weinberg equilibrium were registered. RESULTS: Four hundred and seventeen/one thousand and seventy-six patients (38.6%) showed thrombophilia: 217 PAI-1 4G-4G, 176 MTHFR C677TT, 71 V Leiden factor and 41 prothrombin G20210 A, 84 with more than 1 THRGF; 350 presented with no viral liver cirrhosis (NVLC) and 729 with, called viral liver cirrhosis (VLC), of whom 56 patients were hepatitis C virus + hepatitis B virus. PAI-1 4G-4G, MTHFR C677TT, the presence of at least one TRHGF and the presence of > 1 THRGF, were statistically more frequent in patients with NVLC vs patients with VLC: All χ2 > 3.85 and P < 0.05. Patients with PVT and/or BCS with at least one TRHGF were 189/352 (53.7%). The Hardy-Weinberg of PAI-1 and MTHFR 677 genotypes deviated from that expected from a population in equilibrium in patients with NVLC (respectively χ2 = 39.3; P < 0.000 and χ2 = 27.94; P < 0.05), whereas the equilibrium was respected in VLC. CONCLUSION: MTHFR 677TT was nearly twofold and PAI-1 4G-4G more than threefold more frequently found in NVLC vs patients with VLC; the Hardy-Weinberg equilibrium of these two polymorphisms confirms this data in NVLC. We suggest that PAI-1 4G-4G and MTHFR 677TT could be considered as factors of fibrosis and thrombosis mechanisms, increasing

  12. Efficient Inference of Parsimonious Phenomenological Models of Cellular Dynamics Using S-Systems and Alternating Regression

    PubMed Central

    Daniels, Bryan C.; Nemenman, Ilya

    2015-01-01

    The nonlinearity of dynamics in systems biology makes it hard to infer them from experimental data. Simple linear models are computationally efficient, but cannot incorporate these important nonlinearities. An adaptive method based on the S-system formalism, which is a sensible representation of nonlinear mass-action kinetics typically found in cellular dynamics, maintains the efficiency of linear regression. We combine this approach with adaptive model selection to obtain efficient and parsimonious representations of cellular dynamics. The approach is tested by inferring the dynamics of yeast glycolysis from simulated data. With little computing time, it produces dynamical models with high predictive power and with structural complexity adapted to the difficulty of the inference problem. PMID:25806510

  13. Redox Homeostasis and Cellular Antioxidant Systems: Crucial Players in Cancer Growth and Therapy

    PubMed Central

    Ciucis, Chiara De

    2016-01-01

    Reactive oxygen species (ROS) and their products are components of cell signaling pathways and play important roles in cellular physiology and pathophysiology. Under physiological conditions, cells control ROS levels by the use of scavenging systems such as superoxide dismutases, peroxiredoxins, and glutathione that balance ROS generation and elimination. Under oxidative stress conditions, excessive ROS can damage cellular proteins, lipids, and DNA, leading to cell damage that may contribute to carcinogenesis. Several studies have shown that cancer cells display an adaptive response to oxidative stress by increasing expression of antioxidant enzymes and molecules. As a double-edged sword, ROS influence signaling pathways determining beneficial or detrimental outcomes in cancer therapy. In this review, we address the role of redox homeostasis in cancer growth and therapy and examine the current literature regarding the redox regulatory systems that become upregulated in cancer and their role in promoting tumor progression and resistance to chemotherapy. PMID:27418953

  14. Green light radiation effects on free radicals inhibition in cellular and chemical systems.

    PubMed

    Comorosan, Sorin; Polosan, Silviu; Jipa, Silviu; Popescu, Irinel; Marton, George; Ionescu, Elena; Cristache, Ligia; Badila, Dumitru; Mitrica, Radu

    2011-01-10

    Free radicals generation is inhibited through green light (GL) irradiation in cellular systems and in chemical reactions. Standard melanocyte cultures were UV-irradiated and the induced cellular reactive oxygen species (ROS) were quantified by the fluorescence technique. The same cell cultures, previously protected by a 24h GL exposure, displayed a significantly lower ROS production. A simple chemical reaction is subsequently chosen, in which the production of free radicals is well defined. Paraffin wax and mineral oil were GL irradiated during thermal degradation and the oxidation products checked by chemiluminescence [CL] and Fourier transform infrared spectra [FT-IR]. The same clear inhibition of the radical oxidation of alkanes is recorded. A quantum chemistry modeling of these results is performed and a mechanism involving a new type of Rydberg macromolecular systems with implications for biology and medicine is suggested. PMID:20934350

  15. Acoustically detectable cellular-level lung injury induced by fluid mechanical stresses in microfluidic airway systems.

    PubMed

    Huh, Dongeun; Fujioka, Hideki; Tung, Yi-Chung; Futai, Nobuyuki; Paine, Robert; Grotberg, James B; Takayama, Shuichi

    2007-11-27

    We describe a microfabricated airway system integrated with computerized air-liquid two-phase microfluidics that enables on-chip engineering of human airway epithelia and precise reproduction of physiologic or pathologic liquid plug flows found in the respiratory system. Using this device, we demonstrate cellular-level lung injury under flow conditions that cause symptoms characteristic of a wide range of pulmonary diseases. Specifically, propagation and rupture of liquid plugs that simulate surfactant-deficient reopening of closed airways lead to significant injury of small airway epithelial cells by generating deleterious fluid mechanical stresses. We also show that the explosive pressure waves produced by plug rupture enable detection of the mechanical cellular injury as crackling sounds. PMID:18006663

  16. Encapsulated Cellular Implants for Recombinant Protein Delivery and Therapeutic Modulation of the Immune System

    PubMed Central

    Lathuilière, Aurélien; Mach, Nicolas; Schneider, Bernard L.

    2015-01-01

    Ex vivo gene therapy using retrievable encapsulated cellular implants is an effective strategy for the local and/or chronic delivery of therapeutic proteins. In particular, it is considered an innovative approach to modulate the activity of the immune system. Two recently proposed therapeutic schemes using genetically engineered encapsulated cells are discussed here: the chronic administration of monoclonal antibodies for passive immunization against neurodegenerative diseases and the local delivery of a cytokine as an adjuvant for anti-cancer vaccines. PMID:26006227

  17. Mobile Location Using Improved Covariance Shaping Least-Squares Estimation in Cellular Systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chang, Ann-Chen; Lee, Yu-Hong

    This Letter deals with the problem of non-line-of-sight (NLOS) in cellular systems devoted to location purposes. In conjugation with a variable loading technique, we present an efficient technique to make covariance shaping least squares estimator has robust capabilities against the NLOS effects. Compared with other methods, the proposed improved estimator has high accuracy under white Gaussian measurement noises and NLOS effects.

  18. Measuring information flow in cellular networks by the systems biology method through microarray data

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Bor-Sen; Li, Cheng-Wei

    2015-01-01

    In general, it is very difficult to measure the information flow in a cellular network directly. In this study, based on an information flow model and microarray data, we measured the information flow in cellular networks indirectly by using a systems biology method. First, we used a recursive least square parameter estimation algorithm to identify the system parameters of coupling signal transduction pathways and the cellular gene regulatory network (GRN). Then, based on the identified parameters and systems theory, we estimated the signal transductivities of the coupling signal transduction pathways from the extracellular signals to each downstream protein and the information transductivities of the GRN between transcription factors in response to environmental events. According to the proposed method, the information flow, which is characterized by signal transductivity in coupling signaling pathways and information transductivity in the GRN, can be estimated by microarray temporal data or microarray sample data. It can also be estimated by other high-throughput data such as next-generation sequencing or proteomic data. Finally, the information flows of the signal transduction pathways and the GRN in leukemia cancer cells and non-leukemia normal cells were also measured to analyze the systematic dysfunction in this cancer from microarray sample data. The results show that the signal transductivities of signal transduction pathways change substantially from normal cells to leukemia cancer cells. PMID:26082788

  19. Efficient Preamble Design Technique for Millimeter-Wave Cellular Systems with Beamforming

    PubMed Central

    Han, Dae Geun; Kim, Yeong Jun; Cho, Yong Soo

    2016-01-01

    The processing time for beam training in millimeter-wave (mmWave) cellular systems can be significantly reduced by a code division multiplexing (CDM)-based technique, where multiple beams are transmitted simultaneously with their corresponding Tx beam IDs (BIDs) in the preamble. However, mmWave cellular systems with CDM-based preambles require a large number of cell IDs (CIDs) and BIDs, and a high computational complexity for CID and BID (CBID) searches. In this paper, a new preamble design technique that can increase the number of CBIDs significantly is proposed, using a preamble sequence constructed by a combination of two Zadoff-Chu (ZC) sequences. An efficient technique for the CBID detection is also described for the proposed preamble. It is shown by simulations using a simple model of an mmWave cellular system that the proposed technique can obtain a significant reduction in the complexity of the CBID detection without a noticeable performance degradation, compared to the previous technique. PMID:27455260

  20. Efficient Preamble Design Technique for Millimeter-Wave Cellular Systems with Beamforming.

    PubMed

    Han, Dae Geun; Kim, Yeong Jun; Cho, Yong Soo

    2016-01-01

    The processing time for beam training in millimeter-wave (mmWave) cellular systems can be significantly reduced by a code division multiplexing (CDM)-based technique, where multiple beams are transmitted simultaneously with their corresponding Tx beam IDs (BIDs) in the preamble. However, mmWave cellular systems with CDM-based preambles require a large number of cell IDs (CIDs) and BIDs, and a high computational complexity for CID and BID (CBID) searches. In this paper, a new preamble design technique that can increase the number of CBIDs significantly is proposed, using a preamble sequence constructed by a combination of two Zadoff-Chu (ZC) sequences. An efficient technique for the CBID detection is also described for the proposed preamble. It is shown by simulations using a simple model of an mmWave cellular system that the proposed technique can obtain a significant reduction in the complexity of the CBID detection without a noticeable performance degradation, compared to the previous technique. PMID:27455260

  1. Cognitive Cellular Systems: A New Challenge on the RF Analog Frontend

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Varga, Gabor; Schrey, Moritz; Subbiah, Iyappan; Ashok, Arun; Heinen, Stefan

    2016-07-01

    Cognitive Cellular Systems are seen today as one of the most promising ways of moving forward solving or at least easing the still worsening situation of congested spectrum caused by the growing number of users and the expectation of higher data transfer rates. As the intelligence of a Cognitive Radio system is located in the digital domain - the Cognitive Engine and associated layers - extensive research has been ongoing in that domain since Mitola published his idea in 1999. Since, a big progress has been made in the domain of architectures and algorithms making systems more efficient and highly flexible. The pace of this progress, however, is going to be impeded by hard requirements on the received and transmitted signal quality, introducing ultimate challenges on the performance of the RF analog frontend, such as in-band local oscillator harmonics, ultra low sensitivity and ultra high linearity. The RF frontend is thus likely to become the limiting technical factor in the true realization of a Cognitive Cellular System. Based on short recapitulations of the most crucial issues in RF analog design for Cognitive Systems, this article will point out why those mechanisms become responsible for the limitation of the overall performance particularly in a broadband Cognitive Cellular System. Furthermore, as part of a possible solution to ease the situation, system design of a high intermediate frequency (IF) to UHF frequency converter for cognitive radios is discussed and the performance of such a converter analyzed as a proof of concept. In addition to successfully tackling some of the challenges, such a high-IF converter enables white space operation for existing commercial devices by acting as frequency converter. From detailed measurements, the capabilities in both physical layer and application layer performance of a high-IF frontend developed out of off-the-shelf components is explained and is shown to provide negligible degradation to the commercial device

  2. StUbEx: Stable tagged ubiquitin exchange system for the global investigation of cellular ubiquitination.

    PubMed

    Akimov, Vyacheslav; Henningsen, Jeanette; Hallenborg, Philip; Rigbolt, Kristoffer T G; Jensen, Søren Skov; Nielsen, Mogens M; Kratchmarova, Irina; Blagoev, Blagoy

    2014-09-01

    Post-translational modification of proteins with the small polypeptide ubiquitin plays a pivotal role in many cellular processes, altering protein lifespan, location, and function and regulating protein-protein interactions. Ubiquitination exerts its diverse functions through complex mechanisms by formation of different polymeric chains and subsequent recognition of the ubiquitin signal by specific protein interaction domains. Despite some recent advances in the analytical tools for the analysis of ubiquitination by mass spectrometry, there is still a need for additional strategies suitable for investigation of cellular ubiquitination at the proteome level. Here, we present a stable tagged ubiquitin exchange (StUbEx) cellular system in which endogenous ubiquitin is replaced with an epitope-tagged version, thereby allowing specific and efficient affinity purification of ubiquitinated proteins for global analyses of protein ubiquitination. Importantly, the overall level of ubiquitin in the cell remains virtually unchanged, thus avoiding ubiquitination artifacts associated with overexpression. The efficiency and reproducibility of the method were assessed through unbiased analysis of epidermal growth factor (EGF) signaling by quantitative mass spectrometry, covering over 3400 potential ubiquitinated proteins. The StUbEx system is applicable to virtually any cell line and can be readily adapted to any of the ubiquitin-like post-translational modifications. PMID:25093938

  3. BioXyce : an engineering platform for the study of cellular systems.

    SciTech Connect

    May, Elebeoba Eni; Schiek, Richard Louis

    2008-11-01

    Researchers use constructs from the field of electrical engineering for the modeling and analysis of biological systems, but few exploit parallels between electrical and biological circuits for simulation purposes. The authors discuss the development of BioXyce, a circuit-based biological simulation platform that uses Xyce, a large-scale electrical circuit simulator, as its simulation engine. BioXyce is capable of simulating whole-cell and multicellular systems. Simulation results for the central metabolism in Escherichia coli K12 and cellular differentiation in Drosophila sp. are presented.

  4. BioXyce: an engineering platform for the study of cellular systems.

    PubMed

    May, E E; Schiek, R L

    2009-03-01

    Researchers use constructs from the field of electrical engineering for the modelling and analysis of biological systems, but few exploit parallels between electrical and biological circuits for simulation purposes. The authors discuss the development of BioXyce, a circuit-based biological simulation platform that uses Xyce, a large-scale electrical circuit simulator, as its simulation engine. BioXyce is capable of simulating whole-cell and multicellular systems. Simulation results for the central metabolism in Escherichia coli K12 and cellular differentiation in Drosophila sp. are presented. PMID:19292562

  5. An asynchronous communication system based on the hyperchaotic system of 6th-order cellular neural network

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Xingyuan; Xu, Bing; Luo, Chao

    2012-11-01

    This paper proposes a novel asynchronous communication scheme. Based on this scheme, a model using the hyperchaotic system of 6th-order Cellular Neural Network (CNN) is designed. This scheme enhances the security of asynchronous communication compared to the conventional ones. It is noteworthy that the proposed communication scheme does not depend on synchronization, and almost all chaotic systems can be involved in this scheme. Numerical simulations show the effectiveness of this scheme.

  6. 49 CFR 173.65 - Exceptions for Division 1.4G consumer fireworks.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 2 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Exceptions for Division 1.4G consumer fireworks... Class 1 § 173.65 Exceptions for Division 1.4G consumer fireworks. (a) Notwithstanding the requirements of §§ 173.56(b), 173.56(f), 173.56(i), and 173.64, Division 1.4G consumer fireworks may be...

  7. 49 CFR 173.65 - Exceptions for Division 1.4G consumer fireworks.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 2 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Exceptions for Division 1.4G consumer fireworks... Class 1 § 173.65 Exceptions for Division 1.4G consumer fireworks. (a) Notwithstanding the requirements of §§ 173.56(b), 173.56(f), 173.56(i), and 173.64, Division 1.4G consumer fireworks may be...

  8. The evolution of early cellular systems viewed through the lens of biological interactions

    PubMed Central

    Poole, Anthony M.; Lundin, Daniel; Rytkönen, Kalle T.

    2015-01-01

    The minimal cell concept represents a pragmatic approach to the question of how few genes are required to run a cell. This is a helpful way to build a parts-list, and has been more successful than attempts to deduce a minimal gene set for life by inferring the gene repertoire of the last universal common ancestor, as few genes trace back to this hypothetical ancestral state. However, the study of minimal cellular systems is the study of biological outliers where, by practical necessity, coevolutionary interactions are minimized or ignored. In this paper, we consider the biological context from which minimal genomes have been removed. For instance, some of the most reduced genomes are from endosymbionts and are the result of coevolutionary interactions with a host; few such organisms are “free-living.” As few, if any, biological systems exist in complete isolation, we expect that, as with modern life, early biological systems were part of an ecosystem, replete with organismal interactions. We favor refocusing discussions of the evolution of cellular systems on processes rather than gene counts. We therefore draw a distinction between a pragmatic minimal cell (an interesting engineering problem), a distributed genome (a system resulting from an evolutionary transition involving more than one cell) and the looser coevolutionary interactions that are ubiquitous in ecosystems. Finally, we consider the distributed genome and coevolutionary interactions between genomic entities in the context of early evolution. PMID:26539175

  9. DNA Mismatch Repair System: Repercussions in Cellular Homeostasis and Relationship with Aging

    PubMed Central

    Conde-Pérezprina, Juan Cristóbal; León-Galván, Miguel Ángel; Konigsberg, Mina

    2012-01-01

    The mechanisms that concern DNA repair have been studied in the last years due to their consequences in cellular homeostasis. The diverse and damaging stimuli that affect DNA integrity, such as changes in the genetic sequence and modifications in gene expression, can disrupt the steady state of the cell and have serious repercussions to pathways that regulate apoptosis, senescence, and cancer. These altered pathways not only modify cellular and organism longevity, but quality of life (“health-span”). The DNA mismatch repair system (MMR) is highly conserved between species; its role is paramount in the preservation of DNA integrity, placing it as a necessary focal point in the study of pathways that prolong lifespan, aging, and disease. Here, we review different insights concerning the malfunction or absence of the DNA-MMR and its impact on cellular homeostasis. In particular, we will focus on DNA-MMR mechanisms regulated by known repair proteins MSH2, MSH6, PMS2, and MHL1, among others. PMID:23213348

  10. Mitochondrial Oxidative Phosphorylation System (OXPHOS) Deficits in Schizophrenia: Possible Interactions with Cellular Processes.

    PubMed

    Bergman, Oded; Ben-Shachar, Dorit

    2016-08-01

    Mitochondria are key players in the generation and regulation of cellular bioenergetics, producing the majority of adenosine triphosphate molecules by the oxidative phosphorylation system (OXPHOS). Linked to numerous signaling pathways and cellular functions, mitochondria, and OXPHOS in particular, are involved in neuronal development, connectivity, plasticity, and differentiation. Impairments in a variety of mitochondrial functions have been described in different general and psychiatric disorders, including schizophrenia (SCZ), a severe, chronic, debilitating illness that heavily affects the lives of patients and their families. This article reviews findings emphasizing the role of OXPHOS in the pathophysiology of SCZ. Evidence accumulated during the past few decades from imaging, transcriptomic, proteomic, and metabolomic studies points at OXPHOS deficit involvement in SCZ. Abnormalities have been reported in high-energy phosphates generated by the OXPHOS, in the activity of its complexes and gene expression, primarily of complex I (CoI). In addition, cellular signaling such as cAMP/protein kinase A (PKA) and Ca(+2), neuronal development, connectivity, and plasticity have been linked to OXPHOS function and are reported to be impaired in SCZ. Finally, CoI has been shown as a site of interaction for both dopamine (DA) and antipsychotic drugs, further substantiating its role in the pathology of SCZ. Understanding the role of mitochondria and the OXPHOS in particular may encourage new insights into the pathophysiology and etiology of this debilitating disorder. PMID:27412728

  11. Synchronization, TIGoRS, and Information Flow in Complex Systems: Dispositional Cellular Automata.

    PubMed

    Sulis, William H

    2016-04-01

    Synchronization has a long history in physics where it refers to the phase matching of two identical oscillators. This notion has been extensively studied in physics as well as in biology, where it has been applied to such widely varying phenomena as the flashing of fireflies and firing of neurons in the brain. Human behavior, however, may be recurrent but it is not oscillatory even though many physiological systems do exhibit oscillatory tendencies. Moreover, much of human behaviour is collaborative and cooperative, where the individual behaviours may be distinct yet contemporaneous (if not simultaneous) and taken collectively express some functionality. In the context of behaviour, the important aspect is the repeated co-occurrence in time of behaviours that facilitate the propagation of information or of functionality, regardless of whether or not these behaviours are similar or identical. An example of this weaker notion of synchronization is transient induced global response synchronization (TIGoRS). Previous work has shown that TIGoRS is a ubiquitous phenomenon among complex systems, enabling them to stably parse environmental transients into salient units to which they stably respond. This leads to the notion of Sulis machines, which emergently generate a primitive linguistic structure through their dynamics. This article reviews the notion of TIGoRS and its expression in several complex systems models including tempered neural networks, driven cellular automata and cocktail party automata. The emergent linguistics of Sulis machines are discussed. A new class of complex systems model, the dispositional cellular automaton is introduced. A new metric for TIGoRS, the excess synchronization, is introduced and applied to the study of TIGoRS in dispositional cellular automata. It is shown that these automata exhibit a nonlinear synchronization response to certain perturbing transients. PMID:27033136

  12. Pretreatment with enteral cholestyramine prevents suppression of the cellular immune system after partial hepatectomy.

    PubMed Central

    Van Leeuwen, P A; Boermeester, M A; Houdijk, A P; Meyer, S; Cuesta, M A; Wesdorp, R I; Rodrick, M L; Wilmore, D W

    1995-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: The authors tested the hypothesis that the beneficial effects of the endotoxin-binding agent cholestyramine on the postoperative course in rats that had undergone a partial hepatectomy was the result of improvement of cellular immune functions. SUMMARY BACKGROUND DATA: Major liver resection is associated with severe postoperative complications and a high incidence of systemic infections. Gut-derived endotoxins previously were shown to be involved in the pathogenic processes after partial hepatectomy in rats. In addition, enteral cholestyramine improved postoperative survival, but how its beneficial effects are mediated is not clear. METHODS: Rats that were force-fed for 7 days with either cholestyramine (150 mg/day) or 0.9% saline (equal volume) were randomized to undergo a partial hepatectomy or a sham operation. After 24 hours, the rats were killed and splenic mononuclear cells were tested in vitro for mitogenic responses and cytokine production. RESULTS: Proliferative responses of splenic B and T lymphocytes and lipopolysaccharide-stimulated production of tumor necrosis factor and interleukin-1 by splenocytes were lower in rats after partial hepatectomy than in sham-operated animals. An increased concanavalin A-stimulated production of interleukin-2 also was found after partial hepatectomy compared with sham levels. Pretreatment with enteral cholestyramine preserved cellular proliferative responsiveness of both B and T cells, and restored cytokine production by splenocytes to sham levels. CONCLUSION: Prophylactic treatment with enteral cholestyramine preserved cellular immune functions after partial hepatectomy in the rat, which may explain its beneficial effects on the postoperative course. Furthermore, the authors' results are consistent with the hypothesis that endotoxemia is involved in the pathogenesis of the cellular immune derangements after partial hepatectomy. PMID:7717782

  13. Characterization of inhibitors of phosphodiesterase 1C on a human cellular system.

    PubMed

    Dunkern, Torsten R; Hatzelmann, Armin

    2007-09-01

    Different inhibitors of the Ca(2+)/calmodulin-stimulated phosphodiesterase 1 family have been described and used for the examination of phosphodiesterase 1 in cellular, organ or animal models. However, the inhibitors described differ in potency and selectivity for the different phosphodiesterase family enzymes, and in part exhibit additional pharmacodynamic actions. In this study, we demonstrate that phosphodiesterase 1C is expressed in the human glioblastoma cell line A172 with regard to mRNA, protein and activity level, and that lower activities of phosphodiesterase 2, phosphodiesterase 3, phosphodiesterase 4 and phosphodiesterase 5 are also present. The identity of the phosphodiesterase 1C activity detected was verified by downregulation of the mRNA and protein through human phosphodiesterase 1C specific small interfering RNA. In addition, the measured K(m) values (cAMP, 1.7 microm; cGMP, 1.3 microm) are characteristic of phosphodiesterase 1C. We demonstrate that treatment with the Ca(2+) ionophore ionomycin increases intracellular Ca(2+) in a concentration-dependent way without affecting cell viability. Under conditions of enhanced intracellular Ca(2+) concentration, a rapid increase in cAMP levels caused by the adenylyl cyclase activator forskolin was abolished, indicating the involvement of Ca(2+)-activated phosphodiesterase 1C. The reduction of forskolin-stimulated cAMP levels was reversed by phosphodiesterase 1 inhibitors in a concentration-dependent way. Using this cellular system, we compared the cellular potency of published phosphodiesterase 1 inhibitors, including 8-methoxymethyl-3-isobutyl-1-methylxanthine, vinpocetine, SCH51866, and two established phosphodiesterase 1 inhibitors developed by Schering-Plough (named compounds 31 and 30). We demonstrate that up to 10 microm 8-methoxymethyl-3-isobutyl-1-methylxanthine and vinpocetine had no effect on the reduction of forskolin-stimulated cAMP levels by ionomycin, whereas the more selective and up to 10

  14. In Silico Modeling of the Immune System: Cellular and Molecular Scale Approaches

    PubMed Central

    Belfiore, Mariagrazia; Aricò, Giuseppina; Ronsisvalle, Simone

    2014-01-01

    The revolutions in biotechnology and information technology have produced clinical data, which complement biological data. These data enable detailed descriptions of various healthy and diseased states and responses to therapies. For the investigation of the physiology and pathology of the immune responses, computer and mathematical models have been used in the last decades, enabling the representation of biological processes. In this modeling effort, a major issue is represented by the communication between models that work at cellular and molecular level, that is, multiscale representation. Here we sketch some attempts to model immune system dynamics at both levels. PMID:24804217

  15. Efficient Analysis of Systems Biology Markup Language Models of Cellular Populations Using Arrays.

    PubMed

    Watanabe, Leandro; Myers, Chris J

    2016-08-19

    The Systems Biology Markup Language (SBML) has been widely used for modeling biological systems. Although SBML has been successful in representing a wide variety of biochemical models, the core standard lacks the structure for representing large complex regular systems in a standard way, such as whole-cell and cellular population models. These models require a large number of variables to represent certain aspects of these types of models, such as the chromosome in the whole-cell model and the many identical cell models in a cellular population. While SBML core is not designed to handle these types of models efficiently, the proposed SBML arrays package can represent such regular structures more easily. However, in order to take full advantage of the package, analysis needs to be aware of the arrays structure. When expanding the array constructs within a model, some of the advantages of using arrays are lost. This paper describes a more efficient way to simulate arrayed models. To illustrate the proposed method, this paper uses a population of repressilator and genetic toggle switch circuits as examples. Results show that there are memory benefits using this approach with a modest cost in runtime. PMID:26912276

  16. New insights into the antioxidant activity of hydroxycinnamic and hydroxybenzoic systems: spectroscopic, electrochemistry, and cellular studies.

    PubMed

    Mura, F; Silva, T; Castro, C; Borges, F; Zuñiga, M C; Morales, J; Olea-Azar, C

    2014-12-01

    A series hydroxycinnamic and gallic acids and their derivatives were studied with the aim of evaluating their in vitro antioxidant properties both in homogeneous and in cellular systems. It was concluded from the oxygen radical absorbance capacity-fluorescein (ORAC-FL), 1,1-diphenyl-2-picrylhydrazyl (DPPH), and cyclic voltammetry data that some compounds exhibit remarkable antioxidant properties. In general, in homogeneous media (DPPH assay), galloyl-based cinnamic and benzoic systems (compounds 7-11) were the most active, exhibiting the lowest oxidation potentials in both dimethyl sulfoxide (DMSO) and phosphate buffer. Yet, p-coumaric acid and its derivatives (compounds 1-3) disclosed the highest scavenging activity toward peroxyl radicals (ORAC-FL assay). Interesting structure-property- activity relationships between ORAC-FL, or DPPH radical, and redox potentials have been attained, showing that the latter parameter can be a valuable antioxidant measure. It was evidenced that redox potentials are related to the structural features of cinnamic and benzoic systems and that their activities are also dependent on the radical generated in the assay. Electron spin resonance data of the phenoxyl radicals generated both in DMSO and phosphate buffer support the assumption that radical stability is related to the type of phenolic system. Galloyl-based cinnamic and benzoic ester-type systems (compounds 9 and 11) were the most active and effective compounds in cell-based assays (51.13 ± 1.27% and 54.90 ± 3.65%, respectively). In cellular systems, hydroxycinnamic and hydroxybenzoic systems operate based on their intrinsic antioxidant outline and lipophilic properties, so the balance between these two properties is considered of the utmost importance to ensure their performance in the prevention or minimization of the effects due to free radical overproduction. PMID:25236566

  17. Mobile Applications and 4G Wireless Networks: A Framework for Analysis

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Yang, Samuel C.

    2012-01-01

    Purpose: The use of mobile wireless data services continues to increase worldwide. New fourth-generation (4G) wireless networks can deliver data rates exceeding 2 Mbps. The purpose of this paper is to develop a framework of 4G mobile applications that utilize such high data rates and run on small form-factor devices. Design/methodology/approach:…

  18. Development of a Sox2 reporter system modeling cellular heterogeneity in glioma

    PubMed Central

    Stoltz, Kevin; Sinyuk, Maksim; Hale, James S.; Wu, Qiulian; Otvos, Balint; Walker, Kiera; Vasanji, Amit; Rich, Jeremy N.; Hjelmeland, Anita B.; Lathia, Justin D.

    2015-01-01

    Background Malignant gliomas are complex systems containing a number of factors that drive tumor initiation and progression, including genetic aberrations that lead to extensive cellular heterogeneity within the neoplastic compartment. Mouse models recapitulate these genetic aberrations, but readily observable heterogeneity remains challenging. Methods To interrogate cellular heterogeneity in mouse glioma models, we utilized a replication-competent avian sarcoma-leukosis virus long terminal repeat with splice acceptor/tumor virus A (RCAS-tva) system to generate spontaneous mouse gliomas that contained a Sox2-enhanced green fluorescent protein (EGFP) reporter. Glial fibrillary acidic protein-tva mice were crossed with Sox2–EGFP mice, and tumors were initiated that contained a subpopulation of Sox2–EGFP-high cells enriched for tumor-initiating cell properties such as self-renewal, multilineage differentiation potential, and perivascular localization. Results Following implantation into recipient mice, Sox2–EGFP-high cells generated tumors containing Sox2–EGFP-high and Sox2–EGFP-low cells. Kinomic analysis of Sox2–EGFP-high cells revealed activation of known glioma signaling pathways that are strongly correlated with patient survival including platelet-derived growth factor receptor beta, phosphoinositide-3 kinase, and vascular endothelial growth factor. Our functional analysis identified active feline sarcoma (Fes) signaling in Sox2–EGFP-high cells. Fes negatively correlated with glioma patient survival and was coexpressed with Sox2-positive cells in glioma xenografts and primary patient-derived tissue. Conclusions Our RCAS-tva/Sox2-EGFP model will empower closer examination of cellular heterogeneity and will be useful for identifying novel glioma pathways as well as testing preclinical treatment efficacy. PMID:25416826

  19. DNA-controlled dynamic colloidal nanoparticle systems for mediating cellular interaction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ohta, Seiichi; Glancy, Dylan; Chan, Warren C. W.

    2016-02-01

    Precise control of biosystems requires development of materials that can dynamically change physicochemical properties. Inspired by the ability of proteins to alter their conformation to mediate function, we explored the use of DNA as molecular keys to assemble and transform colloidal nanoparticle systems. The systems consist of a core nanoparticle surrounded by small satellites, the conformation of which can be transformed in response to DNA via a toe-hold displacement mechanism. The conformational changes can alter the optical properties and biological interactions of the assembled nanosystem. Photoluminescent signal is altered by changes in fluorophore-modified particle distance, whereas cellular targeting efficiency is increased 2.5 times by changing the surface display of targeting ligands. These concepts provide strategies for engineering dynamic nanotechnology systems for navigating complex biological environments.

  20. The VCP/p97 system at a glance: connecting cellular function to disease pathogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Meyer, Hemmo; Weihl, Conrad C.

    2014-01-01

    ABSTRACT The ATPase valosin-containing protein (VCP)/p97 has emerged as a central and important element of the ubiquitin system. Together with a network of cofactors, it regulates an ever-expanding range of processes that stretch into almost every aspect of cellular physiology. Its main role in proteostasis and key functions in signaling pathways are of relevance to degenerative diseases and genomic stability. In this Cell Science at a Glance and the accompanying poster, we give a brief overview of this complex system. In addition, we discuss the pathogenic basis for VCP/p97-associated diseases and then highlight in more detail new exciting links to the translational stress response and RNA biology that further underscore the significance of the VCP/p97 system. PMID:25146396

  1. Optical-Resolution Photoacoustic Microscopy: Auscultation of Biological Systems at the Cellular Level

    PubMed Central

    Hu, Song; Wang, Lihong V.

    2013-01-01

    Photoacoustic microscopy (PAM) offers unprecedented sensitivity to optical absorption and opens a new window to study biological systems at multiple length- and timescales. In particular, optical-resolution PAM (OR-PAM) has pushed the technical envelope to submicron length scales and millisecond timescales. Here, we review the state of the art of OR-PAM in biophysical research. With properly chosen optical wavelengths, OR-PAM can spectrally differentiate a variety of endogenous and exogenous chromophores, unveiling the anatomical, functional, metabolic, and molecular information of biological systems. Newly uncovered contrast mechanisms of linear dichroism and Förster resonance energy transfer further distinguish OR-PAM. Integrating multiple contrasts and advanced scanning mechanisms has capacitated OR-PAM to comprehensively interrogate biological systems at the cellular level in real time. Two future directions are discussed, where OR-PAM holds the potential to translate basic biophysical research into clinical healthcare. PMID:23972836

  2. DNA-controlled dynamic colloidal nanoparticle systems for mediating cellular interaction.

    PubMed

    Ohta, Seiichi; Glancy, Dylan; Chan, Warren C W

    2016-02-19

    Precise control of biosystems requires development of materials that can dynamically change physicochemical properties. Inspired by the ability of proteins to alter their conformation to mediate function, we explored the use of DNA as molecular keys to assemble and transform colloidal nanoparticle systems. The systems consist of a core nanoparticle surrounded by small satellites, the conformation of which can be transformed in response to DNA via a toe-hold displacement mechanism. The conformational changes can alter the optical properties and biological interactions of the assembled nanosystem. Photoluminescent signal is altered by changes in fluorophore-modified particle distance, whereas cellular targeting efficiency is increased 2.5 times by changing the surface display of targeting ligands. These concepts provide strategies for engineering dynamic nanotechnology systems for navigating complex biological environments. PMID:26912892

  3. New Tools and New Biology: Recent Miniaturized Systems for Molecular and Cellular Biology

    PubMed Central

    Hamon, Morgan; Hong, Jong Wook

    2013-01-01

    Recent advances in applied physics and chemistry have led to the development of novel microfluidic systems. Microfluidic systems allow minute amounts of reagents to be processed using μm-scale channels and offer several advantages over conventional analytical devices for use in biological sciences: faster, more accurate and more reproducible analytical performance, reduced cell and reagent consumption, portability, and integration of functional components in a single chip. In this review, we introduce how microfluidics has been applied to biological sciences. We first present an overview of the fabrication of microfluidic systems and describe the distinct technologies available for biological research. We then present examples of microsystems used in biological sciences, focusing on applications in molecular and cellular biology. PMID:24305843

  4. Regulation of gene expression by internal ribosome entry sites or cryptic promoters: the eIF4G story.

    PubMed

    Han, Baoguang; Zhang, Jian-Ting

    2002-11-01

    As an alternative to the scanning mechanism of initiation, the direct-internal-initiation mechanism postulates that the translational machinery assembles at the AUG start codon without traversing the entire 5' untranslated region (5'-UTR) of the mRNA. Although the existence of internal ribosome entry sites (IRESs) in viral mRNAs is considered to be well established, the existence of IRESs in cellular mRNAs has recently been challenged, in part because when testing is carried out using a conventional dicistronic vector, Northern blot analyses might not be sensitive enough to detect low levels of monocistronic transcripts derived via a cryptic promoter or splice site. To address this concern, we created a new promoterless dicistronic vector to test the putative IRES derived from the 5'-UTR of an mRNA that encodes the translation initiation factor eIF4G. Our analysis of this 5'-UTR sequence unexpectedly revealed a strong promoter. The activity of the internal promoter relies on the integrity of a polypyrimidine tract (PPT) sequence that had been identified as an essential component of the IRES. The PPT sequence overlaps with a binding site for transcription factor C/EBPbeta. Two other transcription factors, Sp1 and Ets, were also found to bind to and mediate expression from the promoter in the 5'-UTR of eIF4G mRNA. The biological significance of the internal promoter in the eIF4G mRNA might lie in the production of an N-terminally truncated form of the protein. Consistent with the idea that the cryptic promoter we identified underlies the previously reported IRES activity, we found no evidence of IRES function when a dicistronic mRNA containing the eIF4G sequence was translated in vitro or in vivo. Using the promoterless dicistronic vector, we also found promoter activities in the long 5'-UTRs of human Sno and mouse Bad mRNAs although monocistronic transcripts were not detectable on Northern blot analyses. The promoterless dicistronic vector might therefore prove

  5. Microfluidics-Based in Vivo Mimetic Systems for the Study of Cellular Biology

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Conspectus The human body is a complex network of molecules, organelles, cells, tissues, and organs: an uncountable number of interactions and transformations interconnect all the system’s components. In addition to these biochemical components, biophysical components, such as pressure, flow, and morphology, and the location of all of these interactions play an important role in the human body. Technical difficulties have frequently limited researchers from observing cellular biology as it occurs within the human body, but some state-of-the-art analytical techniques have revealed distinct cellular behaviors that occur only in the context of the interactions. These types of findings have inspired bioanalytical chemists to provide new tools to better understand these cellular behaviors and interactions. What blocks us from understanding critical biological interactions in the human body? Conventional approaches are often too naïve to provide realistic data and in vivo whole animal studies give complex results that may or may not be relevant for humans. Microfluidics offers an opportunity to bridge these two extremes: while these studies will not model the complexity of the in vivo human system, they can control the complexity so researchers can examine critical factors of interest carefully and quantitatively. In addition, the use of human cells, such as cells isolated from donated blood, captures human-relevant data and limits the use of animals in research. In addition, researchers can adapt these systems easily and cost-effectively to a variety of high-end signal transduction mechanisms, facilitating high-throughput studies that are also spatially, temporally, or chemically resolved. These strengths should allow microfluidic platforms to reveal critical parameters in the human body and provide insights that will help with the translation of pharmacological advances to clinical trials. In this Account, we describe selected microfluidic innovations within the

  6. [Motivation and Emotional States: Structural Systemic, Neurochemical, Molecular and Cellular Mechanisms].

    PubMed

    Bazyan, A S

    2016-01-01

    The structural, systemic, neurochemical, molecular and cellular mechanisms of organization and coding motivation and emotional states are describe. The GABA and glutamatergic synaptic systems of basal ganglia form a neural network and participate in the implementation of voluntary behavior. Neuropeptides, neurohormones and paracrine neuromodulators involved in the organization of motivation and emotional states, integrated with synaptic systems, controlled by neural networks and organizing goal-directed behavior. Structural centers for united and integrated of information in voluntary and goal-directed behavior are globus pallidus. Substantia nigra pars reticulata switches the information from corticobasal networks to thalamocortical networks, induces global dopaminergic (DA) signal and organize interaction of mesolimbic and nigostriatnoy DA systems controlled by prefrontal and motor cortex. Together with the motor cortex, substantia nigra displays information in the brainstem and spinal cord to implementation of behavior. Motivation states are formed in the interaction of neurohormonal and neuropeptide systems by monoaminergic systems of brain. Emotional states are formed by monoaminergic systems of the mid-brain, where the leading role belongs to the mesolimbic DA system. The emotional and motivation state of the encoded specific epigenetic molecular and chemical pattern of neuron. PMID:27149821

  7. Flux-driven cellular precipitation in open system to form porous Cu3Sn

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gusak, Andriy M.; Chen, Chih; Tu, K. N.

    2016-05-01

    Recently, a new morphology of porous Cu3Sn with lamellar structure is observed. Several possible explanations of the formation are proposed and compared. The most reasonable one seems to be the one based on a theory of flux-driven cellular precipitation in open system. Outflux of Sn from Cu6Sn5 generates simultaneously supersaturation with vacancies and with copper leading to the eutectoid-like transformation β → α + γ (where γ is void). The transformation is complete due to a complete outflux of Sn from the Cu6Sn5 phase. Simple formulae for prediction of the lamellar structure parameters and the propagation velocity are obtained and compared reasonably with experimental data. The suggested model can be interpreted as one more case of the flux-driven phase transformations in open systems.

  8. A putative Arabidopsis thaliana glycosyltransferase, At4g01220, which is closely related to three plant cell wall-specific xylosyltransferases, is differentially expressed spatially and temporally.

    PubMed

    Fangel, Jonatan U; Petersen, Bent L; Jensen, Niels B; Willats, William G T; Bacic, Antony; Egelund, Jack

    2011-03-01

    Plant cell wall polysaccharides are amongst the most complex, heterogeneous and abundant bio-molecules on earth. This makes the biosynthetic enzymes, namely the glycosyltransferases and polysaccharide synthases, important research targets in plant science and biotechnology. As an initial step to characterize At4g01220, a putative Arabidopsis thaliana encoding glycosyltransferases in CAZy GT-family-77 that is similar to three known xylosyltransferases involved in the biosynthesis of the pectic polysaccharide, rhamnogalacturonan II, we conducted an expression analysis. In transgenic Arabidopsis thaliana plants containing a fusion between the At4g01220 promoter and the gusA reporter gene we found the expression to be spatially and developmentally regulated. Analysis of Nicotiana benthamiana transfected with the At2g01220::YFP fusion protein revealed that the fusion protein resided in a Brefeldin A-sensitive compartment consistent with a sub-cellular location in the Golgi apparatus. In addition, in silico expression analysis from the Genevestigator database revealed that At4g01220 was up-regulated upon treatment with isoxaben, an inhibitor of cellulose synthesis, which, together with a co-expression analysis that identified a number of plant cell wall co-related biosynthetic genes, suggests involvement in cell wall biosynthesis with pectin being a prime candidate. The data presented provide insights into the expression, sub-cellular location and regulation of At4g01220 under various conditions and may help elucidate its specific function. PMID:21421394

  9. Alteration in systemic vascular resistance and cardiac output during acute cellular rejection and recovery in heart transplant recipients.

    PubMed

    Garan, Arthur R; Uriel, Nir; Sayer, Gabriel; Sims, Daniel; Zahner, Doris; Farr, Maryjane; Mancini, Donna; Jorde, Ulrich P

    2010-03-01

    Coronary vascular reserve is impaired during acute cellular rejection of the orthotopically transplanted heart, but changes in the peripheral vasculature during rejection have not been well described. To investigate whether peripheral vascular compensatory mechanisms are preserved after orthotopic heart transplantation (OHT), we longitudinally observed systemic vascular resistance (SVR) and cardiac output (CO) during acute cellular rejection. CO decreased during high-grade acute cellular rejection, and maintenance of mean arterial pressure was achieved by increases in SVR, and these changes did not return to baseline until several months after histologic resolution of rejection. PMID:19875310

  10. Consideration of Remote Support System for Deaf-Blind Persons using Body-Braille and Cellular Phones

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ohtsuka, Satoshi; Sasaki, Nobuyuki; Hasegawa, Sadao; Harakawa, Tetsumi

    New type of remote support system for handicapped persons is proposed in this paper. Body-Braille system is consisted of six small vibrators which have been used in cellular phones. And this system is put on the any part of human body. Supports method are similar to usual Braille, and the impaired persons acquire the communication or information about circumferences by reading the vibration patterns on the skin which are consisted of six on-off vibrations of small motors. This paper has shown the remote support system and experiment in which Body-Braille system and cellular phone are connected to realize its functions. The deaf-blind persons have cellular phone with small camera, and remote supporter can get the necessary information by receiving images from the phone, and then send recognition result to subject using Body-Braille. From the results of the experiment, proposed support system has been clarified to be effective.

  11. Theoretical implications of cellular immune reactions against helper lymphocytes infected by an immune system retrovirus.

    PubMed Central

    Reibnegger, G; Fuchs, D; Hausen, A; Werner, E R; Dierich, M P; Wachter, H

    1987-01-01

    The breakdown of the immune system induced by the human immunodeficiency virus might be due to the active immune destruction of human immunodeficiency virus-infected helper T lymphocytes expressing viral antigens. By numerical simulation, we have studied possible consequences that a hypothetical immunodeficiency virus (IDV) may have on the cellular immune response by using a mathematical model. In this model, IDV infects CD4+ (helper) T cells and is actively synthesized by the immunologically activated helper T cells. Infected helper T cells synthesizing IDV express antigenic determinants specific for IDV and trigger a cellular immune response against themselves that is mediated by cytotoxic T cells and cytotoxic macrophages. The dynamic evolution of the model in the case of mixed-type infections with IDV and with another pathogen that evokes a cell-mediated immune response shows strong interactions between both simultaneous infections. The model might be of value to elucidate the dynamics leading to opportunistic infections. Furthermore, a pivotal role for immunological stimulation in the progressive exacerbation of the disease can be demonstrated. PMID:2959958

  12. A Novel Mathematical Model Describing Adaptive Cellular Drug Metabolism and Toxicity in the Chemoimmune System

    PubMed Central

    Tóth, Attila; Brózik, Anna; Szakács, Gergely; Sarkadi, Balázs; Hegedüs, Tamás

    2015-01-01

    Cells cope with the threat of xenobiotic stress by activating a complex molecular network that recognizes and eliminates chemically diverse toxic compounds. This “chemoimmune system” consists of cellular Phase I and Phase II metabolic enzymes, Phase 0 and Phase III ATP Binding Cassette (ABC) membrane transporters, and nuclear receptors regulating these components. In order to provide a systems biology characterization of the chemoimmune network, we designed a reaction kinetic model based on differential equations describing Phase 0–III participants and regulatory elements, and characterized cellular fitness to evaluate toxicity. In spite of the simplifications, the model recapitulates changes associated with acquired drug resistance and allows toxicity predictions under variable protein expression and xenobiotic exposure conditions. Our simulations suggest that multidrug ABC transporters at Phase 0 significantly facilitate the defense function of successive network members by lowering intracellular drug concentrations. The model was extended with a novel toxicity framework which opened the possibility of performing in silico cytotoxicity assays. The alterations of the in silico cytotoxicity curves show good agreement with in vitro cell killing experiments. The behavior of the simplified kinetic model suggests that it can serve as a basis for more complex models to efficiently predict xenobiotic and drug metabolism for human medical applications. PMID:25699998

  13. Cellular and Molecular Actions of Methylene Blue in the Nervous System

    PubMed Central

    Oz, Murat; Lorke, Dietrich E.; Hasan, Mohammed; Petroianu, George A.

    2010-01-01

    Methylene Blue (MB), following its introduction to biology in the 19th century by Ehrlich, has found uses in various areas of medicine and biology. At present, MB is the first line of treatment in methemoglobinemias, is used frequently in the treatment of ifosfamide-induced encephalopathy, and is routinely employed as a diagnostic tool in surgical procedures. Furthermore, recent studies suggest that MB has beneficial effects in Alzheimer's disease and memory improvement. Although the modulation of the cGMP pathway is considered the most significant effect of MB, mediating its pharmacological actions, recent studies indicate that it has multiple cellular and molecular targets. In the majority of cases, biological effects and clinical applications of MB are dictated by its unique physicochemical properties including its planar structure, redox chemistry, ionic charges, and light spectrum characteristics. In this review article, these physicochemical features and the actions of MB on multiple cellular and molecular targets are discussed with regard to their relevance to the nervous system. PMID:19760660

  14. Lipidomics: a mass spectrometry based, systems level analysis of cellular lipids

    PubMed Central

    Ivanova, Pavlina T.; Milne, Stephen B.; Myers, David S.; Brown, H. Alex

    2009-01-01

    Lipidomics is a logical outcome of the history and traditions of lipid biochemistry and advances in mass spectrometry are at the heart of a renaissance in understanding the roles of lipids in cellular functions. Our desire to understand the complexity of lipids in biology has led to new techniques that allow us to identify over 1000 phospholipids in mammalian cell types and tissues. Improvements in chromatographic separation and mass spectrometry have positioned us to determine not only the lipid composition (i.e., parts list) of cells and tissues, but also address questions regarding lipid substrates and products that previously overwhelmed traditional analytical technologies. In the decade since lipidomics was conceived much of the efforts have been on new methodologies, development of computer programs to decipher the gigabytes of raw data, and struggling with the highly variable nature of biological systems where absolute quantities of a given metabolite may be less important than its relative change in concentration. It is clear that the technology is now sufficiently developed to address fundamental questions about the roles of lipids in cellular signaling and metabolic pathways. PMID:19744877

  15. Adaptive Cellular Stress Pathways as Therapeutic Targets of Dietary Phytochemicals: Focus on the Nervous System

    PubMed Central

    Jo, Dong-Gyu; Park, Daeui; Chung, Hae Young

    2014-01-01

    During the past 5 decades, it has been widely promulgated that the chemicals in plants that are good for health act as direct scavengers of free radicals. Here we review evidence that favors a different hypothesis for the health benefits of plant consumption, namely, that some phytochemicals exert disease-preventive and therapeutic actions by engaging one or more adaptive cellular response pathways in cells. The evolutionary basis for the latter mechanism is grounded in the fact that plants produce natural antifeedant/noxious chemicals that discourage insects and other organisms from eating them. However, in the amounts typically consumed by humans, the phytochemicals activate one or more conserved adaptive cellular stress response pathways and thereby enhance the ability of cells to resist injury and disease. Examplesof such pathways include those involving the transcription factors nuclear factor erythroid 2-related factor 2, nuclear factor-κB, hypoxia-inducible factor 1α, peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor γ, and forkhead box subgroup O, as well as the production and action of trophic factors and hormones. Translational research to develop interventions that target these pathways may lead to new classes of therapeutic agents that act by stimulating adaptive stress response pathways to bolster endogenous defenses against tissue injury and disease. Because neurons are particularly sensitive to potentially noxious phytochemicals, we focus on the nervous system but also include findings from other cell types in which actions of phytochemicals on specific signal transduction pathways have been more thoroughly studied. PMID:24958636

  16. Cellular and molecular actions of Methylene Blue in the nervous system.

    PubMed

    Oz, Murat; Lorke, Dietrich E; Hasan, Mohammed; Petroianu, George A

    2011-01-01

    Methylene Blue (MB), following its introduction to biology in the 19th century by Ehrlich, has found uses in various areas of medicine and biology. At present, MB is the first line of treatment in methemoglobinemias, is used frequently in the treatment of ifosfamide-induced encephalopathy, and is routinely employed as a diagnostic tool in surgical procedures. Furthermore, recent studies suggest that MB has beneficial effects in Alzheimer's disease and memory improvement. Although the modulation of the cGMP pathway is considered the most significant effect of MB, mediating its pharmacological actions, recent studies indicate that it has multiple cellular and molecular targets. In the majority of cases, biological effects and clinical applications of MB are dictated by its unique physicochemical properties including its planar structure, redox chemistry, ionic charges, and light spectrum characteristics. In this review article, these physicochemical features and the actions of MB on multiple cellular and molecular targets are discussed with regard to their relevance to the nervous system. PMID:19760660

  17. Adaptive cellular stress pathways as therapeutic targets of dietary phytochemicals: focus on the nervous system.

    PubMed

    Lee, Jaewon; Jo, Dong-Gyu; Park, Daeui; Chung, Hae Young; Mattson, Mark P

    2014-07-01

    During the past 5 decades, it has been widely promulgated that the chemicals in plants that are good for health act as direct scavengers of free radicals. Here we review evidence that favors a different hypothesis for the health benefits of plant consumption, namely, that some phytochemicals exert disease-preventive and therapeutic actions by engaging one or more adaptive cellular response pathways in cells. The evolutionary basis for the latter mechanism is grounded in the fact that plants produce natural antifeedant/noxious chemicals that discourage insects and other organisms from eating them. However, in the amounts typically consumed by humans, the phytochemicals activate one or more conserved adaptive cellular stress response pathways and thereby enhance the ability of cells to resist injury and disease. Examplesof such pathways include those involving the transcription factors nuclear factor erythroid 2-related factor 2, nuclear factor-κB, hypoxia-inducible factor 1α, peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor γ, and forkhead box subgroup O, as well as the production and action of trophic factors and hormones. Translational research to develop interventions that target these pathways may lead to new classes of therapeutic agents that act by stimulating adaptive stress response pathways to bolster endogenous defenses against tissue injury and disease. Because neurons are particularly sensitive to potentially noxious phytochemicals, we focus on the nervous system but also include findings from other cell types in which actions of phytochemicals on specific signal transduction pathways have been more thoroughly studied. PMID:24958636

  18. A Classical Morphological Analysis of Galaxies in the Spitzer Survey of Stellar Structure in Galaxies (S4G)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Buta, Ronald J.; Sheth, Kartik; Athanassoula, E.; Bosma, A.; Knapen, Johan H.; Laurikainen, Eija; Salo, Heikki; Elmegreen, Debra; Ho, Luis C.; Zaritsky, Dennis; Courtois, Helene; Hinz, Joannah L.; Muñoz-Mateos, Juan-Carlos; Kim, Taehyun; Regan, Michael W.; Gadotti, Dimitri A.; Gil de Paz, Armando; Laine, Jarkko; Menéndez-Delmestre, Karín; Comerón, Sébastien; Erroz Ferrer, Santiago; Seibert, Mark; Mizusawa, Trisha; Holwerda, Benne; Madore, Barry F.

    2015-04-01

    The Spitzer Survey of Stellar Structure in Galaxies (S4G) is the largest available database of deep, homogeneous middle-infrared (mid-IR) images of galaxies of all types. The survey, which includes 2352 nearby galaxies, reveals galaxy morphology only minimally affected by interstellar extinction. This paper presents an atlas and classifications of S4G galaxies in the Comprehensive de Vaucouleurs revised Hubble-Sandage (CVRHS) system. The CVRHS system follows the precepts of classical de Vaucouleurs morphology, modified to include recognition of other features such as inner, outer, and nuclear lenses, nuclear rings, bars, and disks, spheroidal galaxies, X patterns and box/peanut structures, OLR subclass outer rings and pseudorings, bar ansae and barlenses, parallel sequence late-types, thick disks, and embedded disks in 3D early-type systems. We show that our CVRHS classifications are internally consistent, and that nearly half of the S4G sample consists of extreme late-type systems (mostly bulgeless, pure disk galaxies) in the range Scd-Im. The most common family classification for mid-IR types S0/a to Sc is SA while that for types Scd to Sm is SB. The bars in these two type domains are very different in mid-IR structure and morphology. This paper examines the bar, ring, and type classification fractions in the sample, and also includes several montages of images highlighting the various kinds of “stellar structures” seen in mid-IR galaxy morphology.

  19. Science Highlights from the Spitzer Survey of Stellar Structure in Galaxies (S4G) & Public Release of S4G Data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sheth, Kartik

    2013-01-01

    The Spitzer Survey of Stellar Structure in Galaxies (S4G) is the largest and the most homogenous survey of the distribution of mass and stellar structure in over 2,300 nearby galaxies. With an integration time of four minutes per pixel at 3.6 and 4.5 microns, the S4G maps are extremely deep, tracing the stellar surface densities of < 1 solar mass per square parsec! S4G is the ultimate survey of the endoskeleton of nearby galaxies from dwarfs to ellipticals and affords an incredible treasury of data which we can address a host of outstanding questions in galaxy evolution. At this special session we will present details on the public release of this survey which will include science ready images, masks for the foreground and background stars, globally integrated properties and radial profiles of all galaxies. In addition we will release the results from a GALFIT decomposition of 200 galaxies which will be supplemented with the remainder of the survey within six months. The data are being released through the NASA/IPAC Infrared Science Archive (IRSA). I will present an overview of the survey, the data we are releasing, introduce the speakers and present science highlights from the team.

  20. Pathogens Penetrating the Central Nervous System: Infection Pathways and the Cellular and Molecular Mechanisms of Invasion

    PubMed Central

    Dando, Samantha J.; Mackay-Sim, Alan; Norton, Robert; Currie, Bart J.; St. John, James A.; Ekberg, Jenny A. K.; Batzloff, Michael

    2014-01-01

    SUMMARY The brain is well protected against microbial invasion by cellular barriers, such as the blood-brain barrier (BBB) and the blood-cerebrospinal fluid barrier (BCSFB). In addition, cells within the central nervous system (CNS) are capable of producing an immune response against invading pathogens. Nonetheless, a range of pathogenic microbes make their way to the CNS, and the resulting infections can cause significant morbidity and mortality. Bacteria, amoebae, fungi, and viruses are capable of CNS invasion, with the latter using axonal transport as a common route of infection. In this review, we compare the mechanisms by which bacterial pathogens reach the CNS and infect the brain. In particular, we focus on recent data regarding mechanisms of bacterial translocation from the nasal mucosa to the brain, which represents a little explored pathway of bacterial invasion but has been proposed as being particularly important in explaining how infection with Burkholderia pseudomallei can result in melioidosis encephalomyelitis. PMID:25278572

  1. Cellular computational networks--a scalable architecture for learning the dynamics of large networked systems.

    PubMed

    Luitel, Bipul; Venayagamoorthy, Ganesh Kumar

    2014-02-01

    Neural networks for implementing large networked systems such as smart electric power grids consist of multiple inputs and outputs. Many outputs lead to a greater number of parameters to be adapted. Each additional variable increases the dimensionality of the problem and hence learning becomes a challenge. Cellular computational networks (CCNs) are a class of sparsely connected dynamic recurrent networks (DRNs). By proper selection of a set of input elements for each output variable in a given application, a DRN can be modified into a CCN which significantly reduces the complexity of the neural network and allows use of simple training methods for independent learning in each cell thus making it scalable. This article demonstrates this concept of developing a CCN using dimensionality reduction in a DRN for scalability and better performance. The concept has been analytically explained and empirically verified through application. PMID:24300549

  2. Cellular and molecular pathways of extremely-low-frequency electromagnetic field interactions with living systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tenforde, T. S.

    1992-06-01

    There is growing evidence that environmental electric and magnetic fields in the extremely-low-frequency (ELF) band below 300 Hz can influence biological functions by mechanisms that are only poorly understood at the present time. The primary objectives of this paper are to review the physical properties of ELF fields, their interactions with living systems at the tissue, cellular, and subcellular levels, and the key role of cell membranes in the transduction of signals from imposed ELF fields. Topics of discussion include signal-to-noise ratios for single cells and cell aggregates, resonance phenomena involving a combination of static and ELF magnetic fields, and the possible influence of ELF fields on molecular signaling pathways that involve membrane receptors and cytoplasmic second messengers.

  3. Cellular localization of Na(+), K(+)-ATPase in the mammalian vestibular system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kerr, T. P.

    1984-01-01

    Two different, but complementary, procedures for cellular localization of Na+, K+-ATPase in the guinea pig vestibular system were employed. One of these techniques, devised by Stirling, depends upon the well documented ability of the specific inhibitor ouabain to bind selectively to Na+,K+-ATPase, blocking catalytic activity. Microdisected vestibular tissues are incubated with tritium-labelled (3H-) ouabain, and regions with a high concentration of Na+,K+-ATPase are subsequently identified by light microscope autoradiography. A second method, originated by Ernst, detects inorganic phosphate released from an artificial substrate (nitrophenyl phosphate) by catalytic activity of the enzyme. In the presence of strontium ion, phosphate is precipitated near regions of high activity, then converted to a product which may finally be visualized in the electron microscope. This cytochemical enzymatic reaction is inhibited by ouabain.

  4. Designing a mathematical model for integrating dynamic cellular manufacturing into supply chain system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aalaei, Amin; Davoudpour, Hamid

    2012-11-01

    This article presents designing a new mathematical model for integrating dynamic cellular manufacturing into supply chain system with an extensive coverage of important manufacturing features consideration of multiple plants location, multi-markets allocation, multi-period planning horizons with demand and part mix variation, machine capacity, and the main constraints are demand of markets satisfaction in each period, machine availability, machine time-capacity, worker assignment, available time of worker, production volume for each plant and the amounts allocated to each market. The aim of the proposed model is to minimize holding and outsourcing costs, inter-cell material handling cost, external transportation cost, procurement & maintenance and overhead cost of machines, setup cost, reconfiguration cost of machines installation and removal, hiring, firing and salary worker costs. Aimed to prove the potential benefits of such a design, presented an example is shown using a proposed model.

  5. Cellular and molecular pathways of extremely-low-frequency electromagnetic field interactions with living systems

    SciTech Connect

    Tenforde, T.S.

    1992-06-01

    There is growing evidence that environmental electric and magnetic fields in the extremely-low-frequency (ELF) band below 300 Hz can influence biological functions by mechanisms that are only poorly understood at the present time. The primary objectives of this paper are to review the physical properties of ELF fields, their interactions with living systems at the tissue, cellular, and subcellular levels, and the key role of cell membranes ;in the transduction of signals from imposed ELF fields. Topics of discussion include signal-to-noise ratios for single cells and cell aggregates, resonance phenomena involving a combination of static and ELF magnetic fields, and the possible influence of ELF fields on molecular signaling pathways that involve membrane receptors and cytoplasmic second messengers.

  6. Cellular Biotechnology Operations Support Systems-Fluid Dynamics Investigation (CBOSS-FDI)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2003-01-01

    Aboard the International Space Station (ISS), the Tissue Culture Module (TCM) is the stationary bioreactor vessel in which cell cultures grow. However, for the Cellular Biotechnology Operations Support Systems-Fluid Dynamics Investigation (CBOSS-FDI), color polystyrene beads are used to measure the effectiveness of various mixing procedures. The beads are similar in size and density to human lymphoid cells. Uniform mixing is a crucial component of CBOSS experiments involving the immune response of human lymphoid cell suspensions. The goal is to develop procedures that are both convenient for the flight crew and are optimal in providing uniform and reproducible mixing of all components, including cells. The average bead density in a well mixed TCM will be uniform, with no bubbles, and it will be measured using the absorption of light. In this photograph, a TCM is shown after mixing protocols, and bubbles of various sizes can be seen.

  7. Cellular Biotechnology Operations Support Systems-Fluid Dynamics Investigation (CBOSS-FDI)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2003-01-01

    Aboard the International Space Station (ISS), the Tissue Culture Module (TCM) is the stationary bioreactor vessel in which cell cultures grow. However, for the Cellular Biotechnology Operations Support Systems-Fluid Dynamics Investigation (CBOSS-FDI), color polystyrene beads are used to measure the effectiveness of various mixing procedures. The beads are similar in size and density to human lymphoid cells. Uniform mixing is a crucial component of CBOSS experiments involving the immune response of human lymphoid cell suspensions. The goal is to develop procedures that are both convenient for the flight crew and are optimal in providing uniform and reproducible mixing of all components, including cells. The average bead density in a well mixed TCM will be uniform, with no bubbles, and it will be measured using the absorption of light. In this photograph, beads are trapped in the injection port, with bubbles forming shortly after injection.

