Science.gov

Sample records for 4t1 tumor cells

  1. Rapamycin Promotes Mouse 4T1 Tumor Metastasis that Can Be Reversed by a Dendritic Cell-Based Vaccine

    PubMed Central

    Lin, Tien-Jen; Liang, Wen-Miin; Hsiao, Pei-Wen; M. S, Pradeep; Wei, Wen-Chi; Lin, Hsin-Ting; Yin, Shu-Yi; Yang, Ning-Sun

    2015-01-01

    Suppression of tumor metastasis is a key strategy for successful cancer interventions. Previous studies indicated that rapamycin (sirolimus) may promote tumor regression activity or enhance immune response against tumor targets. However, rapamycin also exhibits immunosuppressant effects and is hence used clinically as an organ transplantation drug. We hypothesized that the immunosuppressive activities of rapamycin might also negatively mediate host immunity, resulting in promotion of tumor metastasis. In this study, the effects of rapamycin and phytochemical shikonin were investigated in vitro and in vivo in a 4T1 mouse mammary tumor model through quantitative assessment of immunogenic cell death (ICD), autophagy, tumor growth and metastasis. Tumor-bearing mice were immunized with test vaccines to monitor their effect on tumor metastasis. We found that intraperitoneal (ip) administration of rapamycin after a tumor-resection surgery drastically increased the metastatic activity of 4T1 tumors. Possible correlation of this finding to human cancers was suggested by epidemiological analysis of data from Taiwan’s National Health Insurance Research Database (NHIRD). Since our previous studies showed that modified tumor cell lysate (TCL)-pulsed, dendritic cell (DC)-based cancer vaccines can effectively suppress metastasis in mouse tumor models, we assessed whether such vaccines may help offset this rapamycin-promoted metastasis. We observed that shikonin efficiently induced ICD of 4T1 cells in culture, and DC vaccines pulsed with shikonin-treated TCL (SK-TCL-DC) significantly suppressed rapamycin-enhanced metastasis and Treg cell expansion in test mice. In conclusion, rapamycin treatment in mice (and perhaps in humans) promotes metastasis and the effect may be offset by treatment with a DC-based cancer vaccine. PMID:26426423

  2. Rapamycin Promotes Mouse 4T1 Tumor Metastasis that Can Be Reversed by a Dendritic Cell-Based Vaccine.

    PubMed

    Lin, Tien-Jen; Liang, Wen-Miin; Hsiao, Pei-Wen; M S, Pradeep; Wei, Wen-Chi; Lin, Hsin-Ting; Yin, Shu-Yi; Yang, Ning-Sun

    2015-01-01

    Suppression of tumor metastasis is a key strategy for successful cancer interventions. Previous studies indicated that rapamycin (sirolimus) may promote tumor regression activity or enhance immune response against tumor targets. However, rapamycin also exhibits immunosuppressant effects and is hence used clinically as an organ transplantation drug. We hypothesized that the immunosuppressive activities of rapamycin might also negatively mediate host immunity, resulting in promotion of tumor metastasis. In this study, the effects of rapamycin and phytochemical shikonin were investigated in vitro and in vivo in a 4T1 mouse mammary tumor model through quantitative assessment of immunogenic cell death (ICD), autophagy, tumor growth and metastasis. Tumor-bearing mice were immunized with test vaccines to monitor their effect on tumor metastasis. We found that intraperitoneal (ip) administration of rapamycin after a tumor-resection surgery drastically increased the metastatic activity of 4T1 tumors. Possible correlation of this finding to human cancers was suggested by epidemiological analysis of data from Taiwan's National Health Insurance Research Database (NHIRD). Since our previous studies showed that modified tumor cell lysate (TCL)-pulsed, dendritic cell (DC)-based cancer vaccines can effectively suppress metastasis in mouse tumor models, we assessed whether such vaccines may help offset this rapamycin-promoted metastasis. We observed that shikonin efficiently induced ICD of 4T1 cells in culture, and DC vaccines pulsed with shikonin-treated TCL (SK-TCL-DC) significantly suppressed rapamycin-enhanced metastasis and Treg cell expansion in test mice. In conclusion, rapamycin treatment in mice (and perhaps in humans) promotes metastasis and the effect may be offset by treatment with a DC-based cancer vaccine. PMID:26426423

  3. Radio-photothermal therapy mediated by a single compartment nanoplatform depletes tumor initiating cells and reduces lung metastasis in the orthotopic 4T1 breast tumor model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, Min; Zhao, Jun; Tian, Mei; Song, Shaoli; Zhang, Rui; Gupta, Sanjay; Tan, Dongfeng; Shen, Haifa; Ferrari, Mauro; Li, Chun

    2015-11-01

    Tumor Initiating Cells (TICs) are resistant to radiotherapy and chemotherapy, and are believed to be responsible for tumor recurrence and metastasis. Combination therapies can overcome the limitation of conventional cancer treatments, and have demonstrated promising application in the clinic. Here, we show that dual modality radiotherapy (RT) and photothermal therapy (PTT) mediated by a single compartment nanosystem copper-64-labeled copper sulfide nanoparticles ([64Cu]CuS NPs) could suppress breast tumor metastasis through eradication of TICs. Positron electron tomography (PET) imaging and biodistribution studies showed that more than 90% of [64Cu]CuS NPs was retained in subcutaneously grown BT474 breast tumor 24 h after intratumoral (i.t.) injection, indicating the NPs are suitable for the combination therapy. Combined RT/PTT therapy resulted in significant tumor growth delay in the subcutaneous BT474 breast cancer model. Moreover, RT/PTT treatment significantly prolonged the survival of mice bearing orthotopic 4T1 breast tumors compared to no treatment, RT alone, or PTT alone. The RT/PTT combination therapy significantly reduced the number of tumor nodules in the lung and the formation of tumor mammospheres from treated 4T1 tumors. No obvious side effects of the CuS NPs were noted in the treated mice in a pilot toxicity study. Taken together, our data support the feasibility of a therapeutic approach for the suppression of tumor metastasis through localized RT/PTT therapy.Tumor Initiating Cells (TICs) are resistant to radiotherapy and chemotherapy, and are believed to be responsible for tumor recurrence and metastasis. Combination therapies can overcome the limitation of conventional cancer treatments, and have demonstrated promising application in the clinic. Here, we show that dual modality radiotherapy (RT) and photothermal therapy (PTT) mediated by a single compartment nanosystem copper-64-labeled copper sulfide nanoparticles ([64Cu]CuS NPs) could suppress

  4. Effects of letrozole on breast cancer micro-metastatic tumor growth in bone and lung in mice inoculated with murine 4T1 cells.

    PubMed

    Wang, Wendan; Belosay, Aashvini; Yang, Xujuan; Hartman, James A; Song, Huaxin; Iwaniec, Urszula T; Turner, Russell T; Churchwell, Mona I; Doerge, Daniel R; Helferich, William G

    2016-06-01

    Breast cancer (BC) is the leading cancer in women worldwide. Metastasis occurs in stage IV BC with bone and lung being common metastatic sites. Here we evaluate the effects of the aromatase inhibitor letrozole on BC micro-metastatic tumor growth in bone and lung metastasis in intact and ovariectomized (OVX) mice with murine estrogen receptor negative (ER-) BC cells inoculated in tibia. Forty-eight BALB/c mice were randomly assigned to one of four groups: OVX, OVX + Letrozole, Intact, and Intact + Letrozole, and injected with 4T1 cells intra-tibially. Letrozole was subcutaneously injected daily for 23 days at a dose of 1.75 µg/g body weight. Tumor progression was monitored by bioluminescence imaging (BLI). Following necropsy, inoculated tibiae were scanned via µCT and bone response to tumor was scored from 0 (no ectopic mineralization/osteolysis) to 5 (extensive ectopic mineralization/osteolysis). OVX mice had higher tibial pathology scores indicative of more extensive bone destruction than intact mice, irrespective of letrozole treatment. Letrozole decreased serum estradiol levels and reduced lung surface tumor numbers in intact animals. Furthermore, mice receiving letrozole had significantly fewer tumor colonies and fewer proliferative cells in the lung than OVX and intact controls based on H&E and Ki-67 staining, respectively. In conclusion, BC-inoculated OVX animals had higher tibia pathology scores than BC-inoculated intact animals and letrozole reduced BC metastases to lungs. These findings suggest that, by lowering systemic estrogen level and/or by interacting with the host organ, the aromatase inhibitor letrozole has the potential to reduce ER- BC metastasis to lung. PMID:27209469

  5. Primary 4T1 tumor resection provides critical "window of opportunity" for immunotherapy.

    PubMed

    Ghochikyan, Anahit; Davtyan, Arpine; Hovakimyan, Armine; Davtyan, Hayk; Poghosyan, Anna; Bagaev, Alexander; Ataullakhanov, Ravshan I; Nelson, Edward L; Agadjanyan, Michael G

    2014-02-01

    It is believed that primary tumor resection modulates host-tumor immune interaction, but this has not been characterized in a stringent breast cancer tumor model. This report, using the 4T1 murine mammary tumor model, characterizes for the first time the dynamic longitudinal changes in immunosuppressive and effector components of the immune system after resection of an established orthotopic primary tumor with a defined natural history of developing lung metastases. More specifically, we analyzed changes of absolute numbers and frequencies of MDSC, regulatory T cells (Treg), as well as activated CD4 and CD8 positive T cells in spleens and, in some studies, lungs of 4T1 tumor-bearing mice and mice after primary tumor resection. Importantly, using mathematical analyses we established that primary resection of an orthotopic tumor had created a "window of opportunity" with decreased tumor-associated immune suppression that existed for approximately 10 days. Although tumor resection did slightly prolong survival, it did not affect the ultimate development of metastatic disease since animals with resected tumors or intact primary tumors eventually died by day 47 and 43, respectively. This window of opportunity likely occurs in humans providing a rationale and parameters for integration and testing of immunotherapeutic strategies in this critical "window of opportunity" to combat the development of metastatic disease. PMID:24096737

  6. Primary 4T1 tumor resection provides critical "window of opportunity" for immunotherapy.

    PubMed

    Ghochikyan, Anahit; Davtyan, Arpine; Hovakimyan, Armine; Davtyan, Hayk; Poghosyan, Anna; Bagaev, Alexander; Ataullakhanov, Ravshan I; Nelson, Edward L; Agadjanyan, Michael G

    2014-02-01

    It is believed that primary tumor resection modulates host-tumor immune interaction, but this has not been characterized in a stringent breast cancer tumor model. This report, using the 4T1 murine mammary tumor model, characterizes for the first time the dynamic longitudinal changes in immunosuppressive and effector components of the immune system after resection of an established orthotopic primary tumor with a defined natural history of developing lung metastases. More specifically, we analyzed changes of absolute numbers and frequencies of MDSC, regulatory T cells (Treg), as well as activated CD4 and CD8 positive T cells in spleens and, in some studies, lungs of 4T1 tumor-bearing mice and mice after primary tumor resection. Importantly, using mathematical analyses we established that primary resection of an orthotopic tumor had created a "window of opportunity" with decreased tumor-associated immune suppression that existed for approximately 10 days. Although tumor resection did slightly prolong survival, it did not affect the ultimate development of metastatic disease since animals with resected tumors or intact primary tumors eventually died by day 47 and 43, respectively. This window of opportunity likely occurs in humans providing a rationale and parameters for integration and testing of immunotherapeutic strategies in this critical "window of opportunity" to combat the development of metastatic disease.

  7. Low local blood perfusion, high white blood cell and high platelet count are associated with primary tumor growth and lung metastasis in a 4T1 mouse breast cancer metastasis model

    PubMed Central

    WANG, CHUAN; CHEN, YING-GE; GAO, JIAN-LI; LYU, GUI-YUAN; SU, JIE; ZHANG, QI; JI, XIN; YAN, JI-ZHONG; QIU, QIAO-LI; ZHANG, YUE-LI; LI, LIN-ZI; XU, HAN-TING; CHEN, SU-HONG

    2015-01-01

    It was originally thought that no single routine blood test result would be able to indicate whether or not a patient had cancer; however, several novel studies have indicated that the median survival and prognosis of cancer patients were markedly associated with the systemic circulation features of cancer patients. In addition, certain parameters, such as white blood cell (WBC) count, were largely altered in malignant tumors. In the present study, routine blood tests were performed in order to observe the change of blood cells in tumor-bearing mice following the implantation of 4T1 breast cancer cells into the mammary fat pad; in addition, blood flow in breast tumor sites was measured indirectly using laser Doppler perfusion imaging (LDPI), in an attempt to explain the relevance between the blood circulation features and the growth or metastasis of breast cancer in mice model. The LDPI and blood test results indicated that the implantation of 4T1 breast cancer cells into BALB/c mice led to thrombosis as well as high WBC count, high platelet count, high plateletcrit and low blood perfusion. Following implantation of the 4T1 cells for four weeks, the lung metastatic number was determined and the Pearson correlation coefficient revealed that the number of visceral lung metastatic sites had a marked negative association with the ratio of basophils (BASO%; r=-0.512; P<0.01) and the mean corpuscular hemoglobin was significantly correlated with primary tumor weight (r=0.425; P<0.05). In conclusion, the results of the present study demonstrated that tumor growth led to thrombosis and acute anemia in mice; in addition, when blood BASO% was low, an increased number of lung metastases were observed in tumor-bearing mice. PMID:26622565

  8. Tetrandrine Suppresses Cancer Angiogenesis and Metastasis in 4T1 Tumor Bearing Mice

    PubMed Central

    Gao, Jian-Li; He, Tong-Chuan; He, Kai; Chen, Su-Hong; Lv, Gui-Yuan

    2013-01-01

    Metastasis remains the most deadly aspect of cancer and still evades direct treatment. Thus, there is a great need to develop new treatment regimens to suppress tumor cells that have escaped surgical removal or that may have already disseminated. We have found that tetrandrine (TET) exhibits anticolon cancer activity. Here, we investigate the inhibition effect of TET to breast cancer metastasis, angiogenesis and its molecular basis underlying TET's anticancer activity. We compare TET with chemotherapy drug doxorubicin in 4T1 tumor bearing BALB/c mice model and find that TET exhibits an anticancer metastatic and antiangiogenic activities better than those of doxorubicin. The lung metastatic sites were decreased by TET, which is confirmed by bioluminescence imaging in vivo. On the other hand, laser doppler perfusion imaging (LDI) was used for measuring the blood flow of tumor in 4T1-tumor bearing mice. As a result, the local blood perfusion of tumor was markedly decreased by TET after 3 weeks. Mechanistically, TET treatment leads to a decrease in p-ERK level and an increase in NF-κB levels in HUVECs. TET also regulated metastatic and angiogenic related proteins, including vascular endothelial growth factor, hypoxia-inducible factor-1α, integrin β5, endothelial cell specific molecule-1, and intercellular adhesion molecule-1 in vivo. PMID:23762115

  9. High Resolution X-Ray Microangiography of 4T1 Tumor in Mouse Using Synchrotron Radiation

    SciTech Connect

    Sun Jianqi; Liu Ping; Gu Xiang; Liu Xiaoxia; Zhao Jun; Xiao Tiqiao; Xu, Lisa X.

    2010-07-23

    Angiogenesis is very important in tumor growth and metastasis. But in clinic, only vessels lager than 200 {mu}m in diameter, can be observed using conventional medical imaging. Synchrotron radiation (SR) phase contrast imaging, whose spatial resolution can reach as high as 1 {mu}m, has great advantages in imaging soft tissue structures, such as blood vessels and tumor tissues. In this paper, the morphology of newly formed micro-vessels in the mouse 4T1 tumor samples was firstly studied with contrast agent. Then, the angiogenesis in nude mice tumor window model was observed without contrast agent using the SR phase contrast imaging at the beamline for X-ray imaging and biomedical applications, Shanghai Synchrotron Radiation Facility (SSRF). The images of tumors showed dense, irregular and tortuous tumor micro-vessels with the smallest size of 20-30 {mu}m in diameter.

  10. The combined use of Camellia sinensis and metronomic zoledronate in 4T1 mouse carcinoma against tumor growth and metastasis.

    PubMed

    Luo, Ke-Wang; Yue, Grace Gar-Lee; Ko, Chun-Hay; Gao, Si; Lee, Julia Kin-Ming; Li, Gang; Fung, Kwok-Pui; Leung, Ping-Chung; Lau, Clara Bik-San

    2015-07-01

    In previous studies, we demonstrated that the green tea Camellia sinensis (CS) water extract had potent antitumor and antimetastatic effects on 4T1 breast cancer. The metronomic regimen (0.0125 mg/kg twice a week for 4 weeks) of zoledronate (ZOL) was found to be effective in decreasing tumor burden and metastasis as compared with conventional regimen. The aim of the present study was to investigate the antitumor, antimetastatic and anti-osteolytic effects of the combined use of CS water extract and metronomic ZOL against 4T1 breast carcinoma in vitro and in vivo. The results demonstrated that the combination of CS+ZOL exerted a more potent effect on lung and liver by decreasing tumor burden and metastasis, when compared to CS or metronomic ZOL as monotherapies. The combination of CS+ZOL demonstrated optimal bone protection against breast cancer-induced osteolysis for the three groups of CS, ZOL and CS+ZOL. The in vitro results further demonstrated that ZOL enhanced CS-induced apoptosis in 4T1 cells as assessed by the Annexin V-FITC/PI staining and caspase-3 activity assays. In addition, the combined use of CS+ZOL significantly inhibited 4T1 cell migration. Mechanistic studies showed that the enzyme levels of matrix metalloproteinases (MMP)-2 and MMP-9 were suppressed significantly by CS+ZOL. In conclusion, to the best of our knowledge, this is the first study to investigate the novel combined application of herbal extract CS and chemotherapy ZOL in 4T1 breast cancer. The combination of CS plus metronomic ZOL demonstrated significant antitumor, antimetastatic and anti-osteolytic effects against breast cancer, and suggested potential clinical application for breast cancer patients.

  11. Anticancer Activity of Saponins from Allium chinense against the B16 Melanoma and 4T1 Breast Carcinoma Cell

    PubMed Central

    Yu, Zhihui; Zhang, Tong; Zhou, Fengjuan; Xiao, Xiuqing; Ding, Xuezhi; He, Hao; Rang, Jie; Quan, Meifang; Wang, Ting; Zuo, Mingxing; Xia, Liqiu

    2015-01-01

    The cytotoxic substance of A. chinense saponins (ACSs) was isolated using ethanol extraction and purified with the D101 macroporous adsorption resin approach. We investigated the anticancer activity of ACSs in the B16 melanoma and 4T1 breast carcinoma cell lines. Methylthioninium chloride and hematoxylin-eosin staining with Giemsa dyestuff were used when the cells were treated with ACSs. The results showed that the cells morphologies changed significantly; ACSs induced cell death in B16 and 4T1 cells based on acridine orange/ethidium bromide double fluorescence staining, with the number and degree of apoptotic tumor cells increasing as ACS concentration increased. ACSs inhibited the proliferation of B16 and 4T1 cells in a dose-dependent manner. They also inhibited cell migration and colony formation and exhibited a concentration-dependent effect. In addition, ACSs apparently inhibited the growth of melanoma in vivo. The preliminary antitumor in vivo assay revealed that early medication positively affected tumor inhibition action and effectively protected the liver and spleen of C57 BL/6 mice from injury. This study provides evidence for the cytotoxicity of ACSs and a strong foundation for further research to establish the theoretical basis for cell death and help in the design and development of new anticancer drugs. PMID:26146506

  12. Rejection of metastatic 4T1 breast cancer by attenuation of Treg cells in combination with immune stimulation.

    PubMed

    Chen, Li; Huang, Tian-Gui; Meseck, Marcia; Mandeli, John; Fallon, John; Woo, Savio L C

    2007-12-01

    4T1 breast carcinoma is a highly malignant and poorly immunogenic murine tumor model that resembles advanced breast cancer in humans, and is refractory to most immune stimulation-based treatments. We hypothesize that the ineffectiveness of immune stimulatory treatment is mediated by the suppressive effects of CD4(+)CD25(+) regulatory T (Treg) cells, which can be attenuated by engaging the glucocorticoid-induced tumor necrosis factor receptor family-related protein with its natural ligand (GITRL); further, combination treatment with existing immune stimulation regimens will augment anti-tumor immunity and eradicate metastatic 4T1 tumors in mice.A soluble homodimeric form of mouse GITRL (mIg-mGITRLs) was molecularly constructed and used to treat orthotopic 4T1 tumors established in immune-competent, syngeneic Balb/c mice. When applied in combination with adenovirus-mediated intratumoral murine granulocyte macrophage colony stimulating factor (GM-CSF) and interleukin-12 (IL-12) gene delivery plus systemic 4-1BB activation, mIg-mGITRLs attenuated the immune-suppressive function of splenic Treg cells, which led to elevated interferon-gamma (IFN-gamma) production, tumor-specific cytolytic T-cell activities, tumor rejection and long-term survival in 65% of the animals without apparent toxicities. The results demonstrate that addition of mIg-mGITRLs to an immune-stimulatory treatment regimen significantly improved long-term survival without apparent toxicity, and could potentially be clinically translated into an effective and safe treatment modality for metastatic breast cancer in patients. PMID:17968355

  13. Secretion of N- and O-linked Glycoproteins from 4T1 Murine Mammary Carcinoma Cells.

    PubMed

    Phang, Wai-Mei; Tan, Aik-Aun; Gopinath, Subash C B; Hashim, Onn H; Kiew, Lik Voon; Chen, Yeng

    2016-01-01

    Breast cancer is one of the most common cancers that affect women globally and accounts for ~23% of all cancers diagnosed in women. Breast cancer is also one of the leading causes of death primarily due to late stage diagnoses and a lack of effective treatments. Therefore, discovering protein expression biomarkers is mandatory for early detection and thus, critical for successful therapy. Two-dimensional electrophoresis (2D-E) coupled with lectin-based analysis followed by mass spectrometry were applied to identify potential biomarkers in the secretions of a murine mammary carcinoma cell line. Comparisons of the protein profiles of the murine 4T1 mammary carcinoma cell line and a normal murine MM3MG mammary cell line indicated that cadherin-1 (CDH), collagenase 3 (MMP-13), Viral envelope protein G7e (VEP), Gag protein (GAG) and Hypothetical protein LOC433182 (LOC) were uniquely expressed by the 4T1 cells, and pigment epithelium-derived factor (PEDF) was exclusively secreted by the MM3MG cells. Further analysis by a lectin-based study revealed that aberrant O-glycosylated CDH, N-glycosylated MMP-13 and LOC were present in the 4T1 medium. These differentially expressed N- and O-linked glycoprotein candidates, which were identified by combining lectin-based analysis with 2D-E, could serve as potential diagnostic and prognostic markers for breast cancer. PMID:27226773

  14. Secretion of N- and O-linked Glycoproteins from 4T1 Murine Mammary Carcinoma Cells

    PubMed Central

    Phang, Wai-Mei; Tan, Aik-Aun; Gopinath, Subash C.B.; Hashim, Onn H.; Kiew, Lik Voon; Chen, Yeng

    2016-01-01

    Breast cancer is one of the most common cancers that affect women globally and accounts for ~23% of all cancers diagnosed in women. Breast cancer is also one of the leading causes of death primarily due to late stage diagnoses and a lack of effective treatments. Therefore, discovering protein expression biomarkers is mandatory for early detection and thus, critical for successful therapy. Two-dimensional electrophoresis (2D-E) coupled with lectin-based analysis followed by mass spectrometry were applied to identify potential biomarkers in the secretions of a murine mammary carcinoma cell line. Comparisons of the protein profiles of the murine 4T1 mammary carcinoma cell line and a normal murine MM3MG mammary cell line indicated that cadherin-1 (CDH), collagenase 3 (MMP-13), Viral envelope protein G7e (VEP), Gag protein (GAG) and Hypothetical protein LOC433182 (LOC) were uniquely expressed by the 4T1 cells, and pigment epithelium-derived factor (PEDF) was exclusively secreted by the MM3MG cells. Further analysis by a lectin-based study revealed that aberrant O-glycosylated CDH, N-glycosylated MMP-13 and LOC were present in the 4T1 medium. These differentially expressed N- and O-linked glycoprotein candidates, which were identified by combining lectin-based analysis with 2D-E, could serve as potential diagnostic and prognostic markers for breast cancer. PMID:27226773

  15. Stromal Integrin α11β1 Affects RM11 Prostate and 4T1 Breast Xenograft Tumors Differently

    PubMed Central

    Skogstrand, Trude; Sortland, Kristina; Schmid, Marei Caroline; Reed, Rolf K.; Stuhr, Linda

    2016-01-01

    Purpose It has been implied that the collagen binding integrin α11β1 plays a role in carcinogenesis. As still relatively little is known about how the stromal integrin α11β1 affects different aspects of tumor development, we wanted to examine the direct effects on primary tumor growth, fibrosis, tumor interstitial fluid pressure (PIF) and metastasis in murine 4T1 mammary and RM11 prostate tumors, using an in vivo SCID integrin α11-deficient mouse model. Methods Tumor growth was measured using a caliper, PIF by the wick-in-needle technique, activated fibroblasts by α-SMA immunofluorescence staining and fibrosis by transmission electron microscopy and picrosirius-red staining. Metastases were evaluated using hematoxylin and eosin stained sections. Results RM11 tumor growth was significantly reduced in the SCID integrin α11-deficient (α11-KO) compared to in SCID integrin α11 wild type (WT) mice, whereas there was no similar effect in the 4T1 tumor model. The 4T1 model demonstrated an alteration in collagen fibril diameter in the integrin α11-KO mice compared to WT, which was not found in the RM11 model. There were no significant differences in the amount of activated fibroblasts, total collagen content, collagen organization or PIF in the tumors in integrin α11-deficient mice compared to WT mice. There was also no difference in lung metastases between the two groups. Conclusion Deficiency of stromal integrin α11β1 showed different effects on tumor growth and collagen fibril diameter depending on tumor type, but no effect on tumor PIF or development of lung metastasis. PMID:26990302

  16. Downregulation of CD73 in 4T1 breast cancer cells through siRNA-loaded chitosan-lactate nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Jadidi-Niaragh, Farhad; Atyabi, Fatemeh; Rastegari, Ali; Mollarazi, Esmail; Kiani, Melika; Razavi, Alireza; Yousefi, Mehdi; Kheshtchin, Nasim; Hassannia, Hadi; Hadjati, Jamshid; Shokri, Fazel

    2016-06-01

    The immunosuppressive factors in tumor microenvironment enhance tumor growth and suppress anti-tumor immune responses. Adenosine is an important immunosuppressive factor which can be secreted by both tumor and immune cells trough action of two cell surface ecto-nucleotidase molecules CD39 and CD73. Blocking the adenosine generating molecules has emerged as an effective immunotherapeutic approach for treatment of cancer. In this study, CD73-siRNA encapsulated into chitosan-lactate (ChLa) nanoparticles (NPs) was employed to suppress the expression of CD73 molecule on 4T1 breast tumor cells, in vitro. ChLa NPs were generated through ionic gelation of ChLa by tripolyphosphate (TPP). Small interfering RNA (SiRNA)-loaded NPs had about 100 nm size with a polydispersive index below 0.3 and a zeta potential about 13. Our results showed that ChLa NPs with Ch 50 kDa exhibit the best physicochemical features with the high siRNA encapsulation capacity. Synthesized NPs were able to fully bind with siRNA, protect them against serum and heparin degradation, and promote the transfection process. While the NPs exhibited low toxicity during 72 h cell culture, the transfection of Ch-plasmid expressing green fluorescent protein (pEGFP) NPs was efficient in 4T1 cells with a transfection rate of 53.6 % as detected by flow cytometry. In addition, CD73-siRNA-loaded ChLa NPs could efficiently suppress the expression of CD73 as assayed by real-time polymerase chain reaction and flow cytometry. As a conclusion, CD73-siRNA-loaded ChLa NPs may be considered as a promising therapeutic tool for cancer therapy; however, further in vivo investigations are necessary.

