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Sample records for 4s giant resonance

  1. The Electric Giant Resonances

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    van der Woude, A.

    The following sections are included: * Introduction * Experimental Methods to Study Giant Resonances * Introduction * The Tools * Introduction * Tools for Isoscalar Scattering * INELASTIC α-SCATTERING * INELASTIC PROTON SCATTERING * Tools for Isovector Excitations * γ-ABSORPTION AND PARTICLE CAPTURE REACTIONS * CHARGE EXCHANGE REACTIONS - THE (π+, π0) REACTION * Tools For Isoscalar And Isovector Excitations * INELASTIC ELECTRON SCATTERING * GIANT RESONANCE EXCITATION BY FAST HEAVY IONS * From Multipole Cross Section To Multipole Strength * The Electric Isoscalar Resonances * The Isoscalar Giant Monopole Resonance * Systematics on the GMR * Compressibility and the Giant Monopole Resonance * Introduction * The Compressibility of nuclear matter from the GMR energies * Discussion * The Isoscalar Giant Quadrupole Resonance * General Trends In Medium-Heavy and Heavy Nuclei * The GQR In Light Nuclei * The Isoscalar 3- Strength, LEOR and HEOR * Isoscalar 4+ Strength * Miscellaneous; Isoscalar 1- and L > 4-Strength * The Electric Isovector Giant Resonances * The Isovector Giant Dipole Resonance: GDR * The Isovector Giant Monopole Resonances: IVGMR * The Isovector Quadrupole Resonance: IVGQR * The Effect of Ground State Deformation on the Shape of Giant Resonance: Microscopic Picture * Giant Resonances Built on Excited States * Introduction * Capture Reactions on Light Nuclei * Statistical decay of GDR γ Emission in Heavy Compound Systems * Introduction * Theoretical Predictions * Some Experimental Results * Summary and Outlook * Acknowledgements * General References * References

  2. Giant resonances: Progress, new directions, new challenges

    SciTech Connect

    Bertrand, J.R.; Beene, J.R.

    1989-01-01

    A review of some recent developments in the field of giant multipole resonances is presented. Particular emphasis is placed on directions that the authors feel will be followed in this field during the next several years. In particular, the use of high-energy heavy ions to excite the giant resonances is shown to provide exciting new capabilities for giant resonance studies. Among subjects covered are: Coulomb excitation of giant resonances, photon decay of giant resonances, the recent controversy over the identity of the giant monopole resonance, the most recent value for incompressibility of nuclear matter from analysis of giant monopole data, the isospin character of the 63 A/sup /minus/1/3/ GQR, agreement between (e,e/prime/) and (hadron, hadron/prime/) excitation of the giant quadrupole resonance, prospects for multiphonon giant resonance observation, and isolation of the isovector giant quadrupole resonance. 55 refs., 23 figs., 4 tabs.

  3. Giant resonances of endohedral atoms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Amusia, M. Ya.; Baltenkov, A. S.; Chernysheva, L. V.

    2008-04-01

    It is demonstrated for the first time that the effect of a fullerene shell on the photoionization of a “caged” atom in an endohedral can result in the formation of giant endohedral resonances or GER. This is illustrated by the concrete case of the Xe@C60 photoionization cross section that, at 17 eV, exhibits a powerful resonance with total oscillator strengths of about 25. The prominent modification of the 5 p 6 electron photoionization cross section of Xe@C60 takes place due to the strong fullerene shell polarization under the action of the incoming electromagnetic wave and the oscillation of this cross section due to the reflection of the photoelectron from Xe by the C60. These two factors transform the smoothly decreasing 5 p 6 cross section of Xe into a rather complex curve with a powerful maximum for Xe@C60, with the oscillator strength of it being equal to 25. We also present the results for the dipole angular anisotropy parameter that is strongly affected by the reflection of the photoelectron waves, but not modified by C60 polarization.

  4. Giant resonances of endohedral atoms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Amusia, M. Ya.; Baltenkov, Arkadiy; Chernysheva, Larissa

    2008-05-01

    We demonstrate for that the effect of fullerene shell upon photoionization of the ``caged'' atom in an endohedral can result in formation of Giant Endohedral Resonances or GER. This is illustrated by the concrete case of Xe@C60 photoionization cross-section that exhibits at 17 eV a powerful resonance with total oscillator strengths of about 25. The prominent modification of the 5p^6 electron photoionization cross-section of Xe@C60 takes place due to strong fullerene shell polarization under the action of the incoming electromagnetic wave and oscillation of this cross-section due to the reflection of the photoelectron from Xe by the C60. These two factors transform the smoothly decreasing 5p^6 cross-section of Xe into a rather complex curve with a powerful maximum for Xe@C60, with the oscillator strength of it being equal to 25! We present also the results for the dipole angular anisotropy parameter that is strongly affected by the reflection of the photoelectron waves but not modified by C60 polarization.

  5. Isoscalar giant resonances in {sup 48}Ca

    SciTech Connect

    Lui, Y.-W.; Youngblood, D. H.; Shlomo, S.; Chen, X.; Tokimoto, Y.; Krishichayan,; Anders, M.; Button, J.

    2011-04-15

    The giant resonance region from 9.5 MeV < E{sub x} < 40 MeV in {sup 48}Ca has been studied with inelastic scattering of 240-MeV {alpha} particles at small angles, including 0 deg. 95{sub -15}{sup +11}% of E0 energy-weighted sum rule (EWSR), 83{sub -16}{sup +10}% of E2 EWSR, and 137 {+-} 20% of E1 EWSR were located below E{sub x}=40 MeV. A comparison of the experimental data with calculated results for the isoscalar giant monopole resonance, obtained within the mean-field-based random-phase approximation, is also given.

  6. Giant infantile gliosarcoma: magnetic resonance imaging findings.

    PubMed

    Sanal, Hatice Tuba; Bulakbasi, Nail; Kocaoglu, Murat; Onguru, Onder; Chen, Lina

    2008-08-01

    Gliosarcoma is an uncommon variant of glioblastoma multiforme, which is composed of gliomatous and sarcomatous elements. The tumor is rarely encountered in childhood. This case report presents the magnetic resonance imaging characteristics of a giant gliosarcoma in a 3-year-old girl. Size and location of the tumor are described.

  7. a Survey of Giant Resonance Excitations with 200 Mev Protons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tinsley, James Royce

    The giant resonance region in ('60)Ni, ('90)Zr, ('120)Sn, and ('208)Pb has been studied using inelastic scattering of 200 MeV protons. Angular distributions were obtained for the giant quadrupole resonance, giant octupole resonance, and for the combined giant dipole and giant monopole resonance between 4 and 20 degrees. The 2(H/2PI)(omega) component of the giant hexadecapole resonance has been directly observed for the first time in ('208)Pb. In the other nuclei, upper limits on the amount of hexadecapole strength contained within the giant quadrupole resonance have been obtained. Peaks are observed in ('60)Ni and ('90)Zr that are consistent with recently reported M1 states. Discrepancies between sum rules extracted from this data and from previous work are discussed. Possible explanations include DWBA breakdown or difficulties in estimating the magnitude of the continuum. Systematics obtained for the giant resonances are compared to earlier work.

  8. Dynamical Coupling of Pygmy and Giant Resonances

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bertulani, Carlos; Brady, Nathan; Aumann, Thomas; Thomas, James

    2016-03-01

    One of the effects overseen in studies of excitation of pygmy resonances is the fact that both pygmy and giant resonances are strongly coupled. This coupling leads to dynamical effects such as the modification of transition probabilities and and cross sections. We make an assessment of such effects by means of the relativistic coupled channels equations developed by our group. Supported by the U.S. NSF Grant No. 1415656 and the U.S. DOE Grant No. DE-FG02-08ER41533.

  9. Thermal effects on isoscalar giant resonance energies in hot nuclei

    SciTech Connect

    Wen, W.; Dai, G.; Jin, G.

    1995-07-01

    The thermal effects on the energies of the isoscalar giant multipole resonances of hot nuclei are discussed and an approximate formula for the energy as a function of temperature is derived via a hydrodynamic theory. The energy difference between the isoscalar giant multipole resonance of a hot nucleus and its ground-state resonance depends on the competition between the volume expansion and the increase of the average kinetic energy per nucleon of hot nuclei, which lower and raise the resonance energy, respectively, and nearly counteract each other in magnitude. The variaiton of the isoscalar giant resonance energy with temperature is very small.

  10. Pion production via isobar giant resonance formation and decay

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Townsend, L. W.; Deutchman, P. A.; Madigan, R. L.; Norbury, J. W.

    1984-01-01

    A spin, isotopic-spin formalism for the production of pions due to decays of isobar giant resonances formed in peripheral heavy-ion collisions is presented. The projectile nucleus isobar giant resonance state is assumed to coherently form and then incoherently decay to produce the pions. Total spin and isotopic spin for the system are conserved through the concomitant excitation of the target nucleus to an isobaric analog giant resonance state. Comparisons of the predicted total pion cross sections, over a range of energies, are made with heavy-ion pion data.

  11. Isoscalar giant resonance strength in {sup 28}Si

    SciTech Connect

    Youngblood, D. H.; Lui, Y.-W.; Clark, H. L.

    2007-08-15

    Data taken previously covering the giant resonance region from 9 MeV giant resonance peaks containing 74 {+-} 7% of the isoscalar E0 energy weighted sum rule (EWSR), 102 {+-} 11% of the E2 EWSR, and 84 {+-} 8% of the E3 EWSR were identified.

  12. Internal Pair Decay of Giant Resonances in Hot LEAD-200.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Adami, Susan

    Electron-positron pairs emitted during the de -excitation of the hot ^{200}Pb were detected with the Stony Brook pair detector, a phoswich array, in order to observe the internal pair decay of giant resonances (GR) built on excited states. These collective excitations are particularly well defined in heavy nuclei, and the full GR sum rule had been found in the ground state excitations of both the giant dipole resonance and the isoscalar monopole resonance. The excited compound nucleus was formed by bombarding a ^{181} Ta target with a 95 MeV pulsed ^ {19}F beam. While the gamma-decay from giant resonances of multipolarities L >=q 1 results in cross-sections 3-4 orders of magnitudes bigger than the internal pair decay, the decay of giant monopole resonances via a collective E0 transition can only be observed in the e^+ - e^ --decay channel. Another advantage of investigating electro-magnetic transitions via the pair decay channel is the fact that the correlation angle (and also the energy sharing) between the electron and the positron provides insight in the multipolarity of the observed transition. Especially the angular correlation distribution of an L = 0 transition is easily distinguished from the L >=q 1 cases. In the data analysis, the pair spectra were compared to calculations using the statistical model code CASCADE, which was modified to include the internal pair decay of giant resonances from the compound nucleus as well as from the fission fragments. In addition, gamma measurements from the same reaction at a comparable excitation energy (93 MeV) were available. The extracted pair spectra confirmed the CASCADE prediction that the giant dipole resonance dominates the pair decay from a hot, heavy nucleus. Superior statistics would be necessary in order to extract weaker modes like the monopole or quadrupole resonances and due to the lack in statistics this work can only offer a rough estimate for the width and position of the isoscalar giant monopole

  13. Giant dipole resonance parameters with uncertainties from photonuclear cross sections

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Plujko, V. A.; Capote, R.; Gorbachenko, O. M.

    2011-09-01

    Updated values and corresponding uncertainties of isovector giant dipole resonance (IVGDR or GDR) model parameters are presented that are obtained by the least-squares fitting of theoretical photoabsorption cross sections to experimental data. The theoretical photoabsorption cross section is taken as a sum of the components corresponding to excitation of the GDR and quasideuteron contribution to the experimental photoabsorption cross section. The present compilation covers experimental data as of January 2010.

  14. Isoscalar giant resonance strength in {sup 24}Mg

    SciTech Connect

    Youngblood, D. H.; Lui, Y.-W.; Chen, X. F.; Clark, H. L.

    2009-12-15

    The giant resonance region from 9 MeV

  15. Isobar giant resonance formation in self-conjugate nuclei

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Townsend, L. W.; Deutchman, P. A.

    1981-03-01

    The production of isobars with concomitant giant resonance excitations due to peripheral collisions of relativistic heavy ions is investigated. The interaction is described by a modified form of the central term in the one-pion-exchange potential (OPEP) where the projectile ordinary spin operator is replaced by a transition spin operator which describes the creation of an isobar from a nucleon. The scattering is analyzed using time-dependent harmonic perturbation theory to determine the reaction total cross sections. The results obtained, which are valid for reactions involving self-conjugate nuclei, are applied to the specific collison of 2.1 {GeV}/{nucleon}16O projectiles with 12C targets at rest. Cross sections are investigated using two different models for the nuclear spin states. In the first model, the many-body nuclear spin state is reduced, in the spirit of a particle-hole state, to an equivalent two-body state called a particle-core state. In the second model, the many-body spin states are described by unsymmetrized products of individual particle spins. Properties of the spin giant resonance and isobar giant resonance states are investigated. Finally, isobar decay and isobar/pion absorption effects are discussed.

  16. Giant resonances in {sup 112}Sn and {sup 124}Sn: Isotopic dependence of monopole resonance energies

    SciTech Connect

    Lui, Y.-W.; Youngblood, D.H.; Tokimoto, Y.; Clark, H.L.; John, B.

    2004-07-01

    The giant resonance region from 10 MeVgiant monopole resonance energies was found to be consistent with relativistic and nonrelativistic calculations for interactions with K{sub NM}{approx}220-240 MeV.

  17. Crystal ball studies of giant resonance gamma decay

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Beene, J. R.; Bertrand, F. E.; Halbert, M. L.

    1985-01-01

    We have carried out coincidence experiments to investigate the photon and neutron emission from the giant resonance region in 208Pb and 90Zr using the ORNL Spin Spectrometer, a 72-segment NaI detector system. States in 208Pb and 90Zr were excited by inelastic scattering of 380-MeV 17O. We have determined the total gamma-decay probability, the ground-state gamma branching ratio, and the branching ratios to a number of low-lying stats as a function of excitation energy in 208Pb to ˜15 MeV. Especially interesting observations include the absence of a significant branch from the giant quadrupole resonance to the 3- state at 2.6 MeV, a strong branch from this resonance to a 3- state at 4.9 MeV, and the dominance of decays to various 1- states at 5-7 MeV from the region around 14 MeV of excitation (E0 resonances). Comparable but less complete data were also obtained on 90Zr.

  18. Enhancement of Giant Magento-Impedance Effect Using LC Resonance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Z. M.; Zhao, Z. J.; Liu, L. P.; Lin, H.; Cheng, J. K.; Yang, J. X.; Yang, X. L.

    In this study, resonance enhancement of giant magneto-impedance (GMI) effect in Fe-based Fe73.5Cu1Nb3Si13.5B9 glass-coated microwires was investigated. A new method was adopted by sputtering a copper layer in the outside of the Fe-based glass-coated wire. A capacitance forms between the ferromagnetic core and outer copper layer, where the glass insulator works as a dielectric layer. Therefore, the composite wire forms an LC resonance circuit (which consists of an inductor, represented by the letter L, and a capacitor, presented by the letter C) itself, resulting in an increase of GMI ratio from 250% to 330%. Meanwhile, the influence of resonance frequency on the GMI effect was discussed.

  19. Giant M1 resonance in /sup 140/Ce

    SciTech Connect

    Laszewski, R.M.; Rullhusen, P.; Hoblit, S.D.; LeBrun, S.F.

    1986-11-01

    Highly polarized tagged photons were used to measure the distribution of M1 transition strength in /sup 140/Ce at excitations between 6.7 and 8.7 MeV. A strength of summationgGAMMA/sub 0//sup 2/(M1)/GAMMA = 11.2/sub -3.1/ /sup +4.5/ eV corresponding to a B(M1up-arrow) of about 7.5..mu../sub 0//sup 2/ was observed centered at an excitation of 7.95 MeV. This distribution of M1 strength can account for the giant magnetic dipole resonance predicted in /sup 140/Ce.

  20. Excitation-energy dependence of the giant dipole resonance width

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Enders, G.; Berg, F. D.; Hagel, K.; Kühn, W.; Metag, V.; Novotny, R.; Pfeiffer, M.; Schwalb, O.; Charity, R. J.; Gobbi, A.; Freifelder, R.; Henning, W.; Hildenbrand, K. D.; Holzmann, R.; Mayer, R. S.; Simon, R. S.; Wessels, J. P.; Casini, G.; Olmi, A.; Stefanini, A. A.

    1992-07-01

    High-energy γ rays have been measured in coincidence with heavy fragents in deeply inelastic reactions of 136Xe+48Ti at 18.5 MeV/nucleon. The giant dipole resonance (GDR) strength function is deduced from an analysis of the photon spectra within the statistical model. The GDR width Γ is studied as a function of the fragment excitation energy E*. A saturation at about Γ=10 MeV is observed for E*/A>=1.0 MeV/nucleon.

  1. Analytical model of a giant magnetostrictive resonance transducer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sheykholeslami, M.; Hojjat, Y.; Ansari, S.; Cinquemani, S.; Ghodsi, M.

    2016-04-01

    Resonance transducers have been widely developed and studied, as they can be profitably used in many application such as liquid atomizing and sonar technology. The active element of these devices can be a giant magnetostrictive material (GMM) that is known to have significant energy density and good performance at high frequencies. The paper introduces an analytical model of GMM transducers to describe their dynamics in different working conditions and to predict any change in their performance. The knowledge of the transducer behavior, especially in operating conditions different from the ideal ones, is helpful in the design and fabrication of highly efficient devices. This transducer is design to properly work in its second mode of vibration and its working frequency is around 8000 Hz. Most interesting parameters of the device, such as quality factor, bandwidth and output strain are obtained from theoretical analysis.

  2. Giant resonances in {sup 46,48}Ti

    SciTech Connect

    Tokimoto, Y.; Lui, Y.-W.; Clark, H. L.; John, B.; Chen, X.; Youngblood, D. H.

    2006-10-15

    The giant resonance region from 9 MeV

  3. Role of pairing in the description of giant monopole resonances

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Avogadro, Paolo; Bertulani, Carlos A.

    2013-10-01

    We compare the results obtained in the framework of the quasiparticle random-phase approximation on top of a Hartree-Fock-Bogoliubov with the most recent experiments on giant monopole resonances in Pb, Sn, Zr, Sm, Mo, and Cd. Our calculations are fully self-consistent and the density dependence of pairing interactions is, for the first time in this framework, properly taken into account. In the particle-hole (ph) channel we employ different Skyrme functionals (SLy5, SkM* and Skxs20) while in the particle-particle (pp) channel we make use of density-dependent contact interactions. We introduce in the pp channel the recently proposed contact interactions which take into account the neutron-proton asymmetry. We find that no single parametrization is able to reproduce with sufficient accuracy all the nuclei. Since about two-thirds of the nuclei under investigation are better explained with a soft parametrization, this tends to suggest that the currently accepted picture for the incompressibility might require modifications.

  4. Photon scattering studies of the giant dipole resonance in medium weight nuclei

    SciTech Connect

    Bowles, T.J.; Holt, R.J.; Jackson, H.E.; Laszewski, R.M.; McKeown, R.D.; Nathan, A.M.; Specht, J.R.

    1981-11-01

    Quasimonochromatic photons have been used to measure elastic and inelastic photon scattering cross sections in the giant dipole resonance region of /sup 52/Cr, Fe, /sup 60/Ni, /sup 92/Mo, and /sup 96/Mo in an experiment in which the elastic and inelastic scattering are resolved. The elastic scattering cross sections show clear evidence for isospin splitting of the giant dipole resonance. The inelastic scattering to low-lying vibrational levels, which is a measure of the coupling between the giant dipole resonance and collective surface vibrations, is in qualitative agreement with the predictions of the dynamic collective model. However, when examined in detail, this model does not provide an adequate description of the scattering data.

  5. Excitation and photon decay of giant multipole resonances - the role and future of medium-energy heavy ions

    SciTech Connect

    Bertrand, F.E.; Beene, J.R.; Horen, D.J.

    1988-01-01

    Inelastic scattering of medium energy heavy ions provides very large cross sections and peak-to-continuum ratios for excitation of giant resonances. For energies above about 50 MeV/nucleon, giant resonances are excited primarily through Coulomb excitation, which is indifferent to isospin, thus providing a good probe for the study of isovector giant resonances. The extremely large cross sections available from heavy ion excitation permit the study of rare decay modes of the photon decay of giant resonances following excitation by 22 and 84 MeV/nucleon /sup 17/O projectiles. The singles results at 84 MeV/nucleon yield peak cross sections for the isoscalar giant quadrupole resonance and the isovector giant dipole resonance of approximately 0.8 and 3 barns/sr, respectively. Data on the ground state decay of the isoscalar giant quadrupole and isovector giant dipole resonances are presented and compared with calculations. Decays to low-lying excited states are also discussed. Preliminary results from an experiment to isolate the /sup 208/Pb isovector quadrupole resonance using its gamma decay are presented.

  6. Relativistic effects on giant resonances in electron-impact double ionization

    SciTech Connect

    Pindzola, M.S.

    1987-06-01

    The electron-impact double-ionization cross section for Fr/sup +/ is calculated in the distorted-wave Born approximation. A giant resonance in the 5d subshell ionization-autoionization contribution to the cross section is found to be quite sensitive to changes in the double-well potential caused by relativistic effects on bound-state wave functions.

  7. The Isoscalar Giant Dipole Resonance in {sup 20}Pb, {sup 90}Zr and the Nuclear Compressibility

    SciTech Connect

    Yildirim, Serbulent; Koeroglu, Ulas

    2008-11-11

    The isoscalar giant dipol resonance (ISGDR) in finite nuclei is studied within the framework of a relativistic transport approach. The excitation energies of spherical {sup 90}Zr and {sup 208}Pb nuclei are obtained for different quantum hydrodynamical Lagrangian parametrization. The sensitivity of ISGDR excitation energy on the nuclear bulk to surface properties are also investigated.

  8. Coupled-Channel Models of Direct-Semidirect Capture via Giant-Dipole Resonances

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thompson, I. J.; Escher, J. E.; Arbanas, G.

    2014-04-01

    Semidirect capture, a two-step process that excites a giant-dipole resonance followed by its radiative de-excitation, is a dominant process near giant-dipole resonances, that is, for incoming neutron energies within 5-20 MeV. At lower energies such processes may affect neutron capture rates that are relevant to astrophysical nucleosynthesis models. We implement a semidirect capture model in the coupled-channel reaction code Fresco and validate it by comparing the cross section for direct-semidirect capture 208Pb(n,γ)209Pb to experimental data. We also investigate the effect of low-energy electric dipole strength in the pygmy resonance. We use a conventional single-particle direct-semidirect capture code Cupido for comparison. Furthermore, we present and discuss our results for direct-semidirect capture reaction 130Sn(n,γ)131Sn, the cross section of which is known to have a significant effect on nucleosynthesis models.

  9. Coupled-Channel Models of Direct-Semidirect Capture via Giant-Dipole Resonances

    SciTech Connect

    Thompson, I J; Escher, Jutta E; Arbanas, Goran

    2013-01-01

    Semidirect capture, a two-step process that excites a giant-dipole resonance followed by its radiative de-excitation, is a dominant process near giant-dipole resonances, that is, for incoming neutron energies within 5 20 MeV. At lower energies such processes may affect neutron capture rates that are relevant to astrophysical nucleosynthesis models. We implement a semidirect capture model in the coupled-channel reaction code Fresco and validate it by comparing the cross section for direct-semidirect capture 208Pb(n,g)209Pb to experimental data. We also investigate the effect of low-energy electric dipole strength in the pygmy resonance. We use a conventional single-particle direct-semidirect capture code Cupido for comparison. Furthermore, we present and discuss our results for direct-semidirect capture reaction 130Sn(n,g)131Sn, the cross section of which is known to have a significant effect on nucleosynthesis models.

  10. Giant resonance tuning of micro and nanomechanical oscillators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vitorino, Miguel V.; Carpentier, Simon; Panzarella, Alain; Rodrigues, Mario S.; Costa, Luca

    2015-01-01

    We present a method to tune the resonance frequency and the Q-factor of micro and nano-metric mechanical oscillators. A counteracting loop drives a capacitive force applied to the oscillator. The proportional and differential gains are used to shift the resonance frequency up to 75% and to tune the Q-factor of the oscillator, by changing its effective stiffness and damping ratio. The oscillator position is monitored in a large bandwidth with a fiber-optic based interferometer. We applied this simple operational scheme with different oscillators for modifying easily their dynamical properties. Compared to alternative methods requiring external fields, our method can either increase or decrease the resonance frequency in a frequency range much more extended. This opens up a wide range of applications, from force sensors with extremely low elastic constants but high quality factor to tunable energy harvesters or to high-frequency tuning of radio frequency filters. The control scheme can work in different media, and is then suitable to be applied to biological sensors and actuators.

  11. Recent results on giant dipole resonance decays in highly excited nuclei

    SciTech Connect

    Snover, K.A.

    1991-01-01

    Some recent results on Giant Dipole Resonance (GDR) decays in highly excited, equilibrated nuclei, are discussed based primarily on work done at Seattle. Four sections address the following topics: oblate shapes of rotating, highly excited Zr--Mo nuclei; adiabatic versus motionally narrowed' GDR decay; large spin-driven deformations observed in hot medium-mass nuclei; and search for entrance channel effects in GDR decay following [sup 58]Ni [plus] [sup 92]Zr fusion. 22 refs.

  12. Recent results on giant dipole resonance decays in highly excited nuclei

    SciTech Connect

    Snover, K.A.

    1991-12-31

    Some recent results on Giant Dipole Resonance (GDR) decays in highly excited, equilibrated nuclei, are discussed based primarily on work done at Seattle. Four sections address the following topics: oblate shapes of rotating, highly excited Zr--Mo nuclei; adiabatic versus `motionally narrowed` GDR decay; large spin-driven deformations observed in hot medium-mass nuclei; and search for entrance channel effects in GDR decay following {sup 58}Ni {plus} {sup 92}Zr fusion. 22 refs.

  13. a Measurement of the Isovector Giant Quadrupole Resonance in LEAD-208 Using Elastic Polarized Photon Scattering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dale, Daniel Stanton

    This experiment used highly polarized tagged photons to measure polarization asymmetries for elastic scattering in ^{208}Pb in the energy region of the isovector giant quadrupole resonance (IVGQR). These measurements were performed at excitation energies between 16 and 30 MeV. Photons with enhanced linear polarization were obtained from an off-axis tagged photon beam by making a kinematic selection on the post-bremsstrahlung electrons. Scattered photons were detected in two large NaI(Tl) crystals. The polarization asymmetries clearly show the signature for interference between the isovector giant quadrupole resonance and the underlying electric dipole strength. The gross features of the IVGQR strength distribution were obtained in a relatively model independent manner. An isovector giant quadrupole resonance was observed at an excitation energy of 20.1 +/- 0.5 MeV, with a width of 6.3 +/- 0.5 MeV, and an energy weighted strength of 1.4 +/- 0.3 isovector sum rule units.

  14. First measurement of isoscalar giant resonances in a stored-beam experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zamora, J. C.; Aumann, T.; Bagchi, S.; Bönig, S.; Csatlós, M.; Dillmann, I.; Dimopoulou, C.; Egelhof, P.; Eremin, V.; Furuno, T.; Geissel, H.; Gernhäuser, R.; Harakeh, M. N.; Hartig, A.-L.; Ilieva, S.; Kalantar-Nayestanaki, N.; Kiselev, O.; Kollmus, H.; Kozhuharov, C.; Krasznahorkay, A.; Kröll, Th.; Kuilman, M.; Litvinov, S.; Litvinov, Yu. A.; Mahjour-Shafiei, M.; Mutterer, M.; Nagae, D.; Najafi, M. A.; Nociforo, C.; Nolden, F.; Popp, U.; Rigollet, C.; Roy, S.; Scheidenberger, C.; von Schmid, M.; Steck, M.; Streicher, B.; Stuhl, L.; Thürauf, M.; Uesaka, T.; Weick, H.; Winfield, J. S.; Winters, D.; Woods, P. J.; Yamaguchi, T.; Yue, K.; Zenihiro, J.

    2016-12-01

    A new technique developed for measuring nuclear reactions at low momentum transfer with stored beams in inverse kinematics was successfully used to study isoscalar giant resonances. The experiment was carried out at the experimental heavy-ion storage ring (ESR) at the GSI facility using a stored 58Ni beam at 100 MeV/u and an internal helium gas-jet target. In these measurements, inelastically scattered α-recoils at very forward center-of-mass angles (θcm ≤ 1.5 °) were detected with a dedicated setup, including ultra-high vacuum compatible detectors. Experimental results indicate a dominant contribution of the isoscalar giant monopole resonance at this very forward angular range. It was found that the monopole contribution exhausts 79-11+12% of the energy-weighted sum rule (EWSR), which agrees with measurements performed in normal kinematics. This opens up the opportunity to investigate the giant resonances in a large domain of unstable and exotic nuclei in the near future. It is a fundamental milestone towards new nuclear reaction studies with stored ion beams.

  15. Giant enhancement of second harmonic generation by engineering double plasmonic resonances at nanoscale.

    PubMed

    Ren, Ming-Liang; Liu, Si-Yun; Wang, Ben-Li; Chen, Bao-Qin; Li, Jiafang; Li, Zhi-Yuan

    2014-11-17

    We have investigated second harmonic generation (SHG) from Ag-coated LiNbO₃(LN) core-shell nanocuboids and found that giant SHG can occur via deliberately designed double plasmonic resonances. By controlling the aspect ratio, we can tune fundamental wave (FW) and SHG signal to match the longitudinal and transverse plasmonic modes simultaneously, and achieve giant enhancement of SHG by 3 × 10(5) in comparison to a bare LN nanocuboid and by about one order of magnitude to the case adopting only single plasmonic resonance. The underlying key physics is that the double-resonance nanoparticle enables greatly enhanced trapping and harvesting of incident FW energy, efficient internal transfer of optical energy from FW to the SHG signal, and much improved power to transport the SHG energy from the nanoparticle to the far-field region. The proposed double-resonance nanostructure can serve as an efficient subwavelength coherent light source through SHG and enable flexible engineering of light-matter interaction at nanoscale.

  16. On the orbital evolution of a pair of giant planets in mean motion resonance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    André, Q.; Papaloizou, J. C. B.

    2016-10-01

    Pairs of extrasolar giant planets in a mean motion commensurability are common with 2:1 resonance occurring most frequently. Disc-planet interaction provides a mechanism for their origin. However, the time-scale on which this could operate in particular cases is unclear. We perform 2D and 3D numerical simulations of pairs of giant planets in a protoplanetary disc as they form and maintain a mean motion commensurability. We consider systems with current parameters similar to those of HD 155358, 24 Sextantis and HD 60532, and disc models of varying mass, decreasing mass corresponding to increasing age. For the lowest mass discs, systems with planets in the Jovian mass range migrate inwards maintaining a 2:1 commensurability. Systems with the inner planet currently at around 1 au from the central star could have originated at a few au and migrated inwards on a time-scale comparable to protoplanetary disc lifetimes. Systems of larger mass planets such as HD 60532 attain 3:1 resonance as observed. For a given mass accretion rate, results are insensitive to the disc model for the range of viscosity prescriptions adopted, there being good agreement between 2D and 3D simulations. However, in a higher mass disc a pair of Jovian mass planets passes through 2:1 resonance before attaining a temporary phase lasting a few thousand orbits in an unstable 5:3 resonance prior to undergoing a scattering. Thus, finding systems in this commensurability is unlikely.

  17. Double Photon Decay of the Electromagnetically Excited Double Giant Dipole Resonance in LEAD-208

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ritman, James Lambrecht

    In this work the electromagnetic excitation of high lying collective states has been studied in relativistic heavy ion collisions. The interaction in peripheral collisions is dominated by the exchange of high energy virtual photons. Heavy systems near 1cdotA GeV produce a virtual photon field that is highly luminous and of sufficiently short duration to enable the multiple excitation of Giant Resonances with high probability. In particular, the double excitation of the Giant Dipole Resonance (GDR) has been studied in this work by measuring the photons emitted in peripheral reactions with the system 1.A GeV ^ {209}Bi on ^{208} Pb. This study concentrated on the photon decay of Coulomb excited collective states. Despite the relatively small ground state gamma-decay branching ratio, investigation of this channel provides several advantages compared to measuring statistical particle decay. The most important advantage is the strong enhancement of E1 transitions with respect to higher multipolarities; therefore, study of gamma-decay provides a highly selective measurement of the GDR. Photons in the Giant Resonance region were measured both as singles and as gamma- gamma pairs. For symmetry reasons the target and projectile nuclei can be mutually Coulomb excited. In order to insure that both photons in the gamma -gamma pairs came from the same nucleus, the large Doppler shift of photons emitted from the moving projectile has been exploited. Appropriate placement of the gamma detectors permitted a complete separation of the GDR photons emitted by either the target or projectile nucleus. This work provides the first experimental evidence of the gamma-gamma decay of the Coulomb excited double GDR (GDR2). The position of the resonance indicates harmonicity of the T_{<} multi-GDR. However, the increase of the GDR2 width over the GDR's width by only about a factor of sqrt{2} is significantly less than expected. Finally, the GDR2 excitation cross section is compared with model

  18. Dipole Excitation of Soft and Giant Resonances in 132Sn and neighboring unstable nuclei

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boretzky, Konstanze

    2006-04-01

    The evolution of dipole-strength distributions above the one-neutron threshold was investigated for exotic neutron-rich nuclei in a series of experiments using the electromagnetic projectile excitation at beam energies around 500 MeV/u. For halo nuclei, the large observed dipole strength (shown here for 11Be) is explained within the direct-breakup model to be of non-collective character. For neutron-rich oxygen isotopes, the origin of the observed low-lying strength is concluded to be due to single-particle transitions on theoretical grounds. The dipole strength spectra for 130,132Sn exhibit resonance-like structures observed at energies around 10 MeV exhausting a few percent of the Thomas-Reiche-Kuhn (TRK) sum rule, separated clearly from the dominant Giant Dipole Resonance (GDR). The data agree with predictions for a new dipole mode related to the oscillation of excess neutrons versus the core nucleons ("pygmy resonance").

  19. Making the Moon from a fast-spinning Earth: a giant impact followed by resonant despinning.

    PubMed

    Ćuk, Matija; Stewart, Sarah T

    2012-11-23

    A common origin for the Moon and Earth is required by their identical isotopic composition. However, simulations of the current giant impact hypothesis for Moon formation find that most lunar material originated from the impactor, which should have had a different isotopic signature. Previous Moon-formation studies assumed that the angular momentum after the impact was similar to that of the present day; however, Earth-mass planets are expected to have higher spin rates at the end of accretion. Here, we show that typical last giant impacts onto a fast-spinning proto-Earth can produce a Moon-forming disk derived primarily from Earth's mantle. Furthermore, we find that a faster-spinning early Earth-Moon system can lose angular momentum and reach the present state through an orbital resonance between the Sun and Moon.

  20. Isoscalar giant resonances for nuclei with mass between 56 and 60

    SciTech Connect

    Lui, Y.-W.; Youngblood, D.H.; Clark, H.L.; Tokimoto, Y.; John, B.

    2006-01-15

    The giant resonance region from 10 MeV giant monopole energy between A=40 and 90 is compared to relativistic and nonrelativistic calculations for interactions with compressibility of nuclear matter K{sub NM}{approx}211-225 MeV.

  1. Photofission of {sup 238}U in the giant-resonance region

    SciTech Connect

    Dzhilavyan, L. Z. Nedorezov, V. G.

    2013-12-15

    Data on cross sections for the reaction {sup 238}U(γ,F) in the giant-resonance region were analyzed in connection with the preparation of new experiments aimed at studying {sup 238}U photofission—in particular, in beams of photons from in-flight positron annihilation on internal targets of positron storage rings. These data were taken from measurements also performed with annihilation photons but from positron beams external to the accelerators used. The procedures applied in such measurements and based both on processing the multiplicity of detected neutrons and on detecting fission fragments were also analyzed.

  2. Particle-hole optical model and strength functions for high-energy giant resonances

    SciTech Connect

    Urin, M. H.

    2010-08-15

    A formulation of the particle-hole optical model is proposed for describing the contribution of the fragmentation effect to the formation of strength functions for high-energy giant resonances. The model is based on the Bethe-Goldstone equation for the energy-averaged particle-hole Green's function. In this equation, the particle-hole interaction that is induced by a virtual excitation of multiquasiparticle configurations and in which, upon averaging over energy, an imaginary part is contained is taken into account. An analogy with the single-quasiparticle optical model is discussed.

  3. Giant dipole resonance in proton capture reactions using an extended quantum molecular dynamics model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, K.; Ma, Y. G.; Zhang, G. Q.; Cao, X. G.; He, W. B.; Shen, W. Q.

    2017-01-01

    Proton capture reaction is an important process concerning the astrophysical origin of the elements. In present work, we focus on giant dipole resonance (GDR) in proton capture reactions, such as 11B(p ,γ )12C , 27Al(p ,γ )28Si , 39K(p ,γ )40Ca , and 67Co(p ,γ )68Ni in a framework of an extended quantum molecular dynamics model. The systematic properties of GDR parameters including the peak energy, the strength, and full width at half maximum (FWHM) have been studied. The dependence of FWHM on temperature has also been discussed. Some comparisons with experimental data have been presented.

  4. Inhomogeneous and intrinsic damping of giant dipole resonance in hot rotating nuclei with A ~ 150

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chakrabarty, D. R.; Datar, V. M.; Kumar, Suresh; Mirgule, E. T.; Mitra, A.; Nanal, V.; Pillay, R. G.; Rout, P. C.

    2010-05-01

    High-energy gamma rays in the range of ~4-28 MeV were measured in the reaction 28Si+124Sn at E(28Si) ~ 185 MeV in coincidence with low-energy gamma ray multiplicities and evaporation residues. The centroid energy and width of the giant dipole resonance were extracted for various multiplicity windows from the statistical model analysis. These extracted widths, along with those from an earlier measurement at E(28Si) ~ 149 MeV, show a discrepancy with the results of a calculation under the thermal shape fluctuation model which describes the inhomogeneous damping of the resonance. An empirical form of the temperature and angular momentum dependence of the width, describing the data at both the beam energies, has been derived. The present results suggest that the contributions from both the inhomogeneous damping and the intrinsic collisional damping processes should be included.

  5. First Measurement of the Giant Monopole and Quadrupole Resonances in a Short-Lived Nucleus: {sup 56}Ni

    SciTech Connect

    Monrozeau, C.; Khan, E.; Blumenfeld, Y.; Beaumel, D.; Ebran, J. P.; Frascaria, N.; Gupta, D.; Marechal, F.; Scarpaci, J-A.; Mittig, W.; Roussel-Chomaz, P.; Gelin, M.; Garg, U.; Gillibert, A.; Keeley, N.; Obertelli, A.

    2008-02-01

    The isoscalar giant monopole resonance (GMR) and giant quadrupole resonance (GQR) have been measured in the {sup 56}Ni unstable nucleus by inducing the {sup 56}Ni(d,d{sup '}) reaction at 50A MeV in the Maya active target at the GANIL facility. The GMR and GQR centroids are measured at 19.3{+-}0.5 MeV and 16.2{+-}0.5 MeV, respectively. The corresponding angular distributions are extracted from 3 deg. to 7 deg. A multipole decomposition analysis using distorted wave Born approximation with random phase approximation transition densities shows that both the GMR and the GQR exhaust a large fraction of the energy-weighted sum rule. The demonstration of this new method opens a broad range of giant resonance studies at intermediate-energy radioactive beam facilities.

  6. Resonant excitation of black holes by massive bosonic fields and giant ringings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Décanini, Yves; Folacci, Antoine; Ould El Hadj, Mohamed

    2014-04-01

    We consider the massive scalar field, the Proca field, and the Fierz-Pauli field in the Schwarzschild spacetime and we focus more particularly on their long-lived quasinormal modes. We show numerically that the associated excitation factors have a strong resonant behavior and we confirm this result analytically from semiclassical considerations based on the properties of the unstable circular geodesics on which a massive particle can orbit the black hole. The conspiracy of (i) the long-lived behavior of the quasinormal modes and (ii) the resonant behavior of their excitation factors induces intrinsic giant ringings, i.e., ringings of a huge amplitude. Such ringings, which are moreover slowly decaying, are directly constructed from the retarded Green function. If we describe the source of the black hole perturbation by an initial value problem with Gaussian initial data, i.e., if we consider the excitation of the black hole from an extrinsic point of view, we can show that these extraordinary ringings are still present. This suggests that physically realistic sources of perturbations should generate giant and slowly decaying ringings and that their existence could be used to constrain ultralight bosonic field theory interacting with black holes.

  7. Charged-particle Decay of the Isoscalar giant dipole resonance in ^58Ni

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Tao; Hunyadi, Matyas; Garg, Umesh; Hoffman, Joe; Nayak, B. K.; Fujiwara, M.; Hara, K.; Hashimoto, H.; Itoh, M.; Murakami, T.; Nakanishi, K.; Kishi, S.; Sakaguchi, H.; Terashima, S.; Uchida, M.; Yasuda, Y.; Yosoi, M.; Akimune, H.; Harakeh, M. N.

    2004-10-01

    The isoscalar giant dipole resonance(ISGDR) has been measured by single experiments with the use of inelastic α-scattering in many nuclei[1]. However, information on its decay properties is scarce. The decay properties, especially the relative population and total strength of hole states in the (A-1) nucleus resulting from particle decay of giant resonance in nuclei can provide crucial tests for the microscopic model calculations. Caculations based on continuum-RPA approach have recently become abailable and provide results on partial branching ratios for direct neutron and proton decay of ISGDR [2]. We report on a coincidence experiment searching for these direct particle decay branches from the ISGDR in the nucleus ^58Ni. The experiment was performed at the RCNP, Osaka University, using inelastic α-scattering at a beam energy of 400 MeV. The inelastically scattered α particles were detected by the magnetic spectrometer ``Grand Raiden'' at 2.5^rc, with the decay protons detected by a set of sixteen Si(Li) detectors with a thickness of 5.0 mm and an effective area of 400 mm^2 each placed at backward angles. The result for the observed final states in ^57Co will be presented and compared with the theoretical calculations. References: [1] M.Uchida et al., Phys.Rev. C 69, 051301 (2004), [2] M.L. Gorelik et al., Phys. Rev. C 69, 054322 (2004)

  8. Nonlinear SU(2,1) Model of Multiple Giant Dipole Resonance Coulomb Excitation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hussein, Mahir; de Toledo Piza, Antonio; Vorov, Oleg

    2000-10-01

    We construct a three-dimensional analytically soluble model of the nonlinear effects in Coulomb excitation of multiphonon Giant Dipole Resonances (GDR) based on the SU(2,1) algebra^1. Analytical expressions for the multi-phonon transition probabilities are derived. For reasonably small magnitude of nonlinearity x~= 0.15-0.3, the enhancement factor for the Double Giant Resonance excitation probabilities and the cross sections reaches values 1.3-2 compatible^1,2 with experimental data from relativistic ion collision experiments^3. The full 3-dimensional model predicts enhancement of the multiple GDR cross sections at low and high bombarding energies (with the minimum at ~= 1.3 GeV for the Pb+Pb colliding system). Enhancement factors for Double GDR measured in thirteen different processes with various projectiles and targets at different bombarding energies are well reproduced with the same value of the nonlinearity parameter with the exception of the anomalous case of ^136Xe which requires a larger value. The work has been supported by the FAPESP and by the CNPq. References ^1 M. S. Hussein, A. F. R. de Toledo Piza and O. K.Vorov, Ann. Phys. (N.Y.), 2000, to appear. ^2 M. S. Hussein, A. F. R. de Toledo Piza and O. K.Vorov, Phys. Rev. C59,R1242 (1999). ^3 T. Aumann, P.F. Bortignon, and H. Emling, Annu. Rev. Nucl. Part. Sci. 48, 351 (1998).

  9. Giant positive and negative Goos-Hänchen shift on dielectric gratings caused by guided mode resonance.

    PubMed

    Yang, Rui; Zhu, Wenkan; Li, Jingjing

    2014-01-27

    Giant positive and negative Goos-Hänchen shift more than 5000 times of the operating wavelength is observed when a beam is totally reflected from a substrate decorated by a dielectric grating. Different to the former studies where Goos-Hänchen shift is related to metamaterials or plasmonic materials with ohmic loss, here the giant shift is realized with unity reflectance without the loss. This is extremely advantageous for sensor applications. The Goos-Hänchen shift exhibits a strong resonant feature at the frequency of guided mode resonance, and is associated to the energy flow carried by the guided mode.

  10. Resonant bonding driven giant phonon anharmonicity and low thermal conductivity of phosphorene

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qin, Guangzhao; Zhang, Xiaoliang; Yue, Sheng-Ying; Qin, Zhenzhen; Wang, Huimin; Han, Yang; Hu, Ming

    2016-10-01

    Two-dimensional (2D) phosphorene, which possesses fascinating physical and chemical properties distinctively different from other 2D materials, calls for a fundamental understanding of thermal transport properties for its rapidly growing applications in nano- and optoelectronics and thermoelectrics. However, even the basic phonon property, for example, the exact value of the lattice thermal conductivity (κ ) of phosphorene reported in the literature, can differ unacceptably by one order of magnitude. More importantly, the fundamental physics underlying its unique properties such as strong phonon anharmonicity and unusual anisotropy remains largely unknown. In this paper, based on the analysis of electronic structure and lattice dynamics from first principles, we report that the giant phonon anharmonicity in phosphorene is associated with the soft transverse optical (TO) phonon modes and arises from the long-range interactions driven by the orbital governed resonant bonding. We also provide a microscopic picture connecting the anisotropic and low κ of phosphorene to the giant directional phonon anharmonicity and long-range interactions, which are further traced back to the asymmetric resonant orbital occupations of electrons and characteristics of the hinge-like structure. The unambiguously low κ of phosphorene obtained consistently by three independent ab initio methods confirms the phonon anharmonicity to a large extent and is expected to end the confusing huge deviations in previous studies. This work further pinpoints the necessity of including van der Waals interactions to accurately describe the interatomic interactions in phosphorene. We propose in 2D material that resonant bonding leads to low thermal conductivity, despite that it is originally found in three-dimensional (3D) thermoelectric and phase-change materials. Our study offers insights into phonon transport from the view of orbital states, which would be of great significance to the design of

  11. Search for magnetic dipole strength and giant spin-flip resonances in heavy nuclei. [120 to 200 MeV

    SciTech Connect

    Horen, D J

    1980-01-01

    A description is given of the use of high-resolution (n,n) scattering and the (p,n) reaction as tools to investigate highly excited states, with emphasis on information pertaining to magnetic dipole strength and giant spin-flip resonances in heavy nuclei. It is shown how the ability to determine uniquely the spins and parities of resonances observed in neutron scattering has been instrumental to an understanding of the distribution of M1 strength in /sup 207/ /sup 208/Pb. Some recent results of (p,n) studies with intermediate energy protons are discussed. Energy systematics of the giant Gamow-Teller (GT) resonance as well as new ..delta..l = ..delta..S = 1 resonance with J/sup ..pi../ = (1,2)/sup -/ are presented. It is shown how the (p,n) reaction might be useful in locating M1 strength in heavy nuclei. 20 figures.

  12. Multineutron photodisintegration of the 197Au nucleus behind the giant dipole resonance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ermakov, A. N.; Ishkhanov, B. S.; Kapitonov, I. M.; Htun, Kyaw Kyaw; Makarenko, I. V.; Orlin, V. N.; Shvedunov, V. I.

    2008-03-01

    An experiment in which the gold isotope 197Au was irradiated with a beam of bremsstrahlung photons having an endpoint energy of E {/γ m } = 67.7 MeV and originating from the RTM-70 racetrack microtron of the Institute of Nuclear Physics at Moscow State University was performed. The gammaray spectra of the residual beta activity of an irradiated sample were measured. Multinucleon photonuclear reactions on 197Au nuclei were observed in the experiment. Photonuclear reactions on a 197Au nucleus that involve the emission of up to seven neutrons were recorded for the first time. The experimental results in question suggest the important role of the quasideuteron photodisintegration mechanism in the energy region behind the giant dipole resonance.

  13. Comment on "Thermal shape fluctuation model study of the giant dipole resonance in 152Gd"

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chakrabarty, D. R.; Datar, V. M.

    2016-10-01

    A recent paper [A. K. Rhine Kumar and P. Arumugam, Phys. Rev. C 92, 044314 (2015), 10.1103/PhysRevC.92.044314] presented calculations of the giant dipole resonance width and γ -ray absorption cross sections for 152Gd at various temperatures and angular momenta and compared these with the experimental data. In the comparison of the cross sections, the authors used the linearized representations of the experimental spectra which actually represent the absorption cross sections divided by the γ -ray energy. In this Comment we make the comparison with the appropriate absorption cross sections derived from the data. The comparison shows a reasonable agreement if the higher value of the dipole-dipole interaction parameter, mentioned in the paper, is used in the calculation.

  14. Proton decay from the isoscalar giant dipole resonance in {sup 58}Ni

    SciTech Connect

    Hunyadi, M.; Hashimoto, H.; Fujimura, H.; Fujiwara, M.; Hara, K.; Itoh, M.; Nakanishi, K.; Okumura, S.; Li, T.; Garg, U.; Hoffman, J.; Nayak, B. K.; Akimune, H.; Gacsi, Z.; Harakeh, M. N.

    2009-10-15

    Proton decay from the 3({Dirac_h}/2{pi}){omega} isoscalar giant dipole resonance (ISGDR) in {sup 58}Ni has been measured using the ({alpha},{alpha}{sup '}p) reaction at a bombarding energy of 386 MeV to investigate its decay properties. We have extracted the ISGDR strength under the coincidence condition between inelastically scattered {alpha} particles at forward angles and decay protons emitted at backward angles. Branching ratios for proton decay to low-lying states of {sup 57}Co have been determined, and the results compared with predictions of recent continuum-RPA calculations. The final-state spectra of protons decaying to the low-lying states in {sup 57}Co were analyzed for a more detailed understanding of the structure of the ISGDR. It is found that there are differences in the structure of the ISGDR as a function of excitation energy.

  15. Neutron-skin thickness from the study of the anti-analog giant dipole resonance

    SciTech Connect

    Krasznahorkay, A.; Stuhl, L.; Csatlos, M.; Algora, A.; and others

    2012-10-20

    The {gamma}-decay of the anti-analog of the giant dipole resonance (AGDR) to the isobaric analog state has been measured following the p({sup 124}Sn,n) reaction at a beam energy of 600 MeV/nucleon. The energy of the transition was also calculated with state-of-the-art self-consistent relativistic random-phase approximation (RPA) and turned out to be very sensitive to the neutronskin thickness ({Delta}R{sub pn}). By comparing the theoretical results with the measured one, the {Delta}R{sub pn} value for {sup 124}Sn was deduced to be 0.21 {+-} 0.07 fm, which agrees well with the previous results. The present method offers new possibilities for measuring the neutron-skin thicknesses of very exotic isotopes.

  16. Fine structure of the isoscalar giant quadrupole resonance in 28Si and 27Al

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Usman, I. T.; Buthelezi, Z.; Carter, J.; Cooper, G. R. J.; Fearick, R. W.; Förtsch, S. V.; Fujita, H.; Fujita, Y.; von Neumann-Cosel, P.; Neveling, R.; Papakonstantinou, P.; Pysmenetska, I.; Richter, A.; Roth, R.; Sideras-Haddad, E.; Smit, F. D.

    2016-08-01

    The isoscalar giant quadrupole resonance in 28Si and 27Al has been investigated with high-energy-resolution proton inelastic scattering at Ep=200 MeV and at scattering angles close to the maximum of Δ L =2 angular distributions with the K600 magnetic spectrometer of iThemba LABS, South Africa. Characteristic scales are extracted from the observed fine structure with a wavelet analysis and compared for 28Si with random-phase approximation and second random phase approximation calculations with an interaction derived from the Argonne V18 potential by a unitary transformation. A recent extension of the method to deformed nuclei provides the best description of the data, suggesting the significance of Landau damping.

  17. Giant resonances in {sup 116}Sn from 240 MeV {sup 6}Li scattering

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, X.; Lui, Y.-W.; Clark, H. L.; Tokimoto, Y.; Youngblood, D. H.

    2009-02-15

    Giant resonances in {sup 116}Sn were measured by inelastic scattering of {sup 6}Li ions at E{sub {sup 6}Li}=240 MeV over the angle range 0 deg. - 6 deg. Isoscalar E0-E3 strength distributions were obtained with a double folding model analysis. A total of 106{sub -11}{sup +27}% of the E0 EWSR was found in the excitation energy range from 8 MeV to 30 MeV with a centroid (m{sub 1}/m{sub 0}) energy 15.39{sub -0.20}{sup +0.35} MeV in agreement with results obtained with {alpha} inelastic scattering.

  18. Study of Isoscalar Giant Resonances in Exotic Nuclei by Means of Inverse Reactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Harakeh, M. N.

    2015-11-01

    Isoscalar giant resonances in exotic nuclei can be studied using inelastic alpha scattering in inverse kinematics. In particular, the compression modes, i.e. isoscalar giant monopole and dipole resonances, are very interesting because they can furnish information on the different terms of the nuclear incompressibility, especially if measured in long isotopic chains including nuclei far from the valley of stability. As beams of exotic nuclei have relatively low intensities thick targets have to be used in order to get a reasonable yield. However, this leads to degradation of the energy resolution and stops low-energy recoil particles. Two good alternatives exist. The first method is to use an active target, such as MAYA, which is a time-projection chamber and therefore can be used for detection of low-energy recoil particles. Furthermore, its thickness can be increased by increasing the length of the detection volume or the gas pressure without severe loss of energy resolution. The second method is to use a storage ring for storing the exotic nuclei, which then interact with target nuclei from a gas-jet target. Here, the luminosity and hence the yield are increased because the exotic nuclei circulate in the ring at a frequency of around 106 turns/s. Low-energy recoil particles traverse the gas-jet with little loss of energy and can be detected in solid-state detectors. Pioneering experiments with both methods have been performed for inelastic scattering of secondary 56Ni beam off helium nuclei. Here, preliminary results of the experiment with the active target MAYA will be presented.

  19. Magnetic interactions between a [4Fe-4S]1+ cluster and a flavin mononucleotide radical in the enzyme trimethylamine dehydrogenase: A high-field electron paramagnetic resonance study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fournel, Andre; Gambarelli, Serge; Guigliarelli, Bruno; More, Claude; Asso, Marcel; Chouteau, Gerard; Hille, Russ; Bertrand, Patrick

    1998-12-01

    Trimethylamine dehydrogenase is a bacterial enzyme which contains two redox centers: a flavin mononucleotide (FMN) group which constitutes the active site and a [4Fe-4S]1+,2+ cluster which transfers the electrons provided by the FMN to an electron-transferring flavoprotein. According to the x-ray crystal structure, the center-to-center distance is equal to 12 Å and the nearest atoms of the two centers are separated by a 4 Å gap. Although this arrangement does not appear especially favorable for mediating strong magnetic interactions, a triplet state electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) spectrum arising from the intercenter magnetic coupling is observed at X band (9 GHz) when the enzyme is reduced by its substrate. In earlier work, the temperature dependence of this spectrum and its analysis based on a triplet state spin Hamiltonian were used to propose the range (0.8-100 cm-1) for the parameter J0 of the isotropic interaction J0SA.SB, but neither the magnitude of J0 nor its sign could be further specified [R. C. Stevenson, W. R. Dunham, R. H. Sands, T. P. Singer, and H. Beinert, Biochim. Biophys. Acta 869, 81 (1986)]. In the present work, we have studied the interaction EPR spectrum in the range 9-340 GHz. Numerical simulations based on a spin Hamiltonian describing a system of two S=1/2 interacting spins allowed us to determine the full set of parameters describing the magnetic interactions between the FMN radical and the [4Fe-4S]1+ cluster. In particular, our study demonstrates that the coupling is antiferromagnetic with J0=+0.72 cm-1. Although this value corresponds to the lower limit of the range proposed previously, it still appears markedly larger than those measured in biological systems in which a similar arrangement of two paramagnetic centers is found.

  20. Plasmonic amplifiers: engineering giant light enhancements by tuning resonances in multiscale plasmonic nanostructures.

    PubMed

    Chen, Aiqing; Miller, Ryan L; DePrince, A Eugene; Joshi-Imre, Alexandra; Shevchenko, Elena; Ocola, Leonidas E; Gray, Stephen K; Welp, Ulrich; Vlasko-Vlasov, Vitalii K

    2013-06-10

    The unique ability of plasmonic nanostructures to guide, enhance, and manipulate subwavelength light offers multiple novel applications in chemical and biological sensing, imaging, and photonic microcircuitry. Here the reproducible, giant light amplification in multiscale plasmonic structures is demonstrated. These structures combine strongly coupled components of different dimensions and topologies that resonate at the same optical frequency. A light amplifier is constructed using a silver mirror carrying light-enhancing surface plasmons, dielectric gratings forming distributed Bragg cavities on top of the mirror, and gold nanoparticle arrays self-assembled into the grating grooves. By tuning the resonances of the individual components to the same frequency, multiple enhancement of the light intensity in the nanometer gaps between the particles is achieved. Using a monolayer of benzenethiol molecules on this structure, an average SERS enhancement factor ∼10⁸ is obtained, and the maximum enhancement in the interparticle hot-spots is ∼3 × 10¹⁰, in good agreement with FDTD calculations. The high enhancement factor, large density of well-ordered hot-spots, and good fidelity of the SERS signal make this design a promising platform for quantitative SERS sensing, optical detection, efficient solid state lighting, advanced photovoltaics, and other emerging photonic applications.

  1. Intense {gamma}-Ray Source in the Giant-Dipole-Resonance Range Driven by 10-TW Laser Pulses

    SciTech Connect

    Giulietti, A.; Gamucci, A.; Gizzi, L. A.; Labate, L.; Bourgeois, N.; Marques, J. R.; Ceccotti, T.; Dobosz, S.; D'Oliveira, P.; Monot, P.; Popescu, H.; Reau, F.; Martin, P.; Galy, J.; Hamilton, D. J.; Giulietti, D.

    2008-09-05

    A {gamma}-ray source with an intense component around the giant dipole resonance for photonuclear absorption has been obtained via bremsstrahlung of electron bunches driven by a 10-TW tabletop laser. 3D particle-in-cell simulation proves the achievement of a nonlinear regime leading to efficient acceleration of several sequential electron bunches per each laser pulse. The rate of the {gamma}-ray yield in the giant dipole resonance region (8

  2. Giant resonances in {sup 238}U within the quasiparticle random-phase approximation with the Gogny force

    SciTech Connect

    Peru, S.; Gosselin, G.; Martini, M.; Dupuis, M.; Hilaire, S.

    2011-01-15

    Fully consistent axially-symmetric deformed quasiparticle random-phase approximation (QRPA) calculations have been performed, using the same Gogny D1S effective force for both the Hartree-Fock-Bogolyubov mean field and QRPA matrix. New implementation of this approach leads to the applicability of QRPA to heavy deformed nuclei. Giant resonances and low-energy collective states for monopole, dipole, quadrupole, and octupole modes are predicted for the heavy deformed nucleus {sup 238}U and compared with experimental data.

  3. Separation of contributions of isovector E2 and E1 giant resonances in direct and inverse reactions with real and virtual photons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dzhilavyan, L. Z.; Lapik, A. M.; Nedorezov, V. G.; Tulupov, B. A.

    2017-01-01

    A brief overview of the methods for separating the contributions of isovector electric quadrupole ( E2) and dominant dipole ( E1) giant resonances in atomic nuclei, which are excited in direct and inverse reactions with photons (real and virtual), is given. The basic parameters of isovector giant resonance E2, which were declared to date by applying some of these methods to the results with 208Pb, are also presented.

  4. TERRESTRIAL PLANET FORMATION DURING THE MIGRATION AND RESONANCE CROSSINGS OF THE GIANT PLANETS

    SciTech Connect

    Lykawka, Patryk Sofia; Ito, Takashi

    2013-08-10

    The newly formed giant planets may have migrated and crossed a number of mutual mean motion resonances (MMRs) when smaller objects (embryos) were accreting to form the terrestrial planets in the planetesimal disk. We investigated the effects of the planetesimal-driven migration of Jupiter and Saturn, and the influence of their mutual 1:2 MMR crossing on terrestrial planet formation for the first time, by performing N-body simulations. These simulations considered distinct timescales of MMR crossing and planet migration. In total, 68 high-resolution simulation runs using 2000 disk planetesimals were performed, which was a significant improvement on previously published results. Even when the effects of the 1:2 MMR crossing and planet migration were included in the system, Venus and Earth analogs (considering both orbits and masses) successfully formed in several runs. In addition, we found that the orbits of planetesimals beyond a {approx} 1.5-2 AU were dynamically depleted by the strengthened sweeping secular resonances associated with Jupiter's and Saturn's more eccentric orbits (relative to the present day) during planet migration. However, this depletion did not prevent the formation of massive Mars analogs (planets with more than 1.5 times Mars's mass). Although late MMR crossings (at t > 30 Myr) could remove such planets, Mars-like small mass planets survived on overly excited orbits (high e and/or i), or were completely lost in these systems. We conclude that the orbital migration and crossing of the mutual 1:2 MMR of Jupiter and Saturn are unlikely to provide suitable orbital conditions for the formation of solar system terrestrial planets. This suggests that to explain Mars's small mass and the absence of other planets between Mars and Jupiter, the outer asteroid belt must have suffered a severe depletion due to interactions with Jupiter/Saturn, or by an alternative mechanism (e.g., rogue super-Earths)

  5. Effects of thermal shape fluctuations and pairing fluctuations on the giant dipole resonance in warm nuclei

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rhine Kumar, A. K.; Arumugam, P.; Dang, N. Dinh

    2015-04-01

    Apart from the higher limits of isospin and temperature, the properties of atomic nuclei are intriguing and less explored at the limits of lowest but finite temperatures. At very low temperatures there is a strong interplay between the shell (quantal fluctuations), statistical (thermal fluctuations), and residual pairing effects as evidenced from the studies on giant dipole resonance (GDR). In our recent work [Phys. Rev. C 90, 044308 (2014), 10.1103/PhysRevC.90.044308], we have outlined some of our results from a theoretical approach for such warm nuclei where all these effects are incorporated along within the thermal shape fluctuation model (TSFM) extended to include the fluctuations in the pairing field. In this article, we present the complete formalism based on the microscopic-macroscopic approach for determining the deformation energies and a macroscopic approach which links the deformation to GDR observables. We discuss our results for the nuclei 97Tc,120Sn,179Au, and 208Pb, and corroborate with the experimental data available. The TSFM could explain the data successfully at low temperature only with a proper treatment of pairing and its fluctuations. More measurements with better precision could yield rich information about several phase transitions that can happen in warm nuclei.

  6. Experimental study of the isovector giant dipole resonance in 80Zr and 81Rb

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ceruti, S.; Camera, F.; Bracco, A.; Mentana, A.; Avigo, R.; Benzoni, G.; Blasi, N.; Bocchi, G.; Bottoni, S.; Brambilla, S.; Crespi, F. C. L.; Giaz, A.; Leoni, S.; Million, B.; Morales, A. I.; Nicolini, R.; Pellegri, L.; Riboldi, S.; Wieland, O.; Bazzacco, D.; Ciemala, M.; Farnea, E.; Gottardo, A.; Kmiecik, M.; Maj, A.; Mengoni, D.; Michelagnoli, C.; Modamio, V.; Montanari, D.; Napoli, D.; Recchia, F.; Sahin, E.; Ur, C.; Valiente-Dobón, J. J.; Wasilewska, B.; Zieblinski, M.

    2017-01-01

    The isovector giant dipole resonance (IVGDR) γ decay was measured in the compound nuclei 80Zr and 81Rb at an excitation energy of E*=54 MeV. The fusion reaction 40Ca+40Ca at Ebeam=136 MeV was used to form the compound nucleus 80Zr, while the reaction 37Cl+44Ca at Ebeam=95 MeV was used to form the compound nucleus 81Rb at the same excitation energy. The IVGDR parameters extracted from the analysis were compared with the ones found at higher excitation energy (E*=83 MeV). The comparison allows one to observe two different nuclear mechanisms: (i) the IVGDR intrinsic width remains constant with the excitation energy in the nucleus 81Rb; (ii) the isospin-violating spreading width (i.e., Coulomb spreading width) remains constant with the excitation energy in the nucleus 80Zr. The experimental setup used for the γ -ray detection was composed by the AGATA demonstrator array coupled to the large-volume LaBr3:Ce detectors of the HECTOR+ array.

  7. Temperature dependence of the giant dipole resonance width in 152Gd

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ghosh, C.; Mishra, G.; Rhine Kumar, A. K.; Dokania, N.; Nanal, V.; Pillay, R. G.; Kumar, Suresh; Rout, P. C.; Joshi, Sandeep; Arumugam, P.

    2016-07-01

    To investigate the dependence of giant dipole resonance (GDR) width on temperature (T ) and angular momentum (J ), high energy γ -ray spectra were measured in the reaction 28Si+124Sn at E28Si=135 MeV. The J information was deduced from multiplicity of low-energy γ rays. The GDR parameters, namely, the centroid energy and width are extracted using statistical model analysis. The observed variation of the GDR width for T ˜1.2 -1.37 MeV and J ˜20 ℏ -40 ℏ is consistent with the universal scaling given by Kusnezov et al., which is applicable in the liquid-drop regime. The GDR input cross sections extracted from the statistical model best fits are compared with thermal shape fluctuation model (TSFM) calculations and are found to be in good agreement. The TSFM calculations predominantly favor the noncollective oblate shape, while the statistical model fit with both prolate and oblate shapes describes the data. The present data together with earlier measurements indicate a very slow variation of the GDR width for T ˜1.2 to 1.5 MeV. The observed trend is well explained by the TSFM calculations, although the calculated values are ˜4 %-13% higher than the data.

  8. Extreme nuclear shapes examined via giant dipole resonance lineshapes in hot light-mass systems

    SciTech Connect

    Pandit, Deepak; Mukhopadhyay, S.; Pal, Surajit; Bhattacharya, S.; Bhattacharya, C.; Banerjee, K.; Kundu, S.; Rana, T. K.; Dey, A.; Mukherjee, G.; Ghosh, T.; Banerjee, S. R.; De, A.; Gupta, D.

    2010-06-15

    The influence of alpha clustering on nuclear reaction dynamics is investigated using the giant dipole resonance (GDR) lineshape studies in the reactions {sup 20}Ne (E{sub lab}=145,160 MeV) + {sup 12}C and {sup 20}Ne (E{sub lab}=160 MeV) + {sup 27}Al, populating {sup 32}S and {sup 47}V, respectively. The GDR lineshapes from the two systems are remarkably different from each other. Whereas, the non-alpha-like {sup 47}V undergoes Jacobi shape transition and matches exceptionally well with the theoretical GDR lineshape estimated under the framework rotating liquid drop model (RLDM) and thermal shape fluctuation model (TSFM) signifying shape equilibration, for the alpha cluster {sup 32}S an extended prolate kind of shape is observed. This unusual deformation, seen directly via gamma decay for the first time, is predicted to be due to the formation of orbiting dinuclear configuration or molecular structure of {sup 16}O + {sup 16}O in the {sup 32}S superdeformed band.

  9. Giant dipole resonance width in nuclei near Sn at low temperature and high angular momentum

    SciTech Connect

    Bhattacharya, Srijit; Mukhopadhyay, S.; Pandit, Deepak; Pal, Surajit; Bhattacharya, S.; Bhattacharya, C.; Banerjee, K.; Kundu, S.; Rana, T. K.; Dey, A.; Mukherjee, G.; Ghosh, T.; Gupta, D.; Banerjee, S. R.

    2008-02-15

    High energy {gamma} rays in coincidence with low energy yrast {gamma} rays have been measured from {sup 113}Sb, at excitation energies of 109 and 122 MeV, formed by bombarding {sup 20}Ne on {sup 93}Nb at projectile energies of 145 and 160 MeV, respectively, to study the role of angular momentum (J) and temperature (T) over giant dipole resonance (GDR) width ({gamma}). The maximum populated angular momenta for fusion were 67({Dirac_h}/2{pi}) and 73({Dirac_h}/2{pi}), respectively, for the above-mentioned beam energies. The high energy photons were detected using a Large Area Modular BaF{sub 2} Detector Array (LAMBDA) along with a 24-element multiplicity filter. After pre-equilibrium corrections, the excitation energy E* was averaged over the decay steps of the compound nucleus (CN). The average values of temperature, angular momentum, CN mass, etc., have been calculated using the statistical model code CASCADE. Using those average values, results show the systematic increase of GDR width with T, which is consistent with Kusnezov parametrization and the thermal shape fluctuation model (TSFM). The rise of GDR width with temperature also supports the assumptions of adiabatic coupling in the TSFM. But the GDR widths and corresponding reduced plots with J are not consistent with those of the theoretical model at high spins.

  10. The temperature dependence of the width of the giant dipole resonance

    SciTech Connect

    Ormand, W.E. |; Bortignon, P.F. |; Broglia, R.A. ||

    1995-12-31

    A systematic study of the full-width-at-half-maximum (FWHM) of the giant-dipole resonance (GDR) as a function of temperature for the nuclei {sup 120}Sn and {sup 208}Pb confirms the overall theoretical picture of the GDR in hot nuclei; in particular, the role played by large-amplitude thermal fluctuations of the nuclear shape. This is confirmed by the good agreement between theory and experiment achieved over a range of temperatures from 1.25--32 MeV and by the differences in the behavior of the FWHM for {sup 120}Sn and {sup 208}Pb, which can be attributed to the presence of strong shell corrections favoring spherical shapes in {sup 208}Pb that are absent in {sup 120}Sn. Finally, the increase in the FWHM over that expected from thermal averaging at temperatures of the order 3.0 MeV is in accordance with the increase expected from the particle evaporation of the compound system.

  11. Signature of clustering in quantum many-body systems probed by the giant dipole resonance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pandit, Deepak; Mondal, Debasish; Dey, Balaram; Bhattacharya, Srijit; Mukhopadhyay, S.; Pal, Surajit; De, A.; Banerjee, S. R.

    2017-03-01

    The present experimental study illustrates how large deformations attained by nuclei due to cluster formation are perceived through the giant dipole resonance (GDR) strength function. The high energy GDR γ rays have been measured from 32S at different angular momenta (J ) but similar temperatures in the reactions 4He(Elab=45 MeV )+28Si and 20Ne(Elab=145 MeV )+12C . The experimental data at lower J (˜10 ℏ ) suggests a normal deformation, similar to the ground state value, showing no potential signature of clustering. However, it is found that the GDR lineshape is fragmented into two prominent peaks at high J (˜20 ℏ ) providing a direct measurement of the large deformation developed in the nucleus. The observed lineshape is also completely different from the ones seen for Jacobi shape transition at high J pointing towards the formation of cluster structure in superdeformed states of 32S at such high spin. Thus, the GDR can be regarded as a unique tool to study cluster formation at high excitation energies and angular momenta.

  12. Experimental study of playback giant magnetic resonance head nonlinearity in perpendicular recording

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Luo, P.; Stoev, K.; Liu, F.; Vadde, A.; Gibbons, M.; Lederman, M.; Re, M.

    2003-05-01

    In this article, nonlinear distortions of the playback giant magnetic resonance (GMR) sensor in perpendicular recording are characterized in both time and frequency domains. We use three perpendicular media with different Mrt (0.46, 0.6, and 0.8 emu/cm2) and two groups of similar magnetic-read width (MRW) but different junction type [contiguous junction (CJ) and lead-over-lay (LOL)] GMR heads. Square-wave patterns at moderate densities are recorded to minimize NLTS, partial erasure, and transition broadening effects. Both time- and frequency-domain measurements indicate that the LOL-type GMR heads show playback nonlinearity (7%-23%), while the CJ-type GMR heads do not. Micromagnetic simulation is utilized to understand the hard bias field with different junction designs. The result indicates that the hard bias (HB) field in LOL type (HB field ˜6.9 Oe) at the air bearing surface (ABS) and stripe center is much lower than that in CJ type (HB field ˜54.0 Oe). Therefore, the free layer with large HB-HB distance will be more susceptible to saturation.

  13. Global investigation of the fine structure of the isoscalar giant quadrupole resonance

    SciTech Connect

    Shevchenko, A.; Burda, O.; Kalmykov, Y.; Neumann-Cosel, P. von; Ponomarev, V. Yu.; Richter, A.; Wambach, J.; Carter, J.; Sideras-Haddad, E.; Cooper, G. R. J.; Fearick, R. W.; Foertsch, S. V.; Lawrie, J. J.; Neveling, R.; Smit, F. D.; Fujita, H.; Fujita, Y.; Lacroix, D.