  8. A cellular system that degrades misfolded proteins and protects against neurodegeneration.

    PubMed

    Guo, Lili; Giasson, Benoit I; Glavis-Bloom, Alex; Brewer, Michael D; Shorter, James; Gitler, Aaron D; Yang, Xiaolu

    2014-07-01

    Misfolded proteins compromise cellular function and cause disease. How these proteins are detected and degraded is not well understood. Here we show that PML/TRIM19 and the SUMO-dependent ubiquitin ligase RNF4 act together to promote the degradation of misfolded proteins in the mammalian cell nucleus. PML selectively interacts with misfolded proteins through distinct substrate recognition sites and conjugates these proteins with the small ubiquitin-like modifiers (SUMOs) through its SUMO ligase activity. SUMOylated misfolded proteins are then recognized and ubiquitinated by RNF4 and are subsequently targeted for proteasomal degradation. We further show that PML deficiency exacerbates polyglutamine (polyQ) disease in a mouse model of spinocerebellar ataxia 1 (SCA1). These findings reveal a mammalian system that removes misfolded proteins through sequential SUMOylation and ubiquitination and define its role in protection against protein-misfolding diseases. PMID:24882209

  9. WRF4G project: Advances in running climate simulations on the EGI Infrastructure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Blanco, Carlos; Cofino, Antonio S.; Fernández Quiruelas, Valvanuz; García, Markel; Fernández, Jesús

    2014-05-01

    The Weather Research and Forecasting For Grid (WRF4G) project is a two-year Spanish National R&D project, which has started in 2011. It is now a well established project, involving scientists and technical staff from several institutions, which contribute results to international initiatives such as CORDEX and European FP7 projects such as SPECS and EUPORIAS. The aim of the WRF4G project is to homogenize access hybrid Distributed Computer Infrastructures (DCIs), such as HPC and Grid infrastructures, for climate researchers. Additionally, it provides a productive interface to accomplish ambitious climate experiments such as regional hind-cast/forecast and sensitivity studies. Although Grid infrastructures are very powerful, they have some drawbacks for executing climate applications such as the WRF model. This makes necessary to encapsulate the applications in a middleware in order to provide the appropriate services for monitoring and management. Therefore, the challenge of the WRF4G project is to develop a generic adaptation framework (WRF4G framework) to disseminate it to the scientific community. The framework aims at simplifying the model access by releasing climate scientists from technical and computational aspects. In this contribution, we present some new advances of the WRF4G framework, including new components for designing experiments, simulation monitoring and data management. Additionally, we will show how WRF4G makes possible to run complex experiments on EGI infrastructures concurrently over several VOs such as esr and earth.vo.ibergrid. http://www.meteo.unican.es/software/wrf4g This work has been partially funded by the European Regional Development Fund (ERDF) and the Spanish National R&D Plan 2008-2011 (CGL2011-28864, WRF4G)

  10. T-4G Simulator and T-4 Ground Training Devices in USAF Undergraduate Pilot Training.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Woodruff, Robert R.; Smith, James F.

    The objective of the project was to investigate the utility of using an A/F37A-T4G T-37 flight simulator within the context of Air Force undergraduate pilot training. Twenty-one subjects, selected from three undergraduate pilot training classes, were given contact flight training in a TP4G/EPT simulator before going to T-37 aircraft for further…

  11. Crystal structure of an eIF4G-like protein from Danio rerio

    SciTech Connect

    Bae, Euiyoung; Bitto, Eduard; Bingman, Craig A.; McCoy, Jason G.; Wesenberg, Gary E.; Phillips, Jr., George N.

    2012-04-18

    The gene LOC 91917 Danio rerio (zebrafish) encodes a protein annotated in the UniProt knowledgebase as the middle domain of eukaryotic initiation factor 4G domain containing protein b (MIF4Gdb). Its molecular weight is 25.8 kDa, and it comprises 222 amino acid residues. BLAST searches revealed homologues of D. rerio MIF4Gdb in many eukaryotes including humans. The homologue sand MIF4Gdb were identified as members of the Pfam family, MIF4G (PF2854), which is named after the middle domain of eukaryotic initiation factor 4G (eIF4G). eIF4G is a component of eukaryotic translational initiation complex, and contains binding sites for other initiation factors, suggesting its critical role in translational initiation. The MIF4G domain also occurs in several other proteins involved in RNA metabolism, including the Nonsense-mediated mRNA decay 2 protein (NMD2/UPF2), and the nuclear cap-binding protein 80-kDa subunit (CBP80). Sequence and structure analysis of the MIF4G domains in many proteins indicate that the domain assumes an all helical fold and has tandem repeated motifs. The zebrafish protein described here has homology to domains of other proteins variously referred to as NIC-containing proteins (NMD2, eIF4G, CBP80). The biological function of D. rerio MIF4Gdb has not yet been experimentally characterized, and the annotation is based on amino acid sequence comparison. D. rerio MIF4Gdb did not share more than 25% sequence identity with any protein for which the three-dimensional structure is known and was selected as a target for structure determination by the Center for Eukaryotic Structural Genomics (CESG). Here, they report the crystal structure of D. rerio MIF4Gdb (UniGene code Dr.79360, UniProt code Q5EAQ1, CESG target number GO.79294).

  12. A software architecture for multi-cellular system simulations on graphics processing units.

    PubMed

    Jeannin-Girardon, Anne; Ballet, Pascal; Rodin, Vincent

    2013-09-01

    The first aim of simulation in virtual environment is to help biologists to have a better understanding of the simulated system. The cost of such simulation is significantly reduced compared to that of in vivo simulation. However, the inherent complexity of biological system makes it hard to simulate these systems on non-parallel architectures: models might be made of sub-models and take several scales into account; the number of simulated entities may be quite large. Today, graphics cards are used for general purpose computing which has been made easier thanks to frameworks like CUDA or OpenCL. Parallelization of models may however not be easy: parallel computer programing skills are often required; several hardware architectures may be used to execute models. In this paper, we present the software architecture we built in order to implement various models able to simulate multi-cellular system. This architecture is modular and it implements data structures adapted for graphics processing units architectures. It allows efficient simulation of biological mechanisms. PMID:23900760

  13. The role of time delay in adaptive cellular negative feedback systems.

    PubMed

    Lapytsko, Anastasiya; Schaber, Jörg

    2016-06-01

    Adaptation in cellular systems is often mediated by negative feedbacks, which usually come with certain time delays causing several characteristic response patterns including an overdamped response, damped or sustained oscillations. Here, we analyse generic two-dimensional delay differential equations with delayed negative feedback describing the dynamics of biochemical adaptive signal-response networks. We derive explicit thresholds and boundaries showing how time delay determines characteristic response patterns of these networks. Applying our theoretical analyses to concrete data we show that adaptation to osmotic stress in yeast is optimal in the sense of minimizing adaptation time without causing oscillatory behaviour, i.e., a critically damped response. In addition, our framework demonstrates that a slight increase of time delay in the NF-κB system might induce a switch from damped to sustained oscillatory behaviour. Thus, we demonstrate how delay differential equations can be used to explicitly study the delay in biochemical negative feedback systems. Our analysis also provides insight into how time delay may tune biological signal-response patterns and control the systems behaviour. PMID:26995333

  14. On the Use of FOSS4G in Land Cover Fraction Estimation with Unmixing Algorithms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kumar, U.; Milesi, C.; Raja, K.; Ganguly, S.; Wang, W.; Zhang, G.; Nemani, R. R.

    2014-12-01

    The popularity and usage of FOSS4G (FOSS for Geoinformatics) has increased drastically in the last two decades with increasing benefits that facilitate spatial data analysis, image processing, graphics and map production, spatial modeling and visualization. The objective of this paper is to use FOSS4G to implement and perform a quantitative analysis of three different unmixing algorithms: Constraint Least-Square (CLS), Unconstraint Least-Square, and Orthogonal Subspace Projection to estimate land cover (LC) fraction estimates from RS data. The LC fractions obtained by unmixing of mixed pixels represent mixture of more than one class per pixel rendering more accurate LC abundance estimates. The algorithms were implemented in C++ programming language with OpenCV package (http://opencv.org/) and boost C++ libraries (www.boost.org) in the NASA Earth Exchange at the NASA Advanced Supercomputing Facility. GRASS GIS was used for visualization of results and statistical analysis was carried in R in a Linux system environment. A set of global endmembers for substrate, vegetation and dark objects were used to unmix the data using the three algorithms and were compared with Singular Value decomposition unmixed outputs available in ENVI image processing software. First, computer simulated data of different signal to noise ratio were used to evaluate the algorithms. The second set of experiments was carried out in an agricultural set-up with a spectrally diverse collection of 11 Landsat-5 scenes (acquired in 2008) for an agricultural setup in Frenso, California and the ground data were collected on those specific dates when the satellite passed through the site. Finally, in the third set of experiments, a pair of coincident clear sky Landsat and World View 2 data for an urbanized area of San Francisco were used to assess the algorithm. Validation of the results using descriptive statistics, correlation coefficient (cc), RMSE, boxplot and bivariate distribution function

  15. Length Scale Correlations of Cellular Microstructures in Directionally Solidified Binary System

    SciTech Connect

    Yunxue Shen

    2002-06-27

    In a cellular array, a range of primary spacing is found to be stable under given growth conditions. Since a strong coupling of solute field exists between the neighboring cells, primary spacing variation should also influence other microstructure features such as cell shape and cell length. The existence of multiple solutions is examined in this study both theoretically as well as experimentally. A theoretical model is developed that identifies and relates four important microstructural lengths, which are found to be primary spacing, tip radius, cell width and cell length. This general microstructural relationship is shown to be valid for different cells in an array as well as for other cellular patterns obtained under different growth conditions. The unique feature of the model is that the microstructure correlation does not depend on composition or growth conditions since these variables scale microstructural lengths to satisfy the relationship obtained in this study. Detailed directional solidification experimental studies have been carried out in the succinonitrile-salol system to characterize and measure these four length scales. Besides the validation of the model, experimental results showed additional scaling laws to be present. In the regime where only a cellular structure is formed, the shape of the cell, the cell tip radius and the length of the cell are all found to scale individually with the local primary spacing. The presence of multiple solutions of primary spacing is also shown to influence the cell-dendrite transition that is controlled not only by the processing variables (growth velocity, thermal gradient and composition) but also by the local cell spacing. The cell-dendrite transition was found not to be sharp, but occurred over a range of processing conditions. Two critical conditions have been identified such that only cells are present below lower critics condition, and only dendrites are formed above the upper critics condition. Between

  16. Length Scale Correlations of Cellular Microstructures in Directionally Solidified Binary System

    SciTech Connect

    Yunxue Shen

    2002-08-01

    In a cellular array, a range of primary spacing is found to be stable under given growth conditions. Since a strong coupling of solute field exists between the neighboring cells, primary spacing variation should also influence other microstructure features such as cell shape and cell length. The existence of multiple solutions is examined in this study both theoretically as well as experimentally. A theoretical model is developed that identifies and relates four important microstructural lengths, which are found to be primary spacing, tip radius, cell width and cell length. This general microstructural relationship is shown to be valid for different cells in an array as well as for other cellular patterns obtained under different growth conditions. The unique feature of the model is that the microstructure correlation does not depend on composition or growth conditions since these variables scale microstructural lengths to satisfy the relationship obtained in this study. Detailed directional solidification experimental studies have been carried out in the succinonitrile-salol system to characterize and measure these four length scales. Besides the validation of the model, experimental results showed additional scaling laws to be present. In the regime where only a cellular structure is formed, the shape of the cell, the cell tip radius and the length of the cell are all found to scale individually with the local primary spacing. The presence of multiple solutions of primary spacing is also shown to influence the cell-dendrite transition that is controlled not only by the processing variables (growth velocity, thermal gradient and composition) but also by the local cell spacing. The cell-dendrite transition was found not to be sharp, but occurred over a range of processing conditions. Two critical conditions have been identified such that only cells are present below lower critics condition, and only dendrites are formed above the upper critics condition. Between

  17. Mucosal and systemic cellular immune responses induced by Toxoplasma gondii antigens in cyst orally infected mice.

    PubMed Central

    Chardès, T; Velge-Roussel, F; Mevelec, P; Mevelec, M N; Buzoni-Gatel, D; Bout, D

    1993-01-01

    This study was performed to determine the T-cellular immune responses following Toxoplasma gondii oral infection and to assess further toxoplasma antigens on their ability to stimulate in vitro mucosal and systemic T-cell immunity. Parasite-specific cellular immune responses in Peyer's patches (PP), in mesenteric lymph nodes (MLN) and in spleen (SPL) were investigated using a lymphoblastic transformation test following oral infection of mice with strain 76K cysts of T. gondii. An early toxoplasma sonicate-induced mucosal T-cell proliferation occurred in MLN and PP with a peak responsiveness on day 6 post-infection (PI) and rapidly reached background levels on day 7 PI in PP and on day 8 PI in mesenteric lymph nodes. A later splenic cellular blastogenesis was observed from day 28 PI and persisted throughout the experiment (day 91). At the time of T-cell proliferation, FACS analyses revealed a decrease in the relative percentages of CD4+ and CD8+ T cells with a predominance of CD8+ lymphocytes which leads to an inversion of the CD4/CD8 ratios. We found that CBA/J is a high responder mouse strain in the induction of mesenteric and splenic T-lymphocyte blastogenesis compared to the intermediate responder BALB/c and low responder C57BL/6. Toxoplasma gondii antigens SAG1 (30,000 MW) and GRA4 (40,000-41,000 MW), which are known to induce locally IgA antibodies, are shown to stimulate primed mucosal T lymphocytes from CBA/J and BALB/c mice whereas no proliferation was demonstrated with C57BL/6 T cells. 229-242 peptide, derived from the deduced amino acid sequence of GRA4, only induces detectable proliferation of primed-CBA/J T lymphocytes. Following oral experimental infection, the in vitro mesenteric response to a toxoplasma sonicate is dominated by a Th2-type cytokine pattern whereas a predominant Th1 cytokine response is observed in the spleen. Finally, in vitro stimulation of mesenteric T cells with the three defined toxoplasma antigens resulted in secretion of

  18. Phase transition in the economically modeled growth of a cellular nervous system

    PubMed Central

    Nicosia, Vincenzo; Vértes, Petra E.; Schafer, William R.; Latora, Vito; Bullmore, Edward T.

    2013-01-01

    Spatially embedded complex networks, such as nervous systems, the Internet, and transportation networks, generally have nontrivial topological patterns of connections combined with nearly minimal wiring costs. However, the growth rules shaping these economical tradeoffs between cost and topology are not well understood. Here, we study the cellular nervous system of the nematode worm Caenorhabditis elegans, together with information on the birth times of neurons and on their spatial locations. We find that the growth of this network undergoes a transition from an accelerated to a constant increase in the number of links (synaptic connections) as a function of the number of nodes (neurons). The time of this phase transition coincides closely with the observed moment of hatching, when development switches metamorphically from oval to larval stages. We use graph analysis and generative modeling to show that the transition between different growth regimes, as well as its coincidence with the moment of hatching, may be explained by a dynamic economical model that incorporates a tradeoff between topology and cost that is continuously negotiated and renegotiated over developmental time. As the body of the animal progressively elongates, the cost of longer-distance connections is increasingly penalized. This growth process regenerates many aspects of the adult nervous system’s organization, including the neuronal membership of anatomically predefined ganglia. We expect that similar economical principles may be found in the development of other biological or manmade spatially embedded complex systems. PMID:23610428

  19. Semaphorin 5A mediated cellular navigation: connecting nervous system and cancer

    PubMed Central

    Purohit, Abhilasha; Sadanandam, Anguraj; Myneni, Pavan; Singh, Rakesh K.

    2014-01-01

    The ultraprecise wiring of neurons banks on the instructions provided by guidance cue proteins that steer them to their appropriate target tissue during neuronal development. Semaphorins are one such family of proteins. Semaphorins are known to play major physiological roles during the development of various organs including nervous system, cardiovascular, and immune systems. Their role in different pathologies including cancer remains an intense area of investigation. This review focuses on a novel member of this family of proteins, semaphorin 5A, which is much less explored in comparison to its other affiliates. Recent reports suggest that semaphorins play important roles in the pathology of cancer by affecting angiogenesis, tumor growth and metastasis. We will firstly give a general overview of the semaphorin family and its receptors. Next, we discuss their roles in cellular movements and how that makes them a connecting link between nervous system and cancer. Finally, we focus our discussion on semaphorin 5A to summarize the prevailing knowledge for this molecule in developmental biology and carcinogenesis. PMID:25263940

  20. Cellular defense system gene expression profiling of human whole blood: opportunities to predict health benefits in response to diet.

    PubMed

    Drew, Janice E

    2012-07-01

    Diet is a critical factor in the maintenance of human cellular defense systems, immunity, inflammation, redox regulation, metabolism, and DNA repair that ensure optimal health and reduce disease risk. Assessment of dietary modulation of cellular defense systems in humans has been limited due to difficulties in accessing target tissues. Notably, peripheral blood gene expression profiles associated with nonhematologic disease are detectable. Coupled with recent innovations in gene expression technologies, gene expression profiling of human blood to determine predictive markers associated with health status and dietary modulation is now a feasible prospect for nutrition scientists. This review focuses on cellular defense system gene expression profiling of human whole blood and the opportunities this presents, using recent technological advances, to predict health status and benefits conferred by diet. PMID:22797985

  1. Using a Virtual Tissue Culture System to Assist Students in Understanding Life at the Cellular Level

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McLauglin, Jacqueline S.; Seaquist, Stephen B.

    2008-01-01

    In every biology course ever taught in the nation's classrooms, and in every biology book ever published, students are taught about the "cell." The cell is as fundamental to biology as the atom is to chemistry. Truly, everything an organism does occurs fundamentally at the cellular level. Beyond memorizing the cellular definition, students are not…

  2. Feeding Behaviors in Cellular Slime Molds: A Microbial System To Study Competition.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bozzone, Donna M.

    1997-01-01

    Describes a laboratory project for first-year biology students that examines competition among various cellular slime molds. After a brief introduction to the topic of competition and basic life history information about cellular slime molds, students choose a question and design original experiments to seek an answer. (Author/AIM)

  3. Quadruple Vessel Coronary Artery Bypass Grafting in a 14-Year-Old Child With Plasminogen Activator Inhibitor-1 4G/4G Gene Polymorphism.

    PubMed

    Cvetkovic, Draginja; Lafaro, Rocco; Giamelli, Joseph; Suvro, Sett; Erb, Markus; Yaghoubian, Saman

    2016-06-01

    Myocardial ischemia due to coronary artery disease is an extremely rare condition in childhood and adolescence. Absence of obvious serious risk factors remains a challenge to modern cardiology. We present the case of a 14-year-old boy who underwent quadruple-vessel coronary artery bypass grafting with bilateral pedicled internal mammary artery and bilateral radial artery grafting. We try to highlight a rare but important 4G variant PAI-1 (SERPINE 1) gene mutation as the etiology of severe coronary artery disease in our patient. To the best of our knowledge, he is one of the youngest patients who underwent coronary artery bypass surgery with 4 arterial grafts. PMID:26848133

  4. Cellular Decomposition Based Hybrid-Hierarchical Control Systems with Applications to Flight Management Systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Caines, P. E.

    1999-01-01

    The work in this research project has been focused on the construction of a hierarchical hybrid control theory which is applicable to flight management systems. The motivation and underlying philosophical position for this work has been that the scale, inherent complexity and the large number of agents (aircraft) involved in an air traffic system imply that a hierarchical modelling and control methodology is required for its management and real time control. In the current work the complex discrete or continuous state space of a system with a small number of agents is aggregated in such a way that discrete (finite state machine or supervisory automaton) controlled dynamics are abstracted from the system's behaviour. High level control may then be either directly applied at this abstracted level, or, if this is in itself of significant complexity, further layers of abstractions may be created to produce a system with an acceptable degree of complexity at each level. By the nature of this construction, high level commands are necessarily realizable at lower levels in the system.

  5. A biofidelic 3D culture model to study the development of brain cellular systems.

    PubMed

    Ren, M; Du, C; Herrero Acero, E; Tang-Schomer, M D; Özkucur, N

    2016-01-01

    Little is known about how cells assemble as systems during corticogenesis to generate collective functions. We built a neurobiology platform that consists of fetal rat cerebral cortical cells grown within 3D silk scaffolds (SF). Ivermectin (Ivm), a glycine receptor (GLR) agonist, was used to modulate cell resting membrane potential (Vmem) according to methods described in a previous work that implicated Ivm in the arrangement and connectivity of cortical cell assemblies. The cells developed into distinct populations of neuroglial stem/progenitor cells, mature neurons or epithelial-mesenchymal cells. Importantly, the synchronized electrical activity in the newly developed cortical assemblies could be recorded as local field potential (LFP) measurements. This study therefore describes the first example of the development of a biologically relevant cortical plate assembly outside of the body. This model provides i) a preclinical basis for engineering cerebral cortex tissue autografts and ii) a biofidelic 3D culture model for investigating biologically relevant processes during the functional development of cerebral cortical cellular systems. PMID:27112667

  6. Kinetic Monte Carlo and cellular particle dynamics simulations of multicellular systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Flenner, Elijah; Janosi, Lorant; Barz, Bogdan; Neagu, Adrian; Forgacs, Gabor; Kosztin, Ioan

    2012-03-01

    Computer modeling of multicellular systems has been a valuable tool for interpreting and guiding in vitro experiments relevant to embryonic morphogenesis, tumor growth, angiogenesis and, lately, structure formation following the printing of cell aggregates as bioink particles. Here we formulate two computer simulation methods: (1) a kinetic Monte Carlo (KMC) and (2) a cellular particle dynamics (CPD) method, which are capable of describing and predicting the shape evolution in time of three-dimensional multicellular systems during their biomechanical relaxation. Our work is motivated by the need of developing quantitative methods for optimizing postprinting structure formation in bioprinting-assisted tissue engineering. The KMC and CPD model parameters are determined and calibrated by using an original computational-theoretical-experimental framework applied to the fusion of two spherical cell aggregates. The two methods are used to predict the (1) formation of a toroidal structure through fusion of spherical aggregates and (2) cell sorting within an aggregate formed by two types of cells with different adhesivities.

  7. A biofidelic 3D culture model to study the development of brain cellular systems

    PubMed Central

    Ren, M.; Du, C.; Herrero Acero, E.; Tang-Schomer, M. D.; Özkucur, N.

    2016-01-01

    Little is known about how cells assemble as systems during corticogenesis to generate collective functions. We built a neurobiology platform that consists of fetal rat cerebral cortical cells grown within 3D silk scaffolds (SF). Ivermectin (Ivm), a glycine receptor (GLR) agonist, was used to modulate cell resting membrane potential (Vmem) according to methods described in a previous work that implicated Ivm in the arrangement and connectivity of cortical cell assemblies. The cells developed into distinct populations of neuroglial stem/progenitor cells, mature neurons or epithelial-mesenchymal cells. Importantly, the synchronized electrical activity in the newly developed cortical assemblies could be recorded as local field potential (LFP) measurements. This study therefore describes the first example of the development of a biologically relevant cortical plate assembly outside of the body. This model provides i) a preclinical basis for engineering cerebral cortex tissue autografts and ii) a biofidelic 3D culture model for investigating biologically relevant processes during the functional development of cerebral cortical cellular systems. PMID:27112667

  8. Alzheimer's as a Systems-Level Disease Involving the Interplay of Multiple Cellular Networks.

    PubMed

    Castrillo, Juan I; Oliver, Stephen G

    2016-01-01

    Alzheimer's disease (AD), and many neurodegenerative disorders, are multifactorial in nature. They involve a combination of genomic, epigenomic, interactomic and environmental factors. Progress is being made, and these complex diseases are beginning to be understood as having their origin in altered states of biological networks at the cellular level. In the case of AD, genomic susceptibility and mechanisms leading to (or accompanying) the impairment of the central Amyloid Precursor Protein (APP) processing and tau networks are widely accepted as major contributors to the diseased state. The derangement of these networks may result in both the gain and loss of functions, increased generation of toxic species (e.g., toxic soluble oligomers and aggregates) and imbalances, whose effects can propagate to supra-cellular levels. Although well sustained by empirical data and widely accepted, this global perspective often overlooks the essential roles played by the main counteracting homeostatic networks (e.g., protein quality control/proteostasis, unfolded protein response, protein folding chaperone networks, disaggregases, ER-associated degradation/ubiquitin proteasome system, endolysosomal network, autophagy, and other stress-protective and clearance networks), whose relevance to AD is just beginning to be fully realized. In this chapter, an integrative perspective is presented. Alzheimer's disease is characterized to be a result of: (a) intrinsic genomic/epigenomic susceptibility and, (b) a continued dynamic interplay between the deranged networks and the central homeostatic networks of nerve cells. This interplay of networks will underlie both the onset and rate of progression of the disease in each individual. Integrative Systems Biology approaches are required to effect its elucidation. Comprehensive Systems Biology experiments at different 'omics levels in simple model organisms, engineered to recapitulate the basic features of AD may illuminate the onset and

  9. Development of an Insert Co-culture System of Two Cellular Types in the Absence of Cell-Cell Contact.

    PubMed

    Renaud, Justine; Martinoli, Maria-Grazia

    2016-01-01

    The role of secreted soluble factors in the modification of cellular responses is a recurrent theme in the study of all tissues and systems. In an attempt to make straightforward the very complex relationships between the several cellular subtypes that compose multicellular organisms, in vitro techniques have been developed to help researchers acquire a detailed understanding of single cell populations. One of these techniques uses inserts with a permeable membrane allowing secreted soluble factors to diffuse. Thus, a population of cells grown in inserts can be co-cultured in a well or dish containing a different cell type for evaluating cellular changes following paracrine signaling in the absence of cell-cell contact. Such insert co-culture systems offer various advantages over other co-culture techniques, namely bidirectional signaling, conserved cell polarity and population-specific detection of cellular changes. In addition to being utilized in the field of inflammation, cancer, angiogenesis and differentiation, these co-culture systems are of prime importance in the study of the intricate relationships that exist between the different cellular subtypes present in the central nervous system, particularly in the context of neuroinflammation. This article offers general methodological guidelines in order to set up an experiment in order to evaluating cellular changes mediated by secreted soluble factors using an insert co-culture system. Moreover, a specific protocol to measure the neuroinflammatory effects of cytokines secreted by lipopolysaccharide-activated N9 microglia on neuronal PC12 cells will be detailed, offering a concrete understanding of insert co-culture methodology. PMID:27500972

  10. Coarse-graining of cellular automata, emergence, and the predictability of complex systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Israeli, Navot; Goldenfeld, Nigel

    2006-02-01

    We study the predictability of emergent phenomena in complex systems. Using nearest-neighbor, one-dimensional cellular automata (CA) as an example, we show how to construct local coarse-grained descriptions of CA in all classes of Wolfram’s classification. The resulting coarse-grained CA that we construct are capable of emulating the large-scale behavior of the original systems without accounting for small-scale details. Several CA that can be coarse-grained by this construction are known to be universal Turing machines; they can emulate any CA or other computing devices and are therefore undecidable. We thus show that because in practice one only seeks coarse-grained information, complex physical systems can be predictable and even decidable at some level of description. The renormalization group flows that we construct induce a hierarchy of CA rules. This hierarchy agrees well with apparent rule complexity and is therefore a good candidate for a complexity measure and a classification method. Finally we argue that the large-scale dynamics of CA can be very simple, at least when measured by the Kolmogorov complexity of the large-scale update rule, and moreover exhibits a novel scaling law. We show that because of this large-scale simplicity, the probability of finding a coarse-grained description of CA approaches unity as one goes to increasingly coarser scales. We interpret this large-scale simplicity as a pattern formation mechanism in which large-scale patterns are forced upon the system by the simplicity of the rules that govern the large-scale dynamics.

  11. Hetero-cellular prototyping by synchronized multi-material bioprinting for rotary cell culture system.

    PubMed

    Snyder, Jessica; Son, Ae Rin; Hamid, Qudus; Wu, Honglu; Sun, Wei

    2016-03-01

    Bottom-up tissue engineering requires methodological progress of biofabrication to capture key design facets of anatomical arrangements across micro, meso and macro-scales. The diffusive mass transfer properties necessary to elicit stability and functionality require hetero-typic contact, cell-to-cell signaling and uniform nutrient diffusion. Bioprinting techniques successfully build mathematically defined porous architecture to diminish resistance to mass transfer. Current limitations of bioprinted cell assemblies include poor micro-scale formability of cell-laden soft gels and asymmetrical macro-scale diffusion through 3D volumes. The objective of this work is to engineer a synchronized multi-material bioprinter (SMMB) system which improves the resolution and expands the capability of existing bioprinting systems by packaging multiple cell types in heterotypic arrays prior to deposition. This unit cell approach to arranging multiple cell-laden solutions is integrated with a motion system to print heterogeneous filaments as tissue engineered scaffolds and nanoliter droplets. The set of SMMB process parameters control the geometric arrangement of the combined flow's internal features and constituent material's volume fractions. SMMB printed hepatocyte-endothelial laden 200 nl droplets are cultured in a rotary cell culture system (RCCS) to study the effect of microgravity on an in vitro model of the human hepatic lobule. RCCS conditioning for 48 h increased hepatocyte cytoplasm diameter 2 μm, increased metabolic rate, and decreased drug half-life. SMMB hetero-cellular models present a 10-fold increase in metabolic rate, compared to SMMB mono-culture models. Improved bioprinting resolution due to process control of cell-laden matrix packaging as well as nanoliter droplet printing capability identify SMMB as a viable technique to improve in vitro model efficacy. PMID:26759993

  12. Pb-induced cellular defense system in the root meristematic cells of Allium sativum L

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background Electron microscopy (EM) techniques enable identification of the main accumulations of lead (Pb) in cells and cellular organelles and observations of changes in cell ultrastructure. Although there is extensive literature relating to studies on the influence of heavy metals on plants, Pb tolerance strategies of plants have not yet been fully explained. Allium sativum L. is a potential plant for absorption and accumulation of heavy metals. In previous investigations the effects of different concentrations (10-5 to 10-3 M) of Pb were investigated in A. sativum, indicating a significant inhibitory effect on shoot and root growth at 10-3 to 10-4 M Pb. In the present study, we used EM and cytochemistry to investigate ultrastructural alterations, identify the synthesis and distribution of cysteine-rich proteins induced by Pb and explain the possible mechanisms of the Pb-induced cellular defense system in A. sativum. Results After 1 h of Pb treatment, dictyosomes were accompanied by numerous vesicles within cytoplasm. The endoplasm reticulum (ER) with swollen cisternae was arranged along the cell wall after 2 h. Some flattened cisternae were broken up into small closed vesicles and the nuclear envelope was generally more dilated after 4 h. During 24-36 h, phenomena appeared such as high vacuolization of cytoplasm and electron-dense granules in cell walls, vacuoles, cytoplasm and mitochondrial membranes. Other changes included mitochondrial swelling and loss of cristae, and vacuolization of ER and dictyosomes during 48-72 h. In the Pb-treatment groups, silver grains were observed in cell walls and in cytoplasm, suggesting the Gomori-Swift reaction can indirectly evaluate the Pb effects on plant cells. Conclusions Cell walls can immobilize some Pb ions. Cysteine-rich proteins in cell walls were confirmed by the Gomori-Swift reaction. The morphological alterations in plasma membrane, dictyosomes and ER reflect the features of detoxification and tolerance under Pb

  13. Implementation of a cellular neural network-based segmentation algorithm on the bio-inspired vision system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Karabiber, Fethullah; Grassi, Giuseppe; Vecchio, Pietro; Arik, Sabri; Yalcin, M. Erhan

    2011-01-01

    Based on the cellular neural network (CNN) paradigm, the bio-inspired (bi-i) cellular vision system is a computing platform consisting of state-of-the-art sensing, cellular sensing-processing and digital signal processing. This paper presents the implementation of a novel CNN-based segmentation algorithm onto the bi-i system. The experimental results, carried out for different benchmark video sequences, highlight the feasibility of the approach, which provides a frame rate of about 26 frame/sec. Comparisons with existing CNN-based methods show that, even though these methods are from two to six times faster than the proposed one, the conceived approach is more accurate and, consequently, represents a satisfying trade-off between real-time requirements and accuracy.

  14. Clec4g (LSECtin) interacts with BACE1 and suppresses Aβ generation.

    PubMed

    Kizuka, Yasuhiko; Kitazume, Shinobu; Sato, Keiko; Taniguchi, Naoyuki

    2015-06-01

    β-Site amyloid precursor protein cleaving enzyme-1 (BACE1) is a central molecule in Alzheimer's disease (AD). It cleaves amyloid precursor protein (APP) to produce the toxic amyloid-β (Aβ) peptides. Thus, a novel BACE1 modulator could offer a new therapeutic strategy for AD. We report that C-type lectin-like domain family 4, member g (Clec4g, also designated as LSECtin) interacts with BACE1 in mouse brain and cultured cells. Overexpression of Clec4g suppressed BACE1-mediated Aβ generation, and affected the intracellular distribution of BACE1 but not its catalytic activity. These results highlight a novel role of Clec4g in negatively regulating BACE1 function. PMID:25957769

  15. Investigating the quality of video consultations performed using fourth generation (4G) mobile telecommunications.

    PubMed

    Caffery, Liam J; Smith, Anthony C

    2015-09-01

    The use of fourth-generation (4G) mobile telecommunications to provide real-time video consultations were investigated in this study with the aims of determining if 4G is a suitable telecommunications technology; and secondly, to identify if variation in perceived audio and video quality were due to underlying network performance. Three patient end-points that used 4G Internet connections were evaluated. Consulting clinicians recorded their perception of audio and video quality using the International Telecommunications Union scales during clinics with these patient end-points. These scores were used to calculate a mean opinion score (MOS). The network performance metrics were obtained for each session and the relationships between these metrics and the session's quality scores were tested. Clinicians scored the quality of 50 hours of video consultations, involving 36 clinic sessions. The MOS for audio was 4.1 ± 0.62 and the MOS for video was 4.4 ± 0.22. Image impairment and effort to listen were also rated favourably. There was no correlation between audio or video quality and the network metrics of packet loss or jitter. These findings suggest that 4G networks are an appropriate telecommunication technology to deliver real-time video consultations. Variations in quality scores observed during this study were not explained by the packet loss and jitter in the underlying network. Before establishing a telemedicine service, the performance of the 4G network should be assessed at the location of the proposed service. This is due to known variability in performance of 4G networks. PMID:25766856

  16. Molecular links between cellular senescence, longevity and age-related diseases - a systems biology perspective.

    PubMed

    Tacutu, Robi; Budovsky, Arie; Yanai, Hagai; Fraifeld, Vadim E

    2011-12-01

    The role of cellular senescence (CS) in age-related diseases (ARDs) is a quickly emerging topic in aging research. Our comprehensive data mining revealed over 250 genes tightly associated with CS. Using systems biology tools, we found that CS is closely interconnected with aging, longevity and ARDs, either by sharing common genes and regulators or by protein-protein interactions and eventually by common signaling pathways. The most enriched pathways across CS, ARDs and aging-associated conditions (oxidative stress and chronic inflammation) are growth-promoting pathways and the pathways responsible for cell-extracellular matrix interactions and stress response. Of note, the patterns of evolutionary conservation of CS and cancer genes showed a high degree of similarity, suggesting the co-evolution of these two phenomena. Moreover, cancer genes and microRNAs seem to stand at the crossroad between CS and ARDs. Our analysis also provides the basis for new predictions: the genes common to both cancer and other ARD(s) are highly likely candidates to be involved in CS and vice versa. Altogether, this study shows that there are multiple links between CS, aging, longevity and ARDs, suggesting a common molecular basis for all these conditions. Modulating CS may represent a potential pro-longevity and anti-ARDs therapeutic strategy. PMID:22184282

  17. Low levels of graphene and graphene oxide inhibit cellular xenobiotic defense system mediated by efflux transporters.

    PubMed

    Liu, Su; Jiang, Wei; Wu, Bing; Yu, Jing; Yu, Haiyan; Zhang, Xu-Xiang; Torres-Duarte, Cristina; Cherr, Gary N

    2016-06-01

    Low levels of graphene and graphene oxide (GO) are considered to be environmentally safe. In this study, we analyzed the potential effects of graphene and GO at relatively low concentrations on cellular xenobiotic defense system mediated by efflux transporters. The results showed that graphene (<0.5 μg/mL) and GO (<20 μg/mL) did not decrease cell viability, generate reactive oxygen species, or disrupt mitochondrial function. However, graphene and GO at the nontoxic concentrations could increase calcein-AM (CAM, an indicator of membrane ATP-binding cassette (ABC) transporter) activity) accumulation, indicating inhibition of ABC transporters' efflux capabilities. This inhibition was observed even at 0.005 μg/mL graphene and 0.05 μg/mL GO, which are 100 times and 400 times lower than their lowest toxic concentration from cytotoxicity experiments, respectively. The inhibition of ABC transporters significantly increased the toxicity of paraquat and arsenic, known substrates of ABC transporters. The inhibition of ABC transporters was found to be based on graphene and GO damaging the plasma membrane structure and fluidity, thus altering functions of transmembrane ABC transporters. This study demonstrates that low levels of graphene and GO are not environmentally safe since they can significantly make cell more susceptible to other xenobiotics, and this chemosensitizing activity should be considered in the risk assessment of graphene and GO. PMID:26554512

  18. Systemic induction of cells mediating antibody-dependent cellular cytotoxicity following administration of interleukin 2.

    PubMed

    Eisenthal, A; Rosenberg, S A

    1989-12-15

    We have previously demonstrated that incubation of murine cells in vitro in interleukin 2 (IL-2) induced antibody-dependent cellular cytotoxicity (ADCC) and that these cells were derived from the NK/LAK, FcR+ cell population. In the present study we show that in vivo administration of IL-2 to mice induces cells which exhibit ADCC activity in the peritoneal cavity, liver, lungs, and to a lesser degree in the bone marrow, spleen, mesenteric lymph nodes, and thymus. A gradual increase in ADCC activity and the number of Fc-receptor-positive cells was seen 1 to 3 days after starting IL-2 treatment. The cells mediating ADCC are closely related to LAK cells since they expressed Thy1.2 antigens and are derived from asialo GM1-positive, Lyt2/L3T4-negative, radiosensitive cells. These results demonstrate that IL-2 can systemically induce cells with ADCC activity and that this ability may be useful in the establishment of therapeutic models against disseminated cancer when combined with specific antitumor monoclonal antibodies. PMID:2573425

  19. An archived multi-objective simulated annealing for a dynamic cellular manufacturing system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shirazi, Hossein; Kia, Reza; Javadian, Nikbakhsh; Tavakkoli-Moghaddam, Reza

    2014-05-01

    To design a group layout of a cellular manufacturing system (CMS) in a dynamic environment, a multi-objective mixed-integer non-linear programming model is developed. The model integrates cell formation, group layout and production planning (PP) as three interrelated decisions involved in the design of a CMS. This paper provides an extensive coverage of important manufacturing features used in the design of CMSs and enhances the flexibility of an existing model in handling the fluctuations of part demands more economically by adding machine depot and PP decisions. Two conflicting objectives to be minimized are the total costs and the imbalance of workload among cells. As the considered objectives in this model are in conflict with each other, an archived multi-objective simulated annealing (AMOSA) algorithm is designed to find Pareto-optimal solutions. Matrix-based solution representation, a heuristic procedure generating an initial and feasible solution and efficient mutation operators are the advantages of the designed AMOSA. To demonstrate the efficiency of the proposed algorithm, the performance of AMOSA is compared with an exact algorithm (i.e., ∈-constraint method) solved by the GAMS software and a well-known evolutionary algorithm, namely NSGA-II for some randomly generated problems based on some comparison metrics. The obtained results show that the designed AMOSA can obtain satisfactory solutions for the multi-objective model.

  20. A versatile transreplication-based system to identify cellular proteins involved in geminivirus replication.

    PubMed

    Morilla, Gabriel; Castillo, Araceli G; Preiss, Werner; Jeske, Holger; Bejarano, Eduardo R

    2006-04-01

    A versatile green fluorescent protein (GFP) expression cassette containing the replication origins of the monopartite begomovirus Tomato yellow leaf curl Sardinia virus (TYLCSV) is described. Transgenic Nicotiana benthamiana plants containing one copy of the cassette stably integrated into their genome were superinfected with TYLCSV, which mobilized and replicated the cassette as an episomal replicon. The expression of the reporter gene (the GFP gene) was thereby modified. Whereas GFP fluorescence was dimmed in the intercostal areas, an increase of green fluorescence in veins of all leaves placed above the inoculation site, as well as in transport tissues of roots and stems, was observed. The release of episomal trans replicons from the transgene and the increase in GFP expression were dependent on the cognate geminiviral replication-associated protein (Rep) and required interaction between Rep and the intergenic region of TYLCSV. This expression system is able to monitor the replication status of TYLCSV in plants, as induction of GFP expression is only produced in those tissues where Rep is present. To further confirm this notion, the expression of a host factor required for geminivirus replication, the proliferating cellular nuclear antigen (PCNA) was transiently silenced. Inhibition of PCNA prevented GFP induction in veins and reduced viral DNA. We propose that these plants could be widely used to easily identify host factors required for geminivirus replication by virus-induced gene silencing. PMID:16537630

  1. A Versatile Transreplication-Based System To Identify Cellular Proteins Involved in Geminivirus Replication

    PubMed Central

    Morilla, Gabriel; Castillo, Araceli G.; Preiss, Werner; Jeske, Holger; Bejarano, Eduardo R.

    2006-01-01

    A versatile green fluorescent protein (GFP) expression cassette containing the replication origins of the monopartite begomovirus Tomato yellow leaf curl Sardinia virus (TYLCSV) is described. Transgenic Nicotiana benthamiana plants containing one copy of the cassette stably integrated into their genome were superinfected with TYLCSV, which mobilized and replicated the cassette as an episomal replicon. The expression of the reporter gene (the GFP gene) was thereby modified. Whereas GFP fluorescence was dimmed in the intercostal areas, an increase of green fluorescence in veins of all leaves placed above the inoculation site, as well as in transport tissues of roots and stems, was observed. The release of episomal trans replicons from the transgene and the increase in GFP expression were dependent on the cognate geminiviral replication-associated protein (Rep) and required interaction between Rep and the intergenic region of TYLCSV. This expression system is able to monitor the replication status of TYLCSV in plants, as induction of GFP expression is only produced in those tissues where Rep is present. To further confirm this notion, the expression of a host factor required for geminivirus replication, the proliferating cellular nuclear antigen (PCNA) was transiently silenced. Inhibition of PCNA prevented GFP induction in veins and reduced viral DNA. We propose that these plants could be widely used to easily identify host factors required for geminivirus replication by virus-induced gene silencing. PMID:16537630

  2. The effect of an autologous cellular gel-matrix integrated implant system on wound healing

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background This manuscript reports the production and preclinical studies to examine the tolerance and efficacy of an autologous cellular gel-matrix integrated implant system (IIS) aimed to treat full-thickness skin lesions. Methods The best concentration of fibrinogen and thrombin was experimentally determined by employing 28 formula ratios of thrombin and fibrinogen and checking clot formation and apparent stability. IIS was formed by integrating skin cells by means of the in situ gelification of fibrin into a porous crosslinked scaffold composed of chitosan, gelatin and hyaluronic acid. The in vitro cell proliferation within the IIS was examined by the MTT assay and PCNA expression. An experimental rabbit model consisting of six circular lesions was utilized to test each of the components of the IIS. Then, the IIS was utilized in an animal model to cover a 35% body surface full thickness lesion. Results The preclinical assays in rabbits demonstrated that the IIS was well tolerated and also that IIS-treated rabbit with lesions of 35% of their body surface, exhibited a better survival rate (p = 0,06). Conclusion IIS should be further studied as a new wound dressing which shows promising properties, being the most remarkable its good biological tolerance and cell growth promotion properties. PMID:20565787

  3. Cellular Biotechnology Operations Support Systems-Fluid Dynamics Investigation (CBOSS-FDI)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2003-01-01

    Aboard the International Space Station (ISS), the Tissue Culture Module (TCM) is the stationary bioreactor vessel in which cell cultures grow. However, for the Cellular Biotechnology Operations Support Systems-Fluid Dynamics Investigation (CBOSS-FDI), color polystyrene beads are used to measure the effectiveness of various mixing procedures. Uniform mixing is a crucial component of CBOSS experiments involving the immune response of human lymphoid cell suspensions. In this picture, the beads are trapped in the injection port shortly after injection. Swirls of beads indicate, event to the naked eye, the contents of the TCM are not fully mixed. The beads are similar in size and density to human lymphoid cells. The goal is to develop procedures that are both convenient for the flight crew and are optimal in providing uniform and reproducible mixing of all components, including cells. The average bead density in a well mixed TCM will be uniform, with no bubbles, and it will be measured using the absorption of light

  4. A multi-objective model for designing a group layout of a dynamic cellular manufacturing system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kia, Reza; Shirazi, Hossein; Javadian, Nikbakhsh; Tavakkoli-Moghaddam, Reza

    2013-04-01

    This paper presents a multi-objective mixed-integer nonlinear programming model to design a group layout of a cellular manufacturing system in a dynamic environment, in which the number of cells to be formed is variable. Cell formation (CF) and group layout (GL) are concurrently made in a dynamic environment by the integrated model, which incorporates with an extensive coverage of important manufacturing features used in the design of CMSs. Additionally, there are some features that make the presented model different from the previous studies. These features include the following: (1) the variable number of cells, (2) the integrated CF and GL decisions in a dynamic environment by a multi-objective mathematical model, and (3) two conflicting objectives that minimize the total costs (i.e., costs of intra and inter-cell material handling, machine relocation, purchasing new machines, machine overhead, machine processing, and forming cells) and minimize the imbalance of workload among cells. Furthermore, the presented model considers some limitations, such as machine capability, machine capacity, part demands satisfaction, cell size, material flow conservation, and location assignment. Four numerical examples are solved by the GAMS software to illustrate the promising results obtained by the incorporated features.

  5. Designing and implementing a regional urban modeling system using the SLEUTH cellular urban model

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Jantz, C.A.; Goetz, S.J.; Donato, D.; Claggett, P.

    2010-01-01

    This paper presents a fine-scale (30 meter resolution) regional land cover modeling system, based on the SLEUTH cellular automata model, that was developed for a 257000 km2 area comprising the Chesapeake Bay drainage basin in the eastern United States. As part of this effort, we developed a new version of the SLEUTH model (SLEUTH-3r), which introduces new functionality and fit metrics that substantially increase the performance and applicability of the model. In addition, we developed methods that expand the capability of SLEUTH to incorporate economic, cultural and policy information, opening up new avenues for the integration of SLEUTH with other land-change models. SLEUTH-3r is also more computationally efficient (by a factor of 5) and uses less memory (reduced 65%) than the original software. With the new version of SLEUTH, we were able to achieve high accuracies at both the aggregate level of 15 sub-regional modeling units and at finer scales. We present forecasts to 2030 of urban development under a current trends scenario across the entire Chesapeake Bay drainage basin, and three alternative scenarios for a sub-region within the Chesapeake Bay watershed to illustrate the new ability of SLEUTH-3r to generate forecasts across a broad range of conditions. ?? 2009 Elsevier Ltd.

  6. Space experiment "Cellular Responses to Radiation in Space (CELLRAD)": Hardware and biological system tests

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hellweg, Christine E.; Dilruba, Shahana; Adrian, Astrid; Feles, Sebastian; Schmitz, Claudia; Berger, Thomas; Przybyla, Bartos; Briganti, Luca; Franz, Markus; Segerer, Jürgen; Spitta, Luis F.; Henschenmacher, Bernd; Konda, Bikash; Diegeler, Sebastian; Baumstark-Khan, Christa; Panitz, Corinna; Reitz, Günther

    2015-11-01

    One factor contributing to the high uncertainty in radiation risk assessment for long-term space missions is the insufficient knowledge about possible interactions of radiation with other spaceflight environmental factors. Such factors, e.g. microgravity, have to be considered as possibly additive or even synergistic factors in cancerogenesis. Regarding the effects of microgravity on signal transduction, it cannot be excluded that microgravity alters the cellular response to cosmic radiation, which comprises a complex network of signaling pathways. The purpose of the experiment "Cellular Responses to Radiation in Space" (CELLRAD, formerly CERASP) is to study the effects of combined exposure to microgravity, radiation and general space flight conditions on mammalian cells, in particular Human Embryonic Kidney (HEK) cells that are stably transfected with different plasmids allowing monitoring of proliferation and the Nuclear Factor κB (NF-κB) pathway by means of fluorescent proteins. The cells will be seeded on ground in multiwell plate units (MPUs), transported to the ISS, and irradiated by an artificial radiation source after an adaptation period at 0 × g and 1 × g. After different incubation periods, the cells will be fixed by pumping a formaldehyde solution into the MPUs. Ground control samples will be treated in the same way. For implementation of CELLRAD in the Biolab on the International Space Station (ISS), tests of the hardware and the biological systems were performed. The sequence of different steps in MPU fabrication (cutting, drilling, cleaning, growth surface coating, and sterilization) was optimized in order to reach full biocompatibility. Different coatings of the foil used as growth surface revealed that coating with 0.1 mg/ml poly-D-lysine supports cell attachment better than collagen type I. The tests of prototype hardware (Science Model) proved its full functionality for automated medium change, irradiation and fixation of cells. Exposure of

  7. Space experiment "Cellular Responses to Radiation in Space (CellRad)": Hardware and biological system tests.

    PubMed

    Hellweg, Christine E; Dilruba, Shahana; Adrian, Astrid; Feles, Sebastian; Schmitz, Claudia; Berger, Thomas; Przybyla, Bartos; Briganti, Luca; Franz, Markus; Segerer, Jürgen; Spitta, Luis F; Henschenmacher, Bernd; Konda, Bikash; Diegeler, Sebastian; Baumstark-Khan, Christa; Panitz, Corinna; Reitz, Günther

    2015-11-01

    One factor contributing to the high uncertainty in radiation risk assessment for long-term space missions is the insufficient knowledge about possible interactions of radiation with other spaceflight environmental factors. Such factors, e.g. microgravity, have to be considered as possibly additive or even synergistic factors in cancerogenesis. Regarding the effects of microgravity on signal transduction, it cannot be excluded that microgravity alters the cellular response to cosmic radiation, which comprises a complex network of signaling pathways. The purpose of the experiment "Cellular Responses to Radiation in Space" (CellRad, formerly CERASP) is to study the effects of combined exposure to microgravity, radiation and general space flight conditions on mammalian cells, in particular Human Embryonic Kidney (HEK) cells that are stably transfected with different plasmids allowing monitoring of proliferation and the Nuclear Factor κB (NF-κB) pathway by means of fluorescent proteins. The cells will be seeded on ground in multiwell plate units (MPUs), transported to the ISS, and irradiated by an artificial radiation source after an adaptation period at 0 × g and 1 × g. After different incubation periods, the cells will be fixed by pumping a formaldehyde solution into the MPUs. Ground control samples will be treated in the same way. For implementation of CellRad in the Biolab on the International Space Station (ISS), tests of the hardware and the biological systems were performed. The sequence of different steps in MPU fabrication (cutting, drilling, cleaning, growth surface coating, and sterilization) was optimized in order to reach full biocompatibility. Different coatings of the foil used as growth surface revealed that coating with 0.1 mg/ml poly-D-lysine supports cell attachment better than collagen type I. The tests of prototype hardware (Science Model) proved its full functionality for automated medium change, irradiation and fixation of cells. Exposure of

  8. Cellular respiration: replicating in vivo systems biology for in vitro exploration of human exposome, microbiome, and disease pathogenesis biomarkers

    EPA Science Inventory

    This editorial develops a philosophy for expanding the scope of Journal of Breath Research (JBR) into the realm of cellular level study, and links certain topics back to more traditional systemic research for understanding human health based on exhaled breath constituents. The ex...

  9. Effects of trona on the redox status of cellular system of male rats.

    PubMed

    Ajiboye, Taofeek O; Komolafe, Yesirat O; Yakubu, Musa T; Ogunbode, Simiat M

    2015-02-01

    The effects of trona (Kaun), a food additive, on the redox status of the liver and kidney of male Wistar rats were investigated. A total of 60 male rats (145 ± 2.52 g) were grouped into four: A, B, C and D, where group A (the control) received 1 mL of distilled water orally while those in groups B, C and D (test groups) received orally, same volume of trona preparation corresponding to 100, 200 and 400 mg/kg body weight, respectively, for 28 days. Administration of trona significantly reduced (p < 0.05) alkaline phosphatase activity in the liver and kidney with corresponding increases in the serum enzyme. Acid phosphatase activity increased significantly (p < 0.05) in the liver and kidney with no significant change (p > 0.05) in the activity of the serum enzyme. The activities of superoxide dismutase, catalase, glutathione peroxidase, glutathione reductase and the levels of reduced glutathione, vitamins C and E in the liver and kidney of the animals decreased significantly (p < 0.05). In contrast, malondialdehyde and lipid hydroperoxide of trona-treated animals increased significantly (p < 0.05) in liver and kidney. Overall, data from this study revealed that trona exhibited its toxic effect by suppressing or depleting the antioxidant systems and increasing the risk of attack by oxidants generated either from its metabolites or from other in vivo means on the rat cellular system. PMID:23293130

  10. Systemic molecular and cellular changes induced in rats upon inhalation of JP-8 petroleum fuel vapor.

    PubMed

    Hanas, Jay S; Bruce Briggs, G; Lerner, Megan R; Lightfoot, Stan A; Larabee, Jason L; Karsies, Todd J; Epstein, Robert B; Hanas, Rushie J; Brackett, Daniel J; Hocker, James R

    2010-05-01

    Limited information is available regarding systemic changes in mammals associated with exposures to petroleum/hydrocarbon fuels. In this study, systemic toxicity of JP-8 jet fuel was observed in a rat inhalation model at different JP-8 fuel vapor concentrations (250, 500, or 1000 mg/m(3), for 91 days). Gel electrophoresis and mass spectrometry sequencing identified the alpha-2 microglobulin protein to be elevated in rat kidney in a JP-8 dose-dependent manner. Western blot analysis of kidney and lung tissue extracts revealed JP-8 dependent elevation of inducible heat shock protein 70 (HSP70). Tissue changes were observed histologically (hematoxylin and eosin staining) in liver, kidney, lung, bone marrow, and heart, and more prevalently at medium or high JP-8 vapor phase exposures (500-1000 mg/m(3)) than at low vapor phase exposure (250 mg/m(3)) or non-JP-8 controls. JP-8 fuel-induced liver alterations included dilated sinusoids, cytoplasmic clumping, and fat cell deposition. Changes to the kidneys included reduced numbers of nuclei, and cytoplasmic dumping in the lumen of proximal convoluted tubules. JP-8 dependent lung alterations were edema and dilated alveolar capillaries, which allowed clumping of red blood cells (RBCs). Changes in the bone marrow in response to JP-8 included reduction of fat cells and fat globules, and cellular proliferation (RBCs, white blood cells-WBCs, and megakaryocytes). Heart tissue from JP-8 exposed animals contained increased numbers of inflammatory and fibroblast cells, as well as myofibril scarring. cDNA array analysis of heart tissue revealed a JP-8 dependent increase in atrial natriuretic peptide precursor mRNA and a decrease in voltage-gated potassium (K+) ion channel mRNA. PMID:20233090

  11. A functional screen for copper homeostasis genes identifies a pharmacologically tractable cellular system

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Copper is essential for the survival of aerobic organisms. If copper is not properly regulated in the body however, it can be extremely cytotoxic and genetic mutations that compromise copper homeostasis result in severe clinical phenotypes. Understanding how cells maintain optimal copper levels is therefore highly relevant to human health. Results We found that addition of copper (Cu) to culture medium leads to increased respiratory growth of yeast, a phenotype which we then systematically and quantitatively measured in 5050 homozygous diploid deletion strains. Cu’s positive effect on respiratory growth was quantitatively reduced in deletion strains representing 73 different genes, the function of which identify increased iron uptake as a cause of the increase in growth rate. Conversely, these effects were enhanced in strains representing 93 genes. Many of these strains exhibited respiratory defects that were specifically rescued by supplementing the growth medium with Cu. Among the genes identified are known and direct regulators of copper homeostasis, genes required to maintain low vacuolar pH, and genes where evidence supporting a functional link with Cu has been heretofore lacking. Roughly half of the genes are conserved in man, and several of these are associated with Mendelian disorders, including the Cu-imbalance syndromes Menkes and Wilson’s disease. We additionally demonstrate that pharmacological agents, including the approved drug disulfiram, can rescue Cu-deficiencies of both environmental and genetic origin. Conclusions A functional screen in yeast has expanded the list of genes required for Cu-dependent fitness, revealing a complex cellular system with implications for human health. Respiratory fitness defects arising from perturbations in this system can be corrected with pharmacological agents that increase intracellular copper concentrations. PMID:24708151

  12. Linking the VPS35 and EIF4G1 pathways in Parkinson's disease.

    PubMed

    Ross, Owen A; Cook, Casey; Petrucelli, Leonard

    2015-01-01

    Elucidating the underlying pathogenic pathways in Parkinson's disease will be critical for targeted drug development. In this issue of Neuron, Dhungel et al. (2015) utilize a yeast model to establish a link between VPS35 and EIF4G1 in α-synuclein-related neurodegeneration. PMID:25569341

  13. Adoption of 4G Mobile Services from the Female Student's Perspective: Case of Princess Nora University

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rawashdeh, Awni

    2015-01-01

    The aim this study was to examine the relationship between the perceived usefulness, perceived ease of use, perceived entertainment, attitude and the users' intention toward using the fourth-generation (4G) wireless mobile services. Data of this study were collected by survey with a cross sectional approach. The data were analyzed with factor…

  14. Guest editorial. Introduction to the special section: 4G Health--the long-term evolution of m-Health.

    PubMed

    Istepanaian, Robert S H; Zhang, Y-T

    2012-01-01

    In the last decade, the seminal term and concept of "m-health" were first defined and introduced in this transactions as "mobile computing, medical sensor, and communications technologies for healthcare." Since that special section, the m-health concept has become one of the key technological domains that reflected the key advances in remote healthcare and e-health systems. The m-health is currently bringing together major academic research and industry disciplines worldwide to achieve innovative solutions in the areas of healthcare delivery and technology sectors. From the wireless communications perspective, the current decade is expected to bring the introduction of new wireless standards and network systems with true mobile broadband and fast internet access healthcare services. These will be developed around what is currently called the fourth-generation (4G) mobile communication systems. In this editorial paper, we will introduce the new and novel concept of 4G health that represents the long-term evolution of m-health since the introduction of the concept in 2004. The special section also presents a snapshot of the recent advances in these areas and addresses some of the challenges and future implementation issues from the evolved m-health perspective. It will also present some of the concepts that can go beyond the traditional "m-health ecosystem" of the existing systems. The contributions presented in this special section represent some of these developments and illustrate the multidisciplinary nature of this important and emerging healthcare delivery concept. PMID:22271836

  15. 78 FR 8191 - Certain Wireless Devices With 3G and/or 4G Capabilities and Components Thereof; Institution of...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-02-05

    ... COMMISSION Certain Wireless Devices With 3G and/or 4G Capabilities and Components Thereof; Institution of... certain wireless devices with 3G and/or 4G capabilities and components thereof by reason of infringement... wireless devices with 3G and/or 4G capabilities and components thereof by reason of infringement of one...

  16. Thermal monitoring: Raman spectrometer system for remote measurement of cellular temperature on a microscopic scale.

    PubMed

    Pikov, Victor; Siegel, Peter H

    2010-01-01

    A simple setup is demonstrated for remote temperature monitoring of water, water-based media, and cells on a microscopic scale. The technique relies on recording changes in the shape of a stretching band of the hydroxyl group in liquid water at 3,100-3,700 cm(-1). Rather than direct measurements in the near-infrared (IR), a simple Raman spectrometer setup is realized. The measured Raman shifts are observed at near optical wavelengths using an inverted microscope with standard objectives in contrast to costly near-IR elements. This allows for simultaneous visible inspection through the same optical path. An inexpensive 671-nm diode pump laser (< 100 mW), standard dichroic and lowpass filters, and a commercial 600-1,000 nm spectrometer complete the instrument. Temperature changes of 1 degrees C are readily distinguished over a range consistent with cellular processes (25-45 degrees C) using integration times below 10 s. Greatly improved sensitivity was obtained by an automated two-peak fitting procedure. When combined with an optical camera, the instrument can be used to monitor changes in cell behavior as a function of temperature without the need for invasive probing. The instrument is very simple to realize, inexpensive compared with traditional Raman spectrometers and IR microscopes, and applicable to a wide range of problems in microthermometry of biological systems. In a first application of its kind, the instrument was used to successfully determine the temperature rise of a cluster of H1299 derived human lung cells adhered to polystyrene and immersed in phosphate-buffered saline (PBS) under exposure of RF millimeter wave radiation (60 GHz, 1.3, 2.6, and 5.2 mW/mm2). PMID:20176524

  17. Geospatial Data Stream Processing in Python Using FOSS4G Components

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McFerren, G.; van Zyl, T.

    2016-06-01

    One viewpoint of current and future IT systems holds that there is an increase in the scale and velocity at which data are acquired and analysed from heterogeneous, dynamic sources. In the earth observation and geoinformatics domains, this process is driven by the increase in number and types of devices that report location and the proliferation of assorted sensors, from satellite constellations to oceanic buoy arrays. Much of these data will be encountered as self-contained messages on data streams - continuous, infinite flows of data. Spatial analytics over data streams concerns the search for spatial and spatio-temporal relationships within and amongst data "on the move". In spatial databases, queries can assess a store of data to unpack spatial relationships; this is not the case on streams, where spatial relationships need to be established with the incomplete data available. Methods for spatially-based indexing, filtering, joining and transforming of streaming data need to be established and implemented in software components. This article describes the usage patterns and performance metrics of a number of well known FOSS4G Python software libraries within the data stream processing paradigm. In particular, we consider the RTree library for spatial indexing, the Shapely library for geometric processing and transformation and the PyProj library for projection and geodesic calculations over streams of geospatial data. We introduce a message oriented Python-based geospatial data streaming framework called Swordfish, which provides data stream processing primitives, functions, transports and a common data model for describing messages, based on the Open Geospatial Consortium Observations and Measurements (O&M) and Unidata Common Data Model (CDM) standards. We illustrate how the geospatial software components are integrated with the Swordfish framework. Furthermore, we describe the tight temporal constraints under which geospatial functionality can be invoked when

  18. Micro 3D cell culture systems for cellular behavior studies: Culture matrices, devices, substrates, and in-situ sensing methods.

    PubMed

    Choi, Jonghoon; Lee, Eun Kyu; Choo, Jaebum; Yuh, Junhan; Hong, Jong Wook

    2015-09-01

    Microfabricated systems equipped with 3D cell culture devices and in-situ cellular biosensing tools can be a powerful bionanotechnology platform to investigate a variety of biomedical applications. Various construction substrates such as plastics, glass, and paper are used for microstructures. When selecting a construction substrate, a key consideration is a porous microenvironment that allows for spheroid growth and mimics the extracellular matrix (ECM) of cell aggregates. Various bio-functionalized hydrogels are ideal candidates that mimic the natural ECM for 3D cell culture. When selecting an optimal and appropriate microfabrication method, both the intended use of the system and the characteristics and restrictions of the target cells should be carefully considered. For highly sensitive and near-cell surface detection of excreted cellular compounds, SERS-based microsystems capable of dual modal imaging have the potential to be powerful tools; however, the development of optical reporters and nanoprobes remains a key challenge. We expect that the microsystems capable of both 3D cell culture and cellular response monitoring would serve as excellent tools to provide fundamental cellular behavior information for various biomedical applications such as metastasis, wound healing, high throughput screening, tissue engineering, regenerative medicine, and drug discovery and development. PMID:26358782

  19. Two related trypanosomatid eIF4G homologues have functional differences compatible with distinct roles during translation initiation.

    PubMed

    Moura, Danielle M N; Reis, Christian R S; Xavier, Camila C; da Costa Lima, Tamara D; Lima, Rodrigo P; Carrington, Mark; de Melo Neto, Osvaldo P

    2015-01-01

    In higher eukaryotes, eIF4A, eIF4E and eIF4G homologues interact to enable mRNA recruitment to the ribosome. eIF4G acts as a scaffold for these interactions and also interacts with other proteins of the translational machinery. Trypanosomatid protozoa have multiple homologues of eIF4E and eIF4G and the precise function of each remains unclear. Here, 2 previously described eIF4G homologues, EIF4G3 and EIF4G4, were further investigated. In vitro, both homologues bound EIF4AI, but with different interaction properties. Binding to distinct eIF4Es was also confirmed; EIF4G3 bound EIF4E4 while EIF4G4 bound EIF4E3, both these interactions required similar binding motifs. EIF4G3, but not EIF4G4, interacted with PABP1, a poly-A binding protein homolog. Work in vivo with Trypanosoma brucei showed that both EIF4G3 and EIF4G4 are cytoplasmic and essential for viability. Depletion of EIF4G3 caused a rapid reduction in total translation while EIF4G4 depletion led to changes in morphology but no substantial inhibition of translation. Site-directed mutagenesis was used to disrupt interactions of the eIF4Gs with either eIF4E or eIF4A, causing different levels of growth inhibition. Overall the results show that only EIF4G3, with its cap binding partner EIF4E4, plays a major role in translational initiation. PMID:25826663

  20. Two related trypanosomatid eIF4G homologues have functional differences compatible with distinct roles during translation initiation

    PubMed Central

    Moura, Danielle MN; Reis, Christian RS; Xavier, Camila C; da Costa Lima, Tamara D; Lima, Rodrigo P; Carrington, Mark; de Melo Neto, Osvaldo P

    2015-01-01

    In higher eukaryotes, eIF4A, eIF4E and eIF4G homologues interact to enable mRNA recruitment to the ribosome. eIF4G acts as a scaffold for these interactions and also interacts with other proteins of the translational machinery. Trypanosomatid protozoa have multiple homologues of eIF4E and eIF4G and the precise function of each remains unclear. Here, 2 previously described eIF4G homologues, EIF4G3 and EIF4G4, were further investigated. In vitro, both homologues bound EIF4AI, but with different interaction properties. Binding to distinct eIF4Es was also confirmed; EIF4G3 bound EIF4E4 while EIF4G4 bound EIF4E3, both these interactions required similar binding motifs. EIF4G3, but not EIF4G4, interacted with PABP1, a poly-A binding protein homolog. Work in vivo with Trypanosoma brucei showed that both EIF4G3 and EIF4G4 are cytoplasmic and essential for viability. Depletion of EIF4G3 caused a rapid reduction in total translation while EIF4G4 depletion led to changes in morphology but no substantial inhibition of translation. Site-directed mutagenesis was used to disrupt interactions of the eIF4Gs with either eIF4E or eIF4A, causing different levels of growth inhibition. Overall the results show that only EIF4G3, with its cap binding partner EIF4E4, plays a major role in translational initiation. PMID:25826663

  1. Modeling step-pool systems in steep streams by a cellular automaton sandpile model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saletti, M.; Molnar, P.; Hassan, M. A.; Zimmermann, A. E.; Fraccarollo, L.

