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Sample records for 4t1 mouse mammary

  1. 4T1 Murine Mammary Carcinoma Cells Enhance Macrophage-Mediated Innate Inflammatory Responses

    PubMed Central

    Madera, Laurence; Greenshields, Anna; Coombs, Melanie R. Power; Hoskin, David W.

    2015-01-01

    Tumor progression and the immune response are intricately linked. While it is known that cancers alter macrophage inflammatory responses to promote tumor progression, little is known regarding how cancers affect macrophage-dependent innate host defense. In this study, murine bone-marrow-derived macrophages (BMDM) were exposed to murine carcinoma-conditioned media prior to assessment of the macrophage inflammatory response. BMDMs exposed to 4T1 mammary carcinoma-conditioned medium demonstrated enhanced production of pro-inflammatory cytokines tumor necrosis factor α, interleukin-6, and CCL2 in response to lipopolysaccharide (LPS) while production of interleukin-10 remained unchanged. The increased LPS-induced production of pro-inflammatory cytokines was transient and correlated with enhanced cytokine production in response to other Toll-like receptor agonists, including peptidoglycan and flagellin. In addition, 4T1-conditioned BMDMs exhibited strengthened LPS-induced nitric oxide production and enhanced phagocytosis of Escherichia coli. 4T1-mediated augmentation of macrophage responses to LPS was partially dependent on the NFκB pathway, macrophage-colony stimulating factor, and actin polymerization, as well as the presence of 4T1-secreted extracellular vesicles. Furthermore, peritoneal macrophages obtained from 4T1 tumor-bearing mice displayed enhanced pro-inflammatory cytokine production in response to LPS. These results suggest that uptake of 4T1-secreted factors and actin-mediated ingestion of 4T1-secreted exosomes by macrophages cause a transient enhancement of innate inflammatory responses. Mammary carcinoma-mediated regulation of innate immunity may have significant implications for our understanding of host defense and cancer progression. PMID:26177198

  2. Secretion of N- and O-linked Glycoproteins from 4T1 Murine Mammary Carcinoma Cells

    PubMed Central

    Phang, Wai-Mei; Tan, Aik-Aun; Gopinath, Subash C.B.; Hashim, Onn H.; Kiew, Lik Voon; Chen, Yeng

    2016-01-01

    Breast cancer is one of the most common cancers that affect women globally and accounts for ~23% of all cancers diagnosed in women. Breast cancer is also one of the leading causes of death primarily due to late stage diagnoses and a lack of effective treatments. Therefore, discovering protein expression biomarkers is mandatory for early detection and thus, critical for successful therapy. Two-dimensional electrophoresis (2D-E) coupled with lectin-based analysis followed by mass spectrometry were applied to identify potential biomarkers in the secretions of a murine mammary carcinoma cell line. Comparisons of the protein profiles of the murine 4T1 mammary carcinoma cell line and a normal murine MM3MG mammary cell line indicated that cadherin-1 (CDH), collagenase 3 (MMP-13), Viral envelope protein G7e (VEP), Gag protein (GAG) and Hypothetical protein LOC433182 (LOC) were uniquely expressed by the 4T1 cells, and pigment epithelium-derived factor (PEDF) was exclusively secreted by the MM3MG cells. Further analysis by a lectin-based study revealed that aberrant O-glycosylated CDH, N-glycosylated MMP-13 and LOC were present in the 4T1 medium. These differentially expressed N- and O-linked glycoprotein candidates, which were identified by combining lectin-based analysis with 2D-E, could serve as potential diagnostic and prognostic markers for breast cancer. PMID:27226773

  3. Cytotoxicity and Apoptosis Induction of Ardisia crispa and Its Solvent Partitions against Mus musculus Mammary Carcinoma Cell Line (4T1)

    PubMed Central

    Nordin, Muhammad Luqman; Zakaria, Zainul Amiruddin; Othman, Fauziah; Abdullah, Muhammad Nazrul Hakim

    2017-01-01

    This study was conducted to investigate the cytotoxicity and apoptosis effect of A. crispa extract and its solvent partition (ethyl acetate and aqueous extract) against Mus musculus mammary carcinoma cell line (4T1). The normal mouse fibroblast cell line (NIH3T3) was used as comparison for selective cytotoxicity properties. The cytotoxicity evaluation was assessed using MTT assay. AO/PI dual fluorescent staining assay and Annexin V-FITC were used for apoptosis analysis. Results showed that 80% methanol extract from leaves showed most promising antimammary cancer agent with IC50 value of 42.26 ± 1.82 μg/mL and selective index (SI) value of 10.22. Ethyl acetate was cytotoxic for both cancer and normal cell while aqueous extract exhibited poor cytotoxic effect. 4T1 cells labelled with AO/PI and Annexin V-FITC and treated with 80% methanol extract demonstrated that the extract induces apoptosis to 4T1 mammary cancer cells. In conclusion, 80% methanol extract of A. crispa was selectively cytotoxic towards 4T1 cells but less cytotoxic towards NIH3T3 cells and induced the cancerous cells into apoptotic stage as early as 6 hours.

  4. Green tea (Camellia sinensis) extract inhibits both the metastasis and osteolytic components of mammary cancer 4T1 lesions in mice.

    PubMed

    Luo, Ke-Wang; Ko, Chun-Hay; Yue, Grace Gar-Lee; Lee, Julia Kin-Ming; Li, Kai-Kai; Lee, Michelle; Li, Gang; Fung, Kwok-Pui; Leung, Ping-Chung; Lau, Clara Bik-San

    2014-04-01

    Green tea (Camellia sinensis, CS), a kind of Chinese tea commonly consumed as a healthy beverage, has been demonstrated to have various biological activities, including antioxidation, antiobesity and anticancer. Our study aims to investigate the antitumor, antimetastasis and antiosteolytic effects of CS aqueous extract both in vitro and in vivo using metastasis-specific mouse mammary carcinoma 4T1 cells. Our results showed that treatment of 4T1 cells with CS aqueous extract resulted in significant inhibition of 4T1 cell proliferation. CS extract induced 4T1 apoptosis in a dose-dependent manner as assessed by annexin-V and propidium iodide staining and caspase-3 activity. Western blot analysis showed that CS increased the expression of Bax-to-Bcl-2 ratio and activated caspase-8 and caspase-3 to induce apoptosis. CS also inhibited 4T1 cell migration and invasion at 0.06-0.125 mg/ml. In addition, CS extract (0.6 g/kg, orally fed daily for 4 weeks) was effective in decreasing the tumor weight by 34.8% in female BALB/c mice against water treatment control (100%). Apart from the antitumor effect, CS extract significantly decreased lung and liver metastasis in BALB/c mice bearing 4T1 tumors by 54.5% and 72.6%, respectively. Furthermore, micro-computed tomography and in vitro osteoclast staining analysis suggested that CS extract was effective in bone protection against breast cancer-induced bone destruction. In conclusion, the present study demonstrated that the CS aqueous extract, which closely mimics green tea beverage, has potent antitumor and antimetastasis effects in breast cancer and could protect the bone from breast cancer-induced bone destruction.

  5. Rapamycin Promotes Mouse 4T1 Tumor Metastasis that Can Be Reversed by a Dendritic Cell-Based Vaccine.

    PubMed

    Lin, Tien-Jen; Liang, Wen-Miin; Hsiao, Pei-Wen; M S, Pradeep; Wei, Wen-Chi; Lin, Hsin-Ting; Yin, Shu-Yi; Yang, Ning-Sun

    2015-01-01

    Suppression of tumor metastasis is a key strategy for successful cancer interventions. Previous studies indicated that rapamycin (sirolimus) may promote tumor regression activity or enhance immune response against tumor targets. However, rapamycin also exhibits immunosuppressant effects and is hence used clinically as an organ transplantation drug. We hypothesized that the immunosuppressive activities of rapamycin might also negatively mediate host immunity, resulting in promotion of tumor metastasis. In this study, the effects of rapamycin and phytochemical shikonin were investigated in vitro and in vivo in a 4T1 mouse mammary tumor model through quantitative assessment of immunogenic cell death (ICD), autophagy, tumor growth and metastasis. Tumor-bearing mice were immunized with test vaccines to monitor their effect on tumor metastasis. We found that intraperitoneal (ip) administration of rapamycin after a tumor-resection surgery drastically increased the metastatic activity of 4T1 tumors. Possible correlation of this finding to human cancers was suggested by epidemiological analysis of data from Taiwan's National Health Insurance Research Database (NHIRD). Since our previous studies showed that modified tumor cell lysate (TCL)-pulsed, dendritic cell (DC)-based cancer vaccines can effectively suppress metastasis in mouse tumor models, we assessed whether such vaccines may help offset this rapamycin-promoted metastasis. We observed that shikonin efficiently induced ICD of 4T1 cells in culture, and DC vaccines pulsed with shikonin-treated TCL (SK-TCL-DC) significantly suppressed rapamycin-enhanced metastasis and Treg cell expansion in test mice. In conclusion, rapamycin treatment in mice (and perhaps in humans) promotes metastasis and the effect may be offset by treatment with a DC-based cancer vaccine.

  6. High Resolution X-Ray Microangiography of 4T1 Tumor in Mouse Using Synchrotron Radiation

    SciTech Connect

    Sun Jianqi; Liu Ping; Gu Xiang; Liu Xiaoxia; Zhao Jun; Xiao Tiqiao; Xu, Lisa X.

    2010-07-23

    Angiogenesis is very important in tumor growth and metastasis. But in clinic, only vessels lager than 200 {mu}m in diameter, can be observed using conventional medical imaging. Synchrotron radiation (SR) phase contrast imaging, whose spatial resolution can reach as high as 1 {mu}m, has great advantages in imaging soft tissue structures, such as blood vessels and tumor tissues. In this paper, the morphology of newly formed micro-vessels in the mouse 4T1 tumor samples was firstly studied with contrast agent. Then, the angiogenesis in nude mice tumor window model was observed without contrast agent using the SR phase contrast imaging at the beamline for X-ray imaging and biomedical applications, Shanghai Synchrotron Radiation Facility (SSRF). The images of tumors showed dense, irregular and tortuous tumor micro-vessels with the smallest size of 20-30 {mu}m in diameter.

  7. Licoricidin, an Active Compound in the Hexane/Ethanol Extract of Glycyrrhiza uralensis, Inhibits Lung Metastasis of 4T1 Murine Mammary Carcinoma Cells

    PubMed Central

    Park, So Young; Kwon, Soo Jin; Lim, Soon Sung; Kim, Jin-Kyu; Lee, Ki Won; Park, Jung Han Yoon

    2016-01-01

    Licorice extracts containing glycyrrhizin exhibit anti-carcinogenic properties. Because glycyrrhizin induces severe hypokalemia and hypertension, we prepared a hexane/ethanol extract of Glycyrrhiza uralensis (HEGU) that lacks glycyrrhizin, and showed that HEGU induces apoptosis and G1 cell cycle arrest and inhibits migration of DU145 human prostate cancer cells. Our previous in vitro studies identified two active components in HEGU: isoangustone A, which induces apoptosis and G1 cycle arrest, and licoricidin, which inhibits metastasis. This study examined whether HEGU and licoricidin inhibit metastasis using the 4T1 mammary cancer model. Both HEGU and licoricidin treatment reduced pulmonary metastasis and the expression of CD45, CD31, HIF-1α, iNOS, COX-2, and VEGF-A in tumor tissues. Additionally, a decrease in protein expression of VEGF-R2, VEGF-C, VEGF-R3, and LYVE-1 was noted in tumor tissues of licoricidin-treated mice. Furthermore, the blood concentrations of MMP-9, ICAM-1, VCAM-1, and VEGF-A were decreased in HEGU-treated mice. In vitro 4T1 cell culture results showed that both HEGU and licoricidin inhibited cell migration, MMP-9 secretion, and VCAM expression. The present study demonstrates that the licoricidin in HEGU inhibits lung metastasis of 4T1 mammary carcinoma cells, which may be mediated via inhibition of cancer cell migration, tumor angiogenesis, and lymphangiogenesis. PMID:27314329

  8. Licoricidin, an Active Compound in the Hexane/Ethanol Extract of Glycyrrhiza uralensis, Inhibits Lung Metastasis of 4T1 Murine Mammary Carcinoma Cells.

    PubMed

    Park, So Young; Kwon, Soo Jin; Lim, Soon Sung; Kim, Jin-Kyu; Lee, Ki Won; Park, Jung Han Yoon

    2016-06-14

    Licorice extracts containing glycyrrhizin exhibit anti-carcinogenic properties. Because glycyrrhizin induces severe hypokalemia and hypertension, we prepared a hexane/ethanol extract of Glycyrrhiza uralensis (HEGU) that lacks glycyrrhizin, and showed that HEGU induces apoptosis and G1 cell cycle arrest and inhibits migration of DU145 human prostate cancer cells. Our previous in vitro studies identified two active components in HEGU: isoangustone A, which induces apoptosis and G1 cycle arrest, and licoricidin, which inhibits metastasis. This study examined whether HEGU and licoricidin inhibit metastasis using the 4T1 mammary cancer model. Both HEGU and licoricidin treatment reduced pulmonary metastasis and the expression of CD45, CD31, HIF-1α, iNOS, COX-2, and VEGF-A in tumor tissues. Additionally, a decrease in protein expression of VEGF-R2, VEGF-C, VEGF-R3, and LYVE-1 was noted in tumor tissues of licoricidin-treated mice. Furthermore, the blood concentrations of MMP-9, ICAM-1, VCAM-1, and VEGF-A were decreased in HEGU-treated mice. In vitro 4T1 cell culture results showed that both HEGU and licoricidin inhibited cell migration, MMP-9 secretion, and VCAM expression. The present study demonstrates that the licoricidin in HEGU inhibits lung metastasis of 4T1 mammary carcinoma cells, which may be mediated via inhibition of cancer cell migration, tumor angiogenesis, and lymphangiogenesis.

  9. Comparison of the Adipose and Luminal Mammary Gland Compartment as Orthotopic Inoculation Sites in a 4T1-Based Immunocompetent Preclinical Model for Triple-Negative Breast Cancer.

    PubMed

    Steenbrugge, Jonas; Breyne, Koen; Denies, Sofie; Dekimpe, Melissa; Demeyere, Kristel; De Wever, Olivier; Vermeulen, Peter; Van Laere, Steven; Sanders, Niek N; Meyer, Evelyne

    2016-12-01

    Breast tumorigenesis is classically studied in mice by inoculating tumor cells in the fat pad, the adipose compartment of the mammary gland. Alternatively, the mammary ducts, which constitute the luminal mammary gland compartment, also provide a suitable inoculation site to induce breast cancer in murine models. The microenvironments in these compartments influence tumor cell progression, yet this effect has not been investigated in an immunocompetent context. Here, we compared both mammary gland compartments as distinct inoculation sites, taking into account the immunological aspect by inoculating 4T1 tumor cells in immunocompetent mice. Following tumor cell inoculation in the adipose compartment of non-pretreated/naive, hormonally pretreated/naive and non-pretreated/lactating mice, the primary tumors developed similarly. However, a slower onset of primary tumor growth was found after inoculations in the luminal compartment of non-pretreated/lactating mice. Despite this difference in tumor development rate, metastasis to the liver and lungs was equally observed and was accompanied by lymphatic spreading of tumor cells and progressive splenomegaly with both inoculation types. Chitinase 3-like 1 (CHI3L1) and lipocalin 2 (LCN2) served as innovative biomarkers for disease progression showing increased levels in primary tumors and sera of the non-pretreated/lactating inoculation groups. A slower increase in circulating CHI3L1 but not LCN2 levels, was observed after inoculations in the luminal compartment which corroborated the slower tumor development at this inoculation site. Our results highlight the critical impact of different mammary gland compartments on tumor development in syngeneic murine models and support the use of novel tumor progression biomarkers in an immune-competent environment.

  10. Humanization of the mouse mammary gland.

    PubMed

    Wronski, A; Arendt, L M; Kuperwasser, Charlotte

    2015-01-01

    Although mouse models have provided invaluable information on the mechanisms of mammary gland development, anatomical and developmental differences between human and mice limit full understanding of this fundamental process. Humanization of the mouse mammary gland by injecting immortalized human breast stromal cells into the cleared murine mammary fat pad enables the growth and development of human mammary epithelial cells or tissue. This facilitates the characterization of human mammary gland development or tumorigenesis by utilizing the mouse mammary fat pad. Here we describe the process of isolating human mammary stromal and epithelial cells as well as their introduction into the mammary fat pads of immunocompromised mice.

  11. Histone deacetylase inhibitors deplete myeloid-derived suppressor cells induced by 4T1 mammary tumors in vivo and in vitro.

    PubMed

    Wang, Hai-Fang; Ning, Fen; Liu, Zong-Cai; Wu, Long; Li, Zi-Qian; Qi, Yi-Fei; Zhang, Ge; Wang, Hong-Sheng; Cai, Shao-Hui; Du, Jun

    2017-03-01

    Myeloid-derived suppressor cells (MDSC) have been identified as a population of immature myeloid cells that suppress anti-tumor immunity. MDSC are increased in tumor-bearing hosts; thus, depletion of MDSC may enhance anti-tumor immunity. Histone deacetylase inhibitors (HDACi) are chemical agents that are primarily used against hematologic malignancies. The ability of these agents to modulate anticancer immunity has recently been extensively studied. However, the effect of HDACi on MDSC has remained largely unexplored. In the present study, we provide the first demonstration that HDACi treatment decreases MDSC accumulation in the spleen, blood and tumor bed but increases the proportion of T cells (particularly the frequency of IFN-γ- or perforin-producing CD8(+) T cells) in BALB/C mice with 4T1 mammary tumors. In addition, HDACi exposure of bone marrow (BM) cells significantly eliminated the MDSC population induced by GM-CSF or the tumor burden in vitro, which was further demonstrated as functionally important to relieve the inhibitory effect of MDSC-enriched BM cells on T cell proliferation. Mechanistically, HDACi increased the apoptosis of Gr-1(+) cells (almost MDSC) compared with that of Gr-1(-) cells, which was abrogated by the ROS scavenger N-acetylcysteine, suggesting that the HDACi-induced increase in MDSC apoptosis due to increased intracellular ROS might partially account for the observed depletion of MDSC. These findings suggest that the elimination of MDSC using an HDACi may contribute to the overall anti-tumor properties of these agents, highlighting a novel property of HDACi as potent MDSC-targeting agents, which may be used to enhance the efficacy of immunotherapeutic regimens.

  12. Optimizing non-invasive radiofrequency hyperthermia treatment for improving drug delivery in 4T1 mouse breast cancer model

    PubMed Central

    Ware, Matthew J.; Krzykawska-Serda, Martyna; Chak-Shing Ho, Jason; Newton, Jared; Suki, Sarah; Law, Justin; Nguyen, Lam; Keshishian, Vazrik; Serda, Maciej; Taylor, Kimberly; Curley, Steven A.; Corr, Stuart J.

    2017-01-01

    Interactions of high-frequency radio waves (RF) with biological tissues are currently being investigated as a therapeutic platform for non-invasive cancer hyperthermia therapy. RF delivers thermal energy into tissues, which increases intra-tumoral drug perfusion and blood-flow. Herein, we describe an optical-based method to optimize the short-term treatment schedules of drug and hyperthermia administration in a 4T1 breast cancer model via RF, with the aim of maximizing drug localization and homogenous distribution within the tumor microenvironment. This method, based on the analysis of fluorescent dyes localized into the tumor, is more time, cost and resource efficient, when compared to current analytical methods for tumor-targeting drug analysis such as HPLC and LC-MS. Alexa-Albumin 647 nm fluorphore was chosen as a surrogate for nab-paclitaxel based on its similar molecular weight and albumin driven pharmacokinetics. We found that RF hyperthermia induced a 30–40% increase in Alexa-Albumin into the tumor micro-environment 24 h after treatment when compared to non-heat treated mice. Additionally, we showed that the RF method of delivering hyperthermia to tumors was more localized and uniform across the tumor mass when compared to other methods of heating. Lastly, we provided insight into some of the factors that influence the delivery of RF hyperthermia to tumors. PMID:28287120

  13. Optimizing non-invasive radiofrequency hyperthermia treatment for improving drug delivery in 4T1 mouse breast cancer model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ware, Matthew J.; Krzykawska-Serda, Martyna; Chak-Shing Ho, Jason; Newton, Jared; Suki, Sarah; Law, Justin; Nguyen, Lam; Keshishian, Vazrik; Serda, Maciej; Taylor, Kimberly; Curley, Steven A.; Corr, Stuart J.

    2017-03-01

    Interactions of high-frequency radio waves (RF) with biological tissues are currently being investigated as a therapeutic platform for non-invasive cancer hyperthermia therapy. RF delivers thermal energy into tissues, which increases intra-tumoral drug perfusion and blood-flow. Herein, we describe an optical-based method to optimize the short-term treatment schedules of drug and hyperthermia administration in a 4T1 breast cancer model via RF, with the aim of maximizing drug localization and homogenous distribution within the tumor microenvironment. This method, based on the analysis of fluorescent dyes localized into the tumor, is more time, cost and resource efficient, when compared to current analytical methods for tumor-targeting drug analysis such as HPLC and LC-MS. Alexa-Albumin 647 nm fluorphore was chosen as a surrogate for nab-paclitaxel based on its similar molecular weight and albumin driven pharmacokinetics. We found that RF hyperthermia induced a 30–40% increase in Alexa-Albumin into the tumor micro-environment 24 h after treatment when compared to non-heat treated mice. Additionally, we showed that the RF method of delivering hyperthermia to tumors was more localized and uniform across the tumor mass when compared to other methods of heating. Lastly, we provided insight into some of the factors that influence the delivery of RF hyperthermia to tumors.

  14. Optimizing non-invasive radiofrequency hyperthermia treatment for improving drug delivery in 4T1 mouse breast cancer model.

    PubMed

    Ware, Matthew J; Krzykawska-Serda, Martyna; Chak-Shing Ho, Jason; Newton, Jared; Suki, Sarah; Law, Justin; Nguyen, Lam; Keshishian, Vazrik; Serda, Maciej; Taylor, Kimberly; Curley, Steven A; Corr, Stuart J

    2017-03-13

    Interactions of high-frequency radio waves (RF) with biological tissues are currently being investigated as a therapeutic platform for non-invasive cancer hyperthermia therapy. RF delivers thermal energy into tissues, which increases intra-tumoral drug perfusion and blood-flow. Herein, we describe an optical-based method to optimize the short-term treatment schedules of drug and hyperthermia administration in a 4T1 breast cancer model via RF, with the aim of maximizing drug localization and homogenous distribution within the tumor microenvironment. This method, based on the analysis of fluorescent dyes localized into the tumor, is more time, cost and resource efficient, when compared to current analytical methods for tumor-targeting drug analysis such as HPLC and LC-MS. Alexa-Albumin 647 nm fluorphore was chosen as a surrogate for nab-paclitaxel based on its similar molecular weight and albumin driven pharmacokinetics. We found that RF hyperthermia induced a 30-40% increase in Alexa-Albumin into the tumor micro-environment 24 h after treatment when compared to non-heat treated mice. Additionally, we showed that the RF method of delivering hyperthermia to tumors was more localized and uniform across the tumor mass when compared to other methods of heating. Lastly, we provided insight into some of the factors that influence the delivery of RF hyperthermia to tumors.

  15. Gemcitabine directly inhibits myeloid derived suppressor cells in BALB/c mice bearing 4T1 mammary carcinoma and augments expansion of T cells from tumor-bearing mice.

    PubMed

    Le, Hanh K; Graham, Laura; Cha, Esther; Morales, Johanna K; Manjili, Masoud H; Bear, Harry D

    2009-07-01

    Myeloid derived suppressor cells (MDSCs) accumulate in 4T1 mammary carcinoma bearing mice and present a barrier to the success of adoptive immunotherapy (AIT) by suppressing T cell immunity. In this study, we investigated the inhibition of MDSCs by gemcitabine (GEM), a chemotherapy agent that may have favorable immunologic effects. BALB/c mice were inoculated with 4T1 mammary carcinoma cells and treated with GEM either once a week starting 5 days after tumor inoculation (EARLY GEM) or as a single dose at days 20-25 (LATE GEM). Splenic mononuclear cells were isolated, activated in vitro, expanded, and stimulated with tumor antigen. T cells were then used for AIT to treat tumor-bearing mice. EARLY GEM treatment of 4T1 tumor-bearing mice significantly inhibited tumor growth, reduced splenomegaly, and significantly decreased MDSC proportion in the spleen. Support for a direct effect was demonstrated through suppression of MDSCs in spleens, bone marrow, and blood harvested 24 and 48 h after LATE GEM treatment, despite no significant decrease in tumor burden. Interestingly, treatment of tumor-bearing mice with GEM augmented in vitro expansion of splenic T cells and boosted IFN-gamma secretion in response to stimulation by tumor antigen. However, despite GEM-mediated inhibition of MDSC suppression, splenic T cells from mice with advanced tumors were ineffective in vivo against established tumors. This study provides support for direct inhibition of MDSCs and direct reduction of tumor burden by GEM in 4T1 tumor-bearing mice. GEM treatment of mice with advanced tumors improves T cell function and growth in vitro.

  16. Mouse Mammary Cancer Models - Mechanisms and Markers

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2001-08-01

    Wipl knockout mouse model and have shown defects in cell cycle control in cells derived from Wipl null animals. We are crossing these mice to mammary...compartment of the testes (13,14). Mice lacking Wipl are viable, but males show a reduced longevity and frequent runting (14). Wipl null males also show...predominates and thus the other TG/p53 mouse . Wnt-1 TG mice contain several copies nontumor components should not obscure any strong of a germline Wnt-1

  17. Low local blood perfusion, high white blood cell and high platelet count are associated with primary tumor growth and lung metastasis in a 4T1 mouse breast cancer metastasis model.

    PubMed

    Wang, Chuan; Chen, Ying-Ge; Gao, Jian-Li; Lyu, Gui-Yuan; Su, Jie; Zhang, Q I; Ji, Xin; Yan, Ji-Zhong; Qiu, Qiao-Li; Zhang, Yue-Li; Li, Lin-Zi; Xu, Han-Ting; Chen, Su-Hong

    2015-08-01

    It was originally thought that no single routine blood test result would be able to indicate whether or not a patient had cancer; however, several novel studies have indicated that the median survival and prognosis of cancer patients were markedly associated with the systemic circulation features of cancer patients. In addition, certain parameters, such as white blood cell (WBC) count, were largely altered in malignant tumors. In the present study, routine blood tests were performed in order to observe the change of blood cells in tumor-bearing mice following the implantation of 4T1 breast cancer cells into the mammary fat pad; in addition, blood flow in breast tumor sites was measured indirectly using laser Doppler perfusion imaging (LDPI), in an attempt to explain the relevance between the blood circulation features and the growth or metastasis of breast cancer in mice model. The LDPI and blood test results indicated that the implantation of 4T1 breast cancer cells into BALB/c mice led to thrombosis as well as high WBC count, high platelet count, high plateletcrit and low blood perfusion. Following implantation of the 4T1 cells for four weeks, the lung metastatic number was determined and the Pearson correlation coefficient revealed that the number of visceral lung metastatic sites had a marked negative association with the ratio of basophils (BASO%; r=-0.512; P<0.01) and the mean corpuscular hemoglobin was significantly correlated with primary tumor weight (r=0.425; P<0.05). In conclusion, the results of the present study demonstrated that tumor growth led to thrombosis and acute anemia in mice; in addition, when blood BASO% was low, an increased number of lung metastases were observed in tumor-bearing mice.

  18. Canine parvovirus NS1 protein exhibits anti-tumor activity in a mouse mammary tumor model.

    PubMed

    Gupta, Shishir Kumar; Yadav, Pavan Kumar; Gandham, Ravi Kumar; Sahoo, A P; Harish, D R; Singh, Arvind Kumar; Tiwari, A K

    2016-02-02

    Many viral proteins have the ability to kill tumor cells specifically without harming the normal cells. These proteins, on ectopic expression, cause lysis or induction of apoptosis in the target tumor cells. Parvovirus NS1 is one of such proteins, which is known to kill high proliferating tumor cells. In the present study, we assessed the apoptosis inducing ability of canine parvovirus type 2 NS1 protein (CPV2.NS1) in vitro in 4T1 cells, and found it to cause significant cell death due to induction of apoptosis through intrinsic or mitochondrial pathway. Further, we also evaluated the oncolytic activity of CPV2.NS1 protein in a mouse mammary tumor model. The results suggested that CPV2.NS1 was able to inhibit the growth of 4T1 induced mouse mammary tumor as indicated by significantly reduced tumor volume, mitotic, AgNOR and PCNA indices. Further, inhibition of tumor growth was found to be because of induction of apoptosis in the tumor cells, which was evident by a significant increase in the number of TUNEL positive cells. Further, CPV2.NS1 was also able to stimulate the immune cells against the tumor antigens as indicated by the increased CD4+ and CD8+ counts in the blood of CVP2.NS1 treated mice. Further optimization of the delivery of NS1 protein and use of an adjuvant may further enhance its anti-tumor activity.

  19. Mouse mammary tumor virus-like nucleotide sequences in canine and feline mammary tumors.

    PubMed

    Hsu, Wei-Li; Lin, Hsing-Yi; Chiou, Shyan-Song; Chang, Chao-Chin; Wang, Szu-Pong; Lin, Kuan-Hsun; Chulakasian, Songkhla; Wong, Min-Liang; Chang, Shih-Chieh

    2010-12-01

    Mouse mammary tumor virus (MMTV) has been speculated to be involved in human breast cancer. Companion animals, dogs, and cats with intimate human contacts may contribute to the transmission of MMTV between mouse and human. The aim of this study was to detect MMTV-like nucleotide sequences in canine and feline mammary tumors by nested PCR. Results showed that the presence of MMTV-like env and LTR sequences in canine malignant mammary tumors was 3.49% (3/86) and 18.60% (16/86), respectively. For feline malignant mammary tumors, the presence of both env and LTR sequences was found to be 22.22% (2/9). Nevertheless, the MMTV-like LTR and env sequences also were detected in normal mammary glands of dogs and cats. In comparisons of the MMTV-like DNA sequences of our findings to those of NIH 3T3 (MMTV-positive murine cell line) and human breast cancer cells, the sequence similarities ranged from 94 to 98%. Phylogenetic analysis revealed that intermixing among sequences identified from tissues of different hosts, i.e., mouse, dog, cat, and human, indicated the MMTV-like DNA existing in these hosts. Moreover, the env transcript was detected in 1 of the 19 MMTV-positive samples by reverse transcription-PCR. Taken together, our study provides evidence for the existence and expression of MMTV-like sequences in neoplastic and normal mammary glands of dogs and cats.

  20. Mouse Mammary Tumor Virus-Like Nucleotide Sequences in Canine and Feline Mammary Tumors▿

    PubMed Central

    Hsu, Wei-Li; Lin, Hsing-Yi; Chiou, Shyan-Song; Chang, Chao-Chin; Wang, Szu-Pong; Lin, Kuan-Hsun; Chulakasian, Songkhla; Wong, Min-Liang; Chang, Shih-Chieh

    2010-01-01

    Mouse mammary tumor virus (MMTV) has been speculated to be involved in human breast cancer. Companion animals, dogs, and cats with intimate human contacts may contribute to the transmission of MMTV between mouse and human. The aim of this study was to detect MMTV-like nucleotide sequences in canine and feline mammary tumors by nested PCR. Results showed that the presence of MMTV-like env and LTR sequences in canine malignant mammary tumors was 3.49% (3/86) and 18.60% (16/86), respectively. For feline malignant mammary tumors, the presence of both env and LTR sequences was found to be 22.22% (2/9). Nevertheless, the MMTV-like LTR and env sequences also were detected in normal mammary glands of dogs and cats. In comparisons of the MMTV-like DNA sequences of our findings to those of NIH 3T3 (MMTV-positive murine cell line) and human breast cancer cells, the sequence similarities ranged from 94 to 98%. Phylogenetic analysis revealed that intermixing among sequences identified from tissues of different hosts, i.e., mouse, dog, cat, and human, indicated the MMTV-like DNA existing in these hosts. Moreover, the env transcript was detected in 1 of the 19 MMTV-positive samples by reverse transcription-PCR. Taken together, our study provides evidence for the existence and expression of MMTV-like sequences in neoplastic and normal mammary glands of dogs and cats. PMID:20881168

  1. Neuropilin-2 promotes branching morphogenesis in the mouse mammary gland.

    PubMed

    Goel, Hira Lal; Bae, Donggoo; Pursell, Bryan; Gouvin, Lindsey M; Lu, Shaolei; Mercurio, Arthur M

    2011-07-01

    Although the neuropilins were characterized as semaphorin receptors that regulate axon guidance, they also function as vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) receptors and contribute to the development of other tissues. Here, we assessed the role of NRP2 in mouse mammary gland development based on our observation that NRP2 is expressed preferentially in the terminal end buds of developing glands. A floxed NRP2 mouse was bred with an MMTV-Cre strain to generate a mammary gland-specific knockout of NRP2. MMTV-Cre;NRP2(loxP/loxP) mice exhibited significant defects in branching morphogenesis and ductal outgrowth compared with either littermate MMTV-Cre;NRP2(+/loxP) or MMTV-Cre mice. Mechanistic insight into this morphological defect was obtained from a mouse mammary cell line in which we observed that VEGF(165), an NRP2 ligand, induces branching morphogenesis in 3D cultures and that branching is dependent upon NRP2 as shown using shRNAs and a function-blocking antibody. Epithelial cells in the mouse mammary gland express VEGF, supporting the hypothesis that this NRP2 ligand contributes to mammary gland morphogenesis. Importantly, we demonstrate that VEGF and NRP2 activate focal adhesion kinase (FAK) and promote FAK-dependent branching morphogenesis in vitro. The significance of this mechanism is substantiated by our finding that FAK activation is diminished significantly in developing MMTV-Cre;NRP2(loxP/loxP) mammary glands compared with control glands. Together, our data reveal a VEGF/NRP2/FAK signaling axis that is important for branching morphogenesis and mammary gland development. In a broader context, our data support an emerging hypothesis that directional outgrowth and branching morphogenesis in a variety of tissues are influenced by signals that were identified initially for their role in axon guidance.

  2. Lessons Learned from Mouse Mammary Tumor Virus in Animal Models

    PubMed Central

    Dudley, Jaquelin P.; Golovkina, Tatyana V.; Ross, Susan R.

    2016-01-01

    Mouse mammary tumor virus (MMTV), which was discovered as a milk-transmitted, infectious, cancer-inducing agent in the 1930s, has been used as an animal model for the study of retroviral infection and transmission, antiviral immune responses, and breast cancer and lymphoma biology. The main target cells for MMTV infection in vivo are cells of the immune system and mammary epithelial cells. Although the host mounts an immune response to the virus, MMTV has evolved multiple means of evading this response. MMTV causes mammary tumors when the provirus integrates into the mammary epithelial and lymphoid cell genome during viral replication and thereby activates cellular oncogene expression. Thus, tumor induction is a by-product of the infection cycle. A number of important oncogenes have been discovered by carrying out MMTV integration site analysis, some of which may play a role in human breast cancer. PMID:27034391

  3. Mouse mammary tumor virus suppresses apoptosis of mammary epithelial cells through ITAM-mediated signaling.

    PubMed

    Kim, Hyoung H; Grande, Shannon M; Monroe, John G; Ross, Susan R

    2012-12-01

    Many receptors in hematopoietic cells use a common signaling pathway that relies on a highly conserved immunoreceptor tyrosine-based activation motif (ITAM), which signals through Src family tyrosine kinases. ITAM-bearing proteins are also found in many oncogenic viruses, including the mouse mammary tumor virus (MMTV) envelope (Env). We previously showed that MMTV Env expression transformed normal mammary epithelial cells and that Src kinases were important mediators in this transformation. To study how ITAM signaling affects mammary cell transformation, we utilized mammary cell lines expressing two different ITAM-containing proteins, one encoding a MMTV provirus and the other a B cell receptor fusion protein. ITAM-expressing cells were resistant to both serum starvation- and chemotherapeutic drug-induced apoptosis, whereas cells transduced with these molecules bearing ITAM mutations were indistinguishable from untransduced cells in their sensitivity to these treatments. We also found that Src kinase was activated in the MMTV-expressing cells and that MMTV-induced apoptosis resistance was completely restored by the Src inhibitor PP2. In vivo, MMTV infection delayed involution-induced apoptosis in the mouse mammary gland. Our results show that MMTV suppresses apoptosis through ITAM-mediated Src tyrosine kinase signaling. These studies could lead to the development of effective treatment of nonhematopoietic cell cancers in which ITAM-mediated signaling plays a role.

  4. The role of neutralizing antibodies for mouse mammary tumor virus transmission and mammary cancer development

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Finke, Daniela; Luther, Sanjiv A.; Acha-Orbea, Hans

    2003-01-01

    Mouse mammary tumor virus (MMTV) infection establishes chronic germinal centers and a lifelong neutralizing Ab response. We show that removal of the draining lymph node after establishment of the germinal center reaction led to complete loss of neutralizing Abs despite comparable infection levels in peripheral lymphocytes. Importantly, in the absence of neutralization, only the exocrine organs mammary gland, salivary gland, pancreas, and skin showed strikingly increased infection, resulting in accelerated mammary tumor development. Induction of stronger neutralization did not influence chronic infection levels of peripheral lymphoid organs but strongly inhibited mammary gland infection and virus transmission to the next generation. Taken together, we provide evidence that a tight equilibrium in virus neutralization allows limited infection of exocrine organs and controls cancer development in susceptible mouse strains. These experiments show that a strong neutralizing Ab response induced after infection is not able to control lymphoid MMTV infection. Strong neutralization, however, is capable of blocking amplification of mammary gland infection, tumor development, and virus transmission to the next generation. The results also indicate a role of neutralization in natural resistance to MMTV infection.

  5. CDP Is a Repressor of Mouse Mammary Tumor Virus Expression in the Mammary Gland

    PubMed Central

    Zhu, Quan; Gregg, Keqin; Lozano, Mary; Liu, Jinqi; Dudley, Jaquelin P.

    2000-01-01

    Mouse mammary tumor virus (MMTV) transcription is highest in the lactating mammary gland but is detectable in a variety of other tissues. Previous results have shown that MMTV expression is suppressed in lymphoid and other tissues through the binding of the homeodomain-containing repressor special AT-rich binding protein 1 to a negative regulatory element (NRE) in the MMTV long terminal repeat (LTR). Another homeoprotein repressor, CCAAT displacement protein (CDP), also binds to the MMTV NRE, but a role for CDP in MMTV transcriptional suppression has not yet been demonstrated. In this paper, we show that the level of CDP decreases during development of the mammary gland and that this decline in CDP level correlates with the known increase in MMTV expression observed during mammary gland differentiation. Moreover, CDP overexpression was able to suppress MMTV LTR-reporter gene activity up to 20-fold in transient-transfection assays of mouse mammary cells. To determine if this effect was due to direct binding of CDP to the promoter-proximal NRE, we performed DNase I protection assays to map two CDP-binding sites from +835 to +845 and +920 to +931 relative to the first base of the LTR. Mutations engineered into each of these sites decreased CDP binding to the proximal NRE, whereas a combination of these mutations further reduced binding. Subsequently, each of these mutations was introduced into the full-length MMTV LTR upstream of the luciferase reporter gene. Analysis of stable transfectants of LTR constructs showed that CDP binding site mutations in the proximal NRE elevated reporter gene expression two- to sixfold compared to wild-type LTR constructs. Thus, MMTV expression increases during mammary gland development, in part due to decreased CDP levels and CDP binding to the LTR. Together, these experiments provide the first evidence that CDP acts as a repressor of MMTV transcription in the mammary gland. PMID:10864645

  6. Hormone signaling requirements for the conversion of non-mammary mouse cells to mammary cell fate(s) in vivo.

    PubMed

    Boulanger, Corinne A; Rosenfield, Sonia M; George, Andrea L; Smith, Gilbert H

    2015-06-01

    Mammotropic hormones and growth factors play a very important role in mammary growth and differentiation. Here, hormones including Estrogen, Progesterone, Prolactin, their cognate receptors, and the growth factor Amphiregulin, are tested with respect to their roles in signaling non-mammary cells from the mouse to redirect to mammary epithelial cell fate(s). This was done in the context of glandular regeneration in pubertal athymic female mice. Our previous studies demonstrated that mammary stem cell niches are recapitulated during gland regeneration in vivo. During this process, cells of exogenous origin cooperate with mammary epithelial cells to form mammary stem cell niches and thus respond to normal developmental signals. In all cases tested with the possible exception of estrogen receptor alpha (ER-α), hormone signaling is dispensable for non-mammary cells to undertake mammary epithelial cell fate(s), proliferate, and contribute progeny to chimeric mammary outgrowths. Importantly, redirected non-mammary cell progeny, regardless of their source, have the ability to self-renew and contribute offspring to secondary mammary outgrowths derived from transplanted chimeric mammary fragments; thus suggesting that some of these cells are capable of mammary stem cell/progenitor functions.

  7. Luminol-based bioluminescence imaging of mouse mammary tumors.

    PubMed

    Alshetaiwi, Hamad S; Balivada, Sivasai; Shrestha, Tej B; Pyle, Marla; Basel, Matthew T; Bossmann, Stefan H; Troyer, Deryl L

    2013-10-05

    Polymorphonuclear neutrophils (PMNs) are the most abundant circulating blood leukocytes. They are part of the innate immune system and provide a first line of defense by migrating toward areas of inflammation in response to chemical signals released from the site. Some solid tumors, such as breast cancer, also cause recruitment and activation of PMNs and release of myeloperoxidase. In this study, we demonstrate that administration of luminol to mice that have been transplanted with 4T1 mammary tumor cells permits the detection of myeloperoxidase activity, and consequently, the location of the tumor. Luminol allowed detection of activated PMNs only two days after cancer cell transplantation, even though tumors were not yet palpable. In conclusion, luminol-bioluminescence imaging (BLI) can provide a pathway towards detection of solid tumors at an early stage in preclinical tumor models.

  8. [Secret excretion from the mouse mammary gland].

    PubMed

    Tolkunov, Iu A; Balakina, G B; Markov, A G

    2000-02-01

    Histological studies revealed that the mammary gland nipple have smooth muscle fibres along the nipple channel. These fibres infiltrate the connective tissue parallel to the skin. The ring muscles are not obvious. Delays in the milk excretion in mice may be due to specifics of allocation and functioning of the nipple smooth muscles. To obtain milk, a mechanical action upon the nipple and a synchronised release of oxitocin into the blood are necessary.

  9. Genes affected by mouse mammary tumor virus (MMTV) proviral insertions in mouse mammary tumors are deregulated or mutated in primary human mammary tumors

    PubMed Central

    Callahan, Robert; Mudunuri, Uma; Bargo, Sharon; Raafat, Ahmed; McCurdy, David; Boulanger, Corinne; Lowther, William; Stephens, Robert; Luke, Brian T.; Stewart, Claudia; Wu, Xiaolin; Munroe, David; Smith, Gilbert H.

    2012-01-01

    The accumulation of mutations is a contributing factor in the initiation of premalignant mammary lesions and their progression to malignancy and metastasis. We have used a mouse model in which the carcinogen is the mouse mammary tumor virus (MMTV) which induces clonal premalignant mammary lesions and malignant mammary tumors by insertional mutagenesis. Identification of the genes and signaling pathways affected in MMTV-induced mouse mammary lesions provides a rationale for determining whether genetic alteration of the human orthologues of these genes/pathways may contribute to human breast carcinogenesis. A high-throughput platform for inverse PCR to identify MMTV-host junction fragments and their nucleotide sequences in a large panel of MMTV-induced lesions was developed. Validation of the genes affected by MMTV-insertion was carried out by microarray analysis. Common integration site (CIS) means that the gene was altered by an MMTV proviral insertion in at least two independent lesions arising in different hosts. Three of the new genes identified as CIS for MMTV were assayed for their capability to confer on HC11 mouse mammary epithelial cells the ability for invasion, anchorage independent growth and tumor development in nude mice. Analysis of MMTV induced mammary premalignant hyperplastic outgrowth (HOG) lines and mammary tumors led to the identification of CIS restricted to 35 loci. Within these loci members of the Wnt, Fgf and Rspo gene families plus two linked genes (Npm3 and Ddn) were frequently activated in tumors induced by MMTV. A second group of 15 CIS occur at a low frequency (2-5 observations) in mammary HOGs or tumors. In this latter group the expression of either Phf19 or Sdc2 was shown to increase HC11 cells invasion capability. Foxl1 expression conferred on HC11 cells the capability for anchorage-independent colony formation in soft agar and tumor development in nude mice. The published transcriptome and nucleotide sequence analysis of gene

  10. CELL CONTACTS IN THE MOUSE MAMMARY GLAND

    PubMed Central

    Pitelka, Dorothy R.; Hamamoto, Susan T.; Duafala, Joan G.; Nemanic, Michael K.

    1973-01-01

    The nature and distribution of cell contacts have been examined in thin sections and freeze-fracture replicas of mammary gland samples from female C3H/Crgl mice at stages from birth through pregnancy, lactation, and postweaning involution. Epithelial cells of major mammary ducts at all stages examined are linked at their luminal borders by junctional complexes consisting of tight junctions, variable intermediate junctions, occasional small gap junctions, and one or more series of desmosomes. Scattered desmosomes and gap junctions link ductal epithelial and myoepithelial cells in all combinations; hemidesmosomes attach myoepithelial cells to the basal lamina. Freeze-fracture replicas confirm the erratic distribution of gap junctions and reveal a loose, irregular network of ridges comprising the continuous tight-junctional belts. Alveoli develop early in gestation and initially resemble ducts. Later, as alveoli and small ducts become actively secretory, they lose all desmosomes and most intermediate junctions, whereas tight and gap junctions persist, The tight-junctional network becomes compact and orderly, its undulating ridges oriented predominantly parallel to the luminal surface. It is suggested that these changes in junctional morphology, occurring in secretory cells around parturition, may be related to the greatly enhanced rate of movement of milk precursors and products through the lactating epithelium, or to the profound and recurrent changes in shape of secretory cells that occur in relation to myoepithelial cell contraction, or to both. PMID:4569313

  11. Three-Dimensional Cultures of Mouse Mammary Epithelial Cells

    PubMed Central

    Mroue, Rana; Bissell, Mina J.

    2013-01-01

    The mammary gland is an ideal “model organism” for studying tissue specificity and gene expression in mammals: it is one of the few organs that develop after birth and it undergoes multiple cycles of growth, differentiation and regression during the animal’s lifetime in preparation for the important function of lactation. The basic “functional differentiation” unit in the gland is the mammary acinus made up of a layer of polarized epithelial cells specialized for milk production surrounded by myoepithelial contractile cells, and the two-layered structure is surrounded by basement membrane. Much knowledge about the regulation of mammary gland development has been acquired from studying the physiology of the gland and of lactation in rodents. Culture studies, however, were hampered by the inability to maintain functional differentiation on conventional tissue culture plastic. We now know that the microenvironment, including the extracellular matrix and tissue architecture, plays a crucial role in directing functional differentiation of organs. Thus, in order for culture systems to be effective experimental models, they need to recapitulate the basic unit of differentiated function in the tissue or organ and to maintain its three-dimensional (3D) structure. Mouse mammary culture models evolved from basic monolayers of cells to an array of complex 3D systems that observe the importance of the microenvironment in dictating proper tissue function and structure. In this chapter, we focus on how 3D mouse mammary epithelial cultures have enabled investigators to gain a better understanding of the organization, development and function of the acinus, and to identify key molecular, structural, and mechanical cues important for maintaining mammary function and architecture. The accompanying chapter of Vidi et al. describes 3D models developed for human cells. Here, we describe how mouse primary epithelial cells and cell lines—essentially those we use in our

  12. A novel non-mouse mammary tumor virus activation of the Int-3 gene in a spontaneous mouse mammary tumor.

    PubMed Central

    Kordon, E C; Smith, G H; Callahan, R; Gallahan, D

    1995-01-01

    In a mouse mammary tumor model system in which carcinogenic progression can be investigated, we have found a unique mutation of Int-3 associated with progression from premalignant lobular hyperplasia to tumor. Sequence analysis of the rearranged fragment revealed an insertion of an intracisternal type A particle (IAP) within the Int-3 gene. Int-3 is mutated frequently in mouse mammary tumor virus (MMTV)-induced mammary tumors by insertion of MMTV proviral DNA into this intragenic region. In these mutations, the insertion produces a chimeric Int-3 transcript encoding the cytoplasmic portion of the Int-3 protein driven by the MMTV long terminal repeat promoter. In this case, the IAP DNA was inserted in the opposite transcriptional orientation relative to Int-3; nevertheless, a similar chimeric RNA transcript driven by a cryptic promoter in the oppositely oriented 5' IAP long terminal repeat was generated. This is the first demonstration that an insertional mutation unrelated to MMTV activates an Int gene commonly associated with mammary tumorigenesis. PMID:7494323

  13. Role of the Stem Cell Niche in Hormone-Induced Tumorigenesis in Fetal Mouse Mammary Epithelium

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2005-08-01

    AD Award Number: W81XWH-04-1-0719 TITLE: Role of the Stem Cell Niche in Hormone-Induced Tumorigenesis in Fetal Mouse Mammary Epithelium PRINCIPAL...TITLE AND SUBTITLE 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER Role of the Stem Cell Niche in Hormone-induced Tumorigenesis in Fetal Mouse 5b. GRANT NUMBER Mammary Epithelium...SUPPLEMENTARY NOTES 14. ABSTRACT SEE PAGE 4 15. SUBJECT TERMS Stem Cells , Stem Cell niche, Immunohistochemistry, mammary gland, breast cancer 16

  14. Tamoxifen inhibition of prolactin action in the mouse mammary gland.

    PubMed

    Biswas, R; Vonderhaar, B K

    1991-01-01

    Binding of lactogenic hormones to particulate and solubilized microsomal membranes isolated from mammary glands of lactating mice is inhibited by direct addition of 10(-10) M or greater concentrations of triphenylethylene antiestrogens [i.e. tamoxifen (TAM), 4-hydroxy-tamoxifen, and Nafoxidine] to the binding assays. Estradiol and other antiestrogens such as BPEA (-2-(4-tert-butyl-phenoxy) ethyl diethylamine hydrochloride, LY117018, and LY 156758 do not have this effect. The triphenylethylene antiestrogens bind to the membrane-associated antiestrogen binding sites (AEBS). Effectiveness of binding to the AEBS parallels the effectiveness of inhibition of the lactogen binding. The effect is selective in that binding of epidermal growth factor and insulin to these same membranes is unaffected by the antiestrogens. Binding of PRL to membranes prepared from the livers of the lactating mice is also unaffected. Both the PRL receptor and AEBS are primarily localized to the microsomal membrane fraction of cells. Maximal inhibition of PRL binding by TAM is observed in the light microsomes that contain plasma membranes. In addition to inhibition of PRL binding, TAM also prevents the PRL-induced accumulation of caseins by cultured mouse mammary explants. Thus it appears that the triphenylethylene antiestrogens, acting through the AEBS, act as antilactogens in the normal mammary gland.

  15. Investigating the Role of FIP200 in Mammary Carcinogenesis Using a Transgenic Mouse Model

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2007-04-01

    the mammary gland of virgin mice however, lactating mice have severe lobulo-alveolar hypoplasia in the mammary gland. After completing the analysis... hypoplasia which renders the dams unable to lactate). In the 1B mating scheme a female mouse with FAKFlox/Flox genotype was mated to a male MMTV...Epithelial-Specific Deletion of the Focal Adhesion Kinase Gene Leads to Severe Lobulo-Alveolar Hypoplasia and Secretory Immaturity of the Murine Mammary

  16. Int-6, a highly conserved, widely expressed gene, is mutated by mouse mammary tumor virus in mammary preneoplasia.

    PubMed Central

    Marchetti, A; Buttitta, F; Miyazaki, S; Gallahan, D; Smith, G H; Callahan, R

    1995-01-01

    With a unique mouse mammary tumor model system in which mouse mammary tumor virus (MMTV) insertional mutations can be detected during progression from preneoplasia to frank malignancy, including metastasis, we have discovered a new common integration site (designated Int-6) for MMTV in mouse mammary tumors. MMTV was integrated into Int-6 in a mammary hyperplastic outgrowth line, its tumors and metastases, and two independent mammary tumors arising in unrelated mice. The Int-6 gene is ubiquitously expressed as a 1.4-kb RNA species in adult tissues and is detected beginning at day 8 of embryonic development. The nucleotide sequence of Int-6 is unrelated to any of the known genes in the GenBank database. MMTV integrates within introns of the gene in the opposite transcriptional orientation. In each tumor tested, this results in the expression of a truncated Int-6/long terminal repeat (LTR) chimeric RNA species which is terminated at a cryptic termination signal in the MMTV LTR. Since the nonrearranged Int-6 alleles in these tumors contain no mutations, we favor the conclusion that truncation of the Int-6 gene product either biologically activates its function or represents a dominant-negative mutation. PMID:7853537

  17. Multiphoton intravital microscopy setup to visualize the mouse mammary gland

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Adur, Javier; Herrera Torres, Ana M.; Masedunskas, Andrius; Baratti, Mariana O.; de Thomaz, Andre A.; Pelegati, Vitor B.; Carvalho, Hernandes F.; Cesar, Carlos L.

    2013-06-01

    Recently, light microscopy-based techniques have been extended to live mammalian models leading to the development of a new imaging approach called intravital microscopy (IVM). Although IVM has been introduced at the beginning of the last century, its major advancements have occurred in the last twenty years with the development of non-linear microscopy that has enabled performing deep tissue imaging. IVM has been utilized to address many biological questions in basic research and is now a fundamental tool that provide information on tissues such as morphology, cellular architecture, and metabolic status. IVM has become an indispensable tool in numerous areas. This study presents and describes the practical aspects of IVM necessary to visualize epithelial cells of live mouse mammary gland with multiphoton techniques.

  18. Human mammary microenvironment better regulates the biology of human breast cancer in humanized mouse model.

    PubMed

    Zheng, Ming-Jie; Wang, Jue; Xu, Lu; Zha, Xiao-Ming; Zhao, Yi; Ling, Li-Jun; Wang, Shui

    2015-02-01

    During the past decades, many efforts have been made in mimicking the clinical progress of human cancer in mouse models. Previously, we developed a human breast tissue-derived (HB) mouse model. Theoretically, it may mimic the interactions between "species-specific" mammary microenvironment of human origin and human breast cancer cells. However, detailed evidences are absent. The present study (in vivo, cellular, and molecular experiments) was designed to explore the regulatory role of human mammary microenvironment in the progress of human breast cancer cells. Subcutaneous (SUB), mammary fat pad (MFP), and HB mouse models were developed for in vivo comparisons. Then, the orthotopic tumor masses from three different mouse models were collected for primary culture. Finally, the biology of primary cultured human breast cancer cells was compared by cellular and molecular experiments. Results of in vivo mouse models indicated that human breast cancer cells grew better in human mammary microenvironment. Cellular and molecular experiments confirmed that primary cultured human breast cancer cells from HB mouse model showed a better proliferative and anti-apoptotic biology than those from SUB to MFP mouse models. Meanwhile, primary cultured human breast cancer cells from HB mouse model also obtained the migratory and invasive biology for "species-specific" tissue metastasis to human tissues. Comprehensive analyses suggest that "species-specific" mammary microenvironment of human origin better regulates the biology of human breast cancer cells in our humanized mouse model of breast cancer, which is more consistent with the clinical progress of human breast cancer.

  19. In vivo functional differences in microvascular response of 4T1 and Caki-1 tumors after treatment with OXi4503.

    PubMed

    Wankhede, Mamta; Dedeugd, Casey; Siemann, Dietmar W; Sorg, Brian S

    2010-03-01

    4T1 mouse mammary adenocarcinomas and Caki-1 human renal cell carcinomas grown in mouse dorsal window chambers were serially treated with the vascular disrupting agent (VDA) OXi4503 and their responses compared. The real-time in vivo response was assessed using spectral imaging of microvascular hemoglobin saturation. To our knowledge this is the first use of spectral imaging technology for investigation of vascular disrupting agents. Previous research showing tumor size dependence in the treatment response to VDAs suggested that for the size of tumors used in this study only a moderate response would be observed; however, the tumors unexpectedly had very different responses to treatment. Caki-1 tumors showed little permanent vessel damage and experienced transient vessel collapse with time-dependent oxygenation changes followed by recovery starting at 6 h after treatment. Caki-1 tumors did not manifest necrotic avascular regions even after repeated treatments. These results are consistent with those obtained using other imaging modalities and histology. In contrast, similarly sized 4T1 tumors showed extensive vessel disintegration, minor vascular collapse, and a drop in tumor oxygenation up to 6 h post-treatment, after which reperfusion of collapsed vessels and extensive vascular remodeling and neovascularization of the tumor rim occurred from 8-48 h. The completely disintegrated vessels did not recover and left behind avascular and apparently necrotic regions in the tumor core. Spectral imaging appears to be a useful technique for in vivo investigation of vascular disrupting agents. The differential responses of these two tumor-types suggest that further investigation of the mechanisms of action of VDAs and individual characterization of tumor VDA-responses may be needed for optimal clinical use of these agents.

  20. s-SHIP promoter expression marks activated stem cells in developing mouse mammary tissue

    PubMed Central

    Bai, Lixia; Rohrschneider, Larry R.

    2010-01-01

    Mammary stem cells (MaSCs) play critical roles in normal development and perhaps tumorigenesis of the mammary gland. Using combined cell markers, adult MaSCs have been enriched in a basal cell population, but the exact identity of MaSCs remains unknown. We used the s-SHIP promoter to tag presumptive stem cells with GFP in the embryos of a transgenic mouse model. Here we show, in postnatal mammary gland development, that GFP+ cap cells in puberty and basal alveolar bud cells in pregnancy each exhibit self-renewal and regenerative capabilities for all mammary epithelial cells of a new functional mammary gland upon transplantation. Single GFP+ cells can regenerate the mammary epithelial network. GFP+ mammary epithelial cells are p63+, CD24mod, CD49fhigh, and CD29high; are actively proliferating; and express s-SHIP mRNA. Overall, our results identify the activated MaSC population in vivo at the forefront of rapidly developing terminal end buds (puberty) and alveolar buds (pregnancy) in the mammary gland. In addition, GFP+ basal cells are expanded in MMTV-Wnt1 breast tumors but not in ErbB2 tumors. These results enable MaSC in situ identification and isolation via a consistent single parameter using a new mouse model with applications for further analyses of normal and potential cancer stem cells. PMID:20810647

  1. Versican G3 Promotes Mouse Mammary Tumor Cell Growth, Migration, and Metastasis by Influencing EGF Receptor Signaling

    PubMed Central

    Du, William Weidong; Yang, Burton B.; Shatseva, Tatiana A.; Yang, Bing L.; Deng, Zhaoqun; Shan, Sze Wan; Lee, Daniel Y.; Seth, Arun; Yee, Albert J.

    2010-01-01

    Increased versican expression in breast tumors is predictive of relapse and has negative impact on survival rates. The C-terminal G3 domain of versican influences local and systemic tumor invasiveness in pre-clinical murine models. However, the mechanism(s) by which G3 influences breast tumor growth and metastasis is not well characterized. Here we evaluated the expression of versican in mouse mammary tumor cell lines observing that 4T1 cells expressed highest levels while 66c14 cells expressed low levels. We exogenously expressed a G3 construct in 66c14 cells and analyzed its effects on cell proliferation, migration, cell cycle progression, and EGFR signaling. Experiments in a syngeneic orthotopic animal model demonstrated that G3 promoted tumor growth and systemic metastasis in vivo. Activation of pERK correlated with high levels of G3 expression. In vitro, G3 enhanced breast cancer cell proliferation and migration by up-regulating EGFR signaling, and enhanced cell motility through chemotactic mechanisms to bone stromal cells, which was prevented by inhibitor AG 1478. G3 expressing cells demonstrated increased CDK2 and GSK-3β (S9P) expression, which were related to cell growth. The activity of G3 on mouse mammary tumor cell growth, migration and its effect on spontaneous metastasis to bone in an orthotopic model was modulated by up-regulating the EGFR-mediated signaling pathway. Taken together, EGFR-signaling appears to be an important pathway in versican G3-mediated breast cancer tumor invasiveness and metastasis. PMID:21079779

  2. Aurora kinase-A overexpression in mouse mammary epithelium induces mammary adenocarcinomas harboring genetic alterations shared with human breast cancer.

    PubMed

    Treekitkarnmongkol, Warapen; Katayama, Hiroshi; Kai, Kazuharu; Sasai, Kaori; Jones, Jennifer Carter; Wang, Jing; Shen, Li; Sahin, Aysegul A; Gagea, Mihai; Ueno, Naoto T; Creighton, Chad J; Sen, Subrata

    2016-12-01

    Recent data from The Cancer Genome Atlas analysis have revealed that Aurora kinase A (AURKA) amplification and overexpression characterize a distinct subset of human tumors across multiple cancer types. Although elevated expression of AURKA has been shown to induce oncogenic phenotypes in cells in vitro, findings from transgenic mouse models of Aurora-A overexpression in mammary glands have been distinct depending on the models generated. In the present study, we report that prolonged overexpression of AURKA transgene in mammary epithelium driven by ovine β-lactoglobulin promoter, activated through multiple pregnancy and lactation cycles, results in the development of mammary adenocarcinomas with alterations in cancer-relevant genes and epithelial-to-mesenchymal transition. The tumor incidence was 38.9% (7/18) in Aurora-A transgenic mice at 16 months of age following 4-5 pregnancy cycles. Aurora-A overexpression in the tumor tissues accompanied activation of Akt, elevation of Cyclin D1, Tpx2 and Plk1 along with downregulation of ERα and p53 proteins, albeit at varying levels. Microarray comparative genomic hybridization (CGH) analyses of transgenic mouse mammary adenocarcinomas revealed copy gain of Glp1r and losses of Ercc5, Pten and Tcf7l2 loci. Review of human breast tumor transcriptomic data sets showed association of these genes at varying levels with Aurora-A gain of function alterations. Whole exome sequencing of the mouse tumors also identified gene mutations detected in Aurora-A overexpressing human breast cancers. Our findings demonstrate that prolonged overexpression of Aurora-A can be a driver somatic genetic event in mammary adenocarcinomas associated with deregulated tumor-relevant pathways in the Aurora-A subset of human breast cancer.

  3. Specific medicinal plant polysaccharides effectively enhance the potency of a DC-based vaccine against mouse mammary tumor metastasis.

    PubMed

    Chang, Wei Ting; Lai, Tzung Hsien; Chyan, Yau Jan; Yin, Shu Yi; Chen, Yung Hsiang; Wei, Wen Chi; Yang, Ning-Sun

    2015-01-01

    Dendritic cell (DC) vaccines are a newly emerging immunotherapeutic approach for the treatment and prevention of cancer, but major challenges still remain particularly with respect to clinical efficacy. Engineering and optimization of adjuvant formulations for DC-based vaccines is one strategy through which more efficacious treatments may be obtained. In this study, we developed a new ex vivo approach for DC vaccine preparation. We evaluated two highly purified mixed polysaccharide fractions from the root of Astragalus membranaceus and Codonopsis pilosulae, named Am and Cp, for their use in enhancing the efficiency of a DC-based cancer vaccine against metastasis of 4T1 mammary carcinoma in mice. Mixed lymphocyte reaction showed all Am-, Cp- and [Am+Cp]-treated DCs enhanced mouse CD4+ and CD8+ T-cell proliferation. [Am+Cp]-treated DCs exhibited the strongest anti-4T1 metastasis activity in test mice. Treatments with Am, Cp and [Am+Cp] also resulted in augmented expression of CD40, CD80 and CD86 markers in test DCs. Bioinformatics analysis of the cytokine array data from treated DCs identified that [Am+Cp] is efficacious in activation of specific immune functions via mediating the expression of cytokines/chemokines involved in the recruitment and differentiation of defined immune cells. Biochemical analysis revealed that Am and Cp are composed mainly of polysaccharides containing a high level (70-95%) glucose residues, but few or no (< 1%) mannose residues. In summary, our findings suggest that the specific plant polysaccharides Am and Cp extracted from traditional Chinese medicines can be effectively used instead of bacterial LPS as a potent adjuvant in the formulation of a DC-based vaccine for cancer immunotherapies.

  4. Specific Medicinal Plant Polysaccharides Effectively Enhance the Potency of a DC-Based Vaccine against Mouse Mammary Tumor Metastasis

    PubMed Central

    Chang, Wei Ting; Lai, Tzung Hsien; Chyan, Yau Jan; Yin, Shu Yi; Chen, Yung Hsiang; Wei, Wen Chi; Yang, Ning-Sun

    2015-01-01

    Dendritic cell (DC) vaccines are a newly emerging immunotherapeutic approach for the treatment and prevention of cancer, but major challenges still remain particularly with respect to clinical efficacy. Engineering and optimization of adjuvant formulations for DC-based vaccines is one strategy through which more efficacious treatments may be obtained. In this study, we developed a new ex vivo approach for DC vaccine preparation. We evaluated two highly purified mixed polysaccharide fractions from the root of Astragalus membranaceus and Codonopsis pilosulae, named Am and Cp, for their use in enhancing the efficiency of a DC-based cancer vaccine against metastasis of 4T1 mammary carcinoma in mice. Mixed lymphocyte reaction showed all Am-, Cp- and [Am+Cp]-treated DCs enhanced mouse CD4+ and CD8+ T-cell proliferation. [Am+Cp]-treated DCs exhibited the strongest anti-4T1 metastasis activity in test mice. Treatments with Am, Cp and [Am+Cp] also resulted in augmented expression of CD40, CD80 and CD86 markers in test DCs. Bioinformatics analysis of the cytokine array data from treated DCs identified that [Am+Cp] is efficacious in activation of specific immune functions via mediating the expression of cytokines/chemokines involved in the recruitment and differentiation of defined immune cells. Biochemical analysis revealed that Am and Cp are composed mainly of polysaccharides containing a high level (70–95%) glucose residues, but few or no (< 1%) mannose residues. In summary, our findings suggest that the specific plant polysaccharides Am and Cp extracted from traditional Chinese medicines can be effectively used instead of bacterial LPS as a potent adjuvant in the formulation of a DC-based vaccine for cancer immunotherapies. PMID:25825910

  5. Scintillation Studies of the Mouse Mammary Tumor Virus with ^125I

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yazdi, Amir; Blue, Eric; Bradley, Eric; Majewski, Stan; Mohammed, Shira; Qian, Jianguo; Saha, Margaret; Schworer, Stephen; Sutton, Jonathan; Weisenberger, Andrew; Welsh, Robert

    2007-10-01

    We have applied the techniques of scintillation imaging to studies of the mouse mammary tumor virus (MMTV). In these studies, Sodium Iodide Symporter (NIS) transfers the radioactive ^125I to the mammary glands of lactating mice and in particular to those mammaries with visible tumors. These studies have principally been carried out using pixellated scintillators coupled to position sensitive photomultiplier tubes (PSPMTs). More recently, we have initiated such studies with a monolithic slab of LaBr3 scintillator coupled to an array of PSPMTs. Several techniques of mapping and measuring the development of such tumors have been employed. These will be discussed in detail and preliminary results will be reported.

  6. Functional and molecular characterisation of EO771.LMB tumours, a new C57BL/6-mouse-derived model of spontaneously metastatic mammary cancer.

    PubMed

    Johnstone, Cameron N; Smith, Yvonne E; Cao, Yuan; Burrows, Allan D; Cross, Ryan S N; Ling, Xiawei; Redvers, Richard P; Doherty, Judy P; Eckhardt, Bedrich L; Natoli, Anthony L; Restall, Christina M; Lucas, Erin; Pearson, Helen B; Deb, Siddhartha; Britt, Kara L; Rizzitelli, Alexandra; Li, Jason; Harmey, Judith H; Pouliot, Normand; Anderson, Robin L

    2015-03-01

    The translation of basic research into improved therapies for breast cancer patients requires relevant preclinical models that incorporate spontaneous metastasis. We have completed a functional and molecular characterisation of a new isogenic C57BL/6 mouse model of breast cancer metastasis, comparing and contrasting it with the established BALB/c 4T1 model. Metastatic EO771.LMB tumours were derived from poorly metastatic parental EO771 mammary tumours. Functional differences were evaluated using both in vitro assays and spontaneous metastasis assays in mice. Results were compared to non-metastatic 67NR and metastatic 4T1.2 tumours of the 4T1 model. Protein and transcript levels of markers of human breast cancer molecular subtypes were measured in the four tumour lines, as well as p53 (Tp53) tumour-suppressor gene status and responses to tamoxifen in vivo and in vitro. Array-based expression profiling of whole tumours identified genes and pathways that were deregulated in metastatic tumours. EO771.LMB cells metastasised spontaneously to lung in C57BL/6 mice and displayed increased invasive capacity compared with parental EO771. By immunohistochemical assessment, EO771 and EO771.LMB were basal-like, as was the 4T1.2 tumour, whereas 67NR had a luminal phenotype. Primary tumours from all lines were negative for progesterone receptor, Erb-b2/Neu and cytokeratin 5/6, but positive for epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR). Only 67NR displayed nuclear estrogen receptor alpha (ERα) positivity. EO771 and EO771.LMB expressed mutant p53, whereas 67NR and 4T1.2 were p53-null. Integrated molecular analysis of both the EO771/EO771.LMB and 67NR/4T1.2 pairs indicated that upregulation of matrix metalloproteinase-3 (MMP-3), parathyroid hormone-like hormone (Pthlh) and S100 calcium binding protein A8 (S100a8) and downregulation of the thrombospondin receptor (Cd36) might be causally involved in metastatic dissemination of breast cancer.

  7. Functional and molecular characterisation of EO771.LMB tumours, a new C57BL/6-mouse-derived model of spontaneously metastatic mammary cancer

    PubMed Central

    Johnstone, Cameron N.; Smith, Yvonne E.; Cao, Yuan; Burrows, Allan D.; Cross, Ryan S. N.; Ling, Xiawei; Redvers, Richard P.; Doherty, Judy P.; Eckhardt, Bedrich L.; Natoli, Anthony L.; Restall, Christina M.; Lucas, Erin; Pearson, Helen B.; Deb, Siddhartha; Britt, Kara L.; Rizzitelli, Alexandra; Li, Jason; Harmey, Judith H.; Pouliot, Normand; Anderson, Robin L.

    2015-01-01

    The translation of basic research into improved therapies for breast cancer patients requires relevant preclinical models that incorporate spontaneous metastasis. We have completed a functional and molecular characterisation of a new isogenic C57BL/6 mouse model of breast cancer metastasis, comparing and contrasting it with the established BALB/c 4T1 model. Metastatic EO771.LMB tumours were derived from poorly metastatic parental EO771 mammary tumours. Functional differences were evaluated using both in vitro assays and spontaneous metastasis assays in mice. Results were compared to non-metastatic 67NR and metastatic 4T1.2 tumours of the 4T1 model. Protein and transcript levels of markers of human breast cancer molecular subtypes were measured in the four tumour lines, as well as p53 (Tp53) tumour-suppressor gene status and responses to tamoxifen in vivo and in vitro. Array-based expression profiling of whole tumours identified genes and pathways that were deregulated in metastatic tumours. EO771.LMB cells metastasised spontaneously to lung in C57BL/6 mice and displayed increased invasive capacity compared with parental EO771. By immunohistochemical assessment, EO771 and EO771.LMB were basal-like, as was the 4T1.2 tumour, whereas 67NR had a luminal phenotype. Primary tumours from all lines were negative for progesterone receptor, Erb-b2/Neu and cytokeratin 5/6, but positive for epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR). Only 67NR displayed nuclear estrogen receptor alpha (ERα) positivity. EO771 and EO771.LMB expressed mutant p53, whereas 67NR and 4T1.2 were p53-null. Integrated molecular analysis of both the EO771/EO771.LMB and 67NR/4T1.2 pairs indicated that upregulation of matrix metalloproteinase-3 (MMP-3), parathyroid hormone-like hormone (Pthlh) and S100 calcium binding protein A8 (S100a8) and downregulation of the thrombospondin receptor (Cd36) might be causally involved in metastatic dissemination of breast cancer. PMID:25633981

  8. Prolactin effects on the dietary regulation of mouse mammary tumor virus proviral DNA expression.

    PubMed Central

    Hamada, N; Engelman, R W; Tomita, Y; Chen, R F; Iwai, H; Good, R A; Day, N K

    1990-01-01

    Chronic energy-intake restriction inhibits mouse mammary tumor virus (MMTV)-induced mammary tumors in C3H/Ou mice by greater than 90%. We have shown that associated with suppression of mammary tumorigenesis there is a reduction or inhibition of circulating prolactin, MMTV particles expressed, and MMTV mRNA transcription in mammary glands (and in most organs tested). To understand the concerted action of prolactin, energy-consumption level, and MMTV on inducing mammary tumors, experiments were designed to control prolactin and energy levels in order to evaluate their effects on MMTV mRNA expression. Mice on restricted diets were grafted with adenohypophyses, and mice fed ad libitum were treated with the dopaminomimetic agent octahydrobenzo [g]quinoline. Adenohypophyseal grafting significantly increased prolactin in dietary (energy)-restricted mice, and this effect was associated with an increase in MMTV mRNA expression within the mammary gland; a linear correlation between prolactin levels and MMTV mRNA expression in the mammary gland was found. Conversely, elimination of the nocturnal peak of circulating prolactin by i.p. injection of dopaminomimetic octahydrobenzo [g]quinoline to mice fed ad libitum delayed (by 8 weeks) and reduced (even as long as 25 weeks) mammary gland MMTV mRNA expression. These findings associate prolactin influences with MMTV mRNA production in mice and help explain the link between chronic energy-intake restriction and reduced MMTV gene expression. Images PMID:1975696

  9. Raman spectra of normal and cancerous mouse mammary gland tissue using near infrared excitation energy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Naik, Vaman; Serhatkulu, G. K.; Dai, H.; Shukla, N.; Weber, R.; Thakur, J. S.; Freeman, D. C.; Pandya, A. K.; Auner, G. W.; Naik, R.; Miller, R. F.; Cao, A.; Klein, M. D.; Rabah, R.

    2006-03-01

    Raman spectra of normal mammary gland tissues, malignant mammary gland tumors, and lymph nodes have been recorded using fresh tissue from mice. Tumors were induced in mice by subcutaneously injecting 4T1 BALB/c mammary tumor (a highly malignant) cell line. The Raman spectra were collected using the same tissues that were examined by histopathology for determining the cancerous/normal state of the tissue. Differences in various peak intensities, peak shifts and peak ratios were analyzed to determine the Raman spectral features that differentiate mammary gland tumors from non-tumorous tissue. Tissues that were confirmed by pathology as cancerous (tumors) show several distinctive features in the Raman spectra compared to the spectra of the normal tissues. For example, the cancerous tissues show Raman peaks at 621, 642, 1004, 1032, 1175 and 1208 cm-1 that are assignable to amino acids containing aromatic side-chains such as phenylalanine, tryptophan and tyrosine. Further, the cancerous tissues show a greatly reduced level of phospholipids compared to the normal tissues. The Raman spectral regions that are sensitive to pathologic alteration in the tissue will be discussed.

  10. Differential roles of ERα and ERβ in normal and neoplastic development in the mouse mammary gland.

    PubMed

    Mehta, Rajendra G; Hawthorne, Michael; Mehta, Rajeshwari R; Torres, Karen E O; Peng, Xinjian; McCormick, David L; Kopelovich, Levy

    2014-01-01

    The present experiments were performed to determine the roles of estrogen receptors α and β (ERα and ERβ) in normal and neoplastic development in the mouse mammary gland. In wild-type mice, in vivo administration of estradiol (E) + progesterone (P) stimulated mammary ductal growth and alveolar differentiation. Mammary glands from mice in which the ERβ gene has been deleted (βERKO mice) demonstrated normal ductal growth and differentiation in response to E + P. By contrast, mammary glands from mice in which the ERα gene has been deleted (αERKO mice) demonstrated only rudimentary ductal structures that did not differentiate in response to E + P. EGF demonstrates estrogen-like activity in the mammary glands of αERKO mice: treatment of αERKO mice with EGF + P (without E) supported normal mammary gland development, induced expression of progesterone receptor (PR), and increased levels of G-protein-coupled receptor (GPR30) protein. Mammary gland development in βERKO mice treated with EGF + P was comparable to that of wild-type mice receiving EGF + P; EGF had no statistically significant effects on the induction of PR or expression of GPR30 in mammary glands harvested from either wild-type mice or βERKO mice. In vitro exposure of mammary glands to 7,12-dimethylbenz[a]anthracene (DMBA) induced preneoplastic mammary alveolar lesions (MAL) in glands from wild-type mice and βERKO mice, but failed to induce MAL in mammary glands from αERKO mice. Microarray analysis of DMBA-treated mammary glands identified 28 functional pathways whose expression was significantly different in αERKO mice versus both βERKO and wild-type mice; key functions that were differentially expressed in αERKO mice included cell division, cell proliferation, and apoptosis. The data demonstrate distinct roles for ERα and ERβ in normal and neoplastic development in the mouse mammary gland, and suggest that EGF can mimic the ERα-mediated effects of E in this organ.

  11. Magnolol inhibits the inflammatory response in mouse mammary epithelial cells and a mouse mastitis model.

    PubMed

    Wei, Wang; Dejie, Liang; Xiaojing, Song; Tiancheng, Wang; Yongguo, Cao; Zhengtao, Yang; Naisheng, Zhang

    2015-02-01

    Mastitis comprises an inflammation of the mammary gland, which is almost always linked with bacterial infection. The treatment of mastitis concerns antimicrobial substances, but not very successful. On the other hand, anti-inflammatory therapy with Chinese traditional medicine becomes an effective way for treating mastitis. Magnolol is a polyphenolic binaphthalene compound extracted from the stem bark of Magnolia sp., which has been shown to exert a potential for anti-inflammatory activity. The purpose of this study was to investigate the protective effects of magnolol on inflammation in lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-induced mastitis mouse model in vivo and the mechanism of this protective effects in LPS-stimulated mouse mammary epithelial cells (MMECs) in vitro. The damage of tissues was determined by histopathology and myeloperoxidase (MPO) assay. The expression of pro-inflammatory cytokines was determined by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA). Nuclear factor-kappa B (NF-κB), inhibitory kappa B (IκBα) protein, p38, extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK), c-Jun N-terminal kinase (JNK), and Toll-like receptor 4 (TLR4) were determined by Western blot. The results showed that magnolol significantly inhibit the LPS-induced TNF-α, IL-6, and IL-1β production both in vivo and vitro. Magnolol declined the phosphorylation of IκBα, p65, p38, ERK, and JNK in LPS-stimulated MMECs. Furthermore, magnolol inhibited the expression of TLR4 in LPS-stimulated MMECs. In vivo study, it was also observed that magnolol attenuated the damage of mastitis tissues in the mouse models. These findings demonstrated that magnolol attenuate LPS-stimulated inflammatory response by suppressing TLR4/NF-κB/mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) signaling system. Thereby, magnolol may be a therapeutic agent against mastitis.

