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Sample records for 4h-sic p-i-n diodes

  1. Carbon nanotube intramolecular p-i-n junction diodes with symmetric and asymmetric contacts

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Changxin; Liao, Chenghao; Wei, Liangming; Zhong, Hanqing; He, Rong; Liu, Qinran; Liu, Xiaodong; Lai, Yunfeng; Song, Chuanjuan; Jin, Tiening; Zhang, Yafei

    2016-01-01

    A p-i-n junction diode based on the selectively doped single-walled carbon nanotube (SWCNT) had been investigated, in which two opposite ends of individual SWCNT channel were doped into the p- and n-type SWCNT respectively while the middle segment of SWCNT was kept as the intrinsic. The symmetric and asymmetric contacts were used to fabricate the p-i-n junction diodes respectively and studied the effect of the contact on the device characteristics. It was shown that a low reverse saturation current of ~20 pA could be achieved by these both diodes. We found that the use of the asymmetric contact can effectively improve the performance of the p-i-n diode, with the rectification ratio enhanced from ~102 for the device with the Au/Au symmetric contact to >103 for the one with the Pd/Al asymmetric contact. The improvement of the device performance by the asymmetric-contact structure was attributed to the decrease of the effective Schottky-barrier height at the contacts under forward bias, increasing the forward current of the diode. The p-i-n diode with asymmetric contact also had a higher rectification ratio than its counterpart before doping the SWCNT channel, which is because that the p-i-n junction in the device decreased the reverse saturated current. PMID:26915400

  2. Carbon nanotube intramolecular p-i-n junction diodes with symmetric and asymmetric contacts.

    PubMed

    Chen, Changxin; Liao, Chenghao; Wei, Liangming; Zhong, Hanqing; He, Rong; Liu, Qinran; Liu, Xiaodong; Lai, Yunfeng; Song, Chuanjuan; Jin, Tiening; Zhang, Yafei

    2016-01-01

    A p-i-n junction diode based on the selectively doped single-walled carbon nanotube (SWCNT) had been investigated, in which two opposite ends of individual SWCNT channel were doped into the p- and n-type SWCNT respectively while the middle segment of SWCNT was kept as the intrinsic. The symmetric and asymmetric contacts were used to fabricate the p-i-n junction diodes respectively and studied the effect of the contact on the device characteristics. It was shown that a low reverse saturation current of ~20 pA could be achieved by these both diodes. We found that the use of the asymmetric contact can effectively improve the performance of the p-i-n diode, with the rectification ratio enhanced from ~10(2) for the device with the Au/Au symmetric contact to >10(3) for the one with the Pd/Al asymmetric contact. The improvement of the device performance by the asymmetric-contact structure was attributed to the decrease of the effective Schottky-barrier height at the contacts under forward bias, increasing the forward current of the diode. The p-i-n diode with asymmetric contact also had a higher rectification ratio than its counterpart before doping the SWCNT channel, which is because that the p-i-n junction in the device decreased the reverse saturated current. PMID:26915400

  3. Carbon nanotube intramolecular p-i-n junction diodes with symmetric and asymmetric contacts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Changxin; Liao, Chenghao; Wei, Liangming; Zhong, Hanqing; He, Rong; Liu, Qinran; Liu, Xiaodong; Lai, Yunfeng; Song, Chuanjuan; Jin, Tiening; Zhang, Yafei

    2016-02-01

    A p-i-n junction diode based on the selectively doped single-walled carbon nanotube (SWCNT) had been investigated, in which two opposite ends of individual SWCNT channel were doped into the p- and n-type SWCNT respectively while the middle segment of SWCNT was kept as the intrinsic. The symmetric and asymmetric contacts were used to fabricate the p-i-n junction diodes respectively and studied the effect of the contact on the device characteristics. It was shown that a low reverse saturation current of ~20 pA could be achieved by these both diodes. We found that the use of the asymmetric contact can effectively improve the performance of the p-i-n diode, with the rectification ratio enhanced from ~102 for the device with the Au/Au symmetric contact to >103 for the one with the Pd/Al asymmetric contact. The improvement of the device performance by the asymmetric-contact structure was attributed to the decrease of the effective Schottky-barrier height at the contacts under forward bias, increasing the forward current of the diode. The p-i-n diode with asymmetric contact also had a higher rectification ratio than its counterpart before doping the SWCNT channel, which is because that the p-i-n junction in the device decreased the reverse saturated current.

  4. Diode p-i-n-STRUCTURES Based on Neutron Doped Si1-xGex-ALLOYS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chekanov, V.; Yevseyev, V.; Kuryatkov, V.; Prokofyeva, T.

    Photoelectric properties of neutron transmutation doped (NTD) Si1-xGex solid solutions (alloy) with variable composition are presented. It is shown that the application of NTD method to Si1-xGex solid solutions with gradient composition (x = 0-2 at.%) along an ingot allows to receive p-i-n-structures with typical diode characteristics. We studied electrical and photoelectrical properties of that structure. Deep level transient spectroscopy of p-i-n diode has revealed the energy levels in the forbidden zone of Si1-xGex, connected with transmutation Se impurity. It is established that p-i-n-structures possess high spectral sensitivity with a maximum at hν = 1.2-1.5 eV (300 K). Possible application of Si1-xGex-alloys in development of uncooled photodiodes with large effective area was considered.

  5. A p-i-n junction diode based on locally doped carbon nanotube network

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Xiaodong; Chen, Changxin; Wei, Liangming; Hu, Nantao; Song, Chuanjuan; Liao, Chenghao; He, Rong; Dong, Xusheng; Wang, Ying; Liu, Qinran; Zhang, Yafei

    2016-01-01

    A p-i-n junction diode constructed by the locally doped network of single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWNTs) was investigated. In this diode, the two opposite ends of the SWNT-network channel were selectively doped by triethyloxonium hexachloroantimonate (OA) and polyethylenimine (PEI) to obtain the air-stable p- and n-type SWNTs respectively while the central area of the SWNT-network remained intrinsic state, resulting in the formation of a p-i-n junction with a strong built-in electronic field in the SWNTs. The results showed that the forward current and the rectification ratio of the diode increased as the doping degree increased. The forward current of the device could also be increased by decreasing the channel length. A high-performance p-i-n junction diode with a high rectification ratio (~104), large forward current (~12.2 μA) and low reverse saturated current (~1.8 nA) was achieved with the OA and PEI doping time of 5 h and 18 h for a channel length of ~6 μm. PMID:26996610

  6. A p-i-n junction diode based on locally doped carbon nanotube network

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Xiaodong; Chen, Changxin; Wei, Liangming; Hu, Nantao; Song, Chuanjuan; Liao, Chenghao; He, Rong; Dong, Xusheng; Wang, Ying; Liu, Qinran; Zhang, Yafei

    2016-03-01

    A p-i-n junction diode constructed by the locally doped network of single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWNTs) was investigated. In this diode, the two opposite ends of the SWNT-network channel were selectively doped by triethyloxonium hexachloroantimonate (OA) and polyethylenimine (PEI) to obtain the air-stable p- and n-type SWNTs respectively while the central area of the SWNT-network remained intrinsic state, resulting in the formation of a p-i-n junction with a strong built-in electronic field in the SWNTs. The results showed that the forward current and the rectification ratio of the diode increased as the doping degree increased. The forward current of the device could also be increased by decreasing the channel length. A high-performance p-i-n junction diode with a high rectification ratio (~104), large forward current (~12.2 μA) and low reverse saturated current (~1.8 nA) was achieved with the OA and PEI doping time of 5 h and 18 h for a channel length of ~6 μm.

  7. Planarization of High Aspect Ratio P-I-N Diode Pillar Arrays for Blanket Electrical Contacts

    SciTech Connect

    Voss, L F; Shao, Q; Reinhardt, C E; Graff, R T; Conway, A M; Nikolic, R J; Deo, N; Cheung, C L

    2009-03-05

    Two planarization techniques for high aspect ratio three dimensional pillar structured P-I-N diodes have been developed in order to enable a continuous coating of metal on the top of the structures. The first technique allows for coating of structures with topography through the use of a planarizing photoresist followed by RIE etch back to expose the tops of the pillar structure. The second technique also utilizes photoresist, but instead allows for planarization of a structure in which the pillars are filled and coated with a conformal coating by matching the etch rate of the photoresist to the underlying layers. These techniques enable deposition using either sputtering or electron beam evaporation of metal films to allow for electrical contact to the tops of the underlying pillar structure. These processes have potential applications for many devices comprised of 3-D high aspect ratio structures. Two separate processes have been developed in order to ensure a uniform surface for deposition of an electrode on the {sup 10}Boron filled P-I-N pillar structured diodes. Each uses S1518 photoresist in order to achieve a relatively uniform surface despite the non-uniformity of the underlying detector. Both processes allow for metallization of the final structure and provide good electrical continuity over a 3D pillar structure.

  8. Performance and breakdown characteristics of irradiated vertical power GaN P-i-N diodes

    DOE PAGESBeta

    King, M. P.; Armstrong, A. M.; Dickerson, J. R.; Vizkelethy, G.; Fleming, R. M.; Campbell, J.; Wampler, W. R.; Kizilyalli, I. C.; Bour, D. P.; Aktas, O.; et al

    2015-10-29

    Electrical performance and defect characterization of vertical GaN P-i-N diodes before and after irradiation with 2.5 MeV protons and neutrons is investigated. Devices exhibit increase in specific on-resistance following irradiation with protons and neutrons, indicating displacement damage introduces defects into the p-GaN and n- drift regions of the device that impact on-state device performance. The breakdown voltage of these devices, initially above 1700 V, is observed to decrease only slightly for particle fluence <; 1013 cm-2. Furthermore, the unipolar figure of merit for power devices indicates that while the on-resistance and breakdown voltage degrade with irradiation, vertical GaN P-i-Ns remainmore » superior to the performance of the best available, unirradiated silicon devices and on-par with unirradiated modern SiC-based power devices.« less

  9. Drift Phenomena of Forward and Reverse Recovery Characteristics in 0001 4H-SiC p-i-n Diode

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nakayama, Koji; Sugawara, Yoshitaka; Tsuchida, Hidekazu; Kimura, Chiharu; Aoki, Hidemitsu

    2011-04-01

    4H-SiC p-i-n diodes fabricated on the (0001) C-face showed smaller forward voltage drift and minimal changes in reverse recovery characteristics after a forward bias stress test compared to those observed on the (0001) Si-face. These drift phenomena in 4H-SiC p-i-n diodes could be explained by increased recombination along the perimeter of single Shockley-type stacking faults. It is suggested that the number of single Shockley-type stacking faults significantly decreased in the drift layer fabricated on (0001) C-face in comparison with that on (0001) Si-face.

  10. Dead layer on silicon p-i-n diode charged-particle detectors

    SciTech Connect

    Wall, B. L.; Amsbaugh, John F.; Beglarian, A.; Bergmann, T.; Bichsel, H. C.; Bodine, L. I.; Boyd, N. M.; Burritt, Tom H.; Chaoui, Z.; Corona, T. J.; Doe, Peter J.; Enomoto, S.; Harms, F.; Harper, Gregory; Howe, M. A.; Martin, E. L.; Parno, D. S.; Peterson, David; Petzold, Linda; Renschler, R.; Robertson, R. G. H.; Schwarz, J.; Steidl, M.; Van Wechel, T. D.; VanDevender, Brent A.; Wustling, S.; Wierman, K. J.; Wilkerson, J. F.

    2014-04-21

    Abstract Semiconductor detectors in general have a dead layer at their surfaces that is either a result of natural or induced passivation, or is formed during the process of making a contact. Charged particles passing through this region produce ionization that is incompletely collected and recorded, which leads to departures from the ideal in both energy deposition and resolution. The silicon p-i-n diode used in the KATRIN neutrinomass experiment has such a dead layer. We have constructed a detailed Monte Carlo model for the passage of electrons from vacuum into a silicon detector, and compared the measured energy spectra to the predicted ones for a range of energies from 12 to 20 keV. The comparison provides experimental evidence that a substantial fraction of the ionization produced in the "dead" layer evidently escapes by discussion, with 46% being collected in the depletion zone and the balance being neutralized at the contact or by bulk recombination. The most elementary model of a thinner dead layer from which no charge is collected is strongly disfavored.

  11. Quantum oscillations in the photocurrent of GaAs/AlAs p-i-n diodes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vdovin, E. E.; Ashdown, M.; Patanè, A.; Eaves, L.; Campion, R. P.; Khanin, Yu. N.; Henini, M.; Makarovsky, O.

    2014-05-01

    We report large amplitude quantum oscillations and negative differential conductance in the bias voltage-dependent photocurrent of p-i-n GaAs diodes with an AlAs barrier in the intrinsic (i) region. The oscillations appear only when the devices are illuminated with above-band gap radiation. They are strongly suppressed by a weak (˜2 T) in-plane magnetic field. Their period, amplitude, and magnetic field dependence are explained in terms of the quantized motion of confined photoexcited electrons and holes in the triangular potential wells formed by the AlAs barrier and the strong electric field in the intrinsic region. With increasing electric field, the energy levels of the electrons (holes) successively reach the top of their confining potentials, thus leading to a larger overlap of their wave functions with the free carriers in the p- (and n-) doped electrodes and to the observed oscillatory modulation of the recombination rate and photocurrent as a function of the applied voltage. The effect on the photocurrent oscillations amplitude of placing a layer of InAs quantum dots in the AlAs barrier layer is also examined.

  12. Lead Halide Perovskite Photovoltaic as a Model p-i-n Diode.

    PubMed

    Miyano, Kenjiro; Tripathi, Neeti; Yanagida, Masatoshi; Shirai, Yasuhiro

    2016-02-16

    The lead halide perovskite photovoltaic cells, especially the iodide compound CH3NH3PbI3 family, exhibited enormous progress in the energy conversion efficiency in the past few years. Although the first attempt to use the perovskite was as a sensitizer in a dye-sensitized solar cell, it has been recognized at the early stage of the development that the working of the perovskite photovoltaics is akin to that of the inorganic thin film solar cells. In fact, theoretically perovskite is always treated as an ordinary direct band gap semiconductor and hence the perovskite photovoltaics as a p-i-n diode. Despite this recognition, research effort along this line of thought is still in pieces and incomplete. Different measurements have been applied to different types of devices (different not only in the materials but also in the cell structures), making it difficult to have a coherent picture. To make the situation worse, the perovskite photovoltaics have been plagued by the irreproducible optoelectronic properties, most notably the sweep direction dependent current-voltage relationship, the hysteresis problem. Under such circumstances, it is naturally very difficult to analyze the data. Therefore, we set out to make hysteresis-free samples and apply time-tested models and numerical tools developed in the field of inorganic semiconductors. A series of electrical measurements have been performed on one type of CH3NH3PbI3 photovoltaic cells, in which a special attention was paid to ensure that their electronic reproducibility was better than the fitting error in the numerical analysis. The data can be quantitatively explained in terms of the established models of inorganic semiconductors: current/voltage relationship can be very well described by a two-diode model, while impedance spectroscopy revealed the presence of a thick intrinsic layer with the help of a numerical solver, SCAPS, developed for thin film solar cell analysis. These results point to that CH3NH3PbI3 is an

  13. Electrically injected near-infrared light emission from single InN nanowire p-i-n diode

    SciTech Connect

    Le, Binh Huy; Zhao, Songrui; Tran, Nhung Hong; Mi, Zetian

    2014-12-08

    We report on the achievement of electroluminescence emission of single InN p-i-n nanowire devices. InN p-i-n nanowire structures were grown directly on Si substrate by plasma-assisted molecular beam epitaxy and subsequently transferred to foreign substrate for the fabrication of single nanowire light emitting diodes. Electroluminescence emission with a peak energy of 0.71 eV (1.75 μm) was observed at 77 K. The measurement of near-bandgap electroluminescence provides unambiguous evidence for the achievement of p-type conduction of InN.

  14. Electrically injected near-infrared light emission from single InN nanowire p-i-n diode

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Le, Binh Huy; Zhao, Songrui; Tran, Nhung Hong; Mi, Zetian

    2014-12-01

    We report on the achievement of electroluminescence emission of single InN p-i-n nanowire devices. InN p-i-n nanowire structures were grown directly on Si substrate by plasma-assisted molecular beam epitaxy and subsequently transferred to foreign substrate for the fabrication of single nanowire light emitting diodes. Electroluminescence emission with a peak energy of 0.71 eV (1.75 μm) was observed at 77 K. The measurement of near-bandgap electroluminescence provides unambiguous evidence for the achievement of p-type conduction of InN.

  15. Growth of Shockley type stacking faults upon forward degradation in 4H-SiC p-i-n diodes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tanaka, Atsushi; Matsuhata, Hirofumi; Kawabata, Naoyuki; Mori, Daisuke; Inoue, Kei; Ryo, Mina; Fujimoto, Takumi; Tawara, Takeshi; Miyazato, Masaki; Miyajima, Masaaki; Fukuda, Kenji; Ohtsuki, Akihiro; Kato, Tomohisa; Tsuchida, Hidekazu; Yonezawa, Yoshiyuki; Kimoto, Tsunenobu

    2016-03-01

    The growth of Shockley type stacking faults in p-i-n diodes fabricated on the C-face of 4H-SiC during forward current operation was investigated using Berg-Barrett X-ray topography and photoluminescence imaging. After forward current experiment, Shockley type stacking faults were generated from very short portions of basal plane dislocations lower than the conversion points to threading edge dislocations in the epitaxial layer. The growth behavior of Shockley type stacking faults was discussed. Growth of stacking faults in the substrates was not observed.

  16. Comprehensive physics-based compact model for fast p-i-n diode using MATLAB and Simulink

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xue, Peng; Fu, Guicui; Zhang, Dong

    2016-07-01

    In this study, a physics-based model for the fast p-i-n diode is proposed. The model is based on the 1-D Fourier-based solution of ambipolar diffusion equation (ADE) implemented in MATLAB and Simulink. The physical characteristics of fast diode design concepts such as local lifetime control (LLC), emitter control (EMCON) and deep field stop are taken into account. Based on these fast diode design concepts, the ADE is solved for all injection levels instead of high-level injection only as usually done. The variation of high-level lifetime due to local lifetime control is also included in the solution. With the deep field stop layer taken into consideration, the depletion behavior in the N-base during reverse recovery is redescribed. Some physical effects such as avalanche generation and carrier recombination in the depletion region are also taken into account. To be self contained, a parameter extraction method is proposed to extract all the parameters of the model. In the end, the static and reverse recovery experiments for a commercial EMCON diode and a LLC diode are used to validate the proposed model. The simulation results are compared with experiment results and good agreement is obtained.

  17. Performance and breakdown characteristics of irradiated vertical power GaN P-i-N diodes

    SciTech Connect

    King, M. P.; Armstrong, A. M.; Dickerson, J. R.; Vizkelethy, G.; Fleming, R. M.; Campbell, J.; Wampler, W. R.; Kizilyalli, I. C.; Bour, D. P.; Aktas, O.; Nie, H.; Disney, D.; Wierer, Jr., J.; Allerman, A. A.; Moseley, M. W.; Kaplar, R. J.

    2015-10-29

    Electrical performance and defect characterization of vertical GaN P-i-N diodes before and after irradiation with 2.5 MeV protons and neutrons is investigated. Devices exhibit increase in specific on-resistance following irradiation with protons and neutrons, indicating displacement damage introduces defects into the p-GaN and n- drift regions of the device that impact on-state device performance. The breakdown voltage of these devices, initially above 1700 V, is observed to decrease only slightly for particle fluence <; 1013 cm-2. Furthermore, the unipolar figure of merit for power devices indicates that while the on-resistance and breakdown voltage degrade with irradiation, vertical GaN P-i-Ns remain superior to the performance of the best available, unirradiated silicon devices and on-par with unirradiated modern SiC-based power devices.

  18. Effects of Be acceptors on the spin polarization of carriers in p-i-n resonant tunneling diodes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Awan, I. T.; Galeti, H. V. A.; Galvão Gobato, Y.; Brasil, M. J. S. P.; Taylor, D.; Henini, M.

    2014-08-01

    In this paper, we have investigated the effect of Be acceptors on the electroluminescence and the spin polarization in GaAs/AlAs p-i-n resonant tunneling diodes. The quantum well emission comprise two main lines separated by ˜20 meV attributed to excitonic and Be-related transitions, which intensities show remarkably abrupt variations at critical voltages, particularly at the electron resonant peak where it shows a high-frequency bistability. The circular-polarization degree of the quantum-well electroluminescence also shows strong and abrupt variations at the critical bias voltages and it attains relatively large values (of ˜-75% at 15 T). These effects may be explored to design novel devices for spintronic applications such as a high-frequency spin-oscillators.

  19. Effects of Be acceptors on the spin polarization of carriers in p-i-n resonant tunneling diodes

    SciTech Connect

    Awan, I. T.; Galvão Gobato, Y.; Galeti, H. V. A.; Brasil, M. J. S. P.; Taylor, D.; Henini, M.

    2014-08-07

    In this paper, we have investigated the effect of Be acceptors on the electroluminescence and the spin polarization in GaAs/AlAs p-i-n resonant tunneling diodes. The quantum well emission comprise two main lines separated by ∼20 meV attributed to excitonic and Be-related transitions, which intensities show remarkably abrupt variations at critical voltages, particularly at the electron resonant peak where it shows a high-frequency bistability. The circular-polarization degree of the quantum-well electroluminescence also shows strong and abrupt variations at the critical bias voltages and it attains relatively large values (of ∼−75% at 15 T). These effects may be explored to design novel devices for spintronic applications such as a high-frequency spin-oscillators.

  20. Highly efficient p-i-n-type organic light emitting diodes on ZnO:Al substrates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tomita, Yuto; May, Christian; Toerker, Michael; Amelung, Joerg; Eritt, Michael; Loeffler, Frank; Luber, Claus; Leo, Karl; Walzer, Karsten; Fehse, Karsten; Huang, Qiang

    2007-08-01

    Aluminum doped zinc oxide (ZAO) is presented in this letter as an alternative transparent electrode: optimized ZAO films offer excellent parameters for organic light emitting diodes (OLEDs). The ZAO films are applied to various p-i-n-type OLEDs. By using green phosphorescent molecules in a double emitter structure, very high efficiencies were obtained, namely, 54.6cd /A and 61.5lm/W for 100cd/m2 at 2.78V. Additionally, white OLEDs on ZAO demonstrated pure white emission independent of the luminance and high efficiencies of 12.6cd/A and 14.5lm/W for 100cd/m2 at 2.6V, which is comparable to indium-tin-oxide based white OLEDs.

  1. Optimizing photon-pair generation electronically using a p-i-n diode incorporated in a silicon microring resonator

    SciTech Connect

    Savanier, Marc Kumar, Ranjeet; Mookherjea, Shayan

    2015-09-28

    Silicon photonic microchips may be useful for compact, inexpensive, room-temperature optically pumped photon-pair sources, which unlike conventional photon-pair generators based on crystals or optical fibers, can be manufactured using CMOS-compatible processes on silicon wafers. It has been shown that photon pairs can be created in simple structures such as microring resonators at a rate of a few hundred kilohertz using less than a milliwatt of optical pump power, based on the process of spontaneous four-wave mixing. To create a practical photon-pair source, however, also requires some way of monitoring the device and aligning the pump wavelength when the temperature varies, since silicon resonators are highly sensitive to temperature. In fact, monitoring photodiodes are standard components in classical laser diodes, but the incorporation of germanium or InGaAs photodiodes would raise the cost and fabrication complexity. Here, we present a simple and effective all-electronic technique for finding the optimum operating point for the microring used to generate photon pairs, based on measuring the reverse-biased current in a silicon p-i-n junction diode fabricated across the waveguide that constitutes the silicon microring. We show that by monitoring the current, and using it to tune the pump laser wavelength, the photon-pair generation properties of the microring can be preserved over a temperature range of more than 30 °C.

  2. Temperature dependent electroluminescence from all-Si-nanocrystal p-i-n diodes grown on dielectric substrates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, L.; Puthen-Veettil, B.; Nomoto, K.; Hao, X.; Jia, X.; Lin, Z.; Yang, T. C.; Zhang, T.; Gutsch, S.; Conibeer, G.; Perez-Wurfl, I.

    2016-02-01

    In this work, we demonstrate for the first time the electroluminescence (EL) from a mesa isolated p-i-n diode based on silicon nanocrystals (Si NCs) embedded in a SiO2 matrix fabricated on a dielectric substrate. The structure fabricated on a dielectric substrate ensures that the EL signal originates entirely from the Si NC material. A small offset between the EL (1.28 eV) and photoluminescence (PL) (1.33 eV) peak energies has been observed at room temperature. We attribute this discrepancy to the different subset of light-emitting Si NCs in EL and PL. A model classifying Si NCs into connected NCs and isolated NCs is proposed. Atom probe tomography is employed to visualize the existence of isolated NCs and connected NCs. This model has been further studied using temperature dependent EL and PL, where a blue-shift of peak energy is observed as the temperature is increased. The blue-shift is attributed to the temperature dependent transport between the two subsets of NCs and the quenching of the PL emission from the connected NCs at higher temperatures.

  3. Effect of Longitudinal Optical Phonon--Plasmon Coupling on the Transient Self-Consistent Field in GaAs p--i--n Diodes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thao, Dinh Nhu; The, Nguyen Phuoc

    2013-10-01

    The effect of longitudinal optical (LO) phonon--coherent plasmon coupling on the transient self-consistent field and then on frequency spectra of collective oscillations in GaAs p--i--n diodes without a biased field is investigated by the self-consistent ensemble Monte Carlo method. The frequency spectra of collective oscillations in the diodes show that there are two new strong peaks in the terahertz range when the coupling is taken into account. These peaks replace the coupled phonon--plasmon peaks in the bulk semiconductor.

  4. Analysis of different forward current-voltage behaviours of Al implanted 4H-SiC vertical p-i-n diodes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Megherbi, M. L.; Pezzimenti, F.; Dehimi, L.; Rao, S.; Della Corte, F. G.

    2015-07-01

    In this work different experimental current-voltage behaviours of several Al implanted 4H-SiC p-i-n diodes are investigated by means of numerical simulations in a wide range of currents and temperatures. Some devices for which recombination and tunneling are the dominant current processes at all biases are classified as "leaky" diodes. The well behaved diodes, instead, show good rectifying characteristics with a current conduction due to tunneling below 1.7 V, recombination between 1.7 V and 2.5 V, and diffusion processes above 2.5 V. At higher current regimes, a series resistance in excess of 1 mΩ cm2 becomes the main current limiting factor. Depending on the relative weight between the contact resistances and the internal diode resistance, different temperature dependencies of the current are obtained. A good agreement between numerical and measured data is achieved employing temperature-dependent carrier lifetime and mobility as fitting parameters.

  5. Development of high temperature diffusion technology for edge termination and switching behavior improvement of silicon carbide p-i-n diodes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bolotnikov, Alexander V.

    forward voltage drop (3.3 V at 100 A/cm2) and high blocking voltage (more than 2500 V). A fabrication technology of p-i-n diodes with reduced switching losses through the incorporation of deep recombination centers via diffusion of boron was developed. The improvement of reverse recovery characteristic is attributed to the effect of localized lifetime control by recombination centers created by diffused boron. It is demonstrated that p-i-n diodes produced by high temperature diffusion exhibit better switching capability compared to epi-grown p-i-n diodes. The improved behavior is attributed to the reduced lifetime region created by the diffused boron layer. The good performance of SiC devices fabricated with diffusion implementation confirmed the viability of this process.

  6. The open circuit voltage in amorphous silicon p-i-n solar cells and its relationship to material, device and dark diode parameters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dutta, U.; Chatterjee, P.

    2004-08-01

    We review the sensitivity of the open-circuit voltage (Voc) to material, device and dark diode parameters, and try to assess the possibilities of improving this quantity in hydrogenated amorphous silicon (a-Si:H) p-i-n solar cells, having a wide band-gap emitter layer. We find that parameters that affect Voc can broadly be classified into two categories: those that alter the built-in potential (Vbi) appreciably, and those that produce small or no change in Vbi, but can still alter Voc by changing the dark recombination current in the intrinsic absorber or the interfaces. The study is carried out using an electrical-optical model based on the solution of the Poisson's and the continuity equations. In agreement with existing work, we find that Voc is very sensitive to all parameters that appreciably alter Vbi, viz., the transparent conducting oxide/P contact barrier height, the P layer thickness and its activation energy, although Voc is found to be more sensitive to these parameters than Vbi itself. However, we cannot correlate such changes in Voc to the dark diode parameters. On the other hand, parameters that have little effect on Vbi, but alter the dark recombination current, viz., the density of states, capture cross-sections and the Urbach edge, have only a minor influence on Voc, although these changes can qualitatively be linked to changes in the dark current. Also we find that the common belief that Voc decreases as the reverse bias generation current increases is not always true. Boron profiling of the P /I interface and its effect on Voc has also been studied. All in all our study indicates that in a-Si:H p-i-n cells under AM1.5 light, there is little scope of further improving Voc, while retaining the cell efficiency.

  7. Fabrication and characterization of silicon nanowire p-i-n MOS gated diode for use as p-type tunnel FET

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brouzet, V.; Salem, B.; Periwal, P.; Rosaz, G.; Baron, T.; Bassani, F.; Gentile, P.; Ghibaudo, G.

    2015-11-01

    In this paper, we present the fabrication and electrical characterization of a MOS gated diode based on axially doped silicon nanowire (NW) p-i-n junctions. These nanowires are grown by chemical vapour deposition (CVD) using the vapour-liquid-solid (VLS) mechanism. NWs have a length of about 7 \\upmu {m} with 3 \\upmu {m} of doped regions (p-type and n-type) and 1 \\upmu {m} of intrinsic region. The gate stack is composed of 15 nm of hafnium dioxide ({HfO}2), 80 nm of nickel and 120 nm of aluminium. At room temperature, I_{{on}} =-52 {nA}/\\upmu {m} (V_{{DS}}=-0.5 {V}, V_{{GS}}=-4 {V}), and an I_{{on}}/I_{{off}} ratio of about 104 with a very low I_{{off}} current has been obtained. Electrical measurements are carried out between 90 and 390 K, and we show that the I on current is less temperature dependent below 250 K. We also observe that the ON current is increasing between 250 and 390 K. These transfer characteristics at low and high temperature confirm the tunnelling transport mechanisms in our devices.

  8. Effect of tunable dot charging on photoresponse spectra of GaAs p-i-n diode with InAs quantum dots

    SciTech Connect

    Shang, Xiangjun; Yu, Ying; Li, Mifeng; Wang, Lijuan; Zha, Guowei; Ni, Haiqiao; Niu, Zhichuan; Pettersson, Håkan

    2015-12-28

    Quantum dot (QD)-embedded photodiodes have demonstrated great potential for use as detectors. A modulation of QD charging opens intriguing possibilities for adaptive sensing with bias-tunable detector characteristics. Here, we report on a p-i-n GaAs photodiode with InAs QDs whose charging is tunable due to unintentional Be diffusion and trap-assisted tunneling of holes, from bias- and temperature (T)-dependent photocurrent spectroscopy. For the sub-bandgap spectra, the T-dependent relative intensities “QD-s/WL” and “WL/GaAs” (WL: wetting layer) indicate dominant tunneling under −0.9 V (trap-assisted tunneling from the top QDs) and dominant thermal escape under −0.2 ∼ 0.5 V (from the bottom QDs since the top ones are charged and inactive for optical absorption) from the QD s-state, dominant tunneling from WL, and enhanced QD charging at >190 K (related to trap level ionization). For the above-bandgap spectra, the degradation of the spectral profile (especially near the GaAs bandedge) as the bias and T tune (especially under −0.2 ∼ 0.2 V and at >190 K) can be explained well by the enhanced photoelectron capture in QDs with tunable charging. The dominant spectral profile with no degradation under 0.5 V is due to a saturated electron capture in charged QDs (i.e., charging neutralization). QD level simulation and schematic bandstructures can help one understand these effects.

  9. Compressively strained SiGe band-to-band tunneling model calibration based on p-i-n diodes and prospect of strained SiGe tunneling field-effect transistors

    SciTech Connect

    Kao, Kuo-Hsing; Meyer, Kristin De; Verhulst, Anne S.; Rooyackers, Rita; Douhard, Bastien; Delmotte, Joris; Bender, Hugo; Richard, Olivier; Vandervorst, Wilfried; Simoen, Eddy; Hikavyy, Andriy; Loo, Roger; Arstila, Kai; Collaert, Nadine; Thean, Aaron; Heyns, Marc M.

    2014-12-07

    Band-to-band tunneling parameters of strained indirect bandgap materials are not well-known, hampering the reliability of performance predictions of tunneling devices based on these materials. The nonlocal band-to-band tunneling model for compressively strained SiGe is calibrated based on a comparison of strained SiGe p-i-n tunneling diode measurements and doping-profile-based diode simulations. Dopant and Ge profiles of the diodes are determined by secondary ion mass spectrometry and capacitance-voltage measurements. Theoretical parameters of the band-to-band tunneling model are calculated based on strain-dependent properties such as bandgap, phonon energy, deformation-potential-based electron-phonon coupling, and hole effective masses of strained SiGe. The latter is determined with a 6-band k·p model. The calibration indicates an underestimation of the theoretical electron-phonon coupling with nearly an order of magnitude. Prospects of compressively strained SiGe tunneling transistors are made by simulations with the calibrated model.

  10. Continuous Holdup Measurements with Silicon P-I-N Photodiodes

    SciTech Connect

    Bell, Z.W.; Oberer, R.B.; Williams, J.A.; Smith, D.E.; Paulus, M.J.

    2002-05-01

    We report on the behavior of silicon P-I-N photodiodes used to perform holdup measurements on plumbing. These detectors differ from traditional scintillation detectors in that no high-voltage is required, no scintillator is used (gamma and X rays are converted directly by the diode), and they are considerably more compact. Although the small size of the diodes means they are not nearly as efficient as scintillation detectors, the diodes' size does mean that a detector module, including one or more diodes, pulse shaping electronics, analog-to-digital converter, embedded microprocessor, and digital interface can be realized in a package (excluding shielding) the size of a pocket calculator. This small size, coupled with only low-voltage power requirement, completely solid-state realization, and internal control functions allows these detectors to be strategically deployed on a permanent basis, thereby reducing or eliminating the need for manual holdup measurements. In this paper, we report on the measurement of gamma and X rays from {sup 235}U and {sup 238}U contained in steel pipe. We describe the features of the spectra, the electronics of the device and show how a network of them may be used to improve estimates of inventory in holdup.

  11. Semiconductor P-I-N detector

    SciTech Connect

    Sudharsanan, Rengarajan; Karam, Nasser H.

    2001-01-01

    A semiconductor P-I-N detector including an intrinsic wafer, a P-doped layer, an N-doped layer, and a boundary layer for reducing the diffusion of dopants into the intrinsic wafer. The boundary layer is positioned between one of the doped regions and the intrinsic wafer. The intrinsic wafer can be composed of CdZnTe or CdTe, the P-doped layer can be composed of ZnTe doped with copper, and the N-doped layer can be composed of CdS doped with indium. The boundary layers is formed of an undoped semiconductor material. The boundary layer can be deposited onto the underlying intrinsic wafer. The doped regions are then typically formed by a deposition process or by doping a section of the deposited boundary layer.

  12. High-speed dual-wavelength demultiplexing and detection in a monolithic superlattice p-i-n waveguide detector array

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Larsson, A.; Andrekson, P. A.; Andersson, P.; Eng, S. T.; Salzman, J.

    1986-01-01

    High-speed (1 Gbit/x) dual-wavelength demultiplexing and detection in a monolithic linear array of superlattice p-i-n photodetectors in a waveguide configuration is demonstrated. A crosstalk attenuation of 28 dB was achieved between two digital transmission channels with an interchannel wavelength spacing of 30 nm. The device performance is a result of an enhanced electroabsorption due to the quantum-confined Stark effect in the superlattice p-i-n diodes.

  13. Photovoltaic response of a polymer p-i-n junction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Yanguang; Hu, Yufeng; Gao, Jun

    2007-12-01

    We report the photovoltaic characterization of a polymer p-i-n junction, realized by in situ electrochemical doping and thermal cycling. The planar, "frozen" p-i-n junction exhibits record-high open-circuit voltage up to 2.25V, and in-plane short-circuit current density in excess of 10mA /cm2 under simulated sunlight (˜300mW/cm2). Our results suggest that built-in potential close to the polymer energy gap in magnitude can be obtained in a polymer device structure without the use of dissimilar electrodes, and large short-circuit current density is possible without the use of strong electron acceptors, which limits the open-circuit voltage.

  14. P-I-N CdTe gamma-ray detectors by liquid phase epitaxy (LPE)

    SciTech Connect

    Shin, S.H.; Niizawa, G.T.; Pasko, J.G.; Bostrup, G.L.; Ryan, F.J.; Khoshnevisan, M.; Westmark, C.I.; Fuller, C.

    1984-01-01

    A new device concept of CdTe gamma ray detectors has been demonstrated by using p+(HgCdTe)-n(CdTe)-n+(HgCdTe) diode structures. Both p+ and n/sup +/-type Hg/sub 0.25/Cd/sub 0.75/Te epilayers were grown by the liquid phase epitaxy (LPE) technique on semi-insulating CdTe sensor elements. The LPE-grown P-I-N structure offers potential advantages for p-n junction formation and ohmic contact over standard ion-implanted diodes or Schottky barrier devices. Detectors with active areas of 2 mm/sup 2/ were fabricated. Resolutions of 10 keV were obtained for the 122 keV gamma peak of Co/sup 57/ at room temperature.

  15. P-I-N CdTe gamma ray detectors by liquid phase epitaxy (LPE)

    SciTech Connect

    Shin, S.H.; Bostrup, G.L.; Fuller, C.; Khoshnevisan, M.; Niizawa, G.T.; Pasko, J.G.; Ryan, F.J.; Westmark, C.I.

    1985-02-01

    A new device concept for CdTe gamma ray detectors has been demonstrated using p/sup +/(HgCdTe)-n(CdTe)-n/sup +/ (HgCdTe) diode structures. Both p/sup +/ and n/sup +/ Hg /SUB 0.25/ Cd /SUB 0.75/ Te epilayers were grown by the liquid phase epitaxy (LPE) technique on semi-insulating CdTe sensor elements. The LPE grown P-I-N structure offers potential advantages for p-n junction and ohmic contact formation over standard ion implanted diodes or Schottky barrier devices. Detectors with active areas of 2 mm/sup 2/ were fabricated. Resolutions of 10 KeV were obtained for the 122 KeV gamma peak of Co/sup 57/ at room temperature.

  16. Improved designs for p-i-n OLEDs towards the minimal power loss of devices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qin, Dashan

    2014-05-01

    Currently, the low yield, high power loss, and poor stability of organic light emitting diodes (OLEDs) panels are remaining as the obstacles to the fast growth of the OLED industry, especially for the lighting application. The p-i-n OLEDs have been widely recognized as the promising method to circumvent these bottleneck factors, due to the unique merit of the electrical doping to enable low power loss. In p-i-n OLEDs, the frequently used n-doped electron transport layers (n-ETL1) such as n-BCP, n-Alq3 possess markedly lower conductivities but better capabilities of injecting electrons into ETL such as BCP, Alq3, as compared to another class of n-doped ETLs (n-ETL2), e.g., n-NTCDA, n-PTCDA, n-C60. Thus, in order to minimize the electron loss, we provide the structure of uniting two n-doped layers, cathode/ n-ETL2/ n-ETL1/ ETL. In p-i-n OLEDs, the hole current injected from the single p-doped hole transport layer (p-HTL) into the neat HTL must be limited, because the higher conductivity p-HTL has the higher lying highest occupied molecular orbital (HOMO) level, leading to a larger hole transport energy barrier (φB) at the interface with the neat HTL. Therefore, in order to minimize the hole loss, we suggest the structure of uniting two p-HTLs, anode/ p-HTL2/ p-HTL1/ HTL. The p-HTL2 possesses high-lying HOMO level and thereby high conductivity, decreasing the ohmic loss in the hole conduction; the p-HTL1 features a low-lying HOMO level, reducing the φB.

  17. Negative differential resistance in direct bandgap GeSn p-i-n structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schulte-Braucks, C.; Stange, D.; von den Driesch, N.; Blaeser, S.; Ikonic, Z.; Hartmann, J. M.; Mantl, S.; Buca, D.

    2015-07-01

    Certain GeSn alloys are group IV direct bandgap semiconductors with prospects for electrical and optoelectronical applications. In this letter, we report on the temperature dependence of the electrical characteristics of high Sn-content Ge 0.89 Sn 0.11 p-i-n diodes. NiGeSn contacts were used to minimize the access resistance and ensure compatibility with silicon technology. The major emphasis is placed on the negative differential resistance in which peak to valley current ratios up to 2.3 were obtained. TCAD simulations were performed to identify the origin of the various current contributions, providing evidence for direct band to band tunneling and trap assisted tunneling.

  18. Monolithic integration of germanium-on-insulator p-i-n photodetector on silicon.

    PubMed

    Nam, Ju Hyung; Afshinmanesh, Farzaneh; Nam, Donguk; Jung, Woo Shik; Kamins, Theodore I; Brongersma, Mark L; Saraswat, Krishna C

    2015-06-15

    A germanium-on-insulator (GOI) p-i-n photodetector, monolithically integrated on a silicon (Si) substrate, is demonstrated. GOI is formed by lateral-overgrowth (LAT-OVG) of Ge on silicon dioxide (SiO(2)) through windows etched in SiO(2) on Si. The photodetector shows excellent diode characteristics with high on/off ratio (6 × 10(4)), low dark current, and flat reverse current-voltage (I-V) characteristics. Enhanced light absorption up to 1550 nm is observed due to the residual biaxial tensile strain induced during the epitaxial growth of Ge caused by cooling after the deposition. This truly Si-compatible Ge photodetector using monolithic integration enables new opportunities for high-performance GOI based photonic devices on Si platform. PMID:26193560

  19. Direct-bandgap electroluminescence from a horizontal Ge p-i-n ridge waveguide on Si(001) substrate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Zhi; Li, Yaming; He, Chao; Li, Chuanbo; Xue, Chunlai; Zuo, Yuhua; Cheng, Buwen; Wang, Qiming

    2014-05-01

    Horizontal injection Ge p-i-n ridge waveguide light emitting diodes (LEDs) were fabricated on n--Si(001) substrates by ultrahigh vacuum chemical vapor deposition. The direct-bandgap electroluminescence (EL) of Ge waveguide LEDs under a continuous/pulse electrical pump was studied. The heating effect from a continuous electrical pump was found to significantly enhance the emission of devices. The top surface EL intensity of the Ge waveguide LEDs significantly depended on the position. Most direct-bandgap radiative recombination of Ge p-i-n waveguide LEDs occurred near the N+ region of the junction. This interesting phenomenon could be explained by the carrier distribution in the junction and the pseudo-direct bandgap of Ge.

  20. Direct-bandgap electroluminescence from a horizontal Ge p-i-n ridge waveguide on Si(001) substrate

    SciTech Connect

    Liu, Zhi; Li, Yaming; He, Chao; Li, Chuanbo; Xue, Chunlai; Zuo, Yuhua; Cheng, Buwen Wang, Qiming

    2014-05-12

    Horizontal injection Ge p-i-n ridge waveguide light emitting diodes (LEDs) were fabricated on n{sup −}-Si(001) substrates by ultrahigh vacuum chemical vapor deposition. The direct-bandgap electroluminescence (EL) of Ge waveguide LEDs under a continuous/pulse electrical pump was studied. The heating effect from a continuous electrical pump was found to significantly enhance the emission of devices. The top surface EL intensity of the Ge waveguide LEDs significantly depended on the position. Most direct-bandgap radiative recombination of Ge p-i-n waveguide LEDs occurred near the N{sup +} region of the junction. This interesting phenomenon could be explained by the carrier distribution in the junction and the pseudo-direct bandgap of Ge.

  1. Integrated Amorphous Silicon p-i-n Temperature Sensor for CMOS Photonics

    PubMed Central

    Rao, Sandro; Pangallo, Giovanni; Della Corte, Francesco Giuseppe

    2016-01-01

    Hydrogenated amorphous silicon (a-Si:H) shows interesting optoelectronic and technological properties that make it suitable for the fabrication of passive and active micro-photonic devices, compatible moreover with standard microelectronic devices on a microchip. A temperature sensor based on a hydrogenated amorphous silicon p-i-n diode integrated in an optical waveguide for silicon photonics applications is presented here. The linear dependence of the voltage drop across the forward-biased diode on temperature, in a range from 30 °C up to 170 °C, has been used for thermal sensing. A high sensitivity of 11.9 mV/°C in the bias current range of 34–40 nA has been measured. The proposed device is particularly suitable for the continuous temperature monitoring of CMOS-compatible photonic integrated circuits, where the behavior of the on-chip active and passive devices are strongly dependent on their operating temperature. PMID:26751446

  2. Integrated Amorphous Silicon p-i-n Temperature Sensor for CMOS Photonics.

    PubMed

    Rao, Sandro; Pangallo, Giovanni; Della Corte, Francesco Giuseppe

    2016-01-01

    Hydrogenated amorphous silicon (a-Si:H) shows interesting optoelectronic and technological properties that make it suitable for the fabrication of passive and active micro-photonic devices, compatible moreover with standard microelectronic devices on a microchip. A temperature sensor based on a hydrogenated amorphous silicon p-i-n diode integrated in an optical waveguide for silicon photonics applications is presented here. The linear dependence of the voltage drop across the forward-biased diode on temperature, in a range from 30 °C up to 170 °C, has been used for thermal sensing. A high sensitivity of 11.9 mV/°C in the bias current range of 34-40 nA has been measured. The proposed device is particularly suitable for the continuous temperature monitoring of CMOS-compatible photonic integrated circuits, where the behavior of the on-chip active and passive devices are strongly dependent on their operating temperature. PMID:26751446

  3. Temperature dependent characterization of gallium arsenide X-ray mesa p-i-n photodiodes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lioliou, G.; Meng, X.; Ng, J. S.; Barnett, A. M.

    2016-03-01

    Electrical characterization of two GaAs p+-i-n+ mesa X-ray photodiodes over the temperature range 0 °C to 120 °C together with characterization of one of the diodes as an X-ray detector over the temperature range 0 °C to 60 °C is reported as part of the development of photon counting X-ray spectroscopic systems for harsh environments. The randomly selected diodes were fully etched and unpassivated. The diodes were 200 μm in diameter and had 7 μm thick i layers. The leakage current density was found to increase from (3 ± 1) nA/cm-2 at 0 °C to (24.36 ± 0.05) μA/cm-2 at 120 °C for D1 and from a current density smaller than the uncertainty (0.2 ± 1.2) nA/cm-2 at 0 °C to (9.39 ± 0.02) μA/cm-2 at 120 °C for D2 at the maximum investigated reverse bias (15 V). The best energy resolution (FWHM at 5.9 keV) was achieved at 5 V reverse bias, at each temperature; 730 eV at 0 °C, 750 eV at 20 °C, 770 eV at 40 °C, and 840 eV at 60 °C. It was found that the parallel white noise was the main source of the photopeak broadening only when the detector operated at 60 °C, at 5 V, 10 V, and 15 V reverse bias and at long shaping times (>5 μs), whereas the sum of the dielectric noise and charge trapping noise was the dominant source of noise for all the other spectra.

  4. Development of a P-I-N HgCdTe photomixer for laser heterodyne spectrometry

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bratt, Peter R.

    1987-01-01

    An improved HgCdTe photomixer technology was demonstrated employing a p-i-n photodiode structure. The i-region was near intrinsic n-type HgCdTe; the n-region was formed by B+ ion implantation; and the p-region was formed either by a shallow Au diffusion or by a Pt Schottky barrier. Experimental devices in a back-side illuminated mesa diode configuration were fabricated, tested, and delivered. The best photomixer was packaged in a 24-hour LN2 dewar along with a cooled GaAs FET preamplifier. Testing was performed by mixing black-body radiation with a CO2 laser beam and measuring the IF signal, noise, and signal-to-noise ratio in the GHz frequency range. Signal bandwidth for this photomixer was 1.3 GHz. The heterodyne NEP was 4.4 x 10 to the -20 W/Hz out to 1 GHz increasing to 8.6 x 10 to the -10 W/Hz at 2 GHz. Other photomixers delivered on this program had heterodyne NEPs at 1 GHz ranging from 8 x 10 to the -20 to 4.4 x 10 to the -19 W/Hz and NEP bandwidths from 2 to 4 GHz.

  5. Characterization of gallium arsenide X-ray mesa p-i-n photodiodes at room temperature

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lioliou, G.; Meng, X.; Ng, J. S.; Barnett, A. M.

    2016-03-01

    Two GaAs mesa p+-i-n+ photodiodes intended for photon counting X-ray spectroscopy, having an i layer thickness of 7 μm and diameter of 200 μm, have been characterized electrically, for their responsivity at the wavelength range 580 nm to 980 nm and one of them for its performance at detection of soft X-rays, at room temperature. Dark current and capacitance measurements as a function of applied forward and reverse bias are presented. The results show low leakage current densities, in the range of nA/cm2 at the maximum internal electric field (22 kV/cm). The unintentional doping concentration of the i layer, calculated from capacitance measurements, was found to be <1014 cm-3. Photocurrent measurements were performed under visible and near infrared light illumination for both diodes. The analysis of these measurements suggests the presence of a non-active (dead) layer (0.16 μm thickness) at the p+ side top contact interface, where the photogenerated carriers do not contribute to the photocurrent, possibly due to recombination. One of the diodes, D1, was also characterized as detector for room temperature photon counting X-ray spectroscopy; the best energy resolution achieved (FWHM) at 5.9 keV was 745 eV. The noise analysis of the system, based on spectra obtained at different shaping times and applied reverse biases, showed that the dominant source of noise is the dielectric noise. It was also calculated that there was at least (165±24) eV charge trapping noise at 0 V.

  6. Improved charge collection of the buried p-i-n a-Si:H radiation detectors

    SciTech Connect

    Fujieda, I.; Cho, G.; Conti, M.; Drewery, J.; Kaplan, S.N.; Perez-Mendez, V.; Qureshi, S.; Street, R.A.; Xerox Palo Alto Research Center, CA )

    1989-09-01

    Charge collection in hydrogenated amorphous silicon (a-Si:H) radiation detectors is improved for high LET particle detection by adding thin intrinsic layers to the usual p-i-n structure. This buried p-i-n structure enables us to apply higher bias and the electric field is enhanced. When irradiated by 5.8 MeV {alpha} particles, the 5.7 {mu}m thick buried p-i-n detector with bias 300V gives a signal size of 60,000 electrons, compared to about 20,000 electrons with the simple p-i-n detectors. The improved charge collection in the new structure is discussed. The capability of tailoring the field profile by doping a-Si:H opens a way to some interesting device structures. 17 refs., 7 figs.

  7. A final report for: Gallium arsenide P-I-N detectors for high-sensitivity imaging of thermal neutrons

    SciTech Connect

    Vernon, Stanley M.

    1999-04-01

    This SBIR Phase I developed neutron detectors made from gallium arsenide (GaAs) p-type/ intrinsic/n-type (P-I-N) diodes grown by metalorganic chemical vapor deposition (MOCVD) onto semi-insulating (S1) bulk GaAs wafers. A layer of isotonically enriched boron-10 evaporated onto the front surface serves to convert incoming neutrons into lithium ions and a 1.47 MeV alpha particle which creates electron-hole pairs that are detected by the GaAs diode. Various thicknesses of ''intrinsic'' (I) undoped GaAs were tested, as was use of a back-surface field (BSF) formed from a layer of Al{sub x}Ga{sub 1-x}As. Schottky-barrier diodes formed from the same structures without the p+ GaAs top layer were tested as a comparison. After mesa etching and application of contacts, devices were tested in visible light before application of the boron coating. Internal quantum efficiency (IQE) of the best diode near the GaAs bandedge is over 90%. The lowest dark current measured is 1 x 10{sup -12} amps at -1 V on a 3mm x 3mm diode, or a density of 1.1 x 10{sup -11} amps cm{sup -2}, with many of the diode structures tested having nearly similar results. The PIN diodes were significantly better than the Schottky barrier device, which had six orders of magnitude higher dark current. Diodes were characterized in terms of their current-mode response to 5.5 MeV alpha particles from 241-Americium. These radiation-induced currents were as high as 9.78 x 10{sup -7} A cm{sup -1} on a PIN device with an Al{sub x}Ga{sub 1-x}As BSF. Simple PIN diodes had currents as high as 2.44 x 10{sup -7} A cm{sup -2}, with thicker undoped layers showing better sensitivity. Boron coatings were applied, and response to neutrons tested at University of Michigan by Dr. Doug McGregor. Devices with PIN and Schottky barrier designs showed neutron detection efficiencies as high as 2% on 5 {micro}m thick devices, with no need for external bias voltages. PIN diodes showed higher breakdown voltages and lower noise

  8. The effect of embedded nanopillars on the built-in electric field of amorphous silicon p-i-n devices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kirkpatrick, T.; Simmons, C. B.; Akey, A. J.; Tabet, N.; Buonassisi, T.

    2016-05-01

    In this work, we report on the experimental modification of the built-in electric field of a-Si:H p-i-n junctions, resulting from Ag nanopillars embedded within the intrinsic layer (i-layer). Increased open-circuit voltages, from J-V traces, and reduced charge transit-times, from time-of-flight (ToF) measurements, indicate that the built-in electric field within the i-layer is increased with respect to unstructured reference samples. Decreased short-circuit current density values coupled with competing diode J-V characteristics, however, indicate that the charge collection from the i-layer is significantly decreased for the nanopillar samples. Theoretical and functional analysis of the ToF data reaffirms both reduced charge-transit times and decreased charge collection, and is able to quantitatively confirm the enhanced built-in electric field of the nanopillar samples.

  9. Coplanar waveguide discontinuities for P-I-N diode switches and filter applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dib, N. I.; Katehi, P. B.; Ponchak, George E.; Simons, Rainee N.

    1990-01-01

    A full wave space domain integral equation (SDIE) analysis of coplanar waveguide (CPW) two port discontinuities is presented. An experimental setup to measure the S-parameters of such discontinuities is described. Experimental and theoretical results for CPW realizations of pass-band and stop-band filters are presented. The S-parameters of such structures are plotted in the frequency range 5 to 25 GHz.

  10. Energy conversion process of p-i-n amorphous Si solar cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kuwano, Y.; Tsuda, S.; Ohnishi, M.

    1982-02-01

    The photovoltaic conversion process of a p-i-n amorphous silicon (a-Si) solar cell is investigated, and its theoretical limit efficiency is calculated. Under AM-1 illumination, the theoretical limit efficiency of the p-i-n a-Si solar cell is estimated to be 12.5%, while that under fluorescent lamp illumination is estimated to be 25.9%. In the calculation of the charge distribution in a-Si film, the Shifted U distribution is proposed for the distribution function of gap states. Poisson's equation is directly solved as a boundary condition problem, and the output characteristics of the p-i-n a-Si solar cell are calculated by solving the continuity equation for the photo-generated carriers.

  11. Photocapacitance study at p-i-n photodiode by numerical C- V integration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kavasoglu, A. Sertap; Kavasoglu, Nese; Oktik, Sener

    2009-02-01

    This paper describes a different numerical approach to estimate the impurity profile in a typical p-i-n device by using measured capacitance-voltage ( C- V) characteristics. The constructed numerical model has been found to provide an impurity profile which is almost consistent with those reported in the literature. Until now, no study of the anomalous capacitance response of the silicon p-i-n device induced by the space charge effects due to photo-generated carriers has been reported. In this study, we unveiled this anomalous behaviour through illuminated C- V characteristics. The illuminated C- V result of BPW34 exhibits capacitance oscillations. This behaviour could be augmented by the density of states discontinuities in intrinsic silicon [Biswajit Das. Observation of capacitance-voltage oscillations in porous silicon. Physica E: Low-dimens Syst Nanostruct 2004;23(1-2):141-46].

  12. Gate-Controlled P-I-N Junction Switching Device with Graphene Nanoribbon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nakaharai, Shu; Iijima, Tomohiko; Ogawa, Shinichi; Miyazaki, Hisao; Li, Songlin; Tsukagoshi, Kazuhito; Sato, Shintaro; Yokoyama, Naoki

    2012-01-01

    A graphene P-I-N junction switching device with a nanoribbon is proposed, which was aimed at finding an optimized operation scheme for graphene transistors. The device has two bulk graphene regions where the carrier type is electrostatically controlled by a top gate, and these two regions are separated by a nanoribbon that works as an insulator, resulting in a junction configuration of (P or N)-I-(P or N). It is demonstrated that the drain current modulation strongly depends on the junction configuration, while the nanoribbon is not directly top-gated, and that the device with a P-I-N or N-I-P junction can exhibit better switching properties.

  13. Optoelectronic properties of p-i-n heterojunctions based on germanium nanocrystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Parola, S.; Quesnel, E.; Muffato, V.; Xie, L.; Leifer, K.; Coignus, J.; Slaoui, A.