    2013-12-01

    Alluvial step-pool systems in gravel-bed rivers have been widely studied in the last decades in both field and flume experiments. The focus has been on step formation, the geometry of step-pool sequences, the spatial and temporal variation in step properties, and the hydraulics of flow over steps. Scientists have focused on the conditions under which step-pool sequences form, remain stable and eventually collapse (Church and Zimmermann, 2007; Curran 2007). Step-pool systems are usually stable for very long periods, in which the macro-morphology does not change, even if single step-pool units may change during small flood events. Step structures typically collapse during intense flood events, with return times of 20÷50 years. These breakdown events produce an avalanche-like pulse of sediment and a rearrangement in the channel morphology. Despite a rich literature on the processes of step formation and collapse, the modeling thereof is still in its infancy. It has been proposed by Church and Zimmermann (2007) that step formation is ruled mainly by random location of big boulders along the channel--these grains act as keystones which block smaller particles and create a channel-spanning step. The nonlinear threshold-driven processes of jamming and collapse, together with the stochastic nature of bedload transport and the random location of the keystones, makes it impossible to model the step-pool system in a deterministic way. Instead, we hypothesize that step-pool systems during intense sediment transport events behave like open, dynamical and dissipative systems close to a critical state, and we adopt the modeling framework of self-organized criticality (Bak et al., 1988) in this description. To test our hypothesis we developed a cellular automaton model based on ideas of the simple sandpile model in 1-D and 2-D. Grains are added at the top of a channel randomly, they pass through the channel and form bed structures, and ultimately exit the channel at the

  2. Thermoregulation in unrestrained rats during and after exposure to 1.5-4 G

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Giacchino, J.; Horwitz, B. A.; Horowitz, J. M.

    1979-01-01

    Unrestrained rats were exposed to cold for 1 h during and immediately after exposure to hypergravic fields (1.5-4 G) to determine if they recover their ability to thermoregulate on reentry to 1-G conditions. In contrast to the decreased body temperatures observed when cold exposure occurred concurrently with acceleration, hypothalamic, carotid, and brown fat temperatures did not fall when rats were exposed to cold immediately after return to 1 G. These results support the hypothesis that the thermoregulatory alterations seen under hypergravic conditions are manifestations of an effect of ongoing exposure to hypergravity and can be reversed on termination of acceleration. The reversibility of the thermoregulatory impairment is apparently unaffected by the magnitude of the acceleration field over a range of 1.5-4 G.

  3. Adipose depots differ in cellularity, adipokines produced, gene expression, and cell systems

    PubMed Central

    Dodson, Michael V; Du, Min; Wang, Songbo; Bergen, Werner G; Fernyhough-Culver, Melinda; Basu, Urmila; Poulos, Sylvia P; Hausman, Gary J

    2014-01-01

    The race to manage the health concerns related to excess fat deposition has spawned a proliferation of clinical and basic research efforts to understand variables including dietary uptake, metabolism, and lipid deposition by adipocytes. A full appreciation of these variables must also include a depot-specific understanding of content and location in order to elucidate mechanisms governing cellular development and regulation of fat deposition. Because adipose tissue depots contain various cell types, differences in the cellularity among and within adipose depots are presently being documented to ascertain functional differences. This has led to the possibility of there being, within any one adipose depot, cellular distinctions that essentially result in adipose depots within depots. The papers comprising this issue will underscore numerous differences in cellularity (development, histogenesis, growth, metabolic function, regulation) of different adipose depots. Such information is useful in deciphering adipose depot involvement both in normal physiology and in pathology. Obesity, diabetes, metabolic syndrome, carcass composition of meat animals, performance of elite athletes, physiology/pathophysiology of aging, and numerous other diseases might be altered with a greater understanding of adipose depots and the cells that comprise them—including stem cells—during initial development and subsequent periods of normal/abnormal growth into senescence. Once thought to be dormant and innocuous, the adipocyte is emerging as a dynamic and influential cell and research will continue to identify complex physiologic regulation of processes involved in adipose depot physiology. PMID:26317047

  4. The inflammatory function of renal glomerular mesangial cells and their interaction with the cellular immune system.

    PubMed

    Radeke, H H; Resch, K

    1992-09-01

    The autoimmune nature of chronic progredient glomerular diseases has been well established. Like in other chronic inflammatory diseases, the active role of organ-borne cells has become increasingly apparent--both for the inflammatory process and for the initiation and perpetuation of the immune reaction. In most forms of glomerulonephritis, intrinsic glomerular mesangial cells are likely candidates to come into intimate contact with immune cells such as monocytes or lymphocytes. On the basis of cell culture studies we would like to integrate the current knowledge available about the responsiveness of mesangial cells to inflammatory agents and the resulting secretory capacity and, moreover, their possible role in sustaining chronic inflammatory injury and autoimmune reactions through a direct interaction with lymphocytes. Apart from being responsive to physiological stimuli such as angiotensin II, glomerular mesangial cells are predominantly activated by agents related to inflammation. This includes exogenous substances such as the components of gram-negative bacteria and an array of highly potent immunological stimuli like antigen-antibody complexes, activated complement, or various cytokines. The transformation of resting mesangial cells to proliferating cells with an accompanying expansion of their secretory profile and responsiveness is due to mediators like platelet-derived growth factor, transforming growth factor, and others. Numerous low-molecular-weight substances (O2-, H2O2, NO, platelet-activating factor, eicosanoids), proteins (proteinases, matrix components, interleukins 1 and 6, colony-stimulating factors, growth factors), and cell-surface molecules released or expressed by mesangial cells participate in the inflammatory process. Among these products interleukin 1 and/or 6, class II major histocompatibility antigen and integrins also support an interaction with the cellular immune system. It has been well documented that mesangial cells induced in

  5. Analysis of the Throughput of the Cellular Radio-Communication Systems Using Coordinated Data Transmission to Suppress Mutual Unintended Interference

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Morozov, G. V.; Davydov, A. V.; Mal'tsev, A. A.

    2014-08-01

    We present the results of the comparative analysis of two data-transmission schemes of the fourth-generation cellular communication standard LTE-A, which use the "quasistatic" and "dynamic" coordination at the neighbor base stations. Both schemes are used to suppress mutual unintended co-channel interference resulting from the repeated use of one frequency channel by the neighbor base stations. The general case of the heterogeneous cellular radio-communication system with different station types (macro- and picostations) is considered. In this work, the efficiency of the coordinated-transmission schemes is studied along with the adaptive algorithms for the dataflow planning and control. The use of both coordination schemes is comparatively analyzed. An original algorithm for redistribution of the user connections is proposed for the dynamic scheme and the dependence of the communication-system throughput on the radio-network configuration and the number of base stations, that participate in the coordination is studied.

  6. Preservation, induction or incorporation of metabolism into the in vitro cellular system - views to current opportunities and limitations.

    PubMed

    Pelkonen, Olavi; Turpeinen, Miia; Hakkola, Jukka; Abass, Khaled; Pasanen, Markku; Raunio, Hannu; Vähäkangas, Kirsi

    2013-08-01

    Metabolism plays a major role in the toxicokinetics of a vast majority of substances, although other dispositional processes have to be considered as well. There are currently a large repertoire of primary or permanent cells/cell lines with variable metabolic capacities and a number of experimental approaches to preserve, induce or incorporate biotransformation enzymes for the development of metabolically competent cells. Many of these cell lines possess also other important dispositional characteristics mimicking the in vivo situation. Such cell models can be employed in studies targeted for estimating metabolic disposition of a substance or the production of active metabolites and ensuing toxic end points. There are also ways to collect metabolic information by using a large number of non-cellular systems and build a coherent view on metabolism, although not really replacing the actual cellular system. Early consideration of metabolic competence is a necessary prerequisite for the validation and use of cellular systems for toxicity studies and in vitro-in vivo extrapolation. PMID:22728233

  7. 47 CFR 22.909 - Cellular markets.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 2 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Cellular markets. 22.909 Section 22.909... Cellular Radiotelephone Service § 22.909 Cellular markets. Cellular markets are standard geographic areas used by the FCC for administrative convenience in the licensing of cellular systems. Cellular...

  8. 47 CFR 22.909 - Cellular markets.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 2 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Cellular markets. 22.909 Section 22.909... Cellular Radiotelephone Service § 22.909 Cellular markets. Cellular markets are standard geographic areas used by the FCC for administrative convenience in the licensing of cellular systems. Cellular...

  9. 47 CFR 90.672 - Unacceptable interference to non-cellular 800 MHz licensees from 800 MHz cellular systems or part...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... Business/Industrial Land Transportation Pool. (a) Definition. Except as provided in 47 CFR 90.617(k... 900 MHz Business/Industrial Land Transportation Pool. 90.672 Section 90.672 Telecommunication FEDERAL... Procedures and Process-Unacceptable Interference § 90.672 Unacceptable interference to non-cellular 800...

  10. 47 CFR 90.672 - Unacceptable interference to non-cellular 800 MHz licensees from 800 MHz cellular systems or part...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... Business/Industrial Land Transportation Pool. (a) Definition. Except as provided in 47 CFR 90.617(k... 900 MHz Business/Industrial Land Transportation Pool. 90.672 Section 90.672 Telecommunication FEDERAL... Procedures and Process-Unacceptable Interference § 90.672 Unacceptable interference to non-cellular 800...

  11. 47 CFR 90.672 - Unacceptable interference to non-cellular 800 MHz licensees from 800 MHz cellular systems or part...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... Business/Industrial Land Transportation Pool. (a) Definition. Except as provided in 47 CFR 90.617(k... 900 MHz Business/Industrial Land Transportation Pool. 90.672 Section 90.672 Telecommunication FEDERAL... Procedures and Process-Unacceptable Interference § 90.672 Unacceptable interference to non-cellular 800...

  12. Eukaryotic initiation factor 4B and the poly(A)-binding protein bind eIF4G competitively.

    PubMed

    Cheng, Shijun; Gallie, Daniel R

    2013-01-01

    The eukaryotic translation initiation factor (eIF) 4G functions as a scaffold protein that assembles components of the translation initiation complex required to recruit the 40S ribosomal subunit to an mRNA. Although many eukaryotes express two highly similar eIF4G isoforms, those in plants are highly divergent in size and sequence from one another and are referred to as eIF4G and eIFiso4G. Although the domain organization of eIFiso4G differs substantially from eIF4G orthologs in other species, the domain organization of plant eIF4G is largely unknown despite the fact that it is more similar in size and sequence to eIF4G of other eukaryotes. In this study, we show that eIF4G differs from eIFiso4G in that it contains two distinct interaction domains for the poly(A) binding protein (PABP) and eIF4B but is similar to eIFiso4G in having two eIF4A interaction domains. PABP and eIF4B bind the same N-terminal region of eIF4G as they do to a region C-proximal to the HEAT-1 domain in the middle domain of eIF4G, resulting in competitive binding between eIF4B and PABP to each site. eIF4G also differs from eIFiso4G in that no competitive binding was observed between PABP and eIF4A or between eIF4B and eIF4A to its HEAT-1-containing region. These results demonstrate that despite substantial differences in size, sequence, and domain organization, PABP and eIF4B bind to eIF4G and eIFiso4G competitively. PMID:26824014

  13. Activation of cap-independent translation by variant eukaryotic initiation factor 4G in vivo

    PubMed Central

    Kaiser, Constanze; Dobrikova, Elena Y.; Bradrick, Shelton S.; Shveygert, Mayya; Herbert, James T.; Gromeier, Matthias

    2008-01-01

    Protein synthesis is tightly controlled by assembly of an intricate ribonucleoprotein complex at the m7GTP-cap on eukaryotic mRNAs. Ensuing linear scanning of the 5′ untranslated region (UTR) is believed to transfer the preinitiation complex to the initiation codon. Eukaryotic mRNAs are characterized by significant 5′ UTR heterogeneity, raising the possibility of differential control of translation initiation rate at individual mRNAs. Curiously, many mRNAs with unconventional, highly structured 5′ UTRs encode proteins with central biological roles in growth control, metabolism, or stress response. The 5′ UTRs of such mRNAs may influence protein synthesis rate in multiple ways, but most significantly they have been implicated in mediating alternative means of translation initiation. Cap-independent initiation bypasses strict control over the formation of initiation intermediates at the m7GTP cap. However, the molecular mechanisms that favor alternative means of ribosome recruitment are not understood. Here we provide evidence that eukaryotic initiation factor (eIF) 4G controls cap-independent translation initiation at the c-myc and vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) 5′ UTRs in vivo. Cap-independent translation was investigated in tetracycline-inducible cell lines expressing either full-length eIF4G or a C-terminal fragment (Ct) lacking interaction with eIF4E and poly(A) binding protein. Expression of Ct, but not intact eIF4G, potently stimulated cap-independent initiation at the c-myc/VEGF 5′ UTRs. In vitro RNA-binding assays suggest that stimulation of cap-independent translation initiation by Ct is due to direct association with the c-myc/VEGF 5′ UTR, enabling 43S preinitiation complex recruitment. Our work demonstrates that variant translation initiation factors enable unconventional translation initiation at mRNA subsets with distinct structural features. PMID:18755839

  14. Abnormalities in the cellular phase of blood fibrinolytic activity in systemic lupus erythematosus and in venous thromboembolism

    SciTech Connect

    Moroz, L.A.; MacLean, L.D.; Langleben, D.

    1986-09-15

    Fibrinolytic activities of whole blood and plasma were determined by /sup 125/I-fibrin radiometric assay in 16 normal subjects, and in 11 patients with systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE), 14 with progressive systemic sclerosis (PSS), 23 with venous thromboembolic disease, and 20 patients awaiting elective surgery. Mean whole blood and plasma activities for patients with PSS, and for those awaiting elective surgery, were similar to normal values, as was the mean plasma activity in patients with SLE. However, mean whole blood activity in SLE was significantly decreased compared with normals (p less than 0.05), with mean plasma activity accounting for 44% of mean whole blood activity (compared with 17% in normal subjects), representing a 67% decrease in mean calculated cellular phase activity in SLE, when compared with normals. Since the numbers of cells (neutrophils, monocytes) possibly involved in cellular activity were not decreased, the findings suggest a functional defect in fibrinolytic activity of one or more blood cell types in SLE. An additional finding was the participation of the cellular phase as well as the well-known plasma phase of blood in the fibrinolytic response to thromboembolism.

  15. A tandem regression-outlier analysis of a ligand cellular system for key structural modifications around ligand binding

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background A tandem technique of hard equipment is often used for the chemical analysis of a single cell to first isolate and then detect the wanted identities. The first part is the separation of wanted chemicals from the bulk of a cell; the second part is the actual detection of the important identities. To identify the key structural modifications around ligand binding, the present study aims to develop a counterpart of tandem technique for cheminformatics. A statistical regression and its outliers act as a computational technique for separation. Results A PPARγ (peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor gamma) agonist cellular system was subjected to such an investigation. Results show that this tandem regression-outlier analysis, or the prioritization of the context equations tagged with features of the outliers, is an effective regression technique of cheminformatics to detect key structural modifications, as well as their tendency of impact to ligand binding. Conclusions The key structural modifications around ligand binding are effectively extracted or characterized out of cellular reactions. This is because molecular binding is the paramount factor in such ligand cellular system and key structural modifications around ligand binding are expected to create outliers. Therefore, such outliers can be captured by this tandem regression-outlier analysis. PMID:23627990

  16. The C-terminal domain of eukaryotic protein synthesis initiation factor (eIF) 4G is sufficient to support cap-independent translation in the absence of eIF4E.

    PubMed Central

    Ohlmann, T; Rau, M; Pain, V M; Morley, S J

    1996-01-01

    The foot and mouth disease virus, a picornavirus, encodes two forms of a cysteine proteinase (leader or L protease) that bisects the EIF4G polypeptide of the initiation factor complex eIF4F into N-terminal (Nt) and C-terminal (Ct) domains. Previously we showed that, although in vitro cleavage of the translation initiation factor, eIF4G, with L protease decreases cap-dependent translation, the cleavage products themselves may directly promote cap-dependent protein synthesis. We now demonstrate that translation of uncapped mRNAs normally exhibits a strong requirement for eIF4F. However, this dependence is abolished when eIF4G is cleaved, with the Ct domain capable of supporting translation in the absence of the Nt domain. In contrast, the efficient translation of the second cistron of bicistronic mRNAs, directed by two distinct Internal Ribosome Entry Segments (IRES), exhibits no requirement for eIF4E but is dependent upon either intact eIF4G or the Ct domain. These results demonstrate that: (i) the apparent requirement for eIF4F for internal initiation on IRES-driven mRNAs can be fulfilled by the Ct proteolytic cleavage product; (ii) when eIF4G is cleaved, the Ct domain can also support cap-independent translation of cellular mRNAs not possessing an IRES element, in the absence of eIF4E; and (iii) when eIF4G is intact, translation of cellular mRNAs, whether capped or uncapped, is strictly dependent upon eIF4E. These data complement recent work in other laboratories defining the binding sites for other initiation factors on the eIF4G molecule. Images PMID:8635470

  17. Eukaryotic Translation Initiation Factor eIFiso4G Is Required to Regulate Violaxanthin De-epoxidase Expression in Arabidopsis*

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Zhong; Jolley, Blair; Caldwell, Christian; Gallie, Daniel R.

    2014-01-01

    The eukaryotic translation initiation factor (eIF) 4G is a scaffold protein that organizes the assembly of those initiation factors needed to recruit the 40 S ribosomal subunit to an mRNA. Plants, like many eukaryotes, express two eIF4G isoforms. eIFiso4G, one of the isoforms specific to plants, is unique among eukaryotic eIF4G proteins in that it is highly divergent and unusually small in size, raising the possibility of functional specialization. In this study, the role of eIFiso4G in plant growth was investigated using null mutants for the eIF4G isoforms in Arabidopsis. eIFiso4G loss of function mutants exhibited smaller cell, leaf, plant size, and biomass accumulation that correlated with its reduced photosynthetic activity, phenotypes not observed with the eIF4G loss of function mutant. Although no change in photorespiration or dark respiration was observed in the eIFiso4G loss of function mutant, a reduction in chlorophyll levels and an increase in the level of nonphotochemical quenching were observed. An increase in xanthophyll cycle activity and the generation of reactive oxygen species contributed to the qE and qI components of nonphotochemical quenching, respectively. An increase in the transcript and protein levels of violaxanthin de-epoxidase in the eIFiso4G loss of function mutant and an increase in its xanthophyll de-epoxidation state correlated with the higher qE associated with loss of eIFiso4G expression. These observations indicate that eIFiso4G expression is required to regulate violaxanthin de-epoxidase expression and to support photosynthetic activity. PMID:24706761

  18. Systems Glycobiology: Integrating Glycogenomics, Glycoproteomics, Glycomics, and Other 'Omics Data Sets to Characterize Cellular Glycosylation Processes.

    PubMed

    Bennun, Sandra V; Hizal, Deniz Baycin; Heffner, Kelley; Can, Ozge; Zhang, Hui; Betenbaugh, Michael J

    2016-08-14

    The number of proteins encoded in the human genome has been estimated at between 20,000 and 25,000, despite estimates that the entire proteome contains more than a million proteins. One reason for this difference is due to many post-translational modifications of protein that contribute to proteome complexity. Among these, glycosylation is of particular relevance because it serves to modify a large number of cellular proteins. Glycogenomics, glycoproteomics, glycomics, and glycoinformatics are helping to accelerate our understanding of the cellular events involved in generating the glycoproteome, the variety of glycan structures possible, and the importance of roles that glycans play in therapeutics and disease. Indeed, interest in glycosylation has expanded rapidly over the past decade, as large amounts of experimental 'omics data relevant to glycosylation processing have accumulated. Furthermore, new and more sophisticated glycoinformatics tools and databases are now available for glycan and glycosylation pathway analysis. Here, we summarize some of the recent advances in both experimental profiling and analytical methods involving N- and O-linked glycosylation processing for biotechnological and medically relevant cells together with the unique opportunities and challenges associated with interrogating and assimilating multiple, disparate high-throughput glycosylation data sets. This emerging era of advanced glycomics will lead to the discovery of key glycan biomarkers linked to diseases and help establish a better understanding of physiology and improved control of glycosylation processing in diverse cells and tissues important to disease and production of recombinant therapeutics. Furthermore, methodologies that facilitate the integration of glycomics measurements together with other 'omics data sets will lead to a deeper understanding and greater insights into the nature of glycosylation as a complex cellular process. PMID:27423401

  19. A Novel Cell Traction Force Microscopy to Study Multi-Cellular System

    PubMed Central

    Anand, Sandeep V.; Saif, Taher A.

    2014-01-01

    Traction forces exerted by adherent cells on their microenvironment can mediate many critical cellular functions. Accurate quantification of these forces is essential for mechanistic understanding of mechanotransduction. However, most existing methods of quantifying cellular forces are limited to single cells in isolation, whereas most physiological processes are inherently multi-cellular in nature where cell-cell and cell-microenvironment interactions determine the emergent properties of cell clusters. In the present study, a robust finite-element-method-based cell traction force microscopy technique is developed to estimate the traction forces produced by multiple isolated cells as well as cell clusters on soft substrates. The method accounts for the finite thickness of the substrate. Hence, cell cluster size can be larger than substrate thickness. The method allows computing the traction field from the substrate displacements within the cells' and clusters' boundaries. The displacement data outside these boundaries are not necessary. The utility of the method is demonstrated by computing the traction generated by multiple monkey kidney fibroblasts (MKF) and human colon cancerous (HCT-8) cells in close proximity, as well as by large clusters. It is found that cells act as individual contractile groups within clusters for generating traction. There may be multiple of such groups in the cluster, or the entire cluster may behave a single group. Individual cells do not form dipoles, but serve as a conduit of force (transmission lines) over long distances in the cluster. The cell-cell force can be either tensile or compressive depending on the cell-microenvironment interactions. PMID:24901766

  20. Microbial Consortia Engineering for Cellular Factories: in vitro to in silico systems

    PubMed Central

    Bernstein, Hans C; Carlson, Ross P

    2012-01-01

    This mini-review discusses the current state of experimental and computational microbial consortia engineering with a focus on cellular factories. A discussion of promising ecological theories central to community resource usage is presented to facilitate interpretation of consortial designs. Recent case studies exemplifying different resource usage motifs and consortial assembly templates are presented. The review also highlights in silico approaches to design and to analyze consortia with an emphasis on stoichiometric modeling methods. The discipline of microbial consortia engineering possesses a widely accepted potential to generate highly novel and effective bio-catalysts for applications from biofuels to specialty chemicals to enhanced mineral recovery. PMID:24688677

  1. Depression correlated with cellular immunity in systemic immunodeficient Epstein-Barr virus syndrome (SIDES).

    PubMed

    Allen, A D; Tilkian, S M

    1986-03-01

    We conducted studies on the peripheral blood of 12 depressed patients with previous diagnoses of mood and/or personality disorders. These patients, and other depressives we observed informally, were resistant to infectious mononucleosis during an epidemic of that illness. All 12 had serologic evidence of a chronic or recrudescent viremia caused by the Epstein-Barr virus (EBV), the infectious agent in infectious mononucleosis. Additional evidence that EBV viremia may be causally related to depression was provided by a strong correlation between the intensity of depressive symptoms and the cellular immune response to the EBV infection. PMID:3005245

  2. A telemedicine wound care model using 4G with smart phones or smart glasses

    PubMed Central

    Ye, Junna; Zuo, Yanhai; Xie, Ting; Wu, Minjie; Ni, Pengwen; Kang, Yutian; Yu, Xiaoping; Sun, Xiaofang; Huang, Yao; Lu, Shuliang

    2016-01-01

    Abstract To assess the feasibility of a wound care model using 4th-generation mobile communication technology standards (4G) with smart phones or smart glasses for wound management. This wound care model is an interactive, real-time platform for implementing telemedicine changing wound dressings, or doing operations. It was set up in March 2015 between Jinhua in Zhejiang province and Shanghai, China, which are 328 km apart. It comprised of a video application (APP), 4G net, smart phones or smart glasses, and a central server. This model service has been used in 30 patients with wounds on their lower extremities for 109 times in 1 month. Following a short learning curve, the service worked well and was deemed to be user-friendly. Two (6.7%) patients had wounds healed, while others still required wound dressing changes after the study finished. Both local surgeons and patients showed good acceptance of this model (100% and 83.33%, respectively). This telemedicine model is feasible and valuable because it provides an opportunity of medical service about wound healing in remote areas where specialists are scarce. PMID:27495023

  3. Effects of phthalates on the human corneal endothelial cell line B4G12.

    PubMed

    Krüger, Tanja; Cao, Yi; Kjærgaard, Søren K; Knudsen, Lisbeth E; Bonefeld-Jørgensen, Eva C

    2012-01-01

    Phthalates are industrial chemicals used in many cosmetics. We evaluated an in vitro model for eye irritancy testing using the human corneal endothelial cell line B4G12. Cell proliferation and toxicity were assessed after exposing to di-n-butyl phthalate (DBP), benzyl butyl phthalate (BBP), di-2-ethylhexyl phthalate (DEHP), diisodecyl phthalate (DIDP), di-n-octyl phthalate (DnOP), and di-isononyl phthalate (DINP). Gene expression and secretion of inflammatory cytokines were evaluated after exposure to DBP. Decreased cell proliferation was observed for the phthalates DBP, BBP, and DEHP, and cell toxicity was observed for DBP and BBP. Upon DBP exposure at nontoxic concentrations, a significant increased gene expression and cytokine cell secretion were observed for interleukin-1β (IL-1β) and IL-8, and also an increased IL-6 secretion was observed. In conclusion, the human corneal endothelial cell line B4G12 may be a potential model for inflammatory eye irritancy testing of phthalates. PMID:22723514

  4. Cellular Biology in Terms of Stochastic Nonlinear Biochemical Dynamics: Emergent Properties, Isogenetic Variations and Chemical System Inheritability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qian, Hong

    2010-12-01

    Based on a stochastic, nonlinear, open biochemical reaction system perspective, we present an analytical theory for cellular biochemical processes. The chemical master equation (CME) approach provides a unifying mathematical framework for cellular modeling. We apply this theory to both self-regulating gene networks and phosphorylation-dephosphorylation signaling modules with feedbacks. Two types of bistability are illustrated in mesoscopic biochemical systems: one that has a macroscopic, deterministic counterpart and another that does not. In certain cases, the latter stochastic bistability is shown to be a "ghost" of the extinction phenomenon. We argue the thermal fluctuations inherent in molecular processes do not disappear in mesoscopic cell-sized nonlinear systems; rather they manifest themselves as isogenetic variations on a different time scale. Isogenetic biochemical variations in terms of the stochastic attractors can have extremely long lifetime. Transitions among discrete stochastic attractors spend most of the time in "waiting", exhibit punctuated equilibria. It can be naturally passed to "daughter cells" via a simple growth and division process. The CME system follows a set of nonequilibrium thermodynamic laws that include non-increasing free energy F( t) with external energy drive Q hk ≥0, and total entropy production rate e p =- dF/ dt+ Q hk ≥0. In the thermodynamic limit, with a system's size being infinitely large, the nonlinear bistability in the CME exhibits many of the characteristics of macroscopic equilibrium phase transition.

  5. High resolution light-sheet based high-throughput imaging cytometry system enables visualization of intra-cellular organelles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Regmi, Raju; Mohan, Kavya; Mondal, Partha Pratim

    2014-09-01

    Visualization of intracellular organelles is achieved using a newly developed high throughput imaging cytometry system. This system interrogates the microfluidic channel using a sheet of light rather than the existing point-based scanning techniques. The advantages of the developed system are many, including, single-shot scanning of specimens flowing through the microfluidic channel at flow rate ranging from micro- to nano- lit./min. Moreover, this opens-up in-vivo imaging of sub-cellular structures and simultaneous cell counting in an imaging cytometry system. We recorded a maximum count of 2400 cells/min at a flow-rate of 700 nl/min, and simultaneous visualization of fluorescently-labeled mitochondrial network in HeLa cells during flow. The developed imaging cytometry system may find immediate application in biotechnology, fluorescence microscopy and nano-medicine.

  6. Cellular activation in limbic brain systems during social play behaviour in rats

    PubMed Central

    van Kerkhof, Linda W.M.; Trezza, Viviana; Mulder, Tessa; Gao, Ping; Voorn, Pieter; Vanderschuren, Louk J.M.J.

    2013-01-01

    Positive social interactions during the juvenile and adolescent phases of life are essential for proper social and cognitive development in mammals, including humans. During this developmental period, there is a marked increase in peer-peer interactions, signified by the abundance of social play behaviour. Despite its importance for behavioural development, our knowledge of the neural underpinnings of social play behaviour is limited. Therefore, the purpose of this study was to map the neural circuits involved in social play behaviour in rats. This was achieved by examining cellular activity after social play using the immediate early gene c-fos as a marker. After a session of social play behaviour, pronounced increases in c-fos expression were observed in the medial prefrontal cortex, medial and ventral orbitofrontal cortex, dorsal striatum, nucleus accumbens core and shell, lateral amygdala, several thalamic nuclei, dorsal raphe and the pedunculopontine tegmental nucleus. Importantly, the cellular activity patterns after social play were topographically organised in this network, as indicated by play-specific correlations in c-fos activity between regions with known direct connections. These correlations suggest involvement in social play behaviour of the projections from the medial prefrontal cortex to the striatum, and of amygdala and monoaminergic inputs to frontal cortex and striatum. The analyses presented here outline a topographically organised neural network implicated in processes such as reward, motivation and cognitive control over behaviour, which mediates social play behaviour in rats. PMID:23670540

  7. Mitotic phosphorylation of eukaryotic initiation factor 4G1 (eIF4G1) at Ser1232 by Cdk1:cyclin B inhibits eIF4A helicase complex binding with RNA.

    PubMed

    Dobrikov, Mikhail I; Shveygert, Mayya; Brown, Michael C; Gromeier, Matthias

    2014-02-01

    During mitosis, global translation is suppressed, while synthesis of proteins with vital mitotic roles must go on. Prior evidence suggests that the mitotic translation shift involves control of initiation. Yet, no signals specifically targeting translation initiation factors during mitosis have been identified. We used phosphoproteomics to investigate the central translation initiation scaffold and "ribosome adaptor," eukaryotic initiation factor 4G1 (eIF4G1) in interphase or nocodazole-arrested mitotic cells. This approach and kinase inhibition assays, in vitro phosphorylation with recombinant kinase, and kinase depletion-reconstitution experiments revealed that Ser1232 in eIF4G1 is phosphorylated by cyclin-dependent kinase 1 (Cdk1):cyclin B during mitosis. Ser1232 is located in an unstructured region of the C-terminal portion of eIF4G1 that coordinates assembly of the eIF4G/-4A/-4B helicase complex and binding of the mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) signal-integrating kinase, Mnk. Intense phosphorylation of Ser1232 in mitosis strongly enhanced the interactions of eIF4A with HEAT domain 2 of eIF4G and decreased association of eIF4G/-4A with RNA. Our findings implicate phosphorylation of eIF4G1(Ser1232) by Cdk1:cyclin B and its inhibitory effects on eIF4A helicase activity in the mitotic translation initiation shift. PMID:24248602

  8. Endogenous stimuli-sensitive multistage polymeric micelleplex anticancer drug delivery system for efficient tumor penetration and cellular internalization.

    PubMed

    Li, Junjie; Ke, Wendong; Li, Hui; Zha, Zengshi; Han, Yu; Ge, Zhishen

    2015-10-28

    To efficiently deliver anticancer drugs to the entire tumor tissue and cancer cells, an endogenous stimuli-sensitive multistage polymeric micelleplex drug delivery system is developed via electrostatic complexation between poly(ethylene glycol)-block-poly[(N'-dimethylmaleoyl-2-aminoethyl)aspartamide]-block-poly(ε-caprolactone) (PEG-b-PAsp(EDA-DM)-b-PCL) triblock copolymer micelles and cisplatin prodrug (Pt(IV))-conjugated cationic poly(amidoamine) dendrimers (PAMAM-Pt(IV)). The micelleplexes maintain structural stability at pH 7.4 ensuring long blood circulation and high tumor accumulation level, while they exhibit triggered release of secondary PAMAM-Pt(IV) dendrimer nanocarriers at tumoral acidity (≈pH 6.8) due to acid-labile charge-reversal properties of PAsp(EDA-DM) component under mildly acidic condition. The released PAMAM delivery nanocarriers with small size and slightly positive charges exhibit significantly deep tumor tissue penetration and efficient cellular internalization, followed by release of active cisplatin anticancer drug in intracellular reducing medium. In vivo investigation reveals that the Pt(IV)-loading micelleplexes significantly suppress tumor growth via intravenous injection due to synergistic effect of long circulation in bloodstream, high tumor accumulation, deep tumor tissue penetration, and efficient cellular internalization. Thus, the micelleplexes with stimuli-responsive multistage release feature show great potentials for better therapeutic efficacy of cancer especially through enhanced tumor penetration and cellular internalization. PMID:26346421

  9. Enhanced translation initiation factor 4G levels correlate with production levels of monoclonal antibodies in recombinant CHO cell lines.

    PubMed

    Pavitt, Graham D

    2016-03-15

    Using cells to manufacture protein-based therapeutics or biopharmaceuticals is a rapidly expanding industrial activity. Chinese hamster ovary (CHO) cells are the most frequently used mammalian host-expression system for the manufacture of biopharmaceuticals. Over the past ∼30 years academic and industrial researchers have studied cell expression characteristics with aims to improve product yield, quality, scalability and reproducibility. Although many steps in the gene expression and secretion pathways have been optimized, little attention has been paid to optimizing protein synthesis factors and regulators during this process. A new study in Biochemical Journal by Mead et al., provides a first systematic study of several protein synthesis factors and finds that the expression level of eIF4G1 correlates with the level of recombinant protein expressed in cultures. Optimizing levels and activities of protein synthesis factors may help to enhance recombinant protein expression of biopharmaceuticals. PMID:26965386

  10. Cellular Redox Systems Impact the Aggregation of Cu,Zn Superoxide Dismutase Linked to Familial Amyotrophic Lateral Sclerosis.

    PubMed

    Álvarez-Zaldiernas, Cristina; Lu, Jun; Zheng, Yujuan; Yang, Hongqian; Blasi, Juan; Solsona, Carles; Holmgren, Arne

    2016-08-12

    Protein misfolding is implicated in neurodegenerative diseases such as ALS, where mutations of superoxide dismutase 1 (SOD1) account for about 20% of the inherited mutations. Human SOD1 (hSOD1) contains four cysteines, including Cys(57) and Cys(146), which have been linked to protein stability and folding via forming a disulfide bond, and Cys(6) and Cys(111) as free thiols. But the roles of the cellular oxidation-reduction (redox) environment in SOD1 folding and aggregation are not well understood. Here we explore the effects of cellular redox systems on the aggregation of hSOD1 proteins. We found that the known hSOD1 mutations G93A and A4V increased the capability of the thioredoxin and glutaredoxin systems to reduce hSOD1 compared with wild-type hSOD1. Treatment with inhibitors of these redox systems resulted in an increase of hSOD1 aggregates in the cytoplasm of cells transfected with mutants but not in cells transfected with wild-type hSOD1 or those containing a secondary C111G mutation. This aggregation may be coupled to changes in the redox state of the G93A and A4V mutants upon mild oxidative stress. These results strongly suggest that the thioredoxin and glutaredoxin systems are the key regulators for hSOD1 aggregation and may play critical roles in the pathogenesis of ALS. PMID:27261461

  11. Thrombophilic genetic factors PAI-1 4G-4G and MTHFR 677TT as risk factors of alcohol, cryptogenic liver cirrhosis and portal vein thrombosis, in a Caucasian population.

    PubMed

    D'Amico, Mario; Pasta, Francesca; Pasta, Linda

    2015-08-15

    The thrombophilic genetic factors (THRGFs), PAI-1 4G-4G, MTHFR 677TT, V Leiden 506Q and Prothrombin 20210A, were studied as risk factors in 865 Caucasian patients with liver cirrhosis, consecutively enrolled from June 2008 to January 2014. A total of 582 HCV, 80 HBV, 94 alcohol, (82 with more than one etiologic factor) and 191 cryptogenic patients with liver cirrhosis had been consecutively enrolled; 243 patients showed portal vein thrombosis (PVT). At least one of the above THRGFs was present in 339/865 patients (39.2%). PAI-1 4G-4G and MTHFR 677TT were the most frequent THRGFs, statistically significant in patients with alcohol, cryptogenic liver cirrhosis, and PVT: respectively 24 and 28, 50 and 73, and 65 and 83 (all chi-square tests>3.84, and p values<0.05). Two logistic regression analysis, using PAI-1 4G-4G and MTHFR 677TT, as dependent variable, confirmed the independent significant relationship of these THRGFs with alcohol, cryptogenic liver cirrhosis and PVT. PAI 1 and MTHFR 677 genotypes, deviated from those expected in populations in Hardy-Weinberg equilibrium (all p values<0.05), in the subgroups of patients with alcohol, cryptogenic liver cirrhosis and presence of PVT. Our study shows the pivotal role of PAI-1 4G-4G and MTHFR 677TT in patients with alcohol, cryptogenic liver cirrhosis, and PVT, in a Caucasian population. In conclusion, thrombo and fibro-genetic mechanisms of PAI-1 4G-4G and MTHFR 677TT, could have a role in the development of liver cirrhosis, mainly in patients without HCV and HBV, and PVT. PMID:25987440

  12. Characterization of galactic bars from 3.6 μm S4G imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Díaz-García, S.; Salo, H.; Laurikainen, E.; Herrera-Endoqui, M.

    2016-03-01

    Context. Stellar bars play an essential role in the secular evolution of disk galaxies because they are responsible for the redistribution of matter and angular momentum. Dynamical models predict that bars become stronger and longer in time, while their rotation speed slows down. Aims: We use the Spitzer Survey of Stellar Structure in Galaxies (S4G) 3.6 μm imaging to study the properties (length and strength) and fraction of bars at z = 0 over a wide range of galaxy masses (M∗ ≈ 108-1011 M⊙) and Hubble types (-3 ≤ T ≤ 10). Methods: We calculated gravitational forces from the 3.6 μm images for galaxies with a disk inclination lower than 65°. We used the maximum of the tangential-to-radial force ratio in the bar region (Qb) as a measure of the bar-induced perturbation strength for a sample of ~600 barred galaxies. We also used the maximum of the normalized m = 2 Fourier density amplitude (A2max) to characterize the bar. Bar sizes were estimated i) visually; ii) from ellipse fitting; iii) from the radii of the strongest torque; and iv) from the radii of the largest m = 2 Fourier amplitude in the bar region. By combining our force calculations with the H i kinematics from the literature, we estimated the ratio of the halo-to-stellar mass (Mh/M∗) within the optical disk and by further using the universal rotation curve models, we obtained a first-order model of the rotation curve decomposition of 1128 disk galaxies. Results: We probe possible sources of uncertainty in our Qb measurements: the assumed scale height and its radial variation, the influence of the spiral arms torques, the effect of non-stellar emission in the bar region, and the dilution of the bar forces by the dark matter halo (our models imply that only ~10% of the disks in our sample are maximal). We find that for early- and intermediate-type disks (-3 ≤ T< 5), the relatively modest influence of the dark matter halo leads to a systematic reduction of the mean Qb by about 10-15%, which is

  13. Dynamical and critical behavior of a simple discrete model of the cellular immune system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brass, A.; Bancroft, A. J.; Clamp, M. E.; Grencis, R. K.; Else, K. J.

    1994-08-01

    A simple cellular automata model has been constructed to investigate the interactions between the two T-helper subset cell types (TH1 and TH2) in a lymph node during chronic parasitic infection. The model exhibits behavior similar to a phase transition as a function of the antigenic burden placed on the host. At low antigen density the behavior of the model resembles that of a ``paramagnetic'' phase in which both T-helper cell subset cells can coexist. Above a threshold antigen density then one or other of the TH subset cells becomes dominant and forms a single, connected, infinite cluster (equivalent to a ``ferromagnetic'' phase). Much of the phenomenological behavior of the model is seen to be in good agreement with that observed in animal models of parasitic infection.

  14. Protozoa as model systems for the study of cellular responses to altered gravity conditions.

    PubMed

    Hemmersbach-Krause, R; Briegleb, W; Häder D-P; Vogel, K; Klein, S; Mulisch, M

    1994-01-01

    The orientation behavior of Paramecium changed in a similar way after transition to conditions of free-fall in a sounding rocket and after transition to conditions of simulated weightlessness on a fast rotating clinostat. After a period of residual orientation, Paramecium cells distributed themselves randomly 80 s (120 s) after onset of free-fall (simulated weightlessness). Swimming velocity increased significantly; however, the increase was transient and subsided after 3 min in the rocket experiments, while the velocity remained enhanced even during 2 h of rotation on a fast clinostat. Trichocysts were present and without morphological changes in Paramecium cells which had been exposed to a rocket flight, as well as to fast or slow rotation on a clinostat. Regeneration of the oral apparatus of Stentor and morphogenesis of Eufolliculina proceeded normally on the clinostat. The results demonstrate that the clinostat is a useful tool to simulate the conditions of weightlessness on earth and to detect gravisensitive cellular functions. PMID:11537958

  15. Multiscale Systems Analysis of Root Growth and Development: Modeling Beyond the Network and Cellular Scales

    PubMed Central

    Band, Leah R.; Fozard, John A.; Godin, Christophe; Jensen, Oliver E.; Pridmore, Tony; Bennett, Malcolm J.; King, John R.

    2012-01-01

    Over recent decades, we have gained detailed knowledge of many processes involved in root growth and development. However, with this knowledge come increasing complexity and an increasing need for mechanistic modeling to understand how those individual processes interact. One major challenge is in relating genotypes to phenotypes, requiring us to move beyond the network and cellular scales, to use multiscale modeling to predict emergent dynamics at the tissue and organ levels. In this review, we highlight recent developments in multiscale modeling, illustrating how these are generating new mechanistic insights into the regulation of root growth and development. We consider how these models are motivating new biological data analysis and explore directions for future research. This modeling progress will be crucial as we move from a qualitative to an increasingly quantitative understanding of root biology, generating predictive tools that accelerate the development of improved crop varieties. PMID:23110897

  16. Improved Cellular Specificity of Plasmonic Nanobubbles versus Nanoparticles in Heterogeneous Cell Systems

    PubMed Central

    Lukianova-Hleb, Ekaterina Y.; Ren, Xiaoyang; Constantinou, Pamela E.; Danysh, Brian P.; Shenefelt, Derek L.; Carson, Daniel D.; Farach-Carson, Mary C.; Kulchitsky, Vladimir A.; Wu, Xiangwei; Wagner, Daniel S.; Lapotko, Dmitri O.

    2012-01-01

    The limited specificity of nanoparticle (NP) uptake by target cells associated with a disease is one of the principal challenges of nanomedicine. Using the threshold mechanism of plasmonic nanobubble (PNB) generation and enhanced accumulation and clustering of gold nanoparticles in target cells, we increased the specificity of PNB generation and detection in target versus non-target cells by more than one order of magnitude compared to the specificity of NP uptake by the same cells. This improved cellular specificity of PNBs was demonstrated in six different cell models representing diverse molecular targets such as epidermal growth factor receptor, CD3 receptor, prostate specific membrane antigen and mucin molecule MUC1. Thus PNBs may be a universal method and nano-agent that overcome the problem of non-specific uptake of NPs by non-target cells and improve the specificity of NP-based diagnostics, therapeutics and theranostics at the cell level. PMID:22509318

  17. Cellular and molecular mechanisms of HGF/Met in the cardiovascular system.

    PubMed

    Gallo, Simona; Sala, Valentina; Gatti, Stefano; Crepaldi, Tiziana

    2015-12-01

    Met tyrosine kinase receptor, also known as c-Met, is the HGF (hepatocyte growth factor) receptor. The HGF/Met pathway has a prominent role in cardiovascular remodelling after tissue injury. The present review provides a synopsis of the cellular and molecular mechanisms underlying the effects of HGF/Met in the heart and blood vessels. In vivo, HGF/Met function is particularly important for the protection of the heart in response to both acute and chronic insults, including ischaemic injury and doxorubicin-induced cardiotoxicity. Accordingly, conditional deletion of Met in cardiomyocytes results in impaired organ defence against oxidative stress. After ischaemic injury, activation of Met provides strong anti-apoptotic stimuli for cardiomyocytes through PI3K (phosphoinositide 3-kinase)/Akt and MAPK (mitogen-activated protein kinase) cascades. Recently, we found that HGF/Met is also important for autophagy regulation in cardiomyocytes via the mTOR (mammalian target of rapamycin) pathway. HGF/Met induces proliferation and migration of endothelial cells through Rac1 (Ras-related C3 botulinum toxin substrate 1) activation. In fibroblasts, HGF/Met antagonizes the actions of TGFβ1 (transforming growth factor β1) and AngII (angiotensin II), thus preventing fibrosis. Moreover, HGF/Met influences the inflammatory response of macrophages and the immune response of dendritic cells, indicating its protective function against atherosclerotic and autoimmune diseases. The HGF/Met axis also plays an important role in regulating self-renewal and myocardial regeneration through the enhancement of cardiac progenitor cells. HGF/Met has beneficial effects against myocardial infarction and endothelial dysfunction: the cellular and molecular mechanisms underlying repair function in the heart and blood vessels are common and include pro-angiogenic, anti-inflammatory and anti-fibrotic actions. Thus administration of HGF or HGF mimetics may represent a promising therapeutic agent for the

  18. Complete Genome Sequence of Cupriavidus basilensis 4G11, Isolated from the Oak Ridge Field Research Center Site

    PubMed Central

    Ray, Jayashree; Waters, R. Jordan; Skerker, Jeffrey M.; Kuehl, Jennifer V.; Price, Morgan N.; Huang, Jiawen; Chakraborty, Romy; Arkin, Adam P.

    2015-01-01

    Cupriavidus basilensis 4G11 was isolated from groundwater at the Oak Ridge Field Research Center (FRC) site. Here, we report the complete genome sequence and annotation of Cupriavidus basilensis 4G11. The genome contains 8,421,483 bp, 7,661 predicted protein-coding genes, and a total GC content of 64.4%. PMID:25977418

  19. Draft Genome Sequence of Lewinella sp. Strain 4G2 Isolated from the Coastal Sea Surface Microlayer

    PubMed Central

    Yoshizawa, Susumu; Nakajima, Yu; Ogura, Yoshitoshi; Hayashi, Tetsuya; Hamasaki, Koji

    2016-01-01

    We report here the draft genome of Lewinella sp. strain 4G2, isolated from the sea surface microlayer (SML) of a coastal marine inlet. The genome sequence of strain 4G2 should contribute to understanding the lifestyles of bacteria living in the SML. PMID:27469943

  20. Draft Genome Sequence of Lewinella sp. Strain 4G2 Isolated from the Coastal Sea Surface Microlayer.

    PubMed

    Wong, Shu-Kuan; Yoshizawa, Susumu; Nakajima, Yu; Ogura, Yoshitoshi; Hayashi, Tetsuya; Hamasaki, Koji

    2016-01-01

    We report here the draft genome of Lewinella sp. strain 4G2, isolated from the sea surface microlayer (SML) of a coastal marine inlet. The genome sequence of strain 4G2 should contribute to understanding the lifestyles of bacteria living in the SML. PMID:27469943

  1. Complete genome sequence of Cupriavidus basilensis 4G11, isolated from the Oak Ridge Field Research Center site

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Ray, Jayashree; Waters, R. Jordan; Skerker, Jeffrey M.; Kuehl, Jennifer V.; Price, Morgan N.; Huang, Jiawen; Chakraborty, Romy; Arkin, Adam P.; Deutschbauer, Adam

    2015-05-14

    Cupriavidus basilensis 4G11 was isolated from groundwater at the Oak Ridge Field Research Center (FRC) site. Here, we report the complete genome sequence and annotation of Cupriavidus basilensis 4G11. The genome contains 8,421,483 bp, 7,661 predicted protein-coding genes, and a total GC content of 64.4%.

  2. Hit to lead studies on (hetero)arylpyrimidines--agonists of the canonical Wnt-beta-catenin cellular messaging system.

    PubMed

    Gilbert, Adam M; Bursavich, Matthew G; Alon, Nippa; Bhat, Bheem M; Bex, Frederick J; Cain, Michael; Coleburn, Valerie; Gironda, Virginia; Green, Paula; Hauze, Diane B; Kharode, Yogendra; Krishnamurthy, Girija; Kirisits, Matthew; Lam, Ho-Sun; Liu, Yao-Bin; Lombardi, Sabrina; Matteo, Jeanne; Murrills, Richard; Robinson, John A; Selim, Sally; Sharp, Michael; Unwalla, Raymond; Varadarajan, Usha; Zhao, Weiguang; Yaworsky, Paul J

    2010-01-01

    A series of (hetero)arylpyrimidines agonists of the Wnt-beta-catenin cellular messaging system have been prepared. These compounds show activity in U2OS cells transfected with Wnt-3a, TCF-luciferase, Dkk-1 and tk-Renilla. Selected compounds show minimal GSK-3beta inhibition indicating that the Wnt-beta-catenin agonism activity most likely comes from interaction at Wnt-3a/Dkk-1. Two examples 1 and 25 show in vivo osteogenic activity in a mouse calvaria model. One example 1 is shown to activate non-phosphorylated beta-catenin formation in bone. PMID:19897365

  3. 'Inorganics-in-organics': recent developments and outlook for 4G polymer solar cells.

    PubMed

    Jayawardena, K D G Imalka; Rozanski, Lynn J; Mills, Chris A; Beliatis, Michail J; Nismy, N Aamina; Silva, S Ravi P

    2013-09-21

    Recent developments in solution processable single junction polymer solar cells have led to a significant improvement in power conversion efficiencies from ∼5% to beyond 9%. While much of the initial efficiency improvements were driven through judicious design of donor polymers, it is the engineering of device architectures through the incorporation of inorganic nanostructures and better processing that has continued the efficiency gains. Inorganic nano-components such as carbon nanotubes, graphene and its derivatives, metal nanoparticles and metal oxides have played a central role in improving device performance and longevity beyond those achieved by conventional 3G polymer solar cells. The present work aims to summarise the diverse roles played by the nanosystems and features in state of the art next generation (4G) polymer solar cells. The challenges associated with the engineering of such devices for future deployment are also discussed. PMID:23900455

  4. A Retroviral CRISPR-Cas9 System for Cellular Autism-Associated Phenotype Discovery in Developing Neurons.

    PubMed

    Williams, Michael R; Fricano-Kugler, Catherine J; Getz, Stephanie A; Skelton, Patrick D; Lee, Jeonghoon; Rizzuto, Christian P; Geller, Joseph S; Li, Meijie; Luikart, Bryan W

    2016-01-01

    Retroviruses expressing a fluorescent protein, Cas9, and a small guide RNA are used to mimic nonsense PTEN mutations from autism patients in developing mouse neurons. We compare the cellular phenotype elicited by CRISPR-Cas9 to those elicited using shRNA or Cre/Lox technologies and find that knockdown or knockout (KO) produced a corresponding moderate or severe neuronal hypertrophy in all cells. In contrast, the Cas9 approach produced missense and nonsense Pten mutations, resulting in a mix of KO-equivalent hypertrophic and wild type-like phenotypes. Importantly, despite this mixed phenotype, the neuronal hypertrophy resulting from Pten loss was evident on average in the population of manipulated cells. Having reproduced the known Pten KO phenotype using the CRISPR-Cas9 system we design viruses to target a gene that has recently been associated with autism, KATNAL2. Katnal2 deletion in the mouse results in decreased dendritic arborization of developing neurons. We conclude that retroviral implementation of the CRISPR-Cas9 system is an efficient system for cellular phenotype discovery in wild-type animals. PMID:27161796

  5. A Retroviral CRISPR-Cas9 System for Cellular Autism-Associated Phenotype Discovery in Developing Neurons

    PubMed Central

    Williams, Michael R.; Fricano-Kugler, Catherine J.; Getz, Stephanie A.; Skelton, Patrick D.; Lee, Jeonghoon; Rizzuto, Christian P.; Geller, Joseph S.; Li, Meijie; Luikart, Bryan W.

    2016-01-01

    Retroviruses expressing a fluorescent protein, Cas9, and a small guide RNA are used to mimic nonsense PTEN mutations from autism patients in developing mouse neurons. We compare the cellular phenotype elicited by CRISPR-Cas9 to those elicited using shRNA or Cre/Lox technologies and find that knockdown or knockout (KO) produced a corresponding moderate or severe neuronal hypertrophy in all cells. In contrast, the Cas9 approach produced missense and nonsense Pten mutations, resulting in a mix of KO-equivalent hypertrophic and wild type-like phenotypes. Importantly, despite this mixed phenotype, the neuronal hypertrophy resulting from Pten loss was evident on average in the population of manipulated cells. Having reproduced the known Pten KO phenotype using the CRISPR-Cas9 system we design viruses to target a gene that has recently been associated with autism, KATNAL2. Katnal2 deletion in the mouse results in decreased dendritic arborization of developing neurons. We conclude that retroviral implementation of the CRISPR-Cas9 system is an efficient system for cellular phenotype discovery in wild-type animals. PMID:27161796

  6. Conformational state of human cardiac 5-HT(4(g)) receptors influences the functional effects of polyclonal anti-5-HT(4) receptor antibodies.

    PubMed

    Di Scala, Emmanuella; Rose, Stéphanie; Hérault, Olivier; Argibay, Jorge; Cosnay, Pierre; Bozon, Véronique

    2007-04-01

    The functional effects of the anti-G21V antibody directed against the second extracellular loop of human heart 5-HT(4) receptors can differ when the receptors are expressed in different cell lines. Here, we extend these studies to show variation in the responses of 5-HT(4(g)) receptors to the antibody within the same expression system. In a previous report no effect of the anti-G21V antibodies had been shown upon 5-HT(4(g)) receptors expressed in CHO cells. Here the same antibodies alone or when added before 5-HT had a functional "inverse-agonist like" effect upon 5-HT(4(g)) receptors expressed in a separate line of CHO cells. Although these CHO cells showed a lower efficacy of cAMP production evoked by 5-HT than the previous report they express a similar h5-HT(4(g)) receptor density. Inhibition of either phosphodiesterases or Gi proteins had no effect upon the action of the antibody. Conformational states of the 5-HT(4) receptor and/or equilibrium between different states of receptors may then determine the functional effect of antibodies against this receptor. PMID:17222392

  7. Targeted delivery of photosensitizers: efficacy and selectivity issues revealed by multifunctional ORMOSIL nanovectors in cellular systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Selvestrel, Francesco; Moret, Francesca; Segat, Daniela; Woodhams, Josephine H.; Fracasso, Giulio; Echevarria, Iria M. Rio; Baù, Luca; Rastrelli, Federico; Compagnin, Chiara; Reddi, Elena; Fedeli, Chiara; Papini, Emanuele; Tavano, Regina; MacKenzie, Alexandra; Bovis, Melissa; Yaghini, Elnaz; MacRobert, Alexander J.; Zanini, Silvia; Boscaini, Anita; Colombatti, Marco; Mancin, Fabrizio

    2013-06-01

    PEGylated and non-PEGylated ORMOSIL nanoparticles prepared by microemulsion condensation of vinyltriethoxy-silane (VTES) were investigated in detail for their micro-structure and ability to deliver photoactive agents. With respect to pure silica nanoparticles, organic modification substantially changes the microstructure and the surface properties. This in turn leads to a modulation of both the photophysical properties of embedded photosensitizers and the interaction of the nanoparticles with biological entities such as serum proteins. The flexibility of the synthetic procedure allows the rapid preparation and screening of multifunctional nanosystems for photodynamic therapy (PDT). Selective targeting of model cancer cells was tested by using folate, an integrin specific RGD peptide and anti-EGFR antibodies. Data suggest the interference of the stealth-conferring layer (PEG) with small targeting agents, but not with bulky antibodies. Moreover, we showed that selective photokilling of tumour cells may be limited even in the case of efficient targeting because of intrinsic transport limitations of active cellular uptake mechanisms or suboptimum localization.PEGylated and non-PEGylated ORMOSIL nanoparticles prepared by microemulsion condensation of vinyltriethoxy-silane (VTES) were investigated in detail for their micro-structure and ability to deliver photoactive agents. With respect to pure silica nanoparticles, organic modification substantially changes the microstructure and the surface properties. This in turn leads to a modulation of both the photophysical properties of embedded photosensitizers and the interaction of the nanoparticles with biological entities such as serum proteins. The flexibility of the synthetic procedure allows the rapid preparation and screening of multifunctional nanosystems for photodynamic therapy (PDT). Selective targeting of model cancer cells was tested by using folate, an integrin specific RGD peptide and anti-EGFR antibodies. Data

  8. Efficacy Evaluation of a New Hyaluronan Derivative HYADD® 4-G to Maintain Cartilage Integrity in a Rabbit Model of Osteoarthritis

    PubMed Central

    Schiavinato, Antonella; Ganster, Murielle Marie

    2013-01-01

    Objective: To test the efficacy of a hyaluronan derivative (HYADD®4-G) in a model of osteoarthritis (anterior cruciate ligament [ACLT]) and to compare its efficacy with the injection of growth factors. Design: In a first experimental set-up, specially selected for treatment scheme with published studies on hyaluronan or growth factor efficacy in osteoarthritis, saline, HYADD®4-G, rh-BMP-7, and the treatments of rh-BMP-7 or rh-BMP-2 with HYADD®4-G were injected after ACLT, for five times starting 3 weeks after ACLT. Euthanasia was at day 70. The knees were evaluated by gross morphological observation, x-ray, and histology (Study A). In a second experimental set-up selected to evaluate the efficacy of three viscosupplement injections, starting 4 weeks after ACTL, HYADD®4-G was compared to saline (Study B). Results: (A) X-ray analysis showed more damage in the saline group than all other treatment groups (2.67 ± 0.61 for saline, 0.83 ± 0.26 for HYADD®4-G, 1.67 ± 0.82 for HYADD®4-G with rh-BMP-2, 0.75 ± 0.76 for HYADD®4-G with rh-BMP-7, and 1.58 ± 0.49 for rh-BMP-7), P < 0.05. In the femoral condyle, the Mankin’s score for HYADD®4-G with rh-BMP-2, HYADD®4-G with rh-BMP-7, and rh-BMP7 alone was statistically lower compared to saline in the medial part; in the lateral part a significant lower value was observed in the HYADD®4-G with the rh-BMP-2 group. (B) The Kellgren and Lawrence score and Mankin’s score was lower in the HYADD®4-G group than in the saline group (P < 0.002 and P = 0.0031). Conclusions: These two studies suggest that HYADD®4-G delayed the cartilage degeneration and that the association of HYADD®4-G with growth factors is synergistic. PMID:23550192

  9. Enhanced Handoff Scheme for Downlink-Uplink Asymmetric Channels in Cellular Systems

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    In the latest cellular networks, data services like SNS and UCC can create asymmetric packet generation rates over the downlink and uplink channels. This asymmetry can lead to a downlink-uplink asymmetric channel condition being experienced by cell edge users. This paper proposes a handoff scheme to cope effectively with downlink-uplink asymmetric channels. The proposed handoff scheme exploits the uplink channel quality as well as the downlink channel quality to determine the appropriate timing and direction of handoff. We first introduce downlink and uplink channel models that consider the intercell interference, to verify the downlink-uplink channel asymmetry. Based on these results, we propose an enhanced handoff scheme that exploits both the uplink and downlink channel qualities to reduce the handoff-call dropping probability and the service interruption time. The simulation results show that the proposed handoff scheme reduces the handoff-call dropping probability about 30% and increases the satisfaction of the service interruption time requirement about 7% under high-offered load, compared to conventional mobile-assisted handoff. Especially, the proposed handoff scheme is more efficient when the uplink QoS requirement is much stricter than the downlink QoS requirement or uplink channel quality is worse than downlink channel quality. PMID:24501576

  10. Multi-functional MIMO communication in multi-hop cellular systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roger, Sandra; Calabuig, Daniel; Monserrat, Jose F.; Cardona, Narcis

    2014-12-01

    In the context of multi-hop cellular communications, user equipment devices (UEs) with relaying capabilities provide a virtual infrastructure that can enhance the cell spectral efficiency. UE relays, which are generally transparent to the destination user and lack channel state information, mainly operate in an open-loop mode. Most open-loop transmission techniques for relaying are based on orthogonal space-time block coding (OSTBC), which offers a good trade-off between performance and complexity. In this paper, we consider the concept of multi-functional multiple-input multiple-output (MIMO) transmission, which combines OSTBC with beamforming techniques. This concept is applied to networks with multiple relays, which can offer a high number of antennas to implement multi-functional MIMO techniques. The proposed schemes are shown to reduce the bit error rate of the destination user with respect to a direct transmission from the base station (BS). Furthermore, the multi-functional setup exhibits better performance than conventional OSTBC at high transmission rates.

  11. Design and testing of a new microcalorimetric vessel for use with living cellular systems and in titration experiments.

    PubMed

    Nordmark, M G; Laynez, J; Schön, A; Suurkuusk, J; Wadsö, I

    1984-12-01

    A new microcalorimetric vessel primarily intended for use with living cellular systems and in titration experiments has been designed and tested. The vessel, which forms a modular system, fits into an ampoule measuring cylinder of the LKB 'BioActivity Monitor'. It can be used with different sample cups, volume 1-3 ml, and can be equipped with different types of stirrer and sample holders for cellular materials. Experiments can be performed with or without medium perfusing through the vessel. Small quantities of reagents can be added to the sample compartment during the measurements. Stepwise calorimetric titrations can be performed by an automatic procedure. Test experiments reported include results of measurements with human T-lymphoma cells in stirred suspension and melanoma cells adhered to a polystyrene film in a stirred perfusing medium. Results from titration experiments where N-acetyl-D-alanine was bound to ristocetin A are reported, delta G degree' = -16.5 +/- 0.2 kJ mol-1 and delta H degree' = -32.1 +/- 0.4 kJ mol-1. PMID:6397499

  12. Cellular systems for toxicity testing. Final report 1 Sep 82-31 Aug 83

    SciTech Connect

    Williams, G.M.; Dunkel, V.C.; Ray, V.A.

    1983-06-01

    Metabolism and End Points of In Vitro Systems, Cytotoxicity, DNA Damage, Chromosome Effects, Mutagenicity Systems, Mammalian Mutagenesis, Transformation Systems, Effects of Tumor Promoters, Mechanistic Significance and Relevance of Short-Term Tests, Application of Short-Term Tests to Chemical Safety Evaluation, and Poster Papers.

  13. Peptide-MHC Cellular Microarray with Innovative Data Analysis System for Simultaneously Detecting Multiple CD4 T-Cell Responses

    PubMed Central

    Ge, Xinhui; Gebe, John A.; Bollyky, Paul L.; James, Eddie A.; Yang, Junbao; Stern, Lawrence J.; Kwok, William W.