  12. Effect of prolactin and bromocriptine on growth of transplanted hormone-dependent mouse mammary tumours.

    PubMed Central

    Briand, P.; Thorpe, S. M.; Daehnfeldt, J. L.

    1977-01-01

    Administration of ovine prolactin alone supported growth of hormone-dependent GR mouse mammary tumours. Growth of hormone-independent tumours was not stimulated. Furthermore, administration of bromocriptine, a compound that inhibits release of prolactin from the pituitary gland, was shown to inhibit the growth of hormone-dependent tumours in animals receiving treatment with progesterone + oestrone. Administration of prolactin or bromocriptine to mice bearing tumours that grew independently of progesterone + oestrone treatment had no influence on tumour growth. We conclude that direct as well as indirect evidence has been found for the involvement of prolactin in the growth of transplanted, hormone-dependent GR mouse mammary tumours. PMID:577471

  13. Lactoferrin at basal side of mouse mammary epithelium derives in part from stroma cells.

    PubMed

    Pecorini, Chiara; Delpal, Serge; Truchet, Sandrine; Le Provost, Fabienne; Baldi, Antonella; Ollivier-Bousquet, Michèle

    2009-11-01

    Lactoferrin is synthesized by glandular epithelial cells and neutrophils and is also present on both sides of the mammary epithelium. We have studied the origin of lactoferrin detected in the various compartments of mouse mammary tissue. As revealed by immunogold electron microscopy, lactoferrin is present in mammary epithelial cells and in the basal region of the epithelium, associated with connective tissue and stroma cells at all physiological stages studied. A perturbation of protein synthesis or transport after in vitro treatment with cycloheximide or brefeldin A does not abrogate lactoferrin labelling in the basal region of the epithelium. The expression of lactoferrin has also been observed in the fat pads of mammary glands from mice surgically depleted of epithelial cells. The sealing of one teat for 24 h is accompanied by an increase in both the number of stroma cells and the labelling of myoepithelial cells. Thus, the lactoferrin present in the interstitial space of the mouse mammary epithelium originates in part from stroma cells. Possible roles of lactoferrin at the basal side of the mammary epithelium are discussed.

  14. Transfer of the IL-37b gene elicits anti-tumor responses in mice bearing 4T1 breast cancer

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Wei-qiang; Zhao, Dan; Zhou, Yu-shan; Hu, Xiao-yu; Sun, Zhi-na; Yu, Gang; Wu, Wan-tong; Chen, Song; Kuang, Jiu-long; Xu, Guo-gang; Han, Zhong-chao; Wang, Bang-mao; Yang, Jing-xian; Feng, Xiao-ming

    2015-01-01

    Aim: IL-37b has shown anti-cancer activities in addition to its anti-inflammatory properties. In this study, we investigated the effects of IL-37b on breast carcinoma growth in mice and to determine the involvement of T cell activation in the effects. Methods: IL-37b gene was transferred into mouse breast carcinoma cell line 4T1 (4T1-IL37b cells), the expression of secretory IL-37b by the cells was detected, and the effects of IL-37b expression on the cell proliferation in vitro was evaluated. After injection of 4T1 cells or 4T1-IL37b cells into immunocompetent BALB/c mice, immunodeficient BALB/c nude mice and NOD-SCID mice, the tumor growth and survival rate were measured. The proliferation of T cells in vitro was also detected. Results: IL-37b was detected in the supernatants of 4T1-IL37b cells with a concentration of 12.02±0.875 ng/mL. IL-37b expression did not affect 4T1 cell proliferation in vitro. BALB/c mice inoculated with 4T1-IL37b cells showed significant retardation of tumor growth. BALB/c mice inoculated with both 4T1 cells and mitomycin C-treated 4T1-IL37b cells also showed significant retardation of tumor growth. But the anti-cancer activity of IL-37b was abrogated in BALB/c nude mice and NOD-SCID mice inoculated with 4T1-IL37b cells. Recombinant IL-37b slightly promoted CD4+ T cell proliferation without affecting CD8+ T cell proliferation. Conclusion: IL-37b exerts anti-4T1 breast carcinoma effects in vivo by modulating the tumor microenvironment and influencing T cell activation. PMID:25832432

  15. Methods for preparing fluorescent and neutral red-stained whole mounts of mouse mammary glands.

    PubMed

    Landua, John D; Visbal, Adriana P; Lewis, Michael T

    2009-12-01

    Whole mount preparations of mouse mammary glands are useful for evaluating overall changes in growth and morphology, and are essential for detecting and evaluating focal or regionally-localized phenotypes that would be difficult to detect or analyze using other techniques. We present three newly developed methods for preparing whole mounts of mammary glands from genetically-engineered mice expressing fluorescent proteins, as well as using either neutral red or a variety of fluorescent dyes. Unlike traditional hematoxylin- or carmine-stained preparations, neutral red-stained and some fluorescent preparations can be used for several common downstream analyses.

  16. Multivariate statistical analysis of Raman spectra to distinguish normal, tumor, lymph nodes and mastitis in mouse mammary tissues

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dai, H.; Thakur, J. S.; Serhatkulu, G. K.; Pandya, A. K.; Auner, G. W.; Naik, R.; Freeman, D. C.; Naik, V. M.; Cao, A.; Klein, M. D.; Rabah, R.

    2006-03-01

    Raman spectra ( > 680) of normal mammary gland, malignant mammary gland tumors, and lymph node tissues from mice injected with 4T1 tumor cells have been recorded using 785 nm excitation laser. The state of the tissues was confirmed by standard pathological tests. The multivariate statistical analysis methods (principle component analysis and discriminant functional analysis) have been used to categorize the Raman spectra. The statistical algorithms based on the Raman spectral peak heights, clearly separated tissues into six distinct classes, including mastitis, which is clearly separated from normal and tumor. This study suggests that the Raman spectroscopy can possibly perform a real-time analysis of the human mammary tissues for the detection of cancer.

  17. Social isolation induces autophagy in the mouse mammary gland: link to increased mammary cancer risk.

    PubMed

    Sumis, Allison; Cook, Katherine L; Andrade, Fabia O; Hu, Rong; Kidney, Emma; Zhang, Xiyuan; Kim, Dominic; Carney, Elissa; Nguyen, Nguyen; Yu, Wei; Bouker, Kerrie B; Cruz, Idalia; Clarke, Robert; Hilakivi-Clarke, Leena

    2016-10-01

    Social isolation is a strong predictor of early all-cause mortality and consistently increases breast cancer risk in both women and animal models. Because social isolation increases body weight, we compared its effects to those caused by a consumption of obesity-inducing diet (OID) in C57BL/6 mice. Social isolation and OID impaired insulin and glucose sensitivity. In socially isolated, OID-fed mice (I-OID), insulin resistance was linked to reduced Pparg expression and increased neuropeptide Y levels, but in group-housed OID fed mice (G-OID), it was linked to increased leptin and reduced adiponectin levels, indicating that the pathways leading to insulin resistance are different. Carcinogen-induced mammary tumorigenesis was significantly higher in I-OID mice than in the other groups, but cancer risk was also increased in socially isolated, control diet-fed mice (I-C) and G-OID mice compared with that in controls. Unfolded protein response (UPR) signaling (GRP78; IRE1) was upregulated in the mammary glands of OID-fed mice, but not in control diet-fed, socially isolated I-C mice. In contrast, expression of BECLIN1, ATG7 and LC3II were increased, and p62 was downregulated by social isolation, indicating increased autophagy. In the mammary glands of socially isolated mice, but not in G-OID mice, mRNA expressions of p53 and the p53-regulated autophagy inducer Dram1 were upregulated, and nuclear p53 staining was strong. Our findings further indicated that autophagy and tumorigenesis were not increased in Atg7(+/-) mice kept in social isolation and fed OID. Thus, social isolation may increase breast cancer risk by inducing autophagy, independent of changes in body weight.

  18. Protein tyrosine kinase 6 promotes ERBB2-induced mammary gland tumorigenesis in the mouse

    PubMed Central

    Peng, M; Ball-Kell, S M; Tyner, A L

    2015-01-01

    Protein tyrosine kinase 6 (PTK6) expression, activation, and amplification of the PTK6 gene have been reported in ERBB2/HER2-positive mammary gland cancers. To explore contributions of PTK6 to mammary gland tumorigenesis promoted by activated ERBB2, we crossed Ptk6−/− mice with the mouse mammary tumor virus-ERBB2 transgenic mouse line expressing activated ERBB2 and characterized tumor development and progression. ERBB2-induced tumorigenesis was significantly delayed and diminished in mice lacking PTK6. PTK6 expression was induced in the mammary glands of ERBB2 transgenic mice before tumor development and correlated with activation of signal transducer and activator of transcription 3 (STAT3) and increased proliferation. Disruption of PTK6 impaired STAT3 activation and proliferation. Phosphorylation of the PTK6 substrates focal adhesion kinase (FAK) and breast cancer anti-estrogen resistance 1 (BCAR1; p130CAS) was decreased in Ptk6−/− mammary gland tumors. Reduced numbers of metastases were detected in the lungs of Ptk6−/− mice expressing activated ERBB2, compared with wild-type ERBB2 transgenic mice. PTK6 activation was detected at the edges of ERBB2-positive tumors. These data support roles for PTK6 in both ERBB2-induced mammary gland tumor initiation and metastasis, and identify STAT3, FAK, and BCAR1 as physiologically relevant PTK6 substrates in breast cancer. Including PTK6 inhibitors as part of a treatment regimen could have distinct benefits in ERBB2/HER2-positive breast cancers. PMID:26247733

  19. Epidermal growth factor precursor in mouse lactating mammary gland alveolar cells

    SciTech Connect

    Brown, C.F.; Teng, C.T.; Pentecost, B.T.; DiAugustine, R.P. )

    1989-07-01

    Previous studies have demonstrated that high levels of epidermal growth factor (EGF) occur in human and rodent milk and that oral administration of this polypeptide stimulates rodent gastrointestinal development. It is not known whether EGF in milk originates from cells of the lactating mammary gland or is sequestered from an extramammary source. In the present study, prepro-EGF mRNA (approximately 4.7 kilobases) was detected in the CD-1 mouse mammary gland throughout the period of lactation; by comparison, negligible levels of this EGF transcript were found in the gland during pregnancy. Low levels of EGF immunoreactivity (4-5 ng/g wet wt tissue) were extracted from lactating (day 18) mammary glands with dilute acetic acid. Immunolocalization was evident with antisera to either EGF or two other regions of the EGF precursor in essentially all alveolar cells of the lactating gland. The most prominent staining with antiserum to EGF was observed along the luminal borders of cells; this pattern of cellular staining required proteolytic pretreatment of tissue sections. Western blot analyses of cell membranes isolated from the day 16 lactating mammary gland revealed an EGF-immunoreactive band at about 145K, which was equivalent in size to the EGF precursor found in mouse kidney cell membranes. Despite these findings, labeling of lactating mammary gland mince with L-(35S)methionine and cysteine for up to 4 h did not reveal any specific bands in immunoprecipitates. These cumulative findings suggest that the precursor form of EGF occurs in alveolar cells of lactating mammary gland and that this protein is translocated to the cell membrane.

  20. Conditional Wwox Deletion in Mouse Mammary Gland by Means of Two Cre Recombinase Approaches

    PubMed Central

    Ferguson, Brent W.; Gao, Xinsheng; Kil, Hyunsuk; Lee, Jaeho; Benavides, Fernando; Abba, Martin C.; Aldaz, C. Marcelo

    2012-01-01

    Loss of WWOX expression has been reported in many different cancers including breast cancer. Elucidating the function of this gene in adult tissues has not been possible with full Wwox knockout models. Here we characterize the first conditional models of Wwox ablation in mouse mammary epithelium utilizing two transgenic lines expressing Cre recombinase, keratin 5-Cre (BK5-Cre) and MMTV-Cre. In the BK5-Cre model we observed very efficient Wwox ablation in KO mammary glands. However, BK5-Cre Wwox KO animals die prematurely for unknown reasons. In the MMTV-Cre model we observed significant ablation of Wwox in mammary epithelium with no effect on survival. In both of these models we found that Wwox deletion resulted in impaired mammary branching morphogenesis. We demonstrate that loss of Wwox is not carcinogenic in our KO models. Furthermore, no evidence of increase proliferation or development of premalignant lesions was observed. In none of the models did loss of a single Wwox allele (i.e. haploinsufficiency) have any observable phenotypic effect in mammary gland. To better understand the function of Wwox in the mammary gland, transcriptome profiling was performed. We observed that Wwox ablation results in the deregulation of genes involved in various cellular processes. We found that expression of the non-canonical Wnt ligand, Wnt5a, was significantly upregulated in Wwox KO mammary epithelium. Interestingly, we also determined that components of the Jak/Stat3 signaling pathway were upregulated in KO mice and this correlated with a very robust increase in phospho-Stat3 signaling, which warrants further testing. Even though the loss of Wwox expression in breast and other cancers is very well documented, our findings suggest that Wwox does not act as a classical tumor suppressor as previously thought. PMID:22574198

  1. Common Integration Sites for MMTV in Viral Induced Mouse Mammary Tumors

    PubMed Central

    Callahan, Robert

    2011-01-01

    The paradigm of mammary cancer induction by the mouse mammary tumor virus (MMTV) is used to illustrate the body of evidence that supports the hypothesis that mammary epithelial stem/progenitor cells represent targets for oncogenic transformation. It is argued that this is not a special case applicable only to MMTV-induced mammary cancer, because MMTV acts as an environmental mutagen producing random interruptions in the somatic DNA of infected cells by insertion of proviral DNA copies. In addition to disrupting the host genome, the proviral DNA also influences gene expression through its associated enhancer sequences over significant inter-genomic distances. Genes commonly affected by MMTV insertion in multiple individual tumors include, the Wnt, FGF, RSpo gene families as well as eIF3e and Notch4. All of these gene families are known to play essential roles in stem cell maintenance and behavior in a variety of organs. The MMTV-induced mutations accumulate in cells that are long-lived and possess the properties of stem cells, namely, self-renewal and the capacity to produce divergent epithelial progeny through asymmetric division. The evidence shows that epithelial cells with these properties are present in normal mammary glands, may be infected with MMTV, become transformed to produce epithelial hyperplasia through MMTV-induced mutagenesis and progress to frank mammary malignancy. Retroviral marking via MMTV proviral insertion demonstrates that this process progresses from a single mammary epithelial cell that possesses all of the features ascribed to tissue-specific stem cells. PMID:18709449

  2. Alveolar progenitor cells develop in mouse mammary glands independent of pregnancy and lactation.

    PubMed

    Booth, Brian W; Boulanger, Corinne A; Smith, Gilbert H

    2007-09-01

    We have previously described pluripotent, parity-induced mammary epithelial cells (PI-MEC) marked by Rosa26-lacZ expression in the mammary glands of parous females. PI-MEC act as lobule-limited epithelial stem/progenitor cells. To determine whether parity is necessary to generate PI-MEC, we incubated mammary explant cultures from virgin mice in vitro with insulin alone (I), hydrocortisone alone (H), prolactin alone (Prl), or a combination of these lactogenic hormones (IHPrl). Insulin alone activated the WAP-Cre gene. Hydrocortisone and prolactin alone did not. Any combination of hormones that included insulin was effective. Only I, H and Prl together were able to induce secretory differentiation and milk protein synthesis. In addition, EGF, IGF-2 and IGF-1 added individually produced activated (lacZ(+)) PI-MEC in explant cultures. Neither estrogen nor progesterone induced WAP-Cre expression in the explants. None of these positive initiators of WAP-Cre expression in PI-MEC were effective in mammospheres or two-dimensional cultures of mammary epithelium, indicating the indispensability of epithelial-stromal interaction in PI-MEC activation. Like PI-MEC, lacZ(+) cells from virgin explants proliferated and contributed progeny to mammospheres in vitro and to epithelial outgrowths in vivo after transplantation. LacZ(+) cells induced in virgin mouse mammary explants were multipotent (like PI-MEC) in impregnated hosts producing lacZ(+) mammary alveolar structures comprised of both myoepithelial and luminal progeny. These data demonstrate PI-MEC, a mammary epithelial sub-population of lobule-limited progenitor cells, are present in nulliparous female mice before parity and, like the PI-MEC observed following parity, are capable of proliferation, self-renewal and the capacity to produce progeny of diverse epithelial cell fates.

  3. A compendium of the mouse mammary tumor biologist: from the initial observations in the house mouse to the development of genetically engineered mice.

    PubMed

    Cardiff, Robert D; Kenney, Nicholas

    2011-06-01

    For over a century, mouse mammary tumor biology and the associated mouse mammary tumor virus (MMTV) have served as the foundation for experimental cancer research, in general, and, in particular, experimental breast cancer research. Spontaneous mouse mammary tumors were the basis for studies of the natural history of neoplasia, oncogenic viruses, host responses, endocrinology and neoplastic progression. However, lacking formal proof of a human mammary tumor virus, the preeminence of the mouse model faded in the 1980s. Since the late 1980s, genetically engineered mice (GEM) have proven extremely useful for studying breast cancer and have become the animal model for human breast cancer. Hundreds of mouse models of human breast cancer have been developed since the first demonstration in 1984. The GEM have attracted a new generation of molecular and cellular biologists eager to apply their skill sets to these surrogates of the human disease. Newcomers often enter the field without an appreciation of the origins of mouse mammary tumor biology and the basis for many of the prevailing concepts. Our purpose in writing this compendium is to extend an "olive branch" while simultaneously deepen the knowledge of the novice mouse mammary tumor biologist as they journey into a field rich in pathology and genetics spanning several centuries.

  4. Identification of mouse mammary epithelial cells by immunofluorescence with rabbit and guinea pig antikeratin antisera.

    PubMed Central

    Asch, B B; Burstein, N A; Vidrich, A; Sun, T T

    1981-01-01

    Few markers are available to identify the three types of mammary epithelial cells--ductal, alveolar, and myoepithelial--especially in pathological conditions and in cell cultures. We have used antisera to human keratins in immunofluorescence to facilitate the identification of the three mouse mammary epithelial cell types. In frozen tissue sections and primary cell cultures, a rabbit antikeratin antiserum specifically stained cytoplasmic filaments in all three types of epithelial cells. A guinea pig antiserum against the same keratin preparation, however, reacted preferentially with filaments in myoepithelial cells and readily detected this cell type in normal, dysplastic, and malignant mammary tissues and cell cultures. Neither antisera reacted with fibroblasts or any other mesenchymal cells. The combined use of the two antikeratin antisera thereby permits rapid surveys of tissue sections and cultures for the localization of not only all epithelial cells but also the subpopulation of myoepithelial cells. Moreover, when mammary cultures established from late-pregnant or lactating mice were stained simultaneously with guinea pig antikeratin and rabbit anticasein antisera, three populations of epithelial cells were mutually exclusive: those stained by anticasein antiserum, those stained by guinea pig antikeratin antiserum, and those stained by neither, consistent with properties of alveolar, myoepithelial, and ductal cells, respectively. These antisera thus offer a tool for studying different epithelial cell types during mammary development, tumorigenesis, and malignant progression. Images PMID:6170984

  5. Reinitiation of Growth in Senescent Mouse Mammary Epithelium in Response to Cholera Toxin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Daniel, Charles W.; Silberstein, Gary B.; Strickland, Phyllis

    1984-06-01

    Several lines of mouse mammary tissue that had been serially transplanted until mitotic senescence was reached were exposed in vivo to plastic implants that slowly released cholera toxin. Gland tissue surrounding the implants displayed new end buds, indicating reinitiation of growth and morphogenesis. The ability of cholera toxin, which elevates intracellular adenosine 3',5'-monophosphate, to temporarily reverse the senescent phenotype suggests that this mitotic dysfunction results not from generalized cellular deterioration but from specific changes in cell regulation.

  6. Vitamin D Pathway Status and the Identification of Target Genes in the Mouse Mammary Gland

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2014-11-01

    significant increase in cancer incidence in women who are vitamin D deficient (1;2). It was also shown that there is a correlation between breast cancer...the correlation between vitamin D deficiency and an increase in breast cancer incidence. 18 References 1 Abbas S et al. Dietary...AD_________________ Award Number: W81XWH-11-1-0152 TITLE: Vitamin D Pathway Status and the Identification of Target Genes in the Mouse Mammary

  7. Inhibition of STAT3 signaling blocks obesity-induced mammary hyperplasia in a mouse model

    PubMed Central

    Park, Jeong Won; Zhao, Li; Willingham, Mark C; Cheng, Sheue-Yann

    2017-01-01

    Compelling epidemiologic evidence indicates that obesity is a risk factor for human cancers, including breast. However, molecular mechanisms by which obesity could contribute to the development of breast cancer remain unclear. To understand the impact of obesity on breast cancer development, we used a mutant mouse that expresses a mutated thyroid hormone receptor β (denoted as PV) with haplodeficiency of the Pten gene (ThrbPV/PVPten+/- mice). We previously showed that adult nulliparous female ThrbPV/PVPten+/- mice developed extensive mammary hyperplasia and breast tumors. In this study, we induced obesity in ThrbPV/PVPten+/- mice by feeding them a high fat diet (HFD). We found HFD exacerbated the extent of mammary hyperplasia in ThrbPV/PVPten+/- mice. HFD elevated serum leptin levels but had no effect on the levels of serum thyroid stimulating hormone, thyroid hormones, and estrogens. Molecular analysis showed that the obesity-induced hyperplasia was mediated by the leptin/leptin receptor-JAK1-STAT3 pathway to increase key cell cycle regulators to stimulate mammary epithelial cell proliferation. Activated STAT3 signaling led to altered expression in the key regulators of epithelial-mesenchymal-transition (EMT) to augment invasiveness and migration of mammary proliferating epithelial cells. Moreover, treatment of HFD-ThrbPV/PVPten+/- mice with a STAT3 inhibitor, S3I-201, markedly reversed the obesity-induced mammary hyperplasia and reduced EMT signals to lessen cell invasiveness and migration. Our studies not only elucidated how obesity could contribute to mammary hyperplasia at the molecular level, but also, importantly, demonstrated that inhibition of the STAT3 activity could be a novel treatment strategy for obesity-induced breast cancer progression.

  8. Epigenetic Modifications Unlock the Milk Protein Gene Loci during Mouse Mammary Gland Development and Differentiation

    PubMed Central

    Rijnkels, Monique; Freeman-Zadrowski, Courtneay; Hernandez, Joseph; Potluri, Vani; Wang, Liguo; Li, Wei; Lemay, Danielle G.

    2013-01-01

    Background Unlike other tissues, development and differentiation of the mammary gland occur mostly after birth. The roles of systemic hormones and local growth factors important for this development and functional differentiation are well-studied. In other tissues, it has been shown that chromatin organization plays a key role in transcriptional regulation and underlies epigenetic regulation during development and differentiation. However, the role of chromatin organization in mammary gland development and differentiation is less well-defined. Here, we have studied the changes in chromatin organization at the milk protein gene loci (casein, whey acidic protein, and others) in the mouse mammary gland before and after functional differentiation. Methodology/Principal Findings Distal regulatory elements within the casein gene cluster and whey acidic protein gene region have an open chromatin organization after pubertal development, while proximal promoters only gain open-chromatin marks during pregnancy in conjunction with the major induction of their expression. In contrast, other milk protein genes, such as alpha-lactalbumin, already have an open chromatin organization in the mature virgin gland. Changes in chromatin organization in the casein gene cluster region that are present after puberty persisted after lactation has ceased, while the changes which occurred during pregnancy at the gene promoters were not maintained. In general, mammary gland expressed genes and their regulatory elements exhibit developmental stage- and tissue-specific chromatin organization. Conclusions/Significance A progressive gain of epigenetic marks indicative of open/active chromatin on genes marking functional differentiation accompanies the development of the mammary gland. These results support a model in which a chromatin organization is established during pubertal development that is then poised to respond to the systemic hormonal signals of pregnancy and lactation to achieve the

  9. NF-κB signaling regulates cell-autonomous regulation of CXCL10 in breast cancer 4T1 cells

    PubMed Central

    Jin, Won Jong; Kim, Bongjun; Kim, Darong; Park Choo, Hea-Young; Kim, Hong-Hee; Ha, Hyunil; Lee, Zang Hee

    2017-01-01

    The chemokine CXCL10 and its receptor CXCR3 play a role in breast cancer metastasis to bone and osteoclast activation. However, the mechanism of CXCL10/CXCR3-induced intracellular signaling has not been fully investigated. To evaluate CXCL10-induced cellular events in the mouse breast cancer cell line 4T1, we developed a new synthetic CXCR3 antagonist JN-2. In this study, we observed that secretion of CXCL10 in the supernatant of 4T1 cells was gradually increased during cell growth. JN-2 inhibited basal and CXCL10-induced CXCL10 expression and cell motility in 4T1 cells. Treatment of 4T1 cells with CXCL10 increased the expression of P65, a subunit of the NF-κB pathway, via activation of the NF-κB transcriptional activity. Ectopic overexpression of P65 increased CXCL10 secretion and blunted JN-2-induced suppression of CXCL10 secretion, whereas overexpression of IκBα suppressed CXCL10 secretion. These results indicate that the CXCL10/CXCR3 axis creates a positive feedback loop through the canonical NF-κB signaling pathway in 4T1 cells. In addition, treatment of osteoblasts with conditioned medium from JN-2-treated 4T1 cells inhibited the expression of RANKL, a crucial cytokine for osteoclast differentiation, which resulted in an inhibitory effect on osteoclast differentiation in the co-culture system of bone marrow-derived macrophages and osteoblasts. Direct intrafemoral injection of 4T1 cells induced severe bone destruction; however, this effect was suppressed by the CXCR3 antagonist via downregulation of P65 expression in an animal model. Collectively, these results suggest that the CXCL10/CXCR3-mediated NF-κB signaling pathway plays a role in the control of autonomous regulation of CXCL10 and malignant tumor properties in breast cancer 4T1 cells. PMID:28209986

  10. A mammary cell-specific enhancer in mouse mammary tumor virus DNA is composed of multiple regulatory elements including binding sites for CTF/NFI and a novel transcription factor, mammary cell-activating factor.

    PubMed Central

    Mink, S; Härtig, E; Jennewein, P; Doppler, W; Cato, A C

    1992-01-01

    Mouse mammary tumor virus (MMTV) is a milk-transmitted retrovirus involved in the neoplastic transformation of mouse mammary gland cells. The expression of this virus is regulated by mammary cell type-specific factors, steroid hormones, and polypeptide growth factors. Sequences for mammary cell-specific expression are located in an enhancer element in the extreme 5' end of the long terminal repeat region of this virus. This enhancer, when cloned in front of the herpes simplex thymidine kinase promoter, endows the promoter with mammary cell-specific response. Using functional and DNA-protein-binding studies with constructs mutated in the MMTV long terminal repeat enhancer, we have identified two main regulatory elements necessary for the mammary cell-specific response. These elements consist of binding sites for a transcription factor in the family of CTF/NFI proteins and the transcription factor mammary cell-activating factor (MAF) that recognizes the sequence G Pu Pu G C/G A A G G/T. Combinations of CTF/NFI- and MAF-binding sites or multiple copies of either one of these binding sites but not solitary binding sites mediate mammary cell-specific expression. The functional activities of these two regulatory elements are enhanced by another factor that binds to the core sequence ACAAAG. Interdigitated binding sites for CTF/NFI, MAF, and/or the ACAAAG factor are also found in the 5' upstream regions of genes encoding whey milk proteins from different species. These findings suggest that mammary cell-specific regulation is achieved by a concerted action of factors binding to multiple regulatory sites. Images PMID:1328867

  11. Prenatal Mammary Gland Development in the Mouse: Research Models and Techniques for Its Study from Past to Present.

    PubMed

    Veltmaat, Jacqueline M

    2017-01-01

    Mammary gland development starts during prenatal life, when at designated positions along the ventrolateral boundary of the embryonic or fetal trunk, surface ectodermal cells coalesce to form primordia for mammary glands, instead of differentiating into epidermis. With the wealth of genetically engineered mice available as research models, our understanding of the prenatal phase of mammary development has recently greatly advanced. This understanding includes the recognition of molecular and mechanistic parallels between prenatal and postnatal mammary morphogenesis and even tumorigenesis, much of which can moreover be extrapolated to human. This makes the murine embryonic mammary gland a useful model for a myriad of questions pertaining to normal and pathological breast development. Hence, unless indicated otherwise, this review describes embryonic mammary gland development in mouse only, and lists mouse models that have been examined for defects in embryonic mammary development. Techniques that originated in the field of developmental biology, such as explant culture and tissue recombination, were adapted specifically to research on the embryonic mammary gland. Detailed protocols for these techniques have recently been published elsewhere. This review describes how the development and adaptation of these techniques moved the field forward from insights on (comparative) morphogenesis of the embryonic mammary gland to the understanding of tissue and molecular interactions and their regulation of morphogenesis and functional development of the embryonic mammary gland. It is here furthermore illustrated how generic molecular biology and biochemistry techniques can be combined with these older, developmental biology techniques, to address relevant research questions. As such, this review should provide a solid starting point for those wishing to familiarize themselves with this fascinating and important subdomain of mammary gland biology, and guide them in designing a

  12. Selection of Novel Peptides Homing the 4T1 CELL Line: Exploring Alternative Targets for Triple Negative Breast Cancer.

    PubMed

    Silva, Vera L; Ferreira, Debora; Nobrega, Franklin L; Martins, Ivone M; Kluskens, Leon D; Rodrigues, Ligia R

    2016-01-01

    The use of bacteriophages to select novel ligands has been widely explored for cancer therapy. Their application is most warranted in cancer subtypes lacking knowledge on how to target the cancer cells in question, such as the triple negative breast cancer, eventually leading to the development of alternative nanomedicines for cancer therapeutics. Therefore, the following study aimed to select and characterize novel peptides for a triple negative breast cancer murine mammary carcinoma cell line- 4T1. Using phage display, 7 and 12 amino acid random peptide libraries were screened against the 4T1 cell line. A total of four rounds, plus a counter-selection round using the 3T3 murine fibroblast cell line, was performed. The enriched selective peptides were characterized and their binding capacity towards 4T1 tissue samples was confirmed by immunofluorescence and flow cytometry analysis. The selected peptides (4T1pep1 -CPTASNTSC and 4T1pep2-EVQSSKFPAHVS) were enriched over few rounds of selection and exhibited specific binding to the 4T1 cell line. Interestingly, affinity to the human MDA-MB-231 cell line was also observed for both peptides, promoting the translational application of these novel ligands between species. Additionally, bioinformatics analysis suggested that both peptides target human Mucin-16. This protein has been implicated in different types of cancer, as it is involved in many important cellular functions. This study strongly supports the need of finding alternative targeting systems for TNBC and the peptides herein selected exhibit promising future application as novel homing peptides for breast cancer therapy.

  13. Selection of Novel Peptides Homing the 4T1 CELL Line: Exploring Alternative Targets for Triple Negative Breast Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Nobrega, Franklin L.; Martins, Ivone M.

    2016-01-01

    The use of bacteriophages to select novel ligands has been widely explored for cancer therapy. Their application is most warranted in cancer subtypes lacking knowledge on how to target the cancer cells in question, such as the triple negative breast cancer, eventually leading to the development of alternative nanomedicines for cancer therapeutics. Therefore, the following study aimed to select and characterize novel peptides for a triple negative breast cancer murine mammary carcinoma cell line– 4T1. Using phage display, 7 and 12 amino acid random peptide libraries were screened against the 4T1 cell line. A total of four rounds, plus a counter-selection round using the 3T3 murine fibroblast cell line, was performed. The enriched selective peptides were characterized and their binding capacity towards 4T1 tissue samples was confirmed by immunofluorescence and flow cytometry analysis. The selected peptides (4T1pep1 –CPTASNTSC and 4T1pep2—EVQSSKFPAHVS) were enriched over few rounds of selection and exhibited specific binding to the 4T1 cell line. Interestingly, affinity to the human MDA-MB-231 cell line was also observed for both peptides, promoting the translational application of these novel ligands between species. Additionally, bioinformatics analysis suggested that both peptides target human Mucin-16. This protein has been implicated in different types of cancer, as it is involved in many important cellular functions. This study strongly supports the need of finding alternative targeting systems for TNBC and the peptides herein selected exhibit promising future application as novel homing peptides for breast cancer therapy. PMID:27548261

  14. Presence of hyperplastic pectoral mammary glands in a white-footed mouse (Peromyscus leucopus) from a Superfund Site in Oklahoma, USA.

    PubMed

    Hays, Kimberly A; Breshears, Melanie A

    2011-01-01

    Laboratory experiments have documented the effects of hormones and endocrine-disrupting compounds on mammary development in mammals. However, few observations of mammary hyperplasia have been presented for wild rodents. We describe hyperplastic mammary glands in a wild-caught white-footed mouse (Peromyscus leucopus) from an area contaminated with heavy metals.

  15. Mouse Mammary Intraductal (MIND) Method for Transplantation of Patient Derived Primary DCIS Cells and Cell Lines

    PubMed Central

    Kittrell, Frances; Valdez, Kelli; Elsarraj, Hanan; Hong, Yan; Medina, Daniel; Behbod, Fariba

    2016-01-01

    The MIND method involves intraductal injection of patient derived ductal carcinoma in situ (DCIS) cells and DCIS cell lines (MCF10DCIS.COM and SUM225) inside the mouse mammary ducts [Video 1 and Figure 1 in Behbod et al. (2009)]. This method mimics the normal environment of DCIS and facilitates study of the natural progression of human DCIS, i.e., their initial growth as carcinoma in situ within the ducts, followed by invasion into the stroma through the myoepithelial cell layer and basement membrane (Behbod et al., 2009; Valdez et al., 2011). In order to demonstrate that transplantation procedure is successful, the transplanted mammary glands may be excised as early as two weeks following intraductal injection of cells followed by Hematoxylin and Eosin (H&E) staining and/or immunofluorescence staining using human specific cytokeratin 5 and/or 19 [please see Figures 2–4 in Behbod et al. (2009)]. Additionally, the presence of trypan blue inside the mouse mammary ducts immediately following intraductal injection is the best indicator that the injection was successful (Video 1 starting at 4:33 sec). PMID:27446983

  16. Involvement of Notch1 in the development of mouse mammary tumors.

    PubMed

    Diévart, A; Beaulieu, N; Jolicoeur, P

    1999-10-28

    The MMTV/neu transgenic (Tg) mice spontaneously develop mammary tumors stochastically after a long latent period, suggesting that the c-neu/erbB2 oncogene is not sufficient for tumor formation. To identify putative collaborator(s) of the c-neu/erbB2, we used the provirus insertional mutagenesis approach with mammary tumors arising in MMTV/neu Tg mice infected with the mouse mammary tumor virus (MMTV). The Notch1 gene was identified as a novel target for MMTV provirus insertional activation. In Notch1-rearranged tumors, the Notch1 gene was interrupted by the MMTV provirus insertion upstream of the exons coding for the TM domain. These insertions led to overexpression of novel 5' truncated approximately 7 kb RNA coding for 280 kDa mutant protein harboring only the Notch1 ectodomain, N(EC)mut. These may be involved in tumor formation. Another consequence of these insertions was the expression of truncated 3' Notch1 transcripts (3.5 - 4.5 kb) and proteins (86 - 110 kDa) deleted of most of the extracellular sequences (Notch1intra). We found that 3' truncated Notch1intra can transform HC11 mouse mammary epithelial cells in vitro. Deletion analysis revealed that the ankyrin-repeats and the domain 1 (aa 1751 - 1821) are required, while a signal peptide, the two conserved cysteines (C1652 and C1685) and the OPA and PEST sequences are dispensable for transformation. These results indicate that the N-terminally truncated Notch1intra protein behaves as an oncogene in this system.

  17. An immunoreceptor tyrosine activation motif in the mouse mammary tumor virus envelope protein plays a role in virus-induced mammary tumors.

    PubMed

    Ross, Susan R; Schmidt, John W; Katz, Elad; Cappelli, Laura; Hultine, Stacy; Gimotty, Phyllis; Monroe, John G

    2006-09-01

    Mouse mammary tumor virus (MMTV) induces breast cancer with almost 100% efficiency in susceptible strains through insertional activation of protooncogenes, such as members of the wnt and fibroblast growth factor (fgf) families. We previously showed that expression of the MMTV envelope protein (Env) in normal immortalized mammary epithelial cells grown in three-dimensional cultures caused their morphological transformation, and that this phenotype depended on an immunoreceptor tyrosine-based activation motif (ITAM) present in Env and signaling through the Syk tyrosine kinase (E. Katz, M. H. Lareef, J. C. Rassa, S. M. Grande, L. B. King, J. Russo, S. R. Ross, and J. G. Monroe, J. Exp. Med. 201:431-439, 2005). Here, we examined the role of the Env protein in virus-induced mammary tumorigenesis in vivo. Similar to the effect seen in vitro, Env expression in the mammary glands of transgenic mice bearing either full-length wild-type provirus or only Env transgenes showed increased lobuloalveolar budding. Introduction of the ITAM mutation into the env of an infectious, replication-competent MMTV or into MMTV/murine leukemia virus pseudotypes had no effect on incorporation of Env into virus particles or on in vitro infectivity. Moreover, replication-competent MMTV bearing the ITAM mutation in Env infected lymphoid and mammary tissue at the same level as wild-type MMTV and was transmitted through milk. However, mammary tumor induction was greatly attenuated, and the pattern of oncogene activation was altered. Taken together, these studies indicate that the MMTV Env protein participates in mammary epithelial cell transformation in vivo and that this requires a functional ITAM in the envelope protein.

  18. Prevalence of mouse mammary tumor virus (MMTV) in wild house mice (Mus musculis) in southeastern Australia.

    PubMed

    Faedo, Margaret; Hinds, Lyn A; Singleton, Grant R; Rawlinson, William D

    2007-10-01

    We determined the prevalence of mouse mammary tumor virus (MMTV) in introduced, free-roaming, wild house mice (Mus musculus domesticus) [corrected] and compared envelope (env) and long terminal repeat (LTR) nucleotide sequences of viruses from wild mice and other sources. Mice were trapped on two occasions, in October (spring) and the following May (autumn) of 2003-2004 in the Mallee region of northwestern Victoria, Australia. Animals were assigned to three cohorts (subadult, young, and old adults) based on their body length. The DNA from salivary glands (62 of 62 mice) and mammary glands (19 of 32 female mice) was screened for the MMTV envelope (env) gene, and the long terminal repeat (LTR) region including the superantigen (SAg) sequence was amplified from a subset. Positive polymerase chain reaction (PCR) results for the MMTV env PCR were detected from salivary gland tissues from 60 of 62 (97%) mice and from mammary gland tissues from 19 of 19 (100%) female mice. All but two mice were positive for MMTV env across both sexes and the three cohorts. Similarity of the SAg carboxy-terminal nucleotide sequence between free-roaming wild house mice varied from 64% to 99%, although most of this variation was due to DNA sequences from two mice (M4 and M5). Phylogenetic analysis of the LTR region did not result in distinct grouping of sequences derived from mice when comparisons were made among sequences from mice in the US, Europe, and Australia, and MMTV-like virus (MMTV-LV) env sequences derived from human hosts. We report a high prevalence of the MMTV env sequence during a sampling period when peak mouse density was low. This indicates that MMTV is an enzootic virus in a population of wild, free-ranging mice in northwestern Victoria, in Australia. Phylogenetic analysis, based upon env and LTR sequence data, indicated minor variation among all isolates. This represents the first report on the prevalence of MMTV in mouse populations in Australia.

  19. Mammary Stem Cell Based Somatic Mouse Models Reveal Breast Cancer Drivers Causing Cell Fate Dysregulation

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Zheng; Christin, John R.; Wang, Chunhui; Ge, Kai; Oktay, Maja H.; Guo, Wenjun

    2016-01-01

    SUMMARY Cancer genomics have provided an unprecedented opportunity for understanding genetic causes of human cancer. However, distinguishing which mutations are functionally relevant to cancer pathogenesis remains a major challenge. We describe here a mammary stem cell (MaSC) organoid-based approach for rapid generation of somatic GEMMs (genetically engineered mouse models). By using RNAi and CRISPR-mediated genome engineering in MaSC-GEMMs, we have discovered that inactivation of Ptpn22 or Mll3, two genes mutated in human breast cancer, greatly accelerated PI3K-driven mammary tumorigenesis. Using these tumor models, we have also identified genetic alterations promoting tumor metastasis and causing resistance to PI3K-targeted therapy. Both Ptpn22 and Mll3 inactivation resulted in disruption of mammary gland differentiation and an increase in stem cell activity. Mechanistically, Mll3 deletion enhanced stem cell activity through activation of the HIF pathway. Thus, our study established a robust in vivo platform for functional cancer genomics and discovered functional breast cancer mutations. PMID:27653681

  20. Lactose synthetase activity in mouse mammary glands is controlled by thyroid hormones

    PubMed Central

    1979-01-01

    Epithelial cells in explants from the mammary glands of euthyroid mature virgin mice are proliferatively dormant. They must undergo DNA synthesis and traverse the cell cycle in vitro before they are able to differentiate fully in response to insulin, hydrocortisone, and prolactin, and synthesize enzymatically active alpha-lactalbumin (measured as lactose synthetase activity). In contrast, glands from hyperthyroid mature virgin mice do not require DNA synthesis in vitro to differentiate. Explants from the euthyroid virgin tissue overcome their dependence on DNA synthesis when 10(-9) M 3,5,3'-triiodo-L- thyronine is added directly to the cultures in addition to the other three hormones. Explants from involuted mammary glands from euthyroid primiparous mice do not require DNA synthesis in vitro to make the milk protein even though they, like explants from mature euthyroid virgin tissue, are proliferatively dormant and do not contain detectable lactose synthetase activity in vivo. Glands from primiparous animals made mildly hypothyroid by ingestion of 0.1% thiouracil in drinking water during 7 wk of involution remain morphologically indistinguishable from glands of their euthyroid counterparts. However, explants from the glands of these hypothyroid animals revert to a state of dependence on DNA synthesis to differentiate functionally. These observations suggest that the dependence on DNA synthesis and cell cycle traversal for hormonal induction of lactose synthetase activity in the mouse mammary gland is controlled by thyroid hormones. PMID:117014

  1. Regulated expression of mouse mammary tumor proviral genes in cells of the B lineage

    PubMed Central

    1991-01-01

    We evaluated the expression of mouse mammary tumor proviral (MMTV) transcripts during B cell ontogeny and compared levels of RNA in B lymphocytes and B cell lines with levels in other cells of the hematopoietic lineage and in a mammary cell line. We demonstrate that MMTV transcripts are expressed as early as the pro-B cell stage in ontogeny and are expressed at basal constitutive levels throughout most of the B cell developmental pathway. The level of MMTV expression in B cells is similar to constitutive levels in mammary tissues and two to three orders of magnitude greater than in activated T cells. Levels of MMTV transcripts in B cells are not solely due to positional effects. Transient transfection assays showed that MMTV upregulation resulted from transcriptional activation of the viral LTR, indicating that there are specific and inducible transcription factors that regulate MMTV expression in B cells. MMTV transcripts could not be upregulated in pre- B cell lines but could be induced in some mature B cell lines. There was a correlation between the ability to stimulate B cells to secrete antibody and the ability to induce upregulated MMTV expression. Evidence is presented that suggests that the principal transcription factors involved in MMTV expression do not include the B cell factors OTF-2 or NF-kappa B, but rather are likely to be novel factors that are induced during differentiation to antibody secretion. A hypothesis for why mammary tumor viruses are well adapted for expression in cells of the B lineage is proposed, and the implications of this for the documented influence of MMTV gene products on the T cell repertoire are discussed. PMID:1660524

  2. Modulation of Notch Signaling Elicits Signature Tumors and Inhibits Hras1-Induced Oncogenesis in the Mouse Mammary Epithelium

    PubMed Central

    Kiaris, Hippokratis; Politi, Katerina; Grimm, Lisa M.; Szabolcs, Matthias; Fisher, Peter; Efstratiadis, Argiris; Artavanis-Tsakonas, Spyros

    2004-01-01

    Deregulation of Notch signaling, which normally affects a broad spectrum of cell fates, has been implicated in various neoplastic conditions. Here we describe a transgenic mouse model, which demonstrates that expression of a constitutively active form of the Notch1 receptor in the mammary epithelium induces the rapid development of pregnancy/lactation-dependent neoplasms that consistently exhibit a characteristic histopathological pattern. These signature tumors retain the ability to respond to apoptotic stimuli and regress on initiation of mammary gland involution, but eventually appear to progress in subsequent pregnancies to nonregressing malignant adenocarcinomas. Additionally, we present evidence indicating that cyclin D1 is an in vivo target of Notch signals in the mammary glands and demonstrate that we can effectively inhibit Hras1-driven, cyclin D1-dependent mammary oncogenesis by transgenic expression of the Notch antagonist Deltex. PMID:15277242

  3. Mouse mammary tumor virus infection accelerates mammary carcinogenesis in Wnt-1 transgenic mice by insertional activation of int-2/Fgf-3 and hst/Fgf-4.

    PubMed Central

    Shackleford, G M; MacArthur, C A; Kwan, H C; Varmus, H E

    1993-01-01

    Transgenic mice carrying the Wnt-1 protooncogene modified for expression in mammary epithelial cells exhibit hyperplastic mammary glands and stochastically develop mammary carcinomas, suggesting that additional events are necessary for tumorigenesis. To induce such events and to identify the genes involved, we have infected Wnt-1 transgenic mice with mouse mammary tumor virus (MMTV), intending to insertionally activate, and thereby molecularly tag, cooperating protooncogenes. Infection of breeding female Wnt-1 transgenics decreased the average age at which tumors appeared from approximately 4 months to approximately 2.5 months and increased the average number of primary tumors per mouse from 1-2 to > 5. A smaller effect was observed in virgin females, and infection of transgenic males showed no significant effect on tumor latency. More than half of the tumors from the infected breeding group contained one or more newly acquired MMTV proviruses in a pattern suggesting that most cells in tumors arose from a single infected cell. Analyses of provirus-containing tumors for induced or altered expression of int-2/Fgf-3, hst/Fgf-4, int-3, and Wnt-3 showed activation of int-2 in 39% of tumors, hst in 3%, and both int-2 and hst in 3%. DNA analyses with probes for protooncogenes and MMTV confirmed that the activations resulted from proviral insertions. There was no evidence for proviral insertions at the int-3, Wnt-3, or Wnt-1 loci. These findings provide further evidence that fibroblast growth factors Int-2 and Hst can cooperate with Wnt-1, another secreted factor, in mammary tumorigenesis, and they illustrate the capacity of this system to identify cooperating oncogenes. Images PMID:8380647

  4. Investigating the Role of FIP200 in Mammary Carcinogenesis Using a Transgenic Mouse Model

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2006-04-01

    in the mammary gland of virgin mice however, lactating mice have severe lobulo-alveolar hypoplasia in the mammary gland. 15. SUBJECT TERMS...mammary gland of virgin mice however, lactating mice have severe lobulo-alveolar hypoplasia in the mammary gland. Body Aim 1. Generation of mammary...leads to dwarfism and pregnant females have severe lobulo-alveolar hypoplasia affecting the mammary gland and, as a consequence, have difficulty

  5. Mouse mammary tumor like virus sequences in breast milk from healthy lactating women.

    PubMed

    Johal, Harpreet; Ford, Caroline; Glenn, Wendy; Heads, Joy; Lawson, James; Rawlinson, William

    2011-08-01

    Mouse mammary tumor virus (MMTV) has been a long standing candidate as a potential cause of some human breast cancers. Forty years ago, electron microscopic images of MMTV-like particles were identified in milk from 5% of healthy lactating women. These observations, however, have not been confirmed by modern methods. The purpose of this study was to confirm the presence of MMTV-like DNA sequences in human milk from normal lactating women. Standard and in situ PCR analyses were conducted on DNA extracted from fresh breast milk samples collected from a group of 91 healthy lactating women volunteers. The MMTV-like viral positive PCR products were sequenced and a phylogenetic tree was constructed to compare these sequences. Immunohistochemistry analyses were performed on breast milk cells using polyclonal rabbit antibodies against affinity-purified MMTV envelope glycoproteins 52/36. MMTV-like envelope gene sequences were identified by PCR in 5% (4/91) of breast milk samples from healthy lactating women volunteers. These observations were confirmed by in situ PCR and immunohistochemistry using MMTV gp52/36 antibodies. These findings confirm the presence of MMTV-like gene sequences in human milk. As MMTV is transmitted via milk from mouse mothers to their newborn pups to cause mammary tumors when they become adults, this indicates a means of transmission of this virus in humans.

  6. Indirubin Treatment of Lipopolysaccharide-Induced Mastitis in a Mouse Model and Activity in Mouse Mammary Epithelial Cells

    PubMed Central

    Lai, Jin-lun; Liu, Yu-hui; Peng, Yong-chong; Ge, Pan; He, Chen-fei; Liu, Chang; Chen, Ying-yu; Guo, Ai-zhen

    2017-01-01

    Indirubin is a Chinese medicine extracted from indigo and known to be effective for treating chronic myelogenous leukemia, neoplasia, and inflammatory disease. This study evaluated the in vivo anti-inflammatory activity of indirubin in a lipopolysaccharide- (LPS-) induced mouse mastitis model. The indirubin mechanism and targets were evaluated in vitro in mouse mammary epithelial cells. In the mouse model, indirubin significantly attenuated the severity of inflammatory lesions, edema, inflammatory hyperemia, milk stasis and local tissue necrosis, and neutrophil infiltration. Indirubin significantly decreased myeloperoxidase activity and downregulated the production of tumor necrosis factor-α, interleukin-1β (IL-1β), and IL-6 caused by LPS. In vitro, indirubin inhibited LPS-stimulated expression of proinflammatory cytokines in a dose-dependent manner. It also downregulated LPS-induced toll-like receptor 4 (TLR4) expression and inhibited phosphorylation of LPS-induced nuclear transcription factor-kappa B (NF-κB) P65 protein and inhibitor of kappa B. In addition to its effect on the NF-κB signaling pathway, indirubin suppressed the mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) signaling by inhibiting phosphorylation of extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK), P38, and c-jun NH2-terminal kinase (JNK). Indirubin improved LPS-induced mouse mastitis by suppressing TLR4 and downstream NF-κB and MAPK pathway inflammatory signals and might be a potential treatment of mastitis and other inflammatory diseases. PMID:28255203

  7. In-silico QTL mapping of postpubertal mammary ductal development in the mouse uncovers potential human breast cancer risk loci

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Genetic background plays a dominant role in mammary gland development and breast cancer (BrCa). Despite this, the role of genetics is only partially understood. This study used strain-dependent variation in an inbred mouse mapping panel, to identify quantitative trait loci (QTL) underlying structura...

  8. Serum inhibits the immunosuppressive function of myeloid-derived suppressor cells isolated from 4T1 tumor-bearing mice.

    PubMed

    Hamilton, Melisa J; Banáth, Judit P; Lam, Vivian; Lepard, Nancy E; Krystal, Gerald; Bennewith, Kevin L

    2012-05-01

    As more groups investigate the role of myeloid-derived suppressor cells (MDSCs) in promoting the growth of primary tumors and distant tumor metastases, it is imperative to ensure the accurate detection and quantification of MDSC immunosuppression ex vivo. MDSCs are defined by their ability to suppress immune responses. Although different in vitro culture conditions have been used to study MDSCs, the effect of different culture conditions on MDSC immunosuppression is unknown. We therefore isolated MDSCs from the lungs and spleens of 4T1 murine mammary tumor-bearing mice and assayed MDSC-mediated suppression of T cell responses under different culture conditions. We found that 4T1-induced MDSCs effectively suppressed T cell proliferation under serum-free conditions, but not when fetal calf serum (FCS) was present. FCS neither altered the immunosuppressive activities of other myeloid cell types (i.e., peritoneal or tumor-associated macrophages) nor modified the susceptibility of T cells to myeloid cell-mediated suppression, but instead acted directly on 4T1-induced MDSCs to significantly reduce their immunosuppressive function. Importantly, we found that bovine serum albumin was a major contributor to the antagonistic effects of FCS on 4T1-induced MDSC immunosuppression by inhibiting reactive oxygen species production from MDSCs. This work reveals that in vitro culture conditions influence the immunosuppressive properties of MDSCs and highlights the importance of testing different culture conditions on MDSC phenotype to ensure that MDSC immunosuppression is not being masked. These data have important implications for the accurate detection and identification of MDSCs, as well as for determining the influence of MDSC-mediated immunosuppression on primary and metastatic tumor growth.

  9. Leukocyte populations and cytokine expression in the mammary gland in a mouse model of Streptococcus agalactiae mastitis.

    PubMed

    Trigo, Gabriela; Dinis, Márcia; França, Angela; Bonifácio Andrade, Elva; Gil da Costa, Rui M; Ferreira, Paula; Tavares, Delfina

    2009-07-01

    Streptococcus agalactiae is a contagious, mastitis-causing pathogen that is highly adapted to survive in the bovine mammary gland. This study used a BALB/c mouse model of Streptococcus agalactiae mastitis to evaluate leukocyte populations in regional lymph nodes and cytokine expression in the mammary gland involved in the immune response against Streptococcus agalactiae. It was found that the bacteria replicated efficiently in the mammary gland, peaking after 24 h and increasing by 100-fold. Dissemination of bacteria to systemic organs was observed 6 h after infection. At the same time, a massive infiltration of polymorphonuclear cells and an increase in the inflammatory cytokines interleukin (IL)-1beta, IL-6 and tumour necrosis factor-alpha were detected in mammary glands, indicating an early inflammatory response. A decrease in the levels of inflammatory cytokines in mammary glands was observed 72 h after infection, accompanied by an increase in the levels of IL-12 and IL-10, which were related to a gradual decrease in bacterial load. An increase in the number of macrophages and B220(+) lymphocytes and similar increases in both CD4(+) and CD8(+) T cells in regional lymph nodes were observed, being most pronounced 5 days after infection. Moreover, increased levels of anti-Streptococcus agalactiae antibodies in the mammary gland were observed 10 days after infection. Overall, these data suggest that the host exhibits both innate and acquired immune responses in response to Streptococcus agalactiae mastitis.

  10. Chemo-immunotherapy induces tumor regression in a mouse model of spontaneous mammary carcinogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Carpinelli, Giulia; Canese, Rossella; Cecchetti, Serena; Schiavoni, Giovanna; D'Urso, Maria Teresa; Belardelli, Filippo; Proietti, Enrico

    2016-01-01

    Tumor-specific immune tolerance represents an obstacle for the development of effective anti-tumor immune responses through cancer vaccines. We here evaluated the efficacy of chemo-immunotherapy in breaking tumor-specific immune tolerance in an almost incurable mouse model of spontaneous carcinogenesis. Transgenic HER-2/neu mice bearing large mammary tumors received the adoptive transfer of splenocytes and serum isolated from immune donors, with or without pre-conditioning with cyclophosphamide. Treatment efficacy was assessed by monitoring tumor growth by manual inspection and by magnetic resonance imaging. The same chemo-immunotherapy protocol was tested on tumor-free HER-2/neu mice, to evaluate the effects on tumor emergence. Our data show that chemo-immunotherapy hampered carcinogenesis and caused the regression of large mammary tumor lesions in tumor-bearing HER-2/neu mice. The complete eradication of a significant number of tumor lesions occurred only in mice receiving cyclophosphamide shortly before immunotherapy, and was associated with increased serum anti HER-2/p185 antibodies and tumor leukocyte infiltration. The same protocol significantly delayed the appearance of mammary tumors when administered to tumor-free HER-2/neu mice, indicating that this chemo-immunotherapy approach acted through the elicitation of an effective anti-tumor immune response. Overall, our data support the immune-modulatory role of chemotherapy in overcoming cancer immune tolerance when administered at lymphodepleting non-myeloablative doses shortly before transfer of antigen-specific immune cells and immunoglobulins. These findings open new perspectives on combining immune-modulatory chemotherapy and immunotherapy to overcome immune tolerance in cancer patients. PMID:27486759

  11. Beef tallow increases the potency of conjugated linoleic acid in the reduction of mouse mammary tumor metastasis.

    PubMed

    Hubbard, Neil E; Lim, Debora; Erickson, Kent L

    2006-01-01

    Animal studies consistently show that dietary conjugated linoleic acid (CLA) reduces mammary tumorigenesis including metastasis. Relatively low concentrations of CLA are required for those effects, and a threshold level exists above which there is no added reduction. We reasoned that the concentration of CLA required to effectively alter mammary tumor metastasis may be dependent on the type of dietary fat because select fatty acids can enhance or suppress normal or malignant cell growth and metastasis. For this study, the diets (a total of 12 different groups) differed in fatty acid composition but not in energy from fat (40%). In experiments involving spontaneous metastasis, mice were fed for 11 wk; in experiments in which mice were injected i.v. with tumor cells, they were fed for 7 wk. Mice were then assessed for the effect of CLA concentration on mammary tumorigenesis. Mammary tumor growth was not altered, but metastasis was significantly decreased when beef tallow (BT) replaced half of a defined vegetable fat blend (VFB). That blend reflects the typical fat content of a Western diet. In addition, that same VFB:BT diet lowered the concentration of CLA required to significantly decrease mammary tumor metastasis from 0.1% of the diet to 0.05%. A diet in which corn oil replaced half of the VFB did not lower the threshold from 0.1 to 0.05%. In vitro, the main fatty acid in vegetable oil, linoleic acid, reduced the efficacy of CLA toxicity on mammary tumor cells in culture. Alternatively, fatty acids normally found in BT, such as oleic, stearic, and palmitic acids, either did not change or enhanced the cytolytic effects of CLA isomers on mouse mammary tumor cells in culture. These data provide evidence that dietary BT, itself with negligible levels of CLA, may increase the efficacy of dietary CLA in reducing mammary tumorigenesis.

  12. Interaction of mouse mammary epithelial cells with collagen substrata: regulation of casein gene expression and secretion

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, E.Y.H.P.; Lee, W.H.; Kaetzel, C.S.; Parry, G.; Bissell, M.J.

    1985-03-01

    Mouse mammary epithelial cells (MMEC) secrete certain milk proteins only when cultured on floating collagen gels. The authors demonstrate that modulation of milk proteins by substrata is manifested at several regulatory levels; (i) cells cultured on floating collagen gels have 3- to 10-fold more casein mRNA than cells cultured on plastic or attached collagen gels. (ii) Cells on the latter two flat substrata, nevertheless, synthesize a significant amount of caseins, indicating that the remaining mRNA is functional. (iii) Cells on all substrata are inducible for casein mRNA and casein proteins by prolactin, but the extent of induction is greater on collagen than that on plastic - i.e., the substratum confers an altered degree of inducibility. (iv) Cells on all substrata synthesize casein proteins at rates proportional to the amount of casein mRNA, but the newly synthesized caseins in cells on plastic are degraded intracellularly, whereas those synthesized by cells on floating gels are secreted into the medium. (v) Cells on all substrata examined lose virtually all mRNA for whey acidic protein despite the fact that this mRNA is abundant in the mammary gland itself; the authors conclude that additional, as-yet-unknown, factors are necessary for synthesis and secretion of whey acidic protein in culture.

  13. Proteolytic maturation of protein C upon engineering the mouse mammary gland to express furin.

    PubMed Central

    Drews, R; Paleyanda, R K; Lee, T K; Chang, R R; Rehemtulla, A; Kaufman, R J; Drohan, W N; Luboń, H

    1995-01-01

    Endoproteolytic processing of the human protein C (HPC) precursor to its mature form involves cleavage of the propeptide after amino acids Lys-2-Arg-1 and removal of a Lys156-Arg157 dipeptide connecting the light and heavy chains. This processing was inefficient in the mammary gland of transgenic mice and pigs. We hypothesized that the protein processing capacity of specific animal organs may be improved by the coexpression of selected processing enzymes. We tested this by targeting expression of the human proprotein processing enzyme, named paired basic amino acid cleaving enzyme (PACE)/furin, or an enzymatically inactive mutant, PACEM, to the mouse mammary gland. In contrast to mice expressing HPC alone, or to HPC/PACEM bigenic mice, coexpression of PACE with HPC resulted in efficient conversion of the precursor to mature protein, with cleavage at the appropriate sites. These results suggest the involvement of PACE in the processing of HPC in vivo and represent an example of the engineering of animal organs into bioreactors with enhanced protein processing capacity. Images Fig. 2 Fig. 3 Fig. 4 Fig. 5 PMID:7479820

  14. Negative regulation in correct tissue-specific expression of mouse mammary tumor virus in transgenic mice.

    PubMed Central

    Ross, S R; Hsu, C L; Choi, Y; Mok, E; Dudley, J P

    1990-01-01

    Mouse mammary tumor virus (MMTV) is an endogenous murine retrovirus that is expressed in the epithelial cells of the mammary and salivary glands, lungs, kidneys, and seminal vesicles and in the lymphoid cells of the spleen and thymus. Several studies have shown that the long terminal repeat (LTR) of this virus can direct the expression of reporter genes to the same tissues in transgenic mice. To determine whether multiple regulatory elements within the LTR are involved in this tissue-specific expression, we have established lines of transgenic mice containing transgenes that have deletions in the MMTV LTR. Deletions of all LTR sequences upstream of -364 or of LTR sequences from -165 to -665 both result in the expression of linked reporter genes such as the simian virus 40 early region or the bacterial enzyme chloramphenicol acetyltransferase in novel sites, such as the heart, brain, and skeletal muscle; expression of endogenous MMTV and transgenes containing the full-length LTR is not detected in these organs. Negative regulation appears to involve more than one region, since deletion of sequences between either -201 and -471 or -201 and -344, as well as sequences upstream of -364, results in inappropriate expression in heart, brain, and skeletal muscle. Therefore, a negative regulatory element(s) in the MMTV LTR can suppress transcription from the viral promoter in several different organs. This represents the first example of generalized negative regulatory elements that act in many different tissues in transgenic mice to prevent inappropriate expression of a gene. Images PMID:1700274

  15. A new immunization and treatment strategy for mouse mammary tumor virus (MMTV) associated cancers

    PubMed Central

    Braitbard, Ori; Roniger, Maayan; Bar-Sinai, Allan; Rajchman, Dana; Gross, Tamar; Abramovitch, Hillel; Ferla, Marco La; Franceschi, Sara; Lessi, Francesca; Naccarato, Antonio Giuseppe; Mazzanti, Chiara M.; Bevilacqua, Generoso; Hochman, Jacob

    2016-01-01

    Mouse Mammary Tumor Virus (MMTV) causes mammary carcinoma or lymphoma in mice. An increasing body of evidence in recent years supports its involvement also in human sporadic breast cancer. It is thus of importance to develop new strategies to impair the development, growth and metastasis of MMTV-associated cancers. The signal peptide of the envelope precursor protein of this virus: MMTV-p14 (p14) is an excellent target for such strategies, due to unique characteristics distinct from its regular endoplasmic reticulum targeting function. These include cell surface expression in: murine cancer cells that harbor the virus, human breast cancer (MCF-7) cells that ectopically express p14, as well as cultured human cells derived from an invasive ductal breast carcinoma positive for MMTV sequences. These findings support its use in signal peptide-based immune targeting. Indeed, priming and boosting mice with p14 elicits a specific anti-signal peptide immune response sufficient for protective vaccination against MMTV-associated tumors. Furthermore, passive immunization using a combination of anti-p14 monoclonal antibodies or the transfer of T-cells from immunized mice (Adoptive Cell Transfer) is also therapeutically effective. With reports demonstrating involvement of MMTV in human breast cancer, we propose the immune-mediated targeting of p14 as a strategy for prevention, treatment and diagnosis of MMTV-associated cancers. PMID:26934560

  16. Human saliva as route of inter-human infection for mouse mammary tumor virus.

    PubMed

    Mazzanti, Chiara Maria; Lessi, Francesca; Armogida, Ivana; Zavaglia, Katia; Franceschi, Sara; Al Hamad, Mohammad; Roncella, Manuela; Ghilli, Matteo; Boldrini, Antonio; Aretini, Paolo; Fanelli, Giovanni; Marchetti, Ivo; Scatena, Cristian; Hochman, Jacob; Naccarato, Antonio Giuseppe; Bevilacqua, Generoso

    2015-07-30

    Etiology of human breast cancer is unknown, whereas the Mouse Mammary Tumor Virus (MMTV) is recognized as the etiologic agent of mouse mammary carcinoma. Moreover, this experimental model contributed substantially to our understanding of many biological aspects of the human disease. Several data strongly suggest a causative role of MMTV in humans, such as the presence of viral sequences in a high percentage of infiltrating breast carcinoma and in its preinvasive lesions, the production of viral particles in primary cultures of breast cancer, the ability of the virus to infect cells in culture. This paper demonstrates that MMTV is present in human saliva and salivary glands. MMTV presence was investigated by fluorescent PCR, RT-PCR, FISH, immunohistochemistry, and whole transcriptome analysis. Saliva was obtained from newborns, children, adults, and breast cancer patients. The saliva of newborns is MMTV-free, whereas MMTV is present in saliva of children (26.66%), healthy adults (10.60%), and breast cancer patients (57.14% as DNA and 33.9% as RNA). MMTV is also present in 8.10% of salivary glands. RNA-seq analysis performed on saliva of a breast cancer patient demonstrates a high expression of MMTV RNA in comparison to negative controls. The possibility of a contamination by murine DNA was excluded by murine mtDNA and IAP LTR PCR. These findings confirm the presence of MMTV in humans, strongly suggest saliva as route in inter-human infection, and support the hypothesis of a viral origin for human breast carcinoma.

  17. Human saliva as route of inter-human infection for mouse mammary tumor virus

    PubMed Central

    Armogida, Ivana; Zavaglia, Katia; Franceschi, Sara; Al Hamad, Mohammad; Roncella, Manuela; Ghilli, Matteo; Boldrini, Antonio; Aretini, Paolo; Fanelli, Giovanni; Marchetti, Ivo; Scatena, Cristian; Hochman, Jacob; Naccarato, Antonio Giuseppe; Bevilacqua, Generoso

    2015-01-01

    Etiology of human breast cancer is unknown, whereas the Mouse Mammary Tumor Virus (MMTV) is recognized as the etiologic agent of mouse mammary carcinoma. Moreover, this experimental model contributed substantially to our understanding of many biological aspects of the human disease. Several data strongly suggest a causative role of MMTV in humans, such as the presence of viral sequences in a high percentage of infiltrating breast carcinoma and in its preinvasive lesions, the production of viral particles in primary cultures of breast cancer, the ability of the virus to infect cells in culture. This paper demonstrates that MMTV is present in human saliva and salivary glands. MMTV presence was investigated by fluorescent PCR, RT-PCR, FISH, immunohistochemistry, and whole transcriptome analysis. Saliva was obtained from newborns, children, adults, and breast cancer patients. The saliva of newborns is MMTV-free, whereas MMTV is present in saliva of children (26.66%), healthy adults (10.60%), and breast cancer patients (57.14% as DNA and 33.9% as RNA). MMTV is also present in 8.10% of salivary glands. RNA-seq analysis performed on saliva of a breast cancer patient demonstrates a high expression of MMTV RNA in comparison to negative controls. The possibility of a contamination by murine DNA was excluded by murine mtDNA and IAP LTR PCR. These findings confirm the presence of MMTV in humans, strongly suggest saliva as route in inter-human infection, and support the hypothesis of a viral origin for human breast carcinoma. PMID:26214095

  18. The role of protein glycosylation in the compartmentalization and processing of mouse mammary tumor virus glycoproteins in mouse mammary tumor virus-infected rat hepatoma cells.

    PubMed

    Firestone, G L

    1983-05-25

    The relationship of protein glycosylation to compartmentalization and processing of mouse mammary tumor virus (MTV) glycoproteins has been examined in M1.54, a cloned line of MTV-infected rat hepatoma tissue culture cells. Previous work established that full maturation of MTV glycoproteins in this cell line requires dexamethasone, a synthetic glucocorticoid (Firestone, G. L., Payvar, F., and Yamamoto, K. R. (1982) Nature (Lond.) 300, 221-225). The ability to regulate production of the full complement of five mature membrane-associated and secreted viral glycoproteins from one initially synthesized precursor has been used to advantage in the present work. At concentrations of tunicamycin that specifically inhibit N-linked protein glycosylation, incorporation of [35S]methionine into total cellular and secreted protein is not detectably affected, MTV-specific mRNAs are produced normally, and the nonglycosylated form of the glycosylated viral precursor polyprotein accumulates within the cells. However, tunicamycin inhibits the site-specific cleavage of the glycosylated polyprotein and distribution of MTV polypeptides to the cell surface and extracellular fractions. Thus, when tunicamycin-treated cultures of M1.54 are exposed to dexamethasone and [35S]methionine, no labeled viral antigens are detected in the culture medium. Similarly, tunicamycin prevents the appearance of membrane-associated viral antigens that can be labeled externally by lactoperoxidase-mediated iodination and it protects the cells against the cytolytic effects of MTV-specific antiserum and complement. Taken together, these results are consistent with the view that while glycosylation of some proteins may be unessential for their compartmentalization and processing, it does appear to be correlated with proper maturation of others. The hormone-dependent maturation of MTV glycoproteins in M1.54 may be particularly useful for study of this latter class since glycosylation is stringently associated with

  19. Analysis of the transfer RNA population of mouse mammary glands infected with a latent mammary tumor virus.

    PubMed

    Hentzen, D

    1976-09-01

    Mammary gland transfer RNA's (tRNA'S) of CEH mice infected with mammary tumor virus were analyzed in the preneoplastic state and compared to tRNAs of virus-free C3Hf mice and another uninfected strain, C57BL/6, which is completely resistant to cancer. This quantitative study was based on the ability of each tRNA to fix its corresponding amino acid. The amount of each of the 17 tRNA's tested was identical for the three mammary glands. In addition, tRNA populations during lactation correlated with the amino acids incorporated into the lactoproteins synthesized, which indicates adapation of the tRNA's to protein biosynthesis. Qualitative chromatographic studies on reverse phase capillary columns Type 5 of 10 aminoacyl-tRNA's did not reveal any difference in the isoacceptor elution profiles. This shows that no new isoaccepting tRNA is associated with the mammary tumor virus at that stage, and that no viral modification of a host tRNA has occurred.

  20. Low-dose BPA exposure alters the mesenchymal and epithelial transcriptomes of the mouse fetal mammary gland.

    PubMed

    Wadia, Perinaaz R; Cabaton, Nicolas J; Borrero, Michael D; Rubin, Beverly S; Sonnenschein, Carlos; Shioda, Toshi; Soto, Ana M

    2013-01-01

    Exposure of rodent fetuses to low doses of the endocrine disruptor bisphenol A (BPA) causes subtle morphological changes in the prenatal mammary gland and results in pre-cancerous and cancerous lesions during adulthood. To examine whether the BPA-induced morphological alterations of the fetal mouse mammary glands are a) associated with changes in mRNA expression reflecting estrogenic actions and/or b) dependent on the estrogen receptor α (ERα), we compared the transcriptomal effects of BPA and the steroidal estrogen ethinylestradiol (EE2) on fetal mammary tissues of wild type and ERα knock-out mice. Mammary glands from fetuses of dams exposed to vehicle, 250 ng BPA/kg BW/d or 10 ng EE2/kg BW/d from embryonic day (E) 8 were harvested at E19. Transcriptomal analyses on the ductal epithelium and periductal stroma revealed altered expression of genes involved in the focal adhesion and adipogenesis pathways in the BPA-exposed stroma while genes regulating the apoptosis pathway changed their expression in the BPA-exposed epithelium. These changes in gene expression correlated with previously reported histological changes in matrix organization, adipogenesis, and lumen formation resulting in enhanced maturation of the fat-pad and delayed lumen formation in the epithelium of BPA-exposed fetal mammary glands. Overall similarities in the transcriptomal effects of BPA and EE2 were more pronounced in the epithelium, than in the stroma. In addition, the effects of BPA and EE2 on the expression of various genes involved in mammary stromal-epithelial interactions were suppressed in the absence of ERα. These observations support a model whereby BPA and EE2 act directly on the stroma, which expresses ERα, ERβ and GPR30 in fetal mammary glands, and that the stroma, in turn, affects gene expression in the epithelium, where ERα and ERβ are below the level of detection at this stage of development.

  1. Time-lapse imaging of primary preneoplastic mammary epithelial cells derived from genetically engineered mouse models of breast cancer.

    PubMed

    Nakles, Rebecca E; Millman, Sarah L; Cabrera, M Carla; Johnson, Peter; Mueller, Susette; Hoppe, Philipp S; Schroeder, Timm; Furth, Priscilla A

    2013-02-08

    Time-lapse imaging can be used to compare behavior of cultured primary preneoplastic mammary epithelial cells derived from different genetically engineered mouse models of breast cancer. For example, time between cell divisions (cell lifetimes), apoptotic cell numbers, evolution of morphological changes, and mechanism of colony formation can be quantified and compared in cells carrying specific genetic lesions. Primary mammary epithelial cell cultures are generated from mammary glands without palpable tumor. Glands are carefully resected with clear separation from adjacent muscle, lymph nodes are removed, and single-cell suspensions of enriched mammary epithelial cells are generated by mincing mammary tissue followed by enzymatic dissociation and filtration. Single-cell suspensions are plated and placed directly under a microscope within an incubator chamber for live-cell imaging. Sixteen 650 μm x 700 μm fields in a 4x4 configuration from each well of a 6-well plate are imaged every 15 min for 5 days. Time-lapse images are examined directly to measure cellular behaviors that can include mechanism and frequency of cell colony formation within the first 24 hr of plating the cells (aggregation versus cell proliferation), incidence of apoptosis, and phasing of morphological changes. Single-cell tracking is used to generate cell fate maps for measurement of individual cell lifetimes and investigation of cell division patterns. Quantitative data are statistically analyzed to assess for significant differences in behavior correlated with specific genetic lesions.

  2. Circadian Regulation of Benzo[a]Pyrene Metabolism and DNA Adduct Formation in Breast Cells and the Mouse Mammary Gland.

    PubMed

    Schmitt, Emily E; Barhoumi, Rola; Metz, Richard P; Porter, Weston W

    2017-03-01

    The circadian clock plays a role in many biologic processes, yet very little is known about its role in metabolism of drugs and carcinogens. The purpose of this study was to define the impact of circadian rhythms on benzo-a-pyrene (BaP) metabolism in the mouse mammary gland and develop a circadian in vitro model for investigating changes in BaP metabolism resulting from cross-talk between the molecular clock and aryl hydrocarbon receptor. Female 129sv mice (12 weeks old) received a single gavage dose of 50 mg/kg BaP at either noon or midnight, and mammary tissues were isolated 4 or 24 hours later. BaP-induced Cyp1a1 and Cyp1b1 mRNA levels were higher 4 hours after dosing at noon than at 4 hours after dosing at midnight, and this corresponded with parallel changes in Per gene expression. In our in vitro model, we dosed MCF10A mammary cells at different times after serum shock to study how time of day shifts drug metabolism in cells. Analysis of CYP1A1 and CYP1B1 gene expression showed the maximum enzyme-induced metabolism response 12 and 20 hours after shock, as determined by ethoxyresorufin-O-deethylase activity, metabolism of BaP, and formation of DNA-BaP adducts. The pattern of PER-, BMAL-, and aryl hydrocarbon receptor-induced P450 gene expression and BaP metabolism was similar to BaP-induced Cyp1A1 and Cyp1B1 and molecular clock gene expression in mouse mammary glands. These studies indicate time-of-day exposure influences BaP metabolism in mouse mammary glands and describe an in vitro model that can be used to investigate the circadian influence on the metabolism of carcinogens.

  3. Modulation of secreted proteins of mouse mammary epithelial cells by the collagenous substrata

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, E.Y.H.; Parry, G.; Bissell, M.J.

    1984-01-01

    It has been shown previously that cultures of mouse mammary epithelial cells retain their characteristic morphology and their ability to produce ..gamma..-casein, a member of the casein gene family, only if they are maintained on floating collagen gels. In this paper we show: (a) Cells on floating collagen gels secrete not only ..gamma..-casein but also ..cap alpha../sub 1/-, ..cap alpha../sub 2/-, and ..beta..-caseins. These are not secreted by cells on plastic and are secreted to only a very limited extent by cells on attached collagen gels. (b) The floating collagen gel regulates at the level of synthesis and/or stabilization of the caseins rather than at the level of secretion alone. Contraction of the floating gel is important in that cells cultured on floating glutaraldehyde cross-linked gels do not secrete any of the caseins. (c) The secretion of an 80,000-mol-wt protein, most probably transferrin, and a 67,000-mol-wt protein, probably butyrophilin, a major protein of the milk fat globule membrane, are partially modulated by substrata. However, in contrast to the caseins, these are always detectable in media from cells cultured on plastic and attached gels. (d) Whey acidic protein, a major whey protein, is actively secreted by freshly isolated cells but is secreted in extremely limited quantities in cultured cells regardless of the nature of the substratum used. Lactalbumin secretion is also decreased significantly in cultured cells. (e) A previously unreported set of proteins, which may be minor milk proteins, are prominently secreted by the mammary cells on all substrata tested. We conclude that while the substratum profoundly influences the secretion of the caseins, it does not regulate the expression of every milk-specific protein in the same way. The mechanistic implications of these findings are discussed.

  4. Cooperation between structural elements in hormono-regulated transcription from the mouse mammary tumor virus promoter.