    2013-07-01

    We investigated the possibility of using physical vapour deposited Ge nanocrystals (NCs) in optoelectronic devices such as solar cells. We have prepared p-i-n heterojunctions based on p+-doped Si substrate/undoped Ge NCs/ZnO:Al layer stacks and their optoelectronic properties were characterised. Under light, the generation of photo-carriers from the Ge NCs themselves was demonstrated. The photovoltaic behaviour of the p-i-n structure was also highlighted, with a measured Voc of 224 mV compared to 580 mV in theory. The discrepancy between theory and experiment was discussed on the basis of TEM observations, optical and carrier generation measurements as well as modelling.

  14. Carrier trapping and escape times in p-i-n GaInNAs MQW structures

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    We used a semi-classical model to describe carrier capture into and thermionic escape from GaInNAs/GaAs multiple quantum wells (MQWs) situated within the intrinsic region of a GaAs p-i-n junction. The results are used to explain photocurrent oscillations with applied bias observed in these structures, in terms of charge accumulation and resonance tunnelling. PMID:24417767

  15. Gate-Controlled P-I-N Junction Switching Device with Graphene Nanoribbon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nakaharai, Shu; Iijima, Tomohiko; Ogawa, Shinichi; Miyazaki, Hisao; Li, Songlin; Tsukagoshi, Kazuhito; Sato, Shintaro; Yokoyama, Naoki

    2012-02-01

    The concept of a novel graphene P-I-N junction switching device with a nanoribbon is proposed, and its basic operation is demonstrated in an experiment. The concept aims to optimize the operation scheme for graphene transistors toward a superior on-off property. The device has two bulk graphene regions where the carrier type is electrostatically controlled by a top-gate, and these two regions are separated by a nanoribbon which works as insulator. As a result, the device forms a (P or N)-I-(P or N) junction. The off state is obtained by lifting the band of the bulk graphene of the source side and lowering that of the drain side, so that the device forms a P-I-N junction. In this configuration, the leakage current is reduced more effectively than the conventional single gate transistors due to a high barrier height and a long tunneling length in the nanoribbon. The on state is obtained by flipping the polarity of the bias of either top-gate to form a P-I-P or N-I-N junction. An experiment showed that the drain current was suppressed in the cases of P-I-N and N-I-P compared to P-I-P and N-I-N, and all of the behaviors were consistent with what was expected from the device operation model. This research is granted by JSPS through FIRST Program initiated by CSTP.

  16. Influence of bilayer resist processing on p-i-n OLEDs: towards multicolor photolithographic structuring of organic displays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krotkus, Simonas; Nehm, Frederik; Janneck, Robby; Kalkura, Shrujan; Zakhidov, Alex A.; Schober, Matthias; Hild, Olaf R.; Kasemann, Daniel; Hofmann, Simone; Leo, Karl; Reineke, Sebastian

    2015-03-01

    Recently, bilayer resist processing combined with development in hydrofluoroether (HFE) solvents has been shown to enable single color structuring of vacuum-deposited state-of-the-art organic light-emitting diodes (OLED). In this work, we focus on further steps required to achieve multicolor structuring of p-i-n OLEDs using a bilayer resist approach. We show that the green phosphorescent OLED stack is undamaged after lift-off in HFEs, which is a necessary step in order to achieve RGB pixel array structured by means of photolithography. Furthermore, we investigate the influence of both, double resist processing on red OLEDs and exposure of the devices to ambient conditions, on the basis of the electrical, optical and lifetime parameters of the devices. Additionally, water vapor transmission rates of single and bilayer system are evaluated with thin Ca film conductance test. We conclude that diffusion of propylene glycol methyl ether acetate (PGMEA) through the fluoropolymer film is the main mechanism behind OLED degradation observed after bilayer processing.

  17. Amorphous silicon p-i-n photodetector with Frisch grid for high-speed medical imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Allec, Nicholas; Goldan, Amir H.; Wang, Kai; Chen, Feng; Karim, Karim S.

    2010-04-01

    In indirect digital x-ray detectors, photodetectors such as hydrogenated amorphous silicon (a-Si:H) p-i-n photodetectors are used to convert the optical photons generated by the scintillating material to collectible electron-hole pairs. A problem that arises during the collection of the charges is that the mobility and lifetime of both types of carriers (electrons and holes) differ. In a-Si:H, the mobility of holes is much lower than that of electrons which leads to depth-dependent signal variations and causes the charge collection time to be extensive. It has been shown that the use of a Frisch grid can reduce the effect of the slower carriers in direct x-ray detectors. The Frisch grid is essentially a conducting grid that shields carriers from the collecting electrode until they are in close proximity. When the pixel electrodes are properly biased, the grid prevents the slow moving carriers (traveling away from the collecting electrode) from being collected and puts more weight on the fast moving carriers, thus allowing the total charge to be collected in less time. In this paper we investigate the use of a Frisch grid in a-Si:H p-i-n photodetectors for indirect x-ray detectors. Through simulations and theoretical analysis we determine the grid line sizes and positioning that will be most effective for practical p-i-n photodetector designs. In addition we compare the results of photodetectors with and without the grid to characterize the improvement achievable.

  18. GeSn p-i-n waveguide photodetectors on silicon substrates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peng, Yu-Hsiang; Cheng, H. H.; Mashanov, Vladimir I.; Chang, Guo-En

    2014-12-01

    We report an investigation on GeSn p-i-n waveguide photodetectors grown on a Ge-buffered Si wafer. In comparison with a reference Ge detector, the GeSn detector shows an enhanced responsivity in the measured energy range, mainly attributed to the smaller bandgap caused by Sn-alloying. Analysis of the quantum efficiency indicates that increasing the Sn content in the active layers can significantly shorten the required device length to achieve the maximum efficiency. The present investigation demonstrates the planar photodetectors desired for monolithic integration with electronic devices.

  19. Density of states measurements in a p-i-n solar cell

    SciTech Connect

    Crandall, R.S.; Wang, Q.

    1996-05-01

    The authors describe results of density of states (DOS) profiling in p-i-n solar-cell devices using drive-level capacitance (DLC) techniques. Near the p-i interface the defect density is high, decreasing rapidly into the interior, reaching low values in the central region of the cell, and rising rapidly again at the n-i interface. They show that the states in the central region are neutral dangling-bond defects, whereas those near the interfaces with the doped layers are charged dangling bonds.

  20. GeSn p-i-n waveguide photodetectors on silicon substrates

    SciTech Connect

    Peng, Yu-Hsiang; Chang, Guo-En; Cheng, H. H.; Mashanov, Vladimir I.

    2014-12-08

    We report an investigation on GeSn p-i-n waveguide photodetectors grown on a Ge-buffered Si wafer. In comparison with a reference Ge detector, the GeSn detector shows an enhanced responsivity in the measured energy range, mainly attributed to the smaller bandgap caused by Sn-alloying. Analysis of the quantum efficiency indicates that increasing the Sn content in the active layers can significantly shorten the required device length to achieve the maximum efficiency. The present investigation demonstrates the planar photodetectors desired for monolithic integration with electronic devices.

  1. High performance p-i-n CdTe and CdZnTe detectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khusainov, A. Kh; Dudin, A. L.; Ilves, A. G.; Morozov, V. F.; Pustovoit, A. K.; Arlt, R. D.

    1999-06-01

    A breakthrough in the performance of p-i-n CdTe and CdZnTe detectors is reported. The detector stability has been significantly improved, allowing their use in precise gamma and XRF applications. Detectors with energy resolution close to Si and Ge were produced operating with only -30--35°C cooling (by a Peltier cooler of 15×15×10 mm size and a consumed power less than 5 W). Presently detectors with volume of up to 300 mm 3 are available. In terms of photoelectric effect efficiency it corresponds to HPGe detectors with volumes of about 1.5 cm 3. The possibilities of further improvement of CdTe and CdZnTe detector characteristics are discussed in this paper.

  2. The electrochemical capacitance-voltage characterization of InP based p-i-n structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Li-wei; Lu, Yi-dan; Xu, Jin-tong; Li, Xiang-yang

    2013-09-01

    Electrochemical Capacitance-Voltage (EC-V) profiling is currently one of the most often used methods for majority carrier concentration depth profiling of semiconductors. The experiments of EC-V profiling on InP based structures were conducted by Wafer Profiler CVP21, and there are two problems in the experiments of InP based p-i-n structures : a)the experimental results of EC-V profiling of i layer were not in line with the theoretically data after the EC-V profiling of p layer, which can be measured within the error range; b) The measurements of etching depth were not very accurate. In this paper, we made comparative experiments on InP based n-i-n structures, and find out a method to deal with the first problem: firstly etch p layer before EC-V profiling, so we can gain a relatively accurate result of EC-V profiling of i layer. Besides, use back contacts instead of front contacts to do the EC-V profiling according to the instruction book of the Wafer Profiler CVP21. Then the author tried to infer the reason that results in the first problem theoretically. Meanwhile we can calibrate the etching depth through Profile-system and Scanning Probe Microscope (SPM). And there are two possible reasons which result in the second problem: the defects of the semiconductors and the electrolyte we used to etch the semiconductors.

  3. GaAs nanowire array solar cells with axial p-i-n junctions.

    PubMed

    Yao, Maoqing; Huang, Ningfeng; Cong, Sen; Chi, Chun-Yung; Seyedi, M Ashkan; Lin, Yen-Ting; Cao, Yu; Povinelli, Michelle L; Dapkus, P Daniel; Zhou, Chongwu

    2014-06-11

    Because of unique structural, optical, and electrical properties, solar cells based on semiconductor nanowires are a rapidly evolving scientific enterprise. Various approaches employing III-V nanowires have emerged, among which GaAs, especially, is under intense research and development. Most reported GaAs nanowire solar cells form p-n junctions in the radial direction; however, nanowires using axial junction may enable the attainment of high open circuit voltage (Voc) and integration into multijunction solar cells. Here, we report GaAs nanowire solar cells with axial p-i-n junctions that achieve 7.58% efficiency. Simulations show that axial junctions are more tolerant to doping variation than radial junctions and lead to higher Voc under certain conditions. We further study the effect of wire diameter and junction depth using electrical characterization and cathodoluminescence. The results show that large diameter and shallow junctions are essential for a high extraction efficiency. Our approach opens up great opportunity for future low-cost, high-efficiency photovoltaics. PMID:24849203

  4. Si Radial p-i-n Junction Photovoltaic Arrays with Built-In Light Concentrators.

    PubMed

    Yoo, Jinkyoung; Nguyen, Binh-Minh; Campbell, Ian H; Dayeh, Shadi A; Schuele, Paul; Evans, David; Picraux, S Tom

    2015-05-26

    High-performance photovoltaic (PV) devices require strong light absorption, low reflection and efficient photogenerated carrier collection for high quantum efficiency. Previous optical studies of vertical wires arrays have revealed that extremely efficient light absorption in the visible wavelengths is achievable. Photovoltaic studies have further advanced the wire approach by employing radial p-n junction architectures to achieve more efficient carrier collection. While radial p-n junction formation and optimized light absorption have independently been considered, PV efficiencies have further opportunities for enhancement by exploiting the radial p-n junction fabrication procedures to form arrays that simultaneously enhance both light absorption and carrier collection efficiency. Here we report a concept of morphology control to improve PV performance, light absorption and quantum efficiency of silicon radial p-i-n junction arrays. Surface energy minimization during vapor phase epitaxy is exploited to form match-head structures at the tips of the wires. The match-head structure acts as a built-in light concentrator and enhances optical absorptance and external quantum efficiencies by 30 to 40%, and PV efficiency under AM 1.5G illumination by 20% compared to cylindrical structures without match-heads. The design rules for these improvements with match-head arrays are systematically studied. This approach of process-enhanced control of three-dimensional Si morphologies provides a fab-compatible way to enhance the PV performance of Si radial p-n junction wire arrays. PMID:25961330

  5. Dense nanoimprinted silicon nanowire arrays with passivated axial p-i-n junctions for photovoltaic applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Peng; Liu, Pei; Siontas, Stylianos; Zaslavsky, A.; Pacifici, D.; Ha, Jong-Yoon; Krylyuk, S.; Davydov, A. V.

    2015-03-01

    We report on the fabrication and photovoltaic characteristics of vertical arrays of silicon axial p-i-n junction nanowire (NW) solar cells grown by vapor-liquid-solid (VLS) epitaxy. NW surface passivation with silicon dioxide shell is shown to enhance carrier recombination time, open-circuit voltage (VOC), short-circuit current density (JSC), and fill factor (FF). The photovoltaic performance of passivated individual NW and NW arrays was compared under 532 nm laser illumination with power density of ˜10 W/cm2. Higher values of VOC and FF in the NW arrays are explained by enhanced light trapping. In order to verify the effect of NW density on light absorption and hence on the photovoltaic performance of NW arrays, dense Si NW arrays were fabricated using nanoimprint lithography to periodically arrange the gold seed particles prior to epitaxial growth. Compared to sparse NW arrays fabricated using VLS growth from randomly distributed gold seeds, the nanoimprinted NW array solar cells show a greatly increased peak external quantum efficiency of ˜8% and internal quantum efficiency of ˜90% in the visible spectral range. Three-dimensional finite-difference time-domain simulations of Si NW periodic arrays with varying pitch (P) confirm the importance of high NW density. Specifically, due to diffractive scattering and light trapping, absorption efficiency close to 100% in the 400-650 nm spectral range is calculated for a Si NW array with P = 250 nm, significantly outperforming a blanket Si film of the same thickness.

  6. Tunable superlattice p-i-n photodetectors: Characteristics, theory, and applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Larsson, Anders; Andrekson, Peter A.; Eng, Sverre T.; Yariv, Amnon

    1988-01-01

    Extended measurements and theory on the recently developed monolithic wavelength demultiplexer consisting of voltage-tunable superlattice p-i-n photodetectors in a waveguide configuration are discussed. It is shown that the device is able to demultiplex and detect two optical signals with a wavelength separation of 20 nm directly into different electrical channels at a data rate of 1 Gb/s and with a crosstalk attenuation varying between 20 and 28 dB, depending on the polarization. The minimum acceptable crosstalk attenuation at a data rate of 100 Mb/s is determined to be 10 dB. The feasibility of using the device as a polarization angle sensor for linearly polarized light is also demonstrated. A theory for the emission of photogenerated carriers out of the quantum wells is included, since this is potentially a speed limiting mechanism in these detectors. It is shown that a theory of thermally assisted tunneling by polar optical phonon interaction is able to predict emission times consistent with the observed temporal response.

  7. Dense nanoimprinted silicon nanowire arrays with passivated axial p-i-n junctions for photovoltaic applications

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, Peng; Liu, Pei; Siontas, Stylianos; Zaslavsky, A.; Pacifici, D.; Ha, Jong-Yoon; Krylyuk, S.; Davydov, A. V.

    2015-03-28

    We report on the fabrication and photovoltaic characteristics of vertical arrays of silicon axial p-i-n junction nanowire (NW) solar cells grown by vapor-liquid-solid (VLS) epitaxy. NW surface passivation with silicon dioxide shell is shown to enhance carrier recombination time, open-circuit voltage (V{sub OC}), short-circuit current density (J{sub SC}), and fill factor (FF). The photovoltaic performance of passivated individual NW and NW arrays was compared under 532 nm laser illumination with power density of ∼10 W/cm{sup 2}. Higher values of V{sub OC} and FF in the NW arrays are explained by enhanced light trapping. In order to verify the effect of NW density on light absorption and hence on the photovoltaic performance of NW arrays, dense Si NW arrays were fabricated using nanoimprint lithography to periodically arrange the gold seed particles prior to epitaxial growth. Compared to sparse NW arrays fabricated using VLS growth from randomly distributed gold seeds, the nanoimprinted NW array solar cells show a greatly increased peak external quantum efficiency of ∼8% and internal quantum efficiency of ∼90% in the visible spectral range. Three-dimensional finite-difference time-domain simulations of Si NW periodic arrays with varying pitch (P) confirm the importance of high NW density. Specifically, due to diffractive scattering and light trapping, absorption efficiency close to 100% in the 400–650 nm spectral range is calculated for a Si NW array with P = 250 nm, significantly outperforming a blanket Si film of the same thickness.

  8. GeSn p-i-n photodetectors with GeSn layer grown by magnetron sputtering epitaxy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zheng, Jun; Wang, Suyuan; Liu, Zhi; Cong, Hui; Xue, Chunlai; Li, Chuanbo; Zuo, Yuhua; Cheng, Buwen; Wang, Qiming

    2016-01-01

    We report an investigation of normal-incidence GeSn-based p-i-n photodetectors (PDs) with a Ge0.94Sn0.06 active layer grown using sputter epitaxy on a Ge(100) substrate. A low dark current density of 0.24 A/cm2 was obtained at a reverse bias of 1 V. A high optical responsivity of the Ge0.94Sn0.06/Ge p-i-n PDs at zero bias was achieved, with an optical response wavelength extending to 1985 nm. The temperature-dependent optical-response measurement was performed, and a clear redshift absorption edge was observed. This work presents an approach for developing efficient and cost-effective GeSn-based infrared devices.

  9. Superlinear generation of exciton and related paramagnetism induced by forward current in a diamond p-i-n junction

    SciTech Connect

    Natori, Kenji

    2015-02-07

    The concentration of excitons generated in a high-quality diamond p-i-n junction is investigated considering the forward current characteristics of the junction. As the forward current in the junction increases, the exciton concentration increases superlinearly, contrary to the linear increases of the electron and hole concentration. This tendency suggests a superlinear increase in emission intensity due to exciton recombination. The increase rate is more radical than quadratic, in accordance with the observed increase of the integrated intensity of free exciton emission. To estimate the concentration of triplet excitons generated in the p-i-n junction, observation of the paramagnetism due to the exciton spin moment is proposed. The magnetic susceptibility superlinearly increases with the increase in the forward current, unlike any other magnetic property of the device.

  10. Severe test of a dangling bond only model of thin film silicon p-i-n solar cell degradation

    SciTech Connect

    Willett, D.R.

    1987-06-25

    This paper uses a model that links previous research into the metastable defects found in undoped thin film Si:H or a-Si:H (TFS) films to the light-induced degradation of TFS solar cells. The fill factor changes of two experimental studies are modeled. The first series is a group of 704, 4-cm/sup 2/ p-i-n solar cells with eleven different i-layer thicknesses ranging from 1,000A to 200,000A. The second series is a group of 144, 4-cm/sup 2/ p-i-n solar cells all made in the same deposition and then exposed under different illumination levels and temperatures. The dangling bond model is shown to be an incomplete explanation of the fill factor changes due to light soaking. Data for the short time region and long time region cannot both be fit with the same parameters

  11. Broadband and high-speed silicon dual-ring modulator based on p-i-n-i-p junction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Haq, Bahawal; Rasras, Mahmoud

    2016-05-01

    We propose a silicon dual-ring modulator consisting of two serially cascaded rings embedded with p-i-n-i-p junctions driven by one signal, in contrast to a differential signal pair. The simulations for optimizing the design of the phase shifter and the optical response of the both rings are performed. We show that the device performs better than the single ring. The modulator has a higher optical bandwidth, 3-dB modulation bandwidth and bit rate as compared to a single ring. In contrast to a cascaded ring modulator driven by a differential signal pair, it can be driven by a single p-i-n-i-p junction and RF signal. A serially coupled ring resonator has three times the resonance linewidth as compared to a single ring. Furthermore, it can support significantly higher data rates of up to 13 GHz.

  12. Large lateral photovoltaic effect in µc-SiOx:H/a-Si:H/c-Si p-i-n structure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qiao, Shuang; Chen, Jianhui; Liu, Jihong; Zhang, Xinhui; Wang, Shufang; Fu, Guangsheng

    2016-03-01

    In this paper, we report on a large lateral photovoltaic effect (LPE) in a hydrogenated microcrystal silicon-oxygen (µc-SiOx:H)-based p-i-n structure. Compared with LPE in a hydrogenated amorphous silicon (a-Si:H)-based p-i-n structure, this structure showed an abnormal current-voltage (I-V) curve with a lower photoelectric conversion efficiency, but exhibited a much higher LPE with the highest position sensitivity of 64.3 mV/mm. We ascribe this to the enhancement of the lateral gradient of excess transmitted carriers induced by increasing both Schottky barrier and p-type layer body conductivity. Our results suggest that this µc-SiOx:H-based p-i-n structure may be a promising candidate for position-sensitive detectors (PSDs). Moreover, our results may also imply that solar cell devices with abnormal I-V curves (or low efficiency) could find their new applications in other aspects.

  13. Amorphous Silicon p-i-n Structure Acting as Light and Temperature Sensor

    PubMed Central

    de Cesare, Giampiero; Nascetti, Augusto; Caputo, Domenico

    2015-01-01

    In this work, we propose a multi-parametric sensor able to measure both temperature and radiation intensity, suitable to increase the level of integration and miniaturization in Lab-on-Chip applications. The device is based on amorphous silicon p-doped/intrinsic/n-doped thin film junction. The device is first characterized as radiation and temperature sensor independently. We found a maximum value of responsivity equal to 350 mA/W at 510 nm and temperature sensitivity equal to 3.2 mV/K. We then investigated the effects of the temperature variation on light intensity measurement and of the light intensity variation on the accuracy of the temperature measurement. We found that the temperature variation induces an error lower than 0.55 pW/K in the light intensity measurement at 550 nm when the diode is biased in short circuit condition, while an error below 1 K/µW results in the temperature measurement when a forward bias current higher than 25 µA/cm2 is applied. PMID:26016913

  14. Specific features of light current-voltage characteristics of p-i-n structures based on amorphous silicon in the case of the tunnel-drift mechanism of dark current transport

    SciTech Connect

    Andreev, A. A.

    2008-11-15

    Current-voltage (I-V) characteristics of p-i-n structures based on amorphous silicon ({alpha}-Si:H) with small hole diffusion lengths (shorter than the thickness of the i-layer of a p-i-n structure) have been experimentally studied with and without illumination. It is shown that forward I-V characteristics of structures of this kind can be described by a dependence inherent in diodes, with a diode ideality factor two-three times the maximum value of 2, theoretically predicted for generation-recombination currents in p-n junctions. The dark current is always substantially lower than the photocurrent in a cell biased with a voltage approximately equal to the opencircuit voltage of the photocell. Dark currents cannot contribute to the I-V characteristic under illumination. The photocurrent decreases with increasing photovoltage at a bias lower than the open-circuit voltage because of a decrease in the collection coefficient and the increasingly important role of back diffusion of electrons into the p-contact, rather than as a result of the dark injection. In the case of biases exceeding the open-circuit voltage, back diffusion becomes the predominant component of the current.

  15. Efficiency Improvement by Transparent Contact Layer in InGaN-Based p-i-n Solar Cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shim, J. P.; Jeon, S. R.; Lee, D. S.

    2011-12-01

    InGaN/GaN p-i-n solar cells with 10.8% indium composition were fabricated with different current spreading layers and metal-grid electrodes. Ni/Au (5nm/5nm) and ITO (150 nm) were used as a spreading layer for comparison. The solar cell with the ITO current spreading layer showed better results than Ni/Au, a 79.5% fill factor and 1% conversion efficiency. Optimization of the metal-gird electrodes also affected on solar cell efficiency.

  16. Simulation for spectral response of solar-blind AlGaN based p-i-n photodiodes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xue, Shiwei; Xu, Jintong; Li, Xiangyang

    2015-04-01

    In this article, we introduced how to build a physical model of refer to the device structure and parameters. Simulations for solar-blind AlGaN based p-i-n photodiodes spectral characteristics were conducted in use of Silvaco TCAD, where device structure and parameters are comprehensively considered. In simulation, the effects of polarization, Urbach tail, mobility, saturated velocities and lifetime in AlGaN device was considered. Especially, we focused on how the concentration-dependent Shockley-Read-Hall (SRH) recombination model affects simulation results. By simulating, we analyzed the effects in spectral response caused by TAUN0 and TAUP0, and got the values of TAUN0 and TAUP0 which can bring a result coincides with test results. After that, we changed their values and made the simulation results especially the part under 255 nm performed better. In conclusion, the spectral response between 200 nm and 320 nm of solar-blind AlGaN based p-i-n photodiodes were simulated and compared with test results. We also found that TAUN0 and TAUP0 have a large impact on spectral response of AlGaN material.

  17. Enhanced photovoltaic property by forming p-i-n structures containing Si quantum dots/SiC multilayers

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Si quantum dots (Si QDs)/SiC multilayers were fabricated by annealing hydrogenated amorphous Si/SiC multilayers prepared in a plasma-enhanced chemical vapor deposition system. The thickness of amorphous Si layer was designed to be 4 nm, and the thickness of amorphous SiC layer was kept at 2 nm. Transmission electron microscopy observation revealed the formation of Si QDs after 900°C annealing. The optical properties of the Si QDs/SiC multilayers were studied, and the optical band gap deduced from the optical absorption coefficient result is 1.48 eV. Moreover, the p-i-n structure with n-a-Si/i-(Si QDs/SiC multilayers)/p-Si was fabricated, and the carrier transportation mechanism was investigated. The p-i-n structure was used in a solar cell device. The cell had the open circuit voltage of 532 mV and the power conversion efficiency (PCE) of 6.28%. PACS 81.07.Ta; 78.67.Pt; 88.40.jj PMID:25489285

  18. Enhanced photovoltaic property by forming p-i-n structures containing Si quantum dots/SiC multilayers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cao, Yunqing; Lu, Peng; Zhang, Xiaowei; Xu, Jun; Xu, Ling; Chen, Kunji

    2014-11-01

    Si quantum dots (Si QDs)/SiC multilayers were fabricated by annealing hydrogenated amorphous Si/SiC multilayers prepared in a plasma-enhanced chemical vapor deposition system. The thickness of amorphous Si layer was designed to be 4 nm, and the thickness of amorphous SiC layer was kept at 2 nm. Transmission electron microscopy observation revealed the formation of Si QDs after 900°C annealing. The optical properties of the Si QDs/SiC multilayers were studied, and the optical band gap deduced from the optical absorption coefficient result is 1.48 eV. Moreover, the p-i-n structure with n-a-Si/i-(Si QDs/SiC multilayers)/p-Si was fabricated, and the carrier transportation mechanism was investigated. The p-i-n structure was used in a solar cell device. The cell had the open circuit voltage of 532 mV and the power conversion efficiency (PCE) of 6.28%.

  19. Analytical and equivalent-circuit models based on numerical solutions for amorphous silicon p/i/n solar cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Misiakos, K.; Lindholm, F. A.

    The authors present contact-to-contact computer solutions of the a-Si:H p/i/n solar cell and uses these to obtain the approximations and insight needed for the development of analytical models. The numerical results allow study of many aspects of internal variables as functions of position, terminal voltage, and phonon flux density. Based on the numerical results, analytical and equivalent-circuit models are proposed which support each other and explain the physical origin of interdependencies among such variables as quantum efficiency, electric field and recombination rate profiles, and their relation to current-voltage characteristics. The concept of the limiting carrier is mathematically treated by separating the current into photocollected and back-injection components. The limiting carrier is the carrier with the least photocollected current.

  20. GeSn-based p-i-n photodiodes with strained active layer on a Si wafer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tseng, H. H.; Li, H.; Mashanov, V.; Yang, Y. J.; Cheng, H. H.; Chang, G. E.; Soref, R. A.; Sun, G.

    2013-12-01

    We report an investigation of GeSn-based p-i-n photodiodes with an active GeSn layer that is almost fully strained. The results show that (a) the response of the Ge/GeSn/Ge heterojunction photodiodes is stronger than that of the reference Ge-based photodiodes at photon energies above the 0.8 eV direct bandgap of bulk Ge (<1.55 μm), and (b) the optical response extends to lower energy regions (1.55-1.80 μm wavelengths) as characterized by the strained GeSn bandgap. A cusp-like spectral characteristic is observed for samples with high Sn contents, which is attributed to the significant strain-induced energy splitting of heavy and light hole bands. This work represents a step forward in developing GeSn-based infrared photodetectors.

  1. Photoconductivity and photoluminescence under bias in GaInNAs/GaAs MQW p-i-n structures.

    PubMed

    Khalil, Hagir M; Royall, Ben; Mazzucato, Simone; Balkan, Naci

    2012-01-01

    The low temperature photoluminescence under bias (PLb) and the photoconductivity (PC) of a p-i-n GaInNAs/GaAs multiple quantum well sample have been investigated. Under optical excitation with photons of energy greater than the GaAs bandgap, PC and PLb results show a number of step-like increases when the sample is reverse biased. The nature of these steps, which depends upon the temperature, exciting wavelength and intensity and the number of quantum wells (QWs) in the device, is explained in terms of thermionic emission and negative charge accumulation due to the low confinement of holes in GaInNAs QWs. At high temperature, thermal escape from the wells becomes much more dominant and the steps smear out. PMID:23021540

  2. Photoconductivity and photoluminescence under bias in GaInNAs/GaAs MQW p-i-n structures

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    The low temperature photoluminescence under bias (PLb) and the photoconductivity (PC) of a p-i-n GaInNAs/GaAs multiple quantum well sample have been investigated. Under optical excitation with photons of energy greater than the GaAs bandgap, PC and PLb results show a number of step-like increases when the sample is reverse biased. The nature of these steps, which depends upon the temperature, exciting wavelength and intensity and the number of quantum wells (QWs) in the device, is explained in terms of thermionic emission and negative charge accumulation due to the low confinement of holes in GaInNAs QWs. At high temperature, thermal escape from the wells becomes much more dominant and the steps smear out. PMID:23021540

  3. Hump-shaped internal collection efficiency of degraded a-Si:H {ital p-i-n} solar cells

    SciTech Connect

    Smole, F.; Topic, M.; Furlan, J.; Kusian, W.

    1997-07-01

    Measured internal collection efficiency (ICE) characteristics of annealed and degraded a-Si:H p-i-n solar cells were used for an analysis of their internal behavior. Using the numerical simulator ASPIN, simulations were performed in order to fit and explain pronounced hump-shaped voltage-dependent ICE characteristics of degraded structures under weak short-wavelength illumination. Agreement with measured ICE characteristics for a degraded cell was obtained only if in addition to the introduction of light-induced dangling bond defect states, their capture cross sections were also increased, in particular the capture cross section for the charged defect states were increased. This caused a change in the occupancy of defect states at the p-i interface and front part of the i layer under forward biases. Consequently, the electric field in the front part of the cell was sustained under higher forward biases, resulting in recovery of the ICE. {copyright} {ital 1997 American Institute of Physics.}

  4. Temperature dependence of the photovoltage from Franz-Keldysh oscillations in a GaAs p+-i-n+ structure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Sang Jo; Sohn, Chang Won; Jo, Hyun-Jun; Han, Im Sik; Kim, Jong Su; Noh, Sam Kyu; Choi, Hyonkwang; Leem, Jae-Young

    2015-09-01

    The temperature dependences of the junction electric fields and photovoltage have been investigated for a GaAs p+-i-n+ structure by using photoreflectance (PR) spectroscopy. The electric field strength was examined through three types of Franz-Keldysh oscillation (FKO) analyses; then, the photovoltage was evaluated with respect to temperature in the range from 30 to 300 K. From the PR results, we observed two electric fields that are estimated to originate from two regions of FKOs in undoped GaAs and from the space charge region in highly-doped GaAs. The electric field under illumination decreased with decreasing temperature while the photovoltage obtained from the electric field increased. We also demonstrate that PR spectroscopy is a good method for investigating the photovoltaic effect in solar-cell structures.

  5. Optimizing light absorption in a thin-film p-i-n solar cell using a quasi-periodic grating

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Atalla, Mahmoud R. M.

    2014-03-01

    A p-i-n solar cell is best suited for strong absorbers with poor collection capabilities. However, the absorption naturally decreases at photon energies close to the electronic bandgap of the semiconductor. We hypothesized that a quasi-periodic surface textures in the role of diffraction gratings at the back contact can efficiently scatter light increasing the optical path length inside the absorber layer. The effect of quasi-periodic corrugated backing metallic contact of various types was studied theoretically. To help optimizing the design of the quasi periodic grating the corresponding canonical problem was considered. The absorption of light was calculated using the rigorous coupled-wave approach. The n- and i-layers consist of isotropic nonhomogeneous multilayered semiconductor.

  6. Solar-blind AlGaN 256x256 p-i-n detectors and focal plane arrays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reine, M. B.; Hairston, A.; Lamarre, P.; Wong, K. K.; Tobin, S. P.; Sood, A. K.; Cooke, C.; Pophristic, M.; Guo, S.; Peres, B.; Singh, R.; Eddy, C. R., Jr.; Chowdhury, U.; Wong, M. M.; Dupuis, R. D.; Li, T.; DenBaars, S. P.

    2006-02-01

    This paper reports the development of aluminum-gallium nitride (AlGaN or Al xGa 1-xN) photodiode technology for high-operability 256×256 hybrid Focal Plane Arrays (FPAs) for solar-blind ultraviolet (UV) detection in the 260-280 nm spectral region. These hybrid UV FPAs consist of a 256×256 back-illuminated AlGaN p-i-n photodiode array, operating at zero bias voltage, bump-mounted to a matching 256×256 silicon CMOS readout integrated circuit (ROIC) chip. The unit cell size is 30×30 μm2. The photodiode arrays were fabricated from multilayer AlGaN films grown by MOCVD on 2" dia. UV-transparent sapphire substrates. Improvements in AlGaN material growth and device design enabled high quantum efficiency and extremely low leakage current to be achieved in high-operability 256×256 p-i-n photodiode arrays with cuton and cutoff wavelengths of 260 and 280 nm, placing the response in the solar-blind wavelength region (less than about 280 nm) where solar radiation is heavily absorbed by the ozone layer. External quantum efficiencies (at V=0, 270 nm, no antireflection coating) as high as 58% were measured in backilluminated devices. A number of 256×256 FPAs, with the AlGaN arrays fabricated from films grown at three different facilities, achieved response operabilities as high as 99.8%, response nonuniformities (σ/μ) as low as 2.5%, and zero-bias resistance median values as high as 1×10 16 ohm, corresponding to R 0A products of 7×10 10 ohm-cm2. Noise Equivalent Irradiance (NEI) data were measured on these FPAs. Median NEI values at 1 Hz are 250-500 photons/pixel-s, with best-element values as low as 90 photons/pixel-s at 1 Hz.

  7. Transparent conducting oxide contacts for n-i-p and p-i-n amorphous silicon solar cells

    SciTech Connect

    Hegedus, S.S.; Buchanan, W.A.; Eser, E.; Phillips, J.E.; Shafarman, W.N. |

    1997-02-01

    We investigate the effect of sputtered transparent conducting oxide (TCO) contacts on the device performance of ss/n-i-p/TCO and glass/SnO {sub 2}/p-i-n/TCO/Ag solar cells. TCO materials ITO and ZnO are compared, and found to have very similar transparency at the same sheet resistance. Sputtering ZnO with O{sub 2} in the Ar reduces FF for ss/n-i-p/ZnO devices, compared to sputtering without O{sub 2}. This is attributed to an interface not bulk effect. Sputtering ITO with O{sub 2} on the same devices increases J{sub SC} due to higher ITO transparency, compared to sputtering without O{sub 2} , but has no effect on FF. Based on curvature in the J(V) curve around V{sub OC}, the ZnO/p layer contact appears to be non-ohmic. For p-i-n/TCO/Ag devices, {mu}c-Si n-layers have much higher V{sub OC}, J{sub SC}, and FF for all variations of TCO/Ag back reflectors compared to an a-Si n-layer. Devices with ITO/Ag have lower V{sub OC} and J{sub SC} compared to devices with ZnO/Ag. Sputtering ZnO with O{sub 2} has no detrimental effect on devices with {mu}c-Si n-layers but severely reduces FF in devices with a-Si n-layers. {copyright} {ital 1997 American Institute of Physics.}

  8. Performance and analysis of amorphous silicon p-i-n solar cells made by chemical-vapor deposition from disilane

    SciTech Connect

    Hegedus, S.S.; Rocheleau, R.E.; Buchanan, W.; Baron, B.N.

    1987-01-01

    The photovoltaic performance of amorphous silicon p-i-n solar cells made by chemical-vapor deposition (CVD) from disilane is reported and analyzed. Intrinsic layers were deposited at rates from 0.2 to 50 A/s at temperatures from 380 to 460 /sup 0/C with and without boron doping. Device performance was insensitive to substantial differences in disilane purity. A cell efficiency of 4% was achieved. The primary limitation to higher efficiency was low fill factor (<50%) due to high series resistance (>18 ..cap omega.. cm/sup 2/). Analysis of the series resistance indicated a contact-related resistance of 4--12 ..cap omega.. cm/sup 2/ and a photoconductive resistance composed of intrinsic layer thickness-independent (10 ..cap omega.. cm/sup 2/) and thickness-dependent terms. Analysis of the voltage dependence of the current collection indicated a fill factor of 60% would be expected in the absence of series resistance. The maximum short-circuit current of 12.5 mA/cm/sup 2/ (normalized to 100 mW/cm/sup 2/) resulted with a boron-doped i layer deposited at 440 /sup 0/C at 3.3 A/s. Modeling of the collection efficiency indicated collection widths up to 0.33 ..mu..m for boron-doped and 0.24 ..mu..m for undoped p-i-n devices. In order to achieve high-efficiency cells using CVD from disilane, the limitations imposed by low photoconductivity, a high density of states, and restricted cell design imposed by the high deposition temperatures would have to be overcome.

  9. Solar-blind AlGaN 256×256 p-i-n detectors and focal plane arrays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reine, M. B.; Hairston, A.; Lamarre, P.; Wong, K. K.; Tobin, S. P.; Sood, A. K.; Cooke, C.; Pophristic, M.; Guo, S.; Peres, B.; Singh, R.; Eddy, C. R. _Jr., Jr.; Chowdhury, U.; Wong, M. M.; Dupuis, R. D.; Li, T.; DenBaars, S. P.

    2006-02-01

    This paper reports the development of aluminum-gallium nitride (AlGaN or Al xGa 1-xN) photodiode technology for high-operability 256×256 hybrid Focal Plane Arrays (FPAs) for solar-blind ultraviolet (UV) detection in the 260-280 nm spectral region. These hybrid UV FPAs consist of a 256×256 back-illuminated AlGaN p-i-n photodiode array, operating at zero bias voltage, bump-mounted to a matching 256×256 silicon CMOS readout integrated circuit (ROIC) chip. The unit cell size is 30×30 μm2. The photodiode arrays were fabricated from multilayer AlGaN films grown by MOCVD on 2" dia. UV-transparent sapphire substrates. Improvements in AlGaN material growth and device design enabled high quantum efficiency and extremely low leakage current to be achieved in high-operability 256×256 p-i-n photodiode arrays with cuton and cutoff wavelengths of 260 and 280 nm, placing the response in the solar-blind wavelength region (less than about 280 nm) where solar radiation is heavily absorbed by the ozone layer. External quantum efficiencies (at V=0, 270 nm, no antireflection coating) as high as 58% were measured in back-illuminated devices. A number of 256×256 FPAs, with the AlGaN arrays fabricated from films grown at three different facilities, achieved response operabilities as high as 99.8%, response nonuniformities (σ/μ) as low as 2.5%, and zero-bias resistance median values as high as 1×10 16 ohm, corresponding to R0A products of 7×10 10 ohm-cm2. Noise Equivalent Irradiance (NEI) data were measured on these FPAs. Median NEI values at 1 Hz are 250-500 photons/pixel-s, with best-element values as low as 90 photons/pixel-s at 1 Hz.

  10. Highly transparent front electrodes with metal fingers for p-i-n thin-film silicon solar cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moulin, Etienne; Müller, Thomas Christian Mathias; Warzechac, Marek; Hoffmann, Andre; Paetzold, Ulrich Wilhelm; Aeberhard, Urs

    2015-03-01

    The optical and electrical properties of transparent conductive oxides (TCOs), traditionally used in thin-film silicon (TF-Si) solar cells as front-electrode materials, are interlinked, such that an increase in TCO transparency is generally achieved at the cost of reduced lateral conductance. Combining a highly transparent TCO front electrode of moderate conductance with metal fingers to support charge collection is a well-established technique in wafer-based technologies or for TF-Si solar cells in the substrate (n-i-p) configuration. Here, we extend this concept to TF-Si solar cells in the superstrate (p-i-n) configuration. The metal fingers are used in conjunction with a millimeter-scale textured foil, attached to the glass superstrate, which provides an antireflective and retroreflective effect; the latter effect mitigates the shadowing losses induced by the metal fingers. As a result, a substantial increase in power conversion efficiency, from 8.7% to 9.1%, is achieved for 1-μm-thick microcrystalline silicon solar cells deposited on a highly transparent thermally treated aluminum-doped zinc oxide layer combined with silver fingers, compared to cells deposited on a state-of-the-art zinc oxide layer.

  11. Operation and test of hybridized silicon p-i-n arrays using open-source array control hardware and software

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moore, Andrew C.; Ninkov, Zoran; Burley, Gregory S.; Forrest, William J.; McMurtry, Craig W.; Avery, Lars E.

    2003-05-01

    A system for controlling and testing high-resolution non-destructive astronomical imagers was constructed using open-source components, both hardware and software. The open-source electronics design, originated by Carnegie Observatories (OCIW) for CCD cameras, was modified, assembled, and augmented with new circuitry which facilitates monitoring of voltages and currents. The electronics was run from Python user interface software based on a design from the University of Rochester. This new software utilized the Numarray and pyFITS modules developed at the Space Telescope Science Institute (STScI). Interfacing to the "dv" FITS image analysis package from the NASA IRTF was also implemented. Python (the STScI language of choice) was used as the primary language for systems integration, scripts for data acquisition, and scripts for data analysis. The DSP clocking software was a mixture of C and Motorola 56303 assembly. An interrupt-driven kernel-mode PCI device driver for Red Hat Linux was written in C, and used the PC processor and memory for image processing and acquisition. Two 1Κ × 1Κ Raytheon SB226-based hybridized silicon p-i-n arrays were operated and tested with the new system at temperatures as low as 10K. Signal path gain, node capacitance, well depth, dark current, and MTF measurements were made and are presented here.

  12. p-i-n heterojunctions with BiFeO3 perovskite nanoparticles and p- and n-type oxides: photovoltaic properties.

    PubMed

    Chatterjee, Soumyo; Bera, Abhijit; Pal, Amlan J

    2014-11-26

    We formed p-i-n heterojunctions based on a thin film of BiFeO3 nanoparticles. The perovskite acting as an intrinsic semiconductor was sandwiched between a p-type and an n-type oxide semiconductor as hole- and electron-collecting layer, respectively, making the heterojunction act as an all-inorganic oxide p-i-n device. We have characterized the perovskite and carrier collecting materials, such as NiO and MoO3 nanoparticles as p-type materials and ZnO nanoparticles as the n-type material, with scanning tunneling spectroscopy; from the spectrum of the density of states, we could locate the band edges to infer the nature of the active semiconductor materials. The energy level diagram of p-i-n heterojunctions showed that type-II band alignment formed at the p-i and i-n interfaces, favoring carrier separation at both of them. We have compared the photovoltaic properties of the perovskite in p-i-n heterojunctions and also in p-i and i-n junctions. From current-voltage characteristics and impedance spectroscopy, we have observed that two depletion regions were formed at the p-i and i-n interfaces of a p-i-n heterojunction. The two depletion regions operative at p-i-n heterojunctions have yielded better photovoltaic properties as compared to devices having one depletion region in the p-i or the i-n junction. The results evidenced photovoltaic devices based on all-inorganic oxide, nontoxic, and perovskite materials. PMID:25350523

  13. Analysis and Simulation of Superlattice GaN/InGaN p-i-n Solar Cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Giannoccaro, Giovanni; Passaro, Vittorio M. N.

    Indium gallium nitride (InGaN) is becoming a promising semiconductor material for fabrication of solar cells due to its high absorption coefficient (about 105 cm-1) and tunable (by its In content) direct band-gap, from 0.71 eV (EInN) to 3.43 eV (EGaN). Solar cells based on structures with variable In content should show a reduction of thermalization losses, absorbing almost the whole of solar spectrum. Unfortunately, these advantages are partially lost and InGaN solar cells performance reduced due to technological issues (low quality of InGaN layer growth on GaN substrate) and wurtzite nature of InGaN semiconductor (spontaneous and piezoelectric polarizations), in particular in case of In-rich ternary alloy. This paper is focused on the parametric analysis and simulation of an intermediate band (IB) superlattice GaN/InGaN p-i-n solar cell on GaN quasi-bulk substrate. Photovoltaic device performances are investigated and simulated as a function of both In concentration in GaN/InGaN quantum wells (QWs) and QW number. For a superlattice with 28 QWs, an efficiency of 1.05 % with a short-circuit current density of 1.193 mA/cm2 has been achieved. Furthermore, some considerations on the possibility to obtain a more efficient InGaN solar cell with a wider absorption spectrum using InN quantum dots (QDs) in a photovoltaic device structure are also derived.

  14. Low resistivity lateral P-I-N junction formed by Ni-InGaAsP alloy for carrier injection InGaAsP photonic devices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Park, Jin-Kwon; Takenaka, Mitsuru; Takagi, Shinichi

    2016-04-01

    In this study, we investigate low-resistivity InGaAsP lateral P-I-N junctions using Ni-InGaAsP alloy in conjunction with Zn diffusion. It is found that Ni-InGaAsP alloy is formed via a direct reaction between Ni and InGaAsP after annealing at more than 300 °C. The Ni-InGaAsP preserves the initial Schottky junction properties between Ni and InGaAsP, and thus exhibits an ohmic contact for n-InGaAsP and a Schottky contact for p-InGaAsP. Hence, the Ni-InGaAsP alloy can be used instead of the Si ion implantation process to form the P-I-N junction. The Ni-InGaAsP alloy exhibits significantly lower contact resistance and sheet resistance than Si implanted n+-InGaAsP. The InGaAsP lateral P-I-N junction formed with the Ni-InGaAsP alloy and Zn diffusion shows approximately 10 times lower access resistance than the n+-InGaAsP junction. Thus, we successfully achieve large on-current in the lateral P-I-N junction with the Ni-InGaAsP alloy. The fabrication procedure of the lateral P-I-N junction using the Ni-InGaAsP alloy is promising for carrier-injection photonic devices on the III-V CMOS photonics platform.

  15. Near-infrared electroluminescence and photo detection in InGaAs p-i-n microdisks grown by selective area growth on silicon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kjellman, Jon Øyvind; Sugiyama, Masakazu; Nakano, Yoshiaki

    2014-06-01

    Microselective-area growth of p-i-n InGaAs disks on (111) silicon by metalorganic chemical vapor deposition is a promising technology for III/V-on-Si integration. As a proof-of-concept, room-temperature electroluminescence is reported from ensembles of p-i-n InGaAs-on-Si micro-disks. The observed spectrum shows peak luminescence at 1.78 μm with a local maxima at 1.65 μm. The disks are also shown to generate a measurable photo current when illuminated by infrared light with less energy than the silicon bandgap energy. This makes these InGaAs-on-Si disks a promising technology for monolithic integration of light sources and detectors with silicon photonics and complementary metal-oxide-semiconductor electronics for optical communication, sensing, and imaging.

  16. Design Issues of GaAs and AlGaAs Delta-Doped p-i-n Quantum-Well APD's

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wang, Yang

    1994-01-01

    We examine the basic design issues in the optimization of GaAs delta-doped and AlGAs delta-doped quantum-well avalanche photodiode (APD) structures using a theoretical analysis based on an ensemble Monte Carlo simulation. The devices are variations of the p-i-n doped quantum-well structure previously described in the literature. They have the same low-noise, high-gain and high-bandwidth features as the p-i-n doped quantum-well device. However, the use of delta doping provides far greater control or the doping concentrations within each stage possibly enhancing the extent to which the device can be depleted. As a result, it is expected that the proposed devices will operate at higher gain levels (at very low noise) than devices previously developed.

  17. Texture etched ZnO:Al films as front contact and back reflector in amorphous silicon p-i-n and n-i-p solar cells

    SciTech Connect

    Rech, B.; Wieder, S.; Beneking, C.; Loeffl, A.; Kluth, O.; Reetz, W.; Wagner, H.

    1997-12-31

    This paper treats the use of texture etched ZnO:Al films in amorphous silicon solar cells. Chemically textured ZnO:Al films were implemented as a front TCO in p-i-n (superstrate) and n-i-p (substrate) solar cells, and in combination with Ag as a textured back reflector in n-i-p (substrate) solar cells. These cells exhibit excellent optical and light-trapping properties demonstrated by high short-circuit current densities. Adapted microcrystalline p-layers solve the ZnO/p-contact problem and thereby provide high fill factors and open-circuit voltages. The initial efficiencies so far obtained are close to 10% for p-i-n and 8% for n-i-p solar cells.

  18. Suppression of dark current in germanium-tin on silicon p-i-n photodiode by a silicon surface passivation technique.

    PubMed

    Dong, Yuan; Wang, Wei; Lei, Dian; Gong, Xiao; Zhou, Qian; Lee, Shuh Ying; Loke, Wan Khai; Yoon, Soon-Fatt; Tok, Eng Soon; Liang, Gengchiau; Yeo, Yee-Chia

    2015-07-13

    We demonstrate that a complementary metal-oxide-semiconductor (CMOS) compatible silicon (Si) surface passivation technique effectively suppress the dark current originating from the mesa sidewall of the Ge(0.95)Sn(0.05) on Si (Ge(0.95)Sn(0.05)/Si) p-i-n photodiode. Current-voltage (I-V) characteristics show that the sidewall surface passivation technique could reduce the surface leakage current density (Jsurf) of the photodiode by ~100 times. A low dark current density (Jdark) of 0.073 A/cm(2) at a bias voltage of -1 V is achieved, which is among the lowest reported values for Ge(1-x)Sn(x)/Si p-i-n photodiodes. Temperature-dependent I-V measurement is performed for the Si-passivated and non-passivated photodiodes, from which the activation energies of dark current are extracted to be 0.304 eV and 0.142 eV, respectively. In addition, the optical responsivity of the Ge(0.95)Sn(0.05)/Si p-i-n photodiodes to light signals with wavelengths ranging from 1510 nm to 1877 nm is reported. PMID:26191919

  19. Channelized coplanar waveguide pin-diode switches

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ponchak, G. E.; Simons, R. N.

    1989-01-01

    Three different types of p-i-n diode, reflective CPW switches are presented. The first two switches are the series and the shunt mounted diode switches. Each has achieved greater than 15 dB of isolation over a broad bandwidth. The third switch is a narrow band, high isolation switched filter which has achieved 19 dB of isolation. Equivalent circuits and measured performance for each switch is presented.

  20. On the propensity of guiding surface-plasmon-polariton waves by the back-contact of an amorphous silicon p-i-n solar cell

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Atalla, Mahmoud R. M.; Suliman, Samia A.

    2015-04-01

    The effect of varying the n-layer on the propensity of guiding surface-plasmon-polariton (SPP) waves by the back-contact of a p-i-n solar cell was studied theoretically. The i-layer was assumed to consist of an a-Si1-xGex:H homogeneous layer of bandgap energy 1.3 eV. To determine the SPP waves that can propagate at the metal/multilayer material interface, a canonical boundary-value problem comprising periodically repeated p-i-n semiconductor layers partnering a homogeneous metal was solved for four different n-layers. The canonical problem was formulated to predict both of the TM- and TE-polarized SPP waves that can be guided by the interface. It was found that the configurations that have an amorphous silicon layer partnering the metal have equivalent propensity for guiding TM- and TE-polarized SPP waves by the planar metal/multilayer material interface, although their phase speeds, e-folding distances, and localization are slightly altered. On the other hand, the configuration that has an aluminum zinc oxide partnering the metal has significantly reduced propensity for guiding TE-polarized SPP waves. To examine the excitability of the SPP waves predicted from the canonical problem, one of the considered configurations is incorporated in a practical grating-coupled configuration. Oblique incidence was assumed, and multiple SPP waves were successfully excited. The total absorptance of the p-i-n solar cell shows enhancement at the SPP wave excitation wavelengths.

  1. Effect of doping on room temperature carrier escape mechanisms in InAs/GaAs quantum dot p-i-n junction photovoltaic cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sellers, D. G.; Chen, E. Y.; Polly, S. J.; Hubbard, S. M.; Doty, M. F.

    2016-05-01

    We investigate the effect of doping on the mechanisms of carrier escape from intermediate states in delta-doped InAs/GaAs intermediate band solar cells. The intermediate states arise from InAs quantum dots embedded in a GaAs p-i-n junction cell. We find that doping the sample increases the number of excited-state carriers participating in a cycle of trapping and carrier escape via thermal, optical, and tunneling mechanisms. However, we find that the efficiency of the optically-driven carrier escape mechanism is independent of doping and remains small.

  2. Efficient gate control of spin-valve signals and Hanle signals in GaAs channel with p-i-n junction-type back-gate structure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miyakawa, Takumi; Akiho, Takafumi; Ebina, Yuya; Yamamoto, Masafumi; Uemura, Tetsuya

    2016-02-01

    Efficient gate control of spin-valve signals and Hanle signals was achieved in a GaAs channel with a p-i-n back-gate structure. Experiments showed that the amplitude of the spin-valve signal (ΔVNL) under constant-injection-current conditions increased for a cross nonlocal geometry when the channel was depleted by the gate voltage (VG). In contrast, the VG dependence of ΔVNL for a nonlocal geometry was complicated. The gate modulation efficiency of spin signals was approximately 50 times that with a graphene or Si channel.

  3. Developing Seedless Growth of ZnO Micro/Nanowire Arrays towards ZnO/FeS2/CuI P-I-N Photodiode Application

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Zhi; Wang, Minqiang; Shukla, Sudhanshu; Zhu, Yue; Deng, Jianping; Ge, Hu; Wang, Xingzhi; Xiong, Qihua

    2015-06-01

    A seedless hydrothermal method is developed to grow high density and vertically aligned ZnO micro/nanowire arrays with low defect density on metal films under the saturated nutrition solution. In particular, the mechanism of seedless method is discussed here. A buffer layer can be confirmed by transmission electron microscopy (TEM), which may release the elastic strain between ZnO and substrate to achieve this highly mismatched heteroepitaxial structures. Based on ZnO micro/nanowire arrays with excellent wettability surface, we prepared ZnO-FeS2-CuI p-i-n photodiode by all-solution processed method with the high rectifying ratio of 197 at ±1 V. Under AM 1.5 condition, the Jsc of 0.5 mA/cm2, on-off current ratio of 371 and fast photoresponse at zero bias voltage were obtained. This good performance comes from excellent collection ability of photogenerated electrons and holes due to the increased depletion layer width for p-i-n structure. Finally, the high responsivity around 900 nm shows the potential as near infrared photodetectors applications.

  4. Characterisation of Al0.52In0.48P mesa p-i-n photodiodes for X-ray photon counting spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Butera, S.; Lioliou, G.; Krysa, A. B.; Barnett, A. M.

    2016-07-01

    Results characterising the performance of thin (2 μm i-layer) Al0.52In0.48P p+-i-n+ mesa photodiodes for X-ray photon counting spectroscopy are reported at room temperature. Two 200 μm diameter and two 400 μm diameter Al0.52In0.48P p+-i-n+ mesa photodiodes were studied. Dark current results as a function of applied reverse bias are shown; dark current densities <3 nA/cm2 were observed at 30 V (150 kV/cm) for all the devices analysed. Capacitance measurements as a function of applied reverse bias are also reported. X-ray spectra were collected using 10 μs shaping time, with the device illuminated by an 55Fe radioisotope X-ray source. Experimental results showed that the best energy resolution (FWHM) achieved at 5.9 keV was 930 eV for the 200 μm Al0.52In0.48P diameter devices, when reverse biased at 15 V. System noise analysis was also carried out, and the different noise contributions were computed.

  5. Developing Seedless Growth of ZnO Micro/Nanowire Arrays towards ZnO/FeS2/CuI P-I-N Photodiode Application

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Zhi; Wang, Minqiang; Shukla, Sudhanshu; Zhu, Yue; Deng, Jianping; Ge, Hu; Wang, Xingzhi; Xiong, Qihua

    2015-01-01

    A seedless hydrothermal method is developed to grow high density and vertically aligned ZnO micro/nanowire arrays with low defect density on metal films under the saturated nutrition solution. In particular, the mechanism of seedless method is discussed here. A buffer layer can be confirmed by transmission electron microscopy (TEM), which may release the elastic strain between ZnO and substrate to achieve this highly mismatched heteroepitaxial structures. Based on ZnO micro/nanowire arrays with excellent wettability surface, we prepared ZnO-FeS2-CuI p-i-n photodiode by all-solution processed method with the high rectifying ratio of 197 at ±1 V. Under AM 1.5 condition, the Jsc of 0.5 mA/cm2, on-off current ratio of 371 and fast photoresponse at zero bias voltage were obtained. This good performance comes from excellent collection ability of photogenerated electrons and holes due to the increased depletion layer width for p-i-n structure. Finally, the high responsivity around 900 nm shows the potential as near infrared photodetectors applications. PMID:26077658

  6. Si Waveguide-Integrated Metal-Semiconductor-Metal and p-i-n-Type Ge Photodiodes Using Si-Capping Layer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fujikata, Junichi; Miura, Makoto; Noguchi, Masataka; Okamoto, Daisuke; Horikawa, Tsuyoshi; Arakawa, Yasuhiko

    2013-04-01

    We studied Si waveguide-integrated metal-semiconductor-metal (MSM) and p-i-n-type Ge photodiodes (Ge-PDs), using a Si-capping layer. As for an MSM Ge-PD, the Schottky barrier height was increased up to 0.44 V by applying a 8-20 nm Si-capping layer, and a very low dark current density of approximately 0.4 nA/µm2 was achieved with a high responsivity of 0.8 A/W. In addition, a small electrode spacing of 1 µm realized high-speed photodetection of 20 Gbps. As for a p-i-n-type Ge-PD, by applying a 10-20 nm Si capping layer, the contact resistance between a metal electrode of Ti/TiN/Al and n+-Si capping layer was successfully reduced to 1×10-5 Ω.cm2. A 45 GHz bandwidth was obtained with a low dark current density of 0.8 nA/µm2. Moreover, a more than 20 GHz bandwidth was achieved with zero-bias voltage. In the case of zero-bias voltage operation, a 3 dB bandwidth was a little affected by input power, which would originate from the photocarrier screening effect on the built-in electric field.