    2010-01-01

    Background Peptide:MHC cellular microarrays have been proposed to simultaneously characterize multiple Ag-specific populations of T cells. The practice of studying immune responses to complicated pathogens with this tool demands extensive knowledge of T cell epitopes and the availability of peptide:MHC complexes for array fabrication as well as a specialized data analysis approach for result interpretation. Methodology/Principal Findings We co-immobilized peptide:DR0401 complexes, anti-CD28, anti-CD11a and cytokine capture antibodies on the surface of chamber slides to generate a functional array that was able to detect rare Ag-specific T cell populations from previously primed in vitro T cell cultures. A novel statistical methodology was also developed to facilitate batch processing of raw array-like data into standardized endpoint scores, which linearly correlated with total Ag-specific T cell inputs. Applying these methods to analyze Influenza A viral antigen-specific T cell responses, we not only revealed the most prominent viral epitopes, but also demonstrated the heterogeneity of anti-viral cellular responses in healthy individuals. Applying these methods to examine the insulin producing beta-cell autoantigen specific T cell responses, we observed little difference between autoimmune diabetic patients and healthy individuals, suggesting a more subtle association between diabetes status and peripheral autoreactive T cells. Conclusions/Significance The data analysis system is reliable for T cell specificity and functional testing. Peptide:MHC cellular microarrays can be used to obtain multi-parametric results using limited blood samples in a variety of translational settings. PMID:20634998

  14. WRF4G project: Adaptation of WRF Model to Distributed Computing Infrastructures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cofino, Antonio S.; Fernández Quiruelas, Valvanuz; García Díez, Markel; Blanco Real, Jose C.; Fernández, Jesús

    2013-04-01

    Nowadays Grid Computing is powerful computational tool which is ready to be used for scientific community in different areas (such as biomedicine, astrophysics, climate, etc.). However, the use of this distributed computing infrastructures (DCI) is not yet common practice in climate research, and only a few teams and applications in this area take advantage of this infrastructure. Thus, the first objective of this project is to popularize the use of this technology in the atmospheric sciences area. In order to achieve this objective, one of the most used applications has been taken (WRF; a limited- area model, successor of the MM5 model), that has a user community formed by more than 8000 researchers worldwide. This community develop its research activity on different areas and could benefit from the advantages of Grid resources (case study simulations, regional hind-cast/forecast, sensitivity studies, etc.). The WRF model is been used as input by many energy and natural hazards community, therefore those community will also benefit. However, Grid infrastructures have some drawbacks for the execution of applications that make an intensive use of CPU and memory for a long period of time. This makes necessary to develop a specific framework (middleware). This middleware encapsulates the application and provides appropriate services for the monitoring and management of the jobs and the data. Thus, the second objective of the project consists on the development of a generic adaptation of WRF for Grid (WRF4G), to be distributed as open-source and to be integrated in the official WRF development cycle. The use of this WRF adaptation should be transparent and useful to face any of the previously described studies, and avoid any of the problems of the Grid infrastructure. Moreover it should simplify the access to the Grid infrastructures for the research teams, and also to free them from the technical and computational aspects of the use of the Grid. Finally, in order to

  15. Temporal order of evolution of DNA replication systems inferred by comparison of cellular and viral DNA polymerases

    PubMed Central

    Koonin, Eugene V

    2006-01-01

    Background The core enzymes of the DNA replication systems show striking diversity among cellular life forms and more so among viruses. In particular, and counter-intuitively, given the central role of DNA in all cells and the mechanistic uniformity of replication, the core enzymes of the replication systems of bacteria and archaea (as well as eukaryotes) are unrelated or extremely distantly related. Viruses and plasmids, in addition, possess at least two unique DNA replication systems, namely, the protein-primed and rolling circle modalities of replication. This unexpected diversity makes the origin and evolution of DNA replication systems a particularly challenging and intriguing problem in evolutionary biology. Results I propose a specific succession for the emergence of different DNA replication systems, drawing argument from the differences in their representation among viruses and other selfish replicating elements. In a striking pattern, the DNA replication systems of viruses infecting bacteria and eukaryotes are dominated by the archaeal-type B-family DNA polymerase (PolB) whereas the bacterial replicative DNA polymerase (PolC) is present only in a handful of bacteriophage genomes. There is no apparent mechanistic impediment to the involvement of the bacterial-type replication machinery in viral DNA replication. Therefore, I hypothesize that the observed, markedly unequal distribution of the replicative DNA polymerases among the known cellular and viral replication systems has a historical explanation. I propose that, among the two types of DNA replication machineries that are found in extant life forms, the archaeal-type, PolB-based system evolved first and had already given rise to a variety of diverse viruses and other selfish elements before the advent of the bacterial, PolC-based machinery. Conceivably, at that stage of evolution, the niches for DNA-viral reproduction have been already filled with viruses replicating with the help of the archaeal

  16. Delivery of quantum dot bioconjugates to the cellular cytosol: release from the endolysosomal system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Delehanty, James B., III; Bradburne, Christopher E.; Boeneman, Kelly E.; Medintz, Igor L.; Farrell, Dorothy; Pons, Thomas; Mei, Bing C.; Blanco-Canosa, Juan B.; Dawson, Philip E.; Mattoussi, Hedi

    2010-02-01

    To realize their full potential as intracellular imaging and sensing reagents, robust and efficient methods for the targeted cellular delivery of luminescent semiconductor quantum dots (QDs) must be developed. We have previously shown that QDs decorated with histidine-terminated polyarginine cell-penetrating peptides (CPP) are rapidly and specifically internalized via endocytosis by several mammalian cell lines with no cytotoxicity. Here we demonstrate the long-term intracellular stability and fate of these QD-peptide conjugates. We found that the QD-peptide conjugates remain sequestered within endolysosomal vesicles for up to three days after delivery. However, the CPP appeared to remain stably associated with the QD within these acidic vesicles over this time period. Hence, we explored a number of techniques to either actively deliver QDs directly to the cytosol or to facilitate the endosomal release of endocytosed QDs to the cytosol. Active methods (e.g., electroporation) delivered only modest amounts of QDs to the cytosol that appeared to form aggregates. Delivery of QDs using polymer-based transfection reagents resulted primarily in the endosomal sequestration of the QDs, although one commercial polymer tested delivered QDs to the cytosol but only after several days in culture and with a considerable degree of polymer-induced toxicity. Finally, a modular, amphiphilic peptide containing functionalities designed for cell penetration and vesicular membrane interaction demonstrated the ability to deliver QDs in a well-dispersed manner to the cytosol. This peptide mediated rapid QD uptake followed by a slower efficient endosomal release of the QDs to the cytosol that peaked at 48 hours post-delivery. Importantly, this QD-peptide conjugate elicited minimal cytotoxicity in two cell lines tested. A more detailed understanding of the mechanism of the peptide's uptake and endosomal escape attributes will lead to the design of further QD conjugates for targeted imaging

  17. [Cellular defense system of some synanthropic dipterans inhabitant of bacterially aggressive environment].

    PubMed

    Kind, T V

    2014-01-01

    nodulation. A differing case is Syrphidae whe-e charcoal injection produce depletion of hemolymph both from particles and all types of hemocytes. So the specimen of different higher Diptera families can use different schemes of cellular defense reaction. PMID:25509155

  18. Fibroblast-Derived Extracellular Matrices: An Alternative Cell Culture System That Increases Metastatic Cellular Properties

    PubMed Central

    Scherzer, Michael T.; Waigel, Sabine; Donninger, Howard; Arumugam, Vennila; Zacharias, Wolfgang; Clark, Geoffrey; Siskind, Leah J.; Soucy, Patricia; Beverly, Levi

    2015-01-01

    Poor survival rates from lung cancer can largely be attributed to metastatic cells that invade and spread throughout the body. The tumor microenvironment (TME) is composed of multiple cell types, as well as non-cellular components. The TME plays a critical role in the development of metastatic cancers by providing migratory cues and changing the properties of the tumor cells. The Extracellular Matrix (ECM), a main component of the TME, has been shown to change composition during tumor progression, contributing to cancer cell invasion and survival away from the primary cancer site. Although the ECM is well-known to influence the fate of tumor progression, little is known about the molecular mechanisms that are affected by the cancer cell-ECM interactions. It is imperative that these mechanisms are elucidated in order to properly understand and prevent lung cancer dissemination. However, common in vitro studies do not incorporate these interactions into everyday cell culture assays. We have adopted a model that examines decellularized human fibroblast-derived ECM as a 3-dimensional substrate for growth of lung adenocarcinoma cell lines. Here, we have characterized the effect of fibroblast-derived matrices on the properties of various lung-derived epithelial cell lines, including cancerous and non-transformed cells. This work highlights the significance of the cell-ECM interaction and its requirement for incorporation into in vitro experiments. Implementation of a fibroblast-derived ECM as an in vitro technique will provide researchers with an important factor to manipulate to better recreate and study the TME. PMID:26371754

  19. Human Eukaryotic Initiation Factor 4G (eIF4G) Protein Binds to eIF3c, -d, and -e to Promote mRNA Recruitment to the Ribosome*

    PubMed Central

    Villa, Nancy; Do, Angelie; Hershey, John W. B.; Fraser, Christopher S.

    2013-01-01

    Recruitment of mRNA to the 40S ribosomal subunit requires the coordinated interaction of a large number of translation initiation factors. In mammals, the direct interaction between eukaryotic initiation factor 4G (eIF4G) and eIF3 is thought to act as the molecular bridge between the mRNA cap-binding complex and the 40S subunit. A discrete ∼90 amino acid domain in eIF4G is responsible for binding to eIF3, but the identity of the eIF3 subunit(s) involved is less clear. The eIF3e subunit has been shown to directly bind eIF4G, but the potential role of other eIF3 subunits in stabilizing this interaction has not been investigated. It is also not clear if the eIF4A helicase plays a role in stabilizing the interaction between eIF4G and eIF3. Here, we have used a fluorescence anisotropy assay to demonstrate that eIF4G binds to eIF3 independently of eIF4A binding to the middle region of eIF4G. By using a site-specific cross-linking approach, we unexpectedly show that the eIF4G-binding surface in eIF3 is comprised of the -c, -d and -e subunits. Screening multiple cross-linker positions reveals that eIF4G contains two distinct eIF3-binding subdomains within the previously identified eIF3-binding domain. Finally, by employing an eIF4G-dependent translation assay, we establish that both of these subdomains are required for efficient mRNA recruitment to the ribosome and stimulate translation. Our study reveals unexpected complexity to the eIF3-eIF4G interaction that provides new insight into the regulation of mRNA recruitment to the human ribosome. PMID:24092755

  20. Microbial Protein-Protein Interactions (MiPPI) Data from the Genomics: GTL Center for Molecular and Cellular Systems (CMCS)

    DOE Data Explorer

    The Genomic Science Center for Molecular and Cellular Systems (CMCS), established in 2002, seeks to identify and characterize the complete set of protein complexes within a cell to provide a mechanistic basis for the understanding of biochemical functions. The CMCS is anchored at ORNL and PNNL. CMCS initially focused on the identification and characterization of protein complexes in two microbial systems,Rhodopseudomonas palustris (R. palustris) and Shewanella oneidensis (S. oneidensis). These two organisms have also been the focus of major DOE Genomic Science/Microbial Cell Program (MCP) projects. To develop an approach for identifying the diverse types of complexes present in microbial organisms, CMCS incorporates a number of molecular biology, microbiology, analytical and computational tools in an integrated pipeline.

  1. Sex differences in the cellular defence system against free radicals from oxygen or drug metabolites in rat.

    PubMed

    Julicher, R H; Sterrenberg, L; Haenen, G R; Bast, A; Noordhoek, J

    1984-12-01

    In this study, it was investigated whether sex-related differences in the protective mechanisms against oxygen radicals and free radical metabolites from drugs were present in rat liver, heart, and kidney. To that end, superoxide dismutase, catalase, the factors of the glutathione system and vitamin E were measured. In addition, NADPH-dependent cytochrome c-reductase activity was established, as this enzyme is involved in the formation of free radicals in the presence of many xenobiotics. The total capacity of the cellular systems that detoxify reactive oxygen species or free radical-drug metabolites seems to be higher in female liver as compared to male. No differences were found for heart and kidney tissue. It is hypothesized that female rats probably are less vulnerable for those drugs whose hepatotoxic action is induced by excessive formation of free radical species. PMID:6442559

  2. Identification of cellular genes critical to recombinant protein production using a Gaussia luciferase-based siRNA screening system.

    PubMed

    Lwa, Teng Rhui; Tan, Chuan Hao; Lew, Qiao Jing; Chu, Kai Ling; Tan, Janice; Lee, Yih Yean; Chao, Sheng-Hao

    2010-04-15

    Development of high-throughput functional genomic screening, including siRNA screening, provides a novel approach for quick identification of critical factors involved in biological processes. Here, we apply this strategy to search for cellular genes involved in recombinant protein production. Since most of biopharmaceutical proteins are secreted proteins, we develop a cell-based reporter assay using a secreted luciferase, Gaussia luciferase (Gluc), as the reporter. Human embryonic kidney 293 (HEK293) cells transiently transfected with the Gluc reporter plasmid are used to screen our siRNA panel. Three cellular genes, CCAAT/enhancer binding protein gamma (CEBPG), potassium channel tetramerisation domain containing 2 (KCTD2), transmembrane protein 183A (TMEM183A), were isolated from the screening. Production of erythropoietin (EPO) was significantly inhibited when CEBPG, KCTD2, and TMEM183A were knocked down. Furthermore, overexpression of CEBPG is shown to significantly improve production of recombinant EPO, interferon gamma, and monoclonal antibody in HEK293 and Chinese hamster ovary cells. Collectively, this novel Gluc-based siRNA screening system is proven to be a useful tool for investigation of secreted protein production in mammalian cells. PMID:20188772

  3. Structure-activity relationship study of 4EGI-1, small molecule eIF4E/eIF4G protein-protein interaction inhibitors

    PubMed Central

    Takrouri, Khuloud; Chen, Ting; Papadopoulos, Evangelos; Sahoo, Rupam; Kabha, Eihab; Chen, Han; Cantel, Sonia; Wagner, Gerhard; Halperin, Jose A; Aktas, Bertal H; Chorev, Michael

    2014-01-01

    Protein-protein interactions are critical for regulating the activity of translation initiation factors and multitude of other cellular process, and form the largest block of untapped albeit most challenging targets for drug development. 4EGI-1, (E/Z)-2-(2-(4-(3,4-dichlorophenyl)thiazol-2-yl)hydrazono)-3-(2-nitrophenyl)propanoic acid, is a hit compound discovered in a screening campaign of small molecule libraries as an inhibitor of translation initiation factors eIF4E and eIF4G protein-protein interaction; it inhibits translation initiation in vitro and in vivo. A series of 4EGI-1-derived thiazol-2-yl hydrazones have been designed and synthesized in order to delineate the structural latitude and improve its binding affinity to eIF4E, and increase its potency in inhibiting the eIF4E/eIF4G interaction. Probing a wide range of substituents on both phenyl rings comprising the 3-phenylpropionic acid and 4-phenylthiazolidine moieties in the context of both E- and Z-isomers of 4EGI-1 led to analogs with enhanced binding affinity and translation initiation inhibitory activities. PMID:24675136

  4. Effect of the Route of Administration and PEGylation of Poly(amidoamine) Dendrimers on Their Systemic and Lung Cellular Biodistribution.

    PubMed

    Zhong, Qian; Merkel, Olivia M; Reineke, Joshua J; da Rocha, Sandro R P

    2016-06-01

    There are many opportunities in the development of oral inhalation (oi) formulations for the delivery of small molecule therapeutics and biologics to and through the lungs. Nanocarriers have the potential to play a key role in advancing oi technologies and pushing the boundary of the pulmonary delivery market. In this work we investigate the effect of the route of administration and PEGylation on the systemic and lung cellular biodistribution of generation 3, amino-terminated poly(amidoamine) (PAMAM) dendrimers (G3NH2). Pharmacokinetic profiles show that the dendrimers reach their peak concentration in systemic circulation within a few hours after pulmonary delivery, independent of their chemistry (PEGylated or not), charge (+24 mV for G3NH2 vs -3.7 mV for G3NH2-24PEG1000), or size (5.1 nm for G3NH2 and 9.9 nm for G3NH2-24PEG1000). However, high density of surface modification with PEG enhances pulmonary absorption and the peak plasma concentration upon pulmonary delivery. The route of administration and PEGylation also significantly impact the whole body and local (lung cellular) distribution of the dendrimers. While ca. 83% of G3NH2 is found in the lungs upon pulmonary delivery at 6.5 h post administration, only 2% reached the lungs upon intravenous (iv) delivery. Moreover, no measurable concentration of either G3NH2 or G3NH2-24PEG1000 is found in the lymph nodes upon iv administration, while these are the tissues with the second highest mass distribution of dendrimers post pulmonary delivery. Dendrimer chemistry also significantly impacts the (cellular) distribution of the nanocarriers in the lung tissue. Upon pulmonary delivery, approximately 20% of the lung endothelial cells are seen to internalize G3NH2-24PEG1000, compared to only 6% for G3NH2. Conversely, G3NH2 is more readily taken up by lung epithelial cells (35%) when compared to its PEGylated counterpart (24%). The results shown here suggest that both the pulmonary route of administration and dendrimer

  5. Enhanced Cellular Delivery and Biocompatibility of a Small Layered Double Hydroxide–Liposome Composite System

    PubMed Central

    Dong, Haiyan; Parekh, Harendra S.; Xu, Zhi Ping

    2014-01-01

    The various classes of gene delivery vectors possess distinct advantages and disadvantages, each of which impacts on cargo loading, delivery and, ultimately, its function. With this in mind, herein we report on a small layered double hydroxide (sLDH)–liposome composite system, drawing upon the salient features of LDH and liposome classes of vectors, while avoiding their inherent shortfalls when used independently. sLDH–liposome composites were prepared by the hydration of freeze-dried matrix method. These composite systems, with a Z-average size of ≈200 nm, exhibited low cytotoxicity and demonstrated good suspension stability, both in water and cell culture medium after rehydration. Our studies demonstrate that short dsDNAs/ssDNAs were completely bound and protected in the composite system at an sLDH:DNA mass ratio of 20:1, regardless of the approach to DNA loading. This composite system delivered DNA to HCT-116 cells with ≈3-fold greater efficiency, when compared to sLDH alone. Our findings point towards the sLDH-liposome composite system being an effective and biocompatible gene delivery system. PMID:25431895

  6. Cytochrome P450 gene, CYP4G51, modulates hydrocarbon production in the pea aphid, Acyrthosiphon pisum.

    PubMed

    Chen, Nan; Fan, Yong-Liang; Bai, Yu; Li, Xiang-Dong; Zhang, Zhan-Feng; Liu, Tong-Xian

    2016-09-01

    Terrestrial insects deposit a layer of hydrocarbons (HCs) as waterproofing agents on their epicuticle. The insect-specific CYP4G genes, subfamily members of P450, have been found in all insects with sequenced genomes to date. They are critical for HC biosynthesis in Drosophila; however, their functional roles in other insects including the piercing-sucking hemipterous aphids remain unknown. In this study, we presented the molecular characterization and a functional study of the CYP4G51 gene in the pea aphid, Acyrthosiphon pisum (Harris). CYP4G51 transcript was detectable across the whole life cycle of A. pisum, and was prominently expressed in the aphid head and abdominal cuticle. Up-regulation of CYP4G51 under desiccation stress was more significant in the third instar nymphs compared with the adults. Also, up-regulation of CYP4G51 was observed when the aphids fed on an artificial diet compared with those fed on the broad bean plant, and was positively correlated with a high level of cuticular HCs (CHCs). RNAi knockdown of CYP4G51 significantly reduced its expression and caused reductions in both internal and external HCs. A deficiency in CHCs resulted in aphids being more susceptible to desiccation, with increased mortality under desiccation stress. The current results confirm that CYP4G51 modulates HC biosynthesis to protect aphids from desiccation. Moreover, our data also indicate that saturated and straight-chain HCs play a major role in cuticular waterproofing in the pea aphid. A. pisum CYP4G51 could be considered as a novel RNAi target in the field of insect pest management. PMID:27425674

  7. Characterization of a novel bioreactor system for 3D cellular mechanobiology studies.

    PubMed

    Cook, Colin A; Huri, Pinar Y; Ginn, Brian P; Gilbert-Honick, Jordana; Somers, Sarah M; Temple, Joshua P; Mao, Hai-Quan; Grayson, Warren L

    2016-08-01

    In vitro engineering systems can be powerful tools for studying tissue development in response to biophysical stimuli as well as for evaluating the functionality of engineered tissue grafts. It has been challenging, however, to develop systems that adequately integrate the application of biomimetic mechanical strain to engineered tissue with the ability to assess functional outcomes in real time. The aim of this study was to design a bioreactor system capable of real-time conditioning (dynamic, uniaxial strain, and electrical stimulation) of centimeter-long 3D tissue engineered constructs simultaneously with the capacity to monitor local strains. The system addresses key limitations of uniform sample loading and real-time imaging capabilities. Our system features an electrospun fibrin scaffold, which exhibits physiologically relevant stiffness and uniaxial alignment that facilitates cell adhesion, alignment, and proliferation. We have demonstrated the capacity for directly incorporating human adipose-derived stromal/stem cells into the fibers during the electrospinning process and subsequent culture of the cell-seeded constructs in the bioreactor. The bioreactor facilitates accurate pre-straining of the 3D constructs as well as the application of dynamic and static uniaxial strains while monitoring bulk construct tensions. The incorporation of fluorescent nanoparticles throughout the scaffolds enables in situ monitoring of local strain fields using fluorescent digital image correlation techniques, since the bioreactor is imaging compatible, and allows the assessment of local sample stiffness and stresses when coupled with force sensor measurements. In addition, the system is capable of measuring the electromechanical coupling of skeletal muscle explants by applying an electrical stimulus and simultaneously measuring the force of contraction. The packaging of these technologies, biomaterials, and analytical methods into a single bioreactor system has produced a

  8. Molecular characterization and oxidative stress response of a cytochrome P450 gene (CYP4G11) from Apis cerana cerana.

    PubMed

    Shi, Weina; Sun, Jing; Xu, Baohua; Li, Han

    2013-01-01

    Cytochrome P450 proteins, widely distributed multifunctional enzymes, are mainly involved in biosynthetic and degradative pathways of endogenous compounds and the detoxification of xenobiotics in insects. Moreover, these enzymes exhibit peroxidase-like activity, therefore they may be involved in protecting organisms against the toxicity of reactive oxygen species (ROS). In the present study, we cloned a CYP4G11 gene--AccCYP4G11--from the Chinese honey-bee (Apis cerana cerana). The open reading frame of the cDNA was 1656 bp long and encoded a 551 amino acids polypeptide, which shared high sequence identity with homologous cytochrome P450 proteins. In the genomic DNA sequence, a 5'-flanking region consisting of 1168 bp was obtained, and some putative transcription factor binding sites were predicted. Quantitative polymerase chain reaction (Q-PCR) revealed that the level of AccCYP4G11 was higher in the epidermis than in other tissues, and AccCYP4G11 was expressed in all stages with the highest level in two-week-old adult worker honey-bees. Moreover, the expression patterns under oxidative stress indicated that AccCYP4G11 transcription was significantly influenced by external factors, such as temperature challenges, ultraviolet (UV) light, and insecticide treatment. AccCYP4G11 was regulated differentially in response to oxidative stress and may be involved in protecting honey-bees from oxidative injury. PMID:24601089

  9. Molecular and cellular characterisation of the zinc uptake (Znu) system of Nostoc punctiforme.

    PubMed

    Hudek, Lee; Pearson, Leanne A; Michalczyk, Agnes; Neilan, Brett A; Ackland, M Leigh

    2013-11-01

    Metal homoeostasis in cyanobacteria is based on uptake and export systems that are controlled by their own regulators. This study characterises the zinc uptake (Znu) system in Nostoc punctiforme. The system was found to comprise of three subunits in an ACB operon: a Zn(2+)-binding protein (ZnuA18), a transmembrane domain (ZnuB) and an ATPase (ZnuC). These proteins are encoded within the znu operon regulated by a zinc uptake transcription repressor (Zur). Interestingly, a second Zn(2+)-binding protein (ZnuA08) was also identified at a distal genomic location. Interactions between components of the ZnuACB system were investigated using knockouts of the individual genes. The znuA08(-), znuA18(-), znuB(-) and znuC(-) mutants displayed overall reduced znuACB transcript levels, suggesting that all system components are required for normal expression of znu genes. Zinc uptake assays in the Zn(2+)-binding protein mutant strains showed that the disruption of znuA18 had a greater negative effect on zinc uptake than disruption of znuA08. Complementation studies in Escherichia coli indicated that both znuA08 and znuA18 were able to restore zinc uptake in a znuA(-) mutant, with znuA18 permitting the highest zinc uptake rate. The N. punctiforme zur was also able to complement the E. coli zur(-) mutant. PMID:23710564

  10. Adaptive Subframe Partitioning and Efficient Packet Scheduling in OFDMA Cellular System with Fixed Decode-and-Forward Relays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Liping; Ji, Yusheng; Liu, Fuqiang

    The integration of multihop relays with orthogonal frequency-division multiple access (OFDMA) cellular infrastructures can meet the growing demands for better coverage and higher throughput. Resource allocation in the OFDMA two-hop relay system is more complex than that in the conventional single-hop OFDMA system. With time division between transmissions from the base station (BS) and those from relay stations (RSs), fixed partitioning of the BS subframe and RS subframes can not adapt to various traffic demands. Moreover, single-hop scheduling algorithms can not be used directly in the two-hop system. Therefore, we propose a semi-distributed algorithm called ASP to adjust the length of every subframe adaptively, and suggest two ways to extend single-hop scheduling algorithms into multihop scenarios: link-based and end-to-end approaches. Simulation results indicate that the ASP algorithm increases system utilization and fairness. The max carrier-to-interference ratio (Max C/I) and proportional fairness (PF) scheduling algorithms extended using the end-to-end approach obtain higher throughput than those using the link-based approach, but at the expense of more overhead for information exchange between the BS and RSs. The resource allocation scheme using ASP and end-to-end PF scheduling achieves a tradeoff between system throughput maximization and fairness.

  11. A cellular and regulatory map of the cholinergic nervous system of C. elegans

    PubMed Central

    Pereira, Laura; Kratsios, Paschalis; Serrano-Saiz, Esther; Sheftel, Hila; Mayo, Avi E; Hall, David H; White, John G; LeBoeuf, Brigitte; Garcia, L Rene; Alon, Uri; Hobert, Oliver

    2015-01-01

    Nervous system maps are of critical importance for understanding how nervous systems develop and function. We systematically map here all cholinergic neuron types in the male and hermaphrodite C. elegans nervous system. We find that acetylcholine (ACh) is the most broadly used neurotransmitter and we analyze its usage relative to other neurotransmitters within the context of the entire connectome and within specific network motifs embedded in the connectome. We reveal several dynamic aspects of cholinergic neurotransmitter identity, including a sexually dimorphic glutamatergic to cholinergic neurotransmitter switch in a sex-shared interneuron. An expression pattern analysis of ACh-gated anion channels furthermore suggests that ACh may also operate very broadly as an inhibitory neurotransmitter. As a first application of this comprehensive neurotransmitter map, we identify transcriptional regulatory mechanisms that control cholinergic neurotransmitter identity and cholinergic circuit assembly. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.12432.001 PMID:26705699

  12. Stress, ageing and their influence on functional, cellular and molecular aspects of the immune system.

    PubMed

    Vitlic, Ana; Lord, Janet M; Phillips, Anna C

    2014-06-01

    The immune response is essential for keeping an organism healthy and for defending it from different types of pathogens. It is a complex system that consists of a large number of components performing different functions. The adequate and controlled interaction between these components is necessary for a robust and strong immune response. There are, however, many factors that interfere with the way the immune response functions. Stress and ageing now consistently appear in the literature as factors that act upon the immune system in the way that is often damaging. This review focuses on the role of stress and ageing in altering the robustness of the immune response first separately, and then simultaneously, discussing the effects that emerge from their interplay. The special focus is on the psychological stress and the impact that it has at different levels, from the whole system to the individual molecules, resulting in consequences for physical health. PMID:24562499

  13. Globular Cluster Populations: Results Including S4G Late-type Galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zaritsky, Dennis; McCabe, Kelsey; Aravena, Manuel; Athanassoula, E.; Bosma, Albert; Comerón, Sébastien; Courtois, Helene M.; Elmegreen, Bruce G.; Elmegreen, Debra M.; Erroz-Ferrer, Santiago; Gadotti, Dimitri A.; Hinz, Joannah L.; Ho, Luis C.; Holwerda, Benne; Kim, Taehyun; Knapen, Johan H.; Laine, Jarkko; Laurikainen, Eija; Muñoz-Mateos, Juan Carlos; Salo, Heikki; Sheth, Kartik

    2016-02-01

    Using 3.6 and 4.5 μm images of 73 late-type, edge-on galaxies from the S4G survey, we compare the richness of the globular cluster populations of these galaxies to those of early-type galaxies that we measured previously. In general, the galaxies presented here fill in the distribution for galaxies with lower stellar mass, M*, specifically {log}({M}*/{M}⊙ )\\lt 10, overlap the results for early-type galaxies of similar masses, and, by doing so, strengthen the case for a dependence of the number of globular clusters per 109M⊙ of galaxy stellar mass, TN, on M*. For 8.5\\lt {log}({M}*/{M}⊙ )\\lt 10.5 we find the relationship can be satisfactorily described as {T}{{N}}={({M}*/{10}6.7)}-0.56 when M* is expressed in solar masses. The functional form of the relationship is only weakly constrained, and extrapolation outside this range is not advised. Our late-type galaxies, in contrast to our early types, do not show the tendency for low-mass galaxies to split into two TN families. Using these results and a galaxy stellar mass function from the literature, we calculate that, in a volume-limited, local universe sample, clusters are most likely to be found around fairly massive galaxies (M* ˜ 1010.8M⊙) and present a fitting function for the volume number density of clusters as a function of parent-galaxy stellar mass. We find no correlation between TN and large-scale environment, but we do find a tendency for galaxies of fixed M* to have larger TN if they have converted a larger proportion of their baryons into stars.

  14. Nano-jewels in biology. Gold and platinum on diamond nanoparticles as antioxidant systems against cellular oxidative stress.

    PubMed

    Martín, Roberto; Menchón, Cristina; Apostolova, Nadezda; Victor, Victor M; Alvaro, Mercedes; Herance, José Raúl; García, Hermenegildo

    2010-11-23

    Diamond nanoparticles (DNPs) obtained by explosive detonation have become commercially available. These commercial DNPs can be treated under Fenton conditions (FeSO(4) and H(2)O(2) at acidic pH) to obtain purer DNP samples with a small average particle size (4 nm) and a large population of surface OH groups (HO-DNPs). These Fenton-treated HO-DNPs have been used as a support of gold and platinum nanoparticles (≤2 nm average size). The resulting materials (Au/HO-DNP and Pt/HO-DNP) exhibit a high antioxidant activity against reactive oxygen species induced in a hepatoma cell line. In addition to presenting good biocompatibility, Au/HO- and Pt/HO-DNP exhibit about a two-fold higher antioxidant activity than glutathione, one of the reference antioxidant systems. The most active material against cellular oxidative stress was Au/HO-DNP. PMID:20939514

  15. The regeneration of epidermal cells of Saintpaulia leaves as a new plant-tissue system for cellular radiation biology.

    PubMed

    Engels, F M; van der Laan, F M; Leenhouts, H P; Chadwick, K H

    1980-09-01

    Investigation of the nucleus of epidermal cells of the petioles of Saintpaulia leaves by cytofluorimetry revealed that all cells are in a non-cycling pre DNA synthesis phase. Cultivation of dissected leaves results in a synchronous regeneration process of a defined number of cells. Five days after onset of cultivation the cells reach the first mitosis. The nuclear development during the regeneration process is described. Irradiation of the leaves results in a directly visible inhibition of this regenerating capability which is used to quantify cell survival in a tissue. The data show that the radiation response has a similar shape to that of the survival of single cells in culture. This response can be observed before the first mitosis of the cells and its application as a new plant tissue system for cellular radiation research is discussed. PMID:7012060

  16. Impact of a Stochastic Parameterization of Cumulus Convection Using Cellular Automata in a Meso-Scale Ensemble Prediction System.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bengtsson, L.

    2014-12-01

    A common way of addressing forecast uncertainty in Numerical Weather Prediction (NWP) models is to use ensemble prediction. The idea behind ensemble predictionis to simulate the sensitivity of the forecast to the initial and boundary conditions, as well as model construction error, such as sub-grid physical parameterizations. Existing methods used in order to account for such model consturction uncertainty include; multi-model ensembles, adding random perturbations to the tendencies produced by the parameterizations, or perturbing parameters within the parameterizations. Although such methods are successful in a probabilistic sense, individual ensemble members can be degraded in a deterministic sense by adding random non-physical perturbations. Furthermore, different ensemble members can have different bias (and skill) since they are based on separate models and/or parameters. Another way of accounting for model uncertainty (due to sub-grid variability) is to introduce random variability in the convection parameterization itself. Here we will present the impact of the stochastic deep convection parameterization using cellular automata described in Bengtsson et. al. 2013, as implemented in the high resolution meso-scale ensemble prediction system HarmonEPS. The questions we would like to answer are; can we improve the forecast skill both in a deterministic and probabilistic sense using the stochastic convection scheme? Can the stochastic parameterization in terms of the spread/skill relationship compete with the multi-model approach? Furthermore, the stochastic parameterization proposed in Bengtsson et. al. 2013 addresses lateral communication between model grid-boxes by using a cellular automaton. It was demonstrated that the scheme in a deterministic model is capable of contributing to the organization of convective squall-lines and meso-scale convective systems. We study if and how uncertainties with origin on the sub-grid scale transfer to the larger atmospheric

  17. Comparison of two in vitro systems to assess cellular effects of nanoparticles-containing aerosols

    PubMed Central

    Fröhlich, Eleonore; Bonstingl, Gudrun; Höfler, Anita; Meindl, Claudia; Leitinger, Gerd; Pieber, Thomas R.; Roblegg, Eva

    2013-01-01

    Inhalation treatment with nanoparticle containing aerosols appears a promising new therapeutic option but new formulations have to be assessed for efficacy and toxicity. We evaluated the utility of a VITROCELL®6 PT-CF + PARI LC SPRINT® Baby Nebulizer (PARI BOY) system compared with a conventional MicroSprayer. A549 cells were cultured in the air–liquid interface, exposed to nanoparticle aerosols and characterized by measurement of transepithelial electrical resistance and staining for tight junction proteins. Deposition and distribution rates of polystyrene particles and of carbon nanotubes on the cells were assessed. In addition, cytotoxicity of aerosols containing polystyrene particles was compared with cytotoxicity of polystyrene particles in suspension tested in submersed cultures. Exposure by itself in both exposure systems did not damage the cells. Deposition rates of aerosolized polystyrene particles were about 700 times and that of carbon nanotubes about 4 times higher in the MicroSprayer than in the VITROCELL®6 PT-CF system. Cytotoxicity of amine-functionalized polystyrene nanoparticles was significantly higher when applied as an aerosol on cell cultured in air–liquid interface culture compared with nanoparticle suspensions tested in submersed culture. The higher cytotoxicity of aerosolized nanoparticles underscores the importance of relevant exposure systems. PMID:22906573

  18. GIS Based System for Post-Earthquake Crisis Managment Using Cellular Network

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Raeesi, M.; Sadeghi-Niaraki, A.

    2013-09-01

    Earthquakes are among the most destructive natural disasters. Earthquakes happen mainly near the edges of tectonic plates, but they may happen just about anywhere. Earthquakes cannot be predicted. Quick response after disasters, like earthquake, decreases loss of life and costs. Massive earthquakes often cause structures to collapse, trapping victims under dense rubble for long periods of time. After the earthquake and destroyed some areas, several teams are sent to find the location of the destroyed areas. The search and rescue phase usually is maintained for many days. Time reduction for surviving people is very important. A Geographical Information System (GIS) can be used for decreasing response time and management in critical situations. Position estimation in short period of time time is important. This paper proposes a GIS based system for post-earthquake disaster management solution. This system relies on several mobile positioning methods such as cell-ID and TA method, signal strength method, angel of arrival method, time of arrival method and time difference of arrival method. For quick positioning, the system can be helped by any person who has a mobile device. After positioning and specifying the critical points, the points are sent to a central site for managing the procedure of quick response for helping. This solution establishes a quick way to manage the post-earthquake crisis.

  19. Feeding Behavior of Aplysia: A Model System for Comparing Cellular Mechanisms of Classical and Operant Conditioning

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Baxter, Douglas A.; Byrne, John H.

    2006-01-01

    Feeding behavior of Aplysia provides an excellent model system for analyzing and comparing mechanisms underlying appetitive classical conditioning and reward operant conditioning. Behavioral protocols have been developed for both forms of associative learning, both of which increase the occurrence of biting following training. Because the neural…

  20. Cellular location and major terminal networks of the orexinergic system in the brain of two megachiropterans.

    PubMed

    Dell, Leigh-Anne; Kruger, Jean-Leigh; Pettigrew, John D; Manger, Paul R

    2013-11-01

    The present study describes the distribution of orexin-A immunoreactive neurons and their terminal networks in the brains of two species of megachiropterans. In general the organization of the orexinergic system in the mammalian brain is conserved across species, but as one of two groups of mammals that fly and have a high metabolic rate, it was of interest to determine whether there were any specific differences in the organization of this system in the megachiropterans. Orexinergic neurons were limited in distribution to the hypothalamus, and formed three distinct clusters, or nuclei, a main cluster with a perifornical location, a zona incerta cluster in the dorsolateral hypothalamus and an optic tract cluster in the ventrolateral hypothalamus. The nuclear parcellation of the orexinergic system in the megachiropterans is similar to that seen in many mammals, but differs from the microchiropterans where the optic tract cluster is absent. The terminal networks of the orexinergic neurons in the megachiropterans was similar to that seen in a range of mammalian species, with significant terminal networks being found in the hypothalamus, cholinergic pedunculopontine and laterodorsal tegemental nuclei, the noradrenergic locus coeruleus complex, all serotonergic nuclei, the paraventricular nuclei of the epithalamus and adjacent to the habenular nuclei. While the megachiropteran orexinergic system is typically mammalian in form, it does differ from that reported for microchiropterans, and thus provides an additional neural character arguing for independent evolution of these two chiropteran suborders. PMID:24041616

  1. Early Systemic Cellular Immune Response in Children and Young Adults Receiving Decellularized Fresh Allografts for Pulmonary Valve Replacement

    PubMed Central

    Neumann, Anneke; Breymann, Thomas; Cebotari, Serghei; Boethig, Dietmar; Horke, Alexander; Beerbaum, Philipp; Westhoff-Bleck, Mechthild; Bertram, Harald; Ono, Masamichi; Tudorache, Igor; Haverich, Axel; Beutel, Gernot

    2014-01-01

    Objectives: The longevity of homografts is determined by the activation of the recipients' immune system resulting from allogenic antigen exposition. Fresh decellularized pulmonary homografts (DPH) have shown promising early results in pulmonary valve replacement in children and young adults and could potentially avoid significant activation of the immune system, as more than 99% of the donor DNA is removed during the decellularization process. While the humoral immune response to decellularized allografts has been studied, detailed information on the more significant cellular immune response is currently lacking. Methods and Results: Peripheral blood samples were obtained from patients undergoing pulmonary valve replacement with DPH before, after, and for approximately 3 years after implantation. Absolute counts and percentages of mature T- (CD3+), B- (CD19+), and natural killer- (CD16+/CD56+) cells, as well as T helper- (CD4+) and cytotoxic T-cell- (CD8+) subsets, were determined by fluorescence-activated cell sorting (FACS). Between May 2009 and September 2013, 199 blood samples taken from 47 patients with a mean age at DPH implantation of 16.6±10.8 years were analyzed. The hemodynamic performance of DPH was excellent in all but one patient, and no valve-related deaths or conduit explantations were observed. The short-term follow up revealed a significant postoperative decrease in cell counts of most subtypes with reconstitution after 3 months. Continued assessment did not show any significant deviations in cell counts from their baseline values. Conclusion: The absence of cellular immune response in patients receiving DPH supports the concept that decellularization can provide a basis for autologous regeneration. PMID:24138470

  2. Validation of vacuum-based refrigerated system for biobanking tissue preservation: analysis of cellular morphology, protein stability, and RNA quality.

    PubMed

    Condelli, Valentina; Lettini, Giacomo; Patitucci, Giuseppe; D'Auria, Fiorella; D'Amico, Michele; Vita, Giulia; Musto, Pellegrino; Cuomo, Carmela; Landriscina, Matteo

    2014-02-01

    Biobanks of fresh, unfixed human normal and malignant tissues represent a valuable source for gene expression analysis in translational cancer research and molecular pathology. However, the success of molecular and cellular analysis in both clinical and translational research is strongly dependent on the collection, handling, storage, and quality control of fresh human tissue samples. The aim of this study was to evaluate an innovative vacuum-based refrigerated system, as a logistically feasible technology to increase the collection of tissue specimens, preserving the integrity of cellular and molecular components. We tested randomly-selected tissues stored under vacuum at 4°C by using endpoints important for research and diagnosis, including tissue morphology, epitope stability, and RNA integrity. Gene expression was evaluated by qualitative and quantitative RT analysis of selected housekeeping and tissue-specific genes. Tissue morphology and overall protein stability were generally well preserved, being compromised only in gallbladder tissue. By contrast, phosphoprotein and RNA analysis demonstrated a time-dependent degree of degradation, with progressive loss of stability from 24 to 72 hours. However, this reduction in RNA quality did not represent a limitation for successful expression analysis of selected genes. Indeed, a comparative qualitative and quantitative RT-PCR analysis showed that RNA extracted from tissues stored under vacuum is suitable for gene expression profiling, but requires highly sensitive technologies, such as quantitative RT-PCR. These data suggest that the refrigerated vacuum-based system represents a suitable and feasible technology for routine transport of fresh specimens from surgery to biobanks, thus increasing the opportunity to collect biospecimens. PMID:24620768

  3. Catalogue of the morphological features in the Spitzer Survey of Stellar Structure in Galaxies (S4G)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Herrera-Endoqui, M.; Díaz-García, S.; Laurikainen, E.; Salo, H.

    2015-10-01

    Context. A catalogue of the features for the complete Spitzer Survey of Stellar Structure in Galaxies (S4G), including 2352 nearby galaxies, is presented. The measurements are made using 3.6 μm images, largely tracing the old stellar population; at this wavelength the effects of dust are also minimal. The measured features are the sizes, ellipticities, and orientations of bars, rings, ringlenses, and lenses. Measured in a similar manner are also barlenses (lens-like structures embedded in the bars), which are not lenses in the usual sense, being rather the more face-on counterparts of the boxy/peanut structures in the edge-on view. In addition, pitch angles of spiral arm segments are measured for those galaxies where they can be reliably traced. More than one pitch angle may appear for a single galaxy. All measurements are made in a human-supervised manner so that attention is paid to each galaxy. Aims: We create a catalogue of morphological features in the complete S4G. Methods: We used isophotal analysis, unsharp masking, and fitting ellipses to measured structures. Results: We find that the sizes of the inner rings and lenses normalized to barlength correlate with the galaxy mass: the normalized sizes increase toward the less massive galaxies; it has been suggested that this is related to the larger dark matter content in the bar region in these systems. Bars in the low mass galaxies are also less concentrated, likely to be connected to the mass cut-off in the appearance of the nuclear rings and lenses. We also show observational evidence that barlenses indeed form part of the bar, and that a large fraction of the inner lenses in the non-barred galaxies could be former barlenses in which the thin outer bar component has dissolved. Full Tables 2 and 3 are only available at the CDS via anonymous ftp to http://cdsarc.u-strasbg.fr (ftp://130.79.128.5) or via http://cdsarc.u-strasbg.fr/viz-bin/qcat?J/A+A/582/A86

  4. The p53 network: Cellular and systemic DNA damage responses in aging and cancer

    PubMed Central

    Reinhardt, H. Christian; Schumacher, Björn

    2014-01-01

    Genome instability contributes to cancer development and accelerates age-related pathologies as evidenced by a variety of congenital cancer susceptibility and progeroid syndromes that are caused by defects in genome maintenance mechanisms. DNA damage response pathways that are mediated through the tumor suppressor p53 play an important role in the cell intrinsic responses to genome instability, including a transient cell cycle arrest, senescence and apoptosis. Both senescence and apoptosis are powerful tumor suppressive pathways preventing the uncontrolled proliferation of transformed cells. However, both pathways can potentially deplete stem and progenitor cell pools, thus promoting tissue degeneration and organ failure, which are both hallmarks of aging. p53 signaling is also involved in mediating non-cell autonomous interactions with the innate immune system and in the systemic adjustments during the aging process. The network of p53 target genes thus functions as an important regulator of cancer prevention and the physiology of aging. PMID:22265392

  5. In Vitro Testing of Biomaterials for Neural Repair: Focus on Cellular Systems and High-Content Analysis.

    PubMed

    Baldassarro, Vito Antonio; Dolci, Luisa Stella; Mangano, Chiara; Giardino, Luciana; Gualandi, Chiara; Focarete, Maria Letizia; Calzà, Laura

    2016-01-01

    Biomimetic materials are designed to stimulate specific cellular responses at the molecular level. To improve the soundness of in vitro testing of the biological impact of new materials, appropriate cell systems and technologies must be standardized also taking regulatory issues into consideration. In this study, the biological and molecular effects of different scaffolds on three neural systems, that is, the neural cell line SH-SY5Y, primary cortical neurons, and neural stem cells, were compared. The effect of poly(L-lactic acid) scaffolds having different surface geometry (conventional two-dimensional seeding flat surface, random or aligned fibers as semi3D structure) and chemical functionalization (laminin or ECM extract) were studied. The endpoints were defined for efficacy (i.e., neural differentiation and neurite elongation) and for safety (i.e., cell death/survival) using high-content analysis. It is demonstrated that (i) the definition of the biological properties of biomaterials is profoundly influenced by the test system used; (ii) the definition of the in vitro safety profile of biomaterials for neural repair is also influenced by the test system; (iii) cell-based high-content screening may well be successfully used to characterize both the efficacy and safety of novel biomaterials, thus speeding up and improving the soundness of this critical step in material science having medical applications. PMID:27588220

  6. In Vitro Testing of Biomaterials for Neural Repair: Focus on Cellular Systems and High-Content Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Baldassarro, Vito Antonio; Dolci, Luisa Stella; Mangano, Chiara; Giardino, Luciana; Gualandi, Chiara; Focarete, Maria Letizia; Calzà, Laura

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Biomimetic materials are designed to stimulate specific cellular responses at the molecular level. To improve the soundness of in vitro testing of the biological impact of new materials, appropriate cell systems and technologies must be standardized also taking regulatory issues into consideration. In this study, the biological and molecular effects of different scaffolds on three neural systems, that is, the neural cell line SH-SY5Y, primary cortical neurons, and neural stem cells, were compared. The effect of poly(L-lactic acid) scaffolds having different surface geometry (conventional two-dimensional seeding flat surface, random or aligned fibers as semi3D structure) and chemical functionalization (laminin or ECM extract) were studied. The endpoints were defined for efficacy (i.e., neural differentiation and neurite elongation) and for safety (i.e., cell death/survival) using high-content analysis. It is demonstrated that (i) the definition of the biological properties of biomaterials is profoundly influenced by the test system used; (ii) the definition of the in vitro safety profile of biomaterials for neural repair is also influenced by the test system; (iii) cell-based high-content screening may well be successfully used to characterize both the efficacy and safety of novel biomaterials, thus speeding up and improving the soundness of this critical step in material science having medical applications. PMID:27588220

  7. Model Systems of Precursor Cellular Membranes: Long-Chain Alcohols Stabilize Spontaneously Formed Oleic Acid Vesicles

    PubMed Central

    Rendón, Adela; Carton, David Gil; Sot, Jesús; García-Pacios, Marcos; Montes, Ruth; Valle, Mikel; Arrondo, José-Luis R.; Goñi, Felix M.; Ruiz-Mirazo, Kepa

    2012-01-01

    Oleic acid vesicles have been used as model systems to study the properties of membranes that could be the evolutionary precursors of more complex, stable, and impermeable phospholipid biomembranes. Pure fatty acid vesicles in general show high sensitivity to ionic strength and pH variation, but there is growing evidence that this lack of stability can be counterbalanced through mixtures with other amphiphilic or surfactant compounds. Here, we present a systematic experimental analysis of the oleic acid system and explore the spontaneous formation of vesicles under different conditions, as well as the effects that alcohols and alkanes may have in the process. Our results support the hypothesis that alcohols (in particular 10- to 14-C-atom alcohols) contribute to the stability of oleic acid vesicles under a wider range of experimental conditions. Moreover, studies of mixed oleic-acid-alkane and oleic-acid-alcohol systems using infrared spectroscopy and Langmuir trough measurements indicate that precisely those alcohols that increased vesicle stability also decreased the mobility of oleic acid polar headgroups, as well as the area/molecule of lipid. PMID:22339864

  8. Simultaneous model discrimination and parameter estimation in dynamic models of cellular systems

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Model development is a key task in systems biology, which typically starts from an initial model candidate and, involving an iterative cycle of hypotheses-driven model modifications, leads to new experimentation and subsequent model identification steps. The final product of this cycle is a satisfactory refined model of the biological phenomena under study. During such iterative model development, researchers frequently propose a set of model candidates from which the best alternative must be selected. Here we consider this problem of model selection and formulate it as a simultaneous model selection and parameter identification problem. More precisely, we consider a general mixed-integer nonlinear programming (MINLP) formulation for model selection and identification, with emphasis on dynamic models consisting of sets of either ODEs (ordinary differential equations) or DAEs (differential algebraic equations). Results We solved the MINLP formulation for model selection and identification using an algorithm based on Scatter Search (SS). We illustrate the capabilities and efficiency of the proposed strategy with a case study considering the KdpD/KdpE system regulating potassium homeostasis in Escherichia coli. The proposed approach resulted in a final model that presents a better fit to the in silico generated experimental data. Conclusions The presented MINLP-based optimization approach for nested-model selection and identification is a powerful methodology for model development in systems biology. This strategy can be used to perform model selection and parameter estimation in one single step, thus greatly reducing the number of experiments and computations of traditional modeling approaches. PMID:23938131

  9. Tinnitus: pathology of synaptic plasticity at the cellular and system levels.

    PubMed

    Guitton, Matthieu J

    2012-01-01

    Despite being more and more common, and having a high impact on the quality of life of sufferers, tinnitus does not yet have a cure. This has been mostly the result of limited knowledge of the biological mechanisms underlying this adverse pathology. However, the last decade has witnessed tremendous progress in our understanding on the pathophysiology of tinnitus. Animal models have demonstrated that tinnitus is a pathology of neural plasticity, and has two main components: a molecular, peripheral component related to the initiation phase of tinnitus; and a system-level, central component-related to the long-term maintenance of tinnitus. Using the most recent experimental data and the molecular/system dichotomy as a framework, we describe here the biological basis of tinnitus. We then discuss these mechanisms from an evolutionary perspective, highlighting similarities with memory. Finally, we consider how these discoveries can translate into therapies, and we suggest operative strategies to design new and effective combined therapeutic solutions using both pharmacological (local and systemic) and behavioral tools (e.g., using tele-medicine and virtual reality settings). PMID:22408611

  10. Differences in cytokinin control on cellular dynamics of zucchini cotyledons cultivated in two experimental systems.

    PubMed

    Stoynova-Bakalova, E; Petrov, P; Gigova, L; Ivanova, N

    2011-01-01

    The effect of endogenous cytokinins on the pattern of palisade cell division post-germination does not depend on the conditions of cotyledon development -in planta (attached to seedlings) or in vitro (isolated from dry zucchini seeds and cultured on water). In cotyledons originating from 4-day-old seedlings (experimental system 1), exogenous cytokinin temporarily (in the first 2 day of cultivation) enhanced post-mitotic cell enlargement of palisade cells, mainly due to enhanced water uptake and use of cell storage compounds, all of which lead to cotyledon senescence. Cytokinin is not able to resume the completed palisade cell division on day 5. As a result, the number of cells and the final areas of treated and control cotyledons are quite similar. By contrast, the effects of cytokinin on cotyledons isolated from dry seeds (experimental system 2) are better expressed, promoting an increase in number of palisade cells accompanied by additional cotyledon area enlargement. However, the prolonged post-mitotic cell expansion in control cotyledons compensates for the reduced speed of cell growth and division activity and decreases differences in final cotyledon area between treatments. The results define cell division as the primary target of cytokinin stimulation in cotyledon tissues competent for division, and determine the temporal patterns of palisade cell cycling related to cotyledon age. This knowledge permits a better choice of experimental system to study effects on cell proliferation and cell growth, as well as cell enlargement and senescence-related events using physiologically homogeneous material. PMID:21143721

  11. Microscale screening systems for 3D cellular microenvironments: platforms, advances, and challenges

    PubMed Central

    Montanez-Sauri, Sara I.; Beebe, David J.; Sung, Kyung Eun

    2015-01-01

    The increasing interest in studying cells using more in vivo-like three-dimensional (3D) microenvironments has created a need for advanced 3D screening platforms with enhanced functionalities and increased throughput. 3D screening platforms that better mimic in vivo microenvironments with enhanced throughput would provide more in-depth understanding of the complexity and heterogeneity of microenvironments. The platforms would also better predict the toxicity and efficacy of potential drugs in physiologically relevant conditions. Traditional 3D culture models (e.g. spinner flasks, gyratory rotation devices, non-adhesive surfaces, polymers) were developed to create 3D multicellular structures. However, these traditional systems require large volumes of reagents and cells, and are not compatible with high throughput screening (HTS) systems. Microscale technology offers the miniaturization of 3D cultures and allows efficient screening of various conditions. This review will discuss the development, most influential works, and current advantages and challenges of microscale culture systems for screening cells in 3D microenvironments. PMID:25274061

  12. Tinnitus: pathology of synaptic plasticity at the cellular and system levels

    PubMed Central

    Guitton, Matthieu J.

    2012-01-01

    Despite being more and more common, and having a high impact on the quality of life of sufferers, tinnitus does not yet have a cure. This has been mostly the result of limited knowledge of the biological mechanisms underlying this adverse pathology. However, the last decade has witnessed tremendous progress in our understanding on the pathophysiology of tinnitus. Animal models have demonstrated that tinnitus is a pathology of neural plasticity, and has two main components: a molecular, peripheral component related to the initiation phase of tinnitus; and a system-level, central component-related to the long-term maintenance of tinnitus. Using the most recent experimental data and the molecular/system dichotomy as a framework, we describe here the biological basis of tinnitus. We then discuss these mechanisms from an evolutionary perspective, highlighting similarities with memory. Finally, we consider how these discoveries can translate into therapies, and we suggest operative strategies to design new and effective combined therapeutic solutions using both pharmacological (local and systemic) and behavioral tools (e.g., using tele-medicine and virtual reality settings). PMID:22408611

  13. Resonation-based hybrid continuous-time/discrete-time cascade ΣΔ modulators: application to 4G wireless telecom

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de la Rosa, José M.; Morgado, Alonso; del Río, Rocío

    2009-05-01

    This paper presents innovative architectures of hybrid Continuous-Time/Discrete-Time (CT/DT) cascade ΣΔ Modulators (ΣΔMs) made up of a front-end CT stage and a back-end DT stage. In addition to increasing the digitized signal bandwidth as compared to conventional ΣΔMs, the proposed topologies take advantage of the CT nature of the front-end ΣΔM stage, by embedding anti-aliasing filtering as well as their suitability to operate up to the GHz range. Moreover, the presented modulators include multi-bit quantization and Unity Signal Transfer Function (USTF) in both stages to reduce the integrator output swings, and programmable resonation to optimally distribute the zeroes of the overall Noise Transfer Function (NTF), such that the in-band quantization noise is minimized for each operation mode. Both local and inter-stage (global) based resonation architectures are synthesized and compared in terms of their circuit complexity, resolution-bandwidth programmability and robustness with respect to circuit non-ideal effects. The combination of all mentioned characteristics results in novel hybrid ΣΔMs, very suited for the implementation of adaptive/reconfigurable Analog-to-Digital Converters (ADCs) intended for the 4th Generation (4G) of wireless telecom systems.

  14. On the definition of adapted audio/video profiles for high-quality video calling services over LTE/4G

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ndiaye, Maty; Quinquis, Catherine; Larabi, Mohamed Chaker; Le Lay, Gwenael; Saadane, Hakim; Perrine, Clency

    2014-01-01

    During the last decade, the important advances and widespread availability of mobile technology (operating systems, GPUs, terminal resolution and so on) have encouraged a fast development of voice and video services like video-calling. While multimedia services have largely grown on mobile devices, the generated increase of data consumption is leading to the saturation of mobile networks. In order to provide data with high bit-rates and maintain performance as close as possible to traditional networks, the 3GPP (The 3rd Generation Partnership Project) worked on a high performance standard for mobile called Long Term Evolution (LTE). In this paper, we aim at expressing recommendations related to audio and video media profiles (selection of audio and video codecs, bit-rates, frame-rates, audio and video formats) for a typical video-calling services held over LTE/4G mobile networks. These profiles are defined according to targeted devices (smartphones, tablets), so as to ensure the best possible quality of experience (QoE). Obtained results indicate that for a CIF format (352 x 288 pixels) which is usually used for smartphones, the VP8 codec provides a better image quality than the H.264 codec for low bitrates (from 128 to 384 kbps). However sequences with high motion, H.264 in slow mode is preferred. Regarding audio, better results are globally achieved using wideband codecs offering good quality except for opus codec (at 12.2 kbps).

  15. Stimulatory and possible antioxidant effects of High Density Green Photons (HDGP) on cellular systems

    PubMed Central

    Paslaru, L; Nastase, A; Stefan, L; Florea, R; Sorop, A; Ionescu, E; Popescu, I; Comorasan, S

    2014-01-01

    The interactions between the electromagnetic field and the biological systems were extensively investigated, with remarkable results and advanced technologies. Nevertheless, the visible domain of the spectrum has been rather neglected, since the classic physics did not allow electronic transitions induced by visible light. Recently, the interaction of light with the matter has generated a new scientific domain known in Physics as optical manipulation, with the new concepts of optical matter and optical force. This article presents the results of our work concerning in vitro effects of High Density Green Photons (HDGP) irradiation on cell cultures: stimulation of cell proliferation and migration and a possible antioxidant action. PMID:25713633

  16. An Inducible System for Rapid Degradation of Specific Cellular Proteins Using Proteasome Adaptors

    PubMed Central

    Wilmington, Shameika R.; Matouschek, Andreas

    2016-01-01

    A common way to study protein function is to deplete the protein of interest from cells and observe the response. Traditional methods involve disrupting gene expression but these techniques are only effective against newly synthesized proteins and leave previously existing and stable proteins untouched. Here, we introduce a technique that induces the rapid degradation of specific proteins in mammalian cells by shuttling the proteins to the proteasome for degradation in a ubiquitin-independent manner. We present two implementations of the system in human culture cells that can be used individually to control protein concentration. Our study presents a simple, robust, and flexible technology platform for manipulating intracellular protein levels. PMID:27043013

  17. Characterization of the emergent properties of a synthetic quasi-cellular system

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background The process of solutes entrapment during liposomes formation is interesting for the investigation of the relationship between the formation of compartments and the distribution of molecules inside them; a relevant issue in the studies of the origin of life. Theoretically, when no interactions are supposed among the chemical species to be entrapped, the entrapment is described by a standard Poisson process. But very recent experimental findings show that, for small liposomes (100 nm diameter), the distribution of entrapped molecules is best described by a power-law function. This is of a great importance, as the two random processes give rise to two completely different scenarios. Here we present an in silico stochastic simulation of the encapsulation of a cell-free molecular translation system (the PURE system), obtained following two different entrapment models: a pure Poisson process, and a power-law. The protein synthesis inside the liposomes has been studied in both cases, with the aim to highlight experimental observables that could be measured to assess which model gives a better representation of the real process. Results Firstly, a minimal model for in vitro protein synthesis, based on the PURE system molecular composition, has been formalized. Then, we have designed a reliable experimental simulation where stochastic factors affect the reaction course inside the compartment. To this end, 24 solutes, which represent the PURE system components, have been stochastically distributed among vesicles by following either a Poisson or a power-law distribution. The course of the protein synthesis within each vesicle has been consequently calculated, as a function of vesicle size. Our study can predict translation yield in a population of small liposomes down to the attoliter (10-18 L) range. Our results show that the efficiency of protein synthesis peaks at approximately 3·10-16 L (840 nm diam.) with a Poisson distribution of solutes, while a relative

  18. Cellular and Network Mechanisms Underlying Information Processing in a Simple Sensory System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jacobs, Gwen; Henze, Chris; Biegel, Bryan (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    Realistic, biophysically-based compartmental models were constructed of several primary sensory interneurons in the cricket cercal sensory system. A dynamic atlas of the afferent input to these cells was used to set spatio-temporal parameters for the simulated stimulus-dependent synaptic inputs. We examined the roles of dendritic morphology, passive membrane properties, and active conductances on the frequency tuning of the neurons. The sensitivity of narrow-band low pass interneurons could be explained entirely by the electronic structure of the dendritic arbors and the dynamic sensitivity of the SIZ. The dynamic characteristics of interneurons with higher frequency sensitivity required models with voltage-dependent dendritic conductances.

  19. Eukaryotic Initiation Factor 4G Suppresses Nonsense-Mediated mRNA Decay by Two Genetically Separable Mechanisms

    PubMed Central

    Joncourt, Raphael; Eberle, Andrea B.; Rufener, Simone C.; Mühlemann, Oliver

    2014-01-01

    Nonsense-mediated mRNA decay (NMD), which is best known for degrading mRNAs with premature termination codons (PTCs), is thought to be triggered by aberrant translation termination at stop codons located in an environment of the mRNP that is devoid of signals necessary for proper termination. In mammals, the cytoplasmic poly(A)-binding protein 1 (PABPC1) has been reported to promote correct termination and therewith antagonize NMD by interacting with the eukaryotic release factors 1 (eRF1) and 3 (eRF3). Using tethering assays in which proteins of interest are recruited as MS2 fusions to a NMD reporter transcript, we show that the three N-terminal RNA recognition motifs (RRMs) of PABPC1 are sufficient to antagonize NMD, while the eRF3-interacting C-terminal domain is dispensable. The RRM1-3 portion of PABPC1 interacts with eukaryotic initiation factor 4G (eIF4G) and tethering of eIF4G to the NMD reporter also suppresses NMD. We identified the interactions of the eIF4G N-terminus with PABPC1 and the eIF4G core domain with eIF3 as two genetically separable features that independently enable tethered eIF4G to inhibit NMD. Collectively, our results reveal a function of PABPC1, eIF4G and eIF3 in translation termination and NMD suppression, and they provide additional evidence for a tight coupling between translation termination and initiation. PMID:25148142

  20. Cellular Dose of Partly Soluble Cu Particle Aerosols at the Air–Liquid Interface Using an In Vitro Lung Cell Exposure System

    PubMed Central

    Cronholm, Pontus; Karlsson, Hanna L.; Midander, Klara; Odnevall Wallinder, Inger; Möller, Lennart

    2013-01-01

    Abstract Background There is currently a need to develop and test in vitro systems for predicting the toxicity of nanoparticles. One challenge is to determine the actual cellular dose of nanoparticles after exposure. Methods In this study, human epithelial lung cells (A549) were exposed to airborne Cu particles at the air–liquid interface (ALI). The cellular dose was determined for two different particle sizes at different deposition conditions, including constant and pulsed Cu aerosol flow. Results Airborne polydisperse particles with a geometric mean diameter (GMD) of 180 nm [geometric standard deviation (GSD) 1.5, concentration 105 particles/mL] deposited at the ALI yielded a cellular dose of 0.4–2.6 μg/cm2 at pulsed flow and 1.6–7.6 μg/cm2 at constant flow. Smaller polydisperse particles in the nanoregime (GMD 80 nm, GSD 1.5, concentration 107 particles/mL) resulted in a lower cellular dose of 0.01–0.05 μg/cm2 at pulsed flow, whereas no deposition was observed at constant flow. Exposure experiments with and without cells showed that the Cu particles were partly dissolved upon deposition on cells and in contact with medium. Conclusions Different cellular doses were obtained for the different Cu particle sizes (generated with different methods). Furthermore, the cellular doses were affected by the flow conditions in the cell exposure system and the solubility of Cu. The cellular doses of Cu presented here are the amount of Cu that remained on the cells after completion of an experiment. As Cu particles were partly dissolved, Cu (a nonnegligible contribution) was, in addition, present and analyzed in the nourishing medium present beneath the cells. This study presents cellular doses induced by Cu particles and demonstrates difficulties with deposition of nanoparticles at the ALI and of partially soluble particles. PMID:22889118

  1. Cellular automata model simulating traffic car accidents in the on-ramp system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Echab, H.; Lakouari, N.; Ez-Zahraouy, H.; Benyoussef, A.