    PubMed Central

    Gouilleux, F; Sola, B; Couette, B; Richard-Foy, H

    1991-01-01

    The mouse mammary tumor virus (MMTV) promoter is under the control of several types of regulatory agents. The proximal promoter within the long terminal repeat (LTR), from -200 to the CAP site and its regulation by steroid hormones have been extensively studied. However the precise role of sequences located upstream of this region remain unclear. We have constructed MMTV LTR deletion mutants coupled to the luciferase reporter gene and assayed their activities after transient transfection into transformed mammary epithelial cells (34i) and immortalized fibroblasts (NIH-3T3). In the absence of hormone, the MMTV promoter is almost silent, and deletions in the LTR have no significant effect on basal activity. In the presence of hormone, deletions spanning from the 5'-end to -455 have only slight effects on luciferase levels. In contrast, deletion of the region spanning from -450 to -201 leads to a dramatic decrease in transcription. A substantial decrease, more marked in 34i cells, is also clear when 90bp between -290 and -201 are deleted. At least one element cooperating positively with the glucocorticoid response element (GRE) is present between -223 and -201, as supported by the results of substitution mutation experiments. In 34i cell line, dexamethasone stimulates the MMTV LTR transcriptional activity to a level comparable to that of SV40. In contrast, in NIH-3T3 cells, MMTV promoter inducibility is weak. This results from a glucocorticoid receptor content 10-fold lower in NIH-3T3 cells than in 34i cells. Transfection of a glucocorticoid receptor expression plasmid allows recovery of a high inducibility of the MMTV promoter. This was true with all the MMTV LTR mutants studied here and suggests that NIH-3T3 cells possess all the factors necessary to cooperate with the steroid hormone in order to achieve a high transcriptional activity. PMID:1851294

  5. Protein-coding potential of mouse mammary tumor virus genome RNA as examined by in vitro translation.

    PubMed Central

    Dickson, C; Peters, G

    1981-01-01

    The protein-coding capacity of the mouse mammary tumor virus genome has been examined by in vitro translation of genome length and polyadenylated subgenomic fragments of viral RNA. Intact genome RNA of about 35S programmed synthesis of the Pr77gag, Pr110gag and Pr160gag/pol precursors seen in infected cells in vivo. Polyadenylated RNA fragments of 18 to 28S encoded products whose tryptic peptide maps resembled those of the nonglycosylated precursor to the envelope glycoproteins, confirming the gene order 5'-gag-pol-env-3'. Translation of polyadenylated RNA fragments smaller than 18S yielded a series of related proteins whose peptide maps bore no resemblance to any of the virion structural proteins. Thus, a region of the mouse mammary tumor virus genome distal to the env gene appears to have an open reading frame sufficient to encode at least 36,000 daltons of protein as of yet unknown function. Images PMID:6260988

  6. A novel protein with anti-metastasis activity on 4T1 carcinoma from medicinal fungus Cordyceps militaris.

    PubMed

    Yang, Qing; Yin, Yalin; Yu, Guojun; Jin, Yanxia; Ye, Xiangdong; Shrestha, Alok; Liu, Wei; Yu, Wenhui; Sun, Hui

    2015-09-01

    Cordyceps militaris is a famous fungus used in traditional Chinese medicine for nearly one thousand years. And its fruiting body is known to possess anticancer and immunomodulatory activities. This study describes the isolation, characterization, and test of antitumor activity of a C. militaris protein, called here as "C. militaris immunoregulatory protein" (CMIP). CMIP was purified through a three-step chromatographic procedure. The MS analyses showed that CMIP corresponded to an uncharacterized protein (CCM_01955) in the C. militaris transcriptional database. Circular dichroism of CMIP revealed the composition of 35.5% β-sheet, 18.5% α-helix, 17.0% turn and 29.0% random coil. No significant cytotoxicity of CMIP was observed on HeLa, HepG2 and 4T1 tumor cells. However, CMIP demonstrated anti-metastasis activity on a mouse model of 4T1 breast cancer lung metastasis. It reduced the number of tumor nodules in the lung of tumor-bearing mice and prolonged their survival time. Furthermore, proliferation of the 4T1 cells was inhibited by macrophage-CMIP conditioned media. And the mRNA levels of cytokines TNF-α, IL-1β and IL-6 were increased significantly in peritoneal macrophages treated by CMIP. These results reveal the antitumor potential of CMIP, thus reinforcing the importance of biochemical prospecting of C. militaris.

  7. Mutations in the hormone regulatory element of mouse mammary tumor virus differentially affect the response to progestins, androgens, and glucocorticoids.

    PubMed Central

    Gowland, P L; Buetti, E

    1989-01-01

    Transcription of the mouse mammary tumor virus DNA is known to be induced by several steroid hormones. Using chimeric MMTV plasmids containing mutations within the hormone regulatory element, we have previously studied the regions required for the glucocorticoid response in mouse fibroblasts. Here we report the characterization of elements essential for the stimulation by progestins and androgens as compared with glucocorticoids. The same set of mutant plasmids was transfected into the human mammary tumor cell line T47D, and the specific transcripts were analyzed by an S1 nuclease protection assay. Androgen-mediated stimulation, although weak, showed an extended sensitivity to mutations, with a slight preference for the proximal region. The results with progestin suggest that sequences within all the described sites protected by the receptor in vitro are required and that the promoter-proximal region (-128 to -78 from the RNA start site) is more important than the distal one (-190 to -160). Moreover, a binding site for nuclear factor I was not required for the progestin response, whereas it was required for glucocorticoids. Thus, the various steroid receptors play a role in the differential regulation of mouse mammary tumor virus transcription by recognizing distinct sequence differences in the hormone regulatory element and interacting with different factors bound to the promoter. Images PMID:2550809

  8. Screening and analysis of breast cancer genes regulated by the human mammary microenvironment in a humanized mouse model

    PubMed Central

    Zheng, Mingjie; Wang, Jue; Ling, Lijun; Xue, Dandan; Wang, Shui; Zhao, Yi

    2016-01-01

    Tumor microenvironments play critical regulatory roles in tumor growth. Although mouse cancer models have contributed to the understanding of human tumor biology, the effectiveness of mouse cancer models is limited by the inability of the models to accurately present humanized tumor microenvironments. Previously, a humanized breast cancer model in severe combined immunodeficiency mice was established, in which human breast cancer tissue was implanted subcutaneously, followed by injection of human breast cancer cells. It was demonstrated that breast cancer cells showed improved growth in the human mammary microenvironment compared with a conventional subcutaneous mouse model. In the present study, the novel mouse model and microarray technology was used to analyze changes in the expression of genes in breast cancer cells that are regulated by the human mammary microenvironment. Humanized breast and conventional subcutaneous mouse models were established, and orthotopic tumor cells were obtained from orthotopic tumor masses by primary culture. An expression microarray using Illumina HumanHT-12 v4 Expression BeadChip and database analyses were performed to investigate changes in gene expression between tumors from each microenvironment. A total of 94 genes were differentially expressed between the primary cells cultured from the humanized and conventional mouse models. Significant upregulation of genes that promote cell proliferation and metastasis or inhibit apoptosis, such as SH3-domain binding protein 5 (BTK-associated), sodium/chloride cotransporter 3 and periostin, osteoblast specific factor, and genes that promote angiogenesis, such as KIAA1618, was also noted. Other genes that restrain cell proliferation and accelerate cell apoptosis, including tripartite motif containing TRIM36 and NES1, were downregulated. The present results revealed differences in various aspects of tumor growth and metabolism between the two model groups and indicated the functional

  9. Functional elements of the steroid hormone-responsive promoter of mouse mammary tumor virus.

    PubMed Central

    Toohey, M G; Lee, J W; Huang, M; Peterson, D O

    1990-01-01

    Transcription from the promoter of mouse mammary tumor virus is subject to induction by several classes of steroid hormones as well as to repression by a negative regulatory element present in the long terminal repeats of proviral DNA. In order to characterize the functional elements of the promoter that in some way must respond to these regulatory signals, a number of promoter mutations were constructed, including a set of linker-scanning mutations across the entire promoter region. Analysis of these mutated promoters with a transient-transfection assay defined at least three mutation-sensitive promoter elements that are required for both basal and hormone-induced transcription. One mutation-sensitive region contains a TATA element located at approximately position -30 with respect to the start of transcription. A second mutation-sensitive region contains two 10-base-pair direct repeats located between positions -60 and -38, within which are embedded three copies of octamer-related sequences; complete disruption of this region of the promoter leads to a more severe decrease in transcription than do any of the linker-scanning mutations, suggesting that the repeated sequences may be at least partially functionally redundant. Gel electrophoresis mobility shift assays were used to demonstrate specific binding of a nuclear protein to this region of the promoter. A third mutation-sensitive region contains a binding site for nuclear factor 1 (NF-1) located between positions -77 and -63. Site-directed mutations in the NF-1-binding site which increase the apparent affinity of NF-1 for the promoter in vitro do not decrease the hormone dependence of transcription, suggesting that transcriptional activation mediated by steroid hormone-receptor complexes cannot be explained by facilitation or stabilization of the interaction of promoter sequences with NF-1 and consistent with the idea that binding of NF-1 is not rate determining in transcription from the mouse mammary tumor

  10. Variegated transgene expression in mouse mammary gland is determined by the transgene integration locus.

    PubMed Central

    Dobie, K W; Lee, M; Fantes, J A; Graham, E; Clark, A J; Springbett, A; Lathe, R; McClenaghan, M

    1996-01-01

    Mice carrying an ovine beta-lactoglobulin (BLG) transgene secrete BLG protein into their milk. To explore transgene expression stability, we studied expression levels in three BLG transgenic mouse lines. Unexpectedly, two lines exhibited variable levels of transgene expression. Copy number within lines appeared to be stable and there was no evidence of transgene rearrangement. In the most variable line, BLG production levels were stable within individual mice in two successive lactations. Backcrossing demonstrated that genetic background did not contribute significantly to variable expression. Tissue in situ hybridization revealed mosaicism of transgene expression within individual mammary glands from the two variable lines; in low expressors, discrete patches of cells expressing the transgene were observed. Transgene protein concentrations in milk reflected the proportion of epithelial cells expressing BLG mRNA. Furthermore, chromosomal in situ hybridization revealed that transgene arrays in both lines are situated close to the centromere. We propose that mosaicism of transgene expression is a consequence of the chromosomal location and/or the nature of the primary transgene integration event. Images Fig. 3 Fig. 4 PMID:8692874

  11. Functional redundancy of octamer elements in the mouse mammary tumor virus promoter.

    PubMed Central

    Huang, M; Lee, J W; Peterson, D O

    1993-01-01

    The promoter of mouse mammary tumor virus contains three overlapping sequence elements related to the octamer consensus (ATGCAAAT) that are largely contained within two 10 bp direct repeats (CTTATGTAAA) separated by a 2 bp spacer between 60 and 39 relative to the start of transcription. Gel electrophoresis mobility shift competition assays demonstrate that the most distal of these octamer-related elements is recognized by a protein that also binds to the most proximal element, while the central octamer-related element is not efficiently recognized. Transient transfection assays with altered promoters reveal that the portion of the 10 bp repeat that is not related to the octamer consensus appears not to be important for transcription. The distal and proximal octamer-related elements are, at least to some extent, functionally redundant. Complete deletion of one element has little or no effect on promoter activity so long as certain spacing constraints among remaining promoter elements are maintained. Systematic variation of such spacing reveals a cyclic effect on promoter activity corresponding to the periodicity of Bform DNA, suggesting functional interactions between proteins bound to adjacent sites. Images PMID:8255781

  12. The mouse mammary tumour virus long terminal repeat encodes a type II transmembrane glycoprotein.

    PubMed Central

    Korman, A J; Bourgarel, P; Meo, T; Rieckhof, G E

    1992-01-01

    Superantigens are products of bacterial or viral origin which stimulate large numbers of T cells as a consequence of the interaction of particular V beta chains of the T cell receptor with class II major histocompatibility complex (MHC) molecules and superantigen on the stimulating cell. The Minor lymphocyte stimulatory (Mls) antigens, originally discovered as strong lymphocyte stimulatory determinants in vitro and subsequently shown to delete T cells expressing specific V beta chains during development, have recently been shown to be genetically linked to endogenous mouse mammary tumour viruses (MTVs). This stimulation is effectuated by an unidentified product encoded by an open reading frame (orf) present in the 3' long terminal repeat (LTR) of MTVs. Using in vitro translation in the presence of rough microsomal vesicles, we show that (i) the orf of MTV encodes a type II transmembrane glycoprotein (N-terminus intracellular, C-terminus extracytoplasmic), and (ii) a cotranslationally secreted orf protein is not produced. We have also isolated and sequenced several endogenous MTV orfs (MTV-1, MTV-6 and MTV-13) which are involved in the deletion of V beta-bearing T cells; each of these sequences are nearly identical to each other. These observations, together with sequence comparisons of several orf genes, lead to a model of action of viral superantigens. Images PMID:1316276

  13. Nuclear, optical, and magnetic resonance imaging in a mouse mammary window chamber model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leung, Hui Min; Schafer, Rachel; Gmitro, Arthur F.

    2014-09-01

    An orthotopic mouse mammary window chamber (MWC) model has been developed for multimodal in-vivo functional and anatomical imaging of breast cancer xenografts. Capabilities to image numerous physiological aspects of the same tumor microenvironment over time has important applications such as in experiments studying the efficacies of therapeutic interventions, improvement of cancer detection and investigating basic cancer biology. The compatibility of this MWC model with optical, nuclear and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) makes it possible to perform a multitude of studies ranging from cellular imaging to whole body imaging. Thus, the MWC represents a powerful tool for breast cancer research. Here, two imaging applications are highlighted, namely the nuclear imaging of glycolytic metabolism with 18FFDG and MRI of tissue perfusion. Nuclear imaging is performed with the use of a 3μm thin phosphor scintillator placed directly in contact with the tissue and visible light from the scintillation is directly detected in a low noise, light tight imaging system. Tissue perfusion is imaged either qualitatively with a dynamic contrast enhancement (DCE) MRI technique or quantitatively with an arterial spin labeling flow-sensitive alternating inversion recovery-rapid acquisition with relaxation enhancement (FAIR-RARE) technique.

  14. Using Mouse Mammary Tumor Cells to Teach Core Biology Concepts: A Simple Lab Module.

    PubMed

    McIlrath, Victoria; Trye, Alice; Aguanno, Ann

    2015-06-18

    Undergraduate biology students are required to learn, understand and apply a variety of cellular and molecular biology concepts and techniques in preparation for biomedical, graduate and professional programs or careers in science. To address this, a simple laboratory module was devised to teach the concepts of cell division, cellular communication and cancer through the application of animal cell culture techniques. Here the mouse mammary tumor (MMT) cell line is used to model for breast cancer. Students learn to grow and characterize these animal cells in culture and test the effects of traditional and non-traditional chemotherapy agents on cell proliferation. Specifically, students determine the optimal cell concentration for plating and growing cells, learn how to prepare and dilute drug solutions, identify the best dosage and treatment time course of the antiproliferative agents, and ascertain the rate of cell death in response to various treatments. The module employs both a standard cell counting technique using a hemocytometer and a novel cell counting method using microscopy software. The experimental procedure lends to open-ended inquiry as students can modify critical steps of the protocol, including testing homeopathic agents and over-the-counter drugs. In short, this lab module requires students to use the scientific process to apply their knowledge of the cell cycle, cellular signaling pathways, cancer and modes of treatment, all while developing an array of laboratory skills including cell culture and analysis of experimental data not routinely taught in the undergraduate classroom.

  15. Evaluation of Lung Metastasis in Mouse Mammary Tumor Models by Quantitative Real-time PCR

    PubMed Central

    Abt, Melissa A.; Grek, Christina L.; Ghatnekar, Gautam S.; Yeh, Elizabeth S.

    2016-01-01

    Metastatic disease is the spread of malignant tumor cells from the primary cancer site to a distant organ and is the primary cause of cancer associated death 1. Common sites of metastatic spread include lung, lymph node, brain, and bone 2. Mechanisms that drive metastasis are intense areas of cancer research. Consequently, effective assays to measure metastatic burden in distant sites of metastasis are instrumental for cancer research. Evaluation of lung metastases in mammary tumor models is generally performed by gross qualitative observation of lung tissue following dissection. Quantitative methods of evaluating metastasis are currently limited to ex vivo and in vivo imaging based techniques that require user defined parameters. Many of these techniques are at the whole organism level rather than the cellular level 3–6. Although newer imaging methods utilizing multi-photon microscopy are able to evaluate metastasis at the cellular level 7, these highly elegant procedures are more suited to evaluating mechanisms of dissemination rather than quantitative assessment of metastatic burden. Here, a simple in vitro method to quantitatively assess metastasis is presented. Using quantitative Real-time PCR (QRT-PCR), tumor cell specific mRNA can be detected within the mouse lung tissue. PMID:26862835

  16. Evaluation of Lung Metastasis in Mouse Mammary Tumor Models by Quantitative Real-time PCR.

    PubMed

    Abt, Melissa A; Grek, Christina L; Ghatnekar, Gautam S; Yeh, Elizabeth S

    2016-01-29

    Metastatic disease is the spread of malignant tumor cells from the primary cancer site to a distant organ and is the primary cause of cancer associated death. Common sites of metastatic spread include lung, lymph node, brain, and bone. Mechanisms that drive metastasis are intense areas of cancer research. Consequently, effective assays to measure metastatic burden in distant sites of metastasis are instrumental for cancer research. Evaluation of lung metastases in mammary tumor models is generally performed by gross qualitative observation of lung tissue following dissection. Quantitative methods of evaluating metastasis are currently limited to ex vivo and in vivo imaging based techniques that require user defined parameters. Many of these techniques are at the whole organism level rather than the cellular level. Although newer imaging methods utilizing multi-photon microscopy are able to evaluate metastasis at the cellular level, these highly elegant procedures are more suited to evaluating mechanisms of dissemination rather than quantitative assessment of metastatic burden. Here, a simple in vitro method to quantitatively assess metastasis is presented. Using quantitative Real-time PCR (QRT-PCR), tumor cell specific mRNA can be detected within the mouse lung tissue.

  17. Identification of reliable reference genes for qRT-PCR studies of the developing mouse mammary gland

    PubMed Central

    van de Moosdijk, Anoeska Agatha Alida; van Amerongen, Renée

    2016-01-01

    Cell growth and differentiation are often driven by subtle changes in gene expression. Many challenges still exist in detecting these changes, particularly in the context of a complex, developing tissue. Quantitative reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction (qRT-PCR) allows relatively high-throughput evaluation of multiple genes and developmental time points. Proper quantification of gene expression levels by qRT-PCR requires normalization to one or more reference genes. Traditionally, these genes have been selected based on their presumed “housekeeping” function, with the implicit assumption that they are stably expressed over the entire experimental set. However, this is rarely tested empirically. Here we describe the identification of novel reference genes for the mouse mammary gland based on their stable expression in published microarray datasets. We compared eight novel candidate reference genes (Arpc3, Clock, Ctbp1, Phf7, Prdx1, Sugp2, Taf11 and Usp7) to eight traditional ones (18S, Actb, Gapdh, Hmbs, Hprt, Rpl13a, Sdha and Tbp) and analysed all genes for stable expression in the mouse mammary gland from pre-puberty to adulthood using four different algorithms (GeNorm, DeltaCt, BestKeeper and NormFinder). Prdx1, Phf7 and Ctbp1 were validated as novel and reliable, tissue-specific reference genes that outperform traditional reference genes in qRT-PCR studies of postnatal mammary gland development. PMID:27752147

  18. Whey acidic protein (WAP) depresses the proliferation of mouse (MMT) and human (MCF-7) mammary tumor cells.

    PubMed

    Nukumi, Naoko; Iwamori, Tokuko; Naito, Kunihiko; Tojo, Hideaki

    2005-10-01

    We previously reported that the enforced expression of exogenous whey acidic protein (WAP) significantly inhibited the proliferation of mouse mammary epithelial cells (HC11 and EpH4/H6 cells). This paper presents the first evidence that WAP also depresses the proliferation of mammary tumor cells from mouse (MMT cells) and human (MCF-7 cells). We established WAP-clonal MMT and MCF-7 cell lines, and confirmed the secretion of WAP from the WAP-clonal cells into culture medium. The enforced expression of WAP significantly inhibited the proliferation of MMT and MCF-7 cells in in vitro culture. FACScan analyses revealed that G0/G1 phase cell-cycle progression was disordered and elongated in the WAP-clonal MMT and MCF-7 cells compared to that of the control cells. The expression of cyclin D1 was significantly decreased in the WAP-clonal MMT and MCF-7 cells, suggesting that progression from the G1 to the S phase was delayed in the WAP-clonal cells. The present results indicate that WAP plays a negative regulatory role in the cell-cycle progression of mammary tumor cells via a paracrine mechanism.

  19. Measuring oxygen tension modulation, induced by a new pre-radiotherapy therapeutic, in a mammary window chamber mouse model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schafer, Rachel; Gmitro, Arthur F.

    2015-03-01

    Tumor regions under hypoxic or low oxygen conditions respond less effectively to many treatment strategies, including radiation therapy. A novel investigational therapeutic, NVX-108 (NuvOx Pharma), has been developed to increase delivery of oxygen through the use of a nano-emulsion of dodecofluoropentane. By raising pO2 levels prior to delivering radiation, treatment efficacy may be improved. To aid in evaluating the novel drug, oxygen tension was quantitatively measured, spatially and temporally, to record the effect of administrating NVX-108 in an orthotopic mammary window chamber mouse model of breast cancer. The oxygen tension was measured through the use of an oxygen-sensitive coating, comprised of phosphorescent platinum porphyrin dye embedded in a polystyrene matrix. The coating, applied to the surface of the coverslip of the window chamber through spin coating, is placed in contact with the mammary fat pad to record the oxygenation status of the surface tissue layer. Prior to implantation of the window chamber, a tumor is grown in the SCID mouse model by injection of MCF-7 cells into the mammary fat pad. Two-dimensional spatial distributions of the pO2 levels were obtained through conversion of measured maps of phosphorescent lifetime. The resulting information on the spatial and temporal variation of the induced oxygen modulation could provide valuable insight into the optimal timing between administration of NVX-108 and radiation treatment to provide the most effective treatment outcome.

  20. A model of spontaneous mouse mammary tumor for human estrogen receptor- and progesterone receptor-negative breast cancer

    PubMed Central

    ZHENG, LIXIANG; ZHOU, BUGAO; MENG, XIANMING; ZHU, WEIFENG; ZUO, AIREN; WANG, XIAOMIN; JIANG, RUNDE; YU, SHIPING

    2014-01-01

    Breast cancer (BC) is the most frequently malignancy in women. Therefore, establishment of an animal model for the development of preventative measures and effective treatment for tumors is required. A novel heterogeneous spontaneous mammary tumor animal model of Kunming mice was generated. The purpose of this study was to characterize the spontaneous mammary tumor model. Histopathologically, invasive nodular masses of pleomorphic tubular neoplastic epithelial cells invaded fibro-vascular stroma, adjacent dermis and muscle tissue. Metastatic spread through blood vessel into liver and lungs was observed by hematoxylin eosin staining. No estrogen receptor (ER) or progesterone receptor (PR) immunoreactivity was detected in their associated malignant tumors, human epidermal growth factor receptor-2 (HER-2) protein weak expression was found by immunohistochemistry. High expression of vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF), moderate or high expression of c-Myc and cyclin D1 were observed in tumor sections at different stages (2, 4, 6 and 8 weeks after cancer being found) when compared with that of the normal mammary glands. The result showed that the model is of an invasive ductal carcinoma. Remarkably in the mouse model, ER and PR-negative and HER2 weak positivity are observed. The high or moderate expressions of breast cancer markers (VEGF, c-Myc and cyclin D1) in mammary cancer tissue change at different stages. To our knowledge, this is the first report of a spontaneous mammary model displaying colony-strain, outbred mice. This model will be an attractive tool to understand the biology of anti-hormonal breast cancer in women. PMID:25230850

  1. Impact of diethylhexyl phthalate on gene expression and development of mammary glands of pregnant mouse.

    PubMed

    Li, Lan; Liu, Jing-Cai; Zhao, Yong; Lai, Fang-Nong; Yang, Fan; Ge, Wei; Dou, Cheng-Li; Shen, Wei; Zhang, Xi-Feng; Chen, Hong

    2015-10-01

    The widely used diethylhexyl phthalate (DEHP) is a known endocrine disruptor that causes persistent alterations in the structure and function of female reproductive system, including ovaries, uterus and oviducts. To explore the molecular mechanism of the effect of DEHP on the development of mammary glands, we investigated the cell cycle, growth, proliferation and gene expression of mammary gland cells of pregnant mice exposed to DEHP. It was demonstrated, for the first time, that the mammary gland cells of pregnant mice treated with DEHP for 0.5-3.5 days post-coitum had increased proliferation, growth rate and number of cells in the G2/S phase. The expression of cell proliferation-related genes was significantly altered after short time and low-dose DEHP treatment of mammary gland cells in vivo and in vitro. These findings showed adverse effects of DEHP on mammary gland cells in pregnant mice.

  2. 25-Hydroxyvitamin D3 is a natural chemopreventive agent against carcinogen induced precancerous lesions in mouse mammary gland organ culture

    PubMed Central

    Peng, Xinjian; Hawthorne, Michael; Vaishnav, Avani; St-Arnaud, René

    2009-01-01

    Despite the role of vitamin D3 endocrine system in prevention of mammary gland transformation in animal models, use of 1,25(OH)2D3 in clinical settings is precluded due to its toxicity in vivo. Therefore much effort has been placed in developing relatively non-toxic vitamin D analogs. Recently, with the discovery of the expression of 25-hydroxy vitamin D3 1α-hydroxylase (CYP27B1) in multiple extrarenal organs, the functional role of prohormone, 25-hydroxyvitamin D3 [25(OH)D3], has been redefined. Since 25(OH)D3 does not cause hypercalcemia and maintains relative high concentration in serum, it is possible that the prohormone can be converted to active hormone in mammary epithelial cells to provide chemopreventive effects. In the present study, we evaluated its functional significance using mouse mammary organ culture (MMOC) system. We first showed that 25(OH)D3 1α-hydroxylase is extensively expressed in mammary ductal epithelial cells at both protein and mRNA levels, which is a prerequisite for 25(OH)D3 to function in an autocrine/paracrine manner. However, we also observed that clotrimazol (1α-hydroxylase inhibitor) enhanced 25(OH)D3 -induced CYP24 expression in breast cancer cells. In mammary glands derived from 1α-hydroxylase knockout mice, 25(OH)D3 treatment in organ culture significantly induced CYP24 expression, indicating a potential direct effect of 25(OH)D3. In MMOC, 100–250 nM 25(OH)D3 suppressed both ovarian hormone-dependent and -independent mammary precancerous lesions (induced by DMBA) by more than 50%, while the active hormone 1,25(OH)2D3 (positive control) at 100 nM suppressed alveolar lesions by more than 80%. The inactive vitamin D3 (negative control) at 100 nM suppressed alveolar lesions by only 20% (P > 0.05). We found that 25(OH)D3 inhibits DMBA-induced mammary alveolar lesions (MAL) in a stage-specific manner: 25(OH)D3 mainly inhibits the promotion stage of lesion formation. We conclude that 25(OH)D3 could serve as a non-toxic natural

  3. 25-Hydroxyvitamin D3 is a natural chemopreventive agent against carcinogen induced precancerous lesions in mouse mammary gland organ culture.

    PubMed

    Peng, Xinjian; Hawthorne, Michael; Vaishnav, Avani; St-Arnaud, René; Mehta, Rajendra G

    2009-01-01

    Despite the role of vitamin D(3) endocrine system in prevention of mammary gland transformation in animal models, use of 1,25(OH)(2)D(3 )in clinical settings is precluded due to its toxicity in vivo. Therefore much effort has been placed in developing relatively non-toxic vitamin D analogs. Recently, with the discovery of the expression of 25-hydroxy vitamin D(3) 1alpha-hydroxylase (CYP27B1) in multiple extrarenal organs, the functional role of prohormone, 25-hydroxyvitamin D(3) [25(OH)D(3)], has been redefined. Since 25(OH)D(3) does not cause hypercalcemia and maintains relative high concentration in serum, it is possible that the prohormone can be converted to active hormone in mammary epithelial cells to provide chemopreventive effects. In the present study, we evaluated its functional significance using mouse mammary organ culture (MMOC) system. We first showed that 25(OH)D(3) 1alpha-hydroxylase is extensively expressed in mammary ductal epithelial cells at both protein and mRNA levels, which is a prerequisite for 25(OH)D(3) to function in an autocrine/paracrine manner. However, we also observed that clotrimazol (1alpha-hydroxylase inhibitor) enhanced 25(OH)D(3) -induced CYP24 expression in breast cancer cells. In mammary glands derived from 1alpha-hydroxylase knockout mice, 25(OH)D(3) treatment in organ culture significantly induced CYP24 expression, indicating a potential direct effect of 25(OH)D(3). In MMOC, 100-250 nM 25(OH)D(3) suppressed both ovarian hormone-dependent and -independent mammary precancerous lesions (induced by DMBA) by more than 50%, while the active hormone 1,25(OH)(2)D(3) (positive control) at 100 nM suppressed alveolar lesions by more than 80%. The inactive vitamin D(3) (negative control) at 100 nM suppressed alveolar lesions by only 20% (P>0.05). We found that 25(OH)D(3) inhibits DMBA-induced mammary alveolar lesions (MAL) in a stage-specific manner: 25(OH)D(3) mainly inhibits the promotion stage of lesion formation. We conclude that 25

  4. A mutant RNA pseudoknot that promotes ribosomal frameshifting in mouse mammary tumor virus.

    PubMed

    Kang, H; Tinoco, I

    1997-05-15

    A single A-->G mutation that changes a potential A.U base pair to a G.U pair at the junction of the stems and loops of a non-frameshifting pseudoknot dramatically increases its frameshifting efficiency in mouse mammary tumor virus. The structure of the non-frameshifting pseudoknot APK has been found to be very different from that of pseudoknots that cause efficient frameshifting [Kang,H., Hines,J.V. and Tinoco,I. (1995) J. Mol. Biol. , 259, 135-147]. The 3-dimensional structure of the mutant pseudoknot was determined by restrained molecular dynamics based on NMR-derived interproton distance and torsion angle constraints. One striking feature of the mutant pseudoknot compared with the parent pseudoknot is that a G.U base pair forms at the top of stem 2, thus leaving only 1 nt at the junction of the two stems. The conformation is very different from that of the previously determined non-frameshifting parent pseudoknot, which lacks the A.U base pair at the top of the stem and has 2 nt between the stems. However, the conformation is quite similar to that of efficient frameshifting pseudoknots whose structures were previously determined by NMR. A single adenylate residue intervenes between the two stems and interrupts their coaxial stacking. This unpaired nucleotide produces a bent structure. The structural similarity among the efficient frameshifting pseudoknots indicates that a specific conformation is required for ribosomal frameshifting, further implying a specific interaction of the pseudoknot with the ribosome.

  5. Stimulation of basal transcription from the mouse mammary tumor virus promoter by Oct proteins.

    PubMed Central

    Kim, M H; Peterson, D O

    1995-01-01

    The steroid hormone-inducible promoter of mouse mammary tumor virus (MMTV) contains three overlapping sequences related to the consensus octamer motif ATGCAAAT. Basal promoter activity in the absence of hormone induction from a template in which all three octamer elements were mutated was decreased by two-to threefold in in vitro transcription assays. Oct-1 protein purified from HeLa cell nuclear extracts, as well as recombinant Oct-1 expressed in bacteria, recognized MMTV octamer-related sequences, as shown by DNase I footprinting. Furthermore, rabbit polyclonal antiserum directed against recombinant Oct-1 completely inhibited the formation of specific complexes between MMTV octamer-related sequences and proteins present in nuclear extracts of HeLa cells, indicating that Oct-1 is the major protein in HeLa nuclear extracts that recognizes octamer-related sequences in the MMTV promoter. In addition, depletion of Oct-1 from the nuclear extract by using Oct-1-specific antiserum or a sequence-specific DNA affinity resin decreased in vitro transcription from the wild-type MMTV promoter to a level identical to that obtained from a promoter in which all three octamer-related sequences were mutated. Addition of purified HeLa Oct-1 or recombinant Oct-1 to the depleted extract selectively increased transcription from the wild-type relative to the mutated promoter, demonstrating that Oct-1 transcription factor stimulates basal transcription from the MMTV promoter. A similar effect was observed when purified recombinant Oct-2 was added to the Oct-1-depleted extract, suggesting that Oct-2 may play an important role in MMTV transcription in B cells. PMID:7609037

  6. The Rac Inhibitor EHop-016 Inhibits Mammary Tumor Growth and Metastasis in a Nude Mouse Model

    PubMed Central

    Castillo-Pichardo, Linette; Humphries-Bickley, Tessa; De La Parra, Columba; Forestier-Roman, Ingrid; Martinez-Ferrer, Magaly; Hernandez, Eliud; Vlaar, Cornelis; Ferrer-Acosta, Yancy; Washington, Anthony V.; Cubano, Luis A.; Rodriguez-Orengo, Jose; Dharmawardhane, Suranganie

    2014-01-01

    Metastatic disease still lacks effective treatments, and remains the primary cause of cancer mortality. Therefore, there is a critical need to develop better strategies to inhibit metastatic cancer. The Rho family GTPase Rac is an ideal target for anti-metastatic cancer therapy, because Rac is a key molecular switch that is activated by a myriad of cell surface receptors to promote cancer cell migration/invasion and survival. Previously, we reported the design and development of EHop-016, a small molecule compound, which inhibits Rac activity of metastatic cancer cells with an IC50 of 1 μM. EHop-016 also inhibits the activity of the Rac downstream effector p21-activated kinase (PAK), lamellipodia extension, and cell migration in metastatic cancer cells. Herein, we tested the efficacy of EHop-016 in a nude mouse model of experimental metastasis, where EHop-016 administration at 25 mg/kg body weight (BW) significantly reduced mammary fat pad tumor growth, metastasis, and angiogenesis. As quantified by UPLC MS/MS, EHop-016 was detectable in the plasma of nude mice at 17 to 23 ng/ml levels at 12 h following intraperitoneal (i.p.) administration of 10 to 25 mg/kg BW EHop-016. The EHop-016 mediated inhibition of angiogenesis In Vivo was confirmed by immunohistochemistry of excised tumors and by In Vitro tube formation assays of endothelial cells. Moreover, EHop-016 affected cell viability by down-regulating Akt and Jun kinase activities and c-Myc and Cyclin D expression, as well as increasing caspase 3/7 activities in metastatic cancer cells. In conclusion, EHop-016 has potential as an anticancer compound to block cancer progression via multiple Rac-directed mechanisms. PMID:25389450

  7. Regulation of cholesterol synthesis in cultured mouse mammary carcinoma FM3A cells.

    PubMed

    Hasumi, K; Otsuki, R; Endo, A

    1985-08-01

    Mouse mammary carcinoma FM3A cells, which are able to grow in a serum-free medium, have novel characteristics that could be valuable in biochemical and somatic cell genetic studies. In FM3A cells grown in the presence of serum, both sterol synthesis and the activity of 3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl coenzyme A (HMG-CoA) reductase, the major rate-limiting enzyme in the cholesterol biosynthetic pathway, were strongly suppressed by human low density lipoprotein (LDL). The addition of LDL (50 micrograms protein/ml) resulted in a 50% decrease in the reductase activity within 3 h and a 95% reduction after 24 h. Similarly, over 90% suppression of the reductase activity was obtained by the addition of LDL or mevalonolactone when the cells were grown on a serum-free medium. ML-236B (compactin), a specific inhibitor of HMG-CoA reductase, inhibited sterol synthesis from [14C]acetate by 80% at 1 microM. Reductase activity in FM3A cells was increased by 2.5- to 5-fold when the cells were treated with ML-236B (at 0.26-2.6 microM for 24 h). Thus, in FM3A cells, HMG-CoA reductase activity responded well to LDL, as is observed in human skin fibroblasts. Along with other novel features of this cell line, the present observations indicate that FM3A cells should be useful in biochemical and somatic cell genetic analysis of cholesterol metabolism, especially as regards the regulation of HMG-CoA reductase activity.

  8. Effects of social housing condition and behavior on growth of the Shionogi mouse mammary carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Grimm, M S; Emerman, J T; Weinberg, J

    1996-01-01

    We have demonstrated marked effects of social housing condition on the growth rate of the androgen-responsive Shionogi mouse mammary carcinoma. The present study investigated the possible role of psychosocial variables in modulating the differential tumor growth rates observed. Male DD/S mice were reared individually housed (I) or in groups (G) of three or five siblings or nonsiblings. Following tumor cell injection, mice either remained in their rearing conditions (II, GG) or were rehoused (IG, GI). Effects of group size, sibling relationship, dominance status, change vs. no change in housing condition, and direction of change (individual to group or group to individual) were examined. Home cage behaviors were monitored both prior to and following tumor cell injection and rehousing. Overall, mice in the GI conditions showed faster tumor growth rates than mice in the IG conditions. Mice in the II and GG conditions showed intermediate tumor growth rates. Differences in group size and sibling relationship prior to and following tumor cell injection and rehousing had no significant influence on tumor growth rates. However, both change in housing condition and direction of change following tumor cell injection/rehousing were significant variables in modulating differential tumor growth rates. Dominance status differentially influenced tumor growth depending on whether mice experienced a change in housing; in the IG conditions, dominant mice showed faster tumor growth whereas in the GG conditions, dominant mice showed slower tumor growth than subordinate mice. Increased fighting among mice in IG compared to mice in GG conditions may play a role in modulating differential tumor growth rates.

  9. Molecular cloning and characterization of the mouse carboxyl ester lipase gene and evidence for expression in the lactating mammary gland

    SciTech Connect

    Lidmer, A.S.; Lundberg, L.; Kannius, M.; Bjursell, G.

    1995-09-01

    DNA hybridization was used to isolate a 2.04-kb cDNA encoding carboxyl ester lipase (CEL) from a mouse lactating mammary gland, {lambda}gt10 cDNA library. The cDNA sequence translated into a protein of 599 amino acids, including 20 amino acids of a putative signal peptide. Comparison of the deduced amino acid sequence of the mouse CEL with CEL from five other species revealed that there is a high degree of a homology between the different species. The mouse CEL gene was also isolated and found to span approximately 7.2 kb and to include 11 exons. This organization is similar to those of the recently reported human and rat CEL genes. We have also analyzed expression of the CEL gene in the mammary glands from other species by performing a Northern blot analysis with RNA from goat and cow. The results show that the gene is expressed in both species. 36 refs., 6 figs., 1 tab.

  10. Inhibition of mouse mammary ductal morphogenesis and down-regulation of the EGF receptor by epidermal growth factor.

    PubMed

    Coleman, S; Daniel, C W

    1990-02-01

    EGF, initially demonstrated to be a potent mitogen for a variety of cell types, has more recently been shown to inhibit proliferation of several cell lines. Few studies, however, have addressed the effects of EGF on growth and morphogenesis of tissues in vivo, particularly with regard to EGF as a possible inhibitor. We now demonstrate that EGF treatment of vigorously growing mammary ducts, administered directly to the glands by slow release plastic implants, inhibited normal ductal growth. Inhibition was restricted to the region around the implant and untreated glands in the same animal were normal, indicating direct effects of EGF. EGF-treated end buds were smaller and demonstrated reduced levels of DNA synthesis, although remnants of a stem (cap) cell layer persisted. Full inhibition of growth occurred within 3 days of implantation and required extended exposure to EGF, since treatment of 5 hr or less had no effect on ductal growth. At the lower inhibitory doses tested, growth resumed within 8 days, indicating reversibility of inhibition. No lobuloalveolar or hyperplastic response was seen. 125I-EGF autoradiography revealed that ductal growth inhibition was preceded by the disappearance of EGF receptors located in the cap cell layer of the end bud epithelium and in stromal cells adjacent to the buds. These results, in conjunction with our previous evidence demonstrating the growth-stimulatory effect by EGF on nonproliferating mammary ducts, suggest a growth regulatory role for EGF in mouse mammary ductal morphogenesis.

  11. Epithelium-dependent extracellular matrix synthesis in transforming growth factor-beta 1-growth-inhibited mouse mammary gland.

    PubMed

    Silberstein, G B; Strickland, P; Coleman, S; Daniel, C W

    1990-06-01

    Exogenous transforming growth factor beta (TGF-beta 1) was shown in earlier studies to reversibly inhibit mouse mammary ductal growth. Using small plastic implants to treat regions of developing mammary glands in situ, we now report that TGF-beta 1 growth inhibition is associated with an ectopic accumulation of type I collagen messenger RNA and protein, as well as the glycosaminoglycan, chondroitin sulfate. Both macromolecules are normal components of the ductal extracellular matrix, which, under the influence of exogenous TGF-beta 1, became unusually concentrated immediately adjacent to the epithelial cells at the tip of the ductal growth points, the end buds. Stimulation of extracellular matrix was confined to aggregations of connective tissue cells around affected end buds and was not present around the TGF-beta 1 implants themselves, indicating that the matrix effect was epithelium dependent. Ectopic matrix synthesis was specific for TGF-beta 1 insofar as it was absent at ducts treated with other growth inhibitors, or at ducts undergoing normal involution in response to endogenous regulatory processes. These findings are consistent with the matrix-stimulating properties of TGF-beta 1 reported for other systems, but differ in their strict dependence upon epithelium. A possible role for endogenous TGF-beta 1 in modulating a mammary epithelium-stroma interaction is suggested.

  12. TRAM-Derived Decoy Peptides inhibits the inflammatory response in mouse mammary epithelial cells and a mastitis model in mice.

    PubMed

    Hu, Xiaoyu; Tian, Yuan; Wang, Tiancheng; Zhang, Wenlong; Wang, Wei; Gao, Xuejiao; Qu, Shihui; Cao, Yongguo; Zhang, Naisheng

    2015-10-05

    It has been proved that TRAM-Derived Decoy peptides have anti-inflammatory properties. In this study, we synthesized a TRAM-Derived decoy peptide (TM6), belongs to TRAM TIR domain, of which sequence is "N"-RQIKIWFQNRRMKWK, KENFLRDTWCNFQFY-"C" and evaluated the effects of TM6 on lipopolysaccharide-induced mastitis in mice. In vivo, LPS-induced mice mastitis model was established by injection of LPS through the duct of mammary gland. TM6 was injected 1h before or after LPS treatment. In vitro, primary mouse mammary epithelial cells were used to investigate the effects of TM6 on LPS-induced inflammatory responses. The results showed that TM6 inhibited LPS-induced mammary gland histopathologic changes, MPO activity, and TNF-α, IL-1β and IL-6 production in mice. In vitro, TM6 significantly inhibited LPS-induced TNF-α and IL-6 production, as well as NF-κB and MAPKs activation. In conclusion, this study demonstrated that TM6 had protective effects on LPS-mastitis and may be a promising therapeutic reagent for mastitis treatment.

  13. Histopathological findings in a highly invasive mouse mammary carcinoma transfected with human tissue inhibitor of metalloproteinases-1.

    PubMed

    Alonso, D F; Skilton, G; De Lorenzo, M S; Scursoni, A M; Yoshiji, H; Gomez, D E

    1998-01-01

    We have transfected a full-lenght cDNA-encoding human tissue inhibitor of metalloproteinases-1 (TIMP-1) by lipofection in highly invasive F3II mouse mammary sarcomatoid carcinoma cells. In vitro, overexpression of TIMP-1 was associated with abrogation of metalloproteinase activity, extended doubling time, and a more flattened, epithelioid polyhedric morphology. Female Balb/c mice inoculated subcutaneously with TIMP-1 transfectant exhibited a prolonged tumor latency and tumor burden was significantly lower in early stages of tumor growth. Control F3II cells grew by invading the muscular and adipose layers of the subcutis, dermis, and dermal papillae. On the contrary, mammary carcinoma cells transfected with TIMP-1 grew without signs of active invasion of dermis. Tumors also revealed a decreased amount of necrosis and host inflammatory cell infiltrates. However, histological analysis did not demonstrate any change in vascular density. Animals bearing F3II tumors overexpressing TIMP-1 showed a significant reduction in the size of metastatic lung nodules. These data suggested that TIMP-1 overexpression may reduce local invasion and delay the progression of the metastatic disease in the present mammary tumor model.

  14. Establishing estrogen-responsive mouse mammary organoids from single Lgr5+ cells☆,☆☆,★

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Lixing; Adileh, Mohammad; Martin, Maria Laura; Klingler, Stefan; White, Julie; Ma, Xiaojing; Howe, Louise R.; Brown, Anthony M.C.; Kolesnick, Richard

    2016-01-01

    Recent evidence suggests that mammary cells expressing R-spondin receptor and Wnt pathway regulator Lgr5, regarded as a stem cell marker in multiple tissues, might represent mammary stem cells (MaSCs). Whether L gr5 marks a multipotent subpopulation of Lin-CD24low/medCD49fhigh MaSCs remains controversial. To some extent the differing results reflect different assays used to assess properties of stemness, including lineage tracing in vivo, mammosphere culture, and mammary fat pad transplantation assays. To address this issue directly, we isolated Lgr5+ cells from mammary glands of Lgr5-lacZ mice and established organoids based on principles adapted from studies of Wnt-driven Lgr5+ cell populations in other organs. Mammary organoids were grown from single Lgr5+ mammary cells in Matrigel, the substratum of choice for intestinal organoids, and in a growth factor cocktail containing EGF, Wnt3a and R-spondin, designed to optimally activate the endogenous Wnt signaling program of stem cells. Colonies derived from single Lgr5+ cells manifest at least four distinct cell populations: Lgr5+ and Lgr5− basal cells and c-Kit+ and c-Kit− luminal cells that spontaneously organize into a ductal structure with basal cells around the periphery and luminal cells lining an interior cavity, reminiscent of normal mammary duct structure. Lgr5+ cell-derived organoids were sustainable during prolonged passaging. In contrast, although Lgr5− cells expand into primary colonies, colony-forming efficiency immediately dissipated upon passaging. Furthermore, reproductive hormones induce epithelial cell proliferation resulting in marked increases in lumen diameter accompanied by squamous transdifferentiation. We propose this estrogen-responsive, self-organizing duct-like structure derived from single murine Lgr5+ mammary cells represents a “mini-breast” organoid. PMID:27511963

  15. The Influence of Stromal Transforming Growth Factor-Beta Receptor Signaling on Mouse Mammary Neoplasia

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2004-08-01

    and -P3) are members of a family of peptide growth factors that include inhibins, bone morphogenic proteins (BMPs) and growth and differentiation...DNIIR) in the mammary epithelium and in stromal fibroblasts resulted in precocious lobuloalveolar development and increased lateral branching...necessary for proper ductal development during puberty . It has been suggested that TGF-P regulates pubertal mammary development through the epithelium and

  16. Mutational and Functional Analysis of the C-Terminal Region of the C3H Mouse Mammary Tumor Virus Superantigen

    PubMed Central

    Wrona, Thomas J.; Lozano, Mary; Binhazim, Awadh A.; Dudley, Jaquelin P.

    1998-01-01

    The mouse mammary tumor virus (MMTV) encodes within the U3 region of the long terminal repeat (LTR) a protein known as the superantigen (Sag). Sag is needed for the efficient transmission of milk-borne virus from the gut to target tissue in the mammary gland. MMTV-infected B cells in the gut express Sag as a type II transmembrane protein that is recognized by the variable region of particular beta chains (Vβ) of the T-cell receptor (TCR) on the surface of T cells. Recognition of Sag by particular TCRs results in T-cell stimulation, release of cytokines, and amplification of MMTV infection in lymphoid cells that are needed for infection of adolescent mammary tissue. Because the C-terminal 30 to 40 amino acids of Sag are variable and correlate with recognition of particular TCR Vβ chains, we prepared a series of C-terminal Sag mutations that were introduced into a cloned infectious MMTV provirus. Virus-producing XC rat cells were used for injection of susceptible BALB/c mice, and these mice were monitored for functional Sag activity by the deletion of C3H MMTV Sag-reactive (CD4+ Vβ14+) T cells. Injected mice also were analyzed for mutant infection and tumor formation in mammary glands as well as milk-borne transmission of MMTV to offspring. Most mutations abrogated Sag function, although one mutation (HPA242) that changed the negative charge of the extreme C terminus to a positive charge created a weaker Sag that slowed the kinetics of Sag-mediated T-cell deletion. Despite the lack of Sag activity, many of the sag mutant viruses were capable of sporadic infections of the mammary glands of injected mice but not of offspring mice, indicating that functional Sag increases the probability of milk-borne MMTV infection. Furthermore, although most viruses encoding nonfunctional Sags were unable to cause mammary tumors, tumors were induced by such viruses carrying mutations in a negative regulatory element that overlaps the sag gene within the LTR, suggesting that loss of

  17. Endocrine hormones and local signals during the development of the mouse mammary gland.

    PubMed

    Brisken, Cathrin; Ataca, Dalya

    2015-01-01

    Most of mammary gland development occurs postnatally under the control of female reproductive hormones, which in turn interact with other endocrine factors. While hormones impinge on many tissues and trigger very complex biological responses, tissue recombination experiments with hormone receptor-deficient mammary epithelia revealed eminent roles for estrogens, progesterone, and prolactin receptor (PrlR) signaling that are intrinsic to the mammary epithelium. A subset of the luminal mammary epithelial cells expresses the estrogen receptor α (ERα), the progesterone receptor (PR), and the PrlR and act as sensor cells. These cells convert the detected systemic signals into local signals that are developmental stage-dependent and may be direct, juxtacrine, or paracrine. This setup ensures that the original input is amplified and that the biological responses of multiple cell types can be coordinated. Some key mediators of hormone action have been identified such as Wnt, EGFR, IGFR, and RANK signaling. Multiple signaling pathways such as FGF, Hedgehog, and Notch signaling participate in driving different aspects of mammary gland development locally but how they link to the hormonal control remains to be elucidated. An increasing number of endocrine factors are appearing to have a role in mammary gland development, the adipose tissue is increasingly recognized to play a role in endocrine regulation, and a complex role of the immune system with multiple different cell types is being revealed. For further resources related to this article, please visit the WIREs website.

  18. High resolution 3D MRI of mouse mammary glands with intra-ductal injection of contrast media.

    PubMed

    Markiewicz, Erica; Fan, Xiaobing; Mustafi, Devkumar; Zamora, Marta; Roman, Brian B; Jansen, Sanaz A; Macleod, Kay; Conzen, Suzanne D; Karczmar, Gregory S

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to use high resolution three-dimensional (3D) magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) to study mouse mammary gland ductal architecture based on intra-ductal injection of contrast agents. Female FVB/N mice age 12-20 weeks (n=12), were used in this study. A 34G, 45° tip Hamilton needle with a 25μL Hamilton syringe was inserted into the tip of the nipple. Approximately 20-25μL of a Gadodiamide/Trypan blue/saline solution was injected slowly over one minute into the nipple and duct. To prevent washout of contrast media from ducts due to perfusion, and maximize the conspicuity of ducts on MRI, mice were sacrificed one minute after injection. High resolution 3D T1-weighted images were acquired on a 9.4T Bruker scanner after sacrifice to eliminate motion artifacts and reduce contrast media leakage from ducts. Trypan blue staining was well distributed throughout the ductal tree. MRI showed the mammary gland ductal structure clearly. In spoiled gradient echo T1-weighted images, the signal-to-noise ratio of regions identified as enhancing mammary ducts following contrast injection was significantly higher than that of muscle (p<0.02) and significantly higher than that of contralateral mammary ducts that were not injected with contrast media (p<0.0001). The methods described here could be adapted for injection of specialized contrast agents to measure metabolism or target receptors in normal ducts and ducts with in situ cancers.

  19. Insertion mutation of the int-1 and int-2 loci by mouse mammary tumor virus in premalignant and malignant neoplasms from the GR mouse strain.

    PubMed Central

    Morris, D W; Barry, P A; Bradshaw, H D; Cardiff, R D

    1990-01-01

    Mouse mammary tumor virus (MMTV)-induced mammary adenocarcinomas can develop from several different premalignant precursors common in GR mice. Insertion mutagenesis of the mammary protooncogenes int-1 and int-2 was studied in this multistep system by analyzing samples from various stages of neoplastic development for novel int-1 and int-2 restriction fragments generated by MMTV provirus integration. int-1 and int-2 insertion mutations were observed in both premalignant lesions and malignant tumors. Some of the tumors with insertion mutations were experimentally derived from insertion mutation-free premalignant precursors. Each class of neoplasm examined had a characteristic frequency of int-1 and int-2 insertion mutations; however, no correspondence was observed between neoplasm morphology and mutation of either gene. These results indicate that insertion mutation of the int-1 and int-2 loci by MMTV provirus can be involved in the earliest identifiable stages of neoplastic development as well as during progression of premalignant lesions to tumors. Insertion mutation of int-1 and int-2 is therefore not stage specific in this system. Images PMID:2157060

  20. Endogenous Mouse Mammary Tumor Viruses (Mtv): New Roles for an Old Virus in Cancer, Infection, and Immunity

    PubMed Central

    Holt, Michael P.; Shevach, Ethan M.; Punkosdy, George A.

    2013-01-01

    Mouse Mammary Tumor Viruses are beta-retroviruses that exist in both exogenous (MMTV) and endogenous (Mtv) forms. Exogenous MMTV is transmitted via the milk of lactating animals and is capable of inducing mammary gland tumors later in life. MMTV has provided a number of critical models for studying both viral infection as well as human breast cancer. In addition to the horizontally transmitted MMTV, most inbred mouse strains contain permanently integrated Mtv proviruses within their genome that are remnants of MMTV infection and vertically transmitted. Historically, Mtv have been appreciated for their role in shaping the T cell repertoire during thymic development via negative selection. In addition, more recent work has demonstrated a larger role for Mtv in modulating host immune responses due to its peripheral expression. The influence of Mtv on host response has been observed during experimental murine models of Polyomavirus- and ESb-induced lymphoma as well as Leishmania major and Plasmodium berghei ANKA infection. Decreased susceptibility to bacterial pathogens and virus-induced tumors has been observed among mice lacking all Mtv. We have also demonstrated a role for Mtv Sag in the expansion of regulatory T cells following chronic viral infection. The aim of this review is to summarize the latest research in the field regarding peripheral expression of Mtv with a particular focus on their role and influence on the immune system, infectious disease outcome, and potential involvement in tumor formation. PMID:24324930

  1. Mammary Gland Pathology Subsequent to Acute Infection with Strong versus Weak Biofilm Forming Staphylococcus aureus Bovine Mastitis Isolates: A Pilot Study Using Non-Invasive Mouse Mastitis Model

    PubMed Central

    Gogoi-Tiwari, Jully; Williams, Vincent; Waryah, Charlene Babra; Costantino, Paul; Al-Salami, Hani; Mathavan, Sangeetha; Wells, Kelsi; Tiwari, Harish Kumar; Hegde, Nagendra; Isloor, Shrikrishna; Al-Sallami, Hesham; Mukkur, Trilochan

    2017-01-01

    Background Biofilm formation by Staphylococcus aureus is an important virulence attribute because of its potential to induce persistent antibiotic resistance, retard phagocytosis and either attenuate or promote inflammation, depending upon the disease syndrome, in vivo. This study was undertaken to evaluate the potential significance of strength of biofilm formation by clinical bovine mastitis-associated S. aureus in mammary tissue damage by using a mouse mastitis model. Methods Two S. aureus strains of the same capsular phenotype with different biofilm forming strengths were used to non-invasively infect mammary glands of lactating mice. Biofilm forming potential of these strains were determined by tissue culture plate method, ica typing and virulence gene profile per detection by PCR. Delivery of the infectious dose of S. aureus was directly through the teat lactiferous duct without invasive scraping of the teat surface. Both bacteriological and histological methods were used for analysis of mammary gland pathology of mice post-infection. Results Histopathological analysis of the infected mammary glands revealed that mice inoculated with the strong biofilm forming S. aureus strain produced marked acute mastitic lesions, showing profuse infiltration predominantly with neutrophils, with evidence of necrosis in the affected mammary glands. In contrast, the damage was significantly less severe in mammary glands of mice infected with the weak biofilm-forming S. aureus strain. Although both IL-1β and TNF-α inflammatory biomarkers were produced in infected mice, level of TNF-α produced was significantly higher (p<0.05) in mice inoculated with strong biofilm forming S. aureus than the weak biofilm forming strain. Conclusion This finding suggests an important role of TNF-α in mammary gland pathology post-infection with strong biofilm-forming S. aureus in the acute mouse mastitis model, and offers an opportunity for the development of novel strategies for reduction of

  2. Processing and amino acid sequence analysis of the mouse mammary tumor virus env gene product.

    PubMed Central

    Arthur, L O; Copeland, T D; Oroszlan, S; Schochetman, G

    1982-01-01

    The envelope proteins of mouse mammary tumor virus (MMTV) are synthesized from a subgenomic 24S mRNA as a 75,000-dalton glycosylated precursor polyprotein which is eventually processed to the mature glycoproteins gp52 and gp36. In vivo synthesis of this env precursor in the presence of the core glycosylation inhibitor tunicamycin yielded a precursor of approximately 61,000 daltons (P61env). However, a 67,000-dalton protein (P67env) was obtained from cell-free translation with the MMTV 24S mRNA as the template. To determine whether the portion of the protein cleaved from P67env to give P61env was removed from the NH2-terminal end of P67env and as such would represent a leader sequence, the NH2-terminal amino acid sequence of the terminal peptide gp52 was determined. Glutamic acid, and not methionine, was found to be the amino-terminal residue of gp52, indicating that the cleaved portion was derived from the NH2-terminal end of P67env. The NH2-terminal amino acid sequences of gp52's from endogenous and exogenous C3H MMTVs were determined though 46 residues and found to be identical. However, amino acid composition and type-specific gp52 radioimmunoassays from MMTVs grown in heterologous cells indicated primary structure differences between gp52's of the two viruses. The nucleic acid sequence of cloned MMTV DNA fragments (J. Majors and H. E. Varmus, personal communication) in conjunction with the NH2-terminal sequence of gp52 allowed localization of the env gene in the MMTV genome. Nucleotides coding for the NH2 terminus of gp52 begin approximately 0.8 kilobase to the 3' side of the single EcoRI cleavage site. Localization of the env gene at that point agrees with the proposed gene order -gag-pol-env- and also allows sufficient coding potential for the glycoprotein precursor without extending into the long terminal repeat. Images PMID:6281457

  3. Quantitative Assessment of Mouse Mammary Gland Morphology Using Automated Digital Image Processing and TEB Detection.

    PubMed

    Blacher, Silvia; Gérard, Céline; Gallez, Anne; Foidart, Jean-Michel; Noël, Agnès; Péqueux, Christel

    2016-04-01

    The assessment of rodent mammary gland morphology is largely used to study the molecular mechanisms driving breast development and to analyze the impact of various endocrine disruptors with putative pathological implications. In this work, we propose a methodology relying on fully automated digital image analysis methods including image processing and quantification of the whole ductal tree and of the terminal end buds as well. It allows to accurately and objectively measure both growth parameters and fine morphological glandular structures. Mammary gland elongation was characterized by 2 parameters: the length and the epithelial area of the ductal tree. Ductal tree fine structures were characterized by: 1) branch end-point density, 2) branching density, and 3) branch length distribution. The proposed methodology was compared with quantification methods classically used in the literature. This procedure can be transposed to several software and thus largely used by scientists studying rodent mammary gland morphology.

  4. Developing a Novel Mouse Model for Breast Cancer by Targeting Oncogenes to Mammary Progenitor Cells

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2005-04-01

    obtained and rederived into our facility this line of mice from another investigator Tom O’Brien (1). We are in the process of testing this line for...Breed K6-rtTA transgenic mice with established tetO-c-Myc mice. Transplant the mammary cells from the resulting bi -transgenic mice into 10 inguinal...concentrated RCAS-K-RasG12D-IRES-Cre virus to inguinal mammary glands of 10 pubertal and 10 estrogen-stimulated K6-TVA /p53flox/flox bi -genic females. Monitor

  5. A redundant nuclear protein binding site contributes to negative regulation of the mouse mammary tumor virus long terminal repeat.

    PubMed

    Bramblett, D; Hsu, C L; Lozano, M; Earnest, K; Fabritius, C; Dudley, J

    1995-12-01

    The tissue specificity of mouse mammary tumor virus (MMTV) expression is controlled by regulatory elements in the MMTV long terminal repeat (LTR). These regulatory elements include the hormone response element, located approximately between -200 and -75, as well as binding sites for NF-1, Oct-1 (OTF-1), and mammary gland enhancer factors. Naturally occurring MMTV deletion variants isolated from T-cell and kidney tumors, transgenic-mouse experiments with MMTV LTR deletions, and transient transfection assays with LTR constructs indicate that there are additional transcription regulatory elements, including a negative regulatory element (NRE), located upstream of the hormone response element. To further define this regulatory region, we have constructed a series of BAL 31 deletion mutants in the MMTV LTR for use in transient transfection assays. These assays indicated that deletion of two regions (referred to as promoter-distal and -proximal NREs) between -637 and -201 elevated basal MMTV promoter activity in the absence of glucocorticoids. The region between -637 and -264 was surveyed for the presence of nuclear protein binding sites by gel retardation assays. Only one type of protein complex (referred to as NRE-binding protein or NBP) bound exclusively to sites that mapped to the promoter-distal and -proximal NREs identified by BAL 31 mutations. The promoter-proximal binding site was mapped further by linker substitution mutations and transfection assays. Mutations that mapped to a region containing an inverted repeat beginning at -287 relative to the start of transcription elevated basal expression of a reporter gene driven by the MMTV LTR. A 59-bp DNA fragment from the distal NRE also bound the NBP complex. Gel retardation assays showed that mutations within both inverted repeats of the proximal NRE eliminated NBP binding and mutations within single repeats altered NBP binding. Intriguingly, the NBP complex was detected in extracts from T cells and lung cells but

  6. A redundant nuclear protein binding site contributes to negative regulation of the mouse mammary tumor virus long terminal repeat.

    PubMed Central

    Bramblett, D; Hsu, C L; Lozano, M; Earnest, K; Fabritius, C; Dudley, J

    1995-01-01

    The tissue specificity of mouse mammary tumor virus (MMTV) expression is controlled by regulatory elements in the MMTV long terminal repeat (LTR). These regulatory elements include the hormone response element, located approximately between -200 and -75, as well as binding sites for NF-1, Oct-1 (OTF-1), and mammary gland enhancer factors. Naturally occurring MMTV deletion variants isolated from T-cell and kidney tumors, transgenic-mouse experiments with MMTV LTR deletions, and transient transfection assays with LTR constructs indicate that there are additional transcription regulatory elements, including a negative regulatory element (NRE), located upstream of the hormone response element. To further define this regulatory region, we have constructed a series of BAL 31 deletion mutants in the MMTV LTR for use in transient transfection assays. These assays indicated that deletion of two regions (referred to as promoter-distal and -proximal NREs) between -637 and -201 elevated basal MMTV promoter activity in the absence of glucocorticoids. The region between -637 and -264 was surveyed for the presence of nuclear protein binding sites by gel retardation assays. Only one type of protein complex (referred to as NRE-binding protein or NBP) bound exclusively to sites that mapped to the promoter-distal and -proximal NREs identified by BAL 31 mutations. The promoter-proximal binding site was mapped further by linker substitution mutations and transfection assays. Mutations that mapped to a region containing an inverted repeat beginning at -287 relative to the start of transcription elevated basal expression of a reporter gene driven by the MMTV LTR. A 59-bp DNA fragment from the distal NRE also bound the NBP complex. Gel retardation assays showed that mutations within both inverted repeats of the proximal NRE eliminated NBP binding and mutations within single repeats altered NBP binding. Intriguingly, the NBP complex was detected in extracts from T cells and lung cells but

  7. Novel Transgenic Mouse Model for Testing the Effect of Circulating IGF-I on Mammary Stem/Progenitor Cell Number and Tumorigenesis

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2007-08-01

    AD_________________ Award Number: W81XWH-06-1-0628 TITLE: Novel Transgenic Mouse Model for Testing ...TITLE AND SUBTITLE 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER Novel Transgenic Mouse Model for Testing the Effect of Circulating IGF-I on Mammary Stem/Progenitor Cell...tumorigenesis. We found no difference in time to tumor formation in ErbB2 vs. TTR-IGF-I/ErbB2 transgenic mice . Our conclusion is either that ErbB2

  8. Stably integrated mouse mammary tumor virus long terminal repeat DNA requires the octamer motifs for basal promoter activity.

    PubMed Central

    Buetti, E

    1994-01-01

    In the mouse mammary tumor virus promoter, a tandem of octamer motifs, recognized by ubiquitous and tissue-restricted Oct transcription factors, is located upstream of the TATA box and next to a binding site for the transcription factor nuclear factor I (NF-I). Their function was investigated with mutant long terminal repeats under different transfection conditions in mouse Ltk- cells and quantitative S1 nuclease mapping of the transcripts. In stable transfectants, which are most representative of the state of proviral DNA with respect to both number of integrated DNA templates and chromatin organization, a long terminal repeat mutant of both octamer sites showed an average 50-fold reduction of the basal transcription level, while the dexamethasone-stimulated level was unaffected. DNase I in vitro footprinting assays with L-cell nuclear protein extracts showed that the mutant DNA was unable to bind octamer factors but had a normal footprint in the NF-I site. I conclude that mouse mammary tumor virus employs the tandem octamer motifs of the viral promoter, recognized by the ubiquitous transcription factor Oct-1, for its basal transcriptional activity and the NF-I binding site, as previously shown, for glucocorticoid-stimulated transcription. A deletion mutant with only one octamer site showed a marked base-level reduction at high copy number but little reduction at low copies of integrated plasmids. The observed transcription levels may depend both on the relative ratio of transcription factors to DNA templates and on the relative affinity of binding sites, as determined by oligonucleotide competition footprinting. Images PMID:8289800

  9. Induced p53 loss in mouse luminal cells causes clonal expansion and development of mammary tumours

    PubMed Central

    Tao, Luwei; Xiang, Dongxi; Xie, Ying; Bronson, Roderick T.; Li, Zhe

    2017-01-01

    Most breast cancers may have a luminal origin. TP53 is one of the most frequently mutated genes in breast cancers. However, how p53 deficiency contributes to breast tumorigenesis from luminal cells remains elusive. Here we report that induced p53 loss in Krt8+ mammary luminal cells leads to their clonal expansion without directly affecting their luminal identity. All induced mice develop mammary tumours with 9qA1 (Yap1) and/or 6qA2 (Met) amplification(s). These tumours exhibit a mammary stem cell (MaSC)-like expression signature and most closely resemble claudin-low breast cancer. Thus, although p53 does not directly control the luminal fate, its loss facilitates acquisition of MaSC-like properties by luminal cells and predisposes them to development of mammary tumours with loss of luminal identity. Our data also suggest that claudin-low breast cancer can develop from luminal cells, possibly via a basal-like intermediate state, although further study using a different luminal promoter is needed to fully support this conclusion. PMID:28194015

  10. Epigenetic modifications unlock the milk protein gene loci during mouse mammary gland development and differentiation

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Unlike with other tissues, development and differentiation of the mammary gland occur mostly after birth. The roles of systemic hormones and local growth factors important for this development and functional differentiation are well-studied. In other tissues, it has been shown that chromatin organiz...

  11. Mouse mammary tumor virus uses mouse but not human transferrin receptor 1 to reach a low pH compartment and infect cells

    SciTech Connect

    Wang Enxiu; Obeng-Adjei, Nyamekye; Ying Qihua; Davey, Robert A.; Ross, Susan R.

    2008-11-25

    Mouse mammary tumor virus (MMTV) is a pH-dependent virus that uses mouse transferrin receptor 1 (TfR1) for entry into cells. Previous studies demonstrated that MMTV could induce pH 5-dependent fusion-from-with of mouse cells. Here we show that the MMTV envelope-mediated cell-cell fusion requires both the entry receptor and low pH (pH 5). Although expression of the MMTV envelope and TfR1 was sufficient to mediate low pH-dependent syncytia formation, virus infection required trafficking to a low pH compartment; infection was independent of cathepsin-mediated proteolysis. Human TfR1 did not support virus infection, although envelope-mediated syncytia formation occurred with human cells after pH 5 treatment and this fusion depended on TfR1 expression. However, although the MMTV envelope bound human TfR1, virus was only internalized and trafficked to a low pH compartment in cells expressing mouse TfR1. Thus, while human TfR1 supported cell-cell fusion, because it was not internalized when bound to MMTV, it did not function as an entry receptor. Our data suggest that MMTV uses TfR1 for all steps of entry: cell attachment, induction of the conformational changes in Env required for membrane fusion and internalization to an appropriate acidic compartment.

  12. Impaired mouse mammary gland growth and development is mediated by melatonin and its MT1G protein-coupled receptor via repression of ERα, Akt1, and Stat5.

    PubMed

    Xiang, Shulin; Mao, Lulu; Yuan, Lin; Duplessis, Tamika; Jones, Frank; Hoyle, Gary W; Frasch, Tripp; Dauchy, Robert; Blask, David E; Chakravarty, Geetika; Hill, Steven M

    2012-10-01

    To determine whether melatonin, via its MT(1)  G protein-coupled receptor, impacts mouse mammary gland development, we generated a mouse mammary tumor virus (MMTV)-MT1-Flag-mammary gland over-expressing (MT1-mOE) transgenic mouse. Increased expression of the MT(1) -Flag transgene was observed in the mammary glands of pubescent MT1-mOE transgenic female mice, with further significant increases during pregnancy and lactation. Mammary gland whole mounts from MT1-mOE mice showed significant reductions in ductal growth, ductal branching, and terminal end bud formation. Elevated MT(1) receptor expression in pregnant and lactating female MT1-mOE mice was associated with reduced lobulo-alveolar development, inhibition of mammary epithelial cell proliferation, and significant reductions in body weights of suckling pups. Elevated MT(1) expression in pregnant and lactating MT1-mOE mice correlated with reduced mammary gland expression of Akt1, phospho-Stat5, Wnt4, estrogen receptor alpha, progesterone receptors A and B, and milk proteins β-casein and whey acidic protein. Estrogen- and progesterone-stimulated mammary gland development was repressed by elevated MT(1) receptor expression and exogenous melatonin administration. These studies demonstrate that the MT(1) melatonin receptor and its ligand melatonin play an important regulatory role in mammary gland development and lactation in mice through both growth suppression and alteration of developmental paradigms.

  13. The immunostimulatory effect of biogenic selenium nanoparticles on the 4T1 breast cancer model: an in vivo study.

    PubMed

    Yazdi, Mohammad Hossein; Mahdavi, Mehdi; Varastehmoradi, Bardia; Faramarzi, Mohammad Ali; Shahverdi, Ahmad Reza

    2012-10-01

    Selenium salts as well as elemental selenium nanoparticles are attracting the attention of researchers due to their excellent biological properties. The aim of the present work was to study immunomodulation by applying elemental Se NPs to stimulate the immune response of mice bearing 4 T1 breast cancer tumors. Six- to 8-week-old female inbred BALB/c mice were divided into two groups of test and control, each containing 15 mice. Every day, for 2 weeks prior to tumor induction, selenium nanoparticles were orally administered to the mice at a dose of 100 μg/day. Then, 1 × 10(6) cells from a 4 T1 cell line were injected subcutaneously to each mouse. Oral nanoparticle administration was continued daily for 3 weeks after tumor induction. Different immunological parameters were then evaluated including cytokine level, delayed type hypersensitivity (DTH) response as well as tumor growth and the survival rates in all treated or nontreated animals. The production of Th1 cytokines, such as IFN-γ and IL-12, in spleen cell culture was increased in the test mice-administered selenium nanoparticles. The DTH response of test mice also showed a significant increase when compared to the control mice. The survival rate was notably higher for the selenium nanoparticle-treated mice compared to the control mice. Our results suggest that selenium nanoparticle administration can result in considerable induction of the Th1 platform of immune response through the elevation of IFN-γ and IL-12 and may be a cause for better prognosis in mice with tumors.

  14. No association between Epstein-Barr Virus and Mouse Mammary Tumor Virus with Breast Cancer in Mexican Women

    PubMed Central

    Morales-Sánchez, Abigail; Molina-Muñoz, Tzindilú; Martínez-López, Juan L. E.; Hernández-Sancén, Paulina; Mantilla, Alejandra; Leal, Yelda A.; Torres, Javier; Fuentes-Pananá, Ezequiel M.

    2013-01-01

    Breast cancer is the most frequent malignancy affecting women worldwide. It has been suggested that infection by Epstein Barr Virus (EBV), Mouse Mammary Tumor Virus or a similar virus, MMTV-like virus (MMTV-LV), play a role in the etiology of the disease. However, studies looking at the presence of these viruses in breast cancer have produced conflicting results, and this possible association remains controversial. Here, we used polymerase chain reaction assay to screen specific sequences of EBV and MMTV-LV in 86 tumor and 65 adjacent tissues from Mexican women with breast cancer. Neither tumor samples nor adjacent tissue were positive for either virus in a first round PCR and only 4 tumor samples were EBV positive by a more sensitive nested PCR. Considering the study's statistical power, these results do not support the involvement of EBV and MMTV-LV in the etiology of breast cancer. PMID:24131889

  15. No association between Epstein-Barr Virus and Mouse Mammary Tumor Virus with Breast Cancer in Mexican Women

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Morales-Sánchez, Abigail; Molina-Muñoz, Tzindilú; Martínez-López, Juan L. E.; Hernández-Sancén, Paulina; Mantilla, Alejandra; Leal, Yelda A.; Torres, Javier; Fuentes-Pananá, Ezequiel M.

    2013-10-01

    Breast cancer is the most frequent malignancy affecting women worldwide. It has been suggested that infection by Epstein Barr Virus (EBV), Mouse Mammary Tumor Virus or a similar virus, MMTV-like virus (MMTV-LV), play a role in the etiology of the disease. However, studies looking at the presence of these viruses in breast cancer have produced conflicting results, and this possible association remains controversial. Here, we used polymerase chain reaction assay to screen specific sequences of EBV and MMTV-LV in 86 tumor and 65 adjacent tissues from Mexican women with breast cancer. Neither tumor samples nor adjacent tissue were positive for either virus in a first round PCR and only 4 tumor samples were EBV positive by a more sensitive nested PCR. Considering the study's statistical power, these results do not support the involvement of EBV and MMTV-LV in the etiology of breast cancer.

  16. Stabilin-1 is expressed in human breast cancer and supports tumor growth in mammary adenocarcinoma mouse model

    PubMed Central

    Riabov, Vladimir; Yin, Shuiping; Song, Bin; Avdic, Aida; Schledzewski, Kai; Ovsiy, Ilja; Gratchev, Alexei; Verdiell, Maria Llopis; Sticht, Carsten; Schmuttermaier, Christina; Schönhaber, Hiltrud; Weiss, Christel; Fields, Alan P.; Simon-Keller, Katja; Pfister, Frederick; Berlit, Sebastian; Marx, Alexander; Arnold, Bernd; Goerdt, Sergij; Kzhyshkowska, Julia

    2016-01-01

    Stabilin-1 is a multifunctional scavenger receptor expressed on alternatively-activated macrophages. Stabilin-1 mediates phagocytosis of “unwanted-self” components, intracellular sorting, and endocytic clearance of extracellular ligands including SPARC that modulates breast cancer growth. The expression of stabilin-1 was found on tumor-associated macrophages (TAM) in mouse and human cancers including melanoma, lymphoma, glioblastoma, and pancreatic insulinoma. Despite its tumor-promoting role in mouse models of melanoma and lymphoma the expression and functional role of stabilin-1 in breast cancer was unknown. Here, we demonstrate that stabilin-1 is expressed on TAM in human breast cancer, and its expression is most pronounced on stage I disease. Using stabilin-1 knockout (ko) mice we show that stabilin-1 facilitates growth of mouse TS/A mammary adenocarcinoma. Endocytosis assay on stabilin-1 ko TAM demonstrated impaired clearance of stabilin-1 ligands including SPARC that was capable of inducing cell death in TS/A cells. Affymetrix microarray analysis on purified TAM and reporter assays in stabilin-1 expressing cell lines demonstrated no influence of stabilin-1 expression on intracellular signalling. Our results suggest stabilin-1 mediated silent clearance of extracellular tumor growth-inhibiting factors (e.g. SPARC) as a mechanism of stabilin-1 induced tumor growth. Silent clearance function of stabilin-1 makes it an attractive candidate for delivery of immunomodulatory anti-cancer therapeutic drugs to TAM. PMID:27105498

  17. Oncostatin M Promotes Mammary Tumor Metastasis to Bone and Osteolytic Bone Degradation

    PubMed Central

    Bolin, Celeste; Tawara, Ken; Sutherland, Caleb; Redshaw, Jeff; Aranda, Patrick; Moselhy, Jim; Anderson, Robin

    2012-01-01

    Oncostatin M (OSM) is an interleukin-6 (IL-6) family cytokine that has been implicated in a number of biological processes including inflammation, hematopoiesis, immune responses, development, and bone homeostasis. Recent evidence suggests that OSM may promote breast tumor invasion and metastasis. We investigated the role of OSM in the formation of bone metastases in vivo using the 4T1.2 mouse mammary tumor model in which OSM expression was knocked down using shRNA (4T1.2-OSM). 4T1.2-OSM cells were injected orthotopically into Balb/c mice, resulting in a greater than 97% decrease in spontaneous metastasis to bone compared to control cells. Intratibial injection of these same 4T1.2-OSM cells also dramatically reduced the osteolytic destruction of trabecular bone volume compared to control cells. Furthermore, in a tumor resection model, mice bearing 4T1.2-OSM tumors showed an increase in survival by a median of 10 days. To investigate the specific cellular mechanisms important for OSM-induced osteolytic metastasis to bone, an in vitro model was developed using the RAW 264.7 preosteoclast cell line co-cultured with 4T1.2 mouse mammary tumor cells. Treatment of co-cultures with OSM resulted in a 3-fold induction of osteoclastogenesis using the TRAP assay. We identified several tumor cell–induced factors including vascular endothelial growth factor, IL-6, and a previously uncharacterized OSM-regulated bone metastasis factor, amphiregulin (AREG), which increased osteoclast differentiation by 4.5-fold. In addition, pretreatment of co-cultures with an anti-AREG neutralizing antibody completely reversed OSM-induced osteoclastogenesis. Our results suggest that one mechanism for OSM-induced osteoclast differentiation is via an AREG autocrine loop, resulting in decreased osteoprotegerin secretion by the 4T1.2 cells. These data provide evidence that OSM might be an important therapeutic target for the prevention of breast cancer metastasis to bone. PMID:23050044

  18. In vivo, cAMP stimulates growth and morphogenesis of mouse mammary ducts.

    PubMed

    Silberstein, G B; Strickland, P; Trumpbour, V; Coleman, S; Daniel, C W

    1984-08-01

    In culture, cAMP is known to be mitogenic for mammary cells and several other epithelia, but evidence for a similar role in vivo has been only correlative. We have used plastic implants to cause slow release of cholera toxin and other cAMP-active agents to local areas of mammary glands in ovariectomized mice. Elevated levels of intracellular cAMP around the implants promoted vigorous growth and normal ductal morphogenesis, while distant sites were unaffected. Local effects of cAMP included restoration of normal ductal caliber, formation of new end buds, and reinitiation of DNA synthesis in both epithelium and surrounding stroma. Thus, cAMP is both a mitogenic and a morphogenetic factor in this tissue.