  7. High-efficiency p-i-n superstrate amorphous Si solar cells on SiO x periodic arrays of three-dimensional microstructure prepared by soft imprinting

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Niikura, Chisato; Chowdhury, Amartya; Janthong, Bancha; Sichanugrist, Porponth; Konagai, Makoto

    2016-04-01

    Efficient amorphous Si thin-film solar cells in a p-i-n superstrate configuration with a high initial conversion efficiency of 10.3% were successfully fabricated on periodically three-dimensional (3D) micropatterned SiO x /glass substrates prepared by soft imprinting. Conformal film deposition on a 3D microstructure was realized owing to the shape of our newly designed 3D pattern and the triode plasma-enhanced CVD technique, which enables the selective transport of favorable film precursors to the substrate surface. The nanoscale surface texture of the front transparent conductive oxide layer was found to be crucial for optical confinement, unexceptionally for amorphous Si solar cells on a 3D microstructure, which results in an improved short-circuit current density.

  8. Large Perovskite Grain Growth in Low-Temperature Solution-Processed Planar p-i-n Solar Cells by Sodium Addition.

    PubMed

    Bag, Santanu; Durstock, Michael F

    2016-03-01

    Thin-film p-i-n type planar heterojunction perovskite solar cells have the advantage of full low temperature solution processability and can, therefore, be adopted in roll-to-roll production and flexible devices. One of the main challenges with these devices, however, is the ability to finely control the film morphology during the deposition and crystallization of the perovskite layer. Processes suitable for optimization of the perovskite layer film morphology with large grains are highly desirable for reduced recombination of charge carriers. Here, we show how uniform thin films with micron size perovskite grains can be made through the use of a controlled amount of sodium ions in the precursor solution. Large micrometer-size CH3NH3PbI3 perovskite grains are formed during low-temperature thin-film growth by adding sodium ions to the PbI2 precursor solution in a two-step interdiffusion process. By adjusting additive concentration, film morphologies were optimized and the fabricated p-i-n planar perovskite-PCBM solar cells showed improved power conversion efficiences (an average of 3-4% absolute efficiency enhancement) compared to the nonsodium based devices. Overall, the additive enhanced grain growth process helped to reach a high 14.2% solar cell device efficiency with low hysteresis. This method of grain growth is quite general and provides a facile way to fabricate large-grained CH3NH3PbI3 on any arbitrary surface by an all solution-processed route. PMID:26862869

  9. Sn-based Ge/Ge0.975Sn0.025/Ge p-i-n photodetector operated with back-side illumination

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chang, C.; Li, H.; Huang, S. H.; Cheng, H. H.; Sun, G.; Soref, R. A.

    2016-04-01

    We report an investigation of a GeSn-based p-i-n photodetector grown on a Ge wafer that collects light signal from the back of the wafer. Temperature dependent absorption measurements performed over a wide temperature range (300 K down to 25 K) show that (a) absorption starts at the indirect bandgap of the active GeSn layer and continues up to the direct bandgap of the Ge wafer, and (b) the peak responsivity increases rapidly at first with decreasing temperature, then increases more slowly, followed by a decrease at the lower temperatures. The maximum responsivity happens at 125 K, which can easily be achieved with the use of liquid nitrogen. The temperature dependence of the photocurrent is analyzed by taking into consideration of the temperature dependence of the electron and hole mobility in the active layer, and the analysis result is in reasonable agreement with the data in the temperature regime where the rapid increase occurs. This investigation demonstrates the feasibility of a GeSn-based photodiode that can be operated with back-side illumination for applications in image sensing systems.

  10. High performance planar p-i-n perovskite solar cells with crown-ether functionalized fullerene and LiF as double cathode buffer layers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Xiaodong; Lei, Ming; Zhou, Yi; Song, Bo; Li, Yongfang

    2015-08-01

    Double cathode buffer layers (CBLs) composed of fullerene derivative functionalized with a crown-ether end group in its side chain (denoted as PCBC) and a LiF layer were introduced between the PCBM acceptor layer and the top cathode in planar p-i-n perovskite solar cells (pero-SCs) based on CH3NH3PbI3-XClX. The devices with the PCBC/LiF double CBLs showed significant improvements in power conversion efficiency (PCE) and long-term stability when compared to the device with LiF single CBL. Through optimizing the spin-coating speed of PCBC, a maximum PCE of 15.53% has been achieved, which is approximately 15% higher than that of the device with single LiF CBL. The remarkable improvement in PCE can be attributed to the formation of a better ohmic contact in the CBL between PCBC and LiF/Al electrode arising from the dipole moment of PCBC, leading to the enhanced fill factor and short-circuit current density (Jsc). Besides the PCE, the long-term stability of the devices with PCBC interlayer is also superior to that of the device with LiF single CBL, which is due to the more effective protection for the perovskite/PCBM interface.

  11. Dependence on the incident light power of the internal electric fields in a GaAs p-i-n solar cell according to bright photoreflectance spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jo, Hyun-Jun; Mun, Young Hee; Kim, Jong Su; Lee, Sang Jun

    2016-07-01

    Bright photoreflectance (BPR) spectroscopy at room temperature is used to examine the internal electric fields in a GaAs p-i-n solar cell for their dependence on the incident light power. Electric fields are observed at 30 µW and 100 µW of incident light. With increasing power, the strengths of the two electric fields are reduced due to the photovoltage effect. The electric field observed at 30 µW is assigned to the p-i interface, which is close to the surface. The other electric field is due to the i-n interface because the incident light penetrates deeper as the light power is increased. The electric field strength of 35.6 kV/cm at the p-i interface is lower than that of 42.9 kV/cm at the i-n interface at 500 µW of light power because the photovoltage effect is proportional to the number of photo-generated carriers, which is reduced as the distance from the surface increases. When the incident light power is similar to the excitation beam power, the electric fields at the p-i interface are saturated.

  12. Sensitivity evaluation of fiber optic OC-48 p-i-n transimpedance amplifier receivers using sweep-frequency modulation and intermixing diagnostics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lin, Gong-Ru; Liao, Yu-Sheng

    2005-04-01

    The sensitivity of SONET p-i-n photodiode receivers with transimpedance amplifiers (PIN-TIA) from OC-3 to OC-48 data rates, measured by using a standard bit-error-rate tester (BERT) and a novel sweep-frequency-modulation/intermixing (SMIM) technique, are compared. A threshold intermixed voltage below 15.8 mV obtained by the SMIM method corresponding to the sensitivity of the PIN-TIA receiver beyond -32 dBm determined by BERT for the SONET OC-48 PIN-TIA receivers with a required BER of better than 10-10 is reported. The analysis interprets that the intermixed voltage for improving the PIN-TIA receiver sensitivity from -31 to -33 dBm has to be increased from 12.5 to 20.4 mV. As compared to the BERT, the SMIM is a relatively simplified, fast, and low-cost technique for on-line mass-production diagnostics for measuring the sensitivity and evaluating the BER performances of PIN-TIA receivers.

  13. Measured and Simulated Dark J-V Characteristics of a-Si:H Single Junction p-i-n Solar Cells Irradiated with 40 keV Electrons

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lord, Kenneth; Woodyard, James R.

    2002-01-01

    The effect of 40 keV electron irradiation on a-Si:H p-i-n single-junction solar cells was investigated using measured and simulated dark J-V characteristics. EPRI-AMPS and PC-1D simulators were explored for use in the studies. The EPRI-AMPS simulator was employed and simulator parameters selected to produce agreement with measured J-V characteristics. Three current mechanisms were evident in the measured dark J-V characteristics after electron irradiation, namely, injection, shunting and a term of the form CV(sup m). Using a single discrete defect state level at the center of the band gap, good agreement was achieved between measured and simulated J-V characteristics in the forward-bias voltage region where the dark current density was dominated by injection. The current mechanism of the form CV(sup m) was removed by annealing for two hours at 140 C. Subsequent irradiation restored the CV(sup m) current mechanism and it was removed by a second anneal. Some evidence of the CV(sup m) term is present in device simulations with a higher level of discrete density of states located at the center of the bandgap.

  14. Solar-blind Al x Ga1- x N ( x > 0.45) p- i- n photodiodes with a polarization- p-doped emitter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kuznetsova, N. V.; Nechaev, D. V.; Shmidt, N. M.; Karpov, S. Yu.; Rzheutskii, N. V.; Zemlyakov, V. E.; Kaibyshev, V. Kh.; Kazantsev, D. Yu.; Troshkov, S. I.; Egorkin, V. I.; Ber, B. Ya.; Lutsenko, E. V.; Ivanov, S. V.; Jmerik, V. N.

    2016-06-01

    Polarization-induced p-type doping of AlGaN layers with high aluminum content during plasmaassisted MBE growth has been studied. It is shown that a gradient of the AlN molar fraction in AlGaN (composition gradient) on a level of 0.005 nm-1 must be set in order to obtain a hole concentration of ~1018 cm-3 (measured by the C- V method) in Al x Ga1- x N:Mg ( x = 0.52-0.32) layers with dopant concentration [Mg] = 1.3 × 1018 cm-3. p- i- n photodiodes based on AlGaN heterostructures with such layers as p-emitters showed maximum photoresponsitivity in the solar-blind wavelength range (λ = 281 nm) about 35 and 48 mA/W at reverse bias voltage U = 0 and-5 V, respectively, and exhibited a dark current density of 3.9 × 10-8 A/cm2 at U =-5 V.

  15. Electro-optical modulation at 1550 nm in an as-deposited hydrogenated amorphous silicon p-i-n waveguiding device.

    PubMed

    Della Corte, Francesco G; Rao, Sandro; Coppola, Giuseppe; Summonte, Caterina

    2011-02-14

    Hydrogenated amorphous silicon (a-Si:H) has been already considered for the objective of passive optical elements, like waveguides and ring resonators, within photonic integrated circuits at λ = 1.55 μm. However the study of its electro-optical properties is still at an early stage, therefore this semiconductor in practice is not considered for light modulation as yet. We demonstrated, for the first time, effective electro-optical modulation in a reverse biased a-Si:H p-i-n waveguiding structure. In particular, phase modulation was studied in a waveguide integrated Fabry-Perot resonator in which the V(π)⋅L(π) product was determined to be 63 V⋅cm. Characteristic switch-on and switch-off times of 14 ns were measured. The device employed a wider gap amorphous silicon carbide 
(a-SiC:H) film for the lower cladding layer instead of silicon oxide. In this way the highest temperature involved in the fabrication process was 170°C, which ensured the desired technological compatibility with CMOS processes. PMID:21369117

  16. Numerical simulation of the effect of the free carrier motilities on light-soaked a-Si:H p-i-n solar cell

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ayat, L.; Bouhdjar, A. F.; Meftah, AF.; Sengouga, N.

    2015-07-01

    Using a previous model, which was developed to describe the light-induced creation of the defect density in the a-Si:H gap states, we present in this work a computer simulation of the a-Si:H p-i-n solar cell behavior under continuous illumination. We have considered the simple case of a monochromatic light beam nonuniformly absorbed. As a consequence of this light-absorption profile, the increase of the dangling bond density is assumed to be inhomogeneous over the intrinsic layer (i-layer). We investigate the internal variable profiles during illumination to understand in more detail the changes resulting from the light-induced degradation effect. Changes in the cell external parameters including the open circuit voltage, Voc, the short circuit current density, Jsc, the fill factor, FF, and the maximum power density, Pmax, are also presented. This shows, in addition, the free carrier mobility influence. The obtained results show that Voc seems to be the less affected parameter by the light-induced increase of the dangling bond density. Moreover, its degradation is very weak-sensitive to the free carrier mobility. Finally, the free hole mobility effect is found to be more important than that of electrons in the improvement of the solar cell performance.

  17. Characterization of the SnO2/p Contact Resistance and SnO2 Properties in Operating a-Si:H p-i-n Solar Cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kaplan, Ruhý; Kaplan, Bengü

    2002-11-01

    A method is presented to characterize the TCO/p contact and the TCO sheet resistance in a-Si TCO/p-i-n superstrate devices. It is extremely useful for understanding resistance losses in modulus and diagnosing how plasma processing influences the TCO layers. Analysis of 4-terminal dark J-V measurements as a function of temperature on devices with varying TCO geometry yields the TCO/p contact resistance RTCO/p, its activation energy Ea or barrier height, and the TCO sheet resistance RSH in an integrated device structure. The method is applied to devices fabricated on different brands of commercial SnO2 substrates with different p-layers. Important new results are found. Ea for the SnO2/p contact resistance are about 40-50 meV which is < 2kT, and therefore not a rectifying barrier. RSH in one brand of SnO2 has a benefical decrease of 60% after a-Si deposition while another brand is unaffected. The impact of RSH or RTCO losses on the FF (fill factor) are determined.

  18. High performance planar p-i-n perovskite solar cells with crown-ether functionalized fullerene and LiF as double cathode buffer layers

    SciTech Connect

    Liu, Xiaodong; Zhou, Yi E-mail: songbo@suda.edu.cn Song, Bo E-mail: songbo@suda.edu.cn; Lei, Ming; Li, Yongfang E-mail: songbo@suda.edu.cn

    2015-08-10

    Double cathode buffer layers (CBLs) composed of fullerene derivative functionalized with a crown-ether end group in its side chain (denoted as PCBC) and a LiF layer were introduced between the PCBM acceptor layer and the top cathode in planar p-i-n perovskite solar cells (pero-SCs) based on CH{sub 3}NH{sub 3}PbI{sub 3−X}Cl{sub X}. The devices with the PCBC/LiF double CBLs showed significant improvements in power conversion efficiency (PCE) and long-term stability when compared to the device with LiF single CBL. Through optimizing the spin-coating speed of PCBC, a maximum PCE of 15.53% has been achieved, which is approximately 15% higher than that of the device with single LiF CBL. The remarkable improvement in PCE can be attributed to the formation of a better ohmic contact in the CBL between PCBC and LiF/Al electrode arising from the dipole moment of PCBC, leading to the enhanced fill factor and short-circuit current density (J{sub sc}). Besides the PCE, the long-term stability of the devices with PCBC interlayer is also superior to that of the device with LiF single CBL, which is due to the more effective protection for the perovskite/PCBM interface.

  19. In-situ gallium-doping for forming p+ germanium-tin and application in germanium-tin p-i-n photodetector

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Wei; Vajandar, Saumitra; Lim, Sin Leng; Dong, Yuan; D'Costa, Vijay Richard; Osipowicz, Thomas; Tok, Eng Soon; Yeo, Yee-Chia

    2016-04-01

    The in-situ Ga doping technique was used to form heavily p-type doped germanium-tin (Ge1-xSnx) layers by molecular beam epitaxy, avoiding issues such as Sn precipitation and surface segregation at high annealing temperatures that are associated with the alternative implant and anneal approach. In this way, an electrically active Ga concentration of up to ˜3.2 × 1020 cm-3 can be realized for Ge1-xSnx. The impacts of varying the Ga concentration on the crystalline quality and the mobility of p-type Ge1-xSnx were investigated. High crystalline quality Ge0.915Sn0.085 can be realized with an active Ga concentration of up to ˜1.2 × 1020 cm-3. More than 98% of the Sn atoms are located on substitutional lattice sites, although the substitutionality of Sn in p-type Ge1-xSnx decreases with an increasing Ga concentration. When the Ga concentration introduced is higher than 3.2 × 1020 cm-3, excess Ga atoms cannot be substitutionally incorporated, and segregation of Ga and Sn towards the surface during growth is observed. The in-situ Ga-doped Ge0.915Sn0.085 epitaxy was integrated in a Ge0.915Sn0.085-on-Si p-i-n (PIN) photodiode fabrication process, and well-behaved Ge0.915Sn0.085/Si PIN junction characteristics were obtained. A large forward-bias current to reverse bias current ratio of 6 × 104 and a low reverse current (dark current) of 0.24 μA were achieved at Vbias = -1 V.

  20. Multistability, ionic doping, and charge dynamics in electrosynthesized polypyrrole, polymer-nanoparticle blend nonvolatile memory, and fixed p-i-n junction polymer light-emitting electrochemical cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Simon, Daniel Theodore

    -assembled monolayer (SAM) at the cathode-polymer interface. The addition of the SAM causes a twofold increase in quantum efficiency. Photovoltaic analysis indicates that the SAM increases both open-circuit voltage and short-circuit current. Current versus voltage data are presented which indicate that the SAM does not simply introduce an interfacial dipole layer, but rather provides a fixed doping region, and thus a more stable p-i-n structure.

  1. Impact of silicon epitaxial thickness layer in high power diode devices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mee, Cheh Chai; Arshad, M. K. Md.; Hashim, U.; Fathil, M. F. M.

    2016-07-01

    The p-i-n diode is one of the earliest semiconductor devices developed for power circuit application. It is formed with the intrinsically doped i.e. i-layer sandwiched between the p-type and n-type layers. In this paper, we focus on the integration of the intrinsic region of silicon p-i-n diode to the current-voltage characteristics. In our structure, n-type refers to the bulk substrate and intrinsic region refers to the epitaxial layer of the silicon substrate. We make a thickness variation in the intrinsic region of p-i-n diode and how it affects diode performance. An additional layer is added on the epitaxial layer during the process to control the diffusion from the bottom of bulk substrate. Result shows that intrinsic layer optimization has successfully enhances the diode device robustness in terms of diode current-voltage characteristics, which reflects better manufacturing yield and improve the final product performance.

  2. Measurement of the transmission magnetic circular dichroism of Ga{sub 1−x}Mn{sub x}As epilayers using a built-in p-i-n photodiode

    SciTech Connect

    He, Z. X.; Zheng, H. Z. Wang, H. L.; Zhao, J. H.

    2014-02-28

    By constructing a GaMnAs epilayer/semi-insulating In{sub 0.2}Ga{sub 0.8}As/(001) n{sup +}-GaAs substrate layer structure as a built-in p-i-n photodiode, we developed a scheme for on-chip measurements of transmission magnetic circular dichroism (T-MCD). Both the hysteresis loops in the magnetic field sweeps and the wavelength scans at saturated magnetic fields measured using the new T-MCD scheme, illustrated the same features as those previously measured on the freestanding GaMnAs thin films by conventional T-MCD. Because a large group of epitaxially grown magnetic film/semiconductor heterostructures, such as Fe, NiFe, CoFeAl, and MnGa films on semiconductor substrates, are becoming important new building blocks for semiconductor-based spin field-effect transistor, perpendicular magnetic tunnel junction (p-MTJ) and lateral MTJ devices, the new T-MCD scheme can be applied to tests of their magnetic properties by forming either p-i-n or Schottky photodiodes.

  3. Experimental investigation and numerical modelling of photocurrent oscillations in lattice matched Ga1−x In x N y As1−y /GaAs quantum well p-i-n photodiodes

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Photocurrent oscillations, observed at low temperatures in lattice-matched Ga1−x In x N y As1−y /GaAs multiple quantum well (MQW) p-i-n samples, are investigated as a function of applied bias and excitation wavelength and are modelled with the aid of semiconductor simulation software. The oscillations appear only at low temperatures and have the highest amplitude when the optical excitation energy is in resonance with the GaInNAs bandgap. They are explained in terms of electron accumulation and the formation of high-field domains in the GaInNAs QWs as a result of the disparity between the photoexcited electron and hole escape rates from the QWs. The application of the external bias results in the motion of the high-field domain towards the anode where the excess charge dissipates from the well adjacent to anode via tunnelling. PMID:24548551

  4. Experimental investigation and numerical modelling of photocurrent oscillations in lattice matched Ga1-xInxNyAs1-y/GaAs quantum well p-i-n photodiodes.

    PubMed

    Royall, Ben; Khalil, Hagir; Mazzucato, Simone; Erol, Ayse; Balkan, Naci

    2014-01-01

    Photocurrent oscillations, observed at low temperatures in lattice-matched Ga1-xInxNyAs1-y/GaAs multiple quantum well (MQW) p-i-n samples, are investigated as a function of applied bias and excitation wavelength and are modelled with the aid of semiconductor simulation software. The oscillations appear only at low temperatures and have the highest amplitude when the optical excitation energy is in resonance with the GaInNAs bandgap. They are explained in terms of electron accumulation and the formation of high-field domains in the GaInNAs QWs as a result of the disparity between the photoexcited electron and hole escape rates from the QWs. The application of the external bias results in the motion of the high-field domain towards the anode where the excess charge dissipates from the well adjacent to anode via tunnelling. PMID:24548551

  5. Improved organic p-i-n type solar cells with n-doped fluorinated hexaazatrinaphthylene derivatives HATNA-F{sub 6} and HATNA-F{sub 12} as transparent electron transport material

    SciTech Connect

    Selzer, Franz Falkenberg, Christiane Leo, Karl Riede, Moritz; Hamburger, Manuel Baumgarten, Martin Müllen, Klaus

    2014-02-07

    We study new electron transport materials (ETM) to replace the reference material C{sub 60} in p-i-n type organic solar cells. A comprehensive material characterization is performed on two fluorinated hexaazatrinaphthylene derivatives, HATNA-F{sub 6} and HATNA-F{sub 12}, to identify the most promising material for the application in devices. We find that both HATNA derivatives are equally able to substitute C{sub 60} as ETM as they exhibit large optical energy gaps, low surface roughness, and sufficiently high electron mobilities. Furthermore, large electron conductivities of 3.5×10{sup −5} S/cm and 2.0×10{sup −4} S/cm are achieved by n-doping with 4 wt. % W{sub 2}(hpp){sub 4}. HOMO levels of (7.72 ± 0.05) eV and (7.73 ± 0.05) eV are measured by ultraviolet photoelectron spectroscopy and subsequently used for estimating LUMO values of (4.2 ± 0.8) eV and (4.3 ± 0.8) eV. Both fluorinated HATNA derivatives are successfully applied in p-i-n type solar cells. Compared to identical reference devices comprising the standard material C{sub 60}, the power conversion efficiency (PCE) can be increased from 2.1 % to 2.4 % by using the new fluorinated HATNA derivatives.

  6. Development and fabrication of a fast recovery, high voltage power diode

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Berman, A. H.; Balodis, V.; Duffin, J. J.; Gaugh, C.; Kkaratnicki, H. M.; Troutman, G.

    1981-01-01

    The use of positive bevels for P-I-N mesa structures to achieve high voltages is described. The technique of glass passivation for mesa structures is described. The utilization of high energy radiation to control the lifetime of carriers in silicon is reported as a means to achieve fast recovery times. Characterization data is reported and is in agreement with design concepts developed for power diodes.

  7. Temperature-dependent electroluminescence from GeSn heterojunction light-emitting diode on Si substrate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chang, Chiao; Li, Hui; Huang, Ssu-Hsuan; Lin, Li-Chien; Cheng, Hung-Hsiang

    2016-04-01

    The electroluminescence from a Ge/GeSn/Ge p-i-n light-emitting diode on Si was investigated under different temperatures ranging from 25 to 150 K. The diode was operated at a low injection current density of 13 A/cm2. We obtained no-phonon- and phonon-assisted replicas in emission spectra. Also, the relationship between indirect bandgap energy and temperature was investigated. The temperature-dependent bandgap energy followed Varshni’s empirical expression with α = 4.884 × 10-4 eV/K and β = 130 K.

  8. A micrometer-size movable light emitting area in a resonant tunneling light emitting diode

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pettinari, G.; Balakrishnan, N.; Makarovsky, O.; Campion, R. P.; Polimeni, A.; Capizzi, M.; Patanè, A.

    2013-12-01

    We report on the fabrication of a micrometer-size movable light emitting area in a GaAs/AlAs quantum well resonant tunneling p-i-n diode. The spatial position of the micrometer-size light emitting area shifts linearly with increasing applied bias, up to 30 μm for a bias increment of 0.2 V. Also, the simultaneous resonant tunneling injection of both electrons and holes into the quantum well states is achieved at specific positions of the diode, thus resulting in a tenfold increase of the electroluminescence intensity.

  9. Reliability of vapor-grown planar In0.53Ga0.47As/InP p-i-n photodiodes with very high failure activation energy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Forrest, Stephen R.; Ban, V. S.; Gasparian, G.; Gay, Daniel; Olsen, Gregory H.

    1988-05-01

    The mean time to failure (MTTF) was measured for a statistically significant population of planar In0.53Ga0.47As/InP heterostructure p-i-n photodetectors at several elevated temperatures. The probability for failure is fit to a log-normal distribution, with the result that the width of the failure distribution is sigma = 0.55 +/- 0.2, and is roughly independent of temperature. From the temperature dependence of MTTF data, it is found that the failure mechanism is thermally activated, with an activation energy of less than 1.5 +/- 0.2 eV measured in the temperature range of 170-250 C. This extrapolates to a MTTF of less than 0.1 failure in 109h (or less than 0.1 FIT) at 70 C, indicating that such devices are useful for systems requiring extremely high reliable components, even if operated at elevated temperatures for significant time periods. This activation energy is the highest value reported for In0.53Ga0.47As/InP photodetectors, and is significantly higher than the energies of 0.85 eV often suspected for these devices.

  10. 10Gbps operation of a metamorphic InGaP buffered In 0.53Ga 0.47As p-i-n photodetector grown on GaAs substrate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liao, Yu-Sheng; Lin, Gong-Ru; Lin, Chi-Kuan; Chu, Yi-Shiang; Kuo, Hao-Chung; Feng, Milton

    2005-11-01

    A novel top-illuminated In 0.53Ga 0.47As p-i-n photodiodes (MM-PINPD) grown on GaAs substrate by using a linearly graded metamorphic In xGa 1-xP (x graded from 0.49 to 1) buffer layer has been demonstrated on the SONET OC-192 receiving performance. With a cost-efficient TO-46 package, the MM-PINPD at data rate of 10 Gbit/s can be obtained at minimum optical power of -19.5 dBm. At wavelength of 1550nm, the dark current, optical responsivities, noise equivalent power, and operational bandwidth of the MM-PINPD with aperture diameter of 60 μm are 13 pA, 0.6 A/W, 3.4×10 -15 W/Hz 1/2, and 8 GHz, respectively. All the parameters are comparable to those of similar devices made on InP substrate or other InGaAs products epitaxially grown on an InGaAlAs buffered GaAs substrate. The performances of the MM-PINPD on GaAs are analyzed by impulse injecting of 1.2-ps pulse-train, eye pattern at 10Gbps, and frequency response from VNA.

  11. Impact of band structure of Ohmic contact layers on the response feature of p-i-n very long wavelength type II InAs/GaSb superlattice photodetector

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Jianliang; Ma, Wenquan; Zhang, Yanhua; Cao, Yulian; Liu, Ke; Huang, Wenjun; Lu, Shulong

    2015-06-01

    We show that the energy band structure of the Ohmic contact layers can have a big impact on the response feature of very long wavelength (VLW) detection using p-i-n type II superlattices (SLs). It is found that, if the p and n Ohmic contact layers are comprised of mid wavelength (MW) InAs/GaSb SLs, the photoresponse of the detector is dominated by a short wavelength band with the 50% cutoff wavelength at 2.67 μm, while the designed VLW response is very weak at 0 V. With increasing the bias voltage, the designed VLW response with the 50% cutoff wavelength at 17.8 μm becomes stronger and stronger. In contrast, if the p and n Ohmic contact layers are made up of the same SLs, as those of the VLW absorber region, only a broad VLW response shows up. The response difference between the two samples is attributed to blocking of the photogenerated carriers by the energy barriers at the interfaces between the absorber and the contact layers for the sample using MW SLs as the contact layers.

  12. Single-Layer Light-Emitting Diodes Using Organometal Halide Perovskite/Poly(ethylene oxide) Composite Thin Films.

    PubMed

    Li, Junqiang; Bade, Sri Ganesh R; Shan, Xin; Yu, Zhibin

    2015-09-16

    Organometal halide perovskite and poly(ethylene oxide) composite thin films are studied. Single-layer light-emitting diodes using the composite thin film sandwiched between indium tin oxide and indium-gallium eutectic alloy exhibit a low turn-on voltage and high brightness because of the ionic conductivity of the composite film and the formation of a p-i-n homojunction. PMID:26247326

  13. p-i-n/n-i-p type planar hybrid structure of highly efficient perovskite solar cells towards improved air stability: synthetic strategies and the role of p-type hole transport layer (HTL) and n-type electron transport layer (ETL) metal oxides.

    PubMed

    Mali, Sawanta S; Hong, Chang Kook

    2016-05-19

    There has been fast recent progress in perovskite solar cells (PSCs) towards low cost photovoltaic technology. Organometal mixed halide (MAPbX or FAPbX) perovskites are the most promising light absorbing material sandwiched between the electron transport layer (ETL) and hole transport layer (HTL). These two layers play a critical role in boosting the power conversion efficiency (PCE) and maintaining air stability. However, the device stability is a serious issue in regular as well as p-i-n inverted type perovskite solar cells. This mini-review briefly outlines the state-of-art of p-i-n/n-i-p type planar hybrid perovskite solar cells using MAPbX/FAPbX perovskite absorbing layers. Later, we will focus on recent trends, progress and further opportunities in exploring the air stable hybrid planar structure PSCs. PMID:27161123

  14. p-i-n/n-i-p type planar hybrid structure of highly efficient perovskite solar cells towards improved air stability: synthetic strategies and the role of p-type hole transport layer (HTL) and n-type electron transport layer (ETL) metal oxides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mali, Sawanta S.; Hong, Chang Kook

    2016-05-01

    There has been fast recent progress in perovskite solar cells (PSCs) towards low cost photovoltaic technology. Organometal mixed halide (MAPbX or FAPbX) perovskites are the most promising light absorbing material sandwiched between the electron transport layer (ETL) and hole transport layer (HTL). These two layers play a critical role in boosting the power conversion efficiency (PCE) and maintaining air stability. However, the device stability is a serious issue in regular as well as p-i-n inverted type perovskite solar cells. This mini-review briefly outlines the state-of-art of p-i-n/n-i-p type planar hybrid perovskite solar cells using MAPbX/FAPbX perovskite absorbing layers. Later, we will focus on recent trends, progress and further opportunities in exploring the air stable hybrid planar structure PSCs.

  15. Data Diode

    SciTech Connect

    2014-11-07

    The Data Diode is a data security technology that can be deployed within an organization's defense-in-depth computer network strategy for information assurance. For internal security, the software creates an environment within the network where an organization's approved users can work freely inside an enclave of protected data, but file transfers out of the enclave is restricted. For external security, once a network intruder has penetrated the network, the intruder is able to "see" the protected data, but is unable to download the actual data. During the time it takes for the intruder to search for a way around the obstacle created by the Data Diode, the network's intrusion detection technologies can locate and thwart the malicious intent of the intruder. Development of the Data Diode technology was made possible by funding from the Intelligence Advanced Research Projects Activity (IARPA).

  16. Data Diode

    2014-11-07

    The Data Diode is a data security technology that can be deployed within an organization's defense-in-depth computer network strategy for information assurance. For internal security, the software creates an environment within the network where an organization's approved users can work freely inside an enclave of protected data, but file transfers out of the enclave is restricted. For external security, once a network intruder has penetrated the network, the intruder is able to "see" the protectedmore » data, but is unable to download the actual data. During the time it takes for the intruder to search for a way around the obstacle created by the Data Diode, the network's intrusion detection technologies can locate and thwart the malicious intent of the intruder. Development of the Data Diode technology was made possible by funding from the Intelligence Advanced Research Projects Activity (IARPA).« less

  17. Using band engineering to tailor the emission spectra of trichromatic semipolar InGaN light-emitting diodes for phosphor-free polarized white light emission

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kowsz, S. J.; Pynn, C. D.; Oh, S. H.; Farrell, R. M.; DenBaars, S. P.; Nakamura, S.

    2016-07-01

    We report a polarized white light-emitting device that monolithically integrates an electrically injected blue light-emitting diode grown on the (20 2 ¯ 1 ¯ ) face of a bulk GaN substrate and optically pumped InGaN quantum wells (QWs) with green and red light emission grown on the (20 2 ¯ 1 ) face. To overcome the challenges associated with growing high indium content InGaN QWs for long wavelength emission, a p-i-n doping profile was used to red-shift the emission wavelength of one of the optically pumped QWs by creating a built-in electric field in the same direction as the polarization-induced electric field. Emission peaks were observed at 450 nm from the electrically injected QW and at 520 nm and 590 nm from the optically pumped QWs, which were situated in n-i-n and p-i-n structures, respectively. The optically pumped QW in the p-i-n structure was grown at a growth temperature that was 10 °C colder compared to the QW in the n-i-n structure, so the emission from the QW in the p-i-n structure was red-shifted due to increased indium content as well as the built-in electric field. Modeling work confirmed that the built-in electric field made a greater contribution than the change in alloy composition to the red-shift in emission from the QW in the p-i-n structure. The combined emission from the red, green, and blue QWs resulted in white-light emission with Commission Internationale de l'Eclairage x- and y-chromaticity coordinates of (0.33, 0.35) and an optical polarization ratio of 0.30.

  18. Broad interband semiconductor laser diodes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tan, Chee Loon

    A semiconductor laser is a diode device that emits light via stimulated emission. Conventionally, light emitted from a semiconductor laser is spatially coherent or narrowband. The fundamental mechanism of stimulated emission process in general leads only to a single wavelength emission. However, there are some lasers emit light with a broad spectrum or different distinct wavelength subjected to various operating conditions such as external grating configuration with semiconductor laser, diode-pumped self-Q-switch fiber laser, ultrashort pulse excitation, photonic crystal fiber, ultrabroadband solid-state lasers, semiconductor optical amplifier-based multiwavelength tunable fiber lasers, nonlinear crystal, broadband semiconductor laser etc. This type of broadband laser is vital in many practical applications such as optical telecommunications, spectroscopy measurement, imaging technology, etc. Recently, an ultra-broadband semiconductor laser that utilizes intersubband optical transitions via quantum cascade configuration has been realized. Laser action with a Fabry-Perot spectrum covering all wavelengths from 6 to 8 microm simultaneously is demonstrated with this approach. More recently, broadband emission results from interband optical transitions via quantum-dot/dash nanostructures have been demonstrated in a simple p-i-n laser diode structure. To date, this latest approach offers the simplest design by proper engineering of quantized energy states as well as utilizing the high inhomogeneity of the dot/dash nanostructures, which is inherent from self-assembled growth technology. In this dissertation, modeling of semiconductor InGaAs/GaAs quantum-dot broadband laser utilizing the properties of inhomogeneous and homogeneous broadening effects on lasing spectral will be discussed, followed by a detail analysis of another type of broad interband semiconductor laser, which is InAs/InGaAlAs quantum-dash broadband laser. Based on the device characterization results

  19. Diode and Diode Circuits, a Programmed Text.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Balabanian, Norman; Kirwin, Gerald J.

    This programed text on diode and diode circuits was developed under contract with the United States Office of Education as Number 4 in a series of materials for use in an electrical engineering sequence. It is intended as a supplement to a regular text and other instructional material. (DH)

  20. Laser Diode Ignition (LDI)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kass, William J.; Andrews, Larry A.; Boney, Craig M.; Chow, Weng W.; Clements, James W.; Merson, John A.; Salas, F. Jim; Williams, Randy J.; Hinkle, Lane R.

    1994-01-01

    This paper reviews the status of the Laser Diode Ignition (LDI) program at Sandia National Labs. One watt laser diodes have been characterized for use with a single explosive actuator. Extensive measurements of the effect of electrostatic discharge (ESD) pulses on the laser diode optical output have been made. Characterization of optical fiber and connectors over temperature has been done. Multiple laser diodes have been packaged to ignite multiple explosive devices and an eight element laser diode array has been recently tested by igniting eight explosive devices at predetermined 100 ms intervals.

  1. Laser diode protection circuit

    SciTech Connect

    Burgyan, L.; Hand, W.L.

    1990-05-08

    This patent describes a method for protecting a laser diode included within an electro-optical circuit. It comprises: the laser diode, a DC bias supply for supplying forward conduction current to the laser diode to cause it to emit light energy at a predetermined quiescent operating point, and an RF amplifier means for supplying an RF amplitude of an analog modulating signal to the laser diode for modulating the intensity of the emitted light energy about the quiescent operating point thereof, the method including providing a very high impedance to the laser diode during its nominal operating conditions about the quiescent point and, sensing an instantaneous amplitude of the RF amplitude modulating signal to detect amplitude surges therein, and responding to the sensing means by removing forward conduction current from the laser diode during the sense amplitude surges int he RF amplitude of the analog modulating signal, thereby causing the laser diode to reduce emission of light energy to a safe level.

  2. Ultrastrong light-matter coupling in electrically doped microcavity organic light emitting diodes

    SciTech Connect

    Mazzeo, M.; Genco, A.; Gambino, S.; Ballarini, D.; Mangione, F.; Sanvitto, D.; Di Stefano, O.; Patanè, S.; Savasta, S.; Gigli, G.

    2014-06-09

    The coupling of the electromagnetic field with an electronic transition gives rise, for strong enough light-matter interactions, to hybrid states called exciton-polaritons. When the energy exchanged between light and matter becomes a significant fraction of the material transition energy an extreme optical regime called ultrastrong coupling (USC) is achieved. We report a microcavity embedded p-i-n monolithic organic light emitting diode working in USC, employing a thin film of squaraine dye as active layer. A normalized coupling ratio of 30% has been achieved at room temperature. These USC devices exhibit a dispersion-less angle-resolved electroluminescence that can be exploited for the realization of innovative optoelectronic devices. Our results may open the way towards electrically pumped polariton lasers.

  3. Bypass diode integration

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shepard, N. F., Jr.

    1981-01-01

    Protective bypass diodes and mounting configurations which are applicable for use with photovoltaic modules having power dissipation requirements in the 5 to 50 watt range were investigated. Using PN silicon and Schottky diode characterization data on packaged diodes and diode chips, typical diodes were selected as representative for each range of current carrying capacity, an appropriate heat dissipating mounting concept along with its environmental enclosure was defined, and a thermal analysis relating junction temperature as a function of power dissipation was performed. In addition, the heat dissipating mounting device dimensions were varied to determine the effect on junction temperature. The results of the analysis are presented as a set of curves indicating junction temperature as a function of power dissipation for each diode package.

  4. Coaxial foilless diode

    SciTech Connect

    Kong, Long; Liu, QingXiang; Li, XiangQiang; Wang, ShaoMeng

    2014-05-15

    A kind of coaxial foilless diode is proposed in this paper, with the structure model and operating principle of the diode are given. The current-voltage relation of the coaxial foilless diode and the effects of structure parameters on the relation are studied by simulation. By solving the electron motion equation, the beam deviation characteristic in the presence of external magnetic field in transmission process is analyzed, and the relationship between transverse misalignment with diode parameters is obtained. These results should be of interest to the area of generation and propagation of radial beam for application of generating high power microwaves.

  5. Resonant Zener tunnelling via zero-dimensional states in a narrow gap diode

    PubMed Central

    Di Paola, D. M.; Kesaria, M.; Makarovsky, O.; Velichko, A.; Eaves, L.; Mori, N.; Krier, A.; Patanè, A.

    2016-01-01

    Interband tunnelling of carriers through a forbidden energy gap, known as Zener tunnelling, is a phenomenon of fundamental and technological interest. Its experimental observation in the Esaki p-n semiconductor diode has led to the first demonstration and exploitation of quantum tunnelling in a condensed matter system. Here we demonstrate a new type of Zener tunnelling that involves the resonant transmission of electrons through zero-dimensional (0D) states. In our devices, a narrow quantum well of the mid-infrared (MIR) alloy In(AsN) is placed in the intrinsic (i) layer of a p-i-n diode. The incorporation of nitrogen in the quantum well creates 0D states that are localized on nanometer lengthscales. These levels provide intermediate states that act as “stepping stones” for electrons tunnelling across the diode and give rise to a negative differential resistance (NDR) that is weakly dependent on temperature. These electron transport properties have potential for the development of nanometre-scale non-linear components for electronics and MIR photonics. PMID:27535896

  6. Resonant Zener tunnelling via zero-dimensional states in a narrow gap diode.

    PubMed

    Di Paola, D M; Kesaria, M; Makarovsky, O; Velichko, A; Eaves, L; Mori, N; Krier, A; Patanè, A

    2016-01-01

    Interband tunnelling of carriers through a forbidden energy gap, known as Zener tunnelling, is a phenomenon of fundamental and technological interest. Its experimental observation in the Esaki p-n semiconductor diode has led to the first demonstration and exploitation of quantum tunnelling in a condensed matter system. Here we demonstrate a new type of Zener tunnelling that involves the resonant transmission of electrons through zero-dimensional (0D) states. In our devices, a narrow quantum well of the mid-infrared (MIR) alloy In(AsN) is placed in the intrinsic (i) layer of a p-i-n diode. The incorporation of nitrogen in the quantum well creates 0D states that are localized on nanometer lengthscales. These levels provide intermediate states that act as "stepping stones" for electrons tunnelling across the diode and give rise to a negative differential resistance (NDR) that is weakly dependent on temperature. These electron transport properties have potential for the development of nanometre-scale non-linear components for electronics and MIR photonics. PMID:27535896

  7. Vortex diode jet

    DOEpatents

    Houck, Edward D.

    1994-01-01

    A fluid transfer system that combines a vortex diode with a jet ejector to transfer liquid from one tank to a second tank by a gas pressurization method having no moving mechanical parts in the fluid system. The vortex diode is a device that has a high resistance to flow in one direction and a low resistance to flow in the other.

  8. Diodes stabilize LED output

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Deters, R. A.

    1977-01-01

    Small-signal diodes are placed in series with light-emitting diodes (LED's) to stabilize LED output against temperature fluctuations. Simple inexpensive method compensates for thermal fluctuations over a broad temperature range. Requiring few components, technique is particularly useful where circuit-board space is limited.

  9. Propulsion of nanowire diodes.

    PubMed

    Calvo-Marzal, Percy; Sattayasamitsathit, Sirilak; Balasubramanian, Shankar; Windmiller, Joshua R; Dao, Cuong; Wang, Joseph

    2010-03-14

    The propulsion of semiconductor diode nanowires under external AC electric field is described. Such fuel-free electric field-induced nanowire propulsion offers considerable promise for diverse technological applications. PMID:20177595

  10. Inelastic tunnel diodes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Anderson, L. M. (Inventor)

    1984-01-01

    Power is extracted from plasmons, photons, or other guided electromagnetic waves at infrared to midultraviolet frequencies by inelastic tunneling in metal-insulator-semiconductor-metal diodes. Inelastic tunneling produces power by absorbing plasmons to pump electrons to higher potential. Specifically, an electron from a semiconductor layer absorbs a plasmon and simultaneously tunnels across an insulator into metal layer which is at higher potential. The diode voltage determines the fraction of energy extracted from the plasmons; any excess is lost to heat.

  11. Vortex diode jet

    SciTech Connect

    Houck, E.D.

    1994-05-17

    A fluid transfer system is described that combines a vortex diode with a jet ejector to transfer liquid from one tank to a second tank by a gas pressurization method having no moving mechanical parts in the fluid system. The vortex diode is a device that has a high resistance to flow in one direction and a low resistance to flow in the other. 10 figures.

  12. Light-emitting Diodes

    PubMed Central

    Opel, Daniel R.; Hagstrom, Erika; Pace, Aaron K.; Sisto, Krisanne; Hirano-Ali, Stefanie A.; Desai, Shraddha

    2015-01-01

    Background: In the early 1990s, the biological significance of light-emitting diodes was realized. Since this discovery, various light sources have been investigated for their cutaneous effects. Study design: A Medline search was performed on light-emitting diode lights and their therapeutic effects between 1996 and 2010. Additionally, an open-label, investigator-blinded study was performed using a yellow light-emitting diode device to treat acne, rosacea, photoaging, alopecia areata, and androgenetic alopecia. Results: The authors identified several case-based reports, small case series, and a few randomized controlled trials evaluating the use of four different wavelengths of light-emitting diodes. These devices were classified as red, blue, yellow, or infrared, and covered a wide range of clinical applications. The 21 patients the authors treated had mixed results regarding patient satisfaction and pre- and post-treatment evaluation of improvement in clinical appearance. Conclusion: Review of the literature revealed that differing wavelengths of light-emitting diode devices have many beneficial effects, including wound healing, acne treatment, sunburn prevention, phototherapy for facial rhytides, and skin rejuvenation. The authors’ clinical experience with a specific yellow light-emitting diode device was mixed, depending on the condition being treated, and was likely influenced by the device parameters. PMID:26155326

  13. Photovoltaic module bypass diode encapsulation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shepard, N. J., Jr.

    1983-01-01

    The design and processing techniques necessary to incorporate bypass diodes within the module encapsulant are presented. The Semicon PN junction diode cells were selected. Diode junction to heat spreader thermal resistance measurements, performed on a variety of mounted diode chip types and sizes, have yielded values which are consistently below 1 deg C per watt, but show some instability when thermally cycled over the temperature range from -40 to 150 deg C. Three representative experimental modules, each incorporating integral bypass diode/heat spreader assemblies of various sizes, were designed. Thermal testing of these modules enabled the formulation of a recommended heat spreader plate sizing relationship. The production cost of three encapsulated bypass diode/heat spreader assemblies were compared with similarly rated externally mounted packaged diodes. It is concluded that, when proper designed and installed, these bypass diode devices will improve the overall reliability of a terrestrial array over a 20 year design lifetime.

  14. Pyrolyzed carbon film diodes.

    PubMed

    Morton, Kirstin C; Tokuhisa, Hideo; Baker, Lane A

    2013-11-13

    We have previously reported pyrolyzed parylene C (PPC) as a conductive carbon electrode material for use with micropipets, atomic force microscopy probes, and planar electrodes. Advantages of carbon electrode fabrication from PPC include conformal coating of high-aspect ratio micro/nanoscale features and the benefits afforded by chemical vapor deposition of carbon polymers. In this work, we demonstrate chemical surface doping of PPC through the use of previously reported methods. Chemically treated PPC films are characterized by multiple spectroscopic and electronic measurements. Pyrolyzed parylene C and doped PPC are used to construct diodes that are examined as both p-n heterojunction and Schottky barrier diodes. Half-wave rectification is achieved with PPC diodes and demonstrates the applicability of PPC as a conductive and semiconductive material in device fabrication. PMID:24090451

  15. Coaxial diode and vircator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Guozhi; Qiu, Shi; Wang, Hongjun; Huang, Wenhua; Wang, Feng

    1997-10-01

    The experimental and theoretical results of coaxial diode and the theoretical results of coaxial vircator are presented in this paper. The cathode is a cold, field- emitting graphite ring and needle-shaped copper applied to a grounded cylinder. The anode is a semi-transparent cylinder located inside of, and concentric to the cathode cylinder. The anode cylinder is pulsed positive. The coaxial vircator generates microwave by injecting a radial electron beam into cylinder such that the space-charge limited current is exceeded. A virtual cathode forms and oscillates in radial position and amplitude, generating microwaves which are extracted by an attached waveguide with a circular cross- section. Analytic and PIC simulations were used to study coaxial diode and vircator, with aid of the two dimensional PIC code, KARAT. The comparisons between the theoretical and the experimental results for a coaxial diode are presented.

  16. Blanket integrated blocking diodes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Uebele, P.; Kasper, C.; Rasch, K.-D.

    1986-11-01

    Two types of large area protection diodes for integration in solar arrays were developed in planar technology. For application in a bus voltage concept of V sub bus = 80 V a p-doped blanket integrated blocking diode (p-IBD) was developed with V sub rev = 120 V, whereas for the high voltage concept of V sub bus = 160 V a n-IBD with V sub rev = 250 V was developed. Application as blanket integrated shunt diodes is recommended. The optimized rearside diffusion provides a low forward voltage drop in the temperature range of minus 100 to plus 150 C. As a consequence of planar technology metallized coverglasses have to be used to minimize the photocurrent.

  17. Cryogenic thermal diodes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Paulsen, Brandon R.; Batty, J. C.; Agren, John

    2000-01-01

    Space based cryogenic thermal management systems for advanced infrared sensor platforms are a critical failure mode to the spacecraft missions they are supporting. Recent advances in cryocooler technologies have increased the achievable cooling capacities and decreased the operating temperatures of these systems, but there is still a fundamental need for redundancy in these systems. Cryogenic thermal diodes act as thermal switches, allowing heat to flow through them when in a conduction mode and restricting the flow of heat when in an isolation mode. These diodes will allow multiple cryocoolers to cool a single infrared focal plane array. The Space Dynamics Laboratory has undertaken an internal research and development effort to develop this innovative technology. This paper briefly describes the design parameters of several prototype thermal diodes that were developed and tested. .

  18. Heat pipes - Thermal diodes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aptekar, B. F.; Baum, J. M.; Ivanovskii, M. N.; Kolgotin, F. F.; Serbin, V. I.

    The performance concept and peculiarities of the new type of thermal diode with the trap and with the wick breakage are dealt with in the report. The experimental data were obtained and analysed for the working fluid mass and the volume of the liquid in the wick on the forward-mode limiting heat transfer. The flow rate pulsation of the working fluid in the wick was observed visually on the setup with the transparent wall. The quantitative difference on the data on the investigated thermal diode and on the identical heat pipes without the wick breakage is found experimentally concerning the forward-mode limiting heat transfer.

  19. Dual function conducting polymer diodes

    DOEpatents

    Heeger, Alan J.; Yu, Gang

    1996-01-01

    Dual function diodes based on conjugated organic polymer active layers are disclosed. When positively biased the diodes function as light emitters. When negatively biased they are highly efficient photodiodes. Methods of preparation and use of these diodes in displays and input/output devices are also disclosed.

  20. A photon thermal diode.

    PubMed

    Chen, Zhen; Wong, Carlaton; Lubner, Sean; Yee, Shannon; Miller, John; Jang, Wanyoung; Hardin, Corey; Fong, Anthony; Garay, Javier E; Dames, Chris

    2014-01-01

    A thermal diode is a two-terminal nonlinear device that rectifies energy carriers (for example, photons, phonons and electrons) in the thermal domain, the heat transfer analogue to the familiar electrical diode. Effective thermal rectifiers could have an impact on diverse applications ranging from heat engines to refrigeration, thermal regulation of buildings and thermal logic. However, experimental demonstrations have lagged far behind theoretical proposals. Here we present the first experimental results for a photon thermal diode. The device is based on asymmetric scattering of ballistic energy carriers by pyramidal reflectors. Recent theoretical work has predicted that this ballistic mechanism also requires a nonlinearity in order to yield asymmetric thermal transport, a requirement of all thermal diodes arising from the second Law of Thermodynamics, and realized here using an 'inelastic thermal collimator' element. Experiments confirm both effects: with pyramids and collimator the thermal rectification is 10.9 ± 0.8%, while without the collimator no rectification is detectable (<0.3%). PMID:25399761

  1. Graphene-based ultrafast diode

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dragoman, D.; Dragoman, M.; Plana, R.

    2010-10-01

    We present a graphene-based ballistic diode, which is able to rectify an incident signal due to an oblique gate positioned between the two terminals of the device. The operating point of the diode can be controlled by the applied gate voltage, whereas the current-voltage dependence of the device can be changed by varying the inclination angle of the gate. In particular, the ideality factor of the graphene-based diode can take values higher or lower than 1 by modifying this inclination angle. The rectifying properties of the graphene diode are thus tunable, in deep contrast with semiconductor-based diodes.

  2. Spin-Wave Diode

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lan, Jin; Yu, Weichao; Wu, Ruqian; Xiao, Jiang

    2015-10-01

    A diode, a device allowing unidirectional signal transmission, is a fundamental element of logic structures, and it lies at the heart of modern information systems. The spin wave or magnon, representing a collective quasiparticle excitation of the magnetic order in magnetic materials, is a promising candidate for an information carrier for the next-generation energy-saving technologies. Here, we propose a scalable and reprogrammable pure spin-wave logic hardware architecture using domain walls and surface anisotropy stripes as waveguides on a single magnetic wafer. We demonstrate theoretically the design principle of the simplest logic component, a spin-wave diode, utilizing the chiral bound states in a magnetic domain wall with a Dzyaloshinskii-Moriya interaction, and confirm its performance through micromagnetic simulations. Our findings open a new vista for realizing different types of pure spin-wave logic components and finally achieving an energy-efficient and hardware-reprogrammable spin-wave computer.

  3. Hole spin injection from a GaMnAs layer into GaAs-AlAs-InGaAs resonant tunneling diodes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rodrigues, D. H.; Brasil, M. J. S. P.; Orlita, M.; Kunc, J.; Galeti, H. V. A.; Henini, M.; Taylor, D.; Galvão Gobato, Y.

    2016-04-01

    We have investigated the polarization-resolved electroluminescence (EL) of a p-i-n GaAs/AlAs/InGaAs resonant tunneling diode (RTD) containing a GaMnAs (x  =  5%) spin injector under high magnetic fields. We demonstrate that under hole resonant tunneling condition, the GaMnAs contact acts as an efficient spin-polarized source for holes tunneling through the device. Polarization degrees up to 80% were observed in the device around the hole resonance at 2 K under 15 T. Our results could be valuable for improving the hole-spin injection in GaMnAs-based spintronic devices.

  4. Whiskerless Schottky diode

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bishop, William L. (Inventor); Mcleod, Kathleen A. (Inventor); Mattauch, Robert J. (Inventor)

    1991-01-01

    A Schottky diode for millimeter and submillimeter wave applications is comprised of a multi-layered structure including active layers of gallium arsenide on a semi-insulating gallium arsenide substrate with first and second insulating layers of silicon dioxide on the active layers of gallium arsenide. An ohmic contact pad lays on the silicon dioxide layers. An anode is formed in a window which is in and through the silicon dioxide layers. An elongated contact finger extends from the pad to the anode and a trench, preferably a transverse channel or trench of predetermined width, is formed in the active layers of the diode structure under the contact finger. The channel extends through the active layers to or substantially to the interface of the semi-insulating gallium arsenide substrate and the adjacent gallium arsenide layer which constitutes a buffer layer. Such a structure minimizes the effect of the major source of shunt capacitance by interrupting the current path between the conductive layers beneath the anode contact pad and the ohmic contact. Other embodiments of the diode may substitute various insulating or semi-insulating materials for the silicon dioxide, various semi-conductors for the active layers of gallium arsenide, and other materials for the substrate, which may be insulating or semi-insulating.

  5. Cryogenic thermal diode heat pipes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Alario, J.

    1979-01-01

    The development of spiral artery cryogenic thermal diode heat pipes was continued. Ethane was the working fluid and stainless steel the heat pipe material in all cases. The major tasks included: (1) building a liquid blockage (blocking orifice) thermal diode suitable for the HEPP space flight experiment; (2) building a liquid trap thermal diode engineering model; (3) retesting the original liquid blockage engineering model, and (4) investigating the startup dynamics of artery cryogenic thermal diodes. An experimental investigation was also conducted into the wetting characteristics of ethane/stainless steel systems using a specially constructed chamber that permitted in situ observations.

  6. A new cryogenic diode thermometer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Courts, S. S.; Swinehart, P. R.; Yeager, C. J.

    2002-05-01

    While the introduction of yet another cryogenic diode thermometer is not earth shattering, a new diode thermometer, the DT-600 series, recently introduced by Lake Shore Cryotronics, possesses three features that make it unique among commercial diode thermometers. First, these diodes have been probed at the chip level, allowing for the availability of a bare chip thermometer matching a standard curve-an important feature in situations where real estate is at a premium (IR detectors), or where in-situ calibration is difficult. Second, the thermometry industry has assumed that interchangeability should be best at low temperatures. Thus, good interchangeability at room temperatures implies a very good interchangeability at cryogenic temperature, resulting in a premium priced sensor. The DT-600 series diode thermometer is available in an interchangeability band comparable to platinum RTDs with the added advantage of interchangeability to 2 K. Third, and most important, the DT-600 series diode does not exhibit an instability in the I-V characteristic in the 8 K to 20 K temperature range that is observed in other commercial diode thermometer devices [1]. This paper presents performance characteristics for the DT-600 series diode thermometer along with a comparison of I-V curves for this device and other commercial diode thermometers exhibiting an I-V instability.

