Science.gov

Sample records for 4pi ge spectrometer

  1. A 4. pi. tracking TPC magnetic spectrometer for RHIC

    SciTech Connect

    Danby, G.; Eiseman, S.E.; Etkin, A.; Foley, K.J.; Hackenburg, R.W.; Longacre, R.S.; Love, W.A.; Morris, T.W.; Platner, E.D.; Saulys, A.C.; Van Dijk, J.H. ); Lindenbaum, S.J. City Coll., New York, NY ); Chan, C.S.; Kramer, M.A.; Zhao, K. ); Biswas, N.; Kenney, P.; Piekarz, J. (Notre Dame Univ

    1990-01-01

    The primary physics objective of the 4{pi} TPC magnetic spectrometer proposal is to search for the Quark-Gluon Plasma. In previous workshops we have discussed what the possible hadronic signatures of such a state of matter would be. Succinctly, the QGP is a direct prediction of non-perturbative QCD. Therefore the question of the existence of this new state of matter bears directly on the validity of non-perturbative QCD. However, since non-perturbative QCD has never been established, it is apparent that what may await us is a host of new phenomena that will go beyond the standard model.

  2. Results on search for a QGP with a TPC magnetic spectrometer at AGS and plans for an approx 4. pi. TPC magnetic spectrometer at RHIC

    SciTech Connect

    Lindenbaum, S.J. City Univ. of New York, NY )

    1991-01-01

    In the first part of this paper a search for a Quark-Gluon Plasma (QGP) with a TPC Magnetic Spectrometer at AGS by the BNL/CCNY/Johns Hopkins/Rice (E-810) Collaboration is discussed. At AGS energies the expected increase in baryon density is near maximum. If a QGP is formed even rarely this approach provides a sensitive method for its detection. We have found some interesting phenomena including strangeness enhancement, multi-{Lambda} and K{sub s}{sup 0} events and an increased slope for {pi}{sup {minus}} (corresponding to a reduced temperature) in the usual temperature plot for p{sub {perpendicular}} < 0.2 GeV/c. We plan to increase the statistics with the 14.5 GeV/c {times} A Si ions on targets from light to heavy and then to continue the program with incident Au ions. In Part 2 we discuss the BNL/CCNY/Notre Dame/Rice proposal for an {approx} 4{pi} TPC Magnetic Spectrometer for RHIC which we believe will be a sensitive probe for hadronic QGP signals, and also capable of observing departures from QCD should they occur. 8 refs., 12 figs.

  3. 4. pi. physics. [/sup 40/Ar + KCl, 0. 4 to 1. 8 GeV/A

    SciTech Connect

    Sandoval, A.

    1980-03-01

    Exclusive ..pi../sup -/ and charged-particle production in collisions of /sup 40/Ar on KCl are studied at incident energies from 0.4 to 1.8 GeV/A. The correlation between the ..pi../sup -/ and the total charged particle multiplicity confines the reaction along a narrow ridge with no exotic islands of pion production. For high multiplicities the system reaches the total disintegration of target and projectile into singly charged fragments and pions. Every 200 MeV/A datum was taken with a central and inelastic trigger. For central collisions the mean ..pi../sup -/ multiplicity increases linearly with the bombarding energy with no marked discontinuities due to the ..delta..(3,3) resonance. At 1.8 GeV/A evidence for nonthermal ..pi../sup -/ production in central collisions is found. The total c.m. energy in ..pi../sup -/ shows linear dependence on the ..pi../sup -/ multiplicity with a slope of epsilon = 300 MeV/..pi../sup -/. Strange particle production in the central collision of 1.8 GeV/A Ar on KCl is seen. 8 figures.

  4. 4Pi-RESOLFT nanoscopy

    PubMed Central

    Böhm, Ulrike; Hell, Stefan W.; Schmidt, Roman

    2016-01-01

    By enlarging the aperture along the optic axis, the coherent utilization of opposing objective lenses (4Pi arrangement) has the potential to offer the sharpest and most light-efficient point-spread-functions in three-dimensional (3D) far-field fluorescence nanoscopy. However, to obtain unambiguous images, the signal has to be discriminated against contributions from lobes above and below the focal plane, which has tentatively limited 4Pi arrangements to imaging samples with controllable optical conditions. Here we apply the 4Pi scheme to RESOLFT nanoscopy using two-photon absorption for the on-switching of fluorescent proteins. We show that in this combination, the lobes are so low that low-light level, 3D nanoscale imaging of living cells becomes possible. Our method thus offers robust access to densely packed, axially extended cellular regions that have been notoriously difficult to super-resolve. Our approach also entails a fluorescence read-out scheme that translates molecular sensitivity to local off-switching rates into improved signal-to-noise ratio and resolution. PMID:26833381

  5. 4Pi-RESOLFT nanoscopy.

    PubMed

    Böhm, Ulrike; Hell, Stefan W; Schmidt, Roman

    2016-01-01

    By enlarging the aperture along the optic axis, the coherent utilization of opposing objective lenses (4Pi arrangement) has the potential to offer the sharpest and most light-efficient point-spread-functions in three-dimensional (3D) far-field fluorescence nanoscopy. However, to obtain unambiguous images, the signal has to be discriminated against contributions from lobes above and below the focal plane, which has tentatively limited 4Pi arrangements to imaging samples with controllable optical conditions. Here we apply the 4Pi scheme to RESOLFT nanoscopy using two-photon absorption for the on-switching of fluorescent proteins. We show that in this combination, the lobes are so low that low-light level, 3D nanoscale imaging of living cells becomes possible. Our method thus offers robust access to densely packed, axially extended cellular regions that have been notoriously difficult to super-resolve. Our approach also entails a fluorescence read-out scheme that translates molecular sensitivity to local off-switching rates into improved signal-to-noise ratio and resolution. PMID:26833381

  6. 4Pi-RESOLFT nanoscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Böhm, Ulrike; Hell, Stefan W.; Schmidt, Roman

    2016-02-01

    By enlarging the aperture along the optic axis, the coherent utilization of opposing objective lenses (4Pi arrangement) has the potential to offer the sharpest and most light-efficient point-spread-functions in three-dimensional (3D) far-field fluorescence nanoscopy. However, to obtain unambiguous images, the signal has to be discriminated against contributions from lobes above and below the focal plane, which has tentatively limited 4Pi arrangements to imaging samples with controllable optical conditions. Here we apply the 4Pi scheme to RESOLFT nanoscopy using two-photon absorption for the on-switching of fluorescent proteins. We show that in this combination, the lobes are so low that low-light level, 3D nanoscale imaging of living cells becomes possible. Our method thus offers robust access to densely packed, axially extended cellular regions that have been notoriously difficult to super-resolve. Our approach also entails a fluorescence read-out scheme that translates molecular sensitivity to local off-switching rates into improved signal-to-noise ratio and resolution.

  7. 4. pi. physics with the plastic ball

    SciTech Connect

    Gutbrod, H.H.; Loehner, H.; Poskanzer, A.M.; Renner, T.; Riedesel, H.; Ritter, H.G.; Warwick, A.; Weik, F.; Wieman, H.

    1982-10-01

    4 ..pi.. data taken with the Plastic Ball show that cluster production in relativistic nuclear collisions depends on both the size of the participant volume and the finite size of the cluster. The measurement of the degree of thermalization and the search for collective flow will permit the study of the applicability of macroscopic concepts such as temperature and density.

  8. GIOVE, a shallow laboratory Ge-spectrometer with 100 μBq/kg sensitivity

    SciTech Connect

    Heusser, G.; Weber, M.; Denz, T.; Hakenmueller, J.; Hofacker, R.; Lackner, R.; Lindner, M.; Maneschg, W.; Reisfelder, M.; Simgen, H.; Schreiner, J.; Stolzenburg, D.; Strecker, H.; Westermann, J.

    2013-08-08

    A new germanium gamma spectrometer called GIOVE (Germanium spectrometer with Inner and Outer Veto) has been set up at the underground/shallow laboratory (15 m w.e.) of MPI-K. Its double plastic scintillator veto system and neutron moderation interlayer lower the background by more than one order of magnitude compared to the other existing spectrometer at this facility. The integral (40-2700 keV) background rate of about 290 counts (day kg){sup −1} is just a factor 4 to 8 above that of the GeMPI spectrometers operated at LNGS (3800 m w.e.) and thus proves that even under shallow overburden sub mBq/kg sensitivities are achievable. Extended material screening and neutron attenuation studies preceded the final design of the spectrometer. The technical realization of the spectrometer is described in detail with special emphasis on the inner veto system. For its optimisation a simulation model was developed for light collection on small low activity PMT’s under various geometrical conditions. Radon suppression is accomplished by employing a gas tight sample container and a nitrogen flushed glove-box system with an airlock. The active volume of the crystal was modelled by absorption scanning measurements and Monte Carlo simulations. The complete shield is implemented in a Geant4 based simulation framework.

  9. Broadband Single-Shot Electron Spectrometer for GeV-Class Laser Plasma Based Accelerators

    SciTech Connect

    Nakamura, K.; Wan, W.; Ybarrolaza, N.; Syversrud, D.; Wallig, J.; Leemans, W.P.

    2008-05-01

    Laser-plasma-based accelerators can provide electrons over a broad energy range and/or with large momentum spread. The electron beam energy distribution can be controlled via accurate control of laser and plasma properties, and beams with energies ranging from'0.5 to 1000 MeV have been observed. Measuring these energy distributions in a single shot requires the use of a diagnostic with large momentum acceptance and, ideally, sufficient resolution to accurately measure energy spread in the case of narrow energy spread. Such a broadband single-shot electron magnetic spectrometer for GeV-class laser-plasma-based accelerators has been developed at Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory. A detailed description of the hardware and the design concept is presented, as well as a performance evaluation of the spectrometer. The spectrometer covered electron beam energies raging from 0.01 to 1.1 GeV in a single shot, and enabled the simultaneous measurement of the laser properties at the exit of the accelerator through the use of a sufficiently large pole gap. Based on measured field maps and 3rd-order transport analysis, a few percent-level resolution and determination of the absolute energy were achieved over the entire energy range. Laser-plasma-based accelerator experiments demonstrated the capability of the spectrometer as a diagnostic and its suitability for such a broadband electron source.

  10. GeMini: The Next-Generation Mechanically-Cooled Germanium Spectrometer

    SciTech Connect

    Burks, M

    2008-11-12

    The next-generation mechanically-cooled germanium spectrometer has been developed. GeMini (MINIature GErmanium spectrometer) has been designed to bring high-resolution gamma-ray spectroscopy to a range of demanding field environments. Intended applications include short-notice inspections, border patrol, port monitoring and emergency response, where positive nuclide identification of radioactive materials is required but power and liquid cryogen are not easily available. GeMini weighs 2.75 kg for the basic instrument and 4.5 kg for the full instrument including user interface and ruggedized hermetic packaging. It is very low power allowing it to operate for 10 hours on a single set of rechargeable batteries. This instrument employs technology adapted from the gamma-ray spectrometer currently flying on NASA's Mercury MESSENGER spacecraft. Specifically, infrared shielding techniques allow for a vast reduction of thermal load. This in turn allows for a smaller, lighter-weight design, well-suited for a hand-held instrument. Three working prototypes have been built and tested in the lab. The measured energy resolution is 3 keV fwhm at 662 keV gamma-rays. This paper will focus on the design and performance of the instrument.

  11. 4. pi. data of relativistic nuclear collisions. [Plastic ball

    SciTech Connect

    Gutbrod, H.H.; Gustafsson, H.A.; Kolb, B.

    1983-05-01

    During the past two years, complete events of relativistic nuclear collisions are being studied with the Plastic Ball, the first electronic nonmagnetic particle-identifying 4..pi.. spectrometer. It is well suited to handle the large multiplicities in these reactions and allows collection of data at a rate sufficient to make further software selections to look at rare events. The analysis of the data follows various lines covering topics like thermalization, stopping or transparency, cluster-production mechanism (--can it tell entropy), search for collective flow through various global analyzing methods that allow determination of the scattering plane, projectile fragmentation (--is there a bounce-off), pion distribution, two-particle correlations: Hanbury-Brown Twiss, and excited nuclear states (--nucleosynthesis at the freezeout point or from chemical equilibrium). We will cover in this contribution only two subjects: stopping and thermalization and cluster production.

  12. Calibration of Ge gamma-ray spectrometers for complex sample geometries and matrices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Semkow, T. M.; Bradt, C. J.; Beach, S. E.; Haines, D. K.; Khan, A. J.; Bari, A.; Torres, M. A.; Marrantino, J. C.; Syed, U.-F.; Kitto, M. E.; Hoffman, T. J.; Curtis, P.

    2015-11-01

    A comprehensive study of the efficiency calibration and calibration verification of Ge gamma-ray spectrometers was performed using semi-empirical, computational Monte-Carlo (MC), and transfer methods. The aim of this study was to evaluate the accuracy of the quantification of gamma-emitting radionuclides in complex matrices normally encountered in environmental and food samples. A wide range of gamma energies from 59.5 to 1836.0 keV and geometries from a 10-mL jar to 1.4-L Marinelli beaker were studied on four Ge spectrometers with the relative efficiencies between 102% and 140%. Density and coincidence summing corrections were applied. Innovative techniques were developed for the preparation of artificial complex matrices from materials such as acidified water, polystyrene, ethanol, sugar, and sand, resulting in the densities ranging from 0.3655 to 2.164 g cm-3. They were spiked with gamma activity traceable to international standards and used for calibration verifications. A quantitative method of tuning MC calculations to experiment was developed based on a multidimensional chi-square paraboloid.

  13. Development of a Multi-GeV spectrometer for laser-plasma experiment at FLAME

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Valente, P.; Anelli, F.; Bacci, A.; Batani, D.; Bellaveglia, M.; Benocci, R.; Benedetti, C.; Cacciotti, L.; Cecchetti, C. A.; Clozza, A.; Cultrera, L.; Di Pirro, G.; Drenska, N.; Faccini, R.; Ferrario, M.; Filippetto, D.; Fioravanti, S.; Gallo, A.; Gamucci, A.; Gatti, G.; Ghigo, A.; Giulietti, A.; Giulietti, D.; Gizzi, L. A.; Koester, P.; Labate, L.; Levato, T.; Lollo, V.; Londrillo, P.; Martellotti, S.; Pace, E.; Pathak, N.; Rossi, A.; Tani, F.; Serafini, L.; Turchetti, G.; Vaccarezza, C.

    2011-10-01

    The advance in laser-plasma acceleration techniques pushes the regime of the resulting accelerated particles to higher energies and intensities. In particular, the upcoming experiments with the 250 TW laser at the FLAME facility of the INFN Laboratori Nazionali di Frascati, will enter the GeV regime with more than 100 pC of electrons. At the current status of understanding of the acceleration mechanism, relatively large angular and energy spreads are expected. There is therefore the need for developing a device capable to measure the energy of electrons over three orders of magnitude (few MeV to few GeV), with still unknown angular divergences. Within the PlasmonX experiment at FLAME, a spectrometer is being constructed to perform these measurements. It is made of an electro-magnet and a screen made of scintillating fibers for the measurement of the trajectories of the particles. The large range of operation, the huge number of particles and the need to focus the divergence, present challenges in the design and construction of such a device. We present the design considerations for this spectrometer that lead to the use of scintillating fibers, multichannel photo-multipliers and a multiplexing electronics, a combination which is innovative in the field. We also present the experimental results obtained with a high intensity electron beam performed on a prototype at the LNF beam test facility.

  14. The Diogene 4 pi detector at Saturne

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Alard, J. P.; Arnold, J.; Augerat, J.; Babinet, R.; Bastid, N.; Brochard, F.; Costilhes, J. P.; Crouau, M.; De Marco, N.; Drouet, M.; Dupieux, P.; Fanet, H.; Fodor, Z.; Fraysse, L.; Girard, J.; Gorodetzky, P.; Gosset, J.; Laspalles, C.; Lemaire, M. C.; L'Hote, D.; Lucas, B.; Montarou, G.; Papineau, A.; Parizet, M. J.; Schimmerling, W.

    1987-01-01

    Diogene, an electronic 4 pi detector, has been built and installed at the Saturne synchrotron in Saclay. The forward angular range (0 degree-6 degrees) is covered by 48 time-of-flight scintillator telescopes that provide charge identification. The trajectories of fragments emitted at larger angles are recorded in a cylindrical 0.4-m3 Pictorial Drift Chamber (PDC) surrounding the target. The PDC is inside a 1-T magnetic field; the axis of the PDC cylinder and the magnetic field are parallel to the beam. Good identification has been obtained for both positive and negative pi mesons and for hydrogen and helium isotopes. Multiplicities in relativistic nucleus-nucleus reactions up to 40 have been detected, limited mainly by the present electronics.

  15. Analysis of Superconducting Dipole Coil of 11 GeV Super High Momentum Spectrometer

    SciTech Connect

    Sun, Eric; Cheng, Gary; Lassiter, Steve R.; Brindza, Paul D.; Fowler, Michael J.

    2015-06-01

    Jefferson Lab is constructing five Super High Momentum Spectrometer (SHMS) superconducting magnets for the 12 GeV Upgrade. This paper reports measured coil material properties and the results of the extensive finite element analysis (FEA) for the dipole coil. To properly define the smeared orthotropic material of the coil, a detailed coil model is set up to compute material parameters because not all parameters were measured. Stress and strain acceptance criteria are discussed. Eight load steps are defined. The preheat temperature of the force collar is optimized under two loading scenarios so that the positive pressure between the inner coil and central spacer is maintained while there is not too much squeeze to the coil.

  16. Estimation method of planetary fast neutron flux by a Ge gamma-ray spectrometer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hareyama, M.; Fujibayashi, Y.; Yamashita, Y.; Karouji, Y.; Nagaoka, H.; Kobayashi, S.; Reedy, R. C.; Gasnault, O.; Forni, O.; d'Uston, C.; Kim, K. J.; Hasebe, N.

    2016-08-01

    An intensity map of lunar fast neutrons (LFNs) and their temporal variation has been estimated by fitting "sawtooth" peaks in the energy spectra of lunar gamma rays observed by the Kaguya (SELENE) Gamma Ray Spectrometer (GRS) consisting of a high-purity germanium (HPGe) detector with a BGO scintillator. While an ordinary peak in the spectrum is produced by only gamma ray lines, the sawtooth peak is produced by gamma ray lines and recoil nuclei in the detector by Ge(n ,n‧ γ) reaction. We develop a model for the shape of the sawtooth peak and apply it to fit sawtooth peaks together with ordinary peaks in actual observed spectra on the Moon. The temporal variation of LFNs is synchronous with that of galactic cosmic rays (GCRs), and the global distribution of fast neutrons on the lunar surface agrees well with the past observation reported by the Neutron Spectrometer aboard Lunar Prospector. Based on these results, a new method is established to estimate the flux of fast neutrons by fitting sawtooth peaks on the gamma ray spectrum observed by the HPGe detector.

  17. 4Pi Spectral Self-interference Fluorescence Microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dogan, Mehmet; Swan, Anna K.; Unlu, M. Selim; Goldberg, Bennett B.

    2006-03-01

    4Pi fluorescence confocal microscopy [1] improves axial resolution, and Spectral Self-Interference Fluorescence Microscopy (SSFM) [2] provides sub-nanometer localization of fluorescent emitters in biological structures. Here we report on the construction and evaluation of a 4Pi fluorescence confocal microscope and discuss the efforts to combine the high resolution 4Pi technique with SSFM. In the 4Pi microscope, the back focal planes of two opposing high numerical aperture objectives are filled with coherent laser illumination and counter propagating spherical wave fronts form constructive interference at the common focus of two objectives, resulting in an improvement of the axial point spread function (PSF). We characterized the 3-D PSF of the microscope using fluorescent polystyrene beads and fluorescent monolayers. We measured a factor of 3 improvement of the axial PSF compared to a confocal microscope. [1] S. W. Hell et al. J.Opt.Soc.Am. A Vol.9, No.12, pp.2159 (1992) [2] A. K. Swan et al. IEEE JSTQE Vol. 9, No. 2, pp. 294 (2003)

  18. Feasibility of Parity-Violating Electron Scattering Experiments Below 1 GeV Beam Energy with a Toroidal Spectrometer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bartlett, Kurtis

    2015-10-01

    The next generation of high precision parity-violating electron scattering experiments could potentially make use of a toroidal spectrometer to perform additional measurements of the proton's weak charge (Qwp) using a hydrogen target, a test of the Standard Model using a carbon target as well as possibly studying the neutron skin of heavier nuclei. I will present the results of recent Geant4 Monte-Carlo studies performed to test the feasibility of such a toroidal spectrometer at beam energies below 1 GeV employing a concept similar to that used by the recent JLab Qweak measurement. It appears that given sufficient beam time such a measurement could be complementary to the JLab measurement, but at a significantly lower Q2. The feasibility of measuring the neutron skin using such a spectrometer will also be discussed. The key issue for this latter type of measurement is the ability to achieve the necessary resolution to separate the elastic and first excited state. This work was supported in part by the National Science Foundation under Grant No. PHY-1206053.

  19. Continuous fluorescence microphotolysis and correlation spectroscopy using 4Pi microscopy.

    PubMed

    Arkhipov, Anton; Hüve, Jana; Kahms, Martin; Peters, Reiner; Schulten, Klaus

    2007-12-01

    Continuous fluorescence microphotolysis (CFM) and fluorescence correlation spectroscopy (FCS) permit measurement of molecular mobility and association reactions in single living cells. CFM and FCS complement each other ideally and can be realized using identical equipment. So far, the spatial resolution of CFM and FCS was restricted by the resolution of the light microscope to the micrometer scale. However, cellular functions generally occur on the nanometer scale. Here, we develop the theoretical and computational framework for CFM and FCS experiments using 4Pi microscopy, which features an axial resolution of approximately 100 nm. The framework, taking the actual 4Pi point spread function of the instrument into account, was validated by measurements on model systems, employing 4Pi conditions or normal confocal conditions together with either single- or two-photon excitation. In all cases experimental data could be well fitted by computed curves for expected diffusion coefficients, even when the signal/noise ratio was small due to the small number of fluorophores involved.

  20. The Superconducting Horizontal Bend Magnet for the Jefferson Lab's 11 GeV/c Super High Momentum Spectrometer

    SciTech Connect

    S. Chouhan, J. DeKamp, A. Zeller, P. Brindza, S. Lassiter, M. Fowler, E. Sun

    2010-06-01

    A collaboration between NSCL and Jlab has developed the reference design and coil winding for Jlab's Super High Momentum Spectrometer (SHMS) horizontal bend magnet. A warm iron ??C?? type superferric dipole magnet will bend the 12 GeV/c particles horizontally by 3?? to allow the SHMS to reach angles as low as 5.5??. This requires an integral field strength of up to 2.1 T.m. The major challenges are the tight geometry, high and unbalanced forces and a required low fringe field in primary beam path. A coil design based on flattened SSC Rutherford cable that provides a large current margin and commercially available fiberglass prepreg epoxy tape has been developed. A complete test coil has been wound and will be cold tested. This paper present the modified magnet design includes coil forces, coil restraint system and fringe field. In addition, coil properties, quench calculations and the full mechanical details are also presented.

  1. Cryostat design and magnetostatic analysis of the 6 GeV superconducting dipole for the CEBAF high momentum spectrometer

    SciTech Connect

    Miller, J.A.; Brindza, P.D.; Fowler, M.J.; Hunter, W.T.; Lassiter, S.R.; Thorpe, R.R. )

    1991-03-01

    This paper reports on the dipole for the Hall C High Momentum Spectrometer which is a 470 ton, superconducting, cryostable magnet. With a bend radius of 12.05625 m and an effective length of 5.26 m, it is configured to achieve a 25{degrees} bending angle for 6 GeV/c momentum particles over its 42 cm gap at a central field excitation of 1.66 T. The thermal syphon cooled coil consists of three double pancakes of 3 kA copper stabilized conductor. The cryostat consists of this cryostable coil wound directly onto a stainless steel bobbin with G-10 support cylinders connected to the bobbin to transfer loads produced during energization to the yoke iron, and inflated stainless steel heat transfer panel cooled by LN{sub 2} and a stainless steel vacuum vessel.

  2. Code CUGEL: A code to unfold Ge(Li) spectrometer polyenergetic gamma photon experimental distributions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Steyn, J. J.; Born, U.

    1970-01-01

    A FORTRAN code was developed for the Univac 1108 digital computer to unfold lithium-drifted germanium semiconductor spectrometers, polyenergetic gamma photon experimental distributions. It was designed to analyze the combination continuous and monoenergetic gamma radiation field of radioisotope volumetric sources. The code generates the detector system response matrix function and applies it to monoenergetic spectral components discretely and to the continuum iteratively. It corrects for system drift, source decay, background, and detection efficiency. Results are presented in digital form for differential and integrated photon number and energy distributions, and for exposure dose.

  3. Pulse shaping for Ge-spectrometers optimized for ballistic deficit and electronic noise

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kalinin, A. I.; Bednyakov, V. A.

    2005-02-01

    For large-volume high-purity Ge detectors, working at low counting rates, a new two-level shaping is proposed which is based on a cusp-like form of the bottom part of the shaping and a parabolic-like form of the top shaping part. Due to the side wings of the cusp the good noise characteristics of the shaping are conserved. At the same time, the parabolic part of the pulse shape allows rather satisfactory compensation of the ballistic deficit. Calculation shows that the noise factor can be improved within 10-12% as compared to standard quasi-Gaussian shaping.

  4. Prototype Ge:Ga detectors for the NASA-Ames cooled grating spectrometer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Houck, J. R.

    1981-07-01

    The detectors were fabricated from a Ge:Ga wafer from Eagle-Pitcher with a room temperature resistivity of approx. 12ohms cm. The wafer is approximately 2 inches in diameter and 0.061 inches thick. The contact material was ion implanted with Boron using 10 to the 14th power ions/sq cm at 25 Kev and 2 x10 to the 14th power ions/sq cm at 50 Kev. The crystal was then sputter-cleaned and metallized first with sputtered Ti and then sputter Au. In addition to the usual infrared measurements of responsivity and noise, measurements were made of the detectors' response to ionizing radiation.

  5. Characterization of Lead Tungstate for Neutral Particle Spectrometer at 12 GeV JLab

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Runyon, Christian

    2015-10-01

    Precision measurements of the deeply-virtual Compton scattering cross section at different beam energies to extract the real part of the Compton form factor, measurements to push the energy scale of real Compton scattering, and measurements of the basic semi-inclusive neutral-pion cross section in a kinematical region where the QCD factorization scheme is expected to hold all have something in common: the need for detecting neutral particles with high precision and high luminosity. The Neutral Particle Spectrometer (NPS) is a crystal electromagnetic calorimeter preceded by a sweeping magnet to sweep away charged particles. In this presentation I will show the results of PbWO4 crystal quality studies for the NPS. PbWO4 is optimal for the NPS due to its small Moliere radius and radiation hardness. The critical aspect for crystal quality, and thus resolution/precision, is the combination of high light output and radiation hardness, which depend strongly on the manufacturing process. We have tested the performance of PbWO4 crystals, and in particular, measured their light yield, optical transmission, and uniformity and radiation hardness. The homogeneity of the crystal was investigated based on the variation of the transverse optical transmission. Supported in part by NSF-PHY-1306227.

  6. VizieR Online Data Catalog: HI4PI spectra and column density maps (HI4PI team+, 2016)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hi4PI Collaboration; Ben Bekhti, N.; Floeer, L.; Keller, R.; Kerp, J.; Lenz, D.; Winkel, B.; Bailin, J.; Calabretta, M. R.; Dedes, L.; Ford, H. A.; Gibson, B. K.; Haud, U.; Janowiecki, S.; Kalberla, P. M. W.; Lockman, F. J.; McClure-Griffiths, N. M.; Murphy, T.; Nakanishi, H.; Pisano, D. J.; Staveley-Smith, L.

    2016-09-01

    The HI4PI data release comprises 21-cm neutral atomic hydrogen data of the Milky Way (-600km/s0°; -470km/s4PI covers the full 4-pi sky. Spectral data is provided in three forms: (1) Standard FITS data cubes, for the full sky in both, Equatorial (J2000) and Galactic coordinates, each in four different map projections, AIT, CAR, MOL, and SFL; see world-coordinate-system, WCS, references: Greisen & Calabretta, 2002A&A...395.1061G, Calabretta & Greisen, 2002A&A...395.1077C, Greisen et al., 2006A&A...446..747G (2) Smaller FITS data cubes, each having a size of about 20x20 sq.deg. For convenience, we provide four different map projections, CAR, SFL, SIN, and TAN (again see WCS references). Note, size in longitude is 20° in absolute coordinates for CAR projection, and 20° true-angular size for SFL, SIN, and TAN projections. Again, Equatorial and Galactic coordinate systems are provided. (3) FITS binary tables containing lists of spectra sampled on a HealPIX grid (nside=1024, Galactic coordinates, Ring indexing scheme, Gorski et al., 2005ApJ...622..759G). To make handling of the data easier, the table is split into smaller files. Each of these contains spectra belonging to one of the 192 base/parent pixels of the nside=4 pixelization. For convenience, the binary tables also contain EQ2000 and Galactic coordinate positions for each individual spectrum, as well as the associated HealPIX index. Furthermore, we provide the full-sky HI column density distribution, both, in a (1) HealPIX-grid binary table (nside=1024, Galactic coordinates, Ring indexing scheme), and (2) Standard FITS 2D images in four map projections, AIT, CAR, MOL, and SFL. Various velocity intervals were applied to calculate NHI. Equatorial and Galactic coordinate systems are provided. (16 data files).

  7. Curved optical tubes in a 4Pi focusing system.

    PubMed

    Yan, Shaohui; Yu, Xianghua; Li, Manman; Yao, Baoli

    2015-08-24

    We demonstrate the possibility of creating curved optical tubes in a 4Pi focusing system. The focal fields of such optical tubes have interesting properties: the energy is concentered in the neighborhood of a prescribed three-dimensional (3D) curve while the cross section is of hollow shape. The creation of these optical tubes is based on the annular focal spot of a vortex beam, which is employed as a building block. An optical tube is thus obtained by covering the central-axis curve of the tube by various such building blocks. Each building block has a certain orientation and position, realized by a rotation plus a certain translation. The spatial spectrum (the input field as well) of the optical tube is obtained by linearly superposing the spectrum of each transformed building block. The curve is rather arbitrary. Three examples of optical tubes: a torus, a solenoid and a trefoil knot are given, showing a good agreement with the expected results. PMID:26368256

  8. Search for a QGP with a TPC spectrometer, and QGP signals predicted by new event generator

    SciTech Connect

    Lindenbaum, S.J.

    1988-12-08

    The BNL/CCNY/Johns Hopkins/Rice Collaboration has developed and successfully tested a TPC Magnetic Spectrometer to search for OGP signals produced by ion beams at AGS. Test data with 14.5 GeV/c /times/ A Oxygen ions incident on a Pb target has been obtained. These include a 78-prong nuclear interaction in the MPS magnet which was pattern recognized with an efficiency approx.75%. A cascade and plasma event generator has also been developed, the predictions of which are used to illustrate how our technique can detect possible plasma signals at AGS and RHIC. A 4..pi.. tracking TPC magnetic spectrometer has been proposed for RHIC. The new event generator predicts striking central rapidity bump QGP signals at RHIC for p, /bar p/, ..pi../sup +-/, K/sup +-/, etc., produced by 100 GeV/c /times/ A Au on Au collisions and these are presented. 2 refs., 13 figs., 1 tab.

  9. Charge exchange dp → (pp)n reaction study at 1.75 A GeV/c by the STRELA spectrometer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Basilev, S. N.; Bushuev, Yu. P.; Glagolev, V. V.; Dolgiy, S. A.; Kirillov, D. A.; Kostyaeva, N. V.; Kovalenko, A. D.; Livanov, A. N.; Manyakov, P. K.; Martinská, G.; Mušinský, J.; Piskunov, N. M.; Povtoreiko, A. A.; Rukoyatkin, P. A.; Shindin, R. A.; Sitnik, I. M.; Slepnev, V. M.; Slepnev, I. V.; Urbán, J.

    2016-02-01

    The differential cross sections of the charge exchange reaction dp → (pp)n has been measured at 1.75 GeV/c momentum per nucleon for small transferred momenta using the one arm magnetic spectrometer STRELA at the Nuclotron accelerator. The ratio of the differential cross section of the charge exchange reaction dp → (pp)n to that of the np → pn elementary process is discussed in order to estimate the spin-dependent part of the np → pn charge exchange amplitude on the basis of dp → (pp)n data. The np → pn amplitude turned out to be predominantly spin-dependent.

  10. Measurement of cross section and electron asymmetry of the p (e(pol), e-prime pi+) n reaction in the Delta(1232) and higher resonances for Q**2 <= 4.9-(GeV/c)**2

    SciTech Connect

    Kijun Park; Inna Aznauryan; Volker Burkert; Wooyoung Kim

    2006-06-01

    The cross section and beam asymmetry were measured in channel of (pol)ep --> e'pi^+n using 5.754 GeV electron beam with CEBAF Large Acceptance Spectrometer(CLAS). This measurement covers 4 pi angular coverage and high Q^2 up to 4.9 GeV^2 under various resonance mass regions. The structure functions sigmaT + epsilonLsigmaL, sigmaTT, sigmaLT and sigmaLT/ were extracted from fit angular distribution of cross section and asymmetry.

  11. NEPTUN-A spectrometer for measuring the Spin Analyzing Power in p-p elastic scattering at large P2⊥ at 400 GeV (and 3 TeV) at UNK

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lin, Ali M. T.

    1995-09-01

    We are constructing the NEPTUN-A spectrometer for measuring the Spin Analyzing Power in p+p↑→p+p at P2⊥=2 to 10 (GeV/c)2 at 400 GeV (or at 3 TeV) when the UNK accelerator in Protvino, Russia, becomes operational. The spectrometer consists of a 55 m long recoil arm with 3 horizontally bending magnets to guide the recoil protons onto a fixed 37° line. Then two vertical dipole magnets bend the protons up by 12° for momentum analysis. The momentum will be measured to an accuracy of 0.1% using chambers. In order to accept a large solid angle, the spectrometer contains a strong-focusing pair of quadrupoles looking at the polarized proton jet target. The forward arm consists of scintillator hodoscopes for measurement of the forward vertical angle. Acceptances and event rates are calculated. The status of the spectrometer is reported.

  12. Optimization of statistical methods for HpGe gamma-ray spectrometer used in wide count rate ranges

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gervino, G.; Mana, G.; Palmisano, C.

    2016-07-01

    The need to perform γ-ray measurements with HpGe detectors is a common technique in many fields such as nuclear physics, radiochemistry, nuclear medicine and neutron activation analysis. The use of HpGe detectors is chosen in situations where isotope identification is needed because of their excellent resolution. Our challenge is to obtain the "best" spectroscopy data possible in every measurement situation. "Best" is a combination of statistical (number of counts) and spectral quality (peak, width and position) over a wide range of counting rates. In this framework, we applied Bayesian methods and the Ellipsoidal Nested Sampling (a multidimensional integration technique) to study the most likely distribution for the shape of HpGe spectra. In treating these experiments, the prior information suggests to model the likelihood function with a product of Poisson distributions. We present the efforts that have been done in order to optimize the statistical methods to HpGe detector outputs with the aim to evaluate to a better order of precision the detector efficiency, the absolute measured activity and the spectra background. Reaching a more precise knowledge of statistical and systematic uncertainties for the measured physical observables is the final goal of this research project.

  13. GSI-LBL plastic ball/wall spectrometer

    SciTech Connect

    Gustafsson, H.A.; Doss, K.G.R.; Gutbrod, H.H.; Kolb, B.; Ludewigt, B.; Poskanzer, A.M.; Renner, T.; Riedesel, H.; Ritter, H.G.; Warwick, A.

    1984-09-01

    For the high multiplicity events occurring in relativistics nuclear collisions an electronic 4..pi.. detector with particle identification has been built. It consists of 815 ..delta..E - E telescopes and 176 TOF telescopes covering 97% of 4..pi... Very good particle identification has been obtained for hydrogen and helium isotopes and also ..pi../sup +/ have been detected with high efficiency. This spectrometer was used at the Berkeley Bevalac to study the reactions Ca + Ca, Nb + Nb and Au + Au at energies between 0.15 and 1.05 GeV/nucleon. Various exclusive observables like the degree of thermalization, the multiplicity dependence of composite particle formation, and freeze-out densities are discussed. From global analyses the collective flow of nuclear matter has been deduced. A method of separating efficiently participant and spectator particles has been applied in order to disentangle the two collective effects: The side-splash of the participants and the bounce-off in the fragmentation region. 9 references, 11 figures.

  14. Commissioning of horizontal-bend superconducting magnet for Jefferson Lab's 11-GeV super high momentum spectrometer

    DOE PAGES

    Sun, Eric; Brindza, Paul D.; Lassiter, Steven R.; Fowler, Mike J.; Fenker, Howard C.; DeKamp, Jon C.

    2016-03-02

    Commissioning characteristics of the Superconducting High Momentum Spectrometer (SHMS) Horizontal Bend (HB) magnet was presented. Pre-commissioning peer review of the magnet uncovered issues with eddy currents in the thermal shield, resulting in additional testing and modeling of the magnet. A three-stage test plan was discussed. A solution of using a small dump resistor and a warm thermal shield was presented. Analyses illustrated that it was safe to run the magnet to full test current. As a result, the HB magnet was successfully cooled to 4 K and reached its maximum test current of 4000 A.

  15. Large size GEM for Super Bigbite Spectrometer (SBS) polarimeter for Hall A 12 GeV program at JLab

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gnanvo, Kondo; Liyanage, Nilanga; Nelyubin, Vladimir; Saenboonruang, Kiadtisak; Sacher, Seth; Wojtsekhowski, Bogdan

    2015-05-01

    We report on the R&D effort in the design and construction of a large size Gas Electron Multiplier (GEM) for the Proton Polarimeter Back Tracker (BT) of the Super Bigbite Spectrometer (SBS) in Hall A at Thomas Jefferson National Laboratory (JLab). The SBS BT GEM trackers consist of two sets of five large GEM chambers of size 60×200 cm2. The GEM chamber is a vertical stack of four GEM modules, each with an active area of 60×50 cm2. We have built and tested several prototypes and the construction of GEM modules for SBS BT is ongoing. We describe in this paper the design and construction of the GEM module prototype as well as the preliminary results on performance from tests carried out in our detector lab and during test beam at Fermi National Laboratory (Fermilab).

  16. Large size GEM for Super Bigbite Spectrometer (SBS) polarimeter for Hall A 12GeV program at JLab

    SciTech Connect

    Gnanvo, Kondo; Liyanage, Nilanga; Nelyubin, Vladimir; Saenboonruang, Kiadtisak; Sacher, Seth; Wojtsekhowski, Bogdan

    2015-05-01

    We report on the R&D effort in the design and construction of a large size GEM chamber for the Proton Polarimeter of the Super Bigbite Spectrometer (SBS) in Hall A at Thomas Jefferson National Laboratory (JLab). The SBS Polarimeter trackers consist of two sets of four large chambers of size 200 cm x 60 cm2. Each chamber is a vertical stack of four GEM modules with an active area of 60 cm x 50 cm. We have built and tested several GEM modules and we describe in this paper the design and construction of the final GEM as well as the preliminary results on performances from tests carried out in our detector lab and with test beams at (Fermilab).

  17. Large size GEM for Super Bigbite Spectrometer (SBS) polarimeter for Hall A 12GeV program at JLab

    DOE PAGES

    Gnanvo, Kondo; Liyanage, Nilanga; Nelyubin, Vladimir; Saenboonruang, Kiadtisak; Sacher, Seth; Wojtsekhowski, Bogdan

    2015-05-01

    We report on the R&D effort in the design and construction of a large size GEM chamber for the Proton Polarimeter of the Super Bigbite Spectrometer (SBS) in Hall A at Thomas Jefferson National Laboratory (JLab). The SBS Polarimeter trackers consist of two sets of four large chambers of size 200 cm x 60 cm2. Each chamber is a vertical stack of four GEM modules with an active area of 60 cm x 50 cm. We have built and tested several GEM modules and we describe in this paper the design and construction of the final GEM as well asmore » the preliminary results on performances from tests carried out in our detector lab and with test beams at (Fermilab).« less

  18. Taylor series expansion based multidimensional image reconstruction for confocal and 4pi microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dilipkumar, Shilpa; Pratim Mondal, Partha

    2013-08-01

    We propose and experimentally demonstrate a three-dimensional (3D) image reconstruction methodology based on Taylor series approximation (TSA) in a Bayesian image reconstruction formulation. TSA incorporates the requirement of analyticity in the image domain, and acts as a finite impulse response filter. This technique is validated on images obtained from widefield, confocal laser scanning fluorescence microscopy and two-photon excited 4pi (2PE-4pi) fluorescence microscopy. Studies on simulated 3D objects, mitochondria-tagged yeast cells (labeled with Mitotracker Orange) and mitochondrial networks (tagged with Green fluorescent protein) show a signal-to-background improvement of 40% and resolution enhancement from 360 to 240 nm. This technique can easily be extended to other imaging modalities (single plane illumination microscopy (SPIM), individual molecule localization SPIM, stimulated emission depletion microscopy and its variants).

  19. HI4PI: A full-sky H I survey based on EBHIS and GASS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    HI4PI Collaboration; Ben Bekhti, N.; Flöer, L.; Keller, R.; Kerp, J.; Lenz, D.; Winkel, B.; Bailin, J.; Calabretta, M. R.; Dedes, L.; Ford, H. A.; Gibson, B. K.; Haud, U.; Janowiecki, S.; Kalberla, P. M. W.; Lockman, F. J.; McClure-Griffiths, N. M.; Murphy, T.; Nakanishi, H.; Pisano, D. J.; Staveley-Smith, L.

    2016-10-01

    Context. Measurement of the Galactic neutral atomic hydrogen (H I) column density, NH I, and brightness temperatures, TB, is of high scientific value for a broad range of astrophysical disciplines. In the past two decades, one of the most-used legacy H I datasets has been the Leiden/Argentine/Bonn Survey (LAB). Aims: We release the H I 4π survey (HI4PI), an all-sky database of Galactic H I, which supersedes the LAB survey. Methods: The HI4PI survey is based on data from the recently completed first coverage of the Effelsberg-Bonn H I Survey (EBHIS) and from the third revision of the Galactic All-Sky Survey (GASS). EBHIS and GASS share similar angular resolution and match well in sensitivity. Combined, they are ideally suited to be a successor to LAB. Results: The new HI4PI survey outperforms the LAB in angular resolution (ϑFWHM = 16´´.2) and sensitivity (σrms = 43 mK). Moreover, it has full spatial sampling and thus overcomes a major drawback of LAB, which severely undersamples the sky. We publish all-sky column density maps of the neutral atomic hydrogen in the Milky Way, along with full spectroscopic data, in several map projections including HEALPix. HI4PI datasets are only available at the CDS via anonymous ftp to http://cdsarc.u-strasbg.fr (http://130.79.128.5) or via http://cdsarc.u-strasbg.fr/viz-bin/qcat?J/A+A/594/A116

  20. First result from the Alpha Magnetic Spectrometer on the International Space Station: precision measurement of the positron fraction in primary cosmic rays of 0.5-350 GeV.

    PubMed

    Aguilar, M; Alberti, G; Alpat, B; Alvino, A; Ambrosi, G; Andeen, K; Anderhub, H; Arruda, L; Azzarello, P; Bachlechner, A; Barao, F; Baret, B; Barrau, A; Barrin, L; Bartoloni, A; Basara, L; Basili, A; Batalha, L; Bates, J; Battiston, R; Bazo, J; Becker, R; Becker, U; Behlmann, M; Beischer, B; Berdugo, J; Berges, P; Bertucci, B; Bigongiari, G; Biland, A; Bindi, V; Bizzaglia, S; Boella, G; de Boer, W; Bollweg, K; Bolmont, J; Borgia, B; Borsini, S; Boschini, M J; Boudoul, G; Bourquin, M; Brun, P; Buénerd, M; Burger, J; Burger, W; Cadoux, F; Cai, X D; Capell, M; Casadei, D; Casaus, J; Cascioli, V; Castellini, G; Cernuda, I; Cervelli, F; Chae, M J; Chang, Y H; Chen, A I; Chen, C R; Chen, H; Cheng, G M; Chen, H S; Cheng, L; Chernoplyiokov, N; Chikanian, A; Choumilov, E; Choutko, V; Chung, C H; Clark, C; Clavero, R; Coignet, G; Commichau, V; Consolandi, C; Contin, A; Corti, C; Costado Dios, M T; Coste, B; Crespo, D; Cui, Z; Dai, M; Delgado, C; Della Torre, S; Demirkoz, B; Dennett, P; Derome, L; Di Falco, S; Diao, X H; Diago, A; Djambazov, L; Díaz, C; von Doetinchem, P; Du, W J; Dubois, J M; Duperay, R; Duranti, M; D'Urso, D; Egorov, A; Eline, A; Eppling, F J; Eronen, T; van Es, J; Esser, H; Falvard, A; Fiandrini, E; Fiasson, A; Finch, E; Fisher, P; Flood, K; Foglio, R; Fohey, M; Fopp, S; Fouque, N; Galaktionov, Y; Gallilee, M; Gallin-Martel, L; Gallucci, G; García, B; García, J; García-López, R; García-Tabares, L; Gargiulo, C; Gast, H; Gebauer, I; Gentile, S; Gervasi, M; Gillard, W; Giovacchini, F; Girard, L; Goglov, P; Gong, J; Goy-Henningsen, C; Grandi, D; Graziani, M; Grechko, A; Gross, A; Guerri, I; de la Guía, C; Guo, K H; Habiby, M; Haino, S; Hauler, F; He, Z H; Heil, M; Heilig, J; Hermel, R; Hofer, H; Huang, Z C; Hungerford, W; Incagli, M; Ionica, M; Jacholkowska, A; Jang, W Y; Jinchi, H; Jongmanns, M; Journet, L; Jungermann, L; Karpinski, W; Kim, G N; Kim, K S; Kirn, Th; Kossakowski, R; Koulemzine, A; Kounina, O; Kounine, A; Koutsenko, V; Krafczyk, M S; Laudi, E; Laurenti, G; Lauritzen, C; Lebedev, A; Lee, M W; Lee, S C; Leluc, C; León Vargas, H; Lepareur, V; Li, J Q; Li, Q; Li, T X; Li, W; Li, Z H; Lipari, P; Lin, C H; Liu, D; Liu, H; Lomtadze, T; Lu, Y S; Lucidi, S; Lübelsmeyer, K; Luo, J Z; Lustermann, W; Lv, S; Madsen, J; Majka, R; Malinin, A; Mañá, C; Marín, J; Martin, T; Martínez, G; Masciocchi, F; Masi, N; Maurin, D; McInturff, A; McIntyre, P; Menchaca-Rocha, A; Meng, Q; Menichelli, M; Mereu, I; Millinger, M; Mo, D C; Molina, M; Mott, P; Mujunen, A; Natale, S; Nemeth, P; Ni, J Q; Nikonov, N; Nozzoli, F; Nunes, P; Obermeier, A; Oh, S; Oliva, A; Palmonari, F; Palomares, C; Paniccia, M; Papi, A; Park, W H; Pauluzzi, M; Pauss, F; Pauw, A; Pedreschi, E; Pensotti, S; Pereira, R; Perrin, E; Pessina, G; Pierschel, G; Pilo, F; Piluso, A; Pizzolotto, C; Plyaskin, V; Pochon, J; Pohl, M; Poireau, V; Porter, S; Pouxe, J; Putze, A; Quadrani, L; Qi, X N; Rancoita, P G; Rapin, D; Ren, Z L; Ricol, J S; Riihonen, E; Rodríguez, I; Roeser, U; Rosier-Lees, S; Rossi, L; Rozhkov, A; Rozza, D; Sabellek, A; Sagdeev, R; Sandweiss, J; Santos, B; Saouter, P; Sarchioni, M; Schael, S; Schinzel, D; Schmanau, M; Schwering, G; Schulz von Dratzig, A; Scolieri, G; Seo, E S; Shan, B S; Shi, J Y; Shi, Y M; Siedenburg, T; Siedling, R; Son, D; Spada, F; Spinella, F; Steuer, M; Stiff, K; Sun, W; Sun, W H; Sun, X H; Tacconi, M; Tang, C P; Tang, X W; Tang, Z C; Tao, L; Tassan-Viol, J; Ting, Samuel C C; Ting, S M; Titus, C; Tomassetti, N; Toral, F; Torsti, J; Tsai, J R; Tutt, J C; Ulbricht, J; Urban, T; Vagelli, V; Valente, E; Vannini, C; Valtonen, E; Vargas Trevino, M; Vaurynovich, S; Vecchi, M; Vergain, M; Verlaat, B; Vescovi, C; Vialle, J P; Viertel, G; Volpini, G; Wang, D; Wang, N H; Wang, Q L; Wang, R S; Wang, X; Wang, Z X; Wallraff, W; Weng, Z L; Willenbrock, M; Wlochal, M; Wu, H; Wu, K Y; Wu, Z S; Xiao, W J; Xie, S; Xiong, R Q; Xin, G M; Xu, N S; Xu, W; Yan, Q; Yang, J; Yang, M; Ye, Q H; Yi, H; Yu, Y J; Yu, Z Q; Zeissler, S; Zhang, J G; Zhang, Z; Zhang, M M; Zheng, Z M; Zhuang, H L; Zhukov, V; Zichichi, A; Zuccon, P; Zurbach, C

    2013-04-01

    A precision measurement by the Alpha Magnetic Spectrometer on the International Space Station of the positron fraction in primary cosmic rays in the energy range from 0.5 to 350 GeV based on 6.8 × 10(6) positron and electron events is presented. The very accurate data show that the positron fraction is steadily increasing from 10 to ∼ 250  GeV, but, from 20 to 250 GeV, the slope decreases by an order of magnitude. The positron fraction spectrum shows no fine structure, and the positron to electron ratio shows no observable anisotropy. Together, these features show the existence of new physical phenomena. PMID:25166975

  1. First result from the Alpha Magnetic Spectrometer on the International Space Station: precision measurement of the positron fraction in primary cosmic rays of 0.5-350 GeV.

    PubMed

    Aguilar, M; Alberti, G; Alpat, B; Alvino, A; Ambrosi, G; Andeen, K; Anderhub, H; Arruda, L; Azzarello, P; Bachlechner, A; Barao, F; Baret, B; Barrau, A; Barrin, L; Bartoloni, A; Basara, L; Basili, A; Batalha, L; Bates, J; Battiston, R; Bazo, J; Becker, R; Becker, U; Behlmann, M; Beischer, B; Berdugo, J; Berges, P; Bertucci, B; Bigongiari, G; Biland, A; Bindi, V; Bizzaglia, S; Boella, G; de Boer, W; Bollweg, K; Bolmont, J; Borgia, B; Borsini, S; Boschini, M J; Boudoul, G; Bourquin, M; Brun, P; Buénerd, M; Burger, J; Burger, W; Cadoux, F; Cai, X D; Capell, M; Casadei, D; Casaus, J; Cascioli, V; Castellini, G; Cernuda, I; Cervelli, F; Chae, M J; Chang, Y H; Chen, A I; Chen, C R; Chen, H; Cheng, G M; Chen, H S; Cheng, L; Chernoplyiokov, N; Chikanian, A; Choumilov, E; Choutko, V; Chung, C H; Clark, C; Clavero, R; Coignet, G; Commichau, V; Consolandi, C; Contin, A; Corti, C; Costado Dios, M T; Coste, B; Crespo, D; Cui, Z; Dai, M; Delgado, C; Della Torre, S; Demirkoz, B; Dennett, P; Derome, L; Di Falco, S; Diao, X H; Diago, A; Djambazov, L; Díaz, C; von Doetinchem, P; Du, W J; Dubois, J M; Duperay, R; Duranti, M; D'Urso, D; Egorov, A; Eline, A; Eppling, F J; Eronen, T; van Es, J; Esser, H; Falvard, A; Fiandrini, E; Fiasson, A; Finch, E; Fisher, P; Flood, K; Foglio, R; Fohey, M; Fopp, S; Fouque, N; Galaktionov, Y; Gallilee, M; Gallin-Martel, L; Gallucci, G; García, B; García, J; García-López, R; García-Tabares, L; Gargiulo, C; Gast, H; Gebauer, I; Gentile, S; Gervasi, M; Gillard, W; Giovacchini, F; Girard, L; Goglov, P; Gong, J; Goy-Henningsen, C; Grandi, D; Graziani, M; Grechko, A; Gross, A; Guerri, I; de la Guía, C; Guo, K H; Habiby, M; Haino, S; Hauler, F; He, Z H; Heil, M; Heilig, J; Hermel, R; Hofer, H; Huang, Z C; Hungerford, W; Incagli, M; Ionica, M; Jacholkowska, A; Jang, W Y; Jinchi, H; Jongmanns, M; Journet, L; Jungermann, L; Karpinski, W; Kim, G N; Kim, K S; Kirn, Th; Kossakowski, R; Koulemzine, A; Kounina, O; Kounine, A; Koutsenko, V; Krafczyk, M S; Laudi, E; Laurenti, G; Lauritzen, C; Lebedev, A; Lee, M W; Lee, S C; Leluc, C; León Vargas, H; Lepareur, V; Li, J Q; Li, Q; Li, T X; Li, W; Li, Z H; Lipari, P; Lin, C H; Liu, D; Liu, H; Lomtadze, T; Lu, Y S; Lucidi, S; Lübelsmeyer, K; Luo, J Z; Lustermann, W; Lv, S; Madsen, J; Majka, R; Malinin, A; Mañá, C; Marín, J; Martin, T; Martínez, G; Masciocchi, F; Masi, N; Maurin, D; McInturff, A; McIntyre, P; Menchaca-Rocha, A; Meng, Q; Menichelli, M; Mereu, I; Millinger, M; Mo, D C; Molina, M; Mott, P; Mujunen, A; Natale, S; Nemeth, P; Ni, J Q; Nikonov, N; Nozzoli, F; Nunes, P; Obermeier, A; Oh, S; Oliva, A; Palmonari, F; Palomares, C; Paniccia, M; Papi, A; Park, W H; Pauluzzi, M; Pauss, F; Pauw, A; Pedreschi, E; Pensotti, S; Pereira, R; Perrin, E; Pessina, G; Pierschel, G; Pilo, F; Piluso, A; Pizzolotto, C; Plyaskin, V; Pochon, J; Pohl, M; Poireau, V; Porter, S; Pouxe, J; Putze, A; Quadrani, L; Qi, X N; Rancoita, P G; Rapin, D; Ren, Z L; Ricol, J S; Riihonen, E; Rodríguez, I; Roeser, U; Rosier-Lees, S; Rossi, L; Rozhkov, A; Rozza, D; Sabellek, A; Sagdeev, R; Sandweiss, J; Santos, B; Saouter, P; Sarchioni, M; Schael, S; Schinzel, D; Schmanau, M; Schwering, G; Schulz von Dratzig, A; Scolieri, G; Seo, E S; Shan, B S; Shi, J Y; Shi, Y M; Siedenburg, T; Siedling, R; Son, D; Spada, F; Spinella, F; Steuer, M; Stiff, K; Sun, W; Sun, W H; Sun, X H; Tacconi, M; Tang, C P; Tang, X W; Tang, Z C; Tao, L; Tassan-Viol, J; Ting, Samuel C C; Ting, S M; Titus, C; Tomassetti, N; Toral, F; Torsti, J; Tsai, J R; Tutt, J C; Ulbricht, J; Urban, T; Vagelli, V; Valente, E; Vannini, C; Valtonen, E; Vargas Trevino, M; Vaurynovich, S; Vecchi, M; Vergain, M; Verlaat, B; Vescovi, C; Vialle, J P; Viertel, G; Volpini, G; Wang, D; Wang, N H; Wang, Q L; Wang, R S; Wang, X; Wang, Z X; Wallraff, W; Weng, Z L; Willenbrock, M; Wlochal, M; Wu, H; Wu, K Y; Wu, Z S; Xiao, W J; Xie, S; Xiong, R Q; Xin, G M; Xu, N S; Xu, W; Yan, Q; Yang, J; Yang, M; Ye, Q H; Yi, H; Yu, Y J; Yu, Z Q; Zeissler, S; Zhang, J G; Zhang, Z; Zhang, M M; Zheng, Z M; Zhuang, H L; Zhukov, V; Zichichi, A; Zuccon, P; Zurbach, C

    2013-04-01

    A precision measurement by the Alpha Magnetic Spectrometer on the International Space Station of the positron fraction in primary cosmic rays in the energy range from 0.5 to 350 GeV based on 6.8 × 10(6) positron and electron events is presented. The very accurate data show that the positron fraction is steadily increasing from 10 to ∼ 250  GeV, but, from 20 to 250 GeV, the slope decreases by an order of magnitude. The positron fraction spectrum shows no fine structure, and the positron to electron ratio shows no observable anisotropy. Together, these features show the existence of new physical phenomena.

  2. Detailed angular correlation analysis with 4{pi} spectrometers: Spin determinations and multipolarity mixing measurements in {sup 128}Ba

    SciTech Connect

    Wiedenhoever, I.; Vogel, O.; Klein, H.; Dewald, A.; von Brentano, P.; Gableske, J.; Nicolay, N.; Gelberg, A.; Wiedenhoever, I.; Janssens, R.V.; Carpenter, M.P.; Kruecken, R.; Petkov, P.; Gizon, A.; Gizon, J.; Bazzacco, D.; Rossi Alvarez, C.; Pavan, P.; de Angelis, G.; Lunardi, S.; Napoli, D.R.; Frauendorf, S.; Doenau, F.

    1998-08-01

    We analyze for the first time the full {gamma}{gamma} directional correlations from oriented states (DCO) in an experiment performed with the GASP detector array. Our analysis is based on a transformation of the directional information into expansion coefficients of an orthogonal basis. With this method, which we call SpeeDCO (spectral expansion of DCO), the complete DCO information is concentrated in 12 {gamma}{gamma} coincidence spectra. The analysis is applicable to all detector arrays which uniformly cover the solid angle. We show that the complete DCO information can be used for a reliable and unique determination of spins and multipolarity mixing ratios in weakly populated bands. We were able to establish the spins and the positive parity of the {Delta}I=1 {open_quotes}M1 band{close_quotes} in {sup 128}Ba and multipolarity mixing ratios of nine M1/E2 in-band transitions were derived as well. The measured values are in good agreement with those expected for a high-K rotational band. thinsp thinsp thinsp {copyright} {ital 1998} {ital The American Physical Society}

  3. Generation of multiple spherical spots with a radially polarized beam in a 4pi focusing system.

    PubMed

    Yan, Shaohui; Yao, Baoli; Zhao, Wei; Lei, Ming

    2010-09-01

    We demonstrate the possibility of creating multiple spherical spots in a 4pi focusing system with a radially polarized beam. Using spherical waves to expand the plane wave factor in the Richards-Wolf integral, it is found that a proper spatial modulation in the amplitude of the input field with radial polarization can form multiple spherical spots with a focusing system satisfying the Herschel condition. These spots are distributed symmetrically about the focus on the optical axis with variable positions and intensities. Although we consider only the case of three spherical spots in this paper, generalization to the multiple-spots case will present no difficulty.

  4. DANCE : a 4[pi] barium fluoride detector for measuring neutron capture on unstable nuclei /.

    SciTech Connect

    Ullmann, J. L.; Haight, Robert C.; Hunt, L. F.; Reifarth, R.; Rundberg, R. S.; Bredeweg, T. A.; Fowler, Malcolm M.; Miller, G. G.; Heil, M.; Käppeler, F.; Chamberlin, E. P.

    2002-01-01

    Measurements of neutron capture on unstable nuclei are important for studies of s-process nucleosynthesis, nuclear waste transmutation, and stewardship science. A 160-element, 4{pi} barium fluoride detector array, and associated neutron flight path, is being constructed to make capture measurements at the moderated neutron spallation source at LANSCE. Measurements can be made on as little as 1 mg of sample material over energies from near thermal to near 100 keV. The design of the DANCE array is described and neutron flux measurements from flight path commissioning are shown. The array is expected to be complete by the end of 2002.

  5. Optimization of a coincidence system using plastic scintillators in 4pi geometry.

    PubMed

    Dias, M S; Piuvezam-Filho, H; Koskinas, M F

    2008-01-01

    Improvements recently developed at the Nuclear Metrology Laboratory of IPEN-CNEN/SP in São Paulo were performed in order to increase the detector efficiency of a 4pibeta-gamma coincidence primary system using plastic scintillators in 4pi geometry. Measurements were undertaken and compared to the original system and Monte Carlo simulations of the extrapolation curves were calculated for this new system and compared to experimental results. For this purpose, the code Penelope was applied for calculating response functions for each detector and the code Esquema, developed at LMN, was used for simulating the decay scheme processes.

  6. SPEIR: A Ge Compton Camera

    SciTech Connect

    Mihailescu, L; Vetter, K M; Burks, M T; Hull, E L; Craig, W W

    2004-02-11

    The SPEctroscopic Imager for {gamma}-Rays (SPEIR) is a new concept of a compact {gamma}-ray imaging system of high efficiency and spectroscopic resolution with a 4-{pi} field-of-view. The system behind this concept employs double-sided segmented planar Ge detectors accompanied by the use of list-mode photon reconstruction methods to create a sensitive, compact Compton scatter camera.

  7. A PbWO4-based Neutral Particle Spectrometer in Hall C at 12 GeV JLab

    SciTech Connect

    Horn, Tanja

    2015-02-01

    The Neutral Particle Spectrometer is a standalone electromagnetic calorimeter capable of detecting high energy photons from, for instance, DVCS or π0 decay with good energy and spatial resolution in a high rate environment. It can be used together with the Hall C high-momentum spectrometers for a suite of experiments with the underlying scientific objective of studying quark dynamics through exclusive and semi-inclusive reactions.

  8. Search for tau- ---> 4pi- 3pi+ (pi0) nu/tau Decays

    SciTech Connect

    Ter-Antonian, R.; Kass, R.; Allmendinger, T.; Hast, C.; /SLAC

    2005-06-21

    A search for the decay of the {tau} lepton to seven charged pions and at most one {pi}{sup 0} was performed using the BABAR detector at the PEP-II e{sup +}e{sup -} collider. The analysis uses data recorded on and near the {Upsilon}(4S) resonance between 1999 and 2003, a total of 124.3 fb{sup -1}. They observe 7 events with an expected background of 11.9 {+-} 2.2 events and calculate a preliminary upper limit of BR({tau}{sup -} {yields} 4{pi}{sup -} 3{pi}{sup +}({pi}{sup 0}){nu}{sub {tau}}) < 2.7 x 10{sup -7} at 90% CL. This is a significant improvement over the previous limit established by the CLEO Collaboration.

  9. The SAGE spectrometer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pakarinen, J.; Papadakis, P.; Sorri, J.; Herzberg, R.-D.; Greenlees, P. T.; Butler, P. A.; Coleman-Smith, P. J.; Cox, D. M.; Cresswell, J. R.; Jones, P.; Julin, R.; Konki, J.; Lazarus, I. H.; Letts, S. C.; Mistry, A.; Page, R. D.; Parr, E.; Pucknell, V. F. E.; Rahkila, P.; Sampson, J.; Sandzelius, M.; Seddon, D. A.; Simpson, J.; Thornhill, J.; Wells, D.

    2014-03-01

    The SAGE spectrometer has been constructed for in-beam nuclear structure studies. SAGE combines a Ge-detector array and an electron spectrometer for detection of -rays and internal conversion electrons, respectively, and allows simultaneous observation of both electrons and -rays emitted from excited nuclei. SAGE is set up in the Accelerator Laboratory of the University of Jyväskylä and works in conjunction with the RITU gas-filled recoil separator and the GREAT focal-plane spectrometer allowing the use of the recoil-decay tagging method.

  10. The data acquisition and control system for the 4{pi} detector CHIMERA

    SciTech Connect

    Aiello, S.; Anzalone, A.; Cardella, G.

    1998-08-01

    CHIMERA (Charged Heavy Ions Mass and Energy Resolving Array), a new 4{pi} detector for charged particles is under development at various sites of the Istituto Nazionale di Fisica Nucleare. This paper describes the new data acquisition system built to handle the signals coming out from the detector with a rate up to 1 kHz on almost 5000 electronic channels. The required average throughput for the system is in the order of the 1 MB/s. The used converters allow double-range conversion on 15 bits, in less than 50 {micro}s for all the 64 channels. The FDL link connects the different VME 9U crates performing a programmable hardware readout with a rate up to 100 MB/s. It uses a fast hardware protocol (Sparse Data Scan) to read the data buffers and send them to a FIC 8243 CPU board. A FIC 8243 dual-processor board forwards data (through Ethernet) to the analysis station (266 Mhz Digital AlphaStation or Sun Sparcstation). A DLT (Digital Linear Tape) unit connected to analysis station is used to store data. The new data acquisition system has been tested under beam conditions at the Laboratorio Nazionale del Sud (Catania, Italy) and at GANIL (Caen, France).

  11. Aberration control in 4Pi nanoscopy: definitions, properties, and applications (Conference Presentation)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hao, Xiang; Allgeyer, Edward S.; Velasco, Mary Grace M.; Booth, Martin J.; Bewersdorf, Joerg

    2016-03-01

    The development of fluorescence microscopy, which allows live-cell imaging with high labeling specificity, has made the visualization of cellular architecture routine. However, for centuries, the spatial resolution of optical microscopy was fundamentally limited by diffraction. The past two decades have seen a revolution in far-field optical nanoscopy (or "super-resolution" microscopy). The best 3D resolution is achieved by optical nanoscopes like the isoSTED or the iPALM/4Pi-SMS, which utilize two opposing objective lenses in a coherent manner. These system are, however, also more complex and the required interference conditions demand precise aberration control. Our research involves developing novel adaptive optics techniques that enable high spatial and temporal resolution imaging for biological applications. In this talk, we will discuss how adaptive optics can enhance dual-objective lens nanoscopes. We will demonstrate how adaptive optics devices provide unprecedented freedom to manipulate the light field in isoSTED nanoscopy, allow to realize automatic beam alignment, suppress the inherent side-lobes of the point-spread function, and dynamically compensate for sample-induced aberrations. We will present both the theoretical groundwork and the experimental confirmations.

  12. Measurements of π ^{± }, K^{± }, K^0_S, \\varLambda and proton production in proton-carbon interactions at 31 GeV/ c with the NA61/SHINE spectrometer at the CERN SPS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abgrall, N.; Aduszkiewicz, A.; Ali, Y.; Andronov, E.; Antićić, T.; Antoniou, N.; Baatar, B.; Bay, F.; Blondel, A.; Blümer, J.; Bogomilov, M.; Brandin, A.; Bravar, A.; Brzychczyk, J.; Bunyatov, S. A.; Busygina, O.; Christakoglou, P.; Czopowicz, T.; Damyanova, A.; Davis, N.; Debieux, S.; Dembinski, H.; Deveaux, M.; Diakonos, F.; Di Luise, S.; Dominik, W.; Drozhzhova, T.; Dumarchez, J.; Dynowski, K.; Engel, R.; Ereditato, A.; Feofilov, G. A.; Fodor, Z.; Gaździcki, M.; Golubeva, M.; Grebieszkow, K.; Grzeszczuk, A.; Guber, F.; Haesler, A.; Hasegawa, T.; Herve, A.; Hierholzer, M.; Igolkin, S.; Ivashkin, A.; Joković, D.; Johnson, S. R.; Kadija, K.; Kapoyannis, A.; Kaptur, E.; Kiełczewska, D.; Kisiel, J.; Kobayashi, T.; Kolesnikov, V. I.; Kolev, D.; Kondratiev, V. P.; Korzenev, A.; Kowalik, K.; Kowalski, S.; Koziel, M.; Krasnoperov, A.; Kuich, M.; Kurepin, A.; Larsen, D.; László, A.; Lewicki, M.; Lyubushkin, V. V.; Maćkowiak-Pawłowska, M.; Majka, Z.; Maksiak, B.; Malakhov, A. I.; Marchionni, A.; Manić, D.; Marcinek, A.; Marino, A. D.; Marton, K.; Mathes, H.-J.; Matulewicz, T.; Matveev, V.; Melkumov, G. L.; Messerly, B.; Mills, G. B.; Morozov, S.; Mrówczyński, S.; Murphy, S.; Nagai, Y.; Nakadaira, T.; Naskret, M.; Nirkko, M.; Nishikawa, K.; Palczewski, T.; Panagiotou, A. D.; Paolone, V.; Pavin, M.; Petukhov, O.; Pistillo, C.; Płaneta, R.; Popov, B. A.; Posiadała-Zezula, M.; Puławski, S.; Puzović, J.; Rauch, W.; Ravonel, M.; Redij, A.; Renfordt, R.; Richter-Was, E.; Robert, A.; Röhrich, D.; Rondio, E.; Roth, M.; Rubbia, A.; Rumberger, B. T.; Rustamov, A.; Rybczynski, M.; Sadovsky, A.; Sakashita, K.; Sarnecki, R.; Schmidt, K.; Sekiguchi, T.; Selyuzhenkov, I.; Seryakov, A.; Seyboth, P.; Sgalaberna, D.; Shibata, M.; Słodkowski, M.; Staszel, P.; Stefanek, G.; Stepaniak, J.; Ströbele, H.; Šuša, T.; Szuba, M.; Tada, M.; Taranenko, A.; Tefelska, A.; Tefelski, D.; Tereshchenko, V.; Tsenov, R.; Turko, L.; Ulrich, R.; Unger, M.; Vassiliou, M.; Veberič, D.; Vechernin, V. V.; Vesztergombi, G.; Vinogradov, L.; Wilczek, A.; Wlodarczyk, Z.; Wojtaszek-Szwarc, A.; Wyszyński, O.; Yarritu, K.; Zambelli, L.; Zimmerman, E. D.