  19. Characterization of mammary cancer stem cells in the MMTV-PyMT mouse model.

    PubMed

    Ma, Jun; Lanza, Denise Grant; Guest, Ian; Uk-Lim, Chang; Glinskii, Anna; Glinsky, Gennadi; Sell, Stewart

    2012-12-01

    Breast cancer stem cells, the root of tumor growth, present challenges to investigate: Primary human breast cancer cells are difficult to establish in culture and inconsistently yield tumors after transplantation into immune-deficient recipient mice. Furthermore, there is limited characterization of mammary cancer stem cells in mice, the ideal model for the study of breast cancer. We herein describe a pre-clinical breast cancer stem cell model, based on the properties of cancer stem cells, derived from transgenic MMTV-PyMT mice. Using a defined set of cell surface markers to identify cancer stem cells by flow cytometry, at least four cell populations were recovered from primary mammary cancers. Only two of the four populations, one epithelial and one mesenchymal, were able to survive and proliferate in vitro. The epithelial population exhibited tumor initiation potential with as few as 10 cells injected into syngeneic immune-competent recipients. Tumors initiated from injected cell lines recapitulated the morphological and physiological components of the primary tumor. To highlight the stemness potential of the putative cancer stem cells, B lymphoma Mo-MLV insertion region 1 homolog (Bmi-1) expression was knocked down via shRNA targeting Bmi-1. Without Bmi-1 expression, putative cancer stem cells could no longer initiate tumors, but tumor initiation was rescued with the introduction of a Bmi-1 overexpression vector in the Bmi-1 knockdown cells. In conclusion, our data show that primary mammary cancers from MMTV-PyMT mice contain putative cancer stem cells that survive in culture and can be used to create a model for study of mammary cancer stem cells.

  20. Thyroid hormone regulation of epidermal growth factor receptor levels in mouse mammary glands

    SciTech Connect

    Vonderhaar, B.K.; Tang, E.; Lyster, R.R.; Nascimento, M.C.

    1986-08-01

    The specific binding of iodinated epidermal growth factor ((/sup 125/I)iodo-EGF) to membranes prepared from the mammary glands and spontaneous breast tumors of euthyroid and hypothyroid mice was measured in order to determine whether thyroid hormones regulate the EGF receptor levels in vivo. Membranes from hypothyroid mammary glands of mice at various developmental ages bound 50-65% less EGF than those of age-matched euthyroid controls. Treatment of hypothyroid mice with L-T4 before killing restored binding to the euthyroid control level. Spontaneous breast tumors arising in hypothyroid mice also bound 30-40% less EGF than tumors from euthyroid animals even after in vitro desaturation of the membranes of endogenous growth factors with 3 M MgCl2 treatment. The decrease in binding in hypothyroid membranes was due to a decrease in the number of binding sites, not to a change in affinity of the growth factor for its receptor, as determined by Scatchard analysis of the binding data. Both euthyroid and hypothyroid membranes bound EGF primarily to a single class of high affinity sites (dissociation constant (Kd) = 0.7-1.8 nM). Euthyroid membranes bound 28.4 +/- (SE) 0.6 fmol/mg protein, whereas hypothyroid membranes bound 15.5 +/- 1.0 fmol/mg protein. These data indicate that EGF receptor levels in normal mammary glands and spontaneous breast tumors in mice are subject to regulation by thyroid status.

  1. Peptidylarginine Deiminase 3 (PAD3) Is Upregulated by Prolactin Stimulation of CID-9 Cells and Expressed in the Lactating Mouse Mammary Gland

    PubMed Central

    Li, Guangyuan; Hayward, Isaac N.; Jenkins, Brittany R.; Rothfuss, Heather M.; Young, Coleman H.; Nevalainen, Marja T.; Muth, Aaron; Thompson, Paul R.; Navratil, Amy M.; Cherrington, Brian D.

    2016-01-01

    Peptidylarginine deiminases (PADs) post-translationally convert arginine into neutral citrulline residues. Our past work shows that PADs are expressed in the canine and murine mammary glands; however, the mechanisms regulating PAD expression and the function of citrullination in the normal mammary gland are unclear. Therefore, the first objective herein was to investigate regulation of PAD expression in mammary epithelial cells. We first examined PAD levels in CID-9 cells, which were derived from the mammary gland of mid-pregnant mice. PAD3 expression is significantly higher than all other PAD isoforms and mediates protein citrullination in CID-9 cells. We next hypothesized that prolactin regulates PAD3 expression. To test this, CID-9 cells were stimulated with 5 μg/mL of prolactin for 48 hours which significantly increases PAD3 mRNA and protein expression. Use of a JAK2 inhibitor and a dominant negative (DN)-STAT5 adenovirus indicate that prolactin stimulation of PAD3 expression is mediated by the JAK2/STAT5 signaling pathway in CID-9 cells. In addition, the human PAD3 gene promoter is prolactin responsive in CID-9 cells. Our second objective was to investigate the expression and activity of PAD3 in the lactating mouse mammary gland. PAD3 expression in the mammary gland is highest on lactation day 9 and coincident with citrullinated proteins such as histones. Use of the PAD3 specific inhibitor, Cl4-amidine, indicates that PAD3, in part, can citrullinate proteins in L9 mammary glands. Collectively, our results show that upregulation of PAD3 is mediated by prolactin induction of the JAK2/STAT5 signaling pathway, and that PAD3 appears to citrullinate proteins during lactation. PMID:26799659

  2. Ductal morphogenesis in the mouse mammary gland: evidence supporting a role for epidermal growth factor.

    PubMed

    Coleman, S; Silberstein, G B; Daniel, C W

    1988-06-01

    Epidermal growth factor (EGF) is a potent mitogen for a variety of cells in vitro, but studies on its effects in vivo and its possible role as a natural growth regulator are few. Using slow-release plastic implants, capable of delivering EGF to small regions of the gland over a period of several days, we have shown that EGF reinitiated ductal growth and morphogenesis in growth-static glands of ovariectomized mice. The effects of implanted EGF were confined to the zone around the implant and were time and dose dependent. Unimplanted glands in the same animal were unaffected. Local effects included (1) the formation of new ductal growth points (end buds), (2) the restoration of normal end bud histomorphology and the reappearance of a stem (cap) cell layer, (3) the reinitiation of epithelial DNA synthesis, and (4) an increase in ductal diameter. No lobulo-alveolar or hyperplastic growth was seen. Competitive binding assays and autoradiography were used to characterize EGF receptor activity in growing and static glands. High and low affinity receptors were demonstrated in each tissue, while 125I-EGF autoradiography revealed differential, specific binding of the ligand to certain epithelial and stromal elements. In the epithelium, label was concentrated in the cap cells of the end buds and in myoepithelial cells of the mammary ducts. Stromal cell label was heaviest adjacent to the epithelium in the end bud flank and subtending ducts, suggesting the induction of stromal EGF receptors by mammary epithelium. Because exogenous EGF is both a mitogenic and morphogenetic factor in this tissue and can serve as a locally acting substitute for known systemic mammogens such as estrogen and prolactin, it must be considered a strong candidate for a naturally occurring mammary tissue mitogen.

  3. Antiproliferative and apoptotic effects of tocopherols and tocotrienols on normal mouse mammary epithelial cells.

    PubMed

    McIntyre, B S; Briski, K P; Tirmenstein, M A; Fariss, M W; Gapor, A; Sylvester, P W

    2000-02-01

    Studies were conducted to determine the comparative effects of tocopherols and tocotrienols on normal mammary epithelial cell growth and viability. Cells isolated from midpregnant BALB/c mice were grown within collagen gels and maintained on serum-free media. Treatment with 0-120 microM alpha- and gamma-tocopherol had no effect, whereas 12.5-100m microM tocotrienol-rich fraction of palm oil (TRF), 100-120 microM delta-tocopherol, 50-60 microM alpha-tocotrienol, and 8-14 microM gamma- or delta-tocotrienol significantly inhibited cell growth in a dose-responsive manner. In acute studies, 24-h exposure to 0-250 microM alpha-, gamma-, and delta-tocopherol had no effect, whereas similar treatment with 100-250 microM TRF, 140-250 microM alpha-, 25-100 microM gamma- or delta-tocotrienol significantly reduced cell viability. Growth-inhibitory doses of TRF, delta-tocopherol, and alpha-, gamma-, and delta-tocotrienol were shown to induce apoptosis in these cells, as indicated by DNA fragmentation. Results also showed that mammary epithelial cells more easily or preferentially took up tocotrienols as compared to tocopherols, suggesting that at least part of the reason tocotrienols display greater biopotency than tocopherols is because of greater cellular accumulation. In summary, these findings suggest that the highly biopotent gamma- and delta-tocotrienol isoforms may play a physiological role in modulating normal mammary gland growth, function, and remodeling.

  4. The Immune System as a New Possible Cell Target for AFP 464 in a Spontaneous Mammary Cancer Mouse Model.

    PubMed

    Callero, Mariana A; Rodriguez, Cristina E; Sólimo, Aldana; Bal de Kier Joffé, Elisa; Loaiza Perez, Andrea I

    2017-02-16

    Aminoflavone (AFP 464, NSC 710464), an antitumor agent which recently entered phase II clinical trials, acts against estrogen-positive breast cancer (ER +). AFP 464, which has a unique mechanism of action by activating aryl hydrocarbon receptor (AhR) signaling pathway, decreased tumor size and growth rate in the estrogen dependent, Tamoxifen-sensitive spontaneous M05 mouse model. Considering that AhR has recently emerged as a physiological regulator of the innate and adaptive immune responses, we investigated whether AFP 464 modulates the immune response in our mouse model. Studies on the effect of AFP 464 on the immune system were carried in BALB/c mice bearing M05 semi-differentiated mammary adenocarcinomas that express estrogen and progesterone receptors. Splenic cells and tumor inflammatory infiltrates were studied by cytometric analyses. The modulation of splenocytes cytotoxic activity by AFP 464 was also evaluated. We further investigated the effects of AFP 464 on peritoneal macrophages by evaluating metalloproteinase, arginase and iNOS activities. We found that AFP 464 increased splenic cytotoxic activity, diminished the number of systemic and local Treg lymphocytes and MDSCs, and induced a M1 phenotype in peritoneal macrophages of M05 tumor bearing mice. Therefore, we conclude that AFP 464 modulates immune response which collaborates with its anti-tumor activity. Our results place the immune system as a novel target for this anti-cancer agent to strengthen the rationale for its inclusion in breast cancer treatment regimens. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved.

  5. Distribution of macrophages, osteoclasts and the B-lymphocyte lineage in osteolytic metastasis of mouse mammary carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Li, Minqi; Sasaki, Tomoyo; Ono, Katsuhiro; de Freitas, Paulo Henrique Luiz; Sobhan, Ubaidus; Kojima, Taku; Shimomura, Junko; Oda, Kimimitsu; Amizuka, Norio

    2007-06-01

    The purpose of this study was to examine the localization of macrophages, B-lymphocytes and osteoclasts in tumoral lesions of mammary carcinoma metastasized to bone of non-immunocompromised mice. Mouse mammary carcinoma cells (BALB/c-MC) were injected through the left cardiac ventricle into 5-week-old female wild-type Balb/c mice. The femora and tibiae of mice with metastasized cancer were extracted, and thereafter processed for histochemical analyses. The foci of metastasized tumor cells occupied the metaphyseal area, and the cell death zones could be identified within the tumor mass. Abundant tartrate-resistant acid phosphatase (TRAP)-positive osteoclasts were found among the alkaline phosphatase (ALP)-reactive osteoblastic cell layer that covered the bone surface neighboring the metastatic lesion. In contrast, F4/80-positive macrophages/monocytes were localized adjacent to, or invading the metastatic tissue. In addition, some F4/80-positive cells were found in the aforementioned cell death zones. Unlike F4/80-positive cells, CD45R-positive B-lymphocytes did not accumulate at the surfaces of the tumor lesions, nor infiltrate into them, but were found scattered over bone marrow. Interestingly, some CD45R-positive cells were observed close to TRAP-positive osteoclasts in the stromal tissue surrounding the tumor lesion. Our findings suggest that, in the bone metastatic lesions of non-immunocompromised mice, F4/80-positive macrophages/monocytes accumulated on and/or infiltrated into the tumor nests, while CD45R-positive B-lymphocytes were associated with osteoclasts, rather than attacking metastatic tumor cells.

  6. Cancer Stem Cells Contribute to Cisplatin Resistance in Brca1/p53–Mediated Mouse Mammary Tumors

    PubMed Central

    Shafee, Norazizah; Smith, Christopher R.; Wei, Shuanzeng; Kim, Yoon; Mills, Gordon B.; Hortobagyi, Gabriel N.; Stanbridge, Eric J.; Lee, Eva Y-H. P.

    2010-01-01

    The majority of BRCA1-associated breast cancers are basal cell–like, which is associated with a poor outcome. Using a spontaneous mouse mammary tumor model, we show that platinum compounds, which generate DNA breaks during the repair process, are more effective than doxorubicin in Brca1/p53–mutated tumors. At 0.5 mg/kg of daily cisplatin treatment, 80% primary tumors (n = 8) show complete pathologic response. At greater dosages, 100% show complete response (n = 19). However, after 2 to 3 months of complete remission following platinum treatment, tumors relapse and become refractory to successive rounds of treatment. Approximately 3.8% to 8.0% (mean, 5.9%) of tumor cells express the normal mammary stem cell markers, CD29hi24med, and these cells are tumorigenic, whereas CD29med24–/lo and CD29med24hi cells have diminished tumorigenicity or are nontumorigenic, respectively. In partially platinum-responsive primary transplants, 6.6% to 11.0% (mean, 8.8%) tumor cells are CD29hi24med; these populations significantly increase to 16.5% to 29.2% (mean, 22.8%; P < 0.05) in platinum-refractory secondary tumor transplants. Further, refractory tumor cells have greater colony-forming ability than the primary transplant–derived cells in the presence of cisplatin. Expression of a normal stem cell marker, Nanog, is decreased in the CD29hi24med populations in the secondary transplants. Top2A expression is also down-regulated in secondary drug-resistant tumor populations and, in one case, was accompanied by genomic deletion of Top2A. These studies identify distinct cancer cell populations for therapeutic targeting in breast cancer and implicate clonal evolution and expansion of cancer stem-like cells as a potential cause of chemoresistance. PMID:18451150

  7. Selenium Deficiency Facilitates Inflammation Following S. aureus Infection by Regulating TLR2-Related Pathways in the Mouse Mammary Gland.

    PubMed

    Gao, Xuejiao; Zhang, Zecai; Li, Ying; Shen, Peng; Hu, Xiaoyu; Cao, Yongguo; Zhang, Naisheng

    2016-08-01

    Selenium (Se) is an essential micronutrient affecting various aspects of health. Se deficiency has been associated with inflammation and immune responses. Mastitis poses a serious problem for humans and animals in the postpartum period. Staphylococcus aureus (S. aureus) is the most common infectious bacterial pathogen associated with mastitis. The present study sought to determine the effects and underlying mechanism of dietary Se on S. aureus-induced inflammation using a model of mouse mastitis. ELISA and Western blotting were performed to detect protein levels. Quantitative PCR (qPCR) was performed to detect messenger RNA (mRNA) levels. The histopathological changes indicated that Se deficiency resulted in increased inflammatory lesions in S. aureus mastitis, whereas Se deficiency did not induce inflammatory lesions in the mammary gland. Myeloperoxidase (MPO) activity was increased in Se-deficient mice with S. aureus mastitis. Analysis of cytokine mRNA and protein showed that Se deficiency leads to increased TNF-α, IL-1β, and IL-6 production in S. aureus mastitis. In addition, Se deficiency enhanced the mRNA and protein expressions of toll-like receptor 2 (TLR2), which were originally upregulated by S. aureus in the mammary gland tissues and human embryonic kidney 293 (HEK293)-mTLR2 cells. When Se-deficient mice were infected with S. aureus, the phosphorylation of IκB, nuclear factor-κB (NF-κB), extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK), c-Jun N-terminal kinase (JNK), and p38 was greatly increased. The results indicate that Se deficiency could intensify the inflammatory reaction in S. aureus mastitis. This work contributes to the exploration of new methods of preventing or treating of S. aureus mastitis and other infectious diseases.

  8. Misregulation of Stromelysin-1 in Mouse Mammary Tumor Cells Accompanies Acquisition of Stromelysin-1 dependent Invasive Properties

    SciTech Connect

    Lochter, A.; Srebrow, A.; Sympson, C.J.; Terracio, N.; Werb, Z.; Bissell, M.J.

    1997-02-21

    Stromelysin-1 is a member of the metalloproteinase family of extracellular matrix-degrading enzymes that regulates tissue remodeling. We previously established a transgenic mouse model in which rat stromelysin-1 targeted to the mammary gland augmented expression of endogenous stromelysin-1, disrupted functional differentiation, and induced mammary tumors. A cell line generated from an adenocarcinoma in one of these animals and a previously described mammary tumor cell line generated in culture readily invaded both a reconstituted basement membrane and type I collagen gels, whereas a nonmalignant, functionally normal epithelial cell line did not. Invasion of Matrigel by tumor cells was largely abolished by metalloproteinase inhibitors, but not by inhibitors of other proteinase families. Inhibition experiments with antisense oligodeoxynucleotides revealed that Matrigel invasion of both cell lines was critically dependent on stromelysin-1 expression. Invasion of collagen, on the other hand, was reduced by only 40-50%. Stromelysin-1 was expressed in both malignant and nonmalignant cells grown on plastic substrata. Its expression was completely inhibited in nonmalignant cells, but up-regulated in tumor cells, in response to Matrigel. Thus misregulation of stromelysin-1 expression appears to be an important aspect of mammary tumor cell progression to an invasive phenotype. The matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs) are a family of extracellular matrix (ECM)-degrading enzymes that have been implicated in a variety of normal developmental and pathological processes, including tumorigenesis. The MMP family comprises at least 15 members with different, albeit overlapping, substrate specificities. During activation of latent MMPs, their propeptides are cleaved and they are converted to a lower molecular weight form by other enzymes, including serine proteinases, and by autocatalytic cleavage. Among the MMPs, stromelysin-1 (SL1) possesses the broadest substrate specificity. Despite

  9. Silencing Vimentin Expression Decreases Pulmonary Metastases in a Pre-Diabetic Mouse Model of Mammary Tumor Progression

    PubMed Central

    Zelenko, Zara; Gallagher, Emily J.; Tobin-Hess, Aviva; Belardi, Valentina; Rostoker, Ran; Blank, Jeffery; Dina, Yemisi; LeRoith, Derek

    2016-01-01

    Increased breast cancer risk and mortality has been associated with obesity and Type 2 diabetes (T2D). Hyperinsulinemia, a key factor in obesity, pre-diabetes and T2D, has been associated with decreased breast cancer survival. In the current study, a mouse model of pre-diabetes (MKR mouse) was used to investigate the mechanisms through which endogenous hyperinsulinemia promotes mammary tumor metastases. The MKR mice developed larger primary tumors and greater number of pulmonary metastases compared to wild type (WT) mice after injection with c-Myc/Vegf overexpressing MVT-1 cells. Analysis of the primary tumors showed significant increase in Vimentin protein expression in the MKR mice compared to WT. We hypothesized that Vimentin was an important mediator in the effect of hyperinsulinemia on breast cancer metastasis. Lentiviral shRNA knockdown of Vimentin led to a significant decrease in invasion of the MVT-1 cells and abrogated the increase in cell invasion in response to insulin. In the pre-diabetic MKR mouse, Vimentin knockdown led to a decrease in pulmonary metastases. In vitro, we found that insulin increased pAKT, prevented Caspase 3 activation, and increased Vimentin. Inhibiting the PI3K/AKT pathway, using NVP-BKM120, increased active Caspase 3 and decreased Vimentin levels. This study is the first to show that Vimentin plays an important role in tumor metastasis in vivo in the setting of pre-diabetes and endogenous hyperinsulinemia. Vimentin targeting may be an important therapeutic strategy to reduce metastases in patients with obesity, pre-diabetes or T2D. PMID:27568979

  10. Nucleotide sequencing of an apparent proviral copy of env mRNA defines determinants of expression of the mouse mammary tumor virus env gene.

    PubMed Central

    Majors, J E; Varmus, H E

    1983-01-01

    To extend our understanding of the organization and expression of the mouse mammary tumor virus genome, we determined the nucleotide sequence of large regions of a cloned mouse mammary tumor virus strain C3H provirus that appears to be a DNA copy of env mRNA. In conjunction with analysis of several additional clones of integrated and unintegrated mouse mammary tumor virus DNAs, we came to the following conclusions: (i) the mRNA for env is generated by splicing mechanisms that recognize conventional eucaryotic signals at donor and acceptor sites with a leader of at least 289 bases in length; (ii) the first of three possible initiation codons for translation of env follows the splice junction by a single nucleotide and produces a signal peptide of 98 amino acids; (iii) the amino terminal sequence of the major virion glycoprotein gp52env is confirmed by nucleotide sequencing and is encoded by a sequence beginning 584 nucleotides from the 5' end of env mRNA; (iv) the final 17 amino acids at the carboxyl terminus of the primary product of env are encoded within the long terminal repeat by the 51 bases at the 5' end of the U3 domain; and (v) bases 2 through 4 at the 5' end of the long terminal repeat constitute an initiation codon that commences an open reading frame capable of directing the synthesis of a 36-kilodalton protein. PMID:6312081

  11. Immunohistochemical evidence of rapid extracellular matrix remodeling after iron-particle irradiation of mouse mammary gland

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ehrhart, E. J.; Gillette, E. L.; Barcellos-Hoff, M. H.; Chaterjee, A. (Principal Investigator)

    1996-01-01

    High-LET radiation has unique physical and biological properties compared to sparsely ionizing radiation. Recent studies demonstrate that sparsely ionizing radiation rapidly alters the pattern of extracellular matrix expression in several tissues, but little is known about the effect of heavy-ion radiation. This study investigates densely ionizing radiation-induced changes in extracellular matrix localization in the mammary glands of adult female BALB/c mice after whole-body irradiation with 0.8 Gy 600 MeV iron particles. The basement membrane and interstitial extracellular matrix proteins of the mammary gland stroma were mapped with respect to time postirradiation using immunofluorescence. Collagen III was induced in the adipose stroma within 1 day, continued to increase through day 9 and was resolved by day 14. Immunoreactive tenascin was induced in the epithelium by day 1, was evident at the epithelial-stromal interface by day 5-9 and persisted as a condensed layer beneath the basement membrane through day 14. These findings parallel similar changes induced by gamma irradiation but demonstrate different onset and chronicity. In contrast, the integrity of epithelial basement membrane, which was unaffected by sparsely ionizing radiation, was disrupted by iron-particle irradiation. Laminin immunoreactivity was mildly irregular at 1 h postirradiation and showed discontinuities and thickening from days 1 to 9. Continuity was restored by day 14. Thus high-LET radiation, like sparsely ionizing radiation, induces rapid-remodeling of the stromal extracellular matrix but also appears to alter the integrity of the epithelial basement membrane, which is an important regulator of epithelial cell proliferation and differentiation.

  12. The 5'-untranslated region of the mouse mammary tumor virus mRNA exhibits cap-independent translation initiation.

    PubMed

    Vallejos, Maricarmen; Ramdohr, Pablo; Valiente-Echeverría, Fernando; Tapia, Karla; Rodriguez, Felipe E; Lowy, Fernando; Huidobro-Toro, J Pablo; Dangerfield, John A; López-Lastra, Marcelo

    2010-01-01

    In this study, we demonstrate the identification of an internal ribosome entry site (IRES) within the 5'-untranslated region (5'-UTR) of the mouse mammary tumor virus (MMTV). The 5'-UTR of the full-length mRNA derived from the infectious, complete MMTV genome was cloned into a dual luciferase reporter construct containing an upstream Renilla luciferase gene (RLuc) and a downstream firefly luciferase gene (FLuc). In rabbit reticulocyte lysate, the MMTV 5'-UTR was capable of driving translation of the second cistron. In vitro translational activity from the MMTV 5'-UTR was resistant to the addition of m(7)GpppG cap-analog and cleavage of eIF4G by foot-and-mouth disease virus (FMDV) L-protease. IRES activity was also demonstrated in the Xenopus laevis oocyte by micro-injection of capped and polyadenylated bicistronic RNAs harboring the MMTV-5'-UTR. Finally, transfection assays showed that the MMTV-IRES exhibits cell type-dependent translational activity, suggesting a requirement for as yet unidentified cellular factors for its optimal function.

  13. Moderate increase in histone acetylation activates the mouse mammary tumor virus promoter and remodels its nucleosome structure.

    PubMed Central

    Bartsch, J; Truss, M; Bode, J; Beato, M

    1996-01-01

    The mouse mammary tumor virus (MMTV) promoter is regulated by steroid hormones through a hormone-responsive region that is organized in a positioned nucleosome. Hormone induction leads to a structural change of this nucleosome which makes its DNA more sensitive to cleavage by DNase I and enables simultaneous binding of all relevant transcription factors. In cells carrying either episomal or chromosomally integrated MMTV promoters, moderate acetylation of core histones, generated by treatment with low concentrations of the histone deacetylase inhibitors sodium butyrate or trichostatin A, enhances transcription from the MMTV promoter in the absence of hormone and potentiates transactivation by either glucocorticoids or progestins. At higher concentrations, histone deacetylase inhibitors reduce basal and hormone induced MMTV transcription. Inducing inhibitor concentrations lead to the same type of nucleosomal DNase I hypersensitivity as hormone treatment, suggesting that moderate acetylation of core histone activates the MMTV promoter by mechanisms involving chromatin remodeling similar to that generated by the inducing hormones. Images Fig. 1 Fig. 2 Fig. 3 Fig. 4 PMID:8855250

  14. Histone H1 Phosphorylation by Cdk2 Selectively Modulates Mouse Mammary Tumor Virus Transcription through Chromatin Remodeling

    PubMed Central

    Bhattacharjee, Rabindra N.; Banks, Geoffrey C.; Trotter, Kevin W.; Lee, Huay-Leng; Archer, Trevor K.

    2001-01-01

    Transcriptional activation of the mouse mammary tumor virus (MMTV) promoter by ligand-bound glucocorticoid receptor (GR) is transient. Previously, we demonstrated that prolonged hormone exposure results in displacement of the transcription factor nuclear factor 1 (NF1) and the basal transcription complex from the promoter, the dephosphorylation of histone H1, and the establishment of a repressive chromatin structure. We have explored the mechanistic link between histone H1 dephosphorylation and silencing of the MMTV promoter by describing the putative kinase responsible for H1 phosphorylation. Both in vitro kinase assays and in vivo protein expression studies suggest that in hormone-treated cells the ability of cdk2 to phosphorylate histone H1 is decreased and the cdk2 inhibitory p21 protein level is increased. To address the role of cdk2 and histone H1 dephosphorylation in the silencing of the MMTV promoter, we used potent cdk2 inhibitors, Roscovitine and CVT-313, to generate an MMTV promoter which is associated predominantly with the dephosphorylated form of histone H1. Both Roscovitine and CVT-313 block phosphorylation of histone H1 and, under these conditions, the GR is unable to remodel chromatin, recruit transcription factors to the promoter, or stimulate MMTV mRNA accumulation. These results suggest a model where cdk2-directed histone H1 phosphorylation is a necessary condition to permit GR-mediated chromatin remodeling and activation of the MMTV promoter in vivo. PMID:11463824

  15. Phorbol ester-inducible T-cell-specific expression of variant mouse mammary tumor virus long terminal repeats

    SciTech Connect

    Theunissen, H.J.M.; Paardekooper, M.; Maduro, L.J.; Michalides, R.J.A.M.; Nusse, R. )

    1989-08-01

    Acquired proviruses of mouse mammary tumor virus (MMTV) in T-cell leukemias of male GR mice have rearrangements in the U3 region of their long terminal repeats (LTR). In contrast to the endogenous nonrearranged MMTV proviruses, these mutated copies are highly expressed in leukemic T cells. To investigate whether the sequence alterations in the LTR are responsible for the high expression of rearranged MMTV proviruses, the authors made constructs in which normal and variant LTRs drive the bacterial reporter gene chloramphenicol acetyltransferase (CAT). Two different rearranged LTRs were used, one containing a 420-base-pair (bp) deletion (L13) and another carrying a 456-bp deletion plus an 82-bp insertion (L42). These constructs were transfected into murine (GRSL) and human (MOLT-4) T-cell lines that either had or had not been treated with phorbol ester (12-O-tetradecanoylphorbol-13-acetate (TPA)). In GRSL cells, the L13-LTR-CAT construct showed transcriptional activity that was further enhanced by TPA. In MOLT-4 cells, both variant LTRs were active, but only after stimulation with TPA. In contrast, normal(N)-LTR-CAT constructs were not expressed, irrespective of TPA addition. They conclude that the LTR rearrangements generate TPA responsiveness and contribute to T-cell-specific expression of MMTV variants.

  16. Effects of mitomycin C alone and in combination with X-rays on EMT6 mouse mammary tumors in vivo

    SciTech Connect

    Rockwell, S.

    1983-10-01

    The effects of mitomycin C alone and in combination with radiation on the cells of EMT6 mouse mammary tumors in BALB/cKaRw mice were examined. At doses near the toxic level, approximately 98% of the tumor cells were killed by a single injection of mitomycin C. Both proliferating and quiescent cells and both hypoxic and aerobic cells were killed by the drug. Cytotoxicity with mitomycin C occurred rapidly and was apparently complete within 30 minutes after injection of the drug. No evidence was found for repair of potentially lethal mitomycin C damage or sublethal mitomycin C damage by the tumor cells. Mitomycin C and radiation in combination produced an additive cytotoxicity; neither agent was found to alter significantly the shape of the dose-response curve for the other agent. The cytotoxicity of mitomycin C and radiation in combination depended on the sequence and timing of the treatments; additive toxicities were obtained when mitomycin C was given just after, just before, or up to 24 hours before irradiation, but the combination was less effective when mitomycin C was given 2-12 hours after irradiation.

  17. Alpha1 and Alpha2 Integrins Mediate Invasive Activity of Mouse Mammary Carcinoma Cells through Regulation of Stromelysin-1 Expression

    SciTech Connect

    Lochter, Andre; Navre, Marc; Werb, Zena; Bissell, Mina J

    1998-06-29

    Tumor cell invasion relies on cell migration and extracellular matrix proteolysis. We investigated the contribution of different integrins to the invasive activity of mouse mammary carcinoma cells. Antibodies against integrin subunits {alpha}6 and {beta}1, but not against {alpha}1 and {alpha}2, inhibited cell locomotion on a reconstituted basement membrane in two-dimensional cell migration assays, whereas antibodies against {beta}1, but not against a6 or {alpha}2, interfered with cell adhesion to basement membrane constituents. Blocking antibodies against {alpha}1 integrins impaired only cell adhesion to type IV collagen. Antibodies against {alpha}1, {alpha}2, {alpha}6, and {beta}1, but not {alpha}5, integrin subunits reduced invasion of a reconstituted basement membrane. Integrins {alpha}1 and {alpha}2, which contributed only marginally to motility and adhesion, regulated proteinase production. Antibodies against {alpha}1 and {alpha}2, but not {alpha}6 and {beta}1, integrin subunits inhibited both transcription and protein expression of the matrix metalloproteinase stromelysin-1. Inhibition of tumor cell invasion by antibodies against {alpha}1 and {alpha}2 was reversed by addition of recombinant stromelysin-1. In contrast, stromelysin-1 could not rescue invasion inhibited by anti-{alpha}6 antibodies. Our data indicate that {alpha}1 and {alpha}2 integrins confer invasive behavior by regulating stromelysin-1 expression, whereas {alpha}6 integrins regulate cell motility. These results provide new insights into the specific functions of integrins during tumor cell invasion.

  18. Inhibition of chromatin assembly in Xenopus oocytes correlates with derepression of the mouse mammary tumor virus promoter.

    PubMed Central

    Perlmann, T; Wrange, O

    1991-01-01

    The mouse mammary tumor virus (MMTV) promoter is positively regulated by glucocorticoid hormone via binding of glucocorticoid receptor to a specific response element. Upon addition of hormone, a nucleosome containing the glucocorticoid response element is removed or structurally altered, suggesting that the nucleosome interferes with transcription. Accordingly, inhibition of chromatin assembly should relieve the repression and result in an increased constitutive activity. We have tested this hypothesis by injecting nonspecific competitor DNA into Xenopus laevis oocytes to titrate endogenous histones. The coinjection of competitor DNA altered chromatin structure: nucleosomal ladders produced by micrococcal nuclease were disrupted, and the unique helical setting of the MMTV promoter in a nucleosome was lost, as shown by in situ DNase I footprinting. Basal MMTV transcription was drastically increased by competitor DNA, whereas a coinjected, constitutively active adenovirus 2 major late promoter was not stimulated. These results show that the uninduced MMTV promoter is under negative control and provide direct support for the theory that the nucleosomal organization maintains the repression of this promoter in its uninduced state. Images PMID:1656227

  19. Basement-membrane heparan sulphate with high affinity for antithrombin synthesized by normal and transformed mouse mammary epithelial cells.

    PubMed Central

    Pejler, G; David, G

    1987-01-01

    Basement-membrane proteoglycans, biosynthetically labelled with [35S]sulphate, were isolated from normal and transformed mouse mammary epithelial cells. Proteoglycans synthesized by normal cells contained mainly heparan sulphate and, in addition, small amounts of chondroitin sulphate chains, whereas transformed cells synthesized a relatively higher proportion of chondroitin sulphate. Polysaccharide chains from transformed cells were of lower average Mr and of lower anionic charge density compared with chains isolated from the untransformed counterparts, confirming results reported previously [David & Van den Berghe (1983) J. Biol. Chem. 258, 7338-7344]. A large proportion of the chains isolated from normal cells bound with high affinity to immobilized antithrombin, and the presence of 3-O-sulphated glucosamine residues, previously identified as unique markers for the antithrombin-binding region of heparin [Lindahl, Bäckström, Thunberg & Leder (1980) Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci. U.S.A. 77, 6551-6555], could be demonstrated. A significantly lower proportion of the chains derived from transformed cells bound with high affinity to antithrombin, and a corresponding decrease in the amount of incorporated 3-O-sulphate was observed. PMID:2963617

  20. Selection of rat hepatoma cells defective in hormone-regulated production of mouse mammary tumor virus RNA.

    PubMed Central

    Grove, J R; Ringold, G M

    1981-01-01

    We have been studying the mechanism of glucocorticoid hormone action by using mouse mammary tumor virus (MMTV)-infected rat hepatoma cells as a model system. J2.17, a clonal cell line that contains one MMTV provirus, induces tyrosine aminotransferase (TyrATase; L-tyrosine:2-oxoglutarate aminotransferase, EC 2.6.1.5), viral RNA, and the cell surface viral glycoprotein gp52 in response to dexamethasone. Using a fluorescence-activated cell sorter and a rabbit antiserum directed against gp52, we selected a cell population that displays a reduced hormone-mediated increase in cell surface gp52. Fourteen clones of this population were assayed for induction of viral gp52 and RNA and of cellular TyrATase. The results of these assays revealed that the clones display a variety of responses to hormone. One clone has retained wild-type responses of both TyrATase and gp52. Six clones exhibit coordinately reduced or abolished responses of both markers. Seven clones show normal induction of TyrATase but reduced or undetectable induction of gp52. These latter clones exhibit reduced production of MMTV RNA and thus may represent a unique class of variants defective in the regulation of MMTV gene expression. Images PMID:6117075

  1. Cell-free synthesis of mouse mammary tumor virus Pr77 from virion and intracellular mRNA.

    PubMed Central

    Dahl, H H; Dickson, C

    1979-01-01

    Mouse mammary tumor virus (MuMTV) was purified from two cell lines (GR and Mm5MT/c1), and the genomic RNA was isolated and translated in vitro in cell-free systems derived from mouse L cells and rabbit reticulocytes. The major translation product in both systems was a protein with the molecular weight 77,000. Several other products were also detected, among them a 110,000-dalton and in minor amounts a 160,000-dalton protein. All three polypeptides were specifically immunoprecipitated by antiserum raised against the major core protein of MuMTV (p27), but they were not precipitated by antiserum against the virion glycoprotein gp52. Analysis of the in vitro products by tryptic peptide mapping established their relationship to the virion non-glycosylated structural proteins. The 77,000-dalton polypeptide was found to be similar, if not identical, to an analogous precursor isolated from MuMTV-producing cells. Peptide mapping of the 110,000-dalton protein shows that it contains all of the methionine-labeled peptides found in the 77,000-dalton protein plus some additional peptides. We conclude that the products synthesized in vitro from the genomic MuMTV RNA are related to the non-glycosylated virion structural proteins. Polyadenylic acid-containing RNA from MuMTV-producing cells also directed the synthesis of the 77,000-dalton polypeptide in the L-cell system. If this RNA preparation was first fractionated by sucrose gradient centrifugation the 77,000-dalton protein appeared to be synthesized from mRNA with a sedimentation coefficient between 25 and 35S. Images PMID:221668

  2. Detection and identification of mouse mammary tumor virus-like DNA sequences in blood and breast tissues of breast cancer patients.

    PubMed

    Naushad, Wasifa; Bin Rahat, Talha; Gomez, Miriam Kathleen; Ashiq, Muhammad Taimoor; Younas, Muhammad; Sadia, Hajra

    2014-08-01

    Mouse mammary tumor virus (MMTV) is a well-known cause of mammary tumors in mice transmitted as endogenous proviruses or exogenously as infectious virions. The hypothesis that a retrovirus homologous to MMTV is involved in human breast cancers has resulted in renewed interest in the etiology of human breast cancer. Therefore, the detection of MMTV-like exogenous sequences in 30-40 % of invasive breast cancer has increased attention towards this hypothesis. To detect the prevalence of MMTV in Pakistani population, 666-bp-long MMTV envelop and 630-bp LTR sequences were amplified from breast cancer patient samples (tissue biopsies and peripheral blood) using mouse with mammary tumor as control. MMTV-like virus env and LTR DNA sequences were detected in 20 and 26 % of breast tumor samples, respectively, from the total of 80 breast cancer patients' blood and tissue samples. No significant association was observed between age, grade of disease, and lymph node involvement with the prevalence of MMTV-like sequences. Our data add to the growing number of studies implicating MMTV-like virus in human breast cancer, but still clear causal association of MMTV to breast cancer remains to be reputable.

  3. Tumor-derived mesenchymal stem cells and orthotopic site increase the tumor initiation potential of putative mouse mammary cancer stem cells derived from MMTV-PyMT mice.

    PubMed

    Lanza, Denise Grant; Ma, Jun; Guest, Ian; Uk-Lim, Chang; Glinskii, Anna; Glinsky, Gennadi; Sell, Stewart

    2012-12-01

    The ability to transplant mammary cancer stem cells, identified by the phenotype CD24(+)CD29(+)CD49f(+)Sca-1(low), is dependent on the microenvironment in which the cells are placed. Using the MMTV-PyMT mouse model of mammary cancer, we now report two methods of tumor growth enhancement: contributions of tumor stroma in the form of tumor-derived mesenchymal stem cells and orthotopic vs. heterotopic transplantation sites. To support evidence of stem cell function, tumor-derived mesenchymal stem cells differentiated into adipocyte- and osteocyte-like cells after culture in specific medium. Co-injection of tumor-initiating cells with tumor-derived mesenchymal stem cells significantly increased tumor initiation compared to subcutaneous injection of TICs alone; co-injection also allowed tumor initiation with a single TIC. Interestingly, we observed the formation of sarcomas after co-injections of tumor-derived mesenchymal stem cells or mouse embryonic fibroblasts with TICs; sarcomas are not observed in spontaneous MMTV-PyMT tumors and rarely observed in injections of TICs alone. Tumor initiation was also significantly increased in the orthotopic injection site compared to heterotopic injections. We conclude that tumor stroma and orthotopic sites both enhance tumor initiation by mammary cancer stem cells.

  4. Transcriptome analysis of embryonic mammary cells reveals insights into mammary lineage establishment

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Introduction The mammary primordium forms during embryogenesis as a result of inductive interactions between its constitutive tissues, the mesenchyme and epithelium, and represents the earliest evidence of commitment to the mammary lineage. Previous studies of embryonic mouse mammary epithelium indicated that, by mid-gestation, these cells are determined to a mammary cell fate and that a stem cell population has been delimited. Mammary mesenchyme can induce mammary development from simple epithelium even across species and classes, and can partially restore features of differentiated tissue to mouse mammary tumours in co-culture experiments. Despite these exciting properties, the molecular identity of embryonic mammary cells remains to be fully characterised. Methods Here, we define the transcriptome of the mammary primordium and the two distinct cellular compartments that comprise it, the mammary primordial bud epithelium and mammary mesenchyme. Pathway and network analysis was performed and comparisons of embryonic mammary gene expression profiles to those of both postnatal mouse and human mammary epithelial cell sub-populations and stroma were made. Results Several of the genes we have detected in our embryonic mammary cell signatures were previously shown to regulate mammary cell fate and development, but we also identified a large number of novel candidates. Additionally, we determined genes that were expressed by both embryonic and postnatal mammary cells, which represent candidate regulators of mammary cell fate, differentiation and progenitor cell function that could signal from mammary lineage inception during embryogenesis through postnatal development. Comparison of embryonic mammary cell signatures with those of human breast cells identified potential regulators of mammary progenitor cell functions conserved across species. Conclusions These results provide new insights into genetic regulatory mechanisms of mammary development, particularly

  5. Estradiol and tamoxifen regulate NRF-1 and mitochondrial function in mouse mammary gland and uterus.

    PubMed

    Ivanova, Margarita M; Radde, Brandie N; Son, Jieun; Mehta, Fabiola F; Chung, Sang-Hyuk; Klinge, Carolyn M

    2013-10-01

    Nuclear respiratory factor-1 (NRF-1) stimulates the transcription of nuclear-encoded genes that regulate mitochondrial (mt) genome transcription and biogenesis. We reported that estradiol (E2) and 4-hydroxytamoxifen (4-OHT) stimulate NRF-1 transcription in an estrogen receptor α (ERα)- and ERβ-dependent manner in human breast cancer cells. The aim of this study was to determine whether E2 and 4-OHT increase NRF-1 in vivo. Here, we report that E2 and 4-OHT increase NRF-1 expression in mammary gland (MG) and uterus of ovariectomized C57BL/6 mice in a time-dependent manner. E2 increased NRF-1 protein in the uterus and MG; however, in MG, 4-OHT increased Nrf1 mRNA but not protein. Chromatin immunoprecipitation assays revealed increased in vivo recruitment of ERα to the Nrf1 promoter and intron 3 in MG and uterus 6 h after E2 and 4-OHT treatment, commensurate with increased NRF-1 expression. E2- and 4-OHT-induced increases in NRF-1 and its target genes Tfam, Tfb1m, and Tfb2m were coordinated in MG but not in uterus due to uterine-selective inhibition of the expression of the NRF-1 coactivators Ppargc1a and Ppargc1b by E2 and 4-OHT. E2 transiently increased NRF-1 and PGC-1α nuclear staining while reducing PGC-1α in uterus. E2, not 4-OHT, activates mt biogenesis in MG and uterus in a time-dependent manner. E2 increased mt outer membrane Tomm40 protein levels in MG and uterus whereas 4-OHT increased Tomm40 only in uterus. These data support the hypothesis of tissue-selective regulation of NRF-1 and its downstream targets by E2 and 4-OHT in vivo.

  6. Bisphenol A (BPA) Exposure In Utero Leads to Immunoregulatory Cytokine Dysregulation in the Mouse Mammary Gland: A Potential Mechanism Programming Breast Cancer Risk.

    PubMed

    Fischer, Catha; Mamillapalli, Ramanaiah; Goetz, Laura G; Jorgenson, Elisa; Ilagan, Ysabel; Taylor, Hugh S

    2016-08-01

    Bisphenol-A (BPA) is a ubiquitous estrogen-like endocrine disrupting compound (EDC). BPA exposure in utero has been linked to breast cancer and abnormal mammary gland development in mice. The recent rise in incidence of human breast cancer and decreased age of first detection suggests a possible environmental etiology. We hypothesized that developmental programming of carcinogenesis may involve an aberrant immune response. Both innate and adaptive immunity play a role in tumor suppression through cytolytic CD8, NK, and Th1 T-cells. We hypothesized that BPA exposure in utero would lead to dysregulation of both innate and adaptive immunity in the mammary gland. CD1 mice were exposed to BPA in utero during gestation (days 9-21) via osmotic minipump. At 6 weeks, the female offspring were ovariectomized and estradiol was given at 8 weeks. RNA and protein were extracted from the posterior mammary glands, and the mRNA and protein levels were measured by PCR array, qRT-PCR, and western blot. In mouse mammary tissue, BPA exposure in utero significantly decreased the expression of members of the chemokine CXC family (Cxcl2, Cxcl4, Cxcl14, and Ccl20), interleukin 1 (Il1) gene family (Il1β and Il1rn), interleukin 2 gene family (Il7 receptor), and interferon gene family (interferon regulatory factor 9 (Irf9), as well as immune response gene 1 (Irg1). Additionally, BPA exposure in utero decreased Esr1 receptor gene expression and increased Esr2 receptor gene expression. In utero exposure of BPA resulted in significant changes to inflammatory modulators within mammary tissue. We suggest that dysregulation of inflammatory cytokines, both pro-inflammatory and anti-inflammatory, leads to a microenvironment that may promote disordered cell growth through inhibition of the immune response that targets cancer cells.

  7. Ink4a/Arf(-/-) and HRAS(G12V) transform mouse mammary cells into triple-negative breast cancer containing tumorigenic CD49f(-) quiescent cells.

    PubMed

    Kai, K; Iwamoto, T; Kobayashi, T; Arima, Y; Takamoto, Y; Ohnishi, N; Bartholomeusz, C; Horii, R; Akiyama, F; Hortobagyi, G N; Pusztai, L; Saya, H; Ueno, N T

    2014-01-23

    Intratumoral heterogeneity within individual breast tumors is a well-known phenomenon that may contribute to drug resistance. This heterogeneity is dependent on several factors, such as types of oncogenic drivers and tumor precursor cells. The purpose of our study was to engineer a mouse mammary tumor model with intratumoral heterogeneity by using defined genetic perturbations. To achieve this, we used mice with knockout (-/-) of Ink4a/Arf, a tumor suppressor locus; these mice are known to be susceptible to non-mammary tumors such as fibrosarcoma. To induce mammary tumors, we retrovirally introduced an oncogene, HRAS(G12V), into Ink4a/Arf(-/-) mammary cells in vitro, and those cells were inoculated into syngeneic mice mammary fat pads. We observed 100% tumorigenesis. The tumors formed were negative for estrogen receptor, progesterone receptor and HER2. Further, they had pathological features similar to those of human triple-negative breast cancer (TNBC) (for example, pushing borders, central necrosis). The tumors were found to be heterogeneous and included two subpopulations: CD49f(-) quiescent cells and CD49f(+)cells. Contrary to our expectation, CD49f(-) quiescent cells had high tumor-initiating potential and CD49f(+)cells had relatively low tumor-initiating potential. Gene expression analysis revealed that CD49f(-) quiescent cells overexpressed epithelial-to-mesenchymal transition-driving genes, reminiscent of tumor-initiating cells and claudin-low breast cancer. Our animal model with intratumoral heterogeneity, derived from defined genetic perturbations, allows us to test novel molecular targeted drugs in a setting that mimics the intratumoral heterogeneity of human TNBC.

  8. Developmental regulation of mitochondrial biogenesis and function in the mouse mammary gland during a prolonged lactation cycle

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The regulation of mitochondrial biogenesis and function in the lactating mammary cell is poorly understood. The goal of this study was to use proteomics to relate temporal changes in mammary cell mitochondrial function during lactation to changes in the proteins that make up this organelle. The hypo...

  9. The BH3-only protein BIM contributes to late-stage involution in the mouse mammary gland

    PubMed Central

    Schuler, F; Baumgartner, F; Klepsch, V; Chamson, M; Müller-Holzner, E; Watson, C J; Oh, S; Hennighausen, L; Tymoszuk, P; Doppler, W; Villunger, A

    2016-01-01

    After cessation of lactation, involution of the mouse mammary gland proceeds in two distinct phases, a reversible and an irreversible one, which leads to the death and removal of alveolar cells. Cell death is preceded by the loss of STAT5 activity, which abrogates cell differentiation and gain of STAT3 activity. Despite early observations implicating BCL2 (B cell lymphoma 2) family proteins in this process, recent evidence suggests that STAT3-controlled cathepsin activity is most critical for cell death at the early stage of involution. Somewhat surprisingly, this cell death associates with but does not depend on the activation of pro-apoptotic effector caspases. However, transgenic overexpression of BCL2, that blocks caspase activation, delays involution while conditional deletion of BclX accelerates this process, suggesting that BCL2 family proteins are needed for the effective execution of involution. Here, we report on the transcriptional induction of multiple pro-apoptotic BCL2 family proteins of the ‘BH3-only' subgroup during involution and the rate-limiting role of BIM in this process. Loss of Bim delayed epithelial cell clearance during involution after forced weaning in mice, whereas the absence of related Bmf had minor and loss of Bad or Noxa no impact on this process. Consistent with a contribution of BCL2 family proteins to the second wave of cell death during involution, loss of Bim reduced the number of apoptotic cells in this irreversible phase. Notably, the expression changes observed within the BCL2 family did not depend on STAT3 signalling, in line with its initiating role early in the process, but rather appear to result from relief of repression by STAT5. Our findings support the existence of a signalling circuitry regulating the irreversible phase of involution in mice by engaging BH3-only protein-driven mitochondrial apoptosis. PMID:26045049

  10. Epstein-Barr Virus, Human Papillomavirus and Mouse Mammary Tumour Virus as Multiple Viruses in Breast Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Glenn, Wendy K.; Heng, Benjamin; Delprado, Warick; Iacopetta, Barry; Whitaker, Noel J.; Lawson, James S.

    2012-01-01

    Background The purpose of this investigation is to determine if Epstein Barr virus (EBV), high risk human papillomavirus (HPV), and mouse mammary tumour viruses (MMTV) co-exist in some breast cancers. Materials and Methods All the specimens were from women residing in Australia. For investigations based on standard PCR, we used fresh frozen DNA extracts from 50 unselected invasive breast cancers. For normal breast specimens, we used DNA extracts from epithelial cells from milk donated by 40 lactating women. For investigations based on in situ PCR we used 27 unselected archival formalin fixed breast cancer specimens and 18 unselected archival formalin fixed normal breast specimens from women who had breast reduction surgery. Thirteen of these fixed breast cancer specimens were ductal carcinoma in situ (dcis) and 14 were predominantly invasive ductal carcinomas (idc). Results EBV sequences were identified in 68%, high risk HPV sequences in 50%, and MMTV sequences in 78% of DNA extracted from 50 invasive breast cancer specimens. These same viruses were identified in selected normal and breast cancer specimens by in situ PCR. Sequences from more than one viral type were identified in 72% of the same breast cancer specimens. Normal controls showed these viruses were also present in epithelial cells in human milk – EBV (35%), HPV, 20%) and MMTV (32%) of 40 milk samples from normal lactating women, with multiple viruses being identified in 13% of the same milk samples. Conclusions We conclude that (i) EBV, HPV and MMTV gene sequences are present and co-exist in many human breast cancers, (ii) the presence of these viruses in breast cancer is associated with young age of diagnosis and possibly an increased grade of breast cancer. PMID:23183846

  11. An iterative calibration method with prediction of post-translational modifications for the construction of a two-dimensional electrophoresis database of mouse mammary gland proteins.

    PubMed

    Aksu, Sevil; Scheler, Christian; Focks, Nicole; Leenders, Frauke; Theuring, Franz; Salnikow, Johann; Jungblut, Peter R

    2002-10-01

    Protein databases serve as general reference resources providing an orientation on two-dimensional electrophoresis (2-DE) patterns of interest. The intention behind constructing a 2-DE database of the water soluble proteins from wild-type mouse mammary gland tissue was to create a reference before going on to investigate cancer-associated protein variations. This database shall be deemed to be a model system for mouse tissue, which is open for transgenic or knockout experiments. Proteins were separated and characterized in terms of their molecular weight (M(r)) and isoelectric point (pI) by high resolution 2-DE. The proteins were identified using prevalent proteomics methods. One method was peptide mass fingerprinting by matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization-mass spectrometry. Another method was N-terminal sequencing by Edman degradation. By N-terminal sequencing M(r) and pI values were specified more accurately and so the calibration of the master gel was obtained more systematically and exactly. This permits the prediction of possible post-translational modifications of some proteins. The mouse mammary gland 2-DE protein database created presently contains 66 identified protein spots, which are clickable on the gel pattern. This relational database is accessible on the WWW under the URL: http://www.mpiib-berlin.mpg.de/2D-PAGE.

  12. Effects of Perfluorooctanoic Acid on Mouse Mammary Gland Development and Differentiation Resulting from Cross-Foster and Restricted Gestational Exposures

    EPA Science Inventory

    The adverse consequences of developmental exposures to perfluorooctanoic acid (PFOA) have been established, and include impaired development of the offspring mammary gland (MG). However, the relationship between the timing or route of exposure, and the phenotypic consequences in ...

  13. Robust homology-directed repair within mouse mammary tissue is not specifically affected by Brca2 mutation

    PubMed Central

    Kass, Elizabeth M.; Lim, Pei Xin; Helgadottir, Hildur R.; Moynahan, Mary Ellen; Jasin, Maria

    2016-01-01

    The mammary gland undergoes significant proliferative stages after birth, but little is known about how the developmental changes impact DNA double-strand break (DSB) repair. Mutations in multiple genes involved in homology-directed repair (HDR), considered a particularly accurate pathway for repairing DSBs, are linked to breast cancer susceptibility, including BRCA2. Using reporter mice that express an inducible endonuclease, we find that HDR is particularly robust in mammary tissue during puberty and pregnancy, accounting for 34–40% of detected repair events, more than in other tissues examined. Brca2 hypomorphic mutation leads to HDR defects in mammary epithelium during puberty and pregnancy, including in different epithelial lineages. Notably, a similar dependence on Brca2 is observed in other proliferative tissues, including small intestine epithelium. Our results suggest that the greater reliance on HDR in the proliferating mammary gland, rather than a specific dependence on BRCA2, may increase its susceptibility to tumorigenesis incurred by BRCA2 mutation. PMID:27779185

  14. Dasatinib inhibits mammary tumour development in a genetically engineered mouse model.

    PubMed

    Karim, Saadia A; Creedon, Helen; Patel, Hitesh; Carragher, Neil O; Morton, Jennifer P; Muller, William J; Evans, Thomas Rj; Gusterson, Barry; Sansom, Owen J; Brunton, Valerie G

    2013-08-01

    Src family kinase activity is elevated in a number of human cancers including breast cancer. This increased activity has been associated with aggressive disease and poor prognosis. Src inhibitors are currently in clinical development with a number of trials currently assessing their activity in breast cancer. However, the results to date have been disappointing and a further evaluation of the preclinical effects of Src inhibitors is required to help establish whether these agents will be useful in the treatment of breast cancer. In this study we investigate the effects of dasatinib, which is a potent inhibitor of Src family kinases, on the initiation and development of breast cancer in a genetically engineered model of the disease. The mouse model utilized is driven by expression of activated ErbB-2 under the transcriptional control of its endogenous promoter coupled with conditional loss of Pten under the control of Cre recombinase expressed by the BLG promoter. We show that daily oral administration of dasatinib delays tumour onset and increases overall survival but does not inhibit the proliferation of established tumours. The striking difference between the dasatinib-treated group of tumours and the vehicle controls was the prominent squamous metaplasia that was seen in six out of 11 dasatinib-treated tumours. This was accompanied by a dramatic up-regulation of both E-cadherin and β-catenin and down-regulation of ErbB-2 in the dasatinib-treated tumours. Dasatinib also inhibited both the migration and the invasion of tumour-derived cell lines in vitro. Together these data support the argument that benefits of Src inhibitors may predominate in early or even pre-invasive disease.

  15. DMBA induced mouse mammary tumors display high incidence of activating Pik3caH1047 and loss of function Pten mutations

    PubMed Central

    Abba, Martín C.; Zhong, Yi; Lee, Jaeho; Kil, Hyunsuk; Lu, Yue; Takata, Yoko; Simper, Melissa S.; Gaddis, Sally; Shen, Jianjun; Aldaz, C. Marcelo

    2016-01-01

    Controversy always existed on the utility of chemically induced mouse mammary carcinogenesis models as valid equivalents for the study of human breast cancer. Here, we performed whole exome and RNA sequencing on long latency mammary tumors (218 ± 27 days) induced by the carcinogen 7,12-Dimethylbenzathracene (DMBA) and short latency tumors (65 ± 11 days) induced by the progestin Medroxyprogesterone Acetate (MPA) plus DMBA in CD2F1 mice. Long latency tumors displayed a high frequency of Pi3kca and/or Pten mutations detected in 11 of 13 (85%) long latency cases (14/22, 64% overall). Eighty-two percent (9/11) of tumors carried the Pik3ca H1047L/R hot-spot mutation, as frequently found in human breast cancer. These tumors were luminal-like and mostly ER/PR+, as in humans. Transcriptome profiling indicated a significant activation of the PI3K-Akt pathway (p=3.82e-6). On the other hand MPA+DMBA induced short latency tumors displayed mutations in cancer drivers not commonly found mutated in human breast cancer (e.g. Hras and Apc). These tumors were mostly basal-like and MPA exposure led to Rankl overexpression (60 fold induction) and immunosuppressive gene expression signatures. In summary, long latency DMBA induced mouse mammary tumors reproduce the molecular profile of human luminal breast carcinomas representing an excellent preclinical model for the testing of PIK3CA/Akt/mTOR pathway inhibitory therapies and a good platform for the developing of additional preclinical tools such as syngeneic transplants in immunocompetent hosts. PMID:27588403

  16. CCAAT/enhancer binding protein beta (C/EBPβ) isoform balance as a regulator of epithelial-mesenchymal transition in mouse mammary epithelial cells

    SciTech Connect

    Miura, Yuka; Hagiwara, Natsumi; Radisky, Derek C.; Hirai, Yohei

    2014-09-10

    Activation of the epithelial-mesenchymal transition (EMT) program promotes cell invasion and metastasis, and is reversed through mesenchymal-epithelial transition (MET) after formation of distant metastases. Here, we show that an imbalance of gene products encoded by the transcriptional factor C/EBPβ, LAP (liver-enriched activating protein) and LIP (liver-enriched inhibitory protein), can regulate both EMT- and MET-like phenotypic changes in mouse mammary epithelial cells. By using tetracycline repressive LIP expression constructs, we found that SCp2 cells, a clonal epithelial line of COMMA1-D cells, expressed EMT markers, lost the ability to undergo alveolar-like morphogenesis in 3D Matrigel, and acquired properties of benign adenoma cells. Conversely, we found that inducible expression of LAP in SCg6 cells, a clonal fibroblastic line of COMMA1-D cells, began to express epithelial keratins with suppression of proliferation. The overexpression of the C/EBPβ gene products in these COMMA1-D derivatives was suppressed by long-term cultivation on tissue culture plastic, but gene expression was maintained in cells grown on Matrigel or exposed to proteasome inhibitors. Thus, imbalances of C/EBPβ gene products in mouse mammary epithelial cells, which are affected by contact with basement membrane, are defined as a potential regulator of metastatic potential. - Highlights: • We created a temporal imbalance of C/EBPβ gene products in the mammary model cells. • The temporal up-regulation of LIP protein induced EMT-like cell behaviors. • The temporal up-regulation of LAP protein induced MET-like cell behaviors. • Excess amount of C/EBPβ gene products were eliminated by proteasomal-degradation. • Basement membrane components attenuated proteasome-triggered protein elimination.

  17. The Position and Length of the Steroid-Dependent Hypersensitive Region in the Mouse Mammary Tumor Virus Long Terminal Repeat Are Invariant despite Multiple Nucleosome B Frames

    PubMed Central

    Fragoso, Gilberto; Pennie, William D.; John, Sam; Hager, Gordon L.

    1998-01-01

    Stimulation of the mouse mammary tumor virus with steroids results in the generation of a DNase I-hypersensitive region (HSR) spanning the hormone responsive element (HRE) in the long terminal repeat. Restriction enzymes were used to characterize the accessibility of various sites within the HSR of mouse mammary tumor virus long terminal repeat-reporter constructions in four different cell lines. The glucocorticoid-dependent HSR was found to span minimally 187 bases, a stretch of DNA longer than that associated with histones in the core particle. Although the 5′-most receptor binding site within the HRE is downstream of −190, hypersensitive sites were found further upstream to at least −295. The relationship in the accessibility between pairs of sites in the vicinity of the HSR was further examined in one cell line by a two-enzyme restriction access assay. In the uninduced state, the accessibilities at these sites were found to be independent of each other. In contrast, when stimulated with hormone, the accessibilities at these sites were observed to become linked. That is, once a distinct promoter was activated, all of the sites within the HSR of that molecule became accessible. The HSR formed along an invariant stretch of DNA sequence despite the multiplicity of nucleosome frames in the nucleosome B region, where the HRE is located. The results indicate that the macroscopic length of the HSR does not arise from core length-remodeling events in molecules containing Nuc-B in alternative positions. PMID:9584204

  18. Tissue-specific and ubiquitous factors binding next to the glucocorticoid receptor modulate transcription from the mouse mammary tumor virus promoter.

    PubMed Central

    Cavin, C; Buetti, E

    1995-01-01

    Steroid hormones complexed with their receptors play an essential role in the regulation of mouse mammary tumor virus (MMTV) transcription. However, the need for additional tissue-specific regulatory factors is suggested by the lack of virus expression in liver, in which glucocorticoid receptors are highly abundant, and by the tissue-specific transcription of reporter genes linked to an MMTV long terminal repeat in transgenic mice. In this study, we characterized two distal-region regulatory elements, DRa and DRc, which, together with the distal glucocorticoid receptor binding site (DRb), increased transcription from the MMTV promoter in permissive cells. This was demonstrated by transfection of these sequences (DRa, DRb, and DRc) in different combinations with the natural MMTV promoter in mouse fibroblasts and mammary epithelial cells, followed by quantitative S1 nuclease mapping of the transcripts. We further showed by DNase I footprinting, methylation interference, and gel retardation assays with various nuclear extracts from permissive or nonpermissive tissues and cell lines that the factors binding to the DRa site are distinct and tissue-specific whereas those binding to DRc are ubiquitous. PMID:7745724

  19. Ascorbate supplementation inhibits growth and metastasis of B16FO melanoma and 4T1 breast cancer cells in vitamin C-deficient mice.

    PubMed

    Cha, John; Roomi, M Waheed; Ivanov, Vadim; Kalinovsky, Tatiana; Niedzwiecki, Aleksandra; Rath, Matthias

    2013-01-01

    Degradation of the extracellular matrix (ECM) plays a critical role in the formation of tumors and metastasis and has been found to correlate with the aggressiveness of tumor growth and invasiveness of cancer. Ascorbic acid, which is known to be essential for the structural integrity of the intercellular matrix, is not produced by humans and must be obtained from the diet. Cancer patients have been shown to have very low reserves of ascorbic acid. Our main objective was to determine the effect of ascorbate supplementation on metastasis, tumor growth and tumor immunohistochemistry in mice unable to synthesize ascorbic acid [gulonolactone oxidase (gulo) knockout (KO)] when challenged with B16FO melanoma or 4T1 breast cancer cells. Gulo KO female mice 36-38 weeks of age were deprived of or maintained on ascorbate in food and water for 4 weeks prior to and 2 weeks post intraperitoneal (IP) injection of 5x105 B16FO murine melanoma cells or to injection of 5x105 4T1 breast cancer cells into the mammary pad of mice. Ascorbate-supplemented gulo KO mice injected with B16FO melanoma cells demonstrated significant reduction (by 71%, p=0.005) in tumor metastasis compared to gulo KO mice on the control diet. The mean tumor weight in ascorbate supplemented mice injected with 4T1 cells was reduced by 28% compared to tumor weight in scorbutic mice. Scorbutic tumors demonstrated large dark cores, associated with increased necrotic areas and breaches to the tumor surface, apoptosis and matrix metalloproteinase-9 (MMP-9), and weak, disorganized or missing collagen I tumor capsule. In contrast, the ascorbate-supplemented group tumors had smaller fainter colored cores and confined areas of necrosis/apoptosis with no breaches from the core to the outside of the tumor and a robust collagen I tumor capsule. In both studies, ascorbate supplementation of gulo KO mice resulted in profoundly decreased serum inflammatory cytokine interleukin (IL)-6 (99% decrease, p=0.01 in the B16F0

  20. TGF beta suppresses casein synthesis in mouse mammary explants and may play a role in controlling milk levels during pregnancy

    PubMed Central

    1993-01-01

    Mammary explants from 14-15-d-pregnant mice synthesize and secrete milk proteins in culture in response to insulin, hydrocortisone, and prolactin. Here we demonstrate that transforming growth factor beta (TGF beta) treatment suppresses, in a dose dependent and reversible manner, the ability of explants to synthesize and secrete milk caseins. TGF beta does not affect the level of casein mRNA within explants but inhibits casein synthesis posttranscriptionally. We also show increased expression of TGF beta 2 and TGF beta 3 in intact mammary gland as pregnancy progresses, with reduced expression of all three TGF betas at the onset of lactation. These findings suggest that endogenously produced TGF beta may limit the accumulation of milk caseins that are produced in the mammary gland during pregnancy. PMID:8416990

  1. ROLES OF EPIDERMAL GROWTH FACTOR (EGF) AND TRANSFORMING GROWTH FACTOR-ALPHA (TGF-A) IN MEDIATION OF DIOXIN (TCDD)-INDUCED DELAYS IN DEVELOPMENT OF THE MOUSE MAMMARY GLAND

    EPA Science Inventory

    Roles of Epidermal Growth Factor (EGF) and Transforming Growth Factor-alpha (TGF-a) in Mediation of Dioxin (TCDD)-Induced Delays in Development of the Mouse Mammary Gland.
    Suzanne E. Fenton, Barbara Abbott, Lamont Bryant, and Angela Buckalew. U.S. EPA, NHEERL, Reproductive Tox...

  2. Associated expressions of FGFR-2 and FGFR-3: from mouse mammary gland physiology to human breast cancer.

    PubMed

    Cerliani, Juan P; Vanzulli, Silvia I; Piñero, Cecilia Pérez; Bottino, María C; Sahores, Ana; Nuñez, Myriam; Varchetta, Romina; Martins, Rubén; Zeitlin, Eduardo; Hewitt, Stephen M; Molinolo, Alfredo A; Lanari, Claudia; Lamb, Caroline A

    2012-06-01

    Fibroblast growth factor receptors (FGFRs) are tyrosine kinase receptors which have been implicated in breast cancer. The aim of this study was to evaluate FGFR-1, -2, -3, and -4 protein expressions in normal murine mammary gland development, and in murine and human breast carcinomas. Using immunohistochemistry and Western blot, we report a hormonal regulation of FGFR during postnatal mammary gland development. Progestin treatment of adult virgin mammary glands resulted in changes in localization of FGFR-3 from the cytoplasm to the nucleus, while treatment with 17-β-estradiol induced changes in the expressions and/or localizations of FGFR-2 and -3. In murine mammary carcinomas showing different degrees of hormone dependence, we found progestin-induced increased expressions, mainly of FGFR-2 and -3. These receptors were constitutively activated in hormone-independent variants. We studied three luminal human breast cancer cell lines growing as xenografts, which particularly expressed FGFR-2 and -3, suggesting a correlation between hormonal status and FGFR expression. Most importantly, in breast cancer samples from 58 patients, we found a strong association (P < 0.01; Spearman correlation) between FGFR-2 and -3 expressions and a weaker correlation of each receptor with estrogen receptor expression. FGFR-4 correlated with c-erbB2 over expression. We conclude that FGFR-2 and -3 may be mechanistically linked and can be potential targets for treatment of estrogen receptor-positive breast cancer patients.

  3. Short communication: Staphylococcus aureus infection modulates expression of drug transporters and inflammatory biomarkers in mouse mammary gland.

    PubMed

    Oskarsson, A; Yagdiran, Y; Nazemi, S; Tallkvist, J; Knight, C H

    2017-03-01

    Mastitis is the most common disease in dairy herds worldwide and is often caused by Staphylococcus aureus. Little is known about the effect of mastitis on transporters in the mammary gland and the effect on transporter-mediated secretion of drugs into milk. We studied gene expressions of ATP-binding cassette and solute carrier transporters in S. aureus-infected mammary glands of mice. On d 7 of lactation, NMRI mice were inoculated with 1,000 cfu of S. aureus in 2 mammary glands and with a saline vehicle in 2 control glands. Gene expression of the transporters, Bcrp, Mdr1, Mrp1, Oatp1a5, Octn1, and Oct1, and of Csn2, the gene encoding β-casein, were determined in mammary glands at 72 h after treatment. As biomarkers of the inflammatory response gene, expressions of the cytokines Il6, Tnfα, and the chemokine Cxcl2 were measured. Despite a high individual variation between the 6 animals, some characteristic patterns were evident. The 3 inflammatory biomarkers were upregulated in all animals; Csn2 was downregulated compared with controls in all animals, although not statistically significantly. Both Mrp1 and Oatp1a5 were statistically significantly upregulated and Bcrp was downregulated. Gene expression of Bcrp followed the expression of Csn2 in each of the animals, indicating a possible co-regulation. The findings demonstrate that S. aureus infection has an effect on expression of drug transporters in the mammary gland, which may affect secretion of drugs into milk and efficacy of drug therapy.

  4. RUNX2 correlates with subtype-specific breast cancer in a human tissue microarray, and ectopic expression of Runx2 perturbs differentiation in the mouse mammary gland.

    PubMed

    McDonald, Laura; Ferrari, Nicola; Terry, Anne; Bell, Margaret; Mohammed, Zahra M; Orange, Clare; Jenkins, Alma; Muller, William J; Gusterson, Barry A; Neil, James C; Edwards, Joanne; Morris, Joanna S; Cameron, Ewan R; Blyth, Karen

    2014-05-01

    RUNX2, a master regulator of osteogenesis, is oncogenic in the lymphoid lineage; however, little is known about its role in epithelial cancers. Upregulation of RUNX2 in cell lines correlates with increased invasiveness and the capacity to form osteolytic disease in models of breast and prostate cancer. However, most studies have analysed the effects of this gene in a limited number of cell lines and its role in primary breast cancer has not been resolved. Using a human tumour tissue microarray, we show that high RUNX2 expression is significantly associated with oestrogen receptor (ER)/progesterone receptor (PR)/HER2-negative breast cancers and that patients with high RUNX2 expression have a poorer survival rate than those with negative or low expression. We confirm RUNX2 as a gene that has a potentially important functional role in triple-negative breast cancer. To investigate the role of this gene in breast cancer, we made a transgenic model in which Runx2 is specifically expressed in murine mammary epithelium under the control of the mouse mammary tumour virus (MMTV) promoter. We show that ectopic Runx2 perturbs normal development in pubertal and lactating animals, delaying ductal elongation and inhibiting lobular alveolar differentiation. We also show that the Runx2 transgene elicits age-related, pre-neoplastic changes in the mammary epithelium of older transgenic animals, suggesting that elevated RUNX2 expression renders such tissue more susceptible to oncogenic changes and providing further evidence that this gene might have an important, context-dependent role in breast cancer.

  5. Anticancer Activity of Saponins from Allium chinense against the B16 Melanoma and 4T1 Breast Carcinoma Cell

    PubMed Central

    Yu, Zhihui; Zhang, Tong; Zhou, Fengjuan; Xiao, Xiuqing; Ding, Xuezhi; He, Hao; Rang, Jie; Quan, Meifang; Wang, Ting; Zuo, Mingxing; Xia, Liqiu

    2015-01-01

    The cytotoxic substance of A. chinense saponins (ACSs) was isolated using ethanol extraction and purified with the D101 macroporous adsorption resin approach. We investigated the anticancer activity of ACSs in the B16 melanoma and 4T1 breast carcinoma cell lines. Methylthioninium chloride and hematoxylin-eosin staining with Giemsa dyestuff were used when the cells were treated with ACSs. The results showed that the cells morphologies changed significantly; ACSs induced cell death in B16 and 4T1 cells based on acridine orange/ethidium bromide double fluorescence staining, with the number and degree of apoptotic tumor cells increasing as ACS concentration increased. ACSs inhibited the proliferation of B16 and 4T1 cells in a dose-dependent manner. They also inhibited cell migration and colony formation and exhibited a concentration-dependent effect. In addition, ACSs apparently inhibited the growth of melanoma in vivo. The preliminary antitumor in vivo assay revealed that early medication positively affected tumor inhibition action and effectively protected the liver and spleen of C57 BL/6 mice from injury. This study provides evidence for the cytotoxicity of ACSs and a strong foundation for further research to establish the theoretical basis for cell death and help in the design and development of new anticancer drugs. PMID:26146506

  6. Theranostic probe for simultaneous in vivo photoacoustic imaging and confined photothermolysis by pulsed laser at 1064 nm in 4T1 breast cancer model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, Min; Ku, Geng; Pageon, Laura; Li, Chun

    2014-11-01

    Here, we report that polyethylene glycol (PEG)-coated copper(ii) sulfide nanoparticles (PEG-CuS NPs) with their peak absorption tuned to 1064 nm could be used both as a contrast agent for photoacoustic tomographic imaging of mouse tumor vasculature and as a mediator for confined photothermolysis of tumor cells in an orthotopic syngeneic 4T1 breast tumor model. PEG-CuS NPs showed stronger photoacoustic signal than hollow gold nanospheres and single-wall carbon nanotubes at 1064 nm. MicroPET imaging of 4T1 tumor-bearing mice showed a gradual accumulation of the NPs in the tumor over time. About 6.5% of injected dose were taken up in each gram of tumor tissue at 24 h after intravenous injection of 64Cu-labeled PEG-CuS NPs. For both photoacoustic imaging and therapeutic studies, nanosecond (ns)-pulsed laser was delivered with Q-switched Nd:YAG at a wavelength of 1064 nm. Unlike conventional photothermal ablation therapy mediated by continuous wave laser with which heat could spread to the surrounding normal tissue, interaction of CuS NPs with short pulsed laser deliver heat rapidly to the treatment volume keeping the thermal damage confined to the target tissues. Our data demonstrated that it is possible to use a single-compartment nanoplatform to achieve both photoacoustic tomography and highly selective tumor destruction at 1064 nm in small animals.Here, we report that polyethylene glycol (PEG)-coated copper(ii) sulfide nanoparticles (PEG-CuS NPs) with their peak absorption tuned to 1064 nm could be used both as a contrast agent for photoacoustic tomographic imaging of mouse tumor vasculature and as a mediator for confined photothermolysis of tumor cells in an orthotopic syngeneic 4T1 breast tumor model. PEG-CuS NPs showed stronger photoacoustic signal than hollow gold nanospheres and single-wall carbon nanotubes at 1064 nm. MicroPET imaging of 4T1 tumor-bearing mice showed a gradual accumulation of the NPs in the tumor over time. About 6.5% of injected dose were

  7. Tumor-induced inflammation in mammary adipose tissue stimulates a vicious cycle of autotaxin expression and breast cancer progression.

    PubMed

    Benesch, Matthew G K; Tang, Xiaoyun; Dewald, Jay; Dong, Wei-Feng; Mackey, John R; Hemmings, Denise G; McMullen, Todd P W; Brindley, David N

    2015-09-01

    Compared to normal tissues, many cancer cells overexpress autotaxin (ATX). This secreted enzyme produces extracellular lysophosphatidate, which signals through 6 GPCRs to drive cancer progression. Our previous work showed that ATX inhibition decreases 4T1 breast tumor growth in BALB/c mice by 60% for about 11 d. However, 4T1 cells do not produce significant ATX. Instead, the ATX is produced by adjacent mammary adipose tissue. We investigated the molecular basis of this interaction in human and mouse breast tumors. Inflammatory mediators secreted by breast cancer cells increased ATX production in adipose tissue. The increased lysophosphatidate signaling further increased inflammatory mediator production in adipose tissue and tumors. Blocking ATX activity in mice bearing 4T1 tumors with 10 mg/kg/d ONO-8430506 (a competitive ATX inhibitor, IC90 = 100 nM; Ono Pharma Co., Ltd., Osaka, Japan) broke this vicious inflammatory cycle by decreasing 20 inflammatory mediators by 1.5-8-fold in cancer-inflamed adipose tissue. There was no significant decrease in inflammatory mediator levels in fat pads that did not bear tumors. ONO-8430506 also decreased plasma TNF-α and G-CSF cytokine levels by >70% and leukocyte infiltration in breast tumors and adjacent adipose tissue by >50%. Hence, blocking tumor-driven inflammation by ATX inhibition is effective in decreasing tumor growth in breast cancers where the cancer cells express negligible ATX.

  8. USF-1 as an Inhibitor of Mammary Gland Carcinogenesis

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2002-09-01

    was targeted to the mammary gland under the control of the mouse mammary tumor virus (mmtv) long terminal repeat. Of eight lines of transgenic mice ...be explored by testing the hypothesis that targeted overexpression of USF-2 in the mammary glands of MMTV-myc transgenic mice will cause withdrawal...USF-2 under the control of the mouse mammary tumor virus long terminal repeat. Once in hand this new line of transgenic mice would be crossed with a

  9. Nucleosome-mediated disruption of transcription factor-chromatin initiation complexes at the mouse mammary tumor virus long terminal repeat in vivo.

    PubMed Central

    Lee, H L; Archer, T K

    1994-01-01

    Glucocorticoid induction of mouse mammary tumor virus (MMTV) is short lived, returning to base levels within 24 h despite the continued presence of hormone. MMTV DNA sequences assembled as chromatin require hormone for binding by nuclear factor 1 (NF1) and octamer proteins (OCT). However, in the same cells, NF1 and OCT factors are bound to transiently introduced DNA in the absence of hormone. In contrast, recruitment of the TATA-binding protein and a novel DNA-binding protein, which we have designated FDT, for factor downstream of the TATA-binding protein, is hormone dependent for both stable and transient templates. Furthermore, transient DNA templates, but not nucleosomal templates, retain these transcription factors over the course of 24 h. This finding suggests that MMTV chromatin structure contributes to activation and cessation of transcription in vivo. Images PMID:8264599

  10. Adaptation of Laser Microdissection Technique for the Study of a Spontaneous Metastatic Mammary Carcinoma Mouse Model by NanoString Technologies.

    PubMed

    Castro, Nadia P; Merchant, Anand S; Saylor, Karen L; Anver, Miriam R; Salomon, David S; Golubeva, Yelena G

    2016-01-01

    Laser capture microdissection (LCM) of tissue is an established tool in medical research for collection of distinguished cell populations under direct microscopic visualization for molecular analysis. LCM samples have been successfully analyzed in a number of genomic and proteomic downstream molecular applications. However, LCM sample collection and preparation procedure has to be adapted to each downstream analysis platform. In this present manuscript we describe in detail the adaptation of LCM methodology for the collection and preparation of fresh frozen samples for NanoString analysis based on a study of a model of mouse mammary gland carcinoma and its lung metastasis. Our adaptation of LCM sample preparation and workflow to the requirements of the NanoString platform allowed acquiring samples with high RNA quality. The NanoString analysis of such samples provided sensitive detection of genes of interest and their associated molecular pathways. NanoString is a reliable gene expression analysis platform that can be effectively coupled with LCM.

  11. Use of the immune adherence hemagglutination test for titration of breast cancer patients' sea cross-reacting with purified mouse mammary tumor virus.