  7. BIN Diode For Submillimeter Wavelengths

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Maserjian, J.

    1989-01-01

    Diode formed by selective doping during epitaxial growth, starting with semi-insulating substrate. Use of high-mobility semiconductors like GaAs extends cutoff frequency. Either molecular-beam epitaxy (MBE) or organometallic chemical-vapor deposition used to form layers of diode. Planar growth process permits subsequent fabrication of arrays of diodes by standard photolithographic techniques, to achieve quasi-optical coupling of submillimeter radiation. Useful for generation of harmonics or heterodyne mixing in receivers for atmospheric and space spectroscopy operating at millimeter and submillimeter wavelengths. Used as frequency doublers or triplers, diodes of new type extend frequency range of present solid-state oscillators.

  8. Cylindrical electron beam diode

    DOEpatents

    Bolduc, Paul E.

    1976-01-01

    A diode discharge device may include a tubular anode concentrically encircled by and spaced from a tubular cathode electrode with ends intermediate the ends of said anode electrode, and a metal conductive housing having a tubular wall disposed around the cathode electrode with end walls connected to the anode electrode. High energy electron current coupling is through an opening in the housing tubular wall to a portion of the cathode electrode intermediate its ends. Suitable utilization means may be within the anode electrode at positions to be irradiated by electrons emitted from the cathode electrode and transmitted through the anode walls.

  9. Diode laser applications in urology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sam, Richard C.; Esch, Victor C.

    1995-05-01

    Diode lasers are air-cooled, efficient, compact devices which have the potential of very low cost when produced in quantity. The characteristics of diode lasers are discussed. Their applications in interstitial thermal treatment of the prostate, and laser ablation of prostate tissues, will be presented.

  10. Making an ultrastable diode laser

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Archibald, James; Washburn, Matt; van Zijll, Marshall; Erickson, Christopher; Neyenhuis, Brian; Doermann, Greg; Durfee, Dallin

    2006-10-01

    We have constructed a 657nm diode laser with excellent stability for use in an atom interferometer. The laser is a grating-stabilized diode laser is locked to a high-finesse cavity using the Pound-Drever-Hall method. We have measured a linewidth of about 1 kHz and are working on several improvements which should further reduce our linewidth.

  11. Gallium phosphide high temperature diodes

    SciTech Connect

    Chaffin, R.J.; Dawson, L.R.

    1981-01-01

    The purpose of this work is to develop high temperature (> 300/sup 0/C) diodes for geothermal and other energy applications. A comparison of reverse leakage currents of Si, GaAs and GaP is made. Diodes made from GaP should be usable to > 500/sup 0/C. An LPE process for producing high quality, grown junction GaP diodes is described. This process uses low vapor pressure Mg as a dopant which allows multiple boat growth in the same LPE run. These LPE wafers have been cut into die and metallized to make the diodes. These diodes produce leakage currents below 10/sup -3/ A/cm/sup 2/ at 400/sup 0/C while exhibiting good high temperature rectification characteristics. High temperature life test data is presented which shows exceptional stability of the V-I characteristics.

  12. Light Emitting Diode (LED)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1997-01-01

    A special lighting technology was developed for space-based commercial plant growth research on NASA's Space Shuttle. Surgeons have used this technology to treat brain cancer on Earth, in two successful operations. The treatment technique called photodynamic therapy, requires the surgeon to use tiny pinhead-size Light Emitting Diodes (LEDs) (a source releasing long wavelengths of light) to activate light-sensitive, tumor-treating drugs. Laser light has been used for this type of surgery in the past, but the LED light illuminates through all nearby tissues, reaching parts of a tumor that shorter wavelengths of laser light carnot. The new probe is safer because the longer wavelengths of light are cooler than the shorter wavelengths of laser light, making the LED less likely to injure normal brain tissue near the tumor. It can also be used for hours at a time while still remaining cool to the touch. The LED probe consists of 144 tiny pinhead-size diodes, is 9-inches long, and about one-half-inch in diameter. The small balloon aids in even distribution of the light source. The LED light source is compact, about the size of a briefcase, and can be purchased for a fraction of the cost of a laser. The probe was developed for photodynamic cancer therapy by the Marshall Space Flight Center under a NASA Small Business Innovative Research program grant.

  13. AC Impedance Studies of Polymer Light-emitting Electrochemical Cells and Light-emitting Diodes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Yongfang; Gao, Jun; Heeger, Alan J.; Yu, Gang; Cao, Yong

    1998-03-01

    The alternating current (ac) impedance of polymer light-emitting electrochemical cells (LECs) is studied and compared with that of polymer light-emitting diodes(LEDs) in the frequency range from 100 Hz to 5 M Hz. The device capacitance, resistance and interface characteristics are analyzed using the frequency dependence of the impedance and plots of the imaginary component of the impedance (Z") vs. the real part (Z'). At low bias voltages, polymer LEDs behave as pure capacitors whereas the polymer blend in the LEC exhibits an ionic conductivity contribution to the impedance. With dc bias higher than the energy gap of the semiconducting polymer (eV > Eg), the Z" vs. Z' plot of the LEC is a flattened semicircle, while that of LED is a semicircle with a small tail at low frequencies. In the LED, the capacitance is independent of voltages, the film resistance decreases as the bias voltage is increased in forward bias due to charge injection at higher voltages. In the LEC, the capacitance increases at voltages sufficient to induce electrochemical redox and doping near the electrodes. From this increase, the thickness of the i-layer of the p-i-n junction is estimated to approximately 0.8 of the film thickness (at the bias voltage of 3 V). Thus, in the LEC under operating conditions, the crossover region from p-type occupies most of the film thickness.

  14. Diode Structure for Microwave and Infrared Applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Alcorn, George; Leinteran, Charles; Chiang, Bing

    1987-01-01

    Microwave signals switched or modulated optically. Planar diode with transparent cathode made in BaAs, Si, and InSb versions. Depending on specific configuration and material, such diode used for optical modulation of microwave signal or as infrared detector. Transparent cathode fabricated on GaAs diode so diode illuminates to generate and control short-circuit current.

  15. Laser diode array and transmission optics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kwon, Jin H.

    1989-01-01

    Information on laser diode array and transmission optics is given in viewgraph form. Information is given on coherent combining of laser diode arrays, amplification through a laser diode array, the far field pattern of a laser diode transmitter, and beam diameter at receiver vs. transmission distance.

  16. Emitron: microwave diode

    DOEpatents

    Craig, G.D.; Pettibone, J.S.; Drobot, A.T.

    1982-05-06

    The invention comprises a new class of device, driven by electron or other charged particle flow, for producing coherent microwaves by utilizing the interaction of electromagnetic waves with electron flow in diodes not requiring an external magnetic field. Anode and cathode surfaces are electrically charged with respect to one another by electron flow, for example caused by a Marx bank voltage source or by other charged particle flow, for example by a high energy charged particle beam. This produces an electric field which stimulates an emitted electron beam to flow in the anode-cathode region. The emitted electrons are accelerated by the electric field and coherent microwaves are produced by the three dimensional spatial and temporal interaction of the accelerated electrons with geometrically allowed microwave modes which results in the bunching of the electrons and the pumping of at least one dominant microwave mode.

  17. White light emitting diodes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baur, J.; Schlotter, P.; Schneider, J.

    Using blue-emitting GaN LEDs on SiC substrate chips as primary light sources, we have fabricated green, yellow, red and white light emitting diodes (LUCOLEDs). The generation of mixed colors, as turquoise and magenta, is also demonstrated. The underlying physical principle is that of luminescence downconversion (Stokes shift), as typical for organic dye molecules and many inorganic phosphors. For white light generation via the LUCOLED principle, the phosphor Y3Al5O12:Ce3+(4f1) is ideally suited. The optical characteristics of Ce3+(4f1) in Y3Al5O12(YAG) are discussed in detail. Possibilities to "tune" the white color by various substitutions in the garnet lattice are shortly outlined.

  18. Diode Laser Arrays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Botez, Dan; Scifres, Don R.

    1994-08-01

    This book provides a comprehensive overview of the fundamental principles and applications of semiconductor diode laser arrays. All of the major types of arrays are discussed in detail, including coherent, incoherent, edge- and surface-emitting, horizontal- and vertical-cavity, individually addressed, lattice- matched and strained-layer systems. The initial chapters cover such topics as lasers, amplifiers, external-cavity control, theoretical modeling, and operational dynamics. Spatially incoherent arrays are then described in detail, and the uses of vertical-cavity surface emitter and edge-emitting arrays in parallel optical-signal processing and multi-channel optical recording are discussed. Researchers and graduate students in solid state physics and electrical engineering studying the properties and applications of such arrays will find this book invaluable.

  19. Unstable resonator diode laser

    SciTech Connect

    Clark, G.L.

    1988-04-19

    In a semiconductor diode laser, a structure is described comprising: a generally planar active layer, across which a forward bias voltage is applied, cladding layers adjacent to the active layer, to confine light in a direction perpendicular to the active layer, and first and second facets; in which the first facet is curved to present a concave part-cylindrical reflective surface toward the active layer, and in which the second facet includes a curved portion presenting a convex part-cylindrical reflective surface toward the active layer and a planar portion that is non-reflective. The curvatures of the two curved surfaces have axes of curvature that are approximately perpendicular to the active layer, the curvatures being selected to form an unstable resonator, in which light is confined in a particular sense by the cladding layers and from which energy is out-coupled through the planar portion of the second facet.

  20. Laterally injected light-emitting diode and laser diode

    DOEpatents

    Miller, Mary A.; Crawford, Mary H.; Allerman, Andrew A.

    2015-06-16

    A p-type superlattice is used to laterally inject holes into an III-nitride multiple quantum well active layer, enabling efficient light extraction from the active area. Laterally-injected light-emitting diodes and laser diodes can enable brighter, more efficient devices that impact a wide range of wavelengths and applications. For UV wavelengths, applications include fluorescence-based biological sensing, epoxy curing, and water purification. For visible devices, applications include solid state lighting and projection systems.

  1. Enhanced vbasis laser diode package

    SciTech Connect

    Deri, Robert J.; Chen, Diana; Bayramian, Andy; Freitas, Barry; Kotovsky, Jack

    2014-08-19

    A substrate having an upper surface and a lower surface is provided. The substrate includes a plurality of v-grooves formed in the upper surface. Each v-groove includes a first side and a second side perpendicular to the first side. A laser diode bar assembly is disposed within each of the v-grooves and attached to the first side. The laser diode bar assembly includes a first adhesion layer disposed on the first side of the v-groove, a metal plate attached to the first adhesion layer, a second adhesion layer disposed over the metal plate, and a laser diode bar attached to the second adhesion layer. The laser diode bar has a coefficient of thermal expansion (CTE) substantially similar to that of the metal plate.

  2. Thermometric Property of a Diode.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Inman, Fred W.; Woodruff, Dan

    1995-01-01

    Presents a simple way to implement the thermometric property of a semiconductor diode to produce a thermometer with a nearly linear dependence upon temperature over a wide range of temperatures. (JRH)

  3. Light Emitting Diodes (LEDs)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1997-01-01

    A special lighting technology was developed for space-based commercial plant growth research on NASA's Space Shuttle. Surgeons have used this technology to treat brain cancer on Earth, in two successful operations. The treatment technique, called Photodynamic Therapy, requires the surgeon to use tiny, pinhead-size Light Emitting Diodes (LEDs) (a source that releases long wavelengths of light ) to activate light-sensitive, tumor-treating drugs. 'A young woman operated on in May 1999 has fully recovered with no complications and no evidence of the tumor coming back,' said Dr. Harry Whelan, a pediatric neurologist at the Medical Hospital of Wisconsin in Milwaukee. Laser light has been used for this type of surgery in the past, but the LED light illuminates through all nearby tissues, reaching parts of a tumor that shorter wavelengths of laser light carnot. The new probe is safer because the longer wavelengths of light are cooler than the shorter wavelengths of laser light, making the LED less likely to injure normal brain tissue near the tumor. It can be used for hours at a time while still remaining cool to the touch. The LED light source is compact, about the size of a briefcase, and can be purchased for a fraction of the cost of a laser. The LEDs, developed and managed by NASA's Marshall Space Flight Center, have been used on seven Space Shuttle flights inside the Microgravity Astroculture Facility. This technology has also been successfully used to further commercial research in crop growth.

  4. Carbon-Nanotube Schottky Diodes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Manohara, Harish; Wong, Eric; Schlecht, Erich; Hunt, Brian; Siegel, Peter

    2006-01-01

    Schottky diodes based on semiconducting single-walled carbon nanotubes are being developed as essential components of the next generation of submillimeter-wave sensors and sources. Initial performance predictions have shown that the performance characteristics of these devices can exceed those of the state-of-the-art solid-state Schottky diodes that have been the components of choice for room-temperature submillimeter-wave sensors for more than 50 years. For state-of-the-art Schottky diodes used as detectors at frequencies above a few hundred gigahertz, the inherent parasitic capacitances associated with their semiconductor junction areas and the resistances associated with low electron mobilities limit achievable sensitivity. The performance of such a detector falls off approximately exponentially with frequency above 500 GHz. Moreover, when used as frequency multipliers for generating signals, state-of-the-art solid-state Schottky diodes exhibit extremely low efficiencies, generally putting out only micro-watts of power at frequencies up to 1.5 THz. The shortcomings of the state-of-the-art solid-state Schottky diodes can be overcome by exploiting the unique electronic properties of semiconducting carbon nanotubes. A single-walled carbon nanotube can be metallic or semiconducting, depending on its chirality, and exhibits high electron mobility (recently reported to be approx.= 2x10(exp 5)sq cm/V-s) and low parasitic capacitance. Because of the narrowness of nanotubes, Schottky diodes based on carbon nanotubes have ultra-small junction areas (of the order of a few square nanometers) and consequent junction capacitances of the order of 10(exp -18) F, which translates to cutoff frequency >5 THz. Because the turn-on power levels of these devices are very low (of the order of nano-watts), the input power levels needed for pumping local oscillators containing these devices should be lower than those needed for local oscillators containing state-of-the-art solid

  5. Gas Sensing Diode and Method of Manufacturing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hunter, Gary William (Inventor)

    2000-01-01

    A diode for sensing hydrogen and hydrocarbons and the process for manufacturing the diode are disclosed. The diode is a Schottky diode which has a palladium chrome contact on the C-face of an n-type 6H Silicon carbide epilayer. The epilayer is grown on the C-face of a 6H silicon carbide substrate. The diode is capable of measuring low concentrations of hydrogen and hydrocarbons at high temperatures, for example, 800 C. The diode is both sensitive and stable at elevated temperatures.

  6. Gas Sensing Diode Comprising SiC

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hunter, Gary William (Inventor)

    2001-01-01

    A diode for sensing hydrogen and hydrocarbons and the process for manufacturing the diode are disclosed. The diode is a Schottky diode which has a palladium chrome contact on the C-face of an n-type 6H Silicon carbide epilayer. The epilayer is grown on the C-face of a 6H silicon carbide substrate. The diode is capable of measuring low concentrations of hydrogen and hydrocarbons at high temperatures, for example, 800 degrees C. The diode is both sensitive and stable at elevated temperatures.

  7. Diode laser array

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Carlson, Nils W. (Inventor); Evans, Gary A. (Inventor); Kaiser, Charlie J. (Inventor)

    1990-01-01

    A diode laser array comprises a substrate of a semiconductor material having first and second opposed surfaces. On the first surface is a plurality of spaced gain sections and a separate distributed Bragg reflector passive waveguide at each end of each gain section and optically connecting the gain sections. Each gain section includes a cavity therein wherein charge carriers are generated and recombine to generate light which is confined in the cavity. Also, the cavity, which is preferably a quantum well cavity, provides both a high differential gain and potentially large depth of loss modulation. Each waveguide has a wavelength which is preferably formed by an extension of the cavity of the gain sections and a grating. The grating has a period which provides a selective feedback of light into the gain sections to supporting lasing, which allows some of the light to be emitted from the waveguide normal to the surface of the substrate and which allows optical coupling of the gain sections. Also, the grating period provides an operating wavelength which is on the short wavelength side of the gain period of the gain sections required for laser oscillation. An RF pulse is applied so as to maximize the magnitude of the loss modulation and the differential gain in the gain sections. The array is operated by applying a DC bias to all the gain sections at a level just below the threshold of the gain sections to only one of the gain sections which raises the bias in all of the gain sections to a level that causes all of the gain sections to oscillate. Thus, a small bias can turn the array on and off.

  8. Mounting for diodes provides efficient heat sink

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1964-01-01

    Efficient heat sink is provided by soldering diodes to metal support bars which are brazed to a ceramic base. Electrical connections between diodes on adjacent bars are made flexible by metal strips which aid in heat dissipation.

  9. Comparison of bipolar and unipolar ionic diodes

    SciTech Connect

    Vlassiouk, Ivan V

    2010-01-01

    Nanoporous ionic diodes, as well as devices for manipulating ions and molecules in a solution, have attracted a great deal of interest from researchers in various fields from the fundamental point of view. Ionic diodes allow the ions to be transported in one direction and block the transport in the other. There are two types of diodes that have been realized experimentally. A bipolar diode contains a junction between two zones of the pore walls with positive and negative surface charges. A unipolar diode contains a zone that is neutral and a zone that is charged. In this paper we discuss differences in operation of the diodes with a special emphasis on the sensitivity of their performance to the lengths of the charged and neutral zones. We also show that a bipolar diode offers more asymmetric current-voltage curves than a unipolar diode.

  10. Visible and Near-Infrared Quantum Well Laser Diodes Grown by Solid Source Molecular Beam Epitaxy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Varriano, John A.

    1993-01-01

    The growth of near infrared quantum well (QW) laser diodes in the AlGaAs material system and visible QW laser diodes in the AlGaInP material system by solid source molecular beam epitaxy (MBE) is investigated. Procedures for fabrication, measurement, and analysis are developed on the more easily grown GaAs QW lasers. Several studies are performed on the GaAs QW lasers. Doping of the laser core with a p-i-n profile improves laser performance. Low growth temperatures result in lasers with high threshold current densities due to the formation of traps caused by interface states and a deep level near the QW interface region. High growth temperatures also cause increases in threshold currents due to the effects of Ga desorption. Threshold current is not observed to depend strongly on the width of the laser waveguide core. Fabrication of lasers with tilted facets is facilitated by using misoriented substrates. The lasers exhibit higher threshold current densities due to decreased facet reflectivity. The benefits of compressively strained active layers are demonstrated in a GaInAs QW laser. Growth of visible AlGaInP lasers lattice matched to GaAs substrates is performed using a novel valved cracker cell for solid phosphorus. The cell avoids the expense and possible toxicity associated with the use of phosphine common in other growth techniques. It also alleviates the problems encountered when using solid phosphorus in a conventional effusion cell. High quality AlGaInP material is grown using the cell. The quality of the AlInP and GaInP ternaries is comparable to or better than that grown by other techniques based on photoluminescence and Raman spectroscopy measurements. The material is found to be highly disordered. Adequate doping levels for laser operation are obtained in the AlGaInP quaternary. Growth stops at the QW/barrier interfaces are proven to be detrimental to laser performance. Appropriate choices of barrier Al composition and QW Ga composition allow for the

  11. Method of making diode structures

    DOEpatents

    Compaan, Alvin D.; Gupta, Akhlesh

    2006-11-28

    A method of making a diode structure includes the step of depositing a transparent electrode layer of any one or more of the group ZnO, ZnS and CdO onto a substrate layer, and depositing an active semiconductor junction having an n-type layer and a p-type layer onto the transparent electrode layer under process conditions that avoid substantial degradation of the electrode layer. A back electrode coating layer is applied to form a diode structure.

  12. IC Fabrication Methods Improve Laser Diodes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Miller, M.; Pickhardt, V.

    1984-01-01

    Family of high-performance, tunable diode lasers developed for use as local oscillators in passive laser heterodyne spectrometer. Diodes fabricated using standard IC processes include photolithography, selective etching and vacuum deposition of metals and insulators. Packaging refinements improved thermal-cycling characteristics of diodes and increased room-temperature shelf life.

  13. Low Temperature Thermometry Using Inexpensive Silicon Diodes.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Waltham, N. R.; And Others

    1981-01-01

    Describes the use of silicon diodes for low temperature thermometry in the teaching laboratory. A simple and inexpensive circuit for display of the diode forward voltage under constant current conditions is described, and its application in the evaluation of low cost silicon diodes as low temperature thermometers is presented. (SK)

  14. Imaging charge separation and carrier recombination in nanowire p-i-n junctions using ultrafast microscopy.

    PubMed

    Gabriel, Michelle M; Grumstrup, Erik M; Kirschbrown, Justin R; Pinion, Christopher W; Christesen, Joseph D; Zigler, David F; Cating, Emma E M; Cahoon, James F; Papanikolas, John M

    2014-06-11

    Silicon nanowires incorporating p-type/n-type (p-n) junctions have been introduced as basic building blocks for future nanoscale electronic components. Controlling charge flow through these doped nanostructures is central to their function, yet our understanding of this process is inferred from measurements that average over entire structures or integrate over long times. Here, we have used femtosecond pump-probe microscopy to directly image the dynamics of photogenerated charge carriers in silicon nanowires encoded with p-n junctions along the growth axis. Initially, motion is dictated by carrier-carrier interactions, resulting in diffusive spreading of the neutral electron-hole cloud. Charge separation occurs at longer times as the carrier distribution reaches the edges of the depletion region, leading to a persistent electron population in the n-type region. Time-resolved visualization of the carrier dynamics yields clear, direct information on fundamental drift, diffusion, and recombination processes in these systems, providing a powerful tool for understanding and improving materials for nanotechnology. PMID:24867088

  15. 42 GHz p.i.n Germanium photodetector integrated in a silicon-on-insulator waveguide.

    PubMed

    Vivien, Laurent; Osmond, Johann; Fédéli, Jean-Marc; Marris-Morini, Delphine; Crozat, Paul; Damlencourt, Jean-François; Cassan, Eric; Lecunff, Y; Laval, Suzanne

    2009-04-13

    A compact pin Ge photodetector is integrated in submicron SOI rib waveguide. The detector length is reduced down to 15 microm using butt coupling configuration which is sufficient to totally absorb light at the wavelength of 1.55 microm. A -3 dB bandwidth of 42 GHz has been measured at a 4V reverse bias with a responsivity as high as 1 A/W at the wavelength of 1.55 microm and a low dark current density of 60 mA/cm(2). At a wavelength of 1.52 microm, a responsivity of 1 A/W is obtained under -0.5 V bias. The process is fully compatible with CMOS technology. PMID:19365450

  16. Hybrid method of making an amorphous silicon P-I-N semiconductor device

    DOEpatents

    Moustakas, Theodore D.; Morel, Don L.; Abeles, Benjamin

    1983-10-04

    The invention is directed to a hydrogenated amorphous silicon PIN semiconductor device of hybrid glow discharge/reactive sputtering fabrication. The hybrid fabrication method is of advantage in providing an ability to control the optical band gap of the P and N layers, resulting in increased photogeneration of charge carriers and device output.

  17. Improved method of preparing p-i-n junctions in amorphous silicon semiconductors

    DOEpatents

    Madan, A.

    1984-12-10

    A method of preparing p/sup +/-i-n/sup +/ junctions for amorphous silicon semiconductors includes depositing amorphous silicon on a thin layer of trivalent material, such as aluminum, indium, or gallium at a temperature in the range of 200/sup 0/C to 250/sup 0/C. At this temperature, the layer of trivalent material diffuses into the amorphous silicon to form a graded p/sup +/-i junction. A layer of n-type doped material is then deposited onto the intrinsic amorphous silicon layer in a conventional manner to finish forming the p/sup +/-i-n/sup +/ junction.

  18. Electrically Tunable Valley-Light Emitting Diode (vLED) Based on CVD-Grown Monolayer WS2.

    PubMed

    Yang, Weihuang; Shang, Jingzhi; Wang, Jianpu; Shen, Xiaonan; Cao, Bingchen; Peimyoo, Namphung; Zou, Chenji; Chen, Yu; Wang, Yanlong; Cong, Chunxiao; Huang, Wei; Yu, Ting

    2016-03-01

    Owing to direct band gap and strong spin-orbit coupling, monolayer transition-metal dichalcogenides (TMDs) exhibit rich new physics and great applicable potentials. The remarkable valley contrast and light emission promise such two-dimensional (2D) semiconductors a bright future of valleytronics and light-emitting diodes (LEDs). Though the electroluminescence (EL) has been observed in mechanically exfoliated small flakes of TMDs, considering real applications, a strategy that could offer mass-product and high compatibility is greatly demanded. Large-area and high-quality samples prepared by chemical vapor deposition (CVD) are perfect candidates toward such goal. Here, we report the first demonstration of electrically tunable chiral EL from CVD-grown monolayer WS2 by constructing a p-i-n heterojunction. The chirality contrast of the overall EL reaches as high as 81% and can be effectively modulated by forward current. The success of fabricating valley LEDs based on CVD WS2 opens up many opportunities for developing large-scale production of unconventional 2D optoelectronic devices. PMID:26854533

  19. Diode-pumped laser research

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ramos-Izquierdo, L.; Bufton, J. L.; Chan, K.

    1988-01-01

    The Laboratory for Oceans is currently working on the development of compact laser diode array (LD) pumped Nd:YAG lasers for use in space-based altimetry and ranging. Laser diode-array pumping technology promises to increase the electrical to optical efficiency of solid state lasers by an order of magnitude with a lifetime increase of nearly three orders of magnitude relative to today's conventional flashlamp-pumped laser systems. The small size, efficiency, and ruggedness make LD-pumped solid state lasers ideal for space based applications. In an in-house RTOP effort, a novel multiple-pass LD-pumped Nd:YAG laser amplifier was designed and tested to increase the 100 microjoule output pulse energy of the Lightwave laser oscillator. Preliminary results have yielded a round trip amplifier gain of about 15 percent using 7 microjoule LD-pump energy. As a parallel activity, funding was recently obtained to investigate the possible use of custom made fiber optic arrays to obtain an efficient optical coupling mechanism between the emitting laser diode-arrays and the target solid state laser material. Fiber optic coupling arrays would allow for the easy manipulation of the spatial emitting pattern of the diode pump sources to match either an end or side pumping laser configuration.

  20. Characterization of Stock Blu-ray diodes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cunningham, Mark; Archibald, James; Erickson, Christopher; Durfee, Dallin

    2010-10-01

    I am developing a process to test and characterize diodes of unknown wavelengths. using a B&WTEK Spectrometer we are characterizing the wavelength of 405 nm blu-ray diodes purchased in bulk. With the known error in production of the Diode Lasers we are hoping to find a diode at 408 nm to use in driving a raman transition between hyperfine states of strontium 87 ions. The bulk of the project is a java program that communicates with the spectrometer and graphically displays the intensities of the wavelengths from the laser diodes.

  1. Varactor-diode modulator yields conversion gain

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Breitkopf, K.

    1980-05-01

    It is shown that varactor diodes used as modulator elements can make a balanced diode mixer yield conversion gain when employed in an upconverter. Replacing the normal mixer diodes with varactor diodes and inserting the IF and LO voltages at a level that drives the diodes into their nonlinear voltage-capacitance region produces a parametric amplifying effect. This modification results in conversion gain rather than loss, and brings the desired output power up to the 0.1-1.0 W level. The use of this technique in a lower-sideband UHF TV upconverter is considered.

  2. Polymer/metal interfaces and the performance of polymer light-emitting diodes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bharathan, Jayesh M.; Yang, Yang

    1998-09-01

    Conjugated polymers are often treated as semiconductors with low doping concentrations. Unlike the traditional semiconductors which have a high density of surface states (mainly due to the dangling bonds), the nature of the metal/polymer interface, including barrier height and charge injection efficiency, is quite sensitive to the work function of the contact metal. In this article, we present evidence to show that the pinning of the surface Fermi level effect commonly observed at the silicon/metal interface can also be observed at the metal/polymer interface. It is achieved by controlling the doping level at the metal/polymer [poly(2-methoxy-5(2'-ethyl-hexyloxy)-1,4-phenylene vinylene) or MEH-PPV] interface. ITO/MEH-PPV/Al devices doped with 2 Å of calcium on the cathode side of the interfacial layer have the same device performance as the ITO/MEH-PPV/Ca devices. The heavily n-doped region pins the surface energy level, hence the polymer interface at the cathode side is no longer sensitive to the work function of the overcoated metal. It is believed that either the midgap bipolaron energy states created by the dopants or the sharp band bending at the interface is responsible for facilitating the electron injection. On the other hand, a p-doped region at the anode side, obtained by using a thin layer of an acid at the interface, pins the surface energy level and makes the contact insensitive to the work function of the anode. Therefore, an efficient polymer light-emitting diode with the p-i-n structure has been demonstrated without the matching of the work function of the metal electrodes.

  3. Megahertz organic/polymer diodes

    DOEpatents

    Katz, Howard Edan; Sun, Jia; Pal, Nath Bhola

    2012-12-11

    Featured is an organic/polymer diode having a first layer composed essentially of one of an organic semiconductor material or a polymeric semiconductor material and a second layer formed on the first layer and being electrically coupled to the first layer such that current flows through the layers in one direction when a voltage is applied in one direction. The second layer is essentially composed of a material whose characteristics and properties are such that when formed on the first layer, the diode is capable of high frequency rectifications on the order of megahertz rectifications such as for example rectifications at one of above 100KHz, 500KhZ, IMHz, or 10 MHz. In further embodiments, the layers are arranged so as to be exposed to atmosphere.

  4. Quantum Noise in Laser Diodes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Giacobino, E.; Marin, F.; Bramati, A.; Jost, V.; Poizat, J. Ph.; Roch, J.-F.; Grangier, P.; Zhang, T.-C.

    1996-01-01

    We have investigated the intensity noise of single mode laser diodes, either free-running or using different types of line narrowing techniques at room temperature. We have measured an intensity squeezing of 1.2 dB with grating-extended cavity lasers and 1.4 dB with injection locked lasers (respectively 1.6 dB and 2.3 dB inferred at the laser output). We have observed that the intensity noise of a free-running nominally single mode laser diode results from a cancellation effect between large anti-correlated fluctuations of the main mode and of weak longitudinal side modes. Reducing the side modes by line narrowing techniques results in intensity squeezing.

  5. Electromagnetically controlled multiferroic thermal diode

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chotorlishvili, L.; Etesami, S. R.; Berakdar, J.; Khomeriki, R.; Ren, Jie

    2015-10-01

    We propose an electromagnetically tunable thermal diode based on a two-phase multiferroic composite. Analytical and full numerical calculations for a prototypical heterojunction composed of iron on barium titanate in the tetragonal phase demonstrate a strong heat rectification effect that can be controlled externally by a moderate electric field. This finding is important for thermally based information processing and sensing and can also be integrated in (spin) electronic circuits for heat management and recycling.

  6. X-ray Diode Preparation

    SciTech Connect

    Henderson, D J; Good, D E; Hogge, K W; Molina, I; Howe, R A; Lutz, S S; Flores, P A; McGillivray, K D; Skarda, W M; Nelson, D S; Ormond, E S; Cordova, S R

    2011-06-16

    A rod pinch x-ray diode assembly culminates in a coaxial anode cathode arrangement where a small anode rod extends through the aperture of a cathode plate. Shotto- shot repeatability in rod placement, and thus x-ray source spot position, has potential to positively affect radiographic image quality. Thus, how to both control and measure, according to a Cartesian coordinate system, anode rod tip displacement (x, y) (off the beam line-of-sight retical) and also anode rod tip extension (z) (along the line-of-sight center line) become salient issues relative to radiographic image set utility. To address these issues both hardware fabrication and x-ray diode assembly methods were reviewed, and additional controls were introduced. A photogrammetric procedure was developed to quantify anode rod tip position in situ. Computer models and mock-up assemblies with precision fiducials were produced to validate this procedure. Therefore, both anode rod tip displacement and anode rod tip extension parameters were successfully controlled. Rod position was measured and met the required specifications: (1) radial displacement <0.25 mm and (2) axial placement of ±0.25 mm. We demonstrated that precision control and measurement of large scale components is achievable in a pulse power system (i.e., hardware and operations). Correlations with diode performance and radiography are presented.

  7. A single-molecule diode

    PubMed Central

    Elbing, Mark; Ochs, Rolf; Koentopp, Max; Fischer, Matthias; von Hänisch, Carsten; Weigend, Florian; Evers, Ferdinand; Weber, Heiko B.; Mayor, Marcel

    2005-01-01

    We have designed and synthesized a molecular rod that consists of two weakly coupled electronic π -systems with mutually shifted energy levels. The asymmetry thus implied manifests itself in a current–voltage characteristic with pronounced dependence on the sign of the bias voltage, which makes the molecule a prototype for a molecular diode. The individual molecules were immobilized by sulfur–gold bonds between both electrodes of a mechanically controlled break junction, and their electronic transport properties have been investigated. The results indeed show diode-like current–voltage characteristics. In contrast to that, control experiments with symmetric molecular rods consisting of two identical π -systems did not show significant asymmetries in the transport properties. To investigate the underlying transport mechanism, phenomenological arguments are combined with calculations based on density functional theory. The theoretical analysis suggests that the bias dependence of the polarizability of the molecule feeds back into the current leading to an asymmetric shape of the current–voltage characteristics, similar to the phenomena in a semiconductor diode. PMID:15956208

  8. Thermic diode performance characteristics and design manual

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bernard, D. E.; Buckley, S.

    1979-01-01

    Thermic diode solar panels are a passive method of space and hot water heating using the thermosyphon principle. Simplified methods of sizing and performing economic analyses of solar heating systems had until now been limited to passive systems. A mathematical model of the thermic diode including its high level of stratification has been constructed allowing its performance characteristics to be studied. Further analysis resulted in a thermic diode design manual based on the f-chart method.

  9. Schlieren with a laser diode source

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Burner, A. W.; Franke, J. M.

    1981-01-01

    The use of a laser diode as a light source for a schlieren system designed to study phase objects such as a wind-tunnel flow is explored. A laser diode schlieren photograph and a white light schlieren photograph (zirconium arc source) are presented for comparison. The laser diode has increased sensitivity, compared with light schlieren, without appreciable image degradiation, and is an acceptable source for schlieren flow visualization.

  10. Thermal (Silicon Diode) Data Acquisition Systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wright, Ernest; Kegley, Jeff

    2008-01-01

    Marshall Space Flight Center s X-ray Cryogenic Facility (XRCF) has been performing cryogenic testing to 20 Kelvin since 1999. Two configurations for acquiring data from silicon diode temperature sensors have been implemented at the facility. The facility's environment is recorded via a data acquisition system capable of reading up to 60 silicon diodes. Test article temperature is recorded by a second data acquisition system capable of reading 150+ silicon diodes. The specifications and architecture of both systems will be presented.

  11. Thermal (Silicon Diode) Data Acquisition System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kegley, Jeffrey

    2008-01-01

    Marshall Space Flight Center's X-ray Calibration Facility (XRCF) has been performing cryogenic testing to 20 Kelvin since 1999. Two configurations for acquiring data from silicon diode temperature sensors have been implemented at the facility. The facility's environment is recorded via a data acquisition system capable of reading up to 60 silicon diodes. Test article temperature is recorded by a second data acquisition system capable of reading 150+ silicon diodes. The specifications and architecture of both systems will be presented.

  12. Physics and applications of laser diode chaos

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sciamanna, M.; Shore, K. A.

    2015-03-01

    This Review Article provides an overview of chaos in laser diodes by surveying experimental achievements in the area and explaining the theory behind the phenomenon. The fundamental physics underpinning laser diode chaos and also the opportunities for harnessing it for potential applications are discussed. The availability and ease of operation of laser diodes, in a wide range of configurations, make them a convenient testbed for exploring basic aspects of nonlinear and chaotic dynamics. It also makes them attractive for practical tasks, such as chaos-based secure communications and random number generation. Avenues for future research and development of chaotic laser diodes are also identified.

  13. Effects of radiation on laser diodes.

    SciTech Connect

    Phifer, Carol Celeste

    2004-09-01

    The effects of ionizing and neutron radiation on the characteristics and performance of laser diodes are reviewed, and the formation mechanisms for nonradiative recombination centers, the primary type of radiation damage in laser diodes, are discussed. Additional topics include the detrimental effects of aluminum in the active (lasing) volume, the transient effects of high-dose-rate pulses of ionizing radiation, and a summary of ways to improve the radiation hardness of laser diodes. Radiation effects on laser diodes emitting in the wavelength region around 808 nm are emphasized.

  14. Grating rhomb diode laser power combiner

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Minott, Peter O.; Abshire, James B.

    1987-01-01

    A compact device for spectrally combining many laser-diode beams into a single multi-wavelength beam has been developed for use in NASA's intersatellite communications programs. The prototype device combines seven 30 milliwatt beams into a single beam with 70 percent efficiency producing an output of approximately 150 milliwatts. All beams are coaxial and can be collimated with a single transmitter optical system. The combining technique is relatively insensitive to drifts in the laser-diode wavelength and provides both increased power output and laser-diode source redundancy. Combination of more than 100 laser-diodes producing an output greater than 5 watts appears feasible with this technique.

  15. Self-Injection Locking Of Diode Lasers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hemmati, H.

    1991-01-01

    Simple optical coupling scheme locks array of gain-guided diode lasers into oscillation in single mode and with single-lobed output beam. Selective feedback from thin etalon self-injection-locks array into desired mode. One application of new scheme for pumping of neodymium: yttrium aluminum garnet lasers with diode-laser arrays.

  16. Semiconductor diode with external field modulation

    DOEpatents

    Nasby, Robert D.

    2000-01-01

    A non-destructive-readout nonvolatile semiconductor diode switching device that may be used as a memory element is disclosed. The diode switching device is formed with a ferroelectric material disposed above a rectifying junction to control the conduction characteristics therein by means of a remanent polarization. The invention may be used for the formation of integrated circuit memories for the storage of information.

  17. Demonstrating the Light-Emitting Diode.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Johnson, David A.

    1995-01-01

    Describes a simple inexpensive circuit which can be used to quickly demonstrate the basic function and versatility of the solid state diode. Can be used to demonstrate the light-emitting diode (LED) as a light emitter, temperature sensor, light detector with both a linear and logarithmic response, and charge storage device. (JRH)

  18. Laser diode package with enhanced cooling

    DOEpatents

    Deri, Robert J.; Kotovsky, Jack; Spadaccini, Christopher M.

    2012-06-12

    A laser diode package assembly includes a reservoir filled with a fusible metal in close proximity to a laser diode. The fusible metal absorbs heat from the laser diode and undergoes a phase change from solid to liquid during the operation of the laser. The metal absorbs heat during the phase transition. Once the laser diode is turned off, the liquid metal cools off and resolidifies. The reservoir is designed such that that the liquid metal does not leave the reservoir even when in liquid state. The laser diode assembly further includes a lid with one or more fin structures that extend into the reservoir and are in contact with the metal in the reservoir.

  19. Laser diode package with enhanced cooling

    DOEpatents

    Deri, Robert J.; Kotovsky, Jack; Spadaccini, Christopher M.

    2012-06-26

    A laser diode package assembly includes a reservoir filled with a fusible metal in close proximity to a laser diode. The fusible metal absorbs heat from the laser diode and undergoes a phase change from solid to liquid during the operation of the laser. The metal absorbs heat during the phase transition. Once the laser diode is turned off, the liquid metal cools off and resolidifies. The reservoir is designed such that that the liquid metal does not leave the reservoir even when in liquid state. The laser diode assembly further includes a lid with one or more fin structures that extend into the reservoir and are in contact with the metal in the reservoir.

  20. Laser diode package with enhanced cooling

    DOEpatents

    Deri, Robert J.; Kotovsky, Jack; Spadaccini, Christopher M.

    2011-09-13

    A laser diode package assembly includes a reservoir filled with a fusible metal in close proximity to a laser diode. The fusible metal absorbs heat from the laser diode and undergoes a phase change from solid to liquid during the operation of the laser. The metal absorbs heat during the phase transition. Once the laser diode is turned off, the liquid metal cools off and resolidifies. The reservoir is designed such that that the liquid metal does not leave the reservoir even when in liquid state. The laser diode assembly further includes a lid with one or more fin structures that extend into the reservoir and are in contact with the metal in the reservoir.

  1. Very high brightness diode laser

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Heinemann, Stefan; Lewis, Ben; Michaelis, Karsten; Schmidt, Torsten

    2012-03-01

    Multiple Single Emitter (MSE) modules allow highest power and highest brightness diode lasers based on standard broad area diodes. 12 single emitters, each rated at 11 W, are stacked in fast axis and with polarization multiplexing 200W are achieved in a fully collimated beam with a beam quality of 7mm*mrad in both axes. Volume Bragg Gratings (VBG) stabilize the wavelength and narrow the linewidth to less than 2nm. Dichroic mirrors are used for dense wavelength multiplexing of 4 channels within 12 nm. 400W are measured from a 0.2 mm fiber, 0.1 NA. Control and drive electronics are integrated into the 200 W platform and represent a basic building block for a variety of applications, such as a flexible turn key system comprising 12 MSE modules. An integrated beam switch directs the light in six 100 μm, or in one 0.2 mm and one 0.1 mm fiber. 800W are measured from the six 0.1 mm fibers and 700W from the 0.2 mm fiber. The technologies can be transferred to other wavelengths to include 793 nm and 1530 nm. Narrow line gratings and optimized spectral combining enable further improvements in spectral brightness and power.

  2. Hermetic diode laser transmitter module

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ollila, Jyrki; Kautio, Kari; Vahakangas, Jouko; Hannula, Tapio; Kopola, Harri K.; Oikarinen, Jorma; Sivonen, Matti

    1999-04-01

    In very demanding optoelectronic sensor applications it is necessary to encapsulate semiconductor components hermetically in metal housings to ensure reliable operation of the sensor. In this paper we report on the development work to package a laser diode transmitter module for a time- off-light distance sensor application. The module consists of a lens, laser diode, electronic circuit and optomechanics. Specifications include high acceleration, -40....+75 degree(s)C temperature range, very low gas leakage and mass-production capability. We have applied solder glasses for sealing optical lenses and electrical leads hermetically into a metal case. The lens-metal case sealing has been made by using a special soldering glass preform preserving the optical quality of the lens. The metal housings are finally sealed in an inert atmosphere by welding. The assembly concept to retain excellent optical power and tight optical axis alignment specifications is described. The reliability of the laser modules manufactured has been extensively tested using different aging and environmental test procedures. Sealed packages achieve MIL- 883 standard requirements for gas leakage.

  3. Broadband light-emitting diode

    DOEpatents

    Fritz, I.J.; Klem, J.F.; Hafich, M.J.

    1998-07-14

    A broadband light-emitting diode is disclosed. The broadband light-emitting diode (LED) comprises a plurality of III-V compound semiconductor layers grown on a semiconductor substrate, with the semiconductor layers including a pair of cladding layers sandwiched about a strained-quantum-well active region having a plurality of different energy bandgaps for generating light in a wavelength range of about 1.3--2 {micro}m. In one embodiment of the present invention, the active region may comprise a first-grown quantum-well layer and a last-grown quantum-well layer that are oppositely strained; whereas in another embodiment of the invention, the active region is formed from a short-period superlattice structure (i.e. a pseudo alloy) comprising alternating thin layers of InGaAs and InGaAlAs. The use a short-period superlattice structure for the active region allows different layers within the active region to be simply and accurately grown by repetitively opening and closing one or more shutters in an MBE growth apparatus to repetitively switch between different growth states therein. The broadband LED may be formed as either a surface-emitting LED or as an edge-emitting LED for use in applications such as chemical sensing, fiber optic gyroscopes, wavelength-divisionmultiplexed (WDM) fiber-optic data links, and WDM fiber-optic sensor networks for automobiles and aircraft. 10 figs.

  4. Broadband light-emitting diode

    DOEpatents

    Fritz, Ian J.; Klem, John F.; Hafich, Michael J.

    1998-01-01

    A broadband light-emitting diode. The broadband light-emitting diode (LED) comprises a plurality of III-V compound semiconductor layers grown on a semiconductor substrate, with the semiconductor layers including a pair of cladding layers sandwiched about a strained-quantum-well active region having a plurality of different energy bandgaps for generating light in a wavelength range of about 1.3-2 .mu.m. In one embodiment of the present invention, the active region may comprise a first-grown quantum-well layer and a last-grown quantum-well layer that are oppositely strained; whereas in another embodiment of the invention, the active region is formed from a short-period superlattice structure (i.e. a pseudo alloy) comprising alternating thin layers of InGaAs and InGaAlAs. The use a short-period superlattice structure for the active region allows different layers within the active region to be simply and accurately grown by repetitively opening and closing one or more shutters in an MBE growth apparatus to repetitively switch between different growth states therein. The broadband LED may be formed as either a surface-emitting LED or as an edge-emitting LED for use in applications such as chemical sensing, fiber optic gyroscopes, wavelength-division-multiplexed (WDM) fiber-optic data links, and WDM fiber-optic sensor networks for automobiles and aircraft.

  5. Sixty GHz IMPATT diode development

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ma, Y. E.; Chen, J.; Benko, E.; Barger, M. J.; Nghiem, H.; Trinh, T. Q.; Kung, J.

    1985-01-01

    The objective of this program is to develop 60 GHz GaAs IMPATT Diodes suitable for communications applications. The performance goal of the 60 GHz IMPATT is 1W CW output power with a conversion efficiency of 15 percent and 10 year life time. During the course of the program, double drift (DD) GaAs IMPATT Diodes have been developed resulting in the state of the art performance at V band frequencies. A CW output power of 1.12 W was demonstrated at 51.9 GHz with 9.7 percent efficiency. The best conversion efficiency achieved was 15.3 percent. V band DD GaAs IMPATTs were developed using both small signal and large signal analyses. GaAs wafers of DD flat, DD hybrid, and DD Read profiles using molecular beam epitaxy (MBE) were developed with excellent doping profile control. Wafer evaluation was routinely made by the capacitance versus voltage (C-V) measurement. Ion mass spectrometry (SIMS) analysis was also used for more detailed profile evaluation.

  6. Warm-white light-emitting diode with high color rendering index fabricated by combining trichromatic InGaN emitter with single red phosphor.

    PubMed

    Sheu, Jinn-Kong; Chen, Fu-Bang; Wang, Yen-Chin; Chang, Chih-Chiang; Huang, Shih-Hsien; Liu, Chun-Nan; Lee, Ming-Lun

    2015-04-01

    We present a trichromatic GaN-based light-emitting diode (LED) that emits near-ultraviolet (n-UV) blue and green peaks combined with red phosphor to generate white light with a low correlated color temperature (CCT) and high color rendering index (CRI). The LED structure, blue and green unipolar InGaN/GaN multiple quantum wells (MQWs) stacked with a top p-i-n structure containing an InGaN/GaN MQW emitting n-UV light, was grown epitaxially on a single substrate. The trichromatic LED chips feature a vertical conduction structure on a silicon substrate fabricated through wafer bonding and laser lift-off techniques. The blue and green InGaN/GaN MQWs were pumped with n-UV light to re-emit low-energy photons when the LEDs were electrically driven with a forward current. The emission spectrum included three peaks at approximately 405, 468, and 537 nm. Furthermore, the trichromatic LED chips were combined with red phosphor to generate white light with a CCT and CRI of approximately 2900 and 92, respectively. PMID:25968789

  7. A physical model for the reverse leakage current in (In,Ga)N/GaN light-emitting diodes based on nanowires

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Musolino, M.; van Treeck, D.; Tahraoui, A.; Scarparo, L.; De Santi, C.; Meneghini, M.; Zanoni, E.; Geelhaar, L.; Riechert, H.

    2016-01-01

    We investigated the origin of the high reverse leakage current in light emitting diodes (LEDs) based on (In,Ga)N/GaN nanowire (NW) ensembles grown by molecular beam epitaxy on Si substrates. To this end, capacitance deep level transient spectroscopy (DLTS) and temperature-dependent current-voltage (I-V) measurements were performed on a fully processed NW-LED. The DLTS measurements reveal the presence of two distinct electron traps with high concentrations in the depletion region of the p-i-n junction. These band gap states are located at energies of 570 ± 20 and 840 ± 30 meV below the conduction band minimum. The physical origin of these deep level states is discussed. The temperature-dependent I-V characteristics, acquired between 83 and 403 K, show that different conduction mechanisms cause the observed leakage current. On the basis of all these results, we developed a quantitative physical model for charge transport in the reverse bias regime. By taking into account the mutual interaction of variable range hopping and electron emission from Coulombic trap states, with the latter being described by phonon-assisted tunnelling and the Poole-Frenkel effect, we can model the experimental I-V curves in the entire range of temperatures with a consistent set of parameters. Our model should be applicable to planar GaN-based LEDs as well. Furthermore, possible approaches to decrease the leakage current in NW-LEDs are proposed.

  8. Enhanced emission from mid-infrared AlInSb light-emitting diodes with p-type contact grid geometry

    SciTech Connect

    Meriggi, Laura Ding, Ying; Thayne, Iain G.; Sorel, Marc; Steer, Matthew J.; MacGregor, Calum; Ironside, Charles N.

    2015-02-14

    We report on the impact of lateral current spreading on light emission from aluminium indium antimonide (AlInSb) mid-infrared p-i-n light-emitting diodes (LEDs) grown by molecular beam epitaxy on a GaAs substrate. Due to the high effective mass of holes in Al{sub x}In{sub 1−x}Sb, the resistivity of p-type material determines the 3-D distribution of current flow in the devices. This work shows that maximum light emission, as measured by electroluminescence, and 3-times wall-plug efficiency improvement were obtained at room temperature from devices with a p-type contact grid geometry with a spacing of twice the current spreading length in the p-type material, which was measured by spatially resolved photocurrent. The LED with the optimal contact geometry exhibits improved performance at high injection current levels thanks to the more uniform carrier distribution across the device area.

  9. Diode lasers: From laboratory to industry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nasim, Hira; Jamil, Yasir

    2014-03-01

    The invention of first laser in 1960 triggered the discovery of several new families of lasers. A rich interplay of different lasing materials resulted in a far better understanding of the phenomena particularly linked with atomic and molecular spectroscopy. Diode lasers have gone through tremendous developments on the forefront of applied physics that have shown novel ways to the researchers. Some interesting attributes of the diode lasers like cost effectiveness, miniature size, high reliability and relative simplicity of use make them good candidates for utilization in various practical applications. Diode lasers are being used by a variety of professionals and in several spectroscopic techniques covering many areas of pure and applied sciences. Diode lasers have revolutionized many fields like optical communication industry, medical science, trace gas monitoring, studies related to biology, analytical chemistry including elemental analysis, war fare studies etc. In this paper the diode laser based technologies and measurement techniques ranging from laboratory research to automated field and industry have been reviewed. The application specific developments of diode lasers and various methods of their utilization particularly during the last decade are discussed comprehensively. A detailed snapshot of the current state of the art diode laser applications is given along with a detailed discussion on the upcoming challenges.

  10. Checker Takes the Guesswork out of Diode Identification

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Harman, Charles

    2011-01-01

    At technical colleges and secondary-level tech schools, students enrolled in basic electronics labs who have learned about diodes that do rectification are used to seeing power diodes like the 1N4001. When the students are introduced to low-power zener diodes and signal diodes, component identification gets more complex. If the small zeners are…

  11. Ion Diode Experiments on PBFA-X

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lockner, Thomas

    1996-05-01

    The PBFA-II pulsed power accelerator at Sandia National Laboratories has been modified to replace the radially focusing ion diode with an extraction ion diode. In the extraction diode mode (PBFA X) the ion beam is generated on the surface of an annular disk and extracted along the cylindrical axis. An additional magnetically insulated transmission line (MITL) has been installed to transmit power from the center to the bottom of the accelerator, where it drives a magnetically insulated extraction ion diode. The modification increases access to the diode and the diagnostics, permitting a higher shot rate, and allows us to study extraction diode technology at a power level near what is required for a high yield facility. The modification also includes reversing the polarity of the top half of the accelerator to permit operation at twice the previous source voltage. In the new configuration the diode could operate at 15 MV and 0.8 MA. This operating point is near the 30 MV, 1.0 MA operating point envisioned for one module of a high yield facility, and will allow the study of intense extraction ion diodes at power levels relevant to such a facility. Experimental results will be presented including MITL coupling studies, beam current density control, discharge cleaning of diode surfaces to reduce the presence of contaminant ions in the source beam, and the effect of anode substrate materials on the purity of the lithium beam. A comparison between predicted and measured radial beam profiles will also be presented, with the predicted profiles obtained from the ATHETA code that solves magnetostatics problems in two dimensions. This work was supported by the US/DOE under contract No. DE-AC04-94AL85000. +In collaboration with R. S. Coats, M. E. Cuneo, M. P. Desjarlias, D. J. Johnson, T. A. Mehlhorn, C. W. Mendel, Jr., P. Menge#, and W. J. Poukey,

  12. A Portable Diode Array Spectrophotometer.

    PubMed

    Stephenson, David

    2016-05-01

    A cheap portable visible light spectrometer is presented. The spectrometer uses readily sourced items and could be constructed by anyone with a knowledge of electronics. The spectrometer covers the wavelength range 450-725 nm with a resolution better than 5 nm. The spectrometer uses a diffraction grating to separate wavelengths, which are detected using a 128-element diode array, the output of which is analyzed using a microprocessor. The spectrum is displayed on a small liquid crystal display screen and can be saved to a micro SD card for later analysis. Battery life (2 × AAA) is estimated to be 200 hours. The overall dimensions of the unit are 120 × 65 × 60 mm, and it weighs about 200 g. PMID:27036399

  13. Quantum Dot Light Emitting Diode

    SciTech Connect

    Keith Kahen

    2008-07-31

    The project objective is to create low cost coatable inorganic light emitting diodes, composed of quantum dot emitters and inorganic nanoparticles, which have the potential for efficiencies equivalent to that of LEDs and OLEDs and lifetime, brightness, and environmental stability between that of LEDs and OLEDs. At the end of the project the Recipient shall gain an understanding of the device physics and properties of Quantum-Dot LEDs (QD-LEDs), have reliable and accurate nanocrystal synthesis routines, and have formed green-yellow emitting QD-LEDs with a device efficiency greater than 3 lumens/W, a brightness greater than 400 cd/m2, and a device operational lifetime of more than 1000 hours. Thus the aim of the project is to break the current cost-efficiency paradigm by creating novel low cost inorganic LEDs composed of inorganic nanoparticles.

  14. Quantum Dot Light Emitting Diode

    SciTech Connect

    Kahen, Keith

    2008-07-31

    The project objective is to create low cost coatable inorganic light emitting diodes, composed of quantum dot emitters and inorganic nanoparticles, which have the potential for efficiencies equivalent to that of LEDs and OLEDs and lifetime, brightness, and environmental stability between that of LEDs and OLEDs. At the end of the project the Recipient shall gain an understanding of the device physics and properties of Quantum-Dot LEDs (QD-LEDs), have reliable and accurate nanocrystal synthesis routines, and have formed green-yellow emitting QD-LEDs with a device efficiency greater than 3 lumens/W, a brightness greater than 400 cd/m{sup 2}, and a device operational lifetime of more than 1000 hours. Thus the aim of the project is to break the current cost-efficiency paradigm by creating novel low cost inorganic LEDs composed of inorganic nanoparticles.

  15. Bilayer avalanche spin-diode logic

    SciTech Connect

    Friedman, Joseph S. Querlioz, Damien; Fadel, Eric R.; Wessels, Bruce W.; Sahakian, Alan V.

    2015-11-15

    A novel spintronic computing paradigm is proposed and analyzed in which InSb p-n bilayer avalanche spin-diodes are cascaded to efficiently perform complex logic operations. This spin-diode logic family uses control wires to generate magnetic fields that modulate the resistance of the spin-diodes, and currents through these devices control the resistance of cascaded devices. Electromagnetic simulations are performed to demonstrate the cascading mechanism, and guidelines are provided for the development of this innovative computing technology. This cascading scheme permits compact logic circuits with switching speeds determined by electromagnetic wave propagation rather than electron motion, enabling high-performance spintronic computing.

  16. Bilayer avalanche spin-diode logic

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Friedman, Joseph S.; Fadel, Eric R.; Wessels, Bruce W.; Querlioz, Damien; Sahakian, Alan V.

    2015-11-01

    A novel spintronic computing paradigm is proposed and analyzed in which InSb p-n bilayer avalanche spin-diodes are cascaded to efficiently perform complex logic operations. This spin-diode logic family uses control wires to generate magnetic fields that modulate the resistance of the spin-diodes, and currents through these devices control the resistance of cascaded devices. Electromagnetic simulations are performed to demonstrate the cascading mechanism, and guidelines are provided for the development of this innovative computing technology. This cascading scheme permits compact logic circuits with switching speeds determined by electromagnetic wave propagation rather than electron motion, enabling high-performance spintronic computing.