    2009-04-15

    Fine structure in the region of the isoscalar giant quadrupole resonance (ISGQR) in {sup 58}Ni, {sup 89}Y, {sup 90}Zr, {sup 120}Sn, {sup 166}Er, and {sup 208}Pb has been observed in high-energy-resolution ({delta}E{sub 1/2}{approx_equal}35-50 keV) inelastic proton scattering measurements at E{sub 0}=200 MeV at iThemba LABS. Calculations of the corresponding quadrupole excitation strength functions performed within models based on the random-phase approximation (RPA) reveal similar fine structure when the mixing of one-particle one-hole states with two-particle two-hole states is taken into account. A detailed comparison of the experimental data is made with results from the quasiparticle-phonon model (QPM) and the extended time-dependent Hartree-Fock (ETDHF) method. For {sup 208}Pb, additional theoretical results from second RPA and the extended theory of finite Fermi systems (ETFFS) are discussed. A continuous wavelet analysis of the experimental and the calculated spectra is used to extract dominant scales characterizing the fine structure. Although the calculations agree with qualitative features of these scales, considerable differences are found between the model and experimental results and amongst different models. Within the framework of the QPM and ETDHF calculations it is possible to decompose the model spaces into subspaces approximately corresponding to different damping mechanisms. It is demonstrated that characteristic scales mainly arise from the collective coupling of the ISGQR to low-energy surface vibrations.

  14. Finite amplitude method applied to the giant dipole resonance in heavy rare-earth nuclei

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oishi, Tomohiro; Kortelainen, Markus; Hinohara, Nobuo

    2016-03-01

    Background: The quasiparticle random phase approximation (QRPA), within the framework of nuclear density functional theory (DFT), has been a standard tool to access the collective excitations of atomic nuclei. Recently, the finite amplitude method (FAM) was developed in order to perform the QRPA calculations efficiently without any truncation on the two-quasiparticle model space. Purpose: We discuss the nuclear giant dipole resonance (GDR) in heavy rare-earth isotopes, for which the conventional matrix diagonalization of the QRPA is numerically demanding. A role of the Thomas-Reiche-Kuhn (TRK) sum rule enhancement factor, connected to the isovector effective mass, is also investigated. Methods: The electric dipole photoabsorption cross section was calculated within a parallelized FAM-QRPA scheme. We employed the Skyrme energy density functional self-consistently in the DFT calculation for the ground states and FAM-QRPA calculation for the excitations. Results: The mean GDR frequency and width are mostly reproduced with the FAM-QRPA, when compared to experimental data, although some deficiency is observed with isotopes heavier than erbium. A role of the TRK enhancement factor in actual GDR strength is clearly shown: its increment leads to a shift of the GDR strength to higher-energy region, without a significant change in the transition amplitudes. Conclusions: The newly developed FAM-QRPA scheme shows remarkable efficiency, which enables one to perform systematic analysis of GDR for heavy rare-earth nuclei. The theoretical deficiency of the photoabsorption cross section could not be improved by only adjusting the TRK enhancement factor, suggesting the necessity of an approach beyond self-consistent QRPA and/or a more systematic optimization of the energy density functional (EDF) parameters.

  15. Magnetic resonance imaging findings of undifferentiated carcinoma with osteoclast-like giant cells of pancreas.

    PubMed

    Yang, Kyung Yoon; Choi, Joon-Il; Choi, Moon Hyung; Park, Michael Yong; Rha, Sung Eun; Byun, Jae Young; Jung, Eun Sun; Lall, Chandana

    2016-01-01

    Undifferentiated carcinoma with osteoclast-like giant cells is a rare pancreatic and periampullary neoplasm with less than 50 cases reported in the literature. Pathologically, this tumor mimics a giant cell tumor in bones. We report a case of undifferentiated carcinoma with osteoclast-like giant cells in a 55-year-old man presenting as a pancreatic mass with associated regional and distant lymphadenopathy. On T1- and T2-weighted images, the mass shows dark signal intensity which was atypical for a pancreatic adenocarcinoma.

  16. Role of deformation on giant resonances within the quasiparticle random-phase approximation and the Gogny force

    SciTech Connect

    Peru, S.; Goutte, H.

    2008-04-15

    Fully consistent axially-symmetric-deformed quasiparticle random phase approximation (QRPA) calculations have been performed, in which the same Gogny D1S effective force has been used for both the Hartree-Fock-Bogolyubov mean field and the QRPA approaches. Giant resonances calculated in deformed {sup 26-28}Si and {sup 22-24}Mg nuclei as well as in the spherical {sup 30}Si and {sup 28}Mg isotopes are presented. Theoretical results for isovector-dipole and isoscalar monopole, quadrupole, and octupole responses are presented and the impact of the intrinsic nuclear deformation is discussed.

  17. USING SCHUMANN RESONANCE MEASUREMENTS FOR CONSTRAINING THE WATER ABUNDANCE ON THE GIANT PLANETS-IMPLICATIONS FOR THE SOLAR SYSTEM'S FORMATION

    SciTech Connect

    Simoes, Fernando; Pfaff, Robert; Klenzing, Jeffrey; Freudenreich, Henry; Bromund, Kenneth; Martin, Steven; Rowland, Douglas; Takahashi, Yukihiro; Yair, Yoav

    2012-05-01

    The formation and evolution of the solar system is closely related to the abundance of volatiles, namely water, ammonia, and methane in the protoplanetary disk. Accurate measurement of volatiles in the solar system is therefore important for understanding not only the nebular hypothesis and origin of life but also planetary cosmogony as a whole. In this work, we propose a new remote sensing technique to infer the outer planets' water content by measuring Tremendously and Extremely Low Frequency (TLF-ELF) electromagnetic wave characteristics (Schumann resonances) excited by lightning in their gaseous envelopes. Schumann resonance detection can be potentially used for constraining the uncertainty of volatiles of the giant planets, mainly Uranus and Neptune, because such TLF-ELF wave signatures are closely related to the electric conductivity profile and water content.

  18. A SECOND GIANT PLANET IN 3:2 MEAN-MOTION RESONANCE IN THE HD 204313 SYSTEM

    SciTech Connect

    Robertson, Paul; Endl, Michael; Cochran, William D.; MacQueen, Phillip J.; Brugamyer, Erik J.; Barnes, Stuart I.; Caldwell, Caroline; Horner, J.; Wittenmyer, Robert A.; Simon, Attila E.

    2012-07-20

    We present eight years of high-precision radial velocity (RV) data for HD 204313 from the 2.7 m Harlan J. Smith Telescope at McDonald Observatory. The star is known to have a giant planet (Msin i = 3.5 M{sub J} ) on a {approx}1900 day orbit, and a Neptune-mass planet at 0.2 AU. Using our own data in combination with the published CORALIE RVs of Segransan et al., we discover an outer Jovian (Msin i = 1.6 M{sub J} ) planet with P {approx} 2800 days. Our orbital fit suggests that the planets are in a 3:2 mean motion resonance, which would potentially affect their stability. We perform a detailed stability analysis and verify that the planets must be in resonance.

  19. Using Schumann Resonance Measurements for Constraining the Water Abundance on the Giant Planets - Implications for the Solar System Formation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Simoes, Fernando; Pfaff, Robert; Hamelin, Michel; Klenzing, Jeffrey; Freudenreich, Henry; Beghin, Christian; Berthelier, Jean-Jacques; Bromund, Kenneth; Grard, Rejean; Lebreton, Jean-Pierre; Martin, Steven; Rowland, Douglas; Sentman, Davis; Takahashi, Yukihiro; Yair, Yoav

    2012-01-01

    The formation and evolution of the Solar System is closely related to the abundance of volatiles, namely water, ammonia, and methane in the protoplanetary disk. Accurate measurement of volatiles in the Solar System is therefore important to understand not only the nebular hypothesis and origin of life but also planetary cosmogony as a whole. In this work, we propose a new, remote sensing technique to infer the outer planets water content by measuring Tremendously and Extremely Low Frequency (TLF-ELF) electromagnetic wave characteristics (Schumann resonances) excited by lightning in their gaseous envelopes. Schumann resonance detection can be potentially used for constraining the uncertainty of volatiles of the giant planets, mainly Uranus and Neptune, because such TLF-ELF wave signatures are closely related to the electric conductivity profile and water content.

  20. Probing nuclear shapes close to the fission limit with the giant dipole resonance in {sup 216}Rn

    SciTech Connect

    Kmiecik, M.; Maj, A.; Brekiesz, M.; Krolas, W.; Meczynski, W.; Styczen, J.; Zieblinski, M.; Million, B.; Bracco, A.; Camera, F.; Benzoni, G.; Leoni, S.; Wieland, O.; Brambilla, S.; Herskind, B.; Kicinska-Habior, M.; Dubray, N.; Dudek, J.; Schunck, N.

    2004-12-01

    The gamma-ray decay of the giant dipole resonance (GDR) in the compound nucleus {sup 216}Rn formed with the reaction {sup 18}O+{sup 198}Pt at the bombarding energy of 96 MeV was investigated. High-energy gamma-ray spectra in coincidence with both prompt and delayed low-energy transitions were measured. The obtained GDR width at the average temperature {approx_equal}1 MeV was found to be larger than that at T=0 MeV and to be approximately constant as a function of spin. The measured width value of 7 MeV is found to be consistent with the predictions based on calculations of the nuclear shape distribution using the newest approach for the treatment of the fission barrier within the liquid drop model. The present study is the first investigation of the giant dipole resonance width from the fusion-evaporation decay channel in this nuclear mass range.

  1. (. pi. sup +- ,. pi. sup +- prime N) reactions on sup 12 C and sup 208 Pb near the giant resonance region

    SciTech Connect

    Yoo, Sung Hoon.

    1990-05-01

    Angular distributions for the {sup 12}C({pi}{sup {plus minus}}, {pi}{sup {plus minus}}{prime} p) and {sup 208}Pb({pi}{sup {plus minus}}, {pi}{sup {plus minus}}{prime} p or n) reactions near the giant resonance region have been measured at T{sub {pi}} = 180 MeV, and found different between {pi}{sup +} and {pi}{sup {minus}} data. This observation is interpreted as evidence for different excitation mechanisms dominating the {pi}{sup {minus}}-nucleus and {pi}{sup +}-nucleus interactions in the giant resonance region of these targets. A comparison with the single-nucleon knock-out distorted-wave impulse approximation calculations shows, even though these calculations underestimate ({pi}{sup {plus minus}}, {pi}{sup {plus minus}}{prime} N) data for both targets, the dominance of direct process for ({pi}{sup +}, {pi}{sup {plus}}{prime} p) or ({pi}{sup {minus}}, {pi}{sup {minus}}{prime} n) in contrast to ({pi}{sup {minus}}, {pi}{sup {minus}}{prime} p) or ({pi}{sup +}, {pi}{sup +}{prime} n). In the ({pi}{sup +}, {pi}{sup +}{prime} p) reaction proton-proton hole states are excited directly and appear to have a large probability for direct decay with escape width, whereas in ({pi}{sup {minus}}, {pi}{sup {minus}}{prime} p) the preferentially excited neutron-neutron hole doorway states couple to resonance states and decay with spreading width. This interpretation led us to suggest that the ratio of cross-sections for inelastic scattering to the giant resonance region should be written in terms of an incoherent sum of cross-sections to neutron and proton doorway states. In a heavy nucleus such as {sup 208}Pb, neutron and proton doorway states. In a heavy nucleus such as {sup 208}Pb, neutron and proton doorway states contribute incoherently because the different decay processes do not populate the same final states of the residual nucleus.

  2. Use of the ( e , e prime n ) reaction to study the giant multipole resonances in sup 116 Sn

    SciTech Connect

    Miskimen, R.A.; Ammons, E.A.; Arruda-Neto, J.D.T.; Bolme, G.O.; Cardman, L.S.; Cole, P.L.; Deininger, J.R.; Dolfini, S.M.; Linzey, A.J.; Mandeville, J.B.; Miller, B.L.; Mueller, P.E.; Papanicolas, C.N.; Serdarevic, A.; Williamson, S.E. )

    1991-04-01

    The giant multipole resonances in {sup 116}Sn have been studied using the ({ital e},{ital e}{prime}{ital n}) reaction. Data were taken at effective momentum transfers of 0.37, 0.45, and 0.55 fm{sup {minus}1} and a multipole analysis of the data was performed. The inferred multipole strength functions identify the {ital E}2 and {ital E}0 resonances as distinct peaks at 12.2 and 17.9 MeV, respectively. The energy-weighted sum-rule strengths for the {ital E}2 and {ital E}0 resonances, obtained using a Lorentzian fit to the data, are 34{plus minus}13% and 93{plus minus}37%. When compared with results from alpha scattering and pion scattering the sum-rule strengths exhibit approximate agreement, but the {ital E}0 strength identified in this measurement lies at higher excitation energy, consistent with the trend observed in heavier nuclei. The ({ital e},{ital e}{prime}{ital n}) data are compared with a continuum random phase approximation (RPA) calculation of the {ital E}2 and {ital E}0 strengths, and with an open-shell RPA calculation of the {ital E}2 strength. Both calculations disagree with the data in the region of the {ital E}2 resonance.

  3. Study of multipole giant resonances in /sup 90/Zr and /sup 120/Sn in scattering of 93-MeV /sup 6/Li ions

    SciTech Connect

    Venikov, N.I.; Glukhov, Y.A.; Dem'yanova, A.S.; Drozdov, S.I.; Novatskii, V.G.; Ogloblin, A.A.; Sakuta, S.B.; Stepanov, D.N.; Unezhev, V.N.; Yupinov, Y.L.; Brynkush, M.; Grama, K.; Lazer, I.

    1981-04-01

    In the inelastic scattering of /sup 6/Li ions with energy 93 MeV we have investigated the regions of quadrupole and octupole giant isoscalar resonances (E/sub x/approx.63A/sup -1/3/ and E/sub x/approx.30A/sup -13/ MeV, respectively) in the nuclei /sup 90/Zr and /sup 120/Sn. The angular distributions of the resonance groups obtained in the region of angles 12--24/sup 0/ are analyzed by the distorted wave Born approximation. Detailed study of the group at E/sub x/approx.63A/sup -1/3/ favors existence of a monopole giant resonance which is located at an excitation energy approx.76A/sup -1/3/ MeV on the left wing of the quadrupole resonance.

  4. How the presence of a gas giant affects the formation of mean-motion resonances between two low-mass planets in a locally isothermal gaseous disc

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Podlewska-Gaca, E.; Szuszkiewicz, E.

    2014-03-01

    In this paper we investigate the possibility of a migration-induced resonance locking in systems containing three planets, namely an Earth analogue (1 M⊕), a super-Earth (4 M⊕) and a gas giant (one Jupiter mass). The planets have been listed in order of increasing orbital periods. All three bodies are embedded in a locally isothermal gaseous disc and orbit around a solar mass star. We are interested in answering the following questions: will the low-mass planets form the same resonant structures with each other in the vicinity of the gas giant as in the case when the gas giant is absent? More in general, how will the presence of the gas giant affect the evolution of the two low-mass planets? When there is no gas giant in the system, it has been already shown that if the two low-mass planets undergo a convergent differential migration, they will capture each other in a mean-motion resonance. For the choices of disc parameters and planet masses made in this paper, the formation of the 5:4 resonance in the absence of the Jupiter has been observed in a previous investigation and confirmed here. In this work we add a gas giant on the most external orbit of the system in such a way that its differential migration is convergent with the low-mass planets. We show that the result of this set-up is the speeding up of the migration of the super-Earth and, after that, all three planets become locked in a triple mean-motion resonance. However, this resonance is not maintained due to the low-mass planet eccentricity excitation, a fact that leads to close encounters between planets and eventually to the ejection from the internal orbits of one or both low-mass planets. We have observed that the ejected low-mass planets can leave the system, fall into a star or become the external planet relative to the gas giant. In our simulations the latter situation has been observed for the super-Earth. It follows from the results presented here that the presence of a Jupiter-like planet

  5. Dynamics of an [Fe4S4(SPh)4]2- cluster explored via IR, Raman, and nuclear resonance vibrational spectroscopy (NRVS)-analysis using 36S substitution, DFT calculations, and empirical force fields.

    PubMed

    Xiao, Yuming; Koutmos, Markos; Case, David A; Coucouvanis, Dimitri; Wang, Hongxin; Cramer, Stephen P

    2006-05-14

    We have used four vibrational spectroscopies--FT-IR, FT-Raman, resonance Raman, and 57Fe nuclear resonance vibrational spectroscopy (NRVS)--to study the normal modes of the Fe-S cluster in [(n-Bu)4N]2[Fe4S4(SPh)4]. This [Fe4S4(SR)4]2- complex serves as a model for the clusters in 4Fe ferredoxins and high-potential iron proteins (HiPIPs). The IR spectra exhibited differences above and below the 243 K phase transition. Significant shifts with 36S substitution into the bridging S positions were also observed. The NRVS results were in good agreement with the low temperature data from the conventional spectroscopies. The NRVS spectra were interpreted by normal mode analysis using optimized Urey-Bradley force fields (UBFF) as well as from DFT theory. For the UBFF calculations, the parameters were refined by comparing calculated and observed NRVS frequencies and intensities. The frequency shifts after 36S substitution were used as an additional constraint. A D 2d symmetry Fe4S4S'4 model could explain most of the observed frequencies, but a better match to the observed intensities was obtained when the ligand aromatic rings were included for a D 2d Fe4S4(SPh)4 model. The best results were obtained using the low temperature structure without symmetry constraints. In addition to stretching and bending vibrations, low frequency modes between approximately 50 and 100 cm(-1) were observed. These modes, which have not been seen before, are interpreted as twisting motions with opposing sides of the cube rotating in opposite directions. In contrast with a recent paper on a related Fe4S4 cluster, we find no need to assign a large fraction of the low frequency NRVS intensity to 'rotational lattice modes'. We also reassign the 430 cm(-1) band as primarily an elongation of the thiophenolate ring, with approximately 10% terminal Fe-S stretch character. This study illustrates the benefits of combining NRVS with conventional Raman and IR analysis for characterization of Fe-S centers. DFT

  6. Giant resonances in {sup 24}Mg and {sup 28}Si from 240 MeV {sup 6}Li scattering

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, X.; Lui, Y.-W.; Clark, H. L.; Tokimoto, Y.; Youngblood, D. H.

    2009-07-15

    Elastic and inelastic scattering of 240 MeV {sup 6}Li particles from {sup 24}Mg and {sup 28}Si were measured with the MDM spectrometer. Optical potential parameters for {sup 6}Li+{sup 24}Mg and {sup 6}Li+{sup 28}Si scattering systems were obtained by fitting elastic scattering with two different folding model potentials as well as W-S potentials. E0-E3 giant resonance strength distributions for {sup 28}Si and {sup 24}Mg were obtained. E0 strength corresponding to 106{sub -24}{sup +34}% of the EWSR was identified in {sup 24}Mg and 80{sub -20}{sup +35}% was found for {sup 28}Si between E{sub x}=8.0 to 40.0 MeV.

  7. Pump-probe photoelectron velocity-map imaging of autoionizing singly excited 4s{sup 1}4p{sup 6}np{sup 1}(n=7,8) and doubly excited 4s{sup 2}4p{sup 4}5s{sup 1}6p{sup 1} resonances in atomic krypton

    SciTech Connect

    Doughty, Benjamin; Haber, Louis H.; Leone, Stephen R.

    2011-10-15

    Pump-probe photoelectron velocity-map imaging, using 27-eV high-harmonic excitation and 786-nm ionization, is used to resolve overlapping autoionizing resonances in atomic krypton, obtaining two-photon photoelectron angular distributions (PADs) for singly and doubly excited states. Two features in the photoelectron spectrum are assigned to singly excited 4s{sup 1}4p{sup 6}np{sup 1} (n = 7,8) configurations and four features provide information about double excitation configurations. The anisotropy parameters for the singly excited 7p configuration are measured to be {beta}{sub 2} = 1.61 {+-} 0.06 and {beta}{sub 4} = 1.54 {+-} 0.16 while the 8p configuration gives {beta}{sub 2} = 1.23 {+-} 0.19 and {beta}{sub 4} = 0.60 {+-} 0.15. These anisotropies most likely represent the sum of overlapping PADs from states of singlet and triplet spin multiplicities. Of the four bands corresponding to ionization of doubly excited states, two are assigned to 4s{sup 2}4p{sup 4}5s{sup 1}6p{sup 1} configurations that are probed to different J-split ion states. The two remaining doubly excited states are attributed to a previously observed, but unassigned, resonance in the vacuum-ultraviolet photoabsorption spectrum. The PADs from each of the double excitation states are also influenced by overlap from neighboring states that are not completely spectrally resolved. The anisotropies of the observed double excitation states are reported, anticipating future theoretical and experimental work to separate the overlapping PADs into the state resolved PADs. The results can be used to test theories of excited state ionization.

  8. Studies of Pressure-Broadening of Alkali Atom Resonance Lines for Modeling Atmospheres of Extrasolar Giant Planets and Brown Dwarfs

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kirby, Kate; Babb, J.; Yoshino, K.

    2004-01-01

    In L-dwarfs and T-dwarfs the resonance lines of sodium and potassium are so profoundly pressure-broadened that their wings extend several hundred nanometers from line center. With accurate knowledge of the line profiles as a function of temperature and pressure: such lines can prove to be valuable diagnostics of the atmospheres of such objects. We have initiated a joint program of theoretical and experimental research to study the line-broadening of alkali atom resonance lines due to collisions with species such as helium and molecular hydrogen. Although potassium and sodium are the alkali species of most interest in the atmospheres of cool brown dwarfs and extrasolar giant planets, some of our theoretical focus this year has involved the calculation of pressure-broadening of lithium resonance lines by He, as a test of a newly developed suite of computer codes. In addition, theoretical calculations have been carried out to determine the leading long range van der Waals coefficients for the interactions of ground and excited alkali metal atoms with helium atoms, to within a probable error of 2%. Such data is important in determining the behavior of the resonance line profiles in the far wings. Important progress has been made on the experimental aspects of the program since the arrival of a postdoctoral fellow in September. A new absorption cell has been designed, which incorporates a number of technical improvements over the previous cell, including a larger cell diameter to enhance the signal, and fittings which allow for easier cleaning, thereby significantly reducing the instrument down-time.

  9. Relating the 4s{sigma}{sup -1} inner-valence photoelectron spectrum of HBr with the Br 3d{sup -1}5l{lambda} resonant Auger spectra: An approach to the assignments

    SciTech Connect

    Puettner, R.; Hu, Y. F.; Bancroft, G. M.; Kivimaeki, A.; Jurvansuu, M.; Aksela, H.; Aksela, S.

    2003-09-01

    The high resolution Br 4s{sigma}{sup -1} photoelectron spectrum of HBr is presented together with the resonant Auger spectra resulting from excitations from the 3d core levels to the low-n Rydberg orbitals 5s{sigma}, 5p{sigma}, and 5p{pi}. The very complex spectra can be broadly assigned using two observations. First, the energy splittings of the 4p{pi}{sup -2}5s and 4p{pi}{sup -2}5p states are very similar to the splittings of the 4p{pi}{sup -2}({sup 1}{sigma}{sup +},{sup 1}{delta}, and {sup 3}{sigma}{sup -}) final states seen previously in the normal Auger spectra. Second, the {sup 2}{sigma}{sup +} states, which are the dominant correlation satellites in the complex 4s{sigma}{sup -1} photoelectron spectrum, are often enhanced in the 5s{sigma} resonance Auger spectra. Electron correlation and spin-orbit interaction in the final states are important to understand all of these spectra. Unlike the normal Auger spectra, vibrational excitations play only a minor role in these spectra, showing that the 5s and 5p Rydberg orbitals have some bonding character.

  10. Atom Resonance Lines for Modeling Atmosphere: Studies of Pressure-Broadening of Alkali Atom Resonance Lines for Modeling Atmospheres of Extrasolar Giant Planets and Brown Dwarfs

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hasan, Hashima (Technical Monitor); Kirby, K.; Babb, J.; Yoshino, K.

    2005-01-01

    We report on progress made in a joint program of theoretical and experimental research to study the line-broadening of alkali atom resonance lines due to collisions with species such as helium and molecular hydrogen. Accurate knowledge of the line profiles of Na and K as a function of temperature and pressure will allow such lines to serve as valuable diagnostics of the atmospheres of brown dwarfs and extra-solar giant planets. A new experimental apparatus has been designed, built and tested over the past year, and we are poised to begin collecting data on the first system of interest, the potassium resonance lines perturbed by collisions with helium. On the theoretical front, calculations of line-broadening due to sodium collisions with helium are nearly complete, using accurate molecular potential energy curves and transition moments just recently computed for this system. In addition we have completed calculations of the three relevant potential energy curves and associated transition moments for K - He, using the MOLPRO quantum chemistry codes. Currently, calculations of the potential surfaces describing K-H2 are in progress.

  11. Configuration-interaction-induced dynamic spin polarization of the Ar*(2p{sub 1/2,3/2}{sup -1}4s{sub 1/2}){sub J=1} resonant Auger decay

    SciTech Connect

    Lohmann, B.; Langer, B.; Snell, G.; Canton, S.; Berrah, N.; Kleiman, U.; Becker, U.; Martins, M.

    2005-02-01

    Spin-resolved measurements of the Ar{sup *}(2p{sub 1/2,3/2}{sup -1}4s{sub 1/2}){sub J=1} resonantly excited L{sub 2,3}M{sub 2,3}M{sub 2,3} Auger decay have been performed. The low resolution Auger spectrum, which due to cancellation between different multiplet components should exhibit virtually zero dynamic spin polarization, reveals an unexpected nonvanishing polarization effect. Calculations within a relativistic distorted wave approximation explain this effect as configuration-interaction (CI) induced. The CI generates experimentally unresolved fine structure components with low and high total angular momentum, giving rise to asymmetric cases where the high J part of certain multiplets is suppressed by internal selection rules for diagram lines. In this case, only the low J components survive with no partner for spin-polarization cancellation.

  12. Giant Goos-Hänchen effect and Fano resonance at photonic crystal surfaces.

    PubMed

    Soboleva, I V; Moskalenko, V V; Fedyanin, A A

    2012-03-23

    The Goos-Hänchen effect and Fano resonance are studied in photonic crystals that are considered Fourier counterparts in wave-vector-coordinate space. The Goos-Hänchen effect, which is enhanced by the excitation of Bloch surface electromagnetic waves, is visualized using far-field microscopy and measured at the surface of photonic crystals by angular spectroscopy. The maximal Goos-Hänchen shift is observed to be 66  μm.

  13. Calculations of the giant-dipole-resonance photoneutrons using a coupled EGS4-morse code

    SciTech Connect

    Liu, J.C.; Nelson, W.R.; Kase, K.R.; Mao, X.S.

    1995-10-01

    The production and transport of the photoneutrons from the giant-dipoleresonance reaction have been implemented in a coupled EGS4-MORSE code. The total neutron yield (including both the direct neutron and evaporation neutron components) is calculated by folding the photoneutron yield cross sections with the photon track length distribution in the target. Empirical algorithms based on the measurements have been developed to estimate the fraction and energy of the direct neutron component for each photon. The statistical theory in the EVAP4 code, incorporated as a MORSE subroutine, is used to determine the energies of the evaporation neutrons. These represent major improvements over other calculations that assumed no direct neutrons, a constant fraction of direct neutrons, monoenergetic direct neutron, or a constant nuclear temperature for the evaporation neutrons. It was also assumed that the slow neutrons (< 2.5 MeV) are emitted isotropically and the fast neutrons are emitted anisotropically in the form of 1+Csin{sup 2}{theta}, which have a peak emission at 900. Comparisons between the calculated and the measured photoneutron results (spectra of the direct, evaporation and total neutrons; nuclear temperatures; direct neutron fractions) for materials of lead, tungsten, tantalum and copper have been made. The results show that the empirical algorithms, albeit simple, can produce reasonable results over the interested photon energy range.

  14. Isomeric ratios in photonuclear reactions of molybdenum isotopes induced by bremsstrahlung in the giant dipole resonance region

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thiep, Tran Duc; An, Truong Thi; Cuong, Phan Viet; Vinh, Nguyen The; Hue, Bui Minh; Belov, A. G.; Maslov, O. D.; Mishinsky, G. V.; Zhemenik, V. I.

    2017-01-01

    We have determined the isomeric ratios of isomeric pairs 97m,gNb, 95m,gNb and 91m,gMo produced in 98Mo(γ, p)97m,gNb, 96Mo(γ, p)95m,gNb and 92Mo(γ, n)91m,gMo photonuclear reactions in the giant dipole resonance (GDR) region by the activation method. The results were analyzed, discussed and compared with the similar data from literature to examine the role of excitation energy, neutron configuration, channel effect and direct and pre-equilibrium processes in (γ, p) photonuclear reactions. In this work the isomeric ratios for 97m,gNb from 14 to 19 MeV, for 195m,gNb from14 to 24 MeV except 20 and 23.5 MeV and for 91m,gMo at 14 and 15 MeV are the first time measurements.

  15. Giant peak to valley ratio in a GaN based resonant tunnel diode with barrier width modulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sankaranarayanan, Sandeep; Saha, Dipankar

    2016-10-01

    A barrier width modulated GaN based resonant tunnel diode is theoretically proposed which exhibits a giant peak to valley current ratio as high as 60 and a high negative differential conductance (NDC) of 1.77 × 106 S/cm2 with very low valley current density of 3 mA/cm2. This is achieved by the unique characteristic of the device current which monotonically decreases for applied voltages greater than the valley voltage in our simulation window. This is in contrast to all the other negative differential conductance based devices which experience an immediate exponential increase in current after the NDC region. The proposed device is also the first bidirectional tunneling diode which shows negative differential conductance for both polarity of the applied bias which is normally not observed with the conventional GaN/AlGaN double barrier structures due to the strong asymmetry arising from the internal electric fields due to polarization. The unique characteristics of the device can be attributed to the use of a modulated barrier width which is made possible by a polarization modulating InGaN layer and efficient utilization of internal electric fields in III-nitrides.

  16. Electric dipole strength distribution below the E1 giant resonance in N = 82 nuclei

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guliyev, Ekber; Kuliev, Ali; Guner, Mehmet

    2010-12-01

    In this study quasiparticle random-phase approximation with the translational invariant Hamiltonian using deformed mean field potential has been conducted to describe electric dipole excitations in 136Xe, 138Ba, 140Ce, 142Nd, 144Sm and 146Gd isotones. The distribution of the calculated E1 strength shows a resonance like structure at energies between 6-8 MeV exhausting up to 1% of the isovector electric dipole Energy Weighted Sum Rule and in some aspects nicely confirms the experimental data. It has been shown that the main part of E1 strength, observed below the threshold in these nuclei may be interpreted as main fragments of the Pygmy Dipole resonance. The agreement between calculated mean excitation energies as well as summed B(E1) value of the 1- excitations and the available experimental data is quite good. The calculations indicate the presence of a few prominent positive parity 1+ States in heavy N = 82 isotones in the energy interval 6-8 MeV which shows not all dipole excitations were of electric character in this energy range.

  17. Electric dipole strength distribution below the E1 giant resonance in N = 82 nuclei

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guliyev, Ekber; Kuliev, Ali; Guner, Mehmet

    2010-12-01

    In this study quasiparticle random-phase approximation with the translational invariant Hamiltonian using deformed mean field potential has been conducted to describe electric dipole excitations in 136Xe, 138Ba, 140Ce, 142Nd, 144Sm and 146Gd isotones. The distribution of the calculated E1 strength shows a resonance like structure at energies between 6-8 MeV exhausting up to 1% of the isovector electric dipole Energy Weighted Sum Rule and in some aspects nicely confirms the experimental data. It has been shown that the main part of E1 strength, observed below the threshold in these nuclei may be interpreted as main fragments of the Pygmy Dipole resonance. The agreement between calculated mean excitation energies as well as summed B( E1) value of the 1- excitations and the available experimental data is quite good. The calculations indicate the presence of a few prominent positive parity 1+ States in heavy N = 82 isotones in the energy interval 6-8 MeV which shows not all dipole excitations were of electric character in this energy range.

  18. Giant electric field control of magnetism and narrow ferromagnetic resonance linewidth in FeCoSiB/Si/SiO2/PMN-PT multiferroic heterostructures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gao, Y.; Wang, X.; Xie, L.; Hu, Z.; Lin, H.; Zhou, Z.; Nan, T.; Yang, X.; Howe, B. M.; Jones, J. G.; Brown, G. J.; Sun, N. X.

    2016-06-01

    It has been challenging to achieve combined strong magnetoelectric coupling and narrow ferromagnetic resonance (FMR) linewidth in multiferroic heterostructures. Electric field induced large effective field of 175 Oe and narrow FMR linewidth of 40 Oe were observed in FeCoSiB/Si/SiO2/PMN-PT heterostructures with substrate clamping effect minimized through removing the Si substrate. As a comparison, FeCoSiB/PMN-PT heterostructures with FeCoSiB film directly deposited on PMN-PT showed a comparable voltage induced effective magnetic field but a significantly larger FMR linewidth of 283 Oe. These multiferroic heterostructures exhibiting combined giant magnetoelectric coupling and narrow ferromagnetic resonance linewidth offer great opportunities for integrated voltage tunable RF magnetic devices.

  19. X-ray excited photoluminescence near the giant resonance in solid-solution Gd(1-x)Tb(x)OCl nanocrystals and their retention upon solvothermal topotactic transformation to Gd(1-x)Tb(x)F3.

    PubMed

    Waetzig, Gregory R; Horrocks, Gregory A; Jude, Joshua W; Zuin, Lucia; Banerjee, Sarbajit

    2016-01-14

    Design rules for X-ray phosphors are much less established as compared to their optically stimulated counterparts owing to the absence of a detailed understanding of sensitization mechanisms, activation pathways and recombination channels upon high-energy excitation. Here, we demonstrate a pronounced modulation of the X-ray excited photoluminescence of Tb(3+) centers upon excitation in proximity to the giant resonance of the host Gd(3+) ions in solid-solution Gd1-xTbxOCl nanocrystals prepared by a non-hydrolytic cross-coupling method. The strong suppression of X-ray excited optical luminescence at the giant resonance suggests a change in mechanism from multiple exciton generation to single thermal exciton formation and Auger decay processes. The solid-solution Gd1-xTbxOCl nanocrystals are further topotactically transformed with retention of a nine-coordinated cation environment to solid-solution Gd1-xTbxF3 nanocrystals upon solvothermal treatment with XeF2. The metastable hexagonal phase of GdF3 can be stabilized at room temperature through this topotactic approach and is transformed subsequently to the orthorhombic phase. The fluoride nanocrystals indicate an analogous but blue-shifted modulation of the X-ray excited optical luminescence of the Tb(3+) centers upon X-ray excitation near the giant resonance of the host Gd(3+) ions.

  20. Localized surface plasmon resonances dominated giant lateral photovoltaic effect observed in ZnO/Ag/Si nanostructure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Ke; Wang, Hui; Gan, Zhikai; Zhou, Peiqi; Mei, Chunlian; Huang, Xu; Xia, Yuxing

    2016-03-01

    We report substantially enlarged lateral photovoltaic effect (LPE) in the ZnO/Ag/Si nanostructures. The maximum LPE sensitivity (55.05 mv/mm) obtained in this structure is about seven times larger than that observed in the control sample (7.88 mv/mm) of ZnO/Si. We attribute this phenomenon to the strong localized surface plasmon resonances (LSPRs) induced by nano Ag semicontinuous films. Quite different from the traditional LPE in PN junction type structures, in which light-generated carriers contributed to LPE merely depends on direct excitation of light in semiconductor, this work firstly demonstrates that, by introducing a super thin metal Ag in the interface between two different kinds of semiconductors, the nanoscale Ag embedded in the interface will produce strong resonance of localized field, causing extra intraband excitation, interband excitation and an enhanced direct excitation. As a consequence, these LSPRs dominated contributions harvest much more carriers, giving rise to a greatly enhanced LPE. In particular, this LSPRs-driven mechanism constitutes a sharp contrast to the traditional LPE operation mechanism. This work suggests a brand new LSPRs approach for tailoring LPE-based devices and also opens avenues of research within current photoelectric sensors area.

  1. Localized surface plasmon resonances dominated giant lateral photovoltaic effect observed in ZnO/Ag/Si nanostructure

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Ke; Wang, Hui; Gan, Zhikai; Zhou, Peiqi; Mei, Chunlian; Huang, Xu; Xia, Yuxing

    2016-01-01

    We report substantially enlarged lateral photovoltaic effect (LPE) in the ZnO/Ag/Si nanostructures. The maximum LPE sensitivity (55.05 mv/mm) obtained in this structure is about seven times larger than that observed in the control sample (7.88 mv/mm) of ZnO/Si. We attribute this phenomenon to the strong localized surface plasmon resonances (LSPRs) induced by nano Ag semicontinuous films. Quite different from the traditional LPE in PN junction type structures, in which light-generated carriers contributed to LPE merely depends on direct excitation of light in semiconductor, this work firstly demonstrates that, by introducing a super thin metal Ag in the interface between two different kinds of semiconductors, the nanoscale Ag embedded in the interface will produce strong resonance of localized field, causing extra intraband excitation, interband excitation and an enhanced direct excitation. As a consequence, these LSPRs dominated contributions harvest much more carriers, giving rise to a greatly enhanced LPE. In particular, this LSPRs-driven mechanism constitutes a sharp contrast to the traditional LPE operation mechanism. This work suggests a brand new LSPRs approach for tailoring LPE-based devices and also opens avenues of research within current photoelectric sensors area. PMID:26965713

  2. Emerging giant resonant exciton induced by Ta substitution in anatase TiO2: A tunable correlation effect

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yong, Z.; Trevisanutto, P. E.; Chiodo, L.; Santoso, I.; Barman, A. R.; Asmara, T. C.; Dhar, S.; Kotlov, A.; Terentjevs, A.; Della Sala, F.; Olevano, V.; Rübhausen, M.; Venkatesan, T.; Rusydi, A.

    2016-05-01

    Titanium dioxide (TiO2) has rich physical properties with potential implications for both fundamental physics and new applications. To date, the main focus of applied research is to tune its optical properties, which is usually done via doping and/or nanoengineering. However, understanding the role of d electrons in materials and possible functionalization of d -electron properties are still major challenges. Herewith, within a combination of an innovative experimental technique, high-energy optical conductivity, and state-of-the-art ab initio electronic structure calculations, we report an emerging, novel resonant exciton in the deep ultraviolet region of the optical response. The resonant exciton evolves upon low-concentration Ta substitution in anatase TiO2 films. It is surprisingly robust and related to strong electron-electron and electron-hole interactions. The d - and f -orbital localization, due to Ta substitution, plays an unexpected role, activating strong electronic correlations and dominating the optical response under photoexcitation. Our results shed light on a new optical phenomenon in anatase TiO2 films and on the possibility of tuning electronic properties by Ta substitution.

  3. Localized surface plasmon resonances dominated giant lateral photovoltaic effect observed in ZnO/Ag/Si nanostructure.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Ke; Wang, Hui; Gan, Zhikai; Zhou, Peiqi; Mei, Chunlian; Huang, Xu; Xia, Yuxing

    2016-03-11

    We report substantially enlarged lateral photovoltaic effect (LPE) in the ZnO/Ag/Si nanostructures. The maximum LPE sensitivity (55.05 mv/mm) obtained in this structure is about seven times larger than that observed in the control sample (7.88 mv/mm) of ZnO/Si. We attribute this phenomenon to the strong localized surface plasmon resonances (LSPRs) induced by nano Ag semicontinuous films. Quite different from the traditional LPE in PN junction type structures, in which light-generated carriers contributed to LPE merely depends on direct excitation of light in semiconductor, this work firstly demonstrates that, by introducing a super thin metal Ag in the interface between two different kinds of semiconductors, the nanoscale Ag embedded in the interface will produce strong resonance of localized field, causing extra intraband excitation, interband excitation and an enhanced direct excitation. As a consequence, these LSPRs dominated contributions harvest much more carriers, giving rise to a greatly enhanced LPE. In particular, this LSPRs-driven mechanism constitutes a sharp contrast to the traditional LPE operation mechanism. This work suggests a brand new LSPRs approach for tailoring LPE-based devices and also opens avenues of research within current photoelectric sensors area.

  4. Spin observables for the isovector spin-dipole giant resonance excited in (p,n) reactions at medium energies.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Watson, J. W.

    1996-10-01

    For charge-exchange reactions at medium energies, one of the dominant features of small-angle spectra is the excitation of the ΔT = 1, ΔL = 1, ΔS = 1 isovector "spin-dipole" resonance (SDR). We describe how polarization-transfer measurements can be used to identify the overlapping J^π = 0^-, 1^-, and 2^- components of the SDR. Results for ^16O(p,n) and ^40Ca(p,n) using data (J. W. Watson et al.), Nucl. Phys. A577, 79c (1994). (J. W. Watson et al.), Nucl. Phys. A599, 211c (1996). for the transverse polarization-transfer coefficient D_NN' are presented and compared with distorted-wave impulse approximation (DWIA) calculations with theory of finite Fermi systems (TFFS) wavefunctions. (F. A. Gareev et al.), Sov. J. Part. Nucl. 19, 373 (1988). Future experiments will utilize complete sets of polarization-transfer data to extract the longitudinal and transverse spin responses,(M. Ichimura and K. Kawahigashi, Phys. Rev. C45), 1822 (1992). which will provide a more definitive separation of the different J^πs in the SDR. footnote Supported by NSF PHY 94-09265

  5. Doorway-state analysis of the fine structure in the giant quadrupole resonance in 208Pb observed in inelastic electron scattered

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Winchenbach, J.; Pingel, K.; Holzwarth, G.; Kühner, G.; Richter, A.

    1983-11-01

    The fine structure observed in high resolution inelastic electron scattering data obtained at DALINAC for 208Pb in the excitation energy range of the giant quadrupole resonance (GQR) has been analysed under the assumption that the measured strongly fragmented E2 strength distribution is due to the coupling of one or two doorway states to a large number of more complicated states. The coupling matrix elements derived from the analysis allow the determination of the escape and spreading widths Γ ↑ and Γ ↓, the excitation energies Ed, the energy shifts ΔEd, and their energy dependence, for the underlying doorways.

  6. Giant Magnons Meet Giant Gravitons

    SciTech Connect

    Hofman, Diego M.

    2008-07-28

    We study the worldsheet reflection matrix of a string attached to a D-brane in AdS{sub 5}xS{sup 5}. The D-brane corresponds to a maximal giant graviton that wraps an S{sup 3} inside S{sup 5}. In the gauge theory, the open string is described by a spin chain with boundaries. We focus on open strings with a large SO(6) charge and define an asymptotic boundary reflection matrix. Using the symmetries of the problem, we review the computation of the boundary reflection matrix, up to a phase. We also discuss weak and strong coupling computations where we obtain the overall phase factor and test our exact results.

  7. Mass loss in red giants and supergiants

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sanner, F.

    1975-01-01

    The circumstellar envelopes surrounding late-type giants and supergiants were studied using high resolution, photoelectric scans of strong optical resonance lines. A method for extracting the circumstellar from the stellar components of the lines allowed a quantitative determination of the physical conditions in the envelopes and the rates of mass loss at various positions in the red giant region of the HR diagram. The observed strengthening of the circumstellar spectrum with increasing luminosity and later spectral type is probably caused by an increase in the mass of the envelopes. The mass loss rate for individual stars is proportional to the visual luminosity; high rates for the supergiants suggest that mass loss is important in their evolution. The bulk of the mass return to the interstellar medium in the red giant region comes from the normal giants, at a rate comparable to that of planetary nebulae.

  8. YOUNG SOLAR SYSTEM's FIFTH GIANT PLANET?

    SciTech Connect

    Nesvorny, David

    2011-12-15

    Studies of solar system formation suggest that the solar system's giant planets formed and migrated in the protoplanetary disk to reach the resonant orbits with all planets inside {approx}15 AU from the Sun. After the gas disk's dispersal, Uranus and Neptune were likely scattered by the gas giants, and approached their current orbits while dispersing the transplanetary disk of planetesimals, whose remains survived to this time in the region known as the Kuiper Belt. Here we performed N-body integrations of the scattering phase between giant planets in an attempt to determine which initial states are plausible. We found that the dynamical simulations starting with a resonant system of four giant planets have a low success rate in matching the present orbits of giant planets and various other constraints (e.g., survival of the terrestrial planets). The dynamical evolution is typically too violent, if Jupiter and Saturn start in the 3:2 resonance, and leads to final systems with fewer than four planets. Several initial states stand out in that they show a relatively large likelihood of success in matching the constraints. Some of the statistically best results were obtained when assuming that the solar system initially had five giant planets and one ice giant, with the mass comparable to that of Uranus and Neptune, and which was ejected to interstellar space by Jupiter. This possibility appears to be conceivable in view of the recent discovery of a large number of free-floating planets in interstellar space, which indicates that planet ejection should be common.

  9. Effect of giant charge-transfer resonance σCT 109 barn on operation of magnetic fusion reactor below ``critical energy.''

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hester, Timothy; Maglich, Bogdan; Scott, Dan; Vaucher, Alexander

    2016-10-01

    Charge transfer (CT) reactivity was assumed to be negligible compared to ionization (IO) before Belfast measurements1-3 revealed the opposite: CT predominance over IO, σCT 109 b , σCT /σIO U 100 , below critical `atomic unit of velocity', vo = 2.2 ×108cms-1 , which is orbital velocity of e in H atom. Near vo, U = 1 , i.e. σCT σIO . Critical ion energy is T0 (lab) = k 25 M [ KeV ] = 200 KeV for [ ERR : md : MbegChr = 0 x 2329 , MendChr = 0 x 232 A , nParams = 1 ] = ion mass [ amu ] = 4 for DT mix ; k = 2 . ``Burnout'' pumping that requires U << 1 is inoperable in the U >> 1 regime whereas CT continually acts like compressor increasing operating vacuum pressure during neutral beam discharge to 10-3 Torr/0.3 s; this, in turn, sets upper limits to ion life-time against neutralization to τ =10-6 s. τ is 105 times shorter than thermalization time constant; hence plasma cannot be created. Lawson4 was unaware of CT resonance; his ``critical temperature'' (30 KeV for DT) should be replaced with T0.

  10. Transforming giants.

    PubMed

    Kanter, Rosabeth Moss

    2008-01-01

    Large corporations have long been seen as lumbering, inflexible, bureaucratic--and clueless about global developments. But recently some multinationals seem to be transforming themselves: They're engaging employees, moving quickly, and introducing innovations that show true connection with the world. Harvard Business School's Kanter ventured with a research team inside a dozen global giants--including IBM, Procter & Gamble, Omron, CEMEX, Cisco, and Banco Real--to discover what has been driving the change. After conducting more than 350 interviews on five continents, she and her colleagues came away with a strong sense that we are witnessing the dawn of a new model of corporate power: The coordination of actions and decisions on the front lines now appears to stem from widely shared values and a sturdy platform of common processes and technology, not from top-down decrees. In particular, the values that engage the passions of far-flung workforces stress openness, inclusion, and making the world a better place. Through this shift in what might be called their guidance systems, the companies have become as creative and nimble as much smaller ones, even while taking on social and environmental challenges of a scale that only large enterprises could attempt. IBM, for instance, has created a nonprofit partnership, World Community Grid, through which any organization or individual can donate unused computing power to research projects and see what is being done with the donation in real time. IBM has gained an inspiring showcase for its new technology, helped business partners connect with the company in a positive way, and offered individuals all over the globe the chance to contribute to something big.

  11. Giant Cell Arteritis

    MedlinePlus

    Giant cell arteritis is a disorder that causes inflammation of your arteries, usually in the scalp, neck, and arms. ... arteries, which keeps blood from flowing well. Giant cell arteritis often occurs with another disorder called polymyalgia ...

  12. Giant impacts on giant planets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de Pater, Imke

    2013-10-01

    The 2009 impact and recent superbolides on Jupiter caught the world by surprise and cast doubt on impactor flux estimates for the outer solar system. Enhanced amateur planetary imaging techniques yield both high spatial resolution {enabling the 2009 impact debris field detection} and rapid frame rates {enabling the 2010/2012 impact flash detections and lightcurve measurements}.We propose a ToO program to image future impacts on Jupiter and Saturn. To remove the possibility of impact cloud non-detections, the program will be triggered only if an existing impact debris field is seen, an object on a collision course with Jupiter or Saturn is discovered, or an impact light curve is measured with an estimated total energy large enough to generate an impact cloud in a giant planet atmosphere {10^20 J}.HST provides the only way to image these events in the ultraviolet, providing information on aerosol altitudes and on smaller particles that are less visible to ground-based infrared observations. High-resolution imaging with proper timing {not achievable from the ground} is required to measure precisely both the velocity fields of impact sites and the optical spectrum of impact debris. HST observations of past impacts on Jupiter have also served both as cornerstones of science investigations at other wavelengths and as vehicles for effective public outreach.Large outer solar system impacts are governed by the same physics as in the terrestrial events that dominate the impact threat to humans. Studying the behavior of impactors of various sizes and compositions, as they enter the atmosphere at varying angles and speeds, will better quantify terrestrial impact hazards.

  13. Giant impacts on giant planets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de Pater, Imke

    2014-10-01

    The 2009 impact and recent superbolides on Jupiter caught the world by surprise and cast doubt on impactor flux estimates for the outer solar system. Enhanced amateur planetary imaging techniques yield both high spatial resolution (enabling the 2009 impact debris field detection) and rapid frame rates (enabling the 2010/2012 impact flash detections and lightcurve measurements).We propose a ToO program to image future impacts on Jupiter and Saturn. To remove the possibility of impact cloud non-detections, the program will be triggered only if an existing impact debris field is seen, an object on a collision course with Jupiter or Saturn is discovered, or an impact light curve is measured with an estimated total energy large enough to generate an impact cloud in a giant planet atmosphere (10^20 J).HST provides the only way to image these events in the ultraviolet, providing information on aerosol altitudes and on smaller particles that are less visible to ground-based infrared observations. High-resolution imaging with proper timing (not achievable from the ground) is required to measure precisely both the velocity fields of impact sites and the optical spectrum of impact debris. HST observations of past impacts on Jupiter have also served both as cornerstones of science investigations at other wavelengths and as vehicles for effective public outreach.Large outer solar system impacts are governed by the same physics as in the terrestrial events that dominate the impact threat to humans. Studying the behavior of impactors of various sizes and compositions, as they enter the atmosphere at varying angles and speeds, will better quantify terrestrial impact hazards.

  14. Giant impacts on giant planets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de Pater, Imke

    2012-10-01

    The 2009 impact on Jupiter caught the world by surprise and cast doubt on impactor flux estimates for the outer solar system. Enhanced amateur planetary imaging techniques yield both high spatial resolution {enabling the 2009 impact debris field detection} and rapid frame rates {enabling the 2010 impact flash detections and lightcurve measurements}.We propose a Target of Opportunity program to image future impacts on Jupiter and Saturn. To remove the possibility of impact cloud non-detections, the program will be triggered only if an existing impact debris field is seen, an object on a collision course with Jupiter or Saturn is discovered, or an impact light curve is measured with an estimated total energy large enough to generate an impact cloud in a giant planet atmosphere.HST provides the only way to image these events in the ultraviolet, providing information on aerosol altitudes and on smaller particles that are less visible to ground-based infrared observations. High-resolution imaging with proper timing {not achievable from the ground} is required to measure precisely both the velocity fields of impact sites and the optical spectrum of impact debris. HST observations of past impacts on Jupiter have also served both as cornerstones of science investigations at other wavelengths and as vehicles for effective public outreach.Large outer solar system impacts are governed by the same physics as in the terrestrial events that dominate the impact threat to humans. Studying the behavior of impactors of various sizes and compositions, as they enter the atmosphere at varying angles and speeds, will better quantify terrestrial impact hazards.

  15. Search for missing ψ (4 S ) in the e+e-→π+π-ψ (2 S ) process

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Dian-Yong; Liu, Xiang; Matsuki, Takayuki

    2016-02-01

    A detailed analysis to find a missing ψ (4 S ) is made by utilizing the recent precise measurements of the cross section for the process e+e-→ψ (2 S )π+π- by Belle. Assuming three resonances Y (4360 ), Y (4660 ), and ψ (4 S ) to fit the data, we obtain the resonance parameters for ψ (4 S ) as m =4243 MeV and Γ =16 ±31 MeV , showing a narrow state as predicted before. A combined fit to the data e+e-→ψ (2 S )π+π- , hcπ+π- , and χc 0ω is also performed to obtain the similar resonance parameters of ψ (4 S ). The upper limit of the branching ratio is fitted to be B (ψ (4 S )→ψ (2 S )π+π-)<3 ×10-3, which can be understood by hadronic loop contributions within a reasonable range of parameters. In addition, the ratios of the branching ratios of the ψ (4 S ) dipion transition to that of ψ (4 S )→χc 0ω are fitted, which can be further measured by BESIII and the forthcoming BelleII to confirm the existence of ψ (4 S ).

  16. Management of giant liver hemangiomas: an update.

    PubMed

    Hoekstra, Lisette T; Bieze, Matthanja; Erdogan, Deha; Roelofs, Joris J T H; Beuers, Ulrich H W; van Gulik, Thomas M

    2013-03-01

    Liver hemangiomas are the most common benign liver tumors and are usually incidental findings. Liver hemangiomas are readily demonstrated by abdominal ultrasonography, computed tomography or magnetic resonance imaging. Giant liver hemangiomas are defined by a diameter larger than 5 cm. In patients with a giant liver hemangioma, observation is justified in the absence of symptoms. Surgical resection is indicated in patients with abdominal (mechanical) complaints or complications, or when diagnosis remains inconclusive. Enucleation is the preferred surgical method, according to existing literature and our own experience. Spontaneous or traumatic rupture of a giant hepatic hemangioma is rare, however, the mortality rate is high (36-39%). An uncommon complication of a giant hemangioma is disseminated intravascular coagulation (Kasabach-Merritt syndrome); intervention is then required. Herein, the authors provide a literature update of the current evidence concerning the management of giant hepatic hemangiomas. In addition, the authors assessed treatment strategies and outcomes in a series of patients with giant liver hemangiomas managed in our department.

  17. Giant M1 resonance in Pb

    SciTech Connect

    Laszewski, R.M.; Rullhusen, P.; Hoblit, S.D.; LeBrun, S.F.

    1985-02-11

    Highly polarized tagged photons were used to measure the distribution of M1 transition strength in /sup 206/Pb at excitations between 6.7 and 8.1 MeV. The observed B(up-arrowM1) of about 19..mu../sub 0//sup 2/ can account for most of the isovector M1 strength that is expected in the Pb nucleus. This result in /sup 206/Pb is compared with the current experimental situation in /sup 208/Pb. The discrepancy between predicted and observed M1 strengths in /sup 208/Pb can probably be attributed to local fragmentation of the strength into states that are too weak to have yet all been identified.

  18. [Trochanteric bursitis, pelvic enthesopathy and giant cell arteritis].

    PubMed

    Lorléac'h, A; Duffau, P; Michaux, C; Greib, C; Caubet, O; Viallard, J-F; Pellegrin, J-L

    2008-12-01

    Giant cell arteritis, a large-sized vessel vasculitis, may be associated with musculoskeletal proximal (polymyalgia rheumatica) or distal manifestations. A 68-year-old woman, who had inflammatory pelvic girdle pain, was diagnosed with giant cell arteritis and was successfully treated with corticosteroids. The magnetic resonance imaging and ultrasonography revealed a bilateral bursitis and pelvic girdle enthesopathy. Bursitis is the main anatomic lesion occurring in polymyalgia rheumatica and can be underlined by ultrasonography.

  19. Giant Kerr nonlinearities in circuit quantum electrodynamics.

    PubMed

    Rebić, Stojan; Twamley, Jason; Milburn, Gerard J

    2009-10-09

    The very small size of optical nonlinearities places strict restrictions on the types of novel physics one can explore. This work describes how a single artificial multilevel Cooper pair box molecule, interacting with a superconducting microwave coplanar resonator, when suitably driven, can generate extremely large optical nonlinearities at microwave frequencies, with no associated absorption. We describe how the giant self-Kerr effect can be detected by measuring the second-order correlation function and quadrature squeezing spectrum.

  20. Giant optical nonlinearity of plasmonic nanostructures

    SciTech Connect

    Melentiev, P N; Afanasev, A E; Balykin, V I

    2014-06-30

    The experimental studies of giant optical nonlinearity of single metal nanostructures are briefly reviewed. A new hybrid nanostructure – split-hole resonator (SHR) – is investigated. This structure is characterised by a record-high efficiency of third-harmonic generation and multiphoton luminescence (its nonlinearity exceeds that of a single nanohole by five orders of magnitude) and an unprecedently high sensitivity to light polarisation (extinction coefficient 4 × 10{sup 4}). (extreme light fields and their applications)

  1. Electron Excitation Cross Sections for the 2s(sup 2)2p(sup 3) (sup 4)S -> 2s(sup 2)2p(sup 3) (sup 2d) ->2s2p(sup 4) (sup 4p) (Resonance) Transitions in Oil

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zuo, M.; Smith, S.; Chutjian, A.; Williams, I.; Tayal, S.; McLaughlin, B.

    1994-01-01

    Experimental and theoretical excitation cross sections are reported for the first forbidden transition xxx and the first allowed (resonance) transition xxx in OII. Use is made of electron-energy loss and merged beams methods. The electron energy range covered is 3.33 eV (threshold) to 15 eV for the S->D transition, and 14.9 eV (threshold) to 40 eV for the S->P transition. Care was taken to assess and minimize the metastable fraction of the OII beam. An electron mirror was designed and tested to reflect inelastically back-scattered electrons into the forward direction to account for the full range of polar scattering angles. Comparisons are made between present experiments and 11-state R-Matrix calculations. Calculations are also presented for the xxx transition.

  2. The hydrogen permeability of Pd{sub 4}S

    SciTech Connect

    O'Brien, Casey; Miller, James; Gellman, Andrew; Morreale, Bryan

    2011-04-01

    Hydrogen permeates rapidly through pure Pd membranes, but H{sub 2}S, a common minor component in hydrogen-containing streams, produces a Pd{sub 4}S film on the Pd surface that severely retards hydrogen permeation. Hydrogen still permeates through the bi-layered Pd{sub 4}S/Pd structure, indicating that the Pd{sub 4}S surface is active for H{sub 2} dissociation; the low hydrogen permeability of the Pd4S film is responsible for the decreased rate of hydrogen transport. In this work, the hydrogen permeability of Pd{sub 4}S was determined experimentally in the 623-773 K temperature range. Bi-layered Pd{sub 4}S/Pd foils were produced by exposing pure Pd foils to H{sub 2}S. H{sub 2} fluxes through the bi-layered Pd{sub 4}S/Pd foils were measured during exposure to both pure H{sub 2} and a 1000 ppm H{sub 2}S in H{sub 2} gas mixture. Our results show that H{sub 2}S slows hydrogen permeation through Pd mainly by producing a Pd{sub 4}S film on the Pd surface that is roughly an order-of-magnitude less permeable to hydrogen (k{sub Pd{sub 4}S} = 10{sup −7.5} exp(−0.22 eV/k{sub B}T) molH{sub 2}/m/s/Pa{sup 1/2}) than pure Pd. The presence of H{sub 2}S in the gas stream results in greater inhibition of hydrogen transport than can be explained by the very low permeability of Pd{sub 4}S. H{sub 2}S may block H2 dissociation sites at the Pd{sub 4}S surface.

  3. Exchange anisotropy in the skyrmion host GaV4S8.

    PubMed

    Ehlers, D; Stasinopoulos, I; Kézsmárki, I; Fehér, T; Tsurkan, V; von Nidda, H-A Krug; Grundler, D; Loidl, A

    2017-02-15

    Using ferromagnetic resonance spectroscopy at 34 GHz we explored the magnetic anisotropy of single-crystalline GaV4S8 in the field-polarized magnetic state. We describe the data in terms of an easy-axis type uniaxial anisotropy with an anisotropy constant [Formula: see text] erg cm(-3) at 2 K, corresponding to a relative exchange anisotropy [Formula: see text]%, and about [Formula: see text]erg cm(-3) near 11 K, i.e. at temperatures where the skyrmion-lattice phase was recently discovered. The relatively large value of K 1 explains the confinement of the skyrmion tubes to the [Formula: see text] easy axes. A distinct set of resonances in the spectra is attributed to the co-existence of different rhombohedral domains. Complementary broadband spectroscopy demonstrates that non-collinear spin states may sensitively be detected by electron spin resonance techniques.

  4. Nqrs Data for C9H12D4LiNO4S (Subst. No. 1188)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chihara, H.; Nakamura, N.

    This document is part of Subvolume A `Substances Containing Ag … C10H15' of Volume 48 `Nuclear Quadrupole Resonance Spectroscopy Data' of Landolt-Börnstein - Group III `Condensed Matter'. It contains an extract of Section `3.2 Data tables' of the Chapter `3 Nuclear quadrupole resonance data' providing the NQRS data for C9H12D4LiNO4S (Subst. No. 1188)

  5. Unstable giant gravitons

    SciTech Connect

    Mello Koch, Robert de; Ives, Norman; Smolic, Jelena; Smolic, Milena

    2006-03-15

    We find giant graviton solutions in Frolov's three parameter generalization of the Lunin-Maldacena background. The background we study has {gamma}-tilde{sub 1}=0 and {gamma}-tilde{sub 2}={gamma}-tilde{sub 3}={gamma}-tilde. This class of backgrounds provides a nonsupersymmetric example of the gauge theory/gravity correspondence that can be tested quantitatively, as recently shown by Frolov, Roiban, and Tseytlin. The giant graviton solutions we find have a greater energy than the point gravitons, making them unstable states. Despite this, we find striking quantitative agreement between the gauge theory and gravity descriptions of open strings attached to the giant.

  6. The Next Giant Step

    NASA Video Gallery

    Artist Robert McCall painted "The Next Giant Step" in 1979 to commemorate the heroism and courage of spaceflight pioneers. Located in the lobby of Johnson's building 2, the mural depicts America's ...

  7. The Giant Cell.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stockdale, Dennis

    1998-01-01

    Provides directions for the construction of giant plastic cells, including details for building and installing the organelles. Also contains instructions for preparing the ribosomes, nucleolus, nucleus, and mitochondria. (DDR)

  8. Search for direct photons in Υ(4S) decays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Narain, M.; Heintz, U.; Lee-Franzini, J.; Lovelock, D. M. J.; Schamberger, R. D.; Willins, J.; Yanagisawa, C.; Franzini, P.; Tuts, P. M.

    1990-11-01

    We have searched for photon signals in Υ(4S) decays, indicative of large decay rates involving annihilation of the bb¯ pair rather than decays to BB¯ meson pairs. We do not observe any evidence for such signals. We also obtain a model-independent upper limit of (4.5-6.0)% for the branching ratio of Υ(4S)-->ggX, for 0

  9. Measurement of the branching fraction of Gamma(4S) --> B0B0.

    PubMed

    Aubert, B; Barate, R; Boutigny, D; Couderc, F; Karyotakis, Y; Lees, J P; Poireau, V; Tisserand, V; Zghiche, A; Grauges-Pous, E; Palano, A; Pappagallo, M; Pompili, A; Chen, J C; Qi, N D; Rong, G; Wang, P; Zhu, Y S; Eigen, G; Ofte, I; Stugu, B; Abrams, G S; Borgland, A W; Breon, A B; Brown, D N; Button-Shafer, J; Cahn, R N; Charles, E; Day, C T; Gill, M S; Gritsan, A V; Groysman, Y; Jacobsen, R G; Kadel, R W; Kadyk, J; Kerth, L T; Kolomensky, Yu G; Kukartsev, G; Lynch, G; Mir, L M; Oddone, P J; Orimoto, T J; Pripstein, M; Roe, N A; Ronan, M T; Wenzel, W A; Barrett, M; Ford, K E; Harrison, T J; Hart, A J; Hawkes, C M; Morgan, S E; Watson, A T; Fritsch, M; Goetzen, K; Held, T; Koch, H; Lewandowski, B; Pelizaeus, M; Peters, K; Schroeder, T; Steinke, M; Boyd, J T; Burke, J P; Chevalier, N; Cottingham, W N; Kelly, M P; Cuhadar-Donszelmann, T; Hearty, C; Knecht, N S; Mattison, T S; McKenna, J A; Thiessen, D; Khan, A; Kyberd, P; Teodorescu, L; Blinov, A E; Blinov, V E; Bukin, A D; Druzhinin, V P; Golubev, V B; Ivanchenko, V N; Kravchenko, E A; Onuchin, A P; Serednyakov, S I; Skovpen, Yu I; Solodov, E P; Yushkov, A N; Best, D; Bondioli, M; Bruinsma, M; Chao, M; Eschrich, I; Kirkby, D; Lankford, A J; Mandelkern, M; Mommsen, R K; Roethel, W; Stoker, D P; Buchanan, C; Hartfiel, B L; Weinstein, A J R; Foulkes, S D; Gary, J W; Long, O; Shen, B C; Wang, K; Zhang, L; Del Re, D; Hadavand, H K; Hill, E J; MacFarlane, D B; Paar, H P; Rahatlou, Sh; Sharma, V; Berryhill, J W; Campagnari, C; Cunha, A; Dahmes, B; Hong, T M; Lu, A; Mazur, M A; Richman, J D; Verkerke, W; Beck, T W; Eisner, A M; Flacco, C J; Heusch, C A; Kroseberg, J; Lockman, W S; Nesom, G; Schalk, T; Schumm, B A; Seiden, A; Spradlin, P; Williams, D C; Wilson, M G; Albert, J; Chen, E; Dubois-Felsmann, G P; Dvoretskii, A; Hitlin, D G; Narsky, I; Piatenko, T; Porter, F C; Ryd, A; Samuel, A; Yang, S; Jayatilleke, S; Mancinelli, G; Meadows, B T; Sokoloff, M D; Blanc, F; Bloom, P; Chen, S; Ford, W T; Nauenberg, U; Olivas, A; Rankin, P; Ruddick, W O; Smith, J G; Ulmer, K A; Zhang, J; Chen, A; Eckhart, E A; Harton, J L; Soffer, A; Toki, W H; Wilson, R J; Zeng, Q; Spaan, B; Altenburg, D; Brandt, T; Brose, J; Dickopp, M; Feltresi, E; Hauke, A; Lacker, H M; Maly, E; Nogowski, R; Otto, S; Petzold, A; Schott, G; Schubert, J; Schubert, K R; Schwierz, R; Sundermann, J E; Bernard, D; Bonneaud, G R; Grenier, P; Schrenk, S; Thiebaux, Ch; Vasileiadis, G; Verderi, M; Bard, D J; Clark, P J; Gradl, W; Muheim, F; Playfer, S; Xie, Y; Andreotti, M; Azzolini, V; Bettoni, D; Bozzi, C; Calabrese, R; Cibinetto, G; Luppi, E; Negrini, M; Piemontese, L; Sarti, A; Anulli, F; Baldini-Ferroli, R; Calcaterra, A; de Sangro, R; Finocchiaro, G; Patteri, P; Peruzzi, I M; Piccolo, M; Zallo, A; Buzzo, A; Capra, R; Contri, R; Lo Vetere, M; Macri, M; Monge, M R; Passaggio, S; Patrignani, C; Robutti, E; Santroni, A; Tosi, S; Bailey, S; Brandenburg, G; Chaisanguanthum, K S; Morii, M; Won, E; Dubitzky, R S; Langenegger, U; Marks, J; Uwer, U; Bhimji, W; Bowerman, D A; Dauncey, P D; Egede, U; Gaillard, J R; Morton, G W; Nash, J A; Nikolich, M B; Taylor, G P; Charles, M J; Grenier, G J; Mallik, U; Cochran, J; Crawley, H B; Meyer, W T; Prell, S; Rosenberg, E I; Rubin, A E; Yi, J; Arnaud, N; Davier, M; Giroux, X; Grosdidier, G; Höcker, A; Le Diberder, F; Lepeltier, V; Lutz, A M; Petersen, T C; Pierini, M; Plaszczynski, S; Rodier, S; Roudeau, P; Schune, M H; Stocchi, A; Wormser, G; Cheng, C H; Lange, D J; Simani, M C; Wright, D M; Bevan, A J; Chavez, C A; Coleman, J P; Forster, I J; Fry, J R; Gabathuler, E; Gamet, R; George, K A; Hutchcroft, D E; Parry, R J; Payne, D J; Touramanis, C; Cormack, C M; Di Lodovico, F; Brown, C L; Cowan, G; Flack, R L; Flaecher, H U; Green, M G; Jackson, P S; McMahon, T R; Ricciardi, S; Salvatore, F; Winter, M A; Brown, D; Davis, C L; Allison, J; Barlow, N R; Barlow, R J; Hodgkinson, M C; Lafferty, G D; Naisbit, M T; Williams, J C; Chen, C; Farbin, A; Hulsbergen, W D; Jawahery, A; Kovalskyi, D; Lae, C K; Lillard, V; Roberts, D A; Blaylock, G; Dallapiccola, C; Hertzbach, S S; Kofler, R; Koptchev, V B; Moore, T B; Saremi, S; Staengle, H; Willocq, S; Cowan, R; Koeneke, K; Sciolla, G; Sekula, S J; Taylor, F; Yamamoto, R K; Patel, P M; Robertson, S H; Lazzaro, A; Lombardo, V; Palombo, F; Bauer, J M; Cremaldi, L; Eschenburg, V; Godang, R; Kroeger, R; Reidy, J; Sanders, D A; Summers, D J; Zhao, H W; Brunet, S; Côté, D; Taras, P; Nicholson, H; Cavallo, N; De Nardo, G; Fabozzi, F; Gatto, C; Lista, L; Monorchio, D; Paolucci, P; Piccolo, D; Sciacca, C; Baak, M; Bulten, H; Raven, G; Snoek, H L; Wilden, L; Jessop, C P; Losecco, J M; Allmendinger, T; Benelli, G; Gan, K K; Honscheid, K; Hufnagel, D; Kagan, H; Kass, R; Pulliam, T; Rahimi, A M; Ter-Antonyan, R; Wong, Q K; Brau, J; Frey, R; Igonkina, O; Lu, M; Potter, C T; Sinev, N B; Strom, D; Torrence, E; Colecchia, F; Dorigo, A; Galeazzi, F; Margoni, M; Morandin, M; Posocco, M; Rotondo, M; Simonetto, F; Stroili, R; Voci, C; Benayoun, M; Briand, H; Chauveau, J; David, P; Del Buono, L; de la Vaissière, Ch; Hamon, O; John, M J J; Leruste, Ph; Malclès, J; Ocariz, J; Roos, L; Therin, G; Behera, P K; Gladney, L; Guo, Q H; Panetta, J; Biasini, M; Covarelli, R; Pioppi, M; Angelini, C; Batignani, G; Bettarini, S; Bucci, F; Calderini, G; Carpinelli, M; Forti, F; Giorgi, M A; Lusiani, A; Marchiori, G; Morganti, M; Neri, N; Paoloni, E; Rama, M; Rizzo, G; Simi, G; Walsh, J; Haire, M; Judd, D; Paick, K; Wagoner, D E; Danielson, N; Elmer, P; Lau, Y P; Lu, C; Olsen, J; Smith, A J S; Telnov, A V; Bellini, F; Cavoto, G; D'Orazio, A; Di Marco, E; Faccini, R; Ferrarotto, F; Ferroni, F; Gaspero, M; Li Gioi, L; Mazzoni, M A; Morganti, S; Piredda, G; Polci, F; Tehrani, F Safai; Voena, C; Christ, S; Schröder, H; Wagner, G; Waldi, R; Adye, T; De Groot, N; Franek, B; Gopal, G P; Olaiya, E O; Wilson, F F; Aleksan, R; Emery, S; Gaidot, A; Ganzhur, S F; Giraud, P-F; Graziani, G; de Monchenault, G Hamel; Kozanecki, W; Legendre, M; London, G W; Mayer, B; Vasseur, G; Yèche, Ch; Zito, M; Purohit, M V; Weidemann, A W; Wilson, J R; Yumiceva, F X; Abe, T; Allen, M; Aston, D; Bartoldus, R; Berger, N; Boyarski, A M; Buchmueller, O L; Claus, R; Convery, M R; Cristinziani, M; Dingfelder, J C; Dong, D; Dorfan, J; Dujmic, D; Dunwoodie, W; Fan, S; Field, R C; Glanzman, T; Gowdy, S J; Hadig, T; Halyo, V; Hast, C; Hryn'ova, T; Innes, W R; Kelsey, M H; Kim, P; Kocian, M L; Leith, D W G S; Libby, J; Luitz, S; Luth, V; Lynch, H L; Marsiske, H; Messner, R; Mohapatra, A K; Muller, D R; O'Grady, C P; Ozcan, V E; Perazzo, A; Perl, M; Ratcliff, B N; Roodman, A; Salnikov, A A; Schindler, R H; Schwiening, J; Snyder, A; Soha, A; Stelzer, J; Strube, J; Su, D; Sullivan, M K; Thompson, J; Va'vra, J; Wagner, S R; Weaver, M; Wisniewski, W J; Wittgen, M; Wright, D H; Yarritu, A K; Young, C C; Burchat, P R; Edwards, A J; Majewski, S A; Petersen, B A; Roat, C; Ahmed, M; Ahmed, S; Alam, M S; Ernst, J A; Saeed, M A; Saleem, M; Wappler, F R; Bugg, W; Krishnamurthy, M; Spanier, S M; Eckmann, R; Kim, H; Ritchie, J L; Satpathy, A; Schwitters, R F; Izen, J M; Kitayama, I; Lou, X C; Ye, S; Bianchi, F; Bona, M; Gallo, F; Gamba, D; Bomben, M; Bosisio, L; Cartaro, C; Cossutti, F; Ricca, G Della; Dittongo, S; Grancagnolo, S; Lanceri, L; Poropat, P; Vitale, L; Vuagnin, G; Martinez-Vidal, F; Panvini, R S; Banerjee, Sw; Bhuyan, B; Brown, C M; Fortin, D; Hamano, K; Jackson, P D; Kowalewski, R; Roney, J M; Sobie, R J; Back, J J; Harrison, P F; Latham, T E; Mohanty, G B; Band, H R; Chen, X; Cheng, B; Dasu, S; Datta, M; Eichenbaum, A M; Flood, K T; Graham, M; Hollar, J J; Johnson, J R; Kutter, P E; Li, H; Liu, R; Mellado, B; Mihalyi, A; Pan, Y; Prepost, R; Tan, P; von Wimmersperg-Toeller, J H; Wu, J; Wu, S L; Yu, Z; Greene, M G; Neal, H

    2005-07-22

    We report the first measurement of the branching fraction f(00) for Gamma(4S) --> B(0)B(0). The data sample consists of 81.7 fb(-1) collected at the Gamma(4S) resonance with the BABAR detector at the SLAC PEP-II asymmetric-energy e(+)e(-) storage ring. Using partial reconstruction of the decay B(0) --> D(*+) l(-)nu(l) in which only the charged lepton and the soft pion from the decay D(*+) --> D(0)pi(+) are reconstructed, we obtain f(00) = 0.487 +/- 0.010(stat) +/- 0.008(syst). Our result does not depend on the branching fractions of B(0) --> D(*+)l(-)nu(l) and D(*+) --> D(0)pi(+) decays, on the ratio of the charged and neutral B meson lifetimes, nor on the assumption of isospin symmetry.