  17. Suppressive effects of a proton beam on tumor growth and lung metastasis through the inhibition of metastatic gene expression in 4T1 orthotopic breast cancer model.

    PubMed

    Kwon, Yun-Suk; Lee, Kyu-Shik; Chun, So-Young; Jang, Tae Jung; Nam, Kyung-Soo

    2016-07-01

    A proton beam is a next generation tool to treat intractable cancer. Although the therapeutic effects of a proton beam are well known, the effect on tumor metastasis is not fully described. Here, we investigated the effects of a proton beam on metastasis in highly invasive 4T1 murine breast cancer cells and their orthotopic breast cancer model. Cells were irradiated with 2, 4, 8 or 16 Gy proton beam, and changes in cell proliferation, survival, and migration were observed by MTT, colony forming and wound healing assays. 4T1 breast cancer cell-implanted BALB/c mice were established and the animals were randomly divided into 4 groups when tumor size reached 200 mm3. Breast tumors were selectively irradiated with 10, 20 or 30 Gy proton beam. Breast tumor sizes were measured twice a week, and breast tumor and lung tissues were pathologically observed. Metastasis-regulating gene expression was assessed with quantitative RT-PCR. A proton beam dose-dependently decreased cell proliferation, survival and migration in 4T1 murine breast cancer cells. Also, growth of breast tumors in the 4T1 orthotopic breast cancer model was significantly suppressed by proton beam irradiation without significant change of body weight. Furthermore, fewer tumor nodules metastasized from breast tumor into lung in mice irradiated with 30 Gy proton beam, but not with 10 and 20 Gy, than in control. We observed correspondingly lower expression levels of urokinase plasminogen activator (uPA), uPA receptor, cyclooxygenase (COX)-2, and vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF), which are important factors in cancer metastasis, in breast tumor irradiated with 30 Gy proton beam. Proton beam irradiation did not affect expressions of matrix metalloproteinase (MMP)-9 and MMP-2. Taken together, the data suggest that, although proton beam therapy is an effective tool for breast cancer treatment, a suitable dose is necessary to prevent metastasis-linked relapse and poor prognosis. PMID:27176787

  18. Aspirin Breaks the Crosstalk between 3T3-L1 Adipocytes and 4T1 Breast Cancer Cells by Regulating Cytokine Production.

    PubMed

    Hsieh, Chia-Chien; Huang, Yu-Shan

    2016-01-01

    Breast cancer is one of the most common cancers in women worldwide. The obesity process is normally accompanied by chronic, low-grade inflammation. Infiltration by inflammatory cytokines and immune cells provides a favorable microenvironment for tumor growth, migration, and metastasis. Epidemiological evidence has shown that aspirin is an effective agent against several types of cancer. The aim of this study is to investigate the anti-inflammatory and anti-cancer effects of aspirin on 3T3-L1 adipocytes, 4T1 murine breast cancer cells, and their crosstalk. The results showed that aspirin treatment inhibited differentiation and lipid accumulation by 3T3-L1 preadipocytes, and decreased the secretion of the inflammatory adipokine MCP-1 after stimulation with tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-α or conditioned medium from RAW264.7 cells. In 4T1 cells, treatment with aspirin decreased cell viability and migration, possibly by suppressing MCP-1 and VEGF secretion. Subsequently, culture of 4T1 cells in 3T3-L1 adipocyte-conditioned medium (Ad-CM) and co-culture of 3T3-L1 and 4T1 cells using a transwell plate were performed to clarify the relationship between these two cell lines. Aspirin exerted its inhibitory effects in the transwell co-culture system, as well as the conditioned-medium model. Aspirin treatment significantly inhibited the proliferation of 4T1 cells, and decreased the production of MCP-1 and PAI-1 in both the Ad-CM model and co-culture system. Aspirin inhibited inflammatory MCP-1 adipokine production by 3T3-L1 adipocytes and the cell growth and migration of 4T1 cells. It also broke the crosstalk between these two cell lines, possibly contributing to its chemopreventive properties in breast cancer. This is the first report that aspirin's chemopreventive activity supports the potential application in auxiliary therapy against obesity-related breast cancer development. PMID:26794215

  19. Aspirin Breaks the Crosstalk between 3T3-L1 Adipocytes and 4T1 Breast Cancer Cells by Regulating Cytokine Production.

    PubMed

    Hsieh, Chia-Chien; Huang, Yu-Shan

    2016-01-01

    Breast cancer is one of the most common cancers in women worldwide. The obesity process is normally accompanied by chronic, low-grade inflammation. Infiltration by inflammatory cytokines and immune cells provides a favorable microenvironment for tumor growth, migration, and metastasis. Epidemiological evidence has shown that aspirin is an effective agent against several types of cancer. The aim of this study is to investigate the anti-inflammatory and anti-cancer effects of aspirin on 3T3-L1 adipocytes, 4T1 murine breast cancer cells, and their crosstalk. The results showed that aspirin treatment inhibited differentiation and lipid accumulation by 3T3-L1 preadipocytes, and decreased the secretion of the inflammatory adipokine MCP-1 after stimulation with tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-α or conditioned medium from RAW264.7 cells. In 4T1 cells, treatment with aspirin decreased cell viability and migration, possibly by suppressing MCP-1 and VEGF secretion. Subsequently, culture of 4T1 cells in 3T3-L1 adipocyte-conditioned medium (Ad-CM) and co-culture of 3T3-L1 and 4T1 cells using a transwell plate were performed to clarify the relationship between these two cell lines. Aspirin exerted its inhibitory effects in the transwell co-culture system, as well as the conditioned-medium model. Aspirin treatment significantly inhibited the proliferation of 4T1 cells, and decreased the production of MCP-1 and PAI-1 in both the Ad-CM model and co-culture system. Aspirin inhibited inflammatory MCP-1 adipokine production by 3T3-L1 adipocytes and the cell growth and migration of 4T1 cells. It also broke the crosstalk between these two cell lines, possibly contributing to its chemopreventive properties in breast cancer. This is the first report that aspirin's chemopreventive activity supports the potential application in auxiliary therapy against obesity-related breast cancer development.

  20. In vivo antitumor and antimetastatic effects of flavokawain B in 4T1 breast cancer cell-challenged mice

    PubMed Central

    Abu, Nadiah; Mohamed, Nurul Elyani; Yeap, Swee Keong; Lim, Kian Lam; Akhtar, M Nadeem; Zulfadli, Aimi Jamil; Kee, Beh Boon; Abdullah, Mohd Puad; Omar, Abdul Rahman; Alitheen, Noorjahan Banu

    2015-01-01

    Flavokawain B (FKB) is a naturally occurring chalcone that can be isolated through the root extracts of the kava-kava plant (Piper methysticum). It can also be synthesized chemically to increase the yield. This compound is a promising candidate as a biological agent, as it is reported to be involved in a wide range of biological activities. Furthermore, FKB was reported to have antitumorigenic effects in several cancer cell lines in vitro. However, the in vivo antitumor effects of FKB have not been reported on yet. Breast cancer is one of the major causes of cancer-related deaths in the world today. Any potential treatment should not only impede the growth of the tumor, but also modulate the immune system efficiently and inhibit the formation of secondary tumors. As presented in our study, FKB induced apoptosis in 4T1 tumors in vivo, as evidenced by the terminal deoxynucleotidyl transferase dUTP nick end labeling and hematoxylin and eosin staining of the tumor. FKB also regulated the immune system by increasing both helper and cytolytic T-cell and natural killer cell populations. In addition, FKB also enhanced the levels of interleukin 2 and interferon gamma but suppressed interleukin 1B. Apart from that, FKB was also found to inhibit metastasis, as evaluated by clonogenic assay, bone marrow smearing assay, real-time polymerase chain reaction, Western blot, and proteome profiler analysis. All in all, FKB may serve as a promising anticancer agent, especially in treating breast cancer. PMID:25834398

  1. Murine breast carcinoma 4T1 cells are more sensitive to atranorin than normal epithelial NMuMG cells in vitro: Anticancer and hepatoprotective effects of atranorin in vivo.

    PubMed

    Solár, Peter; Hrčková, Gabriela; Koptašíková, Lenka; Velebný, Samuel; Solárová, Zuzana; Bačkor, Martin

    2016-04-25

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the anticancer effect of atranorin (ATR) on murine 4T1 breast carcinoma cells and compare its sensitivity with normal mammary epithelial NMuMG cells in vitro. Anti-tumor and hepatoprotective activity of ATR-therapy was examined on mouse model of 4T1-induced cancer disease. ATR significantly reduced clonogenic ability of carcinoma 4T1 cells at the concentration of 75 μM, but clonogenicity of normal NMuMG cells was not affected by any of ATR concentrations tested. Moreover, flow cytometric and BrdU incorporation analysis did not confirm the inhibited entry into S-phase of the cell cyle after ATR incubation, and on the contrary, it induced apoptosis associated with the activation of caspase-3 and PARP cleavage in 4T1 cells. Although ATR did not cause any significant changes in Bcl-xL protein expression in NMuMG cells, an apparent depletion of Bcl-xL protein in 4T1 cells after 48 h ATR therapy was confirmed. Based on this result as well as the result of the total cell number decline, we can conclude that 4T1 cells are more sensitive to ATR therapy than NMuMG cells. ATR administration resulted in significantly longer survival time of BALB/c mice inoculated with 4T1 cells, what was associated with reduced tumor size and the higher numbers of apoptotic 4T1 cells. No differences were recorded in the number of BrdU-positive tumor cells between ATR-treated group and controls. Results indicate that ATR has rather proapoptotic than antiproliferative effect on 4T1 cells in vitro and in vivo and normal NMuMG cells are less sensitive to ATR. Furthermore, our studies revealed protective effect of ATR against oxidative stress in the livers of the tumor-bearing mice. PMID:26969521

  2. Murine breast carcinoma 4T1 cells are more sensitive to atranorin than normal epithelial NMuMG cells in vitro: Anticancer and hepatoprotective effects of atranorin in vivo.

    PubMed

    Solár, Peter; Hrčková, Gabriela; Koptašíková, Lenka; Velebný, Samuel; Solárová, Zuzana; Bačkor, Martin

    2016-04-25

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the anticancer effect of atranorin (ATR) on murine 4T1 breast carcinoma cells and compare its sensitivity with normal mammary epithelial NMuMG cells in vitro. Anti-tumor and hepatoprotective activity of ATR-therapy was examined on mouse model of 4T1-induced cancer disease. ATR significantly reduced clonogenic ability of carcinoma 4T1 cells at the concentration of 75 μM, but clonogenicity of normal NMuMG cells was not affected by any of ATR concentrations tested. Moreover, flow cytometric and BrdU incorporation analysis did not confirm the inhibited entry into S-phase of the cell cyle after ATR incubation, and on the contrary, it induced apoptosis associated with the activation of caspase-3 and PARP cleavage in 4T1 cells. Although ATR did not cause any significant changes in Bcl-xL protein expression in NMuMG cells, an apparent depletion of Bcl-xL protein in 4T1 cells after 48 h ATR therapy was confirmed. Based on this result as well as the result of the total cell number decline, we can conclude that 4T1 cells are more sensitive to ATR therapy than NMuMG cells. ATR administration resulted in significantly longer survival time of BALB/c mice inoculated with 4T1 cells, what was associated with reduced tumor size and the higher numbers of apoptotic 4T1 cells. No differences were recorded in the number of BrdU-positive tumor cells between ATR-treated group and controls. Results indicate that ATR has rather proapoptotic than antiproliferative effect on 4T1 cells in vitro and in vivo and normal NMuMG cells are less sensitive to ATR. Furthermore, our studies revealed protective effect of ATR against oxidative stress in the livers of the tumor-bearing mice.

  3. Elimination of the chemotherapy resistant subpopulation of 4T1 mouse breast cancer by haploidentical NK cells cures the vast majority of mice.

    PubMed

    Frings, Peter W H; Van Elssen, Catharina H M J; Wieten, Lotte; Matos, Catarina; Hupperets, Pierre S J G; Schouten, Harry C; Bos, Gerard M J; van Gelder, Michel

    2011-12-01

    Metastatic breast cancer is currently incurable despite initial responsiveness, assumingly due to the presence of chemoresistant subpopulations that can be characterized as label retaining cells (LRC). In the 4T1 mouse breast cancer model, we previously achieved cure after Cyclophosphamide and Total Body Irradiation (CY + TBI) followed by haploidentical bone marrow and spleen transplantation (BMSPLT). CY + TBI without transplantation induced only transient impaired tumor growth indicating a critical role of donor immune cells. As it remained unknown if the 4T1 model resembles human disease with respect to the presence of subpopulations of chemoresistant LRC, we now demonstrate this is indeed the case. Chemoresistance of 4T1 LRC was demonstrated by in vitro co-incubation of fluorescently labeled 4T1 cells in limiting dilution with cyclophosphamide, doxorubicin or cisplatinum, after which only LRC containing colonies remained. LRC also remain in vivo after treatment with CY + TBI. Succeeding experiments set up to identify the haploidentical effector cell responsible for cure and, therefore, for the elimination of chemoresistant LRC designate donor NK cells crucial for the anti-tumor effect. NK cell depletion of the haploidentical graft fully abrogated the anti-tumor effect. Increased disease-free survival retained after transplantation of haploidentical bone marrow and NK cell-enriched spleen cell grafts, even in the absence of donor T-cells or of donor bone marrow. Tumor growth analysis indicates the anti-tumor effect being immediate (days). Based on these data, it is worthwhile to explore alloreactive adoptive NK cell therapy as consolidation for patients with metastasized breast cancer. PMID:21274621

  4. Selection of Novel Peptides Homing the 4T1 CELL Line: Exploring Alternative Targets for Triple Negative Breast Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Nobrega, Franklin L.; Martins, Ivone M.

    2016-01-01

    The use of bacteriophages to select novel ligands has been widely explored for cancer therapy. Their application is most warranted in cancer subtypes lacking knowledge on how to target the cancer cells in question, such as the triple negative breast cancer, eventually leading to the development of alternative nanomedicines for cancer therapeutics. Therefore, the following study aimed to select and characterize novel peptides for a triple negative breast cancer murine mammary carcinoma cell line– 4T1. Using phage display, 7 and 12 amino acid random peptide libraries were screened against the 4T1 cell line. A total of four rounds, plus a counter-selection round using the 3T3 murine fibroblast cell line, was performed. The enriched selective peptides were characterized and their binding capacity towards 4T1 tissue samples was confirmed by immunofluorescence and flow cytometry analysis. The selected peptides (4T1pep1 –CPTASNTSC and 4T1pep2—EVQSSKFPAHVS) were enriched over few rounds of selection and exhibited specific binding to the 4T1 cell line. Interestingly, affinity to the human MDA-MB-231 cell line was also observed for both peptides, promoting the translational application of these novel ligands between species. Additionally, bioinformatics analysis suggested that both peptides target human Mucin-16. This protein has been implicated in different types of cancer, as it is involved in many important cellular functions. This study strongly supports the need of finding alternative targeting systems for TNBC and the peptides herein selected exhibit promising future application as novel homing peptides for breast cancer therapy. PMID:27548261

  5. Selection of Novel Peptides Homing the 4T1 CELL Line: Exploring Alternative Targets for Triple Negative Breast Cancer.

    PubMed

    Silva, Vera L; Ferreira, Debora; Nobrega, Franklin L; Martins, Ivone M; Kluskens, Leon D; Rodrigues, Ligia R

    2016-01-01

    The use of bacteriophages to select novel ligands has been widely explored for cancer therapy. Their application is most warranted in cancer subtypes lacking knowledge on how to target the cancer cells in question, such as the triple negative breast cancer, eventually leading to the development of alternative nanomedicines for cancer therapeutics. Therefore, the following study aimed to select and characterize novel peptides for a triple negative breast cancer murine mammary carcinoma cell line- 4T1. Using phage display, 7 and 12 amino acid random peptide libraries were screened against the 4T1 cell line. A total of four rounds, plus a counter-selection round using the 3T3 murine fibroblast cell line, was performed. The enriched selective peptides were characterized and their binding capacity towards 4T1 tissue samples was confirmed by immunofluorescence and flow cytometry analysis. The selected peptides (4T1pep1 -CPTASNTSC and 4T1pep2-EVQSSKFPAHVS) were enriched over few rounds of selection and exhibited specific binding to the 4T1 cell line. Interestingly, affinity to the human MDA-MB-231 cell line was also observed for both peptides, promoting the translational application of these novel ligands between species. Additionally, bioinformatics analysis suggested that both peptides target human Mucin-16. This protein has been implicated in different types of cancer, as it is involved in many important cellular functions. This study strongly supports the need of finding alternative targeting systems for TNBC and the peptides herein selected exhibit promising future application as novel homing peptides for breast cancer therapy. PMID:27548261

  6. Licoricidin, an Active Compound in the Hexane/Ethanol Extract of Glycyrrhiza uralensis, Inhibits Lung Metastasis of 4T1 Murine Mammary Carcinoma Cells

    PubMed Central

    Park, So Young; Kwon, Soo Jin; Lim, Soon Sung; Kim, Jin-Kyu; Lee, Ki Won; Park, Jung Han Yoon

    2016-01-01

    Licorice extracts containing glycyrrhizin exhibit anti-carcinogenic properties. Because glycyrrhizin induces severe hypokalemia and hypertension, we prepared a hexane/ethanol extract of Glycyrrhiza uralensis (HEGU) that lacks glycyrrhizin, and showed that HEGU induces apoptosis and G1 cell cycle arrest and inhibits migration of DU145 human prostate cancer cells. Our previous in vitro studies identified two active components in HEGU: isoangustone A, which induces apoptosis and G1 cycle arrest, and licoricidin, which inhibits metastasis. This study examined whether HEGU and licoricidin inhibit metastasis using the 4T1 mammary cancer model. Both HEGU and licoricidin treatment reduced pulmonary metastasis and the expression of CD45, CD31, HIF-1α, iNOS, COX-2, and VEGF-A in tumor tissues. Additionally, a decrease in protein expression of VEGF-R2, VEGF-C, VEGF-R3, and LYVE-1 was noted in tumor tissues of licoricidin-treated mice. Furthermore, the blood concentrations of MMP-9, ICAM-1, VCAM-1, and VEGF-A were decreased in HEGU-treated mice. In vitro 4T1 cell culture results showed that both HEGU and licoricidin inhibited cell migration, MMP-9 secretion, and VCAM expression. The present study demonstrates that the licoricidin in HEGU inhibits lung metastasis of 4T1 mammary carcinoma cells, which may be mediated via inhibition of cancer cell migration, tumor angiogenesis, and lymphangiogenesis. PMID:27314329

  7. Licoricidin, an Active Compound in the Hexane/Ethanol Extract of Glycyrrhiza uralensis, Inhibits Lung Metastasis of 4T1 Murine Mammary Carcinoma Cells.

    PubMed

    Park, So Young; Kwon, Soo Jin; Lim, Soon Sung; Kim, Jin-Kyu; Lee, Ki Won; Park, Jung Han Yoon

    2016-01-01

    Licorice extracts containing glycyrrhizin exhibit anti-carcinogenic properties. Because glycyrrhizin induces severe hypokalemia and hypertension, we prepared a hexane/ethanol extract of Glycyrrhiza uralensis (HEGU) that lacks glycyrrhizin, and showed that HEGU induces apoptosis and G1 cell cycle arrest and inhibits migration of DU145 human prostate cancer cells. Our previous in vitro studies identified two active components in HEGU: isoangustone A, which induces apoptosis and G1 cycle arrest, and licoricidin, which inhibits metastasis. This study examined whether HEGU and licoricidin inhibit metastasis using the 4T1 mammary cancer model. Both HEGU and licoricidin treatment reduced pulmonary metastasis and the expression of CD45, CD31, HIF-1α, iNOS, COX-2, and VEGF-A in tumor tissues. Additionally, a decrease in protein expression of VEGF-R2, VEGF-C, VEGF-R3, and LYVE-1 was noted in tumor tissues of licoricidin-treated mice. Furthermore, the blood concentrations of MMP-9, ICAM-1, VCAM-1, and VEGF-A were decreased in HEGU-treated mice. In vitro 4T1 cell culture results showed that both HEGU and licoricidin inhibited cell migration, MMP-9 secretion, and VCAM expression. The present study demonstrates that the licoricidin in HEGU inhibits lung metastasis of 4T1 mammary carcinoma cells, which may be mediated via inhibition of cancer cell migration, tumor angiogenesis, and lymphangiogenesis. PMID:27314329

  8. Molecular changes in bone marrow, tumor and serum after conductive ablation of murine 4T1 breast carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Przybyla, Beata D; Shafirstein, Gal; Vishal, Sagar J; Dennis, Richard A; Griffin, Robert J

    2014-02-01

    Thermal ablation of solid tumors using conductive interstitial thermal therapy (CITT) produces coagulative necrosis in the center of ablation. Local changes in homeostasis for surviving tumor and systemic changes in circulation and distant organs must be understood and monitored in order to prevent tumor re-growth and metastasis. The purpose of this study was to use a mouse carcinoma model to evaluate molecular changes in the bone marrow and surviving tumor after CITT treatment by quantification of transcripts associated with cancer progression and hyperthermia, serum cytokines, stress proteins and the marrow/tumor cross-talk regulator stromal-derived factor 1. Analysis of 27 genes and 22 proteins with quantitative PCR, ELISA, immunoblotting and multiplex antibody assays revealed that the gene and protein expression in tissue and serum was significantly different between ablated and control mice. The transcripts of four genes (Cxcl12, Sele, Fgf2, Lifr) were significantly higher in the bone marrow of treated mice. Tumors surviving ablation showed significantly lower levels of the Lifr and Sele transcripts. Similarly, the majority of transcripts measured in tumors decreased with treatment. Surviving tumors also contained lower levels of SDF-1α and HIF-1α proteins whereas HSP27 and HSP70 were higher. Of 16 serum chemokines, IFNγ and GM-CSF levels were lower with treatment. These results indicate that CITT ablation causes molecular changes which may slow cancer cell proliferation. However, inhibition of HSP27 may be necessary to control aggressiveness of surviving cancer stem cells. The changes in bone marrow are suggestive of possible increased recruitment of circulatory cancer cells. Therefore, the possibility of heightened bone metastasis after thermal ablation needs to be further investigated and inhibition strategies developed, if warranted.