    2015-01-01

    In this paper, using Nagel-Schreckenberg model we study the on-ramp system under the expanded open boundary condition. The phase diagram of the two-lane on-ramp system is computed. It is found that the expanded left boundary insertion strategy enhances the flow in the on-ramp lane. Furthermore, we have studied the probability of the occurrence of car accidents. We distinguish two types of car accidents: the accident at the on-ramp site (Prc) and the rear-end accident in the main road (Pac). It is shown that car accidents at the on-ramp site are more likely to occur when traffic is free on road A. However, the rear-end accidents begin to occur above a critical injecting rate αc1. The influence of the on-ramp length (LB) and position (xC0) on the car accidents probabilities is studied. We found that large LB or xC0 causes an important decrease of the probability Prc. However, only large xC0 provokes an increase of the probability Pac. The effect of the stochastic randomization is also computed.

  2. Analysis and control of a cellular converter system with stochastic ripple cancellation and minimal magnetics

    SciTech Connect

    Perreault, D.J.; Kassakian, J.G.

    1997-01-01

    A parallel converter architecture based on the resonant pole inverter (RPI) topology is presented. It is shown that this architecture minimizes the output magnetics required for current sharing. A new current control scheme is introduced which reduces peak currents, losses, and output voltage ripple for many operating conditions. This new control method is applicable to both the single RPI and the parallel architecture. Additionally, the paper analytically quantifies the degree of passive ripple cancellation between cells of a parallel architecture. It is shown that the rms ripple current of an N-cell paralleled converter system is a factor of 1/{radical}N lower than for an equivalent single converter. These results are verified using a piecewise-linear model. The authors conclude that the parallel architecture overcomes some of the major disadvantages of the conventional RPI.

  3. Activation and regulation of cellular inflammasomes: gaps in our knowledge for central nervous system injury.

    PubMed

    de Rivero Vaccari, Juan Pablo; Dietrich, W Dalton; Keane, Robert W

    2014-03-01

    The inflammasome is an intracellular multiprotein complex involved in the activation of caspase-1 and the processing of the proinflammatory cytokines interleukin-1β (IL-1β) and IL-18. The inflammasome in the central nervous system (CNS) is involved in the generation of an innate immune inflammatory response through IL-1 cytokine release and in cell death through the process of pyroptosis. In this review, we consider the different types of inflammasomes (NLRP1, NLRP2, NLRP3, and AIM2) that have been described in CNS cells, namely neurons, astrocytes, and microglia. Importantly, we focus on the role of the inflammasome after brain and spinal cord injury and cover the potential activators of the inflammasome after CNS injury such as adenosine triphosphate and DNA, and the therapeutic potential of targeting the inflammasome to improve outcomes after CNS trauma. PMID:24398940

  4. The cellular immune system in the post-myocardial infarction repair process.

    PubMed

    Latet, Sam C; Hoymans, Vicky Y; Van Herck, Paul L; Vrints, Christiaan J

    2015-01-20

    Growing evidence indicates that overactivation and prolongation of the inflammatory response after acute myocardial infarction (AMI) result in worse left ventricular remodelling, dysfunction and progression to heart failure. This post-AMI inflammatory response is characterised by the critical involvement of cells from both the innate and adaptive immune systems. In this review paper, we aim to summarise and discuss the emergence of immune cells in the bloodstream and myocardium after AMI in men and mice. Subset composition, phenotypes, and kinetics of immune cells are considered. In addition, the relation with post-MI cardiac remodelling, function and outcome is reported. Increased knowledge of immune components, the mechanisms and interactions by which these cells contribute to myocardial damage and repair following AMI may help to close the gaps that limit improvement of treatments of those who survive the acute infarction. PMID:25464457

  5. Activation and regulation of cellular inflammasomes: gaps in our knowledge for central nervous system injury

    PubMed Central

    de Rivero Vaccari, Juan Pablo; Dietrich, W Dalton; Keane, Robert W

    2014-01-01

    The inflammasome is an intracellular multiprotein complex involved in the activation of caspase-1 and the processing of the proinflammatory cytokines interleukin-1β (IL-1β) and IL-18. The inflammasome in the central nervous system (CNS) is involved in the generation of an innate immune inflammatory response through IL-1 cytokine release and in cell death through the process of pyroptosis. In this review, we consider the different types of inflammasomes (NLRP1, NLRP2, NLRP3, and AIM2) that have been described in CNS cells, namely neurons, astrocytes, and microglia. Importantly, we focus on the role of the inflammasome after brain and spinal cord injury and cover the potential activators of the inflammasome after CNS injury such as adenosine triphosphate and DNA, and the therapeutic potential of targeting the inflammasome to improve outcomes after CNS trauma. PMID:24398940

  6. Microbial Type I Fatty Acid Synthases (FAS): Major Players in a Network of Cellular FAS Systems

    PubMed Central

    Schweizer, Eckhart; Hofmann, Jörg

    2004-01-01

    The present review focuses on microbial type I fatty acid synthases (FASs), demonstrating their structural and functional diversity. Depending on their origin and biochemical function, multifunctional type I FAS proteins form dimers or hexamers with characteristic organization of their catalytic domains. A single polypeptide may contain one or more sets of the eight FAS component functions. Alternatively, these functions may split up into two different and mutually complementing subunits. Targeted inactivation of the individual yeast FAS acylation sites allowed us to define their roles during the overall catalytic process. In particular, their pronounced negative cooperativity is presumed to coordinate the FAS initiation and chain elongation reactions. Expression of the unlinked genes, FAS1 and FAS2, is in part constitutive and in part subject to repression by the phospholipid precursors inositol and choline. The interplay of the involved regulatory proteins, Rap1, Reb1, Abf1, Ino2/Ino4, Opi1, Sin3 and TFIIB, has been elucidated in considerable detail. Balanced levels of subunits α and β are ensured by an autoregulatory effect of FAS1 on FAS2 expression and by posttranslational degradation of excess FAS subunits. The functional specificity of type I FAS multienzymes usually requires the presence of multiple FAS systems within the same cell. De novo synthesis of long-chain fatty acids, mitochondrial fatty acid synthesis, acylation of certain secondary metabolites and coenzymes, fatty acid elongation, and the vast diversity of mycobacterial lipids each result from specific FAS activities. The microcompartmentalization of FAS activities in type I multienzymes may thus allow for both the controlled and concerted action of multiple FAS systems within the same cell. PMID:15353567

  7. Identification of multiple cellular uptake pathways of polystyrene nanoparticles and factors affecting the uptake: relevance for drug delivery systems.

    PubMed

    Firdessa, Rebuma; Oelschlaeger, Tobias A; Moll, Heidrun

    2014-01-01

    Nanoparticles may address challenges by human diseases through improving diagnosis, vaccination and treatment. The uptake mechanism regulates the type of threat a particle poses on the host cells and how a cell responds to it. Hence, understanding the uptake mechanisms and cellular interactions of nanoparticles at the cellular and subcellular level is a prerequisite for their effective biomedical applications. The present study shows the uptake mechanisms of polystyrene nanoparticles and factors affecting their uptake in bone marrow-derived macrophages, 293T kidney epithelial cells and L929 fibroblasts. Labeling with the endocytic marker FM4-64 and transmission electron microscopy studies show that the nanoparticles were internalized rapidly via endocytosis and accumulated in intracellular vesicles. Soon after their internalizations, nanoparticles trafficked to organelles with acidic pH. Analysis of the ultrastructural morphology of the plasma membrane invaginations or extravasations provides clear evidence for the involvement of several uptake routes in parallel to internalize a given type of nanoparticles by mammalian cells, highlighting the complexity of the nanoparticle-cell interactions. Blocking the specific endocytic pathways by different pharmacological inhibitors shows similar outcomes. The potential to take up nanoparticles varies highly among different cell types in a particle sizes-, time- and energy-dependent manner. Furthermore, infection and the activation status of bone marrow-derived macrophages significantly affect the uptake potential of the cells, indicating the need to understand the diseases' pathogenesis to establish effective and rational drug-delivery systems. This study enhances our understanding of the application of nanotechnology in biomedical sciences. PMID:25224362

  8. Cellular resilience.

    PubMed

    Smirnova, Lena; Harris, Georgina; Leist, Marcel; Hartung, Thomas

    2015-01-01

    Cellular resilience describes the ability of a cell to cope with environmental changes such as toxicant exposure. If cellular metabolism does not collapse directly after the hit or end in programmed cell death, the ensuing stress responses promote a new homeostasis under stress. The processes of reverting "back to normal" and reversal of apoptosis ("anastasis") have been studied little at the cellular level. Cell types show astonishingly similar vulnerability to most toxicants, except for those that require a very specific target, metabolism or mechanism present only in specific cell types. The majority of chemicals triggers "general cytotoxicity" in any cell at similar concentrations. We hypothesize that cells differ less in their vulnerability to a given toxicant than in their resilience (coping with the "hit"). In many cases, cells do not return to the naive state after a toxic insult. The phenomena of "pre-conditioning", "tolerance" and "hormesis" describe this for low-dose exposures to toxicants that render the cell more resistant to subsequent hits. The defense and resilience programs include epigenetic changes that leave a "memory/scar" - an alteration as a consequence of the stress the cell has experienced. These memories might have long-term consequences, both positive (resistance) and negative, that contribute to chronic and delayed manifestations of hazard and, ultimately, disease. This article calls for more systematic analyses of how cells cope with toxic perturbations in the long-term after stressor withdrawal. A technical prerequisite for these are stable (organotypic) cultures and a characterization of stress response molecular networks. PMID:26536287

  9. The interaction of cytoplasmic poly(A)-binding protein with eukaryotic initiation factor 4G suppresses nonsense-mediated mRNA decay

    PubMed Central

    Fatscher, Tobias; Boehm, Volker; Weiche, Benjamin

    2014-01-01

    Nonsense-mediated mRNA decay (NMD) eliminates different classes of mRNA substrates including transcripts with long 3′ UTRs. Current models of NMD suggest that the long physical distance between the poly(A) tail and the termination codon reduces the interaction between cytoplasmic poly(A)-binding protein (PABPC1) and the eukaryotic release factor 3a (eRF3a) during translation termination. In the absence of PABPC1 binding, eRF3a recruits the NMD factor UPF1 to the terminating ribosome, triggering mRNA degradation. Here, we have used the MS2 tethering system to investigate the suppression of NMD by PABPC1. We show that tethering of PABPC1 between the termination codon and a long 3′ UTR specifically inhibits NMD-mediated mRNA degradation. Contrary to the current model, tethered PABPC1 mutants unable to interact with eRF3a still efficiently suppress NMD. We find that the interaction of PABPC1 with eukaryotic initiation factor 4G (eIF4G), which mediates the circularization of mRNAs, is essential for NMD inhibition by tethered PABPC1. Furthermore, recruiting either eRF3a or eIF4G in proximity to an upstream termination codon antagonizes NMD. While tethering of an eRF3a mutant unable to interact with PABPC1 fails to suppress NMD, tethered eIF4G inhibits NMD in a PABPC1-independent manner, indicating a sequential arrangement of NMD antagonizing factors. In conclusion, our results establish a previously unrecognized link between translation termination, mRNA circularization, and NMD suppression, thereby suggesting a revised model for the activation of NMD at termination codons upstream of long 3′ UTR. PMID:25147240

  10. Systems biology approaches for understanding cellular mechanisms of immunity in lymph nodes during infection

    PubMed Central

    Mirsky, Henry Philip; Miller, Mark J.; Linderman, Jennifer J.; Kirschner, Denise E.

    2015-01-01

    Adaptive immunity is initiated in secondary lymphoid tissues when naive T cells recognize foreign antigen presented as MHC-bound peptide on the surface of dendritic cells. Only a small fraction of T cells in the naive repertoire will express T cell receptors specific for a given epitope, but antigen recognition triggers T cell activation and proliferation, thus greatly expanding antigen-specific clones. Expanded T cells can serve a helper function for B cell responses or traffic to sites of infection to secrete cytokines or kill infected cells. Over the past decade, two- photon microscopy of lymphoid tissues has shed important light on T cell development, antigen recognition, cell trafficking and effector functions. These data have enabled the development of sophisticated quantitative and computational models that, in turn, have been used to test hypotheses in silico that would otherwise be impossible or difficult to explore experimentally. Here, we review these models and their principal findings and highlight remaining questions where modeling approaches are poised to advance our understanding of complex immunological systems. PMID:21798267

  11. Perilipin Expression Reveals Adipogenic Potential of hADSCs inside Superporous Polymeric Cellular Delivery Systems

    PubMed Central

    Dinescu, Sorina; Galateanu, Bianca; Lungu, Adriana; Radu, Eugen; Nae, Sorin; Iovu, Horia; Costache, Marieta

    2014-01-01

    Recent progress in tissue engineering and regenerative medicine envisages the use of cell-scaffold bioconstructs to best mimic the natural in vivo microenvironment. Our aim was not only to develop novel 3D porous scaffolds for regenerative applications by the association of gelatin (G), alginate (A), and polyacrylamide (PAA) major assets but also to evaluate their in vitro potential to support human adipose-derived stem cells (hADSCs) adipogenesis. G-A-PAA biomatrix investigated in this work is an interesting substrate combining the advantages of the three individual constituents, namely, biodegradability of G, hydrophilicity of A and PAA, superior elasticity at compression with respect to the G-A and PAA controls, and the capacity to generate porous scaffolds. hADSCs inside these novel interpenetrating polymer networks (IPNs) were able to populate the entire scaffold structure and to display their characteristic spindle-like shape as a consequence of a good interaction with G component of the matrices. Additionally, hADSCs proved to display the capacity to differentiate towards mature adipocytes, to accumulate lipids inside their cytoplasm, and to express perilipin late adipogenic marker inside novel IPNs described in this study. On long term, this newly designed biomatrix aims to represent a stem cell delivery system product dedicated for modern regenerative strategies. PMID:24895615

  12. Evidence for progressive reduction and loss of telocytes in the dermal cellular network of systemic sclerosis.

    PubMed

    Manetti, Mirko; Guiducci, Serena; Ruffo, Martina; Rosa, Irene; Faussone-Pellegrini, Maria Simonetta; Matucci-Cerinic, Marco; Ibba-Manneschi, Lidia

    2013-04-01

    Telocytes, a peculiar type of stromal cells, have been recently identified in a variety of tissues and organs, including human skin. Systemic sclerosis (SSc, scleroderma) is a complex connective tissue disease characterized by fibrosis of the skin and internal organs. We presently investigated telocyte distribution and features in the skin of SSc patients compared with normal skin. By an integrated immunohistochemical and transmission electron microscopy approach, we confirmed that telocytes were present in human dermis, where they were mainly recognizable by their typical ultrastructural features and were immunophenotypically characterized by CD34 expression. Our findings also showed that dermal telocytes were immunophenotypically negative for CD31/PECAM-1 (endothelial cells), α-SMA (myofibroblasts, pericytes, vascular smooth muscle cells), CD11c (dendritic cells, macrophages), CD90/Thy-1 (fibroblasts) and c-kit/CD117 (mast cells). In normal skin, telocytes were organized to form three-dimensional networks distributed among collagen bundles and elastic fibres, and surrounded microvessels, nerves and skin adnexa (hair follicles, sebaceous and sweat glands). Telocytes displayed severe ultrastructural damages (swollen mitochondria, cytoplasmic vacuolization, lipofuscinic bodies) suggestive of ischaemia-induced cell degeneration and were progressively lost from the clinically affected skin of SSc patients. Telocyte damage and loss evolved differently according to SSc subsets and stages, being more rapid and severe in diffuse SSc. Briefly, in human skin telocytes are a distinct stromal cell population. In SSc skin, the progressive loss of telocytes might (i) contribute to the altered three-dimensional organization of the extracellular matrix, (ii) reduce the control of fibroblast, myofibroblast and mast cell activity, and (iii) impair skin regeneration and/or repair. PMID:23444845

  13. Genomes to Life''Center for Molecular and Cellular Systems'': A research program for identification and characterization of protein complexes.

    SciTech Connect

    Buchanan, M V.; Larimer, Frank; Wiley, H S.; Kennel, S J.; Squier, Thomas C.; Ramsey, John M.; Rodland, Karin D.; Hurst, G B.; Smith, Richard D.; Xu, Ying; Dixon, David A.; Doktycz, M J.; Colson, Steve D.; Gesteland, R; Giometti, Carol S.; Young, Mark E.; Giddings, Ralph M.

    2002-02-01

    Goal 1 of Department of Energy's Genomes to Life (GTL) program seeks to identify and characterize the complete set of protein complexes within a cell. Goal 1 forms the foundation necessary to accomplish the other objectives of the GTL program, which focus on gene regulatory networks and molecular level characterization of interactions in microbial communities. Together this information would allow cells and their components to be understood in sufficient detail to predict, test, and understand the responses of a biological system to its environment. The Center for Molecular and Cellular Systems has been established to identify and characterize protein complexes using high through-put analytical technologies. A dynamic research program is being developed that supports the goals of the Center by focusing on the development of new capabilities for sample preparation and complex separations, molecular level identification of the protein complexes by mass spectrometry, characterization of the complexes in living cells by imaging techniques, and bioinformatics and computational tools for the collection and interpretation of data and formation of databases and tools to allow the data to be shared by the biological community.

  14. Remodelling of cellular excitation (reaction) and intercellular coupling (diffusion) by chronic atrial fibrillation represented by a reaction-diffusion system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Henggui; Garratt, Clifford J.; Kharche, Sanjay; Holden, Arun V.

    2009-06-01

    Human atrial tissue is an excitable system, in which myocytes are excitable elements, and cell-to-cell electrotonic interactions are via diffusive interactions of cell membrane potentials. We developed a family of excitable system models for human atrium at cellular, tissue and anatomical levels for both normal and chronic atrial fibrillation (AF) conditions. The effects of AF-induced remodelling of cell membrane ionic channels (reaction kinetics) and intercellular gap junctional coupling (diffusion) on atrial excitability, conduction of excitation waves and dynamics of re-entrant excitation waves are quantified. Both ionic channel and gap junctional coupling remodelling have rate dependent effects on atrial propagation. Membrane channel conductance remodelling allows the propagation of activity at higher rates than those sustained in normal tissue or in tissue with gap junctional remodelling alone. Membrane channel conductance remodelling is essential for the propagation of activity at rates higher than 300/min as seen in AF. Spatially heterogeneous gap junction coupling remodelling increased the risk of conduction block, an essential factor for the genesis of re-entry. In 2D and 3D anatomical models, the dynamical behaviours of re-entrant excitation waves are also altered by membrane channel modelling. This study provides insights to understand the pro-arrhythmic effects of AF-induced reaction and diffusion remodelling in atrial tissue.

  15. Evolving a three-dimensional cellular automata dynamic system constituted of cells-charges for modelling real earthquake activity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sirakoulis, G. Ch.

    2009-04-01

    Greece is referred as the most active seismically region of Europe and one of the top active lands in the world. However, the complexity of the available seismicity information calls for the development of ever more powerful and more reliable computational tools to tackle complex problems associated with proper interpretation of the obtained geophysical information. Cellular Automata (CAs) were showed to be a promising model for earthquake modelling, because certain aspects of the earthquake dynamics, function and evolution can be simulated using several mathematical tools introduced through the use of CAs. In this study, a three-dimensional (3-d) CA dynamic system constituted of cell-charges and taking into account the recorded focal depth, able to simulate real earthquake activity is presented. The whole simulation process of the earthquake activity is evolved with an LC analogue CA model in correspondence to well known earthquake models. The parameterisation of the CA model in terms of potential threshold and geophysical area characteristics is succeeded by applying a standard genetic algorithm (GA) which would extend the model ability to study various hypotheses concerning the seismicity of the region under consideration. As a result, the proposed model optimizes the simulation results, which are compared with the Gutenberg - Richter (GR) scaling relations derived by the use of real data, as well as it expands its validity in broader and different regions of increased hazard. Finally, the hardware implementation of the proposed model is also examined. The FPGA realisation of the proposed 3-d CA based earthquake simulation model will exhibit distinct features that facilitate its utilisation, meaning low-cost, high-speed, compactness and portability. The development and manufacture of the dedicated processor aims at its effective incorporation into an efficient seismographic system. As a result, the dedicated processor could realize the first stage of a

  16. Species sequence differences determine the interaction of GnRH receptor with the cellular quality control system.

    PubMed

    Cabrera-Wrooman, Alejandro; Janovick, Jo Ann; Conn, P Michael

    2013-12-01

    Plasma membrane expression (PME) of the human GnRHR (hGnRHR) is regulated by a primate-specific Lys(191) which destabilizes a Cys(14)-Cys(200) bridge required by the cellular quality control system (QCS). A 4-amino, non-contiguous "motif" (Leu(112), Gln(208), Leu(300), Asp(302)) is required for this effect. The hGnRHR sequence, with or without Lys(191), decreases PME and inositol phosphate (IP) production when co-expressed with calnexin, a QCS chaperone. WT rat GnRHR, decreases PME and IP production, when co-expressed with calnexin, but to a lesser degree than hGnRH. When the human sequence contains the rat motif, IP production is closer to that of rat GnRHR. When Lys(191) is deleted from hGnRHR and co-expressed with calnexin, IP production is similar to the rat sequence. When rat GnRHR containing Lys(191) and the human motif is co-expressed with calnexin, IP production is similar to cells expressing the hGnRHR. The motif sequence appears to be a determinant of calnexin recognition. PMID:23891857

  17. Simulating the conversion of rural settlements to town land based on multi-agent systems and cellular automata.

    PubMed

    Liu, Yaolin; Kong, Xuesong; Liu, Yanfang; Chen, Yiyun

    2013-01-01

    Rapid urbanization in China has triggered the conversion of land from rural to urban use, particularly the conversion of rural settlements to town land. This conversion is the result of the joint effects of the geographic environment and agents involving the government, investors, and farmers. To understand the dynamic interaction dominated by agents and to predict the future landscape of town expansion, a small town land-planning model is proposed based on the integration of multi-agent systems (MAS) and cellular automata (CA). The MAS-CA model links the decision-making behaviors of agents with the neighbor effect of CA. The interaction rules are projected by analyzing the preference conflicts among agents. To better illustrate the effects of the geographic environment, neighborhood, and agent behavior, a comparative analysis between the CA and MAS-CA models in three different towns is presented, revealing interesting patterns in terms of quantity, spatial characteristics, and the coordinating process. The simulation of rural settlements conversion to town land through modeling agent decision and human-environment interaction is very useful for understanding the mechanisms of rural-urban land-use change in developing countries. This process can assist town planners in formulating appropriate development plans. PMID:24244472

  18. Simulating the Conversion of Rural Settlements to Town Land Based on Multi-Agent Systems and Cellular Automata

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Yaolin; Kong, Xuesong; Liu, Yanfang; Chen, Yiyun

    2013-01-01

    Rapid urbanization in China has triggered the conversion of land from rural to urban use, particularly the conversion of rural settlements to town land. This conversion is the result of the joint effects of the geographic environment and agents involving the government, investors, and farmers. To understand the dynamic interaction dominated by agents and to predict the future landscape of town expansion, a small town land-planning model is proposed based on the integration of multi-agent systems (MAS) and cellular automata (CA). The MAS-CA model links the decision-making behaviors of agents with the neighbor effect of CA. The interaction rules are projected by analyzing the preference conflicts among agents. To better illustrate the effects of the geographic environment, neighborhood, and agent behavior, a comparative analysis between the CA and MAS-CA models in three different towns is presented, revealing interesting patterns in terms of quantity, spatial characteristics, and the coordinating process. The simulation of rural settlements conversion to town land through modeling agent decision and human-environment interaction is very useful for understanding the mechanisms of rural-urban land-use change in developing countries. This process can assist town planners in formulating appropriate development plans. PMID:24244472

  19. Coat protein enhances translational efficiency of Alfalfa mosaic virus RNAs and interacts with the eIF4G component of initiation factor eIF4F.

    PubMed

    Krab, Ivo M; Caldwell, Christian; Gallie, Daniel R; Bol, John F

    2005-06-01

    The three plus-strand genomic RNAs of Alfalfa mosaic virus (AMV) and the subgenomic messenger for viral coat protein (CP) contain a 5'-cap structure, but no 3'-poly(A) tail. Binding of CP to the 3' end of AMV RNAs is required for efficient translation of the viral RNAs and to initiate infection in plant cells. To study the role of CP in translation, plant protoplasts were transfected with luciferase (Luc) transcripts with 3'-terminal sequences consisting of the 3' untranslated region of AMV RNA 3 (Luc-AMV), a poly(A) tail of 50 residues [Luc-poly(A)] or a short vector-derived sequence (Luc-control). Pre-incubation of the transcripts with CP had no effect on Luc expression from Luc-poly(A) or Luc-control, but strongly stimulated Luc expression from Luc-AMV. From time-course experiments, it was calculated that CP binding increased the half-life of Luc-AMV by 20 % and enhanced its translational efficiency by about 40-fold. In addition to the 3' AMV sequence, the cap structure was required for CP-mediated stimulation of Luc-AMV translation. Glutathione S-transferase pull-down assays revealed an interaction between AMV CP and initiation factor complexes eIF4F and eIFiso4F from wheatgerm. Far-Western blotting revealed that this binding occurred through an interaction of CP with the eIF4G and eIFiso4G subunits of eIF4F and eIFiso4F, respectively. The results support the hypothesis that the role of CP in translation of viral RNAs mimics the role of the poly(A)-binding protein in translation of cellular mRNAs. PMID:15914864

  20. Complete Genome Sequence of Methanogenic Archaeon ISO4-G1, a Member of the Methanomassiliicoccales, Isolated from a Sheep Rumen

    PubMed Central

    Kelly, William J.; Li, Dong; Lambie, Suzanne C.; Jeyanathan, Jeyamalar; Cox, Faith; Li, Yang; Attwood, Graeme T.; Altermann, Eric

    2016-01-01

    Methanogenic archaeon ISO4-G1 is a methylotrophic methanogen belonging to the order Methanomassiliicoccales that was isolated from a sheep rumen. Its genome has been sequenced to provide information on the genetic diversity of rumen methanogens in order to develop technologies for ruminant methane mitigation. PMID:27056226

  1. Relation between osteonecrosis of the femoral head and PAI-1 4G/5G gene polymorphism: a meta-analysis

    PubMed Central

    Zeng, Zheng; Wang, Bing; Pan, Haitao

    2015-01-01

    Objective: The aim of this study was to investigate the association of plasminogen activator inhibitor-1 (PAI-1) 4G/5G gene polymorphism and osteonecrosis of the femoral head (ONFH). Methods: The pooled relative risk ratio (RR) and 95% confidence intervals (95% CI) were calculated using the the RevMan 5.0 software. Results: The present study included 969 patients with ONFH and 419 healthy controls. The Meta analysis results showed: There is association between PAI-1 gene 4G/5G polymorphism and the increasing risk of ONFH (allele model: RR = 1.24, 95% CI = 1.16 ~ 1.33; dominant genetic model: RR = 1.12, 95% CI = 1.05 ~ 1.18). It was found that the association between PAI-1 gene 4 G/5 G polymorphism and the susceptibility of ONFH (P < 0.05) through the comparison of Caucasian population and Asian people according to the analysis of different races. Conclusions: There is association between PAI-1 gene 4 G/5 G polymorphism and the increasing of the susceptibility of ONFH. PMID:26884949

  2. VizieR Online Data Catalog: Globular cluster populations in S4G galaxies. II. (Zaritsky+, 2016)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zaritsky, D.; McCabe, K.; Aravena, M.; Athanassoula, E.; Bosma, A.; Comeron, S.; Courtois, H. M.; Elmegreen, B. G.; Elmegreen, D. M.; Erroz-Ferrer, S.; Gadotti, D. A.; Hinz, J. L.; Ho, L. C.; Holwerda, B.; Kim, T.; Knapen, J. H.; Laine, J.; Laurikainen, E.; Munoz-Mateos, J. C.; Salo, H.; Sheth, K.

    2016-04-01

    As in Paper I (Zaritsky+, 2015, J/ApJ/799/159), the parent sample is the S4G sample, which currently consists of 2352 galaxies (Sheth et al. 2010, J/PASP/122/1397). We provide and analyze images of these galaxies obtained with the Spitzer Space Telescope and its Infrared Array Camera (IRAC). (1 data file).

  3. Cellular Contraction and Polarization Drive Collective Cellular Motion.

    PubMed

    Notbohm, Jacob; Banerjee, Shiladitya; Utuje, Kazage J C; Gweon, Bomi; Jang, Hwanseok; Park, Yongdoo; Shin, Jennifer; Butler, James P; Fredberg, Jeffrey J; Marchetti, M Cristina

    2016-06-21

    Coordinated motions of close-packed multicellular systems typically generate cooperative packs, swirls, and clusters. These cooperative motions are driven by active cellular forces, but the physical nature of these forces and how they generate collective cellular motion remain poorly understood. Here, we study forces and motions in a confined epithelial monolayer and make two experimental observations: 1) the direction of local cellular motion deviates systematically from the direction of the local traction exerted by each cell upon its substrate; and 2) oscillating waves of cellular motion arise spontaneously. Based on these observations, we propose a theory that connects forces and motions using two internal state variables, one of which generates an effective cellular polarization, and the other, through contractile forces, an effective cellular inertia. In agreement with theoretical predictions, drugs that inhibit contractility reduce both the cellular effective elastic modulus and the frequency of oscillations. Together, theory and experiment provide evidence suggesting that collective cellular motion is driven by at least two internal variables that serve to sustain waves and to polarize local cellular traction in a direction that deviates systematically from local cellular velocity. PMID:27332131

  4. Codon-biased translation can be regulated by wobble-base tRNA modification systems during cellular stress responses

    PubMed Central

    Endres, Lauren; Dedon, Peter C; Begley, Thomas J

    2015-01-01

    tRNA (tRNA) is a key molecule used for protein synthesis, with multiple points of stress-induced regulation that can include transcription, transcript processing, localization and ribonucleoside base modification. Enzyme-catalyzed modification of tRNA occurs at a number of base and sugar positions and has the potential to influence specific anticodon-codon interactions and regulate translation. Notably, altered tRNA modification has been linked to mitochondrial diseases and cancer progression. In this review, specific to Eukaryotic systems, we discuss how recent systems-level analyses using a bioanalytical platform have revealed that there is extensive reprogramming of tRNA modifications in response to cellular stress and during cell cycle progression. Combined with genome-wide codon bias analytics and gene expression studies, a model emerges in which stress-induced reprogramming of tRNA drives the translational regulation of critical response proteins whose transcripts display a distinct codon bias. Termed Modification Tunable Transcripts (MoTTs),1 we define them as (1) transcripts that use specific degenerate codons and codon biases to encode critical stress response proteins, and (2) transcripts whose translation is influenced by changes in wobble base tRNA modification. In this review we note that the MoTTs translational model is also applicable to the process of stop-codon recoding for selenocysteine incorporation, as stop-codon recoding involves a selective codon bias and modified tRNA to decode selenocysteine during the translation of a key subset of oxidative stress response proteins. Further, we discuss how in addition to RNA modification analytics, the comprehensive characterization of translational regulation of specific transcripts requires a variety of tools, including high coverage codon-reporters, ribosome profiling and linked genomic and proteomic approaches. Together these tools will yield important new insights into the role of translational

  5. The role of renin-angiotensin system in cellular differentiation: implications in pancreatic islet cell development and islet transplantation.

    PubMed

    Wang, Lin; Leung, Po Sing

    2013-12-01

    In addition to the well-characterized circulating renin-angiotensin system (RAS), local RAS has been identified recently in diverse tissues and organs. The presence of key components of the RAS in local tissues is important for our understanding of the patho-physiological mechanism(s) of several metabolic diseases, and may serve as a major therapeutic target for cardiometabolic syndromes. Locally generated and physiologically active RAS components have functions that are distinct from the classical vasoconstriction and fluid homeostasis actions of systemic RAS and cater specifically for local tissues. Local RAS can affect islet-cell function and structure in the adult pancreas as well as proliferation and differentiation of pancreatic stem/progenitor cells during development. Differentiation of stem/progenitor cells into insulin-expressing cells suitable for therapeutic transplantation offers a desperately needed new approach for replacement of glucose-responsive insulin producing cells in diabetic patients. Given that the generation of functional and transplantable islet cells has proven to be difficult, elucidation of RAS involvement in cellular regeneration and differentiation may propel pancreatic stem/progenitor cell development and thus β-cell regeneration forward. This review provides a critical appraisal of current research progress on the role of the RAS, including the newly characterized ACE2/Ang-(1-7)/Mas axis in the proliferation, differentiation, and maturation of pancreatic stem/progenitor cells. It is thus plausible to propose that the AT1 stimulation could be a repair mechanism involving the AT2R as well as the ACE2/Ang-(1-7)/Mas axis in directing β-cell development in diabetic patients using genetic and pharmaceutical manipulation of the RAS. PMID:23994025

  6. Cellular automata to understand the behaviour of beach-dune systems: Application to El Fangar Spit active dune system (Ebro delta, Spain)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barrio-Parra, Fernando; Rodríguez-Santalla, Inmaculada

    2016-08-01

    Coastal dunes are sedimentary environments characterized by their high dynamism. Their evolution is determined by sedimentary exchanges between the beach-dune subsystems and the dune dynamics itself. Knowledge about these exchanges is important to prioritize management and conservation strategies of these environments. The aim of this work is the inclusion of the aeolian transport rates obtained using a calibrated cellular automaton to estimate the beach-dune sediment exchange rates in a real active dune field at El Fangar Spit (Ebro Delta, Spain). The dune dynamics model is able to estimate average aeolian sediment fluxes. These are used in combination with the observed net sediment budget to obtain a quantitative characterization of the sediment exchange interactions. The methods produce a substantial improvement in the understanding of coastal sedimentary systems that could have major implications in areas where the management and conservation of dune fields are of concern.

  7. Autoantibodies to angiotensin and endothelin receptors in systemic sclerosis induce cellular and systemic events associated with disease pathogenesis

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Introduction Vasculopathy, inflammatory fibrosis and functional autoantibodies (Abs) are major manifestations of systemic sclerosis (SSc). Abs directed against the angiotensin II type 1 receptor (AT1R) and endothelin-1 type A receptor (ETAR) are associated with characteristic disease features including vascular, inflammatory, and fibrotic complications indicating their role in SSc pathogenesis. Therefore, the impact of anti-AT1R and anti-ETAR Abs on initiation of inflammation and fibrosis was analyzed. Methods Anti-AT1R and anti-ETAR Ab-positive immunoglobulin G (IgG) from SSc patients (SSc-IgG) was used for experiments. Healthy donor IgG served as a normal control, and AT1R and ETAR activation was inhibited by antagonists. Protein expression was measured with ELISA, mRNA expression with real time-PCR, endothelial repair with a scratch assay, and collagen expression with immunocytochemistry. Transendothelial neutrophil migration was measured with a culture insert system, and neutrophil ROS activation with immunofluorescence. Neutrophils in bronchoalveolar lavage fluids (BALFs) were analyzed microscopically after passive transfer of SSc-IgG or NC-IgG into naïve C57BL/6J mice. KC plasma levels were quantified by a suspension array system. Histologic analyses were performed by using light microscopy. Results Anti-AT1R and anti-ETAR Ab-positive SSc-IgG induced activation of human microvascular endothelial cells (HMEC-1). Elevated protein and mRNA levels of the proinflammatory chemokine interleukin-8 (IL-8, CXCL8) and elevated mRNA levels of the vascular cell adhesion molecule-1 (VCAM-1) were induced in HMEC-1. Furthermore, activation of HMEC-1 with SSc-IgG increased neutrophil migration through an endothelial cell layer and activation of reactive oxygen species (ROS). SSc-IgG decreased HMEC-1 wound repair and induced type I collagen production in healthy donor skin fibroblasts. Effects of migration, wound repair, and collagen expression were dependent on the Ab

  8. The Perilipins: Major Cytosolic Lipid Droplet-Associated Proteins and Their Roles in Cellular Lipid Storage, Mobilization, and Systemic Homeostasis.

    PubMed

    Kimmel, Alan R; Sztalryd, Carole

    2016-07-17

    The discovery by Dr. Constantine Londos of perilipin 1, the major scaffold protein at the surface of cytosolic lipid droplets in adipocytes, marked a fundamental conceptual change in the understanding of lipolytic regulation. Focus then shifted from the enzymatic activation of lipases to substrate accessibility, mediated by perilipin-dependent protein sequestration and recruitment. Consequently, the lipid droplet became recognized as a unique, metabolically active cellular organelle and its surface as the active site for novel protein-protein interactions. A new area of investigation emerged, centered on lipid droplets' biology and their role in energy homeostasis. The perilipin family is of ancient origin and has expanded to include five mammalian genes and a growing list of evolutionarily conserved members. Universally, the perilipins modulate cellular lipid storage. This review provides a summary that connects the perilipins to both cellular and whole-body homeostasis. PMID:27431369

  9. Synthesis and preliminary in vitro kinase inhibition evaluation of new diversely substituted pyrido[3,4-g]quinazoline derivatives.

    PubMed

    Zeinyeh, Wael; Esvan, Yannick J; Nauton, Lionel; Loaëc, Nadège; Meijer, Laurent; Théry, Vincent; Anizon, Fabrice; Giraud, Francis; Moreau, Pascale

    2016-09-01

    The synthesis of new diversely substituted pyrido[3,4-g]quinazolines is described. The inhibitory potencies of prepared compounds toward a panel of five CMGC protein kinases (CDK5, CLK1, DYRK1A, CK1, GSK3), that are known to play a potential role in Alzheimer's disease, were evaluated. The best overall kinase inhibition profile was found for nitro compound 4 bearing an ethyl group at the 5-position. PMID:27469128

  10. Alternative Oxidase Pathway Optimizes Photosynthesis During Osmotic and Temperature Stress by Regulating Cellular ROS, Malate Valve and Antioxidative Systems.

    PubMed

    Dinakar, Challabathula; Vishwakarma, Abhaypratap; Raghavendra, Agepati S; Padmasree, Kollipara

    2016-01-01

    The present study reveals the importance of alternative oxidase (AOX) pathway in optimizing photosynthesis under osmotic and temperature stress conditions in the mesophyll protoplasts of Pisum sativum. The responses of photosynthesis and respiration were monitored at saturating light intensity of 1000 μmoles m(-2) s(-1) at 25°C under a range of sorbitol concentrations from 0.4 to 1.0 M to induce hyper-osmotic stress and by varying the temperature of the thermo-jacketed pre-incubation chamber from 25 to 10°C to impose sub-optimal temperature stress. Compared to controls (0.4 M sorbitol and 25°C), the mesophyll protoplasts showed remarkable decrease in NaHCO3-dependent O2 evolution (indicator of photosynthetic carbon assimilation), under both hyper-osmotic (1.0 M sorbitol) and sub-optimal temperature stress conditions (10°C), while the decrease in rates of respiratory O2 uptake were marginal. The capacity of AOX pathway increased significantly in parallel to increase in intracellular pyruvate and reactive oxygen species (ROS) levels under both hyper-osmotic stress and sub-optimal temperature stress under the background of saturating light. The ratio of redox couple (Malate/OAA) related to malate valve increased in contrast to the ratio of redox couple (GSH/GSSG) related to antioxidative system during hyper-osmotic stress. Further, the ratio of GSH/GSSG decreased in the presence of sub-optimal temperature, while the ratio of Malate/OAA showed no visible changes. Also, the redox ratios of pyridine nucleotides increased under hyper-osmotic (NADH/NAD) and sub-optimal temperature (NADPH/NADP) stresses, respectively. However, upon restriction of AOX pathway by using salicylhydroxamic acid (SHAM), the observed changes in NaHCO3-dependent O2 evolution, cellular ROS, redox ratios of Malate/OAA, NAD(P)H/NAD(P) and GSH/GSSG were further aggravated under stress conditions with concomitant modulations in NADP-MDH and antioxidant enzymes. Taken together, the results indicated

  11. Alternative Oxidase Pathway Optimizes Photosynthesis During Osmotic and Temperature Stress by Regulating Cellular ROS, Malate Valve and Antioxidative Systems

    PubMed Central

    Vishwakarma, Abhaypratap; Raghavendra, Agepati S.; Padmasree, Kollipara

    2016-01-01

    The present study reveals the importance of alternative oxidase (AOX) pathway in optimizing photosynthesis under osmotic and temperature stress conditions in the mesophyll protoplasts of Pisum sativum. The responses of photosynthesis and respiration were monitored at saturating light intensity of 1000 μmoles m–2 s–1 at 25°C under a range of sorbitol concentrations from 0.4 to 1.0 M to induce hyper-osmotic stress and by varying the temperature of the thermo-jacketed pre-incubation chamber from 25 to 10°C to impose sub-optimal temperature stress. Compared to controls (0.4 M sorbitol and 25°C), the mesophyll protoplasts showed remarkable decrease in NaHCO3-dependent O2 evolution (indicator of photosynthetic carbon assimilation), under both hyper-osmotic (1.0 M sorbitol) and sub-optimal temperature stress conditions (10°C), while the decrease in rates of respiratory O2 uptake were marginal. The capacity of AOX pathway increased significantly in parallel to increase in intracellular pyruvate and reactive oxygen species (ROS) levels under both hyper-osmotic stress and sub-optimal temperature stress under the background of saturating light. The ratio of redox couple (Malate/OAA) related to malate valve increased in contrast to the ratio of redox couple (GSH/GSSG) related to antioxidative system during hyper-osmotic stress. Further, the ratio of GSH/GSSG decreased in the presence of sub-optimal temperature, while the ratio of Malate/OAA showed no visible changes. Also, the redox ratios of pyridine nucleotides increased under hyper-osmotic (NADH/NAD) and sub-optimal temperature (NADPH/NADP) stresses, respectively. However, upon restriction of AOX pathway by using salicylhydroxamic acid (SHAM), the observed changes in NaHCO3-dependent O2 evolution, cellular ROS, redox ratios of Malate/OAA, NAD(P)H/NAD(P) and GSH/GSSG were further aggravated under stress conditions with concomitant modulations in NADP-MDH and antioxidant enzymes. Taken together, the results indicated

  12. Hα kinematics of S4G spiral galaxies - II. Data description and non-circular motions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Erroz-Ferrer, Santiago; Knapen, Johan H.; Leaman, Ryan; Cisternas, Mauricio; Font, Joan; Beckman, John E.; Sheth, Kartik; Muñoz-Mateos, Juan Carlos; Díaz-García, Simón; Bosma, Albert; Athanassoula, E.; Elmegreen, Bruce G.; Ho, Luis C.; Kim, Taehyun; Laurikainen, Eija; Martinez-Valpuesta, Inma; Meidt, Sharon E.; Salo, Heikki

    2015-07-01

    We present a kinematical study of 29 spiral galaxies included in the Spitzer Survey of Stellar Structure in Galaxies, using Hα Fabry-Perot (FP) data obtained with the Galaxy Hα Fabry-Perot System instrument at the William Herschel Telescope in La Palma, complemented with images in the R band and in Hα. The primary goal is to study the evolution and properties of the main structural components of galaxies through the kinematical analysis of the FP data, complemented with studies of morphology, star formation and mass distribution. In this paper we describe how the FP data have been obtained, processed and analysed. We present the resulting moment maps, rotation curves, velocity model maps and residual maps. Images are available in FITS format through the NASA/IPAC Extragalactic Database and the Centre de Données Stellaires. With these data products we study the non-circular motions, in particular those found along the bars and spiral arms. The data indicate that the amplitude of the non-circular motions created by the bar does not correlate with the bar strength indicators. The amplitude of those non-circular motions in the spiral arms does not correlate with either arm class or star formation rate along the spiral arms. This implies that the presence and the magnitude of the streaming motions in the arms is a local phenomenon.

  13. MSAT and cellular hybrid networking

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Baranowsky, Patrick W., II

    1993-01-01

    Westinghouse Electric Corporation is developing both the Communications Ground Segment and the Series 1000 Mobile Phone for American Mobile Satellite Corporation's (AMSC's) Mobile Satellite (MSAT) system. The success of the voice services portion of this system depends, to some extent, upon the interoperability of the cellular network and the satellite communication circuit switched communication channels. This paper will describe the set of user-selectable cellular interoperable modes (cellular first/satellite second, etc.) provided by the Mobile Phone and described how they are implemented with the ground segment. Topics including roaming registration and cellular-to-satellite 'seamless' call handoff will be discussed, along with the relevant Interim Standard IS-41 Revision B Cellular Radiotelecommunications Intersystem Operations and IOS-553 Mobile Station - Land Station Compatibility Specification.

  14. RHPS4 G-Quadruplex Ligand Induces Anti-Proliferative Effects in Brain Tumor Cells

    PubMed Central

    Lagah, Sunil; Tan, I-Li; Radhakrishnan, Priya; Hirst, Robert A.; Ward, Jennifer H.; O’Callaghan, Chris; Smith, Stuart J.; Stevens, Malcolm F. G.; Grundy, Richard G.; Rahman, Ruman

    2014-01-01

    Background Telomeric 3′ overhangs can fold into a four-stranded DNA structure termed G-quadruplex (G4), a formation which inhibits telomerase. As telomerase activation is crucial for telomere maintenance in most cancer cells, several classes of G4 ligands have been designed to directly disrupt telomeric structure. Methods We exposed brain tumor cells to the G4 ligand 3,11-difluoro-6,8,13-trimethyl-8H-quino[4,3,2-kl]acridinium methosulfate (RHPS4) and investigated proliferation, cell cycle dynamics, telomere length, telomerase activity and activated c-Myc levels. Results Although all cell lines tested were sensitive to RHPS4, PFSK-1 central nervous system primitive neuroectodermal cells, DAOY medulloblastoma cells and U87 glioblastoma cells exhibited up to 30-fold increased sensitivity compared to KNS42 glioblastoma, C6 glioma and Res196 ependymoma cells. An increased proportion of S-phase cells were observed in medulloblastoma and high grade glioma cells whilst CNS PNET cells showed an increased proportion of G1-phase cells. RHPS4-induced phenotypes were concomitant with telomerase inhibition, manifested in a telomere length-independent manner and not associated with activated c-Myc levels. However, anti-proliferative effects were also observed in normal neural/endothelial cells in vitro and ex vivo. Conclusion This study warrants in vivo validation of RHPS4 and alternative G4 ligands as potential anti-cancer agents for brain tumors but highlights the consideration of dose-limiting tissue toxicities. PMID:24454961

  15. Auxin and Cellular Elongation.

    PubMed

    Velasquez, Silvia Melina; Barbez, Elke; Kleine-Vehn, Jürgen; Estevez, José M

    2016-03-01

    Auxin is a crucial growth regulator in plants. However, a comprehensive understanding of how auxin induces cell expansion is perplexing, because auxin acts in a concentration- and cell type-dependent manner. Consequently, it is desirable to focus on certain cell types to exemplify the underlying growth mechanisms. On the other hand, plant tissues display supracellular growth (beyond the level of single cells); hence, other cell types might compromise the growth of a certain tissue. Tip-growing cells do not display neighbor-induced growth constraints and, therefore, are a valuable source of information for growth-controlling mechanisms. Here, we focus on auxin-induced cellular elongation in root hairs, exposing a mechanistic view of plant growth regulation. We highlight a complex interplay between auxin metabolism and transport, steering root hair development in response to internal and external triggers. Auxin signaling modules and downstream cascades of transcription factors define a developmental program that appears rate limiting for cellular growth. With this knowledge in mind, the root hair cell is a very suitable model system in which to dissect cellular effectors required for cellular expansion. PMID:26787325

  16. Cellular dysfunction in sepsis.

    PubMed

    Singer, Mervyn

    2008-12-01

    Cellular dysfunction is a commonplace sequelum of sepsis and other systemic inflammatory conditions. Impaired energy production (related to mitochondrial inhibition, damage, and reduced protein turnover) appears to be a core mechanism underlying the development of organ dysfunction. The reduction in energy availability appears to trigger a metabolic shutdown that impairs normal functioning of the cell. This may well represent an adaptive mechanism analogous to hibernation that prevents a massive degree of cell death and thus enables eventual recovery in survivors. PMID:18954700

  17. Quantum cellular automata

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Porod, Wolfgang; Lent, Craig S.; Bernstein, Gary H.

    1994-06-01

    The Notre Dame group has developed a new paradigm for ultra-dense and ultra-fast information processing in nanoelectronic systems. These Quantum Cellular Automata (QCA's) are the first concrete proposal for a technology based on arrays of coupled quantum dots. The basic building block of these cellular arrays is the Notre Dame Logic Cell, as it has been called in the literature. The phenomenon of Coulomb exclusion, which is a synergistic interplay of quantum confinement and Coulomb interaction, leads to a bistable behavior of each cell which makes possible their use in large-scale cellular arrays. The physical interaction between neighboring cells has been exploited to implement logic functions. New functionality may be achieved in this fashion, and the Notre Dame group invented a versatile majority logic gate. In a series of papers, the feasibility of QCA wires, wire crossing, inverters, and Boolean logic gates was demonstrated. A major finding is that all logic functions may be integrated in a hierarchial fashion which allows the design of complicated QCA structures. The most complicated system which was simulated to date is a one-bit full adder consisting of some 200 cells. In addition to exploring these new concepts, efforts are under way to physically realize such structures both in semiconductor and metal systems. Extensive modeling work of semiconductor quantum dot structures has helped identify optimum design parameters for QCA experimental implementations.

  18. A New Flow-Regulating Cell Type in the Demosponge Tethya wilhelma – Functional Cellular Anatomy of a Leuconoid Canal System

    PubMed Central

    Hammel, Jörg U.; Nickel, Michael

    2014-01-01

    Demosponges possess a leucon-type canal system which is characterized by a highly complex network of canal segments and choanocyte chambers. As sponges are sessile filter feeders, their aquiferous system plays an essential role in various fundamental physiological processes. Due to the morphological and architectural complexity of the canal system and the strong interdependence between flow conditions and anatomy, our understanding of fluid dynamics throughout leuconoid systems is patchy. This paper provides comprehensive morphometric data on the general architecture of the canal system, flow measurements and detailed cellular anatomical information to help fill in the gaps. We focus on the functional cellular anatomy of the aquiferous system and discuss all relevant cell types in the context of hydrodynamic and evolutionary constraints. Our analysis is based on the canal system of the tropical demosponge Tethya wilhelma, which we studied using scanning electron microscopy. We found a hitherto undescribed cell type, the reticuloapopylocyte, which is involved in flow regulation in the choanocyte chambers. It has a highly fenestrated, grid-like morphology and covers the apopylar opening. The minute opening of the reticuloapopylocyte occurs in an opened, intermediate and closed state. These states permit a gradual regulation of the total apopylar opening area. In this paper the three states are included in a theoretical study into flow conditions which aims to draw a link between functional cellular anatomy, the hydrodynamic situation and the regular body contractions seen in T. wilhelma. This provides a basis for new hypotheses regarding the function of bypass elements and the role of hydrostatic pressure in body contractions. Our study provides insights into the local and global flow conditions in the sponge canal system and thus enhances current understanding of related physiological processes. PMID:25409176

  19. A cardiac electrical activity model based on a cellular automata system in comparison with neural network model.

    PubMed

    Khan, Muhammad Sadiq Ali; Yousuf, Sidrah

    2016-03-01

    Cardiac Electrical Activity is commonly distributed into three dimensions of Cardiac Tissue (Myocardium) and evolves with duration of time. The indicator of heart diseases can occur randomly at any time of a day. Heart rate, conduction and each electrical activity during cardiac cycle should be monitor non-invasively for the assessment of "Action Potential" (regular) and "Arrhythmia" (irregular) rhythms. Many heart diseases can easily be examined through Automata model like Cellular Automata concepts. This paper deals with the different states of cardiac rhythms using cellular automata with the comparison of neural network also provides fast and highly effective stimulation for the contraction of cardiac muscles on the Atria in the result of genesis of electrical spark or wave. The specific formulated model named as "States of automaton Proposed Model for CEA (Cardiac Electrical Activity)" by using Cellular Automata Methodology is commonly shows the three states of cardiac tissues conduction phenomena (i) Resting (Relax and Excitable state), (ii) ARP (Excited but Absolutely refractory Phase i.e. Excited but not able to excite neighboring cells) (iii) RRP (Excited but Relatively Refractory Phase i.e. Excited and able to excite neighboring cells). The result indicates most efficient modeling with few burden of computation and it is Action Potential during the pumping of blood in cardiac cycle. PMID:27087101

  20. miR-139-5p controls translation in myeloid leukemia through EIF4G2.

    PubMed

    Emmrich, S; Engeland, F; El-Khatib, M; Henke, K; Obulkasim, A; Schöning, J; Katsman-Kuipers, J E; Michel Zwaan, C; Pich, A; Stary, J; Baruchel, A; de Haas, V; Reinhardt, D; Fornerod, M; van den Heuvel-Eibrink, M M; Klusmann, J H

    2016-04-01

    MicroRNAs (miRNAs) are crucial components of homeostatic and developmental gene regulation. In turn, dysregulation of miRNA expression is a common feature of different types of cancer, which can be harnessed therapeutically. Here we identify miR-139-5p suppression across several cytogenetically defined acute myeloid leukemia (AML) subgroups. The promoter of mir-139 was transcriptionally silenced and could be reactivated by histone deacetylase inhibitors in a dose-dependent manner. Restoration of mir-139 expression in cell lines representing the major AML subgroups (t[8;21], inv[16], mixed lineage leukemia-rearranged and complex karyotype AML) caused cell cycle arrest and apoptosis in vitro and in xenograft mouse models in vivo. During normal hematopoiesis, mir-139 is exclusively expressed in terminally differentiated neutrophils and macrophages. Ectopic expression of mir-139 repressed proliferation of normal CD34(+)-hematopoietic stem and progenitor cells and perturbed myelomonocytic in vitro differentiation. Mechanistically, mir-139 exerts its effects by repressing the translation initiation factor EIF4G2, thereby reducing overall protein synthesis while specifically inducing the translation of cell cycle inhibitor p27(Kip1). Knockdown of EIF4G2 recapitulated the effects of mir-139, whereas restoring EIF4G2 expression rescued the mir-139 phenotype. Moreover, elevated miR-139-5p expression is associated with a favorable outcome in a cohort of 165 pediatric patients with AML. Thus, mir-139 acts as a global tumor suppressor-miR in AML by controlling protein translation. As AML cells are dependent on high protein synthesis rates controlling the expression of mir-139 constitutes a novel path for the treatment of AML. PMID:26165837

  1. The Spitzer Survey of Stellar Structure in Galaxies (S4G): Multi-component Decomposition Strategies and Data Release

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Salo, Heikki; Laurikainen, Eija; Laine, Jarkko; Comerón, Sebastien; Gadotti, Dimitri A.; Buta, Ron; Sheth, Kartik; Zaritsky, Dennis; Ho, Luis; Knapen, Johan; Athanassoula, E.; Bosma, Albert; Laine, Seppo; Cisternas, Mauricio; Kim, Taehyun; Muñoz-Mateos, Juan Carlos; Regan, Michael; Hinz, Joannah L.; Gil de Paz, Armando; Menendez-Delmestre, Karin; Mizusawa, Trisha; Erroz-Ferrer, Santiago; Meidt, Sharon E.; Querejeta, Miguel

    2015-07-01

    The Spitzer Survey of Stellar Structure in Galaxies (S4G) is a deep 3.6 and 4.5 μm imaging survey of 2352 nearby (<40 Mpc) galaxies. We describe the S4G data analysis pipeline 4, which is dedicated to two-dimensional structural surface brightness decompositions of 3.6 μm images, using GALFIT3.0. Besides automatic 1-component Sérsic fits, and 2-component Sérsic bulge + exponential disk fits, we present human-supervised multi-component decompositions, which include, when judged appropriate, a central point source, bulge, disk, and bar components. Comparison of the fitted parameters indicates that multi-component models are needed to obtain reliable estimates for the bulge Sérsic index and bulge-to-total light ratio (B/T), confirming earlier results. Here, we describe the preparations of input data done for decompositions, give examples of our decomposition strategy, and describe the data products released via IRSA and via our web page (www.oulu.fi/astronomy/S4G_PIPELINE4/MAIN). These products include all the input data and decomposition files in electronic form, making it easy to extend the decompositions to suit specific science purposes. We also provide our IDL-based visualization tools (GALFIDL) developed for displaying/running GALFIT-decompositions, as well as our mask editing procedure (MASK_EDIT) used in data preparation. A detailed analysis of the bulge, disk, and bar parameters derived from multi-component decompositions will be published separately.

  2. Downscaling seasonal to centennial simulations on distributed computing infrastructures using WRF model. The WRF4G project

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cofino, A. S.; Fernández Quiruelas, V.; Blanco Real, J. C.; García Díez, M.; Fernández, J.

    2013-12-01

    Nowadays Grid Computing is powerful computational tool which is ready to be used for scientific community in different areas (such as biomedicine, astrophysics, climate, etc.). However, the use of this distributed computing infrastructures (DCI) is not yet common practice in climate research, and only a few teams and applications in this area take advantage of this infrastructure. Thus, the WRF4G project objective is to popularize the use of this technology in the atmospheric sciences area. In order to achieve this objective, one of the most used applications has been taken (WRF; a limited- area model, successor of the MM5 model), that has a user community formed by more than 8000 researchers worldwide. This community develop its research activity on different areas and could benefit from the advantages of Grid resources (case study simulations, regional hind-cast/forecast, sensitivity studies, etc.). The WRF model is used by many groups, in the climate research community, to carry on downscaling simulations. Therefore this community will also benefit. However, Grid infrastructures have some drawbacks for the execution of applications that make an intensive use of CPU and memory for a long period of time. This makes necessary to develop a specific framework (middleware). This middleware encapsulates the application and provides appropriate services for the monitoring and management of the simulations and the data. Thus,another objective of theWRF4G project consists on the development of a generic adaptation of WRF to DCIs. It should simplify the access to the DCIs for the researchers, and also to free them from the technical and computational aspects of the use of theses DCI. Finally, in order to demonstrate the ability of WRF4G solving actual scientific challenges with interest and relevance on the climate science (implying a high computational cost) we will shown results from different kind of downscaling experiments, like ERA-Interim re-analysis, CMIP5 models

  3. Competitive potential of cellular mobile telecommunications

    SciTech Connect

    Ware, H.

    1983-02-03

    The Federal Communications Commission (FCC) has recently issued rules for the commercial operation of a telecommunications technology not previously in commercial use: the cellular mobile radio. The author has carefully considered the potential for competition between cellular systems and for competition between cellular radio and alternative communications technologies under the regulatory scheme which has been adopted by the FCC. He finds that competition between cellular and wire-line services can be viable if cellular cost and demand data are carefully tracked to avoid market congestion and if cellular or other techniques are not allowed to undercut selected local exchange rates.

  4. A Dual-Ligand Liposomal System Composed of a Cell-Penetrating Peptide and a Mitochondrial RNA Aptamer Synergistically Facilitates Cellular Uptake and Mitochondrial Targeting.

    PubMed

    Yamada, Yuma; Furukawa, Ryo; Harashima, Hideyoshi

    2016-05-01

    It has been reported that the use of mitochondrial RNA aptamers including RNase P (RP) results in the selective mitochondrial delivery of endogenous and exogenous RNAs. The issue of whether these aptamers would be useful ligands for the mitochondrial targeting of a nanoparticle has not been demonstrated to date because nanocarriers modified with these RNA aptamers are insufficiently internalized by cells. We report here on the development of a dual-ligand liposomal system composed of octaarginine (R8), a device that enhances cellular uptake, and an RP aptamer for mitochondrial targeting to permit a nanocarrier to be efficiently delivered to mitochondria. Surprisingly, the cellular uptake of the R8-modified nanocarrier was facilitated by modification with an RP aptamer. The optimal composition of a nanocarrier needed for efficient cellular uptake and mitochondrial targeting was determined. In a confocal laser scanning microscopy analysis, the dual-ligand-modified nanocarrier was found to result in effective mitochondrial targeting through an ATP-dependent pathway and was much more effective than a single-ligand R8-modified nanocarrier. This is the first report of the regulation of intracellular trafficking by a mitochondrial RNA aptamer-modified nanocarrier system. PMID:27056631

  5. Topology and regulation of the human eIF4A/4G/4H helicase complex in translation initiation

    PubMed Central

    Marintchev, Assen; Edmonds, Katherine A.; Marintcheva, Boriana; Hendrickson, Elthea; Oberer, Monika; Suzuki, Chikako; Herdy, Barbara; Sonenberg, Nahum; Wagner, Gerhard

    2009-01-01

    Summary The RNA helicase eIF4A plays a key role in unwinding of mRNA and scanning during translation initiation. Free eIF4A is a poor helicase and requires the accessory proteins eIF4G and eIF4H. However, the structure of the helicase complex and the mechanisms of stimulation of eIF4A activity have remained elusive. Here we report the topology of the eIF4A/4G/4H helicase complex, which is built from multiple experimentally observed domain-domain contacts. Remarkably, some of the interactions are continuously rearranged during the ATP binding/hydrolysis cycle of the helicase. We show that the accessory proteins modulate the affinity of eIF4A for ATP by interacting simultaneously with both helicase domains and promoting either the closed, ATP-bound conformation or the open, nucleotide-free conformation. The topology of the complex and the spatial arrangement of the RNA-binding surfaces offer insights into their roles in stimulation of helicase activity and the mechanisms of mRNA unwinding and scanning. PMID:19203580

  6. An accurately preorganized IRES RNA structure enables eIF4G capture for initiation of viral translation.

    PubMed

    Imai, Shunsuke; Kumar, Parimal; Hellen, Christopher U T; D'Souza, Victoria M; Wagner, Gerhard

    2016-09-01

    Many viruses bypass canonical cap-dependent translation in host cells by using internal ribosomal entry sites (IRESs) in their transcripts; IRESs hijack initiation factors for the assembly of initiation complexes. However, it is currently unknown how IRES RNAs recognize initiation factors that have no endogenous RNA binding partners; in a prominent example, the IRES of encephalomyocarditis virus (EMCV) interacts with the HEAT-1 domain of eukaryotic initiation factor 4G (eIF4G). Here we report the solution structure of the J-K region of this IRES and show that its stems are precisely organized to position protein-recognition bulges. This multisite interaction mechanism operates on an all-or-nothing principle in which all domains are required. This preorganization is accomplished by an 'adjuster module': a pentaloop motif that acts as a dual-sided docking station for base-pair receptors. Because subtle changes in the orientation abrogate protein capture, our study highlights how a viral RNA acquires affinity for a target protein. PMID:27525590

  7. A telemedicine wound care model using 4G with smart phones or smart glasses: A pilot study.

    PubMed

    Ye, Junna; Zuo, Yanhai; Xie, Ting; Wu, Minjie; Ni, Pengwen; Kang, Yutian; Yu, Xiaoping; Sun, Xiaofang; Huang, Yao; Lu, Shuliang

    2016-08-01

    To assess the feasibility of a wound care model using 4th-generation mobile communication technology standards (4G) with smart phones or smart glasses for wound management.This wound care model is an interactive, real-time platform for implementing telemedicine changing wound dressings, or doing operations. It was set up in March 2015 between Jinhua in Zhejiang province and Shanghai, China, which are 328 km apart. It comprised of a video application (APP), 4G net, smart phones or smart glasses, and a central server.This model service has been used in 30 patients with wounds on their lower extremities for 109 times in 1 month. Following a short learning curve, the service worked well and was deemed to be user-friendly. Two (6.7%) patients had wounds healed, while others still required wound dressing changes after the study finished. Both local surgeons and patients showed good acceptance of this model (100% and 83.33%, respectively).This telemedicine model is feasible and valuable because it provides an opportunity of medical service about wound healing in remote areas where specialists are scarce. PMID:27495023

  8. Fabrication of cellular materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Prud'homme, Robert K.; Aksay, Ilhan A.; Garg, Rajeev

    1996-02-01

    Nature uses cellular materials in applications requiring strength while, simultaneously, minimizing raw materials requirements. Minimizing raw materials is efficient both in terms of the energy expended by the organism to synthesize the structure and in terms of the strength- to-weight ratio of the structure. Wood is the most obvious example of cellular bio-materials, and it is the focus of other presentations in this symposium. The lightweight bone structure of birds is another excellent example where weight is a key criterion. The anchoring foot of the common muscle [Mytilus edulis] whereby it attaches itself to objects is a further example of a biological system that uses a foam to fill space and yet conserve on raw materials. In the case of the muscle the foam is water filled and the foot structure distributes stress over a larger area so that the strength of the byssal thread from which it is suspended is matched to the strength of interfacial attachment of the foot to a substrate. In these examples the synthesis and fabrication of the cellular material is directed by intercellular, genetically coded, biochemical reactions. The resulting cell sizes are microns in scale. Cellular materials at the next larger scale are created by organisms at the next higher level of integration. For example an African tree frog lays her eggs in a gas/fluid foam sack she builds on a branch overhanging a pond. The outside of the foam sack hardens in the sun and prevents water evaporation. The foam structure minimizes the amount of fluid that needs to be incorporated into the sack and minimizes its weight. However, as far as the developing eggs are concerned, they are in an aqueous medium, i.e. the continuous fluid phase of the foam. After precisely six days the eggs hatch, and the solidified outer wall re-liquefies and dumps the emerging tadpoles into the pond below. The bee honeycomb is an example of a cellular material with exquisite periodicity at millimeter length scales. The

  9. Probabilistic cellular automata.

    PubMed

    Agapie, Alexandru; Andreica, Anca; Giuclea, Marius

    2014-09-01

    Cellular automata are binary lattices used for modeling complex dynamical systems. The automaton evolves iteratively from one configuration to another, using some local transition rule based on the number of ones in the neighborhood of each cell. With respect to the number of cells allowed to change per iteration, we speak of either synchronous or asynchronous automata. If randomness is involved to some degree in the transition rule, we speak of probabilistic automata, otherwise they are called deterministic. With either type of cellular automaton we are dealing with, the main theoretical challenge stays the same: starting from an arbitrary initial configuration, predict (with highest accuracy) the end configuration. If the automaton is deterministic, the outcome simplifies to one of two configurations, all zeros or all ones. If the automaton is probabilistic, the whole process is modeled by a finite homogeneous Markov chain, and the outcome is the corresponding stationary distribution. Based on our previous results for the asynchronous case-connecting the probability of a configuration in the stationary distribution to its number of zero-one borders-the article offers both numerical and theoretical insight into the long-term behavior of synchronous cellular automata. PMID:24999557

  10. A systemic approach to explore the flexibility of energy stores at the cellular scale: Examples from muscle cells.

    PubMed

    Taghipoor, Masoomeh; van Milgen, Jaap; Gondret, Florence

    2016-09-01

    Variations in energy storage and expenditure are key elements for animals adaptation to rapidly changing environments. Because of the multiplicity of metabolic pathways, metabolic crossroads and interactions between anabolic and catabolic processes within and between different cells, the flexibility of energy stores in animal cells is difficult to describe by simple verbal, textual or graphic terms. We propose a mathematical model to study the influence of internal and external challenges on the dynamic behavior of energy stores and its consequence on cell energy status. The role of the flexibility of energy stores on the energy equilibrium at the cellular level is illustrated through three case studies: variation in eating frequency (i.e., glucose input), level of physical activity (i.e., ATP requirement), and changes in cell characteristics (i.e., maximum capacity of glycogen storage). Sensitivity analysis has been performed to highlight the most relevant parameters of the model; model simulations have then been performed to illustrate how variation in these key parameters affects cellular energy balance. According to this analysis, glycogen maximum accumulation capacity and homeostatic energy demand are among the most important parameters regulating muscle cell metabolism to ensure its energy equilibrium. PMID:27338303

  11. F-box and leucine-rich repeat protein 5 (FBXL5) is required for maintenance of cellular and systemic iron homeostasis.

