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Sample records for 4t1 murine breast

  1. Effects of letrozole on breast cancer micro-metastatic tumor growth in bone and lung in mice inoculated with murine 4T1 cells.

    PubMed

    Wang, Wendan; Belosay, Aashvini; Yang, Xujuan; Hartman, James A; Song, Huaxin; Iwaniec, Urszula T; Turner, Russell T; Churchwell, Mona I; Doerge, Daniel R; Helferich, William G

    2016-06-01

    Breast cancer (BC) is the leading cancer in women worldwide. Metastasis occurs in stage IV BC with bone and lung being common metastatic sites. Here we evaluate the effects of the aromatase inhibitor letrozole on BC micro-metastatic tumor growth in bone and lung metastasis in intact and ovariectomized (OVX) mice with murine estrogen receptor negative (ER-) BC cells inoculated in tibia. Forty-eight BALB/c mice were randomly assigned to one of four groups: OVX, OVX + Letrozole, Intact, and Intact + Letrozole, and injected with 4T1 cells intra-tibially. Letrozole was subcutaneously injected daily for 23 days at a dose of 1.75 µg/g body weight. Tumor progression was monitored by bioluminescence imaging (BLI). Following necropsy, inoculated tibiae were scanned via µCT and bone response to tumor was scored from 0 (no ectopic mineralization/osteolysis) to 5 (extensive ectopic mineralization/osteolysis). OVX mice had higher tibial pathology scores indicative of more extensive bone destruction than intact mice, irrespective of letrozole treatment. Letrozole decreased serum estradiol levels and reduced lung surface tumor numbers in intact animals. Furthermore, mice receiving letrozole had significantly fewer tumor colonies and fewer proliferative cells in the lung than OVX and intact controls based on H&E and Ki-67 staining, respectively. In conclusion, BC-inoculated OVX animals had higher tibia pathology scores than BC-inoculated intact animals and letrozole reduced BC metastases to lungs. These findings suggest that, by lowering systemic estrogen level and/or by interacting with the host organ, the aromatase inhibitor letrozole has the potential to reduce ER- BC metastasis to lung. PMID:27209469

  2. Murine breast carcinoma 4T1 cells are more sensitive to atranorin than normal epithelial NMuMG cells in vitro: Anticancer and hepatoprotective effects of atranorin in vivo.

    PubMed

    Solár, Peter; Hrčková, Gabriela; Koptašíková, Lenka; Velebný, Samuel; Solárová, Zuzana; Bačkor, Martin

    2016-04-25

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the anticancer effect of atranorin (ATR) on murine 4T1 breast carcinoma cells and compare its sensitivity with normal mammary epithelial NMuMG cells in vitro. Anti-tumor and hepatoprotective activity of ATR-therapy was examined on mouse model of 4T1-induced cancer disease. ATR significantly reduced clonogenic ability of carcinoma 4T1 cells at the concentration of 75 μM, but clonogenicity of normal NMuMG cells was not affected by any of ATR concentrations tested. Moreover, flow cytometric and BrdU incorporation analysis did not confirm the inhibited entry into S-phase of the cell cyle after ATR incubation, and on the contrary, it induced apoptosis associated with the activation of caspase-3 and PARP cleavage in 4T1 cells. Although ATR did not cause any significant changes in Bcl-xL protein expression in NMuMG cells, an apparent depletion of Bcl-xL protein in 4T1 cells after 48 h ATR therapy was confirmed. Based on this result as well as the result of the total cell number decline, we can conclude that 4T1 cells are more sensitive to ATR therapy than NMuMG cells. ATR administration resulted in significantly longer survival time of BALB/c mice inoculated with 4T1 cells, what was associated with reduced tumor size and the higher numbers of apoptotic 4T1 cells. No differences were recorded in the number of BrdU-positive tumor cells between ATR-treated group and controls. Results indicate that ATR has rather proapoptotic than antiproliferative effect on 4T1 cells in vitro and in vivo and normal NMuMG cells are less sensitive to ATR. Furthermore, our studies revealed protective effect of ATR against oxidative stress in the livers of the tumor-bearing mice. PMID:26969521

  3. Murine breast carcinoma 4T1 cells are more sensitive to atranorin than normal epithelial NMuMG cells in vitro: Anticancer and hepatoprotective effects of atranorin in vivo.

    PubMed

    Solár, Peter; Hrčková, Gabriela; Koptašíková, Lenka; Velebný, Samuel; Solárová, Zuzana; Bačkor, Martin

    2016-04-25

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the anticancer effect of atranorin (ATR) on murine 4T1 breast carcinoma cells and compare its sensitivity with normal mammary epithelial NMuMG cells in vitro. Anti-tumor and hepatoprotective activity of ATR-therapy was examined on mouse model of 4T1-induced cancer disease. ATR significantly reduced clonogenic ability of carcinoma 4T1 cells at the concentration of 75 μM, but clonogenicity of normal NMuMG cells was not affected by any of ATR concentrations tested. Moreover, flow cytometric and BrdU incorporation analysis did not confirm the inhibited entry into S-phase of the cell cyle after ATR incubation, and on the contrary, it induced apoptosis associated with the activation of caspase-3 and PARP cleavage in 4T1 cells. Although ATR did not cause any significant changes in Bcl-xL protein expression in NMuMG cells, an apparent depletion of Bcl-xL protein in 4T1 cells after 48 h ATR therapy was confirmed. Based on this result as well as the result of the total cell number decline, we can conclude that 4T1 cells are more sensitive to ATR therapy than NMuMG cells. ATR administration resulted in significantly longer survival time of BALB/c mice inoculated with 4T1 cells, what was associated with reduced tumor size and the higher numbers of apoptotic 4T1 cells. No differences were recorded in the number of BrdU-positive tumor cells between ATR-treated group and controls. Results indicate that ATR has rather proapoptotic than antiproliferative effect on 4T1 cells in vitro and in vivo and normal NMuMG cells are less sensitive to ATR. Furthermore, our studies revealed protective effect of ATR against oxidative stress in the livers of the tumor-bearing mice.

  4. Prevention of Metastasis in a 4T1 Murine Breast Cancer Model by Doxorubicin Carried by Folate Conjugated pH Sensitive Polymeric Micelles

    PubMed Central

    Gao, Zhong-Gao; Tian, Li; Hu, Jun; Park, In-Suh; Bae, You Han

    2011-01-01

    This study primarily focused on the anti-metastatic activity of doxorubicin (DOX) loaded in a pH-sensitive mixed polymeric micelle formed from two block polymers: poly(L-lactide) (PLLA) (Mn 3000)-b-poly(ethylene glycol) (PEG) (Mn 2000)-folate and poly(L-histidine) (PHis) (Mn 4700)-b-PEG (Mn 2000). Tumor formation and metastasis in mice were examined using a murine mammary carcinoma cell of 4T1 which is one of the most aggressive metastatic cancer cell lines. The efficacy was evaluated by tumor size, body weight change, survival rate, dorsal skin fold window chamber model, and histological observation of the lung, heart, liver and spleen after treatment with various DOX formulations. When the tumor reached 50–100 mm3 in size, the mice were treated by 4 times at a 3-day interval at a dose of 10 mg DOX/kg. The mixed micelle formulation resulted in retarded tumor growth, no weight loss, and no death for 4–5 weeks. In another set of the in vivo test for histological evaluation of the organs, the mice were similarly treated but the formulations were injected one day after 4T1 cell inoculation. The treatment by DOX loaded mixed micelle showed no apparent metastasis till 28 days. However, significant metastasis to the lung and heart was observed on Day 28 when the mice were treated with DOX carried by PBS, PLLA-b-PEG micelle and PHis-b-PEG micelle. PMID:21295088

  5. Secretion of N- and O-linked Glycoproteins from 4T1 Murine Mammary Carcinoma Cells.

    PubMed

    Phang, Wai-Mei; Tan, Aik-Aun; Gopinath, Subash C B; Hashim, Onn H; Kiew, Lik Voon; Chen, Yeng

    2016-01-01

    Breast cancer is one of the most common cancers that affect women globally and accounts for ~23% of all cancers diagnosed in women. Breast cancer is also one of the leading causes of death primarily due to late stage diagnoses and a lack of effective treatments. Therefore, discovering protein expression biomarkers is mandatory for early detection and thus, critical for successful therapy. Two-dimensional electrophoresis (2D-E) coupled with lectin-based analysis followed by mass spectrometry were applied to identify potential biomarkers in the secretions of a murine mammary carcinoma cell line. Comparisons of the protein profiles of the murine 4T1 mammary carcinoma cell line and a normal murine MM3MG mammary cell line indicated that cadherin-1 (CDH), collagenase 3 (MMP-13), Viral envelope protein G7e (VEP), Gag protein (GAG) and Hypothetical protein LOC433182 (LOC) were uniquely expressed by the 4T1 cells, and pigment epithelium-derived factor (PEDF) was exclusively secreted by the MM3MG cells. Further analysis by a lectin-based study revealed that aberrant O-glycosylated CDH, N-glycosylated MMP-13 and LOC were present in the 4T1 medium. These differentially expressed N- and O-linked glycoprotein candidates, which were identified by combining lectin-based analysis with 2D-E, could serve as potential diagnostic and prognostic markers for breast cancer. PMID:27226773

  6. Secretion of N- and O-linked Glycoproteins from 4T1 Murine Mammary Carcinoma Cells

    PubMed Central

    Phang, Wai-Mei; Tan, Aik-Aun; Gopinath, Subash C.B.; Hashim, Onn H.; Kiew, Lik Voon; Chen, Yeng

    2016-01-01

    Breast cancer is one of the most common cancers that affect women globally and accounts for ~23% of all cancers diagnosed in women. Breast cancer is also one of the leading causes of death primarily due to late stage diagnoses and a lack of effective treatments. Therefore, discovering protein expression biomarkers is mandatory for early detection and thus, critical for successful therapy. Two-dimensional electrophoresis (2D-E) coupled with lectin-based analysis followed by mass spectrometry were applied to identify potential biomarkers in the secretions of a murine mammary carcinoma cell line. Comparisons of the protein profiles of the murine 4T1 mammary carcinoma cell line and a normal murine MM3MG mammary cell line indicated that cadherin-1 (CDH), collagenase 3 (MMP-13), Viral envelope protein G7e (VEP), Gag protein (GAG) and Hypothetical protein LOC433182 (LOC) were uniquely expressed by the 4T1 cells, and pigment epithelium-derived factor (PEDF) was exclusively secreted by the MM3MG cells. Further analysis by a lectin-based study revealed that aberrant O-glycosylated CDH, N-glycosylated MMP-13 and LOC were present in the 4T1 medium. These differentially expressed N- and O-linked glycoprotein candidates, which were identified by combining lectin-based analysis with 2D-E, could serve as potential diagnostic and prognostic markers for breast cancer. PMID:27226773

  7. Lx2-32c–loaded polymeric micelles with small size for intravenous drug delivery and their inhibitory effect on tumor growth and metastasis in clinically associated 4T1 murine breast cancer

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Li-qing; Huang, Wei; Gao, Zhong-gao; Fang, Wei-shuo; Jin, Ming-ji

    2016-01-01

    Lx2-32c is a novel taxane derivative with a strong antitumor activity. In this study, we developed Lx2-32c–loaded polymeric micelles (Lx2-32c-PMs) with small size and investigated their antitumor efficacy against tumor growth and metastasis on 4T1 murine breast cancer cell line with Cremophor EL–based Lx2-32c solution as the control. In this study, copolymer monomethoxy polyethylene glycol2000–polylactide1300 was used to prepare Lx2-32c-PMs by film hydration method, and their physicochemical properties were characterized as well, according to morphology, particle size, zeta potential, in vitro drug release, and reconstitution stability. Under confocal laser scanning microscopy, it was observed that Lx2-32c-PMs could be effectively taken up by 4T1 cells in a time-dependent manner. Cell Counting Kit-8 assay showed that the IC50 of Lx2-32c-PMs was 0.3827 nM. Meanwhile, Lx2-32c-PMs had better ability to promote apoptosis and induce G2/M cycle block and polyploidy formation, compared with Lx2-32c solution. More importantly, in vivo animal studies showed that compared to Lx2-32c solution, Lx2-32c-PMs possessed better ability not only to effectively inhibit the tumor growth, but also to significantly suppress spontaneous and postoperative metastasis to distant organs in 4T1 orthotopic tumor-bearing mice. Consequently, Lx2-32c-PMs have significantly prolonged the survival lifetime of tumor-bearing mice. Thus, our study reveals that Lx2-32c-PMs had favorable antitumor activity and exhibited a good prospect for application in the field of antitumor therapy. PMID:27799769

  8. Adjuvant Effect of Biogenic Selenium Nanoparticles Improves the Immune Responses and Survival of Mice Receiving 4T1 Cell Antigens as Vaccine in Breast Cancer Murine Model.

    PubMed

    Yazdi, Mohammad Hossein; Varastehmoradi, Bardia; Faghfuri, Elnaz; Mavandadnejad, Faranak; Mahdavi, Mehdi; Shahverdi, Ahmad Reza

    2015-12-01

    The modification of tumor-associated antigen-based vaccine to elicit a more robust immune response has been addressed in several ways. In the present work, we aimed to investigate the immunomodulatory effect of selenium nanoparticles as an immunoadjuvant in formulation of a tumor-associated antigen-based vaccine in a preventive form. Fortyfive female inbred BALB/c mice five-to-seven weeks old were used and divided into three groups of test and control, each containing fifteen mice. Group one injected by PBS and used as a control. Group two injected by breast tumor cell lysate alone as vaccine. Group three injected by SeNPs with tumor cell lysate as vaccine. All injections were carried out on day fourteen, twentyone and twentyeight of the study. Tumor induction was done at day thirty. Twenty days after tumor induction serum samples were gathered to measure the cytokine assay. Tumor growth and weight of mice as well as delayed type hyper sensitivity (DTH) response were monitored during the study. Results of the present work showed a significant increase in the level of serum IFN-γ, IL-2, IL-12 and decreased TGF-β in SeNPs/vaccine injected mice as well as lower tumor volume, more potent DTH responses and longer survival rate in comparison to control and tumor lysate vaccine. Taken together, it can be deduced from this work that SeNPs can be considered as an adjuvant in vaccine in triggering robust immune response against breast cancer. But further evaluations are still needed to find the best formula for this agent in antitumor vaccines. PMID:26682463

  9. Selection of Novel Peptides Homing the 4T1 CELL Line: Exploring Alternative Targets for Triple Negative Breast Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Nobrega, Franklin L.; Martins, Ivone M.

    2016-01-01

    The use of bacteriophages to select novel ligands has been widely explored for cancer therapy. Their application is most warranted in cancer subtypes lacking knowledge on how to target the cancer cells in question, such as the triple negative breast cancer, eventually leading to the development of alternative nanomedicines for cancer therapeutics. Therefore, the following study aimed to select and characterize novel peptides for a triple negative breast cancer murine mammary carcinoma cell line– 4T1. Using phage display, 7 and 12 amino acid random peptide libraries were screened against the 4T1 cell line. A total of four rounds, plus a counter-selection round using the 3T3 murine fibroblast cell line, was performed. The enriched selective peptides were characterized and their binding capacity towards 4T1 tissue samples was confirmed by immunofluorescence and flow cytometry analysis. The selected peptides (4T1pep1 –CPTASNTSC and 4T1pep2—EVQSSKFPAHVS) were enriched over few rounds of selection and exhibited specific binding to the 4T1 cell line. Interestingly, affinity to the human MDA-MB-231 cell line was also observed for both peptides, promoting the translational application of these novel ligands between species. Additionally, bioinformatics analysis suggested that both peptides target human Mucin-16. This protein has been implicated in different types of cancer, as it is involved in many important cellular functions. This study strongly supports the need of finding alternative targeting systems for TNBC and the peptides herein selected exhibit promising future application as novel homing peptides for breast cancer therapy. PMID:27548261

  10. Selection of Novel Peptides Homing the 4T1 CELL Line: Exploring Alternative Targets for Triple Negative Breast Cancer.

    PubMed

    Silva, Vera L; Ferreira, Debora; Nobrega, Franklin L; Martins, Ivone M; Kluskens, Leon D; Rodrigues, Ligia R

    2016-01-01

    The use of bacteriophages to select novel ligands has been widely explored for cancer therapy. Their application is most warranted in cancer subtypes lacking knowledge on how to target the cancer cells in question, such as the triple negative breast cancer, eventually leading to the development of alternative nanomedicines for cancer therapeutics. Therefore, the following study aimed to select and characterize novel peptides for a triple negative breast cancer murine mammary carcinoma cell line- 4T1. Using phage display, 7 and 12 amino acid random peptide libraries were screened against the 4T1 cell line. A total of four rounds, plus a counter-selection round using the 3T3 murine fibroblast cell line, was performed. The enriched selective peptides were characterized and their binding capacity towards 4T1 tissue samples was confirmed by immunofluorescence and flow cytometry analysis. The selected peptides (4T1pep1 -CPTASNTSC and 4T1pep2-EVQSSKFPAHVS) were enriched over few rounds of selection and exhibited specific binding to the 4T1 cell line. Interestingly, affinity to the human MDA-MB-231 cell line was also observed for both peptides, promoting the translational application of these novel ligands between species. Additionally, bioinformatics analysis suggested that both peptides target human Mucin-16. This protein has been implicated in different types of cancer, as it is involved in many important cellular functions. This study strongly supports the need of finding alternative targeting systems for TNBC and the peptides herein selected exhibit promising future application as novel homing peptides for breast cancer therapy. PMID:27548261

  11. Rejection of metastatic 4T1 breast cancer by attenuation of Treg cells in combination with immune stimulation.

    PubMed

    Chen, Li; Huang, Tian-Gui; Meseck, Marcia; Mandeli, John; Fallon, John; Woo, Savio L C

    2007-12-01

    4T1 breast carcinoma is a highly malignant and poorly immunogenic murine tumor model that resembles advanced breast cancer in humans, and is refractory to most immune stimulation-based treatments. We hypothesize that the ineffectiveness of immune stimulatory treatment is mediated by the suppressive effects of CD4(+)CD25(+) regulatory T (Treg) cells, which can be attenuated by engaging the glucocorticoid-induced tumor necrosis factor receptor family-related protein with its natural ligand (GITRL); further, combination treatment with existing immune stimulation regimens will augment anti-tumor immunity and eradicate metastatic 4T1 tumors in mice.A soluble homodimeric form of mouse GITRL (mIg-mGITRLs) was molecularly constructed and used to treat orthotopic 4T1 tumors established in immune-competent, syngeneic Balb/c mice. When applied in combination with adenovirus-mediated intratumoral murine granulocyte macrophage colony stimulating factor (GM-CSF) and interleukin-12 (IL-12) gene delivery plus systemic 4-1BB activation, mIg-mGITRLs attenuated the immune-suppressive function of splenic Treg cells, which led to elevated interferon-gamma (IFN-gamma) production, tumor-specific cytolytic T-cell activities, tumor rejection and long-term survival in 65% of the animals without apparent toxicities. The results demonstrate that addition of mIg-mGITRLs to an immune-stimulatory treatment regimen significantly improved long-term survival without apparent toxicity, and could potentially be clinically translated into an effective and safe treatment modality for metastatic breast cancer in patients. PMID:17968355

  12. Aspirin Breaks the Crosstalk between 3T3-L1 Adipocytes and 4T1 Breast Cancer Cells by Regulating Cytokine Production.

    PubMed

    Hsieh, Chia-Chien; Huang, Yu-Shan

    2016-01-01

    Breast cancer is one of the most common cancers in women worldwide. The obesity process is normally accompanied by chronic, low-grade inflammation. Infiltration by inflammatory cytokines and immune cells provides a favorable microenvironment for tumor growth, migration, and metastasis. Epidemiological evidence has shown that aspirin is an effective agent against several types of cancer. The aim of this study is to investigate the anti-inflammatory and anti-cancer effects of aspirin on 3T3-L1 adipocytes, 4T1 murine breast cancer cells, and their crosstalk. The results showed that aspirin treatment inhibited differentiation and lipid accumulation by 3T3-L1 preadipocytes, and decreased the secretion of the inflammatory adipokine MCP-1 after stimulation with tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-α or conditioned medium from RAW264.7 cells. In 4T1 cells, treatment with aspirin decreased cell viability and migration, possibly by suppressing MCP-1 and VEGF secretion. Subsequently, culture of 4T1 cells in 3T3-L1 adipocyte-conditioned medium (Ad-CM) and co-culture of 3T3-L1 and 4T1 cells using a transwell plate were performed to clarify the relationship between these two cell lines. Aspirin exerted its inhibitory effects in the transwell co-culture system, as well as the conditioned-medium model. Aspirin treatment significantly inhibited the proliferation of 4T1 cells, and decreased the production of MCP-1 and PAI-1 in both the Ad-CM model and co-culture system. Aspirin inhibited inflammatory MCP-1 adipokine production by 3T3-L1 adipocytes and the cell growth and migration of 4T1 cells. It also broke the crosstalk between these two cell lines, possibly contributing to its chemopreventive properties in breast cancer. This is the first report that aspirin's chemopreventive activity supports the potential application in auxiliary therapy against obesity-related breast cancer development. PMID:26794215

  13. Aspirin Breaks the Crosstalk between 3T3-L1 Adipocytes and 4T1 Breast Cancer Cells by Regulating Cytokine Production.

    PubMed

    Hsieh, Chia-Chien; Huang, Yu-Shan

    2016-01-01

    Breast cancer is one of the most common cancers in women worldwide. The obesity process is normally accompanied by chronic, low-grade inflammation. Infiltration by inflammatory cytokines and immune cells provides a favorable microenvironment for tumor growth, migration, and metastasis. Epidemiological evidence has shown that aspirin is an effective agent against several types of cancer. The aim of this study is to investigate the anti-inflammatory and anti-cancer effects of aspirin on 3T3-L1 adipocytes, 4T1 murine breast cancer cells, and their crosstalk. The results showed that aspirin treatment inhibited differentiation and lipid accumulation by 3T3-L1 preadipocytes, and decreased the secretion of the inflammatory adipokine MCP-1 after stimulation with tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-α or conditioned medium from RAW264.7 cells. In 4T1 cells, treatment with aspirin decreased cell viability and migration, possibly by suppressing MCP-1 and VEGF secretion. Subsequently, culture of 4T1 cells in 3T3-L1 adipocyte-conditioned medium (Ad-CM) and co-culture of 3T3-L1 and 4T1 cells using a transwell plate were performed to clarify the relationship between these two cell lines. Aspirin exerted its inhibitory effects in the transwell co-culture system, as well as the conditioned-medium model. Aspirin treatment significantly inhibited the proliferation of 4T1 cells, and decreased the production of MCP-1 and PAI-1 in both the Ad-CM model and co-culture system. Aspirin inhibited inflammatory MCP-1 adipokine production by 3T3-L1 adipocytes and the cell growth and migration of 4T1 cells. It also broke the crosstalk between these two cell lines, possibly contributing to its chemopreventive properties in breast cancer. This is the first report that aspirin's chemopreventive activity supports the potential application in auxiliary therapy against obesity-related breast cancer development.

  14. Suppressive effects of a proton beam on tumor growth and lung metastasis through the inhibition of metastatic gene expression in 4T1 orthotopic breast cancer model.

    PubMed

    Kwon, Yun-Suk; Lee, Kyu-Shik; Chun, So-Young; Jang, Tae Jung; Nam, Kyung-Soo

    2016-07-01

    A proton beam is a next generation tool to treat intractable cancer. Although the therapeutic effects of a proton beam are well known, the effect on tumor metastasis is not fully described. Here, we investigated the effects of a proton beam on metastasis in highly invasive 4T1 murine breast cancer cells and their orthotopic breast cancer model. Cells were irradiated with 2, 4, 8 or 16 Gy proton beam, and changes in cell proliferation, survival, and migration were observed by MTT, colony forming and wound healing assays. 4T1 breast cancer cell-implanted BALB/c mice were established and the animals were randomly divided into 4 groups when tumor size reached 200 mm3. Breast tumors were selectively irradiated with 10, 20 or 30 Gy proton beam. Breast tumor sizes were measured twice a week, and breast tumor and lung tissues were pathologically observed. Metastasis-regulating gene expression was assessed with quantitative RT-PCR. A proton beam dose-dependently decreased cell proliferation, survival and migration in 4T1 murine breast cancer cells. Also, growth of breast tumors in the 4T1 orthotopic breast cancer model was significantly suppressed by proton beam irradiation without significant change of body weight. Furthermore, fewer tumor nodules metastasized from breast tumor into lung in mice irradiated with 30 Gy proton beam, but not with 10 and 20 Gy, than in control. We observed correspondingly lower expression levels of urokinase plasminogen activator (uPA), uPA receptor, cyclooxygenase (COX)-2, and vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF), which are important factors in cancer metastasis, in breast tumor irradiated with 30 Gy proton beam. Proton beam irradiation did not affect expressions of matrix metalloproteinase (MMP)-9 and MMP-2. Taken together, the data suggest that, although proton beam therapy is an effective tool for breast cancer treatment, a suitable dose is necessary to prevent metastasis-linked relapse and poor prognosis. PMID:27176787

  15. Mono- and Combined Therapy of Metastasizing Breast Carcinoma 4T1 with Zoledronic Acid and Doxorubicin.

    PubMed

    Baklaushev, V P; Grinenko, N F; Yusubalieva, G M; Gubskii, I L; Burenkov, M S; Rabinovich, E Z; Ivanova, N V; Chekhonin, V P

    2016-08-01

    The efficiency of monotherapy with zoledronic acid (Resorba), doxorubicin, and their combination was studied on the model of metastasizing breast carcinoma in BALB/c mice. Doxorubicin monotherapy was accompanied by a significant increase in median survival up to 57 days (vs. 34 and 35 days in control groups); 27% animals survived for 90 days (duration of the study). Bioluminescence area of the primary tumor significantly decreased on days 21 and 28; the total number of visceral metastases also decreased according to magnetic-resonance imaging data. Resorba monotherapy produced no general toxic effect, the median survival increased to 64 days, and 90-day survival was 33%. Imaging techniques (magnetic-resonance imaging, microtomography, bioluminescent analysis) showed that Resorba delayed the development of the primary tumor (regression of luminescence area on days 21 and 28, regression of standardized bioluminescence intensity on day 28) and significantly reduced the number of visceral metastases in comparison with the control. Combination therapy was less effective than monotherapy with the same medications. Median survival was 55 days, 90-day survival was 13%, but magnetic-resonance imaging and bioluminescence analysis after combination therapy also showed delayed growth of the primary tumor and reduced number of visceral metastases. Microtomography revealed bone metastases in ~30% animals of the control group; in experimental groups, no bone metastases were found. The experiment with periosteal (distal epiphysis of the femur) injection of 4T1-Luc2 tumor cells demonstrated pronounced selective effectiveness of Resorba in relation to bone metastases. Monotherapy with Resorba can prevent the development of not only bone, but also visceral metastases of breast cancer. PMID:27590765

  16. Anticancer Activity of Saponins from Allium chinense against the B16 Melanoma and 4T1 Breast Carcinoma Cell

    PubMed Central

    Yu, Zhihui; Zhang, Tong; Zhou, Fengjuan; Xiao, Xiuqing; Ding, Xuezhi; He, Hao; Rang, Jie; Quan, Meifang; Wang, Ting; Zuo, Mingxing; Xia, Liqiu

    2015-01-01

    The cytotoxic substance of A. chinense saponins (ACSs) was isolated using ethanol extraction and purified with the D101 macroporous adsorption resin approach. We investigated the anticancer activity of ACSs in the B16 melanoma and 4T1 breast carcinoma cell lines. Methylthioninium chloride and hematoxylin-eosin staining with Giemsa dyestuff were used when the cells were treated with ACSs. The results showed that the cells morphologies changed significantly; ACSs induced cell death in B16 and 4T1 cells based on acridine orange/ethidium bromide double fluorescence staining, with the number and degree of apoptotic tumor cells increasing as ACS concentration increased. ACSs inhibited the proliferation of B16 and 4T1 cells in a dose-dependent manner. They also inhibited cell migration and colony formation and exhibited a concentration-dependent effect. In addition, ACSs apparently inhibited the growth of melanoma in vivo. The preliminary antitumor in vivo assay revealed that early medication positively affected tumor inhibition action and effectively protected the liver and spleen of C57 BL/6 mice from injury. This study provides evidence for the cytotoxicity of ACSs and a strong foundation for further research to establish the theoretical basis for cell death and help in the design and development of new anticancer drugs. PMID:26146506

  17. Stromal Integrin α11β1 Affects RM11 Prostate and 4T1 Breast Xenograft Tumors Differently

    PubMed Central

    Skogstrand, Trude; Sortland, Kristina; Schmid, Marei Caroline; Reed, Rolf K.; Stuhr, Linda

    2016-01-01

    Purpose It has been implied that the collagen binding integrin α11β1 plays a role in carcinogenesis. As still relatively little is known about how the stromal integrin α11β1 affects different aspects of tumor development, we wanted to examine the direct effects on primary tumor growth, fibrosis, tumor interstitial fluid pressure (PIF) and metastasis in murine 4T1 mammary and RM11 prostate tumors, using an in vivo SCID integrin α11-deficient mouse model. Methods Tumor growth was measured using a caliper, PIF by the wick-in-needle technique, activated fibroblasts by α-SMA immunofluorescence staining and fibrosis by transmission electron microscopy and picrosirius-red staining. Metastases were evaluated using hematoxylin and eosin stained sections. Results RM11 tumor growth was significantly reduced in the SCID integrin α11-deficient (α11-KO) compared to in SCID integrin α11 wild type (WT) mice, whereas there was no similar effect in the 4T1 tumor model. The 4T1 model demonstrated an alteration in collagen fibril diameter in the integrin α11-KO mice compared to WT, which was not found in the RM11 model. There were no significant differences in the amount of activated fibroblasts, total collagen content, collagen organization or PIF in the tumors in integrin α11-deficient mice compared to WT mice. There was also no difference in lung metastases between the two groups. Conclusion Deficiency of stromal integrin α11β1 showed different effects on tumor growth and collagen fibril diameter depending on tumor type, but no effect on tumor PIF or development of lung metastasis. PMID:26990302

  18. Downregulation of CD73 in 4T1 breast cancer cells through siRNA-loaded chitosan-lactate nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Jadidi-Niaragh, Farhad; Atyabi, Fatemeh; Rastegari, Ali; Mollarazi, Esmail; Kiani, Melika; Razavi, Alireza; Yousefi, Mehdi; Kheshtchin, Nasim; Hassannia, Hadi; Hadjati, Jamshid; Shokri, Fazel

    2016-06-01

    The immunosuppressive factors in tumor microenvironment enhance tumor growth and suppress anti-tumor immune responses. Adenosine is an important immunosuppressive factor which can be secreted by both tumor and immune cells trough action of two cell surface ecto-nucleotidase molecules CD39 and CD73. Blocking the adenosine generating molecules has emerged as an effective immunotherapeutic approach for treatment of cancer. In this study, CD73-siRNA encapsulated into chitosan-lactate (ChLa) nanoparticles (NPs) was employed to suppress the expression of CD73 molecule on 4T1 breast tumor cells, in vitro. ChLa NPs were generated through ionic gelation of ChLa by tripolyphosphate (TPP). Small interfering RNA (SiRNA)-loaded NPs had about 100 nm size with a polydispersive index below 0.3 and a zeta potential about 13. Our results showed that ChLa NPs with Ch 50 kDa exhibit the best physicochemical features with the high siRNA encapsulation capacity. Synthesized NPs were able to fully bind with siRNA, protect them against serum and heparin degradation, and promote the transfection process. While the NPs exhibited low toxicity during 72 h cell culture, the transfection of Ch-plasmid expressing green fluorescent protein (pEGFP) NPs was efficient in 4T1 cells with a transfection rate of 53.6 % as detected by flow cytometry. In addition, CD73-siRNA-loaded ChLa NPs could efficiently suppress the expression of CD73 as assayed by real-time polymerase chain reaction and flow cytometry. As a conclusion, CD73-siRNA-loaded ChLa NPs may be considered as a promising therapeutic tool for cancer therapy; however, further in vivo investigations are necessary.

  19. In vivo antitumor and antimetastatic effects of flavokawain B in 4T1 breast cancer cell-challenged mice

    PubMed Central

    Abu, Nadiah; Mohamed, Nurul Elyani; Yeap, Swee Keong; Lim, Kian Lam; Akhtar, M Nadeem; Zulfadli, Aimi Jamil; Kee, Beh Boon; Abdullah, Mohd Puad; Omar, Abdul Rahman; Alitheen, Noorjahan Banu

    2015-01-01

    Flavokawain B (FKB) is a naturally occurring chalcone that can be isolated through the root extracts of the kava-kava plant (Piper methysticum). It can also be synthesized chemically to increase the yield. This compound is a promising candidate as a biological agent, as it is reported to be involved in a wide range of biological activities. Furthermore, FKB was reported to have antitumorigenic effects in several cancer cell lines in vitro. However, the in vivo antitumor effects of FKB have not been reported on yet. Breast cancer is one of the major causes of cancer-related deaths in the world today. Any potential treatment should not only impede the growth of the tumor, but also modulate the immune system efficiently and inhibit the formation of secondary tumors. As presented in our study, FKB induced apoptosis in 4T1 tumors in vivo, as evidenced by the terminal deoxynucleotidyl transferase dUTP nick end labeling and hematoxylin and eosin staining of the tumor. FKB also regulated the immune system by increasing both helper and cytolytic T-cell and natural killer cell populations. In addition, FKB also enhanced the levels of interleukin 2 and interferon gamma but suppressed interleukin 1B. Apart from that, FKB was also found to inhibit metastasis, as evaluated by clonogenic assay, bone marrow smearing assay, real-time polymerase chain reaction, Western blot, and proteome profiler analysis. All in all, FKB may serve as a promising anticancer agent, especially in treating breast cancer. PMID:25834398

  20. Elimination of the chemotherapy resistant subpopulation of 4T1 mouse breast cancer by haploidentical NK cells cures the vast majority of mice.

    PubMed

    Frings, Peter W H; Van Elssen, Catharina H M J; Wieten, Lotte; Matos, Catarina; Hupperets, Pierre S J G; Schouten, Harry C; Bos, Gerard M J; van Gelder, Michel

    2011-12-01

    Metastatic breast cancer is currently incurable despite initial responsiveness, assumingly due to the presence of chemoresistant subpopulations that can be characterized as label retaining cells (LRC). In the 4T1 mouse breast cancer model, we previously achieved cure after Cyclophosphamide and Total Body Irradiation (CY + TBI) followed by haploidentical bone marrow and spleen transplantation (BMSPLT). CY + TBI without transplantation induced only transient impaired tumor growth indicating a critical role of donor immune cells. As it remained unknown if the 4T1 model resembles human disease with respect to the presence of subpopulations of chemoresistant LRC, we now demonstrate this is indeed the case. Chemoresistance of 4T1 LRC was demonstrated by in vitro co-incubation of fluorescently labeled 4T1 cells in limiting dilution with cyclophosphamide, doxorubicin or cisplatinum, after which only LRC containing colonies remained. LRC also remain in vivo after treatment with CY + TBI. Succeeding experiments set up to identify the haploidentical effector cell responsible for cure and, therefore, for the elimination of chemoresistant LRC designate donor NK cells crucial for the anti-tumor effect. NK cell depletion of the haploidentical graft fully abrogated the anti-tumor effect. Increased disease-free survival retained after transplantation of haploidentical bone marrow and NK cell-enriched spleen cell grafts, even in the absence of donor T-cells or of donor bone marrow. Tumor growth analysis indicates the anti-tumor effect being immediate (days). Based on these data, it is worthwhile to explore alloreactive adoptive NK cell therapy as consolidation for patients with metastasized breast cancer. PMID:21274621

  1. Escherichia coli Nissle 1917 Targets and Restrains Mouse B16 Melanoma and 4T1 Breast Tumors through Expression of Azurin Protein

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Yunlei; Zhang, Youming; Zhang, Xiangli; Ding, Xuezhi; Yan, Fu; Wu, Feng

    2012-01-01

    Many studies have demonstrated that intravenously administered bacteria can target and proliferate in solid tumors and then quickly be released from other organs. Here, we employed the tumor-targeting property of Escherichia coli Nissle 1917 to inhibit mouse B16 melanoma and 4T1 breast tumors through the expression of azurin protein. For this purpose, recombinant azurin-expressing E. coli Nissle 1917 was developed. The levels of in vitro and in vivo azurin secretion in the engineered bacterium were determined by immunochemistry. Our results demonstrated that B16 melanoma and orthotopic 4T1 breast tumor growth were remarkably restrained and pulmonary metastasis was prevented in immunocompetent mice. It is worth noting that this therapeutic effect partially resulted from the antitumor activity of neutrophils and lymphocytes due to inflammatory responses caused by bacterial infections. No toxicity was observed in the animal during the experiments. This study indicates that E. coli Nissle 1917 could be a potential carrier to deliver antitumor drugs effectively for cancer therapy. PMID:22923405

  2. Radio-photothermal therapy mediated by a single compartment nanoplatform depletes tumor initiating cells and reduces lung metastasis in the orthotopic 4T1 breast tumor model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, Min; Zhao, Jun; Tian, Mei; Song, Shaoli; Zhang, Rui; Gupta, Sanjay; Tan, Dongfeng; Shen, Haifa; Ferrari, Mauro; Li, Chun

    2015-11-01

    Tumor Initiating Cells (TICs) are resistant to radiotherapy and chemotherapy, and are believed to be responsible for tumor recurrence and metastasis. Combination therapies can overcome the limitation of conventional cancer treatments, and have demonstrated promising application in the clinic. Here, we show that dual modality radiotherapy (RT) and photothermal therapy (PTT) mediated by a single compartment nanosystem copper-64-labeled copper sulfide nanoparticles ([64Cu]CuS NPs) could suppress breast tumor metastasis through eradication of TICs. Positron electron tomography (PET) imaging and biodistribution studies showed that more than 90% of [64Cu]CuS NPs was retained in subcutaneously grown BT474 breast tumor 24 h after intratumoral (i.t.) injection, indicating the NPs are suitable for the combination therapy. Combined RT/PTT therapy resulted in significant tumor growth delay in the subcutaneous BT474 breast cancer model. Moreover, RT/PTT treatment significantly prolonged the survival of mice bearing orthotopic 4T1 breast tumors compared to no treatment, RT alone, or PTT alone. The RT/PTT combination therapy significantly reduced the number of tumor nodules in the lung and the formation of tumor mammospheres from treated 4T1 tumors. No obvious side effects of the CuS NPs were noted in the treated mice in a pilot toxicity study. Taken together, our data support the feasibility of a therapeutic approach for the suppression of tumor metastasis through localized RT/PTT therapy.Tumor Initiating Cells (TICs) are resistant to radiotherapy and chemotherapy, and are believed to be responsible for tumor recurrence and metastasis. Combination therapies can overcome the limitation of conventional cancer treatments, and have demonstrated promising application in the clinic. Here, we show that dual modality radiotherapy (RT) and photothermal therapy (PTT) mediated by a single compartment nanosystem copper-64-labeled copper sulfide nanoparticles ([64Cu]CuS NPs) could suppress

  3. Theranostic probe for simultaneous in vivo photoacoustic imaging and confined photothermolysis by pulsed laser at 1064 nm in 4T1 breast cancer model

    PubMed Central

    Zhou, Min; Ku, Geng; Pageon, Laura; Li, Chun

    2015-01-01

    Here, we report that polyethylene glycol (PEG)-coated copper(II) sulfide nanoparticles (PEG-CuS NPs) with their peak absorption tuned to 1064 nm could be used both as a contrast agent for photoacoustic tomographic imaging of mouse tumor vasculature and as a mediator for confined phothermolysis of tumor cells in an orthotopic syngeneic 4T1 breast tumor model. PEG-CuS NPs showed stronger photoacoustic signal than hollow gold nanospheres and single-wall carbon nanotubes at 1064 nm. MicroPET imaging of 4T1 tumor-bearing mice showed a gradual accumulation of the NPs in the tumor over time. About 6.5% of injected dose were taken up in each gram of tumor tissue at 24 h after intravenous injection of 64Cu-labeled PEG-CuS NPs. For both photoacoustic imaging and therapeutic studies, nanosecond (ns)-pulsed laser was delivered with Q-switched Nd:YAG at a wavelength of 1064 nm. Unlike conventional photothermal ablation therapy mediated by continuous wave laser with which heat could spread to the surrounding normal tissue, interaction of CuS NPs with short pulsed laser deliver heat rapidly to the treatment volume keeping the thermal damage confined to the target tissues. Our data demonstrated that it is possible to use a single-compartment nanoplatform to achieve both photoacoustic tomography and highly selective tumor destruction at 1064 nm in small animals. PMID:25379880

  4. Theranostic probe for simultaneous in vivo photoacoustic imaging and confined photothermolysis by pulsed laser at 1064 nm in 4T1 breast cancer model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, Min; Ku, Geng; Pageon, Laura; Li, Chun

    2014-11-01

    Here, we report that polyethylene glycol (PEG)-coated copper(ii) sulfide nanoparticles (PEG-CuS NPs) with their peak absorption tuned to 1064 nm could be used both as a contrast agent for photoacoustic tomographic imaging of mouse tumor vasculature and as a mediator for confined photothermolysis of tumor cells in an orthotopic syngeneic 4T1 breast tumor model. PEG-CuS NPs showed stronger photoacoustic signal than hollow gold nanospheres and single-wall carbon nanotubes at 1064 nm. MicroPET imaging of 4T1 tumor-bearing mice showed a gradual accumulation of the NPs in the tumor over time. About 6.5% of injected dose were taken up in each gram of tumor tissue at 24 h after intravenous injection of 64Cu-labeled PEG-CuS NPs. For both photoacoustic imaging and therapeutic studies, nanosecond (ns)-pulsed laser was delivered with Q-switched Nd:YAG at a wavelength of 1064 nm. Unlike conventional photothermal ablation therapy mediated by continuous wave laser with which heat could spread to the surrounding normal tissue, interaction of CuS NPs with short pulsed laser deliver heat rapidly to the treatment volume keeping the thermal damage confined to the target tissues. Our data demonstrated that it is possible to use a single-compartment nanoplatform to achieve both photoacoustic tomography and highly selective tumor destruction at 1064 nm in small animals.Here, we report that polyethylene glycol (PEG)-coated copper(ii) sulfide nanoparticles (PEG-CuS NPs) with their peak absorption tuned to 1064 nm could be used both as a contrast agent for photoacoustic tomographic imaging of mouse tumor vasculature and as a mediator for confined photothermolysis of tumor cells in an orthotopic syngeneic 4T1 breast tumor model. PEG-CuS NPs showed stronger photoacoustic signal than hollow gold nanospheres and single-wall carbon nanotubes at 1064 nm. MicroPET imaging of 4T1 tumor-bearing mice showed a gradual accumulation of the NPs in the tumor over time. About 6.5% of injected dose were

  5. Licoricidin, an Active Compound in the Hexane/Ethanol Extract of Glycyrrhiza uralensis, Inhibits Lung Metastasis of 4T1 Murine Mammary Carcinoma Cells

    PubMed Central

    Park, So Young; Kwon, Soo Jin; Lim, Soon Sung; Kim, Jin-Kyu; Lee, Ki Won; Park, Jung Han Yoon

    2016-01-01

    Licorice extracts containing glycyrrhizin exhibit anti-carcinogenic properties. Because glycyrrhizin induces severe hypokalemia and hypertension, we prepared a hexane/ethanol extract of Glycyrrhiza uralensis (HEGU) that lacks glycyrrhizin, and showed that HEGU induces apoptosis and G1 cell cycle arrest and inhibits migration of DU145 human prostate cancer cells. Our previous in vitro studies identified two active components in HEGU: isoangustone A, which induces apoptosis and G1 cycle arrest, and licoricidin, which inhibits metastasis. This study examined whether HEGU and licoricidin inhibit metastasis using the 4T1 mammary cancer model. Both HEGU and licoricidin treatment reduced pulmonary metastasis and the expression of CD45, CD31, HIF-1α, iNOS, COX-2, and VEGF-A in tumor tissues. Additionally, a decrease in protein expression of VEGF-R2, VEGF-C, VEGF-R3, and LYVE-1 was noted in tumor tissues of licoricidin-treated mice. Furthermore, the blood concentrations of MMP-9, ICAM-1, VCAM-1, and VEGF-A were decreased in HEGU-treated mice. In vitro 4T1 cell culture results showed that both HEGU and licoricidin inhibited cell migration, MMP-9 secretion, and VCAM expression. The present study demonstrates that the licoricidin in HEGU inhibits lung metastasis of 4T1 mammary carcinoma cells, which may be mediated via inhibition of cancer cell migration, tumor angiogenesis, and lymphangiogenesis. PMID:27314329

  6. Licoricidin, an Active Compound in the Hexane/Ethanol Extract of Glycyrrhiza uralensis, Inhibits Lung Metastasis of 4T1 Murine Mammary Carcinoma Cells.

    PubMed

    Park, So Young; Kwon, Soo Jin; Lim, Soon Sung; Kim, Jin-Kyu; Lee, Ki Won; Park, Jung Han Yoon

    2016-01-01

    Licorice extracts containing glycyrrhizin exhibit anti-carcinogenic properties. Because glycyrrhizin induces severe hypokalemia and hypertension, we prepared a hexane/ethanol extract of Glycyrrhiza uralensis (HEGU) that lacks glycyrrhizin, and showed that HEGU induces apoptosis and G1 cell cycle arrest and inhibits migration of DU145 human prostate cancer cells. Our previous in vitro studies identified two active components in HEGU: isoangustone A, which induces apoptosis and G1 cycle arrest, and licoricidin, which inhibits metastasis. This study examined whether HEGU and licoricidin inhibit metastasis using the 4T1 mammary cancer model. Both HEGU and licoricidin treatment reduced pulmonary metastasis and the expression of CD45, CD31, HIF-1α, iNOS, COX-2, and VEGF-A in tumor tissues. Additionally, a decrease in protein expression of VEGF-R2, VEGF-C, VEGF-R3, and LYVE-1 was noted in tumor tissues of licoricidin-treated mice. Furthermore, the blood concentrations of MMP-9, ICAM-1, VCAM-1, and VEGF-A were decreased in HEGU-treated mice. In vitro 4T1 cell culture results showed that both HEGU and licoricidin inhibited cell migration, MMP-9 secretion, and VCAM expression. The present study demonstrates that the licoricidin in HEGU inhibits lung metastasis of 4T1 mammary carcinoma cells, which may be mediated via inhibition of cancer cell migration, tumor angiogenesis, and lymphangiogenesis. PMID:27314329

  7. PG545, a heparan sulfate mimetic, reduces heparanase expression in vivo, blocks spontaneous metastases and enhances overall survival in the 4T1 breast carcinoma model.

    PubMed

    Hammond, Edward; Brandt, Ralf; Dredge, Keith

    2012-01-01

    PG545 is a clinically relevant heparan sulfate (HS) mimetic which, in addition to possessing anti-angiogenic properties, also acts as a heparanase inhibitor which may differentiate its mechanism(s) of action from approved angiogenesis inhibitors. The degradation of HS by heparanase has been strongly implicated in cell dissemination and the metastatic process. Thus, the anti-metastatic activity of PG545 has been linked to the enzymatic function of heparanase - the only endoglycosidase known to cleave HS, an important component of the extracellular matrix (ECM) which represents a potential avenue for therapeutic intervention for certain metastatic cancer indications. Recent concerns raised about the paucity of overall survival as an endpoint in mouse models of clinically relevant metastasis led us to examine the effect of PG545 on the progression of both primary tumor growth and the spontaneously metastasizing disease in the 4T1 syngeneic breast carcinoma model in a non-surgical and surgical (mastectomy) setting. PG545 significantly inhibited primary tumor growth but importantly also inhibited lung metastasis in treated mice, an effect not observed with the tyrosine kinase inhibitor sorafenib. Importantly, PG545 significantly enhanced overall survival compared to vehicle control and the sorafenib group, suggesting PG545's inhibitory effect on heparanase is indeed a critical attribute to induce anti-metastatic activity. In addition to blocking a common angiogenic signalling pathway in tumor cells, the expression of heparanase in the primary tumor and lung was also significantly reduced by PG545 treatment. These results support the ongoing development of PG545 and highlight the potential utility in metastatic disease settings. PMID:23300607

  8. Hybrid paclitaxel and gold nanorod-loaded human serum albumin nanoparticles for simultaneous chemotherapeutic and photothermal therapy on 4T1 breast cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Peralta, Donna V; Heidari, Zahra; Dash, Srikanta; Tarr, Matthew A

    2015-04-01

    The use of human serum albumin nanoparticles (HSAPs) as a drug carrier system for cancer treatment has proven successful through current marketable clinical formulations. Despite this success, there is a current lack of multifunctional HSAPs, which offer combinational therapies of more than one proven technique. Gold nanorods (AuNRs) have also shown medicinal promise due to their photothermal therapy capabilities. In this study, a desolvation and cross-linking approach was employed to successfully encapsulate gold nanorods into HSAPs simultaneously with the chemotherapeutic drug paclitaxel (PAC); forming PAC-AuNR-HSAPs with desirable overall particle sizes of 299 ± 6 nm. The loading efficiency of paclitaxel into PAC-AuNR-HSAPs reached up to 3 μg PAC/mg HSA. The PAC-AuNR-HSAPs experienced photothermal heating; with the bulk particle solution reaching up to 46 °C after 15 min of near-IR laser exposure. This heat increase marked the successful attainment of the temperature necessary to cause severe cellular hyperthermia and necrosis. The encasement strategy facilitated a colloidal hybrid treatment system capable of enhanced permeability and retention effects, photothermal ablation of cancer cells, and release of the active paclitaxel of up to 188 ng (from PAC-AuNR-HSAPs created with 30 mg HSA) in a single 15 min irradiation session. When treated with PAC-AuNR-HSAPs containing 20 μg PAC/mL particle solution, 4T1 mouse breast cancer cells experienced ∼82% cell death without irradiation and ∼94% cell death after just one irradiation session. The results for PAC-AuNR-HSAPs were better than that of free PAC, which only killed ∼77% of the cells without irradiation and ∼80% with irradiation. The hybrid particle system also lends itself to future customizable external functionalities via conjugated targeting ligands, such as antibodies. Internal entrapment of patient tailored medication combinations are also possible with this combination treatment platform, which

  9. Formulation, Characterization, and Antitumor Properties of Trans- and Cis-Citral in the 4T1 Breast Cancer Xenograft Mouse Model

    PubMed Central

    Zeng, San; Kapur, Arvinder; Patankar, Manish S.; Xiong, May P.

    2015-01-01

    Purpose Citral is composed of a random mixture of two geometric stereoisomers geranial (trans-citral) and neral (cis-citral) yet few studies have directly compared their in vivo antitumor properties. A micelle formulation was therefore developed. Methods Geranial and neral were synthesized. Commercially-purchased citral, geranial, and neral were formulated in PEG-b-PCL (block sizes of 5000:10000, Mw/Mn 1.26) micelles. In vitro degradation, drug release, cytotoxicity, flow cytometry, and western blot studies were conducted. The antitumor properties of drug formulations (40 mg/kg and 80 mg/kg based on MTD studies) were evaluated on the 4T1 xenograft mouse model and tumor tissues were analyzed by western blot. Results Micelles encapsulated drugs with >50% LE at 5-40% drug to polymer (w/w), displayed sustained release (t1/2 of 8-9 hours), and improved drug stability at pH 5.0. The IC50 of drug formulations against 4T1 cells ranged from 1.4-9.9 μM. Western blot revealed that autophagy was the main cause of cytotoxicity. Geranial at 80 mg/kg was most effective at inhibiting tumor growth. Conclusions Geranial is significantly more potent than neral and citral at 80 mg/kg (p<0.001) and western blot of tumor tissues confirms that autophagy and not apoptosis is the major mechanism of tumor growth inhibition in p53-null 4T1 cells. PMID:25673043

  10. Molecular changes in bone marrow, tumor and serum after conductive ablation of murine 4T1 breast carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Przybyla, Beata D; Shafirstein, Gal; Vishal, Sagar J; Dennis, Richard A; Griffin, Robert J

    2014-02-01

    Thermal ablation of solid tumors using conductive interstitial thermal therapy (CITT) produces coagulative necrosis in the center of ablation. Local changes in homeostasis for surviving tumor and systemic changes in circulation and distant organs must be understood and monitored in order to prevent tumor re-growth and metastasis. The purpose of this study was to use a mouse carcinoma model to evaluate molecular changes in the bone marrow and surviving tumor after CITT treatment by quantification of transcripts associated with cancer progression and hyperthermia, serum cytokines, stress proteins and the marrow/tumor cross-talk regulator stromal-derived factor 1. Analysis of 27 genes and 22 proteins with quantitative PCR, ELISA, immunoblotting and multiplex antibody assays revealed that the gene and protein expression in tissue and serum was significantly different between ablated and control mice. The transcripts of four genes (Cxcl12, Sele, Fgf2, Lifr) were significantly higher in the bone marrow of treated mice. Tumors surviving ablation showed significantly lower levels of the Lifr and Sele transcripts. Similarly, the majority of transcripts measured in tumors decreased with treatment. Surviving tumors also contained lower levels of SDF-1α and HIF-1α proteins whereas HSP27 and HSP70 were higher. Of 16 serum chemokines, IFNγ and GM-CSF levels were lower with treatment. These results indicate that CITT ablation causes molecular changes which may slow cancer cell proliferation. However, inhibition of HSP27 may be necessary to control aggressiveness of surviving cancer stem cells. The changes in bone marrow are suggestive of possible increased recruitment of circulatory cancer cells. Therefore, the possibility of heightened bone metastasis after thermal ablation needs to be further investigated and inhibition strategies developed, if warranted.

  11. Low local blood perfusion, high white blood cell and high platelet count are associated with primary tumor growth and lung metastasis in a 4T1 mouse breast cancer metastasis model

    PubMed Central

    WANG, CHUAN; CHEN, YING-GE; GAO, JIAN-LI; LYU, GUI-YUAN; SU, JIE; ZHANG, QI; JI, XIN; YAN, JI-ZHONG; QIU, QIAO-LI; ZHANG, YUE-LI; LI, LIN-ZI; XU, HAN-TING; CHEN, SU-HONG

    2015-01-01

    It was originally thought that no single routine blood test result would be able to indicate whether or not a patient had cancer; however, several novel studies have indicated that the median survival and prognosis of cancer patients were markedly associated with the systemic circulation features of cancer patients. In addition, certain parameters, such as white blood cell (WBC) count, were largely altered in malignant tumors. In the present study, routine blood tests were performed in order to observe the change of blood cells in tumor-bearing mice following the implantation of 4T1 breast cancer cells into the mammary fat pad; in addition, blood flow in breast tumor sites was measured indirectly using laser Doppler perfusion imaging (LDPI), in an attempt to explain the relevance between the blood circulation features and the growth or metastasis of breast cancer in mice model. The LDPI and blood test results indicated that the implantation of 4T1 breast cancer cells into BALB/c mice led to thrombosis as well as high WBC count, high platelet count, high plateletcrit and low blood perfusion. Following implantation of the 4T1 cells for four weeks, the lung metastatic number was determined and the Pearson correlation coefficient revealed that the number of visceral lung metastatic sites had a marked negative association with the ratio of basophils (BASO%; r=-0.512; P<0.01) and the mean corpuscular hemoglobin was significantly correlated with primary tumor weight (r=0.425; P<0.05). In conclusion, the results of the present study demonstrated that tumor growth led to thrombosis and acute anemia in mice; in addition, when blood BASO% was low, an increased number of lung metastases were observed in tumor-bearing mice. PMID:26622565

  12. The in vivo Therapeutic Effect of Free Wanderer Powder ( xiāo yáo sǎn, Xiaoyaosan) on Mice with 4T1 Cell Induced Breast Cancer Model.

    PubMed

    Chen, Wen-Fang; Xu, Li; Yu, Chung-Him; Ho, Chui-Kwan; Wu, Ka; Leung, Gina Cw; Wong, Man-Sau

    2012-01-01

    In the present study, we investigated the therapeutic effect of a classical TCM formula, Free Wanderer Powder ( xiāo yáo sǎn), in a breast cancer mouse model induced with estrogen-insensitive breast cancer 4T1 cells. Ovariectomized Balb/c mice (6-8 weeks) or sham mice were injected into the fourth mammary fat pad with 4T1 cells in which tumors were palpable 7 days after injection. On the eighth day, the mice were divided into 4 groups and tubefed daily with vehicle, Free Wanderer Powder ( xiāo yáo sǎn) formula or tamoxifen for 28 days. Tumor growth inhibition and the decrease of the average tumor mass were most evident in mice treated with Free Wanderer Powder ( xiāo yáo sǎn). Free Wanderer Powder ( xiāo yáo sǎn) treatment significantly reduced Bcl-2 and elevated Bax and p53 protein expressions in breast cancer tumor. These results were further confirmed by immunohistochemisty. Tamoxifen could decrease spleen mass and Bcl-2 protein expression, increase the Bax protein expression as well as exert uterotrophic effects by increasing uterus index and inducing the gene expressions in the uterus. Taken together, these results show that Free Wanderer Powder ( xiāo yáo sǎn) treatment induced apoptosis at protein level and inhibited the tumor growth in 4T1-induced ovariectomized Balb/c female mice, indicating the possibility of its future use for treatment of estrogen-insensitive breast caner.

  13. DNA methyltransferase inhibition increases efficacy of adoptive cellular immunotherapy of murine breast cancer.

    PubMed

    Terracina, Krista P; Graham, Laura J; Payne, Kyle K; Manjili, Masoud H; Baek, Annabel; Damle, Sheela R; Bear, Harry D

    2016-09-01

    Adoptive T cell immunotherapy is a promising approach to cancer treatment that currently has limited clinical applications. DNA methyltransferase inhibitors (DNAMTi) have known potential to affect the immune system through multiple mechanisms that could enhance the cytotoxic T cell responses, including: upregulation of tumor antigen expression, increased MHC class I expression, and blunting of myeloid derived suppressor cells (MDSCs) expansion. In this study, we have investigated the effect of combining the DNAMTi, decitabine, with adoptive T cell immunotherapy in the murine 4T1 mammary carcinoma model. We found that expression of neu, MHC class I molecules, and several murine cancer testis antigens (CTA) was increased by decitabine treatment of 4T1 cells in vitro. Decitabine also increased expression of multiple CTA in two human breast cancer cell lines. Decitabine-treated 4T1 cells stimulated greater IFN-gamma release from tumor-sensitized lymphocytes, implying increased immunogenicity. Expansion of CD11b + Gr1 + MDSC in 4T1 tumor-bearing mice was significantly diminished by decitabine treatment. Decitabine treatment improved the efficacy of adoptive T cell immunotherapy in mice with established 4T1 tumors, with greater inhibition of tumor growth and an increased cure rate. Decitabine may have a role in combination with existing and emerging immunotherapies for breast cancer. PMID:27416831

  14. Curcumin improves the therapeutic efficacy of Listeria(at)-Mage-b vaccine in correlation with improved T-cell responses in blood of a triple-negative breast cancer model 4T1.

    PubMed

    Singh, Manisha; Ramos, Ilyssa; Asafu-Adjei, Denise; Quispe-Tintaya, Wilber; Chandra, Dinesh; Jahangir, Arthee; Zang, Xingxing; Aggarwal, Bharat B; Gravekamp, Claudia

    2013-08-01

    Success of cancer vaccination is strongly hampered by immune suppression in the tumor microenvironment (TME). Interleukin (IL)-6 is particularly and highly produced by triple-negative breast cancer (TNBC) cells, and has been considered as an important contributor to immune suppression in the TME. Therefore, we hypothesized that IL-6 reduction may improve efficacy of vaccination against TNBC cancer through improved T-cell responses. To prove this hypothesis, we investigated the effect of curcumin, an inhibitor of IL-6 production, on vaccination of a highly attenuated Listeria monocytogenes (Listeria(at)), encoding tumor-associated antigens (TAA) Mage-b in a TNBC model 4T1. Two therapeutic vaccination strategies with Listeria(at)-Mage-b and curcumin were tested. The first immunization strategy involved all Listeria(at)-Mage-b vaccinations and curcumin after tumor development. As curcumin has been consumed all over the world, the second immunization strategy involved curcumin before and all therapeutic vaccinations with Listeria(at)-Mage-b after tumor development. Here, we demonstrate that curcumin significantly improves therapeutic efficacy of Listeria(at)-Mage-b with both immunization strategies particularly against metastases in a TNBC model (4T1). The combination therapy was slightly but significantly more effective against the metastases when curcumin was administered before compared to after tumor development. With curcumin before tumor development in the combination therapy, the production of IL-6 was significantly decreased and IL-12 increased by myeloid-derived suppressor cells (MDSC), in correlation with improved CD4 and CD8 T-cell responses in blood. Our study suggests that curcumin improves the efficacy of Listeria(at)-Mage-b vaccine against metastases in TNBC model 4T1 through reversal of tumor-induced immune suppression. PMID:24156030

  15. Curcumin improves the therapeutic efficacy of Listeriaat-Mage-b vaccine in correlation with improved T-cell responses in blood of a triple-negative breast cancer model 4T1

    PubMed Central

    Singh, Manisha; Ramos, Ilyssa; Asafu-Adjei, Denise; Quispe-Tintaya, Wilber; Chandra, Dinesh; Jahangir, Arthee; Zang, Xingxing; Aggarwal, Bharat B; Gravekamp, Claudia

    2013-01-01

    Abstract Success of cancer vaccination is strongly hampered by immune suppression in the tumor microenvironment (TME). Interleukin (IL)-6 is particularly and highly produced by triple-negative breast cancer (TNBC) cells, and has been considered as an important contributor to immune suppression in the TME. Therefore, we hypothesized that IL-6 reduction may improve efficacy of vaccination against TNBC cancer through improved T-cell responses. To prove this hypothesis, we investigated the effect of curcumin, an inhibitor of IL-6 production, on vaccination of a highly attenuated Listeria monocytogenes (Listeriaat), encoding tumor-associated antigens (TAA) Mage-b in a TNBC model 4T1. Two therapeutic vaccination strategies with Listeriaat-Mage-b and curcumin were tested. The first immunization strategy involved all Listeriaat-Mage-b vaccinations and curcumin after tumor development. As curcumin has been consumed all over the world, the second immunization strategy involved curcumin before and all therapeutic vaccinations with Listeriaat-Mage-b after tumor development. Here, we demonstrate that curcumin significantly improves therapeutic efficacy of Listeriaat-Mage-b with both immunization strategies particularly against metastases in a TNBC model (4T1). The combination therapy was slightly but significantly more effective against the metastases when curcumin was administered before compared to after tumor development. With curcumin before tumor development in the combination therapy, the production of IL-6 was significantly decreased and IL-12 increased by myeloid-derived suppressor cells (MDSC), in correlation with improved CD4 and CD8 T-cell responses in blood. Our study suggests that curcumin improves the efficacy of Listeriaat-Mage-b vaccine against metastases in TNBC model 4T1 through reversal of tumor-induced immune suppression. This study is focused on improving cancer vaccination by reducing immune suppression. Here we demonstrate that curcumin improves vaccine

  16. Chemotherapeutic drug-specific alteration of microvascular blood flow in murine breast cancer as measured by diffuse correlation spectroscopy

    PubMed Central

    Ramirez, Gabriel; Proctor, Ashley R.; Jung, Ki Won; Wu, Tong Tong; Han, Songfeng; Adams, Russell R.; Ren, Jingxuan; Byun, Daniel K.; Madden, Kelley S.; Brown, Edward B.; Foster, Thomas H.; Farzam, Parisa; Durduran, Turgut; Choe, Regine

    2016-01-01

    The non-invasive, in vivo measurement of microvascular blood flow has the potential to enhance breast cancer therapy monitoring. Here, longitudinal blood flow of 4T1 murine breast cancer (N=125) under chemotherapy was quantified with diffuse correlation spectroscopy based on layer models. Six different treatment regimens involving doxorubicin, cyclophosphamide, and paclitaxel at clinically relevant doses were investigated. Treatments with cyclophosphamide increased blood flow as early as 3 days after administration, whereas paclitaxel induced a transient blood flow decrease at 1 day after administration. Early blood flow changes correlated strongly with the treatment outcome and distinguished treated from untreated mice individually for effective treatments. PMID:27699124

  17. Chemotherapeutic drug-specific alteration of microvascular blood flow in murine breast cancer as measured by diffuse correlation spectroscopy

    PubMed Central

    Ramirez, Gabriel; Proctor, Ashley R.; Jung, Ki Won; Wu, Tong Tong; Han, Songfeng; Adams, Russell R.; Ren, Jingxuan; Byun, Daniel K.; Madden, Kelley S.; Brown, Edward B.; Foster, Thomas H.; Farzam, Parisa; Durduran, Turgut; Choe, Regine

    2016-01-01

    The non-invasive, in vivo measurement of microvascular blood flow has the potential to enhance breast cancer therapy monitoring. Here, longitudinal blood flow of 4T1 murine breast cancer (N=125) under chemotherapy was quantified with diffuse correlation spectroscopy based on layer models. Six different treatment regimens involving doxorubicin, cyclophosphamide, and paclitaxel at clinically relevant doses were investigated. Treatments with cyclophosphamide increased blood flow as early as 3 days after administration, whereas paclitaxel induced a transient blood flow decrease at 1 day after administration. Early blood flow changes correlated strongly with the treatment outcome and distinguished treated from untreated mice individually for effective treatments.

  18. Primary 4T1 tumor resection provides critical "window of opportunity" for immunotherapy.

    PubMed

    Ghochikyan, Anahit; Davtyan, Arpine; Hovakimyan, Armine; Davtyan, Hayk; Poghosyan, Anna; Bagaev, Alexander; Ataullakhanov, Ravshan I; Nelson, Edward L; Agadjanyan, Michael G

    2014-02-01

    It is believed that primary tumor resection modulates host-tumor immune interaction, but this has not been characterized in a stringent breast cancer tumor model. This report, using the 4T1 murine mammary tumor model, characterizes for the first time the dynamic longitudinal changes in immunosuppressive and effector components of the immune system after resection of an established orthotopic primary tumor with a defined natural history of developing lung metastases. More specifically, we analyzed changes of absolute numbers and frequencies of MDSC, regulatory T cells (Treg), as well as activated CD4 and CD8 positive T cells in spleens and, in some studies, lungs of 4T1 tumor-bearing mice and mice after primary tumor resection. Importantly, using mathematical analyses we established that primary resection of an orthotopic tumor had created a "window of opportunity" with decreased tumor-associated immune suppression that existed for approximately 10 days. Although tumor resection did slightly prolong survival, it did not affect the ultimate development of metastatic disease since animals with resected tumors or intact primary tumors eventually died by day 47 and 43, respectively. This window of opportunity likely occurs in humans providing a rationale and parameters for integration and testing of immunotherapeutic strategies in this critical "window of opportunity" to combat the development of metastatic disease. PMID:24096737

  19. Primary 4T1 tumor resection provides critical "window of opportunity" for immunotherapy.

    PubMed

    Ghochikyan, Anahit; Davtyan, Arpine; Hovakimyan, Armine; Davtyan, Hayk; Poghosyan, Anna; Bagaev, Alexander; Ataullakhanov, Ravshan I; Nelson, Edward L; Agadjanyan, Michael G

    2014-02-01

    It is believed that primary tumor resection modulates host-tumor immune interaction, but this has not been characterized in a stringent breast cancer tumor model. This report, using the 4T1 murine mammary tumor model, characterizes for the first time the dynamic longitudinal changes in immunosuppressive and effector components of the immune system after resection of an established orthotopic primary tumor with a defined natural history of developing lung metastases. More specifically, we analyzed changes of absolute numbers and frequencies of MDSC, regulatory T cells (Treg), as well as activated CD4 and CD8 positive T cells in spleens and, in some studies, lungs of 4T1 tumor-bearing mice and mice after primary tumor resection. Importantly, using mathematical analyses we established that primary resection of an orthotopic tumor had created a "window of opportunity" with decreased tumor-associated immune suppression that existed for approximately 10 days. Although tumor resection did slightly prolong survival, it did not affect the ultimate development of metastatic disease since animals with resected tumors or intact primary tumors eventually died by day 47 and 43, respectively. This window of opportunity likely occurs in humans providing a rationale and parameters for integration and testing of immunotherapeutic strategies in this critical "window of opportunity" to combat the development of metastatic disease.

  20. Distribution and inhibition effect of Seleno-L-Methionine on 4T1 mouse mammary carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Song, Hongjiao; Ren, Xiaomin; Liu, Ping

    2015-01-01

    To identify the relationship between selenium intake and breast cancer progression, SeMet supplement was applied to 4T1 murine mammary carcinoma for 28 days and the effect of SeMet on tumor growth was assessed. Combined with SXRF mapping, trace metal distribution in tumor tissues in relation to selenium-associated protein expressions and cellular transcription factors, HIF-1α accumulation and its targeted molecule expressions involved in tumor progression, were further investigated using immunohistochemical staining. Our results showed that tumor growth was inhibited significantly and tumor cells apoptosis was promoted after SeMet supplement. High Se intakes in tumor tissues overlaid with high iron distribution were observed by SXRF mapping. SeMet supplement increased SBP1 expression and decreased GPx1 expression, and greatly inhibited VEGF expression and tumor immune suppression cells accumulation in tumor tissues. In conclusion, SeMet-mediated anti-cancer effect was likely to inhibit tumor growth through high expression of SBP1 inhibiting GPx1 activity and HIF-1α, which could be used as chemopreventive strategies in breast cancer. PMID:26330897

  1. An improved syngeneic orthotopic murine model of human breast cancer progression.

    PubMed

    Rashid, Omar M; Nagahashi, Masayuki; Ramachandran, Suburamaniam; Dumur, Catherine; Schaum, Julia; Yamada, Akimitsu; Terracina, Krista P; Milstien, Sheldon; Spiegel, Sarah; Takabe, Kazuaki

    2014-10-01

    Breast cancer drug development costs nearly $610 million and 37 months in preclinical mouse model trials with minimal success rates. Despite these inefficiencies, there are still no consensus breast cancer preclinical models. Murine mammary adenocarcinoma 4T1-luc2 cells were implanted subcutaneous (SQ) or orthotopically percutaneous (OP) injection in the area of the nipple, or surgically into the chest 2nd mammary fat pad under direct vision (ODV) in Balb/c immunocompetent mice. Tumor progression was followed by in vivo bioluminescence and direct measurements, pathology and survival determined, and tumor gene expression analyzed by genome-wide microarrays. ODV produced less variable-sized tumors and was a reliable method of implantation. ODV implantation into the chest 2nd mammary pad rather than into the abdominal 4th mammary pad, the most common implantation site, better mimicked human breast cancer progression pattern, which correlated with bioluminescent tumor burden and survival. Compared to SQ, ODV produced tumors that differentially expressed genes whose interaction networks are of importance in cancer research. qPCR validation of 10 specific target genes of interest in ongoing clinical trials demonstrated significant differences in expression. ODV implantation into the chest 2nd mammary pad provides the most reliable model that mimics human breast cancer compared from subcutaneous implantation that produces tumors with different genome expression profiles of clinical significance. Increased understanding of the limitations of the different preclinical models in use will help guide new investigations and may improve the efficiency of breast cancer drug development . PMID:25200444

  2. Eps8 vaccine exerts prophylactic antitumor effects in a murine model: a novel vaccine for breast carcinoma.

    PubMed

    He, Yan-Jie; Zhou, Jing; Zhao, Tong-Feng; Hu, Liang-Shan; Gan, Jing-Ying; Deng, Lan; Li, Yuhua

    2013-08-01

    Cancer vaccines are an effective way to prevent the occurrence of cancer. Epidermal growth factor receptor pathway substrate 8 (Eps8) is a novel tumor-associated antigen, which is overexpressed in the majority of tumor types. In the present study, the Eps8 protein was cloned and characterized, and its feasibility as an antitumor agent in murine breast carcinoma was investigated. The results revealed that the Eps8 protein increased the secretion of interleukin (IL)-12 in the culture supernatant of dendritic cells (DCs). The Eps8 protein‑pulsed DCs induced significant cytotoxic T lymphocyte (CTL) responses, T-cell proliferation and a higher level of interferon (IFN)-γ in the culture supernatant of the splenocytes ex vivo. Additionally, when the mice were immunized with the Eps8 vaccine, this resulted in a regression of 4T1 breast tumors and significantly prolonged survival time in the tumor‑bearing mice compared with that in the phosphate-buffered saline (PBS) control group. The Eps8 vaccine induced higher CTL responses in the splenocytes of mice vaccinated against the 4T1 cells; the ratio of CD4+/CD8+ T cells was increased in the Eps8 group; and the percentage of CD4+CD25+ FoxP3+ regulatory T (Treg) cells in the Eps8 group was significantly lower compared with that of the PBS group. The results suggested that the Eps8 vaccine was able to stimulate antitumor effects against 4T1 breast cancer cells in vitro and in vivo, and it may provide a potential immunotherapeutic agent for the treatment of breast cancer. PMID:23754615

  3. Interactome analysis of myeloid-derived suppressor cells in murine models of colon and breast cancer.

    PubMed

    Aliper, Alexander M; Frieden-Korovkina, Victoria P; Buzdin, Anton; Roumiantsev, Sergey A; Zhavoronkov, Alex

    2014-11-30

    In solid cancers, myeloid derived suppressor cells (MDSC) infiltrate (peri)tumoral tissues to induce immune tolerance and hence to establish a microenvironment permissive to tumor growth. Importantly, the mechanisms that facilitate such infiltration or a subsequent immune suppression are not fully understood. Hence, in this study, we aimed to delineate disparate molecular pathways which MDSC utilize in murine models of colon or breast cancer. Using pathways enrichment analysis, we completed interactome maps of multiple signaling pathways in CD11b+/Gr1(high/low) MDSC from spleens and tumor infiltrates of mice with c26GM colon cancer and tumor infiltrates of MDSC in 4T1 breast cancer. In both cancer models, infiltrating MDSC, but not CD11b+ splenic cells, have been found to be enriched in multiple signaling molecules suggestive of their enhanced proliferative and invasive phenotypes. The interactome data has been subsequently used to reconstruct a previously unexplored regulation of MDSC cell cycle by the c-myc transcription factor which was predicted by the analysis. Thus, this study represents a first interactome mapping of distinct multiple molecular pathways whereby MDSC sustain cancer progression. PMID:25294811

  4. Thrombin-cleaved COOH(-) terminal osteopontin peptide binds with cyclophilin C to CD147 in murine breast cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Mi, Zhiyong; Oliver, Tim; Guo, Hongtao; Gao, Chengjiang; Kuo, Paul C

    2007-05-01

    Osteopontin is a glycoprotein that has been linked to metastatic function in breast, lung, and prostate cancers. However, the mechanism by which osteopontin acts to induce metastatic properties is largely unknown. One intriguing feature of osteopontin is the presence of a conserved thrombin cleavage site that is COOH-terminal from a well-characterized RGD domain. Although the COOH-terminal fragment may bind to cell surface CD44 receptors, little is known about the COOH-terminal osteopontin fragment. In the current study, we use the murine mammary epithelial tumor cell lines 4T1 and 4T07; these cells are thioguanine-resistant sublines derived from the parental population of 410.4 cells from Balb/cfC3H mice. Using flow cytometry and Forster resonance energy transfer, we show that the COOH-terminal fragment of osteopontin binds with another marker of metastatic function (cyclophilin C or rotamase) to the CD147 cell surface glycoprotein (also known as extracellular matrix metalloproteinase inducer), to activate Akt1/2 and matrix metalloproteinase-2. In in vitro assays, thrombin cleavage of osteopontin to generate short COOH-terminal osteopontin in the presence of cyclophilin C increases migration and invasion of both 4T07 and 4T1 cells. This interaction between osteopontin peptide and cyclophilin C has not been previously described but assigns a heretofore unknown function for the thrombin-cleaved osteopontin COOH-terminal fragment.

  5. The combined use of Camellia sinensis and metronomic zoledronate in 4T1 mouse carcinoma against tumor growth and metastasis.

    PubMed

    Luo, Ke-Wang; Yue, Grace Gar-Lee; Ko, Chun-Hay; Gao, Si; Lee, Julia Kin-Ming; Li, Gang; Fung, Kwok-Pui; Leung, Ping-Chung; Lau, Clara Bik-San

    2015-07-01

    In previous studies, we demonstrated that the green tea Camellia sinensis (CS) water extract had potent antitumor and antimetastatic effects on 4T1 breast cancer. The metronomic regimen (0.0125 mg/kg twice a week for 4 weeks) of zoledronate (ZOL) was found to be effective in decreasing tumor burden and metastasis as compared with conventional regimen. The aim of the present study was to investigate the antitumor, antimetastatic and anti-osteolytic effects of the combined use of CS water extract and metronomic ZOL against 4T1 breast carcinoma in vitro and in vivo. The results demonstrated that the combination of CS+ZOL exerted a more potent effect on lung and liver by decreasing tumor burden and metastasis, when compared to CS or metronomic ZOL as monotherapies. The combination of CS+ZOL demonstrated optimal bone protection against breast cancer-induced osteolysis for the three groups of CS, ZOL and CS+ZOL. The in vitro results further demonstrated that ZOL enhanced CS-induced apoptosis in 4T1 cells as assessed by the Annexin V-FITC/PI staining and caspase-3 activity assays. In addition, the combined use of CS+ZOL significantly inhibited 4T1 cell migration. Mechanistic studies showed that the enzyme levels of matrix metalloproteinases (MMP)-2 and MMP-9 were suppressed significantly by CS+ZOL. In conclusion, to the best of our knowledge, this is the first study to investigate the novel combined application of herbal extract CS and chemotherapy ZOL in 4T1 breast cancer. The combination of CS plus metronomic ZOL demonstrated significant antitumor, antimetastatic and anti-osteolytic effects against breast cancer, and suggested potential clinical application for breast cancer patients.