  9. Enhancement of fibroblast activation protein α-based vaccines and adenovirus boost immunity by cyclophosphamide through inhibiting IL-10 expression in 4T1 tumor bearing mice.

    PubMed

    Xia, Qiu; Geng, Fei; Zhang, Fang-Fang; Liu, Chen-Lu; Xu, Ping; Lu, Zhen-Zhen; Zhang, Hai-Hong; Kong, Wei; Yu, Xiang-Hui

    2016-08-31

    Fibroblast activation protein α (FAPα) is expressed in cancer-associated fibroblasts (CAFs) of more than 90% of malignant epithelia carcinomas. CAFs are the main type of cells in the tumor microenvironment which offer nutrition and protection to the tumor and regulate immunosuppression. To eliminate CAFs, a vaccine targeting FAPα may be used with a heterologous prime-boost strategy to enhance the FAPα-specific cellular immunity. Here, a FAP vaccine using a recombinant adenovirus (rAd) vector was constructed as well as a DNA vaccine reported in our previous work. Although the DNA prime-rAd boost strategy enhanced FAPα-specific immune responses, improvement of anti-tumor immunity effects was not observed. Examination of immunosuppressive factors revealed that high expression of the IL-10 cytokine was considered the main cause of the failure of the prime-boost strategy. However, heterologous vaccination in combination with a low-dose of cyclophosphamide (CY), which was reported to reduce IL-10 production and promote a shift from immunosuppression to immunopotentiation, resulted in enhanced effects in terms of numbers of effector T cells and tumor growth inhibition rates, compared to the CY alone or DNA alone group. Tumor growth was inhibited markedly when the prime-boost strategy was combined with CY in both the prophylactic and therapeutic settings and the survival time of 4T1 tumor bearing mice was also prolonged significantly. With the reduction of IL-10, enhancement of the anti-tumor effect by the prime-boost strategy was observed. These results suggest that FAPα-targeted rAd boosting in combination with CY is an attractive approach to overcoming immunosuppression in cancer vaccines. PMID:27498213

  10. Escherichia coli Nissle 1917 Targets and Restrains Mouse B16 Melanoma and 4T1 Breast Tumors through Expression of Azurin Protein

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Yunlei; Zhang, Youming; Zhang, Xiangli; Ding, Xuezhi; Yan, Fu; Wu, Feng

    2012-01-01

    Many studies have demonstrated that intravenously administered bacteria can target and proliferate in solid tumors and then quickly be released from other organs. Here, we employed the tumor-targeting property of Escherichia coli Nissle 1917 to inhibit mouse B16 melanoma and 4T1 breast tumors through the expression of azurin protein. For this purpose, recombinant azurin-expressing E. coli Nissle 1917 was developed. The levels of in vitro and in vivo azurin secretion in the engineered bacterium were determined by immunochemistry. Our results demonstrated that B16 melanoma and orthotopic 4T1 breast tumor growth were remarkably restrained and pulmonary metastasis was prevented in immunocompetent mice. It is worth noting that this therapeutic effect partially resulted from the antitumor activity of neutrophils and lymphocytes due to inflammatory responses caused by bacterial infections. No toxicity was observed in the animal during the experiments. This study indicates that E. coli Nissle 1917 could be a potential carrier to deliver antitumor drugs effectively for cancer therapy. PMID:22923405

  11. Lx2-32c–loaded polymeric micelles with small size for intravenous drug delivery and their inhibitory effect on tumor growth and metastasis in clinically associated 4T1 murine breast cancer

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Li-qing; Huang, Wei; Gao, Zhong-gao; Fang, Wei-shuo; Jin, Ming-ji

    2016-01-01

    Lx2-32c is a novel taxane derivative with a strong antitumor activity. In this study, we developed Lx2-32c–loaded polymeric micelles (Lx2-32c-PMs) with small size and investigated their antitumor efficacy against tumor growth and metastasis on 4T1 murine breast cancer cell line with Cremophor EL–based Lx2-32c solution as the control. In this study, copolymer monomethoxy polyethylene glycol2000–polylactide1300 was used to prepare Lx2-32c-PMs by film hydration method, and their physicochemical properties were characterized as well, according to morphology, particle size, zeta potential, in vitro drug release, and reconstitution stability. Under confocal laser scanning microscopy, it was observed that Lx2-32c-PMs could be effectively taken up by 4T1 cells in a time-dependent manner. Cell Counting Kit-8 assay showed that the IC50 of Lx2-32c-PMs was 0.3827 nM. Meanwhile, Lx2-32c-PMs had better ability to promote apoptosis and induce G2/M cycle block and polyploidy formation, compared with Lx2-32c solution. More importantly, in vivo animal studies showed that compared to Lx2-32c solution, Lx2-32c-PMs possessed better ability not only to effectively inhibit the tumor growth, but also to significantly suppress spontaneous and postoperative metastasis to distant organs in 4T1 orthotopic tumor-bearing mice. Consequently, Lx2-32c-PMs have significantly prolonged the survival lifetime of tumor-bearing mice. Thus, our study reveals that Lx2-32c-PMs had favorable antitumor activity and exhibited a good prospect for application in the field of antitumor therapy. PMID:27799769

  12. Curcumin improves the therapeutic efficacy of Listeria(at)-Mage-b vaccine in correlation with improved T-cell responses in blood of a triple-negative breast cancer model 4T1.

    PubMed

    Singh, Manisha; Ramos, Ilyssa; Asafu-Adjei, Denise; Quispe-Tintaya, Wilber; Chandra, Dinesh; Jahangir, Arthee; Zang, Xingxing; Aggarwal, Bharat B; Gravekamp, Claudia

    2013-08-01

    Success of cancer vaccination is strongly hampered by immune suppression in the tumor microenvironment (TME). Interleukin (IL)-6 is particularly and highly produced by triple-negative breast cancer (TNBC) cells, and has been considered as an important contributor to immune suppression in the TME. Therefore, we hypothesized that IL-6 reduction may improve efficacy of vaccination against TNBC cancer through improved T-cell responses. To prove this hypothesis, we investigated the effect of curcumin, an inhibitor of IL-6 production, on vaccination of a highly attenuated Listeria monocytogenes (Listeria(at)), encoding tumor-associated antigens (TAA) Mage-b in a TNBC model 4T1. Two therapeutic vaccination strategies with Listeria(at)-Mage-b and curcumin were tested. The first immunization strategy involved all Listeria(at)-Mage-b vaccinations and curcumin after tumor development. As curcumin has been consumed all over the world, the second immunization strategy involved curcumin before and all therapeutic vaccinations with Listeria(at)-Mage-b after tumor development. Here, we demonstrate that curcumin significantly improves therapeutic efficacy of Listeria(at)-Mage-b with both immunization strategies particularly against metastases in a TNBC model (4T1). The combination therapy was slightly but significantly more effective against the metastases when curcumin was administered before compared to after tumor development. With curcumin before tumor development in the combination therapy, the production of IL-6 was significantly decreased and IL-12 increased by myeloid-derived suppressor cells (MDSC), in correlation with improved CD4 and CD8 T-cell responses in blood. Our study suggests that curcumin improves the efficacy of Listeria(at)-Mage-b vaccine against metastases in TNBC model 4T1 through reversal of tumor-induced immune suppression. PMID:24156030

  13. The in vivo Therapeutic Effect of Free Wanderer Powder ( xiāo yáo sǎn, Xiaoyaosan) on Mice with 4T1 Cell Induced Breast Cancer Model.

    PubMed

    Chen, Wen-Fang; Xu, Li; Yu, Chung-Him; Ho, Chui-Kwan; Wu, Ka; Leung, Gina Cw; Wong, Man-Sau

    2012-01-01

    In the present study, we investigated the therapeutic effect of a classical TCM formula, Free Wanderer Powder ( xiāo yáo sǎn), in a breast cancer mouse model induced with estrogen-insensitive breast cancer 4T1 cells. Ovariectomized Balb/c mice (6-8 weeks) or sham mice were injected into the fourth mammary fat pad with 4T1 cells in which tumors were palpable 7 days after injection. On the eighth day, the mice were divided into 4 groups and tubefed daily with vehicle, Free Wanderer Powder ( xiāo yáo sǎn) formula or tamoxifen for 28 days. Tumor growth inhibition and the decrease of the average tumor mass were most evident in mice treated with Free Wanderer Powder ( xiāo yáo sǎn). Free Wanderer Powder ( xiāo yáo sǎn) treatment significantly reduced Bcl-2 and elevated Bax and p53 protein expressions in breast cancer tumor. These results were further confirmed by immunohistochemisty. Tamoxifen could decrease spleen mass and Bcl-2 protein expression, increase the Bax protein expression as well as exert uterotrophic effects by increasing uterus index and inducing the gene expressions in the uterus. Taken together, these results show that Free Wanderer Powder ( xiāo yáo sǎn) treatment induced apoptosis at protein level and inhibited the tumor growth in 4T1-induced ovariectomized Balb/c female mice, indicating the possibility of its future use for treatment of estrogen-insensitive breast caner.

  14. Curcumin improves the therapeutic efficacy of Listeriaat-Mage-b vaccine in correlation with improved T-cell responses in blood of a triple-negative breast cancer model 4T1

    PubMed Central

    Singh, Manisha; Ramos, Ilyssa; Asafu-Adjei, Denise; Quispe-Tintaya, Wilber; Chandra, Dinesh; Jahangir, Arthee; Zang, Xingxing; Aggarwal, Bharat B; Gravekamp, Claudia

    2013-01-01

    Abstract Success of cancer vaccination is strongly hampered by immune suppression in the tumor microenvironment (TME). Interleukin (IL)-6 is particularly and highly produced by triple-negative breast cancer (TNBC) cells, and has been considered as an important contributor to immune suppression in the TME. Therefore, we hypothesized that IL-6 reduction may improve efficacy of vaccination against TNBC cancer through improved T-cell responses. To prove this hypothesis, we investigated the effect of curcumin, an inhibitor of IL-6 production, on vaccination of a highly attenuated Listeria monocytogenes (Listeriaat), encoding tumor-associated antigens (TAA) Mage-b in a TNBC model 4T1. Two therapeutic vaccination strategies with Listeriaat-Mage-b and curcumin were tested. The first immunization strategy involved all Listeriaat-Mage-b vaccinations and curcumin after tumor development. As curcumin has been consumed all over the world, the second immunization strategy involved curcumin before and all therapeutic vaccinations with Listeriaat-Mage-b after tumor development. Here, we demonstrate that curcumin significantly improves therapeutic efficacy of Listeriaat-Mage-b with both immunization strategies particularly against metastases in a TNBC model (4T1). The combination therapy was slightly but significantly more effective against the metastases when curcumin was administered before compared to after tumor development. With curcumin before tumor development in the combination therapy, the production of IL-6 was significantly decreased and IL-12 increased by myeloid-derived suppressor cells (MDSC), in correlation with improved CD4 and CD8 T-cell responses in blood. Our study suggests that curcumin improves the efficacy of Listeriaat-Mage-b vaccine against metastases in TNBC model 4T1 through reversal of tumor-induced immune suppression. This study is focused on improving cancer vaccination by reducing immune suppression. Here we demonstrate that curcumin improves vaccine

  15. Hybrid paclitaxel and gold nanorod-loaded human serum albumin nanoparticles for simultaneous chemotherapeutic and photothermal therapy on 4T1 breast cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Peralta, Donna V; Heidari, Zahra; Dash, Srikanta; Tarr, Matthew A

    2015-04-01

    The use of human serum albumin nanoparticles (HSAPs) as a drug carrier system for cancer treatment has proven successful through current marketable clinical formulations. Despite this success, there is a current lack of multifunctional HSAPs, which offer combinational therapies of more than one proven technique. Gold nanorods (AuNRs) have also shown medicinal promise due to their photothermal therapy capabilities. In this study, a desolvation and cross-linking approach was employed to successfully encapsulate gold nanorods into HSAPs simultaneously with the chemotherapeutic drug paclitaxel (PAC); forming PAC-AuNR-HSAPs with desirable overall particle sizes of 299 ± 6 nm. The loading efficiency of paclitaxel into PAC-AuNR-HSAPs reached up to 3 μg PAC/mg HSA. The PAC-AuNR-HSAPs experienced photothermal heating; with the bulk particle solution reaching up to 46 °C after 15 min of near-IR laser exposure. This heat increase marked the successful attainment of the temperature necessary to cause severe cellular hyperthermia and necrosis. The encasement strategy facilitated a colloidal hybrid treatment system capable of enhanced permeability and retention effects, photothermal ablation of cancer cells, and release of the active paclitaxel of up to 188 ng (from PAC-AuNR-HSAPs created with 30 mg HSA) in a single 15 min irradiation session. When treated with PAC-AuNR-HSAPs containing 20 μg PAC/mL particle solution, 4T1 mouse breast cancer cells experienced ∼82% cell death without irradiation and ∼94% cell death after just one irradiation session. The results for PAC-AuNR-HSAPs were better than that of free PAC, which only killed ∼77% of the cells without irradiation and ∼80% with irradiation. The hybrid particle system also lends itself to future customizable external functionalities via conjugated targeting ligands, such as antibodies. Internal entrapment of patient tailored medication combinations are also possible with this combination treatment platform, which

  16. Adjuvant Effect of Biogenic Selenium Nanoparticles Improves the Immune Responses and Survival of Mice Receiving 4T1 Cell Antigens as Vaccine in Breast Cancer Murine Model.

    PubMed

    Yazdi, Mohammad Hossein; Varastehmoradi, Bardia; Faghfuri, Elnaz; Mavandadnejad, Faranak; Mahdavi, Mehdi; Shahverdi, Ahmad Reza

    2015-12-01

    The modification of tumor-associated antigen-based vaccine to elicit a more robust immune response has been addressed in several ways. In the present work, we aimed to investigate the immunomodulatory effect of selenium nanoparticles as an immunoadjuvant in formulation of a tumor-associated antigen-based vaccine in a preventive form. Fortyfive female inbred BALB/c mice five-to-seven weeks old were used and divided into three groups of test and control, each containing fifteen mice. Group one injected by PBS and used as a control. Group two injected by breast tumor cell lysate alone as vaccine. Group three injected by SeNPs with tumor cell lysate as vaccine. All injections were carried out on day fourteen, twentyone and twentyeight of the study. Tumor induction was done at day thirty. Twenty days after tumor induction serum samples were gathered to measure the cytokine assay. Tumor growth and weight of mice as well as delayed type hyper sensitivity (DTH) response were monitored during the study. Results of the present work showed a significant increase in the level of serum IFN-γ, IL-2, IL-12 and decreased TGF-β in SeNPs/vaccine injected mice as well as lower tumor volume, more potent DTH responses and longer survival rate in comparison to control and tumor lysate vaccine. Taken together, it can be deduced from this work that SeNPs can be considered as an adjuvant in vaccine in triggering robust immune response against breast cancer. But further evaluations are still needed to find the best formula for this agent in antitumor vaccines. PMID:26682463

  17. Umbelliprenin is Potentially Toxic Against the HT29, CT26, MCF-7, 4T1, A172, and GL26 Cell Lines, Potentially Harmful Against Bone Marrow-Derived Stem Cells, and Non-Toxic Against Peripheral Blood Mononuclear Cells

    PubMed Central

    Rashidi, Mohsen; Ziai, Seyed Ali; Moini Zanjani, Taraneh; Khalilnezhad, Ahad; Jamshidi, Hamidreza; Amani, Davar

    2016-01-01

    Background Resistance to chemotherapy is a growing concern, thus natural anticancer agents are drawing the attention of many scientists and clinicians. One natural anticancer agent, umbelliprenin, is a coumarin produced by many species of Ferula. Objectives We aimed to examine the inhibitory effect of umbelliprenin on human and mouse bone marrow-derived stem cells (BMDSCs), peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs), and different cancer cell lines. Materials and Methods In this in vitro experimental study, the HT29, CT26, MCF-7, 4T1, A172, and GL26 cancer cells and human and mouse BMDSCs and PBMCs were cultured in RPMI-1640 medium supplemented with 10% fetal bovine serum (FBS), incubated at 37°C for 24 hours in a 5% CO2 atmosphere, and then were treated with different concentrations of umbelliprenin dissolved in dimethyl sulfoxide (DMSO) (3, 6, 12, 25, 50, 100, and 200 µg/mL) for 24, 48, and 72 hours at 37°C. Each experiment was performed in triplicate. Finally, the cell survival rate was assessed by MTT assay. The IC50 values were calculated based on the log values using GraphPad Prism version 5 software for windows (La Jolla CA, USA) and were expressed as mean ± SEM. Results Umbelliprenin inhibited the cancer cells in a concentration-dependent (P < 0.05) but not time-dependent manner (P > 0.05). The most sensitive and resistant cell lines at the 24-hour incubation time were 4T1 (IC50, 30.9 ± 3.1 µg/mL) and A172 (IC50, 51.9 ± 6.7 µg/mL); at the 48-hour incubation time: 4T1 (IC50, 30.6 ± 2.6 µg/mL) and CT26 (IC50, 53.2 ± 3.6 µg/mL); and at the 72-hour incubation time: HT29 (IC50, 37.1 ± 1.4 µg/mL) and 4T1 (IC50, 62.2 ± 4.8 µg/mL). Both human and mouse BMDSCs showed the highest resistance at the 24-hour incubation time (IC50s, 254.7 ± 21 and 204.4 ± 4.5 µg/mL, respectively) and the highest sensitivity at the 72-hour incubation time (IC50s, 120.4 ± 5 and 159.0 ± 7.3 µg/mL, respectively). The PBMCs of both human and mouse origin revealed very

  18. Distribution and inhibition effect of Seleno-L-Methionine on 4T1 mouse mammary carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Song, Hongjiao; Ren, Xiaomin; Liu, Ping

    2015-01-01

    To identify the relationship between selenium intake and breast cancer progression, SeMet supplement was applied to 4T1 murine mammary carcinoma for 28 days and the effect of SeMet on tumor growth was assessed. Combined with SXRF mapping, trace metal distribution in tumor tissues in relation to selenium-associated protein expressions and cellular transcription factors, HIF-1α accumulation and its targeted molecule expressions involved in tumor progression, were further investigated using immunohistochemical staining. Our results showed that tumor growth was inhibited significantly and tumor cells apoptosis was promoted after SeMet supplement. High Se intakes in tumor tissues overlaid with high iron distribution were observed by SXRF mapping. SeMet supplement increased SBP1 expression and decreased GPx1 expression, and greatly inhibited VEGF expression and tumor immune suppression cells accumulation in tumor tissues. In conclusion, SeMet-mediated anti-cancer effect was likely to inhibit tumor growth through high expression of SBP1 inhibiting GPx1 activity and HIF-1α, which could be used as chemopreventive strategies in breast cancer. PMID:26330897

  19. Tumor cell secretion of soluble factor(s) for specific immunosuppression.

    PubMed

    Kano, Arihiro

    2015-03-09

    Studies of tumor models using syngeneic transplantation have advanced our understanding of tumor immunity, including both immune surveillance and evasion. Murine mammary carcinoma 4T1 cells secrete immunosuppressive soluble factors as demonstrated in splenocyte culture. Cultured primary splenocytes secrete IFN-γ, which was strikingly elevated when the cells were isolated from 4T1 tumor-bearing mice. The secretion of IFN-γ peaked a week after 4T1 inoculation and then declined. This reduction may be due to the relatively decreased lymphocytes and increased granulocytes in a spleen accompanied by splenomegaly with time after the 4T1 inoculation. IFN-γ production was further suppressed with the addition of the conditioned media from 4T1 cells to the splenocyte culture. This suppressive effect was more evident in the splenocytes isolated from mice that had 4T1 tumors for a longer period of time and was not observed in the conditioned medium either from CT26 cells or with splenocytes isolated from CT26 tumor-bearing mice. These results suggest that the IFN-γ suppression is 4T1 tumor-specific. The soluble factor(s) in the 4T1-conditioned media was a protein between 10 to 100 kDa. The cytokine tip assay demonstrated several known cytokines that negatively regulate immune responses and may be candidates for this immunosuppression activity.

  20. Green tea (Camellia sinensis) extract inhibits both the metastasis and osteolytic components of mammary cancer 4T1 lesions in mice.

    PubMed

    Luo, Ke-Wang; Ko, Chun-Hay; Yue, Grace Gar-Lee; Lee, Julia Kin-Ming; Li, Kai-Kai; Lee, Michelle; Li, Gang; Fung, Kwok-Pui; Leung, Ping-Chung; Lau, Clara Bik-San

    2014-04-01

    Green tea (Camellia sinensis, CS), a kind of Chinese tea commonly consumed as a healthy beverage, has been demonstrated to have various biological activities, including antioxidation, antiobesity and anticancer. Our study aims to investigate the antitumor, antimetastasis and antiosteolytic effects of CS aqueous extract both in vitro and in vivo using metastasis-specific mouse mammary carcinoma 4T1 cells. Our results showed that treatment of 4T1 cells with CS aqueous extract resulted in significant inhibition of 4T1 cell proliferation. CS extract induced 4T1 apoptosis in a dose-dependent manner as assessed by annexin-V and propidium iodide staining and caspase-3 activity. Western blot analysis showed that CS increased the expression of Bax-to-Bcl-2 ratio and activated caspase-8 and caspase-3 to induce apoptosis. CS also inhibited 4T1 cell migration and invasion at 0.06-0.125 mg/ml. In addition, CS extract (0.6 g/kg, orally fed daily for 4 weeks) was effective in decreasing the tumor weight by 34.8% in female BALB/c mice against water treatment control (100%). Apart from the antitumor effect, CS extract significantly decreased lung and liver metastasis in BALB/c mice bearing 4T1 tumors by 54.5% and 72.6%, respectively. Furthermore, micro-computed tomography and in vitro osteoclast staining analysis suggested that CS extract was effective in bone protection against breast cancer-induced bone destruction. In conclusion, the present study demonstrated that the CS aqueous extract, which closely mimics green tea beverage, has potent antitumor and antimetastasis effects in breast cancer and could protect the bone from breast cancer-induced bone destruction.

  1. Formulation, Characterization, and Antitumor Properties of Trans- and Cis-Citral in the 4T1 Breast Cancer Xenograft Mouse Model

    PubMed Central

    Zeng, San; Kapur, Arvinder; Patankar, Manish S.; Xiong, May P.