    PubMed

    Nagayoshi, S; Imai, M; Tsutsui, Y; Saga, S; Takahashi, M; Hoshino, M

    1981-02-01

    Ninety-two sera from patients with breast cancer, 42 sera from patients with neoplastic diseases other than breast cancer and 59 sera from apparently healthy women were examined by means of the immune adherence hemagglutination (IAHA) test using purified mouse mammary tumor virus (MMTV) fron RII mouse milk. It was found that 36.4% (34/96) of the sera from breast cancer patients, 7.1% (3/42) of the sera from patients with other neoplastic diseases and 5.1% (3/59) of the sera from apparently healthy women showed a positive reaction. Among the IAHA positive sera from breast cancer patients, 82.9% (29/35) showed a titer of more than 1:16. On the other hand, none of the positive sera from patients with cancers other than breast cancer showed a titer of more than 1:16. The sera from 4 breast cancer patients, which showed a positive reaction with RII MMTV in the IAHA test, were tested to examine the specificity of the reaction by using milk samples from sources other than RII mice, including C57BL mice, dogs, cattle and humans. None of the 4 sera showed a positive reaction with milk samples from sources other than the RIII mouse.

  12. Computerized segmentation algorithm with personalized atlases of murine MRIs in a SV40 large T-antigen mouse mammary cancer model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sibley, Adam R.; Markiewicz, Erica; Mustafi, Devkumar; Fan, Xiaobing; Conzen, Suzanne; Karczmar, Greg; Giger, Maryellen L.

    2016-03-01

    Quantities of MRI data, much larger than can be objectively and efficiently analyzed manually, are routinely generated in preclinical research. We aim to develop an automated image segmentation and registration pipeline to aid in analysis of image data from our high-throughput 9.4 Tesla small animal MRI imaging center. T2-weighted, fat-suppressed MRIs were acquired over 4 life-cycle time-points [up to 12 to 18 weeks] of twelve C3(1) SV40 Large T-antigen mice for a total of 46 T2-weighted MRI volumes; each with a matrix size of 192 x 256, 62 slices, in plane resolution 0.1 mm, and slice thickness 0.5 mm. These image sets were acquired with the goal of tracking and quantifying progression of mammary intraepithelial neoplasia (MIN) to invasive cancer in mice, believed to be similar to ductal carcinoma in situ (DCIS) in humans. Our segmentation algorithm takes 2D seed-points drawn by the user at the center of the 4 co-registered volumes associated with each mouse. The level set then evolves in 3D from these 2D seeds. The contour evolution incorporates texture information, edge information, and a statistical shape model in a two-step process. Volumetric DICE coefficients comparing the automatic with manual segmentations were computed and ranged between 0.75 and 0.58 for averages over the 4 life-cycle time points of the mice. Incorporation of these personalized atlases with intra and inter mouse registration is expected to enable locally and globally tracking of the morphological and textural changes in the mammary tissue and associated lesions of these mice.

  13. Transcriptomic Analysis of the Mouse Mammary Gland Reveals New Insights for the Role of Serotonin in Lactation

    PubMed Central

    Laporta, Jimena; Peñagaricano, Francisco; Hernandez, Laura L.

    2015-01-01

    Serotonin regulates numerous processes in the mammary gland. Our objective was to discover novel genes, pathways and functions which serotonin modulates during lactation. The rate limiting enzyme in the synthesis of non-neuronal serotonin is tryptophan-hydroxylase (TPH1). Therefore, we used TPH1 deficient dams (KO; serotonin deficient, n = 4) and compared them to wild-type (WT; n = 4) and rescue (RC; KO + 100 mg/kg 5-hydroxytryptophan injected daily, n = 4) dams. Mammary tissues were collected on day 10 of lactation. Total RNA extraction, amplification, library preparation and sequencing were performed following the Illumina mRNA-Seq. Overall, 97 and 204 genes (false discovery rate, FDR ≤ 0.01) exhibited a minimum of a 2-fold expression difference between WT vs. KO and WT vs. RC dams, respectively. Most differentially expressed genes were related to calcium homeostasis, apoptosis regulation, cell cycle, cell differentiation and proliferation, and the immune response. Additionally, gene set enrichment analysis using Gene Ontology and Medical Subject Headings databases revealed the alteration of several biological processes (FDR ≤ 0.01) including fat cell differentiation and lipid metabolism, regulation of extracellular signal-related kinase and mitogen-activated kinase cascades, insulin resistance, nuclear transport, membrane potential regulation, and calcium release from the endoplasmic reticulum into the cytosol. The majority of the biological processes and pathways altered in the KO dams are central for mammary gland homeostasis. Increasing peripheral serotonin in the RC dams affects specific pathways that favor lactation. Our data confirms the importance of serotonin during lactation in the mammary gland. PMID:26470019

  14. Tumor Microenvironment Regulates Metastasis and Metastasis Genes of Mouse MMTV-PymT Mammary Cancer Cells In Vivo

    PubMed Central

    Werbeck, J. L.; Thudi, N. K.; Martin, C. K.; Premanandan, C.; Yu, L.; Ostrowksi, M. C.; Rosol, T. J.

    2014-01-01

    Metastasis is the primary cause of death in breast cancer patients, yet there are challenges to modeling this process in vivo. The goal of this study was to analyze the effects of injection site on tumor growth and metastasis and gene expression of breast cancer cells in vivo using the MMTV-PymT breast cancer model (Met-1 cells). Met-1 cells were injected into 5 sites (subcutaneous, mammary fat pad, tail vein, intracardiac, and intratibial), and tumors and metastases were monitored using bioluminescent imaging and confirmed with gross necropsy and histopathology. Met-1 tumors were analyzed based on morphology and changes in gene expression in each tissue microenvironment. There were 6 permissible sites of Met-1 tumor growth (mammary gland, subcutis, lung, adrenal gland, ovary, bone). Met-1 cells grew faster in the subcutis compared to mammary fat pad tumors (highest Ki-67 index). Morphologic differences were evident in each tumor microenvironment. Finally, 7 genes were differentially expressed in the Met-1 tumors in the 6 sites of growth or metastasis. This investigation demonstrates that breast cancer progression and metastasis are regulated by not only the tumor cells but also the experimental model and unique molecular signals from the tumor microenvironment. PMID:24091811

  15. Tumor microenvironment regulates metastasis and metastasis genes of mouse MMTV-PymT mammary cancer cells in vivo.

    PubMed

    Werbeck, J L; Thudi, N K; Martin, C K; Premanandan, C; Yu, L; Ostrowksi, M C; Rosol, T J

    2014-07-01

    Metastasis is the primary cause of death in breast cancer patients, yet there are challenges to modeling this process in vivo. The goal of this study was to analyze the effects of injection site on tumor growth and metastasis and gene expression of breast cancer cells in vivo using the MMTV-PymT breast cancer model (Met-1 cells). Met-1 cells were injected into 5 sites (subcutaneous, mammary fat pad, tail vein, intracardiac, and intratibial), and tumors and metastases were monitored using bioluminescent imaging and confirmed with gross necropsy and histopathology. Met-1 tumors were analyzed based on morphology and changes in gene expression in each tissue microenvironment. There were 6 permissible sites of Met-1 tumor growth (mammary gland, subcutis, lung, adrenal gland, ovary, bone). Met-1 cells grew faster in the subcutis compared to mammary fat pad tumors (highest Ki-67 index). Morphologic differences were evident in each tumor microenvironment. Finally, 7 genes were differentially expressed in the Met-1 tumors in the 6 sites of growth or metastasis. This investigation demonstrates that breast cancer progression and metastasis are regulated by not only the tumor cells but also the experimental model and unique molecular signals from the tumor microenvironment.

  16. Glucose metabolite patterns as markers of functional differentiation in freshly isolated and cultured mouse mammary epithelial cells

    SciTech Connect

    Emerman, J.T.; Bartley, J.C.; Bissel, M.J.

    1981-01-01

    In the mammary gland of non-ruminant animals, glucose is utilized in a characteristic and unique way during lacation. By measuring the incorporation of glucose carbon from (U-/sup 14/C)glucose into intermediary metabolitees and metabolic products in mammary epithelia cells from virgin, pregnant, and lacating mice, we domonstrate that glucose metabolite patterns can be used to recognize stages of differentiated function. For these cells, the rates of synthesis of glycogen and lactose, the ratio of lactate to alanine, and the ratio of citrate to malate are important parameters in identifying the degree of expression of differentiation. We further show that these patterns can be used as markers to determine the differentiated state of cultured mammary epithelial cells. Cells maintained on plastic substrates lose their distinctive glucose metabolite patterns while those on floating collagen gels do not. Cells isolated from pregnant mice and cultured on collagen gels have a pattern similar to that of their freshly isolated counter-parts. When isolated from lacating mice, the metabolite patterns of cells cultured on collagen gels are different from that of the cells of origin, and resembles that of freshly isolated cells from pregnant mice. Our findings suggest that the floating collagen gels under the culture conditions used in these experiments provide an environment for the functional expression of the pregnant state, while additional factors are needed for the expression of the lactating state.

  17. GLUCOSE METABOLITE PATTERNS AS MARKERS OF FUNCTIONAL DIFFERENTIATION IN FRESHLY ISOLATED AND CULTURED MOUSE MAMMARY EPITHELIAL CELLS

    SciTech Connect

    Emerman, J.T.; Bartley, J.C.; Bissell, M.J.

    1980-06-01

    In the mammary gland of nonruminant animals, glucose is utilized in a characteristic and unique way during lactation. We have measured the incorporation of glucose carbon from [U-{sup 14}C] glucose into intermediary metabolites and metabolic products in mammary epithelial cells from virgin, pregnant, and lactating mice and demonstrate that glucose metabolite patterns can be used to recognize stages of differentiated function. For these cells, the rates of synthesis of glycogen and lactose, the ratio of lactate to alanine, and the ratio of citrate to malate were important parameters in identifying the degree of expression of differentiation. We further show that these patterns can be used as markers to determine the differentiated state of cultured mammary epithelial cells. Cells maintained on plastic substrates lose their distinctive glucose metabolite patterns while those on floating collagen gels do not. Cells from pregnant mice have a pattern similar to freshly isolated cells from pregnant mice. The pattern of cells from lactating mice is different from that of the cells of origin, and resembles that of the cells from pregnant mice. Our findings suggest that the floating collagen gels under the culture conditions used in these experiments provide an environment for the functional expression of the pregnant state, while additional factors are needed for the expression of the lactating state.

  18. Lunasin Attenuates Obesity-Associated Metastasis of 4T1 Breast Cancer Cell through Anti-Inflammatory Property

    PubMed Central

    Hsieh, Chia-Chien; Wang, Chih-Hsuan; Huang, Yu-Shan

    2016-01-01

    Obesity prevalence is increasing worldwide and is accompanied by low-grade inflammation with macrophage infiltration, which is linked with a poorer breast cancer prognosis. Lunasin is a natural seed peptide with chemopreventive properties and multiple bioactivities. This is the first study to explore the chemopreventive effects of lunasin in the obesity-related breast cancer condition using 4T1 breast cancer cells, 3T3-L1 adipocytes, and conditioned media. An obesity-related environment, such as leptin-treatment or adipocyte-conditioned medium (Ad-CM), promoted 4T1 cell proliferation and metastasis. Lunasin treatment inhibited metastasis of breast cancer cells, partially through modestly inhibiting production of the angiogenesis-mediator vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) and significantly by inhibiting secretion in the Ad-CM condition. Subsequently, two adipocytes inflammation models, 3T3-L1 adipocytes were stimulated by tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-α, and RAW 264.7 cell-conditioned medium (RAW-CM) was used to mimic the obese microenvironment. Lunasin significantly inhibited interleukin (IL)-6 and macrophage chemoattractant protein (MCP)-1 secretion by TNF-α stimulation, and MCP-1 secretion in the RAW-CM model. This study highlights that lunasin suppressed 3T3-L1 adipocyte inflammation and inhibited 4T1 breast cancer cell migration. Interestingly, lunasin exerted more effective anti-metastasis activity in the obesity-related condition models, indicating that it possesses anti-inflammatory properties and blocks adipocyte-cancer cell cross-talk. PMID:27983683

  19. Extract of Azadirachta indica (Neem) Leaf Induces Apoptosis in 4T1 Breast Cancer BALB/c Mice

    PubMed Central

    Othman, Fauziah; Motalleb, Gholamreza; Lam Tsuey Peng, Sally; Rahmat, Asmah; Fakurazi, Sharida; Pei Pei, Chong

    2011-01-01

    Objective: Azadirachta indica (Neem) has been used traditionally for many centuries. Some impressive therapeutic qualities have been discovered. However, the therapeutic effect of neem leaf extract in 4T1 breast cancer has not been documented. The purpose of the present study is to investigate the therapeutic effect of ethanolic Neem leaf extract in an in vivo 4T1 breast cancer model in mice. Materials and Methods: A total of 84 female BALB/c mice were divided randomly into 7 groups (3 non-cancerous groups and 4 cancerous groups) consisting of 12 mice per group. The 3 non-cancerous groups were normal mice treated with 0.5% of Tween 20 in phosphate buffer saline (PBS) (NC), 250 mg/kg Neem (N250) or 500 mg/kg Neem (N500). The 4 cancerous groups were; cancer controls treated with 0.5% of Tween 20 in PBS (CC), and cancerous mice treated with 0.5 µg/mL tamoxifen citrate (CT), 250 mg/kg Neem leaf extract (CN 250) or 500 mg/kg Neem leaf extract (CN 500). Terminal deoxynucleotidyl transferase dUTP nick end labeling (TUNEL) assays were used to evaluate apoptosis (cell death) in the breast cancer tissues. SPSS software, version 14 was used for statistical analysis. Statistical significance was defined as p≤0.05. Non parametric analysis of variance (ANOVA) was performed with the Kruskal Wallis test for the TUNEL assays. Parametric data among the groups was compared using ANOVA. Results: TUNEL assays showed that the CN 250 and CN 500 groups had a higher incidence of apoptosis compared with the cancer controls. Conclusion: The findings showed that neem leaf extract induces apoptosis in 4T1 breast cancer BALB/c mice. PMID:23507990

  20. Mammary tumors

    SciTech Connect

    Weller, R.E.

    1988-10-01

    Mammary neoplasia is one of the more common malignancies affecting domestic species. Despite their importance, they are often over- diagnosed, undertreated and subject to several misconceptions propagated by veterinarians and pet owners alike. Mammary neoplasia is the most frequent tumor type encountered in the female accounting for almost half of all malignancies reported. The canine has the highest incidence of mammary tumors of all domestic species. In the dog, about 65 percent of mammary tumors are benign mixed tumors, and 25 percent are carcinomas. The rest are adenomas, myoepitheliomas, and malignant mixed tumors. The age distribution of mammary tumors closely follows the age distribution of most tumors in the dog. Mammary tumors are rare in dogs 2 years old, but incidence begins to increase sharply at approximately 6 years of age. Median age at diagnosis is about 10 years. No breed predilection has been consistently reported.

  1. Establishment and characterization of mouse mammary carcinoma cell lines expressing RET with a multiple endocrine neoplasia 2A mutation.

    PubMed

    Kawai, Kumi; Jijiwa, Mayumi; Shimono, Yohei; Kurokawa, Kei; Murakumo, Yoshiki; Ichihara, Masatoshi; Takahashi, Masahide

    2003-11-01

    We recently generated transgenic mice expressing the RET proto-oncogene with a multiple endocrine neoplasia type 2A mutation (RET-MEN2A). Mammary tumors with frequent lung metastasis were developed in 22% of female transgenic mice in a stochastic fashion. In the current study, we established two cell lines (named MKK-f and MKK-s) from mammary tumors developed in RET-MEN2A transgenic mice. MKK-f and MKK-s were derived from well-differentiated ductal carcinoma and sarcomatous spindle cell carcinoma, respectively. MKK-f cells show epithelial-like morphology with a doubling time of 19 h, and MKK-s cells show spindle-shaped morphology with a doubling time of 15 h. When inoculated in immunodeficient mice, both cell lines were tumorigenic, metastasized to the lung and displayed histological features similar to those of the primary tumors. They maintained a high level of RET expression and activation of signaling molecules downstream of RET. Consistent with the histological phenotype, expression of E-cadherin was almost undetectable in MKK-s cells, whereas its expression was very high in MKK-f cells. When the difference of gene expression between the two cell lines was analyzed using cDNA microarrays including approximately 900 genes/ESTs, a total of 21 up- or down-regulated (> 2.0-fold) genes were identified. Differentially regulated genes included thymosin beta-10, fibroblast growth factor receptor 4, aldo-keto reductase and caspase 6 genes, which are known to be associated with tumor development and progression. These results may reflect the profiles of the transcriptional changes associated with dedifferentiation or progression of mammary carcinomas developed in genetically engineered mice.

  2. Development of a Novel Therapeutic Paradigm Utilizing a Mammary Gland-Targeted, Bin-1 Knockout Mouse Model

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2007-03-01

    allogeneic MHC class I and class II molecules. Used to assess T-cell functional capacity. Plasmacytoid morphology There are two main subsets of...STAT3β- transfected tumour cells led to increased expression of IL12, MHC class II and CD40, and concomitantly increased the ability of the DCs to...operation of the ‘floxed’ allele in the mammary gland. In the ‘tri-lox’ scheme used, deletion of exon 3 leads to exon 2 to 4 splicing, producing an

  3. Laser Raman Tweezer Spectroscopy (RTS) for the Molecular and Functional Characterization of Single Live Mouse Mammary Tumor Initiating Cells (TIC)

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2013-04-01

    15 minutes), then bounded by a pap- pen in circular form. We then covered the cells with 15-20µl of PBS to be analyzed by a 100x immersion lens on...microscope stage and PBS was continually added to the pap- pen circle every 15 minutes to combat evaporation. In this way, the cells could be kept in...Bioengineering Research Center, Lawrence, Kansas, April 12, 2012. • An abstract was submitted to the 2013 Mammary Gland Biology Gordon Conference and was

  4. Mammary phenotypic expression induced in epidermal cells by embryonic mammary mesenchyme.

    PubMed

    Cunha, G R; Young, P; Christov, K; Guzman, R; Nandi, S; Talamantes, F; Thordarson, G

    1995-01-01

    The goal of this research was to establish methods for inducing mammary epithelial differentiation from nonmammary epithelium. For this purpose, mid-ventral or dorsal epidermis (skin epithelium; SKE) from 13-day rat or mouse embryos was associated with 13-day embryonic mouse mammary mesenchyme (mammary gland mesenchyme; MGM) (mouse MGM+rat or mouse SKE). The resultant MGM+SKE recombinants as well as controls (homotypic mouse mammary recombinants, homotypic mouse skin recombinants and mouse mammary mesenchyme by itself) were grafted under the renal capsule of syngeneic or athymic female nude mouse hosts. Most female hosts were induced to undergo lactogenesis by grafting an adult pituitary which elicited a state of hyperprolactinemia. Tissue recombinants of mouse MGM+rat or mouse SKE grown for 1 month in vivo formed a hair-bearing keratinized skin from which mammary ductal structures extended into the mesenchyme. The ducts were composed of columnar luminal epithelial cells as well as basal, actin-positive myoepithelial cells. When grown in pituitary-grafted hosts, the ductal epithelial cells expressed casein and alpha-lactalbumin as judged by immunocytochemistry. The expression of caseins in MGM+SKE recombinants was confirmed by Western blot. The epithelial cells in mouse MGM+rat SKE recombinants expressing milk proteins were shown to be rat cells while the surrounding connective tissue was composed of mouse cells based upon staining with Hoechst dye 33258. Using mammary-specific markers, these studies confirmed the earlier morphological studies of Propper and unequivocally demonstrated for the first time that embryonic mammary mesenchyme can induce morphological and functional mammary differentiation from nonmammary epithelium.

  5. Inhibitory Effects of Dopamine Receptor D1 Agonist on Mammary Tumor and Bone Metastasis

    PubMed Central

    Minami, Kazumasa; Liu, Shengzhi; Liu, Yang; Chen, Andy; Wan, Qiaoqiao; Na, Sungsoo; Li, Bai-Yan; Matsuura, Nariaki; Koizumi, Masahiko; Yin, Yukun; Gan, Liangying; Xu, Aihua; Li, Jiliang; Nakshatri, Harikrishna; Yokota, Hiroki

    2017-01-01

    Dopaminergic signaling plays a critical role in the nervous system, but little is known about its potential role in breast cancer and bone metabolism. A screening of ~1,000 biologically active compounds revealed that a selective agonist of dopamine receptor D1 (DRD1), A77636, inhibited proliferation of 4T1.2 mammary tumor cells as well as MDA-MB-231 breast cancer cells. Herein, we examined the effect of A77636 on bone quality using a mouse model of bone metastasis from mammary tumor. A77636 inhibited migration of cancer cells in a DRD1-dependent fashion and suppressed development of bone-resorbing osteoclasts by downregulating NFATc1 through the elevation of phosphorylation of eIF2α. In the mouse model of bone metastasis, A77636 reduced osteolytic lesions and prevented mechanical weakening of the femur and tibia. Collectively, we expect that dopaminergic signaling might provide a novel therapeutic target for breast cancer and bone metastasis. PMID:28374823

  6. Effects of prolactin on lipid biosynthesis and protein kinase C in mouse mammary gland and NB sub 2 node lymphoma cells

    SciTech Connect

    Waters, S.B.

    1989-01-01

    In cultured mouse mammary gland explants derived from 12-14 day pregnant mice, prolactin (PRL) stimulates an increased rate of incorporation of ({sup 14}C)acetate and ({sup 3}H)glucose into triglycerides. The effect is significant between 4-6 hours after addition of PRL. Enzymes likely to be rate-limiting to this process include acetyl CoA carboxylase (ACC), fatty acid synthetase, acetyl CoA synthetase, and/or pyruvate dehydrogenase (PDH). It is possible that early perturbations of phospholipid (PL) metabolism may represent the initial cellular effects of PRL. Consequently the effect of PRL on the incorporation of several precursors into PLs was determined. Employing ({sup 14}C)acetate as a substrate, PRL stimulates its incorporation into phosphatidylcholine, as early as 1-2 hours, and phosphatidylinositol, phosphatidylserine and phosphatidylethanolamine by 2-4 hours. ({sup 3}H)Glycerol incorporation into triglycerides was significantly enhanced by PRL between 4-6 hours, but not into PLs until after 16 hours. Similarly, PRL did not enhance incorporation of ({sup 32}P)O{sub 4}, ({sup 3}H)choline, ({sup 3}H)inositol or ({sup 3}H)seine into PLs until 14-16 hours after addition to culture. 12-O-tetradeconyl-phorbol-13-acetate (TPA) was found to increase ({sup 3}H)uridine incorporation into RNA, and ({sup 3}H)leucine incorporation into caseins in a PRL-like manner. In addition, PRL stimulates a transient, time-dependent translocation of PKC to the particulate fraction of mammary gland explants.

  7. Detection of in situ mammary cancer in a transgenic mouse model: in vitro and in vivo MRI studies demonstrate histopathologic correlation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jansen, S. A.; Conzen, S. D.; Fan, X.; Krausz, T.; Zamora, M.; Foxley, S.; River, J.; Newstead, G. M.; Karczmar, G. S.

    2008-10-01

    Improving the prevention and detection of preinvasive ductal carcinoma in situ (DCIS) is expected to lower both morbidity and mortality from breast cancer. Transgenic mouse models can be used as a 'test bed' to develop new imaging methods and to evaluate the efficacy of candidate preventive therapies. We hypothesized that despite its microscopic size, early murine mammary cancer, including DCIS, might be accurately detected by MRI. C3(1) SV40 TAg female mice (n = 23) between 10 and 18 weeks of age were selected for study. Eleven mice were subjected to in vitro imaging using a T2-weighted spin echo sequence and 12 mice were selected for in vivo imaging using a T1-weighted gradient echo, a T2-weighted spin echo and high spectral and spatial resolution imaging sequences. The imaged glands were carefully dissected, formalin fixed and paraffin embedded, and then H&E stained sections were obtained. The ratio of image-detected versus histologically detected cancers was obtained by reviewing the MR images and H&E sections independently and using histology as the gold standard. MR images were able to detect 12/12 intramammary lymph nodes, 1/1 relatively large (~5 mm) tumor, 17/18 small (~1 mm) tumors and 13/16 ducts distended with DCIS greater than 300 µm. Significantly, there were no false positives—i.e., image detection always corresponded to a histologically detectable cancer in this model. These results indicate that MR imaging can reliably detect both preinvasive in situ and early invasive mammary cancers in mice with high sensitivity. This technology is an important step toward the more effective use of non-invasive imaging in pre-clinical studies of breast cancer prevention, detection and treatment.

  8. Staphylococcus aureus and Lipopolysaccharide Modulate Gene Expressions of Drug Transporters in Mouse Mammary Epithelial Cells Correlation to Inflammatory Biomarkers

    PubMed Central

    Yagdiran, Yagmur; Tallkvist, Jonas; Artursson, Karin

    2016-01-01

    Inflammation in the mammary gland (mastitis) is the most common disease in dairy herds worldwide, often caused by the pathogens Staphylococcus aureus (S. aureus) and Escherichia coli (E. coli). Little is known about the effects of mastitis on drug transporters and the impact on transporter-mediated excretion of drugs into milk. We used murine mammary epithelial HC11 cells, after lactogenic differentiation into a secreting phenotype, and studied gene expressions of ABC- and SLC- transporters after treatment of cells with S. aureus and lipopolysaccharide, an endotoxin secreted by E. coli. The studied transporters were Bcrp, Mdr1, Mrp1, Oatp1a5, Octn1 and Oct1. In addition, Csn2, the gene encoding β-casein, was analyzed. As biomarkers of the inflammatory response, gene expressions of the cytokines Il6 and Tnfα and the chemokine Cxcl2 were determined. Our results show that S. aureus and LPS treatment of cells, at non-cytotoxic concentrations, induced an up-regulation of Mdr1 and of the inflammatory biomarkers, except that Tnfα was not affected by lipopolysaccharide. By simple regression analysis we could demonstrate statistically significant positive correlations between each of the transporters with each of the inflammatory biomarkers in cells treated with S. aureus. The coefficients of determination (R2) were 0.7–0.9 for all but one correlation. After treatment of cells with lipopolysaccharide, statistically significant correlations were only found between Mdr1 and the two parameters Cxcl2 and Il6. The expression of Csn2 was up-regulated in cells treated with S. aureus, indicating that the secretory function of the cells was not impaired. The strong correlation in gene expressions between transporters and inflammatory biomarkers may suggest a co-regulation and that the transporters have a role in the transport of cytokines and chemokines. Our results demonstrate that transporters in mammary cells can be affected by infection, which may have an impact on

  9. Lack of growth of a pregnancy-dependent mouse mammary tumor (TPDMT-4) in the absence of pituitary hormones.

    PubMed

    Matsuzawa, A; Yamamoto, T

    1977-04-01

    Mammary tumors of line TPDMT-4, established in DDD mice, were characterized by growth during pregnancy and regression after parturition; this resulted in higher growth peaks in subsequent pregnancies in breeders and no growth in virgins. The effect of hypophysectomy on tumor growth in mice given 17beta-estradiol (E) and progesterone (P) or deoxycorticosterone acetate (DCA) was investigated. Growth of cancers occurred in E+P- and E+DCA-treated virgins, but not in cholesterol-treated virgins. Tumors did not grow to palpable sizes in cholesterol-, E+P-, and E+DCA-treated hypophysectomized virgins; this indicated that pituitary hormones were essential for tumor growth. Impalpable cholesterol-treated, 5 of 10 E+P-treated, and 3 of 6 E+DCA-treated hypophysectomized animals. The neoplasms showed ductal and tubular structures that were lined by a single layer of well-differentiated buoidal epithelium, which suggested that the tumor line might be derived from ductal cells.

  10. Glucocorticoid receptors in primary cultures of mouse mammary epithelial cells: characterization and modulation by prolactin and cortisol

    SciTech Connect

    Schneider, W.; Shyamala, G.

    1985-06-01

    Mammary epithelial cells isolated from midpregant mice and cultured on collagen gels contain soluble glucocorticoid receptors. The kinetics of binding of dexamethasone reveal a saturable binding site (dissociation constant (K /sub d/), approximately 1 nM), and the binding site obeys a steroid specificity characteristic of a glucocorticoid receptor. As with the receptor isolated from intact glands, the receptor from the cultured cells also requires the addition of dithiothreitol for maximal binding of dexamethasone. The receptors are maintained at in vivo levels (approximately 1.3 pmol/mg DNA) for at least a period of 10 days in culture. However, the presence of both cortisol and PRL is required for the maintenance of the receptors, and the effect of both these hormones is dose dependent.

  11. The 5′-untranslated region of the mouse mammary tumor virus mRNA exhibits cap-independent translation initiation

    PubMed Central

    Vallejos, Maricarmen; Ramdohr, Pablo; Valiente-Echeverría, Fernando; Tapia, Karla; Rodriguez, Felipe E.; Lowy, Fernando; Huidobro-Toro, J. Pablo; Dangerfield, John A.; López-Lastra, Marcelo

    2010-01-01

    In this study, we demonstrate the identification of an internal ribosome entry site (IRES) within the 5′-untranslated region (5′-UTR) of the mouse mammary tumor virus (MMTV). The 5′-UTR of the full-length mRNA derived from the infectious, complete MMTV genome was cloned into a dual luciferase reporter construct containing an upstream Renilla luciferase gene (RLuc) and a downstream firefly luciferase gene (FLuc). In rabbit reticulocyte lysate, the MMTV 5′-UTR was capable of driving translation of the second cistron. In vitro translational activity from the MMTV 5′-UTR was resistant to the addition of m7GpppG cap-analog and cleavage of eIF4G by foot-and-mouth disease virus (FMDV) L-protease. IRES activity was also demonstrated in the Xenopus laevis oocyte by micro-injection of capped and polyadenylated bicistronic RNAs harboring the MMTV-5′-UTR. Finally, transfection assays showed that the MMTV-IRES exhibits cell type-dependent translational activity, suggesting a requirement for as yet unidentified cellular factors for its optimal function. PMID:19889724

  12. Structure of adduct X, the last unknown of the six major DNA adducts of mitomycin C formed in EMT6 mouse mammary tumor cells.

    PubMed

    Palom, Y; Belcourt, M F; Musser, S M; Sartorelli, A C; Rockwell, S; Tomasz, M

    2000-06-01

    Treatment of EMT6 mouse mammary tumor cells with mitomycin C (MC) results in the formation of six major MC-DNA adducts. We identified the last unknown of these ("adduct X") as a guanine N(2) adduct of 2, 7-diaminomitosene (2,7-DAM), in which the mitosene is linked at its C-10 position to guanine N(2). The assigned structure is based on UV and mass spectra of adduct X isolated directly from the cells, as well as on its difference UV, second-derivative UV, and circular dichroism spectra, synthesis from [8-(3)H]deoxyguanosine, and observation of its heat stability. These tests were carried out using 17 microg of synthetic material altogether. The mechanism of formation of adduct X involves reductive metabolism of MC to 2,7-DAM, which undergoes a second round of reductive activation to alkylate DNA, yielding adduct X and another 2,7-DAM-guanine adduct (adduct Y), which is linked at guanine N7 to the mitosene. Adduct Y has been described previously. Adduct X is formed preferentially at GpC, while adduct Y favors the GpG sequence. In contrast to MC-DNA adducts, the 2,7-DAM-DNA adducts are not cytotoxic.

  13. Mouse Mammary Tumor Virus Signal Peptide Uses a Novel p97-Dependent and Derlin-Independent Retrotranslocation Mechanism To Escape Proteasomal Degradation

    PubMed Central

    Byun, Hyewon; Das, Poulami; Yu, Houqing; Aleman, Alejandro; Lozano, Mary M.; Matouschek, Andreas

    2017-01-01

    ABSTRACT Multiple pathogens, including viruses and bacteria, manipulate endoplasmic reticulum-associated degradation (ERAD) to avoid the host immune response and promote their replication. The betaretrovirus mouse mammary tumor virus (MMTV) encodes Rem, which is a precursor protein that is cleaved into a 98-amino-acid signal peptide (SP) and a C-terminal protein (Rem-CT). SP uses retrotranslocation for ER membrane extraction and yet avoids ERAD by an unknown mechanism to enter the nucleus and function as a Rev-like protein. To determine how SP escapes ERAD, we used a ubiquitin-activated interaction trap (UBAIT) screen to trap and identify transient protein interactions with SP, including the ERAD-associated p97 ATPase, but not E3 ligases or Derlin proteins linked to retrotranslocation, polyubiquitylation, and proteasomal degradation of extracted proteins. A dominant negative p97 ATPase inhibited both Rem and SP function. Immunoprecipitation experiments indicated that Rem, but not SP, is polyubiquitylated. Using both yeast and mammalian expression systems, linkage of a ubiquitin-like domain (UbL) to SP or Rem induced degradation by the proteasome, whereas SP was stable in the absence of the UbL. ERAD-associated Derlin proteins were not required for SP activity. Together, these results suggested that Rem uses a novel p97-dependent, Derlin-independent retrotranslocation mechanism distinct from other pathogens to avoid SP ubiquitylation and proteasomal degradation. PMID:28351922

  14. Genomic DNA of MCF-7 breast cancer cells not an ideal choice as positive control for PCR amplification based detection of Mouse Mammary Tumor Virus-Like Sequences.

    PubMed

    Kulkarni, Bhushan B; Hiremath, Shivaprakash V; Kulkarni, Suyamindra S; Hallikeri, Umesh R; Patil, Basavaraj R; Gai, Pramod B

    2013-11-01

    The identification of the etiology of breast cancer is a crucial research issue for the development of an effective preventive and treatment strategies. Researchers are exploring the possible involvement of Mouse Mammary Tumor Virus (MMTV) in causing human breast cancer. Hence, it becomes very important to use a consistent positive control agent in PCR amplification based detection of MMTV-Like Sequence (MMTV-LS) in human breast cancer for accurate and reproducible results. This study was done to investigate the feasibility of using genomic DNA of MCF-7 breast cancer cells to detect MMTV-LS using PCR amplification based detection. MMTV env and SAG gene located at the 3' long terminal repeat (LTR) sequences were targeted for the PCR based detection. No amplification was observed in case of the genomic DNA of MCF-7 breast cancer cells. However, the 2.7 kb DNA fragment comprising MMTV env and SAG LTR sequences yielded the products of desired size. From these results it can be concluded that Genomic DNA of MCF-7 cell is not a suitable choice as positive control for PCR or RT-PCR based detection of MMTV-LS. It is also suggested that plasmids containing the cloned genes or sequences of MMTV be used as positive control for detection of MMTV-LS.

  15. Evaluation Frequency of Merkel Cell Polyoma, Epstein-Barr and Mouse Mammary Tumor Viruses in Patients with Breast Cancer in Kerman, Southeast of Iran.

    PubMed

    Reza, Malekpour Afshar; Reza, Mollaie Hamid; Mahdiyeh, Lashkarizadeh; Mehdi, Fazlalipour; Hamid, Zeinali Nejad

    2015-01-01

    Breast cancer is the most common cancer among women worldwide. Roles of the Epstein-Barr, Merkel cell polyoma and mouse mammary tumor viruses in breast carcinogenesis are still controversial although any relationship would clearly be important for breast cancer etiology, early detection and prevention. In the present study associations between EBV, MMTV and Merkel cell polyoma virus and breast cancer in 100 Iranian patients were evaluated using paraffin-embedded tissues. EBER RNA and expression of p53 and large T antigen were evaluated by real time PCR and CD34, p63, HER2, PR and ER markers were studied by immunohistochemistry. EBV was detected in 8/100 (8%), MMTV in 12/100 (12%), MPy in 3/100 (3%) and EBER RNA in 18/100 (18%) cases. None of the control samples demonstrated any of the viruses. p53 was suppressed in EBV, MPy and MMTV positive samples. The large T antigen rate was raised in MPy positive samples. Our results showed that EBV, MMTV and the Merkel cell polyoma virus are foundwith some proportion of breast cancers in our patients, suggesting that these viruses might have a significant role in breast cancer in Kerman, southeast of Iran.

  16. Recombinant R-spondin2 and Wnt3a Up- and Down-Regulate Novel Target Genes in C57MG Mouse Mammary Epithelial Cells

    PubMed Central

    Baljinnyam, Bolormaa; Klauzinska, Malgorzata; Saffo, Saad; Callahan, Robert; Rubin, Jeffrey S.

    2012-01-01

    R-spondins (Rspos) comprise a family of four secreted proteins that have important roles in cell proliferation, cell fate determination and organogenesis. Rspos typically exert their effects by potentiating the Wnt/β-catenin signaling pathway. To systematically investigate the impact of Rspo/Wnt on gene expression, we performed a microarray analysis using C57MG mouse mammary epithelial cells treated with recombinant Rspo2 and/or Wnt3a. We observed the up- and down-regulation of several previously unidentified target genes, including ones that encode proteins involved in immune responses, effectors of other growth factor signaling pathways and transcription factors. Dozens of these changes were validated by quantitative real time RT-PCR. Time course experiments showed that Rspo2 typically had little or no effect on Wnt-dependent gene expression at 3 or 6 h, but enhanced expression at 24 h, consistent with biochemical data indicating that Rspo2 acts primarily to sustain rather than acutely increase Wnt pathway activation. Up-regulation of gene expression was inhibited by pre-treatment with Dickkopf1, a Wnt/β-catenin pathway antagonist, and by siRNA knockdown of β-catenin expression. While Dickkopf1 blocked Rspo2/Wnt3a-dependent down-regulation, a number of down-regulated genes were not affected by β-catenin knockdown, suggesting that in these instances down-regulation was mediated by a β-catenin-independent mechanism. PMID:22238613

  17. Adaptation of Laser Microdissection Technique for the Study of a Spontaneous Metastatic Mammary Carcinoma Mouse Model by NanoString Technologies

    PubMed Central

    Saylor, Karen L.; Anver, Miriam R.; Salomon, David S.; Golubeva, Yelena G.

    2016-01-01

    Laser capture microdissection (LCM) of tissue is an established tool in medical research for collection of distinguished cell populations under direct microscopic visualization for molecular analysis. LCM samples have been successfully analyzed in a number of genomic and proteomic downstream molecular applications. However, LCM sample collection and preparation procedure has to be adapted to each downstream analysis platform. In this present manuscript we describe in detail the adaptation of LCM methodology for the collection and preparation of fresh frozen samples for NanoString analysis based on a study of a model of mouse mammary gland carcinoma and its lung metastasis. Our adaptation of LCM sample preparation and workflow to the requirements of the NanoString platform allowed acquiring samples with high RNA quality. The NanoString analysis of such samples provided sensitive detection of genes of interest and their associated molecular pathways. NanoString is a reliable gene expression analysis platform that can be effectively coupled with LCM. PMID:27077656

  18. An obesity-dependent lactation defect in the viable yellow agouti mouse is associated with mammary inflammation

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Maternal obesity is known to delay lactogenesis in breast-feeding women, as well as negatively impact lactation in other species. Obesity is also understood to be associated with inflammation. Work with the viable yellow agouti (Avy) mouse in our laboratory has documented a lactation defect in obese...

  19. Wwox inactivation enhances mammary tumorigenesis.

    PubMed

    Abdeen, S K; Salah, Z; Maly, B; Smith, Y; Tufail, R; Abu-Odeh, M; Zanesi, N; Croce, C M; Nawaz, Z; Aqeilan, R I

    2011-09-08

    Breast cancer is the leading cause of cancer-related death in women worldwide. Expression of the WWOX tumor suppressor is absent or reduced in a large proportion of breast tumors suggesting that loss of WWOX may contribute to breast tumorigenesis. Wwox-deficient mice die by 3-4 weeks of age precluding adult tumor analysis. To evaluate the effect of WWOX-altered expression on mammary tumor formation, the Wwox-heterozygous allele was back crossed onto the C3H mammary tumor-susceptible genetic background (Wwox(C3H)+/-) and incidence of mammary tumor formation was evaluated. Although 50% of the female Wwox(C3H)+/- mice developed mammary carcinomas, only 7% of Wwox(C3H)+/+ mice did. Intriguingly, mammary tumors in Wwox(C3H)+/- mice frequently lost WWOX protein expression suggesting a genetic predisposition toward mammary tumorigenesis. Immunohistochemical staining of hormone receptors revealed loss of estrogen receptor-α (ER) and progesterone receptor in the majority of these tumors. In vitro, depletion of WWOX in MCF7 ER-positive cells led to reduced ER expression and reduced sensitivity to tamoxifen and estrogen treatment and was associated with enhanced survival and anchorage-independent growth. Finally, cDNA array analyses of murine normal mammary epithelial cells and mammary tumors identified 163 significantly downreguated and 129 upregulated genes in the tumors. The majority of differentially expressed genes were part of pathways involved in cellular movement, cell-to-cell signaling and interaction, cellular development, cellular growth and proliferation and cell death. These changes in gene expression of mouse mammary tumors in Wwox(C3H)+/- mice resemble, at least in part, human breast cancer development. Our findings demonstrate the critical role that the WWOX tumor suppressor gene has in preventing tumorigenesis in breast cancer.

  20. Expression of the fusogenic p14 FAST protein from a replication-defective adenovirus vector does not provide a therapeutic benefit in an immunocompetent mouse model of cancer

    PubMed Central

    Wong, C M; Nash, L A; Del Papa, J; Poulin, K L; Falls, T; Bell, J C; Parks, R J

    2016-01-01

    When injected directly into a tumor mass, adenovirus (Ad) vectors only transduce cells immediately along the injection tract. Expression of fusogenic proteins from the Ad vector can lead to syncytium formation, which efficiently spreads the therapeutic effect. Fusogenic proteins can also cause cancer cell death directly, and enhance the release of exosome-like particles containing tumor-associated antigens, which boosts the anti-tumor immune response. In this study, we have examined whether delivery of an early region 1 (E1)-deleted, replication-defective Ad vector encoding the reptilian reovirus p14 fusion-associated small transmembrane (FAST) protein can provide therapeutic efficacy in an immunocompetent mouse tumor model. A high multiplicity of infection of AdFAST is required to induce cell fusion in mouse mammary carcinoma 4T1 cells in vitro, and FAST protein expression caused a modest reduction in cell membrane integrity and metabolic activity compared with cells infected with a control vector. Cells expressing FAST protein released significantly higher quantities of exosomes. In immunocompetent Balb/C mice harboring subcutaneous 4T1 tumors, AdFAST did not induce detectable cancer cell fusion, promote tumor regression or prolong mouse survival compared with untreated mice. This study suggests that in the context of the 4T1 model, Ad-mediated FAST protein expression did not elicit a therapeutic effect. PMID:27740615

  1. 2D immunoblots show differential response of mouse IgG and IgM antibodies to antigens of mammary carcinoma 4 T1 cells

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Immunosuppression in breast cancer has been reported in women and in the highly metastatic mouse mammary tumor model 4 T1. The immunosuppressive environment complicates the use of the humoral response against the tumor as an immunodiagnostic tool. IgM has not been used in immunodiagnostic in part because its antitumor responses, both innate and adaptive, have not been studied in function of time in breast cancer. We show a new approach to analyzing the mouse humoral immune response, and compare the evolution with time of IgG and IgM responses against the antigens of 4 T1 cells. Methods The study is based on 2-dimensional immunoblotting detection of antigens from 4 T1 cells by the IgG and IgM antibodies in the serum of female mice injected with 4 T1 cells. Results There was a high variability in the intra-and inter-mouse response. Variability in the IgM response was manifested as a pattern of spots that could become a multibinomial variable of 0 and 1, which could represent a signature of the immune response. Different numbers of spots was found in the IgG and IgM responses from week 1 to 5. On average, the IgM had more but the IgG response decrease with the time. The natural IgM at t = 0 responds stronger than w1; the adaptive response of both IgM and IgG were elicited where, with the former being stronger better than the latter. Antigens that are recognized by some female mice in the first week are also recognized by other female mice at time 0. Contamination of the natural IgM makes difficult use the adaptive IgM as a tool for immunodiagnostic. Conclusions IgM and IgG response varied with the time and individuals. Spot variation in 2D pattern for the natural IgM could be expressed as a binomial signature, which opens up the way to correlate a particular pattern with resistance or susceptibility. This uncovers a battery of IgMs for each individual to confront cancer or infections. The possibility to differentiate between adaptive IgM antibodies

  2. Effects of Combined Soy Isoflavone Extract and Docetaxel Treatment on Murine 4T1 Breast Tumor Model

    PubMed Central

    Hejazi, Ehsan; Nasrollahzadeh, Javad; Fatemi, Ramina; Barzegar-Yar Mohamadi, Leila; Saliminejad, Kioomars; Amiri, Zohre; Kimiagar, Masoud; Houshyari, Mohammad; Tavakoli, Maryam; Idali, Farah

    2015-01-01

    Background Emergence of drug resistance has brought major problems in chemotherapy. Using nutrients in combination with chemotherapy could be beneficial for improvement of sensitivity of tumors to drug resistance. Soybean-derived isoflavones have been suggested as chemopreventive agents for certain types of cancer, particularly breast cancer. In this study, the synergistic effects of soy isoflavone extract in combination with docetaxel in murine 4T1 breast tumor model were investigated. Methods In this study, mice were divided into 4 groups (15 mice per group) of control, the dietary Soy Isoflavone Extract (SIE, 100 mg/kg diet), the Docetaxel (DOCE, 10 mg/kg) injection and the combination of dietary soy isoflavone extract and intravenous docetaxel injection (DOCE+SIE). After 3 injections of docetaxel (once a week), 7 mice were sacrificed to analyze MKI67 gene and protein expressions and the rest were monitored for diet consumption, tumor growth and survival rates. Results In DOCE+SIE group, diet consumption was significantly higher than DOCE group. While lifespan showed a trend towards improvement in DOCE+SIE group, no significant difference was observed among the 4 studied groups. Tumor volume was not significantly affected in treated groups. A lower but not significant MKI67 protein expression was detected in western blot in DOCE+SIE group. The mRNA expression was not significantly different among groups. Conclusion The results suggest that the combination of soy isoflavone as an adjunct to docetaxel chemotherapy can be effective in improving diet consumption in breast cancer. PMID:25926948

  3. Umbelliprenin is Potentially Toxic Against the HT29, CT26, MCF-7, 4T1, A172, and GL26 Cell Lines, Potentially Harmful Against Bone Marrow-Derived Stem Cells, and Non-Toxic Against Peripheral Blood Mononuclear Cells

    PubMed Central

    Rashidi, Mohsen; Ziai, Seyed Ali; Moini Zanjani, Taraneh; Khalilnezhad, Ahad; Jamshidi, Hamidreza; Amani, Davar

    2016-01-01

    Background Resistance to chemotherapy is a growing concern, thus natural anticancer agents are drawing the attention of many scientists and clinicians. One natural anticancer agent, umbelliprenin, is a coumarin produced by many species of Ferula. Objectives We aimed to examine the inhibitory effect of umbelliprenin on human and mouse bone marrow-derived stem cells (BMDSCs), peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs), and different cancer cell lines. Materials and Methods In this in vitro experimental study, the HT29, CT26, MCF-7, 4T1, A172, and GL26 cancer cells and human and mouse BMDSCs and PBMCs were cultured in RPMI-1640 medium supplemented with 10% fetal bovine serum (FBS), incubated at 37°C for 24 hours in a 5% CO2 atmosphere, and then were treated with different concentrations of umbelliprenin dissolved in dimethyl sulfoxide (DMSO) (3, 6, 12, 25, 50, 100, and 200 µg/mL) for 24, 48, and 72 hours at 37°C. Each experiment was performed in triplicate. Finally, the cell survival rate was assessed by MTT assay. The IC50 values were calculated based on the log values using GraphPad Prism version 5 software for windows (La Jolla CA, USA) and were expressed as mean ± SEM. Results Umbelliprenin inhibited the cancer cells in a concentration-dependent (P < 0.05) but not time-dependent manner (P > 0.05). The most sensitive and resistant cell lines at the 24-hour incubation time were 4T1 (IC50, 30.9 ± 3.1 µg/mL) and A172 (IC50, 51.9 ± 6.7 µg/mL); at the 48-hour incubation time: 4T1 (IC50, 30.6 ± 2.6 µg/mL) and CT26 (IC50, 53.2 ± 3.6 µg/mL); and at the 72-hour incubation time: HT29 (IC50, 37.1 ± 1.4 µg/mL) and 4T1 (IC50, 62.2 ± 4.8 µg/mL). Both human and mouse BMDSCs showed the highest resistance at the 24-hour incubation time (IC50s, 254.7 ± 21 and 204.4 ± 4.5 µg/mL, respectively) and the highest sensitivity at the 72-hour incubation time (IC50s, 120.4 ± 5 and 159.0 ± 7.3 µg/mL, respectively). The PBMCs of both human and mouse origin revealed very

  4. Collagen induced arthritis increases secondary metastasis in MMTV-PyV MT mouse model of mammary cancer

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Several studies have demonstrated that sites of chronic inflammation are often associated with the establishment and growth of various malignancies. A common inflammatory condition in humans is autoimmune arthritis (AA). Although AA and cancer are different diseases, many of the underlying processes that contribute to the disorders of the joints and connective tissue that characterize AA also affect cancer progression and metastasis. Systemically, AA can lead to cellular infiltration and inflammation of the lungs. Several studies have reported statistically significant risk ratios between AA and breast cancer. Despite this knowledge being available, there has been minimal research linking breast cancer, arthritis, and metastasis associated with breast cancer. Notably both diseases are extremely prevalent in older post-menopausal women. Methods To establish the novel link between arthritis induced inflammation and secondary metastasis associated with breast cancer, PyV MT mice that spontaneously develop mammary gland carcinoma were injected with Type II collagen (CII) to induce arthritis at 9 and 18 weeks of age for pre-metastatic and metastatic condition. The sites of secondary metastasis and the associated inflammatory microenvironment were evaluated. Results A significant increase in breast cancer-associated secondary metastasis to the lungs and bones was observed in the arthritic versus the non-arthritic PyV MT mice along with an increase in primary tumor burden. We report significant increases in the levels of interstitial cellular infiltrates and pro-inflammatory cytokines such as interleukin-17 (IL-17), interleukin-6 (IL-6), Pro- Matrix metallopeptidase 9 (Pro-MMP9), insulin like growth factor-II (GF-II) and macrophage colony stimulating factor (M-CSF) in the arthritic lung and bone milieu as well as in the circulation. These pro-inflammatory cytokines along with the inflammatory microenvironment may be the underlying factors facilitating tumor

  5. INDUCTION OF MAMMARY GLAND DEVELOPMENT IN ESTROGEN RECEPTOR-ALPHA KNOCKOUT MICE

    EPA Science Inventory

    Mammary glands from the estrogen receptor knockout ( ERKO) mouse do not undergo ductal morphogenesis or alveolar development. Disrupted Er signaling may result in reduced estrogen-responsive gene products in the mammary gland or reduced mammotropic hormones that contribute t...

  6. Polypyrimidine tract-binding protein binds to the 5' untranslated region of the mouse mammary tumor virus mRNA and stimulates cap-independent translation initiation.

    PubMed

    Cáceres, Carlos J; Contreras, Nataly; Angulo, Jenniffer; Vera-Otarola, Jorge; Pino-Ajenjo, Constanza; Llorian, Miriam; Ameur, Melissa; Lisboa, Francisco; Pino, Karla; Lowy, Fernando; Sargueil, Bruno; López-Lastra, Marcelo

    2016-05-01

    The 5' untranslated region (UTR) of the full-length mRNA of the mouse mammary tumor virus (MMTV) harbors an internal ribosomal entry site (IRES). In this study, we show that the polypyrimidine tract-binding protein (PTB), an RNA-binding protein with four RNA recognition motifs (RRMs), binds to the MMTV 5' UTR stimulating its IRES activity. There are three isoforms of PTB: PTB1, PTB2, and PTB4. Results show that PTB1 and PTB4, but not PTB2, stimulate MMTV-IRES activity. PTB1 promotes MMTV-IRES-mediated initiation more strongly than PTB4. When expressed in combination, PTB1 further enhanced PTB4 stimulation of the MMTV-IRES, while PTB2 fully abrogates PTB4-induced stimulation. PTB1-induced stimulation of MMTV-IRES was not altered in the presence of PTB4 or PTB2. Mutational analysis reveals that stimulation of MMTV-IRES activity is abrogated when PTB1 is mutated either in RRM1/RRM2 or RRM3/RRM4. In contrast, a PTB4 RRM1/RRM2 mutant has reduced effect over MMTV-IRES activity, while stimulation of the MMTV-IRES activity is still observed when the PTB4 RRM3/RMM4 mutant is used. Therefore, PTB1 and PTB4 differentially stimulate the IRES activity. In contrast, PTB2 acts as a negative modulator of PTB4-induced stimulation of MMTV-IRES. We conclude that PTB1 and PTB4 act as IRES trans-acting factors of the MMTV-IRES.

  7. T-cell epitope strength in WAP-T mouse mammary carcinomas is an important determinant in PD1/PD-L1 immune checkpoint blockade therapy

    PubMed Central

    Bruns, Michael; Wanger, Jara; Schumacher, Udo; Deppert, Wolfgang

    2016-01-01

    Using the SV40 transgenic WAP-T/WAP-TNP mouse models for mammary carcinomas, we compared the response to immune checkpoint blockade therapy in tumor mice expressing either SV40 T-antigen containing the LCMV NP-epitope (T-AgNP in WAP-TNP mice), or the unmodified T-antigen (T-Ag in WAP-T mice). Specifically, we asked, whether the presence of the highly immunogenic NP-epitope in T-AgNP influences this response in comparison to the weakly immunogenic T-cell epitopes of T-Ag in WAP-T tumor mice. Treatment of WAP-TNP tumor mice with either anti-PD1 or anti-PD-L1 antibodies led to tumor regression, with anti-PD-L1 treatment being more effective. However, tumors had fully re-appeared after 21 days, indicating that CTL exhaustion had been rapidly re-established. Surprisingly, the same treatment applied to WAP-T tumor mice resulted in a significantly prolonged period of tumor regression. We provide evidence that in contrast to the weak antigenic stimuli exerted by T-cell epitopes of T-Ag, the strong antigenic stimulus of the NP-epitope in T-AgNP has a dual effect: (i) a rapid generation of active NP-specific CTLs, accompanied (ii) by accelerated CTL exhaustion. Our data support the hypothesis that the immunogenicity of tumor antigen T-cell epitopes strongly influences the success of immune checkpoint blockade therapy. PMID:27579535

  8. Contribution of the intercalated adenosine at the helical junction to the stability of the gag-pro frameshifting pseudoknot from mouse mammary tumor virus.

    PubMed

    Theimer, C A; Giedroc, D P

    2000-03-01

    The mouse mammary tumor virus (MMTV) gag-pro frameshifting pseudoknot is an H-type RNA pseudoknot that contains an unpaired adenosine (A14) at the junction of the two helical stems required for efficient frameshifting activity. The thermodynamics of folding of the MMTV vpk pseudoknot have been compared with a structurally homologous mutant RNA containing a G x U to G-C substitution at the helical junction (U13C RNA), and an A14 deletion mutation in that context (U13CdeltaA14 RNA). Dual wavelength optical melting and differential scanning calorimetry reveal that the unpaired adenosine contributes 0.7 (+/-0.2) kcal mol(-1) at low salt and 1.4 (+/-0.2) kcal mol(-1) to the stability (deltaG(0)37) at 1 M NaCl. This stability increment derives from a favorable enthalpy contribution to the stability deltadeltaH = 6.6 (+/-2.1) kcal mol(-1) with deltadeltaG(0)37 comparable to that predicted for the stacking of a dangling 3' unpaired adenosine on a G-C or G x U base pair. Group 1A monovalent ions, NH4+, Mg2+, and Co(NH3)6(3+) ions stabilize the A14 and deltaA14 pseudoknots to largely identical extents, revealing that the observed differences in stability in these molecules do not derive from a differential or specific accumulation of ions in the A14 versus deltaA14 pseudoknots. Knowledge of this free energy contribution may facilitate the prediction of RNA pseudoknot formation from primary nucleotide sequence (Gultyaev et al., 1999, RNA 5:609-617).

  9. The effect of deletion of cyclooxygenase-2, prostaglandin receptor EP2, or EP4 in bone marrow cells on osteoclasts induced by mouse mammary cancer cell lines.

    PubMed

    Ono, Katsuhiro; Akatsu, Takuhiko; Kugai, Nobuo; Pilbeam, Carol C; Raisz, Lawrence G

    2003-11-01

    The inducible prostaglandin (PG) synthesis enzyme, cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2), is involved in osteoclast (OC) formation in cocultures of mouse mammary cancer cell lines (MMT060562 or BALB/c-MC) and bone marrow cells through production of PGE(2). There are four PGE(2) receptors but only the EP2 and EP4 receptors are reported to be important for OC formation. We have investigated the role of COX-2, EP2 receptor, and EP4 receptor in marrow cells for osteoclastogenesis in cocultures of cancer cells and bone marrow cells. We cocultured cancer cell lines with bone marrow cells from COX-2 knockout (-/-), EP2 -/- or EP4 -/- mice compared to wild-type mice. In addition, an EP4 receptor antagonist (EP4 RA) was added in some cocultures. Disruption of COX-2 gene in bone marrow cells had no effect on PGE(2) production and OC formation in cocultures with MMT060562, while it abrogated PGE(2) production and OC formation in cocultures with BALB/c-MC. Disruption of the EP2 gene in bone marrow cells had no effect on OC formation in the cocultures, while disruption of the EP4 gene in bone marrow cells abrogated OC formation in the cocultures. Furthermore, EP4 RA suppressed OC formation and prevented the increase in receptor activator of nuclear factor kappaB ligand (RANKL) mRNA levels in the cocultures. We conclude that COX-2 in cancer cells is responsible for PGE(2) and OC production in cocultures with MMT060562, while COX-2 in bone marrow cells, not cancer cells, is responsible for PGE(2) and OC production in cocultures with BALB/c-MC, and EP4 receptors are essential for OC formation in both cocultures.

  10. Glucocorticoid and progestin receptors are differently involved in the cooperation with a structural element of the mouse mammary tumor virus promoter.

    PubMed Central

    Le Ricousse, S; Gouilleux, F; Fortin, D; Joulin, V; Richard-Foy, H

    1996-01-01

    We have previously characterized a regulatory element located between -294 and -200 within the mouse mammary tumor virus (MMTV) long terminal repeat (LTR). This element termed AA element cooperates with the glucocorticoid response elements (GREs) for glucocorticoid activation. Here we show that in a MMTV LTR wild type context, the deletion of this element significantly reduces both glucocorticoid and progestin activation of the promoter. Deletion of the two most distal GREs forces the glucocorticoid receptor (GR) and the progestin receptor (PR) to bind the same response elements and results in a dramatic decrease in the inducibility of the MMTV promoter by the two hormones. The simultaneous deletion of the two distal GREs and of the AA element abolishes completely the glucocorticoid-induced activation of the promoter. In contrast it restores a significant level of progestin-induced activation. This different effect of the double deletion on glucocorticoid- and progestin-induced MMTV promoter activation is not cell specific because it is also observed, and is even stronger, when either GR or PR is expressed in the same cell line (NIH 3T3). This is the first description of a mutated MMTV promoter that, although retaining GREs, is activated by progestins and not by glucocorticoids. This suggests a different functional cooperation between protein(s) interacting with the AA element and GR or PR. Cotransfections with constructs containing wild-type or mutated MMTV LTR with either PR lacking its C-terminal domain or GR/PR chimeras in which the N-terminal domains have been exchanged demonstrate that the N-terminal domains of the receptors specify the different behavior of GR and PR regarding the AA element. Images Fig. 1 Fig. 2 Fig. 3 Fig. 4 Fig. 5 PMID:8643531

  11. Linkage of superantigen-like stimulation of syngeneic T cells in a mouse model of follicular center B cell lymphoma to transcription of endogenous mammary tumor virus.

    PubMed Central

    Tsiagbe, V K; Yoshimoto, T; Asakawa, J; Cho, S Y; Meruelo, D; Thorbecke, G J

    1993-01-01

    The MHC class II I-A(s) positive B cell lymphomas reticulum cell sarcoma (RCS) that arise in > 90% of SJL mice by the age of 12 months have superantigen-like stimulating properties. In the present study, therefore, RCS cell lines were examined for abnormal expression of endogenous mouse mammary tumor virus (MMTV) proviruses. Extraordinarily high expression of a 1.8 kb mRNA hybridizing with the long terminal repeat (LTR) of MMTV was found in both primary lymphomas and in vitro RCS lines, but not in an SJL B cell lymphoma, NJ101, that does not stimulate syngeneic T cells, or in LPS activated SJL B cells. A cDNA was cloned from cRCS-2 and sequenced. A 31mer oligonucleotide probe, prepared based on the unique C-terminal sequence of this RCS-Mtv LTR, detected the 1.8 kb mRNA in all RCS lymphomas, while a similar probe for the C-terminal sequence of Mtv-8 LTR hybridized with the larger mRNA present in normal B cells and in NJ101. Preincubation with 19mer antisense S-oligonucleotides, prepared based on the sequences of the first two potential translation initiation sites common to both Mtv-8 and the RCS-Mtv LTR, significantly reduced the ability of RCS cells to stimulate syngeneic T cells. Moreover, transfection of NJ101 cells with the cloned RCS-MMTV cDNA conferred V beta 16 T cell stimulating properties on to these cells. It is concluded that expression of the product of this MMTV-LTR mRNA provides RCS with the strong T cell stimulating properties that it needs for its growth. These results thus identify a novel oncogenic property of MMTV-LTR. Images PMID:8389694

  12. Identification of Mammary Specific Transcription Factors.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1998-01-01

    per response, including the time for reviewing instructions, searching existing data sources, gathering and maintaining the data needed, and...release; distribution unlimited 12b. DISTRIBUTION CODE 13. ABSTRACT (Maximum 200 words) The Mouse Mammary Tumor Virus (MMTV) achieves its highest...levels of expression in the mammary glands of lactating mice . Previous work showed that the MMTV Long Terminal Repeat (LTR) has a modest level of

  13. Formation of a major DNA adduct of the mitomycin metabolite 2,7-diaminomitosene in EMT6 mouse mammary tumor cells treated with mitomycin C.

    PubMed

    Palom, Y; Belcourt, M F; Kumar, G S; Arai, H; Kasai, M; Sartorelli, A C; Rockwell, S; Tomasz, M

    1998-01-01

    Treatment of EMT6 mouse mammary tumor cells with [3H]mitomycin C (MC) results in the formation of six major DNA adducts, as described earlier using an HPLC assay of 3H-labeled products of enzymatic hydrolysis of DNA isolated from MC-treated cells. Four of these adducts were identified as monofunctional and bifunctional guanine-N2 adducts in the minor groove of DNA. In order to establish relationships between individual types of MC-DNA adducts and biological responses it is necessary to identify all of the adducts formed in cells. To this end we have now identified a predominant, previously unknown adduct formed in MC-treated EMT6 cells as a derivative not of MC, but of 2,7-diaminomitosene (2,7-DAM), the major bioreductive metabolite of MC. Rigorous proof demonstrates that it is a DNA major groove, guanine-N7 adduct of 2,7-DAM, linked at C-10 to DNA. The adduct is relatively stable at ambient temperature, but is readily depurinated upon heating. Its isolation from MC-treated cells indicates that MC is reductively metabolized to 2,7-DAM, which then undergoes further reductive activation to alkylate DNA, along with the parent MC. Low MC:DNA ratios were identified as a critical factor promoting 2,7-DAM adduct formation in an in vitro model calf thymus DNA/ MC/reductase model system, as well as in MC-treated EMT6 cells. The 2,7-DAM-guanine-N7 DNA adduct appears to be relatively noncytotoxic, as indicated by the dramatically lower cytotoxicity of 2,7-DAM in comparison with MC in EMT6 cells. Like MC, 2,7-DAM exhibited slightly greater cytotoxicity to cells treated under hypoxic as compared to aerobic conditions. However, 2,7-DAM was markedly less cytotoxic than MC under both aerobic and hypoxic conditions. Thus, metabolic reduction of MC to 2,7-DAM represents a detoxification process. The differential effects of MC-DNA and 2,7-DAM-DNA adducts support the concept that specific structural features of the DNA damage may play a critical role in the cytotoxic response to a DNA

  14. Adducts of mitomycin C and DNA in EMT6 mouse mammary tumor cells: effects of hypoxia and dicumarol on adduct patterns.

    PubMed

    Bizanek, R; Chowdary, D; Arai, H; Kasai, M; Hughes, C S; Sartorelli, A C; Rockwell, S; Tomasz, M

    1993-11-01

    6-CH3-3H-Mitomycin C (MC) was used to identify MC-DNA adducts formed in EMT6 mouse mammary tumor cells. DNA was isolated from cells treated with 3H-MC. The DNA was enzymatically digested, and the digest was analyzed for 3H-labeled adducts by high performance liquid chromatography. All four major adducts previously isolated and characterized in cell-free systems were detected: two different monoadducts and two bisadducts forming DNA-interstrand and DNA-intrastrand cross-links, respectively. No MC-DNA adducts other than the DNA interstrand cross-link had been shown previously to be formed in living cells. A MC-deoxyguanosine adduct of unknown structure was also detected in DNA from EMT6 cells; this adduct was also formed with purified EMT6 DNA. High performance liquid chromatography analysis was further applied to study the relationship between DNA adducts and cytotoxicity. The number of adducts increased with the concentration of MC in both aerobic and hypoxic cells. At a constant drug level, more adducts were observed in cells treated under hypoxic conditions than in cells treated aerobically; at 2 microM MC, 4.8 x 10(-7) and 3.1 x 10(-7) adducts/nucleotide were observed under hypoxic and aerobic conditions, respectively. The increased adduct frequency under hypoxia correlates with the known increased cytotoxicity of MC to EMT6 cells under hypoxic conditions. In addition, a higher ratio of cross-linked adducts to monoadducts was observed in hypoxic cells. The high performance liquid chromatography techniques were also used to examine the effects of dicumarol (DIC) on adduct patterns in cells treated simultaneously with 3H-MC. The MC-DNA adduct frequencies in DIC-treated cells were increased 1.5-fold under hypoxia and decreased 1.6-fold under aerobic conditions from those observed without DIC. This finding correlates with the known DIC-induced increase and decrease in the cytotoxicity of MC in hypoxic and aerobic EMT6 cells, respectively. The monoadduct resulting

  15. Administration of probiotics Lactobacillus rhamnosus GG and Lactobacillus gasseri K7 during pregnancy and lactation changes mouse mesenteric lymph nodes and mammary gland microbiota.

    PubMed

    Treven, P; Mrak, V; Bogovič Matijašić, B; Horvat, S; Rogelj, I

    2015-04-01

    The milk and mammary gland (MG) microbiome can be influenced by several factors, such as mode of delivery, breastfeeding, maternal lifestyle, health status, and diet. An increasing number of studies show a variety of positive effects of consumption of probiotics during pregnancy and breastfeeding on the mother and the newborn. The aim of this study was to investigate the effect of oral administration of probiotics Lactobacillus gasseri K7 (LK7) and Lactobacillus rhamnosus GG (LGG) during pregnancy and lactation on microbiota of the mouse mesenteric lymph nodes (MLN), MG, and milk. Pregnant FVB/N mice were fed skim milk or probiotics LGG or LK7 resuspended in skim milk during gestation and lactation. On d 3 and 8 postpartum, blood, feces, MLN, MG, and milk were analyzed for the presence of LGG or LK7. The effects of probiotics on MLN, MG, and milk microbiota was evaluated by real-time PCR and by 16S ribosomal DNA 454-pyrosequencing. In 5 of 8 fecal samples from the LGG group and in 5 of 8 fecal samples from the LK7 group, more than 1 × 10(3) of live LGG or LK7 bacterial cells were detected, respectively, whereas no viable LGG or LK7 cells were detected in the control group. Live lactic acid bacteria but no LGG or LK7 were detected in blood, MLN, and MG. Both probiotics significantly increased the total bacterial load as assessed by copies of 16S ribosomal DNA in MLN, and a similar trend was observed in MG. Metagenomic sequencing revealed that both probiotics increased the abundance of Firmicutes in MG, especially the abundance of lactic acid bacteria. The Lactobacillus genus appeared exclusively in MG from probiotic groups. Both probiotics influenced MLN microbiota by decreasing diversity (Chao1) and increasing the distribution of species (Shannon index). The LGG probiotic also affected the MG microbiota as it increased diversity and distribution of species and proportions of the genera Lactobacillus and Bifidobacterium. These results provide evidence that

  16. Quantitation of TGF-β proteins in mouse tissues shows reciprocal changes in TGF-β1 and TGF-β3 in normal vs neoplastic mammary epithelium.

    PubMed

    Flanders, Kathleen C; Yang, Yu-An; Herrmann, Michelle; Chen, JinQiu; Mendoza, Nerissa; Mirza, Amer M; Wakefield, Lalage M

    2016-06-21

    Transforming growth factor-βs (TGF-βs) regulate tissue homeostasis, and their expression is perturbed in many diseases. The three isoforms (TGF-β1, -β2, and -β3) have similar bioactivities in vitro but show distinct activities in vivo. Little quantitative information exists for expression of TGF-β isoform proteins in physiology or disease. We developed an optimized method to quantitate protein levels of the three isoforms, using a Luminex® xMAP®-based multianalyte assay following acid-ethanol extraction of tissues. Analysis of multiple tissues and plasma from four strains of adult mice showed that TGF-β1 is the predominant isoform with TGF-β2 being ~10-fold lower. There were no sex-specific differences in isoform expression, but some tissues showed inter-strain variation, particularly for TGF-β2. The only adult tissue expressing appreciable TGF-β3 was the mammary gland, where its levels were comparable to TGF-β1. In situ hybridization showed the luminal epithelium as the major source of all TGF-β isoforms in the normal mammary gland. TGF-β1 protein was 3-8-fold higher in three murine mammary tumor models than in normal mammary gland, while TGF-β3 protein was 2-3-fold lower in tumors than normal tissue, suggesting reciprocal regulation of these isoforms in mammary tumorigenesis.

  17. Quantitation of TGF-β proteins in mouse tissues shows reciprocal changes in TGF-β1 and TGF-β3 in normal vs neoplastic mammary epithelium

    PubMed Central

    Herrmann, Michelle; Chen, JinQiu; Mendoza, Nerissa; Mirza, Amer M.; Wakefield, Lalage M.

    2016-01-01

    Transforming growth factor-βs (TGF-βs) regulate tissue homeostasis, and their expression is perturbed in many diseases. The three isoforms (TGF-β1, -β2, and -β3) have similar bioactivities in vitro but show distinct activities in vivo. Little quantitative information exists for expression of TGF-β isoform proteins in physiology or disease. We developed an optimized method to quantitate protein levels of the three isoforms, using a Luminex® xMAP®-based multianalyte assay following acid-ethanol extraction of tissues. Analysis of multiple tissues and plasma from four strains of adult mice showed that TGF-β1 is the predominant isoform with TGF-β2 being ~10-fold lower. There were no sex-specific differences in isoform expression, but some tissues showed inter-strain variation, particularly for TGF-β2. The only adult tissue expressing appreciable TGF-β3 was the mammary gland, where its levels were comparable to TGF-β1. In situ hybridization showed the luminal epithelium as the major source of all TGF-β isoforms in the normal mammary gland. TGF-β1 protein was 3-8-fold higher in three murine mammary tumor models than in normal mammary gland, while TGF-β3 protein was 2-3-fold lower in tumors than normal tissue, suggesting reciprocal regulation of these isoforms in mammary tumorigenesis. PMID:27203217

  18. Positional variations in mammary gland development and cancer.

    PubMed

    Veltmaat, Jacqueline M; Ramsdell, Ann F; Sterneck, Esta

    2013-06-01

    Most mammals develop their mammary glands in pairs of which the two counterparts are symmetrically displaced away from the ventral midline. Based on this symmetry and the same functional outcome as a milk-producing organ, the mammary glands are easily presumed to be mere copies of one another. Based on our analysis of published data with inclusion of new results related to mammary development and pathology in mice, we argue that this presumption is incorrect: Between and within pairs, mammary glands differ from one another, and tumor incidence and biology depend on the position along the anterior-posterior and the left-right axis as well. This insight has implications for experimental designs with mouse models and for data extrapolation between mammary glands within and between species. We suggest that improved documentation of location-specific mammary gland features will lead to more insights into the molecular mechanisms of mammary gland development and cancer biology in both mice and humans.

  19. Genetic Susceptibility to Estrogen-Induced Mammary Cancers

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2000-11-01

    mammary glands were reflected in mammary histology. (A and E) Thin sections from Fig. 3. E2 induced pituitary growth and hyperprolactinemia similarly in...with E2 5 (33%) exhibited a normal DNA profile where the great for 12 wk induced pituitary growth and hyperprolactinemia in majority of cells displayed...etal. , " terone, or PRL. Hyperprolactinemia has been shown to be sufficient to induce mammary cancer in certain strains of mouse 1 , (29-31) and rat

  20. USF-1 as an Inhibitor of Mammary Gland Carcinogenesis

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2001-09-01

    The hypothesis tested in this proposal is that overexpression of USF in the mammary glands of transgenic mice will inhibit myc-dependent...tumorigenesis. To test this hypothesis, a transgene was constructed to target the overexpression of FLAG-tagged USF-2 to the mammary glands of transgenic mice ...under the control of the mouse mammary tumor virus (mmtv) long terminal repeat. A total of eight lines of transgenic mice were generated. Of these, one

  1. The MAPKERK-1,2 pathway integrates distinct and antagonistic signals from TGF alpha and FGF7 in morphogenesis of mouse mammary epithelium

    SciTech Connect

    Fata, Jimmie E; Mori, Hidetoshi; Ewald, Andrew J; Zhang, Hui; Yao, Evelyn; Werb, Zena; Bissell, Mina J

    2006-10-03

    Transforming growth factor-{alpha} (TGF{alpha}) and fibroblast growth factor-7 (FGF7) exhibit distinct expression patterns in the mammary gland. Both factors signal through mitogen-activated kinase/extracellular regulated kinase-1,2 (MAPK{sup ERK1,2}); however, their unique and/or combined contributions to mammary morphogenesis have not been examined. In ex vivo mammary explants, we show that a sustained activation of MAPK{sup ERK1,2} for 1 h, induced by TGF{alpha}, was necessary and sufficient to initiate branching morphogenesis, whereas a transient activation (15 min) of MAPK{sup ERK1,2}, induced by FGF7, led to growth without branching. Unlike TGF{alpha}, FGF7 promoted sustained proliferation as well as ectopic localization of, and increase in, keratin-6 expressing cells. The response of the explants to FGF10 was similar to that to FGF7. Simultaneous stimulation by FGF7 and TGF{alpha} indicated that the FGF7-induced MAPK{sup ERK1,2} signaling and associated phenotypes were dominant: FGF7 may prevent branching by suppression of two necessary TGF{alpha}-induced morphogenetic effectors, matrix metalloproteinase-3 (MMP-3/stromelysin-1), and fibronectin. Our findings indicate that expression of morphogenetic effectors, proliferation, and cell-type decisions during mammary organoid morphogenesis are intimately dependent on the duration of activation of MAPK{sup ERK1,2} activation.

  2. Growth requirements of human mammary epithelial cells in culture.

    PubMed

    Taylor-Papadimitriou, J; Shearer, M; Stoker, M G

    1977-12-15

    Colony-forming epithelial cells can be separated from the non-dividing "foam cells" in human milk by differential adhesion to glass and freezing. The growth of such partially purified mammary epithelial cells is stimulated by co-culture with non-dividing feeder cells. Foam cells, mitomycin-treated mouse fibroblast lines and human mammary fibroblasts and calf lens epithelial cells are all effective in promoting mammary epithelial cell growth. Contact between epithelial cells and feeders is not required for the growth-promoting effect. The mitogenic effect of epidermal growth factor on mammary epithelial cells also requires feeder cell activity.

  3. Keeping abreast of the mammary epithelial hierarchy and breast tumorigenesis.

    PubMed

    Visvader, Jane E

    2009-11-15

    The epithelium of the mammary gland exists in a highly dynamic state, undergoing dramatic morphogenetic changes during puberty, pregnancy, lactation, and regression. The recent identification of stem and progenitor populations in mouse and human mammary tissue has provided evidence that the mammary epithelium is organized in a hierarchical manner. Characterization of these normal epithelial subtypes is an important step toward understanding which cells are predisposed to oncogenesis. This review summarizes progress in the field toward defining constituent cells and key molecular regulators of the mammary epithelial hierarchy. Potential relationships between normal epithelial populations and breast tumor subtypes are discussed, with implications for understanding the cellular etiology underpinning breast tumor heterogeneity.

  4. MMTV-PyMT and Derived Met-1 Mouse Mammary Tumor Cells as Models for Studying the Role of the Androgen Receptor in Triple-Negative Breast Cancer Progression.

    PubMed

    Christenson, Jessica L; Butterfield, Kiel T; Spoelstra, Nicole S; Norris, John D; Josan, Jatinder S; Pollock, Julie A; McDonnell, Donald P; Katzenellenbogen, Benita S; Katzenellenbogen, John A; Richer, Jennifer K

    2017-04-01

    Triple-negative breast cancer (TNBC) has a faster rate of metastasis compared to other breast cancer subtypes, and no effective targeted therapies are currently FDA-approved. Recent data indicate that the androgen receptor (AR) promotes tumor survival and may serve as a potential therapeutic target in TNBC. Studies of AR in disease progression and the systemic effects of anti-androgens have been hindered by the lack of an AR-positive (AR+) immunocompetent preclinical model. In this study, we identified the transgenic MMTV-PyMT (mouse mammary tumor virus-polyoma middle tumor-antigen) mouse mammary gland carcinoma model of breast cancer and Met-1 cells derived from this model as tools to study the role of AR in breast cancer progression. AR protein expression was examined in late-stage primary tumors and lung metastases from MMTV-PyMT mice as well as in Met-1 cells by immunohistochemistry (IHC). Sensitivity of Met-1 cells to the AR agonist dihydrotestosterone (DHT) and anti-androgen therapy was examined using cell viability, migration/invasion, and anchorage-independent growth assays. Late-stage primary tumors and lung metastases from MMTV-PyMT mice and Met-1 cells expressed abundant nuclear AR protein, while negative for estrogen and progesterone receptors. Met-1 sensitivity to DHT and AR antagonists demonstrated a reliance on AR for survival, and AR antagonists inhibited invasion and anchorage-independent growth. These data suggest that the MMTV-PyMT model and Met-1 cells may serve as valuable tools for mechanistic studies of the role of AR in disease progression and how anti-androgens affect the tumor microenvironment.