  6. Antitumor and antimetastatic activities of chloroquine diphosphate in a murine model of breast cancer.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Pei-Du; Zhao, Ying-Lan; Deng, Xiao-Qiang; Mao, Yong-Qiu; Shi, Wei; Tang, Qing-Qing; Li, Zheng-Guang; Zheng, Yu-Zhu; Yang, Sheng-Yong; Wei, Yu-Quan

    2010-11-01

    Metastatic breast cancers are hard to treat and almost always fatal. Chloroquine diphosphate, a derivative of quinine, has long been used as a potent and commonly used medicine against different human diseases. We therefore investigated the effects of chloroquine diphosphate on a highly metastatic mouse mammary carcinoma cell line. In vitro treatment of 4T1 mouse breast cancer cells with chloroquine diphosphate resulted in significant inhibition of cellular proliferation and viability, and induction of apoptosis in 4T1 cells in a time- and dose-dependent manner. Further analysis indicated that induction of apoptosis was associated with the loss of mitochondrial membrane potential, release of cytochrome c, and activation of caspase-9 and caspase-3, and cleavage of poly(ADP-ribose) polymerase. The effect of chloroquine diphosphate was then examined using a mice model in which 4T1 cells were implanted subcutaneously. Chloroquine diphosphate (25mg/kg and 50mg/kg, respectively) significantly inhibited the growth of the implanted 4T1 tumor cells and induced apoptosis in the tumor microenvironment. Moreover, the metastasis of tumor cells to the lungs was inhibited significantly and the survival of the mice enhanced. These data suggested that chloroquine diphosphate might have chemotherapeutic efficacy against breast cancer including inhibition of metastasis. PMID:20888174

  7. Biophysical and morphological effects of nanodiamond/nanoplatinum solution (DPV576) on metastatic murine breast cancer cells in vitro

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ghoneum, Alia; Zhu, Huanqi; Woo, JungReem; Zabinyakov, Nikita; Sharma, Shivani; Gimzewski, James K.

    2014-11-01

    Nanoparticles have recently gained increased attention as drug delivery systems for the treatment of cancer due to their minute size and unique chemical properties. However, very few studies have tested the biophysical changes associated with nanoparticles on metastatic cancer cells at the cellular and sub-cellular scales. Here, we investigated the mechanical and morphological properties of cancer cells by measuring the changes in cell Young’s Modulus using AFM, filopodial retraction (FR) by time lapse optical light microscopy imaging and filopodial disorganization by high resolution AFM imaging of cells upon treatment with nanoparticles. In the current study, nanomechanical changes in live murine metastatic breast cancer cells (4T1) post exposure to a nanodiamond/nanoplatinum mixture dispersed in aqueous solution (DPV576), were monitored. Results showed a decrease in Young’s modulus at two hours post treatment with DPV576 in a dose dependent manner. Partial FR at 20 min and complete FR at 40 min were observed. Moreover, analysis of the retraction distance (in microns) measured over time (minutes), showed that a DPV576 concentration of 15%v/v yielded the highest FR rate. In addition, DPV576 treated cells showed early signs of filopodial disorganization and disintegration. This study demonstrates the changes in cell stiffness and tracks early structural alterations of metastatic breast cancer cells post treatment with DPV576, which may have important implications in the role of nanodiamond/nanoplatinum based cancer cell therapy and sensitization to chemotherapy drugs.

  8. Tetrandrine Suppresses Cancer Angiogenesis and Metastasis in 4T1 Tumor Bearing Mice

    PubMed Central

    Gao, Jian-Li; He, Tong-Chuan; He, Kai; Chen, Su-Hong; Lv, Gui-Yuan

    2013-01-01

    Metastasis remains the most deadly aspect of cancer and still evades direct treatment. Thus, there is a great need to develop new treatment regimens to suppress tumor cells that have escaped surgical removal or that may have already disseminated. We have found that tetrandrine (TET) exhibits anticolon cancer activity. Here, we investigate the inhibition effect of TET to breast cancer metastasis, angiogenesis and its molecular basis underlying TET's anticancer activity. We compare TET with chemotherapy drug doxorubicin in 4T1 tumor bearing BALB/c mice model and find that TET exhibits an anticancer metastatic and antiangiogenic activities better than those of doxorubicin. The lung metastatic sites were decreased by TET, which is confirmed by bioluminescence imaging in vivo. On the other hand, laser doppler perfusion imaging (LDI) was used for measuring the blood flow of tumor in 4T1-tumor bearing mice. As a result, the local blood perfusion of tumor was markedly decreased by TET after 3 weeks. Mechanistically, TET treatment leads to a decrease in p-ERK level and an increase in NF-κB levels in HUVECs. TET also regulated metastatic and angiogenic related proteins, including vascular endothelial growth factor, hypoxia-inducible factor-1α, integrin β5, endothelial cell specific molecule-1, and intercellular adhesion molecule-1 in vivo. PMID:23762115

  9. Tocotrienol-Adjuvanted Dendritic Cells Inhibit Tumor Growth and Metastasis: A Murine Model of Breast Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Abdul Hafid, Sitti Rahma; Chakravarthi, Srikumar; Nesaretnam, Kalanithi; Radhakrishnan, Ammu Kutty

    2013-01-01

    Tocotrienol-rich fraction (TRF) from palm oil is reported to possess anti-cancer and immune-enhancing effects. In this study, TRF supplementation was used as an adjuvant to enhance the anti-cancer effects of dendritic cells (DC)-based cancer vaccine in a syngeneic mouse model of breast cancer. Female BALB/c mice were inoculated with 4T1 cells in mammary pad to induce tumor. When the tumor was palpable, the mice in the experimental groups were injected subcutaneously with DC-pulsed with tumor lysate (TL) from 4T1 cells (DC+TL) once a week for three weeks and fed daily with 1 mg TRF or vehicle. Control mice received unpulsed DC and were fed with vehicle. The combined therapy of using DC+TL injections and TRF supplementation (DC+TL+TRF) inhibited (p<0.05) tumor growth and metastasis. Splenocytes from the DC+TL+TRF group cultured with mitomycin-C (MMC)-treated 4T1 cells produced higher (p<0.05) levels of IFN-γ and IL-12. The cytotoxic T-lymphocyte (CTL) assay also showed enhanced tumor-specific killing (p<0.05) by CD8+ T-lymphocytes isolated from mice in the DC+TL+TRF group. This study shows that TRF has the potential to be used as an adjuvant to enhance effectiveness of DC-based vaccines. PMID:24069344

  10. Molecular response of 4T1-induced mouse mammary tumours and healthy tissues to zinc treatment.

    PubMed

    Sztalmachova, Marketa; Gumulec, Jaromir; Raudenska, Martina; Polanska, Hana; Holubova, Monika; Balvan, Jan; Hudcova, Kristyna; Knopfova, Lucia; Kizek, Rene; Adam, Vojtech; Babula, Petr; Masarik, Michal

    2015-04-01

    Breast cancer patients negative for the nuclear oestrogen receptor α have a particularly poor prognosis. Therefore, the 4T1 cell line (considered as a triple-negative model) was chosen to induce malignancy in mice. The aim of the present study was to assess if zinc ions, provided in excess, may significantly modify the process of mammary oncogenesis. Zn(II) ions were chosen because of their documented antitumour effects. Zn(II) is also known to induce the expression of metallothioneins (MT) and glutathion (GSH). A total dose of zinc sulphate per one gram of mouse weight used in the experiment was 0.15 mg. We studied the expression of MT1, MT2, TP53 and MTF-1 genes and also examined the effect of the tumour on antioxidant capacity. Tumour-free mice had significantly higher expression levels of the studied genes (p<0.003). Significant differences were also revealed in the gene expression between the tissues (p<0.001). The highest expression levels were observed in the liver. As compared to brain, lung and liver, significantly lower concentrations of MT protein were found in the primary tumour; an inverse trend was observed in the concentration of Zinc(II). In non-tumour mice, the amount of hepatic hydrosulphuryl groups significantly increased by the exposure to Zn(II), but the animals with tumour induction showed no similar trend. The primary tumour size of zinc-treated animals was 20% smaller (p=0.002); however, no significant effect on metastasis progression due to the zinc treatment was discovered. In conclusion, Zn(II) itself may mute the growth of primary breast tumours especially at their early stages.

  11. Green tea (Camellia sinensis) extract inhibits both the metastasis and osteolytic components of mammary cancer 4T1 lesions in mice.

    PubMed

    Luo, Ke-Wang; Ko, Chun-Hay; Yue, Grace Gar-Lee; Lee, Julia Kin-Ming; Li, Kai-Kai; Lee, Michelle; Li, Gang; Fung, Kwok-Pui; Leung, Ping-Chung; Lau, Clara Bik-San

    2014-04-01

    Green tea (Camellia sinensis, CS), a kind of Chinese tea commonly consumed as a healthy beverage, has been demonstrated to have various biological activities, including antioxidation, antiobesity and anticancer. Our study aims to investigate the antitumor, antimetastasis and antiosteolytic effects of CS aqueous extract both in vitro and in vivo using metastasis-specific mouse mammary carcinoma 4T1 cells. Our results showed that treatment of 4T1 cells with CS aqueous extract resulted in significant inhibition of 4T1 cell proliferation. CS extract induced 4T1 apoptosis in a dose-dependent manner as assessed by annexin-V and propidium iodide staining and caspase-3 activity. Western blot analysis showed that CS increased the expression of Bax-to-Bcl-2 ratio and activated caspase-8 and caspase-3 to induce apoptosis. CS also inhibited 4T1 cell migration and invasion at 0.06-0.125 mg/ml. In addition, CS extract (0.6 g/kg, orally fed daily for 4 weeks) was effective in decreasing the tumor weight by 34.8% in female BALB/c mice against water treatment control (100%). Apart from the antitumor effect, CS extract significantly decreased lung and liver metastasis in BALB/c mice bearing 4T1 tumors by 54.5% and 72.6%, respectively. Furthermore, micro-computed tomography and in vitro osteoclast staining analysis suggested that CS extract was effective in bone protection against breast cancer-induced bone destruction. In conclusion, the present study demonstrated that the CS aqueous extract, which closely mimics green tea beverage, has potent antitumor and antimetastasis effects in breast cancer and could protect the bone from breast cancer-induced bone destruction.

  12. Adjuvant Cationic Liposomes Presenting MPL and IL-12 Induce Cell Death, Suppress Tumor Growth, and Alter the Cellular Phenotype of Tumors in a Murine Model of Breast Cancer

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Dendritic cells (DC) process and present antigens to T lymphocytes, inducing potent immune responses when encountered in association with activating signals, such as pathogen-associated molecular patterns. Using the 4T1 murine model of breast cancer, cationic liposomes containing monophosphoryl lipid A (MPL) and interleukin (IL)-12 were administered by intratumoral injection. Combination multivalent presentation of the Toll-like receptor-4 ligand MPL and cytotoxic 1,2-dioleoyl-3-trmethylammonium-propane lipids induced cell death, decreased cellular proliferation, and increased serum levels of IL-1β and tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-α. The addition of recombinant IL-12 further suppressed tumor growth and increased expression of IL-1β, TNF-α, and interferon-γ. IL-12 also increased the percentage of cytolytic T cells, DC, and F4/80+ macrophages in the tumor. While single agent therapy elevated levels of nitric oxide synthase 3-fold above basal levels in the tumor, combination therapy with MPL cationic liposomes and IL-12 stimulated a 7-fold increase, supporting the observed cell cycle arrest (loss of Ki-67 expression) and apoptosis (TUNEL positive). In mice bearing dual tumors, the growth of distal, untreated tumors mirrored that of liposome-treated tumors, supporting the presence of a systemic immune response. PMID:25179345

  13. Essential roles of the interaction between cancer cell-derived chemokine, CCL4, and intra-bone CCR5-expressing fibroblasts in breast cancer bone metastasis.

    PubMed

    Sasaki, Soichiro; Baba, Tomohisa; Nishimura, Tatsunori; Hayakawa, Yoshihiro; Hashimoto, Shin-Ichi; Gotoh, Noriko; Mukaida, Naofumi

    2016-08-01

    From a murine breast cancer cell line, 4T1, we established a subclone, 4T1.3, which consistently metastasizes to bone upon its injection into the mammary fat pad. 4T1.3 clone exhibited similar proliferation rate and migration capacity as the parental clone. However, the intra-bone injection of 4T1.3 clone caused larger tumors than that of the parental cells, accompanied with increases in fibroblast, but not osteoclast or osteoblast numbers. 4T1.3 clone displayed an enhanced expression of a chemokine, CCL4, but not its specific receptor, CCR5. CCL4 shRNA-transfection of 4T1.3 clone had few effects on its in vitro properties, but reduced the tumorigenicity arising from the intra-bone injection. Moreover, intra-bone injection of 4T1.3 clone caused smaller tumors in mice deficient in CCR5 or those receiving CCR5 antagonist than in wild-type mice. The reduced tumor formation was associated with attenuated accumulation of CCR5-positive fibroblasts expressing connective tissue growth factor (CTGF)/CCN2. Tumor cell-derived CCL4 could induce fibroblasts to express CTGF/CCN2, which could support 4T1.3 clone proliferation under hypoxic culture conditions. Thus, the CCL4-CCR5 axis can contribute to breast cancer metastasis to bone by mediating the interaction between cancer cells and fibroblasts in bone cavity.

  14. Delivery-Corrected Imaging of Fluorescently-Labeled Glucose Reveals Distinct Metabolic Phenotypes in Murine Breast Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Frees, Amy E.; Rajaram, Narasimhan; McCachren, Samuel S.; Fontanella, Andrew N.; Dewhirst, Mark W.; Ramanujam, Nimmi

    2014-01-01

    When monitoring response to cancer therapy, it is important to differentiate changes in glucose tracer uptake caused by altered delivery versus a true metabolic shift. Here, we propose an optical imaging method to quantify glucose uptake and correct for in vivo delivery effects. Glucose uptake was measured using a fluorescent D-glucose derivative 2-(N-(7-Nitrobenz-2-oxa-1,3-diazol-4-yl)Amino)-2-deoxy-D-glucose (2-NBDG) in mice implanted with dorsal skin flap window chambers. Additionally, vascular oxygenation (SO2) was calculated using only endogenous hemoglobin contrast. Results showed that the delivery factor proposed for correction, “RD”, reported on red blood cell velocity and injected 2-NBDG dose. Delivery-corrected 2-NBDG uptake (2-NBDG60/RD) inversely correlated with blood glucose in normal tissue, indicating sensitivity to glucose demand. We further applied our method in metastatic 4T1 and nonmetastatic 4T07 murine mammary adenocarcinomas. The ratio 2-NBDG60/RD was increased in 4T1 tumors relative to 4T07 tumors yet average SO2 was comparable, suggesting a shift toward a “Warburgian” (aerobic glycolysis) metabolism in the metastatic 4T1 line. In heterogeneous regions of both 4T1 and 4T07, 2-NBDG60/RD increased slightly but significantly as vascular oxygenation decreased, indicative of the Pasteur effect in both tumors. These data demonstrate the utility of delivery-corrected 2-NBDG and vascular oxygenation imaging for differentiating metabolic phenotypes in vivo. PMID:25526261

  15. Lactobacillus acidophilus could modulate the immune response against breast cancer in murine model.

    PubMed

    Maroof, Hamidreza; Hassan, Zuhir Mohammad; Mobarez, Ashraf Mohabati; Mohamadabadi, Maryam Azimi

    2012-12-01

    Cancer immune-therapy is an interesting avenue of studying the effects of deviating immune system responses to achieve the desired result. Lactobacilli are inhabitants of the GI tract which have shown beneficial health effects on various ailments including malignancies. Their mechanisms of action comprise a very intense area of research. In this study we evaluated the immunomodulatory effects of Lactobacillus acidophilus in in vivo model of breast cancer. Lactobacillus acidophilus (L.a) was isolated from traditional home-made yogurt and also from neonatal stool by aerobic overnight culture at 37°C in MRS broth. Delayed Type Hypersensitivity (DTH) assay was performed to find the best immunostimulant dose. 4T1 tumour bearing mice were treated with 2 × 10(8) cfu of isolated L. acidophilus and 20 mg/kg Cyclophosphamide for 15 consecutive days. Tumour volume was measured using a digital vernier calliper. Lymphocyte proliferation was done using MTT proliferation assay. Production of IFNγ, IL-4 and TGF-β from cultured Splenocytes was assessed in the presence of purified tumour antigen. According to results administration of L.a induced a significant decrease in tumour growth pattern (P value = 0.00). Significant alterations in splenocyte production of IFN-γ, IL-4 and TGf-β (P values < 0.05) and also lymphocyte proliferation in L.a treated animals was evident (P value < 0.05). This study indicated that oral administration of L.a is able to alter the cytokine production in tumour bearing mice into a Th1 protective pattern, favourable to anti tumour immunity. Reduced tumour growth rate and increased lymphocyte proliferation are also thus supportive. Further studies are required to elucidate the exact mechanism by which local actions of probiotics affect the systemic immune responses against transformed cells. PMID:22711009

  16. High Resolution X-Ray Microangiography of 4T1 Tumor in Mouse Using Synchrotron Radiation

    SciTech Connect

    Sun Jianqi; Liu Ping; Gu Xiang; Liu Xiaoxia; Zhao Jun; Xiao Tiqiao; Xu, Lisa X.

    2010-07-23

    Angiogenesis is very important in tumor growth and metastasis. But in clinic, only vessels lager than 200 {mu}m in diameter, can be observed using conventional medical imaging. Synchrotron radiation (SR) phase contrast imaging, whose spatial resolution can reach as high as 1 {mu}m, has great advantages in imaging soft tissue structures, such as blood vessels and tumor tissues. In this paper, the morphology of newly formed micro-vessels in the mouse 4T1 tumor samples was firstly studied with contrast agent. Then, the angiogenesis in nude mice tumor window model was observed without contrast agent using the SR phase contrast imaging at the beamline for X-ray imaging and biomedical applications, Shanghai Synchrotron Radiation Facility (SSRF). The images of tumors showed dense, irregular and tortuous tumor micro-vessels with the smallest size of 20-30 {mu}m in diameter.

  17. Inhibition of metastatic tumor growth and metastasis via targeting metastatic breast cancer by chlorotoxin-modified liposomes.

    PubMed

    Qin, Chao; He, Bing; Dai, Wenbing; Zhang, Hua; Wang, Xueqing; Wang, Jiancheng; Zhang, Xuan; Wang, Guangji; Yin, Lifang; Zhang, Qiang

    2014-10-01

    A liposome system modified with chlorotoxin (ClTx), a scorpion venom peptide previously utilized for targeting brain tumors, was established. Its targeting efficiency and antimetastasis behavior against metastatic breast cancer highly expressed MMP-2, the receptor of ClTx, were investigated. 4T1, a metastatic breast cancer cell line derived from a murine breast tumor, was selected as the cell model. As results, the ClTx-modified liposomes displayed specific binding to 4T1 as determined by flow cytometry and confocal imaging. The cytotoxicity assay revealed that the ClTx modification increased the toxicity compared with nonmodified liposomes. In addition, the modified liposomes also exhibited high in vivo targeting efficiency in the BALB/c mice bearing 4T1 tumors. Importantly, this system inhibited the growth of metastatic tumor and prevented the incidence of lung metastasis in mice bearing 4T1 tumors with only low systemic toxicity. The data obtained from the in vitro and in vivo studies confirmed that the ClTx-modified liposomes increased the drug delivery to metastatic breast cancers. This study proved that the ClTx-modified liposomes had targeting ability to metastatic breast cancer in addition to brain cancer, and displayed an obvious antimetastasis effect. Generally, it may provide a promising strategy for metastatic breast cancer therapy.

  18. Amifostine Reduces Radiation-Induced Complications in a Murine Model of Expander-Based Breast Reconstruction

    PubMed Central

    Felice, Peter A.; Nelson, Noah S.; Page, Erin E.; Deshpande, Sagar S.; Donneys, Alexis; Rodriguez, José; Buchman, Steven R.

    2014-01-01

    Background Immediate expander-based breast reconstruction after mastectomy is a prevalent option for many women with breast cancer. When coupled with adjuvant radiation, however, radiation-induced skin and soft tissue injury diminish the success of this reconstructive technique. We hypothesize that prophylactic administration of the cytoprotectant Amifostine will reduce soft tissue complications from irradiation, aiding expander-based reconstruction for women battling this disease. Methods Sprague Dawley rats were divided into two experimental groups, Operative Expander Placement (Expander) and Operative Sham (Sham). Expander specimens received a sub-latissimus tissue expander with a 15cc fill volume; Shams underwent identical procedures without expander placement. Experimental groups were further divided into Control specimens receiving no further intervention, XRT specimens receiving human-equivalent radiation, and AMF-XRT specimens receiving both Amifostine and human-equivalent radiation. Animals underwent a 45-day recovery period and were evaluated grossly and via ImageJ analysis for skin and soft tissue complications. Results None of the Control, XRT, or AMF-XRT Sham specimens showed skin and soft tissue complications. For Expander animals, significantly fewer AMF-XRT specimens (4 of 13, 30%) demonstrated skin and soft tissue complications compared to XRT specimens (9 of 13, 69%; p = 0.041). ImageJ evaluation of Expander specimens demonstrated a significant increase in skin and soft tissue necrosis for XRT specimens (12.94%), compared with AMF-XRT animals (6.96%, p = 0.019). Conclusions Amifostine pre-treatment significantly reduced skin and soft-tissue complications in both gross inspection and ImageJ analysis. These findings demonstrate that Amifostine prophylaxis provides protection against radiation-induced skin and soft tissue injury in a murine model of expander-based breast reconstruction. Level of Evidence Animal study, not gradable for level of

  19. Assessing the accuracy and reproducibility of modality independent elastography in a murine model of breast cancer

    PubMed Central

    Weis, Jared A.; Flint, Katelyn M.; Sanchez, Violeta; Yankeelov, Thomas E.; Miga, Michael I.

    2015-01-01

    Abstract. Cancer progression has been linked to mechanics. Therefore, there has been recent interest in developing noninvasive imaging tools for cancer assessment that are sensitive to changes in tissue mechanical properties. We have developed one such method, modality independent elastography (MIE), that estimates the relative elastic properties of tissue by fitting anatomical image volumes acquired before and after the application of compression to biomechanical models. The aim of this study was to assess the accuracy and reproducibility of the method using phantoms and a murine breast cancer model. Magnetic resonance imaging data were acquired, and the MIE method was used to estimate relative volumetric stiffness. Accuracy was assessed using phantom data by comparing to gold-standard mechanical testing of elasticity ratios. Validation error was <12%. Reproducibility analysis was performed on animal data, and within-subject coefficients of variation ranged from 2 to 13% at the bulk level and 32% at the voxel level. To our knowledge, this is the first study to assess the reproducibility of an elasticity imaging metric in a preclinical cancer model. Our results suggest that the MIE method can reproducibly generate accurate estimates of the relative mechanical stiffness and provide guidance on the degree of change needed in order to declare biological changes rather than experimental error in future therapeutic studies. PMID:26158120

  20. Protoporphyrin IX fluorescence for enhanced photodynamic diagnosis and photodynamic therapy in murine models of skin and breast cancer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rollakanti, Kishore Reddy

    Protoporphyrin IX (PpIX) is a photosensitizing agent derived from aminolevulinic acid. PpIX accumulates specifically within target cancer cells, where it fluoresces and produces cytotoxic reactive oxygen species. Our aims were to employ PpIX fluorescence to detect squamous cell carcinoma (SCC) of the skin (Photodynamic diagnosis, PDD), and to improve treatment efficacy (Photodynamic therapy, PDT) for basal cell carcinoma (BCC) and cutaneous breast cancer. Hyperspectral imaging and a spectrometer based dosimeter system were used to detect very early SCC in UVB-irradiated murine skin, using PpIX fluorescence. Regarding PDT, we showed that low non-toxic doses of vitamin D, given before ALA application, increase tumor specific PpIX accumulation and sensitize BCC and breast cancer cells to ALA-PDT. These optical imaging methods and the combination therapy regimen (vitamin D and ALA-PDT) are promising tools for effective management of skin and breast cancer.

  1. Dynamic changes in high and low mammographic density human breast tissues maintained in murine tissue engineering chambers during various murine peripartum states and over time.

    PubMed

    Chew, G L; Huang, D; Huo, C W; Blick, T; Hill, P; Cawson, J; Frazer, H; Southey, M D; Hopper, J L; Henderson, M A; Haviv, I; Thompson, E W

    2013-07-01

    Mammographic density (MD) is a strong heritable risk factor for breast cancer, and may decrease with increasing parity. However, the biomolecular basis for MD-associated breast cancer remains unclear, and systemic hormonal effects on MD-associated risk is poorly understood. This study assessed the effect of murine peripartum states on high and low MD tissue maintained in a xenograft model of human MD. Method High and low MD human breast tissues were precisely sampled under radiographic guidance from prophylactic mastectomy specimens of women. The high and low MD tissues were maintained in separate vascularised biochambers in nulliparous or pregnant SCID mice for 4 weeks, or mice undergoing postpartum involution or lactation for three additional weeks. High and low MD biochamber material was harvested for histologic and radiographic comparisons during various murine peripartum states. High and low MD biochamber tissues in nulliparous mice were harvested at different timepoints for histologic and radiographic comparisons. Results High MD biochamber tissues had decreased stromal (p = 0.0027), increased adipose (p = 0.0003) and a trend to increased glandular tissue areas (p = 0.076) after murine postpartum involution. Stromal areas decreased (p = 0.042), while glandular (p = 0.001) and adipose areas (p = 0.009) increased in high MD biochamber tissues during lactation. A difference in radiographic density was observed in high (p = 0.0021) or low MD biochamber tissues (p = 0.004) between nulliparous, pregnant and involution groups. No differences in tissue composition were observed in high or low MD biochamber tissues maintained for different durations, although radiographic density increased over time. Conclusion High MD biochamber tissues had measurable histologic changes after postpartum involution or lactation. Alterations in radiographic density occurred in biochamber tissues between different peripartum states and over time. These findings

  2. Cisplatin Prodrug-Conjugated Gold Nanocluster for Fluorescence Imaging and Targeted Therapy of the Breast Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Zhou, Fangyuan; Feng, Bing; Yu, Haijun; Wang, Dangge; Wang, Tingting; Liu, Jianping; Meng, Qingshuo; Wang, Siling; Zhang, Pengcheng; Zhang, Zhiwen; Li, Yaping

    2016-01-01

    Theranostic nanomedicine has emerged as a promising modality for cancer diagnosis and treatment. In this study, we report the fabrication of fluorescence gold nanoclusters (GNC) conjugated with a cisplatin prodrug and folic acid (FA) (FA-GNC-Pt) for fluorescence imaging and targeted chemotherapy of breast cancer. The physio-chemical properties of FA-GNC-Pt nanoparticles are thoroughly characterized by fluorescence/UV-Vis spectroscopic measurement, particle size and zeta-potential examination. We find that FA-modification significantly accelerated the cellular uptake and increased the cytotoxicity of GNC-Pt nanoparticles in murine 4T1 breast cancer cells. Fluorescence imaging in vivo using 4T1 tumor bearing nude mouse model shows that FA-GNC-Pt nanoparticles selectively accumulate in the orthotopic 4T1 tumor and generate strong fluorescence signal due to the tumor targeting effect of FA. Moreover, we demonstrate that FA-GNC-Pt nanoparticles significantly inhibit the growth and lung metastasis of the orthotopically implanted 4T1 breast tumors. All these data imply a good potential of the GNC-based theranostic nanoplatform for fluorescence tumor imaging and cancer therapy. PMID:27022415

  3. Near-Infrared Imaging of Adoptive Immune Cell Therapy in Breast Cancer Model Using Cell Membrane Labeling

    PubMed Central

    Youniss, Fatma M.; Sundaresan, Gobalakrishnan; Graham, Laura J.; Wang, Li; Berry, Collin R.; Dewkar, Gajanan K.; Jose, Purnima; Bear, Harry D.; Zweit, Jamal

    2014-01-01

    The overall objective of this study is to non-invasively image and assess tumor targeting and retention of directly labeled T-lymphocytes following their adoptive transfer in mice. T-lymphocytes obtained from draining lymph nodes of 4T1 (murine breast cancer cell) sensitized BALB/C mice were activated in-vitro with Bryostatin/Ionomycin for 18 hours, and were grown in the presence of Interleukin-2 for 6 days. T-lymphocytes were then directly labeled with 1,1-dioctadecyltetramethyl indotricarbocyanine Iodide (DiR), a lipophilic near infrared fluorescent dye that labels the cell membrane. Assays for viability, proliferation, and function of labeled T-lymphocytes showed that they were unaffected by DiR labeling. The DiR labeled cells were injected via tail vein in mice bearing 4T1 tumors in the flank. In some cases labeled 4T1 specific T-lymphocytes were injected a week before 4T1 tumor cell implantation. Multi-spectral in vivo fluorescence imaging was done to subtract the autofluorescence and isolate the near infrared signal carried by the T-lymphocytes. In recipient mice with established 4T1 tumors, labeled 4T1 specific T-lymphocytes showed marked tumor retention, which peaked 6 days post infusion and persisted at the tumor site for up to 3 weeks. When 4T1 tumor cells were implanted 1-week post-infusion of labeled T-lymphocytes, T-lymphocytes responded to the immunologic challenge and accumulated at the site of 4T1 cell implantation within two hours and the signal persisted for 2 more weeks. Tumor accumulation of labeled 4T1 specific T-lymphocytes was absent in mice bearing Meth A sarcoma tumors. When lysate of 4T1 specific labeled T-lymphocytes was injected into 4T1 tumor bearing mice the near infrared signal was not detected at the tumor site. In conclusion, our validated results confirm that the near infrared signal detected at the tumor site represents the DiR labeled 4T1 specific viable T-lymphocytes and their response to immunologic challenge can be imaged in

  4. Repeated PD-1/PD-L1 monoclonal antibody administration induces fatal xenogeneic hypersensitivity reactions in a murine model of breast cancer

    PubMed Central

    Mall, Christine; Sckisel, Gail D.; Proia, David A.; Mirsoian, Annie; Grossenbacher, Steven K.; Pai, Chien-Chun Steven; Chen, Mingyi; Monjazeb, Arta M.; Kelly, Karen; Blazar, Bruce R.; Murphy, William J.

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) targeting coinhibitory molecules such as PD-1, PD-L1 and CTLA-4 are increasingly used as targets of therapeutic intervention against cancer. While these targets have led to a critical paradigm shift in treatments for cancer, these approaches are also plagued with limitations owing to cancer immune evasion mechanisms and adverse toxicities associated with continuous treatment. It has been difficult to reproduce and develop interventions to these limitations preclinically due to poor reagent efficacy and reagent xenogenecity not seen in human trials. In this study, we investigated adverse effects of repeated administration of PD-1 and PD-L1 mAbs in the murine 4T1 mammary carcinoma model. We observed rapid and fatal hypersensitivity reactions in tumor bearing mice within 30–60 min after 4–5 administrations of PD-L1 or PD-1 mAb but not CTLA-4 antibody treatment. These events occurred only in mice bearing the highly inflammatory 4T1 tumor and did not occur in mice bearing non-inflammatory tumors. We observed that mortality was associated with systemic accumulation of IgG1 antibodies, antibodies specific to the PD-1 mAb, and accumulation of Gr-1high neutrophils in lungs which have been implicated in the IgG mediated pathway of anaphylaxis. Anti-PD-1 associated toxicities were alleviated when PD-1 blockade was combined with the therapeutic HSP90 inhibitor, ganetespib, which impaired immune responses toward the xenogeneic PD-1 mAb. This study highlights a previously uncharacterized fatal hypersensitivity exacerbated by the PD-1/PD-L1 axis in the broadly used 4T1 tumor model as well as an interesting relationship between this particular class of checkpoint blockade and tumor-dependent immunomodulation. PMID:27057446

  5. Modulation of breast cancer cell viability by a cannabinoid receptor 2 agonist, JWH-015, is calcium dependent

    PubMed Central

    Hanlon, Katherine E; Lozano-Ondoua, Alysia N; Umaretiya, Puja J; Symons-Liguori, Ashley M; Chandramouli, Anupama; Moy, Jamie K; Kwass, William K; Mantyh, Patrick W; Nelson, Mark A; Vanderah, Todd W

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Cannabinoid compounds, both nonspecific as well as agonists selective for either cannabinoid receptor 1 (CB1) or cannabinoid receptor 2 (CB2), have been shown to modulate the tumor microenvironment by inducing apoptosis in tumor cells in several model systems. The mechanism of this modulation remains only partially delineated, and activity induced via the CB1 and CB2 receptors may be distinct despite significant sequence homology and structural similarity of ligands. Methods The CB2-selective agonist JWH-015 was used to investigate mechanisms downstream of CB2 activation in mouse and human breast cancer cell lines in vitro and in a murine mammary tumor model. Results JWH-015 treatment significantly reduced primary tumor burden and metastasis of luciferase-tagged murine mammary carcinoma 4T1 cells in immunocompetent mice in vivo. Furthermore, JWH-015 reduced the viability of murine 4T1 and human MCF7 mammary carcinoma cells in vitro by inducing apoptosis. JWH-015-mediated reduction of breast cancer cell viability was not dependent on Gαi signaling in vitro or modified by classical pharmacological blockade of CB1, GPR55, TRPV1, or TRPA1 receptors. JWH-015 effects were calcium dependent and induced changes in MAPK/ERK signaling. Conclusion The results of this work characterize the actions of a CB2-selective agonist on breast cancer cells in a syngeneic murine model representing how a clinical presentation of cancer progression and metastasis may be significantly modulated by a G-protein-coupled receptor. PMID:27186076

  6. Rapamycin Promotes Mouse 4T1 Tumor Metastasis that Can Be Reversed by a Dendritic Cell-Based Vaccine

    PubMed Central

    Lin, Tien-Jen; Liang, Wen-Miin; Hsiao, Pei-Wen; M. S, Pradeep; Wei, Wen-Chi; Lin, Hsin-Ting; Yin, Shu-Yi; Yang, Ning-Sun

    2015-01-01

    Suppression of tumor metastasis is a key strategy for successful cancer interventions. Previous studies indicated that rapamycin (sirolimus) may promote tumor regression activity or enhance immune response against tumor targets. However, rapamycin also exhibits immunosuppressant effects and is hence used clinically as an organ transplantation drug. We hypothesized that the immunosuppressive activities of rapamycin might also negatively mediate host immunity, resulting in promotion of tumor metastasis. In this study, the effects of rapamycin and phytochemical shikonin were investigated in vitro and in vivo in a 4T1 mouse mammary tumor model through quantitative assessment of immunogenic cell death (ICD), autophagy, tumor growth and metastasis. Tumor-bearing mice were immunized with test vaccines to monitor their effect on tumor metastasis. We found that intraperitoneal (ip) administration of rapamycin after a tumor-resection surgery drastically increased the metastatic activity of 4T1 tumors. Possible correlation of this finding to human cancers was suggested by epidemiological analysis of data from Taiwan’s National Health Insurance Research Database (NHIRD). Since our previous studies showed that modified tumor cell lysate (TCL)-pulsed, dendritic cell (DC)-based cancer vaccines can effectively suppress metastasis in mouse tumor models, we assessed whether such vaccines may help offset this rapamycin-promoted metastasis. We observed that shikonin efficiently induced ICD of 4T1 cells in culture, and DC vaccines pulsed with shikonin-treated TCL (SK-TCL-DC) significantly suppressed rapamycin-enhanced metastasis and Treg cell expansion in test mice. In conclusion, rapamycin treatment in mice (and perhaps in humans) promotes metastasis and the effect may be offset by treatment with a DC-based cancer vaccine. PMID:26426423

  7. Rapamycin Promotes Mouse 4T1 Tumor Metastasis that Can Be Reversed by a Dendritic Cell-Based Vaccine.

    PubMed

    Lin, Tien-Jen; Liang, Wen-Miin; Hsiao, Pei-Wen; M S, Pradeep; Wei, Wen-Chi; Lin, Hsin-Ting; Yin, Shu-Yi; Yang, Ning-Sun

    2015-01-01

    Suppression of tumor metastasis is a key strategy for successful cancer interventions. Previous studies indicated that rapamycin (sirolimus) may promote tumor regression activity or enhance immune response against tumor targets. However, rapamycin also exhibits immunosuppressant effects and is hence used clinically as an organ transplantation drug. We hypothesized that the immunosuppressive activities of rapamycin might also negatively mediate host immunity, resulting in promotion of tumor metastasis. In this study, the effects of rapamycin and phytochemical shikonin were investigated in vitro and in vivo in a 4T1 mouse mammary tumor model through quantitative assessment of immunogenic cell death (ICD), autophagy, tumor growth and metastasis. Tumor-bearing mice were immunized with test vaccines to monitor their effect on tumor metastasis. We found that intraperitoneal (ip) administration of rapamycin after a tumor-resection surgery drastically increased the metastatic activity of 4T1 tumors. Possible correlation of this finding to human cancers was suggested by epidemiological analysis of data from Taiwan's National Health Insurance Research Database (NHIRD). Since our previous studies showed that modified tumor cell lysate (TCL)-pulsed, dendritic cell (DC)-based cancer vaccines can effectively suppress metastasis in mouse tumor models, we assessed whether such vaccines may help offset this rapamycin-promoted metastasis. We observed that shikonin efficiently induced ICD of 4T1 cells in culture, and DC vaccines pulsed with shikonin-treated TCL (SK-TCL-DC) significantly suppressed rapamycin-enhanced metastasis and Treg cell expansion in test mice. In conclusion, rapamycin treatment in mice (and perhaps in humans) promotes metastasis and the effect may be offset by treatment with a DC-based cancer vaccine. PMID:26426423

  8. Exploiting changes in the tumour microenvironment with sequential cytokine and matrix metalloprotease inhibitor treatment in a murine breast cancer model

    PubMed Central

    Scott, K A; Holdsworth, H; Balkwill, F R; Dias, S

    2000-01-01

    The study of treatment-induced changes in the tumour microenvironment might lead to effective combinations of biological therapy. IL-12 induced tumour regression and cure of an experimental murine breast cancer, HTH-K, but only after long-term treatment that was associated with chronic toxicity. During IL-12 therapy, tumour levels of the matrix metalloprotease MMP-9 declined and its inhibitor TIMP-1 was strongly induced. We therefore administered alternate cycles of IL-12 and the MMP inhibitor Batimastat (BB94) to mice. Therapeutic efficacy was increased compared with short-term IL-12 therapy but without the chronic toxicity associated with long-term IL-12 treatment. Image analysis of treated tumours revealed that BB94 prevented regeneration of tumour and stromal compartments that normally occurred after short-term IL-12 therapy. © 2000 Cancer Research Campaign http://www.bjcancer.com PMID:11076665

  9. IL4 receptor α mediates enhanced glucose and glutamine metabolism to support breast cancer growth.

    PubMed

    Venmar, Katherine T; Kimmel, Danielle W; Cliffel, David E; Fingleton, Barbara

    2015-05-01

    The type II interleukin-4 receptor (IL4R) is expressed in human breast cancer, and in murine models thereof. It is activated by interleukin-4 (IL4), a cytokine produced predominantly by immune cells. Previously, we showed that expression of IL4Rα, a signaling component of IL4R, mediates enhanced metastatic growth through promotion of tumor cell survival and proliferation. In lymphocytes, these processes are supported by increased glucose and glutamine metabolism, and B lymphocyte survival is dependent upon IL4/IL4R-induced glucose metabolism. However, it is unknown whether IL4R-mediated metabolic reprogramming could support tumor growth. Here, we show that IL4Rα expression increases proliferation thus enhancing primary mammary tumor growth. In vitro, IL4-enhanced glucose consumption and lactate production in 4T1 cells was mediated by IL4Rα. Expression of the glucose transporter GLUT1 increased in response to IL4 in vitro, and enhanced GLUT1 expression was associated with the presence of IL4Rα in 4T1 mammary tumors in vivo. Although IL4 treatment did not induce changes in glucose metabolism in MDA-MB-231 human breast cancer cells, it increased expression of the main glutamine transporter, ASCT2, and enhanced glutamine consumption in both MDA-MB-231 and 4T1 cells. Pharmacologic inhibition of glutamine metabolism with compound 968 blocked IL4/IL4Rα-increased cell number in both cell lines. Our results demonstrate that IL4R mediates enhanced glucose and glutamine metabolism in 4T1 cancer cells, and that IL4-induced growth is supported by IL4/IL4R-enhanced glutamine metabolism in both human and murine mammary cancer cells. This highlights IL4Rα as a possible target for effective breast cancer therapy.

  10. Contrast-enhanced X-ray detection of breast microcalcifications in a murine model using targeted gold nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Cole, Lisa E; Vargo-Gogola, Tracy; Roeder, Ryan K

    2014-07-22

    Microcalcifications are deposits of hydroxyapatite (HA) mineral within breast tissue and the most common abnormality detected by mammography when screening for breast cancer due to exhibiting greater X-ray attenuation than the surrounding tissue. However, the detection of microcalcifications is limited by the sensitivity and specificity of mammography. Therefore, the objective of this study was to investigate in vivo targeted delivery of bisphosphonate-functionalized gold nanoparticles (BP-Au NPs) for contrast-enhanced detection of microcalcifications using computed tomography (CT). A murine model was developed for precise, a priori control over the level of microcalcification burden by injecting varying concentrations of HA crystals in a Matrigel carrier into mammary glands. The measured X-ray attenuation of microcalcifications containing varying HA concentrations demonstrated that the model was reproducible and able to recapitulate varying levels of microcalcification burden, including levels undetectable by CT in the absence of contrast enhancement. After intramammary delivery, BP-Au NPs provided enhanced contrast for the detection of microcalcifications that were otherwise below the CT detection limit. BP-Au NPs targeted microcalcifications due to specific binding to HA crystal surfaces, resulting in contrast between the HA microcalcification site and surrounding tissue which was visibly apparent (∼30-135 HU) within 2 days after delivery. Therefore, targeted BP-Au NPs enabled improved sensitivity and specificity for the detection of microcalcifications.

  11. Contrast-enhanced X-ray detection of breast microcalcifications in a murine model using targeted gold nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Cole, Lisa E; Vargo-Gogola, Tracy; Roeder, Ryan K

    2014-07-22

    Microcalcifications are deposits of hydroxyapatite (HA) mineral within breast tissue and the most common abnormality detected by mammography when screening for breast cancer due to exhibiting greater X-ray attenuation than the surrounding tissue. However, the detection of microcalcifications is limited by the sensitivity and specificity of mammography. Therefore, the objective of this study was to investigate in vivo targeted delivery of bisphosphonate-functionalized gold nanoparticles (BP-Au NPs) for contrast-enhanced detection of microcalcifications using computed tomography (CT). A murine model was developed for precise, a priori control over the level of microcalcification burden by injecting varying concentrations of HA crystals in a Matrigel carrier into mammary glands. The measured X-ray attenuation of microcalcifications containing varying HA concentrations demonstrated that the model was reproducible and able to recapitulate varying levels of microcalcification burden, including levels undetectable by CT in the absence of contrast enhancement. After intramammary delivery, BP-Au NPs provided enhanced contrast for the detection of microcalcifications that were otherwise below the CT detection limit. BP-Au NPs targeted microcalcifications due to specific binding to HA crystal surfaces, resulting in contrast between the HA microcalcification site and surrounding tissue which was visibly apparent (∼30-135 HU) within 2 days after delivery. Therefore, targeted BP-Au NPs enabled improved sensitivity and specificity for the detection of microcalcifications. PMID:24992365

  12. Gallotannin-rich Caesalpinia spinosa fraction decreases the primary tumor and factors associated with poor prognosis in a murine breast cancer model

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Several treatment alternatives are available for primary breast cancer, although those for metastatic disease or inflammation associated with tumor progression are ineffective. Therefore, there is a great need for new therapeutic alternatives capable of generating an immune response against residual tumor cells, thus contributing to eradication of micrometastases and cancer stem cells. The use of complex natural products is an excellent therapeutic alternative widely used by Chinese, Hindu, Egyptian, and ancestral Latin-American Indian populations. Methods The present study evaluated cytotoxic, antitumor, and tumor progression activities of a gallotannin-rich fraction derived from Caesalpinia spinosa (P2Et). The parameters evaluated in vitro were mitochondrial membrane depolarization, phosphatidylserine externalization, caspase 3 activation, DNA fragmentation, and clonogenic activity. The parameters evaluated in vivo were tumor growth, leukocyte number, metastatic cell number, and cytokine production by flow cytometry. Results The in vitro results showed that the P2Et fraction induced apoptosis with mitochondrial membrane potential loss, phosphatidylserine externalization, caspase 3 activation, DNA fragmentation, and decreased clonogenic capacity of 4T1 cells. In vivo, the P2Et fraction induced primary tumor reduction in terms of diameter and weight in BALB/c mice transplanted with 4T1 cells and decreased numbers of metastatic cells, mainly in the spleen. Furthermore, decreases in the number of peripheral blood leukocytes (leukemoid reaction) and interleukin 6 (IL-6) serum levels were found, which are events associated with a poor prognosis. The P2Et fraction exerts its activity on the primary tumor, reduces cell migration to distant organs, and decreases IL-6 serum levels, implying tumor microenvironment mechanisms. Conclusions Overall, the P2Et fraction lessens risk factors associated with tumor progression and diminishes primary tumor size, showing

  13. Endostatin and irradiation modifies the activity of ADAM10 and neprilysin in breast cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Aydemir, Esra Arslan; Şimşek, Ece; Korcum, Aylin Fidan; Fişkin, Kayahan

    2016-09-01

    Angiogenesis, the formation of new blood vessels, is regarded as a key cancer cell property. Endostatin (ES) is a potential antiangiogenic agent and it may be useful when implemented in combination with other cancer therapeutic strategies. The present study investigated the in vitro effects of ES, radiotherapy (RT) or combination therapy (ES + RT) on two important proteases, a disintegrin and metalloproteinase domain‑containing protein 10 (ADAM10) and neprilysin (NEP) in 4T1 mouse breast cancer cells and the more metastatic phenotype of 4THMpc breast cancer cells. 4T1 and 4THMpc cells were treated with recombinant murine ES (4 µg/ml) alone, RT (45 Gy) alone or with ES + RT. ADAM10 enzyme activity was determined using a tumor necrosis factor‑α converting enzyme (α‑secretase) activity assay kit, and NEP enzyme activity was measured with a fluorometric assay based on the generation of free dansyl‑D‑Ala‑Gly from N-dansyl-Ala-Gly-D-nitro-Phe-Gly, the substrate of NEP. Western blotting analysis was performed to determine whether the altered enzyme activity levels of the two cell lines occurred due to changes in expression level. These data indicate that ES independently potentiates the activity of ADAM10 and NEP enzymes in 4T1 and 4THMpc breast cancer cells. PMID:27430992

  14. NDRG2 Expression Decreases Tumor-Induced Osteoclast Differentiation by Down-regulating ICAM1 in Breast Cancer Cells.

    PubMed

    Kim, Bomi; Nam, Sorim; Lim, Ji Hyun; Lim, Jong-Seok

    2016-01-01

    Bone matrix is properly maintained by osteoclasts and osteoblasts. In the tumor microenvironment, osteoclasts are increasingly differentiated by the various ligands and cytokines secreted from the metastasized cancer cells at the bone metastasis niche. The activated osteoclasts generate osteolytic lesions. For this reason, studies focusing on the differentiation of osteoclasts are important to reduce bone destruction by tumor metastasis. The N-myc downstream-regulated gene 2 (NDRG2) has been known to contribute to the suppression of tumor growth and metastasis, but the precise role of NDRG2 in osteoclast differentiation induced by cancer cells has not been elucidated. In this study, we demonstrate that NDRG2 expression in breast cancer cells has an inhibitory effect on osteoclast differentiation. RAW 264.7 cells, which are monocytic preosteoclast cells, treated with the conditioned media (CM) of murine breast cancer cells (4T1) expressing NDRG2 are less differentiated into the multinucleated osteoclast-like cells than those treated with the CM of 4T1-WT or 4T1-mock cells. Interestingly, 4T1 cells stably expressing NDRG2 showed a decreased mRNA and protein level of intercellular adhesion molecule 1 (ICAM1), which is known to enhance osteoclast maturation. Osteoclast differentiation was also reduced by ICAM1 knockdown in 4T1 cells. In addition, blocking the interaction between soluble ICAM1 and ICAM1 receptors significantly decreased osteoclastogenesis of RAW 264.7 cells in the tumor environment. Collectively, these results suggest that the reduction of ICAM1 expression by NDRG2 in breast cancer cells decreases osteoclast differentiation, and demonstrate that excessive bone resorption could be inhibited via ICAM1 down-regulation by NDRG2 expression.

  15. Radiation-induced lung damage promotes breast cancer lung-metastasis through CXCR4 signaling.

    PubMed

    Feys, Lynn; Descamps, Benedicte; Vanhove, Christian; Vral, Anne; Veldeman, Liv; Vermeulen, Stefan; De Wagter, Carlos; Bracke, Marc; De Wever, Olivier

    2015-09-29

    Radiotherapy is a mainstay in the postoperative treatment of breast cancer as it reduces the risks of local recurrence and mortality after both conservative surgery and mastectomy. Despite recent efforts to decrease irradiation volumes through accelerated partial irradiation techniques, late cardiac and pulmonary toxicity still occurs after breast irradiation. The importance of this pulmonary injury towards lung metastasis is unclear. Preirradiation of lung epithelial cells induces DNA damage, p53 activation and a secretome enriched in the chemokines SDF-1/CXCL12 and MIF. Irradiated lung epithelial cells stimulate adhesion, spreading, growth, and (transendothelial) migration of human MDA-MB-231 and murine 4T1 breast cancer cells. These metastasis-associated cellular activities were largely mimicked by recombinant CXCL12 and MIF. Moreover, an allosteric inhibitor of the CXCR4 receptor prevented the metastasis-associated cellular activities stimulated by the secretome of irradiated lung epithelial cells. Furthermore, partial (10%) irradiation of the right lung significantly stimulated breast cancer lung-specific metastasis in the syngeneic, orthotopic 4T1 breast cancer model.Our results warrant further investigation of the potential pro-metastatic effects of radiation and indicate the need to develop efficient drugs that will be successful in combination with radiotherapy to prevent therapy-induced spread of cancer cells.

  16. Radiation-induced lung damage promotes breast cancer lung-metastasis through CXCR4 signaling

    PubMed Central

    Feys, Lynn; Descamps, Benedicte; Vanhove, Christian; Vral, Anne; Veldeman, Liv; Vermeulen, Stefan; De Wagter, Carlos; Bracke, Marc; De Wever, Olivier

    2015-01-01

    Radiotherapy is a mainstay in the postoperative treatment of breast cancer as it reduces the risks of local recurrence and mortality after both conservative surgery and mastectomy. Despite recent efforts to decrease irradiation volumes through accelerated partial irradiation techniques, late cardiac and pulmonary toxicity still occurs after breast irradiation. The importance of this pulmonary injury towards lung metastasis is unclear. Preirradiation of lung epithelial cells induces DNA damage, p53 activation and a secretome enriched in the chemokines SDF-1/CXCL12 and MIF. Irradiated lung epithelial cells stimulate adhesion, spreading, growth, and (transendothelial) migration of human MDA-MB-231 and murine 4T1 breast cancer cells. These metastasis-associated cellular activities were largely mimicked by recombinant CXCL12 and MIF. Moreover, an allosteric inhibitor of the CXCR4 receptor prevented the metastasis-associated cellular activities stimulated by the secretome of irradiated lung epithelial cells. Furthermore, partial (10%) irradiation of the right lung significantly stimulated breast cancer lung-specific metastasis in the syngeneic, orthotopic 4T1 breast cancer model. Our results warrant further investigation of the potential pro-metastatic effects of radiation and indicate the need to develop efficient drugs that will be successful in combination with radiotherapy to prevent therapy-induced spread of cancer cells. PMID:26396176

  17. Effects of Tamoxifen and oestrogen on histology and radiographic density in high and low mammographic density human breast tissues maintained in murine tissue engineering chambers.

    PubMed

    Chew, G L; Huo, C W; Huang, D; Blick, T; Hill, P; Cawson, J; Frazer, H; Southey, M C; Hopper, J L; Britt, K; Henderson, M A; Haviv, I; Thompson, E W

    2014-11-01

    Mammographic density (MD) is a strong risk factor for breast cancer. It is altered by exogenous endocrine treatments, including hormone replacement therapy and Tamoxifen. Such agents also modify breast cancer (BC) risk. However, the biomolecular basis of how systemic endocrine therapy modifies MD and MD-associated BC risk is poorly understood. This study aims to determine whether our xenograft biochamber model can be used to study the effectiveness of therapies aimed at modulating MD, by examine the effects of Tamoxifen and oestrogen on histologic and radiographic changes in high and low MD tissues maintained within the biochamber model. High and low MD human tissues were precisely sampled under radiographic guidance from prophylactic mastectomy fresh specimens of high-risk women, then inserted into separate vascularized murine biochambers. The murine hosts were concurrently implanted with Tamoxifen, oestrogen or placebo pellets, and the high and low MD biochamber tissues maintained in the murine host environment for 3 months, before the high and low MD biochamber tissues were harvested for histologic and radiographic analyses. The radiographic density of high MD tissue maintained in murine biochambers was decreased in Tamoxifen-treated mice compared to oestrogen-treated mice (p = 0.02). Tamoxifen treatment of high MD tissue in SCID mice led to a decrease in stromal (p = 0.009), and an increase in adipose (p = 0.023) percent areas, compared to placebo-treated mice. No histologic or radiographic differences were observed in low MD biochamber tissue with any treatment. High MD biochamber tissues maintained in mice implanted with Tamoxifen, oestrogen or placebo pellets had dynamic and measurable histologic compositional and radiographic changes. This further validates the dynamic nature of the MD xenograft model, and suggests the biochamber model may be useful for assessing the underlying molecular pathways of Tamoxifen-reduced MD, and in testing of other

  18. CD24 Is Not Required for Tumor Initiation and Growth in Murine Breast and Prostate Cancer Models

    PubMed Central

    Cremers, Natascha; Neeb, Antje; Uhle, Tanja; Dimmler, Arno; Rothley, Melanie; Allgayer, Heike; Fodde, Riccardo; Sleeman, Jonathan Paul; Thiele, Wilko

    2016-01-01

    CD24 is a small, heavily glycosylated, GPI-linked membrane protein, whose expression has been associated with the tumorigenesis and progression of several types of cancer. Here, we studied the expression of CD24 in tumors of MMTV-PyMT, Apc1572/T+ and TRAMP genetic mouse models that spontaneously develop mammary or prostate carcinoma, respectively. We found that CD24 is expressed during tumor development in all three models. In MMTV-PyMT and Apc1572T/+ breast tumors, CD24 was strongly but heterogeneously expressed during early tumorigenesis, but decreased in more advanced stages, and accordingly was increased in poorly differentiated lesions compared with well differentiated lesions. In prostate tumors developing in TRAMP mice, CD24 expression was strong within hyperplastic lesions in comparison with non-hyperplastic regions, and heterogeneous CD24 expression was maintained in advanced prostate carcinomas. To investigate whether CD24 plays a functional role in tumorigenesis in these models, we crossed CD24 deficient mice with MMTV-PyMT, Apc1572T/+ and TRAMP mice, and assessed the influence of CD24 deficiency on tumor onset and tumor burden. We found that mice negative or positive for CD24 did not significantly differ in terms of tumor initiation and burden in the genetic tumor models tested, with the exception of Apc1572T/+ mice, in which lack of CD24 reduced the mammary tumor burden slightly but significantly. Together, our data suggest that while CD24 is distinctively expressed during the early development of murine mammary and prostate tumors, it is not essential for the formation of tumors developing in MMTV-PyMT, Apc1572T/+ and TRAMP mice. PMID:26978528

  19. A Multifaceted Role for Myd88-Dependent Signaling in Progression of Murine Mammary Carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Higgins, Mary J.; Serrano, Antonio; Boateng, Kofi Y.; Parsons, Victoria A.; Phuong, Tiffany; Seifert, Alyssa; Ricca, Jacob M.; Tucker, Kyle C.; Eidelman, Alec S.; Carey, Maureen A.; Kurt, Robert A.

    2016-01-01

    Previous data obtained in our laboratory suggested that there may be constitutive signaling through the myeloid differentiation primary response gene 88 (Myd88)-dependent signaling cascade in murine mammary carcinoma. Here, we extended these findings by showing that, in the absence of an added Toll-like receptor (TLR) agonist, the myddosome complex was preformed in 4T1 tumor cells, and that Myd88 influenced cytoplasmic extracellular signal–regulated kinase (Erk)1/Erk2 levels, nuclear levels of nuclear factor-kappaB (NFκB) and signal transducer and activator of transcription 5 (STAT5), tumor-derived chemokine (C–C motif) ligand 2 (CCL2) expression, and in vitro and in vivo tumor growth. In addition, RNA-sequencing revealed that Myd88-dependent signaling enhanced the expression of genes that could contribute to breast cancer progression and genes previously associated with poor outcome for patients with breast cancer, in addition to suppressing the expression of genes capable of inhibiting breast cancer progression. Yet, Myd88-dependent signaling in tumor cells also suppressed expression of genes that could contribute to tumor progression. Collectively, these data revealed a multifaceted role for Myd88-dependent signaling in murine mammary carcinoma. PMID:27812285

  20. Retrieval of Disseminated Tumor Cells Colonizing the Bone in Murine Breast Cancer Metastasis Models

    PubMed Central

    Welte, Thomas; Yu, Cuijuan

    2016-01-01

    In breast cancer, the most frequent site of metastasis is bone. Disseminated tumor cells (DTCs) can be detected in the bone marrow of patients by their expression of epithelial or oncogenic markers [1], and the presence and frequency of these DTCs are associated with poor prognosis. However, many of the details behind this process remain elusive, including the biological properties and fates of these apparently indolent cancer cells. To provide pre-clinical models of DTCs, we have developed a procedure that allows for controlled and enhanced delivery of tumor cells to the bone in animal experiments via injection into the iliac artery of the hind limb [2]. To our surprise, we found that most cancer cells became integrated into the solid bone matrix shortly after arriving in the bone, and only a minority can be flushed out with the bone marrow. Here we describe a method that helps to retrieve DTCs homing to the bone in which we achieve an improved recovery of those tumor cells closely associated with the bone microenvironment. In our view it is especially important to analyze these tumor cell subpopulations, as they may take full advantage of growth-, survival- and immune-protective signals provided by neighbor cells. We also show a pilot study on how this approach may be applied to the analysis of cancer dormancy. Our study suggests that the detection and retrieval of DTCs in clinical studies are incomplete because they are conducted exclusively with bone marrow aspirates. PMID:26490041

  1. Interstitial Fluid Sphingosine-1-Phosphate in Murine Mammary Gland and Cancer and Human Breast Tissue and Cancer Determined by Novel Methods.

    PubMed

    Nagahashi, Masayuki; Yamada, Akimitsu; Miyazaki, Hiroshi; Allegood, Jeremy C; Tsuchida, Junko; Aoyagi, Tomoyoshi; Huang, Wei-Ching; Terracina, Krista P; Adams, Barbara J; Rashid, Omar M; Milstien, Sheldon; Wakai, Toshifumi; Spiegel, Sarah; Takabe, Kazuaki

    2016-06-01

    The tumor microenvironment is a determining factor for cancer biology and progression. Sphingosine-1-phosphate (S1P), produced by sphingosine kinases (SphKs), is a bioactive lipid mediator that regulates processes important for cancer progression. Despite its critical roles, the levels of S1P in interstitial fluid (IF), an important component of the tumor microenvironment, have never previously been measured due to a lack of efficient methods for collecting and quantifying IF. The purpose of this study is to clarify the levels of S1P in the IF from murine mammary glands and its tumors utilizing our novel methods. We developed an improved centrifugation method to collect IF. Sphingolipids in IF, blood, and tissue samples were measured by mass spectrometry. In mice with a deletion of SphK1, but not SphK2, levels of S1P in IF from the mammary glands were greatly attenuated. Levels of S1P in IF from mammary tumors were reduced when tumor growth was suppressed by oral administration of FTY720/fingolimod. Importantly, sphingosine, dihydro-sphingosine, and S1P levels, but not dihydro-S1P, were significantly higher in human breast tumor tissue IF than in the normal breast tissue IF. To our knowledge, this is the first reported S1P IF measurement in murine normal mammary glands and mammary tumors, as well as in human patients with breast cancer. S1P tumor IF measurement illuminates new aspects of the role of S1P in the tumor microenvironment.

  2. Peripherally cross-linking the shell of core-shell polymer micelles decreases premature release of physically loaded combretastatin A4 in whole blood and increases its mean residence time and subsequent potency against primary murine breast tumors after IV administration

    PubMed Central

    Wakaskar, Rajesh R.; Bathena, Sai Praneeth R.; Tallapaka, Shailendra; Ambardekar, Vishakha V.; Gautum, Nagsen; Thakare, Rhishikesh N.; Simet, Samantha M.; Curran, Stephen M.; Singh, Rakesh K.; Dong, Yuxiang

    2014-01-01

    Purpose Determine the feasibility and potential benefit of peripherally cross-linking the shell of core-shell polymer micelles on the premature release of physically loaded hydrophobic drug in whole blood and subsequent potency against solid tumors. Methods Individual Pluronic F127 polymer micelles (F127 PM) peripherally cross-linked with ethylenediamine at 76% of total PEO blocks (X-F127 PM) were physically loaded with combretastatin A4 (CA4) by the solid dispersion method and compared to CA4 physically loaded in uncross-linked F127 PM, CA4 in DMSO in vitro, or water-soluble CA4 phosphate (CA4P) in vivo. Results X-F127 PM had similar CA4 loading and aqueous solubility as F127 PM up to 10 mg CA4 / mL at 22.9 wt% and did not aggregate in PBS or 90% (v/v) human serum at 37°C for at least 24 h. In contrast, X-F127 PM decreased the unbound fraction of CA4 in whole blood (fu) and increased the mean plasma residence time and subsequent potency of CA4 against the vascular function and growth of primary murine 4T1 breast tumors over CA4 in F127 PM and water-soluble CA4P after IV administration. Conclusions Given that decreasing the fu is an indication of decreased drug release, peripherally cross-linking the shell of core-shell polymer micelles may be a simple approach to decrease premature release of physically loaded hydrophobic drug in the blood and increase subsequent potency in solid tumors. PMID:25223962

  3. In vivo photoacoustic imaging of breast cancer tumor with HER2-targeted nanodiamonds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Ti; Cui, Huizhong; Fang, Chia-Yi; Jo, Janggun; Yang, Xinmai; Chang, Huan-Cheng; Forrest, M. Laird

    2013-09-01

    Radiation-damaged nanodiamonds (NDs) are ideal optical contrast agents for photoacoustic (PA) imaging in biological tissues due to their good biocompatibility and high optical absorbance in the near-infrared (NIR) range. Acid treated NDs are oxidized to form carboxyl groups on the surface, functionalized with polyethylene glycol (PEG) and human epidermal growth factor receptor 2 (HER2) targeting ligand for breast cancer tumor imaging. Because of the specific binding of the ligand conjugated NDs to the HER2-overexpressing murine breast cancer cells (4T1.2 neu), the tumor tissues are significantly delineated from the surrounding normal tissue at wavelength of 820 nm under the PA imaging modality. Moreover, HER2 targeted NDs (HER2-PEG-NDs) result in higher accumulation in HER2 positive breast tumors as compared to non-targeted NDs after intravenous injection (i.v.). Longer retention time of HER-PEG-NDs is observed in HER2 overexpressing tumor model than that in negative tumor model (4T1.2). This demonstrates that targeting moiety conjugated NDs have great potential for the sensitive detection of cancer tumors and provide an attractive delivery strategy for anti-cancer drugs.

  4. Influence of the phosphodiesterase-5 inhibitor, sildenafil, on sensitivity to chemotherapy in breast tumor cells.

    PubMed

    Di, Xu; Gennings, Chris; Bear, Harry D; Graham, Laura J; Sheth, Christopher M; White, Kimber L; Gewirtz, David A

    2010-11-01

    Studies were performed to determine the influence of the phosphodiesterase-5 inhibitor, sildenafil, on sensitivity to adriamycin (doxorubicin) in four human breast tumor cell lines and one murine breast tumor line. Sildenafil did not interfere with the effectiveness of adriamycin in any of the cell lines tested. Sildenafil also failed to protect MDA-MB231 cells against the cytotoxicity of cisplatin, taxol or camptothecin. Sildenafil enhanced sensitivity to adriamycin markedly in the p53 mutant MDA-MB231 and p53 null MCF-7/E6 cells and moderately in the MCF-7/caspase 3 and 4T1 cell lines. In the MDA-MB231 cells, sildenafil increased the extent of DNA damage induced by adriamycin as well as the extent of apoptotic cell death. Sildenafil did not influence sensitivity to adriamycin in bone marrow cells or macrophages. In an immunocompetent model of breast cancer (4T1 mammary carcinoma in Balb/c mice), sildenafil did not attenuate the antitumor effects of adriamycin; furthermore, the combination of sildenafil with adriamycin was no more toxic to the animals than adriamycin alone. Given that sildenafil has been shown to have the potential to protect the heart against the toxicity of adriamycin, these studies suggest that the inclusion of sildenafil with conventional chemotherapeutic protocols involving adriamycin (and possibly cisplatin, camptothecin and/or paclitaxel) should not compromise the antitumor effectiveness of these drugs nor enhance their toxicity to the patient. PMID:20155316

  5. IL-15 superagonist/IL-15RαSushi-Fc fusion complex (IL-15SA/IL-15RαSu-Fc; ALT-803) markedly enhances specific subpopulations of NK and memory CD8+ T cells, and mediates potent anti-tumor activity against murine breast and colon carcinomas

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Peter S.; Kwilas, Anna R.; Xu, Wenxin; Alter, Sarah; Jeng, Emily K.; Wong, Hing C.

    2016-01-01

    Interleukin (IL)-15-N72D superagonist-complexed with IL-15RαSushi-Fc fusion protein (IL-15SA/IL-15RαSu-Fc; ALT-803) has been reported to exhibit significant anti-tumor activity in murine myeloma, rat bladder cancer, and murine glioblastoma models. In this study, we examined the immunomodulatory and anti-tumor effects of IL-15SA/IL-15RαSu-Fc in tumor-free and highly metastatic tumor-bearing mice. Here, IL-15SA/IL-15RαSu-Fc significantly expanded natural killer (NK) and CD8+ T cells. In examining NK cell subsets, the greatest significant increase was in highly cytotoxic and migrating (CD11b+, CD27hi; high effector) NK cells, leading to enhanced function on a per-cell basis. CD8+ T cell subset analysis determined that IL-15SA/IL-15RαSu-Fc significantly increased IL-15 responding memory (CD122+, CD44+) CD8+ T cells, in particular those having the innate (NKG2D+, PD1−) phenotype. In 4T1 breast tumor–bearing mice, IL-15SA/IL-15RαSu-Fc induced significant anti-tumor activity against spontaneous pulmonary metastases, depending on CD8+ T and NK cells, and resulting in prolonged survival. Similar anti-tumor activity was seen in the experimental pulmonary metastasis model of CT26 colon carcinoma cells, particularly when IL-15SA/IL-15RαSu-Fc was combined with a cocktail of checkpoint inhibitors, anti-CTLA-4 and anti-PD-L1. Altogether, these studies showed for the first time that IL-15SA/IL-15RαSu-Fc (1) promoted the development of high effector NK cells and CD8+ T cell responders of the innate phenotype, (2) enhanced function of NK cells, and (3) played a vital role in reducing tumor metastasis and ultimately survival, especially in combination with checkpoint inhibitors. PMID:26910920

  6. RA-XII inhibits tumour growth and metastasis in breast tumour-bearing mice via reducing cell adhesion and invasion and promoting matrix degradation

    PubMed Central

    Leung, Hoi-Wing; Zhao, Si-Meng; Yue, Grace Gar-Lee; Lee, Julia Kin-Ming; Fung, Kwok-Pui; Leung, Ping-Chung; Tan, Ning-Hua; Lau, Clara Bik-San

    2015-01-01

    Cancer cells acquire invasive ability to degrade and adhere to extracellular matrix (ECM) and migrate to adjacent tissues. This ultimately results metastasis. Hence, the present study investigated the in vitro effects of cyclopeptide glycoside, RA-XII on cell adhesion, invasion, proliferation and matrix degradation, and its underlying mechanism in murine breast tumour cells, 4T1. The effect of RA-XII on tumour growth and metastasis in 4T1-bearing mice was also investigated. Our results showed that RA-XII inhibited tumour cell adhesion to collagen, fibronectin and laminin, RA-XII also reduced the expressions of vascular cell adhesion molecule, intracellular adhesion molecule and integrins, and integrin binding. In addition, RA-XII significantly inhibited breast tumour cell migration via interfering cofilin signaling and chemokine receptors. The activities of matrix metalloproteinase-9 and urokinase-type of plasminogen activator, and the expressions of ECM-associated proteinases were attenuated significantly by RA-XII. Furthermore, RA-XII induced G1 phase arrest and inhibited the expressions of cyclins and cyclin-dependent kinases. RA-XII inhibited the expressions of molecules in PI3K/AKT, NF-kappaB, FAK/pSRC, MAPK and EGFR signaling. RA-XII was also shown to have anti-tumour, anti-angiogenic and anti-metastatic activities in metastatic breast tumour-bearing mice. These findings strongly suggested that RA-XII is a potential anti-metastatic agent for breast cancer. PMID:26592552

  7. Targeting single-walled carbon nanotubes for the treatment of breast cancer using photothermal therapy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Neves, Luís F. F.; Krais, John J.; Van Rite, Brent D.; Ramesh, Rajagopal; Resasco, Daniel E.; Harrison, Roger G.

    2013-09-01

    This paper focuses on the targeting of single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWNTs) for the treatment of breast cancer with minimal side effects using photothermal therapy. The human protein annexin V (AV) binds specifically to anionic phospholipids expressed externally on the surface of tumour cells and endothelial cells that line the tumour vasculature. A 2 h incubation of the SWNT-AV conjugate with proliferating endothelial cells followed by washing and near-infrared (NIR) irradiation at a wavelength of 980 nm was enough to induce significant cell death; there was no significant cell death with irradiation or the conjugate alone. Administration of the same conjugate i.v. in BALB/c female mice with implanted 4T1 murine mammary at a dose of 0.8 mg SWNT kg-1 and followed one day later by NIR irradiation of the tumour at a wavelength of 980 nm led to complete disappearance of implanted 4T1 mouse mammary tumours for the majority of the animals by 11 days since the irradiation. The combination of the photothermal therapy with the immunoadjuvant cyclophosphamide resulted in increased survival. The in vivo results suggest the SWNT-AV/NIR treatment is a promising approach to treat breast cancer.

  8. Decreased Cortisol and Pain in Breast Cancer: Biofield Therapy Potential

    PubMed Central

    Running, Alice

    2015-01-01

    Breast cancer is one of the leading causes of cancer death among women of all races. Pain is a common symptom associated with cancer; 75–90% of cancer patients experience pain during their illness and up to 50% of that pain is undertreated. Unrelieved pain leads to increased levels of the stress hormone cortisol. The purpose of this study was to examine the impact of bioenergy on fecal cortisol levels for mice injected with murine mammary carcinoma 4T1 in two separate pilot studies. Using a multiple experimental group design, six to eight week old female BALB/c mice were injected with tumor and randomly assigned, in groups of 10, to daily treatment, every other day treatment, and no treatment groups. Five days after tumor cell injection, bioenergy interventions were begun for a period of ten consecutive days. Fecal samples were collected for each study and ELISA analysis was conducted at the end of both studies. For both studies, cortisol levels were decreased in the every other day treatment groups but remained high in the no treatment groups. Future studies utilizing bioenergy therapies on cortisol levels in a murine breast cancer model can begin to describe pain outcomes and therapeutic dose. PMID:26170887

  9. Decreased Cortisol and Pain in Breast Cancer: Biofield Therapy Potential.

    PubMed

    Running, Alice

    2015-01-01

    Breast cancer is one of the leading causes of cancer death among women of all races. Pain is a common symptom associated with cancer; 75-90% of cancer patients experience pain during their illness and up to 50% of that pain is undertreated. Unrelieved pain leads to increased levels of the stress hormone cortisol. The purpose of this study was to examine the impact of bioenergy on fecal cortisol levels for mice injected with murine mammary carcinoma 4T1 in two separate pilot studies. Using a multiple experimental group design, six to eight week old female BALB/c mice were injected with tumor and randomly assigned, in groups of 10, to daily treatment, every other day treatment, and no treatment groups. Five days after tumor cell injection, bioenergy interventions were begun for a period of ten consecutive days. Fecal samples were collected for each study and ELISA analysis was conducted at the end of both studies. For both studies, cortisol levels were decreased in the every other day treatment groups but remained high in the no treatment groups. Future studies utilizing bioenergy therapies on cortisol levels in a murine breast cancer model can begin to describe pain outcomes and therapeutic dose.

  10. In vivo visualization and ex vivo quantification of murine breast cancer cells in the mouse brain using MRI cell tracking and electron paramagnetic resonance.

    PubMed

    Danhier, Pierre; Magat, Julie; Levêque, Philippe; De Preter, Géraldine; Porporato, Paolo E; Bouzin, Caroline; Jordan, Bénédicte F; Demeur, Gladys; Haufroid, Vincent; Feron, Olivier; Sonveaux, Pierre; Gallez, Bernard

    2015-03-01

    Cell tracking could be useful to elucidate fundamental processes of cancer biology such as metastasis. The aim of this study was to visualize, using MRI, and to quantify, using electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR), the entrapment of murine breast cancer cells labeled with superparamagnetic iron oxide particles (SPIOs) in the mouse brain after intracardiac injection. For this purpose, luciferase-expressing murine 4 T1-luc breast cancer cells were labeled with fluorescent Molday ION Rhodamine B SPIOs. Following intracardiac injection, SPIO-labeled 4 T1-luc cells were imaged using multiple gradient-echo sequences. Ex vivo iron oxide quantification in the mouse brain was performed using EPR (9 GHz). The long-term fate of 4 T1-luc cells after injection was characterized using bioluminescence imaging (BLI), brain MRI and immunofluorescence. We observed hypointense spots due to SPIO-labeled cells in the mouse brain 4 h after injection on T2 *-weighted images. Histology studies showed that SPIO-labeled cancer cells were localized within blood vessels shortly after delivery. Ex vivo quantification of SPIOs showed that less than 1% of the injected cells were taken up by the mouse brain after injection. MRI experiments did not reveal the development of macrometastases in the mouse brain several days after injection, but immunofluorescence studies demonstrated that these cells found in the brain established micrometastases. Concerning the metastatic patterns of 4 T1-luc cells, an EPR biodistribution study demonstrated that SPIO-labeled 4 T1-luc cells were also entrapped in the lungs of mice after intracardiac injection. BLI performed 6 days after injection of 4 T1-luc cells showed that this cell line formed macrometastases in the lungs and in the bones. Conclusively, EPR and MRI were found to be complementary for cell tracking applications. MRI cell tracking at 11.7 T allowed sensitive detection of isolated SPIO-labeled cells in the mouse brain, whereas EPR

  11. In vivo visualization and ex vivo quantification of murine breast cancer cells in the mouse brain using MRI cell tracking and electron paramagnetic resonance.

    PubMed

    Danhier, Pierre; Magat, Julie; Levêque, Philippe; De Preter, Géraldine; Porporato, Paolo E; Bouzin, Caroline; Jordan, Bénédicte F; Demeur, Gladys; Haufroid, Vincent; Feron, Olivier; Sonveaux, Pierre; Gallez, Bernard

    2015-03-01

    Cell tracking could be useful to elucidate fundamental processes of cancer biology such as metastasis. The aim of this study was to visualize, using MRI, and to quantify, using electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR), the entrapment of murine breast cancer cells labeled with superparamagnetic iron oxide particles (SPIOs) in the mouse brain after intracardiac injection. For this purpose, luciferase-expressing murine 4 T1-luc breast cancer cells were labeled with fluorescent Molday ION Rhodamine B SPIOs. Following intracardiac injection, SPIO-labeled 4 T1-luc cells were imaged using multiple gradient-echo sequences. Ex vivo iron oxide quantification in the mouse brain was performed using EPR (9 GHz). The long-term fate of 4 T1-luc cells after injection was characterized using bioluminescence imaging (BLI), brain MRI and immunofluorescence. We observed hypointense spots due to SPIO-labeled cells in the mouse brain 4 h after injection on T2 *-weighted images. Histology studies showed that SPIO-labeled cancer cells were localized within blood vessels shortly after delivery. Ex vivo quantification of SPIOs showed that less than 1% of the injected cells were taken up by the mouse brain after injection. MRI experiments did not reveal the development of macrometastases in the mouse brain several days after injection, but immunofluorescence studies demonstrated that these cells found in the brain established micrometastases. Concerning the metastatic patterns of 4 T1-luc cells, an EPR biodistribution study demonstrated that SPIO-labeled 4 T1-luc cells were also entrapped in the lungs of mice after intracardiac injection. BLI performed 6 days after injection of 4 T1-luc cells showed that this cell line formed macrometastases in the lungs and in the bones. Conclusively, EPR and MRI were found to be complementary for cell tracking applications. MRI cell tracking at 11.7 T allowed sensitive detection of isolated SPIO-labeled cells in the mouse brain, whereas EPR

  12. The CC chemokine CK beta-11/MIP-3 beta/ELC/Exodus 3 mediates tumor rejection of murine breast cancer cells through NK cells.