    2015-01-01

    Purpose Citral is composed of a random mixture of two geometric stereoisomers geranial (trans-citral) and neral (cis-citral) yet few studies have directly compared their in vivo antitumor properties. A micelle formulation was therefore developed. Methods Geranial and neral were synthesized. Commercially-purchased citral, geranial, and neral were formulated in PEG-b-PCL (block sizes of 5000:10000, Mw/Mn 1.26) micelles. In vitro degradation, drug release, cytotoxicity, flow cytometry, and western blot studies were conducted. The antitumor properties of drug formulations (40 mg/kg and 80 mg/kg based on MTD studies) were evaluated on the 4T1 xenograft mouse model and tumor tissues were analyzed by western blot. Results Micelles encapsulated drugs with >50% LE at 5-40% drug to polymer (w/w), displayed sustained release (t1/2 of 8-9 hours), and improved drug stability at pH 5.0. The IC50 of drug formulations against 4T1 cells ranged from 1.4-9.9 μM. Western blot revealed that autophagy was the main cause of cytotoxicity. Geranial at 80 mg/kg was most effective at inhibiting tumor growth. Conclusions Geranial is significantly more potent than neral and citral at 80 mg/kg (p<0.001) and western blot of tumor tissues confirms that autophagy and not apoptosis is the major mechanism of tumor growth inhibition in p53-null 4T1 cells. PMID:25673043

  2. Mono- and Combined Therapy of Metastasizing Breast Carcinoma 4T1 with Zoledronic Acid and Doxorubicin.

    PubMed

    Baklaushev, V P; Grinenko, N F; Yusubalieva, G M; Gubskii, I L; Burenkov, M S; Rabinovich, E Z; Ivanova, N V; Chekhonin, V P

    2016-08-01

    The efficiency of monotherapy with zoledronic acid (Resorba), doxorubicin, and their combination was studied on the model of metastasizing breast carcinoma in BALB/c mice. Doxorubicin monotherapy was accompanied by a significant increase in median survival up to 57 days (vs. 34 and 35 days in control groups); 27% animals survived for 90 days (duration of the study). Bioluminescence area of the primary tumor significantly decreased on days 21 and 28; the total number of visceral metastases also decreased according to magnetic-resonance imaging data. Resorba monotherapy produced no general toxic effect, the median survival increased to 64 days, and 90-day survival was 33%. Imaging techniques (magnetic-resonance imaging, microtomography, bioluminescent analysis) showed that Resorba delayed the development of the primary tumor (regression of luminescence area on days 21 and 28, regression of standardized bioluminescence intensity on day 28) and significantly reduced the number of visceral metastases in comparison with the control. Combination therapy was less effective than monotherapy with the same medications. Median survival was 55 days, 90-day survival was 13%, but magnetic-resonance imaging and bioluminescence analysis after combination therapy also showed delayed growth of the primary tumor and reduced number of visceral metastases. Microtomography revealed bone metastases in ~30% animals of the control group; in experimental groups, no bone metastases were found. The experiment with periosteal (distal epiphysis of the femur) injection of 4T1-Luc2 tumor cells demonstrated pronounced selective effectiveness of Resorba in relation to bone metastases. Monotherapy with Resorba can prevent the development of not only bone, but also visceral metastases of breast cancer. PMID:27590765

  3. Theranostic probe for simultaneous in vivo photoacoustic imaging and confined photothermolysis by pulsed laser at 1064 nm in 4T1 breast cancer model

    PubMed Central

    Zhou, Min; Ku, Geng; Pageon, Laura; Li, Chun

    2015-01-01

    Here, we report that polyethylene glycol (PEG)-coated copper(II) sulfide nanoparticles (PEG-CuS NPs) with their peak absorption tuned to 1064 nm could be used both as a contrast agent for photoacoustic tomographic imaging of mouse tumor vasculature and as a mediator for confined phothermolysis of tumor cells in an orthotopic syngeneic 4T1 breast tumor model. PEG-CuS NPs showed stronger photoacoustic signal than hollow gold nanospheres and single-wall carbon nanotubes at 1064 nm. MicroPET imaging of 4T1 tumor-bearing mice showed a gradual accumulation of the NPs in the tumor over time. About 6.5% of injected dose were taken up in each gram of tumor tissue at 24 h after intravenous injection of 64Cu-labeled PEG-CuS NPs. For both photoacoustic imaging and therapeutic studies, nanosecond (ns)-pulsed laser was delivered with Q-switched Nd:YAG at a wavelength of 1064 nm. Unlike conventional photothermal ablation therapy mediated by continuous wave laser with which heat could spread to the surrounding normal tissue, interaction of CuS NPs with short pulsed laser deliver heat rapidly to the treatment volume keeping the thermal damage confined to the target tissues. Our data demonstrated that it is possible to use a single-compartment nanoplatform to achieve both photoacoustic tomography and highly selective tumor destruction at 1064 nm in small animals. PMID:25379880

  4. Prevention of Metastasis in a 4T1 Murine Breast Cancer Model by Doxorubicin Carried by Folate Conjugated pH Sensitive Polymeric Micelles

    PubMed Central

    Gao, Zhong-Gao; Tian, Li; Hu, Jun; Park, In-Suh; Bae, You Han

    2011-01-01

    This study primarily focused on the anti-metastatic activity of doxorubicin (DOX) loaded in a pH-sensitive mixed polymeric micelle formed from two block polymers: poly(L-lactide) (PLLA) (Mn 3000)-b-poly(ethylene glycol) (PEG) (Mn 2000)-folate and poly(L-histidine) (PHis) (Mn 4700)-b-PEG (Mn 2000). Tumor formation and metastasis in mice were examined using a murine mammary carcinoma cell of 4T1 which is one of the most aggressive metastatic cancer cell lines. The efficacy was evaluated by tumor size, body weight change, survival rate, dorsal skin fold window chamber model, and histological observation of the lung, heart, liver and spleen after treatment with various DOX formulations. When the tumor reached 50–100 mm3 in size, the mice were treated by 4 times at a 3-day interval at a dose of 10 mg DOX/kg. The mixed micelle formulation resulted in retarded tumor growth, no weight loss, and no death for 4–5 weeks. In another set of the in vivo test for histological evaluation of the organs, the mice were similarly treated but the formulations were injected one day after 4T1 cell inoculation. The treatment by DOX loaded mixed micelle showed no apparent metastasis till 28 days. However, significant metastasis to the lung and heart was observed on Day 28 when the mice were treated with DOX carried by PBS, PLLA-b-PEG micelle and PHis-b-PEG micelle. PMID:21295088

  5. Theranostic probe for simultaneous in vivo photoacoustic imaging and confined photothermolysis by pulsed laser at 1064 nm in 4T1 breast cancer model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, Min; Ku, Geng; Pageon, Laura; Li, Chun

    2014-11-01

    Here, we report that polyethylene glycol (PEG)-coated copper(ii) sulfide nanoparticles (PEG-CuS NPs) with their peak absorption tuned to 1064 nm could be used both as a contrast agent for photoacoustic tomographic imaging of mouse tumor vasculature and as a mediator for confined photothermolysis of tumor cells in an orthotopic syngeneic 4T1 breast tumor model. PEG-CuS NPs showed stronger photoacoustic signal than hollow gold nanospheres and single-wall carbon nanotubes at 1064 nm. MicroPET imaging of 4T1 tumor-bearing mice showed a gradual accumulation of the NPs in the tumor over time. About 6.5% of injected dose were taken up in each gram of tumor tissue at 24 h after intravenous injection of 64Cu-labeled PEG-CuS NPs. For both photoacoustic imaging and therapeutic studies, nanosecond (ns)-pulsed laser was delivered with Q-switched Nd:YAG at a wavelength of 1064 nm. Unlike conventional photothermal ablation therapy mediated by continuous wave laser with which heat could spread to the surrounding normal tissue, interaction of CuS NPs with short pulsed laser deliver heat rapidly to the treatment volume keeping the thermal damage confined to the target tissues. Our data demonstrated that it is possible to use a single-compartment nanoplatform to achieve both photoacoustic tomography and highly selective tumor destruction at 1064 nm in small animals.Here, we report that polyethylene glycol (PEG)-coated copper(ii) sulfide nanoparticles (PEG-CuS NPs) with their peak absorption tuned to 1064 nm could be used both as a contrast agent for photoacoustic tomographic imaging of mouse tumor vasculature and as a mediator for confined photothermolysis of tumor cells in an orthotopic syngeneic 4T1 breast tumor model. PEG-CuS NPs showed stronger photoacoustic signal than hollow gold nanospheres and single-wall carbon nanotubes at 1064 nm. MicroPET imaging of 4T1 tumor-bearing mice showed a gradual accumulation of the NPs in the tumor over time. About 6.5% of injected dose were

  6. Tumor cell metabolism

    PubMed Central

    Romero-Garcia, Susana; Lopez-Gonzalez, Jose Sullivan; B´ez-Viveros, José Luis; Aguilar-Cazares, Dolores

    2011-01-01

    Cancer is a genetic disease that is caused by mutations in oncogenes, tumor suppressor genes and stability genes. The fact that the metabolism of tumor cells is altered has been known for many years. However, the mechanisms and consequences of metabolic reprogramming have just begun to be understood. In this review, an integral view of tumor cell metabolism is presented, showing how metabolic pathways are reprogrammed to satisfy tumor cell proliferation and survival requirements. In tumor cells, glycolysis is strongly enhanced to fulfill the high ATP demands of these cells; glucose carbons are the main building blocks in fatty acid and nucleotide biosynthesis. Glutaminolysis is also increased to satisfy NADPH regeneration, whereas glutamine carbons replenish the Krebs cycle, which produces metabolites that are constantly used for macromolecular biosynthesis. A characteristic feature of the tumor microenvironment is acidosis, which results from the local increase in lactic acid production by tumor cells. This phenomenon is attributed to the carbons from glutamine and glucose, which are also used for lactic acid production. Lactic acidosis also directs the metabolic reprogramming of tumor cells and serves as an additional selective pressure. Finally, we also discuss the role of mitochondria in supporting tumor cell metabolism. PMID:22057267

  7. [Retroperitoneal germ cell tumor].

    PubMed

    Borrell Palanca, A; García Garzón, J; Villamón Fort, R; Domenech Pérez, C; Martínez Lorente, A; Gunthner, S; García Sisamón, F

    1999-03-01

    We report a case of retroperitoneal extragonadal germ-cell tumor in an 17 years old patient who presented with aedema and pain in left inferior extremity asociated with hemopthysis caused by pulmonar metastasis, who was treated with chemotherapy and resection of residual mass and pulmonary nodes. Dyagnosis was stableshed by fine neadle aspiration biopsy of the wass. We comment on the difficult of stableshing differential dyagnosis between retroperitoneal extragonadal germ-cell tumor and metastasis of a testicular tumor. Dyagnosis is stableshed by the finding of a histologically malignant germ-cell tumor with normal testis. We considered physical examination and ecographyc exploration enough for a correct dyagnosis.

  8. Multiple granular cell tumor.

    PubMed

    Jones, J K; Kuo, T T; Griffiths, C M; Itharat, S

    1980-10-01

    Eleven cases of granular cell tumor were reviewed. In two of the cases multiple sites of involvement were seen. The tumor occurred in the oral cavity in both of these cases and each was initially wrongly diagnosed as squamous cell carcinoma. The most common site was the subcutaneous tissue (nine patients) and the tongue was involved in three cases. In one patient the parotid gland was involved. Eight of the patients were females and three were males; seven were black and four were white. The importance of differentiating between squamous cell carcinoma and granular cell tumor is stressed, as is the need for a simple wide surgical excision. PMID:7421377

  9. Zebrafish Germ Cell Tumors.

    PubMed

    Sanchez, Angelica; Amatruda, James F

    2016-01-01

    Germ cell tumors (GCTs) are malignant cancers that arise from embryonic precursors known as Primordial Germ Cells. GCTs occur in neonates, children, adolescents and young adults and can occur in the testis, the ovary or extragonadal sites. Because GCTs arise from pluripotent cells, the tumors can exhibit a wide range of different histologies. Current cisplatin-based combination therapies cures most patients, however at the cost of significant toxicity to normal tissues. While GWAS studies and genomic analysis of human GCTs have uncovered somatic mutations and loci that might confer tumor susceptibility, little is still known about the exact mechanisms that drive tumor development, and animal models that faithfully recapitulate all the different GCT subtypes are lacking. Here, we summarize current understanding of germline development in humans and zebrafish, describe the biology of human germ cell tumors, and discuss progress and prospects for zebrafish GCT models that may contribute to better understanding of human GCTs. PMID:27165367

  10. Circulating Tumor Cells.

    PubMed

    Paoletti, Costanza; Hayes, Daniel F

    2016-01-01

    Circulating Tumor Cells (CTC) are shed from primary or secondary tumors. Prior studies have demonstrated that enumeration of CTC is a robust independent prognostic factor of progression free and overall survival in patients with early and metastatic breast cancer. CTC, as well as other circulating tumor markers, have the appealing advantages over tissue biopsy of (1) ease of collection, (2) serial evaluation, and (3) interrogation of the entire tumor burden instead of just a limited part of the tumor. Advances have been recently made in phenotyping and genotyping of CTC, which should provide insights into the predictive role of CTC for sensitivity or resistance to therapies. In addition, CTC phenotypic marker changes during the course of treatment may serve as pharmacodynamic monitoring tools. Therefore, CTC may be considered "liquid biopsies," providing prognostic and predictive clinical information as well as additional understanding of tumor heterogeneity.

  11. Brain tumor stem cells.

    PubMed

    Palm, Thomas; Schwamborn, Jens C

    2010-06-01

    Since the end of the 'no-new-neuron' theory, emerging evidence from multiple studies has supported the existence of stem cells in neurogenic areas of the adult brain. Along with this discovery, neural stem cells became candidate cells being at the origin of brain tumors. In fact, it has been demonstrated that molecular mechanisms controlling self-renewal and differentiation are shared between brain tumor stem cells and neural stem cells and that corruption of genes implicated in these pathways can direct tumor growth. In this regard, future anticancer approaches could be inspired by uncovering such redundancies and setting up treatments leading to exhaustion of the cancer stem cell pool. However, deleterious effects on (normal) neural stem cells should be minimized. Such therapeutic models underline the importance to study the cellular mechanisms implicated in fate decisions of neural stem cells and the oncogenic derivation of adult brain cells. In this review, we discuss the putative origins of brain tumor stem cells and their possible implications on future therapies.

  12. Tocotrienol-Adjuvanted Dendritic Cells Inhibit Tumor Growth and Metastasis: A Murine Model of Breast Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Abdul Hafid, Sitti Rahma; Chakravarthi, Srikumar; Nesaretnam, Kalanithi; Radhakrishnan, Ammu Kutty

    2013-01-01

    Tocotrienol-rich fraction (TRF) from palm oil is reported to possess anti-cancer and immune-enhancing effects. In this study, TRF supplementation was used as an adjuvant to enhance the anti-cancer effects of dendritic cells (DC)-based cancer vaccine in a syngeneic mouse model of breast cancer. Female BALB/c mice were inoculated with 4T1 cells in mammary pad to induce tumor. When the tumor was palpable, the mice in the experimental groups were injected subcutaneously with DC-pulsed with tumor lysate (TL) from 4T1 cells (DC+TL) once a week for three weeks and fed daily with 1 mg TRF or vehicle. Control mice received unpulsed DC and were fed with vehicle. The combined therapy of using DC+TL injections and TRF supplementation (DC+TL+TRF) inhibited (p<0.05) tumor growth and metastasis. Splenocytes from the DC+TL+TRF group cultured with mitomycin-C (MMC)-treated 4T1 cells produced higher (p<0.05) levels of IFN-γ and IL-12. The cytotoxic T-lymphocyte (CTL) assay also showed enhanced tumor-specific killing (p<0.05) by CD8+ T-lymphocytes isolated from mice in the DC+TL+TRF group. This study shows that TRF has the potential to be used as an adjuvant to enhance effectiveness of DC-based vaccines. PMID:24069344

  13. NDRG2 Expression Decreases Tumor-Induced Osteoclast Differentiation by Down-regulating ICAM1 in Breast Cancer Cells.

    PubMed

    Kim, Bomi; Nam, Sorim; Lim, Ji Hyun; Lim, Jong-Seok

    2016-01-01

    Bone matrix is properly maintained by osteoclasts and osteoblasts. In the tumor microenvironment, osteoclasts are increasingly differentiated by the various ligands and cytokines secreted from the metastasized cancer cells at the bone metastasis niche. The activated osteoclasts generate osteolytic lesions. For this reason, studies focusing on the differentiation of osteoclasts are important to reduce bone destruction by tumor metastasis. The N-myc downstream-regulated gene 2 (NDRG2) has been known to contribute to the suppression of tumor growth and metastasis, but the precise role of NDRG2 in osteoclast differentiation induced by cancer cells has not been elucidated. In this study, we demonstrate that NDRG2 expression in breast cancer cells has an inhibitory effect on osteoclast differentiation. RAW 264.7 cells, which are monocytic preosteoclast cells, treated with the conditioned media (CM) of murine breast cancer cells (4T1) expressing NDRG2 are less differentiated into the multinucleated osteoclast-like cells than those treated with the CM of 4T1-WT or 4T1-mock cells. Interestingly, 4T1 cells stably expressing NDRG2 showed a decreased mRNA and protein level of intercellular adhesion molecule 1 (ICAM1), which is known to enhance osteoclast maturation. Osteoclast differentiation was also reduced by ICAM1 knockdown in 4T1 cells. In addition, blocking the interaction between soluble ICAM1 and ICAM1 receptors significantly decreased osteoclastogenesis of RAW 264.7 cells in the tumor environment. Collectively, these results suggest that the reduction of ICAM1 expression by NDRG2 in breast cancer cells decreases osteoclast differentiation, and demonstrate that excessive bone resorption could be inhibited via ICAM1 down-regulation by NDRG2 expression.

  14. Testicular germ cell tumors.

    PubMed

    Looijenga, Leendert H J

    2014-02-01

    Human germ cell tumors are of interest because of their epidemiology, clinical behavior and pathobiology. Histologically, they are subdivided into various elements, with similarities to embryogenesis. Recent insights resulted in a division of five types of human germ cell tumors. In the context of male germ cells, three are relevant; Type I: teratomas and yolk sac tumors of neonates and infants; Type II: seminomas and nonseminomas of (predominantly) adolescents and adults; and Type III: spermatocytic seminomas of the elderly. Recent studies led to significant increases in understanding of the parameters involved in the earliest pathogenetic steps of human germ cells tumors, in particularly the seminomas and nonseminomas (Type II). In case of a disturbed gonadal physiology, either due to the germ cell itself, or the micro-environment, embryonic germ cells during a specific window of sensitization can be blocked in their maturation, resulting in carcinoma in situ or gonadoblastoma, the precursors of seminomas and nonseminomas. The level of testicularization of the gonad determines the histological composition of the precursor. These insights will allow better definition of individuals at risk to develop a germ cell malignancy, with putative preventive measurements, and allow better selection of scientific approaches to elucidate the pathogenesis. PMID:24683949

  15. Regulatory T cells prevent CD8 T cell maturation by inhibiting CD4 Th cells at tumor sites.

    PubMed

    Chaput, Nathalie; Darrasse-Jèze, Guillaume; Bergot, Anne-Sophie; Cordier, Corinne; Ngo-Abdalla, Stacie; Klatzmann, David; Azogui, Orly

    2007-10-15

    Natural regulatory T cells (Tregs) are present in high frequencies among tumor-infiltrating lymphocytes and in draining lymph nodes, supposedly facilitating tumor development. To investigate their role in controlling local immune responses, we analyzed intratumoral T cell accumulation and function in the presence or absence of Tregs. Tumors that grew in normal BALB/c mice injected with the 4T1 tumor cell line were highly infiltrated by Tregs, CD4 and CD8 cells, all having unique characteristics. Most infiltrating Tregs expressed low levels of CD25Rs and Foxp3. They did not proliferate even in the presence of IL-2 but maintained a strong suppressor activity. CD4 T cells were profoundly anergic and CD8 T cell proliferation and cytotoxicity were severely impaired. Depletion of Tregs modified the characteristics of tumor infiltrates. Tumors were initially invaded by activated CD4(+)CD25(-) T cells, which produced IL-2 and IFN-gamma. This was followed by the recruitment of highly cytotoxic CD8(+) T cells at tumor sites leading to tumor rejection. The beneficial effect of Treg depletion in tumor regression was abrogated when CD4 helper cells were also depleted. These findings indicate that the massive infiltration of tumors by Tregs prevents the development of a successful helper response. The Tregs in our model prevent Th cell activation and subsequent development of efficient CD8 T cell activity required for the control of tumor growth. PMID:17911581

  16. Tumor heterogeneity and circulating tumor cells.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Chufeng; Guan, Yan; Sun, Yulan; Ai, Dan; Guo, Qisen

    2016-05-01

    In patients with cancer, individualized treatment strategies are generally guided by an analysis of molecular biomarkers. However, genetic instability allows tumor cells to lose monoclonality and acquire genetic heterogeneity, an important characteristic of tumors, during disease progression. Researchers have found that there is tumor heterogeneity between the primary tumor and metastatic lesions, between different metastatic lesions, and even within a single tumor (either primary or metastatic). Tumor heterogeneity is associated with heterogeneous protein functions, which lowers diagnostic precision and consequently becomes an obstacle to determining the appropriate therapeutic strategies for individual cancer patients. With the development of novel testing technologies, an increasing number of studies have attempted to explore tumor heterogeneity by examining circulating tumor cells (CTCs), with the expectation that CTCs may comprehensively represent the full spectrum of mutations and/or protein expression alterations present in the cancer. In addition, this strategy represents a minimally invasive approach compared to traditional tissue biopsies that can be used to dynamically monitor tumor evolution. The present article reviews the potential efficacy of using CTCs to identify both spatial and temporal tumor heterogeneity. This review also highlights current issues in this field and provides an outlook toward future applications of CTCs.

  17. [Mediastinal germ cell tumors].

    PubMed

    Bremmer, F; Ströbel, P

    2016-09-01

    The mediastinum is among the most frequent anatomic region in which germ cell tumors (GCT) arise, second only to the gonads. Mediastinal GCT (mGCT) account for 16 % of all mediastinal neoplasms. Although the morphology and (according to all available data) the molecular genetics of mediastinal and gonadal GCT are identical, a number of unique aspects exist. There is a highly relevant bi-modal age distribution. In pre-pubertal children of both sexes, mGCT consist exclusively of teratomas and yolk sac tumors. The prognosis is generally favorable with modern treatment. In post-pubertal adults, virtually all patients with malignant mGCT are males; the prognosis is more guarded and depends (among other factors) on the histological GCT components and is similar to GCT in other organs. So-called somatic type malignancies (i. e. clonally related, non-germ cell neoplasias arising in a GCT) are much more frequent in mGCT than in other organs, and the association between mediastinal yolk sac tumors and hematological malignancies, such as myelodysplasias and leukemias, is unique to mediastinal tumors. The prognosis of GCT with somatic type malignancies is generally dismal. PMID:27491549

  18. Equine testicular interstitial cell tumors.

    PubMed

    Gelberg, H B; McEntee, K

    1987-05-01

    Interstitial cell tumors from nine stallions were described. In all but one horse the tumors were found in undescended testes. Five animals had bilateral tumors. Two animals showed increased aggression. Tumors contained two cell types. The first type were large distinctly bordered eosinophilic cells interpreted to be hyperplastic and hypertrophic interstitial cells. They blended with pleomorphic often spindloid neoplastic cells which had fibrillar, vacuolated cytoplasm and indistinct cell borders. This latter cell population was arranged in nodules or broad sheets as endocrine-like packets or interweaving fascicles. Biologic behavior of the neoplasms could not be ascertained from histologic examination. PMID:2885961

  19. Molecular response of 4T1-induced mouse mammary tumours and healthy tissues to zinc treatment.

    PubMed

    Sztalmachova, Marketa; Gumulec, Jaromir; Raudenska, Martina; Polanska, Hana; Holubova, Monika; Balvan, Jan; Hudcova, Kristyna; Knopfova, Lucia; Kizek, Rene; Adam, Vojtech; Babula, Petr; Masarik, Michal

    2015-04-01

    Breast cancer patients negative for the nuclear oestrogen receptor α have a particularly poor prognosis. Therefore, the 4T1 cell line (considered as a triple-negative model) was chosen to induce malignancy in mice. The aim of the present study was to assess if zinc ions, provided in excess, may significantly modify the process of mammary oncogenesis. Zn(II) ions were chosen because of their documented antitumour effects. Zn(II) is also known to induce the expression of metallothioneins (MT) and glutathion (GSH). A total dose of zinc sulphate per one gram of mouse weight used in the experiment was 0.15 mg. We studied the expression of MT1, MT2, TP53 and MTF-1 genes and also examined the effect of the tumour on antioxidant capacity. Tumour-free mice had significantly higher expression levels of the studied genes (p<0.003). Significant differences were also revealed in the gene expression between the tissues (p<0.001). The highest expression levels were observed in the liver. As compared to brain, lung and liver, significantly lower concentrations of MT protein were found in the primary tumour; an inverse trend was observed in the concentration of Zinc(II). In non-tumour mice, the amount of hepatic hydrosulphuryl groups significantly increased by the exposure to Zn(II), but the animals with tumour induction showed no similar trend. The primary tumour size of zinc-treated animals was 20% smaller (p=0.002); however, no significant effect on metastasis progression due to the zinc treatment was discovered. In conclusion, Zn(II) itself may mute the growth of primary breast tumours especially at their early stages.