    PubMed

    Ruiz, Julio C; Walker, Scott D; Anderson, Sheila A; Eisenstein, Richard S; Bruick, Richard K

    2013-01-01

    Maintenance of cellular iron homeostasis requires post-transcriptional regulation of iron metabolism genes by iron regulatory protein 2 (IRP2). The hemerythrin-like domain of F-box and leucine-rich repeat protein 5 (FBXL5), an E3 ubiquitin ligase subunit, senses iron and oxygen availability and facilitates IRP2 degradation in iron replete cells. Disruption of the ubiquitously expressed murine Fbxl5 gene results in a failure to sense increased cellular iron availability, accompanied by constitutive IRP2 accumulation and misexpression of IRP2 target genes. FBXL5-null mice die during embryogenesis, although viability is restored by simultaneous deletion of the IRP2, but not IRP1, gene. Mice containing a single functional Fbxl5 allele behave like their wild type littermates when fed an iron-sufficient diet. However, unlike wild type mice that manifest decreased hematocrit and hemoglobin levels when fed a low-iron diet, Fbxl5 heterozygotes maintain normal hematologic values due to increased iron absorption. The responsiveness of IRP2 to low iron is specifically enhanced in the duodena of the heterozygotes and is accompanied by increased expression of the divalent metal transporter-1. These results confirm the role of FBXL5 in the in vivo maintenance of cellular and systemic iron homeostasis and reveal a privileged role for the intestine in their regulation by virtue of its unique FBXL5 iron sensitivity. PMID:23135277

  12. F-box and Leucine-rich Repeat Protein 5 (FBXL5) Is Required for Maintenance of Cellular and Systemic Iron Homeostasis*

    PubMed Central

    Ruiz, Julio C.; Walker, Scott D.; Anderson, Sheila A.; Eisenstein, Richard S.; Bruick, Richard K.

    2013-01-01

    Maintenance of cellular iron homeostasis requires post-transcriptional regulation of iron metabolism genes by iron regulatory protein 2 (IRP2). The hemerythrin-like domain of F-box and leucine-rich repeat protein 5 (FBXL5), an E3 ubiquitin ligase subunit, senses iron and oxygen availability and facilitates IRP2 degradation in iron replete cells. Disruption of the ubiquitously expressed murine Fbxl5 gene results in a failure to sense increased cellular iron availability, accompanied by constitutive IRP2 accumulation and misexpression of IRP2 target genes. FBXL5-null mice die during embryogenesis, although viability is restored by simultaneous deletion of the IRP2, but not IRP1, gene. Mice containing a single functional Fbxl5 allele behave like their wild type littermates when fed an iron-sufficient diet. However, unlike wild type mice that manifest decreased hematocrit and hemoglobin levels when fed a low-iron diet, Fbxl5 heterozygotes maintain normal hematologic values due to increased iron absorption. The responsiveness of IRP2 to low iron is specifically enhanced in the duodena of the heterozygotes and is accompanied by increased expression of the divalent metal transporter-1. These results confirm the role of FBXL5 in the in vivo maintenance of cellular and systemic iron homeostasis and reveal a privileged role for the intestine in their regulation by virtue of its unique FBXL5 iron sensitivity. PMID:23135277

  13. VizieR Online Data Catalog: 3.6um S4G Galactic bars characterization (Diaz-Garcia+, 2016)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Diaz-Garcia, S.; Salo, H.; Laurikainen, E.; Herrera-Endoqui, M.

    Here, we provide the bar strength measurements of a sample of ~600 barred galaxies drawn from the Spitzer Survey of Stellar Structure in Galaxies (Sheth et al., 2010, Cat. J/PASP/122/1397). Bars were identified based on the morphological classifications by Buta et al. (2015, Cat. J/ApJS/217/32). Besides, we provide a parameterization of the stellar contribution to the rotation curve and an estimate to the stellar-to-halo mass ratio within the optical radius for a sample of 1345 non-highly inclined galaxies (i<65°). The radial force profiles and rotation curve decomposition models of each of these galaxies are also given. Table A1 contains fundamental parameters of the galaxies such as the total stellar mass and distances (values for all the S4G sample are calculated in Munoz-Mateos et al., 2015ApJS..219....3M). Besides, we provide an estimate of the scale-heights and optical radii. We also list the inclination-corrected HI maximum velocities, the parameters of the stellar and halo components of the rotation curves, and the estimates of the halo-to-stellar mass ratios within the optical disk. In Table A2 it is given the gravitational torque parameters and radii, with and without spiral arms and halo correction. In Table A3 it is provided the maximum normalized Fourier amplitudes and radii (for the m = 2, 4, 6 and 8 components) and the bar ellipticities (from Herrera-Endoqui et al., 2015A&A...582A..86H) deprojected to the disk plane using the orientation parameters from S4G Pipeline 4 (Salo et al., 2015, Cat. J/ApJS/219/4). The evaluation of the gravitational torques and m=2 Fourier amplitude at the bar radius is also listed in both tables. In the directory "rfp" we provide the gravitational torque radial profiles, with and without spiral arms and halo correction, even Fourier amplitudes and m=2 phase of 1345 non-highly inclined disk S4G galaxies ('radialforce_profiles.dat'). Likewise, for the same sample, in the directory "rcdm" we tabulate the rotation curve

  14. Initial response and cellular protection through the Keap1/Nrf2 system during the exposure of primary mouse hepatocytes to 1,2-naphthoquinone.

    PubMed

    Miura, Takashi; Shinkai, Yasuhiro; Jiang, Hai-Yan; Iwamoto, Noriko; Sumi, Daigo; Taguchi, Keiko; Yamamoto, Masayuki; Jinno, Hideto; Tanaka-Kagawa, Toshiko; Cho, Arthur K; Kumagai, Yoshito

    2011-04-18

    Quinones are reactive chemical species that cause cellular damage by modifying protein thiols and/or catalyzing the reduction of oxygen to reactive oxygen species, thereby promoting oxidative stress. Transcription factor Nrf2 plays a crucial role in cellular defense against electrophilic modification and oxidative stress. In studies using 1,2-naphthoquinone (1,2-NQ) as a model quinone, we found that Keap1, the negative regulator of Nrf2, was readily arylated at its reactive thiols by 1,2-NQ. Exposure of primary mouse hepatocytes to 1,2-NQ resulted in the activation of Nrf2 and the upregulation of some of Nrf2's downstream genes. This interaction was further investigated in hepatocytes from Nrf2 knockout mice in which the proteins responsible for the metabolism and excretion of 1,2-NQ are minimally expressed. The chemical modification of cellular proteins by 1,2-NQ was enhanced by Nrf2 deletion, resulting in increased toxicity. However, deletion of the negative regulatory protein, Keap1, drastically reduced the covalent binding by 1,2-NQ and its cellular toxicity. Experiments with chemicals that inhibit the biotransformation and extracellular excretion of 1,2-NQ suggest that 1,2-NQ undergoes detoxification and excretion into the extracellular space predominantly by two-electron reduction and subsequent glucuronidation by NAD(P)H:quinone oxidoreductase 1 and uridine 5'-diphosphate-glucuronosyltransferases, followed by multidrug resistance-associated protein-dependent excretion. These findings suggest that the Keap1/Nrf2 system is essential for the prevention of cell damage resulting from exposure to 1,2-NQ. PMID:21384861

  15. Complete genome sequence of Cupriavidus basilensis 4G11, isolated from the Oak Ridge Field Research Center site

    SciTech Connect

    Ray, Jayashree; Waters, R. Jordan; Skerker, Jeffrey M.; Kuehl, Jennifer V.; Price, Morgan N.; Huang, Jiawen; Chakraborty, Romy; Arkin, Adam P.; Deutschbauer, Adam

    2015-05-14

    Cupriavidus basilensis 4G11 was isolated from groundwater at the Oak Ridge Field Research Center (FRC) site. Here, we report the complete genome sequence and annotation of Cupriavidus basilensis 4G11. The genome contains 8,421,483 bp, 7,661 predicted protein-coding genes, and a total GC content of 64.4%.

  16. 78 FR 958 - Certain Wireless Devices With 3G and/or 4G Capabilities and Components Thereof Notice of Receipt...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-01-07

    ... COMMISSION Certain Wireless Devices With 3G and/or 4G Capabilities and Components Thereof Notice of Receipt... Commission has received a complaint entitled Certain Wireless Devices with 3G and/or 4G Capabilities and... importation, and the sale within the United States after importation of certain wireless devices with 3g...

  17. Kinematical evidence for secular evolution in Spitzer Survey of Stellar Structure in Galaxies (S4G) spirals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Erroz-Ferrer, Santiago; Knapen, Johan H.; Font, Joan; Beckman, John E.

    2015-03-01

    We present a study of the kinematics of a sample of isolated spiral galaxies in the Spitzer Survey of Stellar Structure in Galaxies (S4G). We use Hα Fabry-Perot data from the GHαFaS instrument at the William Herschel Telescope (WHT) in La Palma, complemented with images at 3.6 microns, in the R band and in the Hα filter. The resulting data cubes and velocity field maps allow a complete study of the kinematics of a galaxy, including in-depth investigations of the rotation curve, velocity moment maps, velocity residual maps, gradient maps and position-velocity (PV) diagrams. We find clear evidence of the secular evolution processes going on in these galaxies, such as asymmetries in the velocity field in the bar zone, and non-circular motions, probably in response to the potential of the structural components of the galaxies, or to past or present interactions.

  18. Metallicities of Low Mass Inefficient Star Forming Dwarfs in S4G: Testing the Closed Box Paradigm

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McKay, Myles; Stirewalt, Sabrina; Sheth, Kartik; de Swardt, Bonita; Walter, Donald

    2015-03-01

    Low mass dwarf galaxies are the most numerous extragalactic population in the Local Universe. Many gas-rich dwarfs appear to be forming stars less efficiently than normal, massive disk galaxies and are therefore important laboratories for the study of star formation. Here we present new observations using the Palomar Double Spectrograph for 19 dwarf galaxies from the S4G Survey with the lowest stellar to HI mass ratios. Preliminary analysis of the data indicate a wide range of metallicities which vary by as much as 0.5 dex in a single galaxy in different star forming regions. Such a dispersion in metallicities favors an open box model and the results suggest a varied star formation history, possibly induced via minor mergers and accretion. The National Radio Astronomy Observatory(NRAO), National Science Foundation(NSF), and the National Astronomy Consortium (NAC) Cville Cohort. Additional support was provided by NSF Awards AST-0750814 and AST-1358913 to South Carolina State University.

  19. Control of cellular automata

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bagnoli, Franco; Rechtman, Raúl; El Yacoubi, Samira

    2012-12-01

    We study the problem of master-slave synchronization and control of totalistic cellular automata. The synchronization mechanism is that of setting a fraction of sites of the slave system equal to those of the master one (pinching synchronization). The synchronization observable is the distance between the two configurations. We present three control strategies that exploit local information (the number of nonzero first-order Boolean derivatives) in order to choose the sites to be synchronized. When no local information is used, we speak of simple pinching synchronization. We find the critical properties of control and discuss the best control strategy compared with simple synchronization.

  20. VizieR Online Data Catalog: Catalogue of features in the S4G (Herrera-Endoqui+, 2015)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Herrera-Endoqui, M.; Diaz-Garcia, S.; Laurikainen, E.; Salo, H.

    2015-08-01

    Table 2 contains the properties of bars, ring- and lens-structures in the S4G. Data for bars contains the visual estimated barlength, the maximum ellipticity in the bar region, the visual estimated position angle, and the barlength obtained from the ellipticity maximum. They are given in both the sky plane and the disk plane, the conversion is made using P4 orientation parameters (Salo et al., 2015ApJS..219....4S; Table 1). For bars the disk plane values are given only when a reliable ellipticity maximum was found and the galaxy inclination i<65 deg. For other features the parameters are obtained from fitting ellipses to points tracing the structure. A quality flag for our measurement is also given: 1 indicates a good fit and unambiguously identified feature, 2 indicates a hard to trace feature, 3 indicates an uncertain feature identification (due to high inclination of host galaxy or incomplete feature). Table 3 contains the properties of spiral arms in the S4G. Type of spiral arms, the pitch angle, the inner and the outer radius are given for every spiral segment (see the catalogue web page). The type of spiral arms are taken from Buta et al. (2015ApJS..217...32B, Cat. J/ApJS/217/32): G for grand design, M for multiple, and F for flocculent spiral arms. Our estimation of the quality of the fit is also given (1.0 = good; 2.0 = acceptable). (2 data files).

  1. Genome-wide assessment of the carriers involved in the cellular uptake of drugs: a model system in yeast

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background The uptake of drugs into cells has traditionally been considered to be predominantly via passive diffusion through the bilayer portion of the cell membrane. The recent recognition that drug uptake is mostly carrier-mediated raises the question of which drugs use which carriers. Results To answer this, we have constructed a chemical genomics platform built upon the yeast gene deletion collection, using competition experiments in batch fermenters and robotic automation of cytotoxicity screens, including protection by 'natural' substrates. Using these, we tested 26 different drugs and identified the carriers required for 18 of the drugs to gain entry into yeast cells. Conclusions As well as providing a useful platform technology, these results further substantiate the notion that the cellular uptake of pharmaceutical drugs normally occurs via carrier-mediated transport and indicates that establishing the identity and tissue distribution of such carriers should be a major consideration in the design of safe and effective drugs. PMID:22023736

  2. Meta-analysis of expression of hepatic organic anion-transporting polypeptide (OATP) transporters in cellular systems relative to human liver tissue.

    PubMed

    Badée, Justine; Achour, Brahim; Rostami-Hodjegan, Amin; Galetin, Aleksandra

    2015-04-01

    Organic anion-transporting polypeptide (OATP)1B1, OATP1B3, and OATP2B1 transporters play an important role in hepatic drug disposition. Recently, an increasing number of studies have reported proteomic expression data for OATP transporters. However, systematic analysis and understanding of the actual differences in OATP expression between liver tissue and commonly used cellular systems is lacking. In the current study, meta-analysis was performed to assess the protein expression of OATP transporters reported in hepatocytes relative to liver tissue and to identify any potential correlations in transporter expression levels in the same individual. OATP1B1 was identified as the most abundant uptake transporter at 5.9 ± 8.3, 5.8 ± 3.3, and 4.2 ± 1.7 fmol/μg protein in liver tissue, sandwich-cultured human hepatocytes (SCHH), and cryopreserved suspended hepatocytes, respectively. The rank order in average expression in liver tissue and cellular systems was OATP1B1 > OATP1B3 ≈ OATP2B1. Abundance levels of the OATP transporters investigated were not significantly different between liver and cellular systems, with the exception of OATP2B1 expression in SCHH relative to liver tissue. Analysis of OATP1B1, OATP1B3, and OATP2B1 liver expression data in the same individuals (n = 86) identified weak (OATP1B1-OATP2B1) to moderately (OATP1B3-OATP2B1) significant correlations. A significant weak correlation was noted between OATP1B1 abundance and age of human donors, whereas expression of the OATPs investigated was independent of sex. Implications of the current analysis on the in vitro-in vivo extrapolation of transporter-mediated drug disposition using physiologically based pharmacokinetic models are discussed. PMID:25564656

  3. Cellular Stress Responses and Monitored Cellular Activities.

    PubMed

    Sawa, Teiji; Naito, Yoshifumi; Kato, Hideya; Amaya, Fumimasa

    2016-08-01

    To survive, organisms require mechanisms that enable them to sense changes in the outside environment, introduce necessary responses, and resist unfavorable distortion. Consequently, through evolutionary adaptation, cells have become equipped with the apparatus required to monitor their fundamental intracellular processes and the mechanisms needed to try to offset malfunction without receiving any direct signals from the outside environment. It has been shown recently that eukaryotic cells are equipped with a special mechanism that monitors their fundamental cellular functions and that some pathogenic proteobacteria can override this monitoring mechanism to cause harm. The monitored cellular activities involved in the stressed intracellular response have been researched extensively in Caenorhabditis elegans, where discovery of an association between key mitochondrial activities and innate immune responses was named "cellular associated detoxification and defenses (cSADD)." This cellular surveillance pathway (cSADD) oversees core cellular activities such as mitochondrial respiration and protein transport into mitochondria, detects xenobiotics and invading pathogens, and activates the endocrine pathways controlling behavior, detoxification, and immunity. The cSADD pathway is probably associated with cellular responses to stress in human inflammatory diseases. In the critical care field, the pathogenesis of lethal inflammatory syndromes (e.g., respiratory distress syndromes and sepsis) involves the disturbance of mitochondrial respiration leading to cell death. Up-to-date knowledge about monitored cellular activities and cSADD, especially focusing on mitochondrial involvement, can probably help fill a knowledge gap regarding the pathogenesis of lethal inflammatory syndromes in the critical care field. PMID:26954943

  4. Cellular mechanics and motility

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hénon, Sylvie; Sykes, Cécile

    2015-10-01

    The term motility defines the movement of a living organism. One widely known example is the motility of sperm cells, or the one of flagellar bacteria. The propulsive element of such organisms is a cilium(or flagellum) that beats. Although cells in our tissues do not have a flagellum in general, they are still able to move, as we will discover in this chapter. In fact, in both cases of movement, with or without a flagellum, cell motility is due to a dynamic re-arrangement of polymers inside the cell. Let us first have a closer look at the propulsion mechanism in the case of a flagellum or a cilium, which is the best known, but also the simplest, and which will help us to define the hydrodynamic general conditions of cell movement. A flagellum is sustained by cellular polymers arranged in semi-flexible bundles and flagellar beating generates cell displacement. These polymers or filaments are part of the cellular skeleton, or "cytoskeleton", which is, in this case, external to the cellular main body of the organism. In fact, bacteria move in a hydrodynamic regime in which viscosity dominates over inertia. The system is thus in a hydrodynamic regime of low Reynolds number (Box 5.1), which is nearly exclusively the case in all cell movements. Bacteria and their propulsion mode by flagella beating are our unicellular ancestors 3.5 billion years ago. Since then, we have evolved to form pluricellular organisms. However, to keep the ability of displacement, to heal our wounds for example, our cells lost their flagellum, since it was not optimal in a dense cell environment: cells are too close to each other to leave enough space for the flagella to accomplish propulsion. The cytoskeleton thus developed inside the cell body to ensure cell shape changes and movement, and also mechanical strength within a tissue. The cytoskeleton of our cells, like the polymers or filaments that sustain the flagellum, is also composed of semi-flexible filaments arranged in bundles, and also in

  5. Deletion of the eIFiso4G subunit of the Arabidopsis eIFiso4F translation initiation complex impairs health and viability

    PubMed Central

    Lellis, Andrew D.; Allen, M. Leah; Aertker, Alice W.; Tran, Jonathan K.; Hillis, David M.; Harbin, Courtney R.; Caldwell, Christian; Gallie, Daniel R.

    2010-01-01

    Arabidopsis thaliana knockout lines for the plant-specific eukaryotic translation initiation factors eIFiso4G1 (i4g1) and eIFiso4G2 (i4g2) genes have been obtained. To address the potential for functional redundancy of these genes, homozygous double mutant lines were generated by crossing individual knockout lines. Both single and double mutant plants were analyzed for changes in gross morphology, development, and responses to selected environmental stressors. Single gene knockouts appear to have minimal effect on morphology, germination rate, growth rate, flowering time, or fertility. However, double mutant i4g1/i4g2 knockout plants show reduced germination rates, slow growth rates, moderate chlorosis, impaired fertility and reduced long term seed viability. Double mutant plants also exhibit altered responses to dehydration, salinity, and heat stress. The i4g2 and i4g1/i4g2 double mutant has reduced amounts of chlorophyll a and b suggesting a role in the expression of chloroplast proteins. General protein synthesis did not appear to be affected as the levels of gross protein expression did not appear to change in the mutants. The lack of a phenotype for either of the single mutants suggests there is considerable functional overlap. However, the strong phenotypes observed for the double mutant indicates that the individual gene products may have specialized roles in the expression of proteins involved in plant growth and development. Electronic supplementary material The online version of this article (doi:10.1007/s11103-010-9670-z) contains supplementary material, which is available to authorized users. PMID:20694742

  6. Control and regulation of the cellular responses to cold shock: the responses in yeast and mammalian systems

    PubMed Central

    Al-Fageeh, Mohamed B.; Smales, C. Mark

    2006-01-01

    Although the cold-shock response has now been studied in a number of different organisms for several decades, it is only in the last few years that we have begun to understand the molecular mechanisms that govern adaptation to cold stress. Notably, all organisms from prokaryotes to plants and higher eukaryotes respond to cold shock in a comparatively similar manner. The general response of cells to cold stress is the elite and rapid overexpression of a small group of proteins, the so-called CSPs (cold-shock proteins). The most well characterized CSP is CspA, the major CSP expressed in Escherichia coli upon temperature downshift. More recently, a number of reports have shown that exposing yeast or mammalian cells to sub-physiological temperatures (<30 or <37 °C respectively) invokes a co-ordinated cellular response involving modulation of transcription, translation, metabolism, the cell cycle and the cell cytoskeleton. In the present review, we summarize the regulation and role of cold-shock genes and proteins in the adaptive response upon decreased temperature with particular reference to yeast and in vitro cultured mammalian cells. Finally, we present an integrated model for the co-ordinated responses required to maintain the viability and integrity of mammalian cells upon mild hypothermic cold shock. PMID:16792527

  7. Cellular Phone Towers

    MedlinePlus

    ... the call. How are people exposed to the energy from cellular phone towers? As people use cell ... where people can be exposed to them. The energy from a cellular phone tower antenna, like that ...

  8. The Role of Dynamics and Allostery in the Inhibition of the eIF4E/eIF4G Translation Initiation Factor Complex

    PubMed Central

    Papadopoulos, Evangelos; Blackledge, Martin

    2016-01-01

    Lack of regulation of the eIF4E/eIF4G interaction is a hallmark of cancer. 4EGI-1 binds to eIF4E preventing association to eIF4G via an allosteric mechanism. We use NMR spectroscopy and MD simulations to obtain a mechanistic description of the role of correlated dynamics in this allosteric regulation. We show that binding of 4EGI-1 perturbs native correlated motions and increases correlated fluctuations in part of the eIF4G binding site. PMID:27162083

  9. Hierarchical cellular materials

    SciTech Connect

    Gibson, L.J.

    1991-01-01

    In this paper a method for estimating the contributions of both the composite and the cellular microstructures to the overall material properties and the mechanical efficiency of natural cellular solids will be described. The method will be demonstrated by focusing on the Young's modulus; similar techniques can be used for other material properties. The results suggest efficient microstructures for engineered cellular materials.

  10. Hierarchical cellular materials

    SciTech Connect

    Gibson, L.J.

    1991-12-31

    In this paper a method for estimating the contributions of both the composite and the cellular microstructures to the overall material properties and the mechanical efficiency of natural cellular solids will be described. The method will be demonstrated by focusing on the Young`s modulus; similar techniques can be used for other material properties. The results suggest efficient microstructures for engineered cellular materials.

  11. Spitzer/Infrared Array Camera near-infrared features in the outer parts of S4G galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Laine, Seppo; Knapen, Johan H.; Muñoz-Mateos, Juan-Carlos; Kim, Taehyun; Comerón, Sébastien; Martig, Marie; Holwerda, Benne W.; Athanassoula, E.; Bosma, Albert; Johansson, Peter H.; Erroz-Ferrer, Santiago; Gadotti, Dimitri A.; Gil de Paz, Armando; Hinz, Joannah; Laine, Jarkko; Laurikainen, Eija; Menéndez-Delmestre, Karín; Mizusawa, Trisha; Regan, Michael W.; Salo, Heikki; Sheth, Kartik; Seibert, Mark; Buta, Ronald J.; Cisternas, Mauricio; Elmegreen, Bruce G.; Elmegreen, Debra M.; Ho, Luis C.; Madore, Barry F.; Zaritsky, Dennis

    2014-11-01

    We present a catalogue and images of visually detected features, such as asymmetries, extensions, warps, shells, tidal tails, polar rings, and obvious signs of mergers or interactions, in the faint outer regions (at and outside of R25) of nearby galaxies. This catalogue can be used in future quantitative studies that examine galaxy evolution due to internal and external factors. We are able to reliably detect outer region features down to a brightness level of 0.03 MJy sr-1 pixel-1 at 3.6 μm in the Spitzer Survey of Stellar Structure in Galaxies (S4G). We also tabulate companion galaxies. We find asymmetries in the outer isophotes in 22 ± 1 per cent of the sample. The asymmetry fraction does not correlate with galaxy classification as an interacting galaxy or merger remnant, or with the presence of companions. We also compare the detected features to similar features in galaxies taken from cosmological zoom re-simulations. The simulated images have a higher fraction (33 per cent) of outer disc asymmetries, which may be due to selection effects and an uncertain star formation threshold in the models. The asymmetries may have either an internal (e.g. lopsidedness due to dark halo asymmetry) or external origin.

  12. Leber's hereditary optic neuropathy is associated with the mitochondrial ND4 G11696A mutation in five Chinese families

    SciTech Connect

    Zhou Xiangtian |; Wei Qiping; Yang Li; Tong Yi |; Zhao Fuxin; Lu Chunjie; Qian Yaping; Sun Yanghong; Lu Fan; Qu Jia |. E-mail: jqu@wzmc.net; Guan Minxin ||. E-mail: min-xin.guan@cchmc.org

    2006-02-03

    We report here the clinical, genetic, and molecular characterization of five Chinese families with Leber's hereditary optic neuropathy (LHON). Clinical and genetic evaluations revealed the variable severity and age-of-onset in visual impairment in these families. Strikingly, there were extremely low penetrances of visual impairment in these Chinese families. Sequence analysis of the complete mitochondrial genomes in these pedigrees showed the distinct sets of mtDNA polymorphism, in addition to the identical ND4 G11696A mutation associated with LHON. Indeed, this mutation is present in homoplasmy only in the maternal lineage of those pedigrees but not other members of these families. In fact, the occurrence of the G11696A mutation in these several genetically unrelated subjects affected by visual impairment strongly indicates that this mutation is involved in the pathogenesis of visual impairment. Furthermore, the N405D in the ND5 and G5820A in the tRNA{sup Cys}, showing high evolutional conservation, may contribute to the phenotypic expression of G11696A mutation in the WZ10 pedigree. However, there was the absence of functionally significant mtDNA mutations in other four Chinese pedigrees carrying the G11696A mutation. Therefore, nuclear modifier gene(s) or environmental factor(s) may play a role in the phenotypic expression of the LHON-associated G11696A mutation in these Chinese pedigrees.

  13. GRAND DESIGN AND FLOCCULENT SPIRALS IN THE SPITZER SURVEY OF STELLAR STRUCTURE IN GALAXIES (S{sup 4}G)

    SciTech Connect

    Elmegreen, Debra Meloy; Yau, Andrew; Elmegreen, Bruce G.; Athanassoula, E.; Bosma, Albert; Helou, George; Sheth, Kartik; Ho, Luis C.; Madore, Barry F.; Menendez-Delmestre, KarIn; Gadotti, Dimitri A.; Knapen, Johan H.; Laurikainen, Eija; Salo, Heikki; Meidt, Sharon E.; Regan, Michael W.; Zaritsky, Dennis; Aravena, Manuel

    2011-08-10

    Spiral arm properties of 46 galaxies in the Spitzer Survey of Stellar Structure in Galaxies (S{sup 4}G) were measured at 3.6 {mu}m, where extinction is small and the old stars dominate. The sample includes flocculent, multiple arm, and grand design types with a wide range of Hubble and bar types. We find that most optically flocculent galaxies are also flocculent in the mid-IR because of star formation uncorrelated with stellar density waves, whereas multiple arm and grand design galaxies have underlying stellar waves. Arm-interarm contrasts increase from flocculent to multiple arm to grand design galaxies and with later Hubble types. Structure can be traced further out in the disk than in previous surveys. Some spirals peak at mid-radius while others continuously rise or fall, depending on Hubble and bar type. We find evidence for regular and symmetric modulations of the arm strength in NGC 4321. Bars tend to be long, high amplitude, and flat-profiled in early-type spirals, with arm contrasts that decrease with radius beyond the end of the bar, and they tend to be short, low amplitude, and exponential-profiled in late Hubble types, with arm contrasts that are constant or increase with radius. Longer bars tend to have larger amplitudes and stronger arms.

  14. Perinatal Exposure to a Low Dose of Bisphenol A Impaired Systemic Cellular Immune Response and Predisposes Young Rats to Intestinal Parasitic Infection

    PubMed Central

    Ménard, Sandrine; Guzylack-Piriou, Laurence; Lencina, Corinne; Leveque, Mathilde; Naturel, Manon; Sekkal, Soraya; Harkat, Cherryl; Gaultier, Eric; Olier, Maïwenn; Garcia-Villar, Raphael; Theodorou, Vassilia; Houdeau, Eric

    2014-01-01

    Perinatal exposure to the food contaminant bisphenol A (BPA) in rats induces long lasting adverse effects on intestinal immune homeostasis. This study was aimed at examining the immune response to dietary antigens and the clearance of parasites in young rats at the end of perinatal exposure to a low dose of BPA. Female rats were fed with BPA [5 µg/kg of body weight/day] or vehicle from gestational day 15 to pup weaning. Juvenile female offspring (day (D)25) were used to analyze immune cell populations, humoral and cellular responses after oral tolerance or immunization protocol to ovalbumin (OVA), and susceptibility to infection by the intestinal nematode Nippostrongylus brasiliensis (N. brasiliensis). Anti-OVA IgG titers following either oral tolerance or immunization were not affected after BPA perinatal exposure, while a sharp decrease in OVA-induced IFNγ secretion occurred in spleen and mesenteric lymph nodes (MLN) of OVA-immunized rats. These results are consistent with a decreased number of helper T cells, regulatory T cells and dendritic cells in spleen and MLN of BPA-exposed rats. The lack of cellular response to antigens questioned the ability of BPA-exposed rats to clear intestinal infections. A 1.5-fold increase in N. brasiliensis living larvae was observed in the intestine of BPA-exposed rats compared to controls due to an inappropriate Th1/Th2 cytokine production in infected jejunal tissues. These results show that perinatal BPA exposure impairs cellular response to food antigens, and increases susceptibility to intestinal parasitic infection in the juveniles. This emphasized the maturing immune system during perinatal period highly sensitive to low dose exposure to BPA, altering innate and adaptative immune response capacities in early life. PMID:25415191

  15. Adaptive stochastic cellular automata: Applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qian, S.; Lee, Y. C.; Jones, R. D.; Barnes, C. W.; Flake, G. W.; O'Rourke, M. K.; Lee, K.; Chen, H. H.; Sun, G. Z.; Zhang, Y. Q.; Chen, D.; Giles, C. L.

    1990-09-01

    The stochastic learning cellular automata model has been applied to the problem of controlling unstable systems. Two example unstable systems studied are controlled by an adaptive stochastic cellular automata algorithm with an adaptive critic. The reinforcement learning algorithm and the architecture of the stochastic CA controller are presented. Learning to balance a single pole is discussed in detail. Balancing an inverted double pendulum highlights the power of the stochastic CA approach. The stochastic CA model is compared to conventional adaptive control and artificial neural network approaches.

  16. Cellular stress response, redox status, and vitagenes in glaucoma: a systemic oxidant disorder linked to Alzheimer’s disease

    PubMed Central

    Trovato Salinaro, Angela; Cornelius, Carolin; Koverech, Guido; Koverech, Angela; Scuto, Maria; Lodato, Francesca; Fronte, Vincenzo; Muccilli, Vera; Reibaldi, Michele; Longo, Antonio; Uva, Maurizio G.; Calabrese, Vittorio

    2014-01-01

    Amyloid deposits, constituted of amyloid beta (Aβ) aggregates, are a characteristic feature of several neurodegenerative diseases, such as Alzheimer’s, mild cognitive impairment and Parkinson’s disease. They also have been recently implicated in the pathogenesis of retinal damage, as well as age-related macular degeneration and glaucoma. Glaucoma is a progressive optic neuropathy characterized by gradual degeneration of neuronal tissue due to retinal ganglion cell loss, associated to visual field loss over time resulting in irreversible blindness. Accumulation of Aβ characterizes glaucoma as a protein misfolding disease, suggesting a pathogenic role for oxidative stress in the pathogenesis of retinal degenerative damage associated to glaucoma. There is a growing body of evidence demonstrating a link between Alzheimer’s disease and glaucoma. Further, several heat shock proteins (HSPs) members have been implicated both in neurodegenerative diseases and glaucomatous apoptosis. To maintain redox homeostasis vitagenes, as integrated mechanisms, operate actively to preserve cell survival under condition of stress. Vitagenes encode for sirtuin, thioredoxin and HSPs. The present study was designed to investigate cellular stress response mechanisms in the blood of patients with glaucoma, compared to control subjects. Levels of vitagenes HSP-72, heme oxygenase-1, as well as F2-isoprostanes were significantly higher in the blood of patients with glaucoma than in controls. Furthermore, in the same experimental group increased expression of Trx and sirtuin 1 were measured. Our results sustain the importance of redox homeostasis disruption in the pathogenesis of glaucoma and highlights the opportunity that new therapies that prevents neurodegeneration through non-immunomodulatory mechanisms might be synergistically associated with current glaucoma therapies, thus unraveling important targets for novel cytoprotective strategies. PMID:24936186

  17. D620N mutation in the VPS35 gene and R1205H mutation in the EIF4G1 gene are uncommon in the Greek population.

    PubMed

    Kalinderi, Kallirhoe; Bostantjopoulou, Sevasti; Katsarou, Zoe; Dimikiotou, Maria; Fidani, Liana

    2015-10-01

    Recently, vacuolar protein sorting 35 (VPS35) and eukaryotic translation initiation factor 4 gamma 1 (EIF4G1) have been identified as new causal Parkinson's disease (PD) genes, with the VPS35 D620N and EIF4G1 R1205H mutations being identified in both autosomal dominant late-onset familial and sporadic PD patients. However, the frequencies of these two mutations among different ethnic groups vary. We studied the VPS35 D620N and EIF4G1 R1205H mutations in a total of 333 individuals, 202 Greek patients with sporadic PD and 131 control subjects, using a polymerase chain reaction-restriction fragment length polymorphism (PCR-RFLP) method. None of our studied individuals carried these two mutations. Our data support that the VPS35 D620N and EIF4G1 R1205H mutations are not a common cause of PD in the Greek population. PMID:26300542

  18. Photo-protective effect of sargachromenol against UVB radiation-induced damage through modulating cellular antioxidant systems and apoptosis in human keratinocytes.

    PubMed

    Fernando, Pattage Madushan Dilhara Jayatissa; Piao, Mei Jing; Hewage, Susara Ruwan Kumara Madduma; Kang, Hee Kyoung; Yoo, Eun Sook; Koh, Young Sang; Ko, Mi Hee; Ko, Chang Sik; Byeon, Sang Hee; Mun, Seung Ri; Lee, Nam Ho; Hyun, Jin Won

    2016-04-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the photo-preventive effects of sargachromenol (SC) against ultraviolet B (UVB)-induced oxidative stress in human keratinocytes via assessing the antioxidant properties and underlying molecular mechanisms. SC exhibited a significant scavenging effect on UVB-induced intracellular reactive oxygen species (ROS). SC attenuated UVB-induced oxidative macromolecular damage, including the protein carbonyl content, DNA strand break, and 8-isoprostane level. Furthermore, SC decreased UVB-induced Bax, cleaved caspase-9, and cleaved caspase-3 protein levels, but increased that of Bcl-2, which are well-known key mediators of apoptosis. Moreover, SC increased superoxide dismutase, catalase, and heme oxygenase-1 protein expression. Pre-treatment with SC upregulated the main transcription factor of antioxidant enzymes, erythroid 2-related factor 2 level, which was reduced by UVB irradiation. Extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK) and Jun N-terminal kinases (JNK) are involved in the regulation of many cellular events, including apoptosis. SC treatment reversed ERK and JNK activation induced by UVB. Collectively, these data indicate that SC can provide remarkable cytoprotection against the adverse effects of UVB radiation by modulating cellular antioxidant systems, and suggest the potential of developing a medical agent for ROS-induced skin diseases. PMID:26991844

  19. Deranged bioenergetics and defective redox capacity in T lymphocytes and neutrophils are related to cellular dysfunction and increased oxidative stress in patients with active systemic lupus erythematosus.

    PubMed

    Li, Ko-Jen; Wu, Cheng-Han; Hsieh, Song-Chou; Lu, Ming-Chi; Tsai, Chang-Youh; Yu, Chia-Li

    2012-01-01

    Urinary excretion of N-benzoyl-glycyl-Nε-(hexanonyl)lysine, a biomarker of oxidative stress, was higher in 26 patients with active systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) than in 11 non-SLE patients with connective tissue diseases and in 14 healthy volunteers. We hypothesized that increased oxidative stress in active SLE might be attributable to deranged bioenergetics, defective reduction-oxidation (redox) capacity, or other factors. We demonstrated that, compared to normal cells, T lymphocytes (T) and polymorphonuclear neutrophils (PMN) of active SLE showed defective expression of facilitative glucose transporters GLUT-3 and GLUT-6, which led to increased intracellular basal lactate and decreased ATP production. In addition, the redox capacity, including intracellular GSH levels and the enzyme activity of glutathione peroxidase (GSH-Px) and γ-glutamyl-transpeptidase (GGT), was decreased in SLE-T. Compared to normal cells, SLE-PMN showed decreased intracellular GSH levels, and GGT enzyme activity was found in SLE-PMN and enhanced expression of CD53, a coprecipitating molecule for GGT. We conclude that deranged cellular bioenergetics and defective redox capacity in T and PMN are responsible for cellular immune dysfunction and are related to increased oxidative stress in active SLE patients. PMID:22007252

  20. Evidence that the tri-cellular metabolism of N-acetylaspartate functions as the brain's "operating system": how NAA metabolism supports meaningful intercellular frequency-encoded communications.

    PubMed

    Baslow, Morris H

    2010-11-01

    N-acetylaspartate (NAA), an acetylated derivative of L-aspartate (Asp), and N-acetylaspartylglutamate (NAAG), a derivative of NAA and L-glutamate (Glu), are synthesized by neurons in brain. However, neurons cannot catabolize either of these substances, and so their metabolism requires the participation of two other cell types. Neurons release both NAA and NAAG to extra-cellular fluid (ECF) upon stimulation, where astrocytes, the target cells for NAAG, hydrolyze it releasing NAA back into ECF, and oligodendrocytes, the target cells for NAA, hydrolyze it releasing Asp to ECF for recycling to neurons. This sequence is unique as it is the only known amino acid metabolic cycle in brain that requires three cell types for its completion. The results of this cycling are two-fold. First, neuronal metabolic water is transported to ECF for its removal from brain. Second, the rate of neuronal activity is coupled with focal hyperemia, providing stimulated neurons with the energy required for transmission of meaningful frequency-encoded messages. In this paper, it is proposed that the tri-cellular metabolism of NAA functions as the "operating system" of the brain, and is essential for normal cognitive and motor activities. Evidence in support of this hypothesis is provided by the outcomes of two human inborn errors in NAA metabolism. PMID:20563610

  1. From cells to embryos: the application of femtosecond laser pulses for altering cellular material in complex biological systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kohli, V.; Elezzabi, A. Y.

    2008-02-01

    We report the application of high-intensity femtosecond laser pulses as a novel tool for manipulating biological specimens. When femtosecond laser pulses were focused to a near diffraction-limited focal spot, cellular material within the laser focal volume was surgically ablated. Several dissection cuts were made in the membrane of live mammalian cells, and membrane surgery was accomplished without inducing cell collapse or disassociation. By altering how the laser pulses were applied, focal adhesions joining live epithelial cells were surgically removed, resulting in single cell isolation. To further examine the versatility of this reported tool, cells were transiently permeabilized for introducing foreign material into the cytoplasm of live mammalian cells. Localizing focused femtosecond laser pulses on the biological membrane resulted in the formation of transient pores, which were harnessed as a pathway for the delivery of exogenous material. Individual mammalian cells were permeabilized in the presence of a hyperosmotic cryoprotective disaccharide. Material delivery was confirmed by measuring the volumetric response of cells permeabilized in 0.2, 0.3, 0.4 and 0.5 M cryoprotective sugar. The survival of permeabilized cells in increasing osmolarity of sugar was assessed using a membrane integrity assay. Further demonstrating the novelty of this reported tool, laser surgery of an aquatic embryo, the zebrafish (Danio rerio), was also performed. Utilizing the transient pores that were formed in the embryonic cells of the zebrafish embryo, an exogenous fluorescent probe FITC, Streptavidin-conjugated quantum dots or plasmid DNA (sCMV) encoding EGFP was introduced into the developing embryonic cells. To determine if the laser induced any short- or long-term effects on development, laser-manipulated embryos were reared to 2 and 7 days post-fertilization and compared to control embryos at the same developmental stages. Light microscopy and scanning electron microscopy

  2. Application of AirCell Cellular AMPS Network and Iridium Satellite System Dual Mode Service to Air Traffic Management

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shamma, Mohammed A.

    2004-01-01

    The AirCell/Iridium dual mode service is evaluated for potential applications to Air Traffic Management (ATM) communication needs. The AirCell system which is largely based on the Advanced Mobile Phone System (AMPS) technology, and the Iridium FDMA/TDMA system largely based on the Global System for Mobile Communications(GSM) technology, can both provide communication relief for existing or future aeronautical communication links. Both have a potential to serve as experimental platforms for future technologies via a cost effective approach. The two systems are well established in the entire CONUS and globally hence making it feasible to utilize in all regions, for all altitudes, and all classes of aircraft. Both systems have been certified for air usage. The paper summarizes the specifications of the AirCell/Iridium system, as well as the ATM current and future links, and application specifications. the paper highlights the scenarios, applications, and conditions under which the AirCell/Iridium technology can be suited for ATM Communication.

  3. Cap-independent polysomal association of natural mRNAs encoding c-myc, BiP, and eIF4G conferred by internal ribosome entry sites.

    PubMed Central

    Johannes, G; Sarnow, P

    1998-01-01

    Sequence elements that can function as internal ribosome entry sites (IRES) have been identified in 5' noncoding regions of certain uncapped viral and capped cellular mRNA molecules. However, it has remained largely unknown whether IRES elements are functional when located in their natural capped mRNAs. Therefore, the polysomal association and translation of several IRES-containing cellular mRNAs was tested under conditions that severely inhibited cap-dependent translation, that is, after infection with poliovirus. It was found that several known IRES-containing mRNAs, such as BiP and c-myc, were both associated with the translation apparatus and translated in infected cells when cap-dependent translation of most host-cell mRNAs was blocked, indicating that the IRES elements were functional in their natural mRNAs. Curiously, the mRNAs that encode eukaryotic initiation factor 4GI (eIF4GI) and 4GII (eIF4GII), two proteins with high identity and similar functions in the initiation of cap-dependent translation, were both associated with polysomes in infected cells. The 5'-end sequences of eIF4GI mRNA were isolated from a cDNA expression library and shown to function as an internal ribosome entry site when placed into a dicistronic mRNA. These findings suggest that eIF4G proteins can be synthesized at times when 5' cap-dependent mRNA translation is blocked, supporting the notion that eIF4G proteins are needed in both 5' cap-independent and 5' cap-dependent translational initiation mechanisms. PMID:9848649

  4. LmCYP4G102: An oenocyte-specific cytochrome P450 gene required for cuticular waterproofing in the migratory locust, Locusta migratoria.

    PubMed

    Yu, Zhitao; Zhang, Xueyao; Wang, Yiwen; Moussian, Bernard; Zhu, Kun Yan; Li, Sheng; Ma, Enbo; Zhang, Jianzhen

    2016-01-01

    Cytochrome P450 superfamily proteins play important roles in detoxification of xenobiotics and during physiological and developmental processes. To contribute to our understanding of this large gene family in insects, we have investigated the function of the cytochrome P450 gene LmCYP4G102 in the migratory locust Locusta migratoria. Suppression of LmCYP4G102 expression by RNA interference (RNAi) does not interfere with moulting but causes rapid loss of body weight - probably due to massive loss of water, and death soon after moulting. Accordingly, maintaining these animals at 90% relative humidity prevented lethality. Consistently, RNAi against LmCYP4G102 provoked a decrease in the content of cuticular alkanes, which as an important fraction of cuticular hydrocarbons have been shown to confer desiccation resistance. In addition, the cuticle of LmCYP4G102-knockdown locusts was fragile and easier deformable than in control animals. Presumably, this phenotype is due to decreased amounts of cuticular water that is reported to modulate cuticle mechanics. Interestingly, LmCYP4G102 was not expressed in the epidermis that produces the cuticle but in the sub-epdiermal hepatocyte-like oenocytes. Together, our results suggest that the oenocyte-specific LmCYP4G102 plays a critical role in the synthesis of cuticular hydrocarbons, which are important for cuticle waterproofing and mechanical stability in L. migratoria. PMID:27444410

  5. LmCYP4G102: An oenocyte-specific cytochrome P450 gene required for cuticular waterproofing in the migratory locust, Locusta migratoria

    PubMed Central

    Yu, Zhitao; Zhang, Xueyao; Wang, Yiwen; Moussian, Bernard; Zhu, Kun Yan; Li, Sheng; Ma, Enbo; Zhang, Jianzhen

    2016-01-01

    Cytochrome P450 superfamily proteins play important roles in detoxification of xenobiotics and during physiological and developmental processes. To contribute to our understanding of this large gene family in insects, we have investigated the function of the cytochrome P450 gene LmCYP4G102 in the migratory locust Locusta migratoria. Suppression of LmCYP4G102 expression by RNA interference (RNAi) does not interfere with moulting but causes rapid loss of body weight - probably due to massive loss of water, and death soon after moulting. Accordingly, maintaining these animals at 90% relative humidity prevented lethality. Consistently, RNAi against LmCYP4G102 provoked a decrease in the content of cuticular alkanes, which as an important fraction of cuticular hydrocarbons have been shown to confer desiccation resistance. In addition, the cuticle of LmCYP4G102-knockdown locusts was fragile and easier deformable than in control animals. Presumably, this phenotype is due to decreased amounts of cuticular water that is reported to modulate cuticle mechanics. Interestingly, LmCYP4G102 was not expressed in the epidermis that produces the cuticle but in the sub-epdiermal hepatocyte-like oenocytes. Together, our results suggest that the oenocyte-specific LmCYP4G102 plays a critical role in the synthesis of cuticular hydrocarbons, which are important for cuticle waterproofing and mechanical stability in L. migratoria PMID:27444410

  6. An Fc gamma RII-, Fc gamma RIII-specific monoclonal antibody (2.4G2) decreases acute Trypanosoma cruzi infection in mice.

    PubMed Central

    Araujo-Jorge, T; Rivera, M T; el Bouhdidi, A; Daëron, M; Carlier, Y

    1993-01-01

    In order to study the role of Fc gamma Rs in Trypanosoma cruzi infection in mice, the 2.4G2 monoclonal antibody (MAb), specific to the extracellular domains of Fc gamma RII and Fc gamma RIII, was injected intraperitoneally into mice. Flow cytometry studies of uninfected mice showed that 2.4G2 MAb bound to peritoneal and lymph node cells, respectively, on days 2 and 6 after injection. Repeating 2.4G2 injections every 3 to 4 days decreased the availability of Fc gamma Rs on peritoneal, lymph node, and spleen cells. Injections of 2.4G2 MAb into T. cruzi-infected mice, at days -1, 3, 7, 11, 16, 20, and 24 relative to infection, reduced mortality in comparison with that in infected animals injected with an unrelated MAb (50 versus 93.3% mortality; P < 0.01). Parasitemia in 2.4G2-treated mice was significantly (three times) lower than in control animals on days 21 and 24 postinfection (P < 0.05), before parasite-specific antibodies were detectable at significant levels. Immunoglobulin and T. cruzi-specific antibody levels were similar in all groups of mice. These results indicate that repeated injections of 2.4G2 MAb administered to acutely infected mice reduce the in vivo infection level, suggesting that Fc gamma Rs play a role in the early host invasion by T. cruzi parasites. Images PMID:8406898

  7. MIF4G domain containing protein regulates cell cycle and hepatic carcinogenesis by antagonizing CDK2-dependent p27 stability.

    PubMed

    Wan, C; Hou, S; Ni, R; Lv, L; Ding, Z; Huang, X; Hang, Q; He, S; Wang, Y; Cheng, C; Gu, X X; Xu, G; Shen, A

    2015-01-01

    The CDK inhibitor p27(kip1) plays crucial roles in cell cycle regulation and cancer progression. Through yeast two-hybrid screening, we identified MIF4G domain containing protein (MIF4GD) as a novel binding partner for p27. The association of MIF4GD and p27 was verified using immunoprecipitation and glutathione S-transferase (GST) pull-down assays. Interaction with MIF4GD led to the stabilization of p27 both in the nucleus and in the cytoplasm in hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) cells as a result of suppressed phosphorylation of p27 by CDK2 at threonine187. Serum stimulation decreased the levels of MIF4GD and p27 simultaneously. In addition, MIF4GD overexpression resulted in increased p27 levels and reduced cell proliferation, while knockdown of MIF4GD promoted cell cycle progression with decreased p27 levels in cells. Furthermore, overexpression of MIF4GD reduced colony formation and inhibited xenograft tumor growth in nude mice. Finally, we found that both MIF4GD and p27 were expressed at low levels in HCC tissues compared to non-cancerous tissues, and that low expression levels of MIF4GD and p27 were associated with significantly worse prognosis in HCC patients. Our results suggest that MIF4GD is a potential regulator of p27-dependent cell proliferation in HCC. These findings provide a rational framework for the development of potential HCC therapy by targeting the MIF4GD-p27 interaction. PMID:24336329

  8. Depletion of the cellular antioxidant system contributes to tenofovir disoproxil fumarate - induced mitochondrial damage and increased oxido-nitrosative stress in the kidney

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Nephrotoxicity is a dose limiting side effect of tenofovir, a reverse transcriptase inhibitor that is used for the treatment of HIV infection. The mechanism of tenofovir nephrotoxicity is not clear. Tenofovir is specifically toxic to the proximal convoluted tubules and proximal tubular mitochondria are the targets of tenofovir cytotoxicity. Damaged mitochondria are major sources of reactive oxygen species and cellular damage is reported to occur after the antioxidants are depleted. The purpose of the study is to investigate the alterations in cellular antioxidant system in tenofovir induced renal damage using a rat model. Results Chronic tenofovir administration to adult Wistar rats resulted in proximal tubular damage (as evidenced by light microscopy), proximal tubular dysfunction (as shown by Fanconi syndrome and tubular proteinuria), and extensive proximal tubular mitochondrial injury (as revealed by electron microscopy). A 50% increase in protein carbonyl content was observed in the kidneys of TDF treated rats as compared with the control. Reduced glutathione was decreased by 50%. The activity of superoxide dismutase was decreased by 57%, glutathione peroxidase by 45%, and glutathione reductase by 150% as compared with control. Carbonic Anhydrase activity was decreased by 45% in the TDF treated rat kidneys as compared with control. Succinate dehydrogenase activity, an indicator of mitochondrial activity was decreased by 29% in the TDF treated rat kidneys as compared with controls, suggesting mitochondrial dysfunction. Conclusion Tenofovir- induced mitochondrial damage and increased oxidative stress in the rat kidneys may be due to depletion of the antioxidant system particularly, the glutathione dependent system and MnSOD. PMID:23957306

  9. Synthesis of Rigidified eIF4E/eIF4G Inhibitor-1 (4EGI-1) Mimetic and Their in Vitro Characterization as Inhibitors of Protein–Protein Interaction

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    The 4EGI-1 is the prototypic inhibitor of eIF4E/eIF4G interaction, a potent inhibitor of translation initiation in vitro and in vivo and an efficacious anticancer agent in animal models of human cancers. We report on the design, synthesis, and in vitro characterization of a series of rigidified mimetic of this prototypic inhibitor in which the phenyl in the 2-(4-(3,4-dichlorophenyl)thiazol-2-yl) moiety was bridged into a tricyclic system. The bridge consisted one of the following: ethylene, methylene oxide, methylenesulfide, methylenesulfoxide, and methylenesulfone. Numerous analogues in this series were found to be markedly more potent than the parent prototypic inhibitor in the inhibition of eIF4E/eIF4G interaction, thus preventing the eIF4F complex formation, a rate limiting step in the translation initiation cascade in eukaryotes, and in inhibition of human cancer cell proliferation. PMID:24827861

  10. Engineering Cellular Metabolism.

    PubMed

    Nielsen, Jens; Keasling, Jay D

    2016-03-10

    Metabolic engineering is the science of rewiring the metabolism of cells to enhance production of native metabolites or to endow cells with the ability to produce new products. The potential applications of such efforts are wide ranging, including the generation of fuels, chemicals, foods, feeds, and pharmaceuticals. However, making cells into efficient factories is challenging because cells have evolved robust metabolic networks with hard-wired, tightly regulated lines of communication between molecular pathways that resist efforts to divert resources. Here, we will review the current status and challenges of metabolic engineering and will discuss how new technologies can enable metabolic engineering to be scaled up to the industrial level, either by cutting off the lines of control for endogenous metabolism or by infiltrating the system with disruptive, heterologous pathways that overcome cellular regulation. PMID:26967285

  11. Molecular mechanism of the dual activity of 4EGI-1: Dissociating eIF4G from eIF4E but stabilizing the binding of unphosphorylated 4E-BP1

    PubMed Central

    Sekiyama, Naotaka; Arthanari, Haribabu; Papadopoulos, Evangelos; Rodriguez-Mias, Ricard A.; Wagner, Gerhard; Léger-Abraham, Mélissa

    2015-01-01

    The eIF4E-binding protein (4E-BP) is a phosphorylation-dependent regulator of protein synthesis. The nonphosphorylated or minimally phosphorylated form binds translation initiation factor 4E (eIF4E), preventing binding of eIF4G and the recruitment of the small ribosomal subunit. Signaling events stimulate serial phosphorylation of 4E-BP, primarily by mammalian target of rapamycin complex 1 (mTORC1) at residues T37/T46, followed by T70 and S65. Hyperphosphorylated 4E-BP dissociates from eIF4E, allowing eIF4E to interact with eIF4G and translation initiation to resume. Because overexpression of eIF4E is linked to cellular transformation, 4E-BP is a tumor suppressor, and up-regulation of its activity is a goal of interest for cancer therapy. A recently discovered small molecule, eIF4E/eIF4G interaction inhibitor 1 (4EGI-1), disrupts the eIF4E/eIF4G interaction and promotes binding of 4E-BP1 to eIF4E. Structures of 14- to 16-residue 4E-BP fragments bound to eIF4E contain the eIF4E consensus binding motif, 54YXXXXLΦ60 (motif 1) but lack known phosphorylation sites. We report here a 2.1-Å crystal structure of mouse eIF4E in complex with m7GTP and with a fragment of human 4E-BP1, extended C-terminally from the consensus-binding motif (4E-BP150–84). The extension, which includes a proline-turn-helix segment (motif 2) followed by a loop of irregular structure, reveals the location of two phosphorylation sites (S65 and T70). Our major finding is that the C-terminal extension (motif 3) is critical to 4E-BP1–mediated cell cycle arrest and that it partially overlaps with the binding site of 4EGI-1. The binding of 4E-BP1 and 4EGI-1 to eIF4E is therefore not mutually exclusive, and both ligands contribute to shift the equilibrium toward the inhibition of translation initiation. PMID:26170285

  12. Synthetic biology in cellular immunotherapy

    PubMed Central

    Chakravarti, Deboki; Wong, Wilson W.

    2015-01-01

    The adoptive transfer of genetically engineered T cells with cancer-targeting receptors has shown tremendous promise for eradicating tumors in clinical trials. This form of cellular immunotherapy presents a unique opportunity to incorporate advanced systems and synthetic biology approaches to create cancer therapeutics with novel functions. Here, we first review the development of synthetic receptors, switches, and circuits to control the location, duration, and strength of T cell activity against tumors. In addition, we discuss the cellular engineering and genome editing of host cells (or the chassis) to improve the efficacy of cell-based cancer therapeutics, and to reduce the time and cost of manufacturing. PMID:26088008

  13. Global properties of cellular automata

    SciTech Connect

    Jen, E.

    1986-04-01

    Cellular automata are discrete mathematical systems that generate diverse, often complicated, behavior using simple deterministic rules. Analysis of the local structure of these rules makes possible a description of the global properties of the associated automata. A class of cellular automata that generate infinitely many aperoidic temporal sequences is defined,a s is the set of rules for which inverses exist. Necessary and sufficient conditions are derived characterizing the classes of ''nearest-neighbor'' rules for which arbitrary finite initial conditions (i) evolve to a homogeneous state; (ii) generate at least one constant temporal sequence.

  14. Cellular automaton for chimera states

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    García-Morales, Vladimir

    2016-04-01

    A minimalistic model for chimera states is presented. The model is a cellular automaton (CA) which depends on only one adjustable parameter, the range of the nonlocal coupling, and is built from elementary cellular automata and the majority (voting) rule. This suggests the universality of chimera-like behavior from a new point of view: Already simple CA rules based on the majority rule exhibit this behavior. After a short transient, we find chimera states for arbitrary initial conditions, the system spontaneously splitting into stable domains separated by static boundaries, some synchronously oscillating and the others incoherent. When the coupling range is local, nontrivial coherent structures with different periodicities are formed.

  15. Cellular senescence in aging primates.

    PubMed

    Herbig, Utz; Ferreira, Mark; Condel, Laura; Carey, Dee; Sedivy, John M

    2006-03-01

    The aging of organisms is characterized by a gradual functional decline of all organ systems. Mammalian somatic cells in culture display a limited proliferative life span, at the end of which they undergo an irreversible cell cycle arrest known as replicative senescence. Whether cellular senescence contributes to organismal aging has been controversial. We investigated telomere dysfunction, a recently discovered biomarker of cellular senescence, and found that the number of senescent fibroblasts increases exponentially in the skin of aging baboons, reaching >15% of all cells in very old individuals. In addition, the same cells contain activated ataxia-telangiectasia mutated kinase and heterochromatinized nuclei, confirming their senescent status. PMID:16456035

  16. Enhanced visible-light photocatalytic decomposition of 2,4-dichlorophenoxyacetic acid over ZnIn2S4/g-C3N4 photocatalyst.

    PubMed

    Qiu, Pengxiang; Yao, Jinhua; Chen, Huan; Jiang, Fang; Xie, Xianchuan

    2016-11-01

    ZnIn2S4/g-C3N4 heterojunction photocatalyst was successfully synthesized via a simple hydrothermal method and applied to visible-light photocatalytic decomposition of 2,4-dichlorophenoxyacetic acid (2,4-D) from aqueous phase. The flower-like ZnIn2S4 particles were dispersed on the surface of g-C3N4 nanosheets in the ZnIn2S4/g-C3N4 composite. The composite showed higher separation rate of electron-hole pairs as compared to ZnIn2S4 and g-C3N4. Consequently, the ZnIn2S4/g-C3N4 composite exhibited enhanced visible light photocatalytic decomposition efficiency of 2,4-D, within 20% ZnIn2S4/g-C3N4 composite owning the highest photocatalytic efficiency and initial rate. The initial rates of 2,4-D degradation on g-C3N4, ZnIn2S4, and 20% ZnIn2S4/g-C3N4 were 1.23, 0.57 and 3.69mmol/(gcath), respectively. The h(+) and O2(-) were found to be the dominant active species for 2,4-D decomposition. The photocatalytic degradation pathways of 2,4-D by ZnIn2S4/g-C3N4 under visible light irradiation were explored. The ZnIn2S4/g-C3N4 composite displayed high photostability in recycling tests, reflecting its promising potential as an effective visible light photocatalyst for 2,4-D treatment. PMID:27267690

  17. Orphan nuclear receptor HNF4G promotes bladder cancer growth and invasion through the regulation of the hyaluronan synthase 2 gene

    PubMed Central

    Okegawa, T; Ushio, K; Imai, M; Morimoto, M; Hara, T

    2013-01-01

    Nuclear receptors (NRs) are a class of transcription factors that are closely involved in the progression of certain types of cancer. We aimed to study the relation between bladder cancer and NRs, with special focus on orphan NRs whose ligands and functions have not been identified. First, we examined the expression levels of 22 genes encoding orphan NRs in clinical bladder cancer and found that hepatocyte nuclear factor 4γ (HNF4G; NR2A2) and NR2F6 were the genes that were upregulated most frequently in cancer tissues compared with their paired normal tissues. Knockdown and overexpression of each of these orphan NRs suppressed and stimulated the growth of bladder cancer cells in vitro, respectively. HNF4G also promoted tumor growth in bladder cancer xenograft models in vivo. Furthermore, HNF4G was both necessary and sufficient for the invasion of bladder cancer cells in vitro. Moreover, using microarray analyses, we identified hyaluronan synthase 2 (HAS2) as one of the genes induced by HNF4G in bladder cancer cells. Transcription was activated by HNF4G in reporter assays using the promoter/enhancer region of the HAS2 gene. The endogenous expression of the HAS2 gene was suppressed by knockdown of HNF4G. In turn, knockdown of HAS2 inhibited the growth and invasion of bladder cancer cells. Taken together, our data suggest that some orphan NRs are involved in bladder cancer progression and that, among them, HNF4G promotes the growth and invasion of bladder cancer, at least in part, via the regulation of the HAS2 gene. PMID:23896584

  18. Eukaryotic Initiation Factors 4G and 4A Mediate Conformational Changes Downstream of the Initiation Codon of the Encephalomyocarditis Virus Internal Ribosomal Entry Site

    PubMed Central

    Kolupaeva, Victoria G.; Lomakin, Ivan B.; Pestova, Tatyana V.; Hellen, Christopher U. T.