    PubMed

    Braun, S E; Chen, K; Foster, R G; Kim, C H; Hromas, R; Kaplan, M H; Broxmeyer, H E; Cornetta, K

    2000-04-15

    CK beta-11 chemoattracts T cells, B cells, dendritic cells, macrophage progenitors, and NK cells and facilitates dendritic cell and T cell interactions in secondary lymphoid tissues. We hypothesized that expression of CK beta-11 in tumor cells may generate antitumor immunity through these interactions. After transduction with the retroviral vector L(CK beta 11)SN, the murine breast cancer cell line C3L5 (C3L5-CK beta 11) showed expression of retroviral mRNA by Northern analysis and production of functional CK beta-11 by chemotaxis of human NK cells to C3L5-CK beta 11 supernatant. Only 10% of mice injected with C3L5-CK beta 11 developed tumors, compared with 100% of mice injected with a transduced control C3L5 line (C3L5-G1N). Importantly, the in vitro growth characteristics of the CK beta-11-transduced cell line were unaffected, suggesting the difference in growth in vivo was a result of chemokine production. Vaccination with C3L5-CK beta 11 partially protected animals from parental C3L5 challenge. Immunodepletion with anti-asialo-GM1 or anti-CD4 during C3L5-CK beta 11 vaccination significantly reduced CK beta-11 antitumor activity compared with control and anti-CD8-treated groups. Splenocytes from NK-depleted animals transferred the acquired immunity generated with C3L5-CK beta 11 vaccination, while splenocytes from the CD4-depleted animals did not. These results indicate, for the first time, that expression of CK beta-11 in a breast cancer cell line mediates rejection of the transduced tumor through a mechanism involving NK and CD4+ cells. Furthermore, CK beta-11-transduced tumor cells generate long-term antitumor immunity that requires CD4+ cells. These studies demonstrate the potential role of CK beta-11 as an adjuvant in stimulating antitumor responses.

  13. Dietary soy isoflavones increase metastasis to lungs in an experimental model of breast cancer with bone micro-tumors.

    PubMed

    Yang, Xujuan; Belosay, Aashvini; Hartman, James A; Song, Huaxin; Zhang, Yukun; Wang, Wendan; Doerge, Daniel R; Helferich, William G

    2015-04-01

    Bone is one of the most common sites for metastasis in breast cancer (BC). Micro-metastasis in bone marrow was detected in 30% of patients with stage I, II, or III BC at primary surgery and is a strong indicator of poor prognosis. The role dietary soy isoflavones play in BC with bone micro-metastasis is unclear. In this study, we examined the effects of genistein, daidzein, (-)-equol or a mixture of soy isoflavones on BC with bone micro-metastasis using an experimental model of murine mammary cancer 4T1 cells engineered with luciferase. A small number (1000) of 4T1 cells were injected into the tibia of female Balb/c mice to establish micro-tumors in bone. Soy isoflavones were supplemented in the AIN-93G diet at 750 mg/kg and were provided to mice from 3 weeks before to 3 weeks after cell injection. Bioluminescent imaging was conducted on day 2 (D2), D6, D8, D16 and D20 post cell injection and the results indicated dietary soy isoflavones enhanced the growth of bone micro-tumors on D8. Furthermore, dietary soy isoflavones stimulated metastatic tumor formation in lungs and increased Ki-67 protein expression in these metastasized tumors. In vitro, soy isoflavones (<10 µM) had limited effects on the growth, motility or invasion of 4T1 cells. Thus, the in vivo stimulatory effect could be likely due to systemic effects between the host, 4T1 tumors and soy isoflavones. In conclusion, soy isoflavones stimulate BC with bone micro-metastasis in mice and further investigations are needed regarding their consumption by BC survivors.

  14. Tumor-targeting Salmonella typhimurium A1-R arrests growth of breast-cancer brain metastasis.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Yong; Miwa, Shinji; Zhang, Nan; Hoffman, Robert M; Zhao, Ming

    2015-02-20

    Brain metastasis is a morbid, treatment-resistant, end-stage frequent occurrence in breast cancer patients. The aim of this study was to evaluate the efficacy of tumor-targeting Salmonella typhimurium A1-R on breast cancer brain metastases. High brain-metastatic variants of murine 4T1 breast cancer cells expressing red fluorescent protein (RFP) were injected orthotopically in the mammary fat pad in non-transgenic nude mice or in the left ventricle of non-transgenic nude mice and transgenic nude mice expressing nestin-driven green fluorescent protein (ND-GFP). ND-GFP mice express GFP in nascent blood vessels. In the orthotopically-injected mice, the primary tumor was surgically-resected in order to allow brain metastasis to develop. At various time points, the tumors and vasculature in the brain were imaged by confocal and stereo fluorescence microscopy. Some of the breast cancer cells that reached the brain extravasated and grew perivascularly and some of the cells proliferated within the vasculature. S. typhimurium A1-R significantly inhibited brain metastasis in both metastatic models and increased survival of the orthotopically-transplanted, primary-tumor-resected mice (p<0.05). The results of the present study suggest the clinical potential of bacterial therapy of breast cancer brain metastasis.

  15. The efficacy of nuclease-resistant Chol-siRNA in primary breast tumors following complexation with PLL-PEG(5K).

    PubMed

    Ambardekar, Vishakha V; Wakaskar, Rajesh R; Sharma, Bhawna; Bowman, Joy; Vayaboury, Willy; Singh, Rakesh K; Vetro, Joseph A

    2013-07-01

    Modifying the sense strand of nuclease-resistant siRNA with 3'-cholesterol (Chol-*siRNA) increases mRNA suppression after i.v. administration but with relatively low efficacy. We previously found evidence in vitro that suggests complexation of Chol-siRNA with PLL-PEG(5K), a block copolymer of poly-l-lysine and 5 kDa polyethylene glycol, may increase the efficacy of Chol-siRNA in vivo in a PLL block length-dependent manner. In this study, the extent that polyplexes of PLL10-PEG(5K), PLL30-PEG(5K), and PLL50-PEG(5K) protect complexed Chol-siRNA in high concentrations of murine serum and affect the activity of Chol-*siRNA in murine 4T1 breast tumor epithelial cells in vitro and in primary orthotopic tumors of 4T1 was compared. PLL-PEG(5K) required 3'-Chol to protect full-length siRNA from nuclease degradation in 90% (v/v) murine serum and protection was increased by increasing PLL block length and nuclease resistance of Chol-siRNA. Polyplexes of Chol-*siLuc suppressed stably expressed luciferase in 4T1-Luc cells to different levels in vitro where PLL30 > PLL50 > PLL10. In contrast, only polyplexes of Chol-*siLuc and PLL30-PEG(5K) or PLL50-PEG(5K) suppressed high levels of luciferase in primary orthotopic tumors of 4T1-Luc after i.v. administration, whereas polyplexes of Chol-*siLuc and PLL10-PEG(5K), inactive Chol-*siCtrl polyplexes of PLL-PEG(5K), or Chol-*siLuc alone had no detectable activity. As a whole, these results indicate that polyplexes of PLL-PEG(5K) increase the efficacy of nuclease-resistant Chol-siRNA in primary breast tumors after i.v. administration in a PLL block length-dependent manner. Thus, complexation of Chol-siRNA with PLL-PEG(5K) may be a promising approach to increase the efficacy of Chol-siRNA in a wide range of primary tumors, metastases, and other tissues but likely requires a PLL block length that balances polymer-related adverse effects, Chol-siRNA bioavailability, and subsequent activity in the target cell.

  16. Zeeman spectroscopy of the internal transition 4T1 to 6A1 of Fe3+ ions in wurtzite GaN

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Neuschl, B.; Gödecke, M. L.; Thonke, K.; Lipski, F.; Klein, M.; Scholz, F.; Feneberg, M.

    2015-12-01

    Internal transitions of Fe3+ ions in wurtzite gallium nitride were analyzed by means of photoluminescence, Zeeman, and transmission spectroscopy in order to investigate the fine structure. Magnetic fields up to 14 T were applied perpendicular or parallel to the crystal c-axis, causing a characteristic splitting pattern of the luminescence related to the transition from the 4T1 excited state to the 6A1 ground state of Fe3+. The complete Hamiltonian matrix is constructed taking into account the crystal field in cubic and trigonal symmetry, spin-orbit interaction, and the influence of external magnetic fields. Numerical solution yields the exact energy level scheme of the excited state 4G of Fe3+ ions in GaN, which partly revises assumptions based on a qualitative treatment considering group theory only and invoking the influence of a Jahn-Teller effect. The coincidence of the calculated energy levels with the experimental data verifies the derived fine structure of the 3d metal ion.

  17. DNA Double-Strand Break Repair Genes and Oxidative Damage in Brain Metastasis of Breast Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Evans, Lynda; Duchnowska, Renata; Reed, L. Tiffany; Palmieri, Diane; Qian, Yongzhen; Badve, Sunil; Sledge, George; Gril, Brunilde; Aladjem, Mirit I.; Fu, Haiqing; Flores, Natasha M.; Gökmen-Polar, Yesim; Biernat, Wojciech; Szutowicz-Zielińska, Ewa; Mandat, Tomasz; Trojanowski, Tomasz; Och, Waldemar; Czartoryska-Arlukowicz, Bogumiła; Jassem, Jacek; Mitchell, James B.

    2014-01-01

    Background Breast cancer frequently metastasizes to the brain, colonizing a neuro-inflammatory microenvironment. The molecular pathways facilitating this colonization remain poorly understood. Methods Expression profiling of 23 matched sets of human resected brain metastases and primary breast tumors by two-sided paired t test was performed to identify brain metastasis–specific genes. The implicated DNA repair genes BARD1 and RAD51 were modulated in human (MDA-MB-231-BR) and murine (4T1-BR) brain-tropic breast cancer cell lines by lentiviral transduction of cDNA or short hairpin RNA (shRNA) coding sequences. Their functional contribution to brain metastasis development was evaluated in mouse xenograft models (n = 10 mice per group). Results Human brain metastases overexpressed BARD1 and RAD51 compared with either matched primary tumors (1.74-fold, P < .001; 1.46-fold, P < .001, respectively) or unlinked systemic metastases (1.49-fold, P = .01; 1.44-fold, P = .008, respectively). Overexpression of either gene in MDA-MB-231-BR cells increased brain metastases by threefold to fourfold after intracardiac injections, but not lung metastases upon tail-vein injections. In 4T1-BR cells, shRNA-mediated RAD51 knockdown reduced brain metastases by 2.5-fold without affecting lung metastasis development. In vitro, BARD1- and RAD51-overexpressing cells showed reduced genomic instability but only exhibited growth and colonization phenotypes upon DNA damage induction. Reactive oxygen species were present in tumor cells and elevated in the metastatic neuro-inflammatory microenvironment and could provide an endogenous source of genotoxic stress. Tempol, a brain-permeable oxygen radical scavenger suppressed brain metastasis promotion induced by BARD1 and RAD51 overexpression. Conclusions BARD1 and RAD51 are frequently overexpressed in brain metastases from breast cancer and may constitute a mechanism to overcome reactive oxygen species–mediated genotoxic stress in the metastatic

  18. Efficacy of carboplatin alone and in combination with ABT888 in intracranial murine models of BRCA-mutated and BRCA-wild-type triple negative breast cancer

    PubMed Central

    Karginova, Olga; Siegel, Marni B.; Van Swearingen, Amanda E. D.; Deal, Allison M.; Adamo, Barbara; Sambade, Maria J.; Bazyar, Soha; Nikolaishvili-Feinberg, Nana; Bash, Ryan; O’Neal, Sara; Sandison, Katie; Parker, Joel S.; Santos, Charlene; Darr, David; Zamboni, William; Lee, Yueh Z.; Miller, C. Ryan; Anders, Carey K.

    2015-01-01

    Patients with breast cancer brain metastases have extremely limited survival and no approved systemic therapeutics. Triple negative breast cancer (TNBC) commonly metastasizes to the brain and predicts poor prognosis. TNBC frequently harbors BRCA mutations translating to platinum sensitivity potentially augmented by additional suppression of DNA repair mechanisms through poly(ADP-ribose)polymerase (PARP) inhibition. We evaluated brain penetrance and efficacy of Carboplatin +/− the PARP inhibitor ABT888, and investigated gene expression changes in murine intracranial (IC) TNBC models stratified by BRCA and molecular subtype status. Athymic mice were inoculated intra-cerebrally with BRCA-mutant: SUM149 (basal), MDA-MB-436 (claudin-low), or BRCA-wild-type: MDA-MB-468 (basal), MDA-MB-231BR (claudin-low) TNBC cells and treated with PBS control (IP, weekly), Carboplatin (50mg/kg/week, IP), ABT888 (25mg/kg/day, OG), or their combination. DNA-damage (γ-H2AX), apoptosis (cleaved-Caspase-3(cC3)) and gene expression were measured in IC tumors. Carboplatin+/−ABT888 significantly improved survival in BRCA-mutant IC models compared to control, but did not improve survival in BRCA-wild-type IC models. Carboplatin+ABT888 revealed a modest survival advantage versus Carboplatin in BRCA-mutant models. ABT888 yielded a marginal survival benefit in the MDA-MB-436, but not in the SUM149 model. BRCA-mutant SUM149 expression of γ-H2AX and cC3 proteins was elevated in all treatment groups compared to Control, while BRCA-wild-type MDA-MB-468 cC3 expression did not increase with treatment. Carboplatin treatment induced common gene expression changes in BRCA-mutant models. Carboplatin+/−ABT888 penetrates the brain and improves survival in BRCA-mutant IC TNBC models with corresponding DNA damage and gene expression changes. Combination therapy represents a potential promising treatment strategy for patients with TNBC brain metastases warranting further clinical investigation. PMID

  19. Efficacy of Carboplatin Alone and in Combination with ABT888 in Intracranial Murine Models of BRCA-Mutated and BRCA-Wild-Type Triple-Negative Breast Cancer.

    PubMed

    Karginova, Olga; Siegel, Marni B; Van Swearingen, Amanda E D; Deal, Allison M; Adamo, Barbara; Sambade, Maria J; Bazyar, Soha; Nikolaishvili-Feinberg, Nana; Bash, Ryan; O'Neal, Sara; Sandison, Katie; Parker, Joel S; Santos, Charlene; Darr, David; Zamboni, William; Lee, Yueh Z; Miller, C Ryan; Anders, Carey K

    2015-04-01

    Patients with breast cancer brain metastases have extremely limited survival and no approved systemic therapeutics. Triple-negative breast cancer (TNBC) commonly metastasizes to the brain and predicts poor prognosis. TNBC frequently harbors BRCA mutations translating to platinum sensitivity potentially augmented by additional suppression of DNA repair mechanisms through PARP inhibition. We evaluated brain penetrance and efficacy of carboplatin ± the PARP inhibitor ABT888, and investigated gene-expression changes in murine intracranial TNBC models stratified by BRCA and molecular subtype status. Athymic mice were inoculated intracerebrally with BRCA-mutant: SUM149 (basal), MDA-MB-436 (claudin-low); or BRCA-wild-type (wt): MDA-MB-468 (basal), MDA-MB-231BR (claudin-low). TNBC cells were treated with PBS control [intraperitoneal (IP), weekly], carboplatin (50 mg/kg/wk, IP), ABT888 (25 mg/kg/d, oral gavage), or their combination. DNA damage (γ-H2AX), apoptosis (cleaved caspase-3, cC3), and gene expression were measured in intracranial tumors. Carboplatin ± ABT888 significantly improved survival in BRCA-mutant intracranial models compared with control, but did not improve survival in BRCA-wt intracranial models. Carboplatin + ABT888 revealed a modest survival advantage versus carboplatin in BRCA-mutant models. ABT888 yielded a marginal survival benefit in the MDA-MB-436, but not in the SUM149 model. BRCA-mutant SUM149 expression of γ-H2AX and cC3 proteins was elevated in all treatment groups compared with control, whereas BRCA-wt MDA-MB-468 cC3 expression did not increase with treatment. Carboplatin treatment induced common gene-expression changes in BRCA-mutant models. Carboplatin ± ABT888 penetrates the brain and improves survival in BRCA-mutant intracranial TNBC models with corresponding DNA damage and gene-expression changes. Combination therapy represents a potential promising treatment strategy for patients with TNBC brain metastases warranting further

  20. Enhancement of fibroblast activation protein α-based vaccines and adenovirus boost immunity by cyclophosphamide through inhibiting IL-10 expression in 4T1 tumor bearing mice.

    PubMed

    Xia, Qiu; Geng, Fei; Zhang, Fang-Fang; Liu, Chen-Lu; Xu, Ping; Lu, Zhen-Zhen; Zhang, Hai-Hong; Kong, Wei; Yu, Xiang-Hui

    2016-08-31

    Fibroblast activation protein α (FAPα) is expressed in cancer-associated fibroblasts (CAFs) of more than 90% of malignant epithelia carcinomas. CAFs are the main type of cells in the tumor microenvironment which offer nutrition and protection to the tumor and regulate immunosuppression. To eliminate CAFs, a vaccine targeting FAPα may be used with a heterologous prime-boost strategy to enhance the FAPα-specific cellular immunity. Here, a FAP vaccine using a recombinant adenovirus (rAd) vector was constructed as well as a DNA vaccine reported in our previous work. Although the DNA prime-rAd boost strategy enhanced FAPα-specific immune responses, improvement of anti-tumor immunity effects was not observed. Examination of immunosuppressive factors revealed that high expression of the IL-10 cytokine was considered the main cause of the failure of the prime-boost strategy. However, heterologous vaccination in combination with a low-dose of cyclophosphamide (CY), which was reported to reduce IL-10 production and promote a shift from immunosuppression to immunopotentiation, resulted in enhanced effects in terms of numbers of effector T cells and tumor growth inhibition rates, compared to the CY alone or DNA alone group. Tumor growth was inhibited markedly when the prime-boost strategy was combined with CY in both the prophylactic and therapeutic settings and the survival time of 4T1 tumor bearing mice was also prolonged significantly. With the reduction of IL-10, enhancement of the anti-tumor effect by the prime-boost strategy was observed. These results suggest that FAPα-targeted rAd boosting in combination with CY is an attractive approach to overcoming immunosuppression in cancer vaccines. PMID:27498213

  1. Multiple molecular and cellular changes associated with tumour stasis and regression during IL-12 therapy of a murine breast cancer model.

    PubMed

    Dias, S; Thomas, H; Balkwill, F

    1998-01-01

    IL-12 treatment of a murine transplantable breast carcinoma (HTH-K) led to tumour regression and cure which was related to the duration of treatment. We studied the sequential molecular and phenotypic changes in IL-12-treated tumours. IFN-gamma mRNA was detected 8 hr after the first treatment. mRNA expression for the IFN-gamma-inducible genes beta 2-microglobulin and indoleamine dioxygenase (IDO) was induced subsequently, together with the chemokine IP-10. IL-12-treated tumours had an abundant cellular infiltrate, consisting mainly of CD8+ T cells. mRNA for granzyme B and perforin also could be detected, suggesting that those cells were activated. After 7 days of daily therapy, tumours in IL-12-treated mice had a significant reduction in vasculature. Finally, the number of apoptotic tumour cells increased throughout IL-12 treatment. We compared the anti-tumour effects of IL-12 to those induced by IFN-gamma therapy, which caused initial tumour stasis but subsequent tumour progression. IFN-gamma induced beta 2-microglobulin and IDO over a 7-day period, but IP-10 was induced only transiently. IFN-gamma caused a lesser cellular infiltrate, a minor anti-angiogenic effect and a transient apoptotic effect. The success of IL-12 may be due to its ability to produce a distinct sequence of molecular and phenotypic changes in tumours, leading to an anti-tumour immune response, toxicity against tumour cells and an anti-angiogenic effect. Other cytokines, such as IFN-gamma, induce some, but not all, of these actions. Comparison of IL-12 and IFN-gamma suggests that sustained induction of IP-10 and activation of a resulting cellular infiltrate may be key changes in regressing tumours. PMID:9426704

  2. Poly(ethylene glycol)-block-poly(ε-caprolactone)–and phospholipid-based stealth nanoparticles with enhanced therapeutic efficacy on murine breast cancer by improved intracellular drug delivery

    PubMed Central

    He, Xiaodan; Li, Li; Su, Hong; Zhou, Dinglun; Song, Hongmei; Wang, Ling; Jiang, Xuehua

    2015-01-01

    Background Effective anticancer drug delivery to the tumor site without rapid body clearance is a prerequisite for successful chemotherapy. 1,2-distearoyl-sn-glycero-3-phospho-ethanolamine-N-(methoxy[polyethyleneglycol]-2000) (DSPE-PEG2000) has been widely used in the preparation of stealth liposomes. Although PEG chains can efficiently preserve liposomes from rapid clearance by the reticuloendothelial system (RES), its application has been hindered by poor cellular uptake and unsatisfactory therapeutic effect. Methods To address the dilemma, we presented a facile approach to fabricate novel stealth nanoparticles generated by poly(ethylene glycol)-block-poly(ε-caprolactone) (PEG-b-PCL), soybean phosphatidylcholine (SPC), and cholesterol, namely LPPs (L represented lipid and PP represented PEG-b-PCL), for the delivery of anticancer drug paclitaxel (PTX). LPPs were prepared using the thin film hydration method. Two PEG-b-PCL polymers with different molecular weights (MW; PEG2000-b-PCL2000, MW: 4,000 Da and PEG5000-b-PCL5000, MW: 10,000 Da) were used to fabricate stealth nanoparticles. Conventional PEGylated liposome (LDP2000, L represented lipid and DP2000 represented DSPE-PEG2000) composed of SPC, cholesterol, and DSPE-PEG2000 was used as the control. The physical properties, cellular uptake, endocytosis pathway, cytotoxicity, pharmacokinetics, tumor accumulation, and anticancer efficacy of free PTX, PTX-loaded LPPs, and LDP2000 were systemically investigated after injection into 4T1 breast tumor–bearing mice. Results LPPs were vesicles around 100 nm in size with negative zeta potential. With enhanced stability, LPPs achieved sustainable release of cancer therapeutics. The cellular uptake level was closely related to the PEG chain length of PEG-b-PCL; a shorter PEG chain resulted in higher cellular uptake. Moreover, the cellular internalization of LPP2000 modified by PEG2000-b-PCL2000 on 4T1 cells was 2.1-fold higher than LDP2000 due to the improved stability of

  3. The potential use of lapatinib-loaded human serum albumin nanoparticles in the treatment of triple-negative breast cancer.

    PubMed

    Wan, Xu; Zheng, Xiaoyao; Pang, Xiaoying; Zhang, Zheming; Jing, Tao; Xu, Wei; Zhang, Qizhi

    2015-04-30

    Triple-negative breast cancer (TNBC) is an aggressive cancer with limited treatment options. However, the shared feature of epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) expression in TNBC offers the opportunity for targeted molecular therapy for this breast cancer subtype. Previous studies have indicated that lapatinib, a selective small-molecular dual-tyrosine kinase inhibitor of HER2 and EGFR, is effective in reducing cancer progression and metastasis, indicating that it might be a candidate for TNBC treatment. However, its poor water solubility, low and variable oral absorption, and large daily dose all limit the clinical use of lapatinib. In this study, we developed human serum albumin (HSA) nanoparticles loaded with lapatinib for intravenous administration to overcome these disadvantages and enhance its efficacy against TNBC. 4T1 cells (a murine TNBC cells) were selected as the cell model because their growth and metastatic spread are very close to those of human breast cancer cells. Lapatinib-loaded HSA nanoparticles (LHNPs) were prepared by Nab technology. LHNPs displayed cytotoxicity similar to the free drug but exhibited superior capacity to induce early apoptosis in 4T1 monolayer cells. Importantly, LHNPs showed improved penetration and inhibition effects in tumor spheroids compared to lapatinib solution (LS). Pharmacokinetic investigations revealed that HSA nanoparticles (i.v.) effectively increased the accumulation of lapatinib in tumor tissue at 2.38 and 16.6 times the level of LS (i.v.) and Tykerb (p.o.), respectively. Consequently, it had markedly better suppression effects both on primary breast cancer and lung metastasis in tumor-bearing mice compared to the commercial drug Tykerb. The improved anti-tumor efficacy of LHNPs may be partly attributed to its close binding to SPARC, which is widely present in the extracellular matrix of tumor tissue. These results demonstrated that LHNPs might be a promising anti-tumor agent for TNBC.

  4. Ginsenoside Rd attenuates breast cancer metastasis implicating derepressing microRNA-18a-regulated Smad2 expression.

    PubMed

    Wang, Peiwei; Du, Xiaoye; Xiong, Minqi; Cui, Jingang; Yang, Qinbo; Wang, Wenjian; Chen, Yu; Zhang, Teng

    2016-01-01

    Metastasis remains a major cause of mortality and poor prognosis in breast cancer patients. Anti-metastatic therapies are in great need to achieve optimal clinical outcome in breast cancer patients. Panax Notoginseng Saponins (PNS) has previously been shown to inhibit breast cancer metastasis in mouse. Here the potential anti-metastatic effect of one of the chemical compounds of PNS, ginsenoside Rd (Rd), was further evaluated in mouse mammary carcinoma 4T1 cells. The results revealed that Rd treatment dose-dependently suppressed cell migration and invasion in cultured 4T1 cells. In 4T1 cell-inoculated mice, Rd treatment led to decreased number of tumor lesions in lungs in both spontaneous and experimental metastasis models. Rd treatment resulted in increased expression of Smad2 in cultured 4T1 cells and in tumors grown from inoculated 4T1 cells. Rd treatment decreased the expression of microRNA (miR)-18a in cultured 4T1 cells and in tumors derived from inoculated 4T1 cells. Smad2 was further verified to be a direct target of miR-18a in 4T1 cells. The significant impact of Rd on counteracting miR-18a-medidated downregulation of Smad2 expression was also demonstrated. Together, the current work shows for the first time that Rd treatment attenuates breast cancer metastasis in part through derepressing miR-18a-mediated Smad2 expression regulation. PMID:27641158

  5. Ginsenoside Rd attenuates breast cancer metastasis implicating derepressing microRNA-18a-regulated Smad2 expression

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Peiwei; Du, Xiaoye; Xiong, Minqi; Cui, Jingang; Yang, Qinbo; Wang, Wenjian; Chen, Yu; Zhang, Teng

    2016-01-01

    Metastasis remains a major cause of mortality and poor prognosis in breast cancer patients. Anti-metastatic therapies are in great need to achieve optimal clinical outcome in breast cancer patients. Panax Notoginseng Saponins (PNS) has previously been shown to inhibit breast cancer metastasis in mouse. Here the potential anti-metastatic effect of one of the chemical compounds of PNS, ginsenoside Rd (Rd), was further evaluated in mouse mammary carcinoma 4T1 cells. The results revealed that Rd treatment dose-dependently suppressed cell migration and invasion in cultured 4T1 cells. In 4T1 cell-inoculated mice, Rd treatment led to decreased number of tumor lesions in lungs in both spontaneous and experimental metastasis models. Rd treatment resulted in increased expression of Smad2 in cultured 4T1 cells and in tumors grown from inoculated 4T1 cells. Rd treatment decreased the expression of microRNA (miR)-18a in cultured 4T1 cells and in tumors derived from inoculated 4T1 cells. Smad2 was further verified to be a direct target of miR-18a in 4T1 cells. The significant impact of Rd on counteracting miR-18a-medidated downregulation of Smad2 expression was also demonstrated. Together, the current work shows for the first time that Rd treatment attenuates breast cancer metastasis in part through derepressing miR-18a-mediated Smad2 expression regulation. PMID:27641158

  6. Pre-osteoblastic MC3T3-E1 promote breast cancer cell growth in bone in a murine xenograft model

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The bones are the most common sites of breast cancer metastasis. Upon arrival within the bone microenvironment, breast cancer cells coordinate the activities of stromal cells, resulting in an increase in osteoclast activity and bone matrix degradation. In late stages of bone metastasis, breast cance...

  7. Overexpression of the chimeric plasmin-resistant VEGF165/VEGF183 (132-158) protein in murine breast cancer induces distinct vascular patterning adjacent to tumors and retarded tumor growth.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Hui-Yong; Fan, Bing-Lin; Wu, Xin-Sheng; Mu, Ling-Min; Wang, Wen-Feng; Zhu, Wu-Ling

    2015-02-01

    A chimeric plasmin‑resistant vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF)165/VEGF183 (132-158) protein, named as VEGF183 (according to the nomenclature of VEGF), designed by a previous study, was demonstrated to have an enhanced affinity for the extracellular matrix (ECM) amongst other bioactivities. However, it is now accepted that mutant VEGFs frequently demonstrate different angiogenic activities and produce different vascular patterning from the parental molecule. The present study hypothesized that VEGF183, due to its enhanced binding affinity to the ECM, would exhibit a different angiogenic activity and produce a different vascular patterning compared to those of VEGF165. Murine breast cancer EMT‑6 cells were manipulated to stably overexpress VEGF165 or VEGF183. These cells were then inoculated intradermally into BALB/c mice in order to monitor the formation of vascular patterning in skin proximal to tumors. In vivo angiogenesis experiments revealed that overexpression of VEGF183 in murine breast cancer cells resulted in irregular, disorganized and dense vascular patterning as well as induced a significant inhibition of tumor growth compared with that of VEGF165. In addition, allograft tumor immunochemical assays of VEGF183‑overexpressing tumors demonstrated significantly lower vascular densities than those of VEGF165‑overexpressing tumors; however, VEGF183 tumors had a significantly enlarged vascular caliber. Conversely, cell wound healing experiments revealed that VEGF183‑overexpressing EMT‑6 cells had significantly decreased migration rates compared with those of VEGF165‑overexpressing EMT‑6 cells. In conclusion, the results of the present study supported the hypothesis that the altered ECM affinity of VEGF induced structural alterations to vasculature. In addition, these results provided a novel insight into VEGF design and indirect evidence for the function of exon 8 in VEGF. [Corrected] PMID:25373557

  8. Plant cyclopeptide RA-V kills human breast cancer cells by inducing mitochondria-mediated apoptosis through blocking PDK1–AKT interaction

    SciTech Connect

    Fang, Xian-Ying; Chen, Wei; Fan, Jun-Ting; Song, Ran; Wang, Lu; Gu, Yan-Hong; Zeng, Guang-Zhi; Shen, Yan; Wu, Xue-Feng; Tan, Ning-Hua; Xu, Qiang; Sun, Yang

    2013-02-15

    In the present paper, we examined the effects of a natural cyclopeptide RA-V on human breast cancer cells and the underlying mechanisms. RA-V significantly inhibited the growth of human breast cancer MCF-7, MDA-MB-231 cells and murine breast cancer 4T1 cells. In addition, RA-V triggered mitochondrial apoptotic pathway which was indicated by the loss of mitochondrial membrane potential, the release of cytochrome c, and the activation of caspase cascade. Further study showed that RA-V dramatically inhibited phosphorylation of AKT and 3-phosphoinositide dependent protein kinase 1 (PDK1) in MCF-7 cells. Moreover, RA-V disrupted the interaction between PDK1 and AKT in MCF-7 cells. Furthermore, RA-V-induced apoptosis could be enhanced by phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase inhibitor or attenuated by over-expression of AKT in all the three kinds of breast cancer cells. Taken together, this study shows that RA-V, which can induce mitochondria-mediated apoptosis, exerts strong anti-tumor activity against human breast cancer. The underlying anti-cancer mechanism of RA-V is related to the blockage of the interaction between PDK1 and AKT. - Highlights: ► Plant cyclopeptide RA-V kills human breast cancer cells. ► RA-V triggered mitochondrial apoptotic pathway in human breast cancer cells. ► RA-V inhibited phosphorylation of AKT and PDK1 in breast cancer MCF-7 cells. ► Its mechanism is related to the blockage of the interaction between PDK1 and AKT.

  9. Radiofrequency thermal ablation of breast tumors combined with intralesional administration of IL-7 and IL-15 augments anti-tumor immune responses and inhibits tumor development and metastasis

    PubMed Central

    Habibi, Mehran; Kmieciak, Maciej; Graham, Laura; Morales, Johanna K; Bear, Harry D; Manjili, Masoud H

    2008-01-01

    Tumor development or recurrence is always a matter of concern following radiofrequency thermal ablation (RFA) of tumors. To determine whether combining RFA with immunologically active cytokines might induce tumor-specific immune responses against mammary carcinoma and inhibit tumor development or metastasis, we evaluated intralesional injection of IL-7 and IL-15 in RFA-treated murine tumors. We used two different breast carcinoma models: neu-overexpressing mouse mammary carcinoma (MMC) in FVBN202 transgenic mouse and 4T1 tumors in Balb/c mouse. MMC tend to relapse even in the presence of neu-specific immune responses, and 4T1 is a weakly immunogenic, aggressive and highly metastatic transplantable tumor. In vivo growth of both of these tumors is also associated with increased numbers of CD11b+Gr1+ myeloid-derived suppressor cells (MDSC). We showed for the first time that unlike RFA alone, RFA combined with the administration of intralesional IL-7 and IL-15 (after RFA), induced immune responses to tumors, inhibited tumor development and lung metastasis, and reduced MDSC. PMID:18425677

  10. β-Bisabolene, a Sesquiterpene from the Essential Oil Extract of Opoponax (Commiphora guidottii), Exhibits Cytotoxicity in Breast Cancer Cell Lines.

    PubMed

    Yeo, Syn Kok; Ali, Ahmed Y; Hayward, Olivia A; Turnham, Daniel; Jackson, Troy; Bowen, Ifor D; Clarkson, Richard

    2016-03-01

    The essential oils from Commiphora species have for centuries been recognized to possess medicinal properties. Here, we performed gas chromatography-mass spectrometry on the essential oil from opoponax (Commiphora guidotti) and identified bisabolene isomers as the main constituents of this essential oil. Opoponax essential oil, a chemical component; β-bisabolene and an alcoholic analogue, α-bisabolol, were tested for their ability to selectively kill breast cancer cells. Only β-bisabolene, a sesquiterpene constituting 5% of the essential oil, exhibited selective cytotoxic activity for mouse cells (IC50 in normal Eph4: >200 µg/ml, MG1361: 65.49 µg/ml, 4T1: 48.99 µg/ml) and human breast cancer cells (IC50 in normal MCF-10A: 114.3 µg/ml, MCF-7: 66.91 µg/ml, MDA-MB-231: 98.39 µg/ml, SKBR3: 70.62 µg/ml and BT474: 74.3 µg/ml). This loss of viability was because of the induction of apoptosis as shown by Annexin V-propidium iodide and caspase-3/7 activity assay. β-bisabolene was also effective in reducing the growth of transplanted 4T1 mammary tumours in vivo (37.5% reduction in volume by endpoint). In summary, we have identified an anti-cancer agent from the essential oil of opoponax that exhibits specific cytotoxicity to both human and murine mammary tumour cells in vitro and in vivo, and this warrants further investigation into the use of β-bisabolene in the treatment of breast cancers. PMID:26666387

  11. Novel recombinant protein FlaA N/C increases tumor radiosensitivity via NF-κB signaling in murine breast cancer cells

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Ying; Wu, Dongming; Fan, Yuanchun; Li, Peigeng; Du, Hongfei; Shi, Jiao; Wang, Dan; Zhou, Xiaoping

    2016-01-01

    The recombinant protein flagellin A (FlaA) N/C, derived from the flagellin protein of Legionella pneumophila, has been shown to increase the expression of cytoprotective cytokines, activate the nuclear factor-κB (NF-κB) signaling pathway, and increase the survival of mice following total body irradiation. Determi ning whether FlaA N/C has a sensitizing effect on tumor radiation or a direct tumoricidal effect is critical for its application as an effective radiation protection agent. The present study investigated the molecular mechanism underlying the tumor radiosensitivity of FlaA N/C. FlaA N/C was found to increase tumor apoptosis and autophagy, regulate the cell cycle and increase radiosensitivity in 4T1 tumor cells. Furthermore, FlaA N/C was found to promote radiosensitivity by activating NF-κB signaling. Finally, the present study analyzed FlaA N/C-enhanced radiosensitivity in animal models, and FlaA N/C was found to significantly prolong the survival period of mice after total body radiation. This indicates that FlaA N/C might be a novel radiation sensitizer in tumor radiation therapy. PMID:27703525

  12. Murine Typhus

    PubMed Central

    Dzul-Rosado, Karla R; Zavala Velázquez, Jorge Ernesto; Zavala-Castro, Jorge

    2012-01-01

    Rickettsia typhi: is an intracellular bacteria who causes murine typhus. His importance is reflected in the high frequency founding specific antibodies against Rickettsia typhi in several worldwide seroepidemiological studies, the seroprevalence ranging between 3-36%. Natural reservoirs of R. typhi are rats (some species belonging the Rattus Genus) and fleas (Xenopsylla cheopis) are his vector. This infection is associated with overcrowding, pollution and poor hygiene. Typically presents fever, headache, rash on trunk and extremities, in some cases may occur organ-specific complications, affecting liver, kidney, lung or brain. Initially the disease is very similar to other diseases, is very common to confuse the murine typhus with Dengue fever, therefore, ignorance of the disease is a factor related to complications or non-specific treatments for the resolution of this infection. This paper presents the most relevant information to consider about the rickettsiosis caused by Rickettsia typhi. PMID:24893060

  13. Umbelliprenin is Potentially Toxic Against the HT29, CT26, MCF-7, 4T1, A172, and GL26 Cell Lines, Potentially Harmful Against Bone Marrow-Derived Stem Cells, and Non-Toxic Against Peripheral Blood Mononuclear Cells

    PubMed Central

    Rashidi, Mohsen; Ziai, Seyed Ali; Moini Zanjani, Taraneh; Khalilnezhad, Ahad; Jamshidi, Hamidreza; Amani, Davar

    2016-01-01

    Background Resistance to chemotherapy is a growing concern, thus natural anticancer agents are drawing the attention of many scientists and clinicians. One natural anticancer agent, umbelliprenin, is a coumarin produced by many species of Ferula. Objectives We aimed to examine the inhibitory effect of umbelliprenin on human and mouse bone marrow-derived stem cells (BMDSCs), peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs), and different cancer cell lines. Materials and Methods In this in vitro experimental study, the HT29, CT26, MCF-7, 4T1, A172, and GL26 cancer cells and human and mouse BMDSCs and PBMCs were cultured in RPMI-1640 medium supplemented with 10% fetal bovine serum (FBS), incubated at 37°C for 24 hours in a 5% CO2 atmosphere, and then were treated with different concentrations of umbelliprenin dissolved in dimethyl sulfoxide (DMSO) (3, 6, 12, 25, 50, 100, and 200 µg/mL) for 24, 48, and 72 hours at 37°C. Each experiment was performed in triplicate. Finally, the cell survival rate was assessed by MTT assay. The IC50 values were calculated based on the log values using GraphPad Prism version 5 software for windows (La Jolla CA, USA) and were expressed as mean ± SEM. Results Umbelliprenin inhibited the cancer cells in a concentration-dependent (P < 0.05) but not time-dependent manner (P > 0.05). The most sensitive and resistant cell lines at the 24-hour incubation time were 4T1 (IC50, 30.9 ± 3.1 µg/mL) and A172 (IC50, 51.9 ± 6.7 µg/mL); at the 48-hour incubation time: 4T1 (IC50, 30.6 ± 2.6 µg/mL) and CT26 (IC50, 53.2 ± 3.6 µg/mL); and at the 72-hour incubation time: HT29 (IC50, 37.1 ± 1.4 µg/mL) and 4T1 (IC50, 62.2 ± 4.8 µg/mL). Both human and mouse BMDSCs showed the highest resistance at the 24-hour incubation time (IC50s, 254.7 ± 21 and 204.4 ± 4.5 µg/mL, respectively) and the highest sensitivity at the 72-hour incubation time (IC50s, 120.4 ± 5 and 159.0 ± 7.3 µg/mL, respectively). The PBMCs of both human and mouse origin revealed very

  14. Comparative study of two kinds of repeated photodynamic therapy strategies in breast cancer by using a sensitizer, sinoporphyrin sodium.

    PubMed

    Xiong, Wenli; Wang, Xiaobing; Hu, Jianmin; Liu, Yichen; Liu, Quanhong; Wang, Pan

    2016-07-01

    Sinoporphyrin sodium (DVDMS) is a newly identified photosensitizer that was isolated from Photofrin. Experimental and clinical results have demonstrated that repeated application of PDT greatly improved the therapeutic efficacy. Here, we comparatively studied two kinds of photodynamic therapy (PDT) strategies by using DVDMS (2mg/kg) in murine breast cancer 4T1 xenograft model to provide evidence which strategy exerts a better antitumor effect. Regimen (1): DVDMS was injected one time into tumor-bearing mice, which were then repeatedly exposed to 50J/cm(2) light 24h, 30h and 36h later. Regimen (2): DVDMS was injected 3 times and mice exposed to 50J/cm(2) light 24h after each injection, with 5days intervals between each DVDMS injection. On day 21 after the tumor cell injection, in regimen (1) the tumor volume inhibition ratio was reached to 85.75±7.60%. While at the same day the inhibition ratio was 65.74±8.64% of regimen (2). Additionally, regimen (1) appeared to more effectively initiate tumor tissue destruction and cancer cell apoptosis, inhibit lung metastasis, suppress cancer cell proliferation and angiogenesis. Moreover, no obvious effect on body weight and other side effects were observed in the treated mice. These results suggest that regimen (1) might be a potentially efficient strategy against breast cancer. PMID:27162175

  15. A comparative small-animal PET evaluation of [11C]tariquidar, [11C]elacridar and (R)-[11C]verapamil for detection of P-glycoprotein expressing murine breast cancer

    PubMed Central

    Wanek, Thomas; Kuntner, Claudia; Bankstahl, Jens P.; Bankstahl, Marion; Stanek, Johann; Sauberer, Michael; Mairinger, Severin; Strommer, Sabine; Wacheck, Volker; Löscher, Wolfgang; Erker, Thomas; Müller, Markus; Langer, Oliver

    2013-01-01

    Purpose One important mechanism for chemoresistance of tumours is overexpression of the adenosine triphosphate-binding cassette transporter P-glycoprotein (Pgp). Pgp reduces intracellular concentrations of chemotherapeutic drugs. Aim of this study was to compare the suitability of the radiolabelled Pgp inhibitors [11C]tariquidar and [11C]elacridar with the Pgp substrate radiotracer (R)-[11C]verapamil to discriminate tumours expressing low and high levels of Pgp using small-animal PET imaging in a murine breast cancer model. Methods Murine mammary carcinoma cells (EMT6) were continuously exposed to doxorubicin to generate a Pgp overexpressing, doxorubicin-resistant cell line (EMT6AR1.0 cells). Both cell lines were subcutaneously injected in female athymic nude mice. One week after implantation, animals underwent PET scans with [11C]tariquidar (n=7), [11C]elacridar (n=6) and (R)-[11C]verapamil (n=7), before and after administration of unlabelled tariquidar (15 mg/kg). Pgp expression in tumour grafts was studied by Western blotting. Results [11C]Tariquidar showed significantly higher retention in Pgp overexpressing EMT6AR1.0 compared with EMT6 tumours (mean area under the time-activity curve in scan 1 from time 0 to 60 min, AUC0-60±SD: 38.8±2.2 min vs. 25.0±5.3 min, p=0.016, Wilcoxon matched pairs test). [11C]Elacridar and (R)-[11C]verapamil were not able to discriminate Pgp expression in tumour models. Following administration of unlabelled tariquidar, both EMT6Ar1.0 and EMT6 tumours showed increases in tumoural uptake of [11C]tariquidar, [11C]elacridar and (R)-[11C]verapamil. Conclusions Among the tested radiotracers, [11C]tariquidar performed best in discriminating high from low Pgp expressing tumours. Therefore [11C]tariquidar merits further investigation as a PET tracer to assess Pgp expression levels of solid tumours. PMID:21983837

  16. The calcineurin/NFAT pathway is activated in diagnostic breast cancer cases and is essential to survival and metastasis of mammary cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Quang, C Tran; Leboucher, S; Passaro, D; Fuhrmann, L; Nourieh, M; Vincent-Salomon, A; Ghysdael, J

    2015-02-26

    Nuclear factor of activated T cells 1 (NFAT1) expression has been associated with increased migratory/invasive properties of mammary tumor-derived cell lines in vitro. It is unknown, however, if NFAT activation actually occurs in breast cancer cases and whether the calcineurin/NFAT pathway is important to mammary tumorigenesis. Using a cohort of 321 diagnostic cases of the major subgroup of breast cancer, we found Cn/NFAT pathway activated in ER(-)PR(-)HER2(-) triple-negative breast cancer subtype, whereas its prevalence is less in other subgroups. Using a small hairpin RNA-based gene expression silencing approach in murine mammary tumor cell line (4T1), we show that not only NFAT1 but also NFAT2 and their upstream activator Cn are essential to the migratory and invasive properties of mammary tumor cells. We also demonstrate that Cn, NFAT1 and NFAT2 are essential to the tumorigenic and metastatic properties of these cells in mice, a phenotype which coincides with increased apoptosis in vivo. Finally, global gene expression analyses identified several NFAT-deregulated genes, many of them being previously associated with mammary tumorigenesis. In particular, we identified the gene encoding a disintegrin and metalloproteinase with thrombonspondin motifs 1, as being a potential direct target of NFAT1. Thus, our results show that the Cn/NFAT pathway is activated in diagnostic cases of breast cancers and is essential to the tumorigenic and metastatic potential of mammary tumor cell line. These results suggest that pharmacological inhibition of the Cn/NFAT pathway at different levels could be of therapeutical interest for breast cancer patients.

  17. Huaier extract suppresses breast cancer via regulating tumor-associated macrophages

    PubMed Central

    Li, Yaming; Qi, Wenwen; Song, Xiaojin; Lv, Shangge; Zhang, Hanwen; Yang, Qifeng

    2016-01-01

    Macrophages in tumor microenvironment are mostly M2-polarized - and have been reported to promote tumorigenesis, which are also defined as tumor-associated macrophages (TAMs). Here, we examined the regulatory effects of Huaier extract on TAMs using RAW264.7 murine macrophage cell line. Our data demonstrated that Huaier extract could inhibit the infiltration of macrophages into tumor microenvironment in a dose-dependent manner. By performing RT-PCR, immunofluorescence and phagocytosis assay, we were able to find that Huaier extract could regulate the polarization of macrophages, with decreased M2-polarization and increased phagocytosis of RAW264.7 cells. Moreover, we identified that Huaier extract could suppress macrophages-induced angiogenesis by using HUVEC migration assay, tube formation and chorioallantoic membrane assay. Additionally, western blotting showed decreased expression of MMP2, MMP9 and VEGF with the use of Huaier extract. Finally, we found that Huaier extract could inhibit M2-macrophages infiltration and angiogenesis through treating 4T1 tumor bearing mice with Huaier extract. Our study revealed a novel mechanism of the anti-tumor effect of Huaier extract which inhibited angiogenesis by targeting TAMs. These findings provided that Huaier was a promising drug for clinical treatment of breast cancer. PMID:26831282

  18. Metabolic Plasticity of Metastatic Breast Cancer Cells: Adaptation to Changes in the Microenvironment1

    PubMed Central

    Simões, Rui V.; Serganova, Inna S.; Kruchevsky, Natalia; Leftin, Avigdor; Shestov, Alexander A.; Thaler, Howard T.; Sukenick, George; Locasale, Jason W.; Blasberg, Ronald G.; Koutcher, Jason A.; Ackerstaff, Ellen

    2015-01-01

    Cancer cells adapt their metabolism during tumorigenesis. We studied two isogenic breast cancer cells lines (highly metastatic 4T1; nonmetastatic 67NR) to identify differences in their glucose and glutamine metabolism in response to metabolic and environmental stress. Dynamic magnetic resonance spectroscopy of 13C-isotopomers showed that 4T1 cells have higher glycolytic and tricarboxylic acid (TCA) cycle flux than 67NR cells and readily switch between glycolysis and oxidative phosphorylation (OXPHOS) in response to different extracellular environments. OXPHOS activity increased with metastatic potential in isogenic cell lines derived from the same primary breast cancer: 4T1 > 4T07 and 168FARN (local micrometastasis only) > 67NR. We observed a restricted TCA cycle flux at the succinate dehydrogenase step in 67NR cells (but not in 4T1 cells), leading to succinate accumulation and hindering OXPHOS. In the four isogenic cell lines, environmental stresses modulated succinate dehydrogenase subunit A expression according to metastatic potential. Moreover, glucose-derived lactate production was more glutamine dependent in cell lines with higher metastatic potential. These studies show clear differences in TCA cycle metabolism between 4T1 and 67NR breast cancer cells. They indicate that metastases-forming 4T1 cells are more adept at adjusting their metabolism in response to environmental stress than isogenic, nonmetastatic 67NR cells. We suggest that the metabolic plasticity and adaptability are more important to the metastatic breast cancer phenotype than rapid cell proliferation alone, which could 1) provide a new biomarker for early detection of this phenotype, possibly at the time of diagnosis, and 2) lead to new treatment strategies of metastatic breast cancer by targeting mitochondrial metabolism. PMID:26408259

  19. Core Needle Biopsy of Breast Cancer Tumors Increases Distant Metastases in a Mouse Model12

    PubMed Central

    Mathenge, Edward Gitau; Dean, Cheryl Ann; Clements, Derek; Vaghar-Kashani, Ahmad; Photopoulos, Steffany; Coyle, Krysta Mila; Giacomantonio, Michael; Malueth, Benjamin; Nunokawa, Anna; Jordan, Julie; Lewis, John D.; Gujar, Shashi Ashok; Marcato, Paola; Lee, Patrick W.K.; Giacomantonio, Carman Anthony

    2014-01-01

    INTRODUCTION: Incisional biopsies, including the diagnostic core needle biopsy (CNB), routinely performed before surgical excision of breast cancer tumors are hypothesized to increase the risk of metastatic disease. In this study, we experimentally determined whether CNB of breast cancer tumors results in increased distant metastases and examine important resultant changes in the primary tumor and tumor microenvironment associated with this outcome. METHOD: To evaluate the effect of CNB on metastasis development, we implanted murine mammary 4T1 tumor cells in BALB/c mice and performed CNB on palpable tumors in half the mice. Subsequently, emulating the human scenario, all mice underwent complete tumor excision and were allowed to recover, with attendant metastasis development. Tumor growth, lung metastasis, circulating tumor cell (CTC) levels, variation in gene expression, composition of the tumor microenvironment, and changes in immunologic markers were compared in biopsied and non-biopsied mice. RESULTS: Mice with biopsied tumors developed significantly more lung metastases compared to non-biopsied mice. Tumors from biopsied mice contained a higher frequency of myeloid-derived suppressor cells (MDSCs) accompanied by reduced CD4 + T cells, CD8 + T cells, and macrophages, suggesting biopsy-mediated development of an increasingly immunosuppressive tumor microenvironment. We also observed a CNB-dependent up-regulation in the expression of SOX4, Ezh2, and other key epithelial-mesenchymal transition (EMT) genes, as well as increased CTC levels among the biopsy group. CONCLUSION: CNB creates an immunosuppressive tumor microenvironment, increases EMT, and facilitates release of CTCs, all of which likely contribute to the observed increase in development of distant metastases. PMID:25425969

  20. Breast Cancer

    MedlinePlus

    ... version of this page please turn Javascript on. Breast Cancer What is Breast Cancer? How Tumors Form The body is made up ... tumors form in the breast tissue. Who Gets Breast Cancer? Breast cancer is one of the most common ...

  1. Characterization of passive permeability at the blood-tumor barrier in five preclinical models of brain metastases of breast cancer.

    PubMed

    Adkins, Chris E; Mohammad, Afroz S; Terrell-Hall, Tori B; Dolan, Emma L; Shah, Neal; Sechrest, Emily; Griffith, Jessica; Lockman, Paul R

    2016-04-01

    The blood-brain barrier (BBB) is compromised in brain metastases, allowing for enhanced drug permeation into brain. The extent and heterogeneity of BBB permeability in metastatic lesions is important when considering the administration of chemotherapeutics. Since permeability characteristics have been described in limited experimental models of brain metastases, we sought to define these changes in five brain-tropic breast cancer cell lines: MDA-MB-231BR (triple negative), MDA-MB-231BR-HER2, JIMT-1-BR3, 4T1-BR5 (murine), and SUM190 (inflammatory HER2 expressing). Permeability was assessed using quantitative autoradiography and fluorescence microscopy by co-administration of the tracers (14)C-aminoisobutyric acid (AIB) and Texas red conjugated dextran prior to euthanasia. Each experimental brain metastases model produced variably increased permeability to both tracers; additionally, the magnitude of heterogeneity was different among each model with the highest ranges observed in the SUM190 (up to 45-fold increase in AIB) and MDA-MB-231BR-HER2 (up to 33-fold in AIB) models while the lowest range was observed in the JIMT-1-BR3 (up to 5.5-fold in AIB) model. There was no strong correlation observed between lesion size and permeability in any of these preclinical models of brain metastases. Interestingly, the experimental models resulting in smaller mean metastases size resulted in shorter median survival while models producing larger lesions had longer median survival. These findings strengthen the evidence of heterogeneity in brain metastases of breast cancer by utilizing five unique experimental models and simultaneously emphasize the challenges of chemotherapeutic approaches to treat brain metastases. PMID:26944053

  2. Characterization of passive permeability at the blood-tumor barrier in five preclinical models of brain metastases of breast cancer.

    PubMed

    Adkins, Chris E; Mohammad, Afroz S; Terrell-Hall, Tori B; Dolan, Emma L; Shah, Neal; Sechrest, Emily; Griffith, Jessica; Lockman, Paul R

    2016-04-01

    The blood-brain barrier (BBB) is compromised in brain metastases, allowing for enhanced drug permeation into brain. The extent and heterogeneity of BBB permeability in metastatic lesions is important when considering the administration of chemotherapeutics. Since permeability characteristics have been described in limited experimental models of brain metastases, we sought to define these changes in five brain-tropic breast cancer cell lines: MDA-MB-231BR (triple negative), MDA-MB-231BR-HER2, JIMT-1-BR3, 4T1-BR5 (murine), and SUM190 (inflammatory HER2 expressing). Permeability was assessed using quantitative autoradiography and fluorescence microscopy by co-administration of the tracers (14)C-aminoisobutyric acid (AIB) and Texas red conjugated dextran prior to euthanasia. Each experimental brain metastases model produced variably increased permeability to both tracers; additionally, the magnitude of heterogeneity was different among each model with the highest ranges observed in the SUM190 (up to 45-fold increase in AIB) and MDA-MB-231BR-HER2 (up to 33-fold in AIB) models while the lowest range was observed in the JIMT-1-BR3 (up to 5.5-fold in AIB) model. There was no strong correlation observed between lesion size and permeability in any of these preclinical models of brain metastases. Interestingly, the experimental models resulting in smaller mean metastases size resulted in shorter median survival while models producing larger lesions had longer median survival. These findings strengthen the evidence of heterogeneity in brain metastases of breast cancer by utilizing five unique experimental models and simultaneously emphasize the challenges of chemotherapeutic approaches to treat brain metastases.

  3. Cryoablation and Meriva have strong therapeutic effect on triple-negative breast cancer

    PubMed Central

    Chandra, Dinesh; Jahangir, Arthee; Cornelis, Francois; Rombauts, Klara; Meheus, Lydie; Jorcyk, Cheryl L; Gravekamp, Claudia

    2016-01-01

    Interleukin-6, a cytokine produced particularly by triple-negative breast cancers, strongly inhibits T cell responses in the tumor microenvironment. Here we tested cryoablation combined with Meriva (a lecithin delivery system of curcumin with improved bioavailability) in mice with metastatic breast cancer (4T1). Cryoablation involves killing of tumor cells through freezing and thawing, resulting in recruitment of tumor-specific T cells, while curcumin stimulates T cells through the reduction of IL-6 in the TME. Cryoablation plus Meriva accumulated and activated CD8+ T cells to multiple tumor-associated antigens such as Mage-b and Survivin (both expressed by 4T1 tumors). This correlated with a nearly complete reduction of 4T1 primary tumors and lung metastases while little effect was observed from saline or Meriva alone (28 d after tumor cell injection). The survival rate in the group of cryoablation plus Meriva was significantly improved compared to all control groups. Using a less aggressive 4T1 model expressing luciferase (4T1.2luc3), we demonstrated that all mice receiving saline or Meriva developed metastases in the lungs and a primary tumor (38 d after tumor cell injection; and died soon after that), but not the mice receiving cryoablation or cryoablation plus Meriva. However, on day 58 the mice receiving cryoablation developed 4T1.2luc3 metastases in the lungs, while mice receiving cryoablation plus Meriva were free of metastases. These results strongly suggest that cryoablation delayed the development of lung metastases on the short-term, but Meriva administered after cryoablation was significantly better in delaying the development of lung metastases and survival on the long-term. PMID:26942057

  4. Ultrasound - Breast

    MedlinePlus

    ... discharge) and to characterize potential abnormalities seen on mammography or breast magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). Ultrasound imaging ... supply in breast lesions . Supplemental Breast Cancer Screening Mammography is the only screening tool for breast cancer ...

  5. Breast pain

    MedlinePlus

    Pain - breast; Mastalgia; Mastodynia; Breast tenderness ... There are many possible causes for breast pain. For example, hormone level changes from menstruation or pregnancy often cause breast tenderness. Some swelling and tenderness just before your period ...

  6. An Orthotopic Mouse Model of Spontaneous Breast Cancer Metastasis.

    PubMed

    Paschall, Amy V; Liu, Kebin

    2016-01-01

    Metastasis is the primary cause of mortality of breast cancer patients. The mechanism underlying cancer cell metastasis, including breast cancer metastasis, is largely unknown and is a focus in cancer research. Various breast cancer spontaneous metastasis mouse models have been established. Here, we report a simplified procedure to establish orthotopic transplanted breast cancer primary tumor and resultant spontaneous metastasis that mimic human breast cancer metastasis. Combined with the bioluminescence live tumor imaging, this mouse model allows tumor growth and progression kinetics to be monitored and quantified. In this model, a low dose (1 x 10(4) cells) of 4T1-Luc breast cancer cells was injected into BALB/c mouse mammary fat pad using a tuberculin syringe. Mice were injected with luciferin and imaged at various time points using a bioluminescent imaging system. When the primary tumors grew to the size limit as in the IACUC-approved protocol (approximately 30 days), mice were anesthetized under constant flow of 2% isoflurane and oxygen. The tumor area was sterilized with 70% ethanol. The mouse skin around the tumor was excised to expose the tumor which was removed with a pair of sterile scissors. Removal of the primary tumor extends the survival of the 4T-1 tumor-bearing mice for one month. The mice were then repeatedly imaged for metastatic tumor spreading to distant organs. Therapeutic agents can be administered to suppress tumor metastasis at this point. This model is simple and yet sensitive in quantifying breast cancer cell growth in the primary site and progression kinetics to distant organs, and thus is an excellent model for studying breast cancer growth and progression, and for testing anti-metastasis therapeutic and immunotherapeutic agents in vivo. PMID:27584043

  7. What Is Breast Cancer?

    MedlinePlus

    ... Next Topic Types of breast cancers What is breast cancer? Breast cancer starts when cells in the breast ... breast cancer? ” and Non-cancerous Breast Conditions . How Breast Cancer Spreads Breast cancer can spread through the lymph ...

  8. Dense Breasts

    MedlinePlus

    ... woman’s breasts. It is most commonly determined using mammography, a diagnostic test that uses low dose x- ... woman’s breasts, which is most commonly determined through mammography. The breast is made up of glandular, connective, ...

  9. Breast lump

    MedlinePlus

    Breast mass ... males and females of all ages have normal breast tissue. This tissue responds to hormone changes. Because of this, lumps can come and go. Breast lumps may appear at any age: Both male ...

  10. Breast Diseases

    MedlinePlus

    Most women experience breast changes at some time. Your age, hormone levels, and medicines you take may cause lumps, bumps, and discharges (fluids that are not breast milk). If you have a breast lump, pain, ...

  11. An autoimmune-mediated strategy for prophylactic breast cancer vaccination.

    PubMed

    Jaini, Ritika; Kesaraju, Pavani; Johnson, Justin M; Altuntas, Cengiz Z; Jane-Wit, Daniel; Tuohy, Vincent K

    2010-07-01

    Although vaccination is most effective when used to prevent disease, cancer vaccine development has focused predominantly on providing therapy against established growing tumors. The difficulty in developing prophylactic cancer vaccines is primarily due to the fact that tumor antigens are variations of self proteins and would probably mediate profound autoimmune complications if used in a preventive vaccine setting. Here we use several mouse breast cancer models to define a prototypic strategy for prophylactic cancer vaccination. We selected alpha-lactalbumin as our target vaccine autoantigen because it is a breast-specific differentiation protein expressed in high amounts in the majority of human breast carcinomas and in mammary epithelial cells only during lactation. We found that immunoreactivity against alpha-lactalbumin provides substantial protection and therapy against growth of autochthonous tumors in transgenic mouse models of breast cancer and against 4T1 transplantable breast tumors in BALB/c mice. Because alpha-lactalbumin is conditionally expressed only during lactation, vaccination-induced prophylaxis occurs without any detectable inflammation in normal nonlactating breast tissue. Thus, alpha-lactalbumin vaccination may provide safe and effective protection against the development of breast cancer for women in their post-child-bearing, premenopausal years, when lactation is readily avoidable and risk for developing breast cancer is high.

  12. The Anthelmintic Drug Niclosamide Induces Apoptosis, Impairs Metastasis and Reduces Immunosuppressive Cells in Breast Cancer Model

    PubMed Central

    Yan, Yupeng; Xia, Yong; Song, Xuejiao; Liu, Li; Li, Deliang; Wang, Ningyu; Zhang, Lidan; Zhu, Yongxia; Zeng, Jun; Wei, Yuquan; Yu, Luoting

    2014-01-01

    Breast carcinoma is the most common female cancer with considerable metastatic potential. Discovery of new therapeutic approaches for treatment of metastatic breast cancer is still needed. Here, we reported our finding with niclosamide, an FDA approved anthelmintic drug. The potency of niclosamide on breast cancer was assessed in vitro and in vivo. In this investigation, we found that niclosamide showed a dramatic growth inhibition against breast cancer cell lines and induced apoptosis of 4T1 cells in a dose-dependent manner. Further, Western blot analysis demonstrated the occurrence of its apoptosis was associated with activation of Cleaved caspases-3, down-regulation of Bcl-2, Mcl-1 and Survivin. Moreover, niclosamide blocked breast cancer cells migration and invasion, and the reduction of phosphorylated STAT3Tyr705, phosphorylated FAKTyr925 and phosphorylated SrcTyr416 were also observed. Furthermore, in our animal experiments, intraperitoneal administration of 20 mg/kg/d niclosamide suppressed 4T1 tumor growth without detectable toxicity. Histological and immunohistochemical analyses revealed a decrease in Ki67-positive cells, VEGF-positive cells and microvessel density (MVD) and an increase in Cleaved caspase-3-positive cells upon niclosamide. Notably, niclosamide reduced the number of myeloid-derived suppressor cells (MDSCs) in tumor tissues and blocked formation of pulmonary metastases. Taken together, these results demonstrated that niclosamide may be a promising candidate for breast cancer. PMID:24416452

  13. Breast MRI scan

    MedlinePlus

    MRI - breast; Magnetic resonance imaging - breast; Breast cancer - MRI; Breast cancer screening - MRI ... the same breast or the other breast after breast cancer has been diagnosed Distinguish between scar tissue and ...

  14. Fibroadenoma - breast

    MedlinePlus

    ... provider if you notice: Any new breast lumps A breast lump that your provider has checked before that grows or changes Bruising on your breast for no reason Dimpled or wrinkled skin (like an orange) on your breast Nipple changes or nipple discharge

  15. Endoscopic Breast Surgery in Treating Patients With Breast Cancer

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2014-02-05

    Male Breast Cancer; Recurrent Breast Cancer; Stage IA Breast Cancer; Stage IB Breast Cancer; Stage II Breast Cancer; Stage IIIA Breast Cancer; Stage IIIB Breast Cancer; Stage IIIC Breast Cancer; Stage IV Breast Cancer

  16. Genomic profiling of murine mammary tumors identifies potential personalized drug targets for p53-deficient mammary cancers

    PubMed Central

    Agrawal, Yash N.; Koboldt, Daniel C.; Kanchi, Krishna L.; Herschkowitz, Jason I.; Mardis, Elaine R.; Rosen, Jeffrey M.; Perou, Charles M.

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Targeted therapies against basal-like breast tumors, which are typically ‘triple-negative breast cancers (TNBCs)’, remain an important unmet clinical need. Somatic TP53 mutations are the most common genetic event in basal-like breast tumors and TNBC. To identify additional drivers and possible drug targets of this subtype, a comparative study between human and murine tumors was performed by utilizing a murine Trp53-null mammary transplant tumor model. We show that two subsets of murine Trp53-null mammary transplant tumors resemble aspects of the human basal-like subtype. DNA-microarray, whole-genome and exome-based sequencing approaches were used to interrogate the secondary genetic aberrations of these tumors, which were then compared to human basal-like tumors to identify conserved somatic genetic features. DNA copy-number variation produced the largest number of conserved candidate personalized drug targets. These candidates were filtered using a DNA-RNA Pearson correlation cut-off and a requirement that the gene was deemed essential in at least 5% of human breast cancer cell lines from an RNA-mediated interference screen database. Five potential personalized drug target genes, which were spontaneously amplified loci in both murine and human basal-like tumors, were identified: Cul4a, Lamp1, Met, Pnpla6 and Tubgcp3. As a proof of concept, inhibition of Met using crizotinib caused Met-amplified murine tumors to initially undergo complete regression. This study identifies Met as a promising drug target in a subset of murine Trp53-null tumors, thus identifying a potential shared driver with a subset of human basal-like breast cancers. Our results also highlight the importance of comparative genomic studies for discovering personalized drug targets and for providing a preclinical model for further investigations of key tumor signaling pathways. PMID:27149990

  17. IR-780 Dye as a Sonosensitizer for Sonodynamic Therapy of Breast Tumor

    PubMed Central

    Li, Yekuo; Zhou, Qunfang; Deng, Zhiting; Pan, Min; Liu, Xin; Wu, Junru; Yan, Fei; Zheng, Hairong

    2016-01-01

    Sonodynamic therapy (SDT) has become a new modality for cancer therapy through activating certain chemical sensitizers by ultrasound (US). Discovery and development of novel sonosensitizers are attracting extensive attentions. Here, we introduce IR-780 iodide, a lipophilic heptamethine dye with a peak optical absorption of 780 nm wavelength, which can function as SDT agents for breast cancer treatment. The in vitro cellular uptake, cell viability, and the generation levels of reactive oxygen species (ROS) were examined by using 4T1 breast cancer cells incubated with various concentrations of IR-780 followed by US irradiation. Our results showed a dose- and time-dependent cellular uptake of IR-780 iodide in 4T1 cancer cells. Significant lower viabilities and more necrotic/apoptotic cells were found when these cancer cells were treated with IR-780 iodide with US irradiation. Further analyzing the generation of ROS demonstrated significant increase of 1O2 level and H2O2, but not ⋅OH in the SDT-treated cells. The in vivo anti-tumor efficacy of SDT with IR-780 revealed significant tumor growth inhibition of xenografts of 4T1 cancer cells; it was further confirmed by histological analysis and TUNEL staining. Our results strongly suggest that SDT combined with IR-780 may provide a promising strategy for tumor treatment with minimal side effects. PMID:27174006

  18. Codelivery of thioridazine and doxorubicin using nanoparticles for effective breast cancer therapy

    PubMed Central

    Jin, Xun; Zou, Bingwen; Luo, Li; Zhong, Chuanhong; Zhang, Peilan; Cheng, Hao; Guo, Yanfang; Gou, Maling

    2016-01-01

    Cancer chemotherapy can benefit from the combination of different anticancer drugs. Here, we prepared doxorubicin (Dox)- and thioridazine (Thio)-coloaded methoxy poly(ethylene glycol)-poly(l-lactic acid) (MPEG-PLA) nanoparticles (NPs) for breast cancer therapy. These NPs have an average particle size of 27 nm. The drug loading efficiencies of Thio and Dox are 4.71% and 1.98%, respectively. Compared to the treatment of Thio or Dox alone, the combination of Thio and Dox exhibited a synergistic effect in inhibiting the growth of 4T1 breast cancer cells in vitro. In addition, the Thio- and Dox-coloaded MPEG-PLA NPs could efficiently suppress the growth of breast cancer cells in vivo. This study suggests that Thio- and Dox-coloaded MPEG-PLA NPs might have potential applications in breast cancer treatment. PMID:27660446

  19. Codelivery of thioridazine and doxorubicin using nanoparticles for effective breast cancer therapy

    PubMed Central

    Jin, Xun; Zou, Bingwen; Luo, Li; Zhong, Chuanhong; Zhang, Peilan; Cheng, Hao; Guo, Yanfang; Gou, Maling

    2016-01-01

    Cancer chemotherapy can benefit from the combination of different anticancer drugs. Here, we prepared doxorubicin (Dox)- and thioridazine (Thio)-coloaded methoxy poly(ethylene glycol)-poly(l-lactic acid) (MPEG-PLA) nanoparticles (NPs) for breast cancer therapy. These NPs have an average particle size of 27 nm. The drug loading efficiencies of Thio and Dox are 4.71% and 1.98%, respectively. Compared to the treatment of Thio or Dox alone, the combination of Thio and Dox exhibited a synergistic effect in inhibiting the growth of 4T1 breast cancer cells in vitro. In addition, the Thio- and Dox-coloaded MPEG-PLA NPs could efficiently suppress the growth of breast cancer cells in vivo. This study suggests that Thio- and Dox-coloaded MPEG-PLA NPs might have potential applications in breast cancer treatment.

  20. Breast Cancer

    MedlinePlus

    Breast cancer affects one in eight women during their lives. No one knows why some women get breast cancer, but there are many risk factors. Risks that ... who have family members with breast or ovarian cancer may wish to be tested for the genes. ...

  1. Studying the Role of Alveolar Macrophages in Breast Cancer Metastasis.

    PubMed

    Vadrevu, Surya Kumari; Sharma, Sharad; Chintala, Navin; Patel, Jalpa; Karbowniczek, Magdalena; Markiewski, Maciej

    2016-01-01

    This paper describes the application of the syngeneic model of breast cancer (4T1) to the studies on a role of pulmonary alveolar macrophages in cancer metastasis. The 4T1 cells expressing GFP in combination with imaging and confocal microscopy are used to monitor tumor growth, track metastasizing tumor cells, and quantify the metastatic burden. These approaches are supplemented by digital histopathology that allows the automated and unbiased quantification of metastases. In this method the routinely prepared histological lung sections, which are stained with hematoxylin and eosin, are scanned and converted to the digital slides that are then analyzed by the self-trained pattern recognition software. In addition, we describe the flow cytometry approaches with the use of multiple cell surface markers to identify alveolar macrophages in the lungs. To determine impact of alveolar macrophages on metastases and antitumor immunity these cells are depleted with the clodronate-containing liposomes administrated intranasally to tumor-bearing mice. This approach leads to the specific and efficient depletion of this cell population as confirmed by flow cytometry. Tumor volumes and lung metastases are evaluated in mice depleted of alveolar macrophages, to determine the role of these cells in the metastatic progression of breast cancer. PMID:27403530

  2. Fluorescence and reflectance spectral imaging system for a murine mammary window chamber model

    PubMed Central

    Leung, Hui Min; Gmitro, Arthur F.

    2015-01-01

    A spectral imaging system was developed to study the development of breast cancer xenografts in a murine mammary window chamber model. The instrument is configured to work with either a laser to excite fluorescence or a broadband light source for diffuse reflectance imaging. Two applications were demonstrated. First, spectral imaging of fluorescence signals was demonstrated with a GFP-breast cancer tumor and fluorescein injection. Second, based on the principles of broadband reflectance spectroscopy, the instrument was used to monitor dynamic changes of tissue absorbance to yield tissue oxygenation maps at different time points during tumor progression. PMID:26309753

  3. Targeting galectin-1 overcomes breast cancer-associated immunosuppression and prevents metastatic disease.

    PubMed

    Dalotto-Moreno, Tomás; Croci, Diego O; Cerliani, Juan P; Martinez-Allo, Verónica C; Dergan-Dylon, Sebastián; Méndez-Huergo, Santiago P; Stupirski, Juan C; Mazal, Daniel; Osinaga, Eduardo; Toscano, Marta A; Sundblad, Victoria; Rabinovich, Gabriel A; Salatino, Mariana

    2013-02-01

    Galectin-1 (Gal1), an evolutionarily conserved glycan-binding protein, contributes to the creation of an immunosuppressed microenvironment at sites of tumor growth. In spite of considerable progress in elucidating its role in tumor-immune escape, the mechanisms underlying the inhibitory functions of Gal1 remain obscure. Here, we investigated the contribution of tumor Gal1 to tumor growth, metastasis, and immunosuppression in breast cancer. We found that the frequency of Gal1(+) cells in human breast cancer biopsies correlated positively with tumor grade, while specimens from patients with benign hyperplasia showed negative or limited Gal1 staining. To examine the pathophysiologic relevance of Gal1 in breast cancer, we used the metastatic mouse mammary tumor 4T1, which expresses and secretes substantial amounts of Gal1. Silencing Gal1 expression in this model induced a marked reduction in both tumor growth and the number of lung metastases. This effect was abrogated when mice were inoculated with wild-type 4T1 tumor cells in their contralateral flank, suggesting involvement of a systemic modulation of the immune response. Gal1 attenuation in 4T1 cells also reduced the frequency of CD4(+)CD25(+) Foxp3(+) regulatory T (T(reg)) cells within the tumor, draining lymph nodes, spleen, and lung metastases. Further, it abrogated the immunosuppressive function of T(reg) cells and selectively lowered the expression of the T-cell regulatory molecule LAT (linker for activation of T cells) on these cells, disarming their suppressive activity. Taken together, our results offer a preclinical proof of concept that therapeutic targeting of Gal1 can overcome breast cancer-associated immunosuppression and can prevent metastatic disease. PMID:23204230

  4. Bone sialoprotein mediates the tumor cell-targeted prometastatic activity of TGF-β in a mouse model of breast cancer.

    PubMed Central

    Nam, Jeong-Seok; Suchar, Adam M.; Kang, Mi-Jin; Stuelten, Christina H.; Tang, Binwu; Michalowska, Aleksandra M.; Fisher, Larry W.; Fedarko, Neal S.; Jain, Alka; Pinkas, Jan; Lonning, Scott; Wakefield, Lalage M.

    2006-01-01

    Transforming growth factor-βs (TGF-βs) play a dual role in carcinogenesis, functioning as tumor suppressors early in the process, and then switching to act as pro-metastatic factors in late-stage disease. We have previously shown that high molecular weight TGF-β antagonists can suppress metastasis without the predicted toxicities (Yang et al., J. Clin. Invest. (2002) 109:1607-1615). To address the underlying mechanisms, we have used the 4T1 syngeneic mouse model of metastatic breast cancer. Treatment of mice with a monoclonal anti-TGF-β antibody (1D11) significantly suppressed metastasis of 4T1 cells to the lungs. When metastatic 4T1 cells were recovered from lungs of 1D11-treated and control mice, the most differentially expressed gene was found to be bone sialoprotein (Bsp). Immunostaining confirmed the loss of Bsp protein in 1D11-treated lung metastases, and TGF-β was shown to regulate and correlate with Bsp expression in vitro. Functionally, knockdown of Bsp in 4T1 cells reduced the ability of TGF-β to induce local collagen degradation and invasion in vitro, and treatment with recombinant BSP protected 4T1 cells from complement-mediated lysis. Finally, suppression of Bsp in 4T1 cells reduced metastasis in vivo. We conclude that Bsp is a plausible mediator of at least some of the tumor cell-targeted prometastatic activity of TGF-β in this model, and that Bsp expression in metastases can be successfully suppressed by systemic treatment with anti-TGF-β antibodies. PMID:16778210

  5. Attenuation of malignant phenotypes of breast cancer cells through eIF2α-mediated downregulation of Rac1 signaling.

    PubMed

    Hamamura, Kazunori; Minami, Kazumasa; Tanjung, Nancy; Wan, Qiaoqiao; Koizumi, Masahiko; Matsuura, Nariaki; Na, Sungsoo; Yokota, Hiroki

    2014-06-01

    Blocking dephosphorylation of eukaryotic translation initiation factor 2α (eIF2α) is reported to alter proliferation and differentiation of various cells. Using salubrinal and guanabenz as an inhibitory agent of dephosphorylation of eIF2α, we addressed a question whether an elevated level of phosphorylated eIF2α attenuates malignant phenotypes of triple negative breast cancer cells (TNBCs) that lack estrogen receptor, progesterone receptor and human epidermal growth factor receptor-2. We determined effects of salubrinal and guanabenz on in vitro phenotype of 4T1 mammary tumor cells and MDA-MB-231 human breast cancer cells and evaluated their effects on in vivo tumor growth using BALB/c mice injected with 4T1 cells. The results revealed that these agents block the proliferation and survival of 4T1 and MDA-MB-231 cells, as well as their invasion and motility. Silencing eIF2α revealed that eIF2α is involved in the reduction in invasion and motility. Furthermore, salubrinal-driven inactivation of Rac1 was suppressed in the cells treated with eIF2α siRNA, and treatment with Rac1 siRNA reduced cell invasion and motility. In vivo assay revealed that subcutaneous administration of salubrinal reduced the volume and weight of tumors induced by 4T1 cells. Collectively, the results indicate that these agents can attenuate malignant phenotype and tumor growth of breast cancer cells through the eIF2α-mediated Rac1 pathway. Since salubrinal and guanabenz are known to inhibit bone resorption, this study provides a potential use of eIF2α-mediated Rac1 regulation in suppressing the growth and metastasis of breast cancer. PMID:24691491

  6. Breast Cancer Prevention

    MedlinePlus

    ... of Breast & Gynecologic Cancers Breast Cancer Screening Research Breast Cancer Prevention (PDQ®)–Patient Version What is prevention? Go ... to keep cancer from starting. General Information About Breast Cancer Key Points Breast cancer is a disease in ...