  20. Pancreatic islet cell tumor

    MedlinePlus

    Complications of these tumors include: Diabetes Hormone crises (if the tumor releases certain types of hormones) Severe low blood sugar (from insulinomas) Severe ulcers in the stomach and small intestine (from gastrinomas) Spread of the tumor to the liver

  1. Macrophage Migration Inhibitory Factor promotes tumor growth and metastasis by inducing Myeloid Derived Suppressor Cells in the tumor microenvironment

    PubMed Central

    Simpson, Kendra D.; Templeton, Dennis J.; Cross, Janet V.

    2012-01-01

    The Macrophage Migration Inhibitory Factor (MIF), an inflammatory cytokine, is overexpressed in many solid tumors and is associated with poor prognosis. We previously identified inhibitors of MIF within a class of natural products with demonstrated anti-cancer activities. We therefore sought to determine how MIF contributes to tumor growth and progression. We show here that, in murine tumors including the 4T1 model of aggressive, spontaneously metastatic breast cancer in immunologically intact mice, tumor-derived MIF promotes tumor growth and pulmonary metastasis through control of inflammatory cells within the tumor. Specifically, MIF increases the prevalence of a highly immune suppressive subpopulation of myeloid derived suppressor cells (MDSCs) within the tumor. In vitro, MIF promotes differentiation of myeloid cells into the same population of MDSCs. Pharmacologic inhibition of MIF reduces MDSC accumulation in the tumor similar to MIF depletion, and blocks the MIF-dependent in vitro differentiation of MDSCs. Our results demonstrate that MIF is a therapeutically targetable mechanism for control of tumor growth and metastasis through regulation of the host immune response, and support the potential utility of MIF inhibitors, either alone or in combination with standard tumor-targeting therapeutic or immunotherapy approaches. PMID:23125418

  2. PG545, a heparan sulfate mimetic, reduces heparanase expression in vivo, blocks spontaneous metastases and enhances overall survival in the 4T1 breast carcinoma model.

    PubMed

    Hammond, Edward; Brandt, Ralf; Dredge, Keith

    2012-01-01

    PG545 is a clinically relevant heparan sulfate (HS) mimetic which, in addition to possessing anti-angiogenic properties, also acts as a heparanase inhibitor which may differentiate its mechanism(s) of action from approved angiogenesis inhibitors. The degradation of HS by heparanase has been strongly implicated in cell dissemination and the metastatic process. Thus, the anti-metastatic activity of PG545 has been linked to the enzymatic function of heparanase - the only endoglycosidase known to cleave HS, an important component of the extracellular matrix (ECM) which represents a potential avenue for therapeutic intervention for certain metastatic cancer indications. Recent concerns raised about the paucity of overall survival as an endpoint in mouse models of clinically relevant metastasis led us to examine the effect of PG545 on the progression of both primary tumor growth and the spontaneously metastasizing disease in the 4T1 syngeneic breast carcinoma model in a non-surgical and surgical (mastectomy) setting. PG545 significantly inhibited primary tumor growth but importantly also inhibited lung metastasis in treated mice, an effect not observed with the tyrosine kinase inhibitor sorafenib. Importantly, PG545 significantly enhanced overall survival compared to vehicle control and the sorafenib group, suggesting PG545's inhibitory effect on heparanase is indeed a critical attribute to induce anti-metastatic activity. In addition to blocking a common angiogenic signalling pathway in tumor cells, the expression of heparanase in the primary tumor and lung was also significantly reduced by PG545 treatment. These results support the ongoing development of PG545 and highlight the potential utility in metastatic disease settings. PMID:23300607

  3. General Information about Pancreatic Neuroendocrine Tumors (Islet Cell Tumors)

    MedlinePlus

    ... Islet Cell Tumors) Treatment (PDQ®)–Patient Version General Information About Pancreatic Neuroendocrine Tumors (Islet Cell Tumors) Go ... the PDQ Adult Treatment Editorial Board . Clinical Trial Information A clinical trial is a study to answer ...

  4. Detection of circulating tumor cells.

    PubMed

    de Wit, Sanne; van Dalum, Guus; Terstappen, Leon W M M

    2014-01-01

    The increasing number of treatment options for patients with metastatic carcinomas has created an accompanying need for methods to determine if the tumor will be responsive to the intended therapy and to monitor its effectiveness. Ideally, these methods would be noninvasive and provide quantitative real-time analysis of tumor activity in a variety of carcinomas. Assessment of circulating tumor cells shed into the blood during metastasis may satisfy this need. Here we review the CellSearch technology used for the detection of circulating tumor cells and discuss potential future directions for improvements.

  5. Detection of Circulating Tumor Cells

    PubMed Central

    Terstappen, Leon W. M. M.

    2014-01-01

    The increasing number of treatment options for patients with metastatic carcinomas has created an accompanying need for methods to determine if the tumor will be responsive to the intended therapy and to monitor its effectiveness. Ideally, these methods would be noninvasive and provide quantitative real-time analysis of tumor activity in a variety of carcinomas. Assessment of circulating tumor cells shed into the blood during metastasis may satisfy this need. Here we review the CellSearch technology used for the detection of circulating tumor cells and discuss potential future directions for improvements. PMID:25133014

  6. Deformability of Tumor Cells versus Blood Cells

    PubMed Central

    Shaw Bagnall, Josephine; Byun, Sangwon; Begum, Shahinoor; Miyamoto, David T.; Hecht, Vivian C.; Maheswaran, Shyamala; Stott, Shannon L.; Toner, Mehmet; Hynes, Richard O.; Manalis, Scott R.

    2015-01-01

    The potential for circulating tumor cells (CTCs) to elucidate the process of cancer metastasis and inform clinical decision-making has made their isolation of great importance. However, CTCs are rare in the blood, and universal properties with which to identify them remain elusive. As technological advancements have made single-cell deformability measurements increasingly routine, the assessment of physical distinctions between tumor cells and blood cells may provide insight into the feasibility of deformability-based methods for identifying CTCs in patient blood. To this end, we present an initial study assessing deformability differences between tumor cells and blood cells, indicated by the length of time required for them to pass through a microfluidic constriction. Here, we demonstrate that deformability changes in tumor cells that have undergone phenotypic shifts are small compared to differences between tumor cell lines and blood cells. Additionally, in a syngeneic mouse tumor model, cells that are able to exit a tumor and enter circulation are not required to be more deformable than the cells that were first injected into the mouse. However, a limited study of metastatic prostate cancer patients provides evidence that some CTCs may be more mechanically similar to blood cells than to typical tumor cell lines. PMID:26679988

  7. The tumor microenvironment shapes lineage, transcriptional, and functional diversity of infiltrating myeloid cells.

    PubMed

    Elpek, Kutlu G; Cremasco, Viviana; Shen, Hua; Harvey, Christopher J; Wucherpfennig, Kai W; Goldstein, Daniel R; Monach, Paul A; Turley, Shannon J

    2014-07-01

    Myeloid cells play important regulatory roles within the tumor environment by directly promoting tumor progression and modulating the function of tumor-infiltrating lymphocytes, and as such, they represent a potential therapeutic target for the treatment of cancer. Although distinct subsets of tumor-associated myeloid cells have been identified, a broader analysis of the complete myeloid cell landscape within individual tumors and also across different tumor types has been lacking. By establishing the developmental and transcriptomic signatures of infiltrating myeloid cells from multiple primary tumors, we found that tumor-associated macrophages (TAM) and tumor-associated neutrophils (TAN), while present within all tumors analyzed, exhibited strikingly different frequencies, gene expression profiles, and functions across cancer types. We also evaluated the impact of anatomic location and circulating factors on the myeloid cell composition of tumors. The makeup of the myeloid compartment was determined by the tumor microenvironment rather than the anatomic location of tumor development or tumor-derived circulating factors. Protumorigenic and hypoxia-associated genes were enriched in TAMs and TANs compared with splenic myeloid-derived suppressor cells. Although all TANs had an altered expression pattern of secretory effector molecules, in each tumor type they exhibited a unique cytokine, chemokine, and associated receptor expression profile. One such molecule, haptoglobin, was uniquely expressed by 4T1 TANs and identified as a possible diagnostic biomarker for tumors characterized by the accumulation of myeloid cells. Thus, we have identified considerable cancer-specific diversity in the lineage, gene expression, and function of tumor-infiltrating myeloid cells. PMID:24801837

  8. Bone sialoprotein mediates the tumor cell-targeted prometastatic activity of TGF-β in a mouse model of breast cancer.

    PubMed Central

    Nam, Jeong-Seok; Suchar, Adam M.; Kang, Mi-Jin; Stuelten, Christina H.; Tang, Binwu; Michalowska, Aleksandra M.; Fisher, Larry W.; Fedarko, Neal S.; Jain, Alka; Pinkas, Jan; Lonning, Scott; Wakefield, Lalage M.

    2006-01-01

    Transforming growth factor-βs (TGF-βs) play a dual role in carcinogenesis, functioning as tumor suppressors early in the process, and then switching to act as pro-metastatic factors in late-stage disease. We have previously shown that high molecular weight TGF-β antagonists can suppress metastasis without the predicted toxicities (Yang et al., J. Clin. Invest. (2002) 109:1607-1615). To address the underlying mechanisms, we have used the 4T1 syngeneic mouse model of metastatic breast cancer. Treatment of mice with a monoclonal anti-TGF-β antibody (1D11) significantly suppressed metastasis of 4T1 cells to the lungs. When metastatic 4T1 cells were recovered from lungs of 1D11-treated and control mice, the most differentially expressed gene was found to be bone sialoprotein (Bsp). Immunostaining confirmed the loss of Bsp protein in 1D11-treated lung metastases, and TGF-β was shown to regulate and correlate with Bsp expression in vitro. Functionally, knockdown of Bsp in 4T1 cells reduced the ability of TGF-β to induce local collagen degradation and invasion in vitro, and treatment with recombinant BSP protected 4T1 cells from complement-mediated lysis. Finally, suppression of Bsp in 4T1 cells reduced metastasis in vivo. We conclude that Bsp is a plausible mediator of at least some of the tumor cell-targeted prometastatic activity of TGF-β in this model, and that Bsp expression in metastases can be successfully suppressed by systemic treatment with anti-TGF-β antibodies. PMID:16778210

  9. Mesenchymal stem cells with Sirt1 overexpression suppress breast tumor growth via chemokine-dependent natural killer cells recruitment

    PubMed Central

    Yu, Yang; Liu, Yan; Zong, Chen; Yu, Qingbo; Yang, Xue; Liang, Lei; Ye, Fei; Nong, Li; Jia, Yuxian; Lu, Yongkui; Han, Zhipeng

    2016-01-01

    Mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) are generally used in regenerative medicine, tissue engineering and therapy for immune disorder diseases. However, due to the immunosuppressive function of MSCs, the application of MSCs in breast cancer therapy remains limited. Sirt1 is the closest mammalian homologue of the yeast enzyme Sir2 which has an established capacity to influence yeast replicative lifespan. In this study, we demonstrated the effect of MSCs with Sirt1 overexpression (MSCs-Sirt1) in mice bearing 4T1 breast cancer and investigated the underlying mechanism. Firstly, we found that MSCs could accelerate breast tumor growth with promoted proliferation and inhibited apoptosis, whereas MSCs-Sirt1 significantly suppressed tumor growth with proliferation inhibition and apoptosis promotion. Moreover, we detected that NK cells were the prominent antitumor effectors for the MSCs-Sirt1-induced antitumor activity. Besides that, CXCL10 and IFN-γ showed the high level expression in MSCs-Sirt1 treatment group. The impulsive effect of MSCs-Sirt1 on 4T1 cells in vivo could be reversed by inhibition of CXCL10 and IFN-γ. Overall, our results suggest that MSCs-Sirt1 can effectively inhibit breast tumor growth via the recruitment of NK cells in tumor inflammatory microenvironment. PMID:27782173

  10. Influence of the phosphodiesterase-5 inhibitor, sildenafil, on sensitivity to chemotherapy in breast tumor cells.

    PubMed

    Di, Xu; Gennings, Chris; Bear, Harry D; Graham, Laura J; Sheth, Christopher M; White, Kimber L; Gewirtz, David A

    2010-11-01

    Studies were performed to determine the influence of the phosphodiesterase-5 inhibitor, sildenafil, on sensitivity to adriamycin (doxorubicin) in four human breast tumor cell lines and one murine breast tumor line. Sildenafil did not interfere with the effectiveness of adriamycin in any of the cell lines tested. Sildenafil also failed to protect MDA-MB231 cells against the cytotoxicity of cisplatin, taxol or camptothecin. Sildenafil enhanced sensitivity to adriamycin markedly in the p53 mutant MDA-MB231 and p53 null MCF-7/E6 cells and moderately in the MCF-7/caspase 3 and 4T1 cell lines. In the MDA-MB231 cells, sildenafil increased the extent of DNA damage induced by adriamycin as well as the extent of apoptotic cell death. Sildenafil did not influence sensitivity to adriamycin in bone marrow cells or macrophages. In an immunocompetent model of breast cancer (4T1 mammary carcinoma in Balb/c mice), sildenafil did not attenuate the antitumor effects of adriamycin; furthermore, the combination of sildenafil with adriamycin was no more toxic to the animals than adriamycin alone. Given that sildenafil has been shown to have the potential to protect the heart against the toxicity of adriamycin, these studies suggest that the inclusion of sildenafil with conventional chemotherapeutic protocols involving adriamycin (and possibly cisplatin, camptothecin and/or paclitaxel) should not compromise the antitumor effectiveness of these drugs nor enhance their toxicity to the patient. PMID:20155316

  11. Hyperdiploid tumor cells increase phenotypic heterogeneity within Glioblastoma tumors.

    PubMed

    Donovan, Prudence; Cato, Kathleen; Legaie, Roxane; Jayalath, Rumal; Olsson, Gemma; Hall, Bruce; Olson, Sarah; Boros, Samuel; Reynolds, Brent A; Harding, Angus

    2014-04-01

    Here we report the identification of a proliferative, viable, and hyperdiploid tumor cell subpopulation present within Glioblastoma (GB) patient tumors. Using xenograft tumor models, we demonstrate that hyperdiploid cell populations are maintained in xenograft tumors and that clonally expanded hyperdiploid cells support tumor formation and progression in vivo. In some patient tumorsphere lines, hyperdiploidy is maintained during long-term culture and in vivo within xenograft tumor models, suggesting that hyperdiploidy can be a stable cell state. In other patient lines hyperdiploid cells display genetic drift in vitro and in vivo, suggesting that in these patients hyperdiploidy is a transient cell state that generates novel phenotypes, potentially facilitating rapid tumor evolution. We show that the hyperdiploid cells are resistant to conventional therapy, in part due to infrequent cell division due to a delay in the G₀/G₁ phase of the cell cycle. Hyperdiploid tumor cells are significantly larger and more metabolically active than euploid cancer cells, and this correlates to an increased sensitivity to the effects of glycolysis inhibition. Together these data identify GB hyperdiploid tumor cells as a potentially important subpopulation of cells that are well positioned to contribute to tumor evolution and disease recurrence in adult brain cancer patients, and suggest tumor metabolism as a promising point of therapeutic intervention against this subpopulation. PMID:24448662

  12. Novel role for tumor-induced expansion of myeloid-derived cells in cancer cachexia.

    PubMed

    Cuenca, Alex G; Cuenca, Angela L; Winfield, Robert D; Joiner, Dallas N; Gentile, Lori; Delano, Matthew J; Kelly-Scumpia, Kindra M; Scumpia, Philip O; Matheny, Michael K; Scarpace, Philip J; Vila, Lizette; Efron, Philip A; LaFace, Drake M; Moldawer, Lyle L

    2014-06-15

    Cancer progression is associated with inflammation, increased metabolic demand, infection, cachexia, and eventually death. Myeloid-derived suppressor cells (MDSCs) commonly expand during cancer and are associated with adaptive immune suppression and inflammatory metabolite production. We propose that cancer-induced cachexia is driven at least in part by the expansion of MDSCs. MDSC expansion in 4T1 mammary carcinoma-bearing hosts is associated with induction of a hepatic acute-phase protein response and altered host energy and fat metabolism, and eventually reduced survival to polymicrobial sepsis and endotoxemia. Similar results are also seen in mice bearing a Lewis lung carcinoma and a C26 colon adenocarcinoma. However, a similar cachexia response is not seen with equivalent growth of the 66C4 subclone of 4T1, in which MDSC expansion does not occur. Importantly, reducing MDSC numbers in 4T1-bearing animals can ameliorate some of these late responses and reduce susceptibility to inflammation-induced organ injury and death. In addition, administering MDSCs from both tumor- and nontumor-bearing mice can produce an acute-phase response. Thus, we propose a previously undescribed mechanism for the development of cancer cachexia, whereby progressive MDSC expansion contributes to changes in host protein and energy metabolism and reduced resistance to infection.

  13. [Granulosa cell tumor of Abrikossof].

    PubMed

    Alberti, P; Bianchi, P; Pruneri, U; Pasini, M; Corsetti, V; Pasini, G F

    1993-01-01

    The authors report a case of Abrikossof's tumor that came under their observation. The reappraisal of the literature permits to review on this disorder that was unknown until few years ago. Electronic microscope and immunohistochemical study allowed to recognize the real origin of this tumor. It arises from peripheric nervous tissue particularly from Schwann's cells. This neoplasm must be considered as benign, especially when of small dimensions. In case of rapidly growing or larger than 8 cm forms a widely exeretic surgery and a careful follow-up, because of the possibility of finding tumors in other district of the body.

  14. Tumor-evoked regulatory B cells promote breast cancer metastasis by converting resting CD4⁺ T cells to T-regulatory cells.

    PubMed

    Olkhanud, Purevdorj B; Damdinsuren, Bazarragchaa; Bodogai, Monica; Gress, Ronald E; Sen, Ranjan; Wejksza, Katarzyna; Malchinkhuu, Enkhzol; Wersto, Robert P; Biragyn, Arya

    2011-05-15

    Pulmonary metastasis of breast cancer requires recruitment and expansion of T-regulatory cells (Treg) that promote escape from host protective immune cells. However, it remains unclear precisely how tumors recruit Tregs to support metastatic growth. Here we report the mechanistic involvement of a unique and previously undescribed subset of regulatory B cells. These cells, designated tumor-evoked Bregs (tBreg), phenotypically resemble activated but poorly proliferative mature B2 cells (CD19(+) CD25(High) CD69(High)) that express constitutively active Stat3 and B7-H1(High) CD81(High) CD86(High) CD62L(Low) IgM(Int). Our studies with the mouse 4T1 model of breast cancer indicate that the primary role of tBregs in lung metastases is to induce TGF-β-dependent conversion of FoxP3(+) Tregs from resting CD4(+) T cells. In the absence of tBregs, 4T1 tumors cannot metastasize into the lungs efficiently due to poor Treg conversion. Our findings have important clinical implications, as they suggest that tBregs must be controlled to interrupt the initiation of a key cancer-induced immunosuppressive event that is critical to support cancer metastasis. PMID:21444674

  15. Metastasis and Circulating Tumor Cells.

    PubMed

    van Dalum, Guus; Holland, Linda; Terstappen, Leon Wmm

    2012-10-01

    Cancer is a prominent cause of death worldwide. In most cases, it is not the primary tumor which causes death, but the metastases. Metastatic tumors are spread over the entire human body and are more difficult to remove or treat than the primary tumor. In a patient with metastatic disease, circulating tumor cells (CTCs) can be found in venous blood. These circulating tumor cells are part of the metastatic cascade. Clinical studies have shown that these cells can be used to predict treatment response and their presence is strongly associated with poor survival prospects. Enumeration and characterization of CTCs is important as this can help clinicians make more informed decisions when choosing or evaluating treatment. CTC counts are being included in an increasing number of studies and thus are becoming a bigger part of disease diagnosis and therapy management. We present an overview of the most prominent CTC enumeration and characterization methods and discuss the assumptions made about the CTC phenotype. Extensive CTC characterization of for example the DNA, RNA and antigen expression may lead to more understanding of the metastatic process.

  16. Metastasis and Circulating Tumor Cells

    PubMed Central

    van Dalum, Guus; Holland, Linda

    2012-01-01

    Cancer is a prominent cause of death worldwide. In most cases, it is not the primary tumor which causes death, but the metastases. Metastatic tumors are spread over the entire human body and are more difficult to remove or treat than the primary tumor. In a patient with metastatic disease, circulating tumor cells (CTCs) can be found in venous blood. These circulating tumor cells are part of the metastatic cascade. Clinical studies have shown that these cells can be used to predict treatment response and their presence is strongly associated with poor survival prospects. Enumeration and characterization of CTCs is important as this can help clinicians make more informed decisions when choosing or evaluating treatment. CTC counts are being included in an increasing number of studies and thus are becoming a bigger part of disease diagnosis and therapy management. We present an overview of the most prominent CTC enumeration and characterization methods and discuss the assumptions made about the CTC phenotype. Extensive CTC characterization of for example the DNA, RNA and antigen expression may lead to more understanding of the metastatic process. PMID:27683421

  17. Metastasis and Circulating Tumor Cells

    PubMed Central

    van Dalum, Guus; Holland, Linda

    2012-01-01

    Cancer is a prominent cause of death worldwide. In most cases, it is not the primary tumor which causes death, but the metastases. Metastatic tumors are spread over the entire human body and are more difficult to remove or treat than the primary tumor. In a patient with metastatic disease, circulating tumor cells (CTCs) can be found in venous blood. These circulating tumor cells are part of the metastatic cascade. Clinical studies have shown that these cells can be used to predict treatment response and their presence is strongly associated with poor survival prospects. Enumeration and characterization of CTCs is important as this can help clinicians make more informed decisions when choosing or evaluating treatment. CTC counts are being included in an increasing number of studies and thus are becoming a bigger part of disease diagnosis and therapy management. We present an overview of the most prominent CTC enumeration and characterization methods and discuss the assumptions made about the CTC phenotype. Extensive CTC characterization of for example the DNA, RNA and antigen expression may lead to more understanding of the metastatic process.

  18. Expansion of CD11b(+)Ly6G (+)Ly6C (int) cells driven by medroxyprogesterone acetate in mice bearing breast tumors restrains NK cell effector functions.