  5. Role of the Mouse Pygopus 2 Gene and Wnt Signaling in Normal and Malignant Development of Mammary Glands and Hair Follicles

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2006-05-01

    catenin, which is believed to abolish canonical Wnt signaling, or transgenic expression of Dkk1 , an inhibitor of Wnt signaling, in skin prior to...reduced proliferation of embryonic mammary epithelial cells Disruption of Wnt signaling by overexpressing Dkk1 abolishes the ability of the ectoderm to...signaling is disrupted by Dkk1 overexpression. Is mpygo2 required for Wnt signaling after all? We directly addressed this question using double transgenic

  6. Exposure to Ionizing Radiation Causes Long-Term Increase in Serum Estradiol and Activation of PI3K-Akt Signaling Pathway in Mouse Mammary Gland

    SciTech Connect

    Suman, Shubhankar; Johnson, Michael D.; Fornace, Albert J.; Datta, Kamal

    2012-10-01

    Purpose: Exposure to ionizing radiation is an established risk factor for breast cancer. Radiation exposure during infancy, childhood, and adolescence confers the highest risk. Although radiation is a proven mammary carcinogen, it remains unclear where it acts in the complex multistage process of breast cancer development. In this study, we investigated the long-term pathophysiologic effects of ionizing radiation at a dose (2 Gy) relevant to fractionated radiotherapy. Methods and Materials: Adolescent (6-8 weeks old; n = 10) female C57BL/6J mice were exposed to 2 Gy total body {gamma}-radiation, the mammary glands were surgically removed, and serum and urine samples were collected 2 and 12 months after exposure. Molecular pathways involving estrogen receptor-{alpha} (ER{alpha}) and phosphatidylinositol-3-OH kinase (PI3K)-Akt signaling were investigated by immunohistochemistry and Western blot. Results: Serum estrogen and urinary levels of the oncogenic estrogen metabolite (16{alpha}OHE1) were significantly increased in irradiated animals. Immunostaining for the cellular proliferative marker Ki-67 and cyclin-D1 showed increased nuclear accumulation in sections of mammary glands from irradiated vs. control mice. Marked increase in p85{alpha}, a regulatory sub-unit of the PI3K was associated with increase in Akt, phospho-Akt, phospho-BAD, phospho-mTOR, and c-Myc in irradiated samples. Persistent increase in nuclear ER{alpha} in mammary tissues 2 and 12 months after radiation exposure was also observed. Conclusions: Taken together, our data not only support epidemiologic observations associating radiation and breast cancer but also, specify molecular events that could be involved in radiation-induced breast cancer.

  7. Suppressive effects of a proton beam on tumor growth and lung metastasis through the inhibition of metastatic gene expression in 4T1 orthotopic breast cancer model.

    PubMed

    Kwon, Yun-Suk; Lee, Kyu-Shik; Chun, So-Young; Jang, Tae Jung; Nam, Kyung-Soo

    2016-07-01

    A proton beam is a next generation tool to treat intractable cancer. Although the therapeutic effects of a proton beam are well known, the effect on tumor metastasis is not fully described. Here, we investigated the effects of a proton beam on metastasis in highly invasive 4T1 murine breast cancer cells and their orthotopic breast cancer model. Cells were irradiated with 2, 4, 8 or 16 Gy proton beam, and changes in cell proliferation, survival, and migration were observed by MTT, colony forming and wound healing assays. 4T1 breast cancer cell-implanted BALB/c mice were established and the animals were randomly divided into 4 groups when tumor size reached 200 mm3. Breast tumors were selectively irradiated with 10, 20 or 30 Gy proton beam. Breast tumor sizes were measured twice a week, and breast tumor and lung tissues were pathologically observed. Metastasis-regulating gene expression was assessed with quantitative RT-PCR. A proton beam dose-dependently decreased cell proliferation, survival and migration in 4T1 murine breast cancer cells. Also, growth of breast tumors in the 4T1 orthotopic breast cancer model was significantly suppressed by proton beam irradiation without significant change of body weight. Furthermore, fewer tumor nodules metastasized from breast tumor into lung in mice irradiated with 30 Gy proton beam, but not with 10 and 20 Gy, than in control. We observed correspondingly lower expression levels of urokinase plasminogen activator (uPA), uPA receptor, cyclooxygenase (COX)-2, and vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF), which are important factors in cancer metastasis, in breast tumor irradiated with 30 Gy proton beam. Proton beam irradiation did not affect expressions of matrix metalloproteinase (MMP)-9 and MMP-2. Taken together, the data suggest that, although proton beam therapy is an effective tool for breast cancer treatment, a suitable dose is necessary to prevent metastasis-linked relapse and poor prognosis.

  8. Mammary Cancer and Activation of Transposable Elements

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2013-09-01

    cytes and ADS-derived induced pluripotent stem cells (ADS-iPSCs) (19) and primary mouse ES cells to isolated sperm and oocytes (20). We selected an...051 59 5 92% H9-IMR90 5875 7 669 782 605 58 91% oocyte - ES cell (mouse) 4727 1 204 883 334 25 93% sperm - ES cell (mouse) 4580 4 364 748 1027 104 91...collaborator, Dr. Anne Peaston, developed a genetically engineered mouse model in which a specific mammary cell population is fluorescently marked upon

  9. Reduced nursing frequency during prolonged lactation in the mouse decreases milk production and increases mammary expression of tryptophan hydroxylase 1 (TPH1), but does not accelerate mammary gland remodeling

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    We have observed that lactating mouse dams nursed 4 times per day (4X) maintained lactation, but had lower milk yields by the weigh-suckle-weigh method, than dams nursed ad libitum (AL). Therefore, we hypothesized that decreased nursing frequency would also decrease lactation persistence, increase m...

  10. Synthesis, Characterization and in Vitro Evaluation of Manganese Ferrite (MnFe2O4) Nanoparticles for Their Biocompatibility with Murine Breast Cancer Cells (4T1).

    PubMed

    Kanagesan, Samikannu; Aziz, Sidek Bin Ab; Hashim, Mansor; Ismail, Ismayadi; Tamilselvan, Subramani; Alitheen, Noorjahan Banu Binti Mohammed; Swamy, Mallappa Kumara; Purna Chandra Rao, Bandaru

    2016-03-11

    Manganese ferrite (MnFe2O4) magnetic nanoparticles were successfully prepared by a sol-gel self-combustion technique using iron nitrate and manganese nitrate, followed by calcination at 150 °C for 24 h. Calcined sample was systematically characterized by X-ray diffraction (XRD), Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR), transmission electron microscopy (TEM), and vibrational sample magnetometry (VSM) in order to identify the crystalline phase, functional group, morphology, particle size, shape and magnetic behavior. It was observed that the resultant spinal ferrites obtained at low temperature exhibit single phase, nanoparticle size and good magnetic behavior. The study results have revealed the existence of a potent dose dependent cytotoxic effect of MnFe2O4 nanoparticles against 4T1 cell lines at varying concentrations with IC50 values of 210, 198 and 171 μg/mL after 24 h, 48 h and 72 h of incubation, respectively. Cells exposed to higher concentrations of nanoparticles showed a progressive increase of apoptotic and necrotic activity. Below 125 μg/mL concentration the nanoparticles were biocompatible with 4T1 cells.

  11. Radio-Photothermal Therapy Mediated by a Single Compartment Nanoplatform Depletes Tumor Initiating Cells and Reduces Lung Metastasis in Orthotopic 4T1 Breast Tumor Model

    PubMed Central

    Zhou, Min; Zhao, Jun; Tian, Mei; Song, Shaoli; Zhang, Rui; Gupta, Sanjay; Tan, Dongfeng; Shen, Haifa; Ferrari, Mauro; Li, Chun

    2016-01-01

    Tumor Initiating Cells (TICs) are resistant to radiotherapy and chemotherapy, and are believed to be responsible for tumor recurrence and metastasis. Combination therapies can overcome the limitation of conventional cancer treatments, and has demonstrated promising application in clinic. Here, we show that dual modality radiotherapy (RT) and photothermal therapy (PTT) mediated by a single compartment nanosystem copper-64-labeled copper sulfide nanoparticles ([64Cu]CuS NPs) could suppress breast tumor metastasis through eradication of TICs. Positron electron tomography (PET) imaging and biodistribution studies showed that more than 90% of [64Cu]CuS NPs was retained in subcutaneously grown BT474 breast tumor 24 h after intratumoral (i.t.) injection, indicating the NPs is suitable for the combination therapy. Combined RT/PTT therapy resulted in significant tumor growth delay in subcutaneous BT474 breast cancer model. Moreover, RT/PTT treatment significantly prolonged the survival of mice bearing orthotopic 4T1 breast tumors compared to no treatment, RT alone, or PTT alone. The RT/PTT combination therapy significantly reduced the number of tumor nodules in the lung and the formation of tumor mammospheres from treated 4T1 tumors. No obvious side effects of the CuS NPs were noted in the treated mice in a pilot toxicity study. Taken together, our data support the feasibility of a therapeutic approach for suppression of tumor metastasis through localized RT/PTT therapy. PMID:26376843

  12. Enhancement of maternal lactation performance during prolonged lactation in the mouse by mouse GH and long-R3-IGF-I is linked to changes in mammary signaling and gene expression

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    GH, prolactin (PRL), and IGF-I stimulate lactation-related metabolic processes in mammary epithelial cells. However, the ability of these factors to stimulate milk production in animals varies depending on species and experimental variables. Previous work in our laboratory demonstrated that transgen...

  13. Phospholipid makeup of the breast adipose tissue is impacted by obesity and mammary cancer in the mouse: Results of a pilot study.

    PubMed

    Margolis, Michael; Perez, Osvaldo; Martinez, Mitchell; Santander, Ana M; Mendez, Armando J; Nadji, Mehrdad; Nayer, Ali; Bhattacharya, Sanjoy; Torroella-Kouri, Marta

    2015-01-01

    Obesity, an established risk factor for breast cancer (BC), is associated with systemic inflammation. The breast contains adipose tissue (bAT), yet whether it plays a role in BC progression in obese females is being intensively studied. There is scarce knowledge on the lipid composition of bAT in health and disease. The purpose of this pilot study was: 1) to determine whether obesity and BC are associated with inflammatory changes in bAT 2) to analyze for the first time the lipid profile of bAT in obese and lean mammary tumor-bearing and normal mice. Syngeneic E0771 mammary tumor cells were implanted into the mammary fat pad of lean and diet-induced obese C57BL/6 mice. BATs were analyzed four weeks after tumor cell inoculation by immunohistochemistry and mass spectrometry. Phospholipids were identified and subjected to ratiometric quantification using a TSQ Quantum Access Max triple quadrupole mass spectrometer utilizing precursor ion scan or neutral ion loss scan employing appropriate class specific lipid standards in a two step quantification process. Four main classes of phospholipids were analyzed: phosphatidylcholines phosphatidylserines, phosphatidylethanolamines and phosphatidylinositols. Our results showed that bAT in obese (normal and tumor-bearing) mice contained hypertrophic adipocytes compared with their corresponding samples in lean mice; higher numbers of macrophages and crown-like structures were observed in obese tumor bearers compared to obese normal mice. BAT from normal obese mice revealed higher concentrations of phosphatidylethanolamines. Furthermore, bAT from tumor-bearing mice expressed higher phosphatidylcholines than that from non-tumor bearing mice, suggesting the presence of the tumor is associated with phosphatidylcholines. Conversion of phosphatidylethanolamines to phosphatidylcholines will be investigated in E0771 cells. Additional studies are projected to investigate macrophage activation by these specific classes of phospholipids

  14. The anti-metastatic nm23-1 gene is needed for the final step of mammary duct maturation of the mouse nipple.

    PubMed

    Deplagne, Camille; Peuchant, Evelyne; Moranvillier, Isabelle; Dubus, Pierre; Dabernat, Sandrine

    2011-04-07

    Nm23/NDP kinases are multifunctional enzymes involved in the general homeostasis of triphosphate nucleosides. Numerous studies have shown that NDPKs also serve as regulatory factors of various cell activities, not always connected to nucleotide phosphorylation. In particular, the nme-1 gene, encoding the NM23-1/NDPKA protein, has been reported as a metastasis suppressor gene. This activity was validated in hepatocellular tumors induced in nm23-1 deficient mice. Yet, data describing the primary physiological functions of nm23-1/NDPKA is still scarce. We have characterized in depth the phenotype of nm23-1 deletion in the mammary gland in mice carrying whole body nm23-M1 invalidation. We also asked why the nm23-M1⁻/⁻ mutant females displayed severe nursing disability. We found that the growth retardation of mutant virgin glands was due to reduced proliferation and apoptosis of the epithelial cells within the terminal end buds. The balance of pro/anti-apoptotic factors was impaired in comparison with wild type glands. In the lactating glands, the reduced proliferation rate persisted, but the apoptotic factors were unchanged. However, those defects did not seem to affect the gland maturation since the glands lacking nm23-1/NDPKA appeared morphologically normal. Thorough examination of all the functional aspects of the mammary glands revealed that lack of nm23-1/NDPKA does not impact the production or the ejection of milk in the lumen of lobuloalveolae. Interestingly, an epithelial plug was found to obstruct the extremity of the unique lactiferous duct delivering the milk out of the nipple. These cells, normally disappearing after lactation takes place, persisted in the mutant nipples. This work provides a rare instance of nm23-1/NDPKA physiological functions in the mammary glands and reveals its implication as a modulator factor of proliferation and apoptosis in this tissue.

  15. Stem cells and the developing mammary gland.

    PubMed

    Makarem, Maisam; Spike, Benjamin T; Dravis, Christopher; Kannan, Nagarajan; Wahl, Geoffrey M; Eaves, Connie J

    2013-06-01

    The mammary gland undergoes dynamic changes throughout life. In the mouse, these begin with initial morphogenesis of the gland in the mid-gestation embryo followed by hormonally regulated changes during puberty and later in adulthood. The adult mammary gland contains a hierarchy of cell types with varying potentials for self-maintenance and differentiation. These include cells able to produce complete, functional mammary glands in vivo and that contain daughter cells with the same remarkable regenerative potential, as well as cells with more limited clonogenic activity in vitro. Here we review how applying in vitro and in vivo methods for quantifying these cells in adult mammary tissue to fetal mammary cells has enabled the first cells fulfilling the functional criteria of transplantable, isolated mammary stem cells to be identified a few days before birth. Thereafter, the number of these cells increases rapidly. Populations containing these fetal stem cells display growth and gene expression programs that differ from their adult counterparts but share signatures characteristic of certain types of breast cancer. Such observations reinforce growing evidence of important differences between tissue-specific fetal and adult cells with stem cell properties and emphasize the merits of investigating their molecular basis.

  16. Radio-photothermal therapy mediated by a single compartment nanoplatform depletes tumor initiating cells and reduces lung metastasis in the orthotopic 4T1 breast tumor model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, Min; Zhao, Jun; Tian, Mei; Song, Shaoli; Zhang, Rui; Gupta, Sanjay; Tan, Dongfeng; Shen, Haifa; Ferrari, Mauro; Li, Chun

    2015-11-01

    Tumor Initiating Cells (TICs) are resistant to radiotherapy and chemotherapy, and are believed to be responsible for tumor recurrence and metastasis. Combination therapies can overcome the limitation of conventional cancer treatments, and have demonstrated promising application in the clinic. Here, we show that dual modality radiotherapy (RT) and photothermal therapy (PTT) mediated by a single compartment nanosystem copper-64-labeled copper sulfide nanoparticles ([64Cu]CuS NPs) could suppress breast tumor metastasis through eradication of TICs. Positron electron tomography (PET) imaging and biodistribution studies showed that more than 90% of [64Cu]CuS NPs was retained in subcutaneously grown BT474 breast tumor 24 h after intratumoral (i.t.) injection, indicating the NPs are suitable for the combination therapy. Combined RT/PTT therapy resulted in significant tumor growth delay in the subcutaneous BT474 breast cancer model. Moreover, RT/PTT treatment significantly prolonged the survival of mice bearing orthotopic 4T1 breast tumors compared to no treatment, RT alone, or PTT alone. The RT/PTT combination therapy significantly reduced the number of tumor nodules in the lung and the formation of tumor mammospheres from treated 4T1 tumors. No obvious side effects of the CuS NPs were noted in the treated mice in a pilot toxicity study. Taken together, our data support the feasibility of a therapeutic approach for the suppression of tumor metastasis through localized RT/PTT therapy.Tumor Initiating Cells (TICs) are resistant to radiotherapy and chemotherapy, and are believed to be responsible for tumor recurrence and metastasis. Combination therapies can overcome the limitation of conventional cancer treatments, and have demonstrated promising application in the clinic. Here, we show that dual modality radiotherapy (RT) and photothermal therapy (PTT) mediated by a single compartment nanosystem copper-64-labeled copper sulfide nanoparticles ([64Cu]CuS NPs) could suppress

  17. Mammary extracellular matrix directs differentiation of testicular and embryonic stem cells to form functional mammary glands in vivo

    PubMed Central

    Bruno, Robert D.; Fleming, Jodie M.; George, Andrea L.; Boulanger, Corinne A.; Schedin, Pepper; Smith, Gilbert H.

    2017-01-01

    Previously, we demonstrated the ability of the normal mammary microenvironment (niche) to direct non-mammary cells including testicular and embryonic stem cells (ESCs) to adopt a mammary epithelial cell (MEC) fate. These studies relied upon the interaction of transplanted normal MECs with non-mammary cells within the mammary fat-pads of recipient mice that had their endogenous epithelium removed. Here, we tested whether acellular mammary extracellular matrix (mECM) preparations are sufficient to direct differentiation of testicular-derived cells and ESCs to form functional mammary epithelial trees in vivo. We found that mECMs isolated from adult mice and rats were sufficient to redirect testicular derived cells to produce normal mammary epithelial trees within epithelial divested mouse mammary fat-pads. Conversely, ECMs isolated from omental fat and lung did not redirect testicular cells to a MEC fate, indicating the necessity of tissue specific components of the mECM. mECM preparations also completely inhibited teratoma formation from ESC inoculations. Further, a phenotypically normal ductal outgrowth resulted from a single inoculation of ESCs and mECM. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first demonstration of a tissue specific ECM driving differentiation of cells to form a functional tissue in vivo. PMID:28071703

  18. Use of a Novel Embryonic Mammary Stem Cell Gene Signature to Improve Human Breast Cancer Diagnostics and Therapeutic Decision Making

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2014-10-01

    sorting data coming from human and mouse adult mammary gland , and coming from the fetal mammary rudiment, to define gene expression profiles of...AD_____________ Award Number: W81XWH-12-1-0106 TITLE: Use of a Novel Embryonic Mammary Stem Cell Gene Signature to Improve Human...SUBTITLE Use of a Novel Embryonic Mammary Stem Cell Gene Signature to Improve Human Breast Cancer Diagnostics and Therapeutic Decision Making Improve

  19. Use of a Novel Embryonic Mammary Stem Cell Gene Signature to Improve Human Breast Cancer Diagnostics and Therapeutic Decision Making

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2014-10-01

    Conclusion. We have used FAC sorting data coming from human and mouse adult mammary gland , and coming from the fetal mammary rudiment, to define gene...AD_____________ Award Number: W81XWH-12-1-0107 TITLE: Use of a Novel Embryonic Mammary Stem Cell Gene Signature to Improve Human...4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE Use of a Novel Embryonic Mammary Stem Cell Gene Signature to Improve Human Breast Cancer Diagnostics and Therapeutic

  20. Of Microenvironments and Mammary Stem Cells

    SciTech Connect

    LaBarge, Mark A; Petersen, Ole W; Bissell, Mina J

    2007-06-01

    In most adult tissues there reside pools of stem and progenitor cells inside specialized microenvironments referred to as niches. The niche protects the stem cells from inappropriate expansion and directs their critical functions. Thus guided, stem cells are able to maintain tissue homeostasis throughout the ebb and flow of metabolic and physical demands encountered over a lifetime. Indeed, a pool of stem cells maintains mammary gland structure throughout development, and responds to the physiological demands associated with pregnancy. This review discusses how stem cells were identified in both human and mouse mammary glands; each requiring different techniques that were determined by differing biological needs and ethical constraints. These studies together create a robust portrait of mammary gland biology and identify the location of the stem cell niche, elucidate a developmental hierarchy, and suggest how the niche might be manipulated for therapeutic benefit.

  1. Notch in mammary gland development and breast cancer.

    PubMed

    Politi, Katerina; Feirt, Nikki; Kitajewski, Jan

    2004-10-01

    Notch signaling has been implicated in many processes including cell fate determination and oncogenesis. In mice, the Notch1 and Notch4 genes are both targets for insertion and rearrangement by the mouse mammary tumor virus and these mutations promote epithelial mammary tumorigenesis. Moreover, expression of a constitutively active form of Notch4 in mammary epithelial cells inhibits epithelial differentiation and leads to tumor formation in this organ. These data implicate the Notch pathway in breast tumorigenesis and provide the foundation for future experiments that will aid in our understanding of the role of Notch in human breast cancer development. Here, we review studies of mammary tumorigenesis induced by Notch in mouse and in vitro culture models providing evidence that Notch activation is a causal factor in human breast cancer.

  2. Effect of Neem Leaf Extract (Azadirachta indica) on c-Myc Oncogene Expression in 4T1 Breast Cancer Cells of BALB/c Mice

    PubMed Central

    Othman, Fauziah; Motalleb, Gholamreza; Lam Tsuey Peng, Sally; Rahmat, Asmah; Basri, Rusliza; Pei Pei, Chong

    2012-01-01

    Objective: Breast cancer is the most common cause of cancer-related deaths in women both worldwide and in Malaysia. Azadirachta indica (A. Juss), commonly known as neem, is one of the most versatile medicinal plants that has gained worldwide prominence due to its medicinal properties. However, the anticancer effect of ethanolic neem leaf extract against breast cancer has not been documented. The purpose of the present study is to investigate the effect of neem leaf extract on c-Myc oncogene expression in 4T1 breast cancer BALB/c mice. Materials and Methods: In this experimental study, A total of 48 female BALB/c mice were divided randomly into four groups of 12 mice per group: i.cancer control (CC) treated with 0.5% Tween 20 in PBS, ii. 0.5 µg/mL tamoxifen citrate (CT), iii. 250 mg/kg neem leaf extract (C250), and iv. 500 mg/kg neem leaf extract (C500). in situ reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction (in situ RT-PCR) was applied to evaluate suppression of c-Myc oncogene expression in breast cancer tissue. Results: The C500 group showed significant (p<0.05) suppression of c-Myc oncogene expression compared to the CC group. Conclusion: c-Myc was found to be down regulated under the effect of 500 mg/kg ethanolic neem leaf extract. PMID:23626938

  3. Pim-1 kinase expression during murine mammary development

    SciTech Connect

    Gapter, Leslie A.; Magnuson, Nancy S.; Ng, Ka-yun; Hosick, Howard L. . E-mail: hosick@wsu.edu

    2006-07-07

    Pim-1 kinase phosphorylates substrates whose activities are linked to proliferation, survival, differentiation, and apoptosis. Although pim-1 is induced by hormones and cytokines, the hormonal control and contribution of Pim-1 to mammary gland development have not been evaluated. We examined Pim-1 expression in mammary cell lines, investigated whether Pim-1 levels could be altered in breast epithelia by mammogenic hormones, and evaluated Pim-1 expression during mammary development. We found that Pim-1 was elevated in most mammary carcinoma cell lines and progesterone increased Pim-1 protein to some extent in non-tumorigenic mammary epithelia. Pim-1 expression in situ was consistent with the documented profile of progesterone activity in mouse mammary glands. Pim-1 nuclear localization correlated with cytoplasmic distribution for its substrate, p21{sup CIP/Waf1}, and we found that Pim-1 and p21 associate in vitro. Our results suggest that Pim-1 expression may be regulated by progesterone during mammary development and Pim-1 associates with p21 in mammary epithelial cells.

  4. Soy isoflavones increase latency of spontaneous mammary tumors in mice.

    PubMed

    Jin, Zeming; MacDonald, Ruth S

    2002-10-01

    Soy protein, with and without isoflavones, is being added to foods by manufacturers in response to the Food and Drug Administration (FDA)-approved health claim for cardiovascular protection. Furthermore, soy isoflavones are increasingly consumed by women in the United States as an alternative to hormone replacement therapy. The role of these phytoestrogens in breast cancer is controversial. Although exposure of rodents to soy isoflavones during the perinatal period appears to reduce mammary cancer formation, exposure in utero or during adulthood may increase tumor growth. The mouse mammary tumor virus (MMTV)-neu mouse spontaneously develops mammary tumors due to overexpression of the ErbB-2/neu/HER2 oncogene. This model is comparable with human breast cancer because overexpression of the neu oncogene occurs in 20-40% of human breast cancers. We fed MMTV-neu mice AIN-93G diets containing no isoflavones, 250 mg/kg genistein, 250 mg/kg daidzein or an isoflavone mixture (NovaSoy, equivalent to 250 mg genistein/kg) from 7 wk of age. Mammary tumor latency was significantly delayed in mice fed isoflavones compared with the control. Once tumors formed, however, the isoflavones did not reduce the number or size of tumors such that at 34 wk of age there were no differences in tumor burden among the treatment groups. Hence, in the MMTV-neu mouse, soy isoflavones delayed mammary tumorigenesis. Further studies are warranted to define the cellular mechanisms through which these compounds affect mammary tumorigenesis in this model.

  5. The male mammary gland: a target for the xenoestrogen bisphenol A.

    PubMed

    Vandenberg, Laura N; Schaeberle, Cheryl M; Rubin, Beverly S; Sonnenschein, Carlos; Soto, Ana M

    2013-06-01

    Males of some strains of mice retain their mammary epithelium even in the absence of nipples. Here, we have characterized the mammary gland in male CD-1 mice both in whole mounts and histological sections. We also examined the effects of bisphenol A (BPA), an estrogen mimic that alters development of the female mouse mammary gland. BPA was administered at a range of environmentally relevant doses (0.25-250μg/kg/day) to pregnant and lactating mice and then the mammary glands of male offspring were examined at several periods in adulthood. We observed age- and dose-specific effects on mammary gland morphology, indicating that perinatal BPA exposures alter the male mammary gland in adulthood. These results may provide insight into gynecomastia, the most common male breast disease in humans, where proliferation of the mammary epithelium leads to breast enlargement.

  6. Canonical Wnt Signaling as a Specific Marker of Normal and Tumorigenic Mammary Stem Cells

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2013-02-01

    mammary epithelium impacts glandular development . We found ductal abnormali ties; however, the phenotype was not as severe as expected. Approximately...In previous reports we have clearly showed that cells w ith activated canonical Wnt signaling are present within the mammary epithelium starting at...Wnt1 transgenic cells. We generated a mouse line in which ~-catenin is conditionally deleted in the mammary epithelium of MMTV-Wnt1 transgenic

  7. Role of Fibroblast Growth Factor Binding Protein-1 in Mammary Development and Tumorigenesis

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2009-10-01

    Hens and Wysolmerski 2005). At the future site of each nipple , five disk-like placodes line up and invade into the underlying mesenchyme. Referred...mouse mammary gland forms a single ductal tree leading to each nipple . The nascent mammary gland remains quiescent until puberty where the...harvested as described in this original proposal. 12 Apoptosis at regular intervals is a normal part of mammary physiology . In murine models

  8. Advanced Imaging Approaches to Characterize Stromal and Metabolic Changes in In Vivo Mammary Tumor Models

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2013-03-01

    characterization and toward future intravital studies. Preliminary fluorescence lifetime images were also collected intravitally through a mammary imaging window...intend to use this characterization to understand shifts in fluorescence lifetime collected by intravital imaging using a mammary imaging window...collected intravitally through a mammary imaging window implanted in a female, PyVT positive, Col1a1 heterozygote, mouse (Figure 7). A paper has

  9. A lovastatin-elicited genetic program inhibits M2 macrophage polarization and enhances T cell infiltration into spontaneous mouse mammary tumors.

    PubMed

    Mira, Emilia; Carmona-Rodríguez, Lorena; Tardáguila, Manuel; Azcoitia, Iñigo; González-Martín, Alicia; Almonacid, Luis; Casas, Josefina; Fabriás, Gemma; Mañes, Santos

    2013-12-01

    Beyond their ability to inhibit cholesterol biosynthesis, the statins have pleiotropic effects that include anti-inflammatory and immunomodulatory activities. Statins could have clinical utility, alone or in combination with other chemotherapeutics, in the treatment of cancer. The mechanisms that underlie the anti-tumor activity of the statins are nonetheless poorly defined. No studies have analyzed how they alter the tumor-associated leukocyte infiltrate, a central factor that influences tumor stroma and cancer evolution. Here we used HER2/neu transgenic (Tg-neu) mice to analyze the effect of lovastatin (Lov) on the inflammatory reaction of spontaneous mammary tumors. Lov treatment of tumor-bearing Tg-neu mice did not alter growth of established tumors, but significantly reduced the number of new oncogenic lesions in these mice. Moreover, Lov inhibited the growth of newly implanted Tg-neu tumors in immunocompetent but not in immunodeficient mice. We found that Lov enhanced tumor infiltration by effector T cells, and reduced the number of immunosuppressive and pro-angiogenic M2-like tumor-associated macrophages (TAM). Concomitantly, the drug improved the structure and function of the tumor vasculature, measured as enhanced tumor oxygenation and penetration of cytotoxic drugs. Microarray analysis identified a Lov-elicited genetic program in Tg-neu tumors that might explain these effects; we observed Lov-induced downregulation of placental growth factor, which triggers aberrant angiogenesis and M2-like TAM polarization. Our results identify a role for lovastatin in the shaping and re-education of the inflammatory infiltrate in tumors, with functional consequences in angiogenesis and antitumor immunity.

  10. Recognition of tumor antigens in 4T1 cells by natural IgM from three strains of mice with different susceptibilities to spontaneous breast cancer

    PubMed Central

    Díaz-Zaragoza, Mariana; Hernández-Ávila, Ricardo; Ostoa-Saloma, Pedro

    2017-01-01

    The issue of antibody responses to tumors is potentially important to cancer immunologists. Early detection of cancer represents one of the most promising approaches to reduce the growing cancer burden. Natural immunoglobulin (Ig)M antibodies have been associated with the recognition and elimination of cancerous and precancerous cells. Using natural IgM antibodies, the present study identified a set of antigens in healthy mice from three different strains and examined whether the global patterns of antibodies are able to discriminate between a condition of more or less susceptibility to breast cancer. The current study performed two-dimensional (2D) immunoblotting to detect antigens from 4T1 cells using natural IgM from serum of healthy female mice from three different strains. The t-test was used to analyze the total number of spots. There were no significant differences in the numbers of antigens recognized in each strain. However, differences in patterns were observed on 2D immunoblots among the three strains. The reactivity patterns of natural IgM antibodies to particular antigens exhibited non-random clustering, which discriminated between strains with different susceptibilities to spontaneous breast cancer. The results demonstrated that the patterns of reactivity to defined subsets of antigens are able to provide information regarding differential diagnosis associated with breast cancer sensitivity. Therefore, it may be concluded that it is possible to segregate the IgM humoral immune response toward cancer antigens according to the genetic background of individuals. In addition, it is possible to identify the recognized antigens that allow grouping or discriminate between the different IgM antibodies expressed. The possible association between a particular antigen and cancer susceptibility requires further study, but the methodology exposed in the present study may identify potential candidates for this possible association. PMID:28123554

  11. STX140, but not paclitaxel, inhibits mammary tumour initiation and progression in C3(1)/SV40 T/t-antigen transgenic mice.

    PubMed

    Meyer-Losic, Florence; Newman, Simon P; Day, Joanna M; Reed, Michael J; Kasprzyk, Philip G; Purohit, Atul; Foster, Paul A

    2013-01-01

    Despite paclitxael's clinical success, treating hormone-refractory breast cancer remains challenging. Paclitaxel has a poor pharmacological profile, characterized by a low therapeutic index (TIX) caused by severe dose limiting toxicities, such as neutropenia and peripheral neuropathy. Consequently, new drugs are urgently required. STX140, a compound previously shown to have excellent efficacy against many tumors, is here compared to paclitaxel in three translational in vivo breast cancer models, a rat model of peripheral neuropathy, and through pharmacological testing. Three different in vivo mouse models of breast cancer were used; the metastatic 4T1 orthotopic model, the C3(1)/SV40 T-Ag model, and the MDA-MB-231 xenograft model. To determine TIX and pharmacological profile of STX140, a comprehensive dosing regime was performed in mice bearing MDA-MD-231 xenografts. Finally, peripheral neuropathy was examined using a rat plantar thermal hyperalgesia model. In the 4T1 metastatic model, STX140 and paclitaxel significantly inhibited primary tumor growth and lung metastases. All C3(1)/SV40 T-Ag mice in the control and paclitaxel treated groups developed palpable mammary cancer. STX140 blocked 47% of tumors developing and significantly inhibited growth of tumors that did develop. STX140 treatment caused a significant (P<0.001) survival advantage for animals in early and late intervention groups. Conversely, in C3(1)/SV40 T-Ag mice, paclitaxel failed to inhibit tumor growth and did not increase survival time. Furthermore, paclitaxel, but not STX140, induced significant peripheral neuropathy and neutropenia. These results show that STX140 has a greater anti-cancer efficacy, TIX, and reduced neurotoxicity compared to paclitaxel in C3(1)/SV40 T-Ag mice and therefore may be of significant benefit to patients with breast cancer.

  12. Disruption of reelin signaling alters mammary gland morphogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Khialeeva, Elvira; Lane, Timothy F.; Carpenter, Ellen M.

    2011-01-01

    Reelin signaling is required for appropriate cell migration and ductal patterning during mammary gland morphogenesis. Dab1, an intracellular adaptor protein activated in response to reelin signaling, is expressed in the developing mammary bud and in luminal epithelial cells in the adult gland. Reelin protein is expressed in a complementary pattern, first in the epithelium overlying the mammary bud during embryogenesis and then in the myoepithelium and periductal stroma in the adult. Deletion in mouse of either reelin or Dab1 induced alterations in the development of the ductal network, including significant retardation in ductal elongation, decreased terminal branching, and thickening and disorganization of the luminal wall. At later stages, some mutant glands overcame these early delays, but went on to exhibit enlarged and chaotic ductal morphologies and decreased terminal branching: these phenotypes are suggestive of a role for reelin in spatial patterning or structural organization of the mammary epithelium. Isolated mammary epithelial cells exhibited decreased migration in response to exogenous reelin in vitro, a response that required Dab1. These observations highlight a role for reelin signaling in the directed migration of mammary epithelial cells driving ductal elongation into the mammary fat pad and provide the first evidence that reelin signaling may be crucial for regulating the migration and organization of non-neural tissues. PMID:21266412

  13. Role of the EGF-Related Growth Factor Cripto in Murine Mammary Tumorigenesis

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1999-10-01

    mice, we utilized the MMTV-SVPA vector [23], which contains a mouse mammary tumor virus (MMTV) long terminal repeat (LTR) enhancer/promoter (Fig. 3a...transgene vector and inserts, a, The MMTV-SVPA expression vector contains the long terminal repeat from the mouse mammary tumor virus, 5’ untranslated...Our current interpretation is that the ectopic expression of Cripto in human breast tumors may reflect a cooperative interaction with overexpressed

  14. Amphiregulin mediates self-renewal in an immortal mammary epithelial cell line with stem cell characteristics

    SciTech Connect

    Booth, Brian W.; Boulanger, Corinne A.; Anderson, Lisa H.; Jimenez-Rojo, Lucia; Brisken, Cathrin; Smith, Gilbert H.

    2010-02-01

    Amphiregulin (AREG), a ligand for epidermal growth factor receptor, is required for mammary gland ductal morphogenesis and mediates estrogen actions in vivo, emerging as an essential growth factor during mammary gland growth and differentiation. The COMMA-D {beta}-geo (CD{beta}geo) mouse mammary cell line displays characteristics of normal mammary progenitor cells including the ability to regenerate a mammary gland when transplanted into the cleared fat pad of a juvenile mouse, nuclear label retention, and the capacity to form anchorage-independent mammospheres. We demonstrate that AREG is essential for formation of floating mammospheres by CD{beta}geo cells and that the mitogen activated protein kinase signaling pathway is involved in AREG-mediated mammosphere formation. Addition of exogenous AREG promotes mammosphere formation in cells where AREG expression is knocked down by siRNA and mammosphere formation by AREG{sup -/-} mammary epithelial cells. AREG knockdown inhibits mammosphere formation by duct-limited mammary progenitor cells but not lobule-limited mammary progenitor cells. These data demonstrate AREG mediates the function of a subset of mammary progenitor cells in vitro.

  15. The change of proliferating cell nuclear antigen and apoptosis of the MM46 mammary cancer cells of the mouse after single high-dose irradiation.

    PubMed

    Kobayashi, Michiya; Okamoto, Ken; Namikawa, Tsutomu; Okabayashi, Takehiro; Araki, Keijiro

    2005-09-01

    The effects of intraoperative radiotherapy on tumor cells were elucidated by immunohistochemical examination of changes in the level of proliferating cell nuclear antigen. In addition, the terminal deoxynucleotidyl transferase-mediated dUTP nick-end labeling method was used to examine the level of apoptosis in mouse MM46 tumor cells after a single high dose of irradiation (30 Gy, 6 MeV). A significant decrease in the number of tumor cells compared to controls was observed on the 3rd, 7th, and 14th days following irradiation, but not on the 1st day. Consistent with these results, the proliferating cell nuclear antigen labeling index of irradiated cells decreased significantly on the 3rd, 7th, and 14th days following irradiation, but not on the 1st day. By comparison, the regrowth area on day 14 only showed no difference compared to the control group. The apoptotic index increased on the 7th and 14th day after irradiation, but at a lower rate than the observed decrease in the level of proliferating cell nuclear antigen. We speculate that the major mechanism of single high-dose radiation effect is inhibition of DNA synthesis.

  16. Mammary Duct Ectasia

    MedlinePlus

    ... tenderness or inflammation of the clogged duct (periductal mastitis). Mammary duct ectasia most often occurs in women ... that's turned inward (inverted) A bacterial infection called mastitis also may develop in the affected milk duct, ...

  17. II. Capsular vaso-mimicry formed by transgenic mammary tumor spheroids implanted ectopically into mouse dorsal skin fold: implications for cellular mechanisms of metastasis.

    PubMed

    Witkiewicz, Halina; Oh, Phil; Schnitzer, Jan E

    2013-01-01

    Most cancer patients die of metastatic disease, not primary tumors, while biological mechanisms leading to metastases remain unclear and effective therapies are missing. Using a mouse dorsal skin chamber model we had observed that tumor growth and vasculature formation could be influenced by the way in vitro cultured (avascular) spheroids of N202 breast tumor cells were implanted; co-implantation of lactating breast tissue created stimulating microenvironment, whereas the absence of the graft resulted in temporary tumor dormancy. This report addressed the issue of cellular mechanisms of the vasculogenic switch that ended the dormancy. In situ ultrastructural analysis revealed that the tumors survived in ectopic microenvironment until some of host and tumor stem cells evolved independently into cells initiating the vasculogenic switch. The tumor cells that survived and proliferated under hypoxic conditions for three weeks were supported by erythrogenic autophagy of others. However, the host microenvironment first responded as it would to non-immunogenic foreign bodies, i.e., by encapsulating the tumor spheroids with collagen-producing fibroblasts. That led to a form of vaso-mimicry consisting of tumor cells amid tumor-derived erythrosomes (synonym of erythrocytes), megakaryocytes and platelets, and encapsulating them all, the host fibroblasts. Such capsular vaso-mimicry could potentially facilitate metastasis by fusing with morphologically similar lymphatic vessels or veins. Once incorporated into the host circulatory system, tumor cells could be carried away passively by blood flow, regardless of their genetic heterogeneity. The fake vascular segment would have permeability properties different from genuine vascular endothelium. The capsular vaso-mimicry was different from vasculogenic mimicry earlier observed in metastases-associated malignant tumors where channels formed by tumor cells were said to contain circulating blood. Structures similar to the vasculogenic

  18. II. Capsular vaso-mimicry formed by transgenic mammary tumor spheroids implanted ectopically into mouse dorsal skin fold: implications for cellular mechanisms of metastasis

    PubMed Central

    Witkiewicz, Halina

    2013-01-01

    Most cancer patients die of metastatic disease, not primary tumors, while biological mechanisms leading to metastases remain unclear and effective therapies are missing. Using a mouse dorsal skin chamber model we had observed that tumor growth and vasculature formation could be influenced by the way in vitro cultured (avascular) spheroids of N202 breast tumor cells were implanted; co-implantation of lactating breast tissue created stimulating microenvironment, whereas the absence of the graft resulted in temporary tumor dormancy. This report addressed the issue of cellular mechanisms of the vasculogenic switch that ended the dormancy. In situ ultrastructural analysis revealed that the tumors survived in ectopic microenvironment until some of host and tumor stem cells evolved independently into cells initiating the vasculogenic switch. The tumor cells that survived and proliferated under hypoxic conditions for three weeks were supported by erythrogenic autophagy of others. However, the host microenvironment first responded as it would to non-immunogenic foreign bodies, i.e., by encapsulating the tumor spheroids with collagen-producing fibroblasts. That led to a form of vaso-mimicry consisting of tumor cells amid tumor-derived erythrosomes (synonym of erythrocytes), megakaryocytes and platelets, and encapsulating them all, the host fibroblasts. Such capsular vaso-mimicry could potentially facilitate metastasis by fusing with morphologically similar lymphatic vessels or veins. Once incorporated into the host circulatory system, tumor cells could be carried away passively by blood flow, regardless of their genetic heterogeneity. The fake vascular segment would have permeability properties different from genuine vascular endothelium. The capsular vaso-mimicry was different from vasculogenic mimicry earlier observed in metastases-associated malignant tumors where channels formed by tumor cells were said to contain circulating blood. Structures similar to the vasculogenic

  19. USF-1 as an Inhibitor of Mammary Gland Carcinogenesis

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2000-09-01

    virgin transgenic mice under the control of the mouse mammary tumor virus (MMTV) long terminal repeat. The transgene was evaluated in transfected...cells in culture, and then injected into fertilized FVB mouse embryos. A total of 370 embryos were injected and transferred into recipient females ...resulting in 11 pregnancies. From these a total of 84 offspring were obtained, 12 of which were positive for the transgene. Females from the F0 and F

  20. Role of phospholipids in the actions of prolactin in the mammary gland

    SciTech Connect

    Etindi, R.O.N.

    1987-01-01

    These studies were designed to determine the role of phospholipid turnover in the mechanism of action of prolactin in mammary gland explants derived from 12-14 day pregnant mice. Prolactin stimulates phospholipid biosynthesis 12-16h after cultured mouse mammary tissues are exposed to it. Prolactin stimulates phospholipid biosynthesis at physiological concentrations and the response is maximal at all PRL concentrations above 25 ng/ml. p-Bromphenacyl bromide (BPB) at concentrations of 50 ..mu..M and above and quinacrine (50 ..mu..M) abolish the actions of prolactin on casein and lipid biosynthesis in cultured mouse mammary gland explants. In mouse mammary gland explants, binding of prolactin to its receptor leads to a phospholipase C type hydrolysis of inositol phospholipids, but this effect is transient and does not occur immediately after hormone exposure. Prolactin significantly stimulated the accumulation of (/sup 3/H)label in inositol monophosphate (IP/sub 1/), inositol bisphosphate (IP/sub 2/) and inositol trisphosphate (IP/sub 3/) 1-3 hours after addition of prolactin. Gossypol, a drug which has been shown to be an inhibitor of kinase C activity in mouse mammary tissues, is shown to abolish several of the actions of prolactin in cultured mouse mammary gland expalants.

  1. Mammary cancers and pregnancy.

    PubMed Central

    Anderson, J M

    1979-01-01

    Uncertainties persist about management and prognosis of mammary cancers that occur during and after pregnancy and during lactation. Pathological features of mammary cancers occurring during pregnancy are the same as those in non-pregnant women and survival rates are comparable. Management should be the same as in non-pregnant patients. Termination of pregnancy does not improve survival but it should be advised if the prognosis is poor. Mastectomy apparently presents little danger to the fetus, though treatment such as chemotherapy and irradiation should be avoided. Women who have received treatment for mammary cancer need not be advised against subsequent pregnancy. Routine ovarian radiation in non-pregnant premenopausal women is not generally to be recommended, since it does not prolong survival and would deprive some of the chance of further pregnancy. In lactating women who develop mammary cancers survival is apparently not adversely affected. Lactation should be suppressed initially and followed by mastectomy. Regimens of immunotherapy, chemotherapy, or radiotherapy may then be begun. Until results of current trials of combined treatments of mammary cancers associated with pregnancy are available, management should be neither aggressive nor tentative. It should be based on a well-balanced concept of applying all available treatments, as in non-pregnant patients. PMID:376044

  2. Mammary gland development.

    PubMed

    Macias, Hector; Hinck, Lindsay

    2012-01-01

    The mammary gland develops through several distinct stages. The first transpires in the embryo as the ectoderm forms a mammary line that resolves into placodes. Regulated by epithelial–mesenchymal interactions, the placodes descend into the underlying mesenchyme and produce the rudimentary ductal structure of the gland present at birth. Subsequent stages of development—pubertal growth, pregnancy, lactation, and involution—occur postnatally under the regulation of hormones. Puberty initiates branching morphogenesis, which requires growth hormone (GH) and estrogen, as well as insulin-like growth factor 1 (IGF1), to create a ductal tree that fills the fat pad. Upon pregnancy, the combined actions of progesterone and prolactin generate alveoli, which secrete milk during lactation. Lack of demand for milk at weaning initiates the process of involution whereby the gland is remodeled back to its prepregnancy state. These processes require numerous signaling pathways that have distinct regulatory functions at different stages of gland development. Signaling pathways also regulate a specialized subpopulation of mammary stem cells that fuel the dramatic changes in the gland occurring with each pregnancy. Our knowledge of mammary gland development and mammary stem cell biology has significantly contributed to our understanding of breast cancer and has advanced the discovery of therapies to treat this disease.

  3. Differential transformation of mammary epithelial cells by Wnt genes.

    PubMed Central

    Wong, G T; Gavin, B J; McMahon, A P

    1994-01-01

    The mouse Wnt family includes at least 10 genes that encode structurally related secreted glycoproteins. Wnt-1 and Wnt-3 were originally identified as oncogenes activated by the insertion of mouse mammary tumor virus in virus-induced mammary adenocarcinomas, although they are not expressed in the normal mammary gland. However, five other Wnt genes are differentially expressed during development of adult mammary tissue, suggesting that they may play distinct roles in various phases of mammary gland growth and development. Induction of transformation by Wnt-1 and Wnt-3 may be due to interference with these normal regulatory events; however, there is no direct evidence for this hypothesis. We have tested Wnt family members for the ability to induce transformation of cultured mammary cells. The results demonstrate that the Wnt gene family can be divided into three groups depending on their ability to induce morphological transformation and altered growth characteristics of the C57MG mammary epithelial cell line. Wnt-1, Wnt-3A, and Wnt-7A were highly transforming and induced colonies which formed and shed balls of cells. Wnt-2, Wnt-5B, and Wnt-7B also induced transformation but with a lower frequency and an apparent decrease in saturation density. In contrast, Wnt-6 and two other family members which are normally expressed in C57MG cells, Wnt-4 and Wnt-5A, failed to induce transformation. These data demonstrate that the Wnt genes have distinct effects on cell growth and should not be regarded as functionally equivalent. Images PMID:8065359

  4. Evidence for a multipotent mammary progenitor with pregnancy-specific activity

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Introduction The mouse mammary gland provides a powerful model system for studying processes involved in epithelial tissue development. Although markers that enrich for mammary stem cells and progenitors have been identified, our understanding of the mammary developmental hierarchy remains incomplete. Methods We used the MMTV promoter linked to the reverse tetracycline transactivator to induce H2BGFP expression in the mouse mammary gland. Mammary epithelial cells (MECs) from virgin mice were sorted by flow cytometry for expression of the mammary stem cell/progenitor markers CD24 and CD29, and H2BGFP. Sorted populations were analyzed for in vivo repopulation ability, expression of mammary lineage markers, and differential gene expression. Results The reconstituting activity of CD24+/CD29+ cells in cleared fat pad transplantation assays was not distinguished in GFP+ compared to GFP- subpopulations. However, within the CD24+/CD29lo luminal progenitor-enriched population, H2BGFP+, but not H2BGFP-, MECs formed mammary structures in transplantation assays; moreover, this activity was dramatically enhanced in pregnant recipients. These outgrowths contained luminal and myoepithelial mammary lineages and produced milk, but lacked the capacity for serial transplantation. Transcriptional microarray analysis revealed that H2BGFP+/CD24+/CD29lo MECs are distinct from H2BGFP-/CD24+/CD29lo MECs and enriched for gene expression signatures with both the stem cell (CD24+/CD29+) and luminal progenitor (CD24+/CD29lo/CD61+) compartments. Conclusions We have identified a population of MECs containing pregnancy-activated multipotent progenitors that are present in the virgin mammary gland and contribute to the expansion of the mammary gland during pregnancy. PMID:23947835

  5. Loss of vitamin D receptor signaling from the mammary epithelium or adipose tissue alters pubertal glandular development.

    PubMed

    Johnson, Abby L; Zinser, Glendon M; Waltz, Susan E

    2014-10-15

    Vitamin D₃ receptor (VDR) signaling within the mammary gland regulates various postnatal stages of glandular development, including puberty, pregnancy, involution, and tumorigenesis. Previous studies have shown that vitamin D₃ treatment induces cell-autonomous growth inhibition and differentiation of mammary epithelial cells in culture. Furthermore, mammary adipose tissue serves as a depot for vitamin D₃ storage, and both epithelial cells and adipocytes are capable of bioactivating vitamin D₃. Despite the pervasiveness of VDR in mammary tissue, individual contributions of epithelial cells and adipocytes, as well as the VDR-regulated cross-talk between these two cell types during pubertal mammary development, have yet to be investigated. To assess the cell-type specific effect of VDR signaling during pubertal mammary development, novel mouse models with mammary epithelial- or adipocyte-specific loss of VDR were generated. Interestingly, loss of VDR in either cellular compartment accelerated ductal morphogenesis with increased epithelial cell proliferation and decreased apoptosis within terminal end buds. Conversely, VDR signaling specifically in the mammary epithelium modulated hormone-induced alveolar growth, as ablation of VDR in this cell type resulted in precocious alveolar development. In examining cellular cross-talk ex vivo, we show that ligand-dependent VDR signaling in adipocytes significantly inhibits mammary epithelial cell growth in part through the vitamin D₃-dependent production of the cytokine IL-6. Collectively, these studies delineate independent roles for vitamin D₃-dependent VDR signaling in mammary adipocytes and epithelial cells in controlling pubertal mammary gland development.

  6. Development of novel murine mammary imaging windows to examine wound healing effects on leukocyte trafficking in mammary tumors with intravital imaging

    PubMed Central

    Sobolik, Tammy; Su, Ying-Jun; Ashby, Will; Schaffer, David K.; Wells, Sam; Wikswo, John P.; Zijlstra, Andries; Richmond, Ann

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT We developed mammary imaging windows (MIWs) to evaluate leukocyte infiltration and cancer cell dissemination in mouse mammary tumors imaged by confocal microscopy. Previous techniques relied on surgical resection of a skin flap to image the tumor microenvironment restricting imaging time to a few hours. Utilization of mammary imaging windows offers extension of intravital imaging of the tumor microenvironment. We have characterized strengths and identified some previously undescribed potential weaknesses of MIW techniques. Through iterative enhancements of a transdermal portal we defined conditions for improved quality and extended confocal imaging time for imaging key cell-cell interactions in the tumor microenvironment. PMID:28243517

  7. Development of novel murine mammary imaging windows to examine wound healing effects on leukocyte trafficking in mammary tumors with intravital imaging.

    PubMed

    Sobolik, Tammy; Su, Ying-Jun; Ashby, Will; Schaffer, David K; Wells, Sam; Wikswo, John P; Zijlstra, Andries; Richmond, Ann

    2016-01-01

    We developed mammary imaging windows (MIWs) to evaluate leukocyte infiltration and cancer cell dissemination in mouse mammary tumors imaged by confocal microscopy. Previous techniques relied on surgical resection of a skin flap to image the tumor microenvironment restricting imaging time to a few hours. Utilization of mammary imaging windows offers extension of intravital imaging of the tumor microenvironment. We have characterized strengths and identified some previously undescribed potential weaknesses of MIW techniques. Through iterative enhancements of a transdermal portal we defined conditions for improved quality and extended confocal imaging time for imaging key cell-cell interactions in the tumor microenvironment.

  8. Canine mammary gland tumors.

    PubMed

    Sorenmo, Karin

    2003-05-01

    The National Consensus Group recommends that all women with tumors larger than 1 cm be offered chemotherapy regardless of tumor histology of lymph node status. This recommendation is to ensure that everyone at risk for failing, even though the risk may be low in women with relatively small tumors and favorable histology, has a choice and receives the benefit of adjuvant chemotherapy. This type of treatment recommendation may also be made in dogs based on recognized, well-accepted prognostic factors such as tumor size, stage, type, and histologic differentiation. Based on the limited clinical information available in veterinary medicine, the drugs that are effective in human breast cancer, such as cyclophosphamide, 5-fluorouracil, and doxorubicin, may also have a role in the treatment of malignant mammary gland tumors in dogs. Randomized prospective studies are needed, however, to evaluate the efficacy of chemotherapy in dogs with high-risk mammary gland tumors and to determine which drugs and protocols are the most efficacious. Until such studies are performed, the treatment of canine mammary gland tumors will be based on the individual oncologist's understanding of tumor biology, experience, interpretation of the available studies, and a little bit of gut-feeling. Table 2 is a proposal for treatment guidelines for malignant canine mammary gland tumors according to established prognostic factors, results from published veterinary studies, and current recommendations for breast cancer treatment in women.

  9. Specific posttranslational modification regulates early events in mammary carcinoma formation.

    PubMed

    Guo, Hua-Bei; Johnson, Heather; Randolph, Matthew; Nagy, Tamas; Blalock, Ryan; Pierce, Michael

    2010-12-07

    The expression of an enzyme, GnT-V, that catalyzes a specific posttranslational modification of a family of glycoproteins, namely a branched N-glycan, is transcriptionally up-regulated during breast carcinoma oncogenesis. To determine the molecular basis of how early events in breast carcinoma formation are regulated by GnT-V, we studied both the early stages of mammary tumor formation by using 3D cell culture and a her-2 transgenic mouse mammary tumor model. Overexpression of GnT-V in MCF-10A mammary epithelial cells in 3D culture disrupted acinar morphogenesis with impaired hollow lumen formation, an early characteristic of mammary neoplastic transformation. The disrupted acinar morphogenesis of mammary tumor cells in 3D culture caused by her-2 expression was reversed in tumors that lacked GnT-V expression. Moreover, her-2-induced mammary tumor onset was significantly delayed in the GnT-V null tumors, evidence that the lack of the posttranslational modification catalyzed by GnT-V attenuated tumor formation. Inhibited activation of both PKB and ERK signaling pathways was observed in GnT-V null tumor cells. The proportion of tumor-initiating cells (TICs) in the mammary tumors from GnT-V null mice was significantly reduced compared with controls, and GnT-V null TICs displayed a reduced ability to form secondary tumors in NOD/SCID mice. These results demonstrate that GnT-V expression and its branched glycan products effectively modulate her-2-mediated signaling pathways that, in turn, regulate the relative proportion of tumor initiating cells and the latency of her-2-driven tumor onset.

  10. Role of the EGF-Related Growth Factor cripto in Murine Mammary Tumorigenesis

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2000-10-01

    subsequently induced in the primitive streak (Brachyury, Fgf8) are mislocalized proximally, adjacent neuroectoderm ’-•, was found throughout the...transgenes to the mammary epithelium of transgenic mice, we utilized the MMTV-SVPA vector (Wang et al., 1994), which contains a mouse mammary tumor virus...current interpretation is that the ectopic expression of Cripto in human breast tumors may reflect a cooperative interaction with overexpressed

  11. Targeted Overexpression of EZH2 in the Mammary Gland Disrupts Ductal Morphogenesis and Causes Epithelial Hyperplasia

    PubMed Central

    Li, Xin; Gonzalez, Maria E.; Toy, Katherine; Filzen, Tracey; Merajver, Sofia D.; Kleer, Celina G.

    2009-01-01

    The Polycomb group protein enhancer of zeste homolog 2 (EZH2), which has roles during development of numerous tissues, is a critical regulator of cell type identity. Overexpression of EZH2 has been detected in invasive breast carcinoma tissue samples and is observed in human breast tissue samples of morphologically normal lobules up to 12 years before the development of breast cancer. The function of EZH2 during preneoplastic progression in the mammary gland is unknown. To investigate the role of EZH2 in the mammary gland, we targeted the expression of EZH2 to mammary epithelial cells using the mouse mammary tumor virus long terminal repeat. EZH2 overexpression resulted in aberrant terminal end bud architecture. By the age of 4 months, 100% of female mouse mammary tumor virus-EZH2 virgin mice developed intraductal epithelial hyperplasia resembling the human counterpart accompanied by premature differentiation of ductal epithelial cells and up-regulation of the luminal marker GATA-3. In addition, remodeling of the mammary gland after parturition was impaired and EZH2 overexpression caused delayed involution. Mechanistically, we found that EZH2 physically interacts with β-catenin, inducing β-catenin nuclear accumulation in mammary epithelial cells and activating Wnt/β-catenin signaling. The biological significance of these data to human hyperplasias is demonstrated by EZH2 up-regulation and colocalization with β-catenin in human intraductal epithelial hyperplasia, the earliest histologically identifiable precursor of breast carcinoma. PMID:19661437

  12. Curcumin improves the therapeutic efficacy of Listeria(at)-Mage-b vaccine in correlation with improved T-cell responses in blood of a triple-negative breast cancer model 4T1.

    PubMed

    Singh, Manisha; Ramos, Ilyssa; Asafu-Adjei, Denise; Quispe-Tintaya, Wilber; Chandra, Dinesh; Jahangir, Arthee; Zang, Xingxing; Aggarwal, Bharat B; Gravekamp, Claudia

    2013-08-01

    Success of cancer vaccination is strongly hampered by immune suppression in the tumor microenvironment (TME). Interleukin (IL)-6 is particularly and highly produced by triple-negative breast cancer (TNBC) cells, and has been considered as an important contributor to immune suppression in the TME. Therefore, we hypothesized that IL-6 reduction may improve efficacy of vaccination against TNBC cancer through improved T-cell responses. To prove this hypothesis, we investigated the effect of curcumin, an inhibitor of IL-6 production, on vaccination of a highly attenuated Listeria monocytogenes (Listeria(at)), encoding tumor-associated antigens (TAA) Mage-b in a TNBC model 4T1. Two therapeutic vaccination strategies with Listeria(at)-Mage-b and curcumin were tested. The first immunization strategy involved all Listeria(at)-Mage-b vaccinations and curcumin after tumor development. As curcumin has been consumed all over the world, the second immunization strategy involved curcumin before and all therapeutic vaccinations with Listeria(at)-Mage-b after tumor development. Here, we demonstrate that curcumin significantly improves therapeutic efficacy of Listeria(at)-Mage-b with both immunization strategies particularly against metastases in a TNBC model (4T1). The combination therapy was slightly but significantly more effective against the metastases when curcumin was administered before compared to after tumor development. With curcumin before tumor development in the combination therapy, the production of IL-6 was significantly decreased and IL-12 increased by myeloid-derived suppressor cells (MDSC), in correlation with improved CD4 and CD8 T-cell responses in blood. Our study suggests that curcumin improves the efficacy of Listeria(at)-Mage-b vaccine against metastases in TNBC model 4T1 through reversal of tumor-induced immune suppression.

  13. Lx2-32c–loaded polymeric micelles with small size for intravenous drug delivery and their inhibitory effect on tumor growth and metastasis in clinically associated 4T1 murine breast cancer

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Li-qing; Huang, Wei; Gao, Zhong-gao; Fang, Wei-shuo; Jin, Ming-ji

    2016-01-01

    Lx2-32c is a novel taxane derivative with a strong antitumor activity. In this study, we developed Lx2-32c–loaded polymeric micelles (Lx2-32c-PMs) with small size and investigated their antitumor efficacy against tumor growth and metastasis on 4T1 murine breast cancer cell line with Cremophor EL–based Lx2-32c solution as the control. In this study, copolymer monomethoxy polyethylene glycol2000–polylactide1300 was used to prepare Lx2-32c-PMs by film hydration method, and their physicochemical properties were characterized as well, according to morphology, particle size, zeta potential, in vitro drug release, and reconstitution stability. Under confocal laser scanning microscopy, it was observed that Lx2-32c-PMs could be effectively taken up by 4T1 cells in a time-dependent manner. Cell Counting Kit-8 assay showed that the IC50 of Lx2-32c-PMs was 0.3827 nM. Meanwhile, Lx2-32c-PMs had better ability to promote apoptosis and induce G2/M cycle block and polyploidy formation, compared with Lx2-32c solution. More importantly, in vivo animal studies showed that compared to Lx2-32c solution, Lx2-32c-PMs possessed better ability not only to effectively inhibit the tumor growth, but also to significantly suppress spontaneous and postoperative metastasis to distant organs in 4T1 orthotopic tumor-bearing mice. Consequently, Lx2-32c-PMs have significantly prolonged the survival lifetime of tumor-bearing mice. Thus, our study reveals that Lx2-32c-PMs had favorable antitumor activity and exhibited a good prospect for application in the field of antitumor therapy. PMID:27799769

  14. Keratinocyte Growth Factor Causes Cystic Dilation of the Mammary Glands of Mice

    PubMed Central

    Yi, Eunhee S.; Bedoya, Adriana A.; Lee, Hyesun; Kim, Seokhyun; Housley, Regina M.; Aukerman, Sharon L.; Tarpley, John E.; Starnes, Charles; Yin, Songmei; Pierce, Glenn F.; Ulich, Thomas R.

    1994-01-01

    Keratinocyte growth factor (KGF) is a paracrine mediator of epithelial cell proliferation that has been reported to induce marked proliferation of mammary epithelium in rats. In this study, systemic administration of KGF into naive and oophorectomized mice causes mammary gland proliferation, as evidenced histologically by the appearance of cysts lined by a single layer of epithelium and by hyperplastic epithelium. Whole mount preparations of the mammary glands reveal that the histologically noted cysts are actually ducts that are dilated along much of their length. The histology of the mammary glands of KGF-treated mice is similar to the histology of fibrocystic disease in the buman female breast. The response in mice differs significantly from the appearance of the mammary glands in KGF-treated rats in which ductal epithelial proliferation is most prominent. Estrogen and progesterone when administered in combination but not alone cause the development of numerous endbuds in the mouse mammary gland. KGF in estrogen- and progesterone-pretreated mice causes the growth of dilated ducts, hyperplastic epithelium within ducts and endbuds, and a fibrous metamorphosis of periductal adipose tissue. The mammary epithelial hyperplasia caused by KGF is rapidly reversible in both mice and rats after cessation of KGF treatment. The spectrum of KGF-, estrogen-, and progesterone-induced mammary histopathology in mice provides a model for the study of fibrocystic and hyperplastic breast disease. ImagesFigure 1Figure 2Figure 3Figure 4Figure 5Figure 6 PMID:7977634

  15. Id-1 is not expressed in the luminal epithelial cells of mammary glands

    PubMed Central

    Uehara, Norihisa; Chou, Yu-Chien; Galvez, Jose J; de-Candia, Paola; Cardiff, Robert D; Benezra, Robert; Shyamala, Gopalan

    2003-01-01

    Background The family of inhibitor of differentiation/DNA binding (Id) proteins is known to regulate development in several tissues. One member of this gene family, Id-1, has been implicated in mammary development and carcinogenesis. Mammary glands contain various cell types, among which the luminal epithelial cells are primarily targeted for proliferation, differentiation and carcinogenesis. Therefore, to assess the precise significance of Id-1 in mammary biology and carcinogenesis, we examined its cellular localization in vivo using immunohistochemistry. Methods Extracts of whole mammary glands from wild type and Id-1 null mutant mice, and tissue sections from paraffin-embedded mouse mammary glands from various developmental stages and normal human breast were subjected to immunoblot and immunohistochemical analyses, respectively. In both these procedures, an anti-Id-1 rabbit polyclonal antibody was used for detection of Id-1. Results In immunoblot analyses, using whole mammary gland extracts, Id-1 was detected. In immunohistochemical analyses, however, Id-1 was not detected in the luminal epithelial cells of mammary glands during any stage of development, but it was detected in vascular endothelial cells. Conclusion Id-1 is not expressed in the luminal epithelial cells of mammary glands. PMID:12631395

  16. Physiologically activated mammary fibroblasts promote postpartum mammary cancer

    PubMed Central

    Guo, Qiuchen; Burchard, Julja; Spellman, Paul

    2017-01-01

    Women diagnosed with breast cancer within 5 years of childbirth have poorer prognosis than nulliparous or pregnant women. Weaning-induced breast involution is implicated, as the collagen-rich, immunosuppressive microenvironment of the involuting mammary gland is tumor promotional in mice. To investigate the role of mammary fibroblasts, isolated mammary PDGFRα+ cells from nulliparous and postweaning mice were assessed for activation phenotype and protumorigenic function. Fibroblast activation during involution was evident by increased expression of fibrillar collagens, lysyl oxidase, Tgfb1, and Cxcl12 genes. The ability of mammary tumors to grow in an isogenic, orthotopic transplant model was increased when tumor cells were coinjected with involution-derived compared with nulliparous-derived mammary fibroblasts. Mammary tumors in the involution-fibroblast group had increased Ly6C+ monocytes at the tumor border, and decreased CD8+ T cell infiltration and tumor cell death. Ibuprofen treatment suppressed involution-fibroblast activation and tumor promotional capacity, concurrent with decreases in tumor Ly6C+ monocytes, and increases in intratumoral CD8+ T cell infiltration, granzyme levels, and tumor cell death. In total, our data identify a COX/prostaglandin E2 (PGE2)–dependent activated mammary fibroblast within the involuting mammary gland that displays protumorigenic, immunosuppressive activity, identifying fibroblasts as potential targets for the prevention and treatment of postpartum breast cancer. PMID:28352652

  17. Combined effect of aerobic interval training and selenium nanoparticles on expression of IL-15 and IL-10/TNF-α ratio in skeletal muscle of 4T1 breast cancer mice with cachexia.

    PubMed

    Molanouri Shamsi, M; Chekachak, S; Soudi, S; Quinn, L S; Ranjbar, K; Chenari, J; Yazdi, M H; Mahdavi, M

    2017-02-01

    Cancer cachexia is characterized by inflammation, loss of skeletal muscle and adipose tissue mass, and functional impairment. Oxidative stress and inflammation are believed to regulate pathways controlling skeletal muscle wasting. The aim of this study was to determine the effects of aerobic interval training and the purported antioxidant treatment, selenium nanoparticle supplementation, on expression of IL-15 and inflammatory cytokines in 4T1 breast cancer-bearing mice with cachexia. Selenium nanoparticle supplementation accelerated cachexia symptoms in tumor-bearing mice, while exercise training prevented muscle wasting in tumor-bearing mice. Also, aerobic interval training enhanced the anti-inflammatory indices IL-10/TNF-α ratio and IL-15 expression in skeletal muscle in tumor-bearing mice. However, combining exercise training and antioxidant supplementation prevented cachexia and muscle wasting and additionally decreased tumor volume in 4T1 breast cancer mice. These finding suggested that combining exercise training and antioxidant supplementation could be a strategy for managing tumor volume and preventing cachexia in breast cancer.

  18. Early neoplastic and metastatic mammary tumours of transgenic mice detected by 5-aminolevulinic acid-stimulated protoporphyrin IX accumulation

    PubMed Central

    Dorward, A M; Fancher, K S; Duffy, T M; Beamer, W G; Walt, H

    2005-01-01

    A photodynamic technique for human breast cancer detection founded upon the ability of tumour cells to rapidly accumulate the fluorescent product protoporphyrin IX (PpIX) has been applied to transgenic mouse models of mammary tumorigenesis. A major goal of this investigation was to determine whether mouse mammary tumours are reliable models of human disease in terms of PpIX accumulation, for future mechanistic and therapeutic studies. The haeme substrate 5-aminolevulinic acid (5-ALA) (200 mg kg−1) was administered to mouse strains that develop mammary tumours of various histological subtypes upon expression of the transgenic oncogenes HRAS, Polyoma Virus middle T antigen, or Simian Virus 40 large T antigen in the mammary gland. Early neoplastic lesions, primary tumours and metastases showed consistent and rapid PpIX accumulation compared to the normal surrounding tissues, as evidenced by red fluorescence (635 nm) when the tumours were directly illuminated with blue light (380–440 nm). Detection of mouse mammary tumours at the stage of ductal carcinoma in situ by red fluorescence emissions suggests that enhanced PpIX synthesis is a good marker for early tumorigenic processes in the mammary gland. We propose the mouse models provide an ideal experimental system for further investigation of the early diagnostic and therapeutic potential of 5-ALA-stimulated PpIX accumulation in human breast cancer patients. PMID:16251872

  19. Ductal barriers in mammary epithelium

    PubMed Central

    Owens, Mark B; Hill, Arnold DK; Hopkins, Ann M

    2013-01-01

    Tissue barriers play an integral role in the biology and pathobiology of mammary ductal epithelium. In normal breast physiology, tight and adherens junctions undergo dynamic changes in permeability in response to hormonal and other stimuli, while several of their proteins are directly involved in mammary tumorigenesis. This review describes first the structure of mammary ductal epithelial barriers and their role in normal mammary development, examining the cyclical changes in response to puberty, pregnancy, lactation and involution. It then examines the role of adherens and tight junctions and the participation of their constituent proteins in mammary tumorigenic functions such as migration, invasion and metastasis. Finally, it discusses the potential of these adhesion proteins as both prognostic biomarkers and potential therapeutic targets in breast cancer. PMID:24665412

  20. Curcumin improves the therapeutic efficacy of Listeriaat-Mage-b vaccine in correlation with improved T-cell responses in blood of a triple-negative breast cancer model 4T1

    PubMed Central

    Singh, Manisha; Ramos, Ilyssa; Asafu-Adjei, Denise; Quispe-Tintaya, Wilber; Chandra, Dinesh; Jahangir, Arthee; Zang, Xingxing; Aggarwal, Bharat B; Gravekamp, Claudia

    2013-01-01

    Abstract Success of cancer vaccination is strongly hampered by immune suppression in the tumor microenvironment (TME). Interleukin (IL)-6 is particularly and highly produced by triple-negative breast cancer (TNBC) cells, and has been considered as an important contributor to immune suppression in the TME. Therefore, we hypothesized that IL-6 reduction may improve efficacy of vaccination against TNBC cancer through improved T-cell responses. To prove this hypothesis, we investigated the effect of curcumin, an inhibitor of IL-6 production, on vaccination of a highly attenuated Listeria monocytogenes (Listeriaat), encoding tumor-associated antigens (TAA) Mage-b in a TNBC model 4T1. Two therapeutic vaccination strategies with Listeriaat-Mage-b and curcumin were tested. The first immunization strategy involved all Listeriaat-Mage-b vaccinations and curcumin after tumor development. As curcumin has been consumed all over the world, the second immunization strategy involved curcumin before and all therapeutic vaccinations with Listeriaat-Mage-b after tumor development. Here, we demonstrate that curcumin significantly improves therapeutic efficacy of Listeriaat-Mage-b with both immunization strategies particularly against metastases in a TNBC model (4T1). The combination therapy was slightly but significantly more effective against the metastases when curcumin was administered before compared to after tumor development. With curcumin before tumor development in the combination therapy, the production of IL-6 was significantly decreased and IL-12 increased by myeloid-derived suppressor cells (MDSC), in correlation with improved CD4 and CD8 T-cell responses in blood. Our study suggests that curcumin improves the efficacy of Listeriaat-Mage-b vaccine against metastases in TNBC model 4T1 through reversal of tumor-induced immune suppression. This study is focused on improving cancer vaccination by reducing immune suppression. Here we demonstrate that curcumin improves vaccine

  1. The protective effects of paeonol against epirubicin-induced hepatotoxicity in 4T1-tumor bearing mice via inhibition of the PI3K/Akt/NF-kB pathway.

    PubMed

    Wu, Jing; Xue, Xia; Zhang, Bin; Jiang, Wen; Cao, Hongmei; Wang, Rongmei; Sun, Deqing; Guo, Ruichen

    2016-01-25

    Epirubicin is widely used for the treatment of various breast cancers; however, it has serious adverse side effects, such as hepatotoxicity, which require dose-adjustment or therapy substitution. Paeonol, an active component from Moutan Cortex, has a variety of biological activities, including preventing or reducing various toxicities induced by antineoplastics. Protection by paeonol against hepatotoxicity induced by epirubicin and the underlying mechanism of action were investigated in this study. Cytosolic enzymes in the serum and oxidative stress indices in the liver were determined. The protective effects were determined using the MTT assay in vitro or by evaluating the expression of apoptotic factors and crucial proteins in the PI3K/Akt/NF-kB pathway using western blot analysis. It is concluded that paeonol alleviates epirubicin-induced hepatotoxicity in 4T1-tumor bearing mice by inhibiting the PI3K/Akt/NF-kB pathway.

  2. Perfluorooctanoic acid effects on ovaries mediate its inhibition of peripubertal mammary gland development in Balb/c and C57Bl/6 mice

    EPA Science Inventory

    Exposure to perfluorooctanoic acid (PFOA), a synthetic perfluorinated compound and an agonist of peroxisomes proliferator-activated receptor α (PPARα), causes stunted mouse mammary gland development in various developmental stages. However, the underlying mechanisms remain poorly...

  3. New insights into fetal mammary gland morphogenesis: differential effects of natural and environmental estrogens

    PubMed Central

    Speroni, Lucia; Voutilainen, Maria; Mikkola, Marja L.; Klager, Skylar A.; Schaeberle, Cheryl M.; Sonnenschein, Carlos; Soto, Ana M.

    2017-01-01

    An increased breast cancer risk during adulthood has been linked to estrogen exposure during fetal life. However, the impossibility of removing estrogens from the feto-maternal unit has hindered the testing of estrogen’s direct effect on mammary gland organogenesis. To overcome this limitation, we developed an ex vivo culture method of the mammary gland where the direct action of estrogens can be tested during embryonic days (E)14 to 19. Mouse mammary buds dissected at E14 and cultured for 5 days showed that estrogens directly altered fetal mammary gland development. Exposure to 0.1 pM, 10 pM, and 1 nM 17 β-estradiol (E2) resulted in monotonic inhibition of mammary buds ductal growth. In contrast, Bisphenol-A (BPA) elicited a non-monotonic response. At environmentally relevant doses (1 nM), BPA significantly increased ductal growth, as previously observed in vivo, while 1 μM BPA significantly inhibited ductal growth. Ductal branching followed the same pattern. This effect of BPA was blocked by Fulvestrant, a full estrogen antagonist, while the effect of estradiol was not. This method may be used to study the hormonal regulation of mammary gland development, and to test newly synthesized chemicals that are released into the environment without proper assessment of their hormonal action on critical targets like the mammary gland. PMID:28102330

  4. Differential requirement of GRP94 and GRP78 in mammary gland development

    PubMed Central

    Zhu, Genyuan; Wang, Miao; Spike, Benjamin; Gray, Peter C.; Shen, Jieli; Lee, Sung-Hyung; Chen, Si-Yi; Lee, Amy S.

    2014-01-01

    Glucose Regulated Protein (GRP) 94 and GRP78 are critical molecular chaperones and regulators of signaling. Conditional knockout mouse models have revealed tissue specific requirements for GRP94 and GRP78, including selection for allele retention in specific cell types. Here we report the consequences of mammary-targeted knockout of these GRPs. Our studies revealed that MMTV-Cre, Grp94f/f mammary glands, despite GRP94 deficiency, exhibited normal proliferation and ductal morphogenesis. Interestingly, MMTV-Cre, Grp78f/f mammary glands displayed only slightly reduced GRP78 protein levels, associating with the retention of the non-recombined Grp78 floxed alleles in isolated mammary epithelial cells and displayed phenotypes comparable to wild-type glands. In contrast, transduction of isolated Grp78f/f mammary epithelial stem/progenitor cells with adenovirus expressing GFP and Cre-recombinase was successful in GRP78 ablation, and the GFP sorted cells failed to give rise to repopulated mammary glands in de-epithelialized recipient mice. These studies imply GRP78, but not GRP94, is required for mammary gland development. PMID:24953136

  5. Aquaporin water channels in the mammary gland: from physiology to pathophysiology and neoplasia.

    PubMed

    Mobasheri, Ali; Barrett-Jolley, Richard

    2014-03-01

    Aquaporins are membrane proteins that play fundamental roles in water and small solute transport across epithelial and endothelial barriers. Recent studies suggest that several aquaporin proteins are present in the mammary gland. Immunohistochemical techniques have confirmed the presence of aquaporin 1 (AQP1) and AQP3 water channels in rat, mouse, bovine and human mammary glands. Studies suggest that in addition to AQP1 and AQP3 AQP4, AQP5 and AQP7 proteins are expressed in different locations in the mammary gland. Aquaporins play key roles in tumor biology and are involved in cell growth, migration and formation of ascites via increased water permeability of micro-vessels. Emerging evidence suggests that expression of these proteins is altered in mammary tumors and in breast cancer cell lines although it is not yet clear whether this is a cause or a consequence of neoplastic development. This review analyzes the expression and potential functional roles of aquaporin water channels in the mammary gland. The physiological mechanisms involved in the transport of water and small solutes across mammary endothelial and epithelial barriers are discussed in the context of milk production and lactation. This paper also reviews papers from the recent cancer literature that implicate aquaporins in mammary neoplasia.

  6. Experimental mammary carcinogenesis - Rat models.

    PubMed

    Alvarado, Antonieta; Faustino-Rocha, Ana I; Colaço, Bruno; Oliveira, Paula A

    2017-03-15

    Mammary cancer is one of the most common cancers, victimizing more than half a million of women worldwide every year. Despite all the studies in this field, the current therapeutic approaches are not effective and have several devastating effects for patients. In this way, the need to better understand the mammary cancer biopathology and find effective therapies led to the development of several rodent models over years. With this review, the authors intended to provide the readers with an overview of the rat models used to study mammary carcinogenesis, with a special emphasis on chemically-induced models.

  7. Hypoxia-inducible factor-1α induces ErbB4 signaling in the differentiating mammary gland.

    PubMed

    Paatero, Ilkka; Seagroves, Tiffany N; Vaparanta, Katri; Han, Wen; Jones, Frank E; Johnson, Randall S; Elenius, Klaus

    2014-08-08

    Conditional knock-out of Hif1a in the mouse mammary gland impairs lobuloalveolar differentiation during lactation. Here, we demonstrate that expression of ErbB4 was reduced in the lobulalveoli of mice with mammary gland-specific deletion of Hif1a. Erbb4 was not, however, a direct target gene for transcriptional regulation by HIF-1α in vitro. HIF-1α overexpression or HIF accumulating prolyl hydroxylase inhibitors reduced ErbB4 endocytosis, promoted transcriptional co-regulatory activity of ErbB4, and stimulated ErbB4-induced differentiation of mammary carcinoma cells. Consistently, RNA interference-mediated down-regulation of HIF-1α resulted in reduced ErbB4 protein amount and reduced mammary carcinoma cell differentiation. These findings indicate that HIF-1α is a physiologically relevant regulator of ErbB4 and that ErbB4 is involved in HIF-regulated differentiation of the mammary gland.