  17. Diode-pumped CW molecular lasers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wellegehausen, B.; Luhs, W.

    2016-05-01

    First continuous laser oscillation on many lines in the range of 533-635 nm on different transitions of Na2 and Te2 molecules has been obtained, optically pumped with common cw blue emitting InGaN diode lasers operating around 445 and 460 nm. Spectral narrowing of the diode laser is achieved with a beamsplitter and grating setup, allowing use of more than 50 % of the diode power. Operation conditions and properties of the laser systems are presented, and perspectives for the realization of compact low cost molecular lasers are discussed.

  18. Improved Thermoelectrically Cooled Laser-Diode Assemblies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Glesne, Thomas R.; Schwemmer, Geary K.; Famiglietti, Joe

    1994-01-01

    Cooling decreases wavelength and increases efficiency and lifetime. Two improved thermoelectrically cooled laser-diode assemblies incorporate commercial laser diodes providing combination of both high wavelength stability and broad wavelength tuning which are broadly tunable, highly stable devices for injection seeding of pulsed, high-power tunable alexandrite lasers used in lidar remote sensing of water vapor at wavelengths in vicinity of 727 nanometers. Provide temperature control needed to take advantage of tunability of commercial AlGaAs laser diodes in present injection-seeding application.

  19. Spectral line-diode registry effects with photodiode array detectors

    SciTech Connect

    Winge, R.K.; Fassel, V.A.; Eckels, D.E.

    1986-05-01

    A limitation of photodiode array detectors for spectroscopic intensity measurements relates to the spacing of the diodes and the errors generated when a spectral line is not in exact registry with the diode or diodes from which its intensity is being measured. These misregistry intensity errors, which may be as high as 25 to 30%, are documented for a range of spectral bandwidths and for single diode (pixel) intensities and multiple diode summations of intensities.

  20. Arbitrary waveform generator to improve laser diode driver performance

    SciTech Connect

    Fulkerson, Jr, Edward Steven

    2015-11-03

    An arbitrary waveform generator modifies the input signal to a laser diode driver circuit in order to reduce the overshoot/undershoot and provide a "flat-top" signal to the laser diode driver circuit. The input signal is modified based on the original received signal and the feedback from the laser diode by measuring the actual current flowing in the laser diode after the original signal is applied to the laser diode.

  1. Performance of the cold powered diodes and diode leads in the main magnets of the LHC

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Willering, G. P.; Giloux, C.; Bajko, M.; Bednarek, M.; Bottura, L.; Charifoulline, Z.; Dahlerup-Petersen, K.; Dib, G.; D'Angelo, G.; Gharib, A.; Grand-Clement, L.; Izquierdo Bermudez, S.; Prin, H.; Roger, V.; Rowan, S.; Savary, F.; Tock, J.-Ph; Verweij, A.

    2015-12-01

    During quench tests in 2011 variations in resistance of an order of magnitude were found in the diode by-pass circuit of the main LHC magnets. An investigation campaign was started to understand the source, the occurrence and the impact of the high resistances. Many tests were performed offline in the SM18 test facility with a focus on the contact resistance of the diode to heat sink contact and the diode wafer temperature. In 2014 the performance of the diodes and diode leads of the main dipole bypass systems in the LHC was assessed during a high current qualification test. In the test a current cycle similar to a magnet circuit discharge from 11 kA with a time constant of 100 s was performed. Resistances of up to 600 μΩ have been found in the diode leads at intermediate current, but in general the high resistances decrease at higher current levels and no sign of overheating of diodes has been seen and the bypass circuit passed the test. In this report the performance of the diodes and in particular the contact resistances in the diode leads are analysed with available data acquired over more than 10 years from acceptance test until the main dipole training campaign in the LHC in 2015.

  2. Analysis of phased-array diode lasers

    SciTech Connect

    Hardy, A.; Streifer, W.

    1985-07-01

    An improved, more accurate analysis of phased-array diode lasers is presented, which yields results that differ both qualitatively and quantitatively from those previously employed. A numerical example indicating decreased splitting in array mode gains is included.

  3. Advanced laser diodes for sensing applications

    SciTech Connect

    VAWTER,GREGORY A.; MAR,ALAN; CHOW,WENG W.; ALLERMAN,ANDREW A.

    2000-01-01

    The authors have developed diode lasers for short pulse duration and high peak pulse power in the 0.01--100.0 m pulsewidth regime. A primary goal of the program was producing up to 10 W while maintaining good far-field beam quality and ease of manufacturability for low cost. High peak power, 17 W, picosecond pulses have been achieved by gain switching of flared geometry waveguide lasers and amplifiers. Such high powers area world record for this type of diode laser. The light emission pattern from diode lasers is of critical importance for sensing systems such as range finding and chemical detection. They have developed a new integrated optical beam transformer producing rib-waveguide diode lasers with a symmetric, low divergence, output beam and increased upper power limits for irreversible facet damage.

  4. Blood sugar monitoring with laser diode

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Xiqin; Chen, Jianhong; Yeo, Joon Hock

    2006-09-01

    In this paper, the non-invasive measurement of blood sugar level was studied by use of near infrared laser diode. The in-vivo experiments were carried out using laser diodes with wavelength 1625nm and 1650nm. Several volunteers were tested before and after drinking glucose solution. We took blood from a fingertip and measured its concentration with a glucose meter while taking signal voltage from laser diode system. The signal voltage was processed by using a computer and blood absorption was obtained. The results show that blood sugar level and blood absorption have similar trends before and after drinking glucose solution. We also compared the trends of drinking glucose solution and pure water and the results show that the difference of blood absorption is obvious. From the results we can see that laser diode is suitable for blood glucose monitoring.

  5. Diode laser (980nm) cartilage reshaping

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    El Kharbotly, A.; El Tayeb, T.; Mostafa, Y.; Hesham, I.

    2011-03-01

    Loss of facial or ear cartilage due to trauma or surgery is a major challenge to the otolaryngologists and plastic surgeons as the complicated geometric contours are difficult to be animated. Diode laser (980 nm) has been proven effective in reshaping and maintaining the new geometric shape achieved by laser. This study focused on determining the optimum laser parameters needed for cartilage reshaping with a controlled water cooling system. Harvested animal cartilages were angulated with different degrees and irradiated with different diode laser powers (980nm, 4x8mm spot size). The cartilage specimens were maintained in a deformation angle for two hours after irradiation then released for another two hours. They were serially measured and photographed. High-power Diode laser irradiation with water cooling is a cheep and effective method for reshaping the cartilage needed for reconstruction of difficult situations in otorhinolaryngologic surgery. Key words: cartilage,diode laser (980nm), reshaping.

  6. Diode Lasers and Practical Trace Analysis.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Imasaka, Totaro; Nobuhiko, Ishibashi

    1990-01-01

    Applications of lasers to molecular absorption spectrometry, molecular fluorescence spectrometry, visible semiconductor fluorometry, atomic absorption spectrometry, and atomic fluorescence spectrometry are discussed. Details of the use of the frequency-doubled diode laser are provided. (CW)

  7. Schottky barrier diode and method thereof

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Aslam, Shahid (Inventor); Franz, David (Inventor)

    2008-01-01

    Pt/n.sup.-GaN Schottky barrier diodes are disclosed that are particularly suited to serve as ultra-violet sensors operating at wavelengths below 200 nm. The Pt/n.sup.-GaN Schottky barrier diodes have very large active areas, up to 1 cm.sup.2, which exhibit extremely low leakage current at low reverse biases. Very large area Pt/n.sup.-GaN Schottky diodes of sizes 0.25 cm.sup.2 and 1 cm.sup.2 have been fabricated from n.sup.-/n.sup.+ GaN epitaxial layers grown by vapor phase epitaxy on single crystal c-plane sapphire, which showed leakage currents of 14 pA and 2.7 nA, respectively for the 0.25 cm.sup.2 and 1 cm.sup.2 diodes both configured at a 0.5V reverse bias.

  8. Varactor diode assembly with low parasitic reactances

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dickens, L. E.

    1975-01-01

    Development of varactor diode assembly overcomes parasitic reactances of conventional varactor packages. In specially constructed assembly very high idler-frequency to signal-frequency ratios are used to obtain low-noise operation over maximum bandwidth.

  9. Impedance characteristics of terawatt ion diodes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mendel, C. W., Jr.; Desjarlais, M. P.; Pointon, T. D.; Quintenz, J. P.; Rosenthal, S. E.; Seidel, D. B.; Slutz, S. A.

    Light ion fusion research has developed ion diodes that have unique properties when compared to other ion diodes. These diodes involve relativistic electrons, ion beam stagnation pressures that compress the magnetic field to the order of 10 Tesla, and large space charge and particle current effects throughout the accelerating region. These diodes have required new theories and models to account for effects that previously were unimportant. One of the most important effects of the magnetic field compression and large space charge has been impedance collapse. The impedance collapse can lead to poor energy transfer efficiency, beam debunching, and rapid change of the beam focus. The current understanding of these effects is discussed including some of the methods used to ameliorate them, and the future directions the theory and modeling will take.

  10. JANTX/N98B Zener diode

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1980-01-01

    Tested diodes were manufactured aby Motorola and Siemens. Both sample lots performed well in groups 1 and 3 testing. Group 2 testing was most detrimental of three groups. Extreme heat was big factor in failure mode.

  11. Photochemistry of Organic Light-Emitting Diodes

    SciTech Connect

    Ehara, Masahiro; Nakatsuji, Hiroshi

    2007-12-26

    The optical properties and excited-state geometries of some organic light-emitting diodes have been investigated by the SAC-CI method. The absorption and emission spectra have been predicted in high accuracy and the chain-length dependence of transition energies has been precisely reproduced. The present study provides the useful basis for the theoretical design predicting the photo-physical properties of the organic light-emitting diodes.

  12. Bypass diode for a solar cell

    SciTech Connect

    Rim, Seung Bum; Kim, Taeseok; Smith, David D.; Cousins, Peter J.

    2012-03-13

    Bypass diodes for solar cells are described. In one embodiment, a bypass diode for a solar cell includes a substrate of the solar cell. A first conductive region is disposed above the substrate, the first conductive region of a first conductivity type. A second conductive region is disposed on the first conductive region, the second conductive region of a second conductivity type opposite the first conductivity type.

  13. Impedance characteristics of multistage ion diodes

    SciTech Connect

    Desjarlais, M.

    1994-09-01

    We further develop a theory of multistage diodes that includes the possibility of emission of ions in the final stage. The exact solutions are extremely cumbersome and are not practical for most applications. We have developed approximate solutions that are very accurate, require no integrations, and may be rapidly calculated using a simple iterative scheme. These solutions for the total current as a function of voltage are used in time-dependent modeling of a two-stage diode.

  14. Varactor diodes for millimeter and submillimeter wavelengths

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rizzi, Brian J.; Hesler, Jeffrey L.; Dossal, Hasan; Crowe, Thomas W.

    1992-01-01

    Whisker-contacted GaAs Schottky barrier varactor diodes are the most common high-frequency multiplier element in use today. They are inherently simple devices that have very high frequency response and have been used to supply local oscillator power for Schottky heterodyne receivers to frequencies approaching 700 GHz. This paper discusses the development of improved varactor diode technology for space based applications at millimeter and submillimeter wavelengths.

  15. Organic Schottky diode: Characterization of traps

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rani, Varsha; Yadav, Sarita; Ghosh, Subhasis

    2015-06-01

    We have demonstrated the formation and characterization of Schottky junction in metal/organic/metal sandwiched devices based on organic molecular semiconductors, using current-voltage (J-V) and capacitance-voltage (C-V) characteristics, in particular how traps affect the device performance. Ideality factor of organic Schottky diode is always greater than unity and increases with decreasing the temperature. Diffusion coefficient has been determined from current density -voltage characteristic in Schottky diodes.

  16. Performance measurements of hybrid PIN diode arrays

    SciTech Connect

    Shapiro, S.L. ); Arens, J.F.; Jernigan, J.G. . Space Sciences Lab.); Kramer, G. ); Collins, T.; Worley, S. ); Wilburn, C.D. ); Skubic, P. )

    1990-10-01

    We report the successful development of hybrid PIN diode arrays and a series of room-temperature measurements in a high-energy pion beam at FNAL. A PMOS VLSI 256 {times} 256 readout array having 30 {mu}m square pixels was indium-bump bonded to a mating PIN diode detector array. Preliminary measurements on the resulting hybrid show excellent signal-to-noise at room temperature. 3 refs., 5 figs.

  17. Phase Noise Reduction of Laser Diode

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zhang, T. C.; Poizat, J.-Ph.; Grelu, P.; Roch, J.-F.; Grangier, P.; Marin, F.; Bramati, A.; Jost, V.; Levenson, M. D.; Giacobino, E.

    1996-01-01

    Phase noise of single mode laser diodes, either free-running or using line narrowing technique at room temperature, namely injection-locking, has been investigated. It is shown that free-running diodes exhibit very large excess phase noise, typically more than 80 dB above shot-noise at 10 MHz, which can be significantly reduced by the above-mentioned technique.

  18. Stacked Switchable Element and Diode Combination

    DOEpatents

    Branz, H. M.; Wang, Q.

    2006-06-27

    A device (10) comprises a semiconductor diode (12) and a switchable element (14) positioned in stacked adjacent relationship so that the semiconductor diode (12) and the switchable element (14) are electrically connected in series with one another. The switchable element (14) is switchable from a low-conductance state to a high-conductance state in response to the application of a forming voltage to the switchable element (14).

  19. Stacked switchable element and diode combination

    DOEpatents

    Branz, Howard M.; Wang, Qi

    2006-06-27

    A device (10) comprises a semiconductor diode (12) and a switchable element (14) positioned in stacked adjacent relationship so that the semiconductor diode (12) and the switchable element (14) are electrically connected in series with one another. The switchable element (14) is switchable from a low-conductance state to a high-conductance state in response to the application of a forming voltage to the switchable element (14).

  20. SOI diode uncooled infrared focal plane arrays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kimata, Masafumi; Ueno, Masashi; Takeda, Munehisa; Seto, Toshiki

    2006-02-01

    An uncooled infrared focal plane array (IR FPA) is a MEMS device that integrates an array of tiny thermal infrared detector pixels. An SOI diode uncooled IR FPA is a type that uses freestanding single-crystal diodes as temperature sensors and has various advantages over the other MEMS-based uncooled IR FPAs. Since the first demonstration of an SOI diode uncooled IR FPA in 1999, the pixel structure has been improved by developing sophisticated MEMS processes. The most advanced pixel has a three-level structure that has an independent metal reflector for interference infrared absorption between the temperature sensor (bottom level) and the infrared-absorbing thin metal film (top level). This structure makes it possible to design pixels with lower thermal conductance by allocating more area for thermal isolation without reducing infrared absorption. The new MEMS process for the three-level structure includes a XeF II dry bulk silicon etching process and a double organic sacrificial layer surface micromachining process. Employing advanced MEMS technology, we have developed a 640 x 480-element SOI diode uncooled IR FPA with 25-μm square pixels. The noise equivalent temperature difference of the FPA is 40 mK with f/1.0 optics. This result clearly demonstrates the great potential of the SOI diode uncooled IR FPA for high-end applications. In this paper, we explain the advances and state-of-the-art technology of the SOI diode uncooled IR FPA.

  1. SiC-Based Schottky Diode Gas Sensors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hunter, Gary W.; Neudeck, Philip G.; Chen, Liang-Yu; Knight, Dak; Liu, Chung-Chiun; Wu, Quing-Hai

    1997-01-01

    Silicon carbide based Schottky diode gas sensors are being developed for high temperature applications such as emission measurements. Two different types of gas sensitive diodes will be discussed in this paper. By varying the structure of the diode, one can affect the diode stability as well as the diode sensitivity to various gases. It is concluded that the ability of SiC to operate as a high temperature semiconductor significantly enhances the versatility of the Schottky diode gas sensing structure and will potentially allow the fabrication of a SiC-based gas sensor arrays for versatile high temperature gas sensing applications.

  2. Percutaneous diode laser disc nucleoplasty

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Menchetti, P. P.; Longo, Leonardo

    2004-09-01

    The treatment of herniated disc disease (HNP) over the years involved different miniinvasive surgical options. The classical microsurgical approach has been substituted over the years both by endoscopic approach in which is possible to practice via endoscopy a laser thermo-discoplasty, both by percutaneous laser disc nucleoplasty. In the last ten years, the percutaneous laser disc nucleoplasty have been done worldwide in more than 40000 cases of HNP. Because water is the major component of the intervertebral disc, and in HNP pain is caused by the disc protrusion pressing against the nerve root, a 980 nm Diode laser introduced via a 22G needle under X-ray guidance and local anesthesia, vaporizes a small amount of nucleous polposus with a disc shrinkage and a relief of pressure on nerve root. Most patients get off the table pain free and are back to work in 5 to 7 days. Material and method: to date, 130 patients (155 cases) suffering for relevant symptoms therapy-resistant 6 months on average before consulting our department, have been treated. Eightyfour (72%) males and 46 (28%) females had a percutaneous laser disc nucleoplasty. The average age of patients operated was 48 years (22 - 69). The level of disc removal was L3/L4 in 12 cases, L4/L5 in 87 cases and L5/S1 in 56 cases. Two different levels were treated at the same time in 25 patients. Results: the success rate at a minimum follow-up of 6 months was 88% with a complication rate of 0.5%.

  3. Diode-pumped laser altimeter

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Welford, D.; Isyanova, Y.

    1993-01-01

    TEM(sub 00)-mode output energies up to 22.5 mJ with 23 percent slope efficiencies were generated at 1.064 microns in a diode-laser pumped Nd:YAG laser using a transverse-pumping geometry. 1.32-micron performance was equally impressive at 10.2 mJ output energy with 15 percent slope efficiency. The same pumping geometry was successfully carried forward to several complex Q-switched laser resonator designs with no noticeable degradation of beam quality. Output beam profiles were consistently shown to have greater than 90 percent correlation with the ideal TEM(sub 00)-order Gaussian profile. A comparison study on pulse-reflection-mode (PRM), pulse-transmission-mode (PTM), and passive Q-switching techniques was undertaken. The PRM Q-switched laser generated 8.3 mJ pulses with durations as short as 10 ns. The PTM Q-switch laser generated 5 mJ pulses with durations as short as 5 ns. The passively Q-switched laser generated 5 mJ pulses with durations as short as 2.4 ns. Frequency doubling of both 1.064 microns and 1.32 microns with conversion efficiencies of 56 percent in lithium triborate and 10 percent in rubidium titanyl arsenate, respectively, was shown. Sum-frequency generation of the 1.064 microns and 1.32 microns radiations was demonstrated in KTP to generate 1.1 mJ of 0.589 micron output with 11.5 percent conversion efficiency.

  4. Efficient millimeter wave 1140 GHz/ diode for harmonic power generation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1967-01-01

    Epitaxial gallium arsenide diode junction formed in a crossed waveguide structure operates as a variable reactance harmonic generator. This varactor diode can generate power efficiently in the low-millimeter wavelength.

  5. Proton displacement damage in light-emitting and laser diodes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Johnston, A. H.

    2000-01-01

    The effects of proton displacement damage on light-emitting diodes and laser diodes are discussed, comparing the radiation sensitivity of current technology devices with older devices for which data exists in the literature.

  6. Diode-quad bridge circuit means

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Harrison, D. R.; Dimeff, J. (Inventor)

    1975-01-01

    Diode-quad bridge circuit means is described for use as a transducer circuit or as a discriminator circuit. It includes: (1) a diode bridge having first, second, third, and fourth bridge terminals consecutively coupled together by four diodes polarized in circulating relationship; (2) a first impedance connected between the second bridge terminal and a circuit ground; (3) a second impedance connected between the fourth bridge terminal and the circuit ground; (4) a signal source having a first source terminal capacitively coupled to the first and third bridge terminals, and a second source terminal connected to the circuit ground; and (5) an output terminal coupled to the first bridge terminal and at which an output signal may be taken.

  7. Comparative efficiency analysis of GaN-based light-emitting diodes and laser diodes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Piprek, Joachim

    2016-07-01

    Nobel laureate Shuji Nakamura predicted in 2014 that GaN-based laser diodes are the future of solid state lighting. However, blue GaN-lasers still exhibit less than 40% wall-plug efficiency, while some GaN-based blue light-emitting diodes exceed 80%. This paper investigates non-thermal reasons behind this difference. The inherently poor hole conductivity of the Mg-doped waveguide cladding layer of laser diodes is identified as main reason for their low electrical-to-optical energy conversion efficiency.

  8. A Diode Laser System for Synchronous Photoinjection

    SciTech Connect

    Poelker, M., Hansknecht, J.

    1997-12-31

    A laser system, which is composed of a gain switched diode seed laser and a single-pass diode optical amplifier, is used to drive the polarized electron source at Jefferson Lab. The system emits pulsed laser light synchronized to the accelerating cavity radio frequency (rf) at 1497 MHz or the third subharmonic, 499 MHz. The maximum average output power from the laser system is 500 mW and the optical pulse width is 60 to 80 ps. The laser system is compact and very reliable operating remotely for many days without attention.

  9. Diode amplifier of modulated optical beam power

    SciTech Connect

    D'yachkov, N V; Bogatov, A P; Gushchik, T I; Drakin, A E

    2014-11-30

    Analytical relations are obtained between characteristics of modulated light at the output and input of an optical diode power amplifier operating in the highly saturated gain regime. It is shown that a diode amplifier may act as an amplitude-to-phase modulation converter with a rather large bandwidth (∼10 GHz). The low sensitivity of the output power of the amplifier to the input beam power and its high energy efficiency allow it to be used as a building block of a high-power multielement laser system with coherent summation of a large number of optical beams. (lasers)

  10. An all-silicon passive optical diode.

    PubMed

    Fan, Li; Wang, Jian; Varghese, Leo T; Shen, Hao; Niu, Ben; Xuan, Yi; Weiner, Andrew M; Qi, Minghao

    2012-01-27

    A passive optical diode effect would be useful for on-chip optical information processing but has been difficult to achieve. Using a method based on optical nonlinearity, we demonstrate a forward-backward transmission ratio of up to 28 decibels within telecommunication wavelengths. Our device, which uses two silicon rings 5 micrometers in radius, is passive yet maintains optical nonreciprocity for a broad range of input power levels, and it performs equally well even if the backward input power is higher than the forward input. The silicon optical diode is ultracompact and is compatible with current complementary metal-oxide semiconductor processing. PMID:22194410

  11. High power diode pumped alkali vapor lasers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zweiback, J.; Krupke, B.

    2008-05-01

    Diode pumped alkali lasers have developed rapidly since their first demonstration. These lasers offer a path to convert highly efficient, but relatively low brightness, laser diodes into a single high power, high brightness beam. General Atomics has been engaged in the development of DPALs with scalable architectures. We have examined different species and pump characteristics. We show that high absorption can be achieved even when the pump source bandwidth is several times the absorption bandwidth. In addition, we present experimental results for both potassium and rubidium systems pumped with a 0.2 nm bandwidth alexandrite laser. These data show slope efficiencies of 67% and 72% respectively.

  12. Integrated injection-locked semiconductor diode laser

    DOEpatents

    Hadley, G.R.; Hohimer, J.P.; Owyoung, A.

    1991-02-19

    A continuous wave integrated injection-locked high-power diode laser array is provided with an on-chip independently-controlled master laser. The integrated injection locked high-power diode laser array is capable of continuous wave lasing in a single near-diffraction limited output beam at single-facet power levels up to 125 mW (250 mW total). Electronic steering of the array emission over an angle of 0.5 degrees is obtained by varying current to the master laser. The master laser injects a laser beam into the slave array by reflection of a rear facet. 18 figures.

  13. Single photon avalanche diode radiation tests

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kodet, Jan; Prochazka, Ivan; Blazej, Josef; Sun, Xiaoli; Cavanaugh, John

    2012-12-01

    The single photon counting diodes are recently planned for applications in deep space missions. That is why the proton radiation and gamma ray radiation tests of silicon based single photon avalanche diodes were measured and compared. The main characteristic that changed after the irradiation was effective dark count rate, which was measured using actively quenching and gating circuit. The radiation reached 6.5 krad at 53 MeV protons energy and 34 krad using gamma ray radiation source 60Co. The annealing rates were monitored at room temperature and at 60 °C.

  14. Thermal diode made by nematic liquid crystal

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Melo, Djair; Fernandes, Ivna; Moraes, Fernando; Fumeron, Sébastien; Pereira, Erms

    2016-09-01

    This work investigates how a thermal diode can be designed from a nematic liquid crystal confined inside a cylindrical capillary. In the case of homeotropic anchoring, a defect structure called escaped radial disclination arises. The asymmetry of such structure causes thermal rectification rates up to 3.5% at room temperature, comparable to thermal diodes made from carbon nanotubes. Sensitivity of the system with respect to the heat power supply, the geometry of the capillary tube and the molecular anchoring angle is also discussed.

  15. Integrated injection-locked semiconductor diode laser

    DOEpatents

    Hadley, G. Ronald; Hohimer, John P.; Owyoung, Adelbert

    1991-01-01

    A continuous wave integrated injection-locked high-power diode laser array is provided with an on-chip independently-controlled master laser. The integrated injection locked high-power diode laser array is capable of continuous wave lasing in a single near-diffraction limited output beam at single-facet power levels up to 125 mW (250 mW total). Electronic steering of the array emission over an angle of 0.5 degrees is obtained by varying current to the master laser. The master laser injects a laser beam into the slave array by reflection of a rear facet.

  16. Polycrystalline Diamond Schottky Diodes and Their Applications.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Ganming

    In this work, four-hot-filament CVD techniques for in situ boron doped diamond synthesis on silicon substrates were extensively studied. A novel tungsten filament shape and arrangement used to obtain large-area, uniform, boron doped polycrystalline diamond thin films. Both the experimental results and radiative heat transfer analysis showed that this technique improved the uniformity of the substrate temperature. XRD, Raman and SEM studies indicate that large area, uniform, high quality polycrystalline diamond films were obtained. Schottky diodes were fabricated by either sputter deposition of silver or thermal evaporation of aluminum or gold, on boron doped diamond thin films. High forward current density and a high forward-to-reverse current ratio were exhibited by silver on diamond Schottky diodes. Schottky barrier heights and the majority carrier concentrations of both aluminum and gold contacted diodes were determined from the C-V measurements. Furthermore, a novel theoretical C-V-f analysis of deep level boron doped diamond Schottky diodes was performed. The analytical results agree well with the experimental results. Compressive stress was found to have a large effect on the forward biased I-V characteristics of the diamond Schottky diodes, whereas the effect on the reverse biased characteristics was relatively small. The stress effect on the forward biased diamond Schottky diode was attributed to piezojunction and piezoresistance effects. The measured force sensitivity of the diode was as high as 0.75 V/N at 1 mA forward bias. This result shows that CVD diamond device has potential for mechanical transducer applications. The quantitative photoresponse characteristics of the diodes were studied in the spectral range of 300 -1050 nm. Semi-transparent gold contacts were used for better photoresponse. Quantum efficiency as high as 50% was obtained at 500 nm, when a reverse bias of over 1 volt was applied. The Schottky barrier heights between either gold or

  17. NASA direct detection laser diode driver

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Seery, B. D.; Hornbuckle, C. A.

    1989-01-01

    TRW has developed a prototype driver circuit for GaAs laser diodes as part of the NASA/Goddard Space Flight Center's Direct Detection Laser Transceiver (DDLT) program. The circuit is designed to drive the laser diode over a range of user-selectable data rates from 1.7 to 220 Mbps, Manchester-encoded, while ensuring compatibility with 8-bit and quaternary pulse position modulation (QPPM) formats for simulating deep space communications. The resulting hybrid circuit has demonstrated 10 to 90 percent rise and fall times of less than 300 ps at peak currents exceeding 100 mA.

  18. Proton degradation of light-emitting diodes

    SciTech Connect

    Johnston, A.H.; Rax, B.G.; Selva, L.E.; Barnes, C.E.

    1999-12-01

    Proton degradation is investigated for several types of light-emitting diodes with wavelengths in the near infrared region. Several basic light-emitting diode (LED) technologies are compared, including homojunction and double-heterojunction devices. Homojunction LEDs fabricated with amphoteric dopants are far more sensitive to displacement damage than double-heterojunction LEDs, and are strongly affected by injection-enhanced annealing. Unit-to-unit variability remains an important issue for all LED technologies. For some technologies, degradation of the forward voltage characteristics appears to be more significant than degradation of light output.

  19. A 640 GHz Planar-Diode Fundamental Mixer/Receiver

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Siegel, P.; Mehdi, I.; Dengler, R.; Lee, T.; Humphrey, D.; Pease, A.

    1998-01-01

    The design and performance of a 640 GHz solid-state receiver using a fundamental planar-Schottky-diode mixer, InP Gunn diode oscillator, whisker-contacted Schottky-varactor-diode sextupler and folded-Fabry-Perot diplexer are reported.

  20. Nanostructured thin films for organic photovoltaic cells and organic light-emitting diodes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zheng, Ying

    2009-12-01

    heterojunction device based on the same D -- A materials. We also show that the efficiency of a deep-blue phosphorescent OLED (PHOLED) can be significantly enhanced by improving the exciton and charge confinement in the multilayer organic stack. A peak external quantum efficiency of (20 +/- 1) % is achieved, which approaches the theoretical maximum of PHOLED without specific out-coupling mechanisms. We further demonstrate PHOLEDs with enhanced power efficiency by using the p-i- n device structures to reduce driving voltage and achieved a maximum of (14 +/- 1) lm/W and (12 +/- 1) lm/W at a luminance of 100 cd/m 2. Moreover, an ultra low turn-on voltage of ˜ 1.3 V is observed in an orange-emitting polymer light-emitting diode (PLED) using ZnO nanoparticles as the electron injection layer. An Auger-assisted electron injection mechanism is proposed to explain the low turn-on voltage. The novel ZnO nanoparicles electron injection layer opens a new way to reduce driving voltage in PLED. (Full text of this dissertation may be available via the University of Florida Libraries web site. Please check http://www.uflib.ufl.edu/etd.html)

  1. Diode-pumped dysprosium laser materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bowman, S. R.; Condon, N. J.; O'Connor, S.; Rosenberg, A.

    2009-05-01

    We are investigating materials for direct blue solid-state lasers assuming UV excitation with GaN based laser diodes. Room temperature spectroscopy is reported relevant to a proposed quasi-three level laser from the 4F9/2 level in trivalent dysprosium. Modeling based on these measurements suggests this is a promising new laser transition.

  2. Entangled Light Emission From a Diode

    SciTech Connect

    Stevenson, R. M.; Shields, A. J.; Salter, C. L.; Farrer, I.; Nicoll, C. A.; Ritchie, D. A.

    2011-12-23

    Electrically-driven entangled photon generation is demonstrated for the first time using a single semiconductor quantum dot embedded in a light emitting diode structure. The entanglement fidelity is shown to be of sufficient quality for applications such as quantum key distribution.

  3. Uniform insulation applied-B ion diode

    DOEpatents

    Seidel, David B.; Slutz, Stephen A.

    1988-01-01

    An applied-B field extraction ion diode has uniform insulation over an anode surface for increased efficiency. When the uniform insulation is accomplished with anode coils, and a charge-exchange foil is properly placed, the ions may be focused at a point on the z axis.

  4. Optical diodes. [primary mechanism is electronic tunneling

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gustafson, T. K.

    1976-01-01

    Research on metal-barrier-metal structures is reviewed. Topics discussed include: demonstration of antenna coupling and rectification characteristics with high resistance evaporated structures at a wavelength of 10 microns; application of these devices to coherent conversion of laser radiation and infrared and optical circuit elements; and comparison of the point-contact type of diode structure and the newly developed photolithographic structures.

  5. Long Persistent Light Emitting Diode Indicators

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jia, Dongdong; Ma, Yiwei; Hunter, D. N.

    2007-01-01

    An undergraduate laboratory was designed for undergraduate students to make long persistent light emitting diode (LED) indicators using phosphors. Blue LEDs, which emit at 465 nm, were characterized and used as an excitation source. Long persistent phosphors, SrAl[subscript 2]O[subscript 4]:Eu[superscript 2+],Dy[superscript 3+] (green) and…

  6. Noninvasive blood glucose monitoring with laser diode

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Xiqin; Chen, Jianhong; Ooi, Ean Tat; Yeo, Joon Hock

    2006-02-01

    The non-invasive measurement of blood sugar level was studied by use of near infrared laser diodes. The in vitro and in vivo experiments were carried out using six laser diodes having wavelengths range from 1550 nm to 1750nm. Several volunteers were tested for OGTT (Oral Glucose Tolerance Test) experiment. We took blood from a fingertip and measured its concentration with a glucose meter while taking signal voltage from laser diodes system. The data of signal voltage were processed to do calibration and prediction; in this paper PLS (Partial Least Square) method was used to do modeling. For in vitro experiment, good linear relationship between predicted glucose concentration and real glucose concentration was obtained. For in vivo experiments, we got the blood sugar level distributions in Clarke error grid that is a reference for doctors to do diagnosis and treatment. In the Clarke error grid, 75% of all data was in area A and 25 % was in area B. From the in vitro and in vivo results we know that multiple laser diodes are suitable for non-invasive blood glucose monitoring.

  7. Diode pumped Nd:YAG laser development

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Reno, C. W.; Herzog, D. G.

    1976-01-01

    A low power Nd:YAG laser was constructed which employs GaAs injection lasers as a pump source. Power outputs of 125 mW TEM CW with the rod at 250 K and the pump at 180 K were achieved for 45 W input power to the pump source. Operation of the laser, with array and laser at a common heat sink temperature of 250 K, was inhibited by difficulties in constructing long-life GaAs LOC laser arrays. Tests verified pumping with output power of 20 to 30 mW with rod and pump at 250 K. Although life tests with single LOC GaAs diodes were somewhat encouraging (with single diodes operating as long as 9000 hours without degradation), failures of single diodes in arrays continue to occur, and 50 percent power is lost in a few hundred hours at 1 percent duty factor. Because of the large recent advances in the state of the art of CW room temperature AlGaAs diodes, their demonstrated lifetimes of greater than 5,000 hours, and their inherent advantages for this task, it is recommended that these sources be used for further CW YAG injection laser pumping work.

  8. A CW Gunn Diode Switching Element.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hurtado, Marco; Rosenbaum, Fred J.

    As part of a study of the application of communication satellites to educational development, certain technical aspects of such a system were examined. A current controlled bistable switching element using a CW Gunn diode is reported on here. With modest circuits switching rates of the order of 10 MHz have been obtained. Switching is initiated by…

  9. Flexoelectric MEMS: towards an electromechanical strain diode.

    PubMed

    Bhaskar, U K; Banerjee, N; Abdollahi, A; Solanas, E; Rijnders, G; Catalan, G

    2016-01-21

    Piezoelectricity and flexoelectricity are two independent but not incompatible forms of electromechanical response exhibited by nanoscale ferroelectrics. Here, we show that flexoelectricity can either enhance or suppress the piezoelectric response of the cantilever depending on the ferroelectric polarity and lead to a diode-like asymmetric (two-state) electromechanical response. PMID:26676467

  10. Light-Emitting Diodes: Solving Complex Problems

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Planinšic, Gorazd; Etkina, Eugenia

    2015-01-01

    This is the fourth paper in our Light-Emitting Diodes series. The series aims to create a systematic library of LED-based materials and to provide readers with the description of experiments and the pedagogical treatment that would help their students construct, test, and apply physics concepts and mathematical relations. The first paper provided…

  11. Light-Emitting Diodes: A Hidden Treasure

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Planinšic, Gorazd; Etkina, Eugenia

    2014-01-01

    LEDs, or light-emitting diodes, are cheap, easy to purchase, and thus commonly used in physics instruction as indicators of electric current or as sources of light (Fig. 1). In our opinion LEDs represent a unique piece of equipment that can be used to collect experimental evidence, and construct and test new ideas in almost every unit of a general…

  12. Light-Emitting Diodes: Learning New Physics

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Planinšic, Gorazd; Etkina, Eugenia

    2015-01-01

    This is the third paper in our Light-Emitting Diodes series. The series aims to create a systematic library of LED-based materials and to provide the readers with the description of experiments and pedagogical treatment that would help their students construct, test, and apply physics concepts and mathematical relations. The first paper, published…

  13. Afterglow Organic Light-Emitting Diode.

    PubMed

    Kabe, Ryota; Notsuka, Naoto; Yoshida, Kou; Adachi, Chihaya

    2016-01-27

    An afterglow organic light-emitting diode (OLED) that displays electroluminescence with long transient decay after it is turned off is demonstrated. This OLED exhibits blue and green dual emission originating from fluorescence and phosphorescence, respectively. A phosphorescence lifetime of 4.3 s is achieved. PMID:26599764

  14. Phosphorescent Nanocluster Light-Emitting Diodes.

    PubMed

    Kuttipillai, Padmanaban S; Zhao, Yimu; Traverse, Christopher J; Staples, Richard J; Levine, Benjamin G; Lunt, Richard R

    2016-01-13

    Devices utilizing an entirely new class of earth abundant, inexpensive phosphorescent emitters based on metal-halide nanoclusters are reported. Light-emitting diodes with tunable performance are demonstrated by varying cation substitution to these nanoclusters. Theoretical calculations provide insight about the nature of the phosphorescent emitting states, which involves a strong pseudo-Jahn-Teller distortion. PMID:26568044

  15. The Fuge Tube Diode Array Spectrophotometer

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Arneson, B. T.; Long, S. R.; Stewart, K. K.; Lagowski, J. J.

    2008-01-01

    We present the details for adapting a diode array UV-vis spectrophotometer to incorporate the use of polypropylene microcentrifuge tubes--fuge tubes--as cuvettes. Optical data are presented validating that the polyethylene fuge tubes are equivalent to the standard square cross section polystyrene or glass cuvettes generally used in…

  16. Development of gallium aluminum phosphide electroluminescent diodes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chicotka, R. J.; Lorenz, M. R.; Nethercot, A. H.; Pettit, G. D.

    1972-01-01

    Work done on the development of gallium aluminum phosphide alloys for electroluminescent light sources is described. The preparation of this wide band gap semiconductor alloy, its physical properties (particularly the band structure, the electrical characteristics, and the light emitting properties) and work done on the fabrication of diode structures from these alloys are broadly covered.

  17. Advances in laser diodes for pyrotechnic applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Craig, Richard R.

    1993-01-01

    Background information concerning the use of laser diodes in pyrotechnic applications is provided in viewgraph form. The following topics are discussed: damage limits, temperature stability, fiber coupling issues, and small (100 micron) and large (400 micron) fiber results. The discussions concerning fiber results concentrate on the areas of package geometry and electro-optical properties.

  18. Radial direct bandgap p-i-n GaNP microwire solar cells with enhanced short circuit current

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sukrittanon, Supanee; Liu, Ren; Breeden, Michael C.; Pan, Janet L.; Jungjohann, K. L.; Tu, Charles W.; Dayeh, Shadi A.

    2016-08-01

    We report the demonstration of dilute nitride heterostructure core/shell microwire solar cells utilizing the combination of top-down reactive-ion etching to create the cores (GaP) and molecular beam epitaxy to create the shells (GaNP). Systematic studies of cell performance over a series of microwire lengths, array periods, and microwire sidewall morphologies examined by transmission electron microscopy were conducted to shed light on performance-limiting factors and to optimize the cell efficiency. We show by microscopy and correlated external quantum efficiency characterization that the open circuit voltage is degraded primarily due to the presence of defects at the GaP/GaNP interface and in the GaNP shells, and is not limited by surface recombination. Compared to thin film solar cells in the same growth run, the microwire solar cells exhibit greater short circuit current but poorer open circuit voltage due to greater light absorption and number of defects in the microwire structure, respectively. The comprehensive understanding presented in this work suggests that performance benefits of dilute nitride microwire solar cells can be achieved by further tuning of the epitaxial quality of the underlying materials.

  19. Study of the Staebler-Wronski degradation effect in a-Si:H based p-i-n solar cell

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Naseem, H. A.; Brown, W. D.; Ang, S. S.

    1993-01-01

    Conversion of solar energy into electricity using environmentally safe and clean photovoltaic methods to supplement the ever increasing energy needs has been a cherished goal of many scientists and engineers around the world. Photovoltaic solar cells on the other hand, have been the power source for satellites ever since their introduction in the early sixties. For widespread terrestrial applications, however, the cost of photovoltaic systems must be reduced considerably. Much progress has been made in the recent past towards developing economically viable terrestrial systems, and the future looks highly promising. Thin film solar cells offer cost reductions mainly from their low processing cost, low material cost, and choice of low cost substrates. These are also very attractive for space applications because of their high power densities (power produced per kilogram of solar cell pay load) and high radiation resistance. Amorphous silicon based solar cells are amongst the top candidates for economically viable terrestrial and space based power generation. Despite very low federal funding during the eighties, amorphous silicon solar cell efficiencies have continually been improved - from a low 3 percent to over 13 percent now. Further improvements have been made by the use of multi-junction tandem solar cells. Efficiencies close to 15 percent have been achieved in several labs. In order to be competitive with fossil fuel generated electricity, it is believed that module efficiency of 15 percent or cell efficiency of 20 percent is required. Thus, further improvements in cell performance is imperative. One major problem that was discovered almost 15 years ago in amorphous silicon devices is the well known Staebler-Wronski Effect. Efficiency of amorphous silicon solar cells was found to degrade upon exposure to sunlight. Until now their is no consensus among the scientists on the mechanism for this degradation. Efficiency may degrade anywhere from 10 percent to almost 50 percent within the first few months of operation. In order to improve solar cell efficiencies, it is clear that the cause or causes of such degradation must be found and the processing conditions altered to minimize the loss in efficiency. This project was initiated in 1987 to investigate a possible link between metallic impurities, in particular, Ag, and this degradation. Such a link was established by one of the NASA scientists for the light induced degradation of n+/p crystalline silicon solar cells.

  20. Fast recovery, high voltage silicon diodes for AC motor controllers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Balodis, V.; Berman, A. H.; Gaugh, C.

    1982-01-01

    The fabrication and characterization of a high voltage, high current, fast recovery silicon diode for use in AC motor controllers, originally developed for NASA for use in avionics power supplies, is presented. The diode utilizes a positive bevel PIN mesa structure with glass passivation and has the following characteristics: peak inverse voltage - 1200 volts, forward voltage at 50 amperes - 1.5 volts, reverse recovery time of 200 nanoseconds. Characterization data for the diode, included in a table, show agreement with design concepts developed for power diodes. Circuit diagrams of the diode are also given.

  1. Spin-current diode with a ferromagnetic semiconductor

    SciTech Connect

    Sun, Qing-Feng Xie, X. C.

    2015-05-04

    Diode is a key device in electronics: the charge current can flow through the device under a forward bias, while almost no current flows under a reverse bias. Here, we propose a corresponding device in spintronics: the spin-current diode, in which the forward spin current is large but the reversed one is negligible. We show that the lead/ferromagnetic quantum dot/lead system and the lead/ferromagnetic semiconductor/lead junction can work as spin-current diodes. The spin-current diode, a low dissipation device, may have important applications in spintronics, as the conventional charge-current diode does in electronics.

  2. The Pierce-diode approximation to the single-emitter plasma diode

    SciTech Connect

    Ender, A. Ya.; Kuhn, S.; Kuznetsov, V. I.

    2006-11-15

    The possibility of modeling fast processes in the collisionless single-emitter plasma diode (Knudsen diode with surface ionization, KDSI) by means of the Pierce-diode is studied. The KDSI is of practical importance in that it is an almost exact model of thermionic energy converters (TICs) in the collisionless regime and can also be used to model low-density Q-machines. At high temperatures, the Knudsen TIC comes close to the efficiency of the Carnot cycle and hence is the most promising converter of thermal to electric energy. TICs can be applied as component parts in high-temperature electronics. It is shown that normalizations must be chosen appropriately in order to compare the plasma characteristics of the two models: the KDSI and the Pierce-diode. A linear eigenmode theory of the KDSI is developed. For both nonlinear time-independent states and linear eigenmodes without electron reflection, excellent agreement is found between the analytical potential distributions for the Pierce-diode and the corresponding numerical ones for the KDSI. For the states with electron reflection, the agreement is satisfactory in a qualitative sense. A full classification of states of both diodes for the regimes with and without electron reflection is presented. The effect of the thermal spread in electron velocities on the potential distributions and the ({epsilon},{eta}) diagrams is analyzed. Generally speaking, the methodology developed is usefully applicable to a variety of systems in which the electrons have beam-like distributions.

  3. The Pierce-diode approximation to the single-emitter plasma diode

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ender, A. Ya.; Kuhn, S.; Kuznetsov, V. I.

    2006-11-01

    The possibility of modeling fast processes in the collisionless single-emitter plasma diode (Knudsen diode with surface ionization, KDSI) by means of the Pierce-diode is studied. The KDSI is of practical importance in that it is an almost exact model of thermionic energy converters (TICs) in the collisionless regime and can also be used to model low-density Q-machines. At high temperatures, the Knudsen TIC comes close to the efficiency of the Carnot cycle and hence is the most promising converter of thermal to electric energy. TICs can be applied as component parts in high-temperature electronics. It is shown that normalizations must be chosen appropriately in order to compare the plasma characteristics of the two models: the KDSI and the Pierce-diode. A linear eigenmode theory of the KDSI is developed. For both nonlinear time-independent states and linear eigenmodes without electron reflection, excellent agreement is found between the analytical potential distributions for the Pierce-diode and the corresponding numerical ones for the KDSI. For the states with electron reflection, the agreement is satisfactory in a qualitative sense. A full classification of states of both diodes for the regimes with and without electron reflection is presented. The effect of the thermal spread in electron velocities on the potential distributions and the (ɛ,η) diagrams is analyzed. Generally speaking, the methodology developed is usefully applicable to a variety of systems in which the electrons have beam-like distributions.

  4. 100 Years of the Physics of Diodes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Luginsland, John

    2013-10-01

    The Child-Langmuir Law (CL), discovered 100 years ago, gives the maximum current that can be transported across a planar diode in the steady state. As a quintessential example of the impact of space-charge shielding near a charged surface, it is central to the studies of high current diodes, such as high power microwave sources, vacuum microelectronics, electron and ion sources, and high current drivers used in high-energy density physics experiments. CL remains a touchstone of fundamental sheath physics, including contemporary studies of nano-scale quantum diodes and plasmonic devices. Its solid state analog is the Mott-Gurney law, governing the maximum charge injection in solids, such as organic materials and other dielectrics, which is important to energy devices, such as solar cells and light-emitting diodes. This paper reviews the important advances in the physics of diodes since the discovery of CL, including virtual cathode formation and extension of CL to multiple dimensions, to the quantum regime, and to ultrafast processes. We will review the influence of magnetic fields, multiple species in bipolar flow, electromagnetic and time dependent effects in both short pulse and high frequency THz limits, and single electron regimes. Transitions from various emission mechanisms (thermionic, field, and photo-emission) to the space charge limited state (CL) will be addressed, especially highlighting important simulation and experimental developments in selected contemporary areas of study. This talk will stress the fundamental physical links between the physics of beams to limiting currents in other areas, such as low temperature plasmas, laser plasmas, and space propulsion. Also emphasized is the role of non-equilibrium phenomena associated with materials and plasmas in close contact. Work supported by the Air Force Office of Scientific Research.

  5. Electron beam current in high power cylindrical diode

    SciTech Connect

    Roy, Amitava; Menon, R.; Mitra, S.; Sharma, Vishnu; Singh, S. K.; Nagesh, K. V.; Chakravarthy, D. P.

    2010-01-15

    Intense electron beam generation studies were carried out in high power cylindrical diode to investigate the effect of the accelerating gap and diode voltage on the electron beam current. The diode voltage has been varied from 130 to 356 kV, whereas the current density has been varied from 87 to 391 A/cm{sup 2} with 100 ns pulse duration. The experimentally obtained electron beam current in the cylindrical diode has been compared with the Langmuir-Blodgett law. It was found that the diode current can be explained by a model of anode and cathode plasma expanding toward each other. However, the diode voltage and current do not follow the bipolar space-charge limited flow model. It was also found that initially only a part of the cathode take part in the emission process. The plasma expands at 4.2 cm/mus for 1.7 cm anode-cathode gap and the plasma velocity decreases for smaller gaps. The electrode plasma expansion velocity of the cylindrical diode is much smaller as compared with the planar diode for the same accelerating gap and diode voltage. Therefore, much higher voltage can be obtained for the cylindrical diodes as compared with the planar diodes for the same accelerating gap.

  6. Transient shutdown analysis of low-temperature thermal diodes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Williams, R. J.

    1979-01-01

    The various thermal diodes available for use in cryogenic systems are described. Two diode types, liquid-trap and liquid-blockage diodes, were considered to be the most attractive, and thermal models were constructed to predict their behavior in the reverse mode. The diodes, which are of similar size and throughput, were also examined experimentally in a parallel test setup under nominally identical conditions. Their characteristics were ascertained in terms of forward-mode and reverse-mode conductances, shutdown times and energies, and recovery to forward-mode operation with ethane as the working fluid in the temperature range 170 K to 220 K. Results show that the liquid-blockage diode is the quicker of the two diodes to shut down from the forward mode (8 min as opposed to 10 min). However, the liquid-blockage diode has a larger reverse-mode conductance which results in a greater overall evaporator temperature rise. The importance of the relative size and heat inputs to the condenser/reservoir configuration of the liquid-blockage diode and the evaporator trap configuration for the liquid-trap diode are demonstrated. Also included are data which show the susceptibility of the diodes to recovery to forward-mode operation. Guidelines for the choice of a particular diode for an actual application are given.

  7. Qualification and Selection of Flight Diode Lasers for Space Applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Liebe, Carl C.; Dillon, Robert P.; Gontijo, Ivair; Forouhar, Siamak; Shapiro, Andrew A.; Cooper, Mark S.; Meras, Patrick L.

    2010-01-01

    The reliability and lifetime of laser diodes is critical to space missions. The Nuclear Spectroscopic Telescope Array (NuSTAR) mission includes a metrology system that is based upon laser diodes. An operational test facility has been developed to qualify and select, by mission standards, laser diodes that will survive the intended space environment and mission lifetime. The facility is situated in an electrostatic discharge (ESD) certified clean-room and consist of an enclosed temperature-controlled stage that can accommodate up to 20 laser diodes. The facility is designed to characterize a single laser diode, in addition to conducting laser lifetime testing on up to 20 laser diodes simultaneously. A standard laser current driver is used to drive a single laser diode. Laser diode current, voltage, power, and wavelength are measured for each laser diode, and a method of selecting the most adequate laser diodes for space deployment is implemented. The method consists of creating histograms of laser threshold currents, powers at a designated current, and wavelengths at designated power. From these histograms, the laser diodes that illustrate a performance that is outside the normal are rejected and the remaining lasers are considered spaceborne candidates. To perform laser lifetime testing, the facility is equipped with 20 custom laser drivers that were designed and built by California Institute of Technology specifically to drive NuSTAR metrology lasers. The laser drivers can be operated in constant-current mode or alternating-current mode. Situated inside the enclosure, in front of the laser diodes, are 20 power-meter heads to record laser power throughout the duration of lifetime testing. Prior to connecting a laser diode to the current source for characterization and lifetime testing, a background program is initiated to collect current, voltage, and resistance. This backstage data collection enables the operational test facility to have full laser diode

  8. Green (In,Ga,Al)P-GaP light-emitting diodes grown on high-index GaAs surfaces

    SciTech Connect

    Ledentsov, N. N. Shchukin, V. A.; Lyytikäinen, J.; Okhotnikov, O.; Shernyakov, Yu. M.; Payusov, A. S.; Gordeev, N. Yu.; Maximov, M. V.; Schlichting, S.; Nippert, F.; Hoffmann, A.

    2014-11-03

    We report on green (550–560 nm) electroluminescence (EL) from (Al{sub 0.5}Ga{sub 0.5}){sub 0.5}In{sub 0.5}P-(Al{sub 0.8}Ga{sub 0.2}){sub 0.5}In{sub 0.5}P double p-i-n heterostructures with monolayer-scale GaP insertions in the cladding layers and light-emitting diodes based thereupon. The structures are grown side-by-side on high-index and (100) GaAs substrates by molecular beam epitaxy. At moderate current densities (∼500 A/cm{sup 2}), the EL intensity of the structures is comparable for all substrate orientations. Opposite to the (100)-grown strictures, the EL spectra of (211) and (311)-grown devices are shifted towards shorter wavelengths (∼550 nm at room temperature). At high current densities (>1 kA/cm{sup 2}), a much higher EL intensity is achieved for the devices grown on high-index substrates. The integrated intensity of (311)-grown structures gradually saturates at current densities above 4 kA/cm{sup 2}, whereas no saturation is revealed for (211)-grown structures up to the current densities above 14 kA/cm{sup 2}. We attribute the effect to the surface orientation-dependent engineering of the GaP band structure, which prevents the escape of the nonequilibrium electrons into the indirect conduction band minima of the p-doped (Al{sub 0.8}Ga{sub 0.2}){sub 0.5}In{sub 0.5}P cladding layers.

  9. Green (In,Ga,Al)P-GaP light-emitting diodes grown on high-index GaAs surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ledentsov, N. N.; Shchukin, V. A.; Lyytikäinen, J.; Okhotnikov, O.; Cherkashin, N. A.; Shernyakov, Yu M.; Payusov, A. S.; Gordeev, N. Y.; Maximov, M. V.; Schlichting, S.; Nippert, F.; Hoffmann, A.

    2015-03-01

    We report on green (550-560 nm) electroluminescence (EL) from (Al0.5Ga0.5)0.5In0.5P-(Al0.8Ga0.2)0.5In0.5P double p-i-n heterostructures with monolayer-scale tensile strained GaP insertions in the cladding layers and light-emitting diodes (LEDs) based thereupon. The structures are grown side-by-side on high-index and (100) GaAs substrates by molecular beam epitaxy. Cross-sectional transmission electron microscopy studies indicate that GaP insertions are flat, thus the GaP-barrier substrate orientation-dependent heights should match the predictions of the flat model. At moderate current densities (~500 A/cm2) the EL intensity of the structures is comparable for all substrate orientations. Opposite to the (100)-grown strictures, the EL spectra of (211) and (311)-grown devices are shifted towards shorter wavelengths (~550 nm at room temperature). At high current densities (>1 kA/cm2) a much higher EL intensity is achieved for the devices grown on high-index substrates. The integrated intensity of (311)-grown structures gradually saturates at current densities above 4 kA/cm2, whereas no saturation is revealed for (211)-grown structures up to the current densities above 14 kA/cm2. We attribute the effect to the surface orientation-dependent engineering of the GaP band structure which prevents the escape of the nonequilibrium electrons into the indirect conduction band minima of the p- doped (Al0.8Ga0.2)0.5In0.5P cladding layers.

  10. Underwater Chaotic Lidar using Blue Laser Diodes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rumbaugh, Luke K.

    The thesis proposes and explores an underwater lidar system architecture based on chaotic modulation of recently introduced, commercially available, low cost blue laser diodes. This approach is experimentally shown to allow accurate underwater impulse response measurements while eliminating the need for several major components typically found in high-performance underwater lidar systems. The proposed approach is to: 1. Generate wideband, noise-like intensity modulation signals using optical chaotic modulation of blue-green laser diodes, and then 2. Use this signal source to develop an underwater chaotic lidar system that uses no electrical signal generator, no electro-optic modulator, no optical frequency doubler, and no large-aperture photodetector. The outcome of this thesis is the demonstration of a new underwater lidar system architecture that could allow high resolution ranging, imaging, and water profiling measurements in turbid water, at a reduced size, weight, power and cost relative to state-of-the-art high-performance underwater lidar sensors. This work also makes contributions to the state of the art in optics, nonlinear dynamics, and underwater sensing by demonstrating for the first time: 1. Wideband noise-like intensity modulation of a blue laser diode using no electrical signal generator or electro-optic modulator. Optical chaotic modulation of a 462 nm blue InGaN laser diode by self-feedback is explored for the first time. The usefulness of the signal to chaotic lidar is evaluated in terms of bandwidth, modulation depth, and autocorrelation peak-to-sidelobe-ratio (PSLR) using both computer and laboratory experiments. In laboratory experiments, the optical feedback technique is shown to be effective in generating wideband, noise-like chaotic signals with strong modulation depth when the diode is operated in an external-cavity dominated state. The modulation signal strength is shown to be limited by the onset of lasing within the diode's internal

  11. Photovoltaic-module bypass-diode encapsulation. Annual report

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1983-06-20

    The design and processing techniques necessary to incorporate bypass diodes within the module encapsulant are presented in this annual report. A comprehensive survey of available pad-mounted PN junction and Schottky diodes led to the selection of Semicon PN junction diode cells for this application. Diode junction-to-heat spreader thermal resistance measurements, performed on a variety of mounted diode chip types and sizes, have yielded values which are consistently below 1/sup 0/C per watt, but show some instability when thermally cycled over the temperature range from -40 to 150/sup 0/C. Based on the results of a detailed thermal analysis, which covered the range of bypass currents from 2 to 20 amperes, three representative experimental modules, each incorporating integral bypass diode/heat spreader assemblies of various sizes, were designed and fabricated. Thermal testing of these modules has enabled the formation of a recommended heat spreader plate sizing relationship. The production cost of three encapsulated bypass diode/heat spreader assemblies were compared with similarly rated externally-mounted packaged diodes. An assessment of bypass diode reliability, which relies heavily on rectifying diode failure rate data, leads to the general conclusion that, when proper designed and installed, these devices will improve the overall reliability of a terrestrial array over a 20 year design lifetime.