    PubMed

    Spallanzani, Raúl Germán; Dalotto-Moreno, Tomás; Raffo Iraolagoitia, Ximena Lucía; Ziblat, Andrea; Domaica, Carolina Inés; Avila, Damián Ezequiel; Rossi, Lucas Ezequiel; Fuertes, Mercedes Beatriz; Battistone, María Agustina; Rabinovich, Gabriel Adrián; Salatino, Mariana; Zwirner, Norberto Walter

    2013-12-01

    The progesterone analog medroxyprogesterone acetate (MPA) is widely used as a hormone replacement therapy in postmenopausal women and as contraceptive. However, prolonged administration of MPA is associated with increased incidence of breast cancer through ill-defined mechanisms. Here, we explored whether exposure to MPA during mammary tumor growth affects myeloid-derived suppressor cells (MDSCs; CD11b(+)Gr-1(+), mostly CD11b(+)Ly6G(+)Ly6C(int) and CD11b(+)Ly6G(-)Ly6C(high) cells) and natural killer (NK) cells, potentially restraining tumor immunosurveillance. We used the highly metastatic 4T1 breast tumor (which does not express the classical progesterone receptor and expands MDSCs) to challenge BALB/c mice in the absence or in the presence of MPA. We observed that MPA promoted the accumulation of NK cells in spleens of tumor-bearing mice, but with reduced degranulation ability and in vivo cytotoxic activity. Simultaneously, MPA induced a preferential expansion of CD11b(+)Ly6G(+)Ly6C(int) cells in spleen and bone marrow of 4T1 tumor-bearing mice. In vitro, MPA promoted nuclear mobilization of the glucocorticoid receptor (GR) in 4T1 cells and endowed these cells with the ability to promote a preferential differentiation of bone marrow cells into CD11b(+)Ly6G(+)Ly6C(int) cells that displayed suppressive activity on NK cell degranulation. Sorted CD11b(+)Gr-1(+) cells from MPA-treated tumor-bearing mice exhibited higher suppressive activity on NK cell degranulation than CD11b(+)Gr-1(+) cells from vehicle-treated tumor-bearing mice. Thus, MPA, acting through the GR, endows tumor cells with an enhanced capacity to expand CD11b(+)Ly6G(+)Ly6C(int) cells that subsequently display a stronger suppression of NK cell-mediated anti-tumor immunity. Our results describe an alternative mechanism by which MPA may affect immunosurveillance and have potential implication in breast cancer incidence. PMID:24114144

  19. Role of mast cells in tumor growth.

    PubMed

    Conti, Pio; Castellani, Maria L; Kempuraj, Durasamy; Salini, Vincenzo; Vecchiet, Jacopo; Tetè, Stefano; Mastrangelo, Filiberto; Perrella, Alessandro; De Lutiis, Maria Anna; Tagen, Michael; Theoharides, Theoharis C

    2007-01-01

    The growth of malignant tumors is determined in large part by the proliferative capacity of the tumor cells. Clinical observations and animal experiments have established that tumor cells elicit immune responses. Histopathologic studies show that many tumors are surrounded by mononuclear cell and mast cell infiltrates. Mast cells are ubiquitous in the body and are critical for allergic reactions. Increasing evidence indicates that mast cells secrete proinflammatory cytokines and are involved in neuro-inflammatory processes and cancer. Mast cells accumulate in the stroma surrounding certain tumors, especially mammary adenocarcinoma, and the molecules they secrete can benefit the tumor. However, mast cells can also increase at the site of tumor growth and participate in tumor rejection. Mast cells may be recruited by tumor-derived chemoattractants and selectively secrete molecules such as growth factors, histamine, heparin, VEGF, and IL-8, as well as proteases that permit the formation of new blood vessels and metastases. Tumor mast cell intersections play regulatory and modulatory roles affecting various aspects of tumor growth. Discovery of these new roles of mast cells further complicates the understanding of tumor growth. This review focuses on the strategic importance of mast cells to the progression of tumors, and proposes a revised immune effector mechanism of mast cell involvement in tumor growth. PMID:18000287

  20. Interaction of MSC with tumor cells.

    PubMed

    Melzer, Catharina; Yang, Yuanyuan; Hass, Ralf

    2016-01-01

    Tumor development and tumor progression is not only determined by the corresponding tumor cells but also by the tumor microenvironment. This includes an orchestrated network of interacting cell types (e.g. immune cells, endothelial cells, fibroblasts, and mesenchymal stroma/stem cells (MSC)) via the extracellular matrix and soluble factors such as cytokines, chemokines, growth factors and various metabolites. Cell populations of the tumor microenvironment can interact directly and indirectly with cancer cells by mutually altering properties and functions of the involved partners. Particularly, mesenchymal stroma/stem cells (MSC) play an important role during carcinogenesis exhibiting different types of intercellular communication. Accordingly, this work focusses on diverse mechanisms of interaction between MSC and cancer cells. Moreover, some functional changes and consequences for both cell types are summarized which can eventually result in the establishment of a carcinoma stem cell niche (CSCN) or the generation of new tumor cell populations by MSC-tumor cell fusion. PMID:27608835

  1. Palifosfamide in Treating Patients With Recurrent Germ Cell Tumors

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2015-06-11

    Adult Central Nervous System Germ Cell Tumor; Adult Teratoma; Malignant Extragonadal Germ Cell Tumor; Malignant Extragonadal Non-Seminomatous Germ Cell Tumor; Extragonadal Seminoma; Recurrent Malignant Testicular Germ Cell Tumor; Recurrent Ovarian Germ Cell Tumor; Stage IV Extragonadal Non-Seminomatous Germ Cell Tumor; Stage IV Extragonadal Seminoma; Stage IV Ovarian Germ Cell Tumor

  2. Near-Infrared Imaging of Adoptive Immune Cell Therapy in Breast Cancer Model Using Cell Membrane Labeling

    PubMed Central

    Youniss, Fatma M.; Sundaresan, Gobalakrishnan; Graham, Laura J.; Wang, Li; Berry, Collin R.; Dewkar, Gajanan K.; Jose, Purnima; Bear, Harry D.; Zweit, Jamal

    2014-01-01

    The overall objective of this study is to non-invasively image and assess tumor targeting and retention of directly labeled T-lymphocytes following their adoptive transfer in mice. T-lymphocytes obtained from draining lymph nodes of 4T1 (murine breast cancer cell) sensitized BALB/C mice were activated in-vitro with Bryostatin/Ionomycin for 18 hours, and were grown in the presence of Interleukin-2 for 6 days. T-lymphocytes were then directly labeled with 1,1-dioctadecyltetramethyl indotricarbocyanine Iodide (DiR), a lipophilic near infrared fluorescent dye that labels the cell membrane. Assays for viability, proliferation, and function of labeled T-lymphocytes showed that they were unaffected by DiR labeling. The DiR labeled cells were injected via tail vein in mice bearing 4T1 tumors in the flank. In some cases labeled 4T1 specific T-lymphocytes were injected a week before 4T1 tumor cell implantation. Multi-spectral in vivo fluorescence imaging was done to subtract the autofluorescence and isolate the near infrared signal carried by the T-lymphocytes. In recipient mice with established 4T1 tumors, labeled 4T1 specific T-lymphocytes showed marked tumor retention, which peaked 6 days post infusion and persisted at the tumor site for up to 3 weeks. When 4T1 tumor cells were implanted 1-week post-infusion of labeled T-lymphocytes, T-lymphocytes responded to the immunologic challenge and accumulated at the site of 4T1 cell implantation within two hours and the signal persisted for 2 more weeks. Tumor accumulation of labeled 4T1 specific T-lymphocytes was absent in mice bearing Meth A sarcoma tumors. When lysate of 4T1 specific labeled T-lymphocytes was injected into 4T1 tumor bearing mice the near infrared signal was not detected at the tumor site. In conclusion, our validated results confirm that the near infrared signal detected at the tumor site represents the DiR labeled 4T1 specific viable T-lymphocytes and their response to immunologic challenge can be imaged in

  3. General Information about Extragonadal Germ Cell Tumors

    MedlinePlus

    ... Germ Cell Tumors Treatment (PDQ®)–Patient Version General Information About Extragonadal Germ Cell Tumors Go to Health ... the PDQ Adult Treatment Editorial Board . Clinical Trial Information A clinical trial is a study to answer ...

  4. General Information about Ovarian Germ Cell Tumors

    MedlinePlus

    ... Germ Cell Tumors Treatment (PDQ®)–Patient Version General Information About Ovarian Germ Cell Tumors Go to Health ... the PDQ Adult Treatment Editorial Board . Clinical Trial Information A clinical trial is a study to answer ...

  5. Patient-Derived Antibody Targets Tumor Cells

    Cancer.gov

    An NCI Cancer Currents blog on an antibody derived from patients that killed tumor cells in cell lines of several cancer types and slowed tumor growth in mouse models of brain and lung cancer without evidence of side effects.

  6. Dendritic cells are stressed out in tumor.

    PubMed

    Maj, Tomasz; Zou, Weiping

    2015-09-01

    A recently paper published in Cell reports that dendritic cells (DCs) are dysfunctional in the tumor environment. Tumor impairs DC function through induction of endoplasmic reticulum stress response and subsequent disruption of lipid metabolic homeostasis.

  7. Adjuvant Cationic Liposomes Presenting MPL and IL-12 Induce Cell Death, Suppress Tumor Growth, and Alter the Cellular Phenotype of Tumors in a Murine Model of Breast Cancer

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Dendritic cells (DC) process and present antigens to T lymphocytes, inducing potent immune responses when encountered in association with activating signals, such as pathogen-associated molecular patterns. Using the 4T1 murine model of breast cancer, cationic liposomes containing monophosphoryl lipid A (MPL) and interleukin (IL)-12 were administered by intratumoral injection. Combination multivalent presentation of the Toll-like receptor-4 ligand MPL and cytotoxic 1,2-dioleoyl-3-trmethylammonium-propane lipids induced cell death, decreased cellular proliferation, and increased serum levels of IL-1β and tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-α. The addition of recombinant IL-12 further suppressed tumor growth and increased expression of IL-1β, TNF-α, and interferon-γ. IL-12 also increased the percentage of cytolytic T cells, DC, and F4/80+ macrophages in the tumor. While single agent therapy elevated levels of nitric oxide synthase 3-fold above basal levels in the tumor, combination therapy with MPL cationic liposomes and IL-12 stimulated a 7-fold increase, supporting the observed cell cycle arrest (loss of Ki-67 expression) and apoptosis (TUNEL positive). In mice bearing dual tumors, the growth of distal, untreated tumors mirrored that of liposome-treated tumors, supporting the presence of a systemic immune response. PMID:25179345

  8. Glucose-conjugated chitosan nanoparticles for targeted drug delivery and their specific interaction with tumor cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Jing; Ma, Fang-Kui; Dang, Qi-Feng; Liang, Xing-Guo; Chen, Xi-Guang

    2014-12-01

    A novel targeted drug delivery system, glucose-conjugated chitosan nanoparticles (GCNPs), was developed for specific recognition and interaction with glucose transporters (Gluts) over-expressed by tumor cells. GC was synthesized by using succinic acid as a linker between glucosamine and chitosan (CS), and successful synthesis was confirmed by NMR and elemental analysis. GCNPs were prepared by ionic crosslinking method, and characterized in terms of morphology, size, and zeta potential. The optimally prepared nanoparticles showed spherical shapes with an average particle size of (187.9 ± 3.8) nm and a zeta potential of (- 15.43 ± 0.31) mV. The GCNPs showed negligible cytotoxicity to mouse embryo fibroblast and 4T1 cells. Doxorubicin (DOX) could be efficiently entrapped into GCNPs, with a loading capacity and encapsulation efficiency of 20.11% and 64.81%, respectively. DOX-loaded nanoparticles exhibited sustained-release behavior in phosphate buffered saline (pH 7.4). In vitro cellular uptake studies showed that the GCNPs had better endocytosis ability than CSNPs, and the antitumor activity of DOX/GCNPs was 4-5 times effectiveness in 4T1 cell killing than that of DOX/CSNPs. All the results demonstrate that nanoparticles decorated with glucose have specific interactions with cancer cells via the recognition between glucose and Gluts. Therefore, Gluts-targeted GCNPs may be promising delivery agents in cancer therapies.

  9. Metabolic Imaging: A link between Lactate Dehydrogenase A, Lactate and Tumor Phenotype

    PubMed Central

    Thakur, Sunitha B.; Vider, Jelena; Russell, James; Blasberg, Ronald; Koutcher, Jason A.

    2014-01-01

    Purpose We compared the metabolic profiles and the association between LDH-A expression and lactate production in two isogenic murine breast cancer cell lines and tumors (67NR and 4T1). These cell lines were derived from a single mammary tumor and have different growth and metabolic phenotypes. Experimental Design LDH-A expression, lactate concentration, glucose utilization and oxygen consumption were measured in cells, and the potential relationship between tumor lactate levels (measured by magnetic resonance spectroscopic imaging (MRSI)) and tumor glucose utilization (measured by [18F] 2-deoxy-2-fluoro-D-glucose positron emission tomography ([18F]FDG-PET)) was assessed in orthotopic breast tumors derived from these cell lines. Results We show a substantial difference in LDH-A expression between 67NR and 4T1 cells under normoxia and hypoxia. We also show that small orthotopic 4T1 tumors generate tenfold more lactate than corresponding 67NR tumors. The high lactate levels in small primary 4T1 tumors are associated with intense pimonidazole staining (a hypoxia indicator). Less intense hypoxia staining was observed in the larger 67NR tumors, and is consistent with the gradual increase and plateau of lactate concentration in enlarging 67NR tumors. Conclusions Lactate-MRSI has a greater dynamic range than [18F]FDG-PET and may be a more sensitive measure with which to evaluate the aggressive and metastatic potential of primary breast tumors. PMID:21844011

  10. Ranitidine modifies myeloid cell populations and inhibits breast tumor development and spread in mice.

    PubMed

    Vila-Leahey, Ava; Oldford, Sharon A; Marignani, Paola A; Wang, Jun; Haidl, Ian D; Marshall, Jean S

    2016-07-01

    Histamine receptor 2 (H2) antagonists are widely used clinically for the control of gastrointestinal symptoms, but also impact immune function. They have been reported to reduce tumor growth in established colon and lung cancer models. Histamine has also been reported to modify populations of myeloid-derived suppressor cells (MDSCs). We have examined the impact of the widely used H2 antagonist ranitidine, on both myeloid cell populations and tumor development and spread, in three distinct models of breast cancer that highlight different stages of cancer progression. Oral ranitidine treatment significantly decreased the monocytic MDSC population in the spleen and bone marrow both alone and in the context of an orthotopic breast tumor model. H2 antagonists ranitidine and famotidine, but not H1 or H4 antagonists, significantly inhibited lung metastasis in the 4T1 model. In the E0771 model, ranitidine decreased primary tumor growth while omeprazole treatment had no impact on tumor development. Gemcitabine treatment prevented the tumor growth inhibition associated with ranitidine treatment. In keeping with ranitidine-induced changes in myeloid cell populations in non-tumor-bearing mice, ranitidine also delayed the onset of spontaneous tumor development, and decreased the number of tumors that developed in LKB1(-/-)/NIC mice. These results indicate that ranitidine alters monocyte populations associated with MDSC activity, and subsequently impacts breast tumor development and outcome. Ranitidine has potential as an adjuvant therapy or preventative agent in breast cancer and provides a novel and safe approach to the long-term reduction of tumor-associated immune suppression. PMID:27622015

  11. Ranitidine modifies myeloid cell populations and inhibits breast tumor development and spread in mice

    PubMed Central

    Vila-Leahey, Ava; Oldford, Sharon A.; Marignani, Paola A.; Wang, Jun; Haidl, Ian D.; Marshall, Jean S.

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Histamine receptor 2 (H2) antagonists are widely used clinically for the control of gastrointestinal symptoms, but also impact immune function. They have been reported to reduce tumor growth in established colon and lung cancer models. Histamine has also been reported to modify populations of myeloid-derived suppressor cells (MDSCs). We have examined the impact of the widely used H2 antagonist ranitidine, on both myeloid cell populations and tumor development and spread, in three distinct models of breast cancer that highlight different stages of cancer progression. Oral ranitidine treatment significantly decreased the monocytic MDSC population in the spleen and bone marrow both alone and in the context of an orthotopic breast tumor model. H2 antagonists ranitidine and famotidine, but not H1 or H4 antagonists, significantly inhibited lung metastasis in the 4T1 model. In the E0771 model, ranitidine decreased primary tumor growth while omeprazole treatment had no impact on tumor development. Gemcitabine treatment prevented the tumor growth inhibition associated with ranitidine treatment. In keeping with ranitidine-induced changes in myeloid cell populations in non-tumor-bearing mice, ranitidine also delayed the onset of spontaneous tumor development, and decreased the number of tumors that developed in LKB1−/−/NIC mice. These results indicate that ranitidine alters monocyte populations associated with MDSC activity, and subsequently impacts breast tumor development and outcome. Ranitidine has potential as an adjuvant therapy or preventative agent in breast cancer and provides a novel and safe approach to the long-term reduction of tumor-associated immune suppression. PMID:27622015

  12. Ranitidine modifies myeloid cell populations and inhibits breast tumor development and spread in mice

    PubMed Central

    Vila-Leahey, Ava; Oldford, Sharon A.; Marignani, Paola A.; Wang, Jun; Haidl, Ian D.; Marshall, Jean S.

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Histamine receptor 2 (H2) antagonists are widely used clinically for the control of gastrointestinal symptoms, but also impact immune function. They have been reported to reduce tumor growth in established colon and lung cancer models. Histamine has also been reported to modify populations of myeloid-derived suppressor cells (MDSCs). We have examined the impact of the widely used H2 antagonist ranitidine, on both myeloid cell populations and tumor development and spread, in three distinct models of breast cancer that highlight different stages of cancer progression. Oral ranitidine treatment significantly decreased the monocytic MDSC population in the spleen and bone marrow both alone and in the context of an orthotopic breast tumor model. H2 antagonists ranitidine and famotidine, but not H1 or H4 antagonists, significantly inhibited lung metastasis in the 4T1 model. In the E0771 model, ranitidine decreased primary tumor growth while omeprazole treatment had no impact on tumor development. Gemcitabine treatment prevented the tumor growth inhibition associated with ranitidine treatment. In keeping with ranitidine-induced changes in myeloid cell populations in non-tumor-bearing mice, ranitidine also delayed the onset of spontaneous tumor development, and decreased the number of tumors that developed in LKB1−/−/NIC mice. These results indicate that ranitidine alters monocyte populations associated with MDSC activity, and subsequently impacts breast tumor development and outcome. Ranitidine has potential as an adjuvant therapy or preventative agent in breast cancer and provides a novel and safe approach to the long-term reduction of tumor-associated immune suppression.

  13. Treatment Option Overview (Extragonadal Germ Cell Tumors)

    MedlinePlus

    ... hCG and LDH may be at any level. Poor prognosis A nonseminoma extragonadal germ cell tumor is in the poor prognosis group if: the tumor is in the ... extragonadal germ cell tumor does not have a poor prognosis group. Treatment Option Overview Key Points There ...

  14. Emodin Inhibits Breast Cancer Growth by Blocking the Tumor-Promoting Feedforward Loop between Cancer Cells and Macrophages.

    PubMed

    Iwanowycz, Stephen; Wang, Junfeng; Hodge, Johnie; Wang, Yuzhen; Yu, Fang; Fan, Daping

    2016-08-01

    Macrophage infiltration correlates with severity in many types of cancer. Tumor cells recruit macrophages and educate them to adopt an M2-like phenotype through the secretion of chemokines and growth factors, such as MCP1 and CSF1. Macrophages in turn promote tumor growth through supporting angiogenesis, suppressing antitumor immunity, modulating extracellular matrix remodeling, and promoting tumor cell migration. Thus, tumor cells and macrophages interact to create a feedforward loop supporting tumor growth and metastasis. In this study, we tested the ability of emodin, a Chinese herb-derived compound, to inhibit breast cancer growth in mice and examined the underlying mechanisms. Emodin was used to treat mice bearing EO771 or 4T1 breast tumors. It was shown that emodin attenuated tumor growth by inhibiting macrophage infiltration and M2-like polarization, accompanied by increased T-cell activation and reduced angiogenesis in tumors. The tumor inhibitory effects of emodin were lost in tumor-bearing mice with macrophage depletion. Emodin inhibited IRF4, STAT6, and C/EBPβ signaling and increased inhibitory histone H3 lysine 27 tri-methylation (H3K27m3) on the promoters of M2-related genes in tumor-associated macrophages. In addition, emodin inhibited tumor cell secretion of MCP1 and CSF1, as well as expression of surface anchoring molecule Thy-1, thus suppressing macrophage migration toward and adhesion to tumor cells. These results suggest that emodin acts on both breast cancer cells and macrophages and effectively blocks the tumor-promoting feedforward loop between the two cell types, thereby inhibiting breast cancer growth and metastasis. Mol Cancer Ther; 15(8); 1931-42. ©2016 AACR. PMID:27196773

  15. Essential roles of the interaction between cancer cell-derived chemokine, CCL4, and intra-bone CCR5-expressing fibroblasts in breast cancer bone metastasis.

    PubMed

    Sasaki, Soichiro; Baba, Tomohisa; Nishimura, Tatsunori; Hayakawa, Yoshihiro; Hashimoto, Shin-Ichi; Gotoh, Noriko; Mukaida, Naofumi

    2016-08-01

    From a murine breast cancer cell line, 4T1, we established a subclone, 4T1.3, which consistently metastasizes to bone upon its injection into the mammary fat pad. 4T1.3 clone exhibited similar proliferation rate and migration capacity as the parental clone. However, the intra-bone injection of 4T1.3 clone caused larger tumors than that of the parental cells, accompanied with increases in fibroblast, but not osteoclast or osteoblast numbers. 4T1.3 clone displayed an enhanced expression of a chemokine, CCL4, but not its specific receptor, CCR5. CCL4 shRNA-transfection of 4T1.3 clone had few effects on its in vitro properties, but reduced the tumorigenicity arising from the intra-bone injection. Moreover, intra-bone injection of 4T1.3 clone caused smaller tumors in mice deficient in CCR5 or those receiving CCR5 antagonist than in wild-type mice. The reduced tumor formation was associated with attenuated accumulation of CCR5-positive fibroblasts expressing connective tissue growth factor (CTGF)/CCN2. Tumor cell-derived CCL4 could induce fibroblasts to express CTGF/CCN2, which could support 4T1.3 clone proliferation under hypoxic culture conditions. Thus, the CCL4-CCR5 axis can contribute to breast cancer metastasis to bone by mediating the interaction between cancer cells and fibroblasts in bone cavity.

  16. Interaction of tumor cells with the microenvironment

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Recent advances in tumor biology have revealed that a detailed analysis of the complex interactions of tumor cells with their adjacent microenvironment (tumor stroma) is mandatory in order to understand the various mechanisms involved in tumor growth and the development of metastasis. The mutual interactions between tumor cells and cellular and non-cellular components (extracellular matrix = ECM) of the tumor microenvironment will eventually lead to a loss of tissue homeostasis and promote tumor development and progression. Thus, interactions of genetically altered tumor cells and the ECM on the one hand and reactive non-neoplastic cells on the other hand essentially control most aspects of tumorigenesis such as epithelial-mesenchymal-transition (EMT), migration, invasion (i.e. migration through connective tissue), metastasis formation, neovascularisation, apoptosis and chemotherapeutic drug resistance. In this mini-review we will focus on these issues that were recently raised by two review articles in CCS. PMID:21914164

  17. Enhanced Anti-Tumor Efficacy through a Combination of Integrin αvβ6-Targeted Photodynamic Therapy and Immune Checkpoint Inhibition

    PubMed Central

    Gao, Liquan; Zhang, Chenran; Gao, Duo; Liu, Hao; Yu, Xinhe; Lai, Jianhao; Wang, Fan; Lin, Jian; Liu, Zhaofei

    2016-01-01

    “Training” the host immune system to recognize and systemically eliminate residual tumor lesions and micrometastases is a promising strategy for cancer therapy. In this study, we investigated whether integrin αvβ6-targeted photodynamic therapy (PDT) of tumors using a phthalocyanine dye-labeled probe (termed DSAB-HK) could trigger the host immune response, and whether PDT in combination with anti-PD-1 immune checkpoint inhibition could be used for the effective therapy of primary tumors and metastases. By near-infrared fluorescence imaging, DSAB-HK was demonstrated to specifically target either subcutaneous tumors in a 4T1 mouse breast cancer model or firefly luciferase stably transfected 4T1 (4T1-fLuc) lung metastatic tumors. Upon light irradiation, PDT by DSAB-HK significantly inhibited the growth of subcutaneous 4T1 tumors, and in addition promoted the maturation of dendritic cells and their production of cytokines, which subsequently stimulated the tumor recruitment of CD8+ cytotoxic T lymphocytes. Furthermore, DSAB-HK PDT of the first tumor followed by PD-1 blockade markedly suppressed the growth of a second subcutaneous tumor, and also slowed the growth of 4T1-fLuc lung metastasis as demonstrated by serial bioluminescence imaging. Together, our results demonstrated the synergistic effect of tumor-targeted PDT and immune checkpoint inhibition for improving anti-tumor immunity and suppressing tumor growth/metastasis. PMID:27022411

  18. Enhanced Anti-Tumor Efficacy through a Combination of Integrin αvβ6-Targeted Photodynamic Therapy and Immune Checkpoint Inhibition.