    2016-02-01

    Measurements of hadron production in p + C interactions at 31 GeV/ c are performed using the NA61/SHINE spectrometer at the CERN SPS. The analysis is based on the full set of data collected in 2009 using a graphite target with a thickness of 4 % of a nuclear interaction length. Inelastic and production cross sections as well as spectra of π ^{± }, K^{± }, p, K^0_S and \\varLambda are measured with high precision. These measurements are essential for improved calculations of the initial neutrino fluxes in the T2K long-baseline neutrino oscillation experiment in Japan. A comparison of the NA61/SHINE measurements with predictions of several hadroproduction models is presented.

  13. Study of Nuclei far From Stability by Using the CHIMERA 4{pi} Detector and Radioactive Beams at LNS

    SciTech Connect

    Cardella, G.; De Filippo, E.; Pagano, A.; Papa, M.; Pirrone, S.; Verde, G.; Amorini, F.; Anzalone, A.; Maiolino, C.; Auditore, L.; Loria, D.; Trifiro, A.; Trimarchi, M.; Cavallaro, S.; Lombardo, I.; Porto, F.; Rizzo, F.; Russotto, P.; Chatterjee, M. B.; Geraci, E.

    2009-08-26

    At LNS are available radioactive beams at tandem and intermediate energies provided respectively by the EXCYT and by the fragmentation FRIBS facilities. Using these beams, and the 4{pi} detector CHIMERA, we want to study excitation and decay of resonances in light exotic nuclei populated with pick-up stripping and other reaction mechanisms. Some preliminary results obtained with stable and unstable beams are reported.

  14. Monolithic spectrometer

    DOEpatents

    Rajic, S.; Egert, C.M.; Kahl, W.K.; Snyder, W.B. Jr.; Evans, B.M. III; Marlar, T.A.; Cunningham, J.P.

    1998-05-19

    A monolithic spectrometer is disclosed for use in spectroscopy. The spectrometer is a single body of translucent material with positioned surfaces for the transmission, reflection and spectral analysis of light rays. 6 figs.

  15. Monolithic spectrometer

    DOEpatents

    Rajic, Slobodan; Egert, Charles M.; Kahl, William K.; Snyder, Jr., William B.; Evans, III, Boyd M.; Marlar, Troy A.; Cunningham, Joseph P.

    1998-01-01

    A monolithic spectrometer is disclosed for use in spectroscopy. The spectrometer is a single body of translucent material with positioned surfaces for the transmission, reflection and spectral analysis of light rays.

  16. Spectrometer for rare alpha-decay events

    SciTech Connect

    Kuznetsov, A.N.; Kushniruk, V.F.; Nefed'ev, O.K.; Rykhlyuk, A.V.; Subbotin, V.G.; Tomin, V.I.; Kharitonov, Yu.P.; Tsyganov, Yu.S.

    1987-07-01

    A low-background alpha spectrometer with 4..pi.. registration geometry is described. Use of time measurements reduces the background level in the region of 6-7 MeV to 0.02-0.03 counts/day. For two detectors 20 mm in diameter located at a distance of 1 mm from one another in registration of decay of /sup 223/Ra applied to the surface of one of the detectors, the decay efficiency is 0.82 +/- 0.04. The resolution for the 3.18-MeV line is 60 keV.

  17. Correlation spectrometer

    DOEpatents

    Sinclair, Michael B.; Pfeifer, Kent B.; Flemming, Jeb H.; Jones, Gary D.; Tigges, Chris P.

    2010-04-13

    A correlation spectrometer can detect a large number of gaseous compounds, or chemical species, with a species-specific mask wheel. In this mode, the spectrometer is optimized for the direct measurement of individual target compounds. Additionally, the spectrometer can measure the transmission spectrum from a given sample of gas. In this mode, infrared light is passed through a gas sample and the infrared transmission signature of the gasses present is recorded and measured using Hadamard encoding techniques. The spectrometer can detect the transmission or emission spectra in any system where multiple species are present in a generally known volume.

  18. Spatial filtering nearly eliminates the side-lobes in single- and multi-photon 4pi-type-C super-resolution fluorescence microscopy.

    PubMed

    M, Kavya; Regmi, Raju; Mondal, Partha P

    2013-09-01

    Super-resolution microscopy has tremendously progressed our understanding of cellular biophysics and biochemistry. Specifically, 4pi fluorescence microscopy technique stands out because of its axial super-resolution capability. All types of 4pi-microscopy techniques work well in conjugation with deconvolution techniques to get rid of artifacts due to side-lobes. In this regard, we propose a technique based on spatial filter in a 4pi-type-C confocal setup to get rid of these artifacts. Using a special spatial filter, we have reduced the depth-of-focus. Interference of two similar depth-of-focus beams in a 4π geometry result in substantial reduction of side-lobes. Studies show a reduction of side-lobes by 46% and 76% for single and two photon variant compared to 4pi - type - C confocal system. This is incredible considering the resolving capability of the existing 4pi - type - C confocal microscopy. Moreover, the main lobe is found to be 150 nm for the proposed spatial filtering technique as compared to 690 nm of the state-of-art confocal system. Reconstruction of experimentally obtained 2PE - 4pi data of green fluorescent protein (GFP)-tagged mitocondrial network shows near elimination of artifacts arising out of side-lobes. Proposed technique may find interesting application in fluorescence microscopy, nano-lithography, and cell biology. PMID:24089833

  19. Multidimensional spectrometer

    DOEpatents

    Zanni, Martin Thomas; Damrauer, Niels H.

    2010-07-20

    A multidimensional spectrometer for the infrared, visible, and ultraviolet regions of the electromagnetic spectrum, and a method for making multidimensional spectroscopic measurements in the infrared, visible, and ultraviolet regions of the electromagnetic spectrum. The multidimensional spectrometer facilitates measurements of inter- and intra-molecular interactions.

  20. SCINTILLATION SPECTROMETER

    DOEpatents

    Bell, P.R.; Francis, J.E.

    1960-06-21

    A portable scintillation spectrometer is described which is especially useful in radio-biological studies for determining the uptake and distribution of gamma -emitting substances in tissue. The spectrometer includes a collimator having a plurality of apertures that are hexagonal in cross section. Two crystals are provided: one is activated to respond to incident rays from the collimator; the other is not activated and shields the first from external radiation.

  1. Nuclear structure analysis using the Orange Spectrometer

    SciTech Connect

    Regis, J.-M.; Pascovici, Gh.; Christen, S.; Meersschout, T.; Bernards, C.; Fransen, Ch.; Dewald, A.; Braun, N.; Heinze, S.; Thiel, S.; Jolie, J.; Materna, Th.

    2009-01-28

    Recently, an Orange spectrometer, a focusing iron-free magnetic spectrometer, has been installed at a beam line of the 10 MV Tandem accelerator of the IKP of the University of Cologne. The high efficiency of 15% of 4{pi} for the detection of conversion electrons and the energy resolution of 1% makes the Orange spectrometer a powerful instrument. From the conversion electron spectrum, transition multipolarities can be determined using the so called K to L ratio. In combination with an array of germanium and lanthanum bromide detectors, e{sup -}-{gamma}-coincidences can be performed to investigate the level scheme. Moreover, the very fast lanthanum bromide scintillator with an energy resolution of 3% allows e{sup -}-{gamma} lifetime measurements down to 0.3 ns. A second Orange spectrometer can be added to build the Double Orange Spectrometer for e{sup -}-e{sup -}-coincidences. It is indispensable for lifetime measurements of low intensity or nearby lying transitions as often occur in odd-A and odd-odd nuclei. The capabilities are illustrated with several examples.

  2. Spectrometer gun

    DOEpatents

    Waechter, D.A.; Wolf, M.A.; Umbarger, C.J.

    1981-11-03

    A hand-holdable, battery-operated, microprocessor-based spectrometer gun is described that includes a low-power matrix display and sufficient memory to permit both real-time observation and extended analysis of detected radiation pulses. Universality of the incorporated signal processing circuitry permits operation with various detectors having differing pulse detection and sensitivity parameters.

  3. Spectrometer gun

    DOEpatents

    Waechter, David A.; Wolf, Michael A.; Umbarger, C. John

    1985-01-01

    A hand-holdable, battery-operated, microprocessor-based spectrometer gun includes a low-power matrix display and sufficient memory to permit both real-time observation and extended analysis of detected radiation pulses. Universality of the incorporated signal processing circuitry permits operation with various detectors having differing pulse detection and sensitivity parameters.

  4. HISS spectrometer

    SciTech Connect

    Greiner, D.E.

    1984-11-01

    This talk describes the Heavy Ion Spectrometer System (HISS) facility at the Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory's Bevalac. Three completed experiments and their results are illustrated. The second half of the talk is a detailed discussion of the response of drift chambers to heavy ions. The limitations of trajectory measurement over a large range in incident particle charge are presented.

  5. (Data acquisition for Ge detector arrays)

    SciTech Connect

    Hensley, D.C.

    1989-10-09

    The traveler presented three invited lectures entitled An Overview of Data Acquisition for Ge Detector Arrays,'' Specialized Data Acquisition for Ge Detector Arrays,'' and Gamma-Ray Angular Correlations from Heavy-Ion Inelastic Scattering Measured in the Spin Spectrometer'' and acted as a Study Group Coordinator at the Nuclear Structure in the Era of New Spectroscopy Workshop in Copenhagen, Denmark.

  6. The Spectrometer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Greenslade, Thomas B.

    2012-03-01

    In the fall of 1999 I was shown an Ocean Optics spectrometer-in-the-computer at St. Patricks College at Maynooth, Ireland, and thought that I had seen heaven. Of course, it could not resolve the sodium D-lines (I had done that many years before with a homemade wire diffraction grating ), and I began to realize that inside was some familiar old technology. In this paper I would like to discuss its ancestors.

  7. The Spectrometer

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Greenslade, Thomas B., Jr.

    2012-01-01

    In the fall of 1999 I was shown an Ocean Optics spectrometer-in-the-computer at St. Patricks College at Maynooth, Ireland, and thought that I had seen heaven. Of course, it could not resolve the sodium D-lines (I had done that many years before with a homemade wire diffraction grating), and I began to realize that inside was some familiar old…

  8. Superconducting magnetic spectrometer for cosmic ray nuclei.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smith, L. H.; Buffington, A.; Wahlig, M. A.; Dauber, P.

    1972-01-01

    This paper describes the design, calibration, and operation of a magnetic spectrometer for particle astronomy. The spectrometer consists of a superconducting magnet, optical spark chambers, scintillation detectors, and associated electronics. The instrument has been flown in a balloon gondola to 4.8 g/sq cm residual atmosphere, where it was used to analyze the charge and differential rigidity spectra of primary nuclei from 5 to 100 GeV/c.

  9. High statistics measurement of the positron fraction in primary cosmic rays of 0.5-500 GeV with the alpha magnetic spectrometer on the international space station.

    PubMed

    Accardo, L; Aguilar, M; Aisa, D; Alpat, B; Alvino, A; Ambrosi, G; Andeen, K; Arruda, L; Attig, N; Azzarello, P; Bachlechner, A; Barao, F; Barrau, A; Barrin, L; Bartoloni, A; Basara, L; Battarbee, M; Battiston, R; Bazo, J; Becker, U; Behlmann, M; Beischer, B; Berdugo, J; Bertucci, B; Bigongiari, G; Bindi, V; Bizzaglia, S; Bizzarri, M; Boella, G; de Boer, W; Bollweg, K; Bonnivard, V; Borgia, B; Borsini, S; Boschini, M J; Bourquin, M; Burger, J; Cadoux, F; Cai, X D; Capell, M; Caroff, S; Carosi, G; Casaus, J; Cascioli, V; Castellini, G; Cernuda, I; Cerreta, D; Cervelli, F; Chae, M J; Chang, Y H; Chen, A I; Chen, H; Cheng, G M; Chen, H S; Cheng, L; Chikanian, A; Chou, H Y; Choumilov, E; Choutko, V; Chung, C H; Cindolo, F; Clark, C; Clavero, R; Coignet, G; Consolandi, C; Contin, A; Corti, C; Coste, B; Cui, Z; Dai, M; Delgado, C; Della Torre, S; Demirköz, M B; Derome, L; Di Falco, S; Di Masso, L; Dimiccoli, F; Díaz, C; von Doetinchem, P; Du, W J; Duranti, M; D'Urso, D; Eline, A; Eppling, F J; Eronen, T; Fan, Y Y; Farnesini, L; Feng, J; Fiandrini, E; Fiasson, A; Finch, E; Fisher, P; Galaktionov, Y; Gallucci, G; García, B; García-López, R; Gast, H; Gebauer, I; Gervasi, M; Ghelfi, A; Gillard, W; Giovacchini, F; Goglov, P; Gong, J; Goy, C; Grabski, V; Grandi, D; Graziani, M; Guandalini, C; Guerri, I; Guo, K H; Haas, D; Habiby, M; Haino, S; Han, K C; He, Z H; Heil, M; Henning, R; Hoffman, J; Hsieh, T H; Huang, Z C; Huh, C; Incagli, M; Ionica, M; Jang, W Y; Jinchi, H; Kanishev, K; Kim, G N; Kim, K S; Kirn, Th; Kossakowski, R; Kounina, O; Kounine, A; Koutsenko, V; Krafczyk, M S; Kunz, S; La Vacca, G; Laudi, E; Laurenti, G; Lazzizzera, I; Lebedev, A; Lee, H T; Lee, S C; Leluc, C; Levi, G; Li, H L; Li, J Q; Li, Q; Li, Q; Li, T X; Li, W; Li, Y; Li, Z H; Li, Z Y; Lim, S; Lin, C H; Lipari, P; Lippert, T; Liu, D; Liu, H; Lolli, M; Lomtadze, T; Lu, M J; Lu, Y S; Luebelsmeyer, K; Luo, F; Luo, J Z; Lv, S S; Majka, R; Malinin, A; Mañá, C; Marín, J; Martin, T; Martínez, G; Masi, N; Massera, F; Maurin, D; Menchaca-Rocha, A; Meng, Q; Mo, D C; Monreal, B; Morescalchi, L; Mott, P; Müller, M; Ni, J Q; Nikonov, N; Nozzoli, F; Nunes, P; Obermeier, A; Oliva, A; Orcinha, M; Palmonari, F; Palomares, C; Paniccia, M; Papi, A; Pauluzzi, M; Pedreschi, E; Pensotti, S; Pereira, R; Pilastrini, R; Pilo, F; Piluso, A; Pizzolotto, C; Plyaskin, V; Pohl, M; Poireau, V; Postaci, E; Putze, A; Quadrani, L; Qi, X M; Rancoita, P G; Rapin, D; Ricol, J S; Rodríguez, I; Rosier-Lees, S; Rossi, L; Rozhkov, A; Rozza, D; Rybka, G; Sagdeev, R; Sandweiss, J; Saouter, P; Sbarra, C; Schael, S; Schmidt, S M; Schuckardt, D; Schulz von Dratzig, A; Schwering, G; Scolieri, G; Seo, E S; Shan, B S; Shan, Y H; Shi, J Y; Shi, X Y; Shi, Y M; Siedenburg, T; Son, D; Spada, F; Spinella, F; Sun, W; Sun, W H; Tacconi, M; Tang, C P; Tang, X W; Tang, Z C; Tao, L; Tescaro, D; Ting, Samuel C C; Ting, S M; Tomassetti, N; Torsti, J; Türkoğlu, C; Urban, T; Vagelli, V; Valente, E; Vannini, C; Valtonen, E; Vaurynovich, S; Vecchi, M; Velasco, M; Vialle, J P; Vitale, V; Volpini, G; Wang, L Q; Wang, Q L; Wang, R S; Wang, X; Wang, Z X; Weng, Z L; Whitman, K; Wienkenhöver, J; Wu, H; Wu, K Y; Xia, X; Xie, M; Xie, S; Xiong, R Q; Xin, G M; Xu, N S; Xu, W; Yan, Q; Yang, J; Yang, M; Ye, Q H; Yi, H; Yu, Y J; Yu, Z Q; Zeissler, S; Zhang, J H; Zhang, M T; Zhang, X B; Zhang, Z; Zheng, Z M; Zhou, F; Zhuang, H L; Zhukov, V; Zichichi, A; Zimmermann, N; Zuccon, P; Zurbach, C

    2014-09-19

    A precision measurement by AMS of the positron fraction in primary cosmic rays in the energy range from 0.5 to 500 GeV based on 10.9 million positron and electron events is presented. This measurement extends the energy range of our previous observation and increases its precision. The new results show, for the first time, that above ∼200  GeV the positron fraction no longer exhibits an increase with energy.

  10. High statistics measurement of the positron fraction in primary cosmic rays of 0.5-500 GeV with the alpha magnetic spectrometer on the international space station.

    PubMed

    Accardo, L; Aguilar, M; Aisa, D; Alpat, B; Alvino, A; Ambrosi, G; Andeen, K; Arruda, L; Attig, N; Azzarello, P; Bachlechner, A; Barao, F; Barrau, A; Barrin, L; Bartoloni, A; Basara, L; Battarbee, M; Battiston, R; Bazo, J; Becker, U; Behlmann, M; Beischer, B; Berdugo, J; Bertucci, B; Bigongiari, G; Bindi, V; Bizzaglia, S; Bizzarri, M; Boella, G; de Boer, W; Bollweg, K; Bonnivard, V; Borgia, B; Borsini, S; Boschini, M J; Bourquin, M; Burger, J; Cadoux, F; Cai, X D; Capell, M; Caroff, S; Carosi, G; Casaus, J; Cascioli, V; Castellini, G; Cernuda, I; Cerreta, D; Cervelli, F; Chae, M J; Chang, Y H; Chen, A I; Chen, H; Cheng, G M; Chen, H S; Cheng, L; Chikanian, A; Chou, H Y; Choumilov, E; Choutko, V; Chung, C H; Cindolo, F; Clark, C; Clavero, R; Coignet, G; Consolandi, C; Contin, A; Corti, C; Coste, B; Cui, Z; Dai, M; Delgado, C; Della Torre, S; Demirköz, M B; Derome, L; Di Falco, S; Di Masso, L; Dimiccoli, F; Díaz, C; von Doetinchem, P; Du, W J; Duranti, M; D'Urso, D; Eline, A; Eppling, F J; Eronen, T; Fan, Y Y; Farnesini, L; Feng, J; Fiandrini, E; Fiasson, A; Finch, E; Fisher, P; Galaktionov, Y; Gallucci, G; García, B; García-López, R; Gast, H; Gebauer, I; Gervasi, M; Ghelfi, A; Gillard, W; Giovacchini, F; Goglov, P; Gong, J; Goy, C; Grabski, V; Grandi, D; Graziani, M; Guandalini, C; Guerri, I; Guo, K H; Haas, D; Habiby, M; Haino, S; Han, K C; He, Z H; Heil, M; Henning, R; Hoffman, J; Hsieh, T H; Huang, Z C; Huh, C; Incagli, M; Ionica, M; Jang, W Y; Jinchi, H; Kanishev, K; Kim, G N; Kim, K S; Kirn, Th; Kossakowski, R; Kounina, O; Kounine, A; Koutsenko, V; Krafczyk, M S; Kunz, S; La Vacca, G; Laudi, E; Laurenti, G; Lazzizzera, I; Lebedev, A; Lee, H T; Lee, S C; Leluc, C; Levi, G; Li, H L; Li, J Q; Li, Q; Li, Q; Li, T X; Li, W; Li, Y; Li, Z H; Li, Z Y; Lim, S; Lin, C H; Lipari, P; Lippert, T; Liu, D; Liu, H; Lolli, M; Lomtadze, T; Lu, M J; Lu, Y S; Luebelsmeyer, K; Luo, F; Luo, J Z; Lv, S S; Majka, R; Malinin, A; Mañá, C; Marín, J; Martin, T; Martínez, G; Masi, N; Massera, F; Maurin, D; Menchaca-Rocha, A; Meng, Q; Mo, D C; Monreal, B; Morescalchi, L; Mott, P; Müller, M; Ni, J Q; Nikonov, N; Nozzoli, F; Nunes, P; Obermeier, A; Oliva, A; Orcinha, M; Palmonari, F; Palomares, C; Paniccia, M; Papi, A; Pauluzzi, M; Pedreschi, E; Pensotti, S; Pereira, R; Pilastrini, R; Pilo, F; Piluso, A; Pizzolotto, C; Plyaskin, V; Pohl, M; Poireau, V; Postaci, E; Putze, A; Quadrani, L; Qi, X M; Rancoita, P G; Rapin, D; Ricol, J S; Rodríguez, I; Rosier-Lees, S; Rossi, L; Rozhkov, A; Rozza, D; Rybka, G; Sagdeev, R; Sandweiss, J; Saouter, P; Sbarra, C; Schael, S; Schmidt, S M; Schuckardt, D; Schulz von Dratzig, A; Schwering, G; Scolieri, G; Seo, E S; Shan, B S; Shan, Y H; Shi, J Y; Shi, X Y; Shi, Y M; Siedenburg, T; Son, D; Spada, F; Spinella, F; Sun, W; Sun, W H; Tacconi, M; Tang, C P; Tang, X W; Tang, Z C; Tao, L; Tescaro, D; Ting, Samuel C C; Ting, S M; Tomassetti, N; Torsti, J; Türkoğlu, C; Urban, T; Vagelli, V; Valente, E; Vannini, C; Valtonen, E; Vaurynovich, S; Vecchi, M; Velasco, M; Vialle, J P; Vitale, V; Volpini, G; Wang, L Q; Wang, Q L; Wang, R S; Wang, X; Wang, Z X; Weng, Z L; Whitman, K; Wienkenhöver, J; Wu, H; Wu, K Y; Xia, X; Xie, M; Xie, S; Xiong, R Q; Xin, G M; Xu, N S; Xu, W; Yan, Q; Yang, J; Yang, M; Ye, Q H; Yi, H; Yu, Y J; Yu, Z Q; Zeissler, S; Zhang, J H; Zhang, M T; Zhang, X B; Zhang, Z; Zheng, Z M; Zhou, F; Zhuang, H L; Zhukov, V; Zichichi, A; Zimmermann, N; Zuccon, P; Zurbach, C

    2014-09-19

    A precision measurement by AMS of the positron fraction in primary cosmic rays in the energy range from 0.5 to 500 GeV based on 10.9 million positron and electron events is presented. This measurement extends the energy range of our previous observation and increases its precision. The new results show, for the first time, that above ∼200  GeV the positron fraction no longer exhibits an increase with energy. PMID:25279616

  11. Photophoretic spectrometer

    SciTech Connect

    Arnold, S.; Amani, Y.; Orenstein, A.

    1980-09-01

    An instrument is described which measures the spectral dependence of the radiometric (photophoretic) force on a micron-sized particle in a static configuration. This spectrometer consists of a servo-stabilized Millikan chamber which can be used as a photophoretic balance over the spectral range from 200 nm to 1000 nm. Spectra may be taken in a vacuum as small as 10/sup -4/ torr. The action spectrum of the photophoretic force on a crystallite of CdS is used as an example. The pressure dependence of the force at 500 nm is consistant with a radiometric mechanism.

  12. MASS SPECTROMETER

    DOEpatents

    White, F.A.

    1960-08-23

    A mass spectrometer is designed with a first adjustable magnetic field for resolving an ion beam into beams of selected masses, a second adjustable magnetic field for further resolving the ion beam from the first field into beams of selected masses, a thin foil disposed in the path of the beam between the first and second magnets to dissociate molecular ions incident thereon, an electrostatic field for further resolving the ion beam from the second field into beams of selected masses, and a detector disposed adjacent to the electrostatic field to receive the ion beam.

  13. Precision Measurement of the (e^{+}+e^{-}) Flux in Primary Cosmic Rays from 0.5 GeV to 1 TeV with the Alpha Magnetic Spectrometer on the International Space Station.

    PubMed

    Aguilar, M; Aisa, D; Alpat, B; Alvino, A; Ambrosi, G; Andeen, K; Arruda, L; Attig, N; Azzarello, P; Bachlechner, A; Barao, F; Barrau, A; Barrin, L; Bartoloni, A; Basara, L; Battarbee, M; Battiston, R; Bazo, J; Becker, U; Behlmann, M; Beischer, B; Berdugo, J; Bertucci, B; Bigongiari, G; Bindi, V; Bizzaglia, S; Bizzarri, M; Boella, G; de Boer, W; Bollweg, K; Bonnivard, V; Borgia, B; Borsini, S; Boschini, M J; Bourquin, M; Burger, J; Cadoux, F; Cai, X D; Capell, M; Caroff, S; Casaus, J; Cascioli, V; Castellini, G; Cernuda, I; Cervelli, F; Chae, M J; Chang, Y H; Chen, A I; Chen, H; Cheng, G M; Chen, H S; Cheng, L; Chikanian, A; Chou, H Y; Choumilov, E; Choutko, V; Chung, C H; Clark, C; Clavero, R; Coignet, G; Consolandi, C; Contin, A; Corti, C; Coste, B; Crispoltoni, M; Cui, Z; Dai, M; Delgado, C; Della Torre, S; Demirköz, M B; Derome, L; Di Falco, S; Di Masso, L; Dimiccoli, F; Díaz, C; von Doetinchem, P; Donnini, F; Du, W J; Duranti, M; D'Urso, D; Eline, A; Eppling, F J; Eronen, T; Fan, Y Y; Farnesini, L; Feng, J; Fiandrini, E; Fiasson, A; Finch, E; Fisher, P; Galaktionov, Y; Gallucci, G; García, B; García-López, R; Gargiulo, C; Gast, H; Gebauer, I; Gervasi, M; Ghelfi, A; Gillard, W; Giovacchini, F; Goglov, P; Gong, J; Goy, C; Grabski, V; Grandi, D; Graziani, M; Guandalini, C; Guerri, I; Guo, K H; Habiby, M; Haino, S; Han, K C; He, Z H; Heil, M; Hoffman, J; Hsieh, T H; Huang, Z C; Huh, C; Incagli, M; Ionica, M; Jang, W Y; Jinchi, H; Kanishev, K; Kim, G N; Kim, K S; Kirn, Th; Kossakowski, R; Kounina, O; Kounine, A; Koutsenko, V; Krafczyk, M S; Kunz, S; La Vacca, G; Laudi, E; Laurenti, G; Lazzizzera, I; Lebedev, A; Lee, H T; Lee, S C; Leluc, C; Li, H L; Li, J Q; Li, Q; Li, Q; Li, T X; Li, W; Li, Y; Li, Z H; Li, Z Y; Lim, S; Lin, C H; Lipari, P; Lippert, T; Liu, D; Liu, H; Lomtadze, T; Lu, M J; Lu, Y S; Luebelsmeyer, K; Luo, F; Luo, J Z; Lv, S S; Majka, R; Malinin, A; Mañá, C; Marín, J; Martin, T; Martínez, G; Masi, N; Maurin, D; Menchaca-Rocha, A; Meng, Q; Mo, D C; Morescalchi, L; Mott, P; Müller, M; Ni, J Q; Nikonov, N; Nozzoli, F; Nunes, P; Obermeier, A; Oliva, A; Orcinha, M; Palmonari, F; Palomares, C; Paniccia, M; Papi, A; Pauluzzi, M; Pedreschi, E; Pensotti, S; Pereira, R; Pilo, F; Piluso, A; Pizzolotto, C; Plyaskin, V; Pohl, M; Poireau, V; Postaci, E; Putze, A; Quadrani, L; Qi, X M; Räihä, T; Rancoita, P G; Rapin, D; Ricol, J S; Rodríguez, I; Rosier-Lees, S; Rozhkov, A; Rozza, D; Sagdeev, R; Sandweiss, J; Saouter, P; Sbarra, C; Schael, S; Schmidt, S M; Schuckardt, D; Schulz von Dratzig, A; Schwering, G; Scolieri, G; Seo, E S; Shan, B S; Shan, Y H; Shi, J Y; Shi, X Y; Shi, Y M; Siedenburg, T; Son, D; Spada, F; Spinella, F; Sun, W; Sun, W H; Tacconi, M; Tang, C P; Tang, X W; Tang, Z C; Tao, L; Tescaro, D; Ting, Samuel C C; Ting, S M; Tomassetti, N; Torsti, J; Türkoğlu, C; Urban, T; Vagelli, V; Valente, E; Vannini, C; Valtonen, E; Vaurynovich, S; Vecchi, M; Velasco, M; Vialle, J P; Wang, L Q; Wang, Q L; Wang, R S; Wang, X; Wang, Z X; Weng, Z L; Whitman, K; Wienkenhöver, J; Wu, H; Xia, X; Xie, M; Xie, S; Xiong, R Q; Xin, G M; Xu, N S; Xu, W; Yan, Q; Yang, J; Yang, M; Ye, Q H; Yi, H; Yu, Y J; Yu, Z Q; Zeissler, S; Zhang, J H; Zhang, M T; Zhang, X B; Zhang, Z; Zheng, Z M; Zhuang, H L; Zhukov, V; Zichichi, A; Zimmermann, N; Zuccon, P; Zurbach, C

    2014-11-28

    We present a measurement of the cosmic ray (e^{+}+e^{-}) flux in the range 0.5 GeV to 1 TeV based on the analysis of 10.6 million (e^{+}+e^{-}) events collected by AMS. The statistics and the resolution of AMS provide a precision measurement of the flux. The flux is smooth and reveals new and distinct information. Above 30.2 GeV, the flux can be described by a single power law with a spectral index γ=-3.170±0.008(stat+syst)±0.008(energy scale).

  14. Precision Measurement of the(e++e-)Flux in Primary Cosmic Rays from 0.5 GeV to 1 TeV with the Alpha Magnetic Spectrometer on the International Space Station

    DOE PAGES

    Aguilar, M.; Aisa, D.; Alpat, B.; Alvino, A.; Ambrosi, G.; Andeen, K.; Arruda, L.; Attig, N.; Azzarello, P.; Bachlechner, A.; et al

    2014-11-26

    We present a measurement of the cosmic ray (e++e-) flux in the range 0.5 GeV to 1 TeV based on the analysis of 10.6 million (e++e-) events collected by AMS. The statistics and the resolution of AMS provide a precision measurement of the flux. The flux is smooth and reveals new and distinct information. Above 30.2 GeV, the flux can be described by a single power law with a spectral index γ= -3.170 ± 0.008(stat+syst) ± 0.008(energy scale).

  15. Precision Measurement of the (e^{+}+e^{-}) Flux in Primary Cosmic Rays from 0.5 GeV to 1 TeV with the Alpha Magnetic Spectrometer on the International Space Station.

    PubMed

    Aguilar, M; Aisa, D; Alpat, B; Alvino, A; Ambrosi, G; Andeen, K; Arruda, L; Attig, N; Azzarello, P; Bachlechner, A; Barao, F; Barrau, A; Barrin, L; Bartoloni, A; Basara, L; Battarbee, M; Battiston, R; Bazo, J; Becker, U; Behlmann, M; Beischer, B; Berdugo, J; Bertucci, B; Bigongiari, G; Bindi, V; Bizzaglia, S; Bizzarri, M; Boella, G; de Boer, W; Bollweg, K; Bonnivard, V; Borgia, B; Borsini, S; Boschini, M J; Bourquin, M; Burger, J; Cadoux, F; Cai, X D; Capell, M; Caroff, S; Casaus, J; Cascioli, V; Castellini, G; Cernuda, I; Cervelli, F; Chae, M J; Chang, Y H; Chen, A I; Chen, H; Cheng, G M; Chen, H S; Cheng, L; Chikanian, A; Chou, H Y; Choumilov, E; Choutko, V; Chung, C H; Clark, C; Clavero, R; Coignet, G; Consolandi, C; Contin, A; Corti, C; Coste, B; Crispoltoni, M; Cui, Z; Dai, M; Delgado, C; Della Torre, S; Demirköz, M B; Derome, L; Di Falco, S; Di Masso, L; Dimiccoli, F; Díaz, C; von Doetinchem, P; Donnini, F; Du, W J; Duranti, M; D'Urso, D; Eline, A; Eppling, F J; Eronen, T; Fan, Y Y; Farnesini, L; Feng, J; Fiandrini, E; Fiasson, A; Finch, E; Fisher, P; Galaktionov, Y; Gallucci, G; García, B; García-López, R; Gargiulo, C; Gast, H; Gebauer, I; Gervasi, M; Ghelfi, A; Gillard, W; Giovacchini, F; Goglov, P; Gong, J; Goy, C; Grabski, V; Grandi, D; Graziani, M; Guandalini, C; Guerri, I; Guo, K H; Habiby, M; Haino, S; Han, K C; He, Z H; Heil, M; Hoffman, J; Hsieh, T H; Huang, Z C; Huh, C; Incagli, M; Ionica, M; Jang, W Y; Jinchi, H; Kanishev, K; Kim, G N; Kim, K S; Kirn, Th; Kossakowski, R; Kounina, O; Kounine, A; Koutsenko, V; Krafczyk, M S; Kunz, S; La Vacca, G; Laudi, E; Laurenti, G; Lazzizzera, I; Lebedev, A; Lee, H T; Lee, S C; Leluc, C; Li, H L; Li, J Q; Li, Q; Li, Q; Li, T X; Li, W; Li, Y; Li, Z H; Li, Z Y; Lim, S; Lin, C H; Lipari, P; Lippert, T; Liu, D; Liu, H; Lomtadze, T; Lu, M J; Lu, Y S; Luebelsmeyer, K; Luo, F; Luo, J Z; Lv, S S; Majka, R; Malinin, A; Mañá, C; Marín, J; Martin, T; Martínez, G; Masi, N; Maurin, D; Menchaca-Rocha, A; Meng, Q; Mo, D C; Morescalchi, L; Mott, P; Müller, M; Ni, J Q; Nikonov, N; Nozzoli, F; Nunes, P; Obermeier, A; Oliva, A; Orcinha, M; Palmonari, F; Palomares, C; Paniccia, M; Papi, A; Pauluzzi, M; Pedreschi, E; Pensotti, S; Pereira, R; Pilo, F; Piluso, A; Pizzolotto, C; Plyaskin, V; Pohl, M; Poireau, V; Postaci, E; Putze, A; Quadrani, L; Qi, X M; Räihä, T; Rancoita, P G; Rapin, D; Ricol, J S; Rodríguez, I; Rosier-Lees, S; Rozhkov, A; Rozza, D; Sagdeev, R; Sandweiss, J; Saouter, P; Sbarra, C; Schael, S; Schmidt, S M; Schuckardt, D; Schulz von Dratzig, A; Schwering, G; Scolieri, G; Seo, E S; Shan, B S; Shan, Y H; Shi, J Y; Shi, X Y; Shi, Y M; Siedenburg, T; Son, D; Spada, F; Spinella, F; Sun, W; Sun, W H; Tacconi, M; Tang, C P; Tang, X W; Tang, Z C; Tao, L; Tescaro, D; Ting, Samuel C C; Ting, S M; Tomassetti, N; Torsti, J; Türkoğlu, C; Urban, T; Vagelli, V; Valente, E; Vannini, C; Valtonen, E; Vaurynovich, S; Vecchi, M; Velasco, M; Vialle, J P; Wang, L Q; Wang, Q L; Wang, R S; Wang, X; Wang, Z X; Weng, Z L; Whitman, K; Wienkenhöver, J; Wu, H; Xia, X; Xie, M; Xie, S; Xiong, R Q; Xin, G M; Xu, N S; Xu, W; Yan, Q; Yang, J; Yang, M; Ye, Q H; Yi, H; Yu, Y J; Yu, Z Q; Zeissler, S; Zhang, J H; Zhang, M T; Zhang, X B; Zhang, Z; Zheng, Z M; Zhuang, H L; Zhukov, V; Zichichi, A; Zimmermann, N; Zuccon, P; Zurbach, C

    2014-11-28

    We present a measurement of the cosmic ray (e^{+}+e^{-}) flux in the range 0.5 GeV to 1 TeV based on the analysis of 10.6 million (e^{+}+e^{-}) events collected by AMS. The statistics and the resolution of AMS provide a precision measurement of the flux. The flux is smooth and reveals new and distinct information. Above 30.2 GeV, the flux can be described by a single power law with a spectral index γ=-3.170±0.008(stat+syst)±0.008(energy scale). PMID:25494065

  16. Distribution of mitochondrial DNA nucleoids inside the linear tubules vs. bulk parts of mitochondrial network as visualized by 4Pi microscopy.

    PubMed

    Dlasková, Andrea; Engstová, Hana; Plecitá-Hlavatá, Lydie; Lessard, Mark; Alán, Lukáš; Reguera, David Pajuelo; Jabůrek, Martin; Ježek, Petr

    2015-06-01

    Mitochondrial nucleoids are confined sites of mitochondrial DNA existing in complex clusters with the DNA-compacting mitochondrial (mt) transcription factor A (TFAM) and other accessory proteins and gene expression machinery proteins, such as a mt single-stranded-DNA-binding protein (mtSSB). To visualize nucleoid distribution within the mt reticular network, we have employed three-dimensional (3D) double-color 4Pi microscopy. The mt network was visualized in hepatocellular carcinoma HepG2 cells via mt-matrix-addressed GFP, while 3D immunocytochemistry of mtSSB was performed. Optimization of iso-surface computation threshold for nucleoid 4Pi images to 30 led to an average nucleoid diameter of 219 ± 110 and 224 ± 100 nm in glucose- and galactose-cultivated HepG2 cells (the latter with obligatory oxidative phosphorylation). We have positioned mtDNA nucleoids within the mt reticulum network and refined our model for nucleoid redistribution within the fragmented network--clustering of up to ten nucleoids in 2 μm diameter mitochondrial spheroids of a fragmented mt network, arising from an original 10 μm mt tubule of a 400 nm diameter. However, the theoretically fragmented bulk parts were observed most frequently as being reintegrated into the continuous mt network in 4Pi images. Since the predicted nucleoid counts within the bulk parts corresponded to the model, we conclude that fragmentation/reintegration cycles are not accompanied by mtDNA degradation or that mtDNA degradation is equally balanced by mtDNA replication.

  17. The Detector for Advanced Neutron Capture Experiments: A 4{pi} BaF2 Detector for Neutron Capture Measurements at LANSCE

    SciTech Connect

    Ullmann, J.L.; Esch, E.-I.; Haight, R.C.; Hunt, L.; O'Donnell, J.M.; Reifarth, R.; Agvaanluvsan, U.; Alpizar, A.; Hatarik, R.; Bond, E.M.; Bredeweg, T.A.; Kronenberg, A.; Rundberg, R.S.; Vieira, D.J.; Wilhelmy, J.B.; Folden, C.M.; Hoffman, D.C.; Greife, U.; Schwantes, J.M.; Strottman, D.D.

    2005-05-24

    The Detector for Advanced Neutron Capture Experiments (DANCE) is a 162-element 4{pi} BaF2 array designed to make neutron capture cross-section measurements on rare or radioactive targets with masses as little as one milligram. Accurate capture cross sections are needed in many research areas, including stellar nucleosynthesis, advanced nuclear fuel cycles, waste transmutation, and other applied programs. These cross sections are difficult to calculate accurately and must be measured. The design and initial performance results of DANCE is discussed.

  18. E1 and E2 S factors of {sup 12}C({alpha},{gamma}{sub 0}){sup 16}O from {gamma}-ray angular distributions with a 4 {pi}-detector array

    SciTech Connect

    Assuncao, M.; Lefebvre-Schuhl, A.; Kiener, J.; Tatischeff, V.; Boukari-Pelissie, C.; Coc, A.; Correia, J.J.; Grama, C.; Hannachi, F.; Korichi, A.; LeDu, D.; Lopez-Martens, A.; Meunier, R.; Thibaud, J.P.; Beck, C.; Courtin, S.

    2006-05-15

    A new experiment to determine the thermonuclear cross section of the {sup 12}C({alpha},{gamma}){sup 16}O reaction has been performed in regular kinematics using an intense {alpha}-particle beam of up to 340 {mu}A from the Stuttgart DYNAMITRON. For the first time, a 4{pi}-germanium-detector setup has been used to measure the angular distribution of the {gamma} rays at all angles simultaneously. It consisted of an array of nine EUROGAM high-purity Ge detectors in close geometry, actively shielded individually with bismuth germanate crystals. The {sup 12}C targets were isotopically enriched by magnetic separation during implantation. The depth profiles of the implanted carbon in the {sup 12}C targets were determined by Rutherford backscattering for purposes of cross-section normalization and absolute determination of the E1 and E2 S factors. Angular distributions of the {gamma} decay to the {sup 16}O ground state were measured in the energy range E{sub c.m.}=1.30-2.78 MeV and in the angular range (lab.) 30 deg. -130 deg. . From these distributions, astrophysical E1 and E2 S-factor functions vs energy were calculated, both of which are indispensable to the modeling of this reaction and the extrapolation toward lower energies. The separation of the E1 and E2 capture channels was done both by taking the phase value {phi}{sub 12} as a free parameter and by fixing it using the results of elastic {alpha}-particle scattering on {sup 12}C in the same energy range.

  19. NEAR Gamma Ray Spectrometer Characterization and Repair

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Groves, Joel Lee; Vajda, Stefan

    1998-01-01

    This report covers the work completed in the third year of the contract. The principle activities during this period were (1) the characterization of the NEAR 2 Gamma Ray Spectrometer using a neutron generator to generate complex gamma ray spectra and a large Ge Detecter to identify all the major peaks in the spectra; (2) the evaluation and repair of the Engineering Model Unit of the Gamma Ray Spectrometer for the NEAR mission; (3) the investigation of polycapillary x-ray optics for x-ray detection; and (4) technology transfer from NASA to forensic science.

  20. The LASS (Larger Aperture Superconducting Solenoid) spectrometer

    SciTech Connect

    Aston, D.; Awaji, N.; Barnett, B.; Bienz, T.; Bierce, R.; Bird, F.; Bird, L.; Blockus, D.; Carnegie, R.K.; Chien, C.Y.

    1986-04-01

    LASS is the acronym for the Large Aperture Superconducting Solenoid spectrometer which is located in an rf-separated hadron beam at the Stanford Linear Accelerator Center. This spectrometer was constructed in order to perform high statistics studies of multiparticle final states produced in hadron reactions. Such reactions are frequently characterized by events having complicated topologies and/or relatively high particle multiplicity. Their detailed study requires a spectrometer which can provide good resolution in momentum and position over almost the entire solid angle subtended by the production point. In addition, good final state particle identification must be available so that separation of the many kinematically-overlapping final states can be achieved. Precise analyses of the individual reaction channels require high statistics, so that the spectrometer must be capable of high data-taking rates in order that such samples can be acquired in a reasonable running time. Finally, the spectrometer must be complemented by a sophisticated off-line analysis package which efficiently finds tracks, recognizes and fits event topologies and correctly associates the available particle identification information. This, together with complicated programs which perform specific analysis tasks such as partial wave analysis, requires a great deal of software effort allied to a very large computing capacity. This paper describes the construction and performance of the LASS spectrometer, which is an attempt to realize the features just discussed. The configuration of the spectrometer corresponds to the data-taking on K and K interactions in hydrogen at 11 GeV/c which took place in 1981 and 1982. This constitutes a major upgrade of the configuration used to acquire lower statistics data on 11 GeV/c K p interactions during 1977 and 1978, which is also described briefly.

  1. Tropospheric Emission Spectrometer and Airborne Emission Spectrometer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Glavich, T.; Beer, R.

    1996-01-01

    The Tropospheric Emission Spectrometer (TES) is an instrument being developed for the NASA Earth Observing System Chemistry Platform. TES will measure the distribution of ozone and its precursors in the lower atmosphere. The Airborne Emission Spectrometer (AES) is an aircraft precursor to TES. Applicable descriptions are given of instrument design, technology challenges, implementation and operations for both.

  2. Compact Infrared Spectrometers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mouroulis, Pantazis

    2009-01-01

    Concentric spectrometer forms are advantageous for constructing a variety of systems spanning the entire visible to infrared range. Spectrometer examples are given, including broadband or high resolution forms. Some issues associated with the Dyson catadioptric type are also discussed.

  3. Mars Airborne Prospecting Spectrometer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Steinkraus, J. M.; Wright, M. W.; Rheingans, B. E.; Steinkraus, D. E.; George, W. P.; Aljabri, A.; Hall, J. L.; Scott, D. C.

    2012-06-01

    One novel approach towards addressing the need for innovative instrumentation and investigation approaches is the integration of a suite of four spectrometer systems to form the Mars Airborne Prospecting Spectrometers (MAPS) for prospecting on Mars.

  4. Miniature Neutron-Alpha Activation Spectrometer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rhodes, Edgar; Holloway, James Paul; He, Zhong; Goldsten, John

    2002-10-01

    We are developing a miniature neutron-alpha activation spectrometer for in-situ analysis of chem-bio samples, including rocks, fines, ices, and drill cores, suitable for a lander or Rover platform for Mars or outer-planet missions. In the neutron-activation mode, penetrating analysis will be performed of the whole sample using a γ spectrometer and in the α-activation mode, the sample surface will be analyzed using Rutherford-backscatter and x-ray spectrometers. Novel in our approach is the development of a switchable radioactive neutron source and a small high-resolution γ detector. The detectors and electronics will benefit from remote unattended operation capabilities resulting from our NEAR XGRS heritage and recent development of a Ge γ detector for MESSENGER. Much of the technology used in this instrument can be adapted to portable or unattended terrestrial applications for detection of explosives, chemical toxins, nuclear weapons, and contraband.

  5. Performance of an INTEGRAL spectrometer model

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jean, P.; Naya, J. E.; vonBallmoos, P.; Vedrenne, G.; Teegarden, B.

    1997-01-01

    Model calculations for the INTEGRAL spectrometer (SPI) onboard the future INTErnational Gamma Ray Astrophysics Laboratory (INTEGAL) are presented, where the sensitivity for narrow lines is based on estimates of the background level and the detection efficiency. The instrumental background rates are explained as the sum of various components that depend on the cosmic ray intensity and the spectrometer characteristics, such as the mass distribution around the Ge detectors, the passive material, the characteristics of the detector system and the background reduction techniques. Extended background calculations were performed with Monte Carlo simulations and using semi-empirical and calculated neutron and proton cross sections. In order to improve the INTEGRAL spectrometer sensitivity, several designs and background reduction techniques were compared for an instrument with a fixed detector volume.

  6. Superconducting magnets for space flight. [magnetic cosmic ray spectrometers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Golden, R. L.

    1975-01-01

    The operating principle and application of superconducting magnetic spectrometers for cosmic ray analysis are described. Magnetic spectrometer experiments are thought to be possible in the areas of charge composition and its possible energy dependence, isotopic separation up to several GeV/n, electrons and positrons energy spectra, galactic secondary antiprotons, searches for primordial antimatter, searches for substructure in energy spectra, and gamma ray astronomy. Operational problems associated with the magnets are discussed, and a possible shuttle payload is also described.

  7. Spherical grating spectrometers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    O'Donoghue, Darragh; Clemens, J. Christopher

    2014-07-01

    We describe designs for spectrometers employing convex dispersers. The Offner spectrometer was the first such instrument; it has almost exclusively been employed on satellite platforms, and has had little impact on ground-based instruments. We have learned how to fabricate curved Volume Phase Holographic (VPH) gratings and, in contrast to the planar gratings of traditional spectrometers, describe how such devices can be used in optical/infrared spectrometers designed specifically for curved diffraction gratings. Volume Phase Holographic gratings are highly efficient compared to conventional surface relief gratings; they have become the disperser of choice in optical / NIR spectrometers. The advantage of spectrometers with curved VPH dispersers is the very small number of optical elements used (the simplest comprising a grating and a spherical mirror), as well as illumination of mirrors off axis, resulting in greater efficiency and reduction in size. We describe a "Half Offner" spectrometer, an even simpler version of the Offner spectrometer. We present an entirely novel design, the Spherical Transmission Grating Spectrometer (STGS), and discuss exemplary applications, including a design for a double-beam spectrometer without any requirement for a dichroic. This paradigm change in spectrometer design offers an alternative to all-refractive astronomical spectrometer designs, using expensive, fragile lens elements fabricated from CaF2 or even more exotic materials. The unobscured mirror layout avoids a major drawback of the previous generation of catadioptric spectrometer designs. We describe laboratory measurements of the efficiency and image quality of a curved VPH grating in a STGS design, demonstrating, simultaneously, efficiency comparable to planar VPH gratings along with good image quality. The stage is now set for construction of a prototype instrument with impressive performance.

  8. Gamma-ray spectrometer utilizing xenon at high pressure

    SciTech Connect

    Smith, G.C.; Mahler, G.J.; Yu, B.; Kane, W.R.; Markey, J.K.

    1994-08-01

    A prototype gamma-ray spectrometer utilizing xenon gas near the critical point (166{degrees}C, 58 atm) is under development. The spectrometer will function as a room-temperature ionization chamber detecting gamma rays in the energy range 100 keV2 MeV, with an energy resolution intermediate between semiconductor (Ge) and scintillation (NaI) spectrometers. The energy resolution is superior to that of a NaI scintillation spectrometer by a substantial margin (approximately a factor 5), and accordingly, much more information can be extracted from a given gamma-ray spectrum. Unlike germanium detectors, the spectrometer possesses the capability for sustained operation under ambient temperature conditions without a requirement for liquid nitrogen.

  9. The molecular mechanism of polygalasaponin F-mediated decreases in TNFα: emphasizing the role of the TLR4-PI3K/AKT-NF-κB pathway.

    PubMed

    Yan, Wen-Fen; Shao, Qian-Hang; Zhang, Dong-Ming; Yuan, Yu-He; Chen, Nai-Hong

    2015-01-01

    Polygalasaponin F (PS-F), an oleanane-type triterpenoid saponin extracted from Polygala japonica, decreases the release of the inflammatory cytokine tumor necrosis factor α (TNFα), but the precise molecular mechanisms by which this event occurs are not fully understood. To study the anti-neuroinflammatory mechanisms of PS-F, enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay was used to detect the secretion of TNFα from BV-2 microglial cells. Nuclear proteins extracted from BV-2 microglial cells stimulated by lipopolysaccharide (LPS) and pretreated with/without inhibitors were measured by Western blotting, and cell viability was evaluated by MTT analysis. The results indicated that inhibition of toll-like receptor (TLR) 4 (CLI-095 1 μg/ml), phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase (PI3K) (Ly294002 10 μM) or IκBα phosphorylation (Bay11-7082 10 μM) completely prevents the release of TNFα induced by LPS without affecting cell viability and attenuated the nuclear translocation of p65 stimulated by LPS. In addition, PS-F exhibited a similar trend regarding TNFα release, AKT phosphorylation and NF-κB translocation. These results suggest that PS-F reduces neuroinflammatory cytokine secretion through the regulation of the TLR4-PI3K/AKT-NF-κB signaling pathway. PMID:26235355

  10. MicroRNA-7 inhibits the stemness of prostate cancer stem-like cells and tumorigenesis by repressing KLF4/PI3K/Akt/p21 pathway.

    PubMed

    Chang, Yun-Li; Zhou, Pei-Jie; Wei, Lianzi; Li, Wang; Ji, Zhongzhong; Fang, Yu-Xiang; Gao, Wei-Qiang

    2015-09-15

    Up to now, the molecular mechanisms underlying the stemness of prostate cancer stem cells (PCSCs) are still poorly understood. In this study, we demonstrated that microRNA-7 (miR-7) appears to be a novel tumor-suppressor miRNA, which abrogates the stemness of PCSCs and inhibits prostate tumorigenesis by suppressing a key stemness factor KLF4. MicroRNA-7 is down-regulated in prostate cancer cells compared to non-tumorigenic prostate epithelial cells. Restoration of miR-7 suppresses the expression of the stemness factor KLF4 in PCSCs and inhibits prostate tumorigenesis both in vitro and in vivo. Interestingly, the suppression of the stemness of PCSCs by miR-7 is sustained for generations in xenografts. Analysis of clinical samples also revealed a negative correlation between miR-7 expression and prostate tumor progression. Mechanistically, overexpression of miR-7 may lead to a cell cycle arrest but not apoptosis, which seems achieved via suppressing the KLF4/PI3K/Akt/p21 pathway. This study identifies miR-7 as a suppressor of PCSCs' stemness and implicates its potential application for PCa therapy.

  11. The molecular mechanism of polygalasaponin F-mediated decreases in TNFα: emphasizing the role of the TLR4-PI3K/AKT-NF-κB pathway.

    PubMed

    Yan, Wen-Fen; Shao, Qian-Hang; Zhang, Dong-Ming; Yuan, Yu-He; Chen, Nai-Hong

    2015-01-01

    Polygalasaponin F (PS-F), an oleanane-type triterpenoid saponin extracted from Polygala japonica, decreases the release of the inflammatory cytokine tumor necrosis factor α (TNFα), but the precise molecular mechanisms by which this event occurs are not fully understood. To study the anti-neuroinflammatory mechanisms of PS-F, enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay was used to detect the secretion of TNFα from BV-2 microglial cells. Nuclear proteins extracted from BV-2 microglial cells stimulated by lipopolysaccharide (LPS) and pretreated with/without inhibitors were measured by Western blotting, and cell viability was evaluated by MTT analysis. The results indicated that inhibition of toll-like receptor (TLR) 4 (CLI-095 1 μg/ml), phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase (PI3K) (Ly294002 10 μM) or IκBα phosphorylation (Bay11-7082 10 μM) completely prevents the release of TNFα induced by LPS without affecting cell viability and attenuated the nuclear translocation of p65 stimulated by LPS. In addition, PS-F exhibited a similar trend regarding TNFα release, AKT phosphorylation and NF-κB translocation. These results suggest that PS-F reduces neuroinflammatory cytokine secretion through the regulation of the TLR4-PI3K/AKT-NF-κB signaling pathway.

  12. MicroRNA-7 inhibits the stemness of prostate cancer stem-like cells and tumorigenesis by repressing KLF4/PI3K/Akt/p21 pathway

    PubMed Central

    Chang, Yun-Li; Zhou, Pei-Jie; Wei, Lianzi; Li, Wang; Ji, Zhongzhong; Fang, Yu-Xiang; Gao, Wei-Qiang

    2015-01-01

    Up to now, the molecular mechanisms underlying the stemness of prostate cancer stem cells (PCSCs) are still poorly understood. In this study, we demonstrated that microRNA-7 (miR-7) appears to be a novel tumor-suppressor miRNA, which abrogates the stemness of PCSCs and inhibits prostate tumorigenesis by suppressing a key stemness factor KLF4. MicroRNA-7 is down-regulated in prostate cancer cells compared to non-tumorigenic prostate epithelial cells. Restoration of miR-7 suppresses the expression of the stemness factor KLF4 in PCSCs and inhibits prostate tumorigenesis both in vitro and in vivo. Interestingly, the suppression of the stemness of PCSCs by miR-7 is sustained for generations in xenografts. Analysis of clinical samples also revealed a negative correlation between miR-7 expression and prostate tumor progression. Mechanistically, overexpression of miR-7 may lead to a cell cycle arrest but not apoptosis, which seems achieved via suppressing the KLF4/PI3K/Akt/p21 pathway. This study identifies miR-7 as a suppressor of PCSCs' stemness and implicates its potential application for PCa therapy. PMID:26172296

  13. The Quadrupole Mass Spectrometer

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Matheson, E.; Harris, T. J.

    1969-01-01

    Describes the construction and operation of a quadrupole mass spectrometer for experiments in an advanced-teaching laboratory. Discusses the theory of operation of the spectrometer and the factors affecting the resolution. Some examples of mass spectra obtained with this instrument are presented and discussed. (LC)

  14. Rotationally resolved pulsed field ionization photoelectron bands for O{sub 2}{sup +}(a {sup 4}{pi}{sub u}, v{sup +}=0-18) in the energy range of 16.0-18.0 eV

    SciTech Connect

    Song, Y.; Evans, M.; Ng, C. Y.; Hsu, C.-W.; Jarvis, G. K.

    2000-01-15

    We have obtained rotationally resolved pulsed field ionization-photoelectron (PFI-PE) spectra of O{sub 2} in the energy range of 16.0-18.0 eV, covering ionization transitions O{sub 2}{sup +}(a {sup 4}{pi}{sub u}, v{sup +}=0-18,J{sup +})(<-)O{sub 2}(X {sup 3}{sigma}{sub g}{sup .}, v{sup ''}=0,N{sup ''}). Although these vibrational PFI-PE bands for O{sub 2}{sup +}(a {sup 4}{pi}{sub u}, v{sup +}) have significant overlaps with those for O{sub 2}{sup +}(X {sup 2}{pi}{sub g}) and O{sub 2}{sup +}(A {sup 2}{pi}{sub u}), we have identified all O{sub 2}{sup +}(a {sup 4}{pi}{sub u}, v{sup +}=0-18) bands by simulation of spectra obtained using supersonically cooled O{sub 2} samples with rotational temperatures {approx_equal}20 and 220 K. While the v{sup +}=4-18PFI-PE bands represent the first rotationally resolved photoelectron data for O{sub 2}{sup +}(a {sup 4}{pi}{sub u}), the PFI-PE bands for O{sub 2}{sup +}(a {sup 4}{pi}{sub u}, v{sup +}=10-18) are the first rotationally resolved spectroscopic data for these levels. The simulation also allows the determination of accurate ionization energies, vibrational constants, and rotational constants for O{sub 2}{sup +}(a {sup 2}{pi}{sub u}, v{sup +}=0-18). The observed intensities of spin-orbit components for the majority of O{sub 2}{sup +}(a {sup 2}{pi}{sub u}, v{sup +}) vibrational bands are in accordance with the forced spin-orbit/rotational autoionization mechanism. (c) 2000 American Institute of Physics.

  15. Pseudomorphic GeSn/Ge (001) heterostructures

    SciTech Connect

    Tonkikh, A. A.; Talalaev, V. G.; Werner, P.

    2013-11-15

    The synthesis of pseudomorphic GeSn heterostructures on a Ge (001) substrate by molecular-beam epitaxy is described. Investigations by transmission electron microscopy show that the GeSn layers are defect free and possess cubic diamondlike structure. Photoluminescence spectroscopy reveals interband radiative recombination in the GeSn quantum wells, which is identified as indirect transitions between the subbands of heavy electrons and heavy holes. On the basis of experimental data and modeling of the band structure of pseudomorphic GeSn compounds, the lower boundary of the bowing parameter for the indirect band gap is estimated as b{sub L} {>=} 1.47 eV.

  16. Spectrometers for fast neutrons from solar flares.

    PubMed

    Slobodrian, R J; Potvin, L; Rioux, C

    1994-10-01

    Neutrons with energies exceeding 1 GeV are emitted in the course of solar flares. Suitable dedicated neutron spectrometers with directional characteristics are necessary for a systematic spectroscopy of solar neutrons. We report here a study of instruments based on the detection of proton recoils from hydrogenous media, with double scattering in order to provide directional information, and also a novel scheme based on the detection of radiation from the neutron magnetic dipole moment, permitting also directional detection of neutrons. Specific designs and detection systems are discussed.

  17. Imaging Fourier transform spectrometer

    SciTech Connect

    Bennett, C.L.

    1993-09-13

    This invention is comprised of an imaging Fourier transform spectrometer having a Fourier transform infrared spectrometer providing a series of images to a focal plane array camera. The focal plane array camera is clocked to a multiple of zero crossing occurrences as caused by a moving mirror of the Fourier transform infrared spectrometer and as detected by a laser detector such that the frame capture rate of the focal plane array camera corresponds to a multiple of the zero crossing rate of the Fourier transform infrared spectrometer. The images are transmitted to a computer for processing such that representations of the images as viewed in the light of an arbitrary spectral ``fingerprint`` pattern can be displayed on a monitor or otherwise stored and manipulated by the computer.

  18. Composite Spectrometer Prisms

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Breckinridge, J. B.; Page, N. A.; Rodgers, J. M.

    1985-01-01

    Efficient linear dispersive element for spectrometer instruments achieved using several different glasses in multiple-element prism. Good results obtained in both two-and three-element prisms using variety of different glass materials.

  19. AUTOMATIC MASS SPECTROMETER

    DOEpatents

    Hanson, M.L.; Tabor, C.D. Jr.

    1961-12-01

    A mass spectrometer for analyzing the components of a gas is designed which is capable of continuous automatic operation such as analysis of samples of process gas from a continuous production system where the gas content may be changing. (AEC)

  20. A Simple Raman Spectrometer.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Blond, J. P.; Boggett, D. M.

    1980-01-01

    Discusses some basic physical ideas about light scattering and describes a simple Raman spectrometer, a single prism monochromator and a multiplier detector. This discussion is intended for British undergraduate physics students. (HM)

  1. Fourier Transform Spectrometer System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Campbell, Joel F. (Inventor)

    2014-01-01

    A Fourier transform spectrometer (FTS) data acquisition system includes an FTS spectrometer that receives a spectral signal and a laser signal. The system further includes a wideband detector, which is in communication with the FTS spectrometer and receives the spectral signal and laser signal from the FTS spectrometer. The wideband detector produces a composite signal comprising the laser signal and the spectral signal. The system further comprises a converter in communication with the wideband detector to receive and digitize the composite signal. The system further includes a signal processing unit that receives the composite signal from the converter. The signal processing unit further filters the laser signal and the spectral signal from the composite signal and demodulates the laser signal, to produce velocity corrected spectral data.

  2. Large Isotope Spectrometer for Astromag

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Binns, W. R.; Klarmann, J.; Israel, M. H.; Garrard, T. L.; Mewaldt, R. A.; Stone, E. C.; Ormes, J. F.; Streitmatter, R. E.; Rasmussen, I. L.; Wiedenbeck, M. E.

    1990-01-01

    The Large Isotope Spectrometer for Astromag (LISA) is an experiment designed to measure the isotopic composition and energy spectra of cosmic rays for elements extending from beryllium through zinc. The overall objectives of this investigation are to study the origin and evolution of galactic matter; the acceleration, transport, and time scales of cosmic rays in the galaxy; and search for heavy antinuclei in the cosmic radiation. To achieve these objectives, the LISA experiment will make the first identifications of individual heavy cosmic ray isotopes in the energy range from about 2.5 to 4 GeV/n where relativistic time dilation effects enhance the abundances of radioactive clocks and where the effects of solar modulation and cross-section variations are minimized. It will extend high resolution measurements of individual element abundances and their energy spectra to energies of nearly 1 TeV/n, and has the potential for discovering heavy anti-nuclei which could not have been formed except in extragalactic sources.

  3. Polarized-neutron spectrometer development and experiments at Brookhaven

    SciTech Connect

    Majkrzak, C.F.; Shirane, G.

    1982-09-01

    Recent work at Brookhaven has focussed on the development of polarized neutron spectrometers and reflects the resurgence of interest in polarization analysis. Both Heusler crystals and FeGe multilayers used in conjunction with pyrolytic graphite crystals have been tested as polarizing monochromators on a triple-axis instrument. The goal is to first obtain polarized beams of adequate intensity and then to evaluate various instrumental innovations which affect control of spectrometer resolution by utilizing the properties of polarized beams. Progress in these regards is reported. A recent study of the magnetic excitations in amorphous ferromagnets employing the instrumentation for polarization analysis developed thus far is also discussed.

  4. Electron-proton spectrometer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Winckler, J. R.

    1973-01-01

    An electron-proton spectrometer was designed to measure the geomagnetically trapped radiation in a geostationary orbit at 6.6 earth radii in the outer radiation belt. This instrument is to be flown on the Applications Technology Satellite-F (ATS-F). The electron-proton spectrometer consists of two permanent magnet surface barrier detector arrays and associated electronics capable of selecting and detecting electrons in three energy ranges: (1) 30-50 keV, (2) 150-200 keV, and (3) 500 keV and protons in three energy ranges. The electron-proton spectrometer has the capability of measuring the fluxes of electrons and protons in various directions with respect to the magnetic field lines running through the satellite. One magnet detector array system is implemented to scan between EME north and south through west, sampling the directional flux in 15 steps. The other magnet-detector array system is fixed looking toward EME east.

  5. Compact Grism Spectrometer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Teare, S. W.

    2003-05-01

    Many observatories and instrument builders are retrofitting visible and near-infrared spectrometers into their existing imaging cameras. Camera designs that reimage the focal plane and have the optical filters located in a pseudo collimated beam are ideal candidates for the addition of a spectrometer. One device commonly used as the dispersing element for such spectrometers is a grism. The traditional grism is constructed from a prism that has had a diffraction grating applied on one surface. The objective of such a design is to use the prism wedge angle to select the desired "in-line" or "zero-deviation" wavelength that passes through on axis. The grating on the surface of the prism provides much of the dispersion for the spectrometer. A grism can also be used in a "constant-dispersion" design which provides an almost linear spatial scale across the spectrum. In this paper we provide an overview of the development of a grism spectrometer for use in a near infrared camera and demonstrate that a compact grism spectrometer can be developed on a very modest budget that can be afforded at almost any facility. The grism design was prototyped using visible light and then a final device was constructed which provides partial coverage in the near infrared I, J, H and K astronomical bands using the appropriate band pass filter for order sorting. The near infrared grism presented here provides a spectral resolution of about 650 and velocity resolution of about 450 km/s. The design of this grism relied on a computer code called Xspect, developed by the author, to determine the various critical parameters of the grism. This work was supported by a small equipment grant from NASA and administered by the AAS.

  6. Cosmic ray nuclei of energy 50 GeV/NUC

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Balasubrahmanyan, V. K.; Streitmatter, R. E.; Ormes, J. F.

    1985-01-01

    Preliminary results from the High Energy Gas Cerenkov Spectrometer indicate that the sub-iron to iron ratio increases beyond 100 GeV/nucleon. This surprising finding is examined in light of various models for the origin and propagation of galactic cosmic rays.

  7. The Apollo Alpha Spectrometer.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jagoda, N.; Kubierschky, K.; Frank, R.; Carroll, J.

    1973-01-01

    Located in the Science Instrument Module of Apollo 15 and 16, the Alpha Particle Spectrometer was designed to detect and measure the energy of alpha particles emitted by the radon isotopes and their daughter products. The spectrometer sensor consisted of an array of totally depleted silicon surface barrier detectors. Biased amplifier and linear gate techniques were utilized to reduce resolution degradation, thereby permitting the use of a single 512 channel PHA. Sensor identification and in-flight radioactive calibration were incorporated to enhance data reduction.

  8. Comparison of imaging spectrometers

    SciTech Connect

    Bennett, C

    2000-01-09

    Realistic signal to noise performance estimates for the various types of instruments being considered for NGST are compared, based on the point source detection values quoted in the available ISIM final reports. The corresponding sensitivity of the various types of spectrometers operating in a full field imaging mode, for both emission line objects and broad spectral distribution objects, is computed and displayed. For the purpose of seeing the earliest galaxies, or the faintest possible emission line sources, the imaging Fourier transform spectrometer emerges superior to all others, by orders of magnitude in speed.

  9. Broad band waveguide spectrometer

    DOEpatents

    Goldman, Don S.