    2003-01-01

    Initiation of translation of encephalomyocarditis virus mRNA is mediated by an internal ribosome entry site (IRES) comprising structural domains H, I, J-K, and L immediately upstream of the initiation codon AUG at nucleotide 834 (AUG834). Assembly of 48S ribosomal complexes on the IRES requires eukaryotic initiation factor 2 (eIF2), eIF3, eIF4A, and the central domain of eIF4G to which eIF4A binds. Footprinting experiments confirmed that eIF4G binds a three-way helical junction in the J-K domain and showed that it interacts extensively with RNA duplexes in the J-K and L domains. Deletion of apical hairpins in the J and K domains synergistically impaired the binding of eIF4G and IRES function. Directed hydroxyl radical probing, done by using Fe(II) tethered to surface residues in eIF4G's central domain, indicated that it is oriented with its N terminus towards the base of domain J and its C terminus towards the apex. eIF4G recruits eIF4A to a defined location on the IRES, and the eIF4G/eIF4A complex caused localized ATP-independent conformational changes in the eIF4G-binding region of the IRES. This complex also induced more extensive conformational rearrangements at the 3′ border of the ribosome binding site that required ATP and active eIF4A. We propose that these conformational changes prepare the region flanking AUG834 for productive binding of the ribosome. PMID:12509466

  19. A Conserved Interaction between a C-Terminal Motif in Norovirus VPg and the HEAT-1 Domain of eIF4G Is Essential for Translation Initiation

    PubMed Central

    Leen, Eoin N.; Sorgeloos, Frédéric; Correia, Samantha; Chaudhry, Yasmin; Cannac, Fabien; Pastore, Chiara; Xu, Yingqi; Graham, Stephen C.; Matthews, Stephen J.; Goodfellow, Ian G.; Curry, Stephen

    2016-01-01

    Translation initiation is a critical early step in the replication cycle of the positive-sense, single-stranded RNA genome of noroviruses, a major cause of gastroenteritis in humans. Norovirus RNA, which has neither a 5´ m7G cap nor an internal ribosome entry site (IRES), adopts an unusual mechanism to initiate protein synthesis that relies on interactions between the VPg protein covalently attached to the 5´-end of the viral RNA and eukaryotic initiation factors (eIFs) in the host cell. For murine norovirus (MNV) we previously showed that VPg binds to the middle fragment of eIF4G (4GM; residues 652–1132). Here we have used pull-down assays, fluorescence anisotropy, and isothermal titration calorimetry (ITC) to demonstrate that a stretch of ~20 amino acids at the C terminus of MNV VPg mediates direct and specific binding to the HEAT-1 domain within the 4GM fragment of eIF4G. Our analysis further reveals that the MNV C terminus binds to eIF4G HEAT-1 via a motif that is conserved in all known noroviruses. Fine mutagenic mapping suggests that the MNV VPg C terminus may interact with eIF4G in a helical conformation. NMR spectroscopy was used to define the VPg binding site on eIF4G HEAT-1, which was confirmed by mutagenesis and binding assays. We have found that this site is non-overlapping with the binding site for eIF4A on eIF4G HEAT-1 by demonstrating that norovirus VPg can form ternary VPg-eIF4G-eIF4A complexes. The functional significance of the VPg-eIF4G interaction was shown by the ability of fusion proteins containing the C-terminal peptide of MNV VPg to inhibit in vitro translation of norovirus RNA but not cap- or IRES-dependent translation. These observations define important structural details of a functional interaction between norovirus VPg and eIF4G and reveal a binding interface that might be exploited as a target for antiviral therapy. PMID:26734730

  20. Sleeping Beauty transposon-based system for cellular reprogramming and targeted gene insertion in induced pluripotent stem cells

    PubMed Central

    Grabundzija, Ivana; Wang, Jichang; Sebe, Attila; Erdei, Zsuzsanna; Kajdi, Robert; Devaraj, Anantharam; Steinemann, Doris; Szuhai, Károly; Stein, Ulrike; Cantz, Tobias; Schambach, Axel; Baum, Christopher; Izsvák, Zsuzsanna; Sarkadi, Balázs; Ivics, Zoltán

    2013-01-01

    The discovery of direct cell reprogramming and induced pluripotent stem (iPS) cell technology opened up new avenues for the application of non-viral, transposon-based gene delivery systems. The Sleeping Beauty (SB) transposon is highly advanced for versatile genetic manipulations in mammalian cells. We established iPS cell reprogramming of mouse embryonic fibroblasts and human foreskin fibroblasts by transposition of OSKM (Oct4, Sox2, Klf4 and c-Myc) and OSKML (OSKM + Lin28) expression cassettes mobilized by the SB100X hyperactive transposase. The efficiency of iPS cell derivation with SB transposon system was in the range of that obtained with retroviral vectors. Co-expression of the miRNA302/367 cluster together with OSKM significantly improved reprogramming efficiency and accelerated the temporal kinetics of reprogramming. The iPS cells displayed a stable karyotype, and hallmarks of pluripotency including expression of stem cell markers and the ability to differentiate into embryoid bodies in vitro. We demonstrate Cre recombinase-mediated exchange allowing simultaneous removal of the reprogramming cassette and targeted knock-in of an expression cassette of interest into the transposon-tagged locus in mouse iPS cells. This strategy would allow correction of a genetic defect by site-specific insertion of a therapeutic gene construct into ‘safe harbor’ sites in the genomes of autologous, patient-derived iPS cells. PMID:23275558

  1. 47 CFR 22.911 - Cellular geographic service area.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... Cellular Geographic Service Area (CGSA) of a cellular system is the geographic area considered by the FCC... system information update in accordance with § 22.947(c). (3) For original systems in MSAs, extensions of... 47 Telecommunication 2 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Cellular geographic service area....

  2. Modelling cellular behaviour

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Endy, Drew; Brent, Roger

    2001-01-01

    Representations of cellular processes that can be used to compute their future behaviour would be of general scientific and practical value. But past attempts to construct such representations have been disappointing. This is now changing. Increases in biological understanding combined with advances in computational methods and in computer power make it possible to foresee construction of useful and predictive simulations of cellular processes.

  3. Cellular damages in the Allium cepa test system, caused by BTEX mixture prior and after biodegradation process.

    PubMed

    Mazzeo, Dânia Elisa Christofoletti; Fernandes, Thaís Cristina Casimiro; Marin-Morales, Maria Aparecida

    2011-09-01

    Petroleum and derivatives have been considered one of the main environmental contaminants. Among petroleum derivatives, the volatile organic compounds benzene, toluene, ethylbenzene and xylene (BTEX) represent a major concern due to their toxicity and easy accumulation in groundwater. Biodegradation methods seem to be suitable tools for the clean-up of BTEX contaminants from groundwater. Genotoxic and mutagenic potential of BTEX prior and after biodegradation process was evaluated through analyses of chromosomal aberrations and MN test in meristematic and F(1) root cells using the Allium cepa test system. Seeds of A. cepa were germinated into five concentrations of BTEX, non-biodegraded and biodegraded, in ultra-pure water (negative control), in MMS 4×10(-4)M (positive control) and in culture medium used in the biodegradation (blank biodegradation control). Results showed a significant frequency of both chromosomal and nuclear aberrations. The micronucleus (MN) frequency in meristematic cells was significant for most of tested samples. However, MN was not present in significant levels in the F(1) cells, suggesting that there was no permanent damage for the meristematic cell. The BTEX effects were significantly reduced in the biodegraded samples when compared to the respective non-biodegraded concentrations. Therefore, in this study, the biodegradation process showed to be a reliable and effective alternative to treat BTEX-contaminated waters. Based on our results and available data, the BTEX toxicity could also be related to a synergistic effect of its compounds. PMID:21741065

  4. Effects of Lipids on in Vitro Release and Cellular Uptake of β-Carotene in Nanoemulsion-Based Delivery Systems.

    PubMed

    Yi, Jiang; Zhong, Fang; Zhang, Yuzhu; Yokoyama, Wallace; Zhao, Liqing

    2015-12-23

    β-Carotene (BC) nanoemulsions were successfully prepared by microfluidization. BC micellarization was significantly affected by bile salts and pancreatin concentration. Positive and linear correlation was observed between BC release and bile salts concentration. Pancreatin facilitated BC's release in simulated digestion. Compared to the control (bulk oil) (4.6%), nanoemulsion delivery systems significantly improved the micellarization of BC (70.9%). The amount of BC partitioned into micelles was positively proportional to the length of carrier oils. Unsaturated fatty acid (UFA)-rich oils were better than saturated fatty acid (SFA)-rich oils in transferring BC (p < 0.05). No significant difference was observed between monounsaturated fatty acid (MUFA)-rich oils and polyunsaturated fatty acid (PUFA)-rich oils (p > 0.05). A positive and linear relationship between the degree of lipolysis and the release of BC in vitro digestion was observed. Bile salts showed cytotoxicity to Caco-2 cells below 20 times dilution. BC uptake by Caco-2 cells was not affected by fatty acid (FA) compositions in micelles, but BC uptake was proportional to its concentration in the diluted micelle fraction. The results obtained are beneficial to encapsulate and deliver BC or other bioactive lipophilic carotenoids in a wide range of commercial products. PMID:26629789

  5. Expansion and concatenation of nonmuscle myosin IIA filaments drive cellular contractile system formation during interphase and mitosis

    PubMed Central

    Fenix, Aidan M.; Taneja, Nilay; Buttler, Carmen A.; Lewis, John; Van Engelenburg, Schuyler B.; Ohi, Ryoma; Burnette, Dylan T.

    2016-01-01

    Cell movement and cytokinesis are facilitated by contractile forces generated by the molecular motor, nonmuscle myosin II (NMII). NMII molecules form a filament (NMII-F) through interactions of their C-terminal rod domains, positioning groups of N-terminal motor domains on opposite sides. The NMII motors then bind and pull actin filaments toward the NMII-F, thus driving contraction. Inside of crawling cells, NMIIA-Fs form large macromolecular ensembles (i.e., NMIIA-F stacks), but how this occurs is unknown. Here we show NMIIA-F stacks are formed through two non–mutually exclusive mechanisms: expansion and concatenation. During expansion, NMIIA molecules within the NMIIA-F spread out concurrent with addition of new NMIIA molecules. Concatenation occurs when multiple NMIIA-Fs/NMIIA-F stacks move together and align. We found that NMIIA-F stack formation was regulated by both motor activity and the availability of surrounding actin filaments. Furthermore, our data showed expansion and concatenation also formed the contractile ring in dividing cells. Thus interphase and mitotic cells share similar mechanisms for creating large contractile units, and these are likely to underlie how other myosin II–based contractile systems are assembled. PMID:26960797

  6. A comparative systems analysis of polysaccharide-elicited responses in Neurospora crassa reveals carbon source-specific cellular adaptations

    PubMed Central

    Benz, J. Philipp; Chau, Bryant H.; Zheng, Diana; Bauer, Stefan; Glass, N. Louise; Somerville, Chris R.

    2014-01-01

    Summary Filamentous fungi are powerful producers of hydrolytic enzymes for the deconstruction of plant cell wall polysaccharides. However, the central question of how these sugars are perceived in the context of the complex cell wall matrix remains largely elusive. To address this question in a systematic fashion we performed an extensive comparative systems analysis of how the model filamentous fungus Neurospora crassa responds to the three main cell wall polysaccharides: pectin, hemicellulose and cellulose. We found the pectic response to be largely independent of the cellulolytic one with some overlap to hemicellulose, and in its extent surprisingly high, suggesting advantages for the fungus beyond being a mere carbon source. Our approach furthermore allowed us to identify carbon source-specific adaptations, such as the induction of the unfolded protein response on cellulose, and a commonly induced set of 29 genes likely involved in carbon scouting. Moreover, by hierarchical clustering we generated a co-expression matrix useful for the discovery of new components involved in polysaccharide utilization. This is exemplified by the identification of lat-1, which we demonstrate to encode for the physiologically relevant arabinose transporter in Neurospora. The analyses presented here are an important step towards understanding fungal degradation processes of complex biomass. PMID:24224966

  7. Cellular responses induced in vitro by iron (Fe) in a central nervous system cell line (U343MGa).

    PubMed

    Alcântara, D D F A; Ribeiro, H F; Matos, L A; Sousa, J M C; Burbano, R R; Bahia, M O

    2013-01-01

    Iron is the most important metallic chemical element on Earth. Poisoning caused by excessive iron in humans has been associated with pulmonary diseases including neoplasms caused by inhalation of iron oxides. The involvement of iron in neurodegenerative processes has already been described. DNA alterations are induced by iron and other chemical compounds containing this metal; however, the data are controversial and the mechanism by which iron induces mutagenesis remains unknown. This study assessed in vitro iron-induced cytotoxic and genotoxic responses in an astrocytic cell line. Short- and long-term cytotoxicity and genotoxicity were evaluated with the Cell Proliferation Kit II and micronucleus test, respectively. Results indicated that the highest concentration of iron sulfate tested was cytotoxic in long-term cytotoxic assays and increased micronucleus frequency in comparison to controls. The significant cytotoxicity observed here might be due to the intrinsic ability of iron to induce apoptosis and possible changes in cell cycle kinetics; the genotoxic effects are probably due to the oxidant properties of iron itself. This was the first study to investigate the induction of micronuclei by iron in central nervous system cells. PMID:23765962

  8. Smokeless tobacco consumption impedes metabolic, cellular, apoptotic and systemic stress pattern: A study on Government employees in Kolkata, India

    PubMed Central

    Biswas, Sushobhan; Manna, Krishnendu; Das, Ujjal; Khan, Amitava; Pradhan, Anirban; Sengupta, Aaveri; Bose, Surajit; Ghosh, Saurabh; Dey, Sanjit

    2015-01-01

    Smokeless tobacco (SLT) remains a threat amongst a large population across the globe and particularly in India. The oral use of tobacco has been implicated to cause physiological stress leading to extreme toxicological challenge. The study included 47 SLT-users and 44 non-users providing a spectrum of pathophysiological, clinico-biochemical, antioxidant parameters, cell cycle progression study of PBMC and morphological changes of red blood cells (RBC). The expressions of p53, p21, Bax, Bcl-2, IL-6, TNF- α, Cox-2, iNOS were analyzed from thirteen representative SLT-users and twelve non-users. Difference in CRP, random glucose, serum cholesterol, TG, HLDL-C, LDL-C, VLDL-C, neutrophil count, monocyte count, ESR, SOD (PBMC) and TBARS (RBC membrane) were found to be statistically significant (p < 0.05) between the studied groups. The current study confers crucial insight into SLT mediated effects on systemic toxicity and stress. This has challenged the metabolic condition leading to a rise in the inflammatory status, increased apoptosis and RBC membrane damage. The above findings were substantiated with metabolic, clinical and biochemical parameters. This is possibly the first ever in-depth report and remains an invaluable document on the fatal effects of SLT. PMID:26669667

  9. 47 CFR 22.909 - Cellular markets.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... Metropolitan Areas and the Gulf of Mexico Service Area (water area of the Gulf of Mexico, border is the coastline), defined by the Office of Management and Budget, as modified by the FCC. (b) RSAs. Rural Service... used by the FCC for administrative convenience in the licensing of cellular systems. Cellular...

  10. 47 CFR 22.909 - Cellular markets.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... Metropolitan Areas and the Gulf of Mexico Service Area (water area of the Gulf of Mexico, border is the coastline), defined by the Office of Management and Budget, as modified by the FCC. (b) RSAs. Rural Service... used by the FCC for administrative convenience in the licensing of cellular systems. Cellular...

  11. 47 CFR 22.909 - Cellular markets.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... Metropolitan Areas and the Gulf of Mexico Service Area (water area of the Gulf of Mexico, border is the coastline), defined by the Office of Management and Budget, as modified by the FCC. (b) RSAs. Rural Service... used by the FCC for administrative convenience in the licensing of cellular systems. Cellular...

  12. Systems proteomics of cardiac chromatin identifies nucleolin as a regulator of growth and cellular plasticity in cardiomyocytes.

    PubMed

    Monte, Emma; Mouillesseaux, Kevin; Chen, Haodong; Kimball, Todd; Ren, Shuxun; Wang, Yibin; Chen, Jau-Nian; Vondriska, Thomas M; Franklin, Sarah

    2013-12-01

    Myocyte hypertrophy antecedent to heart failure involves changes in global gene expression, although the preceding mechanisms to coordinate DNA accessibility on a genomic scale are unknown. Chromatin-associated proteins alter chromatin structure by changing their association with DNA, thereby altering the gene expression profile. Little is known about the global changes in chromatin subproteomes that accompany heart failure, and the mechanisms by which these proteins alter chromatin structure. The present study tests the fundamental hypothesis that cardiac growth and plasticity in the setting of disease recapitulates conserved developmental chromatin remodeling events. We used quantitative proteomics to identify chromatin-associated proteins extracted via detergent and to quantify changes in their abundance during disease. Our study identified 321 proteins in this subproteome, demonstrating it to have modest conservation (37%) with that revealed using strong acid. Of these proteins, 176 exhibited altered expression during cardiac hypertrophy and failure; we conducted extensive functional characterization of one of these proteins, Nucleolin. Morpholino-based knockdown of nucleolin nearly abolished protein expression but surprisingly had little impact on gross morphological development. However, hearts of fish lacking Nucleolin displayed severe developmental impairment, abnormal chamber patterning and functional deficits, ostensibly due to defects in cardiac looping and myocyte differentiation. The mechanisms underlying these defects involve perturbed bone morphogenetic protein 4 expression, decreased rRNA transcription, and a shift to more heterochromatic chromatin. This study reports the quantitative analysis of a new chromatin subproteome in the normal and diseased mouse heart. Validation studies in the complementary model system of zebrafish examine the role of Nucleolin to orchestrate genomic reprogramming events shared between development and disease. PMID

  13. Early systemic sclerosis: marker autoantibodies and videocapillaroscopy patterns are each associated with distinct clinical, functional and cellular activation markers

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Introduction Early systemic sclerosis (SSc) is characterized by Raynaud's phenomenon together with scleroderma marker autoantibodies and/or a scleroderma pattern at capillaroscopy and no other distinctive feature of SSc. Patients presenting with marker autoantibodies plus a capillaroscopic scleroderma pattern seem to evolve into definite SSc more frequently than patients with either feature. Whether early SSc patients with only marker autoantibodies or capillaroscopic positivity differ in any aspect at presentation is unclear. Methods Seventy-one consecutive early SSc patients were investigated for preclinical cardiopulmonary alterations. Out of these, 44 patients and 25 controls affected by osteoarthritis or primary fibromyalgia syndrome were also investigated for serum markers of fibroblast (carboxyterminal propeptide of collagen I), endothelial (soluble E-selectin) and T-cell (soluble IL-2 receptor alpha) activation. Results Thirty-two of the 71 patients (45.1%) had both a marker autoantibody and a capillaroscopic scleroderma pattern (subset 1), 16 patients (22.5%) had only a marker autoantibody (subset 2), and 23 patients (32.4%) had only a capillaroscopic scleroderma pattern (subset 3). Patients with marker autoantibodies (n = 48, 67.6%) had a higher prevalence of impaired diffusing lung capacity for carbon monoxide (P = 0.0217) and increased serum levels of carboxyterminal propeptide of collagen I (P = 0.0037), regardless of capillaroscopic alterations. Patients with a capillaroscopic scleroderma pattern (n = 55, 77.5%) had a higher prevalence of puffy fingers (P = 0.0001) and increased serum levels of soluble E-selectin (P = 0.0003) regardless of marker autoantibodies. Conclusion These results suggest that the autoantibody and microvascular patterns in early SSc may each be related to different clinical-preclinical features and circulating activation markers at presentation. Longitudinal studies are warranted to investigate whether these subsets undergo a

  14. A Saccharomyces cerevisiae assay system to investigate ligand/AdipoR1 interactions that lead to cellular signaling.

    PubMed

    Aouida, Mustapha; Kim, Kangchang; Shaikh, Abdul Rajjak; Pardo, Jose M; Eppinger, Jörg; Yun, Dae-Jin; Bressan, Ray A; Narasimhan, Meena L

    2013-01-01

    important mammalian adiponectin-AdipoR1 signaling pathways. This system should facilitate the development of therapeutic inventions targeting adiponectin and/or AdipoR physiology. PMID:23762377

  15. Tailor-Made pH-Responsive Poly(choline phosphate) Prodrug as a Drug Delivery System for Rapid Cellular Internalization.

    PubMed

    Wang, Wenliang; Wang, Bo; Ma, Xiaojing; Liu, Sanrong; Shang, Xudong; Yu, Xifei

    2016-06-13

    Rapid cellular uptake and efficient drug release in tumor cells are two of the major challenges for cancer therapy. Herein, we designed and synthesized a novel pH-responsive polymer-drug conjugate system poly(2-(methacryloyloxy)ethyl choline phosphate)-b-poly(2-methoxy-2-oxoethyl methacrylate-hydrazide-doxorubicin) (PCP-Dox) to overcome these two challenges simultaneously. It has been proved that PCP-Dox can be easily and rapidly internalized by various cancer cells due to the strong interaction between multivalent choline phosphate (CP) groups and cell membranes. Furthermore, Dox, linked to the polymer carrier via acid-labile hydrazone bond, can be released from carriers due to the increased acidity in lysosome/endosome (pH 5.0-5.5) after the polymer prodrug was internalized into the cancer cells. The cell viability assay demonstrated that this novel polymer prodrug has shown enhanced cytotoxicity in various cancer cells, indicating its great potential as a new drug delivery system for cancer therapy. PMID:27151282

  16. Time course and cellular localization of interleukin-10 mRNA and protein expression in autoimmune inflammation of the rat central nervous system.

    PubMed Central

    Jander, S.; Pohl, J.; D'Urso, D.; Gillen, C.; Stoll, G.

    1998-01-01

    Experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis of the Lewis rat is a T-cell-mediated autoimmune disease of the central nervous system characterized by a self-limiting monophasic course. In this study, we analyzed the expression of the anti-inflammatory cytokine interleukin (IL)-10 at the mRNA and protein level in experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis actively induced with the encephalitogenic 68-86 peptide of guinea pig myelin basic protein. Semiquantitative reverse transcriptase-polymerase chain reaction revealed that IL-10 mRNA expression peaked during the acute phase of the disease at days 11 and 13. IL-10 mRNA was synchronously induced with mRNA for the proinflammatory cytokine interferon-gamma. Immunocytochemistry with a monoclonal antibody against rat IL-10 showed that the peak of IL-10 mRNA was accompanied by an abundant expression of IL-10 protein during the acute stage of the disease. Both in situ hybridization and double labeling immunocytochemistry in combination with confocal microscopy identified T cells, macrophages/microglia, and astrocytes as major cellular sources of IL-10 in vivo. The early peak of IL-10 production was unexpected in light of its well-documented anti-inflammatory properties. Additional studies are required to determine whether endogenous IL-10 contributes to rapid clinical remission typical for Lewis rat experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis or if it plays other, yet undefined, roles in central nervous system autoimmunity. Images Figure 1 Figure 2 Figure 3 Figure 4 PMID:9546358

  17. The cellular immune system in myelomagenesis: NK cells and T cells in the development of MM and their uses in immunotherapies

    PubMed Central

    Dosani, T; Carlsten, M; Maric, I; Landgren, O

    2015-01-01

    As vast strides are being made in the management and treatment of multiple myeloma (MM), recent interests are increasingly focusing on understanding the development of the disease. The knowledge that MM develops exclusively from a protracted phase of monoclonal gammopathy of undetermined significance provides an opportunity to study tumor evolution in this process. Although the immune system has been implicated in the development of MM, the scientific literature on the role and status of various immune components in this process is broad and sometimes contradictory. Accordingly, we present a review of cellular immune subsets in myelomagenesis. We summarize the current literature on the quantitative and functional profiles of natural killer cells and T-cells, including conventional T-cells, natural killer T-cells, γδ T-cells and regulatory T-cells, in myelomagenesis. Our goal is to provide an overview of the status and function of these immune cells in both the peripheral blood and the bone marrow during myelomagenesis. This provides a better understanding of the nature of the immune system in tumor evolution, the knowledge of which is especially significant considering that immunotherapies are increasingly being explored in the treatment of both MM and its precursor conditions. PMID:25885426

  18. Effects of temperature, CO2/O2 concentrations and light intensity on cellular prolification of microalgae, eugrena gracilis, in aquatic food production of bioregenerative life support systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kitaya, Y.; Azuma, H.; Kiyota, M.

    Microalgae are likely to play an important role in aquatic food production modules in bioregenerative systems for producing feeds for fish, converting CO_2 to O_2 and remedying water quality as well as aquatic higher plants. In the present study, the effects of culture conditions on the cellular proliferation of microalgae, Eugrena gracilis, was investigated to determine the optimum culture conditions for microalgae production in aquatic food production modules including both microalgae culture and fish culture systems. E. gracilis was cultured under conditions with five levels of temperature (25-33°C), three levels of CO_2 concentration (2-6%), four levels of O_2 concentration (10-25%), and three levels of photosynthetic photon flux density (50-120 μmol m-2 s-1). The number of Eugrena cells in a certain volume of solution was monitored with a microscope under each environment. The multiplication rate of the cells was highest at temperatures of 29°C, 4% CO_2, 20% O_2 and 90 μmol m-2 s-1 PPFD. The results demonstrate that E. gracilis could efficiently produce biomass and convert CO_2 to O_2 under relatively low light intensities in aquatic food production modules.

  19. Cellular localization and adaptive changes of the cardiac delta opioid receptor system in an experimental model of heart failure in rats.

    PubMed

    Treskatsch, Sascha; Feldheiser, Aarne; Shaqura, Mohammed; Dehe, Lukas; Habazettl, Helmut; Röpke, Torsten K; Shakibaei, Mehdi; Schäfer, Michael; Spies, Claudia D; Mousa, Shaaban A

    2016-02-01

    The role of the cardiac opioid system in congestive heart failure (CHF) is not fully understood. Therefore, this project investigated the cellular localization of delta opioid receptors (DOR) in left ventricle (LV) myocardium and adaptive changes in DOR and its endogenous ligand, the precursor peptide proenkephalin (PENK), during CHF. Following IRB approval, DOR localization was determined by radioligand binding using [H(3)]Naltrindole and by double immunofluorescence confocal analysis in the LV of male Wistar rats. Additionally, 28 days following an infrarenal aortocaval fistula (ACF) the extent of CHF and adaptions in left ventricular DOR and PENK expression were examined by hemodynamic measurements, RT-PCR, and Western blot. DOR specific membrane binding sites were identified in LV myocardium. DOR were colocalized with L-type Ca(2+)-channels (Cav1.2) as well as with intracellular ryanodine receptors (RyR) of the sarcoplasmatic reticulum. Following ACF severe congestive heart failure developed in all rats and was accompanied by up-regulation of DOR and PENK on mRNA as well as receptor proteins representing consecutive adaptations. These findings might suggest that the cardiac delta opioid system possesses the ability to play a regulatory role in the cardiomyocyte calcium homeostasis, especially in response to heart failure. PMID:25552382

  20. Evolving gene regulation networks into cellular networks guiding adaptive behavior: an outline how single cells could have evolved into a centralized neurosensory system

    PubMed Central

    Fritzsch, Bernd; Jahan, Israt; Pan, Ning; Elliott, Karen L.

    2014-01-01

    Understanding the evolution of the neurosensory system of man, able to reflect on its own origin, is one of the major goals of comparative neurobiology. Details of the origin of neurosensory cells, their aggregation into central nervous systems and associated sensory organs, their localized patterning into remarkably different cell types aggregated into variably sized parts of the central nervous system begin to emerge. Insights at the cellular and molecular level begin to shed some light on the evolution of neurosensory cells, partially covered in this review. Molecular evidence suggests that high mobility group (HMG) proteins of pre-metazoans evolved into the definitive Sox [SRY (sex determining region Y)-box] genes used for neurosensory precursor specification in metazoans. Likewise, pre-metazoan basic helix-loop-helix (bHLH) genes evolved in metazoans into the group A bHLH genes dedicated to neurosensory differentiation in bilaterians. Available evidence suggests that the Sox and bHLH genes evolved a cross-regulatory network able to synchronize expansion of precursor populations and their subsequent differentiation into novel parts of the brain or sensory organs. Molecular evidence suggests metazoans evolved patterning gene networks early and not dedicated to neuronal development. Only later in evolution were these patterning gene networks tied into the increasing complexity of diffusible factors, many of which were already present in pre-metazoans, to drive local patterning events. It appears that the evolving molecular basis of neurosensory cell development may have led, in interaction with differentially expressed patterning genes, to local network modifications guiding unique specializations of neurosensory cells into sensory organs and various areas of the central nervous system. PMID:25416504

  1. Cellular Reflectarray Antenna

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Romanofsky, Robert R.

    2010-01-01

    The cellular reflectarray antenna is intended to replace conventional parabolic reflectors that must be physically aligned with a particular satellite in geostationary orbit. These arrays are designed for specified geographical locations, defined by latitude and longitude, each called a "cell." A particular cell occupies nominally 1,500 square miles (3,885 sq. km), but this varies according to latitude and longitude. The cellular reflectarray antenna designed for a particular cell is simply positioned to align with magnetic North, and the antenna surface is level (parallel to the ground). A given cellular reflectarray antenna will not operate in any other cell.

  2. Molecular and Cellular Biophysics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jackson, Meyer B.

    2006-01-01

    Molecular and Cellular Biophysics provides advanced undergraduate and graduate students with a foundation in the basic concepts of biophysics. Students who have taken physical chemistry and calculus courses will find this book an accessible and valuable aid in learning how these concepts can be used in biological research. The text provides a rigorous treatment of the fundamental theories in biophysics and illustrates their application with examples. Conformational transitions of proteins are studied first using thermodynamics, and subsequently with kinetics. Allosteric theory is developed as the synthesis of conformational transitions and association reactions. Basic ideas of thermodynamics and kinetics are applied to topics such as protein folding, enzyme catalysis and ion channel permeation. These concepts are then used as the building blocks in a treatment of membrane excitability. Through these examples, students will gain an understanding of the general importance and broad applicability of biophysical principles to biological problems. Offers a unique synthesis of concepts across a wide range of biophysical topics Provides a rigorous theoretical treatment, alongside applications in biological systems Author has been teaching biophysics for nearly 25 years

  3. Active Cellular Nematics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Duclos, Guillaume; Erlenkaemper, Christoph; Garcia, Simon; Yevick, Hannah; Joanny, Jean-François; Silberzan, Pascal; Biology inspired physics at mesoscales Team; Physical approach of biological problems Team

    We study the emergence of a nematic order in a two-dimensional tissue of apolar elongated fibroblast cells. Initially, these cells are very motile and the monolayer is characterized by giant density fluctuations, a signature of far-from-equilibrium systems. As the cell density increases because of proliferation, the cells align with each other forming large perfectly oriented domains while the cellular movements slow down and eventually freeze. Therefore topological defects characteristic of nematic phases remain trapped at long times, preventing the development of infinite domains. By analogy with classical non-active nematics, we have investigated the role of boundaries and we have shown that cells confined in stripes of width smaller than typically 500 µm are perfectly aligned in the stripe direction. Experiments performed in cross-shaped patterns show that both the number of cells and the degree of alignment impact the final orientation. Reference: Duclos G., Garcia S., Yevick H.G. and Silberzan P., ''Perfect nematic order in confined monolayers of spindle-shaped cells'', Soft Matter, 10, 14, 2014

  4. Interdomain allostery promotes assembly of the poly(A) mRNA complex with PABP and eIF4G.

    PubMed

    Safaee, Nozhat; Kozlov, Guennadi; Noronha, Anne M; Xie, Jingwei; Wilds, Christopher J; Gehring, Kalle

    2012-11-01

    Many RNA-binding proteins contain multiple single-strand nucleic acid-binding domains and assemble into large multiprotein messenger ribonucleic acid protein (mRNP) complexes. The mechanisms underlying the self-assembly of these complexes are largely unknown. In eukaryotes, the association of the translation factors polyadenylate-binding protein-1 (PABP) and eIF4G is essential for high-level expression of polyadenylated mRNAs. Here, we report the crystal structure of the ternary complex poly(A)(11)·PABP(1-190)·eIF4G(178-203) at 2.0 Å resolution. Our NMR and crystallographic data show that eIF4G interacts with the RRM2 domain of PABP. Analysis of the interaction by small-angle X-ray scattering, isothermal titration calorimetry, and electromobility shift assays reveals that this interaction is allosterically regulated by poly(A) binding to PABP. Furthermore, we have confirmed the importance of poly(A) for the endogenous PABP and eIF4G interaction in immunoprecipitation experiments using HeLa cell extracts. Our findings reveal interdomain allostery as a mechanism for cooperative assembly of RNP complexes. PMID:23041282

  5. 16 CFR 1615.32 - Method for establishment and use of alternate laundering procedures under section 4(g)(4)(ii) of...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ...-6X (16 CFR 1615.4(g)(4)(ii)) requires that all fabrics and certain garments subject to the standard...(a) and 1 CFR part 51. (2) This rule provides the procedures to be followed by persons seeking... showing why the applicant believes the procedure should be considered reliable with the fabric or...

  6. 16 CFR 1615.32 - Method for establishment and use of alternate laundering procedures under section 4(g)(4)(ii) of...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ...-6X (16 CFR 1615.4(g)(4)(ii)) requires that all fabrics and certain garments subject to the standard...(a) and 1 CFR part 51. (2) This rule provides the procedures to be followed by persons seeking... single fabric or garment production unit. (4) As used in this section, fabric means fabric or...

  7. 16 CFR 1615.32 - Method for establishment and use of alternate laundering procedures under section 4(g)(4)(ii) of...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ...-6X (16 CFR 1615.4(g)(4)(ii)) requires that all fabrics and certain garments subject to the standard...(a) and 1 CFR part 51. (2) This rule provides the procedures to be followed by persons seeking... single fabric or garment production unit. (4) As used in this section, fabric means fabric or...

  8. 16 CFR 1615.32 - Method for establishment and use of alternate laundering procedures under section 4(g)(4)(ii) of...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ...-6X (16 CFR 1615.4(g)(4)(ii)) requires that all fabrics and certain garments subject to the standard...(a) and 1 CFR part 51. (2) This rule provides the procedures to be followed by persons seeking... single fabric or garment production unit. (4) As used in this section, fabric means fabric or...

  9. 16 CFR 1615.32 - Method for establishment and use of alternate laundering procedures under section 4(g)(4)(ii) of...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ...-6X (16 CFR 1615.4(g)(4)(ii)) requires that all fabrics and certain garments subject to the standard...(a) and 1 CFR part 51. (2) This rule provides the procedures to be followed by persons seeking... single fabric or garment production unit. (4) As used in this section, fabric means fabric or...

  10. Unusual cause of aborted sudden cardiac death in a teen athlete: homozygosity for the 4G allele of the plasminogen activase inhibitor type 1 gene.

    PubMed

    Phillips, Susie B; Batlivala, Sarosh; Knudson, Jarrod D

    2015-10-01

    Common aetiologies of sudden cardiac death in children include coronary anomalies, channelopathies, and cardiomyopathies. Less frequently, hypercoagulable states cause sudden arrest. We report an unusual case of aborted sudden cardiac death in a teenager, ultimately found to have homozygosity for the 4G allele of the plasminogen activase inhibitor type 1 gene. PMID:25498839

  11. miR-139 is up-regulated in osteoarthritis and inhibits chondrocyte proliferation and migration possibly via suppressing EIF4G2 and IGF1R.

    PubMed

    Hu, Weihua; Zhang, Weikai; Li, Feng; Guo, Fengjing; Chen, Anmin

    2016-05-27

    Osteoarthritis (OA) is one of the most progressive articular cartilage erosions. microRNAs (miRNAs) play pivotal roles in OA modulation, but the role of miR-139 in OA remains elusive. This study aims to reveal the effects and possible mechanism of miR-139 in OA and chondrocytes. The levels of miR-139 and its possible targets eukaryotic translation initiation factor 4 gamma 2 (EIF4G2) and insulin-like growth factor 1 receptor (IGF1R) were detected by qRT-PCR in the articular cartilages of 20 OA patients and 20 non-OA patients. Human chondrocyte CHON-001 cells were transfected with miR-139 mimic or inhibitor, as well as the siRNAs of EIF4G2 and IGF1R. Cell viability by MTT assay, proliferation by colony formation assay and migration by Transwell assay were performed. Results showed that miR-139 was up-regulated, while EIF4G2 and IGF1R mRNAs down-regulated in OA cartilages (P < 0.001), and negative correlations existed between the level of miR-139 and EIF4G2 or IGF1R. Overexpression of miR-139 in CHON-001 cells suppressed both mRNA and protein levels of EIF4G2 and IGF1R, and inhibited cell viability, colony formation number and cell migration, while miR-139 inhibitor induced the opposite effects. Knockdown of EIF4G2 or IGF1R in CHON-001 cells reversed the effects of miR-139 inhibitor on cell viability, colony formation and cell migration. These results indicate that miR-139 is capable of inhibiting chondrocyte proliferation and migration, thus being a possible therapeutic target for OA. The mechanism of miR-139 in chondrocytes may be related to its regulation on EIF4G2 and IGF1R. PMID:27105918

  12. CELLULAR MAGNESIUM HOMEOSTASIS

    PubMed Central

    Romani, Andrea M.P.

    2011-01-01

    Magnesium, the second most abundant cellular cation after potassium, is essential to regulate numerous cellular functions and enzymes, including ion channels, metabolic cycles, and signaling pathways, as attested by more than 1000 entries in the literature. Despite significant recent progress, however, our understanding of how cells regulate Mg2+ homeostasis and transport still remains incomplete. For example, the occurrence of major fluxes of Mg2+ in either direction across the plasma membrane of mammalian cells following metabolic or hormonal stimuli has been extensively documented. Yet, the mechanisms ultimately responsible for magnesium extrusion across the cell membrane have not been cloned. Even less is known about the regulation in cellular organelles. The present review is aimed at providing the reader with a comprehensive and up-to-date understanding of the mechanisms enacted by eukaryotic cells to regulate cellular Mg2+ homeostasis and how these mechanisms are altered under specific pathological conditions. PMID:21640700

  13. Effects of Methanol Extract of Breadfruit (Artocarpus altilis) on Atherogenic Indices and Redox Status of Cellular System of Hypercholesterolemic Male Rats.

    PubMed

    Adaramoye, Oluwatosin Adekunle; Akanni, Olubukola Oyebimpe

    2014-01-01

    We investigated the effects of methanol extract of Artocarpus altilis (AA) on atherogenic indices and redox status of cellular system of rats fed with dietary cholesterol while Questran (QUE) served as standard. Biochemical indices such as total cholesterol (TC), triglycerides (TG), low- and high-density lipoproteins-cholesterol (LDL-C and HDL-C), aspartate and alanine aminotransferases (AST and ALT), lactate dehydrogenase (LDH), reduced glutathione, glutathione-s-transferase, glutathione peroxidase (GPx), catalase (CAT), superoxide dismutase (SOD), and lipid peroxidation (LPO) were assessed. Hypercholesterolemic (HC) rats had significantly increased relative weight of liver and heart. Dietary cholesterol caused a significant increase (P < 0.05) in the levels of serum, hepatic, and cardiac TC by 110%, 70%, and 85%, LDL-C by 79%, 82%, and 176%, and TG by 68%, 96%, and 62%, respectively. Treatment with AA significantly reduced the relative weight of the organs and lipid parameters. There were beneficial increases in serum and cardiac HDL-C levels in HC rats treated with AA. In HC rats, serum LDH, ALT, and AST activities and levels of LPO were increased, whereas hepatic and cardiac SOD, CAT, and GPx were reduced. All biochemical and histological alterations were ameliorated upon treatment with AA. Extract of AA had protective effects against dietary cholesterol-induced hypercholesterolemia. PMID:24592277

  14. Solving a mathematical model integrating unequal-area facilities layout and part scheduling in a cellular manufacturing system by a genetic algorithm.

    PubMed

    Ebrahimi, Ahmad; Kia, Reza; Komijan, Alireza Rashidi

    2016-01-01

    In this article, a novel integrated mixed-integer nonlinear programming model is presented for designing a cellular manufacturing system (CMS) considering machine layout and part scheduling problems simultaneously as interrelated decisions. The integrated CMS model is formulated to incorporate several design features including part due date, material handling time, operation sequence, processing time, an intra-cell layout of unequal-area facilities, and part scheduling. The objective function is to minimize makespan, tardiness penalties, and material handling costs of inter-cell and intra-cell movements. Two numerical examples are solved by the Lingo software to illustrate the results obtained by the incorporated features. In order to assess the effects and importance of integration of machine layout and part scheduling in designing a CMS, two approaches, sequentially and concurrent are investigated and the improvement resulted from a concurrent approach is revealed. Also, due to the NP-hardness of the integrated model, an efficient genetic algorithm is designed. As a consequence, computational results of this study indicate that the best solutions found by GA are better than the solutions found by B&B in much less time for both sequential and concurrent approaches. Moreover, the comparisons between the objective function values (OFVs) obtained by sequential and concurrent approaches demonstrate that the OFV improvement is averagely around 17 % by GA and 14 % by B&B. PMID:27536537

  15. Effects of Methanol Extract of Breadfruit (Artocarpus altilis) on Atherogenic Indices and Redox Status of Cellular System of Hypercholesterolemic Male Rats

    PubMed Central

    Adaramoye, Oluwatosin Adekunle; Akanni, Olubukola Oyebimpe

    2014-01-01

    We investigated the effects of methanol extract of Artocarpus altilis (AA) on atherogenic indices and redox status of cellular system of rats fed with dietary cholesterol while Questran (QUE) served as standard. Biochemical indices such as total cholesterol (TC), triglycerides (TG), low- and high-density lipoproteins-cholesterol (LDL-C and HDL-C), aspartate and alanine aminotransferases (AST and ALT), lactate dehydrogenase (LDH), reduced glutathione, glutathione-s-transferase, glutathione peroxidase (GPx), catalase (CAT), superoxide dismutase (SOD), and lipid peroxidation (LPO) were assessed. Hypercholesterolemic (HC) rats had significantly increased relative weight of liver and heart. Dietary cholesterol caused a significant increase (P < 0.05) in the levels of serum, hepatic, and cardiac TC by 110%, 70%, and 85%, LDL-C by 79%, 82%, and 176%, and TG by 68%, 96%, and 62%, respectively. Treatment with AA significantly reduced the relative weight of the organs and lipid parameters. There were beneficial increases in serum and cardiac HDL-C levels in HC rats treated with AA. In HC rats, serum LDH, ALT, and AST activities and levels of LPO were increased, whereas hepatic and cardiac SOD, CAT, and GPx were reduced. All biochemical and histological alterations were ameliorated upon treatment with AA. Extract of AA had protective effects against dietary cholesterol-induced hypercholesterolemia. PMID:24592277

  16. BDMC33, A Curcumin Derivative Suppresses Inflammatory Responses in Macrophage-Like Cellular System: Role of Inhibition in NF-κB and MAPK Signaling Pathways

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Ka-Heng; Chow, Yuh-Lit; Sharmili, Vidyadaran; Abas, Faridah; Alitheen, Noorjahan Banu Mohamed; Shaari, Khozirah; Israf, Daud Ahmad; Lajis, Nordin Haji; Syahida, Ahmad

    2012-01-01

    Our preliminary screening has shown that curcumin derivative BDMC33 [2,6-bis(2,5-dimethoxybenzylidene)cyclohexanone] exerted promising nitric oxide inhibitory activity in activated macrophages. However, the molecular basis and mechanism for its pharmacological action is yet to be elucidated. The aim of this study was to investigate the anti-inflammatory properties of BDMC33 and elucidate its underlying mechanism action in macrophage cells. Our current study demonstrated that BDMC33 inhibits the secretion of major pro-inflammatory mediators in stimulated macrophages, and includes NO, TNF-α and IL-1β through interference in both nuclear factor kappaB (NF-κB) and mitogen activator protein kinase (MAPK) signaling cascade in IFN-γ/LPS-stimulated macrophages. Moreover, BDMC33 also interrupted LPS signaling through inhibiting the surface expression of CD-14 accessory molecules. In addition, the inhibitory action of BDMC33 not only restricted the macrophages cell (RAW264.7), but also inhibited the secretion of NO and TNF-α in IFN-γ/LPS-challenged microglial cells (BV-2). The experimental data suggests the inflammatory action of BDMC33 on activated macrophage-like cellular systems, which could be used as a future therapeutic agent in the management of chronic inflammatory diseases. PMID:22489138

  17. In black South Africans from rural and urban communities, the 4G/5G PAI-1 polymorphism influences PAI-1 activity, but not plasma clot lysis time.

    PubMed

    de Lange, Zelda; Rijken, Dingeman C; Hoekstra, Tiny; Conradie, Karin R; Jerling, Johann C; Pieters, Marlien

    2013-01-01

    Data on genetic and environmental factors influencing PAI-1 levels and their consequent effect on clot lysis in black African populations are limited. We identified polymorphisms in the promoter area of the PAI-1 gene and determined their influence on PAI-1act levels and plasma clot lysis time (CLT). We also describe gene-environment interactions and the effect of urbanisation. Data from 2010 apparently healthy urban and rural black participants from the South African arm of the PURE study were cross-sectionally analysed. The 5G allele frequency of the 4G/5G polymorphism was 0.85. PAI-1act increased across genotypes in the urban subgroup (p = 0.009) but not significantly in the rural subgroup, while CLT did not differ across genotypes. Significant interaction terms were found between the 4G/5G polymorphism and BMI, waist circumference and triglycerides in determining PAI-1act, and between the 4G/5G polymorphism and fibrinogen and fibrinogen gamma prime in determining CLT. The C428T and G429A polymorphisms did not show direct relationships with PAI-1act or CLT but they did influence the association of other environmental factors with PAI-1act and CLT. Several of these interactions differed significantly between rural and urban subgroups, particularly in individuals harbouring the mutant alleles. In conclusion, although the 4G/5G polymorphism significantly affected PAI-1act, it contributed less than 1% to the PAI-1act variance. (Central) obesity was the biggest contributor to PAI-1act variance (12.5%). Urbanisation significantly influenced the effect of the 4G/5G polymorphism on PAI-1act as well as gene-environment interactions for the C428T and G429A genotypes in determining PAI-1act and CLT. PMID:24386152

  18. In Black South Africans from Rural and Urban Communities, the 4G/5G PAI-1 Polymorphism Influences PAI-1 Activity, but Not Plasma Clot Lysis Time

    PubMed Central

    de Lange, Zelda; Rijken, Dingeman C.; Hoekstra, Tiny; Conradie, Karin R.; Jerling, Johann C.; Pieters, Marlien

    2013-01-01

    Data on genetic and environmental factors influencing PAI-1 levels and their consequent effect on clot lysis in black African populations are limited. We identified polymorphisms in the promoter area of the PAI-1 gene and determined their influence on PAI-1act levels and plasma clot lysis time (CLT). We also describe gene-environment interactions and the effect of urbanisation. Data from 2010 apparently healthy urban and rural black participants from the South African arm of the PURE study were cross-sectionally analysed. The 5G allele frequency of the 4G/5G polymorphism was 0.85. PAI-1act increased across genotypes in the urban subgroup (p = 0.009) but not significantly in the rural subgroup, while CLT did not differ across genotypes. Significant interaction terms were found between the 4G/5G polymorphism and BMI, waist circumference and triglycerides in determining PAI-1act, and between the 4G/5G polymorphism and fibrinogen and fibrinogen gamma prime in determining CLT. The C428T and G429A polymorphisms did not show direct relationships with PAI-1act or CLT but they did influence the association of other environmental factors with PAI-1act and CLT. Several of these interactions differed significantly between rural and urban subgroups, particularly in individuals harbouring the mutant alleles. In conclusion, although the 4G/5G polymorphism significantly affected PAI-1act, it contributed less than 1% to the PAI-1act variance. (Central) obesity was the biggest contributor to PAI-1act variance (12.5%). Urbanisation significantly influenced the effect of the 4G/5G polymorphism on PAI-1act as well as gene-environment interactions for the C428T and G429A genotypes in determining PAI-1act and CLT. PMID:24386152

  19. Passive Noise Filtering by Cellular Compartmentalization.

    PubMed

    Stoeger, Thomas; Battich, Nico; Pelkmans, Lucas

    2016-03-10

    Chemical reactions contain an inherent element of randomness, which presents itself as noise that interferes with cellular processes and communication. Here we discuss the ability of the spatial partitioning of molecular systems to filter and, thus, remove noise, while preserving regulated and predictable differences between single living cells. In contrast to active noise filtering by network motifs, cellular compartmentalization is highly effective and easily scales to numerous systems without requiring a substantial usage of cellular energy. We will use passive noise filtering by the eukaryotic cell nucleus as an example of how this increases predictability of transcriptional output, with possible implications for the evolution of complex multicellularity. PMID:26967282

  20. Cellular solidification of transparent monotectics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kaulker, W. F.

    1986-01-01

    Understanding how liquid phase particles are engulfed or pushed during freezing of a monotectic is addressed. The additional complication is that the solid-liquid interface is nonplanar due to constitutional undercooling. Some evidence of particle pushing where the particles are the liquid phase of the montectic was already observed. Cellular freezing of the succinonitrile-glycerol system also occurred. Only a few compositions were tested at that time. The starting materials were not especially pure so that cellular interface observed was likely due to the presence of unkown impurities, the major portion of which was water. Topics addressed include: the effort of modeling the particle pushing process using the computer, establishing an apparatus for the determination of phase diagrams, and the measurement of the temperature gradients with a specimen which will solidify on the temperature gradient microscope stage.

  1. Cellular Homeostasis and Aging.

    PubMed

    Hartl, F Ulrich

    2016-06-01

    Aging and longevity are controlled by a multiplicity of molecular and cellular signaling events that interface with environmental factors to maintain cellular homeostasis. Modulation of these pathways to extend life span, including insulin-like signaling and the response to dietary restriction, identified the cellular machineries and networks of protein homeostasis (proteostasis) and stress resistance pathways as critical players in the aging process. A decline of proteostasis capacity during aging leads to dysfunction of specific cell types and tissues, rendering the organism susceptible to a range of chronic diseases. This volume of the Annual Review of Biochemistry contains a set of two reviews addressing our current understanding of the molecular mechanisms underlying aging in model organisms and humans. PMID:27050288

  2. Architected Cellular Materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schaedler, Tobias A.; Carter, William B.

    2016-07-01

    Additive manufacturing enables fabrication of materials with intricate cellular architecture, whereby progress in 3D printing techniques is increasing the possible configurations of voids and solids ad infinitum. Examples are microlattices with graded porosity and truss structures optimized for specific loading conditions. The cellular architecture determines the mechanical properties and density of these materials and can influence a wide range of other properties, e.g., acoustic, thermal, and biological properties. By combining optimized cellular architectures with high-performance metals and ceramics, several lightweight materials that exhibit strength and stiffness previously unachievable at low densities were recently demonstrated. This review introduces the field of architected materials; summarizes the most common fabrication methods, with an emphasis on additive manufacturing; and discusses recent progress in the development of architected materials. The review also discusses important applications, including lightweight structures, energy absorption, metamaterials, thermal management, and bioscaffolds.

  3. Irregular Cellular Learning Automata.

    PubMed

    Esnaashari, Mehdi; Meybodi, Mohammad Reza

    2015-08-01

    Cellular learning automaton (CLA) is a recently introduced model that combines cellular automaton (CA) and learning automaton (LA). The basic idea of CLA is to use LA to adjust the state transition probability of stochastic CA. This model has been used to solve problems in areas such as channel assignment in cellular networks, call admission control, image processing, and very large scale integration placement. In this paper, an extension of CLA called irregular CLA (ICLA) is introduced. This extension is obtained by removing the structure regularity assumption in CLA. Irregularity in the structure of ICLA is needed in some applications, such as computer networks, web mining, and grid computing. The concept of expediency has been introduced for ICLA and then, conditions under which an ICLA becomes expedient are analytically found. PMID:25291810

  4. First-order magnetization process as a tool of magnetic-anisotropy determination: Application to the uranium-based intermetallic U3C u4G e4

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gorbunov, D. I.; Henriques, M. S.; Andreev, A. V.; Skourski, Y.; Richter, M.; Havela, L.; Wosnitza, J.

    2016-02-01

    Uranium-based intermetallic compounds often display very strong magnetic anisotropies, the energy of which is usually not directly accessible by common experimental methods. Here, we report on static- and pulsed-field studies of U3C u4G e4 . This material orders ferromagnetically at TC=73 K with the easy magnetization direction along the a axis and a strong b c -plane anisotropy. The magnetization measured for fields along the hard b direction displays a first-order magnetization process that can be described well by use of a phenomenological theory yielding anisotropy constants up to the sixth order. This phenomenological description, working excellently for U3C u4G e4 , may also be applied for other uranium-based compounds.

  5. Temperature effects on biomass, geosmin, and 2-methylisoborneol production and cellular activity by Nocardia spp. and Streptomyces spp. isolated from rainbow trout recirculating aquaculture systems.

    PubMed

    Schrader, Kevin K; Harries, Marcuslene D; Page, Phaedra N

    2015-05-01

    Isolates of Nocardia cummidelens, Nocard ia fluminea, Streptomyces albidoflavus, and Streptomyces luridiscabiei attributed as the cause of "earthy-musty" off-flavor in rainbow trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss) raised in recirculating aquaculture systems (RAS) were evaluated for the effect of temperature (10-30 °C) on biomass, geosmin, and 2-methylisoborneol (MIB) production and cellular activity. Cultures of these isolates were monitored over 7 days by measuring culture dry weight, geosmin, and MIB production using solid-phase microextraction-gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (SPME-GC-MS), and ATP production via a luminometer. Compared to the other isolates, S. luridiscabiei had significantly (P < 0.05) higher biomass (8.17 ± 0.35 mg/mL) at 15 °C (water temperature in the RAS) after 7 days incubation. In addition, S. luridiscabiei produced significantly (P < 0.05) higher geosmin (69,976 ± 15,733 ng/L) at 15 °C. At 25 °C and 30 °C, S. albidoflavus produced significantly (P < 0.05) higher geosmin (182,074 ± 60,272 ng/L and 399,991 ± 102,262 ng/L, respectively). All isolates produced MIB at 15 °C, but S. luridiscabiei produced significantly (P < 0.05) higher MIB (97,143 ± 28,972 ng/L) and ATP after 7 days. Therefore, S. luridiscabiei appears to be a likely contributor of geosmin and MIB in the RAS. PMID:25724337

  6. Intra-articular glenohumeral injections of HYADD®4-G for the treatment of painful shoulder osteoarthritis: a prospective multicenter, open-label trial

    PubMed Central

    PORCELLINI, GIUSEPPE; MEROLLA, GIOVANNI; GIORDAN, NICOLA; PALADINI, PAOLO; BURINI, ANDREA; CESARI, EUGENIO; CASTAGNA, ALESSANDRO

    2015-01-01

    Purpose numerous experimental and clinical studies in osteoarthritis (OA) have demonstrated that intra-articular (IA) administration of hyaluronic acid can improve the altered rheological properties of the synovial fluid and exert protective and reparative effects on the joint structure. The objective of this study was to evaluate the safety and performance of HYADD®4-G (Hymovis®) in patients with glenohumeral joint OA. Methods forty-one patients with shoulder pain and limited shoulder function resulting from concentric glenohumeral joint OA were enrolled in a multicenter clinical trial. Patients received two HYADD®4-G injections administered one week apart. The main outcome measure was improvement in shoulder pain on movement at six months as assessed through a 100-mm visual analog scale (VAS), range of motion (ROM) values, and Constant-Murley Shoulder Outcome Score (CS). Results two IA injections of HYADD®4-G (Hymovis®) significantly decreased pain and improved shoulder function for up to six months from the first injection. The VAS score decreased (from 66.1 mm to 37.7 mm at six months) and improvements were recorded in the total CS and in the ROM values ( rotation decreased from a mean value of 54.2° at baseline to 63.2° at six months and internal rotation from a mean value of 44.0° at baseline to 45.7° at 26 weeks). No serious adverse events occurred. Conclusions the study results demonstrated that two IA injections of HYADD®4-G (Hymovis®) may be a safe and effective treatment option for shoulder pain associated with glenohumeral OA and that the effects of the injections are still present for up to six months after the treatment. Level of evidence Level IV, therapeutic case series. PMID:26889467

  7. Equol, an isoflavone metabolite, regulates cancer cell viability and protein synthesis initiation via c-Myc and eIF4G.

    PubMed

    de la Parra, Columba; Borrero-Garcia, Luis D; Cruz-Collazo, Ailed; Schneider, Robert J; Dharmawardhane, Suranganie

    2015-03-01

    Epidemiological studies implicate dietary soy isoflavones as breast cancer preventives, especially due to their anti-estrogenic properties. However, soy isoflavones may also have a role in promoting breast cancer, which has yet to be clarified. We previously reported that equol, a metabolite of the soy isoflavone daidzein, may advance breast cancer potential via up-regulation of the eukaryotic initiation factor 4GI (eIF4GI). In estrogen receptor negative (ER-) metastatic breast cancer cells, equol induced elevated levels of eIF4G, which were associated with increased cell viability and the selective translation of mRNAs that use non-canonical means of initiation, including internal ribosome entry site (IRES), ribosome shunting, and eIF4G enhancers. These mRNAs typically code for oncogenic, survival, and cell stress molecules. Among those mRNAs translationally increased by equol was the oncogene and eIF4G enhancer, c-Myc. Here we report that siRNA-mediated knockdown of c-Myc abrogates the increase in cancer cell viability and mammosphere formation by equol, and results in a significant down-regulation of eIF4GI (the major eIF4G isoform), as well as reduces levels of some, but not all, proteins encoded by mRNAs that are translationally stimulated by equol treatment. Knockdown of eIF4GI also markedly reduces an equol-mediated increase in IRES-dependent mRNA translation and the expression of specific oncogenic proteins. However, eIF4GI knockdown did not reciprocally affect c-Myc levels or cell viability. This study therefore implicates c-Myc as a potential regulator of the cancer-promoting effects of equol via up-regulation of eIF4GI and selective initiation of translation on mRNAs that utilize non-canonical initiation, including certain oncogenes. PMID:25593313

  8. 47 CFR 32.5003 - Cellular mobile revenue.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 2 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Cellular mobile revenue. 32.5003 Section 32... SYSTEM OF ACCOUNTS FOR TELECOMMUNICATIONS COMPANIES Instructions For Revenue Accounts § 32.5003 Cellular mobile revenue. This account shall include message revenue derived from cellular...

  9. 47 CFR 22.901 - Cellular service requirements and limitations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... accordance with 5 U.S.C. 552(a) and 1 CFR part 51. Copies of the standard may be purchased from Global... SERVICES PUBLIC MOBILE SERVICES Cellular Radiotelephone Service § 22.901 Cellular service requirements and... operates in compliance with this section. (a) Each cellular system must provide either mobile...

  10. The S. pombe translation initiation factor eIF4G is Sumoylated and associates with the SUMO protease Ulp2.

    PubMed

    Jongjitwimol, Jirapas; Feng, Min; Zhou, Lihong; Wilkinson, Oliver; Small, Lauren; Baldock, Robert; Taylor, Deborah L; Smith, Duncan; Bowler, Lucas D; Morley, Simon J; Watts, Felicity Z

    2014-01-01

    SUMO is a small post-translational modifier, that is attached to lysine residues in target proteins. It acts by altering protein-protein interactions, protein localisation and protein activity. SUMO chains can also act as substrates for ubiquitination, resulting in proteasome-mediated degradation of the target protein. SUMO is removed from target proteins by one of a number of specific proteases. The processes of sumoylation and desumoylation have well documented roles in DNA metabolism and in the maintenance of chromatin structure. To further analyse the role of this modification, we have purified protein complexes containing the S. pombe SUMO protease, Ulp2. These complexes contain proteins required for ribosome biogenesis, RNA stability and protein synthesis. Here we have focussed on two translation initiation factors that we identified as co-purifying with Ulp2, eIF4G and eIF3h. We demonstrate that eIF4G, but not eIF3h, is sumoylated. This modification is increased under conditions that produce cytoplasmic stress granules. Consistent with this we observe partial co-localisation of eIF4G and SUMO in stressed cells. Using HeLa cells, we demonstrate that human eIF4GI is also sumoylated; in vitro studies indicate that human eIF4GI is modified on K1368 and K1588, that are located in the C-terminal eIF4A- and Mnk-binding sites respectively. PMID:24818994

  11. Parkinson’s disease genes VPS35 and EIF4G1 interact genetically and converge on α–synuclein

    PubMed Central

    Dhungel, Nripesh; Eleuteri, Simona; Li, Ling-bo; Kramer, Nicholas J.; Chartron, Justin; Spencer, Brian; Kosberg, Kori; Fields, Jerel Adam; Klodjan, Stafa; Adame, Anthony; Lashuel, Hilal; Frydman, Judith; Shen, Kang; Masliah, Eliezer; Gitler, Aaron D.

    2014-01-01

    Summary Parkinson’s disease (PD) is a common neurodegenerative disorder. Functional interactions between some PD genes, like PINK1 and parkin, have been identified, but whether other ones interact remains elusive. Here we report an unexpected genetic interaction between two PD genes, VPS35 and EIF4G1. We provide evidence that EIF4G1 upregulation causes defects associated with protein misfolding. Expression of a sortilin protein rescues these defects, downstream of VPS35, suggesting a potential role for sortilins in PD. We also show interactions between VPS35, EIF4G1 and α–synuclein, a protein with a key role in PD. We extend our findings from yeast to an animal model and show these interactions are conserved in neurons and in transgenic mice. Our studies reveal unexpected genetic and functional interactions between two seemingly unrelated PD genes and functionally connect them to α–synuclein pathobiology in yeast, worms, and mouse. Finally, we provide a resource of candidate PD genes for future interrogation. PMID:25533483

  12. Genetic Dominance & Cellular Processes

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Seager, Robert D.

    2014-01-01

    In learning genetics, many students misunderstand and misinterpret what "dominance" means. Understanding is easier if students realize that dominance is not a mechanism, but rather a consequence of underlying cellular processes. For example, metabolic pathways are often little affected by changes in enzyme concentration. This means that…

  13. Teaching cellular engineering.

    PubMed

    Hammer, Daniel A; Waugh, Richard E

    2006-02-01

    Cellular engineering is one of the fastest growing subdisciplines in the field of Biomedical Engineering. It involves the application of engineering analysis to understand and control cellular behavior, with the ultimate objective of developing novel therapeutic or diagnostic approaches for the clinic or harnessing cellular function for commercial applications. Well-educated students in this area need strong foundational knowledge in engineering science, chemistry, and cell and molecular biology. In undergraduate curricula, the challenge is to include essential engineering skills plus appropriate levels of training in chemistry and biology while satisfying accreditation-mandated breadth in engineering training. At the graduate level, educators must accommodate students with diverse backgrounds and provide them with both a state-of-the-art understanding of the life sciences and the most advanced engineering skills. Engineering curricular content should include mechanics and materials, physical chemistry, transport phenomena, and control theory. Training from faculty with appointments and research programs in the life sciences is generally recommended, and additional life science content should also be integrated within the engineering curriculum. A capstone course in cellular engineering that includes opportunities for students to have hands-on experiences with state-of-the-art laboratory techniques is highly recommended. PMID:16450196

  14. The New Cellular Immunology

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Claman, Henry N.