  10. Observation of e+e-→χc 0ω and missing higher charmonium ψ (4 S )

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Dian-Yong; Liu, Xiang; Matsuki, Takayuki

    2015-05-01

    Stimulated by the recent BESIII observation of a new resonance in e+e-→ω χc 0 which is consistent with our predicted ψ (4 S ), we estimate the meson loop contribution to ψ (4 S )→ω χc 0 in this work. The evaluation indicates that our theoretical estimate can overlap with the experimental data in a reasonable parameter range. This fact shows that introduction of the missing higher charmonium ψ (4 S ) provides a possible explanation to the recent BESIII observation. The upper limit of a branching ratio of ψ (4 S )→η J /ψ is also predicted to be 1.9 ×10-3 , which can be further tested by BESIII, Belle, and forthcoming BelleII.

  11. [MR imaging of a giant solitary trichoepithelioma of the skin].

    PubMed

    Oursin, C; Krüger, H J; Sigmund, G; Hellerich, U

    1991-11-01

    Magnetic resonance images of a "giant solitary trichoepithelioma" (GST) are presented for the first time. Furthermore, to our knowledge this is the largest GST ever to be reported in the current literature. Magnetic resonance imaging gave information on the origin of the tumor and on the depth of invasion. The signal intensity is non-specific and does not allow histological classification. Preoperatively, the MR examination depicts the extent of the tumor and thus helps in the surgical management that follows.

  12. Imaging of giant cell tumor of bone

    PubMed Central

    Purohit, Shaligram; Pardiwala, Dinshaw N

    2007-01-01

    Giant cell tumor (GCT) of bone is a benign but locally aggressive and destructive lesion generally occurring in skeletally mature individuals. Typically involving the epiphysiometaphyseal region of long bones, the most common sites include the distal femur, proximal tibia and distal radius. On radiographs, GCT demonstrates a lytic lesion centered in the epiphysis but involving the metaphysis and extending at least in part to the adjacent articular cortex. Most are eccentric, but become symmetric and centrally located with growth. Most cases show circumscribed borders or so-called geographical destruction with no periosteal reaction unless a pathological fracture is present. There is no mineralized tumor matrix. Giant cell tumor can produce wide-ranging appearances depending on site, complications such as hemorrhage or pathological fracture and after surgical intervention. This review demonstrates a spectrum of these features and describes the imaging characteristics of GCT in conventional radiographs, computerized tomography scans, magnetic resonance imaging, bone scans, positron emission tomography scans and angiography. PMID:21139758

  13. Giant congenital melanocytic nevus*

    PubMed Central

    Viana, Ana Carolina Leite; Gontijo, Bernardo; Bittencourt, Flávia Vasques

    2013-01-01

    Giant congenital melanocytic nevus is usually defined as a melanocytic lesion present at birth that will reach a diameter ≥ 20 cm in adulthood. Its incidence is estimated in <1:20,000 newborns. Despite its rarity, this lesion is important because it may associate with severe complications such as malignant melanoma, affect the central nervous system (neurocutaneous melanosis), and have major psychosocial impact on the patient and his family due to its unsightly appearance. Giant congenital melanocytic nevus generally presents as a brown lesion, with flat or mammilated surface, well-demarcated borders and hypertrichosis. Congenital melanocytic nevus is primarily a clinical diagnosis. However, congenital nevi are histologically distinguished from acquired nevi mainly by their larger size, the spread of the nevus cells to the deep layers of the skin and by their more varied architecture and morphology. Although giant congenital melanocytic nevus is recognized as a risk factor for the development of melanoma, the precise magnitude of this risk is still controversial. The estimated lifetime risk of developing melanoma varies from 5 to 10%. On account of these uncertainties and the size of the lesions, the management of giant congenital melanocytic nevus needs individualization. Treatment may include surgical and non-surgical procedures, psychological intervention and/or clinical follow-up, with special attention to changes in color, texture or on the surface of the lesion. The only absolute indication for surgery in giant congenital melanocytic nevus is the development of a malignant neoplasm on the lesion. PMID:24474093

  14. Giant congenital melanocytic nevus.

    PubMed

    Viana, Ana Carolina Leite; Gontijo, Bernardo; Bittencourt, Flávia Vasques

    2013-01-01

    Giant congenital melanocytic nevus is usually defined as a melanocytic lesion present at birth that will reach a diameter ≥ 20 cm in adulthood. Its incidence is estimated in <1:20,000 newborns. Despite its rarity, this lesion is important because it may associate with severe complications such as malignant melanoma, affect the central nervous system (neurocutaneous melanosis), and have major psychosocial impact on the patient and his family due to its unsightly appearance. Giant congenital melanocytic nevus generally presents as a brown lesion, with flat or mammilated surface, well-demarcated borders and hypertrichosis. Congenital melanocytic nevus is primarily a clinical diagnosis. However, congenital nevi are histologically distinguished from acquired nevi mainly by their larger size, the spread of the nevus cells to the deep layers of the skin and by their more varied architecture and morphology. Although giant congenital melanocytic nevus is recognized as a risk factor for the development of melanoma, the precise magnitude of this risk is still controversial. The estimated lifetime risk of developing melanoma varies from 5 to 10%. On account of these uncertainties and the size of the lesions, the management of giant congenital melanocytic nevus needs individualization. Treatment may include surgical and non-surgical procedures, psychological intervention and/or clinical follow-up, with special attention to changes in color, texture or on the surface of the lesion. The only absolute indication for surgery in giant congenital melanocytic nevus is the development of a malignant neoplasm on the lesion.

  15. An Innocent Giant

    PubMed Central

    Solanki, Lakhan Singh; Dhingra, Mandeep; Raghubanshi, Gunjan; Thami, Gurvinder Pal

    2014-01-01

    A cutaneous horn (cornu cutaneum) is a protrusion from the skin composed of a cornified material. It may be associated with a benign, premalignant, or malignant lesion at the base, masking numerous dermatoses. In a 24-year-old female, a giant cutaneous horn arising from a seborrheic keratosis located on the leg is presented. This case has been reported to emphasize that a giant cutaneous horn may also occur in young patients, even in photoprotected areas, and are not always associated with malignancy. PMID:25484426

  16. Mass loss from red giants - Results from ultraviolet spectroscopy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Linsky, J. L.

    1985-01-01

    New instrumentation in space, primarily the IUE spacecraft, has enabled the application of ultraviolet spectroscopic techniques to the determination of physical properties and reliable mass loss rates for red giant winds. One important result is the determination of where in the H-R diagram are found stars with hot outer atmospheres and with cool winds. So far it appears that single cool stars, except perhaps the so-called hybrid stars, have either hot outer atmospheres or cool winds but not both. The C II resonance (1335 A) and intersystem (2325 A) multiplets have been used to derive temperatures, densities, and geometrical extents for the chromospheric portions of red giant winds, with the result that the red giants and the earlier giants with hot coronae have qualitatively different chromospheres. Mass loss rates can now be derived accurately from the analysis of asymmetric emission lines, such as the Mg II resonance lines, and from P Cygni profile lines of atoms in the dominant ionization stage when a hot star is available to probe the wind of a red giant. The Zeta Aur systems, consisting of a K-M supergiant and a main sequence B star are important systems for reliable mass loss rates for the red supergiant components are becoming available.

  17. Analogs of the giant dipole and spin-dipole resonances in {sup 4}He and in {alpha} clusters of {sup 6,7}Li studied by the {sup 4}He,{sup 6,7}Li({sup 7}Li,{sup 7}Be{gamma}) reactions

    SciTech Connect

    Nakayama, S.; Matsumoto, E.; Fushimi, K.; Hayami, R.; Kawasuso, H.; Yasuda, K.; Yamagata, T.; Akimune, H.; Ikemizu, H.; Asaji, S.; Ishida, T.; Kudoh, T.; Sagara, K.; Fujiwara, M.; Hashimoto, H.; Kawase, K.; Nakanishi, K.; Oota, T.; Yosoi, M.; Greenfield, M. B.

    2008-07-15

    We studied analogs of the giant dipole resonance (GDR) and spin-dipole resonance (SDR) in {sup 4}He and in the {alpha} clusters of {sup 6,7}Li via the ({sup 7}Li,{sup 7}Be{gamma}) reactions on {sup 4}He, {sup 6}Li, and {sup 7}Li at an incident energy of 455 MeV and at a scattering angle of 0 deg. by measuring spin-nonflip and spin-flip spectra. The reaction Q-values for the analogs of the GDR and SDR in the {alpha} clusters of {sup 6,7}Li were found to be more negative than those in {sup 4}He by 2.0{+-}0.5 MeV. The ratios of the cross section for the analog of the GDR to that for the analog of the SDR in {sup 4}He and in the {alpha} clusters of {sup 6}Li and {sup 7}Li were found to be the same within errors, 0.5{+-}0.1. The cross sections for the analogs of the GDR as well as those for the analogs of the SDR in the {alpha} clusters of {sup 6,7}Li were 0.6{approx}0.8 times smaller than those in {sup 4}He. These results suggest that excitations of {alpha} clusters embedded in nuclei are suppressed as compared with excitations of free {alpha} particles.

  18. Giant field enhancement in electromagnetic Helmholtz nanoantenna

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chevalier, Paul; Bouchon, Patrick; Greffet, Jean-Jacques; Pelouard, Jean-Luc; Haïdar, Riad; Pardo, Fabrice

    2014-11-01

    Inspired by the acoustic Helmholtz resonator, we propose a slit-box electromagnetic nanoantenna able to concentrate the energy of an incident beam into surfaces a thousand times smaller than with a classical lens. This design produces a giant electric field enhancement throughout the slit. The intensity enhancement reaches 104 in the visible range up to 108 in the THz range even with focused beams, thanks to an omnidirectional reception. These properties could target applications requiring extreme light concentration, such as surface-enhanced infrared absorption, nonlinear optics, and biophotonics.

  19. Giant monopole strength in {sup 58}Ni

    SciTech Connect

    Lui, Y.-W.; Clark, H. L.; Youngblood, D. H.

    2000-06-01

    The strength distribution of the giant monopole resonance in {sup 58}Ni has been measured from E{sub x}=10 to 35 MeV using small-angle scattering of 240-MeV {alpha} particles. E0 strength corresponding to 74{sub -12}{sup +22}% of the E0 EWSR was found between E{sub x}=12.0 and 31.1 MeV with a centroid of 20.30{sub -0.14}{sup +1.69} MeV. (c) 2000 The American Physical Society.

  20. Giant scrotal elephantiasis.

    PubMed

    Kuepper, Daniel

    2005-02-01

    How much can a man carry? Penoscrotal elephantiasis is a debilitating syndrome. This is a case report of a patient with giant genital elephantiasis secondary to long-standing lymphogranuloma venereum infection in Ethiopia. Complete surgical resection of the pathologic tissue and penile reconstruction was undertaken with good cosmetic and functional results.

  1. Electroluminescence of Giant Stretchability.

    PubMed

    Yang, Can Hui; Chen, Baohong; Zhou, Jinxiong; Chen, Yong Mei; Suo, Zhigang

    2016-06-01

    A new type of electroluminescent device achieves giant stretchability by integrating electronic and ionic components. The device uses phosphor powders as electroluminescent materials, and hydrogels as stretchable and transparent ionic conductors. Subject to cyclic voltage, the phosphor powders luminesce, but the ionic conductors do not electrolyze. The device produces constant luminance when stretched up to an area strain of 1500%.

  2. Management of giant pseudomeningoceles after spinal surgery

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background Pseudomeningoceles are a rare complication after spinal surgery, and studies on these complex formations are few. Methods Between October 2000 and March 2008, 11 patients who developed symptomatic pseudomeningoceles after spinal surgery were recruited. In this retrospective study, we reported our experiences in the management of these complex, symptomatic pseudomeningoceles after spinal surgery. A giant pseudomeningocele was defined as a pseudomeningocele >8 cm in length. We also evaluated the risk factors for the formation of giant pseudomeningoceles. Results All patients were treated successfully with a combined treatment protocol of open revision surgery for extirpation of the pseudomeningoceles, repair of dural tears, and implantation of a subarachnoid catheter for drainage. Surgery-related complications were not observed. Recurrence of pseudomeningocele was not observed for any patient at a mean follow-up of 16.5 months. This result was confirmed by magnetic resonance imaging. Conclusions We conclude that a combined treatment protocol involving open revision surgery for extirpation of pseudomeningoceles, repair of dural tears, and implantation of a subarachnoid catheter for drainage is safe and effective to treat giant pseudomeningoceles. PMID:20302667

  3. The Giant Pairing Vibration in Carbon isotopes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cavallaro, M.; Cappuzzello, F.; Carbone, D.; Agodi, C.; Azaiez, F.; Assié, M.; de Séréville, N.; Scarpaci, J. A.

    2016-07-01

    The 13C(18O,16O)15C and 12C(18O,16O)14C reactions at 84 MeV incident energy were explored up to high excitation energy of the residual nucleus thanks to the use of the MAGNEX spectrometer to detect the ejectiles. In the region above the two-neutron separation energy, a resonance has been observed in both nuclei, attributed to the Giant Pairing Vibration (GPV). The neutron decay of the 15C resonances, including the GPV, populated via the two- neutron transfer reaction has been studied using an innovative technique, which couples MAGNEX with the EDEN neutron detector array. The data show that the 15C GPV mainly decays via two-neutron emission.

  4. Atrial fibrillation detection using an iPhone 4S.

    PubMed

    Lee, Jinseok; Reyes, Bersain A; McManus, David D; Maitas, Oscar; Mathias, Oscar; Chon, Ki H

    2013-01-01

    Atrial fibrillation (AF) affects three to five million Americans and is associated with significant morbidity and mortality. Existing methods to diagnose this paroxysmal arrhythmia are cumbersome and/or expensive. We hypothesized that an iPhone 4S can be used to detect AF based on its ability to record a pulsatile photoplethysmogram signal from a fingertip using the built-in camera lens. To investigate the capability of the iPhone 4S for AF detection, we first used two databases, the MIT-BIH AF and normal sinus rhythm (NSR) to derive discriminatory threshold values between two rhythms. Both databases include RR time series originating from 250 Hz sampled ECG recordings. We rescaled the RR time series to 30 Hz so that the RR time series resolution is 1/30 (s) which is equivalent to the resolution from an iPhone 4S. We investigated three statistical methods consisting of the root mean square of successive differences (RMSSD), the Shannon entropy (ShE) and the sample entropy (SampE), which have been proved to be useful tools for AF assessment. Using 64-beat segments from the MIT-BIH databases, we found the beat-to-beat accuracy value of 0.9405, 0.9300, and 0.9614 for RMSSD, ShE, and SampE, respectively. Using an iPhone 4S, we collected 2-min pulsatile time series from 25 prospectively recruited subjects with AF pre- and postelectrical cardioversion. Using derived threshold values of RMSSD, ShE and SampE from the MIT-BIH databases, we found the beat-to-beat accuracy of 0.9844, 0.8494, and 0.9522, respectively. It should be recognized that for clinical applications, the most relevant objective is to detect the presence of AF in the data. Using this criterion, we achieved an accuracy of 100% for both the MIT-BIH AF and iPhone 4S databases.

  5. Exchange anisotropy in the skyrmion host GaV4S8

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ehlers, D.; Stasinopoulos, I.; Kézsmárki, I.; Fehér, T.; Tsurkan, V.; Krug von Nidda, H.-A.; Grundler, D.; Loidl, A.

    2017-02-01

    Using ferromagnetic resonance spectroscopy at 34 GHz we explored the magnetic anisotropy of single-crystalline GaV4S8 in the field-polarized magnetic state. We describe the data in terms of an easy-axis type uniaxial anisotropy with an anisotropy constant {{K}1}=1.6\\cdot {{10}5} erg cm-3 at 2 K, corresponding to a relative exchange anisotropy Δ J/J≈ 5 %, and about 1.0\\cdot {{10}5}~ erg cm-3 near 11 K, i.e. at temperatures where the skyrmion-lattice phase was recently discovered. The relatively large value of K 1 explains the confinement of the skyrmion tubes to the < 1 1 1> easy axes. A distinct set of resonances in the spectra is attributed to the co-existence of different rhombohedral domains. Complementary broadband spectroscopy demonstrates that non-collinear spin states may sensitively be detected by electron spin resonance techniques.

  6. Ice Giant Exploration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rymer, A. M.; Arridge, C. S.; Masters, A.; Turtle, E. P.; Simon, A. A.; Hofstadter, M. D.; Turrini, D.; Politi, R.

    2015-12-01

    The Ice Giants in our solar system, Uranus and Neptune, are fundamentally different from their Gas Giant siblings Jupiter and Saturn, from the different proportions of rock and ice to the configuration of their planetary magnetic fields. Kepler space telescope discoveries of exo-planets indicate that planets of this type are among the most ubiquitous universally and therefore a future mission to explore the nature of the Ice Giants in our own solar system will provide insights into the nature of extra-solar system objects in general. Uranus has the smallest self- luminosity of all the planets, potentially related to catastrophic events early in the planet's history, which also may explain Uranus' large obliquity. Uranus' atmosphere is subject to extreme seasonal forcing making it unique in the Solar System. Neptune is also unique in a number of ways, notably its large moon Triton which is likely a captured Kuiper Belt Object and one of only two moons in the solar system with a robustly collisional atmosphere. Similar to Uranus, the angle between the solar wind and the magnetic dipole axis is subject to large-amplitude variations on both diurnal and seasonal timescales, but peculiarly it has one of the quietest magnetospheres of the solar system, at least according to Voyager 2, the only spacecraft to encounter Neptune to date. A comprehensive mission, as advocated in the Decadal Survey, would provide enormous science return but is also challenging and expensive. In this presentation we will discuss mission scenarios and suggest how collaboration between disciplines and internationally can help us to pursue a mission that includes Ice Giant exploration.

  7. Giant cell arteritis

    PubMed Central

    Calvo-Romero, J

    2003-01-01

    Giant cell arteritis (GCA), temporal arteritis or Horton's arteritis, is a systemic vasculitis which involves large and medium sized vessels, especially the extracranial branches of the carotid arteries, in persons usually older than 50 years. Permanent visual loss, ischaemic strokes, and thoracic and abdominal aortic aneurysms are feared complications of GCA. The treatment consists of high dose steroids. Mortality, with a correct treatment, in patients with GCA seems to be similar that of controls. PMID:13679546

  8. Giant Cell Arteritis.

    PubMed

    Hoffman, Gary S

    2016-11-01

    This issue provides a clinical overview of giant cell arteritis, focusing on diagnosis, treatment, and practice improvement. The content of In the Clinic is drawn from the clinical information and education resources of the American College of Physicians (ACP), including MKSAP (Medical Knowledge and Self-Assessment Program). Annals of Internal Medicine editors develop In the Clinic in collaboration with the ACP's Medical Education and Publishing divisions and with the assistance of additional science writers and physician writers.

  9. Resonances and resonance widths

    SciTech Connect

    Collins, T.

    1986-05-01

    Two-dimensional betatron resonances are much more important than their simple one-dimensional counterparts and exhibit a strong dependence on the betatron phase advance per cell. A practical definition of ''width'' is expanded upon in order to display these relations in tables. A primarily pedagogical introduction is given to explain the tables, and also to encourage a wider capability for deriving resonance behavior and wider use of ''designer'' resonances.

  10. De novo design of an artificial bis[4Fe-4S] binding protein.

    PubMed

    Roy, Anindya; Sarrou, Iosifina; Vaughn, Michael D; Astashkin, Andrei V; Ghirlanda, Giovanna

    2013-10-29

    In nature, protein subunits containing multiple iron-sulfur clusters often mediate the delivery of reducing equivalents from metabolic pathways to the active site of redox proteins. The de novo design of redox active proteins should include the engineering of a conduit for the delivery of electrons to and from the active site, in which multiple redox active centers are arranged in a controlled manner. Here, we describe a designed three-helix protein, DSD-bis[4Fe-4S], that coordinates two iron-sulfur clusters within its hydrophobic core. The design exploits the pseudo two-fold symmetry of the protein scaffold, DSD, which is a homodimeric three-helix bundle. Starting from the sequence of the parent peptide, we mutated eight leucine residues per dimer in the hydrophobic core to cysteine to provide the first coordination sphere for cubane-type iron-sulfur clusters. Incorporation of two clusters per dimer is readily achieved by in situ reconstitution and imparts increased stability to thermal denaturation compared to that of the apo form of the peptide as assessed by circular dichroism-monitored thermal denaturation. The presence of [4Fe-4S] clusters in intact proteins is confirmed by UV-vis spectroscopy, gel filtration, analytical ultracentrifugation, and electron paramagnetic resonance spectroscopy. Pulsed electron-electron double-resonance experiments have detected a magnetic dipole interaction between the two clusters ~0.7 MHz, which is consistent with the expected intercluster distance of 29-34 Å. Taken together, our data demonstrate the successful design of an artificial multi-iron-sulfur cluster protein with evidence of cluster-cluster interaction. The design principles implemented here can be extended to the design of multicluster molecular wires.

  11. Imaging Extrasolar Giant Planets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bowler, Brendan P.

    2016-10-01

    High-contrast adaptive optics (AO) imaging is a powerful technique to probe the architectures of planetary systems from the outside-in and survey the atmospheres of self-luminous giant planets. Direct imaging has rapidly matured over the past decade and especially the last few years with the advent of high-order AO systems, dedicated planet-finding instruments with specialized coronagraphs, and innovative observing and post-processing strategies to suppress speckle noise. This review summarizes recent progress in high-contrast imaging with particular emphasis on observational results, discoveries near and below the deuterium-burning limit, and a practical overview of large-scale surveys and dedicated instruments. I conclude with a statistical meta-analysis of deep imaging surveys in the literature. Based on observations of 384 unique and single young (≈5-300 Myr) stars spanning stellar masses between 0.1 and 3.0 M ⊙, the overall occurrence rate of 5-13 M Jup companions at orbital distances of 30-300 au is {0.6}-0.5+0.7 % assuming hot-start evolutionary models. The most massive giant planets regularly accessible to direct imaging are about as rare as hot Jupiters are around Sun-like stars. Dividing this sample into individual stellar mass bins does not reveal any statistically significant trend in planet frequency with host mass: giant planets are found around {2.8}-2.3+3.7 % of BA stars, <4.1% of FGK stars, and <3.9% of M dwarfs. Looking forward, extreme AO systems and the next generation of ground- and space-based telescopes with smaller inner working angles and deeper detection limits will increase the pace of discovery to ultimately map the demographics, composition, evolution, and origin of planets spanning a broad range of masses and ages.

  12. A Giant Urethral Calculus.

    PubMed

    Sigdel, G; Agarwal, A; Keshaw, B W

    2014-01-01

    Urethral calculi are rare forms of urolithiasis. Majority of the calculi are migratory from urinary bladder or upper urinary tract. Primary urethral calculi usually occur in presence of urethral stricture or diverticulum. In this article we report a case of a giant posterior urethral calculus measuring 7x3x2 cm in a 47 years old male. Patient presented with acute retention of urine which was preceded by burning micturition and dribbling of urine for one week. The calculus was pushed in to the bladder through the cystoscope and was removed by suprapubic cystolithotomy.

  13. Giant left ventricular pseudoaneurysm.

    PubMed

    Prakash, Sumi; Garg, Nadish; Xie, Gong-Yuan; Dellsperger, Kevin C

    2010-01-01

    Left ventricular (LV) pseudoaneurysm (PS) is an uncommon, often fatal complication associated with myocardial infarction, cardiothoracic surgery, trauma, and, rarely, infective endocarditis. A 28-year-old man with prior history of bioprosthetic mitral valve replacement presented with congestive heart failure and bacteremia with Abiotrophia granulitica. Transesophageal echocardiogram showed bioprosthesis dysfunction, large vegetations, mitral regurgitation, and probable PS. Cardiac and chest CT confirmed a PS communicating with the left ventricle Patient had pulseless electrical activity and died. Autopsy showed a giant PS with layered thrombus and pseudo-endothelialized cavity. Our case highlights the importance of multimodality imaging as an important tool in management of PS.

  14. Giant papillary conjunctivitis.

    PubMed Central

    Donshik, P C

    1994-01-01

    Giant papillary conjunctivitis is a syndrome found frequently as a complication of contact lenses. Many variables can affect the onset and severity of the presenting signs and symptoms. Rigid gas permeable contact lenses appear to result in less severe signs and symptoms, with a longer time before the development of giant papillary conjunctivitis. Nonionic, low-water-content soft contact lenses tend to produce less severe signs and symptoms than ionic, low-water-content soft contact lenses. Enzymatic treatment appears to lessen the severity of signs and symptoms. The association of an allergy appears to play a role in the onset of the severity of the signs and symptoms but does not appear to affect the final ability of the individual to wear contact lenses. Using multiple treatment options, such as changing the polymer to a glyceryl methyl methacrylate or a rigid lens, or utilizing a soft lens on a frequent-replacement basis, can result in a success rate of over 90%. In individuals who still have a return of symptoms, the use of topical mast cell stabilizers or a nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drug as an adjunctive therapy offers the added possibility of keeping these patients in contact lenses. Images FIGURE 1 FIGURE 2 FIGURE 3 FIGURE 4 FIGURE 5 FIGURE 6 FIGURE 7 FIGURE 11 A FIGURE 11 B FIGURE 11 C FIGURE 11 D PMID:7886881

  15. Giant extragenital Bowen's disease.

    PubMed

    Bakardzhiev, Ilko; Chokoeva, Anastasiya Atanasova; Tchernev, Georgi

    2015-12-01

    Giant extragenital forms of Morbus Bowen are extremely rare. The already described cases in the word literature are most commonly with periungual localization, as well as located on the foot and neck area. The clinical manifestation is presented most commonly by non-specific erythematous to erythematous-squamous plaques or papules, which is confusing to the clinician. From the pathogenic point of view, it is important to be confirmed or rejected the presence of human papilloma viruses (HPVs) in each case of affected patient, as this information is mandatory in respect to the adequate selection of the subsequent regimen. If HPVs are detected, systemic antiviral therapy could be initiated to reduce the size of the lesions before subsequent surgical eradication. A postoperative prevention through vaccination could be also considered additionally. In cases of HPV-negative giant extragenital forms of Morbus Bowen (as in the described patient), the focus should be on local immunomodulation by substances such as imiquimod, which reduce the size of the lesions, thereby creating optimal opportunities for their future surgical eradication. Other possible options described in the literature include topical application of 5-fluorouracil, photodynamic therapy, cryotherapy, and laser therapy (carbon dioxide laser). The choice of the most appropriate regimen should have been an individual decision of the clinician, considering also the location and the extent of the lesion.

  16. Gas Giants Form Quickly

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2007-01-01

    This is an artist's concept of a hypothetical 10-million-year-old star system. The bright blur at the center is a star much like our sun. The other orb in the image is a gas-giant planet like Jupiter. Wisps of white throughout the image represent traces of gas.

    Astronomers using NASA's Spitzer Space Telescope have found evidence showing that gas-giant planets either form within the first 10 million years of a sun-like star's life, or not at all. The lifespan for sun-like stars is about 10 billion years.

    The scientists came to this conclusion after searching for traces of gas around 15 different sun-like stars, most with ages ranging from 3 million to 30 million years. With the help of Spitzer's Infrared Spectrometer instrument, they were able to search for relatively warm gas in the inner regions of these star systems, an area comparable to the zone between Earth and Jupiter in our own solar system. They also used ground-based radio telescopes to search for cooler gas in the outer regions of these systems, an area comparable to the zone around Saturn and beyond.

  17. Giant Intradiverticular Bladder Tumor

    PubMed Central

    Noh, Mohamad Syafeeq Faeez Md; Aziz, Ahmad Fuad Abdul; Ghani, Khairul Asri Mohd; Siang, Christopher Lee Kheng; Yunus, Rosna; Yusof, Mubarak Mohd

    2017-01-01

    Patient: Male, 74 Final Diagnosis: Giant intradiverticular bladder tumor with metastasis Symptoms: Hematuria Medication:— Clinical Procedure: — Specialty: Urology Objective: Rare disease Background: Intradiverticular bladder tumors are rare. This renders diagnosis of an intradiverticular bladder tumor difficult. Imaging plays a vital role in achieving the diagnosis, and subsequently staging of the disease. Case Report: A 74-year-old male presented to our center with a few months history of constitutional symptoms. Upon further history, he reported hematuria two months prior to presentation, which stopped temporarily, only to recur a few days prior to coming to the hospital. The patient admitted to having lower urinary tract symptoms. However, there was no dysuria, no sandy urine, and no fever. Palpation of his abdomen revealed a vague mass at the suprapubic region, which was non tender. In view of his history and the clinical examination findings, an ultrasound of the abdomen and computed tomography (CT) was arranged. These investigations revealed a giant tumor that seemed to be arising from a bladder diverticulum, with a mass effect and hydronephrosis. He later underwent operative intervention. Conclusions: Intradiverticular bladder tumors may present a challenge to the treating physician in an atypical presentation; thus requiring a high index of suspicion and knowledge of tumor pathophysiology. As illustrated in our case, CT with its wide availability and multiplanar imaging capabilities offers a useful means for diagnosis, disease staging, operative planning, and follow-up. PMID:28246375

  18. Reinflating Giant Planets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kohler, Susanna

    2017-01-01

    Two new, large gas-giant exoplanets have been discovered orbiting close to their host stars. A recent study examining these planets and others like them may help us to better understand what happens to close-in hot Jupiters as their host stars reach the end of their main-sequence lives.OversizedGiantsUnbinned transit light curves for HAT-P-65b. [Adapted from Hartman et al. 2016]The discovery of HAT-P-65b and HAT-P-66b, two new transiting hot Jupiters, is intriguing. These planets have periods of just under 3 days and masses of roughly 0.5 and 0.8 times that of Jupiter, but their sizes are whats really interesting: they have inflated radii of 1.89 and 1.59 times that of Jupiter.These two planets, discovered using the Hungarian-made Automated Telescope Network (HATNet) in Arizona and Hawaii, mark the latest in an ever-growing sample of gas-giant exoplanets with radii larger than expected based on theoretical planetary structure models.What causes this discrepancy? Did the planets just fail to contract to the expected size when they were initially formed, or were they reinflated later in their lifetimes? If the latter, how? These are questions that scientists are only now starting to be able to address using statistics of the sample of close-in, transiting planets.Unbinned transit light curves for HAT-P-66b. [Hartman et al. 2016]Exploring Other PlanetsLed by Joel Hartman (Princeton University), the team that discovered HAT-P-65b and HAT-P-66b has examined these planets observed parameters and those of dozens of other known close-in, transiting exoplanets discovered with a variety of transiting exoplanet missions: HAT, WASP, Kepler, TrES, and KELT. Hartman and collaborators used this sample to draw conclusions about what causes some of these planets to have such large radii.The team found that there is a statistically significant correlation between the radii of close-in giant planets and the fractional ages of their host stars (i.e., the stars age divided by its full

  19. Neutron decay of the Giant Pairing Vibration in 15C

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cavallaro, M.; Agodi, C.; Assié, M.; Azaiez, F.; Cappuzzello, F.; Carbone, D.; de Séréville, N.; Foti, A.; Pandola, L.; Scarpaci, J. A.; Sgouros, O.; Soukeras, V.

    2016-06-01

    The neutron decay of the resonant states of light neutron-rich nuclei is an important and poorly explored property, useful to extract valuable nuclear structure information. The neutron decay of the 15C resonances populated via the two-neutron transfer reaction 13C(18O,16O n) at 84 MeV incident energy is studied using an innovative technique which couples the MAGNEX magnetic spectrometer and the EDEN neutron detector array. The data show that the recently observed 15C Giant Pairing Vibration at 13.7 MeV mainly decays via two-neutron emission.

  20. Allometry indicates giant eyes of giant squid are not exceptional

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background The eyes of giant and colossal squid are among the largest eyes in the history of life. It was recently proposed that sperm whale predation is the main driver of eye size evolution in giant squid, on the basis of an optical model that suggested optimal performance in detecting large luminous visual targets such as whales in the deep sea. However, it is poorly understood how the eye size of giant and colossal squid compares to that of other aquatic organisms when scaling effects are considered. Results We performed a large-scale comparative study that included 87 squid species and 237 species of acanthomorph fish. While squid have larger eyes than most acanthomorphs, a comparison of relative eye size among squid suggests that giant and colossal squid do not have unusually large eyes. After revising constants used in a previous model we found that large eyes perform equally well in detecting point targets and large luminous targets in the deep sea. Conclusions The eyes of giant and colossal squid do not appear exceptionally large when allometric effects are considered. It is probable that the giant eyes of giant squid result from a phylogenetically conserved developmental pattern manifested in very large animals. Whatever the cause of large eyes, they appear to have several advantages for vision in the reduced light of the deep mesopelagic zone. PMID:23418818

  1. OMAC4S- Open Modular Avionics for Space Applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Herpel, H.-J.; Willich, G.; Vogel, T.; Schuettauf, A.; Pletner, S.; Schoen, F.; Fidi, C.; Loetzke, M.; Dittrich, L.; Schuelke, P.; Wolf, T.

    2013-08-01

    Today's spacecraft avionics architecture is characterised by a broad variety of processing modules, operating systems and interfaces for exchanging data between different processing modules. The software that implements most of the satellite functionality has to deal with this fact and is one of the reasons why software has become one of the major cost drivers in satellite projects. Similar problems have triggered developments in other industrial domains like AUTOSAR in the automotive area or Integrated Modular Architecture (IMA) in the aerospace industry [8]. All these initiatives are based on the definition of standards for computing platforms and the interfaces between these platforms. The goals of the Open Modular Avionics Architecture for Space Applications (OMAC4S) initiative started by Astrium, Fraunhofer FOKUS, STI, SYSGO and TTTech are to outline a solution that helps to reduce complexity and costs for space avionics significantly. This initiative is partly funded by the German national space agency (DLR) through the project On-Board Computer System Architecture (OBC-SA). In this paper we describe how standardization and the usage of already proven technologies from other industrial domains will help to limit the effect of the software development on schedule and costs of satellite projects. In addition we will demonstrate a migration path to make these technologies available for space applications.

  2. [Giant esophageal fibrovascular polyp].

    PubMed

    Palacios, Fernando; Contardo, Carlos; Guevara, Jorge; Vera, Augusto; Aguilar, Luis; Huamán, Manuel; Palomino, Américo; Yabar, Alejandro

    2003-01-01

    Fibrovascular polyps are extremely rare benign neoplasias of the esophagus, which usually originate in the lower cricoid area. They do not produce any discomfort in the patient for a long time, however it may make itself evident by the patient's regurgitation of the polyp, producing asphyxia or, more frequently, dysphagia. The case of a 58 year old male patient is presented herein, with a 9 month record of dysphagia, weight loss and intermittent melena. The barium x-ray showed a distended esophagus, with a tumor running from the upper esophageal sphincter to the cardia. The endoscopy confirmed the presence of a pediculated tumor, implanted in the cervical esophagus. Surgeons suspected the potential malignancy of the tumor and performed a transhiatal esophagectomy. The final pathologic diagnosis was giant fibrovascular esophageal polyp.

  3. Giant Hedge-Hogs: Spikes on Giant Gravitons

    SciTech Connect

    Sadri, D

    2004-01-28

    We consider giant gravitons on the maximally supersymmetric plane-wave background of type IIB string theory. Fixing the light-cone gauge, we work out the low energy effective light-cone Hamiltonian of the three-sphere giant graviton. At first order, this is a U(1) gauge theory on R x S{sup 3}. We place sources in this effective gauge theory. Although non-vanishing net electric charge configurations are disallowed by Gauss' law, electric dipoles can be formed. From the string theory point of view these dipoles can be understood as open strings piercing the three-sphere, generalizing the usual BIons to the giant gravitons, BIGGons. Our results can be used to give a two dimensional (worldsheet) description of giant gravitons, similar to Polchinski's description for the usual D-branes, in agreement with the discussions of hep-th/0204196.

  4. A giant Ordovician anomalocaridid.

    PubMed

    Van Roy, Peter; Briggs, Derek E G

    2011-05-26

    Anomalocaridids, giant lightly sclerotized invertebrate predators, occur in a number of exceptionally preserved early and middle Cambrian (542-501 million years ago) biotas and have come to symbolize the unfamiliar morphologies displayed by stem organisms in faunas of the Burgess Shale type. They are characterized by a pair of anterior, segmented appendages, a circlet of plates around the mouth, and an elongate segmented trunk lacking true tergites with a pair of flexible lateral lobes per segment. Disarticulated body parts, such as the anterior appendages and oral circlet, had been assigned to a range of taxonomic groups--but the discovery of complete specimens from the middle Cambrian Burgess Shale showed that these disparate elements all belong to a single kind of animal. Phylogenetic analyses support a position of anomalocaridids in the arthropod stem, as a sister group to the euarthropods. The anomalocaridids were the largest animals in Cambrian communities. The youngest unequivocal examples occur in the middle Cambrian Marjum Formation of Utah but an arthropod retaining some anomalocaridid characteristics is present in the Devonian of Germany. Here we report the post-Cambrian occurrence of anomalocaridids, from the Early Ordovician (488-472 million years ago) Fezouata Biota in southeastern Morocco, including specimens larger than any in Cambrian biotas. These giant animals were an important element of some marine communities for about 30 million years longer than previously realized. The Moroccan specimens confirm the presence of a dorsal array of flexible blades attached to a transverse rachis on the trunk segments; these blades probably functioned as gills.

  5. Pharma giants swap research programs.

    PubMed

    2014-07-01

    Pharmaceutical giants Novartis and GlaxoSmithKline (GSK) agreed in late April to swap some assets, with Novartis handing off its vaccine business to GSK and getting most of the British company's cancer portfolio in return.

  6. Theories of Giant Planet Formation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lissauer, Jack J.; Young, Richard E. (Technical Monitor)

    1998-01-01

    An overview of current theories of planetary formation, with emphasis on giant planets, is presented. The most detailed models are based upon observations of our own Solar System and of young stars and their environments. While these models predict that rocky planets should form around most single stars, the frequency of formation of gas giant planets is more difficult to predict theoretically. Terrestrial planets are believed to grow via pairwise accretion until the spacing of planetary orbits becomes large enough that the configuration is stable for the age of the system. Giant planets begin their growth as do terrestrial planets, but they become massive enough that they are able to accumulate substantial amounts of gas before the protoplanetary disk dissipates. Most models for extrasolar giant planets suggest that they formed as did Jupiter and Saturn (in nearly circular orbits, far enough from the star that ice could), and subsequently migrated to their current positions, although some models suggest in situ formation.

  7. Lichens On Galapagos Giant Tortoises.

    PubMed

    Hendrickson, J R; Weber, W A

    1964-06-19

    The association of Physcia picta with the giant Galdpagos tortoise is believed to be the first reported occurrence of lichens on land animals. The habitat is restricted to specific sites on the carapace of male tortoises.

  8. Landscape of the lost giants

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2013-09-01

    The Pleistocene megafauna extinction erased a group of remarkable animals. Whether humans had a prominent role in the extinction remains controversial, but it is emerging that the disappearance of the giants has markedly affected the environment.

  9. Atmospheres of Extrasolar Giant Planets

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Marley, Mark

    2006-01-01

    The next decade will almost certainly see the direct imaging of extrasolar giant planets around nearby stars. Unlike purely radial velocity detections, direct imaging will open the door to characterizing the atmosphere and interiors of extrasola planets and ultimately provide clues on their formation and evolution through time. This process has already begun for the transiting planets, placing new constraints on their atmospheric structure, composition, and evolution. Indeed the key to understanding giant planet detectability, interpreting spectra, and constraining effective temperature and hence evolution-is the atmosphere. I will review the universe of extrasolar giant planet models, focusing on what we have already learned from modeling and what we will likely be able to learn from the first generation of direct detection data. In addition to these theoretical considerations, I will review the observations and interpretation of the - transiting hot Jupiters. These objects provide a test of our ability to model exotic atmospheres and challenge our current understanding of giant planet evolution.

  10. A Case of Giant Uterine Lipoleiomyoma Simulating Malignancy.

    PubMed

    Karaman, Erbil; Çim, Numan; Bulut, Gülay; Elçi, Gülhan; Andıç, Esra; Tekin, Mustafa; Kolusarı, Ali

    2015-01-01

    Introduction. Uterine leiomyoma is the most common benign pathology in women and lipoleiomyoma is an extremely rare and specific type of leiomyoma. Here, we report an unusual case of giant pedunculated subserous lipoleiomyoma misdiagnosed preoperatively as leiomyosarcoma. Case. A 45-year-old woman admitted to our gynecology outpatient clinic for complaints of abdominal distention, tiredness, and pelvic pain for the last 6 months. Sonography and abdominal magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) showed a giant semisolid mass that filled whole abdominal cavity from pelvis to subdiaphragmatic area. A primary diagnosis of uterine sarcoma or ovarian malignancy was made. On operation, total abdominal hysterectomy with a pedunculated mass of size 30 × 23 × 12 cm and weighing 5.4 kg and bilateral salpingo-oophorectomy were performed. The histopathology revealed a lipoleiomyoma with extensive cystic and fatty degeneration without any malignancy. Discussion. The diagnosis of leiomyoma is done usually with pelvic ultrasound but sometimes it is difficult to reach a correct diagnosis especially in cases of giant and pedunculated lipoleiomyoma that included fatty tissue which may mimick malignancy. Conclusion. Subserous pedunculated giant lipoleiomyoma should be kept in mind in the differential diagnosis of leiomyosarcoma or ovarian malignancy.

  11. Giants in the Local Region

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Luck, R. Earle; Heiter, Ulrike

    2007-06-01

    We present parameter and abundance data for a sample of 298 nearby giants. The spectroscopic data for this work have a resolution of R~60,000, S/N>150, and spectral coverage from 475 to 685 nm. Overall trends in the Z>10 abundances are dominated by Galactic chemical evolution, while the light-element abundances are influenced by stellar evolution, as well as Galactic evolution. We find several super-Li stars in our sample and confirm that Li abundances in the first giant branch are related to mixing depths. Once astration of lithium on the main sequence along with the overall range of main-sequence lithium abundances are taken into account, the lithium abundances of the giants are not dramatically at odds with the predictions of standard stellar evolution. We find the giants to be carbon-diluted in accord with standard stellar evolution and that the carbon and oxygen abundances determined for the local giants are consistent with those found in local field dwarfs. We find that there is evidence for systematic carbon variations in the red giant clump in the sense that the blue side of the clump is carbon-poor (more diluted) than the red side.

  12. The Giant Magnetocaloric Effect

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pecharsky, Vitalij K.

    1998-03-01

    Since the discovery of the magnetocaloric effect in pure iron by E.Warburg in 1881, it has been measured experimentally on many magnetic metals and compounds. The majority of the materials studied order magnetically undergoing a second order phase transformation. The magnetocaloric effect, typically peaking near the Curie or the Néel temperature, generally ranges from 0.5 to 2 K (in terms of adiabatic temperature change) or at 1 to 4 J/kg K (in terms of isothermal magnetic entropy change) per 1 T magnetic field change. The giant magnetocaloric effect recently discovered in Gd_5(Si_xGe_1-x)4 alloys, where x <= 0.5, is associated with a first order magnetic phase transition and it reaches values of 3 to 4 K and 6 to 10 J/kg K per 1 T field change, respectively. The refrigerant capacity, which is the measure of how much heat can be transferred from a cold to a hot reservoir in one ideal thermodynamic cycle, is larger than that of the best second order phase transition materials by 25 to 100%. When the Gd_5(Si_xGe_1-x)4 alloys are compared with other known materials, which show first order magnetic phase transition, such as Dy, Ho, Er, HoCo_2, NdMn_2Si_2, Fe_0.49Rh_0.51, and (Hf_0.83Ta_0.17)Fe_2+x, only Fe_0.49Rh_0.51 has comparable magnetocaloric properties. However, the first order magnetic phase transition in Fe_0.49Rh_0.51 is irreversible, and the magnetocaloric effect disappears after one magnetizing/demagnetizing cycle. A study of the crystal structure, thermodynamics, and magnetism of the Gd_5(Si_xGe_1-x)4 alloys, where 0 <= x <= 1 allowed us to obtain a qualitative understanding of the basic relations between the composition, the crystal structure, and the change in thermodynamics and magnetocaloric properties, which occur in the Gd_5(Si_xGe_1-x)4 system, and which brings about the giant magnetocaloric effect when x <= 0.5.

  13. Highly sensitive surface plasmon resonance chemical sensor based on Goos-Hanchen effects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yin, Xiaobo; Hesselink, Lambertus

    2006-08-01

    The resonance enhanced Goos-Hanchen shifts at attenuated total internal reflection enables the possibility for highly sensitive surface plasmon resonance sensor. The observed giant displacements result from the singular phase retardation at the resonance where the phase is continuous but changes dramatically. The phenomenon is proposed for chemical sensing and the superior sensitivity is demonstrated.

  14. A unique advantage for giant eyes in giant squid.

    PubMed

    Nilsson, Dan-Eric; Warrant, Eric J; Johnsen, Sönke; Hanlon, Roger; Shashar, Nadav

    2012-04-24

    Giant and colossal deep-sea squid (Architeuthis and Mesonychoteuthis) have the largest eyes in the animal kingdom [1, 2], but there is no explanation for why they would need eyes that are nearly three times the diameter of those of any other extant animal. Here we develop a theory for visual detection in pelagic habitats, which predicts that such giant eyes are unlikely to evolve for detecting mates or prey at long distance but are instead uniquely suited for detecting very large predators, such as sperm whales. We also provide photographic documentation of an eyeball of about 27 cm with a 9 cm pupil in a giant squid, and we predict that, below 600 m depth, it would allow detection of sperm whales at distances exceeding 120 m. With this long range of vision, giant squid get an early warning of approaching sperm whales. Because the sonar range of sperm whales exceeds 120 m [3-5], we hypothesize that a well-prepared and powerful evasive response to hunting sperm whales may have driven the evolution of huge dimensions in both eyes and bodies of giant and colossal squid. Our theory also provides insights into the vision of Mesozoic ichthyosaurs with unusually large eyes.

  15. Formation of the giant planets

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lissauer, Jack J.

    2006-01-01

    The observed properties of giant planets, models of their evolution and observations of protoplanetary disks provide constraints on the formation of gas giant planets. The four largest planets in our Solar System contain considerable quantities of hydrogen and helium, which could not have condensed into solid planetesimals within the protoplanetary disk. All three (transiting) extrasolar giant planets with well determined masses and radii also must contain substantial amounts of these light gases. Jupiter and Saturn are mostly hydrogen and helium, but have larger abundances of heavier elements than does the Sun. Neptune and Uranus are primarily composed of heavier elements. HD 149026 b, which is slightly more massive than is Saturn, appears to have comparable quantities of light gases and heavy elements. HD 209458 b and TrES-1 are primarily hydrogen and helium, but may contain supersolar abundances of heavy elements. Spacecraft flybys and observations of satellite orbits provide estimates of the gravitational moments of the giant planets in our Solar System, which in turn provide information on the internal distribution of matter within Jupiter, Saturn, Uranus and Neptune. Atmospheric thermal structure and heat flow measurements constrain the interior temperatures of planets. Internal processes may cause giant planets to become more compositionally differentiated or alternatively more homogeneous; high-pressure laboratory .experiments provide data useful for modeling these processes. The preponderance of evidence supports the core nucleated gas accretion model. According to this model, giant planets begin their growth by the accumulation of small solid bodies, as do terrestrial planets. However, unlike terrestrial planets, the growing giant planet cores become massive enough that they are able to accumulate substantial amounts of gas before the protoplanetary disk dissipates. The primary questions regarding the core nucleated growth model is under what conditions

  16. Clump Giants in the Hyades

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mushotzky, Richard F. (Technical Monitor); Brickhouse, Nancy

    2003-01-01

    The project is entitled 'Clump Giants in the Hyades.' This observation of one of the late-type Hyades giants (Gamma Tau) has implications for understanding the formation of late-type stellar coronae as a function of the evolutionary state of the star. The Hyades giants are interesting because they are all clump giants in the Helium burning phase, similar to the cool primary of Capella. The Hyades giants show significantly more magnetic activity than expected from their state of evolution (and slowed-down rotation). Thus these systems provide an important clue to dynamo action. The data were obtained by the satellite on 13 March 2001 for a total RGS exposure of 58220 seconds. These data were delivered to the PI on 7 August 2001. The data could not be reprocessed until SAS Version 5.3.3 which became available 7 June 2002. Although the guidelines for assessing background rates suggested that half the data were contaminated, it does not appear that the spectral region of the RGS was adversely affected by unusually high background. The spectra show strong lines of Fe XVII and XVIII, O VII and VIII, Ne IX and X, along with numerous weaker lines. The emission measure distribution is highly reminiscent of Capella; if anything, the emission measure distribution is steeper at 6 million K than for Capella. Gamma Tau is the second brightest of the Hyades clump giants. Pallavicini et al. have shown that the luminosity of the brightest Hyades giant (Theta Tau) is remarkably similar to its luminosity as measured by Einstein. Short-term variability is also modest. We are addressing the variability issue now for Gamma Tau. Initial results were reported at the 2003 Seattle AAS meeting. A paper is in preparation for submission to the Astrophysical Journal.

  17. Secular resonances with Ceres and Vesta

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tsirvoulis, Georgios; Novaković, Bojan

    2016-12-01

    In this work we explore dynamical perturbations induced by the massive asteroids Ceres and Vesta on main-belt asteroids through secular resonances. First we determine the location of the linear secular resonances with Ceres and Vesta in the main belt, using a purely numerical technique. Then we use a set of numerical simulations of fictitious asteroids to investigate the importance of these secular resonances in the orbital evolution of main-belt asteroids. We found, evaluating the magnitude of the perturbations in the proper elements of the test particles, that in some cases the strength of these secular resonances is comparable to that of known non-linear secular resonances with the giant planets. Finally we explore the asteroid families that are crossed by the secular resonances we studied, and identified several cases where the latter seem to play an important role in their post-impact evolution.

  18. Giant fluorescence enhancement of fluorophores coupled to nanopatch antennas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mikkelsen, Maiken H.; Rose, Alec; Hoang, Thang B.; McGuire, Felicia; Mock, Jack J.; Ciracì, Cristian; Smith, David R.

    2014-03-01

    Plasmonic cavities and nanoantennas have proven to be particularly attractive candidates for modifying the excitation and decay rates of nearby emitters. Here, we demonstrate giant enhancement of fluorescence in planar nanoparticles electromagnetically coupled to a metallic film, resembling nanopatch antennas. The antennas consist of colloidally synthesized silver nanocubes deposited over a 50 nm silver film. The cubes and film are separated by a ~ 5 nm selfassembled polyelectrolyte spacer layer, coated with a dilute layer of fluorophores (sulfo-cy5 carboxylic acid). By varying the size of the nanocubes, we tune the plasmonic resonance throughout the excitation and emission spectra of the embedded fluorophores, demonstrating a seamless transition between fluorescence enhancement and quenching. The experimentally observed behavior agrees well with performed finite-element simulations. Using this tunable platform, design rules for optimal enhancement are revealed, allowing us to demonstrate giant fluorescence enhancements and a significantly increased spontaneous emission rate. This work was supported by the Air Force Office of Scientific Research.

  19. The influence of interlayer exchange coupling in giant-magnetoresistive devices on spin diode effect in wide frequency range

    SciTech Connect

    Ziętek, Sławomir Skowroński, Witold; Wiśniowski, Piotr; Czapkiewicz, Maciej; Stobiecki, Tomasz; Ogrodnik, Piotr; Barnaś, Józef

    2015-09-21

    Spin diode effect in a giant magnetoresistive strip is measured in a broad frequency range, including resonance and off-resonance frequencies. The off-resonance dc signal is relatively strong and also significantly dependent on the exchange coupling between magnetic films through the spacer layer. The measured dc signal is described theoretically by taking into account magnetic dynamics induced by Oersted field created by an ac current flowing through the system.

  20. Experimental and Theoretical Studies of Pressure Broadened Alkali-Metal Atom Resonance Lines

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shindo, F.; Zhu, C.; Kirby, K.; Babb, J. F.

    2006-01-01

    We are carrying out a joint theoretical and experimental research program to study the broadening of alkali atom resonance lines due to collisions with helium and molecular hydrogen for applications to spectroscopic studies of brown dwarfs and extrasolar giant planets.

  1. Open questions about giant viruses.

    PubMed

    Claverie, Jean-Michel; Abergel, Chantal

    2013-01-01

    The recent discovery of giant viruses exhibiting double-stranded DNA genomes larger than a million base pairs, encoding more than a thousand proteins and packed in near micron-sized icosahedral particles, opened a new and unexpected chapter in virology. As of today, these giant viruses and their closest relatives of lesser dimensions infect unicellular eukaryotes found in aquatic environments, but belonging to a wide diversity of early branching phyla. This broad phylogenetic distribution of hosts is consistent with the hypothesis that giant viruses originated prior to the radiation of the eukaryotic domain and/or might have been involved in the partition of nuclear versus cytoplasmic functions in ancestral cells. The distinctive features of the known giant viruses, in particular the recurrent presence of components of the translation apparatus in their proteome, raise a number of fundamental questions about their origin, their mode of evolution, and the relationship they may entertain with other dsDNA viruses, the genome size of which exhibits the widest distribution among all biological entities, from less than 5 kb to more than 1.25 Mb (a ratio of 1:250). At a more conceptual level, the convergence between the discovery of increasingly reduced parasitic cellular organisms and that of giant viruses exhibiting a widening array of cellular-like functions may ultimately abolish the historical discontinuity between the viral and the cellular world.

  2. Giant Magellan Telescope: overview

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Johns, Matt; McCarthy, Patrick; Raybould, Keith; Bouchez, Antonin; Farahani, Arash; Filgueira, Jose; Jacoby, George; Shectman, Steve; Sheehan, Michael

    2012-09-01

    The Giant Magellan Telescope (GMT) is a 25-meter optical/infrared extremely large telescope that is being built by an international consortium of universities and research institutions. It will be located at the Las Campanas Observatory, Chile. The GMT primary mirror consists of seven 8.4-m borosilicate honeycomb mirror segments made at the Steward Observatory Mirror Lab (SOML). Six identical off-axis segments and one on-axis segment are arranged on a single nearly-paraboloidal parent surface having an overall focal ratio of f/0.7. The fabrication, testing and verification procedures required to produce the closely-matched off-axis mirror segments were developed during the production of the first mirror. Production of the second and third off-axis segments is underway. GMT incorporates a seven-segment Gregorian adaptive secondary to implement three modes of adaptive-optics operation: natural-guide star AO, laser-tomography AO, and ground-layer AO. A wide-field corrector/ADC is available for use in seeing-limited mode over a 20-arcmin diameter field of view. Up to seven instruments can be mounted simultaneously on the telescope in a large Gregorian Instrument Rotator. Conceptual design studies were completed for six AO and seeing-limited instruments, plus a multi-object fiber feed, and a roadmap for phased deployment of the GMT instrument suite is being developed. The partner institutions have made firm commitments for approximately 45% of the funds required to build the telescope. Project Office efforts are currently focused on advancing the telescope and enclosure design in preparation for subsystem- and system-level preliminary design reviews which are scheduled to be completed in the first half of 2013.

  3. Giant serpentine aneurysm arising from the middle cerebral artery successfully treated with trapping and anastomosis: case report.

    PubMed

    Abiko, Masaru; Ikawa, Fusao; Ohbayashi, Naohiko; Mitsuhara, Takafumi; Nosaka, Ryo; Inagawa, Tetsuji

    2009-02-01

    A 56-year-old man presented with a giant serpentine aneurysm arising from the middle cerebral artery (MCA) manifesting as right hemiparesis and motor aphasia. Magnetic resonance imaging and digital subtraction angiography identified the giant serpentine aneurysm arising from the MCA. The patient was treated surgically. Temporary clipping of the distal channel induced thrombosis in the vascular channel, and the thrombosis was aspirated with an ultrasonic suction device after superficial temporal artery-MCA anastomosis. This case shows that initial occlusion of the distal channel is effective to treat giant serpentine aneurysm.

  4. Polymyalgia Rheumatica and Giant Cell Arteritis

    MedlinePlus

    ... Clinical Trial Journal Articles Polymyalgia Rheumatica and Giant Cell Arteritis May 2016 Questions and Answers about Polymyalgia Rheumatica and Giant Cell Arteritis This publication contains general information about polymyalgia ...

  5. Sizing Up Red-Giant Twins

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kohler, Susanna

    2016-02-01

    In KIC 9246715, two red-giant stars twins in nearly every way circle each other in a 171-day orbit. This binary pair may be a key to learning about masses and radii of stars with asteroseismology, the study of oscillations in the interiors of stars.Two Ways to MeasureIn order to understand a stars evolution, it is critical that we know its mass and radius. Unfortunately, these quantities are often difficult to pin down!One of the few cases in which we can directly measure stars masses and radii is in eclipsing binaries, wherein two stars eclipse each other as they orbit. If we have a well-sampled light curve for the binary, as well as radial velocities for both stars, then we can determine the stars complete orbital information, including their masses and radii.But there may be another way to obtain stellar mass and radius: asteroseismology. In asteroseismology, oscillations inside stars are used to characterize the stellar interiors. Conveniently, if a star with a convective envelope exhibits solar-like oscillations, these oscillations can be directly compared to those of the Sun. Mass and radius scaling relations which use the Sun as a benchmark and scale based on the stars temperature can then be used to derive the mass and radius of the star.Test Subjects from KeplerSolar-like oscillations from KIC 9246715 are shown in red across different resonant frequencies. The oscillations of a single red-giant star with similar properties are shown upside down in grey for reference. [Rawls et al. 2016]Of course, scaling relations are only useful if we can test them! A team of scientists including Meredith Rawls (New Mexico State University) has identified 18 red-giant eclipsing binaries in the Kepler field of view that also exhibit solar-like oscillations perfect for testing the scaling relations.In a recent study led by Rawls, the team analyzed the first of these binaries, KIC 9246715. Using the Kepler light curves in addition to radial velocity measurements from high

  6. Giant lobelias exemplify convergent evolution

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Giant lobeliads on tropical mountains in East Africa and Hawaii have highly unusual, giant-rosette growth forms that appear to be convergent on each other and on those of several independently evolved groups of Asteraceae and other families. A recent phylogenetic analysis by Antonelli, based on sequencing the widest selection of lobeliads to date, raises doubts about this paradigmatic example of convergent evolution. Here I address the kinds of evidence needed to test for convergent evolution and argue that the analysis by Antonelli fails on four points. Antonelli's analysis makes several important contributions to our understanding of lobeliad evolution and geographic spread, but his claim regarding convergence appears to be invalid. Giant lobeliads in Hawaii and Africa represent paradigmatic examples of convergent evolution. PMID:20074322

  7. Atmospheres of Extrasolar Giant Planets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marley, M. S.; Fortney, J.; Seager, S.; Barman, T.

    The key to understanding an extrasolar giant planet's spectrum - and hence its detectability and evolution - lies with its atmosphere. Now that direct observations of thermal emission from extrasolar giant planets (EGPs) are in hand, atmosphere models can be used to constrain atmospheric composition, thermal structure, and ultimately the formation and evolution of detected planets. We review the important physical processes that influence the atmospheric structure and evolution of EGPs and consider what has already been learned from the first generation of observations and modeling. We pay particular attention to the roles of cloud structure, metallicity, and atmospheric chemistry in affecting detectable properties through Spitzer Space Telescope observations of the transiting giant planets. Our review stresses the uncertainties that ultimately limit our ability to interpret EGP observations. Finally we will conclude with a look to the future as characterization of multiple individual planets in a single stellar system leads to the study of comparative planetary architectures.

  8. CMB lensing and giant rings

    SciTech Connect

    Rathaus, Ben; Itzhaki, Nissan E-mail: ben.rathaus@gmail.com

    2012-05-01

    We study the CMB lensing signature of a pre-inationary particle (PIP), assuming it is responsible for the giant rings anomaly that was found recently in the WMAP data. Simulating Planck-like data we find that generically the CMB lensing signal to noise ratio associated with such a PIP is quite small and it would be difficult to cross correlate the temperature giant rings with the CMB lensing signal. However, if the pre-inationary particle is also responsible for the bulk flow measured from the local large scale structure, which happens to point roughly at the same direction as the giant rings, then the CMB lensing signal to noise ratio is fairly significant.

  9. Structure of giant muscle proteins

    PubMed Central

    Meyer, Logan C.; Wright, Nathan T.

    2013-01-01

    Giant muscle proteins (e.g., titin, nebulin, and obscurin) play a seminal role in muscle elasticity, stretch response, and sarcomeric organization. Each giant protein consists of multiple tandem structural domains, usually arranged in a modular fashion spanning 500 kDa to 4 MDa. Although many of the domains are similar in structure, subtle differences create a unique function of each domain. Recent high and low resolution structural and dynamic studies now suggest more nuanced overall protein structures than previously realized. These findings show that atomic structure, interactions between tandem domains, and intrasarcomeric environment all influence the shape, motion, and therefore function of giant proteins. In this article we will review the current understanding of titin, obscurin, and nebulin structure, from the atomic level through the molecular level. PMID:24376425

  10. Spectroscopic Studies on the [4Fe-4S] Cluster in Adenosine 5′-Phosphosulfate Reductase from Mycobacterium tuberculosis

    PubMed Central

    Bhave, Devayani P.; Hong, Jiyoung A.; Lee, Michael; Jiang, Wei; Krebs, Carsten; Carroll, Kate S.

    2011-01-01

    Mycobacterium tuberculosis adenosine 5′-phosphosulfate reductase (MtAPR) is an iron-sulfur protein and a validated target to develop new antitubercular agents, particularly for the treatment of latent infection. The enzyme harbors a [4Fe-4S]2+ cluster that is coordinated by four cysteinyl ligands, two of which are adjacent in the amino acid sequence. The iron-sulfur cluster is essential for catalysis; however, the precise role of the [4Fe-4S] cluster in APR remains unknown. Progress in this area has been hampered by the failure to generate a paramagnetic state of the [4Fe-4S] cluster that can be studied by electron paramagnetic resonance spectroscopy. Herein, we overcome this limitation and report the EPR spectra of MtAPR in the [4Fe-4S]+ state. The EPR signal is rhombic and consists of two overlapping S = ½ species. Substrate binding to MtAPR led to a marked increase in the intensity and resolution of the EPR signal and to minor shifts in principle g values that were not observed among a panel of substrate analogs, including adenosine 5′-diphosphate. Using site-directed mutagenesis, in conjunction with kinetic and EPR studies, we have also identified an essential role for the active site residue Lys-144, whose side chain interacts with both the iron-sulfur cluster and the sulfate group of adenosine 5′-phosphosulfate. The implications of these findings are discussed with respect to the role of the iron-sulfur cluster in the catalytic mechanism of APR. PMID:21075841

  11. Giant right atrial thrombi treated with thrombolysis.

    PubMed

    Ruiz-Bailén, Manuel; López-Caler, Carmen; Castillo-Rivera, Ana; Rucabado-Aguilar, Luis; Ramos Cuadra, José Angel; Lara Toral, Juan; Lozano Cabezas, Cristobal; Fernández Guerrero, Juan Carlos

    2008-04-01

    The present report describes giant atrial thrombi that were treated with thrombolysis in a community hospital. Two patients with giant atrial thrombi whose treatment involved complications are presented. Both patients developed cardiogenic shock and were treated unsuccessfully with thrombolysis. Because thrombolysis of giant thrombi may be ineffective, patients in this situation may require surgery.

  12. Giant right atrial thrombi treated with thrombolysis

    PubMed Central

    Ruiz-Bailén, Manuel; López-Caler, Carmen; Castillo-Rivera, Ana; Rucabado-Aguilar, Luis; Cuadra, José Ángel Ramos; Toral, Juan Lara; Cabezas, Cristobal Lozano; Guerrero, Juan Carlos Fernández

    2008-01-01

    The present report describes giant atrial thrombi that were treated with thrombolysis in a community hospital. Two patients with giant atrial thrombi whose treatment involved complications are presented. Both patients developed cardiogenic shock and were treated unsuccessfully with thrombolysis. Because thrombolysis of giant thrombi may be ineffective, patients in this situation may require surgery. PMID:18401474

  13. Cabergoline treatment in invasive giant prolactinoma.

    PubMed

    Alsubaie, Sadeem; Almalki, Mussa H

    2014-01-01

    Patients with invasive giant prolactinoma suffer from a constellation of symptoms including headache, blurred vision, lethargy, and sexual dysfunction. Cabergoline, a potent dopamine agonist, is a known medication prescribed for the treatment of invasive giant prolactinoma. Here, we report a case of invasive giant prolactinoma in a 52-year-old Saudi male with dramatic response to cabergoline treatment clinically, biochemically, and radiologically.

  14. Charting the Giants

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2004-06-01

    zero expansion asymptotically after an infinite time and has a flat geometry). All three observational tests by means of supernovae (green), the cosmic microwave background (blue) and galaxy clusters converge at a Universe around Ωm ~ 0.3 and ΩΛ ~ 0.7. The dark red region for the galaxy cluster determination corresponds to 95% certainty (2-sigma statistical deviation) when assuming good knowledge of all other cosmological parameters, and the light red region assumes a minimum knowledge. For the supernovae and WMAP results, the inner and outer regions corespond to 68% (1-sigma) and 95% certainty, respectively. References: Schuecker et al. 2003, A&A, 398, 867 (REFLEX); Tonry et al. 2003, ApJ, 594, 1 (supernovae); Riess et al. 2004, ApJ, 607, 665 (supernovae) Galaxy clusters are far from being evenly distributed in the Universe. Instead, they tend to conglomerate into even larger structures, "super-clusters". Thus, from stars which gather in galaxies, galaxies which congregate in clusters and clusters tying together in super-clusters, the Universe shows structuring on all scales, from the smallest to the largest ones. This is a relict of the very early (formation) epoch of the Universe, the so-called "inflationary" period. At that time, only a minuscule fraction of one second after the Big Bang, the tiny density fluctuations were amplified and over the eons, they gave birth to the much larger structures. Because of the link between the first fluctuations and the giant structures now observed, the unique REFLEX catalogue - the largest of its kind - allows astronomers to put considerable constraints on the content of the Universe, and in particular on the amount of dark matter that is believed to pervade it. Rather interestingly, these constraints are totally independent from all other methods so far used to assert the existence of dark matter, such as the study of very distant supernovae (see e.g. ESO PR 21/98) or the analysis of the Cosmic Microwave background (e

  15. Giant Intradural Mucocele in a Patient with Adult Onset Seizures

    PubMed Central

    Kechagias, E.; Georgakoulias, N.; Ioakimidou, C.; Kyriazi, S.; Kontogeorgos, G.; Seretis, A.

    2009-01-01

    A rare case of mucopyocele in a patient who presented with epileptic seizures is reported. The computed tomography scan (CT) and the magnetic resonance (MR) imaging revealed an intradural extension of a giant fronto-ethmoidal mucopyocele, eroding the cribriform plate and compressing both frontal lobes. The lesion was removed by craniotomy with elimination of the mass effect and reconstruction of the anterior skull base. An intracranial-intradural mucopyocele is an extremely rare cause of generalized convulsion as a presenting symptom, with only 6 cases reported in the literature. The total removal of the lesion associated with anterior fossa reconstruction is the treatment of choice. PMID:20847833

  16. Giant intradural extramedullary spinal hydatid cyst--a rare presentation.

    PubMed

    Rashid, Muddassir; Kirmani, Sanna; Rashid, Mubashir

    2012-01-01

    The hydatidosis, or echinococcosis, has a characteristic geographic distribution, occurring most frequently in sheep-raising regions in Mediterranean, Central Asian, and South American countries and in Australia. Spinal hydatidosis is very rare, and intradural location is a rarer category of spinal hydatidosis. We report a case of intradural extramedullary spinal hydatid cyst in a 9-year-old boy. On magnetic resonance imaging, an intradural extramedullary giant cystic lesion was seen mimicking an arachnoid cyst. However, endemic origin of the patient and positive serology helped to make the diagnosis of hydatid cyst, which was confirmed on postoperative histopathology.

  17. Giant nontraumatic intradiploic arachnoid cyst in a young male*

    PubMed Central

    Sharma, Rajesh; Gupta, Puneet; Mahajan, Manik; Sharma, Poonam; Gupta, Anchal; Khurana, Arti

    2016-01-01

    Intradiploic arachnoid cysts have scarcely been reported in the literature, most reported cases being secondary to trauma. Nontraumatic arachnoid cysts are quite rare and have been reported mostly in adults. Here, we report the case of a 16-year-old male presenting with a slowly growing mass in the occipital region and intermittent headaches. On the basis of the findings of X-rays, computed tomography scans, and magnetic resonance imaging scans of the head, the mass was diagnosed as a giant intradiploic arachnoid cyst. PMID:27818549

  18. Chromosome jumping from D4S10 (G8) toward the Huntington disease gene.

    PubMed Central

    Richards, J E; Gilliam, T C; Cole, J L; Drumm, M L; Wasmuth, J J; Gusella, J F; Collins, F S

    1988-01-01

    The gene for Huntington disease (HD) has been localized to the distal portion of the short arm of human chromosome 4 by linkage analysis. Currently, the two closest DNA markers are D4S10 (G8), located approximately equal to 3 centimorgans centromeric to HD, and D4S43 (C4H), positioned 0-1.5 centimorgans from HD. In an effort to move closer to the HD gene, with the eventual goal of identifying the gene itself, we have applied the technique of chromosome jumping to this region. A 200-kilobase jumping library has been constructed, and a jump from D4S10 has been obtained and its approximate distance verified by pulsed field gel electrophoresis. Two restriction fragment length polymorphisms have been identified at the jump locus, which is denoted D4S81. Linkage analysis of previously identified recombinants between D4S10 and HD or D4S10 and D4S43 shows that in two of five events the jump has crossed the recombination points. This unequivocally orients D4S10 and D4S81 on the chromosome, provides additional markers for HD, and suggests that recombination frequency in this region of chromosome 4 may be increased, so that the physical distance from D4S10 to HD may not be as large as originally suspected. Images PMID:2901098

  19. On the Nature and Timing of Giant Planet Migration in the Solar System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Agnor, Craig B.