    1995-01-01

    A spectrometer for analyzing a sample of material utilizing a broad band source of electromagnetic radiation and a detector. The spectrometer employs a waveguide possessing an entry and an exit for the electromagnetic radiation emanating from the source. The waveguide further includes a surface between the entry and exit portions which permits interaction between the electromagnetic radiation passing through the wave guide and a sample material. A tapered portion forms a part of the entry of the wave guide and couples the electromagnetic radiation emanating from the source to the waveguide. The electromagnetic radiation passing from the exit of the waveguide is captured and directed to a detector for analysis.

  10. Effect of Sn implantation on thermal stability improvement of NiSiGe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, B.; Meng, X.; Ping, Y.; Yu, W.; Xue, Z.; Wei, X.; Di, Z.; Zhang, M.; Wang, X.

    2015-12-01

    We study the formation of nickel-germanosilicide (NiSiGe) on Sn ion pre-implanted Si0.8Ge0.2 layers. The Sn influences on NiSiGe morphology and sheet resistance are investigated at different annealing temperature. The NiSiGe films were characterized by scanning electron microscopy (SEM), Rutherford backscattering spectrometry (RBS), cross-section transmission electron microscopy (XTEM), and Energy Dispersive X-ray spectrometer (EDX) techniques. It is shown that the presence of Sn atoms increases the thermal stability of NiSiGe about 150 °C. We demonstrate that the Sn atoms retard the Ni germanosilicidation rate, stabilize the NiSiGe phase, and smooth the NiSiGe/SiGe interface.

  11. Short-orbit spectrometer for Hall C at CEBAF

    SciTech Connect

    Jackson, H.E.; Potterveld, D.H.; Zeidman, B.

    1995-08-01

    An examination of the proposed experimental program for Hall C at CEBAF reveals a major emphasis on coincidence experiments involving a {open_quotes}core{close_quotes} spectrometer and a second arm capable of detecting particles with momenta < 2 GeV/c with moderate energy and angular resolution. In most cases, the core spectrometer serves to tag a virtual photon, which induces a reaction in a nuclear target resulting in the ejection of a hadron in the energy range (0.2-2.0 GeV) which is observed in the second spectrometer. Nuclear physics topics addressed in these experiments include color transparency, nucleon propagation, pion electroproduction, and hyperon physics. All of these programs require an acceptance in the hadron spectrometer as large as possible in solid angle and momentum to maximize operational efficiency. In addition, relatively short spectrometer drift lengths are required in experiments involving detection of pions or kaons in order to minimize decay losses. Because the requirements for energy resolution in this class of experiments is moderate, typically {approximately} 10{sup -3}, an optimized design with a short optical length less than 10 m will provide a well-matched spectrometer capability. Excellent particle discrimination will be essential for detection of pions and kaons in the presence of high backgrounds. Operation at luminosities as high as 10{sup 38}/cm{sup 2} sec will be required frequently. To provide this second-arm capability, the Argonne group has built, under contract to CEBAF, a short-orbit spectrometer, the SOS, based on a QD{bar D} design. The QD{bar D} configuration provides a large momentum acceptance, with good energy resolution and solid-angle acceptance in a very compact geometry which can meet the needs of a broad spectrum of studies appropriate for Hall C at CEBAF.

  12. Mass Spectrometers in Space!

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brinckerhoff, William B.

    2012-01-01

    Exploration of our solar system over several decades has benefitted greatly from the sensitive chemical analyses offered by spaceflight mass spectrometers. When dealing with an unknown environment, the broadband detection capabilities of mass analyzers have proven extremely valuable in determining the composition and thereby the basic nature of space environments, including the outer reaches of Earth s atmosphere, interplanetary space, the Moon, and the planets and their satellites. Numerous mass analyzer types, including quadrupole, monopole, sector, ion trap, and time-of-flight have been incorporated in flight instruments and delivered robotically to a variety of planetary environments. All such instruments went through a rigorous process of application-specific development, often including significant miniaturization, testing, and qualification for the space environment. Upcoming missions to Mars and opportunities for missions to Venus, Europa, Saturn, Titan, asteroids, and comets provide new challenges for flight mass spectrometers that push to state of the art in fundamental analytical technique. The Sample Analysis at Mars (SAM) investigation on the recently-launch Mars Science Laboratory (MSL) rover mission incorporates a quadrupole analyzer to support direct evolved gas as well as gas chromatograph-based analysis of martian rocks and atmosphere, seeking signs of a past or present habitable environment. A next-generation linear ion trap mass spectrometer, using both electron impact and laser ionization, is being incorporated into the Mars Organic Molecule Analyzer (MOMA) instrument, which will be flown to Mars in 2018. These and other mass spectrometers and mission concepts at various stages of development will be described.

  13. Fourier Transform Spectrometer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1998-01-01

    Understanding the global atmospheric changes is difficult with today's current technology. However, with high resolution and nearly continuous observations from a satellite, it's possible to transform our understanding of the atmosphere. To enable the next generation of atmospheric science, a new class of orbiting atmospheric sensors is being developed. The foundation of this advanced concept is the Fourier Transform Spectrometer, or FTS.

  14. Instrumental background in balloon-borne gamma-ray spectrometers and techniques for its reduction

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gehrels, N.

    1985-01-01

    Instrumental background in balloon-borne gamma-ray spectrometers is presented. The calculations are based on newly available interaction cross sections and new analytic techniques, and are the most detailed and accurate published to date. Results compare well with measurements made in the 20 keV to 10 MeV energy range by the Goddard Low Energy Gamma-ray Spectrometer (LEGS). The principal components of the continuum background in spectrometers with GE detectors and thick active shields are: (1) elastic neutron scattering of atmospheric neutrons on the Ge nuclei; (2) aperture flux of atmospheric and cosmic gamma rays; (3) beta decays of unstable nuclides produced by nuclear interactions of atmospheric protons and neutrons with Ge nuclei; and (4) shield leakage of atmospheric gamma rays. The improved understanding of these components leads to several recommended techniques for reducing the background.

  15. Crystals for stellar spectrometers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Alexandropoulos, N. G.; Cohen, G. G.

    1974-01-01

    Crystal evaluation as it applies to instrumentation employed in X-ray astronomy is reviewed, and some solutions are offered to problems that are commonly encountered. A general approach for selecting the most appropriate crystals for a given problem is also suggested. The energy dependence of the diffraction properties of (002) PET, (111) Ge, (101) ADP, (101) KAP, and (001) RAP are reported.

  16. Tropospheric and Airborne Emission Spectrometers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Glavich, Thomas; Beer, Reinhard

    1996-01-01

    X This paper describes the development of two related instruments, the Tropospheric Emission Spectrometer (TES) and the Airborne Emission Spectrometer (AES). Both instruments are infrared imaging Fourier Transform Spectrometers, used for measuring the state of the lower atmosphere, and in particular the measurement of ozone and ozone sources and sinks.

  17. Alpha Magnetic Spectrometer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ting, Samuel

    2012-07-01

    The Alpha Magnetic Spectrometer (AMS) is a precision particle physics magnetic spectrometer designed to measure electrons, positrons, gamma rays and various nuclei and anti-nuclei from the cosmos up to TeV energy ranges. AMS weighs 7.5 tons and measures 5 meters by 4 meters by 3 meters. It contains 300,000 channels of electronics and 650 onboard microprocessors. It was delivered to the International Space Station onboard space shuttle Endeavour and installed on May 19, 2011. Since that time, more than 14 billion cosmic ray events have been collected. All the detectors function properly. At this moment, we are actively engaged in data analysis. AMS is an international collaboration involving 16 countries and 60 institutes. It took 16 years to construct and test. AMS is the only major physical science experiment on the International Space Station and will continue to collect data over the entire lifetime of the Space Station (10-20 years).

  18. Imaging Fourier Transform Spectrometer

    SciTech Connect

    Bennett, C.L.; Carter, M.R.; Fields, D.J.; Hernandez, J.

    1993-04-14

    The operating principles of an Imaging Fourier Transform Spectrometer (IFTS) are discussed. The advantages and disadvantages of such instruments with respect to alternative imaging spectrometers are discussed. The primary advantages of the IFTS are the capacity to acquire more than an order of magnitude more spectral channels than alternative systems with more than an order of magnitude greater etendue than for alternative systems. The primary disadvantage of IFTS, or FTS in general, is the sensitivity to temporal fluctuations, either random or periodic. Data from the IRIFTS (ir IFTS) prototype instrument, sensitive in the infrared, are presented having a spectral sensitivity of 0.01 absorbance units, a spectral resolution of 6 cm{sup {minus}1} over the range 0 to 7899 cm{sup {minus}1}, and a spatial resolution of 2.5 mr.

  19. FAST NEUTRON SPECTROMETER

    DOEpatents

    Davis, F.J.; Hurst, G.S.; Reinhardt, P.W.

    1959-08-18

    An improved proton recoil spectrometer for determining the energy spectrum of a fast neutron beam is described. Instead of discriminating against and thereby"throwing away" the many recoil protons other than those traveling parallel to the neutron beam axis as do conventional spectrometers, this device utilizes protons scattered over a very wide solid angle. An ovoidal gas-filled recoil chamber is coated on the inside with a scintillator. The ovoidal shape of the sensitive portion of the wall defining the chamber conforms to the envelope of the range of the proton recoils from the radiator disposed within the chamber. A photomultiplier monitors the output of the scintillator, and a counter counts the pulses caused by protons of energy just sufficient to reach the scintillator.

  20. Surface Plasmon Based Spectrometer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wig, Andrew; Passian, Ali; Boudreaux, Philip; Ferrell, Tom

    2008-03-01

    A spectrometer that uses surface plasmon excitation in thin metal films to separate light into its component wavelengths is described. The use of surface plasmons as a dispersive medium sets this spectrometer apart from prism, grating, and interference based variants and allows for the miniaturization of this device. Theoretical and experimental results are presented for two different operation models. In the first case surface plasmon tunneling in the near field is used to provide transmission spectra of different broad band-pass, glass filters across the visible wavelength range with high stray-light rejection at low resolution as well as absorption spectra of chlorophyll extracted from a spinach leaf. The second model looks at the far field components of surface plasmon scattering.

  1. Miniaturized Ion Mobility Spectrometer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kaye, William J. (Inventor); Stimac, Robert M. (Inventor)

    2015-01-01

    By utilizing the combination of a unique electronic ion injection control circuit in conjunction with a particularly designed drift cell construction, the instantly disclosed ion mobility spectrometer achieves increased levels of sensitivity, while achieving significant reductions in size and weight. The instant IMS is of a much simpler and easy to manufacture design, rugged and hermetically sealed, capable of operation at high temperatures to at least 250.degree. C., and is uniquely sensitive, particularly to explosive chemicals.

  2. Rapid scanning mass spectrometer

    SciTech Connect

    Leckey, J.H.; Boeckmann, M.D.

    1996-11-25

    Mass spectrometers and residual gas analyzers (RGA) are used in a variety of applications for analysis of volatile and semi-volatile materials. Analysis is performed by detecting fragments of gas molecules, based on their mass to charge ratio, which are generated in the mass spectrometer. When used as a detector for a gas chromatograph, they function as a means to quantitatively identify isolated volatile species which have been separated from other species via the gas chromatograph. Vacuum Technology, Inc., (VTI) produces a magnetic sector mass spectrometer/RGA which is used in many industrial and laboratory environments. In order to increase the utility of this instrument, it is desirable to increase the mass scanning speed, thereby increasing the number of applications for which it is suited. This project performed the following three upgrades on the computer interface. (1) A new electrometer was designed and built to process the signal from the detector. This new electrometer is more sensitive, over 10 times faster, and over 100 times more stable than the electrometer it will replace. (2) The controller EPROM was reprogrammed with new firmware. This firmware acts as an operating system for the interface and is used to shuttle communications between the PC and the AEROVAC mass spectrometer. (3) The voltage regulator which causes the ion selector voltage to ramp to allow ions of selected mass to be sequentially detected was redesigned and prototyped. The redesigned voltage regulator can be ramped up or down more than 100 times faster than the existing regulator. These changes were incorporated into a prototype unit and preliminary performance testing conducted. Results indicated that scanning speed was significantly increased over the unmodified version.

  3. X-ray Spectrometer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Porter, F. Scott

    2004-01-01

    The X-ray Spectrometer (XRS) instrument is a revolutionary non-dispersive spectrometer that will form the basis for the Astro-E2 observatory to be launched in 2005. We have recently installed a flight spare X R S microcalorimeter spectrometer at the EBIT-I facility at LLNL replacing the XRS from the earlier Astro-E mission and providing twice the resolution. The X R S microcalorimeter is an x-ray detector that senses the heat deposited by the incident photon. It achieves a high energy resolution by operating at 0.06K and by carefully controlling the heat capacity and thermal conductance. The XRS/EBIT instrument has 32 pixels in a square geometry and achieves an energy resolution of 6 eV at 6 keV, with a bandpass from 0.1 to 12 keV (or more at higher operating temperature). The instrument allows detailed studies of the x-ray line emission of laboratory plasmas. The XRS/EBIT also provides an extensive calibration "library" for the Astro-E2 observatory.

  4. Mass spectrometers: instrumentation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cooks, R. G.; Hoke, S. H., II; Morand, K. L.; Lammert, S. A.

    1992-09-01

    Developments in mass spectrometry instrumentation over the past three years are reviewed. The subject is characterized by an enormous diversity of designs, a high degree of competition between different laboratories working with either different or similar techniques and by extremely rapid progress in improving analytical performance. Instruments can be grouped into genealogical charts based on their physical and conceptual interrelationships. This is illustrated using mass analyzers of different types. The time course of development of particular instrumental concepts is illustrated in terms of the s-curves typical of cell growth. Examples are given of instruments which are at the exponential, linear and mature growth stages. The prime examples used are respectively: (i) hybrid instruments designed to study reactive collisions of ions with surfaces: (ii) the Paul ion trap; and (iii) the triple quadrupole mass spectrometer. In the area of ion/surface collisions, reactive collisions such as hydrogen radical abstraction from the surface by the impinging ion are studied. They are shown to depend upon the chemical nature of the surface through the use of experiments which utilize self-assembled monolayers as surfaces. The internal energy deposited during surface-induced dissociation upon collision with different surfaces in a BEEQ instrument is also discussed. Attention is also given to a second area of emerging instrumentation, namely technology which allows mass spectrometers to be used for on-line monitoring of fluid streams. A summary of recent improvements in the performance of the rapidly developing quadrupole ion trap instrument illustrates this stage of instrument development. Improvements in resolution and mass range and their application to the characterization of biomolecules are described. The interaction of theory with experiment is illustrated through the role of simulations of ion motion in the ion trap. It is emphasized that mature instruments play a

  5. Analytical response function for planar Ge detectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    García-Alvarez, Juan A.; Maidana, Nora L.; Vanin, Vito R.; Fernández-Varea, José M.

    2016-04-01

    We model the response function (RF) of planar HPGe x-ray spectrometers for photon energies between around 10 keV and 100 keV. The RF is based on the proposal of Seltzer [1981. Nucl. Instrum. Methods 188, 133-151] and takes into account the full-energy absorption in the Ge active volume, the escape of Ge Kα and Kβ x-rays and the escape of photons after one Compton interaction. The relativistic impulse approximation is employed instead of the Klein-Nishina formula to describe incoherent photon scattering in the Ge crystal. We also incorporate a simple model for the continuous component of the spectrum produced by the escape of photo-electrons from the active volume. In our calculations we include external interaction contributions to the RF: (i) the incoherent scattering effects caused by the detector's Be window and (ii) the spectrum produced by photo-electrons emitted in the Ge dead layer that reach the active volume. The analytical RF model is compared with pulse-height spectra simulated using the PENELOPE Monte Carlo code.

  6. Recent study for multibaryon states with strangeness in pC interaction at 10 GeV/c

    SciTech Connect

    Aslanyan, P. Zh.

    2013-08-15

    Strange multibaryon states with {Lambda}-hyperon and K{sub s}{sup 0} -meson subsystems has been studied from 700 000 stereo photographs or 10{sup 6} inelastic interactions which was obtained from expose of 2-m propane bubble chamber (PBC) LHEP, JINR to proton beams at 10 GeV/c. The obtained results from PBC can be divided into three subjects: in-medium effects of hadronic particles; baryon spectroscopy; hyper-nucleus production. At present the experimental situation is confused; so is theory. New accelerator research complexes has unique possibility for high-statistic and 4{pi}-geometry study of exotic states.

  7. A field-deployable gamma-ray spectrometer utilizing xenon at high pressure

    SciTech Connect

    Smith, G.C.; Mahler, G.J.; Yu, B.; Salwen, C.; Kane, W.R.; Lemley, J.R.

    1996-10-01

    Prototype gamma-ray spectrometers utilizing xenon gas at high pressure, suitable for applications in the nuclear safeguards, arms control, and nonproliferation communities, have been developed at Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL). These spectrometers function as ambient-temperature ionization chambers detecting gamma rays with good efficiency in the energy range 50 keV - 2 MeV, with an energy resolution intermediate between semiconductor (Ge) and scintillation (NaI) spectrometers. They are capable of prolonged, low-power operation without a requirement for cryogenic fluids or other cooling mechanisms, and with the addition of small quantities of {sup 3}He gas, can function simultaneously as efficient thermal neutron detectors.

  8. MASS SPECTROMETER LEAK

    DOEpatents

    Shields, W.R.

    1960-10-18

    An improved valve is described for precisely regulating the flow of a sample fluid to be analyzed, such as in a mass spectrometer, where a gas sample is allowed to "leak" into an evacuated region at a very low, controlled rate. The flow regulating valve controls minute flow of gases by allowing the gas to diffuse between two mating surfaces. The structure of the valve is such as to prevent the corrosive feed gas from contacting the bellows which is employed in the operation of the valve, thus preventing deterioration of the bellows.

  9. Modular total absorption spectrometer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Karny, M.; Rykaczewski, K. P.; Fijałkowska, A.; Rasco, B. C.; Wolińska-Cichocka, M.; Grzywacz, R. K.; Goetz, K. C.; Miller, D.; Zganjar, E. F.

    2016-11-01

    The design and performance of the Modular Total Absorption Spectrometer built and commissioned at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory is presented. The active volume of the detector is approximately one ton of NaI(Tl), which results in very high full γ energy peak efficiency of 71% at 6 MeV and nearly flat efficiency of around 81.5% for low energy γ-rays between 300 keV and 1 MeV. In addition to the high peak efficiency, the modular construction of the detector permits the use of a γ-coincidence technique in data analysis as well as β-delayed neutron observation.

  10. Automated transportable mass spectrometer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Echo, M. W.

    1981-09-01

    The need was identified for a mass spectrometer (MS) which can be conveniently transported among several facilities for rapid verification of the isotopic composition of special nuclear material. This requirement for a light weight, transportable MS for U and Pu mass analysis was met by deleting the gas chromograph (GC) portions of a Hewlett-Packard Model 5992 Quadrupole GCMS and substituting a vacuum lock sample entry system. A programmable power supply and vacuum gauge were added and circuitry modifications were made to enable use of the supplied software.

  11. Gas Chromatic Mass Spectrometer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wey, Chowen

    1995-01-01

    Gas chromatograph/mass spectrometer (GC/MS) used to measure and identify combustion species present in trace concentration. Advanced extractive diagnostic method measures to parts per billion (PPB), as well as differentiates between different types of hydrocarbons. Applicable for petrochemical, waste incinerator, diesel transporation, and electric utility companies in accurately monitoring types of hydrocarbon emissions generated by fuel combustion, in order to meet stricter environmental requirements. Other potential applications include manufacturing processes requiring precise detection of toxic gaseous chemicals, biomedical applications requiring precise identification of accumulative gaseous species, and gas utility operations requiring high-sensitivity leak detection.

  12. Detector development for Jefferson Lab's 12 GeV Upgrade

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qiang, Yi

    2015-05-01

    Jefferson Lab will soon finish its highly anticipated 12 GeV Upgrade. With doubled maximum energy, Jefferson Lab's Continuous Electron Beam Accelerator Facility (CEBAF) will enable a new experimental program with substantial discovery potential, addressing important topics in nuclear, hadronic and electroweak physics. In order to take full advantage of the high energy, high luminosity beam, new detectors are being developed, designed and constructed to fit the needs of different physics topics. The paper will give an overview of various new detector technologies to be used for 12 GeV experiments. It will then focus on the development of two solenoid-based spectrometers, the GlueX and SoLID spectrometers. The GlueX experiment in Hall D will study the complex properties of gluons through exotic hybrid meson spectroscopy. The GlueX spectrometer, a hermetic detector package designed for spectroscopy and the associated partial wave analysis, is currently in the final stage of construction. Hall A, on the other hand, is developing the SoLID spectrometer to capture the 3D image of the nucleon from semi-inclusive processes and to study the intrinsic properties of quarks through mirror symmetry breaking. Such a spectrometer will have the capability to handle very high event rates while still maintaining a large acceptance in the forward region.

  13. Detector development for Jefferson Lab's 12GeV Upgrade

    SciTech Connect

    Qiang, Yi

    2015-05-01

    Jefferson Lab will soon finish its highly anticipated 12 GeV Upgrade. With doubled maximum energy, Jefferson Lab’s Continuous Electron Beam Accelerator Facility (CEBAF) will enable a new experimental program with substantial discovery potential, addressing important topics in nuclear, hadronic and electroweak physics. In order to take full advantage of the high energy, high luminosity beam, new detectors are being developed, designed and constructed to fit the needs of different physics topics. The paper will give an overview of various new detector technologies to be used for 12 GeV experiments. It will then focus on the development of two solenoid-based spectrometers, the GlueX and SoLID spectrometers. The GlueX experiment in Hall D will study the complex properties of gluons through exotic hybrid meson spectroscopy. The GlueX spectrometer, a hermetic detector package designed for spectroscopy and the associated partial wave analysis, is currently in the final stage of construction. Hall A, on the other hand, is developing the SoLID spectrometer to capture the 3D image of the nucleon from semi-inclusive processes and to study the intrinsic properties of quarks through mirror symmetry breaking. Such a spectrometer will have the capability to handle very high event rates while still maintaining a large acceptance in the forward region.

  14. Detector development for Jefferson Lab's 12GeV Upgrade

    DOE PAGES

    Qiang, Yi

    2015-05-01

    Jefferson Lab will soon finish its highly anticipated 12 GeV Upgrade. With doubled maximum energy, Jefferson Lab’s Continuous Electron Beam Accelerator Facility (CEBAF) will enable a new experimental program with substantial discovery potential, addressing important topics in nuclear, hadronic and electroweak physics. In order to take full advantage of the high energy, high luminosity beam, new detectors are being developed, designed and constructed to fit the needs of different physics topics. The paper will give an overview of various new detector technologies to be used for 12 GeV experiments. It will then focus on the development of two solenoid-based spectrometers,more » the GlueX and SoLID spectrometers. The GlueX experiment in Hall D will study the complex properties of gluons through exotic hybrid meson spectroscopy. The GlueX spectrometer, a hermetic detector package designed for spectroscopy and the associated partial wave analysis, is currently in the final stage of construction. Hall A, on the other hand, is developing the SoLID spectrometer to capture the 3D image of the nucleon from semi-inclusive processes and to study the intrinsic properties of quarks through mirror symmetry breaking. Such a spectrometer will have the capability to handle very high event rates while still maintaining a large acceptance in the forward region.« less

  15. Optical fiber interferometric spectrometer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Yong; Li, Baosheng; Liu, Yan; Zhai, Yufeng; Wang, An

    2006-02-01

    We design an optical fiber spectrometer based on optical fiber Mach-Zehnder interferometer. In optical fiber Fourier transform spectrometer spectra information is obtained by Fourier transform of interferogram, which recording intensity change vs. optical path difference. Optical path difference is generated by stretching one fiber arm which wound around fiber stretch drive by high power supply. Information from detector is linear with time rather than with optical path difference. In order to obtain high accuracy wavenumber, reference beam is used to control the optical path difference. Optical path difference is measured by reference laser interference fringe. Interferogram vs. optical path difference is resampled by Brault algorithm with information from reference beam and test beam. In the same condition, one-sided interferogram has higher resolution than that of two-sided interferogram. For one-sided interferogram, zero path difference position must be determined as accurately as possible, small shift will result in phase error. For practical experiment in laboratory, position shift is inevitable, so phase error correction must be considered. Zero order fringe is determined by curve fitting. Spectrum of light source is obtained from one-sided interferogram by Fourier cosine transform. A spectral resolution of about ~3.1 cm -1 is achieved. In practice, higher resolution is needed. This compact equipment will be used in emission spectra and absorption spectra, especially in infrared region.

  16. Resonant ultrasound spectrometer

    DOEpatents

    Migliori, Albert; Visscher, William M.; Fisk, Zachary

    1990-01-01

    An ultrasound resonant spectrometer determines the resonant frequency spectrum of a rectangular parallelepiped sample of a high dissipation material over an expected resonant response frequency range. A sample holder structure grips corners of the sample between piezoelectric drive and receive transducers. Each transducer is mounted on a membrane for only weakly coupling the transducer to the holder structure and operatively contacts a material effective to remove system resonant responses at the transducer from the expected response range. i.e., either a material such as diamond to move the response frequencies above the range or a damping powder to preclude response within the range. A square-law detector amplifier receives the response signal and retransmits the signal on an isolated shield of connecting cabling to remove cabling capacitive effects. The amplifier also provides a substantially frequency independently voltage divider with the receive transducer. The spectrometer is extremely sensitive to enable low amplitude resonance to be detected for use in calculating the elastic constants of the high dissipation sample.

  17. ISS Update: Alpha Magnetic Spectrometer

    NASA Video Gallery

    NASA Public Affairs Officer Kelly Humphries interviews Trent Martin, Johnson Space Center project manager for the Alpha Magnetic Spectrometer (AMS) aboard the International Space Station. Questions...

  18. Photo ion spectrometer

    DOEpatents

    Gruen, D.M.; Young, C.E.; Pellin, M.J.

    1989-12-26

    A charged particle spectrometer is described for performing ultrasensitive quantitative analysis of selected atomic components removed from a sample. Significant improvements in performing energy and angular refocusing spectroscopy are accomplished by means of a two dimensional structure for generating predetermined electromagnetic field boundary conditions. Both resonance and non-resonance ionization of selected neutral atomic components allow accumulation of increased chemical information. A multiplexed operation between a SIMS mode and a neutral atomic component ionization mode with EARTOF analysis enables comparison of chemical information from secondary ions and neutral atomic components removed from the sample. An electronic system is described for switching high level signals, such as SIMS signals, directly to a transient recorder and through a charge amplifier to the transient recorder for a low level signal pulse counting mode, such as for a neutral atomic component ionization mode. 12 figs.

  19. Optical fiber smartphone spectrometer.

    PubMed

    Hossain, Md Arafat; Canning, John; Cook, Kevin; Jamalipour, Abbas

    2016-05-15

    An optical fiber-based smartphone spectrometer incorporating an endoscopic fiber bundle is demonstrated. The endoscope allows transmission of the smartphone camera LED light to a sample, removing complications from varying background illumination. The reflected spectra collected from a surface or interface is dispersed onto the camera CMOS using a reflecting diffraction grating. A spectral resolution as low as δλ∼2.0  nm over a bandwidth of Δλ∼250  nm is obtained using a slit width, ωslit=0.7  mm. The instrument has vast potential in a number of industrial applications including agricultural produce analysis. Spectral analysis of apples shows straightforward measurement of the pigments anthocyanins, carotenoid, and chlorophyll, all of which decrease with increasing storage time. PMID:27176971

  20. Photo ion spectrometer

    DOEpatents

    Gruen, Dieter M.; Young, Charles E.; Pellin, Michael J.

    1989-01-01

    A charged particle spectrometer for performing ultrasensitive quantitative analysis of selected atomic components removed from a sample. Significant improvements in performing energy and angular refocusing spectroscopy are accomplished by means of a two dimensional structure for generating predetermined electromagnetic field boundary conditions. Both resonance and non-resonance ionization of selected neutral atomic components allow accumulation of increased chemical information. A multiplexed operation between a SIMS mode and a neutral atomic component ionization mode with EARTOF analysis enables comparison of chemical information from secondary ions and neutral atomic components removed from the sample. An electronic system is described for switching high level signals, such as SIMS signals, directly to a transient recorder and through a charge amplifier to the transient recorder for a low level signal pulse counting mode, such as for a neutral atomic component ionization mode.

  1. Coastal Research Imaging Spectrometer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lucey, Paul G.; Williams, Timothy; Horton, Keith A.

    2002-01-01

    The Coastal Research Imaging Spectrometer (CRIS) is an airborne remote-sensing system designed specifically for research on the physical, chemical, and biological characteristics of coastal waters. The CRIS includes a visible-light hyperspectral imaging subsystem for measuring the color of water, which contains information on the biota, sediment, and nutrient contents of the water. The CRIS also includes an infrared imaging subsystem, which provides information on the temperature of the water. The combination of measurements enables investigation of biological effects of both natural and artificial flows of water from land into the ocean, including diffuse and point-source flows that may contain biological and/or chemical pollutants. Temperature is an important element of such measurements because temperature contrasts can often be used to distinguish among flows from different sources: for example, a sewage outflow could manifest itself in spectral images as a local high-temperature anomaly.

  2. Lunar orbital mass spectrometer experiment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lord, W. P.

    1971-01-01

    The design, development, manufacture, test and calibration of five lunar orbital mass spectrometers with the four associated ground support equipment test sets are discussed. A mass spectrometer was installed in the Apollo 15 and one in the Apollo 16 Scientific Instrument Module within the Service Module. The Apollo 15 mass spectrometer was operated with collection of 38 hours of mass spectra data during lunar orbit and 50 hours of data were collected during transearth coast. The Apollo 16 mass spectrometer was operated with collection of 76 hours of mass spectra data during lunar orbit. However, the Apollo 16 mass spectrometer was ejected into lunar orbit upon malfunction of spacecraft boom system just prior to transearth insection and no transearth coast data was possible.

  3. Analysis and implementation of a space resolving spherical crystal spectrometer for x-ray Thomson scattering experiments

    SciTech Connect

    Harding, E. C.; Ao, T.; Bailey, J. E.; Loisel, G.; Sinars, D. B.; Geissel, M.; Rochau, G. A.; Smith, I. C.

    2015-04-15

    The application of a space-resolving spectrometer to X-ray Thomson Scattering (XRTS) experiments has the potential to advance the study of warm dense matter. This has motivated the design of a spherical crystal spectrometer, which is a doubly focusing geometry with an overall high sensitivity and the capability of providing high-resolution, space-resolved spectra. A detailed analysis of the image fluence and crystal throughput in this geometry is carried out and analytical estimates of these quantities are presented. This analysis informed the design of a new spectrometer intended for future XRTS experiments on the Z-machine. The new spectrometer collects 6 keV x-rays with a spherically bent Ge (422) crystal and focuses the collected x-rays onto the Rowland circle. The spectrometer was built and then tested with a foam target. The resulting high-quality spectra prove that a spherical spectrometer is a viable diagnostic for XRTS experiments.

  4. Analysis and implementation of a space resolving spherical crystal spectrometer for x-ray Thomson scattering experiments.

    PubMed

    Harding, E C; Ao, T; Bailey, J E; Loisel, G; Sinars, D B; Geissel, M; Rochau, G A; Smith, I C

    2015-04-01

    The application of a space-resolving spectrometer to X-ray Thomson Scattering (XRTS) experiments has the potential to advance the study of warm dense matter. This has motivated the design of a spherical crystal spectrometer, which is a doubly focusing geometry with an overall high sensitivity and the capability of providing high-resolution, space-resolved spectra. A detailed analysis of the image fluence and crystal throughput in this geometry is carried out and analytical estimates of these quantities are presented. This analysis informed the design of a new spectrometer intended for future XRTS experiments on the Z-machine. The new spectrometer collects 6 keV x-rays with a spherically bent Ge (422) crystal and focuses the collected x-rays onto the Rowland circle. The spectrometer was built and then tested with a foam target. The resulting high-quality spectra prove that a spherical spectrometer is a viable diagnostic for XRTS experiments.

  5. Analysis and implementation of a space resolving spherical crystal spectrometer for x-ray Thomson scattering experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Harding, E. C.; Ao, T.; Bailey, J. E.; Loisel, G.; Sinars, D. B.; Geissel, M.; Rochau, G. A.; Smith, I. C.

    2015-04-01

    The application of a space-resolving spectrometer to X-ray Thomson Scattering (XRTS) experiments has the potential to advance the study of warm dense matter. This has motivated the design of a spherical crystal spectrometer, which is a doubly focusing geometry with an overall high sensitivity and the capability of providing high-resolution, space-resolved spectra. A detailed analysis of the image fluence and crystal throughput in this geometry is carried out and analytical estimates of these quantities are presented. This analysis informed the design of a new spectrometer intended for future XRTS experiments on the Z-machine. The new spectrometer collects 6 keV x-rays with a spherically bent Ge (422) crystal and focuses the collected x-rays onto the Rowland circle. The spectrometer was built and then tested with a foam target. The resulting high-quality spectra prove that a spherical spectrometer is a viable diagnostic for XRTS experiments.

  6. Strangelet search in S-W collisons at 200 {A·GeV}/{c}

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Appelquist, G.; Baglin, C.; Bohm, C.; Borer, K.; Bussière, A.; Elsener, K.; Dittus, F.; Frei, D.; Guillaud, J. P.; Hovander, B.; Klingenberg, R.; Lohmann, K. D.; Hugentobler, E.; Moser, U.; Pretzl, K.; Schacher, J.; Selldèn, B.; Stoffel, F.; Volken, W.; Zhang, Q. P.

    1994-01-01

    We have searched for new massive particles with a low charge to mass ratio in S -W collisions at a beam momentum of 200 {GeV}/{c} per nucleon. Upper limits for the production of strangelets with a mass to charge ratio up to 60 {GeV}/{c 2} at rigidities of ± 150 GV are reported. This study was done with a test setup using as a spectrometer the H 6-beamline in the north area at CERN.

  7. A Liquid-Cryogen-Free Superconducting Tunnel Junction X-ray Spectrometer for Astrobiology Research at the Synchrotron

    SciTech Connect

    Friedrich, S; Drury, O B; Hertrich, T; Hoehne, J

    2008-06-15

    Superconducting tunnel junctions (STJs) are being developed as energy-dispersive soft X-ray detectors, because they combine the high energy resolution of low-temperature detectors with the comparably high count rates of non-thermal devices. We have built a 36-pixel spectrometer based on 200 {micro}m x 200 {micro}m Nb-Al-AlOx-Al-Nb STJs. It offers an energy resolution of {approx}10 to 20 eV FWHM in the soft X-ray band below 1 keV, a solid angle coverage {Omega}/4{pi} {approx} 10{sup -3}, and can be operated at total rates up to {approx}10{sup 6} counts/s. For STJ operation by non-expert users, we have built a liquid-cryogen-free spectrometer with a mechanical pulse-tube cryocooler and a two-stage adiabatic demagnetization refrigerator. It is fully automated for cooldown to a base temperature of <30 mK in 15 hours, and has a hold time of >3 days between demagnetization cycles for STJ operation at 0.3 K. The STJ spectrometers are used for speciation measurements on dilute samples by fluorescence-detected X-ray absorption spectroscopy, and can achieve sensitivities below 100 ppm. We discuss the spectrometer performance in representative applications on metals in meteorites in the context of geological signatures of biological activity.

  8. A seven-crystal Johann-type hard x-ray spectrometer at the Stanford Synchrotron Radiation Lightsource

    SciTech Connect

    Sokaras, D.; Weng, T.-C.; Nordlund, D.; Velikov, P.; Wenger, D.; Garachtchenko, A.; George, M.; Borzenets, V.; Johnson, B.; Rabedeau, T.; Alonso-Mori, R.; Bergmann, U.

    2013-05-15

    We present a multicrystal Johann-type hard x-ray spectrometer ({approx}5-18 keV) recently developed, installed, and operated at the Stanford Synchrotron Radiation Lightsource. The instrument is set at the wiggler beamline 6-2 equipped with two liquid nitrogen cooled monochromators - Si(111) and Si(311) - as well as collimating and focusing optics. The spectrometer consists of seven spherically bent crystal analyzers placed on intersecting vertical Rowland circles of 1 m of diameter. The spectrometer is scanned vertically capturing an extended backscattering Bragg angular range (88 Degree-Sign -74 Degree-Sign ) while maintaining all crystals on the Rowland circle trace. The instrument operates in atmospheric pressure by means of a helium bag and when all the seven crystals are used (100 mm of projected diameter each), has a solid angle of about 0.45% of 4{pi} sr. The typical resolving power is in the order of (E/{Delta}E){approx}10 000. The spectrometer's high detection efficiency combined with the beamline 6-2 characteristics permits routine studies of x-ray emission, high energy resolution fluorescence detected x-ray absorption and resonant inelastic x-ray scattering of very diluted samples as well as implementation of demanding in situ environments.

  9. VEGAS: VErsatile GBT Astronomical Spectrometer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bussa, Srikanth; VEGAS Development Team

    2012-01-01

    The National Science Foundation Advanced Technologies and Instrumentation (NSF-ATI) program is funding a new spectrometer backend for the Green Bank Telescope (GBT). This spectrometer is being built by the CICADA collaboration - collaboration between the National Radio Astronomy Observatory (NRAO) and the Center for Astronomy Signal Processing and Electronics Research (CASPER) at the University of California Berkeley.The backend is named as VErsatile GBT Astronomical Spectrometer (VEGAS) and will replace the capabilities of the existing spectrometers. This backend supports data processing from focal plane array systems. The spectrometer will be capable of processing up to 1.25 GHz bandwidth from 8 dual polarized beams or a bandwidth up to 10 GHz from a dual polarized beam.The spectrometer will be using 8-bit analog to digital converters (ADC), which gives a better dynamic range than existing GBT spectrometers. There will be 8 tunable digital sub-bands within the 1.25 GHz bandwidth, which will enhance the capability of simultaneous observation of multiple spectral transitions. The maximum spectral dump rate to disk will be about 0.5 msec. The vastly enhanced backend capabilities will support several science projects with the GBT. The projects include mapping temperature and density structure of molecular clouds; searches for organic molecules in the interstellar medium; determination of the fundamental constants of our evolving Universe; red-shifted spectral features from galaxies across cosmic time and survey for pulsars in the extreme gravitational environment of the Galactic Center.

  10. Photo ion spectrometer

    DOEpatents

    Gruen, D.M.; Young, C.E.; Pellin, M.J.

    1989-08-08

    A method and apparatus are described for extracting for quantitative analysis ions of selected atomic components of a sample. A lens system is configured to provide a slowly diminishing field region for a volume containing the selected atomic components, enabling accurate energy analysis of ions generated in the slowly diminishing field region. The lens system also enables focusing on a sample of a charged particle beam, such as an ion beam, along a path length perpendicular to the sample and extraction of the charged particles along a path length also perpendicular to the sample. Improvement of signal to noise ratio is achieved by laser excitation of ions to selected auto-ionization states before carrying out quantitative analysis. Accurate energy analysis of energetic charged particles is assured by using a preselected resistive thick film configuration disposed on an insulator substrate for generating predetermined electric field boundary conditions to achieve for analysis the required electric field potential. The spectrometer also is applicable in the fields of SIMS, ISS and electron spectroscopy. 8 figs.

  11. The OPERA muon spectrometers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Garfagnini, A.; Bergnoli, A.; Brugnera, R.; Carrara, E.; Ciesielski, R.; Dal Corso, F.; Dusini, S.; Fanin, C.; Longhin, A.; Stanco, L.; Cazes, A.; Cecchetti, A.; Di Troia, C.; Dulach, B.; Felici, G.; Mengucci, A.; Orecchini, D.; Paoloni, A.; Spinetti, M.; Terranova, F.; Ventura, M.; Votano, L.; Candela, A.; D'Incecco, M.; Gustavino, C.; Lindozzi, M.

    2007-03-01

    The OPERA experiment will study νμ to ντ oscillations through τ appearance on the 732 km long CERN to Gran Sasso baseline. The magnet yokes of the two muon spectrometers are instrumented with 48 planes of high resistivity bakelite Resistive Plate Chambers (RPC) operated in streamer mode. Each plane covers about 70 m2. A general introduction to the system installation and commissioning will be given. Four RPC planes were instrumented and the first tests were performed confirming a good behavior of the installed RPCs in terms of intrinsic noise and operating currents. The measured noise maps agree with those obtained in the extensive quality test performed at surface. Counting rates are below 20 Hz/m2. Single and multiple cosmic muon tracks were also reconstructed. The estimated efficiency is close to the geometrical limit and the very first measurements of the absolute and differential muon flux are in agreement with the expectations. Finally, a description of the readout electronics and of the slow control system is given.

  12. Mesospheric aerosol sampling spectrometer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Knappmiller, Scott; Robertson, Scott; Sternovsky, Zoltan; Horanyi, Mihaly; Kohnert, Rick

    . The Mesospheric Aerosol Sampling Spectrometer (MASS) instrument has been launched on two sounding rockets in August, 2007 from Andoya, Norway to detect charged sub-visible aerosol particles in the polar mesosphere. The MASS instrument is designed to collect charged aerosols, cluster ions, and electrons on four pairs of graphite electrodes, three of which are biased with increasing voltage. The design of the MASS instrument was complicated by the short mean free path in the mesosphere. The opening to MASS was deliberately built to increase the mean free path and to reduce the shock wave within the instrument. The design procedure began with aerodynamics simulations of the flow through the instrument using Direct Simulation Monte Carlo (DSMC) in 3-D. The electric fields within the instrument were calculated using a Laplace solver in 3-D. With the aerodynamic and electric field simulations completed, an algorithm was created to find the trajectories of charged aerosols including collisions within MASS. Using this algorithm the collection efficiencies for each electrode was calculated as a function of the charge to mass ratio of the incoming particle. The simulation results have been confirmed experimentally using an Argon RF ion beam. The data from the August launches have been analyzed and the initial results show the MASS instrument operated as expected. Additional studies are underway to determine if there were effects from payload charging or spurious charge generation within the instrument. This project is supported by NASA.

  13. Neutron range spectrometer

    DOEpatents

    Manglos, Stephen H.

    1989-06-06

    A neutron range spectrometer and method for determining the neutron energy spectrum of a neutron emitting source are disclosed. Neutrons from the source are collimnated along a collimation axis and a position sensitive neutron counter is disposed in the path of the collimated neutron beam. The counter determines positions along the collimation axis of interactions between the neutrons in the neutron beam and a neutron-absorbing material in the counter. From the interaction positions, a computer analyzes the data and determines the neutron energy spectrum of the neutron beam. The counter is preferably shielded and a suitable neutron-absorbing material is He-3. The computer solves the following equation in the analysis: ##EQU1## where: N(x).DELTA.x=the number of neutron interactions measured between a position x and x+.DELTA.x, A.sub.i (E.sub.i).DELTA.E.sub.i =the number of incident neutrons with energy between E.sub.i and E.sub.i +.DELTA.E.sub.i, and C=C(E.sub.i)=N .sigma.(E.sub.i) where N=the number density of absorbing atoms in the position sensitive counter means and .sigma. (E.sub.i)=the average cross section of the absorbing interaction between E.sub.i and E.sub.i +.DELTA.E.sub.i.

  14. Photo ion spectrometer

    DOEpatents

    Gruen, Dieter M.; Young, Charles E.; Pellin, Michael J.

    1989-01-01

    A method and apparatus for extracting for quantitative analysis ions of selected atomic components of a sample. A lens system is configured to provide a slowly diminishing field region for a volume containing the selected atomic components, enabling accurate energy analysis of ions generated in the slowly diminishing field region. The lens system also enables focusing on a sample of a charged particle beam, such as an ion beam, along a path length perpendicular to the sample and extraction of the charged particles along a path length also perpendicular to the sample. Improvement of signal to noise ratio is achieved by laser excitation of ions to selected autoionization states before carrying out quantitative analysis. Accurate energy analysis of energetic charged particles is assured by using a preselected resistive thick film configuration disposed on an insulator substrate for generating predetermined electric field boundary conditions to achieve for analysis the required electric field potential. The spectrometer also is applicable in the fields of SIMS, ISS and electron spectroscopy.

  15. Aerosol mobility size spectrometer

    DOEpatents

    Wang, Jian; Kulkarni, Pramod

    2007-11-20

    A device for measuring aerosol size distribution within a sample containing aerosol particles. The device generally includes a spectrometer housing defining an interior chamber and a camera for recording aerosol size streams exiting the chamber. The housing includes an inlet for introducing a flow medium into the chamber in a flow direction, an aerosol injection port adjacent the inlet for introducing a charged aerosol sample into the chamber, a separation section for applying an electric field to the aerosol sample across the flow direction and an outlet opposite the inlet. In the separation section, the aerosol sample becomes entrained in the flow medium and the aerosol particles within the aerosol sample are separated by size into a plurality of aerosol flow streams under the influence of the electric field. The camera is disposed adjacent the housing outlet for optically detecting a relative position of at least one aerosol flow stream exiting the outlet and for optically detecting the number of aerosol particles within the at least one aerosol flow stream.

  16. Method for calibrating mass spectrometers

    DOEpatents

    Anderson, Gordon A [Benton City, WA; Brands, Michael D [Richland, WA; Bruce, James E [Schwenksville, PA; Pasa-Tolic, Ljiljana [Richland, WA; Smith, Richard D [Richland, WA

    2002-12-24

    A method whereby a mass spectra generated by a mass spectrometer is calibrated by shifting the parameters used by the spectrometer to assign masses to the spectra in a manner which reconciles the signal of ions within the spectra having equal mass but differing charge states, or by reconciling ions having known differences in mass to relative values consistent with those known differences. In this manner, the mass spectrometer is calibrated without the need for standards while allowing the generation of a highly accurate mass spectra by the instrument.

  17. Multiple order common path spectrometer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Newbury, Amy B. (Inventor)

    2010-01-01

    The present invention relates to a dispersive spectrometer. The spectrometer allows detection of multiple orders of light on a single focal plane array by splitting the orders spatially using a dichroic assembly. A conventional dispersion mechanism such as a defraction grating disperses the light spectrally. As a result, multiple wavelength orders can be imaged on a single focal plane array of limited spectral extent, doubling (or more) the number of spectral channels as compared to a conventional spectrometer. In addition, this is achieved in a common path device.

  18. Gamma ray spectrometer for ITER

    SciTech Connect

    Gin, D.; Chugunov, I.; Shevelev, A.; Khilkevitch, E.; Doinikov, D.; Naidenov, V.; Pasternak, A.; Polunovsky, I.; Kiptily, V.

    2014-08-21

    Gamma diagnostics is considered to be primary for the confined α-particles and runaway electrons measurements on ITER. The gamma spectrometer will be embedded into a neutron dump of the ITER Neutral Particle Analyzer diagnostic complex. It will supplement NPA measurements on the fuel isotope ratio and confined alphas/fast ions. In this paper an update on ITER gamma spectrometer developments is given. A new geometry of the system is described and detailed analysis of expected signals for the spectrometer is presented.

  19. New results from the LASS (Large Aperture Superconducting Solenoid) spectrometer

    SciTech Connect

    Aston, D.; Awaji, N.; Bienz, T.; Bird, F.; D'Amore, J.; Dunwoodie, W.; Endorf, R.; Fujii, K.; Hayashii, H.; Iwata, S.

    1987-06-22

    New results are presented from analyses of several mesonic and baryonic states containing one or more strange quarks. The data are taken from a high statistics (4 events/nb) study of K p interactions at 11 GeV/c carried out in the LASS Spectrometer at SLAC. New information is reported on the underlying K* states and also evidence for selective coupling of K eta to the K*'s; on the strangeonium members of the axial vector nonets in the K anti K channel; and on evidence for an * state.

  20. Germanium-gated γ-γ fast timing of excited states in fission fragments using the EXILL&FATIMA spectrometer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Régis, J.-M.; Simpson, G. S.; Blanc, A.; de France, G.; Jentschel, M.; Köster, U.; Mutti, P.; Paziy, V.; Saed-Samii, N.; Soldner, T.; Ur, C. A.; Urban, W.; Bruce, A. M.; Drouet, F.; Fraile, L. M.; Ilieva, S.; Jolie, J.; Korten, W.; Kröll, T.; Lalkovski, S.; Mach, H.; Mărginean, N.; Pascovici, G.; Podolyak, Zs.; Regan, P. H.; Roberts, O. J.; Smith, J. F.; Townsley, C.; Vancraeyenest, A.; Warr, N.

    2014-11-01

    A high-granularity mixed spectrometer consisting of high-resolution Ge and very fast LaBr3(Ce)-scintillator detectors has been installed around a fission target at the cold-neutron guide PF1B of the high-flux reactor of the Institut Laue-Langevin. Lifetimes of excited states in the range of 10 ps to 10 ns can be measured in around 100 exotic neutron-rich fission fragments using Ge-gated LaBr3(Ce)-LaBr3(Ce) or Ge-Ge-LaBr3(Ce)-LaBr3(Ce) coincidences. We report on various characteristics of the EXILL&FATIMA spectrometer for the energy range of 40 keV up to 6.8 MeV and present results of ps-lifetime test measurements in a fission fragment. The results are discussed with respect to possible systematic errors induced by background contributions.

  1. The characteristics of a low background germanium gamma ray spectrometer at China JinPing Underground Laboratory.

    PubMed

    Zeng, Zhi; Mi, Yuhao; Ma, Hao; Cheng, Jianping; Su, Jian; Yue, Qian

    2014-09-01

    A low background germanium gamma ray spectrometer, GeTHU, has been installed at China JinPing Underground Laboratory (CJPL). The integral background count rate of the spectrometer was 0.629 cpm between 40 and 2700 keV, the origins of which were studied by Monte Carlo simulation. Detection limits and efficiencies were calculated for selected gamma peaks. Some samples of rare event experiments were measured and (137)Cs contamination was found in boric acid. GeTHU will be mainly used to measure environmental samples and screen materials in dark matter and double beta decay experiments. PMID:24950199

  2. Coastal Research Imaging Spectrometer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2002-01-01

    The Coastal Research Imaging Spectrometer (CRIS) is an airborne remote-sensing system designed specifically for research on the physical, chemical, and biological characteristics of coastal waters. The CRIS includes a visible-light hyperspectral imaging subsystem for measuring the color of water, which contains information on the biota, sediment, and nutrient contents of the water. The CRIS also includes an infrared imaging subsystem, which provides information on the temperature of the water. The combination of measurements enables investigation of biological effects of both natural and artificial flows of water from land into the ocean, including diffuse and point-source flows that may contain biological and/or chemical pollutants. Temperature is an important element of such measurements because temperature contrasts can often be used to distinguish among flows from different sources: for example, a sewage outflow could manifest itself in spectral images as a local high-temperature anomaly.anomaly. Both the visible and infrared subsystems scan in "pushbroom" mode: that is, an aircraft carrying the system moves along a ground track, the system is aimed downward, and image data are acquired in acrosstrack linear arrays of pixels. Both subsystems operate at a frame rate of 30 Hz. The infrared and visible-light optics are adjusted so that both subsystems are aimed at the same moving swath, which has across-track angular width of 15. Data from the infrared and visible imaging subsystems are stored in the same file along with aircraft-position data acquired by a Global Positioning System receiver. The combination of the three sets of data is used to construct infrared and hyperspectral maps of scanned areas shown.

  3. Alpha Magnetic Spectrometer (AMS) Overview

    NASA Video Gallery

    The Alpha Magnetic Spectrometer (AMS) is flying to the station on STS-134. The AMS experiment is a state-of-the-art particle physics detector being operated by an international team composed of 60 ...

  4. The GRAVITY spectrometers: optical qualification

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yazici, Senol; Straubmeier, Christian; Wiest, Michael; Wank, Imke; Fischer, Sebastian; Horrobin, Matthew; Eisenhauer, Frank; Perrin, Guy; Perraut, Karine; Brandner, Wolfgang; Amorim, Antonio; Schöller, Markus; Eckart, Andreas

    2014-07-01

    GRAVITY1 is a 2nd generation Very Large Telescope Interferometer (VLTI) operated in the astronomical K-band. In the Beam Combiner Instrument2 (BCI) four Fiber Couplers3 (FC) will feed the light coming from each telescope into two fibers, a reference channel for the fringe tracking spectrometer4 (FT) and a science channel for the science spectrometer4 (SC). The differential Optical Path Difference (dOPD) between the two channels will be corrected using a novel metrology concept.5 The metrology laser will keep control of the dOPD of the two channels. It is injected into the spectrometers and detected at the telescope level. Piezo-actuated fiber stretchers correct the dOPD accordingly. Fiber-fed Integrated Optics6 (IO) combine coherently the light of all six baselines and feed both spectrometers. Assisted by Infrared Wavefront Sensors7 (IWS) at each Unit Telescope (UT) and correcting the path difference between the channels with an accuracy of up to 5 nm, GRAVITY will push the limits of astrometrical accuracy to the order of 10 μas and provide phase-referenced interferometric imaging with a resolution of 4 mas. The University of Cologne developed, constructed and tested both spectrometers of the camera system. Both units are designed for the near infrared (1.95 - 2.45 μm) and are operated in a cryogenic environment. The Fringe Tracker is optimized for highest transmission with fixed spectral resolution (R = 22) realized by a double-prism.8 The Science spectrometer is more diverse and allows to choose from three different spectral resolutions8 (R = [22, 500, 4000]), where the lowest resolution is achieved with a prism and the higher resolutions are realized with grisms. A Wollaston prism in each spectrometer allows for polarimetric splitting of the light. The goal for the spectrometers is to concentrate at least 90% of the ux in 2 × 2 pixel (36 × 36 μm2) for the Science channel and in 1 pixel (24 × 24 μm) in the Fringe Tracking channel. In Section 1, we present

  5. Preliminary Analysis of the Multisphere Neutron Spectrometer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Goldhagen, P.; Kniss, T.; Wilson, J. W.; Singleterry, R. C.; Jones, I. W.; VanSteveninck, W.

    2003-01-01

    Crews working on present-day jet aircraft are a large occupationally exposed group with a relatively high average effective dose from galactic cosmic radiation. Crews of future high-speed commercial aircraft flying at higher altitudes would be even more exposed. To help reduce the significant uncertainties in calculations of such exposures, the Atmospheric Ionizing Radiation (AIR) Project, an international collaboration of 15 laboratories, made simultaneous radiation measurements with 14 instruments on five flights of a NASA ER-2 high-altitude aircraft. The primary AIR instrument was a highly sensitive extended-energy multisphere neutron spectrometer with lead and steel shells placed within the moderators of two of its 14 detectors to enhance response at high energies. Detector responses were calculated for neutrons and charged hadrons at energies up to 100 GeV using MCNPX. Neutron spectra were unfolded from the measured count rates using the new MAXED code. We have measured the cosmic-ray neutron spectrum (thermal to greater than 10 GeV), total neutron fluence rate, and neutron effective dose and dose equivalent rates and their dependence on altitude and geomagnetic cutoff. The measured cosmic-ray neutron spectra have almost no thermal neutrons, a large "evaporation" peak near 1 MeV and a second broad peak near 100 MeV which contributes about 69% of the neutron effective dose. At high altitude, geomagnetic latitude has very little effect on the shape of the spectrum, but it is the dominant variable affecting neutron fluence rate, which was 8 times higher at the northernmost measurement location than it was at the southernmost. The shape of the spectrum varied only slightly with altitude from 21 km down to 12 km (56 - 201 grams per square centimeter atmospheric depth), but was significantly different on the ground. In all cases, ambient dose equivalent was greater than effective dose for cosmic-ray neutrons.

  6. Physics with CLAS at Energies up to 12 GeV

    SciTech Connect

    Volker D. Burkert

    1998-06-01

    An energy increase of CEBAF into the 8-12 GeV range will benefit the physics program with CLAS in at least three areas: first, it increases the accessible range in four-momentum transfer for the study of exclusive reactions and form factor measurements to Q{sup 2} = 6 -10 GeV{sup 2}. Second, it extends the phase space available for the production of heavy mesons with masses greater than 1.5 GeV, and for total hadronic masses W < 4 GeV. Third, it will allow to fully reach the deep inelastic regime, with momentum and energy transfers needed for the study of transitions into the regime where pQCD may be applicable for inclusive as well as specific exclusive processes. The boundaries of the physics program are defined by the capabilities of the CLAS detector. These include: large acceptance (but not 4{pi}); high luminosity at large acceptance; detection of several (but not many) hadrons in the final state; hadron detection out-of-plane; and operation of polarized solid state targets for electrons (NH2, ND3) and photons (HD). For the following discussion we assumed that CLAS will be upgraded in several important aspects: full coverage for the charged particle tracking (without magnetic analysis) and the detection of high energy photons; extension of scattering angle coverage down to angles of about 5 degrees; extend particle identification, especially kaon/pion separation from 2 to 5 GeV/c; and implement photon tagging capabilities at high energies, which one currently limited to 6 GeV electron beam energies.

  7. Photoluminescence and electroluminescence from Ge/strained GeSn/Ge quantum wells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lin, Chung-Yi; Huang, Chih-Hsiung; Huang, Shih-Hsien; Chang, Chih-Chiang; Liu, C. W.; Huang, Yi-Chiau; Chung, Hua; Chang, Chorng-Ping

    2016-08-01

    Ge/strained GeSn/Ge quantum wells are grown on a 300 mm Si substrate by chemical vapor deposition. The direct bandgap emission from strained GeSn is observed in the photoluminescence spectra and is enhanced by Al2O3/SiO2 passivation due to the field effect. The electroluminescence of the direct bandgap emission of strained GeSn is also observed from the Ni/Al2O3/GeSn metal-insulator-semiconductor tunneling diodes. Electroluminescence is a good indicator of GeSn material quality, since defects in GeSn layers degrade the electroluminescence intensity significantly. At the accumulation bias, the holes in the Ni gate electrode tunnel to the strained n-type GeSn layer through the ultrathin Al2O3 and recombine radiatively with electrons. The emission wavelength of photoluminescence and electroluminescence can be tuned by the Sn content.

  8. Coastal Research Imaging Spectrometer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lucey, Paul G.; Williams, Timothy; Horton, Keith A.

    2004-01-01

    The Coastal Research Imaging Spectrometer (CRIS) is an airborne remote sensing system designed specifically for research on the physical, chemical, and biological characteristics of coastal waters. The CRIS includes a visible-light hyperspectral imaging subsystem for measuring the color of water, which contains information on the biota, sediment, and nutrient contents of the water. The CRIS also includes an infrared imaging subsystem, which provides information on the temperature of the water. The combination of measurements enables investigation of biological effects of both natural and artificial flows of water from land into the ocean, including diffuse and point-source flows that may contain biological and/or chemical pollutants. Temperature is an important element of such measurements because temperature contrasts can often be used to distinguish among flows from different sources: for example, a sewage outflow could manifest itself in spectral images as a local high-temperature anomaly. Both the visible and infrared subsystems scan in pushbroom mode: that is, an aircraft carrying the system moves along a ground track, the system is aimed downward, and image data are acquired in across-track linear arrays of pixels. Both subsystems operate at a frame rate of 30 Hz. The infrared and visible-light optics are adjusted so that both subsystems are aimed at the same moving swath, which has across-track angular width of 15 . Data from the infrared and visible imaging subsystems are stored in the same file along with aircraft- position data acquired by a Global Positioning System receiver. The combination of the three sets of data is used to construct infrared and hyperspectral maps of scanned areas (see figure). The visible subsystem is based on a grating spectrograph and a rapid-readout charge-coupled-device camera. Images of the swatch are acquired in 256 spectral bands at wavelengths from 400 to 800 nm. The infrared subsystem, which is sensitive in a single

  9. Resolution-enhanced Mapping Spectrometer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kumer, J. B.; Aubrun, J. N.; Rosenberg, W. J.; Roche, A. E.

    1993-01-01

    A familiar mapping spectrometer implementation utilizes two dimensional detector arrays with spectral dispersion along one direction and spatial along the other. Spectral images are formed by spatially scanning across the scene (i.e., push-broom scanning). For imaging grating and prism spectrometers, the slit is perpendicular to the spatial scan direction. For spectrometers utilizing linearly variable focal-plane-mounted filters the spatial scan direction is perpendicular to the direction of spectral variation. These spectrometers share the common limitation that the number of spectral resolution elements is given by the number of pixels along the spectral (or dispersive) direction. Resolution enhancement by first passing the light input to the spectrometer through a scanned etalon or Michelson is discussed. Thus, while a detector element is scanned through a spatial resolution element of the scene, it is also temporally sampled. The analysis for all the pixels in the dispersive direction is addressed. Several specific examples are discussed. The alternate use of a Michelson for the same enhancement purpose is also discussed. Suitable for weight constrained deep space missions, hardware systems were developed including actuators, sensor, and electronics such that low-resolution etalons with performance required for implementation would weigh less than one pound.

  10. Ultra Compact Imaging Spectrometer (UCIS)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Blaney, Diana L.; Green, Robert; Mouroulis, Pantazis; Cable, Morgan; Ehlmann, Bethany; Haag, Justin; Lamborn, Andrew; McKinley, Ian; Rodriguez, Jose; van Gorp, Byron

    2016-10-01

    The Ultra Compact Imaging Spectrometer (UCIS) is a modular visible to short wavelength infrared imaging spectrometer architecture which could be adapted to a variety of mission concepts requiring low mass and low power. Imaging spectroscopy is an established technique to address complex questions of geologic evolution by mapping diagnostic absorption features due to minerals, organics, and volatiles throughout our solar system. At the core of UCIS is an Offner imaging spectrometer using M3 heritage and a miniature pulse tube cryo-cooler developed under the NASA Maturation of Instruments for Solar System Exploration (MatISSE) program to cool the focal plane array. The TRL 6 integrated spectrometer and cryo-cooler provide a basic imaging spectrometer capability that is used with a variety of fore optics to address lunar, mars, and small body science goals. Potential configurations include: remote sensing from small orbiters and flyby spacecraft; in situ panoramic imaging spectroscopy; and in situ micro-spectroscopy. A micro-spectroscopy front end is being developed using MatISSE funding with integration and testing planned this summer.

  11. A balloon-borne ionization spectrometer with very large aperture for the detection of high energy cosmic rays

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Atallah, K.; Modlinger, A.; Schmidt, W. K. H.; Cleghorn, T. F.

    1975-01-01

    A balloon experiment which was used to determine the chemical composition of very high-energy cosmic rays up to and beyond 100 GeV/nucleon is described. The detector had a geometric factor of 1 sq m sr and a total weight on the balloon of 2100 kg. The apparatus consisted of an ionization spectrometer, spark chambers, and plastic scintillation and Cherenkov counters. It was calibrated at CERN up to 24 GeV/c protons and at DESY up to 7 GeV/c electrons. In October 1972 it was flown successfully on a stratospheric balloon.

  12. Mini ion trap mass spectrometer

    DOEpatents

    Dietrich, D.D.; Keville, R.F.

    1995-09-19

    An ion trap is described which operates in the regime between research ion traps which can detect ions with a mass resolution of better than 1:10{sup 9} and commercial mass spectrometers requiring 10{sup 4} ions with resolutions of a few hundred. The power consumption is kept to a minimum by the use of permanent magnets and a novel electron gun design. By Fourier analyzing the ion cyclotron resonance signals induced in the trap electrodes, a complete mass spectra in a single combined structure can be detected. An attribute of the ion trap mass spectrometer is that overall system size is drastically reduced due to combining a unique electron source and mass analyzer/detector in a single device. This enables portable low power mass spectrometers for the detection of environmental pollutants or illicit substances, as well as sensors for on board diagnostics to monitor engine performance or for active feedback in any process involving exhausting waste products. 10 figs.

  13. Mini ion trap mass spectrometer

    DOEpatents

    Dietrich, Daniel D.; Keville, Robert F.

    1995-01-01

    An ion trap which operates in the regime between research ion traps which can detect ions with a mass resolution of better than 1:10.sup.9 and commercial mass spectrometers requiring 10.sup.4 ions with resolutions of a few hundred. The power consumption is kept to a minimum by the use of permanent magnets and a novel electron gun design. By Fourier analyzing the ion cyclotron resonance signals induced in the trap electrodes, a complete mass spectra in a single combined structure can be detected. An attribute of the ion trap mass spectrometer is that overall system size is drastically reduced due to combining a unique electron source and mass analyzer/detector in a single device. This enables portable low power mass spectrometers for the detection of environmental pollutants or illicit substances, as well as sensors for on board diagnostics to monitor engine performance or for active feedback in any process involving exhausting waste products.

  14. Multichannel Spectrometer of Time Distribution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Akindinova, E. V.; Babenko, A. G.; Vakhtel, V. M.; Evseev, N. A.; Rabotkin, V. A.; Kharitonova, D. D.

    2015-06-01

    For research and control of characteristics of radiation fluxes, radioactive sources in particular, for example, in paper [1], a spectrometer and methods of data measurement and processing based on the multichannel counter of time intervals of accident events appearance (impulses of particle detector) MC-2A (SPC "ASPECT") were created. The spectrometer has four independent channels of registration of time intervals of impulses appearance and correspondent amplitude and spectrometric channels for control along the energy spectra of the operation stationarity of paths of each of the channels from the detector to the amplifier. The registration of alpha-radiation is carried out by the semiconductor detectors with energy resolution of 16-30 keV. Using a spectrometer there have been taken measurements of oscillations of alpha-radiation 239-Pu flux intensity with a subsequent autocorrelative statistical analysis of the time series of readings.

  15. GeV Electron Beams from a Capillary Discharge Guided Laser Plasma Accelerator

    SciTech Connect

    Nakamura, Kei; Gonsalves, Anthony; Panasenko, Dmitriy; Lin, Chen; Toth, Csaba; Geddes, Cameron; Schroeder, Carl; Esarey, Eric; Leemans, Wim

    2010-07-08

    Laser plasma acceleration (LPA) up to 1 GeV has been realized at Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory by using a capillary discharge waveguide. In this paper, the capillary discharge guided LPA system including a broadband single-shot electron spectrometer is described. The spectrometer was designed specifically for LPA experiments and has amomentumacceptance of 0.01 - 1.1 GeV/c with a percent level resolution. Experiments using a 33 mm long, 300 mu m diameter capillary demonstrated the generation of high energy electron beams up to 1 GeV. By de-tuning discharge delay from optimum guiding performance, selftrapping and acceleration were found to be stabilized producing 460 MeV electron beams.

  16. A cometary ion mass spectrometer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shelley, E. G.; Simpson, D. A.

    1984-01-01

    The development of flight suitable analyzer units for that part of the GIOTTO Ion Mass Spectrometer (IMS) experiment designated the High Energy Range Spectrometer (HERS) is discussed. Topics covered include: design of the total ion-optical system for the HERS analyzer; the preparation of the design of analyzing magnet; the evaluation of microchannel plate detectors and associated two-dimensional anode arrays; and the fabrication and evaluation of two flight-suitable units of the complete ion-optical analyzer system including two-dimensional imaging detectors and associated image encoding electronics.

  17. Towed seabed gamma ray spectrometer

    SciTech Connect

    Jones, D.G. )

    1994-08-01

    For more than 50 years, the measurement of radioactivity has been used for onshore geological surveys and in laboratories. The British Geological Survey (BGS) has extended the use of this type of equipment to the marine environment with the development of seabed gamma ray spectrometer systems. The present seabed gamma ray spectrometer, known as the Eel, has been successfully used for sediment and solid rock mapping, mineral exploration, and radioactive pollution studies. The range of applications for the system continues to expand. This paper examines the technological aspects of the Eel and some of the applications for which it has been used.

  18. JPL Fourier transform ultraviolet spectrometer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cageao, R. P.; Friedl, R. R.; Sander, Stanley P.; Yung, Y. L.

    1994-01-01

    The Fourier Transform Ultraviolet Spectrometer (FTUVS) is a new high resolution interferometric spectrometer for multiple-species detection in the UV, visible and near-IR. As an OH sensor, measurements can be carried out by remote sensing (limb emission and column absorption), or in-situ sensing (long-path absorption or laser-induced fluorescence). As a high resolution detector in a high repetition rate (greater than 10 kHz) LIF system, OH fluorescence can be discriminated against non-resonant background emission and laser scatter, permitting (0, 0) excitation.