    PubMed

    Gao, Liquan; Zhang, Chenran; Gao, Duo; Liu, Hao; Yu, Xinhe; Lai, Jianhao; Wang, Fan; Lin, Jian; Liu, Zhaofei

    2016-01-01

    "Training" the host immune system to recognize and systemically eliminate residual tumor lesions and micrometastases is a promising strategy for cancer therapy. In this study, we investigated whether integrin αvβ6-targeted photodynamic therapy (PDT) of tumors using a phthalocyanine dye-labeled probe (termed DSAB-HK) could trigger the host immune response, and whether PDT in combination with anti-PD-1 immune checkpoint inhibition could be used for the effective therapy of primary tumors and metastases. By near-infrared fluorescence imaging, DSAB-HK was demonstrated to specifically target either subcutaneous tumors in a 4T1 mouse breast cancer model or firefly luciferase stably transfected 4T1 (4T1-fLuc) lung metastatic tumors. Upon light irradiation, PDT by DSAB-HK significantly inhibited the growth of subcutaneous 4T1 tumors, and in addition promoted the maturation of dendritic cells and their production of cytokines, which subsequently stimulated the tumor recruitment of CD8(+) cytotoxic T lymphocytes. Furthermore, DSAB-HK PDT of the first tumor followed by PD-1 blockade markedly suppressed the growth of a second subcutaneous tumor, and also slowed the growth of 4T1-fLuc lung metastasis as demonstrated by serial bioluminescence imaging. Together, our results demonstrated the synergistic effect of tumor-targeted PDT and immune checkpoint inhibition for improving anti-tumor immunity and suppressing tumor growth/metastasis. PMID:27022411

  19. Autophagy sensitivity of neuroendocrine lung tumor cells.

    PubMed

    Hong, Seung-Keun; Kim, Jin-Hwan; Starenki, Dmytro; Park, Jong-In

    2013-12-01

    Neuroendocrine (NE) phenotypes characterize a spectrum of lung tumors, including low-grade typical and intermediate-grade atypical carcinoid, high-grade large-cell NE carcinoma and small cell lung carcinoma. Currently, no effective treatments are available to cure NE lung tumors, demanding identification of biological features specific to these tumors. Here, we report that autophagy has an important role for NE lung tumor cell proliferation and survival. We found that the expression levels of the autophagy marker LC3 are relatively high in a panel of lung tumor cell lines expressing high levels of neuron-specific enolase (NSE), a key NE marker in lung tumors. In response to bafilomycin A1 and chloroquine, NE lung tumor cells exhibited cytotoxicity whereas non-NE lung tumor cells exhibited cytostasis, indicating a distinct role of autophagy for NE lung tumor cell survival. Intriguingly, in certain NE lung tumor cell lines, the levels of processed LC3 (LC3-II) were inversely correlated with AKT activity. When AKT activity was inhibited using AKTi or MK2206, the levels of LC3-II and SQSTM1/p62 were increased. In contrast, torin 1, rapamycin or mTOR knockdown increased p62 levels, suggesting that these two pathways have opposing effects on autophagy in certain NE lung tumors. Moreover, inhibition of one pathway resulted in reduced activity of the other, suggesting that these two pathways crosstalk in the tumors. These results suggest that NE lung tumor cells share a common feature of autophagy and are more sensitive to autophagy inhibition than non-NE lung tumor cells. PMID:24126619

  20. Drug Release Kinetics, Cell Uptake, and Tumor Toxicity of Hybrid VVVVVVKK Peptide-Assembled Polylactide Nanoparticles

    PubMed Central

    Jabbari, Esmaiel; Yang, Xiaoming; Moeinzadeh, Seyedsina; He, Xuezhong

    2013-01-01

    An exciting approach to tumor delivery is encapsulation of the drug in self-assembled polymer-peptide nanoparticles. The objective of this work was to synthesize a conjugate of low molecular weight polylactide (LMW PLA) and V6K2 peptide, and investigate self-assembly, drug release kinetics, cell uptake and toxicity, drug pharmacokinetics, and tumor cell invasion with Doxorubicin (DOX) or paclitaxel (PTX). The results for PLA-V6K2 self-assembled NPs were compared with those of polyethylene glycol stabilized PLA (PLA-EG) NPs. The size of PLA-V6K2 and PLA-EG NPs were 100±20 and 130±50 nm, respectively, with polydispersity index of 1.04 and 1.14. The encapsulation efficiency of DOX in PLA-V6K2 and PLA-EG NPs was 44±9% and 55±5%, respectively, and that of PTX was >90 for both NP types. The release of DOX and PTX from PLA-V6K2 was slower than that of PLA-EG and the release rate was relatively constant with time. Based on molecular dynamic simulation, the less hydrophobic DOX was distributed in the lactide core as well as the peptide shell while the hydrophobic PTX was localized mainly to the lactide core. PLA-V6K2 NPs had significantly higher cell uptake by 4T1 mouse breast carcinoma cells compared to PLA-EG NPs, which was attributed to the electrostatic interactions between the peptide and negatively charged moieties on the cell membrane. PLA-V6K2 NPs showed no toxicity to marrow stromal cells. DOX loaded PLA-V6K2 NPs showed higher toxicity to 4T1 cells and the DNA damage response and apoptosis was delayed compared to the free DOX. DOX or PTX encapsulated in PLA-V6K2 NPs significantly reduced invasion of 4T1 cells compared to those cells treated with the drug in PLA-EG NPs. Invasion of 4T1 cells treated with DOX in PLA-V6K2 and PLA-EG NPs was 5±1% and 30±5%, respectively, and that of PTX was 11±2% and 40±7%. The AUC of DOX in PLA-V6K2 NPs was 67% and 21% higher than those of free DOX and PLA-EG NPs, respectively. DOX loaded PLA-V6K2 NPs injected in C3He

  1. Tumor initiating cells in malignant gliomas

    PubMed Central

    Hadjipanayis, Costas G.; Van Meir, Erwin G.

    2009-01-01

    A rare subpopulation of cells within malignant gliomas, which shares canonical properties with neural stem cells (NSCs), may be integral to glial tumor development and perpetuation. These cells, also known as tumor initiating cells (TICs), have the ability to self-renew, develop into any cell in the overall tumor population (multipotency), and proliferate. A defining property of TICs is their ability to initiate new tumors in immunocompromised mice with high efficiency. Mounting evidence suggests that TICs originate from the transformation of NSCs and their progenitors. New findings show that TICs may be more resistant to chemotherapy and radiation than the bulk of tumor cells, thereby permitting recurrent tumor formation and accounting for the failure of conventional therapies. The development of new therapeutic strategies selectively targeting TICs while sparing NSCs may provide for more effective treatment of malignant gliomas. PMID:19189072

  2. Hypoxic Tumor Microenvironment and Cancer Cell Differentiation

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Yuri; Lin, Qun; Glazer, Peter M.; Yun, Zhong

    2010-01-01

    Hypoxia or oxygen deficiency is a salient feature of solid tumors. Hypoxic tumors are often resistant to conventional cancer therapies, and tumor hypoxia correlates with advanced stages of malignancy. Hypoxic tumors appear to be poorly differentiated. Increasing evidence suggests that hypoxia has the potential to inhibit tumor cell differentiation and thus plays a direct role in the maintenance of cancer stem cells. Studies have also shown that hypoxia blocks differentiation of mesenchymal stem/progenitor cells, a potential source of tumor-associated stromal cells. It is therefore likely that hypoxia may have a profound impact on the evolution of the tumor stromal microenvironment. These observations have led to the emergence of a novel paradigm for a role of hypoxia in facilitating tumor progression. Hypoxia may help create a microenvironment enriched in poorly differentiated tumor cells and undifferentiated stromal cells. Such an undifferentiated hypoxic microenvironment may provide essential cellular interactions and environmental signals for the preferential maintenance of cancer stem cells. This hypothesis suggests that effectively targeting hypoxic cancer stem cells is a key to successful tumor control. PMID:19519400

  3. Evolution of cooperation among tumor cells.

    PubMed

    Axelrod, Robert; Axelrod, David E; Pienta, Kenneth J

    2006-09-01

    The evolution of cooperation has a well established theoretical framework based on game theory. This approach has made valuable contributions to a wide variety of disciplines, including political science, economics, and evolutionary biology. Existing cancer theory suggests that individual clones of cancer cells evolve independently from one another, acquiring all of the genetic traits or hallmarks necessary to form a malignant tumor. It is also now recognized that tumors are heterotypic, with cancer cells interacting with normal stromal cells within the tissue microenvironment, including endothelial, stromal, and nerve cells. This tumor cell-stromal cell interaction in itself is a form of commensalism, because it has been demonstrated that these nonmalignant cells support and even enable tumor growth. Here, we add to this theory by regarding tumor cells as game players whose interactions help to determine their Darwinian fitness. We marshal evidence that tumor cells overcome certain host defenses by means of diffusible products. Our original contribution is to raise the possibility that two nearby cells can protect each other from a set of host defenses that neither could survive alone. Cooperation can evolve as by-product mutualism among genetically diverse tumor cells. Our hypothesis supplements, but does not supplant, the traditional view of carcinogenesis in which one clonal population of cells develops all of the necessary genetic traits independently to form a tumor. Cooperation through the sharing of diffusible products raises new questions about tumorigenesis and has implications for understanding observed phenomena, designing new experiments, and developing new therapeutic approaches.

  4. Therapeutic Trial for Patients With Ewing Sarcoma Family of Tumor and Desmoplastic Small Round Cell Tumors

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2015-12-01

    Desmoplastic Small Round Cell Tumor; Ewing Sarcoma of Bone or Soft Tissue; Localized Ewing Sarcoma/Peripheral Primitive Neuroectodermal Tumor; Metastatic Ewing Sarcoma/Peripheral Primitive Neuroectodermal Tumor

  5. FNA of thyroid granular cell tumor.

    PubMed

    Harp, Eric; Caraway, Nancy P

    2013-09-01

    Granular cell tumor rarely occurs in the thyroid. This case report describes the cytologic features of a granular cell tumor seen in a fine needle aspirate obtained from a 27-year-old woman with a gradually enlarging thyroid nodule. The aspirate showed single as well as syncytial clusters of cells with abundant granular cytoplasm. The differential diagnosis in this case included granular cell tumor, Hurthle cell lesion/neoplasm, and a histiocytic reparative process. Immunohistochemical studies, including S-100 protein and CD68, performed on a cell block preparation were helpful in supporting the diagnosis.

  6. Altered Tumor-Cell Glycosylation Promotes Metastasis

    PubMed Central

    Häuselmann, Irina; Borsig, Lubor

    2014-01-01

    Malignant transformation of cells is associated with aberrant glycosylation presented on the cell-surface. Commonly observed changes in glycan structures during malignancy encompass aberrant expression and glycosylation of mucins; abnormal branching of N-glycans; and increased presence of sialic acid on proteins and glycolipids. Accumulating evidence supports the notion that the presence of certain glycan structures correlates with cancer progression by affecting tumor-cell invasiveness, ability to disseminate through the blood circulation and to metastasize in distant organs. During metastasis tumor-cell-derived glycans enable binding to cells in their microenvironment including endothelium and blood constituents through glycan-binding receptors – lectins. In this review, we will discuss current concepts how tumor-cell-derived glycans contribute to metastasis with the focus on three types of lectins: siglecs, galectins, and selectins. Siglecs are present on virtually all hematopoietic cells and usually negatively regulate immune responses. Galectins are mostly expressed by tumor cells and support tumor-cell survival. Selectins are vascular adhesion receptors that promote tumor-cell dissemination. All lectins facilitate interactions within the tumor microenvironment and thereby promote cancer progression. The identification of mechanisms how tumor glycans contribute to metastasis may help to improve diagnosis, prognosis, and aid to develop clinical strategies to prevent metastasis. PMID:24592356

  7. Angiosarcoma associated with germ cell tumors

    SciTech Connect

    Ulbright, T.M.; Clark, S.A.; Einhorn, L.H.

    1985-03-01

    In two patients with malignant germ cell tumors angiosarcoma developed through two apparently different mechanisms. In one case the angiosarcoma probably developed as a complication of therapeutic radiation, since radiation changes were demonstrated in tissue adjacent to the neoplasm and since the angiosarcoma was not associated with elements of germ cell tumor. The absence of associated germ cell elements does not support the development of the angiosarcoma from a teratoma. In the second case, however, it is likely that the angiosarcoma developed as a result of malignant change within teratomatous foci, since angiosarcomatous elements were intermingled with teratomatous elements and the patient's primary germ cell tumor contained malignant and atypical teratomatous elements as well as prominent vascular proliferation. Malignant change within teratomatous components of germ cell tumors is a phenomenon of increasing importance in this era of effective chemotherapy for germ cell tumors. The development of angiosarcoma as a potential complication of testicular carcinoma has not been reported previously.

  8. Electric Field Analysis of Breast Tumor Cells

    PubMed Central

    Sree, V. Gowri; Udayakumar, K.; Sundararajan, R.

    2011-01-01

    An attractive alternative treatment for malignant tumors that are refractive to conventional therapies, such as surgery, radiation, and chemotherapy, is electrical-pulse-mediated drug delivery. Electric field distribution of tissue/tumor is important for effective treatment of tissues. This paper deals with the electric field distribution study of a tissue model using MAXWELL 3D Simulator. Our results indicate that tumor tissue had lower electric field strength compared to normal cells, which makes them susceptible to electrical-pulse-mediated drug delivery. This difference could be due to the altered properties of tumor cells compared to normal cells, and our results corroborate this. PMID:22295214

  9. Contractile forces in tumor cell migration.

    PubMed

    Mierke, Claudia Tanja; Rösel, Daniel; Fabry, Ben; Brábek, Jan

    2008-09-01

    Cancer is a deadly disease primarily because of the ability of tumor cells to spread from the primary tumor, to invade into the connective tissue, and to form metastases at distant sites. In contrast to cell migration on a planar surface where large cell tractions and contractile forces are not essential, tractions and forces are thought to be crucial for overcoming the resistance and steric hindrance of a dense three-dimensional connective tissue matrix. In this review, we describe recently developed biophysical tools, including 2-D and 3-D traction microscopy to measure contractile forces of cells. We discuss evidence indicating that tumor cell invasiveness is associated with increased contractile force generation.

  10. Imaging Circulating Tumor Cells in Freely Moving Awake Small Animals Using a Miniaturized Intravital Microscope

    PubMed Central

    Sasportas, Laura Sarah; Gambhir, Sanjiv Sam

    2014-01-01

    Metastasis, the cause for 90% of cancer mortality, is a complex and poorly understood process involving the invasion of circulating tumor cells (CTCs) into blood vessels. These cells have potential prognostic value as biomarkers for early metastatic risk. But their rarity and the lack of specificity and sensitivity in measuring them render their interrogation by current techniques very challenging. How and when these cells are circulating in the blood, on their way to potentially give rise to metastasis, is a question that remains largely unanswered. In order to provide an insight into this "black box" using non-invasive imaging, we developed a novel miniature intravital microscopy (mIVM) strategy capable of real-time long-term monitoring of CTCs in awake small animals. We established an experimental 4T1-GL mouse model of metastatic breast cancer, in which tumor cells express both fluorescent and bioluminescent reporter genes to enable both single cell and whole body tumor imaging. Using mIVM, we monitored blood vessels of different diameters in awake mice in an experimental model of metastasis. Using an in-house software algorithm we developed, we demonstrated in vivo CTC enumeration and computation of CTC trajectory and speed. These data represent the first reported use we know of for a miniature mountable intravital microscopy setup for in vivo imaging of CTCs in awake animals. PMID:24497977

  11. Immune Cells in Blood Recognize Tumors

    Cancer.gov

    NCI scientists have developed a novel strategy for identifying immune cells circulating in the blood that recognize specific proteins on tumor cells, a finding they believe may have potential implications for immune-based therapies.

  12. Circulating tumor cells in germ cell tumors: are those biomarkers of real prognostic value? A review

    PubMed Central

    CEBOTARU, CRISTINA LIGIA; OLTEANU, ELENA DIANA; ANTONE, NICOLETA ZENOVIA; BUIGA, RARES; NAGY, VIORICA

    2016-01-01

    Analysis of circulating tumor cells from patients with different types of cancer is nowadays a fascinating new tool of research and their number is proven to be useful as a prognostic factor in metastatic breast, colon and prostate cancer patients. Studies are going beyond enumeration, exploring the circulating tumor cells to better understand the mechanisms of tumorigenesis, invasion and metastasis and their value for characterization, prognosis and tailoring of treatment. Few studies investigated the prognostic significance of circulating tumor cells in germ cell tumors. In this review, we examine the possible significance of the detection of circulating tumor cells in this setting. PMID:27152069

  13. Nm23-h1 binds to gelsolin and inactivates its actin-severing capacity to promote tumor cell motility and metastasis.

    PubMed

    Marino, Natascia; Marshall, Jean-Claude; Collins, Joshua W; Zhou, Ming; Qian, Yongzhen; Veenstra, Timothy; Steeg, Patricia S

    2013-10-01

    Nm23-H1 has been identified as a metastasis suppressor gene, but its protein interactions have yet to be understood with any mechanistic clarity. In this study, we evaluated the proteomic spectrum of interactions made by Nm23-H1 in 4T1 murine breast cancer cells derived from tissue culture, primary mammary tumors, and pulmonary metastases. By this approach, we identified the actin-severing protein Gelsolin as binding partner for Nm23-H1, verifying their interaction by coimmunoprecipitation in 4T1 cells as well as in human MCF7, MDA-MB-231T, and MDA-MB-435 breast cancer cells. In Gelsolin-transfected cells, coexpression of Nm23-H1 abrogated the actin-severing activity of Gelsolin. Conversely, actin severing by Gelsolin was abrogated by RNA interference-mediated silencing of endogenous Nm23-H1. Tumor cell motility was negatively affected in parallel with Gelsolin activity, suggesting that Nm23-H1 binding inactivated the actin-depolymerizing function of Gelsolin to inhibit cell motility. Using indirect immunoflourescence to monitor complexes formed by Gelsolin and Nm23-H1 in living cells, we observed their colocalization in a perinuclear cytoplasmic compartment that was associated with the presence of disrupted actin stress fibers. In vivo analyses revealed that Gelsolin overexpression increased the metastasis of orthotopically implanted 4T1 or tail vein-injected MDA-MB-231T cells (P = 0.001 and 0.04, respectively), along with the proportion of mice with diffuse liver metastases, an effect ablated by coexpression of Nm23-H1. We observed no variation in proliferation among lung metastases. Our findings suggest a new actin-based mechanism that can suppress tumor metastasis.

  14. Pathway-specific differences between tumor cell lines and normal and tumor tissue cells

    PubMed Central

    Ertel, Adam; Verghese, Arun; Byers, Stephen W; Ochs, Michael; Tozeren, Aydin

    2006-01-01

    Background Cell lines are used in experimental investigation of cancer but their capacity to represent tumor cells has yet to be quantified. The aim of the study was to identify significant alterations in pathway usage in cell lines in comparison with normal and tumor tissue. Methods This study utilized a pathway-specific enrichment analysis of publicly accessible microarray data and quantified the gene expression differences between cell lines, tumor, and normal tissue cells for six different tissue types. KEGG pathways that are significantly different between cell lines and tumors, cell lines and normal tissues and tumor and normal tissue were identified through enrichment tests on gene lists obtained using Significance Analysis of Microarrays (SAM). Results Cellular pathways that were significantly upregulated in cell lines compared to tumor cells and normal cells of the same tissue type included ATP synthesis, cell communication, cell cycle, oxidative phosphorylation, purine, pyrimidine and pyruvate metabolism, and proteasome. Results on metabolic pathways suggested an increase in the velocity nucleotide metabolism and RNA production. Pathways that were downregulated in cell lines compared to tumor and normal tissue included cell communication, cell adhesion molecules (CAMs), and ECM-receptor interaction. Only a fraction of the significantly altered genes in tumor-to-normal comparison had similar expressions in cancer cell lines and tumor cells. These genes were tissue-specific and were distributed sparsely among multiple pathways. Conclusion Significantly altered genes in tumors compared to normal tissue were largely tissue specific. Among these genes downregulation was a major trend. In contrast, cell lines contained large sets of significantly upregulated genes that were common to multiple tissue types. Pathway upregulation in cell lines was most pronounced over metabolic pathways including cell nucleotide metabolism and oxidative phosphorylation. Signaling

  15. Imaging Tumor Cell Movement In Vivo

    PubMed Central

    Entenberg, David; Kedrin, Dmitriy; Wyckoff, Jeffrey; Sahai, Erik; Condeelis, John; Segall, Jeffrey E.

    2013-01-01

    This unit describes the methods that we have been developing for analyzing tumor cell motility in mouse and rat models of breast cancer metastasis. Rodents are commonly used both to provide a mammalian system for studying human tumor cells (as xenografts in immunocompromised mice) as well as for following the development of tumors from a specific tissue type in transgenic lines. The Basic Protocol in this unit describes the standard methods used for generation of mammary tumors and imaging them. Additional protocols for labeling macrophages, blood vessel imaging, and image analysis are also included. PMID:23456602

  16. Cell proliferation in salivary gland tumors.

    PubMed

    Skálová, A; Leivo, I

    1996-06-01

    Salivary gland tumors often pose considerable difficulty in differential diagnostic and prognostic assessment based on histomorphologic grounds alone. Histomorphology may poorly correlate with clinical outcome and the tumors within the same type in classification schedule exhibit different clinical courses. Prognostic relevance of various cell proliferation markers has been investigated in many types of human cancer, recently including salivary gland tumors. Evaluation of DNA content by flow cytometry and by cytophotometry, AgNOR technique, and immunohistochemical detection of antigens in cycling cells such as the Ki67 antigen and proliferating cell nuclear antigen (PCNA) have been applied to a variety of benign and malignant salivary gland tumors in only few studies so far. Cell proliferation, assessed with the MIB1 antibody, that recognizes the Ki67 antigen in proliferating cells, represents a significant prognostic factor for acinic cell carcinomas and mucoepidermoid carcinomas of salivary gland origin. Moreover, much lower proliferative activity as assessed with the MIB1 antibody helps to distinguish difficult cases of polymorphous low grade adenocarcinomas from adenoid cystic carcinomas and may contribute to differentiation of solid myoepithelial cell-rich pleomorphic adenomas from various malignant tumors. Thus, assessment of cell proliferation in salivary gland tumors using the MIB1 antibody and PCNA in paraffin-embedded tissue should be incorporated into routine immunohistologic evaluation of histologically difficult cases of salivary gland tumors.

  17. Targeting tumor cell motility to prevent metastasis

    PubMed Central

    Palmer, Trenis D.; Ashby, William J.; Lewis, John D.; Zijlstra, Andries

    2011-01-01

    Mortality and morbidity in patients with solid tumors invariably results from the disruption of normal biological function caused by disseminating tumor cells. Tumor cell migration is under intense investigation as the underlying cause of cancer metastasis. The need for tumor cell motility in the progression of metastasis has been established experimentally and is supported empirically by basic and clinical research implicating a large collection of migration-related genes. However, there are few clinical interventions designed to specifically target the motility of tumor cells and adjuvant therapy to specifically prevent cancer cell dissemination is severely limited. In an attempt to define motility targets suitable for treating metastasis, we have parsed the molecular determinants of tumor cell motility into five underlying principles including cell autonomous ability, soluble communication, cell-cell adhesion, cell-matrix adhesion, and integrating these determinants of migration on molecular scaffolds. The current challenge is to implement meaningful and sustainable inhibition of metastasis by developing clinically viable disruption of molecular targets that control these fundamental capabilities. PMID:21664937

  18. Tumor-associated macrophages (not tumor cells) are the determinants of photosensitizer tumor localization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Korbelik, Mladen; Krosl, Gorazd

    1995-03-01

    The distribution of Photofrin and several other photosensitizers among major cellular populations contained in solid mouse tumors was examined using flow cytometry. Seven tumor models were included in the analysis: sarcomas EMT6, KHT, RIF, FsaR and FsaN, Lewis lung carcinoma and squamous cell carcinoma SCCVII. In all these tumors, the highest photosensitizer levels were found in a subpopulation of tumor associated macrophages consisting of activated cells (as suggested by their increased size, granularity, and the number of interleukin 2 receptors). There was no evidence of selective photosensitizer accumulation in malignant tumor cells. Results consistent with these observations were also obtained with the carcinogen induced squamous cell carcinoma growing in hamster cheek pouch.