    2016-05-01

    Giant planet migration is a natural outcome of gravitational scattering and planet formation processes (Fernandez & Ip 1984). There is compelling evidence that the solar system's giant planets experienced large-scale migration involving close approaches between planets as well as smooth radial migration via planetesimal scattering. Aspects of giant planet migration have been invoked to explain many features of the outer solar system including the resonant structure of the Kuiper Belt (e.g., Malhotra 1993, Levison et al. 2008), the eccentricities of Jupiter and Saturn (Tsiganis et al. 2005, Morbidelli et al. 2009), the capture of Jupiter's Trojan companions (Morbidelli et al. 2005) and the capture of irregular planetary satellites (e.g., Nesvorny et al. 2007) to name a few. If this migration epoch occurred after the formation of the inner planets, then it may also explain the so-called lunar Late Heavy Bombardment (Gomes et al. 2005). This scenario necessarily requires coeval terrestrial and migrating giant planets. Recent N-body integrations exploring this issue have shown that giant planet migration may excite the terrestrial system via nodal and apsidal secular resonances (e.g., Brasser et al. 2013), may drive the terrestrial planets to crossing orbits (Kaib & Chambers 2016) or alternatively leave the inner solar system in a state closely resembling the observed one (Roig et al. 2016). The factors accounting for the large range of outcomes remain unclear. Using linear secular models and N-body simulations I am identifying and characterising the principal aspects of giant planet migration that excite the terrestrial planets' orbits. I will present these results and discuss how they inform the nature and timing of giant planet migration in the solar system.

  20. Giant Serpentine Aneurysms: Multidisciplinary Management

    PubMed Central

    Anshun, W.; Feng, L.; Daming, W.

    2000-01-01

    Summary Sixty-five cases of intracranial giant serpentine aneurysms (GSΛs), including 61 cases reported in the literature and four additional cases presented in this study were reviewed. The clinical presentation, possible causes, natural history, and especially management of GSAs are discussed with emphasis on the need for aggressive intervention and multidisciplinary management. PMID:20667180

  1. On the Shoulders of Giants...

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2013-01-01

    REFERENCES 1. Newton I. Turnbull HW, ed. Correspondence of Isaac Newton . Vol I: 1661Y1675. Cambridge, United Kingdom: Cambridge University Press; 1959:416...calendar), Sir Isaac Newtonopined to Robert Hooke, ‘‘If I have seen further [than you and Descartes], it is by standing on the shoulders of giants.’’1 That

  2. The giant panda gut microbiome.

    PubMed

    Wei, Fuwen; Wang, Xiao; Wu, Qi

    2015-08-01

    Giant pandas (Ailuropoda melanoleuca) are bamboo specialists that evolved from carnivores. Their gut microbiota probably aids in the digestion of cellulose and this is considered an example of gut microbiota adaptation to a bamboo diet. However, this issue remains unresolved and further functional and compositional studies are needed.

  3. Myeloma-like cast nephropathy caused by human recombinant soluble CD4 (sCD4) in monkeys.

    PubMed Central

    Bugelski, P. J.; Solleveld, H. A.; Fong, K. L.; Klinkner, A. M.; Hart, T. K.; Morgan, D. G.

    1992-01-01

    CD4 is the receptor for human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) on lymphocytes and macrophages. Soluble CD4 (sCD4), a recombinant truncated form of CD4, has been shown to inhibit HIV-1 in vitro and is being tested as a therapy for AIDS. Preclinical studies in cynomolgus monkeys revealed a protein cast nephropathy after four daily intravenous doses of 100 mg/kg/day. Renal lesions were not found in monkeys that received 10 mg/kg/day. The renal lesions consisted of proteinaceous tubular casts associated with multinucleate giant cells and neutrophils located in the tubules of the distal nephron. The affected tubules were surrounded by an interstitial mixed inflammatory cell infiltrate. By electron microscopy, the casts were composed of moderately electron dense, paracrystalline material. Immunostaining demonstrated that the casts contained sCD4-derived material and Tamm-Horsfall protein. Moreover, biochemical analysis of urine showed that a portion of sCD4 was excreted as intact protein. Because infection with HIV-1 can be associated with clinically significant nephropathy, these data suggest that renal function should be closely monitored in patients receiving soluble forms of CD4. Images Figure 1 Figure 2 Figure 3 PMID:1546739

  4. Nursery of Giants

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2004-01-01

    Hidden behind a shroud of dust in the constellation Cygnus is a stellar nursery called DR21, which is giving birth to some of the most massive stars in our galaxy. Visible light images reveal no trace of this interstellar cauldron because of heavy dust obscuration. In fact, visible light is attenuated in DR21 by a factor of more than 10,000,000,000,000,000,000,000,000,000,000,000,000,000 (ten thousand trillion heptillion).

    New images from NASA's Spitzer Space Telescope allow us to peek behind the cosmic veil and pinpoint one of the most massive natal stars yet seen in our Milky Way galaxy. The never-before-seen star is 100,000 times as bright as the Sun. Also revealed for the first time is a powerful outflow of hot gas emanating from this star and bursting through a giant molecular cloud.

    This image is a large-scale mosaic assembled from individual photographs obtained with the InfraRed Array Camera (IRAC) aboard Spitzer. The image covers an area about two times that of a full moon. The mosaic is a composite of images obtained at mid-infrared wavelengths of 3.6 microns (blue), 4.5 microns (green), 5.8 microns (orange) and 8 microns (red). The brightest infrared cloud near the top center corresponds to DR21, which presumably contains a cluster of newly forming stars at a distance of 10,000 light-years.

    Protruding out from DR21 toward the bottom left of the image is a gaseous outflow (green), containing both carbon monoxide and molecular hydrogen. Data from the Spitzer spectrograph, which breaks light into its constituent individual wavelengths, indicate the presence of hot steam formed as the outflow heats the surrounding molecular gas. Outflows are physical signatures of processes that create supersonic beams, or jets, of gas. They are usually accompanied by discs of material around the new star, which likely contain the materials from which future planetary systems are formed. Additional newborn stars, depicted in green, can be seen surrounding the

  5. Arabidopsis thaliana Nfu2 accommodates [2Fe-2S] or [4Fe-4S] clusters and is competent for in vitro maturation of chloroplast [2Fe-2S] and [4Fe-4S] cluster-containing proteins†

    PubMed Central

    Gao, Huanyao; Subramanian, Sowmya; Couturier, Jérémy; Naik, Sunil; Kim, Sung-Kun; Leustek, Thomas; Knaff, David B.; Wu, Hui-Chen; Vignols, Florence; Huynh, Boi Hanh; Rouhier, Nicolas; Johnson, Michael K.

    2013-01-01

    Nfu-type proteins are essential in the biogenesis of iron-sulfur (Fe-S) clusters in numerous organisms. A number of phenotypes including low levels of Fe-S cluster incorporation are associated with deletion of the gene encoding a chloroplast-specific Nfu-type protein, Nfu2 from Arabidopsis thaliana (AtNfu2). Here we report that recombinant AtNfu2 is able to assemble both [2Fe-2S] and [4Fe-4S] clusters. Analytical data and gel filtration studies support cluster/protein stoichiometries of one [2Fe-2S] cluster/homotetramer and one [4Fe-4S] cluster/homodimer. The combination of UV-visible absorption and circular dichroism, resonance Raman and Mössbauer spectroscopies has been employed to investigate the nature, properties and transfer of the clusters assembled on Nfu2. The results are consistent with subunit-bridging [2Fe-2S]2+ and [4Fe-4S]2+ clusters coordinated by the cysteines in the conserved CXXC motif. The results also provided insight into the specificity of Nfu2 for maturation of chloroplastic Fe-S proteins via intact, rapid and quantitative cluster transfer. [2Fe-2S] cluster-bound Nfu2 is shown to be an effective [2Fe-2S]2+ cluster donor for glutaredoxin S16, but not glutaredoxin S14. Moreover, [4Fe-4S] cluster-bound Nfu2 is shown to be a very rapid and efficient [4Fe-4S]2+ cluster donor for adenosine 5′-phosphosulfate reductase (APR1) and yeast two-hybrid studies indicate that APR1 forms a complex with Nfu2, but not with Nfu1 and Nfu3, the two other chloroplastic Nfu proteins. This cluster transfer is likely to be physiologically relevant and is particularly significant for plant metabolism as APR1 catalyzes the second step in reductive sulfur assimilation which ultimately results in the biosynthesis of cysteine, methionine, glutathione, and Fe-S clusters. PMID:24032747

  6. There might be giants: unseen Jupiter-mass planets as sculptors of tightly packed planetary systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hands, T. O.; Alexander, R. D.

    2016-03-01

    The limited completeness of the Kepler sample for planets with orbital periods ≳1 yr leaves open the possibility that exoplanetary systems may host undetected giant planets. Should such planets exist, their dynamical interactions with the inner planets may prove vital in sculpting the final orbital configurations of these systems. Using an N-body code with additional forces to emulate the effects of a protoplanetary disc, we perform simulations of the assembly of compact systems of super-Earth-mass planets with unseen giant companions. The simulated systems are analogous to Kepler-11 or Kepler-32 in that they contain four or five inner super-Earths, but our systems also contain longer-period giant companions which are unlikely to have been detected by Kepler. We find that giant companions tend to break widely spaced first-order mean-motion resonances, allowing the inner planets to migrate into tighter resonances. This leads to more compact architectures and increases the occurrence rate of Laplace resonant chains.

  7. Characterization of the Testis-specific Proteasome Subunit α4s in Mammals

    PubMed Central

    Uechi, Hiroyuki; Hamazaki, Jun; Murata, Shigeo

    2014-01-01

    The 26 S proteasome is responsible for regulated proteolysis in eukaryotic cells. It is composed of one 20 S core particle (CP) flanked by one or two 19 S regulatory particles. The CP is composed of seven different α-type subunits (α1-α7) and seven different β-type subunits, three of which are catalytic. Vertebrates encode four additional catalytic β subunits that are expressed predominantly in immune tissues and produce distinct subtypes of CPs particularly well suited for the acquired immune system. In contrast, the diversity of α subunits remains poorly understood. Recently, another α subunit, referred to as α4s, was reported. However, little is known about α4s. Here we provide a detailed characterization of α4s and the α4s-containing CP. α4s is exclusively expressed in germ cells that enter the meiotic prophase and is incorporated into the CP in place of α4. A comparison of structural models revealed that the differences in the primary sequences between α4 and α4s are located on the outer surface of the CP, suggesting that α4s interacts with specific molecules via these unique regions. α4s-containing CPs account for the majority of the CPs in mouse sperm. The catalytic β subunits in the α4s-containing CP are β1, β2, and β5, and immunosubunits are not included in the α4s-containing CP. α4s-containing CPs have a set of peptidase activities almost identical to those of α4-containing CPs. Our results provide a basis for understanding the role of α4s and male germ cell-specific proteasomes in mammals. PMID:24668818

  8. Giant Cell Reparative Granuloma of the Petrous Temporal Bone

    PubMed Central

    Williams, Joy C.; Thorell, William E.; Treves, John S.; Fidler, Mary E.; Moore, Gary F.; Leibrock, Lyal G.

    2000-01-01

    Giant cell reparative granuloma (GCRG) is an unusual, benign bone lesion that most commonly affects the maxilla and mandible; skull involvement is rare. The etiology is uncertain but may be related to trauma. GCRG is difficult to distinguish from giant cell tumor of the bone and has a lower recurrence rate. Thirteen reports of temporal bone GCRG in 11 patients have been reported. One report of a petrous GCRG in a 3-year-old girl has been identified. A 38-year-old male presented with a 2-year history of fullness in his left ear, ipsilateral hearing loss, and intermittent cacosmia. Computed tomography and magnetic resonance imaging revealed a large left-sided anterior temporal extradural mass. The patient underwent a left frontotemporal craniotomy and resection of a left temporal fossa tumor that involved the petrous and squamous parts of the temporal bone. The patient's post-operative course was uneventful, except for increased hearing loss secondary to opening of the epitympanum. Follow-up at one month revealed no other problems. Histopathology of the specimen was consistent with a giant cell reparative granuloma. ImagesFigure 1Figure 2p91-aFigure 3 PMID:17171108

  9. Optical resonator

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Taghavi-Larigani, Shervin (Inventor); Vanzyl, Jakob J. (Inventor); Yariv, Amnon (Inventor)

    2006-01-01

    The invention discloses a semi-ring Fabry-Perot (SRFP) optical resonator structure comprising a medium including an edge forming a reflective facet and a waveguide within the medium, the waveguide having opposing ends formed by the reflective facet. The performance of the SRFP resonator can be further enhanced by including a Mach-Zehnder interferometer in the waveguide on one side of the gain medium. The optical resonator can be employed in a variety of optical devices. Laser structures using at least one SRFP resonator are disclosed where the resonators are disposed on opposite sides of a gain medium. Other laser structures employing one or more resonators on one side of a gain region are also disclosed.

  10. Giant Herbig-Haro Flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reipurth, Bo; Bally, John; Devine, David

    1997-12-01

    We present the discovery of a number of Herbig-Haro flows which extend over parsec-scale distances. The largest of these is the well known HH 111 jet complex, which is shown, through CCD images and a proper motion study, to have an angular extent of almost one degree on the sky, corresponding to 7.7 pc, making it the largest known HH flow. In our imaging survey we also found that T Tauri is at the center of a huge bipolar HH flow, HH 355, with a total extent of 38 arcmin, corresponding to 1.55 pc, and aligned with the axis of the tiny HH 255 flow surrounding the infrared companion T Tau S. We additionally have found a number of other giant HH flow candidates, including HH 315 at PV Cep, HH 41/295 at Haro 5a/6a, HH 300 in Bl8w, HH 354 in Li 165, HH 376 in Li 152, and HH 114/115 and HH 243/244/245/179 in the X Orionis molecular ring. It thus appears that it is common for HH flows to attain parsec-scale dimensions. The ubiquity of parsec-scale HH flows profoundly alters our view of the impact of young stars on their environment. Giant flows have dynamical ages comparable to the duration of the accretion phase of the sources, and provide a fossil record of their mass loss and accretion history. Multiple internal working surfaces and their S-shaped point symmetry provide evidence for variability of ejection velocity and orientation of the source jets. Giant HH flows are either longer or comparable in length to associated CO outflows, providing evidence for unified models in which HH flows power CO flows. Many giant flows have burst out of their source cloud cores and are dissociating molecules and injecting momentum and kinetic energy into the interclump medium of the host clouds. They contribute to the UV radiation field, and may produce C I and C ii in cloud interiors. Giant flows may contribute to the chemical rejuvenation of clouds, the generation of turbulent motions, and the self-regulation of star formation. The terminal working surfaces of giant flows may be

  11. Spin-orbit and rotational couplings in radiative association of C(3P) and N(4S) atoms.

    PubMed

    Antipov, Sergey V; Gustafsson, Magnus; Nyman, Gunnar

    2011-11-14

    The role of spin-orbit and rotational couplings in radiative association of C((3)P) and N((4)S) atoms is investigated. Couplings among doublet electronic states of the CN radical are considered, giving rise to a 6-state model of the process. The solution of the dynamical problem is based on the L(2) method, where a complex absorbing potential is added to the Hamiltonian operator in order to treat continuum and bound levels in the same manner. Comparison of the energy-dependent rate coefficients calculated with and without spin-orbit and rotational couplings shows that the couplings have a strong effect on the resonance structure and low-energy baseline of the rate coefficient.

  12. Proteorhodopsin genes in giant viruses.

    PubMed

    Yutin, Natalya; Koonin, Eugene V

    2012-10-04

    Viruses with large genomes encode numerous proteins that do not directly participate in virus biogenesis but rather modify key functional systems of infected cells. We report that a distinct group of giant viruses infecting unicellular eukaryotes that includes Organic Lake Phycodnaviruses and Phaeocystis globosa virus encode predicted proteorhodopsins that have not been previously detected in viruses. Search of metagenomic sequence data shows that putative viral proteorhodopsins are extremely abundant in marine environments. Phylogenetic analysis suggests that giant viruses acquired proteorhodopsins via horizontal gene transfer from proteorhodopsin-encoding protists although the actual donor(s) could not be presently identified. The pattern of conservation of the predicted functionally important amino acid residues suggests that viral proteorhodopsin homologs function as sensory rhodopsins. We hypothesize that viral rhodopsins modulate light-dependent signaling, in particular phototaxis, in infected protists.

  13. Giant viruses come of age.

    PubMed

    Fischer, Matthias G

    2016-06-01

    Viruses with genomes up to a few megabases in length are a common occurrence in nature, even though they have escaped our notice until recently. These giant viruses infect mainly single-celled eukaryotes and isolation efforts concentrating on amoebal hosts alone have spawned hundreds of viral isolates, featuring viruses with previously unseen virion morphologies and the largest known viral genomes and particles. One of the challenges that lie ahead is to analyze and categorize the available data and to establish an approved classification system that reflects the evolutionary relationships and biological properties of these viruses. Extensive sampling of Acanthamoeba-infecting mimiviruses and initial characterization of their virophage parasites have provided a first blueprint of the genetic diversity and composition of a giant virus clade that will facilitate the taxonomic grouping of these fascinating microorganisms.

  14. Dipole Resonances in 4He

    SciTech Connect

    Matsumoto, E.; Nakayama, S.; Hayami, R.; Fushimi, K.; Kawasuso, H.; Yasuda, K.; Yamagata, T.; Akimune, H.; Ikemizu, H.; Fujiwara, M.; Yosoi, M.; Nakanishi, K.; Kawase, K.; Hashimoto, H.; Oota, T.; Sagara, K.; Kudoh, T.; Asaji, S.; Ishida, T.; Tanaka, M.

    2007-02-26

    We investigated the analogs of the giant dipole resonance (GDR) and spin-dipole resonance (SDR) of 4He by using the 4He(7Li,7Be) reaction at an incident energy of 455 MeV and at forward scattering angles. The {delta}S=0 and {delta}S=1 spectra for 4He were obtained by measuring the 0.43-MeV 7Be {gamma}-ray in coincidence with the scattered 7Be. From the {delta}S=0 and {delta}S=1 spectra thus obtained, the strength distributions of the GDR and SDR in 4He can be derived and the results are compared with the previous data.

  15. Giant thermoelectric effect in graphene

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dragoman, D.; Dragoman, M.

    2007-11-01

    The paper predicts a giant thermoelectric coefficient in a nanostructure consisting of metallic electrodes periodically patterned over graphene, which is deposited on a silicon dioxide substrate. The Seebeck coefficient in this device attains 30mV/K, this value being among the largest reported ever. The calculations are based on a transfer matrix approach that takes a particular form for graphene-based devices. The results are important for future nanogenerators with applications in the area of sensors, energy harvesting, and scavenging.

  16. Observed Properties of Giant Cells

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hathaway, David H.; Upton, Lisa; Colegrove, Owen

    2014-01-01

    The existence of Giant Cells has been suggested by both theory and observation for over 45 years. We have tracked the motions of supergranules in SDO/HMI Doppler velocity data and find larger (Giant Cell) flows that persist for months. The flows in these cells are clockwise around centers of divergence in the north and counter-clockwise in the south. Equatorward flows are correlated with prograde flows - giving the transport of angular momentum toward the equator that is needed to maintain the Sun's rapid equatorial rotation. The cells are most pronounced at mid- and high-latitudes where they exhibit the rotation rates representative of those latitudes. These are clearly large, long-lived, cellular features, with the dynamical characteristics expected from the effects of the Sun's rotation, but the shapes of the cells are not well represented in numerical models. While the Giant Cell flow velocities are small (<10 m/s), their long lifetimes should nonetheless substantially impact the transport of magnetic flux in the Sun's near surface layers.

  17. KEPLER RAPIDLY ROTATING GIANT STARS

    SciTech Connect

    Costa, A. D.; Martins, B. L. Canto; Bravo, J. P.; Paz-Chinchón, F.; Chagas, M. L. das; Leão, I. C.; Oliveira, G. Pereira de; Silva, R. Rodrigues da; Roque, S.; Oliveira, L. L. A. de; Silva, D. Freire da; De Medeiros, J. R.

    2015-07-10

    Rapidly rotating giant stars are relatively rare and may represent important stages of stellar evolution, resulting from stellar coalescence of close binary systems or accretion of substellar companions by their hosting stars. In the present Letter, we report 17 giant stars observed in the scope of the Kepler space mission exhibiting rapid rotation behavior. For the first time, the abnormal rotational behavior for this puzzling family of stars is revealed by direct measurements of rotation, namely from photometric rotation period, exhibiting a very short rotation period with values ranging from 13 to 55 days. This finding points to remarkable surface rotation rates, up to 18 times the rotation of the Sun. These giants are combined with six others recently listed in the literature for mid-infrared (IR) diagnostics based on Wide-field Infrared Survey Explorer information, from which a trend for an IR excess is revealed for at least one-half of the stars, but at a level far lower than the dust excess emission shown by planet-bearing main-sequence stars.

  18. Hairpin Furans and Giant Biaryls.

    PubMed

    Geng, Xin; Mague, Joel T; Donahue, James P; Pascal, Robert A

    2016-05-06

    The thermal reaction of two cyclopentadienones with 5,5'-binaphthoquinone or 6,6'-dimethoxy-5,5'-binaphthoquinone in refluxing nitrobenzene (210 °C) gives, in a single synthetic step that includes two Diels-Alder additions, two decarbonylations, and two dehydrogenations, giant biaryl bisquinones (compounds 13, 14, 15, 18, and 21). However, when two cyclopentadienones react with 6,6'-dimethoxy-5,5'-binaphthoquinone in nitrobenzene at higher temperatures (250-260 °C), the resulting products are molecular ribbons composed of two twisted aromatic systems fused to a heteropentahelicene (19, 20, and 22). These molecules are representatives of a new class of chiral polycyclic aromatic compounds, the "hairpin furans". Interestingly, reheating a dimethoxy-substituted giant biaryl (e.g., 21) in nitrobenzene at 260 °C does not yield the corresponding hairpin furan (22), and mechanistic studies indicate that some intermediate or byproduct of the synthesis of the giant biaryls is a reagent or catalyst necessary for the conversion of the dimethoxybiaryl to the furan.

  19. Electrodynamics in Giant Planet Atmospheres

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koskinen, T.; Yelle, R. V.; Lavvas, P.; Cho, J.

    2014-12-01

    The atmospheres of close-in extrasolar giant planets such as HD209458b are strongly ionized by the UV flux of their host stars. We show that photoionization on such planets creates a dayside ionosphere that extends from the thermosphere to the 100 mbar level. The resulting peak electron density near the 1 mbar level is higher than that encountered in any planetary ionosphere of the solar system, and the model conductivity is in fact comparable to the atmospheres of Sun-like stars. As a result, the momentum and energy balance in the upper atmosphere of HD209458b and similar planets can be strongly affected by ion drag and resistive heating arising from wind-driven electrodynamics. Despite much weaker ionization, electrodynamics is nevertheless also important on the giant planets of the solar system. We use a generic framework to constrain the conductivity regimes on close-in extrasolar planets, and compare the results with conductivites based on the same approach for Jupiter and Saturn. By using a generalized Ohm's law and assumed magnetic fields, we then demonstrate the basic effects of wind-driven ion drag in giant planet atmospheres. Our results show that ion drag is often significant in the upper atmosphere where it can also substantially alter the energy budget through resistive heating.

  20. Rapid improvement in visual loss with cabergoline treatment in a giant prolactinoma case: 5 years survey.

    PubMed

    Tasan, Ertugrul; Hanimoglu, Hakan; Turgut, Seda; Ilhan, Mahmut Muzaffer; Evran, Sevket; Kaynar, Mehmet Yasar

    2015-01-01

    Giant prolactinoma is a rare subset of macroadenomas. Limited studies demonstrated which therapy could be successfully used in the first-line therapy of giant prolactinoma. We presented a case with a 54 × 40 × 40 mm pituitary adenoma and optic chiasmatic compression with left sphenoid sinus invasion. The tumor caused a loss of visual field of the right side. Cabergoline treatment was started with dose of 1.5 mg/week. Fifteen days later, the clinical visual acuity examination showed a significant improvement in the patient with visual field defect. After the five years follow-up magnetic resonance imagining showed reduction of the adenoma size (17 × 12 mm) was significant. Our findings suggest that, cabergoline can be used as a first-line therapy in giant prolactinomas because tumoral shrinkage without a surgical procedure and rapid improvement in visual field defect is achieved with this medical treatment.

  1. Nonlinear resonance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kevorkian, J.

    This report discusses research in the area of slowly varying nonlinear oscillatory systems. Some of the topics discussed are as follows: adiabatic invariants and transient resonance in very slowly varying Hamiltonian systems; sustained resonance in very slowly varying Hamiltonian systems; free-electron lasers with very slow wiggler taper; and bursting oscillators.

  2. Nonlinear resonance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kevorkian, J.; Pernarowski, Mark; Bosley, David L.

    1990-04-01

    The subjects discussed are: transient and sustained resonance for systems with very slowly varying parameters; free electron lasers with very slow wiggler taper; and bursting oscillations in biological systems. Plans are discussed for: FEL applications; transient and sustained resonance; and bursting oscillations.

  3. Giant-cell granuloma of the axis.

    PubMed

    González-Martínez, Emilio; Santamarta, David; Lomas-García, Jesús; Ibáñez-Plágaro, F Javier; Fernández-Fernández, J Javier; Ariño, Teresa Ribas; García-Cosamalón, José

    2012-02-01

    Giant-cell granuloma is a benign and nonneoplastic lesion with an expansive and locally destructive behavior. It typically involves the mandible and the maxilla. Only 1 case arising from the odontoid process of the axis has been reported previously. The authors report on a 64-year-old man with a giant-cell granuloma of the axis. They review this uncommon entity, emphasizing the complexity of differentiating between this lesion and other giant-cell tumors.

  4. Cabergoline Treatment in Invasive Giant Prolactinoma

    PubMed Central

    Alsubaie, Sadeem; Almalki, Mussa H

    2014-01-01

    Patients with invasive giant prolactinoma suffer from a constellation of symptoms including headache, blurred vision, lethargy, and sexual dysfunction. Cabergoline, a potent dopamine agonist, is a known medication prescribed for the treatment of invasive giant prolactinoma. Here, we report a case of invasive giant prolactinoma in a 52-year-old Saudi male with dramatic response to cabergoline treatment clinically, biochemically, and radiologically. PMID:25002819

  5. Guiding the Giant

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    1998-08-01

    New ESO Survey Provides Targets for the VLT Giant astronomical telescopes like the ESO Very Large Telescope (VLT) must be used efficiently. Observing time is expensive and there are long waiting lines of excellent research programmes. Thus the work at the telescope must be very well prepared and optimized as much as possible - mistakes should be avoided and no time lost! Astronomers working with the new 8-m class optical/infrared telescopes must base their observations on detailed lists of suitable target objects if they want to perform cutting-edge science. This is particularly true for research programmes that depend on observations of large samples of comparatively rare, distant objects. This type of work requires that extensive catalogues of such objects must be prepared in advance. One such major catalogue - that will serve as a very useful basis for future VLT observations - has just become available from the new ESO Imaging Survey (EIS). The Need for Sky Surveys Astronomers have since long recognized the need to carry out preparatory observations with other telescopes in order to "guide" large telescopes. To this end, surveys of smaller or larger parts of the sky have been performed by wide-field telescopes, paving the way for subsequent work at the limits of the largest available ground-based telescopes. For instance, a complete photographic survey of the sourthern sky (declination < -17.5°) was carried out in the 1970's with the ESO 1-metre Schmidt Telescope in support of the work at the 3.6-m telescope at the ESO La Silla observatory. However, while until recently most observational programmes could rely on samples of objects found on photographic plates, this is no longer possible. New image surveys must match the fainter limiting magnitudes reached by the new and larger telescopes. Modern digital, multi-colour, deep imaging surveys have thus become an indispensable complement to the 8-m telescopes. The new generation of imaging surveys will, without

  6. Red giants: then and now

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Faulkner, John

    Fred Hoyle's work on the structure and evolution of red giants, particularly his pathbreaking contribution with Martin Schwarzschild (Hoyle and Schwarzschild 1955), is both lauded and critically assessed. In his later lectures and work with students in the early 1960s, Hoyle presented more physical ways of understanding some of the approximations used, and results obtained, in that seminal paper. Although later ideas by other investigators will be touched upon, Hoyle's viewpoint - that low-mass red giants are essentially white dwarfs with a serious mass-storage problem - is still extremely fruitful. Over the years, I have further developed his method of attack. Relatively recently, I have been able to deepen and broaden the approach, finally extending the theory to provide a unifying treatment of the structure of low-mass stars from the main sequence though both the red-giant and horizontal-branch phases of evolution. Many aspects of these stars that had remained puzzling, even mysterious, for decades have now fallen into place, and some questions have been answered that were not even posed before. With low-mass red giants as the simplest example, this recent work emphasizes that stars, in general, may have at least two distinct but very important centres: (I) a geometrical centre, and (II) a separate nuclear centre, residing in a shell outside a zero-luminosity dense core for example. This two-centre perspective leads to an explicit, analytical, asymptotic theory of low-mass red-giant structure. It enables one to appreciate that the problem of understanding why such stars become red giants is one of anticipating a remarkable yet natural structural bifurcation that occurs in them. This bifurcation occurs because of a combination of known and understandable facts just summarized namely that, following central hydrogen exhaustion, a thin nuclear-burning shell does develop outside a more-or-less dense core. In the resulting theory, both ρsh/ρolinec and

  7. The Obliquities of the Giant Planets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hamilton, D. P.; Ward, Wm. R.

    2002-09-01

    Jupiter has by far the smallest obliquity ( ~ 3o) of the planets (not counting tidally de-spun Mercury and Venus) which may be reflective of its formation by hydrodynamic gas flow rather than stochastic impacts. Saturn's obliquity ( ~ 26o), however, seems to belie this simple formation picture. But since the spin angular momentum of any planet is much smaller than its orbital angular momentum, post-formation obliquity can be strongly modified by passing through secular spin-orbit resonances, i.e., when the spin axis precession rate of the planet matches one of the frequencies describing the precession of the orbit plane. Spin axis precession is due to the solar torque on both the oblate figure of the planet and any orbiting satellites. In the case of Jupiter, the torque on the Galilean satellites is the principal cause of its 4.5*105 year precession; Saturn's precession of 1.8*106 years is dominated by Titan. In the past, the planetary spin axis precession rates should have been much faster due to the massive circumplanetary disks from which the current satellites condensed. The regression of the orbital node of a planet is due to the gravitational perturbations of the other planets. Nodal regression is not uniform, but is instead a composite of the planetary system's normal modes. For Jupiter and Saturn, the principal frequency is the nu16, with a period of ~ 49,000 years; the amplitude of this term is I ~ 0o.36 for Jupiter and I ~ 0o.90 for Saturn. In spite of the small amplitudes, slow adiabatic passages through this resonance (due to circumplanetary disk dispersal) could increase planetary obliquities from near zero to ~ [tan1/3 I] ~ 10o. We will discuss scenarios in which giant planet obliquities are affected by this and other resonances, and will use Jupiter's low obliquity to constrain the mass and duration of a satellite precursor disk. DPH acknowledges support from NSF Career Grant AST 9733789 and WRW is grateful to the NASA OSS and PGG programs.

  8. Spontaneous thrombosis in giant intracranial aneurysms.

    PubMed Central

    Whittle, I R; Dorsch, N W; Besser, M

    1982-01-01

    Twelve patients in a series of 22 with giant intracranial aneurysms demonstrated neuroradiological features of partial or total spontaneous intra-aneurysmal thrombosis. The presence of this intra-aneurysmal clot significantly altered the computed tomographic appearance of the giant aneurysm. Massive intra-aneurysmal thrombosis did not protect against subarachnoid haemorrhage and the likelihood of rupture of a clot containing giant aneurysm was not significantly different from that of a non-thrombosed giant aneurysm. Although parent artery occlusion from a thrombosed giant aneurysm, and massive aneurysmal thrombosis leading to the formation of giant serpentine aneurysm were documented, these are rare epiphenomena. The risk of embolisation from a partially thrombosed giant aneurysm, which was documented in one case, would appear to be greater than that from a non-thrombosed giant aneurysm. The findings in this series, and a review of literature, suggest that the presence of intra-aneurysmal clot in giant intracranial aneurysms has little prognostic significance and does not alter the management or outcome after treatment. Images PMID:7175528

  9. ORIGIN OF LITHIUM ENRICHMENT IN K GIANTS

    SciTech Connect

    Kumar, Yerra Bharat; Reddy, Bacham E.; Lambert, David L.

    2011-03-20

    In this Letter, we report on a low-resolution spectroscopic survey for Li-rich K giants among 2000 low-mass (M {<=} 3 M{sub sun}) giants spanning the luminosity range from below to above the luminosity of the clump. Fifteen new Li-rich giants including four super Li-rich K giants (log {epsilon}(Li) {>=}3.2) were discovered. A significant finding is that there is a concentration of Li-rich K giants at the luminosity of the clump or red horizontal branch. This new finding is partly a consequence of the fact that our low-resolution survey is the first large survey to include giants well below and above the red giant branch (RGB) bump and clump locations in the H-R diagram. Origin of the lithium enrichment may be plausibly attributed to the conversion of {sup 3}He via {sup 7}Be to {sup 7}Li by the Cameron-Fowler mechanism but the location for the onset of the conversion is uncertain. Two possible opportunities to effect this conversion are discussed: the bump in the first ascent of the RGB and the He-core flash at the tip of the RGB. The finite luminosity spread of the Li-rich giants serves to reject the idea that Li enhancement is, in general, a consequence of a giant swallowing a large planet.

  10. Acoustic Resonators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Greenslade, Thomas B.

    2012-11-01

    Recently my collection of historical physics teaching apparatus was given a group of 19th-century tuning forks on resonant boxes. Figure 1 shows the smallest fork sitting on the largest one. The large tuning fork oscillates at 128 Hz and has a resonator that is 57.9 cm long. The small fork has a frequency 10 times higher, but its resonator has a length of 11.0 cm instead of the 5.8 cm that simple scaling would suggest. How is this possible?

  11. Tilting Saturn without Tilting Jupiter or Ejecting an Ice Giant: Constraints on migration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McNeil, Douglas S.; Lee, M. H.

    2010-10-01

    The obliquities of the giant planets preserve information about their migration and encounter histories. Are the classic Nice models (Tsiganis et al. 2005) or the resonant Nice models (Morbidelli et al. 2007) compatible with Jupiter's 3 degree tilt and Saturn's 27? Here we consider the obliquity evolution of the giants during the planetesimal-driven migration phase using two methods: (1) a purely secular integration of the Laplace-Lagrange equations with spin, and (2) a hybrid N-body scheme with full interactions between the Sun and the giants but imposed prescriptions for migration and eccentricity and inclination damping. We find that it is difficult to reproduce today's obliquity values as migration timescales sufficient to tilt Saturn via the Hamilton & Ward (2004) secular spin-orbit resonance mechanism generally suffice to tilt Jupiter more than is observed. Moreover, long migration timescales which make tilting Saturn easier simultaneously reduce the survival fraction (to below 20% for timescales longer than 20 Myr.) We discuss the constraints these observations provide on the dynamical history of the giant planets, and the remaining possibility of tilting Saturn during a late very slow migration of Neptune to its present location after the main phase of migration is complete. [This work was supported by Hong Kong RGC grant HKU 7024/08P.

  12. Warm Disks from Giant Impacts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kohler, Susanna

    2015-10-01

    In the process of searching for exoplanetary systems, weve discovered tens of debris disks close around distant stars that are especially bright in infrared wavelengths. New research suggests that we might be looking at the late stages of terrestrial planet formation in these systems.Forming Terrestrial PlanetsAccording to the widely-accepted formation model for our solar-system, protoplanets the size of Mars formed within a protoplanetary disk around our Sun. Eventually, the depletion of the gas in the disk led the orbits of these protoplanets to become chaotically unstable. Finally, in the giant impact stage, many of the protoplanets collided with each other ultimately leading to the formation of the terrestrial planets and their moons as we know them today.If giant impact stages occur in exoplanetary systems, too leading to the formation of terrestrial exoplanets how would we detect this process? According to a study led by Hidenori Genda of the Tokyo Institute of Technology, we might be already be witnessing this stage in observations of warm debris disks around other stars. To test this, Genda and collaborators model giant impact stages and determine what we would expect to see from a system undergoing this violent evolution.Modeling CollisionsSnapshots of a giant impact in one of the authors simulations. The collision causes roughly 0.05 Earth masses of protoplanetary material to be ejected from the system. Click for a closer look! [Genda et al. 2015]The collaborators run a series of simulations evolving protoplanetary bodies in a solar system. The simulations begin 10 Myr into the lifetime of the solar system, i.e., after the gas from the protoplanetary disk has had time to be cleared and the protoplanetary orbits begin to destabilize. The simulations end when the protoplanets are done smashing into each other and have again settled into stable orbits, typically after ~100 Myr.The authors find that, over an average giant impact stage, the total amount of

  13. [3Fe-4S] <--> [4Fe-4S] cluster interconversion in Desulfovibrio africanus ferredoxin III: properties of an Asp14 --> Cys mutant.

    PubMed Central

    Busch, J L; Breton, J L; Bartlett, B M; Armstrong, F A; James, R; Thomson, A J

    1997-01-01

    The 8Fe ferredoxin III from Desulfovibrio africanus is a monomeric protein which contains two [4Fe-4S]2+/1+ clusters, one of which is labile and can readily and reversibly lose one Fe under oxidative conditions to yield a [3Fe-4S]1+/0 cluster. This 4Fe cluster has an S = 3/2 ground sping state insteaed of S = 1/2 in the reduced +1 state [George, Armstrong, Hatchikian and Thomson (1989) Biochem. J. 264, 275-284]. The co-ordination to this cluster is unusual in that an aspartate (Asp14, D14, is found where a cysteine residue normally occurs. Using a mutant protein obtained from the overexpression in Escherichia coli of a synthetic gene in which Asp14, the putative ligand to the removable Fe, has been changed to Cys, we have studied the cluster interconversion properties of the labile cluster. Analysis by EPR and magnetic-circular-dichroism spectroscopies showed that the Asp14 --> Cys (D14C) mutant contains two [4Fe-4S]2+/1+ clusters, both with S = 1/2 in the reduced state. Also, unlike in native 8Fe D. africanus ferredoxin III, the 4Fe <--> 3Fe cluster interconversion reaction was found to be sluggish and did not go to completion. It is inferred that the reversibility of the reaction in the native protein is due to the presence of the aspartate residue at position 14 and that this residue might protect the [3Fe-4S] cluster from further degradation. PMID:9173907

  14. [3Fe-4S] <--> [4Fe-4S] cluster interconversion in Desulfovibrio africanus ferredoxin III: properties of an Asp14 --> Cys mutant.

    PubMed

    Busch, J L; Breton, J L; Bartlett, B M; Armstrong, F A; James, R; Thomson, A J

    1997-04-01

    The 8Fe ferredoxin III from Desulfovibrio africanus is a monomeric protein which contains two [4Fe-4S]2+/1+ clusters, one of which is labile and can readily and reversibly lose one Fe under oxidative conditions to yield a [3Fe-4S]1+/0 cluster. This 4Fe cluster has an S = 3/2 ground sping state insteaed of S = 1/2 in the reduced +1 state [George, Armstrong, Hatchikian and Thomson (1989) Biochem. J. 264, 275-284]. The co-ordination to this cluster is unusual in that an aspartate (Asp14, D14, is found where a cysteine residue normally occurs. Using a mutant protein obtained from the overexpression in Escherichia coli of a synthetic gene in which Asp14, the putative ligand to the removable Fe, has been changed to Cys, we have studied the cluster interconversion properties of the labile cluster. Analysis by EPR and magnetic-circular-dichroism spectroscopies showed that the Asp14 --> Cys (D14C) mutant contains two [4Fe-4S]2+/1+ clusters, both with S = 1/2 in the reduced state. Also, unlike in native 8Fe D. africanus ferredoxin III, the 4Fe <--> 3Fe cluster interconversion reaction was found to be sluggish and did not go to completion. It is inferred that the reversibility of the reaction in the native protein is due to the presence of the aspartate residue at position 14 and that this residue might protect the [3Fe-4S] cluster from further degradation.

  15. Renierite, Cu10ZnGe2Fe4S16-Cu11GeAsFe4S16: a coupled solid solution series.

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Bernstein, L.R.

    1986-01-01

    The composition of renierite is found to be Cu10(Zn1-xCux)Ge2-xAsxFe4S16 (0 = or < x = or < 1), with continuous solid solution between the zincian and arsenian end-members, Cu10ZnGe2Fe4S16 and Cu11GeAsFe4S16, through the coupled substitution Zn(II) + Ge(IV) = Cu(I) + As(V). This is the first reported example of extensive coupled solid solution in a sulphide mineral. Arsenian renierite, not previously characterized, is similar to zincian renierite in polished section, with a slightly redder colour and lower anisotropy. It is reddish orange with relief very similar to that of bornite, though it is harder (VHN25 = 286) and does not tarnish in air. It is slightly bireflective, with colours varying from orange-yellow to reddish orange in nearly crossed polarizers. The strongest powder XRD lines are: 3.042(100), 1.861(29), 1.869(16), 1.594(11) and 1.017(10) A; D(calc.) 4.50 g/cm3. Specimens have been found at the Ruby Creek copper deposit, Alaska, where zincian renierite also occurs, and at the Inexco no. 1 mine, Jamestown, Colorado.-J.A.Z.

  16. Quick Fabrication and Thermoelectric Properties of Cu12Sb4S13 Tetrahedrite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Juyi; Gu, Ming; Bao, Yefeng; Li, Xiaoya; Chen, Lidong

    2016-04-01

    Tetrahedrites, comprised mainly of earth-abundant and environment-friendly elements, copper and sulfur, may pave the way to many new and low-cost thermoelectric energy generation opportunities. However, the preparation of tetrahedrites is time- and energy-consuming. In this paper, we study the melting process and the effect of the annealing time on the microstructure and thermoelectric properties of the Cu12Sb4S13 tetrahedrite, in an effort to shorten the synthesis (melting and annealing) time. Our results show that the Cu12Sb4S13 tetrahedrite phase forms in the melt during cooling. Shortening the melting time does not affect the formation of Cu12Sb4S13. The cooled ingot consists of the principal phase of Cu12Sb4S13 and two secondary phases, Cu3SbS4 and CuSbS2. It is found that prolonged annealing cannot eliminate the impurity phases in Cu12Sb4S13 tetrahedrite, has a small effect on the electrical resistivity, and a negligible effect on the Seebeck coefficient and the thermal conductivity of the tetrahedrite. All our samples have a ZT above 0.47 at 600 K and the maximum ZT obtained was 0.52 when the sample was annealed for 1 day. Based on our experimental results, the time for preparing the Cu12Sb4S13 tetrahedrite can be considerably shortened.

  17. Sodium in weak G-band giants

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Drake, Jeremy J.; Lambert, David L.

    1994-01-01

    Sodium abundances have been determined for eight weak G-band giants whose atmospheres are greatly enriched with products of the CN-cycling H-burning reactions. Systematic errors are minimized by comparing the weak G-band giants to a sample of similar but normal giants. If, further, Ca is selected as a reference element, model atmosphere-related errors should largely be removed. For the weak-G-band stars (Na/Ca) = 0.16 +/- 0.01, which is just possibly greater than the result (Na/Ca) = 0.10 /- 0.03 from the normal giants. This result demonstrates that the atmospheres of the weak G-band giants are not seriously contaminated with products of ON cycling.

  18. Giant Planets in Open Clusters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Quinn, S. N.; White, R. J.; Latham, D. W.

    2015-10-01

    Two decades after the discovery of 51 Peg b, more than 200 hot Jupiters have now been confirmed, but the details of their inward migration remain uncertain. While it is widely accepted that short period giant planets could not have formed in situ, several different mechanisms (e.g., Type II migration, planet-planet scattering, Kozai-Lidov cycles) may contribute to shrinking planetary orbits, and the relative importance of each is not well-constrained. Migration through the gas disk is expected to preserve circular, coplanar orbits and must occur quickly (within ˜ 10 Myr), whereas multi-body processes should initially excite eccentricities and inclinations and may take hundreds of millions of years. Subsequent evolution of the system (e.g., orbital circularization and inclination damping via tidal interaction with the host star) may obscure these differences, so observing hot Jupiters soon after migration occurs can constrain the importance of each mechanism. Fortunately, the well-characterized stars in young and adolescent open clusters (with known ages and compositions) provide natural laboratories for such studies, and recent surveys have begun to take advantage of this opportunity. We present a review of the discoveries in this emerging realm of exoplanet science, discuss the constraints they provide for giant planet formation and migration, and reflect on the future direction of the field.

  19. Rare Giant Cell Tumor of Olecranon Bone!!!!

    PubMed Central

    Goyal, Pawan; Gautam, Vishal; Saini, Narender; Sharma, Yogesh

    2016-01-01

    Introduction: Giant cell tumor (GCT) is a bone tumor involving epiphyseal area of bone abutting the subchondral bone. Commonly found in long bones such as proximal tibia and distal femur. We report a case of GCT of olecranon bone in a 23-year-old male. Case Report: A 23-year-old patient presented to our outpatient department with pain and mild swelling at the elbow from last 2 to 3 months. On examination, it was seen that there was a moderate swelling at the tip of the olecranon. The magnetic resonance imaging reported a lytic lesion in the olecranon but sparing the coronoid process of the ulna, the biopsy report confirmed that histologically it was a GCT of the bone. Total excision of the tumor was done after lifting the aponeurosis of the triceps muscle. The area remaining after excision of the tumor was phenol cauterized and cleaned with hydrogen peroxide solution. Triceps was reinserted on the remaining ulna. At follow-up the radiographs showed adequate excision of the tumor. The patient gained a full range of movement at the elbow and was functionally restored. There were no signs of any systemic spread of the tumor. Conclusion: GCT though a very common bone tumor could be missed if present in atypical locations. Radiographically soap bubble appearance might not be present in every case, and there could be multiple diagnoses for lytic lesion in bone. Proper investigations and histopathological examination are necessary for accurate diagnosis and further treatment planning. Early treatment helps in complete excision of tumor along with return of adequate function of the patient. PMID:28164048

  20. Nonfunctioning giant pituitary adenomas: Invasiveness and recurrence

    PubMed Central

    Landeiro, José Alberto; Fonseca, Elissa Oliveira; Monnerat, Andrea Lima Cruz; Taboada, Giselle Fernandes; Cabral, Gustavo Augusto Porto Sereno; Antunes, Felippe

    2015-01-01

    Background: We report our surgical series of 35 patients with giant nonfunctioning pituitary adenomas (GNFPA). We analyzed the rule of Ki-67 antigen expression in predicting recurrence. Methods: Thirty-five patients were operated between 2000 and 2010. Suprassellar extension of the tumors were classified according to Hardy and Mohr based on magnetic resonance (MR) studies. Pituitary endocrine function and MR scans were assessed preoperatively and at 1, 6, and 12 months postoperatively. Immunohistochemical studies were based in regard to the expression of the proliferative Ki-67 index and the hormonal receptor for luteinizing hormone, follicle stimulating hormone, growth hormone, thyroid stimulating hormone, adrenocorticotropic hormone, and prolactin. Tumors specimens were obtained from 35 patients with GNFPA. Endoscopic transsphenoidal surgery was the approach of choice. Results: Thirty-five patients were submitted to 49 surgeries, 44 (89.8%) were transsphenoidal and 5 (10.2%) were transcranial. The most frequent preoperative complaints were visual acuity impairment and visual field defect in 25 (71.2%) and 23 (65.7%) cases, respectively. Improvement of visual acuitiy and visual field deficit after surgery was seen in 20 (80%) and 17 (73.9%) patients, respectively. Endocrinological deficits were encountered in 20 patients (57.1%). After surgery, 18 patients (51.4%) required hormonal replacement. Three patients had visual symptoms related to pituitary apoplexy and recovered after surgery. The Ki-67 labeling index (LI) ranged from <1% to 4.8%. The rate of recurrence in tumors with Ki-67 <3% was 7.7% (2 patients), Ki-67 >3% was present in 5 patients and the recurrence committed 3 patients. Conclusion: In our series, regardless the improvement of visual function and compressing symptoms, 5 patients with expression of Ki-67 LI more than 3% experienced a recurrence. PMID:26674325

  1. Multisatellite observations of a giant pulsation event

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Takahashi, Kazue; Glassmeier, Karl-Heinz; Angelopoulos, Vassilis; Bonnell, John; Nishimura, Yukitoshi; Singer, Howard J.; Russell, Christopher T.

    2011-11-01

    Giant pulsations (Pgs; frequency ˜10 mHz) were detected with ground magnetometers on the North American continent on 19 October 2008, when the GOES-10, -11, -12, and -13 geostationary satellites and the THEMIS-A probe were magnetically connected to the region of the ground pulsation activity. This unique configuration allowed us to determine the properties of magnetospheric ultra-low-frequency (ULF) waves that caused the Pgs on the ground. All spacecraft detected monochromatic ULF waves at ˜10 mHz, and the coherence between the Pg at the Gillam ground station and the ULF wave at THEMIS-A was high when the magnetic field foot point of the spacecraft came close to the ground station. The ULF waves observed by the five spacecraft had perturbations in the radial and compressional components of the magnetic field and in the azimuthal component of the electric field, which are attributed to poloidal mode standing Alfvén waves. The poloidal waves were accompanied by multiharmonic toroidal waves, and from the frequency relationship among these, it is concluded that the ˜10 mHz oscillations correspond to the fundamental (odd, or symmetric) mode. The standing wave mode also explains the amplitude variation with latitude and the phase delay between the magnetic and electric fields. Numerical models of poloidal waves incorporating finite height integrated ionospheric conductivity indicate that the fundamental mode interpretation is valid even when the damping of the standing waves is strong. Our observations are the most comprehensive to date in terms of spacecraft data, and we believe that theoretical work on the Pg generation mechanism should focus on mechanisms specific to odd mode standing waves, such as drift resonance of ring current ions.

  2. Multisatellite Observations of a Giant Pulsation Event

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Takahashi, K.; Glassmeier, K.; Angelopoulos, V.; Bonnell, J. W.; Nishimura, T.; Singer, H. J.; Russell, C. T.

    2011-12-01

    Giant pulsations (Pgs; frequency ~10 mHz) were detected with ground magnetometers in the North American continent on October 2008, when the GOES-10, -11, -12, and -13 geostationary satellites and the THEMIS-A probe were magnetically connected to the region of the ground pulsation activity. This unique observational configuration allowed us to determine the properties of magnetospheric ultra-low-frequency (ULF) waves that caused the Pgs on the ground. All spacecraft detected monochromatic ULF waves at ~10 mHz, and the coherence between the Pg at the Gillam ground station and the ULF wave at THEMIS-A was high when the magnetic field foot point of the spacecraft came close to the ground station, indicating a causal relationship between the two oscillation phenomena. The ULF waves observed by the five spacecraft had perturbations in the radial and compressional components of the magnetic field and in the azimuthal component of the electric field, which are attributed to poloidal mode standing Alfvén waves. The poloidal waves were accompanied by multiharmonic toroidal waves, and from the frequency relationship among these, it is concluded that the ~10 mHz oscillations correspond to the fundamental (odd, or symmetric) mode. The standing wave mode also explains the amplitude variation with latitude and the phase delay between the magnetic and electric fields. Numerical models of poloidal waves incorporating finite ionospheric conductivity indicate that the fundamental mode interpretation is valid even when the damping of the standing waves is strong. Our observations are the most comprehensive to date in terms of spacecraft data, and we believe that theoretical work on the Pg generation mechanism should focus on mechanisms specific to odd mode standing waves, such as drift resonance of ring current ions.

  3. Characterization of the binding of benzo(a)pyrene (BP) to a 4S cytosolic protein

    SciTech Connect

    Houser, W.H.; Zielinski, R.; Bresnick, E.

    1986-03-01

    The authors have recently reported on the partial purification of a 4S binding protein that interacts in a specific and saturable manner with (/sup 3/H)BP and other polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAH). They also reported that the 4S binding protein was able to interact in a specific and saturable manner with plasmids collectively containing the rat cytochrome P450c gene. The authors have examined further the (/sup 3/H)BP binding properties of the 4S protein. The specific (/sup 3/H)BP binding activity appears to be highest in 4 week old male rats and declines with age. In some animals the specific (/sup 3/H)BP binding activity is induced after pretreatment with either phenobarbital (BP) or isosafrole (IS) as evidenced by a 75% and 52% increase, respectively, over untreated controls. No apparent increase was observed after pretreatment of animals with 3-methylcholanthracene (3MC). The addition of a 200 fold excess of tetra-chlordibenzofuran (TCDBF) to the incubations did not displace (/sup 3/H)BP from the 4S protein. The addition of molybdate (10 mM) to isolation buffers, known to stabilize certain hormone receptors, did not alter the sedimentation coefficient or the specific binding activity of the 4S protein. The authors conclude that: (1) in the rat, the 4S protein appears to be distinct from the 8S protein reported in the mouse and that: (2) the 4S species regulates the PAH induced expression of AHH activity in the rat.

  4. Spin-singlet state formation in the cluster Mott insulator GaNb4S8 studied by μSR and NMR spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Waki, T.; Kajinami, Y.; Tabata, Y.; Nakamura, H.; Yoshida, M.; Takigawa, M.; Watanabe, I.

    2010-01-01

    Muon spin relaxation (μSR) and nuclear magnetic resonance experiments revealed that the spin-singlet state with an excitation gap of ˜200K is realized from S=1/2Nb4 tetrahedral clusters in a cluster Mott insulator GaNb4S8 . The intercluster cooperative phenomenon to the singlet state at TS=32k is triggered by intracluster Jahn-Teller type structural instability developed from ˜3TS . Referring to the lattice symmetry, the formation of Nb8 octamer ( Nb4-Nb4 bond) is suggested.

  5. Separating gas-giant and ice-giant planets by halting pebble accretion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lambrechts, M.; Johansen, A.; Morbidelli, A.

    2014-12-01

    In the solar system giant planets come in two flavours: gas giants (Jupiter and Saturn) with massive gas envelopes, and ice giants (Uranus and Neptune) with much thinner envelopes around their cores. It is poorly understood how these two classes of planets formed. High solid accretion rates, necessary to form the cores of giant planets within the life-time of protoplanetary discs, heat the envelope and prevent rapid gas contraction onto the core, unless accretion is halted. We find that, in fact, accretion of pebbles (~cm sized particles) is self-limiting: when a core becomes massive enough it carves a gap in the pebble disc. This halt in pebble accretion subsequently triggers the rapid collapse of the super-critical gas envelope. Unlike gas giants, ice giants do not reach this threshold mass and can only bind low-mass envelopes that are highly enriched by water vapour from sublimated icy pebbles. This offers an explanation for the compositional difference between gas giants and ice giants in the solar system. Furthermore, unlike planetesimal-driven accretion scenarios, our model allows core formation and envelope attraction within disc life-times, provided that solids in protoplanetary discs are predominantly made up of pebbles. Our results imply that the outer regions of planetary systems, where the mass required to halt pebble accretion is large, are dominated by ice giants and that gas-giant exoplanets in wide orbits are enriched by more than 50 Earth masses of solids.

  6. Multiquark resonances

    DOE PAGES

    Esposito, A.; Pilloni, A.; Polosa, Antonio D.

    2016-12-02

    Multiquark resonances are undoubtedly experimentally observed. The number of states and the amount of details on their properties have been growing over the years. It is very recent the discovery of two pentaquarks and the confirmation of four tetraquarks, two of which had not been observed before. We mainly review the theoretical understanding of this sector of particle physics phenomenology and present some considerations attempting a coherent description of the so called X and Z resonances. The prominent problems plaguing theoretical models, like the absence of selection rules limiting the number of states predicted, motivate new directions in model building.more » Lastly, data are reviewed going through all of the observed resonances with particular attention to their common features and the purpose of providing a starting point to further research.« less

  7. Multiquark resonances

    SciTech Connect

    Esposito, A.; Pilloni, A.; Polosa, Antonio D.

    2016-12-02

    Multiquark resonances are undoubtedly experimentally observed. The number of states and the amount of details on their properties have been growing over the years. It is very recent the discovery of two pentaquarks and the confirmation of four tetraquarks, two of which had not been observed before. We mainly review the theoretical understanding of this sector of particle physics phenomenology and present some considerations attempting a coherent description of the so called X and Z resonances. The prominent problems plaguing theoretical models, like the absence of selection rules limiting the number of states predicted, motivate new directions in model building. Lastly, data are reviewed going through all of the observed resonances with particular attention to their common features and the purpose of providing a starting point to further research.

  8. Multiquark resonances

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Esposito, A.; Pilloni, A.; Polosa, A. D.

    2017-01-01

    Multiquark resonances are undoubtedly experimentally observed. The number of states and the amount of details on their properties have been growing over the years. It is very recent the discovery of two pentaquarks and the confirmation of four tetraquarks, two of which had not been observed before. We mainly review the theoretical understanding of this sector of particle physics phenomenology and present some considerations attempting a coherent description of the so called X and Z resonances. The prominent problems plaguing theoretical models, like the absence of selection rules limiting the number of states predicted, motivate new directions in model building. Data are reviewed going through all of the observed resonances with particular attention to their common features and the purpose of providing a starting point to further research.

  9. Hydrogeologic Assessment of the 4-S Land and Cattle CompanyRanch

    SciTech Connect

    Quinn, Nigel W.T.

    2006-04-10

    Hydrogeological assessment of the 4-S Land and Cattle Company (4-S Ranch) was conducted using a combination of field investigations and a survey of available literature from nearby agricultural water districts and other entities. The 4-S Ranch has been able to meet most of its own water needs providing irrigated pasture for beef cattle by an active program of shallow groundwater pumping in these miconfined aquifer above the Corcoran Clay. Comparison of groundwater pumping on the 4-S Ranch property with groundwater pumping in the adjacent Merquin and Stevinson Water Districts shows great similarity in the well screened depths and the quality of the groundwater produced by the well fields. The pump yield for the eight active production wells on the 4-S property are comparable to the production and drainage wells in the adjacent water districts. Like these Districts the 4-S Ranch lies close to the Valley trough in a historic discharge area. The 4-S Ranch is unique in that it is bounded and bisected by several major water conveyance facilities including Bear Creek. Although the large number of potential recharge structures would suggest significant groundwater conjunctive use potential the major well field development has occurred along the length of the Eastside Canal. The Eastside Canal is known to be leaky above the ''A'' Clay the Canal passes through sandy areas and experiences significant groundwater seepage. This seepage can be intercepted by adjacent groundwater wells. Pumping adjacent to, and along the alignment of the Canal, may induce higher rates of seepage from the Eastside Canal. Groundwater quality below and adjacent to the Eastside Canal is very good, reflecting the origin of this diverted water from the Merced River. Most of the pumpage occurs in a depth interval between 30 ft and 130 ft. Safe yield estimates made using the available data show that the 4-S Ranch has sufficient resources to meet its own needs. Further exploitation of the groundwater will

  10. CHAOTIC DIFFUSION OF RESONANT KUIPER BELT OBJECTS

    SciTech Connect

    Tiscareno, Matthew S.; Malhotra, Renu

    2009-09-15

    We carried out extensive numerical orbit integrations to probe the long-term chaotic dynamics of the two strongest mean-motion resonances of Neptune in the Kuiper Belt, the 3:2 (Plutinos) and 2:1 (Twotinos). Our primary results include a computation of the relative volumes of phase space characterized by large- and small-resonance libration amplitudes, and maps of resonance stability measured by mean chaotic diffusion rate. We find that Neptune's 2:1 resonance has weaker overall long-term stability than the 3:2-only {approx}15% of Twotinos are projected to survive for 4 Gyr, compared to {approx}27% of Plutinos, based on an extrapolation from our 1-Gyr integrations. We find that Pluto has only a modest effect, causing a {approx}4% decrease in the Plutino population that survives to 4 Gyr. Given current observational estimates, and assuming an initial distribution of particles proportional to the local phase-space volume in the resonance, we conclude that the primordial populations of Plutinos and Twotinos formerly made up more than half the population of the classical and resonant Kuiper Belt. We also conclude that Twotinos were originally nearly as numerous as Plutinos; this is consistent with predictions from early models of smooth giant planet migration and resonance sweeping of the Kuiper Belt and provides a useful constraint for more detailed models.

  11. Chloroplast HCF101 is a scaffold protein for [4Fe-4S] cluster assembly

    PubMed Central

    Schwenkert, Serena; Netz, Daili J. A.; Frazzon, Jeverson; Pierik, Antonio J.; Bill, Eckhard; Gross, Jeferson; Lill, Roland; Meurer, Jörg

    2009-01-01

    Oxygen-evolving chloroplasts possess their own iron-sulfur cluster assembly proteins including members of the SUF (sulfur mobilization) and the NFU family. Recently, the chloroplast protein HCF101 (high chlorophyll fluorescence 101) has been shown to be essential for the accumulation of the membrane complex Photosystem I and the soluble ferredoxin-thioredoxin reductases, both containing [4Fe-4S] clusters. The protein belongs to the FSC-NTPase ([4Fe-4S]-cluster-containing P-loop NTPase) superfamily, several members of which play a crucial role in Fe/S cluster biosynthesis. Although the C-terminal ISC-binding site, conserved in other members of the FSC-NTPase family, is not present in chloroplast HCF101 homologues using Mössbauer and EPR spectroscopy, we provide evidence that HCF101 binds a [4Fe-4S] cluster. 55Fe incorporation studies of mitochondrially targeted HCF101 in Saccharomyces cerevisiae confirmed the assembly of an Fe/S cluster in HCF101 in an Nfs1-dependent manner. Site-directed mutagenesis identified three HCF101-specific cysteine residues required for assembly and/or stability of the cluster. We further demonstrate that the reconstituted cluster is transiently bound and can be transferred from HCF101 to a [4Fe-4S] apoprotein. Together, our findings suggest that HCF101 may serve as a chloroplast scaffold protein that specifically assembles [4Fe-4S] clusters and transfers them to the chloroplast membrane and soluble target proteins. PMID:19817716

  12. Laser Resonator

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Harper, L. L. (Inventor)

    1983-01-01

    An optical resonator cavity configuration has a unitary mirror with oppositely directed convex and concave reflective surfaces disposed into one fold and concertedly reversing both ends of a beam propagating from a laser rod disposed between two total internal reflection prisms. The optical components are rigidly positioned with perpendicularly crossed virtual rooflines by a compact optical bed. The rooflines of the internal reflection prisms, are arranged perpendicularly to the axis of the laser beam and to the optical axes of the optical resonator components.

  13. Diagnosis and management of acromegaly: giant invasive adenoma.

    PubMed

    Cahyanur, Rahmat; Setyawan, Wawan; Sudrajat, Dedy G; Setyowati, Susie; Purnamasari, Dyah; Soewondo, Pradana

    2011-04-01

    Acromegaly is a rare disorder caused by excessive growth hormone. Majority of acromegaly are due to pituitary adenoma. It is estimated that 5% of pituitary adenoma become invasive and may grow to gigantic sizes (>4 cm in diameter). We would like to describe a man with giant invasive adenoma. We describe the case of 52-year-old man with acromegaly. The patient was presented to medical care because of hemichorea. He also had visual field defect, uncontrolled diabetes, and dyslipidemia. Hormonal profile showed increment of GH 2-hour after a standard 75-g oral glucose load and of high IGF-1 level with low level of FSH and LH. The next was performed by pituitary imaging. Magnetic resonance imaging showed a macroadenoma with diameter 2.3x3.5x6.6 cm3 that fills the sella tursica, and enlarges into suprasella, genu of corpus collosum, and invades third ventricle. This report describes a rare case of acromegalic patient with giant invasive adenoma. This could be a demonstrative case and lesson for diagnosis and manage acromegalic patient.

  14. The clinical approach toward giant cell tumor of bone.

    PubMed

    van der Heijden, Lizz; Dijkstra, P D Sander; van de Sande, Michiel A J; Kroep, Judith R; Nout, Remi A; van Rijswijk, Carla S P; Bovée, Judith V M G; Hogendoorn, Pancras C W; Gelderblom, Hans

    2014-05-01

    We provide an overview of imaging, histopathology, genetics, and multidisciplinary treatment of giant cell tumor of bone (GCTB), an intermediate, locally aggressive but rarely metastasizing tumor. Overexpression of receptor activator of nuclear factor κB ligand (RANKL) by mononuclear neoplastic stromal cells promotes recruitment of numerous reactive multinucleated giant cells. Conventional radiographs show a typical eccentric lytic lesion, mostly located in the meta-epiphyseal area of long bones. GCTB may also arise in the axial skeleton and very occasionally in the small bones of hands and feet. Magnetic resonance imaging is necessary to evaluate the extent of GCTB within bone and surrounding soft tissues to plan a surgical approach. Curettage with local adjuvants is the preferred treatment. Recurrence rates after curettage with phenol and polymethylmethacrylate (PMMA; 8%-27%) or cryosurgery and PMMA (0%-20%) are comparable. Resection is indicated when joint salvage is not feasible (e.g., intra-articular fracture with soft tissue component). Denosumab (RANKL inhibitor) blocks and bisphosphonates inhibit GCTB-derived osteoclast resorption. With bisphosphonates, stabilization of local and metastatic disease has been reported, although level of evidence was low. Denosumab has been studied to a larger extent and seems to be effective in facilitating intralesional surgery after therapy. Denosumab was recently registered for unresectable disease. Moderate-dose radiotherapy (40-55 Gy) is restricted to rare cases in which surgery would lead to unacceptable morbidity and RANKL inhibitors are contraindicated or unavailable.

  15. B semileptonic decays at the Υ(4S) and the Υ(5S)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yanagisawa, C.; Heintz, U.; Lee-Franzini, J.; Lovelock, D. M. J.; Narain, M.; Schamberger, R. D.; Willins, J.; Franzini, P.; Tuts, P. M.

    1991-05-01

    B-meson semileptonic decay spectra have been obtained at the Υ(4S) and at the Υ(5S) at the Cornell Electron Storage Ring with the Columbia University-Stony Brook detector. The branching ratio for B-->eνX at the Υ(4S) is found to be (10.0+/-0.5)%. The electron spectrum of B-->eνX at the Υ(5S) is observed for the first time and the average branching ratio of B,Bs-->eνX is consistent with that for B's from Υ(4S) decays. The shape of the electron spectrum at the Υ(5S) indicates production of B mesons which are heavier than nonstrange B's, presumably strange B's.

  16. Giant tunneling magnetoresistance in silicene

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Yu; Lou, Yiyi

    2013-11-14

    We have theoretically studied ballistic electron transport in silicene under the manipulation of a pair of ferromagnetic gate. Transport properties like transmission and conductance have been calculated by the standard transfer matrix method for parallel and antiparallel magnetization configurations. It is demonstrated here that, due to the stray field-induced wave-vector filtering effect, remarkable difference in configuration-dependent transport gives rise to a giant tunneling magnetoresistance. In combination with the peculiar buckled structure of silicene and its electric tunable energy gap, the receiving magnetoresistance can be efficiently modulated by the externally-tunable stray field, electrostatic potential, and staggered sublattice potential, providing some flexible strategies to construct silicene-based nanoelectronic device.

  17. A Turkish family with Ellis-van Creveld syndrome in six siblings; linkage analysis on 4p16 region (D4S3360-D4S2366).

    PubMed

    Cağdaş, D N; Parlar, A I; Pac, A; Tutun, U; Balci, S

    2008-01-01

    We present a Turkish family and their 6 children, consecutively affected by Ellis-van Creveld (EVC) Syndrome. Four of the affected children died in the postnatal period, and 2 of them had been admitted to the pediatric cardiology department for their cardiologic evaluation. Since they had the features of the EVC Syndrome, linkage analysis was performed with the polymorphic markers, D4S3360-D4S2366, selected from 4p 16 locus. There was complete segregation between the disease and marker allels and the two affected siblings were homozygote for the polymorphic markers, as expected in autosomal recessive inheritance. The diagnosis of EVC Syndrome was confirmed by this molecular analysis. Two cases with EVC were presented in this report. Case 1 had partial abnormal pulmonary venous return and pulmonary stenosis additional to ostium primum atrial septal defect and mitral cleft. Partial abnormal pulmonary venous return and pulmonary stenosis were previously not reported with EVC Syndrome. Postaxial polydactyly phenotype of the Case 2 differs from her brother's. There is bifid 5th metacarpal and unilateral (L) bifid middle and distal phalanges resembling syndactyly.

  18. Bulk superconductivity in bismuth oxysulfide Bi4O4S3.

    PubMed

    Singh, Shiva Kumar; Kumar, Anuj; Gahtori, Bhasker; Shruti; Sharma, Gyaneshwar; Patnaik, Satyabrata; Awana, Veer P S

    2012-10-10

    A very recent report on the observation of superconductivity in Bi(4)O(4)S(3) [Mizuguchi, Y.; http://arxiv.org/abs/1207.3145] could potentially reignite the search for superconductivity in a broad range of layered sulfides. We report here the synthesis of Bi(4)O(4)S(3) at 500 °C by a vacuum encapsulation technique and its basic characterizations. The as-synthesized Bi(4)O(4)S(3) was contaminated with small amounts of Bi(2)S(3) and Bi impurities. The majority phase was found to be tetragonal (space group I4/mmm) with lattice parameters a = 3.9697(2) Å and c = 41.3520(1) Å. Both AC and DC magnetization measurements confirmed that Bi(4)O(4)S(3) is a bulk superconductor with a superconducting transition temperature (T(c)) of 4.4 K. Isothermal magnetization (M-H) measurements indicated closed loops with clear signatures of flux pinning and irreversible behavior. The lower critical field (H(c1)) at 2 K for the new superconductor was found to be ~15 Oe. Magnetotransport measurements showed a broadening of the resistivity (ρ) and a decrease in T(c) (ρ = 0) with increasing magnetic field. The extrapolated upper critical field H(c2)(0) was ~31 kOe with a corresponding Ginzburg-Landau coherence length of ~100 Å . In the normal state, the ρ ~ T(2) dependence was not indicated. Hall resistivity data showed a nonlinear magnetic field dependence. Our magnetization and electrical transport measurements substantiate the appearance of bulk superconductivity in as-synthesized Bi(4)O(4)S(3). On the other hand, Bi heat-treated at the same temperature is not superconducting, thus excluding the possibility of impurity-driven superconductivity in the newly discovered superconductor Bi(4)O(4)S(3).

  19. [Endovascular treatment of giant intracranial aneurysms].

    PubMed

    Bracard, S; Derelle, A L; Tonnelet, R; Barbier, C; Proust, F; Anxionnat, R

    2016-02-01

    Giant aneurysms are defined as having a maximal diameter higher than 25mm. The dynamic aspect of giant aneurysms, in particular, is its growth, which was responsible for parenchyma sequellae either due to haemorrhagic complications or a compression of cranial nerves. The treatment of these giant aneurysms was challenging because of its size, the mass effect and the neck diameter. These morphologic conditions required complex endovascular procedures such as remodelling, stenting, using flow diverters. Subsequently, the complex procedures increased the risk of morbidity because of ischemic complications. Despite these procedures, the risk of recurrence was high.

  20. SYNOVIAL GIANT CELL TUMOR OF THE KNEE.

    PubMed

    Abdalla, Rene Jorge; Cohen, Moisés; Nóbrega, Jezimar; Forgas, Andrea

    2009-01-01

    Synovial giant cell tumor is a benign neoplasm, rarely reported in the form of malignant metastasis. Synovial giant cell tumor most frequently occurs on the hand, and, most uncommon, on the ankle and knee. In the present study, the authors describe a rare case of synovial giant cell tumor on the knee as well as the treatment approach. Arthroscopy has been shown, in this case, to be the optimal method for treating this kind of lesion, once it allowed a less aggressive approach, while providing good visualization of all compartments of knee joint and full tumor resection.

  1. Idiopathic Giant Cell Myocarditis: A Case Report

    PubMed Central

    Kumari M.K., Kalpana; Mysorekar, Vijaya V.; S., Praveen

    2012-01-01

    Giant-cell myocarditis is a disease of relatively young, predominantly healthy adults. The patients usually die of heart failure and ventricular arrhythmia unless a cardiac transplantation is performed. We are reporting here an autopsy case of idiopathic giant cell myocarditis with no symptoms in a 27-year old -worker who died suddenly. The purpose of this report was to emphasize that idiopathic giant cell myocarditis was a rare disease and that it could exist in the absence of any symptomatic heart disease. PMID:23205365

  2. A giant pancreatic pseudocyst treated by cystogastrostomy

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Grace C; Misra, Subhasis

    2015-01-01

    We report a case of a giant pancreatic pseudocyst in a 65-year-old man presenting with abdominal pain, loss of appetite and abdominal distension. CT scans demonstrated a giant pancreatic pseudocyst measuring 25.7 cm×15.3 cm×10.9 cm anteroposteriorly, with significant compression of surrounding organs. An open cystogastrostomy was performed through a midline incision, and 3 L of fluid was drained from the giant pseudocyst. Recovery has been uneventful. PMID:25804943

  3. Rotation and macroturbulence in bright giants

    SciTech Connect

    Gray, D.F.; Toner, C.G.