  12. Infrared photoemitting diode having reduced work function

    DOEpatents

    Hirschfeld, T.B.

    1982-05-06

    In electro-optical detectors which include as elements a photoemitting photocathode and anode, a photoemitting diode is fabricated which lowers the diode's work function, thus reducing the cooling requirement typically needed for this type of device. The work function is reduced by sandwiching between the photocathode and anode a liquid meidum of the formula NR/sub 3/ and having an electron affinity for the electrons of the photocathode, which liquid medium permits free electrons leaving the photocathode to remain as stable solvated species in the liquid medium. Thus, highly light-absorbent, and therefore thin, metallic layers can be used for detection, thereby reducing dark current at a given temperature, with a consequent reduction in cooling requirements at constant detector performance.

  13. Infrared photoemitting diode having reduced work function

    DOEpatents

    Hirschfeld, Tomas B.

    1984-01-01

    In electro-optical detectors which include as elements a photoemitting photocathode and anode, a photoemitting diode is fabricated which lowers the diode's work function, thus reducing the cooling requirement typically needed for this type of device. The work function is reduced by sandwiching between the photocathode and anode a liquid medium of the formula NR.sub.3 and having an electron affinity for the electrons of the photocathode, which liquid medium permits free electrons leaving the photocathode to remain as stable solvated species in the liquid medium. Thus, highly light-absorbent, and therefore thin, metallic layers can be used for detection, thereby reducing dark current at a given temperature, with a consequent reduction in cooling requirements at constant detector performance.

  14. Advancements in ion diode and triode design.

    PubMed

    Cavenago, M

    2014-02-01

    Selfconsistent laminar flow models, which enable to predict the optimal cathode and anode geometry in simple diodes, must be modified to account for the anode aperture and the effect of other electrodes. An equation for charge coupled to arbitrary laminar flows is here first presented and its numerical solutions are obtained with a new method, based on mesh transformations. It is found that a close match to theoretical flows requires an increase of the simple diode voltage v0 by an amount vδ, which, for a typical case designed for zero exit angle condition, are v0 = 0.7465 and vδ = 0.0294 in adimensional units. States "in" and "out" for the anode lens are also shown, where "out" is a new and nonlinear solution for the beam expansion in a drift tube. PMID:24593456

  15. Design of laser diode stable output system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Bo; Cao, Rui-ming

    2008-03-01

    High-stability output's system of laser diode is introduced in this paper. The system which is based on the MCU of MSP430 has been designed light power feedback loop and coller of TEC. It includes stable current, protecting circuit, light power feedback loop, temperature controlling, power display and so on. It is also able to control and show the power at the real time. The power could be set by botton too. The software of slow start up, slow close and the protecting relay are adopted by MCU. DRV592 is introduced as PWM driver to control the current of TEC. The duty cycle is generate by MCU. In order to control temperature, it is changed to influence the current of TEC. The power that is sampled by photodiode which is integrated in the laser diode is controlled by the micro-processing. The laser is monitored by voltage control circuit and current control circuit at the real time.

  16. Advancements in ion diode and triode design

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cavenago, M.

    2014-02-01

    Selfconsistent laminar flow models, which enable to predict the optimal cathode and anode geometry in simple diodes, must be modified to account for the anode aperture and the effect of other electrodes. An equation for charge coupled to arbitrary laminar flows is here first presented and its numerical solutions are obtained with a new method, based on mesh transformations. It is found that a close match to theoretical flows requires an increase of the simple diode voltage v0 by an amount vδ, which, for a typical case designed for zero exit angle condition, are v0 = 0.7465 and vδ = 0.0294 in adimensional units. States "in" and "out" for the anode lens are also shown, where "out" is a new and nonlinear solution for the beam expansion in a drift tube.

  17. DIODE STEERED MANGETIC-CORE MEMORY

    DOEpatents

    Melmed, A.S.; Shevlin, R.T.; Laupheimer, R.

    1962-09-18

    A word-arranged magnetic-core memory is designed for use in a digital computer utilizing the reverse or back current property of the semi-conductor diodes to restore the information in the memory after read-out. In order to ob tain a read-out signal from a magnetic core storage unit, it is necessary to change the states of some of the magnetic cores. In order to retain the information in the memory after read-out it is then necessary to provide a means to return the switched cores to their states before read-out. A rewrite driver passes a pulse back through each row of cores in which some switching has taken place. This pulse combines with the reverse current pulses of diodes for each column in which a core is switched during read-out to cause the particular cores to be switched back into their states prior to read-out. (AEC)

  18. Novel developments in laser diode Raman spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Claps, Ricardo Javier

    2000-11-01

    This thesis presents the last developments of a laser diode Raman spectrometer for gases, gas flows and vapors, at medium-low pressures. Results are shown for atmospheric gases under STP conditions, and also gas flows from nozzles in subsonic-sonic regimes. The system is unique in that it uses a high power laser diode passively locked by an external grating cavity in Littman/Metcalf configuration, with side-band modes suppressed by 1:10-5, and a reduced bandwidth of <500MHz. The use of Rb vapor cells as notch filters with unprecedented narrow bandwidth (<7 cm-1), allow to collect Stokes and a-Stokes rotational Raman spectra simultaneously. The spectrometer is used to perform studies of thermodynamic equilibrium of gas flows; further studies of samples seeded in the flow (alkali- halides) are discussed, together with potential applications for environmental and industrial monitoring.

  19. Flexoelectric MEMS: towards an electromechanical strain diode

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bhaskar, U. K.; Banerjee, N.; Abdollahi, A.; Solanas, E.; Rijnders, G.; Catalan, G.

    2016-01-01

    Piezoelectricity and flexoelectricity are two independent but not incompatible forms of electromechanical response exhibited by nanoscale ferroelectrics. Here, we show that flexoelectricity can either enhance or suppress the piezoelectric response of the cantilever depending on the ferroelectric polarity and lead to a diode-like asymmetric (two-state) electromechanical response.Piezoelectricity and flexoelectricity are two independent but not incompatible forms of electromechanical response exhibited by nanoscale ferroelectrics. Here, we show that flexoelectricity can either enhance or suppress the piezoelectric response of the cantilever depending on the ferroelectric polarity and lead to a diode-like asymmetric (two-state) electromechanical response. Electronic supplementary information (ESI) available. See DOI: 10.1039/c5nr06514c

  20. Diode-quad bridge circuit means

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Harrison, D. R.; Dimeff, J. (Inventor)

    1975-01-01

    A transducer and frequency discriminator circuit is described including a four-terminal circulating diode bridge, a first pair of capacitors connected in series across two terminals of the bridge, and a second pair of capacitors, or other impedance elements, connected in series across the other two terminals of the bridge. A source of balanced alternating electrical energy for energizing the circuit is coupled between the commonly connected plates of the first pair of capacitors and the commonly connected plates of the second pair of capacitors. Due to the operation of the diode bridge, the sum of the resultant charges developed on the first pair of capacitors is proportional to the relationship between the respective capacitors of the second pair, and consequently, an output voltage taken across the first pair of capacitors will be proportional to that relationship.

  1. Outlook for diode lasers in medicine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arons, Irving J.

    1994-07-01

    From their use in compact disc players and telecommunications to supermarket scanners, semi-conductor diode lasers now play an ever important role in medicine. Beginning in ophthalmology, as replacements for ion photocoagulator lasers, and used for several years outside of the United States for biostimulation of aching muscles and to treat chronic ulcers and wounds, high-powered diode systems are now finding their way into surgery and, in the future, will be used to activate photoactive dyes in the photodynamic therapy treatment of cancers, and perhaps to weld tissue to replace sutures. In this presentation, we attempt to cover the above applications as well as some newer ones, discussing the companies involved, the systems in use or under development, and some exciting new developments about to unfold.

  2. Schottky diodes from 2D germanane

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sahoo, Nanda Gopal; Esteves, Richard J.; Punetha, Vinay Deep; Pestov, Dmitry; Arachchige, Indika U.; McLeskey, James T.

    2016-07-01

    We report on the fabrication and characterization of a Schottky diode made using 2D germanane (hydrogenated germanene). When compared to germanium, the 2D structure has higher electron mobility, an optimal band-gap, and exceptional stability making germanane an outstanding candidate for a variety of opto-electronic devices. One-atom-thick sheets of hydrogenated puckered germanium atoms have been synthesized from a CaGe2 framework via intercalation and characterized by XRD, Raman, and FTIR techniques. The material was then used to fabricate Schottky diodes by suspending the germanane in benzonitrile and drop-casting it onto interdigitated metal electrodes. The devices demonstrate significant rectifying behavior and the outstanding potential of this material.

  3. Photon recycling and Shockley's diode equation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martí, A.; Balenzategui, J. L.; Reyna, R. F.

    1997-10-01

    The Shockley's diode equation predicts a current-voltage characteristic different from that used by Shockley and Queisser to compute the limiting efficiency of photovoltaic energy conversion under the assumptions of the detailed balance theory. The reasons for such discrepancy are discussed being the neglect of photon recycling effects in Shockley's diode equation the main cause. This interpretation is crucial to understand the fundamentals on which the computation of the limiting efficiency of solar cells is based. Without photon recycling effects, it can be concluded that the limiting efficiency (one sun) of a gallium arsenide solar cell is 26.8% (with the sun assumed as blackbody at 6000 K) while the true figure is 30.7%, 38.7% as long as the angle of emission of photons from the cell is fully restricted.

  4. Diode-pumped optical parametric oscillator

    SciTech Connect

    Geiger, A.R.; Hemmati, H.; Farr, W.H.

    1996-02-01

    Diode-pumped optical parametric oscillation has been demonstrated for the first time to our knowledge in a single Nd:MgO:LiNbO{sub 3} nonlinear crystal. The crystal is pumped by a semiconductor diode laser array at 812 nm. The Nd{sup 3+} ions absorb the 812-nm radiation to generate 1084-nm laser oscillation. On internal {ital Q} switching the 1084-nm radiation pumps the LiNbO{sub 3} host crystal that is angle cut at 46.5{degree} and generates optical parametric oscillation. The oscillation threshold that is due to the 1084-nm laser pump with a pulse length of 80 ns in a 1-mm-diameter beam was measured to be {approx_equal}1 mJ and produced 0.5-mJ output at 3400-nm signal wavelength. {copyright} {ital 1996 Optical Society of America.}

  5. Stability theory of Knudsen plasma diodes

    SciTech Connect

    Kuznetsov, V. I. Ender, A. Ya.

    2015-11-15

    A stability theory is developed for a plasma diode in which an electron beam supplied from the emitter propagates without collisions in the self-consistent electric field against the immobile ion background. An integral equation for the amplitude of the perturbed field is deduced using the Q,G method for the regime without electron reflection from a potential barrier. Analytic solutions to this equation are obtained for a number of important particular cases, and the plasma dispersion properties are examined.

  6. Rugged, Tunable Extended-Cavity Diode Laser

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Moore, Donald; Brinza, David; Seidel, David; Klipstein, William; Choi, Dong Ho; Le, Lam; Zhang, Guangzhi; Iniguez, Roberto; Tang, Wade

    2007-01-01

    A rugged, tunable extended-cavity diode laser (ECDL) has been developed to satisfy stringent requirements for frequency stability, notably including low sensitivity to vibration. This laser is designed specifically for use in an atomic-clock experiment to be performed aboard the International Space Station (ISS). Lasers of similar design would be suitable for use in terrestrial laboratories engaged in atomic-clock and atomic-physics research.

  7. Bioinspired Hybrid White Light-Emitting Diodes.

    PubMed

    Weber, Michael D; Niklaus, Lukas; Pröschel, Marlene; Coto, Pedro B; Sonnewald, Uwe; Costa, Rubén D

    2015-10-01

    The first bioinspired hybrid white-light-emitting diodes (bio-HLEDs) featuring protein cascade coatings are presented. For easy fabrication a new strategy to stabilize proteins in rubber-like material was developed. The synergy between the excellent features of fluorescent proteins and the easily processed rubber produces bio-HLEDs with less than 10% loss in luminous efficiency over 100 hours. PMID:26271025

  8. Diode having trenches in a semiconductor region

    DOEpatents

    Palacios, Tomas Apostol; Lu, Bin; Matioli, Elison de Nazareth

    2016-03-22

    An electrode structure is described in which conductive regions are recessed into a semiconductor region. Trenches may be formed in a semiconductor region, such that conductive regions can be formed in the trenches. The electrode structure may be used in semiconductor devices such as field effect transistors or diodes. Nitride-based power semiconductor devices are described including such an electrode structure, which can reduce leakage current and otherwise improve performance.

  9. Microwave Power Combiner With Switching Diodes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Conroy, B. L.; Postal, R. B.; Boreham, J. F.

    1986-01-01

    In multiple-port microwave power combiner, each of outputs of two or more power amplifiers of same frequency and phase passed to common output port separately or together. Each amplifier connected to combiner through switch consisting of resonant structures, radio-frequency chokes, and diode. Switches not only permit flexiblity in selection of amplifiers but isolate unused amplifiers from network, all while operating at relatively low power loss.

  10. Development of ferroelectric electron beam diodes

    SciTech Connect

    Flechtner, D.; Ivers, J.D.; Kerslick, G.A.; Nation, J.A.; Schaechter, L.; Zhang, G.

    1995-12-31

    The authors are currently investigating the use of ferroelectric ceramics for electron beam generation. These materials exhibit a spontaneous (saturation) polarization, P{sub s}, of up to 100{mu}C/cm{sup 2}. Emission occurs when the polarization state of the ferroelectric is changed rapidly by an applied electric field, and a fraction of the surface screening charge is released at a gridded electrode. Using a Lead-Zirconate-Titanate (PZT) ceramic as the electron source in a planar 14kV diode geometry they have measured diode current densities of up to 40A/cm{sup 2} with a 5cm gap. The normalized rms emittance of this beam has been measured to be 12{pi} mm-mrad at 8A. Recent results from experiments to extend operation of this diode up to 70 kV, 300 ns pulses will be reported. They are also designing a 20--30 kV, 1 {micro}s system that will be operated in a repetition rate mode. They are planning to use such a system as part of their program to develop compact X-band sources with average power levels in the hundreds of watts range. Using simulation codes, such as EGUN, together with results from analytical work TWT structures are being designed for use with these sources. The advantages of using PPM focusing in both cylindrical or sheet beam configurations are also under investigation.

  11. Integrated software package for laser diodes characterization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sporea, Dan G.; Sporea, Radu A.

    2003-10-01

    The characteristics of laser diodes (wavelength of the emitted radiation, output optical power, embedded photodiode photocurrent, threshold current, serial resistance, external quantum efficiency) are strongly influenced by their driving circumstances (forward current, case temperature). In order to handle such a complex investigation in an efficient and objective manner, the operation of several instruments (a laser diode driver, a temperature controller, a wavelength meter, a power meter, and a laser beam analyzer) is synchronously controlled by a PC, through serial and GPIB communication. For each equipment, instruments drivers were designed using the industry standards graphical programming environment - LabVIEW from National Instruments. All the developed virtual instruments operate under the supervision of a managing virtual instrument, which sets the driving parameters for each unit under test. The manager virtual instrument scans as appropriate the driving current and case temperature values for the selected laser diode. The software enables data saving in Excel compatible files. In this way, sets of curves can be produced according to the testing cycle needs.

  12. Diode Laser Excision of Oral Benign Lesions

    PubMed Central

    Mathur, Ena; Sareen, Mohit; Dhaka, Payal; Baghla, Pallavi

    2015-01-01

    Introduction: Lasers have made tremendous progress in the field of dentistry and have turned out to be crucial in oral surgery as collateral approach for soft tissue surgery. This rapid progress can be attributed to the fact that lasers allow efficient execution of soft tissue procedures with excellent hemostasis and field visibility. When matched to scalpel, electrocautery or high frequency devices, lasers offer maximum postoperative patient comfort. Methods: Four patients agreed to undergo surgical removal of benign lesions of the oral cavity. 810 nm diode lasers were used in continuous wave mode for excisional biopsy. The specimens were sent for histopathological examination and patients were assessed on intraoperative and postoperative complications. Results: Diode laser surgery was rapid, bloodless and well accepted by patients and led to complete resolution of the lesions. The excised specimen proved adequate for histopathological examination. Hemostasis was achieved immediately after the procedure with minimal postoperative problems, discomfort and scarring. Conclusion: We conclude that diode lasers are rapidly becoming the standard of care in contemporary dental practice and can be employed in procedures requiring excisional biopsy of oral soft tissue lesions with minimal problems in histopathological diagnosis. PMID:26464781

  13. Performance measurements of hybrid PIN diode arrays

    SciTech Connect

    Jernigan, J.G.; Arens, J.F. . Space Sciences Lab.); Kramer, G. ); Collins, T.; Herring, J. ); Shapiro, S.L. ); Wilburn, C.D. )

    1990-05-01

    We report on the successful effort to develop hybrid PIN diode arrays and to demonstrate their potential as components of vertex detectors. Hybrid pixel arrays have been fabricated by the Hughes Aircraft Co. by bump bonding readout chips developed by Hughes to an array of PIN diodes manufactured by Micron Semiconductor Inc. These hybrid pixel arrays were constructed in two configurations. One array format having 10 {times} 64 pixels, each 120 {mu}m square, and the other format having 256 {times} 256 pixels, each 30 {mu}m square. In both cases, the thickness of the PIN diode layer is 300 {mu}m. Measurements of detector performance show that excellent position resolution can be achieved by interpolation. By determining the centroid of the charge cloud which spreads charge into a number of neighboring pixels, a spatial resolution of a few microns has been attained. The noise has been measured to be about 300 electrons (rms) at room temperature, as expected from KTC and dark current considerations, yielding a signal-to-noise ratio of about 100 for minimum ionizing particles. 4 refs., 13 figs.

  14. New laser materials for laser diode pumping

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jenssen, H. P.

    1990-01-01

    The potential advantages of laser diode pumped solid state lasers are many with high overall efficiency being the most important. In order to realize these advantages, the solid state laser material needs to be optimized for diode laser pumping and for the particular application. In the case of the Nd laser, materials with a longer upper level radiative lifetime are desirable. This is because the laser diode is fundamentally a cw source, and to obtain high energy storage, a long integration time is necessary. Fluoride crystals are investigated as host materials for the Nd laser and also for IR laser transitions in other rare earths, such as the 2 micron Ho laser and the 3 micron Er laser. The approach is to investigate both known crystals, such as BaY2F8, as well as new crystals such as NaYF8. Emphasis is on the growth and spectroscopy of BaY2F8. These two efforts are parallel efforts. The growth effort is aimed at establishing conditions for obtaining large, high quality boules for laser samples. This requires numerous experimental growth runs; however, from these runs, samples suitable for spectroscopy become available.

  15. Trap-induced photoconductivity in singlet fission pentacene diodes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qiao, Xianfeng; Zhao, Chen; Chen, Bingbing; Luan, Lin

    2014-07-01

    This paper reports a trap-induced photoconductivity in ITO/pentacene/Al diodes by using current-voltage and magneto-conductance measurements. The comparison of photoconductivity between pentacene diodes with and without trap clearly shows that the traps play a critical role in generating photoconductivity. It shows that no observable photoconductivity is detected for trap-free pentacene diodes, while significant photoconductivity is observed in diodes with trap. This is because the initial photogenerated singlet excitons in pentacene can rapidly split into triplet excitons with higher binding energy prior to dissociating into free charge carriers. The generated triplet excitons react with trapped charges to release charge-carriers from traps, leading to a trap-induced photoconductivity in the single-layer pentacene diodes. Our studies elucidated the formation mechanisms of photoconductivity in pentacene diodes with extremely fast singlet fission rate.

  16. Common rectifier diodes in temperature measurement applications below 50 K

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Järvelä, J.; Stenvall, A.; Mikkonen, R.

    2010-06-01

    In this paper we studied the use of common electronic semiconductor diodes in temperature measurements at cryogenic atmosphere. The motivation for this is the high price of calibrated cryogenic temperature sensors since there are some applications, like quench detection, in which a cheaper and a less accurate sensor would suffice. We measured the forward voltage as a function of temperature, Vf(T), of several silicon rectifier diodes to determine the accuracy and interchangeability of the diodes. The experimental results confimed that Vf(T) of common rectifier diodes are similar to cryogenic sensor diodes, but the variability between two samples is much larger. The interchangeability of the diodes proved to be poor if absolute temperatures are to be measured. However for sensing changes in temperature they proved to be adequate and thus can be used to measure e.g. quench propagation or sense quench ignition at multiple locations with cheap price.

  17. Trap-induced photoconductivity in singlet fission pentacene diodes

    SciTech Connect

    Qiao, Xianfeng Zhao, Chen; Chen, Bingbing; Luan, Lin

    2014-07-21

    This paper reports a trap-induced photoconductivity in ITO/pentacene/Al diodes by using current-voltage and magneto-conductance measurements. The comparison of photoconductivity between pentacene diodes with and without trap clearly shows that the traps play a critical role in generating photoconductivity. It shows that no observable photoconductivity is detected for trap-free pentacene diodes, while significant photoconductivity is observed in diodes with trap. This is because the initial photogenerated singlet excitons in pentacene can rapidly split into triplet excitons with higher binding energy prior to dissociating into free charge carriers. The generated triplet excitons react with trapped charges to release charge-carriers from traps, leading to a trap-induced photoconductivity in the single-layer pentacene diodes. Our studies elucidated the formation mechanisms of photoconductivity in pentacene diodes with extremely fast singlet fission rate.

  18. Electrostatic Discharge (ESD) Protection for a Laser Diode Ignited Actuator

    SciTech Connect

    SALAS, FREDERICK J.; SANCHEZ, DANIEL H.; WEINLEIN, JOHN HARVEY

    2003-06-01

    The use of laser diodes in devices to ignite pyrotechnics provides unique new capabilities including the elimination of electrostatic discharge (ESD) pulses entering the device. The Faraday cage formed by the construction of these devices removes the concern of inadvertent ignition of the energetic material. However, the laser diode itself can be damaged by ESD pulses, therefore, to enhance reliability, some protection of the laser diode is necessary. The development of the MC4612 Optical Actuator has included a circuit to protect the laser diode from ESD pulses including the ''Fisher'' severe human body ESD model. The MC4612 uses a laser diode and is designed to replace existing hot-wire actuators. Optical energy from a laser diode, instead of electrical energy, is used to ignite the pyrotechnic. The protection circuit is described along with a discussion of how the circuit design addresses and circumvents the historic 1Amp/1Watt requirement that has been applicable to hot-wire devices.

  19. Diode laser absorption sensors for combustion control

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xin, Zhou

    Combustion is the most widely used energy conversion technique in the world. Diode-laser absorption sensors offer significant opportunities and advantages for in situ measurements of multiple combustion parameters such as temperature and species concentration due to their high sensitivity, high spectral resolution, fast time response, robustness and non-intrusive character. The overall objective of this thesis is to design and develop time-resolved and real-time tunable diode laser sensors with the potential for combustion control. A crucial element in the design of a tunable-diode-laser optical-absorption-based sensor is the selection of optimum transitions. The strategy and spectroscopic criteria for selecting optimum wavelength regions and absorption line combinations are developed. The development of this design-rule approach establishes a new paradigm to optimize tunable diode laser sensors for target applications. The water vapor spectrum in the 1-2 mum near-infrared region is systematically analyzed to find the best absorption transition pairs for sensitive measurement of temperature in the target combustion environment using a single tunable diode laser. Two sensors are developed in this work. The first sensor is a 1.8 mum, single-laser temperature sensor based on direct absorption scans. Successful time-resolved measurements in a variety of laboratory and practical devices are presented and used to identify potential improvements, and design rules for a second-generation sensor are developed based on the lessons learned. The second generation sensor is a 1.4 mum, single-laser temperature sensor using water vapor absorption detected by wavelength-modulation spectroscopy (WMS), which facilitates rapid data analysis and a 2 kHz real-time data rate in the combustion experiments reported here. Demonstration experiments in a heated cell and a forced Hencken burner confirm the sensitivity and accuracy of the sensors. The first application of TDL thermometry to a

  20. Electrical doping for high performance organic light emitting diodes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Jang-Joo; Leem, Dong-Seok; Lee, Jae-Hyun

    2009-02-01

    Novel p-dopants of ReO3 and CuI, and an n-dopant of Rb2CO3 have been developed. Among many other p-dopants, ReO3 possesses superior characteristics of low temperature deposition, efficient charge generation and increasing the device lifetime. The absorption intensity of charge transfer complexes and current-voltage characteristics revealed that charge generation in p-doped hole transporting layers is more effective when the work function of the dopant is larger. High performance OLEDs have been fabricated using the p- and n-dopants, including the low driving voltage p-i-n phosphorescent OLEDs, high power efficiency of tandem OLEDs using ReO3 doped NPB/ReO3 (1 nm)/Rb2CO3 doped Bphen as the interconnection unit, and top emission OLEDs using CuI doped NPB as the hole injection layer from Ag electrode.

  1. Multimode-diode-pumped gas (alkali-vapor) laser

    SciTech Connect

    Page, R H; Beach, R J; Kanz, V K

    2005-08-22

    We report the first demonstration of a multimode-diode-pumped gas laser--Rb vapor operating on the 795 nm resonance transition. Peak output of {approx}1 Watt was obtained using a volume-Bragg-grating stabilized pump diode array. The laser's output radiance exceeded the pump radiance by a factor greater than 2000. Power scaling (by pumping with larger diode arrays) is therefore possible.

  2. Diode Laser Measurements of Concentration and Temperature in Microgravity Combustion

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Silver, Joel A.; Kane, Daniel J.

    1999-01-01

    Diode laser absorption spectroscopy provides a direct method of determinating species concentration and local gas temperature in combustion flames. Under microgravity conditions, diode lasers are particularly suitable, given their compact size, low mass and low power requirements. The development of diode laser-based sensors for gas detection in microgravity is presented, detailing measurements of molecular oxygen. Current progress of this work and future application possibilities for these methods on the International Space Station are discussed.

  3. Underwater Chaotic Lidar using Blue Laser Diodes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rumbaugh, Luke K.

    The thesis proposes and explores an underwater lidar system architecture based on chaotic modulation of recently introduced, commercially available, low cost blue laser diodes. This approach is experimentally shown to allow accurate underwater impulse response measurements while eliminating the need for several major components typically found in high-performance underwater lidar systems. The proposed approach is to: 1. Generate wideband, noise-like intensity modulation signals using optical chaotic modulation of blue-green laser diodes, and then 2. Use this signal source to develop an underwater chaotic lidar system that uses no electrical signal generator, no electro-optic modulator, no optical frequency doubler, and no large-aperture photodetector. The outcome of this thesis is the demonstration of a new underwater lidar system architecture that could allow high resolution ranging, imaging, and water profiling measurements in turbid water, at a reduced size, weight, power and cost relative to state-of-the-art high-performance underwater lidar sensors. This work also makes contributions to the state of the art in optics, nonlinear dynamics, and underwater sensing by demonstrating for the first time: 1. Wideband noise-like intensity modulation of a blue laser diode using no electrical signal generator or electro-optic modulator. Optical chaotic modulation of a 462 nm blue InGaN laser diode by self-feedback is explored for the first time. The usefulness of the signal to chaotic lidar is evaluated in terms of bandwidth, modulation depth, and autocorrelation peak-to-sidelobe-ratio (PSLR) using both computer and laboratory experiments. In laboratory experiments, the optical feedback technique is shown to be effective in generating wideband, noise-like chaotic signals with strong modulation depth when the diode is operated in an external-cavity dominated state. The modulation signal strength is shown to be limited by the onset of lasing within the diode's internal

  4. Plasma-filled diode based on the coaxial gun.

    PubMed

    Zherlitsyn, A A; Kovalchuk, B M; Pedin, N N

    2012-10-01

    The paper presents the results of studies of a coaxial gun for a plasma-filled electron diode. Effects of the discharge channel diameter and gun current on characteristics of the plasma and pulse generated in the diode were investigated. The electron beam with maximum energy of ≥1 MeV at the current of ≈100 kA was obtained in the experiments with a plasma-filled diode. The energy of ≈5 kJ with the peak power of ≥100 GW dissipated in the diode. PMID:23126788

  5. Quasi-CW Laser Diode Bar Life Tests

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stephen, Mark A.; Krainak, Michael A.; Dallas, Joseph L.

    1997-01-01

    NASA's Goddard Space Flight Center is developing technology for satellite-based, high peak power, LIDAR transmitters requiring 3-5 years of reliable operation. Semi-conductor laser diodes provide high efficiency pumping of solid state lasers with the promise of long-lived, reliable operation. 100-watt quasi- CW laser diode bars have been baselined for the next generation laser altimeters. Multi-billion shot lifetimes are required. The authors have monitored the performance of several diodes for billions of shots and investigated operational modes for improving diode lifetime.

  6. Laboratory diode laser spectroscopy in molecular planetary astronomy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jennings, D. E.

    1988-01-01

    Infrared spectroscopy of planetary atmospheres is performed at high spectral resolution comparable to that in the laboratory. This requires that laboratory spectroscopy use the highest resolution and the most accurate techniques. Tunable diode laser spectroscopy can supply many of the spectroscopic parameters needed by astronomers. In particular, line positions, line strengths, and collisional line widths are measured with diode lasers, and these are often among the best values available. Diode laser spectra are complimentary to lower resolution, broader-coverage Fourier transform spectra. Certain procedures must be adopted, however, when using diode lasers, for determining their output characteristics and for calibrating each spectrum against quality references.

  7. Plasma-filled diode based on the coaxial gun

    SciTech Connect

    Zherlitsyn, A. A.; Kovalchuk, B. M.; Pedin, N. N.

    2012-10-15

    The paper presents the results of studies of a coaxial gun for a plasma-filled electron diode. Effects of the discharge channel diameter and gun current on characteristics of the plasma and pulse generated in the diode were investigated. The electron beam with maximum energy of {>=}1 MeV at the current of Almost-Equal-To 100 kA was obtained in the experiments with a plasma-filled diode. The energy of Almost-Equal-To 5 kJ with the peak power of {>=}100 GW dissipated in the diode.

  8. Plasma-filled diode based on the coaxial gun

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zherlitsyn, A. A.; Kovalchuk, B. M.; Pedin, N. N.

    2012-10-01

    The paper presents the results of studies of a coaxial gun for a plasma-filled electron diode. Effects of the discharge channel diameter and gun current on characteristics of the plasma and pulse generated in the diode were investigated. The electron beam with maximum energy of ≥1 MeV at the current of ≈100 kA was obtained in the experiments with a plasma-filled diode. The energy of ≈5 kJ with the peak power of ≥100 GW dissipated in the diode.

  9. Millimeter-wave diode-grid phase shifters

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lam, Wayne W.; Stolt, Kjell S.; Jou, Christina F.; Luhmann, Neville C., Jr.; Chen, Howard Z.

    1988-01-01

    Monolithic diode grids have been fabricated on 2-cm square gallium-arsenide wafers with 1600 Schottky-barrier varactor diodes. Shorted diodes are detected with a liquid-crystal technique, and the bad diodes are removed with an ultrasonic probe. A small-aperture reflectometer that uses wavefront division interference was developed to measure the reflection coefficient of the grids. A phase shift of 70 deg with a 7-dB loss was obtained at 93 GHz when the bias on the diode grid was changed from -3 V to 1 V. A simple transmission-line grid model, together with the measured low-frequency parameters for the diodes, was shown to predict the measured performance over the entire capacitive bias range of the diodes, as well as over the complete reactive tuning range provided by a reflector behind the grid, and over a wide range of frequencies from 33 GHz to 141 GHz. This shows that the transmission-line model and the measured low-frequency diode parameters can be used to design an electronic beam-steering array and to predict its performance. An electronic beam-steering array made of a pair of grids using state-of-the-art diodes with 5-ohm series resistances would have a loss of 1.4 dB at 90 GHz.

  10. Apparatus for mounting a diode in a microwave circuit

    DOEpatents

    Liu, Shing-gong

    1976-07-27

    Apparatus for mounting a diode in a microwave circuit for making electrical contact between the circuit and ground and for dissipation of heat between the diode and a heat sink. The diode, supported on a thermally and electrically conductive member, is resiliently pressed in electrical contact with the microwave circuit. A tapered collar on the member is elastically deformably wedged into a tapered aperture formed in a heat sink. The wedged collar tightens firmly around the member establishing good thermal and electrical conduction from the diode to the heat sink and ground. Disassembly is facilitated because of the elastically deformed collar.

  11. Thermal compensator for closed-cycle helium refrigerator. [assuring constant temperature for an infrared laser diode

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jennings, D. E.; Hillman, J. J. (Inventor)

    1979-01-01

    The wave length of an infrared, semiconductor laser diode having an output frequency that is dependent on the diode temperature is maintained substantially constant by maintaining the diode temperature constant. The diode is carried by a cold tip of a closed cycle helium refrigerator. The refrigerator has a tendency to cause the temperature of the cold tip to oscillate. A heater diode and a sensor diode are placed on a thermal heat sink that is the only highly conductive thermal path between the laser diode and the cold tip. The heat sink has a small volume and low thermal capacitance so that the sensing diode is at substantially the same temperature as the heater diode and substantially no thermal lag exists between them. The sensor diode is connected in a negative feedback circuit with the heater diode so that the tendency of the laser diode to thermally oscillate is virtually eliminated.

  12. New uncooled thermal IR detector using silicon-diode-micromachined isolated silicon diode for IR detection (MISIR)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Jae-Kwan; Han, Chul-Hi

    2000-12-01

    A new thermal infrared detector using temperature characteristics of a diode has been developed. This micromachined isolated silicon diode for IR detection (MISIR) utilizes an electrochemical etching technique to achieve the thermal isolation of the diode. Experimental dependence of the diode current on the junction temperature enables a high responsivity of the MISIR and the electrochemical etch stop provides an effective isolation at simple and low-cost. The fabricated MISIR has demonstrated a detectivity of 1.2x1010(cm(DOT)HzHLF/W) at room temperature in air ambient.

  13. Diode laser prostatectomy (VLAP): initial canine evaluation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kopchok, George E.; Verbin, Chris; Ayres, Bruce; Peng, Shi-Kaung; White, Rodney A.

    1995-05-01

    This study evaluated the acute and chronic effects of diode laser (960 nm) prostatectomy using a Prolase II fiber in a canine model (n equals 5). The laser fiber consists of a 1000 um quartz fiber which reflects a cone of laser energy, at 45 degree(s) to the axis of the fiber, into the prostatic urethra (Visual Laser Ablation of Prostate). Perineal access was used to guide a 15.5 Fr cystoscope to the level of the prostate. Under visual guidance and continual saline irrigation, 60 watts of laser power was delivered for 60 seconds at 3, 9, and 12 o'clock and 30 seconds at the 6 o'clock (posterior) positions for a total energy fluence of 12,600 J. One prostate received an additional 60 second exposure at 3 and 9 o'clock for a total fluence of 19,800 J. The prostates were evaluated at one day (n equals 1) and 8 weeks (n equals 4). The histopathology of laser effects at one day show areas of necrosis with loss of glandular structures and stromal edema. Surrounding this area was a zone of degenerative glandular structures extending up to 17.5 mm (cross sectional diameter). The histopathology of the 8 week laser treated animals demonstrated dilated prostatic urethras with maximum cross- sectional diameter of 23.4 mm (mean equals 18.5 +/- 3.9 mm). This study demonstrates the effectiveness of diode laser energy for prostatic tissue coagulation and eventual sloughing. The results also demonstrate the safety of diode laser energy, with similar tissue response as seen with Nd:YAG laser, for laser prostatectomy.

  14. Composite resonator vertical cavity laser diode

    SciTech Connect

    Choquette, K.D.; Hou, H.Q.; Chow, W.W.; Geib, K.M.; Hammons, B.E.

    1998-05-01

    The use of two coupled laser cavities has been employed in edge emitting semiconductor lasers for mode suppression and frequency stabilization. The incorporation of coupled resonators within a vertical cavity laser opens up new possibilities due to the unique ability to tailor the interaction between the cavities. Composite resonators can be utilized to control spectral and temporal properties within the laser; previous studies of coupled cavity vertical cavity lasers have employed photopumped structures. The authors report the first composite resonator vertical cavity laser diode consisting of two optical cavities and three monolithic distributed Bragg reflectors. Cavity coupling effects and two techniques for external modulation of the laser are described.

  15. Submillimeter wave detection with superconducting tunnel diodes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wengler, Michael J.

    1992-01-01

    Superconductor-Insulator-Superconductor (SIS) diodes are the detector elements in the most sensitive heterodyne receivers available from 100 to 500 GHz. SIS mixers are the front end of radio astronomical systems around the world. SIS mixer technology is being extended to 1 THz and higher frequencies for eventual use on spaceborne astronomical experiments. Here is a short review of submillimeter SIS mixers. The role of impedance matching in the proper design of an SIS mixer is described. A variety of methods for achieving good impedance match at submillimeter frequencies are presented. The experimental state of the submillimeter SIS mixer art is described and summarized.

  16. Radiation Degradation Mechanisms in Laser Diodes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Johston, A. H.; Miyahira, T. F.

    2004-01-01

    Degradation mechanisms are investigated for laser diodes fabricated with different materials and wavelengths between 660 and 1550 nm. A new approach is developed that evaluates degradation below the laser threshold to determine the radiation-induced recombination density. This allows mechanisms at high injection, such as Auger recombination, to be separated from low-injection damage. New results show that AlGaInP lasers in the visible region are nearly an order of magnitude more resistant to radiation than devices fabricated with AlGaAs or AlGaAsP at longer wavelengths.

  17. Resonant-tunnelling diodes for THz applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Feiginov, Michael; Sydlo, Cezary; Cojocari, Oleg; Meissner, Peter

    2012-10-01

    We investigate experimentally resonant-tunnelling-diode (RTD) oscillators, which are based on RTDs with heavily doped collector. We demonstrate that such RTD oscillators can work at frequencies, which are far beyond the limitations imposed by resonant-state lifetime and relaxation time. Exploiting further such RTDs, we have achieved the record operating frequency of 1.1 THz and show that substantially higher frequencies should be also achievable with RTD oscillators. RTD oscillators are extremely compact (less than a square millimeter) room-temperature sources of coherent cw THz radiation. Such sources should enable plenty of real-world THz applications.

  18. Optical communication with semiconductor laser diode

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Davidson, Frederic; Sun, X.

    1989-01-01

    This interim report describes the progress in the construction of a 220 Mbps Q=4 PPM optical communication system that uses a semiconductor laser as the optical transmitter and an avalanche photodiode (APD) as the photodetector. The transmitter electronics have been completed and contain both GaAs and ECL III IC's. The circuit was able to operate at a source binary data rate from 75 Mbps to 290 Mbps with pulse rise and fall times of 400 ps. The pulse shapes of the laser diode and the response from the APD/preamplifier module were also measured.

  19. Net-2 models of cavities and diodes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vogtlin, G. E.

    1984-08-01

    The network analysis program, Net-2, was used to model microwave cavities and wave guides. Techniques using both lumped lines and distributed transmission lines were used with good agreement compared to measured values. This technique is applicable to pill box and rectangular cavities as well as rectangular and circular wave guides. Higher order modes can be modeled in addition to the fundamental mode. Pulse driven diodes were modeled using Child-Langmuir limited current. These models use six to nine sections to represent the various radial currents and ection parameters. Complex rise-times and resonances were evaluated and measured to several giga hertz.

  20. Bypass diode for a solar cell

    DOEpatents

    Rim, Seung Bum; Kim, Taeseok; Smith, David D; Cousins, Peter J

    2013-11-12

    Methods of fabricating bypass diodes for solar cells are described. In once embodiment, a method includes forming a first conductive region of a first conductivity type above a substrate of a solar cell. A second conductive region of a second conductivity type is formed on the first conductive region. In another embodiment, a method includes forming a first conductive region of a first conductivity type above a substrate of a solar cell. A second conductive region of a second conductivity type is formed within, and surrounded by, an uppermost portion of the first conductive region but is not formed in a lowermost portion of the first conductive region.

  1. Diode pumped alkali vapor fiber laser

    DOEpatents

    Payne, Stephen A.; Beach, Raymond J.; Dawson, Jay W.; Krupke, William F.

    2007-10-23

    A method and apparatus is provided for producing near-diffraction-limited laser light, or amplifying near-diffraction-limited light, in diode pumped alkali vapor photonic-band-gap fiber lasers or amplifiers. Laser light is both substantially generated and propagated in an alkali gas instead of a solid, allowing the nonlinear and damage limitations of conventional solid core fibers to be circumvented. Alkali vapor is introduced into the center hole of a photonic-band-gap fiber, which can then be pumped with light from a pump laser and operated as an oscillator with a seed beam, or can be configured as an amplifier.

  2. Diode pumped alkali vapor fiber laser

    DOEpatents

    Payne, Stephen A.; Beach, Raymond J.; Dawson, Jay W.; Krupke, William F.

    2006-07-26

    A method and apparatus is provided for producing near-diffraction-limited laser light, or amplifying near-diffraction-limited light, in diode pumped alkali vapor photonic-band-gap fiber lasers or amplifiers. Laser light is both substantially generated and propagated in an alkali gas instead of a solid, allowing the nonlinear and damage limitations of conventional solid core fibers to be circumvented. Alkali vapor is introduced into the center hole of a photonic-band-gap fiber, which can then be pumped with light from a pump laser and operated as an oscillator with a seed beam, or can be configured as an amplifier.

  3. Method for partially coating laser diode facets

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dholakia, Anil R. (Inventor)

    1990-01-01

    Bars of integral laser diode devices cleaved from a wafer are placed with their p regions abutting and n regions abutting. A thin BeCu mask having alternate openings and strips of the same width as the end facets is used to mask the n region interfaces so that multiple bars can be partially coated over their exposed p regions with a reflective or partial reflective coating. The partial coating permits identification of the emitting facet from the fully coated back facet during a later device mounting procedure.

  4. Broadband External-Cavity Diode Laser

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pilgrim, Jeffrey S.

    2005-01-01

    A broadband external-cavity diode laser (ECDL) has been invented for use in spectroscopic surveys preparatory to optical detection of gases. Heretofore, commercially available ECDLs have been designed, in conjunction with sophisticated tuning assemblies, for narrow- band (and, typically, single-frequency) operation, as needed for high sensitivity and high spectral resolution in some gas-detection applications. However, for preparatory spectroscopic surveys, high sensitivity and narrow-band operation are not needed; in such cases, the present broadband ECDL offers a simpler, less-expensive, more-compact alternative to a commercial narrowband ECDL.

  5. Advancements in flowing diode pumped alkali lasers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pitz, Greg A.; Stalnaker, Donald M.; Guild, Eric M.; Oliker, Benjamin Q.; Moran, Paul J.; Townsend, Steven W.; Hostutler, David A.

    2016-03-01

    Multiple variants of the Diode Pumped Alkali Laser (DPAL) have recently been demonstrated at the Air Force Research Laboratory (AFRL). Highlights of this ongoing research effort include: a) a 571W rubidium (Rb) based Master Oscillator Power Amplifier (MOPA) with a gain (2α) of 0.48 cm-1, b) a rubidium-cesium (Cs) Multi-Alkali Multi-Line (MAML) laser that simultaneously lases at both 795 nm and 895 nm, and c) a 1.5 kW resonantly pumped potassium (K) DPAL with a slope efficiency of 50%. The common factor among these experiments is the use of a flowing alkali test bed.

  6. An alternative methodology in Schottky diode physics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mitra, J.; Feng, L.; Peñate-Quesada, L.; Dawson, P.

    2015-06-01

    The fabrication and electrical characterization of Schottky junction diodes have been extensively researched for three-quarters of a century since the original work of Schottky in 1938. This study breaks from the highly standardized regime of such research and provides an alternative methodology that prompts novel, more efficient applications of the adroit Schottky junction in areas such as chemical and thermal sensing. The core departure from standard Schottky diode configuration is that the metal electrode is of comparable or higher resistance than the underlying semiconductor. Further, complete electrical characterization is accomplished through recording four-probe resistance-temperature (RD-T) characteristics of the device, where electrical sourcing and sensing is done only via the metal electrode and not directly through the semiconductor. Importantly, this results in probing a nominally unbiased junction while eliminating the need for an Ohmic contact to the semiconductor. The characteristic RD-T plot shows two distinct regions of high (metal) and low (semiconductor) resistances at low and high temperatures, respectively, connected by a cross-over region of width, ΔT, within which there is a large negative temperature coefficient of resistance. The RD-T characteristic is highly sensitive to the Schottky barrier height; consequently, at a fixed temperature, RD responds appreciably to small changes in barrier height such as that induced by absorption of a chemical species (e.g., H2) at the interface. A theoretical model is developed to simulate the RD-T data and applied to Pd/p-Si and Pt/p-Si Schottky diodes with a range of metal electrode resistance. The analysis gives near-perfect fits to the experimental RD-T characteristics, yielding the junction properties as fit parameters. The modelling not only helps elucidate the underlying physics but also helps to comprehend the parameter space essential for the discussed applications. Although the primary regime

  7. Wheat Under LED's (Light Emitting Diodes)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2004-01-01

    Astroculture is a suite of technologies used to produce and maintain a closed controlled environment for plant growth. The two most recent missions supported growth of potato, dwarf wheat, and mustard plants, and provided scientists with the first opportunity to conduct true plant research in space. Light emitting diodes have particular usefulness for plant growth lighting because they emit a much smaller amount of radiant heat than do conventional lighting sources and because they have potential of directing a higher percentage of the emitted light onto plants surfaces. Furthermore, the high output LED's have emissions in the 600-700 nm waveband, which is of highest efficiency for photosynthesis by plants.

  8. Diode pumped alkali lasers (DPALs): an overview

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krupke, William F.

    2008-05-01

    The concept of power-scalable, high beam-quality diode pumped alkali lasers was introduced in 2003 [Krupke, US Patent No. 6,643,311; Opt. Letters, 28, 2336 (2003)]. Since then several laboratory DPAL devices have been reported on, confirming many of the spectroscopic, kinetic, and laser characteristics projected from literature data. This talk will present an overview of the DPAL concept, summarize key relevant properties of the cesium, rubidium, and potassium alkali vapor gain media so-far examined, outline power scaling considerations, and highlight results of published DPAL laboratory experiments.

  9. Rubidium dimer destruction by a diode laser

    SciTech Connect

    Ban, T.; Aumiler, D.; Pichler, G.

    2005-02-01

    We observed rubidium dimer destruction by excitation of rubidium vapor with diode laser light tuned across the Rb D{sub 2} resonance line in a 2400 GHz tuning interval. The destruction was measured for rubidium atom concentrations in the (1-9)x10{sup 16} cm{sup -3} range, pump beam power up to 43 mW, and with a 5 Torr of the helium buffer gas. We discuss the physical mechanisms involved and specify the molecular pathways which may effectively lead to the observed dimer destruction.

  10. Diode Laser for Laryngeal Surgery: a Systematic Review

    PubMed Central

    Arroyo, Helena Hotz; Neri, Larissa; Fussuma, Carina Yuri; Imamura, Rui

    2016-01-01

    Introduction The diode laser has been frequently used in the management of laryngeal disorders. The portability and functional diversity of this tool make it a reasonable alternative to conventional lasers. However, whether diode laser has been applied in transoral laser microsurgery, the ideal parameters, outcomes, and adverse effects remain unclear. Objective The main objective of this systematic review is to provide a reliable evaluation of the use of diode laser in laryngeal diseases, trying to clarify its ideal parameters in the larynx, as well as its outcomes and complications. Data Synthesis We included eleven studies in the final analysis. From the included articles, we collected data on patient and lesion characteristics, treatment (diode laser's parameters used in surgery), and outcomes related to the laser surgery performed. Only two studies were prospective and there were no randomized controlled trials. Most of the evidence suggests that the diode laser can be a useful tool for treatment of different pathologies in the larynx. In this sense, the parameters must be set depending on the goal (vaporization, section, or coagulation) and the clinical problem. Conclusion: The literature lacks studies on the ideal parameters of the diode laser in laryngeal surgery. The available data indicate that diode laser is a useful tool that should be considered in laryngeal surgeries. Thus, large, well-designed studies correlated with diode compared with other lasers are needed to better estimate its effects. PMID:27096024

  11. Integral bypass diodes in an amorphous silicon alloy photovoltaic module

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hanak, J. J.; Flaisher, H.

    1991-01-01

    Thin-film, tandem-junction, amorphous silicon (a-Si) photovoltaic modules were constructed in which a part of the a-Si alloy cell material is used to form bypass protection diodes. This integral design circumvents the need for incorporating external, conventional diodes, thus simplifying the manufacturing process and reducing module weight.

  12. Diode pumped solid-state laser oscillators for spectroscopic applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Byer, R. L.; Basu, S.; Fan, T. Y.; Kozlovsky, W. J.; Nabors, C. D.; Nilsson, A.; Huber, G.

    1987-01-01

    The rapid improvement in diode laser pump sources has led to the recent progress in diode laser pumped solid state lasers. To date, electrical efficiencies of greater than 10 percent were demonstrated. As diode laser costs decrease with increased production volume, diode laser and diode laser array pumped solid state lasers will replace the traditional flashlamp pumped Nd:YAG laser sources. The use of laser diode array pumping of slab geometry lasers will allow efficient, high peak and average power solid state laser sources to be developed. Perhaps the greatest impact of diode laser pumped solid state lasers will be in spectroscopic applications of miniature, monolithic devices. Single-stripe diode-pumped operation of a continuous-wave 946 nm Nd:YAG laser with less than 10 m/w threshold was demonstrated. A slope efficiency of 16 percent near threshold was shown with a projected slope efficiency well above a threshold of 34 percent based on results under Rhodamine 6G dye-laser pumping. Nonlinear crystals for second-harmonic generation of this source were evaluated. The KNbO3 and periodically poled LiNbO3 appear to be the most promising.

  13. Thermal Reliability Study of Bypass Diodes in Photovoltaic Modules (Poster)

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, Z.; Wohlgemuth, J.; Kurtz, S.

    2013-05-01

    This paper presents the result of high-temperature durability and thermal cycling testing and analysis for the selected diodes to study the detail of the thermal design and relative long-term reliability of the bypass diodes used to limit the detrimental effects of module hot-spot susceptibility.

  14. Solar spectrum rectification using nano-antennas and tunneling diodes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dagenais, Mario; Choi, Kwangsik; Yesilkoy, Filiz; Chryssis, Athanasios N.; Peckerar, Martin C.

    2010-02-01

    Our goal is to develop a rectifying antenna (rectenna) applicable to solar spectrum energy harvesting. In particular, we aim to demonstrate viable techniques for converting portion of the solar spectrum not efficiently converted to electric power by current photovoltaic approaches. Novel design guidelines are suggested for rectifying antenna coupled tunneling diodes. We propose a new geometric field enhancement scheme in antenna coupled tunneling diodes that uses surface plasmon resonances. For this purpose, we have successfully implemented a planar tunneling diode with polysilion/SiO2/polysilcon structure. An antenna coupled asymmetric tunneling diode is developed with a pointed triangle electrode for geometric field enhancement. The geometrically asymmetric tunneling diode shows a unique asymmetric tunneling current versus voltage characteristic. Through comparison with crossover tunneling diodes, we verified that the current asymmetry is not from the work function difference between the two electrodes. Results of RF rectification tests using the asymmetric diode demonstrate that our approach is practical for energy harvesting application. Furthermore, we describe how surface plasmons can enhance the electric field across the tunnel junction, lowering the effective "turn-on" voltage of the diode, further improving rectification efficiency.

  15. Organic reprogrammable circuits based on electrochemically formed diodes.

    PubMed

    Liu, Jiang; Engquist, Isak; Berggren, Magnus

    2014-08-13

    We report a method to construct reprogrammable circuits based on organic electrochemical (EC) p-n junction diodes. The diodes are built up from the combination of the organic conjugated polymer poly[2-methoxy-5-(2-ethylhexyloxy)-1,4-phenylenevinylene] and a polymer electrolyte. The p-n diodes are defined by EC doping performed at 70 °C, and then stabilized at -30 °C. The reversible EC reaction allows for in situ reprogramming of the polarity of the organic p-n junction, thus enabling us to reconfigure diode circuits. By combining diodes of specific polarities dedicated circuits have been created, such as various logic gates, a voltage limiter and an AC/DC converter. Reversing the EC reaction allows in situ reprogramming of the p-n junction polarity, thus enabling reconfiguration of diode circuits, for example, from an AND gate to an OR gate. The reprogrammable circuits are based on p-n diodes defined from only two layers, the electrodes and then the active semiconductor:electrolyte composite material. Such simple device structures are promising for large-area and fully printed reconfigurable circuits manufactured using common printing tools. The structure of the reported p-n diodes mimics the architecture of and is based on identical materials used to construct light-emitting electrochemical cells (LEC). Our findings thus provide a robust signal routing technology that is easily integrated with traditional LECs. PMID:24998703

  16. CO.sub.2 optically pumped distributed feedback diode laser

    DOEpatents

    Rockwood, Stephen D.

    1980-01-01

    A diode laser optically pumped by a CO.sub.2 coherent source. Interference fringes generated by feeding the optical pumping beam against a second beam, periodically alter the reflectivity of the diode medium allowing frequency variation of the output signal by varying the impingent angle of the CO.sub.2 laser beams.

  17. Operation of AC Adapters Visualized Using Light-Emitting Diodes

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Regester, Jeffrey

    2016-01-01

    A bridge rectifier is a diamond-shaped configuration of diodes that serves to convert alternating current(AC) into direct current (DC). In our world of AC outlets and DC electronics, they are ubiquitous. Of course, most bridge rectifiers are built with regular diodes, not the light-emitting variety, because LEDs have a number of disadvantages. For…

  18. Digital control of diode laser for atmospheric spectroscopy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Menzies, R. T.; Rutledge, C. W. (Inventor)

    1985-01-01

    A system is described for remote absorption spectroscopy of trace species using a diode laser tunable over a useful spectral region of 50 to 200 cm(-1) by control of diode laser temperature over range from 15 K to 100 K, and tunable over a smaller region of typically 0.1 to 10 cm(-1) by control of the diode laser current over a range from 0 to 2 amps. Diode laser temperature and current set points are transmitted to the instrument in digital form and stored in memory for retrieval under control of a microprocessor during measurements. The laser diode current is determined by a digital to analog converter through a field effect transistor for a high degree of ambient temperature stability, while the laser diode temperature is determined by set points entered into a digital to analog converter under control of the microprocessor. Temperature of the laser diode is sensed by a sensor diode to provide negative feedback to the temperature control circuit that responds to the temperature control digital to analog converter.

  19. Equivalent circuit model of semiconductor nanowire diode by SPICE.

    PubMed

    Lee, SeHan; Yu, YunSeop; Hwang, SungWoo; Ahn, Doyeol

    2007-11-01

    An equivalent circuit model of nanowire diodes is introduced. Because nanowire diodes inevitably involve a metal-semiconductor-metal structure, they consist of two metal-semiconductor contacts and one resistor in between these contacts. Our equivalent circuit consists of two Schottky diodes and one resistor. The current through the reverse-biased Schottky diode is calculated from the thermionic field emission (TFE) theory and that of the forward-biased Schottky diode is obtained from the classical thermionic emission (TE) equation. Our model is integrated into the conventional circuit simulator SPICE by a sub-circuit with TFE and TE routines. The results simulated with our model by SPICE are in good agreement with various, previously reported experimental results. PMID:18047126

  20. Diode Laser Application in Soft Tissue Oral Surgery

    PubMed Central

    Azma, Ehsan; Safavi, Nassimeh

    2013-01-01

    Introduction: Diode laser with wavelengths ranging from 810 to 980 nm in a continuous or pulsed mode was used as a possible instrument for soft tissue surgery in the oral cavity. Discussion: Diode laser is one of laser systems in which photons are produced by electric current with wavelengths of 810, 940 and 980nm. The application of diode laser in soft tissue oral surgery has been evaluated from a safety point of view, for facial pigmentation and vascular lesions and in oral surgery excision; for example frenectomy, epulis fissuratum and fibroma. The advantages of laser application are that it provides relatively bloodless surgical and post surgical courses with minimal swelling and scarring. We used diode laser for excisional biopsy of pyogenic granuloma and gingival pigmentation. Conclusion: The diode laser can be used as a modality for oral soft tissue surgery PMID:25606331

  1. New diode wavelengths for pumping solid-state lasers

    SciTech Connect

    Skidmore, J.A.; Emanuel, M.A.; Beach, R.J.