  19. Portable smartphone optical fibre spectrometer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hossain, Md. Arafat; Canning, John; Cook, Kevin; Jamalipour, Abbas

    2015-09-01

    A low cost, optical fibre based spectrometer has been developed on a smartphone platform for field-portable spectral analysis. Light of visible wavelength is collected using a multimode optical fibre and diffracted by a low cost nanoimprinted diffraction grating. A measurement range over 300 nm span (λ = 400 to 700 nm) is obtained using the smartphone CMOS chip. The spectral resolution is Δλ ~ 0.42 nm/screen pixel. A customized Android application processed the spectra on the same platform and shares with other devices. The results compare well with commercially available spectrometer.

  20. A high-throughput neutron spectrometer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stampfl, Anton; Noakes, Terry; Bartsch, Friedl; Bertinshaw, Joel; Veliscek-Carolan, Jessica; Nateghi, Ebrahim; Raeside, Tyler; Yethiraj, Mohana; Danilkin, Sergey; Kearley, Gordon

    2010-03-01

    A cross-disciplinary high-throughput neutron spectrometer is currently under construction at OPAL, ANSTO's open pool light-water research reactor. The spectrometer is based on the design of a Be-filter spectrometer (FANS) that is operating at the National Institute of Standards research reactor in the USA. The ANSTO filter-spectrometer will be switched in and out with another neutron spectrometer, the triple-axis spectrometer, Taipan. Thus two distinct types of neutron spectrometers will be accessible: one specialised to perform phonon dispersion analysis and the other, the filter-spectrometer, designed specifically to measure vibrational density of states. A summary of the design will be given along with a detailed ray-tracing analysis. Some preliminary results will be presented from the spectrometer.

  1. Spectrometer Optics Calibration for Jefferson Lab g2^p Experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gu, Chao

    2013-04-01

    The proton spin-dependent structure function g2^p in the resonance region has been measured in a recent experiment at Jefferson Lab's Hall A. The goal of this experiment is to determine the g2^p structure function in the Q^2 region of 0.02-0.20 GeV^2 by using a transversely polarized NH3 target. The Hall A High Resolution Spectrometers (HRS) were used to provide an inclusive measurement of scattered electrons at 5.69^o. A pair of septum magnets were used to bend the 5.69^o scatted electrons into the 12.5^o spectrometers. A full optics calibration of the spectrometer is required to extract the kinematic quantities at the interaction vertex. However, the calibration procedure is challenging due to the complications from the strong transverse target field (2.5 T and 5.0 T) and the varied field configurations of the septum magnets. The details of the optics calibration and the progress will be described in this talk.

  2. MICE Spectrometer Magnet System Progress

    SciTech Connect

    Green, Michael A.; Virostek, Steve P.

    2007-08-27

    The first magnets for the muon ionization cooling experimentwill be the tracker solenoids that form the ends of the MICE coolingchannel. The primary purpose of the tracker solenoids is to provide auniform 4 T field (to better than +-0.3 percent over a volume that is 1meter long and 0.3 meters in diameter) spectrometer magnet field for thescintillating fiber detectors that are used to analyze the muons in thechannel before and after ionization cooling. A secondary purpose for thetracker magnet is the matching of the muon beam between the rest of theMICE cooling channel and the uniform field spectrometer magnet. Thetracker solenoid is powered by three 300 amp power supplies. Additionaltuning of the spectrometer is provided by a pair of 50 amp power suppliesacross the spectrometer magnet end coils. The tracker magnet will becooled using a pair of 4 K pulse tube coolers that each provide 1.5 W ofcooling at 4.2 K. Final design and construction of the tracker solenoidsbegan during the summer of 2006. This report describes the progress madeon the construction of the tracker solenoids.

  3. Convex Diffraction Grating Imaging Spectrometer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chrisp, Michael P. (Inventor)

    1999-01-01

    A 1:1 Offner mirror system for imaging off-axis objects is modified by replacing a concave spherical primary mirror that is concentric with a convex secondary mirror with two concave spherical mirrors M1 and M2 of the same or different radii positioned with their respective distances d1 and d2 from a concentric convex spherical diffraction grating having its grooves parallel to the entrance slit of the spectrometer which replaces the convex secondary mirror. By adjusting their distances d1 and d2 and their respective angles of reflection alpha and beta, defined as the respective angles between their incident and reflected rays, all aberrations are corrected without the need to increase the spectrometer size for a given entrance slit size to reduce astigmatism, thus allowing the imaging spectrometer volume to be less for a given application than would be possible with conventional imaging spectrometers and still give excellent spatial and spectral imaging of the slit image spectra over the focal plane.

  4. Acoustically-tuned optical spectrometer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sklar, E.

    1981-01-01

    Lens arrangement corrects for aberrations and gives resolution of 0.7 seconds of arc. In spectrometer, light from telescope is relayed by doublet lens to acoustically tuned optical filter. Selected wavelengths are relayed by triplet lens to charge coupled device camera. Intervening cylindrical lens, tilted at 12 degree angle, corrects for astigmatism and coma introduced by two element birefringent crystal in filter.

  5. IPNS-I chopper spectrometers

    SciTech Connect

    Price, D.L.; Carpenter, J.M.; Pelizzari, C.A.; Sinha, S.K.; Bresof, I.; Ostrowski, G.E.

    1982-01-01

    We briefly describe the layout and operation of the two chopper experiments at IPNS-I. The recent measurement on solid /sup 4/He by Hilleke et al. provides examples of time-of-flight data from the Low Resolution Chopper Spectrometer.

  6. Time of flight mass spectrometer

    DOEpatents

    Ulbricht, Jr., William H.

    1984-01-01

    A time-of-flight mass spectrometer is described in which ions are desorbed from a sample by nuclear fission fragments, such that desorption occurs at the surface of the sample impinged upon by the fission fragments. This configuration allows for the sample to be of any thickness, and eliminates the need for complicated sample preparation.

  7. Mid infrared MEMS FTIR spectrometer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Erfan, Mazen; Sabry, Yasser M.; Mortada, Bassem; Sharaf, Khaled; Khalil, Diaa

    2016-03-01

    In this work we report, for the first time to the best of our knowledge, a bulk-micromachined wideband MEMS-based spectrometer covering both the NIR and the MIR ranges and working from 1200 nm to 4800 nm. The core engine of the spectrometer is a scanning Michelson interferometer micro-fabricated using deep reactive ion etching (DRIE) technology. The spectrum is obtained using the Fourier Transform techniques that allows covering a very wide spectral range limited by the detector responsivity. The moving mirror of the interferometer is driven by a relatively large stroke electrostatic comb-drive actuator. Zirconium fluoride (ZrF4) multimode optical fibers are used to connect light between the white light source and the interferometer input, as well as the interferometer output to a PbSe photoconductive detector. The recorded signal-to-noise ratio is 25 dB at the wavelength of 3350 nm. The spectrometer is successfully used in measuring the absorption spectra of methylene chloride, quartz glass and polystyrene film. The presented solution provides a low cost method for producing miniaturized spectrometers in the near-/mid-infrared.

  8. Alpha proton x ray spectrometer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rieder, Rudi; Waeke, H.; Economou, T.

    1994-01-01

    Mars Pathfinder will carry an alpha-proton x ray spectrometer (APX) for the determination of the elemental chemical composition of Martian rocks and soils. The instrument will measure the concentration of all major and some minor elements, including C, N, and O at levels above typically 1 percent.

  9. Lumen LPS inhibits HCO3(-) absorption in the medullary thick ascending limb through TLR4-PI3K-Akt-mTOR-dependent inhibition of basolateral Na+/H+ exchange.

    PubMed

    Watts, Bruns A; George, Thampi; Good, David W

    2013-08-15

    Sepsis and endotoxemia induce defects in renal tubule function, but the mechanisms are poorly understood. Recently, we demonstrated that lipopolysaccharide (LPS) inhibits HCO3(-) absorption in the medullary thick ascending limb (MTAL) through activation of different Toll-like receptor 4 (TLR4) signaling pathways in the basolateral and apical membranes. Basolateral LPS inhibits HCO3(-) absorption through ERK-dependent inhibition of the apical Na(+)/H(+) exchanger NHE3. Here, we examined the mechanisms of inhibition by lumen LPS. Adding LPS to the lumen decreased HCO3(-) absorption by 29% in rat and mouse MTALs perfused in vitro. Inhibitors of phosphoinositide 3-kinase (PI3K) or its effectors Akt and mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR) eliminated inhibition of HCO3(-) absorption by lumen LPS but had no effect on inhibition by bath LPS. Exposure to LPS for 15 min induced increases in phosphorylation of Akt and mTOR in microdissected MTALs that were blocked by wortmannin, consistent with activation of Akt and mTOR downstream of PI3K. The effects of lumen LPS to activate Akt and inhibit HCO3(-) absorption were eliminated in MTALs from TLR4(-/-) and MyD88(-/-) mice but preserved in tubules lacking Trif or CD14. Inhibition of HCO3(-) absorption by lumen LPS was eliminated under conditions that inhibit basolateral Na(+)/H(+) exchange and prevent inhibition of HCO3(-) absorption mediated through NHE1. Lumen LPS decreased basolateral Na(+)/H(+) exchange activity through PI3K. We conclude that lumen LPS inhibits HCO3(-) absorption in the MTAL through TLR4/MyD88-dependent activation of a PI3K-Akt-mTOR pathway coupled to inhibition of NHE1. Molecular components of the TLR4-PI3K-mTOR pathway represent potential therapeutic targets for sepsis-induced renal tubule dysfunction.

  10. First operation of the PWO crystal calorimeter as a mass spectrometer in a heavy-load high energy physics experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Blick, A. M.; Kachanov, V. A.; Khaustov, G. V.; Kolosov, V. N.; Korzhik, M. V.; Lednev, A. A.; Peigneux, J.-P.; Polovnikov, S. A.; Prokoshkin, Yu. D.; Samoylenko, V. D.; Shagin, P. M.; Singovsky, A. V.; Sugonyaev, V. P.

    1997-02-01

    The lead tungstate (PWO) heavy crystal calorimeter is tested in a GAMS-type experiment detecting 50 000 π0-mesons produced in a 32.5 GeV/ c intensive π- beam of the 70 GeV IHEP accelerator. In spite of a huge beam load of the calorimeter cells (up to 10 6 π -/s), a clean π0 → 2 γ signal is observed. The measured PWO spectrometer mass resolution is in good accordance with previous electron beam tests and GEANT calculations. A high precision of the real-time PWO spectrometer calibration, using the π0 signal during the physics run, is achieved. The results of these very first spectrometric beam tests demonstrate a high performance of multicell PWO spectrometers in heavy-load high energy physics experiments of both fixed target and collider types.

  11. High transverse momentum π0 production by π- and π+ on protons at 280 GeV/c

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bonesini, M.; Bonvin, E.; Booth, P. S. L.; Bortoletto, D.; Carroll, L. J.; Cass, A. J.; Cavalli, D.; Costa, G.; Donnat, M.; Dorsaz, P. A.; Edwards, D. N.; Fischer, J. R.; Fluri, L.; Frame, D.; Gianotti, F.; Jack, S.; Jackson, J. N.; Kelly, M.; Kienzle-Focacci, M. N.; Lucock, R.; Lynch, J. G.; Mandelli, L.; Martin, M.; Mathys, L.; Maxwell, A.; Mazzanti, M.; Myerscough, J. J.; Negus, P. J.; Pensotti-Rancoita, S.; Perini, L.; Perrin, D.; Polesello, G.; Range, W. H.; Rosselet, L.; Snow, S. W.; Tamborini, M.; Thompson, A. S.; Turnbull, R. M.; Wells, J.; Werlen, M.

    1987-03-01

    The inclusive cross sections for π0 production by π- and π+ on protons have been measured with a beam momentum of 280 GeV/c using a fine grained electromagnetic calorimeter and the CERN Omega spectrometer. The transverse momentum and Feynman x F ranges covered are 4.0< p T <7.0 GeV/c and -0.45< x F <0.6 respectively. The data are compared with leading order QCD calculations.

  12. Electron/proton spectrometer certification documentation analyses

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gleeson, P.

    1972-01-01

    A compilation of analyses generated during the development of the electron-proton spectrometer for the Skylab program is presented. The data documents the analyses required by the electron-proton spectrometer verification plan. The verification plan was generated to satisfy the ancillary hardware requirements of the Apollo Applications program. The certification of the spectrometer requires that various tests, inspections, and analyses be documented, approved, and accepted by reliability and quality control personnel of the spectrometer development program.

  13. Sample rotating turntable kit for infrared spectrometers

    DOEpatents

    Eckels, Joel Del; Klunder, Gregory L.

    2008-03-04

    An infrared spectrometer sample rotating turntable kit has a rotatable sample cup containing the sample. The infrared spectrometer has an infrared spectrometer probe for analyzing the sample and the rotatable sample cup is adapted to receive the infrared spectrometer probe. A reflectance standard is located in the rotatable sample cup. A sleeve is positioned proximate the sample cup and adapted to receive the probe. A rotator rotates the rotatable sample cup. A battery is connected to the rotator.

  14. Nucleon Form Factors above 6 GeV

    DOE R&D Accomplishments Database

    Taylor, R. E.

    1967-09-01

    This report describes the results from a preliminary analysis of an elastic electron-proton scattering experiment... . We have measured cross sections for e-p scattering in the range of q{sup 2} from 0.7 to 25.0 (GeV/c){sup 2}, providing a large region of overlap with previous measurements. In this experiment we measure the cross section by observing electrons scattered from a beam passing through a liquid hydrogen target. The scattered particles are momentum analyzed by a magnetic spectrometer and identified as electrons in a total absorption shower counter. Data have been obtained with primary electron energies from 4.0 to 17.9 GeV and at scattering angles from 12.5 to 35.0 degrees. In general, only one measurement of a cross section has been made at each momentum transfer.

  15. Aerosol propellant interference with clinical mass spectrometers.

    PubMed

    Kharasch, E D; Sivarajan, M

    1991-04-01

    Metered dose inhalers containing halogenated propellants may interfere with mass spectrometer quantitation of halogenated inhalation anesthetics. We identify the propellant(s) in a commercially available metered dose inhaler that caused erroneous mass spectrometer readings. In addition, we identify the causes of different types of interference in different mass spectrometers. PMID:2072131

  16. Electron spectrometer for gas-phase spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Bozek, J.D.; Schlachter, A.S.

    1997-04-01

    An electron spectrometer for high-resolution spectroscopy of gaseous samples using synchrotron radiation has been designed and constructed. The spectrometer consists of a gas cell, cylindrical electrostatic lens, spherical-sector electron energy analyzer, position-sensitive detector and associated power supplies, electronics and vacuum pumps. Details of the spectrometer design are presented together with some representative spectra.

  17. Cosmic ray studies with a gas Cerenkov counter in association with an ionization spectrometer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Balasubrahmanyan, V. K.; Ormes, J. F.; Arens, J. F.; Siohan, F.; Simon, M.; Spiegelhauer, H.; Yodh, G. B.

    1980-01-01

    The results from a balloon-borne gas Cerenkov counter (threshold 16.5 GeV/nuc) and an ionization spectrometer are presented. The gas Cerenkov counter provides an absolute energy calibration for the response of the calorimeter for the Z range of 5-26 nuclei of cosmic rays. The contribution of scintillation to the gas Cerenkov pulse height has been obtained by independently selecting particles below the gas Cerenkov threshold using the ionization spectrometer. Energy spectra were derived by minimizing the chi-squared between a Monte Carlo simulated data and flight data. Best fit power laws were determined for C, N, O, Ne, Mg, and Si. The power laws, all consistent with E exp-2.7, are not good fits to the data. A better fit is obtained using the spectrum derived from the spectrometer.

  18. Cosmic ray studies with a gas Cherenkov counter in association with an ionization spectrometer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Balasubrahmanyan, V. K.; Ormes, J. F.; Arens, J. F.; Siohan, F.; Yodh, G. B.; Simon, M.; Spiegelhauer, H.

    1980-01-01

    The results from a balloon-borne gas Cherenkov counter (threshold 16.5 GeV/nucleon) and an ionization spectrometer are presented. The gas Cherenkov counter provides an absolute energy distribution for the response of the calorimeter for 5 or = Z 26 nuclei of cosmic rays. The contribution of scintillation to the gas Cherenkov pulse height was obtained by independently selecting particles below the gas Cherenkov threshold using the ionization spectrometer. Energy spectra were derived by minimizing the chi squared between Monte Carlo simulted data and flight data. Best fit power laws, dN/dE = AE-gamma, were determined for C, N, O, Ne, Mg, and Si. The power laws, all consistent with E (-2.7) are not good fits to the data. A better fit is obtained using the spectrum derived from the spectrometer. The data from the ionization calorimeter and the gas Cherenkov are thus completely self-consistent.

  19. Axial field spectrometer at the CERN ISR

    SciTech Connect

    Gordon, H.; Hogue, R.; Killian, T.

    1981-01-01

    The Axial Field Spectrometer (AFS) was recently brought into operation at the CERN ISR. It is being exploited in a wide-ranging program to study different aspects of those proton-proton or proton-antiproton collisions which are characterized by a large transverse momentum (p/sub T/). Examples include the measurement of inclusive distributions of identified high p/sub T/ hadrons, and the study of event structures characterized by a large transverse energy (E/sub T/) or the production of one or several high-p/sub T/ electrons or photons. The experimental approach to this program emphasizes integration of advanced magnetic spectroscopy with state-of-the-art calorimetry. These techniques are fully exploited to provide maximal information on all particles produced. In addition, information from these detectors is used in new ways for on-line event triggering and filtering; this allows even very rare events to be selected with high efficiency, an essential prerequisite for studies at a high-luminosity hadron collider, such as the ISR. Considerable modularity of the detectors was sought. Apart from clear advantages of construction, debugging, running, and servicing of such components, modularity provides ease for addition or reconfiguration of the system to emphasize the study of specific final states. At present, for example, a 1 sr Cerenkov detector system allows hadron identification up to p approx. = 12 GeV/c; liquid-argon electromagnetic calorimeters and a uranium-scintillator calorimeter (Hexagon) are used for a study of events containing direct photons.

  20. 12 GeV detector technology at Jefferson Lab

    SciTech Connect

    Leckey, John P.; Collaboration: GlueX Collaboration

    2013-04-19

    The Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility (JLab) is presently in the middle of an upgrade to increase the energy of its CW electron beam from 6 GeV to 12 GeV along with the addition of a fourth experimental hall. Driven both by necessity and availability, novel detectors and electronics modules have been used in the upgrade. One such sensor is the Silicon Photomultiplier (SiPM), specifically a Multi-Pixel Photon Counter (MPPC), which is an array of avalanche photodiode pixels operating in Geiger mode that are used to sense photons. The SiPMs replace conventional photomultiplier tubes and have several distinct advantages including the safe operation in a magnetic field and the lack of need for high voltage. Another key to 12 GeV success is advanced fast electronics. Jlab will use custom 250 MHz and 125 MHz 12-bit analog to digital converters (ADCs) and time to digital converters (TDCs) all of which take advantage of VME Switched Serial (VXS) bus with its GB/s high bandwidth readout capability. These new technologies will be used to readout drift chambers, calorimeters, spectrometers and other particle detectors at Jlab once the 12 GeV upgrade is complete. The largest experiment at Jlab utilizing these components is GlueX - an experiment in the newly constructed Hall D that will study the photoproduction of light mesons in the search for hybrid mesons. The performance of these components and their respective detectors will be presented.

  1. 12 GeV detector technology at Jefferson Lab

    SciTech Connect

    Leckey, John P.

    2013-04-01

    The Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility (JLab) is presently in the middle of an upgrade to increase the energy of its CW electron beam from 6 GeV to 12 GeV along with the addition of a fourth experimental hall. Driven both by necessity and availability, novel detectors and electronics modules have been used in the upgrade. One such sensor is the Silicon Photomultiplier (SiPM), specifically a Multi-Pixel Photon Counter (MPPC), which is an array of avalanche photodiode pixels operating in Geiger mode that are used to sense photons. The SiPMs replace conventional photomultiplier tubes and have several distinct advantages including the safe operation in a magnetic field and the lack of need for high voltage. Another key to 12 GeV success is advanced fast electronics. Jlab will use custom 250 MHz and 125 MHz 12-bit analog to digital converters (ADCs) and time to digital converters (TDCs) all of which take advantage of VME Switched Serial (VXS) bus with its GB/s high bandwidth readout capability. These new technologies will be used to readout drift chambers, calorimeters, spectrometers and other particle detectors at Jlab once the 12 GeV upgrade is complete. The largest experiment at Jlab utilizing these components is GlueX - an experiment in the newly constructed Hall D that will study the photoproduction of light mesons in the search for hybrid mesons. The performance of these components and their respective detectors will be presented.

  2. SiGe/Si heterojunction internal photoemission long-wavelength infrared detectors fabricated by molecular beam epitaxy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lin, True-Lon; Ksendzov, A.; Dejewski, Suzan M.; Jones, Eric W.; Fathauer, Robert W.; Krabach, Timothy N.; Maserjian, Joseph

    1991-01-01

    A new SiGe/Si heterojunction internal photoemission (HIP) long-wavelength infrared (LWIR) detector has been fabricated by molecular beam epitaxy (MBE). The detection mechanism of the SiGe/Si HIP detector is infrared absorption in the degenerately doped p+-SiGe layer followed by internal photoemission of photoexcited holes over a heterojunction barrier. By adjusting the Ge concentration in the SiGe layer, and, consequently, the valence band offset between SiGe and Si, the cutoff wavelength of SiGe HIP detectors can be extended into the LWIR (8-17-micron) regime. Detectors were fabricated by growing p+-SiGe layers using MBE on patterned p-type Si substrates. The SiGe layers were boron-doped, with concentrations ranging from 10 to the 19th/cu cm to 4 x 10 to the 20th/cu cm. Infrared absorption of 5-25 percent in a 30-nm-thick p+-SiGe layer was measured in the 3-20-micron range using a Fourier transform infrared spectrometer. Quantum efficiencies of 3-5 percent have been obtained from test devices in the 8-12-micron range.

  3. Imaging X-ray spectrometer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Grant, P. A.; Jackson, J. W., Jr.; Alcorn, G. E.; Marshall, F. E. (Inventor)

    1984-01-01

    An X-ray spectrometer for providing imaging and energy resolution of an X-ray source is described. This spectrometer is comprised of a thick silicon wafer having an embedded matrix or grid of aluminum completely through the wafer fabricated, for example, by thermal migration. The aluminum matrix defines the walls of a rectangular array of silicon X-ray detector cells or pixels. A thermally diffused aluminum electrode is also formed centrally through each of the silicon cells with biasing means being connected to the aluminum cell walls and causes lateral charge carrier depletion between the cell walls so that incident X-ray energy causes a photoelectric reaction within the silicon producing collectible charge carriers in the form of electrons which are collected and used for imaging.

  4. Exploiting a Transmission Grating Spectrometer

    SciTech Connect

    Ronald E. Bell

    2004-12-08

    The availability of compact transmission grating spectrometers now allows an attractive and economical alternative to the more familiar Czerny-Turner configuration for many high-temperature plasma applications. Higher throughput is obtained with short focal length refractive optics and stigmatic imaging. Many more spectra can be obtained with a single spectrometer since smaller, more densely packed optical input fibers can be used. Multiple input slits, along with a bandpass filter, can be used to maximize the number of spectra per detector, providing further economy. Curved slits can correct for the strong image curvature of the short focal length optics. Presented here are the governing grating equations for both standard and high-dispersion transmission gratings, defining dispersion, image curvature, and desired slit curvature, that can be used in the design of improved plasma diagnostics.

  5. Concerning the Spatial Heterodyne Spectrometer

    DOE PAGES

    Lenzner, Matthias; Diels, Jean -Claude

    2016-01-22

    A modified Spatial Heterodyne Spectrometer (SHS) is used for measuring atomic emission spectra with high resolution. This device is basically a Fourier Transform Spectrometer, but the Fourier transform is taken in the directions perpendicular to the optical propagation and heterodyned around one preset wavelength. In recent descriptions of this device, one specific phenomenon - the tilt of the energy front of wave packets when diffracted from a grating - was neglected. This led to an overestimate of the resolving power of this spectrograph, especially in situations when the coherence length of the radiation under test is in the order ofmore » the effective aperture of the device. In conclusion, the limits of usability are shown here together with some measurements of known spectral lines.« less

  6. A simple ice nucleation spectrometer.

    PubMed

    Wharton, David A; Mutch, Jodi S; Wilson, Peter W; Marshall, Craig J; Lim, Miang

    2004-01-01

    The construction of a simple ice nucleation spectrometer is described. It uses 10 microliter droplets loaded into glass capillary tubes which are then inserted into an aluminium holder. Each holder takes six capillary tubes surrounding a central thermocouple. Four holders are placed into a cooling block, cooled by fluid from a programmable refrigerated circulator, and the thermocouples interfaced to a computer to record temperatures. Freezing of each sample is detected by an exotherm on the temperature recording, with 24 samples recorded per run. The spectrometer was tested using deionized water, an extract from a New Zealand alpine cockroach and an extract of lawn grass. The cockroach extract is estimated to contain about 10(3) more nucleators, active at -5 degrees C, than the grass extract. PMID:15618985

  7. Holographic Fabry-Perot spectrometer.

    PubMed

    Martínez-Matos, O; Rodrigo, José A; Vaveliuk, P; Calvo, M L

    2011-02-15

    We propose a spectrum analyzer based on the properties of a hologram recorded with the field transmitted by a Fabry-Perot etalon. The spectral response of this holographic Fabry-Perot spectrometer (HFPS) is analytically investigated in the paraxial approximation and compared with a conventional Fabry-Perot etalon of similar characteristics. We demonstrate that the resolving power is twice increased and the free spectral range (FSR) is reduced to one-half. The proposed spectrometer could improve the operational performance of the etalon because it can exhibit high efficiency and it would be insensible to environmental conditions such as temperature and vibrations. Our analysis also extends to another variant of the HFPS based on holographic multiplexing of the transmitted field of a Fabry-Perot etalon. This device increases the FSR, keeping the same HFPS performance.

  8. On-chip plasmonic spectrometer.

    PubMed

    Tsur, Yuval; Arie, Ady

    2016-08-01

    We report a numerical and experimental study of an on-chip optical spectrometer, utilizing propagating surface plasmon polaritons in the telecom spectral range. The device is based on two holographic gratings, one for coupling, and the other for decoupling free-space radiation with the surface plasmons. This 800 μm×100 μm on-chip spectrometer resolves 17 channels spectrally separated by 3.1 nm, spanning a freely tunable spectral window, and is based on standard lithography fabrication technology. We propose two potential applications for this new device; the first employs the holographic control over the amplitude and phase of the input spectrum, for intrinsically filtering unwanted frequencies, like pump radiation in Raman spectroscopy. The second prospect utilizes the unique plasmonic field enhancement at the metal-dielectric boundary for the spectral analysis of very small samples (e.g., Mie scatterers) placed between the two gratings.

  9. On-chip plasmonic spectrometer.

    PubMed

    Tsur, Yuval; Arie, Ady

    2016-08-01

    We report a numerical and experimental study of an on-chip optical spectrometer, utilizing propagating surface plasmon polaritons in the telecom spectral range. The device is based on two holographic gratings, one for coupling, and the other for decoupling free-space radiation with the surface plasmons. This 800 μm×100 μm on-chip spectrometer resolves 17 channels spectrally separated by 3.1 nm, spanning a freely tunable spectral window, and is based on standard lithography fabrication technology. We propose two potential applications for this new device; the first employs the holographic control over the amplitude and phase of the input spectrum, for intrinsically filtering unwanted frequencies, like pump radiation in Raman spectroscopy. The second prospect utilizes the unique plasmonic field enhancement at the metal-dielectric boundary for the spectral analysis of very small samples (e.g., Mie scatterers) placed between the two gratings. PMID:27472609

  10. Concerning the Spatial Heterodyne Spectrometer.

    PubMed

    Lenzner, Matthias; Diels, Jean-Claude

    2016-01-25

    A modified Spatial Heterodyne Spectrometer (SHS) is used for measuring atomic emission spectra with high resolution. This device is basically a Fourier Transform Spectrometer, but the Fourier transform is taken in the directions perpendicular to the optical propagation and heterodyned around one preset wavelength. In recent descriptions of this device, one specific phenomenon - the tilt of the energy front of wave packets when diffracted from a grating - was neglected. This led to an overestimate of the resolving power of this spectrograph, especially in situations when the coherence length of the radiation under test is in the order of the effective aperture of the device. The limits of usability are shown here together with some measurements of known spectral lines. PMID:26832561

  11. High Resolution Imaging Spectrometer (HIRIS)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Conley, Joseph M.; Herring, Mark; Norris, David D.

    1988-01-01

    The High Resolution Imaging Spectrometer (HIRIS), related data system, orbit, and mission operations are described. The pushbroom instrument simultaneously images the terrestrial surface in 192 spectral bands from 0.4 to 2.5 microns. The swath width is 30 km and spatial resolution is 30 m. It is planned to be launched with the Earth Observing System aboard the Space Station Polar Platform in 1995. Array detectors allow concurrent integration of the signals at 192,000 detector elements.

  12. New limits on dark matter annihilation from Alpha Magnetic Spectrometer cosmic ray positron data.

    PubMed

    Bergström, Lars; Bringmann, Torsten; Cholis, Ilias; Hooper, Dan; Weniger, Christoph

    2013-10-25

    The Alpha Magnetic Spectrometer experiment onboard the International Space Station has recently provided cosmic ray electron and positron data with unprecedented precision in the range from 0.5 to 350 GeV. The observed rise in the positron fraction at energies above 10 GeV remains unexplained, with proposed solutions ranging from local pulsars to TeV-scale dark matter. Here, we make use of this high quality data to place stringent limits on dark matter with masses below ~300 GeV, annihilating or decaying to leptonic final states, essentially independent of the origin of this rise. We significantly improve on existing constraints, in some cases by up to 2 orders of magnitude.

  13. 75 FR 47318 - GE Asset Management Incorporated and GE Investment Distributors, Inc.; Notice of Application and...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-08-05

    ... COMMISSION GE Asset Management Incorporated and GE Investment Distributors, Inc.; Notice of Application and.... Applicants: GE Asset Management Incorporated (``GEAM'') and GE Investment Distributors, Inc. (``GEID....\\3\\ The Commission alleged in the complaint (``Complaint'') that, from 2000 to 2003, four...

  14. Multilayered Ge/SiGe Material in Microfabricated Thermoelectric Modules

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Samarelli, A.; Llin, L. Ferre; Cecchi, S.; Chrastina, D.; Isella, G.; Etzelstorfer, T.; Stangl, J.; Gubler, E. Muller; Weaver, J. M. R.; Dobson, P.; Paul, D. J.

    2014-10-01

    Results for low dimensional p-type Ge/SiGe superlattices with Ge quantum wells of 3.43 nm are presented. A range of microfabricated test structures have been developed to characterise the cross-plane electrical and thermal properties of the Ge/SiGe heterostructures. These superlattices were directly grown on 100-mm-diameter silicon wafers by a chemical vapour deposition growth system with rates up to 6 nm/s. Quantum well and quantum mechanical tunnel barriers with dimensions down to nm have been designed, grown and tested; they demonstrate a ZT of 0.08 ± 0.011 and power factor of 1.34 ± 0.15 m W m-1 K-2 at 300 K. A complete microfabricated module using indium bump-bonding is reported together with preliminary results on unoptimised material and leg dimensions. Routes to optimise the material and modules are discussed.

  15. Ion mobility spectrometer / mass spectrometer (IMS-MS).

    SciTech Connect

    Hunka Deborah Elaine; Austin, Daniel E.

    2005-07-01

    The use of Ion Mobility Spectrometry (IMS) in the Detection of Contraband Sandia researchers use ion mobility spectrometers for trace chemical detection and analysis in a variety of projects and applications. Products developed in recent years based on IMS-technology include explosives detection personnel portals, the Material Area Access (MAA) checkpoint of the future, an explosives detection vehicle portal, hand-held detection systems such as the Hound and Hound II (all 6400), micro-IMS sensors (1700), ordnance detection (2500), and Fourier Transform IMS technology (8700). The emphasis to date has been on explosives detection, but the detection of chemical agents has also been pursued (8100 and 6400). Combining Ion Mobility Spectrometry (IMS) with Mass Spectrometry (MS) is described. The IMS-MS combination overcomes several limitations present in simple IMS systems. Ion mobility alone is insufficient to identify an unknown chemical agent. Collision cross section, upon which mobility is based, is not sufficiently unique or predictable a priori to be able to make a confident peak assignment unless the compounds present are already identified. Molecular mass, on the other hand, is much more readily interpreted and related to compounds. For a given compound, the molecular mass can be determined using a pocket calculator (or in one's head) while a reasonable value of the cross-section might require hours of computation time. Thus a mass spectrum provides chemical specificity and identity not accessible in the mobility spectrum alone. In addition, several advanced mass spectrometric methods, such as tandem MS, have been extensively developed for the purpose of molecular identification. With an appropriate mass spectrometer connected to an ion mobility spectrometer, these advanced identification methods become available, providing greater characterization capability.

  16. Ion Mobility Spectrometer / Mass Spectrometer (IMS-MS).

    SciTech Connect

    Hunka, Deborah E; Austin, Daniel

    2005-10-01

    The use of Ion Mobility Spectrometry (IMS)in the Detection of Contraband Sandia researchers use ion mobility spectrometers for trace chemical detection and analysis in a variety of projects and applications. Products developed in recent years based on IMS-technology include explosives detection personnel portals, the Material Area Access (MAA) checkpoint of the future, an explosives detection vehicle portal, hand-held detection systems such as the Hound and Hound II (all 6400), micro-IMS sensors (1700), ordnance detection (2500), and Fourier Transform IMS technology (8700). The emphasis to date has been on explosives detection, but the detection of chemical agents has also been pursued (8100 and 6400).Combining Ion Mobility Spectrometry (IMS) with Mass Spectrometry (MS)The IMS-MS combination overcomes several limitations present in simple IMS systems. Ion mobility alone is insufficient to identify an unknown chemical agent. Collision cross section, upon which mobility is based, is not sufficiently unique or predictable a priori to be able to make a confident peak assignment unless the compounds present are already identified. Molecular mass, on the other hand, is much more readily interpreted and related to compounds. For a given compound, the molecular mass can be determined using a pocket calculator (or in one's head) while a reasonable value of the cross-section might require hours of computation time. Thus a mass spectrum provides chemical specificity and identity not accessible in the mobility spectrum alone. In addition, several advanced mass spectrometric methods, such as tandem MS, have been extensively developed for the purpose of molecular identification. With an appropriate mass spectrometer connected to an ion mobility spectrometer, these advanced identification methods become available, providing greater characterization capability.3 AcronymsIMSion mobility spectrometryMAAMaterial Access AreaMSmass spectrometryoaTOForthogonal acceleration time

  17. Formation of Hot Nuclei with GeV {ital p} and {ital {pi}}{sup {minus}} Beams

    SciTech Connect

    Hsi, W.; Kwiatkowski, K.; Wang, G.; Bracken, D.S.; Cornell, E.; Ginger, D.S.; Viola, V.E.; Yoder, N.R.; Korteling, R.G.; Gimeno-Nogures, F.; Ramakrishnan, E.; Rowland, D.; Yennello, S.J.; Huang, M.J.; Lynch, W.G.; Tsang, M.B.; Xi, H.; Chu, Y.Y.; Gushue, S.; Remsberg, L.P.; Morley, K.B.; Breuer, H.

    1997-08-01

    4{pi} studies of multiple charged-particle emission in GeV {pi}{sup {minus}} - and proton-induced reactions on a Au target have been performed with the ISiS detector array. Multiplicity, charge, and angular distributions yield nearly identical results for both p and {pi}{sup {minus}} beams, suggesting an independence of hadron type in initiating the fast cascade and subsequent energy deposition in the struck nucleus. The excitation functions show little sensitivity to beam momentum, consistent with a saturation in deposition energy and the concept of limiting fragmentation. However, the intermediate mass fragment multiplicities and fragment charge distributions depend strongly on collision violence. {copyright} {ital 1997} {ital The American Physical Society}

  18. Cosmic ray composition measurements and high energy ionization spectrometers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Arens, J. F.; Ormes, J. F.

    1974-01-01

    Element abundances of cosmic rays Li through Si with energy above 0.8 GeV/amu were measured on a balloon borne instrument containing a total absorption ionization spectrometer. Statistical techniques were used to analyze the five measurements of each particle to determine its charge and energy. The technique allows a determination of systematic errors to be made. Corrections for Landau fluctuations, spark chamber inefficiency, and background particles were included. Comparison with other published results is made. Differences in the shape of the spectrum determined from measurements of different workers indicate that the absolute intensity is still known to only plus or minus 15% between 2 and 10 GV/c rigidity.

  19. The response of a bonner sphere spectrometer to charged hadrons.

    PubMed

    Agosteo, S; Dimovasili, E; Fassò, A; Silari, M

    2004-01-01

    Bonner sphere spectrometers (BSSs) are employed in neutron spectrometry and dosimetry since many years. Recent developments have seen the addition to a conventional BSS of one or more detectors (moderator plus thermal neutron counter) specifically designed to improve the overall response of the spectrometer to neutrons above 10 MeV. These additional detectors employ a shell of material with a high mass number (such as lead) within the polyethylene moderator, in order to slow down high-energy neutrons via (n,xn) reactions. A BSS can be used to measure neutron spectra both outside accelerator shielding and from an unshielded target. Measurements were recently performed at CERN of the neutron yield and spectral fluence at various angles from unshielded, semi-thick copper, silver and lead targets, bombarded by a mixed proton/pion beam with 40 GeV per c momentum. These experiments have provided evidence that under certain circumstances, the use of lead-enriched moderators may present a problem: these detectors were found to have a significant response to the charged hadron component accompanying the neutrons emitted from the target. Conventional polyethylene moderators show a similar behaviour but less pronounced. These secondary hadrons interact with the moderator and generate neutrons, which are in turn detected by the counter. To investigate this effect and determine a correction factor to be applied to the unfolding procedure, a series of Monte Carlo simulations were performed with the FLUKA code. These simulations aimed at determining the response of the BSS to charged hadrons under the specific experimental situation. Following these results, a complete response matrix of the extended BSS to charged pions and protons was calculated with FLUKA. An experimental verification was carried out with a 120 GeV per c hadron beam at the CERF facility at CERN. PMID:15353640

  20. Ge-Au eutectic bonding of Ge {100} single crystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Knowlton, W. B.; Itoh, K. M.; Beeman, J. W.; Emes, J. H.; Loretto, D.; Haller, E. E.

    1993-11-01

    We present preliminary results on the eutectic bonding between two {100} Ge single crystal surfaces using thin films of Au ranging from 900Å/surface to 300Å/surface and Pd (10% the thickness of Au). Following bonding, plan view optical microscopy (OM) of the cleaved interface of samples with Au thicknesses ≤ 500Å/surface show a eutectic morphology more conducive to phonon transmission through the bond interface. High resolution transmission electron microscopy (HRTEM) cross sectional interface studies of a 300Å/surface Au sample show <100> epitaxial growth of Ge. In sections of the bond, lattice continuity of the Ge is apparent through the interface. TEM studies also reveal <110> heteroepitaxial growth of Au with a Au-Ge lattice mismatch of less than 2%. Eutectic bonds with 200Å/surface Au have been attained with characterization pending. An optical polishing technique for Ge has been optimized to insure intimate contact between the Ge surfaces prior to bonding. Interferometry analysis of the optically polished Ge surface shows that surface height fluctuations lie within ±150Å across an interval of 1mm. Characterization of phonon transmission through the interface is discussed with respect to low temperature detection of ballistic phonons.

  1. Electron and positron fluxes in primary cosmic rays measured with the alpha magnetic spectrometer on the international space station.

    PubMed

    Aguilar, M; Aisa, D; Alvino, A; Ambrosi, G; Andeen, K; Arruda, L; Attig, N; Azzarello, P; Bachlechner, A; Barao, F; Barrau, A; Barrin, L; Bartoloni, A; Basara, L; Battarbee, M; Battiston, R; Bazo, J; Becker, U; Behlmann, M; Beischer, B; Berdugo, J; Bertucci, B; Bigongiari, G; Bindi, V; Bizzaglia, S; Bizzarri, M; Boella, G; de Boer, W; Bollweg, K; Bonnivard, V; Borgia, B; Borsini, S; Boschini, M J; Bourquin, M; Burger, J; Cadoux, F; Cai, X D; Capell, M; Caroff, S; Casaus, J; Cascioli, V; Castellini, G; Cernuda, I; Cervelli, F; Chae, M J; Chang, Y H; Chen, A I; Chen, H; Cheng, G M; Chen, H S; Cheng, L; Chikanian, A; Chou, H Y; Choumilov, E; Choutko, V; Chung, C H; Clark, C; Clavero, R; Coignet, G; Consolandi, C; Contin, A; Corti, C; Coste, B; Cui, Z; Dai, M; Delgado, C; Della Torre, S; Demirköz, M B; Derome, L; Di Falco, S; Di Masso, L; Dimiccoli, F; Díaz, C; von Doetinchem, P; Du, W J; Duranti, M; D'Urso, D; Eline, A; Eppling, F J; Eronen, T; Fan, Y Y; Farnesini, L; Feng, J; Fiandrini, E; Fiasson, A; Finch, E; Fisher, P; Galaktionov, Y; Gallucci, G; García, B; García-López, R; Gast, H; Gebauer, I; Gervasi, M; Ghelfi, A; Gillard, W; Giovacchini, F; Goglov, P; Gong, J; Goy, C; Grabski, V; Grandi, D; Graziani, M; Guandalini, C; Guerri, I; Guo, K H; Habiby, M; Haino, S; Han, K C; He, Z H; Heil, M; Hoffman, J; Hsieh, T H; Huang, Z C; Huh, C; Incagli, M; Ionica, M; Jang, W Y; Jinchi, H; Kanishev, K; Kim, G N; Kim, K S; Kirn, Th; Kossakowski, R; Kounina, O; Kounine, A; Koutsenko, V; Krafczyk, M S; Kunz, S; La Vacca, G; Laudi, E; Laurenti, G; Lazzizzera, I; Lebedev, A; Lee, H T; Lee, S C; Leluc, C; Li, H L; Li, J Q; Li, Q; Li, Q; Li, T X; Li, W; Li, Y; Li, Z H; Li, Z Y; Lim, S; Lin, C H; Lipari, P; Lippert, T; Liu, D; Liu, H; Lomtadze, T; Lu, M J; Lu, Y S; Luebelsmeyer, K; Luo, F; Luo, J Z; Lv, S S; Majka, R; Malinin, A; Mañá, C; Marín, J; Martin, T; Martínez, G; Masi, N; Maurin, D; Menchaca-Rocha, A; Meng, Q; Mo, D C; Morescalchi, L; Mott, P; Müller, M; Ni, J Q; Nikonov, N; Nozzoli, F; Nunes, P; Obermeier, A; Oliva, A; Orcinha, M; Palmonari, F; Palomares, C; Paniccia, M; Papi, A; Pedreschi, E; Pensotti, S; Pereira, R; Pilo, F; Piluso, A; Pizzolotto, C; Plyaskin, V; Pohl, M; Poireau, V; Postaci, E; Putze, A; Quadrani, L; Qi, X M; Rancoita, P G; Rapin, D; Ricol, J S; Rodríguez, I; Rosier-Lees, S; Rozhkov, A; Rozza, D; Sagdeev, R; Sandweiss, J; Saouter, P; Sbarra, C; Schael, S; Schmidt, S M; Schuckardt, D; Schulz von Dratzig, A; Schwering, G; Scolieri, G; Seo, E S; Shan, B S; Shan, Y H; Shi, J Y; Shi, X Y; Shi, Y M; Siedenburg, T; Son, D; Spada, F; Spinella, F; Sun, W; Sun, W H; Tacconi, M; Tang, C P; Tang, X W; Tang, Z C; Tao, L; Tescaro, D; Ting, Samuel C C; Ting, S M; Tomassetti, N; Torsti, J; Türkoğlu, C; Urban, T; Vagelli, V; Valente, E; Vannini, C; Valtonen, E; Vaurynovich, S; Vecchi, M; Velasco, M; Vialle, J P; Wang, L Q; Wang, Q L; Wang, R S; Wang, X; Wang, Z X; Weng, Z L; Whitman, K; Wienkenhöver, J; Wu, H; Xia, X; Xie, M; Xie, S; Xiong, R Q; Xin, G M; Xu, N S; Xu, W; Yan, Q; Yang, J; Yang, M; Ye, Q H; Yi, H; Yu, Y J; Yu, Z Q; Zeissler, S; Zhang, J H; Zhang, M T; Zhang, X B; Zhang, Z; Zheng, Z M; Zhuang, H L; Zhukov, V; Zichichi, A; Zimmermann, N; Zuccon, P; Zurbach, C

    2014-09-19

    Precision measurements by the Alpha Magnetic Spectrometer on the International Space Station of the primary cosmic-ray electron flux in the range 0.5 to 700 GeV and the positron flux in the range 0.5 to 500 GeV are presented. The electron flux and the positron flux each require a description beyond a single power-law spectrum. Both the electron flux and the positron flux change their behavior at ∼30  GeV but the fluxes are significantly different in their magnitude and energy dependence. Between 20 and 200 GeV the positron spectral index is significantly harder than the electron spectral index. The determination of the differing behavior of the spectral indices versus energy is a new observation and provides important information on the origins of cosmic-ray electrons and positrons.

  2. Electron and positron fluxes in primary cosmic rays measured with the alpha magnetic spectrometer on the international space station.

    PubMed

    Aguilar, M; Aisa, D; Alvino, A; Ambrosi, G; Andeen, K; Arruda, L; Attig, N; Azzarello, P; Bachlechner, A; Barao, F; Barrau, A; Barrin, L; Bartoloni, A; Basara, L; Battarbee, M; Battiston, R; Bazo, J; Becker, U; Behlmann, M; Beischer, B; Berdugo, J; Bertucci, B; Bigongiari, G; Bindi, V; Bizzaglia, S; Bizzarri, M; Boella, G; de Boer, W; Bollweg, K; Bonnivard, V; Borgia, B; Borsini, S; Boschini, M J; Bourquin, M; Burger, J; Cadoux, F; Cai, X D; Capell, M; Caroff, S; Casaus, J; Cascioli, V; Castellini, G; Cernuda, I; Cervelli, F; Chae, M J; Chang, Y H; Chen, A I; Chen, H; Cheng, G M; Chen, H S; Cheng, L; Chikanian, A; Chou, H Y; Choumilov, E; Choutko, V; Chung, C H; Clark, C; Clavero, R; Coignet, G; Consolandi, C; Contin, A; Corti, C; Coste, B; Cui, Z; Dai, M; Delgado, C; Della Torre, S; Demirköz, M B; Derome, L; Di Falco, S; Di Masso, L; Dimiccoli, F; Díaz, C; von Doetinchem, P; Du, W J; Duranti, M; D'Urso, D; Eline, A; Eppling, F J; Eronen, T; Fan, Y Y; Farnesini, L; Feng, J; Fiandrini, E; Fiasson, A; Finch, E; Fisher, P; Galaktionov, Y; Gallucci, G; García, B; García-López, R; Gast, H; Gebauer, I; Gervasi, M; Ghelfi, A; Gillard, W; Giovacchini, F; Goglov, P; Gong, J; Goy, C; Grabski, V; Grandi, D; Graziani, M; Guandalini, C; Guerri, I; Guo, K H; Habiby, M; Haino, S; Han, K C; He, Z H; Heil, M; Hoffman, J; Hsieh, T H; Huang, Z C; Huh, C; Incagli, M; Ionica, M; Jang, W Y; Jinchi, H; Kanishev, K; Kim, G N; Kim, K S; Kirn, Th; Kossakowski, R; Kounina, O; Kounine, A; Koutsenko, V; Krafczyk, M S; Kunz, S; La Vacca, G; Laudi, E; Laurenti, G; Lazzizzera, I; Lebedev, A; Lee, H T; Lee, S C; Leluc, C; Li, H L; Li, J Q; Li, Q; Li, Q; Li, T X; Li, W; Li, Y; Li, Z H; Li, Z Y; Lim, S; Lin, C H; Lipari, P; Lippert, T; Liu, D; Liu, H; Lomtadze, T; Lu, M J; Lu, Y S; Luebelsmeyer, K; Luo, F; Luo, J Z; Lv, S S; Majka, R; Malinin, A; Mañá, C; Marín, J; Martin, T; Martínez, G; Masi, N; Maurin, D; Menchaca-Rocha, A; Meng, Q; Mo, D C; Morescalchi, L; Mott, P; Müller, M; Ni, J Q; Nikonov, N; Nozzoli, F; Nunes, P; Obermeier, A; Oliva, A; Orcinha, M; Palmonari, F; Palomares, C; Paniccia, M; Papi, A; Pedreschi, E; Pensotti, S; Pereira, R; Pilo, F; Piluso, A; Pizzolotto, C; Plyaskin, V; Pohl, M; Poireau, V; Postaci, E; Putze, A; Quadrani, L; Qi, X M; Rancoita, P G; Rapin, D; Ricol, J S; Rodríguez, I; Rosier-Lees, S; Rozhkov, A; Rozza, D; Sagdeev, R; Sandweiss, J; Saouter, P; Sbarra, C; Schael, S; Schmidt, S M; Schuckardt, D; Schulz von Dratzig, A; Schwering, G; Scolieri, G; Seo, E S; Shan, B S; Shan, Y H; Shi, J Y; Shi, X Y; Shi, Y M; Siedenburg, T; Son, D; Spada, F; Spinella, F; Sun, W; Sun, W H; Tacconi, M; Tang, C P; Tang, X W; Tang, Z C; Tao, L; Tescaro, D; Ting, Samuel C C; Ting, S M; Tomassetti, N; Torsti, J; Türkoğlu, C; Urban, T; Vagelli, V; Valente, E; Vannini, C; Valtonen, E; Vaurynovich, S; Vecchi, M; Velasco, M; Vialle, J P; Wang, L Q; Wang, Q L; Wang, R S; Wang, X; Wang, Z X; Weng, Z L; Whitman, K; Wienkenhöver, J; Wu, H; Xia, X; Xie, M; Xie, S; Xiong, R Q; Xin, G M; Xu, N S; Xu, W; Yan, Q; Yang, J; Yang, M; Ye, Q H; Yi, H; Yu, Y J; Yu, Z Q; Zeissler, S; Zhang, J H; Zhang, M T; Zhang, X B; Zhang, Z; Zheng, Z M; Zhuang, H L; Zhukov, V; Zichichi, A; Zimmermann, N; Zuccon, P; Zurbach, C

    2014-09-19

    Precision measurements by the Alpha Magnetic Spectrometer on the International Space Station of the primary cosmic-ray electron flux in the range 0.5 to 700 GeV and the positron flux in the range 0.5 to 500 GeV are presented. The electron flux and the positron flux each require a description beyond a single power-law spectrum. Both the electron flux and the positron flux change their behavior at ∼30  GeV but the fluxes are significantly different in their magnitude and energy dependence. Between 20 and 200 GeV the positron spectral index is significantly harder than the electron spectral index. The determination of the differing behavior of the spectral indices versus energy is a new observation and provides important information on the origins of cosmic-ray electrons and positrons. PMID:25279617

  3. The Pickup Ion Composition Spectrometer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gilbert, Jason A.; Zurbuchen, Thomas H.; Battel, Steven

    2016-06-01

    Observations of newly ionized atoms that are picked up by the magnetic field in the expanding solar wind contain crucial information about the gas or dust compositions of their origins. The pickup ions (PUIs) are collected by plasma mass spectrometers and analyzed for their density, composition, and velocity distribution. In addition to measurements of PUIs from planetary sources, in situ measurements of interstellar gas have been made possible by spectrometers capable of differentiating between heavy ions of solar and interstellar origin. While important research has been done on these often singly charged ions, the instruments that have detected many of them were designed for the energy range and ionic charge states of the solar wind and energized particle populations, and not for pickup ions. An instrument optimized for the complete energy and time-of-flight characterization of pickup ions will unlock a wealth of data on these hitherto unobserved or unresolved PUI species. The Pickup Ion Composition Spectrometer (PICSpec) is one such instrument and can enable the next generation of pickup ion and isotopic mass composition measurements. By combining a large-gap time-of-flight-energy sensor with a -100 kV high-voltage power supply for ion acceleration, PUIs will not only be above the detection threshold of traditional solid-state energy detectors but also be resolved sufficiently in time of flight that isotopic composition can be determined. This technology will lead to a new generation of space composition instruments, optimized for measurements of both heliospheric and planetary pickup ions.

  4. Ge/Si(001) heterostructures with dense arrays of Ge quantum dots: morphology, defects, photo-emf spectra and terahertz conductivity

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Issues of Ge hut cluster array formation and growth at low temperatures on the Ge/Si(001) wetting layer are discussed on the basis of explorations performed by high resolution STM and in-situ RHEED. Dynamics of the RHEED patterns in the process of Ge hut array formation is investigated at low and high temperatures of Ge deposition. Different dynamics of RHEED patterns during the deposition of Ge atoms in different growth modes is observed, which reflects the difference in adatom mobility and their ‘condensation’ fluxes from Ge 2D gas on the surface for different modes, which in turn control the nucleation rates and densities of Ge clusters. Data of HRTEM studies of multilayer Ge/Si heterostructures are presented with the focus on low-temperature formation of perfect films. Heteroepitaxial Si p–i–n-diodes with multilayer stacks of Ge/Si(001) quantum dot dense arrays built in intrinsic domains have been investigated and found to exhibit the photo-emf in a wide spectral range from 0.8 to 5 μm. An effect of wide-band irradiation by infrared light on the photo-emf spectra has been observed. Photo-emf in different spectral ranges has been found to be differently affected by the wide-band irradiation. A significant increase in photo-emf is observed in the fundamental absorption range under the wide-band irradiation. The observed phenomena are explained in terms of positive and neutral charge states of the quantum dot layers and the Coulomb potential of the quantum dot ensemble. A new design of quantum dot infrared photodetectors is proposed. By using a coherent source spectrometer, first measurements of terahertz dynamical conductivity (absorptivity) spectra of Ge/Si(001) heterostructures were performed at frequencies ranged from 0.3 to 1.2 THz in the temperature interval from 300 to 5 K. The effective dynamical conductivity of the heterostructures with Ge quantum dots has been discovered to be significantly higher than that of the structure with the same amount

  5. Alpha-particle spectrometer experiment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gorenstein, P.; Bjorkholm, P.

    1972-01-01

    Mapping the radon emanation of the moon was studied to find potential areas of high activity by detection of radon isotopes and their daughter products. It was felt that based on observation of regions overflown by Apollo spacecraft and within the field of view of the alpha-particle spectrometer, a radon map could be constructed, identifying and locating lunar areas of outgassing. The basic theory of radon migration from natural concentrations of uranium and thorium is discussed in terms of radon decay and the production of alpha particles. The preliminary analysis of the results indicates no significant alpha emission.

  6. Portable neutron spectrometer and dosimeter

    DOEpatents

    Waechter, David A.; Erkkila, Bruce H.; Vasilik, Dennis G.

    1985-01-01

    The disclosure relates to a battery operated neutron spectrometer/dosimeter utilizing a microprocessor, a built-in tissue equivalent LET neutron detector, and a 128-channel pulse height analyzer with integral liquid crystal display. The apparatus calculates doses and dose rates from neutrons incident on the detector and displays a spectrum of rad or rem as a function of keV per micron of equivalent tissue and also calculates and displays accumulated dose in millirads and millirem as well as neutron dose rates in millirads per hour and millirem per hour.

  7. Portable neutron spectrometer and dosimeter

    DOEpatents

    Waechter, D.A.; Erkkila, B.H.; Vasilik, D.G.

    The disclosure relates to a battery operated neutron spectrometer/dosimeter utilizing a microprocessor, a built-in tissue equivalent LET neutron detector, and a 128-channel pulse height analyzer with integral liquid crystal display. The apparatus calculates doses and dose rates from neutrons incident on the detector and displays a spectrum of rad or rem as a function of keV per micron of equivalent tissue and also calculates and displays accumulated dose in millirads and millirem as well as neutron dose rates in millirads per hour and millirem per hour.

  8. Automated mass spectrometer grows up

    SciTech Connect

    McInteer, B.B.; Montoya, J.G.; Stark, E.E.

    1984-01-01

    In 1980 we reported the development of an automated mass spectrometer for large scale batches of samples enriched in nitrogen-15 as ammonium salts. Since that time significant technical progress has been made in the instrument. Perhaps more significantly, administrative and institutional changes have permitted the entire effort to be transferred to the private sector from its original base at the Los Alamos National Laboratory. This has ensured the continuance of a needed service to the international scientific community as revealed by a development project at a national laboratory, and is an excellent example of beneficial technology transfer to private industry.

  9. High-Resolution Imaging Spectrometer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dozier, Jeff; Goetz, Alexander F. H.

    1990-01-01

    Earth resources observed in greater detail. High-Resolution Imaging Spectrometer, undergoing development for use in NASA's Earth Observing System, measures reflectance of Earth's surface in visible and near-infrared wavelengths. From an orbit around Earth, instrument scans surface of Earth in 200 wavelength bands simultaneously. Produces images enabling identification of minerals in rocks and soils, important algal pigments in oceans and inland waters, changes in spectra associated with biochemistry of plant canopies, compositions of atmospheric aerosols, sizes of grains in snow, and contamination of snow by impurities that absorb visible light.

  10. Wide-range CCD spectrometer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sokolova, Elena A.; Reyes Cortes, Santiago D.

    1996-08-01

    The utilization of wide range spectrometers is a very important feature for the design of optical diagnostics. This paper describes an innovative approach, based on charged coupled device, which allows to analyze different spectral intervals with the same diffraction grating. The spectral interval is varied by changing the position of the entrance slit when the grating is stationary. The optical system can also include a spherical mirror. In this case the geometric position of the mirror is calculated aiming at compensating the first order astigmatism and the meridional coma of the grating. This device is planned to be used in Thomson scattering diagnostic of the TOKAMAK of Instituto Superior Tecnico, Lisbon (ISTTOK).

  11. Fourier-Transform Infrared Spectrometer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schindler, R. A.

    1986-01-01

    Fourier-transform spectrometer provides approximately hundredfold increase in luminosity at detector plane over that achievable with older instruments of this type. Used to analyze such weak sources as pollutants and other low-concentration substances in atmosphere. Interferometer creates fringe patterns on two distinct arrays of light detectors, which observe different wavelength bands. Objective lens focuses scene on image plane, which contains optical chopper. To make instrument less susceptible to variations in scene under observation, field and detector lenses focus entrance aperture, rather that image, onto detector array.

  12. Static Fourier transform infrared spectrometer.

    PubMed

    Schardt, Michael; Murr, Patrik J; Rauscher, Markus S; Tremmel, Anton J; Wiesent, Benjamin R; Koch, Alexander W

    2016-04-01

    Fourier transform spectroscopy has established itself as the standard method for spectral analysis of infrared light. Here we present a robust and compact novel static Fourier transform spectrometer design without any moving parts. The design is well suited for measurements in the infrared as it works with extended light sources independent of their size. The design is experimentally evaluated in the mid-infrared wavelength region between 7.2 μm and 16 μm. Due to its large etendue, its low internal light loss, and its static design it enables high speed spectral analysis in the mid-infrared.

  13. Precision Measurement of the(e++e-)Flux in Primary Cosmic Rays from 0.5 GeV to 1 TeV with the Alpha Magnetic Spectrometer on the International Space Station

    SciTech Connect

    Aguilar, M.; Aisa, D.; Alpat, B.; Alvino, A.; Ambrosi, G.; Andeen, K.; Arruda, L.; Attig, N.; Azzarello, P.; Bachlechner, A.; Barao, F.; Barrau, A.; Barrin, L.; Bartoloni, A.; Basara, L.; Battarbee, M.; Battiston, R.; Bazo, J.; Becker, U.; Behlmann, M.; Beischer, B.; Berdugo, J.; Bertucci, B.; Bigongiari, G.; Bindi, V.; Bizzaglia, S.; Bizzarri, M.; Boella, G.; de Boer, W.; Bollweg, K.; Bonnivard, V.; Borgia, B.; Borsini, S.; Boschini, M. J.; Bourquin, M.; Burger, J.; Cadoux, F.; Cai, X. D.; Capell, M.; Caroff, S.; Casaus, J.; Cascioli, V.; Castellini, G.; Cernuda, I.; Cervelli, F.; Chae, M. J.; Chang, Y. H.; Chen, A. I.; Chen, H.; Cheng, G. M.; Chen, H. S.; Cheng, L.; Chikanian, A.; Chou, H. Y.; Choumilov, E.; Choutko, V.; Chung, C. H.; Clark, C.; Clavero, R.; Coignet, G.; Consolandi, C.; Contin, A.; Corti, C.; Coste, B.; Crispoltoni, M.; Cui, Z.; Dai, M.; Delgado, C.; Della Torre, S.; Demirköz, M. B.; Derome, L.; Di Falco, S.; Di Masso, L.; Dimiccoli, F.; Díaz, C.; von Doetinchem, P.; Donnini, F.; Du, W. J.; Duranti, M.; D’Urso, D.; Eline, A.; Eppling, F. J.; Eronen, T.; Fan, Y. Y.; Farnesini, L.; Feng, J.; Fiandrini, E.; Fiasson, A.; Finch, E.; Fisher, P.; Galaktionov, Y.; Gallucci, G.; García, B.; García-López, R.; Gargiulo, C.; Gast, H.; Gebauer, I.; Gervasi, M.; Ghelfi, A.; Gillard, W.; Giovacchini, F.; Goglov, P.; Gong, J.; Goy, C.; Grabski, V.; Grandi, D.; Graziani, M.; Guandalini, C.; Guerri, I.; Guo, K. H.; Habiby, M.; Haino, S.; Han, K. C.; He, Z. H.; Heil, M.; Hoffman, J.; Hsieh, T. H.; Huang, Z. C.; Huh, C.; Incagli, M.; Ionica, M.; Jang, W. Y.; Jinchi, H.; Kanishev, K.; Kim, G. N.; Kim, K. S.; Kirn, Th.; Kossakowski, R.; Kounina, O.; Kounine, A.; Koutsenko, V.; Krafczyk, M. S.; Kunz, S.; La Vacca, G.; Laudi, E.; Laurenti, G.; Lazzizzera, I.; Lebedev, A.; Lee, H. T.; Lee, S. C.; Leluc, C.; Li, H. L.; Li, J. Q.; Li, Q.; Li, Q.; Li, T. X.; Li, W.; Li, Y.; Li, Z. H.; Li, Z. Y.; Lim, S.; Lin, C. H.; Lipari, P.; Lippert, T.; Liu, D.; Liu, H.; Lomtadze, T.; Lu, M. J.; Lu, Y. S.; Luebelsmeyer, K.; Luo, F.; Luo, J. Z.; Lv, S. S.; Majka, R.; Malinin, A.; Mañá, C.; Marín, J.; Martin, T.; Martínez, G.; Masi, N.; Maurin, D.; Menchaca-Rocha, A.; Meng, Q.; Mo, D. C.; Morescalchi, L.; Mott, P.; Müller, M.; Ni, J. Q.; Nikonov, N.; Nozzoli, F.; Nunes, P.; Obermeier, A.; Oliva, A.; Orcinha, M.; Palmonari, F.; Palomares, C.; Paniccia, M.; Papi, A.; Pauluzzi, M.; Pedreschi, E.; Pensotti, S.; Pereira, R.; Pilo, F.; Piluso, A.; Pizzolotto, C.; Plyaskin, V.; Pohl, M.; Poireau, V.; Postaci, E.; Putze, A.; Quadrani, L.; Qi, X. M.; Räihä, T.; Rancoita, P. G.; Rapin, D.; Ricol, J. S.; Rodríguez, I.; Rosier-Lees, S.; Rozhkov, A.; Rozza, D.; Sagdeev, R.; Sandweiss, J.; Saouter, P.; Sbarra, C.; Schael, S.; Schmidt, S. M.; Schuckardt, D.; Schulz von Dratzig, A.; Schwering, G.; Scolieri, G.; Seo, E. S.; Shan, B. S.; Shan, Y. H.; Shi, J. Y.; Shi, X. Y.; Shi, Y. M.; Siedenburg, T.; Son, D.; Spada, F.; Spinella, F.; Sun, W.; Sun, W. H.; Tacconi, M.; Tang, C. P.; Tang, X. W.; Tang, Z. C.; Tao, L.; Tescaro, D.; Ting, Samuel C. C.; Ting, S. M.; Tomassetti, N.; Torsti, J.; Türkoğlu, C.; Urban, T.; Vagelli, V.; Valente, E.; Vannini, C.; Valtonen, E.; Vaurynovich, S.; Vecchi, M.; Velasco, M.; Vialle, J. P.; Wang, L. Q.; Wang, Q. L.; Wang, R. S.; Wang, X.; Wang, Z. X.; Weng, Z. L.; Whitman, K.; Wienkenhöver, J.; Wu, H.; Xia, X.; Xie, M.; Xie, S.; Xiong, R. Q.; Xin, G. M.; Xu, N. S.; Xu, W.; Yan, Q.; Yang, J.; Yang, M.; Ye, Q. H.; Yi, H.; Yu, Y. J.; Yu, Z. Q.; Zeissler, S.; Zhang, J. H.; Zhang, M. T.; Zhang, X. B.; Zhang, Z.; Zheng, Z. M.; Zhuang, H. L.; Zhukov, V.; Zichichi, A.; Zimmermann, N.; Zuccon, P.; Zurbach, C.

    2014-11-26

    We present a measurement of the cosmic ray (e++e-) flux in the range 0.5 GeV to 1 TeV based on the analysis of 10.6 million (e++e-) events collected by AMS. The statistics and the resolution of AMS provide a precision measurement of the flux. The flux is smooth and reveals new and distinct information. Above 30.2 GeV, the flux can be described by a single power law with a spectral index γ= -3.170 ± 0.008(stat+syst) ± 0.008(energy scale).

  14. Engine spectrometer probe and method of use

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Barkhoudarian, Sarkis (Inventor); Kittinger, Scott A. (Inventor)

    2006-01-01

    The engine spectrometer probe and method of using the same of the present invention provides a simple engine spectrometer probe which is both lightweight and rugged, allowing an exhaust plume monitoring system to be attached to a vehicle, such as the space shuttle. The engine spectrometer probe can be mounted to limit exposure to the heat and debris of the exhaust plume. The spectrometer probe 50 comprises a housing 52 having an aperture 55 and a fiber optic cable 60 having a fiber optic tip 65. The fiber optic tip 65 has an acceptance angle 87 and is coupled to the aperture 55 so that the acceptance angle 87 intersects the exhaust plume 30. The spectrometer probe can generate a spectrum signal from light in the acceptance angle 506 and the spectrum signal can be provided to a spectrometer 508.

  15. Imaging spectrometer/camera having convex grating

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Reininger, Francis M. (Inventor)

    2000-01-01

    An imaging spectrometer has fore-optics coupled to a spectral resolving system with an entrance slit extending in a first direction at an imaging location of the fore-optics for receiving the image, a convex diffraction grating for separating the image into a plurality of spectra of predetermined wavelength ranges; a spectrometer array for detecting the spectra; and at least one concave sperical mirror concentric with the diffraction grating for relaying the image from the entrance slit to the diffraction grating and from the diffraction grating to the spectrometer array. In one embodiment, the spectrometer is configured in a lateral mode in which the entrance slit and the spectrometer array are displaced laterally on opposite sides of the diffraction grating in a second direction substantially perpendicular to the first direction. In another embodiment, the spectrometer is combined with a polychromatic imaging camera array disposed adjacent said entrance slit for recording said image.

  16. Uniaxially stressed Ge:Ga and Ge:Be

    SciTech Connect

    Dubon, O.D. Jr.

    1992-12-01

    The application of a large uniaxial stress to p-type Ge single crystals changes the character of both the valence band and the energy levels associated with the acceptors. Changes include the splitting of the fourfold degeneracy of the valence band top and the reduction of the ionization energy of shallow acceptors. In order to study the effect of uniaxial stress on transport properties of photoexcited holes, a variable temperature photo-Hall effect system was built in which stressed Ge:Ga and Ge:Be could be characterized. Results indicate that stress increases the lifetime and Hall mobility of photoexcited holes. These observations may help further the understanding of fundamental physical processes that affect the performance of stressed Ge photoconductors including the capture of holes by shallow acceptors.

  17. Lunar mass spectrometer test program

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Torney, F. L.; Dobrott, J. R.