    1986-11-01

    Spectral line profiles of 35 F, G, and K bright giants were analyzed to obtain rotation rates, v sin i, and macroturbulence dispersion. This sample indicates that rotation rates of cool class II giants is less than 11 km/s, in contrast with some recent periodicity measurements. Macroturbulence dispersion generally increases with effective temperature, but the range of values at a given effective temperature is much larger than seen for lower luminosity classes; this is interpreted in terms of red-giant and blue-loop evolution. No evidence is found for angular momentum dissipation on the first crossing of the H-R diagram. 57 references.

  4. SYNOVIAL GIANT CELL TUMOR OF THE KNEE

    PubMed Central

    Abdalla, Rene Jorge; Cohen, Moisés; Nóbrega, Jezimar; Forgas, Andrea

    2015-01-01

    Synovial giant cell tumor is a benign neoplasm, rarely reported in the form of malignant metastasis. Synovial giant cell tumor most frequently occurs on the hand, and, most uncommon, on the ankle and knee. In the present study, the authors describe a rare case of synovial giant cell tumor on the knee as well as the treatment approach. Arthroscopy has been shown, in this case, to be the optimal method for treating this kind of lesion, once it allowed a less aggressive approach, while providing good visualization of all compartments of knee joint and full tumor resection. PMID:27004193

  5. Hierarchical spin-orbital polarization of a giant Rashba system

    PubMed Central

    Bawden, Lewis; Riley, Jonathan M.; Kim, Choong H.; Sankar, Raman; Monkman, Eric J.; Shai, Daniel E.; Wei, Haofei I.; Lochocki, Edward B.; Wells, Justin W.; Meevasana, Worawat; Kim, Timur K.; Hoesch, Moritz; Ohtsubo, Yoshiyuki; Le Fèvre, Patrick; Fennie, Craig J.; Shen, Kyle M.; Chou, Fangcheng; King, Phil D. C.

    2015-01-01

    The Rashba effect is one of the most striking manifestations of spin-orbit coupling in solids and provides a cornerstone for the burgeoning field of semiconductor spintronics. It is typically assumed to manifest as a momentum-dependent splitting of a single initially spin-degenerate band into two branches with opposite spin polarization. Combining polarization-dependent and resonant angle-resolved photoemission measurements with density functional theory calculations, we show that the two “spin-split” branches of the model giant Rashba system BiTeI additionally develop disparate orbital textures, each of which is coupled to a distinct spin configuration. This necessitates a reinterpretation of spin splitting in Rashba-like systems and opens new possibilities for controlling spin polarization through the orbital sector. PMID:26601268

  6. Hierarchical spin-orbital polarization of a giant Rashba system.

    PubMed

    Bawden, Lewis; Riley, Jonathan M; Kim, Choong H; Sankar, Raman; Monkman, Eric J; Shai, Daniel E; Wei, Haofei I; Lochocki, Edward B; Wells, Justin W; Meevasana, Worawat; Kim, Timur K; Hoesch, Moritz; Ohtsubo, Yoshiyuki; Le Fèvre, Patrick; Fennie, Craig J; Shen, Kyle M; Chou, Fangcheng; King, Phil D C

    2015-09-01

    The Rashba effect is one of the most striking manifestations of spin-orbit coupling in solids and provides a cornerstone for the burgeoning field of semiconductor spintronics. It is typically assumed to manifest as a momentum-dependent splitting of a single initially spin-degenerate band into two branches with opposite spin polarization. Combining polarization-dependent and resonant angle-resolved photoemission measurements with density functional theory calculations, we show that the two "spin-split" branches of the model giant Rashba system BiTeI additionally develop disparate orbital textures, each of which is coupled to a distinct spin configuration. This necessitates a reinterpretation of spin splitting in Rashba-like systems and opens new possibilities for controlling spin polarization through the orbital sector.

  7. Direct Imaging of Giant Exoplanets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tamura, Motohide

    Since the first detection of exoplanets around a Sun-like star 51 Peg in 1995, their detection and characterization are mainly led by indirect methods such as radial velocity and transit methods. However, recent progresses of observational techniques have finally enabled the direct imaging observations of giant planets of solar-system-scale orbit (with their semi-major axes less than about 50 AU) around A-type stars (e.g., Marois et al. 2008, 2010) and G-type stars (e.g., Kuzuhara et al. 2013). Direct imaging is useful to obtain the physical and atmospheric parameters of exoplanets. In fact not only colors but also a medium-resolution spectroscopy of such planets has been successfully obtained for their atmospheric characterization (Barman et al. 2013). Their masses are typically a few to ~10 Jupiter masses and they orbit at a Saturn- to-Pluto distance. Therefore, like hot-Jupiters and super-Earths they are unlike any solar-system planets, and called wide-orbit giant planets. A recent large search for planets and disk on the Subaru 8.2-m telescope (SEEDS project) has detected a 3-5 Jupiter-masses planet around a Sun-like star GJ 504 (Kuzuhara et al. 2013). It is the coolest planetary companion so far directly imaged and its near-infrared color is “bluer” than that of other directly imaged planets. In this contribution, I will review the recent progresses on direct imaging of exoplanets, highlight the results of the SEEDS project, and discuss the future developments.

  8. Autostereogram resonators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leavey, Sean; Rae, Katherine; Murray, Adam; Courtial, Johannes

    2012-09-01

    Autostereograms, or "Magic Eye" pictures, are repeating patterns designed to give the illusion of depth. Here we discuss optical resonators that create light patterns which, when viewed from a suitable position by a monocular observer, are autostereograms of the three-dimensional shape of one of the mirror surfaces.

  9. Classified computer configuration control system (C{sup 4}S), revision 3, user`s information

    SciTech Connect

    O`Callaghan, P.B.; Nelson, R.A.; Grambihler, A.J.

    1994-04-01

    The Classified Computer Configuration Control System (C{sup 4}S) allows security management to track pertinent information concerning classified computer systems in the scope of their control. Information is entered by the level security manager that is closest to the classified computer system. Managers that are further removed from systems can have consolidated information made available to them. C{sup 4}S can be used to generate reports that are as current as the last information that was entered into the database. C{sup 4}S offers data entry, data display, and data reporting. The user interface uses menus, entry forms, the mouse, and Hot Keys. C{sup 4}S provides help windows that are available at any time by pressing the F1 key. C{sup 4}S has help for each menu, data entry form, and general program information. You can browse a help window by pressing the arrows, page up, or page down keys. You control C{sup 4}S with program options selected from pull-down menus. You {open_quotes}select{close_quotes} by moving a highlight bar up and down or across the menu and pressing enter on one of the options. The highlight bar is moved using the arrow keys, mouse, or selection letters. Notice that a letter of each menu option is a different color from the other letters. This is the selection letter for that option. If you press the selection letter, the highlight bar will move to that option. You can also use a mouse to move the highlight bar to the option by moving the mouse pointer to the option and pressing the mouse button. Explanation of menu options or entry fields appear at the bottom of the screen. These explanations should help you use C{sup 4}S. If you need more help, it is available by pressing F1. C{sup 4}S will bring up a help window for the particular option you are working with. The authors of the program are P.B. O`Callaghan, A. J. Grambihler, and R.A. Nelson.

  10. Lithium Abundance in M3 Red Giant

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Givens, Rashad; Pilachowski, Catherine A.

    2015-01-01

    We present the abundance of lithium in the red giant star vZ 1050 (SK 291) in the globular cluster M3. A previous survey of giants in the cluster showed that like IV-101, vZ 1050 displays a prominent Li I 6707 Å feature. vZ 1050 lies on the blue side of the red giant branch about 1.3 magnitudes above the level of the horizontal branch, and may be an asymptotic giant branch star. A high resolution spectrum of M3 vZ1050 was obtained with the ARC 3.5m telescope and the ARC Echelle Spectrograph (ARCES). Atmospheric parameters were determined using Fe I and Fe II lines from the spectrum using the MOOG spectral analysis program, and the lithium abundance was determined using spectrum synthesis.

  11. Giant cell arteritis presenting as scalp necrosis.

    PubMed

    Maidana, Daniel E; Muñoz, Silvia; Acebes, Xènia; Llatjós, Roger; Jucglà, Anna; Alvarez, Alba

    2011-07-07

    The differential of scalp ulceration in older patients should include several causes, such as herpes zoster, irritant contact dermatitis, ulcerated skin tumors, postirradiation ulcers, microbial infections, pyoderma gangrenosum, and giant cell arteritis. Scalp necrosis associated with giant cell arteritis was first described in the 1940s. The presence of this dermatological sign within giant cell arteritis represents a severity marker of this disease, with a higher mean age at diagnosis, an elevated risk of vision loss and tongue gangrene, as well as overall higher mortality rates, in comparison to patients not presenting this manifestation. Even though scalp necrosis due to giant cell arteritis is exceptional, a high level of suspicion must be held for this clinical finding, in order to initiate prompt and proper treatment and avoid blindness.

  12. "GIANT" Steps to Create Online Orientations

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bacon, Pamela

    2005-01-01

    Online orientation is provided due to the flexibility of online learning. The online orientation consists of the GIANT steps which stands for Get support, Identify your curriculum, Assemble your program, Navigate students through the pilot project and Test students.

  13. Tests of the Giant Impact Hypothesis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jones, J. H.

    1998-01-01

    The giant impact hypothesis has gained popularity as a means of explaining a volatile-depleted Moon that still has a chemical affinity to the Earth. As Taylor's Axiom decrees, the best models of lunar origin are testable, but this is difficult with the giant impact model. The energy associated with the impact would be sufficient to totally melt and partially vaporize the Earth. And this means that there should he no geological vestige of Barber times. Accordingly, it is important to devise tests that may be used to evaluate the giant impact hypothesis. Three such tests are discussed here. None of these is supportive of the giant impact model, but neither do they disprove it.

  14. Giant salivary calculi of the submandibular gland

    PubMed Central

    Fowell, C; MacBean, A

    2012-01-01

    Sialolithasis is the most common salivary gland disease. A case of an unusually large sialolith arising in the submandibular gland is presented, along with a review of the management of giant salivary gland calculi. PMID:24960792

  15. Structural phase transition and phonon instability in Cu12Sb4S13

    DOE PAGES

    May, Andrew F.; Delaire, Olivier A.; Niedziela, Jennifer L.; ...

    2016-02-08

    In this study, a structural phase transition has been discovered in the synthetic tetrahedrite Cu12Sb4S13 at approximately 88 K. Upon cooling, the material transforms from its known cubic symmetry to a tetragonal unit cell that is characterized by an in-plane ordering that leads to a doubling of the unit cell volume. Specific heat capacity measurements demonstrate a hysteresis of more than two degrees in the associated anomaly. A similar hysteresis was observed in powder x-ray diffraction measurements, which also indicate a coexistence of the two phases, and together these results suggest a first-order transition. This structural transition coincides with amore » recently-reported metal-insulator transition, and the structural instability is related to the very low thermal conductivity κ in these materials. Inelastic neutron scattering was used to measure the phonon density of states in Cu12Sb4S13 and Cu10Zn2Sb4S13, both of which possess a localized, low-energy phonon mode associated with strongly anharmonic copper displacements that suppress κ. In Cu12Sb4S13, signatures of the phase transition are observed in the temperature dependence of the localized mode, which disappears at the structural transition. In contrast, in the cubic Zn-doped material, the mode is at slightly higher-energy but observable for all temperatures, though it softens upon cooling.« less

  16. A de novo designed 2[4Fe-4S] ferredoxin mimic mediates electron transfer.

    PubMed

    Roy, Anindya; Sommer, Dayn Joseph; Schmitz, Robert Arthur; Brown, Chelsea Lynn; Gust, Devens; Astashkin, Andrei; Ghirlanda, Giovanna

    2014-12-10

    [Fe-S] clusters, nature's modular electron transfer units, are often arranged in chains that support long-range electron transfer. Despite considerable interest, the design of biomimetic artificial systems emulating multicluster-binding proteins, with the final goal of integrating them in man-made oxidoreductases, remains elusive. Here, we report a novel bis-[4Fe-4S] cluster binding protein, DSD-Fdm, in which the two clusters are positioned within a distance of 12 Å, compatible with the electronic coupling necessary for efficient electron transfer. The design exploits the structural repeat of coiled coils as well as the symmetry of the starting scaffold, a homodimeric helical protein (DSD). In total, eight hydrophobic residues in the core of DSD were replaced by eight cysteine residues that serve as ligands to the [4Fe-4S] clusters. Incorporation of two [4Fe-4S] clusters proceeds with high yield. The two [4Fe-4S] clusters are located in the hydrophobic core of the helical bundle as characterized by various biophysical techniques. The secondary structure of the apo and holo proteins is conserved; further, the incorporation of clusters results in stabilization of the protein with respect to chemical denaturation. Most importantly, this de novo designed protein can mimic the function of natural ferredoxins: we show here that reduced DSD-Fdm transfers electrons to cytochrome c, thus generating the reduced cyt c stoichiometrically.

  17. Role of the S4-S5 Linker in CNG Channel Activation

    PubMed Central

    Kusch, Jana; Zimmer, Thomas; Holschuh, Jascha; Biskup, Christoph; Schulz, Eckhard; Nache, Vasilica; Benndorf, Klaus

    2010-01-01

    Cyclic nucleotide-gated (CNG) channels mediate sensory signal transduction in retinal and olfactory cells. The channels are activated by the binding of cyclic nucleotides to a cyclic nucleotide-binding domain (CNBD) in the C-terminus that is located at the intracellular side. The molecular events translating the ligand binding to the pore opening are still unknown. We investigated the role of the S4-S5 linker in the activation process by quantifying its interaction with other intracellular regions. To this end, we constructed chimeric channels in which the N-terminus, the S4-S5 linker, the C-linker, and the CNBD of the retinal CNGA1 subunit were systematically replaced by the respective regions of the olfactory CNGA2 subunit. Macroscopic concentration-response relations were analyzed, yielding the apparent affinity to cGMP and the Hill coefficient. The degree of functional coupling of intracellular regions in the activation gating was determined by thermodynamic double-mutant cycle analysis. We observed that all four intracellular regions, including the relatively short S4-S5 linker, are involved in controlling the apparent affinity of the channel to cGMP and, moreover, in determining the degree of cooperativity between the subunits, as derived from the Hill coefficient. The interaction energies reveal an interaction of the S4-S5 linker with both the N-terminus and the C-linker, but no interaction with the CNBD. PMID:20959089

  18. Arterial Embolization of Giant Hepatic Hemangiomas

    SciTech Connect

    Giavroglou, Constantinos; Economou, Hippolete; Ioannidis, Ioannis

    2003-02-15

    Hepatic cavernous hemangiomas are usually small and asymptomatic. They are usually discovered incidentally and only a few require treatment. However, giant hemangiomas may cause symptoms,which are indications for treatment. We describe four cases of symptomatic giant hepatic hemangiomas successfully treated with transcatheter arterial embolization, performed with polyvinyl alcohol particles. There were no complications. Follow-up with clinical and imaging examinations showed disappearance of symptoms and decrease in size of lesions.

  19. Signatures of the Giant Pairing Vibration in the 14C and 15C atomic nuclei

    PubMed Central

    Cappuzzello, F.; Carbone, D.; Cavallaro, M.; Bondì, M.; Agodi, C.; Azaiez, F.; Bonaccorso, A.; Cunsolo, A.; Fortunato, L.; Foti, A.; Franchoo, S.; Khan, E.; Linares, R.; Lubian, J.; Scarpaci, J. A.; Vitturi, A.

    2015-01-01

    Giant resonances are collective excitation modes for many-body systems of fermions governed by a mean field, such as the atomic nuclei. The microscopic origin of such modes is the coherence among elementary particle-hole excitations, where a particle is promoted from an occupied state below the Fermi level (hole) to an empty one above the Fermi level (particle). The same coherence is also predicted for the particle–particle and the hole–hole excitations, because of the basic quantum symmetry between particles and holes. In nuclear physics, the giant modes have been widely reported for the particle–hole sector but, despite several attempts, there is no precedent in the particle–particle and hole–hole ones, thus making questionable the aforementioned symmetry assumption. Here we provide experimental indications of the Giant Pairing Vibration, which is the leading particle–particle giant mode. An immediate implication of it is the validation of the particle–hole symmetry. PMID:25814169

  20. Giant aeolian dune size determined by the average depth of the atmospheric boundary layer.

    PubMed

    Andreotti, Bruno; Fourrière, Antoine; Ould-Kaddour, Fouzia; Murray, Brad; Claudin, Philippe

    2009-02-26

    Depending on the wind regime, sand dunes exhibit linear, crescent-shaped or star-like forms resulting from the interaction between dune morphology and sand transport. Small-scale dunes form by destabilization of the sand bed with a wavelength (a few tens of metres) determined by the sand transport saturation length. The mechanisms controlling the formation of giant dunes, and in particular accounting for their typical time and length scales, have remained unknown. Using a combination of field measurements and aerodynamic calculations, we show here that the growth of aeolian giant dunes, ascribed to the nonlinear interaction between small-scale superimposed dunes, is limited by the confinement of the flow within the atmospheric boundary layer. Aeolian giant dunes and river dunes form by similar processes, with the thermal inversion layer that caps the convective boundary layer in the atmosphere acting analogously to the water surface in rivers. In both cases, the bed topography excites surface waves on the interface that in turn modify the near-bed flow velocity. This mechanism is a stabilizing process that prevents the scale of the pattern from coarsening beyond the resonant condition. Our results can explain the mean spacing of aeolian giant dunes ranging from 300 m in coastal terrestrial deserts to 3.5 km. We propose that our findings could serve as a starting point for the modelling of long-term evolution of desert landscapes under specific wind regimes.

  1. Giant aeolian dune size determined by the average depth of the atmospheric boundary layer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Claudin, P.; Fourrière, A.; Andreotti, B.; Murray, A. B.

    2009-12-01

    Depending on the wind regime, sand dunes exhibit linear, crescent-shaped or star-like forms resulting from the interaction between dune morphology and sand transport. Small-scale dunes form by destabilization of the sand bed with a wavelength (a few tens of metres) determined by the sand transport saturation length. The mechanisms controlling the formation of giant dunes, and in particular accounting for their typical time and length scales, have remained unknown. Using a combination of field measurements and aerodynamic calculations, we show here that the growth of aeolian giant dunes, ascribed to the nonlinear interaction between small-scale superimposed dunes, is limited by the confinement of the flow within the atmospheric boundary layer. Aeolian giant dunes and river dunes form by similar processes, with the thermal inversion layer that caps the convective boundary layer in the atmosphere acting analogously to the water surface in rivers. In both cases, the bed topography excites surface waves on the interface that in turn modify the near-bed flow velocity. This mechanism is a stabilizing process that prevents the scale of the pattern from coarsening beyond the resonant condition. Our results can explain the mean spacing of aeolian giant dunes ranging from 300 m in coastal terrestrial deserts to 3.5 km. We propose that our findings could serve as a starting point for the modelling of long-term evolution of desert landscapes under specific wind regimes.

  2. Bayesian Inference of Giant Exoplanet Physics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thorngren, Daniel; Fortney, Jonathan J.

    2017-01-01

    The physical processes within a giant planet directly set its observed radius for a given mass, age, and insolation. The important aspects are the planet’s bulk composition and its interior thermal evolution. By studying many giant planets as an ensemble, we can gain insight into this physics. We demonstrate two novel examples here. We examine 50 cooler transiting giant planets, whose insolation is sufficiently low (T_eff < 1000 K) that they are not affected by the hot Jupiter radius inflation effect. For these planets, the thermal evolution is relatively well understood, and we show that the bulk planet metallicity increases with the total planet mass, which directly impacts plans for future atmospheric studies. We also examine the relation with stellar metallicity and discuss how these relations place new constraints on the core accretion model of planet formation. Our newest work seeks to quantify the flow of energy into hot Jupiters needed to explain their enlarged radii, in addition to their bulk composition. Because the former is related to stellar insolation and the latter is related to mass, we are able to create a hierarchical Bayesian model to disentangle the two effects in our sample of ~300 transiting giant planets. Our results show conclusively that the inflation power is not a simple fraction of stellar insolation: instead, the power increases with incident flux at a much higher rate. We use these results to test published models of giant planet inflation and to provide accurate empirical mass-radius relations for giant planets.

  3. Formation of Giant Planets and Brown Dwarves

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lissauer, Jack J.

    2003-01-01

    According to the prevailing core instability model, giant planets begin their growth by the accumulation of small solid bodies, as do terrestrial planets. However, unlike terrestrial planets, the growing giant planet cores become massive enough that they are able to accumulate substantial amounts of gas before the protoplanetary disk dissipates. Models predict that rocky planets should form in orbit about most stars. It is uncertain whether or not gas giant planet formation is common, because most protoplanetary disks may dissipate before solid planetary cores can grow large enough to gravitationally trap substantial quantities of gas. Ongoing theoretical modeling of accretion of giant planet atmospheres, as well as observations of protoplanetary disks, will help decide this issue. Observations of extrasolar planets around main sequence stars can only provide a lower limit on giant planet formation frequency . This is because after giant planets form, gravitational interactions with material within the protoplanetary disk may cause them to migrat inwards and be lost to the central star. The core instability model can only produce planets greater than a few jovian masses within protoplanetary disks that are more viscous than most such disks are believed to be. Thus, few brown dwarves (objects massive enough to undergo substantial deuterium fusion, estimated to occur above approximately 13 jovian masses) are likely to be formed in this manner. Most brown dwarves, as well as an unknown number of free-floating objects of planetary mass, are probably formed as are stars, by the collapse of extended gas/dust clouds into more compact objects.

  4. Early Solar System Bombardment: Exploring the Echos of Planetary Migration and Lost Ice Giants

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bottke, William

    2017-01-01

    Heavily cratered surfaces on the Moon, Mars, Mercury show the terrestrial planets were battered by an intense bombardment during their first billion years or more, but the timing, sources, and dynamical implications of these impacts are controversial. The Late Heavy Bombardment refers to impact events that occurred after stabilization of planetary lithospheres such that they could be preserved as craters. Lunar melt rocks and meteorite shock ages point toward a discrete episode of elevated impact flux between ~3.5 to ~4.2 Ga and a relative quiescence between ~4.0-4.2 to ~4.4 Ga. Evidence from Precambrian impact spherule layers suggest a long-lived tail of terrestrial impactors lasted to ~2.0-2.5 Ga.Dynamical models that include populations residual from primary accretion and destabilized by giant planet migration can potentially account for observations, although all have pros and cons. The most parsimonious solution to match constraints is a hybrid model with discrete early, post-accretion and later, planetary instability-driven impactor populations.For the latter, giant planet instability models can successfully reproduce the orbits of the giant planets, the origin/properties of Jupiter/Neptune Trojans, irregular satellites, the structure of the main asteroid and Kuiper belts, and the presence of comet-like bodies in the main belt, Hilda, and Trojan asteroid populations. The best solutions, however, postulate there were once five giant planets: Jupiter, Saturn, and three ice giants, one that was eventually ejected out of the Solar System by a Jupiter encounter. Intriguing evidence for this “lost” ice giant planet can be found in the orbital properties of bodies captured in the main asteroid belt.The applicability of giant planet instabilities to exoplanet systems seems likely, with the initial configuration of giant planet orbits a byproduct of their early migration and subsequent capture into mutual mean motion resonances. The question is how long can a

  5. Garcin syndrome resulting from a giant cell tumor of the skull base in a child.

    PubMed

    Bibas-Bonet, Hilda; Fauze, Ricardo A; Lavado, María Graciela; Páez, Rafael O; Nieman, Judith

    2003-05-01

    Garcin syndrome is characterized by a progressive ipsilateral involvement of cranial nerves, culminating in paralysis of all or at least seven of them, without sensory or motor long-tract disturbance, with no intracranial hypertension, and with osteoclastic involvement in the skull base on radiographic computed tomography. Giant cell tumor is a primary bone tumor rarely affecting the skull base. An 8-year-old female presented with a 3-month history of increasingly worsening right otalgia, tinnitus, hearing loss, right facial numbness, and diplopia. She was admitted with a 2-week history of swallowing difficulties, voice change, and right shoulder pain. Neurologic examination disclosed unilateral paralysis of the right fifth through twelfth cranial nerves, with no other abnormal neurologic findings. Skull radiographic computed tomography revealed lytic lesions in the right temporal petrous portion. Computed tomographic scan indicated a destructive mass involving the right greater wing of the sphenoid bone and temporal petrous apex. Magnetic resonance imaging demonstrated a tumor arising from the temporosphenoidal region, infiltrating neither the brain nor the brainstem. No hydrocephalus was observed. Biopsy revealed giant cell tumor. Posterior treatment consisted of radiotherapy. At an 8-year follow-up, the patient was well but with functional sequelae. There is no magnetic resonance imaging evidence of tumor growth. No other giant cell tumor presenting as Garcin syndrome is known to have been reported.

  6. Structural, electromagnetic and thermoelectric properties of Bi4O4S3 superconductor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Srivastava, P.; Shruti; Patnaik, S.

    2014-05-01

    We report on the synthesis and extensive characterization of the layered Bi4O4S3 superconductor. This is the optimally doped sample with Tc ˜ 5.3 K out of a series of Bi6O4S4(SO4)1-x samples synthesized by solid state reaction. The series was prepared towards establishing a phase diagram of the transition temperature as a function of carrier concentration. The crystal structure for Bi4O4S3 shows a different Bi-S-Bi bond angle as compared to that for the parent phase. Scanning electron microscopy images show a platelet-like morphology for Bi4O4S3, signifying the layered structure. While the parent compound is found to be semiconducting, the electrical resistivity of Bi4O4S3 exhibits a T2 dependence in a small temperature range between 25 and 50 K. The typical dome structure for variation of Tc with dopant concentration is not observed. From the magneto-transport data Hc2 for Bi4O4S3 is estimated to be ˜2.75 T using the WHH approximation and the corresponding coherence length is ˜110 Å. Support for multi-band signatures is not seen from the magneto-resistance data. The rf susceptibility data fits well for an S-wave isotropic gap with a gap value higher than the BCS strong coupling limit. Hall measurements confirm the dominance of electronic transport with a charge carrier density of 4.405 × 1019 cm-3 at 10 K. The experimental value of the Seebeck coefficient at 35 K is well in accord with the calculated value deduced by using the density of charge carriers from Hall experiments. The Sommerfeld constant γ is estimated to be 1.113 mJ K-2 mol-1. Evidence for thermally activated flux flow is observed and the pinning potential is found to scale as B-0.3 for B < 0.1 T and B-1.99 for B > 0.1 T.

  7. Biomass yield comparisons of giant miscanthus, giant reed, and miscane grown under irrigated and rainfed conditions

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The U.S. Department of Energy has initiated efforts to decrease the nation’s dependence on imported oil by developing domestic renewable sources of cellulosic-derived bioenergy. In this study, giant miscanthus (Miscanthus x giganteus), sugarcane (complex hybrid of Saccharum spp.), and giant reed (Ar...

  8. Migration of accreting giant planets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Crida, A.; Bitsch, B.; Raibaldi, A.

    2016-12-01

    We present the results of 2D hydro simulations of giant planets in proto-planetary discs, which accrete gas at a more or less high rate. First, starting from a solid core of 20 Earth masses, we show that as soon as the runaway accretion of gas turns on, the planet is saved from type I migration : the gap opening mass is reached before the planet is lost into its host star. Furthermore, gas accretion helps opening the gap in low mass discs. Consequently, if the accretion rate is limited to the disc supply, then the planet is already inside a gap and in type II migration. We further show that the type II migration of a Jupiter mass planet actually depends on its accretion rate. Only when the accretion is high do we retrieve the classical picture where no gas crosses the gap and the planet follows the disc spreading. These results impact our understanding of planet migration and planet population synthesis models. The e-poster presenting these results in French can be found here: L'e-poster présentant ces résultats en français est disponible à cette adresse: http://sf2a.eu/semaine-sf2a/2016/posterpdfs/156_179_49.pdf.

  9. The Giant Planet Satellite Exospheres

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McGrath, M. A.

    2014-12-01

    Exospheres are relatively common in the outer solar system among the moons of the gas giant planets. They span the range from very tenuous, surface-bounded exospheres (e.g., Rhea, Dione) to quite robust exospheres with exobase above the surface (e.g., Io, Triton), and include many intermediate cases (e.g., Europa, Ganymede, Enceladus). The exospheres of these moons exhibit an interesting variety of sources, from surface sputtering, to frost sublimation, to active plumes, and also well illustrate another common characteristic of the outer planet satellite exospheres, namely, that the primary species often exists both as a gas in atmosphere, and a condensate (frost or ice) on the surface. As described by Yelle et al. (1995) for Triton, "The interchange of matter between gas and solid phases on these bodies has profound effects on the physical state of the surface and the structure of the atmosphere." A brief overview of the exospheres of the outer planet satellites will be presented, including an inter-comparison of these satellites exospheres with each other, and with the exospheres of the Moon and Mercury.

  10. A giant thunderstorm on Saturn.

    PubMed

    Fischer, G; Kurth, W S; Gurnett, D A; Zarka, P; Dyudina, U A; Ingersoll, A P; Ewald, S P; Porco, C C; Wesley, A; Go, C; Delcroix, M

    2011-07-06

    Lightning discharges in Saturn's atmosphere emit radio waves with intensities about 10,000 times stronger than those of their terrestrial counterparts. These radio waves are the characteristic features of lightning from thunderstorms on Saturn, which last for days to months. Convective storms about 2,000 kilometres in size have been observed in recent years at planetocentric latitude 35° south (corresponding to a planetographic latitude of 41° south). Here we report observations of a giant thunderstorm at planetocentric latitude 35° north that reached a latitudinal extension of 10,000 kilometres-comparable in size to a 'Great White Spot'-about three weeks after it started in early December 2010. The visible plume consists of high-altitude clouds that overshoot the outermost ammonia cloud layer owing to strong vertical convection, as is typical for thunderstorms. The flash rates of this storm are about an order of magnitude higher than previous ones, and peak rates larger than ten per second were recorded. This main storm developed an elongated eastward tail with additional but weaker storm cells that wrapped around the whole planet by February 2011. Unlike storms on Earth, the total power of this storm is comparable to Saturn's total emitted power. The appearance of such storms in the northern hemisphere could be related to the change of seasons, given that Saturn experienced vernal equinox in August 2009.

  11. Atmospheres of the Giant Planets

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ingersoll, Andrew P.

    2002-01-01

    The giant planets, Jupiter, Saturn, Uranus, and Neptune, are fluid objects. They have no solid surfaces because the light elements constituting them do not condense at solar-system temperatures. Instead, their deep atmospheres grade downward until the distinction between gas and liquid becomes meaningless. The preceding chapter delved into the hot, dark interiors of the Jovian planets. This one focuses on their atmospheres, especially the observable layers from the base of the clouds to the edge of space. These veneers arc only a few hundred kilometers thick, less than one percent of each planet's radius, but they exhibit an incredible variety of dynamic phenomena. The mixtures of elements in these outer layers resemble a cooled-down piece of the Sun. Clouds precipitate out of this gaseous soup in a variety of colors. The cloud patterns are organized by winds, which are powered by heat derived from sunlight (as on Earth) and by internal heat left over from planetary formation. Thus the atmospheres of the Jovian planets are distinctly different both compositionally and dynamically from those of the terrestrial planets. Such differences make them fascinating objects for study, providing clues about the origin and evolution of the planets and the formation of the solar system.

  12. Treatment of Giant Intracranial Aneurysms

    PubMed Central

    Lv, X.; Jiang, C.; Li, Y.; Yang, X.; Zhang, J.; Wu, Z.

    2009-01-01

    Summary We report on report the clinical outcome obtained in treatment of giant intracranial aneurysms (GAs). Between 2005 and 2007, 51 patients with 51 GAs presented at our hospital. Twentynine were treated with primary parent vessel occlusion without distal bypass and ten underwent treatment preserving the parent artery. Twelve patients could not be treated endovascularly. Selective embolization (including two remodeling techniques and two stent-coil embolizations) resulted in only one cure. Two patients died as a result of subarachnoid hemorrhage periprocedurely. Twenty-nine patients treated primarily with parent vessel occlusion and three patients treated with covered stent were considered cured after their treatments. Only one patient treated with parent vessel occlusion experienced ischemia during follow-up, which resulted in a mild neurological deficit. Of the twelve patients who could not be treated endovascularly, one succumbed to surgery, four died while being treated conservatively, and three were lost to follow-up. Parent artery occlusion, covered stent and coil occlusion provide effective protection against bleeding. In treatment of paraclinoid GAs of the internal carotid artery, the use of a stent, and stent-assisted coil embolization may be a pitfall. PMID:20465907

  13. Giant electrocaloric effect around Tc.

    PubMed

    Rose, Maimon C; Cohen, R E

    2012-11-02

    We use molecular dynamics with a first-principles-based shell model potential to study the electrocaloric effect (ECE) in lithium niobate, LiNbO(3), and find a giant electrocaloric effect along a line passing through the ferroelectric transition. With an applied electric field, a line of maximum ECE passes through the zero field ferroelectric transition, continuing along a Widom line at high temperatures with increasing fields, and along the instability that leads to homogeneous ferroelectric switching below T(c) with an applied field antiparallel to the spontaneous polarization. This line is defined as the minimum in the inverse capacitance under an applied electric field. We investigate the effects of pressure, temperature and an applied electric field on the ECE. The behavior we observe in LiNbO(3) should generally apply to ferroelectrics; we therefore suggest that the operating temperature for refrigeration and energy scavenging applications should be above the ferroelectric transition region to obtain a large electrocaloric response. The relationship between T(c), the Widom line, and homogeneous switching should be universal among ferroelectrics, relaxors, multiferroics, and the same behavior should be found under applied magnetic fields in ferromagnets.

  14. Red Giant Plunging Through Space

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2006-01-01

    [figure removed for brevity, see original site] Poster Version

    This image from NASA's Spitzer Space Telescope (left panel) shows the 'bow shock' of a dying star named R Hydrae, or R Hya, in the constellation Hydra.

    Bow shocks are formed where the stellar wind from a star are pushed into a bow shape (illustration, right panel) as the star plunges through the gas and dust between stars. Our own Sun has a bow shock, but prior to this image one had never been observed around this particular class of red giant star.

    R Hya moves through space at approximately 50 kilometers per second. As it does so, it discharges dust and gas into space. Because the star is relatively cool, that ejecta quickly assumes a solid state and collides with the interstellar medium. The resulting dusty nebula is invisible to the naked eye but can be detected using an infrared telescope. This bow shock is 16,295 astronomical units from the star to the apex and 6,188 astronomical units thick (an astronomical unit is the distance between the sun and Earth). The mass of the bow shock is about 400 times the mass of the Earth.

    The false-color Spitzer image shows infrared emissions at 70 microns. Brighter colors represent greater intensities of infrared light at that wavelength. The location of the star itself is drawn onto the picture in the black 'unobserved' region in the center.

  15. The Giant Planet Satellite Exospheres

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    McGrath, Melissa A.

    2014-01-01

    Exospheres are relatively common in the outer solar system among the moons of the gas giant planets. They span the range from very tenuous, surface-bounded exospheres (e.g., Rhea, Dione) to quite robust exospheres with exobase above the surface (e.g., lo, Triton), and include many intermediate cases (e.g., Europa, Ganymede, Enceladus). The exospheres of these moons exhibit an interesting variety of sources, from surface sputtering, to frost sublimation, to active plumes, and also well illustrate another common characteristic of the outer planet satellite exospheres, namely, that the primary species often exists both as a gas in atmosphere, and a condensate (frost or ice) on the surface. As described by Yelle et al. (1995) for Triton, "The interchange of matter between gas and solid phases on these bodies has profound effects on the physical state of the surface and the structure of the atmosphere." A brief overview of the exospheres of the outer planet satellites will be presented, including an inter-comparison of these satellites exospheres with each other, and with the exospheres of the Moon and Mercury.

  16. The "Giant Virus Finder" discovers an abundance of giant viruses in the Antarctic dry valleys.

    PubMed

    Kerepesi, Csaba; Grolmusz, Vince

    2017-02-28

    Mimivirus was identified in 2003 from a biofilm of an industrial water-cooling tower in England. Later, numerous new giant viruses were found in oceans and freshwater habitats, some of them having 2,500 genes. We have demonstrated their likely presence in four soil samples taken from the Kutch Desert (Gujarat, India). Here we describe a bioinformatics work-flow, called the "Giant Virus Finder" that is capable of discovering the likely presence of the genomes of giant viruses in metagenomic shotgun-sequenced datasets. The new workflow is applied to numerous hot and cold desert soil samples as well as some tundra- and forest soils. We show that most of these samples contain giant viruses, especially in the Antarctic dry valleys. The results imply that giant viruses could be frequent not only in aqueous habitats, but in a wide spectrum of soils on our planet.

  17. Giant elves: Lightning-generated electromagnetic pulses in giant planets.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Luque Estepa, Alejandro; Dubrovin, Daria; José Gordillo-Vázquez, Francisco; Ebert, Ute; Parra-Rojas, Francisco Carlos; Yair, Yoav; Price, Colin

    2015-04-01

    We currently have direct optical observations of atmospheric electricity in the two giant gaseous planets of our Solar System [1-5] as well as radio signatures that are possibly generated by lightning from the two icy planets Uranus and Neptune [6,7]. On Earth, the electrical activity of the troposphere is associated with secondary electrical phenomena called Transient Luminous Events (TLEs) that occur in the mesosphere and lower ionosphere. This led some researchers to ask if similar processes may also exist in other planets, focusing first on the quasi-static coupling mechanism [8], which on Earth is responsible for halos and sprites and then including also the induction field, which is negligible in our planet but dominant in Saturn [9]. However, one can show that, according to the best available estimation for lightning parameters, in giant planets such as Saturn and Jupiter the effect of the electromagnetic pulse (EMP) dominates the effect that a lightning discharge has on the lower ionosphere above it. Using a Finite-Differences, Time-Domain (FDTD) solver for the EMP we found [10] that electrically active storms may create a localized but long-lasting layer of enhanced ionization of up to 103 cm-3 free electrons below the ionosphere, thus extending the ionosphere downward. We also estimate that the electromagnetic pulse transports 107 J to 1010 J toward the ionosphere. There emissions of light of up to 108 J would create a transient luminous event analogous to a terrestrial elve. Although these emissions are about 10 times fainter than the emissions coming from the lightning itself, it may be possible to target them for detection by filtering the appropiate wavelengths. [1] Cook, A. F., II, T. C. Duxbury, and G. E. Hunt (1979), First results on Jovian lightning, Nature, 280, 794, doi:10.1038/280794a0. [2] Little, B., C. D. Anger, A. P. Ingersoll, A. R. Vasavada, D. A. Senske, H. H. Breneman, W. J. Borucki, and The Galileo SSI Team (1999), Galileo images of

  18. Stability studies of As4S4 nanosuspension prepared by wet milling in Poloxamer 407.

    PubMed

    Bujňáková, Zdenka; Dutková, Erika; Baláž, Matej; Turianicová, Erika; Baláž, Peter

    2015-01-15

    In this paper the stability of the arsenic sulfide (As4S4) nanosuspension prepared by wet milling in a circulation mill in the environment of copolymer Poloxamer 407 was studied. The obtained As4S4 particles in nanosuspension were of ∼ 100 nm in size. The influence of temperature and UV irradiation on the changes in physical and/or chemical properties was followed. Long-term stability was observed via particle size distribution and zeta potential measurements. Influence of UV irradiation was studied via UV-vis spectroscopy (UV-vis), photoluminicsence (PL) technique and Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR) measurements. The best stability of the nanosuspension (24 weeks) was achieved when stored at 4°C and in the dark.

  19. Strong Decay of ϕ (1 s), ϒ(4s) and Σ±*in Magnetic Field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Filip, Peter

    2016-01-01

    The influence of static magnetic field on decays ϕ (1020) KK̅, ϒ (4s)→ BB̅, and Σ±* → Ʌπ± is discussed. In particular, we estimate how much the ratio of decay widths Γ(K+K-)/Γ(K0K0) and Γ(B+B-)/Γ(B0B0) can be modified by magnetic fields of strength B ≈ 1014 T created in relativistic collisions of heavy nuclei at LHC and RHIC colliders. Due to interaction of charged K and B mesons with the magnetic field, branching ratios for K+K- and B+B- decays of ϕ (1020) and ϒ (4s) completely closed. We study also the influence of magnetic field on strong decay Σ±* (1385) →Ʌ + π±.

  20. Multiferroicity and skyrmions carrying electric polarization in GaV4S8

    PubMed Central

    Ruff, Eugen; Widmann, Sebastian; Lunkenheimer, Peter; Tsurkan, Vladimir; Bordács, Sandor; Kézsmárki, Istvan; Loidl, Alois

    2015-01-01

    Skyrmions are whirl-like topological spin objects with high potential for future magnetic data storage. A fundamental question that is relevant to both basic research and application is whether ferroelectric (FE) polarization can be associated with skyrmions’ magnetic texture and whether these objects can be manipulated by electric fields. We study the interplay between magnetism and electric polarization in the lacunar spinel GaV4S8, which undergoes a structural transition associated with orbital ordering at 44 K and reveals a complex magnetic phase diagram below 13 K, including ferromagnetic, cycloidal, and Néel-type skyrmion lattice (SkL) phases. We found that the orbitally ordered phase of GaV4S8 is FE with a sizable polarization of ~1 μC/cm2. Moreover, we observed spin-driven excess polarizations in all magnetic phases; hence, GaV4S8 hosts three different multiferroic phases with coexisting polar and magnetic order. These include the SkL phase, where we predict a strong spatial modulation of FE polarization close to the skyrmion cores. By taking into account the crystal symmetry and spin patterns of the magnetically ordered phases, we identify exchange striction as the main microscopic mechanism behind the spin-driven FE polarization in each multiferroic phase. Because GaV4S8 is unique among known SkL host materials owing to its polar crystal structure and the observed strong magnetoelectric effect, this study is an important step toward the nondissipative electric field control of skyrmions. PMID:26702441

  1. If It's Resonance, What is Resonating?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kerber, Robert C.

    2006-01-01

    The phenomenon under the name "resonance," which, is based on the mathematical analogy between mechanical resonance and the behavior of wave functions in quantum mechanical exchange phenomena was described. The resonating system does not have a structure intermediate between those involved in the resonance, but instead a structure which is further…

  2. Evaluation for 4S core nuclear design method through integration of benchmark data

    SciTech Connect

    Nagata, A.; Tsuboi, Y.; Moriki, Y.; Kawashima, M.

    2012-07-01

    The 4S is a sodium-cooled small fast reactor which is reflector-controlled for operation through core lifetime about 30 years. The nuclear design method has been selected to treat neutron leakage with high accuracy. It consists of a continuous-energy Monte Carlo code, discrete ordinate transport codes and JENDL-3.3. These two types of neutronic analysis codes are used for the design in a complementary manner. The accuracy of the codes has been evaluated by analysis of benchmark critical experiments and the experimental reactor data. The measured data used for the evaluation is critical experimental data of the FCA XXIII as a physics mockup assembly of the 4S core, FCA XVI, FCA XIX, ZPR, and data of experimental reactor JOYO MK-1. Evaluated characteristics are criticality, reflector reactivity worth, power distribution, absorber reactivity worth, and sodium void worth. A multi-component bias method was applied, especially to improve the accuracy of sodium void reactivity worth. As the result, it has been confirmed that the 4S core nuclear design method provides good accuracy, and typical bias factors and their uncertainties are determined. (authors)

  3. Detection of Hot Earths by Giant Planet Transit Tming

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Deming, Drake; Jennings, Donald E.; Sada, Pedro

    2008-08-01

    Many exoplanet systems contain Jupiter-mass planets on close-in orbits. Theories of planetary system formation account for these hot Jupiters as being end states of inward migration. Variants of those theories also predict terrestrial planets to be captured in mean motion resonance with the hot Jupiters. A recent explosion of discoveries by transit surveys have given us a sample of 25 hot Jupiters transiting stars brighter than V=13. A transit timing survey of these systems could detect hot Earths in resonance, via the large (typically 180 second) perturbations they induce on the giant planet transits. The relatively large sample now available implies that a transit timing survey is well matched to classical observing and telescope scheduling. We propose exploratory observations to perform transit photometry using the 2.1-meter/FLAMINGOS instrument in the J-band, where stellar limb darkening is minimal and transit photometry has maximum sensitivity to shifts in transit time. If our exploratory observations confirm timing precision approaching the predicted values (about 10 seconds for a typical system), we will propose additional observations in later semesters to establish a timing survey.

  4. Giant many-body effects in liquid ammonia absorption spectrum

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ziaei, Vafa; Bredow, Thomas

    2016-11-01

    In the present work, we accurately calculate the absorption spectrum of liquid ammonia up to 13 eV using many-body perturbation approach. The electronic bandgap of liquid NH3 is perfectly described as the combination of density functional theory, Coulomb-hole screened exchange, and G0W0 approximation to the electronic self-energy, yielding a direct gap (Γ → Γ) of 7.71 eV, fully consistent with the experimentally measured gap from photo-emission spectroscopy. With respect to the NH3 optical properties, the entire spectrum in particular the low lying first absorption band is extremely affected by electron-hole interactions, leading to a fundamental redistribution of spectral weights of the independent-particle spectrum. Three well separated but broad main peaks are identified at 7.0, 9.8, and 11.8 eV with steadily increasing intensities in excellent agreement with the experimental data. Furthermore, we observe a giant net blue-shift of the first absorption peak of about 1.4 eV from gaseous to liquid phase as the direct consequence of many-body effects, allowing the associated liquid ammonia absorption band exciton to delocalize and feel more effectively the repulsion effects imposed by the surrounding solvent shells. Further, the spectrum is insensitive to the coupling of resonant and anti-resonant contributions. Concerning electronic response structure of liquid NH3, it is most sensitive to excitations at energies lower than its electronic gap.

  5. An Unusual Case of a Thrombosed Giant Distal PICA Aneurysm Simulating a Large Cavernous Angioma

    PubMed Central

    Lim, Dong-Ho; Jung, Tae-Young; Kim, Tae-Sun

    2008-01-01

    A 64-year-old woman was referred to our hospital with a one-month history of progressive headache. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) showed a hemorrhagic mass adjacent to the left inferior cerebellar hemisphere associated with a peripheral rim of signal void. Angiography demonstrated an avascular mass and the provisional diagnosis was a large cavernous angioma in the cerebellum. Intraoperative findings revealed a thrombosed giant aneurysm of the left distal posterior inferior cerebellar artery (PICA). We report an unusual case of a completely thrombosed giant aneurysm simulating a large cavernous angioma in the cerebellum. The cerebellar cisternal location of the mass may be a clue for the pre-operative diagnosis of an aneurysm. PMID:19096624

  6. LONG RANGE OUTWARD MIGRATION OF GIANT PLANETS, WITH APPLICATION TO FOMALHAUT b

    SciTech Connect

    Crida, Aurelien; Masset, Frederic

    2009-11-10

    Recent observations of exoplanets by direct imaging reveal that giant planets orbit at a few dozens to more than a hundred AU from their central star. The question of the origin of these planets challenges the standard theories of planet formation. We propose a new way of obtaining such far planets, by outward migration of a pair of planets formed in the 10 AU region. Two giant planets in mean motion resonance in a common gap in the protoplanetary disk migrate outward, if the inner one is significantly more massive than the outer one. Using hydrodynamical simulations, we show that their semimajor axes can increase by almost 1 order of magnitude. In a flared disk, the pair of planets should reach an asymptotic radius. This mechanism could account for the presence of Fomalhaut b; then, a second, more massive planet, should be orbiting Fomalhaut at about 75 AU.

  7. Sunspots and Giant-Cell Convection

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Moore, Ron L.; Hathaway, David H.; Reichmann, Ed J.

    2000-01-01

    From analysis of Doppler velocity images from SOHO/MDI, Hathaway et al (2000, Solar Phys., in press) have found clear evidence for giant convection cells that fill the solar surface, have diameters 3 - 10 times that typical of supergranules, and have lifetimes approx. greater than 10 days. Analogous to the superposition of the granular convection on the supergranular convection, the approx. 30,000 km diameter supergranules are superposed on these still larger giant cells. Because the giant cells make up the large-scale end of a continuous power spectrum that peaks at the size scale of supergranules, it appears that the giant cells are made by the same mode of convection as the supergranules. This suggests that the giant cells are similar to supergranules, just longer-lived, larger in diameter, and deeper. Here we point out that the range of lengths of large bipolar sunspot groups is similar to the size range of giant cells. This, along with the long lives (weeks) of large sunspots, suggests that large sunspots sit in long-lived, deep downflows at the corners of giant cells, and that the distance from leader to follower sunspots in large bipolar groups is the distance from one giant-cell corner to the next. By this line of reasoning, an unusually large and strong downdraft might pull in both legs of a rising spot-group magnetic flux loop, resulting in the formation of a delta sunspot. This leads us to suggest that a large, strong giant-cell corner downdraft should be present at the birthplaces of large delta sunspots for some time (days to weeks) before the birth. Thus, early detection of such downdrafts by local helioscismology might provide an early warning for the formation of those active regions (large delta sunspot groups) that produce the Sun's most violent flares and coronal mass ejections. This work is supported by NASA's Office of Space Science through the Solar Physics Branch of its Sun-Earth Connection Program.

  8. An MHD model for magnetar giant flares

    SciTech Connect

    Meng, Y.; Lin, J.; Zhang, Q. S.; Zhang, L.; Reeves, K. K.; Yuan, F. E-mail: jlin@ynao.ac.cn

    2014-04-10

    Giant flares on soft gamma-ray repeaters that are thought to take place on magnetars release enormous energy in a short time interval. Their power can be explained by catastrophic instabilities occurring in the magnetic field configuration and the subsequent magnetic reconnection. By analogy with the coronal mass ejection events on the Sun, we develop a theoretical model via an analytic approach for magnetar giant flares. In this model, the rotation and/or displacement of the crust causes the field to twist and deform, leading to flux rope formation in the magnetosphere and energy accumulation in the related configuration. When the energy and helicity stored in the configuration reach a threshold, the system loses its equilibrium, the flux rope is ejected outward in a catastrophic way, and magnetic reconnection helps the catastrophe develop to a plausible eruption. By taking SGR 1806–20 as an example, we calculate the free magnetic energy released in such an eruptive process and find that it is more than 10{sup 47} erg, which is enough to power a giant flare. The released free magnetic energy is converted into radiative energy, kinetic energy, and gravitational energy of the flux rope. We calculated the light curves of the eruptive processes for the giant flares of SGR 1806–20, SGR 0526–66, and SGR 1900+14, and compared them with the observational data. The calculated light curves are in good agreement with the observed light curves of giant flares.

  9. Giant cell tumor in adipose package Hoffa

    PubMed Central

    Etcheto, H. Rivarola; Escobar, G.; Blanchod, C. Collazo; Palanconi, M.; Zordan, J.; Salinas, E. Alvarez; Autorino₁, Carlos

    2017-01-01

    Tumors of adipose Hoffa package are very uncommon, with isolated cases reported in the literature. His presentation in pediatric patients knee is exceptional. The most frequently described tumors are benign including vellonodular synovitis. The extra-articular localized variant there of is known as giant cell tumor of the tendon sheath. It is characterized by locally aggressive nature, and has been described in reports of isolated cases. Objective: A case of giant cell tumor of the tendon sheath in adipose presentation package Hoffa in pediatric patients is presented in this paper. Methods: male patient eleven years with right knee pain after sports practice was evaluated. Physical examination, showed limited extension -30º, joint effusion, stable negative Lachman maneuver without peripheral knee laxity. MRI hyperintense on tumor is observed in T2 and hypointense on T1 homogeneous and defined edges content displayed prior to LCA related to adipose Hoffa package. Results: The tumor specimen was obtained and histopathology is defined as densely cellular tissue accumulation of xantomisados fibrocollagenous with histiocytes and multinucleated giant cells, compatible with giant cell tumor of tendon sheath. Conclusion: The presentation of giant cell tumors of the tendon sheath in Hoffa fat pad is exceptional. However, his suspicion allows adequate preoperative surgical planning, as a whole resection is the only procedure that has been shown to decrease the rate of recurrence of this disease.

  10. Electrodynamics on extrasolar giant planets

    SciTech Connect

    Koskinen, T. T.; Yelle, R. V.; Lavvas, P.; Cho, J. Y-K.

    2014-11-20

    Strong ionization on close-in extrasolar giant planets (EGPs) suggests that their atmospheres may be affected by ion drag and resistive heating arising from wind-driven electrodynamics. Recent models of ion drag on these planets, however, are based on thermal ionization only and do not include the upper atmosphere above the 1 mbar level. These models are also based on simplified equations of resistive magnetohydrodynamics that are not always valid in extrasolar planet atmospheres. We show that photoionization dominates over thermal ionization over much of the dayside atmosphere above the 100 mbar level, creating an upper ionosphere dominated by ionization of H and He and a lower ionosphere dominated by ionization of metals such as Na, K, and Mg. The resulting dayside electron densities on close-in exoplanets are higher than those encountered in any planetary ionosphere of the solar system, and the conductivities are comparable to the chromosphere of the Sun. Based on these results and assumed magnetic fields, we constrain the conductivity regimes on close-in EGPs and use a generalized Ohm's law to study the basic effects of electrodynamics in their atmospheres. We find that ion drag is important above the 10 mbar level where it can also significantly alter the energy balance through resistive heating. Due to frequent collisions of the electrons and ions with the neutral atmosphere, however, ion drag is largely negligible in the lower atmosphere below the 10 mbar level for a reasonable range of planetary magnetic moments. We find that the atmospheric conductivity decreases by several orders of magnitude in the night side of tidally locked planets, leading to a potentially interesting large-scale dichotomy in electrodynamics between the day and night sides. A combined approach that relies on UV observations of the upper atmosphere, phase curve and Doppler measurements of global dynamics, and visual transit observations to probe the alkali metals can potentially be

  11. Anaplastic giant cell thyroid carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Wallin, G; Lundell, G; Tennvall, J

    2004-01-01

    Anaplastic (giant cell) thyroid carcinoma (ATC), is one of the most aggressive malignancies in humans with a median survival time after diagnosis of 3-6 months. Death from ATC was earlier seen because of local growth and suffocation. ATC is uncommon, accounting for less than 5 % of all thyroid carcinomas. The diagnosis can be established by means of multiple fine needle aspiration biopsies, which are neither harmful nor troublesome for the patient. The cytological diagnosis of this high-grade malignant tumour is usually not difficult for a well trained cytologist. The intention to treat patients with ATC is cure, although only few of them survive. The majority of the patients are older than 60 years and treatment must be influenced by their high age. We have by using a combined modality regimen succeeded in achieving local control in most patients. Every effort should be made to control the primary tumour and thereby improve the quality of remaining life and it is important for patients, relatives and the personnel to know that cure is not impossible. Different treatment combinations have been used since 30 years including radiotherapy, cytostatic drugs and surgery, when feasible. In our latest combined regimen, 22 patients were treated with hyper fractionated radiotherapy 1.6Gy x 2 to a total target dose of 46 Gy given preoperatively, 20 mg doxorubicin was administered intravenously once weekly and surgery was carried out 2-3 weeks after the radiotherapy. 17 of these 22 patients were operated upon and none of these 17 patients got a local recurrence. In the future we are awaiting the development of new therapeutic approaches to this aggressive type of carcinoma. Inhibitors of angiogenesis might be useful. Combretastatin has displayed cytotoxicity against ATC cell lines and has had a positive effect on ATC in a patient. Sodium iodide symporter (NIS) genetherapy is also being currently considered for dedifferentiated thyroid carcinomas with the ultimate aim of

  12. A GIANT SAMPLE OF GIANT PULSES FROM THE CRAB PULSAR

    SciTech Connect

    Mickaliger, M. B.; McLaughlin, M. A.; Lorimer, D. R.; Palliyaguru, N.; Langston, G. I.; Bilous, A. V.; Kondratiev, V. I.; Lyutikov, M.; Ransom, S. M.

    2012-11-20

    We observed the Crab pulsar with the 43 m telescope in Green Bank, WV over a timespan of 15 months. In total we obtained 100 hr of data at 1.2 GHz and seven hours at 330 MHz, resulting in a sample of about 95,000 giant pulses (GPs). This is the largest sample, to date, of GPs from the Crab pulsar taken with the same telescope and backend and analyzed as one data set. We calculated power-law fits to amplitude distributions for main pulse (MP) and interpulse (IP) GPs, resulting in indices in the range of 2.1-3.1 for MP GPs at 1.2 GHz and in the range of 2.5-3.0 and 2.4-3.1 for MP and IP GPs at 330 MHz. We also correlated the GPs at 1.2 GHz with GPs from the Robert C. Byrd Green Bank Telescope (GBT), which were obtained simultaneously at a higher frequency (8.9 GHz) over a span of 26 hr. In total, 7933 GPs from the 43 m telescope at 1.2 GHz and 39,900 GPs from the GBT were recorded during these contemporaneous observations. At 1.2 GHz, 236 (3%) MP GPs and 23 (5%) IP GPs were detected at 8.9 GHz, both with zero chance probability. Another 15 (4%) low-frequency IP GPs were detected within one spin period of high-frequency IP GPs, with a chance probability of 9%. This indicates that the emission processes at high and low radio frequencies are related, despite significant pulse profile shape differences. The 43 m GPs were also correlated with Fermi {gamma}-ray photons to see if increased pair production in the magnetosphere is the mechanism responsible for GP emission. A total of 92,022 GPs and 393 {gamma}-ray photons were used in this correlation analysis. No significant correlations were found between GPs and {gamma}-ray photons. This indicates that increased pair production in the magnetosphere is likely not the dominant cause of GPs. Possible methods of GP production may be increased coherence of synchrotron emission or changes in beaming direction.

  13. NsrR from Streptomyces coelicolor Is a Nitric Oxide-sensing [4Fe-4S] Cluster Protein with a Specialized Regulatory Function*

    PubMed Central

    Crack, Jason C.; Munnoch, John; Dodd, Erin L.; Knowles, Felicity; Al Bassam, Mahmoud M.; Kamali, Saeed; Holland, Ashley A.; Cramer, Stephen P.; Hamilton, Chris J.; Johnson, Michael K.; Thomson, Andrew J.; Hutchings, Matthew I.; Le Brun, Nick E.

    2015-01-01

    The Rrf2 family transcription factor NsrR controls expression of genes in a wide range of bacteria in response to nitric oxide (NO). The precise form of the NO-sensing module of NsrR is the subject of controversy because NsrR proteins containing either [2Fe-2S] or [4Fe-4S] clusters have been observed previously. Optical, Mössbauer, resonance Raman spectroscopies and native mass spectrometry demonstrate that Streptomyces coelicolor NsrR (ScNsrR), previously reported to contain a [2Fe-2S] cluster, can be isolated containing a [4Fe-4S] cluster. ChIP-seq experiments indicated that the ScNsrR regulon is small, consisting of only hmpA1, hmpA2, and nsrR itself. The hmpA genes encode NO-detoxifying flavohemoglobins, indicating that ScNsrR has a specialized regulatory function focused on NO detoxification and is not a global regulator like some NsrR orthologues. EMSAs and DNase I footprinting showed that the [4Fe-4S] form of ScNsrR binds specifically and tightly to an 11-bp inverted repeat sequence in the promoter regions of the identified target genes and that DNA binding is abolished following reaction with NO. Resonance Raman data were consistent with cluster coordination by three Cys residues and one oxygen-containing residue, and analysis of ScNsrR variants suggested that highly conserved Glu-85 may be the fourth ligand. Finally, we demonstrate that some low molecular weight thiols, but importantly not physiologically relevant thiols, such as cysteine and an analogue of mycothiol, bind weakly to the [4Fe-4S] cluster, and exposure of this bound form to O2 results in cluster conversion to the [2Fe-2S] form, which does not bind to DNA. These data help to account for the observation of [2Fe-2S] forms of NsrR. PMID:25771538

  14. What Are Polymyalgia Rheumatica and Giant Cell Arteritis?

    MedlinePlus

    ... permanently damaged. There is also a risk of blindness or stroke. Early symptoms of giant cell arteritis ... giant cell arteritis are more likely to develop blindness. The likelihood of getting these conditions peaks between ...

  15. Dinuclear cobalt(II) and copper(II) complexes with a Py2N4S2 macrocyclic ligand.

    PubMed

    Núñez, Cristina; Bastida, Rufina; Lezama, Luis; Macías, Alejandro; Pérez-Lourido, Paulo; Valencia, Laura

    2011-06-20

    The interaction between Co(II) and Cu(II) ions with a Py(2)N(4)S(2)-coordinating octadentate macrocyclic ligand (L) to afford dinuclear compounds has been investigated. The complexes were characterized by microanalysis, conductivity measurements, IR spectroscopy and liquid secondary ion mass spectrometry. The crystal structure of the compounds [H(4)L](NO(3))(4), [Cu(2)LCl(2)](NO(3))(2) (5), [Cu(2)L(NO(3))(2)](NO(3))(2) (6), and [Cu(2)L(μ-OH)](ClO(4))(3)·H(2)O (7) was also determined by single-crystal X-ray diffraction. The [H(4)L](4+) cation crystal structure presents two different conformations, planar and step, with intermolecular face-to-face π,π-stacking interactions between the pyridinic rings. Complexes 5 and 6 show the metal ions in a slightly distorted square-pyramidal coordination geometry. In the case of complex 7, the crystal structure presents the two metal ions joined by a μ-hydroxo bridge and the Cu(II) centers in a slightly distorted square plane or a tetragonally distorted octahedral geometry, taking into account weak interactions in axial positions. Electron paramagnetic resonance spectroscopy is in accordance with the dinuclear nature of the complexes, with an octahedral environment for the cobalt(II) compounds and square-pyramidal or tetragonally elongated octahedral geometries for the copper(II) compounds. The magnetic behavior is consistent with the existence of antiferromagnetic interactions between the ions for cobalt(II) and copper(II) complexes, while for the Co(II) ones, this behavior could also be explained by spin-orbit coupling.

  16. Lithium and chromospherically active single giants

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fekel, Francis C.

    1988-01-01

    Nine chromospherically active single K giants were identified from surveys of chromospherically active stars. The stars have v sin i's ranging from 6 to 46 km/sec. Such large velocities are not explained by scenarios of main sequence to giant star evolution. Fluxes of the ultraviolet emission lines of these stars are substantially less than those of FK Comae. Many of these giants have a moderate or strong lithium line strongly suggesting that these stars recently evolved from rapidly rotating A or early F stars as is suggested by their space motions. Thus, they are not spun down FK Com stars. The characteristics of these stars are such that they may be confused with pre-main sequence stars. The primary difference may be that the post main sequence stars have strong H alpha absorption lines while the pre-main sequence stars appear to have a weak H alpha absorption line or possibly H alpha in emission above the continuum.

  17. Heavy elements and mixing in red giants

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smith, Verne V.

    A brief overview of the s-process in red giants is presented, followed by discussions of three specific topics involving heavy-element s-process nucleosynthesis and mixing in red giants: (1) a comparison of neutron densities derived from observations and from the most recent stellar models, (2) how observations of technetium in S stars have led to a natural division of these stars into two separate groups, one of which is the result of single-star stellar evolution while the other is the result of mass transfer in a binary system, (3) a brief discussion of the recent speculative suggestion that gamma-ray induced photofission of heavy elements (Th and U) might be a source of the Tc observed in certain types of red giants.

  18. Trace Molecules in Giant Planet Atmospheres

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huestis, D. L.; Smith, G. P.

    2010-12-01

    Chemical kinetics matters in the upper atmospheres of giant planets in our solar system and in extrasolar systems. The composition of a volume of gas depends not only on where it is, but also on how it got there. The giant planets in our own solar system still have much to teach us about what we will be observing on extrasolar giant planets and how to interpret what we observe. Some molecules, such as CO, C2H2, C2H6, PH3, and NH3, which we call tracer molecules, provide remotely observable signatures of vertical transport. PH3 and NH3 especially have complicated thermochemistry and chemical kinetics that, until recently, have been poorly understood. Based on analysis of recent literature, we have identified new chemical mechanisms for interconverting NH3 and N2 and for interconverting PH3 and NH4-H2PO4.

  19. Compositional constraints on giant planet formation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Owen, Tobias; Encrenaz, Therese

    2006-10-01

    Using Ockham's razor as a guide, we have tried to find the simplest model for the formation of giant planets that can explain current observations of atmospheric composition. While this "top-down" approach is far from sufficient to define such models, it establishes a set of boundary conditions whose satisfaction is necessary. Using Jupiter as the prototype, we find that a simple model for giant planet formation that begins with a solar nebula of uniform composition and relies on accretion of low temperature icy planetesimals plus collapse of surrounding solar nebula gas supplies that satisfaction. We compare the resulting predictions of elemental abundances and isotope ratios in the atmospheres of the other giants with those from contrasting models and suggest some key measurements to make further progress.

  20. ɛ Ophiuchi: Revisiting a Red Giant

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kallinger, T.; Matthews, J. M.; Guenther, D. B.; Gruberbauer, M.; Kuschnig, R.; Weiss, W. W.; MOST Team

    2012-09-01

    In only a decade, seismology of red-giant stars has grown from infancy to adulthood in the study of stellar structure and evolution. The stimulants for this accelerated growth have been space observations, first provided by the WIRE star-tracker and MOST, and continuing with CoRoT and Kepler, having detected oscillations in thousands of cool giants. However, almost all of the stars in this impressive sample are faint, with little known about their basic properties. Even reliable spectral classifications are lacking for many of them. MOST is the only space-based photometer capable of continuous observations of bright red giants for which we have independent constraints (e.g., spectroscopy) essential to extract the internal structure from the stars' p-modes.

  1. On the shape of giant soap bubbles.

    PubMed

    Cohen, Caroline; Darbois Texier, Baptiste; Reyssat, Etienne; Snoeijer, Jacco H; Quéré, David; Clanet, Christophe

    2017-03-07

    We study the effect of gravity on giant soap bubbles and show that it becomes dominant above the critical size [Formula: see text], where [Formula: see text] is the mean thickness of the soap film and [Formula: see text] is the capillary length ([Formula: see text] stands for vapor-liquid surface tension, and [Formula: see text] stands for the liquid density). We first show experimentally that large soap bubbles do not retain a spherical shape but flatten when increasing their size. A theoretical model is then developed to account for this effect, predicting the shape based on mechanical equilibrium. In stark contrast to liquid drops, we show that there is no mechanical limit of the height of giant bubble shapes. In practice, the physicochemical constraints imposed by surfactant molecules limit the access to this large asymptotic domain. However, by an exact analogy, it is shown how the giant bubble shapes can be realized by large inflatable structures.

  2. Asymptomatic post-rheumatic giant left atrium

    PubMed Central

    Özkartal, Tardu; Tanner, Felix C; Niemann, Markus

    2016-01-01

    A 78-year-old asymptomatic woman was referred to our clinic for a second opinion regarding indication for mitral valve surgery. An echocardiogram showed a moderate mitral stenosis with a concomitant severe regurgitation. The most striking feature, however, was a giant left atrium with a parasternal anteroposterior diameter of 79 mm and a left atrial volume index of 364 mL/m². There are various echocardiographic definitions of a giant left atrium, which are mainly based on measurements of the anteroposterior diameter of the left atrium using M-mode in the parasternal long axis view. Since the commonly accepted method for echocardiographic evaluation of left atrial size is left atrial volume index, we propose a cut-off value of 140 mL/m2 for the definition of a “giant left atrium”. PMID:27354895

  3. Studies of mass loss and outflows from giant stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Qian

    This thesis aims to provide better understanding of mass loss and outflows from asymptotic giant branch stars using the Bowen code. There are 3 projects involved in this thesis. The main project presented here is on the morphology of the outflow when disturbed by a super Jupiter size companion. There exists resonant modes between the pulsation period and orbital period. At different resonant modes, multiple spiral arms with different spiral arm periods form in the outflows. A simple formula gives the spiral arm period as a function of pulsation and orbital periods. Since the resonant modes appear in close orbits, the decay time scale and spiral arm morphology are also presented. These results may explain asymmetry in the outflows that form planetary nebulae. It also explains the origin of the spiral arm structure around some late AGB stars. A 3-D code will ultimately be need to resolve some questions unanswered by the current 1-D models. The paper on the outflow morphology has been submitted to ApJ. In this thesis, ongoing mass loss studies using the Bowen code are also briefly explained. I generated a large grid of models with varying mass, luminosity, metallicity, mixing length and Bowen model parameters in order to find correlations between the mass loss rate and these parameters. Since dust abundance is an important factor for mass loss, for the third project I tested dust formation in the refrigeration zone which is closer to the photosphere than normal dusty regions. In this test, I assumed that the dust temperature equals to the gas kinetic temperature which is lower than the radiative equilibrium temperature. Since dust temperature is close to the radiative temperature when the dust grain is large, this assumption brings excessive dust into the refrigeration zones. The detailed treatment of dust formation will be refined in future studies.

  4. Design, analysis, and modeling of giant magnetostrictive transducers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Calkins, Frederick Theodore

    The increased use of giant magnetostrictive, Terfenol-D transducers in a wide variety of applications has led to a need for greater understanding of the materials performance. This dissertation attempts to add to the Terfenol-D transducer body of knowledge by providing an in-depth analysis and modeling of an experimental transducer. A description of the magnetostriction process related to Terfenol-D includes a discussion of material properties, production methods, and the effect of mechanical stress, magnetization, and temperature on the material performance. The understanding of the Terfenol-D material performance provides the basis for an analysis of the performance of a Terfenol-D transducer. Issues related to the design and utilization of the Terfenol-D material in the transducers are considered, including the magnetic circuit, application of mechanical prestress, and tuning of the mechanical resonance. Experimental results from two broadband, Tonpilz design transducers show the effects of operating conditions (prestress, magnetic bias, AC magnetization amplitude, and frequency) on performance. In an effort to understand and utlilize the rich performance space described by the experimental results a variety of models are considered. An overview of models applicable to Terfenol-D and Terfenol-D transducers is provided, including a discussion of modeling criteria. The Jiles-Atherton model of ferromagnetic hysteresis is employed to describe the quasi-static transducer performance. This model requires the estimation of only six physically-based parameters to accurately simulate performance. The model is shown to be robust with respect to model parameters over a range of mechanical prestress, magnetic biases, and AC magnetic field amplitudes, allowing predictive capability within these ranges. An additional model, based on electroacoustics theory, explains trends in the frequency domain and facilitates an analysis of efficiency based on impedance and admittance

  5. LITHIUM-RICH GIANTS IN GLOBULAR CLUSTERS

    SciTech Connect

    Kirby, Evan N.; Cohen, Judith G.; Guhathakurta, Puragra; Hong, Jerry; Guo, Michelle; Guo, Rachel; Cunha, Katia

    2016-03-10

    Although red giants deplete lithium on their surfaces, some giants are Li-rich. Intermediate-mass asymptotic giant branch (AGB) stars can generate Li through the Cameron–Fowler conveyor, but the existence of Li-rich, low-mass red giant branch (RGB) stars is puzzling. Globular clusters are the best sites to examine this phenomenon because it is straightforward to determine membership in the cluster and to identify the evolutionary state of each star. In 72 hours of Keck/DEIMOS exposures in 25 clusters, we found four Li-rich RGB and two Li-rich AGB stars. There were 1696 RGB and 125 AGB stars with measurements or upper limits consistent with normal abundances of Li. Hence, the frequency of Li-richness in globular clusters is (0.2 ± 0.1)% for the RGB, (1.6 ± 1.1)% for the AGB, and (0.3 ± 0.1)% for all giants. Because the Li-rich RGB stars are on the lower RGB, Li self-generation mechanisms proposed to occur at the luminosity function bump or He core flash cannot explain these four lower RGB stars. We propose the following origin for Li enrichment: (1) All luminous giants experience a brief phase of Li enrichment at the He core flash. (2) All post-RGB stars with binary companions on the lower RGB will engage in mass transfer. This scenario predicts that 0.1% of lower RGB stars will appear Li-rich due to mass transfer from a recently Li-enhanced companion. This frequency is at the lower end of our confidence interval.