  8. Laminin mediates tissue-specific gene expression in mammary epithelia

    PubMed Central

    1995-01-01

    Tissue-specific gene expression in mammary epithelium is dependent on the extracellular matrix as well as hormones. There is good evidence that the basement membrane provides signals for regulating beta-casein expression, and that integrins are involved in this process. Here, we demonstrate that in the presence of lactogenic hormones, laminin can direct expression of the beta-casein gene. Mouse mammary epithelial cells plated on gels of native laminin or laminin-entactin undergo functional differentiation. On tissue culture plastic, mammary cells respond to soluble basement membrane or purified laminin, but not other extracellular matrix components, by synthesizing beta-casein. In mammary cells transfected with chloramphenicol acetyl transferase reporter constructs, laminin activates transcription from the beta- casein promoter through a specific enhancer element. The inductive effect of laminin on casein expression was specifically blocked by the E3 fragment of the carboxy terminal region of the alpha 1 chain of laminin, by antisera raised against the E3 fragment, and by a peptide corresponding to a sequence within this region. Our results demonstrate that laminin can direct tissue-specific gene expression in epithelial cells through its globular domain. PMID:7730398

  9. Distinct FAK activities determine progenitor and mammary stem cell characteristics

    PubMed Central

    Luo, Ming; Zhao, Xiaofeng; Chen, Song; Liu, Suling; Wicha, Max S.; Guan, Jun-Lin

    2013-01-01

    Mammary stem (MaSCs) and progenitor cells are important for mammary gland development and maintenance and may give rise to mammary cancer stem cells (MaCSCs). Yet there remains limited understanding of how these cells contribute to tumorigenesis. Here we show that conditional deletion of focal adhesion kinase (FAK) in embryonic mammary epithelial cells (MaECs) decreases luminal progenitors (LPs) and basal MaSCs, reducing their colony-forming and regenerative potentials in a cell autonomous manner. Loss of FAK kinase activity in MaECs specifically impaired LP proliferation and alveologenesis, whereas a kinase-independent activity of FAK supported ductal invasion and basal MaSC activity. Deficiency in LPs suppressed tumorigenesis and MaCSC formation in a mouse model of breast cancer. In contrast to the general inhibitory effect of FAK attenuation, inhibitors of FAK kinase preferentially inhibited proliferation and tumorsphere formation of LP-like, but not MaSC-like, human breast cancer cells. Our findings establish distinct kinase dependent and independent activities of FAK that differentially regulate LPs and basal MaSCs. We suggest that targeting these distinct functions may tailor therapeutic strategies to address breast cancer heterogeneity more effectively. PMID:23832665

  10. Laminin Mediates Tissue-specific Gene Expression in Mammary Epithelia

    SciTech Connect

    Streuli, Charles H; Schmidhauser, Christian; Bailey, Nina; Yurchenco, Peter; Skubitz, Amy P. N.; Roskelley, Calvin; Bissell, Mina J

    1995-04-01

    Tissue-specific gene expression in mammary epithelium is dependent on the extracellular matrix as well as hormones. There is good evidence that the basement membrane provides signals for regulating beta-casein expression, and that integrins are involved in this process. Here, we demonstrate that in the presence of lactogenic hormones, laminin can direct expression of the beta-casein gene. Mouse mammary epithelial cells plated on gels of native laminin or laminin-entactin undergo functional differentiation. On tissue culture plastic, mammary cells respond to soluble basement membrane or purified laminin, but not other extracellular matrix components, by synthesizing beta-casein. In mammary cells transfected with chloramphenicol acetyl transferase reporter constructs, laminin activates transcription from the beta-casein promoter through a specific enhancer element. The inductive effect of laminin on casein expression was specifically blocked by the E3 fragment of the carboxy terminal region of the alpha 1 chain of laminin, by antisera raised against the E3 fragment, and by a peptide corresponding to a sequence within this region. Our results demonstrate that laminin can direct tissue-specific gene expression in epithelial cells through its globular domain.

  11. Notch3 marks clonogenic mammary luminal progenitor cells in vivo

    PubMed Central

    Lafkas, Daniel; Rodilla, Veronica; Huyghe, Mathilde; Mourao, Larissa; Kiaris, Hippokratis

    2013-01-01

    The identity of mammary stem and progenitor cells remains poorly understood, mainly as a result of the lack of robust markers. The Notch signaling pathway has been implicated in mammary gland development as well as in tumorigenesis in this tissue. Elevated expression of the Notch3 receptor has been correlated to the highly aggressive “triple negative” human breast cancer. However, the specific cells expressing this Notch paralogue in the mammary gland remain unknown. Using a conditionally inducible Notch3-CreERT2SAT transgenic mouse, we genetically marked Notch3-expressing cells throughout mammary gland development and followed their lineage in vivo. We demonstrate that Notch3 is expressed in a highly clonogenic and transiently quiescent luminal progenitor population that gives rise to a ductal lineage. These cells are capable of surviving multiple successive pregnancies, suggesting a capacity to self-renew. Our results also uncover a role for the Notch3 receptor in restricting the proliferation and consequent clonal expansion of these cells. PMID:24100291

  12. Notch3 marks clonogenic mammary luminal progenitor cells in vivo.

    PubMed

    Lafkas, Daniel; Rodilla, Veronica; Huyghe, Mathilde; Mourao, Larissa; Kiaris, Hippokratis; Fre, Silvia

    2013-10-14

    The identity of mammary stem and progenitor cells remains poorly understood, mainly as a result of the lack of robust markers. The Notch signaling pathway has been implicated in mammary gland development as well as in tumorigenesis in this tissue. Elevated expression of the Notch3 receptor has been correlated to the highly aggressive "triple negative" human breast cancer. However, the specific cells expressing this Notch paralogue in the mammary gland remain unknown. Using a conditionally inducible Notch3-CreERT2(SAT) transgenic mouse, we genetically marked Notch3-expressing cells throughout mammary gland development and followed their lineage in vivo. We demonstrate that Notch3 is expressed in a highly clonogenic and transiently quiescent luminal progenitor population that gives rise to a ductal lineage. These cells are capable of surviving multiple successive pregnancies, suggesting a capacity to self-renew. Our results also uncover a role for the Notch3 receptor in restricting the proliferation and consequent clonal expansion of these cells.

  13. Pubertal Mammary Gland Development: Elucidation of In Vivo Morphogenesis Using Murine Models.

    PubMed

    McBryan, Jean; Howlin, Jillian

    2017-01-01

    During the past 25 years, the combination of increasingly sophisticated gene targeting technology with transplantation techniques has allowed researchers to address a wide array of questions about postnatal mammary gland development. These in turn have significantly contributed to our knowledge of other branched epithelial structures. This review chapter highlights a selection of the mouse models exhibiting a pubertal mammary gland phenotype with a focus on how they have contributed to our overall understanding of in vivo mammary morphogenesis. We discuss mouse models that have enabled us to assign functions to particular genes and proteins and, more importantly, have determined when and where these factors are required for completion of ductal outgrowth and branch patterning. The reason for the success of the mouse mammary gland model is undoubtedly the suitability of the postnatal mammary gland to experimental manipulation. The gland itself is very amenable to investigation and the combination of genetic modification with accessibility to the tissue has allowed an impressive number of studies to inform biology. Excision of the rudimentary epithelial structure postnatally allows genetically modified tissue to be readily transplanted into wild type stroma or vice versa, and has thus defined the contribution of each compartment to particular phenotypes. Similarly, whole gland transplantation has been used to definitively discern local effects from indirect systemic effects of various growth factors and hormones. While appreciative of the power of these tools and techniques, we are also cognizant of some of their limitations, and we discuss some shortcomings and future strategies that can overcome them.

  14. Mammary Analogue Secretory Carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Stevens, Todd M; Parekh, Vishwas

    2016-09-01

    Mammary analogue secretory carcinoma (MASC) is a recently described salivary gland tumor that shares the same histologic appearance and ETV6 gene (12p13) rearrangement as secretory carcinoma of the breast. Prior to its recognition, MASC cases were commonly labeled acinic cell carcinoma and adenocarcinoma, not otherwise specified. Despite distinctive histologic features, MASC may be difficult to distinguish from other salivary gland tumors, in particular zymogen-poor acinic cell carcinoma and low-grade salivary duct carcinoma. Although characteristic morphologic and immunohistochemical features form the basis of a diagnosis of MASC, the presence of an ETV6-NTRK3 gene fusion is confirmatory. Given its recent recognition the true prognostic import of MASC is not yet clearly defined.

  15. Cloning of Mammary Stem Cells

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2001-11-01

    these parity-induced cells do represent a totipotent mammary stem cell population per se, but these cells might support stem cell maintenance as... Stem Cells PRINCIPAL INVESTIGATOR: Dr. Kay-Uwe Wagner CONTRACTING ORGANIZATION: University of Nebraska Medical Center Omaha, Nebraska 68198-6810 REPORT...Mammary Stem Cells DAMD17-00-1-0641 6. AUTHOR(S) Dr. Kay-Uwe Wagner 7. PERFORMING ORGANIZATION NAME(S) AND ADDRESS(ES) 8. PERFORMING ORGANIZATION REPORT

  16. Shh expression is required for embryonic hair follicle but not mammary gland development.

    PubMed

    Michno, Kinga; Boras-Granic, Kata; Mill, Pleasantine; Hui, C C; Hamel, Paul A

    2003-12-01

    The embryonic mammary gland and hair follicle are both derived from the ventral ectoderm, and their development depends on a number of common fundamental developmental pathways. While the Hedgehog (Hh) signaling pathway is required for hair follicle morphogenesis, the role of this pathway during embryonic mammary gland development remains undetermined. We demonstrate here that, unlike the hair follicle, both Shh and Ihh are expressed in the developing embryonic mouse mammary rudiment as early as E12.5. In Shh(-/-) embryos, hair follicle development becomes arrested at an early stage, while the mammary rudiment, which continues to express Ihh, develops in a manner indistinguishable from that of wild-type littermates. The five pairs of mammary buds in Shh(-/-) female embryos exhibit normal branching morphogenesis at E16.5, forming a rudimentary ductal structure identical to wild-type embryonic mammary glands. We further demonstrate that loss of Hh signaling causes altered cyclin D1 expression in the embryonic dermal mesenchyme. Specifically, cyclin D1 is expressed at E14.5 principally in the condensed mesenchymal cells of the presumptive hair follicles and in both mesenchymal and epithelial cells of the mammary rudiments in wild-type and Shh-deficient embryos. By E18.5, robust cyclin D1 expression is maintained in mammary rudiments of both wild-type and Shh-deficient embryos. In hair follicles of wild-type embryos by E18.5, cyclin D1 expression switches to follicular epithelial cells. In contrast, strong cyclin D1 expression is observed principally in the mesenchymal cells of arrested hair follicles in Shh(-/-) embryos at E18.5. These data reveal that, despite the common embryonic origin of hair follicles and mammary glands, distinct patterns of Hh-family expression occur in these two tissues. Furthermore, these data suggest that cyclin D1 expression in the embryonic hair follicle is mediated by both Hh-independent and Hh-dependent mechanisms.

  17. From genes to milk: genomic organization and epigenetic regulation of the mammary transcriptome.

    PubMed

    Lemay, Danielle G; Pollard, Katherine S; Martin, William F; Freeman Zadrowski, Courtneay; Hernandez, Joseph; Korf, Ian; German, J Bruce; Rijnkels, Monique

    2013-01-01

    Even in genomes lacking operons, a gene's position in the genome influences its potential for expression. The mechanisms by which adjacent genes are co-expressed are still not completely understood. Using lactation and the mammary gland as a model system, we explore the hypothesis that chromatin state contributes to the co-regulation of gene neighborhoods. The mammary gland represents a unique evolutionary model, due to its recent appearance, in the context of vertebrate genomes. An understanding of how the mammary gland is regulated to produce milk is also of biomedical and agricultural importance for human lactation and dairying. Here, we integrate epigenomic and transcriptomic data to develop a comprehensive regulatory model. Neighborhoods of mammary-expressed genes were determined using expression data derived from pregnant and lactating mice and a neighborhood scoring tool, G-NEST. Regions of open and closed chromatin were identified by ChIP-Seq of histone modifications H3K36me3, H3K4me2, and H3K27me3 in the mouse mammary gland and liver tissue during lactation. We found that neighborhoods of genes in regions of uniquely active chromatin in the lactating mammary gland, compared with liver tissue, were extremely rare. Rather, genes in most neighborhoods were suppressed during lactation as reflected in their expression levels and their location in regions of silenced chromatin. Chromatin silencing was largely shared between the liver and mammary gland during lactation, and what distinguished the mammary gland was mainly a small tissue-specific repertoire of isolated, expressed genes. These findings suggest that an advantage of the neighborhood organization is in the collective repression of groups of genes via a shared mechanism of chromatin repression. Genes essential to the mammary gland's uniqueness are isolated from neighbors, and likely have less tolerance for variation in expression, properties they share with genes responsible for an organism's survival.

  18. Characterization of WWOX inactivation in murine mammary gland development.

    PubMed

    Abdeen, Suhaib K; Salah, Zaidoun; Khawaled, Saleh; Aqeilan, Rami I

    2013-07-01

    The WW domain-containing oxidoreductase (WWOX) is commonly inactivated in multiple human cancers, including breast cancer. Wwox null mice die prematurely precluding adult tumor analysis. Nevertheless, aging Wwox-heterozygous mice at C3H genetic background develop higher incidence of mammary tumors. We recently generated a Wwox conditional knockout mouse in which loxp sites flank exon 1 in the Wwox allele and showed that total ablation of WWOX in these mice resembles that of conventional targeting of Wwox. Here, we report the characterization of WWOX ablation in mouse mammary gland using MMTV-Cre transgenic line. We demonstrated that WWOX ablation leads to impaired mammary ductal growth. Moreover, targeted deletion of WWOX is associated with increased levels of fibronectin, a component of the extracellular matrix. In addition, we showed that shRNA knockdown of WWOX in MCF10A breast epithelial cells dramatically increased fibronectin and is associated with enhanced cell survival and impaired growth in three-dimensional culture Matrigel assay. Taken together our results are consistent with a critical role for WWOX in normal breast development and tumorigenesis.

  19. Correlations between nuclear and fluorescent Imaging of mammary tumors in mice

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carroll, Robin; Stone, John; Blue, Eric; Bradley, Eric; Qian, Jianguo; Saha, Margaret; Welsh, Robert

    2008-10-01

    Progress with new imaging technologies permits the study of biological processes both in vivo and noninvasively. Two systems, a position-sensitive gamma camera and a cooled-CCD camera have been applied in this work. A C3H strain of mouse carrying the Mouse Mammary Tumor Virus (MMTV) was imaged using 800 nm Q-tracker fluorescent dots conjugated to a peptide targeting integrin αυβ C a mammary marker for angiogenesis. We subsequently imaged with the gamma camera to detect low levels of ^125I distribution, and hence, the activity of a trans-membrane protein called the sodium iodide symporter (NIS) responsible for iodine transport. Preliminary results indicate that the biodistribution of the tagged Q-tracker dots and ^125I co-localize very early in seemingly normal mammary glands of infected MMTV mice, while in larger palpable tumors the Q-dot signals are less apparent in comparison with the^125I signal.

  20. Cross Species Identification and Functional Analysis of MicroRNAs in Mammary Tumorigenesis: Potential Targets for Detection, Diagnosis and Therapy

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2007-07-01

    expression of several miRNAs have been reported in human breast cancers and may be useful in predicting patient prognosis. The functional roles of...models of mammary cancer as a filter to identify miRNAs whose expression may be evolutionarily conserved in breast cancer . Such species of miRNA that...multiple mouse models of mammary cancer that are based upon different initiating oncogenic events. Four general patterns of miRNA expression have been

  1. Mammary tumorigenesis induced by fibroblast growth factor receptor 1 requires activation of the epidermal growth factor receptor.

    PubMed

    Bade, Lindsey K; Goldberg, Jodi E; Dehut, Hazel A; Hall, Majken K; Schwertfeger, Kathryn L

    2011-09-15

    Fibroblast growth factor receptor 1 (FGFR1) is an oncoprotein with known involvement in mammary tumorigenesis. To understand how FGFR1 signaling promotes mammary tumorigenesis, an inducible FGFR1 (iFGFR1) system was created previously. Previous studies have demonstrated that upon iFGFR1 activation in vivo, the epidermal growth factor (EGF) ligands amphiregulin (AREG) and epiregulin (EREG) are upregulated. Both AREG and EREG interact with the EGF receptor (EGFR). Here, we investigated whether the FGFR1-induced increase in AREG and EREG expression might coordinately increase EGFR signaling to promote mammary tumorigenesis. Treatment of mouse mammary epithelial cells with either AREG or EREG conferred a greater migratory potential, increased cellular proliferation and increased extracellular regulated kinase 1/2 (ERK1/2) activation. These effects could be blocked with the EGFR-specific inhibitor erlotinib, suggesting that they are EGFR-dependent. In transgenic mice with iFGFR1 under the control of the mouse mammary tumor virus (MMTV) promoter, iFGFR1 activation also led to increased mammary epithelial cell proliferation that was inhibited with erlotinib. Taken together, these data suggest that AREG and EREG mediate tumorigenic phenotypes by activating EGFR signaling, and that the oncogenic potential of FGFR1 requires EGFR activation to promote mammary tumorigenesis.

  2. Insulin receptors in the mammary gland

    SciTech Connect

    Smith, D.H.

    1986-01-01

    Insulin binding studies were conducted using mammary membrane preparations to further the authors understanding of insulin's role in regulating mammary metabolism, particularly ruminant mammary metabolism. Specific objectives were to: (1) characterize insulin binding to bovine mammary microsomes and determine if the specificity and kinetics of binding indicate the presence of insulin receptors in bovine mammary gland; (2) examine and compare insulin binding by liver and mammary microsomes of the pig and dairy cow; (3) examine insulin binding to bovine milk fat globule membranes (MFGM) and evaluate this model's usefulness in assessing insulin receptor regulation in the mammary gland of the cow; (4) examine the effect of dietary fat in insulin binding by rat mammary and liver microsomes. The specificity and kinetics of /sup 125/I-insulin binding of bovine mammary microsomes indicated the presence of insulin receptors in bovine mammary gland. Bovine liver and mammary microsomes specifically bound less /sup 125/I-insulin than did the corresponding porcine microsomes, and mammary microsomes, regardless of species, specifically bound less /sup 125/I-insulin than did liver microsomes. These differences in binding suggest differences in insulin responsiveness between pigs and cattle, as well as between the liver and mammary glands.

  3. Comparative expression pathway analysis of human and canine mammary tumors

    PubMed Central

    Uva, Paolo; Aurisicchio, Luigi; Watters, James; Loboda, Andrey; Kulkarni, Amit; Castle, John; Palombo, Fabio; Viti, Valentina; Mesiti, Giuseppe; Zappulli, Valentina; Marconato, Laura; Abramo, Francesca; Ciliberto, Gennaro; Lahm, Armin; La Monica, Nicola; de Rinaldis, Emanuele

    2009-01-01

    Background Spontaneous tumors in dog have been demonstrated to share many features with their human counterparts, including relevant molecular targets, histological appearance, genetics, biological behavior and response to conventional treatments. Mammary tumors in dog therefore provide an attractive alternative to more classical mouse models, such as transgenics or xenografts, where the tumour is artificially induced. To assess the extent to which dog tumors represent clinically significant human phenotypes, we performed the first genome-wide comparative analysis of transcriptional changes occurring in mammary tumors of the two species, with particular focus on the molecular pathways involved. Results We analyzed human and dog gene expression data derived from both tumor and normal mammary samples. By analyzing the expression levels of about ten thousand dog/human orthologous genes we observed a significant overlap of genes deregulated in the mammary tumor samples, as compared to their normal counterparts. Pathway analysis of gene expression data revealed a great degree of similarity in the perturbation of many cancer-related pathways, including the 'PI3K/AKT', 'KRAS', 'PTEN', 'WNT-beta catenin' and 'MAPK cascade'. Moreover, we show that the transcriptional relationships between different gene signatures observed in human breast cancer are largely maintained in the canine model, suggesting a close interspecies similarity in the network of cancer signalling circuitries. Conclusion Our data confirm and further strengthen the value of the canine mammary cancer model and open up new perspectives for the evaluation of novel cancer therapeutics and the development of prognostic and diagnostic biomarkers to be used in clinical studies. PMID:19327144

  4. Mammary Cancer and Activation of Transposable Elements

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2014-09-01

    AD_________________ Award Number: W81XWH-11-1-0402 TITLE: Mammary Cancer and Activation...TYPE Annual 3. DATES COVERED 1 Sep 2013 – 31 Aug 2014 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE Mammary Cancer and Activation of Transposable Elements 5a. CONTRACT...investigate molecular events occurring in the preclinical stages of mammary cancer. Specifically, the project investigates the intersection between the

  5. Biological and genetic properties of the p53 null preneoplastic mammary epithelium

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Medina, Daniel; Kittrell, Frances S.; Shepard, Anne; Stephens, L. Clifton; Jiang, Cheng; Lu, Junxuan; Allred, D. Craig; McCarthy, Maureen; Ullrich, Robert L.

    2002-01-01

    The absence of the tumor suppressor gene p53 confers an increased tumorigenic risk for mammary epithelial cells. In this report, we describe the biological and genetic properties of the p53 null preneoplastic mouse mammary epithelium in a p53 wild-type environment. Mammary epithelium from p53 null mice was transplanted serially into the cleared mammary fat pads of p53 wild-type BALB/c female to develop stable outgrowth lines. The outgrowth lines were transplanted for 10 generations. The outgrowths were ductal in morphology and progressed through ductal hyperplasia and ductal carcinoma in situ before invasive cancer. The preneoplastic outgrowth lines were immortal and exhibited activated telomerase activity. They are estrogen and progesterone receptor-positive, and aneuploid, and had various levels of tumorigenic potential. The biological and genetic properties of these lines are distinct from those found in most hyperplastic alveolar outgrowth lines, the form of mammary preneoplasia occurring in most traditional models of murine mammary tumorigenesis. These results indicate that the preneoplastic cell populations found in this genetically engineered model are similar in biological properties to a subset of precurser lesions found in human breast cancer and provide a unique model to identify secondary events critical for tumorigenicity and invasiveness.

  6. Form and function: how estrogen and progesterone regulate the mammary epithelial hierarchy.

    PubMed

    Arendt, Lisa M; Kuperwasser, Charlotte

    2015-06-01

    The mammary gland undergoes dramatic post-natal growth beginning at puberty, followed by full development occurring during pregnancy and lactation. Following lactation, the alveoli undergo apoptosis, and the mammary gland reverses back to resemble the nonparous gland. This process of growth and regression occurs for multiple pregnancies, suggesting the presence of a hierarchy of stem and progenitor cells that are able to regenerate specialized populations of mammary epithelial cells. Expansion of epithelial cell populations in the mammary gland is regulated by ovarian steroids, in particular estrogen acting through its receptor estrogen receptor alpha (ERα) and progesterone signaling through progesterone receptor (PR). A diverse number of stem and progenitor cells have been identified based on expression of cell surface markers and functional assays. Here we review the current understanding of how estrogen and progesterone act together and separately to regulate stem and progenitor cells within the human and mouse mammary tissues. Better understanding of the hierarchal organization of epithelial cell populations in the mammary gland and how the hormonal milieu affects its regulation may provide important insights into the origins of different subtypes of breast cancer.

  7. Autophagy regulator BECN1 suppresses mammary tumorigenesis driven by WNT1 activation and following parity.

    PubMed

    Cicchini, Michelle; Chakrabarti, Rumela; Kongara, Sameera; Price, Sandy; Nahar, Ritu; Lozy, Fred; Zhong, Hua; Vazquez, Alexei; Kang, Yibin; Karantza, Vassiliki

    2014-01-01

    Earlier studies reported allelic deletion of the essential autophagy regulator BECN1 in breast cancers implicating BECN1 loss, and likely defective autophagy, in tumorigenesis. Recent studies have questioned the tumor suppressive role of autophagy, as autophagy-related gene (Atg) defects generally suppress tumorigenesis in well-characterized mouse tumor models. We now report that, while it delays or does not alter mammary tumorigenesis driven by Palb2 loss or ERBB2 and PyMT overexpression, monoallelic Becn1 loss promotes mammary tumor development in 2 specific contexts, namely following parity and in association with wingless-type MMTV integration site family, member 1 (WNT1) activation. Our studies demonstrate that Becn1 heterozygosity, which results in immature mammary epithelial cell expansion and aberrant TNFRSF11A/TNR11/RANK (tumor necrosis factor receptor superfamily, member 11a, NFKB activator) signaling, promotes mammary tumorigenesis in multiparous FVB/N mice and in cooperation with the progenitor cell-transforming WNT1 oncogene. Similar to our Becn1(+/-);MMTV-Wnt1 mouse model, low BECN1 expression and an activated WNT pathway gene signature correlate with the triple-negative subtype, TNFRSF11A axis activation and poor prognosis in human breast cancers. Our results suggest that BECN1 may have nonautophagy-related roles in mammary development, provide insight in the seemingly paradoxical roles of BECN1 in tumorigenesis, and constitute the basis for further studies on the pathophysiology and treatment of clinically aggressive triple negative breast cancers (TNBCs).

  8. Reduced circulating insulin-like growth factor I levels delay the onset of chemically and genetically induced mammary tumors.

    PubMed

    Wu, Yiping; Cui, Karen; Miyoshi, Keiko; Hennighausen, Lothar; Green, Jeffrey E; Setser, Jennifer; LeRoith, Derek; Yakar, Shoshana

    2003-08-01

    Insulin-like growth factors (IGFs) play a crucial role in regulating cell proliferation and differentiation. The aim of this study was to examine the potential relationship between serum IGF-I levels and breast cancer risk. To do this, we studied liver-specific IGF-I gene-deleted (LID) mice, in which circulating IGF-I levels are 25% of that in control mice. Mammary tumors were induced in two ways: (a) by exposing mice to the carcinogen 7,12-dimethybenz (a)anthracene; and (b) by crossing LID mice with C3(1)/SV40 large T-antigen transgenic mice. In both models, LID mice exhibited a delayed latency period of mammary tumor development. In the 7,12-dimethybenz (a)anthracene-induced mammary tumor model, the incidence of palpable mammary tumors was significantly lower in LID mice (26% versus 56% in controls), and the onset of the tumors was delayed (74 +/- 1.2 days in LID mice versus 59.5 +/- 1.1 days in controls). Histological analysis showed extensive squamous metaplasia in late-stage mammary tumors of control mice, whereas late-stage tumors from LID mice exhibited extensive hyperplasia, but little metaplasia. In control mice, the onset of C3(1)/SV40-large T-antigen-induced mammary tumors occurred at 21.6 +/- 1.8 weeks of age, whereas in LID mice the average age of onset was 30.2 +/- 1.7 weeks. In addition, 60% of the mice in the control group developed two or more mammary tumors per mouse, whereas in the LID mice only 30% developed more than one mammary tumor per mouse. Our data demonstrate that circulating IGF-I levels play a significant role as a risk factor in the onset and development of mammary tumors in two well-established animal models of breast cancer.

  9. Relationship Between Organization of Mammary Tumors and the Ability of Tumor Cells to Replicate Mammary Tumor Virus and to Recognize Growth-Inhibitory Contact Signals In Vitro

    PubMed Central

    McGrath, Charles M.; Nandi, S.; Young, Lawrence

    1972-01-01

    Mammary tumor virus (MTV) replication was confined primarily to cells organized as acini in intact mouse mammary glands. Primary mammary tumors maintained a high degree of acinar organization and cells therein continued to replicate MTV vegetatively. Nonacinar mammary cells, derived by serial transplantation of acinar tumor cells, no longer actively replicated MTV. This suggests that phenotypic differences exist among mammary epithelial cells in their ability to support virus replication, that a fundamental relationship exists between the organization of epithelium for secretion and active virus replication, and that this relationship is not altered as a primary consequence of neoplastic transformation. Mammary epithelial cells from pregnant, non-tumor-bearing, MTV-infected BALB/cfC3H mice or from acinar mammary tumors from a number of mouse strains were grown in primary monolayer cultures. Such cell cultures under the influence of insulin and cortisol exhibited the ability to organize into discrete three-dimensional structures called “domes.” MTV replication in such cultures took place primarily in cells within the organized domes. Cells cultured from nonacinar tumors did not exhibit any propensity to organize into domes, nor did they replicate MTV in primary culture. This suggests that the cell organizational requirement for MTV replication observed in vivo is conserved in primary culture. Dome formation is not an effect of virus replication, as cells from uninfected BALB/c animals organized into domes in culture without concomitant MTV replication. Growth-regulating signals, exerted between contiguous cells in cultures of non-MTV-infected mammary epithelium, were not modified by the occurrence of active virus replication nor as a direct consequence of neoplastic transformation. Cells derived from nontumor BALB/cfC3H glands and from spontaneous tumors exhibited cell growth kinetics, saturation densities, and deoxyribonucleic acid synthesis kinetics nearly

  10. Repression of mammary adipogenesis by genistein limits mammosphere formation of human MCF-7 cells.

    PubMed

    Montales, Maria Theresa E; Rahal, Omar M; Nakatani, Hajime; Matsuda, Tsukasa; Simmen, Rosalia C M

    2013-07-01

    Mammary adipose tissue may contribute to breast cancer development and progression by altering neighboring epithelial cell behavior and phenotype through paracrine signaling. Dietary exposure to soy foods is associated with lower mammary tumor risk and reduced body weight and adiposity in humans and in rodent breast cancer models. Despite the suggested linkage between obesity and breast cancer, the local influence of bioactive dietary components on mammary adiposity for antitumor effects remains unknown. Herein, we report that post-weaning dietary exposure to soy protein isolate and its bioactive isoflavone genistein (GEN) lowered mammary adiposity and increased mammary tumor suppressor PTEN and E-cadherin expression in female mice, relative to control casein diet. To ascertain GEN's role in mammary adipose deposition that may affect underlying epithelial cell phenotype, we evaluated GEN's effects on SV40-immortalized mouse mammary stromal fibroblast-like (MSF) cells during differentiation into adipocytes. MSF cells cultured in a differentiation medium with 40 nM GEN showed reductions in mature adipocyte numbers, triglyceride accumulation, and Pparγ (Pparg) and fatty acid synthase transcript levels. GEN inhibition of adipose differentiation was accompanied by increased estrogen receptor β (Erβ (Esr2)) gene expression and was modestly recapitulated by ERβ-selective agonist 2,3-bis-(4-hydroxyphenyl)-propionitrile (DPN). Reduction of Erβ expression by siRNA targeting increased Pparγ transcript levels and stromal fibroblast differentiation into mature adipocytes; the latter was reversed by GEN but not by DPN. Conditioned medium from GEN-treated adipocytes diminished anchorage-independent mammosphere formation of human MCF-7 breast cancer cells. Our results suggest a mechanistic pathway to support direct regulation of mammary adiposity by GEN for breast cancer prevention.

  11. FACS Sorting Mammary Stem Cells.

    PubMed

    Iriondo, Oihana; Rábano, Miriam; Vivanco, María D M

    2015-01-01

    Fluorescent-activated cell sorting (FACS) represents one of the key techniques that have been used to isolate and characterize stem cells, including cells from the mammary gland. A combination of approaches, including recognition of cell surface antigens and different cellular activities, has facilitated the identification of stem cells from the healthy mammary gland and from breast tumors. In this chapter we describe the protocol to use FACS to separate breast cancer stem cells, but most of the general principles discussed could be applied to sort other types of cells.

  12. Metabotropic glutamate receptor 1 disrupts mammary acinar architecture and initiates malignant transformation of mammary epithelial cells

    PubMed Central

    Teh, Jessica L. F.; Shah, Raj; La Cava, Stephanie; Dolfi, Sonia C.; Mehta, Madhura S.; Kongara, Sameera; Price, Sandy; Ganesan, Shridar; Reuhl, Kenneth R.; Hirshfield, Kim M.

    2016-01-01

    Metabotropic glutamate receptor 1 (mGluR1/Grm1) is a member of the G-protein-coupled receptor superfamily, which was once thought to only participate in synaptic transmission and neuronal excitability, but has more recently been implicated in non-neuronal tissue functions. We previously described the oncogenic properties of Grm1 in cultured melanocytes in vitro and in spontaneous melanoma development with 100 % penetrance in vivo. Aberrant mGluR1 expression was detected in 60–80 % of human melanoma cell lines and biopsy samples. As most human cancers are of epithelial origin, we utilized immortalized mouse mammary epithelial cells (iMMECs) as a model system to study the transformative properties of Grm1. We introduced Grm1 into iMMECs and isolated several stable mGluR1-expressing clones. Phenotypic alterations in mammary acinar architecture were assessed using three-dimensional morphogenesis assays. We found that mGluR1-expressing iMMECs exhibited delayed lumen formation in association with decreased central acinar cell death, disrupted cell polarity, and a dramatic increase in the activation of the mitogen-activated protein kinase pathway. Orthotopic implantation of mGluR1-expressing iMMEC clones into mammary fat pads of immunodeficient nude mice resulted in mammary tumor formation in vivo. Persistent mGluR1 expression was required for the maintenance of the tumorigenic phenotypes in vitro and in vivo, as demonstrated by an inducible Grm1-silencing RNA system. Furthermore, mGluR1 was found be expressed in human breast cancer cell lines and breast tumor biopsies. Elevated levels of extracellular glutamate were observed in mGluR1-expressing breast cancer cell lines and concurrent treatment of MCF7 xenografts with glutamate release inhibitor, riluzole, and an AKT inhibitor led to suppression of tumor progression. Our results are likely relevant to human breast cancer, highlighting a putative role of mGluR1 in the pathophysiology of breast cancer and the potential

  13. Terminal end bud maintenance in mammary gland is dependent upon FGFR2b signaling.

    PubMed

    Parsa, Sara; Ramasamy, Suresh K; De Langhe, Stijn; Gupte, Varsha V; Haigh, Jody J; Medina, Daniel; Bellusci, Savério

    2008-05-01

    We previously demonstrated that Fibroblast Growth Factor 10 (FGF10) and its receptor FGFR2b play a key role in controlling the very early stages of mammary gland development during embryogenesis [Mailleux, A.A., Spencer-Dene, B., Dillon, C., Ndiaye, D., Savona-Baron, C., Itoh, N., Kato, S., Dickson, C., Thiery, J.P., and Bellusci, S. (2002). Role of FGF10/FGFR2b signaling during mammary gland development in the mouse embryo. Development 129, 53-60. Veltmaat, J. M., Relaix, F., Le, L.T., Kratochwil, K., Sala, F.G., van Veelen, W., Rice, R., Spencer-Dene, B., Mailleux, A.A., Rice, D.P., Thiery, J.P., and Bellusci, S. (2006). Gli3-mediated somitic Fgf10 expression gradients are required for the induction and patterning of mammary epithelium along the embryonic axes. Development 133, 2325-35.]. However, the role of FGFR2b signaling in postnatal mammary gland development is still elusive. We show that FGF10 is expressed at high level throughout the adipose tissue in the mammary gland of young virgin female mice whereas its main receptor FGFR2 is found mostly in the epithelium. Using a rtTA transactivator/tetracycline promoter approach allowing inducible and reversible attenuation of the FGFR2b signaling throughout the adult mouse, we are now reporting that FGFR2b signaling is also critical during postnatal mammary gland development. Ubiquitous attenuation of FGFR2b signaling in the postnatal mouse for 6 weeks starting immediately after birth is not lethal and leads to minor defects in the animal. Upon dissection of the mammary glands, a 40% reduction in size compared to the WT control is observed. Further examination shows a rudimentary mammary epithelial tree with completely absent terminal end buds (TEBs), compared to a well-branched structure observed in wild type. Transplantation of mammary gland explants into cleared fat pad of wild type mouse recipients indicates that the observed abnormal branching results from defective FGFR2b signaling in the epithelium. We

  14. Regulation of Mammary Progenitor Cells by p53 and Parity

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2011-01-01

    2003). 12. Ibarra , I., Erlich, Y., Muthuswamy, S. K., Sachidanandam, R. & Hannon, G. J. A role for microRNAs in maintenance of mouse mammary...supplemented with 1mM EDTA, 25mM HEPES, 1%FBS and 100u/ml Pen/Strep. The FACS data were collected using LSRII (Becton Dickinson, San Jose CA). A total...epithelial stem/progenitor cells. BREAST CANCER RES. 2009;11(2):R20. 28. Ibarra I, Erlich Y, Muthuswamy SK et al. A role for microRNAs in maintenance

  15. Modulating mammary tumor growth, metastasis and immunosuppression by siRNA-induced MIF reduction in tumor microenvironment.

    PubMed

    Zhang, M; Yan, L; Kim, J A

    2015-10-01

    Macrophage migration inhibitory factor (MIF) has been identified as a major gene product upregulated in breast cancer cells-tissues upon the accumulation of macrophages. However, regulatory role of MIF in tumor microenvironment is not well understood. Previously, we have developed small interfering RNA (siRNA)-loaded nanoparticle system to effectively reduce MIF expression in both breast cancer cells and macrophages. Using this nanoparticle system, in this study we demonstrated that the siRNA-induced MIF reduction in murine mammary cancer line 4T1 and human breast cancer line MDA-MB-231 resulted in significant reduction of cell proliferation and increase of apoptosis; the siRNA-induced MIF reduction in tumor-associated macrophages resulted in a significant reduction of surface expression of CD74 and CD206 and a significant increase of surface expression of major histocompatibility complex II, as well as intracellular expression of tumor necrosis factor-α and interleukin-2. A direct injection of the MIF-siRNA-loaded nanoparticles into 4T1 tumor in mice resulted in effective reduction of intratumoral MIF. This led to a reduction of tumor growth and metastasis. This also resulted in a reduction of circulating myeloid-derived suppressive cells both in number and in suppressive function. CD4 T-cell infiltration to tumor was increased. More importantly, this not only slowed the growth of treated 4T1 tumor, but also delayed the growth and metastasis of a contralateral untreated 4T1-luc tumor, suggesting the development of systemic antitumor responses. This study demonstrates for the first time that the siRNA-mediated intratumoral MIF reduction can induce antitumoral immune response via reducing systemic immune suppression.

  16. Automatic segmentation of histological structures in mammary gland tissue sections

    SciTech Connect

    Fernandez-Gonzalez, Rodrigo; Deschamps, Thomas; Idica, Adam K.; Malladi, Ravikanth; Ortiz de Solorzano, Carlos

    2004-02-17

    Real-time three-dimensional (3D) reconstruction of epithelial structures in human mammary gland tissue blocks mapped with selected markers would be an extremely helpful tool for breast cancer diagnosis and treatment planning. Besides its clear clinical application, this tool could also shed a great deal of light on the molecular basis of breast cancer initiation and progression. In this paper we present a framework for real-time segmentation of epithelial structures in two-dimensional (2D) images of sections of normal and neoplastic mammary gland tissue blocks. Complete 3D rendering of the tissue can then be done by surface rendering of the structures detected in consecutive sections of the blocks. Paraffin embedded or frozen tissue blocks are first sliced, and sections are stained with Hematoxylin and Eosin. The sections are then imaged using conventional bright field microscopy and their background is corrected using a phantom image. We then use the Fast-Marching algorithm to roughly extract the contours of the different morphological structures in the images. The result is then refined with the Level-Set method which converges to an accurate (sub-pixel) solution for the segmentation problem. Finally, our system stacks together the 2D results obtained in order to reconstruct a 3D representation of the entire tissue block under study. Our method is illustrated with results from the segmentation of human and mouse mammary gland tissue samples.

  17. Mammary glands exhibit molecular laterality and undergo left-right asymmetric ductal epithelial growth in MMTV-cNeu mice.

    PubMed

    Robichaux, J P; Hallett, R M; Fuseler, J W; Hassell, J A; Ramsdell, A F

    2015-04-09

    Significant left-right (L-R) differences in tumor incidence and disease outcome occur for cancers of paired organs, including the breasts; however, the basis for this laterality is unknown. Here, we show that despite their morphologic symmetry, left versus right mammary glands in wild-type mice have baseline differences in gene expression that are L-R independently regulated during pubertal development, including genes that regulate luminal progenitor cell renewal, luminal cell differentiation, mammary tumorigenesis, tamoxifen sensitivity and chemotherapeutic resistance. In MMTV-cNeu(Tg/Tg) mice, which model HER2/Neu-amplified breast cancer, baseline L-R differences in mammary gene expression are amplified, sustained or inverted in a gene-specific manner and the mammary ductal epithelium undergoes L-R asymmetric growth and patterning. Comparative genomic analysis of mouse L-R mammary gene expression profiles with gene expression profiles of human breast tumors revealed significant linkage between right-sided gene expression and decreased breast cancer patient survival. Collectively, these findings are the first to demonstrate that mammary glands are lateralized organs, and, moreover, that mammary glands have L-R differential susceptibility to HER2/Neu oncogene-mediated effects on ductal epithelial growth and differentiation. We propose that intrinsic molecular laterality may have a role in L-R asymmetric breast tumor incidence and, furthermore, that interplay between the L-R molecular landscape and oncogene activity may contribute to the differential disease progression and patient outcome that are associated with tumor situs.

  18. Establishment and characterization of a new human oestradiol- and progesterone-receptor-positive mammary carcinoma serially transplantable in nude mice.

    PubMed

    Naundorf, H; Fichtner, I; Büttner, B; Frege, J

    1992-01-01

    A human mammary carcinoma originating from a postmenopausal patient was successfully transplanted into nude mice. According to the adopted criteria the tumour proved to be oestradiol- and progesterone-receptor-positive. Histological studies of the patient tumour revealed a ductal invasive mammary carcinoma with 80% tubular growth pattern. Following transplantation the adenoid structures decreased to 30%; the mitosis rate and grade of malignancy increased. Treatment of the nude mice with 20 micrograms oestradiol benzoate/mouse caused a loss of the oestradiol receptor of the mammary carcinoma. The mammary carcinoma 3366 can be used for testing of antineoplastic substances, antihormones and for studies in regard to down-regulation or blocking of hormone receptors and possible consequences for therapies.

  19. Ectodysplasin/NF-κB signaling in embryonic mammary gland development.

    PubMed

    Lindfors, Päivi H; Voutilainen, Maria; Mikkola, Marja L

    2013-06-01

    The ectodysplasin (Eda) signaling pathway consists of a TNF-like ligand Eda, its receptor Edar, and an adaptor protein Edaradd and its activation leads to NF-κB mediated transcription. In humans, mutations in the EDA pathway genes cause hypohidrotic ectodermal dysplasia, a disorder characterized by defective formation of hair follicles, teeth, and several exocrine glands including the breast. Embryonic mammary gland development proceeds via placode, bud, bulb and sprout stages before the onset of branching morphogenesis. Studies on mouse models have linked Eda with two aspects of embryonic mammary gland morphogenesis: placode induction and ductal growth and branching. Here we summarize the current knowledge on the role of Eda/NF-κB in mammary gland development.

  20. Aging, Breast Cancer and the Mouse Model

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2005-05-01

    Presenescent or senescent hBF (1.2 or 18x×10 4/well, respectively) [M, Stampfer , P. Yaswen, Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory wdre suspended in 60 l cold...2.8 1 2.8 Inducing a human-like senescent phenotype in mouse fibroblasts Jean-Philihoo Copp , Simona Parrinello, Ana Krtolica, Christopher K. Patil...MAMMARY EPITHELIAL CELL PROLIFERATION AND TUMORIGENESIS: A MOUSE MODEL FOR HUMAN AGING. Jean-Philippe Coppe, Simona Parrinello, Ana Krtolica, Christopher

  1. Association of estrogen receptor-α and progesterone receptor A expression with hormonal mammary carcinogenesis: role of the host microenvironment

    PubMed Central

    Montero Girard, Guadalupe; Vanzulli, Silvia I; Cerliani, Juan Pablo; Bottino, María Cecilia; Bolado, Julieta; Vela, Jorge; Becu-Villalobos, Damasia; Benavides, Fernando; Gutkind, Silvio; Patel, Vyomesh; Molinolo, Alfredo; Lanari, Claudia

    2007-01-01

    Introduction Medroxyprogesterone acetate (MPA) induces estrogen receptor (ER)-positive and progesterone receptor (PR)-positive ductal invasive mammary carcinomas in BALB/c mice. We sought to reproduce this MPA cancer model in C57BL/6 mice because of their widespread use in genetic engineering. Within this experimental setting, we studied the carcinogenic effects of MPA, the morphologic changes in mammary glands that are induced by MPA and progesterone, and the levels of ER and PR expression in MPA-treated and progesterone-treated mammary glands. Finally, we evaluated whether the differences found between BALB/c and C57BL/6 mouse strains were due to intrinsic differences in epithelial cells. Methods The carcinogenic effect of MPA was evaluated in C57BL/6 mice using protocols proven to be carcinogenic in BALB/c mice. In addition, BALB/c and C57BL/6 females were treated with progesterone or MPA for 1 or 2 months, and mammary glands were excised for histologic studies and for immunohistochemical and Western blot evaluation of ER and PR. Hormone levels were determined by radioimmunoassay. Isolated mammary epithelial cells were transplanted into cleared fat pads of 21-day-old female Swiss nu/nu mice or control congenic animals. Results MPA failed to induce mammary carcinomas or significant morphologic changes in the mammary glands of C57BL/6 mice. The expression of ER-α and PR isoform A in virgin mice was surprisingly much higher in BALB/c than in C57BL/6 mammary glands, and both receptors were downregulated in progestin-treated BALB/c mice (P < 0.05). PR isoform B levels were low in virgin control mice and increased after progestin treatment in both strains. ER-β expression followed a similar trend. No differences in hormone levels were found between strains. Surprisingly, the transplantation of the epithelial mammary gland cells of both strains into the cleared fat pads of Swiss (nu/nu) mice abolished the mammary gland morphologic differences and the ER and PR

  2. Genistein chemoprevention: timing and mechanisms of action in murine mammary and prostate.

    PubMed

    Lamartiniere, Coral A; Cotroneo, Michelle S; Fritz, Wayne A; Wang, Jun; Mentor-Marcel, Roycelynn; Elgavish, Ada

    2002-03-01

    We investigated the potential of genistein, the primary isoflavone of soy, to protect against breast and prostate cancers in animal models. For mammary cancer studies, Sprague-Dawley rats were fed AIN-76A diet plus minus 250 mg genistein/kg diet. Dimethylbenz[a]anthracene was administered by gavage at d 50 postpartum to induce mammary tumors. Mammary cancer chemoprevention was demonstrated after prepubertal and combined prepubertal and adult genistein treatments but not after prenatal- or adult-only treatments, demonstrating that the timing of exposure to genistein is important for mammary cancer chemoprevention. The cellular mechanism of action was found to be mammary gland and cell differentiation, as shown by whole-mount analysis and beta-casein expression. An imprinting effect was shown for epidermal growth factor receptor expression in mammary terminal end buds. For prostate cancer studies, we used two models. The first was a chemically (N-methylnitrosourea) induced prostate cancer rat model. Genistein in the diet inhibited the development of invasive adenocarcinomas in a dose-dependent manner. The second model was a transgenic mouse model that resulted in spontaneously developing adenocarcinoma tumor of the prostate. Genistein in the diet reduced the incidence of poorly differentiated prostatic adenocarcinomas in a dose-dependent manner and down-regulated androgen receptor, estrogen receptor-alpha, progesterone receptor, epidermal growth factor receptor, insulin-like growth factor-I, and extracellular signal-regulated kinase-1 but not estrogen receptor-beta and transforming growth factor-alpha mRNA expressions. We conclude that dietary genistein protects against mammary and prostate cancers by regulating specific sex steroid receptors and growth factor signaling pathways.

  3. Oestrogen receptor-alpha regulates non-canonical Hedgehog-signalling in the mammary gland

    PubMed Central

    Okolowsky, Nadia; Furth, Priscilla A.; Hamel, Paul A.

    2014-01-01

    Mesenchymal dysplasia (mes) mice harbour a truncation in the C-terminal region of the Hh-ligand receptor, Patched-1 (mPtch1). While the mes variant of mPtch1 binds to Hh-ligands with an affinity similar to that of wild type mPtch1 and appears to normally regulate canonical Hh-signalling via smoothened, the mes mutation causes, among other non-lethal defects, a block to mammary ductal elongation at puberty. We demonstrated previously Hh-signalling induces the activation of Erk1/2 and c-src independently of its control of smo activity. Furthermore, mammary epithelial cell-directed expression of an activated allele of c-src rescued the block to ductal elongation in mes mice, albeit with delayed kinetics. Given that this rescue was accompanied by an induction in estrogen receptor-alpha (ERα) expression and that complex regulatory interactions between ERα and c-src are required for normal mammary gland development, it was hypothesized that expression of ERα would also overcome the block to mammary ductal elongation at puberty in the mes mouse. We demonstrate here that conditional expression of ERα in luminal mammary epithelial cells on the mes background facilitates ductal morphogenesis with kinetics similar to that of the MMTV-c-srcAct mice. We demonstrate further that Erk1/2 is activated in primary mammary epithelial cells by Shh-ligand and that this activation is blocked by the inhibitor of c-src, PP2, is partially blocked by the ERα inhibitor, ICI 182780 but is not blocked by the smo-inhibitor, SANT-1. These data reveal an apparent Hh-signalling cascade operating through c-src and ERα that is required for mammary gland morphogenesis at puberty. PMID:24769368

  4. t10,c12-CLA decreases adiposity in peripubertal mice without dose-related detrimental effects on mammary development, inflammation status, and metabolism.

    PubMed

    Foote, M R; Giesy, S L; Bernal-Santos, G; Bauman, D E; Boisclair, Y R

    2010-12-01

    The trans 10, cis 12-conjugated linoleic acid (10,12-CLA) isomer reduces adiposity in several animal models. In the mouse, however, this effect is associated with adipose tissue inflammation, hyperinsulinemia and hepatic lipid accumulation. Moreover, 10,12-CLA was recently shown to promote mammary ductal hyperplasia and ErbB2/Her2-driven mammary cancer in the mouse. Reasons for detrimental effects of 10,12-CLA on the mouse mammary gland could relate to its effect on the mammary fat pad (MFP), which is essential for normal development. Accordingly, we hypothesized that mammary effects of 10,12-CLA were mediated through the MFP in a dose-dependent manner. Female FVB mice were fed 10,12-CLA at doses of 0%, 0.1%, 0.2%, or 0.5% of the diet from day 24 of age, and effects on mammary development and metabolism were measured on day 49. The 0.5% dose reduced ductal elongation and caused premature alveolar budding. These effects were associated with increased expression of inflammatory markers and genes shown to alter epithelial growth (IGF binding protein-5) and alveolar budding (TNF-α and receptor of activated NF-κB ligand). The 0.5% dose also caused hyperinsulinemia and hepatic lipid accumulation. In contrast, the 0.1% 10,12-CLA dose had no adverse effects on mammary development, metabolic events, and inflammatory responses, but remained effective in decreasing adipose weights and lipogenic gene expression. These results show that a low dose of 10,12-CLA reduces adiposity in the mouse without negative effects on mammary development, inflammation, and metabolism, and suggest that previously reported detrimental effects relate to the use of excessive doses.

  5. Autophagy regulates keratin 8 homeostasis in mammary epithelial cells and in breast tumors

    PubMed Central

    Kongara, Sameera; Kravchuk, Olga; Teplova, Irina; Lozy, Fred; Schulte, Jennifer; Moore, Dirk; Barnard, Nicola; Neumann, Carola A.; White, Eileen; Karantza, Vassiliki

    2010-01-01

    Autophagy is activated in response to cellular stressors and mediates lysosomal degradation and recycling of cytoplasmic material and organelles as a temporary cell survival mechanism. Defective autophagy is implicated in human pathology, as disruption of protein and organelle homeostasis enables disease-promoting mechanisms such as toxic protein aggregation, oxidative stress, genomic damage and inflammation. We previously showed that autophagy-defective immortalized mouse mammary epithelial cells (iMMECs) are susceptible to metabolic stress, DNA damage and genomic instability. We now report that autophagy deficiency was associated with ER and oxidative stress, and deregulation of p62-mediated keratin homeostasis in mammary cells and allograft tumors and in mammary tissues from genetically engineered mice. In human breast tumors, high phospho(Ser73)-K8 levels inversely correlated with Beclin 1 expression. Thus, autophagy preserves cellular fitness by limiting ER and oxidative stress, a function potentially important in autophagy-mediated suppression of mammary tumorigenesis. Furthermore, autophagy regulates keratin homeostasis in the mammary gland via a p62-dependent mechanism. High phospho(Ser73)-K8 expression may be a marker of autophagy functional status in breast tumors and, as such, could have therapeutic implications for breast cancer patients. PMID:20530580

  6. Function of phosphoenolpyruvate carboxykinase in mammary gland epithelial cells[S

    PubMed Central

    Hsieh, Chang-Wen; Huang, Charles; Bederman, Ilya; Yang, Jianqi; Beidelschies, Michelle; Hatzoglou, Maria; Puchowicz, Michelle; Croniger, Colleen M.

    2011-01-01

    Previously, we have shown that Pck1 expression in mammary gland adipocytes and white adipose tissue maintains triglyceride stores through glyceroneogenesis, and these lipids were used for synthesis of milk triglycerides during lactation. Reduced milk triglycerides during lactation resulted in patterning of the newborn for insulin resistance. In this study, the role of Pck1 in mammary gland epithelial cells was analyzed. The developmental expression of Pck1 decreased in isolated mouse mammary gland epithelial cells through development and during lactation. Using HC11, a clonal mammary epithelial cell line, we found that both Janus kinase 2 signal transducers and activators of transcription 5 and the AKT pathways contributed to the repression of Pck1 mRNA by prolactin. These pathways necessitate three accessory factor regions of the Pck1 promoter for repression by prolactin. Using [U-13C6]glucose, [U-13C3]pyruvate, and [U-13C3]glycerol in HC11 cells, we determined that Pck1 functions in the pathway for the conversion of gluconeogenic precursors to glucose and contributes to glycerol-3-phosphate synthesis through glyceroneogenesis. Therefore, Pck1 plays an important role in both the mammary gland adipocytes and epithelial cells during lactation. PMID:21504969

  7. PREPARATION OF EPITHELIAL AND MESENCHYMAL STEM CELLS FROM MURINE MAMMARY GLAND

    PubMed Central

    Guest, I.; Ilic, Z.; Ma, J.

    2011-01-01

    The mammary gland is a complex organ consisting of multiple cell types that undergo extensive remodeling during pregnancy and involution, cyclical changes that suggest the existence of a resident stem cell population that is responsible for this remarkable tissue regeneration. The basic functional unit of the mammary gland is the terminal duct lobular unit, which invades the stromal tissue (fat, connective tissue, blood vessels, etc.). Luminal epithelial cells line the ducts while outer myoepithelial cells secrete the basal lamina that separates the mammary gland parenchyma from the mesenchymal cells of the stroma. Within the epithelial cell population of the ducts resides the mammary gland stem cells and it is believed that this population is the origin of the mammary gland cancer stem cells as well. In the mouse, epithelial stem cells can be separated from mesenchymal cells on the basis of CD24, CD44 and CD49f expression. This allows for the determination of both normal and cancer stem cell potential of these two populations and permits investigation into their interaction in tumour development. PMID:22058055

  8. Identification of genetic loci that control mammary tumor susceptibility through the host microenvironment

    DOE PAGES

    Zhang, Pengju; Lo, Alvin; Huang, Yurong; ...

    2015-03-09

    The interplay between host genetics, tumor microenvironment and environmental exposure in cancer susceptibility remains poorly understood. Here we assessed the genetic control of stromal mediation of mammary tumor susceptibility to low dose ionizing radiation (LDIR) using backcrossed F1 into BALB/c (F1Bx) between cancer susceptible (BALB/c) and resistant (SPRET/EiJ) mouse strains. Tumor formation was evaluated after transplantation of non-irradiated Trp53-/- BALB/c mammary gland fragments into cleared fat pads of F1Bx hosts. Genome-wide linkage analysis revealed 2 genetic loci that constitute the baseline susceptibility via host microenvironment. However, once challenged with LDIR, we discovered 13 additional loci that were enriched for genesmore » involved in cytokines, including TGFβ1 signaling. Surprisingly, LDIR-treated F1Bx cohort significantly reduced incidence of mammary tumors from Trp53-/- fragments as well as prolonged tumor latency, compared to sham-treated controls. We demonstrated further that plasma levels of specific cytokines were significantly correlated with tumor latency. Using an ex vivo 3-D assay, we confirmed TGFβ1 as a strong candidate for reduced mammary invasion in SPRET/EiJ, which could explain resistance of this strain to mammary cancer risk following LDIR. Our results open possible new avenues to understand mechanisms of genes operating via the stroma that affect cancer risk from external environmental exposures.« less

  9. Identification of genetic loci that control mammary tumor susceptibility through the host microenvironment

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, Pengju; Lo, Alvin; Huang, Yurong; Huang, Ge; Liang, Guozhou; Mott, Joni; Karpen, Gary H.; Blakely, Eleanor A.; Bissell, Mina J.; Barcellos-Hoff, Mary Helen; Snijders, Antoine M.; Mao, Jian-Hua

    2015-03-09

    The interplay between host genetics, tumor microenvironment and environmental exposure in cancer susceptibility remains poorly understood. Here we assessed the genetic control of stromal mediation of mammary tumor susceptibility to low dose ionizing radiation (LDIR) using backcrossed F1 into BALB/c (F1Bx) between cancer susceptible (BALB/c) and resistant (SPRET/EiJ) mouse strains. Tumor formation was evaluated after transplantation of non-irradiated Trp53-/- BALB/c mammary gland fragments into cleared fat pads of F1Bx hosts. Genome-wide linkage analysis revealed 2 genetic loci that constitute the baseline susceptibility via host microenvironment. However, once challenged with LDIR, we discovered 13 additional loci that were enriched for genes involved in cytokines, including TGFβ1 signaling. Surprisingly, LDIR-treated F1Bx cohort significantly reduced incidence of mammary tumors from Trp53-/- fragments as well as prolonged tumor latency, compared to sham-treated controls. We demonstrated further that plasma levels of specific cytokines were significantly correlated with tumor latency. Using an ex vivo 3-D assay, we confirmed TGFβ1 as a strong candidate for reduced mammary invasion in SPRET/EiJ, which could explain resistance of this strain to mammary cancer risk following LDIR. Our results open possible new avenues to understand mechanisms of genes operating via the stroma that affect cancer risk from external environmental exposures.

  10. Genetic instability favoring transversions associated with ErbB2-induced mammary tumorigenesis.

    PubMed

    Liu, Shiquan; Liu, Wenjing; Jakubczak, John L; Erexson, Gregory L; Tindall, Kenneth R; Chan, Richard; Muller, William J; Adhya, Sankar; Garges, Susan; Merlino, Glenn

    2002-03-19

    It has been argued that genetic instability is required to generate the myriad mutations that fuel tumor initiation and progression and, in fact, patients with heritable cancer susceptibility syndromes harbor defects in specific genes that normally maintain DNA integrity. However, the vast majority of human cancers arise sporadically, in the absence of deficiencies in known "mutator" genes. We used a cII-based mutation detection assay to show that the mean frequency of forward mutations in primary mammary adenocarcinomas arising in mouse mammary tumor virus-c-erbB2 transgenic mice harboring multiple copies of the lambda bacteriophage genome was significantly higher than in aged-matched, wild-type mammary tissue. Analysis of the cII mutational spectrum within the mammary tumor genomic DNA demonstrated a >6-fold elevation in transversion mutation frequency, resulting in a highly unusual inversion of the transition/transversion ratio characteristic of normal epithelium; frameshift mutation frequencies were unaltered. Arising oncogenic point mutations within the c-erbB2 transgene of such tumors were predominantly transversions as well. Data from this model system support the notion that elaboration of a mutator phenotype is a consequential event in breast cancer and suggest that a novel DNA replication/repair gene is a relatively early mutational target in c-erbB2-induced mammary tumorigenesis.

  11. Low expression of the antibacterial factor L-amino acid oxidase in bovine mammary gland.

    PubMed

    Nagaoka, Kentaro; Zhang, Haolin; Arakuni, Masahiro; Taya, Kazuyoshi; Watanabe, Gen

    2014-12-01

    In the mouse, L-amino acid oxidase (LAO) produces hydrogen peroxide by utilizing free amino acids and is a proven antibacterial factor in mammary glands. Mastitis, a bacterial infection of the mammary gland, is the most frequent disease in dairy cattle. Here, we investigate whether LAO is expressed in the mammary gland of dairy cattle and is antibacterial. In dairy cattle, the expression level of LAO mRNA in the mammary gland was considerably lower than that in mice, and LAO activity was not observed in cattle milk that produced hydrogen peroxide. The expression of LAO mRNA was also low in Japanese Black cattle, the same as in Holstein cattle. A higher LAO mRNA expression was observed in the mastitis glands than in the lactating glands. Furthermore, spleen and lymph nodes expressed high levels of LAO mRNA in dairy cattle. We conclude that mammary glands in dairy cattle have lower ability to express the LAO gene compared to that in mice, which may result in a high incidence of mastitis.

  12. Evaluation of normal and metastatic mammary cells grown in different biomaterial matrices: establishing potential tissue test systems.

    PubMed

    Booth, Brian W; Park, Jang Pyo; Burg, Karen J L

    2013-01-01

    The in vitro growth and differentiation of normal mammalian cells is quite different than the growth of cells derived from tumors. Additionally, cells of the same origin (tissue) behave differently depending on the biomaterial matrix in or on which they are grown in vitro. We examined both Matrigel(TM) and a collagen/agarose blend and demonstrated that two murine mammary derived cells lines, 4T1 and NMuMG, derived from a metastatic mammary tumor or a normal mammary gland, respectively, exhibit different growth and differentiation patterns depending on the three-dimensional matrix in which they are grown. The shape and size of the colonies that formed were matrix dependent. The two cell lines produced different levels of growth factors and metalloproteinases, and expressed differentiation markers specific to a matrix. Through the classification of different cell behaviors in different growth matrices, we will be able to intelligently design and tune tissue test systems to ask and answer specific challenging scientific questions.

  13. The nucleotide sequence of the human int-1 mammary oncogene; evolutionary conservation of coding and non-coding sequences.

    PubMed Central

    van Ooyen, A; Kwee, V; Nusse, R

    1985-01-01

    The mouse mammary tumor virus can induce mammary tumors in mice by proviral activation of an evolutionarily conserved cellular oncogene called int-1. Here we present the nucleotide sequence of the human homologue of int-1, and compare it with the mouse gene. Like the mouse gene, the human homologue contains a reading frame of 370 amino acids, with only four substitutions. The amino acid changes are all in the hydrophobic leader domain of the int-1 encoded protein, and do not significantly alter its hydropathic index. The conservation between the mouse and the human int-1 genes is not restricted to exons; extensive parts of the introns are also homologous. Thus, int-1 ranks among the most conserved genes known, a property shared with other oncogenes. PMID:2998762

  14. A Multifaceted Role for Myd88-Dependent Signaling in Progression of Murine Mammary Carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Higgins, Mary J.; Serrano, Antonio; Boateng, Kofi Y.; Parsons, Victoria A.; Phuong, Tiffany; Seifert, Alyssa; Ricca, Jacob M.; Tucker, Kyle C.; Eidelman, Alec S.; Carey, Maureen A.; Kurt, Robert A.

    2016-01-01

    Previous data obtained in our laboratory suggested that there may be constitutive signaling through the myeloid differentiation primary response gene 88 (Myd88)-dependent signaling cascade in murine mammary carcinoma. Here, we extended these findings by showing that, in the absence of an added Toll-like receptor (TLR) agonist, the myddosome complex was preformed in 4T1 tumor cells, and that Myd88 influenced cytoplasmic extracellular signal–regulated kinase (Erk)1/Erk2 levels, nuclear levels of nuclear factor-kappaB (NFκB) and signal transducer and activator of transcription 5 (STAT5), tumor-derived chemokine (C–C motif) ligand 2 (CCL2) expression, and in vitro and in vivo tumor growth. In addition, RNA-sequencing revealed that Myd88-dependent signaling enhanced the expression of genes that could contribute to breast cancer progression and genes previously associated with poor outcome for patients with breast cancer, in addition to suppressing the expression of genes capable of inhibiting breast cancer progression. Yet, Myd88-dependent signaling in tumor cells also suppressed expression of genes that could contribute to tumor progression. Collectively, these data revealed a multifaceted role for Myd88-dependent signaling in murine mammary carcinoma. PMID:27812285

  15. Regeneration of Bovine Mammary Gland in Immunodeficient Mice by Transplantation of Bovine Mammary Epithelial Cells Mixed with Matrigel

    PubMed Central

    Park, Hyun Jung; Lee, Won Young; Jeong, Ha Yeon; Song, Hyuk

    2016-01-01

    Background and Objectives With the global demand for dairy protein for consumption growing annually, there has been increasing activity in the research field of dairy protein synthesis and production. From a manipulation perspective, it is more difficult to use live cattle for laboratory studies on the production of milk as well as of dairy protein such as casein, as compared with using laboratory animals like rodents. Therefore, we aimed to develop a mouse model of bovine mammary alveolar ducts for laboratory-scale studies. We studied the formation of the bovine mammary gland ductal structure by transplanting the MAC-T bovine alveolar cell line into mice. Methods and Results MAC-T cells (1×107) were suspended in Matrigel and injected into the dorsal tissue of 8-week-old male BALB/C nude mice. Histological analysis of tissue dissected from the MAC-T cell-transplanted mice after 6 weeks showed the typical morphology of the tubuloalveolar female gland, as well as glands made up of branching ducts that were surrounded by smooth muscle with small alveoli budding off the ducts. In addition, the epithelial markers CK14 and CK18 were expressed within the duct-like structure. Prolactin was detected in the duct interior in these CK14+ and CK18+ cells but not in the non-transplanted MAC-T cells. Conclusions These results showed that duct-like tissue had been successfully formed after 6 weeks of transplantation of the CK14+ and CK18+ MAC-T cells into mice dorsal tissue. This mouse model will be a useful tool for further research on the bovine mammary gland. PMID:27788570

  16. Sesamin synergistically potentiates the anticancer effects of γ-tocotrienol in mammary cancer cell lines.

    PubMed

    Akl, Mohamed R; Ayoub, Nehad M; Abuasal, Bilal S; Kaddoumi, Amal; Sylvester, Paul W

    2013-01-01

    γ-Tocotrienol and sesamin are phytochemicals that display potent anticancer activity. Since sesamin inhibits the metabolic degradation of tocotrienols, studies were conducted to determine if combined treatment with sesamin potentiates the antiproliferative effects of γ-tocotrienol on neoplastic mouse (+SA) and human (MCF-7 and MDA-MB-231) mammary cancer cells. Results showed that treatment with γ-tocotrienol or sesamin alone induced a significant dose-responsive growth inhibition, whereas combination treatment with these agents synergistically inhibited the growth of +SA, MCF-7 and MDA-MB-231 mammary cancer cells, while similar treatment doses were found to have little or no effect on normal (mouse CL-S1 and human MCF-10A) mammary epithelial cell growth or viability. However, sesamin synergistic enhancement of γ-tocotrienol-induced anticancer effects was not found to be mediated from a reduction in γ-tocotrienol metabolism. Rather, combined treatment with subeffective doses of γ-tocotrienol and sesamin was found to induce G1 cell cycle arrest, and a corresponding decrease in cyclin D1, CDK2, CDK4, CDK6, phospho-Rb, and E2F1 levels, and increase in p27 and p16 levels. Additional studies showed that the antiproliferative effect of combination treatment did not initiate apoptosis or result in a decrease in mammary cancer cell viability. Taken together, these findings indicate that the synergistic antiproliferative action of combined γ-tocotrienol and sesamin treatment in mouse and human mammary cancer cells is cytostatic, not cytotoxic, and results from G1 cell cycle arrest.

  17. Keratinocyte growth factor causes cystic dilation of the mammary glands of mice. Interactions of keratinocyte growth factor, estrogen, and progesterone in vivo.

    PubMed

    Yi, E S; Bedoya, A A; Lee, H; Kim, S; Housley, R M; Aukerman, S L; Tarpley, J E; Starnes, C; Yin, S; Pierce, G F

    1994-11-01

    Keratinocyte growth factor (KGF) is a paracrine mediator of epithelial cell proliferation that has been reported to induce marked proliferation of mammary epithelium in rats. In this study, systemic administration of KGF into naive and oophorectomized mice causes mammary gland proliferation, as evidenced histologically by the appearance of cysts lined by a single layer of epithelium and by hyperplastic epithelium. Whole mount preparations of the mammary glands reveal that the histologically noted cysts are actually ducts that are dilated along much of their length. The histology of the mammary glands of KGF-treated mice is similar to the histology of fibrocystic disease in the human female breast. The response in mice differs significantly from the appearance of the mammary glands in KGF-treated rats in which ductal epithelial proliferation is most prominent. Estrogen and progesterone when administered in combination but not alone cause the development of numerous endbuds in the mouse mammary gland. KGF in estrogen- and progesterone-pretreated mice causes the growth of dilated ducts, hyperplastic epithelium within ducts and endbuds, and a fibrous metamorphosis of periductal adipose tissue. The mammary epithelial hyperplasia caused by KGF is rapidly reversible in both mice and rats after cessation of KGF treatment. The spectrum of KGF-, estrogen-, and progesterone-induced mammary histopathology in mice provides a model for the study of fibrocystic and hyperplastic breast disease.

  18. The chemokine receptor CCR7 promotes mammary tumorigenesis through amplification of stem-like cells.

    PubMed

    Boyle, S T; Ingman, W V; Poltavets, V; Faulkner, J W; Whitfield, R J; McColl, S R; Kochetkova, M

    2016-01-07

    The chemokine receptor CCR7 is widely implicated in breast cancer pathobiology. Although recent reports correlated high CCR7 levels with more advanced tumor grade and poor prognosis, limited in vivo data are available regarding its specific function in mammary gland neoplasia and the underlying mechanisms involved. To address these questions we generated a bigenic mouse model of breast cancer combined with CCR7 deletion, which revealed that CCR7 ablation results in a considerable delay in tumor onset as well as significantly reduced tumor burden. Importantly, CCR7 was found to exert its function by regulating mammary cancer stem-like cells in both murine and human tumors. In vivo experiments showed that loss of CCR7 activity either through deletion or pharmacological antagonism significantly decreased functional pools of stem-like cells in mouse primary mammary tumors, providing a mechanistic explanation for the tumor-promoting role of this chemokine receptor. These data characterize the oncogenic properties of CCR7 in mammary epithelial neoplasia and point to a new route for therapeutic intervention to target evasive cancer stem cells.

  19. Prevention of Human Mammary Carcinogenesis.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1996-07-01

    of HER-2/neu oncogene-transformed human mammary epithelial cells by a green tea polyphenol. Breast Cancer Res Treat 38:100; 1996 8. Telang NT, Katdare...apoptosis and anchorage-dependent colony forming efficiency. Appendix Figure 5 (AF-5): Effect of (-) epigallo catechin gallate (EGCG) on 184- B5/HER cells is... tea polyphenol. Ann. NY Acad. Sci. 768: 215- 222, 1995. Appendix Pubilcation 5 (AP-5): Fishman J, Osborne MP, Telang NT. The role of estrogen in

  20. Identification of Pro-Differentiation p53 Target Genes and Evaluation of Expression in Normal and Malignant Mammary Gland

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2009-04-01

    bearing these mutations display severe to complete hypoplasia of the mammary epithelia. Consistent with these phenotypes, targeted ablation of TP63 in the...mouse resulted in hypoplasia of both embryonic and adult epithelial and apocrine structures (13, 15). These studies indicate that TP63 is required for

  1. Cytokine networks that mediate epithelial cell-macrophage crosstalk in the mammary gland: implications for development and cancer.

    PubMed

    Sun, Xuan; Ingman, Wendy V

    2014-07-01

    Dynamic interactions between the hormone responsive mammary gland epithelium and surrounding stromal macrophage populations are critical for normal development and function of the mammary gland. Macrophages are versatile cells capable of diverse roles in mammary gland development and maintenance of homeostasis, and their function is highly dependent on signals within the local cytokine microenvironment. The mammary epithelium secretes a number of cytokines, including colony stimulating factor 1 (CSF1), transforming growth factor beta 1 (TGFB1), and chemokine ligand 2 (CCL2) that affect the abundance, phenotype and function of macrophages. However, aberrations in these interactions have been found to increase the risk of tumour formation, and utilisation of stromal macrophage support by tumours can increase the invasive and metastatic potential of the cancer. Studies utilising genetically modified mouse models have shed light on the significance of epithelial cell-macrophage crosstalk, and the cytokines that mediate this communication, in mammary gland development and tumourigenesis. This article reviews the current status of our understanding of the roles of epithelial cell-derived cytokines in mammary gland development and cancer, with a focus on the crosstalk between epithelial cells and the local macrophage population.

  2. The Par3/aPKC interaction is essential for end bud remodeling and progenitor differentiation during mammary gland morphogenesis

    PubMed Central

    McCaffrey, Luke Martin; Macara, Ian G.

    2009-01-01

    Mammalian polarity proteins have been studied predominantly in cell culture systems, and little is known about their functions in vivo. To address this issue, we used a shRNA lentiviral system to manipulate gene expression in mouse mammary stem/progenitor cells. Transplantation of Par3-depleted stem/progenitor cells into the mammary fat pad severely disrupted mammary development, and glands were characterized by ductal hyperplasia, luminal filling, and highly disorganized end bud structures that were unable to remodel into normal ductal structures. Unexpectedly, Par3-depleted mammary glands also had an expanded progenitor population. We identified a novel function for the atypical protein kinase C (aPKC)-binding domain of Par3 in restricting Par3 and aPKC to the apical region in mammary epithelia in vivo, and found that mammary morphogenesis is dependent on the ability of Par3 to directly bind aPKC. These results reveal a new function for Par3 in the regulation of progenitor differentiation and epithelial morphogenesis in vivo and demonstrate for the first time an essential requirement for the Par3–aPKC interaction. PMID:19528321

  3. 9 CFR 310.17 - Inspection of mammary glands.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 9 Animals and Animal Products 2 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Inspection of mammary glands. 310.17... INSPECTION AND CERTIFICATION POST-MORTEM INSPECTION § 310.17 Inspection of mammary glands. (a) Lactating mammary glands and diseased mammary glands of cattle, sheep, swine, and goats shall be removed...

  4. 9 CFR 310.17 - Inspection of mammary glands.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 9 Animals and Animal Products 2 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Inspection of mammary glands. 310.17... INSPECTION AND CERTIFICATION POST-MORTEM INSPECTION § 310.17 Inspection of mammary glands. (a) Lactating mammary glands and diseased mammary glands of cattle, sheep, swine, and goats shall be removed...

  5. 9 CFR 310.17 - Inspection of mammary glands.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 9 Animals and Animal Products 2 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Inspection of mammary glands. 310.17... INSPECTION AND CERTIFICATION POST-MORTEM INSPECTION § 310.17 Inspection of mammary glands. (a) Lactating mammary glands and diseased mammary glands of cattle, sheep, swine, and goats shall be removed...

  6. 9 CFR 310.17 - Inspection of mammary glands.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 9 Animals and Animal Products 2 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Inspection of mammary glands. 310.17... INSPECTION AND CERTIFICATION POST-MORTEM INSPECTION § 310.17 Inspection of mammary glands. (a) Lactating mammary glands and diseased mammary glands of cattle, sheep, swine, and goats shall be removed...

  7. 9 CFR 310.17 - Inspection of mammary glands.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 9 Animals and Animal Products 2 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Inspection of mammary glands. 310.17... INSPECTION AND CERTIFICATION POST-MORTEM INSPECTION § 310.17 Inspection of mammary glands. (a) Lactating mammary glands and diseased mammary glands of cattle, sheep, swine, and goats shall be removed...

  8. Transplantation of a mammary stromal cell line into a mammary fat pad: development of the site-specific in vivo analysis system for mammary stromal cells.

    PubMed

    Nakatani, Hajime; Aoki, Naohito; Nadano, Daita; Matsuda, Tsukasa

    2011-01-01

    The interaction between mammary epithelial and stromal tissue is considered to be important in breast tissue development. In this study, we developed a transplantation procedure for the mammary stromal fibroblastic cell line (MSF) to examine its life in vivo. First we established MSF cells which stably expressed lacZ (lacZ/MSF) and had characteristics of mammary stromal cells. The lacZ/MSF cells were then transplanted into a cleared mammary fat pad of syngenic mice with and without mammary primary epithelial organoids. Whole mount X-gal and carmine staining of the transplants revealed that a number of undifferentiated lacZ/MSF cells survived around the mammary epithelial tissue when transplanted with organoids. These results indicate that transplantation of MSF cells into mammary fat pad was accomplished by co-transplantation with primary mammary organoids. Finally, we discuss the application of transplantation procedure for in vivo studies of the mammary stromal tissue development and stromal-epithelial interactions.

  9. Xanthosine administration does not affect the proportion of epithelial stem cells in bovine mammary tissue, but has a latent negative effect on cell proliferation

    SciTech Connect

    Rauner, Gat; Barash, Itamar

    2014-10-15

    The challenge in manipulating the proportion of somatic stem cells lies in having to override tissue homeostasis. Xanthosine infusion via the teat canal has been reported to augment the number of label-retaining cells in the mammary gland of 3-month-old bovine calves. To further delineate xanthosine's effect on defined stem cells in the mammary gland of heifers—which are candidates for increased prospective milk production following such manipulation—bovine mammary parenchymal tissue was transplanted and integrated into the cleared mammary fat pad of immunodeficient mice. Xanthosine administration for 14 days did not affect the number of label-retaining cells after 10- and 11-week chases. No change in stem cell proportion, analyzed according to CD49f and CD24 expression, was noted. Clone formation and propagation rate of cultured cells, as well as expression of stem cell markers, were also unaffected. In contrast, a latent 50% decrease in bovine mammary cell proliferation rate was observed 11 weeks after xanthosine administration. Tumor development in mice was also limited by xanthosine administration. These effects may have resulted from an initial decrease in expression of the rate-limiting enzyme in guanine synthesis, IMPDH. The data indicate that caution should be exerted when considering xanthosine for stem cell manipulation. - Highlights: • Novel “bovinized“ mouse model for exogenous effects on bovine mammary gland. • Xanthosine did not affect stem cell number/function in bovine mammary gland. • Xanthosine caused an immediate decrease in IMPDH expression in bovine mammary gland. • Xanthosine had latent negative effect on cell proliferation in bovine mammary gland. • Xanthosine administration limited mammary tumor growth.