  7. Types of Breast Cancers

    MedlinePlus

    ... the key statistics about breast cancer? Types of breast cancers Breast cancer can be separated into different types ... than invasive ductal carcinoma. Less common types of breast cancer Inflammatory breast cancer This uncommon type of invasive ...

  8. Breast self-exam

    MedlinePlus

    Self-examination of the breast; BSE; Breast cancer - BSE; Breast cancer screening - self exam ... American Cancer Society. Recommendations for early breast cancer detection in women without breast symptoms. Revised October 20, ... ...

  9. An novel inhibitor of TGF-β type I receptor, IN-1130, blocks breast cancer lung metastasis through inhibition of epithelial-mesenchymal transition.

    PubMed

    Park, Chul-Yong; Min, Kyung Nan; Son, Jee-Yeon; Park, So-Yeon; Nam, Jeong-Seok; Kim, Dae-Kee; Sheen, Yhun Yhong

    2014-08-28

    TGF-β signaling plays an important role in breast cancer progression and metastasis. Epithelial-mesenchymal transition (EMT) is an important step in the progression of solid tumors to metastatic disease. We previously reported that IN-1130, a novel transforming growth factor-β type I receptor kinase (ALK5) inhibitor, suppressed renal fibrosis in obstructive nephropathy (Moon et al., 2006). Here, we show that IN-1130 suppressed EMT and the lung metastasis of mammary tumors in mouse models. Treating human and mouse cell lines with IN-1130 inhibited TGF-β-mediated transcriptional activation, the phosphorylation and nuclear translocation of Smad2, and TGF-β-induced-EMT, which induces morphological changes in epithelial cells. Additionally, we demonstrated that IN-1130 blocked TGF-β-induced 4T1 mammary cancer cell migration and invasion. The TGF-β-mediated increase in matrix metalloproteinase (MMP)-2 and MMP-9 expression was restored by IN-1130 co-treatment with TGF-β in human epithelial cells and in 4T1 cells. Furthermore, we found that lung metastasis from primary breast cancer was inhibited by IN-1130 in both 4T1-xenografted BALB/c mice and MMTV/c-Neu transgenic mice without any change in primary tumor volume. IN-1130 prolonged the life span of tumor-bearing mice. In summary, this study indicated that IN-1130 has therapeutic potential for preventing breast cancer metastasis to the lung.

  10. Liposomes Coated with Isolated Macrophage Membrane Can Target Lung Metastasis of Breast Cancer.

    PubMed

    Cao, Haiqiang; Dan, Zhaoling; He, Xinyu; Zhang, Zhiwen; Yu, Haijun; Yin, Qi; Li, Yaping

    2016-08-23

    Cancer metastasis leads to high mortality of breast cancer and is difficult to treat because of the poor delivery efficiency of drugs. Herein, we report the wrapping of a drug-carrying liposome with an isolated macrophage membrane to improve delivery to metastatic sites. The macrophage membrane decoration increased cellular uptake of the emtansine liposome in metastatic 4T1 breast cancer cells and had inhibitory effects on cell viability. In vivo, the macrophage membrane enabled the liposome to target metastatic cells and produced a notable inhibitory effect on lung metastasis of breast cancer. Our results provide a biomimetic strategy via the biological properties of macrophages to enhance the medical performance of a nanoparticle in vivo for treating cancer metastasis. PMID:27454827

  11. Hinokitiol induces autophagy in murine breast and colorectal cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Wang, Wei-Kuang; Lin, Song-Tao; Chang, Wen-Wei; Liu, Li-Wen; Li, Tom Yu-Tung; Kuo, Chun-Yu; Hsieh, Jeng-Long; Lee, Che-Hsin

    2016-01-01

    Hinokitiol is found in the heartwood of cupressaceous plants and possesses several biological activities. Hinokitiol may play an important role in anti-inflammation and antioxidant processes, making it potentially useful in therapies for inflammatory-mediated disease. Previously, the suppression of tumor growth by hinokitiol has been shown to occur through apoptosis. Programmed cell death can also occur through autophagy, but the mechanism of hinokitiol-induced autophagy in tumor cells is poorly defined. We used an autophagy inhibitor (3-methyladenine) to demonstrate that hinokitiol can induce cell death via an autophagic pathway. Further, we suggest that hinokitiol induces autophagy in a dose-dependent manner. Markers of autophagy were increased after tumor cells were treated with hinokitiol. In addition, immunoblotting revealed that the levels of phosphoprotein kinase B (P-AKT), phosphomammalian target of rapamycin (P-mTOR), and phospho-p70 ribosomal s6 kinase (P-p70S6K) in tumor cells were decreased after hinokitiol treatment. In conclusion, our results indicate that hinokitiol induces the autophagic signaling pathway via downregulation of the AKT/mTOR pathway. Therefore, our findings show that hinokitiol may control tumor growth by inducing autophagic signaling. PMID:25044443

  12. Transcriptomic classification of genetically engineered mouse models of breast cancer identifies human subtype counterparts

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Human breast cancer is a heterogeneous disease consisting of multiple molecular subtypes. Genetically engineered mouse models are a useful resource for studying mammary cancers in vivo under genetically controlled and immune competent conditions. Identifying murine models with conserved human tumor features will facilitate etiology determinations, highlight the effects of mutations on pathway activation, and should improve preclinical drug testing. Results Transcriptomic profiles of 27 murine models of mammary carcinoma and normal mammary tissue were determined using gene expression microarrays. Hierarchical clustering analysis identified 17 distinct murine subtypes. Cross-species analyses using three independent human breast cancer datasets identified eight murine classes that resemble specific human breast cancer subtypes. Multiple models were associated with human basal-like tumors including TgC3(1)-Tag, TgWAP-Myc and Trp53-/-. Interestingly, the TgWAPCre-Etv6 model mimicked the HER2-enriched subtype, a group of human tumors without a murine counterpart in previous comparative studies. Gene signature analysis identified hundreds of commonly expressed pathway signatures between linked mouse and human subtypes, highlighting potentially common genetic drivers of tumorigenesis. Conclusions This study of murine models of breast carcinoma encompasses the largest comprehensive genomic dataset to date to identify human-to-mouse disease subtype counterparts. Our approach illustrates the value of comparisons between species to identify murine models that faithfully mimic the human condition and indicates that multiple genetically engineered mouse models are needed to represent the diversity of human breast cancers. The reported trans-species associations should guide model selection during preclinical study design to ensure appropriate representatives of human disease subtypes are used. PMID:24220145

  13. Breast Feeding.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    International Children's Centre, Paris (France).

    This set of documents consists of English, French, and Spanish translations of four pamphlets on breast-feeding. The pamphlets provide information designed for lay persons, academics and professionals, health personnel and educators, and policy-makers. The contents cover health-related differences between breast and bottle milk; patterns of…

  14. Anticancer Properties and Mechanisms of Fucoidan on Mouse Breast Cancer In Vitro and In Vivo

    PubMed Central

    Xue, Meilan; Ge, Yinlin; Zhang, Jinyu; Wang, Qing; Hou, Lin; Liu, Yongchao; Sun, Lingling; Li, Quan

    2012-01-01

    Background Fucoidan is a sulfated polysaccharide derived from brown algae that has been reported to perform multiple biological activities, including antitumor activity. In this study, we examined the influence of crude fucoidan on mouse breast cancer in vitro and in vivo. Materials and Methods In vitro, fluorescent staining, flow cytometry and Western blot were performed to analyze apoptosis and vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) expression of mouse breast cancer 4T1 cells. In vivo, therapy experiments were conducted on Babl/c mice bearing breast cancer. The tumor volume and weight were measured. The number of apoptotic cells and microvascular density (MVD) in tumor tissues were assessed by TUNEL and CD34 immunostaining. Immunohistochemical assays and ELISA assay were used to detect the expression of VEGF in tissues. Results In vitro studies showed that crude fucoidan significantly decreased the viable number of 4T1 cells, induced apoptosis and down-regulated the expression of VEGF. The expression of Bcl-2 was decreased, and the ratio of Bcl-2 to Bax was significantly decreased. The expression of Survivin and phosphorylated extracellular signal regulated protein kinases (ERKs) was decreased. Cytochrome C was released from mitochondria into cytosol, and the cleaved Caspase-3 protein rose after fucoidan treatment. Intraperitoneal injection of fucoidan in breast cancer models reduced the tumor volume and weight. The enhanced antitumor efficacy was associated with decreased angiogenesis and increased induction of apoptosis. Conclusion These findings indicated that crude fucoidan inhibited mouse breast cancer growth in vitro and in vivo. These data suggest that fucoidan may serve as a potential therapeutic agent for breast cancer. PMID:22916270

  15. Host b7x promotes pulmonary metastasis of breast cancer.

    PubMed

    Abadi, Yael M; Jeon, Hyungjun; Ohaegbulam, Kim C; Scandiuzzi, Lisa; Ghosh, Kaya; Hofmeyer, Kimberly A; Lee, Jun Sik; Ray, Anjana; Gravekamp, Claudia; Zang, Xingxing

    2013-04-01

    B7x (B7-H4 or B7S1) is an inhibitory member of the B7 family of T cell costimulation. It is expressed in low levels in healthy peripheral tissues, such as the lung epithelium, but is overexpressed in a variety of human cancers with negative clinical associations, including metastasis. However, the function of B7x in the context of cancer, whether expressed on cancer cells or on surrounding "host" tissues, has not been elucidated in vivo. We used the 4T1 metastatic breast cancer model and B7x knockout (B7x (-/-)) mice to investigate the effect of host tissue-expressed B7x on cancer. We found that 4T1 cells were B7x negative in vitro and in vivo, and B7x(-/-) mice had significantly fewer lung 4T1 tumor nodules than did wild-type mice. Furthermore, B7x(-/-) mice showed significantly enhanced survival and a memory response to tumor rechallenge. Mechanistic studies revealed that the presence of B7x correlated with reduced general and tumor-specific T cell cytokine responses, as well as with an increased infiltration of immunosuppressive cells, including tumor-associated neutrophils, macrophages, and regulatory T cells, into tumor-bearing lungs. Importantly, tumor-associated neutrophils strongly bound B7x protein and inhibited the proliferation of both CD4 and CD8 T cells. These results suggest that host B7x may enable metastasizing cancer cells to escape local antitumor immune responses through interactions with the innate and adaptive immune systems. Thus, targeting the B7x pathway holds much promise for improving the efficacy of immunotherapy for metastatic cancer. PMID:23455497

  16. Mesenchymal stem cells with Sirt1 overexpression suppress breast tumor growth via chemokine-dependent natural killer cells recruitment

    PubMed Central

    Yu, Yang; Liu, Yan; Zong, Chen; Yu, Qingbo; Yang, Xue; Liang, Lei; Ye, Fei; Nong, Li; Jia, Yuxian; Lu, Yongkui; Han, Zhipeng

    2016-01-01

    Mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) are generally used in regenerative medicine, tissue engineering and therapy for immune disorder diseases. However, due to the immunosuppressive function of MSCs, the application of MSCs in breast cancer therapy remains limited. Sirt1 is the closest mammalian homologue of the yeast enzyme Sir2 which has an established capacity to influence yeast replicative lifespan. In this study, we demonstrated the effect of MSCs with Sirt1 overexpression (MSCs-Sirt1) in mice bearing 4T1 breast cancer and investigated the underlying mechanism. Firstly, we found that MSCs could accelerate breast tumor growth with promoted proliferation and inhibited apoptosis, whereas MSCs-Sirt1 significantly suppressed tumor growth with proliferation inhibition and apoptosis promotion. Moreover, we detected that NK cells were the prominent antitumor effectors for the MSCs-Sirt1-induced antitumor activity. Besides that, CXCL10 and IFN-γ showed the high level expression in MSCs-Sirt1 treatment group. The impulsive effect of MSCs-Sirt1 on 4T1 cells in vivo could be reversed by inhibition of CXCL10 and IFN-γ. Overall, our results suggest that MSCs-Sirt1 can effectively inhibit breast tumor growth via the recruitment of NK cells in tumor inflammatory microenvironment. PMID:27782173

  17. A pH-Responsive Host-guest Nanosystem Loading Succinobucol Suppresses Lung Metastasis of Breast Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Dan, Zhaoling; Cao, Haiqiang; He, Xinyu; Zhang, Zhiwen; Zou, Lili; Zeng, Lijuan; Xu, Yan; Yin, Qi; Xu, Minghua; Zhong, Dafang; Yu, Haijun; Shen, Qi; Zhang, Pengcheng; Li, Yaping

    2016-01-01

    Cancer metastasis is the leading reason for the high mortality of breast cancer. Herein, we report on a pH-responsive host-guest nanosystem of succinobucol (PHN) with pH-stimuli controlled drug release behavior to improve the therapeutic efficacy on lung metastasis of breast cancer. PHN was composed of the host polymer of β-cyclodextrin linked with multiple arms of N,N-diisopropylethylenediamine (βCD-DPA), the guest polymer of adamantyl end-capped methoxy poly(ethylene glycol) (mPEG-Ad), and the active agent of succinobucol. PHN comprises nanometer-sized homogenous spherical particles, and exhibits specific and rapid drug release in response to the intracellular acidic pH-stimuli. Then, the anti-metastatic efficacy of PHN is measured in metastatic 4T1 breast cancer cells, which effectively confirms the superior inhibitory effects on cell migration and invasion activities, VCAM-1 expression and cell-cell binding of RAW 264.7 to 4T1 cells. Moreover, PHN can be specifically delivered to the sites of metastatic nodules in lungs, and result in an obviously improved therapeutic efficacy on lung metastasis of breast cancer. Thereby, the pH-responsive host-guest nanosystem can be a promising drug delivery platform for effective treatment of cancer metastasis. PMID:26909117

  18. Murine gamma interferon fails to inhibit Toxoplasma gondii growth in murine fibroblasts.

    PubMed Central

    Schwartzman, J D; Gonias, S L; Pfefferkorn, E R

    1990-01-01

    Although treatment of human macrophages or fibroblasts with human gamma interferon results in the inhibition of intracellular Toxoplasma gondii, murine gamma interferon stimulated only murine macrophages, not murine fibroblasts, to inhibit T. gondii. This species difference may be important in understanding the control of acute and chronic toxoplasmosis. PMID:2106497

  19. Enhanced MAF Oncogene Expression and Breast Cancer Bone Metastasis

    PubMed Central

    Pavlovic, Milica; Arnal-Estapé, Anna; Rojo, Federico; Bellmunt, Anna; Tarragona, Maria; Guiu, Marc; Planet, Evarist; Garcia-Albéniz, Xabier; Morales, Mónica; Urosevic, Jelena; Gawrzak, Sylwia; Rovira, Ana; Prat, Aleix; Nonell, Lara; Lluch, Ana; Jean-Mairet, Joël; Coleman, Robert; Albanell, Joan

    2015-01-01

    Background: There are currently no biomarkers for early breast cancer patient populations at risk of bone metastasis. Identification of mediators of bone metastasis could be of clinical interest. Methods: A de novo unbiased screening approach based on selection of highly bone metastatic breast cancer cells in vivo was used to determine copy number aberrations (CNAs) associated with bone metastasis. The CNAs associated with bone metastasis were examined in independent primary breast cancer datasets with annotated clinical follow-up. The MAF gene encoded within the CNA associated with bone metastasis was subjected to gain and loss of function validation in breast cancer cells (MCF7, T47D, ZR-75, and 4T1), its downstream mechanism validated, and tested in clinical samples. A multivariable Cox cause-specific hazard model with competing events (death) was used to test the association between 16q23 or MAF and bone metastasis. All statistical tests were two-sided. Results: 16q23 gain CNA encoding the transcription factor MAF mediates breast cancer bone metastasis through the control of PTHrP. 16q23 gain (hazard ratio (HR) for bone metastasis = 14.5, 95% confidence interval (CI) = 6.4 to 32.9, P < .001) as well as MAF overexpression (HR for bone metastasis = 2.5, 95% CI = 1.7 to 3.8, P < .001) in primary breast tumors were specifically associated with risk of metastasis to bone but not to other organs. Conclusions: These results suggest that MAF is a mediator of breast cancer bone metastasis. 16q23 gain or MAF protein overexpression in tumors may help to select patients at risk of bone relapse. PMID:26376684

  20. Breast Cancer Overview

    MedlinePlus

    ... Breast Cancer - Overview Request Permissions Print to PDF Breast Cancer - Overview Approved by the Cancer.Net Editorial Board , ... bean-shaped organs that help fight infection. About breast cancer Cancer begins when healthy cells in the breast ...

  1. Surgery for Breast Cancer

    MedlinePlus

    ... Next Topic Breast-conserving surgery (lumpectomy) Surgery for breast cancer Most women with breast cancer have some type ... Relieve symptoms of advanced cancer Surgery to remove breast cancer There are two main types of surgery to ...

  2. Learning about Breast Cancer

    MedlinePlus

    ... genetic terms used on this page Learning About Breast Cancer What do we know about heredity and breast ... Cancer What do we know about heredity and breast cancer? Breast cancer is a common disease. Each year, ...

  3. Fibrocystic breast disease

    MedlinePlus

    Fibrocystic breast disease; Mammary dysplasia; Diffuse cystic mastopathy; Benign breast disease; Glandular breast changes ... FF, Fort GG, et al, eds. Fibrocystic breast disease. In: Ferri FF, ed. Ferri's Clinical Advisor 2015 . ...

  4. Premenstrual breast changes

    MedlinePlus

    Premenstrual tenderness and swelling of the breasts; Breast tenderness - premenstrual; Breast swelling - premenstrual ... Symptoms of premenstrual breast tenderness may range from mild to ... most severe just before each menstrual period Improve during ...

  5. Breast enlargement in males

    MedlinePlus

    Gynecomastia; Breast enlargement in a male ... The condition may occur in one or both breasts. It begins as a small lump beneath the nipple, which may be tender. One breast may be larger than the other. Enlarged breasts ...

  6. Breast ultrasound

    MedlinePlus

    Hacker NF, Friedland ML. Breast disease. In: Hacker NF, Gambone JC, Hobel CJ, eds. Hacker and Moore's Essentials of Obstetrics and Gynecology . 6th ed. Philadelphia, PA: Elsevier; 2016:chap 30. Harvey ...

  7. Breast lift

    MedlinePlus Videos and Cool Tools

    ... are made to accommodate a higher position for the areola and nipple, as well as to remove excess skin and breast tissue. Stitches usually follow the circumference of the areola, the natural lower crease ...

  8. Breast cancer

    MedlinePlus

    ... drink per day (women at high risk for breast cancer should not drink alcohol at all) ... Services Task Force. Risk assessment, genetic counseling, and ... cancer treatment. Bethesda, MD: National Cancer Institute. Date ...

  9. Breast Density and Your Breast Mammogram Report

    MedlinePlus

    Breast Density and Your Mammogram Report Regular mammograms are the best way to find breast cancer early. But if ... But in some women, there’s little change. Breast density is very common, and is not abnormal. How ...

  10. Multifunctional T Lymphocytes Generated After Therapy With an Antitumor Gallotanin-Rich Normalized Fraction Are Related to Primary Tumor Size Reduction in a Breast Cancer Model.

    PubMed

    Urueña, Claudia; Gomez, Alejandra; Sandoval, Tito; Hernandez, John; Li, Shaoping; Barreto, Alfonso; Fiorentino, Susana

    2015-09-01

    Natural compounds are promising sources for anticancer therapies because of their multifunctional activity and low toxicity. Although the host immune response (IR) is clearly implicated in tumor control, the relationship between natural therapies and IR has not yet been elucidated. The present work evaluates IR induction after treatment with a gallotannin-rich fraction from Caesalpinia spinosa (P2Et). Breast tumor 4T1 cells were used to evaluate antitumor properties and IR activation. Apoptosis and expression of immunogenic cell death (ICD) markers were assessed in vitro, whereas IR and postvaccination tumor evolution were assessed in vivo. P2Et fraction induced apoptotic cell death, displaying phosphatidylserine externalization and DNA fragmentation. ICD markers such as calreticulin, high-mobility group box 1 translocation from nuclei to cytoplasm, and ATP secretion were observed. Primary tumor control was improved by vaccination with P2Et-pretreated 4T1 cells (t-P2Et), yielding long-lasting ex vivo multifunctional CD4(+) and CD8(+) T lymphocytes (interleukin [IL]-2(+), tumor necrosis factor [TNF]-α(+), interferon [IFN]-γ(+)) that secrete IL-2, TNF-α, IL-4, IL-5, and IFN-γ after specific 4T1 cell stimulation. The present study constitutes the first demonstration of a long-lasting antitumor IR induction and primary tumor reduction induced by a complex natural fraction. These data reveal the potential use of this fraction as an adjuvant in breast cancer treatment.

  11. Murine Typhus, Reunion, France, 2011–2013

    PubMed Central

    Camuset, Guillaume; Socolovschi, Cristina; Moiton, Marie-Pierre; Kuli, Barbara; Foucher, Aurélie; Poubeau, Patrice; Borgherini, Gianandrea; Wartel, Guillaume; Audin, Héla; Raoult, Didier; Filleul, Laurent; Parola, Philippe; Pagès, Fréderic

    2015-01-01

    Murine typhus case was initially identified in Reunion, France, in 2012 in a tourist. Our investigation confirmed 8 autochthonous cases that occurred during January 2011–January 2013 in Reunion. Murine typhus should be considered in local patients and in travelers returning from Reunion who have fevers of unknown origin. PMID:25625653

  12. Hydrogen-bonded and reduction-responsive micelles loading atorvastatin for therapy of breast cancer metastasis.

    PubMed

    Xu, Pengfei; Yu, Haijun; Zhang, Zhiwen; Meng, Qingshuo; Sun, Huiping; Chen, Xianzhi; Yin, Qi; Li, Yaping

    2014-08-01

    Metastasis is one of the major obstacles for the successful therapy of breast cancer. Although increased candidate drugs targeting cancer metastasis are tested, their clinical translation is limited by either serve toxicity or low efficacy. In present work, a nano-drug delivery system loading atorvastatin calcium (Ator) was developed for the efficient suppression of the metastasis of breast cancer. The nano-drug delivery system was constructed by a amphiphilic copolymer of methoxy polyethylene glycol-s-s-vitamin E succinate (mPEG-s-s-VES, PSV), which was consisted of a hydrophilic mPEG1k segment and a hydrophobic VES head, which were conjugated with a linker bearing amide and disulfide groups simultaneously. Self-assembly of PSV and Ator formed Ator-loaded PSV micelles (ASM) with good colloidal stability, high drug loading content (up to 50%) and great encapsulation efficiency (99.09 ± 0.28%). In cellular level, it was found that the ASM could efficiently release the Ator payload into cytosol due to detachment of PEG shell at high intracellular glutathione condition. ASM could significantly inhibit the migration and invasion of 4T1 breast cancer cells with inhibitory rates of 79.2% and 88.5%, respectively. In a 4T1 orthotropic mammary tumor metastatic cancer model, it was demonstrated that ASM could completely blocked the lung and liver metastasis of breast cancer with minimal toxicity owing to enhanced Ator accumulation in tumor and lung as compared with that of free Ator. The down-regulations of metastasis-promoting MMP-9, Twist and uPA proteins were demonstrated as the main underlying mechanism. As a result, ASM could be a promising drug delivery system for the efficient therapy of breast cancer metastasis.

  13. Bcl-2/adenovirus E1B 19 kDa interacting protein-3 knockdown enables growth of breast cancer metastases in the lung, liver, and bone.

    PubMed

    Manka, David; Spicer, Zachary; Millhorn, David E

    2005-12-15

    The mouse breast cancer cell lines 4T1, 4T07, and 67NR are highly tumorigenic but vary in metastatic potential: 4T1 widely disseminates, resulting in secondary tumors in the lung, liver, bone, and brain; 4T07 spreads to the lung and liver but is unable to establish metastatic nodules; 67NR is unable to metastasize. The Bcl-2/adenovirus E1B 19 kDa interacting protein-3 (Bnip-3) was recently shown to be absent after hypoxia in pancreatic cancer cell lines whereas its overexpression restored hypoxia-induced cell death. We found that Bnip-3 expression increased after 6 hours of hypoxia in all cell lines tested but was highest in the nonmetastatic 67NR cells and lowest in the highly metastatic 4T1 cells. Hypoxia-induced expression of Bnip-3 in the disseminating but nonmetastatic 4T07 cells was intermediate compared with 4T1 and 67NR cells. Cleaved caspase-3, a key downstream effector of cell death, increased after 6 hours of hypoxia in the 67NR and 4T07 cells by 1.9- and 2.5-fold, respectively. Conversely, cleaved caspase-3 decreased by 45% in the highly metastatic 4T1 cells after hypoxia. Small interfering RNA oligonucleotides targeting endogenous Bnip-3 blocked cell death and increased clonigenic survival after hypoxic challenge in vitro and increased primary tumor size and enabled metastasis to the lung, liver, and sternum of mice inoculated with 4T07 cells in vivo. These data inversely correlate the hypoxia-induced expression of the cell death protein Bnip-3 to metastatic potential and suggest that loss of Bnip-3 expression is critical for malignant and metastatic evasion of hypoxia-induced cell death. PMID:16357180

  14. Murine Model of Hindlimb Ischemia

    PubMed Central

    Niiyama, Hiroshi; Huang, Ngan F.; Rollins, Mark D.; Cooke, John P.

    2009-01-01

    In the United States, peripheral arterial disease (PAD) affects about 10 million individuals, and is also prevalent worldwide. Medical therapies for symptomatic relief are limited. Surgical or endovascular interventions are useful for some individuals, but long-term results are often disappointing. As a result, there is a need for developing new therapies to treat PAD. The murine hindlimb ischemia preparation is a model of PAD, and is useful for testing new therapies. When compared to other models of tissue ischemia such as coronary or cerebral artery ligation, femoral artery ligation provides for a simpler model of ischemic tissue. Other advantages of this model are the ease of access to the femoral artery and low mortality rate. In this video, we demonstrate the methodology for the murine model of unilateral hindimb ischemia. The specific materials and procedures for creating and evaluating the model will be described, including the assessment of limb perfusion by laser Doppler imaging. This protocol can also be utilized for the transplantation and non-invasive tracking of cells, which is demonstrated by Huang et al.1. PMID:19229179

  15. Murine model of wound healing.

    PubMed

    Dunn, Louise; Prosser, Hamish C G; Tan, Joanne T M; Vanags, Laura Z; Ng, Martin K C; Bursill, Christina A

    2013-05-28

    Wound healing and repair are the most complex biological processes that occur in human life. After injury, multiple biological pathways become activated. Impaired wound healing, which occurs in diabetic patients for example, can lead to severe unfavorable outcomes such as amputation. There is, therefore, an increasing impetus to develop novel agents that promote wound repair. The testing of these has been limited to large animal models such as swine, which are often impractical. Mice represent the ideal preclinical model, as they are economical and amenable to genetic manipulation, which allows for mechanistic investigation. However, wound healing in a mouse is fundamentally different to that of humans as it primarily occurs via contraction. Our murine model overcomes this by incorporating a splint around the wound. By splinting the wound, the repair process is then dependent on epithelialization, cellular proliferation and angiogenesis, which closely mirror the biological processes of human wound healing. Whilst requiring consistency and care, this murine model does not involve complicated surgical techniques and allows for the robust testing of promising agents that may, for example, promote angiogenesis or inhibit inflammation. Furthermore, each mouse acts as its own control as two wounds are prepared, enabling the application of both the test compound and the vehicle control on the same animal. In conclusion, we demonstrate a practical, easy-to-learn, and robust model of wound healing, which is comparable to that of humans.

  16. Primary breast cancer induces pulmonary vascular hyperpermeability and promotes metastasis via the VEGF-PKC pathway.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Man; Qin, Chengyong; Han, Mingyong

    2016-06-01

    The lung is one of the most frequent target organs for breast cancer metastasis. When breast cancer cells from a primary tumor do not colonize the lung, which we named the premetastatic phase, the microenvironment of the lung has already been influenced by the primary tumor. However, little is known about the exact premetastatic alteration and regulatory mechanisms of the lung. Here, we used 4T1 cells (a mouse breast cancer cell line which can specifically metastasize to the lung) to build a mouse breast cancer model. We found that primary breast tumor induced increased pulmonary vascular permeability in the premetastatic phase, which facilitated the leakage of rhodamine-dextran and the extravasation of intravenous therapy injected cancer cells. Furthermore, tight junctions (TJs) were disrupted, and the expression of zonula occludens-1(ZO-1), one of the most important components of tight junctions, was decreased in the premetastatic lung. In addition, elevated serum vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) was involved in the destabilization of tight junctions and the VEGF antagonist bevacizumab reversed the primary tumor-induced vascular hyperpermeability. Moreover, activation of the protein kinase C (PKC) pathway disrupted the integrity of TJs and accordingly, the disruption could be alleviated by blocking VEGF. Taken together, these data demonstrate that primary breast cancer may induce tight junction disruptions in the premetastatic lung via the VEGF-PKC pathway and promote pulmonary vascular hyperpermeability before metastasis. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. PMID:26152457

  17. KLF17 is a negative regulator of epithelial-mesenchymal transition and metastasis in breast cancer

    PubMed Central

    Gumireddy, Kiranmai; Li, Anping; Gimotty, Phyllis A.; Klein-Szanto, Andres J.; Showe, Louise C.; Katsaros, Dionyssios; Coukos, George; Zhang, Lin; Huang, Qihong

    2009-01-01

    Metastasis is a complex multi-step process requiring the concerted action of many genes and is the primary cause of cancer deaths. Pathways that regulate metastasis enhancement and suppression both contribute to tumor dissemination process. In order to identify novel metastasis suppressors, we set up a forward genetic screen in a mouse model. We transduced a genome-wide RNAi library into the non-metastatic 168FARN breast cancer cell line, orthotopically transplanted the cells into mouse mammary fat pads, and then selected for cells that could metastasize to the lung and identified an RNAi for the KLF17 gene. Conversely, we demonstrate that ectopic expression of KLF17 in highly metastatic 4T1 breast cancer cell line inhibited their ability to metastasize from the mammary fat pad to the lung. We also show that suppression of KLF17 expression promotes breast cancer cell invasion and epithelial-mesenchymal transition (EMT) and that KLF17 functions by directly binding to the promoter of Id-1, a key metastasis regulator in breast cancer, to inhibit its transcription. Finally, we demonstrate that KLF17 expression is significantly down-regulated in primary human breast cancer samples and that the combined expression patterns of KLF17 and Id-1 can serve as a potential biomarker for lymph node metastasis in breast cancer. PMID:19801974

  18. Myeloid Derived Suppressor Cells in Breast Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Markowitz, Joseph; Wesolowski, Robert; Papenfuss, Tracey; Brooks, Taylor R.

    2013-01-01

    Myeloid Derived Suppressor Cells (MDSCs) are a population of immature myeloid cells defined by their suppressive actions on immune cells such as T cells, dendritic cells, and natural killer cells. MDSCs typically are positive for the markers CD33 and CD11b but express low levels of HLADR in humans. In mice, MDSCs are typically positive for both CD11b and Gr1. These cells exert their suppressive activity on the immune system via the production of reactive oxygen species, arginase, and cytokines. These factors subsequently inhibit the activity of multiple protein targets such as the T cell receptor, STAT1, and indoleamine-pyrrole 2,3-dioxygenase. The numbers of MDSCs tend to increase with cancer burden while inhibiting MDSCs improves disease outcome in murine models. MDSCs also inhibit immune cancer therapeutics. In light of the poor prognosis of metastatic breast cancer in women and the correlation of increasing levels of MDSCs with increasing disease burden, the purposes of this review are to 1) discuss why MDSCs may be important in breast cancer, 2) describe model systems used to study MDSCs in vitro and in vivo, 3) discuss mechanisms involved in MDSC induction/function in breast cancer, and 4) present pre-clinical and clinical studies that explore modulation of the MDSC-immune system interaction in breast cancer. MDSCs inhibit the host immune response in breast cancer patients and diminishing MDSC actions may improve therapeutic outcomes. PMID:23828498

  19. Silibinin and indocyanine green-loaded nanoparticles inhibit the growth and metastasis of mammalian breast cancer cells in vitro

    PubMed Central

    Sun, Hui-ping; Su, Jing-han; Meng, Qing-shuo; Yin, Qi; Zhang, Zhi-wen; Yu, Hai-jun; Zhang, Peng-cheng; Wang, Si-ling; Li, Ya-ping

    2016-01-01

    Aim: To improve the therapeutic efficacy of cancer treatments, combinational therapies based on nanosized drug delivery system (NDDS) has been developed recently. In this study we designed a new NDDS loaded with an anti-metastatic drug silibinin and a photothermal agent indocyanine green (ICG), and investigated its effects on the growth and metastasis of breast cancer cells in vitro. Methods: Silibinin and ICG were self-assembled into PCL lipid nanoparticles (SIPNs). Their physical characteristics including the particle size, zeta potential, morphology and in vitro drug release were examined. 4T1 mammalian breast cancer cells were used to evaluate their cellular internalization, cytotoxicity, and their influences on wound healing, in vitro cell migration and invasion. Results: SIPNs showed a well-defined spherical shape with averaged size of 126.3±0.4 nm and zeta potential of −10.3±0.2 mV. NIR laser irradiation substantially increased the in vitro release of silibinin from the SIPNs (58.3% at the first 8 h, and 97.8% for the total release). Furthermore, NIR laser irradiation markedly increased the uptake of SIPNs into 4T1 cells. Under the NIR laser irradiation, both SIPNs and IPNs (PCL lipid nanoparticles loaded with ICG alone) caused dose-dependent ablation of 4T1 cells. The wound healing, migration and invasion experiments showed that SIPNs exposed to NIR laser irradiation exhibited dramatic in vitro anti-metastasis effects. Conclusion: SIPNs show temperature-sensitive drug release following NIR laser irradiation, which can inhibit the growth and metastasis of breast cancer cells in vitro. PMID:27133295

  20. Targeted delivery of cisplatin by LHRH-peptide conjugated dextran nanoparticles suppresses breast cancer growth and metastasis.

    PubMed

    Li, Mingqiang; Tang, Zhaohui; Zhang, Yu; Lv, Shixian; Li, Quanshun; Chen, Xuesi

    2015-05-01

    The metastasis of breast cancer is the leading cause of cancer death in women. In this work, an attempt to simultaneously inhibit the primary tumor growth and organ-specific metastasis by the cisplatin-loaded LHRH-modified dextran nanoparticles (Dex-SA-CDDP-LHRH) was performed in the 4T1 orthotopic mammary tumor metastasis model. With the rationally designed conjugation site of the LHRH ligand, the Dex-SA-CDDP-LHRH nanoparticles maintained the targeting function of LHRH and specifically bound to the LHRH-receptors overexpressed on the surface of 4T1 breast cancer cells. Therefore, the Dex-SA-CDDP-LHRH nanoparticles exhibited improved cellular uptake and promoted cytotoxicity, when compared with the non-targeted Dex-SA-CDDP nanoparticles. Moreover, both the non-targeted and targeted nanoparticles significantly decreased the systemic toxicity of CDDP and increased the maximum tolerated dose of CDDP from 4 to 30mgkg(-1). Importantly, Dex-SA-CDDP-LHRH markedly enhanced the accumulation of CDDP in the injected primary tumor and metastasis-containing organs, and meanwhile significantly reduced the nephrotoxicity of CDDP. Dose-dependent therapeutic effects further demonstrated that the CDDP-loaded LHRH-decorated polysaccharide nanoparticles significantly enhanced the antitumor and antimetastasis efficacy, as compared to the non-targeted nanoparticles. These results suggest that Dex-SA-CDDP-LHRH nanoparticles show great potential for targeted chemotherapy of metastatic breast cancer. PMID:25735801

  1. Plaque assay for murine norovirus.

    PubMed

    Gonzalez-Hernandez, Mariam B; Bragazzi Cunha, Juliana; Wobus, Christiane E

    2012-01-01

    Murine norovirus (MNV) is the only member of the Norovirus genus that efficiently grows in tissue culture. Cell lysis and cytopathic effect (CPE) are observed during MNV-1 infection of murine dendritic cells or macrophages. This property of MNV-1 can be used to quantify the number of infectious particles in a given sample by performing a plaque assay. The plaque assay relies on the ability of MNV-1 to lyse cells and to form holes in a confluent cell monolayer, which are called plaques. Multiple techniques can be used to detect viral infections in tissue culture, harvested tissue, clinical, and environmental samples, but not all measure the number of infectious particles (e.g. qRT-PCR). One way to quantify infectious viral particles is to perform a plaque assay, which will be described in detail below. A variation on the MNV plaque assay is the fluorescent focus assay, where MNV antigen is immunostained in cell monolayers. This assay can be faster, since viral antigen expression precedes plaque formation. It is also useful for titrating viruses unable to form plaques. However, the fluorescent focus assay requires additional resources beyond those of the plaque assay, such as antibodies and a microscope to count focus-forming units. Infectious MNV can also be quantified by determining the 50% Tissue Culture Infective Dose (TCID50). This assay measures the amount of virus required to produce CPE in 50% of inoculated tissue culture cells by endpoint titration. However, its limit of detection is higher compared to a plaque assay. In this article, we describe a plaque assay protocol that can be used to effectively determine the number of infectious MNV particles present in biological or environmental samples. This method is based on the preparation of 10-fold serial dilutions of MNV-containing samples, which are used to inoculate a monolayer of permissive cells (RAW 264.7 murine macrophage cells). Virus is allowed to attach to the cell monolayer for a given period of

  2. Morphine Modulates Interleukin-4- or Breast Cancer Cell-induced Pro-metastatic Activation of Macrophages.

    PubMed

    Khabbazi, Samira; Goumon, Yannick; Parat, Marie-Odile

    2015-01-01

    Interactions between cancer cells and stromal cells in the tumour microenvironment play a key role in the control of invasiveness, metastasis and angiogenesis. Macrophages display a range of activation states in specific pathological contexts and alternatively activated (M2) macrophages can promote tumour aggressiveness. Opioids are able to modulate tumour growth and metastasis. We tested whether morphine modulates the activation of macrophages induced by (i) interleukin-4 (IL-4), the prototypical M2 polarization-inducing cytokine, or (ii) coculture with breast cancer cells. We showed that IL-4 causes increased MMP-9 production and expression of the alternative activation markers arginase-1 and MRC-1. Morphine prevented IL-4-induced increase in MMP-9 in a naloxone- and methylnaltrexone-reversible fashion. Morphine also prevented IL-4-elicited alternative activation of RAW264.7 macrophages. Expression of MMP-9 and arginase-1 were increased when RAW264.7 were subjected to paracrine activation by 4T1 cells, and this effect was prevented by morphine via an opioid receptor-mediated mechanism. Morphine further decreased 4T1 breast cancer cell invasion elicited by co-culture with RAW264.7. Reduction of MMP-9 expression and alternative activation of macrophages by morphine was confirmed using mouse bone marrow-derived macrophages. Taken together, our results indicate that morphine may modulate tumour aggressiveness by regulating macrophage protease production and M2 polarization within the tumour microenvironment.

  3. Photo-nano immunotherapy for metastatic breast cancer using synergistic single-walled carbon nanotubes and glycated chitosan

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, Feifan; Hasanjee, Aamr; Doughty, Austin; West, Connor; Liu, Hong; Chen, Wei R.

    2015-03-01

    In our previous work, we constructed a multifunctional nano system, using single-walled carbon nanotube (SWNT) and glycated chitosan (GC), which can synergize photothermal and immunological effects. To further confirm the therapy efficacy, with a metastatic mouse mammary tumor model (4T1), we investigate the therapy effects and immune response induced by SWNT-GC, under laser irradiation. Laser+SWNT-GC treatment not only suppressed the prime tumor, but also induced antitumor immune response. It could be developed into a promising treatment modality for the metastatic breast cancer.

  4. Breast biopsy - stereotactic

    MedlinePlus

    ... you have breast cancer . Two main types of breast cancer may be found: Ductal carcinoma starts in the tubes (ducts) that move milk from the breast to the nipple. Most breast cancers are of this ... Lobular carcinoma starts in parts of the breast called lobules, ...

  5. Breast biopsy - ultrasound

    MedlinePlus

    ... you have breast cancer. Two main types of breast cancer may be found: Ductal carcinoma starts in the tubes (ducts) that move milk from the breast to the nipple. Most breast cancers are of this ... Lobular carcinoma starts in parts of the breast called lobules, ...

  6. Breast Reconstruction

    MedlinePlus

    If you need a mastectomy, you have a choice about whether or not to have surgery to rebuild the shape of the breast. Instead of ... be done at the same time as the mastectomy, or it may be done later on. If ...

  7. Breast pain

    PubMed Central

    2007-01-01

    Introduction Breast pain may be cyclical (worse before a period) or non-cyclical, originating from the breast or the chest wall, and occurs at some time in 70% of women. Cyclical breast pain resolves spontaneously in 20-30% of women, but tends to recur in 60% of women. Non-cyclical pain responds poorly to treatment but tends to resolve spontaneously in half of women. Methods and outcomes We conducted a systematic review and aimed to answer the following clinical question: What are the effects of treatments for breast pain? We searched: Medline, Embase, The Cochrane Library and other important databases up to January 2006 (BMJ Clinical Evidence reviews are updated periodically, please check our website for the most up-to-date version of this review). We included harms alerts from relevant organisations such as the US Food and Drug Administration (FDA) and the UK Medicines and Healthcare products Regulatory Agency (MHRA). Results We found 22 systematic reviews, RCTs, or observational studies that met our inclusion criteria. We performed a GRADE evaluation of the quality of evidence for interventions. Conclusions In this systematic review we present information relating to the effectiveness and safety of the following interventions: a low-fat diet, antibiotics, bromocriptine, danazol, diuretics, evening primrose oil, gestrinone, gonadorelin analogues, hormone replacement therapy, lisuride, progestogens, pyridoxine, tamoxifen, tibolone, topical non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs, toremifene, and vitamin E. PMID:19454068

  8. Breast pain

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Introduction Breast pain may be cyclical (worse before a period) or non-cyclical, originating from the breast or the chest wall, and occurs at some time in 70% of women. Cyclical breast pain resolves spontaneously in 20% to 30% of women, but tends to recur in 60% of women. Non-cyclical pain responds poorly to treatment but tends to resolve spontaneously in half of women. Methods and outcomes We conducted a systematic review and aimed to answer the following clinical question: What are the effects of treatments for breast pain? We searched: Medline, Embase, The Cochrane Library, and other important databases up to May 2010 (Clinical Evidence reviews are updated periodically; please check our website for the most up-to-date version of this review). We included harms alerts from relevant organisations such as the US Food and Drug Administration (FDA) and the UK Medicines and Healthcare products Regulatory Agency (MHRA). Results We found 24 systematic reviews, RCTs, or observational studies that met our inclusion criteria. We performed a GRADE evaluation of the quality of evidence for interventions. Conclusions In this systematic review we present information relating to the effectiveness and safety of the following interventions: antibiotics, bromocriptine, combined oral contraceptive pill, danazol, diuretics, evening primrose oil, gestrinone, gonadorelin analogues, hormone replacement therapy (HRT), lisuride, low-fat diet, progestogens, pyridoxine, tamoxifen, tibolone, topical or oral non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs), toremifene, and vitamin E. PMID:21477394

  9. Breast pain

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Introduction Breast pain may be cyclical (worse before a period) or non-cyclical, originating from the breast or the chest wall, and occurs at some time in 70% of women. Cyclical breast pain resolves spontaneously in 20% to 30% of women, but tends to recur in 60% of women. Non-cyclical pain responds poorly to treatment but tends to resolve spontaneously in half of women. Methods and outcomes We conducted a systematic review and aimed to answer the following clinical question: What are the effects of treatments for breast pain? We searched: Medline, Embase, The Cochrane Library, and other important databases up to February 2014 (Clinical Evidence reviews are updated periodically; please check our website for the most up-to-date version of this review). We included harms alerts from relevant organisations such as the US Food and Drug Administration (FDA) and the UK Medicines and Healthcare products Regulatory Agency (MHRA). Results We found 11 studies that met our inclusion criteria. We performed a GRADE evaluation of the quality of evidence for interventions. Conclusions In this systematic review we present information relating to the effectiveness and safety of the following interventions: bra wearing, combined oral contraceptive pill, danazol, gonadorelin analogues, progestogens, tamoxifen, and topical or oral non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs).

  10. General Information about Breast Cancer

    MedlinePlus

    ... of Breast & Gynecologic Cancers Breast Cancer Screening Research Breast Cancer Treatment (PDQ®)–Patient Version General Information About Breast Cancer Go to Health Professional Version Key Points Breast ...

  11. Risks of Breast Cancer Screening

    MedlinePlus

    ... of Breast & Gynecologic Cancers Breast Cancer Screening Research Breast Cancer Screening (PDQ®)–Patient Version What is screening? Go ... cancer screening: Cancer Screening Overview General Information About Breast Cancer Key Points Breast cancer is a disease in ...

  12. Immune Stimulating Photoactive Hybrid Nanoparticles for Metastatic Breast Cancer†

    PubMed Central

    Marrache, Sean; Choi, Joshua H.; Tundup, Smanla; Zaver, Dillon; Harn, Donald A.; Dhar, Shanta

    2012-01-01

    A therapeutic technology that combines the phototoxic and immune-stimulating ability of photodynamic therapy (PDT) with the widespread effectiveness of the immune system can be very promising to treat metastatic breast cancer. We speculated that the knowledge of molecular mechanisms of existing multi-component therapies could provide clues to aid the discovery of new combinations of an immunostimulant with a photosensitizer (PS) using a nanoparticle (NP) delivery platform. Therapeutic challenges when administering therapeutic combinations include the choice of dosages to reduce side effects, the definitive delivery of the correct drug ratio, and exposure to the targets of interest. These factors are very difficult to achieve when drugs are individually administered. By combining controlled release polymer-based NP drug delivery approaches, we were able to differentially deliver zinc phthalocyanine (ZnPc) based PS to metastatic breast cancer cells along with CpG-ODN, a single-stranded DNA that is a known immunostimulant to manage the distant tumors in a temporally regulated manner resulting in more effective management of deadly metastatic breast cancer. We encapsulated ZnPc which is a long-wavelength absorbing PS within a polymeric NP core made up of poly(D,L-lactic-co-glycolic acid)-b-poly(ethylene glycol) (PLGA-b-PEG). After coating the outside of the polymeric core with gold NPs (AuNPs), we further modified the AuNP surface with CpG-ODN. In vitro cytotoxicity using 4T1 metastatic mouse breast carcinoma cells shows significant photocytotoxicity of the hybrid NPs containing both ZnPc and CpG-ODN after irradiation with a 660 nm LASER light and this activity was remarkably better than either treatment alone. Treatment of mouse bone marrow derived dendritic cells with the PDT-killed 4T1 cell lysate shows that the combination of PDT with a synergistic immunostimulant in a single NP system results in significant immune response, which can be used for the treatment of

  13. Breast Cancer (For Kids)

    MedlinePlus

    ... Got Homework? Here's Help White House Lunch Recipes Breast Cancer KidsHealth > For Kids > Breast Cancer Print A A ... for it when they are older. What Is Breast Cancer? The human body is made of tiny building ...

  14. Breast Cancer Disparities

    MedlinePlus

    ... 2.65 MB] Read the MMWR Science Clips Breast Cancer Black Women Have Higher Death Rates from Breast ... of Page U.S. State Info Number of Additional Breast Cancer Deaths Among Black Women, By State SOURCE: National ...

  15. Risks of Breast Implants

    MedlinePlus

    ... larger and longer than these conducted so far. Breastfeeding Some women who undergo breast augmentation can successfully ... breast implant silicone shell into breast milk during breastfeeding. Although there are currently no established methods for ...

  16. Male Breast Cancer

    MedlinePlus

    Although breast cancer is much more common in women, men can get it too. It happens most often to men between ... 60 and 70. Breast lumps usually aren't cancer. However, most men with breast cancer have lumps. ...

  17. Breast lump removal

    MedlinePlus

    Lumpectomy; Wide local excision; Breast conservation surgery; Breast-sparing surgery; Partial mastectomy ... If the breast cancer can be seen on imaging tests but the doctor cannot feel it when examining you, a wire ...

  18. Nifuroxazide induces apoptosis and impairs pulmonary metastasis in breast cancer model.

    PubMed

    Yang, F; Hu, M; Lei, Q; Xia, Y; Zhu, Y; Song, X; Li, Y; Jie, H; Liu, C; Xiong, Y; Zuo, Z; Zeng, A; Li, Y; Yu, L; Shen, G; Wang, D; Xie, Y; Ye, T; Wei, Y

    2015-01-01

    Breast carcinoma is the most common female cancer with considerable metastatic potential. Signal transducers and activators of the transcription 3 (Stat3) signaling pathway is constitutively activated in many cancers including breast cancer and has been validated as a novel potential anticancer target. Here, we reported our finding with nifuroxazide, an antidiarrheal agent identified as a potent inhibitor of Stat3. The potency of nifuroxazide on breast cancer was assessed in vitro and in vivo. In this investigation, we found that nifuroxazide decreased the viability of three breast cancer cell lines and induced apoptosis of cancer cells in a dose-dependent manner. In addition, western blot analysis demonstrated that the occurrence of its apoptosis was associated with activation of cleaved caspases-3 and Bax, downregulation of Bcl-2. Moreover, nifuroxazide markedly blocked cancer cell migration and invasion, and the reduction of phosphorylated-Stat3(Tyr705), matrix metalloproteinase (MMP) MMP-2 and MMP-9 expression were also observed. Furthermore, in our animal experiments, intraperitoneal administration of 50 mg/kg/day nifuroxazide suppressed 4T1 tumor growth and blocked formation of pulmonary metastases without detectable toxicity. Meanwhile, histological and immunohistochemical analyses revealed a decrease in Ki-67-positive cells, MMP-9-positive cells and an increase in cleaved caspase-3-positive cells upon nifuroxazide. Notably, nifuroxazide reduced the number of myeloid-derived suppressor cell in the lung. Our data indicated that nifuroxazide may potentially be a therapeutic agent for growth and metastasis of breast cancer. PMID:25811798

  19. Nifuroxazide induces apoptosis and impairs pulmonary metastasis in breast cancer model

    PubMed Central

    Yang, F; Hu, M; Lei, Q; Xia, Y; Zhu, Y; Song, X; Li, Y; Jie, H; Liu, C; Xiong, Y; Zuo, Z; Zeng, A; Li, Y; Yu, L; Shen, G; Wang, D; Xie, Y; Ye, T; Wei, Y

    2015-01-01

    Breast carcinoma is the most common female cancer with considerable metastatic potential. Signal transducers and activators of the transcription 3 (Stat3) signaling pathway is constitutively activated in many cancers including breast cancer and has been validated as a novel potential anticancer target. Here, we reported our finding with nifuroxazide, an antidiarrheal agent identified as a potent inhibitor of Stat3. The potency of nifuroxazide on breast cancer was assessed in vitro and in vivo. In this investigation, we found that nifuroxazide decreased the viability of three breast cancer cell lines and induced apoptosis of cancer cells in a dose-dependent manner. In addition, western blot analysis demonstrated that the occurrence of its apoptosis was associated with activation of cleaved caspases-3 and Bax, downregulation of Bcl-2. Moreover, nifuroxazide markedly blocked cancer cell migration and invasion, and the reduction of phosphorylated-Stat3Tyr705, matrix metalloproteinase (MMP) MMP-2 and MMP-9 expression were also observed. Furthermore, in our animal experiments, intraperitoneal administration of 50 mg/kg/day nifuroxazide suppressed 4T1 tumor growth and blocked formation of pulmonary metastases without detectable toxicity. Meanwhile, histological and immunohistochemical analyses revealed a decrease in Ki-67-positive cells, MMP-9-positive cells and an increase in cleaved caspase-3-positive cells upon nifuroxazide. Notably, nifuroxazide reduced the number of myeloid-derived suppressor cell in the lung. Our data indicated that nifuroxazide may potentially be a therapeutic agent for growth and metastasis of breast cancer. PMID:25811798

  20. The synergistic effects of radiofrequency ablation (RFA) with glycated chitosan for inhibiting the metastasis of breast cancer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chiu, Hsin-Yu; Leu, Jyh-Der; Chen, Wei R.; Lee, Yi-Jang

    2016-03-01

    Breast cancer is increasing with years in Taiwan because of dietary style, life behavior and several social-physiological factors. According to the record of Bureau of Health Promotion in Taiwan, the incidence of breast cancer is top one, and the mortality of that is top one cancer type in women. Compared with USA, most of breast cancer cases found in Taiwanese women have reached to stage 2 or 3. Current therapeutic strategies for breast cancer include surgery, radiation therapy, chemotherapy, hormone therapy and targeted therapy. However, these methods used for curing the late-stage breast cancer remains rare. Because the metastasis is the major problem of late-stage breast cancer, it is of interest to investigate whether a systemic therapy can reduce the symptoms of cancer. The immunotherapy, particularly an induction of autoimmune system, is probably important for the treatment of late-stage breast cancer. Glycated chitosan (GC) is derived from chitosan, a linear polysaccharide composed of D-glucosamine and N-acetyl-D-glucosamine through β-(1-4) linkage. Several lines of evidence have shown that GC is an immunoadjuvant that can target on primary and metastatic tumors formed in animal and human patients. In our previous data, GC was demonstrated to decrease the motility and invasion of mammalian breast cancer cells in vitro and in vivo. Radiofrequency ablation (RFA) is dependent on a small generator that delivers high frequency alternating electric current directly to burn a tumor lesion. Therefore, the temperature may reach up to above 60 °C. In this study, we used 4T1 mouse breast cancer cell that is the approximately equal to stage 4 of human breast cancer. And triple modality reporter gene (3R) was delivered into the cells using transfected piggyBac, a transposable element for observation of tumor growth and metastasis in vivo. Data showed that growth and metastasis of tumors smaller than 500mm3 were entirely suppressed by RFA-GC combination treatment

  1. Cucurbitacin B inhibits breast cancer metastasis and angiogenesis through VEGF-mediated suppression of FAK/MMP-9 signaling axis.

    PubMed

    Sinha, Sonam; Khan, Sajid; Shukla, Samriddhi; Lakra, Amar Deep; Kumar, Sudhir; Das, Gunjan; Maurya, Rakesh; Meeran, Syed Musthapa

    2016-08-01

    Available breast cancer therapeutic strategies largely target the primary tumor but are ineffective against tumor metastasis and angiogenesis. In our current study, we determined the effect of Cucurbitacin B (CuB), a plant triterpenoid, on the metastatic and angiogenic potential of breast cancer cells. CuB was found to inhibit cellular proliferation and induce apoptosis in breast cancer cells in a time- and dose-dependent manner. Further, CuB-treatment significantly inhibited the migratory and invasive potential of highly metastatic breast cancer MDA-MB-231 and 4T1 cells at sub-IC50 concentrations, where no significant apoptosis was observed. CuB was also found to inhibit migratory, invasive and tube-forming capacities of HUVECs in vitro. In addition, inhibition of pre-existing vasculature in chick embryo chorioallantoic membrane ex vivo further supports the anti-angiogenic effect of CuB. CuB-mediated anti-metastatic and anti-angiogenic effects were associated with the downregulation of VEGF/FAK/MMP-9 signaling, which has been validated by using FAK-inhibitor (FI-14). CuB-treatment resulted in a significant inhibition of VEGF-induced phosphorylation of FAK and MMP-9 expressions similar to the action of FI-14. CuB was also found to decrease the micro-vessel density as evidenced by the decreased expression of CD31, a marker for neovasculature. Further, CuB-treatment inhibited tumor growth, lung metastasis and angiogenesis in a highly metastatic 4T1-syngeneic mouse mammary cancer. Collectively, our findings suggest that CuB inhibited breast cancer metastasis and angiogenesis, at least in part, through the downregulation of VEGF/FAK/MMP-9 signaling. PMID:27210504

  2. Apoptosis in irradiated murine tumors.

    PubMed

    Stephens, L C; Ang, K K; Schultheiss, T E; Milas, L; Meyn, R E

    1991-09-01

    Early radiation responses of transplantable murine ovarian (OCaI) and hepatocellular (HCaI) carcinomas were examined at 6, 24, 48, 96, and 144 h after single photon doses of 25, 35, or 45 Gy. Previous studies using tumor growth delay and tumor radiocurability assays had shown OCaI tumors to be relatively radiosensitive and HCaI tumors to be radioresistant. At 6 h, approximately 20% of nuclei in OCaI tumors showed aberrations characteristic of cell death by apoptosis. This contrasted to an incidence of 3% in HCaI tumors. Mitotic activity was eliminated in OCaI tumors but was only transiently suppressed in HCaI tumors. At 24-96 h, OCaI tumors continued to display apoptosis and progressive necrosis, whereas HCaI tumors responded by exhibiting marked pleomorphism. Factors other than mitotic activity may influence tumor radiosensitivity, and one of these may be susceptibility to induction of apoptosis (programmed cell death), because this was a prominent early radiation response by the radiosensitive OCaI tumors.

  3. Apoptosis in irradiated murine tumors.

    PubMed

    Stephens, L C; Ang, K K; Schultheiss, T E; Milas, L; Meyn, R E

    1991-09-01

    Early radiation responses of transplantable murine ovarian (OCaI) and hepatocellular (HCaI) carcinomas were examined at 6, 24, 48, 96, and 144 h after single photon doses of 25, 35, or 45 Gy. Previous studies using tumor growth delay and tumor radiocurability assays had shown OCaI tumors to be relatively radiosensitive and HCaI tumors to be radioresistant. At 6 h, approximately 20% of nuclei in OCaI tumors showed aberrations characteristic of cell death by apoptosis. This contrasted to an incidence of 3% in HCaI tumors. Mitotic activity was eliminated in OCaI tumors but was only transiently suppressed in HCaI tumors. At 24-96 h, OCaI tumors continued to display apoptosis and progressive necrosis, whereas HCaI tumors responded by exhibiting marked pleomorphism. Factors other than mitotic activity may influence tumor radiosensitivity, and one of these may be susceptibility to induction of apoptosis (programmed cell death), because this was a prominent early radiation response by the radiosensitive OCaI tumors. PMID:1886987

  4. Bromoenol Lactone Attenuates Nicotine-Induced Breast Cancer Cell Proliferation and Migration

    PubMed Central

    Calderon, Lindsay E.; Liu, Shu; Arnold, Nova; Breakall, Bethany; Rollins, Joseph; Ndinguri, Margaret

    2015-01-01

    Objectives Calcium independent group VIA phospholipase A2 (iPLA2β) and Matrix Metalloproteinase-9 (MMP-9) are upregulated in many disease states; their involvement with cancer cell migration has been a recent subject for study. Further, the molecular mechanisms mediating nicotine-induced breast cancer cell progression have not been fully investigated. This study aims to investigate whether iPLA2β mediates nicotine-induced breast cancer cell proliferation and migration through both in-vitro and in-vivo techniques. Subsequently, the ability of Bromoenol Lactone (BEL) to attenuate the severity of nicotine-induced breast cancer was examined. Method and Results We found that BEL significantly attenuated both basal and nicotine-induced 4T1 breast cancer cell proliferation, via an MTT proliferation assay. Breast cancer cell migration was examined by both a scratch and transwell assay, in which, BEL was found to significantly decrease both basal and nicotine-induced migration. Additionally, nicotine-induced MMP-9 expression was found to be mediated in an iPLA2β dependent manner. These results suggest that iPLA2β plays a critical role in mediating both basal and nicotine-induced breast cancer cell proliferation and migration in-vitro. In an in-vivo mouse breast cancer model, BEL treatment was found to significantly reduce both basal (p<0.05) and nicotine-induced tumor growth (p<0.01). Immunohistochemical analysis showed BEL decreased nicotine-induced MMP-9, HIF-1alpha, and CD31 tumor tissue expression. Subsequently, BEL was observed to reduce nicotine-induced lung metastasis. Conclusion The present study indicates that nicotine-induced migration is mediated by MMP-9 production in an iPLA2β dependent manner. Our data suggests that BEL is a possible chemotherapeutic agent as it was found to reduce both nicotine-induced breast cancer tumor growth and lung metastasis. PMID:26588686

  5. Light at night and melatonin have opposite effects on breast cancer tumors in mice assessed by growth rates and global DNA methylation.

    PubMed

    Schwimmer, Hagit; Metzer, Avishag; Pilosof, Yonit; Szyf, Moshe; Machnes, Ziv M; Fares, Fuad; Harel, Orna; Haim, Abraham

    2014-02-01

    Light-at-night (LAN) is a worldwide problem co-distributed with breast cancer prevalence. We hypothesized that exposure to LAN is coincided with a decreased melatonin (MLT) secretion level, followed by epigenetic modifications and resulted in higher breast cancer tumors growth-rate. Accordingly, we studied the effect of LAN exposure and exogenous MLT on breast cancer tumors growth-rate. 4T1 cells were inoculated into BALB/c short day-acclimated mice, resulting in tumors growth. Growth rates were followed under various light exposures and global DNA methylations were measured. Results demonstrated the positive effect of LAN on tumors growth-rate, reversed by MLT through global DNA methylation. PMID:24131150

  6. Mouse Models of Breast Cancer: Platforms for Discovering Precision Imaging Diagnostics and Future Cancer Medicine.

    PubMed

    Manning, H Charles; Buck, Jason R; Cook, Rebecca S

    2016-02-01

    Representing an enormous health care and socioeconomic challenge, breast cancer is the second most common cancer in the world and the second most common cause of cancer-related death. Although many of the challenges associated with preventing, treating, and ultimately curing breast cancer are addressable in the laboratory, successful translation of groundbreaking research to clinical populations remains an important barrier. Particularly when compared with research on other types of solid tumors, breast cancer research is hampered by a lack of tractable in vivo model systems that accurately recapitulate the relevant clinical features of the disease. A primary objective of this article was to provide a generalizable overview of the types of in vivo model systems, with an emphasis primarily on murine models, that are widely deployed in preclinical breast cancer research. Major opportunities to advance precision cancer medicine facilitated by molecular imaging of preclinical breast cancer models are discussed. PMID:26834104

  7. Mouse Models of Breast Cancer: Platforms for Discovering Precision Imaging Diagnostics and Future Cancer Medicine.

    PubMed

    Manning, H Charles; Buck, Jason R; Cook, Rebecca S

    2016-02-01

    Representing an enormous health care and socioeconomic challenge, breast cancer is the second most common cancer in the world and the second most common cause of cancer-related death. Although many of the challenges associated with preventing, treating, and ultimately curing breast cancer are addressable in the laboratory, successful translation of groundbreaking research to clinical populations remains an important barrier. Particularly when compared with research on other types of solid tumors, breast cancer research is hampered by a lack of tractable in vivo model systems that accurately recapitulate the relevant clinical features of the disease. A primary objective of this article was to provide a generalizable overview of the types of in vivo model systems, with an emphasis primarily on murine models, that are widely deployed in preclinical breast cancer research. Major opportunities to advance precision cancer medicine facilitated by molecular imaging of preclinical breast cancer models are discussed.

  8. Titration of murine leukemia viruses with rat cell line RFL.

    PubMed

    Koga, M

    1977-08-01

    Normal rat embryo cell (RFL) from syncytia after infection with murine leukemia virus. The assay for counting the number of syncytium foci produced in RFL cells is a sensitive method for a direct infectivity assay of murine leukemia virus.

  9. Functions of miR-146a and miR-222 in Tumor-associated Macrophages in Breast Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Li, Yanshuang; Zhao, Lianmei; Shi, Bianhua; Ma, Sisi; Xu, Zhenbiao; Ge, Yehua; Liu, Yanxin; Zheng, Dexian; Shi, Juan

    2015-01-01

    Tumor-associated macrophages (TAMs) play critical roles in promoting tumor progression and invasion. However, the molecular mechanisms underlying TAM regulation remain to be further investigated and may make significant contributions to cancer treatment. Mammalian microRNAs (miRNAs) have recently been identified as important regulators of gene expression that function by repressing specific target genes mainly at the post-transcriptional level. However, systematic studies of the functions and mechanisms of miRNAs in TAMs in tumor tissues are rare. In this study, miR-146a and miR-222 were shown to be significantly decreased in TAMs associated with the up-regulated NF-κB p50 subunit. miR-146a promoted the expression of some M2 macrophage phenotype molecules, and miR-146a antagomir transfected RAW264.7 monocyte-macrophage cells inhibited 4T1 tumor growth in vivo. Meanwhile, overexpression of miR-222 inhibited TAM chemotaxis, and miR-222 in TAMs inhibited 4T1 tumor growth by targeting CXCL12 and inhibiting CXCR4. These data revealed that miRNAs influence breast tumor growth by promoting the M2 type polarization or regulating the recruitment of TAMs. These observations suggest that endogenous miRNAs may exert an important role in controlling the polarization and function of TAMs in breast cancer. PMID:26689540

  10. Breast Cancer -- Male

    MedlinePlus

    ... Home > Types of Cancer > Breast Cancer in Men Breast Cancer in Men This is Cancer.Net’s Guide to Breast Cancer in Men. Use the menu below to choose ... social workers, and patient advocates. Cancer.Net Guide Breast Cancer in Men Overview Statistics Risk Factors and Prevention ...

  11. Breast cancer in men

    MedlinePlus

    ... in situ-male; Intraductal carcinoma-male; Inflammatory breast cancer-male; Paget disease of the nipple-male; Breast cancer-male ... The cause of breast cancer is not clear. But there are risk ... breast cancer more likely in men: Exposure to radiation Higher ...

  12. Living Beyond Breast Cancer

    MedlinePlus

    ... Instagram YouTube 2,600 men are diagnosed with breast cancer each year. Learn about risk factors, treatment options ... help hundreds of thousands of people affected by breast cancer. Donate Today Breast Cancer inFocus: Breast Cancer During ...

  13. IFN-γ mediates graft-versus-breast cancer effects via enhancing cytotoxic T lymphocyte activity.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Qianjie; Tong, Lingling; He, Ningning; Feng, Guowei; Leng, Liang; Sun, Weijun; Xu, Yang; Wang, Yuebing; Xiang, Rong; Li, Zongjin

    2014-08-01

    Previous studies have demonstrated the beneficial effect of graft-versus-tumor (GVT) following hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (HSCT) on the incidence of leukemia relapse and the overall survival rate of patients with leukemia; however, detailed mechanisms underlying the effects GVT exhibits on solid tumors following allogeneic HSCT are yet to be elucidated. The aim of the present study was to investigate the immune mechanism underlying the effect of interferon (IFN)-γ on GVT following allogeneic HSCT in breast cancer therapy. An in situ breast cancer mouse model was established by injecting 5×10(4) 4T1 cells into the mammary fat pads of BALB/c mice. The 4T1 cells were transfected with the firefly luciferase reporter gene in order to monitor the tumor progression in real time. An allogeneic HSCT model was then established by transplanting bone marrow mononuclear cells from C57BL/6 mice to the BALB/c mice. To investigate the influence of T lymphocyte proliferation following allogeneic bone marrow transplantation, the levels of CD3(+)CD8(+) cytotoxic T lymphocytes (CTLs) and CD4(+)CD25(+) regulatory T cells were determined. In addition, IFN-γ and granzyme B expression levels in splenic lymphocytes were analyzed using flow cytometry. Allogeneic HSCT was found to significantly promote the proliferation and cytotoxicity of CTLs and suppress the growth of breast cancer. Furthermore, the secretory levels of IFN-γ and granzyme B by T cells were elevated following allogeneic HSCT. These results indicated that alloreactive T cells increased the secretion of IFN-γ, which promoted the alloresponse of donor CTLs. In addition, the CTLs produced granzyme B, which exerted a tumor suppressive effect. PMID:25009582

  14. Shrapnel nanoparticles loading docetaxel inhibit metastasis and growth of breast cancer.

    PubMed

    Xu, Pengfei; Meng, Qingshuo; Sun, Huiping; Yin, Qi; Yu, Haijun; Zhang, Zhiwen; Cao, Mi; Zhang, Yingyi; Li, Yaping

    2015-09-01

    Metastasis is one of the major obstacles for the successful therapy of breast cancer. To inhibit the metastasis and growth of breast cancer simultaneously, a new docetaxel (DTX) loaded shrapnel nano delivery system with the reduction- and enzyme-sensitive properties was designed and developed. Firstly, methoxy polyethylene glycol-peptide-vitamin E succinate (PPV), a matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs)-sensitive copolymer, was synthesized by conjugating mPEG and vitamin E succinate (VES) using an enzyme-sensitive peptide. Then, DTX loaded methoxy polyethylene glycol-s-s-vitamin E succinate (PSV) micelles (DPM) @ PPV-based liposomes (DPM@PL) were prepared by the incorporation of DPM into the PPV-based liposomes. DPM@PL showed a shrapnel structure with average particle size 113.3 ± 2.7 nm. The drug loading and encapsulation efficiency of DPM@PL were 1.93% and 99.02%, respectively. An obvious burst release (>90%) of drug was observed in the simulated tumor microenvironment with MMPs and reductive glutathione. The cellular uptake and cytotoxicity of DPM@PL in 4T1 cells were significantly enhanced after the pre-treatment of activated MMP-9. Compared with Taxotere(®), DPM@PL remarkably increased the distribution of DTX in lung and tumor of 4T1 tumor-bearing mice, and inhibited the in situ tumor growth and pulmonary metastasis formation effectively through the enhanced DTX-induced apoptosis and the reduced metastasis-promoting proteins expression. Compared with saline group, the inhibitory rates of DPM@PL against tumor volume and lung metastasis were about 81% and 92%, respectively, and it didn't produce the significant systemic toxicity. As a result, DPM@PL could be a promising nano delivery system for the successful therapy of breast cancer. PMID:26106797

  15. Murine Norovirus: Propagation, Quantification and Genetic Manipulation

    PubMed Central

    Hwang, Seungmin; Alhatlani, Bader; Arias, Armando; Caddy, Sarah L; Christodoulou, Constantina; Cunha, Juliana; Emmott, Ed; Gonzalez-Hernandez, Marta; Kolawole, Abimbola; Lu, Jia; Rippinger, Christine; Sorgeloos, Frédéric; Thorne, Lucy; Vashist, Surender; Goodfellow, Ian

    2014-01-01

    Murine norovirus (MNV) is a positive-sense, plus-stranded RNA virus in the Caliciviridae family. It is the most common pathogen in biomedical research colonies. MNV is also related to the human noroviruses, which cause the majority of non-bacterial gastroenteritis worldwide. Like the human noroviruses, MNV is an enteric virus that replicates in the intestine and is transmitted by the fecal-oral route. MNV replicates in murine macrophages and dendritic cells in cells in culture and in the murine host. This virus is often used to study mechanisms in norovirus biology, because the human noroviruses are refractory to growth in cell culture. MNV combines the availability of a cell culture and reverse genetics system with the ability to study infection in the native host. Herein, we describe a panel of techniques that are commonly used to study MNV biology. PMID:24789596

  16. The dynamics of murine mammary stem/progenitor cells

    PubMed Central

    DONG, Qiaoxiang; SUN, Lu-Zhe

    2014-01-01

    The stem/progenitor cells in the murine mammary gland are a highly dynamic population of cells that are responsible for ductal elongation in puberty, homeostasis maintenance in adult, and lobulo-alveolar genesis during pregnancy. In recent years understanding the epithelial cell hierarchy within the mammary gland is becoming particularly important as these different stem/progenitor cells were perceived to be the cells of origin for various subtypes of breast cancer. Although significant advances have been made in enrichment and isolation of stem/progenitor cells by combinations of antibodies against cell surface proteins together with flow cytometry, and in identification of stem/progenitor cells with multi-lineage differentiation and self-renewal using mammary fat pad reconstitution assay and in vivo genetic labeling technique, a clear understanding of how these different stem/progenitors are orchestrated in the mammary gland is still lacking. Here we discuss the different in vivo and in vitro methods currently available for stem/progenitor identification, their associated caveats, and a possible new hierarchy model to reconcile various putative stem/progenitor cell populations identified by different research groups. PMID:25580105

  17. Murine Brca1: sequence and significance for human missense mutations.

    PubMed

    Sharan, S K; Wims, M; Bradley, A

    1995-12-01

    We have cloned and sequenced a mouse homologue of the human breast and ovarian cancer susceptibility gene, BRCA1. The predicted mouse Brca1 protein is composed of 1812 amino acids. The murine protein is 60% identical and 72% similar to the human BRCA1 protein. Two regions of high homology have been identified between the two proteins. First is the Cys3-His-Cys4 type zinc-finger domain that is identical between the two proteins. The second region is defined by 115 amino acids near the carboxyl end of the Brca1 protein that is 83% identical to human BRCA1 sequence. Seven of eight amino acids involved in human missense mutations that are associated with the disease were found to be conserved between the two species. In contrast, most of the amino acids that are involved in polymorphic variations were not conserved. We therefore propose that the interspecies conservation of predicted amino acid sequences can be used as an additional criterion to determine the significance of human missense mutations.

  18. ABC- and SLC-Transporters in Murine and Bovine Mammary Epithelium - Effects of Prochloraz

    PubMed Central

    Yagdiran, Yagmur; Oskarsson, Agneta; Knight, Christopher H.; Tallkvist, Jonas

    2016-01-01

    Some chemicals are ligands to efflux transporters which may result in high concentrations in milk. Limited knowledge is available on the influence of maternal exposure to chemicals on the expression and function of transporters in the lactating mammary gland. We determined gene expression of ABC and SLC transporters in murine mammary tissue of different gestation and lactation stages, in murine mammary cells (HC11) featuring resting and secreting phenotypes and in bovine mammary tissue and cells (BME-UV). Effects on transporter expression and function of the imidazole fungicide prochloraz, previously reported to influence BCRP in mammary cells, was investigated on transporter expression and function in the two cell lines. Transporters studied were BCRP, MDR1, MRP1, OATP1A5/OATP1A2, OCTN1 and OCT1. Gene expressions of BCRP and OCT1 in murine mammary glands were increased during gestation and lactation, whereas MDR1, MRP1, OATP1A5 and OCTN1 were decreased, compared to expressions in virgins. All transporters measured in mammary glands of mice were detected in bovine mammary tissue and in HC11 cells, while only MDR1 and MRP1 were detected in BME-UV cells. Prochloraz treatment induced MDR1 gene and protein expression in both differentiated HC11 and BME-UV cells and increased protein function in HC11 cells, resulting in decreased accumulation of the MDR1 substrate digoxin. In conclusion, our results demonstrate that murine (HC11) and bovine (BME-UV) mammary epithelial cells can be applied to characterize expression and function of transporters as well as effects of contaminants on the mammary transporters. An altered expression, induced by a drug or toxic chemical, on any of the transporters expressed in the mammary epithelial cells during lactation may modulate the well-balanced composition of nutrients and/or secretion of contaminants in milk with potential adverse effects on breast-fed infants and dairy consumers. PMID:27028005

  19. ABC- and SLC-Transporters in Murine and Bovine Mammary Epithelium--Effects of Prochloraz.

    PubMed

    Yagdiran, Yagmur; Oskarsson, Agneta; Knight, Christopher H; Tallkvist, Jonas

    2016-01-01

    Some chemicals are ligands to efflux transporters which may result in high concentrations in milk. Limited knowledge is available on the influence of maternal exposure to chemicals on the expression and function of transporters in the lactating mammary gland. We determined gene expression of ABC and SLC transporters in murine mammary tissue of different gestation and lactation stages, in murine mammary cells (HC11) featuring resting and secreting phenotypes and in bovine mammary tissue and cells (BME-UV). Effects on transporter expression and function of the imidazole fungicide prochloraz, previously reported to influence BCRP in mammary cells, was investigated on transporter expression and function in the two cell lines. Transporters studied were BCRP, MDR1, MRP1, OATP1A5/OATP1A2, OCTN1 and OCT1. Gene expressions of BCRP and OCT1 in murine mammary glands were increased during gestation and lactation, whereas MDR1, MRP1, OATP1A5 and OCTN1 were decreased, compared to expressions in virgins. All transporters measured in mammary glands of mice were detected in bovine mammary tissue and in HC11 cells, while only MDR1 and MRP1 were detected in BME-UV cells. Prochloraz treatment induced MDR1 gene and protein expression in both differentiated HC11 and BME-UV cells and increased protein function in HC11 cells, resulting in decreased accumulation of the MDR1 substrate digoxin. In conclusion, our results demonstrate that murine (HC11) and bovine (BME-UV) mammary epithelial cells can be applied to characterize expression and function of transporters as well as effects of contaminants on the mammary transporters. An altered expression, induced by a drug or toxic chemical, on any of the transporters expressed in the mammary epithelial cells during lactation may modulate the well-balanced composition of nutrients and/or secretion of contaminants in milk with potential adverse effects on breast-fed infants and dairy consumers. PMID:27028005

  20. ABC- and SLC-Transporters in Murine and Bovine Mammary Epithelium--Effects of Prochloraz.

    PubMed

    Yagdiran, Yagmur; Oskarsson, Agneta; Knight, Christopher H; Tallkvist, Jonas

    2016-01-01

    Some chemicals are ligands to efflux transporters which may result in high concentrations in milk. Limited knowledge is available on the influence of maternal exposure to chemicals on the expression and function of transporters in the lactating mammary gland. We determined gene expression of ABC and SLC transporters in murine mammary tissue of different gestation and lactation stages, in murine mammary cells (HC11) featuring resting and secreting phenotypes and in bovine mammary tissue and cells (BME-UV). Effects on transporter expression and function of the imidazole fungicide prochloraz, previously reported to influence BCRP in mammary cells, was investigated on transporter expression and function in the two cell lines. Transporters studied were BCRP, MDR1, MRP1, OATP1A5/OATP1A2, OCTN1 and OCT1. Gene expressions of BCRP and OCT1 in murine mammary glands were increased during gestation and lactation, whereas MDR1, MRP1, OATP1A5 and OCTN1 were decreased, compared to expressions in virgins. All transporters measured in mammary glands of mice were detected in bovine mammary tissue and in HC11 cells, while only MDR1 and MRP1 were detected in BME-UV cells. Prochloraz treatment induced MDR1 gene and protein expression in both differentiated HC11 and BME-UV cells and increased protein function in HC11 cells, resulting in decreased accumulation of the MDR1 substrate digoxin. In conclusion, our results demonstrate that murine (HC11) and bovine (BME-UV) mammary epithelial cells can be applied to characterize expression and function of transporters as well as effects of contaminants on the mammary transporters. An altered expression, induced by a drug or toxic chemical, on any of the transporters expressed in the mammary epithelial cells during lactation may modulate the well-balanced composition of nutrients and/or secretion of contaminants in milk with potential adverse effects on breast-fed infants and dairy consumers.