  6. Lithium-rich Giants in Globular Clusters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kirby, Evan N.; Guhathakurta, Puragra; Zhang, Andrew J.; Hong, Jerry; Guo, Michelle; Guo, Rachel; Cohen, Judith G.; Cunha, Katia

    2016-03-01

    Although red giants deplete lithium on their surfaces, some giants are Li-rich. Intermediate-mass asymptotic giant branch (AGB) stars can generate Li through the Cameron-Fowler conveyor, but the existence of Li-rich, low-mass red giant branch (RGB) stars is puzzling. Globular clusters are the best sites to examine this phenomenon because it is straightforward to determine membership in the cluster and to identify the evolutionary state of each star. In 72 hours of Keck/DEIMOS exposures in 25 clusters, we found four Li-rich RGB and two Li-rich AGB stars. There were 1696 RGB and 125 AGB stars with measurements or upper limits consistent with normal abundances of Li. Hence, the frequency of Li-richness in globular clusters is (0.2 ± 0.1)% for the RGB, (1.6 ± 1.1)% for the AGB, and (0.3 ± 0.1)% for all giants. Because the Li-rich RGB stars are on the lower RGB, Li self-generation mechanisms proposed to occur at the luminosity function bump or He core flash cannot explain these four lower RGB stars. We propose the following origin for Li enrichment: (1) All luminous giants experience a brief phase of Li enrichment at the He core flash. (2) All post-RGB stars with binary companions on the lower RGB will engage in mass transfer. This scenario predicts that 0.1% of lower RGB stars will appear Li-rich due to mass transfer from a recently Li-enhanced companion. This frequency is at the lower end of our confidence interval. The data presented herein were obtained at the W. M. Keck Observatory, which is operated as a scientific partnership among the California Institute of Technology, the University of California and the National Aeronautics and Space Administration. The Observatory was made possible by the generous financial support of the W. M. Keck Foundation.

  7. Mechanism of N2 dissociation and kinetics of N(4S) atoms in pure nitrogen plasma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Volynets, A. V.; Lopaev, D. V.; Popov, N. A.

    2016-10-01

    This work deals with kinetics of the ground state nitrogen atoms N(4S) and N2 dissociation mechanism in pure nitrogen plasma. The experiment was carried out in positive column of DC glow discharge at a range of parameters p = 5 - 50 Torr, J = 20 - 100 mA. The use of axial homogeneous glow discharge allowed considering N(4S) balance for spatially uniform conditions controlled by only two terms: source (characterized by effective production rate k diss eff ) and loss (characterized by effective loss time τN l oss ). Analysis of these parameters gains considerably better understanding of N2 dissociation mechanism in pure nitrogen plasma that was the main goal of the given work. So N/N2 dissociation rate as function of discharge parameters was obtained using two independent emission optical methods: actinometry on Ar atoms and N2 2+ band emission decay at discharge modulation. Measurements of N/N2 radial profiles allowed estimating N atom surface loss probability γN l oss and correspondingly τN l oss . It was revealed that γN l oss depends on N(4S) concentration and thereby discharge conditions through the sorption balance of physisorbed N atoms. Simple phenomenological model taking into account basic surface processes provides γN l oss data in good agreement with experiment. Finally, k diss eff was obtained as function of reduced electric field E/N and it was shown that even EEDF self-consistently calculated with accounting for N2 vibrational excitation is unable to provide observed values of k diss eff . Reasons of that fact are discussed in detail.

  8. Large structural changes upon protonation of Fe4S4 clusters: the consequences for reactivity.

    PubMed

    Dance, Ian; Henderson, Richard A

    2014-11-21

    Density functional calculations reveal that protonation of a μ3-S in [Fe4S4X4](2-) clusters (X = halide, thiolate, phenoxide) results in the breaking of one S-Fe bond (to >3 Å, from 2.3 Å). This creates a doubly-bridging SH ligand (μ3-SH is not stable), and a unique three-coordinated planar Fe atom. The under-coordination of this unique Fe atom is the basis of revised mechanisms for the acid-catalysed ligand substitution reactions in which substitution of X by PhS occurs at the unique Fe site by an indirect pathway involving initial displacement of X by acetonitrile (solvent), followed by displacement of coordinated acetonitrile by PhSH. When X = Cl or Br the rate of attack by PhSH is slower than the dissociation of X(-), and is the rate-determining step; in contrast, when X = SEt, SBu(t) or OPh the rate of dissociation of XH is slower than attack by PhSH and is rate-determining for these clusters. A full and consistent interpretation of all kinetic data is presented including new explanations of many of the kinetic observations on the acid-catalysed substitution reactions of [Fe4S4X4](2-) clusters. The proposed mechanisms are supported by density functional calculations of the structures of intermediates, and simulations of some of the steps. These findings are expected to have widespread ramifications for the reaction chemistry of both natural and synthetic clusters with the {Fe4S4} core.

  9. [Giant cell arteritis--case report].

    PubMed

    Napora, Katarzyna J; Obuchowska, Iwona; Mariak, Zofia

    2008-01-01

    Giant cell arteritis is a systemic disease of unknown origin. Vasculitis involves large and medium-sized vessels. Frequent clinical manifestations include characteristic headache in the temporal area, jaw or tongue claudication, apathy, fatigue, weight loss. The incidence of ocular involvement is reported in up to 70% patients. The most common and serious ophthalmic presentation is arteritic anterior ischemic optic neuropathy, which can lead to irreversible visual loss. Only early and aggressive steroid therapy may prevent this dangerous complication. The authors presented a case of a 68-years-old woman with giant cell arteritis. The main visual manifestation of this disease was anterior ischemic optic neuropathy.

  10. A giant Pseudomonas phage from Poland.

    PubMed

    Drulis-Kawa, Zuzanna; Olszak, Tomasz; Danis, Katarzyna; Majkowska-Skrobek, Grazyna; Ackermann, Hans-W

    2014-03-01

    A novel giant phage of the family Myoviridae is described. Pseudomonas phage PA5oct was isolated from a sewage sample from an irrigated field near Wroclaw, Poland. The virion morphology indicates that PA5oct differs from known giant phages. The phage has a head of about 131 nm in diameter and a tail of 136 × 19 nm. Phage PA5oct contains a genome of approximately 375 kbp and differs in size from any tailed phages known. PA5oct was further characterized by determination of its latent period and burst size and its sensitivity to heating, chloroform, and pH.

  11. Isotope shift and hyperfine splitting of the 4s{yields}5p transition in potassium

    SciTech Connect

    Behrle, Alexandra; Koschorreck, Marco; Koehl, Michael

    2011-05-15

    We have investigated the 4s {sup 2}S{sub 1/2}{yields}5p {sup 2}P{sub 1/2} transition (D{sub 1} line) of the potassium isotopes {sup 39}K, {sup 40}K, and {sup 41}K using Doppler-free laser saturation spectroscopy. Our measurements reveal the hyperfine splitting of the 5p {sup 2}P{sub 1/2} state of {sup 40}K, and we have determined the specific mass shift and the nuclear field shift constants for the blue (405 nm) D{sub 1} line.

  12. Giant-cell lesions of the facial bones

    SciTech Connect

    Som, P.M.; Lawson, W.; Cohen, B.A.

    1983-04-01

    Giant-cell lesions of the paranasal sinuses, including the giant-cell reparative granuloma, the brown tumor of hyperparathyroidism, the true giant-cell tumor, cherubism, and the aneurysmal bone cyst, are uncommon entities. Plain radiographic and computed-tomographic studies of these lesions are described and the differential diagnosis is discussed.

  13. New Insight into the Pygmy Dipole Resonance in Stable Nuclei

    SciTech Connect

    Neumann-Cosel, P. von

    2008-11-11

    Two examples of recent work on the structure of low-energy electric dipole modes are presented. The first part discusses the systematics of the pygmy dipole resonance (PDR) in stable tin isotopes deduced from high-resolution ({gamma},{gamma}') experiments. These help to distinguish between microscopic QRPA calculations based on either a relativistic or a nonrelativistic mean-field description, predicting significantly different properties of the PDR. The second part presents attempts to unravel the structure of dipoles modes at energies below the giant dipole resonance (GDR) in {sup 208}Pb with a high-resolution measurement of the (p-vector,p-vector') reaction under 0 deg.

  14. MAPPING DIRECTLY IMAGED GIANT EXOPLANETS

    SciTech Connect

    Kostov, Veselin; Apai, Daniel

    2013-01-01

    With the increasing number of directly imaged giant exoplanets, the current atmosphere models are often not capable of fully explaining the spectra and luminosity of the sources. A particularly challenging component of the atmosphere models is the formation and properties of condensate cloud layers, which fundamentally impact the energetics, opacity, and evolution of the planets. Here we present a suite of techniques that can be used to estimate the level of rotational modulations these planets may show. We propose that the time-resolved observations of such periodic photometric and spectroscopic variations of extrasolar planets due to their rotation can be used as a powerful tool to probe the heterogeneity of their optical surfaces. In this paper, we develop simulations to explore the capabilities of current and next-generation ground- and space-based instruments for this technique. We address and discuss the following questions: (1) what planet properties can be deduced from the light curve and/or spectra, and in particular can we determine rotation periods, spot coverage, spot colors, and spot spectra?; (2) what is the optimal configuration of instrument/wavelength/temporal sampling required for these measurements?; and (3) can principal component analysis be used to invert the light curve and deduce the surface map of the planet? Our simulations describe the expected spectral differences between homogeneous (clear or cloudy) and patchy atmospheres, outline the significance of the dominant absorption features of H{sub 2}O, CH{sub 4}, and CO, and provide a method to distinguish these two types of atmospheres. Assuming surfaces with and without clouds for most currently imaged planets the current models predict the largest variations in the J band. Simulated photometry from current and future instruments is used to estimate the level of detectable photometric variations. We conclude that future instruments will be able to recover not only the rotation periods

  15. Identification of two [4Fe-4S]-cluster-containing hydro-lyases from Pyrococcus furiosus.

    PubMed

    van Vugt-Lussenburg, Barbara M A; van der Weel, Laura; Hagen, Wilfred R; Hagedoorn, Peter-Leon

    2009-09-01

    The hyperthermophilic archaeon Pyrococcus furiosus is a strict anaerobe. It is therefore not expected to use the oxidative tricarboxylic acid (TCA) cycle for energy transduction. Nonetheless, its genome encodes more putative TCA cycle enzymes than the closely related Pyrococcus horikoshii and Pyrococcus abyssi, including an aconitase (PF0201). Furthermore, a two-subunit fumarase (PF1755 and PF1754) is encoded on the Pyr. furiosus genome. In the present study, these three genes were heterologously overexpressed in Escherichia coli to enable characterization of the enzymes. PF1755 and PF1754 were shown to form a [4Fe-4S]-cluster-containing heterodimeric enzyme, able to catalyse the reversible hydratation of fumarate. The aconitase PF0201 also contained an Fe-S cluster, and catalysed the conversion from citrate to isocitrate. The fumarase belongs to the class of two-subunit, [4Fe-4S]-cluster-containing fumarate hydratases exemplified by MmcBC from Pelotomaculum thermopropionicum; the aconitase belongs to the aconitase A family. Aconitase probably plays a role in amino acid synthesis when the organism grows on carbohydrates. However, the function of the seemingly metabolically isolated fumarase in Pyr. furiosus has yet to be established.

  16. iPhone 4s and iPhone 5s Imaging of the Eye

    PubMed Central

    Jalil, Maaz; Ferenczy, Sandor R.; Shields, Carol L.

    2017-01-01

    Background/Aims To evaluate the technical feasibility of a consumer-grade cellular iPhone camera as an ocular imaging device compared to existing ophthalmic imaging equipment for documentation purposes. Methods A comparison of iPhone 4s and 5s images was made with external facial images (macrophotography) using Nikon cameras, slit-lamp images (microphotography) using Zeiss photo slit-lamp camera, and fundus images (fundus photography) using RetCam II. Results In an analysis of six consecutive patients with ophthalmic conditions, both iPhones achieved documentation of external findings (macrophotography) using standard camera modality, tap to focus, and built-in flash. Both iPhones achieved documentation of anterior segment findings (microphotography) during slit-lamp examination through oculars. Both iPhones achieved fundus imaging using standard video modality with continuous iPhone illumination through an ophthalmic lens. Comparison to standard ophthalmic cameras, macrophotography and microphotography were excellent. In comparison to RetCam fundus photography, iPhone fundus photography revealed smaller field and was technically more difficult to obtain, but the quality was nearly similar to RetCam. Conclusions iPhone versions 4s and 5s can provide excellent ophthalmic macrophotography and microphotography and adequate fundus photography. We believe that iPhone imaging could be most useful in settings where expensive, complicated, and cumbersome imaging equipment is unavailable. PMID:28275604

  17. Core level electron binding energies of realgar (As{sub 4}S{sub 4})

    SciTech Connect

    Pratt, A.R.; Nesbitt, H.W.

    2000-04-01

    XPS broad scans and high-resolution narrow-region spectra were collected from fresh realgar (As{sub 4}S{sub 4}) surfaces to measure core level S and As binding energies. Reasonably accurate As and S concentrations were determined from XPS broad scans using peak areas and manufacturer supplied sensitivity factors. High resolution S(2p) and As(3d) narrow region spectra were comprised of photoelectron emissions indicative of As and S in intermediate oxidation states akin to binding energies of As and S polymeric species. S(2p) spectra were interpreted using only S contributions expected from the bulk mineral matrix and showed that S was not greatly affected by surface state phenomena. This was attributed to breakage of intermolecular van der Waals bonds rather than covalent interatomic bonds. As(3d) spectra were found to contain two contributions one from As atoms in As{sub 4}S{sub 4} molecules in the bulk mineral matrix and another possibly from As atoms in molecules situated at the surface.

  18. A rietveld refinement of NaCl-type Ca 5Y 4S 11

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thompson, John G.; Withers, Ray L.; Otero-Diaz, L. Carlos

    1995-10-01

    The crystal structure of Ca 5Y 4S 11 [a = 6.942(1) Å, α = 33.380(5)°, space group R3 m, No. 166, Z = {2}/{11}, Dx = 3.042 g cm -3] was determined using Rietveld refinement of X-ray powder diffraction data collected with Cu Kα 1 radiation using a Guiner-Hägg camera. Ca 5Y 4S 11 is one end-member composition ( x = {2}/{7}) of the solid-solution (1- x)CaS. xY 2S 3, which can be considered as a modulated NaCl-type structure with modulation wave-vector q = {1}/{2}(111)∗. The sulfur sublattice is fully occupied but the metal sublattice contains {2}/{11} vacancies on average. The refinement showed that the additional observed satellite reflections were almost entirely due to metal atom/vacancy ordering rather than sulfur atom displacement. Large anisotropic thermal parameters on both the sulfur and metal atoms were consistent with disordered displacement of these atoms by 0.2-0.4 Å normal to [111]. The chemical plausibility of the refined structure and the implication of this result for other substoichiometric NaCl-type solid solutions are discussed.

  19. Branching Fraction for B+ -> pi0 l+ nu, Measured in Upsilon (4S) -> BBbar Events Tagged by B- -> D0 l- nubar (X) Decays

    SciTech Connect

    Aubert, B.; Barate, R.; Boutigny, D.; Couderc, F.; Karyotakis, Y.; Lees, J.P.; Poireau, V.; Tisserand, V.; Zghiche, A.; Grauges, E.; Palano, A.; Pappagallo, M.; Pompili, A.; Chen, J.C.; Qi, N.D.; Rong, G.; Wang, P.; Zhu, Y.S.; Eigen, G.; Ofte, I.; Stugu, B. /Bergen U. /LBL, Berkeley /UC, Berkeley /Birmingham U. /Ruhr U., Bochum /Bristol U. /British Columbia U. /Brunel U. /Novosibirsk, IYF /UC, Irvine /UCLA /UC, Riverside /UC, San Diego /UC, Santa Barbara /UC, Santa Cruz /Caltech /Cincinnati U. /Colorado U. /Colorado State U. /Dortmund U. /Dresden, Tech. U. /Ecole Polytechnique /Edinburgh U. /Ferrara U. /INFN, Ferrara /Frascati /Genoa U. /INFN, Genoa /Harvard U. /Heidelberg U. /Imperial Coll., London /Iowa U. /Iowa State U. /Orsay, LAL /LLNL, Livermore /Liverpool U. /Queen Mary, U. of London /Royal Holloway, U. of London /Louisville U. /Manchester U. /Maryland U. /Massachusetts U., Amherst /MIT, LNS /McGill U. /Milan U. /INFN, Milan /Mississippi U. /Montreal U. /Mt. Holyoke Coll. /Naples U. /INFN, Naples /NIKHEF, Amsterdam /Notre Dame U. /Ohio State U. /Oregon U. /Padua U. /INFN, Padua /Paris U., VI-VII /Pennsylvania U. /Perugia U. /INFN, Perugia /Pisa U. /INFN, Pisa /Prairie View A-M /Princeton U. /Rome U. /INFN, Rome /Rostock U. /Rutherford /DAPNIA, Saclay /South Carolina U. /SLAC /Stanford U., Phys. Dept. /SUNY, Stony Brook /Tennessee U. /Texas U. /Texas U., Dallas /Turin U. /INFN, Turin /Trieste U. /INFN, Trieste /Valencia U., IFIC /Vanderbilt U. /Victoria U. /Warwick U. /Wisconsin U., Madison /Yale U. /Yale U. /Yale U. /Yale U. /Yale U. /Yale U.

    2005-06-29

    We report a preliminary branching fraction of (1.80 {+-} 0.37{sub stat.} {+-} 0.23{sub syst.}) x 10{sup -4} for the charmless exclusive semileptonic B{sup +} {yields} {pi}{sup 0}{ell}{sup +}{nu} decay, where {ell} can be either a muon or an electron. This result is based on data corresponding to an integrated luminosity of 81 fb{sup -1} collected at the {Upsilon}(4S) resonance with the BABAR detector. The analysis uses B{bar B} events that are tagged by a B meson reconstructed in the semileptonic B{sup -} {yields} D{sup 0}{ell}{sup -}{bar {nu}}(X) decays, where X can be either a {gamma} or a {pi}{sup 0} from a D* decay.

  20. The O(3P) and N(4S) density measurement at 225 km by ultraviolet absorption and fluorescence in the Apollo-Soyuz test project

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kaufman, F.; Rawling, W. T.; Donahue, T. M.; Anderson, J. G.; Hudson, R. D.

    1976-01-01

    The densities of O(3P) and N(4S) at 225 km were determined during the Apollo Soyuz Test Project by a resonance absorption/fluorescence technique in which OI and NI line radiation produced and collimated on board the Apollo was reflected from the Soyuz back to the Apollo for spectral analysis. The two spacecraft maneuvered so that a range of observation angles of plus or minus 15 deg with respect to the normal to the orbital velocity vector was scanned. The measurements were made at night on two consecutive orbits at spacecraft separations of 150 and 500 m. The resulting relative counting rates as function of observation angle were compared to calculated values to determine the oxygen value. This value agrees with mass spectrometric measurements made under similar conditions. The nitrogen value is in good agreement with other measurements and suggests a smaller diurnal variation than is predicted by present models.

  1. Spin-orbit and rotational couplings in radiative association of C({sup 3}P) and N({sup 4}S) atoms

    SciTech Connect

    Antipov, Sergey V.; Gustafsson, Magnus; Nyman, Gunnar

    2011-11-14

    The role of spin-orbit and rotational couplings in radiative association of C({sup 3}P) and N({sup 4}S) atoms is investigated. Couplings among doublet electronic states of the CN radical are considered, giving rise to a 6-state model of the process. The solution of the dynamical problem is based on the L{sup 2} method, where a complex absorbing potential is added to the Hamiltonian operator in order to treat continuum and bound levels in the same manner. Comparison of the energy-dependent rate coefficients calculated with and without spin-orbit and rotational couplings shows that the couplings have a strong effect on the resonance structure and low-energy baseline of the rate coefficient.

  2. Giant molecules composed of polar molecules and atoms in mixed dimensions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qi, Ran; Tan, Shina

    2014-05-01

    Two or three polar molecules, confined to one or two dimensions, can form stable bound states with a single atom living in three dimensions, if the molecule and the atom can interact resonantly such that their mixed dimensional scattering length is large. We call these bound states ``giant molecules'' since it's a molecule composed of smaller molecules and atoms. We study their properties using techniques including exact numerical solution, exact qunatum diffusion Monte Carlo (QMC), Born-Oppenheimer approximation (BOA), and semiclassical approximation. These bound states have a hierarchical structure reminiscent of the celestial systems.

  3. Origin of the giant negative photoresistance of ZnO single crystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barzola-Quiquia, J.; Esquinazi, P.; Villafuerte, M.; Heluani, S. P.; Pöppl, A.; Eisinger, K.

    2010-10-01

    We have measured the temperature dependence (30 K≤T≤300 K) of the electrical resistance of ZnO single crystals prepared by hydrothermal method in darkness and under the influence of light in the ultraviolet range. The resistance decreases several orders of magnitude at temperatures T <200 K after illumination. Electron paramagnetic resonance studies under illumination reveal that the excitation of Li acceptor impurities is the origin for the giant negative photoresistance effect. Permanent photoresistance effect is also observed, which remains many hours after leaving the crystal in darkness.

  4. Ultra-sharp plasmonic resonances from monopole optical nanoantenna phased arrays

    SciTech Connect

    Li, Shi-Qiang; Bruce Buchholz, D.; Zhou, Wei; Ketterson, John B.; Ocola, Leonidas E.; Sakoda, Kazuaki; Chang, Robert P. H.

    2014-06-09

    Diffractively coupled plasmonic resonances possess both ultra-sharp linewidths and giant electric field enhancement around plasmonic nanostructures. They can be applied to create a new generation of sensors, detectors, and nano-optical devices. However, all current designs require stringent index-matching at the resonance condition that limits their applicability. Here, we propose and demonstrate that it is possible to relieve the index-matching requirement and to induce ultra-sharp plasmon resonances in an ordered vertically aligned optical nano-antenna phased array by transforming a dipole resonance to a monopole resonance with a mirror plane. Due to the mirror image effect, the monopole resonance not only retained the dipole features but also enhanced them. The engineered resonances strongly suppressed the radiative decay channel, resulting in a four-order of magnitude enhancement in local electric field and a Q-factor greater than 200.

  5. Experiments with Helmholtz Resonators.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Greenslade, Thomas B., Jr.

    1996-01-01

    Presents experiments that use Helmholtz resonators and have been designed for a sophomore-level course in oscillations and waves. Discusses the theory of the Helmholtz resonator and resonance curves. (JRH)

  6. MRI (Magnetic Resonance Imaging)

    MedlinePlus

    ... and Procedures Medical Imaging MRI (Magnetic Resonance Imaging) MRI (Magnetic Resonance Imaging) Share Tweet Linkedin Pin it More sharing options ... usually given through an IV in the arm. MRI Research Programs at FDA Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) ...

  7. Chiral metamaterials with negative refractive index based on four “U” split ring resonators

    SciTech Connect

    Li, Zhaofeng; Zhao, Rongkuo; Koschny, Thomas; Kafesaki, Maria; Alici, Kamil Boratay; Colak, Evrim; Caglayan, Humeyra; Ozbay, Ekmel; Soukoulis, C.M.

    2010-08-23

    A uniaxial chiral metamaterial is constructed by double-layered four 'U' split ring resonators mutually twisted by 90{sup o}. It shows a giant optical activity and circular dichroism. The retrieval results reveal that a negative refractive index is realized for circularly polarized waves due to the large chirality. The experimental results are in good agreement with the numerical results.

  8. THE REDSHIFT DISTRIBUTION OF GIANT ARCS IN THE SLOAN GIANT ARCS SURVEY

    SciTech Connect

    Bayliss, Matthew B.; Gladders, Michael D.; Koester, Benjamin P.; Oguri, Masamune; Hennawi, Joseph F.; Sharon, Keren; Dahle, Haakon

    2011-01-20

    We measure the redshift distribution of a sample of 28 giant arcs discovered as a part of the Sloan Giant Arcs Survey. Gemini/GMOS-North spectroscopy provides precise redshifts for 24 arcs, and 'redshift desert' constrains for the remaining 4 arcs. This is a direct measurement of the redshift distribution of a uniformly selected sample of bright giant arcs, which is an observable that can be used to inform efforts to predict giant arc statistics. Our primary giant arc sample has a median redshift z = 1.821 and nearly two-thirds of the arcs, 64%, are sources at z {approx}> 1.4, indicating that the population of background sources that are strongly lensed into bright giant arcs resides primarily at high redshift. We also analyze the distribution of redshifts for 19 secondary strongly lensed background sources that are not visually apparent in Sloan Digital Sky Survey imaging, but were identified in deeper follow-up imaging of the lensing cluster fields. Our redshift sample for the secondary sources is not spectroscopically complete, but combining it with our primary giant arc sample suggests that a large fraction of all background galaxies that are strongly lensed by foreground clusters reside at z {approx}> 1.4. Kolmogorov-Smirnov tests indicate that our well-selected, spectroscopically complete primary giant arc redshift sample can be reproduced with a model distribution that is constructed from a combination of results from studies of strong-lensing clusters in numerical simulations and observational constraints on the galaxy luminosity function.

  9. Sucrose-mediated giant cell formation in the genus Neisseria.

    PubMed

    Johnson, K G; McDonald, I J

    1976-03-01

    Growth of Neisseria perflava, Neisseria cinerea, and Neisseria sicca strain Kirkland in media supplemented with sucrose (0.5 to 5.0% w/v) resulted in the formation of giant cells. Response to sucrose was specific in that a variety of other carbohydrates did not mediate giant cell formation. Giant cells appeared only under growth conditions and did not lyse upon transfer to medium lacking sucrose or upon resuspension in hypotonic media. Reversion of giant to normal cells occurred when giant cells were used as inocula and allowed to multiply in media lacking sucrose.

  10. Giant-cell granuloma of the sinuses

    SciTech Connect

    Rhea, J.T.; Weber, A.L.

    1983-04-01

    Three cases are presented which illustrate giant-cell granulomas in the maxillary, ethmoid, and sphenoid sinuses. The radiographic features are nonspecific, and the lesion can mimic carcinoma. Ossification can be demonstrated, especially with computed tomography, and may indicate a benign lesion.

  11. Vocal repertoire of the social giant otter.

    PubMed

    Leuchtenberger, Caroline; Sousa-Lima, Renata; Duplaix, Nicole; Magnusson, William E; Mourão, Guilherme

    2014-11-01

    According to the "social intelligence hypothesis," species with complex social interactions have more sophisticated communication systems. Giant otters (Pteronura brasiliensis) live in groups with complex social interactions. It is likely that the vocal communication of giant otters is more sophisticated than previous studies suggest. The objectives of the current study were to describe the airborne vocal repertoire of giant otters in the Pantanal area of Brazil, to analyze call types within different behavioral contexts, and to correlate vocal complexity with level of sociability of mustelids to verify whether or not the result supports the social intelligence hypothesis. The behavior of nine giant otters groups was observed. Vocalizations recorded were acoustically and statistically analyzed to describe the species' repertoire. The repertoire was comprised by 15 sound types emitted in different behavioral contexts. The main behavioral contexts of each sound type were significantly associated with the acoustic variable ordination of different sound types. A strong correlation between vocal complexity and sociability was found for different species, suggesting that the communication systems observed in the family mustelidae support the social intelligence hypothesis.

  12. Giant Viruses of Amoebas: An Update.

    PubMed

    Aherfi, Sarah; Colson, Philippe; La Scola, Bernard; Raoult, Didier

    2016-01-01

    During the 12 past years, five new or putative virus families encompassing several members, namely Mimiviridae, Marseilleviridae, pandoraviruses, faustoviruses, and virophages were described. In addition, Pithovirus sibericum and Mollivirus sibericum represent type strains of putative new giant virus families. All these viruses were isolated using amoebal coculture methods. These giant viruses were linked by phylogenomic analyses to other large DNA viruses. They were then proposed to be classified in a new viral order, the Megavirales, on the basis of their common origin, as shown by a set of ancestral genes encoding key viral functions, a common virion architecture, and shared major biological features including replication inside cytoplasmic factories. Megavirales is increasingly demonstrated to stand in the tree of life aside Bacteria, Archaea, and Eukarya, and the megavirus ancestor is suspected to be as ancient as cellular ancestors. In addition, giant amoebal viruses are visible under a light microscope and display many phenotypic and genomic features not found in other viruses, while they share other characteristics with parasitic microbes. Moreover, these organisms appear to be common inhabitants of our biosphere, and mimiviruses and marseilleviruses were isolated from human samples and associated to diseases. In the present review, we describe the main features and recent findings on these giant amoebal viruses and virophages.

  13. Giant leucaena (koa haole) energy tree farm

    SciTech Connect

    Brewbaker, J.L.

    1980-09-01

    Giant leucaena is a tall arboreal form of the common koa haole of the tropics that is known for its wide adaptability, hardiness, and rapid growth. Wood yields of the giant leucaena equal or exceed those of other tropical trees and can be the equivalent annually of 30 barrels of oil per acre. In addition, the tree is a legume that produces a marketable co-product, a nutritious, high-nitrogen leaf meal. A thorough assessment is provided of the known yield capability of giant leucaena, its soil and fertilizer needs, its impact on the environment, its water and irrigation needs, its handling from nursery through establishment, its wood properties and combustion characteristics, and methods of harvesting suitable for the comparatively small trees to be grown. Analyses are also given of capital equipment and operating expenses, labor needs, effects of tax incentives, and economic considerations of application to various scenarios and market conditions in Hawaii. This study suggests that giant leucaena could be grown profitably in Molokai as a source of fuel wood and co-product animal feed.

  14. Giant light enhancement in atomic clusters

    SciTech Connect

    Gadomsky, O. N. Gadomskaya, I. V.; Altunin, K. K.

    2009-07-15

    We show that the polarizing effect of the atoms in an atomic cluster can lead to full compensation of the radiative damping of excited atomic states, a change in the sign of the dispersion of the atomic polarizability, and giant light enhancement by the atomic cluster.

  15. Asteroseismic Diagram for Subgiants and Red Giants

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gai, Ning; Tang, Yanke; Yu, Peng; Dou, Xianghua

    2017-02-01

    Asteroseismology is a powerful tool for constraining stellar parameters. NASA’s Kepler mission is providing individual eigenfrequencies for a huge number of stars, including thousands of red giants. Besides the frequencies of acoustic modes, an important breakthrough of the Kepler mission is the detection of nonradial gravity-dominated mixed-mode oscillations in red giants. Unlike pure acoustic modes, mixed modes probe deeply into the interior of stars, allowing the stellar core properties and evolution of stars to be derived. In this work, using the gravity-mode period spacing and the large frequency separation, we construct the ΔΠ1–Δν asteroseismic diagram from models of subgiants and red giants with various masses and metallicities. The relationship ΔΠ1–Δν is able to constrain the ages and masses of the subgiants. Meanwhile, for red giants with masses above 1.5 M ⊙, the ΔΠ1–Δν asteroseismic diagram can also work well to constrain the stellar age and mass. Additionally, we calculate the relative “isochrones” τ, which indicate similar evolution states especially for similar mass stars, on the ΔΠ1–Δν diagram.

  16. Giant Cavernous Haemangioma of the Anterior Mediastinum

    PubMed Central

    Kaya, Seyda Ors; Samancılar, Ozgur; Usluer, Ozan; Acar, Tuba; Yener, Ali Galip

    2015-01-01

    Cavernous hemangiomas of the anterior mediastinum is rare. We present a case of a 56-year-old male patient with a giant cavernous hemangioma of the anterior mediastinum, 18 cm in diameters, approached by left posterolateral thoracotomy. To the best of our knowledge, such a unique case has not been previously presented in the literature. PMID:26644773

  17. Giant Viruses of Amoebas: An Update

    PubMed Central

    Aherfi, Sarah; Colson, Philippe; La Scola, Bernard; Raoult, Didier

    2016-01-01

    During the 12 past years, five new or putative virus families encompassing several members, namely Mimiviridae, Marseilleviridae, pandoraviruses, faustoviruses, and virophages were described. In addition, Pithovirus sibericum and Mollivirus sibericum represent type strains of putative new giant virus families. All these viruses were isolated using amoebal coculture methods. These giant viruses were linked by phylogenomic analyses to other large DNA viruses. They were then proposed to be classified in a new viral order, the Megavirales, on the basis of their common origin, as shown by a set of ancestral genes encoding key viral functions, a common virion architecture, and shared major biological features including replication inside cytoplasmic factories. Megavirales is increasingly demonstrated to stand in the tree of life aside Bacteria, Archaea, and Eukarya, and the megavirus ancestor is suspected to be as ancient as cellular ancestors. In addition, giant amoebal viruses are visible under a light microscope and display many phenotypic and genomic features not found in other viruses, while they share other characteristics with parasitic microbes. Moreover, these organisms appear to be common inhabitants of our biosphere, and mimiviruses and marseilleviruses were isolated from human samples and associated to diseases. In the present review, we describe the main features and recent findings on these giant amoebal viruses and virophages. PMID:27047465

  18. Insights on a Giant Aneurysm Treated Endovascularly.

    PubMed

    Graziano, Francesca; Iacopino, Domenico Gerardo; Ulm, Arthur John

    2016-07-01

    Background Endovascular treatment with stent-assisted Guglielmi detachable coils is an accepted method for treating intracranial giant aneurysms that otherwise would require more invasive or destructive treatment or could not be treated at all. Nevertheless, there is a paucity of information concerning inner postcoiling aneurysmal changes in human subjects over the long term. We report a postmortem analysis of a patient with a giant aneurysm at the vertebrobasilar junction (VBJ) who was treated endovascularly and studied pathologically 24 months after treatment. Materials and Method The head was removed at autopsy and prefixed in a 10% neutral buffered formalin solution. The brain was gently removed from the skull base after cutting the intracranial nerves and vascular structures. The giant VBJ aneurysm and its relationship with the brainstem, cranial nerves, and vessels were captured photographically and analyzed. Afterward, under operating microscope guidance, the vertebrobasilar system with the aneurysm was gently and carefully detached from the brainstem and carefully analyzed. Results No complete fibrous obliteration of the aneurysm lumen could be detected in our case, and no endothelialization had taken place 24 months after treatment. Conclusions Our findings agree with those of previous similar reports. Coiling, in particular in large or giant aneurysms, may be burdened by the risk of coil compaction and recanalization, but it has the advantage of not affecting the flow in the perforating arteries.

  19. Tuberculosis Detection by Giant African Pouched Rats

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Poling, Alan; Weetjens, Bart; Cox, Christophe; Beyene, Negussie; Durgin, Amy; Mahoney, Amanda

    2011-01-01

    In recent years, operant discrimination training procedures have been used to teach giant African pouched rats to detect tuberculosis (TB) in human sputum samples. This article summarizes how the rats are trained and used operationally, as well as their performance in studies published to date. Available data suggest that pouched rats, which can…

  20. Reading on the Shoulders of Giants

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ben-Chaim, Michael; Riendeau, Michael

    2012-01-01

    Reflecting on his successful scientific career, Isaac Newton highlighted his intellectual debt to his predecessors. "If I have seen further," he wrote, "it was "only" by standing on the shoulders of giants." The authors have chosen the title of their article as a token of recognition of their debt to the teachings of…

  1. Standing on the shoulders of giants.

    PubMed

    Romanovsky, Andrej A

    2014-01-01

    In this editorial, the author explains that the journal Temperature stands on the shoulders of giants-prominent scientists of the past and current members of the Temperature community. Temperature also uses the best tools, such as Google Scholar profiles. The editorial includes a new puzzle: why does warm water freeze faster than cold water?

  2. Recovery From Giant Eruptions in Massive Stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kashi, A.; Davidson, K.; Humphreys, R. M.

    2015-12-01

    We perform radiation hydrodynamic simulations to study how very massive stars recover from giant eruptions. The post eruption star experience strong mass loss due to strong winds, driven by radial pulsations in the star*s interior, that operate by the κ-mechanism. The mass loss history obtained in our simulations resembles η Car*s history.

  3. [Habitat selection attributes of giant panda].

    PubMed

    Kang, Dong-Wei; Zhao, Zhi-Jiang; Guo, Wen-Xia; Tan, Liu-Yi; Kang, Wen; Li, Jun-Qing

    2011-02-01

    Based on the 1997-2009 inventory data of Wanglang Nature Reserve, the habitat selection attributes of giant panda were studied from the aspects of topography, forest community structure, and main feeding bamboo by the methods of frequency distribution and Bailey. The giant panda had obvious habitat preferences. Topographically, the preferred microhabitat was on the even or convex slopes at the ridge, top, or middle part of mountain body at an elevation 2500-3000 m, with southwest aspect, 6 degrees-30 degrees, and the distance to the nearest water source > 300 m. As for the forest community structure, the giant panda preferred the microhabitat with the bamboo succeeded from secondary forest or mixed conifer and broad-leaved forest, and with the average tree height being 20-29 m and the shrub coverage being 0-24%. The preferred main feeding bamboo by the giant panda was the growing well Fargesia denudate with an average height of 2-5 m and the coverage of > 50%.

  4. Regenerative feedback resonant circuit

    DOEpatents

    Jones, A. Mark; Kelly, James F.; McCloy, John S.; McMakin, Douglas L.

    2014-09-02

    A regenerative feedback resonant circuit for measuring a transient response in a loop is disclosed. The circuit includes an amplifier for generating a signal in the loop. The circuit further includes a resonator having a resonant cavity and a material located within the cavity. The signal sent into the resonator produces a resonant frequency. A variation of the resonant frequency due to perturbations in electromagnetic properties of the material is measured.

  5. NMR solution structure of the N-terminal domain of hERG and its interaction with the S4-S5 linker

    SciTech Connect

    Li, Qingxin; Gayen, Shovanlal; Chen, Angela Shuyi; Huang, Qiwei; Raida, Manfred; Kang, CongBao

    2010-12-03

    Research highlights: {yields} The N-terminal domain (NTD, eag domain) containing 135 residues of hERG was expressed and purified from E. coli cells. {yields} Solution structure of NTD was determined with NMR spectroscopy. {yields} The alpha-helical region (residues 13-23) was demonstrated to possess the characteristics of an amphipathic helix. {yields} NMR titration confirmed the interaction between NTD and the peptide from the S4-S5 linker. -- Abstract: The human Ether-a-go-go Related Gene (hERG) potassium channel mediates the rapid delayed rectifier current (IKr) in the cardiac action potential. Mutations in the 135 amino acid residue N-terminal domain (NTD) cause channel dysfunction or mis-translocation. To study the structure of NTD, it was overexpressed and purified from Escherichia coli cells using affinity purification and gel filtration chromatography. The purified protein behaved as a monomer under purification conditions. Far- and near-UV, circular dichroism (CD) and solution nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) studies showed that the purified protein was well-folded. The solution structure of NTD was obtained and the N-terminal residues 13-23 forming an amphipathic helix which may be important for the protein-protein or protein-membrane interactions. NMR titration experiment also demonstrated that residues from 88 to 94 in NTD are important for the molecular interaction with the peptide derived from the S4-S5 linker.

  6. THE RESONANT TRANS-NEPTUNIAN POPULATIONS

    SciTech Connect

    Gladman, B.; Lawler, S. M.; Van Laerhoven, C.; Petit, J.-M.; Rousselot, P.; Kavelaars, J.; Jones, R. L.; Parker, J. Wm.; Bieryla, A.; Nicholson, P.; Ashby, M. L. N.

    2012-07-15

    The trans-Neptunian objects (TNOs) trapped in mean-motion resonances with Neptune were likely emplaced there during planet migration late in the giant-planet formation process. We perform detailed modeling of the resonant objects detected in the Canada-France Ecliptic Plane Survey (CFEPS) in order to provide population estimates and, for some resonances, constrain the complex internal orbital element distribution. Detection biases play a critical role because phase relationships with Neptune make object discovery more likely at certain longitudes. This paper discusses the 3:2, 5:2, 2:1, 3:1, 5:1, 4:3, 5:3, 7:3, 5:4, and 7:4 mean-motion resonances, all of which had CFEPS detections, along with our upper limit on 1:1 Neptune Trojans (which is consistent with their small population estimated elsewhere). For the plutinos (TNOs in the 3:2 resonance) we refine the orbital element distribution given by Kavelaars et al. in 2009 and show that steep H-magnitude distributions (N(H){proportional_to}10{sup {alpha}H}, with {alpha} = 0.8-0.9) are favored in the range H{sub g} = 8-9, and confirm that this resonance does not share the inclination distribution of the classical Kuiper Belt. We give the first population estimate for the 5:2 resonance and find that, to within the uncertainties, the population is equal to that of the 3:2 ({approx_equal}13,000 TNOs with H{sub g} < 9.16), whereas the 2:1 population is smaller by a factor of 3-4 compared to the other two resonances. We also measure significant populations inhabiting the 4:3, 5:3, 7:3, 5:4, 7:4, 3:1, and 5:1 resonances, with H{sub g} < 9.16 (D > 100 km) populations in the thousands. We compare our intrinsic population and orbital element distributions with several published models of resonant-TNO production; the most striking discrepancy is that resonances beyond the 2:1 are in reality more heavily populated than in published models.

  7. Assimilation of planets by red giant stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carlberg, Joleen Karen

    The typical red giant star rotates slowly. This characteristic is expected from the conservation of angular momentum as these stars expand during their evolution. Nevertheless, a small percentage of red giant stars are rapidly rotating. One possible source of these stars' excess angular momenta is the orbital angular momentum of a planetary companion. The transfer of orbital angular momentum to the stellar envelope decays the planet's orbit, ultimately leading to the rapid in-spiral of the planet into the star. Using the known sample of exoplanets around main sequence host stars, I simulated both the future evolution of these stars and the expected interactions with their planets and found that Jupiter-mass planets residing at inner solar system distances---relatively common in exoplanetary systems---can contribute enough angular momentum to cause rapid rotation in their host stars during the red giant phase. Gas giant planets are also massive enough to alter the chemical composition of their host stars' envelopes when they are accreted. The central experiment of this thesis is to search for abundance anomalies in the rapid rotators that could be indicative of planet accretion. Hypothetical anomalies include the replenishment of light elements that are diluted by giant stars during first dredge-up (such as the stellar surface abundance of lithium), changes in isotopic abundance ratios that were altered by nucleosynthesis (such as increasing the stellar surface 12C/13C), and the preferential enhancement of refractory elements (indicative of the accretion of chemically fractionated material such as a planet). To increase the total number of known rapid rotators, I measured rotational velocities in a large database of spectra collected for the Grid Giant Star Survey developed for NASA's Space Interferometry Mission's astrometric grid. The 28 new rapid rotators discovered in this sample were combined with rapid rotators from the literature and a control sample of slow

  8. Asymmetry in the triplet 3p-4s Mg lines in cool DZ white dwarfs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Allard, N. F.; Leininger, T.; Gadéa, F. X.; Brousseau-Couture, V.; Dufour, P.

    2016-04-01

    The purpose of the present work is to make an exhaustive study of the line shape of the triplet 3p-4s Mg line (Mgb triplet), which is perturbed by He in the extreme physical conditions found in the cool atmosphere of DZ white dwarfs. This study is undertaken by inferring both a unified theory of spectral line broadening and ab initio potential energies. Cool white dwarfs require a specific treatment for line broadening owing to the high helium densities that are involved. Beyond the conventional symmetrical Lorentzian core at low density, we show that the line profiles are asymmetrical and have significant additional contributions on the short wavelength side. This blue asymmetry is a consequence of low maxima in the corresponding Mg-He potential energy difference curves at short and intermediate internuclear distances. The new profiles are shown to provide a good fit to an SDSS (Sloan Digital Sky Survey) observation.

  9. Superconducting properties of Rh9In4S4 single crystals

    DOE PAGES

    Kaluarachchi, Udhara S.; Lin, Qisheng; Xie, Weiwei; ...

    2016-03-28

    The synthesis and crystallographic, thermodynamic, and transport properties of single crystalline Rh9In4S4 were studied. The resistivity, magnetization, and specific heat measurements all clearly indicate bulk superconductivity with a critical temperature, Tc~2.25 K. The Sommerfeld coefficient γ and the Debye temperature (ΘD) were found to be 34 mJ mol–1 K–2 and 217 K, respectively. The observed specific heat jump, ΔC/γTc=1.66, is larger than the expected BCS weak coupling value of 1.43. Ginzburg-Landau (GL) ratio of the low-temperature GL-penetration depth, λGL≈5750 Å, to the GL-coherence length, ξGL≈94 Å, is large: κ ~60. However, we observed a peak effect in the resistivity measurementmore » as a function of both temperature and magnetic field.« less

  10. Photoluminescence of Giant Quantum Dots Coupled With Waveguide Modes of Plasmonic Gap Bar Nanoantennas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Feng; Nguyen, Hue-Minh; Karan, Niladri; Ghosh, Yagnaseni; Sheehan, Chris; Hollingsworth, Jennifer; Htoon, Han

    2015-03-01

    We designed a plasmonic gap bar nanoantenna, which is in resonances with the emission band of silica-coated giant-CdSe/CdS quantum dots. This antenna is composed of two parallel gold nano-bars with 40 nm gap fabricated on top of a 20 nm thick gold film and glass substrate. Utilizing two-step e-beam lithography process, we have fabricated this antenna and integrated the single silica-coated giant quantum dots into the gap. The enhanced emission rate and emission polarization have been studied for quantum dots placed at different positions along the gap bar antennas. The use of silica shell suppressed the energy transfer quenching from giant quantum dots to metal. Therefore, the detected lifetime shortening by a factor of 8 is purely resulted from the enhancement of decay rate. Experimental measurements also show that the photoluminescence intensity with polarization perpendicular to the bar can be 9 times stronger than along the bar, leading to a linear polarization degree of 0.8. Strong modulation of emission spectra has also been observed. Numerical simulations indicate that the strong linear polarization and the spectral modulation could be due to the emission coupling with the plasmonic waveguide modes.

  11. Resonance beyond frequency-matching: multidimensional resonance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Zhenyu; Li, Mingzhe; Wang, Ruifang

    2017-03-01

    Resonance, conventionally defined as the oscillation of a system when the temporal frequency of an external stimulus matches a natural frequency of the system, is important in both fundamental physics and applied disciplines. However, the spatial character of oscillation is not considered in this definition. We reveal the creation of spatial resonance when the stimulus matches the space pattern of a normal mode in an oscillating system. The complete resonance, which we call multidimensional resonance, should be a combination of both the temporal and the spatial resonance. We further elucidate that the spin wave produced by multidimensional resonance drives considerably faster reversal of the vortex core in a magnetic nanodisc. Multidimensional resonance provides insight into the nature of wave dynamics and opens the door to novel applications.

  12. A Large-scale Relativistic Configuration-interaction Approach: Application to the 4s2 - 4s4p Transition Energies and E1 Rates for Zn-like Ions

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, M H; Cheng, K T

    2009-08-28

    Relativistic configuration-interaction calculations of the 4s4p excitation energies and 4s{sup 2} - 4s4p E1 transitions for Zn-like ions from Z = 30 to 92 are shown. B-spline basis functions are used for these large-scale calculations. QED corrections to the excitation energies are also calculated. Results are in good agreement with other theories and with experiment, and demonstrate the utility of this method for high-precision atomic structure calculations not just for few-electron systems but also for large atomic systems such as Zn-like ions along the entire isoelectronic sequence.

  13. Hilda Asteroid Colors: Insight into Giant Planet Migration?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sharkey, Benjamin; Ryan, Erin L.; Woodward, Charles E.; Noll, Keith S.

    2016-01-01

    The Hilda asteroids are a unique population of small bodies that are locked in a 3:2 mean motion resonance with Jupiter. Unlike other resonances in the asteroid belt, the 3:2 is a stable resonance at 3.95 AU. Objects at this resonance have stable orbits for at least 2 GYr and, more likely, for the age of the Solar System. In an instantaneous top down view of the solar system, the Hildas approximately trace a triangle with over-densities of asteroids near the L3, L4 and L5 Jovian Lagrange points. This configuration is cited as evidence that Jupiter migrated inwards by ~0.4 AU. Stable Hilda orbits have mean eccentricities of 0.16 with typical perihelia of 3.15 AU. These latter properties, in terms of observability and accessibility to spacecraft, are a major advantage that distinguishes the Hildas from other populations of potential scientific interest such as the Jovian Trojans. The Outer Main Belt (OMB) also has many objects that may have originated in the outer protoplanetary disk (OPD). However, the OMB appears to be more mixed with objects from elsewhere in the Main Belt and enjoys only a small advantage in terms of brightness for a given diameter and albedo. The intrinsic collisional probability for objects in the Hilda population is also a factor of 3 to 5 less than the collisional probabilities for Trojan and OMB populations. Thus, the Hildas likely represent a significant population of objects unaltered due to collisional processing. Here we discuss findings of our ongoing NASA Planetary Astronomy program to obtain Sloan optical (g' r' i' z') colors of Hilda-group asteroids. The loci of these colors are compared to the Kuiper Belt populations to test post-formation migration effects of the giant planets in our solar system on the small body population. In part, this work was conducted as part of a University of Minnesota Undergraduate Research Scholarship, and is supported by NASA PAST Award NNX13AJ11G.

  14. Masses, widths, and leptonic widths of the higher upsilon resonances

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lovelock, D. M.; Horstkotte, J. E.; Klopfenstein, C.; Lee-Franzini, J.; Romero, L.; Schamberger, R. D.; Youssef, S.; Franzini, P.; Son, D.; Tuts, P. M.; Zhao, T.; Herb, S.; Dietl, H.; Eigen, G.; Fonseca, V.; Lorenz, E.; Mageras, G.; Han, K.; Imlay, R.; Metcalf, W.; Sreedhar, V.

    1985-02-01

    The masses, total widths, and leptonic widths of three triplet s-wave bb¯ states Υ(4S), Υ(5S), and Υ(6S) are determined from measurements of the e+e- annihilation cross section into hadrons for 10.55resonances are identified from potential model results and their properties are obtained with the help of a simplified coupled-channels calculation. We find M(4S)=10.577 GeV, Γ(4S)=25 MeV, Γee(4S)=0.28 keV; M(5S)=10.845 GeV, Γ(5S)=110 MeV, Γee(5S)=0.37 keV; M(6S)=11.02 GeV, Γ(6S)=90 MeV, Γee(6S)=0.16 keV.

  15. STATISTICAL STUDY OF THE EARLY SOLAR SYSTEM'S INSTABILITY WITH FOUR, FIVE, AND SIX GIANT PLANETS

    SciTech Connect

    Nesvorny, David; Morbidelli, Alessandro

    2012-10-01

    Several properties of the solar system, including the wide radial spacing and orbital eccentricities of giant planets, can be explained if the early solar system evolved through a dynamical instability followed by migration of planets in the planetesimal disk. Here we report the results of a statistical study, in which we performed nearly 10{sup 4} numerical simulations of planetary instability starting from hundreds of different initial conditions. We found that the dynamical evolution is typically too violent, if Jupiter and Saturn start in the 3:2 resonance, leading to ejection of at least one ice giant from the solar system. Planet ejection can be avoided if the mass of the transplanetary disk of planetesimals was large (M{sub disk} {approx}> 50 M{sub Earth}), but we found that a massive disk would lead to excessive dynamical damping (e.g., final e{sub 55} {approx}< 0.01 compared to present e{sub 55} = 0.044, where e{sub 55} is the amplitude of the fifth eccentric mode in the Jupiter's orbit), and to smooth migration that violates constraints from the survival of the terrestrial planets. Better results were obtained when the solar system was assumed to have five giant planets initially, and one ice giant, with mass comparable to that of Uranus and Neptune, was ejected into interstellar space by Jupiter. The best results were obtained when the ejected planet was placed into the external 3:2 or 4:3 resonance with Saturn and M{sub disk} {approx_equal} 20 M{sub Earth}. The range of possible outcomes is rather broad in this case, indicating that the present solar system is neither a typical nor expected result for a given initial state, and occurs, in best cases, with only a {approx_equal}5% probability (as defined by the success criteria described in the main text). The case with six giant planets shows interesting dynamics but does offer significant advantages relative to the five-planet case.

  16. Observation of Upsilon(4S) decays to pi(+)pi(-)Upsilon(1S) and pi(+)pi(-)Upsilon(2S).

    PubMed

    Aubert, B; Barate, R; Bona, M; Boutigny, D; Couderc, F; Karyotakis, Y; Lees, J P; Poireau, V; Tisserand, V; Zghiche, A; Grauges, E; Palano, A; Chen, J C; Qi, N D; Rong, G; Wang, P; Zhu, Y S; Eigen, G; Ofte, I; Stugu, B; Abrams, G S; Battaglia, M; Brown, D N; Button-Shafer, J; Cahn, R N; Charles, E; Gill, M S; Groysman, Y; Jacobsen, R G; Kadyk, J A; Kerth, L T; Kolomensky, Yu G; Kukartsev, G; Lynch, G; Mir, L M; Oddone, P J; Orimoto, T J; Pripstein, M; Roe, N A; Ronan, M T; Wenzel, W A; Barrett, M; Ford, K E; Harrison, T J; Hart, A J; Hawkes, C M; Morgan, S E; Watson, A T; Goetzen, K; Held, T; Koch, H; Lewandowski, B; Pelizaeus, M; Peters, K; Schroeder, T; Steinke, M; Boyd, J T; Burke, J P; Cottingham, W N; Walker, D; Cuhadar-Donszelmann, T; Fulsom, B G; Hearty, C; Knecht, N S; Mattison, T S; McKenna, J A; Khan, A; Kyberd, P; Saleem, M; Teodorescu, L; Blinov, V E; Bukin, A D; Druzhinin, V P; Golubev, V B; Onuchin, A P; Serednyakov, S I; Skovpen, Yu I; Solodov, E P; Todyshev, K Yu; Best, D S; Bondioli, M; Bruinsma, M; Chao, M; Curry, S; Eschrich, I; Kirkby, D; Lankford, A J; Lund, P; Mandelkern, M; Mommsen, R K; Roethel, W; Stoker, D P; Abachi, S; Buchanan, C; Foulkes, S D; Gary, J W; Long, O; Shen, B C; Wang, K; Zhang, L; Hadavand, H K; Hill, E J; Paar, H P; Rahatlou, S; Sharma, V; Berryhill, J W; Campagnari, C; Cunha, A; Dahmes, B; Hong, T M; Kovalskyi, D; Richman, J D; Beck, T W; Eisner, A M; Flacco, C J; Heusch, C A; Kroseberg, J; Lockman, W S; Nesom, G; Schalk, T; Schumm, B A; Seiden, A; Spradlin, P; Williams, D C; Wilson, M G; Albert, J; Chen, E; Dvoretskii, A; Hitlin, D G; Narsky, I; Piatenko, T; Porter, F C; Ryd, A; Samuel, A; Andreassen, R; Mancinelli, G; Meadows, B T; Sokoloff, M D; Blanc, F; Bloom, P C; Chen, S; Ford, W T; Hirschauer, J F; Kreisel, A; Nauenberg, U; Olivas, A; Ruddick, W O; Smith, J G; Ulmer, K A; Wagner, S R; Zhang, J; Chen, A; Eckhart, E A; Soffer, A; Toki, W H; Wilson, R J; Winklmeier, F; Zeng, Q; Altenburg, D D; Feltresi, E; Hauke, A; Jasper, H; Spaan, B; Brandt, T; Klose, V; Lacker, H M; Mader, W F; Nogowski, R; Petzold, A; Schubert, J; Schubert, K R; Schwierz, R; Sundermann, J E; Volk, A; Bernard, D; Bonneaud, G R; Grenier, P; Latour, E; Thiebaux, Ch; Verderi, M; Bard, D J; Clark, P J; Gradl, W; Muheim, F; Playfer, S; Robertson, A I; Xie, Y; Andreotti, M; Bettoni, D; Bozzi, C; Calabrese, R; Cibinetto, G; Luppi, E; Negrini, M; Petrella, A; Piemontese, L; Prencipe, E; Anulli, F; Baldini-Ferroli, R; Calcaterra, A; de Sangro, R; Finocchiaro, G; Pacetti, S; Patteri, P; Peruzzi, I M; Piccolo, M; Rama, M; Zallo, A; Buzzo, A; Capra, R; Contri, R; Lo Vetere, M; Macri, M M; Monge, M R; Passaggio, S; Patrignani, C; Robutti, E; Santroni, A; Tosi, S; Brandenburg, G; Chaisanguanthum, K S; Morii, M; Wu, J; Dubitzky, R S; Marks, J; Schenk, S; Uwer, U; Bhimji, W; Bowerman, D A; Dauncey, P D; Egede, U; Flack, R L; Gaillard, J R; Nash, J A; Nikolich, M B; Panduro Vazquez, W; Chai, X; Charles, M J; Mallik, U; Meyer, N T; Ziegler, V; Cochran, J; Crawley, H B; Dong, L; Eyges, V; Meyer, W T; Prell, S; Rosenberg, E I; Rubin, A E; Gritsan, A V; Fritsch, M; Schott, G; Arnaud, N; Davier, M; Grosdidier, G; Höcker, A; Le Diberder, F; Lepeltier, V; Lutz, A M; Oyanguren, A; Pruvot, S; Rodier, S; Roudeau, P; Schune, M H; Stocchi, A; Wang, W F; Wormser, G; Cheng, C H; Lange, D J; Wright, D M; Chavez, C A; Forster, I J; Fry, J R; Gabathuler, E; Gamet, R; George, K A; Hutchcroft, D E; Payne, D J; Schofield, K C; Touramanis, C; Bevan, A J; Di Lodovico, F; Menges, W; Sacco, R; Brown, C L; Cowan, G; Flaecher, H U; Hopkins, D A; Jackson, P S; McMahon, T R; Ricciardi, S; Salvatore, F; Brown, D N; Davis, C L; Allison, J; Barlow, N R; Barlow, R J; Chia, Y M; Edgar, C L; Kelly, M P; Lafferty, G D; Naisbit, M T; Williams, J C; Yi, J I; Chen, C; Hulsbergen, W D; Jawahery, A; Lae, C K; Roberts, D A; Simi, G; Blaylock, G; Dallapiccola, C; Hertzbach, S S; Li, X; Moore, T B; Saremi, S; Staengle, H; Willocq, S Y; Cowan, R; Koeneke, K; Sciolla, G; Sekula, S J; Spitznagel, M; Taylor, F; Yamamoto, R K; Kim, H; Patel, P M; Robertson, S H; Lazzaro, A; Lombardo, V; Palombo, F; Bauer, J M; Cremaldi, L; Eschenburg, V; Godang, R; Kroeger, R; Reidy, J; Sanders, D A; Summers, D J; Zhao, H W; Brunet, S; Côté, D; Taras, P; Viaud, F B; Nicholson, H; Cavallo, N; De Nardo, G; Del Re, D; Fabozzi, F; Gatto, C; Lista, L; Monorchio, D; Paolucci, P; Piccolo, D; Sciacca, C; Baak, M; Bulten, H; Raven, G; Snoek, H L; Jessop, C P; Losecco, J M; Allmendinger, T; Benelli, G; Gan, K K; Honscheid, K; Hufnagel, D; Jackson, P D; Kagan, H; Kass, R; Pulliam, T; Rahimi, A M; Ter-Antonyan, R; Wong, Q K; Blount, N L; Brau, J; Frey, R; Igonkina, O; Lu, M; Potter, C T; Rahmat, R; Sinev, N B; Strom, D; Strube, J; Torrence, E; Galeazzi, F; Gaz, A; Margoni, M; Morandin, M; Pompili, A; Posocco, M; Rotondo, M; Simonetto, F; Stroili, R; Voci, C; Benayoun, M; Chauveau, J; David, P; Del Buono, L; de la Vaissière, Ch; Hamon, O; Hartfiel, B L; John, M J J; Malclès, J; Ocariz, J; Roos, L; Therin, G; Behera, P K; Gladney, L; Panetta, J; Biasini, M; Covarelli, R; Pioppi, M; Angelini, C; Batignani, G; Bettarini, S; Bucci, F; Calderini, G; Carpinelli, M; Cenci, R; Forti, F; Giorgi, M A; Lusiani, A; Marchiori, G; Mazur, M A; Morganti, M; Neri, N; Rizzo, G; Walsh, J; Haire, M; Judd, D; Wagoner, D E; Biesiada, J; Danielson, N; Elmer, P; Lau, Y P; Lu, C; Olsen, J; Smith, A J S; Telnov, A V; Bellini, F; Cavoto, G; D'Orazio, A; Di Marco, E; Faccini, R; Ferrarotto, F; Ferroni, F; Gaspero, M; Li Gioi, L; Mazzoni, M A; Morganti, S; Piredda, G; Polci, F; Safai Tehrani, F; Voena, C; Ebert, M; Schröder, H; Waldi, R; Adye, T; De Groot, N; Franek, B; Olaiya, E O; Wilson, F F; Emery, S; Gaidot, A; Ganzhur, S F; Hamel de Monchenault, G; Kozanecki, W; Legendre, M; Vasseur, G; Yèche, Ch; Zito, M; Park, W; Purohit, M V; Wilson, J R; Allen, M T; Aston, D; Bartoldus, R; Bechtle, P; Berger, N; Boyarski, A M; Claus, R; Coleman, J P; Convery, M R; Cristinziani, M; Dingfelder, J C; Dong, D; Dorfan, J; Dubois-Felsmann, G P; Dujmic, D; Dunwoodie, W; Field, R C; Glanzman, T; Gowdy, S J; Graham, M T; Halyo, V; Hast, C; Hryn'ova, T; Innes, W R; Kelsey, M H; Kim, P; Kocian, M L; Leith, D W G S; Li, S; Libby, J; Luitz, S; Luth, V; Lynch, H L; Macfarlane, D B; Marsiske, H; Messner, R; Muller, D R; O'grady, C P; Ozcan, V E; Perl, M; Perazzo, A; Ratcliff, B N; Roodman, A; Salnikov, A A; Schindler, R H; Schwiening, J; Snyder, A; Stelzer, J; Su, D; Sullivan, M K; Suzuki, K; Swain, S K; Thompson, J M; Va'vra, J; van Bakel, N; Weaver, M; Weinstein, A J R; Wisniewski, W J; Wittgen, M; Wright, D H; Yarritu, A K; Yi, K; Young, C C; Burchat, P R; Edwards, A J; Majewski, S A; Petersen, B A; Roat, C; Wilden, L; Ahmed, S; Alam, M S; Bula, R; Ernst, J A; Jain, V; Pan, B; Saeed, M A; Wappler, F R; Zain, S B; Bugg, W; Krishnamurthy, M; Spanier, S M; Eckmann, R; Ritchie, J L; Satpathy, A; Schilling, C J; Schwitters, R F; Izen, J M; Kitayama, I; Lou, X C; Ye, S; Bianchi, F; Gallo, F; Gamba, D; Bomben, M; Bosisio, L; Cartaro, C; Cossutti, F; Della Ricca, G; Dittongo, S; Grancagnolo, S; Lanceri, L; Vitale, L; Azzolini, V; Martinez-Vidal, F; Banerjee, Sw; Bhuyan, B; Brown, C M; Fortin, D; Hamano, K; Kowalewski, R; Nugent, I M; Roney, J M; Sobie, R J; Back, J J; Harrison, P F; Latham, T E; Mohanty, G B; Pappagallo, M; Band, H R; Chen, X; Cheng, B; Dasu, S; Datta, M; Eichenbaum, A M; Flood, K T; Hollar, J J; Kutter, P E; Li, H; Liu, R; Mellado, B; Mihalyi, A; Mohapatra, A K; Pan, Y; Pierini, M; Prepost, R; Tan, P; Wu, S L; Yu, Z; Neal, H

    2006-06-16

    Observation of Upsilon(4S) decays to pi(+)pi(-)C and pi(+)pi(-)Upsilon(2S)We present the first measurement of Upsilon(4S) decays to pi(+)pi(-)Upsilon(1S) based on a sample of 230 x 106(4S) mesons collected with the BABAR detector. We measure the product branching fractions Beta(Upsilon(4S) --> pi(+)pi(-)Upsilon(1S)) x BetaUpsilon(1S) --> mu(+)mu(-) = (2.23 +/- 0.25(stat) +/- 0.27(syst))x 10(-6) and Beta(Upsilon(4S) --> pi(+)pi(-)Upsilon(2S) x Beta(Upsilon(2S) --> mu(+)mu(-))=(1.69 +/-0.26(stat) +/- 0.20(syst)) x 10(-)6, from which we derive the partial widths Gamma(Upsilon(4S) --> pi(+)pi(-)Upsilon(1S))=(1.8 +/-0.4) keV and Gamma(Upsilon(4S) --> pi(+)pi(-)Upsilon(2S))=(2.7 +/- 0.8) keV.

  17. Creating an Isotopically Similar Earth and Moon from a Giant Impact with Correct Angular Momentum

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sumpter, William

    2017-01-01

    The giant-impact hypothesis is the dominant theory as to how the Earth-Moon system was formed, but angular momentum concerns have cast a shadow on its validity. Computer generated impacts have been successful in producing virtual Earth-Moon systems that possess many of the properties of the observed system, but when tasked with addressing the isotopic similarities between the Earth and Moon they result in systems with excessive angular momentum. Evection resonance between the Moon and the Sun has been put forth as a means of removing the excess angular momentum, but this reasoning was rejected by The Royal Society at a special session called to discuss the origin of the Moon. We show here how to use impactor spins to create an impact that preserves all the favorable aspects of previous simulations and produces an Earth-Moon system with the correct angular momentum. Evection resonance is not needed.

  18. Simultaneous formation of solar system giant planets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guilera, O. M.; Fortier, A.; Brunini, A.; Benvenuto, O. G.

    2011-08-01

    Context. In the last few years, the so-called "Nice model" has become increasingly significant for studying the formation and evolution of the solar system. According to this model, the initial orbital configuration of the giant planets was much more compact than the one we observe today. Aims: We study the formation of the giant planets in connection with several parameters that describe the protoplanetary disk. We aim to establish which conditions enable their simultaneous formation in line with the initial configuration proposed by the Nice model. We focus on the conditions that lead to the simultaneous formation of two massive cores, corresponding to Jupiter and Saturn, which are able to reach the cross-over mass (where the mass of the envelope of the giant planet equals the mass of the core, and gaseous runway starts), while two other cores that correspond to Uranus and Neptune have to be able to grow to their current masses. Methods: We compute the in situ planetary formation, employing the numerical code introduced in our previous work for different density profiles of the protoplanetary disk. Planetesimal migration is taken into account and planetesimals are considered to follow a size distribution between r_pmin (free parameter) and r_pmax= 100 km. The core's growth is computed according to the oligarchic growth regime. Results: The simultaneous formation of the giant planets was successfully completed for several initial conditions of the disk. We find that for protoplanetary disks characterized by a power law (Σ ∝ r - p), flat surface density profiles (p ≤ 1.5) favor the simultaneous formation. However, for steep slopes (p 2, as previously proposed by other authors) the simultaneous formation of the solar system giant planets is unlikely. Conclusions: The simultaneous formation of the giant planets - in the context of the Nice model - is favored by flat surface density profiles. The formation time-scale agrees with the estimates of disk lifetimes if

  19. Giant many-body effects in liquid ammonia absorption spectrum.

    PubMed

    Ziaei, Vafa; Bredow, Thomas

    2016-11-07

    In the present work, we accurately calculate the absorption spectrum of liquid ammonia up to 13 eV using many-body perturbation approach. The electronic bandgap of liquid NH3 is perfectly described as the combination of density functional theory, Coulomb-hole screened exchange, and G0W0 approximation to the electronic self-energy, yielding a direct gap (Γ → Γ) of 7.71 eV, fully consistent with the experimentally measured gap from photo-emission spectroscopy. With respect to the NH3 optical properties, the entire spectrum in particular the low lying first absorption band is extremely affected by electron-hole interactions, leading to a fundamental redistribution of spectral weights of the independent-particle spectrum. Three well separated but broad main peaks are identified at 7.0, 9.8, and 11.8 eV with steadily increasing intensities in excellent agreement with the experimental data. Furthermore, we observe a giant net blue-shift of the first absorption peak of about 1.4 eV from gaseous to liquid phase as the direct consequence of many-body effects, allowing the associated liquid ammonia absorption band exciton to delocalize and feel more effectively the repulsion effects imposed by the surrounding solvent shells. Further, the spectrum is insensitive to the coupling of resonant and anti-resonant contributions. Concerning electronic response structure of liquid NH3, it is most sensitive to excitations at energies lower than its electronic gap.

  20. A Nitrogen-Fixing Subunit Essential for Accumulating 4Fe-4S-Containing Photosystem I Core Proteins1[OPEN

    PubMed Central

    Nath, Krishna; Wessendorf, Ryan L.

    2016-01-01

    Nitrogen-fixation-subunit-U (NFU)-type proteins have been shown to be involved in the biogenesis of iron-sulfur clusters. We investigated the molecular function of a chloroplastic NFU-type iron-sulfur scaffold protein, NFU3, in Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana) using genetics approaches. Loss-of-function mutations in the NFU3 gene caused yellow pigmentation in leaves, reductions in plant size, leaf size, and growth rate, delay in flowering and seeding, and decreases in seed production. Biochemical and physiological analyses indicated that these defects are due to the substantial reductions in the abundances of 4Fe-4S-containing photosystem I (PSI) core subunits PsaA (where Psa stands for PSI), PsaB, and PsaC and a nearly complete loss of PSI activity. In addition to the substantial decreases in the amounts of PSI core proteins, the content of 3Fe-4S-containing ferredoxin-dependent glutamine oxoglutarate aminotransferases declined significantly in the nfu3 mutants. Furthermore, the absorption spectrum of the recombinant NFU3 protein showed features characteristic of 4Fe-4S and 3Fe-4S clusters, and the in vitro reconstitution experiment indicated an iron-sulfur scaffold function of NFU3. These data demonstrate that NFU3 is involved in the assembly and transfer of 4Fe-4S and 3Fe-4S clusters and that NFU3 is required for the accumulation of 4Fe-4S- and 3Fe-4S-containing proteins, especially 4Fe-4S-containing PSI core subunits, in the Arabidopsis chloroplast. PMID:27784767

  1. Giant oil fields of the Gulf Coast area

    SciTech Connect

    Haeberle, F.R.

    1993-09-01

    The 134 giant fields in the Gulf Coastal area contain 29% of the total giant-field reserves. Cumulative production is 32% of the giant-field cumulative total and 20% of the United States cumulative production. Eighty-nine of the giant fields are offshore with 22% of the reserves, 11 fields are in east Texas with 24% of the reserves, and 1 field is in Florida with 1% of the reserves. In 106 of the giant fields the primary producing interval is Cenozoic with 65% of the reserves, and in 28 giant fields the producing interval is Mesozoic with 35% of the reserves. The primary producing interval is Mesozoic with 35% of the reserves. The primary producing interval in 124 giant fields consists of clastics with 91% of the reserves, in 7 fields the primary lithology is carbonates with 6% of the reserves, and in 3 giant fields the lithology is mixed clastics and carbonates. A total of 127 fields are in structural traps with all of the reserves, 4 fields are stratigraphic traps (3%) with 18% of the reserves, and 3 fields are combination traps with 1% of the reserves. Over 50 of the giant oil fields in structural traps are salt domes. The most prevalent types of giant fields in the Gulf Coastal area are onshore structural traps with Cenozoic clastics as the primary producing intervals.

  2. Giant moving vortex mass in thick magnetic nanodots

    PubMed Central

    Guslienko, K. Y.; Kakazei, G. N.; Ding, J.; Liu, X. M.; Adeyeye, A. O.

    2015-01-01

    Magnetic vortex is one of the simplest topologically non-trivial textures in condensed matter physics. It is the ground state of submicron magnetic elements (dots) of different shapes: cylindrical, square etc. So far, the vast majority of the vortex dynamics studies were focused on thin dots with thickness 5–50 nm and only uniform across the thickness vortex excitation modes were observed. Here we explore the fundamental vortex mode in relatively thick (50–100 nm) dots using broadband ferromagnetic resonance and show that dimensionality increase leads to qualitatively new excitation spectra. We demonstrate that the fundamental mode frequency cannot be explained without introducing a giant vortex mass, which is a result of the vortex distortion due to interaction with spin waves. The vortex mass depends on the system geometry and is non-local because of important role of the dipolar interaction. The mass is rather small for thin dots. However, its importance increases drastically with the dot thickness increasing. PMID:26355430

  3. Cavity- and waveguide-resonators in electron paramagnetic resonance, nuclear magnetic resonance, and magnetic resonance imaging.

    PubMed

    Webb, Andrew

    2014-11-01

    Cavity resonators are widely used in electron paramagnetic resonance, very high field magnetic resonance microimaging and also in high field human imaging. The basic principles and designs of different forms of cavity resonators including rectangular, cylindrical, re-entrant, cavity magnetrons, toroidal cavities and dielectric resonators are reviewed. Applications in EPR and MRI are summarized, and finally the topic of traveling wave MRI using the magnet bore as a waveguide is discussed.

  4. Interaction of Rydberg atoms in circular states with the alkaline-earth Ca(4s{sup 2}) and Sr(5s{sup 2}) atoms

    SciTech Connect

    Mironchuk, E. S.; Narits, A. A.; Lebedev, V. S.