    1972-01-01

    The procedures are described along with results obtained in a test program conducted to demonstrate the performance of a candidate lunar mass spectrometer. The instrument was designed to sample and measure gases believed to exist in the lunar atmosphere at the surface. The subject instrument consists of a cold cathode ion source, a small quadrupole mass analyzer and an off axis electron multiplier ion counting detector. The major program emphasis was placed on demonstrating instrument resolution, sensitivity and S/N ratio over the mass range 0-150 amu and over a partial pressure range from 10 to the minus 9th power to 10 to the minus 13th power torr. Ultrahigh vacuum tests were conducted and the minimum detectable partial pressure for neon, argon, krypton and xenon was successfully determined for the spectrometer using isotopes of these gases. With the exception of neon, the minimum detectable partial pressure is approximately 4 x 10 to the minus 14th power torr for the above gases.

  18. Miniature Ion-Array Spectrometer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hartley, Frank T.

    2006-01-01

    A figure is shown that depicts a proposed miniature ion-mobility spectrometer that would share many features of design and operation of the instrument described in another article. The main differences between that instrument and this one would lie in the configuration and mode of operation of the filter and detector electrodes. A filter electrode and detector electrodes would be located along the sides of a drift tube downstream from the accelerator electrode. These electrodes would apply a combination of (1) a transverse AC electric field that would effect differential transverse dispersal of ions and (2) a transverse DC electric field that would drive the dispersed ions toward the detector electrodes at different distances along the drift tube. The electric current collected by each detector electrode would be a measure of the current, and thus of the abundance of the species of ions impinging on that electrode. The currents collected by all the detector electrodes could be measured simultaneously to obtain continuous readings of abundances of species. The downstream momentum of accelerated ions would be maintained through neutralization on the electrodes; the momentum of the resulting neutral atoms would serve to expel gases from spectrometer, without need for a pump.

  19. [Hadamard transform spectrometer mixed pixels' unmixing method].

    PubMed

    Yan, Peng; Hu, Bing-Liang; Liu, Xue-Bin; Sun, Wei; Li, Li-Bo; Feng, Yu-Tao; Liu, Yong-Zheng

    2011-10-01

    Hadamard transform imaging spectrometer is a multi-channel digital transform spectrometer detection technology, this paper based on digital micromirror array device (DMD) of the Hadamard transform spectrometer working principle and instrument structure, obtained by the imaging sensor mixed pixel were analyzed, theory derived the solution of pixel aliasing hybrid method, simulation results show that the method is simple and effective to improve the accuracy of mixed pixel spectrum more than 10% recovery. PMID:22250574

  20. Compact reflective imaging spectrometer utilizing immersed gratings

    DOEpatents

    Chrisp, Michael P.

    2006-05-09

    A compact imaging spectrometer comprising an entrance slit for directing light, a first mirror that receives said light and reflects said light, an immersive diffraction grating that diffracts said light, a second mirror that focuses said light, and a detector array that receives said focused light. The compact imaging spectrometer can be utilized for remote sensing imaging spectrometers where size and weight are of primary importance.

  1. Charmed-meson production in 800-GeV P-P interactions

    SciTech Connect

    Senko, M.F.

    1989-01-01

    The purpose of this dissertation is to present the results of a study concerning the energy dependence of charmed meson production properties as a test of Quantum Chromodynamics (QCD). This experiment was performed at Fermi National Accelerator Laboratory, using a rapid cycling bubble chamber (LEBC) as a hydrogen target and high resolution vertex detector, in combination with the Fermilab Multiparticle Spectrometer (FMPS). The multiplicity trigger was unbiased, and spectrometer acceptance was good at x{sub F} {ge} 0. A comparison of the results from previous experiments at center of mass energies {radical}s {le} 27 GeV and {radical}s {ge} 53 GeV implies a total charm particle production cross section which rises rapidly as a function of {radical}s. The result of the experiment, {sigma}(D/{bar D}) = 42.7 {plus minus} 7.8 {mu}b at {radical}s = 38 GeV, indicates a slower rise, in agreement with QCD predictions. A maximum likelihood fit to the parameterization of the differential cross section as d{sup 2}{sigma}/dx{sub F}dp{sub {perpendicular}}{sup 2} {approximately} (1 {minus} {vert bar}x{sub F}{vert bar}){sup n}e{sup {minus}bp{sub {perpendicular}}{sup 2}} gives the results n = 8.4{sub {minus}1.9}{sup +2.2}, b= 0.78{sub {minus}0.16}{sup +0.19} (GeV/c){sup {minus}2}, and {l angle}p{perpendicular}{r angle} = 1.1{sub {minus} 0.1}{sup +0.2} GeV/c. When compared with results from the lower energy experiments, these values indicate charm production becoming more central and {l angle}p{perpendicular}{r angle} being consistent with the charmed quark mass. These results are once again consistent with QCD predictions.

  2. Ge/graded-SiGe multiplication layers for low-voltage and low-noise Ge avalanche photodiodes on Si

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miyasaka, Yuji; Hiraki, Tatsurou; Okazaki, Kota; Takeda, Kotaro; Tsuchizawa, Tai; Yamada, Koji; Wada, Kazumi; Ishikawa, Yasuhiko

    2016-04-01

    A new structure is examined for low-voltage and low-noise Ge-based avalanche photodiodes (APDs) on Si, where a Ge/graded-SiGe heterostructure is used as the multiplication layer of a separate-absorption-carrier-multiplication structure. The Ge/SiGe heterojunction multiplication layer is theoretically shown to be useful for preferentially enhancing impact ionization for photogenerated holes injected from the Ge optical-absorption layer via the graded SiGe, reflecting the valence band discontinuity at the Ge/SiGe interface. This property is effective not only for the reduction of operation voltage/electric field strength in Ge-based APDs but also for the reduction of excess noise resulting from the ratio of the ionization coefficients between electrons and holes being far from unity. Such Ge/graded-SiGe heterostructures are successfully fabricated by ultrahigh-vacuum chemical vapor deposition. Preliminary pin diodes having a Ge/graded-SiGe multiplication layer act reasonably as photodetectors, showing a multiplication gain larger than those for diodes without the Ge/SiGe heterojunction.

  3. Elastic antiproton-proton photoproduction between threshold and 4.8 GeV

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barber, D. P.; Dainton, J. B.; Lee, L. C. Y.; Marshall, R.; Thompson, J. C.; Williams, D. T.; Brodbeck, T. J.; Frost, G.; Newton, D.; Patrick, G. N.; Pearce, G. F.; Sloan, T.; Brookes, G. R.; Haynes, W. J.; Wilkes, P. B.

    1980-03-01

    The cross section for the process γ p → overlineppp has been measured from threshold up to 4.8 GeV using a tagged photon beam and a multiparticle spectrometer which detected all final state particles. The production cross section rises rapidly from threshold to a constant value of 35 nb. No evidence is found in the mass spectra for the production of narrow meson resonances decaying into overlinepp.

  4. A compact versatile femtosecond spectrometer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nagarajan, V.; Johnson, E.; Schellenberg, P.; Parson, W.; Windeler, R.

    2002-12-01

    A compact apparatus for femtosecond pump-probe experiments is described. The apparatus is based on a cavity-dumped titanium:sapphire laser. Probe pulses are generated by focusing weak (˜1 nJ) pulses into a microstructure fiber that produces broadband continuum pulses with high efficiency. With the pump pulses compressed and probe pulses uncompressed, the rise time of the pump-probe signals is <100 fs. The 830 nm pump pulses are also frequency doubled to generate light for excitation at 415 nm. The versatility of the spectrometer is demonstrated by exciting molecules at either 830 or 415 nm, and probing at wavelengths ranging from 500 to 950 nm. Some results on the green fluorescent protein are presented.

  5. Clementine RRELAX SRAM Particle Spectrometer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Buehler, M.; Soli, G.; Blaes, B.; Ratliff, J.; Garrett, H.

    1994-01-01

    The Clementine RRELAX radiation monitor chip consists of a p-FET total dose monitor and a 4-kbit SRAM particle spectrometer. Eight of these chips were included in the RRELAX and used to detect the passage of the Clementine (S/C) and the innerstage adapter (ISA) through the earth's radiation belts and the 21-Feb 1994 solar flare. This is the first space flight for this 1.2 micron rad-soft custom CMOS radiation monitor. This paper emphasizes results from the SRAM particle detector which showed that it a) has a detection range of five orders of magnitude relative to the 21-Feb solar flare, b) is not affected by electrons, and c) detected microflares occurring with a 26.5 day period.

  6. Fluorescence imaging spectrometer optical design

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Taiti, A.; Coppo, P.; Battistelli, E.

    2015-09-01

    The optical design of the FLuORescence Imaging Spectrometer (FLORIS) studied for the Fluorescence Explorer (FLEX) mission is discussed. FLEX is a candidate for the ESA's 8th Earth Explorer opportunity mission. FLORIS is a pushbroom hyperspectral imager foreseen to be embarked on board of a medium size satellite, flying in tandem with Sentinel-3 in a Sun synchronous orbit at a height of about 815 km. FLORIS will observe the vegetation fluorescence and reflectance within a spectral range between 500 and 780 nm. Multi-frames acquisitions on matrix detectors during the satellite movement will allow the production of 2D Earth scene images in two different spectral channels, called HR and LR with spectral resolution of 0.3 and 2 nm respectively. A common fore optics is foreseen to enhance by design the spatial co-registration between the two spectral channels, which have the same ground spatial sampling (300 m) and swath (150 km). An overlapped spectral range between the two channels is also introduced to simplify the spectral coregistration. A compact opto-mechanical solution with all spherical and plane optical elements is proposed, and the most significant design rationales are described. The instrument optical architecture foresees a dual Babinet scrambler, a dioptric telescope and two grating spectrometers (HR and LR), each consisting of a modified Offner configuration. The developed design is robust, stable vs temperature, easy to align, showing very high optical quality along the whole field of view. The system gives also excellent correction for transverse chromatic aberration and distortions (keystone and smile).

  7. The Geostationary Fourier Transform Spectrometer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Key, Richard; Sander, Stanley; Eldering, Annmarie; Miller, Charles; Frankenberg, Christian; Natra, Vijay; Rider, David; Blavier, Jean-Francois; Bekker, Dmitriy; Wu, Yen-Hung

    2012-01-01

    The Geostationary Fourier Transform Spectrometer (GeoFTS) is an imaging spectrometer designed for an earth science mission to measure key atmospheric trace gases and process tracers related to climate change and human activity. The GeoFTS instrument is a half meter cube size instrument designed to operate in geostationary orbit as a secondary "hosted" payload on a commercial geostationary satellite mission. The advantage of GEO is the ability to continuously stare at a region of the earth, enabling frequent sampling to capture the diurnal variability of biogenic fluxes and anthropogenic emissions from city to continental scales. The science goal is to obtain a process-based understanding of the carbon cycle from simultaneous high spatial resolution measurements of carbon dioxide (CO2), methane (CH4), carbon monoxide (CO), and chlorophyll fluorescence (CF) many times per day in the near infrared spectral region to capture their spatial and temporal variations on diurnal, synoptic, seasonal and interannual time scales. The GeoFTS instrument is based on a Michelson interferometer design with a number of advanced features incorporated. Two of the most important advanced features are the focal plane arrays and the optical path difference mechanism. A breadboard GeoFTS instrument has demonstrated functionality for simultaneous measurements in the visible and IR in the laboratory and subsequently in the field at the California Laboratory for Atmospheric Remote Sensing (CLARS) observatory on Mt. Wilson overlooking the Los Angeles basin. A GeoFTS engineering model instrument is being developed which will make simultaneous visible and IR measurements under space flight like environmental conditions (thermal-vacuum at 180 K). This will demonstrate critical instrument capabilities such as optical alignment stability, interferometer modulation efficiency, and high throughput FPA signal processing. This will reduce flight instrument development risk and show that the Geo

  8. The Geostationary Fourier Transform Spectrometer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Key, Richard; Sander, Stanley; Eldering, Annmarie; Blavier, Jean-Francois; Bekker, Dmitriy; Manatt, Ken; Rider, David; Wu, Yen-Hung

    2012-01-01

    The Geostationary Fourier Transform Spectrometer (GeoFTS) is an imaging spectrometer designed for a geostationary orbit (GEO) earth science mission to measure key atmospheric trace gases and process tracers related to climate change and human activity. GEO allows GeoFTS to continuously stare at a region of the earth for frequent sampling to capture the variability of biogenic fluxes and anthropogenic emissions from city to continental spatial scales and temporal scales from diurnal, synoptic, seasonal to interannual. The measurement strategy provides a process based understanding of the carbon cycle from contiguous maps of carbon dioxide (CO2), methane (CH4), carbon monoxide (CO), and chlorophyll fluorescence (CF) collected many times per day at high spatial resolution (2.7kmx2.7km at nadir). The CO2/CH4/CO/CF measurement suite in the near infrared spectral region provides the information needed to disentangle natural and anthropogenic contributions to atmospheric carbon concentrations and to minimize uncertainties in the flow of carbon between the atmosphere and surface. The half meter cube size GeoFTS instrument is based on a Michelson interferometer design that uses all high TRL components in a modular configuration to reduce complexity and cost. It is self-contained and as independent of the spacecraft as possible with simple spacecraft interfaces, making it ideal to be a "hosted" payload on a commercial communications satellite mission. The hosted payload approach for measuring the major carbon-containing gases in the atmosphere from the geostationary vantage point will affordably advance the scientific understating of carbon cycle processes and climate change.

  9. SPI: The spectrometer aboard INTEGRAL

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vedrenne, G.; Roques, J.-P.; Schönfelder, V.; Mandrou, P.; Lichti, G. G.; von Kienlin, A.; Cordier, B.; Schanne, S.; Knödlseder, J.; Skinner, G.; Jean, P.; Sanchez, F.; Caraveo, P.; Teegarden, B.; von Ballmoos, P.; Bouchet, L.; Paul, P.; Matteson, J.; Boggs, S.; Wunderer, C.; Leleux, P.; Weidenspointner, G.; Durouchoux, Ph.; Diehl, R.; Strong, A.; Cassé, M.; Clair, M. A.; André, Y.

    2003-11-01

    SPI is a high spectral resolution gamma-ray telescope on board the ESA mission INTEGRAL (International Gamma Ray Astrophysics Laboratory). It consists of an array of 19 closely packed germanium detectors surrounded by an active anticoincidence shield of BGO. The imaging capabilities of the instrument are obtained with a tungsten coded aperture mask located 1.7 m from the Ge array. The fully coded field-of-view is 16ensuremath {o}, the partially coded field of view amounts to 31ensuremath {o}, and the angular resolution is 2.5ensuremath {o}. The energy range extends from 20 keV to 8 MeV with a typical energy resolution of 2.5 keV at 1.3 MeV. Here we present the general concept of the instrument followed by a brief description of each of the main subsystems. INTEGRAL was successfully launched in October 2002 and SPI is functioning extremely well.

  10. High resolution magnetic spectrometer SHARAQ in RIBF

    SciTech Connect

    Shimoura, S.

    2007-05-22

    For a new spectroscopy of nuclei using intense RI beams at RIBF, we started the SHARAQ project where a high-resolution SHARAQ spectrometer is being constructed together with a high-resolution secondary beam line. Physics motivation and the specification of the spectrometer are presented.

  11. Spin Spectrometer at the ALS and APS

    SciTech Connect

    Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory; University of Missouri-Rolla; Boyd Technologies; Morton, Simon A; Morton, Simon A; Tobin, James G; Yu, Sung Woo; Komesu, Takashi; Waddill, George D; Boyd, Peter

    2007-04-20

    A spin-resolving photoelectron spectrometer, the"Spin Spectrometer," has been designed and built. It has been utilized at both the Advanced Light Source in Berkeley, CA, and the Advanced Photon Source in Argonne, IL. Technical details and an example of experimental results are presented here.

  12. An improved nuclear magnetic resonance spectrometer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Elleman, D. D.; Manatt, S. L.

    1967-01-01

    Cylindrical sample container provides a high degree of nuclear stabilization to a nuclear magnetic resonance /nmr/ spectrometer. It is placed coaxially about the nmr insert and contains reference sample that gives a signal suitable for locking the field and frequency of an nmr spectrometer with a simple audio modulation system.

  13. A Mass Spectrometer Simulator in Your Computer

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gagnon, Michel

    2012-01-01

    Introduced to study components of ionized gas, the mass spectrometer has evolved into a highly accurate device now used in many undergraduate and research laboratories. Unfortunately, despite their importance in the formation of future scientists, mass spectrometers remain beyond the financial reach of many high schools and colleges. As a result,…

  14. A spectrometer for lifetime determination by β-γ-γ delayed coincidence technique at KUR-ISOL

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kojima, Y.; Hayashi, H.; Shibata, M.; Endo, S.; Shizuma, K.; Taniguchi, A.

    2011-12-01

    A new spectrometer for measuring nuclear level lifetimes has been installed at the on-line isotope separator of the Kyoto University Reactor. The spectrometer consists of a LaBr3(Ce), Ge and a thin plastic scintillation detector, and the lifetimes are determined using a β-γ-γ delayed coincidence technique. In this study, the LaBr3 detector was used to obtain time spectra, whereas the Ge detector was used to select a desired γ branch. The energy dependence of the time resolutions was measured down to a photon energy of 100 keV. The lifetimes measured for the excited levels in 93Sr and 148Ce agree well with their evaluated values. The lifetime of 8.5(5) ns was obtained for the first time for the 98.2 keV level in 148Pr.

  15. Kinetic study of GeO disproportionation into a GeO{sub 2}/Ge system using x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Wang Shengkai; Liu Honggang; Toriumi, Akira

    2012-08-06

    GeO disproportionation into GeO{sub 2} and Ge is studied through x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy. Direct evidence for the reaction 2GeO {yields} GeO{sub 2} + Ge after annealing in ultra-high vacuum is presented. Activation energy for GeO disproportionation is found to be about 0.7 {+-} 0.2 eV through kinetic and thermodynamic calculations. A kinetic model of GeO disproportionation is established by considering oxygen transfer in the GeO network. The relationship between GeO disproportionation and GeO desorption induced by GeO{sub 2}/Ge interfacial reaction is discussed, and the apparent contradiction between GeO desorption via interfacial redox reaction and GeO disproportionation into Ge and GeO{sub 2} is explained by considering the oxygen vacancy.

  16. Compact time-of-flight mass spectrometer

    SciTech Connect

    Belov, A.S.; Kubalov, S.A.; Kuzik, V.F.; Yakushev, V.P.

    1986-02-01

    This paper describes a time-of-flight mass spectrometer developed for measuring the parameters of a pulsed hydrogen beam. The duration of an electron-beam current pulse in the ionizer of the mass spectrometer can be varied within 2-20 usec, the pulse electron current is 0.6 mA, and the electron energy is 250 eV. The time resolution of the mass spectrometer is determined by the repetition period of the electron-beam current pulses and is 40 usec. The mass spectrometer has 100% transmission in the direction of motion of molecular-beam particles. The dimension of the mass spectrometer is 7 cm in this direction. The mass resolution is sufficient for determination of the composition of the hydrogen beam.

  17. Dispersion of nonresonant third-order nonlinearities in GeSiSn ternary alloys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de Leonardis, Francesco; Troia, Benedetto; Soref, Richard A.; Passaro, Vittorio M. N.

    2016-09-01

    Silicon (Si), tin (Sn), and germanium (Ge) alloys have attracted research attention as direct band gap semiconductors with applications in electronics and optoelectronics. In particular, GeSn field effect transistors can exhibit very high performance in terms of power reduction and operating speed because of the high electron drift mobility, while the SiGeSn system can be constructed using CMOS-compatible techniques to realize lasers, LED, and photodetectors. The wide Si, Ge and Sn transparencies allow the use of binary and ternary alloys extended to mid-IR wavelengths, where nonlinearities can also be employed. However, neither theoretical or experimental predictions of nonlinear features in SiGeSn alloys are reported in the literature. For the first time, a rigorous and detailed physical investigation is presented to estimate the two photon absorption (TPA) coefficient and the Kerr refractive index for the SiGeSn alloy up to 12 μm. The TPA spectrum, the effective TPA wavelength cut-off, and the Kerr nonlinear refractive index have been determined as a function of alloy compositions. The promising results achieved can pave the way to the demonstration of on-chip nonlinear-based applications, including mid-IR spectrometer-on-a-chip, all-optical wavelength down/up-conversion, frequency comb generation, quantum-correlated photon-pair source generation and supercontinuum source creation, as well as Raman lasing.

  18. Measurement of the Proton Form Factor Ratio GE /GM from Double Spin Asymmetries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liyanage, Anusha; SANE Collaboration

    2011-04-01

    Experiment E03-109 (SANE, Spin Asymmetries of the Nucleon Experiment) was carried out in Hall C at Jefferson Lab to study the proton spin structure functions with a dynamically polarized ammonia target and longitudinally polarized electron beam. Scattered electrons were detected by the Big Electron Telescope Array (BETA), and a set of elastic data was collected by detecting the recoiling proton in the High Momentum Spectrometer (HMS) in coincidence with the electron. The measurement of the elastic double spin asymmetry allows to extract the proton electric to magnetic form factor ratio GE /GM at high four-momentum transfers, Q2 = 5.25 (GeV/c)2 and Q2 = 6.25 (GeV/c)2. In addition to the coincidence data, inclusively scattered electrons from the polarized ammonia target were detected by HMS, which allows to extract GE /GM from the beam-target asymmetry in the elastic region at lower four-momentum transfer, Q2 = 2.2 (GeV/c)2. These alternative measurements of GE /GM will verify the dramatic discrepancy at high Q2 between the Rosenbluth and the recoil polarization transfer method. The current status of the analysis will be presented.

  19. Proton Form Factor Ratio GE/GM from Double Spin Asymmetry with Polarized Beam and Target

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liyanage, Anusha

    2010-11-01

    Along with experiment E07-003 (SANE, Spin Asymmetries of the Nucleon Experiment), which has been performed in Hall C at Jefferson Lab with a polarized ammonia target to study the proton's spin structure, elastic scattering was carried out simultaneously, with electrons detected in the Big Electron Telescope Array (BETA) in coincidence with recoiling protons reconstructed by the High Momentum Spectrometer (HMS). The elastic double spin asymmetry allows to extract the proton electric to magnetic form factor ratio GE/GM at high momentum transfers, Q^2 = 5.25 (GeV/c)^2 and Q^2 = 6.25 (GeV/c)^2. In addition to the coincidence data, inclusively scattered electrons from polarized ammonia were detected by HMS, which allows to measure the beam-target asymmetry in the elastic region and to extract the GE/GM at Q^2 = 2.2 (GeV/c)^2. This alternative measurement of GE/GM will verify the dramatic discrepancy at high Q^2 between the Rosenbluth and the recoil polarization transfer method with a different technique. The current status of the analysis and some preliminary results will be presented.

  20. Dispersion of nonresonant third-order nonlinearities in GeSiSn ternary alloys

    PubMed Central

    De Leonardis, Francesco; Troia, Benedetto; Soref, Richard A.; Passaro, Vittorio M. N.

    2016-01-01

    Silicon (Si), tin (Sn), and germanium (Ge) alloys have attracted research attention as direct band gap semiconductors with applications in electronics and optoelectronics. In particular, GeSn field effect transistors can exhibit very high performance in terms of power reduction and operating speed because of the high electron drift mobility, while the SiGeSn system can be constructed using CMOS-compatible techniques to realize lasers, LED, and photodetectors. The wide Si, Ge and Sn transparencies allow the use of binary and ternary alloys extended to mid-IR wavelengths, where nonlinearities can also be employed. However, neither theoretical or experimental predictions of nonlinear features in SiGeSn alloys are reported in the literature. For the first time, a rigorous and detailed physical investigation is presented to estimate the two photon absorption (TPA) coefficient and the Kerr refractive index for the SiGeSn alloy up to 12 μm. The TPA spectrum, the effective TPA wavelength cut-off, and the Kerr nonlinear refractive index have been determined as a function of alloy compositions. The promising results achieved can pave the way to the demonstration of on-chip nonlinear-based applications, including mid-IR spectrometer-on-a-chip, all-optical wavelength down/up-conversion, frequency comb generation, quantum-correlated photon-pair source generation and supercontinuum source creation, as well as Raman lasing. PMID:27622979

  1. Dispersion of nonresonant third-order nonlinearities in GeSiSn ternary alloys.

    PubMed

    De Leonardis, Francesco; Troia, Benedetto; Soref, Richard A; Passaro, Vittorio M N

    2016-01-01

    Silicon (Si), tin (Sn), and germanium (Ge) alloys have attracted research attention as direct band gap semiconductors with applications in electronics and optoelectronics. In particular, GeSn field effect transistors can exhibit very high performance in terms of power reduction and operating speed because of the high electron drift mobility, while the SiGeSn system can be constructed using CMOS-compatible techniques to realize lasers, LED, and photodetectors. The wide Si, Ge and Sn transparencies allow the use of binary and ternary alloys extended to mid-IR wavelengths, where nonlinearities can also be employed. However, neither theoretical or experimental predictions of nonlinear features in SiGeSn alloys are reported in the literature. For the first time, a rigorous and detailed physical investigation is presented to estimate the two photon absorption (TPA) coefficient and the Kerr refractive index for the SiGeSn alloy up to 12 μm. The TPA spectrum, the effective TPA wavelength cut-off, and the Kerr nonlinear refractive index have been determined as a function of alloy compositions. The promising results achieved can pave the way to the demonstration of on-chip nonlinear-based applications, including mid-IR spectrometer-on-a-chip, all-optical wavelength down/up-conversion, frequency comb generation, quantum-correlated photon-pair source generation and supercontinuum source creation, as well as Raman lasing. PMID:27622979

  2. Measurement of the nuclear electromagnetic cascade development in glass at energies above 200 GeV

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gillespie, C. R.; Huggett, R. W.; Humphreys, D. R.; Jones, W. V.; Levit, L. B.

    1971-01-01

    The longitudinal development of nuclear-electromagnetic cascades with energies greater than 200 GeV was measured in a low-Z (glass) absorber. This was done in the course of operating an ionization spectrometer at mountain altitude in an experiment to study the properties of gamma rays emitted from individual interactions at energies around 10,000 GeV. The ionization produced by a cascade is sampled by 20 sheets of plastic scintillator spaced uniformly in depth every 2.2 radiation lengths. Adjacent pairs of scintillators are viewed by photomultipliers which measure the mean ionization produced by an individual cascade in 10 layers each 1.1 interaction length (4.4 radiation lengths) thick. The longitudinal development of the cascades was measured for about 250 cascades having energies ranging from 200 GeV to 2500 GeV. The observations are compared with the predictions of calculations made for this specific spectrometer using a three-dimensional Monte Carlo model of the nuclear-electromagnetic cascade.

  3. Insight into unusual impurity absorbability of GeO(2) in GeO(2)∕Ge stacks.

    PubMed

    Ogawa, Shingo; Suda, Taichi; Yamamoto, Takashi; Kutsuki, Katsuhiro; Hideshima, Iori; Hosoi, Takuji; Shimura, Takayoshi; Watanabe, Heiji

    2011-10-01

    Adsorbed species and its diffusion behaviors in GeO(2)∕Ge stacks, which are future alternative metal-oxide-semiconductor (MOS) materials, have been investigated using various physical analyses. We clarified that GeO(2) rapidly absorbs moisture in air just after its exposure. After the absorbed moisture in GeO(2) reaches a certain limit, the GeO(2) starts to absorb some organic molecules, which is accompanied by a structural change in GeO(2) to form a partial carbonate or hydroxide. We also found that the hydrogen distribution in GeO(2) shows intrinsic characteristics, indicative of different diffusion behaviors at the surface and at the GeO(2)∕Ge interface. Because the impurity absorbability of GeO(2) has a great influence on the electrical properties in Ge-MOS devices, these results provide valuable information in realizing high quality GeO(2)∕Ge stacks for the actual use of Ge-MOS technologies.

  4. Electric and magnetic dipole excitations to bound states in 70,72,74,76Ge

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jung, A.; Lindenstruth, S.; Schacht, H.; Starck, B.; Stock, R.; Wesselborg, C.; Heil, R. D.; Kneissl, U.; Margraf, J.; Pitz, H. H.; Steiper, F.

    1995-02-01

    The nuclei 70,72,74,76Ge were studied by nuclear resonance fluorescence (NRF) experiments. Partially linearly polarized and unpolarized bremsstrahlung of 9 to 14 MeV endpoint energy was used at the Giessen 65 MeV electron linear accelerator; unpolarized bremsstrahlung of 4 MeV endpoint energy was used at the Stuttgart Dynamitron. The scattered photons were detected by Ge γ-ray spectrometers with high energy resolution. Multipolarities were determined by measuring the angular correlations between the beam and the scattered γ rays at different scattering angles. Precise excitation energies and ground-state decay widths of numerous (> 120) previously unknown spin-1 states were extracted. For 65 ground-state transitions (20 M1 transitions, 45 E1 transitions) parities were assigned, in a model-independent way, by polarized bremsstrahlung. A detailed distribution of electric and magnetic dipole strength in the even Ge isotopes was established.

  5. Epi-cleaning of Ge/GeSn heterostructures

    SciTech Connect

    Di Gaspare, L.; Sabbagh, D.; De Seta, M.; Sodo, A.; Wirths, S.; Buca, D.; Zaumseil, P.; Schroeder, T.; Capellini, G.

    2015-01-28

    We demonstrate a very-low temperature cleaning technique based on atomic hydrogen irradiation for highly (1%) tensile strained Ge epilayers grown on metastable, partially strain relaxed GeSn buffer layers. Atomic hydrogen is obtained by catalytic cracking of hydrogen gas on a hot tungsten filament in an ultra-high vacuum chamber. X-ray photoemission spectroscopy, reflection high energy electron spectroscopy, atomic force microscopy, secondary ion mass spectroscopy, and micro-Raman showed that an O- and C-free Ge surface was achieved, while maintaining the same roughness and strain condition of the as-deposited sample and without any Sn segregation, at a process temperature in the 100–300 °C range.

  6. Very low temperature epitaxy of Ge and Ge rich SiGe alloys with Ge2H6 in a Reduced Pressure - Chemical Vapour Deposition tool

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aubin, J.; Hartmann, J. M.; Bauer, M.; Moffatt, S.

    2016-07-01

    We have studied the very low temperature epitaxy of pure Ge and of Ge-rich SiGe alloys in a 200 mm industrial reduced pressure chemical vapour deposition tool. We have, first of all, benchmarked germane (GeH4) and digermane (Ge2H6) for the growth of pure Ge. Used Ge2H6 instead of GeH4 enabled us to dramatically increase the Ge growth rate at temperatures 425 °C and lower (5.6 nm min-1 compared to 0.14 nm min-1 at 350 °C with a Ge2H6 mass-flow one fourth that of GeH4). We have also evaluated at 400 °C, 100 Torr, the impact of the GeH4 or Ge2H6 mass-flow on the Ge growth rate. For a given Ge atomic flow, the higher surface reactivity of digermane yielded roughly five times higher growth rates than with germane. We have then combined digermane with disilane (Si2H6) or dichlorosilane (SiH2Cl2) in order to study the GeSi growth kinetics at 475 °C, 100 Torr. While the SiH2Cl2 mass-flow did not have any clear influence on the GeSi growth rate (with a 14 nm min-1 mean value, then), a Si2H6 mass-flow increase resulted in a slight GeSi growth rate increase (from 11 nm min-1 up to 14 nm min-1). Significantly higher Ge concentrations were otherwise accessed with dichlorosilane than with disilane, in the 77-82% range compared to the 39-53% range, respectively.

  7. Miniature Ion-Mobility Spectrometer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hartley, Frank T.

    2006-01-01

    The figure depicts a proposed miniature ion-mobility spectrometer that would be fabricated by micromachining. Unlike prior ion-mobility spectrometers, the proposed instrument would not be based on a time-of-flight principle and, consequently, would not have some of the disadvantageous characteristics of prior time-of-flight ion-mobility spectrometers. For example, one of these characteristics is the need for a bulky carrier-gas-feeding subsystem that includes a shutter gate to provide short pulses of gas in order to generate short pulses of ions. For another example, there is need for a complex device to generate pulses of ions from the pulses of gas and the device is capable of ionizing only a fraction of the incoming gas molecules; these characteristics preclude miniaturization. In contrast, the proposed instrument would not require a carrier-gas-feeding subsystem and would include a simple, highly compact device that would ionize all the molecules passing through it. The ionization device in the proposed instrument would be a 0.1-micron-thick dielectric membrane with metal electrodes on both sides. Small conical holes would be micromachined through the membrane and electrodes. An electric potential of the order of a volt applied between the membrane electrodes would give rise to an electric field of the order of several megavolts per meter in the submicron gap between the electrodes. An electric field of this magnitude would be sufficient to ionize all the molecules that enter the holes. Ionization (but not avalanche arcing) would occur because the distance between the ionizing electrodes would be less than the mean free path of gas molecules at the operating pressure of instrument. An accelerating grid would be located inside the instrument, downstream from the ionizing membrane. The electric potential applied to this grid would be negative relative to the potential on the inside electrode of the ionizing membrane and would be of a magnitude sufficient to

  8. Broadband Ge/SiGe quantum dot photodetector on pseudosubstrate

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    We report the fabrication and characterization of a ten-period Ge quantum dot photodetector grown on SiGe pseudosubstrate. The detector exhibits tunable photoresponse in both 3- to 5- μm and 8- to 12- μm spectral regions with responsivity values up to about 1 mA/W at a bias of −3 V and operates under normal incidence radiation with background limited performance at 100 K. The relative response in the mid- and long-wave atmospheric windows could be controlled through the applied voltage. PMID:23651470

  9. Photoluminescence and Cathodoluminescence Characterization of Ge/GeO2 Nanostructure Synthesized by Thermal Evaporation of Ge Powder

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pham, V. H.; Trung, D. Q.; Kien, N. D. T.; Tam, P. D.; Huy, P. T.

    2016-09-01

    This paper reports the first attempt to characterize the light-emission from Ge/GeO2 nanostructure synthesized by thermal evaporation. The synthesized Ge/GeO2 was observed to have a nanowire structure. Photoluminescence (PL) results show that the emission center of the PL peak at about 410 and 485 nm depends on the excitation wavelength. Experimental XRD, EDS and spectral analyses suggest that the 410 nm emission can be attributed to the Ge core; however, 485 nm is attributed to the GeO2 sheath.

  10. On the Nb-Ge Binary System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Papadimitriou, Ioannis; Utton, Claire; Tsakiropoulos, Panos

    2015-12-01

    First-principles calculations were used to study intermetallic compounds in the Nb-Ge system, to gain a better understanding of the phase diagram and resolve conflicts reported in the literature. The enthalpy of formation with regard to temperature was calculated for all the intermetallic compounds, to investigate phase stabilities and phase equilibria at low and elevated temperatures. These results, combined with the electronic DOS, suggest that the tI32 (W5Si3-type) Nb5Ge3 and NbGe2 compounds are stable over the whole temperature range. The stoichiometric cP8 Nb3Ge becomes stable close to its melting temperature. Regarding different compositions of the cP8 Nb3Ge, the calculations suggest the (Nb)0.75(Nb,Ge)0.25 model for the Nb3Ge phase instead of the proposed model, (Nb)0.75(Nb,Ge,Va)0.25, where Va represents vacancy. The calculations show that the tI32 (Cr5B3-type) Nb5Ge3, hP16 (Mn5Si3-type) Nb5Ge3 and Nb10Ge7 compounds should be considered metastable. The elastic constants, bulk, shear, and Young's modulus, Poisson's ratio, and Debye temperature of the Nb, Ge, cP8 Nb3Ge, tP32 Nb3Ge, tI32 (Cr5B3-type) Nb5Ge3, tI32 (W5Si3-type) Nb5Ge3, hP16 (Mn5Si3-type) Nb5Ge3, Nb10Ge7 and NbGe2 were calculated. These phases were found to be mechanically stable. Using the Cauchy pressure, Pugh's index of ductility, and the Poisson's ratio as criteria, the calculations suggest that the tI32 (Cr5B3-type) Nb5Ge3 and NbGe2 intermetallics should be brittle (with the latter being the most brittle) and the cP8 Nb3Ge, tP32 Nb3Ge, hP16 Nb5Si3 and Nb10Ge7 ductile (with cP8 Nb3Ge being the most ductile).

  11. Methods for Optical Calibration of the BigBite Hadron Spectrometer

    SciTech Connect

    M. Mihovilovic, K. Allada, B.D. Anderson, J.R.M. Annand, T. Averett, A. Camsonne, R.W. Chan, J.-P. Chen, K. Chirapatpimol, C.W. de Jager, S. Gilad, D.J. Hamilton, J.-O. Hansen, D.W. Higinbotham, J. Juang, X. Jiang, G. Jin, W. Korsch, J.J. LeRose, R.A. Lindgren, N. Liyanage, E. Long, R. Michaels, B. Moffit, P. Monaghan, V. Nelyubin, B.E. Norum, E. Piasetzky, X. Qian, Y. Qiang, S. Riordan, G. Ron, G. Rosner, B. Sawatzky, M. Shabestari, A. Shahinyan, R. Shneor, S. Sirca, R. Subedi, V. Sulkosky, J.W. Watson, B. Wojtsekhowski, Y.-W. Zhang

    2012-09-01

    The techniques for optical calibration of Jefferson Lab's large-acceptance magnetic hadron spectrometer, BigBite, have been examined. The most consistent and stable results were obtained by using a method based on singular value decomposition. In spite of the complexity of the optics, the particles positions and momenta at the target have been precisely reconstructed from the coordinates measured in the detectors by means of a single back-tracing matrix. The technique is applicable to any similar magnetic spectrometer and any particle type. For 0.55 GeV/c protons, we have established the vertex resolution of 1.2 cm, angular resolutions of 7 mrad and 16 mrad (in-plane and out-of-plane, respectively), and a relative momentum resolution of 1.6%.

  12. Quartz Hodoscope for the SuperHMS Spectrometer Trigger System at Hall-C Jefferson Lab

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alharbi, Nouf; Ahmidouch, Abdellah; Aljawarneh, Bashar; Danagoulian, Samuel

    2016-03-01

    A quartz hodoscope of twenty one fused silica (quartz) bars has been constructed and delivered to Jefferson Lab to be part of the trigger system for the Super High Momentum Spectrometer (SHMS). The quartz bars are 125-cm long, 5.5-cm wide, and 2.5-cm thick and are viewed on each end by a UV-sensitive PMT. The SHMS spectrometer will play a central role in carrying out the 11-GeV physics program at Hall-C Jefferson Lab. The quartz hodoscope task is to provide a clean detection of charged particles, a high level of background suppression, and an accurate tracking efficiency determination. The hodoscope has been tested in situ with cosmic rays. We present final performance results of the hodoscope which include light yield, position resolution and efficiency, as well as plans for its commissioning.

  13. Precision measurements of g1 of the proton and the deuteron with 6 GeV electrons

    SciTech Connect

    Prok, Yelena; Bosted, Peter; Kvaltine, Nicholas; Adhikari, Krishna; Adikaram-Mudiyanselage, Dasuni; Aghasyan, Mher; Amaryan, Moskov; Anderson, Mark; Anefalos Pereira, Sergio; Avagyan, Harutyun; Baghdasaryan, Hovhannes; Ball, Jacques; Baltzell, Nathan; Battaglieri, Marco; Biselli, Angela; Bono, Jason; Briscoe, William; Brock, Joseph; Brooks, William; Bueltmann, Stephen; Burkert, Volker; Carlin, Christopher; Carman, Daniel; Celentano, Andrea; Chandavar, Shloka; Colaneri, Luca; Cole, Philip; Contalbrigo, Marco; Cortes, Olga; Crabb, Donald; Crede, Volker; D'Angelo, Annalisa; Dashyan, Natalya; De Vita, Raffaella; De Sanctis, Enzo; Deur, Alexandre; Djalali, Chaden; Dodge, Gail; Doughty, David; Dupre, Raphael; El Alaoui, Ahmed; El Fassi, Lamiaa; Elouadrhiri, Latifa; Fedotov, Gleb; Fegan, Stuart; Fersch, Robert; Fleming, Jamie; Forest, Tony; Garcon, Michel; Gevorgyan, Nerses; Ghandilyan, Yeranuhi; Gilfoyle, Gerard; Girod-Gard, Francois-Xavier; Giovanetti, Kevin; Goetz, John; Gohn, Wesley; Gothe, Ralf; Griffioen, Keith; Guegan, Baptiste; Guler, Nevzat; Hafidi, Kawtar; Hanretty, Charles; Harrison, Nathan; Hattawy, Mohammad; Hicks, Kenneth; Ho, Dao; Holtrop, Maurik; Ilieva, Yordanka; Ireland, David; Ishkhanov, Boris; Isupov, Evgeny; Jawalkar, Sucheta; Jiang, Xiaodong; Jo, Hyon-Suk; Joo, Kyungseon; Kalantarians, Narbe; Keith, Christopher; Keller, Daniel; Khandaker, Mahbubul; Kim, Andrey; Kim, Wooyoung; Klein, Andreas; Klein, Franz; Koirala, Suman; Kubarovsky, Valery; Kuhn, Sebastian; Kuleshov, Sergey; Lenisa, Paolo; Livingston, Kenneth; Lu, Haiyun; MacGregor, Ian; Markov, Nikolai; Mayer, Michael; McKinnon, Bryan; Meekins, David; Mineeva, Taisiya; Mirazita, Marco; Mokeev, Viktor; Montgomery, Rachel; MOUTARDE, Herve; Movsisyan, Aram; Munevar Espitia, Edwin; Munoz Camacho, Carlos; Nadel-Turonski, Pawel; Niccolai, Silvia; Niculescu, Gabriel; Niculescu, Maria; Osipenko, Mikhail; Ostrovidov, Alexander; Pappalardo, Luciano; Paremuzyan, Rafayel; Park, K; Peng, Peng; Phillips, J J; Pierce, Joshua; Pisano, Silvia; Pogorelko, Oleg; Pozdniakov, Serguei; Price, John; Procureur, Sebastien; Protopopescu, Dan; Puckett, Andrew; Raue, Brian; Rimal, Dipak; Ripani, Marco; Rizzo, Alessandro; Rosner, Guenther; Rossi, Patrizia; Roy, Priyashree; Sabatie, Franck; Saini, Mukesh; Salgado, Carlos; Schott, Diane; Schumacher, Reinhard; Seder, Erin; Sharabian, Youri; Simonyan, Ani; Smith, Claude; Smith, Gregory; Sober, Daniel; Sokhan, Daria; Stepanyan, Stepan; Stepanyan, Samuel; Strakovski, Igor; Strauch, Steffen; Sytnik, Valeriy; Taiuti, Mauro; Tang, Wei; Tkachenko, Svyatoslav; Ungaro, Maurizio; Vernarsky, Brian; Vlasov, Alexander; Voskanyan, Hakob; Voutier, Eric; Walford, Natalie; Watts, Daniel; Weinstein, Lawrence; Zachariou, Nicholas; Zana, Lorenzo; Zhang, Jixie; Zhao, Bo; Zhao, Zhiwen; Zonta, Irene

    2014-08-01

    The inclusive polarized structure functions of the proton and deuteron, g1p and g1d, were measured with high statistical precision using polarized 6 GeV electrons incident on a polarized ammonia target in Hall B at Jefferson Laboratory. Electrons scattered at lab angles between 18 and 45 degrees were detected using the CEBAF Large Acceptance Spectrometer (CLAS). For the usual DIS kinematics, Q^2>1 GeV^2 and the final-state invariant mass W>2 GeV, the ratio of polarized to unpolarized structure functions g1/F1 is found to be nearly independent of Q^2 at fixed x. Significant resonant structure is apparent at values of W up to 2.3 GeV. In the framework of perturbative QCD, the high-W results can be used to better constrain the polarization of quarks and gluons in the nucleon, as well as high-twist contributions.

  14. [The coding correction of slit diffraction in Hadamard transform spectrometer].

    PubMed

    Li, Bo; Wang, Shu-Rong; Huang, Yu; Wang, Jun-Bo

    2013-08-01

    According to the principles of Hadamard transform spectrometer and the slit diffraction characteristics, the influence of spectrometer entrance slit diffraction of Hadamard transform spectrometer on the measurement result was analyzed, for the diffraction case, the Hadamard transform spectrometer instrument structure matrix was studied, and the Hadamard transform spectrometer encoding/decoding method was established. The analysis of incident spectral verified the correctness of the coding/ decoding. This method is very important for the high precision measurement of Hadamard transform spectrometer.

  15. The hot plasma spectrometers on Freja

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Norberg, O.; Eliasson, L.

    1991-11-01

    The hot plasma instrumentation F3H on the Swedish-German Freja satellite due for launch in 1992 will consist of electron and ion spectrometers. The spectrometer Magnetic imaging Two dimensional Electron (MATE) will measure the two dimensional electron distribution in the spin plane in the energy range 0.1 to 120 keV. The ion mass spectrometer Three dimensional Ion Composition Spectrometer (TICS) measures a full three dimensional distribution in the energy range 0.5 to 15000 eV/q with high mass resolution. The instruments use a particle 'imaging' detector technique based on a large diameter microchannel plate with position sensitive anode. The topics to be studied with the Freja hot plasma spectrometers include auroral particle acceleration, heating and acceleration of ionospheric ions, and the dynamics of auroral arc systems. Of special importance to the scientific objectives is the high data rate from the Freja instrumentation, the MATE and TICS spectrometers will be sampled every 10 ms, corresponding to a spatial resolution better than 70 m at ionospheric heights. The design, simulation, and calibration of the spectrometers are discussed.

  16. Handheld spectrometers: the state of the art

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Crocombe, Richard A.

    2013-05-01

    "Small" spectrometers fall into three broad classes: small versions of laboratory instruments, providing data, subsequently processed on a PC; dedicated analyzers, providing actionable information to an individual operator; and process analyzers, providing quantitative or semi-quantitative information to a process controller. The emphasis of this paper is on handheld dedicated analyzers. Many spectrometers have historically been large, possible fragile, expensive and complicated to use. The challenge over the last dozen years, as instruments have moved into the field, has been to make spectrometers smaller, affordable, rugged, easy-to-use, but most of all capable of delivering actionable results. Actionable results can dramatically improve the efficiency of a testing process and transform the way business is done. There are several keys to this handheld spectrometer revolution. Consumer electronics has given us powerful mobile platforms, compact batteries, clearly visible displays, new user interfaces, etc., while telecomm has revolutionized miniature optics, sources and detectors. While these technologies enable miniature spectrometers themselves, actionable information has demanded the development of rugged algorithms for material confirmation, unknown identification, mixture analysis and detection of suspicious materials in unknown matrices. These algorithms are far more sophisticated than the `correlation' or `dot-product' methods commonly used in benchtop instruments. Finally, continuing consumer electronics advances now enable many more technologies to be incorporated into handheld spectrometers, including Bluetooth, wireless, WiFi, GPS, cameras and bar code readers, and the continued size shrinkage of spectrometer `engines' leads to the prospect of dual technology or `hyphenated' handheld instruments.

  17. Miniature quadrupole mass spectrometer array

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chutjian, Ara (Inventor); Hecht, Michael H. (Inventor); Orient, Otto J. (Inventor)

    1997-01-01

    The present invention provides a minature quadrupole mass spectrometer array for the separation of ions, comprising a first pair of parallel, planar, nonmagnetic conducting rods each having an axis of symmetry, a second pair of planar, nonmagnetic conducting rods each having an axis of symmetry parallel to said first pair of rods and disposed such that a line perpendicular to each of said first axes of symmetry and a line perpendicular to each of said second axes of symmetry bisect each other and form a generally 90 degree angle. A nonconductive top positioning plate is positioned generally perpendicular to the first and second pairs of rods and has an aperture for ion entrance along an axis equidistant from each axis of symmetry of each of the parallel rods, a nonconductive bottom positioning plate is generally parallel to the top positioning plate and has an aperture for ion exit centered on an axis equidistant from each axis of symmetry of each of the parallel rods, means for maintaining a direct current voltage between the first and second pairs of rods, and means for applying a radio frequency voltage to the first and second pairs of rods.

  18. Miniature quadrupole mass spectrometer array

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chutjian, Ara (Inventor); Hecht, Michael H. (Inventor); Orient, Otto J. (Inventor)

    1998-01-01

    The present invention provides a minature quadrupole mass spectrometer array for the separation of ions, comprising a first pair of parallel, planar, nonmagnetic conducting rods each having an axis of symmetry, a second pair of planar, nonmagnetic conducting rods each having an axis of symmetry parallel to said first pair of rods and disposed such that a line perpendicular to each of said first axes of symmetry and a line perpendicular to each of said second axes of symmetry bisect each other and form a generally 90 degree angle. A nonconductive top positioning plate is positioned generally perpendicular to the first and second pairs of rods and has an aperture for ion entrance along an axis equidistant from each axis of symmetry of each of the parallel rods, a nonconductive bottom positioning plate is generally parallel to the top positioning plate and has an aperture for ion exit centered on an axis equidistant from each axis of symmetry of each of the parallel rods, means for maintaining a direct current voltage between the first and second pairs of rods, and means for applying a radio frequency voltage to the first and second pairs of rods.

  19. Spectrometer design approaching the limit

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Riesenberg, Rainer; Wuttig, Andreas; Peschel, Thomas; Damm, Christoph; Dobschal, Hans-Jürgen

    2008-09-01

    The design limits of grating array spectral sensors are discussed. The limit of a grating spectrometer with respect to the resolution is given by the diffraction limit of the grating. To approach the limit for the visible spectral region the entrance slits should reach a width of 2 μm and larger depending on wavelength and numerical aperture. The detector pixel sizes should be in the same range, which is achieved virtually by the discussed double array arrangement with a transmissive, static slit array and detector array. A number of techniques are applied for optimizing the performance as well as for miniaturization. A sub-pixel imaging including a sub-pixel analysis based on the double array arrangement virtually reduces the detector pixel sizes down to about 20%. To avoid the imaging aberrations the spectra is imaged from different entrance positions by the entrance slit array. The throughput can be increased by using a two dimensional entrance slit array, which includes a multiplex pattern or a fixed adaptive pattern. The design example of a UV-Raman spectral sensor is presented including spectral measurements.

  20. Superconducting High-Resolution X-Ray Spectrometers For Chemical State Analysis Of Dilute Samples

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Friedrich, Stephan; Drury, Owen B.; Funk, Tobias; Sherrell, Darren; Yachandra, Vittal K.; Labov, Simon E.; Cramer, Stephen P.

    2004-05-01

    Cryogenic X-ray spectrometers operating at temperatures below 1 K combine high energy resolution with broadband efficiency for X-ray energies up to 10 keV. They offer advantages for chemical state analysis of dilute samples by fluorescence-detected X-ray absorption spectroscopy (XAS) in cases where conventional Ge or Si(Li) detectors lack energy resolution and grating spectrometers lack detection efficiency. We are developing soft X-ray spectrometers based on superconducting Nb-Al-AlOx-Al-Nb tunnel junction (STJ) technology. X-rays absorbed in one of the superconducting electrodes generate excess charge carriers in proportion to their energy, thereby producing a measurable temporary increase in tunneling current. For STJ operation at the synchrotron, we have designed a two-stage adiabatic demagnetization refrigerator (ADR) with a cold finger that holds a 3 × 3 array of STJs inside the UHV sample chamber at a temperature of ˜0.1 K within ˜15 mm of a room temperature sample. Our STJ spectrometer can have an energy resolution below 10 eV FWHM for X-ray energies up to 1 keV, and has total count rate capabilities above 100,000 counts/s. We will describe detector performance in synchrotron-based X-ray fluorescence experiments and demonstrate its use for XAS on a dilute metal site in a metalloprotein.

  1. A partial-wave analysis of the K -Φ system produced in the reaction K -p → K +K -K -p at 18.5 GeV/c

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Armstrong, T.; Baubillier, M.; Beusch, W.; Bloodworth, I. J.; Bonesini, M.; Burns, A.; Calligarich, A.; Carney, J. N.; Cecchet, G.; Costa, G.; Dolfini, R.; Evangelista, C.; Ghidini, B.; Kinson, J. B.; Knudson, K.; Liguori, G.; Mandelli, L.; Mazzanti, M.; Navach, F.; Palano, A.; Perini, L.; Pons, Y.; Quercigh, E.; Strachman, Z.; Tamborini, M.; Teodoro, D.; Worsell, M. F.; Zito, G.; Zitoun, R.; Bari-Birmingham-CERN-Milan-Paris-Pavia Collaboration

    1983-07-01

    About 15 000 K -Φp events have been collected in the CERN Ω' spectrometer. A partial-wave decomposition of the K -Φ system is performed. The 1 +SO + wave is dominant. The 0 -P0 + and 2 -P0 + waves are important and show resonant behaviour at ˜ 1.83 GeV (Γ ˜ 0.25 GeV) and ˜ 1.73 GeV (Γ ˜ 0.22 GeV) respectively. The first one can be interpreted as the second radial excitation of the kaon while the second one can be identified as one of the two L mesons.

  2. Mini-orange spectrometer at CIAE

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zheng, Yun; Wu, Xiao-Guang; Li, Guang-Sheng; Li, Cong-Bo; He, Chuang-Ye; Chen, Qi-Ming; Zhong, Jian; Zhou, Wen-Kui; Deng, Li-Tao; Zhu, Bao-Ji

    2016-08-01

    A mini-orange spectrometer used for in-beam measurements of internal conversion electrons, consisting of a Si(Li) detector and different sets of SmO5 permanent magnets for filtering and transporting the conversion electrons to the Si(Li) detector, has been developed at the China Institute of Atomic Energy. The working principles and configuration of the mini-orange spectrometer are described. The performance of the setup is illustrated by measured singles conversion electron spectra using the mini-orange spectrometer. Supported by National Natural Science Foundation of China (11305269, 11375267, 11475072, 11405274, 11205068, 11175259)

  3. Gas sampling system for a mass spectrometer

    DOEpatents

    Taylor, Charles E; Ladner, Edward P

    2003-12-30

    The present invention relates generally to a gas sampling system, and specifically to a gas sampling system for transporting a hazardous process gas to a remotely located mass spectrometer. The gas sampling system includes a capillary tube having a predetermined capillary length and capillary diameter in communication with the supply of process gas and the mass spectrometer, a flexible tube surrounding and coaxial with the capillary tube intermediate the supply of process gas and the mass spectrometer, a heat transfer tube surrounding and coaxial with the capillary tube, and a heating device in communication the heat transfer tube for substantially preventing condensation of the process gas within the capillary tube.

  4. Spectrometer for cluster ion beam induced luminescence

    SciTech Connect

    Ryuto, H. Sakata, A.; Takeuchi, M.; Takaoka, G. H.; Musumeci, F.

    2015-02-15

    A spectrometer to detect the ultra-weak luminescence originated by the collision of cluster ions on the surfaces of solid materials was constructed. This spectrometer consists of 11 photomultipliers with band-pass interference filters that can detect the luminescence within the wavelength ranging from 300 to 700 nm and of a photomultiplier without filter. The calibration of the detection system was performed using the photons emitted from a strontium aluminate fluorescent tape and from a high temperature tungsten filament. Preliminary measurements show the ability of this spectrometer to detect the cluster ion beam induced luminescence.

  5. Acousto-optic tunable filter imaging spectrometers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chao, Tien-Hsin; Yu, Jeffrey; Reyes, George; Rider, David; Cheng, Li-Jen

    1991-01-01

    A remote sensing multispectral imaging instrument is being developed that uses a high resolution, fast programmable acoustooptic tunable filter (AOTF) as the spectral bandpass filter. A compact and fully computer controllable AOTF-based imaging spectrometer that operates in the visible wavelength range (0.5-0.8 microns) has been built and tested with success. A second imaging spectrometer operating in the near-infrared wavelength range (1.2-2.4 microns) is also under experimental investigation. The design criteria meeting various system issues, such as imaging quality, spectral response, and field of view (FOV), are discussed. An experiment using this AOTF imaging spectrometer breadboard is described.

  6. Demonstration of a Ge/GeSn/Ge quantum-well microdisk resonator on silicon: enabling high-quality Ge(Sn) materials for micro- and nanophotonics.

    PubMed

    Chen, Robert; Gupta, Suyog; Huang, Yi-Chiau; Huo, Yijie; Rudy, Charles W; Sanchez, Errol; Kim, Yihwan; Kamins, Theodore I; Saraswat, Krishna C; Harris, James S

    2014-01-01

    We theoretically study and experimentally demonstrate a pseudomorphic Ge/Ge0.92Sn0.08/Ge quantum-well microdisk resonator on Ge/Si (001) as a route toward a compact GeSn-based laser on silicon. The structure theoretically exhibits many electronic and optical advantages in laser design, and microdisk resonators using these structures can be precisely fabricated away from highly defective regions in the Ge buffer using a novel etch-stop process. Photoluminescence measurements on 2.7 μm diameter microdisks reveal sharp whispering-gallery-mode resonances (Q > 340) with strong luminescence.

  7. A high precision gamma-ray spectrometer for the Mars-94 mission

    SciTech Connect

    Mitrofanov, I.G.; Anfimov, D.S.; Chernenko, A.M.

    1994-06-01

    The high precision gamma-ray spectrometer (PGS) is scheduled to be launched on the Mars-94 mission in October 1994, and to go into an elliptical polar orbit around Mars. The PGS consists of two high-purity germanium (Ge) detectors, associated electronics, and a passive cooler and will be mounted on one of the solar panels. The PGS will measure nuclear gamma-ray emissions from the martian surface, cosmic gamma-ray bursts, and the high-energy component of solar flares in the broad energy range from 50 KeV to 8 MeV using 4096 energy channels.

  8. A Precise Measurement of Cosmic-Ray Proton Spectrum with BESS Spectrometer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tomoyuki, Sanuki

    1999-08-01

    We report on the absolute cosmic-ray proton spectrum in the energy range 1 to 120 GeV as measured by the '98 balloon flight of the BESS spectrometer, which was launched from Lynn Lake, Manitoba, Canada. The rigidity of the cosmic-ray was measured reliably by continuous tracking in a uniform magnetic field of Ü and 1 Tesla. Background-free particle identifications were achieved by the combination of redundant TOF measurements. The interaction loss was corrected by using Monte Carlo simulations. Atmospheric secondary protons were subtracted by adopting the calculation of Papini et al..

  9. Spectrometer Observations Near Mawrth Vallis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2006-01-01

    This targeted image from the Compact Reconnaissance Imaging Spectrometer for Mars (CRISM) shows a region of heavily altered rock in Mars' ancient cratered highlands. The featured region is just south of Mawrth Vallis, a channel cut by floodwaters deep into the highlands.

    CRISM acquired the image at 1216 UTC (8:16 a.m. EDT) on Oct. 2, 2006, near 25.4 degrees north latitude, 340.7 degrees east longitude. It covers an area about 13 kilometers (8 miles) long and, at the narrowest point, about 9 kilometers (5.6 miles) wide. At the center of the image, the spatial resolution is as good as 35 meters (115 feet) per pixel. The image was taken in 544 colors covering 0.36-3.92 micrometers.

    This image includes four renderings of the data, all map-projected. At top left is an approximately true-color representation. At top right is false color showing brightness of the surface at selected infrared wavelengths. In the two bottom views, brightness of the surface at different infrared wavelengths has been compared to laboratory measurements of minerals, and regions that match different minerals have been colored. The bottom left image shows areas high in iron-rich clay, and the bottom right image shows areas high in aluminum-rich clay.

    Clay minerals are important to understanding the history of water on Mars because their formation requires that rocks were exposed to liquid water for a long time. Environments where they form include soils, cold springs, and hot springs. There are many clay minerals, and which ones form depends on the composition of the rock, and the temperature, acidity, and salt content of the water. CRISM's sister instrument on the Mars Express spacecraft, OMEGA, has spectrally mapped Mars at lower spatial resolution and found several regions rich in clay minerals. The Mawrth Vallis region, in particular, was found to contain iron-rich clay. CRISM is observing these regions at several tens of times higher spatial resolution, to correlate the

  10. Cumulative production of three-nucleon nuclei in {sup 16}Op collisions at a momentum of 3.25 GeV/c per nucleon

    SciTech Connect

    Olimov, Kh. K.

    2009-04-15

    The production of cumulative three-nucleon nuclei ({sup 3}H and {sup 3}He) in {sup 16}Op collisions at a momentum of 3.25 GeV/c per nucleon were studied for the first time under conditions of 4{pi} geometry. The slope parameter of the cross section for the production of cumulative three-nucleon nuclei was determined, and new data on correlations of the yields of A = 3 cumulative nuclei, charged particles, and fragments in {sup 16}Op interactions are reported. The properties of cumulative and noncumulative events were found to be substantially different, and evidence for the presence of a common universal feature in the mechanisms for the cumulative production of hadrons and light nuclear fragments was obtained.

  11. Imaging Spectrometer on a Chip

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wang, Yu; Pain, Bedabrata; Cunningham, Thomas; Zheng, Xinyu

    2007-01-01

    A proposed visible-light imaging spectrometer on a chip would be based on the concept of a heterostructure comprising multiple layers of silicon-based photodetectors interspersed with long-wavelength-pass optical filters. In a typical application, this heterostructure would be replicated in each pixel of an image-detecting integrated circuit of the active-pixel-sensor type (see figure). The design of the heterostructure would exploit the fact that within the visible portion of the spectrum, the characteristic depth of penetration of photons increases with wavelength. Proceeding from the front toward the back, each successive long-wavelength-pass filter would have a longer cutoff wavelength, and each successive photodetector would be made thicker to enable it to absorb a greater proportion of incident longer-wavelength photons. Incident light would pass through the first photodetector and encounter the first filter, which would reflect light having wavelengths shorter than its cutoff wavelength and pass light of longer wavelengths. A large portion of the incident and reflected shorter-wavelength light would be absorbed in the first photodetector. The light that had passed through the first photodetector/filter pair of layers would pass through the second photodetector and encounter the second filter, which would reflect light having wavelengths shorter than its cutoff wavelength while passing light of longer wavelengths. Thus, most of the light reflected by the second filter would lie in the wavelength band between the cutoff wavelengths of the first and second filters. Thus, further, most of the light absorbed in the second photodetector would lie in this wavelength band. In a similar manner, each successive photodetector would detect, predominantly, light in a successively longer wavelength band bounded by the shorter cutoff wavelength of the preceding filter and the longer cutoff wavelength of the following filter.

  12. Calibration of a photomultiplier array spectrometer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bailey, Steven A.; Wright, C. Wayne; Piazza, Charles R.

    1989-01-01

    A systematic approach to the calibration of a photomultiplier array spectrometer is presented. Through this approach, incident light radiance derivation is made by recognizing and tracing gain characteristics for each photomultiplier tube.

  13. Ultra High Mass Range Mass Spectrometer System

    DOEpatents

    Reilly, Peter T. A. [Knoxville, TN

    2005-12-06

    Applicant's present invention comprises mass spectrometer systems that operate in a mass range from 1 to 10.sup.16 DA. The mass spectrometer system comprising an inlet system comprising an aerodynamic lens system, a reverse jet being a gas flux generated in an annulus moving in a reverse direction and a multipole ion guide; a digital ion trap; and a thermal vaporization/ionization detector system. Applicant's present invention further comprises a quadrupole mass spectrometer system comprising an inlet system having a quadrupole mass filter and a thermal vaporization/ionization detector system. Applicant's present invention further comprises an inlet system for use with a mass spectrometer system, a method for slowing energetic particles using an inlet system. Applicant's present invention also comprises a detector device and a method for detecting high mass charged particles.

  14. Electro-optic Imaging Fourier Transform Spectrometer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chao, Tien-Hsin

    2005-01-01

    JPL is developing an innovative compact, low mass, Electro-Optic Imaging Fourier Transform Spectrometer (E-O IFTS) for hyperspectral imaging applications. The spectral region of this spectrometer will be 1 - 2.5 micron (1000-4000/cm) to allow high-resolution, high-speed hyperspectral imaging applications. One application will be the remote sensing of the measurement of a large number of different atmospheric gases simultaneously in the same airmass. Due to the use of a combination of birefringent phase retarders and multiple achromatic phase switches to achieve phase delay, this spectrometer is capable of hyperspectral measurements similar to that of the conventional Fourier transform spectrometer but without any moving parts. In this paper, the principle of operations, system architecture and recent experimental progress will be presented.

  15. Electro-optic Imaging Fourier Transform Spectrometer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chao, Tien-Hsin

    2005-01-01

    JPL is developing an innovative compact, low mass, Electro-Optic Imaging Fourier Transform Spectrometer (E-0IFTS) for hyperspectral imaging applications. The spectral region of this spectrometer will be 1 - 2.5 pm (1000 -4000 cm-') to allow high-resolution, high-speed hyperspectral imaging applications [l-51. One application will be theremote sensing of the measurement of a large number of different atmospheric gases simultaneously in the sameairmass. Due to the use of a combination of birefiingent phase retarders and multiple achromatic phase switches toachieve phase delay, this spectrometer is capable of hyperspectral measurements similar to that of the conventionalFourier transform spectrometer but without any moving parts. In this paper, the principle of operations, systemarchitecture and recent experimental progress will be presen.

  16. Electronically-Scanned Fourier-Transform Spectrometer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Breckinridge, J. B.; Ocallaghan, F. G.

    1984-01-01

    Instrument efficient, lightweight, and stable. Fourier-transform spectrometer configuration uses electronic, instead of mechanical, scanning. Configuration insensitive to vibration-induced sampling errors introduced into mechanically scanned systems.

  17. A novel digital magnetic resonance imaging spectrometer.

    PubMed

    Liu, Zhengmin; Zhao, Cong; Zhou, Heqin; Feng, Huanqing

    2006-01-01

    Spectrometer is the essential part of magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) system. It controls the transmitting and receiving of signals. Many commercial spectrometers are now available. However, they are usually costly and complex. In this paper, a new digital spectrometer based on PCI extensions for instrumentation (PXI) architecture is presented. Radio frequency (RF) pulse is generated with the method of digital synthesis and its frequency and phase are continuously tunable. MR signal acquired by receiver coils is processed by digital quadrature detection and filtered to get the k-space data, which avoid the spectral distortion due to amplitude and phase errors between two channels of traditional detection. Compared to the conventional design, the presented spectrometer is built with general PXI platform and boards. This design works in a digital manner with features of low cost, high performance and accuracy. The experiments demonstrate its efficiency.

  18. Long-Wave Infrared Dyson Spectrometer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Johnson, William R.; Hook, Simon J.; Mouroulis, Pantazis Z.; Wilson, Daniel W.; Gunapala, Sarath D.; Hill, Cory J.; Mumolo, Jason M.; Eng, Bjorn T.

    2008-01-01

    Preliminary results are presented for an ultra compact long-wave infrared slit spectrometer based on the dyson concentric design. The dyson spectrometer has been integrated in a dewar environment with a quantum well infrared photodetecor (QWIP), concave electron beam fabricated diffraction grating and ultra precision slit. The entire system is cooled to cryogenic temperatures to maximize signal to noise ratio performance, hence eliminating thermal signal from transmissive elements and internal stray light. All of this is done while maintaining QWIP thermal control. A general description is given of the spectrometer, alignment technique and predicated performance. The spectrometer has been designed for optimal performance with respect to smile and keystone distortion. A spectral calibration is performed with NIST traceable targets. A 2-point non-uniformity correction is performed with a precision blackbody source to provide radiometric accuracy. Preliminary laboratory results show excellent agreement with modeled noise equivalent delta temperature and detector linearity over a broad temperature range.

  19. Neutron transmutation doped Ge bolometers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Haller, E. E.; Kreysa, E.; Palaio, N. P.; Richards, P. L.; Rodder, M.

    1983-01-01

    Some conclusions reached are as follow. Neutron Transmutation Doping (NTD) of high quality Ge single crystals provides perfect control of doping concentration and uniformity. The resistivity can be tailored to any given bolometer operating temperature down to 0.1 K and probably lower. The excellent uniformity is advantaged for detector array development.

  20. Mass Spectrometer for Airborne Micro-Organisms

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sinha, M. P.; Friedlander, S. K.

    1986-01-01

    Bacteria and other micro-organisms identified continously with aid of new technique for producing samples for mass spectrometer. Technique generates aerosol of organisms and feeds to spectrometer. Given species of organism produces characteristic set of peaks in mass spectrum and thereby identified. Technique useful for monitoring bacterial makeup in environmental studies and in places where cleanliness is essential, such as hospital operating rooms, breweries, and pharmaceutical plants.