  10. Mammary Malignancy in The Male

    PubMed Central

    Alexander, Leslie L.; Benninghoff, David L.; Camiel, Mortimer R.; Medina, Antonio

    1978-01-01

    Mammary carcinoma in the male, a relatively uncommon disease, represents about 0.9 to 1.5 percent of all breast cancers. 1,2 The authors reviewed 16 cases of male breast cancer seen in a 30-year period at the State University of New York, Kings County Hospital Medical Center in Brooklyn, and the North Shore University Hospital in Manhasset. Epidemiology, etiology, demography, signs and symptoms, management, and prognosis are discussed. A review of pertinent literature is presented. ImagesFigure 1Figure 2 PMID:722829

  11. The role of unfolded protein response in differentiation of mammary epithelial cells.

    PubMed

    Tsuchiya, Megumi; Koizumi, Yumiko; Hayashi, Satoko; Hanaoka, Miyuki; Tokutake, Yukako; Yonekura, Shinichi

    2017-03-18

    The accumulation of misfolded proteins in the ER provokes ER stress by increasing the demand for energy, chaperones, and other proteins that are needed to fold client proteins or to degrade unfoldable secretory cargo. This stress activates a signaling network called the unfolded protein response (UPR). However, recent accumulated data suggested that the UPR also provides important signals for regulating cell differentiation and maturation. However, the relationship between UPR and mammary gland development has not been fully elucidated. To define the involvement of the UPR in mammary gland development, mammary glands were collected from non-pregnant mice, at days 5, 10 and 15 of pregnancy, at days 1 and 7 of lactation, and the expression patterns of UPR-related genes were determined by real-time PCR. We found that the mRNA expression of ATF4 and XBP1 significant increased during pregnancy. Moreover, we found that both ATF4 and XBP1 proteins are expressed in mammary epithelial cells by immunohistological analysis. In order to know the role of ATF4 and XBP1 in the differentiation of mammary epithelial cell, we performed gene knockdown experiment using HC11 cells. We found that ATF4 or XBP1 knockdown suppressed the mRNA expression of beta-casein and lactogenic hormone receptor in differentiating HC11 cells. Our results demonstrate that XBP1 and ATF4, which are UPR-related transcription factors, directly or indirectly participate in cell differentiation mechanisms through the regulation of the expression of lactogenic hormone receptors in mouse mammary epithelial cells.

  12. Mutant p53 amplifies Epidermal Growth Factor Receptor family signaling to promote mammary tumorigenesis

    PubMed Central

    Yallowitz, Alisha; Li, Dun; Lobko, Antony; Nemajerova, Alice; Marchenko, Natalia

    2016-01-01

    The epidermal growth factor receptor family (ErbB2/Her2 and EGFR/ErbB1/Her1) often modulates the transcriptional program involved in promoting mammary tumorigenesis. In humans, more than 70% of ErbB2-positive sporadic breast cancers harbor p53 mutations, which correlate with poor prognosis. Also, the extremely high incidence of ErbB2-positive breast cancer in women with p53 germ-line mutations (Li-Fraumeni Syndrome) suggests the key role of mutant p53 specifically in ErbB2-mediated mammary tumorigenesis. To examine the role of mutant p53 during ErbB2-mediated mammary tumorigenesis we introduced a mutant p53 R172H allele into a (MMTV)-ErbB2/Neu mouse model. We show in heterozygous p53 mice that mutp53 R172H is a more potent activator of ErbB2-mediated mammary tumorigenesis than simple loss of p53. The more aggressive disease in mutant p53 animals was reflected by earlier tumor onset, increased mammary tumor multiplicity, and shorter survival. We provide molecular evidence that mutant p53 amplifies ErbB2 and EGFR signaling to promote the expansion of mammary stem cells and induce cancer cell proliferation. This study therefore identifies mutant p53 as an essential player in ErbB2 and EGFR-mediated breast cancer and indicates the potential translational importance of targeting mutant p53 in this subset of breast cancer patients. PMID:25573952

  13. Fibroblast growth factor receptor signaling is essential for normal mammary gland development and stem cell function.

    PubMed

    Pond, Adam C; Bin, Xue; Batts, Torey; Roarty, Kevin; Hilsenbeck, Susan; Rosen, Jeffrey M

    2013-01-01

    Fibroblast growth factor (FGF) signaling plays an important role in embryonic stem cells and adult tissue homeostasis, but the function of FGFs in mammary gland stem cells is less well defined. Both FGFR1 and FGFR2 are expressed in basal and luminal mammary epithelial cells (MECs), suggesting that together they might play a role in mammary gland development and stem cell dynamics. Previous studies have demonstrated that the deletion of FGFR2 resulted only in transient developmental defects in branching morphogenesis. Using a conditional deletion strategy, we investigated the consequences of FGFR1 deletion alone and then the simultaneous deletion of both FGFR1 and FGFR2 in the mammary epithelium. FGFR1 deletion using a keratin 14 promoter-driven Cre-recombinase resulted in an early, yet transient delay in development. However, no reduction in functional outgrowth potential was observed following limiting dilution transplantation analysis. In contrast, a significant reduction in outgrowth potential was observed upon the deletion of both FGFR1 and FGFR2 in MECs using adenovirus-Cre. Additionally, using a fluorescent reporter mouse model to monitor Cre-mediated recombination, we observed a competitive disadvantage following transplantation of both FGFR1/R2-null MECs, most prominently in the basal epithelial cells. This correlated with the complete loss of the mammary stem cell repopulating population in the FGFR1/R2-attenuated epithelium. FGFR1/R2-null MECs were partially rescued in chimeric outgrowths containing wild-type MECs, suggesting the potential importance of paracrine mechanisms involved in the maintenance of the basal epithelial stem cells. These studies document the requirement for functional FGFR signaling in mammary stem cells during development.

  14. Mammary epithelial cell phenotype disruption in vitro and in vivo through ERalpha36 overexpression

    PubMed Central

    Chesnel, Amand; Morel, Chloé; Djermoune, El-Hadi; Boukhobza, Taha

    2017-01-01

    Estrogen receptor alpha 36 (ERα36) is a variant of the canonical estrogen receptor alpha (ERα66), widely expressed in hormone sensitive cancer cells and whose high expression level correlates with a poor survival prognosis for breast cancer patients. While ERα36 activity have been related to breast cancer progression or acquired resistance to treatment, expression level and location of ERα36 are poorly documented in the normal mammary gland. Therefore, we explored the consequences of a ERα36 overexpression in vitro in MCF-10A normal mammary epithelial cells and in vivo in a unique model of MMTV-ERα36 transgenic mouse strain wherein ERα36 mRNA was specifically expressed in the mammary gland. By a combination of bioinformatics and computational analyses of microarray data, we identified hierarchical gene networks, downstream of ERα36 and modulated by the JAK2/STAT3 signaling pathway. Concomitantly, ERα36 overexpression lowered proliferation rate but enhanced migration potential and resistance to staurosporin-induced apoptosis of the MCF-10A cell line. In vivo, ERα36 expression led to duct epithelium thinning and disruption in adult but not in prepubescent mouse mammary gland. These phenotypes correlated with a loss of E-cadherin expression. Here, we show that an enhanced expression of ERα36 is sufficient, by itself, to disrupt normal breast epithelial phenotype in vivo and in vitro through a dominant-positive effect on nongenomic estrogen signaling pathways. These results also suggest that, in the presence of adult endogenous steroid levels, ERα36 overexpression in vivo contributes to alter mammary gland architecture which may support pre-neoplastic lesion and augment breast cancer risk. PMID:28301550

  15. Overexpression of LMO4 induces mammary hyperplasia, promotes cell invasion, and is a predictor of poor outcome in breast cancer

    PubMed Central

    Sum, Eleanor Y. M.; Segara, Davendra; Duscio, Belinda; Bath, Mary L.; Field, Andrew S.; Sutherland, Robert L.; Lindeman, Geoffrey J.; Visvader, Jane E.

    2005-01-01

    The zinc finger protein LMO4 is overexpressed in a high proportion of breast carcinomas. Here, we report that overexpression of a mouse mammary tumor virus (MMTV)-Lmo4 transgene in the mouse mammary gland elicits hyperplasia and mammary intraepithelial neoplasia or adenosquamous carcinoma in two transgenic strains with a tumor latency of 13–18 months. To investigate cellular processes controlled by LMO4 and those that may be deregulated during oncogenesis, we used RNA interference. Down-regulation of LMO4 expression reduced proliferation of human breast cancer cells and increased differentiation of mouse mammary epithelial cells. Furthermore, small-interfering-RNA-transfected breast cancer cells (MDA-MB-231) had a reduced capacity to migrate and invade an extracellular matrix. Conversely, overexpression of LMO4 in noninvasive, immortalized human MCF10A cells promoted cell motility and invasion. Significantly, in a cohort of 159 primary breast cancers, high nuclear levels of LMO4 were an independent predictor of death from breast cancer. Together, these findings suggest that deregulation of LMO4 in breast epithelium contributes directly to breast neoplasia by altering the rate of cellular proliferation and promoting cell invasion. PMID:15897450

  16. Remodeling of endogenous mammary epithelium by breast cancer stem cells.

    PubMed

    Parashurama, Natesh; Lobo, Neethan A; Ito, Ken; Mosley, Adriane R; Habte, Frezghi G; Zabala, Maider; Smith, Bryan R; Lam, Jessica; Weissman, Irving L; Clarke, Michael F; Gambhir, Sanjiv S

    2012-10-01

    Poorly regulated tissue remodeling results in increased breast cancer risk, yet how breast cancer stem cells (CSC) participate in remodeling is unknown. We performed in vivo imaging of changes in fluorescent, endogenous duct architecture as a metric for remodeling. First, we quantitatively imaged physiologic remodeling of primary branches of the developing and regenerating mammary tree. To assess CSC-specific remodeling events, we isolated CSC from MMTV-Wnt1 (mouse mammary tumor virus long-term repeat enhancer driving Wnt1 oncogene) breast tumors, a well studied model in which tissue remodeling affects tumorigenesis. We confirm that CSC drive tumorigenesis, suggesting a link between CSC and remodeling. We find that normal, regenerating, and developing gland maintain a specific branching pattern. In contrast, transplantation of CSC results in changes in the branching patterns of endogenous ducts while non-CSC do not. Specifically, in the presence of CSC, we identified an increased number of branches, branch points, ducts which have greater than 40 branches (5/33 for CSC and 0/39 for non-CSC), and histological evidence of increased branching. Moreover, we demonstrate that only CSC implants invade into surrounding stroma with structures similar to developing mammary ducts (nine for CSC and one for non-CSC). Overall, we demonstrate a novel approach for imaging physiologic and pathological remodeling. Furthermore, we identify unique, CSC-specific, remodeling events. Our data suggest that CSC interact with the microenvironment differently than non-CSC, and that this could eventually be a therapeutic approach for targeting CSC.

  17. APOBEC3 proteins expressed in mammary epithelial cells are packaged into retroviruses and can restrict transmission of milk-borne virions.

    PubMed

    Okeoma, Chioma M; Huegel, Alyssa L; Lingappa, Jaisri; Feldman, Michael D; Ross, Susan R

    2010-12-16

    Viruses, including retroviruses like human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) and mouse mammary tumor virus (MMTV), are transmitted from mother to infants through milk. Lymphoid cells and antibodies are thought to provide mammary gland and milk-borne immunity. In contrast, little is known about the role of mammary epithelial cells (MECs). The APOBEC3 family of retroviral restriction factors is highly expressed in macrophages and lymphoid and dendritic cells. We now show that APOBEC3 proteins are also expressed in mouse and human MECs. Lymphoid cell-expressed APOBEC3 restricts in vivo spread of MMTV to lymphoid and mammary tissue. In contrast, mammary gland-expressed APOBEC3 is packaged into MMTV virions and decreases the infectivity of milk-borne viruses. Moreover, APOBEC3G and other APOBEC3 genes are expressed in human mammary cells and have the potential to restrict viruses produced in this cell type. These data point to a role for APOBEC3 proteins in limiting infectivity of milk-transmitted viruses.

  18. Mammary and extramammary Paget's disease*

    PubMed Central

    Lopes, Lauro Lourival; Lopes, Ione Maria Ribeiro Soares; Lopes, Lauro Rodolpho Soares; Enokihara, Milvia M. S. S.; Michalany, Alexandre Osores; Matsunaga, Nobuo

    2015-01-01

    Paget's disease, described by Sir James Paget in 1874, is classified as mammary and extramammary. The mammary type is rare and often associated with intraductal cancer (93-100% of cases). It is more prevalent in postmenopausal women and it appears as an eczematoid, erythematous, moist or crusted lesion, with or without fine scaling, infiltration and inversion of the nipple. It must be distinguished from erosive adenomatosis of the nipple, cutaneous extension of breast carcinoma, psoriasis, atopic dermatitis, contact dermatitis, chronic eczema, lactiferous ducts ectasia, Bowen's disease, basal cell carcinoma, melanoma and intraductal papilloma. Diagnosis is histological and prognosis and treatment depend on the type of underlying breast cancer. Extramammary Paget's disease is considered an adenocarcinoma originating from the skin or skin appendages in areas with apocrine glands. The primary location is the vulvar area, followed by the perianal region, scrotum, penis and axillae. It starts as an erythematous plaque of indolent growth, with well-defined edges, fine scaling, excoriations, exulcerations and lichenification. In most cases it is not associated with cancer, although there are publications linking it to tumors of the vulva, vagina, cervix and corpus uteri, bladder, ovary, gallbladder, liver, breast, colon and rectum. Differential diagnoses are candidiasis, psoriasis and chronic lichen simplex. Histopathology confirms the diagnosis. Before treatment begins, associated malignancies should be investigated. Surgical excision and micrographic surgery are the best treatment options, although recurrences are frequent. PMID:25830993

  19. Distinct Luminal-Type Mammary Carcinomas Arise from Orthotopic Trp53-Null Mammary Transplantation of Juvenile versus Adult Mice

    DOE PAGES

    Nguyen, David H.; Ouyang, Haoxu; Mao, Jian-Hua; ...

    2014-12-01

    Age and physiologic status, such as menopause, are risk factors for breast cancer. Less clear is what factors influence the diversity of breast cancer. In this study, we investigated the effect of host age on the distribution of tumor subtypes in mouse mammary chimera consisting of wild-type hosts and Trp53 nullizygous epithelium, which undergoes a high rate of neoplastic transformation. Wild-type mammary glands cleared of endogenous epithelium at 3 weeks of age were subsequently transplanted during puberty (5 weeks) or at maturation (10 weeks) with syngeneic Trp53-null mammary tissue fragments and monitored for one year. Tumors arose sooner from adultmore » hosts (AH) compared with juvenile hosts (JH). However, compared with AH tumors, JH tumors grew several times faster, were more perfused, exhibited a two-fold higher mitotic index, and were more highly positive for insulin-like growth factor receptor phosphorylation. Most tumors in each setting were estrogen receptor (ER)-positive (80% JH vs. 70% AH), but JH tumors were significantly more ER-immunoreactive (P = 0.0001) than AH tumors. A differential expression signature (JvA) of juvenile versus adult tumors revealed a luminal transcriptional program. Centroids of the human homologs of JvA genes showed that JH tumors were more like luminal A tumors and AH tumors were more like luminal B tumors. Hierarchical clustering with the JvA human ortholog gene list segregated luminal A and luminal B breast cancers across datasets. Lastly, these data support the notion that age-associated host physiology greatly influences the intrinsic subtype of breast cancer.« less

  20. Distinct Luminal-Type Mammary Carcinomas Arise from Orthotopic Trp53-Null Mammary Transplantation of Juvenile versus Adult Mice

    SciTech Connect

    Nguyen, David H.; Ouyang, Haoxu; Mao, Jian-Hua; Hlatky, Lynn; Barcellos-Hoff, M. H.

    2014-12-01

    Age and physiologic status, such as menopause, are risk factors for breast cancer. Less clear is what factors influence the diversity of breast cancer. In this study, we investigated the effect of host age on the distribution of tumor subtypes in mouse mammary chimera consisting of wild-type hosts and Trp53 nullizygous epithelium, which undergoes a high rate of neoplastic transformation. Wild-type mammary glands cleared of endogenous epithelium at 3 weeks of age were subsequently transplanted during puberty (5 weeks) or at maturation (10 weeks) with syngeneic Trp53-null mammary tissue fragments and monitored for one year. Tumors arose sooner from adult hosts (AH) compared with juvenile hosts (JH). However, compared with AH tumors, JH tumors grew several times faster, were more perfused, exhibited a two-fold higher mitotic index, and were more highly positive for insulin-like growth factor receptor phosphorylation. Most tumors in each setting were estrogen receptor (ER)-positive (80% JH vs. 70% AH), but JH tumors were significantly more ER-immunoreactive (P = 0.0001) than AH tumors. A differential expression signature (JvA) of juvenile versus adult tumors revealed a luminal transcriptional program. Centroids of the human homologs of JvA genes showed that JH tumors were more like luminal A tumors and AH tumors were more like luminal B tumors. Hierarchical clustering with the JvA human ortholog gene list segregated luminal A and luminal B breast cancers across datasets. Lastly, these data support the notion that age-associated host physiology greatly influences the intrinsic subtype of breast cancer.

  1. Proteomic Analysis of Genistein Mammary Cancer

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2005-07-01

    pathways we found up-regulated P-ERK-1, but no significant short-term changes in the tyrosine hydroxylase and iNOS protein expressions in mammary glands...of 21 day old rats. At day 50, there was significant up-regulation of tyrosine hydroxylase and VEGF-R2. This and previous work suggests that early...mammary glands of 21 day old rats only. In 50 day old rats, mammary tyrosine hydroxylase protein expression was up- regulated and now we report that

  2. Mammary gland tumors in captive African hedgehogs.

    PubMed

    Raymond, J T; Gerner, M

    2000-04-01

    From December 1995 to July 1999, eight mammary gland tumors were diagnosed in eight adult captive female African hedgehogs (Atelerix albiventris). The tumors presented as single or multiple subcutaneous masses along the cranial or caudal abdomen that varied in size for each hedgehog. Histologically, seven of eight (88%) mammary gland tumors were malignant. Tumors were classified as solid (4 cases), tubular (2 cases), and papillary (2 cases). Seven tumors had infiltrated into the surrounding stroma and three tumors had histologic evidence of neoplastic vascular invasion. Three hedgehogs had concurrent neoplasms. These are believed to be the first reported cases of mammary gland tumors in African hedgehogs.

  3. The Construction and Expression of Lysine-Rich Gene in the Mammary Gland of Transgenic Mice

    PubMed Central

    Ma, Xin; Zhang, Peng; Song, Guangqi; Chen, Yue; Wang, Zhongwei; Yin, Yupeng; Kong, Delong; Zhang, Sheng; Zhao, Zhihui; Ouyang, Hongsheng

    2012-01-01

    Lysine is the limiting amino acid in cereal grains, which represent a major source of human food and animal feed worldwide, and is considered the most important of the essential amino acids. In this study, β-casein, αS2-casein, and lactotransferrin cDNA clone fragments encoding lysine-rich peptides were fused together to generate a lysine-rich (LR) gene and the mammary gland-specific expression vector pBC1-LR-NEOr was constructed. Transgenic mice were generated by pronuclear microinjection of the linearized expression vectors harboring the LR transgene. The transgenic mice and their offspring were examined using multiplex polymerase chain reaction (PCR), Southern blotting, reverse transcriptase–PCR, in situ hybridization, and Western blotting techniques. Our results showed that the LR gene was successfully integrated into the mouse genome and was transmitted stably. The specific LR gene expression was restricted to the mammary gland, active alveoli of the transgenic female mice during lactation. The lysine level of the two transgenic lines was significantly higher than that of nontransgenic controls (p<0.05). In addition, the growth performance of transgenic pups was enhanced by directly feeding them the LR protein-enriched transgenic milk. Our results demonstrated that lysine-rich gene was successfully constructed and expressed in mammary gland of transgenic mice. This study will provide a better understanding of how mammary gland expression systems that increase the lysine content of milk can be applied to other mammals, such as cows. PMID:22577831

  4. The construction and expression of lysine-rich gene in the mammary gland of transgenic mice.

    PubMed

    Ma, Xin; Zhang, Peng; Song, Guangqi; Chen, Yue; Wang, Zhongwei; Yin, Yupeng; Kong, Delong; Zhang, Sheng; Zhao, Zhihui; Ouyang, Hongsheng; Tang, Bo; Li, Ziyi

    2012-08-01

    Lysine is the limiting amino acid in cereal grains, which represent a major source of human food and animal feed worldwide, and is considered the most important of the essential amino acids. In this study, β-casein, αS2-casein, and lactotransferrin cDNA clone fragments encoding lysine-rich peptides were fused together to generate a lysine-rich (LR) gene and the mammary gland-specific expression vector pBC1-LR-NEO(r) was constructed. Transgenic mice were generated by pronuclear microinjection of the linearized expression vectors harboring the LR transgene. The transgenic mice and their offspring were examined using multiplex polymerase chain reaction (PCR), Southern blotting, reverse transcriptase-PCR, in situ hybridization, and Western blotting techniques. Our results showed that the LR gene was successfully integrated into the mouse genome and was transmitted stably. The specific LR gene expression was restricted to the mammary gland, active alveoli of the transgenic female mice during lactation. The lysine level of the two transgenic lines was significantly higher than that of nontransgenic controls (p<0.05). In addition, the growth performance of transgenic pups was enhanced by directly feeding them the LR protein-enriched transgenic milk. Our results demonstrated that lysine-rich gene was successfully constructed and expressed in mammary gland of transgenic mice. This study will provide a better understanding of how mammary gland expression systems that increase the lysine content of milk can be applied to other mammals, such as cows.

  5. Suppression of mammary epithelial cell differentiation by the helix-loop-helix protein Id-1

    SciTech Connect

    Desprez, P.; Hara, E.; Bissell, M.J.

    1995-06-01

    Cell proliferation and differentiation are precisely coordinated during the development and maturation of the mammary gland, and this balance invariably is disrupted during carcinogenesis. Little is known about the cell-specific transcription factors that regulate these processes in the mammary gland. The mouse mammary epithelial cell line SCp2 grows well under standard culture conditions but arrests growth, forms alveolus-like structures, and expresses {beta}-casein, a differentiation marker, 4 to 5 days after exposure to basement membrane and lactogenic hormones (differentiation signals). The authors show that this differentiation entails a marked decline in the expression of Id-1, a helix-loop-helix (HLH) protein that inactivates basic HLH transcription factors in other cell types. SCp2 cells stably transfected with an Id-1 expression vector grew more rapidly than control cells under standard conditions, but in response to differentiation signals, they lost three-dimensional organization, invaded the basement membrane, and then resumed growth. SCp2 cells expressing an Id-1 antisense vector grew more slowly than controls; in response to differentiation signals, they remained stably growth arrested and fully differentiated, as did control cells. The authors suggest that Id-1 renders cells refractory to differentiation signals and receptive to growth signals by inactivating one or more basic HLH proteins that coordinate growth and differentiation in the mammary epithelium. 53 refs., 6 figs.

  6. Oncogenic AKT1(E17K) mutation induces mammary hyperplasia but prevents HER2-driven tumorigenesis.

    PubMed

    Mancini, Maria L; Lien, Evan C; Toker, Alex

    2016-04-05

    One of the most frequently deregulated signaling pathways in breast cancer is the PI 3-K/Akt cascade. Genetic lesions are commonly found in PIK3CA, PTEN, and AKT, which lead to excessive and constitutive activation of Akt and downstream signaling that results in uncontrolled proliferation and increased cellular survival. One such genetic lesion is the somatic AKT1(E17K) mutation, which has been identified in 4-8% of breast cancer patients. To determine how this mutation contributes to mammary tumorigenesis, we constructed a genetically engineered mouse model that conditionally expresses human AKT1(E17K) in the mammary epithelium. Although AKT1(E17K) is only weakly constitutively active and does not promote proliferation in vitro, it is capable of escaping negative feedback inhibition to exhibit sustained signaling dynamics in vitro. Consistently, both virgin and multiparous AKT1(E17K) mice develop mammary gland hyperplasia that do not progress to carcinoma. This hyperplasia is accompanied by increased estrogen receptor expression, although exposure of the mice to estrogen does not promote tumor development. Moreover, AKT1(E17K) prevents HER2-driven mammary tumor formation, in part through negative feedback inhibition of RTK signaling. Analysis of TCGA breast cancer data revealed that the mRNA expression, total protein levels, and phosphorylation of various RTKs are decreased in human tumors harboring AKT1(E17K).

  7. RANKL/RANK control Brca1 mutation-driven mammary tumors

    PubMed Central

    Sigl, Verena; Owusu-Boaitey, Kwadwo; Joshi, Purna A; Kavirayani, Anoop; Wirnsberger, Gerald; Novatchkova, Maria; Kozieradzki, Ivona; Schramek, Daniel; Edokobi, Nnamdi; Hersl, Jerome; Sampson, Aishia; Odai-Afotey, Ashley; Lazaro, Conxi; Gonzalez-Suarez, Eva; Pujana, Miguel A; CIMBA, for; Heyn, Holger; Vidal, Enrique; Cruickshank, Jennifer; Berman, Hal; Sarao, Renu; Ticevic, Melita; Uribesalgo, Iris; Tortola, Luigi; Rao, Shuan; Tan, Yen; Pfeiler, Georg; Lee, Eva YHP; Bago-Horvath, Zsuzsanna; Kenner, Lukas; Popper, Helmuth; Singer, Christian; Khokha, Rama; Jones, Laundette P; Penninger, Josef M

    2016-01-01

    Breast cancer is the most common female cancer, affecting approximately one in eight women during their life-time. Besides environmental triggers and hormones, inherited mutations in the breast cancer 1 (BRCA1) or BRCA2 genes markedly increase the risk for the development of breast cancer. Here, using two different mouse models, we show that genetic inactivation of the key osteoclast differentiation factor RANK in the mammary epithelium markedly delayed onset, reduced incidence, and attenuated progression of Brca1;p53 mutation-driven mammary cancer. Long-term pharmacological inhibition of the RANK ligand RANKL in mice abolished the occurrence of Brca1 mutation-driven pre-neoplastic lesions. Mechanistically, genetic inactivation of Rank or RANKL/RANK blockade impaired proliferation and expansion of both murine Brca1;p53 mutant mammary stem cells and mammary progenitors from human BRCA1 mutation carriers. In addition, genome variations within the RANK locus were significantly associated with risk of developing breast cancer in women with BRCA1 mutations. Thus, RANKL/RANK control progenitor cell expansion and tumorigenesis in inherited breast cancer. These results present a viable strategy for the possible prevention of breast cancer in BRCA1 mutant patients. PMID:27241552

  8. Detection of differentially expressed genes in methylnitrosourea-induced rat mammary adenocarcinomas.

    PubMed

    Hu, L; Lin, L; Crist, K A; Kelloff, G J; Steele, V E; Lubet, R A; You, M; Wang, Y

    1997-01-01

    In this study, altered gene expression in five methylnitrosourea (MNU)-induced rat mammary adenocarcinomas was investigated using a newly developed competitive cDNA library screening assay. In order to detect the differentially expressed cDNA transcripts, three cDNA libraries (rat mammary, rat liver, and rat kidney) with over 18,000 clones were differentially screened with competing normal and neoplastic mammary cDNA probes. Ninety-eight clones indicated by competitive hybridization to be differentially expressed in tumors were verified by dot-blot hybridization analysis. Of these clones, 45 were found to be overexpressed while 53 were underexpressed in tumors. Forty-five of the confirmed clones were further analyzed by single-pass cDNA sequence determination. Four clones showed homology with cytochrome oxidase subunit I, polyoma virus PTA noncoding region, cytoplasmic beta-actin, and mouse secretory protein containing thrombospondin motifs. Further investigation into the potential roles of these identified genes should contribute significantly to our understanding of the molecular mechanism(s) of rat mammary tumorigenesis.

  9. The Transcriptional Repressor ZNF503/Zeppo2 Promotes Mammary Epithelial Cell Proliferation and Enhances Cell Invasion*

    PubMed Central

    Shahi, Payam; Slorach, Euan M.; Wang, Chih-Yang; Chou, Jonathan; Lu, Angela; Ruderisch, Aline; Werb, Zena

    2015-01-01

    The NET (nocA, Nlz, elB, TLP-1) subfamily of zinc finger proteins is an important mediator during developmental processes. The evolutionary conserved zinc finger protein ZNF503/Zeppo2 (zinc finger elbow-related proline domain protein 2, Zpo2) plays critical roles during embryogenesis. We found that Zpo2 is expressed in adult tissue and examined its function. We found that ZPO2 is a nuclearly targeted transcriptional repressor that is expressed in mammary epithelial cells. Elevated Zpo2 levels increase mammary epithelial cell proliferation. Zpo2 promotes cellular invasion through down-regulation of E-cadherin and regulates the invasive phenotype in a RAC1-dependent manner. We detect elevated Zpo2 expression during breast cancer progression in a MMTV-PyMT transgenic mouse model. Tumor transplant experiments indicated that overexpression of Zpo2 in MMTV-PyMT mammary tumor cell lines enhances lung metastasis. Our findings suggest that Zpo2 plays a significant role in mammary gland homeostasis and that deregulation of Zpo2 may promote breast cancer development. PMID:25538248

  10. Mifepristone inhibits MPA-and FGF2-induced mammary tumor growth but not FGF2-induced mammary hyperplasia.

    PubMed

    Cerliani, Juan P; Giulianelli, Sebastián; Sahores, Ana; Wargon, Victoria; Gongora, Adrian; Baldi, Alberto; Molinolo, Alfredo; Lamb, Caroline E; Lanari, Claudia

    2010-01-01

    We have previously demonstrated a crosstalk between fibroblast growth factor 2 (FGF2) and progestins inducing experimental breast cancer growth. The aim of the present study was to compare the effects of FGF2 and of medroxyprogesterone acetate (MPA) on the mouse mammary glands and to investigate whether the antiprogestin RU486 was able to reverse the MPA- or FGF2-induced effects on both, mammary gland and tumor growth. We demonstrate that FGF2 administered locally induced an intraductal hyperplasia that was not reverted by RU486, suggesting that FGF2-induced effects are progesterone receptor (PR)-independent. However, MPA-induced paraductal hyperplasia was reverted by RU486 and a partial agonistic effect was observed in RU486-treated glands. Using C4-HD tumors which only grow in the presence of MPA, we showed that FGF2 administered intratumorally was able to stimulate tumor growth as MPA. The histology of FGF2-treated tumors showed different degrees of gland differentiation. RU486 inhibited both, MPA or FGF2 induced tumor growth. However, only complete regression was observed in MPA-treated tumors. Our results support the hypothesis that stromal FGF2 activates PR inducing hormone independent tumor growth.

  11. A 470 bp WAP-promoter fragment confers lactation independent, progesterone regulated mammary-specific gene expression in transgenic mice.

    PubMed

    Lipnik, Karoline; Petznek, Helga; Renner-Müller, Ingrid; Egerbacher, Monika; Url, Angelika; Salmons, Brian; Günzburg, Walter H; Hohenadl, Christine

    2005-04-01

    The ability of a 470 bp sub-fragment of the murine whey acidic protein (WAP) promoter in the context of a retroviral expression plasmid to direct gene expression to mammary epithelial cells was analysed in a number of independent transgenic mouse lines. In contrast to previous findings with the genuine 2.5 kb promoter fragment, our studies revealed a highly mammary gland-specific expression detectable only in non-lactating animals. This suggested a mainly progesterone-regulated activity of the short fragment. Therefore, transgene expression was examined in the progesterone-determined estrous cycle and during pregnancy. In accordance with in vitro data from stably transfected cell lines, in both situations expression was upregulated at stages associated with high progesterone levels. Taken together these data provide deeper insight into WAP-promoter regulation and stress the usefulness of the shortened fragment for a lactation independent mammary-targeted expression.

  12. Progesterone receptor gene maps to human chromosome band 11q13, the site of the mammary oncogene int-2

    SciTech Connect

    Law, M.L.; Kao, F.T.; Wei, Q.; Hartz, J.A.; Greene, G.L.; Zarucki-Schulz, T.; Conneely, O.M.; Jones, C.; Puck, T.T.; O'Malley, B.W.; Horwitz, K.B.

    1987-05-01

    Progesterone is involved in the development and progression of breast cancers, and progesterone receptors (PR) are important markers of hormone dependence and disease prognosis. The authors have used a human PR cDNA probe, genomic DNA blotting of a series of Chinese hamster-human cell hybrids, and in situ hybridization to map the human PR gene to chromosome 11, band q13. This band also contains the human homolog of the mouse mammary tumor virus integration site, int-2, which surrounds a protooncogene thought to be involved in the development of murine mammary cancers. That these two genes share the same chromosomal location raises important questions about their possible linkage and about the relationship between the mammary-specific oncogene and the steroid hormone in the development, growth, and hormone dependence of human breast cancers.

  13. Evaluation of Listeria Monocytogenes Based Vaccines for HER-2/neu in Mouse Transgenic Models of Breast Cancer

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2007-09-01

    surrounding vessels in commonly studied mouse tumors. We have identified two autochthonous mouse mammary tumor models, MMTV-infected and MMTV-neu mice , with...Generate mammary specific inducible Tie2Ex mice a. Cross MMTV-rtTA mice with TRE-Tie2Ex mice (FVB and C3H strain). The Transgenic Mouse Facility...at Penn generated C3H/HeN TRE-Tie2Ex and FVB TRE-Tie2Ex transgenic mice using a TRE-Tie2Ex plasmid. Mouse lines that stably transmitted the

  14. Trace element transport in the mammary gland.

    PubMed

    Lönnerdal, Bo

    2007-01-01

    The mammary gland has a remarkable capacity to adapt to maternal deficiency or excess of iron, copper, and zinc and to homeostatically control milk concentrations of these essential nutrients. Similarly, it can regulate changes in concentrations of iron, copper, and zinc change during lactation. For iron, this regulation is achieved by transferrin receptor, DMT1, and ferroportin, whereas mammary gland copper metabolism is regulated by Ctr1, ATP7A, and ATP7B. Zinc homeostasis is complex, involving both zinc importers (Zip3) and zinc exporters (ZnT-1, ZnT-2, and ZnT-4). Both transcriptional and post-translational regulation can affect protein abundance and cellular localization of these transporters, finely orchestrating uptake, intracellular trafficking, and secretion of iron, copper, and zinc. The control of mammary gland uptake and milk secretion of iron, copper, and zinc protects both the mammary gland and the breast-fed infant against deficiency and excess of these nutrients.

  15. Mammary gland: From embryogenesis to adult life.

    PubMed

    Musumeci, Giuseppe; Castrogiovanni, Paola; Szychlinska, Marta Anna; Aiello, Flavia Concetta; Vecchio, Giada Maria; Salvatorelli, Lucia; Magro, Gaetano; Imbesi, Rosa

    2015-01-01

    The aim of this review is to focus on the molecular factors that ensure the optimal development and maintenance of the mammary gland thanks to their integration and coordination. The development of the mammary gland is supported, not only by endocrine signals, but also by regulatory molecules, which are able to integrate signals from the surrounding microenvironment. A major role is certainly played by homeotic genes, but their incorrect expression during the spatiotemporal regulation of proliferative, functional and differentiation cycles of the mammary gland, may result in the onset of neoplastic processes. Attention is directed also to the endocrine aspects and sexual dimorphism of mammary gland development, as well as the role played by ovarian steroids and their receptors in adult life.

  16. Gordon Research Conference on Mammary Gland Biology

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1989-01-01

    The 1989 conference was the tenth in the series of biennial Gordon Research Conferences on Mammary Gland Biology. Traditionally this conference brings together scientists from diverse backgrounds and experience but with a common interest in the biology of the mammary gland. Investigators from agricultural and medical schools, biochemists, cell and molecular biologists, endocrinologists, immunologists, and representatives from the emerging biotechnology industries met to discuss current concepts and results on the function and regulation of the normal and neoplastic mammary gland in a variety of species. Of the participants, approximately three-fourths were engaged in studying the normal mammary gland function, whereas the other quarter were engaged in studying the neoplastic gland. The interactions between scientists, clinicians, veterinarians examining both normal and neoplastic cell function serves to foster the multi-disciplinary goals of the conference and has stimulated many cooperative projects among participants in previous years.

  17. The mammary cellular hierarchy and breast cancer.

    PubMed

    Oakes, Samantha R; Gallego-Ortega, David; Ormandy, Christopher J

    2014-11-01

    Advances in the study of hematopoietic cell maturation have paved the way to a deeper understanding the stem and progenitor cellular hierarchy in the mammary gland. The mammary epithelium, unlike the hematopoietic cellular hierarchy, sits in a complex niche where communication between epithelial cells and signals from the systemic hormonal milieu, as well as from extra-cellular matrix, influence cell fate decisions and contribute to tissue homeostasis. We review the discovery, definition and regulation of the mammary cellular hierarchy and we describe the development of the concepts that have guided our investigations. We outline recent advances in in vivo lineage tracing that is now challenging many of our assumptions regarding the behavior of mammary stem cells, and we show how understanding these cellular lineages has altered our view of breast cancer.

  18. Pathologic progression of mammary carcinomas in a C3(1)/SV40 T/t-antigen transgenic rat model of human triple-negative and Her2-positive breast cancer.

    PubMed

    Hoenerhoff, M J; Shibata, M A; Bode, A; Green, J E

    2011-04-01

    The C3(1) component of the rat prostate steroid binding protein has been used to target expression of the SV40 T/t-antigen to the mammary epithelium of mice resulting in pre-neoplastic lesions that progress to invasive and metastatic cancer with molecular features of human basal-type breast cancer. However, there are major differences in the histologic architecture of the stromal and epithelial elements between the mouse and human mammary glands. The rat mammary gland is more enriched with epithelial and stromal components than the mouse and more closely resembles the cellular composition of the human gland. Additionally, existing rat models of mammary cancer are typically estrogen receptor positive and hormone responsive, unlike most genetically engineered mouse mammary cancer models. In an attempt to develop a mammary cancer model that might more closely resemble the pathology of human breast cancer, we generated a novel C3(1)/SV40 T/t-antigen transgenic rat model that developed progressive mammary lesions leading to highly invasive adenocarcinomas. However, aggressive tumor development prevented the establishment of transgenic lines. Characterization of the tumors revealed that they were primarily estrogen receptor and progesterone receptor negative, and either her2/neu positive or negative, resembling human triple-negative or Her2 positive breast cancer. Tumors expressed the basal marker K14, as well as the luminal marker K18, and were negative for smooth muscle actin. The triple negative phenotype has not been previously reported in a rat mammary cancer model. Further development of a C3(1)SV40 T/t-antigen based model could establish valuable transgenic rat lines that develop basal-type mammary tumors.

  19. Conditional Estrogen Receptor Knockout Mouse Model for Studying Mammary Tumorigenesis

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2002-01-01

    8217 ends of the genomic DNA insert. We then compared this DNA sequence with the Celera gene bank using the BLAST software and found 97% sequence ...accuracy by restriction enzyme analysis and DNA sequencing (fig 3). The complete sequence of the 12.6 kb "targeting construct’ was sequenced from 5’ and 3...reviewing instructions, searching existing data sources, gathering and maintaining the data needed, and completing and reviewing this collection of

  20. Genes Altered by Intracisternal A Particles in Mouse Mammary Tumorigenesis

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1997-07-01

    and characterized. Isolation of the normal counterpart was to be done by library screening and PCR techniques. Southern analysis and isolation of the...library construction was isolated by oligo dT column chromatography (Molecular Research Center, Inc. Cincinnati, OH). cDNA library screening and...clone isolated by library screening . The sequence starts at position 280. There PCR amplicons representing the 5’ end of the clone are shown below pl7b

  1. Mammary fibroadenoma in a lamb

    PubMed Central

    Guvenc, Tolga; Yarim, Murat; Kabak, Yonca B.; Sozgen, Yuksel

    2007-01-01

    A fibroadenoma was diagnosed in the left udder of a 3-month-old female Chios lamb. No recurrence was observed after surgery. Grossly, the tumor had a whitish-gray lobular appearance, and the lobules were interlaced with thin septa. Microscopically, the tumor was composed of proliferating fibroepithelial tissue, including differentiated ducts lined by whorls and interlacing bundles of abundant loose fibrovascular stroma. Immunohistochemistry revealed the ductal epithelium to be positive for pancytokeratin (AE1/AE3) and loose fibrovascular stroma was positive for vimentin and basal cells covering the ductal epithelium of alpha-smooth-muscle actin. Immunostaining for the estrogen and progesterone receptors was negative. A diagnosis of mammary fibroadenoma was made based on the histological and immunohistochemical findings. PMID:17993758

  2. Targeting reverse tetracycline-dependent transactivator to murine mammary epithelial cells that express the progesterone receptor.

    PubMed

    Mukherjee, Atish; Soyal, Selma M; Fernandez-Valdivia, Rodrigo; DeMayo, Francesco J; Lydon, John P

    2007-10-01

    Through an established gene-targeting strategy, reverse tetracycline-dependent transactivator (rtTA) was targeted downstream of the murine progesterone receptor (PR) promoter. Mice were generated in which one (PR(+/rtTA)) or both (PR(rtTA/rtTA)) PR alleles harbor the rtTA insertion. The PR(+/rtTA) and PR(rtTA/rtTA) knockins exhibit phenotypes identical to the normal and the progesterone receptor knockout mouse, respectively. Crossed with the TZA reporter, which carries the TetO-LacZ responder transgene, the PR(+/rtTA)/TZA and PR(rtTA/rtTA)/TZA bigenics exhibit doxycycline-induced beta-galactosidase activity specifically in progesterone responsive target tissues such as the mammary gland, uterus, ovary, and pituitary gland. In the case of the PR(+/rtTA)/TZA mammary epithelium, dual immunofluorescence demonstrated that PR expression and doxycycline-induced beta-galactosidase activity colocalized; beta-galactosidase was not detected in the absence of doxycycline. Although both the PR(+/rtTA) and PR(rtTA/rtTA) knockins represent innovative animal models with which to further query progesterone's mechanism of action in vivo, the PR(rtTA/rtTA) mouse in particular promises to provide unique insight into the paracrine mechanism of action, which underpins progesterone's involvement in mammary morphogenesis with obvious implications for extending our understanding of this steroid's role in breast cancer progression.

  3. Genetic Mapping in Mice Identifies DMBT1 as a Candidate Modifier of Mammary Tumors and Breast Cancer Risk

    PubMed Central

    Blackburn, Anneke C.; Hill, Linda Z.; Roberts, Amy L.; Wang, Jun; Aud, Dee; Jung, Jimmy; Nikolcheva, Tania; Allard, John; Peltz, Gary; Otis, Christopher N.; Cao, Qing J.; Ricketts, Reva St. J.; Naber, Stephen P.; Mollenhauer, Jan; Poustka, Annemarie; Malamud, Daniel; Jerry, D. Joseph

    2007-01-01

    Low-penetrance breast cancer susceptibility alleles seem to play a significant role in breast cancer risk but are difficult to identify in human cohorts. A genetic screen of 176 N2 backcross progeny of two Trp53+/− strains, BALB/c and C57BL/6, which differ in their susceptibility to mammary tumors, identified a modifier of mammary tumor susceptibility in an ∼25-Mb interval on mouse chromosome 7 (designated SuprMam1). Relative to heterozygotes, homozygosity for BALB/c alleles of SuprMam1 significantly decreased mammary tumor latency from 70.7 to 61.1 weeks and increased risk twofold (P = 0.002). Dmbt1 (deleted in malignant brain tumors 1) was identified as a candidate modifier gene within the SuprMam1 interval because it was differentially expressed in mammary tissues from BALB/c-Trp53+/− and C57BL/6-Trp53+/− mice. Dmbt1 mRNA and protein was reduced in mammary glands of the susceptible BALB/c mice. Immunohistochemical staining demonstrated that DMBT1 protein expression was also significantly reduced in normal breast tissue from women with breast cancer (staining score, 1.8; n = 46) compared with cancer-free controls (staining score, 3.9; n = 53; P < 0.0001). These experiments demonstrate the use of Trp53+/− mice as a sensitized background to screen for low-penetrance modifiers of cancer. The results identify a novel mammary tumor susceptibility locus in mice and support a role for DMBT1 in suppression of mammary tumors in both mice and women. PMID:17525270

  4. Mammary ductal growth is impaired in mice lacking leptin-dependent signal transducer and activator of transcription 3 signaling.

    PubMed

    Thorn, Stephanie R; Giesy, Sarah L; Myers, Martin G; Boisclair, Yves R

    2010-08-01

    Mice lacking leptin (ob/ob) or its full-length receptor (db/db) are obese and reproductively incompetent. Fertility, pregnancy, and lactation are restored, respectively, in ob/ob mice treated with leptin through mating, d 6.5 post coitum, and pregnancy. Therefore, leptin signaling is needed for lactation, but the timing of its action and the affected mammary process remain unknown. To address this issue, we used s/s mice lacking only leptin-dependent signal transducer and activator of transcription (STAT)3 signaling. These mice share many features with db/db mice, including obesity, but differ by retaining sufficient activity of the hypothalamic-pituitary-ovarian axis to support reproduction. The s/s mammary epithelium was normal at 3 wk of age but failed to expand through the mammary fat pad (MFP) during the subsequent pubertal period. Ductal growth failure was not corrected by estrogen therapy and did not relate to inadequate IGF-I production by the MFP or to the need for epithelial or stromal leptin-STAT3 signaling. Ductal growth failure coincided with adipocyte hypertrophy and increased MFP production of leptin, TNFalpha, and IL6. These cytokines, however, were unable to inhibit the proliferation of a collection of mouse mammary epithelial cell lines. In conclusion, the very first step of postnatal mammary development fails in s/s mice despite sufficient estrogen IGF-I and an hypothalamic-pituitary-ovarian axis capable of supporting reproduction. This failure is not caused by mammary loss of leptin-dependent STAT3 signaling or by the development of inflammation. These data imply the existence of an unknown mechanism whereby leptin-dependent STAT3 signaling and obesity alter mammary ductal development.

  5. The V-ATPase a2 isoform controls mammary gland development through Notch and TGF-β signaling

    PubMed Central

    Pamarthy, Sahithi; Mao, Liquin; Katara, Gajendra K; Fleetwood, Sara; Kulshreshta, Arpita; Gilman-Sachs, Alice; Beaman, Kenneth D

    2016-01-01

    Among all tissues and organs, the mammary gland is unique because most of its development occurs in adulthood. Notch signaling has a major role in mammary gland development and has been implicated in breast cancer. The vacuolar-ATPase (V-ATPase) is a proton pump responsible for the regulation and control of pH in intracellular vesicles and the extracellular milieu. We have previously reported that a2V-ATPase (a2V), an isoform of ‘a' subunit of V-ATPase, regulates processing of Notch receptor and alters Notch signaling in breast cancer. To study the role of a2V in mammary gland development, we generated an a2V-KO model (conditional mammary knockout a2V mouse strain). During normal mammary gland development, the basal level expression of a2V increased from puberty, virginity, and pregnancy through the lactation stage and then decreased during involution. Litters of a2V-KO mice weighed significantly less when compared with litters from wild-type mice and showed reduced expression of the lactation marker β-casein. Whole-mount analysis of mammary glands demonstrated impaired ductal elongation and bifurcation in a2V-KO mice. Consequently, we found disintegrated mammary epithelium as seen by basal and luminal epithelial staining, although the rate of proliferation remained unchanged. Delayed mammary morphogenesis in a2V-KO mice was associated with aberrant activation of Notch and TGF-β (transforming growth factor-β) pathways. Notably, Hey1 (hairy/enhancer-of-split related with YRPW motif) and Smad2, the key downstream mediators of Notch and TGF-β pathways, respectively, were upregulated in a2V-KO mice and also in human mammary epithelial cells treated with a2V siRNA. Taken together, our results show that a2V deficiency disrupts the endolysosomal route in Notch and TGF signaling, thereby impairing mammary gland development. Our findings have broader implications in developmental and oncogenic cellular environments where V-ATPase, Notch and TGF-β are crucial for cell

  6. Proliferation of Estrogen Receptor alpha Positive Mammary Epithelial Cells is Restrained by TGFbeta1 in Adult Mice

    SciTech Connect

    Ewan, Kenneth B.R.; Oketch-Rabah, Hellen A.; Ravani, Shraddha A.; Shyamala, G.; Moses, Harold L.; Barcellos-Hoff, Mary Helen

    2005-03-03

    Transforming growth factor {beta}1 (TGF{beta}1) is a potent inhibitor of mammary epithelial proliferation. In human breast, estrogen receptor {alpha} (ER{alpha}) cells rarely co-localize with markers of proliferation, but their increased frequency correlates with breast cancer risk. To determine whether TGF{beta}1 is necessary for the quiescence of ER{alpha}-positive population, we examined mouse mammary epithelial gland at estrus. Approximately 35% of cells showed TGF{beta}1 activation, which co-localized with nuclear receptor-phosphorylated Smad 2/3, indicating that TGF{beta} signaling is autocrine. Furthermore, nuclear Smad co-localized with nuclear ER{alpha}. To test whether TGF{beta} was functional, we examined genetically engineered mice with different levels of TGF{beta}1. ER{alpha} co-localization with markers of proliferation (i.e. Ki-67 or BrdU) at estrus was significantly increased in the mammary glands of Tgf{beta}1 C57/bl/129SV heterozygote mice. This relationship was maintained following pregnancy, but was absent at puberty. Conversely, mammary epithelial expression of constitutively active TGF{beta}1 via the MMTV promoter suppressed proliferation of ER{alpha} positive cells. Thus, TGF{beta}1 activation functionally restrains ER{alpha} positive cells from proliferating in adult mammary gland. Accordingly, we propose that TGF{beta}1 dysregulation may promote proliferation of ER{alpha} positive cells associated with breast cancer risk in humans.

  7. Mediator subunits MED1 and MED24 cooperatively contribute to pubertal mammary gland development and growth of breast carcinoma cells.

    PubMed

    Hasegawa, Natsumi; Sumitomo, Akiko; Fujita, Azusa; Aritome, Nami; Mizuta, Shumpei; Matsui, Keiji; Ishino, Ruri; Inoue, Kana; Urahama, Norinaga; Nose, Junko; Mukohara, Toru; Kamoshida, Shingo; Roeder, Robert G; Ito, Mitsuhiro

    2012-04-01

    The Mediator subunit MED1 is essential for mammary gland development and lactation, whose contribution through direct interaction with estrogen receptors (ERs) is restricted to involvement in pubertal mammary gland development and luminal cell differentiation. Here, we provide evidence that the MED24-containing submodule of Mediator functionally communicates specifically with MED1 in pubertal mammary gland development. Mammary glands from MED1/MED24 double heterozygous knockout mice showed profound retardation in ductal branching during puberty, while single haploinsufficient glands developed normally. DNA synthesis of both luminal and basal cells were impaired in double mutant mice, and the expression of ER-targeted genes encoding E2F1 and cyclin D1, which promote progression through the G(1)/S phase of the cell cycle, was attenuated. Luciferase reporter assays employing double mutant mouse embryonic fibroblasts showed selective impairment in ER functions. Various breast carcinoma cell lines expressed abundant amounts of MED1, MED24, and MED30, and attenuated expression of MED1 and MED24 in breast carcinoma cells led to attenuated DNA synthesis and growth. These results indicate functional communications between the MED1 subunit and the MED24-containing submodule that mediate estrogen receptor functions and growth of both normal mammary epithelial cells and breast carcinoma cells.

  8. Genetic mosaic analysis reveals FGF receptor 2 function in terminal end buds during mammary gland branching morphogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Lu, Pengfei; Ewald, Andrew J.; Martin, Gail R.; Werb, Zena

    2008-01-01

    FGF signaling is associated with breast cancer and is required for mammary placode formation in the mouse. In this study, we employed a genetic mosaic analysis based on Cre-mediated recombination to investigate FGF receptor 2 (Fgfr2) function in the postnatal mammary gland. Mosaic inactivation of Fgfr2 by the MMTVCre transgene enabled us to compare the behavior of Fgfr2 null and Fgfr2 heterozygous cells in the same gland. Fgfr2 null cells were at a competitive disadvantage to their Fgfr2 heterozygous neighbors in the highly proliferative terminal end buds (TEBs) at the invasion front, owing to a negative effect of loss of Fgfr2 function on cell proliferation. However, Fgfr2 null cells were tolerated in mature ducts. In these genetic mosaic mammary glands, the epithelial network is apparently built by TEBs that over time are composed of a progressively larger proportion of Fgfr2-positive cells. However, subsequently, most cells lose Fgfr2 function, presumably due to additional rounds of Cre-mediated recombination. Using an independent strategy to create mosaic mammary glands, which employed an adenovirus-Cre that acts only once, we confirmed that Fgfr2 null cells were out-competed by neighboring Fgfr2 heterozygous cells. Together, our data demonstrate that Fgfr2 functions in the proliferating and invading TEBs, but it is not required in the mature ducts of the pubertal mammary gland. PMID:18585375

  9. Abnormal Mammary Adipose Tissue Environment of Brca1 Mutant Mice Show a Persistent Deposition of Highly Vascularized Multilocular Adipocytes.

    PubMed

    Jones, Laundette P; Buelto, Destiney; Tago, Elaine; Owusu-Boaitey, Kwadwo E

    2011-12-08

    A major challenge to breast cancer research is the identification of alterations in the architecture and composition of the breast that are associated with breast cancer progression. The aim of the present investigation was to characterize the mammary adipose phenotype from Brca1 mutant mice in the expectation that this would shed light on the role of the mammary tissue environment in the early stages of breast tumorigenesis. We observed that histological sections of mammary tissue from adult Brca1 mutant mice abnormally display small, multilocular adipocytes that are reminiscent of brown adipose tissue (BAT) as compared to wildtype mice. Using a marker for BAT, the uncoupling protein 1 (UCP1), we demonstrated that these multilocular adipose regions in Brca1 mutant mice stain positive for UCP1. Transcriptionally, UCP1 mRNA levels in the Brca1 mutant mice were elevated greater than 50-fold compared to age-matched mammary glands from wildtype mice. Indeed, BAT has characteristics that are favorable for tumor growth, including high vascularity. Therefore, we also demonstrated that the multilocular brown adipose phenotype in the mammary fat pad of Brca1 mutant mice displayed regions of increased vascularity as evidenced by a significant increase in the protein expression of CD31, a marker for angiogenesis. This Brca1 mutant mouse model should provide a physiologically relevant context to determine whether brown adipose tissue can play a role in breast cancer development.

  10. Morphological and histological characteristics of mammary dysplasias occurring in cell dissociation-derived murine mammary outgrowths

    SciTech Connect

    Ethier, S.P.; Adams, L.M.; Ullrich, R.L.

    1984-10-01

    The morphological and histological characteristics of ductal dysplasias that were observed in mammary outgrowths derived from monodispersed mammary cells of carcinogen-treated mice are described. Mammary outgrowths were derived by injecting either 10(4) or 10(5) enzymatically dissociated mammary cells, obtained from control or carcinogen-treated BALB/c mice, into gland-free mammary fat pads of syngeneic hosts. The mammary dysplasias observed varied considerably in morphological and histological characteristics. The majority of the lesions were ductal in origin and were associated with epithelial hyperplasia which ranged from mild hyperplasia, in which only a few extra layers of epithelium were present, to severe hyperplasia, in which the ducts and end buds were occluded and distended with epithelial cells. In addition, papillary and lobular lesions were observed which were also associated with varying degrees of hyperplasia. The range of mammary dysplasias observed in these outgrowths closely resembles that of lesions associated with the pathogenesis of mammary carcinoma in mice, rats, and humans.

  11. Functional redundancy between Apc and Apc2 regulates tissue homeostasis and prevents tumourigenesis in murine mammary epithelium

    PubMed Central

    Daly, Carl S.; Shaw, Paul; Ordonez, Liliana D.; Williams, Geraint T.; Quist, Jelmar; Grigoriadis, Anita; Van Es, Johan H.; Clevers, Hans; Clarke, Alan R.; Reed, Karen R.

    2016-01-01

    Aberrant Wnt signaling within breast cancer is associated with poor prognosis, but regulation of this pathway in breast tissue remains poorly understood and the consequences of immediate or long-term dysregulation remain elusive. The exact contribution of the Wnt-regulating proteins APC and APC2 in the pathogenesis of human breast cancer are ill-defined, but our analysis of publically available array datasets indicates that tumors with concomitant low expression of both proteins occurs more frequently in the ‘triple negative’ phenotype, which is a subtype of breast cancer with particularly poor prognosis. We have used mouse transgenics to delete Apc and/or Apc2 from mouse mammary epithelium to elucidate the significance of these proteins in mammary homeostasis and delineate their influences on Wnt signaling and tumourigenesis. Loss of either protein alone failed to affect Wnt signaling levels or tissue homeostasis. Strikingly, concomitant loss led to local disruption of β-catenin status, disruption in epithelial integrity, cohesion and polarity, increased cell division and a distinctive form of ductal hyperplasia with ‘squamoid’ ghost cell nodules in young animals. Upon aging, the development of Wnt activated mammary carcinomas with squamous differentiation was accompanied by a significantly reduced survival. This novel Wnt driven mammary tumour model highlights the importance of functional redundancies existing between the Apc proteins both in normal homeostasis and in tumorigenesis. PMID:27694902

  12. Generation Of A Mouse Model For Schwannomatosis

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2010-09-01

    tumor virus (MMTV)-Cre, the whey acidic protein (WAP)-Cre, and the β-lactoglobulin (BLG)-Cre lines. We showed that merlin plays an important role...Cre lines, the mouse mammary tumor virus (MMTV)-Cre, the whey acidic protein (WAP)-Cre, and the β-lactoglobulin (BLG)-Cre lines. We showed that the...cycles, consequently leading to decreased milk production and malnourishment of the offspring by the second lactation. Immunostaining analysis revealed

  13. The nipple: a simple intersection of mammary gland and integument, but focal point of organ function.

    PubMed

    Koyama, Sachiko; Wu, Hsin-Jung; Easwaran, Teresa; Thopady, Sunil; Foley, John

    2013-06-01

    Having glands that secrete milk to nourish neonatal offspring characterizes all mammals. We provide a brief overview of the development and anatomy of nipples and mammary glands in monotremes, marsupials, and marine mammals, and focus on the nipples and mammary glands in terrestrial eutherian species. We first classify eutherians into three groups: the altricial, precocial, and arboreal types based on their rearing system. We then summarize the physiology of lactation and the cell biology of nipples with specific focus on comparing these in the mouse, cow, and human, which represent the three different groups. Finally we propose that the nipple is an example of specialized epidermis. As specialized epidermis, it is dependent the underlying stroma for development and maintenance in adult life. The development of the nipple and signaling pathways that regulate its formation are described.

  14. New insights into cathepsin D in mammary tissue development and remodeling.

    PubMed

    Margaryan, Naira V; Kirschmann, Dawn A; Lipavsky, Alina; Bailey, Caleb M; Hendrix, Mary J C; Khalkhali-Ellis, Zhila

    2010-09-01

    Cathepsin D (CatD) is a lysosomal aspartyl endopeptidase originally considered a "house keeping enzyme" involved in the clearance of unwanted proteins. However, recent studies have revealed CatD's involvement in apoptosis and autophagy, thus signifying an important function in the proper development and maintenance of multi-cellular organs. In the mammary gland, matrix degradation and the remodeling process are orchestrated by proteolytic enzymes, but the role of CatD at distinct developmental stages has remained mostly unexplored. Based on our previous studies we sought to address the role of this endopeptidase in mammary gland development and remodeling. By employing a mouse model, we report a previously unidentified participation of CatD in different stages of mammary gland development. Our findings reveal that CatD undergoes distinct protein processing at different stages of mammary gland development, and this customized processing results in differential enzymatic activity (constitutive and low pH activatable) best fitting particular stage(s) of development. In addition, at the onset of involution the N-glycan structure of this endopeptidase switches from a mixed high mannose and hybrid structure to an almost exclusively high mannose type, but reverts back to the original N-glycan composition by day 4 of involution. Our findings illuminate (at least in part) the "raison d'être" for CatD's numerous and highly regulated proteolytic processing steps from the pro-form to the mature enzyme. In the mammary gland, specific cleavage product(s) perform specialized function(s) befitting each stage of remodeling. It is noteworthy that deregulated synthesis, secretion and glycosylation of CatD are hallmarks of cancer progression. Thus, identifying the role of CatD in a dynamic normal tissue undergoing highly regulated cycles of remodeling could provide valuable information illuminating the deregulation of CatD associated with cancer development and metastasis.

  15. Morinda citrifolia (Noni) Juice Augments Mammary Gland Differentiation and Reduces Mammary Tumor Growth in Mice Expressing the Unactivated c-erbB2 Transgene

    PubMed Central

    Clafshenkel, William P.; King, Tracy L.; Kotlarczyk, Mary P.; Cline, J. Mark; Foster, Warren G.; Davis, Vicki L.; Witt-Enderby, Paula A.

    2012-01-01

    Morinda citrifolia (noni) is reported to have many beneficial properties, including on immune, inflammatory, quality of life, and cancer endpoints, but little is known about its ability to prevent or treat breast cancer. To test its anticancer potential, the effects of Tahitian Noni Juice (TNJ) on mammary carcinogenesis were examined in MMTV-neu transgenic mice. Mammary tumor latency, incidence, multiplicity, and metastatic incidence were unaffected by TNJ treatment, which suggests that it would not increase or decrease breast cancer risk in women taking TNJ for its other benefits. However, noni may be useful to enhance treatment responses in women with existing HER2/neu breast cancer since TNJ resulted in significant reductions in tumor weight and volume and in longer tumor doubling times in mice. Remarkably, its ability to inhibit the growth of this aggressive form of cancer occurred with the mouse equivalent of a recommended dose for humans (<3 oz/day). A 30-day treatment with TNJ also induced significant changes in mammary secondary ductule branching and lobuloalveolar development, serum progesterone levels, and estrous cycling. Additional studies investigating TNJ-induced tumor growth suppression and modified reproductive responses are needed to characterize its potential as a CAM therapy for women with and without HER2+ breast cancer. PMID:22619689

  16. Morinda citrifolia (Noni) Juice Augments Mammary Gland Differentiation and Reduces Mammary Tumor Growth in Mice Expressing the Unactivated c-erbB2 Transgene.

    PubMed

    Clafshenkel, William P; King, Tracy L; Kotlarczyk, Mary P; Cline, J Mark; Foster, Warren G; Davis, Vicki L; Witt-Enderby, Paula A

    2012-01-01

    Morinda citrifolia (noni) is reported to have many beneficial properties, including on immune, inflammatory, quality of life, and cancer endpoints, but little is known about its ability to prevent or treat breast cancer. To test its anticancer potential, the effects of Tahitian Noni Juice (TNJ) on mammary carcinogenesis were examined in MMTV-neu transgenic mice. Mammary tumor latency, incidence, multiplicity, and metastatic incidence were unaffected by TNJ treatment, which suggests that it would not increase or decrease breast cancer risk in women taking TNJ for its other benefits. However, noni may be useful to enhance treatment responses in women with existing HER2/neu breast cancer since TNJ resulted in significant reductions in tumor weight and volume and in longer tumor doubling times in mice. Remarkably, its ability to inhibit the growth of this aggressive form of cancer occurred with the mouse equivalent of a recommended dose for humans (<3 oz/day). A 30-day treatment with TNJ also induced significant changes in mammary secondary ductule branching and lobuloalveolar development, serum progesterone levels, and estrous cycling. Additional studies investigating TNJ-induced tumor growth suppression and modified reproductive responses are needed to characterize its potential as a CAM therapy for women with and without HER2(+) breast cancer.

  17. Prevalence of Glomerulopathies in Canine Mammary Carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    The incidence and prevalence of paraneoplastic glomerulopathy, especially associated with carcinoma, are a matter of debate and the causal link between cancer and glomerular diseases remains unclear. The aim of this study was to evaluate renal biopsies of selected bitches with spontaneous mammary gland carcinoma. We hypothesized that dogs with mammary carcinomas would show histologic evidence of glomerular pathology. A prospective study was performed in dogs with naturally occurring mammary carcinoma that were undergoing tumor resection and ovariohysterectomy. We evaluated renal biopsies of 32 bitches with spontaneous mammary gland carcinoma and 11 control dogs without mammary gland neoplasia. Samples were obtained from the left kidney and the biopsy material was divided for light microscopy (LM), immunofluorescence (IF) and transmission electron microscopy (TEM). Light microscopy abnormalities were identified in 78.1% of dogs with mammary carcinoma (n = 25) and in none of the dogs in the control group. Focal glomerular mesangial matrix expansion was the most common alteration (n = 15, 60.0%), but mesangial cell proliferation (n = 9, 36.0%) and focal segmental glomerulosclerosis (n = 9, 36.0%), synechiae (n = 7, 28.0%), and globally sclerotic glomeruli (n = 6, 24.0%) were also frequent in dogs with malignancy. Immunofluorescence microscopy revealed strong IgM staining was demonstrated in 64.3% (n = 18) of carcinoma dogs. Transmission electron microscopy from dogs with carcinoma revealed slight changes, the most frequent of which was faint sub-endothelial and mesangial deposits of electron-dense material (78%). Mesangial cell interpositioning and segmental effacement of podocyte foot processes were identified in some specimens (45%). Changes in the glomerulus and proteinuria are common in dogs with naturally occurring mammary carcinoma and this condition appears to provide an excellent large animal model for cancer-associated glomerulopathy in humans. PMID:27764139

  18. Comparative aspects of mammary gland development and homeostasis.

    PubMed

    Capuco, Anthony V; Ellis, Steven E

    2013-01-01

    Mammary glands are crucial to the reproductive strategy of mammals, and the milk of domesticated ruminants serves as an important source of nutrients for the human population. The majority of mammary gland development occurs postnatally, and the mammary gland undergoes cyclical periods of growth, differentiation, lactation, and regression that are coordinated to provide nutrients for offspring or are driven by strategies to manage reproduction and milk production of domesticated species. Growth and maintenance of the mammary epithelium depends on the function of mammary stem cells and progenitor cells. In this review, we provide an overview of postnatal mammary gland development, cyclical phases of mammary gland regression (regression during lactation and between successive lactations), and mammary stem cells and progenitor cells. Where possible, these processes are related to animal production and compared across species, particularly bovine, porcine, murine, and human.

  19. Cutaneous metastases of a mammary carcinoma in a llama.

    PubMed Central

    Leichner, T L; Turner, O; Mason, G L; Barrington, G M

    2001-01-01

    An 8-year-old, female llama was evaluated for nonhealing, ulcerative, cutaneous lesions, which also involved the mammary gland. Biopsies of the lesions distant from and within the mammary gland area revealed an aggressive carcinoma. The tumor was confirmed at necropsy to be a mammary gland adenocarcinoma with cutaneous metastasis. Images Figure 1. PMID:11265189

  20. Pigmented mammary paget disease misdiagnosed as malignant melanoma.

    PubMed

    Lee, Ji Hye; Kim, Tae Hyung; Kim, Soo-Chan; Kim, You Chan; Roh, Mi Ryung

    2014-12-01

    Pigmented mammary Paget disease is a very rare clinicopathologic variant of mammary Paget disease. Diagnosis is often difficult because its clinical and histological features are very similar to those of malignant melanoma. Herein, we report a case of pigmented mammary Paget disease misdiagnosed as malignant melanoma.

  1. Comparative aspects of mammary gland development and homeostasis

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Mammary glands are crucial to the reproductive strategy of mammals and the milk of domesticated ruminants serves as an important source of nutrients for the human population. The majority of mammary gland development occurs postnatally and the mammary gland undergoes cyclical periods of growth, dif...

  2. Human breast cancer cells are redirected to mammary epithelial cells upon interaction with the regenerating mammary gland microenvironment in-vivo.

    PubMed

    Bussard, Karen M; Smith, Gilbert H

    2012-01-01

    Breast cancer is the second leading cause of cancer deaths in the United States. At present, the etiology of breast cancer is unknown; however the possibility of a distinct cell of origin, i.e. a cancer stem cell, is a heavily investigated area of research. Influencing signals from the tissue niche are known to affect stem cells. Literature has shown that cancer cells lose their tumorigenic potential and display 'normal' behavior when placed into 'normal' ontogenic environments. Therefore, it may be the case that the tissue microenvironment is able to generate signals to redirect cancer cell fate. Previously, we showed that pluripotent human embryonal carcinoma cells could be redirected by the regenerating mammary gland microenvironment to contribute epithelial progeny for 'normal' gland development in-vivo. Here, we show that that human metastatic, non-metastatic, and metastasis-suppressed breast cancer cells proliferate and contribute to normal mammary gland development in-vivo without tumor formation. Immunochemistry for human-specific mitochondria, keratin 8 and 14, as well as human-specific milk proteins (alpha-lactalbumin, impregnated transplant hosts) confirmed the presence of human cell progeny. Features consistent with normal mammary gland development as seen in intact hosts (duct, lumen formation, development of secretory acini) were recapitulated in both primary and secondary outgrowths from chimeric implants. These results suggest the dominance of the tissue microenvironment over cancer cell fate. This work demonstrates that cultured human breast cancer cells (metastatic and non-metastatic) respond developmentally to signals generated by the mouse mammary gland microenvironment during gland regeneration in-vivo.

  3. Isoform-specific degradation of PR-B by E6-AP is critical for normal mammary gland development.

    PubMed

    Ramamoorthy, Sivapriya; Dhananjayan, Sarath C; Demayo, Francesco J; Nawaz, Zafar

    2010-11-01

    E6-associated protein (E6-AP), which was originally identified as an ubiquitin-protein ligase, also functions as a coactivator of estrogen (ER-α) and progesterone (PR) receptors. To investigate the in vivo role of E6-AP in mammary gland development, we generated transgenic mouse lines that either overexpress wild-type (WT) human E6-AP (E6-AP(WT)) or ubiquitin-protein ligase-defective E6-AP (E6-AP(C833S)) in the mammary gland. Here we show that overexpression of E6-AP(WT) results in impaired mammary gland development. In contrast, overexpression of E6-AP(C833S) or loss of E6-AP (E6-AP(KO)) increases lateral branching and alveolus-like protuberances in the mammary gland. We also show that the mammary phenotypes observed in the E6-AP transgenic and knockout mice are due, in large part, to the alteration of PR-B protein levels. We also observed alteration in ER-α protein level, which might contribute to the observed mammary phenotype by regulating PR expression. Furthermore, E6-AP regulates PR-B protein levels via the ubiquitin-proteasome pathway. Additionally, we also show that E6-AP impairs progesterone-induced Wnt-4 expression by decreasing the steady state level of PR-B in both mice and in human breast cancer cells. In conclusion, we present the novel observation that E6-AP controls mammary gland development by regulating PR-B protein turnover via the ubiquitin proteasome pathway. For the first time, we show that the E3-ligase activity rather than the coactivation function of E6-AP plays an important role in the mammary gland development, and the ubiquitin-dependent PR-B degradation is not required for its transactivation functions. This mechanism appears to regulate normal mammogenesis, and dysregulation of this process may be an important contributor to mammary cancer development and progression.

  4. Mammary stem cells have myoepithelial cell properties

    PubMed Central

    Prater, Michael D.; Petit, Valérie; Russell, I. Alasdair; Giraddi, Rajshekhar; Shehata, Mona; Menon, Suraj; Schulte, Reiner; Kalajzic, Ivo; Rath, Nicola; Olson, Michael F.; Metzger, Daniel; Faraldo, Marisa M.; Deugnier, Marie-Ange; Glukhova, Marina A.; Stingl, John

    2014-01-01

    Contractile myoepithelial cells dominate the basal layer of the mammary epithelium and are considered to be differentiated cells. However, we observe that up to 54% of single basal cells can form colonies when seeded into adherent culture in the presence of agents that disrupt acin-myosin interactions, and on average, 65% of the single-cell-derived basal colonies can repopulate a mammary gland when transplanted in vivo. This indicates that a high proportion of basal myoepithelial cells can give rise to a mammary repopulating unit (MRU). We demonstrate that myoepithelial cells, flow-sorted using 2 independent myoepithelial-specific reporter strategies, have MRU capacity. Using an inducible lineage tracing approach we follow the progeny of α-smooth muscle actin-expressing myoepithelial cells and show that they function as long-lived lineage-restricted stem cells in the virgin state and during pregnancy. PMID:25173976

  5. Myc is a Notch1 transcriptional target and a requisite for Notch1-induced mammary tumorigenesis in mice.

    PubMed

    Klinakis, Apostolos; Szabolcs, Matthias; Politi, Katerina; Kiaris, Hippokratis; Artavanis-Tsakonas, Spyros; Efstratiadis, Argiris

    2006-06-13

    To explore the potential involvement of aberrant Notch1 signaling in breast cancer pathogenesis, we have used a transgenic mouse model. In these animals, mouse mammary tumor virus LTR-driven expression of the constitutively active intracellular domain of the Notch1 receptor (N1(IC)) causes development of lactation-dependent mammary tumors that regress upon gland involution but progress to nonregressing, invasive adenocarcinomas in subsequent pregnancies. Up-regulation of Myc in these tumors prompted a genetic investigation of a potential Notch1/Myc functional relationship in breast carcinogenesis. Conditional ablation of Myc in the mammary epithelium prevented the induction of regressing N1(IC) neoplasms and also reduced the incidence of nonregressing carcinomas, which developed with significantly increased latency. Molecular analyses revealed that both the mouse and human Myc genes are direct transcriptional targets of N1(IC) acting through its downstream Cbf1 transcriptional effector. Consistent with this mechanistic link, Notch1 and Myc expression is positively correlated by immunostaining in 38% of examined human breast carcinomas.

  6. Interaction of the heterozygous nude gene with the asplenia trait in mammary tumorigenesis

    PubMed Central

    1985-01-01

    The BALB/c mouse strain has been shown to contain endogenous mouse mammary tumor virus (MMTV) proviral sequences. However, no exogenous MMTV particles have been detected in their tissues. Female BALB/c mice from our colonies exhibit a very low incidence of spontaneous mammary tumors (SMT); less than 1% at up to 20 mo of age. Immunodeficient BALB/c mice heterozygous for the nude gene (nu/+, +/+), for the dominant hemimelia gene associated with asplenia (+/+, Dh/+), or for both traits (nu/+, Dh/+) have been examined for SMT incidence and the presence of MMTV proviruses. Based on restriction digestion with Eco RI, Bam HI, and Pst I, the immunodeficient mice have an MMTV provirus copy number and organization identical to the BALB/cCrgl strain. This MMTV DNA pattern is distinct from the MMTV proviruses in C3H/He, C57BL/6J and CBA/CaJ mice, which were parental strains of the immunodeficient mutants. Normal female BALB/c or BALB/c heterozygous for the asplenic trait do not develop significant numbers of SMT at up to 19 mo of age. In contrast, an incidence of 23.8% and 57.7% SMT was observed in BALB/c nu/+ heterozygotes, and in BALB/c nu/+, Dh/+ heterozygotes, respectively. These results indicate that agenesis of the spleen, concomitant with the presence of the heterozygous nude gene, contribute to a high incidence of SMT in the low-SMT BALB/c mouse strain. PMID:2982992

  7. Comparison of human coagulation factor VIII expression directed by cytomegalovirus and mammary gland-specific promoters in HC11 cells and transgenic mice.

    PubMed

    Wang, Qing; Hao, Siguo; Ma, Liyuan; Zhang, Wenhao; Wan, Jiangbo; Deng, Xiaohui

    2015-10-01

    Hemophilia A is an inherited X-linked recessive bleeding disorder caused by coagulant factor VIII (FVIII) deficiency. The conventional treatment involves the administration of recombinant human FVIII (rhFVIII) preparations. In this study, the mammary gland 'bioreactor' is designed to specifically and efficiently express a foreign protein hFVIII in the mammary glands of transgenic mice. We constructed a P1A3-hFVIIIBD vector directed by the mammary gland-specific P1A3 promoter, and transiently transfected HC11 cells and mouse mammary glands with P1A3-hFVIIIBD or CMV-hFVIIIBD vectors directed by a ubiquitous cytomegalovirus (CMV) promoter, respectively. We also generated P1A3-hFVIIIBD and CMV-hFVIIIBD transgenic mice by microinjection, respectively. Our data indicated that both vectors effectively expressed hFVIIIBD in HC11 cells at the transcription level, and hFVIIIBD protein was efficiently expressed in mouse milk after the injection of the hFVIIIBD vectors into mouse mammary glands during lactation. In both CMV-hFVIIIBD and P1A3-hFVIIIBD transgenic mice, hFVIIIBD proteins were efficiently expressed in the mammary glands at the mRNA and protein levels. No significant difference was observed in hFVIIIBD levels between the CMV-hFVIIIBD and P1A3-hFVIIIBD transgenic mice (P > 0.05). However, the activity of hFVIII in CMV-directed transgenic mice was slightly higher than that in P1A3-directed transgenic mice (P < 0.05). While hFVIIIBD was present in multiple organs in CMV-hFVIIIBD mice, P1A3-hFVIIIBD mice showed negligible hFVIIIBD expression in organs other than the mammary glands. This study demonstrated that the mammary gland-specific P1A3-hFVIIIBD vector was more suitable for the generation of hFVIIIBD mammary gland bioreactor.

  8. Effects of endotoxin on the lactating mouse

    SciTech Connect

    Carr, J.K.

    1985-01-01

    The regulation of endogenous mouse mammary tumor virus (MMTV) sequences in trans by a host gene, the Lps locus on mouse chromosome 4, was suspected from a genetic linkage analysis. The Lps locus mediates the mouse's response to the injection of lipopolysaccharide (LPS) in the responder mouse while mice with the deficient allele are incapable of responding. Others have found that endotoxin exposure reduces milk production in lactating animals. This observation was confirmed in mice and extended by examining /sup 125/I-prolactin binding to liver membranes of lactating mice. Endotoxin treatment of responder mice increases liver prolactin binding within 15 minutes, followed by a decline over 6 hours. Scatchard analysis shows that the immediate increase comes from both increased affinity and abundance of the prolactin receptor. No such change in prolactin binding is seen in the non-responder following endotoxin treatment nor in /sup 125/I-insulin binding in responders.

  9. Stromal Effects on Mammary Gland Development and Breast Cancer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wiseman, Bryony S.; Werb, Zena

    2002-05-01

    Breast cancer manifests itself in the mammary epithelium, yet there is a growing recognition that mammary stromal cells also play an important role in tumorigenesis. During its developmental cycle, the mammary gland displays many of the properties associated with breast cancer, and many of the stromal factors necessary for mammary development also promote or protect against breast cancer. Here we review our present knowledge of the specific factors and cell types that contribute to epithelial-stromal crosstalk during mammary development. To find cures for diseases like breast cancer that rely on epithelial-stromal crosstalk, we must understand how these different cell types communicate with each other.

  10. Canine