    2015-11-15

    The resonant mechanism of interaction of alkaline-earth atoms having a low electron affinity to Rydberg atoms in circular (l = vertical bar m vertical bar = n–1) and near-circular states has been studied. To describe the dynamics of resonant processes accompanied by nonadiabatic transitions between ionic and Rydberg covalent terms of a quasimolecule, an approach based on the integration of coupled equations for the probability amplitudes has been developed taking into account the possibility of the decay of an anion in the Coulomb field of the positive ionic core of a highly excited atom. The approach involves the specific features of the problem associated with the structure of the wavefunction of a Rydberg electron in states with high orbital angular momenta l ∼ n–1. This approach provides a much more accurate description of the dynamics of electronic transitions at collisions between atoms than that within the modified semiclassical Landau–Zener model. In addition, this approach makes it possible to effectively take into account many channels of the problem. The cross sections for resonant quenching of Rydberg states of the Li(nlm) atom with given principal n, orbital l = n–1, and magnetic m quantum numbers at thermal collisions with the Ca(4s{sup 2}) and Sr(5s{sup 2}) atoms have been calculated. The dependences of the results on n, m, and angle α between the relative velocity of the atoms and the normal to the plane of the orbit of the Rydberg electron have been obtained. The influence of orientational effects on the efficiency of the collisional destruction of circular and near-circular states has been studied. The results indicate a higher stability of such states to their perturbations by neutral particles as compared to usually studied nl states with low values of l (l ≪ n)

  5. Treatment of giant congenital cysts of the midline in adults: Report of two cases and review of the literature

    PubMed Central

    Lauretti, Liverana; Mattogno, Pier Paolo; Bianchi, Federico; Pallini, Roberto; Fernandez, Eduardo; Doglietto, Francesco

    2015-01-01

    Background: Giant cysts of the midline, not associated to a tumor, are exceptional finding in the brain of adults. Here we present two cases of symptomatic giant cerebral cysts of the midline occurred in an elderly and in a young adult patients both treated with mini-invasive unilateral neuroendoscopic procedure. In the recent literature (since 1999) similar cases have not been reported. Beside the clinical report, review of literature and major anatomical features of the region are described. Case Description: These two adults (82 and 41 years old respectively) had a slow progressive development of headache, gait disturbances, memory impairment and urinary incontinence. Magnetic resonance imaging showed giant cyst of the midline and hydrocephalus. Surgery with the endoscopic procedure, through a right frontal burr hole, was followed by clinical and radiological improvement. Conclusion: Giant cerebral cysts of the midline in adults can be successfully treated through a neuroendoscopic monolateral approach that comprehends multiple openings, diffuse coagulation of the capsule, and careful releasing of capsule-ependyma adherences. Knowledge of major anatomical and developmental details of the septal region is necessary to avoid complication in a mini-invasive surgical procedure. PMID:26421217

  6. Lunar mascons as consequences of giant impacts

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Arkani-Hamed, J.

    1974-01-01

    An investigation is conducted regarding the effect of a giant impact on the thermal evolution of the moon. A model is proposed for the formation of the lunar mascons. The model takes into account the evidence of late volcanism during a period from about 3.7 to about 3.2 b.y. ago. It is found that a giant impact produces extensive fracturing in the region surrounding the basin and reduces the average thermal conductivity of the upper 20 km of this region by a factor of about 2. The less conductive ejecta blanket and the fractured zone behave as a thermal insulator. The lithosphere beneath the basin thickens monotonically and it becomes strong enough to support the mascon.

  7. Formation of gas and ice giant planets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boss, Alan P.

    2003-10-01

    The only presently known example of a planetary system containing a terrestrial planet in the habitable zone of a main sequence star is the Solar System. If the Solar System's giant planets formed by the generally assumed mechanism of core accretion, the Solar System probably formed in a relatively long-lived protoplanetary disk in a quiescent region of star formation, such as in the Taurus molecular cloud. However, if the giant planets formed by the more radical disk instability mechanism, then the Solar System would have formed in a region of high mass star formation, similar to the Orion Nebula Cluster or the Carina Nebula. In the latter case, the number of extrasolar planetary systems strongly resembling our own is likely to be significantly larger than in the former case, with important implications for the design of Darwin/TPF.

  8. Viral metagenomics: are we missing the giants?

    PubMed

    Halary, S; Temmam, S; Raoult, D; Desnues, C

    2016-06-01

    Amoeba-infecting giant viruses are recently discovered viruses that have been isolated from diverse environments all around the world. In parallel to isolation efforts, metagenomics confirmed their worldwide distribution from a broad range of environmental and host-associated samples, including humans, depicting them as a major component of eukaryotic viruses in nature and a possible resident of the human/animal virome whose role is still unclear. Nevertheless, metagenomics data about amoeba-infecting giant viruses still remain scarce, mainly because of methodological limitations. Efforts should be pursued both at the metagenomic sample preparation level and on in silico analyses to better understand their roles in the environment and in human/animal health and disease.

  9. Giant viruses of the Kutch Desert.

    PubMed

    Kerepesi, Csaba; Grolmusz, Vince

    2016-03-01

    The Kutch Desert (Great Rann of Kutch, Gujarat, India) is a unique ecosystem: in the larger part of the year it is a hot, salty desert that is flooded regularly in the Indian monsoon season. In the dry season, the crystallized salt deposits form the "white desert" in large regions. The first metagenomic analysis of the soil samples of Kutch was published in 2013, and the data were deposited in the NCBI Sequence Read Archive. At the same time, the sequences were analyzed phylogenetically for prokaryotes, especially for bacteria. In the present work, we identified DNA sequences of recently discovered giant viruses in the soil samples from the Kutch Desert. Since most giant viruses have been discovered in biofilms in industrial cooling towers, ocean water, and freshwater ponds, we were surprised to find their DNA sequences in soil samples from a seasonally very hot and arid, salty environment.

  10. Mass loss from warm giants: Magnetic effects

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mullan, D. J.

    1980-01-01

    Among warm giant stars, rapid mass loss sets in along a well defined velocity dividing line (VDL). Hot corona also disappear close to the VDL and thermal pressure cannot drive the observed rapid mass loss in these stars. The VDL may be associated with magnetic fields changing from closed to open. Such a change is consistent with the lack of X-rays from late-type giants. A magnetic transition locus based on Pneuman's work on helmet streamer stability agrees well with the empirical VDL. The change from closed to open fields not only makes rapid mass loss possible, but also contributes to energizing the mass loss in the form of discrete bubbles.

  11. Thermal escape from extrasolar giant planets

    PubMed Central

    Koskinen, Tommi T.; Lavvas, Panayotis; Harris, Matthew J.; Yelle, Roger V.

    2014-01-01

    The detection of hot atomic hydrogen and heavy atoms and ions at high altitudes around close-in extrasolar giant planets (EGPs) such as HD209458b implies that these planets have hot and rapidly escaping atmospheres that extend to several planetary radii. These characteristics, however, cannot be generalized to all close-in EGPs. The thermal escape mechanism and mass loss rate from EGPs depend on a complex interplay between photochemistry and radiative transfer driven by the stellar UV radiation. In this study, we explore how these processes change under different levels of irradiation on giant planets with different characteristics. We confirm that there are two distinct regimes of thermal escape from EGPs, and that the transition between these regimes is relatively sharp. Our results have implications for thermal mass loss rates from different EGPs that we discuss in the context of currently known planets and the detectability of their upper atmospheres. PMID:24664923

  12. Giant vortex state in mesoscopic superconductors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cobacy García, Luis; Giraldo, Jairo

    2005-08-01

    Using the self-consistent solution of the nonlinear Ginzburg-Landau equations, the superconducting state of a type II mesoscopic cylinder and of an infinite thin sheet with a circular hole (antidot), in the presence of an homogeneous magnetic field is studied. Close to the third critical field, the magnetic field penetrates the sample in the form of a vortex around the axis of the cylinder or of the antidot. This result has been found previously by other authors. The vortex, called a giant vortex, can carry several flux quanta. The giant vortex is persistent when the state is metastable and evolves to the so called paramagnetic Meissner effect (PME) within the cylinder. The behaviour of this effect as a function of the Ginzburg-Landau (GL) parameter is studied and the results are discussed. Gibbs free energy, order parameter and magnetic induccion as a function of the applied field and of the GL parameter are also studied.

  13. Giant radio galaxies and cosmic web

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Heinämäki, Pekka

    2016-10-01

    Giant radio galaxies create the welldistinguishable class of sources.These sources are characterized with edge-brightened radio lobes withhighly collimated radio jets and large linear sizes which make themthe largest individual structures in the Universe. They are also knownto be hosted by elliptical/disturbed host galaxies and avoid clustersand high galaxy density regions. Because of GRG, large linear sizeslobes extend well beyond the interstellar media and host galaxyhalo the evolution of the radio lobes may depend on interactionwith this environment. Using our method to extract filamentarystructure of the galaxies in our local universe we study whetherradio lobe properties in some giant radio galaxies are determinedon an interaction of this filament ambient.

  14. [Giant Meckel's diverticulum in an adult].

    PubMed

    Rivas, Tomas Contreras; Gallardo, Nasser Eluzen; Valenzuela, Sebastian King; Pezoa, María Elena Molina; Zúñiga, José Miguel; Muñoz, Carol Bustamante; Saralic, Biserka Spralja

    2014-10-07

    Meckel's diverticulum results from a partial persistence of the omphalomesenteric duct and is the most common congenital anomaly of the gastrointestinal tract, affecting about 2% of the general population. Its presentation as a giant Meckel's diverticulum (>5 cm) is rare and is associated with major complications. We report a case of a 53 year-old woman with constipation for at least ten years. A colonoscopy from eight years ago suggested megacolon. The patient consults in the last month for abdominal pain associated with anorexia. The computed tomography scan image suggested an ileal megadiverticulum. An exploratory laparotomy revealed a saccular dilatation of the distal ileum of 6 x 15.5 cm, located 20 cm away from the ileocecal valve. We resected the involved segment of distal ileum and performed a manual ileo-ascendo anastomosis. The biopsy showed a saccular dilatation of the wall, lined by small intestinal mucosa with areas of gastric metaplasia, supporting the diagnosis of giant Meckel's diverticulum.

  15. Thermal escape from extrasolar giant planets.

    PubMed

    Koskinen, Tommi T; Lavvas, Panayotis; Harris, Matthew J; Yelle, Roger V

    2014-04-28

    The detection of hot atomic hydrogen and heavy atoms and ions at high altitudes around close-in extrasolar giant planets (EGPs) such as HD209458b implies that these planets have hot and rapidly escaping atmospheres that extend to several planetary radii. These characteristics, however, cannot be generalized to all close-in EGPs. The thermal escape mechanism and mass loss rate from EGPs depend on a complex interplay between photochemistry and radiative transfer driven by the stellar UV radiation. In this study, we explore how these processes change under different levels of irradiation on giant planets with different characteristics. We confirm that there are two distinct regimes of thermal escape from EGPs, and that the transition between these regimes is relatively sharp. Our results have implications for thermal mass loss rates from different EGPs that we discuss in the context of currently known planets and the detectability of their upper atmospheres.

  16. Building the giant planet cores by convergent migration of pebble-accreting embryos

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chrenko, Ondrej; Broz, Miroslav

    2016-10-01

    An explanation of the accretion buildup of giant planet cores on rather short (~Myr) time scales remains a long-standing challenge for scenarios of planetary system formation. One of the recently proposed processes that can take part during this evolutionary stage is the convergent Type I migration of Earth-sized embryos towards the zero-torque radius, occurring at an opacity transition within the dusty-gaseous protoplanetary disk (e.g. Pierens et al. 2013). Inconveniently, simulations show that such groups of embryos do not merge easily because they often get locked in mutual mean-motion resonances and consequently form an inward-migrating convoy.We revise this possibility of merging embryos while taking into account their ongoing growth by pebble accretion. Our aim is to check whether the rapid changes of masses combined with the migration of embryos through the feeding zone can break the resonant chain and allow for the giant planet core formation.The environment of the protoplanetary disk is modeled with the 2D FARGO code (Masset 2000), which we modified in order to perform non-isothermal hydrodynamic simulations, assuming flux-limited radiative diffusion (Levermore & Pomraning 1981). The embedded massive bodies are evolved simultaneously in 3D using the hybrid Wisdom-Holman/Gauss-Radau integrator from the Rebound package (Rein & Spiegel 2015). A semi-analytic method is used to evolve the masses of embryos by pebble accretion (e.g. Levison et al. 2015).

  17. Isolated giant molluscum contagiosum mimicking epidermoid cyst

    PubMed Central

    Uzuncakmak, Tugba K.; Kuru, Burce C.; Zemheri, Ebru I.; Zindanci, Ilkin; Turkoglu, Zafer; Kavala, Mukaddes

    2016-01-01

    Molluscum contagiosum is a benign cutaneous viral infection which is caused by double- stranded DNA poxvirus. It affects mainly children and young adults and usually presents with single or multiple umblicated papules or nodules on face, arms, legs and anogenital regions. It may present in atypical size and clinical appearance in patients with altered or impaired immunity and rarely in immuncompetent patients. Herein we present an immuncompetent young adult patient with isolated giant molluscum contagiosum, which was mimicking epidermoid cyst clinically. PMID:27648389

  18. Immunocytochemical study of giant cell fibroma.

    PubMed

    Campos, E; Gomez, R S

    1999-01-01

    Giant cell fibroma (GCF) is a non-neoplastic lesion of the oral mucosa. The origin of stellate and multinucleate cells of GCF is not well known. The purpose of the present article was to investigate the immunoreactivity of these cells for leukocyte common antigen, vimentin, tryptase, HLA-DR, alpha-smooth muscle actin, CD68, and S-100. The results showed positive staining only for vimentin. This suggests that the stellate and multinucleate cells of GCF have a fibroblast phenotype.

  19. Giant Pleomorphic Adenoma of the Parotid Gland.

    PubMed

    Sajid, Muhammad; Rehman, Sajid; Misbah, Junaid

    2015-10-01

    Salivary gland tumours are a relatively rare entity. Pleomorphic adenoma is the most common amongst these, comprising 60 - 70% of all parotid tumours. Pleomorphic adenomas are benign and tend to increase in size slowly. Here we are presenting a case of giant pleomorphic adenoma of the parotid, being the largest in size to be excised in Pakistan in recorded literature measuring 24 x 22 x 12 cm and weighing 1.8 kgs. Superficial parotidectomy was done with an excellent cosmetic outcome.

  20. Autoionization resonances in the photoabsorption spectra of Fe n+ iron ions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Konovalov, A. V.; Ipatov, A. N.

    2016-11-01

    The photoabsorption cross sections of a neutral iron atom, as well as positive Fe+ and Fe2+ ions, are calculated in the relativistic random-phase approximation with exchange in the energy range 20-160 eV. The wavefunctions of the ground and excited states are calculated in the single-configuration Hartree-Fock-Dirac approximation. The resultant photoabsorption spectra are compared with experimental data and with the results of calculations based on the nonrelativistic spin-polarized version of the random-phase approximation with exchange. Series of autoionization resonance peaks, as well as giant autoionization resonance lines corresponding to discrete transitions 3 p → 3 d, are clearly observed in the photoabsorption cross sections. The conformity of the positions of calculated peaks of giant autoionization resonances with experimental data is substantially improved by taking into account additionally the correlation electron-electron interaction based on the model of the dynamic polarization potential.

  1. A Quick Method to Identify Secular Resonances in Multi-planet Systems with a Binary Companion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pilat-Lohinger, E.; Bazsó, A.; Funk, B.

    2016-11-01

    Gravitational perturbations in multi-planet systems caused by an accompanying star are the subject of this investigation. Our dynamical model is based on the binary star HD 41004 AB where a giant planet orbits HD 41004 A. We modify the orbital parameters of this system and analyze the motion of a hypothetical test planet surrounding HD 41004 A on an interior orbit to the detected giant planet. Our numerical computations indicate perturbations due to mean motion and secular resonances (SRs). The locations of these resonances are usually connected to high eccentricity and highly inclined motion depending strongly on the binary-planet architecture. As the positions of mean motion resonances can easily be determined, the main purpose of this study is to present a new semi-analytical method to determine the location of an SR without huge computational effort.

  2. On the Fermi-GBM Event 0.4 s after GW150914

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Greiner, J.; Burgess, J. M.; Savchenko, V.; Yu, H.-F.

    2016-08-01

    In view of the recent report by Connaughton et al., we analyze continuous time-tagged event (TTE) data of Fermi-gamma-ray burst monitor (GBM) around the time of the gravitational-wave event GW 150914. We find that after proper accounting for low-count statistics, the GBM transient event at 0.4 s after GW 150914 is likely not due to an astrophysical source, but consistent with a background fluctuation, removing the tension between the INTEGRAL/ACS non-detection and GBM. Additionally, reanalysis of other short GRBs shows that without proper statistical modeling the fluence of faint events is over-predicted, as verified for some joint GBM-ACS detections of short GRBs. We detail the statistical procedure to correct these biases. As a result, faint short GRBs, verified by ACS detections, with significances in the broadband light curve even smaller than that of the GBM-GW150914 event are recovered as proper non-zero source, while the GBM-GW150914 event is consistent with zero fluence.

  3. Highly active metallocarboxypeptidase from newly isolated Geobacillus strain SBS-4S: cloning and characterization.

    PubMed

    Tayyab, Muhammad; Rashid, Naeem; Angkawidjaja, Clement; Kanaya, Shigenori; Akhtar, Muhammad

    2011-03-01

    The carboxypeptidase gene from Geobacillus SBS-4S was cloned and sequenced. The sequence analysis displayed the gene consists of an open reading frame of 1503 nucleotides encoding a protein of 500 amino acids (CBP(SBS)). The amino acid sequence comparison revealed that CBP(SBS) exhibited a highest homology of 41.6% (identity) with carboxypeptidase Taq from Thermus aquaticus among the characterized proteases. CBP(SBS) contained an active site motif (265)HEXXH(269) which is conserved in family-M32 of carboxypeptidases. The gene was expressed with His-Tag utilizing Escherichia coli expression system and purified to apparent homogeneity. The purified CBP(SBS) showed highest activity at pH 7.5 and 70°C. The enzyme activity was metal ion dependent. Among metal ions highest activity was found in the presence of Co(2+). Thermostability studies of CBP(SBS) by circular dichroism spectroscopy demonstrated the melting temperature of the protein around 77°C. The enzyme exhibited K(m) and V(max) values of 14 mM and 10526 μmol min(-1) mg(-1) when carbobenzoxy-alanine-arginine was used as substrate. k(cat) and k(cat)/K(m) valves were 10175 s(-1) and 726 mM(-1) s(-1). To our knowledge this is the highest ever reported enzyme activity of a metallocarboxypeptidase and the first characterization of a metallocarboxypeptidase from genus Geobacillus.

  4. Structural principles for computational and de novo design of 4Fe-4S metalloproteins.

    PubMed

    Nanda, Vikas; Senn, Stefan; Pike, Douglas H; Rodriguez-Granillo, Agustina; Hansen, Will A; Khare, Sagar D; Noy, Dror

    2016-05-01

    Iron-sulfur centers in metalloproteins can access multiple oxidation states over a broad range of potentials, allowing them to participate in a variety of electron transfer reactions and serving as catalysts for high-energy redox processes. The nitrogenase FeMoCO cluster converts di-nitrogen to ammonia in an eight-electron transfer step. The 2(Fe4S4) containing bacterial ferredoxin is an evolutionarily ancient metalloprotein fold and is thought to be a primordial progenitor of extant oxidoreductases. Controlling chemical transformations mediated by iron-sulfur centers such as nitrogen fixation, hydrogen production as well as electron transfer reactions involved in photosynthesis are of tremendous importance for sustainable chemistry and energy production initiatives. As such, there is significant interest in the design of iron-sulfur proteins as minimal models to gain fundamental understanding of complex natural systems and as lead-molecules for industrial and energy applications. Herein, we discuss salient structural characteristics of natural iron-sulfur proteins and how they guide principles for design. Model structures of past designs are analyzed in the context of these principles and potential directions for enhanced designs are presented, and new areas of iron-sulfur protein design are proposed. This article is part of a Special issue entitled Biodesign for Bioenergetics--the design and engineering of electronic transfer cofactors, protein networks, edited by Ronald L. Koder and J.L Ross Anderson.

  5. Structural, magnetic, electric, dielectric, and thermodynamic properties of multiferroic Ge V4S8

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Widmann, S.; Günther, A.; Ruff, E.; Tsurkan, V.; Krug von Nidda, H.-A.; Lunkenheimer, P.; Loidl, A.

    2016-12-01

    The lacunar spinel Ge V4S8 undergoes orbital and ferroelectric ordering at the Jahn-Teller transition around 30 K and exhibits antiferromagnetic order below about 14 K. In addition to this orbitally driven ferroelectricity, lacunar spinels are an interesting material class, as the vanadium ions form V4 clusters representing stable molecular entities with a common electron distribution and a well-defined level scheme of molecular states resulting in a unique spin state per V4 molecule. Here we report detailed x-ray, magnetic susceptibility, electrical resistivity, heat capacity, thermal expansion, and dielectric results to characterize the structural, electric, dielectric, magnetic, and thermodynamic properties of this interesting material, which also exhibits strong electronic correlations. From the magnetic susceptibility, we determine a negative Curie-Weiss temperature, indicative for antiferromagnetic exchange and a paramagnetic moment close to a spin S =1 of the V4 molecular clusters. The low-temperature heat capacity provides experimental evidence for gapped magnon excitations. From the entropy release, we conclude about strong correlations between magnetic order and lattice distortions. In addition, the observed anomalies at the phase transitions also indicate strong coupling between structural and electronic degrees of freedom. Utilizing dielectric spectroscopy, we find the onset of significant dispersion effects at the polar Jahn-Teller transition. The dispersion becomes fully suppressed again with the onset of spin order. In addition, the temperature dependencies of dielectric constant and specific heat possibly indicate a sequential appearance of orbital and polar order.

  6. Structural principles for computational and de novo design of 4Fe-4S metalloproteins

    PubMed Central

    Nanda, Vikas; Senn, Stefan; Pike, Douglas H.; Rodriguez-Granillo, Agustina; Hansen, Will; Khare, Sagar D.; Noy, Dror

    2017-01-01

    Iron-sulfur centers in metalloproteins can access multiple oxidation states over a broad range of potentials, allowing them to participate in a variety of electron transfer reactions and serving as catalysts for high-energy redox processes. The nitrogenase FeMoCO cluster converts di-nitrogen to ammonia in an eight-electron transfer step. The 2(Fe4S4) containing bacterial ferredoxin is an evolutionarily ancient metalloprotein fold and is thought to be a primordial progenitor of extant oxidoreductases. Controlling chemical transformations mediated by iron-sulfur centers such as nitrogen fixation, hydrogen production as well as electron transfer reactions involved in photosynthesis are of tremendous importance for sustainable chemistry and energy production initiatives. As such, there is significant interest in the design of iron-sulfur proteins as minimal models to gain fundamental understanding of complex natural systems and as lead-molecules for industrial and energy applications. Herein, we discuss salient structural characteristics of natural iron-sulfur proteins and how they guide principles for design. Model structures of past designs are analyzed in the context of these principles and potential directions for enhanced designs are presented, and new areas of iron-sulfur protein design are proposed. PMID:26449207

  7. Extending the Family of V(4+) S=(1/2) Kagome Antiferromagnets.

    PubMed

    Clark, Lucy; Aidoudi, Farida H; Black, Cameron; Arachchige, Kasun S A; Slawin, Alexandra M Z; Morris, Russell E; Lightfoot, Philip

    2015-12-14

    The ionothermal synthesis, structure, and magnetic susceptibility of a novel inorganic-organic hybrid material, imidazolium vanadium(III,IV) oxyfluoride [C3 H5 N2 ][V9 O6 F24 (H2 O)2 ] (ImVOF) are presented. The structure consists of inorganic vanadium oxyfluoride slabs with kagome layers of V(4+) S=${{ 1/2 }}$ ions separated by a mixed valence layer. These inorganic slabs are intercalated with imidazolium cations. Quinuclidinium (Q) and pyrazinium (Pyz) cations can also be incorporated into the hybrid structure type to give QVOF and PyzVOF analogues, respectively. The highly frustrated topology of the inorganic slabs, along with the quantum nature of the magnetism associated with V(4+) , means that these materials are excellent candidates to host exotic magnetic ground states, such as the highly sought quantum spin liquid. Magnetic susceptibility measurements of all samples suggest an absence of conventional long-range magnetic order down to 2 K despite considerable antiferromagnetic exchange.

  8. Two cases of giant serpentine aneurysm.

    PubMed

    Kumabe, T; Kaneko, U; Ishibashi, T; Kaneko, K; Uchigasaki, S

    1990-06-01

    Giant serpentine aneurysm (GSA) is an entity defined on radiological and pathological grounds as a giant, partially thrombosed aneurysm containing tortuous vascular channels. We have had the opportunity to study two patients with GSAs, which has allowed for a complete comparative anatomical and radiological study. This report emphasizes the etiology of the GSAs. Twenty-two patients with GSAs have been reported in the literature, of which pathological studies were done in 10. In most of these, the aneurysm was found to be filled with an organized thrombus, but in our patients the aneurysm was filled with relatively new clot. The aneurysm enlarged and a change in the tortuous vascular channel was observed over a period of 1 year in the first patient, whereas a globoid aneurysm developed into a GSA in the brief period of just 2 weeks in the second patient. This rapid transformation of a globoid aneurysm into a GSA is of particular interest when the etiology of GSAs is considered. Our patients therefore shed some interesting light on the possible pathophysiology of GSAs. That is, the bloodstream may change dynamically in a giant aneurysm and may become a serpentine channel under conditions that lead to a "Coanda effect."

  9. Giant Cell Tumor of Bone - An Overview

    PubMed Central

    Sobti, Anshul; Agrawal, Pranshu; Agarwala, Sanjay; Agarwal, Manish

    2016-01-01

    Giant Cell tumors (GCT) are benign tumors with potential for aggressive behavior and capacity to metastasize. Although rarely lethal, benign bone tumors may be associated with a substantial disturbance of the local bony architecture that can be particularly troublesome in peri-articular locations. Its histogenesis remains unclear. It is characterized by a proliferation of mononuclear stromal cells and the presence of many multi- nucleated giant cells with homogenous distribution. There is no widely held consensus regarding the ideal treatment method selection. There are advocates of varying surgical techniques ranging from intra-lesional curettage to wide resection. As most giant cell tumors are benign and are located near a joint in young adults, several authors favor an intralesional approach that preserves anatomy of bone in lieu of resection. Although GCT is classified as a benign lesion, few patients develop progressive lung metastases with poor outcomes. Treatment is mainly surgical. Options of chemotherapy and radiotherapy are reserved for selected cases. Recent advances in the understanding of pathogenesis are essential to develop new treatments for this locally destructive primary bone tumor. PMID:26894211

  10. Social Waves in Giant Honeybees Repel Hornets

    PubMed Central

    Kastberger, Gerald; Schmelzer, Evelyn; Kranner, Ilse

    2008-01-01

    Giant honeybees (Apis dorsata) nest in the open and have evolved a plethora of defence behaviors. Against predatory wasps, including hornets, they display highly coordinated Mexican wave-like cascades termed ‘shimmering’. Shimmering starts at distinct spots on the nest surface and then spreads across the nest within a split second whereby hundreds of individual bees flip their abdomens upwards. However, so far it is not known whether prey and predator interact and if shimmering has anti-predatory significance. This article reports on the complex spatial and temporal patterns of interaction between Giant honeybee and hornet exemplified in 450 filmed episodes of two A. dorsata colonies and hornets (Vespa sp.). Detailed frame-by-frame analysis showed that shimmering elicits an avoidance response from the hornets showing a strong temporal correlation with the time course of shimmering. In turn, the strength and the rate of the bees' shimmering are modulated by the hornets' flight speed and proximity. The findings suggest that shimmering creates a ‘shelter zone’ of around 50 cm that prevents predatory wasps from foraging bees directly from the nest surface. Thus shimmering appears to be a key defence strategy that supports the Giant honeybees' open-nesting life-style. PMID:18781205

  11. Observations of Radio Giant Pulses with GAVRT

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jones, Glenn

    2011-08-01

    Radio giant pulses provide a unique opportunity to study the pulsar radio emission mechanism in exquisite detail. Previous studies have revealed a wide range of properties and phenomena, including extraordinarily high brightness temperatures, sub-nanosecond emission features, and banded dynamic spectra. New measurements of giant pulse characteristics can help guide and test theoretical emission models. To this end, an extensive observation campaign has begun which will provide more than 500 hours on the Crab with a 34-meter antenna located in California, USA. The observations are being done as part of an educational outreach program called the Goldstone-Apple Valley Radio Telescope (GAVRT). This antenna has a novel wide bandwidth receiver which provides up to 8 GHz of instantaneous bandwidth in the range of 2.5 to 14 GHz. These observations will provide detailed information about the variability, amplitude distribution, and detailed frequency structure of radio giant pulses. In addition, a database of pulses from these observations and others of the Crab pulsar is being created which will simplify multiwavelength correlation analysis.

  12. Rare cause of odynophagia: Giant esophageal ulcer.

    PubMed

    Veroux, Massimiliano; Aprile, Giuseppe; Amore, Francesca F; Corona, Daniela; Giaquinta, Alessia; Veroux, Pierfrancesco

    2016-04-14

    Gastrointestinal complications are a frequent cause of morbidity after transplantation and may affect up to 40% of kidney transplant recipients. Here we report a rare case of idiopathic giant esophageal ulcer in a kidney transplant recipient. A 37-year-old female presented with a one-week history of odynophagia and weight loss. Upon admission, the patient presented cold sores, and a quantitative cytomegalovirus polymerase chain reaction was positive (10(5) copies/mL). An upper endoscopy demonstrated the presence of a giant ulcer. Serological test and tissue biopsies were unable to demonstrate an infectious origin of the ulcer. Immunosuppression was reduced and everolimus was introduced. An empirical i.v. therapy with acyclovir was started, resulting in a dramatic improvement in symptoms and complete healing of the ulcer. Only two cases of idiopathic giant esophageal ulcer in kidney transplant recipients have been reported in the literature; in both cases, steroid therapy was successful without recurrence of symptoms or endoscopic findings. However, this report suggests that correction of immune imbalance is mandatory to treat such a rare complication.

  13. Giant planet formation via pebble accretion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guilera, O. M.

    2016-08-01

    In the standard model of core accretion, the formation of giant planets occurs by two main processes: first, a massive core is formed by the accretion of solid material; then, when this core exceeds a critical value (typically greater than ) a gaseous runaway growth is triggered and the planet accretes big quantities of gas in a short period of time until the planet achieves its final mass. Thus, the formation of a massive core has to occur when the nebular gas is still available in the disk. This phenomenon imposes a strong time-scale constraint in the giant planet formation due to the fact that the lifetimes of the observed protoplanetary disks are in general lower than 10 Myr. The formation of massive cores before 10 Myr by accretion of big planetesimals (with radii 10 km) in the oligarchic growth regime is only possible in massive disks. However, planetesimal accretion rates significantly increase for small bodies, especially for pebbles, particles of sizes between mm and cm, which are strongly coupled with the gas. In this work, we study the formation of giant planets incorporating pebble accretion rates in our global model of planet formation.

  14. Social waves in giant honeybees repel hornets.

    PubMed

    Kastberger, Gerald; Schmelzer, Evelyn; Kranner, Ilse

    2008-09-10

    Giant honeybees (Apis dorsata) nest in the open and have evolved a plethora of defence behaviors. Against predatory wasps, including hornets, they display highly coordinated Mexican wave-like cascades termed 'shimmering'. Shimmering starts at distinct spots on the nest surface and then spreads across the nest within a split second whereby hundreds of individual bees flip their abdomens upwards. However, so far it is not known whether prey and predator interact and if shimmering has anti-predatory significance. This article reports on the complex spatial and temporal patterns of interaction between Giant honeybee and hornet exemplified in 450 filmed episodes of two A. dorsata colonies and hornets (Vespa sp.). Detailed frame-by-frame analysis showed that shimmering elicits an avoidance response from the hornets showing a strong temporal correlation with the time course of shimmering. In turn, the strength and the rate of the bees' shimmering are modulated by the hornets' flight speed and proximity. The findings suggest that shimmering creates a 'shelter zone' of around 50 cm that prevents predatory wasps from foraging bees directly from the nest surface. Thus shimmering appears to be a key defence strategy that supports the Giant honeybees' open-nesting life-style.

  15. Giant thoracic osteophyte: a distinct clinical entity.

    PubMed

    Coumans, Jean-Valery C E; Neal, Jonathan B; Grottkau, Brian E; Nahed, Brian V; Shin, John H; Walcott, Brian P

    2014-09-01

    Calcified lesions described within the neural axis are classified as either an ossification of the posterior longitudinal ligament, diffuse idiopathic skeletal hyperostosis, or ossification of the ligamentum flavum. We aim to describe a unique pathologic entity: the giant thoracic osteophyte. We identified four patients who were surgically treated at the Massachusetts General Hospital from 2006 to 2012 with unusual calcified lesions in the ventral aspect of the spinal canal. In order to differentiate giant thoracic osteophytes from calcified extruded disc material, disc volumetrics were performed on actual and simulated disc spaces. All patients underwent operative resection of the calcific lesion as they had signs and/or symptoms of spinal cord compression. The lesions were found to be isolated, large calcific masses that originated from the posterior aspect of adjacent thoracic vertebral bodies. Pathological examination was negative for tumor. Adjacent disc volumes were not significantly different from the index disc (p=0.91). A simulated calculation hypothesizing that the calcific mass was extruded disc material demonstrated a significant difference (p=0.01), making this scenario unlikely. In conclusion, giant thoracic osteophyte is a unique and rare entity that can be found in the thoracic spine. The central tenant of surgical treatment is resection to relieve spinal cord compression.

  16. A resonant chain of four transiting, sub-Neptune planets.

    PubMed

    Mills, Sean M; Fabrycky, Daniel C; Migaszewski, Cezary; Ford, Eric B; Petigura, Erik; Isaacson, Howard

    2016-05-26

    Surveys have revealed many multi-planet systems containing super-Earths and Neptunes in orbits of a few days to a few months. There is debate whether in situ assembly or inward migration is the dominant mechanism of the formation of such planetary systems. Simulations suggest that migration creates tightly packed systems with planets whose orbital periods may be expressed as ratios of small integers (resonances), often in a many-planet series (chain). In the hundreds of multi-planet systems of sub-Neptunes, more planet pairs are observed near resonances than would generally be expected, but no individual system has hitherto been identified that must have been formed by migration. Proximity to resonance enables the detection of planets perturbing each other. Here we report transit timing variations of the four planets in the Kepler-223 system, model these variations as resonant-angle librations, and compute the long-term stability of the resonant chain. The architecture of Kepler-223 is too finely tuned to have been formed by scattering, and our numerical simulations demonstrate that its properties are natural outcomes of the migration hypothesis. Similar systems could be destabilized by any of several mechanisms, contributing to the observed orbital-period distribution, where many planets are not in resonances. Planetesimal interactions in particular are thought to be responsible for establishing the current orbits of the four giant planets in the Solar System by disrupting a theoretical initial resonant chain similar to that observed in Kepler-223.

  17. Classified Computer Configuration Control System (C{sup 4}S), Revision 3, Database Administrator`s Guide

    SciTech Connect

    O`Callaghan, P.B.; Nelson, R.A.; Grambihler, A.J.

    1994-04-01

    This document provides a guide for database administration and specific information for the Classified Computer Configuration Control System (C{sup 4}S). As a guide, this document discusses required database administration functions for the set up of database tables and for users of the system. It is assumed that general and user information has been obtained from the Classified Computer Configuration Control System (C{sup 4}S), Revision 3, User`s Information (WHC 1994).

  18. Pb- and Sm-doping effects on the vortex dynamics in Bi4O4S3 superconductor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xie, L.; Tie, X. Y.; Zhang, H. G.

    2017-01-01

    Polycrystalline samples of Bi4O4S3, Bi3.94Pb0.06O4S3, and Bi3.94Sm0.06O4S3 were synthesized using a conventional solid-state reaction method. The vortex dynamics of these samples are studied and compared through measuring the critical current density (Jc) and magnetic relaxation. The estimated Jc value of three samples at temperature 2 K decreases with doping Pb and Sm elements due to the depression of the superconductivity. The normalized pinning force response with reduced field follows the Kramer scaling law f (h )∝ hp(1-h ) q , and the maximum of the reduced field (hmax) is observed at 0.31, 0.24, and 0.18 for Bi4O4S3, Bi3.94Pb0.06O4S3, and Bi3.94Sm0.06O4S3, respectively, indicating the presence of both surface and point pinning centers in these samples. The barrier energy estimated by the magnetic relaxation data depends on the field as a negative power law U0∝Hn and the magnetic relaxation rate S exhibits a considerable monotonic increase with magnetic field, which corroborates a plastic nature of the creep vortex dynamics in these compounds.

  19. Three cases giant panda attack on human at Beijing Zoo

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Peixun; Wang, Tianbing; Xiong, Jian; Xue, Feng; Xu, Hailin; Chen, Jianhai; Zhang, Dianying; Fu, Zhongguo; Jiang, Baoguo

    2014-01-01

    Panda is regarded as Chinese national treasure. Most people always thought they were cute and just ate bamboo and had never imagined a panda could be vicious. Giant panda attacks on human are rare. There, we present three cases of giant panda attacks on humans at the Panda House at Beijing Zoo from September 2006 to June 2009 to warn people of the giant panda’s potentially dangerous behavior. PMID:25550978

  20. The identification of K giant stars in LAMOST pilot survey

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Chao; Yang, Fan; Deng, Licai; Xu, Yan; Cui, Wenyuan; Xue, Xiangxiang; Gao, Shuang; Zhang, Yueyang; Xin, Yu

    2014-01-01

    A support vector machine (SVM) method is applied to select K giant stars directly from the spectral features of LAMOST spectra. The performance of the algorithm is assessed using the MILES library. It shows that the completeness of the K giant stars is 87% with only about 6% dwarf contamination. This allows us to select 18,013 K giant stars at |b|>20° and 38,108 at |b|<20° from LAMOST pilot survey data.

  1. Three cases giant panda attack on human at Beijing Zoo.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Peixun; Wang, Tianbing; Xiong, Jian; Xue, Feng; Xu, Hailin; Chen, Jianhai; Zhang, Dianying; Fu, Zhongguo; Jiang, Baoguo

    2014-01-01

    Panda is regarded as Chinese national treasure. Most people always thought they were cute and just ate bamboo and had never imagined a panda could be vicious. Giant panda attacks on human are rare. There, we present three cases of giant panda attacks on humans at the Panda House at Beijing Zoo from September 2006 to June 2009 to warn people of the giant panda's potentially dangerous behavior.

  2. Liquid Water Oceans in Ice Giants

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wiktorowicz, Sloane J.; Ingersoll, Andrew P.

    2007-01-01

    Aptly named, ice giants such as Uranus and Neptune contain significant amounts of water. While this water cannot be present near the cloud tops, it must be abundant in the deep interior. We investigate the likelihood of a liquid water ocean existing in the hydrogen-rich region between the cloud tops and deep interior. Starting from an assumed temperature at a given upper tropospheric pressure (the photosphere), we follow a moist adiabat downward. The mixing ratio of water to hydrogen in the gas phase is small in the photosphere and increases with depth. The mixing ratio in the condensed phase is near unity in the photosphere and decreases with depth; this gives two possible outcomes. If at some pressure level the mixing ratio of water in the gas phase is equal to that in the deep interior, then that level is the cloud base. The gas below the cloud base has constant mixing ratio. Alternately, if the mixing ratio of water in the condensed phase reaches that in the deep interior, then the surface of a liquid ocean will occur. Below this ocean surface, the mixing ratio of water will be constant. A cloud base occurs when the photospheric temperature is high. For a family of ice giants with different photospheric temperatures, the cooler ice giants will have warmer cloud bases. For an ice giant with a cool enough photospheric temperature, the cloud base will exist at the critical temperature. For still cooler ice giants, ocean surfaces will result. A high mixing ratio of water in the deep interior favors a liquid ocean. We find that Neptune is both too warm (photospheric temperature too high) and too dry (mixing ratio of water in the deep interior too low) for liquid oceans to exist at present. To have a liquid ocean, Neptune s deep interior water to gas ratio would have to be higher than current models allow, and the density at 19 kbar would have to be approx. equal to 0.8 g/cu cm. Such a high density is inconsistent with gravitational data obtained during the Voyager

  3. PLUTINO DETECTION BIASES, INCLUDING THE KOZAI RESONANCE

    SciTech Connect

    Lawler, S. M.; Gladman, B.

    2013-07-01

    Because of their relative proximity within the trans-Neptunian region, the plutinos (objects in the 3:2 mean-motion resonance with Neptune) are numerous in flux-limited catalogs, and well-studied theoretically. We perform detailed modeling of the on-sky detection biases for plutinos, with special attention to those that are simultaneously in the Kozai resonance. In addition to the normal 3:2 resonant argument libration, Kozai plutinos also show periodic oscillations in eccentricity and inclination, coupled to the argument of perihelion ({omega}) oscillation. Due to the mean-motion resonance, plutinos avoid coming to pericenter near Neptune's current position in the ecliptic plane. Because Kozai plutinos are restricted to certain values of {omega}, perihelion always occurs out of the ecliptic plane, biasing ecliptic surveys against finding these objects. The observed Kozai plutino fraction f{sub koz}{sup obs} has been measured by several surveys, finding values between 8% and 25%, while the true Kozai plutino fraction f{sub koz}{sup true} has been predicted to be between 10% and 30% by different giant planet migration simulations. We show that f{sub koz}{sup obs} varies widely depending on the ecliptic latitude and longitude of the survey, so debiasing to find the true ratio is complex. Even a survey that covers most or all of the sky will detect an apparent Kozai fraction that is different from f{sub koz}{sup true}. We present a map of the on-sky plutino Kozai fraction that would be detected by all-sky flux-limited surveys. This will be especially important for the Panoramic Survey Telescope and Rapid Response System and Large Synoptic Survey Telescope projects, which may detect large numbers of plutinos as they sweep the sky. f{sub koz}{sup true} and the distribution of the orbital elements of Kozai plutinos may be a diagnostic of giant planet migration; future migration simulations should provide details on their resonant Kozai populations.

  4. Ultrabass Sounds of the Giant Star xi Hya

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2002-05-01

    First Observations of Solar-type Oscillations in a Star Very Different from the Sun Summary About 30 years ago, astronomers realised that the Sun resonates like a giant musical instrument with well-defined periods (frequencies). It forms a sort of large, spherical organ pipe. The energy that excites these sound waves comes from the turbulent region just below the Sun's visible surface. Observations of the solar sound waves (known as " helioseismology ") have resulted in enormous progress in the exploration of the interior of the Sun, otherwise hidden from view. As is the case on Earth, seismic techniques can be applied and the detailed interpretation of the observed oscillation periods has provided quite accurate information about the structure and motions inside the Sun, our central star. It has now also become possible to apply this technique to some solar-type stars. The first observations concerned the northern star eta Bootis (cf. ESO PR 16/94 ). Last year, extensive and much more accurate observations with the 1.2-m Swiss telescope at the ESO La Silla Observatory proved that Alpha Centauri , a solar "twin", behaves very much like the Sun (cf. ESO PR 15/01 ), and that some of the periods are quite similar to those in the Sun. These new observational data were of a superb quality, and that study marked a true break-through in the new research field of " asteroseismology " (seismology of the stars) for solar-type stars. But what about other types of stars, for instance those that are much larger than the Sun? Based on an extremely intensive observing project with the same telescope, an international group of astronomers [1] has found that the giant star xi Hya ("xi" is the small greek letter [2]; "Hya" is an abbreviation of "Hydrae") behaves like a giant sub-ultra-bass instrument . This star is located in the constellation Hydra (the Water-Monster) at a distance of 130 light-years, it has a radius about 10 times that of the Sun and its luminosity is about 60

  5. Giant Impacts on Earth-Like Worlds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kohler, Susanna

    2016-05-01

    Earth has experienced a large number of impacts, from the cratering events that may have caused mass extinctions to the enormous impact believed to have formed the Moon. A new study examines whether our planets impact history is typical for Earth-like worlds.N-Body ChallengesTimeline placing the authors simulations in context of the history of our solar system (click for a closer look). [Quintana et al. 2016]The final stages of terrestrial planet formation are thought to be dominated by giant impacts of bodies in the protoplanetary disk. During this stage, protoplanets smash into one another and accrete, greatly influencing the growth, composition, and habitability of the final planets.There are two major challenges when simulating this N-body planet formation. The first is fragmentation: since computational time scales as N^2, simulating lots of bodies that split into many more bodies is very computationally intensive. For this reason, fragmentation is usually ignored; simulations instead assume perfect accretion during collisions.Total number of bodies remaining within the authors simulations over time, with fragmentation included (grey) and ignored (red). Both simulations result in the same final number of bodies, but the ones that include fragmentation take more time to reach that final number. [Quintana et al. 2016]The second challengeis that many-body systems are chaotic, which means its necessary to do a large number of simulations to make statistical statements about outcomes.Adding FragmentationA team of scientists led by Elisa Quintana (NASA NPP Senior Fellow at the Ames Research Center) has recently pushed at these challenges by modeling inner-planet formation using a code that does include fragmentation. The team ran 140 simulations with and 140 without the effects of fragmentation using similar initial conditions to understand how including fragmentation affects the outcome.Quintana and collaborators then used the fragmentation-inclusive simulations to

  6. Giant Serpentine Aneurysm of the Middle Cerebral Artery

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Seung Joo; Kwun, Byung Duk; Kim, Chang Jin

    2010-01-01

    Giant serpentine aneurysms are rare and have distinct angiographic findings. The rarity, large size, complex anatomy and hemodynamic characteristics of giant serpentine aneurysms make treatment difficult. We report a case of a giant serpentine aneurysm of the right middle cerebral artery (MCA) that presented as headache. Treatment involved a superficial temporal artery (STA)-MCA bypass followed by aneurysm resection. The patient was discharged without neurological deficits, and early and late follow-up angiography disclosed successful removal of the aneurysm and a patent bypass graft. We conclude that STA-MCA bypass and aneurysm excision is a successful treatment method for a giant serpentine aneurysm. PMID:20856671

  7. Giant Inguinal Herniae Managed by Primary Repair: A Case Series

    PubMed Central

    Anand, Madhur; Naku, Narang; Hajong, Debobratta; Singh, K Lenish

    2017-01-01

    Giant inguinal hernia are usually found in developing countries due to delay in seeking medical attention. The management of such hernias may sometimes require procedures to increase the intra-peritoneal capacity prior to the repair of the giant hernia. Otherwise patients may develop abdominal compartment syndrome leading to various unwanted complications. Primary repair of giant hernias are possible in some cases without having significant post-operative complications. In this present case series, we have managed a total of four patients of giant inguinal hernia by primary repair without much post-operative complications. PMID:28384934

  8. Giant pseudomeningocele after spinal surgery: A case report

    PubMed Central

    Srilomsak, Prepram; Okuno, Kazuma; Sakakibara, Toshihiko; Wang, Zhuo; Kasai, Yuichi

    2012-01-01

    Very few reports have described giant pseudomeningoceles ≥ 8 cm in diameter. We report this case of the biggest giant pseudomeningocele at the unusual cervicothoracic level. A 59 year old man who underwent cervicothoracic laminectomy had a giant pseudomeningocele detected and the lesion gradually grew to about 15 cm in diameter by 2 years postoperatively. Cerebrospinal fluid leak closure was performed and the postoperative course was favorable. We present this case, review the literature and discuss the size and portion, mechanism of formation, symptoms and treatments of giant pseudomeningocele. PMID:22816066

  9. Two cases of giant pyogenic granuloma of scalp

    PubMed Central

    Chandra, B. Satish; Rao, P. Narasimha

    2013-01-01

    Pyogenic granuloma is a benign vascular tumor of unknown etiology, though multiple factors play a role in its onset, e.g., trauma, chronic irritation, drugs etc., It is commonly seen in children and adolescents. Giant pyogenic granuloma is its atypical variant. We are presenting two cases of giant pyogenic granuloma, one, in a 28-year-old adult, presenting as a giant fluffy swelling of scalp and the other in a 11-year-old child, presenting as a giant ulcerated globular swelling of the scalp. PMID:24350008

  10. M-giant star candidates identified in LAMOST DR 1

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhong, Jing; Lépine, Sébastien; Li, Jing; Chen, Li; Hou, Jin-Liang; Yang, Ming; Li, Guang-Wei; Zhang, Yong; Hou, Yong-Hui

    2015-08-01

    We perform a discrimination procedure with the spectral index diagram of TiO5 and CaH2+CaH3 to separate M giants from M dwarfs. Using the M giant spectra identified from LAMOST DR1 with high signal-to-noise ratio, we have successfully assembled a set of M giant templates, which show more reliable spectral features. Combining with the M dwarf/subdwarf templates in Zhong et al., we present an extended library of M-type templates which includes not only M dwarfs with a well-defined temperature and metallicity grid but also M giants with subtypes from M0 to M6. Then, the template-fitting algorithm is used to automatically identify and classify M giant stars from LAMOST DR1. The resulting catalog of M giant stars is cross-matched with 2MASS JHKs and WISE W1/W2 infrared photometry. In addition, we calculated the heliocentric radial velocity of all M giant stars by using the cross-correlation method with the template spectrum in a zero-velocity rest frame. Using the relationship between the absolute infrared magnitude MJ and our classified spectroscopic subtype, we derived the spectroscopic distance of M giants with uncertainties of about 40%. A catalog of 8639 M giants is provided. As an additional result of this analysis, we also present a catalog of 101 690 M dwarfs/subdwarfs which are processed by our classification pipeline.

  11. Giant multinucleated macrophages occur in acute spinal cord injury.

    PubMed

    Leskovar, A; Turek, J; Borgens, R B

    2001-05-01

    Using a cell-isolation and -culture procedure specific for macrophages, we report the existence of giant (more than 50 microm diameter), multinucleated macrophages within an acute, 5-day-old adult rat spinal cord injury. The size and multinuclearity of these isolated giant cells was confirmed using transmission electron microscopy. Giant macrophages are markers for long-term infection, disease, and chronic injury in other soft tissues and are unexpected in the acute inflammatory stage of central nervous system injury. To our knowledge, this descriptive report is the first confirming the existence of giant macrophages in any injured nervous tissue, with additional data suggesting some of these cells to be multinucleated.

  12. Exotic Earths: forming habitable worlds with giant planet migration.

    PubMed

    Raymond, Sean N; Mandell, Avi M; Sigurdsson, Steinn

    2006-09-08

    Close-in giant planets (e.g., "hot Jupiters") are thought to form far from their host stars and migrate inward, through the terrestrial planet zone, via torques with a massive gaseous disk. Here we simulate terrestrial planet growth during and after giant planet migration. Several-Earth-mass planets also form interior to the migrating jovian planet, analogous to recently discovered "hot Earths." Very-water-rich, Earth-mass planets form from surviving material outside the giant planet's orbit, often in the habitable zone and with low orbital eccentricities. More than a third of the known systems of giant planets may harbor Earth-like planets.

  13. Integral resonator gyroscope

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shcheglov, Kirill V. (Inventor); Challoner, A. Dorian (Inventor); Hayworth, Ken J. (Inventor); Wiberg, Dean V. (Inventor); Yee, Karl Y. (Inventor)

    2008-01-01

    The present invention discloses an inertial sensor having an integral resonator. A typical sensor comprises a planar mechanical resonator for sensing motion of the inertial sensor and a case for housing the resonator. The resonator and a wall of the case are defined through an etching process. A typical method of producing the resonator includes etching a baseplate, bonding a wafer to the etched baseplate, through etching the wafer to form a planar mechanical resonator and the wall of the case and bonding an end cap wafer to the wall to complete the case.

  14. Synthesis, Structure, and Characterization of Cu4S10(4-methylpyridine)4

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hepp, Aloysius F.; Richman, Robert M.; Duraj, Stan A.; Andras, Maria T.; Moore, Hall L.; Sabat, Michal; Eckles, William E.; Martuch, Robert A.

    1996-01-01

    The title compound, Cu4S10(4-methylpyridine)(sub 4) (dot) 4-methylpyridine was prepared by three different reactions: the oxidation of copper powder by sulfur and the reaction of copper (I) sulfide (or CuBr (dot) SMe2) with excess sulfur, both in the coordinating solvent, 4-methylpyridine. Red crystals of the compound obtained by layering with hexanes were subjected to single crystal X-ray diffraction. The structure was refined to R = 0.026 and R(sub w) = 0.036 in a space group P1bar (No. 2), with Z = 2, a = 13.983 (2) A, b = 15.384 (2) A, c = 9.660 (1) A, alpha = 93.87 (1)deg., beta = 93.38 (1)deg., gamma = 99.78 (1)deg., V = 2037.9 (9) A(exp 3). The compound has approximate S(sub 4) symmetry and consists of two pentasulfide chains linking four Cu(I) ions, each with a corrdinating 2-methylpyridine. The infrared spectrum was dominated by absorption due to coordinated 4-methylpyridine with several low-energy peaks attributable to S-S stretches, which were also observed by Raman spectroscopy. A featureless electronic absorption spectrum yielded a single peak in the near ultraviolet upon computer enhancement (lambda = 334 nm, epsilon = 10,000), most likely an intraligand transition. Cyclic voltammetry indicates that the polysulfide complex undergoes irrversible oxidation and reduction at +0.04 and -0.34 V vs. SCE, respectively, at 298 K in 4-methylpyridine when swept at 20 mV/sec. The electrochemical behavior was unvaried even at sweep rates as high as 100 V/sec.

  15. Tetrahedral Clusters of GaMo 4S 8-Type Compounds: A Metal Bonding Analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Le Beuze, A.; Loirat, H.; Zerrouki, M. C.; Lissillour, R.

    1995-11-01

    Extended Hückel tight binding calculations have been performed on ligated as well as on ligand-free Mo4 and Mo6 extended frames, in order to analyze the metal-metal bonding within the clusters and particularly the appreciable changes of the metal-metal bond lengths through the M4 tetrahedral units contained in GaM4X8 (M = Mo, Nb, V, Ta; X = S, Se, Te), Mo4S4Y4 (Y = Cl, Br, I). A comparison with the M6 octahedral units of the M Mo6X8 (M = Pb, Ag, La; X = S, Se) series is made. By means of DOS, COOP curves, and overlap populations, results clearly display the strong reorganization of the electronic structure of the bare metal clusters network while the ligand interactions occur, inducing a strong reduction of the strength of the metal-metal bonds. We outline the relationship between the metal-metal bond lengths and various parameters such as the valence electron count (VEC) per cluster and the nature of the ligands. Our results indicate that the two series M4 and M6 differ: M-M bond lengths are unaffected by the VEC in the regular M4 cluster, whereas some M-M bond lengths undergo a significant change when the VEC increases in the distorded M6 clusters. Likewise, it is worthy to note that metal d orbitals have a more significant effect in M4 cluster series. In contrast, the metal-ligand covalency induces similar elongations of metal-metal bonds in the two series.

  16. Nonlinear Optical Studies of Resonant Systems

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1992-08-01

    hh1 Exciton . 2ps D-a " - 4ps b) EIIE 2 FPD from hhl Exciton -2 ps SPE from Stokes -4 ps /shifted resonance " -15 0 5 15 Reference Delay ( ps ) Figure 1...left and right axes. 4 S.T. Cundiff, H. Wang and D.G. Steel Picosecond Photon Echoes... 2 aSPE from 0 ps -_ __ hh1 Exciton . 2ps -2 CO ’- 4ps -b) ELE 2...methods which we have developed based on four - wave mixing as well as coherent transient techniques such as photon echoes. Accesion Fo’- -... NTIS Cn,7

  17. Partially orthogonal resonators for magnetic resonance imaging

    PubMed Central

    Chacon-Caldera, Jorge; Malzacher, Matthias; Schad, Lothar R.

    2017-01-01

    Resonators for signal reception in magnetic resonance are traditionally planar to restrict coil material and avoid coil losses. Here, we present a novel concept to model resonators partially in a plane with maximum sensitivity to the magnetic resonance signal and partially in an orthogonal plane with reduced signal sensitivity. Thus, properties of individual elements in coil arrays can be modified to optimize physical planar space and increase the sensitivity of the overall array. A particular case of the concept is implemented to decrease H-field destructive interferences in planar concentric in-phase arrays. An increase in signal to noise ratio of approximately 20% was achieved with two resonators placed over approximately the same planar area compared to common approaches at a target depth of 10 cm at 3 Tesla. Improved parallel imaging performance of this configuration is also demonstrated. The concept can be further used to increase coil density. PMID:28186135

  18. Partially orthogonal resonators for magnetic resonance imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chacon-Caldera, Jorge; Malzacher, Matthias; Schad, Lothar R.

    2017-02-01

    Resonators for signal reception in magnetic resonance are traditionally planar to restrict coil material and avoid coil losses. Here, we present a novel concept to model resonators partially in a plane with maximum sensitivity to the magnetic resonance signal and partially in an orthogonal plane with reduced signal sensitivity. Thus, properties of individual elements in coil arrays can be modified to optimize physical planar space and increase the sensitivity of the overall array. A particular case of the concept is implemented to decrease H-field destructive interferences in planar concentric in-phase arrays. An increase in signal to noise ratio of approximately 20% was achieved with two resonators placed over approximately the same planar area compared to common approaches at a target depth of 10 cm at 3 Tesla. Improved parallel imaging performance of this configuration is also demonstrated. The concept can be further used to increase coil density.

  19. Paraplegia caused by giant intradural herniation of a lumbar disk after combined spinal-epidural anesthesia in total hip arthroplasty.

    PubMed

    Sawai, Toshiyuki; Nakahira, Junko; Minami, Toshiaki

    2016-08-01

    Total paraplegia after epidural or spinal anesthesia is extremely rare. We herein report a case of total paraplegia caused by a giant intradural herniation of a lumbar disk at the L3-L4 level after total hip arthroplasty for coxarthrosis. The patient had no preoperative neurologic abnormalities. Intraoperative anesthetic management involved combined spinal-epidural anesthesia at the L3-L4 level with continuous intravenous propofol administration. Postoperatively, the patient complained of numbness and total paraplegia of the lower extremities. Magnetic resonance imaging showed a giant herniation of a lumbar disk compressing the spinal cord at the L3-L4 level. The intradural herniation was surgically treated, and the patient's symptoms completely resolved.

  20. MTSET modification of D4S6 cysteines stabilize the fast inactivated state of Nav1.5 sodium channels.

    PubMed

    O'Leary, Michael E; Chahine, Mohamed

    2015-01-01

    The transmembrane S6 segments of Na(+) sodium channels form the cytoplasmic entrance of the channel and line the internal aspects of the aqueous pore. This region of the channel has been implicated in Na(+) channel permeation, gating, and pharmacology. In this study we utilized cysteine substitutions and methanethiosulfonate reagent (MTSET) to investigate the role of the S6 segment of homologous domain 4 (D4S6) in the gating of the cardiac (Nav1.5) channel. D4S6 cysteine mutants were heterologously expressed in tsA201 cells and currents recorded using whole-cell patch clamp. Internal MTSET reduced the peak Na(+) currents, induced hyperpolarizing shifts in steady-state inactivation and slowed the recovery of mutant channels with cysteines inserted near the middle (F1760C, V1763C) and C-terminus (Y1767C) of the D4S6. These findings suggested a link between the MTSET inhibition and fast inactivation. This was confirmed by expressing the V1763C and Y1767C mutations in non-inactivating Nav1.5 channels. Removing inactivation abolished the MTSET inhibition of the V1763C and Y1767C mutants. The data indicate that the MTSET-induced reduction in current primarily results from slower recovery from inactivation that produces hyperpolarizing shifts in fast inactivation and decreases the steady-state availability of the channels. This contrasted with a cysteine inserted near the C-terminus of the D4S6 (I1770C) where MTSET increased the persistent Na(+) current at depolarized voltages consistent with impaired fast inactivation. Covalent modification of D4S6 cysteines with MTSET adduct appears to reduce the mobility of the D4S6 segment and stabilize the channels in the fast inactivated state. These findings indicate that residues located near the middle and C-terminus of the D4S6 play an important role in fast inactivation.

  1. Dispensability of the [4Fe-4S] cluster in novel homologues of adenine glycosylase MutY.

    PubMed

    Trasviña-Arenas, Carlos H; Lopez-Castillo, Laura M; Sanchez-Sandoval, Eugenia; Brieba, Luis G

    2016-02-01

    7,8-Dihydro-8-deoxyguanine (8oG) is one of the most common oxidative lesions in DNA. DNA polymerases misincorporate an adenine across from this lesion. Thus, 8oG is a highly mutagenic lesion responsible for G:C→T:A transversions. MutY is an adenine glycosylase, part of the base excision repair pathway that removes adenines, when mispaired with 8oG or guanine. Its catalytic domain includes a [4Fe-4S] cluster motif coordinated by cysteinyl ligands. When this cluster is absent, MutY activity is depleted and several studies concluded that the [4Fe-4S] cluster motif is an indispensable component for DNA binding, substrate recognition and enzymatic activity. In the present study, we identified 46 MutY homologues that lack the canonical cysteinyl ligands, suggesting an absence of the [4Fe-4S] cluster. A phylogenetic analysis groups these novel MutYs into two different clades. One clade is exclusive of the order Lactobacillales and another clade has a mixed composition of anaerobic and microaerophilic bacteria and species from the protozoan genus Entamoeba. Structural modeling and sequence analysis suggests that the loss of the [4Fe-4S] cluster is compensated by a convergent solution in which bulky amino acids substitute the [4Fe-4S] cluster. We functionally characterized MutYs from Lactobacillus brevis and Entamoeba histolytica as representative members from each clade and found that both enzymes are active adenine glycosylases. Furthermore, chimeric glycosylases, in which the [4Fe-4S] cluster of Escherichia coli MutY is replaced by the corresponding amino acids of LbY and EhY, are also active. Our data indicates that the [4Fe-4S] cluster plays a structural role in MutYs and evidences the existence of alternative functional solutions in nature.

  2. Observation of B ¯ →D(*) π+π-ℓ-ν ¯ Decays in e+e- Collisions at the Υ (4 S ) Resonance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lees, J. P.; Poireau, V.; Tisserand, V.; Grauges, E.; Palano, A.; Eigen, G.; Stugu, B.; Brown, D. N.; Kerth, L. T.; Kolomensky, Yu. G.; Lee, M. J.; Lynch, G.; Koch, H.; Schroeder, T.; Hearty, C.; Mattison, T. S.; McKenna, J. A.; So, R. Y.; Khan, A.; Blinov, V. E.; Buzykaev, A. R.; Druzhinin, V. P.; Golubev, V. B.; Kravchenko, E. A.; Onuchin, A. P.; Serednyakov, S. I.; Skovpen, Yu. I.; Solodov, E. P.; Todyshev, K. Yu.; Lankford, A. J.; Gary, J. W.; Long, O.; Franco Sevilla, M.; Hong, T. M.; Kovalskyi, D.; Richman, J. D.; West, C. A.; Eisner, A. M.; Lockman, W. S.; Panduro Vazquez, W.; Schumm, B. A.; Seiden, A.; Chao, D. S.; Cheng, C. H.; Echenard, B.; Flood, K. T.; Hitlin, D. G.; Kim, J.; Miyashita, T. S.; Ongmongkolkul, P.; Porter, F. C.; Röhrken, M.; Andreassen, R.; Huard, Z.; Meadows, B. T.; Pushpawela, B. G.; Sokoloff, M. D.; Sun, L.; Ford, W. T.; Smith, J. G.; Wagner, S. R.; Ayad, R.; Toki, W. H.; Spaan, B.; Bernard, D.; Verderi, M.; Playfer, S.; Bettoni, D.; Bozzi, C.; Calabrese, R.; Cibinetto, G.; Fioravanti, E.; Garzia, I.; Luppi, E.; Santoro, V.; Calcaterra, A.; de Sangro, R.; Finocchiaro, G.; Martellotti, S.; Patteri, P.; Peruzzi, I. M.; Piccolo, M.; Zallo, A.; Contri, R.; Monge, M. R.; Passaggio, S.; Patrignani, C.; Bhuyan, B.; Prasad, V.; Adametz, A.; Uwer, U.; Lacker, H. M.; Mallik, U.; Chen, C.; Cochran, J.; Prell, S.; Ahmed, H.; Gritsan, A. V.; Arnaud, N.; Davier, M.; Derkach, D.; Grosdidier, G.; Le Diberder, F.; Lutz, A. M.; Malaescu, B.; Roudeau, P.; Stocchi, A.; Wormser, G.; Lange, D. J.; Wright, D. M.; Coleman, J. P.; Fry, J. R.; Gabathuler, E.; Hutchcroft, D. E.; Payne, D. J.; Touramanis, C.; Bevan, A. J.; di Lodovico, F.; Sacco, R.; Cowan, G.; Brown, D. N.; Davis, C. L.; Denig, A. G.; Fritsch, M.; Gradl, W.; Griessinger, K.; Hafner, A.; Schubert, K. R.; Barlow, R. J.; Lafferty, G. D.; Cenci, R.; Hamilton, B.; Jawahery, A.; Roberts, D. A.; Cowan, R.; Cheaib, R.; Patel, P. M.; Robertson, S. H.; Dey, B.; Neri, N.; Palombo, F.; Cremaldi, L.; Godang, R.; Summers, D. J.; Simard, M.; Taras, P.; de Nardo, G.; Onorato, G.; Sciacca, C.; Raven, G.; Jessop, C. P.; Losecco, J. M.; Honscheid, K.; Kass, R.; Margoni, M.; Morandin, M.; Posocco, M.; Rotondo, M.; Simi, G.; Simonetto, F.; Stroili, R.; Akar, S.; Ben-Haim, E.; Bomben, M.; Bonneaud, G. R.; Briand, H.; Calderini, G.; Chauveau, J.; Leruste, Ph.; Marchiori, G.; Ocariz, J.; Biasini, M.; Manoni, E.; Rossi, A.; Angelini, C.; Batignani, G.; Bettarini, S.; Carpinelli, M.; Casarosa, G.; Chrzaszcz, M.; Forti, F.; Giorgi, M. A.; Lusiani, A.; Oberhof, B.; Paoloni, E.; Rama, M.; Rizzo, G.; Walsh, J. J.; Lopes Pegna, D.; Olsen, J.; Smith, A. J. S.; Anulli, F.; Faccini, R.; Ferrarotto, F.; Ferroni, F.; Gaspero, M.; Pilloni, A.; Piredda, G.; Bünger, C.; Dittrich, S.; Grünberg, O.; Hess, M.; Leddig, T.; Voß, C.; Waldi, R.; Adye, T.; Olaiya, E. O.; Wilson, F. F.; Emery, S.; Vasseur, G.; Aston, D.; Bard, D. J.; Cartaro, C.; Convery, M. R.; Dorfan, J.; Dubois-Felsmann, G. P.; Dunwoodie, W.; Ebert, M.; Field, R. C.; Fulsom, B. G.; Graham, M. T.; Hast, C.; Innes, W. R.; Kim, P.; Leith, D. W. G. S.; Luitz, S.; Luth, V.; Macfarlane, D. B.; Muller, D. R.; Neal, H.; Pulliam, T.; Ratcliff, B. N.; Roodman, A.; Schindler, R. H.; Snyder, A.; Su, D.; Sullivan, M. K.; Va'Vra, J.; Wisniewski, W. J.; Wulsin, H. W.; Purohit, M. V.; Wilson, J. R.; Randle-Conde, A.; Sekula, S. J.; Bellis, M.; Burchat, P. R.; Puccio, E. M. T.; Alam, M. S.; Ernst, J. A.; Gorodeisky, R.; Guttman, N.; Peimer, D. R.; Soffer, A.; Spanier, S. M.; Ritchie, J. L.; Schwitters, R. F.; Izen, J. M.; Lou, X. C.; Bianchi, F.; de Mori, F.; Filippi, A.; Gamba, D.; Lanceri, L.; Vitale, L.; Martinez-Vidal, F.; Oyanguren, A.; Albert, J.; Banerjee, Sw.; Beaulieu, A.; Bernlochner, F. U.; Choi, H. H. F.; King, G. J.; Kowalewski, R.; Lewczuk, M. J.; Lueck, T.; Nugent, I. M.; Roney, J. M.; Sobie, R. J.; Tasneem, N.; Gershon, T. J.; Harrison, P. F.; Latham, T. E.; Band, H. R.; Dasu, S.; Pan, Y.; Prepost, R.; Wu, S. L.; Babar Collaboration

    2016-01-01

    We report on measurements of the decays of B ¯ mesons into the semileptonic final states B ¯ →D(*)π+π-ℓ-ν¯, where D(*) represents a D or D* meson and ℓ- is an electron or a muon. These measurements are based on 471 ×106 B B ¯ pairs recorded with the BABAR detector at the SLAC asymmetric B factory PEP-II. We determine the branching fraction ratios Rπ+π-(*)=B (B ¯ →D(*)π+π-ℓ-ν¯)/B (B ¯ →D(*)ℓ-ν¯) using events in which the second B meson is fully reconstructed. We find Rπ+π-=0.067 ±0.010 ±0.008 and Rπ+π-*=0.019±0.005 ±0.004 , where the first uncertainty is statistical and the second is systematic. Based on these results and assuming isospin invariance, we estimate that B ¯ →D(*)π π ℓ-ν¯ decays, where π denotes either a π± and π0 meson, account for up to half the difference between the measured inclusive semileptonic branching fraction to charm hadrons and the corresponding sum of previously measured exclusive branching fractions.

  3. Observation of B→D(*) π^(+)π^(-)ℓ^(-)ν Decays in e^(+)e^(-) Collisions at the Υ(4S) Resonance.

    PubMed

    Lees, J P; Poireau, V; Tisserand, V; Grauges, E; Palano, A; Eigen, G; Stugu, B; Brown, D N; Kerth, L T; Kolomensky, Yu G; Lee, M J; Lynch, G; Koch, H; Schroeder, T; Hearty, C; Mattison, T S; McKenna, J A; So, R Y; Khan, A; Blinov, V E; Buzykaev, A R; Druzhinin, V P; Golubev, V B; Kravchenko, E A; Onuchin, A P; Serednyakov, S I; Skovpen, Yu I; Solodov, E P; Todyshev, K Yu; Lankford, A J; Gary, J W; Long, O; Franco Sevilla, M; Hong, T M; Kovalskyi, D; Richman, J D; West, C A; Eisner, A M; Lockman, W S; Panduro Vazquez, W; Schumm, B A; Seiden, A; Chao, D S; Cheng, C H; Echenard, B; Flood, K T; Hitlin, D G; Kim, J; Miyashita, T S; Ongmongkolkul, P; Porter, F C; Röhrken, M; Andreassen, R; Huard, Z; Meadows, B T; Pushpawela, B G; Sokoloff, M D; Sun, L; Ford, W T; Smith, J G; Wagner, S R; Ayad, R; Toki, W H; Spaan, B; Bernard, D; Verderi, M; Playfer, S; Bettoni, D; Bozzi, C; Calabrese, R; Cibinetto, G; Fioravanti, E; Garzia, I; Luppi, E; Santoro, V; Calcaterra, A; de Sangro, R; Finocchiaro, G; Martellotti, S; Patteri, P; Peruzzi, I M; Piccolo, M; Zallo, A; Contri, R; Monge, M R; Passaggio, S; Patrignani, C; Bhuyan, B; Prasad, V; Adametz, A; Uwer, U; Lacker, H M; Mallik, U; Chen, C; Cochran, J; Prell, S; Ahmed, H; Gritsan, A V; Arnaud, N; Davier, M; Derkach, D; Grosdidier, G; Le Diberder, F; Lutz, A M; Malaescu, B; Roudeau, P; Stocchi, A; Wormser, G; Lange, D J; Wright, D M; Coleman, J P; Fry, J R; Gabathuler, E; Hutchcroft, D E; Payne, D J; Touramanis, C; Bevan, A J; Di Lodovico, F; Sacco, R; Cowan, G; Brown, D N; Davis, C L; Denig, A G; Fritsch, M; Gradl, W; Griessinger, K; Hafner, A; Schubert, K R; Barlow, R J; Lafferty, G D; Cenci, R; Hamilton, B; Jawahery, A; Roberts, D A; Cowan, R; Cheaib, R; Patel, P M; Robertson, S H; Dey, B; Neri, N; Palombo, F; Cremaldi, L; Godang, R; Summers, D J; Simard, M; Taras, P; De Nardo, G; Onorato, G; Sciacca, C; Raven, G; Jessop, C P; LoSecco, J M; Honscheid, K; Kass, R; Margoni, M; Morandin, M; Posocco, M; Rotondo, M; Simi, G; Simonetto, F; Stroili, R; Akar, S; Ben-Haim, E; Bomben, M; Bonneaud, G R; Briand, H; Calderini, G; Chauveau, J; Leruste, Ph; Marchiori, G; Ocariz, J; Biasini, M; Manoni, E; Rossi, A; Angelini, C; Batignani, G; Bettarini, S; Carpinelli, M; Casarosa, G; Chrzaszcz, M; Forti, F; Giorgi, M A; Lusiani, A; Oberhof, B; Paoloni, E; Rama, M; Rizzo, G; Walsh, J J; Lopes Pegna, D; Olsen, J; Smith, A J S; Anulli, F; Faccini, R; Ferrarotto, F; Ferroni, F; Gaspero, M; Pilloni, A; Piredda, G; Bünger, C; Dittrich, S; Grünberg, O; Hess, M; Leddig, T; Voß, C; Waldi, R; Adye, T; Olaiya, E O; Wilson, F F; Emery, S; Vasseur, G; Aston, D; Bard, D J; Cartaro, C; Convery, M R; Dorfan, J; Dubois-Felsmann, G P; Dunwoodie, W; Ebert, M; Field, R C; Fulsom, B G; Graham, M T; Hast, C; Innes, W R; Kim, P; Leith, D W G S; Luitz, S; Luth, V; MacFarlane, D B; Muller, D R; Neal, H; Pulliam, T; Ratcliff, B N; Roodman, A; Schindler, R H; Snyder, A; Su, D; Sullivan, M K; Va'vra, J; Wisniewski, W J; Wulsin, H W; Purohit, M V; Wilson, J R; Randle-Conde, A; Sekula, S J; Bellis, M; Burchat, P R; Puccio, E M T; Alam, M S; Ernst, J A; Gorodeisky, R; Guttman, N; Peimer, D R; Soffer, A; Spanier, S M; Ritchie, J L; Schwitters, R F; Izen, J M; Lou, X C; Bianchi, F; De Mori, F; Filippi, A; Gamba, D; Lanceri, L; Vitale, L; Martinez-Vidal, F; Oyanguren, A; Albert, J; Banerjee, Sw; Beaulieu, A; Bernlochner, F U; Choi, H H F; King, G J; Kowalewski, R; Lewczuk, M J; Lueck, T; Nugent, I M; Roney, J M; Sobie, R J; Tasneem, N; Gershon, T J; Harrison, P F; Latham, T E; Band, H R; Dasu, S; Pan, Y; Prepost, R; Wu, S L

    2016-01-29

    We report on measurements of the decays of B¯ mesons into the semileptonic final states B¯→D^(*)π^(+)π^(-)ℓ^(-)ν¯, where D^(*) represents a D or D^(*) meson and ℓ^(-) is an electron or a muon. These measurements are based on 471×10^(6) BB ¯ pairs recorded with the BABAR detector at the SLAC asymmetric B factory PEP-II. We determine the branching fraction ratios R_{π^{+}π^{-}}^{(*)}=B(B[over ¯]→D^{(*)}π^{+}π^{-}ℓ^{-}ν[over ¯])/B(B[over ¯]→D^{(*)}ℓ^{-}ν[over ¯]) using events in which the second B meson is fully reconstructed. We find R_{π^{+}π^{-}}=0.067±0.010±0.008 and R_{π^{+}π^{-}}^{*}=0.019±0.005±0.004, where the first uncertainty is statistical and the second is systematic. Based on these results and assuming isospin invariance, we estimate that B[over ¯]→D^{(*)}ππℓ^{-}ν[over ¯] decays, where π denotes either a π^{±} and π^{0} meson, account for up to half the difference between the measured inclusive semileptonic branching fraction to charm hadrons and the corresponding sum of previously measured exclusive branching fractions.