  1. Cytotoxic Effects of Biosynthesized Zinc Oxide Nanoparticles on Murine Cell Lines

    PubMed Central

    Namvar, Farideh; Rahman, Heshu Sulaiman; Mohamad, Rosfarizan; Azizi, Susan; Tahir, Paridah Mohd; Chartrand, Max Stanley

    2015-01-01

    The aim of this study is to evaluate the in vitro cytotoxic activity and cellular effects of previously prepared ZnO-NPs on murine cancer cell lines using brown seaweed (Sargassum muticum) aqueous extract. Treated cancer cells with ZnO-NPs for 72 hours demonstrated various levels of cytotoxicity based on calculated IC50 values using MTT assay as follows: 21.7 ± 1.3 μg/mL (4T1), 17.45 ± 1.1 μg/mL (CRL-1451), 11.75 ± 0.8 μg/mL (CT-26), and 5.6 ± 0.55 μg/mL (WEHI-3B), respectively. On the other hand, ZnO-NPs treatments for 72 hours showed no toxicity against normal mouse fibroblast (3T3) cell line. On the other hand, paclitaxel, which imposed an inhibitory effect on WEHI-3B cells with IC50 of 2.25 ± 0.4, 1.17 ± 0.5, and 1.6 ± 0.09 μg/mL after 24, 48, and 72 hours treatment, respectively, was used as positive control. Furthermore, distinct morphological changes were found by utilizing fluorescent dyes; apoptotic population was increased via flowcytometry, while a cell cycle block and stimulation of apoptotic proteins were also observed. Additionally, the present study showed that the caspase activations contributed to ZnO-NPs triggered apoptotic death in WEHI-3 cells. Thus, the nature of biosynthesis and the therapeutic potential of ZnO-NPs could prepare the way for further research on the design of green synthesis therapeutic agents, particularly in nanomedicine, for the treatment of cancer. PMID:25784947

  2. Cytotoxic effects of biosynthesized zinc oxide nanoparticles on murine cell lines.

    PubMed

    Namvar, Farideh; Rahman, Heshu Sulaiman; Mohamad, Rosfarizan; Azizi, Susan; Tahir, Paridah Mohd; Chartrand, Max Stanley; Yeap, Swee Keong

    2015-01-01

    The aim of this study is to evaluate the in vitro cytotoxic activity and cellular effects of previously prepared ZnO-NPs on murine cancer cell lines using brown seaweed (Sargassum muticum) aqueous extract. Treated cancer cells with ZnO-NPs for 72 hours demonstrated various levels of cytotoxicity based on calculated IC50 values using MTT assay as follows: 21.7 ± 1.3 μg/mL (4T1), 17.45 ± 1.1 μg/mL (CRL-1451), 11.75 ± 0.8 μg/mL (CT-26), and 5.6 ± 0.55 μg/mL (WEHI-3B), respectively. On the other hand, ZnO-NPs treatments for 72 hours showed no toxicity against normal mouse fibroblast (3T3) cell line. On the other hand, paclitaxel, which imposed an inhibitory effect on WEHI-3B cells with IC50 of 2.25 ± 0.4, 1.17 ± 0.5, and 1.6 ± 0.09 μg/mL after 24, 48, and 72 hours treatment, respectively, was used as positive control. Furthermore, distinct morphological changes were found by utilizing fluorescent dyes; apoptotic population was increased via flowcytometry, while a cell cycle block and stimulation of apoptotic proteins were also observed. Additionally, the present study showed that the caspase activations contributed to ZnO-NPs triggered apoptotic death in WEHI-3 cells. Thus, the nature of biosynthesis and the therapeutic potential of ZnO-NPs could prepare the way for further research on the design of green synthesis therapeutic agents, particularly in nanomedicine, for the treatment of cancer. PMID:25784947

  3. Vascular targeting of a gold nanoparticle to breast cancer metastasis

    PubMed Central

    Peiris, Pubudu M.; Deb, Partha; Doolittle, Elizabeth; Doron, Gilad; Goldberg, Amy; Govender, Priya; Shah, Shruti; Rao, Swetha; Carbone, Sarah; Cotey, Thomas; Sylvestre, Meilyn; Singh, Sohaj; Schiemann, William P.; Lee, Zhenghong; Karathanasis, Efstathios

    2015-01-01

    The vast majority of breast cancer deaths are due to metastatic disease. While deep tissue targeting of nanoparticles is suitable for some primary tumors, vascular targeting may be a more attractive strategy for micrometastasis. This study combined a vascular targeting strategy with the enhanced targeting capabilities of a nanoparticle to evaluate the ability of a gold nanoparticle to specifically target the early spread of metastatic disease. As a ligand for the vascular targeting strategy, we utilized a peptide targeting alpha(v) beta(3) integrin, which is functionally linked to the development of micrometastases at a distal site. By employing a straightforward radiolabeling method to incorporate Technetium-99m into the gold nanoparticles, we used the high sensitivity of radionuclide imaging to monitor the longitudinal accumulation of the nanoparticles in metastatic sites. Animal and histological studies showed that vascular targeting of the nanoparticle facilitated highly accurate targeting of micrometastasis in the 4T1 mouse model of breast cancer metastasis using radionuclide imaging and a low dose of the nanoparticle. Due to the efficient targeting scheme, 14% of the injected AuNP deposited at metastatic sites in the lungs within 60 min after injection, indicating that the vascular bed of metastasis is a viable target site for nanoparticles. PMID:26036431

  4. Co-loaded paclitaxel/rapamycin liposomes: Development, characterization and in vitro and in vivo evaluation for breast cancer therapy

    PubMed Central

    Eloy, Josimar O.; Petrilli, Raquel; Topan, José Fernando; Antonio, Heriton Marcelo Ribeiro; Barcellos, Juliana Palma Abriata; Chesca, Deise L.; Serafini, Luciano Neder; Tiezzi, Daniel G.; Lee, Robert J.; Marchetti, Juliana Maldonado

    2016-01-01

    Paclitaxel and rapamycin have been reported to act synergistically to treat breast cancer. Albeit paclitaxel is available for breast cancer treatment, the most commonly used formulation in the clinic presents side effects, limiting its use. Furthermore, both drugs present pharmacokinetics drawbacks limiting their in vivo efficacy and clinic combination. As an alternative, drug delivery systems, particularly liposomes, emerge as an option for drug combination, able to simultaneously deliver co-loaded drugs with improved therapeutic index. Therefore, the purpose of this study is to develop and characterize a co-loaded paclitaxel and rapamycin liposome and evaluate it for breast cancer efficacy both in vitro and in vivo. Results showed that a SPC/Chol/DSPE-PEG (2000) liposome was able to co-encapsulate paclitaxel and rapamycin with suitable encapsulation efficiency values, nanometric particle size, low polydispersity and neutral zeta potential. Taken together, FTIR and thermal analysis evidenced drug conversion to the more bioavailable molecular and amorphous forms, respectively, for paclitaxel and rapamycin. The pegylated liposome exhibited excellent colloidal stability and was able to retain drugs encapsulated, which were released in a slow and sustained fashion. Liposomes were more cytotoxic to 4T1 breast cancer cell line than the free drugs and drugs acted synergistically, particularly when co-loaded. Finally, in vivo therapeutic evaluation carried out in 4T1-tumor-bearing mice confirmed the in vitro results. The co-loaded paclitaxel/rapamycin pegylated liposome better controlled tumor growth compared to the solution. Therefore, we expect that the formulation developed herein might be a contribution for future studies focusing on the clinical combination of paclitaxel and rapamycin. PMID:26836480

  5. Co-loaded paclitaxel/rapamycin liposomes: Development, characterization and in vitro and in vivo evaluation for breast cancer therapy.

    PubMed

    Eloy, Josimar O; Petrilli, Raquel; Topan, José Fernando; Antonio, Heriton Marcelo Ribeiro; Barcellos, Juliana Palma Abriata; Chesca, Deise L; Serafini, Luciano Neder; Tiezzi, Daniel G; Lee, Robert J; Marchetti, Juliana Maldonado

    2016-05-01

    Paclitaxel and rapamycin have been reported to act synergistically to treat breast cancer. Albeit paclitaxel is available for breast cancer treatment, the most commonly used formulation in the clinic presents side effects, limiting its use. Furthermore, both drugs present pharmacokinetics drawbacks limiting their in vivo efficacy and clinic combination. As an alternative, drug delivery systems, particularly liposomes, emerge as an option for drug combination, able to simultaneously deliver co-loaded drugs with improved therapeutic index. Therefore, the purpose of this study is to develop and characterize a co-loaded paclitaxel and rapamycin liposome and evaluate it for breast cancer efficacy both in vitro and in vivo. Results showed that a SPC/Chol/DSPE-PEG (2000) liposome was able to co-encapsulate paclitaxel and rapamycin with suitable encapsulation efficiency values, nanometric particle size, low polydispersity and neutral zeta potential. Taken together, FTIR and thermal analysis evidenced drug conversion to the more bioavailable molecular and amorphous forms, respectively, for paclitaxel and rapamycin. The pegylated liposome exhibited excellent colloidal stability and was able to retain drugs encapsulated, which were released in a slow and sustained fashion. Liposomes were more cytotoxic to 4T1 breast cancer cell line than the free drugs and drugs acted synergistically, particularly when co-loaded. Finally, in vivo therapeutic evaluation carried out in 4T1-tumor-bearing mice confirmed the in vitro results. The co-loaded paclitaxel/rapamycin pegylated liposome better controlled tumor growth compared to the solution. Therefore, we expect that the formulation developed herein might be a contribution for future studies focusing on the clinical combination of paclitaxel and rapamycin. PMID:26836480

  6. Ultrasound-Guided Breast Biopsy

    MedlinePlus

    ... the breast are often detected by physical examination, mammography, or other imaging studies. However, it is not ... full size with caption Related Articles and Media Mammography Ultrasound - Breast Breast Cancer Screening Breast Cancer Treatment ...

  7. Stereotactic (Mammographically Guided) Breast Biopsy

    MedlinePlus

    ... Z Stereotactic Breast Biopsy Stereotactic breast biopsy uses mammography – a specific type of breast imaging that uses ... the breast are often detected by physical examination, mammography, or other imaging studies. However, it is not ...

  8. Hormone Therapy for Breast Cancer

    MedlinePlus

    ... Cancers Breast Cancer Screening Research Hormone Therapy for Breast Cancer On This Page What are hormones? How do ... sensitive breast cancer: Adjuvant therapy for early-stage breast cancer : Research has shown that women treated for early- ...

  9. Stages of Male Breast Cancer

    MedlinePlus

    ... Breast & Gynecologic Cancers Breast Cancer Screening Research Male Breast Cancer Treatment (PDQ®)–Patient Version General Information about Male Breast Cancer Go to Health Professional Version Key Points Male ...

  10. Breast Imaging Artifacts.

    PubMed

    Odle, Teresa G

    2015-01-01

    Artifacts appear on breast images for a number of reasons. Radiologic technologists play an important role in identifying artifacts that can help or hinder breast cancer diagnosis and in minimizing artifacts that degrade image quality. This article describes various artifacts that occur in breast imaging, along with their causes. The article focuses on artifacts in mammography, with a heavy emphasis on digital mammography, and on magnetic resonance imaging of the breast. Artifacts in ultrasonography of the breast, digital breast tomosynthesis, and positron emission mammography also are discussed.

  11. [Male breast cancer].

    PubMed

    Mattson, Johanna; Vehmanen, Leena

    2016-01-01

    Breast cancer is rare in men. Diagnosis of the illness may be delayed due to the fact that the doctor and the patient fail to suspect it. Male breast cancer is treated mainly on the same principles as female breast cancer. A man affected with breast cancer should always be directed to genetic testing, as inherited mutations increasing the risk of developing cancer are more common than in female breast cancer. Most breast cancers in men are hormone receptor positive. Among hormone treatments, the antiestrogen tamoxifen exhibits the best efficacy both in early-state and advanced cases. PMID:27188086

  12. Effect of CD44 Binding Peptide Conjugated to an Engineered Inert Matrix on Maintenance of Breast Cancer Stem Cells and Tumorsphere Formation

    PubMed Central

    Moeinzadeh, Seyedsina; He, Xuezhong; Jabbari, Esmaiel

    2013-01-01

    Introduction As cancer cells are affected by many factors in their microenvironment, a major challenge is to isolate the effect of a specific factor on cancer stem cells (CSCs) while keeping other factors unchanged. We have developed a synthetic inert 3D polyethylene glycol diacrylate (PEGDA) gel culture system as a unique tool to study the effect of microenvironmental factors on CSCs response. We have reported that CSCs formed in the inert PEGDA gel by encapsulation of breast cancer cells maintain their stemness within a certain range of gel stiffness. The objective was to investigate the effect of CD44 binding peptide (CD44BP) conjugated to the gel on the maintenance of breast CSCs. Methods 4T1 or MCF7 breast cancer cells were encapsulated in PEGDA gel with CD44BP conjugation. Control groups included dissolved CD44BP and the gel with mutant CD44BP conjugation. Tumorsphere size and density, and expression of CSC markers were determined after 9 days. For in vivo, cell encapsulated gels were inoculated in syngeneic Balb/C mice and tumor formation was determined after 4 weeks. Effect of CD44BP conjugation on breast CSC maintenance was compared with integrin binding RGD peptide (IBP) and fibronectin-derived heparin binding peptide (FHBP). Results Conjugation of CD44BP to the gel inhibited breast tumorsphere formation in vitro and in vivo. The ability of the encapsulated cells to form tumorspheres in the peptide-conjugated gels correlated with the expression of CSC markers. Tumorsphere formation in vitro was enhanced by FHBP while it was abolished by IBP. Conclusion CD44BP and IBP conjugated to the gel abolished tumorsphere formation by encapsulated 4T1 cells while FHBP enhanced tumorsphere formation compared to cells in the gel without peptide. The PEGDA hydrogel culture system provides a novel tool to investigate the individual effect of factors in the microenvironment on CSC maintenance without interference of other factors. PMID:23527117

  13. Tumour-targeted delivery of TRAIL using Salmonella typhimurium enhances breast cancer survival in mice

    PubMed Central

    Ganai, S; Arenas, R B; Forbes, N S

    2009-01-01

    Background: An effective cancer therapeutic must selectively target tumours with minimal systemic toxicity. Expression of a cytotoxic protein using Salmonella typhimurium would enable spatial and temporal control of delivery because these bacteria preferentially target tumours over normal tissue. Methods: We engineered non-pathogenic S. typhimurium to secrete murine TNF-related apoptosis-inducing ligand (TRAIL) under the control of the prokaryotic radiation-inducible RecA promoter. The response of the RecA promoter to radiation was measured using fluorometry and immunoblotting. TRAIL toxicity was determined using flow cytometry and by measuring caspase-3 activation. A syngeneic murine tumour model was used to determine bacterial accumulation and the response to expressed TRAIL. Results: After irradiation, engineered S. typhimurium secreted TRAIL, which caused caspase-3-mediated apoptosis and death in 4T1 mammary carcinoma cells in culture. Systemic injection of Salmonella and induction of TRAIL expression using 2 Gy γ-irradiation caused a significant delay in mammary tumour growth and reduced the risk of death by 76% when compared with irradiated controls. Repeated dosing with TRAIL-bearing Salmonella in conjunction with radiation improved the 30-day survival from 0 to 100%. Conclusion: These results show the pre-clinical utility of S. typhimurium as a TRAIL expression vector that effectively reduces tumour growth and extends host survival. PMID:19861961

  14. Breast augmentation surgery

    MedlinePlus

    ... a change in the shape of your breast, hardening of breast tissue, or some pain. Emotional risks ... starting 5 days after surgery. Massaging helps reduce hardening of the capsule that surrounds the implant. Ask ...

  15. Screening for Breast Problems

    MedlinePlus

    f AQ FREQUENTLY ASKED QUESTIONS FAQ178 GYNECOLOGIC PROBLEMS Mammography and Other Screening Tests for Breast Problems • What ... used to screen for breast problems? • What is mammography? • Why is mammography done? • When should I start ...

  16. MRI of the Breast

    MedlinePlus

    ... as a supplemental tool to breast screening with mammography or ultrasound. It may be used to screen ... following diagnosis, or further evaluate abnormalities seen on mammography. Breast MRI does not use ionizing radiation, and ...

  17. Breast Cancer: Treatment Options

    MedlinePlus

    ... Cancer - Treatment Options Request Permissions Print to PDF Breast Cancer - Treatment Options Approved by the Cancer.Net Editorial ... recommendations for ovarian ablation . Hormonal therapy for metastatic breast cancer Hormonal therapies are also commonly used to treat ...

  18. Breast Reconstruction Alternatives

    MedlinePlus

    ... facts before submitting any insurance claims. For a list of companies that sell breast prostheses and other accessories, see Breast Prostheses and Hair Loss Accessories List . Going flat Some women who do not have ...

  19. Breastfeeding and Breast Milk

    MedlinePlus

    ... NICHD Research Information Clinical Trials Resources and Publications Breastfeeding and Breast Milk: Condition Information Skip sharing on social media links Share this: Page Content Breastfeeding and Breast Milk: Condition Information​ ​​Breastfeeding, also called ...

  20. Stages of Breast Cancer

    MedlinePlus

    ... to treat breast cancer. Internal radiation therapy with strontium-89 (a radionuclide ) is used to relieve bone pain ... breast cancer that has spread to the bones. Strontium-89 is injected into a vein and travels to ...

  1. Breast Cancer Treatment

    MedlinePlus

    ... to treat breast cancer. Internal radiation therapy with strontium-89 (a radionuclide ) is used to relieve bone pain ... breast cancer that has spread to the bones. Strontium-89 is injected into a vein and travels to ...

  2. Breast cancer staging

    MedlinePlus

    Doctors use 7 main stages to describe breast cancer. Stage 0, also called carcinoma in situ. This is cancer that is confined to the lobules or ducts in the breast. It has not spread to surrounding tissue. ...

  3. Breast Reconstruction and Prosthesis

    MedlinePlus

    ... feel of the breast after a mastectomy. A plastic surgeon can do it at the same time ... want breast reconstruction. • Have you talked with your plastic surgeon about your options? You may not be ...

  4. Anandamide inhibits adhesion and migration of breast cancer cells

    SciTech Connect

    Grimaldi, Claudia; Pisanti, Simona; Laezza, Chiara; Malfitano, Anna Maria; Santoro, Antonietta; Vitale, Mario; Caruso, Maria Gabriella; Notarnicola, Maria; Iacuzzo, Irma; Portella, Giuseppe; Di Marzo, Vincenzo . E-mail: vdimarzo@icmib.na.cnr.it; Bifulco, Maurizio . E-mail: maubiful@unina.it

    2006-02-15

    The endocannabinoid system regulates cell proliferation in human breast cancer cells. We reasoned that stimulation of cannabinoid CB{sub 1} receptors could induce a non-invasive phenotype in breast mtastatic cells. In a model of metastatic spreading in vivo, the metabolically stable anandamide analogue, 2-methyl-2'-F-anandamide (Met-F-AEA), significantly reduced the number and dimension of metastatic nodes, this effect being antagonized by the selective CB{sub 1} antagonist SR141716A. In MDA-MB-231 cells, a highly invasive human breast cancer cell line, and in TSA-E1 cells, a murine breast cancer cell line, Met-F-AEA inhibited adhesion and migration on type IV collagen in vitro without modifying integrin expression: both these effects were antagonized by SR141716A. In order to understand the molecular mechanism involved in these processes, we analyzed the phosphorylation of FAK and Src, two tyrosine kinases involved in migration and adhesion. In Met-F-AEA-treated cells, we observed a decreased tyrosine phosphorylation of both FAK and Src, this effect being attenuated by SR141716A. We propose that CB{sub 1} receptor agonists inhibit tumor cell invasion and metastasis by modulating FAK phosphorylation, and that CB{sub 1} receptor activation might represent a novel therapeutic strategy to slow down the growth of breast carcinoma and to inhibit its metastatic diffusion in vivo.

  5. DEAD-box helicase DP103 defines metastatic potential of human breast cancers

    PubMed Central

    Shin, Eun Myoung; Sin Hay, Hui; Lee, Moon Hee; Goh, Jen Nee; Tan, Tuan Zea; Sen, Yin Ping; Lim, See Wee; Yousef, Einas M.; Ong, Hooi Tin; Thike, Aye Aye; Kong, Xiangjun; Wu, Zhengsheng; Mendoz, Earnest; Sun, Wei; Salto-Tellez, Manuel; Lim, Chwee Teck; Lobie, Peter E.; Lim, Yoon Pin; Yap, Celestial T.; Zeng, Qi; Sethi, Gautam; Lee, Martin B.; Tan, Patrick; Goh, Boon Cher; Miller, Lance D.; Thiery, Jean Paul; Zhu, Tao; Gaboury, Louis; Tan, Puay Hoon; Hui, Kam Man; Yip, George Wai-Cheong; Miyamoto, Shigeki; Kumar, Alan Prem; Tergaonkar, Vinay

    2014-01-01

    Despite advancement in breast cancer treatment, 30% of patients with early breast cancers experience relapse with distant metastasis. It is a challenge to identify patients at risk for relapse; therefore, the identification of markers and therapeutic targets for metastatic breast cancers is imperative. Here, we identified DP103 as a biomarker and metastasis-driving oncogene in human breast cancers and determined that DP103 elevates matrix metallopeptidase 9 (MMP9) levels, which are associated with metastasis and invasion through activation of NF-κB. In turn, NF-κB signaling positively activated DP103 expression. Furthermore, DP103 enhanced TGF-β–activated kinase-1 (TAK1) phosphorylation of NF-κB–activating IκB kinase 2 (IKK2), leading to increased NF-κB activity. Reduction of DP103 expression in invasive breast cancer cells reduced phosphorylation of IKK2, abrogated NF-κB–mediated MMP9 expression, and impeded metastasis in a murine xenograft model. In breast cancer patient tissues, elevated levels of DP103 correlated with enhanced MMP9, reduced overall survival, and reduced survival after relapse. Together, these data indicate that a positive DP103/NF-κB feedback loop promotes constitutive NF-κB activation in invasive breast cancers and activation of this pathway is linked to cancer progression and the acquisition of chemotherapy resistance. Furthermore, our results suggest that DP103 has potential as a therapeutic target for breast cancer treatment. PMID:25083991

  6. Stereotactic Image-Guided Navigation During Breast Reconstruction in Patients With Breast Cancer

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2015-08-27

    Ductal Breast Carcinoma in Situ; Lobular Breast Carcinoma in Situ; Recurrent Breast Cancer; Stage IA Breast Cancer; Stage IB Breast Cancer; Stage II Breast Cancer; Stage IIIA Breast Cancer; Stage IIIB Breast Cancer; Stage IIIC Breast Cancer; Stage IV Breast Cancer

  7. Macrophages promote matrix protrusive and invasive function of breast cancer cells via MIP-1β dependent upregulation of MYO3A gene in breast cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Baghel, Khemraj Singh; Tewari, Brij Nath; Shrivastava, Richa; Malik, Showkat Ahmad; Lone, Mehraj U-Din; Jain, Nem Kumar; Tripathi, Chakrapani; Kanchan, Ranjana Kumari; Dixit, Sameer; Singh, Kavita; Mitra, Kalyan; Negi, Mahendra Pal Singh; Srivastava, Mukesh; Misra, Sanjeev; Bhatt, Madan Lal Brahma; Bhadauria, Smrati

    2016-07-01

    The potential of a tumor cell to metastasize profoundly depends on its microenvironment, or "niche" interactions with local components. Tumor-associated-macrophages (TAMs) are the most abundant subpopulation of tumor stroma and represent a key component of tumor microenvironment. The dynamic interaction of cancer cells with neighboring TAMs actively drive cancer progression and metastatic transformation through intercellular signaling networks that need better elucidation. Thus, current study was planned for discerning paracrine communication networks operational between TAMs, and breast cancer cells with special reference to cancer cell invasion and dissemination to distant sites. Here, we report role of MIP-1β in enhancing invasive potential of metastatic breast cancer MDA-MB-231 and MDA-MB-468 cells. In addition, the poorly metastatic MCF-7 cells were also rendered invasive by MIP-1β. The MIP-1β-driven cancer cell invasion was dependent on upregulated expression levels of MYO3A gene, which encodes an unconventional myosin super-family protein harboring a kinase domain. Ex ovo study employing Chick-embryo-model and in vivo Syngenic 4T1/BALB/c mice-model further corroborated aforementioned in vitro findings, thereby substantiating their physiological relevance. Concordantly, human breast cancer specimen exhibited significant association between mRNA expression levels of MIP-1β and MYO3A. Both, MIP-1β and MYO3A exhibited positive correlation with MMP9, an established molecular determinant of cancer cell invasion. Higher expression of these genes correlated with poor survival of breast cancer patients. Collectively, these results point toward so far undisclosed MIP-1β/MYO3A axis being operational during metastasis, wherein macrophage-derived MIP-1β potentiated cancer cell invasion and metastasis via up regulation of MYO3A gene within cancer cells. Our study exposes opportunities for devising potential anti-metastatic strategies for efficient clinical

  8. Macrophages promote matrix protrusive and invasive function of breast cancer cells via MIP-1β dependent upregulation of MYO3A gene in breast cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Baghel, Khemraj Singh; Tewari, Brij Nath; Shrivastava, Richa; Malik, Showkat Ahmad; Lone, Mehraj U-Din; Jain, Nem Kumar; Tripathi, Chakrapani; Kanchan, Ranjana Kumari; Dixit, Sameer; Singh, Kavita; Mitra, Kalyan; Negi, Mahendra Pal Singh; Srivastava, Mukesh; Misra, Sanjeev; Bhatt, Madan Lal Brahma; Bhadauria, Smrati

    2016-07-01

    The potential of a tumor cell to metastasize profoundly depends on its microenvironment, or "niche" interactions with local components. Tumor-associated-macrophages (TAMs) are the most abundant subpopulation of tumor stroma and represent a key component of tumor microenvironment. The dynamic interaction of cancer cells with neighboring TAMs actively drive cancer progression and metastatic transformation through intercellular signaling networks that need better elucidation. Thus, current study was planned for discerning paracrine communication networks operational between TAMs, and breast cancer cells with special reference to cancer cell invasion and dissemination to distant sites. Here, we report role of MIP-1β in enhancing invasive potential of metastatic breast cancer MDA-MB-231 and MDA-MB-468 cells. In addition, the poorly metastatic MCF-7 cells were also rendered invasive by MIP-1β. The MIP-1β-driven cancer cell invasion was dependent on upregulated expression levels of MYO3A gene, which encodes an unconventional myosin super-family protein harboring a kinase domain. Ex ovo study employing Chick-embryo-model and in vivo Syngenic 4T1/BALB/c mice-model further corroborated aforementioned in vitro findings, thereby substantiating their physiological relevance. Concordantly, human breast cancer specimen exhibited significant association between mRNA expression levels of MIP-1β and MYO3A. Both, MIP-1β and MYO3A exhibited positive correlation with MMP9, an established molecular determinant of cancer cell invasion. Higher expression of these genes correlated with poor survival of breast cancer patients. Collectively, these results point toward so far undisclosed MIP-1β/MYO3A axis being operational during metastasis, wherein macrophage-derived MIP-1β potentiated cancer cell invasion and metastasis via up regulation of MYO3A gene within cancer cells. Our study exposes opportunities for devising potential anti-metastatic strategies for efficient clinical

  9. Recovery of extracellular vesicles from human breast milk is influenced by sample collection and vesicle isolation procedures

    PubMed Central

    Zonneveld, Marijke I.; Brisson, Alain R.; van Herwijnen, Martijn J. C.; Tan, Sisareuth; van de Lest, Chris H. A.; Redegeld, Frank A.; Garssen, Johan; Wauben, Marca H. M.; Nolte-'t Hoen, Esther N. M.

    2014-01-01

    Extracellular vesicles (EV) in breast milk carry immune relevant proteins and could play an important role in the instruction of the neonatal immune system. To further analyze these EV and to elucidate their function it is important that native populations of EV can be recovered from (stored) breast milk samples in a reproducible fashion. However, the impact of isolation and storage procedures on recovery of breast milk EV has remained underexposed. Here, we aimed to define parameters important for EV recovery from fresh and stored breast milk. To compare various protocols across different donors, breast milk was spiked with a well-defined murine EV population. We found that centrifugation of EV down into density gradients largely improved density-based separation and isolation of EV, compared to floatation up into gradients after high-force pelleting of EV. Using cryo-electron microscopy, we identified different subpopulations of human breast milk EV and a not previously described population of lipid tubules. Additionally, the impact of cold storage on breast milk EV was investigated. We determined that storing unprocessed breast milk at −80°C or 4°C caused death of cells present in breast milk, leading to contamination of the breast milk EV population with storage-induced EV. Here, an alternative method is proposed to store breast milk samples for EV analysis at later time points. The proposed adaptations to the breast milk storage and EV isolation procedures can be applied for EV-based biomarker profiling of breast milk and functional analysis of the role of breast milk EV in the development of the neonatal immune system. PMID:25206958

  10. Murine models of vaginal trichomonad infections.

    PubMed

    Cobo, Eduardo R; Eckmann, Lars; Corbeil, Lynette B

    2011-10-01

    Trichomonas vaginalis and Tritrichomonas foetus cause common sexually transmitted infections in humans and cattle, respectively. Mouse models of trichomoniasis are important for pathogenic and therapeutic studies. Here, we compared murine genital infections with T. vaginalis and T. foetus. Persistent vaginal infection with T. foetus was established with 100 parasites but T. vaginalis infection required doses of 10(6), perhaps because of greater susceptibility to killing by mouse vaginal polymorphonuclear leukocytes. Infection with T. vaginalis persisted longest after combined treatment of mice with estrogen and dexamethasone, whereas infection was only short-lived when mice were given estrogen or dexamethasone alone, co-infected with Lactobacillus acidophilus, and/or pretreated with antibiotics. Infection rates were similar with metronidazole-resistant (MR) and metronidazole-sensitive (MS) T. vaginalis. High dose but not low dose metronidazole treatment controlled infection with MS better than MR T. vaginalis. These murine models will be valuable for investigating the pathogenesis and treatment of trichomoniasis. PMID:21976570

  11. Immunodetection of Murine Lymphotoxins in Eukaryotic Cells.

    PubMed

    Boitchenko, Veronika E.; Korobko, Vyacheslav G.; Prassolov, Vladimir S.; Kravchenko, Vladimir V.; Kuimov, Alexander N.; Turetskaya, Regina L.; Kuprash, Dmitry V.; Nedospasov, Sergei A.

    2000-10-01

    Lymphotoxins alpha and beta (LTalpha and LTbeta) are members of tumor necrosis factor superfamily. LT heterotrimers exist on the surface of lymphocytes and signal through LTbeta receptor while soluble LTalpha homotrimer can signal through TNF receptors p55 and p75. LT-, as well as TNF-mediated signaling are important for the organogenesis and maintenance of microarchitecture of secondary lymphoid organs in mice and has been implicated in the mechanism of certain inflammatory syndromes in humans. In this study we describe the generation of eukaryotic expression plasmids encoding murine LTalpha and LTbeta genes and a prokaryotic expression construct for murine LTalpha. Using recombinant proteins expressed by these vectors as tools for antisera selection, we produced and characterized several polyclonal antibodies capable of detecting LT proteins in eukaryotic cells.

  12. Retroviral Transduction of Murine Primary T Lymphocytes

    PubMed Central

    Lee, James; Sadelain, Michel; Brentjens, Renier

    2016-01-01

    Summary In comparison to human T cells, efficient retroviral gene transfer and subsequent expansion of murine primary T cells is more difficult to achieve. Herein, we describe an optimized gene transfer protocol utilizing an ecotropic viral vector to transduce primary murine T cells activated with magnetic beads coated with agonistic anti-CD3 and CD28 antibodies. Activated T cells are subsequently centrifuged (spinoculated) on RetroNectin-coated tissue culture plates in the context of retroviral supernatant. Variables found to be critical to high gene transfer and subsequent efficient T cell expansion included CD3/CD28 magnetic bead to cell ratio, time from T cell activation to initial spinoculation, frequency of T cell spinoculation, interleukin-2 concentration in the medium, and the initial purity of the T cell preparation. PMID:19110621

  13. Broccoli Sprout Extract in Treating Patients With Breast Cancer

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-08-16

    Ductal Breast Carcinoma; Ductal Breast Carcinoma In Situ; Estrogen Receptor Negative; Estrogen Receptor Positive; Invasive Breast Carcinoma; Lobular Breast Carcinoma; Postmenopausal; Stage IA Breast Cancer; Stage IB Breast Cancer; Stage IIA Breast Cancer; Stage IIB Breast Cancer

  14. Development and characterization of a preclinical model of breast cancer lung micrometastatic to macrometastatic progression.

    PubMed

    Bailey-Downs, Lora C; Thorpe, Jessica E; Disch, Bryan C; Bastian, Anja; Hauser, Paul J; Farasyn, Taleah; Berry, William L; Hurst, Robert E; Ihnat, Michael A

    2014-01-01

    Most cancer patients die with metastatic disease, thus, good models that recapitulate the natural process of metastasis including a dormancy period with micrometastatic cells would be beneficial in developing treatment strategies. Herein we report a model of natural metastasis that balances time to complete experiments with a reasonable dormancy period, which can be used to better study metastatic progression. The basis for the model is a 4T1 triple negative syngeneic breast cancer model without resection of the primary tumor. A cell titration from 500 to 15,000 GFP tagged 4T1 cells implanted into fat pad number four of immune proficient eight week female BALB/cJ mice optimized speed of the model while possessing metastatic processes including dormancy and beginning of reactivation. The frequency of primary tumors was less than 50% in animals implanted with 500-1500 cells. Although implantation with over 10,000 cells resulted in 100% primary tumor development, the tumors and macrometastases formed were highly aggressive, lacked dormancy, and offered no opportunity for treatment. Implantation of 7,500 cells resulted in >90% tumor take by 10 days; in 30-60 micrometastases in the lung (with many animals also having 2-30 brain micrometastases) two weeks post-implantation, with the first small macrometastases present at five weeks; many animals displaying macrometastases at five weeks and animals becoming moribund by six weeks post-implantation. Using the optimum of 7,500 cells the efficacy of a chemotherapeutic agent for breast cancer, doxorubicin, given at its maximal tolerated dose (MTD; 1 mg/kg weekly) was tested for an effect on metastasis. Doxorubicin treatment significantly reduced primary tumor growth and lung micrometastases but the number of macrometastases at experiment end was not significantly affected. This model should prove useful for development of drugs to target metastasis and to study the biology of metastasis. PMID:24878664

  15. Sinoporphyrin sodium triggered sono-photodynamic effects on breast cancer both in vitro and in vivo.

    PubMed

    Liu, Yichen; Wang, Pan; Liu, Quanhong; Wang, Xiaobing

    2016-07-01

    Sono-photodynamic therapy (SPDT) is a promising anti-cancer strategy. Briefly, SPDT combines ultrasound and light to activate sensitizers that produce mechanical, sonochemical and photochemical activities. Sinoporphyrin sodium (DVDMS) is a newly identified sensitizer that shows great potential in both sonodynamic therapy (SDT) and photodynamic therapy (PDT). In this study, we primarily evaluated the combined effects of SDT and PDT by using DVDMS on breast cancer both in vitro and in vivo. In vitro, DVDMS-SPDT elicits much serious cytotoxicity compared with either SDT or PDT alone by MTT and colony formation assays. 2',7'-Dichlorodihydrofluo-rescein-diacetate (DCFH-DA) and dihydroethidium (DHE) staining revealed that intracellular reactive oxygen species (ROS) were significantly increased in groups given combined therapy. Terephthalic acid (TA) method and FD500-uptake assay reflected that cavitational effects and cell membrane permeability changes after ultrasound irradiation were also involved in the enhancement of combination therapy. In vivo, DVDMS-SPDT markedly inhibits the tumor volume and tumor weight growth. Hematoxylin-eosin staining and immunohistochemistry analysis show DVDMS-SPDT greatly suppressed tumor proliferation. Further, DVDMS-SPDT significantly inhibits tumor lung metastasis in the highly metastatic 4T1 mouse xenograft model, which is consistent well with the in vitro findings evaluated by transwell assay. Moreover, DVDMS-SPDT did not produces obvious effect on body weight and major organs in 4T1 xenograft model. The results suggest that by combination SDT and PDT, the sensitizer DVDMS would produce much better therapeutic effects, and DVDMS-SPDT may be a potential strategy against highly metastatic breast cancer. PMID:26964970

  16. Enhanced Cultivation Of Stimulated Murine B Cells

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sammons, David W.

    1994-01-01

    Method of in vitro cultivation of large numbers of stimulated murine B lymphocytes. Cells electrofused with other cells to produce hybridomas and monoclonal antibodies. Offers several advantages: polyclonally stimulated B-cell blasts cultivated for as long as 14 days, hybridomas created throughout culture period, yield of hybridomas increases during cultivation, and possible to expand polyclonally in vitro number of B cells specific for antigenic determinants first recognized in vivo.

  17. Murine models of human wound healing.

    PubMed

    Chen, Jerry S; Longaker, Michael T; Gurtner, Geoffrey C

    2013-01-01

    In vivo wound healing experiments remain the most predictive models for studying human wound healing, allowing an accurate representation of the complete wound healing environment including various cell types, environmental cues, and paracrine interactions. Small animals are economical, easy to maintain, and allow researchers to take advantage of the numerous transgenic strains that have been developed to investigate the specific mechanisms involved in wound healing and regeneration. Here we describe three reproducible murine wound healing models that recapitulate the human wound healing process.

  18. Breast-feeding and benign breast disease.

    PubMed

    Bernardi, S; Londero, A P; Bertozzi, S; Driul, L; Marchesoni, D; Petri, R

    2012-01-01

    Benign breast disease (BBD) is very common among women in their fertile age, but its correlation with breast reproductive function remains unclear. Our study aimed to investigate the relation between BBD and breast-feeding. We collected data on 105 women with BBD and 98 controls, focusing on their reproductive history and breast-feeding. We analysed data by R (version 2.12.1) considering p < 0.05 as significant. The results showed that fibroadenoma represented the most frequent BBD (55%), followed by fibrocystic changes (19%), intraductal papilloma (6%) and inflammatory breast disorders (5%). The mean age was 31.5 years (± 6.1), BMI 21.2 kg/m² (± 3.4) and age at menarche 13.0 years (± 1.5). Duration of breast-feeding was not significantly different between controls and BBD types (p = NS). Selecting women with fibroadenoma breast-feeding duration directly correlated with the number of benign lesions (p < 0.05), which remains significant also by multivariate analysis. It was concluded that there seemed to be no difference in breast-feeding among BBDs types, but lactation may influence the number of fibroadenomas. Moreover, prospective studies would better define the correlation between lactation and BBDs.

  19. Combination of Potassium Pentagamavunon-0 and Doxorubicin Induces Apoptosis and Cell Cycle Arrest and Inhibits Metastasis in Breast Cancer Cells.

    PubMed

    Putri, Herwandhani; Jenie, Riris Istighfari; Handayani, Sri; Kastian, Ria Fajarwati; Meiyanto, Edy

    2016-01-01

    A salt compound of a curcumin analogue, potassium pentagamavunon-0 (K PGV-0) has been synthesized to improve solubility of pentagamavunon-0 which has been proven to have anti-proliferative effects on several cancer cells. The purpose of this study was to investigate cytotoxic activity and metastasis inhibition by K PGV- 0 alone and in combination with achemotherapeutic agent, doxorubicin (dox), in breast cancer cells. Based on MTT assay analysis, K PGV-0 showed cytotoxic activity in T47D and 4T1 cell lines with IC50 values of 94.9 μM and 49.0±0.2 μM, respectively. In general, K PGV-0+dox demonstrated synergistic effects and decreased cell viability up to 84.7% in T47D cells and 62.6% in 4T1 cells. Cell cycle modulation and apoptosis induction were examined by flow cytometry. K PGV-0 and K PGV-0+dox caused cell accumulation in G2/M phase and apoptosis induction. Regarding cancer metastasis, while K PGV-0 alone did not show any inhibition of 4T1 cell migration, K PGV-0+dox exerted inhibition. K PGV-0 and its combination with dox inhibited the activity of MMP-9 which has a pivotal role in extracellular matrix degradation. These results show that a combination of K PGV-0 and doxorubicin inhibits cancer cell growth through cell cycling, apoptosis induction, and inhibition of cell migration and MMP-9 activity. Therefore, K PGV-0 may have potential for development as a co-chemotherapeutic agent. PMID:27268651

  20. Tumor-evoked regulatory B cells promote breast cancer metastasis by converting resting CD4⁺ T cells to T-regulatory cells.

    PubMed

    Olkhanud, Purevdorj B; Damdinsuren, Bazarragchaa; Bodogai, Monica; Gress, Ronald E; Sen, Ranjan; Wejksza, Katarzyna; Malchinkhuu, Enkhzol; Wersto, Robert P; Biragyn, Arya

    2011-05-15

    Pulmonary metastasis of breast cancer requires recruitment and expansion of T-regulatory cells (Treg) that promote escape from host protective immune cells. However, it remains unclear precisely how tumors recruit Tregs to support metastatic growth. Here we report the mechanistic involvement of a unique and previously undescribed subset of regulatory B cells. These cells, designated tumor-evoked Bregs (tBreg), phenotypically resemble activated but poorly proliferative mature B2 cells (CD19(+) CD25(High) CD69(High)) that express constitutively active Stat3 and B7-H1(High) CD81(High) CD86(High) CD62L(Low) IgM(Int). Our studies with the mouse 4T1 model of breast cancer indicate that the primary role of tBregs in lung metastases is to induce TGF-β-dependent conversion of FoxP3(+) Tregs from resting CD4(+) T cells. In the absence of tBregs, 4T1 tumors cannot metastasize into the lungs efficiently due to poor Treg conversion. Our findings have important clinical implications, as they suggest that tBregs must be controlled to interrupt the initiation of a key cancer-induced immunosuppressive event that is critical to support cancer metastasis. PMID:21444674

  1. Review of autoimmune (lupus-like) glomerulonephritis in murine models.

    PubMed

    Hicks, John; Bullard, Daniel C

    2006-01-01

    While murine models of autoimmune (lupus-like) glomerulonephritis have been available for sometime, it is only recently that immune and inflammatory mechanisms and molecular genetics have been extensively investigated. Genes involved in murine and human lupus nephritis have been discovered and provide insight into this disease process and provide avenues for molecular-targeted therapy. Immune modulation of murine nephritis has provided insight into novel therapy that may attenuate this disease or halt disease progression. With the advances in understanding the pathogenesis of lupus nephritis using translational research modalities, including electron microscopy, and molecular genetics, many "designer" therapies have become available for clinical use and for clinical investigational trials. This paper reviews autoimmune (lupus-like) glomerulonephritis in murine models, candidate genes involved in lupus nephritis, adhesion molecules implicated in murine lupus-like nephritis, immune modulation of murine lupus-like nephritis, and novel and potential therapy for immune complex glomerulonephritis.

  2. A novel combination treatment for breast cancer cells involving BAPTA-AM and proteasome inhibitor bortezomib

    PubMed Central

    YERLIKAYA, AZMI; ERDOĞAN, ELIF; OKUR, EMRAH; YERLIKAYA, ŞERIFE; SAVRAN, BIRCAN

    2016-01-01

    Glucose-regulated protein 78 kDa/binding immunoglobulin protein (GRP78/BIP) is a well-known endoplasmic reticulum (ER) chaperone protein regulating ER stress by facilitating protein folding, assembly and Ca2+ binding. GRP78 is also a member of the heat shock protein 70 gene family and induces tumor cell survival and resistance to chemotherapeutics. Bortezomib is a highly specific 26S proteasome inhibitor that has been approved as treatment for patients with multiple myeloma. The present study first examined the dose- and time-dependent effects of bortezomib on GRP78 expression levels in the highly metastatic mouse breast cancer 4T1 cell line using western blot analysis. The analysis results revealed that GRP78 levels were significantly increased by bortezomib at a dose as low as 10 nM. Time-dependent experiments indicated that the accumulation of GRP78 was initiated after a 24 h incubation period following the addition of 10 nM bortezomib. Subsequently, the present study determined the half maximal inhibitory concentration of intracellular calcium chelator BAPTA-AM (13.6 µM) on 4T1 cells. The combination effect of BAPTA-AM and bortezomib on the 4T1 cells was investigated using 3-(4,5-dimethylthiazol-2-yl)-2,5-diphenyltetrazolium bromide and WST-1 assays and an iCELLigence system. The results revealed that the combination of 10 nM bortezomib + 5 µM BAPTA-AM is more cytotoxic compared with monotherapies, including 10 nM bortezomib, 1 µM BAPTA-AM and 5 µM BAPTA-AM. In addition, the present results revealed that bortezomib + BAPTA-AM combination causes cell death through the induction of apoptosis. The present results also revealed that bortezomib + BAPTA-AM combination-induced apoptosis is associated with a clear increase in the phosphorylation of stress-activated protein kinase/Jun amino-terminal kinase SAPK/JNK. Overall, the present results suggest that bortezomib and BAPTA-AM combination therapy may be a novel therapeutic strategy for breast cancer treatment

  3. Imaging Guided Breast Interventions.

    PubMed

    Masroor, Imrana; Afzal, Shaista; Sufian, Saira Naz

    2016-06-01

    Breast imaging is a developing field, with new and upcoming innovations, decreasing the morbidity and mortality related to breast pathologies with main emphasis on breast cancer. Breast imaging has an essential role in the detection and management of breast disease. It includes a multimodality approach, i.e. mammography, ultrasound, magnetic resonance imaging, nuclear medicine techniques and interventional procedures, done for the diagnosis and definitive management of breast abnormalities. The range of methods to perform biopsy of a suspicious breast lesion found on imaging has also increased markedly from the 1990s with hi-technological progress in surgical as well as percutaneous breast biopsy methods. The image guided percutaneous breast biopsy procedures cause minimal breast scarring, save time, and relieve the patient of the anxiety of going to the operation theatre. The aim of this review was to describe and discuss the different image guided breast biopsy techniques presently employed along with the indications, contraindication, merits and demerits of each method. PMID:27353993

  4. Breast-Conserving Surgery Followed by Radiation Therapy With MRI-Detected Stage I or Stage II Breast Cancer

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2011-12-07

    Ductal Breast Carcinoma in Situ; Estrogen Receptor-negative Breast Cancer; Estrogen Receptor-positive Breast Cancer; HER2-negative Breast Cancer; HER2-positive Breast Cancer; Invasive Ductal Breast Carcinoma; Invasive Lobular Breast Carcinoma; Male Breast Cancer; Medullary Ductal Breast Carcinoma With Lymphocytic Infiltrate; Mucinous Ductal Breast Carcinoma; Papillary Ductal Breast Carcinoma; Progesterone Receptor-negative Breast Cancer; Progesterone Receptor-positive Breast Cancer; Stage I Breast Cancer; Stage II Breast Cancer; Tubular Ductal Breast Carcinoma

  5. Anti-metastatic outcome of isoform-specific prolactin receptor targeting in breast cancer.

    PubMed

    Yonezawa, Tomohiro; Chen, Kuan-Hui Ethan; Ghosh, Mrinal K; Rivera, Lorena; Dill, Riva; Ma, Lisa; Villa, Pedro A; Kawaminami, Mitsumori; Walker, Ameae M

    2015-09-28

    Controversy exists concerning the role of the long prolactin receptor (PRLR) in the progression of breast cancer. By targeting pre-mRNA splicing, we succeeded in knocking down only the long PRLR in vivo, leaving the short forms unaffected. Using two orthotopic and highly-metastatic models of breast cancer, one of which was syngeneic (mouse 4T1) to allow assessment of tumor-immune interactions and one of which was endocrinologically humanized (human BT-474) to activate human PRLRs, we examined the effect of long PRLR knockdown on disease progression. In both models, knockdown dramatically inhibited metastatic spread to the lungs and liver and resulted in increased central death in the primary tumor. In the syngeneic model, immune infiltrates in metastatic sites were changed from innate inflammatory cells to lymphocytes, with an increase in the incidence of tumor-specific cytotoxic T cells. Long PRLR knockdown in three-dimensional culture induced apoptosis of tumor-initiating/cancer stem cells (death of 95% of cells displaying stem cell markers in 15 days). We conclude that the long PRLR plays an important role in breast cancer metastasis. PMID:26095602

  6. Docosahexaenoic Acid in Preventing Recurrence in Breast Cancer Survivors

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-06-20

    Benign Breast Neoplasm; Ductal Breast Carcinoma In Situ; Invasive Breast Carcinoma; Lobular Breast Carcinoma In Situ; Paget Disease of the Breast; Stage IA Breast Cancer; Stage IB Breast Cancer; Stage IIA Breast Cancer; Stage IIB Breast Cancer; Stage IIIA Breast Cancer; Stage IIIB Breast Cancer; Stage IIIC Breast Cancer

  7. Tumor-associated macrophages: unwitting accomplices in breast cancer malignancy

    PubMed Central

    Williams, Carly Bess; Yeh, Elizabeth S; Soloff, Adam C

    2016-01-01

    Deleterious inflammation is a primary feature of breast cancer. Accumulating evidence demonstrates that macrophages, the most abundant leukocyte population in mammary tumors, have a critical role at each stage of cancer progression. Such tumor-associated macrophages facilitate neoplastic transformation, tumor immune evasion and the subsequent metastatic cascade. Herein, we discuss the dynamic process whereby molecular and cellular features of the tumor microenvironment act to license tissue-repair mechanisms of macrophages, fostering angiogenesis, metastasis and the support of cancer stem cells. We illustrate how tumors induce, then exploit trophic macrophages to subvert innate and adaptive immune responses capable of destroying malignant cells. Finally, we discuss compelling evidence from murine models of cancer and early clinical trials in support of macrophage-targeted intervention strategies with the potential to dramatically reduce breast cancer morbidity and mortality. PMID:26998515

  8. New potential beneficial effects of actein, a triterpene glycoside isolated from Cimicifuga species, in breast cancer treatment

    PubMed Central

    Yue, Grace Gar-Lee; Xie, Sida; Lee, Julia Kin-Ming; Kwok, Hin-Fai; Gao, Si; Nian, Yin; Wu, Xiao-Xiao; Wong, Chun-Kwok; Qiu, Ming-Hua; Lau, Clara Bik-San

    2016-01-01

    Actein is a triterpene glycoside isolated from the rhizomes of Cimicifuga foetida (Chinese herb “shengma”) which could inhibit the growth of breast cancer cells. Nevertheless, the effect of actein on angiogenesis, which is an essential step for tumor growth and metastasis, has never been reported. Hence, this study aimed to investigate the in vitro and in vivo effects of actein on angiogenesis using human microvascular endothelial cells (HMEC-1), matrigel plug and tumor-bearing mouse models. Our results showed that actein significantly inhibited the proliferation, reduced the migration and motility of endothelial cells, and it could suppress the protein expressions of VEGFR1, pJNK and pERK, suggesting that JNK/ERK pathways were involved. In vivo results showed that oral administration of actein at 10 mg/kg for 7 days inhibited blood vessel formation in the growth factor-containing matrigel plugs. Oral actein treatments (10–15 mg/kg) for 28 days resulted in decreasing mouse 4T1 breast tumor sizes and metastasis to lungs and livers. The apparent reduced angiogenic proteins (CD34 and Factor VIII) expressions and down-regulated metastasis-related VEGFR1 and CXCR4 gene expressions were observed in breast tumors. Our novel findings provide insights into the use of actein for development of anti-angiogenic agents for breast cancer. PMID:27731376

  9. Do fatty breasts increase or decrease breast cancer risk?

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Few studies have investigated the association of non-dense area or fatty breasts in conjunction with breast density and breast cancer risk. Two articles in a recent issue of Breast Cancer Research investigate the role of absolute non-dense breast area measured on mammograms and find conflicting results: one article finds that non-dense breast area has a modest positive association with breast cancer risk, whereas the other finds that non-dense breast area has a strong protective effect to reduce breast cancer risk. Understanding the interplay of body mass index, menopause status, and measurement of non-dense breast area would help to clarify the contribution of non-dense breast area to breast cancer risk. PMID:22277587

  10. A Detailed Analysis of the Murine TAP Transporter Substrate Specificity

    PubMed Central

    Burgevin, Anne; Saveanu, Loredana; Kim, Yohan; Barilleau, Émilie; Kotturi, Maya; Sette, Alessandro; van Endert, Peter; Peters, Bjoern

    2008-01-01

    Background The transporter associated with antigen processing (TAP) supplies cytosolic peptides into the endoplasmic reticulum for binding to major histocompatibility complex (MHC) class I molecules. Its specificity therefore influences the repertoire of peptides presented by MHC molecules. Compared to human TAP, murine TAP's binding specificity has not been characterized as well, even though murine systems are widely used for basic studies of antigen processing and presentation. Methodology/Principal Findings We performed a detailed experimental analysis of murine TAP binding specificity by measuring the binding affinities of 323 peptides. Based on this experimental data, a computational model of murine TAP specificity was constructed. The model was compared to previously generated data on human and murine TAP specificities. In addition, the murine TAP specificities for known epitopes and random peptides were predicted and compared to assess the impact of murine TAP selectivity on epitope selection. Conclusions/Significance Comparisons to a previously constructed model of human TAP specificity confirms the well-established differences for peptide substrates with positively charged C-termini. In addition these comparisons show that several residues at the N-terminus of peptides which strongly influence binding to human TAP showed little effect on binding to murine TAP, and that the overall influence of the aminoterminal residues on peptide affinity for murine TAP is much lower than for the human transporter. Murine TAP also partly prefers different hydrophobic amino acids than human TAP in the carboxyterminal position. These species-dependent differences in specificity determined in vitro are shown to correlate with the epitope repertoire recognized in vivo. The quantitative model of binding specificity of murine TAP developed herein should be useful for interpreting epitope mapping and immunogenicity data obtained in humanized mouse models. PMID:18545702

  11. Deptor enhances triple-negative breast cancer metastasis and chemoresistance through coupling to survivin expression.

    PubMed

    Parvani, Jenny G; Davuluri, Gangarao; Wendt, Michael K; Espinosa, Christine; Tian, Maozhen; Danielpour, David; Sossey-Alaoui, Khalid; Schiemann, William P

    2015-03-01

    Transforming growth factor-β (TGF-β) functions to suppress tumorigenesis in normal mammary tissues and early-stage breast cancers and, paradoxically, acts to promote the metastasis and chemoresistance in late-stage breast cancers, particularly triple-negative breast cancers (TNBCs). Precisely how TGF-β acquires oncogenic characteristics in late-stage breast cancers remains unknown, as does the role of the endogenous mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR) inhibitor, Dep domain-containing mTOR-interacting protein (Deptor), in coupling TGF-β to TNBC development and metastatic progression. Here we demonstrate that Deptor expression was downregulated in basal-like/TNBCs relative to their luminal counterparts. Additionally, Deptor expression was 1) inversely correlated with the metastatic ability of human (MCF10A) and mouse (4T1) TNBC progression series and 2) robustly repressed by several inducers of epithelial-mesenchymal transition programs. Functional disruption of Deptor expression in 4T07 cells significantly inhibited their proliferation and organoid growth in vitro, as well as prevented their colonization and tumor formation in the lungs of mice. In stark contrast, elevated Deptor expression was significantly associated with poorer overall survival of patients harboring estrogen receptor α-negative breast cancers. Accordingly, enforced Deptor expression in MDA-MB-231 cells dramatically enhanced their 1) organoid growth in vitro, 2) pulmonary outgrowth in mice, and 3) resistance to chemotherapies, an event dependent on the coupling of Deptor to survivin expression. Collectively, our findings highlight the dichotomous functions of Deptor in modulating the proliferation and survival of TNBCs during metastasis; they also implicate Deptor and its stimulation of survivin as essential components of TNBC resistance to chemotherapies and apoptotic stimuli.

  12. Living as a Breast Cancer Survivor

    MedlinePlus

    ... Emotional aspects of breast cancer Living as a breast cancer survivor For many women with breast cancer, treatment ... making some new choices. Follow-up care after breast cancer treatment Even after you have completed breast cancer ...

  13. Breast Cancer Risk in American Women

    MedlinePlus

    ... of Breast & Gynecologic Cancers Breast Cancer Screening Research Breast Cancer Risk in American Women On This Page What ... risk of developing the disease. Personal history of breast cancer : Women who have had breast cancer are more ...

  14. Impact of tumour epithelial subtype on circulating microRNAs in breast cancer patients.

    PubMed

    Waters, Peadar S; Dwyer, Roisin M; Brougham, Cathy; Glynn, Claire L; Wall, Deirdre; Hyland, Peter; Duignan, Maria; McLoughlin, Mark; Newell, John; Kerin, Michael J

    2014-01-01

    While a range of miRNAs have been shown to be dysregulated in the circulation of patients with breast cancer, little is known about the relationship between circulating levels and tumour characteristics. The aim of this study was to analyse alterations in circulating miRNA expression during tumour progression in a murine model of breast cancer, and to detemine the clinical relevance of identified miRNAs at both tissue and circulating level in patient samples. Athymic nude mice received a subcutaneous or mammary fat pad injection of MDA-MB-231 cells. Blood sampling was performed at weeks 1, 3 and 6 following tumour induction, and microRNA extracted. MicroRNA microArray analysis was performed comparing samples harvested at week 1 to those collected at week 6 from the same animals. Significantly altered miRNAs were validated across all murine samples by RQ-PCR (n = 45). Three miRNAs of interest were then quantified in the circulation(n = 166) and tissue (n = 100) of breast cancer patients and healthy control individuals. MicroArray-based analysis of murine blood samples revealed levels of 77 circulating microRNAs to be changed during disease progression, with 44 demonstrating changes >2-fold. Validation across all samples revealed miR-138 to be significantly elevated in the circulation of animals during disease development, with miR-191 and miR-106a levels significantly decreased. Analysis of patient tissue and blood samples revealed miR-138 to be significantly up-regulated in the circulation of patients with breast cancer, with no change observed in the tissue setting. While not significantly changed overall in breast cancer patients compared to controls, circulating miR-106a and miR-191 were significantly decreased in patients with basal breast cancer. In tissue, both miRNAs were significantly elevated in breast cancer compared to normal breast tissue. The data demonstrates an impact of tumour epithelial subtype on circulating levels of miRNAs, and

  15. Targeting MCM2 function as a novel strategy for the treatment of highly malignant breast tumors

    PubMed Central

    Abe, Shinya; Yamamoto, Kouhei; Kurata, Morito; Abe-Suzuki, Shiho; Horii, Rie; Akiyama, Futoshi; Kitagawa, Masanobu

    2015-01-01

    Highly malignant tumors express high levels of the minichromosome maintenance 2 (MCM2) protein, which is associated with advanced tumor grade, advanced stage, and poor prognosis. In a previous study, we showed that Friend leukemia virus (FLV) envelope protein gp70 bound MCM2, impaired its nuclear translocation, and enhanced DNA-damage-induced apoptosis in FLV-infected hematopoietic cells when the cells expressed high levels of MCM2. Here, we show that MCM2 is highly expressed in clinical samples of invasive carcinoma of the breast, especially triple-negative breast cancer (TNBC), and in cancer stem cell (CSC) marker-positive breast cancer cells. To generate a cancer therapy model using gp70, we introduced the gp70 protein into the cytoplasm of murine breast cancer cells that express high levels of MCM2 by conjugating the protein transduction domain (PTD) of Hph-1 to gp70 (Hph- 1-gp70). Hph-1-gp70 was successfully transduced into the cytoplasm of breast cancer cells. The transduced protein enhanced the DNA damage-induced apoptosis of cancer cells in vitro and in vivo. Therefore, an MCM2-targeted strategy using Hph-1-gp70 treatment to induce DNA damage might be a successful therapy for highly malignant breast cancers such as TNBC and for the eradication of CSC-like cells from breast cancer tissue. PMID:26430873

  16. Breast Cancer Rates by State

    MedlinePlus

    ... Associated Lung Ovarian Prostate Skin Uterine Cancer Home Breast Cancer Rates by State Language: English Español (Spanish) Recommend ... from breast cancer each year. Rates of Getting Breast Cancer by State The number of people who get ...

  17. CDC Vital Signs: Breast Cancer

    MedlinePlus

    ... 2.65 MB] Read the MMWR Science Clips Breast Cancer Black Women Have Higher Death Rates from Breast ... of Page U.S. State Info Number of Additional Breast Cancer Deaths Among Black Women, By State SOURCE: National ...

  18. Genetics Home Reference: breast cancer

    MedlinePlus

    ... Me Understand Genetics Home Health Conditions breast cancer breast cancer Enable Javascript to view the expand/collapse boxes. Download PDF Open All Close All Description Breast cancer is a disease in which certain cells in ...

  19. 6 Common Cancers - Breast Cancer

    MedlinePlus

    ... Bar Home Current Issue Past Issues 6 Common Cancers - Breast Cancer Past Issues / Spring 2007 Table of Contents For ... her down. Photo: AP Photo/Brett Flashnick Breast Cancer Breast cancer is a malignant (cancerous) growth that ...

  20. Murine Flexor Tendon Injury and Repair Surgery.

    PubMed

    Ackerman, Jessica E; Loiselle, Alayna E

    2016-01-01

    Tendon connects skeletal muscle and bone, facilitating movement of nearly the entire body. In the hand, flexor tendons (FTs) enable flexion of the fingers and general hand function. Injuries to the FTs are common, and satisfactory healing is often impaired due to excess scar tissue and adhesions between the tendon and surrounding tissue. However, little is known about the molecular and cellular components of FT repair. To that end, a murine model of FT repair that recapitulates many aspects of healing in humans, including impaired range of motion and decreased mechanical properties, has been developed and previously described. Here an in-depth demonstration of this surgical procedure is provided, involving transection and subsequent repair of the flexor digitorum longus (FDL) tendon in the murine hind paw. This technique can be used to conduct lineage analysis of different cell types, assess the effects of gene gain or loss-of-function, and to test the efficacy of pharmacological interventions in the healing process. However, there are two primary limitations to this model: i) the FDL tendon in the mid-portion of the murine hind paw, where the transection and repair occur, is not surrounded by a synovial sheath. Therefore this model does not account for the potential contribution of the sheath to the scar formation process. ii) To protect the integrity of the repair site, the FT is released at the myotendinous junction, decreasing the mechanical forces of the tendon, likely contributing to increased scar formation. Isolation of sufficient cells from the granulation tissue of the FT during the healing process for flow cytometric analysis has proved challenging; cytology centrifugation to concentrate these cells is an alternate method used, and allows for generation of cell preparations on which immunofluorescent labeling can be performed. With this method, quantification of cells or proteins of interest during FT healing becomes possible. PMID:27684281

  1. Irradiation Design for an Experimental Murine Model

    SciTech Connect

    Ballesteros-Zebadua, P.; Moreno-Jimenez, S.; Suarez-Campos, J. E.; Celis, M. A.; Larraga-Gutierrez, J. M.; Garcia-Garduno, O. A.; Rubio-Osornio, M. C.; Custodio-Ramirez, V.; Paz, C.

    2010-12-07

    In radiotherapy and stereotactic radiosurgery, small animal experimental models are frequently used, since there are still a lot of unsolved questions about the biological and biochemical effects of ionizing radiation. This work presents a method for small-animal brain radiotherapy compatible with a dedicated 6MV Linac. This rodent model is focused on the research of the inflammatory effects produced by ionizing radiation in the brain. In this work comparisons between Pencil Beam and Monte Carlo techniques, were used in order to evaluate accuracy of the calculated dose using a commercial planning system. Challenges in this murine model are discussed.

  2. Reemergence of Murine Typhus in Galveston, Texas, USA, 2013

    PubMed Central

    Vohra, Rahat F.; Bouyer, Donald H.; Walker, David H.

    2015-01-01

    Twelve patients with murine typhus were identified in Galveston, Texas, USA, in 2013. An isolate from 1 patient was confirmed to be Rickettsia typhi. Reemergence of murine typhus in Galveston emphasizes the importance of vector control and awareness of this disease by physicians and public health officials. PMID:25695758

  3. Methylcellulose media for plaque assay of murine leukemia virus.

    PubMed

    Watanabe, T; Horikawa, Y; Sato, K; Saito, H

    1982-09-01

    When ecotropic murine leukemia virus was assayed by a methylcellulose-XC cell procedure, plaque titers showed less test-to-test variation, more uniform dose-response curves, and larger plaque sizes, as compared with results of the conventional liquid overlay-XC cell test system. This assay therefore seems to be reliable and useful for the titration of ecotropic murine leukemia virus.

  4. Reemergence of murine typhus in Galveston, Texas, USA, 2013.

    PubMed

    Blanton, Lucas S; Vohra, Rahat F; Bouyer, Donald H; Walker, David H

    2015-03-01

    Twelve patients with murine typhus were identified in Galveston, Texas, USA, in 2013. An isolate from 1 patient was confirmed to be Rickettsia typhi. Reemergence of murine typhus in Galveston emphasizes the importance of vector control and awareness of this disease by physicians and public health officials.

  5. Accelerated Radiation Therapy After Surgery in Treating Patients With Breast Cancer

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-03-16

    Inflammatory Breast Cancer; Invasive Ductal Breast Carcinoma; Invasive Lobular Breast Carcinoma; Mucinous Ductal Breast Carcinoma; Papillary Ductal Breast Carcinoma; Stage II Breast Cancer; Stage IIIA Breast Cancer; Stage IIIB Breast Cancer; Stage IIIC Breast Cancer; Tubular Ductal Breast Carcinoma

  6. Breast Reconstruction after Mastectomy

    PubMed Central

    Schmauss, Daniel; Machens, Hans-Günther; Harder, Yves

    2016-01-01

    Breast cancer is the leading cause of cancer death in women worldwide. Its surgical approach has become less and less mutilating in the last decades. However, the overall number of breast reconstructions has significantly increased lately. Nowadays, breast reconstruction should be individualized at its best, first of all taking into consideration not only the oncological aspects of the tumor, neo-/adjuvant treatment, and genetic predisposition, but also its timing (immediate versus delayed breast reconstruction), as well as the patient’s condition and wish. This article gives an overview over the various possibilities of breast reconstruction, including implant- and expander-based reconstruction, flap-based reconstruction (vascularized autologous tissue), the combination of implant and flap, reconstruction using non-vascularized autologous fat, as well as refinement surgery after breast reconstruction. PMID:26835456

  7. Immunogenicity of murine solid tumor models as a defining feature of in vivo behavior and response to immunotherapy.

    PubMed

    Lechner, Melissa G; Karimi, Saman S; Barry-Holson, Keegan; Angell, Trevor E; Murphy, Katherine A; Church, Connor H; Ohlfest, John R; Hu, Peisheng; Epstein, Alan L

    2013-01-01

    Immune profiling has been widely used to probe mechanisms of immune escape in cancer and identify novel targets for therapy. Two emerging uses of immune signatures are to identify likely responders to immunotherapy regimens among individuals with cancer and to understand the variable responses seen among subjects with cancer in immunotherapy trials. Here, the immune profiles of 6 murine solid tumor models (CT26, 4T1, MAD109, RENCA, LLC, and B16) were correlated to tumor regression and survival in response to 2 immunotherapy regimens. Comprehensive profiles for each model were generated using quantitative reverse transcriptase polymerase chain reaction, immunohistochemistry, and flow cytometry techniques, as well as functional studies of suppressor cell populations (regulatory T cells and myeloid-derived suppressor cells), to analyze intratumoral and draining lymphoid tissues. Tumors were stratified as highly or poorly immunogenic, with highly immunogenic tumors showing a significantly greater presence of T-cell costimulatory molecules and immune suppression in the tumor microenvironment. An absence of tumor-infiltrating cytotoxic T lymphocytes and mature dendritic cells was seen across all models. Delayed tumor growth and increased survival with suppressor cell inhibition and tumor-targeted chemokine+/-dendritic cells vaccine immunotherapy were associated with high tumor immunogenicity in these models. Tumor MHC class I expression correlated with the overall tumor immunogenicity level and was a singular marker to predict immunotherapy response with these regimens. By using experimental tumor models as surrogates for human cancers, these studies demonstrate how select features of an immune profile may be utilized to identify patients most likely to respond to immunotherapy regimens. PMID:24145359

  8. [Combination of TLR7 agonist T7-ethacrynic acid conjugate with ROR1 has a stronger anti-breast cancer effect].

    PubMed

    Zhang, Na; Jin, Guangyi; Jin, Zhenchao; Liu, Bing; Peng, Boya; Gao, Ningning; Hu, Yunlong; Tang, Li

    2016-07-01

    Objective To investigate the synergistic anti-breast cancer effect of Toll-like receptor 7 agonist T7-ethacrynic acid conjugate (T7-EA) in combination with receptor-tyrosine-kinase-like orphan receptor 1 (ROR1). Methods ROR1 cytotoxic T lymphocyte (CTL) epitope was predicted using Syfpeithi online software. Mouse spleen lymphocytes and bone marrow dendritic cells (DCs) were separately stimulated with 4 μmol/L T7-EA and 4 μmol/L ROR1 alone or in combination. ELISA assay was used to measure the levels of interferon-γ (IFN-γ), interleukin 12 (IL-12) and tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α). Xenograft model was established via subcutaneous injection of mouse breast cancer 4T1 cells. The mice were weekly treated through intraperitoneal administration of 3 mg/kg T7-EA, 15 mg/kg ROR1 or the combination of T7-EA and ROR1. After four rounds of treatment, tumor tissues were weighed. Serum level of anti-4T1 tumor protein IgG was measured by ELISA. Specific CTL activity was detected by lactate dehydrogenase (LDH) assay. Results The peptide PYCDETSSV was chosen as an antigen epitope of breast cancer. The T7-EA highly activated in vitro lymphocytes in a dose-dependent manner, which wasn't affected by other relevant peptides. The combination of T7-EA and ROR1 stimulated the secretion of IFN-γ and IL-12 by lymphocytes and TNF-α by bone marrow DCs. The growth of tumor in vivo was significantly inhibited by T7-EA combined with ROR1 compared with T7-EA or ROR1 alone. The specific CTL activity triggered by T7-EA combined with ROR1 was much stronger than that triggered by T7-EA or ROR1 alone. The titer of anti-4T1 tumor protein IgG induced by T7-EA combined with ROR1 was higher than that induced by T7-EA or ROR1. Conclusion The combination of T7-EA and ROR1 has a better killing effect on breast cancer. PMID:27363264

  9. Induction of murine embryonic stem cell differentiation by medicinal plant extracts

    PubMed Central

    Reynertson, Kurt A.; Charlson, Mary E.; Gudas, Lorraine J.

    2010-01-01

    Epidemiological evidence indicates that diets high in fruits and vegetables provide a measure of cancer chemoprevention due to phytochemical constituents. Natural products are a rich source of cancer chemotherapy drugs, and primarily target rapidly-cycling tumor cells. Increasing evidence indicates that many cancers contain small populations of resistant, stem-like cells that have the capacity to regenerate tumors following chemotherapy and radiation, and have been linked to the initiation of metastases. Our goal is to discover natural product-based clinical or dietary interventions that selectively target cancer stem cells, inducing differentiation. We adapted an alkaline phosphatase (AP) stain to assay plant extracts for the capacity to induce differentiation in embryonic stem (ES) cells. AP is a characteristic marker of undifferentiated ES cells, and this represents a novel approach to screening medicinal plant extracts. Following a survey of approximately 100 fractions obtained from twelve species of ethnomedically utilized plants, we found fractions from three species that induced differentiation, decreasing AP and transcript levels of pluripotency markers (Nanog, Oct-4, Rex-1). These fractions affected proliferation of murine ES, and human embryonal, prostate, and breast carcinoma cells in a dose-dependent manner. Several phytochemical constituents were isolated; the antioxidant phytochemicals ellagic acid and gallic acid were shown to affect viability of cultured breast carcinoma cells. PMID:20955699

  10. A Paclitaxel-Loaded Recombinant Polypeptide Nanoparticle Outperforms Abraxane in Multiple Murine Cancer Models

    PubMed Central

    Bhattacharyya, Jayanta; Bellucci, Joseph J.; Weitzhandler, Isaac; McDaniel, Jonathan R.; Spasojevic, Ivan; Li, Xinghai; Lin, Chao-Chieh; Chi, Jen-Tsan Ashley; Chilkoti, Ashutosh

    2015-01-01

    Packaging clinically relevant hydrophobic drugs into a self-assembled nanoparticle can improve their aqueous solubility, plasma half-life, tumor specific uptake and therapeutic potential. To this end, here we conjugated paclitaxel (PTX) to recombinant chimeric polypeptides (CPs) that spontaneously self-assemble into ~60-nm diameter near-monodisperse nanoparticles that increased the systemic exposure of PTX by 7-fold compared to free drug and 2-fold compared to the FDA approved taxane nanoformulation (Abraxane®). The tumor uptake of the CP-PTX nanoparticle was 5-fold greater than free drug and 2-fold greater than Abraxane. In a murine cancer model of human triple negative breast cancer and prostate cancer, CP-PTX induced near complete tumor regression after a single dose in both tumor models, whereas at the same dose, no mice treated with Abraxane survived for more than 80 days (breast) and 60 days (prostate) respectively. These results show that a molecularly engineered nanoparticle with precisely engineered design features outperforms Abraxane, the current gold standard for paclitaxel delivery. PMID:26239362

  11. Induction of murine embryonic stem cell differentiation by medicinal plant extracts

    SciTech Connect

    Reynertson, Kurt A.; Charlson, Mary E.; Gudas, Lorraine J.

    2011-01-01

    Epidemiological evidence indicates that diets high in fruits and vegetables provide a measure of cancer chemoprevention due to phytochemical constituents. Natural products are a rich source of cancer chemotherapy drugs, and primarily target rapidly cycling tumor cells. Increasing evidence indicates that many cancers contain small populations of resistant, stem-like cells that have the capacity to regenerate tumors following chemotherapy and radiation, and have been linked to the initiation of metastases. Our goal is to discover natural product-based clinical or dietary interventions that selectively target cancer stem cells, inducing differentiation. We adapted an alkaline phosphatase (AP) stain to assay plant extracts for the capacity to induce differentiation in embryonic stem (ES) cells. AP is a characteristic marker of undifferentiated ES cells, and this represents a novel approach to screening medicinal plant extracts. Following a survey of approximately 100 fractions obtained from 12 species of ethnomedically utilized plants, we found fractions from 3 species that induced differentiation, decreasing AP and transcript levels of pluripotency markers (Nanog, Oct-4, Rex-1). These fractions affected proliferation of murine ES, and human embryonal, prostate, and breast carcinoma cells in a dose-dependent manner. Several phytochemical constituents were isolated; the antioxidant phytochemicals ellagic acid and gallic acid were shown to affect viability of cultured breast carcinoma cells.

  12. A paclitaxel-loaded recombinant polypeptide nanoparticle outperforms Abraxane in multiple murine cancer models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bhattacharyya, Jayanta; Bellucci, Joseph J.; Weitzhandler, Isaac; McDaniel, Jonathan R.; Spasojevic, Ivan; Li, Xinghai; Lin, Chao-Chieh; Chi, Jen-Tsan Ashley; Chilkoti, Ashutosh

    2015-08-01

    Packaging clinically relevant hydrophobic drugs into a self-assembled nanoparticle can improve their aqueous solubility, plasma half-life, tumour-specific uptake and therapeutic potential. To this end, here we conjugated paclitaxel (PTX) to recombinant chimeric polypeptides (CPs) that spontaneously self-assemble into ~60 nm near-monodisperse nanoparticles that increased the systemic exposure of PTX by sevenfold compared with free drug and twofold compared with the Food and Drug Administration-approved taxane nanoformulation (Abraxane). The tumour uptake of the CP-PTX nanoparticle was fivefold greater than free drug and twofold greater than Abraxane. In a murine cancer model of human triple-negative breast cancer and prostate cancer, CP-PTX induced near-complete tumour regression after a single dose in both tumour models, whereas at the same dose, no mice treated with Abraxane survived for >80 days (breast) and 60 days (prostate), respectively. These results show that a molecularly engineered nanoparticle with precisely engineered design features outperforms Abraxane, the current gold standard for PTX delivery.