  1. Ruggedized Spectrometers Are Built for Tough Jobs

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2015-01-01

    The Mars Curiosity Chemistry and Camera instrument, or ChemCam, analyzes the elemental composition of materials on the Red Planet by using a spectrometer to measure the wavelengths of light they emit. Principal investigator Roger Wiens worked with Ocean Optics, out of Dunedin, Florida, to rework the company's spectrometer to operate in cold and rowdy conditions and also during the stresses of liftoff. Those improvements have been incorporated into the firm's commercial product line.

  2. 1987 calibration of the TFTR neutron spectrometers

    SciTech Connect

    Barnes, C.W.; Strachan, J.D.; Princeton Univ., NJ . Plasma Physics Lab.)

    1989-12-01

    The {sup 3}He neutron spectrometer used for measuring ion temperatures and the NE213 proton recoil spectrometer used for triton burnup measurements were absolutely calibrated with DT and DD neutron generators placed inside the TFTR vacuum vessel. The details of the detector response and calibration are presented. Comparisons are made to the neutron source strengths measured from other calibrated systems. 23 refs., 19 figs., 6 tabs.

  3. Exclusive studies of angular distributions in GeV hadron-induced reactions with [sup 197]Au

    SciTech Connect

    Hsi, W.; Kwiatkowski, K.; Wang, G.; Bracken, D.S.; Cornell, E.; Ginger, D.S.; Viola, V.E. ); Korteling, R.G. V5A I56); Morley, K.B. ); Huang, R.; Lynch, W.G.; Tsang, M.B.; Xi, H. ); Gimeno-Nogues, F.; Ramakrishnan, E.; Rowland, D.; Yennello, S.J. ); Breuer, H. ); Gushue, S.; Remsberg, L.P. ); Botvin

    1999-09-01

    Exclusive studies of angular distributions for intermediate-mass fragments (IMFs) produced in GeV hadron-induced reactions have been performed with the Indiana Silicon Sphere (ISiS) 4[pi] detector array. Special emphasis has been given to understanding the origin of sideways peaking, which becomes prominent in the angular distributions for beam momenta above about 10 GeV/c. Both the magnitude of the effect and the peak angle increase as a function of fragment multiplicity and charge. When gated on IMF kinetic energy, the angular distributions evolve from forward-peaked to near isotropy as the fragment kinetic energy decreases. Fragment-fragment angular-correlation analyses show no obvious evidence for a dynamic mechanism that might signal shock wave effects or the breakup of exotic geometric shapes such as bubbles or toroids. Moving-source and intranuclear cascade simulations suggest that the observed sideways peaking is of kinematic origin, arising from significant transverse momentum imparted to the heavy recoil nucleus during the fast cascade stage of the collision. A two-step cascade and statistical multifragmentation calculation is consistent with this assumption. [copyright] [ital 1999] [ital The American Physical Society

  4. Exclusive studies of angular distributions in GeV hadron-induced reactions with {sup 197}Au

    SciTech Connect

    Hsi, W.; Kwiatkowski, K.; Wang, G.; Bracken, D.S.; Cornell, E.; Ginger, D.S.; Viola, V.E.; Korteling, R.G.; Morley, K.B.; Huang, R.; Lynch, W.G.; Tsang, M.B.; Xi, H.; Gimeno-Nogues, F.; Ramakrishnan, E.; Rowland, D.; Yennello, S.J.; Breuer, H.; Gushue, S.; Remsberg, L.P.; Botvina, A.; Friedman, W.A.

    1999-09-01

    Exclusive studies of angular distributions for intermediate-mass fragments (IMFs) produced in GeV hadron-induced reactions have been performed with the Indiana Silicon Sphere (ISiS) 4{pi} detector array. Special emphasis has been given to understanding the origin of sideways peaking, which becomes prominent in the angular distributions for beam momenta above about 10 GeV/c. Both the magnitude of the effect and the peak angle increase as a function of fragment multiplicity and charge. When gated on IMF kinetic energy, the angular distributions evolve from forward-peaked to near isotropy as the fragment kinetic energy decreases. Fragment-fragment angular-correlation analyses show no obvious evidence for a dynamic mechanism that might signal shock wave effects or the breakup of exotic geometric shapes such as bubbles or toroids. Moving-source and intranuclear cascade simulations suggest that the observed sideways peaking is of kinematic origin, arising from significant transverse momentum imparted to the heavy recoil nucleus during the fast cascade stage of the collision. A two-step cascade and statistical multifragmentation calculation is consistent with this assumption. {copyright} {ital 1999} {ital The American Physical Society}

  5. SUB 1-Millimeter Size Fresnel Micro Spectrometer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Park, Yeonjoon; Koch, Laura; Song, Kyo D.; Park, Sangloon; King, Glen; Choi, Sang

    2010-01-01

    An ultra-small micro spectrometer with less than 1mm diameter was constructed using Fresnel diffraction. The fabricated spectrometer has a diameter of 750 nmicrometers and a focal length of 2.4 mm at 533nm wavelength. The micro spectrometer was built with a simple negative zone plate that has an opaque center with an ecliptic shadow to remove the zero-order direct beam to the aperture slit. Unlike conventional approaches, the detailed optical calculation indicates that the ideal spectral resolution and resolving power do not depend on the miniaturized size but only on the total number of rings. We calculated 2D and 3D photon distribution around the aperture slit and confirmed that improved micro-spectrometers below 1mm size can be built with Fresnel diffraction. The comparison between mathematical simulation and measured data demonstrates the theoretical resolution, measured performance, misalignment effect, and improvement for the sub-1mm Fresnel micro-spectrometer. We suggest the utilization of an array of micro spectrometers for tunable multi-spectral imaging in the ultra violet range.

  6. NIST Calibration of a Neutron Spectrometer ROSPEC.

    PubMed

    Heimbach, Craig

    2006-01-01

    A neutron spectrometer was acquired for use in the measurement of National Institute of Standards and Technology neutron fields. The spectrometer included options for the measurement of low and high energy neutrons, for a total measurement range from 0.01 eV up to 17 MeV. The spectrometer was evaluated in calibration fields and was used to determine the neutron spectrum of an Americium-Beryllium neutron source. The calibration fields used included bare and moderated (252)Cf, monoenergetic neutron fields of 2.5 MeV and 14 MeV, and a thermal-neutron beam. Using the calibration values determined in this exercise, the spectrometer gives a good approximation of the neutron spectrum, and excellent values for neutron fluence, for all NIST calibration fields. The spectrometer also measured an Americium-Beryllium neutron field in a NIST exposure facility and determined the field quite well. The spectrometer measured scattering effects in neutron spectra which previously could be determined only by calculation or integral measurements.

  7. NIST Calibration of a Neutron Spectrometer ROSPEC

    PubMed Central

    Heimbach, Craig

    2006-01-01

    A neutron spectrometer was acquired for use in the measurement of National Institute of Standards and Technology neutron fields. The spectrometer included options for the measurement of low and high energy neutrons, for a total measurement range from 0.01 eV up to 17 MeV. The spectrometer was evaluated in calibration fields and was used to determine the neutron spectrum of an Americium-Beryllium neutron source. The calibration fields used included bare and moderated 252Cf, monoenergetic neutron fields of 2.5 MeV and 14 MeV, and a thermal-neutron beam. Using the calibration values determined in this exercise, the spectrometer gives a good approximation of the neutron spectrum, and excellent values for neutron fluence, for all NIST calibration fields. The spectrometer also measured an Americium-Beryllium neutron field in a NIST exposure facility and determined the field quite well. The spectrometer measured scattering effects in neutron spectra which previously could be determined only by calculation or integral measurements. PMID:27274944

  8. Aqueous electrodeposition of Ge monolayers.

    PubMed

    Liang, Xuehai; Kim, Youn-Geun; Gebergziabiher, Daniel K; Stickney, John L

    2010-02-16

    The electrodeposition of germanium on Au(111) in aqueous solutions has been investigated by means of cyclic voltammetry, Auger electron spectroscopy, and in situ scanning tunneling microscopy (STM). The data yield a picture of germanium deposition, which starts with the formation of two well-ordered hydroxide phases, with 1/3 ML and 4/9 ML coverages upon initial reduction of the Ge(IV) species (probably H(2)GeO(3) at pH 4.7). Those structures appear to result from a three-electron reduction to form surface-limited structures with (square root(3) x square root(3))R30 degrees or (3 x 3) unit cells, respectively. Further reduction, probably in a two-electron process from the hydroxide structures, resulted in a germanium hydride structure, again surface-limited, with a coverage of close to 0.8 ML. The hydride structure is very flat, though with the periodic modulation characteristic of a Moiré pattern. Longer deposition times and lower potentials resulted in increased coverage of Ge in some cases, but with apparently limited coverage as a function of pH. The maximum Ge coverage, about 4 ML, was observed using a pH 9.32 deposition solution. At potentials negative of the Moiré pattern, about -850 mV versus Ag/AgCl, a "corruption" of the smooth Moiré pattern occurred. This roughening appears to mark the initial formation of a Au-Ge alloy, accounting for the observation of coverage in excess of that needed to form the Moiré pattern at some pH values.

  9. NpCoGe, near quantum criticality?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Colineau, E.; Eloirdi, R.; Griveau, J.-C.; Gaczynski, P.; Shick, A. B.

    2013-05-01

    The magnetic and electronic properties of NpCoGe are reported. NpCoGe orders antiferromagnetically at T N ≈ 13 K with an average ordered magnetic moment < µ N p > = 0.80 µ B . The comparison with NpRhGe and uranium analogues suggests the leading role of f-d hybridization, the rather delocalized character of 5f electrons in NpCoGe and its possible proximity to a magnetic quantum critical point.

  10. High transverse momentum prompt photon production by π- and π+ on protons at 280 GeV/c

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bonesini, M.; Bonvin, E.; Boóth, P. S. L.; Bortoletto, D.; Carroll, L. J.; Cass, A. J.; Cavalli, D.; Costa, G.; Donnat, M.; Dorsaz, P. A.; Edwards, D. N.; Fischer, J. R.; Fluri, L.; Frame, D.; Gianotti, F.; Jack, S.; Jackson, J. N.; Kelly, M.; Kienzle-Focacci, M. N.; Lucock, R.; Lynch, J. G.; Mandelli, L.; Martin, M.; Mathys, L.; Maxwell, A.; Mazzanti, M.; Myerscough, J. J.; Negus, P. J.; Pensotti-Rancoita, S.; Perini, L.; Perrin, D.; Polesello, G.; Range, W. H.; Rosselet, L.; Snow, S. W.; Tamborini, M.; Thompson, A. S.; Turnbull, R. M.; Wells, J.; Werlen, M.

    1988-12-01

    The inclusive cross sections for prompt photon production by π- and π+ on protons have been measured with a beam momentum of 280 GeV/c using a fine grained electromagnetic calorimeter and the CERN Omega spectrometer. The transverse momentum and Feynman x F ranges covered are 4.0< p T <7.0GeV/c and -0.45< x F <0.55 respectively. A quantitative comparison of the prompt photon cross section with next-to-leading order QCD predictions using Duke and Owens structure functions is performed.

  11. The JPL Field Emission Spectrometer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hook, Simon J.; Kahle, Anne B.

    1995-01-01

    The Jet Propulsion Laboratory (JPL) Field Emission Spectrometer (FES) was built by Designs and Prototypes based on a set of functional requirements supplied by JPL. The instrument has a spectral resolution of 6 wavenumbers (wn) and can acquire spectra from either the Mid Infrared (3-5 mu m) or the Thermal Infrared (8-12 pm) depending on whether the InSb or HgCdTe detector is installed respectively. The instrument consists of an optical head system unit and battery. The optical head which is tripod mounted includes the interferometer and detector dewar assembly. Wavelength calibration of the interferometer is achieved using a Helium-Neon laser diode. The dewar needs replenishing with liquid Nitrogen approximately every four hours. The system unit includes the controls for operation and the computer used for acquiring viewing and processing spectra. Radiometric calibration is achieved with an external temperature-controlled blackbody that mounts on the fore-optics of the instrument. The blackbody can be set at 5 C increments between 10 and 55 C. The instrument is compact and weighs about 33 kg. Both the wavelength calibration and radiometric calibration of the instrument have been evaluated. The wavelength calibration was checked by comparison of the position of water features in a spectrum of the sky with their position in the output from a high resolution atmospheric model. The results indicatethat the features in the sky spectrum are within 6-8 wn of their position ill the model spectrum. The radiometric calibration was checked by first calibrating the instrument using the external blackbody supplied with the instrument and then measuring the radiance from another external blackbody at a series of temperatures. The temperatures of these radiance spectra were then recovered by inventing Planck's law and the recovered temperatures compared lo the measured blackbody temperature. These results indicate that radiometric calibration is good to 0.5 C over the range of

  12. Improved Cloud Condensation Nucleus Spectrometer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Leu, Ming-Taun

    2010-01-01

    An improved thermal-gradient cloud condensation nucleus spectrometer (CCNS) has been designed to provide several enhancements over prior thermal- gradient counters, including fast response and high-sensitivity detection covering a wide range of supersaturations. CCNSs are used in laboratory research on the relationships among aerosols, supersaturation of air, and the formation of clouds. The operational characteristics of prior counters are such that it takes long times to determine aerosol critical supersaturations. Hence, there is a need for a CCNS capable of rapid scanning through a wide range of supersaturations. The present improved CCNS satisfies this need. The improved thermal-gradient CCNS (see Figure 1) incorporates the following notable features: a) The main chamber is bounded on the top and bottom by parallel thick copper plates, which are joined by a thermally conductive vertical wall on one side and a thermally nonconductive wall on the opposite side. b) To establish a temperature gradient needed to establish a supersaturation gradient, water at two different regulated temperatures is pumped through tubes along the edges of the copper plates at the thermally-nonconductive-wall side. Figure 2 presents an example of temperature and supersaturation gradients for one combination of regulated temperatures at the thermally-nonconductive-wall edges of the copper plates. c) To enable measurement of the temperature gradient, ten thermocouples are cemented to the external surfaces of the copper plates (five on the top plate and five on the bottom plate), spaced at equal intervals along the width axis of the main chamber near the outlet end. d) Pieces of filter paper or cotton felt are cemented onto the interior surfaces of the copper plates and, prior to each experimental run, are saturated with water to establish a supersaturation field inside the main chamber. e) A flow of monodisperse aerosol and a dilution flow of humid air are introduced into the main

  13. Production and knockout of nucleon isobars from helium by 5 GeV pions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jonsson, S.; Dahlgren, S.; Ekelöf, T.; Grafström, P.; Hagberg, E.; Hallgren, A.; Kullander, S.; Badełek, B.; Nassalski, J.; Berthot, J.; Cotte, P.; Doré, C.; Meritet, L.; Querrou, M.; Vazeille, F.; Burq, J. P.; Chemarin, M.; Chevallier, M.; Ille, B.; Lambert, M.; Fäldt, G.; Gugelot, P. C.

    1980-01-01

    Using both recoil and fast-particle spectrometers, the reaction π-+4He-->π-+3H+x has been measured for triton momenta in the region 0.24-0.60 GeV/c. The experimental spectra are presented as functions of triton momentum and angle and of mass of the unmeasured object. In the theoretical analysis it is assumed that the final state can be reached via quasielastic scattering from N*3H states and via N* productions from the p3H state of helium. The most credible of three investigated p3H wave functions requires one percent of N*3H states in the mass range 1.08-1.80 GeV/c2. NUCLEAR REACTIONS 4He(π-,π-x)t, E=5 GeV, Et>10 MeV measured σ(θt,mx), σ(mx,Et), σ(mx,θt) deduced p-t wave-f, x-t prob. 1.1GeV. p(π-,π-)x, E=5 GeV, measured σ(mx).

  14. Acoustoelectric effects in very high-mobility p-SiGe/Ge/SiGe heterostructure

    SciTech Connect

    Drichko, I. L.; Diakonov, A. M.; Lebedeva, E. V.; Smirnov, I. Yu.; Mironov, O. A.; Kummer, M.; Kaenel, H. von

    2009-11-01

    Measurement results of the acoustoelectric effects [surface acoustic waves (SAW) attenuation and velocity] in a high-mobility p-SiGe/Ge/SiGe structure are presented. The structure was low-energy plasma-enhanced chemical vapor deposition grown with a two-dimensional (2D) channel buried in the strained Ge layer. The measurements were performed as a function of temperature (1.5-4.2 K) and magnetic field (up to 8.4 T) at different SAW intensities at frequencies 28 and 87 MHz. Shubnikov-de Haas-like oscillations of both SAW attenuation and the velocity change have been observed. Hole density and mobility, effective mass, quantum and transport relaxation times, as well as the Dingle temperature were measured with a method free of electric contacts. The effect of heating of the 2D hole gas by the electric field of the SAW was investigated. Energy relaxation time tau{sub e}psilon and the deformation potential constant determined.

  15. Mass spectroscopic characterization of the GeSe:GeI4 vapor transport system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Buchan, Nicholas I.; Rosenberger, Franz

    1987-01-01

    The GeSe:GeI4 vapor crystal growth system was characterized mass spectroscopically. A steady-state Knudsen effusion technique was developed to simulate the equilibrium conditions at one end of a vapor transport ampoule. It was found that the previously neglected equilibrium GeSe2(s) = GeSe(v) + 1/2Se2(v) reduces the Se2(v) concentration to an extent that sublimation/condensation of GeSe becomes the dominant transport mechanism. At total pressures near 1 atm the concentration of an additional Ge-Se-I vapor species becomes comparable to that of GeSe(v).

  16. Understanding and engineering of NiGe/Ge junction formed by phosphorus ion implantation after germanidation

    SciTech Connect

    Oka, Hiroshi Minoura, Yuya; Hosoi, Takuji; Shimura, Takayoshi; Watanabe, Heiji

    2014-08-11

    Modulation of the effective electron Schottky barrier height (eSBH) of NiGe/Ge contacts induced by phosphorus ion implantation after germanide formation was investigated by considering local inhomogeneity in the eSBH. Systematic studies of NiGe/Ge contact devices having various germanide thicknesses and ion implantation areas indicated the threshold dopant concentration at the NiGe/Ge interface required for eSBH modulation and negligible dopant diffusion even at NiGe/Ge interface during drive-in annealing, leading to variation in the eSBH between the bottom and sidewall portions of the NiGe regions. Consequently, this method makes it possible to design source/drain contacts with low-resistivity Ohmic and ideal rectifying characteristics for future Ge-based transistors.

  17. Understanding and engineering of NiGe/Ge junction formed by phosphorous ion implantation after germanidation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oka, Hiroshi; Minoura, Yuya; Hosoi, Takuji; Shimura, Takayoshi; Watanabe, Heiji

    2014-08-01

    Modulation of the effective electron Schottky barrier height (eSBH) of NiGe/Ge contacts induced by phosphorous ion implantation after germanide formation was investigated by considering local inhomogeneity in the eSBH. Systematic studies of NiGe/Ge contact devices having various germanide thicknesses and ion implantation areas indicated the threshold dopant concentration at the NiGe/Ge interface required for eSBH modulation and negligible dopant diffusion even at NiGe/Ge interface during drive-in annealing, leading to variation in the eSBH between the bottom and sidewall portions of the NiGe regions. Consequently, this method makes it possible to design source/drain contacts with low-resistivity Ohmic and ideal rectifying characteristics for future Ge-based transistors.

  18. Determining GE^s and GM^s from parity violating asymmetry measurements at Q^2= 0.23, 0.63 GeV^2

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Muether, Mathew

    2008-10-01

    The G^0 experiment recently utilized the high luminosity polarized electron beam at Jefferson Lab to measure parity-violating asymmetries in backward scattered electrons from cryogenic hydrogen and deuterium targets at momentum transfers, Q^2, of 0.23 and 0.63 GeV^2. These asymmetries, arising from the interference of the electromagnetic and neutral weak interactions, are only a few tens of parts-per-million. A dedicated toriodal superconducting magnetic spectrometer, and fast counting electronics provided the required particle identification and measurement precision. These data together with previous results, including the G^0 forward angle measurement [1], allow the determination of the strange electric and magnetic nucleon form factors, GE^s and GM^s at the respective Q^2 values. The current status of our analysis to determine these values will be presented. [1]D.S. Armstrong et al. (G0), Phys. Rev. Lett. 95, 092001 (2005).

  19. Germanium-tin interdiffusion in strained Ge/GeSn multiple-quantum-well structure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Wei; Dong, Yuan; Zhou, Qian; Tok, Eng Soon; Yeo, Yee-Chia

    2016-06-01

    The thermal stability and germanium-tin (Ge-Sn) interdiffusion properties were studied in epitaxial Ge/GeSn multiple-quantum-well (MQW) structure. No obvious interdiffusion was observed for annealing temperatures of 300 °C or below, while observable interdiffusion occurred for annealing temperatures of 380 °C and above. High-resolution x-ray diffraction was used to obtain the interdiffusion coefficient by analyzing the decrease rate of Ge/GeSn periodic satellite peaks. The interdiffusion coefficient is much higher, and the activation enthalpy of 1.21 eV is substantially lower in Ge/GeSn MQW structure than that previously reported in silicon-germanium (Si-Ge) systems. When the annealing temperature is increased to above 500 °C, Ge-Sn interdiffusion becomes severe. Some small pits appear on the surface, which should be related to Sn out-diffusion to the Ge cap layer, followed by Sn desorption from the top surface. This work provides insights into the Ge-Sn interdiffusion and Sn segregation behaviors in Ge/GeSn MQW structure, and the thermal budget that may be used for fabrication of devices comprising Ge/GeSn heterostructures.

  20. Multi-Anode-PMT Analysis for new RICH detector at JLab's CLAS12 spectrometer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Witchger, Andrew; Benmokhtar, Fatiha

    2014-03-01

    Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility (JLab) is performing a large-scale upgrade to the Continuous Electron Beam Accelerator Facility (CEBAF) to reach energies of 12 GeV. CEBAF Large Acceptance Spectrometer (CLAS12) in Hall B is undergoing major upgrade too to run to collect data at these high energies. A new Ring Imaging CHerenkov (RICH) detector is being developed to provide better kaon - pion separation for CLAS12 in the 3 to 8 GeV/ c range. With this addition, when the electron beam hits the target, the resulting pions, kaons, and other particles will pass through a wall of translucent aerogel tiles and create Cherenkov radiation. This light can then be accurately detected by a large array of Multi-Anode Photo-Multiplier Tubes (MA-PMT). The supporting hardware and software systems for MA-PMTs were developed by the collaboration. I am presenting my work on the testing and analysis of these systems and results that will amplify the physical capabilities of the spectrometer.

  1. The Time of Flight Upgrade for CLAS at 12 GeV

    SciTech Connect

    Lewis Graham

    2007-10-01

    The Time of Flight (TOF) system is a detection system within the CEBAF Large Acceptance Spectrometer (CLAS) at Jefferson National Accelerator Facility. CLAS, being a magnetic toroidal multi-gap spectrometer, is used in the detection of particles and their varying properties. Jefferson National Accelerator Facility is providing an incoming electron beam of energy 6 GeV that is used to probe the structure and production of these particles. The CLAS detector is currently adapted to energies of up to 6 GeV, but with recent approval it will now upgrade to energies of 12 GeV. CLAS consists of drift chambers to determine the charged particle paths, gas Cherenkov counters for electron discrimination, TOF scintillators for particle identification, and an electromagnetic calorimeter for identifying showering electrons and photons. The TOF system, which is our focus, is composed of scintillation counters at the forward angle, and covers an area of 206 meters squared. Therefore, we look to upgrade and construct the TOF system of CLAS and outline strategies of current construction, purpose for design, and outlook for the TOF system upgrade

  2. The Time of Flight Upgrade for CLAS at 12 GeV

    SciTech Connect

    Graham, Lewis

    2007-10-26

    The Time of Flight (TOF) system is a detection system within the CEBAF Large Acceptance Spectrometer (CLAS) at Jefferson National Accelerator Facility. CLAS, being a magnetic toroidal multi-gap spectrometer, is used in the detection of particles and their varying properties. Jefferson National Accelerator Facility is providing an incoming electron beam of energy 6 GeV that is used to probe the structure and production of these particles. The CLAS detector is currently adapted to energies of up to 6 GeV, but with recent approval it will now upgrade to energies of 12 GeV. CLAS consists of drift chambers to determine the charged particle paths, gas Cherenkov counters for electron discrimination, TOF scintillators for particle identification, and an electromagnetic calorimeter for identifying showering electrons and photons. The TOF system, which is our focus, is composed of scintillation counters at the forward angle, and covers an area of 206 meters squared. Therefore, we look to upgrade and construct the TOF system of CLAS and outline strategies of current construction, purpose for design, and outlook for the TOF system upgrade.

  3. Microprocessor-Based Airborne Spectrometer System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kates, John C.

    1980-08-01

    A system for airborne infrared spectral signature measurements has been developed using a Fourier transform spectrometer interfaced to a microprocessor data acquisition, control and display system. The microprocessor is a DEC LSI-ll with 20KW RAM, 4KW EPROM, DMA spectrometer interface, digital magnetic tape, and dot-matrix video graphic display. A real-time executive tailored to the requirements and resources available allows concurrent data acquisition, recording, reduction and display. Using multiple buffers, acquisition of spectrometer data via DMA is overlapped with magnetic tape output. A background task selects the most recent spectrometer data and processes it using an FFT into a raw spectrum. A reference background spectrum is subtracted to isolate the data component, then a reference instrument response function is applied to obtain a calibrated absolute irradiance spectrum. The irradiance spectrum is displayed on the video graphic display and mixed with boresight camera video to show the target spectrum superimposed on the target image. Extensive selftest facilities are incorporated for testing all system components and compatibility with data reduction systems. System calibration is supported by selection of reference blackbody temperatures, apertures, and distances. The instrument response curve obtained during calibration is displayed for verification of correct spectrometer operation or diagnosis of faults.

  4. Imaging Spectrometers Using Concave Holographic Gratings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gradie, J.; Wang, S.

    1993-01-01

    Imaging spectroscopy combines the spatial attributes of imaging with the compositionally diagnostic attributes of spectroscopy. For spacebased remote sensing applications, mass, size, power, data rate, and application constrain the scanning approach. For the first three approaches, substantial savings in mass and size of the spectrometer can be achieved in some cases with a concave holographic grating and careful placement of an order-sorting filter. A hologram etched on the single concave surface contains the equivalent of the collimating, dispersing, and camera optics of a conventional grating spectrometer and provides substantial wavelength dependent corrections for spherical aberrations and a flat focal field. These gratings can be blazed to improve efficiency when used over a small wavelength range or left unblazed for broadband uniform efficiency when used over a wavelength range of up to 2 orders. More than 1 order can be imaged along the dispersion axis by placing an appropriately designed step order-sorting filter in front of the one- or two-dimensional detector. This filter can be shaped for additional aberration corrections. The VIRIS imaging spectrometer based on the broadband design provides simultaneous imaging of the entrance slit from lambda = 0.9 to 2.6 microns (1.5 orders) onto a 128 x 128 HgCdTe detector (at 77 K). The VIRIS spectrometer was used for lunar mapping with the UH 24.in telescope at Mauna Kea Observatory. The design is adaptable for small, low mass, space based imaging spectrometers.

  5. Spectral calibration of programmable imaging spectrometer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Du, Guojun; Liao, Zhibo; Jiao, Wenchun; Zong, Xiaoying; He, Xuhua; Wang, Haichao

    2015-10-01

    Programmable imager spectrometer can provide flexible data by changing the spectrum section number, central wavelength, spectral width and spatial resolution in orbit. Spectral calibration of imaging spectrometer plays an important role for acquiring accurate spectrum, two spectral calibration types are in essence: wavelength calibration and Full-width-half-maximum (FWHM). Base on the character of programmable imager spectrometer, designed a set of spectral calibration system. Wavelength calibration realized by utilizing the Monochromatic light of high precision monochromator, during the test, changed output parameters of monochromator according to the spectral bandwidth of imager spectrometer. The FWHM is constructed by a set of variable narrow spectrum lines that is output by tunable laser. Gaussian fitting algorithm is used to determine center wavelength and the FWHM of the characteristic spectrum line, Spectral pixels are calibrated by quadratic polynomial, standard spectroscopic lamp is used to verify wavelength calibration result accuracy. The calibration result indicates that FWHM is better than 2nm, the wavelength uncertainty is less than 0.6nm, meet the calibration requirements of programmable imaging spectrometer.

  6. Bulk and integrated acousto-optic spectrometers for molecular astronomy with heterodyne spectrometers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chin, G.; Buhl, D.; Florez, J. M.

    1981-01-01

    A survey of acousto-optic spectrometers for molecular astronomy is presented, noting a technique of combining the acoustic bending of a collimated coherent light beam with a Bragg cell followed by an array of sensitive photodetectors. This acousto-optic spectrometer has a large bandwidth, a large number of channels, high resolution, and is energy efficient. Receiver development has concentrated on high-frequency heterodyne systems for the study of the chemical composition of the interstellar medium. RF spectrometers employing acousto-optic diffraction cells are described. Acousto-optic techniques have been suggested for applications to electronic warfare, electronic countermeasures and electronic support systems. Plans to use integrated optics for the further miniaturization of acousto-optic spectrometers are described. Bulk acousto-optic spectrometers with 300 MHz and 1 GHz bandwidths are being developed for use in the back-end of high-frequency heterodyne receivers for astronomical research.

  7. Radiation measurement above the lunar surface by Kaguya gamma-ray spectrometer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hasebe, Nobuyuki; Nagaoka, Hiroshi; Kusano, Hiroki; Hareyama, Matoko; Ideguchi, Yusuke; Shimizu, Sota; Shibamura, Eido

    The lunar surface is filled with various ionizing radiations such as high energy galactic particles, albedo particles and secondary radiations of neutrons, gamma rays and other elementary particles. A high-resolution Kaguya Gamma-Ray Spectrometer (KGRS) was carried on the Japan’s lunar explorer SELENE (Kaguya), the largest lunar orbiter since the Apollo missions. The KGRS instrument employed, for the first time in lunar exploration, a high-purity Ge crystal to increase the identification capability of elemental gamma-ray lines. The Ge detector is surrounded by BGO and plastic counters as for anticoincidence shields. The KGRS measured gamma rays in the energy range from 200 keV to 13 MeV with high precision to determine the chemical composition of the lunar surface. It provided data on the abundance of major elements over the entire lunar surface. In addition to the gamma-ray observation by the KGRS, it successfully measured the global distribution of fast neutrons. In the energy spectra of gamma-rays observed by the KGRS, several saw-tooth- peaks of Ge are included, which are formed by the collision interaction of lunar fast neutrons with Ge atoms in the Ge crystal. With these saw-tooth-peaks analysis, global distribution of neutrons emitted from the lunara surface was successfully created, which was compared with the previous results obtained by Lunar Prospector neutron maps. Another anticoincidence counter, the plastic counter with 5 mm thickness, was used to veto radiation events mostly generated by charged particles. A single photomultiplier serves to count scintillation light from the plastic scintillation counter. The global map of counting rates observed by the plastic counter was also created, implying that the radiation counting rate implies the geological distribution, in spite that the plastic counter mostly measures high energy charged particles and energetic neutrons. These results are presented and discussed.

  8. Evaluation of GeO desorption behavior in the metalGeO(2)Ge structure and its improvement of the electrical characteristics.

    PubMed

    Oniki, Yusuke; Koumo, Hideo; Iwazaki, Yoshitaka; Ueno, Tomo

    2010-06-15

    The relation between germanium monoxide (GeO) desorption and either improvement or deterioration in electrical characteristics of metalGeO(2)Ge capacitors fabricated by thermal oxidation has been investigated. In the metalGeO(2)Ge stack, two processes of GeO desorption at different sites and at different temperatures were observed by thermal desorption spectroscopy measurements. The electrical characteristics of as-oxidized metalGeO(2)Ge capacitors shows a large flat-band voltage shift and minority carrier generation due to the GeO desorption from the GeO(2)Ge interface during oxidation of Ge substrates. On the other hand, the electrical properties were drastically improved by a postmetallization annealing at low temperature resulting in a metal catalyzed GeO desorption from the top interface.

  9. Electrical properties of Ge crystals and effective Schottky barrier height of NiGe/Ge junctions modified by P and chalcogen (S, Se, or Te) co-doping

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koike, Masahiro; Kamimuta, Yuuichi; Tezuka, Tsutomu; Yamabe, Kikuo

    2016-09-01

    The electrical properties of Ge crystals and the effective Schottky barrier height (SBH) of NiGe/Ge diodes fabricated by P and/or chalcogen (S, Se, or Te) doping were investigated for Ge n-channel metal-oxide-semiconductor field-effect transistors with a NiGe/n+Ge junction. The electron concentration in Ge was increased more by co-doping with chalcogen and P than by doping with P alone. Moreover, SBH values were decreased in NiGe/nGe diodes and increased in NiGe/pGe diodes compared with undoped NiGe/Ge by both P doping and P and chalcogen co-doping. Co-doping with Te and P was most effective in modifying the SBH.

  10. Electron and Positron Fluxes in Primary Cosmic Rays Measured with the Alpha Magnetic Spectrometer on the International Space Station

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gast, Henning

    2016-07-01

    Precision measurements by the Alpha Magnetic Spectrometer on the International Space Station of the primary cosmic-ray electron flux in the range 0.5 to 700 GeV and the positron flux in the range 0.5 to 500 GeV are presented. The electron flux and the positron flux each require a description beyond a single power-law spectrum. Both the electron flux and the positron flux change their behavior at ˜30 GeV but the fluxes are significantly different in their magnitude and energy dependence. Between 20 and 200 GeV the positron spectral index is significantly harder than the electron spectral index. The results show, for the first time, that neither e+ nor e- can be described by a single power law above 27.2 and 52.3 GeV, respectively. The determination of the differing behavior of the spectral indices versus energy is a new observation and provides important information on the origins of cosmic-ray electrons and positrons. The dependence of the electron and positron fluxes on time will also be discussed.

  11. Compact hydrogen/helium isotope mass spectrometer

    DOEpatents

    Funsten, Herbert O.; McComas, David J.; Scime, Earl E.

    1996-01-01

    The compact hydrogen and helium isotope mass spectrometer of the present invention combines low mass-resolution ion mass spectrometry and beam-foil interaction technology to unambiguously detect and quantify deuterium (D), tritium (T), hydrogen molecule (H.sub.2, HD, D.sub.2, HT, DT, and T.sub.2), .sup.3 He, and .sup.4 He concentrations and concentration variations. The spectrometer provides real-time, high sensitivity, and high accuracy measurements. Currently, no fieldable D or molecular speciation detectors exist. Furthermore, the present spectrometer has a significant advantage over traditional T detectors: no confusion of the measurements by other beta-emitters, and complete separation of atomic and molecular species of equivalent atomic mass (e.g., HD and .sup.3 He).

  12. Partial pressure measurements with an active spectrometer

    SciTech Connect

    Brooks, N.H.; Jensen, T.H.; Colchin, R.J.; Maingi, R.; Wade, M.R.; Finkenthal, D.F.; Naumenko, N.; Tugarinov, S.

    1998-07-01

    Partial pressure neutral ga measurements have been made using a commercial Penning gauge in conjunction with an active spectrometer. In prior work utilizing bandpass filters and conventional spectrometers, trace concentrations of the hydrogen isotopes H, D, T and of the noble gases He, Ne and Ar were determined from characteristic spectral lines in the light emitted by the neutral species of these elements. For all the elements mentioned, the sensitivity was limited by spectral contamination from a pervasive background of molecular hydrogen radiation. The active spectrometer overcomes this limitations by means of a digital lock-in method and correlation with reference spectra. Preliminary measurements of an admixture containing a trace amount of neon in deuterium show better than a factor of 20 improvement in sensitivity over conventional techniques. This can be further improved by correlating the relative intensities of multiple lines to sets of reference spectra.

  13. A compact multichannel spectrometer for Thomson scattering.

    PubMed

    Schoenbeck, N L; Schlossberg, D J; Dowd, A S; Fonck, R J; Winz, G R

    2012-10-01

    The availability of high-efficiency volume phase holographic (VPH) gratings and intensified CCD (ICCD) cameras have motivated a simplified, compact spectrometer for Thomson scattering detection. Measurements of T(e) < 100 eV are achieved by a 2971 l∕mm VPH grating and measurements T(e) > 100 eV by a 2072 l∕mm VPH grating. The spectrometer uses a fast-gated (~2 ns) ICCD camera for detection. A Gen III image intensifier provides ~45% quantum efficiency in the visible region. The total read noise of the image is reduced by on-chip binning of the CCD to match the 8 spatial channels and the 10 spectral bins on the camera. Three spectrometers provide a minimum of 12 spatial channels and 12 channels for background subtraction. PMID:23126988

  14. A compact multichannel spectrometer for Thomson scattering

    SciTech Connect

    Schoenbeck, N. L.; Schlossberg, D. J.; Dowd, A. S.; Fonck, R. J.; Winz, G. R.

    2012-10-15

    The availability of high-efficiency volume phase holographic (VPH) gratings and intensified CCD (ICCD) cameras have motivated a simplified, compact spectrometer for Thomson scattering detection. Measurements of T{sub e} < 100 eV are achieved by a 2971 l/mm VPH grating and measurements T{sub e} > 100 eV by a 2072 l/mm VPH grating. The spectrometer uses a fast-gated ({approx}2 ns) ICCD camera for detection. A Gen III image intensifier provides {approx}45% quantum efficiency in the visible region. The total read noise of the image is reduced by on-chip binning of the CCD to match the 8 spatial channels and the 10 spectral bins on the camera. Three spectrometers provide a minimum of 12 spatial channels and 12 channels for background subtraction.

  15. A compact multichannel spectrometer for Thomson scatteringa)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schoenbeck, N. L.; Schlossberg, D. J.; Dowd, A. S.; Fonck, R. J.; Winz, G. R.

    2012-10-01

    The availability of high-efficiency volume phase holographic (VPH) gratings and intensified CCD (ICCD) cameras have motivated a simplified, compact spectrometer for Thomson scattering detection. Measurements of Te < 100 eV are achieved by a 2971 l/mm VPH grating and measurements Te > 100 eV by a 2072 l/mm VPH grating. The spectrometer uses a fast-gated (˜2 ns) ICCD camera for detection. A Gen III image intensifier provides ˜45% quantum efficiency in the visible region. The total read noise of the image is reduced by on-chip binning of the CCD to match the 8 spatial channels and the 10 spectral bins on the camera. Three spectrometers provide a minimum of 12 spatial channels and 12 channels for background subtraction.

  16. Miniature, sub-nanometer resolution Talbot spectrometer.

    PubMed

    Ye, Erika; Atabaki, Amir H; Han, Ningren; Ram, Rajeev J

    2016-06-01

    Miniaturization of optical spectrometers has a significant practical value as it can enable compact, affordable spectroscopic systems for chemical and biological sensing applications. For many applications, the spectrometer must gather light from sources that span a wide range of emission angles and wavelengths. Here, we report a lens-free spectrometer that is simultaneously compact (<0.6  cm3), of high resolution (<1  nm), and has a clear aperture (of 10×10  mm). The wavelength-scale pattern in the dispersive element strongly diffracts the input light to produce non-paraxial mid-field diffraction patterns that are then recorded using an optimally matched image sensor and processed to reconstruct the spectrum.

  17. Automated calibration of a flight particle spectrometer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Torbert, Roy B.

    1986-01-01

    An automatic calibration system was designed for use in the vacuum facility at the Space Science Laboratory of the Marshall Space Flight Center. That system was developed and used in the intervening winter to calibrate the ion spectrometer that eventually flew in May 1986 aboard the NASA project, CRIT 1. During this summer, it is planned to implement the calibration of both an ion and electron spectrometer of a new design whose basic elements were conceived during the winter of 1985 to 1986. This spectrometer was completed in the summer and successfully mounted in the vacuum tank for calibration. However, the source gate valve malfunctioned, and, at the end of the summer, it still needed a replacement. During the inevitable delays in the experimental research, the numerical model of the Critical Velocity effect was completed and these results were presented.

  18. Broadband microwave absorption spectrometer for liquid media

    SciTech Connect

    Mukherjee, P.; Gosnell, T.R.; Bigio, I.J.

    1988-12-01

    A broadband, continuous-sweep microwave spectrometer has been constructed for measurements of the absorption coefficient of aqueous solutions and other liquid media. The spectrometer makes use of the phase fluctuation optical heterodyne technique, which provides a direct measure of the microwave power deposited in the sample. Consequently, in contrast to the standard dielectrometric techniques that indirectly determine the absorption coefficient via separate measurements of the real and imaginary parts of the dielectric constant, this spectrometer directly measures the microwave absorption coefficient. Broadband spectra are obtained using a transmission line to couple microwave power into the liquid sample. The absorption spectrum for deionized water in the range 3--20 GHz is presented as an example and shows excellent agreement with calculated values of the absorption coefficient based on previously published dielectric data.

  19. A neutron spectrometer using nested moderators.

    PubMed

    Dubeau, J; Hakmana Witharana, S S; Atanackovic, J; Yonkeu, A; Archambault, J P

    2012-06-01

    The design, simulation results and measurements of a new neutron energy spectrometer are presented. The device, which may be called NNS, for Nested Neutron Spectrometer, works under the same principles as a Bonner Sphere Spectrometer (BSS) System, i.e. whereby a thermal neutron detector is surrounded by a polyethylene moderator. However, the moderator is cylindrical in shape. The different thicknesses of moderator are created by inserting one cylinder into another, much like nested Russian dolls. This design results in a much lighter instrument that is also easier to use in the field. Simulations and measurements show that, despite its shape, the device can be made to offer a near angular isotropic response to neutrons and that unfolded neutron spectra are in agreement with those obtained with a more traditional BSS.

  20. Degradation Free Spectrometers for Solar EUV Measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wieman, S. R.; Didkovsky, L. V.; Judge, D. L.; McMullin, D. R.

    2011-12-01

    Solar EUV observations will be made using two new degradation-free EUV spectrometers on a sounding rocket flight scheduled for summer 2012. The two instruments, a rare gas photoionization-based Optics-Free Spectrometer (OFS) and a Dual Grating Spectrometer (DGS), are filter-free and optics-free. OFS can measure the solar EUV spectrum with a spectral resolution comparable to that of grating-based EUV spectrometers. The DGS selectable spectral bandwidth is designed to provide solar irradiance in a 10 nm band centered on the Lyman-alpha 121.6 nm line and a 4 nm band centered on the He-II 30.4 nm line to overlap EUV observations from the SDO/EUV Variability Experiment (EVE) and the SOHO/Solar EUV Monitor (SEM). A clone of the SOHO/SEM flight instrument and a Rare Gas Ionization Cell (RGIC) absolute EUV detector will also be flown to provide additional measurements for inter-comparison. Program delays related to the sounding rocket flight termination system, which was no longer approved by the White Sands Missile Range prevented the previously scheduled summer 2011 launch of these instruments. During this delay several enhancements have been made to the sounding rocket versions of the DFS instruments, including a lighter, simplified vacuum housing and gas system for the OFS and an improved mounting for the DGS, which allows more accurate co-alignment of the optical axes of the DGS, OFS, and the SOHO/SEM clone. Details of these enhancements and results from additional lab testing of the instruments are reported here. The spectrometers are being developed and demonstrated as part of the Degradation Free Spectrometers (DFS) project under NASA's Low Cost Access to Space (LCAS) program and are supported by NASA Grant NNX08BA12G.

  1. Vacuum system for the SAMURAI spectrometer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shimizu, Y.; Otsu, H.; Kobayashi, T.; Kubo, T.; Motobayashi, T.; Sato, H.; Yoneda, K.

    2013-12-01

    The first commissioning experiment of the SAMURAI spectrometer and its beam line was performed in March, 2012. The vacuum system for the SAMURAI spectrometer includes its beam line and the SAMURAI vacuum chamber with the windows for detecting neutrons and charged particles. The window for neutrons was made of stainless steel with a thickness of 3 mm and was designed with a shape of partial cylinder to support itself against the atmospheric pressure. The window for charged particles was of the combination of Kevlar and Mylar with the thickness of 280 and 75 μm, respectively. The pressure in the vacuum system was at a few Pa throughout the commissioning experiment.

  2. Improved real-time imaging spectrometer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lambert, James L. (Inventor); Chao, Tien-Hsin (Inventor); Yu, Jeffrey W. (Inventor); Cheng, Li-Jen (Inventor)

    1993-01-01

    An improved AOTF-based imaging spectrometer that offers several advantages over prior art AOTF imaging spectrometers is presented. The ability to electronically set the bandpass wavelength provides observational flexibility. Various improvements in optical architecture provide simplified magnification variability, improved image resolution and light throughput efficiency and reduced sensitivity to ambient light. Two embodiments of the invention are: (1) operation in the visible/near-infrared domain of wavelength range 0.48 to 0.76 microns; and (2) infrared configuration which operates in the wavelength range of 1.2 to 2.5 microns.

  3. The Constellation-X Reflection Grating Spectrometer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Allen, Jean C.

    2006-01-01

    The Reflection Grating Spectrometer on the Constellation-X mission will provide high sensitivity, high-resolution spectra in the soft x-ray band. The RGS performance requirements are specified as a resolving power of greater than 300 and an effective area of greater than 1000 sq cm across most of the 0.25 to 2.0 keV band. These requirements are driven by the science goals of the mission. We will describe the performance requirements and goals, the reference design of the spectrometer, and examples of science cases where we expect data from the RGS to significantly advance our current understanding of the universe.

  4. Acousto-optic spectrometer for radio astronomy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chin, G.; Buhl, D.; Florez, J. M.

    1980-01-01

    A prototype acousto-optic spectrometer which uses a discrete bulk acoustic wave Itek Bragg cell, 5 mW Helium Neon laser, and a 1024 element Reticon charge coupled photodiode array is described. The analog signals from the photodiode array are digitized, added, and stored in a very high speed custom built multiplexer board which allows synchronous detection of weak signals to be performed. The experiment is controlled and the data are displayed and stored with an LSI-2 microcomputer system with dual floppy discs. The performance of the prototype acousto-optic spectrometer obtained from initial tests is reported.

  5. [Superhigh spectral resolution measurement of spectrometer].

    PubMed

    Liu, Sheng-Gang; Weng, Ji-Dong; Tao, Tian-Jiong

    2013-04-01

    The spectral resolution is one of the most important indexes of spectrometer. A new method is put forward for measuring the superhigh spectral resolution based on the Rayleigh criterion and the optical heterodyne, and the uncertainty of this method is analyzed. The spectral resolution of some spectrometer was measured using this method, and the experimental results show that the spectral resolution is higher than 18.9 pm, and the standard uncertainty is 2.3 pm. When showed using wave number, the spectral resolution is higher than 0.078 8 cm(-1), and the standard uncertainty is 0.009 6 cm(-1).

  6. Beam Shape Effects on Grating Spectrometer Resolution

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Erickson, Edwin F.; Rabanus, David; DeVincenzi, Donald L. (Technical Monitor)

    2000-01-01

    The collimated optical beam in a grating spectrometer may be circular or elliptical in cross section, so that different parts of the beam illuminate different numbers of grooves on the grating. Here we estimate the consequent loss in spectral resolution relative to that obtained with a beam which illuminates a fixed number of grooves. For representative diffraction resolution functions, the effect is to reduce the intrinsic resolving power of the spectrometer by about 13%, exclusive of other contributions such as finite entrance slit width.

  7. MICE Spectrometer Solenoid Magnetic Field Measurements

    SciTech Connect

    Leonova, M.

    2013-09-01

    The Muon Ionization Cooling Experiment (MICE) is designed to demonstrate ionization cooling in a muon beam. Its goal is to measure a 10% change in transverse emittance of a muon beam going through a prototype Neutrino Factory cooling channel section with an absolute measurement accuracy of 0.1%. To measure emittances, MICE uses two solenoidal spectrometers, with Solenoid magnets designed to have 4 T fields, uniform at 3 per mil level in the tracking volumes. Magnetic field measurements of the Spectrometer Solenoid magnet SS2, and analysis of coil parameters for input into magnet models will be discussed.

  8. Wide size range fast integrated mobility spectrometer

    DOEpatents

    Wang, Jian

    2013-10-29

    A mobility spectrometer to measure a nanometer particle size distribution is disclosed. The mobility spectrometer includes a conduit and a detector. The conduit is configured to receive and provide fluid communication of a fluid stream having a charged nanometer particle mixture. The conduit includes a separator section configured to generate an electrical field of two dimensions transverse to a dimension associated with the flow of the charged nanometer particle mixture through the separator section to spatially separate charged nanometer particles of the charged nanometer particle mixture in said two dimensions. The detector is disposed downstream of the conduit to detect concentration and position of the spatially-separated nanometer particles.

  9. Compact Imaging Spectrometer Utilizing Immersed Gratings

    DOEpatents

    Chrisp, Michael P.; Lerner, Scott A.; Kuzmenko, Paul J.; Bennett, Charles L.

    2006-03-21

    A compact imaging spectrometer with an immersive diffraction grating that compensates optical distortions. The imaging spectrometer comprises an entrance slit for transmitting light, a system for receiving the light and directing the light, an immersion grating, and a detector array. The entrance slit, the system for receiving the light, the immersion grating, and the detector array are positioned wherein the entrance slit transmits light to the system for receiving the light and the system for receiving the light directs the light to the immersion grating and the immersion grating receives the light and directs the light through an optical element to the detector array.

  10. Time-of-flight Fourier UCN spectrometer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kulin, G. V.; Frank, A. I.; Goryunov, S. V.; Kustov, D. V.; Geltenbort, P.; Jentschel, M.; Lauss, B.; Schmidt-Wellenburg, P.

    2016-05-01

    We describe a new time-of-flight Fourier spectrometer for investigation of UCN diffraction by a moving grating. The device operates in the regime of a discrete set of modulation frequencies. The results of the first experiments show that the spectrometer may be used for obtaining UCN energy spectra in the energy range of 60 - 200 neV with a resolution of about 5 neV. The accuracy of determination of the line position was estimated to be several units of 10-10 eV.

  11. Automated calibration of a flight particle spectrometer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Torbert, R. B.

    1986-01-01

    A system for calibrating both electron and ion imaging particle spectrometers was devised to calibrate flight instruments in a large vacuum facility in the Space Science Laboratory at the Marshall Space Flight Center. An IBM-compatible computer was used to control, via an IEEE 488 buss protocol, a two-axis gimbled table, constructed to fit inside the tank. Test settings of various diagnostic voltages were also acquired via the buss. These spectrometers constructed by the author at UCSD were calibrated in an automatic procedure programmed on the small computer. Data was up-loaded to the SSL VAX where a program was developed to plot the results.

  12. NASA applications for acousto-optic spectrometers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chin, G.

    1984-01-01

    Small, compact, and rugged IF spectrometers are needed in high resolution heterodyne receivers designed for a new generation of space-borne telescopes planned for the next decade. Acousto-optic Spectrometers (AOS) promise to provide the necessary bandwidth and resolution in a package which is compact, power efficient, and ruggedized for space applications. Sensitivity, linearity, and stability are the primary goals of an astronomical receiver and these features must be demonstrated in order for an AOS to be accepted in place of more conventional RF or digital technology.

  13. Electron-ion-x-ray spectrometer system

    SciTech Connect

    Southworth, S.H.; Deslattes, R.D.; MacDonald, M.A.; LeBrun, T.

    1993-10-01

    The authors describe a spectrometer system developed for electron, ion, and x-ray spectroscopy of gas-phase atoms and molecules following inner-shell excitation by tunable synchrotron radiation. The spectrometer has been used on beamline X-24A at the National Synchrotron Light Source for excitation-dependent studies of Ar L-shell and K-shell photoexcitation and vacancy decay processes. The instrumentation and experimental methods are discussed, and examples are given of electron spectra and coincidence spectra between electrons and fluorescent x-rays.

  14. Noiseless coding for the Gamma Ray spectrometer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rice, R.; Lee, J. J.

    1985-01-01

    The payload of several future unmanned space missions will include a sophisticated gamma ray spectrometer. Severely constrained data rates during certain portions of these missions could limit the possible science return from this instrument. This report investigates the application of universal noiseless coding techniques to represent gamma ray spectrometer data more efficiently without any loss in data integrity. Performance results demonstrate compression factors from 2.5:1 to 20:1 in comparison to a standard representation. Feasibility was also demonstrated by implementing a microprocessor breadboard coder/decoder using an Intel 8086 processor.

  15. Particle Transportation Through the JLab Hall A BigBite Spectrometer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alsalmi, Sheren

    2015-04-01

    The BigBite spectrometer of the Hall A Facility of Jefferson Lab is under refurbishment for use in an experiment (E120-10-103) to measure deep inelastic electron scattering off helium-3 and tritium mirror nuclei in the valence quark region (high Bjorken x range). The experiment will use an 11 GeV upgraded beam to determine the ratio of the neutron to proton F2 inelastic structure functions, and the ratio of the down to up quark, d/u, quark probability distributions in the nucleon. The BigBite spectrometer is based on a custom-shaped dipole magnet, which provides for large momentum and angular acceptances needed for the above measurements. Simulations using a ROOT-based Monte Carlo model for tracking and visualizing scattered electrons passing through the BigBite magnet will be presented. The optics parameters of the dipole magnet have been extracted from a field map produced by a TOSCA magnetostatics calculation. The simulations are necessary to estimate the phase space of the scattered electrons inside the relocated detectors of the spectrometer, and check for electrons which could possibly miss a detector and escape detection. This work is supported by Saudi Arabian Cultural Mission SACM, Kent State University, NSF Grant PHY-1405814, and DOE Contract DE-AC05-06OR23177. Kent State University, Kent, OH, 44242.

  16. The lead-glass electromagnetic calorimeters for the magnetic spectrometers in Hall C at Jefferson Lab

    SciTech Connect

    Mkrtchyan, Hamlet; Carlini, Roger D.; Tadevosyan, Vardan H.; Arrington, John Robert; Asaturyan, Arshak Razmik; Christy, Michael Eric; Dutta, Dipangkar; Ent, Rolf; Fenker, Howard C.; Gaskell, David J.; Horn, Tanja; Jones, Mark K.; Keppel, Cynthia; Mack, David J.; Malace, Simona P.; Mkrtchyan, Arthur; Niculescu, Maria-Ioana; Seely, Charles Jason; Tvaskis, Vladas; Wood, Stephen A.; Zhamkochyan, Simon

    2013-08-01

    The electromagnetic calorimeters of the various magnetic spectrometers in Hall C at Jefferson Lab are presented. For the existing HMS and SOS spectrometers design considerations, relevant construction information, and comparisons of simulated and experimental results are included. The energy resolution of the HMS and SOS calorimeters is better than $\\sigma/E \\sim 6%/\\sqrt E $, and pion/electron ($\\pi/e$) separation of about 100:1 has been achieved in energy range 1 -- 5 GeV. Good agreement has been observed between the experimental and simulated energy resolutions, but simulations systematically exceed experimentally determined $\\pi^-$ suppression factors by close to a factor of two. For the SHMS spectrometer presently under construction details on the design and accompanying GEANT4 simulation efforts are given. The anticipated performance of the new calorimeter is predicted over the full momentum range of the SHMS. Good electron/hadron separation is anticipated by combining the energy deposited in an initial (preshower) calorimeter layer with the total energy deposited in the calorimeter.

  17. Laser annealed in-situ P-doped Ge for on-chip laser source applications (Conference Presentation)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Srinivasan, Ashwyn; Pantouvaki, Marianna; Shimura, Yosuke; Porret, Clement; Van Deun, Rik; Loo, Roger; Van Thourhout, Dries; Van Campenhout, Joris

    2016-05-01

    Realization of a monolithically integrated on-chip laser source remains the holy-grail of Silicon Photonics. Germanium (Ge) is a promising semiconductor for lasing applications when highly doped with Phosphorous (P) and or alloyed with Sn [1, 2]. P doping makes Ge a pseudo-direct band gap material and the emitted wavelengths are compatible with fiber-optic communication applications. However, in-situ P doping with Ge2H6 precursor allows a maximum active P concentration of 6×1019 cm-3 [3]. Even with such active P levels, n++ Ge is still an indirect band gap material and could result in very high threshold current densities. In this work, we demonstrate P-doped Ge layers with active n-type doping beyond 1020 cm-3, grown using Ge2H6 and PH3 and subsequently laser annealed, targeting power-efficient on-chip laser sources. The use of Ge2H6 precursors during the growth of P-doped Ge increases the active P concentration level to a record fully activated concentration of 1.3×1020 cm-3 when laser annealed with a fluence of 1.2 J/cm2. The material stack consisted of 200 nm thick P-doped Ge grown on an annealed 1 µm Ge buffer on Si. Ge:P epitaxy was performed with PH3 and Ge2H6 at 320oC. Low temperature growth enable Ge:P epitaxy far from thermodynamic equilibrium, resulting in an enhanced incorporation of P atoms [3]. At such high active P concentration, the n++ Ge layer is expected to be a pseudo-direct band gap material. The photoluminescence (PL) intensities for layers with highest active P concentration show an enhancement of 18× when compared to undoped Ge grown on Si as shown in Fig. 1 and Fig. 2. The layers were optically pumped with a 640 nm laser and an incident intensity of 410 mW/cm2. The PL was measured with a NIR spectrometer with a Hamamatsu R5509-72 NIR photomultiplier tube detector whose detectivity drops at 1620 nm. Due to high active P concentration, we expect band gap narrowing phenomena to push the PL peak to wavelengths beyond the detection limit

  18. A study on NiGe-contacted Ge n+/p Ge shallow junction prepared by dopant segregation technique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tsui, Bing-Yue; Shih, Jhe-Ju; Lin, Han-Chi; Lin, Chiung-Yuan

    2015-05-01

    In this work, the effect of dopant segregation on the NiGe/n-Ge contact is studied by experiments and first-principles calculations. Both Al-contacted and NiGe-contacted n+/p junctions were fabricated. Phosphorus and arsenic ions were Implanted Before Germanide (IBG) formation or Implanted After Germanide (IAG) formation. The NiGe-contacted junction always exhibit higher forward current than the Al-contacted junction due to dopant segregation. First principles calculations predict that phosphorus atoms tend to segregate on both NiGe side and Ge side while arsenic atoms tend to segregate at Ge side. Since phosphorus has higher activation level and lower diffusion coefficient than arsenic, we propose a phosphorus IBG + arsenic IAG process. Shallow n+/p junction with junction depth 90 nm below the NiGe/Ge interface is achieved. The lowest and average contact resistivity is 2 × 10-6 Ω cm2 and 6.7 × 10-6 Ω cm2, respectively. Methods which can further reduce the junction depth and contact resistivity are suggested.

  19. Simulation results of Pulse Shape Discrimination (PSD) for background reduction in INTEGRAL Spectrometer (SPI) germanium detectors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Slassi-Sennou, S. A.; Boggs, S. E.; Feffer, P. T.; Lin, R. P.

    1997-01-01

    Pulse Shape Discrimination (PSD) for background reduction will be used in the INTErnational Gamma Ray Astrophysics Laboratory (INTEGRAL) imaging spectrometer (SPI) to improve the sensitivity from 200 keV to 2 MeV. The observation of significant astrophysical gamma ray lines in this energy range is expected, where the dominant component of the background is the beta(sup -) decay in the Ge detectors due to the activation of Ge nuclei by cosmic rays. The sensitivity of the SPI will be improved by rejecting beta(sup -) decay events while retaining photon events. The PSD technique will distinguish between single and multiple site events. Simulation results of PSD for INTEGRAL-type Ge detectors using a numerical model for pulse shape generation are presented. The model was shown to agree with the experimental results for a narrow inner bore closed end cylindrical detector. Using PSD, a sensitivity improvement factor of the order of 2.4 at 0.8 MeV is expected.

  20. Possibility of testing the light dark matter hypothesis with the alpha magnetic spectrometer.

    PubMed

    Hooper, Dan; Xue, Wei

    2013-01-25

    The spectrum and morphology of gamma rays from the Galactic center and the spectrum of synchrotron emission observed from the Milky Way's radio filaments have each been interpreted as possible signals of ∼ 7-10 GeV dark matter particles annihilating in the inner Galaxy. In dark matter models capable of producing these signals, the annihilations should also generate significant fluxes of ∼ 7-10 GeV positrons which can lead to a distinctive bumplike feature in a local cosmic ray positron spectrum. In this Letter, we show that while such a feature would be difficult to detect with PAMELA, it would likely be identifiable by the currently operating Alpha Magnetic Spectrometer experiment. As no known astrophysical (i.e., nondark matter) sources or mechanisms are likely to produce such a sharp feature, the observation of a positron bump at around 7-10 GeV would significantly strengthen the case for a dark matter interpretation of the reported gamma-ray and radio anomalies.

  1. Hybrid plasmon photonic crystal resonance grating for integrated spectrometer biosensor.

    PubMed

    Guo, Hong; Guo, Junpeng

    2015-01-15

    Using nanofabricated hybrid metal-dielectric nanohole array photonic crystal gratings, a hybrid plasmonic optical resonance spectrometer biosensor is demonstrated. The new spectrometer sensor technique measures plasmonic optical resonance from the first-order diffraction rather than via the traditional method of measuring optical resonance from transmission. The resonance spectra measured with the new spectrometer technique are compared with the spectra measured using a commercial optical spectrometer. It is shown that the new optical resonance spectrometer can be used to measure plasmonic optical resonance that otherwise cannot be measured with a regular optical spectrometer. PMID:25679856

  2. Hybrid plasmon photonic crystal resonance grating for integrated spectrometer biosensor.

    PubMed

    Guo, Hong; Guo, Junpeng

    2015-01-15

    Using nanofabricated hybrid metal-dielectric nanohole array photonic crystal gratings, a hybrid plasmonic optical resonance spectrometer biosensor is demonstrated. The new spectrometer sensor technique measures plasmonic optical resonance from the first-order diffraction rather than via the traditional method of measuring optical resonance from transmission. The resonance spectra measured with the new spectrometer technique are compared with the spectra measured using a commercial optical spectrometer. It is shown that the new optical resonance spectrometer can be used to measure plasmonic optical resonance that otherwise cannot be measured with a regular optical spectrometer.

  3. Target and beam-target spin asymmetries in exclusive π+ and π– electroproduction with 1.6- to 5.7-GeV electrons

    DOE PAGES

    Bosted, P. E.; Biselli, A. S.; Careccia, S.; Dodge, G.; Fersch, R.; Guler, N.; Kuhn, S. E.; Pierce, J.; Prok, Y.; Zheng, X.; et al

    2016-11-01

    Here, beam-target double-spin asymmetries and target single-spin asymmetries in exclusive π+ and quasiexclusive π– electroproduction were obtained from scattering of 1.6- to 5.7-GeV longitudinally polarized electrons from longitudinally polarized protons (for π+) and deuterons (for π–) using the CEBAF Large Acceptance Spectrometer (CLAS) at Jefferson Lab. The kinematic range covered is 1.1 < W < 2.6 GeV and 0.05 < Q2 < 5GeV2, with good angular coverage in the forward hemisphere. The asymmetry results were divided into approximately 40 000 kinematic bins for π+ from free protons and 15 000 bins for π– production from bound nucleons in the deuteron.more » The present results are found to be in reasonable agreement with fits to previous world data for W < 1.7 GeV and Q2 < 0.5GeV2, with discrepancies increasing at higher values of Q2, especially for W > 1.5 GeV. Very large target-spin asymmetries are observed for W > 1.6 GeV. When combined with cross-section measurements, the present results can provide powerful constraints on nucleon resonance amplitudes at moderate and large values of Q2, for resonances with masses as high as 2.3 GeV.« less

  4. Strangeonium spectroscopy at 11 GeV/c and Cherenkov Ring Imaging at the SLD

    SciTech Connect

    Bienz, T.L.

    1990-07-01

    This thesis is divided into two sections, which describe portions of the data acquisition system and online software for the Cherenkov Ring Imaging Detector (CRID) for the SLD, and analyses of several low cross section strangeonium channels in data from the LASS spectrometer. The CRID section includes a description of the data acquisition system, determination of the preamplifier gain, and development of an online pulse finding algorithm based on deconvolution. Deconvolution uses knowledge of the preamplifier impulse response to aid in pulse finding. The algorithm is fast and shows good single pulse resolution and excellent double pulse resolution in preliminary tests. The strangeonium analyses are based on data from a 4.1 event/nanobarn exposure of the LASS spectrometer in K{sup {minus}}p interactions at 11 GeV/c, and include studies of {Lambda}{eta}{pi}{sup {plus}}{pi}{sup {minus}}, {Lambda}{Kappa}*{Kappa}*, and {Lambda}{phi}{phi}.

  5. Search for strangelets in Pb + Pb collisions at 158 A GeV/c

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arsenescu, R.; Baglin, C.; Beck, H. P.; Borer, K.; Bussière, A.; Elsener, K.; Gorodetzky, Ph; Guillaud, J. P.; Kabana, S.; Klingenberg, R.; Lehmann, G.; Lindén, T.; Lohmann, K. D.; Mommsen, R.; Moser, U.; Pretzl, K.; Schacher, J.; Spiwoks, R.; Tuominiemi, J.; Weber, M.

    2002-11-01

    The NA52 experiment at CERN has investigated lead-lead collisions at 158 A GeV/c and searched for long-lived strange quark matter droplets, so-called strangelets, with a unique signature of a high mass-to-charge ratio. This ratio was measured in a focusing spectrometer equipped with a time-of-flight system. A total of 3×1011 Pb + Pb interactions at positive and 1013 at negative spectrometer polarities have been recorded. No strangelet has been observed, which sets experimental upper limits (90% CL) for the strangelet production at 3×10-9 per interaction for positively charged and at 2×10-10 per interaction for negatively charged strangelets.

  6. Performance of spherically focusing Ge(444) backscattering analyzers for inelastic x-ray scattering

    SciTech Connect

    Macrander, A.T.; Kushnir, V.I.; Blasdell, R.C. )

    1995-02-01

    A spectrometer designed for use as an undulator source and having targeted resolutions of 0.01 eV in one mode of use and 0.2 eV in another will operate at the APS. We report here on analyzers that we have constructed for use on this spectrometer for 0.2 eV resolution. We have tested them at NSLS beamline X21 using focused wiggler radiation and at the Cornell high energy synchrotron source (CHESS) using radiation from the CHESS-ANL undulator. Analyzers were constructed by gluing and pressing 90-mm-diam, (111) oriented Ge wafers into concave glass forms having a radius near 1 m. An overall inelastic scattering resolution of 0.3 eV using the (444) reflection was demonstrated at CHESS. Recent results at X21 revealed a useful diameter of 74 mm at an 87[degree] Bragg angle.

  7. Performance of spherically focusing Ge(444) backscattering analyzers for inelastic x-ray scattering

    SciTech Connect

    Macrander, A.T.; Kushnir, V.I.; Blasdell, R.C.

    1994-08-01

    A spectrometer designed to use an undulator source and having targeted resolutions of 0.01 eV in one mode of use and 0.2 eV in another will operate at the APS. We report here on analyzers that we have, constructed for use on this spectrometer for 0.2-eV resolution. We have tested them at NSLS beamline X21 using focused wiggler radiation and at CHESS using radiation from the CHESS-ANL undulator. Analyzers were constructed by gluing and pressing 90-mm-diameter, (111) oriented Ge wafers into concave glass forms having a radius near 1 m. An overall inelastic scattering resolution of 0.3 eV using the (444) reflection was demonstrated at CHESS. Recent results at X21 revealed a useful diameter of 74 mm at an 870 Bragg angle.