  4. Antioxidant activity of the giant jellyfish Nemopilema nomurai measured by the oxygen radical absorbance capacity and hydroxyl radical averting capacity methods.

    PubMed

    Harada, Kazuki; Maeda, Toshimichi; Hasegawa, Yoshiro; Tokunaga, Takushi; Ogawa, Shinya; Fukuda, Kyoko; Nagatsuka, Norie; Nagao, Keiko; Ueno, Shunshiro

    2011-01-01

    The giant jellyfish Nemopilema nomurai (reaching sizes of up to 2 m diameter and 150 kg), which forms dense blooms, has caused extensive damage to fisheries by overloading trawl nets, while its toxic nematocysts cause dermatological symptoms. Giant jellyfish are currently discarded on the grounds of pest control. However, the giant jellyfish is considered to be edible and is part of Chinese cuisine. Therefore, we investigated whether any benefits for human health may be derived from consumption of the jellyfish in order to formulate medicated diets. Antioxidant activity of Nemopilema nomurai was measured using the oxygen radical absorbance capacity (ORAC) and hydroxyl radical averting capacity (HORAC) methods. Based on the results, the ORAC value of the giant jellyfish freeze-dried sample was 541 µmol trolox equivalent (TE)/100 g and the HORAC value was 3,687 µmol gallic acid equivalent (GAE)/100 g. On the other hand, the IC50 value of hydroxyl radical scavenging activity measured by using the electron spin resonance method was 3.3%. In conclusion, the results suggest that the freeze-dried powder of the giant jellyfish Nemopilema nomurai is a potentially beneficial food for humans.

  5. Neutron resonance averaging

    SciTech Connect

    Chrien, R.E.

    1986-10-01

    The principles of resonance averaging as applied to neutron capture reactions are described. Several illustrations of resonance averaging to problems of nuclear structure and the distribution of radiative strength in nuclei are provided. 30 refs., 12 figs.

  6. Nanomechanical resonance detector

    DOEpatents

    Grossman, Jeffrey C; Zettl, Alexander K

    2013-10-29

    An embodiment of a nanomechanical frequency detector includes a support structure and a plurality of elongated nanostructures coupled to the support structure. Each of the elongated nanostructures has a particular resonant frequency. The plurality of elongated nanostructures has a range of resonant frequencies. An embodiment of a method of identifying an object includes introducing the object to the nanomechanical resonance detector. A resonant response by at least one of the elongated nanostructures of the nanomechanical resonance detector indicates a vibrational mode of the object. An embodiment of a method of identifying a molecular species of the present invention includes introducing the molecular species to the nanomechanical resonance detector. A resonant response by at least one of the elongated nanostructures of the nanomechanical resonance detector indicates a vibrational mode of the molecular species.

  7. Solvothermal synthesis, crystal structure and properties of [Mn(C 6H 18N 4)] 4Mn 2Sb 4S 12 containing the new hetero-metallic [Mn 2Sb 4S 12] core

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schaefer, Michael; Näther, Christian; Bensch, Wolfgang

    2003-08-01

    The novel thioantimonate(III) [Mn(C 6H 18N 4)] 4Mn 2Sb 4S 12 was synthesised under solvothermal conditions by reacting Mn, Sb and S in an aqueous solution of tren (=tris(2-aminoethyl)amine). In the structure MnS 4 tetrahedra and SbS 3 pyramids are linked via common corners and edges to form a new hetero-metallic [Mn 2Sb 4S 12] core. The [Mn(C 6H 18N 4)] 2+ cations are located at the periphery of the core and are bound to the [Mn 2Sb 4S 12] unit via two S atoms. Interesting features of the structure are two large angles around S atoms connecting neighboured MnS 4 tetrahedra. The competition between interatomic bonding interactions and steric requirements are responsible for this observation. The thermal decomposition proceeds in one step involving a complex redox reaction.

  8. The lithium abundances of a large sample of red giants

    SciTech Connect

    Liu, Y. J.; Tan, K. F.; Wang, L.; Zhao, G.; Li, H. N.; Sato, Bun'ei; Takeda, Y. E-mail: gzhao@nao.cas.cn

    2014-04-20

    The lithium abundances for 378 G/K giants are derived with non-local thermodynamic equilibrium correction considered. Among these are 23 stars that host planetary systems. The lithium abundance is investigated, as a function of metallicity, effective temperature, and rotational velocity, as well as the impact of a giant planet on G/K giants. The results show that the lithium abundance is a function of metallicity and effective temperature. The lithium abundance has no correlation with rotational velocity at v sin i < 10 km s{sup –1}. Giants with planets present lower lithium abundance and slow rotational velocity (v sin i < 4 km s{sup –1}). Our sample includes three Li-rich G/K giants, 36 Li-normal stars, and 339 Li-depleted stars. The fraction of Li-rich stars in this sample agrees with the general rate of less than 1% in the literature, and the stars that show normal amounts of Li are supposed to possess the same abundance at the current interstellar medium. For the Li-depleted giants, Li-deficiency may have already taken place at the main sequence stage for many intermediate mass (1.5-5 M {sub ☉}) G/K giants. Finally, we present the lithium abundance and kinematic parameters for an enlarged sample of 565 giants using a compilation of the literature, and confirm that the lithium abundance is a function of metallicity and effective temperature. With the enlarged sample, we investigate the differences between the lithium abundance in thin-/thick-disk giants, which indicate that the lithium abundance in thick-disk giants is more depleted than that in thin-disk giants.

  9. Constructing stable 3D hydrodynamical models of giant stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ohlmann, Sebastian T.; Röpke, Friedrich K.; Pakmor, Rüdiger; Springel, Volker

    2017-02-01

    Hydrodynamical simulations of stellar interactions require stable models of stars as initial conditions. Such initial models, however, are difficult to construct for giant stars because of the wide range in spatial scales of the hydrostatic equilibrium and in dynamical timescales between the core and the envelope of the giant. They are needed for, e.g., modeling the common envelope phase where a giant envelope encompasses both the giant core and a companion star. Here, we present a new method of approximating and reconstructing giant profiles from a stellar evolution code to produce stable models for multi-dimensional hydrodynamical simulations. We determine typical stellar stratification profiles with the one-dimensional stellar evolution code mesa. After an appropriate mapping, hydrodynamical simulations are conducted using the moving-mesh code arepo. The giant profiles are approximated by replacing the core of the giant with a point mass and by constructing a suitable continuation of the profile to the center. Different reconstruction methods are tested that can specifically control the convective behaviour of the model. After mapping to a grid, a relaxation procedure that includes damping of spurious velocities yields stable models in three-dimensional hydrodynamical simulations. Initially convectively stable configurations lead to stable hydrodynamical models while for stratifications that are convectively unstable in the stellar evolution code, simulations recover the convective behaviour of the initial model and show large convective plumes with Mach numbers up to 0.8. Examples are shown for a 2 M⊙ red giant and a 0.67 M⊙ asymptotic giant branch star. A detailed analysis shows that the improved method reliably provides stable models of giant envelopes that can be used as initial conditions for subsequent hydrodynamical simulations of stellar interactions involving giant stars.

  10. [Sequence and antigenicity analysis for VP4s of EV71 strains isolated from Children in Beijing].

    PubMed

    Li, Yu-Yun; Zhu, Ru-Nan; Qian, Yuan; Deng, Jie; Sun, Yu; Wang, Fang; Zhao, Lin-Qing; Liu, Li-Ying

    2011-05-01

    In order to learn about the correlation between the sequences of VP4 of EV71 and clinical symptoms of patients and analyze the antigenicity of VP4 of EV71, as well as the cross-reactivity with VP4 of CA16, the sequences of VP4 gene from 10 EV71 strains isolated from infants and children with hand, foot and mouth diseases (HFMD) during 2007 to 2009 were determined through standard molecular cloning protocols, and the results were analyzed by EditSeq and MegAlign of DNAStar. Full-length genes of VP4s of EV71 and CA16 were amplified from virus isolates and expressed in E. coli. Then the expressed VP4s were used as antigens to detect IgG antibody in 189 sera samples from people taking health check up and patients of non-HFMD by Western-Blot. They were also used to detect IgM antibody in 14 of sera samples from infants and children with EV71 infection and 12 of sera samples from those with CA16 infection. The nucleotides identities among these 10 sequences of VP4s isolated in our lab were 94.20% - 100.00% and the deduced amino acids were identical. There was no consistent divergence between the sequences of serious cases and those from general HFMD cases. Phylogenetic analysis based on VP4s indicated that these 10 VP4s of EV71 belonged to C4. The nucleotide identities between EV71 VP4 (s67) and CA16 VP4 (s401) was 69.60% and the deduced amino acids identities was 78.60%. In the detection of IgG, the sera-positive rate for EV71 VP4 was 38.10% and the sera-positive rate of CA16 VP4 was 58.20%. The difference in the sera-positive rate between them was significant (chi2 = 15.30, P < 0.01), suggesting that the expressed VP4s of EV71 and CA16 were of good antigenicity and not cross-reactive. There was no positive reaction detected for IgM against VP4s for EV71 or CA16. The data from this study reveal important information for the further study of EV71.

  11. Study of time-dependent CP-violating asymmetries and flavor oscillations in neutral B decays at the Υ(4S)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aubert, B.; Boutigny, D.; Gaillard, J.-M.; Hicheur, A.; Karyotakis, Y.; Lees, J. P.; Robbe, P.; Tisserand, V.; Palano, A.; Pompili, A.; Chen, G. P.; Chen, J. C.; Qi, N. D.; Rong, G.; Wang, P.; Zhu, Y. S.; Eigen, G.; Stugu, B.; Abrams, G. S.; Borgland, A. W.; Breon, A. B.; Brown, D. N.; Button-Shafer, J.; Cahn, R. N.; Clark, A. R.; Gill, M. S.; Gritsan, A. V.; Groysman, Y.; Jacobsen, R. G.; Kadel, R. W.; Kadyk, J.; Kerth, L. T.; Kolomensky, Yu. G.; Kral, J. F.; Leclerc, C.; Levi, M. E.; Lynch, G.; Oddone, P. J.; Pripstein, M.; Roe, N. A.; Romosan, A.; Ronan, M. T.; Shelkov, V. G.; Telnov, A. V.; Wenzel, W. A.; Harrison, T. J.; Hawkes, C. M.; Knowles, D. J.; O'Neale, S. W.; Penny, R. C.; Watson, A. T.; Watson, N. K.; Deppermann, T.; Goetzen, K.; Koch, H.; Kunze, M.; Lewandowski, B.; Peters, K.; Schmuecker, H.; Steinke, M.; Barlow, N. R.; Bhimji, W.; Chevalier, N.; Clark, P. J.; Cottingham, W. N.; Foster, B.; Mackay, C.; Wilson, F. F.; Abe, K.; Hearty, C.; Mattison, T. S.; McKenna, J. A.; Thiessen, D.; Jolly, S.; McKemey, A. K.; Blinov, V. E.; Bukin, A. D.; Bukin, D. A.; Buzykaev, A. R.; Golubev, V. B.; Ivanchenko, V. N.; Korol, A. A.; Kravchenko, E. A.; Onuchin, A. P.; Serednyakov, S. I.; Skovpen, Yu. I.; Telnov, V. I.; Yushkov, A. N.; Best, D.; Chao, M.; Kirkby, D.; Lankford, A. J.; Mandelkern, M.; McMahon, S.; Stoker, D. P.; Arisaka, K.; Buchanan, C.; Chun, S.; Macfarlane, D. B.; Prell, S.; Rahatlou, Sh.; Raven, G.; Sharma, V.; Campagnari, C.; Dahmes, B.; Hart, P. A.; Kuznetsova, N.; Levy, S. L.; Long, O.; Lu, A.; Mazur, M. A.; Richman, J. D.; Verkerke, W.; Beringer, J.; Eisner, A. M.; Grothe, M.; Heusch, C. A.; Lockman, W. S.; Pulliam, T.; Schalk, T.; Schmitz, R. E.; Schumm, B. A.; Seiden, A.; Turri, M.; Walkowiak, W.; Williams, D. C.; Wilson, M. G.; Chen, E.; Dubois-Felsmann, G. P.; Dvoretskii, A.; Hitlin, D. G.; Metzler, S.; Oyang, J.; Porter, F. C.; Ryd, A.; Samuel, A.; Weaver, M.; Yang, S.; Zhu, R. Y.; Devmal, S.; Geld, T. L.; Jayatilleke, S.; Mancinelli, G.; Meadows, B. T.; Sokoloff, M. D.; Barillari, T.; Bloom, P.; Dima, M. O.; Ford, W. T.; Nauenberg, U.; Olivas, A.; Rankin, P.; Roy, J.; Smith, J. G.; van Hoek, W. C.; Blouw, J.; Harton, J. L.; Krishnamurthy, M.; Soffer, A.; Toki, W. H.; Wilson, R. J.; Zhang, J.; Brandt, T.; Brose, J.; Colberg, T.; Dickopp, M.; Dubitzky, R. S.; Hauke, A.; Maly, E.; Müller-Pfefferkorn, R.; Otto, S.; Schubert, K. R.; Schwierz, R.; Spaan, B.; Wilden, L.; Bernard, D.; Bonneaud, G. R.; Brochard, F.; Cohen-Tanugi, J.; Ferrag, S.; T'jampens, S.; Thiebaux, Ch.; Vasileiadis, G.; Verderi, M.; Anjomshoaa, A.; Bernet, R.; Khan, A.; Lavin, D.; Muheim, F.; Playfer, S.; Swain, J. E.; Tinslay, J.; Falbo, M.; Borean, C.; Bozzi, C.; Piemontese, L.; Treadwell, E.; Anulli, F.; Baldini-Ferroli, R.; Calcaterra, A.; de Sangro, R.; Falciai, D.; Finocchiaro, G.; Patteri, P.; Peruzzi, I. M.; Piccolo, M.; Xie, Y.; Zallo, A.; Bagnasco, S.; Buzzo, A.; Contri, R.; Crosetti, G.; Lo Vetere, M.; Macri, M.; Monge, M. R.; Passaggio, S.; Pastore, F. C.; Patrignani, C.; Pia, M. G.; Robutti, E.; Santroni, A.; Tosi, S.; Morii, M.; Bartoldus, R.; Hamilton, R.; Mallik, U.; Cochran, J.; Crawley, H. B.; Fischer, P.-A.; Lamsa, J.; Meyer, W. T.; Rosenberg, E. I.; Grosdidier, G.; Hast, C.; Höcker, A.; Lacker, H. M.; Laplace, S.; Lepeltier, V.; Lutz, A. M.; Plaszczynski, S.; Schune, M. H.; Trincaz-Duvoid, S.; Wormser, G.; Bionta, R. M.; Brigljević, V.; Lange, D. J.; Mugge, M.; van Bibber, K.; Wright, D. M.; Bevan, A. J.; Fry, J. R.; Gabathuler, E.; Gamet, R.; George, M.; Kay, M.; Payne, D. J.; Sloane, R. J.; Touramanis, C.; Aspinwall, M. L.; Bowerman, D. A.; Dauncey, P. D.; Egede, U.; Eschrich, I.; Gunawardane, N. J.; Nash, J. A.; Sanders, P.; Smith, D.; Azzopardi, D. E.; Back, J. J.; Bellodi, G.; Dixon, P.; Harrison, P. F.; Potter, R. J.; Shorthouse, H. W.; Strother, P.; Vidal, P. B.; Cowan, G.; George, S.; Green, M. G.; Kurup, A.; Marker, C. E.; McGrath, P.; McMahon, T. R.; Ricciardi, S.; Salvatore, F.; Vaitsas, G.; Brown, D.; Davis, C. L.; Allison, J.; Barlow, R. J.; Boyd, J. T.; Forti, A. C.; Fullwood, J.; Jackson, F.; Lafferty, G. D.; Savvas, N.; Weatherall, J. H.; Williams, J. C.; Farbin, A.; Jawahery, A.; Lillard, V.; Olsen, J.; Roberts, D. A.; Schieck, J. R.; Blaylock, G.; Dallapiccola, C.; Flood, K. T.; Hertzbach, S. S.; Kofler, R.; Koptchev, V. B.; Moore, T. B.; Staengle, H.; Willocq, S.; Brau, B.; Cowan, R.; Sciolla, G.; Taylor, F.; Yamamoto, R. K.; Milek, M.; Patel, P. M.; Palombo, F.; Bauer, J. M.; Cremaldi, L.; Eschenburg, V.; Kroeger, R.; Reidy, J.; Sanders, D. A.; Summers, D. J.; Nief, J. Y.; Taras, P.; Nicholson, H.; Cartaro, C.; Cavallo, N.; de Nardo, G.; Fabozzi, F.; Gatto, C.; Lista, L.; Paolucci, P.; Piccolo, D.; Sciacca, C.; Losecco, J. M.; Alsmiller, J. R.; Gabriel, T. A.; Brau, J.; Frey, R.; Grauges, E.; Iwasaki, M.; Sinev, N. B.; Strom, D.; Colecchia, F.; dal Corso, F.; Dorigo, A.; Galeazzi, F.; Margoni, M.; Michelon, G.; Morandin, M.; Posocco, M.; Rotondo, M.; Simonetto, F.; Stroili, R.; Torassa, E.; Voci, C.; Benayoun, M.; Briand, H.; Chauveau, J.; David, P.; de La Vaissière, Ch.; del Buono, L.; Hamon, O.; Le Diberder, F.; Leruste, Ph.; Ocariz, J.; Roos, L.; Stark, J.; Manfredi, P. F.; Re, V.; Speziali, V.; Frank, E. D.; Gladney, L.; Guo, Q. H.; Panetta, J.; Angelini, C.; Batignani, G.; Bettarini, S.; Bondioli, M.; Bucci, F.; Campagna, E.; Carpinelli, M.; Forti, F.; Giorgi, M. A.; Lusiani, A.; Marchiori, G.; Martinez-Vidal, F.; Morganti, M.; Neri, N.; Paoloni, E.; Rama, M.; Rizzo, G.; Sandrelli, F.; Simi, G.; Triggiani, G.; Walsh, J.; Haire, M.; Judd, D.; Paick, K.; Turnbull, L.; Wagoner, D. E.; Albert, J.; Elmer, P.; Lu, C.; Miftakov, V.; Schaffner, S. F.; Smith, A. J.; Tumanov, A.; Varnes, E. W.; Cavoto, G.; del Re, D.; Ferrarotto, F.; Ferroni, F.; Lamanna, E.; Mazzoni, M. A.; Morganti, S.; Piredda, G.; Safai Tehrani, F.; Serra, M.; Voena, C.; Faccini, R.; Christ, S.; Waldi, R.; Adye, T.; de Groot, N.; Franek, B.; Geddes, N. I.; Gopal, G. P.; Xella, S. M.; Aleksan, R.; Emery, S.; Gaidot, A.; Ganzhur, S. F.; Giraud, P.-F.; Hamel de Monchenault, G.; Kozanecki, W.; Langer, M.; London, G. W.; Mayer, B.; Serfass, B.; Vasseur, G.; Yèche, Ch.; Zito, M.; Purohit, M. V.; Singh, H.; Weidemann, A. W.; Yumiceva, F. X.; Adam, I.; Aston, D.; Berger, N.; Boyarski, A. M.; Calderini, G.; Convery, M. R.; Coupal, D. P.; Dong, D.; Dorfan, J.; Dunwoodie, W.; Field, R. C.; Glanzman, T.; Gowdy, S. J.; Haas, T.; Halyo, V.; Himel, T.; Hryn'ova, T.; Huffer, M. E.; Innes, W. R.; Jessop, C. P.; Kelsey, M. H.; Kim, P.; Kocian, M. L.; Langenegger, U.; Leith, D. W.; Luitz, S.; Luth, V.; Lynch, H. L.; Marsiske, H.; Menke, S.; Messner, R.; Muller, D. R.; O'Grady, C. P.; Ozcan, V. E.; Perazzo, A.; Perl, M.; Petrak, S.; Quinn, H.; Ratcliff, B. N.; Robertson, S. H.; Roodman, A.; Salnikov, A. A.; Schietinger, T.; Schindler, R. H.; Schwiening, J.; Snyder, A.; Soha, A.; Spanier, S. M.; Stelzer, J.; Su, D.; Sullivan, M. K.; Tanaka, H. A.; Va'Vra, J.; Wagner, S. R.; Weinstein, A. J.; Wisniewski, W. J.; Wright, D. H.; Young, C. C.; Burchat, P. R.; Cheng, C. H.; Meyer, T. I.; Roat, C.; Henderson, R.; Bugg, W.; Cohn, H.; Izen, J. M.; Kitayama, I.; Lou, X. C.; Bianchi, F.; Bona, M.; Gamba, D.; Bosisio, L.; della Ricca, G.; Dittongo, S.; Lanceri, L.; Poropat, P.; Vuagnin, G.; Panvini, R. S.; Brown, C. M.; Jackson, P. D.; Kowalewski, R.; Roney, J. M.; Band, H. R.; Charles, E.; Dasu, S.; Eichenbaum, A. M.; Hu, H.; Johnson, J. R.; Liu, R.; di Lodovico, F.; Pan, Y.; Prepost, R.; Scott, I. J.; Sekula, S. J.; von Wimmersperg-Toeller, J. H.; Wu, S. L.; Yu, Z.; Kordich, T. M.; Neal, H.

    2002-08-01

    We present a measurement of time-dependent CP-violating asymmetries in neutral B meson decays collected with the BABAR detector at the PEP-II asymmetric-energy e+e- collider at the Stanford Linear Accelerator Center. The data sample consists of 29.7 fb-1 recorded at the Υ(4S) resonance and 3.9 fb-1 off resonance. One of the neutral B mesons, which are produced in pairs at the Υ(4S), is fully reconstructed in the CP decay modes J/ψK0S, ψ(2S)K0S, χc1K0S, J/ψK*0 (K*0-->K0Sπ0) and J/ψK0L, or in flavor-eigenstate modes involving D(*)π/ρ/a1 and J/ψK*0 (K*0-->K+π-). The flavor of the other neutral B meson is tagged at the time of its decay, mainly with the charge of identified leptons and kaons. A neural network tagging algorithm is used to recover events without a clear lepton or kaon tag. The proper time elapsed between the decays is determined by measuring the distance between the decay vertices. Wrong-tag probabilities, the time-difference resolution function, and the B0-B0 oscillation frequency Δmd are measured with a sample of about 6350 fully-reconstructed B0 decays in hadronic flavor-eigenstate modes. A maximum-likelihood fit to this flavor eigenstate sample finds Δmd=0.516+/-0.016(stat)+/-0.010(syst) ps-1. The value of the asymmetry amplitude sin 2β is determined from a simultaneous maximum-likelihood fit to the time-difference distribution of the flavor-eigenstate sample and about 642 tagged B0 decays in the CP-eigenstate modes. We find sin 2β=0.59+/-0.14(stat)+/-0.05(syst), demonstrating that CP violation exists in the neutral B meson system. We also determine the value of the CP violation parameter |λ|=0.93+/-0.09(stat)+/-0.03(syst), which is consistent with the expectation of |λ|=1 for no direct CP violation.

  12. Porous SnIn4S8 microspheres in a new polymorph that promotes dyes degradation under visible light irradiation.

    PubMed

    Yan, Tingjiang; Li, Liping; Li, Guangshe; Wang, Yunjian; Hu, Wanbiao; Guan, Xiangfeng

    2011-02-15

    Porous SnIn(4)S(8) microspheres were initially synthesized through a facile solvothermal approach and were investigated as visible-light driven photocatalysts for dyes degradation in polluted water. The photocatalysts were characterized by XRD, SEM, TEM, N(2) adsorption-desorption, and UV-vis diffuse reflectance techniques. Results demonstrated that the as-synthesized SnIn(4)S(8) was of a new tetragonal polymorph, showing a band-gap of 2.5 eV, a specific surface area of 197 m(2) g(-1), and an accessible porous structure as well. The photocatalytic activity of the porous SnIn(4)S(8) was evaluated by decomposition of several typical organic dyes including methyl orange, rhodamine B, and methylene blue in aqueous solution under visible light irradiation. It is demonstrated that porous SnIn(4)S(8) was highly photoactive and stable for dyes degradation, showing photocatalytic activity much higher than binary constituent sulfides like In(2)S(3), SnS(2), or even ternary chalcogenide ZnIn(2)S(4) photocatalyst. The excellent photocatalytic performance of porous SnIn(4)S(8) is the consequence of its high surface area, well-defined porous texture, and large amount of hydroxyl radicals.

  13. DO GIANT PLANETS SURVIVE TYPE II MIGRATION?

    SciTech Connect

    Hasegawa, Yasuhiro; Ida, Shigeru E-mail: ida@geo.titech.ac.jp

    2013-09-10

    Planetary migration is one of the most serious problems to systematically understand the observations of exoplanets. We clarify that the theoretically predicted type II, migration (like type I migration) is too fast, by developing detailed analytical arguments in which the timescale of type II migration is compared with the disk lifetime. In the disk-dominated regime, the type II migration timescale is characterized by a local viscous diffusion timescale, while the disk lifetime is characterized by a global diffusion timescale that is much longer than the local one. Even in the planet-dominated regime where the inertia of the planet mass reduces the migration speed, the timescale is still shorter than the disk lifetime except in the final disk evolution stage where the total disk mass decays below the planet mass. This suggests that most giant planets plunge into the central stars within the disk lifetime, and it contradicts the exoplanet observations that gas giants are piled up at r {approx}> 1 AU. We examine additional processes that may arise in protoplanetary disks: dead zones, photoevaporation of gas, and gas flow across a gap formed by a type II migrator. Although they make the type II migration timescale closer to the disk lifetime, we show that none of them can act as an effective barrier for rapid type II migration with the current knowledge of these processes. We point out that gas flow across a gap and the fraction of the flow accreted onto the planets are uncertain and they may have the potential to solve the problem. Much more detailed investigation for each process may be needed to explain the observed distribution of gas giants in extrasolar planetary systems.

  14. Dynamics of Giant Planet Polar Vortices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brueshaber, Shawn R.; Sayanagi, Kunio M.

    2016-10-01

    The polar atmospheres of the giant planets have come under increasing interest since a compact, warm-core, stable, cyclonic polar vortex was discovered at each of Saturn's poles. In addition, the south pole of Neptune appears to have a similar feature, and Uranus' north pole is exhibiting activity that could indicate the formation of a polar vortex. We investigate the formation and maintenance of these giant planet polar vortices by varying several key atmospheric dynamics parameters in a forced-dissipative, 1.5-layer shallow water model. Our simulations are run using the EPIC (Explicit Planetary Isentropic Coordinate) global circulation model, to which we have added a gamma-plane rectangular grid option appropriate for simulating polar atmospheric dynamics.In our numerical simulations, we vary the atmospheric deformation radius, planetary rotation rate, storm forcing intensity, and storm vorticity (cyclone-to-anticyclone) ratio to determine what combination of values favors the formation of a polar vortex. We find that forcing the atmosphere by injecting small-scale mass perturbations ("storms") to form either all cyclones, all anticyclones, or equal numbers of both, may all result in a cyclonic polar vortex. Additionally, we examine the role of eddy momentum convergence in the intensification and maintenance of a polar cyclone.Our simulation results are applicable to understanding all four of the solar system giant planets. In the future, we plan to expand our modeling effort with a more realistic 3D primitive equations model, also with a gamma-plane rectangular grid using EPIC. With our 3D primitive equations model, we will study how various vertical atmospheric stratification structures influence the formation and maintenance of a polar cyclone. While our shallow-water model only involves storms of a single layer, a 3D primitive equations model allows us to study how storms of finite vertical extent and at differing levels in the atmosphere may further favor

  15. The capture of Trojan asteroids by the giant planets during planetary migration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lykawka, P. S.; Horner, J.

    2010-06-01

    Of the four giant planets in the Solar system, only Jupiter and Neptune are currently known to possess swarms of Trojan asteroids - small objects that experience a 1:1 mean motion resonance with their host planet. In Lykawka et al., we performed extensive dynamical simulations, including planetary migration, to investigate the origin of the Neptunian Trojan population. Utilizing the vast amount of simulation data obtained for that work, together with fresh results from new simulations, we here investigate the dynamical capture of Trojans by all four giant planets from a primordial trans-Neptunian disc. We find the likelihood of a given planetesimal from this region being captured on to an orbit within Jupiter's Trojan cloud lies between several times 10-6 and 10-5. For Saturn, the probability is found to be in the range <10-6 to 10-5, whilst for Uranus the probabilities range between 10-5 and 10-4. Finally, Neptune displays the greatest probability of Trojan capture, with values ranging between 10-4 and 10-3. Our results suggest that all four giant planets are able to capture and retain a significant population of Trojan objects from the disc by the end of planetary migration. As a result of encounters with the giant planets prior to Trojan capture, these objects tend to be captured on orbits that are spread over a wide range of orbital eccentricities and inclinations. The bulk of captured objects are to some extent dynamically unstable, and therefore, the populations of these objects tend to decay over the age of the Solar system, providing an important ongoing source of new objects moving on dynamically unstable orbits among the giant planets. Given that a huge population of objects would be displaced by Neptune's outward migration (with a potential cumulative mass a number of times that of the Earth), we conclude that the surviving remnant of the Trojans captured during the migration of the outer planets might be sufficient to explain the currently known Trojan

  16. Giant fibroelastoma of the aortic valve.

    PubMed

    di Summa, Michele; Iezzi, Federica

    2013-01-01

    Fibroelastomas account for less than 10% of all cardiac tumours, representing the most common valvular and the second most common cardiac benign tumour, following myxomas. Fibroelastomas are histologically benign; they can result in life-threatening complications such as stroke, acute valvular dysfunction, embolism, ventricular fibrillation, and sudden death. Surgical resection should be offered to all patients who have symptoms and to asymptomatic patients who have pedunculated lesions or tumors larger than 1 cm in diameter. Valve-sparing excision produces good long-term results in most instances. We report our surgical experience of a giant fibroelastoma in the aortic valve.

  17. Giant magnetoresistance in organic spin valves

    SciTech Connect

    Sun, Da-Li; Yin, Lifeng; Sun, Chengjun; Guo, Hangwen; Gai, Zheng; Zhang, Xiaoguang; Ward, Thomas Z; Cheng, Zhaohua; Shen, Jian

    2010-01-01

    Interfacial diffusion between magnetic electrodes and organic spacer layers is a serious problem in the organic spintronics which complicates attempts to understand the spin-dependent transport mechanism and hurts the achievement of a desirably high magnetoresistance (MR). We deposit nanodots instead of atoms onto the organic layer using buffer layer assist growth. Spin valves using this method exhibit a sharper interface and a giant MR of up to {approx}300%. Analysis of the current-voltage characteristics indicates that the spin-dependent carrier injection correlates with the observed MR.

  18. Enhanced giant magnetoimpedance in heterogeneous nanobrush

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    A highly sensitive and large working range giant magnetoimpedance (GMI) effect is found in the novel nanostructure: nanobrush. The nanostructure is composed of a soft magnetic nanofilm and a nanowire array, respectively fabricated by RF magnetron sputtering and electrochemical deposition. The optimal GMI ratio of nanobrush is promoted to more than 250%, higher than the pure FeNi film and some sandwich structures at low frequency. The design of this structure is based on the vortex distribution of magnetic moments in thin film, and it can be induced by the exchange coupling effect between the interfaces of nanobrush. PMID:22963551

  19. Giant Malignant Pheochromocytoma with Palpable Rib Metastases

    PubMed Central

    Gokce, Gokhan; Kilicli, Fatih; Elagoz, Sahande; Ayan, Semih; Gultekin, Emin Yener

    2014-01-01

    Pheochromocytoma is a rare and usually benign neuroendocrine neoplasm. Only 10% of all these tumors are malignant and there are no definitive histological or cytological criteria of malignancy. Single malignancy criteria are the presence of advanced locoregional disease or metastases. We report a case, with a giant retroperitoneal tumor having multiple metastases including palpable rib metastases, who was diagnosed as a malignant pheochromocytoma. The patient was treated with surgery. The literature was reviewed to evaluate tumor features and current diagnostic and therapeutic approaches for patients with metastatic or potentially malignant pheochromocytoma. PMID:25152826

  20. Enhanced giant magnetoimpedance in heterogeneous nanobrush

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Yi; Mu, Congpu; Luo, Caiqin; Dong, Juan; Liu, Qingfang; Wang, Jianbo

    2012-09-01

    A highly sensitive and large working range giant magnetoimpedance (GMI) effect is found in the novel nanostructure: nanobrush. The nanostructure is composed of a soft magnetic nanofilm and a nanowire array, respectively fabricated by RF magnetron sputtering and electrochemical deposition. The optimal GMI ratio of nanobrush is promoted to more than 250%, higher than the pure FeNi film and some sandwich structures at low frequency. The design of this structure is based on the vortex distribution of magnetic moments in thin film, and it can be induced by the exchange coupling effect between the interfaces of nanobrush.

  1. Enhanced giant magnetoimpedance in heterogeneous nanobrush.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Yi; Mu, Congpu; Luo, Caiqin; Dong, Juan; Liu, Qingfang; Wang, Jianbo

    2012-09-10

    A highly sensitive and large working range giant magnetoimpedance (GMI) effect is found in the novel nanostructure: nanobrush. The nanostructure is composed of a soft magnetic nanofilm and a nanowire array, respectively fabricated by RF magnetron sputtering and electrochemical deposition. The optimal GMI ratio of nanobrush is promoted to more than 250%, higher than the pure FeNi film and some sandwich structures at low frequency. The design of this structure is based on the vortex distribution of magnetic moments in thin film, and it can be induced by the exchange coupling effect between the interfaces of nanobrush.

  2. Asymptomatic Giant Intraventricular Cysticercosis: A Case Report

    PubMed Central

    Wongjittraporn, Suwarat; Tongma, Chawat; Chung, Heath

    2016-01-01

    Neurocysticercosis is a growing health problem in the United States and worldwide. Diagnosis and treatment is challenging especially if the physician is not familiar with this condition. The World Health Organization (WHO) estimates that neurocysticercosis affects 50 million people worldwide, especially in developing countries and causes approximately 50,000 deaths annually.1 Neurocysticercosis is of emerging importance in the United States especially in Hawai‘i because of immigration from disease-endemic regions.2 We present a case of a young Chinese immigrant male who presented with impressive imaging studies of a giant intraventricular neurocysticercosis. This case emphasizes the importance of recognizing neurocysticercosis, especially in the immigrant population. PMID:27437162

  3. Giant nonreciprocity near exceptional-point degeneracies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thomas, Roney; Li, Huanan; Ellis, F. M.; Kottos, Tsampikos

    2016-10-01

    We show that gyrotropic structures with balanced gain and loss that respect antilinear symmetries exhibit a giant nonreciprocity at the so-called exact phase where the eigenfrequencies of the isolated non-Hermitian setup are real. The effect occurs in a parameter domain near an exceptional- point (EP) degeneracy, where mode orthogonality collapses. The theoretical predictions are confirmed numerically in the microwave domain, where a nonreciprocal transport above 90 dB is demonstrated, and are further verified using lumped-circuitry modeling. The analysis allows us to speculate the universal nature of the phenomenon for any wave system where EP and gyrotropy can coexist.

  4. Giant Star Clusters Near Galactic Core

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2001-01-01

    A video sequence of still images goes deep into the Milky Way galaxy to the Arches Cluster. Hubble, penetrating through dust and clouds, peers into the core where two giant clusters shine more brightly than any other clusters in the galaxy. Footage shows the following still images: (1) wide view of Sagittarius constellation; (2) the Palomar Observatory's 2 micron all-sky survey; and (3) an image of the Arches Cluster taken with the Hubble Space Telescope NICMOS instrument. Dr. Don Figer of the Space Telescope Science Institute discusses the significance of the observations and relates his first reaction to the images.

  5. Giant oral lipoma: a rare entity*

    PubMed Central

    Ponce, José Burgos; Ferreira, Gustavo Zanna; Santos, Paulo Sérgio da Silva; Lara, Vanessa Soares

    2016-01-01

    Lipomas are very common benign slow-growing soft tissue neoplasms composed of mature adipose tissue mostly diagnosed in the fifth decade of life. These tumors rarely present in the oral cavity, representing less than approximately 5% of all benign mouth tumors. They are usually less than 2cm in size and etiology remains unclear. We report a young male patient presenting with a giant lipoma in the buccal mucosa. Histopathology revealed a large area of mature fat cells consistent with conventional lipoma and an area of the mucosal lining of the lesion suggestive of morsicatio buccarum. In the present article, we emphasize the clinicopathological features and differential diagnosis of the disease.

  6. Giant magnetoresistance in bilayer graphene nanoflakes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Farghadan, Rouhollah; Farekiyan, Marzieh

    2016-09-01

    Coherent spin transport through bilayer graphene (BLG) nanoflakes sandwiched between two electrodes made of single-layer zigzag graphene nanoribbon was investigated by means of Landauer-Buttiker formalism. Application of a magnetic field only on BLG structure as a channel produces a perfect spin polarization in a large energy region. Moreover, the conductance could be strongly modulated by magnetization of the zigzag edge of AB-stacked BLG, and the junction, entirely made of carbon, produces a giant magnetoresistance (GMR) up to 100%. Intestinally, GMR and spin polarization could be tuned by varying BLG width and length. Generally, MR in a AB-stacked BLG strongly increases (decreases) with length (width).

  7. Giant velum interpositum meningioma in a child.

    PubMed

    Moiyadi, Aliasgar V; Shetty, Prakash

    2012-07-01

    Intraventricular meningiomas are rare, but are relatively more often seen in children. Large size at presentation often obscures anatomical details. A particular subset of such tumors arising from the velum interpositum pose a significant surgical challenge. Thorough preoperative imaging, especially with respect to the course of the deep venous structures, provides useful evidence as to the origin. Preservation of venous anatomy at surgery is vital. We describe a 3-year-old girl with a giant velum interpositum meningioma that was completely excised with excellent outcome. This is probably the youngest such case reported.

  8. On the Role of Additional [4Fe-4S] Clusters with a Free Coordination Site in Radical-SAM Enzymes

    PubMed Central

    Mulliez, Etienne; Duarte, Victor; Arragain, Simon; Fontecave, Marc; Atta, Mohamed

    2017-01-01

    The canonical CysXXXCysXXCys motif is the hallmark of the Radical-SAM superfamily. This motif is responsible for the ligation of a [4Fe-4S] cluster containing a free coordination site available for SAM binding. The five enzymes MoaA, TYW1, MiaB, RimO and LipA contain in addition a second [4Fe-4S] cluster itself bound to three other cysteines and thus also displaying a potentially free coordination site. This review article summarizes recent important achievements obtained on these five enzymes with the main focus to delineate the role of this additional [4Fe-4S] cluster in catalysis. PMID:28361051

  9. The [4Fe4S] cluster of human DNA primase functions as a redox switch using DNA charge transport.

    PubMed

    O'Brien, Elizabeth; Holt, Marilyn E; Thompson, Matthew K; Salay, Lauren E; Ehlinger, Aaron C; Chazin, Walter J; Barton, Jacqueline K

    2017-02-24

    DNA charge transport chemistry offers a means of long-range, rapid redox signaling. We demonstrate that the [4Fe4S] cluster in human DNA primase can make use of this chemistry to coordinate the first steps of DNA synthesis. Using DNA electrochemistry, we found that a change in oxidation state of the [4Fe4S] cluster acts as a switch for DNA binding. Single-atom mutations that inhibit this charge transfer hinder primase initiation without affecting primase structure or polymerization. Generating a single base mismatch in the growing primer duplex, which attenuates DNA charge transport, inhibits primer truncation. Thus, redox signaling by [4Fe4S] clusters using DNA charge transport regulates primase binding to DNA and illustrates chemistry that may efficiently drive substrate handoff between polymerases during DNA replication.

  10. Evolutionary dynamics of giant viruses and their virophages.

    PubMed

    Wodarz, Dominik

    2013-07-01

    Giant viruses contain large genomes, encode many proteins atypical for viruses, replicate in large viral factories, and tend to infect protists. The giant virus replication factories can in turn be infected by so called virophages, which are smaller viruses that negatively impact giant virus replication. An example is Mimiviruses that infect the protist Acanthamoeba and that are themselves infected by the virophage Sputnik. This study examines the evolutionary dynamics of this system, using mathematical models. While the models suggest that the virophage population will evolve to increasing degrees of giant virus inhibition, it further suggests that this renders the virophage population prone to extinction due to dynamic instabilities over wide parameter ranges. Implications and conditions required to avoid extinction are discussed. Another interesting result is that virophage presence can fundamentally alter the evolutionary course of the giant virus. While the giant virus is predicted to evolve toward increasing its basic reproductive ratio in the absence of the virophage, the opposite is true in its presence. Therefore, virophages can not only benefit the host population directly by inhibiting the giant viruses but also indirectly by causing giant viruses to evolve toward weaker phenotypes. Experimental tests for this model are suggested.

  11. New Frontiers-Class Missions to the Ice Giants

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Elder, C. M.; Bramson, A. M.; Blum, L. W.; Chilton, H. T.; Chopra, A.; Chu, C.; Das, A.; Davis, A.; Delgado, A.; Fulton, J.; Jozwiak, L.; Khayat, A.; Landis, M. E.; Molaro, J. L.; Slipski, M.; Valencia, S.; Watkins, J.; Young, C. L.; Budney, C. J.; Mitchell, K. L.

    2017-02-01

    Ice giants are the least understood class of planets in our solar system but the most commonly observed type of exoplanet. We identify the major hurdles to achieving an ice giant mission within the cost constraints of a New Frontiers-class mission.

  12. [Prevalence and clinicopathological characteristics of giant cell tumors].

    PubMed

    Estrada-Villaseñor, E G; Linares-González, L M; Delgado-Cedillo, E A; González-Guzmán, R; Rico-Martínez, G

    2015-01-01

    The frequency of giant cell tumors reported in the literature is very variable. Considering that our population has its own features, which distinguish it from the Anglo-Saxon and Asian populations, we think that both the frequency and the clinical characteristics of giant cell tumors in our population are different. The major aim of this paper was to determine the frequency and clinicopathological characteristics of giant cell tumors of the bone. A cross-sectional descriptive study was conducted of the cases diagnosed at our service as giant cell tumors of the bone from January to December 2013. The electronic clinical records, radiologic records and histologic slides from each case were reviewed. Giant cell tumors represented 17% of total bone tumors and 28% of benign tumors. Patients included 13 females and 18 males. The most frequent locations of giant cell tumors were: the proximal tibia, 9 cases (29%), and the distal femur, 6 cases (19%). Forty-five percent of giant cell tumors were associated with aneurysmal bone cyst (ABC) (14 cases) and one case (3%) was malignant. The frequency of giant cell tumors in this case series was intermediate, that is, higher than the one reported in Anglo-Saxon countries (usually low), but without reaching the frequency rates reported in Asian countries (high).

  13. The central giant cell granuloma in childhood: clinical case report.

    PubMed

    Loyola, Adriano Mota; Fernandes, Alexandre Vieira; Magalhaes, Aparecido Onorio; Moreira, Marilia Rodrigues

    2005-01-01

    This report reviews the literature involving the central giant cell granuloma. Diagnosis and treatment are presented. The article reports the case of central giant cell granuloma, affecting the anterior region maxillary of a child, whom a conservative treatment, with cryotherapy, helped the preservation of anterior permanent teeth germs.

  14. Shoot transcriptome of the Giant Reed, Arundo donax

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The giant reed, Arundo donax, is a perennial grass species that has become an invasive plant in many countries. Expansive stands of A. donax have significant negative impacts on available water resources and efforts are underway to identify biological control agents against this species. The giant r...

  15. Rare liver tumor: symptomatic giant von Meyenburg complex

    PubMed Central

    Singh, Yardesh; Cawich, Shamir O.; Ramjit, Chunilal; Naraynsingh, Vijay

    2016-01-01

    von Meyenburg complexes are hamartomas that arise from intra-hepatic bile ducts. Symptomatic lesions are uncommon and giant lesions are exceedingly rare. When encountered, they should be excised because there are reports of malignant change in large, symptomatic lesions. We report a case of a symptomatic giant von Meyenburg complex. PMID:28068648

  16. Forming giant-sized polymersomes using gel-assisted rehydration

    DOE PAGES

    Greene, Adrienne C.; Sasaki, Darryl Y.; Bachand, George D.

    2016-05-26

    Here, we present a protocol to rapidly form giant polymer vesicles (pGVs). Briefly, polymer solutions are dehydrated on dried agarose films adhered to coverslips. Rehydration of the polymer films results in rapid formation of pGVs. This method greatly advances the preparation of synthetic giant vesicles for direct applications in biomimetic studies.

  17. Forming giant-sized polymersomes using gel-assisted rehydration

    SciTech Connect

    Greene, Adrienne C.; Sasaki, Darryl Y.; Bachand, George D.

    2016-05-26

    Here, we present a protocol to rapidly form giant polymer vesicles (pGVs). Briefly, polymer solutions are dehydrated on dried agarose films adhered to coverslips. Rehydration of the polymer films results in rapid formation of pGVs. This method greatly advances the preparation of synthetic giant vesicles for direct applications in biomimetic studies.

  18. The spherical birdcage resonator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Harpen, Michael D.

    A description of the operation of a spherical resonator capable of producing a uniform magnetic induction throughout a spherical volume is presented. Simple closed-form expressions for the spectrum of resonant frequencies are derived for both the low-pass and the high-pass configuration of the resonator and are shown to compare favorably with observation in an experimental coil system. It is shown that the spherical resonator produces a uniform spherical field of view when used as a magnetic resonance imaging radiofrequency coil.

  19. Ovenized microelectromechanical system (MEMS) resonator

    SciTech Connect

    Olsson, Roy H; Wojciechowski, Kenneth; Kim, Bongsang

    2014-03-11

    An ovenized micro-electro-mechanical system (MEMS) resonator including: a substantially thermally isolated mechanical resonator cavity; a mechanical oscillator coupled to the mechanical resonator cavity; and a heating element formed on the mechanical resonator cavity.

  20. Suppression of Nonmagnetic Insulating State by Application of Pressure in Mineral Tetrahedrite Cu12Sb4S13

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kitagawa, Shunsaku; Sekiya, Taishi; Araki, Shingo; Kobayashi, Tatsuo C.; Ishida, Kenji; Kambe, Takashi; Kimura, Takumi; Nishimoto, Naoki; Kudo, Kazutaka; Nohara, Minoru

    2015-09-01

    The mineral tetrahedrite Cu12Sb4S13 exhibits a first-order metal-insulator transition (MIT) at TMI = 85 K and ambient pressure. We measured the 63Cu-NMR at ambient pressure and the resistivity and magnetic susceptibility at high pressures. 63Cu-NMR results indicate a nonmagnetic insulating ground state in this compound. The MIT is monotonically suppressed by pressure and disappears at ˜1.0 GPa. Two other anomalies are observed in the resistivity measurements, and the pressure-temperature phase diagram of Cu12Sb4S13 is constructed.

  1. Predicted Thermoelectric Properties of the Layered XBi4S7 (X = Mn, Fe) Based Materials: First Principles Calculations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Azam, Sikander; Khan, Saleem Ayaz; Goumri-Said, Souraya; Kanoun, Mohammed Benali

    2017-01-01

    We report a theoretical investigation of electronic structures, optical and thermoelectric properties of two ternary-layered chalcogenides, MnBi4S7 and FeBi4S7 , by combining the first principles density functional calculations and semi-local Boltzmann transport theory. The calculated electronic band structure have demonstrated that both compounds exhibit indirect band gaps. The optical transitions are explored via the dielectric function (real and imaginary parts) along with other related optical constants including refractive index, reflectivity, and energy loss spectrum. These chalcogenides have exhibited interesting thermoelectric properties such as Seebeck's coefficient, electrical and thermal conductivity, and power factor as function of temperatures.

  2. Peripheral giant cell granuloma: This enormity is a rarity.

    PubMed

    Rodrigues, Silvia Victor; Mitra, Dipika Kalyan; Pawar, Sudarshana Devendrasing; Vijayakar, Harshad Narayan

    2015-01-01

    Peripheral giant cell granuloma (PGCG) is an infrequent exophytic lesion of the oral cavity, also known as giant cell epulis, osteoclastoma, giant cell reparative granuloma, or giant cell hyperplasia. Lesions vary in appearance from smooth, regularly outlined masses to irregularly shaped, multilobulated protuberances with surface indentations. Ulcerations of the margin are occasionally seen. The lesions are painless, vary in size, and may cover several teeth. It normally presents as a purplish-red nodule consisting of multinucleated giant cells in the background of mononuclear stromal cells and extravasated red blood cells. This case report describes the unusual appearance of a PGCG extending from left maxillary interdental gingiva to palatal area in 32-year-old female patient.

  3. Metastatic giant basal cell carcinoma: a case report

    PubMed Central

    Bellahammou, Khadija; Lakhdissi, Asmaa; Akkar, Othman; Rais, Fadoua; Naoual, Benhmidou; Elghissassi, Ibrahim; M’rabti, Hind; Errihani, Hassan

    2016-01-01

    Basal cell carcinoma is the most common skin cancer, characterised by a slow growing behavior, metastasis are extremely rare, and it occurs in less than 0, 1% of all cases. Giant basal cell carcinoma is a rare form of basal cell carcinoma, more aggressive and defined as a tumor measuring more than 5 cm at its largest diameter. Only 1% of all basal cell carcinoma develops to a giant basal cell carcinoma, resulting of patient's negligence. Giant basal cell carcinoma is associated with higher potential of metastasis and even death, compared to ordinary basal cell carcinoma. We report a case of giant basal cell carcinoma metastaticin lung occurring in a 79 years old male patient, with a fatal evolution after one course of systemic chemotherapy. Giant basal cell carcinoma is a very rare entity, early detection of these tumors could prevent metastasis occurrence and improve the prognosis of this malignancy. PMID:27795755

  4. Metastatic giant basal cell carcinoma: a case report.

    PubMed

    Bellahammou, Khadija; Lakhdissi, Asmaa; Akkar, Othman; Rais, Fadoua; Naoual, Benhmidou; Elghissassi, Ibrahim; M'rabti, Hind; Errihani, Hassan

    2016-01-01

    Basal cell carcinoma is the most common skin cancer, characterised by a slow growing behavior, metastasis are extremely rare, and it occurs in less than 0, 1% of all cases. Giant basal cell carcinoma is a rare form of basal cell carcinoma, more aggressive and defined as a tumor measuring more than 5 cm at its largest diameter. Only 1% of all basal cell carcinoma develops to a giant basal cell carcinoma, resulting of patient's negligence. Giant basal cell carcinoma is associated with higher potential of metastasis and even death, compared to ordinary basal cell carcinoma. We report a case of giant basal cell carcinoma metastaticin lung occurring in a 79 years old male patient, with a fatal evolution after one course of systemic chemotherapy. Giant basal cell carcinoma is a very rare entity, early detection of these tumors could prevent metastasis occurrence and improve the prognosis of this malignancy.

  5. [Giant haemangioma of the liver: diagnosis and treatment].

    PubMed

    Hoekstra, Lisette T; Bieze, Matthanja; Erdogan, Deha; Roelofs, Joris J T H; Beuers, Ulrich H W; van Gulik, Thomas M

    2012-01-01

    A liver haemangioma is a benign, usually small tumour comprised of blood vessels, which is often discovered coincidentally; giant haemangiomas are defined as haemangiomas larger than 5 cm. The differential diagnosis includes other hypervascular tumours, such as hepatocellular adenoma, hepatocellular carcinoma, metastasis of a neuro-endocrine tumour or renal cell carcinoma.- The diagnosis is based on abdominal ultrasonography and can be confirmed by a CT or MR scan. A wait-and-see approach is justified in patients without symptoms or with minimal symptoms, even in the presence of a giant haemangioma. Surgical resection of a giant haemangioma is only necessary when the preoperative diagnosis is inconclusive, or when the haemangioma leads to mechanical symptoms or complications. Extirpation is the only effective form of treatment of the giant haemangioma; enucleation is preferred over partial liver resection. A known complication of a giant haemangioma is the occurrence of disseminated intravascular coagulation, the Kasabach-Merritt syndrome; intervention is then demanded.

  6. Attosecond-pulse production using resonantly enhanced high-order harmonics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Strelkov, V. V.

    2016-12-01

    We study theoretically the effect of giant resonance in Xe on the phase difference between consecutive resonantly enhanced high-order harmonics and calculate the duration of the attosecond pulses produced by these harmonics. For certain conditions, resonantly induced dephasing compensates the phase difference which is intrinsic for off-resonance harmonics. We find these conditions analytically and compare them with numerical results. This harmonic synchronization allows attosecond-pulse shortening in conjunction with the resonance-induced intensity increase of more than an order of magnitude. The latter enhancement relaxes the requirements for the UV filtering needed for attosecond-pulse production. Using a two-color driving field allows a further increase of the intensity. In particular, a causticlike feature in the harmonic spectrum leads to a generation efficiency growth of up to two orders of magnitude, which is, however, accompanied by an elongation of the XUV pulse.

  7. Optical Helmholtz resonators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chevalier, Paul; Bouchon, Patrick; Haïdar, Riad; Pardo, Fabrice

    2014-08-01

    Helmholtz resonators are widely used acoustic components able to select a single frequency. Here, based on an analogy between acoustics and electromagnetism wave equations, we present an electromagnetic 2D Helmholtz resonator made of a metallic slit-box structure. At the resonance, the light is funneled in the λ/800 apertures, and is subsequently absorbed in the cavity. As in acoustics, there is no higher order of resonance, which is an appealing feature for applications such as photodetection or thermal emission. Eventually, we demonstrate that the slit is of capacitive nature while the box behaves inductively. We derive an analytical formula for the resonance wavelength, which does not rely on wave propagation and therefore does not depend on the permittivity of the material filling the box. Besides, in contrast with half-wavelength resonators, the resonance wavelength can be engineered by both the slit aspect ratio and the box area.

  8. Resonance splitting in gyrotropic ring resonators.

    PubMed

    Jalas, Dirk; Petrov, Alexander; Krause, Michael; Hampe, Jan; Eich, Manfred

    2010-10-15

    We present the theoretical concept of an optical isolator based on resonance splitting in a silicon ring resonator covered with a magneto-optical polymer cladding. For this task, a perturbation method is derived for the modes in the cylindrical coordinate system. A polymer magneto-optical cladding causing a 0.01 amplitude of the off-diagonal element of the dielectric tensor is assumed. It is shown that the derived resonance splitting of the clockwise and counterclockwise modes increases for smaller ring radii. For the ring with a radius of approximately 1.5μm, a 29GHz splitting is demonstrated. An integrated optical isolator with a 10μm geometrical footprint is proposed based on a critically coupled ring resonator.

  9. Management of a giant perineal condylomata acuminata.

    PubMed

    Hemper, Evelyn; Wittau, Mathias; Lemke, Johannes; Kornmann, Marko; Henne-Bruns, Doris

    2016-01-01

    A condylomata acuminata infection is caused by human papillomaviridae (HPV). This sexually transmitted condition most often affects the perineal region. Importantly, infections with types 16 and 18 are associated with an increased risk for anal and cervix cancer. In most cases topical therapy is sufficient for successfully treating condylomata acuminata. Here, we report the case of a 51-year old patient who suffered from a giant perianal located condylomata acuminata which had developed over a period of more than 10 years. Imaging by MRI revealed a possible infiltration of the musculus sphincter ani externus. Because a topical treatment or a radiotherapy was considered unfeasible, a surgical treatment was the only therapeutic option in this unusual case. First, a colostomy was performed and subsequently a resection of the tumor in toto with circular resection of the external portion of the musculus sphincter ani externus was performed. The large skin defect was closed by two gluteus flaps. The rectum wall was reinserted in the remnant of the musculus sphincter ani externus. Postoperatively, parts of the flaps developed necrosis. Therefore, a vacuum sealing therapy was initiated. Subsequently, the remaining skin defects were closed by autologous skin transplantation. Six months later the colostomy could be reversed. To date, one year after first surgery, the patient has still a normal sphincter function and no recurrence of the condylomata acuminata. This case report demonstrates how giant condylomata acuminata can be successfully treated by extended surgical procedures including colostomy and plastic reconstruction of resulting defects upon resection.

  10. [Giant viruses: update, enigmas, controversies and perspectives].

    PubMed

    Claverie, Jean-Michel; Abergel, Chantal

    2016-12-01

    Unlike microbes known in his time, the first virus (that of tobacco mosaic disease) was discovered by Ivanoski in 1892 because it was not retained by Chamberland's porcelain candles. For more than a century afterward, viruses were equated with this simple property that is still extensively used today (using modern 0,2 µm pore filters) as a practical criterion to delineate the "viral fraction" from other microbes in medical or environmental samples. The first documented exception to the simplistic criterion of particle size came with the discovery of Mimivirus, the viral nature of which was eventually recognized in 2003, following ten years during which it was mistaken for an obligate intracellular bacterium. Thirteen more years later, we now realize that non-filtering "giant viruses" are not rare, probably ubiquitous, and come in a large variety of virion shapes, genome sizes, gene contents, and replication strategies. Following a quick description of the 4 giant virus families known today, we discuss the enigmas, controversies and perspectives of conceptual revolutions that are brought about by this new and booming area of virology.

  11. Giant magnetoresistance through a single molecule.

    PubMed

    Schmaus, Stefan; Bagrets, Alexei; Nahas, Yasmine; Yamada, Toyo K; Bork, Annika; Bowen, Martin; Beaurepaire, Eric; Evers, Ferdinand; Wulfhekel, Wulf

    2011-03-01

    Magnetoresistance is a change in the resistance of a material system caused by an applied magnetic field. Giant magnetoresistance occurs in structures containing ferromagnetic contacts separated by a metallic non-magnetic spacer, and is now the basis of read heads for hard drives and for new forms of random access memory. Using an insulator (for example, a molecular thin film) rather than a metal as the spacer gives rise to tunnelling magnetoresistance, which typically produces a larger change in resistance for a given magnetic field strength, but also yields higher resistances, which are a disadvantage for real device operation. Here, we demonstrate giant magnetoresistance across a single, non-magnetic hydrogen phthalocyanine molecule contacted by the ferromagnetic tip of a scanning tunnelling microscope. We measure the magnetoresistance to be 60% and the conductance to be 0.26G(0), where G(0) is the quantum of conductance. Theoretical analysis identifies spin-dependent hybridization of molecular and electrode orbitals as the cause of the large magnetoresistance.

  12. Giant renal artery aneurysm: A case report.

    PubMed

    Cindolo, Luca; Ingrosso, Manuela; De Francesco, Piergustavo; Castellan, Pietro; Berardinelli, Francesco; Fiore, Franco; Schips, Luigi

    2015-07-07

    A case of a 12 cm giant renal artery aneurysm (RAA) in an 59-year-old woman is reported. The patient was referred to our hospital for flank pain and spot hematuria. Ultrasonography (US) revealed some wide lacunar areas in her right kidney and a thin cortex. Three-dimensional computed tomography (3D-CT) revealed a giant right renal arteriovenous malformation (AVM). AngioCT scan showed a pervious right renal artery. The cavities of the right kidney were dilated and the parenchyma was markedly reduced. Two months later the patient underwent an open resection of the aneurysm and a right nephrectomy. She had an uneventful recovery and a healthy status (last follow-up: 9 month). In this particular case, a safe approach is the transabdominal approach since the aneurysm was very large, friable, and located on the right side. This report confirms the opportunity of a planned nephrectomy once there is adequate renal reserve in the opposite kidney using a midline approach.

  13. Giant intradiploic pseudomeningocele of occipital bone.

    PubMed

    Kumar, Rajinder; Chandra, Sarat P; Sharma, Bhawani Shanker

    2012-01-01

    The management of intradiploic CSF collection is controversial. Although it is a benign lesion, even then delay in diagnosis and treatment may lead to significant morbidity. The authors report a very rare case of giant posttraumatic intradiploic pseudomeningocele involving the occipital bone, occipital condyles, and clivus. The pathogenesis and management of intradiploic CSF collection are discussed. This 16-year-old boy presented with a history of enlarging swelling in the suboccipital region associated with headache, lower cranial nerve palsy, and features of high cervical compressive myelopathy. Investigations revealed a giant intradiploic lesion involving the occipital bone, condyles, and clivus associated with secondary basilar invagination, hydrocephalus, and syringomyelia. Intrathecal contrast administration did not reveal communication of intradiploic space with the subarachnoid space. A large occipital craniotomy was performed. A linear fracture and dural defect in the midline was identified, which was closed with fascial graft after removing the inner table of the skull. Cranioplasty was performed using the expanded calvarial bone. Ventriculoperitoneal shunt insertion was performed for hydrocephalus, and the patient improved remarkably. Posttraumatic intradiploic CSF collection, although a benign condition, may present with severe complications if treatment is delayed. Early diagnosis and treatment is essential. The authors suggest that this condition should be treated early, as for growing skull fractures.

  14. Giant cell reparative granuloma of the axis.

    PubMed

    Bayar, Mehmet Akif; Erdem, Yavuz; Gokcek, Cevdet; Koktekir, Ender; Kilic, Celal; Yasitli, Ugur; Tekiner, Ayhan

    2009-10-01

    Giant cell reparative granuloma (GCRG) is a rare, benign fibroosseous lesion. It typically arises in the mandible and maxilla, and less frequently in the skull bones. We report a case of GCRG of the axis, which is the first to be reported in the literature. A 35-year-old man was admitted to our clinic with the complaint of pain at his neck. There was no neurological deficit. CT and MRI showed a lesion destructing the body of the axis. Biopsy specimens were taken through the transoral-transpharyngeal route. Histopathological diagnosis was GCRG. The lesion was removed subtotally by the same route. We filled the tumor cavity with a bone graft and the patient was discharged with a halo brace without any neurological deficits. The follow-up CT revealed one year after the surgery showed sclerosis at the tumor site. The etiopathogenesis of GCRG is still controversial and the differential diagnosis, especially from giant cell tumor of bone is quite difficult. The treatment of choice for these lesions is complete surgical removal. Some authors recommend radiotherapy if total removal fails.

  15. Chromospheric Activity in Population II Giants

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Harper, Graham M.

    2004-01-01

    One of the mysteries of Population II giants is that they still show chromospheric emission despite their great age. The global dynamo which was active during their main-sequence lifetimes is expected to become extremely weak through magnetic rotational braking. The nature of the observed emission is not understood; although acoustic shock waves might provide the heating, acoustic waves are not predicted to drive the observed mass loss - which in turn requires the dissipation of magneto-hydrodynamic waves. This program was designed to search for the faint stellar H Ly beta emission wings and the fluorescent Fe II and H2 emission from one of the brightest, metal poor, Population II stars. These FUSE diagnostics, when combined with existing UV and optical spectra, help determine the major radiative cooling channels for the chromosphere. This observation was to complement that previously planned for the mildly metal deficient giant alpha Boo (K2 III). However, alpha Boo has yet to be observed with FUSE.

  16. Model of a Giant Impact on Saturn

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Parisi, M. G.; Brunini, A.

    2002-09-01

    The stochastic processes at the end of the accretionary epoch have been long known (Safronov 1969). The large spin obliquity of Uranus (98o) is usually attributed to a great tangential collision with another protoplanet at the end of the accretion process (e.g., Korycansky et al. 1990, Parisi and Brunini 1997). Saturn may owe its obliquity (27o) to an impact by a very large protoplanet (Lissauer and Safronov 1991). If satellites had been orbiting around these planets before these large impacts had taken place, the impulse imparted at collision would have produced a shift in the orbital velocity of the satellites. Parisi and Brunini (1997) obtained that outer satellites of Uranus had been probably unbound. The discovery of the outer uranian moons (Gladman et al. 1998, 2000) set important constraints in this scenario. Physical conditions for Uranus, dynamical constraints and restrictions in the possible mechanisms for the origin of the outer uranian satellites were obtained from the knowledge of their actual orbital properties (Brunini et al. 2002). The richness of the irregular satellites systems is yielding valuable insights into the processes that occurred during the final stages of giant planet formation. We present here our first result of the modelling of a giant impact onto Saturn in connection with te recent discovery of a rich system of outer satellites of this planet (Gladman et al. 2001).

  17. Predecessors of the giant 1960 Chile earthquake

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Cisternas, M.; Atwater, B.F.; Torrejon, F.; Sawai, Y.; Machuca, G.; Lagos, M.; Eipert, A.; Youlton, C.; Salgado, I.; Kamataki, T.; Shishikura, M.; Rajendran, C.P.; Malik, J.K.; Rizal, Y.; Husni, M.

    2005-01-01

    It is commonly thought that the longer the time since last earthquake, the larger the next earthquake's slip will be. But this logical predictor of earthquake size, unsuccessful for large earthquakes on a strike-slip fault, fails also with the giant 1960 Chile earthquake of magnitude 9.5 (ref. 3). Although the time since the preceding earthquake spanned 123 years (refs 4, 5), the estimated slip in 1960, which occurred on a fault between the Nazca and South American tectonic plates, equalled 250-350 years' worth of the plate motion. Thus the average interval between such giant earthquakes on this fault should span several centuries. Here we present evidence that such long intervals were indeed typical of the last two millennia. We use buried soils and sand layers as records of tectonic subsidence and tsunami inundation at an estuary midway along the 1960 rupture. In these records, the 1960 earthquake ended a recurrence interval that had begun almost four centuries before, with an earthquake documented by Spanish conquistadors in 1575. Two later earthquakes, in 1737 and 1837, produced little if any subsidence or tsunami at the estuary and they therefore probably left the fault partly loaded with accumulated plate motion that the 1960 earthquake then expended. ?? 2005 Nature Publishing Group.

  18. Giant Baker's Cyst Associated with Rheumatoid Arthritis

    PubMed Central

    Bılgın, Emre; Ketencı, İsmail Emre; Ugurlar, Meriç

    2017-01-01

    We report a rare case of a “giant Baker's cyst-related rheumatoid arthritis (RA)” with 95 × 26 mm dimensions originating from the semimembranosus tendon. The patient presented with chronic pain and a palpable mass behind his left calf located between the posteriosuperior aspect of the popliteal fossa and the distal third of the calf. In MRI cystic lesion which was located in soft tissue at the posterior of gastrocnemius, extensive synovial pannus inside and degeneration of medial meniscus posterior horn were observed. Arthroscopic joint debridement and partial excision of the cyst via biomechanical valve excision were performed. The patient continued his follow-up visits at Rheumatology Department and there was no recurrence of cyst-related symptoms in 1-year follow-up. Similar cases were reported in the literature previously. However, as far as we know, a giant Baker's cyst-related RA, which was treated as described, has not yet been presented. PMID:28116197

  19. Predecessors of the giant 1960 Chile earthquake

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cisternas, Marco; Atwater, Brian F.; Torrejón, Fernando; Sawai, Yuki; Machuca, Gonzalo; Lagos, Marcelo; Eipert, Annaliese; Youlton, Cristián; Salgado, Ignacio; Kamataki, Takanobu; Shishikura, Masanobu; Rajendran, C. P.; Malik, Javed K.; Rizal, Yan; Husni, Muhammad

    2005-09-01

    It is commonly thought that the longer the time since last earthquake, the larger the next earthquake's slip will be. But this logical predictor of earthquake size, unsuccessful for large earthquakes on a strike-slip fault, fails also with the giant 1960 Chile earthquake of magnitude 9.5 (ref. 3). Although the time since the preceding earthquake spanned 123years (refs 4, 5), the estimated slip in 1960, which occurred on a fault between the Nazca and South American tectonic plates, equalled 250-350years' worth of the plate motion. Thus the average interval between such giant earthquakes on this fault should span several centuries. Here we present evidence that such long intervals were indeed typical of the last two millennia. We use buried soils and sand layers as records of tectonic subsidence and tsunami inundation at an estuary midway along the 1960 rupture. In these records, the 1960 earthquake ended a recurrence interval that had begun almost four centuries before, with an earthquake documented by Spanish conquistadors in 1575. Two later earthquakes, in 1737 and 1837, produced little if any subsidence or tsunami at the estuary and they therefore probably left the fault partly loaded with accumulated plate motion that the 1960 earthquake then expended.

  20. Management of a giant perineal condylomata acuminata

    PubMed Central

    Hemper, Evelyn; Wittau, Mathias; Lemke, Johannes; Kornmann, Marko; Henne-Bruns, Doris

    2016-01-01

    A condylomata acuminata infection is caused by human papillomaviridae (HPV). This sexually transmitted condition most often affects the perineal region. Importantly, infections with types 16 and 18 are associated with an increased risk for anal and cervix cancer. In most cases topical therapy is sufficient for successfully treating condylomata acuminata. Here, we report the case of a 51-year old patient who suffered from a giant perianal located condylomata acuminata which had developed over a period of more than 10 years. Imaging by MRI revealed a possible infiltration of the musculus sphincter ani externus. Because a topical treatment or a radiotherapy was considered unfeasible, a surgical treatment was the only therapeutic option in this unusual case. First, a colostomy was performed and subsequently a resection of the tumor in toto with circular resection of the external portion of the musculus sphincter ani externus was performed. The large skin defect was closed by two gluteus flaps. The rectum wall was reinserted in the remnant of the musculus sphincter ani externus. Postoperatively, parts of the flaps developed necrosis. Therefore, a vacuum sealing therapy was initiated. Subsequently, the remaining skin defects were closed by autologous skin transplantation. Six months later the colostomy could be reversed. To date, one year after first surgery, the patient has still a normal sphincter function and no recurrence of the condylomata acuminata. This case report demonstrates how giant condylomata acuminata can be successfully treated by extended surgical procedures including colostomy and plastic reconstruction of resulting defects upon resection. PMID:26814336