  13. Carboplatin and Eribulin Mesylate in Triple Negative Breast Cancer Patients

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-06-30

    Estrogen Receptor-negative Breast Cancer; HER2-negative Breast Cancer; Male Breast Cancer; Progesterone Receptor-negative Breast Cancer; Stage IA Breast Cancer; Stage IB Breast Cancer; Stage II Breast Cancer; Stage IIIA Breast Cancer; Stage IIIB Breast Cancer; Stage IIIC Breast Cancer; Triple-negative Breast Cancer

  14. [Breast reconstruction after mastectomy].

    PubMed

    Ho Quoc, C; Delay, E

    2013-02-01

    The mutilating surgery for breast cancer causes deep somatic and psychological sequelae. Breast reconstruction can mitigate these effects and permit the patient to help rebuild their lives. The purpose of this paper is to focus on breast reconstruction techniques and on factors involved in breast reconstruction. The methods of breast reconstruction are presented: objectives, indications, different techniques, operative risks, and long-term monitoring. Many different techniques can now allow breast reconstruction in most patients. Clinical cases are also presented in order to understand the results we expect from a breast reconstruction. Breast reconstruction provides many benefits for patients in terms of rehabilitation, wellness, and quality of life. In our mind, breast reconstruction should be considered more as an opportunity and a positive choice (the patient can decide to do it), than as an obligation (that the patient would suffer). The consultation with the surgeon who will perform the reconstruction is an important step to give all necessary informations. It is really important that the patient could speak again with him before undergoing reconstruction, if she has any doubt. The quality of information given by medical doctors is essential to the success of psychological intervention. This article was written in a simple, and understandable way to help gynecologists giving the best information to their patients. It is maybe also possible to let them a copy of this article, which would enable them to have a written support and would facilitate future consultation with the surgeon who will perform the reconstruction.

  15. Breast milk jaundice

    MedlinePlus

    Hyperbilirubinemia - breastfeeding; Breast-non-feeding jaundice; Breastfeeding failure jaundice ... of jaundice that is caused by too little breastfeeding by making sure your baby is getting enough ...

  16. Chemoprevention of breast cancer.

    PubMed

    Files, Julia A; Stan, Daniela L; Allen, Summer V; Pruthi, Sandhya

    2012-11-01

    The development of pharmacologic agents for the prevention of breast cancer is a significant milestone in medical and laboratory research. Despite these advances, the endorsement of preventive options has become challenging and complex, as physicians are expected to counsel and tailor their recommendations using a personalized approach taking into account medical comorbidities, degree of risk and patient preferences. This article provides a comprehensive overview of the major breast cancer prevention trials, review of the pharmacologic options available for breast cancer prevention, and strategies for integrating chemoprevention of breast cancer in high-risk women into clinical practice.

  17. Expression of Fas ligand in murine ovary.

    PubMed

    Guo, M W; Xu, J P; Mori, E; Sato, E; Saito, S; Mori, T

    1997-05-01

    Corresponding to the expression of Fas in the ovarian oocytes as previously reported (Guo et al., Biochem Biophys Res Commun 1994; 203:1438-1446; Mori et al., JSIR 1995; 9:49-50), the expression of Fas ligand (FasL) in the ovarian follicle was found to be restricted in the area of granulosa cells by the indirect immunofluorescence (IIF) test. Reverse transcriptase/polymerase chain reaction (RT/PCR) technique coupled with Southern blot hybridization analysis showed that the highest level of FasL mRNA was demonstrated in murine ovaries and granulosa cells 1 day after the administration of pregnant mare's serum gonadotropin (PMSG), while the level of FasL mRNA became very weak on the day 5, respectively. The observed gradual decrease in FasL mRNA could not be attributed to a generalized degradation of cellular RNA during atresia, as evidenced by the presence of constitutive expression of elongation factor 1 alpha (EF-1 alpha) mRNA in murine ovaries and granulosa cells treated with PMSG. Furthermore, in situ hybridization analysis with a FasL-specific probe confirmed that FasL was specifically localized in the granulosa cells of most follicles and its expression was regulated by PMSG administration. FasL localized in granulosa cells might possibly play an important role in the formation of the ovarian atretic follicles, most likely depending on PMSG administration. PMID:9196798

  18. Sexual dimorphism of Murine Masticatory Muscle Function

    PubMed Central

    Daniels, David W.; Tian, Zuozhen; Barton, Elisabeth R.

    2008-01-01

    (1) Objective To determine if gender distinctions of force generating capacity existed in murine masticatory muscles. (2) Design In order to investigate the effect of sex on force generating capacity in this muscle group, an isolated muscle preparation was developed utilizing the murine anterior deep masseter. Age-matched male and female mice were utilized to assess function, muscle fiber type and size in this muscle. (3) Results Maximum isometric force production was not different between age-matched male and female mice. However, the rate of force generation and relaxation was slower in female masseter muscles. Assessment of fiber type distribution by immunohistochemistry revealed a threefold decrease in the proportion of myosin heavy chain 2b positive fibers in female masseters, which correlated with the differences in contraction kinetics. (4) Conclusions These results provide evidence that masticatory muscle strength in mice is not affected by sex, but there are significant distinctions in kinetics associated with force production between males and females. PMID:18028868

  19. Immunosuppression by Murine Sarcoma Virus (Moloney)

    PubMed Central

    Chan, S. P.; Hook, W. A.; Turner, W.; Chirigos, M. A.

    1970-01-01

    Infection of mice with the murine sarcoma virus (Moloney) markedly suppressed the humoral antibody response to sheep erythrocyte antigen injected 10 days after infection, when tumor size was maximal, and on day 26, when primary tumors had partially regressed. Humoral antibody response was also inhibited when antigen was injected at the time secondary tumors and metastases were evident. No significant suppression of humoral antibody was seen when mice were injected with sheep erythrocyte antigen 5 days after virus infection. Inhibition of the cellular immune response of murine sarcoma virus (Moloney)-infected mice, as measured by the increased survival time of skin grafts, was also determined. Mice that were infected 5 days prior to grafting demonstrated prolonged survival of grafts, suggesting a suppression of cellular immunity. These mice had a graft survival time 14 days greater than noninfected controls. No significant prolongation of graft survival was seen in mice grafted at the times of maximum primary tumor growth, of primary tumor regression, or when secondary tumors had appeared. PMID:16557730

  20. Benzaldehyde suppresses murine allergic asthma and rhinitis.

    PubMed

    Jang, Tae Young; Park, Chang-Shin; Kim, Kyu-Sung; Heo, Min-Jeong; Kim, Young Hyo

    2014-10-01

    To evaluate the antiallergic effects of oral benzaldehyde in a murine model of allergic asthma and rhinitis, we divided 20 female BALB/c mice aged 8-10 weeks into nonallergic (intraperitoneally sensitized and intranasally challenged to normal saline), allergic (intraperitoneally sensitized and intranasally challenged to ovalbumin), and 200- and 400-mg/kg benzaldehyde (allergic but treated) groups. The number of nose-scratching events in 10 min, levels of total and ovalbumin-specific IgE in serum, differential counts of inflammatory cells in bronchoalveolar lavage (BAL) fluid, titers of Th2 cytokines (IL-4, IL-5, IL-13) in BAL fluid, histopathologic findings of lung and nasal tissues, and expressions of proteins involved in apoptosis (Bcl-2, Bax, caspase-3), inflammation (COX-2), antioxidation (extracellular SOD, HO-1), and hypoxia (HIF-1α, VEGF) in lung tissue were evaluated. The treated mice had significantly fewer nose-scratching events, less inflammatory cell infiltration in lung and nasal tissues, and lower HIF-1α and VEGF expressions in lung tissue than the allergic group. The number of eosinophils and neutrophils and Th2 cytokine titers in BAL fluid significantly decreased after the treatment (P<0.05). These results imply that oral benzaldehyde exerts antiallergic effects in murine allergic asthma and rhinitis, possibly through inhibition of HIF-1α and VEGF.

  1. Aluminium and the human breast.

    PubMed

    Darbre, P D

    2016-06-01

    The human population is exposed to aluminium (Al) from diet, antacids and vaccine adjuvants, but frequent application of Al-based salts to the underarm as antiperspirant adds a high additional exposure directly to the local area of the human breast. Coincidentally the upper outer quadrant of the breast is where there is also a disproportionately high incidence of breast cysts and breast cancer. Al has been measured in human breast tissues/fluids at higher levels than in blood, and experimental evidence suggests that at physiologically relevant concentrations, Al can adversely impact on human breast epithelial cell biology. Gross cystic breast disease is the most common benign disorder of the breast and evidence is presented that Al may be a causative factor in formation of breast cysts. Evidence is also reviewed that Al can enable the development of multiple hallmarks associated with cancer in breast cells, in particular that it can cause genomic instability and inappropriate proliferation in human breast epithelial cells, and can increase migration and invasion of human breast cancer cells. In addition, Al is a metalloestrogen and oestrogen is a risk factor for breast cancer known to influence multiple hallmarks. The microenvironment is established as another determinant of breast cancer development and Al has been shown to cause adverse alterations to the breast microenvironment. If current usage patterns of Al-based antiperspirant salts contribute to causation of breast cysts and breast cancer, then reduction in exposure would offer a strategy for prevention, and regulatory review is now justified. PMID:26997127

  2. Contralateral breast dose from partial breast brachytherapy.

    PubMed

    Robinson, R Cole; Nelson, Christopher L; Bloom, Elizabeth S; Kisling, Kelly D; Mason, Bryan E; Fisher, Gary D; Kirsner, Steven M

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine the dose to the contralateral breast during accelerated partial breast irradiation (APBI) and to compare it to external beam-published values. Thermoluminescent dosimeter (TLD) packets were used to measure the dose to the most medial aspect of the contralateral breast during APBI simulation, daily quality assurance (QA), and treatment. All patients in this study were treated with a single-entry, multicatheter device for 10 fractions to a total dose of 34 Gy. A mark was placed on the patient's skin on the medial aspect of the opposite breast. Three TLD packets were taped to this mark during the pretreatment simulation. Simulations consisted of an AP and Lateral scout and a limited axial scan encompassing the lumpectomy cavity (miniscan), if rotation was a concern. After the simulation the TLD packets were removed and the patients were moved to the high-dose-rate (HDR) vault where three new TLD packets were taped onto the patients at the skin mark. Treatment was administered with a Nucletron HDR afterloader using Iridium-192 as the treatment source. Post-treatment, TLDs were read (along with the simulation and QA TLD and a set of standards exposed to a known dose of 6 MV photons). Measurements indicate an average total dose to the contralateral breast of 70 cGy for outer quadrant implants and 181 cGy for inner quadrant implants. Compared to external beam breast tangents, these results point to less dose being delivered to the contralateral breast when using APBI. PMID:26699549

  3. Free Rhodium (II) citrate and rhodium (II) citrate magnetic carriers as potential strategies for breast cancer therapy

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Rhodium (II) citrate (Rh2(H2cit)4) has significant antitumor, cytotoxic, and cytostatic activity on Ehrlich ascite tumor. Although toxic to normal cells, its lower toxicity when compared to carboxylate analogues of rhodium (II) indicates Rh2(H2cit)4 as a promising agent for chemotherapy. Nevertheless, few studies have been performed to explore this potential. Superparamagnetic particles of iron oxide (SPIOs) represent an attractive platform as carriers in drug delivery systems (DDS) because they can present greater specificity to tumor cells than normal cells. Thus, the association between Rh2(H2cit)4 and SPIOs can represent a strategy to enhance the former's therapeutic action. In this work, we report the cytotoxicity of free rhodium (II) citrate (Rh2(H2cit)4) and rhodium (II) citrate-loaded maghemite nanoparticles or magnetoliposomes, used as drug delivery systems, on both normal and carcinoma breast cell cultures. Results Treatment with free Rh2(H2cit)4 induced cytotoxicity that was dependent on dose, time, and cell line. The IC50 values showed that this effect was more intense on breast normal cells (MCF-10A) than on breast carcinoma cells (MCF-7 and 4T1). However, the treatment with 50 μM Rh2(H2cit)4-loaded maghemite nanoparticles (Magh-Rh2(H2cit)4) and Rh2(H2cit)4-loaded magnetoliposomes (Lip-Magh-Rh2(H2cit)4) induced a higher cytotoxicity on MCF-7 and 4T1 than on MCF-10A (p < 0.05). These treatments enhanced cytotoxicity up to 4.6 times. These cytotoxic effects, induced by free Rh2(H2cit)4, were evidenced by morphological alterations such as nuclear fragmentation, membrane blebbing and phosphatidylserine exposure, reduction of actin filaments, mitochondrial condensation and an increase in number of vacuoles, suggesting that Rh2(H2cit)4 induces cell death by apoptosis. Conclusions The treatment with rhodium (II) citrate-loaded maghemite nanoparticles and magnetoliposomes induced more specific cytotoxicity on breast carcinoma cells than on breast

  4. Synchronous bilateral breast cancer in a male

    PubMed Central

    Rubio Hernández, María Caridad; Díaz Prado, Yenia Ivet; Pérez, Suanly Rodríguez; Díaz, Ronald Rodríguez; Aleaga, Zaili Gutiérrez

    2013-01-01

    Male breast cancer, which represents only 1% of all breast cancers, is occasionally associated with a family history of breast cancer. Sporadic male breast cancers presenting with another primary breast cancer are extremely rare. In this article, we report on a 70-year-old male patient with bilateral multifocal and synchronous breast cancer and without a family history of breast cancer. PMID:24319497

  5. Overview of Genetically Engineered Mouse Models of Breast Cancer Used in Translational Biology and Drug Development.

    PubMed

    Greenow, Kirsty R; Smalley, Matthew J

    2015-01-01

    Breast cancer is a heterogeneous condition with no single standard of treatment and no definitive method for determining whether a tumor will respond to therapy. The development of murine models that faithfully mimic specific human breast cancer subtypes is critical for the development of patient-specific treatments. While the artificial nature of traditional in vivo xenograft models used to characterize novel anticancer treatments has limited clinical predictive value, the development of genetically engineered mouse models (GEMMs) makes it possible to study the therapeutic responses in an intact microenvironment. GEMMs have proven to be an experimentally tractable platform for evaluating the efficacy of novel therapeutic combinations and for defining the mechanisms of acquired resistance. Described in this overview are several of the more popular breast cancer GEMMs, including details on their value in elucidating the molecular mechanisms of this disorder.

  6. Murine erythropoietin gene: cloning, expression, and human gene homology.

    PubMed Central

    Shoemaker, C B; Mitsock, L D

    1986-01-01

    The gene for murine erythropoietin (EPO) was isolated from a mouse genomic library with a human EPO cDNA probe. Nucleotide sequence analysis permitted the identification of the murine EPO coding sequence and the prediction of the encoded amino acid sequence based on sequence conservation between the mouse and human EPO genes. Both the coding DNA and the amino acid sequences were 80% conserved between the two species. Transformation of COS-1 cells with a mammalian cell expression vector containing the murine EPO coding region resulted in secretion of murine EPO with biological activity on both murine and human erythroid progenitor cells. The transcription start site for the murine EPO gene in kidneys was determined. This permitted tentative identification of the transcription control region. The region included 140 base pairs upstream of the cap site which was over 90% conserved between the murine and human genes. Surprisingly, the first intron and much of the 5'- and 3'-untranslated sequences were also substantially conserved between the genes of the two species. Images PMID:3773894

  7. Breast-feeding multiples.

    PubMed

    Flidel-Rimon, O; Shinwell, E S

    2002-06-01

    Human breast milk is the best nutrition for human infants. Its advantages over the milk of other species, such as cows, include both a reduced risk for infections, allergies and chronic diseases, together with the full nutritional requirements for growth and development. Breast-feeding is as important for multiples as for singletons. Despite the advantages, multiples receive less breast-feeding than singletons. Common reasons for not breast-feeding multiples include the fear of not fulfilling the infants' needs and the difficulty of coping with the demands on the mother's time. In addition, many multiples are delivered prematurely and by Caesarean section. Maternal pain and discomfort together with anxiety over the infants' condition are not conducive to successful breast-feeding. During lactation, the mother needs to add calories to her daily diet. It has been recommended to add approximately 500-600 kcal/day for each infant. Thus, between eating, nursing and sleeping, life is very busy for the mother of multiples. However, there is evidence that, with appropriate nutrition, one mother can nourish more than one infant. Also, simultaneous breast-feeding can save much time. Combined efforts of parents, close family, friends and the medical team can help to make either full or partial breast-feeding of multiples possible. However, when breast-feeding is not possible, health care workers need to carefully avoid judgmental approaches that may induce feelings of guilt.

  8. BREAST CANCER AND EXERCISE

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2008-03-19

    Prevent Osteoporosis and Osteoporotic Fractures; Improve Quality of Life; Improve Weight Control, and Muscular and Cardiovascular Fitness; Help the Patients to Return to Working Life; Reduce the Risk of Breast Cancer Recurrence; Prevent Other Diseases and Reduce All-Cause Mortality in Patients With Primary Breast Cancer.

  9. Breast reconstruction - natural tissue

    MedlinePlus

    ... muscle flap; TRAM; Latissimus muscle flap with a breast implant; DIEP flap; DIEAP flap; Gluteal free flap; ... If you are having breast reconstruction at the same time as mastectomy, the surgeon may do either of the following: Skin-sparing mastectomy. This means ...

  10. Androgens and the breast.

    PubMed

    Dimitrakakis, Constantine; Bondy, Carolyn

    2009-01-01

    Androgens have important physiological effects in women while at the same time they may be implicated in breast cancer pathologies. However, data on the effects of androgens on mammary epithelial proliferation and/or breast cancer incidence are not in full agreement. We performed a literature review evaluating current clinical, genetic and epidemiological data regarding the role of androgens in mammary growth and neoplasia. Epidemiological studies appear to have significant methodological limitations and thus provide inconclusive results. The study of molecular defects involving androgenic pathways in breast cancer is still in its infancy. Clinical and nonhuman primate studies suggest that androgens inhibit mammary epithelial proliferation and breast growth while conventional estrogen treatment suppresses endogenous androgens. Abundant clinical evidence suggests that androgens normally inhibit mammary epithelial proliferation and breast growth. Suppression of androgens using conventional estrogen treatment may thus enhance estrogenic breast stimulation and possibly breast cancer risk. Addition of testosterone to the usual hormone therapy regimen may diminish the estrogen/progestin increase in breast cancer risk but the impact of this combined use on mammary gland homeostasis still needs evaluation.

  11. Androgens and the breast

    PubMed Central

    2009-01-01

    Androgens have important physiological effects in women while at the same time they may be implicated in breast cancer pathologies. However, data on the effects of androgens on mammary epithelial proliferation and/or breast cancer incidence are not in full agreement. We performed a literature review evaluating current clinical, genetic and epidemiological data regarding the role of androgens in mammary growth and neoplasia. Epidemiological studies appear to have significant methodological limitations and thus provide inconclusive results. The study of molecular defects involving androgenic pathways in breast cancer is still in its infancy. Clinical and nonhuman primate studies suggest that androgens inhibit mammary epithelial proliferation and breast growth while conventional estrogen treatment suppresses endogenous androgens. Abundant clinical evidence suggests that androgens normally inhibit mammary epithelial proliferation and breast growth. Suppression of androgens using conventional estrogen treatment may thus enhance estrogenic breast stimulation and possibly breast cancer risk. Addition of testosterone to the usual hormone therapy regimen may diminish the estrogen/progestin increase in breast cancer risk but the impact of this combined use on mammary gland homeostasis still needs evaluation. PMID:19889198

  12. Digital breast tomosynthesis with minimal breast compression

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Scaduto, David A.; Yang, Min; Ripton-Snyder, Jennifer; Fisher, Paul R.; Zhao, Wei

    2015-03-01

    Breast compression is utilized in mammography to improve image quality and reduce radiation dose. Lesion conspicuity is improved by reducing scatter effects on contrast and by reducing the superposition of tissue structures. However, patient discomfort due to breast compression has been cited as a potential cause of noncompliance with recommended screening practices. Further, compression may also occlude blood flow in the breast, complicating imaging with intravenous contrast agents and preventing accurate quantification of contrast enhancement and kinetics. Previous studies have investigated reducing breast compression in planar mammography and digital breast tomosynthesis (DBT), though this typically comes at the expense of degradation in image quality or increase in mean glandular dose (MGD). We propose to optimize the image acquisition technique for reduced compression in DBT without compromising image quality or increasing MGD. A zero-frequency signal-difference-to-noise ratio model is employed to investigate the relationship between tube potential, SDNR and MGD. Phantom and patient images are acquired on a prototype DBT system using the optimized imaging parameters and are assessed for image quality and lesion conspicuity. A preliminary assessment of patient motion during DBT with minimal compression is presented.

  13. Expression and function of the protein tyrosine phosphatase receptor J (PTPRJ) in normal mammary epithelial cells and breast tumors.

    PubMed

    Smart, Chanel E; Askarian Amiri, Marjan E; Wronski, Ania; Dinger, Marcel E; Crawford, Joanna; Ovchinnikov, Dmitry A; Vargas, Ana Cristina; Reid, Lynne; Simpson, Peter T; Song, Sarah; Wiesner, Christiane; French, Juliet D; Dave, Richa K; da Silva, Leonard; Purdon, Amy; Andrew, Megan; Mattick, John S; Lakhani, Sunil R; Brown, Melissa A; Kellie, Stuart

    2012-01-01

    The protein tyrosine phosphatase receptor J, PTPRJ, is a tumor suppressor gene that has been implicated in a range of cancers, including breast cancer, yet little is known about its role in normal breast physiology or in mammary gland tumorigenesis. In this paper we show that PTPRJ mRNA is expressed in normal breast tissue and reduced in corresponding tumors. Meta-analysis revealed that the gene encoding PTPRJ is frequently lost in breast tumors and that low expression of the transcript associated with poorer overall survival at 20 years. Immunohistochemistry of PTPRJ protein in normal human breast tissue revealed a distinctive apical localisation in the luminal cells of alveoli and ducts. Qualitative analysis of a cohort of invasive ductal carcinomas revealed retention of normal apical PTPRJ localization where tubule formation was maintained but that tumors mostly exhibited diffuse cytoplasmic staining, indicating that dysregulation of localisation associated with loss of tissue architecture in tumorigenesis. The murine ortholog, Ptprj, exhibited a similar localisation in normal mammary gland, and was differentially regulated throughout lactational development, and in an in vitro model of mammary epithelial differentiation. Furthermore, ectopic expression of human PTPRJ in HC11 murine mammary epithelial cells inhibited dome formation. These data indicate that PTPRJ may regulate differentiation of normal mammary epithelia and that dysregulation of protein localisation may be associated with tumorigenesis.

  14. Breast Cancer and Bone Loss

    MedlinePlus

    ... Balance › Breast Cancer and Bone Loss Fact Sheet Breast Cancer and Bone Loss July, 2010 Download PDFs English ... JoAnn Pinkerton, MD What is the link between breast cancer and bone loss? Certain treatments for breast cancer ...

  15. Sinomenine inhibits breast cancer cell invasion and migration by suppressing NF-κB activation mediated by IL-4/miR-324-5p/CUEDC2 axis

    SciTech Connect

    Song, Lingqin; Liu, Di; Zhao, Yang; He, Jianjun; Kang, Huafeng; Dai, Zhijun; Wang, Xijing; Zhang, Shuqun; Zan, Ying

    2015-08-28

    Nuclear factor kappa-light-chain-enhancer of activated B cells (NF-κB) is a vital transcription factor that regulates multiple important biological processes, including the epithelial–mesenchymal transition (EMT) and metastasis of breast cancer. Sinomenine is an isoquinoline well known for its remarkable curative effect on rheumatic and arthritic diseases and can induce apoptosis of several cancer cell types. Recently, sinomenine was reported as a tumor suppressor via inhibiting cell proliferation and inducing apoptosis. However, the role and mechanism of sinomenine in invasion and metastasis of breast cancer are largely unknown. Here, we report that sinomenine suppressed the invasion and migration of MDA-MB-231 and 4T1 breast cancer cells in a dose-dependent manner. We detected binding of NF-κB to the inhibitor of NF-κB (IκB) after the MDA-MB-231 cells were treated with 0.25, 0.5, and 1 mM sinomenine. Co-IP analysis revealed that sinomenine enhanced the binding of NF-κB and IκB in a dose-dependent manner, suggesting that sinomenine had an effect on inactivation of NF-κB. Western blotting and ELISA approaches indicated that the suppression effect was closely associated with the phosphorylation of IκB kinase (IKK) and its negative regulator CUEDC2. Sinomenine treatment decreased miR-324-5p expression, thus increased the level of its target gene CUEDC2, and then blocked the phosphorylation of IKK through altering the upstream axis. Finally, transfection of a miR-324-5p mimic inhibited the suppression of invasion and metastasis of MDA-MB-231 and 4T1 cell by sinomenine, providing evidence that sinomenine treatment suppressed breast cancer cell invasion and metastasis via regulation of the IL4/miR-324-5p/CUEDC2 axis. Our findings reveal a novel mechanism by which sinomenine suppresses cancer cell invasion and metastasis, i.e., blocking NF-κB activation. - Highlights: • Sinomenine reduced invasion and migration of MDA-MB-231 and 4T1 breast cancer cells.

  16. Women with Disabilities and Breast Cancer Screening

    MedlinePlus

    ... and Reasonable Accommodations (RA) Women with Disabilities and Breast Cancer Screening Recommend on Facebook Tweet Share Compartir Finding Breast Cancer Early Can Save Lives Disabilities & Breast Cancer Screening ...

  17. The DNA cytosine deaminase APOBEC3B promotes tamoxifen resistance in ER-positive breast cancer

    PubMed Central

    Law, Emily K.; Sieuwerts, Anieta M.; LaPara, Kelly; Leonard, Brandon; Starrett, Gabriel J.; Molan, Amy M.; Temiz, Nuri A.; Vogel, Rachel Isaksson; Meijer-van Gelder, Marion E.; Sweep, Fred C. G. J.; Span, Paul N.; Foekens, John A.; Martens, John W. M.; Yee, Douglas; Harris, Reuben S.

    2016-01-01

    Breast tumors often display extreme genetic heterogeneity characterized by hundreds of gross chromosomal aberrations and tens of thousands of somatic mutations. Tumor evolution is thought to be ongoing and driven by multiple mutagenic processes. A major outstanding question is whether primary tumors have preexisting mutations for therapy resistance or whether additional DNA damage and mutagenesis are necessary. Drug resistance is a key measure of tumor evolvability. If a resistance mutation preexists at the time of primary tumor presentation, then the intended therapy is likely to fail. However, if resistance does not preexist, then ongoing mutational processes still have the potential to undermine therapeutic efficacy. The antiviral enzyme APOBEC3B (apolipoprotein B mRNA-editing enzyme, catalytic polypeptide-like 3B) preferentially deaminates DNA C-to-U, which results in signature C-to-T and C-to-G mutations commonly observed in breast tumors. We use clinical data and xenograft experiments to ask whether APOBEC3B contributes to ongoing breast tumor evolution and resistance to the selective estrogen receptor modulator, tamoxifen. First, APOBEC3B levels in primary estrogen receptor–positive (ER+) breast tumors inversely correlate with the clinical benefit of tamoxifen in the treatment of metastatic ER+ disease. Second, APOBEC3B depletion in an ER+ breast cancer cell line results in prolonged tamoxifen responses in murine xenograft experiments. Third, APOBEC3B overexpression accelerates the development of tamoxifen resistance in murine xenograft experiments by a mechanism that requires the enzyme’s catalytic activity. These studies combine to indicate that APOBEC3B promotes drug resistance in breast cancer and that inhibiting APOBEC3B-dependent tumor evolvability may be an effective strategy to improve efficacies of targeted cancer therapies. PMID:27730215

  18. Cutaneous manifestations of breast cancer.

    PubMed

    Tan, Antoinette R

    2016-06-01

    Breast cancer may present with cutaneous symptoms. The skin manifestations of breast cancer are varied. Some of the more common clinical presentations of metastatic cutaneous lesions from breast cancer will be described. Paraneoplastic cutaneous dermatoses have been reported as markers of breast malignancy and include erythema gyratum repens, acquired ichthyosis, dermatomyositis, multicentric reticulohistiocytosis, and hypertrichosis lanuginosa acquisita. Mammary Paget's disease, often associated with an underlying breast cancer, and Cowden syndrome, which has an increased risk of breast malignancy, each have specific dermatologic findings. Recognition of these distinct cutaneous signs is important in the investigation of either newly diagnosed or recurrent breast cancer. PMID:27178684

  19. Ranitidine modifies myeloid cell populations and inhibits breast tumor development and spread in mice.

    PubMed

    Vila-Leahey, Ava; Oldford, Sharon A; Marignani, Paola A; Wang, Jun; Haidl, Ian D; Marshall, Jean S

    2016-07-01

    Histamine receptor 2 (H2) antagonists are widely used clinically for the control of gastrointestinal symptoms, but also impact immune function. They have been reported to reduce tumor growth in established colon and lung cancer models. Histamine has also been reported to modify populations of myeloid-derived suppressor cells (MDSCs). We have examined the impact of the widely used H2 antagonist ranitidine, on both myeloid cell populations and tumor development and spread, in three distinct models of breast cancer that highlight different stages of cancer progression. Oral ranitidine treatment significantly decreased the monocytic MDSC population in the spleen and bone marrow both alone and in the context of an orthotopic breast tumor model. H2 antagonists ranitidine and famotidine, but not H1 or H4 antagonists, significantly inhibited lung metastasis in the 4T1 model. In the E0771 model, ranitidine decreased primary tumor growth while omeprazole treatment had no impact on tumor development. Gemcitabine treatment prevented the tumor growth inhibition associated with ranitidine treatment. In keeping with ranitidine-induced changes in myeloid cell populations in non-tumor-bearing mice, ranitidine also delayed the onset of spontaneous tumor development, and decreased the number of tumors that developed in LKB1(-/-)/NIC mice. These results indicate that ranitidine alters monocyte populations associated with MDSC activity, and subsequently impacts breast tumor development and outcome. Ranitidine has potential as an adjuvant therapy or preventative agent in breast cancer and provides a novel and safe approach to the long-term reduction of tumor-associated immune suppression. PMID:27622015

  20. Ranitidine modifies myeloid cell populations and inhibits breast tumor development and spread in mice

    PubMed Central

    Vila-Leahey, Ava; Oldford, Sharon A.; Marignani, Paola A.; Wang, Jun; Haidl, Ian D.; Marshall, Jean S.

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Histamine receptor 2 (H2) antagonists are widely used clinically for the control of gastrointestinal symptoms, but also impact immune function. They have been reported to reduce tumor growth in established colon and lung cancer models. Histamine has also been reported to modify populations of myeloid-derived suppressor cells (MDSCs). We have examined the impact of the widely used H2 antagonist ranitidine, on both myeloid cell populations and tumor development and spread, in three distinct models of breast cancer that highlight different stages of cancer progression. Oral ranitidine treatment significantly decreased the monocytic MDSC population in the spleen and bone marrow both alone and in the context of an orthotopic breast tumor model. H2 antagonists ranitidine and famotidine, but not H1 or H4 antagonists, significantly inhibited lung metastasis in the 4T1 model. In the E0771 model, ranitidine decreased primary tumor growth while omeprazole treatment had no impact on tumor development. Gemcitabine treatment prevented the tumor growth inhibition associated with ranitidine treatment. In keeping with ranitidine-induced changes in myeloid cell populations in non-tumor-bearing mice, ranitidine also delayed the onset of spontaneous tumor development, and decreased the number of tumors that developed in LKB1−/−/NIC mice. These results indicate that ranitidine alters monocyte populations associated with MDSC activity, and subsequently impacts breast tumor development and outcome. Ranitidine has potential as an adjuvant therapy or preventative agent in breast cancer and provides a novel and safe approach to the long-term reduction of tumor-associated immune suppression. PMID:27622015

  1. Ranitidine modifies myeloid cell populations and inhibits breast tumor development and spread in mice

    PubMed Central

    Vila-Leahey, Ava; Oldford, Sharon A.; Marignani, Paola A.; Wang, Jun; Haidl, Ian D.; Marshall, Jean S.

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Histamine receptor 2 (H2) antagonists are widely used clinically for the control of gastrointestinal symptoms, but also impact immune function. They have been reported to reduce tumor growth in established colon and lung cancer models. Histamine has also been reported to modify populations of myeloid-derived suppressor cells (MDSCs). We have examined the impact of the widely used H2 antagonist ranitidine, on both myeloid cell populations and tumor development and spread, in three distinct models of breast cancer that highlight different stages of cancer progression. Oral ranitidine treatment significantly decreased the monocytic MDSC population in the spleen and bone marrow both alone and in the context of an orthotopic breast tumor model. H2 antagonists ranitidine and famotidine, but not H1 or H4 antagonists, significantly inhibited lung metastasis in the 4T1 model. In the E0771 model, ranitidine decreased primary tumor growth while omeprazole treatment had no impact on tumor development. Gemcitabine treatment prevented the tumor growth inhibition associated with ranitidine treatment. In keeping with ranitidine-induced changes in myeloid cell populations in non-tumor-bearing mice, ranitidine also delayed the onset of spontaneous tumor development, and decreased the number of tumors that developed in LKB1−/−/NIC mice. These results indicate that ranitidine alters monocyte populations associated with MDSC activity, and subsequently impacts breast tumor development and outcome. Ranitidine has potential as an adjuvant therapy or preventative agent in breast cancer and provides a novel and safe approach to the long-term reduction of tumor-associated immune suppression.

  2. Isolation and culture of murine macrophages.

    PubMed

    Davies, John Q; Gordon, Siamon

    2005-01-01

    The two most convenient sources of primary murine macrophages are the bone marrow and the peritoneal cavity. Resident peritoneal macrophages can readily be harvested from mice and purified by adherence to tissue culture plastic. The injection of Bio-Gel polyacrylamide beads or thioglycollate broth into the peritoneal cavity produces an inflammatory response allowing the purification of large numbers of elicited macrophages. The production of an activated macrophage population can be achieved by using Bacillus-Calmette-Guerin as the inflammatory stimulus. Resident bone marrow macrophages can be isolated following enzymatic separation of cells from bone marrow plugs and enrichment on 30% fetal calf serum containing medium or Ficoll-Hypaque gradients. Bone marrow-derived macrophages can be produced by differentiating nonadherent macrophage precursors with medium containing macrophage colony-stimulating factor.

  3. Extracellular proteolysis in the adult murine brain.

    PubMed

    Sappino, A P; Madani, R; Huarte, J; Belin, D; Kiss, J Z; Wohlwend, A; Vassalli, J D

    1993-08-01

    Plasminogen activators are important mediators of extracellular metabolism. In the nervous system, plasminogen activators are thought to be involved in the remodeling events required for cell migration during development and regeneration. We have now explored the expression of the plasminogen activator/plasmin system in the adult murine central nervous system. Tissue-type plasminogen activator is synthesized by neurons of most brain regions, while prominent tissue-type plasminogen activator-catalyzed proteolysis is restricted to discrete areas, in particular within the hippocampus and hypothalamus. Our observations indicate that tissue-type plasminogen activator-catalyzed proteolysis in neural tissues is not limited to ontogeny, but may also contribute to adult central nervous system physiology, for instance by influencing neuronal plasticity and synaptic reorganization. The identification of an extracellular proteolytic system active in the adult central nervous system may also help gain insights into the pathogeny of neurodegenerative disorders associated with extracellular protein deposition.

  4. Vandetanib as a potential new treatment for estrogen receptor-negative breast cancers.

    PubMed

    Hatem, Rana; Labiod, Dalila; Château-Joubert, Sophie; de Plater, Ludmilla; El Botty, Rania; Vacher, Sophie; Bonin, Florian; Servely, Jean-Luc; Dieras, Véronique; Bièche, Ivan; Marangoni, Elisabetta

    2016-05-15

    The receptor tyrosine kinase RET is implicated in the progression of luminal breast cancers (BC) but its role in estrogen receptor (ER) negative tumors is unknown. Here we investigated the expression of RET in breast cancer patients tumors and patient-derived xenografts (PDX) and evaluated the therapeutic potential of Vandetanib, a tyrosin kinase inhibitor with strong activity against RET, EGFR and VEGFR2, in ER negative breast cancer PDX. The RT-PCR analysis of RET expression in breast tumors of 446 patients and 57 PDX, showed elevated levels of RET in ER+ and HER2+ subtypes and in a small subgroup of triple-negative breast cancers (TNBC). The activity of Vandetanib was tested in vivo in three PDX models of TNBC and one model of HER2+ BC with different expression levels of RET and EGFR. Vandetanib induced tumor regression in PDX models with high expression of RET or EGFR. The effect was associated with inhibition of RET/EGFR phosphorylation and MAP kinase pathway and increased necrosis. In a PDX model with no expression of RET nor EGFR, Vandetanib slowed tumor growth without inducing tumor regression. In addition, treatment by Vandetanib decreased expression of murine Vegf receptors and the endothelial marker Cd31 in the four PDX models tested, suggesting inhibition of tumor vascularization. In summary, these preclinical results suggest that Vandetanib treatment could be useful for patients with ER negative breast cancers overexpressing Vandetanib's main targets.

  5. Downregulated miR-45 Inhibits the G1-S Phase Transition by Targeting Bmi-1 in Breast Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Lan; Liu, Jun-Ling; Yu, Liang; Liu, Xiang-Xia; Wu, Hong-Mei; Lei, Fang-Yong; Wu, Shu; Wang, Xi

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Bmi-1 (B cell-specific Moloney murine leukemia virus integration site 1) is upregulated in breast cancer and was involved in many malignant progressions of breast cells, including cell proliferation, stem cell pluripotency, and cancer initiation. However, the epigenetic regulatory mechanism of Bmi-1 in breast cancer remains unclear. After analysis of the ArrayExpress dataset GSE45666, we comparatively detected the expression levels of miR-495 in 9 examined breast cancer cell lines, normal breast epithelial cells and 8 pairs of fresh clinical tumor samples. Furthermore, to evaluate the effect of miR-495 on the progression of breast cancer, MCF-7 and MDA-MB-231 were transduced to stably overexpress miR-495. The 3-(4,5-dimethyl-2-thiazolyl)-2,5-diphenyl-2-H-tetrazolium bromide assay, colony formation assays, 5-Bromo-2-deoxyUridine labeling and immunofluorescence, anchorage-independent growth ability assay, flow cytometry analysis, and luciferase assays were used to test the effect of miR-495 in MCF-7 and MDA-MB-231 cells in vitro. Xenografted tumor model was also used to evaluate the effect of miR-495 in breast cancer. Herein, we found that miR-495, a predicted regulator of Bmi-1, was frequently downregulated in malignant cells and tissues of breast. Upregulation of miR-495 significantly suppressed breast cancer cell proliferation and tumorigenicity via G1-S arrest. Further analysis revealed that miR-495 targeted Bmi-1 through its 3′ untranslated region. Moreover, Bmi-1 could neutralize the suppressive effect of miR-495 on cell proliferation and tumorigenicity of breast cancer in vivo. These data suggested that miR-495 could inhibit the G1-S phase transition that leads to proliferation and tumorigenicity inhibition by targeting and suppressing Bmi-1 in breast cancer. PMID:26020378

  6. Breast Tumor Targetable Fe3O4 Embedded Thermo-Responsive Nanoparticles for Radiofrequency Assisted Drug Delivery.

    PubMed

    Rejinold, N Sanoj; Thomas, Reju George; Muthiah, Muthunarayanan; Lee, Hwa Jeongong; Jeong, Yong Yeon; Park, In-kyu; Jayakumar, R

    2016-01-01

    Non-invasive radiofrequency (RF) frequency may be utilized as an energy source to activate thermo-responsive nanoparticles for the controlled local delivery of drugs to cancer cells. Herein, we demonstrate that 180 ± 20 nm sized curcumin encapsulated chitosan-graft-poly(N-vinyl caprolactam) nanoparticles containing iron oxide nanoparticles (Fe3O4-CRC-TRC-NPs) were selectively internalized in cancer cells in vivo. Using an RF treatment at 80 watts for 2 min, Fe3O4-CRC-TRC-NPs, dissipated heat energy of 42 degrees C, which is the lower critical solution temperature (LCST) of the chitosan-graft-poly(N-vinyl caprolactam), causing controlled curcumin release and apoptosis to cultured 4T1 breast cancer cells. Further, the tumor localization studies on orthotopic breast cancer model revealed that Fe3O4-CRC-TRC-NPs selectively accumulated at the primary tumor as confirmed by in vivo live imaging followed by ex vivo tissue imaging and HPLC studies. These initial results strongly support the development of RF assisted drug delivery from nanoparticles for improved tumor targeting for breast cancer treatment. PMID:27301171

  7. CD44-Tropic Polymeric Nanocarrier for Breast Cancer Targeted Rapamycin Chemotherapy

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Yunqi; Zhang, Ti; Duan, Shaofeng; Davies, Neal M.; Forrest, M. Laird

    2014-01-01

    In contrast with the conventional targeting of nanoparticles to cancer cells with antibody or peptide conjugates, a hyaluronic acid (HA) matrix nanoparticle with intrinsic-CD44-tropism was developed to deliver rapamycin for localized CD44-positive breast cancer treatment. Rapamycin was chemically conjugated to the particle surface via a novel sustained-release linker, 3-amino-4-methoxy-benzoic acid. The release of the drug from the HA nanoparticle was improved by 42-fold compared to HA-temsirolimus in buffered saline. In CD44 positive MDA-MB-468 cells, using HA as drug delivery carrier, the cell-viability was significantly decreased compared to free rapamycin and CD44-blocked controls. Rat pharmacokinetics showed that the area-under-the-curve of HA nanoparticle formulation was 2.96-fold greater than that of the free drug, and the concomitant total body clearance was 8.82-fold slower. Moreover, in immunocompetent BALB/c mice bearing CD44-positive 4T1.2neu breast cancer, the rapamycin1loaded HA particles significantly improved animal survival, suppressed tumor growth and reduced the prevalence of lung metastasis. PMID:24637218

  8. Omega-3 Fatty Acid in Treating Patients With Stage I-III Breast Cancer

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-03-17

    Ductal Breast Carcinoma in Situ; Lobular Breast Carcinoma in Situ; Male Breast Cancer; Stage IA Breast Cancer; Stage IB Breast Cancer; Stage II Breast Cancer; Stage IIIA Breast Cancer; Stage IIIB Breast Cancer; Stage IIIC Breast Cancer

  9. Novel microbial virulence factor triggers murine lyme arthritis.

    PubMed

    Yang, Xiuli; Qin, Jinhong; Promnares, Kamoltip; Kariu, Toru; Anderson, John F; Pal, Utpal

    2013-03-15

    Borrelia burgdorferi bba57 is a conserved gene encoding a potential lipoprotein of unknown function. Here we show that bba57 is up-regulated in vivo and is required for early murine infection and potential spirochete transmission process. Although BBA57 is dispensable for late murine infection, the mutants were unable to induce disease. We show that BBA57, an outer membrane and surface-exposed antigen, is a major trigger of murine Lyme arthritis; even in cases of larger challenge inocula, which allow their persistence in joints at a level similar to wild-type spirochetes, bba57 mutants are unable to induce joint inflammation. We further showed that BBA57 deficiency reduces the expression of selected "neutrophil-recruiting" chemokines and associated receptors, causing significant impairment of neutrophil chemotaxis. New approaches to combat Lyme disease may include strategies to interfere with BBA57, a novel virulence factor and a trigger of murine Lyme arthritis.

  10. Expansion of CD11b(+)Ly6G (+)Ly6C (int) cells driven by medroxyprogesterone acetate in mice bearing breast tumors restrains NK cell effector functions.

    PubMed

    Spallanzani, Raúl Germán; Dalotto-Moreno, Tomás; Raffo Iraolagoitia, Ximena Lucía; Ziblat, Andrea; Domaica, Carolina Inés; Avila, Damián Ezequiel; Rossi, Lucas Ezequiel; Fuertes, Mercedes Beatriz; Battistone, María Agustina; Rabinovich, Gabriel Adrián; Salatino, Mariana; Zwirner, Norberto Walter

    2013-12-01

    The progesterone analog medroxyprogesterone acetate (MPA) is widely used as a hormone replacement therapy in postmenopausal women and as contraceptive. However, prolonged administration of MPA is associated with increased incidence of breast cancer through ill-defined mechanisms. Here, we explored whether exposure to MPA during mammary tumor growth affects myeloid-derived suppressor cells (MDSCs; CD11b(+)Gr-1(+), mostly CD11b(+)Ly6G(+)Ly6C(int) and CD11b(+)Ly6G(-)Ly6C(high) cells) and natural killer (NK) cells, potentially restraining tumor immunosurveillance. We used the highly metastatic 4T1 breast tumor (which does not express the classical progesterone receptor and expands MDSCs) to challenge BALB/c mice in the absence or in the presence of MPA. We observed that MPA promoted the accumulation of NK cells in spleens of tumor-bearing mice, but with reduced degranulation ability and in vivo cytotoxic activity. Simultaneously, MPA induced a preferential expansion of CD11b(+)Ly6G(+)Ly6C(int) cells in spleen and bone marrow of 4T1 tumor-bearing mice. In vitro, MPA promoted nuclear mobilization of the glucocorticoid receptor (GR) in 4T1 cells and endowed these cells with the ability to promote a preferential differentiation of bone marrow cells into CD11b(+)Ly6G(+)Ly6C(int) cells that displayed suppressive activity on NK cell degranulation. Sorted CD11b(+)Gr-1(+) cells from MPA-treated tumor-bearing mice exhibited higher suppressive activity on NK cell degranulation than CD11b(+)Gr-1(+) cells from vehicle-treated tumor-bearing mice. Thus, MPA, acting through the GR, endows tumor cells with an enhanced capacity to expand CD11b(+)Ly6G(+)Ly6C(int) cells that subsequently display a stronger suppression of NK cell-mediated anti-tumor immunity. Our results describe an alternative mechanism by which MPA may affect immunosurveillance and have potential implication in breast cancer incidence. PMID:24114144

  11. PGC-1α supports glutamine metabolism in breast cancer

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Glutamine metabolism is a central metabolic pathway in cancer. Recently, reductive carboxylation of glutamine for lipogenesis has been shown to constitute a key anabolic route in cancer cells. However, little is known regarding central regulators of the various glutamine metabolic pathways in cancer cells. Methods The impact of PGC-1α and ERRα on glutamine enzyme expression was assessed in ERBB2+ breast cancer cell lines with quantitative RT-PCR, chromatin immunoprecipitation, and immunoblotting experiments. Glutamine flux was quantified using 13C-labeled glutamine and GC/MS analyses. Functional assays for lipogenesis were performed using 14C-labeled glutamine. The expression of glutamine metabolism genes in breast cancer patients was determined by bioinformatics analyses using The Cancer Genome Atlas. Results We show that the transcriptional coactivator PGC-1α, along with the transcription factor ERRα, is a positive regulator of the expression of glutamine metabolism genes in ERBB2+ breast cancer. Indeed, ERBB2+ breast cancer cells with increased expression of PGC-1α display elevated expression of glutamine metabolism genes. Furthermore, ERBB2+ breast cancer cells with reduced expression of PGC-1α or when treated with C29, a pharmacological inhibitor of ERRα, exhibit diminished expression of glutamine metabolism genes. The biological relevance of the control of glutamine metabolism genes by the PGC-1α/ERRα axis is demonstrated by consequent regulation of glutamine flux through the citric acid cycle. PGC-1α and ERRα regulate both the canonical citric acid cycle (forward) and the reductive carboxylation (reverse) fluxes; the latter can be used to support de novo lipogenesis reactions, most notably in hypoxic conditions. Importantly, murine and human ERBB2+ cells lines display a significant dependence on glutamine availability for their growth. Finally, we show that PGC-1α expression is positively correlated with that of the glutamine pathway

  12. Breast surface estimation for radar-based breast imaging systems.

    PubMed

    Williams, Trevor C; Sill, Jeff M; Fear, Elise C

    2008-06-01

    Radar-based microwave breast-imaging techniques typically require the antennas to be placed at a certain distance from or on the breast surface. This requires prior knowledge of the breast location, shape, and size. The method proposed in this paper for obtaining this information is based on a modified tissue sensing adaptive radar algorithm. First, a breast surface detection scan is performed. Data from this scan are used to localize the breast by creating an estimate of the breast surface. If required, the antennas may then be placed at specified distances from the breast surface for a second tumor-sensing scan. This paper introduces the breast surface estimation and antenna placement algorithms. Surface estimation and antenna placement results are demonstrated on three-dimensional breast models derived from magnetic resonance images.

  13. Intensity Modulated Accelerated Partial Breast Irradiation Before Surgery in Treating Older Patients With Hormone Responsive Stage 0-I Breast Cancer

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-05-04

    Ductal Breast Carcinoma in Situ; Estrogen Receptor-negative Breast Cancer; Estrogen Receptor-positive Breast Cancer; Invasive Ductal Breast Carcinoma; Invasive Ductal Breast Carcinoma With Predominant Intraductal Component; Lobular Breast Carcinoma in Situ; Medullary Ductal Breast Carcinoma With Lymphocytic Infiltrate; Mucinous Ductal Breast Carcinoma; Papillary Ductal Breast Carcinoma; Progesterone Receptor-positive Breast Cancer; Stage IA Breast Cancer; Stage IB Breast Cancer; Tubular Ductal Breast Carcinoma

  14. Targeting Breast Cancer Metastasis

    PubMed Central

    Jin, Xin; Mu, Ping

    2015-01-01

    Metastasis is the leading cause of breast cancer-associated deaths. Despite the significant improvement in current therapies in extending patient life, 30–40% of patients may eventually suffer from distant relapse and succumb to the disease. Consequently, a deeper understanding of the metastasis biology is key to developing better treatment strategies and achieving long-lasting therapeutic efficacies against breast cancer. This review covers recent breakthroughs in the discovery of various metastatic traits that contribute to the metastasis cascade of breast cancer, which may provide novel avenues for therapeutic targeting. PMID:26380552

  15. Management of Breast Sarcoma.

    PubMed

    Hsu, Cary; McCloskey, Susan A; Peddi, Parvin F

    2016-10-01

    Breast sarcomas are exceptionally rare mesenchymal neoplasms composed of many histologic subtypes. Therapy is guided by principles established in the management of extremity sarcomas. The anatomic site does influence treatment decisions, particularly the surgical management. Surgery should be undertaken with the aim of achieving a widely negative margin. Selected patients can be managed with breast-conserving surgery. Breast reconstruction is increasingly being undertaken for selected patients. Radiation therapy and chemotherapy are used selectively for large, high-grade sarcomas for which there is significant concern for local and distant recurrence. PMID:27542642

  16. General Information about Male Breast Cancer

    MedlinePlus

    ... Breast & Gynecologic Cancers Breast Cancer Screening Research Male Breast Cancer Treatment (PDQ®)–Patient Version General Information about Male Breast Cancer Go to Health Professional Version Key Points Male ...

  17. What Is Breast Cancer in Men?

    MedlinePlus

    ... statistics about breast cancer in men? What is breast cancer in men? A breast cancer is a malignant ... women but are very rare in men. General breast cancer terms Here are some of the key words ...

  18. Minimally Invasive Treatments for Breast Cancer

    MedlinePlus

    ... SIR login) Interventional Radiology Minimally Invasive Treatments for Breast Cancer Interventional Radiology Treatments Offer New Options and Hope ... have in the fight against breast cancer. About Breast Cancer When breast tissue divides and grows at an ...

  19. General Information about Breast Cancer and Pregnancy

    MedlinePlus

    ... of Breast & Gynecologic Cancers Breast Cancer Screening Research Breast Cancer Treatment and Pregnancy (PDQ®)–Patient Version General Information about Breast Cancer and Pregnancy Go to Health Professional Version Key ...

  20. Abortion, Miscarriage, and Breast Cancer Risk

    MedlinePlus

    ... Cancers Breast Cancer Screening Research Abortion, Miscarriage, and Breast Cancer Risk A woman’s hormone levels normally change throughout ... the development of breast cancer. Important Information about Breast Cancer Risk Factors At present, the factors known to ...

  1. Treatment Options for Male Breast Cancer

    MedlinePlus

    ... Breast & Gynecologic Cancers Breast Cancer Screening Research Male Breast Cancer Treatment (PDQ®)–Patient Version General Information about Male Breast Cancer Go to Health Professional Version Key Points Male ...

  2. Treatment Option Overview (Male Breast Cancer)

    MedlinePlus

    ... Breast & Gynecologic Cancers Breast Cancer Screening Research Male Breast Cancer Treatment (PDQ®)–Patient Version General Information about Male Breast Cancer Go to Health Professional Version Key Points Male ...

  3. Wide Variation Seen in 'Dense' Breast Diagnoses

    MedlinePlus

    ... defined mammography patients' breasts as dense. Higher breast density is a risk factor for breast cancer, experts ... could have implications for the so-called breast density notification laws that have been passed in about ...

  4. G-CSF regulates macrophage phenotype and associates with poor overall survival in human triple-negative breast cancer

    PubMed Central

    Hollmén, Maija; Karaman, Sinem; Schwager, Simon; Lisibach, Angela; Christiansen, Ailsa J.; Maksimow, Mikael; Varga, Zsuzsanna; Jalkanen, Sirpa; Detmar, Michael

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Tumor-associated macrophages (TAMs) have been implicated in the promotion of breast cancer growth and metastasis, and a strong infiltration by TAMs has been associated with estrogen receptor (ER)-negative tumors and poor prognosis. However, the molecular mechanisms behind these observations are unclear. We investigated macrophage activation in response to co-culture with several breast cancer cell lines (T47D, MCF-7, BT-474, SKBR-3, Cal-51 and MDA-MB-231) and found that high granulocyte colony-stimulating factor (G-CSF) secretion by the triple-negative breast cancer (TNBC) cell line MDA-MB-231 gave rise to immunosuppressive HLA-DRlo macrophages that promoted migration of breast cancer cells via secretion of TGF-α. In human breast cancer samples (n = 548), G-CSF was highly expressed in TNBC (p < 0.001) and associated with CD163+ macrophages (p < 0.0001), poorer overall survival (OS) (p = 0.021) and significantly increased numbers of TGF-α+ cells. While G-CSF blockade in the 4T1 mammary tumor model promoted maturation of MHCIIhi blood monocytes and TAMs and significantly reduced lung metastasis, anti-CSF-1R treatment promoted MHCIIloF4/80hiMRhi anti-inflammatory TAMs and enhanced lung metastasis in the presence of high G-CSF levels. Combined anti-G-CSF and anti-CSF-1R therapy significantly increased lymph node metastases, possibly via depletion of the so-called “gate-keeper” subcapsular sinus macrophages. These results indicate that G-CSF promotes the anti-inflammatory phenotype of tumor-induced macrophages when CSF-1R is inhibited and therefore caution against the use of M-CSF/CSF-1R targeting agents in tumors with high G-CSF expression. PMID:27141367

  5. CDDO-Me Redirects Activation of Breast Tumor Associated Macrophages

    PubMed Central

    Ball, Michael S.; Shipman, Emilie P.; Kim, Hyunjung; Liby, Karen T.; Pioli, Patricia A.

    2016-01-01

    Tumor-associated macrophages can account for up to 50% of the tumor mass in breast cancer patients and high TAM density is associated with poor clinical prognosis. Because TAMs enhance tumor growth, development, and metastatic potential, redirection of TAM activation may have significant therapeutic benefit. Our studies in primary human macrophages and murine breast TAMs suggest that the synthetic oleanane triterpenoid CDDO-methyl ester (CDDO-Me) reprograms the activation profile of TAMs from tumor-promoting to tumor-inhibiting. We show that CDDO-Me treatment inhibits expression of IL-10 and VEGF in stimulated human M2 macrophages and TAMs but increases expression of TNF-α and IL-6. Surface expression of CD206 and CD163, which are characteristic of M2 activation, is significantly attenuated by CDDO-Me. In contrast, CDDO-Me up-regulates surface expression of HLA-DR and CD80, which are markers of M1 activation, and importantly potentiates macrophage activation of autologous T cells but inhibits endothelial cell vascularization. These results show for the first time that CDDO-Me redirects activation of M2 macrophages and TAMs from immune-suppressive to immune-stimulatory, and implicate a role for CDDO-Me as an immunotherapeutic in the treatment of breast and potentially other types of cancer. PMID:26918785

  6. Breast reconstruction - implants

    MedlinePlus

    ... visits, your surgeon injects a small amount of saline (salt water) through the valve into the expander. ... breast implants. Implants may be filled with either saline or a silicone gel. You may have another ...

  7. [Epidemiology of breast cancer].

    PubMed

    Rodríguez Cuevas, Sergio A; Capurso García, Marino

    2006-11-01

    Breast cancer is the most frequent malignant tumor worldwide. In recent years there has been observed an increase in its frequency, especially in developing countries, as Mexico, where mortality is arriving to the first cause of death in females. This is, in part, due to a delayed diagnosis, most frequently done in locally advances stages with a low cure rate. This is a review of all risk factors: age, sex, personal and familial history, genetic syndromes, associated breast disease, geographic distribution, body structure and environmental, hormonal, reproductive and dietary factors. It is concluded that breast cancer is a public health problem in developed and developing countries, and the best methods to drop mortality for breast cancer is the wide use of screening mammography in women at risk, in order to find cancers at initial stages and offer the adequate treatment.

  8. Diphtheria toxin-based recombinant murine IL-2 fusion toxin for depleting murine regulatory T cells in vivo.

    PubMed

    Wei, Min; Marino, Jose; Trowell, Aaron; Zhang, Huiping; Stromp Peraino, Jaclyn; Rajasekera, Priyani V; Madsen, Joren C; Sachs, David H; Huang, Christene A; Benichou, Gilles; Wang, Zhirui

    2014-09-01

    Regulatory T cells (Tregs) are a subpopulation of CD4(+) T cells which suppress immune responses of effector cells and are known to play a very important role in protection against autoimmune disease development, induction of transplantation tolerance and suppression of effective immune response against tumor cells. An effective in vivo Treg depletion agent would facilitate Treg-associated studies across many research areas. In this study, we have developed diphtheria toxin-based monovalent and bivalent murine IL-2 fusion toxins for depleting murine IL-2 receptor positive cells including CD25(+) Treg in vivo. Their potencies were assessed by in vitro protein synthesis inhibition and cell proliferation inhibition assays using a murine CD25(+) CTLL-2 cell line. Surprisingly, in contrast to our previously developed recombinant fusion toxins, the monovalent isoform (DT390-mIL-2) was approximately 4-fold more potent than its bivalent counterpart (DT390-bi-mIL-2). Binding analysis by flow cytometry demonstrated that the monovalent isoform bound stronger than the bivalent version. In vivo Treg depletion with the monovalent murine IL-2 fusion toxin was performed using C57BL/6J (B6) mice. Spleen Treg were significantly depleted with a maximum reduction of ∼70% and detectable as early as 12 h after the last injection. The spleen Treg numbers were reduced until Day 3 and returned to control levels by Day 7. We believe that this monovalent murine IL-2 fusion toxin will be an effective in vivo murine Treg depleter. PMID:25147093

  9. Benign breast lesions: Ultrasound

    PubMed Central

    Masciadri, N.; Ferranti, C.

    2011-01-01

    Benign breast diseases constitute a heterogeneous group of lesions arising in the mammary epithelium or in other mammary tissues, and they may also be linked to vascular, inflammatory or traumatic pathologies. Most lesions found in women consulting a physician are benign. Ultrasound (US) diagnostic criteria indicating a benign lesion are described as well as US findings in the most frequent benign breast lesions. PMID:23396888

  10. Adenomyoepithelioma of the breast.

    PubMed

    Jabi, M; Dardick, I; Cardigos, N

    1988-01-01

    This report describes an additional case of adenomyoepithelioma, a rare neoplasm of the breast. The tumor presented as a well-defined mass and, cytologically, appeared to be benign. Histologically, the tumor demonstrated the characteristic bicellular differentiation of luminal epithelial and myoepithelial cells reported in previous adenomyoepitheliomas of the breast. On the basis of histological and immunological features, this tumor appeared to be the counterpart of the clear-cell (glycogen-rich) adenoma and epithelial-myoepithelial carcinoma of the salivary glands.

  11. Women and breast cancer.

    PubMed

    Lippman, M E

    1987-01-01

    One in every 12 women will develop breast cancer; the incidence increases with age, dietary fat intake, caloric intake, height, and weight. The 10-year survival rate of breast cancer patients who refuse therapy is virtually zero. Segmental mastectomy plus radiation and lumpectomy, combined with systemic (adjuvant)chemotherapy, are alternatives under investigation at the National Institutes of Health that may increase the survival rate by decreasing metastatic complications.

  12. Paradoxical antiproliferative effect by a murine mammary tumor-derived epithelial cell line

    PubMed Central

    Gurzov, Esteban N; Nabha, Sanaa M; Yamamoto, Hamilto; Meng, Hong; Scharovsky, O Graciela; Bonfil, R Daniel

    2007-01-01

    Background Despite significant advancement in breast cancer therapy, there is a great need for a better understanding of the mechanisms involved in breast carcinogenesis and progression, as well as of the role of epigenetic contributions from stromal cells in mammary tumorigenesis. In this study, we isolated and characterized murine mammary tumor-derived epithelial and myofibroblast cell lines, and investigated the in vitro and in vivo effect of cellular soluble factors produced by the epithelial cell line on tumor cells. Methods Morphology, immunophenotype, cytogenetics, invasiveness, and tumorigenicity of epithelial (LM-234ep) and myofibroblast (LM-234mf) cell lines isolated from two murine mammary adenocarcinomas with common ancestor were studied. The in vitro effects of LM-234ep conditioned medium on proliferation, cell cycle distribution, and expression of cell cycle proteins, were investigated in LM-234mf cells, mouse melanoma cells (B16-F10), and human cervical adenocarcinoma cells (HeLa). The in vivo anti-tumor activity of LM-234ep conditioned media was evaluated in subcutaneous tumors formed in nude mice by B16-F10 and HeLa cells. Results LM-234ep cells were found to be cytokeratin positive and hipertriploid, whereas LM-234mf cells were α-smooth muscle actin positive and hypohexaploid. Chromosome aberrations were found in both cases. Only LM-234mf revealed to be invasive in vitro and to secrete active MMP-2, though neither of the cell types were able to produce progressing tumors. LM-234ep-derived factors were able to inhibit the in vitro growth of LM-234mf, B16-F10, and HeLa cells, inducing cell cycle arrest in G0/G1 phase. The administration of LM-234ep conditioned medium inhibited the growth of B16-F10 and HeLa tumors in nude mice. Conclusion Our data suggest the existence of epithelial cell variants with tumor suppressive properties within mammary tumors. To our knowledge, this is the first report showing antiproliferative and antineoplastic

  13. Pertuzumab, Trastuzumab, and Paclitaxel Albumin-Stabilized Nanoparticle Formulation in Treating Patients With HER2-Positive Advanced Breast Cancer

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-06-23

    HER2-positive Breast Cancer; Recurrent Breast Cancer; Stage IIA Breast Cancer; Stage IIB Breast Cancer; Stage IIIA Breast Cancer; Stage IIIB Breast Cancer; Stage IIIC Breast Cancer; Stage IV Breast Cancer; Breast Adenocarcinoma; Inflammatory Breast Carcinoma

  14. Diet and breast cancer.

    PubMed

    Blackburn, George L; Copeland, Trisha; Khaodhiar, Lalita; Buckley, Rita B

    2003-03-01

    Obesity, overweight, and a sedentary lifestyle-all common conditions in breast cancer patients-are likely to be associated with poor survival and poor quality of life in women with breast cancer. Diet-related factors are thought to account for about 30% of cancers in developed countries. Most studies of diet and healthcare have focused on the role of single nutrients, foods, or food groups in disease prevention or promotion. Recent cancer guidelines on nutrition and physical activity emphasize diets that promote maintenance of a healthy body weight and a prudent dietary pattern that is low in red and processed meats and high in a variety of vegetables, fruits, and whole grains. Except for dietary fat, few nutritional factors in adult life have been associated with breast cancer. Extensive data from animal model research, international correlations linking fat intake and breast cancer rates, and case-control studies support the hypothesis that a high-fat diet is conducive to the development of breast cancer in postmenopausal women. Conflicting findings from cohort studies, however, have created uncertainty over the role of dietary fat in breast cancer growth and recurrence. Results from large-scale nutritional intervention trials are expected to resolve such issues. As new and improved data on dietary factors and patterns accumulate, dietary guidelines for cancer risk reduction will become more focused.

  15. Polyprotein processing of Theiler's murine encephalomyelitis virus.

    PubMed Central

    Roos, R P; Kong, W P; Semler, B L

    1989-01-01

    To investigate polyprotein processing of Theiler's murine encephalomyelitis viruses, we analyzed in vitro translation reactions programmed by in vitro-derived transcripts from an infectious full-length cDNA clone of the DA strain of Theiler's virus. To help identify the proteinases that carried out the processing, we modified the DA cDNA clone transcription template by linearization with different restriction endonucleases that generate templates of different lengths or by constructing linker insertion or deletion mutations or both in putative proteinase-coding regions. Protein 3C carried out most of the cleavages of the polyprotein, as is true for the other picornaviruses that have been studied. A second proteinase also appeared active at the LP12A-2B junction. A protein of slightly faster mobility than the leader protein was seen with translation of transcripts derived from DA cDNA but not GDVII cDNA. This protein may be synthesized from an alternative initiation site in the DA leader-coding region out of phase with the polyprotein reading frame. Our findings are relevant to ongoing investigations of the abnormal virus expression seen in DA virus late demyelinating disease, since polyprotein processing is critical in regulating picornaviral gene expression. Images PMID:2555559

  16. MR for the investigation of murine vasculature.

    PubMed

    Jacoby, Christoph; Flögel, Ulrich

    2011-01-01

    The investigation of alterations in vessel morphology of transgenic mouse models generally requires time-consuming and laborious planimetry of histological sections. This postmortem analysis is per se restricted to endpoint studies and, furthermore, may reflect the situation in vivo to a limited degree only. For the repetitive and noninvasive monitoring of dynamic changes in the murine vasculature, several protocols for high-resolution 3D MR angiography (MRA) at a vertical 9.4 T system are described. These protocols are based on flow-compensated 3D gradient echo sequences with application-dependent spatial resolution, resulting in voxel sizes between 1 and 13 nL. To ensure constant physiological conditions, particular attention is paid to minimize the acquisition time. All measurements are carried out without a contrast agent to avoid temporal inconstancy of the contrast-to-noise-ratio (CNR) as well as toxic side effects. Moreover, metabolic alterations as a consequence of disturbed vascularization and blood supply are monitored by (31)P MR spectroscopy. PMID:21874492

  17. Quantitative Trait Loci for Murine Growth

    PubMed Central

    Cheverud, J. M.; Routman, E. J.; Duarte, FAM.; van-Swinderen, B.; Cothran, K.; Perel, C.

    1996-01-01

    Body size is an archetypal quantitative trait with variation due to the segregation of many gene loci, each of relatively minor effect, and the environment. We examine the effects of quantitative trait loci (QTLs) on age-specific body weights and growth in the F(2) intercross of the LG/J and SM/J strains of inbred mice. Weekly weights (1-10 wk) and 75 microsatellite genotypes were obtained for 535 mice. Interval mapping was used to locate and measure the genotypic effects of QTLs on body weight and growth. QTL effects were detected on 16 of the 19 autosomes with several chromosomes carrying more than one QTL. The number of QTLs for age-specific weights varied from seven at 1 week to 17 at 10 wk. The QTLs were each of relatively minor, subequal effect. QTLs affecting early and late growth were generally distinct, mapping to different chromosomal locations indicating separate genetic and physiological systems for early and later murine growth. PMID:8846907

  18. Implantable Micropump Technologies for Murine Intracochlear Infusions

    PubMed Central

    Johnson, D. G.; Waldron, M. J.; Frisina, R. D.; Borkholder, D. A.

    2011-01-01

    Due to the very small size of the mouse inner ear, 600 nL volume, developing effective, controlled infusion systems is quite challenging. Key technologies have been created to minimize both size and power for an implantable pump for murine intracochlear infusions. A method for coupling fine capillary tubing to microfluidic channels is presented which provides low volume, biocompatible interconnects withstanding pressures as high as 827 kPa (120 psi) and consuming less than 20 nL of volume exiting in-plane with the pump. Surface micromachined resistive bridges integrated into the flow channel for anemometry based flow rate measurement have been optimized for low power operation in the ultra-low flow rate regime. A process for creation of deformable diaphragms over pump chambers with simultaneous coating of the microfluidic channels has been developed allowing integration of a biocompatible fluid flow path. These advances represent enabling capabilities for a drug delivery system suitable for space constrained applications such as subcutaneous implantation in mice. PMID:21096713

  19. Cortactin is implicated in murine zygotic development

    PubMed Central

    Yu, Dan; Zhang, Helin; Blanpied, Thomas A.; Smith, Elizabeth; Zhan, Xi

    2009-01-01

    Cortactin is a cortex-enriched protein implicated in Arp2/3 complex-mediated actin polymerization. However, the physiological role of cortactin remains unknown. We have generated a mouse strain in which the allele of murine cortactin was disrupted by a gene trapping vector. The resulting heterozygous mice developed normally and were fertile, but embryonic fibroblasts derived from heterozygous animals displayed partial impairment in PDGF-induced membrane ruffling. No homozygous offspring or early embryos even at the two-cell stage were detected. Analysis of oocytes revealed a gradual decrease in the detection of homozygous zygotes after fertilization. In normal oocytes arrested at meiotic metaphase II (MII), cortactin immunoreactivity was detected in an apical layer that overlies the maternal chromosome and overlaps with a polarized cortex enriched with actin. The formation of the polarized cortactin layer was diminished upon treatment with latrunculin B, an actin polymerization inhibitor. After resumption of meiosis II, the majority of cortactin protein was accumulated into the second polar body. Microinjection of MII-arrested eggs with either cortactin antibody or RNA encoding a cortactin mutant deficient in Arp2/3 complex binding disrupted the integrity of the actin cap and inhibited emission of the second polar body triggered by parthenogenesis. Our data suggest that cortactin plays an important role in the mechanics of asymmetric division in oocytes. PMID:20004659

  20. Quantitative investigation of murine cytomegalovirus nucleocapsid interaction.

    PubMed

    Buser, Christopher; Fleischer, Frank; Mertens, Thomas; Michel, Detlef; Schmidt, Volker; Walther, Paul

    2007-10-01

    In this study, we quantitatively investigate the role of the M97 protein for viral morphogenesis in murine cytomegalovirus (MCMV)-infected fibroblast cells. For this purpose, a statistical analysis is performed for the spatial distribution of nuclear B-capsids (devoid of DNA, containing the scaffold) and C-capsids (filled with DNA). Cell nuclei infected with either wild-type or an M97 deletion mutant were compared. Univariate and multivariate point process characteristics (like Ripley's K-function, the L-function and the nearest neighbour distance distribution function) are investigated in order to describe and quantify the effects that the deletion of M97 causes to the process of DNA packaging into nucleocapsids. The estimation of the function L(r) -r reveals that with respect to the wild type there is an increased frequency of point pairs at a very short distance (less than approximately 100 nm) for both the B-capsids as well as for the C-capsids. For the M97 deletion mutant type this is no longer true. Here only the C-capsids show such a clustering behaviour, whereas for B-capsids it is almost nonexistant. Estimations of functionals such as the nearest neighbour distance distribution function confirmed these results. Thereby, a quantification is provided for the effect that the deletion of M97 leads to a loss of typical nucleocapsid clustering in MCMV-infected nuclei. PMID:17910700

  1. The murine excisional wound model: Contraction revisited

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Lin; Mirza, Rita; Kwon, Young; DiPietro, Luisa A.; Koh, Timothy J.

    2016-01-01

    Rodent models of healing are considered limited because of the perception that rodent wounds heal by contraction while humans heal by re-epithelialization. The purpose of this report is to present evidence that simple murine excisional wounds provide a valid and reproducible wound model that heals by both contraction and re-epithelialization. Previous studies have shown that, although rodent wounds contract by up to 80%, much of this contraction occurs only after epithelial closure. To confirm these previous findings, we measured re-epithelialization and contraction in three separate mouse strains, (BALB/c, db/+ and db/db); re-epithelialization and contraction each accounted for ~40-60% of the initial closure of full thickness excisional wounds. After closure, the wound continues to contract and this provides the impression of dominant closure by contraction. In conclusion, the simple excisional rodent wound model produces a well-defined and readily identifiable wound bed over which the process of re-epithelialization is clearly measurable. PMID:26136050

  2. Amphotropic murine leukemia viruses induce spongiform encephalomyelopathy.

    PubMed

    Münk, C; Löhler, J; Prassolov, V; Just, U; Stockschläder, M; Stocking, C

    1997-05-27

    Recombinants of amphotropic murine leukemia virus (A-MuLV) have found widespread use in retroviral vector systems due to their ability to efficiently and stably infect cells of several different species, including human. Previous work has shown that replication-competent recombinants containing the amphotropic env gene, encoding the major SU envelope glycoprotein that determines host tropism, induce lymphomas in vivo. We show here that these viruses also induce a spongiform encephalomyelopathy in mice inoculated perinatally. This fatal central nervous system disease is characterized by noninflammatory spongiform lesions of nerve and glial cells and their processes, and is associated with moderate astro- and microgliosis. The first clinical symptoms are ataxia, tremor, and spasticity, progressing to complete tetraparesis and incontinence, and finally death of the animal. Sequences within the amphotropic env gene are necessary for disease induction. Coinfection of A-MuLV recombinants with nonneuropathogenic ecotropic or polytropic MuLV drastically increases the incidence, degree, and distribution of the neurodegenerative disorder. The consequence of these results in view of the use of A-MuLV recombinants in the clinic is discussed.

  3. Isolation of Murine Embryonic Hemogenic Endothelial Cells

    PubMed Central

    Marcelo, Kathrina L.; Hirschi, Karen K.

    2016-01-01

    The specification of hemogenic endothelial cells from embryonic vascular endothelium occurs during brief developmental periods within distinct tissues, and is necessary for the emergence of definitive HSPC from the murine extra embryonic yolk sac, placenta, umbilical vessels, and the embryonic aorta-gonad-mesonephros (AGM) region. The transient nature and small size of this cell population renders its reproducible isolation for careful quantification and experimental applications technically difficult. We have established a fluorescence-activated cell sorting (FACS)-based protocol for simultaneous isolation of hemogenic endothelial cells and HSPC during their peak generation times in the yolk sac and AGM. We demonstrate methods for dissection of yolk sac and AGM tissues from mouse embryos, and we present optimized tissue digestion and antibody conjugation conditions for maximal cell survival prior to identification and retrieval via FACS. Representative FACS analysis plots are shown that identify the hemogenic endothelial cell and HSPC phenotypes, and describe a methylcellulose-based assay for evaluating their blood forming potential on a clonal level. PMID:27341393

  4. MR for the investigation of murine vasculature.

    PubMed

    Jacoby, Christoph; Flögel, Ulrich

    2011-01-01

    The investigation of alterations in vessel morphology of transgenic mouse models generally requires time-consuming and laborious planimetry of histological sections. This postmortem analysis is per se restricted to endpoint studies and, furthermore, may reflect the situation in vivo to a limited degree only. For the repetitive and noninvasive monitoring of dynamic changes in the murine vasculature, several protocols for high-resolution 3D MR angiography (MRA) at a vertical 9.4 T system are described. These protocols are based on flow-compensated 3D gradient echo sequences with application-dependent spatial resolution, resulting in voxel sizes between 1 and 13 nL. To ensure constant physiological conditions, particular attention is paid to minimize the acquisition time. All measurements are carried out without a contrast agent to avoid temporal inconstancy of the contrast-to-noise-ratio (CNR) as well as toxic side effects. Moreover, metabolic alterations as a consequence of disturbed vascularization and blood supply are monitored by (31)P MR spectroscopy.

  5. Murine norovirus infection does not cause major disruptions in the murine intestinal microbiota

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Murine norovirus (MNV) is the most common gastrointestinal pathogen of research mice and can alter research outcomes in biomedical mouse models of inflammatory bowel disease (IBD). Despite indications that an altered microbiota is a risk factor for IBD, the response of the murine intestinal microbiota to MNV infection has not been examined. Microbiota disruption caused by MNV infection could introduce the confounding effects observed in research experiments. Therefore, this study investigated the effects of MNV infection on the intestinal microbiota of wild-type mice. Results The composition of the intestinal microbiota was assessed over time in both outbred Swiss Webster and inbred C57BL/6 mice following MNV infection. Mice were infected with both persistent and non-persistent MNV strains and tissue-associated or fecal-associated microbiota was analyzed by 16S rRNA-encoding gene pyrosequencing. Analysis of intestinal bacterial communities in infected mice at the phylum and family level showed no major differences to uninfected controls, both in tissue-associated samples and feces, and also over time following infection, demonstrating that the intestinal microbiota of wild-type mice is highly resistant to disruption following MNV infection. Conclusions This is the first study to describe the intestinal microbiota following MNV infection and demonstrates that acute or persistent MNV infection is not associated with major disruptions of microbial communities in Swiss Webster and C57BL/6 mice. PMID:24451302

  6. How Is Breast Cancer Diagnosed?

    MedlinePlus

    ... mammogram. It also helps tell the difference between fluid-filled cysts and solid masses. See Mammograms and Other Breast Imaging Tests for more detailed information. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) of the breast MRIs use ...