    1995-01-01

    High-power laser-diode arrays have been demonstrated to be viable pump sources for solid-state lasers. The diode bars (fill factor of 0.7) were bonded to silicon microchannel heatsinks for high-average-power operation. Over 12 W of CW output power was achieved from a one cm AlGaInP tensile-strained single-quantum-well laser diode bar. At 690 nm, a compressively-strained single-quantum-well laser-diode array produced 360 W/cm{sup 2} per emitting aperture under CW operation, and 2.85 kW of pulsed power from a 3.8 cm{sup 2} emitting-aperture array. InGaAs strained single-quantum-well laser diodes emitting at 900 nm produced 2.8 kW pulsed power from a 4.4 cm{sup 2} emitting-aperture array.

  2. Security Applications of Diodes with Unique Current-Voltage Characteristics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rührmair, Ulrich; Jaeger, Christian; Hilgers, Christian; Algasinger, Michael; Csaba, György; Stutzmann, Martin

    Diodes are among the most simple and inexpensive electric components. In this paper, we investigate how random diodes with irregular I(U) curves can be employed for crypto and security purposes. We show that such diodes can be used to build Strong Physical Unclonable Functions (PUFs), Certificates of Authenticity (COAs), and Physically Obfuscated Keys (POKs), making them a broadly usable security tool. We detail how such diodes can be produced by an efficient and inexpensive method known as ALILE process. Furthermore, we present measurement data from real systems and discuss prototypical implementations. This includes the generation of helper data as well as efficient signature generation by elliptic curves and 2D barcode generation for the application of the diodes as COAs.

  3. Design, fabrication, and testing of a cryogenic thermal diode

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Quadrini, J.; Kosson, R.

    1974-01-01

    Cryogenic heat pipe diode applications and a new heat pipe geometry are discussed. This new geometry employs excess liquid to block the vapor space of the evaporator and part of the transport section during reverse mode conditions. An orifice plate is positioned in the pipe at the blocking meniscus location, with the opening arranged to permit proper liquid distribution in both ground tests and zero g operation. Experimental data are presented for a room temperature heat pipe modified to operate as a blocking orifice diode. The test results verify feasibility of the blocking orifice technique with the diode having a rapid shutoff characteristic. The selection of a diode for fabrication and test was based mainly on a parametric investigation of the liquid trap and liquid blockage techniques. The blocking orifice form of liquid blockage was selected for the cryogenic diode based on its high throughput, small reservoir requirement, and small energy and time required for shutoff.

  4. Spectroscopy with Comb-Referenced Diode Lasers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cich, Matthew; Lopez, Gary V.; Johnson, Philip M.; Sears, Trevor J.; McRaven, Christopher P.

    2010-06-01

    Extended cavity diode lasers have been stabilized by locking to components of an erbium-doped fiber laser-based frequency comb with a 250 MHz comb spacing centered at 1.5μ m. We find the Allan variance of the diode laser frequency relative to the single comb component to which it is locked is of the order of a few Hz. For the system as a whole, the absolute frequency accuracy is approximately 1.5 parts in 1012. In order to characterize the system more completely, we have recorded saturation dip absorption spectra of several transitions in the ν_1 + ν_3 combination band of acetylene near 6530 cm-1. We find good agreement with published absolute frequency measurements for these transitions, which have been used as secondary frequency standards in the past. Aside from extremely precise saturation dip measurements such as these, comb-stabilized lasers should permit excellent measurements of Doppler-broadened lineshapes, both to compare with theory and for analytical applications. Progress along these lines will be reported at the meeting. Acknowledgments: T. J. Sears gratefully acknowledges support from a Brookhaven National Laboratory program development grant that enabled this work and also support for research at Brookhaven National Laboratory which was carried out under Contract No. DE-AC02-98CH10886 with the U.S. Department of Energy and supported by its Office of Basic Energy Sciences, Division of Chemical Sciences, Geosciences and Biosciences.

  5. Sensitivity of resonant tunneling diode photodetectors.

    PubMed

    Pfenning, Andreas; Hartmann, Fabian; Langer, Fabian; Kamp, Martin; Höfling, Sven; Worschech, Lukas

    2016-09-01

    We have studied the sensitivity of AlGaAs/GaAs double barrier resonant tunneling diode photodetectors with an integrated GaInNAs absorption layer for light sensing at the telecommunication wavelength of λ = 1.3 μm for illumination powers from pico- to microwatts. The sensitivity decreases nonlinearly with power. An illumination power increase of seven orders of magnitude leads to a reduction of the photocurrent sensitivity from S I  = 5.82 × 10(3) A W(-1) to 3.2 A W(-1). We attribute the nonlinear sensitivity-power dependence to an altered local electrostatic potential due to hole-accumulation that on the one hand tunes the tunneling current, but on the other hand affects the lifetime of photogenerated holes. In particular, the lifetime decreases exponentially with increasing hole population. The lifetime reduction results from an enhanced electrical field, a rise of the quasi-Fermi level, and an increased energy splitting within the triangular potential well. The non-constant sensitivity is a direct result of the non-constant lifetime. Based on these findings, we provide an expression that allows us to calculate the sensitivity as a function of illumination power and bias voltage, show a way to model the time-resolved photocurrent, and determine the critical power up to which the resonant tunneling diode photodetector sensitivity can be assumed constant. PMID:27454462

  6. Field-effect-tuned lateral organic diodes

    PubMed Central

    Dhar, Bal Mukund; Kini, Geetha S.; Xia, Guoqiang; Jung, Byung Jun; Markovic, Nina; Katz, Howard E.

    2010-01-01

    The operation of organic diodes in solar cells and light-emitting displays strongly depends on the properties of the interfaces between hole- and electron-carrying organic semiconductors. Such interfaces are difficult to characterize, as they are usually buried under the surface or exist as an irregular “bulk heterojunction.” Using a unique fluorinated barrier layer-based lithographic technique, we fabricated a lateral organic p-n junction, allowing the first observation of the potential at an organic p-n interface simultaneously with the charge transport measurements. We find that the diode characteristics of the device (current output and rectification ratio) are consistent with the changes in the surface potentials near the junction, and the current-voltage curves and junction potentials are strongly and self-consistently modulated by a third, gate electrode. The generality of our technique makes this an attractive method to investigate the physics of organic semiconductor junctions. The lithographic technique is applicable to a wide variety of soft material patterns. The observation of built-in potentials makes an important connection between organic junctions and textbook descriptions of inorganic devices. Finally, these kinds of potentials may prove to be controlling factors in charge separation efficiency in organic photovoltaics. PMID:20160116

  7. Sensitivity of resonant tunneling diode photodetectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pfenning, Andreas; Hartmann, Fabian; Langer, Fabian; Kamp, Martin; Höfling, Sven; Worschech, Lukas

    2016-09-01

    We have studied the sensitivity of AlGaAs/GaAs double barrier resonant tunneling diode photodetectors with an integrated GaInNAs absorption layer for light sensing at the telecommunication wavelength of λ = 1.3 μm for illumination powers from pico- to microwatts. The sensitivity decreases nonlinearly with power. An illumination power increase of seven orders of magnitude leads to a reduction of the photocurrent sensitivity from S I = 5.82 × 103 A W‑1 to 3.2 A W‑1. We attribute the nonlinear sensitivity–power dependence to an altered local electrostatic potential due to hole-accumulation that on the one hand tunes the tunneling current, but on the other hand affects the lifetime of photogenerated holes. In particular, the lifetime decreases exponentially with increasing hole population. The lifetime reduction results from an enhanced electrical field, a rise of the quasi-Fermi level, and an increased energy splitting within the triangular potential well. The non-constant sensitivity is a direct result of the non-constant lifetime. Based on these findings, we provide an expression that allows us to calculate the sensitivity as a function of illumination power and bias voltage, show a way to model the time-resolved photocurrent, and determine the critical power up to which the resonant tunneling diode photodetector sensitivity can be assumed constant.

  8. Angle sensitive single photon avalanche diode

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, Changhyuk Johnson, Ben Molnar, Alyosha

    2015-06-08

    An ideal light sensor would provide exact information on intensity, timing, location, and angle of incoming photons. Single photon avalanche diodes (SPADs) provide such desired high (single photon) sensitivity with precise time information and can be implemented at a pixel-scale to form an array to extract spatial information. Furthermore, recent work has demonstrated photodiode-based structures (combined with micro-lenses or diffraction gratings) that are capable of encoding both spatial and angular information of incident light. In this letter, we describe the implementation of such a grating structure on SPADs to realize a pixel-scale angle-sensitive single photon avalanche diode (A-SPAD) built in a standard CMOS process. While the underlying SPAD structure provides high sensitivity, the time information of the two layers of diffraction gratings above offers angle-sensitivity. Such a unique combination of SPAD and diffraction gratings expands the sensing dimensions to pave a path towards lens-less 3-D imaging and light-field time-of-flight imaging.

  9. Highly sensitive nanoscale spin-torque diode

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miwa, S.; Ishibashi, S.; Tomita, H.; Nozaki, T.; Tamura, E.; Ando, K.; Mizuochi, N.; Saruya, T.; Kubota, H.; Yakushiji, K.; Taniguchi, T.; Imamura, H.; Fukushima, A.; Yuasa, S.; Suzuki, Y.

    2014-01-01

    Highly sensitive microwave devices that are operational at room temperature are important for high-speed multiplex telecommunications. Quantum devices such as superconducting bolometers possess high performance but work only at low temperature. On the other hand, semiconductor devices, although enabling high-speed operation at room temperature, have poor signal-to-noise ratios. In this regard, the demonstration of a diode based on spin-torque-induced ferromagnetic resonance between nanomagnets represented a promising development, even though the rectification output was too small for applications (1.4 mV mW-1). Here we show that by applying d.c. bias currents to nanomagnets while precisely controlling their magnetization-potential profiles, a much greater radiofrequency detection sensitivity of 12,000 mV mW-1 is achievable at room temperature, exceeding that of semiconductor diode detectors (3,800 mV mW-1). Theoretical analysis reveals essential roles for nonlinear ferromagnetic resonance, which enhances the signal-to-noise ratio even at room temperature as the size of the magnets decreases.

  10. Space Qualification of Laser Diode Arrays

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Troupaki, Elisavet; Kashem, Nasir B.; Allan, Graham R.; Vasilyev, Aleksey; Stephen, Mark

    2005-01-01

    Laser instruments have great potential in enabling a new generation of remote-sensing scientific instruments. NASA s desire to employ laser instruments aboard satellites, imposes stringent reliability requirements under severe conditions. As a result of these requirements, NASA has a research program to understand, quantify and reduce the risk of failure to these instruments when deployed on satellites. Most of NASA s proposed laser missions have base-lined diode-pumped Nd:YAG lasers that generally use quasi-constant wave (QCW), 808 nm Laser Diode Arrays (LDAs). Our group has an on-going test program to measure the performance of these LDAs when operated in conditions replicating launch and orbit. In this paper, we report on the results of tests designed to measure the effect of vibration loads simulating launch into space and the radiation environment encountered on orbit. Our primary objective is to quantify the performance of the LDAs in conditions replicating those of a satellite instrument, determine their limitations and strengths which will enable better and more robust designs. To this end we have developed a systematic testing strategy to quantify the effect of environmental stresses on the optical and electrical properties of the LDA.

  11. Diode and Final Focus Simulations for DARHT

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hughes, Thomas P.; Welch, Dale R.; Carlson, Randolph L.

    1997-05-01

    We have used the numerical simulation codes uc(ivory,) uc(iprop) and uc(pbguns) to simulate beam dynamics in the diode and final focus of the 4 kA, 20 MV DARHT linear accelerator. A low emittance 4 MV, 4 kA source for a 4-pulse injector was designed using uc(ivory) and uc(pbguns.) Due to the long pulse length (four 70 ns pulses over 1 μsec), we have kept the field stress to < 200 kV/cm over the cathode electrode, and to ≈ 50 kV/cm on the radial insulator stacks. The normalized edge emittance produced by the diode optics is only ≈ 130 mm-mrad. In the final-focus region, we have used uc(iprop) to model the effect of ion emission from the target. The intense electric field of the beam at the 1 mm diameter focal spot produces substantial ion velocities, and, if the space-charge-limited current density can be supplied, significant focal spot degradation may occur due to ion space-charge. Calculations for the ITS test stand, which has a larger focal spot, show that the effect should be observable for H^+ and C^+ ion species. The effect may be lessened if there is insufficient ion density on the target to supply the space-charge-limited current density, or if the ion charge-to-mass ratio is sufficiently large.

  12. A new diode laser acupuncture therapy apparatus

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Chengwei; Huang, Zhen; Li, Dongyu; Zhang, Xiaoyuan

    2006-06-01

    Since the first laser-needles acupuncture apparatus was introduced in therapy, this kind of apparatus has been well used in laser biomedicine as its non-invasive, pain- free, non-bacterium, and safetool. The laser acupuncture apparatus in this paper is based on single-chip microcomputer and associated by semiconductor laser technology. The function like traditional moxibustion including reinforcing and reducing is implemented by applying chaos method to control the duty cycle of moxibustion signal, and the traditional lifting and thrusting of acupuncture is implemented by changing power output of the diode laser. The radiator element of diode laser is made and the drive circuit is designed. And chaos mathematic model is used to produce deterministic class stochastic signal to avoid the body adaptability. This function covers the shortages of continuous irradiation or that of simple disciplinary stimulate signal, which is controlled by some simple electronic circuit and become easily adjusted by human body. The realization of reinforcing and reducing of moxibustion is technological innovation in traditional acupuncture coming true in engineering.

  13. Ion divergence in magnetically insulated diodes

    SciTech Connect

    Slutz, S.A.; Lemke, R.W.; Pointon, T.D.; Desjarlais, M.P.; Johnson, D.J.; Mehlhorn, T.A.; Filuk, A.; Bailey, J.

    1995-12-01

    Magnetically insulated ion diodes are being developed to drive inertial confinement fusion. Ion beam microdivergence must be reduced to achieve the very high beam intensities required to achieve this goal. Three-dimensional particle-in-cell simulations indicate that instability induced fluctuations can produce significant ion divergence during acceleration. These simulations exhibit a fast growing mode early in time, which has been identified as the diocotron instability. The divergence generated by this mode is modest due to the relatively high frequency (>1GHz). Later, a low-frequency low-phase-velocity instability develops. This instability couples effectively to the ions, since the frequency is approximately the reciprocal of the ion transit time, and can generate unacceptably large ion divergences (>30 mrad). Linear stability theory reveals that this mode requires perturbations parallel to the applied magnetic field and is related to the modified two stream instability. Measurements of ion density fluctuations and energy-momentum correlations have confirmed that instabilities develop in ion diodes and contribute to the ion divergence. In addition, spectroscopic measurements indicate that the ions have a significant transverse temperature very close to the emission surface. Passive lithium fluoride (LiF) anodes have larger transverse beam temperatures than laser irradiated active sources. Calculations of source divergence expected from the roughness of LiF surfaces and the possible removal of this layer is presented.

  14. The 60 GHz IMPATT diode development

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dat, Rovindra; Ayyagari, Murthy; Hoag, David; Sloat, David; Anand, Yogi; Whitely, Stan

    1986-01-01

    The objective is to develop 60 GHz IMPATT diodes suitable for communications applications. The performance goals of the 60 GHz IMPATT is 1W CW output power with a conversion efficiency of 15 percent and 10-year lifetime. The final design of the 60 GHz IMPATT structure evolved from computer simulations performed at the University of Michigan. The initial doping profile, involving a hybrid double-drift (HDD) design, was derived from a drift-diffusion model that used the static velocity-field characteristics for GaAs. Unfortunately, the model did not consider the effects of velocity undershoot and delay of the avalanche process due to energy relaxation. Consequently, the initial devices were oscillating at a much lower frequency than anticipated. With a revised simulation program that included the two effects given above, a second HDD profile was generated and was used as a basis for fabrication efforts. In the area of device fabrication, significant progress was made in epitaxial growth and characterization, wafer processing, and die assembly. The organo-metallic chemical vapor deposition (OMCVD) was used. Starting with a baseline X-Band IMPATT technology, appropriate processing steps were modified to satisfy the device requirements at V-Band. In terms of efficiency and reliability, the device requirements dictate a reduction in its series resistance and thermal resistance values. Qualitatively, researchers were able to reduce the diodes' series resistance by reducing the thickness of the N+ GaAs substrate used in its fabrication.

  15. Giant Electroresistive Ferroelectric Diode on 2DEG

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Shin-Ik; Jin Gwon, Hyo; Kim, Dai-Hong; Keun Kim, Seong; Choi, Ji-Won; Yoon, Seok-Jin; Jung Chang, Hye; Kang, Chong-Yun; Kwon, Beomjin; Bark, Chung-Wung; Hong, Seong-Hyeon; Kim, Jin-Sang; Baek, Seung-Hyub

    2015-01-01

    Manipulation of electrons in a solid through transmitting, storing, and switching is the fundamental basis for the microelectronic devices. Recently, the electroresistance effect in the ferroelectric capacitors has provided a novel way to modulate the electron transport by polarization reversal. Here, we demonstrate a giant electroresistive ferroelectric diode integrating a ferroelectric capacitor into two-dimensional electron gas (2DEG) at oxide interface. As a model system, we fabricate an epitaxial Au/Pb(Zr0.2Ti0.8)O3/LaAlO3/SrTiO3 heterostructure, where 2DEG is formed at LaAlO3/SrTiO3 interface. This device functions as a two-terminal, non-volatile memory of 1 diode-1 resistor with a large I+/I− ratio (>108 at ±6 V) and Ion/Ioff ratio (>107). This is attributed to not only Schottky barrier modulation at metal/ferroelectric interface by polarization reversal but also the field-effect metal-insulator transition of 2DEG. Moreover, using this heterostructure, we can demonstrate a memristive behavior for an artificial synapse memory, where the resistance can be continuously tuned by partial polarization switching, and the electrons are only unidirectionally transmitted. Beyond non-volatile memory and logic devices, our results will provide new opportunities to emerging electronic devices such as multifunctional nanoelectronics and neuromorphic electronics. PMID:26014446

  16. Additional electric field in real trench MOS barrier Schottky diode

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mamedov, R. K.; Aslanova, A. R.

    2016-04-01

    In real trench MOS barrier Schottky diode (TMBS diode) additional electric field (AEF) the whole is formed in the near contact region of the semiconductor and its propagation space is limited with the barrier metal and the metallic electrodes of MOS structures. Effective potential barrier height TMBS diode is formed via resulting electric field of superposition AEF and electric field of space charge region (SCR) semiconductor. The dependence of the resulting electric field intensity of the distance towards the inside the semiconductor is nonlinear and characterized by a peak at a certain distance from the interface. The thickness of the SCR in TMBS diode becomes equal to the trench depth. Force and energy parameters of the AEF, and thus resulting electric field in the SCR region, become dependent on the geometric design parameters TMBS diode. The forward I-V characteristic TMBS diode is described by the thermionic emission theory as in conventional flat Scottky diode, and in the reverse bias, current is virtually absent at initial voltage, appears abruptly at a certain critical voltage.

  17. Effect of diode wavelength broadening in a diode end-pumped solid-state amplifier.

    PubMed

    Bourdet, Gilbert L; Casagrande, Olivier

    2007-05-10

    The effect of the spectral broadening in cw diode pumping and the wavelength shift in pulsed pumping of a solid-state laser is investigated theoretically. A very simple model allowing the computation of the reduction of the absorbed pump energy is developed. The results are applied to an ytterbium-doped solid-state laser and should be fruitful for amplifier and laser design. PMID:17446921

  18. Light-Emitting Diodes: Phosphorescent Nanocluster Light-Emitting Diodes (Adv. Mater. 2/2016).

    PubMed

    Kuttipillai, Padmanaban S; Zhao, Yimu; Traverse, Christopher J; Staples, Richard J; Levine, Benjamin G; Lunt, Richard R

    2016-01-13

    On page 320, R. R. Lunt and co-workers demonstrate electroluminescence from earth-abundant phosphorescent metal halide nanoclusters. These inorganic emitters, which exhibit rich photophysics combined with a high phosphorescence quantum yield, are employed in red and near-infrared light-emitting diodes, providing a new platform of phosphorescent emitters for low-cost and high-performance light-emission applications. PMID:26749470

  19. Continuous wave Cs diode pumped alkali laser pumped by single emitter narrowband laser diode.

    PubMed

    Zhdanov, B V; Venus, G; Smirnov, V; Glebov, L; Knize, R J

    2015-08-01

    This paper presents results of cooperative efforts on development of a continuous wave Cs diode pumped alkali laser with moderate output power, which can be considered as a prototype of the commercial device. The developed system operates at 895 nm with output power about 4 W and slope efficiency 28%. Measured turn on time of this system from the standby mode is about a minute. PMID:26329171

  20. Quaternary InGaAsSb Thermophotovoltaic Diodes

    SciTech Connect

    MW Dashiell; JF Beausang; H Ehsani; GJ Nichols; DM Depoy; LR Danielson; P Talamo; KD Rahner; EJ Brown; SR Burger; PM Foruspring; WF Topper; PF Baldasaro; CA Wang; R Huang; M Connors; G Turner; Z Shellenbarger; G Taylor; J Li; R Martinelli; D Donetski; S Anikeev; G Belenky; S Luryi

    2006-03-09

    In{sub x}Ga{sub 1-x}As{sub y}Sb{sub 1-y} thermophotovoltaic (TPV) diodes were grown lattice-matched to GaSb substrates by Metal Organic Vapor Phase Epitaxy (MOVPE) in the bandgap range of E{sub G} = 0.5 to 0.6eV. InGaAsSb TPV diodes, utilizing front-surface spectral control filters, are measured with thermal-to-electric conversion efficiency and power density of {eta}{sub TPV} = 19.7% and PD =0.58 W/cm{sup 2} respectively for a radiator temperature of T{sub radiator} = 950 C, diode temperature of T{sub diode} = 27 C, and diode bandgap of E{sub G} = 0.53eV. Practical limits to TPV energy conversion efficiency are established using measured recombination coefficients and optical properties of front surface spectral control filters, which for 0.53eV InGaAsSb TPV energy conversion is {eta}{sub TPV} = 28% and PD = 0.85W/cm{sup 2} at the above operating temperatures. The most severe performance limits are imposed by (1) diode open-circuit voltage (VOC) limits due to intrinsic Auger recombination and (2) parasitic photon absorption in the inactive regions of the module. Experimentally, the diode V{sub OC} is 15% below the practical limit imposed by intrinsic Auger recombination processes. Analysis of InGaAsSb diode electrical performance vs. diode architecture indicate that the V{sub OC} and thus efficiency is limited by extrinsic recombination processes such as through bulk defects.

  1. Frequency stabilization of diode-laser-pumped solid state lasers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Byer, Robert L.

    1988-01-01

    The goal of the NASA Sunlite program is to fly two diode-laser-pumped solid-state lasers on the space shuttle and while doing so to perform a measurement of their frequency stability and temporal coherence. These measurements will be made by combining the outputs of the two lasers on an optical radiation detector and spectrally analyzing the beat note. Diode-laser-pumped solid-state lasers have several characteristics that will make them useful in space borne experiments. First, this laser has high electrical efficiency. Second, it is of a technology that enables scaling to higher powers in the future. Third, the laser can be made extremely reliable, which is crucial for many space based applications. Fourth, they are frequency and amplitude stable and have high temporal coherence. Diode-laser-pumped solid-state lasers are inherently efficient. Recent results have shown 59 percent slope efficiency for a diode-laser-pumped solid-state laser. As for reliability, the laser proposed should be capable of continuous operation. This is possible because the diode lasers can be remote from the solid state gain medium by coupling through optical fibers. Diode lasers are constructed with optical detectors for monitoring their output power built into their mounting case. A computer can actively monitor the output of each diode laser. If it sees any variation in the output power that might indicate a problem, the computer can turn off that diode laser and turn on a backup diode laser. As for stability requirements, it is now generally believed that any laser can be stabilized if the laser has a frequency actuator capable of tuning the laser frequency as far as it is likely to drift in a measurement time.

  2. Light-Emitting Diodes: A Hidden Treasure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Planinšič, Gorazd; Etkina, Eugenia

    2014-02-01

    LEDs, or light-emitting diodes, are cheap, easy to purchase, and thus commonly used in physics instruction as indicators of electric current or as sources of light (Fig. 1). In our opinion LEDs represent a unique piece of equipment that can be used to collect experimental evidence, and construct and test new ideas in almost every unit of a general physics course (and in many advanced courses) either (I) as "black boxes" that allow students to study certain properties of a system of interest, (II) as physical systems that allow students to learn an astonishing amount of physics that they usually do not encounter in a regular introductory physics course, and (III) as non-traditional devices that allow students to construct concepts that are traditionally a part of a general physics course.

  3. Diode-laser-based therapy device

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Udrea, Mircea V.; Nica, Adriana S.; Florian, Mariana; Poenaru, Daniela; Udrea, Gabriela; Lungeanu, Mihaela; Sporea, Dan G.; Vasiliu, Virgil V.; Vieru, Roxana

    2004-10-01

    A new therapy laser device is presented. The device consists of a central unit and different types of laser probes. The laser probe model SL7-650 delivers seven red (650 nm), 5 mW diode lasers convergent beams. The beams converge at about 30 cm in front of the laser probe and the irradiated area might be varied by simple displacement of the laser probe with respect to the target. The laser probe SL1-808 emits single infrared laser beam up to 500 mW. The efficiency of the use of this device in physiotherapy, and rheumatology, has been put into evidence after years of testing. Dermatology and microsurgery are users of infrared powerful laser probes. The device has successfully passed technical and clinical tests in order to be certified. The laser device design and some medical results are given.

  4. Terahertz imaging system with resonant tunneling diodes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miyamoto, Tomoyuki; Yamaguchi, Atsushi; Mukai, Toshikazu

    2016-03-01

    We report a feasibility study of a terahertz imaging system with resonant tunneling diodes (RTDs) that oscillate at 0.30 THz. A pair of RTDs acted as an emitter and a detector in the system. Terahertz reflection images of opaque samples were acquired with our RTD imaging system. A spatial resolution of 1 mm, which is equal to the wavelength of the RTD emitter, was achieved. The signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) of the reflection image was improved by 6 dB by using polarization optics that reduced interference effects. Additionally, the coherence of the RTD enabled a depth resolution of less than 3 µm to be achieved by an interferometric technique. Thus, RTDs are an attractive candidate for use in small THz imaging systems.

  5. Resonant tunneling diode photodetector with nonconstant responsivity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dong, Yu; Wang, Guanglong; Ni, Haiqiao; Chen, Jianhui; Gao, Fengqi; Li, Baochen; Pei, Kangming; Niu, Zhichuan

    2015-11-01

    Resonant tunneling diode with an In0.53Ga0.47As absorption layer is designed for light detection at 1550 nm. The responsivity of the detector is simulated by solving the Tsu-Esaki equation. The simulation results show that the responsivity of the detector is nonconstant. It decreases with the increment of the power density of the incident light. Samples of the detector are fabricated by molecular beam epitaxy. The experimental results show that the responsivity increases while the power density of the incident light decreases which agree with the simulation results. The responsivity reaches 4.8×108 A/(W/μm2) at room temperature and 5.0×109 A/(W/μm2) at 77 K when the power density of the incident light is 1×10-13 W/μm2.

  6. Rectification mechanism in diblock oligomer molecular diodes.

    PubMed

    Oleynik, I I; Kozhushner, M A; Posvyanskii, V S; Yu, L

    2006-03-10

    We investigated a mechanism of rectification in diblock oligomer diode molecules that have recently been synthesized and showed a pronounced asymmetry in the measured I-V spectrum. The observed rectification effect is due to the resonant nature of electron transfer in the system and the localization properties of bound state wave functions of resonant states of the tunneling electron interacting with an asymmetric molecule in an electric field. The asymmetry of the tunneling wave function is enhanced or weakened depending on the polarity of the applied bias. The conceptually new theoretical approach, the Green's function theory of sub-barrier scattering, is able to provide a physically transparent explanation of this rectification effect based on the concept of the bound state spectrum of a tunneling electron. The theory predicts the characteristic features of the I-V spectrum in qualitative agreement with experiment. PMID:16606295

  7. A single blue nanorod light emitting diode.

    PubMed

    Hou, Y; Bai, J; Smith, R; Wang, T

    2016-05-20

    We report a light emitting diode (LED) consisting of a single InGaN/GaN nanorod fabricated by a cost-effective top-down approach from a standard LED wafer. The device demonstrates high performance with a reduced quantum confined Stark effect compared with a standard planar counterpart fabricated from the same wafer, confirmed by optical and electrical characterization. Current density as high as 5414 A cm(-2) is achieved without significant damage to the device due to the high internal quantum efficiency. The efficiency droop is mainly ascribed to Auger recombination, which was studied by an ABC model. Our work provides a potential method for fabricating compact light sources for advanced photonic integrated circuits without involving expensive or time-consuming fabrication facilities. PMID:27070200

  8. A single blue nanorod light emitting diode

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hou, Y.; Bai, J.; Smith, R.; Wang, T.

    2016-05-01

    We report a light emitting diode (LED) consisting of a single InGaN/GaN nanorod fabricated by a cost-effective top-down approach from a standard LED wafer. The device demonstrates high performance with a reduced quantum confined Stark effect compared with a standard planar counterpart fabricated from the same wafer, confirmed by optical and electrical characterization. Current density as high as 5414 A cm‑2 is achieved without significant damage to the device due to the high internal quantum efficiency. The efficiency droop is mainly ascribed to Auger recombination, which was studied by an ABC model. Our work provides a potential method for fabricating compact light sources for advanced photonic integrated circuits without involving expensive or time-consuming fabrication facilities.

  9. Microlens frames for laser diode arrays

    DOEpatents

    Skidmore, J.A.; Freitas, B.L.

    1999-07-13

    Monolithic microlens frames enable the fabrication of monolithic laser diode arrays and are manufactured inexpensively with high registration, and with inherent focal length compensation for any lens diameter variation. A monolithic substrate is used to fabricate a low-cost microlens array. The substrate is wet-etched or sawed with a series of v-grooves. The v-grooves can be created by wet-etching, by exploiting the large etch-rate selectivity of different crystal planes. The v-grooves provide a support frame for either cylindrical or custom-shaped microlenses. Because the microlens frames are formed by photolithographic semiconductor batch-processing techniques, they can be formed inexpensively over large areas with precise lateral and vertical registration. The v-groove has an important advantage for preserving the correct focus for lenses of varying diameter. 12 figs.

  10. Microlens frames for laser diode arrays

    DOEpatents

    Skidmore, Jay A.; Freitas, Barry L.

    1999-01-01

    Monolithic microlens frames enable the fabrication of monolithic laser diode arrays and are manufactured inexpensively with high registration, and with inherent focal length compensation for any lens diameter variation. A monolithic substrate is used to fabricate a low-cost microlens array. The substrate is wet-etched or sawed with a series of v-grooves. The v-grooves can be created by wet-etching, by exploiting the large etch-rate selectivity of different crystal planes. The v-grooves provide a support frame for either cylindrical or custom-shaped microlenses. Because the microlens frames are formed by photolithographic semiconductor batch-processing techniques, they can be formed inexpensively over large areas with precise lateral and vertical registration. The v-groove has an important advantage for preserving the correct focus for lenses of varying diameter.

  11. Light-Emitting Diodes for Analytical Chemistry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Macka, Mirek; Piasecki, Tomasz; Dasgupta, Purnendu K.

    2014-06-01

    Light-emitting diodes (LEDs) are playing increasingly important roles in analytical chemistry, from the final analysis stage to photoreactors for analyte conversion to actual fabrication of and incorporation in microdevices for analytical use. The extremely fast turn-on/off rates of LEDs have made possible simple approaches to fluorescence lifetime measurement. Although they are increasingly being used as detectors, their wavelength selectivity as detectors has rarely been exploited. From their first proposed use for absorbance measurement in 1970, LEDs have been used in analytical chemistry in too many ways to make a comprehensive review possible. Hence, we critically review here the more recent literature on their use in optical detection and measurement systems. Cloudy as our crystal ball may be, we express our views on the future applications of LEDs in analytical chemistry: The horizon will certainly become wider as LEDs in the deep UV with sufficient intensity become available.

  12. Improved multipass optics for diode laser spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Hu, T.A.; Chappell, E.L.; Munley, J.T.; Sharpe, S.W. )

    1993-12-01

    Feedback between optical elements can be a major source of noise when trying to attain high sensitivity in infrared absorption experiments. We find that a conventional White-cell optical arrangement introduces etaloning fringes that modulate the peak-to-peak amplitude of our signals by 1 part in 16 666, a fractional change of 6[times]10[sup [minus]5]. Although relatively small, this noise'' is systematic and adds coherently with averaging, obscuring interesting absorption features. An easily constructed multipass optical system suited for performing high-resolution infrared spectroscopy in molecular beams is described. The design is based on a variation of the White cell and has been optimized for use with lead salt diode lasers. One of the key components in the improved design is the addition of an oscillating mirror for spoiling optical feedback generated by laser scatter and/or poor mode coupling of the laser to the multipass optics.

  13. Low-cost laser diode array

    DOEpatents

    Freitas, Barry L.; Skidmore, Jay A.

    1999-01-01

    A substrate is used to fabricate a low-cost laser diode array. A substrate is machined from an electrically insulative material that is thermally conductive, or two substrates can be bonded together in which the top substrate is electrically as well as thermally conductive. The substrate thickness is slightly longer than the cavity length, and the width of the groove is wide enough to contain a bar and spring (which secures the laser bar firmly along one face of the groove). The spring also provides electrical continuity from the backside of the bar to the adjacent metalization layer on the laser bar substrate. Arrays containing one or more bars can be formed by creating many grooves at various spacings. Along the groove, many bars can be adjoined at the edges to provide parallel electrical conduction. This architecture allows precise and predictable registration of an array of laser bars to a self-aligned microlens array at low cost.

  14. Low-cost laser diode array

    DOEpatents

    Freitas, B.L.; Skidmore, J.A.

    1999-06-01

    A substrate is used to fabricate a low-cost laser diode array. A substrate is machined from an electrically insulative material that is thermally conductive, or two substrates can be bonded together in which the top substrate is electrically as well as thermally conductive. The substrate thickness is slightly longer than the cavity length, and the width of the groove is wide enough to contain a bar and spring (which secures the laser bar firmly along one face of the groove). The spring also provides electrical continuity from the backside of the bar to the adjacent metalization layer on the laser bar substrate. Arrays containing one or more bars can be formed by creating many grooves at various spacings. Along the groove, many bars can be adjoined at the edges to provide parallel electrical conduction. This architecture allows precise and predictable registration of an array of laser bars to a self-aligned microlens array at low cost. 19 figs.

  15. Contact Whiskers for Millimeter Wave Diodes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kerr, A. R.; Grange, J. A.; Lichtenberger, J. A.

    1978-01-01

    Several techniques are investigated for making short conical tips on wires (whiskers) used for contacting millimeter-wave Schottky diodes. One procedure, using a phosphoric and chromic acid etching solution (PCE), is found to give good results on 12 microns phosphor-bronze wires. Full cone angles of 60 degrees-80 degrees are consistently obtained, compared with the 15 degrees-20 degrees angles obtained with the widely used sodium hydroxide etch. Methods are also described for cleaning, increasing the tip diameter (i.e. blunting), gold plating, and testing the contact resistance of the whiskers. The effects of the whisker tip shape on the electrical resistance, inductance, and capacitance of the whiskers are studied, and examples given for typical sets of parameters.

  16. Diode laser welding of aluminum to steel

    SciTech Connect

    Santo, Loredana; Quadrini, Fabrizio; Trovalusci, Federica

    2011-05-04

    Laser welding of dissimilar materials was carried out by using a high power diode laser to join aluminum to steel in a butt-joint configuration. During testing, the laser scan rate was changed as well as the laser power: at low values of fluence (i.e. the ratio between laser power and scan rate), poor joining was observed; instead at high values of fluence, an excess in the material melting affected the joint integrity. Between these limiting values, a good aesthetics was obtained; further investigations were carried out by means of tensile tests and SEM analyses. Unfortunately, a brittle behavior was observed for all the joints and a maximum rupture stress about 40 MPa was measured. Apart from the formation of intermeltallic phases, poor mechanical performances also depended on the chosen joining configuration, particularly because of the thickness reduction of the seam in comparison with the base material.

  17. Role of diode lasers in metrology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Muthukrishnan, Kris

    1995-01-01

    The field of noncontact metrology is maturing as the video camera based and the laser probe based measurements are finding wide acceptance in the fields of semiconductor, micro electronics, disk drive, biomedical, chemical and aerospace industries. Some manufactures of conventional touch-probe based CMMs (Coordinated Measuring Machines) have started integrating video cameras and laser probes to compliment the measurements made by the touch-probe. The delicate nature of the parts and the extremely small feature sizes have fuelled the growing need for the multisensor technology to be incorporated into a single coordinate measuring machine. The laser probes compliment the video based metrology systems in providing the dynamic Z-height capabilities due to their faster data rate and increased resolution and accuracy. This paper highlights the pros and cons of different diode laser based sensors, drawn from the experience of applying them for measurements in different fields.

  18. Proton Degradation of Light-Emitting Diodes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Johnston, A. H.; Rax, B. G.; Selva, L. E.

    1997-01-01

    The severe degradation of optocouplers in space has been shown to be mainly due to proton displacement damage in the light-emitting diodes that are used within the optocouplers. However, a variety of LED technologies can be used in optocouplers and their sensitivity to proton displacement damage varies by about two orders of magnitude. Optocouplers are very simple hybrid devices, and the type of LED can be readily changed by the manufacturers with little cost impact. many optocoupler manufacturers purchase LEDs from outside sources with little knowledge or control of the manufacturing process used for the LED, leading to the possibility of very dramatic differences in radiation response (JPL has observed such differences for one type of optocoupler that is used in a hybrid power converter).

  19. Destructive Single-Event Failures in Diodes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Casey, Megan C.; Gigliuto, Robert A.; Lauenstein, Jean-Marie; Wilcox, Edward P.; Kim, Hak; Chen, Dakai; Phan, Anthony M.; LaBel, Kenneth A.

    2013-01-01

    In this summary, we have shown that diodes are susceptible to destructive single-event effects, and that these failures occur along the guard ring. By determining the last passing voltages, a safe operating area can be derived. By derating off of those values, rather than by the rated voltage, like what is currently done with power MOSFETs, we can work to ensure the safety of future missions. However, there are still open questions about these failures. Are they limited to a single manufacturer, a small number, or all of them? Is there a threshold rated voltage that must be exceeded to see these failures? With future work, we hope to answer these questions. In the full paper, laser results will also be presented to verify that failures only occur along the guard ring.

  20. An entangled-light-emitting diode.

    PubMed

    Salter, C L; Stevenson, R M; Farrer, I; Nicoll, C A; Ritchie, D A; Shields, A J

    2010-06-01

    An optical quantum computer, powerful enough to solve problems so far intractable using conventional digital logic, requires a large number of entangled photons. At present, entangled-light sources are optically driven with lasers, which are impractical for quantum computing owing to the bulk and complexity of the optics required for large-scale applications. Parametric down-conversion is the most widely used source of entangled light, and has been used to implement non-destructive quantum logic gates. However, these sources are Poissonian and probabilistically emit zero or multiple entangled photon pairs in most cycles, fundamentally limiting the success probability of quantum computational operations. These complications can be overcome by using an electrically driven on-demand source of entangled photon pairs, but so far such a source has not been produced. Here we report the realization of an electrically driven source of entangled photon pairs, consisting of a quantum dot embedded in a semiconductor light-emitting diode (LED) structure. We show that the device emits entangled photon pairs under d.c. and a.c. injection, the latter achieving an entanglement fidelity of up to 0.82. Entangled light with such high fidelity is sufficient for application in quantum relays, in core components of quantum computing such as teleportation, and in entanglement swapping. The a.c. operation of the entangled-light-emitting diode (ELED) indicates its potential function as an on-demand source without the need for a complicated laser driving system; consequently, the ELED is at present the best source on which to base future scalable quantum information applications. PMID:20520709

  1. Photoluminescence excitation measurements using pressure-tuned laser diodes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bercha, Artem; Ivonyak, Yurii; Medryk, Radosław; Trzeciakowski, Witold A.; Dybała, Filip; Piechal, Bernard

    2015-06-01

    Pressure-tuned laser diodes in external cavity were used as tunable sources for photoluminescence excitation (PLE) spectroscopy. The method was demonstrated in the 720 nm-1070 nm spectral range using a few commercial laser diodes. The samples for PLE measurements were quantum-well structures grown on GaAs and on InP. The method is superior to standard PLE measurements using titanium sapphire laser because it can be extended to any spectral range where anti-reflection coated laser diodes are available.

  2. Laser diode arrays for expanded mine detection capability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Crosby, Frank J.; Holloway, John H., Jr.; Petee, Danny A.; Stetson, Suzanne P.; Suiter, Harold R.; Tinsley, Ken R.

    2002-08-01

    A tactical unmanned aerial vehicle-size illumination system for enhanced mine detection capabilities has been designed, developed, integrated, and tested at the Coastal Systems Station. Airborne test flights were performed from June 12, 2001 to February 1, 2002. The Airborne Laser Diode Array Illuminator uses a single-wavelength compact laser diode array stack to provide illumination and is coupled with a pair of intensified CCD video cameras. The cameras were outfitted with various lenses and polarization filters to determine the benefits of each of the configurations. The first airborne demonstration of a laser diode illumination system is described and its effectiveness to perform nighttime mine detection operations is shown.

  3. Construction of Tunnel Diode Oscillator for AC Impedance Measurement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shin, J. H.; Kim, E.

    2014-03-01

    We construct a tunnel diode oscillator (TDO) to study electromagnetic response of a superconducting thin film. Highly sensitive tunnel diode oscillators allow us to detect extremely small changes in electromagnetic properties such as dielectric constant, ac magnetic susceptibility and magnetoresistance. A tunnel diode oscillator is a self-resonant oscillator of which resonance frequency is primarily determined by capacitance and inductance of a resonator. Amplitude of the signal depends on the quality factor of the resonator. The change in the impedance of the sample electromagnetic coupled to one of inductors in the resonator alters impedance of the inductor, and leads to the shift in the resonance frequency and the change of the amplitude.

  4. Long-Lifetime Laser Materials For Effective Diode Pumping

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Barnes, Norman P.

    1991-01-01

    Long quantum lifetimes reduce number of diodes required to pump. Pumping by laser diodes demonstrated with such common Nd laser materials as neodymium:yttrium aluminum garnet (Nd:YAG) and Nd:YLiF4, but such materials as Nd:LaF3, Nd:NaF.9YF3, and possibly Nd:YF3 more useful because of long lifetimes of their upper laser energy levels. Cost effectiveness primary advantage of solid-state laser materials having longer upper-laser-level lifetimes. Because cost of diodes outweighs cost of laser material by perhaps two orders of magnitude, cost reduced significantly.

  5. Photoluminescence excitation measurements using pressure-tuned laser diodes

    SciTech Connect

    Bercha, Artem; Ivonyak, Yurii; Mędryk, Radosław; Trzeciakowski, Witold A. Dybała, Filip; Piechal, Bernard

    2015-06-15

    Pressure-tuned laser diodes in external cavity were used as tunable sources for photoluminescence excitation (PLE) spectroscopy. The method was demonstrated in the 720 nm-1070 nm spectral range using a few commercial laser diodes. The samples for PLE measurements were quantum-well structures grown on GaAs and on InP. The method is superior to standard PLE measurements using titanium sapphire laser because it can be extended to any spectral range where anti-reflection coated laser diodes are available.

  6. Diode-pumped Alexandrite ring laser for lidar applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Munk, A.; Jungbluth, B.; Strotkamp, M.; Hoffmann, H.-D.; Poprawe, R.; Höffner, J.

    2016-03-01

    We present design and performance data of a diode-pumped Q-switched Alexandrite ring laser in the millijoule regime, which is longitudinally pumped by laser diode bar modules in the red spectral range. As a first step, a linear resonator was designed and characterized in qcw operation as well as in Q-switched operation. Based on these investigations, two separate linear cavities were set up, each with one Alexandrite crystal longitudinally pumped by one diode module. The two cavities are fused together and form a ring cavity which yields up to 6 mJ pulse burst energy in the qcw regime at 770 nm.

  7. Design, fabrication and testing of a thermal diode

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Swerdling, B.; Kosson, R.

    1972-01-01

    Heat pipe diode types are discussed. The design, fabrication and test of a flight qualified diode for the Advanced Thermal Control Flight Experiment (ATFE) are described. The review covers the use of non-condensable gas, freezing, liquid trap, and liquid blockage techniques. Test data and parametric performance are presented for the liquid trap and liquid blockage techniques. The liquid blockage technique was selected for the ATFE diode on the basis of small reservoir size, low reverse mode heat transfer, and apparent rapid shut-off.

  8. The millimeter wave super-Schottky diode detector

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Silver, A. H.; Pedersen, R. J.; Mccoll, M.; Dickman, R. L.; Wilson, W. J.

    1981-01-01

    The 31 and 92 GHz measurements of the superconductor-Schottky diode extended to millimeter wavelengths by a redesign of the semiconductor interface are reported. Diodes were fabricated by pulse electroplating Pb on 2 x 10 to the 19th/cu cm p-Ga-As etched with HCl; a thin Au overplate is deposited to protect the Pb film from degradation and to improve its lifetime. The noise performance was almost ideal at 31 and 92 GHz; it was concluded that this diode is a quantum-limited-detector at 31 GHz, with excessive parasitic losses at 92 GHz.

  9. A transient model of a cesium-barium diode

    SciTech Connect

    Luke, J.R.; El-Genk, M.S.

    1995-01-01

    In this work a transient model of a Cs-Ba diode is developed, and a series of experiments is performed using a diode equipped with Langmuir probes. The Langmuir probe data show that the electron energy distribution is non-Maxwellian at low discharge currents, indicating the presence of an electron beam from the emitter. Experimental results also showed that the plasma properties are non-homogeneous across the 1 mm diode gap; the electron temperature and plasma potential were higher near the emitter and the plasma density was higher near the collector. Experimental evidence is presented to show that the discharge contracts to a filament below the maximum thermal emission current.

  10. High efficiency IMPATT diodes for 60 GHz intersatellite link applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Haugland, E. J.

    1984-01-01

    Intersatellite links are expected to play an increasingly important role in future satellite systems. Improved components are required to properly utilize the wide bandwidth allocated for intersatellite link applications around 60 GHz. IMPATT diodes offer the highest potential performance as solid state power sources for a 60 GHz transmitter. Presently available devices do not have the desired power and efficiency. High efficiency, high power IMPATT diodes for intersatellite link applications are being developed by NASA and other government agencies. The development of high efficiency 60 GHz IMPATT diodes by NASA is described.

  11. Means for phase locking the outputs of a surface emitting laser diode array

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lesh, James R. (Inventor)

    1987-01-01

    An array of diode lasers, either a two-dimensional array of surface emitting lasers, or a linear array of stripe lasers, is phase locked by a diode laser through a hologram which focuses the output of the diode laser into a set of distinct, spatially separated beams, each one focused onto the back facet of a separate diode laser of the array. The outputs of the diode lasers thus form an emitted coherent beam out of the front of the array.

  12. Analysis and Optimization of "Full-Length" Diodes

    SciTech Connect

    Schock, Alfred

    2012-01-19

    A method of analyzing the axial variation of the heat generation rate, temperature, voltage, current density and emitter heat flux in a thermionic converter is described. The method is particularly useful for the case of "long" diodes, each extending over the full length of the reactor core. For a given diode geometry and fuel distribution, the analysis combines a nuclear solution of the axial fission density profile with the iterative solution of four differential equations representing the thermal, electrical, and thermionic interactions within the diode. The digital computer program developed to solve these equations can also perform a design optimization with respect to lead resistance, load voltage, and emitter thickness, for a specified maximum emitter temperature. Typical results are presented, and the use of this analysis for predicting the diode operating characteristics is illustrated.

  13. A Direct Reading Thermometer Based on a Silicon Diode.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kirkup, L.; Tonthat, C.

    1998-01-01

    Describes a simple circuit based on an inexpensive quad operational amplifier that permits a direct-reading temperature instrument to be constructed using silicon diodes. Encourages the use of this equipment in introductory thermal experiments. (DDR)

  14. Active graphene-silicon hybrid diode for terahertz waves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Quan; Tian, Zhen; Zhang, Xueqian; Singh, Ranjan; Du, Liangliang; Gu, Jianqiang; Han, Jiaguang; Zhang, Weili

    2015-05-01

    Controlling the propagation properties of the terahertz waves in graphene holds great promise in enabling novel technologies for the convergence of electronics and photonics. A diode is a fundamental electronic device that allows the passage of current in just one direction based on the polarity of the applied voltage. With simultaneous optical and electrical excitations, we experimentally demonstrate an active diode for the terahertz waves consisting of a graphene-silicon hybrid film. The diode transmits terahertz waves when biased with a positive voltage while attenuates the wave under a low negative voltage, which can be seen as an analogue of an electronic semiconductor diode. Here, we obtain a large transmission modulation of 83% in the graphene-silicon hybrid film, which exhibits tremendous potential for applications in designing broadband terahertz modulators and switchable terahertz plasmonic and metamaterial devices.

  15. Active stabilization of a diode laser injection lock.

    PubMed

    Saxberg, Brendan; Plotkin-Swing, Benjamin; Gupta, Subhadeep

    2016-06-01

    We report on a device to electronically stabilize the optical injection lock of a semiconductor diode laser. Our technique uses as discriminator the peak height of the laser's transmission signal on a scanning Fabry-Perot cavity and feeds back to the diode current, thereby maintaining maximum optical power in the injected mode. A two-component feedback algorithm provides constant optimization of the injection lock, keeping it robust to slow thermal drifts and allowing fast recovery from sudden failures such as temporary occlusion of the injection beam. We demonstrate the successful performance of our stabilization method in a diode laser setup at 399 nm used for laser cooling of Yb atoms. The device eases the requirements on passive stabilization and can benefit any diode laser injection lock application, particularly those where several such locks are employed. PMID:27370428

  16. Active graphene-silicon hybrid diode for terahertz waves.

    PubMed

    Li, Quan; Tian, Zhen; Zhang, Xueqian; Singh, Ranjan; Du, Liangliang; Gu, Jianqiang; Han, Jiaguang; Zhang, Weili

    2015-01-01

    Controlling the propagation properties of the terahertz waves in graphene holds great promise in enabling novel technologies for the convergence of electronics and photonics. A diode is a fundamental electronic device that allows the passage of current in just one direction based on the polarity of the applied voltage. With simultaneous optical and electrical excitations, we experimentally demonstrate an active diode for the terahertz waves consisting of a graphene-silicon hybrid film. The diode transmits terahertz waves when biased with a positive voltage while attenuates the wave under a low negative voltage, which can be seen as an analogue of an electronic semiconductor diode. Here, we obtain a large transmission modulation of 83% in the graphene-silicon hybrid film, which exhibits tremendous potential for applications in designing broadband terahertz modulators and switchable terahertz plasmonic and metamaterial devices. PMID:25959596

  17. Passive fluidic diode for simple fluids using nested nanochannel structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mo, Jingwen; Li, Long; Wang, Jun; Li, Zhigang

    2016-03-01

    In this paper, we propose a moving part-free fluidic diode for simple fluids using nested nanochannels, which contain inner and outer channels of different lengths. Molecular dynamics simulations show that the fluidic diode accepts water flows in the forward direction and blocks flows in the backward direction in a wide range of pressure drops. The anisotropic flow rates are generated by the distinct activation pressures in different directions. In the forward direction, the activation pressure is low, which is determined by the infiltration pressure of the inner channel. In the backward direction, the activation pressure is quite high due to the capillary effects when flows are released from the inner to the outer channel. The pressure drop range for the fluidic diode can be varied by changing the channel size or surface wettability. The fluidic diode offers an alternative way for flow control in integrated micro- and nanofluidic devices.

  18. Active multi-mode-interferometer broadband superluminescent diodes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Feifei, Wang; Peng, Jin; Ju, Wu; Yanhua, Wu; Fajie, Hu; Zhanguo, Wang

    2016-01-01

    We report a new quantum dot superluminescent diode with a new device structure. In this device, a multi-mode-interferometer configuration and a J-bend structure were monolithically integrated. Owing to the multi-mode-interferometer structure, the superluminescent diode exhibits 60% increase in output power and 43% reduction in the differential resistance compared with the uniform waveguide width superluminescent diode fabricated from the same wafer. Our device produces an emission spectrum as wide as 103.7 nm with an output power of 2.5 mW at 600 mA continue-wave injection current. This broadband emission spectrum makes the axial resolution of the optical coherence tomography system employing the superluminescent diode to 6 μm in theory, which is high enough for most tissue imaging. Project supported by the National Natural Science Foundation of China (No. 61274072) and the National High Technology Research and Development Program of China (No. 2013AA014201).

  19. Narrowband alexandrite laser injection seeded with frequency dithered diode laser

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schwemmer, Geary; Lee, H. S.; Prasad, Coorg

    1991-01-01

    Narrowband radiation is produced from a pulsed alexandrite laser when injection seeded with the output of a low power, tunable, continuous wave single mode diode laser. Injection seeded power oscillators are easier to frequency stabilize than etalon narrowed lasers, are more efficient and less prone to optical damage. AlGaAs diode lasers are available with wavelengths from 760 to 770 nm in the oxygen A band that can be used for differential absorption lidar remote sensing of atmospheric pressure and temperature. Diodes with room temperature output at 740 nm may be cooled sufficiently to emit in the water vapor absorption band at 720-730 nm for humidity remote sensing. The diode laser linewidth of 200 MHz is sufficient to seed 2 or 3 longitudinal modes of the multi-transverse mode alexandrite laser, giving the pulsed laser a bandwidth of 0.007 to 0.014/cm.

  20. High efficiency >26 W diode end-pumped Alexandrite laser.

    PubMed

    Teppitaksak, Achaya; Minassian, Ara; Thomas, Gabrielle M; Damzen, Michael J

    2014-06-30

    We show for the first time that multi-ten Watt operation of an Alexandrite laser can be achieved with direct red diode-pumping and with high efficiency. An investigation of diode end-pumped Alexandrite rod lasers demonstrates continuous-wave output power in excess of 26W, more than an order of magnitude higher than previous diode end-pumping systems, and slope efficiency 49%, the highest reported for a diode-pumped Alexandrite laser. Wavelength tuning from 730 to 792nm is demonstrated using self-seeding feedback from an external grating. Q-switched laser operation based on polarization-switching to a lower gain axis of Alexandrite has produced ~mJ-pulse energy at 1kHz pulse rate in fundamental TEM(00) mode. PMID:24977887

  1. Active graphene–silicon hybrid diode for terahertz waves

    PubMed Central

    Li, Quan; Tian, Zhen; Zhang, Xueqian; Singh, Ranjan; Du, Liangliang; Gu, Jianqiang; Han, Jiaguang; Zhang, Weili

    2015-01-01

    Controlling the propagation properties of the terahertz waves in graphene holds great promise in enabling novel technologies for the convergence of electronics and photonics. A diode is a fundamental electronic device that allows the passage of current in just one direction based on the polarity of the applied voltage. With simultaneous optical and electrical excitations, we experimentally demonstrate an active diode for the terahertz waves consisting of a graphene–silicon hybrid film. The diode transmits terahertz waves when biased with a positive voltage while attenuates the wave under a low negative voltage, which can be seen as an analogue of an electronic semiconductor diode. Here, we obtain a large transmission modulation of 83% in the graphene–silicon hybrid film, which exhibits tremendous potential for applications in designing broadband terahertz modulators and switchable terahertz plasmonic and metamaterial devices. PMID:25959596

  2. Determining Planck's Constant Using a Light-emitting Diode.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sievers, Dennis; Wilson, Alan

    1989-01-01

    Describes a method for making a simple, inexpensive apparatus which can be used to determine Planck's constant. Provides illustrations of a circuit diagram using one or more light-emitting diodes and a BASIC computer program for simplifying calculations. (RT)

  3. Active stabilization of a diode laser injection lock

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saxberg, Brendan; Plotkin-Swing, Benjamin; Gupta, Subhadeep

    2016-06-01

    We report on a device to electronically stabilize the optical injection lock of a semiconductor diode laser. Our technique uses as discriminator the peak height of the laser's transmission signal on a scanning Fabry-Perot cavity and feeds back to the diode current, thereby maintaining maximum optical power in the injected mode. A two-component feedback algorithm provides constant optimization of the injection lock, keeping it robust to slow thermal drifts and allowing fast recovery from sudden failures such as temporary occlusion of the injection beam. We demonstrate the successful performance of our stabilization method in a diode laser setup at 399 nm used for laser cooling of Yb atoms. The device eases the requirements on passive stabilization and can benefit any diode laser injection lock application, particularly those where several such locks are employed.

  4. Diode-quad bridge for reactive transducers and FM discriminators

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Harrison, D. R.; Dimeff, J.

    1972-01-01

    Diode-quad bridge circuit was developed for use with pressure-sensitive capacitive transducers, liquid-level measuring devices, proximity deflection sensors, and inductive displacement sensors. It may also be used as FM discriminator and as universal impedance bridge.

  5. Stacked, filtered multi-channel X-ray diode array

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    MacNeil, L. P.; Dutra, E. C.; Compton, S. M.; Jacoby, B. A.; Raphaelian, M. L.