  8. Heterogeneous integration of SiGe/Ge and III-V for Si photonics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Takenaka, Mitsuru; Kim, Younghyun; Han, Jaehoon; Kang, Jian; Ikku, Yuki; Cheng, Yongpeng; Park, Jinkwon; Takagi, Shinichi

    2016-05-01

    The heterogeneous integration of SiGe/Ge and III-V semiconductors gives us an opportunity to enhance functionalities of Si photonics platform through their superior material properties which lack in Si. In this paper we discuss what SiGe/Ge and III-V can bring to Si photonics. We have predicted that the light effective hole mass in strained SiGe results in the enhanced the free-carrier effects such as the plasma dispersion effect and free-carrier absorption. We observed significantly larger free-carrier absorption in the SiGe optical modulator than in the control Si device. By fabricating asymmetric Mach-Zehnder interferometer (MZI) SiGe optical modulators, the enhancement of the plasma dispersion effect in strained SiGe has been successfully demonstrated. Mid-infrared integrated photonics based on Ge waveguides on Si have also been investigated. Since Ge is transparent to the entire mid-infrared range, Ge photonic integrated circuits on the Ge-on-Insulator (GeOI) wafer are quite attractive. We have successfully fabricated the GeOI wafer with 2-μm-thick buried oxide (BOX) layer by wafer bonding. The passive waveguide components based on Ge strip waveguides have been demonstrated on the GeOI. We have also demonstrated carrier-injection Ge variable optical attenuators. We have proposed and investigate the III-V CMOS photonics platform by using the III-V on Insulator (IIIV- OI) on a Si wafer. The strong optical confinement in the III-V-OI enables us to achieve high-performance photonic devices. We have successfully demonstrated InGaAsP MZI optical switch with the low on-state crosstalk on the III-V-OI. Ultra-low dark current waveguide InGaAs PDs integrated with an InP grating coupler are also achieved.

  9. Polarization of Λ and Λ¯ in 920 GeV fixed-target proton nucleus collisions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hera-B Collaboration; Abt, I.; Adams, M.; Agari, M.; Albrecht, H.; Aleksandrov, A.; Amaral, V.; Amorim, A.; Aplin, S. J.; Aushev, V.; Bagaturia, Y.; Balagura, V.; Bargiotti, M.; Barsukova, O.; Bastos, J.; Batista, J.; Bauer, C.; Bauer, Th. S.; Belkov, A.; Belkov, Ar.; Belotelov, I.; Bertin, A.; Bobchenko, B.; Böcker, M.; Bogatyrev, A.; Bohm, G.; Bräuer, M.; Bruinsma, M.; Bruschi, M.; Buchholz, P.; Buran, T.; Carvalho, J.; Conde, P.; Cruse, C.; Dam, M.; Danielsen, K. M.; Danilov, M.; de Castro, S.; Deppe, H.; Dong, X.; Dreis, H. B.; Egorytchev, V.; Ehret, K.; Eisele, F.; Emeliyanov, D.; Erhan, S.; Essenov, S.; Fabbri, L.; Faccioli, P.; Feuerstack-Raible, M.; Flammer, J.; Fominykh, B.; Funcke, M.; Garrido, Ll.; Gellrich, A.; Giacobbe, B.; Gläß, J.; Goloubkov, D.; Golubkov, Y.; Golutvin, A.; Golutvin, I.; Gorbounov, I.; Gorišek, A.; Gouchtchine, O.; Goulart, D. C.; Gradl, S.; Gradl, W.; Grimaldi, F.; Guilitsky, Yu.; Hansen, J. D.; Hernández, J. M.; Hofmann, W.; Hohlmann, M.; Hott, T.; Hulsbergen, W.; Husemann, U.; Igonkina, O.; Ispiryan, M.; Jagla, T.; Jiang, C.; Kapitza, H.; Karabekyan, S.; Karpenko, N.; Keller, S.; Kessler, J.; Khasanov, F.; Kiryushin, Yu.; Kisel, I.; Klinkby, E.; Knöpfle, K. T.; Kolanoski, H.; Korpar, S.; Krauss, C.; Kreuzer, P.; Križan, P.; Krücker, D.; Kupper, S.; Kvaratskheliia, T.; Lanyov, A.; Lau, K.; Lewendel, B.; Lohse, T.; Lomonosov, B.; Männer, R.; Mankel, R.; Masciocchi, S.; Massa, I.; Matchikhilian, I.; Medin, G.; Medinnis, M.; Mevius, M.; Michetti, A.; Mikhailov, Yu.; Mizuk, R.; Muresan, R.; Zur Nedden, M.; Negodaev, M.; Nörenberg, M.; Nowak, S.; Núñez Pardo de Vera, M. T.; Ouchrif, M.; Ould-Saada, F.; Padilla, C.; Peralta, D.; Pernack, R.; Pestotnik, R.; Petersen, B. Aa.; Piccinini, M.; Pleier, M. A.; Poli, M.; Popov, V.; Pose, D.; Prystupa, S.; Pugatch, V.; Pylypchenko, Y.; Pyrlik, J.; Reeves, K.; Reßing, D.; Rick, H.; Riu, I.; Robmann, P.; Rostovtseva, I.; Rybnikov, V.; Sánchez, F.; Sbrizzi, A.; Schmelling, M.; Schmidt, B.; Schreiner, A.; Schröder, H.; Schwanke, U.; Schwartz, A. J.; Schwarz, A. S.; Schwenninger, B.; Schwingenheuer, B.; Sciacca, F.; Semprini-Cesari, N.; Shuvalov, S.; Silva, L.; Sözüer, L.; Solunin, S.; Somov, A.; Somov, S.; Spengler, J.; Spighi, R.; Spiridonov, A.; Stanovnik, A.; Starič, M.; Stegmann, C.; Subramania, H. S.; Symalla, M.; Tikhomirov, I.; Titov, M.; Tsakov, I.; Uwer, U.; van Eldik, C.; Vassiliev, Yu.; Villa, M.; Vitale, A.; Vukotic, I.; Wahlberg, H.; Walenta, A. H.; Walter, M.; Wang, J. J.; Wegener, D.; Werthenbach, U.; Wolters, H.; Wurth, R.; Wurz, A.; Zaitsev, Yu.; Zavertyaev, M.; Zeuner, T.; Zhelezov, A.; Zheng, Z.; Zimmermann, R.; Živko, T.; Zoccoli, A.

    2006-07-01

    A measurement of the polarization of Λ and Λ¯ baryons produced in pC and pW collisions at s=41.6 GeV has been performed with the HERA-B spectrometer. The measurements cover the kinematic range of 0.6 GeV/cGeV/c in transverse momentum and -0.15

  10. Kaon pair production in proton-nucleus collisions at 2.83 GeV kinetic energy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kiselev, Yu. T.; Hartmann, M.; Polyanskiy, A.; Paryev, E. Ya.; Barsov, S.; Büscher, M.; Dymov, S.; Gebel, R.; Hejny, V.; Kacharava, A.; Keshelashvili, I.; Lorentz, B.; Maeda, Y.; Merzliakov, S.; Mikirtytchiants, S.; Ohm, H.; Serdyuk, V.; Sibirtsev, A.; Sinitsyna, V. Y.; Stein, H. J.; Ströher, H.; Trusov, S.; Valdau, Yu.; Wilkin, C.; Wüstner, P.; Ye, Q. J.

    2015-12-01

    The production of non-ϕ K+K- pairs by protons at 2.83 GeV kinetic energy on C, Cu, Ag, and Au targets has been investigated by using the COSY-ANKE magnetic spectrometer. The K- momentum dependence of the differential cross section has been measured for laboratory polar angles θK±≤12∘ over the 0.2-0.9 GeV/c range. The comparison of the data with detailed model calculations indicates an attractive K--nucleus potential of about -60 MeV at normal nuclear matter density at a mean momentum of 0.5 GeV/c . However, this approach has difficulty in reproducing the smallness of the observed cross sections at low-K- momenta.

  11. $\\pi^+$ photoproduction on the proton for photon energies from 0.725 to 2.875 GeV

    SciTech Connect

    Dugger, Michael; Ritchie, Barry; Ball, J.P.; Ball, Jacques; Collins, Patrick; Pasyuk, E.; Arndt, Richard; Briscoe, William; Strakovski, Igor; Workman, Ron

    2009-06-01

    Differential cross sections for the reaction $\\gamma p \\to n \\pi^+$ have been measured with the CEBAF Large Acceptance Spectrometer (CLAS) and a tagged photon beam with energies from 0.725 to 2.875 GeV. Where available, the results obtained here compare well with previously published results for the reaction. Agreement with the SAID and MAID analyses is found below 1 GeV. The present set of cross sections has been incorporated into the SAID database, and exploratory fits have been made up to 2.7 GeV. Resonance couplings have been extracted and compared to previous determinations. With the addition of these cross sections to the world data set, significant changes have occurred in the high-energy behavior of the SAID cross-section predictions and amplitudes.

  12. pi0 photoproduction on the proton for photon energies from 0.675 to 2.875-GeV

    SciTech Connect

    Michael Dugger; Barry Ritchie; Jacques Ball; Patrick Collins; Evgueni Pasyuk; Richard Arndt; William Briscoe; Igor Strakovski; Ron Workman; Gary Adams; Moscov Amaryan; Pawel Ambrozewicz; Eric Anciant; Marco Anghinolfi; Burin Asavapibhop; G. Asryan; Gerard Audit; Harutyun Avakian; H. Bagdasaryan; Nathan Baillie; Nathan Baltzell; Steve Barrow; Marco Battaglieri; Kevin Beard; Ivan Bedlinski; Ivan Bedlinskiy; Mehmet Bektasoglu; Matthew Bellis; Nawal Benmouna; Barry Berman; Nicola Bianchi; Angela Biselli; Billy Bonner; Sylvain Bouchigny; Sergey Boyarinov; Robert Bradford; Derek Branford; William Brooks; Stephen Bueltmann; Volker Burkert; Cornel Butuceanu; John Calarco; Sharon Careccia; Daniel Carman; Bryan Carnahan; Shifeng Chen; Philip Cole; Alan Coleman; Philip Coltharp; Dieter Cords; Pietro Corvisiero; Donald Crabb; Hall Crannell; John Cummings; Enzo De Sanctis; Raffaella De Vita; Pavel Degtiarenko; Haluk Denizli; Lawrence Dennis; Alexandre Deur; Kahanawita Dharmawardane; Kalvir Dhuga; Richard Dickson; Chaden Djalali; Gail Dodge; Joseph Donnelly; David Doughty; P. Dragovitsch; Steven Dytman; Oleksandr Dzyubak; Hovanes Egiyan; Kim Egiyan; Latifa Elouadrhiri; A. Empl; Paul Eugenio; Renee Fatemi; Gleb Fedotov; Gerald Feldman; Robert Feuerbach; John Ficenec; Tony Forest; Herbert Funsten; Michel Garcon; Gagik Gavalian; Gerard Gilfoyle; Kevin Giovanetti; Francois-Xavier Girod; John Goetz; Ralf Gothe; Keith Griffioen; Michel Guidal; Matthieu Guillo; Nevzat Guler; Lei Guo; Vardan Gyurjyan; Cynthia Hadjidakis; Rafael Hakobyan; John Hardie; D. Heddle; F. Hersman; Kenneth Hicks; Ishaq Hleiqawi; Maurik Holtrop; J. Hu; Marco Huertas; Charles Hyde; Charles Hyde-Wright; Yordanka Ilieva; David Ireland; Boris Ishkhanov; Mark Ito; David Jenkins; Hyon-Suk Jo; Kyungseon Joo; Henry Juengst; Narbe Kalantarians; James Kellie; Mahbubul Khandaker; Kui Kim; Kinney Kim; Wooyoung Kim; Andreas Klein; Franz Klein; Alexei Klimenko; Mike Klusman; Mikhail Kossov; Zebulun Krahn; Laird Kramer; Valery Kubarovsky; Joachim Kuhn; Sebastian Kuhn; Viacheslav Kuznetsov; Jeff Lachniet; Jean Laget; Jorn Langheinrich; David Lawrence; Tsung-shung Lee; Ana Lima; Kenneth Livingston; K. Lukashin; Joseph Manak; Claude Marchand; Leonard Maximon; Simeon McAleer; Bryan McKinnon; John McNabb; Bernhard Mecking; Mac Mestayer; Curtis Meyer; Tsutomu Mibe; Konstantin Mikhaylov; Ralph Minehart; Marco Mirazita; Rory Miskimen; Viktor Mokeev; Kei Moriya; Steven Morrow; Valeria Muccifora; James Mueller; Gordon Mutchler; Pawel Nadel-Turonski; James Napolitano; Rakhsha Nasseripour; Silvia Niccolai; Gabriel Niculescu; Maria-Ioana Niculescu; Bogdan Niczyporuk; Megh Niroula; Rustam Niyazov; Mina Nozar; Grant O'Rielly; Mikhail Osipenko; Alexander Ostrovidov; K Park; Craig Paterson; Sasha Philips; Joshua Pierce; Nikolay Pivnyuk; Dinko Pocanic; Oleg Pogorelko; S. Pozdniakov; Barry Preedom; John Price; Yelena Prok; Dan Protopopescu; Liming Qin; Brian Raue; Gregory Riccardi; Giovanni Ricco; Marco Ripani; Federico Ronchetti; Guenther Rosner; Patrizia Rossi; David Rowntree; Philip Rubin; Franck Sabatie; Julian Salamanca; Carlos Salgado; Joseph Santoro; Vladimir Sapunenko; Reinhard Schumacher; Vladimir Serov; Aziz Shafi; Youri Sharabian; J. Shaw; Sebastio Simionatto; Alexander Skabelin; Elton Smith; Lee Smith; Daniel Sober; M. Spraker; Aleksey Stavinskiy; Samuel Stepanyan; Stepan Stepanyan; Burnham Stokes; Paul Stoler; Steffen Strauch; Mauro Taiuti; Simon Taylor; David Tedeschi; Ulrike Thoma; R. Thompson; Avtandil Tkabladze; Svyatoslav Tkachenko; Luminita Todor; Clarisse Tur; Maurizio Ungaro; Michael Vineyard; Alexander Vlassov; Xue kai Wang; Lawrence Weinstein; Henry Weller; Dennis Weygand; M. Williams; Elliott Wolin; M.H. Wood; A. Yegneswaran; Jae-Chul Yun; Lorenzo Zana; Jixie Zhang

    2007-07-23

    Differential cross sections for the reaction $\\gamma p \\to p \\pi^0$ have been measured with the CEBAF Large Acceptance Spectrometer (CLAS) and a tagged photon beam with energies from 0.675 to 2.875 GeV. The results reported here possess greater accuracy in the absolute normalization than previous measurements. They disagree with recent CB-ELSA measurements for the process at forward scattering angles. Agreement with the SAID and MAID fits is found below 1 GeV. The present set of cross sections has been incorporated into the SAID database, and exploratory fits have been extended to 3 GeV. Resonance couplings have been extracted and compared to previous determinations.

  13. Pump Effects in Planetary Mass Spectrometers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mahaffy, Paul; Harpold, Dan

    1999-01-01

    Mass spectrometers provide a useful tool in solar system exploration since fundamental questions of Solar System formation and evolution may be constrained by models based on the chemical and isotopic data provided by these instruments. For example, comparison of such data between the atmospheres of the terrestrial planets enables an understanding of mechanisms of atmospheric loss to space and production sources such as from planetary outgassing and from infall from objects such as comets. Over the past 25 years, mass spectrometers have been sent to Mars, Venus, Comet Halley, and Jupiter and are presently in transit to the Saturnian system to sample the atmosphere of Saturn's moon Titan. The quality of data derived from a very small, lightweight, and rugged instrument is constrained not only by the mass analyzer itself, but also by the performance of its gas sampling and pumping systems. A comparison of several planetary mass spectrometer experiments is provided with a focus on the demands placed on the gas processing and pumping systems. For example, the figure below is a mass spectrum from deep in the atmosphere of Jupiter obtained from a quadrupole mass spectrometer developed in the early 1980's for the Galileo Probe (Niemann et al., Space Sci. Rev., 60, 111-142 (1992)). Measurements of Jovian noble gases and other species with this system is described.

  14. Digital Signal Processing in the GRETINA Spectrometer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cromaz, Mario

    2015-10-01

    Developments in the segmentation of large-volume HPGe crystals has enabled the development of high-efficiency gamma-ray spectrometers which have the ability to track the path of gamma-rays scattering through the detector volume. This technology has been successfully implemented in the GRETINA spectrometer whose high efficiency and ability to perform precise event-by-event Doppler correction has made it an important tool in nuclear spectroscopy. Tracking has required the spectrometer to employ a fully digital signal processing chain. Each of the systems 1120 channels are digitized by 100 Mhz, 14-bit flash ADCs. Filters that provide timing and high-resolution energies are implemented on local FPGAs acting on the ADC data streams while interaction point locations and tracks, derived from the trace on each detector segment, are calculated in real time on a computing cluster. In this presentation we will give a description of GRETINA's digital signal processing system, the impact of design decisions on system performance, and a discussion of possible future directions as we look towards soon developing larger spectrometers such as GRETA with full 4 π solid angle coverage. This work was supported by the Office of Science in the Department of Energy under grant DE-AC02-05CH11231.

  15. Advanced Laboratory NMR Spectrometer with Applications.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Biscegli, Clovis; And Others

    1982-01-01

    A description is given of an inexpensive nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectrometer suitable for use in advanced laboratory courses. Applications to the nondestructive analysis of the oil content in corn seeds and in monitoring the crystallization of polymers are presented. (SK)

  16. Neutron spectrometer for fast nuclear reactors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Osipenko, M.; Ripani, M.; Ricco, G.; Caiffi, B.; Pompili, F.; Pillon, M.; Angelone, M.; Verona-Rinati, G.; Cardarelli, R.; Mila, G.; Argiro, S.

    2015-11-01

    In this paper we describe the development and first tests of a neutron spectrometer designed for high flux environments, such as the ones found in fast nuclear reactors. The spectrometer is based on the conversion of neutrons impinging on 6Li into α and t whose total energy comprises the initial neutron energy and the reaction Q-value. The 6LiF layer is sandwiched between two CVD diamond detectors, which measure the two reaction products in coincidence. The spectrometer was calibrated at two neutron energies in well known thermal and 3 MeV neutron fluxes. The measured neutron detection efficiency varies from 4.2 ×10-4 to 3.5 ×10-8 for thermal and 3 MeV neutrons, respectively. These values are in agreement with Geant4 simulations and close to simple estimates based on the knowledge of the 6Li(n,α)t cross-section. The energy resolution of the spectrometer was found to be better than 100 keV when using 2.5 or 5 m cables between the detector and the preamplifiers.

  17. Reflecting Schmidt/Littrow Prism Imaging Spectrometer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Breckinridge, J. B.; Page, N. A.; Shack, R. V.; Shannon, R. R.

    1985-01-01

    High resolution achieved with wide field of view. Imaging Spectrometer features off-axis reflecting optics, including reflecting "slit" that also serves as field flattener. Only refracting element is prism. By scanning slit across object or scene and timing out signal, both spectral and spatial information in scene are obtained.

  18. HyTES: Thermal Imaging Spectrometer Development

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Johnson, William R.; Hook, Simon J.; Mouroulis, Pantazis; Wilson, Daniel W.; Gunapala, Sarath D.; Realmuto, Vincent; Lamborn, Andy; Paine, Chris; Mumolo, Jason M.; Eng, Bjorn T.

    2011-01-01

    The Jet Propulsion Laboratory has developed the Hyperspectral Thermal Emission Spectrometer (HyTES). It is an airborne pushbroom imaging spectrometer based on the Dyson optical configuration. First low altitude test flights are scheduled for later this year. HyTES uses a compact 7.5-12 micrometer m hyperspectral grating spectrometer in combination with a Quantum Well Infrared Photodetector (QWIP) and grating based spectrometer. The Dyson design allows for a very compact and optically fast system (F/1.6). Cooling requirements are minimized due to the single monolithic prism-like grating design. The configuration has the potential to be the optimal science-grade imaging spectroscopy solution for high altitude, lighter-than-air (HAA, LTA) vehicles and unmanned aerial vehicles (UAV) due to its small form factor and relatively low power requirements. The QWIP sensor allows for optimum spatial and spectral uniformity and provides adequate responsivity which allows for near 100mK noise equivalent temperature difference (NEDT) operation across the LWIR passband. The QWIP's repeatability and uniformity will be helpful for data integrity since currently an onboard calibrator is not planned. A calibration will be done before and after eight hour flights to gage any inconsistencies. This has been demonstrated with lab testing. Further test results show adequate NEDT, linearity as well as applicable earth science emissivity target results (Silicates, water) measured in direct sunlight.

  19. Matching the Spectrometers on board ISO

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Burgdorf, M.; Feuchtgruber, H.; Salama, A.; García-Lario, P.; Müller, T.; Lord, S.

    We report on the findings of the Spectral Matching Working Group, the main aim of which was to investigate discontinuities between SWS and LWS in complete ISO spectra from 2 - 200 μm. In order to check in a quantitative way the agreement between the two spectrometers, a software tool was developed which automatically selected observations made with SWS and LWS on the same coordinates and which calculated the ratio of the fluxes in the overlap region from the browser products. In this way all observations suitable for this cross-calibration exercise could be selected, provided that they were performed with standard Astronomical Observing Templates and covered the wavelength range that SWS and LWS have in common. 95% of those targets which were neither extended nor variable showed an agreement better than 20% between the two spectrometers. Several problems with the data from the instruments, like saturation effects, detector transients and discontinuities between the sub-spectra from different detectors, affect both spectrometers in a similar way and require special processing steps. We show, for some solar system objects, to which extent the spectra taken with ISO from the mid- to the far-infrared agree with theoretical models. Furthermore, we discuss for the example of Neptune how the combined information from both spectrometers can be used to put new constraints on models of objects that are possible calibration standards for future missions.

  20. Evaluation of Small Mass Spectrometer Systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Arkin, C. Richard; Griffin, Timothy P.; Ottens, Andrew K.; Diaz, Jorge A.; Follistein, Duke W.; Adams, Fredrick W.; Helms, William R.; Voska, N. (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    Various mass analyzer systems were evaluated. Several systems show promise, including the Stanford Research Systems RGA-100, Inficon XPR-2, the University of Florida's Ion Trap, and the Compact Double Focus Mass Spectrometer. Areas that need improvement are the response time, recovery time, system volume, and system weight. Future work will investigate techniques to improve systems and will evaluate engineering challenges.

  1. Machined electrostatic sector for mass spectrometer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sinha, Mahadeva P. (Inventor)

    2001-01-01

    An electrostatic sector device for a mass spectrometer is formed from a single piece of machinable ceramic. The machined ceramic is coated with a nickel coating, and a notch is etched in the nickel coating to form two separated portions. The sector can be covered by a cover formed from a separate piece of machined ceramic.

  2. Livermore Imaging Fourier Transform Infrared Spectrometer (LIFTIRS)

    SciTech Connect

    Carter, M.R.; Bennett, C.L.; Fields, D.J.; Lee, F.D.

    1995-05-10

    Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory is currently operating a hyperspectral imager, the Livermore Imaging Fourier Transform Infrared Spectrometer (LIFTIRS). This instrument is capable of operating throughout the infrared spectrum from 3 to 12.5 {mu}m with controllable spectral resolution. In this presentation we report on it`s operating characteristics, current capabilities, data throughput and calibration issues.

  3. Lens system for a photo ion spectrometer

    DOEpatents

    Gruen, Dieter M.; Young, Charles E.; Pellin, Michael J.

    1990-01-01

    A lens system in a photo ion spectrometer for manipulating a primary ion beam and ionized atomic component. The atomic components are removed from a sample by a primary ion beam using the lens system, and the ions are extracted for analysis. The lens system further includes ionization resistant coatings for protecting the lens system.

  4. Imaging mass spectrometer with mass tags

    DOEpatents

    Felton, James S.; Wu, Kuang Jen J.; Knize, Mark G.; Kulp, Kristen S.; Gray, Joe W.

    2013-01-29

    A method of analyzing biological material by exposing the biological material to a recognition element, that is coupled to a mass tag element, directing an ion beam of a mass spectrometer to the biological material, interrogating at least one region of interest area from the biological material and producing data, and distributing the data in plots.

  5. Imaging mass spectrometer with mass tags

    DOEpatents

    Felton, James S.; Wu, Kuang Jen; Knize, Mark G.; Kulp, Kristen S.; Gray, Joe W.

    2010-06-01

    A method of analyzing biological material by exposing the biological material to a recognition element, that is coupled to a mass tag element, directing an ion beam of a mass spectrometer to the biological material, interrogating at least one region of interest area from the biological material and producing data, and distributing the data in plots.

  6. Compact imaging spectrometer utilizing immersed gratings

    DOEpatents

    Lerner, Scott A.

    2005-12-20

    A compact imaging spectrometer comprising an entrance slit for directing light, lens means for receiving the light, refracting the light, and focusing the light; an immersed diffraction grating that receives the light from the lens means and defracts the light, the immersed diffraction grating directing the detracted light back to the lens means; and a detector that receives the light from the lens means.

  7. Lens system for a photo ion spectrometer

    DOEpatents

    Gruen, D.M.; Young, C.E.; Pellin, M.J.

    1990-11-27

    A lens system in a photo ion spectrometer for manipulating a primary ion beam and ionized atomic component is disclosed. The atomic components are removed from a sample by a primary ion beam using the lens system, and the ions are extracted for analysis. The lens system further includes ionization resistant coatings for protecting the lens system. 8 figs.

  8. Multi-channel electric aerosol spectrometer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mirme, A.; Noppel, M.; Peil, I.; Salm, J.; Tamm, E.; Tammet, H.

    Multi-channel electric mobility spectrometry is a most efficient technique for the rapid measurement of an unstable aerosol particle size spectrum. The measuring range of the spectrometer from 10 microns to 10 microns is achieved by applying diffusional and field charging mechanisms simultaneously. On-line data processing is carried out with a microcomputer. Experimental calibration ensures correctness of measurement.

  9. Broadband Infrared Heterodyne Spectrometer: Final Report

    SciTech Connect

    Stevens, C G; Cunningham, C T; Tringe, J W

    2010-12-16

    This report summarizes the most important results of our effort to develop a new class of infrared spectrometers based on a novel broadband heterodyne design. Our results indicate that this approach could lead to a near-room temperature operation with performance limited only by quantum noise carried by the incoming signal. Using a model quantum-well infrared photodetector (QWIP), we demonstrated key performance features of our approach. For example, we directly measured the beat frequency signal generated by superimposing local oscillator (LO) light of one frequency and signal light of another through a spectrograph, by injecting the LO light at a laterally displaced input location. In parallel with the development of this novel spectrometer, we modeled a new approach to reducing detector volume though plasmonic resonance effects. Since dark current scales directly with detector volume, this ''photon compression'' can directly lead to lower currents. Our calculations indicate that dark current can be reduced by up to two orders of magnitude in an optimized ''superlens'' structure. Taken together, our spectrometer and dark current reduction strategies provide a promising path toward room temperature operation of a mid-wave and possibly long-wave infrared spectrometer.

  10. Sample spinner for nuclear magnetic resonance spectrometer

    SciTech Connect

    Stejskal, E.O.

    1984-05-01

    A sample spinner for a nuclear magnetic resonance spectrometer having improved operating characteristics is described comprising a rotor supported at both ends by support gas bearings and positioned by a thrust gas bearing. Improved support gas bearings are also described which result in a spinner exhibiting long-term stable operation characteristics.

  11. Electrical characteristics of Ni Ohmic contact on n-type GeSn

    SciTech Connect

    Li, H.; Cheng, H. H.; Lee, L. C.; Lee, C. P.; Su, L. H.; Suen, Y. W.

    2014-06-16

    We report an investigation of the electrical and material characteristics of Ni on an n-type GeSn film under thermal annealing. The current-voltage traces measured with the transmission line method are linear for a wide range of annealing temperatures. The specific contact resistivity was found to decrease with increasing annealing temperature, followed by an increase as the annealing temperature further increased, with a minimum value at an annealing temperature of 350 °C. The material characteristics at the interface layer were measured by energy-dispersive spectrometer, showing that an atomic ratio of (Ni)/(GeSn) = 1:1 yields the lowest specific contact resistivity.

  12. The shape of the primary cosmic ray electron spectrum above 10 GeV

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Silverberg, R. F.; Ormes, J. F.; Balasubrahmanyan, V. K.

    1974-01-01

    A balloon borne measurement of the cosmic ray electron spectrum above 10 GeV is reported in which two new techniques have been used to remove proton background contamination. First, the depth of the spectrometer on one of the flights was more than 40 radiation lengths, enabling hadronically and electromagnetically induced cascades to be differentiated for a subset of the data. Second, electromagnetic cascade starting points were determined to within about 0.1 radiation lengths based upon a calibration with electrons from 5.4 to 18 GeV at the Stanford Linear Accelerator. The resulting spectrum, when fitted with a power law, is steep, but the fit is marginal. A significantly better fit is achieved by assuming a model in which the spectrum is steepening in the measured region.

  13. Production of charged hadrons by positive muons on deuterium and xenon at 490 GeV

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Adams, M. R.; Aderholz, M.; Aïd, S.; Anthony, P. L.; Baker, M. D.; Bartlett, J.; Bhatti, A. A.; Braun, H. M.; Busza, W.; Caroll, T. J.; Conrad, J. M.; Coutrakon, G.; Davisson, R.; Derado, I.; Dhawan, S. K.; Dougherty, W.; Dreyer, T.; Dziunikowska, K.; Eckardt, V.; Ecker, U.; Erdmann, M.; Eskreys, A.; Figiel, J.; Gebauer, H. J.; Geesaman, D. F.; Gilman, R.; Green, M. C.; Haas, J.; Halliwell, C.; Hanlon, J.; Hantke, D.; Hughes, V. W.; Jackson, H. E.; Jaffe, D. E.; Jancso, G.; Jansen, D. M.; Kaufman, S.; Kennedy, R. D.; Kirk, T.; Kobrak, H. G. E.; Krzywdzinski, S.; Kunori, S.; Lord, J. J.; Lubatti, H. J.; McLeod, D.; Magill, S.; Malecki, P.; Manz, A.; Melanson, H.; Michael, D. G.; Mohr, W.; Montgomery, H. E.; Morfin, J. G.; Nickerson, R. B.; O'Day, S.; Olkiewicz, K.; Osborne, L.; Papavassiliou, V.; Pawlik, B.; Pipkin, F. M.; Ramberg, E. J.; Röser, A.; Ryan, J. J.; Salgado, C. W.; Salvarani, A.; Schellman, H.; Schmitt, M.; Schmitz, N.; Schüler, K. P.; Seyerlein, H. J.; Skuja, A.; Snow, G. A.; Söldner-Rembold, S.; Steinberg, P. H.; Stier, H. E.; Stopa, P.; Swanson, R. A.; Talaga, R.; Tentindo-Repond, S.; Trost, H.-J.; Venkataramania, H.; Wilhelm, M.; Wilkes, J.; Wilson, R.; Wittek, W.; Wolbers, S. A.; Zhao, T.

    1994-06-01

    Results on the production of charged hadrons in muon-deuteron and muon-xenon interactions are presented. The data were taken with the E665 spectrometer, which was exposed to the 490 GeV muon beam of the Tevatron at Fermilab. The use of a streamer chamber as vertex detector provides nearly 4π acceptance for charged particles. The μD data are compared with the μXe data in terms of multiplicity distributions, average multiplicities, forward-backward multiplicity correlations, rapidity and transverse momentum distributions and of two-particle rapidity correlations of charged hadrons. The data cover a range of invariant hadronic masses W from 8 to 30 GeV.

  14. PILAC: A pion linac facility for 1-GeV pion physics at LAMPF

    SciTech Connect

    Thiessen, H.A.

    1991-01-01

    A design study or a Pion Linac (PILAC) at LAMPF is underway at Los Alamos. We present here a reference design for a system of pion sources, linac, and high-resolution beam line and spectrometer that will provide 10{sup 9} pions per second on target and 200-keV resolution for the ({pi}{sup +}, K{sup +}) reaction at 0.92 GeV. A general-purpose beam line that delivers both positive and negative pions in the energy range 0.4--1.1 GeV is included, thus opening up the possibility of a broad experimental program as is discussed in this report. A kicker-based beam sharing system allows delivery of beam to both beamlines simultaneously with independent sign and energy control. Because the pionlinac acts like an rf particle separator, all beams produced by PILAC will be free of electron (or positron) and proton contamination. 4 refs., 6 figs.

  15. Production of Λ -hyperons in inelastic p+p interactions at 158 {GeV}/c

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aduszkiewicz, A.; Ali, Y.; Andronov, E.; Antićić, T.; Antoniou, N.; Baatar, B.; Bay, F.; Blondel, A.; Bogomilov, M.; Brandin, A.; Bravar, A.; Brzychczyk, J.; Bunyatov, S. A.; Busygina, O.; Christakoglou, P.; Ćirković, M.; Czopowicz, T.; Damyanova, A.; Davis, N.; Dembinski, H.; Deveaux, M.; Diakonos, F.; Di Luise, S.; Dominik, W.; Dumarchez, J.; Dynowski, K.; Engel, R.; Ereditato, A.; Feofilov, G. A.; Fodor, Z.; Garibov, A.; Gaździcki, M.; Golubeva, M.; Grebieszkow, K.; Grzeszczuk, A.; Guber, F.; Haesler, A.; Hasegawa, T.; Hervé, A. E.; Hierholzer, M.; Igolkin, S.; Ivashkin, A.; Johnson, S. R.; Kadija, K.; Kapoyannis, A.; Kaptur, E.; Kisiel, J.; Kobayashi, T.; Kolesnikov, V. I.; Kolev, D.; Kondratiev, V. P.; Korzenev, A.; Kowalik, K.; Kowalski, S.; Koziel, M.; Krasnoperov, A.; Kuich, M.; Kurepin, A.; Larsen, D.; László, A.; Lewicki, M.; Lyubushkin, V. V.; Maćkowiak-Pawłowska, M.; Maksiak, B.; Malakhov, A. I.; Manić, D.; Marcinek, A.; Marino, A. D.; Marton, K.; Mathes, H.-J.; Matulewicz, T.; Matveev, V.; Melkumov, G. L.; Messerly, B.; Mills, G. B.; Morozov, S.; Mrówczyński, S.; Nagai, Y.; Nakadaira, T.; Naskręt, M.; Nirkko, M.; Nishikawa, K.; Panagiotou, A. D.; Paolone, V.; Pavin, M.; Petukhov, O.; Pistillo, C.; Płaneta, R.; Popov, B. A.; Posiadała, M.; Puławski, S.; Puzović, J.; Rauch, W.; Ravonel, M.; Redij, A.; Renfordt, R.; Richter-Wąs, E.; Robert, A.; Röhrich, D.; Rondio, E.; Roth, M.; Rubbia, A.; Rumberger, B. T.; Rustamov, A.; Rybczynski, M.; Sadovsky, A.; Sakashita, K.; Schmidt, K.; Sekiguchi, T.; Selyuzhenkov, I.; Seryakov, A.; Seyboth, P.; Sgalaberna, D.; Shibata, M.; Słodkowski, M.; Staszel, P.; Stefanek, G.; Stepaniak, J.; Ströbele, H.; Šuša, T.; Szuba, M.; Tada, M.; Taranenko, A.; Tefelski, D.; Tereshchenko, V.; Tsenov, R.; Turko, L.; Ulrich, R.; Unger, M.; Vassiliou, M.; Veberič, D.; Vechernin, V. V.; Vesztergombi, G.; Vinogradov, L.; Wilczek, A.; Włodarczyk, Z.; Wojtaszek-Szwarc, A.; Wyszyński, O.; Zambelli, L.; Zimmerman, E. D.

    2016-04-01

    Inclusive production of Λ -hyperons was measured with the large acceptance NA61/SHINE spectrometer at the CERN SPS in inelastic p+p interactions at beam momentum of 158 {GeV}/c. Spectra of transverse momentum and transverse mass as well as distributions of rapidity and x_{_F} are presented. The mean multiplicity was estimated to be 0.120 {± } 0.006(stat.){± }0.010(sys.). The results are compared with previous measurements and predictions of the Epos, Ur qmd and Fritiof models.

  16. Simulation of GeSn/Ge tunneling field-effect transistors for complementary logic applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Lei; Liang, Renrong; Wang, Jing; Xiao, Lei; Xu, Jun

    2016-09-01

    GeSn/Ge tunneling field-effect transistors (TFETs) with different device configurations are comprehensively investigated by numerical simulation. The lateral PIN- and PNPN-type point-tunneling and vertical line-tunneling device structures are analyzed and compared. Both n- and p-type TFETs are optimized to construct GeSn complementary logic applications. Simulation results indicate that GeSn/Ge heterochannel and heterosource structures significantly improve the device characteristics of point- and line-TFETs, respectively. Device performance and subthreshold swing can be further improved by increasing the Sn composition. GeSn/Ge heterosource line-TFETs exhibit excellent device performance and superior inverter voltage-transfer characteristic, which make them promising candidates for GeSn complementary TFET applications.

  17. Infrared spectrally selective low emissivity from Ge/ZnS one-dimensional heterostructure photonic crystal

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Weigang; Xu, Guoyue; Zhang, Jianchao; Wang, Huihui; Hou, Haili

    2014-11-01

    Ge/ZnS one-dimensional heterostructure photonic crystal (1DHPC) was successfully prepared by alternating thin films of Ge and ZnS on the quartz substrate by using the optical coating technology. The microstructure and spectral emissivity of as-prepared 1DHPC were characterized by using scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and fourier transform infrared spectrometer (FTIR), respectively. The test result of spectral emissivity shows that the average emissivities of as-prepared Ge/ZnS 1DHPC in the atmospheric windows of 3-5 μm and 8-14 μm can be as low as 0.046 and 0.190, respectively, but the average emissivity in the non-atmospheric window of 5-8 μm can be as high as 0.579. The results indicate that the as-prepared Ge/ZnS 1DHPC has obviously infrared spectrally selective low emissivity characteristic, basically meets the requirements of our design. The as-prepared 1DHPC with infrared spectrally selective low emissivity is promising for use as a material to unify the infrared stealth and effective cooling of the aircraft.

  18. The ternary germanides UMnGe and U2Mn3Ge

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hoffmann, Rolf-Dieter; Pöttgen, Rainer; Chevalier, Bernard; Gaudin, Etienne; Matar, Samir F.

    2013-07-01

    The title compounds were prepared by induction levitation melting of the elemental components and subsequent annealing. UMnGe (Pnma, a = 686.12(9), b = 425.49(6) and c = 736.5(1) pm) adopts the orthorhombic structure of TiNiSi and U2Mn3Ge (P63/mmc, a = 524.3(2) and c = 799.2(3) pm) possesses the hexagonal Mg2Cu3Si-type structure (ordered variant of the hexagonal Laves phase MgZn2). Both structures were refined from X-ray powder data to residuals of RI = 0.021 and 0.014 for UMnGe and U2Mn3Ge, respectively. The manganese and germanium atoms in UMnGe build up a three-dimensional [MnGe] network of ordered Mn3Ge3 hexagons with Mn-Ge distances ranging from 248 to 259 pm. The uranium atoms are coordinated by two tilted Mn3Ge3 hexagons. The manganese atoms in U2Mn3Ge build up Kagomé networks with 252 and 272 pm Mn-Mn distances which are connected via the germanium atoms (254 pm Mn-Ge) to a three-dimensional network. A remarkable feature of the U2Mn3Ge structure is a short U-U distance of 278 pm between adjacent cavities of the [Mn3Ge] network. From DFT based electronic structure calculations both germanides are found more cohesive than the Laves phase UMn2, thus underpinning the substantial role of Mn-Ge bonding. Calculations for both germanides show ferrimagnetic ground states with antiparallel spin alignments between U and Mn. The valence bands show bonding characteristics for interactions of atoms of different chemical natures and significant Mn-Mn bonding in U2Mn3Ge. Preliminary investigation of UMnGe by magnetization measurements confirms an antiferromagnetic arrangement below TN = 240 K.

  19. Light absorption enhancement in Ge nanomembrane and its optoelectronic application.

    PubMed

    Kim, Munho; Liu, Shih-Chia; Kim, Tong June; Lee, Jaeseong; Seo, Jung-Hun; Zhou, Weidong; Ma, Zhenqiang

    2016-07-25

    In this study, the light absorption property of Ge nanomembrane (Ge NM), which incorporates hydrogen (H), in near-infrared (NIR) wavelength range was analyzed. Due to the presence of a large amount of structural defects, the light absorption coefficient of the Ge layer becomes much higher (10 times) than that of bulk Ge in the wavelength range of 1000 ~1600 nm. Increased light absorption was further measured from released Ge NM that has H incorporation in comparison to that of bulk Ge, proving the enhanced light absorption coefficient of H incorporated Ge. Finally, metal-semiconductor-metal (MSM) photodetectors were demonstrated using the H incorporated Ge on GeOI.

  20. Portable spectrometer monitors inert gas shield in welding process

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Grove, E. L.

    1967-01-01

    Portable spectrometer using photosensitive readouts, monitors the amount of oxygen and hydrogen in the inert gas shield of a tungsten-inert gas welding process. A fiber optic bundle transmits the light from the welding arc to the spectrometer.

  1. Adapting Raman Spectra from Laboratory Spectrometers to Portable Detection Libraries

    SciTech Connect

    Weatherall, James; Barber, Jeffrey B.; Brauer, Carolyn S.; Johnson, Timothy J.; Su, Yin-Fong; Ball, Christopher D.; Smith, Barry; Cox, Rick; Steinke, Robert; McDaniel, Patricia; Wasserzug, Louis

    2013-02-01

    Raman spectral data collected with high-resolution laboratory spectrometers are processed into a for- mat suitable for importing as a user library on a 1064nm DeltaNu rst generation, eld-deployable spectrometer prototype. The two laboratory systems used are a 1064nm Bruker spectrometer and a 785nm Kaiser spectrometer. The steps taken to compensate for device-dependent spectral resolution, wavenumber shifts between instruments, and wavenumber sensitivity variation are described.

  2. Miniature anastigmatic spectrometer design with a concave toroidal mirror.

    PubMed

    Dong, Jianing; Chen, He; Zhang, Yinchao; Chen, Siying; Guo, Pan

    2016-03-01

    An advanced optical design for a low-cost and astigmatism-corrected spectrometer with a high resolution is presented. The theory and method of astigmatism correction are determined with the use of a concave toroidal mirror. The performances of a modified spectrometer and a traditional spectrometer are compared, and the analysis is verified. Experimentally, the limiting resolution of our spectrometer is 0.1 nm full width at half-maximum, as measured for 579.1 nm.

  3. IR spectrometers for Venus and Mars measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Drummond, Rachel; Neefs, Eddy; Vandaele, Ann C.

    2012-07-01

    The SOIR spectrometer [1] is an infra-red spectrometer that has performed over 500 solar occultation measurements of the Venus atmosphere, profiling major and minor constituents and studying aerosol absorption, temperature and pressure effects. NOMAD is a 3-channel spectrometer for Mars occultation, limb and nadir measurements. 2 channels are infra-red, the other UV-visible. We will present the technology that enables SOIR and NOMAD to get to parts per billion mixing ratio sensitivities for trace atmospheric components and highlight the improvements made to the SOIR design to enable nadir viewing with NOMAD. Key components include the Acousto-Optical Tunable Filter with radio frequency driver that allows these spectrometers to select the wavelength domain under observation with no need for mechanical moving parts. It also allows background measurements because it is opaque when no RF is applied. The grating with 4 grooves/mm is a very hard to manufacture optical component, and suppliers were very difficult to find. The detector-cooler combination (working at 90K) is from Sofradir/Ricor and the model on board Venus Express is still working after 6 years in space (more on/off cycles that ON hour lifetime problem). The detector MCT mix is slightly altered for nadir observation, in order to reduce thermal background noise and the nadir channel spectrometer is cooled down to 173K by a large V-groove radiator. All the optical components have been enlarged to maximise signal throughput and the slit (that determines spatial and spectral resolution) has also been increased. The spacecraft attitude control system switches from yaw steering for nadir to inertial pointing for solar occultations. 1. Nevejans, D., E. Neefs, E. Van Ransbeeck, S. Berkenbosch, R. Clairquin, L. De Vos, W. Moelans, S. Glorieux, A. Baeke, O. Korablev, I. Vinogradov, Y. Kalinnikov, B. Bach, J.P. Dubois, and E. Villard, Compact high-resolution space-borne echelle grating spectrometer with AOTF based on

  4. Differentially pumped dual linear quadrupole ion trap mass spectrometer

    SciTech Connect

    Owen, Benjamin C.; Kenttamaa, Hilkka I.

    2015-10-20

    The present disclosure provides a new tandem mass spectrometer and methods of using the same for analyzing charged particles. The differentially pumped dual linear quadrupole ion trap mass spectrometer of the present disclose includes a combination of two linear quadrupole (LQIT) mass spectrometers with differentially pumped vacuum chambers.

  5. Nuclear astrophysics studies by SAMURAI spectrometer in RIKEN RIBF

    SciTech Connect

    Yoneda, K.

    2012-11-12

    SAMURAI is a spectrometer which is now being constructed at RIKEN RI Beam Factory. This spectrometer is characterized by a large angular-and momentum-acceptance enabling, for example, multi-particle coincidence measurements. Here brief descriptions of SAMURAI spectrometer and physics topics relevant to nuclear astrophysics are presented.

  6. Fourier and Hadamard transform spectrometers - A limited comparison. II

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Harwit, M.; Tai, M. H.

    1977-01-01

    A mathematical approach was used to compare interferometric spectrometers and Hadamard transform spectrometers. The principle results are reported, noting that the simple Hadamard spectrometer encodes more efficiently than a Michelson interferometer which, in turn, encodes less efficiently than is usually acknowledged. Hirschfeld's (1977) major objections to these findings are discussed, although it is noted that none of his objections is supported by evidence.

  7. The low energy magnetic spectrometer on Ulysses and ACE response to near relativistic protons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Morgado, Bruno; Filipe Maia, Dalmiro Jorge; Lanzerotti, Louis; Gonçalves, Patrícia; Patterson, J. Douglas

    2015-05-01

    Aims: We show that the Heliosphere Instrument for Spectra Composition and Anisotropy at Low Energies (HISCALE) on board the Ulysses spacecraft and the Electron Proton Alpha Monitor (EPAM) on board the Advance Composition Explorer (ACE) spacecraft can be used to measure properties for ion populations with kinetic energies in excess of 1 GeV. This previously unexplored source of information is valuable for understanding the origin of near relativistic ions of solar origin. Methods: We model the instrumental response from the low energy magnetic spectrometers from EPAM and HISCALE using a Monte Carlo approach implemented in the Geant4 toolkit to determine the response of different energy channels to energies up to 5 GeV. We compare model results with EPAM observations for 2012 May 17 ground level solar cosmic ray event, including directional fluxes. Results: For the 2012 May event, all the ion channels in EPAM show an onset more than one hour before ions with the highest nominal energy range (1.8 to 4.8 MeV) were expected to arrive. We show from Monte Carlo simulations that the timing at different channels, the ratio between counts at the different channels, and the directional fluxes within a given channel, are consistent with and can be explained by the arrival of particles with energies from 35 MeV to more than 1 GeV. Onset times for the EPAM penetrating protons are consistent with the rise seen in neutron monitor data, implying that EPAM and ground neutron monitors are seeing overlapping energy ranges and that both are consistent with GeV ions being released from the Sun at 10:38 UT.

  8. Modeling of GE Appliances: Final Presentation

    SciTech Connect

    Fuller, Jason C.; Vyakaranam, Bharat; Leistritz, Sean M.; Parker, Graham B.

    2013-01-31

    This report is the final in a series of three reports funded by U.S. Department of Energy Office of Electricity Delivery and Energy Reliability (DOE-OE) in collaboration with GE Appliances’ through a Cooperative Research and Development Agreement (CRADA) to describe the potential of GE Appliances’ DR-enabled appliances to provide benefits to the utility grid.

  9. Carrier trapping and confinement in Ge nanocrystals surrounded by Ge3N4

    PubMed Central

    Park, Youngsin; Chan, Christopher C. S.; Reid, Benjamin P. L.; Nuttall, Luke; Taylor, Robert A.; Lee, Nam-Suk; Lee, Young Mi

    2016-01-01

    We investigated the optical properties of Ge nanocrystals surrounded by Ge3N4. The broad emission ranging from infrared to blue is due to the dependence on the crystal size and preparation methods. Here, we report high resolution Photoluminescence (PL) attributed to emission from individual Ge nanocrystals (nc-Ge) spatially resolved using micro-photoluminescence and detailed using temperature and power-dependent photoluminescence studies. The measured peaks are shown to behave with excitonic characteristics and we argue that the spread of the nc-Ge peaks in the PL spectrum is due to different confinement energies arising from the variation in size of the nanocrystals. PMID:27147195

  10. Mass Spectrometers in Deep Space Missions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mahaffy, Paul; Niemann, Hasso; Harpold, Dan

    2002-01-01

    Mass spectrometers have been included in the payloads of several deep space missions over the past three decades. Our laboratory has designed and developed mass spectrometers for the Galileo Probe into the atmosphere of Jupiter, the Pioneer Venus Orbiter, the Cassini Orbiter Mission to Saturn, the Cassini/Huygens Probe Mission to Saturn's moon Titan, the Nozomi Mission to Mars, and most recently the CONTOUR comet nucleus flyby mission. Each mission has required attention to miniaturization, autonomous sampling, and consideration of the special hazards and measurement requirements of the target environment. Development ongoing in our laboratory includes further miniaturization, improved performance in the areas of sensitivity and precision for the important isotope measurements, and adaptation for the unusual environments to be encountered in locations such as the surface or subsurface of Europa or Mars. Various aspects of both the technical implementation of these delivered and planned experiments and the science drivers will be described.

  11. A Mass Spectrometer Simulator in Your Computer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gagnon, Michel

    2012-12-01

    Introduced to study components of ionized gas, the mass spectrometer has evolved into a highly accurate device now used in many undergraduate and research laboratories. Unfortunately, despite their importance in the formation of future scientists, mass spectrometers remain beyond the financial reach of many high schools and colleges. As a result, it is not possible for instructors to take full advantage of this equipment. Therefore, to facilitate accessibility to this tool, we have developed a realistic computer-based simulator. Using this software, students are able to practice their ability to identify the components of the original gas, thereby gaining a better understanding of the underlying physical laws. The software is available as a free download.

  12. A wideband spectrometer for the SRT

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Comoretto, G.; Natale, V.

    A radiotelescope operating at millimeter wavelengths must be able to analyze an instantaneous bandwidth of at least a few GHz in spectroscopic mode, with a number of spectral points of the order of thousands. Two solutions are examined. In the first, it is assumed that a multi-channel digital spectrometer, with a bandwidth of the order of 100 MHz for each channel, will be available. In this case, a digital filterbank derived from the experience with the ALMA correlator could be used to synthesize a total bandwidth of 1-2 GHz. For wider bandwidths, an acousto-optical spectrometer is proposed. The experience at IRA, Sez. di Firenze with these instruments is presented, and possible solutions are outlined.

  13. A 4 π dilepton spectrometer: PEPSI

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Buda, A.; Bacelar, J. C. S.; Bałanda, A.; van Klinken, J.; Sujkowski, Z.; van der Woude, A.

    1993-11-01

    A novel positron-electron pair spectroscopy instrument (PEPSI) was designed to measure transitions in the energy region 10-40 MeV. It consists of Nd 2Fe 14B permanent magnets forming a compact 4 π magnetic filter consisting of 12 positron and 20 electron mini-orange-like spectrometers. The response function of PEPSI has been measured with mono-energetic beams of electrons from 5 to 20 MeV. The PEPSI spectrometer was used for measuring the internal pair conversion coefficient ( απ) of the 15.1 MeV M1 transition from a Jπ = 1 + state to the ground state in 12C. Our experimental value of απ = (3.3 ± 0.5) × 10 -3 is in good agreement with theoretical estimates.

  14. Quench anaylsis of MICE spectrometer superconducting solenoid

    SciTech Connect

    Kashikhin, Vladimir; Bross, Alan; Prestemon, Soren; / /LBL, Berkeley

    2011-09-01

    MICE superconducting spectrometer solenoids fabrication and tests are in progress now. First tests of the Spectrometer Solenoid discovered some issues which could be related to the chosen passive quench protection system. Both solenoids do not have heaters and quench propagation relied on the 'quench back' effect, cold diodes, and shunt resistors. The solenoids have very large inductances and stored energy which is 100% dissipated in the cold mass during a quench. This makes their protection a challenging task. The paper presents the quench analysis of these solenoids based on 3D FEA solution of coupled transient electromagnetic and thermal problems. The simulations used the Vector Fields QUENCH code. It is shown that in some quench scenarios, the quench propagation is relatively slow and some areas can be overheated. They describe ways of improving the solenoids quench protection in order to reduce the risk of possible failure.

  15. High-resolving mass spectrographs and spectrometers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wollnik, Hermann

    2015-11-01

    Discussed are different types of high resolving mass spectrographs and spectrometers. In detail outlined are (1) magnetic and electric sector field mass spectrographs, which are the oldest systems, (2) Penning Trap mass spectrographs and spectrometers, which have achieved very high mass-resolving powers, but are technically demanding (3) time-of-flight mass spectrographs using high energy ions passing through accelerator rings, which have also achieved very high mass-resolving powers and are equally technically demanding, (4) linear time-of-flight mass spectrographs, which have become the most versatile mass analyzers for low energy ions, while the even higher performing multi-pass systems have only started to be used, (5) orbitraps, which also have achieved remarkably high mass-resolving powers for low energy ions.

  16. A photoacoustic spectrometer for trace gas detection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Telles, E. M.; Bezerra, E.; Scalabrin, A.

    2005-06-01

    A high-resolution external laser photoacoustic spectrometer has been developed for trace gas detection with absorption transitions in coincidence with CO2 laser emission lines (9,2-10,9 μm: 920-1086 cm-1). The CO2 laser operates in 90 CW lines with power of up to 15 W. A PC-controlled step motor can tune the laser lines. The resonance frequency of first longitudinal mode of the photoacoustic cell is at 1600 Hz. The cell Q-factor and cell constant are measured close to 50 and 28 mVcmW-1, respectively. The spectrometer has been tested in preliminary studies to analyze the absorption transitions of ozone (O_3). The ethylene (C_2H_4) from papaya fruit is also investigated using N2 as carrier gas at a constant flow rate.

  17. Improved cold-neutron prompt gamma spectrometer

    SciTech Connect

    Lindstrom, R.M.; Paul, R.L.; Heald, A.E.; Langland, J.K.

    1996-12-31

    The cold-neutron prompt-gamma activation analysis (PGAA) spectrometer at the National Institute of Standard and Technology (NIST) has been rebuilt to take advantage of the newly installed LH{sub 2} cold neutron source at the NIST reactor. The new source, a 32-cm-o.d., 2-cm-thick spherical shell of liquid hydrogen, produces a higher neutron density at longer wave-length than did the D{sub 2}O ice source that has been in use since 1987. At the PGAA spectrometer, located 41 m from the cold source on neutron guide NG7, the effective neutron fluence rate (using s, = 98.6 b for gold) was measured to be 8 x 10{sup 8} cm{sup -2}{center_dot}s{sup -1}, a factor of 3 higher at the same reactor power (20 MW) than before.

  18. Neutron spectrometer for improved SNM search.

    SciTech Connect

    Vance, Andrew L.; Aigeldinger, Georg

    2007-03-01

    With the exception of large laboratory devices with very low sensitivities, a neutron spectrometer have not been built for fission neutrons such as those emitted by special nuclear materials (SNM). The goal of this work was to use a technique known as Capture Gated Neutron Spectrometry to develop a solid-state device with this functionality. This required modifications to trans-stilbene, a known solid-state scintillator. To provide a neutron capture signal we added lithium to this material. This unique triggering signal allowed identification of neutrons that lose all of their energy in the detector, eliminating uncertainties that arise due to partial energy depositions. We successfully implemented a capture gated neutron spectrometer and were able to distinguish an SNM like fission spectrum from a spectrum stemming from a benign neutron source.

  19. The transition-edge EBIT microcalorimeter spectrometer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Betancourt-Martinez, Gabriele L.; Adams, Joseph; Bandler, Simon; Beiersdorfer, Peter; Brown, Gregory; Chervenak, James; Doriese, Randy; Eckart, Megan; Irwin, Kent; Kelley, Richard; Kilbourne, Caroline; Leutenegger, Maurice; Porter, F. S.; Reintsema, Carl; Smith, Stephen; Ullom, Joel

    2014-07-01

    The Transition-edge EBIT Microcalorimeter Spectrometer (TEMS) is a 1000-pixel array instrument to be delivered to the Electron Beam Ion Trap (EBIT) facility at the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) in 2015. It will be the first fully operational array of its kind. The TEMS will utilize the unique capabilities of the EBIT to verify and benchmark atomic theory that is critical for the analysis of high-resolution data from microcalorimeter spectrometers aboard the next generation of x-ray observatories. We present spectra from the present instrumentation at EBIT, as well as our latest results with time-division multiplexing using the current iteration of the TEMS focal plane assembly in our test platform at NASA/GSFC.

  20. O using QCL spectrometer for combustion applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hieta, T.; Merimaa, M.

    2014-12-01

    We demonstrate a high-sensitivity laser-based spectrometer for simultaneous detection of sulphur dioxide (SO2) sulphur trioxide (SO3) and water for coal-fired combustion applications. The spectrometer is based on a quantum-cascade laser (QCL) operating at 7.16 μm, capable of measuring all three components simultaneously in a single frequency sweep. An optical multipass cell having a total path length of 9.1 m is used at increased temperature and at low pressure to ensure reliable measurement of highly reactive SO3 and adequate separation of overlapping spectral features, respectively. Detection limits for SO2 and SO3 are 0.134 and 0.0073 ppm, respectively, when employing a 20-s sampling time.

  1. Data analysis for Skylab proton spectrometer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hill, C. W.

    1976-01-01

    The data from a proton spectrometer flown aboard Skylab is examined. The instrument is sensitive to protons in the energy range 18 to 400 MeV. A partial failure of the spectrometer restricted spectral analysis to two energy bands, 18 to 27 MeV and 27 to 400 MeV. The directional data showed that a Gaussian angular distribution parameter of at least 70 degrees is required for the low energy band and at least 40 degrees for the high energy band. The data, integrated over angle, indicate that the AP3 model extrapolated down to 18-27 MeV is high by factors of 2 to 5 over most of the B-L space mapped. In the 27 to 400 MeV range, the AP3 model is 20 to 100 percent low at low and high values of L, and is high at medium L values in the B-L space mapped.

  2. Associated Particle Tagging (APT) in Magnetic Spectrometers

    SciTech Connect

    Jordan, David V.; Baciak, James E.; Stave, Sean C.; Chichester, David; Dale, Daniel; Kim, Yujong; Harmon, Frank

    2012-10-16

    Summary In Brief The Associated Particle Tagging (APT) project, a collaboration of Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL), Idaho National Laboratory (INL) and the Idaho State University (ISU)/Idaho Accelerator Center (IAC), has completed an exploratory study to assess the role of magnetic spectrometers as the linchpin technology in next-generation tagged-neutron and tagged-photon active interrogation (AI). The computational study considered two principle concepts: (1) the application of a solenoidal alpha-particle spectrometer to a next-generation, large-emittance neutron generator for use in the associated particle imaging technique, and (2) the application of tagged photon beams to the detection of fissile material via active interrogation. In both cases, a magnetic spectrometer momentum-analyzes charged particles (in the neutron case, alpha particles accompanying neutron generation in the D-T reaction; in the tagged photon case, post-bremsstrahlung electrons) to define kinematic properties of the relevant neutral interrogation probe particle (i.e. neutron or photon). The main conclusions of the study can be briefly summarized as follows: Neutron generator: • For the solenoidal spectrometer concept, magnetic field strengths of order 1 Tesla or greater are required to keep the transverse size of the spectrometer smaller than 1 meter. The notional magnetic spectrometer design evaluated in this feasibility study uses a 5-T magnetic field and a borehole radius of 18 cm. • The design shows a potential for 4.5 Sr tagged neutron solid angle, a factor of 4.5 larger than achievable with current API neutron-generator designs. • The potential angular resolution for such a tagged neutron beam can be less than 0.5o for modest Si-detector position resolution (3 mm). Further improvement in angular resolution can be made by using Si-detectors with better position resolution. • The report documents several features of a notional generator design incorporating the

  3. Portable gas chromatograph-mass spectrometer

    DOEpatents

    Andresen, Brian D.; Eckels, Joel D.; Kimmons, James F.; Myers, David W.

    1996-01-01

    A gas chromatograph-mass spectrometer (GC-MS) for use as a field portable organic chemical analysis instrument. The GC-MS is designed to be contained in a standard size suitcase, weighs less than 70 pounds, and requires less than 600 watts of electrical power at peak power (all systems on). The GC-MS includes: a conduction heated, forced air cooled small bore capillary gas chromatograph, a small injector assembly, a self-contained ion/sorption pump vacuum system, a hydrogen supply, a dual computer system used to control the hardware and acquire spectrum data, and operational software used to control the pumping system and the gas chromatograph. This instrument incorporates a modified commercial quadrupole mass spectrometer to achieve the instrument sensitivity and mass resolution characteristic of laboratory bench top units.

  4. Imaging spectrometer wide field catadioptric design

    DOEpatents

    Chrisp; Michael P.

    2008-08-19

    A wide field catadioptric imaging spectrometer with an immersive diffraction grating that compensates optical distortions. The catadioptric design has zero Petzval field curvature. The imaging spectrometer comprises an entrance slit for transmitting light, a system with a catadioptric lens and a dioptric lens for receiving the light and directing the light, an immersion grating, and a detector array. The entrance slit, the system for receiving the light, the immersion grating, and the detector array are positioned wherein the entrance slit transmits light to the system for receiving the light and the system for receiving the light directs the light to the immersion grating and the immersion grating receives the light and directs the light through the system for receiving the light to the detector array.

  5. Portable gas chromatograph-mass spectrometer

    DOEpatents

    Andresen, B.D.; Eckels, J.D.; Kimmons, J.F.; Myers, D.W.

    1996-06-11

    A gas chromatograph-mass spectrometer (GC-MS) is described for use as a field portable organic chemical analysis instrument. The GC-MS is designed to be contained in a standard size suitcase, weighs less than 70 pounds, and requires less than 600 watts of electrical power at peak power (all systems on). The GC-MS includes: a conduction heated, forced air cooled small bore capillary gas chromatograph, a small injector assembly, a self-contained ion/sorption pump vacuum system, a hydrogen supply, a dual computer system used to control the hardware and acquire spectrum data, and operational software used to control the pumping system and the gas chromatograph. This instrument incorporates a modified commercial quadrupole mass spectrometer to achieve the instrument sensitivity and mass resolution characteristic of laboratory bench top units. 4 figs.

  6. Compact imaging spectrometer utilizing immersed gratings

    DOEpatents

    Chrisp, Michael P.; Lerner, Scott A.; Kuzmenko, Paul J.; Bennett, Charles L.

    2007-07-03

    A compact imaging spectrometer with an immersive diffraction grating that compensates optical distortions. The imaging spectrometer comprises an entrance slit for transmitting light, means for receiving the light and directing the light, an immersion grating, and a detector array. The entrance slit, the means for receiving the light, the immersion grating, and the detector array are positioned wherein the entrance slit transmits light to the means for receiving the light and the means for receiving the light directs the light to the immersion grating and the immersion grating receives the light and directs the light to the means for receiving the light, and the means for receiving the light directs the light to the detector array.

  7. Interface for liquid chromatograph-mass spectrometer

    DOEpatents

    Andresen, B.D.; Fought, E.R.

    1989-09-19

    A moving belt interface is described for real-time, high-performance liquid chromatograph (HPLC)/mass spectrometer (MS) analysis which strips away the HPLC solvent as it emerges from the end of the HPLC column and leaves a residue suitable for mass-spectral analysis. The interface includes a portable, stand-alone apparatus having a plural stage vacuum station, a continuous ribbon or belt, a drive train magnetically coupled to an external drive motor, a calibrated HPLC delivery system, a heated probe tip and means located adjacent the probe tip for direct ionization of the residue on the belt. The interface is also capable of being readily adapted to fit any mass spectrometer. 8 figs.

  8. Interface for liquid chromatograph-mass spectrometer

    DOEpatents

    Andresen, Brian D.; Fought, Eric R.

    1989-01-01

    A moving belt interface for real-time, high-performance liquid chromatograph (HPLC)/mass spectrometer (MS) analysis which strips away the HPLC solvent as it emerges from the end of the HPLC column and leaves a residue suitable for mass-spectral analysis. The interface includes a portable, stand-alone apparatus having a plural stage vacuum station, a continuous ribbon or belt, a drive train magnetically coupled to an external drive motor, a calibrated HPLC delivery system, a heated probe tip and means located adjacent the probe tip for direct ionization of the residue on the belt. The interface is also capable of being readily adapted to fit any mass spectrometer.

  9. Portable gas chromatograph-mass spectrometer

    SciTech Connect

    Andresen, B.D.; Eckels, J.D.; Kimmins, J.F.; Myers, D.W.

    1994-12-31

    A gas chromatograph-mass spectrometer (GC-MS) for use as a field portable organic chemical analysis instrument. The GC-MS is designed to be contained in a standard size suitcase, weighs less than 70 pounds, and requires less than 600 watts of electrical power at peak power (all systems on). The GC-MS includes: a conduction heated, forced air cooled small bore capillary gas chromatograph, a small injector assembly, a self-contained ion/sorption pump vacuum system, a hydrogen supply, a dual computer system used to control the hardware and acquire spectrum data, and operational software used to control the pumping system and the gas chromatograph. This instrument incorporates a modified commercial quadrupole mass spectrometer to achieve the instrument sensitivity and mass resolution characteristic of laboratory bench top units.

  10. Solar maximum ultraviolet spectrometer and polarimeter

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tandberg-Hanssen, E.; Woodgate, B. E.; Brandt, J. C.; Chapman, R. D.; Hyder, C. L.; Michalitsianos, A. G.; Shine, R. A.; Athay, R. G.; Beckers, J. M.; Bruner, E. C.

    1979-01-01

    The objectives of the UVSP experiment are to study solar ultraviolet radiations, particularly from flares and active regions, and to measure constituents in the terrestrial atmosphere by the extinction of sunlight at satellite dawn and dusk. The instrument is designed to observe the Sun at a variety of spectral and spatial resolutions in the range from 1150 to 3600 A. A Gregorian telescope with effective focal length of 1.8 m is used to feed a 1 m Ebert-Fastie spectrometer. A polarimeter containing rotatable magnesium fluoride waveplates is included behind the spectrometer entrance slit and will allow all four Stokes parameters to be determined. Velocities on the Sun can also be measured. The instrument is controlled by a computer which can interact with the data stream to modify the observing program. The observing modes, including rasters, spectral scans, velocity measurements, and polarimetry, are also described along with plans for mission operations, data handling, and analysis of the observations.

  11. Mapping Imaging Spectrometer for Europa (MISE)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Blaney, D. L.; Clark, R. N.; Dalton, J. B.; Davies, A. G.; Green, R. O.; Hedman, M. M.; Hibbits, C. A.; Langevin, Y. J.; Lunine, J. I.; McCord, T. B.; Soderblom, J. M.; Cable, M. L.; Mouroulis, P.; Kim, W.; Dorsky, L. I.; Strohbehn, K.

    2015-10-01

    The Mapping Imaging Spectrometer for Europa(MISE) instrument is designed to be able to unravel the composition of Europa, and to provide new insight into the processes that have in the past and continue to shape Europa, and on the habitability of Europa's ocean. The MISE design is the result of collaboration between NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory (California Institute of Technology) and the Applied Physics Laboratory (John Hopkins' University). JPL's Discovery Moon Mineralogy Mapper (M3) on Chandrayan-1 and APL's Compact Reconnaissance Imaging Spectrometer for Mars (CRISM) comprise the technical basis for MISE. Internal JPL and APL investments in conjunction with NASA support under the ICEE program has allowed for instrument technology development and testing to achieve a design which would perform in Europa's radiation environment and meet potential sterilization requirements due to planetary protection.

  12. Pioneer Venus large probe neutral mass spectrometer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hoffman, J.

    1982-01-01

    The deuterium hydrogen abundance ratio in the Venus atmosphere was measured while the inlets to the Pioneer Venus large probe mass spectrometer were coated with sulfuric acid from Venus' clouds. The ratio is (1.6 + or - 0.2) x 10 to the minus two power. It was found that the 100 fold enrichment of deuterium means that Venus outgassed at least 0.3% of a terrestrial ocean and possibly more.

  13. Water Mass Map from Neutron Spectrometer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2003-01-01

    December 8, 2003

    This map shows the estimated lower limit of the water content of the upper meter of Martian soil. The estimates are derived from the hydrogen abundance measured by the neutron spectrometer component of the gamma ray spectrometer suite on NASA's Mars Odyssey spacecraft.