  7. Drugs Approved for Breast Cancer

    MedlinePlus

    ... Ask about Your Treatment Research Drugs Approved for Breast Cancer This page lists cancer drugs approved by the ... are not listed here. Drugs Approved to Prevent Breast Cancer Evista (Raloxifene Hydrochloride) Keoxifene (Raloxifene Hydrochloride) Nolvadex (Tamoxifen ...

  8. Breast Cancer in Young Women

    MedlinePlus

    ... Campaign Initiatives Participation in Cancer Moonshot Stay Informed Breast Cancer in Young Women Recommend on Facebook Tweet Share Compartir Syndicate this page Marleah's family history of breast cancer was her motivation for pursuing a career where ...

  9. Preparing for Breast Reconstruction Surgery

    MedlinePlus

    ... after breast reconstruction surgery Preparing for breast reconstruction surgery Your surgeon can help you know what to ... The plan for follow-up Costs Understanding your surgery costs Health insurance policies often cover most or ...

  10. Causes of breast lumps (image)

    MedlinePlus

    ... breast lumps are benign (non-cancerous), as in fibroadenoma, a condition that mostly affects women under age ... with the menstrual cycle, whereas a lump from fibroadenoma does not. While most breast lumps are benign, ...

  11. Treatment Option Overview (Breast Cancer)

    MedlinePlus

    ... to treat breast cancer. Internal radiation therapy with strontium-89 (a radionuclide ) is used to relieve bone pain ... breast cancer that has spread to the bones. Strontium-89 is injected into a vein and travels to ...

  12. Preventing Breast Cancer: Making Progress

    MedlinePlus

    ... Navigation Bar Home Current Issue Past Issues Preventing Breast Cancer: Making Progress Past Issues / Fall 2006 Table of ... 000 women will have been diagnosed with invasive breast cancer, and nearly 41,000 women will die from ...

  13. BRIT1 regulates p53 stability and functions as a tumor suppressor in breast cancer

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Bo; Wang, Edward; Lin, Shiaw-Yih

    2013-01-01

    In humans, the gene encoding the BRCA1 C terminus-repeat inhibitor of human telomerase expression 1 (BRIT1) protein is located on chromosome 8p23.1, a region implicated in the development of several malignancies, including breast cancer. Previous studies by our group and others suggested that BRIT1 might function as a novel tumor suppressor. Thus, identifying the molecular mechanisms that underlie BRIT1’s tumor suppressive function is important to understand cancer etiology and to identify effective therapeutic strategies for BRIT1-deficient tumors. We thus investigated the role of BRIT1 as a tumor suppressor in breast cancer by using genetic approaches. We discovered that BRIT1 functions as a post-transcriptional regulator of p53 expression. BRIT1 regulates p53 protein stability through blocking murine double minute 2-mediated p53 ubiquitination. To fully demonstrate the role of BRIT1 as a tumor suppressor, we depleted BRIT1 in normal breast epithelial cells. We found that knockdown of BRIT1 caused the oncogenic transformation of normal mammary epithelial cells. Furthermore, ectopic expression of BRIT1 effectively suppressed breast cancer cell proliferation and colony formation in vitro and tumor growth in vivo. Taken together, our study provides new insights into the biological functions of BRIT1 as a tumor suppressor in human breast cancer. PMID:23729656

  14. DLC1-dependent parathyroid hormone–like hormone inhibition suppresses breast cancer bone metastasis

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Yufeng; Lei, Rong; Zhuang, Xueqian; Zhang, Ning; Pan, Hong; Li, Gang; Hu, Jing; Pan, Xiaoqi; Tao, Qian; Fu, Da; Xiao, Jianru; Chin, Y. Eugene; Kang, Yibin; Yang, Qifeng; Hu, Guohong

    2014-01-01

    Bone metastasis is a frequent complication of breast cancer that is often accelerated by TGF-β signaling; however, little is known about how the TGF-β pathway is regulated during bone metastasis. Here we report that deleted in liver cancer 1 (DLC1) is an important regulator of TGF-β responses and osteolytic metastasis of breast cancer cells. In murine models, breast cancer cells lacking DLC1 expression exhibited enhanced capabilities of bone metastasis. Knockdown of DLC1 in cancer cells promoted bone metastasis, leading to manifested osteolysis and accelerated death in mice, while DLC1 overexpression suppressed bone metastasis. Activation of Rho-ROCK signaling in the absence of DLC1 mediated SMAD3 linker region phosphorylation and TGF-β–induced expression of parathyroid hormone–like hormone (PTHLH), leading to osteoclast maturation for osteolytic colonization. Furthermore, pharmacological inhibition of Rho-ROCK effectively reduced PTHLH production and breast cancer bone metastasis in vitro and in vivo. Evaluation of clinical breast tumor samples revealed that reduced DLC1 expression was linked to elevated PTHLH expression and organ-specific metastasis to bone. Overall, our findings define a stroma-dependent paradigm of Rho signaling in cancer and implicate Rho–TGF-β crosstalk in osteolytic bone metastasis. PMID:24590291

  15. Protective effects of dendrosomal curcumin on an animal metastatic breast tumor.

    PubMed

    Farhangi, Baharak; Alizadeh, Ali Mohammad; Khodayari, Hamid; Khodayari, Saeed; Dehghan, Mohammad Javad; Khori, Vahid; Heidarzadeh, Alemeh; Khaniki, Mahmood; Sadeghiezadeh, Majid; Najafi, Farhood

    2015-07-01

    Curcumin has been shown to inhibit migration and invasion of cancer angiogenesis via interacting with key regulatory molecules like NF-κB. Rapidly metabolized and conjugated in the liver, curcumin has the limited systemic bioavailability. Previous results have shown a new light of potential biocompatibility, biodegradability, as well as anti-cancer effects of dendrosomal curcumin (DNC) in biological systems. The present study aims to deliberate the protective effects of DNC on metastatic breast tumor in vitro and in vivo. After the dosing procedure, twenty-seven female mice were divided into 40 and 80mg/kg groups of DNC, along with a control group to investigate the anti-metastatic effects of DNC on mammary tumor-bearing mice. In vitro results showed that the different concentrations of DNC reduced the migration and the adhesion of 4T1 cells after 24h (P<0.05). Under the dosing procedure, DNC was safe at 80mg/kg and lower doses. The treated DNC animals had a higher survival rate and lower metastatic signs (14%) compared to control (100%) (P<0.05). The metastatic tumors were more common in control mice than the treated groups in the lung, the liver and the sternum tissues. Animals treated with DNC had smaller tumor volume in comparison with control group (P<0.05). Final mean tumor volume reached to approximately 1.11, 0.31 and 0.27cm(3) in the control, and 40 and 80mg/kg DNC groups, respectively (P<0.05). Furthermore, suppression of NF-κB expression by DNC led to down-regulation of VEGF, COX-2, and MMP-9 expressions in the breast tumor, the lung, the brain, the spleen and the liver tissues (P<0.05). These outcomes indicate that dendrosomal curcumin has a chemoprotective effect on the breast cancer metastasis through suppression of NF-κB and its regulated gene products. PMID:25863259

  16. Analysis of cardiomyocyte movement in the developing murine heart

    SciTech Connect

    Hashimoto, Hisayuki; Yuasa, Shinsuke; Tabata, Hidenori; Tohyama, Shugo; Seki, Tomohisa; Egashira, Toru; Hayashiji, Nozomi; Hattori, Fumiyuki; Kusumoto, Dai; Kunitomi, Akira; Takei, Makoto; Kashimura, Shin; Yozu, Gakuto; Shimojima, Masaya; Motoda, Chikaaki; Muraoka, Naoto; Nakajima, Kazunori; Sakaue-Sawano, Asako; Miyawaki, Atsushi; Fukuda, Keiichi

    2015-09-04

    The precise assemblage of several types of cardiac precursors controls heart organogenesis. The cardiac precursors show dynamic movement during early development and then form the complicated heart structure. However, cardiomyocyte movements inside the newly organized mammalian heart remain unclear. We previously established the method of ex vivo time-lapse imaging of the murine heart to study cardiomyocyte behavior by using the Fucci (fluorescent ubiquitination-based cell cycle indicator) system, which can effectively label individual G1, S/G2/M, and G1/S-transition phase nuclei in living cardiomyocytes as red, green, and yellow, respectively. Global analysis of gene expression in Fucci green positive ventricular cardiomyocytes confirmed that cell cycle regulatory genes expressed in G1/S, S, G2/M, and M phase transitions were upregulated. Interestingly, pathway analysis revealed that many genes related to the cell cycle were significantly upregulated in the Fucci green positive ventricular cardiomyocytes, while only a small number of genes related to cell motility were upregulated. Time-lapse imaging showed that murine proliferating cardiomyocytes did not exhibit dynamic movement inside the heart, but stayed on site after entering the cell cycle. - Highlights: • We directly visualized cardiomyocyte movement inside the developing murine heart. • Cell cycle related genes were upregulated in the proliferating cardiomyocytes. • Time-lapse imaging revealed that proliferating murine cardiomyocytes stayed in place. • Murine ventricular cardiomyocytes proliferate on site during development.

  17. Apoptosis and the thymic microenvironment in murine lupus.

    PubMed

    Takeoka, Y; Taguchi, N; Shultz, L; Boyd, R L; Naiki, M; Ansari, A A; Gershwin, M E

    1999-11-01

    The thymus of New Zealand black (NZB) mice undergoes premature involution. In addition, cultured thymic epithelial cells from NZB mice undergo accelerated preprogrammed degeneration. NZB mice also have distinctive and well-defined abnormalities of thymic architecture involving stromal cells, defined by staining with monoclonal antibodies specific for the thymic microenvironment. We took advantage of these findings, as well as our large panel of monoclonal antibodies which recognize thymic stroma, to study the induction of apoptosis in the thymus of murine lupus and including changes of epithelial architecture. We studied NZB, MRL/lpr, BXSB/Yaa, C3H/gld mice and BALB/c and C57BL/6 as control mice. Apoptosis was studied both at basal levels and following induction with either dexamethasone or lipopolysaccharide (LPS). The apoptotic cells were primarily found in the thymic cortex, and the frequency of apoptosis in murine lupus was less than 20% of controls. Moreover, all strains of murine lupus had severe abnormalities of the cortical network. These changes were not accentuated by dexamethasone treatment in cultured thymocytes. However, the thymus in murine lupus was less susceptible to LPS-induced apoptosis than control mice. Finally we note that the number of thymic nurse cells (TNC) was lowest in NZB mice. Our findings demonstrate significant abnormalities in the induction of apoptosis and the formation of TNC-like epithelial cells in SLE mice, and suggest that the abnormalities of the thymic microenvironment have an important role in the pathogenesis of murine lupus.

  18. Adhesion: a confounding bias in murine cervical heterotopic heart transplantation

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Jinghui; Chen, Qi; Liu, Fang; Fu, Zhiren; Wang, Quanxing

    2015-01-01

    Tissue adhesion is a common postsurgical phenomenon among the human population. This complication also occurs in murine transplant models. In this study, we investigated the impact of adhesion on murine cervical heterotopic heart transplantation by using sodium hyaluronate (SH) as an anti-adhesive agent. Our study revealed that SH administration produced no significant effect on histological change, TNF-α, IFN-γ, MCP-1, IL-2, IL-6 and IL-10 expression, CD4+ T, CD8+ T, or neutrophil and macrophage counts. Our findings suggest that SH was biocompatible and non-immunogenic. Later, we observed that adhesion not only affected the survival of the graft without mediating rejection, but was closely related to the severity of rejection as manifested by larger and more severe adhesion formation in total-allomismatched and MHC class II-allomismatched murine cardiac allografts. Therefore, we inferred that using the murine cervical heterotopic heart transplant model may lead to an exaggerated p-value in statistical significance testing which could mislead experimenters in considering that the results are more significant than the fact. To the best of our knowledge, this study is the first demonstration that proves that adhesion was a confounding bias in the murine cervical heterotopic heart transplant model and highlights the possibilities for improvement in future use. PMID:26550450

  19. Remodeling of alveolar septa after murine pneumonectomy

    PubMed Central

    Ysasi, Alexandra B.; Wagner, Willi L.; Bennett, Robert D.; Ackermann, Maximilian; Valenzuela, Cristian D.; Belle, Janeil; Tsuda, Akira; Konerding, Moritz A.

    2015-01-01

    In most mammals, removing one lung (pneumonectomy) results in the compensatory growth of the remaining lung. In mice, stereological observations have demonstrated an increase in the number of mature alveoli; however, anatomic evidence of the early phases of alveolar growth has remained elusive. To identify changes in the lung microstructure associated with neoalveolarization, we used tissue histology, electron microscopy, and synchrotron imaging to examine the configuration of the alveolar duct after murine pneumonectomy. Systematic histological examination of the cardiac lobe demonstrated no change in the relative frequency of dihedral angle components (Ends, Bends, and Junctions) (P > 0.05), but a significant decrease in the length of a subset of septal ends (“E”). Septal retraction, observed in 20–30% of the alveolar ducts, was maximal on day 3 after pneumonectomy (P < 0.01) and returned to baseline levels within 3 wk. Consistent with septal retraction, the postpneumonectomy alveolar duct diameter ratio (Dout:Din) was significantly lower 3 days after pneumonectomy compared to all controls except for the detergent-treated lung (P < 0.001). To identify clumped capillaries predicted by septal retraction, vascular casting, analyzed by both scanning electron microscopy and synchrotron imaging, demonstrated matted capillaries that were most prominent 3 days after pneumonectomy. Numerical simulations suggested that septal retraction could reflect increased surface tension within the alveolar duct, resulting in a new equilibrium at a higher total energy and lower surface area. The spatial and temporal association of these microstructural changes with postpneumonectomy lung growth suggests that these changes represent an early phase of alveolar duct remodeling. PMID:26078396

  20. Cryosurgery of breast cancer

    PubMed Central

    Zhou, Liang; Xu, Kecheng

    2012-01-01

    With recent improvements in breast imaging, the ability to identify small breast tumors is markedly improved, prompting significant interest in the use of cryoablation without surgical excision to treat early-stage breast cancer. The cryoablation is often performed using ultrasound-guided tabletop argon-gas-based cryoablation system with a double freeze/thaw cycle. Recent studies have demonstrated that, as a primary therapy for small breast cancer, cryoablation is safe and effective with durable results, and can successfully destroy all cancers <1.0 cm and tumors between 1.0 and 1.5 cm without a significant ductal carcinoma-in-situ (DCIS) component. Presence of noncalcified DCIS is the cause of most cryoablation failures. At this time, cryoablation should be limited to patients with invasive ductal carcinoma <1.5 cm and with <25% DCIS in the core biopsy. For unresectable advanced breast cancer, cryoablation is a palliation modality and may be used as complementary for subsequent resection or other therapies. PMID:25083433

  1. Computerized Cognitive Retraining in Improving Cognitive Function in Breast Cancer Survivors

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-08-26

    Cancer Survivor; Stage 0 Breast Cancer; Stage IA Breast Cancer; Stage IB Breast Cancer; Stage IIA Breast Cancer; Stage IIB Breast Cancer; Stage IIIA Breast Cancer; Stage IIIB Breast Cancer; Stage IIIC Breast Cancer

  2. Virtual Weight Loss Program in Maintaining Weight in African American Breast Cancer Survivors

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-09-01

    Cancer Survivor; Invasive Breast Carcinoma; Stage IA Breast Cancer; Stage IB Breast Cancer; Stage IIA Breast Cancer; Stage IIB Breast Cancer; Stage IIIA Breast Cancer; Stage IIIB Breast Cancer; Stage IIIC Breast Cancer

  3. Chloroquine sensitizes breast cancer cells to chemotherapy independent of autophagy.

    PubMed

    Maycotte, Paola; Aryal, Suraj; Cummings, Christopher T; Thorburn, Jacqueline; Morgan, Michael J; Thorburn, Andrew

    2012-02-01

    Chloroquine (CQ) is a 4-aminoquinoline drug used for the treatment of diverse diseases. It inhibits lysosomal acidification and therefore prevents autophagy by blocking autophagosome fusion and degradation. In cancer treatment, CQ is often used in combination with chemotherapeutic drugs and radiation because it has been shown to enhance the efficacy of tumor cell killing. Since CQ and its derivatives are the only inhibitors of autophagy that are available for use in the clinic, multiple ongoing clinical trials are currently using CQ or hydroxychloroquine (HCQ) for this purpose, either alone, or in combination with other anticancer drugs. Here we show that in the mouse breast cancer cell lines, 67NR and 4T1, autophagy is induced by the DNA damaging agent cisplatin or by drugs that selectively target autophagy regulation, the PtdIns3K inhibitor LY294002, and the mTOR inhibitor rapamycin. In combination with these drugs, CQ sensitized to these treatments, though this effect was more evident with LY294002 and rapamycin treatment. Surprisingly, however, in these experiments CQ sensitization occurred independent of autophagy inhibition, since sensitization was not mimicked by Atg12, Beclin 1 knockdown or bafilomycin treatment, and occurred even in the absence of Atg12. We therefore propose that although CQ might be helpful in combination with cancer therapeutic drugs, its sensitizing effects can occur independently of autophagy inhibition. Consequently, this possibility should be considered in the ongoing clinical trials where CQ or HCQ are used in the treatment of cancer, and caution is warranted when CQ treatment is used in cytotoxic assays in autophagy research. PMID:22252008

  4. Chloroquine sensitizes breast cancer cells to chemotherapy independent of autophagy

    PubMed Central

    Maycotte, Paola; Aryal, Suraj; Cummings, Christopher T; Thorburn, Jacqueline; Morgan, Michael J

    2012-01-01

    Chloroquine (CQ) is a 4-aminoquinoline drug used for the treatment of diverse diseases. It inhibits lysosomal acidification and therefore prevents autophagy by blocking autophagosome fusion and degradation. In cancer treatment, CQ is often used in combination with chemotherapeutic drugs and radiation because it has been shown to enhance the efficacy of tumor cell killing. Since CQ and its derivatives are the only inhibitors of autophagy that are available for use in the clinic, multiple ongoing clinical trials are currently using CQ or hydroxychloroquine (HCQ) for this purpose, either alone, or in combination with other anticancer drugs. Here we show that in the mouse breast cancer cell lines, 67NR and 4T1, autophagy is induced by the DNA damaging agent cisplatin or by drugs that selectively target autophagy regulation, the PtdIns3K inhibitor LY294002, and the mTOR inhibitor rapamycin. In combination with these drugs, CQ sensitized to these treatments, though this effect was more evident with LY294002 and rapamycin treatment. Surprisingly, however, in these experiments CQ sensitization occurred independent of autophagy inhibition, since sensitization was not mimicked by Atg12, Beclin 1 knockdown or bafilomycin treatment, and occurred even in the absence of Atg12. We therefore propose that although CQ might be helpful in combination with cancer therapeutic drugs, its sensitizing effects can occur independently of autophagy inhibition. Consequently, this possibility should be considered in the ongoing clinical trials where CQ or HCQ are used in the treatment of cancer, and caution is warranted when CQ treatment is used in cytotoxic assays in autophagy research. PMID:22252008

  5. Interaction of HM30181 with P-glycoprotein at the murine blood-brain barrier assessed with positron emission tomography

    PubMed Central

    Bauer, Florian; Wanek, Thomas; Mairinger, Severin; Stanek, Johann; Sauberer, Michael; Kuntner, Claudia; Parveen, Zahida; Chiba, Peter; Müller, Markus; Langer, Oliver; Erker, Thomas

    2013-01-01

    HM30181, a potent and selective inhibitor of the adenosine triphosphate-binding cassette transporter P-glycoprotein (Pgp), was shown to enhance oral bioavailability and improve antitumour efficacy of paclitaxel in mouse tumour models. In search for a positron emission tomography (PET) radiotracer to visualise Pgp expression levels at the blood-brain barrier (BBB), we examined the ability of HM30181 to inhibit Pgp at the murine BBB. HM30181 was shown to be approximately equipotent with the reference Pgp inhibitor tariquidar in inhibiting rhodamine 123 efflux from CCRF-CEM T cells (IC50, tariquidar: 8.2±2.0 nM, HM30181: 13.1±2.3 nM). PET scans with the Pgp substrate (R)-[11C]verapamil in FVB wild-type mice pretreated i.v. with HM30181 (10 or 21 mg/kg) failed to show significant increases in (R)-[11C]verapamil brain uptake compared with vehicle treated animals. PET scans with [11C]HM30181 showed low and not significantly different brain uptake of [11C]HM30181 in wild-type, Mdr1a/b(−/−) and Bcrp1(−/−) mice and significantly, i.e. 4.7-fold (P<0.01), higher brain uptake, relative to wild-type animals, in Mdr1a/b(−/−)Bcrp1(−/−) mice. This was consistent with HM30181 being at microdoses a dual substrate of Pgp and breast cancer resistance protein (Bcrp). In vitro autoradiography on low (EMT6) and high (EMT6Ar1.0) Pgp expressing murine breast tumour sections showed 1.9 times higher binding of [11C]HM30181 in EMT6Ar1.0 tumours (P<0.001) which was displaceable with unlabelled tariquidar, elacridar or HM30181 (1 μM). Our data suggest that HM30181 is not able to inhibit Pgp at the murine BBB at clinically feasible doses and that [11C]HM30181 is not suitable as a PET tracer to visualise cerebral Pgp expression levels. PMID:23022332

  6. Telomere sister chromatid exchange in telomerase deficient murine cells

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Yisong; Giannone, Richard J; Liu, Yie

    2005-01-01

    We have recently demonstrated that several types of genomic rearrangements (i.e., telomere sister chromatid exchange (T-SCE), genomic-SCE, or end-to-end fusions) were more often detected in long-term cultured murine telomerase deficient embryonic stem (ES) cells than in freshly prepared murine splenocytes, even through they possessed similar frequencies of critically short telomeres. The high rate of genomic rearrangements in telomerase deficient ES cells, when compared to murine splenocytes, may reflect the cultured cells' gained ability to protect chromosome ends with eroded telomeres allowing them to escape 'end crisis'. However, the possibility that ES cells were more permissive to genomic rearrangements than other cell types or that differences in the microenvironment or genetic background of the animals might consequentially determine the rate of T-SCEs or other genomic rearrangements at critically short telomeres could not be ruled out.

  7. The purification and properties of cancer procoagulant from murine tumors.

    PubMed

    Moore, W R

    1992-04-30

    The protease, cancer procoagulant, was isolated from three murine metastatic tumors and was purified to apparent homogeneity (SDS-PAGE) from Lewis lung cells by the sequence of (NH4)2SO4 precipitation, DE-53 anion-exchange chromatography, and Sephacryl 200 chromatography. The murine tumor enzyme has a molecular weight of 68,000 and Ca2+ is required for procoagulant and proteolytic activity; thus, the murine enzyme is very similar to that isolated from rabbit tumors. Two peptidyl chromogenic substrates of cancer procoagulant were discovered, facilitating kinetic and inhibition studies with the enzyme. The peptide substrate structures and the results of inhibition studies suggest that cancer procoagulant is thrombin-like in specificity but is a thiol protease.

  8. Characterization of eosinophilic esophagitis murine models using optical coherence tomography

    PubMed Central

    Alex, Aneesh; Noti, Mario; Wojno, Elia D. Tait; Artis, David; Zhou, Chao

    2014-01-01

    Pre-clinical studies using murine models are critical for understanding the pathophysiological mechanisms underlying immune-mediated disorders such as Eosinophilic esophagitis (EoE). In this study, an optical coherence tomography (OCT) system capable of providing three-dimensional images with axial and transverse resolutions of 5 µm and 10 µm, respectively, was utilized to obtain esophageal images from a murine model of EoE-like disease ex vivo. Structural changes in the esophagus of wild-type (Tslpr+/+) and mutant (Tslpr−/−) mice with EoE-like disease were quantitatively evaluated and food impaction sites in the esophagus of diseased mice were monitored using OCT. Here, the capability of OCT as a label-free imaging tool devoid of tissue-processing artifacts to effectively characterize murine EoE-like disease models has been demonstrated. PMID:24575353

  9. Bisphosphonates in breast cancer.

    PubMed

    Mathew, Aju; Brufsky, Adam

    2015-08-15

    Bisphosphonates are osteoclast inhibitors, currently being used in oncology to prevent or delay bone morbidity in cancer. Oral and intravenous formulations of bisphosphonates have been found to be efficacious in preventing skeletal-related events such as bone pain, pathologic fractures, spinal cord compression and hypercalcemia of malignancy, in patients with bone metastatic breast cancer. Bisphosphonates are also used to prevent bone loss associated with anti-estrogen therapy using aromatase inhibitors. In addition to its role in preventing bone resorption, several pre-clinical studies have noted an anti-tumor role as well. Recent research effort has particularly focused on investigating an adjuvant role for bisphosphonates in early breast cancer. Recently, few randomized trials have found a beneficial effect for adjuvant use of the aminobisphosphonate, zoledronate, in older patients who are post-menopausal. This review article will summarize the various clinical studies investigating the role of bisphosphonates in breast cancer.

  10. Emodin Inhibits Breast Cancer Growth by Blocking the Tumor-Promoting Feedforward Loop between Cancer Cells and Macrophages.

    PubMed

    Iwanowycz, Stephen; Wang, Junfeng; Hodge, Johnie; Wang, Yuzhen; Yu, Fang; Fan, Daping

    2016-08-01

    Macrophage infiltration correlates with severity in many types of cancer. Tumor cells recruit macrophages and educate them to adopt an M2-like phenotype through the secretion of chemokines and growth factors, such as MCP1 and CSF1. Macrophages in turn promote tumor growth through supporting angiogenesis, suppressing antitumor immunity, modulating extracellular matrix remodeling, and promoting tumor cell migration. Thus, tumor cells and macrophages interact to create a feedforward loop supporting tumor growth and metastasis. In this study, we tested the ability of emodin, a Chinese herb-derived compound, to inhibit breast cancer growth in mice and examined the underlying mechanisms. Emodin was used to treat mice bearing EO771 or 4T1 breast tumors. It was shown that emodin attenuated tumor growth by inhibiting macrophage infiltration and M2-like polarization, accompanied by increased T-cell activation and reduced angiogenesis in tumors. The tumor inhibitory effects of emodin were lost in tumor-bearing mice with macrophage depletion. Emodin inhibited IRF4, STAT6, and C/EBPβ signaling and increased inhibitory histone H3 lysine 27 tri-methylation (H3K27m3) on the promoters of M2-related genes in tumor-associated macrophages. In addition, emodin inhibited tumor cell secretion of MCP1 and CSF1, as well as expression of surface anchoring molecule Thy-1, thus suppressing macrophage migration toward and adhesion to tumor cells. These results suggest that emodin acts on both breast cancer cells and macrophages and effectively blocks the tumor-promoting feedforward loop between the two cell types, thereby inhibiting breast cancer growth and metastasis. Mol Cancer Ther; 15(8); 1931-42. ©2016 AACR. PMID:27196773

  11. Emodin suppresses pulmonary metastasis of breast cancer accompanied with decreased macrophage recruitment and M2 polarization in the lungs.

    PubMed

    Jia, Xuemei; Yu, Fang; Wang, Junfeng; Iwanowycz, Stephen; Saaoud, Fatma; Wang, Yuzhen; Hu, Jun; Wang, Qian; Fan, Daping

    2014-11-01

    Breast cancer is the leading cause of death in female cancer patients due to the lack of effective treatment for metastasis. Macrophages are the most abundant immune cells in the primary and metastatic tumors, and contribute to tumor initiation, progression, and metastasis. Emodin has been found to exert anti-tumor effects through promoting cell cycle arrest and apoptosis, and inhibiting angiogenesis, but its effects on tumor-associated macrophages during cancer metastasis have not been investigated. Mice inoculated with 4T1 or EO771 breast cancer cells orthotopically were treated with Emodin after the primary tumors reached 200 mm3 in size. Primary tumor growth, lung metastasis, and macrophage infiltration in the lungs were analyzed. In vitro experiments were performed to examine the effects of Emodin on macrophage migration and M2 polarization, and the underlying mechanisms. Emodin significantly suppressed breast cancer lung metastasis in both orthotopic mouse models without apparent effects on primary tumors. Reduced infiltration of F4/80+ macrophages and Ym1+ M2 macrophages in lungs was observed in Emodin-treated mice. In vitro experiments demonstrated that Emodin decreased the migration of macrophages toward tumor cell-conditioned medium (TCM) and inhibited macrophage M2 polarization induced by TCM. Mechanistically, Emodin suppressed STAT6 phosphorylation and C/EBPβ expression, two crucial signaling events in macrophage M2 polarization, in macrophages treated with IL-4 or TCM. Taken together, our study, for the first time, demonstrated that Emodin suppressed pulmonary metastasis of breast cancer probably through inhibiting macrophage recruitment and M2 polarization in the lungs by reducing STAT6 phosphorylation and C/EBPβ expression.

  12. Breast feeding: religious influences.

    PubMed

    Levin, S

    1979-01-01

    In Orthodox Jewish communities, mothers are expected to breast-feed their infants and this expectation is to some extent based on religious beliefs. The degree to which this expectation promotes breast-feeding success was assessed by comparing a group of 50 Orthodox Jewish mothers with a group of 50 secular Jewish mothers in regard to infant feeding practices. All of the women lived in the Yeoville suburb of Jahannesburg, South Africa. An effort was made to interview all Orthodox mothers with at least 1 child under the age of 5 living in the area and it was assumed that the 50 mothers in the study constituted all or most of that population. A group of 50 secular mothers, comparable in age, education, and general living conditions, was also interviewed. The 50 Orthodox mothers had a total of 155 children and the secular mothers had a total of 119 children. Despite the quasi-religious motivation of the Orthodox mothers to breast-feed, there were few differences in the infant feeding practices of the 2 groups. At the age of 1 month the ratio of breast-fed to bottle-fed infants was 2.5:1 for the infants of Orthodox mothers and 2.3:1 for the infants of secular mothers. At age 6 months the ratio was 1:3 for both groups. At age 9 months the ratio was 1:6.4 for Orthodox mothers and 1:6 for secular mothers. The children of Orthodox mothers were breast-fed for an average of 5 months while the children of mothers of secular children were breast-fed for 4-1/2 months.

  13. Theiler's murine encephalomyelitis virus induces tumour necrosis factor-alpha in murine astrocyte cell cultures.

    PubMed Central

    Sierra, A; Rubio, N

    1993-01-01

    Cytokines have been postulated to exert an important modulatory and recruiting role in demyelination induced by Theiler's murine encephalomyelitis virus (TMEV) in SJL/J mice. Using a cytolytic bioassay and ELISA, we have detected and quantified a cytokine, tumour necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-alpha), in supernatants from astrocyte cultures infected in vitro with TMEV. TNF was detected only after TMEV-specific infection of astrocyte cultures (approximately 200-400 U/ml). In vitro TNF synthesis appeared in a dose- and time-dependent manner and was produced by both SJL/J (a strain susceptible to TMEV-induced demyelination) and BALB/c (a resistant strain) astrocytes. The precise nature of TNF activity was further assessed by fast protein liquid chromatography (FPLC) and antibody neutralization. These results indicate an active role for astrocytes as accessory immune cells in our experimental model for multiple sclerosis. PMID:8478023

  14. Magnetic resonance imaging and spectroscopy of the murine cardiovascular system.

    PubMed

    Akki, Ashwin; Gupta, Ashish; Weiss, Robert G

    2013-03-01

    Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) has emerged as a powerful and reliable tool to noninvasively study the cardiovascular system in clinical practice. Because transgenic mouse models have assumed a critical role in cardiovascular research, technological advances in MRI have been extended to mice over the last decade. These have provided critical insights into cardiac and vascular morphology, function, and physiology/pathophysiology in many murine models of heart disease. Furthermore, magnetic resonance spectroscopy (MRS) has allowed the nondestructive study of myocardial metabolism in both isolated hearts and in intact mice. This article reviews the current techniques and important pathophysiological insights from the application of MRI/MRS technology to murine models of cardiovascular disease.

  15. Fusarium solani breast abscess.

    PubMed

    Anandi, V; Vishwanathan, P; Sasikala, S; Rangarajan, M; Subramaniyan, C S; Chidambaram, N

    2005-07-01

    An unusual manifestation of breast fusariosis was encountered in a 55-year-old female diabetic patient. Two fine needle aspirates (FNA) from the abscess were done at three days interval and they showed hyaline, septate, branched, fungal hyphae in 10% potassium hydroxide mount. Fungal infection was confirmed by demonstrating the fungal hyphae in the midst of lymphocytes, macrophages and neutrophils in Leishman stained smears. Culture of both FNAs yielded a heavy and pure growth of Fusarium solani. The patient responded to oral ketoconazole 200 mg once daily for 3 weeks. The breast fusariosis reported here is presumably the first case in India. PMID:16100431

  16. Vitamin D and Breast Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Klein, Paula; Grossbard, Michael L.

    2012-01-01

    In addition to its role in calcium homeostasis and bone health, vitamin D has also been reported to have anticancer activities against many cancer types, including breast cancer. The discovery that breast epithelial cells possess the same enzymatic system as the kidney, allowing local manufacture of active vitamin D from circulating precursors, makes the effect of vitamin D in breast cancer biologically plausible. Preclinical and ecologic studies have suggested a role for vitamin D in breast cancer prevention. Inverse associations have also been shown between serum 25-hydroxyvitamin D level (25(OH)D) and breast cancer development, risk for breast cancer recurrence, and mortality in women with early-stage breast cancer. Clinical trials of vitamin D supplementation, however, have yielded inconsistent results. Regardless of whether or not vitamin D helps prevent breast cancer or its recurrence, vitamin D deficiency in the U.S. population is very common, and the adverse impact on bone health, a particular concern for breast cancer survivors, makes it important to understand vitamin D physiology and to recognize and treat vitamin D deficiency. In this review, we discuss vitamin D metabolism and its mechanism of action. We summarize the current evidence of the relationship between vitamin D and breast cancer, highlight ongoing research in this area, and discuss optimal dosing of vitamin D for breast cancer prevention. PMID:22234628

  17. Breast-feeding after transplantation.

    PubMed

    Constantinescu, Serban; Pai, Akshta; Coscia, Lisa A; Davison, John M; Moritz, Michael J; Armenti, Vincent T

    2014-11-01

    Transplantation affords recipients the potential for a full life and, for some, parenthood. Female transplant recipients must continue to take immunosuppression during pregnancy and breast-feeding. This article reviews case and series reports regarding breast-feeding in those taking transplant medications. Avoidance of breast-feeding has been the customary advice because of the potential adverse effects of immunosuppressive exposure on the infant. Subsequent studies have demonstrated that not all medication exposure translates to risk for the infant, that the exposure in utero is greater than via breast milk and that no lingering effects due to breast-feeding have been found to date in infants who were breast-fed while their mothers were taking prednisone, azathioprine, cyclosporine, and/or tacrolimus. Thus, except for those medications where clinical information is inadequate (mycophenolic acid products, sirolimus, everolimus, and belatacept), the recommendation for transplant recipients regarding breast-feeding has evolved into one that is cautiously optimistic.

  18. Nanoelectroablation therapy for murine basal cell carcinoma

    SciTech Connect

    Nuccitelli, Richard; Tran, Kevin; Athos, Brian; Kreis, Mark; Nuccitelli, Pamela; Chang, Kris S.; Epstein, Ervin H.; Tang, Jean Y.

    2012-08-03

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Nanoelectroablation is a new, non-thermal therapy that triggers apoptosis in tumors. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Low energy, ultrashort, high voltage pulses ablate the tumor with little or no scar. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Nanoelectroablation eliminates 99.8% of the BCC but may leave a few remnants behind. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Pilot clinical trials on human BCCs are ongoing and leave no remnants in most cases. -- Abstract: When skin tumors are exposed to non-thermal, low energy, nanosecond pulsed electric fields (nsPEF), apoptosis is initiated both in vitro and in vivo. This nanoelectroablation therapy has already been proven effective in treating subdermal murine allograft tumors. We wanted to determine if this therapy would be equally effective in the treatment of autochthonous BCC tumors in Ptch1{sup +/-}K14-Cre-ER p53 fl/fl mice. These tumors are similar to human BCCs in histology and in response to drug therapy . We have treated 27 BCCs across 8 mice with either 300 pulses of 300 ns duration or 2700 pulses of 100 ns duration, all at 30 kV/cm and 5-7 pulses per second. Every nsPEF-treated BCC began to shrink within a day after treatment and their initial mean volume of 36 {+-} 5 (SEM) mm{sup 3} shrunk by 76 {+-} 3% over the ensuing two weeks. After four weeks, they were 99.8% ablated if the size of the treatment electrode matched the tumor size. If the tumor was larger than the 4 mm wide electrode, multiple treatments were needed for complete ablation. Treated tumors were harvested for histological analysis at various times after treatment and exhibited apoptosis markers. Specifically, pyknosis of nuclei was evident as soon as 2 days after nsPEF treatment, and DNA fragmentation as detected via TUNEL staining was also evident post treatment. Nanoelectroablation is effective in triggering apoptosis and remission of radiation-induced BCCs with a single 6 min-long treatment of 2700 pulses.

  19. Redefining Myeloid Cell Subsets in Murine Spleen

    PubMed Central

    Hey, Ying-Ying; Tan, Jonathan K. H.; O’Neill, Helen C.

    2016-01-01

    Spleen is known to contain multiple dendritic and myeloid cell subsets, distinguishable on the basis of phenotype, function and anatomical location. As a result of recent intensive flow cytometric analyses, splenic dendritic cell (DC) subsets are now better characterized than other myeloid subsets. In order to identify and fully characterize a novel splenic subset termed “L-DC” in relation to other myeloid cells, it was necessary to investigate myeloid subsets in more detail. In terms of cell surface phenotype, L-DC were initially characterized as a CD11bhiCD11cloMHCII−Ly6C−Ly6G− subset in murine spleen. Their expression of CD43, lack of MHCII, and a low level of CD11c was shown to best differentiate L-DC by phenotype from conventional DC subsets. A complete analysis of all subsets in spleen led to the classification of CD11bhiCD11cloMHCII−Ly6CloLy6G− cells as monocytes expressing CX3CR1, CD43 and CD115. Siglec-F expression was used to identify a specific eosinophil population, distinguishable from both Ly6Clo and Ly6Chi monocytes, and other DC subsets. L-DC were characterized as a clear subset of CD11bhiCD11cloMHCII−Ly6C−Ly6G− cells, which are CD43+, Siglec-F− and CD115−. Changes in the prevalence of L-DC compared to other subsets in spleens of mutant mice confirmed the phenotypic distinction between L-DC, cDC and monocyte subsets. L-DC development in vivo was shown to occur independently of the BATF3 transcription factor that regulates cDC development, and also independently of the FLT3L and GM-CSF growth factors which drive cDC and monocyte development, so distinguishing L-DC from these commonly defined cell types. PMID:26793192

  20. Kif14 overexpression accelerates murine retinoblastoma development.

    PubMed

    O'Hare, Michael; Shadmand, Mehdi; Sulaiman, Rania S; Sishtla, Kamakshi; Sakisaka, Toshiaki; Corson, Timothy W

    2016-10-15

    The mitotic kinesin KIF14 has an essential role in the recruitment of proteins required for the final stages of cytokinesis. Genomic gain and/or overexpression of KIF14 has been documented in retinoblastoma and a number of other cancers, such as breast, lung and ovarian carcinomas, strongly suggesting its role as an oncogene. Despite evidence of oncogenic properties in vitro and in xenografts, Kif14's role in tumor progression has not previously been studied in a transgenic cancer model. Using a novel Kif14 overexpressing, simian virus 40 large T-antigen retinoblastoma (TAg-RB) double transgenic mouse model, we aimed to determine Kif14's role in promoting retinal tumor formation. Tumor initiation and development in double transgenics and control TAg-RB littermates were documented in vivo over a time course by optical coherence tomography, with subsequent ex vivo quantification of tumor burden. Kif14 overexpression led to an accelerated initiation of tumor formation in the TAg-RB model and a significantly decreased tumor doubling time (1.8 vs. 2.9 weeks). Moreover, overall percentage tumor burden was also increased by Kif14 overexpression. These data provide the first evidence that Kif14 can promote tumor formation in susceptible cells in vivo. PMID:27270502

  1. Affluence and Breast Cancer.

    PubMed

    Lehrer, Steven; Green, Sheryl; Rosenzweig, Kenneth E

    2016-09-01

    High income, high socioeconomic status, and affluence increase breast cancer incidence. Socioeconomic status in USA breast cancer studies has been assessed by block-group socioeconomic measures. A block group is a portion of a census tract with boundaries that segregate, as far as possible, socioeconomic groups. In this study, we used US Census income data instead of block groups to gauge socioeconomic status of breast cancer patients in relationship with incidence, prognostic markers, and survival. US state breast cancer incidence and mortality data are from the U.S. Cancer Statistics Working Group, United States Cancer Statistics: 1999-2011. Three-Year-Average Median Household Income by State, 2010 to 2012, is from the U.S. Census Bureau, Current Population Survey, 2011 to 2013 Annual Social and Economic Supplements. County incomes are from the 2005-2009 American Community Survey of the U.S. Census Bureau. The American Community Survey is an ongoing statistical survey that samples a small percentage of the population yearly. Its purpose is to provide communities the information they need to plan investments and services. Breast cancer county incidence and survival data are from the National Cancer Institute's Surveillance, Epidemiology and End Results Program (SEER) data base. We analyzed SEER data from 198 counties in California, Connecticut, Georgia, Hawaii, Iowa, New Mexico, Utah, and Washington. SEER uses the Collaborative Stage (CS) Data Collection System. We have retained the SEER CS variables. There was a significant relationship of income with breast cancer incidence in 50 USA states and the District of Columbia in White women (r = 0.623, p < 0.001). There was a significant relationship between node involvement and income in Whites in 198 USA counties. Income was significantly correlated with 5-year relative survival in Whites with localized breast cancer. Income was not correlated with 5-year survival of Black race (p = 0.364) or other races (p = 0

  2. The application of surgical navigation system using optical molecular imaging technology in orthotopic breast cancer and metastasis studies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chi, Chongwei; Zhang, Qian; Kou, Deqiang; Ye, Jinzuo; Mao, Yamin; Qiu, Jingdan; Wang, Jiandong; Yang, Xin; Du, Yang; Tian, Jie

    2014-02-01

    Currently, it has been an international focus on intraoperative precise positioning and accurate resection of tumor and metastases. The methods such as X-rays, computed tomography (CT), magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and positron emission tomography (PET) have played an important role in preoperative accurate diagnosis. However, most of them are inapplicable for intraoperative surgery. We have proposed a surgical navigation system based on optical molecular imaging technology for intraoperative detection of tumors and metastasis. This system collects images from two CCD cameras for real-time fluorescent and color imaging. For image processing, the template matching algorithm is used for multispectral image fusion. For the application of tumor detection, the mouse breast cancer cell line 4T1-luc, which shows highly metastasis, was used for tumor model establishment and a model of matrix metalloproteinase (MMP) expressing breast cancer. The tumor-bearing nude mice were given tail vein injection of MMP 750FAST (PerkinElmer, Inc. USA) probe and imaged with both bioluminescence and fluorescence to assess in vivo binding of the probe to the tumor and metastases sites. Hematoxylin and eosin (H&E) staining was performed to confirm the presence of tumor and metastasis. As a result, one tumor can be observed visually in vivo. However liver metastasis has been detected under surgical navigation system and all were confirmed by histology. This approach helps surgeons to find orthotopic tumors and metastasis during intraoperative resection and visualize tumor borders for precise positioning. Further investigation is needed for future application in clinics.

  3. Targeted inactivation of β1 integrin induces β3 integrin switching, which drives breast cancer metastasis by TGF-β

    PubMed Central

    Parvani, Jenny G.; Galliher-Beckley, Amy J.; Schiemann, Barbara J.; Schiemann, William P.

    2013-01-01

    Mammary tumorigenesis and epithelial–mesenchymal transition (EMT) programs cooperate in converting transforming growth factor-β (TGF-β) from a suppressor to a promoter of breast cancer metastasis. Although previous reports associated β1 and β3 integrins with TGF-β stimulation of EMT and metastasis, the functional interplay and plasticity exhibited by these adhesion molecules in shaping the oncogenic activities of TGF-β remain unknown. We demonstrate that inactivation of β1 integrin impairs TGF-β from stimulating the motility of normal and malignant mammary epithelial cells (MECs) and elicits robust compensatory expression of β3 integrin solely in malignant MECs, but not in their normal counterparts. Compensatory β3 integrin expression also 1) enhances the growth of malignant MECs in rigid and compliant three-dimensional organotypic cultures and 2) restores the induction of the EMT phenotypes by TGF-β. Of importance, compensatory expression of β3 integrin rescues the growth and pulmonary metastasis of β1 integrin–deficient 4T1 tumors in mice, a process that is prevented by genetic depletion or functional inactivation of β3 integrin. Collectively our findings demonstrate that inactivation of β1 integrin elicits metastatic progression via a β3 integrin–specific mechanism, indicating that dual β1 and β3 integrin targeting is necessary to alleviate metastatic disease in breast cancer patients. PMID:24006485

  4. Targeting CXCL12/CXCR4 signaling with oncolytic virotherapy disrupts tumor vasculature and inhibits breast cancer metastases

    PubMed Central

    Gil, Margaret; Seshadri, Mukund; Komorowski, Marcin P.; Abrams, Scott I.; Kozbor, Danuta

    2013-01-01

    Oncolytic viruses hold promise for the treatment of cancer, but their interaction with the tumor microenvironment needs to be elucidated for optimal tumor cell killing. Because the CXCR4 receptor for the stromal cell-derived factor-1 (SDF-1/CXCL12) chemokine is one of the key stimuli involved in signaling interactions between tumor cells and their stromal microenvironment, we used oncolytic virotherapy with a CXCR4 antagonist to target the CXCL12/CXCR4 signaling axis in a triple-negative 4T1 breast carcinoma in syngeneic mice. We show here that CXCR4 antagonist expression from an oncolytic vaccinia virus delivered intravenously to mice with orthotopic tumors attains higher intratumoral concentration than its soluble counterpart and exhibits increased efficacy over that mediated by oncolysis alone. A systemic delivery of the armed virus after resection of the primary tumor was efficacious in inhibiting the development of spontaneous metastasis and increased overall tumor-free survival. Inhibition of tumor growth with the armed virus was associated with destruction of tumor vasculature, reductions in expression of CXCL12 and VEGF, and decrease in intratumoral numbers of bone marrow-derived endothelial and myeloid cells. These changes led to induction of antitumor antibody responses and resistance to tumor rechallenge. Engineering an oncolytic virus armed with a CXCR4 antagonist represents an innovative strategy that targets multiple elements within the tumor microenvironment. As such, this approach could have a significant therapeutic impact against primary and metastatic breast cancer. PMID:23509246

  5. Co-nanoencapsulation of magnetic nanoparticles and selol for breast tumor treatment: in vitro evaluation of cytotoxicity and magnetohyperthermia efficacy

    PubMed Central

    Estevanato, Luciana LC; Silva, Jaqueline R Da; Falqueiro, André M; Mosiniewicz-Szablewska, Ewa; Suchocki, Piotr; Tedesco, Antônio C; Morais, Paulo C; Lacava, Zulmira GM

    2012-01-01

    Antitumor activities have been described in selol, a hydrophobic mixture of molecules containing selenium in their structure, and also in maghemite magnetic nanoparticles (MNPs). Both selol and MNPs were co-encapsulated within poly(lactic-co-glycolic acid) (PLGA) nanocapsules for therapeutic purposes. The PLGA-nanocapsules loaded with MNPs and selol were labeled MSE-NC and characterized by transmission and scanning electron microscopy, electrophoretic mobility, photon correlation spectroscopy, presenting a monodisperse profile, and positive charge. The antitumor effect of MSE-NC was evaluated using normal (MCF-10A) and neoplastic (4T1 and MCF-7) breast cell lines. Nanocapsules containing only MNPs or selol were used as control. MTT assay showed that the cytotoxicity induced by MSE-NC was dose and time dependent. Normal cells were less affected than tumor cells. Cell death occurred mainly by apoptosis. Further exposure of MSE-NC treated neoplastic breast cells to an alternating magnetic field increased the antitumor effect of MSE-NC. It was concluded that selol-loaded magnetic PLGA-nanocapsules (MSE-NC) represent an effective magnetic material platform to promote magnetohyperthermia and thus a potential system for antitumor therapy. PMID:23055734

  6. Cooperative Treatment of Metastatic Breast Cancer Using Host-Guest Nanoplatform Coloaded with Docetaxel and siRNA.

    PubMed

    Wang, Dangge; Wang, Tingting; Xu, Zhiai; Yu, Haijun; Feng, Bing; Zhang, Junying; Guo, Chengyue; Yin, Qi; Zhang, Zhiwen; Li, Yaping

    2016-01-27

    Conventional chemotherapy shows moderate efficiency against metastatic cancer since it targets only part of the mechanisms regulating tumor growth and metastasis. Here, gold nanorod (GNR)-based host-guest nanoplatforms loaded with docetaxel (DTX) and small interfering RNA (siRNA)-p65 (referred to as DTX-loaded GNR (GDTX)/p65) for chemo-, RNA interference (RNAi), and photothermal ablation (PTA) cooperative treatment of metastatic breast cancer are reported. To prepare the nanoplatform, GNRs are first coated with cyclodextrin (CD)-grafted polyethylenimine (PEI) and then loaded with DTX and siRNA through host-guest interaction with CD and electrostatic interaction with PEI, respectively. Upon near-infrared laser irradiation, GNRs generate a significant hyperthermia effect to trigger siRNA and DTX release. DTX reduces tumor growth by inhibiting mitosis of cancer cells. Meanwhile, siRNA-p65 suppresses lung metastasis and proliferation of cancer cells by blocking the nuclear factor kappa B (NF-κB) pathway and downregulating the downstream genes matrix metalloproteinase-9 (MMP-9) and B cell lymphoma-2 (Bcl-2). It is demonstrated that GDTX/p65 in combination with laser irradiation significantly inhibits the growth and lung metastasis of 4T1 breast tumors. The antitumor results suggest promising potential of the host-guest nanoplatform for combinational treatment of metastatic cancer by using RNAi, chemotherapy, and PTA. PMID:26662850

  7. Fulvestrant and/or Anastrozole in Treating Postmenopausal Patients With Stage II-III Breast Cancer Undergoing Surgery

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-09-15

    Estrogen Receptor-positive Breast Cancer; HER2-negative Breast Cancer; Invasive Ductal Breast Carcinoma; Invasive Lobular Breast Carcinoma; Recurrent Breast Cancer; Stage II Breast Cancer; Stage IIIA Breast Cancer; Stage IIIB Breast Cancer; Stage IIIC Breast Cancer

  8. Azacitidine in Treating Patients With Triple Negative Stage I-IV Invasive Breast Cancer That Can Be Removed By Surgery

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2014-02-05

    Recurrent Breast Cancer; Stage IA Breast Cancer; Stage IB Breast Cancer; Stage II Breast Cancer; Stage IIIA Breast Cancer; Stage IIIB Breast Cancer; Stage IIIC Breast Cancer; Stage IV Breast Cancer; Triple-negative Breast Cancer

  9. Cosmetic breast surgery - discharge

    MedlinePlus

    ... have a loss of sensation in your breast skin and nipples after surgery. Sensation may return over time. You may need help with your everyday activities for a few days until your pain and swelling decrease. Incision scars may take several months to over a year ...

  10. Types of Breast Pumps

    MedlinePlus

    ... uses batteries or a cord plugged into an electrical outlet to power a small motorized pump that creates suction to ... pumping. Because these breast pumps rely on a power source, women who use ... situations when electricity or extra batteries may not be available. If ...

  11. [Physical breast examination].

    PubMed

    Migda, Renata; Salamon-Zagajska, Magdalena; Wacławiak, Barbara

    2004-01-01

    The aim of the project was the comparison of the effectiveness of physical breast examination in relation to mammography on the basis of research analysis conducted within the program "The Early Diagnosis of Breast Cancer". The program was conducted at J. Sniadecki Hospital in Nowy Sacz in the year 2002. The physical examination was carried out by professional midwives. The documentation of 400 women who participated in the program was analyzed in order to gain the necessary information. Half of the participants have identified anomalies in breasts (202; 50.5%). There was no difference in the number of the mentioned anomalies between the group of the younger (55; 50.0%) and older women (147; 50.7%). One of the three anomalies diagnosed in mammography was earlier diagnosed in the physical examination. It is important to indicate that it seems more difficult to detect the anomalies in the group of younger women (13; 23.6%) than in the group of the older women (47; 32.0%). Among all anomalies diagnosed in mammography more than half (98; 53.3%) are mastopathies. Only one of the five mastopathies (19; 19.4%) was detected in physical examination. The majority of women who participated in the prevention program live in the city (244; 61.0%). Women from cities had more breast anomalies (53.3%) than women from the country (46.1%).

  12. Murine myocardium OCT imaging with a blood substitute

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Jeehyun; Villard, Joseph W.; Lee, Ho; Feldman, Marc D.; Milner, Thomas E.

    2002-06-01

    Imaging of the in vivo murine myocardium using optical coherence tomography (OCT) is described. Application of conventional techniques (e.g. MRI, Ultrasound imaging) for imaging the murine myocardium is problematic because the wall thickness is less than 1.5mm (20g mouse), and the heart rate can be as high as six-hundred beats per minute. To acquire a real-time image of the murine myocardium, OCT can provide sufficient spatial resolution (10 micrometers ) and imaging speed (1000 A-Scans/s). Strong light scattering by blood in the heart causes significant light attenuation making delineation of the endocardium-chamber boundary problematic. By replacing whole blood in the mouse with an artificial blood substitute we demonstrate significant reduction of light scattering in the murine myocardium. The results indicate a significant reduction in light scattering as whole blood hematocrit is diminished below 5%. To measure thickness change of the myocardium during one cycle, a myocardium edge detection algorithm is developed and demonstrated.

  13. What's New in Breast Cancer Research and Treatment?

    MedlinePlus

    ... References: Breast cancer detailed guide What`s new in breast cancer research and treatment? Researchers around the world are ... for breast cancer Breast cancer treatment Causes of breast cancer Studies continue to uncover lifestyle factors and habits, ...

  14. [Minimally invasive breast surgery].

    PubMed

    Mátrai, Zoltán; Gulyás, Gusztáv; Kunos, Csaba; Sávolt, Akos; Farkas, Emil; Szollár, András; Kásler, Miklós

    2014-02-01

    Due to the development in medical science and industrial technology, minimally invasive procedures have appeared in the surgery of benign and malignant breast diseases. In general , such interventions result in significantly reduced breast and chest wall scars, shorter hospitalization and less pain, but they require specific, expensive devices, longer surgical time compared to open surgery. Furthermore, indications or oncological safety have not been established yet. It is quite likely, that minimally invasive surgical procedures with high-tech devices - similar to other surgical subspecialties -, will gradually become popular and it may form part of routine breast surgery even. Vacuum-assisted core biopsy with a therapeutic indication is suitable for the removal of benign fibroadenomas leaving behind an almost invisible scar, while endoscopically assisted skin-sparing and nipple-sparing mastectomy, axillary staging and reconstruction with latissimus dorsi muscle flap are all feasible through the same short axillary incision. Endoscopic techniques are also suitable for the diagnostics and treatment of intracapsular complications of implant-based breast reconstructions (intracapsular fluid, implant rupture, capsular contracture) and for the biopsy of intracapsular lesions with uncertain pathology. Perception of the role of radiofrequency ablation of breast tumors requires further hands-on experience, but it is likely that it can serve as a replacement of surgical removal in a portion of primary tumors in the future due to the development in functional imaging and anticancer drugs. With the reduction of the price of ductoscopes routine examination of the ductal branch system, guided microdochectomy and targeted surgical removal of terminal ducto-lobular units or a "sick lobe" as an anatomical unit may become feasible. The paper presents the experience of the authors and provides a literature review, for the first time in Hungarian language on the subject. Orv. Hetil

  15. Metabolic Imaging: A link between Lactate Dehydrogenase A, Lactate and Tumor Phenotype

    PubMed Central

    Thakur, Sunitha B.; Vider, Jelena; Russell, James; Blasberg, Ronald; Koutcher, Jason A.

    2014-01-01

    Purpose We compared the metabolic profiles and the association between LDH-A expression and lactate production in two isogenic murine breast cancer cell lines and tumors (67NR and 4T1). These cell lines were derived from a single mammary tumor and have different growth and metabolic phenotypes. Experimental Design LDH-A expression, lactate concentration, glucose utilization and oxygen consumption were measured in cells, and the potential relationship between tumor lactate levels (measured by magnetic resonance spectroscopic imaging (MRSI)) and tumor glucose utilization (measured by [18F] 2-deoxy-2-fluoro-D-glucose positron emission tomography ([18F]FDG-PET)) was assessed in orthotopic breast tumors derived from these cell lines. Results We show a substantial difference in LDH-A expression between 67NR and 4T1 cells under normoxia and hypoxia. We also show that small orthotopic 4T1 tumors generate tenfold more lactate than corresponding 67NR tumors. The high lactate levels in small primary 4T1 tumors are associated with intense pimonidazole staining (a hypoxia indicator). Less intense hypoxia staining was observed in the larger 67NR tumors, and is consistent with the gradual increase and plateau of lactate concentration in enlarging 67NR tumors. Conclusions Lactate-MRSI has a greater dynamic range than [18F]FDG-PET and may be a more sensitive measure with which to evaluate the aggressive and metastatic potential of primary breast tumors. PMID:21844011

  16. Eigenbreasts for statistical breast phantoms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sturgeon, Gregory M.; Tward, Daniel J.; Ketcha, M.; Ratnanather, J. T.; Miller, M. I.; Park, Subok; Segars, W. P.; Lo, Joseph Y.

    2016-03-01

    To facilitate rigorous virtual clinical trials using model observers for breast imaging optimization and evaluation, we demonstrated a method of defining statistical models, based on 177 sets of breast CT patient data, in order to generate tens of thousands of unique digital breast phantoms. In order to separate anatomical texture from variation in breast shape, each training set of breast phantoms were deformed to a consistent atlas compressed geometry. Principal component analysis (PCA) was then performed on the shape-matched breast CT volumes to capture the variation of patient breast textures. PCA decomposes the training set of N breast CT volumes into an N-1-dimensional space of eigenvectors, which we call eigenbreasts. By summing weighted combinations of eigenbreasts, a large ensemble of different breast phantoms can be newly created. Different training sets can be used in eigenbreast analysis for designing basis models to target sub-populations defined by breast characteristics, such as size or density. In this work, we plan to generate ensembles of 30,000 new phantoms based on glandularity for an upcoming virtual trial of lesion detectability in digital breast tomosynthesis. Our method extends our series of digital and physical breast phantoms based on human subject anatomy, providing the capability to generate new, unique ensembles consisting of tens of thousands or more virtual subjects. This work represents an important step towards conducting future virtual trials for tasks-based assessment of breast imaging, where it is vital to have a large ensemble of realistic phantoms for statistical power as well as clinical relevance.

  17. Transfer of Maternal Immune Cells by Breastfeeding: Maternal Cytotoxic T Lymphocytes Present in Breast Milk Localize in the Peyer’s Patches of the Nursed Infant

    PubMed Central

    Tang, May; Zumba, Osvaldo; Mehta, Hetali; Toma, Annmarie; Sant’Angelo, Derek; Laouar, Yasmina

    2016-01-01

    Despite our knowledge of the protective role of antibodies passed to infants through breast milk, our understanding of immunity transfer via maternal leukocytes is still limited. To emulate the immunological interface between the mother and her infant while breast-feeding, we used murine pups fostered after birth onto MHC-matched and MHC-mismatched dams. Overall, data revealed that: 1) Survival of breast milk leukocytes in suckling infants is possible, but not significant after the foster-nursing ceases; 2) Most breast milk lymphocytes establish themselves in specific areas of the intestine termed Peyer’s patches (PPs); 3) While most leukocytes in the milk bolus were myeloid cells, the majority of breast milk leukocytes localized to PPs were T lymphocytes, and cytotoxic T cells (CTLs) in particular; 4) These CTLs exhibit high levels of the gut-homing molecules α4β7 and CCR9, but a reduced expression of the systemic homing marker CD62L; 5) Under the same activation conditions, transferred CD8 T cells through breast milk have a superior capacity to produce potent cytolytic and inflammatory mediators when compared to those generated by the breastfed infant. It is therefore possible that maternal CTLs found in breast milk are directed to the PPs to compensate for the immature adaptive immune system of the infant in order to protect it against constant oral infectious risks during the postnatal phase. PMID:27285085

  18. You, Your Teenage Daughter and Breast Cancer.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brateman, Libby

    1991-01-01

    Discusses breast cancer and teenagers, focusing on how parents can introduce the subject and encourage breast self-examination. The article provides information on breast cancer statistics, mammography, and American Cancer Society services. (SM)

  19. Surgery for Breast Cancer in Men

    MedlinePlus

    ... therapy for breast cancer in men Surgery for breast cancer in men The thought of surgery can be ... 2 to 3 hours. What to expect after breast cancer surgery: After your surgery, you will be taken ...

  20. Dose to the contralateral breast due to primary breast irradiation

    SciTech Connect

    Fraass, B.A.; Roberson, P.L.; Lichter, A.S.

    1985-03-01

    The radiation dose received by the contralateral breast during primary breast irradiation is of concern because breast tissue is subject to cancer induction from low to moderate doses of radiation. In this paper the dose to the opposite breast has been studied in detail for common breast treatment techniques. Measurements have been made on 16 patients, a water phantom, a polystyrene phantom with cork inserts to simulate lung tissue, and a body-shaped phantom with wax breasts. Thermoluminescent dosimeters (TLD), ion chambers, diodes, and film have been used in the various configurations. The patient measurements have shown that there is a wide variation in the opposite breast dose received by patients, even when all are treated with, for example, tangential fields alone. With the phantom measurements, it has been possible to determine the contributions to the opposite breast dose from each of the relevant factors. This makes it possible to explain the wide variation in patient dose measurements, and to make some relatively simple recommendations that will allow the reduction of the dose to the opposite breast from several hundred cGy to about 50 cGy for a typical treatment course dose of 5000 cGy.

  1. Anti-transforming growth factor ß antibody treatment rescues bone loss and prevents breast cancer metastasis to bone.

    PubMed

    Biswas, Swati; Nyman, Jeffry S; Alvarez, JoAnn; Chakrabarti, Anwesa; Ayres, Austin; Sterling, Julie; Edwards, James; Rana, Tapasi; Johnson, Rachelle; Perrien, Daniel S; Lonning, Scott; Shyr, Yu; Matrisian, Lynn M; Mundy, Gregory R

    2011-01-01

    Breast cancer often metastasizes to bone causing osteolytic bone resorption which releases active TGFβ. Because TGFβ favors progression of breast cancer metastasis to bone, we hypothesized that treatment using anti-TGFβ antibody may reduce tumor burden and rescue tumor-associated bone loss in metastatic breast cancer. In this study we have tested the efficacy of an anti-TGFβ antibody 1D11 preventing breast cancer bone metastasis. We have used two preclinical breast cancer bone metastasis models, in which either human breast cancer cells or murine mammary tumor cells were injected in host mice via left cardiac ventricle. Using several in vivo, in vitro and ex vivo assays, we have demonstrated that anti-TGFβ antibody treatment have significantly reduced tumor burden in the bone along with a statistically significant threefold reduction in osteolytic lesion number and tenfold reduction in osteolytic lesion area. A decrease in osteoclast numbers (p = 0.027) in vivo and osteoclastogenesis ex vivo were also observed. Most importantly, in tumor-bearing mice, anti-TGFβ treatment resulted in a twofold increase in bone volume (p<0.01). In addition, treatment with anti-TGFβ antibody increased the mineral-to-collagen ratio in vivo, a reflection of improved tissue level properties. Moreover, anti-TGFβ antibody directly increased mineralized matrix formation in calverial osteoblast (p = 0.005), suggesting a direct beneficial role of anti-TGFβ antibody treatment on osteoblasts. Data presented here demonstrate that anti-TGFβ treatment may offer a novel therapeutic option for tumor-induced bone disease and has the dual potential for simultaneously decreasing tumor burden and rescue bone loss in breast cancer to bone metastases. This approach of intervention has the potential to reduce skeletal related events (SREs) in breast cancer survivors.

  2. [Neoadjuvant therapy in breast cancer].

    PubMed

    Ena, G

    2011-09-01

    Neoadjuvant treatment is the standard therapy for inflammatory and locally advanced breast cancer but is also applied in patients with primary operable breast cancer to facilitate breast-conserving surgery. Disease-free survival and overall survival are equivalent between patients treated with preoperative chemotherapy and patient receiving the same regimen postoperatively. Nevertheless, pathologic complete response can be a predictive indicator of long-term outcomes. Initially encompassing chemotherapy, it is actually extended to hormonotherapy for hormonoresponsive tumor and to targeted therapy such as trastuzumab for the HER2 positive tumor. The neoadjuvant approach of breast cancer will provide better understanding of breast cancer biology and promote translational research. In this paper, a review of the role of preoperative treatment in the management of breast cancer disease is discussed.

  3. Paget's disease of the breast.

    PubMed

    Freund, H; Maydovnik, M; Laufer, N; Durst, A L

    1977-01-01

    Twenty-nine histologically verified cases of Paget's disease of the breast treated at the Hadassah University Hospital in the years 1949-1972 were followed up and analyzed. Dividing this material into two groups according to the presence or absence of a palpable breast tumor revealed significant difference in behavior and survival. Patients with a breast mass (34%) had a 50% axillary lymph node involvement and behaved as with any other ordinary breast cancer, with a 5-year survival rate of 40% and a 10-year survival rate of 33%. Patients with no palpable breast mass (66%) had only a 10.5% lymph node involvement, the 5-year survival rate being 94% and the 10-year survival rate being 91%. Delay in diagnosis seems to play no significant factor in survival rates and outcome. We believe radical mastectomy to be the treatment of choice in all cases of Paget's disease of the breast. PMID:190481

  4. Inhibition of laminin-5 production in breast epithelial cells by overexpression of p300.

    PubMed

    Miller, K A; Chung, J; Lo, D; Jones, J C; Thimmapaya, B; Weitzman, S A

    2000-03-17

    The transcriptional coactivator p300 is essential for normal embryonic development and cellular differentiation. We have been studying the role of p300 in the transcription of a variety of genes, and we became interested in the role of this coactivator in the transcription of genes important in breast epithelial cell biology. From MCF-10A cells (spontaneously immortalized, nontransformed human breast epithelial cells), we developed cell lines that stably overexpress p300. These p300-overexpressing cells displayed reduced adhesion to culture dishes and were found to secrete an extracellular matrix deficient in laminin-5. Laminin-5 is the major extracellular matrix component produced by breast epithelium. Immunofluorescence studies, as well as experiments using normal matrix, confirmed that the decreased adhesion of p300-overexpressing cells is due to laminin-5-deficient extracellular matrix and not due to loss of laminin-5 receptors. Northern blots revealed markedly decreased levels of expression of two of the genes (designated LAMA3 and LAMC2) encoding the alpha3 and gamma2 chains of the laminin-5 heterotrimer in the cells that overexpress p300, whereas LAMB3 mRNA, encoding the third or beta3 chain of laminin-5, was not markedly reduced. Transient transfection experiments with a vector containing a murine LAMA3 promoter demonstrate that overexpressing p300 down-regulates the LAMA3 promoter. In summary, overexpression of p300 leads to down-regulation of laminin-5 production in breast epithelial cells, resulting in decreased adhesion. PMID:10713141

  5. No evidence for the involvement of XMRV or MCV in the pathogenesis of breast cancer

    PubMed Central

    Khan, G; Philip, P S; Naase, M; Al Zarouni, K M I

    2012-01-01

    Background: The aetiology of breast cancer remains elusive. A viral aetiology has been proposed, but to date no virus has been conclusively demonstrated to be involved. Recently, two new viruses, namely Merkel cell polyomavirus (MCV) and xenotropic murine leukaemia virus-related virus (XMRV) have been identified and implicated in the pathogenesis of Merkel cell carcinoma (MCC) and familial form of prostate cancer, respectively. Methods: We examined 204 samples from 58 different cases of breast cancer for presence of MCV or XMRV by PCR. Samples consisted of both malignant and non-malignant tissues. Additionally, we included 6 cases of MCC and 12 cases of prostate cancer as potential controls for MCV and XMRV, respectively. Results: All of the breast cancer samples examined were negative for both MCV and XMRV. However, 4/6 MCC and 2/12 prostate cancer samples were found to be positive for MCV and XMRV, respectively. Sequence analysis of the amplified products confirmed that these sequences belonged to MCV and XMRV. Conclusion: We conclude that there is no evidence for the involvement of MCV or XMRV in the pathogenesis of breast cancer. What role these viruses have in the pathogenesis of MCC and prostate carcinomas remains to be demonstrated. PMID:22343621

  6. Design and Validation of PEG-Derivatized Vitamin E Copolymer for Drug Delivery into Breast Cancer.

    PubMed

    Li, Yanping; Liu, Qinhui; Li, Wenyao; Zhang, Ting; Li, Hanmei; Li, Rui; Chen, Lei; Pu, Shiyun; Kuang, Jiangying; Su, Zhiguang; Zhang, Zhirong; He, Jinhan

    2016-08-17

    This study examined the ability of amphiphilic poly(ethylene glycol) (PEG) derivatives to assemble into micelles for drug delivery. Linear PEG chains were modified on one end with hydrophobic vitamin E succinate (VES), and PEG and VES were mixed in different molar ratios to make amphiphiles, which were characterized in terms of critical micelle concentration (CMC), drug loading capacity (DLC), serum stability, tumor spheroid penetration and tumor targeting in vitro and in vivo. The amphiphile PEG5K-VES6 (PAMV6), which has a wheat-like structure, showed a CMC of 3.03 × 10(-6) M, good serum stability, and tumor accumulation. The model drug, pirarubicin (THP), could be efficiently loaded into PAMV6 micelles at a DLC of 24.81%. PAMV6/THP micelles were more effective than THP solution at inducing cell apoptosis and G2/M arrest in 4T1 cells. THP-loaded PAMV6 micelles also inhibited tumor growth much more than free THP in a syngeneic mouse model of breast cancer. PAMV6-based micellar systems show promise as nanocarriers for improved anticancer chemotherapy. PMID:27418000

  7. Breast cancer lung metastasis requires expression of chemokine receptor CCR4 and regulatory T cells.

    PubMed

    Olkhanud, Purevdorj B; Baatar, Dolgor; Bodogai, Monica; Hakim, Fran; Gress, Ronald; Anderson, Robin L; Deng, Jie; Xu, Mai; Briest, Susanne; Biragyn, Arya

    2009-07-15

    Cancer metastasis is a leading cause of cancer morbidity and mortality. More needs to be learned about mechanisms that control this process. In particular, the role of chemokine receptors in metastasis remains controversial. Here, using a highly metastatic breast cancer (4T1) model, we show that lung metastasis is a feature of only a proportion of the tumor cells that express CCR4. Moreover, the primary tumor growing in mammary pads activates remotely the expression of TARC/CCL17 and MDC/CCL22 in the lungs. These chemokines acting through CCR4 attract both tumor and immune cells. However, CCR4-mediated chemotaxis was not sufficient to produce metastasis, as tumor cells in the lung were efficiently eliminated by natural killer (NK) cells. Lung metastasis required CCR4(+) regulatory T cells (Treg), which directly killed NK cells using beta-galactoside-binding protein. Thus, strategies that abrogate any part of this process should improve the outcome through activation of effector cells and prevention of tumor cell migration. We confirm this prediction by killing CCR4(+) cells through delivery of TARC-fused toxins or depleting Tregs and preventing lung metastasis. PMID:19567680

  8. Digital Mammography and Digital Breast Tomosynthesis.

    PubMed

    Moseley, Tanya W

    2016-06-01

    Breast imaging technology has advanced significantly from the 1930s until the present. American women have a 1 in 8 chance of developing breast cancer. Mammography has been proven in multiple clinical trials to reduce breast cancer mortality. Although a mainstay of breast imaging and improved from film-screen mammography, digital mammography is not a perfect examination. Overlapping obscuring breast tissue limits mammographic interpretation. Breast digital tomosynthesis reduces and/or eliminates overlapping obscuring breast tissue. Although there are some disadvantages with digital breast tomosynthesis, this relatively lost-cost technology may be used effectively in the screening and diagnostic settings. PMID:27101241

  9. Aluminium, antiperspirants and breast cancer.

    PubMed

    Darbre, P D

    2005-09-01

    Aluminium salts are used as the active antiperspirant agent in underarm cosmetics, but the effects of widespread, long term and increasing use remain unknown, especially in relation to the breast, which is a local area of application. Clinical studies showing a disproportionately high incidence of breast cancer in the upper outer quadrant of the breast together with reports of genomic instability in outer quadrants of the breast provide supporting evidence for a role for locally applied cosmetic chemicals in the development of breast cancer. Aluminium is known to have a genotoxic profile, capable of causing both DNA alterations and epigenetic effects, and this would be consistent with a potential role in breast cancer if such effects occurred in breast cells. Oestrogen is a well established influence in breast cancer and its action, dependent on intracellular receptors which function as ligand-activated zinc finger transcription factors, suggests one possible point of interference from aluminium. Results reported here demonstrate that aluminium in the form of aluminium chloride or aluminium chlorhydrate can interfere with the function of oestrogen receptors of MCF7 human breast cancer cells both in terms of ligand binding and in terms of oestrogen-regulated reporter gene expression. This adds aluminium to the increasing list of metals capable of interfering with oestrogen action and termed metalloestrogens. Further studies are now needed to identify the molecular basis of this action, the longer term effects of aluminium exposure and whether aluminium can cause aberrations to other signalling pathways in breast cells. Given the wide exposure of the human population to antiperspirants, it will be important to establish dermal absorption in the local area of the breast and whether long term low level absorption could play a role in the increasing incidence of breast cancer. PMID:16045991

  10. Reproductive factors and breast cancer.

    PubMed

    Kelsey, J L; Gammon, M D; John, E M

    1993-01-01

    Early age at menarche, late age at menopause, and late age at first full-term pregnancy are linked to a modest increase in the risk of developing breast cancer. Some evidence suggests that the earlier the full-term pregnancy, the earlier the period of decreased susceptibility of breast tissue changes begins. Nulliparity is related to an increased risk for breast cancer diagnosed after 40 years old. Multiple full-term pregnancies decrease the risk of breast cancers diagnosed after 40 years regardless of the age at first birth. On the other hand, they may increase the risk for breast cancers diagnosed before 40 years old. Surgical removal of the ovaries protects against breast cancer. Breast feeding apparently protects against breast cancer in China, but a protective effect has not been established in the US. Other than shorter intervals between menstrual periods, which tend to increase the risk, research has not yet made clear the etiologic roles of menstrual cycle characteristics. Other unclear etiologic roles include increased intervals between births, spontaneous and induced abortion, infertility, multiple births at last pregnancy, and hypertension during pregnancy. Researchers tend to accept a mechanism to explain the epidemiologic characteristics of menstrual activity and the increased risk of breast cancer, but no mechanisms have emerged for the other likely risk factors. Greater exposure to estrogen and progesterone simultaneously are linked to early age at menarche, late age at menopause, and shorter menstrual cycle length. So far, data show that long-term combined estrogen/progestin hormone replacement therapy and long-term use of oral contraceptives increase the risk of breast cancer. Moderately increased risks linked to longterm estrogen replacement therapy and obesity in postmenopausal women indicate that estrogen alone influences breast cancer risk. Since much of the research on breast cancer risk factors are inconclusive, more research is needed

  11. Progress in breast cancer: overview.

    PubMed

    Arteaga, Carlos L

    2013-12-01

    This edition of CCR Focus titled Research in Breast Cancer: Frontiers in Genomics, Biology, and Clinical Investigation reviews six topics that cover areas of translational research of high impact in breast cancer. These topics represent areas of breast cancer research where significant progress has occurred but also where very important challenges remain. The papers in this CCR Focus section are contributed by experts in the respective areas of investigation. Herein, key aspects of these contributions and the research directions they propose are reviewed.

  12. Aluminium, antiperspirants and breast cancer.

    PubMed

    Darbre, P D

    2005-09-01

    Aluminium salts are used as the active antiperspirant agent in underarm cosmetics, but the effects of widespread, long term and increasing use remain unknown, especially in relation to the breast, which is a local area of application. Clinical studies showing a disproportionately high incidence of breast cancer in the upper outer quadrant of the breast together with reports of genomic instability in outer quadrants of the breast provide supporting evidence for a role for locally applied cosmetic chemicals in the development of breast cancer. Aluminium is known to have a genotoxic profile, capable of causing both DNA alterations and epigenetic effects, and this would be consistent with a potential role in breast cancer if such effects occurred in breast cells. Oestrogen is a well established influence in breast cancer and its action, dependent on intracellular receptors which function as ligand-activated zinc finger transcription factors, suggests one possible point of interference from aluminium. Results reported here demonstrate that aluminium in the form of aluminium chloride or aluminium chlorhydrate can interfere with the function of oestrogen receptors of MCF7 human breast cancer cells both in terms of ligand binding and in terms of oestrogen-regulated reporter gene expression. This adds aluminium to the increasing list of metals capable of interfering with oestrogen action and termed metalloestrogens. Further studies are now needed to identify the molecular basis of this action, the longer term effects of aluminium exposure and whether aluminium can cause aberrations to other signalling pathways in breast cells. Given the wide exposure of the human population to antiperspirants, it will be important to establish dermal absorption in the local area of the breast and whether long term low level absorption could play a role in the increasing incidence of breast cancer.