    2015-08-01

    There are many types of X-ray diodes that are used for X-ray flux or spectroscopic measurements and for estimating the spectral shape of the VUV to soft X-ray spectrum. However, a need arose for a low cost, robust X-ray diode to use for experiments in hostile environments on multiple platforms, and for experiments that utilize forces that may destroy the diode(s). Since the typical proposed use required a small size with a minimal single line-of-sight, a parallel array could not be used. So, a stacked, filtered multi-channel X-ray diode array was developed, called the MiniXRD. To achieve significant cost savings while maintaining robustness and ease of field setup, repair, and replacement, we designed the system to be modular. The filters were manufactured in-house and cover the range from 450 eV to 5000 eV. To achieve the line-of-sight accuracy needed, we developed mounts and laser alignment techniques. We modeled and tested elements of the diode design at NSTec Livermore Operations (NSTec / LO) to determine temporal response and dynamic range, leading to diode shape and circuitry changes to optimize impedance and charge storage. We fielded individual and stacked systems at several national facilities as ancillary `ride-along' diagnostics to test and improve the design usability. We present the MiniXRD system performance which supports consideration as a viable low-cost alternative for multiple-channel low-energy X-ray measurements. This diode array is currently at Technical Readiness Level (TRL) 6.

  6. Fast-Recovery, High-Voltage Power Diode

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sundberg, G.; Berman, A.; Balodis, V.; Gaugh, C.; Duffin, J.; Karatnicki, H.; Larson, E.

    1985-01-01

    New family of fast-recovery high-voltage power diodes compatible with D60T and D7ST transistors developed. Have wide range of applications in spacecraft and aircraft electrical distribution equipment, dc/dc inverters, and ac motor controllers for high-horsepower electric motors operating from 480-volt ac lines. Fast-Recovery 1,200-V Power Diodes use chip of hexagonal geometry to maximize effective silicon area.

  7. Ball Lenses Collimate And Focus Diode-Laser-Array Beams

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hemmati, Hamid

    1992-01-01

    Ball lenses used to collimate and focus pump light from array of diode lasers onto input face of solid-state laser. Experiments show ball lenses perform as well as, or better than, multiple-element lenses supplied heretofore as parts of commercial arrays of diode lasers. Offers advantages of relative simplicity and ease of fabrication, lower cost, lower weight, and less sensitivity to misalignment.

  8. GaN blue diode lasers: a spectroscopist's view

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leinen, H.; Glässner, D.; Metcalf, H.; Wynands, R.; Haubrich, D.; Meschede, D.

    We have characterized the spectroscopic properties of one of the first samples of blue-emitting diode lasers based on GaN. With such a laser diode operated inside a standard extended cavity arrangement we find a mode-hop free tuning range of more than 20 GHz and a linewidth of 10 MHz. Doppler-free spectroscopy on an indium atomic beam reveals the isotope shift between the two major indium isotopes as well as efficient optical pumping.

  9. Wavelength stabilized multi-kW diode laser systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Köhler, Bernd; Unger, Andreas; Kindervater, Tobias; Drovs, Simon; Wolf, Paul; Hubrich, Ralf; Beczkowiak, Anna; Auch, Stefan; Müntz, Holger; Biesenbach, Jens

    2015-03-01

    We report on wavelength stabilized high-power diode laser systems with enhanced spectral brightness by means of Volume Holographic Gratings. High-power diode laser modules typically have a relatively broad spectral width of about 3 to 6 nm. In addition the center wavelength shifts by changing the temperature and the driving current, which is obstructive for pumping applications with small absorption bandwidths. Wavelength stabilization of high-power diode laser systems is an important method to increase the efficiency of diode pumped solid-state lasers. It also enables power scaling by dense wavelength multiplexing. To ensure a wide locking range and efficient wavelength stabilization the parameters of the Volume Holographic Grating and the parameters of the diode laser bar have to be adapted carefully. Important parameters are the reflectivity of the Volume Holographic Grating, the reflectivity of the diode laser bar as well as its angular and spectral emission characteristics. In this paper we present detailed data on wavelength stabilized diode laser systems with and without fiber coupling in the spectral range from 634 nm up to 1533 nm. The maximum output power of 2.7 kW was measured for a fiber coupled system (1000 μm, NA 0.22), which was stabilized at a wavelength of 969 nm with a spectral width of only 0.6 nm (90% value). Another example is a narrow line-width diode laser stack, which was stabilized at a wavelength of 1533 nm with a spectral bandwidth below 1 nm and an output power of 835 W.

  10. Avalanche-diode oscillator circuit with tuning at multiple frequencies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Parker, D.; Ablow, C. M.; Lee, R. E.; Karp, A.; Chambers, D. R.

    1971-01-01

    Detailed theoretical analysis of three different modes or types of high efficiency oscillation in a PIN diode are presented. For the TRAPATT mode in a PIN diode, it is shown that a traveling avalanche zone is not necessary to generate a dense trapped plasma. An economical computer program for TRAPATT oscillations in a PIN diode is described. Typical results of diode power, dc-to-RF conversion efficiency, and required circuit impedances are presented for several different current waveforms. A semianalytical solution for a second type of high efficiency mode in a PIN diode is derived assuming a rectangular current waveform. A quasi-static approximation is employed to derive a semianalytical solution for the voltage across a PIN diode in a third mode, where avalanching occurs during a major portion of a half cycle. Calculations for this mode indicate that the power increases proportionally to the magnitude of the drive current with a small decrease in efficiency relative to the ordinary TRAPATT mode. An analytical solution is also given for a PIN diode, where it is assumed that the ionization coefficient is a step function. It is shown that the step-ionization approximation permits one to draw possible patterns of avalanche region in the depletion layer as a function of time. A rule governing admissible patterns is derived and an example solution given for one admissible pattern. Preliminary experimental results on the high-efficiency oscillations are presented and discussed. Two different experimental circuits, which used channel-dropping filters to provide independent harmonic tuning, are described. Simpler circuits used to produce high-efficiency oscillations are discussed. Results of experiments using inexpensive Fairchild FD300 diodes are given.

  11. Nanofluidic Diode for Simple Fluids without Moving Parts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Long; Mo, Jingwen; Li, Zhigang

    2015-09-01

    The fabrication of small scale, fixed structure fluidic diodes for simple fluids is quite challenging and has not yet been achieved. Here, we fabricate a moving part-free nanofluidic diode for simple fluids using heterogeneous nanochannels, half of which is hydrophilic and the other half is hydrophobic. It accepts water flows in the forward (from hydrophilic to hydrophobic) direction, while the flows in the backward direction are blocked for pressure drop range 0 <Δ P <0.63 MPa . The diode is ensured by a potential energy barrier at the channel entrance on the hydrophobic side due to the molecular interactions between the water and channel surface. As the upstream pressure becomes higher than 0.63 MPa, the fluidic diode turns to be a rectifier, which allows flows in both the forward and backward directions but with different flow rates. At sufficiently high driving pressures, the fluidic system fails in flow rectification, analogous to the breakdown of electronic diodes. The three different flow modes (diode, rectifier, and breakdown) of the fluidic chip and the underlying rectification mechanisms are confirmed by molecular dynamics simulations.

  12. Recent Immersed Bz X-ray Diode Experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cooper, G. M.; McLean, J.; Davitt, R.; Goldsack, T. J.

    2002-12-01

    The immersed Bz diode is being fielded on one of the AWE Superswarf machines which provides a 55ns, 5.5MV, 35kA electron beam. The external magnetic field, up to 25Tesla, is produced by a solenoid which is driven by a 624μF, 22kV capacitor bank. The magnetic field constrains the electron beam to a small diameter at the target which results in a small x-ray source size. Recent experiments to try and reduce the source size include investigation of shaped field solenoids and the effects of reducing the cathode diameter. The inclusion of a time resolved source size diagnostic has provided more information on the behaviour of the diode. One of the better Bz shots has produced 72R@1m with a 4.0mm spot. This compares to a standard paraxial diode 80R@1m with a 5.3mm spot and the enhanced vacuum cell paraxial diode 65R@1m with a 4.0mm spot. Future investigations aimed at reducing the spot size will include providing a better vacuum in the diode and a possible reduction in the pre-pulse on the diode.

  13. Coherent and noncoherent low-power diodes in clinical practice

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Antipa, Ciprian; Pascu, Mihail-Lucian; Stanciulescu, Viorica; Vlaiculescu, Mihaela; Ionescu, Elena; Bordea, Daniel

    1997-05-01

    Clinical efficacy of the low power laser (LPL) in medical treatments is still not well established. In a double blind, placebo controlled study, we tried to find out first which type of LPL is more efficient, and second if coherence is an important character for clinical efficacy. We treated 1228 patients having different rheumatic diseases, with low power diode, used as follows: A group: IR coherent diode, continuous emission, 3 mW power; B group: IR coherent diode, pulsed emission, output power about 3 mW; C group: IR noncoherent diode continuous emission 9 mW power; D group: both IR diode lasers (continuous or pulsed) and HeNe laser, continuous emission, 2 mW power; E group: placebo laser as control group. The energy dose used for every group was the same, as well as the clinical protocols. The positive results were: 66.16% for A group; 64.06% for B group; 48.87% for C group; 76.66% for D group, and 39.07% for E group. Finally, we showed that LPL is really efficient in the treatment of some rheumatic diseases, especially when red and IR diode laser were used in combination. The type of emission (continuous or pulsed) is not important, but coherence is obviously necessary for clinical efficacy.

  14. Modular package for cooling a laser diode array

    DOEpatents

    Mundinger, David C.; Benett, William J.; Beach, Raymond J.

    1992-01-01

    A laser diode array is disclosed that includes a plurality of planar packages and active cooling. The laser diode array may be operated in a long duty cycle, or in continuous operation. A laser diode bar and a microchannel heat sink are thermally coupled in a compact, thin planar package having the laser diode bar located proximate to one edge. In an array, a number of such thin planar packages are secured together in a stacked configuration, in close proximity so that the laser diodes are spaced closely. The cooling means includes a microchannel heat sink that is attached proximate to the laser bar so that it absorbs heat generated by laser operation. To provide the coolant to the microchannels, each thin planar package comprises a thin inlet manifold and a thin outlet manifold connected to an inlet corridor and an outlet corridor. The inlet corridor comprises a hole extending through each of the packages in the array, and the outlet corridor comprises a hole extending through each of the packages in the array. The inlet and outlet corridors are connected to a conventional coolant circulation system. The laser diode array with active cooling has application as an optical pump for high power solid state lasers. Further, it can be incorporated in equipment such as communications devices and active sensors, and in military and space applications, and it can be useful in applications having space constraints and energy limitations.

  15. InGaAsSb thermophotovoltaic diode physics evaluation

    SciTech Connect

    Charache, G.W.; Baldasaro, P.F.; Danielson, L.R.

    1998-06-01

    The hotside operating temperatures for many projected thermophotovoltaic (TPV) conversion system applications are approximately 1,000 C, which sets an upper limit on the TPV diode bandgap of 0.6 eV from efficiency and power density considerations. This bandgap requirement has necessitated the development of new diode material systems, never previously considered for energy generation. To date, InGaAsSb quaternary diodes grown lattice-matched on GaSb substrates have achieved the highest performance. This report relates observed diode performance to electro-optic properties such as minority carrier lifetime, diffusion length and mobility and provides initial links to microstructural properties. This analysis has bounded potential diode performance improvements. For the 0.52 eV InGaAsSb diodes used in this analysis the measured dark current is 2 {times} 10{sup {minus}5} A/cm{sup 2}, versus a potential Auger limit 1 {times} 10{sup {minus}5} A/cm{sup 2}, a radiative limit of 2 {times} 10{sup {minus}6} A/cm{sup 2} (no photon recycling), and an absolute thermodynamic limit of 1.4 {times} 10{sup {minus}7} A/cm{sup 2}. These dark currents are equivalent to open circuit voltage gains of 20 mV (7%), 60 mV (20%) and 140 mV (45%), respectively.

  16. Environmental testing of a diode-laser-pumped Nd:YAG laser and a set of diode-laser-arrays

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hemmati, H.; Lesh, J. R.

    1989-01-01

    Results of the environmental test of a compact, rigid and lightweight diode-laser-pumped Nd:YAG laser module are discussed. All optical elements are bonded onto the module using space applicable epoxy, and two 200 mW diode laser arrays for pump sources are used to achieve 126 mW of CW output with about 7 percent electrical-to-optical conversion efficiency. This laser assembly and a set of 20 semiconductor diode laser arrays were environmentally tested by being subjected to vibrational and thermal conditions similar to those experienced during launch of the Space Shuttle, and both performed well. Nevertheless, some damage to the laser front facet in diode lasers was observed. Significant degradation was observed only on lasers which performed poorly in the life test. Improvements in the reliability of the Nd:YAG laser are suggested.

  17. VBG controlled narrow bandwidth diode laser arrays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Levy, Joseph; Feeler, Ryan; Junghans, Jeremy

    2012-03-01

    Northrop Grumman Cutting Edge Optronics has developed large kilowatt class lensed laser diode arrays with subnanometer spectral width using Volume Bragg Grating (VBG) reflectors. Using these CW arrays with 100W bars at 885nm, excellent absorption in Nd:YAG is achieved, with lower thermal aberration than can be attained with 808nm pumps. The additional cost of the VBG reflectors and their alignment is partially offset by the much broader wavelength tolerance that is allowed in the unlocked array enhancing bar yield. Furthermore, the center wavelength of the arrays exhibit lower temperature sensitivity allowing the arrays to be operated over a wider current or temperature range than arrays without wavelength control. While there is an efficiency penalty associated with the addition of VBGs of 5-8%, it is more than compensated for by enhanced absorption, especially when used with narrowband absorption lines, such as 885nm in Nd:YAG. An overview of the design and manufacturing issues for arrays that are wavelength-locked with VBGs is presented along with the effect of post-construction hard UV exposure.

  18. Laser diode arrays for naval reconnaissance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Holloway, John H., Jr.; Crosby, Frank J.; Petee, Danny A.; Suiter, Harold R.; Witherspoon, Ned H.

    2003-09-01

    The Airborne Littoral Reconnaissance Technologies (ALRT) Project has demonstrated a nighttime operational minefield detection capability using commercial off-the-shelf high-power Laser Diode Arrays (LDAs). Historically, optical aerial detection of minefields has primarily been limited to daytime operations but LDAs promise compact and efficient lighting to allow for enhanced reconnaissance operations for future mine detection systems. When combined with high-resolution intensified imaging systems, LDAs can illuminate otherwise unseen areas. Future wavelength options will open the way for active multispectral imaging with LDAs. The Coastal Systems Station working for the Office of Naval Research on the ALRT project has designed, developed, integrated, and tested both prototype and commercial arrays from a Cessna airborne platform. Detailed test results show the ability to detect several targets of interest in a variety of background conditions. Initial testing of the prototype arrays, reported on last year, was completed and further investigations of the commercial versions were performed. Polarization-state detection studies were performed, and advantageous properties of the source-target-sensor geometry noted. Current project plans are to expand the field-of-view coverage for Naval exercises in the summer of 2003. This paper describes the test collection, data library products, array information, on-going test analysis results, and future planned testing of the LDAs.

  19. Airborne tunable diode laser measurements of formaldehyde

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fried, Alan; Wert, Bryan P.; Henry, Bruce; Drummond, James R.

    1999-09-01

    Accurate measurements of formaldehyde (CH 2O) in the atmosphere are essential to further our understanding of various atmospheric cycles involving hydrogen and carbon-containing species. Comparisons among independent measurements of this gas and between measurements and model calculations have raised numerous questions regarding the veracity of both endeavors. The present paper describes a long-term effort by our group to develop and employ tunable diode laser absorption spectroscopy (TDLAS) for highly accurate measurements of this gas on both ground-based and aircraft platforms. A highly sensitive and selective TDLAS system, which has successfully flown on three different aircraft campaigns, will be described. Many new hardware and software features, which have been implemented, now make it possible to detect ambient CH 2O concentrations as low as 55 parts-per-trillion employing a 20-s integration time. This paper will also discuss the many aspects associated with high accuracy and its verification, including a brief discussion of our aircraft sampling system and inlet surface effects.

  20. Light-Emitting Diodes and Optical Fibers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dow, J. D.

    Semiconductors have become highly relevant to modern electronics, first with the transistor (Ge), then with Si for efficient electronic conduction.With the discovery of GaAs as an infrared light-emitter, efforts to develop other III-V semiconductors were targeted for colored light-emitting diodes, such as GaAs1 - x P x . It is now possible to produce light-emitting visible semiconducting materials, including a variety of III-V materials. One now has various light-emitters throughout the visible region of the spectrum, with automobile tail-lights and traffic lights being red, yellow, or green found in a variety of optical devices. Now there are many different optical devices, with materials optimized for their color, and for various other properties.In addition to developing colored semiconductors, it is clear that devices are needed with no color, for transparent optical fibers. Such ultra-transparent optical fibers have been developed over the years.

  1. Terahertz Optoelectronics with Surface Plasmon Polariton Diode

    PubMed Central

    Vinnakota, Raj K.; Genov, Dentcho A.

    2014-01-01

    The field of plasmonics has experience a renaissance in recent years by providing a large variety of new physical effects and applications. Surface plasmon polaritons, i.e. the collective electron oscillations at the interface of a metal/semiconductor and a dielectric, may bridge the gap between electronic and photonic devices, provided a fast switching mechanism is identified. Here, we demonstrate a surface plasmon-polariton diode (SPPD) an optoelectronic switch that can operate at exceedingly large signal modulation rates. The SPPD uses heavily doped p-n junction where surface plasmon polaritons propagate at the interface between n and p-type GaAs and can be switched by an external voltage. The devices can operate at transmission modulation higher than 98% and depending on the doping and applied voltage can achieve switching rates of up to 1 THz. The proposed switch is compatible with the current semiconductor fabrication techniques and could lead to nanoscale semiconductor-based optoelectronics. PMID:24811083

  2. Biologically Inspired Organic Light-Emitting Diodes.

    PubMed

    Kim, Jae-Jun; Lee, Jaeho; Yang, Sung-Pyo; Kim, Ha Gon; Kweon, Hee-Seok; Yoo, Seunghyup; Jeong, Ki-Hun

    2016-05-11

    Many animal species employ highly conspicuous traits as courtship signals for successful mating. Fireflies utilize their bioluminescent light as visual courtship signals. In addition to efficient bioluminescent light emission, the structural components of the firefly lantern also contribute to the enhancement of conspicuous optical signaling. Recently, these firefly lantern ultrastructures have attracted much interest and inspired highly efficient light management approaches. Here we report on the unique optical function of the hierarchical ultrastructures found in a firefly (Pyrocoelia rufa) and their biological inspiration of highly efficient organic light-emitting diode (OLED) applications. The hierarchical structures are comprised of longitudinal nanostructures and asymmetric microstructures, which were successfully replicated using geometry-guided resist reflow, replica molding, and polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) oxidation. The external quantum efficiency (EQE) of the bioinspired OLEDs was enhanced by up to 61%. The bioinspired OLEDs clearly showed side-enhanced super-Lambertian emission with a wide-viewing angle. The highly efficient light extraction and wide-angle illumination suggest how the hierarchical structures likely improve the recognition of firefly optical courtship signals over a wide-angle range. At the same time, the biologically inspired designs provide a new paradigm for designing functional optical surfaces for lighting or display applications. PMID:27014918

  3. Thermally enhanced blue light-emitting diode

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xue, Jin; Zhao, Yuji; Oh, Sang-Ho; Herrington, William F.; Speck, James S.; DenBaars, Steven P.; Nakamura, Shuji; Ram, Rajeev J.

    2015-09-01

    We investigate thermoelectric pumping in wide-bandgap GaN based light-emitting diodes (LEDs) to take advantage of high junction temperature rather than avoiding the problem of temperature-induced efficiency droop through external cooling. We experimentally demonstrate a thermally enhanced 450 nm GaN LED, in which nearly fourfold light output power is achieved at 615 K (compared to 295 K room temperature operation), with nearly no reduction in the wall-plug efficiency (i.e., electrical-optical energy conversion efficiency) at bias V <ℏω/q . The LED is shown to work in a mode similar to a thermodynamic heat engine operating with charged carriers pumped into the active region by a combination of electrical work and Peltier heat (phonons) drawn from the lattice. In this optimal operating regime at 615 K, the LED injection current (3.26 A/cm2) is of similar magnitude to the operating point of common high power GaN based LEDs (5-35 A/cm2). This result suggests the possibility of removing bulky heat sinks in current high power LED products thus realizing a significant cost reduction for solid-state lighting.

  4. Patterned polycrystalline diamond microtip vacuum diode arrays

    SciTech Connect

    Kang, W.P.; Davidson, J.L.; Kinser, D.L.

    1995-12-31

    Electron field emission from an array of patterned pyramids of polycrystalline diamond for vacuum diode applications has been investigated. High current emission from the patterned diamond microtip arrays are obtained at low electric fields. A current density from the diamond microtips of 14mA/cm{sup 2} was observed for a field of <10 V/{mu}m. Field emission for these diamond microtips exhibits significant enhancement both in total emission current and stability compared to pure silicon emitters. Moreover, field emission from patterned polycrystalline diamond pyramidal tip arrays is unique in that the applied field is found to be lower (2-3 order of magnitude lower) compared to that required for emission from Si, Ge, GaAs, and metal surfaces. The fabrication process utilizing silicon shaping and micromachining techniques for the fabrication of diamond diaphragms with diamond microtip arrays for vacuum microelectronic applications has been developed. The processing techniques are compatible with IC fabrication technology. The effect of temperature annealing on the current emission characteristics were also investigated.

  5. Terahertz optoelectronics with surface plasmon polariton diode.

    PubMed

    Vinnakota, Raj K; Genov, Dentcho A

    2014-01-01

    The field of plasmonics has experience a renaissance in recent years by providing a large variety of new physical effects and applications. Surface plasmon polaritons, i.e. the collective electron oscillations at the interface of a metal/semiconductor and a dielectric, may bridge the gap between electronic and photonic devices, provided a fast switching mechanism is identified. Here, we demonstrate a surface plasmon-polariton diode (SPPD) an optoelectronic switch that can operate at exceedingly large signal modulation rates. The SPPD uses heavily doped p-n junction where surface plasmon polaritons propagate at the interface between n and p-type GaAs and can be switched by an external voltage. The devices can operate at transmission modulation higher than 98% and depending on the doping and applied voltage can achieve switching rates of up to 1 THz. The proposed switch is compatible with the current semiconductor fabrication techniques and could lead to nanoscale semiconductor-based optoelectronics. PMID:24811083

  6. Flight demonstration of laser diode initiated ordnance

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Boucher, Craig J.; Schulze, Norman R.

    1995-01-01

    A program has been initiated by NASA Headquarters to validate laser initiated ordnance in flight applications. The primary program goal is to bring together a team of government and industry members to develop a laser initiated ordnance system having the test and analysis pedigree to be flown on launch vehicles. The culmination of this effort was a flight of the Pegasus launch vehicle which had two fin rockets initiated by this laser system. In addition, a laser initiated ordnance squib was fired into a pressure bomb during thrusting flight. The complete ordnance system comprising a laser diode firing unit, fiber optic cable assembly, laser initiated detonator, and laser initiated squib was designed and built by The Ensign Bickford Company. The hardware was tested to the requirements of the Pegasus launch vehicle and integrated into the vehicle by The Ensign Bickford Company and the Orbital Sciences Corporation. Discussions include initial program concept, contract implementation, team member responsibilities, analysis results, vehicle integration, safing architecture, ordnance interfaces, mission timeline and telemetry data. A complete system description, summary of the analyses, the qualification test results, and the results of flight are included.

  7. Experimental Demonstration of a Thermoacoustic Diode

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Biwa, Tetsushi; Nakamura, Hiroki; Hyodo, Hiroaki

    2016-06-01

    When an acoustic wave passes through short narrow channels in a regenerator having an axial temperature difference, the acoustic power is amplified for the waves going from cold to hot, whereas it is damped for the waves going in the opposite direction. This study applies such asymmetric wave propagation to demonstrate a thermoacoustic diode, which plays the role of the acoustic counterpart to an optical isolator. Four regenerators having the same longitudinal temperature difference are aligned in series to make four-stage amplification and damping of the acoustic power possible. This alignment leads to the enlarged difference between the acoustic power gains in the forward and backward propagation directions, even with a moderate temperature difference. Furthermore, by introducing the acoustical impedance-matching unit, the power-reflection coefficient is kept as low as 0.017 in forward propagation. The results show that the power-transmission coefficients in the forward and backward directions, respectively, reach 0.98 and 0.023, which means that the power-transmission ratio is 16 dB.

  8. Light-Emitting Diodes: Solving Complex Problems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Planinšič, Gorazd; Etkina, Eugenia

    2015-05-01

    This is the fourth paper in our Light-Emitting Diodes series. The series aims to create a systematic library of LED-based materials and to provide readers with the description of experiments and the pedagogical treatment that would help their students construct, test, and apply physics concepts and mathematical relations. The first paper1 provided an overview of possible uses of LEDs in physics courses. The second paper2 discussed how one could help students learn the foundational aspects of LED physics through a scaf-folded inquiry approach, specifically the ISLE cycle. The third paper3 showed how the physics inherent in the functioning of LEDs could help students deepen their understanding of sources of electric power and the temperature dependence of resistivity, and explore the phenomenon of fluorescence also using the ISLE cycle.4 The goal of this fourth paper is to use LEDs as black boxes that allow students to study certain properties of a system of interest, specifically mechanical, electric, electromagnetic, and light properties. The term "black box" means that we use a device without knowing the mechanism behind its operation.

  9. Light-Emitting Diodes: Learning New Physics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Planinšič, Gorazd; Etkina, Eugenia

    2015-04-01

    This is the third paper in our Light-Emitting Diodes series. The series aims to create a systematic library of LED-based materials and to provide the readers with the description of experiments and pedagogical treatment that would help their students construct, test, and apply physics concepts and mathematical relations. The first paper, published in the February 2014 issue of TPT,1 provided an overview of possible uses of LEDs in a physics course. The second paper2 discussed how one could help students learn the foundational aspects of LED physics through a scaffolded inquiry approach, specifically the ISLE cycle. The goals of this paper are to show how the activities described in our second paper help to deepen student understanding of physics and to broaden student knowledge by exploring new phenomena such as fluorescence. Activities described in this paper are suitable for advanced high school courses, introductory courses for physics and engineering majors, courses for prospective physics teachers, and professional development programs.

  10. MMIC Replacement for Gunn Diode Oscillators

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Crowe, Thomas W.; Porterfield, David

    2011-01-01

    An all-solid-state replacement for high-frequency Gunn diode oscillators (GDOs) has been proposed for use in NASA s millimeter- and submillimeter-wave sensing instruments. Highly developed microwave oscillators are used to achieve a low-noise and highly stable reference signal in the 10-40-GHz band. Compact amplifiers and high-power frequency multipliers extend the signal to the 100-500-GHz band with minimal added phase noise and output power sufficient for NASA missions. This technology can achieve improved output power and frequency agility, while maintaining phase noise and stability comparable to other GDOs. Additional developments of the technology include: a frequency quadrupler to 145 GHz with 18 percent efficiency and 15 percent fixed tuned bandwidth; frequency doublers featuring 124, 240, and 480 GHz; an integrated 874-GHz subharmonic mixer with a mixer noise temperature of 3,000 K DSB (double sideband) and mixer conversion loss of 11.8 dB DSB; a high-efficiency frequency tripler design with peak output power of 23 mW and 14 mW, and efficiency of 16 and 13 percent, respectively; millimeter-wave integrated circuit (MMIC) power amplifiers to the 30-40 GHz band with high DC power efficiency; and an 874-GHz radiometer suitable for airborne observation with state-of-the-art sensitivity at room temperature and less than 5 W of total power consumption.

  11. Lead-strontium-chalcogenide diode laser

    SciTech Connect

    Partin, D.L.

    1988-01-26

    A large optical cavity quantum well double heterojunction semiconductor infrared diode laser is described having an active region layer sandwiched between two contiguous layers of monocrystalline semiconductive material. The laser exhibits current carrier and optical confinement for its active region layer but also exhibits increased operating temperature due to close lattice matching of face centered cubic monocrystalline layers forming the double heterojunctions. The laser comprises a monocrystalline buffer layer of a given conductivity type lead salt semiconductor containing strontium, selenium that has an energy band gap greater than, an index of refraction lesser than, and a lattice constant substantially equal to predetermined values of the active region layer, a monocrystalline active region layer on the buffer layer of a lead salt semiconductor containing a pn junction that has the predetermined energy and gap, index of refraction and lattice constant, and a confinement layer on the active region layer an opposite conductivity type lead salt semiconductor containing lesser amounts and smaller proportions of strontium and selenium that has an energy band gap greater than, an index of refraction smaller than, and a lattice constant substantially equal to the predetermined values.

  12. Optical communication with semiconductor laser diodes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Davidson, F.

    1987-01-01

    A 25 megabit/sec direct detection optical communication system that used Q=4 PPM signalling was constructed and its performance measured under laboratory conditions. The system used a single-mode AlGaAs laser diode transmitter and low noise silicon avalanche photodiode (APD) photodetector. Comparison of measured performance with the theoretical revealed that modeling the APD output as a Gaussian process under conditions of negligible background radiation and low (less than 10 to the -12 power A) APD bulk leakage currents leads to substantial underestimates of optimal APD gain to use and overestimates of system bit error probability. A procedure is given to numerically compute system performance which uses the more accurate Webb's Approximation of the exact Conradi distribution for the APD ouput signal that does not require excessive amounts of computer time (a few minutes of VAX 8600 CPU time per system operating point). Examples are given which illustrate the breakdown of the Gaussian approximation in assessing system performance. This system achieved a bit error probability of 10 to the -6 power at a received signal energy corresponding to an average of 60 absorbed photons/bit and optimal APD gain of 700.

  13. Dead Time of Single Photon Avalanche Diodes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Neri, L.; Tudisco, S.; Musumeci, F.; Scordino, A.; Fallica, G.; Mazzillo, M.; Zimbone, M.

    2011-06-01

    Single Photon Avalanche Diode (SPAD) is the new generation of Geiger-Muller counter device developed in semiconductor technology [S. Privitera et al. Sensors Journal, vol 8 Iss. 8 (2008) 4636; S. Tudisco et al. IEEE Sensors Journal vol 8 ISS 7-8 (2008) 1324; S. Cova et al. Applied Optics 35 (1996) 1956]. Physical dead time model and noise production process has been analyzed and their corrections have been performed [S.H. Lee, R.P. Gardner, M. Jae, Nucl. Instr. and Meth. in Phys. Res. B 263 (2007) 46]. We have been able to extract the real amount of incident photon rate up to 10 7cps using a device with 0.97μs total deadtime. We also developed the equation of the noise count rate vs incoming photon rate, supported by Montecarlo simulation and experimental data. We marked the difference between dark rate and noise count rate, and introduced the noise rate inside the hybrid deadtime equation used for SPAD device.

  14. Diode laser for abdominal tissue cauterization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Durville, Frederic M.; Rediker, Robert H.; Connolly, Raymond J.; Schwaitzberg, Steven D.; Lantis, John

    1999-06-01

    We have developed a new device to effectively and quickly stop bleeding. The new device uses a small, 5 W diode laser to heat-up the tip of a modified medical forceps. The laser beam is totally contained within a protective enclosure, satisfying the requirements for a Class I laser system, which eliminates the need to protective eyewear. The new device is used in a manner similar to that of a bipolar electrocautery device. After visual location, the bleeding site or local vessel(s) is grabbed and clamped with the tips of the forceps-like instrument. The laser is then activated for a duration of typically 5 sec or until traditional visual or auditory clues such as local blubbling and popping indicate that the targeted site is effectively cauterized. When the laser is activated, the tip of the instrument, thus providing hemostasis. The new device was evaluated in animal models and compared with the monopolar and bipolar electrocautery, and also with the recently developed ultrasound technology. It has new been in clinical trials for abdominal surgery since September 1997.

  15. Optical communication with semiconductor laser diodes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Davidson, F.

    1988-01-01

    Slot timing recovery in a direct detection optical PPM communication system can be achieved by processing the photodetector waveform with a nonlinear device whose output forms the input to a phase lock group. The choice of a simple transition detector as the nonlinearity is shown to give satisfactory synchronization performance. The rms phase error of the recovered slot clock and the effect of slot timing jitter on the bit error probability were directly measured. The experimental system consisted of an AlGaAs laser diode (lambda = 834 nm) and a silicon avalanche photodiode (APD) photodetector and used Q=4 PPM signaling operated at a source data rate of 25 megabits/second. The mathematical model developed to characterize system performance is shown to be in good agreement with actual performance measurements. The use of the recovered slot clock in the receiver resulted in no degradation in receiver sensitivity compared to a system with perfect slot timing. The system achieved a bit error probability of 10 to the minus 6 power at received signal energies corresponding to an average of less than 60 detected photons per information bit.

  16. Limitations of silicon diodes for clinical electron dosimetry.

    PubMed

    Song, Haijun; Ahmad, Munir; Deng, Jun; Chen, Zhe; Yue, Ning J; Nath, Ravinder

    2006-01-01

    This work investigates the relevance of several factors affecting the response of silicon diode dosemeters in depth-dose scans of electron beams. These factors are electron energy, instantaneous dose rate, dose per pulse, photon/electron dose ratio and electron scattering angle (directional response). Data from the literature and our own experiments indicate that the impact of these factors may be up to +/-15%. Thus, the different factors would have to cancel out perfectly at all depths in order to produce true depth-dose curves. There are reports of good agreement between depth-doses measured with diodes and ionisation chambers. However, our measurements with a Scantronix electron field detector (EFD) diode and with a plane-parallel ionisation chamber show discrepancies both in the build-up and in the low-dose regions, with a ratio up to 1.4. Moreover, the absolute sensitivity of two diodes of the same EFD model was found to differ by a factor of 3, and this ratio was not constant but changed with depth between 5 and 15% in the low-dose regions of some clinical electron beams. Owing to these inhomogeneities among diodes even of the same model, corrections for each factor would have to be diode-specific and beam-specific. All these corrections would have to be determined using parallel plane chambers, as recommended by AAPM TG-25, which would be unrealistic in clinical practice. Our conclusion is that in general diodes are not reliable in the measurement of depth-dose curves of clinical electron beams. PMID:16772305

  17. Applications of microlens-conditioned laser diode arrays

    SciTech Connect

    Beach, R.J.; Emanuel, M.A.; Freitas, B.L.

    1995-01-01

    The ability to condition the radiance of laser diodes using shaped-fiber cylindrical-microlens technology has dramatically increased the number of applications that can be practically engaged by diode laser arrays. Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) has actively pursued optical efficiency and engineering improvements in this technology in an effort to supply large radiance-conditioned laser diode array sources for its own internal programs. This effort has centered on the development of a modular integrated laser diode packaging technology with the goal of enabling the simple and flexible construction of high average power, high density, two-dimensional arrays with integrated cylindrical microlenses. Within LLNL, the principal applications of microlens-conditioned laser diode arrays are as high intensity pump sources for diode pumped solid state lasers (DPSSLs). A simple end-pumping architecture has been developed and demonstrated that allows the radiation from microlens-conditioned, two-dimensional diode array apertures to be efficiently delivered to the end of rod lasers. To date, pump powers as high as 2.5 kW have been delivered to 3 mm diameter laser rods. Such high power levels are critical for pumping solid state lasers in which the terminal laser level is a Stark level lying in the ground state manifold. Previously, such systems have often required operation of the solid state gain medium at low temperature to freeze out the terminal laser Stark level population. The authors recently developed high intensity pump sources overcome this difficulty by effectively pumping to much higher inversion levels, allowing efficient operation at or near room temperature. Because the end-pumping technology is scalable in absolute power, the number of rare-earth ions and transitions that can be effectively accessed for use in practical DPSSL systems has grown tremendously.

  18. Reliability of high power laser diodes with external optical feedback

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bonsendorf, Dennis; Schneider, Stephan; Meinschien, Jens; Tomm, Jens W.

    2016-03-01

    Direct diode laser systems gain importance in the fields of material processing and solid-state laser pumping. With increased output power, also the influence of strong optical feedback has to be considered. Uncontrolled optical feedback is known for its spectral and power fluctuation effects, as well as potential emitter damage. We found that even intended feedback by use of volume Bragg gratings (VBG) for spectral stabilization may result in emitter lifetime reduction. To provide stable and reliable laser systems design, guidelines and maximum feedback ratings have to be found. We present a model to estimate the optical feedback power coupled back into the laser diode waveguide. It includes several origins of optical feedback and wide range of optical elements. The failure thresholds of InGaAs and AlGaAs bars have been determined not only at standard operation mode but at various working points. The influence of several feedback levels to laser diode lifetime is investigated up to 4000h. The analysis of the semiconductor itself leads to a better understanding of the degradation process by defect spread. Facet microscopy, LBIC- and electroluminescence measurements deliver detailed information about semiconductor defects before and after aging tests. Laser diode protection systems can monitor optical feedback. With this improved understanding, the emergency shutdown threshold can be set low enough to ensure laser diode reliability but also high enough to provide better machine usability avoiding false alarms.

  19. Simulations of Large-Area Electron Beam Diodes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Swanekamp, S. B.; Friedman, M.; Ludeking, L.; Smithe, D.; Obenschain, S. P.

    1999-11-01

    Large area electron beam diodes are typically used to pump the amplifiers of KrF lasers. Simulations of large-area electron beam diodes using the particle-in-cell code MAGIC3D have shown the electron flow in the diode to be unstable. Since this instability can potentially produce a non-uniform current and energy distribution in the hibachi structure and lasing medium it can be detrimental to laser efficiency. These results are similar to simulations performed using the ISIS code.(M.E. Jones and V.A. Thomas, Proceedings of the 8^th) International Conference on High-Power Particle Beams, 665 (1990). We have identified the instability as the so called ``transit-time" instability(C.K. Birdsall and W.B. Bridges, Electrodynamics of Diode Regions), (Academic Press, New York, 1966).^,(T.M. Antonsen, W.H. Miner, E. Ott, and A.T. Drobot, Phys. Fluids 27), 1257 (1984). and have investigated the role of the applied magnetic field and diode geometry. Experiments are underway to characterize the instability on the Nike KrF laser system and will be compared to simulation. Also some possible ways to mitigate the instability will be presented.

  20. In vivo dosimetry with silicon diodes in total body irradiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oliveira, F. F.; Amaral, L. L.; Costa, A. M.; Netto, T. G.

    2014-02-01

    The aim of this work is the characterization and application of silicon diode detectors for in vivo dosimetry in total body irradiation (TBI) treatments. It was evaluated the diode response with temperature, dose rate, gantry angulations and field size. A maximum response variation of 2.2% was obtained for temperature dependence. The response variation for dose rate and angular was within 1.2%. For field size dependence, the detector response increased with field until reach a saturation region, where no more primary radiation beam contributes for dose. The calibration was performed in a TBI setup. Different lateral thicknesses from one patient were simulated and then the calibration factors were determined by means of maximum depth dose readings. Subsequent to calibration, in vivo dosimetry measurements were performed. The response difference between diode readings and the prescribed dose for all treatments was below 4%. This difference is in agreement as recommended by the International Commission on Radiation Units and Measurements (ICRU), which is ±5%. The present work to test the applicability of a silicon diode dosimetry system for performing in vivo dose measurements in TBI techniques presented good results. These measurements demonstrated the value of diode dosimetry as a treatment verification method and its applicability as a part of a quality assurance program in TBI treatments.

  1. Application of AXUV diode detectors at ASDEX Upgrade

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bernert, M.; Eich, T.; Burckhart, A.; Fuchs, J. C.; Giannone, L.; Kallenbach, A.; McDermott, R. M.; Sieglin, B.

    2014-03-01

    In the ASDEX Upgrade tokamak, a radiation measurement for a wide spectral range, based on semiconductor detectors, with 256 lines of sight and a time resolution of 5μs was recently installed. In combination with the foil based bolometry, it is now possible to estimate the absolutely calibrated radiated power of the plasma on fast timescales. This work introduces this diagnostic based on AXUV (Absolute eXtended UltraViolet) n-on-p diodes made by International Radiation Detectors, Inc. The measurement and the degradation of the diodes in a tokamak environment is shown. Even though the AXUV diodes are developed to have a constant sensitivity for all photon energies (1 eV-8 keV), degradation leads to a photon energy dependence of the sensitivity. The foil bolometry, which is restricted to a time resolution of less than 1 kHz, offers a basis for a time dependent calibration of the diodes. The measurements of the quasi-calibrated diodes are compared with the foil bolometry and found to be accurate on the kHz time scale. Therefore, it is assumed, that the corrected values are also valid for the highest time resolution (200 kHz). With this improved diagnostic setup, the radiation induced by edge localized modes is analyzed on fast timescales.

  2. Application of AXUV diode detectors at ASDEX Upgrade.

    PubMed

    Bernert, M; Eich, T; Burckhart, A; Fuchs, J C; Giannone, L; Kallenbach, A; McDermott, R M; Sieglin, B

    2014-03-01

    In the ASDEX Upgrade tokamak, a radiation measurement for a wide spectral range, based on semiconductor detectors, with 256 lines of sight and a time resolution of 5 μs was recently installed. In combination with the foil based bolometry, it is now possible to estimate the absolutely calibrated radiated power of the plasma on fast timescales. This work introduces this diagnostic based on AXUV (Absolute eXtended UltraViolet) n-on-p diodes made by International Radiation Detectors, Inc. The measurement and the degradation of the diodes in a tokamak environment is shown. Even though the AXUV diodes are developed to have a constant sensitivity for all photon energies (1 eV-8 keV), degradation leads to a photon energy dependence of the sensitivity. The foil bolometry, which is restricted to a time resolution of less than 1 kHz, offers a basis for a time dependent calibration of the diodes. The measurements of the quasi-calibrated diodes are compared with the foil bolometry and found to be accurate on the kHz time scale. Therefore, it is assumed, that the corrected values are also valid for the highest time resolution (200 kHz). With this improved diagnostic setup, the radiation induced by edge localized modes is analyzed on fast timescales. PMID:24689581

  3. Wavelength-Agile External-Cavity Diode Laser for DWDM

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pilgrim, Jeffrey S.; Bomse, David S.

    2006-01-01

    A prototype external-cavity diode laser (ECDL) has been developed for communication systems utilizing dense wavelength- division multiplexing (DWDM). This ECDL is an updated version of the ECDL reported in Wavelength-Agile External- Cavity Diode Laser (LEW-17090), NASA Tech Briefs, Vol. 25, No. 11 (November 2001), page 14a. To recapitulate: The wavelength-agile ECDL combines the stability of an external-cavity laser with the wavelength agility of a diode laser. Wavelength is modulated by modulating the injection current of the diode-laser gain element. The external cavity is a Littman-Metcalf resonator, in which the zeroth-order output from a diffraction grating is used as the laser output and the first-order-diffracted light is retro-reflected by a cavity feedback mirror, which establishes one end of the resonator. The other end of the resonator is the output surface of a Fabry-Perot resonator that constitutes the diode-laser gain element. Wavelength is selected by choosing the angle of the diffracted return beam, as determined by position of the feedback mirror. The present wavelength-agile ECDL is distinguished by design details that enable coverage of all 60 channels, separated by 100-GHz frequency intervals, that are specified in DWDM standards.

  4. Method and system for homogenizing diode laser pump arrays

    DOEpatents

    Bayramian, Andy J

    2013-10-01

    An optical amplifier system includes a diode pump array including a plurality of semiconductor diode laser bars disposed in an array configuration and characterized by a periodic distance between adjacent semiconductor diode laser bars. The periodic distance is measured in a first direction perpendicular to each of the plurality of semiconductor diode laser bars. The diode pump array provides a pump output propagating along an optical path and characterized by a first intensity profile measured as a function of the first direction and having a variation greater than 10%. The optical amplifier system also includes a diffractive optic disposed along the optical path. The diffractive optic includes a photo-thermo-refractive glass member. The optical amplifier system further includes an amplifier slab having an input face and position along the optical path and separated from the diffractive optic by a predetermined distance. A second intensity profile measured at the input face of the amplifier slab as a function of the first direction has a variation less than 10%.

  5. Method and system for homogenizing diode laser pump arrays

    DOEpatents

    Bayramian, Andrew James

    2016-05-03

    An optical amplifier system includes a diode pump array including a plurality of semiconductor diode laser bars disposed in an array configuration and characterized by a periodic distance between adjacent semiconductor diode laser bars. The periodic distance is measured in a first direction perpendicular to each of the plurality of semiconductor diode laser bars. The diode pump array provides a pump output propagating along an optical path and characterized by a first intensity profile measured as a function of the first direction and having a variation greater than 10%. The optical amplifier system also includes a diffractive optic disposed along the optical path. The diffractive optic includes a photo-thermo-refractive glass member. The optical amplifier system further includes an amplifier slab having an input face and position along the optical path and separated from the diffractive optic by a predetermined distance. A second intensity profile measured at the input face of the amplifier slab as a function of the first direction has a variation less than 10%.

  6. Application of AXUV diode detectors at ASDEX Upgrade

    SciTech Connect

    Bernert, M. Eich, T.; Burckhart, A.; Fuchs, J. C.; Giannone, L.; Kallenbach, A.; McDermott, R. M.; Sieglin, B.

    2014-03-15

    In the ASDEX Upgrade tokamak, a radiation measurement for a wide spectral range, based on semiconductor detectors, with 256 lines of sight and a time resolution of 5μs was recently installed. In combination with the foil based bolometry, it is now possible to estimate the absolutely calibrated radiated power of the plasma on fast timescales. This work introduces this diagnostic based on AXUV (Absolute eXtended UltraViolet) n-on-p diodes made by International Radiation Detectors, Inc. The measurement and the degradation of the diodes in a tokamak environment is shown. Even though the AXUV diodes are developed to have a constant sensitivity for all photon energies (1 eV-8 keV), degradation leads to a photon energy dependence of the sensitivity. The foil bolometry, which is restricted to a time resolution of less than 1 kHz, offers a basis for a time dependent calibration of the diodes. The measurements of the quasi-calibrated diodes are compared with the foil bolometry and found to be accurate on the kHz time scale. Therefore, it is assumed, that the corrected values are also valid for the highest time resolution (200 kHz). With this improved diagnostic setup, the radiation induced by edge localized modes is analyzed on fast timescales.

  7. Overview on new diode lasers for defense applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Neukum, Joerg

    2012-11-01

    Diode lasers have a broad wavelength range, from the visible to beyond 2.2μm. This allows for various applications in the defense sector, ranging from classic pumping of DPSSL in range finders or target designators, up to pumping directed energy weapons in the 50+ kW range. Also direct diode applications for illumination above 1.55μm, or direct IR countermeasures are of interest. Here an overview is given on some new wavelengths and applications which are recently under discussion. In this overview the following aspects are reviewed: • High Power CW pumps at 808 / 880 / 940nm • Pumps for DPAL - Diode Pumped Alkali Lasers • High Power Diode Lasers in the range < 1.0 μm • Scalable Mini-Bar concept for high brightness fiber coupled modules • The Light Weight Fiber Coupled module based on the Mini-Bar concept Overall, High Power Diode Lasers offer many ways to be used in new applications in the defense market.

  8. Millimeter-wave diode-grid frequency doubler

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jou, Christina F.; Luhmann, Neville C., Jr.; Lam, Wayne W.; Stolt, Kjell S.; Chen, Howard Z.

    1988-01-01

    Monolithic diode grids were fabricated on 2-cm square gallium-arsenide wafers in a proof-of-principle test of a quasi-optical varactor millimeter-wave frequency multiplier array concept. An equivalent circuit model based on a transmission-line analysis of plane wave illumination was applied to predict the array performance. The doubler experiments were performed under far-field illumination conditions. A second-harmonic conversion efficiency of 9.5 percent and output powers of 0.5 W were achieved at 66 GHz when the diode grid was pumped with a pulsed source at 33 GHz. This grid had 760 Schottky-barrier varactor diodes. The average series resistance was 27 ohms, the minimum capacitance was 18 fF at a reverse breakdown voltage of -3 V. The measurements indicate that the diode grid is a feasible device for generating watt-level powers at millimeter frequencies and that substantial improvement is possible by improving the diode breakdown voltage.

  9. Device having two optical ports for switching applications

    DOEpatents

    Rosen, Ayre; Stabile, Paul J.

    1991-09-24

    A two-sided light-activatable semiconductor switch device having an optical port on each side thereof. The semiconductor device may be a p-i-n diode or of bulk intrinsic material. A two ported p-i-n diode, reverse-biased to "off" by a 1.3 kV dc power supply, conducted 192 A when activated by two 1 kW laser diode arrays, one for each optical port.

  10. Measurement and Simulation of the Variation in Proton-Induced Energy Deposition in Large Silicon Diode Arrays

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Howe, Christina L.; Weller, Robert A.; Reed, Robert A.; Sierawski, Brian D.; Marshall, Paul W.; Marshall, Cheryl J.; Mendenhall, Marcus H.; Schrimpf, Ronald D.

    2007-01-01

    The proton induced charge deposition in a well characterized silicon P-i-N focal plane array is analyzed with Monte Carlo based simulations. These simulations include all physical processes, together with pile up, to accurately describe the experimental data. Simulation results reveal important high energy events not easily detected through experiment due to low statistics. The effects of each physical mechanism on the device response is shown for a single proton energy as well as a full proton space flux.

  11. Reliability of High Power Laser Diode Arrays Operating in Long Pulse Mode

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Amzajerdian, Farzin; Meadows, Byron L.; Barnes, Bruce W.; Lockard, George E.; Singh, Upendra N.; Kavaya, Michael J.; Baker, Nathaniel R.

    2006-01-01

    Reliability and lifetime of quasi-CW laser diode arrays are greatly influenced by their thermal characteristics. This paper examines the thermal properties of laser diode arrays operating in long pulse duration regime.

  12. Enhancement in performance of polycarbazole-graphene nanocomposite Schottky diode

    SciTech Connect

    Pandey, Rajiv K.; Singh, Arun Kumar; Prakash, Rajiv

    2013-12-15

    We report formation of polycarbazole (PCz)–graphene nanocomposite over indium tin oxide (ITO) coated glass substrate using electrochemical technique for fabrication of high performance Schottky diodes. The synthesized nanocomposite is characterized before fabrication of devices for confirmation of uniform distribution of graphene nanosheets in the polymer matrix. Pure PCz and PCz-graphene nanocomposites based Schottky diodes are fabricated of configuration Al/PCz/ITO and Al/PCz-graphene nanocomposite/ITO, respectively. The current density–voltage (J-V) characteristics and diode performance parameters (such as the ideality factor, barrier height, and reverse saturation current density) are compared under ambient condition. Al/PCz-graphene nanocomposite/ITO device exhibits better ideality factor in comparison to the device formed using pure PCz. It is also observed that the Al/PCz-graphene nanocomposite/ITO device shows large forward current density and low turn on voltage in comparison to Al/PCz/ITO device.

  13. Power and stability limitations of resonant tunneling diodes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kidner, C.; Mehdi, I.; East, J. R.; Haddad, G. I.

    1990-01-01

    Stability criteria for resonant tunneling diodes are investigated. Details of how extrinsic elements, such as series inductance and parallel capacitance, affect the stability are presented. A GaAs/AlAs/InGaAs/AlAs/GaAs double-barrier diode is investigated, showing the effect of different modes of low-frequency oscillation and the extrinsic circuit required for stabilization. The effect of device stabilization on high-frequency power generation is described. The main conclusions of the paper are: (1) stable resonant tunneling diode operation is difficult to obtain, and (2) the circuit and device conditions required for stable operation greatly reduce the amount of power that can be produced by these devices.

  14. Development and fabrication of improved Schottky power diodes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cordes, L. F.; Garfinkel, M.; Taft, E. A.

    1975-01-01

    Reproducible methods for the fabrication of silicon Schottky diodes have been developed for tungsten, aluminum, conventional platinum silicide, and low temperature platinum silicide. Barrier heights and barrier lowering under reverse bias have been measured, permitting the accurate prediction of forward and reverse diode characteristics. Processing procedures have been developed that permit the fabrication of large area (about 1 sq cm) mesageometry power Schottky diodes with forward and reverse characteristics that approach theoretical values. A theoretical analysis of the operation of bridge rectifier circuits has been performed, which indicates the ranges of frequency and voltage for which Schottky rectifiers are preferred to p-n junctions. Power Schottky rectifiers have been fabricated and tested for voltage ratings up to 140 volts.

  15. Aspects of SiC diode assembly using Ag technology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mysliwiec, Marcin; Guziewicz, Marek; Kisiel, Ryszard

    2013-07-01

    The aim of our paper is to consider the possibility of applying pure Ag technology for assembly of SiC Schottky diode into a ceramic package able to work at temperatures up to 350°C. Ag micropowder was used for assembly SiC structure to DBC interposer of the ceramic package. Ag wire bonds as well as flip-chip technology using Ag balls were used as material for interconnection systems. The parameters of I-V characteristics were used as a quality factor to determine the Schottky diode after hermetization into ceramic package as well as after ageing in air at 350°C in comparison with characteristics of bare SiC diode.

  16. Shunt Diode Designs in Li/cf Shuttle Batteries

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Miller, D.; Higgins, R.

    1984-01-01

    Although Li/CF cells and batteries have an excellent safety record, they are included with other battery systems that require additional safety precautions. One precaution suggested is the inclusion of shunt diodes into these batteries. The benefits of this addition are examined. All cells tested at elevated temperatures vent regardless of length of time between being fully discharged and reversed or inclusion of the diode in the system. Cells discharged at ambient temperatures all show a relatively quick reversal, but stabilize at voltages that are high enough that the diodes are not functioning. Cells tested at depressed temperatures reverse the deepest of all cells tested, with the deepest reversal occurring very early in the test and voltages recovering to above -0.60 volts near the end of the tests. Anode limited cells will eliminate the venting during hot reversal.

  17. Materials processing with a high power diode laser

    SciTech Connect

    Li, L.; Lawrence, J.; Spencer, J.T.

    1996-12-31

    This paper reports on work exploring the feasibility of a range of materials processing applications using a Diomed 60W diode laser delivered through a 600{mu}m diameter optical fibre to a 3 axis CNC workstation. The applications studied include: marking/engraving natural stones (marble and granite), marking ceramic tiles, sealing tile grouts, cutting and marking glass, marking/engraving wood, stripping paint and lacquer, and welding metallic wires. The study shows that even at the present limited power level of diode lasers, many materials processing applications can be accomplished with satisfactory results. Through the study an initial understanding of interaction of high power diode laser (HPDL) beam with various materials has been gained. Also, within the paper basic beam characteristics, and current R&D activities in HPDL technology and materials processing applications are reviewed.

  18. Narrow spectral width laser diode for metastable argon atoms pumping

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gao, Jun; Li, Bin; Wang, Xinbing; Zuo, Duluo

    2016-03-01

    Diode laser pump source with narrow emitting spectrum for optically pumped metastable rare gas laser (OPRGL) of argon was achieved by employing a complex external cavity coupled with volume Bragg grating (VBG). A commercially available c-mount laser diode with rated power of 6 W was used and studied in both the free running mode and VBG external cavity. The maximum output power of 3.9 W with FWHM less than 25 pm and peak wavelength locked around 811.53 nm was obtained from the VBG external cavity laser diode. Precise control of VBG temperature enabled fine tuning of the emission wavelength over a range of 450 pm. Future researches on OPRGL of argon will benefit from it.

  19. Shunt diode designs in Li/CF Shuttle batteries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miller, D.; Higgins, R.

    1984-09-01

    Although Li/CF cells and batteries have an excellent safety record, they are included with other battery systems that require additional safety precautions. One precaution suggested is the inclusion of shunt diodes into these batteries. The benefits of this addition are examined. All cells tested at elevated temperatures vent regardless of length of time between being fully discharged and reversed or inclusion of the diode in the system. Cells discharged at ambient temperatures all show a relatively quick reversal, but stabilize at voltages that are high enough that the diodes are not functioning. Cells tested at depressed temperatures reverse the deepest of all cells tested, with the deepest reversal occurring very early in the test and voltages recovering to above -0.60 volts near the end of the tests. Anode limited cells will eliminate the venting during hot reversal.

  20. Thermally widely tunable laser diodes with distributed feedback

    SciTech Connect

    Todt, R.; Jacke, T.; Meyer, R.; Amann, M.-C.

    2005-07-11

    A thermally widely tunable buried heterostructure laser diode with distributed feedback (DFB) is demonstrated. This device requires only two tuning currents for wide quasicontinuous wavelength tuning, thereby facilitating easy and fast device calibration and control. Furthermore, being based on regular DFB laser fabrication technology, it is readily manufacturable. By using window structures instead of cleaved facets plus antireflection coatings, a regular tuning behavior has been achieved for a DFB-like widely tunable laser diode with only two tuning currents. The laser diode covers the wavelength range between 1552 and 1602 nm. Requiring side-mode suppression ratio and output power above 30 dB and 10 mW, respectively, a wavelength range of 43 nm is accessible.