    The highest water-mass fractions, exceeding 30 percent to well over 60 percent, are in the polar regions, beyond about 60 degrees latitude north or south. Farther from the poles, significant concentrations are in the area bound in longitude by minus 10 degrees to 50 degrees and in latitude by 30 degrees south to 40 degrees north, and in an area to the south and west of Olympus Mons (30 degrees to 0 degrees south latitude and minus 135 degrees to 110 degrees longitude).

    NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory, a division of the California Institute of Technology in Pasadena, manages the 2001 Mars Odyssey mission for the NASA Office of Space Science in Washington. Investigators at Arizona State University in Tempe, the University of Arizona in Tucson and NASA's Johnson Space Center, Houston, operate the science instruments. The gamma-ray spectrometer was provided by the University of Arizona in collaboration with the Russian Aviation and Space Agency, which provided the high-energy neutron detector, and the Los Alamos National Laboratories, New Mexico, which provided the neutron spectrometer. Lockheed Martin Space Systems, Denver, is the prime contractor for the project, and developed and built the orbiter. Mission operations are conducted jointly from Lockheed Martin and from JPL.

  14. Scanning imaging absorption spectrometer for atmospheric chartography

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Burrows, John P.; Chance, Kelly V.

    1991-01-01

    The SCanning Imaging Absorption SpectroMeter for Atmospheric CHartographY is an instrument which measures backscattered, reflected, and transmitted light from the earth's atmosphere and surface. SCIAMACHY has eight spectral channels which observe simultaneously the spectral region between 240 and 1700 nm and selected windows between 1940 and 2400 nm. Each spectral channel contains a grating and linear diode array detector. SCIAMACHY observes the atmosphere in nadir, limb, and solar and lunar occultation viewing geometries.

  15. Capillary zone electrophoresis-mass spectrometer interface

    DOEpatents

    D'Silva, Arthur

    1996-08-06

    A device for providing equal electrical potential between two loci unconnected by solid or liquid electrical conducts is provided. The device comprises a first electrical conducting terminal, a second electrical conducting terminal connected to the first terminal by a rigid dielectric structure, and an electrically conducting gas contacting the first and second terminals. This device is particularly suitable for application in the electrospray ionization interface between a capillary zone electrophoresis apparatus and a mass spectrometer.

  16. Capillary zone electrophoresis-mass spectrometer interface

    DOEpatents

    D`Silva, A.

    1996-08-06

    A device for providing equal electrical potential between two loci unconnected by solid or liquid electrical conductors is provided. The device comprises a first electrical conducting terminal, a second electrical conducting terminal connected to the first terminal by a rigid dielectric structure, and an electrically conducting gas contacting the first and second terminals. This device is particularly suitable for application in the electrospray ionization interface between a capillary zone electrophoresis apparatus and a mass spectrometer. 1 fig.

  17. Midrapidity measurements with the BRAHMS spectrometer

    SciTech Connect

    Beavis, D.

    1995-07-15

    The forward- and midrapidity-arms of the BRAHMS experiment are designed to measure charged particle production over a wide range of transverse momentum for rapidities, 0{le}y{le}4. Details of the midrapidity spectrometer, which provides coverage for 0{le}{eta}{le}1.3, are presented here. The capabilities for inclusive {pi}{sup +-}, K{sup +-}, and p{sup +-} measurements and boson pair correlations are discussed.

  18. Spectrometer of high energy gamma quantums

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Blokhintsev, I. D.; Melioranskiy, A. S.; Kalinkin, L. F.; Nagornykh, Y. I.; Pryakhin, Y. A.

    1979-01-01

    A detailed description of the apparatus GG-2M is given. The spectrometer contains a Cerenkov and scintillation (including anticoincidence) counter. The energies of the gamma quantums are measured by a shower calorimeter, in which scintillation counters are used in the capacity of detectors. Results are given for tuning the device on mu-mesons of cosmic rays. The data of physical tuning allow more reliable interpretation of the results of measurements which are received on the satellites.

  19. A diffuse soft X-ray spectrometer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mccammon, D.

    1981-01-01

    A design for a diffuse X-ray spectrometer utilizing Bragg reflection is described. The geometry has a very high throughput for a given physical size and allows simultaneous observation at all wavelengths within its range. Spectral resolving power is about 35 to 50. A similar unit equipped with thallium acid pthallate crystals will cover the 11 - 24 A-range with about half this throughput and twice the resolving power.

  20. STS-54 Diffuse X-Ray Spectrometer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1993-01-01

    Louis Kaluzienski, Program Scientist, Wilton T. Sanders, Principal Investigator, and Chris Dunker, Diffuse X-Ray Spectrometer (DXS) Mission Manager, each give an overview of the DXS, including the purpose of the DXS, a brief description of x-ray astronomy, the scientific objectives of the DXS, and information on the STS-54 Endeavour mission, in which the DXS is part of the payload. The men then answer questions from the press.

  1. Time Dispersive Spectrometer Using Digital Switching Means

    DOEpatents

    Tarver, III, Edward E.; Siems, William F.

    2004-09-07

    Methods and apparatus are described for time dispersive spectroscopy. In particular, a modulated flow of ionized molecules of a sample are introduced into a drift region of an ion spectrometer. The ions are subsequently detected by an ion detector to produce an ion detection signal. The ion detection signal can be modulated to obtain a signal useful in assaying the chemical constituents of the sample.

  2. Frequency-feedback cavity enhanced spectrometer

    SciTech Connect

    Hovde, David Christian; Gomez, Anthony

    2015-08-18

    A spectrometer comprising an optical cavity, a light source capable of producing light at one or more wavelengths transmitted by the cavity and with the light directed at the cavity, a detector and optics positioned to collect light transmitted by the cavity, feedback electronics causing oscillation of amplitude of the optical signal on the detector at a frequency that depends on cavity losses, and a sensor measuring the oscillation frequency to determine the cavity losses.

  3. Design of a portable microfiber optic spectrometer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tong, Jian-ping; Yang, Yang; Sui, Cheng-hua; Xu, Dang-yang; Wang, fei

    2010-10-01

    Spectrum examination is widely used in scientific research and production. With the development of scientific research and production, the trend of spectrum examination is from indoor to outdoor in situ examination and on-line monitor. So the spectrometer is required to be more minimal. A new type of portable micro fiber spectrometer, using CCD, blaze grating, and two spherical mirror, a small dispersing system based on crossing Czerny-Turner structure, is designed based on this kind of requirement. By analyzing optical system structure, the relation among parameters of these components has been found out in order to fix basic parameters for miniaturized spectrometer; its working wavelength is 200-910nm. The entire spectrum is detected by a CCD for one time, the selection of CCD is product of Toshiba Corporation, linear charge coupled device (L.CCD) TCD1304AP, then received light signal is converted to an electrical signal. The system's hardware circuit includes CPLD, MCU, the CCD driving timing circuit, signal conditioning circuits, high-speed A/D sampling and transform timing circuit. A new kind of driving and sampling system which is high integrated for multi-channel has been designed by using CPLD (complex programmable logical device) and MCU. In this system, many function modules can be generated by logic cells inside of the CPLD chip, such as the driving pulse of CCD, the driving timing of high-speed A/D sampling converter and storage system and so on. In the end, the A/D results can be transmitted to computer by MCU for storage, processing and analysis. The CPLD is programmed in VHDL and compiled, synthesized, simulated and burned with the helping of the environment of Quartus II. The design of portable micro fiber spectrometer has the feature of wide spectrum range and high resolving power, so the system is especially suitable in the application of portable filed examination.

  4. Miniature transmissive DLP-based infrared spectrometer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koudsi, Badia; Refai, Hakki

    2016-02-01

    Spectroscopic measurements have the potential to positively impact a wide range of research, development, monitoring and control applications. In many cases, this potential is not realized because the spectrometer cannot be brought out of the laboratory to the measurement site due to sensitivities to environmental factors, highly accurate data cannot be obtained in a timely manner, or customizing the spectrometer to a specific application is costly and precludes re-use of the device for other application once its original purpose is served. We present the development of a DLP-based spectroscopic system in the near-infrared that is low-cost, compact and rugged, provides high resolution and is highly adaptable through straightforward software control. The key elements of the design include an efficient and compact optical pathway, a high-resolution DMD controlled by a fast DLP board, and a user-friendly, feature-rich software package that facilitates system configuration and data analysis. The DMD replaces the detector array in traditional spectrometers, and is shown to provide greater functionality while eliminating the need for mechanical scanning. We demonstrate how the long, thin columns of mirrors in the DMD provide high wavelength selectivity and capture more light at each wavelength, increasing measurement SNR. Selectively activating columns of mirrors is shown to adaptively tailor the resolution and the wavelengths collected and analyzed by the system allow one device to meet the needs of many different applications and to reduce measurement times. The software interface developed for accessing the many features of the spectrometer is discussed.

  5. Solution synthesis and characterization of quantum confined Ge nanoparticles

    SciTech Connect

    Taylor, B.R.; Kauzlarich, S.M.; Delgado, G.R.; Lee, H.W.H.

    1999-09-01

    A solution synthesis of crystalline Ge nanoparticles (nc-Ge) is reported. The metathesis reaction of NaGe with excess GeCl{sub 4} in glyme solvents produces nc-Ge. Metathesis reactions between KGe and excess GeCl{sub 4} or GeCl{sub 2}:(dioxane) in glyme and Mg{sub 2}Ge and excess GeCl{sub 4} in diglyme and triglyme were also investigated. The surface of these nanoparticles is terminated with alkyl groups by reaction with alkyl Li and Grignard reagents. The alkyl-terminated crystalline Ge nanoparticles ({cflx R}-nc-Ge) were characterized by Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy, high-resolution transmission electron microscopy, powder X-ray diffraction, UV-vis absorption spectroscopy, photoluminescence, and photoluminescence excitation spectroscopy. The optical properties of {cflx R}-nc-Ge made by this method agree with predictions from quantum confinement models.

  6. Silicon Microleaks for Inlets of Mass Spectrometers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Harpold, Dan; Hasso, Niemann; Jamieson, Brian G.; Lynch, Bernard A.

    2009-01-01

    Microleaks for inlets of mass spectrometers used to analyze atmospheric gases can be fabricated in silicon wafers by means of photolithography, etching, and other techniques that are commonly used in the manufacture of integrated circuits and microelectromechanical systems. The microleaks serve to limit the flows of the gases into the mass-spectrometer vacuums to specified very small flow rates consistent with the capacities of the spectrometer vacuum pumps. There is a need to be able to precisely tailor the dimensions of each microleak so as to tailor its conductance to a precise low value. (As used here, "conductance" signifies the ratio between the rate of flow in the leak and the pressure drop from the upstream to the downstream end of the leak.) To date, microleaks have been made, variously, of crimped metal tubes, pulled glass tubes, or frits. Crimped-metal and pulled-glass-tube microleaks cannot readily be fabricated repeatably to precise dimensions and are susceptible to clogging with droplets or particles. Frits tend to be differentially chemically reactive with various gas constituents and, hence, to distort the gas mixtures to be analyzed. The present approach involving microfabrication in silicon largely overcomes the disadvantages of the prior approaches.

  7. MERTIS: a highly integrated IR imaging spectrometer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Walter, I.; Hirsch, H.; Jahn, H.; Knollenberg, J.; Venus, H.

    2006-08-01

    With a background of several instrument developments in the past the German Aerospace Center in Berlin proposed for ESA's deep space mission BepiColombo an imaging spectrometer which meets the challenges of limited technical resources and a very special operational environment. An 80-channel push broom-type spectrometer has been drafted and it s development has been started under the name MERTIS (MErcury Radiometer and Thermal Infrared Spectrometer). The instrument is dedicated to the mineralogy surface science and thermal characteristics studies of the innermost planet. It is based on modern un-cooled micro-bolometer technology and all-reflective optics design. The operation concept principle is characterised by intermediate scanning of the planet, deep space and black bodies as calibration targets. A miniaturised radiometer is included for low level temperature measurements. Altogether the system shall fit into a CD-package sized cube and weigh less than 3 kg. The paper will present the instrument architecture of MERTIS, its design status and will show the results of first components being built.

  8. Expert overseer for mass spectrometer system

    DOEpatents

    Filby, Evan E.; Rankin, Richard A.

    1991-01-01

    An expert overseer for the operation and real-time management of a mass spectrometer and associated laboratory equipment. The overseer is a computer-based expert diagnostic system implemented on a computer separate from the dedicated computer used to control the mass spectrometer and produce the analysis results. An interface links the overseer to components of the mass spectrometer, components of the laboratory support system, and the dedicated control computer. Periodically, the overseer polls these devices and as well as itself. These data are fed into an expert portion of the system for real-time evaluation. A knowledge base used for the evaluation includes both heuristic rules and precise operation parameters. The overseer also compares current readings to a long-term database to detect any developing trends using a combination of statistical and heuristic rules to evaluate the results. The overseer has the capability to alert lab personnel whenever questionable readings or trends are observed and provide a background review of the problem and suggest root causes and potential solutions, or appropriate additional tests that could be performed. The overseer can change the sequence or frequency of the polling to respond to an observation in the current data.

  9. The compact neutron spectrometer at ASDEX Upgrade

    SciTech Connect

    Giacomelli, L.; Zimbal, A.; Tittelmeier, K.; Schuhmacher, H.; Tardini, G.; Neu, R.; Collaboration: ASDEX Upgrade Team

    2011-12-15

    The first neutron spectrometer of ASDEX Upgrade (AUG) was installed in November 2008. It is a compact neutron spectrometer (CNS) based on a BC501A liquid scintillating detector, which can simultaneously measure 2.45-MeV and 14-MeV neutrons emitted from deuterium (D) plasmas and {gamma} radiation. The scintillating detector is coupled to a digital pulse shape discrimination data acquisition (DPSD) system capable of count rates up to 10{sup 6} s{sup -1}. The DPSD system can operate in acquisition and processing mode. With the latter n-{gamma} discrimination is performed off-line based on the two-gate method. The paper describes the tests of the CNS and its installation at AUG. The neutron emission from the D plasma measured during a discharge with high auxiliary heating power was used to validate the CNS performance. The study of the optimal settings for the DPSD data processing to maximize the n-{gamma} discrimination capability of the CNS is reported. The CNS measured both 2.45-MeV and 14-MeV neutrons emitted in AUG D plasmas with a maximum count rate of 5.4 x10{sup 5} s{sup -1} (>10 times higher than similar spectrometers previously achieved) with an efficiency of 9.3 x 10{sup -10} events per AUG neutron.

  10. Modular reconfigurable matched spectral filter spectrometer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schundler, Elizabeth; Engel, James R.; Gruber, Thomas; Vaillancourt, Robert; Benedict-Gill, Ryan; Mansur, David J.; Dixon, John; Potter, Kevin; Newbry, Scott

    2015-06-01

    OPTRA is currently developing a modular, reconfigurable matched spectral filter (RMSF) spectrometer for the monitoring of greenhouse gases. The heart of this spectrometer will be the RMSF core, which is a dispersive spectrometer that images the sample spectrum from 2000 - 3333 cm-1 onto a digital micro-mirror device (DMD) such that different columns correspond to different wavebands. By applying masks to this DMD, a matched spectral filter can be applied in hardware. The core can then be paired with different fore-optics or detector modules to achieve active in situ or passive remote detection of the chemicals of interest. This results in a highly flexible system that can address a wide variety of chemicals by updating the DMD masks and a wide variety of applications by swapping out fore-optic and detector modules. In either configuration, the signal on the detector is effectively a dot-product between the applied mask and the sample spectrum that can be used to make detection and quantification determinations. Using this approach significantly reduces the required data bandwidth of the sensor without reducing the information content, therefore making it ideal for remote, unattended systems. This paper will focus on the design of the RMSF core.

  11. Prismatic analyser concept for neutron spectrometers

    SciTech Connect

    Birk, Jonas O.; Jacobsen, Johan; Hansen, Rasmus L.; Lefmann, Kim; Markó, Márton; Niedermayer, Christof; Freeman, Paul G.; Christensen, Niels B.; Månsson, Martin; Rønnow, Henrik M.

    2014-11-15

    Developments in modern neutron spectroscopy have led to typical sample sizes decreasing from few cm to several mm in diameter samples. We demonstrate how small samples together with the right choice of analyser and detector components makes distance collimation an important concept in crystal analyser spectrometers. We further show that this opens new possibilities where neutrons with different energies are reflected by the same analyser but counted in different detectors, thus improving both energy resolution and total count rate compared to conventional spectrometers. The technique can readily be combined with advanced focussing geometries and with multiplexing instrument designs. We present a combination of simulations and data showing three different energies simultaneously reflected from one analyser. Experiments were performed on a cold triple axis instrument and on a prototype inverse geometry Time-of-flight spectrometer installed at PSI, Switzerland, and shows excellent agreement with the predictions. Typical improvements will be 2.0 times finer resolution and a factor of 1.9 in flux gain compared to a focussing Rowland geometry, or of 3.3 times finer resolution and a factor of 2.4 in flux gain compared to a single flat analyser slab.

  12. ScanSpec: an imaging FTIR spectrometer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nelsson, Claes; Lundberg, Frans; Nilsson, Paer; Berglund, Mattias

    2000-07-01

    The demand for hyperspectral imagers for research has increased in order to match the performance of new sensors for military applications. These work in several spectral bands and targets and backgrounds need to be characterized both spatially and spectrally to enable efficient signature analysis. Another task for a hyperspectral research imager is to acquire hyperspectral data to be able to study new hyperspectral signal processing techniques to detect, classify, and identify targets. This paper describes how a hyperspectral IR imager was developed based on an FTIR spectrometer at the Defence Research Establishment (FOA) in Linkoping, Sweden. The system, called ScanSpec, consists of a fast FTIR spectrometer from Bomem (MR254), an image-scanning mirror device with controlling electronics, and software for data collection and image forming. The spectrometer itself has not been modified. The paper also contains a performance evaluation with NESR NEDT, and MRTD analysis. Finally, some examples of hyperspectral results from field trials are presented: maritime background and remote gas detection.

  13. Imaging spectrometer for fugitive gas leak detection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hinnrichs, Michele

    1999-12-01

    Under contract to the U.S. Air Force and Navy, Pacific Advanced Technology has developed a very sensitive infrared imaging spectrometer that can perform remote imaging and spectro-radiometry. One of the most exciting applications for this technology is in the remote monitoring of smoke stack emissions and fugitive leaks. To date remote continuous emission monitoring (CEM) systems have not been approved by the EPA, however, they are under consideration. If the remote sensing technology is available with the sensitivity to monitor emission at the required levels and man portable it can reduce the cost and improve the reliability of performing such measurements. Pacific Advanced Technology (PAT) believes that it currently has this technology available to industry. This paper will present results from a field test where gas vapors during a refueling process were imaged and identified. In addition images of propane from a leaking stove will be presented. We at PAT have developed a real time image processing board that enhances the signal to noise ratio of low contrast gases and makes them easily viewable using the Image Multispectral Sensing (IMSS) imaging spectrometer. The IMSS imaging spectrometer is the size of a camcorder. Currently the data is stored in a Notebook computer thus allowing the system to be easily carried into power plants to look for fugitive leaks. In the future the IMSS will have an embedded processor and DSP and will be able to transfer data over an Ethernet link.

  14. Compact high performance spectrometers using computational imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Morton, Kenneth; Weisberg, Arel

    2016-05-01

    Compressive sensing technology can theoretically be used to develop low cost compact spectrometers with the performance of larger and more expensive systems. Indeed, compressive sensing for spectroscopic systems has been previously demonstrated using coded aperture techniques, wherein a mask is placed between the grating and a charge coupled device (CCD) and multiple measurements are collected with different masks. Although proven effective for some spectroscopic sensing paradigms (e.g. Raman), this approach requires that the signal being measured is static between shots (low noise and minimal signal fluctuation). Many spectroscopic techniques applicable to remote sensing are inherently noisy and thus coded aperture compressed sensing will likely not be effective. This work explores an alternative approach to compressed sensing that allows for reconstruction of a high resolution spectrum in sensing paradigms featuring significant signal fluctuations between measurements. This is accomplished through relatively minor changes to the spectrometer hardware together with custom super-resolution algorithms. Current results indicate that a potential overall reduction in CCD size of up to a factor of 4 can be attained without a loss of resolution. This reduction can result in significant improvements in cost, size, and weight of spectrometers incorporating the technology.

  15. Multislit optimized spectrometer: fabrication and assembly update

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Valle, Tim; Hardesty, Chuck; Good, William; Seckar, Chris; Shea, Don; Spuhler, Peter; Davis, Curtiss O.; Tufillaro, Nicholas

    2013-09-01

    The NASA ESTO funded Multi-slit Optimized Spectrometer (MOS) Instrument Incubator Program will advance a spatial multiplexing spectrometer for coastal ocean remote sensing from lab demonstration to flight like environment testing. Vibration testing to meet the GEVS requirements for a geostationary orbit launch will be performed. The multiple slit design reduces the required telescope aperture leading to mass and volume reductions over conventional spectrometers when applied to the GEO-CAPE oceans mission. The MOS program is entering year 3 of the 3-year program where assembly and test activities will demonstrate the performance of the MOS concept. This paper discusses the instrument design, fabrication and assembly. It outlines the test plan to realize a technology readiness level of 6. Testing focuses on characterizing radiometric impacts of the multiple slit images multiplexed onto a common focal plane, and assesses the resulting uncertainties imparted to the ocean color data products. The MOS instrument implementation for GEO-CAPE provides system benefits that can lead to cost savings and risk reduction while meeting the science objectives of understanding the dynamic coastal ocean environment.

  16. Advances in miniature spectrometer and sensor development

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Malinen, Jouko; Rissanen, Anna; Saari, Heikki; Karioja, Pentti; Karppinen, Mikko; Aalto, Timo; Tukkiniemi, Kari

    2014-05-01

    Miniaturization and cost reduction of spectrometer and sensor technologies has great potential to open up new applications areas and business opportunities for analytical technology in hand held, mobile and on-line applications. Advances in microfabrication have resulted in high-performance MEMS and MOEMS devices for spectrometer applications. Many other enabling technologies are useful for miniature analytical solutions, such as silicon photonics, nanoimprint lithography (NIL), system-on-chip, system-on-package techniques for integration of electronics and photonics, 3D printing, powerful embedded computing platforms, networked solutions as well as advances in chemometrics modeling. This paper will summarize recent work on spectrometer and sensor miniaturization at VTT Technical Research Centre of Finland. Fabry-Perot interferometer (FPI) tunable filter technology has been developed in two technical versions: Piezoactuated FPIs have been applied in miniature hyperspectral imaging needs in light weight UAV and nanosatellite applications, chemical imaging as well as medical applications. Microfabricated MOEMS FPIs have been developed as cost-effective sensor platforms for visible, NIR and IR applications. Further examples of sensor miniaturization will be discussed, including system-on-package sensor head for mid-IR gas analyzer, roll-to-roll printed Surface Enhanced Raman Scattering (SERS) technology as well as UV imprinted waveguide sensor for formaldehyde detection.

  17. What Happened with Spectrometer Magnet 2B

    SciTech Connect

    Green, Michael A

    2010-05-27

    The spectrometer solenoid is supposed to be the first magnets installed in MICE [1]-[4]. This report described what happened during the test of the MICE spectrometer solenoid 2B. First, the report describes the temperatures in the magnet, the cooler top plate and the shield during the run where the magnet quenched at 258 A. During this quench, a lead between the bottom of the HTS leads and the diode bank burned out causing the magnet to quench. Second, three methods for measuring the net heat flow into the cold mass are described. Third, there is a discussion of possible resistive heating in the HTS leads between liquid helium temperature and the copper plate, which is at about 50 K. Fourth, there is a discussion of the measured first stage heat loads in the magnet, when there is no current in the magnet. The first stage heat load calculations are based on knowing the first stage temperatures of the three two-stage pulse tube coolers and the single stage GM cooler. Fifth, the estimated heat load to the first stage when the magnet has current in it is discussed. Sixth, there is a comparison of the stage 1 heat loads in magnet 1A [5], magnet 2A [6], and magnet 2B [7]. Finally there is a discussion of recommended changes for improving the spectrometer solenoids so that the coolers can keep them cold.

  18. Sensing systems using chip-based spectrometers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nitkowski, Arthur; Preston, Kyle J.; Sherwood-Droz, Nicolás.; Behr, Bradford B.; Bismilla, Yusuf; Cenko, Andrew T.; DesRoches, Brandon; Meade, Jeffrey T.; Munro, Elizabeth A.; Slaa, Jared; Schmidt, Bradley S.; Hajian, Arsen R.

    2014-06-01

    Tornado Spectral Systems has developed a new chip-based spectrometer called OCTANE, the Optical Coherence Tomography Advanced Nanophotonic Engine, built using a planar lightwave circuit with integrated waveguides fabricated on a silicon wafer. While designed for spectral domain optical coherence tomography (SD-OCT) systems, the same miniaturized technology can be applied to many other spectroscopic applications. The field of integrated optics enables the design of complex optical systems which are monolithically integrated on silicon chips. The form factors of these systems can be significantly smaller, more robust and less expensive than their equivalent free-space counterparts. Fabrication techniques and material systems developed for microelectronics have previously been adapted for integrated optics in the telecom industry, where millions of chip-based components are used to power the optical backbone of the internet. We have further adapted the photonic technology platform for spectroscopy applications, allowing unheard-of economies of scale for these types of optical devices. Instead of changing lenses and aligning systems, these devices are accurately designed programmatically and are easily customized for specific applications. Spectrometers using integrated optics have large advantages in systems where size, robustness and cost matter: field-deployable devices, UAVs, UUVs, satellites, handheld scanning and more. We will discuss the performance characteristics of our chip-based spectrometers and the type of spectral sensing applications enabled by this technology.

  19. Autonomously Calibrating a Quadrupole Mass Spectrometer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lee, Seungwon; Bornstein, Benjamin J.

    2009-01-01

    A computer program autonomously manages the calibration of a quadrupole ion mass spectrometer intended for use in monitoring concentrations and changes in concentrations of organic chemicals in the cabin air of the International Space Station. The instrument parameters calibrated include the voltage on a channel electron multiplier, a discriminator threshold, and an ionizer current. Calibration is achieved by analyzing the mass spectrum obtained while sweeping the parameter ranges in a heuristic procedure, developed by mass spectrometer experts, that involves detection of changes in signal trends that humans can easily recognize but cannot necessarily be straightforwardly codified in an algorithm. The procedure includes calculation of signal-to-noise ratios, signal-increase rates, and background-noise-increase rates; finding signal peaks; and identifying peak patterns. The software provides for several recovery-from-error scenarios and error-handling schemes. The software detects trace amounts of contaminant gases in the mass spectrometer and notifies associated command- and-data-handling software to schedule a cleaning. Furthermore, the software autonomously analyzes the mass spectrum to determine whether the parameters of a radio-frequency ramp waveform are set properly so that the peaks of the mass spectrum are at expected locations.

  20. Pseudomorphic GeSn/Ge(001) quantum wells: Examining indirect band gap bowing

    SciTech Connect

    Tonkikh, Alexander A.; Eisenschmidt, Christian; Schmidt, Georg; Talalaev, Vadim G.; Zakharov, Nikolay D.; Werner, Peter; Schilling, Joerg

    2013-07-15

    A study of the bandgap character of compressively strained GeSn{sub 0.060-0.091}/Ge(001) quantum wells grown by molecular beam epitaxy is reported. The built-in strain in GeSn wells leads to an increased separation between L and {Gamma} conduction band minima. The prevalent indirect interband transitions in GeSn were probed by photoluminescence spectroscopy. As a result we could simulate the L-valley bowing parameter in GeSn alloys, b{sub L} = 0.80 {+-} 0.06 eV at 10 K. From this we conclude that even compressively strained GeSn/Ge(001) alloys could become direct band gap semiconductors at the Sn-fraction higher than 17.0 at. %.

  1. Ge/GeSn heterostructures grown on Si (100) by molecular-beam epitaxy

    SciTech Connect

    Sadofyev, Yu. G. Martovitsky, V. P.; Bazalevsky, M. A.; Klekovkin, A. V.; Averyanov, D. V.; Vasil’evskii, I. S.

    2015-01-15

    The growth of GeSn layers by molecular-beam epitaxy on Si (100) wafers coated with a germanium buffer layer is investigated. The properties of the fabricated structures are controlled by reflection high-energy electron diffraction, atomic-force microscopy, X-ray diffractometry, Rutherford backscattering, and Raman scattering. It is shown that GeSn layers with thicknesses up to 0.5 μm and Sn molar fractions up to 0.073 manifest no sign of plastic relaxation upon epitaxy. The lattice constant of the GeSn layers within the growth plane is precisely the same as that of Ge. The effect of rapid thermal annealing on the conversion of metastable elastically strained GeSn layers into a plastically relaxed state is examined. Ge/GeSn quantum wells with Sn molar fraction up to 0.11 are obtained.

  2. Formation and Stabilization of Single-Crystalline Metastable AuGe Phases in Ge Nanowires

    SciTech Connect

    Sutter, E.; Sutter, P.

    2011-07-22

    We use in situ observations by variable temperature transmission electron microscopy on AuGe alloy drops at the tips of Ge nanowires (NWs) with systematically varying composition to demonstrate the controlled formation of metastable solid phases integrated in NWs. The process, which operates in the regime of vapor-liquid-solid growth, involves a size-dependent depression of the alloy liquidus at the nanoscale that leads to extremely Ge-rich AuGe melts at low temperatures. During slow cooling, these liquid AuGe alloy drops show pronounced departures from equilibrium, i.e., a frustrated phase separation of Ge into the adjacent solid NW, and ultimately crystallize as single-crystalline segments of metastable {gamma}-AuGe. Our findings demonstrate a general avenue for synthesizing NW heterostructures containing stable and metastable solid phases, applicable to a wide range of materials of which NWs form by the vapor-liquid-solid method.

  3. Growth and characterization of isotopically enriched [sup 70]Ge and [sup 74]Ge single crystals

    SciTech Connect

    Itoh, K.

    1992-10-01

    Isotopically enriched [sup 70]Ge and [sup 74]Ge single crystals were successfully gown by a newly developed vertical Bridgman method. The system allows us to reliably grow high purity Ge single crystals of approximately 1 cm[sup 3] volume. To our knowledge, we have grown the first [sup 70]Ge single crystal. The electrically active chemical impurity concentration for both crystals was found to be [approximately]2 [times] cm[sup [minus]3] which is two order of magnitude better that of [sup 74]Ge crystals previously grown by two different groups. Isotopic enrichment of the [sup 70]Ge and the [sup 74]Ge crystals is 96.3% and 96.8%, respectively. The residual chemical impurities present in both crystals were identified as phosphorus, copper, aluminum, and indium. A wide variety of experiments which take advantage of the isotopic purity of our crystals are discussed.

  4. Growth and characterization of isotopically enriched {sup 70}Ge and {sup 74}Ge single crystals

    SciTech Connect

    Itoh, K.

    1992-10-01

    Isotopically enriched {sup 70}Ge and {sup 74}Ge single crystals were successfully gown by a newly developed vertical Bridgman method. The system allows us to reliably grow high purity Ge single crystals of approximately 1 cm{sup 3} volume. To our knowledge, we have grown the first {sup 70}Ge single crystal. The electrically active chemical impurity concentration for both crystals was found to be {approximately}2 {times} cm{sup {minus}3} which is two order of magnitude better that of {sup 74}Ge crystals previously grown by two different groups. Isotopic enrichment of the {sup 70}Ge and the {sup 74}Ge crystals is 96.3% and 96.8%, respectively. The residual chemical impurities present in both crystals were identified as phosphorus, copper, aluminum, and indium. A wide variety of experiments which take advantage of the isotopic purity of our crystals are discussed.

  5. The wide-angle neutron spin echo spectrometer project WASP

    SciTech Connect

    Ehlers, Georg

    2007-01-01

    This paper describes design and optimization for the wide angle spin-echo spectrometer (WASP) presently being planned at the ILL. The spectrometer will be a replacement for the high intensity spectrometer IN11 and will enhance its signal by more than one order of magnitude while maintaining the resolution of the present spectrometer. The paper outlines the magnetic field calculations and the considerations about possible limitations. The projected performance has been verified carefully by Monte Carlo raytracing and Biot-Savart magnetic field calculations. The maximum momentum transfer of the new spectrometer is to be extended to 4 angstroms {sup -1}.

  6. Method of multiplexed analysis using ion mobility spectrometer

    DOEpatents

    Belov, Mikhail E.; Smith, Richard D.

    2009-06-02

    A method for analyzing analytes from a sample introduced into a Spectrometer by generating a pseudo random sequence of a modulation bins, organizing each modulation bin as a series of submodulation bins, thereby forming an extended pseudo random sequence of submodulation bins, releasing the analytes in a series of analyte packets into a Spectrometer, thereby generating an unknown original ion signal vector, detecting the analytes at a detector, and characterizing the sample using the plurality of analyte signal subvectors. The method is advantageously applied to an Ion Mobility Spectrometer, and an Ion Mobility Spectrometer interfaced with a Time of Flight Mass Spectrometer.

  7. Relative Sensor with 4Pi Coverage for Formation Flying Missions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tien, Jeffrey Y.; Purcell, George H., Jr.; Srinivasan, Jeffrey M.; Young, Lawrence E.

    2004-01-01

    The Terrestrial Planet Finder (TPF) pre-project, an element of NASA s Origins program, is currently developing two architectures for a mission to search for earth-like planets around nearby stars. One of the architectures being developed is the Formation Flying Interferometer (FFI). The FFI is envisioned to consist of up to seven spacecraft (as many as six "collectors" with IR telescopes, and a "combiner") flying in precise formation within +/-1 cm of pre-determined trajectories for synchronized observations. The spacecraft-to-spacecraft separations are variable between 20 m and 100 m or more during observations to support various configurations of the interferometer in the planet-finding mode. The challenges involved with TPF autonomous operations, ranging from formation acquisition and formation maneuvering to high precision formation control during science observations, are unprecedented. In this paper we discuss the development of the formation acquisition sensor, which uses novel modulation and duplexing schemes to enable fast signal acquisition, multiple-spacecraft operation, and mitigation of inherent jamming conditions, while providing precise formation sensing and integrated radar capability. This approach performs delay synthesis and carrier cycle ambiguity resolution to improve range measurement, and uses differential carrier cycle ambiguity resolution to make precise bearing angle measurements without calibration maneuvers.

  8. The design of asymmetric 4 pi shields for space reactors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Engle, W. W., Jr.; Childs, R. L.; Mynatt, F. R.

    1972-01-01

    A one dimensional shield optimization program based on the method of discrete ordinates has been developed and is used to determine material thicknesses used in asymmetric 4 pion shields for space power reactors. The two dimensional discrete ordinates program DOT is used to check the design, and the information generated in the DOT calculation is used as a guide in shaping the shield which may be considered a first step in two dimensional shield optimization.

  9. Relative Sensor with 4(pi) Coverage for Formation Flying Missions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tien, Jeffrey Y.; Purcell, George H., Jr.; Sirinivasan, Jeffrey M.; Young, Lawrence E.

    2004-01-01

    The Terrestrial Planet Finder (TPF) pre-project, an element of NASA's Origins program, is currently developing two architectures for a mission to search for earth-like planets around nearby stars. One of the architectures being developed is the Formation Flying Interferometer (FFI). The FFI is envisioned to consist of up to seven spacecraft (as many as six 'collectors' with IR telescopes, and a 'combiner') flying in precise formation within f 1 cm of pre-determined trajectories for synchronized observations. The spacecraft-to-spacecraft separations are variable between 20 m and 100 m or more during observations to support various configurations of the interferometer in the planet-finding mode. The challenges involved with TPF autonomous operations, ranging from formation acquisition and formation maneuvering to high precision formation control during science observations, are unprecedented. In this paper we discuss the development of the formation acquisition sensor, which uses novel modulation and duplexing schemes to enable fast signal acquisition, multiple-spacecraft operation, and mitigation of inherent jamming conditions, while providing precise formation sensing and integrated radar capability. This approach performs delay synthesis and carrier cycle ambiguity resolution to improve range measurement, and uses differential carrier cycle ambiguity resolution to make precise bearing angle measurements without calibration maneuvers.

  10. Development of Blocked-Impurity-Band-Type Ge Detectors Fabricated with the Surface-Activated Wafer Bonding Method for Far-Infrared Astronomy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hanaoka, M.; Kaneda, H.; Oyabu, S.; Yamagishi, M.; Hattori, Y.; Ukai, S.; Shichi, K.; Wada, T.; Suzuki, T.; Watanabe, K.; Nagase, K.; Baba, S.; Kochi, C.

    2016-07-01

    We report the current status of the development of our new detectors for far-infrared (FIR) astronomy. We develop Blocked-Impurity-Band (BIB)-type Ge detectors to realize large-format compact arrays covering a wide FIR wavelength range up to 200 \\upmu m. We fabricated Ge junction devices of different physical parameters with a BIB-type structure, using the room temperature, surface-activated wafer bonding (SAB) method. We measured the absolute responsivity and the spectral response curve of each device at low temperatures, using an internal blackbody source in a cryostat and a Fourier transform spectrometer, respectively. The results show that the SAB Ge junction devices have significantly higher absolute responsivities and longer cut-off wavelengths of the spectral response than the conventional bulk Ge:Ga device. Based upon the results, we discuss the optimum parameters of SAB Ge junction devices for FIR detectors. We conclude that SAB Ge junction devices possess a promising applicability to next-generation FIR detectors covering wavelengths up to ˜ 200 \\upmu m with high responsivity. As a next step, we plan to fabricate a BIB-type Ge array device in combination with a low-power cryogenic readout integrated circuit.

  11. 200 A GeV Au+Au Collisions Serve a Nearly Perfect Quark-Gluon Liquid

    SciTech Connect

    Song Huichao; Bass, Steffen A.; Heinz, Ulrich; Shen, Chun; Hirano, Tetsufumi

    2011-05-13

    A new robust method to extract the specific shear viscosity ({eta}/s){sub QGP} of a quark-gluon plasma (QGP) at temperatures T{sub c}GeV Au+Au collisions that v{sub 2}/{epsilon} is a universal function of multiplicity density (1/S)(dN{sub ch}/dy) that depends only on the viscosity but not on the model used for computing the initial fireball eccentricity {epsilon}. Comparing with measurements we find 1<4{pi}({eta}/s){sub QGP}<2.5 where the uncertainty range is dominated by model uncertainties for the values of {epsilon} used to normalize the measured v{sub 2}.

  12. Investigation of pn Correlations in {sup 4}Hep Interactions at a Momentum of 5 GeV/c

    SciTech Connect

    Blinov, A.V.; Turov, V.F.; Chadeyeva, M.V.

    2005-08-01

    Proton-neutron correlations in {sup 4}Hep interactions are studied in an exclusive experiment by using a 2-m bubble chamber exposed to a 5-GeV/c beam of {alpha} particles (the kinetic energy of the protons in the nucleus rest frame is T{sub p} = 620 MeV). Data on the production of pn pairs in 4{pi} geometry for three channels, where it is possible to reconstruct the neutron momentum unambiguously, are used to determine the pn correlation function in {sup 4}Hep interactions. The experimental results are compared with the predictions of a modified Lednicky-Lyuboshitz model. The value obtained for the root-mean-square radius of the pn-emission region is R{sub pn} = 2.1 {+-} 0.3 fm. The dependence of the correlation function on the modulus of the total momentum of the emitted nucleon pair and on the direction of the momentum transfer is studied. An indication that the emission of a pn pair proceeds predominantly through the production of a virtual deuteron is obtained.

  13. Complete measurement of three-body photodisintegration of 3He for photon energies between 0.35 and 1.55 GeV

    SciTech Connect

    Niccolai, Silvia; Audit, Gerard; Berman, Barry; Laget, Jean; Strauch, Steffen; et. Al.

    2004-12-01

    The three-body photodisintegration of 3He has been measured with the CLAS detector at Jefferson Lab, using tagged photons of energies between 0.35 GeV and 1.55 GeV. The large acceptance of the spectrometer allowed us for the first time to cover a wide momentum and angular range for the two outgoing protons. Three kinematic regions dominated by either two- or three-body contributions have been distinguished and analyzed. The measured cross sections have been compared with results of a theoretical model, which, in certain kinematic ranges, have been found to be in reasonable agreement with the data.

  14. Double prompt photon production at high transverse momentum by /pi//sup /minus// on protons at 280 GeV/c

    SciTech Connect

    Bonvin, E.; Bopp, R.; Carroll, L.J.; Cass, A.J.; Chung, S.U.; Donnat, M.; Dorsaz, P.A.; Feliks, M.E.; Fluri, L.; Jackson, J.N.; Kienzle-Focacci, M.N.; Lynch, J.G.; Martin, M.; Mathys, L.; Negus, P.J.; Perini, L.; Poultney, R.; Range, W.H.; Rosselet, L.; Snow, S.W.; Thompson, A.S.; Turnbull, R.M.; Werlen, M.

    1988-06-01

    A search for pairs of high p/sub T/ prompt photons produced in hydrogen by a 280 GeV/c incident /pi//sup /minus// beam has been carried out using a fine-grained electromagnetic calorimeter and the Omega spectrometer at the CERN SPS. Clear evidence for the existence of such events is found with a six standard deviation signal for p/sub T/ > 3.0 GeV/c. The cross sections are consistent with beyond leading order QCD calculations. A discussion on the determination of /alpha//sub s/ is also presented. 18 refs., 7 figs., 7 tabs.

  15. [Design of Dual-Beam Spectrometer in Spectrophotometer for Colorimetry].

    PubMed

    Liu, Yi-xuan; Yan, Chang-xiang

    2015-07-01

    Spectrophotometers for colorimetry are usually composed of two independent and identical spectrometers. In order to reduce the volume of spectrophotometer for colorimetry, a design method of double-beam spectrometer is put forward. A traditional spectrometer is modified so that a new spectrometer can realize the function of double spectrometers, which is especially suitable for portable instruments. One slit is replaced by the double-slit, than two beams of spectrum can be detected. The working principle and design requirement of double-beam spectrometer are described. A spectrometer of portable spectrophotometer is designed by this method. A toroidal imaging mirror is used for the Czerny-Turner double-beam spectrometer in this paper, which can better correct astigmatism, and prevent the dual-beam spectral crosstalk. The results demonstrate that the double-beam spectrometer designed by this method meets the design specifications, with the spectral resolution less than 10 nm, the spectral length of 9.12 mm, and the volume of 57 mm x 54 mm x 23 mm, and without the dual-beam spectral overlap in the detector either. Comparing with a traditional spectrophotometer, the modified spectrophotometer uses a set of double-beam spectrometer instead of two sets of spectrometers, which can greatly reduce the volume. This design method can be specially applied in portable spectrophotometers, also can be widely applied in other double-beam spectrophotometers, which offers a new idea for the design of dual-beam spectrophotometers.

  16. [Development of a high resolution simultaneous microwave plasma torch spectrometer].

    PubMed

    Jiang, Jie; Huan, Yan-Fu; Jin, Wei; Feng, Guo-Dong; Fei, Qiang; Cao, Yan-Bo; Jin, Qin-Han

    2007-11-01

    A unique high resolution simultaneous microwave plasma torch (MPT) atomic emission spectrometer was developed and studied preliminarily. Some advanced technologies were applied to the spectrometer, such as echelle grating, UV-intensified CCD array detector, adjustable microwave generator, and water cooling system for the generator, etc. The detection limits of the spectrometer for some elements were determined, the spectral resolution and pixel resolution of the spectrometer were calculated, and an analysis of a practical sample was carried out. The preliminary results demonstrate that such simultaneous spectrometer has advantages of saving sample and time, possessing high sensitivity and resolution, and low-cost for the purchase and maintenance. Taking analytical figures of merit into consideration, the high resolution simultaneous MPT spectrometer will have extended application areas and greater competition potential as compared with sequential MPT spectrometers.

  17. Mathematical Simulation for Integrated Linear Fresnel Spectrometer Chip

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Park, Yeonjoon; Yoon, Hargoon; Lee, Uhn; King, Glen C.; Choi, Sang H.

    2012-01-01

    A miniaturized solid-state optical spectrometer chip was designed with a linear gradient-gap Fresnel grating which was mounted perpendicularly to a sensor array surface and simulated for its performance and functionality. Unlike common spectrometers which are based on Fraunhoffer diffraction with a regular periodic line grating, the new linear gradient grating Fresnel spectrometer chip can be miniaturized to a much smaller form-factor into the Fresnel regime exceeding the limit of conventional spectrometers. This mathematical calculation shows that building a tiny motionless multi-pixel microspectrometer chip which is smaller than 1 cubic millimter of optical path volume is possible. The new Fresnel spectrometer chip is proportional to the energy scale (hc/lambda), while the conventional spectrometers are proportional to the wavelength scale (lambda). We report the theoretical optical working principle and new data collection algorithm of the new Fresnel spectrometer to build a compact integrated optical chip.

  18. Understanding of interface structures and reaction mechanisms induced by Ge or GeO diffusion in Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}/Ge structure

    SciTech Connect

    Shibayama, Shigehisa; Kato, Kimihiko; Sakashita, Mitsuo; Takeuchi, Wakana; Taoka, Noriyuki; Nakatsuka, Osamu; Zaima, Shigeaki

    2013-08-19

    The reaction mechanisms at Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}/Ge interfaces with thermal oxidation through the Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} layer have been investigated. X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy reveals that an Al{sub 6}Ge{sub 2}O{sub 13} layer is formed near the interface, and a GeO{sub 2} layer is formed on the Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} surface, suggesting Ge or GeO diffusion from the Ge surface. It is also clarified that the Al{sub 6}Ge{sub 2}O{sub 13} layer is formed by the different mechanism with a small activation energy of 0.2 eV, compared with the GeO{sub 2} formation limited by oxygen diffusion. Formation of Al-O-Ge bonds due to the AlGeO formation could lead appropriate interface structures with high interface qualities.

  19. Enhancement of thermal stability and water resistance in yttrium-doped GeO{sub 2}/Ge gate stack

    SciTech Connect

    Lu, Cimang Hyun Lee, Choong; Zhang, Wenfeng; Nishimura, Tomonori; Nagashio, Kosuke; Toriumi, Akira

    2014-03-03

    We have systematically investigated the material and electrical properties of yttrium-doped GeO{sub 2} (Y-GeO{sub 2}) on Germanium (Ge). A significant improvement of both thermal stability and water resistance were demonstrated by Y-GeO{sub 2}/Ge stack, compared to that of pure GeO{sub 2}/Ge stack. The excellent electrical properties of Y-GeO{sub 2}/Ge stacks with low D{sub it} were presented as well as enhancement of dielectric constant in Y-GeO{sub 2} layer, which is beneficial for further equivalent oxide thickness scaling of Ge gate stack. The improvement of thermal stability and water resistance are discussed both in terms of the Gibbs free energy lowering and network modification of Y-GeO{sub 2}.

  20. Silica aerogel threshold Cherenkov counters for the JLab Hall A spectrometers: improvements and proposed modifications

    SciTech Connect

    Luigi Lagamba; Evaristo Cisbani; S. Colilli; R. Crateri; R. De Leo; Salvatore Frullani; Franco Garibaldi; F. Giuliani; M. Gricia; Mauro Iodice; Riccardo Iommi; A. Leone; M. Lucentini; A. Mostarda; E. Nappi; Roberto Perrino; L. Pierangeli; F. Santavenere; Guido M. Urciuoli

    2001-10-01

    Recently approved experiments at Jefferson Lab Hall A require a clean kaon identification in a large electron, pion, and proton background environment. To this end, improved performance is required of the silica aerogel threshold Cherenkov counters installed in the focal plane of the two Hall A spectrometers. In this paper we propose two strategies to improve the performance of the Cherenkov counters which presently use a hydrophilic aerogel radiator, and convey Cherenkov photons towards the photomultipliers by means of mirrors with a parabolic shape in one direction and flat in the other. The first strategy is aerogel baking. In the second strategy we propose a modification of the counter geometry by replacing the mirrors with a planar diffusing surface and by displacing in a different way the photomultipliers. Tests at CERN with a 5GeV/c multiparticle beam revealed that both the strategies are able to increase significantly the number of the detected Cherenkov photons and, therefore, the detector performance.

  1. Ferromagnetic germanide in Ge nanowire transistors for spintronics application.

    PubMed

    Tang, Jianshi; Wang, Chiu-Yen; Hung, Min-Hsiu; Jiang, Xiaowei; Chang, Li-Te; He, Liang; Liu, Pei-Hsuan; Yang, Hong-Jie; Tuan, Hsing-Yu; Chen, Lih-Juann; Wang, Kang L

    2012-06-26

    To explore spintronics applications for Ge nanowire heterostructures formed by thermal annealing, it is critical to develop a ferromagnetic germanide with high Curie temperature and take advantage of the high-quality interface between Ge and the formed ferromagnetic germanide. In this work, we report, for the first time, the formation and characterization of Mn(5)Ge(3)/Ge/Mn(5)Ge(3) nanowire transistors, in which the room-temperature ferromagnetic germanide was found through the solid-state reaction between a single-crystalline Ge nanowire and Mn contact pads upon thermal annealing. The atomically clean interface between Mn(5)Ge(3) and Ge with a relatively small lattice mismatch of 10.6% indicates that Mn(5)Ge(3) is a high-quality ferromagnetic contact to Ge. Temperature-dependent I-V measurements on the Mn(5)Ge(3)/Ge/Mn(5)Ge(3) nanowire heterostructure reveal a Schottky barrier height of 0.25 eV for the Mn(5)Ge(3) contact to p-type Ge. The Ge nanowire field-effect transistors built on the Mn(5)Ge(3)/Ge/Mn(5)Ge(3) heterostructure exhibit a high-performance p-type behavior with a current on/off ratio close to 10(5), and a hole mobility of 150-200 cm(2)/(V s). Temperature-dependent resistance of a fully germanided Mn(5)Ge(3) nanowire shows a clear transition behavior near the Curie temperature of Mn(5)Ge(3) at about 300 K. Our findings of the high-quality room-temperature ferromagnetic Mn(5)Ge(3) contact represent a promising step toward electrical spin injection into Ge nanowires and thus the realization of high-efficiency spintronic devices for room-temperature applications.

  2. Development of a Gas Filled Magnet spectrometer coupled with the Lohengrin spectrometer for fission study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kessedjian, G.; Chebboubi, A.; Faust, H.; Köster, U.; Materna, T.; Sage, C.; Serot, O.

    2013-03-01

    The accurate knowledge of the fission of actinides is necessary for studies of innovative nuclear reactor concepts. The fission yields have a direct influence on the evaluation of the fuel inventory or the reactor residual power after shutdown. A collaboration between the ILL, LPSC and CEA has developed a measurement program on fission fragment distributions at ILL in order to measure the isotopic and isomeric yields. The method is illustrated using the 233U(n,f)98Y reaction. However, the extracted beam from the Lohengrin spectrometer is not isobaric ions which limits the low yield measurements. Presently, the coupling of the Lohengrin spectrometer with a Gas Filled Magnet (GFM) is studied at the ILL in order to define and validate the enhanced purification of the extracted beam. This work will present the results of the spectrometer characterisation, along with a comparison with a dedicated Monte Carlo simulation especially developed for this purpose.

  3. Pulsed laser deposited GeTe-rich GeTe-Sb2Te3 thin films

    PubMed Central

    Bouška, M.; Pechev, S.; Simon, Q.; Boidin, R.; Nazabal, V.; Gutwirth, J.; Baudet, E.; Němec, P.

    2016-01-01

    Pulsed laser deposition technique was used for the fabrication of Ge-Te rich GeTe-Sb2Te3 (Ge6Sb2Te9, Ge8Sb2Te11, Ge10Sb2Te13, and Ge12Sb2Te15) amorphous thin films. To evaluate the influence of GeTe content in the deposited films on physico-chemical properties of the GST materials, scanning electron microscopy with energy-dispersive X-ray analysis, X-ray diffraction and reflectometry, atomic force microscopy, Raman scattering spectroscopy, optical reflectivity, and sheet resistance temperature dependences as well as variable angle spectroscopic ellipsometry measurements were used to characterize as-deposited (amorphous) and annealed (crystalline) layers. Upon crystallization, optical functions and electrical resistance of the films change drastically, leading to large optical and electrical contrast between amorphous and crystalline phases. Large changes of optical/electrical properties are accompanied by the variations of thickness, density, and roughness of the films due to crystallization. Reflectivity contrast as high as ~0.21 at 405 nm was calculated for Ge8Sb2Te11, Ge10Sb2Te13, and Ge12Sb2Te15 layers. PMID:27199107

  4. Pulsed laser deposited GeTe-rich GeTe-Sb2Te3 thin films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bouška, M.; Pechev, S.; Simon, Q.; Boidin, R.; Nazabal, V.; Gutwirth, J.; Baudet, E.; Němec, P.

    2016-05-01

    Pulsed laser deposition technique was used for the fabrication of Ge-Te rich GeTe-Sb2Te3 (Ge6Sb2Te9, Ge8Sb2Te11, Ge10Sb2Te13, and Ge12Sb2Te15) amorphous thin films. To evaluate the influence of GeTe content in the deposited films on physico-chemical properties of the GST materials, scanning electron microscopy with energy-dispersive X-ray analysis, X-ray diffraction and reflectometry, atomic force microscopy, Raman scattering spectroscopy, optical reflectivity, and sheet resistance temperature dependences as well as variable angle spectroscopic ellipsometry measurements were used to characterize as-deposited (amorphous) and annealed (crystalline) layers. Upon crystallization, optical functions and electrical resistance of the films change drastically, leading to large optical and electrical contrast between amorphous and crystalline phases. Large changes of optical/electrical properties are accompanied by the variations of thickness, density, and roughness of the films due to crystallization. Reflectivity contrast as high as ~0.21 at 405 nm was calculated for Ge8Sb2Te11, Ge10Sb2Te13, and Ge12Sb2Te15 layers.

  5. Pulsed laser deposited GeTe-rich GeTe-Sb2Te3 thin films.

    PubMed

    Bouška, M; Pechev, S; Simon, Q; Boidin, R; Nazabal, V; Gutwirth, J; Baudet, E; Němec, P

    2016-01-01

    Pulsed laser deposition technique was used for the fabrication of Ge-Te rich GeTe-Sb2Te3 (Ge6Sb2Te9, Ge8Sb2Te11, Ge10Sb2Te13, and Ge12Sb2Te15) amorphous thin films. To evaluate the influence of GeTe content in the deposited films on physico-chemical properties of the GST materials, scanning electron microscopy with energy-dispersive X-ray analysis, X-ray diffraction and reflectometry, atomic force microscopy, Raman scattering spectroscopy, optical reflectivity, and sheet resistance temperature dependences as well as variable angle spectroscopic ellipsometry measurements were used to characterize as-deposited (amorphous) and annealed (crystalline) layers. Upon crystallization, optical functions and electrical resistance of the films change drastically, leading to large optical and electrical contrast between amorphous and crystalline phases. Large changes of optical/electrical properties are accompanied by the variations of thickness, density, and roughness of the films due to crystallization. Reflectivity contrast as high as ~0.21 at 405 nm was calculated for Ge8Sb2Te11, Ge10Sb2Te13, and Ge12Sb2Te15 layers. PMID:27199107

  6. Energy band alignment of atomic layer deposited HfO{sub 2} oxide film on epitaxial (100)Ge, (110)Ge, and (111)Ge layers

    SciTech Connect

    Hudait, Mantu K.; Zhu Yan

    2013-03-21

    Crystallographically oriented epitaxial Ge layers were grown on (100), (110), and (111)A GaAs substrates by in situ growth process using two separate molecular beam epitaxy chambers. The band alignment properties of atomic layer hafnium oxide (HfO{sub 2}) film deposited on crystallographically oriented epitaxial Ge were investigated using x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS). Valence band offset, {Delta}E{sub v} values of HfO{sub 2} relative to (100)Ge, (110)Ge, and (111)Ge orientations were 2.8 eV, 2.28 eV, and 2.5 eV, respectively. Using XPS data, variation in valence band offset, {Delta}E{sub V}(100)Ge>{Delta}E{sub V}(111)Ge>{Delta}E{sub V}(110)Ge, was obtained related to Ge orientation. Also, the conduction band offset, {Delta}E{sub c} relation, {Delta}E{sub c}(110)Ge>{Delta}E{sub c}(111)Ge>{Delta}E{sub c}(100)Ge related to Ge orientations was obtained using the measured bandgap of HfO{sub 2} on each orientation and with the Ge bandgap of 0.67 eV. These band offset parameters for carrier confinement would offer an important guidance to design Ge-based p- and n-channel metal-oxide field-effect transistor for low-power application.

  7. I8As21Ge25

    PubMed Central

    Ayouz, Katia; Kars, Mohammed; Rebbah, Allaoua; Rebbah, Houria

    2009-01-01

    Single crystals of octaiodine henacosarsenic pentacosagermanium were grown by chemical transport reactions. The structure is isotypic with the analogous clathrates-I. In this structure, the statistically occupied clathrand atoms (As,Ge)46 form bonds in a distorted tetra­hedral coordination and their arrangement can define two polyhedra of different sizes; one is an (As,Ge)20 penta­gonal dodeca­hedron, and the other is an (As,Ge)24 tetra­kaideca­hedron. The guest atom (iodine) resides inside these polyhedra with site symmetry m3 (Wyckoff position 2a) and 2m (Wyckoff position 6d), respectively. PMID:21582033

  8. Thermal conductivity of sputtered amorphous Ge films

    SciTech Connect

    Zhan, Tianzhuo; Xu, Yibin; Goto, Masahiro; Tanaka, Yoshihisa; Kato, Ryozo; Sasaki, Michiko; Kagawa, Yutaka

    2014-02-15

    We measured the thermal conductivity of amorphous Ge films prepared by magnetron sputtering. The thermal conductivity was significantly higher than the value predicted by the minimum thermal conductivity model and increased with deposition temperature. We found that variations in sound velocity and Ge film density were not the main factors in the high thermal conductivity. Fast Fourier transform patterns of transmission electron micrographs revealed that short-range order in the Ge films was responsible for their high thermal conductivity. The results provide experimental evidences to understand the underlying nature of the variation of phonon mean free path in amorphous solids.

  9. Spectrometers for RF breakdown studies for CLIC

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jacewicz, M.; Ziemann, V.; Ekelöf, T.; Dubrovskiy, A.; Ruber, R.

    2016-08-01

    An e+e- collider of several TeV energy will be needed for the precision studies of any new physics discovered at the LHC collider at CERN. One promising candidate is CLIC, a linear collider which is based on a two-beam acceleration scheme that efficiently solves the problem of power distribution to the acceleration structures. The phenomenon that currently prevents achieving high accelerating gradients in high energy accelerators such as the CLIC is the electrical breakdown at very high electrical field. The ongoing experimental work within the CLIC collaboration is trying to benchmark the theoretical models focusing on the physics of vacuum breakdown which is responsible for the discharges. In order to validate the feasibility of accelerating structures and observe the characteristics of the vacuum discharges and their eroding effects on the structure two dedicated spectrometers are now commissioned at the high-power test-stands at CERN. First, the so called Flashbox has opened up a possibility for non-invasive studies of the emitted breakdown currents during two-beam acceleration experiments. It gives a unique possibility to measure the energy of electrons and ions in combination with the arrival time spectra and to put that in context with accelerated beam, which is not possible at any of the other existing test-stands. The second instrument, a spectrometer for detection of the dark and breakdown currents, is operated at one of the 12 GHz stand-alone test-stands at CERN. Built for high repetition rate operation it can measure the spatial and energy distributions of the electrons emitted from the acceleration structure during a single RF pulse. Two new analysis tools: discharge impedance tracking and tomographic image reconstruction, applied to the data from the spectrometer make possible for the first time to obtain the location of the breakdown inside the structure both in the transversal and longitudinal direction thus giving a more complete picture of the

  10. Metrology for terahertz time-domain spectrometers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Molloy, John F.; Naftaly, Mira

    2015-12-01

    In recent years the terahertz time-domain spectrometer (THz TDS) [1] has emerged as a key measurement device for spectroscopic investigations in the frequency range of 0.1-5 THz. To date, almost every type of material has been studied using THz TDS, including semiconductors, ceramics, polymers, metal films, liquid crystals, glasses, pharmaceuticals, DNA molecules, proteins, gases, composites, foams, oils, and many others. Measurements with a TDS are made in the time domain; conversion from the time domain data to a frequency spectrum is achieved by applying the Fourier Transform, calculated numerically using the Fast Fourier Transform (FFT) algorithm. As in many other types of spectrometer, THz TDS requires that the sample data be referenced to similarly acquired data with no sample present. Unlike frequency-domain spectrometers which detect light intensity and measure absorption spectra, a TDS records both amplitude and phase information, and therefore yields both the absorption coefficient and the refractive index of the sample material. The analysis of the data from THz TDS relies on the assumptions that: a) the frequency scale is accurate; b) the measurement of THz field amplitude is linear; and c) that the presence of the sample does not affect the performance characteristics of the instrument. The frequency scale of a THz TDS is derived from the displacement of the delay line; via FFT, positioning errors may give rise to frequency errors that are difficult to quantify. The measurement of the field amplitude in a THz TDS is required to be linear with a dynamic range of the order of 10 000. And attention must be given to the sample positioning and handling in order to avoid sample-related errors.

  11. A Micro-Opto-Mechanical Photoacoustic Spectrometer

    SciTech Connect

    Kotovsky, J

    2008-10-17

    This report describes progress achieved in a one-year LDRD feasibility study of a Photo Acoustic Spectrometer (PAS). Specifically, this team sought to create an all-optical and very small PhotoAcoustic Spectrometer Sensing system (PASS system). The PASS system includes all the hardware needed within a gas environment to analyze the presence of a large variety of molecules. The all-optical PASS system requires only two optical-fibers to communicate with the opto-electronic power and readout systems that exist outside of the gas environment. These systems can be at any distance from the PASS system as signal loss through the optical fibers is very small. The PASS system is intended to be placed in a small space where gases need to be measured and thus must be very small. The size and all-optical constraints placed on the PASS system demand a new design. The PASS system design includes a novel acoustic chamber, optical sensor, power fiber coupling and sensing fiber coupling. Our collaborators at the Atomic Weapons Establishment (AWE) have proven the capabilities of a complete photoacoustic spectrometer that uses a macro-scale PASS system (first 2 references). It was our goal to miniaturize the PASS system and turn it into an all-optical system to allow for its use in confined spaces that prohibit electrical devices. This goal demanded the study of all the system components, selection of an appropriate optical readout system and the design and integration of the optical sensor to the PASS system. A stretch goal was to fabricate a completed PASS system prototype.

  12. The 8-18 GHz radar spectrometer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bush, T. F.; Ulaby, F. T.

    1973-01-01

    The design, construction, testing, and accuracy of an 8-18 GHz radar spectrometer, an FM-CW system which employs a dual antenna system, is described. The antennas, transmitter, and a portion of the receiver are mounted at the top of a 26 meter hydraulic boom which is in turn mounted on a truck for system mobility. HH and VV polarized measurements are possible at incidence angles ranging from 0 deg. to 80 deg. Calibration is accomplished by referencing the measurements against a Luneberg lens of known radar cross section.

  13. The Apollo 17 far ultraviolet spectrometer experiment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fastie, W. G.

    1972-01-01

    The Apollo 17 command service module in lunar orbit will carry a far ultraviolet scanning spectrometer whose prime mission will be to measure the composition of the lunar atmosphere. Additional observations will include the spectral lunar albedo, the temporary atmosphere injected by the engines of the lunar exploration module, the solar system atmosphere, the galactic atmosphere and the spectra of astronomical sources, including the earth. A detailed description of the experimental equipment which observes the spectral range 1180 to 1680 A, the observing program and broad speculation about the possible results of the experiment, are presented.

  14. AFE ion mass spectrometer design study

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wright, Willie

    1989-01-01

    This final technical report covers the activities engaged in by the University of Texas at Dallas, Center for Space Sciences in conjunction with the NASA Langley Research Center, Systems Engineering Division in design studies directed towards defining a suitable ion mass spectrometer to determine the plasma parameter around the Aeroassisted Flight Experiment vehicle during passage through the earth's upper atmosphere. Additional studies relate to the use of a Langmuir probe to measure windward ion/electron concentrations and temperatures. Selected instrument inlet subsystems were tested in the NASA Ames Arc-Jet Facility.

  15. MPS (Multiparticle Spectrometer) data acquisition software system

    SciTech Connect

    Saulys, A.C.; Etkin, A.; Foley, K.J.; Hackenburg, R.W.; Longacre, R.S.; Love, W.A.; Morris, T.W.; Platner, E.D.; Lindenbaum, S.J.; Chan, C.S.

    1989-04-04

    A description of the software for a FASTBUS based data acquisition system in use at the Brookhaven National Laboratory Multiparticle Spectrometer is presented. Data reading and formatting is done by the SLAC Scanner Processors (SSP's) resident in the FASTBUS system. A multiprocess software system on VAX computers is used to communicate with the SSP's, record the data, and monitor on-line the progress of high energy and heavy ion experiments. The structure and the performance of this system are discussed. 4 refs., 1 fig.

  16. Comparison of properties of digital spectrometer systems.

    PubMed

    Mazanova, Monika; Dryak, Pavel; Kovar, Petr; Auerbach, Pavel

    2014-05-01

    We have tested two digital spectrometer systems, the DSP 9660 and Lynx(®) modules, connected to a HPGe detector. Lynx(®) is a fully integrated 32K channel signal analyzer based on digital signal processing techniques, which offers advanced digital stabilization. The model DSP 9660 digitalizes the signal directly at a very high sampling rate. The evaluated properties were integral nonlinearity, differential linearity, channel profiles, resolution and throughput. We found that the DSP system has slightly inferior resolution and throughput in comparison with the Lynx(®) system.

  17. Ion mobility spectrometer with virtual aperture grid

    DOEpatents

    Pfeifer, Kent B.; Rumpf, Arthur N.

    2010-11-23

    An ion mobility spectrometer does not require a physical aperture grid to prevent premature ion detector response. The last electrodes adjacent to the ion collector (typically the last four or five) have an electrode pitch that is less than the width of the ion swarm and each of the adjacent electrodes is connected to a source of free charge, thereby providing a virtual aperture grid at the end of the drift region that shields the ion collector from the mirror current of the approaching ion swarm. The virtual aperture grid is less complex in assembly and function and is less sensitive to vibrations than the physical aperture grid.

  18. Photoacoustic Soot Spectrometer (PASS) Instrument Handbook

    SciTech Connect

    Dubey, M; Springston, S; Koontz, A; Aiken, A

    2013-01-17

    The photoacoustic soot spectrometer (PASS) measures light absorption by aerosol particles. As the particles pass through a laser beam, the absorbed energy heats the particles and in turn the surrounding air, which sets off a pressure wave that can be detected by a microphone. The PASS instruments deployed by ARM can also simultaneously measure the scattered laser light at three wavelengths and therefore provide a direct measure of the single-scattering albedo. The Operator Manual for the PASS-3100 is included here with the permission of Droplet Measurement Technologies, the instrument’s manufacturer.

  19. Micro-optical-mechanical system photoacoustic spectrometer

    DOEpatents

    Kotovsky, Jack; Benett, William J.; Tooker, Angela C.; Alameda, Jennifer B.

    2013-01-01

    All-optical photoacoustic spectrometer sensing systems (PASS system) and methods include all the hardware needed to analyze the presence of a large variety of materials (solid, liquid and gas). Some of the all-optical PASS systems require only two optical-fibers to communicate with the opto-electronic power and readout systems that exist outside of the material environment. Methods for improving the signal-to-noise are provided and enable mirco-scale systems and methods for operating such systems.

  20. Lead Slowing Down Spectrometer Status Report

    SciTech Connect

    Warren, Glen A.; Anderson, Kevin K.; Bonebrake, Eric; Casella, Andrew M.; Danon, Yaron; Devlin, M.; Gavron, Victor A.; Haight, R. C.; Imel, G. R.; Kulisek, Jonathan A.; O'Donnell, J. M.; Weltz, Adam

    2012-06-07

    This report documents the progress that has been completed in the first half of FY2012 in the MPACT-funded Lead Slowing Down Spectrometer project. Significant progress has been made on the algorithm development. We have an improve understanding of the experimental responses in LSDS for fuel-related material. The calibration of the ultra-depleted uranium foils was completed, but the results are inconsistent from measurement to measurement. Future work includes developing a conceptual model of an LSDS system to assay plutonium in used fuel, improving agreement between simulations and measurement, design of a thorium fission chamber, and evaluation of additional detector techniques.