    1973-01-01

    Discusses the nature of the immune response and traces many of the discoveries that have led to the present state of knowledge in immunology. The new cellular immunology is directing its efforts toward improving health by proper manipulation of the immune mechanisms of the body. (JR)

  15. Bioorthogonal Catalysis: A General Method To Evaluate Metal-Catalyzed Reactions in Real Time in Living Systems Using a Cellular Luciferase Reporter System.

    PubMed

    Hsu, Hsiao-Tieh; Trantow, Brian M; Waymouth, Robert M; Wender, Paul A

    2016-02-17

    The development of abiological catalysts that can function in biological systems is an emerging subject of importance with significant ramifications in synthetic chemistry and the life sciences. Herein we report a biocompatible ruthenium complex [Cp(MQA)Ru(C3H5)](+)PF6(-) 2 (Cp = cyclopentadienyl, MQA = 4-methoxyquinoline-2-carboxylate) and a general analytical method for evaluating its performance in real time based on a luciferase reporter system amenable to high throughput screening in cells and by extension to evaluation in luciferase transgenic animals. Precatalyst 2 activates alloc-protected aminoluciferin 4b, a bioluminescence pro-probe, and releases the active luminophore, aminoluciferin (4a), in the presence of luciferase-transfected cells. The formation and enzymatic turnover of 4a, an overall process selected because it emulates pro-drug activation and drug turnover by an intracellular target, is evaluated in real time by photon counting as 4a is converted by intracellular luciferase to oxyaminoluciferin and light. Interestingly, while the catalytic conversion (activation) of 4b to 4a in water produces multiple products, the presence of biological nucleophiles such as thiols prevents byproduct formation and provides almost exclusively luminophore 4a. Our studies show that precatalyst 2 activates 4b extracellularly, exhibits low toxicity at concentrations relevant to catalysis, and is comparably effective in two different cell lines. This proof of concept study shows that precatalyst 2 is a promising lead for bioorthogonal catalytic activation of pro-probes and, by analogy, similarly activatable pro-drugs. More generally, this study provides an analytical method to measure abiological catalytic activation of pro-probes and, by analogy with our earlier studies on pro-Taxol, similarly activatable pro-drugs in real time using a coupled biological catalyst that mediates a bioluminescent readout, providing tools for the study of imaging signal amplification

  16. Cellular immune responses to HIV

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McMichael, Andrew J.; Rowland-Jones, Sarah L.

    2001-04-01

    The cellular immune response to the human immunodeficiency virus, mediated by T lymphocytes, seems strong but fails to control the infection completely. In most virus infections, T cells either eliminate the virus or suppress it indefinitely as a harmless, persisting infection. But the human immunodeficiency virus undermines this control by infecting key immune cells, thereby impairing the response of both the infected CD4+ T cells and the uninfected CD8+ T cells. The failure of the latter to function efficiently facilitates the escape of virus from immune control and the collapse of the whole immune system.

  17. System-Level Insights into the Cellular Interactome of a Non-Model Organism: Inferring, Modelling and Analysing Functional Gene Network of Soybean (Glycine max)

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Yungang; Guo, Maozu; Zou, Quan; Liu, Xiaoyan; Wang, Chunyu; Liu, Yang

    2014-01-01

    Cellular interactome, in which genes and/or their products interact on several levels, forming transcriptional regulatory-, protein interaction-, metabolic-, signal transduction networks, etc., has attracted decades of research focuses. However, such a specific type of network alone can hardly explain the various interactive activities among genes. These networks characterize different interaction relationships, implying their unique intrinsic properties and defects, and covering different slices of biological information. Functional gene network (FGN), a consolidated interaction network that models fuzzy and more generalized notion of gene-gene relations, have been proposed to combine heterogeneous networks with the goal of identifying functional modules supported by multiple interaction types. There are yet no successful precedents of FGNs on sparsely studied non-model organisms, such as soybean (Glycine max), due to the absence of sufficient heterogeneous interaction data. We present an alternative solution for inferring the FGNs of soybean (SoyFGNs), in a pioneering study on the soybean interactome, which is also applicable to other organisms. SoyFGNs exhibit the typical characteristics of biological networks: scale-free, small-world architecture and modularization. Verified by co-expression and KEGG pathways, SoyFGNs are more extensive and accurate than an orthology network derived from Arabidopsis. As a case study, network-guided disease-resistance gene discovery indicates that SoyFGNs can provide system-level studies on gene functions and interactions. This work suggests that inferring and modelling the interactome of a non-model plant are feasible. It will speed up the discovery and definition of the functions and interactions of other genes that control important functions, such as nitrogen fixation and protein or lipid synthesis. The efforts of the study are the basis of our further comprehensive studies on the soybean functional interactome at the genome

  18. CELLULAR PATHOGENESIS OF DIABETIC GASTROENTEROPATHY

    PubMed Central

    Ördög, Tamás; Hayashi, Yujiro; Gibbons, Simon J.

    2010-01-01

    SUMMARY Gastroenteropathy manifesting in upper gastrointestinal symptoms, delayed gastric emptying, constipation, diarrhea and fecal incontinence occurs frequently in patients with diabetes mellitus and represents a significant health care burden. Current treatments are largely symptomatic and ineffective. Better understanding of the cellular and molecular pathogenesis of these disorders is required for the development of more effective therapies. Recent advances in our understanding of the inherent, high-level complexities of the control systems that execute and regulate gastrointestinal motility, together with the utilization of new experimental models and sophisticated physiological, morphological and molecular techniques have lead to the realization that diabetic gastroenteropathies cannot be ascribed to any singular defect or dysfunction. In fact, these disorders are multifactorial and involve a spectrum of metabolic and dystrophic changes that can potentially affect all key components of motor control including the systemic autonomic and enteric nervous systems, interstitial cells of Cajal and smooth muscle cells. Candidate pathomechanisms are also varied and include imbalance between pro- and anti-oxidative factors, altered trophic stimuli to mature cells and their progenitors, and, possibly, autoimmune factors. The goal of this paper is to review the cellular changes underlying diabetic gastroenteropathies and their potential causes, with particular focus on functional interactions between various cell types. It is proposed that diabetic gastroenteropathies should be considered a form of gastrointestinal neuromuscular dystrophy rather than a “functional” disorder. Future research should identify ways to block cytotoxic factors, support the regeneration of damaged cells and translate the experimental findings into new treatment modalities. PMID:19829287

  19. Lack of promoting effects of chronic exposure to 1.95-GHz W-CDMA signals for IMT-2000 cellular system on development of N-ethylnitrosourea-induced central nervous system tumors in F344 rats.

    PubMed

    Shirai, Tomoyuki; Ichihara, Toshio; Wake, Kanako; Watanabe, So-ichi; Yamanaka, Yukio; Kawabe, Mayumi; Taki, Masao; Fujiwara, Osamu; Wang, Jianqing; Takahashi, Satoru; Tamano, Seiko

    2007-10-01

    The present study was performed to evaluate effects of a 2-year exposure to an electromagnetic near-field (EMF) equivalent to that generated by cellular phones on tumor development in the central nervous system (CNS) of rats. For this purpose, pregnant F344 rats were given a single administration of N-ethylnitrosourea (ENU) on gestational day 18. A total of 500 pups were divided into five groups, each composed of 50 males and 50 females: Group 1, untreated controls; Group 2, ENU alone; Groups 3 to 5, ENU + EMF (sham exposure and two exposure levels). A 1.95-GHz wide-band code division multiple access (W-CDMA) signal, which is a feature of the International Mobile Telecommunication 2000 (IMT-2000) cellular system was employed for exposure of the rat head starting from 5 weeks of age, 90 min a day, 5 days a week, for 104 weeks. Brain average specific absorption rates (SARs) were designed to be .67 and 2.0 W/kg for low and high exposures, respectively. The incidence and numbers of brain tumors in female rats exposed to 1.95-GHz W-CDMA signals showed tendencies to increase but without statistical significance. Overall, no significant increase in incidences or numbers, either in the males or females, was detected in the EMF-exposed groups. In addition, no clear changes in tumor types in the brain were evident. Thus, under the present experimental conditions, exposure of heads of rats to 1.95-GHz W-CDMA signals for IMT-2000 for a 2-year period was not demonstrated to accelerate or otherwise affect ENU-initiated brain tumorigenesis. PMID:17516507

  20. Cellular growth in biofilms

    SciTech Connect

    Wood, B.D.; Whitaker, S.

    1999-09-20

    In this paper the authors develop a macroscopic evolutionary equation for the growth of the cellular phase starting from a microscopic description of mass transport and a simple structured model for product formation. The methods of continuum mechanics and volume averaging are used to develop the macroscopic representation by carefully considering the fluxes of chemical species that pertain to cell growth. The concept of structured models is extended to include the transport of reacting chemical species at the microscopic scale. The resulting macroscopic growth model is similar in form to previously published models for the transport of a single substrate and electron donor and for the production of cellular mass and exopolymer. The method of volume averaging indicated under what conditions the developed growth model is valid and provides an explicit connection between the relevant microscopic model parameters and their corresponding macroscopic counterparts.

  1. Trypanosoma brucei translation initiation factor homolog EIF4E6 forms a tripartite cytosolic complex with EIF4G5 and a capping enzyme homolog.

    PubMed

    Freire, Eden R; Malvezzi, Amaranta M; Vashisht, Ajay A; Zuberek, Joanna; Saada, Edwin A; Langousis, Gerasimos; Nascimento, Janaína D F; Moura, Danielle; Darzynkiewicz, Edward; Hill, Kent; de Melo Neto, Osvaldo P; Wohlschlegel, James A; Sturm, Nancy R; Campbell, David A

    2014-07-01

    Trypanosomes lack the transcriptional control characteristic of the majority of eukaryotes that is mediated by gene-specific promoters in a one-gene-one-promoter arrangement. Rather, their genomes are transcribed in large polycistrons with no obvious functional linkage. Posttranscriptional regulation of gene expression must thus play a larger role in these organisms. The eIF4E homolog TbEIF4E6 binds mRNA cap analogs in vitro and is part of a complex in vivo that may fulfill such a role. Knockdown of TbEIF4E6 tagged with protein A-tobacco etch virus protease cleavage site-protein C to approximately 15% of the normal expression level resulted in viable cells that displayed a set of phenotypes linked to detachment of the flagellum from the length of the cell body, if not outright flagellum loss. While these cells appeared and behaved as normal under stationary liquid culture conditions, standard centrifugation resulted in a marked increase in flagellar detachment. Furthermore, the ability of TbEIF4E6-depleted cells to engage in social motility was reduced. The TbEIF4E6 protein forms a cytosolic complex containing a triad of proteins, including the eIF4G homolog TbEIF4G5 and a hypothetical protein of 70.3 kDa, referred to as TbG5-IP. The TbG5-IP analysis revealed two domains with predicted secondary structures conserved in mRNA capping enzymes: nucleoside triphosphate hydrolase and guanylyltransferase. These complex members have the potential for RNA interaction, either via the 5' cap structure for TbEIF4E6 and TbG5-IP or through RNA-binding domains in TbEIF4G5. The associated proteins provide a signpost for future studies to determine how this complex affects capped RNA molecules. PMID:24839125

  2. Radiolabeled cellular blood elements

    SciTech Connect

    Thakur, M.L.; Ezikowitz, M.D.; Hardeman, M.R.

    1985-01-01

    This book contains papers delivered by guest lectures and participants at the Advanced Study Institute's colloquium on Radiolabeled Cellular Blood Elements at Maratea, Italy on August 29, to September 9, 1982. The book includes chapters on basic cell physiology and critical reviews of data and experience in the preparation and use of radiolabeled cells, as well as reports on very recent developments, from a faculty that included experts on cell physiology in health and disease and on the technology of in vivo labeling.

  3. Measurement Techniques for Cellular Biomechanics In Vitro

    PubMed Central

    Addae-Mensah, Kweku A; Wikswo, John P

    2014-01-01

    Living cells and tissues experience mechanical forces in their physiological environments that are known to affect many cellular processes. Also of importance are the mechanical properties of cells, as well as the microforces generated by cellular processes themselves in their microenvironments. The difficulty associated with studying these phenomena in vivo has led to alternatives such as using in vitro models. The need for experimental techniques for investigating cellular biomechanics and mechanobiology in vitro has fueled an evolution in the technology used in these studies. Particularly noteworthy are some of the new biomicroelectromechanical systems (BioMEMs) devices and techniques that have been introduced to the field. We describe some of the cellular micromechanical techniques and methods that have been developed for in vitro studies, and provide summaries of the ranges of measured values of various biomechanical quantities. We also briefly address some of our experiences in using these methods and include modifications we have introduced in order to improve them. PMID:18445766

  4. Predictability in cellular automata.

    PubMed

    Agapie, Alexandru; Andreica, Anca; Chira, Camelia; Giuclea, Marius

    2014-01-01

    Modelled as finite homogeneous Markov chains, probabilistic cellular automata with local transition probabilities in (0, 1) always posses a stationary distribution. This result alone is not very helpful when it comes to predicting the final configuration; one needs also a formula connecting the probabilities in the stationary distribution to some intrinsic feature of the lattice configuration. Previous results on the asynchronous cellular automata have showed that such feature really exists. It is the number of zero-one borders within the automaton's binary configuration. An exponential formula in the number of zero-one borders has been proved for the 1-D, 2-D and 3-D asynchronous automata with neighborhood three, five and seven, respectively. We perform computer experiments on a synchronous cellular automaton to check whether the empirical distribution obeys also that theoretical formula. The numerical results indicate a perfect fit for neighbourhood three and five, which opens the way for a rigorous proof of the formula in this new, synchronous case. PMID:25271778

  5. Discovery of pyrido[3,4-g]quinazoline derivatives as CMGC family protein kinase inhibitors: Design, synthesis, inhibitory potency and X-ray co-crystal structure.

    PubMed

    Esvan, Yannick J; Zeinyeh, Wael; Boibessot, Thibaut; Nauton, Lionel; Théry, Vincent; Knapp, Stefan; Chaikuad, Apirat; Loaëc, Nadège; Meijer, Laurent; Anizon, Fabrice; Giraud, Francis; Moreau, Pascale

    2016-08-01

    The design and synthesis of new pyrido[3,4-g]quinazoline derivatives is described as well as their protein kinase inhibitory potencies toward five CMGC family members (CDK5, CK1, GSK3, CLK1 and DYRK1A). The interest for this original tricyclic heteroaromatic scaffold as modulators of CLK1/DYRK1A activity was validated by nanomolar potencies (compounds 12 and 13). CLK1 co-crystal structures with two inhibitors revealed the binding mode of these compounds within the ATP-binding pocket. PMID:27128181

  6. [Cellular pathology of neurodegenerative disorders].

    PubMed

    Wakabayashi, Koichi

    2013-01-01

    Common cellular and molecular mechanisms including protein aggregation and inclusion body formation are involved in many neurodegenerative diseases. α-Synuclein is a major component of Lewy bodies in Parkinson's disease (PD) as well as in glial cytoplasmic inclusions in multiple system atrophy (MSA). Tau is a principal component of neurofibrillary and glial tangles in tauopathies. Recently, TDP-43 was identified as a component of ubiquitinated inclusions in amyotrophic lateral sclerosis and frontotemporal lobar degeneration. PD is traditionally considered a movement disorder with hallmark lesions in the brainstem pigmented nuclei. However, pathological changes occur in widespread regions of the central and peripheral nervous systems in this disease. Furthermore, primary glial involvement ("gliodegeneration") can be observed in PD and MSA as well as in tauopathy. The present article reviews abnormal protein accumulation and inclusion body formation inside and outside the central nervous system. PMID:23965852

  7. Cellular senescence and protein degradation

    PubMed Central

    Deschênes-Simard, Xavier; Lessard, Frédéric; Gaumont-Leclerc, Marie-France; Bardeesy, Nabeel; Ferbeyre, Gerardo

    2014-01-01

    Autophagy and the ubiquitin–proteasome pathway (UPP) are the major protein degradation systems in eukaryotic cells. Whereas the former mediate a bulk nonspecific degradation, the UPP allows a rapid degradation of specific proteins. Both systems have been shown to play a role in tumorigenesis, and the interest in developing therapeutic agents inhibiting protein degradation is steadily growing. However, emerging data point to a critical role for autophagy in cellular senescence, an established tumor suppressor mechanism. Recently, a selective protein degradation process mediated by the UPP was also shown to contribute to the senescence phenotype. This process is tightly regulated by E3 ubiquitin ligases, deubiquitinases, and several post-translational modifications of target proteins. Illustrating the complexity of UPP, more than 600 human genes have been shown to encode E3 ubiquitin ligases, a number which exceeds that of the protein kinases. Nevertheless, our knowledge of proteasome-dependent protein degradation as a regulated process in cellular contexts such as cancer and senescence remains very limited. Here we discuss the implications of protein degradation in senescence and attempt to relate this function to the protein degradation pattern observed in cancer cells. PMID:24866342

  8. DNA repair gene XPD Asp312Asn and XRCC4 G-1394T polymorphisms and the risk of autism spectrum disorder.

    PubMed

    Dasdemir, S; Guven, M; Pekkoc, K C; Ulucan, H; Dogangun, B; Kirtas, E; Kadak, M T; Kucur, M; Seven, M

    2016-01-01

    Autism spectrum disorder (ASD) is a complex disorder, and its extreme heterogeneity further complicates our understanding of its biology. Epidemiological evidence from family and twin studies supports a strong genetic component in ASD etiology. Oxidative stress and abnormal DNA methylation have been implicated in the pathophysiology of ASD. Brain tissues from ASD cases showed higher levels of oxidative stress biomarkers than healthy controls in postmortem analysis. Association between oxidative stress and DNA damage has been well-known. Thus, we sought to investigate a potential link between DNA repair genes and ASD and analyze the role of XPD Asp312Asn and XRCC4 G-1394T gene polymorphisms for ASD in the Turkish population. Genotyping was conducted by PCR-RFLP based on 100 patients and 96 unrelated healthy controls. We, for the first time, demonstrated a positive association between XRCC4 gene variants and ASD risk. Frequencies of XRCC4-1394 T/G+G/G genotypes were higher in patients (%34) than the controls (%18.7). The statistical analysis revealed that the individuals who had XRCC4-1394 T/G+G/G genotype had an increased risk for ASD (OR = 2.23, 95% CI = 1.10-4.55). However, no significant association was found for XPD Asp312Asn polymorphism with the risk of ASD. Our findings suggest that XRCC4 G-1394T polymorphism might be associated with ASD pathogenesis. PMID:27064873

  9. Formin’ cellular structures

    PubMed Central

    Bogdan, Sven; Schultz, Jörg; Grosshans, Jörg

    2014-01-01

    Members of the Diaphanous (Dia) protein family are key regulators of fundamental actin driven cellular processes, which are conserved from yeast to humans. Researchers have uncovered diverse physiological roles in cell morphology, cell motility, cell polarity, and cell division, which are involved in shaping cells into tissues and organs. The identification of numerous binding partners led to substantial progress in our understanding of the differential functions of Dia proteins. Genetic approaches and new microscopy techniques allow important new insights into their localization, activity, and molecular principles of regulation. PMID:24719676

  10. Understanding the cellular mechanism of recovery from freeze-thaw injury in spinach: possible role of aquaporins, heat shock proteins, dehydrin and antioxidant system.

    PubMed

    Chen, Keting; Arora, Rajeev

    2014-03-01

    Recovery from reversible freeze-thaw injury in plants is a critical component of ultimate frost survival. However, little is known about this aspect at the cellular level. To explore possible cellular mechanism(s) for post-thaw recovery (REC), we used Spinacia oleracea L. cv. Bloomsdale leaves to first determine the reversible freeze-thaw injury point. Freeze (-4.5°C)-thaw-injured tissues (32% injury vs <3% in unfrozen control) fully recovered during post-thaw, as assessed by an ion leakage-based method. Our data indicate that photosystem II efficiency (Fv/Fm) was compromised in injured tissues but recovered during post-thaw. Similarly, the reactive oxygen species (O2 (•-) and H2 O2 ) accumulated in injured tissues but dissipated during recovery, paralleled by the repression and restoration, respectively, of activities of antioxidant enzymes, superoxide dismutase (SOD) (EC. 1.14.1.1), and catalase (CAT) (EC.1.11.1.6) and ascorbate peroxidase (APX) (EC.1.11.1.11). Restoration of CAT and APX activities during recovery was slower than SOD, concomitant with a slower depletion of H2 O2 compared to O2 (•-) . A hypothesis was also tested that the REC is accompanied by changes in the expression of water channels [aquaporines (AQPs)] likely needed for re-absorption of thawed extracellular water. Indeed, the expression of two spinach AQPs, SoPIP2;1 and SoδTIP, was downregulated in injured tissues and restored during recovery. Additionally, a notion that molecular chaperones [heat shock protein of 70 kDa (HSP70s)] and putative membrane stabilizers [dehydrins (DHNs)] are recruited during recovery to restore cellular homeostasis was also tested. We noted that, after an initial repression in injured tissues, the expression of three HSP70s (cytosolic, endoplasmic reticulum and mitochondrial) and a spinach DHN (CAP85) was significantly restored during the REC. PMID:23981077

  11. Cellular Biology of Prion Diseases

    PubMed Central

    Harris, David A.

    1999-01-01

    Prion diseases are fatal neurodegenerative disorders of humans and animals that are important because of their impact on public health and because they exemplify a novel mechanism of infectivity and biological information transfer. These diseases are caused by conformational conversion of a normal host glycoprotein (PrPC) into an infectious isoform (PrPSc) that is devoid of nucleic acid. This review focuses on the current understanding of prion diseases at the cell biological level. The characteristics of the diseases are introduced, and a brief history and description of the prion hypothesis are given. Information is then presented about the structure, expression, biosynthesis, and possible function of PrPC, as well as its posttranslational processing, cellular localization, and trafficking. The latest findings concerning PrPSc are then discussed, including cell culture systems used to generate this pathogenic isoform, the subcellular distribution of the protein, its membrane attachment, proteolytic processing, and its kinetics and sites of synthesis. Information is also provided on molecular models of the PrPC→PrPSc conversion reaction and the possible role of cellular chaperones. The review concludes with suggestions of several important avenues for future investigation. PMID:10398674

  12. Association of G894T eNOS, 4G/5G PAI and T1131C APOA5 polymorphisms with susceptibility to myocardial infarction in Morocco

    PubMed Central

    Hassani Idrissi, Hind; Hmimech, Wiam; Diakite, Brehima; Korchi, Farah; Baghdadi, Dalila; Habbal, Rachida; Nadifi, Sellama

    2016-01-01

    Background Myocardial infarction (MI) is a common multifactorial disease. Numerous studies have found that genetic plays an essential role in MI occurrence. The main objective of our case–control study is to explore the association of G894T eNOS (rs1799983), 4G/5G PAI (rs1799889) and T1131C APOA5 (rs662799) polymorphisms with MI susceptibility in the Moroccan population. Methods and results 118 MI patients were recruited vs 184 healthy controls. DNA samples were genotyped by PCR-RFLP method using MboI, BslI and MseI restriction enzymes respectively for the G894T eNOS, 4G/5G PAI and T1131C APOA5 polymorphisms. Our results show that the G894T eNOS was significantly associated with increased risk of MI under the three genetic transmission models (dominant: OR = 1.64, 95% CI = 1.05–2.58, P = 0.003; recessive: OR = 2.15, 95% CI = 0.74–6.16, P = 0.03; additive: OR = 1.54, 95% CI = 1.06–2.23, P = 0.001). The T1131C APOA5 polymorphism was associated to MI risk in recessive and additive models (OR = 1.53, 95% CI = 0.72–3.2, P = 0.04 and OR = 1.78, 95% CI = 1.26–2.51, P = 0.03 respectively). For the 4G/5G PAI variant, even the cases and controls groups were not in Hardy–Weinberg Equilibrium (HWE), the dominant and additive models show a statistically significant association with MI risk (OR = 7.96, 95%CI = 3.83–16.36, P = 0.01 and OR = 1.96, 95% CI = 1.4–2.72, P = 0.03 respectively). Conclusion Our results suggest that G894T eNOS and T1131C APOA5 polymorphisms may be considered as genetic markers of MI among the Moroccan population. Further studies including larger sample sizes and exploring more genetic associations are needed to confirm our results and to better understand the susceptibility to MI. PMID:27222817

  13. cDNA cloning, expression analysis, and chromosomal localization of a gene with high homology to wheat eIF-(iso)4F and mammalian eIF-4G

    SciTech Connect

    Shaughnessy, J.D. Jr.; Jenkins, N.A.; Copeland, N.G.

    1997-01-15

    A novel mammalian gene, Eif4g2, with a high degree of homology to the p82 subunit of the wheat germ eukaryotic translation initiation factor eIF-(iso)4F and mammalian eIF-4G has been isolated. Zoo blot analysis indicates that Eif4g2 is a single-copy gene that is highly conserved among vertebrates. Northern blot analysis shows that Eif4g2 is ubiquitously expressed at high levels in all human and mouse tissues examined. The 3810-nucleotide Eif4g2 cDNA contains a 907-amino-acid open reading frame that codes for a polypeptide with a predicted molecular mass of 102 kDa. The Eif4g2 polypeptide exhibits an overall similarity to wheat p82 of 52%. A 248-amino-acid segment at the amino-terminal end of both peptides exhibits 63% similarity and contains conserved potential RNA binding domains and a phosphorylation site. The Eif4g2 polypeptide contains multiple potential N-linked glycosylation sites as well as protein kinase C and casein kinase II phosphorylation sites. Southern blot analysis of DNA from interspecific backcross mice shows that Eif4g2 is localized to distal mouse chromosome 7 in a region syntenic with human chromosome 11p15. 25 refs., 5 figs.

  14. Cellular cardiomyoplasty A preliminary clinical report

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang Fumin; Gao Xiang; Yiang Zhijian; Ma Wenzhu; Li Chuanfu; Kao, Race L

    2003-03-01

    Background: Cellular cardiomyoplasty is the method of transplanting myogenic cells into injured myocardium to restore the lost heart muscle cells and to improve ventricular function. Method: Three patients, all with a history of coronary heart disease, underwent coronary artery bypass grafting and implantation of autologous satellite cells. A muscle biopsy of 2-4 g from the right vastus lateralis muscle was obtained for satellite cell (myogenic stem cell from skeletal muscle) isolation and proliferation before implanted into the donor's heart. The cells were suspended in serum-free medium and injected into 30-40 sites at and around the ischemic areas just before reversing the hypothermic cardioplegia to eliminate arrhythmia and to improve retention. After recovery, each patient was maintained at the intensive care unit for 3-4 days with ECG monitoring before transferring to the patient floor. Results: All patients survived the procedure with an uneventful recovery and were discharged from the hospital. At 3-4 months follow-up examination, increased left ventricular ejection fraction of 11% (35-46%), 5.4% (40-45.4%) and 1% (40-41%) and decreased left ventricular diastolic diameter of 4, 2 and 9 mm were observed for the patients, respectively. Arrhythmia was not detected during the follow-up evaluation by ECG. Improved perfusion ({sup 99m}TC-MIBI) and increased metabolic activity ({sup 18}F-deoxyglucose) were found at the sites of satellite cell implantation. Significant increase of wall thickness and movement at the areas of cell injection was also observed using 2D-echo. Conclusion: Cellular cardiomyoplasty using autologous satellite cells is a safe procedure with encouraging beneficial outcomes in patients.

  15. Improvement of Cellular Uptake and Transfection Ability of pDNA Using α-Cyclodextrin-Polyamidoamine Conjugates as Gene Delivery System.

    PubMed

    Qin, Linghao; Cao, Duanwen; Huang, Huan; Ji, Gangjian; Feng, Min; Chen, Jianhai; Pan, Shirong

    2016-02-01

    Polyamidoamine (PAMAM) dendrimers are a class of unique nanomaterials which attracted attention because of their extraordinary properties, such as highly branched structure and types of terminal primary groups. In addition, development in PAMAM chemical modification has broadened its biological application especially for drug and gene delivery. In this study, PAMAMs are covalently conjugated onto α-Cyclodextrin (α-CD) via amide bonds obtaining the starburst cationic polymers (CD-PG2). The chemical structure and composition of CD-PG2 was characterized by IH NMR. Physicochemical and biological properties of CD-PG2/pDNA polyplex were evaluated by agarose gel retardation, stability test against DNasecñ, MTT assay, DLS measurement, CLSM observation, LDH leakage test, cellular uptake route analysis and in-vitro cell transfection. Results showed that CD-PG2 can efficiently condense pDNA into nanoscale particles with a narrow size distribution, and protect pDNA form DNase I degradation. Compared with free PEI-25K and commercial product Lipofectamine2000, CD-PG2 shows excellent gene transfection efficiency without serum interference as well as relatively low cytotoxicity. Cellular uptake of CD-PG2/pDNA polyplex is mainly through CME and CvME route and further investigations demonstrate that α-CD can regulate CvME pathway to improve polyplex transfection behavior. In conclusion, CD-PG2 can be considered as a versatile tool for gene delivery, especially for gene transfer in-vivo. PMID:27305760

  16. Cellular Morphogenesis In Silico

    PubMed Central

    Shinbrot, Troy; Chun, Young; Caicedo-Carvajal, Carlos; Foty, Ramsey

    2009-01-01

    Abstract We describe a model that simulates spherical cells of different types that can migrate and interact either attractively or repulsively. We find that both expected morphologies and previously unreported patterns spontaneously self-assemble. Among the newly discovered patterns are a segmented state of alternating discs, and a “shish-kebab” state, in which one cell type forms a ring around a second type. We show that these unique states result from cellular attraction that increases with distance (e.g., as membranes stretch viscoelastically), and would not be seen in traditional, e.g., molecular, potentials that diminish with distance. Most of the states found computationally have been observed in vitro, and it remains to be established what role these self-assembled states may play in in vivo morphogenesis. PMID:19686642

  17. Cellular ageing mechanisms in osteoarthritis.

    PubMed

    Sacitharan, P K; Vincent, T L

    2016-08-01

    Age is the strongest independent risk factor for the development of osteoarthritis (OA) and for many years this was assumed to be due to repetitive microtrauma of the joint surface over time, the so-called 'wear and tear' arthritis. As our understanding of OA pathogenesis has become more refined, it has changed our appreciation of the role of ageing on disease. Cartilage breakdown in disease is not a passive process but one involving induction and activation of specific matrix-degrading enzymes; chondrocytes are exquisitely sensitive to changes in the mechanical, inflammatory and metabolic environment of the joint; cartilage is continuously adapting to these changes by altering its matrix. Ageing influences all of these processes. In this review, we will discuss how ageing affects tissue structure, joint use and the cellular metabolism. We describe what is known about pathways implicated in ageing in other model systems and discuss the potential value of targeting these pathways in OA. PMID:27215642

  18. Investigation of a Calcium-Responsive Contrast Agent in Cellular Model Systems: Feasibility for Use as a Smart Molecular Probe in Functional MRI

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Responsive or smart contrast agents (SCAs) represent a promising direction for development of novel functional MRI (fMRI) methods for the eventual noninvasive assessment of brain function. In particular, SCAs that respond to Ca2+ may allow tracking neuronal activity independent of brain vasculature, thus avoiding the characteristic limitations of current fMRI techniques. Here we report an in vitro proof-of-principle study with a Ca2+-sensitive, Gd3+-based SCA in an attempt to validate its potential use as a functional in vivo marker. First, we quantified its relaxometric response in a complex 3D cell culture model. Subsequently, we examined potential changes in the functionality of primary glial cells following administration of this SCA. Monitoring intracellular Ca2+ showed that, despite a reduction in the Ca2+ level, transport of Ca2+ through the plasma membrane remained unaffected, while stimulation with ATP induced Ca2+-transients suggested normal cellular signaling in the presence of low millimolar SCA concentrations. SCAs merely lowered the intracellular Ca2+ level. Finally, we estimated the longitudinal relaxation times (T1) for an idealized in vivo fMRI experiment with SCA, for extracellular Ca2+ concentration level changes expected during intense neuronal activity which takes place upon repetitive stimulation. The values we obtained indicate changes in T1 of around 1–6%, sufficient to be robustly detectable using modern MRI methods in high field scanners. Our results encourage further attempts to develop even more potent SCAs and appropriate fMRI protocols. This would result in novel methods that allow monitoring of essential physiological processes at the cellular and molecular level. PMID:24712900

  19. Increased efficacy of VX-809 in different cellular systems results from an early stabilization effect of F508del-CFTR.

    PubMed

    Farinha, Carlos M; Sousa, Marisa; Canato, Sara; Schmidt, André; Uliyakina, Inna; Amaral, Margarida D

    2015-08-01

    Cystic fibrosis (CF), the most common recessive autosomal disease among Caucasians, is caused by mutations in the gene encoding the CF transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR) protein. The most common mutation, F508del, leads to CFTR impaired plasma membrane trafficking. Therapies modulating CFTR basic defect are emerging, such as VX-809, a corrector of F508del-CFTR traffic which just succeeded in a Phase III clinical trial. We recently showed that VX-809 is additive to two other correctors (VRT-325 and compound 4a). Here, we aimed to determine whether the differential rescuing by these compounds results from cell-specific factors or rather from distinct effects at the early biogenesis and/or processing. The rescuing efficiencies of the above three correctors were first compared in different cellular models (primary respiratory cells, cystic fibrosis bronchial epithelial and baby hamster kidney [BHK] cell lines) by functional approaches: micro-Ussing chamber and iodide efflux. Next, biochemical methods (metabolic labeling, pulse-chase and immunoprecipitation) were used to determine their impact on CFTR biogenesis / processing. Functional analyses revealed that VX-809 has the greatest rescuing efficacy and that the relative efficiencies of the three compounds are essentially maintained in all three cellular models tested. Nevertheless, biochemical data show that VX-809 significantly stabilizes F508del-CFTR immature form, an effect that is not observed for C3 nor C4. VX-809 and C3 also significantly increase accumulation of immature CFTR. Our data suggest that VX-809 increases the stability of F508del-CFTR immature form at an early phase of its biogenesis, thus explaining its increased efficacy when inducing its rescue. PMID:26171232

  20. Increased efficacy of VX-809 in different cellular systems results from an early stabilization effect of F508del-CFTR

    PubMed Central

    Farinha, Carlos M; Sousa, Marisa; Canato, Sara; Schmidt, André; Uliyakina, Inna; Amaral, Margarida D

    2015-01-01

    Cystic fibrosis (CF), the most common recessive autosomal disease among Caucasians, is caused by mutations in the gene encoding the CF transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR) protein. The most common mutation, F508del, leads to CFTR impaired plasma membrane trafficking. Therapies modulating CFTR basic defect are emerging, such as VX-809, a corrector of F508del-CFTR traffic which just succeeded in a Phase III clinical trial. We recently showed that VX-809 is additive to two other correctors (VRT-325 and compound 4a). Here, we aimed to determine whether the differential rescuing by these compounds results from cell-specific factors or rather from distinct effects at the early biogenesis and/or processing. The rescuing efficiencies of the above three correctors were first compared in different cellular models (primary respiratory cells, cystic fibrosis bronchial epithelial and baby hamster kidney [BHK] cell lines) by functional approaches: micro-Ussing chamber and iodide efflux. Next, biochemical methods (metabolic labeling, pulse-chase and immunoprecipitation) were used to determine their impact on CFTR biogenesis / processing. Functional analyses revealed that VX-809 has the greatest rescuing efficacy and that the relative efficiencies of the three compounds are essentially maintained in all three cellular models tested. Nevertheless, biochemical data show that VX-809 significantly stabilizes F508del-CFTR immature form, an effect that is not observed for C3 nor C4. VX-809 and C3 also significantly increase accumulation of immature CFTR. Our data suggest that VX-809 increases the stability of F508del-CFTR immature form at an early phase of its biogenesis, thus explaining its increased efficacy when inducing its rescue. PMID:26171232

  1. Loss of cone cyclic nucleotide-gated channel leads to alterations in light response modulating system and cellular stress response pathways: a gene expression profiling study.

    PubMed

    Ma, Hongwei; Thapa, Arjun; Morris, Lynsie M; Michalakis, Stylianos; Biel, Martin; Frank, Mark Barton; Bebak, Melissa; Ding, Xi-Qin

    2013-10-01

    The cone photoreceptor cyclic nucleotide-gated (CNG) channel is essential for central and color vision and visual acuity. Mutations in the channel subunits CNGA3 and CNGB3 are associated with achromatopsia and cone dystrophy. We investigated the gene expression profiles in mouse retina with CNG channel deficiency using whole genome expression microarrays. As cones comprise only 2 to 3% of the total photoreceptor population in the wild-type mouse retina, the mouse lines with CNG channel deficiency on a cone-dominant background, i.e. Cnga3-/-/Nrl-/- and Cngb3-/-/Nrl-/- mice, were used in our study. Comparative data analysis revealed a total of 105 genes altered in Cnga3-/-/Nrl-/- and 92 in Cngb3-/-/Nrl-/- retinas, relative to Nrl-/- retinas, with 27 genes changed in both genotypes. The differentially expressed genes primarily encode proteins associated with cell signaling, cellular function maintenance and gene expression. Ingenuity pathway analysis (IPA) identified 26 and 9 canonical pathways in Cnga3-/-/Nrl-/- and Cngb3-/-/Nrl-/- retinas, respectively, with 6 pathways being shared. The shared pathways include phototransduction, cAMP/PKA-mediated signaling, endothelin signaling, and EIF2/endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress, whereas the IL-1, CREB, and purine metabolism signaling were found to specifically associate with Cnga3 deficiency. Thus, CNG channel deficiency differentially regulates genes that affect cell processes such as phototransduction, cellular survival and gene expression, and such regulations play a crucial role(s) in the retinal adaptation to impaired cone phototransduction. Though lack of Cnga3 and Cngb3 shares many common pathways, deficiency of Cnga3 causes more significant alterations in gene expression. This work provides insights into how cones respond to impaired phototransduction at the gene expression levels. PMID:23740940

  2. Loss of cone cyclic nucleotide-gated channel leads to alterations in light response modulating system and cellular stress response pathways: a gene expression profiling study

    PubMed Central

    Ma, Hongwei; Thapa, Arjun; Morris, Lynsie M.; Michalakis, Stylianos; Biel, Martin; Frank, Mark Barton; Bebak, Melissa; Ding, Xi-Qin

    2013-01-01

    The cone photoreceptor cyclic nucleotide-gated (CNG) channel is essential for central and color vision and visual acuity. Mutations in the channel subunits CNGA3 and CNGB3 are associated with achromatopsia and cone dystrophy. We investigated the gene expression profiles in mouse retina with CNG channel deficiency using whole genome expression microarrays. As cones comprise only 2 to 3% of the total photoreceptor population in the wild-type mouse retina, the mouse lines with CNG channel deficiency on a cone-dominant background, i.e. Cnga3−/−/Nrl−/− and Cngb3−/−/Nrl−/− mice, were used in our study. Comparative data analysis revealed a total of 105 genes altered in Cnga3−/−/Nrl−/− and 92 in Cngb3−/−/Nrl−/− retinas, relative to Nrl−/− retinas, with 27 genes changed in both genotypes. The differentially expressed genes primarily encode proteins associated with cell signaling, cellular function maintenance and gene expression. Ingenuity pathway analysis (IPA) identified 26 and 9 canonical pathways in Cnga3−/−/Nrl−/− and Cngb3−/−/Nrl−/− retinas, respectively, with 6 pathways being shared. The shared pathways include phototransduction, cAMP/PKA-mediated signaling, endothelin signaling, and EIF2/endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress, whereas the IL-1, CREB, and purine metabolism signaling were found to specifically associate with Cnga3 deficiency. Thus, CNG channel deficiency differentially regulates genes that affect cell processes such as phototransduction, cellular survival and gene expression, and such regulations play a crucial role(s) in the retinal adaptation to impaired cone phototransduction. Though lack of Cnga3 and Cngb3 shares many common pathways, deficiency of Cnga3 causes more significant alterations in gene expression. This work provides insights into how cones respond to impaired phototransduction at the gene expression levels. PMID:23740940

  3. Analysis of Blocking Rate and Bandwidth Usage of Mobile IPTV Services in Wireless Cellular Networks

    PubMed Central

    Li, Mingfu

    2014-01-01

    Mobile IPTV services over wireless cellular networks become more and more popular, owing to the significant growth in access bandwidth of wireless cellular networks such as 3G/4G and WiMAX. However, the spectrum resources of wireless cellular networks is rare. How to enhance the spectral efficiency of mobile networks becomes an important issue. Unicast, broadcast, and multicast are the most important transport schemes for offering mobile IPTV services over wireless cellular networks. Therefore, bandwidth usages and blocking rates of unicast, broadcast, and multicast IPTV services were analyzed and compared in this paper. Simulations were also conducted to validate the analytical results. Numerical results demonstrate that the presented analysis is correct, and multicast scheme achieves the best bandwidth usage and blocking rate performance, relative to the other two schemes. PMID:25379521

  4. Analysis of blocking rate and bandwidth usage of mobile IPTV services in wireless cellular networks.

    PubMed

    Li, Mingfu

    2014-01-01

    Mobile IPTV services over wireless cellular networks become more and more popular, owing to the significant growth in access bandwidth of wireless cellular networks such as 3G/4G and WiMAX. However, the spectrum resources of wireless cellular networks is rare. How to enhance the spectral efficiency of mobile networks becomes an important issue. Unicast, broadcast, and multicast are the most important transport schemes for offering mobile IPTV services over wireless cellular networks. Therefore, bandwidth usages and blocking rates of unicast, broadcast, and multicast IPTV services were analyzed and compared in this paper. Simulations were also conducted to validate the analytical results. Numerical results demonstrate that the presented analysis is correct, and multicast scheme achieves the best bandwidth usage and blocking rate performance, relative to the other two schemes. PMID:25379521

  5. Cellular-automata method for phase unwrapping

    SciTech Connect

    Ghiglia, D.C.; Mastin, G.A.; Romero, L.A.

    1987-01-01

    Research into two-dimensional phase unwrapping has uncovered interesting and troublesome inconsistencies that cause path-dependent results. Cellular automata, which are simple, discrete mathematical systems, offered promise of computation in nondirectional, parallel manner. A cellular automaton was discovered that can unwrap consistent phase data in n dimensions in a path-independent manner and can automatically accommodate noise-induced (pointlike) inconsistencies and arbitrary boundary conditions (region partitioning). For data with regional (nonpointlike) inconsistencies, no phase-unwrapping algorithm will converge, including the cellular-automata approach. However, the automata method permits more simple visualization of the regional inconsistencies. Examples of its behavior on one- and two-dimensional data are presented.

  6. Understanding cellular architecture in cancer cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bianco, Simone; Tang, Chao

    2011-03-01

    Understanding the development of cancer is an important goal for today's science. The morphology of cellular organelles, such as the nucleus, the nucleoli and the mitochondria, which is referred to as cellular architecture or cytoarchitecture, is an important indicator of the state of the cell. In particular, there are striking difference between the cellular architecture of a healthy cell versus a cancer cell. In this work we present a dynamical model for the evolution of organelles morphology in cancer cells. Using a dynamical systems approach, we describe the evolution of a cell on its way to cancer as a trajectory in a multidimensional morphology state. The results provided by this work may increase our insight on the mechanism of tumorigenesis and help build new therapeutic strategies.

  7. In situ construction of g-C3N4/g-C3N4 metal-free heterojunction for enhanced visible-light photocatalysis.

    PubMed

    Dong, Fan; Zhao, Zaiwang; Xiong, Ting; Ni, Zilin; Zhang, Wendong; Sun, Yanjuan; Ho, Wing-Kei

    2013-11-13

    The photocatalytic performance of the star photocatalyst g-C3N4 was restricted by the low efficiency because of the fast charge recombination. The present work developed a facile in situ method to construct g-C3N4/g-C3N4 metal-free isotype heterojunction with molecular composite precursors with the aim to greatly promote the charge separation. Considering the fact that g-C3N4 samples prepared from urea and thiourea separately have different band structure, the molecular composite precursors of urea and thiourea were treated simultaneously under the same thermal conditions, in situ creating a novel layered g-C3N4/g-C3N4 metal-free heterojunction (g-g CN heterojunction). This synthesis method is facile, economic, and environmentally benign using easily available earth-abundant green precursors. The confirmation of isotype g-g CN heterojunction was based on XRD, HRTEM, valence band XPS, ns-level PL, photocurrent, and EIS measurement. Upon visible-light irradiation, the photogenerated electrons transfer from g-C3N4 (thiourea) to g-C3N4 (urea) driven by the conduction band offset of 0.10 eV, whereas the photogenerated holes transfer from g-C3N4 (urea) to g-C3N4 (thiourea) driven by the valence band offset of 0.40 eV. The potential difference between the two g-C3N4 components in the heterojunction is the main driving force for efficient charge separation and transfer. For the removal of NO in air, the g-g CN heterojunction exhibited significantly enhanced visible light photocatalytic activity over g-C3N4 alone and physical mixture of g-C3N4 samples. The enhanced photocatalytic performance of g-g CN isotype heterojunction can be directly ascribed to efficient charge separation and transfer across the heterojunction interface as well as prolonged lifetime of charge carriers. This work demonstrated that rational design and construction of isotype heterojunction could open up a new avenue for the development of new efficient visible-light photocatalysts. PMID:24144400

  8. Cellular energy metabolism

    SciTech Connect

    Glaser, M.

    1991-06-01

    Studies have been carried out on adenylate kinase which is an important enzyme in determining the concentrations of the adenine nucleotides. An efficient method has been developed to clone mutant adenylate kinase genes in E. coli. Site-specific mutagenesis of the wild type gene also has been used to obtain forms of adenylate kinase with altered amino acids. The wild type and mutant forms of adenylate kinase have been overexpressed and large quantities were readily isolated. The kinetic and fluorescence properties of the different forms of adenylate kinase were characterized. This has led to a new model for the location of the AMP and ATP bindings sites on the enzyme and a proposal for the mechanism of substrate inhibition. Crystals of the wild type enzyme were obtained that diffract to at least 2.3 {angstrom} resolution. Experiments were also initiated to determine the function of adenylate kinase in vivo. In one set of experiments, E. coli strains with mutations in adenylate kinase showed large changes in cellular nucleotides after reaching the stationary phase in a low phosphate medium. This was caused by selective proteolytic degradation of the mutant adenylate kinase caused by phosphate starvation.

  9. Electrosurgery with cellular precision.

    PubMed

    Palanker, Daniel V; Vankov, Alexander; Huie, Philip

    2008-02-01

    Electrosurgery, one of the most-often used surgical tools, is a robust but somewhat crude technology that has changed surprisingly little since its invention almost a century ago. Continuous radiofrequency is still used for tissue cutting, with thermal damage extending to hundreds of micrometers. In contrast, lasers developed 70 years later, have been constantly perfected, and the laser-tissue interactions explored in great detail, which has allowed tissue ablation with cellular precision in many laser applications. We discuss mechanisms of tissue damage by electric field, and demonstrate that electrosurgery with properly optimized waveforms and microelectrodes can rival many advanced lasers. Pulsed electric waveforms with burst durations ranging from 10 to 100 micros applied via insulated planar electrodes with 12 microm wide exposed edges produced plasma-mediated dissection of tissues with the collateral damage zone ranging from 2 to 10 microm. Length of the electrodes can vary from micrometers to centimeters and all types of soft tissues-from membranes to cartilage and skin could be dissected in liquid medium and in a dry field. This technology may allow for major improvements in outcomes of the current surgical procedures and development of much more refined surgical techniques. PMID:18270030

  10. After fertilization of sea urchin eggs, eIF4G is post-translationally modified and associated with the cap-binding protein eIF4E.

    PubMed

    Oulhen, Nathalie; Salaün, Patrick; Cosson, Bertrand; Cormier, Patrick; Morales, Julia

    2007-02-01

    Release of eukaryotic initiation factor 4E (eIF4E) from its translational repressor eIF4E-binding protein (4E-BP) is a crucial event for the first mitotic division following fertilization of sea urchin eggs. Finding partners of eIF4E following fertilization is crucial to understand how eIF4E functions during this physiological process. The isolation and characterization of cDNA encoding Sphaerechinus granularis eIF4G (SgIF4G) are reported. mRNA of SgIF4G is present as a single 8.5-kb transcript in unfertilized eggs, suggesting that only one ortholog exists in echinoderms. The longest open reading frame predicts a sequence of 5235 nucleotides encoding a deduced polypeptide of 1745 amino acids with a predicted molecular mass of 192 kDa. Among highly conserved domains, SgIF4G protein possesses motifs that correspond to the poly(A) binding protein and eIF4E protein-binding sites. A specific polyclonal antibody was produced and used to characterize the SgIF4G protein in unfertilized and fertilized eggs by SDS-PAGE and western blotting. Multiple differentially migrating bands representing isoforms of sea urchin eIF4G are present in unfertilized eggs. Fertilization triggers modifications of the SgIF4G isoforms and rapid formation of the SgIF4G-eIF4E complex. Whereas rapamycin inhibits the formation of the SgIF4G-eIF4E complex, modification of these SgIF4G isoforms occurs independently from the rapamycin-sensitive pathway. Microinjection of a peptide corresponding to the eIF4E-binding site derived from the sequence of SgIF4G into unfertilized eggs affects the first mitotic division of sea urchin embryos. Association of SgIF4G with eIF4E is a crucial event for the onset of the first mitotic division following fertilization, suggesting that cap-dependent translation is highly regulated during this process. This hypothesis is strengthened by the evidence that microinjection of the cap analog m(7)GDP into unfertilized eggs inhibits the first mitotic division. PMID:17213333

  11. Fundamental Limits to Cellular Sensing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    ten Wolde, Pieter Rein; Becker, Nils B.; Ouldridge, Thomas E.; Mugler, Andrew

    2016-03-01

    In recent years experiments have demonstrated that living cells can measure low chemical concentrations with high precision, and much progress has been made in understanding what sets the fundamental limit to the precision of chemical sensing. Chemical concentration measurements start with the binding of ligand molecules to receptor proteins, which is an inherently noisy process, especially at low concentrations. The signaling networks that transmit the information on the ligand concentration from the receptors into the cell have to filter this receptor input noise as much as possible. These networks, however, are also intrinsically stochastic in nature, which means that they will also add noise to the transmitted signal. In this review, we will first discuss how the diffusive transport and binding of ligand to the receptor sets the receptor correlation time, which is the timescale over which fluctuations in the state of the receptor, arising from the stochastic receptor-ligand binding, decay. We then describe how downstream signaling pathways integrate these receptor-state fluctuations, and how the number of receptors, the receptor correlation time, and the effective integration time set by the downstream network, together impose a fundamental limit on the precision of sensing. We then discuss how cells can remove the receptor input noise while simultaneously suppressing the intrinsic noise in the signaling network. We describe why this mechanism of time integration requires three classes (groups) of resources—receptors and their integration time, readout molecules, energy—and how each resource class sets a fundamental sensing limit. We also briefly discuss the scheme of maximum-likelihood estimation, the role of receptor cooperativity, and how cellular copy protocols differ from canonical copy protocols typically considered in the computational literature, explaining why cellular sensing systems can never reach the Landauer limit on the optimal trade

  12. Saturable absorption and two-photon absorption of 1,2,5-thiadiazolo[3,4-g]quinoxaline based derivatives with near-infrared fluorescence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Du, Yabing; Lin, Xiaodong; Jia, Tingjian; Dong, Jun

    2015-03-01

    Organic molecules with near-infrared (NIR) fluorescence are extremely interesting for the applications in nonlinear optical devices and bioimaging. However, such kind of materials have been relatively rarely studied. In this work, the nonlinear optical properties of 1,2,5-thiadiazolo[3,4-g]quinoxaline based derivatives with NIR fluorescence emission have been investigated for the first time. Under the excitation of femtosecond pulses at 532 nm, the chromophore with dithienyl as donor (TQ2) presents saturable absorption (SA) behavior, while no SA has been observed in the derivative with biphenyl (TQ1) as donor. Moreover, TQ2 exhibits much larger two-photon absorption (TPA) cross-sections with strong NIR fluorescence in the second biological window. The larger nonlinear optical properties of TQ2 is due to the introduction of stronger electron-donating group (dithienyl) and the resultant enhanced intramolecular charge transfer properties. At the end, TPA based optical limiting behaviors of the molecules are demonstrated in THF solutions, thanks to their large solubility and strong TPA.

  13. The GALEX/S4G UV-IR Color-Color Diagram: Catching Spiral Galaxies Away from the Blue Sequence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bouquin, Alexandre Y. K.; Gil de Paz, Armando; Boissier, Samuel; Muñoz-Mateos, Juan-Carlos; Sheth, Kartik; Zaritsky, Dennis; Laine, Jarkko; Gallego, Jesús; Peletier, Reynier F.; Röck, Benjamin R.; Knapen, Johan H.

    2015-02-01

    We obtained GALEX FUV, NUV, and Spitzer/IRAC 3.6 μm photometry for \\gt 2000 galaxies, available for 90% of the S4G sample. We find a very tight GALEX blue sequence (GBS) in the (FUV-NUV) versus (NUV-[3.6]) color-color diagram, which is populated by irregular and spiral galaxies, and is mainly driven by changes in the formation timescale (τ) and a degeneracy between τ and dust reddening. The tightness of the GBS provides an unprecedented way of identifying star-forming galaxies and objects that are just evolving to (or from) what we call the GALEX green valley (GGV). At the red end of the GBS, at (NUV-[3.6]) \\gt 5, we find a wider GALEX red sequence (GRS) mostly populated by E/S0 galaxies that has a perpendicular slope to that of the GBS and of the optical red sequence. We find no such dichotomy in terms of stellar mass (measured by {{M}[3.6]}) since both massive ({{M}\\star }\\gt {{10}11}{{M}⊙ }) blue- and red-sequence galaxies are identified. The type that is proportionally more often found in the GGV is the S0-Sa’s, and most of these are located in high-density environments. We discuss evolutionary models of galaxies that show a rapid transition from the blue to the red sequence on a timescale of 108 yr.

  14. EARLY-TYPE GALAXIES WITH TIDAL DEBRIS AND THEIR SCALING RELATIONS IN THE SPITZER SURVEY OF STELLAR STRUCTURE IN GALAXIES (S{sup 4}G)

    SciTech Connect

    Kim, Taehyun; Sheth, Kartik; Munoz-Mateos, Juan-Carlos; Lee, Myung Gyoon; Gadotti, Dimitri A.; Knapen, Johan H.; Schinnerer, Eva; Ho, Luis C.; Madore, Barry F.; Laurikainen, Eija; Salo, Heikki; Athanassoula, E.; Bosma, Albert; Comeron, Sebastien; Regan, Michael W.; Menendez-Delmestre, Karin; De Paz, Armando Gil; and others

    2012-07-01

    Tidal debris around galaxies can yield important clues on their evolution. We have identified tidal debris in 11 early-type galaxies (T {<=} 0) from a sample of 65 early types drawn from the Spitzer Survey of Stellar Structure in Galaxies (S{sup 4}G). The tidal debris includes features such as shells, ripples, and tidal tails. A variety of techniques, including two-dimensional decomposition of galactic structures, were used to quantify the residual tidal features. The tidal debris contributes {approx}3%-10% to the total 3.6 {mu}m luminosity of the host galaxy. Structural parameters of the galaxies were estimated using two-dimensional profile fitting. We investigate the locations of galaxies with tidal debris in the fundamental plane and Kormendy relation. We find that galaxies with tidal debris lie within the scatter of early-type galaxies without tidal features. Assuming that the tidal debris is indicative of recent gravitational interaction or merger, this suggests that these galaxies have either undergone minor merging events so that the overall structural properties of the galaxies are not significantly altered, or they have undergone a major merging events but already have experienced sufficient relaxation and phase mixing so that their structural properties become similar to those of the non-interacting early-type galaxies.

  15. Facile synthesis of novel CaFe2O4/g-C3N4 nanocomposites for degradation of methylene blue under visible-light irradiation.

    PubMed

    Vadivel, S; Maruthamani, D; Habibi-Yangjeh, A; Paul, Bappi; Dhar, Siddhartha Sankar; Selvam, Kaliyamoorthy

    2016-10-15

    Hybrid organic/inorganic nanocomposites comprised of calcium ferrite (CaFe2O4) and graphitic carbon nitride (g-C3N4) were prepared via a simple two-step process. The hybridized CaFe2O4/g-C3N4 heterostructure was characterized by a variety of techniques, including X-ray diffraction (XRD), Fourier transform-infrared spectroscopy (FT-IR), UV-vis diffuse reflectance spectroscopy (UV-vis DRS), scanning electron microscopy (SEM), transmission electron microscopy (TEM), energy dispersive analysis of X-rays (EDS), X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), photoluminescence spectroscopy, electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS), and photoelectrochemical studies. Photocatalytic activity of the prepared samples was evaluated against degradation of methylene blue (MB) under visible-light irradiation. The photocatalytic activity of CaFe2O4 30%/g-C3N4 nanocomposite, as optimum photocatalyst, for degradation of MB was superior to the pure CaFe2O4 and g-C3N4 samples. It was demonstrated that the photogenerated holes and superoxide ion radicals were the two main reactive species towards the photocatalytic degradation of MB over the nanocomposite. Based on the experimental results, a possible photocatalytic mechanism for the MB degradation over the nanocomposite was proposed. This work may provide some inspiration for the fabrication of spinel ferrites with efficient photocatalytic performance. PMID:27421115

  16. The Spitzer Survey of Stellar Structure in Galaxies (S4G): Stellar Masses, Sizes, and Radial Profiles for 2352 Nearby Galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Muñoz-Mateos, Juan Carlos; Sheth, Kartik; Regan, Michael; Kim, Taehyun; Laine, Jarkko; Erroz-Ferrer, Santiago; Gil de Paz, Armando; Comeron, Sebastien; Hinz, Joannah; Laurikainen, Eija; Salo, Heikki; Athanassoula, E.; Bosma, Albert; Bouquin, Alexandre Y. K.; Schinnerer, Eva; Ho, Luis; Zaritsky, Dennis; Gadotti, Dimitri A.; Madore, Barry; Holwerda, Benne; Menéndez-Delmestre, Karín; Knapen, Johan H.; Meidt, Sharon; Querejeta, Miguel; Mizusawa, Trisha; Seibert, Mark; Laine, Seppo; Courtois, Helene

    2015-07-01

    The Spitzer Survey of Stellar Structure in Galaxies is a volume, magnitude, and size-limited survey of 2352 nearby galaxies with deep imaging at 3.6 and 4.5 μm. In this paper, we describe our surface photometry pipeline and showcase the associated data products that we have released to the community. We also identify the physical mechanisms leading to different levels of central stellar mass concentration for galaxies with the same total stellar mass. Finally, we derive the local stellar mass-size relation at 3.6 μm for galaxies of different morphologies. Our radial profiles reach stellar mass surface densities below ˜ 1 {M}⊙ {{pc}}-2. Given the negligible impact of dust and the almost constant mass-to-light ratio at these wavelengths, these profiles constitute an accurate inventory of the radial distribution of stellar mass in nearby galaxies. From these profiles we have also derived global properties such as asymptotic magnitudes (and the corresponding stellar masses), isophotal sizes and shapes, and concentration indices. These and other data products from our various pipelines (science-ready mosaics, object masks, 2D image decompositions, and stellar mass maps) can be publicly accessed at IRSA (http://irsa.ipac.caltech.edu/data/SPITZER/S4G/).

  17. Fidelity of binding of the guanidinium nucleic acid (DNG) d(Tg)4-T-azido with short strand DNA oligomers (A5G3A5, GA4G3A4G, G2A3G3A3G2, G2A2G5A2G2). A kinetic and thermodynamic study.

    PubMed

    Blaskó, A; Minyat, E E; Dempcy, R O; Bruice, T C

    1997-06-24

    Short strand DNA oligomers (A5G3A5, GA4G3A4G, G2A3G3A3G2, and G2A2G5A2G2) and the guanidinium (g) linked thymidyl nucleoside d(Tg)4-T-azido associate as triplexes. The melting temperatures, Tm, the association and dissociation kinetic and thermodynamic parameters and activation energies for the triplexes were determined by UV thermal analysis. The hypochromic shift and Tm for triplex formation increases with increase in concentration and decreases with the number of mismatches. The melting temperatures are between 35 and 55 degrees C in the range of ionic strength of 0.06-0.24 and decrease with increase in ionic strength at 100 deg/(ionic strength unit). The melting and cooling curves exhibit hysteresis behavior in the temperature range 5-95 degrees C at 0.2 deg/min thermal rate. From these curves, the rate constants and the energies of activation for association (k(on), E(on)) and dissociation (k(off), E(off)) processes were obtained. The second-order rate constants, k(on), for the triplex formation at 288 K are between 10 and 500 M(-2) s(-1). Values of k(on) increase with the decrease in the ionic strength. The first order rate constants for the dissociation, k(off), at 288 K are between 10(-6) and 40 x 10(-6) s(-1) and increase with increase in ionic strength. The energies of activation for the association and dissociation processes are in the range -22 to -9 kcal/mol and 8 to 29 kcal/mol, respectively. At 6.3 x 10(-5) M/base and at the physiological ionic strength (0.15-0.30) and below, the triplex structures formed with d(Tg)4-T-azido and A5G3A5 and GA4G3A4G have well-defined Tm values. The melting curves with G2A3G3A3G2 and G2A2G5A2G2 are very shallow with small hypochromic shifts denoting negligible binding at physiological ionic strength. Therefore, with the increase in the G content (mismatched base pairs) at a certain concentration (e.g., 6.3 x 10(-5) M/base), discrimination (change in fidelity) occurs in the formation and strength of binding of d(Tg)4-T

  18. Gravitational studies in cellular and developmental biology

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Spooner, B. S.

    1992-01-01

    The paucity of data on the role of gravity in cellular and developmental biology has been examined, and a hypothesis has been generated that unifies potential gravity sensitivity in both plant and animal systems. This hypothesis considers the macromolecular order and functional importance of the extracellular matrix compartment, the intracellular cytoskeleton compartment, and the connecting plasma membrane-signal transduction compartment of plant and animal systems as potentially sensitive to alterations in the unit gravity environment in which they evolved.

  19. Phase separation and the formation of cellular bodies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Bin; Broedersz, Chase P.; Meir, Yigal; Wingreen, Ned S.

    Cellular bodies in eukaryotic cells spontaneously assemble to form cellular compartments. Among other functions, these bodies carry out essential biochemical reactions. Cellular bodies form micron-sized structures, which, unlike canonical cell organelles, are not surrounded by membranes. A recent in vitro experiment has shown that phase separation of polymers in solution can explain the formation of cellular bodies. We constructed a lattice-polymer model to capture the essential mechanism leading to this phase separation. We used both analytical and numerical tools to predict the phase diagram of a system of two interacting polymers, including the concentration of each polymer type in the condensed and dilute phase.

  20. Performance and System Validation of a New Cellular-Enabled Blood Glucose Monitoring System Using a New Standard Reference Measurement Procedure of Isotope Dilution UPLC-MRM Mass Spectrometry

    PubMed Central

    Angelides, Kimon; Matsunami, Risë K.; Engler, David A.

    2015-01-01

    Background: We evaluated the accuracy, precision, and linearity of the In Touch® blood glucose monitoring system (BGMS), a new color touch screen and cellular-enabled blood glucose meter, using a new rapid, highly precise and accurate 13C6 isotope-dilution liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry method (IDLC-MS). Methods: Blood glucose measurements from the In Touch® BGMS were referenced to a validated UPLC-MRM standard reference measurement procedure previously shown to be highly accurate and precise. Readings from the In Touch® BGMS were taken over the blood glucose range of 24-640 mg/dL using 12 concentrations of blood glucose. Ten In Touch® BGMS and 3 lots of test strips were used with 10 replicates at each concentration. A lay user study was also performed to assess the ease of use. Results: At blood glucose concentrations <75 mg/dL 100% of the measurements are within ±8 mg/dL from the true reference standard; at blood glucose levels >75 mg/dL 100% of the measurements are within ±15% of the true reference standard. 100% of the results are within category A of the consensus grid. Within-run precision show CV < 3.72% between 24-50 mg/dL and CV<2.22% between 500 and 600 mg/dL. The results show that the In Touch® meter exceeds the minimum criteria of both the ISO 15197:2003 and ISO 15197:2013 standards. The results from a user panel show that 100% of the respondents reported that the color touch screen, with its graphic user interface (GUI), is well labeled and easy to navigate. Conclusions: To our knowledge this is the first touch screen glucose meter and the first study where accuracy of a new BGMS has been measured against a true primary reference standard, namely IDLC-MS. PMID:26002836

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