  13. Breast Cancer Research at NASA

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1998-01-01

    Dr. Robert Richmond extracts breast cell tissue from one of two liquid nitrogen dewars. NASA's Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC) is sponsoring research with Bioreactors, rotating wall vessels designed to grow tissue samples in space, to understand how breast cancer works. This ground-based work studies the growth and assembly of human mammary epithelial cells (HMEC) from breast cancer susceptible tissue. Radiation can make the cells cancerous, thus allowing better comparisons of healthy vs. tunourous tissues.

  14. Breast Cancer Research at NASA

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1998-01-01

    Breast tissue specimens in traditional sample dishes. NASA's Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC) is sponsoring research with Bioreactors, rotating wall vessels designed to grow tissue samples in space, to understand how breast cancer works. This ground-based work studies the growth and assembly of human mammary epithelial cells (HMEC) from breast cancer susceptible tissue. Radiation can make the cells cancerous, thus allowing better comparisons of healthy vs. tunourous tissues.

  15. Breast Cancer Research at NASA

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1998-01-01

    Dr. Harry Mahtani analyzes the gas content of nutrient media from Bioreactor used in research on human breast cancer. NASA's Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC) is sponsoring research with Bioreactors, rotating wall vessels designed to grow tissue samples in space, to understand how breast cancer works. This ground-based work studies the growth and assembly of human mammary epithelial cells (HMEC) from breast cancer susceptible tissue. Radiation can make the cells cancerous, thus allowing better comparisons of healthy vs. tunourous tissues.

  16. Bisphosphonate-functionalized gold nanoparticles for contrast-enhanced X-ray detection of breast microcalcifications.

    PubMed

    Cole, Lisa E; Vargo-Gogola, Tracy; Roeder, Ryan K

    2014-02-01

    Microcalcifications are one of the most common abnormalities detected by mammography for the diagnosis of breast cancer. However, the detection of microcalcifications and correct diagnosis of breast cancer are limited by the sensitivity and specificity of mammography. Therefore, the objective of this study was to investigate the potential of bisphosphonate-functionalized gold nanoparticles (BP-Au NPs) for contrast-enhanced radiographic detection of breast microcalcifications using two models of breast microcalcifications, which allowed for precise control over levels of hydroxyapatite (HA) mineral within a low attenuating matrix. First, an in vitro imaging phantom was prepared with varying concentrations of HA uniformly dispersed in an agarose hydrogel. The X-ray attenuation of HA-agarose compositions labeled by BP-Au NPs was increased by up to 26 HU compared to unlabeled compositions for HA concentrations ranging from 1 to 10 mg/mL. Second, an ex vivo tissue model was developed to more closely mimic the heterogeneity of breast tissue by injecting varying concentrations of HA in a Matrigel carrier into murine mammary glands. The X-ray attenuation of HA-Matrigel compositions labeled by BP-Au NPs was increased by up to 289 HU compared to unlabeled compositions for HA concentrations ranging from 0.5 to 25 mg/mL, which included an HA concentration (0.5 mg/mL) that was otherwise undetectable by micro-computed tomography. Cumulatively, both models demonstrated the ability of BP-Au NPs to enhance contrast for radiographic detection of microcalcifications, including at a clinically-relevant imaging resolution. Therefore, BP-Au NPs may have potential to improve clinical detection of breast microcalcifications by mammography. PMID:24360718

  17. Bisphosphonate-Functionalized Gold Nanoparticles for Contrast-Enhanced X-Ray Detection of Breast Microcalcifications

    PubMed Central

    Cole, Lisa E.; Vargo-Gogola, Tracy; Roeder, Ryan K.

    2014-01-01

    Microcalcifications are one of the most common abnormalities detected by mammography for the diagnosis of breast cancer. However, the detection of microcalcifications and correct diagnosis of breast cancer are limited by the sensitivity and specificity of mammography. Therefore, the objective of this study was to investigate the potential of bisphosphonate-functionalized gold nanoparticles (BP-Au NPs) for contrast-enhanced radiographic detection of breast microcalcifications using two models of breast microcalcifications which allowed for precise control over levels of hydroxyapatite (HA) mineral within a low attenuating matrix. First, an in vitro imaging phantom was prepared with varying concentrations of HA uniformly dispersed in an agarose hydrogel. The X-ray attenuation of HA-agarose compositions labeled by BP-Au NPs was increased by up to 26 HU compared to unlabeled compositions for HA concentrations ranging from 1–10 mg/mL. Second, an ex vivo tissue model was developed to more closely mimic the heterogeneity of breast tissue by injecting varying concentrations of HA in a Matrigel carrier into murine mammary glands. The X-ray attenuation of HA-Matrigel compositions labeled by BP-Au NPs was increased by up to 289 HU compared to unlabeled compositions for HA concentrations ranging from 0.5–25 mg/mL, which included an HA concentration (0.5 mg/mL) that was otherwise undetectable by micro-computed tomography. Cumulatively, both models demonstrated the ability of BP-Au NPs to enhance contrast for radiographic detection of microcalcifications, including at a clinically-relevant imaging resolution. Therefore, BP-Au NPs may have potential to improve clinical detection of breast microcalcifications by mammography. PMID:24360718

  18. Circadian clocks and breast cancer.

    PubMed

    Blakeman, Victoria; Williams, Jack L; Meng, Qing-Jun; Streuli, Charles H

    2016-01-01

    Circadian clocks respond to environmental time cues to coordinate 24-hour oscillations in almost every tissue of the body. In the breast, circadian clocks regulate the rhythmic expression of numerous genes. Disrupted expression of circadian genes can alter breast biology and may promote cancer. Here we overview circadian mechanisms, and the connection between the molecular clock and breast biology. We describe how disruption of circadian genes contributes to cancer via multiple mechanisms, and link this to increased tumour risk in women who work irregular shift patterns. Understanding the influence of circadian rhythms on breast cancer could lead to more efficacious therapies, reformed public health policy and improved patient outcome. PMID:27590298

  19. Breast Cancer Research at NASA

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1998-01-01

    High magnification view of human primary breast tumor cells after 56 days of culture in a NASA Bioreactor. The arrow points to bead surface indicating breast cancer cells (as noted by the staining of tumor cell intermediate filaments). NASA's Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC) is sponsoring research with Bioreactors, rotating wall vessels designed to grow tissue samples in space, to understand how breast cancer works. This ground-based work studies the growth and assembly of human mammary epithelial cell (HMEC) from breast cancer susceptible tissue. Radiation can make the cells cancerous, thus allowing better comparisons of healthy vs. tunorous tissue. Credit: Dr. Jearne Becker, University of South Florida

  20. Breast health in developing countries.

    PubMed

    Yip, C H; Taib, N A

    2014-12-01

    Breast cancer is one of the leading cancers world-wide. While the incidence in developing countries is lower than in developed countries, the mortality is much higher. Of the estimated 1 600 000 new cases of breast cancer globally in 2012, 794 000 were in the more developed world compared to 883 000 in the less developed world; however, there were 198 000 deaths in the more developed world compared to 324 000 in the less developed world (data from Globocan 2012, IARC). Survival from breast cancer depends on two main factors--early detection and optimal treatment. In developing countries, women present with late stages of disease. The barriers to early detection are physical, such as geographical isolation, financial as well as psychosocial, including lack of education, belief in traditional medicine and lack of autonomous decision-making in the male-dominated societies that prevail in the developing world. There are virtually no population-based breast cancer screening programs in developing countries. However, before any screening program can be implemented, there must be facilities to treat the cancers that are detected. Inadequate access to optimal treatment of breast cancer remains a problem. Lack of specialist manpower, facilities and anticancer drugs contribute to the suboptimal care that a woman with breast cancer in a low-income country receives. International groups such as the Breast Health Global Initiative were set up to develop economically feasible, clinical practice guidelines for breast cancer management to improve breast health outcomes in countries with limited resources.

  1. Pleomorphic adenoma of the breast.

    PubMed

    Chen, K T

    1990-06-01

    The clinicopathologic features of 2 new and 24 previously reported cases of pleomorphic adenoma of the breast are reviewed. This benign breast tumor resembles its salivary gland counterpart histologically. The circumscription and preferential juxta-areolar location suggest large breast duct origin of the tumors. Inappropriate surgery, i.e., mastectomy, was performed in 42% of the cases. Misdiagnosis and the resulting inappropriate treatment can easily be avoided if the pathologist includes this entity in the differential diagnosis when confronted with unusual differentiated epithelial breast lesions.

  2. Transcription factors link mouse WAP-T mammary tumors with human breast cancer.

    PubMed

    Otto, Benjamin; Streichert, Thomas; Wegwitz, Florian; Gevensleben, Heidrun; Klätschke, Kristin; Wagener, Christoph; Deppert, Wolfgang; Tolstonog, Genrich V

    2013-03-15

    Mouse models are important tools to decipher the molecular mechanisms of mammary carcinogenesis and to mimic the respective human disease. Despite sharing common phenotypic and genetic features, the proper translation of murine models to human breast cancer remains a challenging task. In a previous study we showed that in the SV40 transgenic WAP-T mice an active Met-pathway and epithelial-mesenchymal characteristics distinguish low- and high-grade mammary carcinoma. To assign these murine tumors to corresponding human tumors we here incorporated the analysis of expression of transcription factor (TF) coding genes and show that thereby a more accurate interspecies translation can be achieved. We describe a novel cross-species translation procedure and demonstrate that expression of unsupervised selected TFs, such as ELF5, HOXA5 and TFCP2L1, can clearly distinguish between the human molecular breast cancer subtypes--or as, for example, expression of TFAP2B between yet unclassified subgroups. By integrating different levels of information like histology, gene set enrichment, expression of differentiation markers and TFs we conclude that tumors in WAP-T mice exhibit similarities to both, human basal-like and non-basal-like subtypes. We furthermore suggest that the low- and high-grade WAP-T tumor phenotypes might arise from distinct cells of tumor origin. Our results underscore the importance of TFs as common cross-species denominators in the regulatory networks underlying mammary carcinogenesis.

  3. Neo-adjuvant Therapy With Anastrozole Plus Pazopanib in Stage II and III ER+ Breast Cancer

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-05-24

    Estrogen Receptor-positive Breast Cancer; Human Epidermal Growth Factor 2 Negative Carcinoma of Breast; Male Breast Cancer; Recurrent Breast Cancer; Stage II Breast Cancer; Stage IIIA Breast Cancer; Stage IIIB Breast Cancer

  4. Vascular and Cognitive Assessments in Patients With Breast Cancer Undergoing Chemotherapy After Surgery

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2015-07-27

    Cognitive/Functional Effects; Recurrent Breast Cancer; Stage IA Breast Cancer; Stage IB Breast Cancer; Stage II Breast Cancer; Stage IIIA Breast Cancer; Stage IIIB Breast Cancer; Stage IIIC Breast Cancer

  5. Caloric Restriction in Treating Patients With Stage 0-I Breast Cancer Undergoing Surgery and Radiation Therapy

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-10-19

    Ductal Breast Carcinoma in Situ; Invasive Ductal Breast Carcinoma; Invasive Lobular Breast Carcinoma; Lobular Breast Carcinoma in Situ; Recurrent Breast Cancer; Stage IA Breast Cancer; Stage IB Breast Cancer

  6. Biomarkers in Tissue Samples From Patients With Newly Diagnosed Breast Cancer Treated With Zoledronic Acid

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-07-12

    Estrogen Receptor-positive Breast Cancer; Invasive Ductal Breast Carcinoma; Progesterone Receptor-positive Breast Cancer; Stage IA Breast Cancer; Stage IB Breast Cancer; Stage IIA Breast Cancer; Stage IIB Breast Cancer

  7. Soy Isoflavones Supplementation in Treating Women at High Risk For or With Breast Cancer

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-04-06

    BRCA1 Mutation Carrier; BRCA2 Mutation Carrier; Ductal Breast Carcinoma in Situ; Lobular Breast Carcinoma in Situ; Stage IA Breast Cancer; Stage IB Breast Cancer; Stage II Breast Cancer; Stage IIIA Breast Cancer; Stage IIIB Breast Cancer

  8. Viruses and Breast Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Lawson, James S.; Heng, Benjamin

    2010-01-01

    Viruses are the accepted cause of many important cancers including cancers of the cervix and anogenital area, the liver, some lymphomas, head and neck cancers and indirectly human immunodeficiency virus associated cancers. For over 50 years, there have been serious attempts to identify viruses which may have a role in breast cancer. Despite these efforts, the establishment of conclusive evidence for such a role has been elusive. However, the development of extremely sophisticated new experimental techniques has allowed the recent development of evidence that human papilloma virus, Epstein-Barr virus, mouse mammary tumor virus and bovine leukemia virus may each have a role in the causation of human breast cancers. This is potentially good news as effective vaccines are already available to prevent infections from carcinogenic strains of human papilloma virus, which causes cancer of the uterine cervix. PMID:24281093

  9. Breast implants. A review.

    PubMed

    Van Zele, D; Heymans, O

    2004-04-01

    Breast implants have been used for about four decades for both reconstructive and aesthetic purposes. In 1963, the quality of the artificial implants was revolutionized by the introduction of the silicone gel-filled implant. Since, this modern prosthesis has gone through an evolution of change and improvement with several types of devices with many variations and styles within each class. Actually, for the last three decades, approximately one million women have received silicone breast implants in the USA. But, in 1992, the American FDA banned silicone from the market, leaving saline implants as the only product generally available as an alternative until now. Other filler materials were introduced, but have never progressed beyond the experimental stage in the USA (in contrast with Europe). The evolution of the different implants through time, with their advantages and disadvantages will be discussed, but also the controversy on silicone implants in the USA and their suspected association with systemic diseases. PMID:15154572

  10. Breast Biopsy System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1994-01-01

    Charge Coupled Devices (CCDs) are high technology silicon chips that connect light directly into electronic or digital images, which can be manipulated or enhanced by computers. When Goddard Space Flight Center (GSFC) scientists realized that existing CCD technology could not meet scientific requirements for the Hubble Space Telescope Imagining Spectrograph, GSFC contracted with Scientific Imaging Technologies, Inc. (SITe) to develop an advanced CCD. SITe then applied many of the NASA-driven enhancements to the manufacture of CCDs for digital mammography. The resulting device images breast tissue more clearly and efficiently. The LORAD Stereo Guide Breast Biopsy system incorporates SITe's CCD as part of a digital camera system that is replacing surgical biopsy in many cases. Known as stereotactic needle biopsy, it is performed under local anesthesia with a needle and saves women time, pain, scarring, radiation exposure and money.

  11. Using mastectomy specimens to develop breast models for breast tomosynthesis and CT breast imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    O'Connor, J. Michael; Das, Mini; Didier, Clay; Mah'D, Mufeed; Glick, Stephen J.

    2008-03-01

    Dedicated x-ray computed tomography (CT) of the breast using a cone-beam flat-panel detector system is a modality under investigation by a number of research teams. As previously reported, we have fabricated a prototype, bench-top flat-panel CT breast imaging (CTBI) system and developed computer simulation software to model such a system. We are developing a methodology to use high resolution, low noise CT reconstructions of fresh mastectomy specimens for generating an ensemble of 3D digital breast phantoms that realistically model 3D compressed and uncompressed breast anatomy. These breast models can be used to simulate realistic projection data for both breast tomosynthesis (BT) and CT systems thereby providing a powerful evaluation and optimization mechanism.

  12. Paclitaxel Albumin-Stabilized Nanoparticle Formulation in Treating Older Patients With Locally Advanced or Metastatic Breast Cancer

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-10-14

    Male Breast Cancer; Recurrent Breast Cancer; Stage IV Breast Cancer; Estrogen Receptor-negative Breast Cancer; Estrogen Receptor-positive Breast Cancer; HER2-negative Breast Cancer; HER2-positive Breast Cancer; Progesterone Receptor-negative Breast Cancer; Progesterone Receptor-positive Breast Cancer; Stage IIIA Breast Cancer; Stage IIIB Breast Cancer; Stage IIIC Breast Cancer; Triple-negative Breast Cancer

  13. [Radiotherapy of breast cancer].

    PubMed

    Hennequin, C; Barillot, I; Azria, D; Belkacémi, Y; Bollet, M; Chauvet, B; Cowen, D; Cutuli, B; Fourquet, A; Hannoun-Lévi, J M; Leblanc, M; Mahé, M A

    2016-09-01

    In breast cancer, radiotherapy is an essential component of the treatment. After conservative surgery for an infiltrating carcinoma, radiotherapy must be systematically performed, regardless of the characteristics of the disease, because it decreases the rate of local recurrence and by this way, specific mortality. Partial breast irradiation could not be proposed routinely but only in very selected and informed patients. For ductal carcinoma in situ, adjuvant radiotherapy must be also systematically performed after lumpectomy. After mastectomy, chest wall irradiation is required for pT3-T4 tumours and if there is an axillary nodal involvement, whatever the number of involved lymph nodes. After neo-adjuvant chemotherapy and mastectomy, in case of pN0 disease, chest wall irradiation is recommended if there is a clinically or radiologically T3-T4 or node positive disease before chemotherapy. Axillary irradiation is recommended only if there is no axillary surgical dissection and a positive sentinel lymph node. Supra and infra-clavicular irradiation is advised in case of positive axillary nodes. Internal mammary irradiation must be discussed case by case, according to the benefit/risk ratio (cardiac toxicity). Dose to the chest wall or the breast must be between 45-50Gy with a conventional fractionation. A boost dose over the tumour bed is required if the patient is younger than 60 years old. Hypofractionation (42.5 Gy in 16 fractions, or 41.6 Gy en 13 or 40 Gy en 15) is possible after tumorectomy and if a nodal irradiation is not mandatory. Delineation of the breast, the chest wall and the nodal areas are based on clinical and radiological evaluations. 3D-conformal irradiation is the recommended technique, intensity-modulated radiotherapy must be proposed only in case of specific clinical situations. Respiratory gating could be useful to decrease the cardiac dose. Concomitant administration of chemotherapy in unadvised, but hormonal treatment could be start with

  14. Breast Cancer Stem Cells

    PubMed Central

    Velasco-Velázquez, Marco A.; Homsi, Nora; De La Fuente, Marisol; Pestell, Richard G.

    2012-01-01

    Breast cancer stem cells (BCSCs) constitute a subpopulation of tumor cells that express stem cell-associated markers and have a high capacity for tumor generation in vivo. Identification of BCSCs from tumor samples or breast cancer cell lines has been based mainly on CD44+/CD24−/low or ALDH+ phenotypes. BCSCs isolation has allowed the analysis of the molecular mechanisms involved in their origin, self-renewal, differentiation into tumor cells, resistance to radiation therapy and chemotherapy, and invasiveness and metastatic ability. Molecular genetic analysis using knockout animals and inducible transgenics have identified NF-κB, c-Jun, p21CIP1, and Forkhead-like-protein Dach1 in BCSC expansion and fate. Clinical analyses of BCSCs in breast tumors have found a correlation between the proportion of BCSCs and poor prognosis. Therefore, new therapies that specifically target BCSCs are an urgent need. We summarize recent evidence that partially explain the biological characteristics of BCSCs. PMID:22249027

  15. Noninvasive enhanced mid-IR imaging of breast cancer development in vivo.

    PubMed

    Case, Jason R; Young, Madison A; Dréau, D; Trammell, Susan R

    2015-11-01

    Lumpectomy coupled with radiation therapy and/or chemotherapy is commonly used to treat breast cancer patients. We are developing an enhanced thermal IR imaging technique that has the potential to provide real-time imaging to guide tissue excision during a lumpectomy by delineating tumor margins. This enhanced thermal imaging method is a combination of IR imaging (8 to 10  μm ) and selective heating of blood (∼0.5°C ) relative to surrounding water-rich tissue using LED sources at low powers. Postacquisition processing of these images highlights temporal changes in temperature and the presence of vascular structures. In this study, fluorescent, standard thermal, and enhanced thermal imaging modalities, as well as physical caliper measurements, were used to monitor breast cancer tumor volumes over a 30-day study period in 19 mice implanted with 4T1-RFP tumor cells. Tumor volumes calculated from fluorescent imaging follow an exponential growth curve for the first 22 days of the study. Cell necrosis affected the tumor volume estimates based on the fluorescent images after day 22. The tumor volumes estimated from enhanced thermal imaging, standard thermal imaging, and caliper measurements all show exponential growth over the entire study period. A strong correlation was found between tumor volumes estimated using fluorescent imaging, standard IR imaging, and caliper measurements with enhanced thermal imaging, indicating that enhanced thermal imaging monitors tumor growth. Further, the enhanced IR images reveal a corona of bright emission along the edges of the tumor masses associated with the tumor margin. In the future, this IR technique might be used to estimate tumor margins in real time during surgical procedures. PMID:26524680

  16. Mitochondrial Localized Stat3 Promotes Breast Cancer Growth via Phosphorylation of Serine 727*

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Qifang; Raje, Vidisha; Yakovlev, Vasily A.; Yacoub, Adly; Szczepanek, Karol; Meier, Jeremy; Derecka, Marta; Chen, Qun; Hu, Ying; Sisler, Jennifer; Hamed, Hossein; Lesnefsky, Edward J.; Valerie, Kristoffer; Dent, Paul; Larner, Andrew C.

    2013-01-01

    Signal transducer and activator of transcription 3 (Stat3) is a key mediator in the development of many cancers. For 20 years, it has been assumed that Stat3 mediates its biological activities as a nuclear localized transcription factor activated by many cytokines. However, recent studies from this laboratory and others indicate that Stat3 has an independent function in the mitochondria (mitoStat3) where it controls the activity of the electron transport chain (ETC) and mediates Ras-induced transformation of mouse embryo fibroblasts. The actions of mitoStat3 in controlling respiration and Ras transformation are mediated by the phosphorylation state of serine 727. To address the role of mitoStat3 in the pathogenesis of cells that are transformed, we used 4T1 breast cancer cells, which form tumors that metastasize in immunocompetent mice. Substitution of Ser-727 for an alanine or aspartate in Stat3 that has a mitochondrial localization sequence, MLS-Stat3, has profound effects on tumor growth, complex I activity of the ETC, and accumulation of reactive oxygen species (ROS). Cells expressing MLS-Stat3(S727A) display slower tumor growth, decreased complex I activity of the ETC, and increased ROS accumulation under hypoxia compared with cells expressing MLS-Stat3. In contrast, cells expressing MLS-Stat3(S727D) show enhanced tumor growth and complex I activity and decreased production of ROS. These results highlight the importance of serine 727 of mitoStat3 in breast cancer and suggest a novel role for mitoStat3 in regulation of ROS concentrations through its action on the ETC. PMID:24019511

  17. Bioenergy and Breast Cancer: A Report on Tumor Growth and Metastasis

    PubMed Central

    Greenwood, Mark; Schmidt, Jade

    2016-01-01

    As many as 80% of the 296,000 women and 2,240 men diagnosed with breast cancer in the United States will seek out complementary and alternative medicine (CAM) treatments. One such therapy is Healing Touch (HT), recognized by the National Center for Complementary and Integrative Health (NCCIH) as a treatment modality. Using a multiple experimental groups design, fifty-six six- to eight-week-old Balb/c mice were injected with 4T1 breast cancer tumor cells and randomly divided into intervention and positive control groups. Five days after tumor cell injection, mice in the intervention groups received HT either daily or every other day for 10 minutes by one HT practitioner. At 15 days after tumor cell injection, tumor size was measured, and metastasis was evaluated by a medical pathologist after necropsy. Tumor size did not differ significantly among the groups (F(3,52) = 0.75, p value = 0.53). The presence of metastasis did not differ across groups (chi-square(3) = 3.902, p = 0.272) or when compared within an organ (liver: chi-square(3) = 2.507, p = 0.474; lungs: chi-square(3) = 3.804, p = 0.283; spleen: chi-square(3) = 0.595, p = 0.898). However, these results did indicate a moderate, though insignificant, positive impact of HT and highlight the need for continued research into dose, length of treatment, and measurable outcomes (tumor size, metastasis) to provide evidence to suggest application for nursing care. PMID:27688787

  18. Noninvasive enhanced mid-IR imaging of breast cancer development in vivo

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Case, Jason R.; Young, Madison A.; Dréau, D.; Trammell, Susan R.

    2015-11-01

    Lumpectomy coupled with radiation therapy and/or chemotherapy is commonly used to treat breast cancer patients. We are developing an enhanced thermal IR imaging technique that has the potential to provide real-time imaging to guide tissue excision during a lumpectomy by delineating tumor margins. This enhanced thermal imaging method is a combination of IR imaging (8 to 10 μm) and selective heating of blood (˜0.5°C) relative to surrounding water-rich tissue using LED sources at low powers. Postacquisition processing of these images highlights temporal changes in temperature and the presence of vascular structures. In this study, fluorescent, standard thermal, and enhanced thermal imaging modalities, as well as physical caliper measurements, were used to monitor breast cancer tumor volumes over a 30-day study period in 19 mice implanted with 4T1-RFP tumor cells. Tumor volumes calculated from fluorescent imaging follow an exponential growth curve for the first 22 days of the study. Cell necrosis affected the tumor volume estimates based on the fluorescent images after day 22. The tumor volumes estimated from enhanced thermal imaging, standard thermal imaging, and caliper measurements all show exponential growth over the entire study period. A strong correlation was found between tumor volumes estimated using fluorescent imaging, standard IR imaging, and caliper measurements with enhanced thermal imaging, indicating that enhanced thermal imaging monitors tumor growth. Further, the enhanced IR images reveal a corona of bright emission along the edges of the tumor masses associated with the tumor margin. In the future, this IR technique might be used to estimate tumor margins in real time during surgical procedures.

  19. Bioenergy and Breast Cancer: A Report on Tumor Growth and Metastasis.

    PubMed

    Running, Alice; Greenwood, Mark; Hildreth, Laura; Schmidt, Jade

    2016-01-01

    As many as 80% of the 296,000 women and 2,240 men diagnosed with breast cancer in the United States will seek out complementary and alternative medicine (CAM) treatments. One such therapy is Healing Touch (HT), recognized by the National Center for Complementary and Integrative Health (NCCIH) as a treatment modality. Using a multiple experimental groups design, fifty-six six- to eight-week-old Balb/c mice were injected with 4T1 breast cancer tumor cells and randomly divided into intervention and positive control groups. Five days after tumor cell injection, mice in the intervention groups received HT either daily or every other day for 10 minutes by one HT practitioner. At 15 days after tumor cell injection, tumor size was measured, and metastasis was evaluated by a medical pathologist after necropsy. Tumor size did not differ significantly among the groups (F(3,52) = 0.75, p value = 0.53). The presence of metastasis did not differ across groups (chi-square(3) = 3.902, p = 0.272) or when compared within an organ (liver: chi-square(3) = 2.507, p = 0.474; lungs: chi-square(3) = 3.804, p = 0.283; spleen: chi-square(3) = 0.595, p = 0.898). However, these results did indicate a moderate, though insignificant, positive impact of HT and highlight the need for continued research into dose, length of treatment, and measurable outcomes (tumor size, metastasis) to provide evidence to suggest application for nursing care.

  20. Bioenergy and Breast Cancer: A Report on Tumor Growth and Metastasis.

    PubMed

    Running, Alice; Greenwood, Mark; Hildreth, Laura; Schmidt, Jade

    2016-01-01

    As many as 80% of the 296,000 women and 2,240 men diagnosed with breast cancer in the United States will seek out complementary and alternative medicine (CAM) treatments. One such therapy is Healing Touch (HT), recognized by the National Center for Complementary and Integrative Health (NCCIH) as a treatment modality. Using a multiple experimental groups design, fifty-six six- to eight-week-old Balb/c mice were injected with 4T1 breast cancer tumor cells and randomly divided into intervention and positive control groups. Five days after tumor cell injection, mice in the intervention groups received HT either daily or every other day for 10 minutes by one HT practitioner. At 15 days after tumor cell injection, tumor size was measured, and metastasis was evaluated by a medical pathologist after necropsy. Tumor size did not differ significantly among the groups (F(3,52) = 0.75, p value = 0.53). The presence of metastasis did not differ across groups (chi-square(3) = 3.902, p = 0.272) or when compared within an organ (liver: chi-square(3) = 2.507, p = 0.474; lungs: chi-square(3) = 3.804, p = 0.283; spleen: chi-square(3) = 0.595, p = 0.898). However, these results did indicate a moderate, though insignificant, positive impact of HT and highlight the need for continued research into dose, length of treatment, and measurable outcomes (tumor size, metastasis) to provide evidence to suggest application for nursing care. PMID:27688787

  1. Bioenergy and Breast Cancer: A Report on Tumor Growth and Metastasis

    PubMed Central

    Greenwood, Mark; Schmidt, Jade

    2016-01-01

    As many as 80% of the 296,000 women and 2,240 men diagnosed with breast cancer in the United States will seek out complementary and alternative medicine (CAM) treatments. One such therapy is Healing Touch (HT), recognized by the National Center for Complementary and Integrative Health (NCCIH) as a treatment modality. Using a multiple experimental groups design, fifty-six six- to eight-week-old Balb/c mice were injected with 4T1 breast cancer tumor cells and randomly divided into intervention and positive control groups. Five days after tumor cell injection, mice in the intervention groups received HT either daily or every other day for 10 minutes by one HT practitioner. At 15 days after tumor cell injection, tumor size was measured, and metastasis was evaluated by a medical pathologist after necropsy. Tumor size did not differ significantly among the groups (F(3,52) = 0.75, p value = 0.53). The presence of metastasis did not differ across groups (chi-square(3) = 3.902, p = 0.272) or when compared within an organ (liver: chi-square(3) = 2.507, p = 0.474; lungs: chi-square(3) = 3.804, p = 0.283; spleen: chi-square(3) = 0.595, p = 0.898). However, these results did indicate a moderate, though insignificant, positive impact of HT and highlight the need for continued research into dose, length of treatment, and measurable outcomes (tumor size, metastasis) to provide evidence to suggest application for nursing care.

  2. The inhibitory effect of roasted licorice extract on human metastatic breast cancer cell-induced bone destruction.

    PubMed

    Lee, Sun Kyoung; Park, Kwang-Kyun; Park, Jung Han Yoon; Lim, Soon Sung; Chung, Won-Yoon

    2013-12-01

    The aim of this study was to determine whether the ethanol extract of roasted licorice (rLE) could inhibit breast cancer-mediated bone destruction. rLE treatment reduced the viability of MDA-MB-231 human metastatic breast cancer cells but did not show any cytotoxicity in hFOB1.19 human osteoblastic cells and murine bone marrow-derived macrophages (BMMs). rLE inhibited expression and secretion of receptor activator of nuclear factor κB ligand (RANKL) as well as the mRNA and protein expression of cyclooxygenase-2 in osteoblastic cells exposed to the conditioned medium of breast cancer cells. rLE dramatically inhibited RANKL-induced osteoclastogenesis in BMMs, thereby reducing osteoclast-mediated pit formation. Moreover, treatment with licochalcone A and isoliquiritigenin as the active components, whose contents are increased by the roasting process, remarkably suppressed RANKL-induced osteoclast formation in BMMs, respectively. Furthermore, orally administered rLE substantially blocked tumor growth and bone destruction in mice inoculated with breast cancer cells in the tibiae. Serum levels of tartrate-resistant acid phosphatase and C-terminal cross-linking telopeptide of type I collagen and trabecular bone morphometric parameters were reversed to almost the same levels as the control mice by the rLE treatment. In conclusion, rLE may be a beneficial agent for preventing and treating bone destruction in patients with breast cancer.

  3. Development of breast phantoms for use in breast imaging simulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    O'Connor, J. Michael

    Dedicated x-ray breast computed tomography (BCT) and breast tomosynthesis (BT) using a cone-beam flat-panel detector system are modalities under investigation by a number of research teams. Several teams, including the University of Massachusetts Medical School (UMMS) Tomographic Breast Imaging Lab (TBIL), have fabricated a prototype, bench-top flat-panel CT breast imaging (CTBI) system. TBIL researchers also use computer simulation software to investigate various x-ray acquisition and reconstruction parameters. I have developed a methodology to use high resolution, low noise CT reconstructions of fresh mastectomy specimens in order to create an ensemble of three-dimensional (3D) digital breast phantoms that realistically model 3D compressed and uncompressed breast anatomy. The resulting breast phantoms can then be used to simulate realistic projection data for both BCT and BT systems thereby providing a powerful evaluation and optimization mechanism for research and development of novel breast imaging systems as well as the optimization of imaging techniques for such systems.

  4. Alternatives to whole breast irradiation in early breast cancer.

    PubMed

    Klimberg, V Suzanne; Rivere, Amy; Peacock, Loverd

    2016-06-01

    Partial breast irradiation (PBI) when added to lumpectomy demonstrates equivalent local recurrence and survival when compared to whole breast radiation. However, PBI can be delivered in much shorter time (5 days as compared to 6 weeks) and even intraoperatively as an one time dose. This article describes the many alternative techniques available for delivering PBI. PMID:27164852

  5. Survivorship care in breast cancer

    PubMed Central

    Smith, Sally L.; Murchison, Sonja; Singh-Carlson, Savitri; Alexander, Cheryl; Wai, Elaine S.

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Objective To compare the perceptions of breast cancer survivors and primary care physicians (PCPs) about PCPs’ ability to deliver survivorship care in breast cancer. Design Mailed survey. Setting British Columbia. Participants A total of 1065 breast cancer survivors who had completed treatment of nonmetastatic breast cancer within the previous year, and 587 PCPs who had patients with nonmetastatic breast cancer discharged to their care within the preceding 18 months. Main outcome measures Breast cancer survivors’ and PCPs’ confidence ratings of PCPs’ ability to deliver the following aspects of care: screening for recurrence; managing osteoporosis, lymphedema, endocrine therapy, menopausal symptoms, and anxiety about or fear of recurrence; and providing nutrition and exercise counseling, sex and body image counseling, and family counseling. Response options for each question included low, adequate, or good. Responses were summarized as frequencies and compared using χ2 tests. Results Response rates for breast cancer survivors and PCPs were 47% and 59%, respectively. Responses were statistically different in all categories (P < .05). Both groups were most confident in the ability of PCPs to screen for recurrence, but breast cancer survivors were 10 times as likely to indicate low confidence (10% of breast cancer survivors vs 1% of PCPs) in this aspect of care. More breast cancer survivors (23%) expressed low confidence in PCPs’ ability to provide counseling about fear of recurrence compared with PCPs (3%). Aspects of care in which both breast cancer survivors and PCPs were most likely to express low confidence included sex and body image counseling (35% of breast cancer survivors vs 26% of PCPs) and family counseling (33% of breast cancer survivors vs 24% of PCPs). Primary care physicians (24%) described low confidence in their ability to manage lymphedema. Conclusion Breast cancer survivors and PCPs are reasonably confident in a PCP-based model

  6. Prolyl isomerase Pin1 negatively regulates the stability of SUV39H1 to promote tumorigenesis in breast cancer.

    PubMed

    Khanal, Prem; Kim, Garam; Lim, Sung-Chul; Yun, Hyo-Jeong; Lee, Kwang Youl; Choi, Hoo-Kyun; Choi, Hong Seok

    2013-11-01

    Pin1, a conserved eukaryotic peptidyl-prolyl cis/trans isomerase, has profound effects on numerous key-signaling molecules, and its deregulation contributes to disease, particularly cancer. Although Pin1-mediated prolyl isomerization of protein servers as a regulatory switch in signaling pathways, the significance of proline isomerase activity in chromatin modifying complex remains unclear. Here, we identify Pin1 as a key negative regulator for suppressor of variegation 3-9 homologue 1 (SUV39H1) stability, a major methyltransferase responsible for histone H3 trimethylation on Lys9 (H3K9me3). Pin1 interacts with SUV39H1 in a phosphorylation-dependent manner and promotes ubiquitination-mediated degradation of SUV39H1. Consequently, Pin1 reduces SUV39H1 abundance and suppresses SUV39H1 ability to induce H3K9me3. In contrast, depletion of Pin1 in cancer cells leads to elevated SUV39H1 expression, which subsequently increases H3K9me3, inhibiting tumorigenecity of cancer cells. In a xenograft model with 4T1 metastatic mouse breast carcinoma cells, Pin1 overexpression increases tumor growth, whereas SUV39H1 overexpression abrogates it. In human breast cancer patients, immunohistochemical staining shows that Pin1 levels are negatively correlated with SUV39H1 as well as H3K9me3 levels. Thus, Pin1-mediated reduction of SUV39H1 stability contributes to convey oncogenic signals for aggressiveness of human breast cancer, suggesting that Pin1 may be a promising drug target for anticancer therapy. PMID:23934277

  7. [Breast tomosynthesis: a new tool for diagnosing breast cancer].

    PubMed

    Martínez Miravete, P; Etxano, J

    2015-01-01

    Breast cancer continues to be the most common malignant tumor in women in occidental countries. Mammography is currently the technique of choice for screening programs; however, although it has been widely validated, mammography has its limitations, especially in dense breasts. Breast tomosynthesis is a revolutionary advance in the diagnosis of breast cancer. It makes it possible to define lesions that are occult in the glandular tissue and therefore to detect breast tumors that are impossible to see on conventional mammograms. In considering the combined use of mammography and tomosynthesis, many factors must be taken into account apart from cancer detection; these include additional radiation, the recall rate, and the time necessary to carry out and interpret the two tests. In this article, we review the technical principles of tomosynthesis, it main uses, and the future perspective for this imaging technique.

  8. Effects of the murine skull in optoacoustic brain microscopy.

    PubMed

    Kneipp, Moritz; Turner, Jake; Estrada, Héctor; Rebling, Johannes; Shoham, Shy; Razansky, Daniel

    2016-01-01

    Despite the great promise behind the recent introduction of optoacoustic technology into the arsenal of small-animal neuroimaging methods, a variety of acoustic and light-related effects introduced by adult murine skull severely compromise the performance of optoacoustics in transcranial imaging. As a result, high-resolution noninvasive optoacoustic microscopy studies are still limited to a thin layer of pial microvasculature, which can be effectively resolved by tight focusing of the excitation light. We examined a range of distortions introduced by an adult murine skull in transcranial optoacoustic imaging under both acoustically- and optically-determined resolution scenarios. It is shown that strong low-pass filtering characteristics of the skull may significantly deteriorate the achievable spatial resolution in deep brain imaging where no light focusing is possible. While only brain vasculature with a diameter larger than 60 µm was effectively resolved via transcranial measurements with acoustic resolution, significant improvements are seen through cranial windows and thinned skull experiments.

  9. Genomic organization of the murine CTL lipase gene

    SciTech Connect

    Kaplan, M.H.; Boyer, S.N.; Grusby, M.J.

    1996-08-01

    Murine cytotoxic T-lymphocyte (CTL) lipase was originally identified as an IL-4-inducible gene in CD8-positive T cells. To further our understanding of both the function and the regulation of CTL lipase in T cells, we have cloned and characterized the murine gene. Two overlapping phage clones spanning 29 kb contain the entire CTL lipase gene. The exon structure in similar to those characterized for the human and canine pancreatic lipase-related protein 1 genes, with notable differences in the 5{prime} end. Transcripts initiate from a site that matches a consensus for an initiator sequence. Potential cis-regulatory elements in the CTL lipase 5{prime} regulatory region that would confer dual tissue specificity in exocrine pancreas and cytotoxic T lymphocytes are identified. The implications of this promoter organization are discussed. 27 refs., 2 figs.

  10. Magnetic resonance imaging and spectroscopy of the murine cardiovascular system

    PubMed Central

    Akki, Ashwin; Gupta, Ashish

    2013-01-01

    Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) has emerged as a powerful and reliable tool to noninvasively study the cardiovascular system in clinical practice. Because transgenic mouse models have assumed a critical role in cardiovascular research, technological advances in MRI have been extended to mice over the last decade. These have provided critical insights into cardiac and vascular morphology, function, and physiology/pathophysiology in many murine models of heart disease. Furthermore, magnetic resonance spectroscopy (MRS) has allowed the nondestructive study of myocardial metabolism in both isolated hearts and in intact mice. This article reviews the current techniques and important pathophysiological insights from the application of MRI/MRS technology to murine models of cardiovascular disease. PMID:23292717

  11. Practical Murine Hematopathology: A Comparative Review and Implications for Research

    PubMed Central

    O'Connell, Karyn E; Mikkola, Amy M; Stepanek, Aaron M; Vernet, Andyna; Hall, Christopher D; Sun, Chia C; Yildirim, Eda; Staropoli, John F; Lee, Jeannie T; Brown, Diane E

    2015-01-01

    Hematologic parameters are important markers of disease in human and veterinary medicine. Biomedical research has benefited from mouse models that recapitulate such disease, thus expanding knowledge of pathogenetic mechanisms and investigative therapies that translate across species. Mice in health have many notable hematologic differences from humans and other veterinary species, including smaller erythrocytes, higher percentage of circulating reticulocytes or polychromasia, lower peripheral blood neutrophil and higher peripheral blood and bone marrow lymphocyte percentages, variable leukocyte morphologies, physiologic splenic hematopoiesis and iron storage, and more numerous and shorter-lived erythrocytes and platelets. For accurate and complete hematologic analyses of disease and response to investigative therapeutic interventions, these differences and the unique features of murine hematopathology must be understood. Here we review murine hematology and hematopathology for practical application to translational investigation. PMID:25926395

  12. Flow Cytometric Analysis of Immune Cells Within Murine Aorta.

    PubMed

    Gjurich, Breanne N; Taghavie-Moghadam, Parésa L; Galkina, Elena V

    2015-01-01

    The immune system plays a critical role in the modulation of atherogenesis at all stages of the disease. However, there are many technical difficulties when studying the immune system within murine aortas. Common techniques such as PCR and immunohistochemistry have answered many questions about the presence of immune cells and mediators of inflammation within the aorta yet many questions remain unanswered due to the limitations of these techniques. On the other hand, cumulatively the flow cytometry approach has propelled the immunology field forward but it has been challenging to apply this technique to aortic tissues. Here, we describe the methodology to isolate and characterize the immune cells within the murine aorta and provide examples of functional assays for aortic leukocytes using flow cytometry. The method involves the harvesting and enzymatic digestion of the aorta, extracellular and intracellular protein staining, and a subsequent flow cytometric analysis. PMID:26445788

  13. Increased photosensitivity to near-ultraviolet light in murine SLE

    SciTech Connect

    Golan, D.T.; Borel, Y.

    1984-02-01

    The authors investigated whether there is increased susceptibility to near-UVL in murine SLE. Cultured spleen cells from either strain of mice with lupus disease or conventional strains of mice were exposed to different UVL fractions in vitro. The effect of DNA synthesis, release, and repair was examined. DNA synthesis and release was measured as percent of (/sup 3/H)thymidine (dT) uptake into either total acid-precipitable radioactive material of cell sediment plus supernatant, or that of the medium alone, whereas hydroxyurea-resistant dT incorporation represented DNA repair. The data indicate that all SLE strains, in contrast to all non-SLE strains, show increased DNA synthesis and release after UV-A exposure. In addition, all murine SLE strains demonstrate increased susceptibility to induction of DNA damage by UV-A. The significance of these observations in relation to the clinical activity of SLE after sunlight exposure is discussed.

  14. A generalized transducing phage for the murine pathogen Citrobacter rodentium

    PubMed Central

    Petty, Nicola K.; Toribio, Ana L.; Goulding, David; Foulds, Ian; Thomson, Nicholas; Dougan, Gordon; Salmond, George P. C.

    2008-01-01

    A virulent phage (φCR1) capable of generalized transduction in Citrobacter rodentium was isolated from the environment and characterized. C. rodentium is a natural pathogen of mice, causing transmissible murine colonic hyperplasia. Sequencing of its genome has recently been completed and will soon be fully annotated and published. C. rodentium is an important model organism for infections caused by the human pathogens enteropathogenic and enterohaemorrhagic Escherichia coli (EPEC and EHEC). φCR1 uses a lipopolysaccharide receptor, has a genome size of approximately 300 kb, and is able to transduce a variety of markers. φCR1 is the first reported transducing phage for C. rodentium and will be a useful tool for functional genomic analysis of this important natural murine pathogen. PMID:17768241

  15. Breast MRI, digital mammography and breast tomosynthesis: Comparison of three methods for early detection of breast cancer

    PubMed Central

    Roganovic, Dragana; Djilas, Dragana; Vujnovic, Sasa; Pavic, Dag; Stojanov, Dragan

    2015-01-01

    Breast cancer is the most common malignancy in women and early detection is important for its successful treatment. The aim of this study was to investigate the sensitivity and specificity of three methods for early detection of breast cancer: breast magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), digital mammography, and breast tomosynthesis in comparison to histopathology, as well as to investigate the intraindividual variability between these modalities. We included 57 breast lesions, each detected by three diagnostic modalities: digital mammography, breast MRI, and breast tomosynthesis, and subsequently confirmed by histopathology. Breast Imaging-Reporting and Data System (BI-RADS) was used for characterizing the lesions. One experienced radiologist interpreted all three diagnostic modalities. Twenty-nine of the breast lesions were malignant while 28 were benign. The sensitivity for digital mammography, breast MRI, and breast tomosynthesis, was 72.4%, 93.1%, and 100%, respectively; while the specificity was 46.4%, 60.7%, and 75%, respectively. Receiver operating characteristics (ROC) curve analysis showed an overall diagnostic advantage of breast tomosynthesis over both breast MRI and digital mammography. with significant difference between breast tomosynthesis and digital mammography (p<0.001), while the difference between breast tomosynthesis and breast MRI was not significant (p = 0.20). PMID:26614855

  16. Transillumination breast spectroscopy (TIBS): a biomarker of breast tissue density

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Blackmore, Kristina M.; Knight, Julia A.; Jong, Roberta; Lilge, Lothar

    2005-08-01

    A primary goal of preventive oncology is the identification of women at increased risk for breast cancer who would benefit most from risk reducing interventions. An established physical risk assessment technique is the use of mammography to quantify the dense tissue content of the breast. Women with a majority of the breast occupied by dense tissue are at four to six times greater risk of breast cancer than women with the least density. The main drawback of mammography is that it requires exposure to ionising radiation and there are concerns regarding use in young women. Another potential physical risk assessment is Transillumination Breast Spectroscopy (TIBS). TIBS uses non-ionizing optical radiation to measure bulk tissue properties and thus is applicable to women of any age. This study examines the feasibility of using TIBS in vivo to detect mammographic density as an interim indicator of breast cancer risk. TIBS measurements were completed on 300 women with radiological normal mammograms. White light (625 to 1060 nm) was delivered to the breast tissue and transmitted light was detected on the opposite side of the breast. Principal component analysis was used to reduce the spectral data and generate individual 'risk' scores. Agreement between the obtained 'risk' scores and mammographic density was established using density cluster analysis, the Kappa statistic and logistic regression. The agreement between breast density assessed by mammography and by TIBS was statistically significant for all 'risk' scores. Logistic regression indicated a strong association between the TIBS scores and mammographic density. TIBS provides an alternative to x-ray derived mammographic density as a biomarker of breast density and hence cancer risk.

  17. Morphology and growth of murine cell lines on model biomaterials.

    PubMed

    Godek, Marisha L; Duchsherer, Nichole L; McElwee, Quinn; Grainger, David W

    2004-01-01

    All biomaterial implants are assaulted by the host "foreign body" immune response. Understanding the complex, dynamic relationship between cells, biomaterials and milieu is an important first step towards controlling this reaction. Material surface chemistry dictates protein adsorption, and thus subsequent cell interactions. The cell-implant is a microenvironment involving 1) proteins that coat the surface and 2) cells that interact with these proteins. Macrophages and fibroblasts are two cell types that interact with proteins on biomaterials surfaces and play different related, but equally important, roles in biomaterials rejection and implant failure. Growth characteristics of four murine cell lines on model biomaterials surfaces were examined. Murine monocyte-macrophages (RAW 264.7 and J774A.1), murine macrophage (IC-21) and murine fibroblast (NIH 3T3) cell lines were tested to determine whether differences exist in adhesion, proliferation, differentiation, spreading, and fusion (macrophage lineages only) on these surfaces. Differences were observed in the ability of cells to adhere to and subsequently proliferate on polymer surfaces. (Monocyte-) macrophages grew well on all surfaces tested and growth rates were measured on three representative polymer biomaterials surfaces: tissue culture polystyrene (TCPS), polystyrene, and Teflon-AF. J774A.1 cultures grown on TCPS and treated with exogenous cytokines IL-4 and GM-CSF were observed to contain multinucleate cells with unusual morphologies. Thus, (monocyte-) macrophage cell lines were found to effectively attach to and interrogate each surface presented, with evidence of extensive spreading on Teflon-AF surfaces, particularly in the IC-21 cultures. The J774A.1 line was able to proliferate and/or differentiate to more specialized cell types (multinucleate/dendritic-like cells) in the presence of soluble chemokine cues. PMID:15133927

  18. Osteopontin Is Upregulated in Human and Murine Acute Schistosomiasis Mansoni

    PubMed Central

    Pereira, Thiago Almeida; Syn, Wing-Kin; Amâncio, Frederico Figueiredo; Cunha, Pedro Henrique Diniz; Caporali, Julia Fonseca Morais; Trindade, Guilherme Vaz de Melo; Santos, Elisângela Trindade; Souza, Márcia Maria; Andrade, Zilton Araújo; Witek, Rafal P; Secor, William Evan; Pereira, Fausto Edmundo Lima; Lambertucci, José Roberto; Diehl, Anna Mae

    2016-01-01

    Background Symptomatic acute schistosomiasis mansoni is a systemic hypersensitivity reaction against the migrating schistosomula and mature eggs after a primary infection. The mechanisms involved in the pathogenesis of acute schistosomiasis are not fully elucidated. Osteopontin has been implicated in granulomatous reactions and in acute hepatic injury. Our aims were to evaluate if osteopontin plays a role in acute Schistosoma mansoni infection in both human and experimentally infected mice and if circulating OPN levels could be a novel biomarker of this infection. Methodology/Principal Findings Serum/plasma osteopontin levels were measured by ELISA in patients with acute (n = 28), hepatointestinal (n = 26), hepatosplenic (n = 39) schistosomiasis and in uninfected controls (n = 21). Liver osteopontin was assessed by immunohistochemistry in needle biopsies of 5 patients. Sera and hepatic osteopontin were quantified in the murine model of schistosomiasis mansoni during acute (7 and 8 weeks post infection, n = 10) and chronic (30 weeks post infection, n = 8) phase. Circulating osteopontin levels are increased in patients with acute schistosomiasis (p = 0.0001). The highest levels of OPN were observed during the peak of clinical symptoms (7–11 weeks post infection), returning to baseline level once the granulomas were modulated (>12 weeks post infection). The plasma levels in acute schistosomiasis were even higher than in hepatosplenic patients. The murine model mirrored the human disease. Macrophages were the major source of OPN in human and murine acute schistosomiasis, while the ductular reaction maintains OPN production in hepatosplenic disease. Soluble egg antigens from S. mansoni induced OPN expression in primary human kupffer cells. Conclusions/Significance S. mansoni egg antigens induce the production of OPN by macrophages in the necrotic-exudative granulomas characteristic of acute schistosomiasis mansoni. Circulating OPN levels are upregulated in human and

  19. Antitumor and antimetastatic activity of interleukin 12 against murine tumors

    PubMed Central

    1993-01-01

    It has recently been demonstrated that in vivo administration of murine interleukin 12 (IL-12) to mice results in augmentation of cytotoxic natural killer (NK)/lymphocyte-activated killer cell activity, enhancement of cytolytic T cell generation, and induction of interferon gamma secretion. In this study, the in vivo activity of murine IL-12 against a number of murine tumors has been evaluated. Experimental pulmonary metastases or subcutaneous growth of the B16F10 melanoma were markedly reduced in mice treated intraperitoneally with IL-12, resulting in an increase in survival time. The therapeutic effectiveness of IL-12 was dose dependent and treatment of subcutaneous tumors could be initiated up to 14 d after injection of tumor cells. Likewise, established experimental hepatic metastases and established subcutaneous M5076 reticulum cell sarcoma and Renca renal cell adenocarcinoma tumors were effectively treated by IL-12 at doses which resulted in no gross toxicity. Local peritumoral injection of IL-12 into established subcutaneous Renca tumors resulted in regression and complete disappearance of these tumors. IL-12 was as effective in NK cell-deficient beige mice or in mice depleted of NK cell activity by treatment with antiasialo GM1, suggesting that NK cells are not the primary cell type mediating the antitumor effects of this cytokine. However, the efficacy of IL-12 was greatly reduced in nude mice suggesting the involvement of T cells. Furthermore, depletion of CD8+ but not CD4+ T cells significantly reduced the efficacy of IL-12. These results demonstrate that IL-12 has potent in vivo antitumor and antimetastatic effects against murine tumors and demonstrate as well the critical role of CD8+ T cells in mediating the antitumor effects against subcutaneous tumors. PMID:8104230

  20. Murine immunization by cesium-137 irradiation attenuated Schistosoma mansoni cercariae

    SciTech Connect

    Stek, M. Jr.; Minard, P.; Cruess, D.F.

    1984-06-01

    Cesium-137, becoming a more readily available ionizing gamma radiation source for laboratory use, was shown to effectively attenuate Schistosoma mansoni cercariae for vaccine production. In parallel comparison studies with the murine model, cesium-137 attenuated cercariae consistently afforded better protection than did the cobalt-60 prepared vaccine. Dose-response data indicated that the optimal total irradiation with cesium-137 was between 45 and 50 Krad.

  1. Comprehensive Echocardiographic Assessment of the Right Ventricle in Murine Models

    PubMed Central

    Patel, Nishi; Singh, Harpreet

    2016-01-01

    Background Non-invasive high-resolution echocardiography to evaluate cardiovascular function of small animals is increasingly being used due to availability of genetically engineered murine models. Even though guidelines and standard values for humans were revised by the American Society of Echocardiography, evaluations on murine models are not performed according to any standard protocols. These limitations are preventing translation of preclinical evaluations to clinical meaningful conclusions. We have assessed the right heart of two commonly used murine models according to standard clinical guidelines, and provided the practical guide and sample values for cardiac assessments. Methods Right heart echocardiography evaluations of CD1 and C57BL/6 mice were performed under 1–3% isoflurane anesthesia using Vevo® 2100 Imaging System with a high-frequency (18–38 MHz) probe (VisualSonics MS400). We have provided a practical guide on how to image and assess the right heart of a mouse which is frequently used to evaluate development of right heart failure due to pulmonary hypertension. Results Our results show significant differences between CD1 and C57BL/6 mice. Right ventricle structural assessment showed significantly larger (p < 0.05) size, and pulmonary artery diameter in CD1 mice (n = 11) compared to C57BL/6 mice (n = 15). Right heart systolic and diastolic functions were similar for both strains. Conclusion Our practical guide on how to image and assess the right heart of murine models provides the first comprehensive values which can be used for preclinical research studies using echocardiography. Additionally, our results indicate that there is a high variability between mouse species and experimental models should be carefully selected for cardiac evaluations. PMID:27721954

  2. Carboplatin and Combination Chemotherapy With or Without Veliparib in Treating Patients With Stage IIB-IIIC Breast Cancer

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2015-10-12

    Estrogen Receptor-negative Breast Cancer; HER2-negative Breast Cancer; Progesterone Receptor-negative Breast Cancer; Stage II Breast Cancer; Stage IIIA Breast Cancer; Stage IIIB Breast Cancer; Stage IIIC Breast Cancer; Triple-negative Breast Cancer

  3. Addition of Carboplatin to Neoadjuvant Therapy for Triple-negative and HER2-positive Early Breast Cancer

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-02-12

    Tubular Breast Cancer Stage II; Mucinous Breast Cancer Stage II; Breast Cancer Female NOS; Invasive Ductal Breast Cancer; Tubular Breast Cancer Stage III; HER-2 Positive Breast Cancer; Inflammatory Breast Cancer Stage IV; Inflammatory Breast Cancer

  4. [Neuroendocrine neoplasms of the breast].

    PubMed

    Anlauf, M; Neumann, M; Bomberg, S; Luczak, K; Heikaus, S; Gustmann, C; Antke, C; Ezziddin, S; Fottner, C; Pavel, M; Pape, U-F; Rinke, A; Lahner, H; Schott, M; Cremer, B; Hörsch, D; Baum, R P; Groh, U; Alkatout, I; Rudlowski, C; Scheler, P; Zirbes, T K; Hoffmann, J; Fehm, T; Gabbert, H E; Baldus, S E

    2015-05-01

    Neuroendocrine neoplasms (NEN) of the breast are specific tumor entities. According to the literature up to 5% of breast neoplasms are malignant epithelial neoplasms of the breast. They are defined by a neuroendocrine (NE) architecture and cytology combined with an expression of the neuroendocrine vesicle markers chromogranin A and/or synaptophysin. The diagnosis is supplemented by the receptor status and the proliferative activity. According to the World Health Organization (WHO) classification of 2012 the following groups of NEN are distinguished: (1) invasive breast carcinoma with NE differentiation, (2) well-differentiated neuroendocrine tumor (NET) and (3) poorly differentiated small cell carcinoma (NEC). This review article focuses on (1) the definition and basic principles of diagnostics, (2) the history, nomenclature and WHO classification from 2003 and 2012, (3) the frequency of breast NEN, (4) the hereditary background and functional activity, (5) the expression of receptors and (6) the possible clinical implications. In addition, the first results of a retrospective single center study (n = 465 patients with breast cancer over a time period of 4 years) on the frequency of NEN of the breast at the Breast Center of the University Hospital Düsseldorf are presented. In this study a frequency of 4.5% of NEN was found based on a diagnostic cut-off of > 50% Chromogranin A and/or synaptophysin positive tumor cells.

  5. Reconstruction of an ablated breast.

    PubMed

    Scarfì, A; Ordemann, K; Hüter, J

    1986-01-01

    It is the aim of the reconstruction of an ablated breast to repair the woman's integrity. The technique of this operation, according to Bomert, is the sliding of a flap of skin in the case of a horizontal breast scar. For the reconstruction, a silicone prosthesis is implanted which in most cases is prepectoral.

  6. Breast cancer statistics and markers.

    PubMed

    Donepudi, Mallika Siva; Kondapalli, Kasturi; Amos, Seelam Jeevan; Venkanteshan, Pavithra

    2014-01-01

    Breast cancer is one of the familiar diseases in women. Incidence and mortality due to cancer, particularly breast cancer has been increasing for last 50 years, even though there is a lacuna in the diagnosis of breast cancer at early stages. According to World Health Organization (WHO) 2012 reports, breast cancer is the leading cause of death in women, accounting 23% of all cancer deaths. In Asia, one in every three women faces the risk of breast cancer in their lifetime as per reports of WHO 2012. Here, the review is been focused on different breast cancer markers, that is, tissue markers (hormone receptors, human epidermal growth factor-2, urokinase plasminogen activator, plasminogen activator inhibitor, p53 and cathepsin D), genetic markers (BRAC1 and 2 and gene expression microarray technique, etc.), and serum markers (CA 15.3, BR 27.29, MCA, CA 549, carcinoembryonic antigen, oncoproteins, and cytokeratins) used in present diagnosis, but none of the mentioned markers can diagnose breast cancer at an early stage. There is a disquieting need for the identification of best diagnosing marker, which can be able to diagnose even in early stage of breast carcinogenesis.

  7. Environmental Chemicals in Breast Milk

    EPA Science Inventory

    Most of the information available on environmental chemicals in breast milk is focused on persistent, lipophilic chemicals; the database on levels of these chemicals has expanded substantially since the 1950s. Currently, various types of chemicals are measured in breast milk and ...

  8. Training of breast surgical oncologists.

    PubMed

    Teshome, Mediget; Kuerer, Henry M

    2016-06-01

    Breast surgical oncology is a defined sub-specialty of general surgery with focus on the surgical management of breast disease and malignancy within a multidisciplinary context. Much of the training of breast surgical oncologists in the United States exists within a fellowship training structure with oversight and approval by the Society of Surgical Oncology (SSO). Rapid continuous changes in breast oncology practice have further substantiated dedicated expertise in breast surgical oncology. Training programs are structured to develop proficiency in fellows for advanced surgical techniques and clinical decision-making as well as exposure to the multidisciplinary aspects of breast cancer management. Components of a successful program include an intense multidisciplinary curriculum, engagement in clinical research and attention to strong mentorship. National curriculum and training requirements as well as supplemental resources assist in standardizing the fellowship experience. As surgical training and the field of breast oncology continues to evolve, so do fellowship training programs to ensure high quality breast surgical oncologists equipped to deliver high quality evidence based patient care while continuing to drive future research and trainee education. PMID:27197510

  9. Pheromone-induced cell proliferation in the murine subventricular zone.

    PubMed

    Koyama, Sachiko; Soini, Helena A; Foley, John; Novotny, Milos V; Lai, Cary

    2014-08-01

    Enhancement of adult neurogenesis in female mice was previously demonstrated through exposure to soiled bedding from males, although the identity of relevant chemosignals has remained unknown. The farnesenes and SBT (2-sec-butyl-4,5-dihydrothiazole) are male murine pheromones that dominant males secrete at higher levels. Previous studies have shown that they induce oestrus in female mice. We have recently shown that these pheromones strongly increase cell proliferation in the SVZ (subventricular zone) of adult female mice. In addition, we found that a female murine pheromone, 2,5-dimethylpyrazine, facilitates similar changes in males. 2,5-dimethylpyrazine is a female pheromone that is secreted when females are housed in large groups and it was originally found to suppress oestrus in females. We found that it does not have suppressive effect on the cell proliferation in the SVZ of females. Similarly, male murine pheromones, SBT and the farnesenes, do not show a suppressive effect on the cell proliferation in the SVZ of males. Our results demonstrated that pheromonal communication between males and females has strong stimulatory effect on both the reproductive physiology and brain cell proliferation, but intrasex pheromonal exchanges do not reduce progenitor proliferation in these brain regions.

  10. Diagnostic imaging advances in murine models of colitis

    PubMed Central

    Brückner, Markus; Lenz, Philipp; Mücke, Marcus M; Gohar, Faekah; Willeke, Peter; Domagk, Dirk; Bettenworth, Dominik

    2016-01-01

    Inflammatory bowel diseases (IBD) such as Crohn’s disease and ulcerative colitis are chronic-remittent inflammatory disorders of the gastrointestinal tract still evoking challenging clinical diagnostic and therapeutic situations. Murine models of experimental colitis are a vital component of research into human IBD concerning questions of its complex pathogenesis or the evaluation of potential new drugs. To monitor the course of colitis, to the present day, classical parameters like histological tissue alterations or analysis of mucosal cytokine/chemokine expression often require euthanasia of animals. Recent advances mean revolutionary non-invasive imaging techniques for in vivo murine colitis diagnostics are increasingly available. These novel and emerging imaging techniques not only allow direct visualization of intestinal inflammation, but also enable molecular imaging and targeting of specific alterations of the inflamed murine mucosa. For the first time, in vivo imaging techniques allow for longitudinal examinations and evaluation of intra-individual therapeutic response. This review discusses the latest developments in the different fields of ultrasound, molecularly targeted contrast agent ultrasound, fluorescence endoscopy, confocal laser endomicroscopy as well as tomographic imaging with magnetic resonance imaging, computed tomography and fluorescence-mediated tomography, discussing their individual limitations and potential future diagnostic applications in the management of human patients with IBD. PMID:26811642

  11. Structure and regulation of the murine gamma-casein gene.

    PubMed

    Kolb, Andreas F

    2002-12-12

    The murine casein locus consists of five genes, which are coordinately regulated during mammary development. The levels of casein-specific mRNAs in mammary epithelial cells increase during the second half of pregnancy and remain high during lactation. The murine gamma-casein gene, which corresponds to the alphaS2-casein gene in ruminants, was isolated from a mouse bacterial artificial chromosome (BAC) library (strain 129SV). The gene contains 14 exons, which are distributed over 14 kb of DNA sequence. The expression pattern of the murine gamma-casein gene mimics that of the neighbouring beta-casein gene in terms of developmental induction in vivo. In cell culture, both the beta- and gamma-casein promoter are synergistically induced by prolactin and glucocorticoids. Glucocorticoid induction is critically dependent on prolactin-mediated activation of STAT5 in both promoters. Several consensus STAT5 binding sites were identified in the gamma-casein promoter, some of which may have an additive effect on prolactin induction. mRNA levels of gamma- and beta-casein are similar in lactating mammary tissue. However, promoter segments derived from the gamma-casein gene are significantly less active in cell culture than comparable fragments of the beta-casein promoter. Promoter hybrids between the gamma- and beta-casein promoters revealed that the critical sequences which are responsible for the different in vitro activity are located in a short promoter proximal region.

  12. Activation of murine macrophages and lymphocytes by Ureaplasma diversum.

    PubMed Central

    Chelmonska-Soyta, A; Miller, R B; Ruhnke, L; Rosendal, S

    1994-01-01

    Ureaplasma diversum is a pathogen in the bovine reproductive tract. The objective of the research was to study interactions with macrophages and lymphocytes which might elucidate aspects of pathogenetic mechanisms of this organism. We studied the activation of murine macrophages of C3H/HeN (LPS-responder) and C3H/HeJ (LPS-low-responder) genotype for TNF-alpha, IL-6, IL-1 and nitric oxide production and blastogenic response of C3H/HeJ splenocytes after Ureaplasma diversum stimulation. Live and heat-killed U. diversum induced TNF-alpha, IL-6 and IL-1 in peritoneal macrophage cultures of both C3H/HeN and C3H/HeJ mice in a dose dependent manner. Interferon-gamma modulated the cytokine production, by increasing the production of TNF-alpha, IL-6 and nitric oxide, but IL-1 secretion was only enhanced in C3H/HeJ macrophages stimulated by live ureaplasmas. Supernatant of U. diversum sonicate was mitogenic for murine spleen lymphocytes. The blastogenic response was dose dependent, and stimulation with both U. diversum and Concanavalin A seemed to have an additive effect. These results suggest that U. diversum, similar to other mycoplasmas, activates murine macrophages and lymphoid cells. The studies should be repeated with bovine cells in order to elucidate pathogenetic aspects of inflammation in cattle caused by U. diversum. PMID:7889459

  13. Cloning and characterization of a murine SIL gene

    SciTech Connect

    Collazo-Garcia, N.; Scherer, P.; Aplan, P.D.

    1995-12-10

    The human SIL gene is disrupted by a site-specific interstitial deletion in 25% of children with T-cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia. Since transcriptionally active genes are prone to recombination events, the recurrent nature of this lesion suggests that the SIL gene product is transcriptionally active in the cell type that undergoes this interstitial deletion and that the SIL gene product may play a role in normal lymphoid development. To facilitate studies of SIL gene function, we have cloned and characterized a murine SIL gene. The predicted murine SIL protein is 75% identical to the human gene, with good homology throughout the open reading frame. An in vitro translated SIL cDNA generated a protein slightly larger than the predicted 139-kDa protein. Although a prior report detected SIL mRNA expression exclusively in hematopoietic tissues, a sensitive RT-PCR assay demonstrated SIL expression to be ubiquitous, detectable in all tissues examined. Since the RT-PCR assay suggested that SIL mRNA expression was higher in rapidly proliferating tissues, we assayed SIL mRNA expression using a murine erythroleukemia model of terminal differentiation and found it to be dramatically decreased in conjunction with terminal differentiation. These studies demonstrate that the human SIL gene product is quite well conserved in rodents and suggest that the SIL gene product may play a role in cell proliferation. 26 refs., 6 figs.

  14. Exogenous progestins and breast cancer.

    PubMed

    Stanford, J L; Thomas, D B

    1993-01-01

    More research on the effect of exogenous progestins on breast cancer risk is clearly needed. Biologic evidence that progestins may act synergistically with estrogen to enhance proliferation of breast epithelial cells emphasizes the importance of further exploration of this issue, particularly given the increasing prevalence of exposure to contraceptive and noncontraceptive progestins. No specific type or dose of progestin in monophasic combination oral contraceptives has been linked to breast cancer. Based on the few epidemiologic studies of progestin-only oral contraceptives, there also is no evidence that they increase risk of breast cancer. Two studies found that longer-term use of progestin-only pills was associated with a decreased risk of breast cancer. However, given the low prevalence of use of minipills, it is unlikely that this exposure substantially affects the incidence of breast cancer in the population as a whole. Use of the injectable contraceptive DMPA has been positively associated with risk of breast cancer in some subgroups of women, although no significant overall adverse effect has been observed in the two largest studies conducted to date. There is suggestive evidence that use at an early age or prior to a first term birth and recent use may increase risk of breast cancer. It remains unclear, however, whether or not surveillance bias may explain the positive association observed in recent users. Additional research on DMPA and breast cancer incidence is needed, since studies published to date have lacked sufficient power to evaluate risk in relation to long-term use. Future studies of breast cancer in relation to use of other long-acting progestational agents such as Norplant will also be important. There is concern about the relation between breast cancer incidence and use of combined estrogen-progestin replacement therapy, especially extended periods of use. At the present time, only one study (45) has estimated risk according to duration of

  15. Apoptosis and cell-cycle arrest in human and murine tumor cells are initiated by isoprenoids.

    PubMed

    Mo, H; Elson, C E

    1999-04-01

    Diverse classes of phytochemicals initiate biological responses that effectively lower cancer risk. One class of phytochemicals, broadly defined as pure and mixed isoprenoids, encompasses an estimated 22,000 individual components. A representative mixed isoprenoid, gamma-tocotrienol, suppresses the growth of murine B16(F10) melanoma cells, and with greater potency, the growth of human breast adenocarcinoma (MCF-7) and human leukemic (HL-60) cells. beta-Ionone, a pure isoprenoid, suppresses the growth of B16 cells and with greater potency, the growth of MCF-7, HL-60 and human colon adenocarcinoma (Caco-2) cells. Results obtained with diverse cell lines differing in ras and p53 status showed that the isoprenoid-mediated suppression of growth is independent of mutated ras and p53 functions. beta-Ionone suppressed the growth of human colon fibroblasts (CCD-18Co) but only when present at three-fold the concentration required to suppress the growth of Caco-2 cells. The isoprenoids initiated apoptosis and, concomitantly arrested cells in the G1 phase of the cell cycle. Both suppress 3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl CoA reductase activity. beta-Ionone and lovastatin interfered with the posttranslational processing of lamin B, an activity essential to assembly of daughter nuclei. This interference, we postulate, renders neosynthesized DNA available to the endonuclease activities leading to apoptotic cell death. Lovastatin-imposed mevalonate starvation suppressed the glycosylation and translocation of growth factor receptors to the cell surface. As a consequence, cells were arrested in the G1 phase of the cell cycle. This rationale may apply to the isoprenoid-mediated G1-phase arrest of tumor cells. The additive and potentially synergistic actions of these isoprenoids in the suppression of tumor cell proliferation and initiation of apoptosis coupled with the mass action of the diverse isoprenoid constituents of plant products may explain, in part, the impact of fruit, vegetable

  16. Diet Complexity and Estrogen Receptor β Status Affect the Composition of the Murine Intestinal Microbiota

    PubMed Central

    Menon, Rani; Watson, Sara E.; Thomas, Laura N.; Allred, Clinton D.; Dabney, Alan; Azcarate-Peril, M. Andrea

    2013-01-01

    Intestinal microbial dysbiosis contributes to the dysmetabolism of luminal factors, including steroid hormones (sterones) that affect the development of chronic gastrointestinal inflammation and the incidence of sterone-responsive cancers of the breast, prostate, and colon. Little is known, however, about the role of specific host sterone nucleoreceptors, including estrogen receptor β (ERβ), in microbiota maintenance. Herein, we test the hypothesis that ERβ status affects microbiota composition and determine if such compositionally distinct microbiota respond differently to changes in diet complexity that favor Proteobacteria enrichment. To this end, conventionally raised female ERβ+/+ and ERβ−/− C57BL/6J mice (mean age of 27 weeks) were initially reared on 8604, a complex diet containing estrogenic isoflavones, and then fed AIN-76, an isoflavone-free semisynthetic diet, for 2 weeks. 16S rRNA gene surveys revealed that the fecal microbiota of 8604-fed mice and AIN-76-fed mice differed, as expected. The relative diversity of Proteobacteria, especially the Alphaproteobacteria and Gammaproteobacteria, increased significantly following the transition to AIN-76. Distinct patterns for beneficial Lactobacillales were exclusive to and highly abundant among 8604-fed mice, whereas several Proteobacteria were exclusive to AIN-76-fed mice. Interestingly, representative orders of the phyla Proteobacteria, Bacteroidetes, and Firmicutes, including the Lactobacillales, also differed as a function of murine ERβ status. Overall, these interactions suggest that sterone nucleoreceptor status and diet complexity may play important roles in microbiota maintenance. Furthermore, we envision that this model for gastrointestinal dysbiosis may be used to identify novel probiotics, prebiotics, nutritional strategies, and pharmaceuticals for the prevention and resolution of Proteobacteria-rich dysbiosis. PMID:23872567

  17. Breast reconstruction: options post-mastectomy.

    PubMed

    Rolph, R; Mehta, S; Farhadi, J

    2016-06-01

    Breast cancer is the most common cancer affecting women in the UK. Breast reconstruction after resection of breast cancers increases patients' quality of life and psychosocial functioning. This article introduces this field and explores the options available to patients with breast cancer. PMID:27269748

  18. Aluminium and human breast diseases.

    PubMed

    Darbre, P D; Pugazhendhi, D; Mannello, F

    2011-11-01

    The human breast is exposed to aluminium from many sources including diet and personal care products, but dermal application of aluminium-based antiperspirant salts provides a local long-term source of exposure. Recent measurements have shown that aluminium is present in both tissue and fat of the human breast but at levels which vary both between breasts and between tissue samples from the same breast. We have recently found increased levels of aluminium in noninvasively collected nipple aspirate fluids taken from breast cancer patients (mean 268 ± 28 μg/l) compared with control healthy subjects (mean 131 ± 10 μg/l) providing evidence of raised aluminium levels in the breast microenvironment when cancer is present. The measurement of higher levels of aluminium in type I human breast cyst fluids (median 150 μg/l) compared with human serum (median 6 μg/l) or human milk (median 25 μg/l) warrants further investigation into any possible role of aluminium in development of this benign breast disease. Emerging evidence for aluminium in several breast structures now requires biomarkers of aluminium action in order to ascertain whether the presence of aluminium has any biological impact. To this end, we report raised levels of proteins that modulate iron homeostasis (ferritin, transferrin) in parallel with raised aluminium in nipple aspirate fluids in vivo, and we report overexpression of mRNA for several S100 calcium binding proteins following long-term exposure of MCF-7 human breast cancer cells in vitro to aluminium chlorhydrate.

  19. Breast feeding and HIV infection.

    PubMed

    Cutting, W A

    1992-10-01

    There are considerable data suggesting that breast milk and colostrum transmit HIV. The European Collaborative Study shows the risk of transmission of HIV from breast milk to infant to be about 28%. A study in Rwanda indicates that transmission is more likely to take place during viremia which occurs during primary HIV infection and later with progression to AIDS. Postnatal transmission in this study stood at about 60%. Breast feeding protects against diarrhea and respiratory infections. A study in Brazil demonstrates that infants who were not breast fed were at 14.2 and 3.6 higher risk of death from diarrhea and respiratory infections, respectively, than breast-fed infants. These risks are especially great where poverty, inadequate sanitation, and poor hygiene predominate. A study in Malaysia shows that infants living in a household with no piped water and no toilet and were not breast-fed faced a 5-fold risk of death after 1 week of age than breast-fed infants living under the same conditions. This risk continued to be high (2.5) for non-breast-fed infants living in a household with piped water and a toilet. In developed countries, affordable formula, clean water, and adequate facilities for sterilizing bottles allows HIV positive mothers to bottle feed their infants which should reduce the vertical transmission rate. In developing countries, however, bottle feeding is expensive and hazardous. Governments often cannot provide potable water and sanitation services. In addition, mathematical models demonstrate that for HIV positive mothers, the risk of infant death is lower in infants who breast feed than in those who do not. Thus, in those areas of the world where infectious diseases and malnutrition are the leading causes of infant death, health workers should promote breast feeding regardless of HIV status of the mothers. PMID:1422355

  20. Aluminium and human breast diseases.

    PubMed

    Darbre, P D; Pugazhendhi, D; Mannello, F

    2011-11-01

    The human breast is exposed to aluminium from many sources including diet and personal care products, but dermal application of aluminium-based antiperspirant salts provides a local long-term source of exposure. Recent measurements have shown that aluminium is present in both tissue and fat of the human breast but at levels which vary both between breasts and between tissue samples from the same breast. We have recently found increased levels of aluminium in noninvasively collected nipple aspirate fluids taken from breast cancer patients (mean 268 ± 28 μg/l) compared with control healthy subjects (mean 131 ± 10 μg/l) providing evidence of raised aluminium levels in the breast microenvironment when cancer is present. The measurement of higher levels of aluminium in type I human breast cyst fluids (median 150 μg/l) compared with human serum (median 6 μg/l) or human milk (median 25 μg/l) warrants further investigation into any possible role of aluminium in development of this benign breast disease. Emerging evidence for aluminium in several breast structures now requires biomarkers of aluminium action in order to ascertain whether the presence of aluminium has any biological impact. To this end, we report raised levels of proteins that modulate iron homeostasis (ferritin, transferrin) in parallel with raised aluminium in nipple aspirate fluids in vivo, and we report overexpression of mRNA for several S100 calcium binding proteins following long-term exposure of MCF-7 human breast cancer cells in vitro to aluminium chlorhydrate. PMID:22099158