  19. DNA Tumor Viruses and Cell Metabolism

    PubMed Central

    Mushtaq, Muhammad; Darekar, Suhas

    2016-01-01

    Viruses play an important role in cancerogenesis. It is estimated that approximately 20% of all cancers are linked to infectious agents. The viral genes modulate the physiological machinery of infected cells that lead to cell transformation and development of cancer. One of the important adoptive responses by the cancer cells is their metabolic change to cope up with continuous requirement of cell survival and proliferation. In this review we will focus on how DNA viruses alter the glucose metabolism of transformed cells. Tumor DNA viruses enhance “aerobic” glycolysis upon virus-induced cell transformation, supporting rapid cell proliferation and showing the Warburg effect. Moreover, viral proteins enhance glucose uptake and controls tumor microenvironment, promoting metastasizing of the tumor cells. PMID:27034740

  20. Sertoli-Leydig cell tumor

    MedlinePlus

    ... voice Enlarged clitoris Facial hair Loss in breast size Stopping of menstrual periods Pain in the lower belly (pelvic area) is another symptom. It is usually due to the tumor pressing on nearby structures

  1. Ceramide Kinase Promotes Tumor Cell Survival and Mammary Tumor Recurrence

    PubMed Central

    Payne, Ania W.; Pant, Dhruv K.; Pan, Tien-chi; Chodosh, Lewis A.

    2014-01-01

    Recurrent breast cancer is typically an incurable disease and, as such, is disproportionately responsible for deaths from this disease. Recurrent breast cancers arise from the pool of disseminated tumor cells (DTCs) that survive adjuvant or neoadjuvant therapy, and patients with detectable DTCs following therapy are at substantially increased risk for recurrence. Consequently, the identification of pathways that contribute to the survival of breast cancer cells following therapy could aid in the development of more effective therapies that decrease the burden of residual disease and thereby reduce the risk of breast cancer recurrence. We now report that Ceramide Kinase (Cerk) is required for mammary tumor recurrence following HER2/neu pathway inhibition and is spontaneously up-regulated during tumor recurrence in multiple genetically engineered mouse models for breast cancer. We find that Cerk is rapidly up-regulated in tumor cells following HER2/neu down-regulation or treatment with Adriamycin and that Cerk is required for tumor cell survival following HER2/neu down-regulation. Consistent with our observations in mouse models, analysis of gene expression profiles from over 2,200 patients revealed that elevated CERK expression is associated with an increased risk of recurrence in women with breast cancer. Additionally, although CERK expression is associated with aggressive subtypes of breast cancer, including those that are ER–, HER2+, basal-like, or high grade, its association with poor clinical outcome is independent of these clinicopathological variables. Together, our findings identify a functional role for Cerk in breast cancer recurrence and suggest the clinical utility of agents targeted against this pro-survival pathway. PMID:25164007

  2. Tumor sialylation impedes T cell mediated anti-tumor responses while promoting tumor associated-regulatory T cells.

    PubMed

    Perdicchio, Maurizio; Cornelissen, Lenneke A M; Streng-Ouwehand, Ingeborg; Engels, Steef; Verstege, Marleen I; Boon, Louis; Geerts, Dirk; van Kooyk, Yvette; Unger, Wendy W J

    2016-02-23

    The increased presence of sialylated glycans on the tumor surface has been linked to poor prognosis, yet the effects on tumor-specific T cell immunity are hardly studied. We here show that hypersialylation of B16 melanoma substantially influences tumor growth by preventing the formation of effector T cells and facilitating the presence of high regulatory T cell (Treg) frequencies. Knock-down of the sialic acid transporter created "sialic acid low" tumors, that grew slower in-vivo than hypersialylated tumors, altered the Treg/Teffector balance, favoring immunological tumor control. The enhanced effector T cell response in developing "sialic acid low" tumors was preceded by and dependent on an increased influx and activity of Natural Killer (NK) cells. Thus, tumor hypersialylation orchestrates immune escape at the level of NK and Teff/Treg balance within the tumor microenvironment, herewith dampening tumor-specific T cell control. Reducing sialylation provides a therapeutic option to render tumors permissive to immune attack. PMID:26741508

  3. Characterization of cell suspensions from solid tumors

    SciTech Connect

    Pallavicini, M.

    1985-07-10

    The desirable features of cells in suspension will necessarily be dependent upon the use for which the cells were prepared. Adequate cell yield or recovery is defined by the measurement to be performed. Retention of cellular morphology is important for microscopic identification of cell types in a heterogenous cell suspension, and may be used to determine whether the cells in suspension are representative of those in the tumor in situ. Different dispersal protocols may yield cells with different degrees of clonogenicity, as well as altered biochemical features, such as loss of cellular proteins, surface antigens, nucleotide pools, etc. The quality of the cell suspension can be judged by the degree of cell clumping and level of cellular debris, both of which impact on flow cytometric measurements and studies in which the number of cells be known accurately. Finally, if the data measured on the cells in suspension are to be extrapolated to phenomena occurring in the tumor in situ, it is desirable that the cells in suspension are representative of those in the solid tumor in vivo. This report compares characteristics of tumor cell suspensions obtained by different types of selected disaggregation methods. 33 refs., 2 figs., 4 tabs.

  4. Canine parvovirus NS1 protein exhibits anti-tumor activity in a mouse mammary tumor model.

    PubMed

    Gupta, Shishir Kumar; Yadav, Pavan Kumar; Gandham, Ravi Kumar; Sahoo, A P; Harish, D R; Singh, Arvind Kumar; Tiwari, A K

    2016-02-01

    Many viral proteins have the ability to kill tumor cells specifically without harming the normal cells. These proteins, on ectopic expression, cause lysis or induction of apoptosis in the target tumor cells. Parvovirus NS1 is one of such proteins, which is known to kill high proliferating tumor cells. In the present study, we assessed the apoptosis inducing ability of canine parvovirus type 2 NS1 protein (CPV2.NS1) in vitro in 4T1 cells, and found it to cause significant cell death due to induction of apoptosis through intrinsic or mitochondrial pathway. Further, we also evaluated the oncolytic activity of CPV2.NS1 protein in a mouse mammary tumor model. The results suggested that CPV2.NS1 was able to inhibit the growth of 4T1 induced mouse mammary tumor as indicated by significantly reduced tumor volume, mitotic, AgNOR and PCNA indices. Further, inhibition of tumor growth was found to be because of induction of apoptosis in the tumor cells, which was evident by a significant increase in the number of TUNEL positive cells. Further, CPV2.NS1 was also able to stimulate the immune cells against the tumor antigens as indicated by the increased CD4+ and CD8+ counts in the blood of CVP2.NS1 treated mice. Further optimization of the delivery of NS1 protein and use of an adjuvant may further enhance its anti-tumor activity.

  5. Anti-CD20 antibody promotes cancer escape via enrichment of tumor-evoked regulatory B cells expressing low levels of CD20 and CD137L.

    PubMed

    Bodogai, Monica; Lee Chang, Catalina; Wejksza, Katarzyna; Lai, Jinping; Merino, Maria; Wersto, Robert P; Gress, Ronald E; Chan, Andrew C; Hesdorffer, Charles; Biragyn, Arya

    2013-04-01

    The possible therapeutic benefits of B-cell depletion in combating tumoral immune escape have been debated. In support of this concept, metastasis of highly aggressive 4T1 breast cancer cells in mice can be abrogated by inactivation of tumor-evoked regulatory B cells (tBreg). Here, we report the unexpected finding that B-cell depletion by CD20 antibody will greatly enhance cancer progression and metastasis. Both murine and human tBregs express low levels of CD20 and, as such, anti-CD20 mostly enriches for these cells. In the 4T1 model of murine breast cancer, this effect of enriching for tBregs suggests that B-cell depletion by anti-CD20 may not be beneficial at all in some cancers. In contrast, we show that in vivo-targeted stimulation of B cells with CXCL13-coupled CpG oligonucleotides (CpG-ODN) can block cancer metastasis by inhibiting CD20(Low) tBregs. Mechanistic investigations suggested that CpG-ODN upregulates low surface levels of 4-1BBL on tBregs to elicit granzyme B-expressing cytolytic CD8(+) T cells, offering some explanative power for the effect. These findings underscore the immunotherapeutic importance of tBreg inactivation as a strategy to enhance cancer therapy by targeting both the regulatory and activating arms of the immune system in vivo. PMID:23365136

  6. Tumor-Associated Endothelial Cells Promote Tumor Metastasis by Chaperoning Circulating Tumor Cells and Protecting Them from Anoikis.

    PubMed

    Yadav, Arti; Kumar, Bhavna; Yu, Jun-Ge; Old, Matthew; Teknos, Theodoros N; Kumar, Pawan

    2015-01-01

    Tumor metastasis is a highly inefficient biological process as millions of tumor cells are released in circulation each day and only a few of them are able to successfully form distal metastatic nodules. This could be due to the fact that most of the epithelial origin cancer cells are anchorage-dependent and undergo rapid anoikis in harsh circulating conditions. A number of studies have shown that in addition to tumor cells, activated endothelial cells are also released into the blood circulation from the primary tumors. However, the precise role of these activated circulating endothelial cells (CECs) in tumor metastasis process is not known. Therefore, we performed a series of experiments to examine if CECs promoted tumor metastasis by chaperoning the tumor cells to distal sites. Our results demonstrate that blood samples from head and neck cancer patients contain significantly higher Bcl-2-positive CECs as compared to healthy volunteers. Technically, it is challenging to know the origin of CECs in patient blood samples, therefore we used an orthotopic SCID mouse model and co-implanted GFP-labeled endothelial cells along with tumor cells. Our results suggest that activated CECs (Bcl-2-positive) were released from primary tumors and they co-migrated with tumor cells to distal sites. Bcl-2 overexpression in endothelial cells (EC-Bcl-2) significantly enhanced adhesion molecule expression and tumor cell binding that was predominantly mediated by E-selectin. In addition, tumor cells bound to EC-Bcl-2 showed a significantly higher anoikis resistance via the activation of Src-FAK pathway. In our in vivo experiments, we observed significantly higher lung metastasis when tumor cells were co-injected with EC-Bcl-2 as compared to EC-VC. E-selectin knockdown in EC-Bcl-2 cells or FAK/FUT3 knockdown in tumor cells significantly reversed EC-Bcl-2-mediated tumor metastasis. Taken together, our results suggest a novel role for CECs in protecting the tumor cells in circulation and

  7. Tumor-Associated Endothelial Cells Promote Tumor Metastasis by Chaperoning Circulating Tumor Cells and Protecting Them from Anoikis.

    PubMed

    Yadav, Arti; Kumar, Bhavna; Yu, Jun-Ge; Old, Matthew; Teknos, Theodoros N; Kumar, Pawan

    2015-01-01

    Tumor metastasis is a highly inefficient biological process as millions of tumor cells are released in circulation each day and only a few of them are able to successfully form distal metastatic nodules. This could be due to the fact that most of the epithelial origin cancer cells are anchorage-dependent and undergo rapid anoikis in harsh circulating conditions. A number of studies have shown that in addition to tumor cells, activated endothelial cells are also released into the blood circulation from the primary tumors. However, the precise role of these activated circulating endothelial cells (CECs) in tumor metastasis process is not known. Therefore, we performed a series of experiments to examine if CECs promoted tumor metastasis by chaperoning the tumor cells to distal sites. Our results demonstrate that blood samples from head and neck cancer patients contain significantly higher Bcl-2-positive CECs as compared to healthy volunteers. Technically, it is challenging to know the origin of CECs in patient blood samples, therefore we used an orthotopic SCID mouse model and co-implanted GFP-labeled endothelial cells along with tumor cells. Our results suggest that activated CECs (Bcl-2-positive) were released from primary tumors and they co-migrated with tumor cells to distal sites. Bcl-2 overexpression in endothelial cells (EC-Bcl-2) significantly enhanced adhesion molecule expression and tumor cell binding that was predominantly mediated by E-selectin. In addition, tumor cells bound to EC-Bcl-2 showed a significantly higher anoikis resistance via the activation of Src-FAK pathway. In our in vivo experiments, we observed significantly higher lung metastasis when tumor cells were co-injected with EC-Bcl-2 as compared to EC-VC. E-selectin knockdown in EC-Bcl-2 cells or FAK/FUT3 knockdown in tumor cells significantly reversed EC-Bcl-2-mediated tumor metastasis. Taken together, our results suggest a novel role for CECs in protecting the tumor cells in circulation and

  8. A paracrine loop between tumor cells and macrophages is required for tumor cell migration in mammary tumors.

    PubMed

    Wyckoff, Jeffrey; Wang, Weigang; Lin, Elaine Y; Wang, Yarong; Pixley, Fiona; Stanley, E Richard; Graf, Thomas; Pollard, Jeffrey W; Segall, Jeffrey; Condeelis, John

    2004-10-01

    Invasion of tumor cells into the surrounding connective tissue and blood vessels is a key step in the metastatic spread of breast tumors. Although the presence of macrophages in primary tumors is associated with increased metastatic potential, the mechanistic basis for this observation is unknown. Using a chemotaxis-based in vivo invasion assay and multiphoton-based intravital imaging, we show that the interaction between macrophages and tumor cells facilitates the migration of carcinoma cells in the primary tumor. Gradients of either epidermal growth factor (EGF) or colony-stimulating factor 1 (CSF-1) stimulate collection into microneedles of tumor cells and macrophages even though tumor cells express only EGF receptor and macrophages express only CSF-1 receptor. Intravital imaging shows that macrophages and tumor cells migrate toward microneedles containing either EGF or CSF-1. Inhibition of either CSF-1- or EGF-stimulated signaling reduces the migration of both cell types. This work provides the first direct evidence for a synergistic interaction between macrophages and tumor cells during cell migration in vivo and indicates a mechanism for how macrophages may contribute to metastasis.

  9. Recognition of tumor cells by Dectin-1 orchestrates innate immune cells for anti-tumor responses

    PubMed Central

    Chiba, Shiho; Ikushima, Hiroaki; Ueki, Hiroshi; Yanai, Hideyuki; Kimura, Yoshitaka; Hangai, Sho; Nishio, Junko; Negishi, Hideo; Tamura, Tomohiko; Saijo, Shinobu; Iwakura, Yoichiro; Taniguchi, Tadatsugu

    2014-01-01

    The eradication of tumor cells requires communication to and signaling by cells of the immune system. Natural killer (NK) cells are essential tumor-killing effector cells of the innate immune system; however, little is known about whether or how other immune cells recognize tumor cells to assist NK cells. Here, we show that the innate immune receptor Dectin-1 expressed on dendritic cells and macrophages is critical to NK-mediated killing of tumor cells that express N-glycan structures at high levels. Receptor recognition of these tumor cells causes the activation of the IRF5 transcription factor and downstream gene induction for the full-blown tumoricidal activity of NK cells. Consistent with this, we show exacerbated in vivo tumor growth in mice genetically deficient in either Dectin-1 or IRF5. The critical contribution of Dectin-1 in the recognition of and signaling by tumor cells may offer new insight into the anti-tumor immune system with therapeutic implications. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.04177.001 PMID:25149452

  10. Energy and Redox Homeostasis in Tumor Cells

    PubMed Central

    de Oliveira, Marcus Fernandes; Amoêdo, Nívea Dias; Rumjanek, Franklin David

    2012-01-01

    Cancer cells display abnormal morphology, chromosomes, and metabolism. This review will focus on the metabolism of tumor cells integrating the available data by way of a functional approach. The first part contains a comprehensive introduction to bioenergetics, mitochondria, and the mechanisms of production and degradation of reactive oxygen species. This will be followed by a discussion on the oxidative metabolism of tumor cells including the morphology, biogenesis, and networking of mitochondria. Tumor cells overexpress proteins that favor fission, such as GTPase dynamin-related protein 1 (Drp1). The interplay between proapoptotic members of the Bcl-2 family that promotes Drp 1-dependent mitochondrial fragmentation and fusogenic antiapoptotic proteins such as Opa-1 will be presented. It will be argued that contrary to the widespread belief that in cancer cells, aerobic glycolysis completely replaces oxidative metabolism, a misrepresentation of Warburg's original results, mitochondria of tumor cells are fully viable and functional. Cancer cells also carry out oxidative metabolism and generally conform to the orthodox model of ATP production maintaining as well an intact electron transport system. Finally, data will be presented indicating that the key to tumor cell survival in an ROS rich environment depends on the overexpression of antioxidant enzymes and high levels of the nonenzymatic antioxidant scavengers. PMID:22693511

  11. STING in tumor and host cells cooperatively work for NK cell-mediated tumor growth retardation.

    PubMed

    Takashima, Ken; Takeda, Yohei; Oshiumi, Hiroyuki; Shime, Hiroaki; Okabe, Masaru; Ikawa, Masahito; Matsumoto, Misako; Seya, Tsukasa

    2016-09-30

    An interferon-inducing DNA sensor STING participates in tumor rejection in mouse models. Here we examined what mechanisms contribute to STING-dependent growth retardation of B16 melanoma sublines by NK cells in vivo. The studies were designed using WT and STING KO black mice, and B16D8 (an NK-sensitive melanoma line having STING) and STING KO B16D8 sublines established for this study. The results from tumor-implant studies suggested that STING in host immune cells and tumor cells induced distinct profiles of chemokines including CXCL10, CCL5 and IL-33, and both participated in NK cell infiltration and activation in B16D8 tumor. Spontaneous activation of STING occurs in host-immune and tumor cells of this NK-sensitive tumor, thereby B16D8 tumor growth being suppressed in this model. Our data show that STING induces tumor cytotoxicity by NK cells through tumor and host immune cell network to contribute to innate surveillance and suppression of tumors in vivo. PMID:27608599

  12. Acinic cell tumors of salivary gland origin.

    PubMed

    Clemis, J D; Bland, J; Fung, C

    1977-09-01

    The acinic cell tumor of salivary gland origin, once thought to be benign, is now known to be an incidiously slow growing malignant neoplasm with lethal potential. While the degree of malignant behavior of individual acinic cell tumors is notably variable, all must be treated with aggression. Traditional and current methods of treatment are reviewed; and, in conjunction with the tumors herein reported, guidelines for managment of this uncommon malignancy are suggested. Four cases have been reviewed in detail and critically analyzed. The pathology, including features of both light and electron microscopy, in included--particularly in relation to the oncocytoid areas identified in from 10% to 40% of the parenchymal cells of our tumors. Since an accurate histopathologic diagnosis is the first step in the establishment of a proper treatment plan, pitfalls in histologic diagnosis have been stressed.

  13. Pathology of testicular germ cell tumors.

    PubMed

    Brodsky, G L

    1991-12-01

    The pathology report on a testicular germ cell tumor should include the following information: Tumor type: The histologic type of tumor present. If the tumor is of mixed type, the components should be listed, in order of relative abundance. The pathologist may endeavor to give a numeric estimate of the percentages of each element. Staging information: The size of the tumor should be listed. Local spread--into rete testis, tunica albuginea, epididymis, and spermatic cord--should be listed. If the cord is involved, possible involvement of its surgical resection margin should be assessed. Vascular/lymphatic invasion should be assessed for its presence or absence. Status of the remainder of the testis: Evidence of cryptorchidism or other dysgenetic features should be mentioned. Such features may imply a greater risk for the development of a contralateral tumor. Also, the presence of normal spermatogenesis elsewhere in the uninvolved testis should be reported. This finding may suggest a relatively decreased risk for contralateral tumor development and is a likely indicator of fertility should the patient consider sperm banking prior to retroperitoneal surgery and chemotherapy. The finding of mature sperm in the epididymis is an easy way to confirm spermatogenesis in the testis. Incidental findings: Lipomas or hydroceles of the cord, adrenal rests, and adnexal cysts may be found. The pathologist plays a crucial role in the diagnosis of germ cell tumors. In addition to elucidating tumor type, the pathologist is relied upon for precise local staging and for the classification of metastases, all of which have important implications in determining optimal therapy. As the clinical management of germ cell tumors evolves, the pathologist will continue to play a role in defining those features that have a bearing on patient outcome.

  14. In Vivo therapeutic potential of mesenchymal stem cell-derived extracellular vesicles with optical imaging reporter in tumor mice model.

    PubMed

    Kalimuthu, Senthilkumar; Gangadaran, Prakash; Li, Xiu Juan; Oh, Ji Min; Lee, Ho Won; Jeong, Shin Young; Lee, Sang-Woo; Lee, Jaetae; Ahn, Byeong-Cheol

    2016-01-01

    Mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) can be used as a therapeutic armor for cancer. Extracellular vesicles (EVs) from MSCs have been evaluated for anticancer effects. In vivo targeting of EVs to the tumor is an essential requirement for successful therapy. Therefore, non-invasive methods of monitoring EVs in animal models are crucial for developing EV-based cancer therapies. The present study to develop bioluminescent EVs using Renilla luciferase (Rluc)-expressing MSCs. The EVs from MSC/Rluc cells (EV-MSC/Rluc) were visualized in a murine lung cancer model. The anticancer effects of EVs on Lewis lung carcinoma (LLC) and other cancer cells were assessed. EV-MSC/Rluc were visualized in vivo in the LLC-efffuc tumor model using optical imaging. The induction of apoptosis was confirmed with Annexin-V and propidium iodide staining. EV-MSC/Rluc and EV-MSCs showed a significant cytotoxic effect against LLC-effluc cells and 4T1; however, no significant effect on CT26, B16F10, TC1 cells. Moreover, EV-MSC/Rluc inhibited LLC tumor growth in vivo. EV-MSC/Rluc-mediated LLC tumor inhibitory mechanism revealed the decreased pERK and increased cleaved caspase 3 and cleaved PARP. We successfully developed luminescent EV-MSC/Rluc that have a therapeutic effect on LLC cells in both in vitro and in vivo. This bioluminescent EV system can be used to optimize EV-based therapy. PMID:27452924

  15. In Vivo therapeutic potential of mesenchymal stem cell-derived extracellular vesicles with optical imaging reporter in tumor mice model

    PubMed Central

    Kalimuthu, Senthilkumar; Gangadaran, Prakash; Li, Xiu Juan; Oh, Ji Min; Lee, Ho Won; Jeong, Shin Young; Lee, Sang-Woo; Lee, Jaetae; Ahn, Byeong-Cheol

    2016-01-01

    Mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) can be used as a therapeutic armor for cancer. Extracellular vesicles (EVs) from MSCs have been evaluated for anticancer effects. In vivo targeting of EVs to the tumor is an essential requirement for successful therapy. Therefore, non-invasive methods of monitoring EVs in animal models are crucial for developing EV-based cancer therapies. The present study to develop bioluminescent EVs using Renilla luciferase (Rluc)-expressing MSCs. The EVs from MSC/Rluc cells (EV-MSC/Rluc) were visualized in a murine lung cancer model. The anticancer effects of EVs on Lewis lung carcinoma (LLC) and other cancer cells were assessed. EV-MSC/Rluc were visualized in vivo in the LLC-efffuc tumor model using optical imaging. The induction of apoptosis was confirmed with Annexin-V and propidium iodide staining. EV-MSC/Rluc and EV-MSCs showed a significant cytotoxic effect against LLC-effluc cells and 4T1; however, no significant effect on CT26, B16F10, TC1 cells. Moreover, EV-MSC/Rluc inhibited LLC tumor growth in vivo. EV-MSC/Rluc-mediated LLC tumor inhibitory mechanism revealed the decreased pERK and increased cleaved caspase 3 and cleaved PARP. We successfully developed luminescent EV-MSC/Rluc that have a therapeutic effect on LLC cells in both in vitro and in vivo. This bioluminescent EV system can be used to optimize EV-based therapy. PMID:27452924

  16. Whole tumor antigen vaccination using dendritic cells: comparison of RNA electroporation and pulsing with UV-irradiated tumor cells.

    PubMed

    Benencia, Fabian; Courrèges, Maria C; Coukos, George

    2008-01-01

    Because of the lack of full characterization of tumor associated antigens for solid tumors, whole antigen use is a convenient approach to tumor vaccination. Tumor RNA and apoptotic tumor cells have been used as a source of whole tumor antigen to prepare dendritic cell (DC) based tumor vaccines, but their efficacy has not been directly compared. Here we compare directly RNA electroporation and pulsing of DCs with whole tumor cells killed by ultraviolet (UV) B radiation using a convenient tumor model expressing human papilloma virus (HPV) E6 and E7 oncogenes. Although both approaches led to DCs presenting tumor antigen, electroporation with tumor cell total RNA induced a significantly higher frequency of tumor-reactive IFN-gamma secreting T cells, and E7-specific CD8+ lymphocytes compared to pulsing with UV-irradiated tumor cells. DCs electroporated with tumor cell RNA induced a larger tumor infiltration by T cells and produced a significantly stronger delay in tumor growth compared to DCs pulsed with UV-irradiated tumor cells. We conclude that electroporation with whole tumor cell RNA and pulsing with UV-irradiated tumor cells are both effective in eliciting antitumor immune response, but RNA electroporation results in more potent tumor vaccination under the examined experimental conditions. PMID:18445282

  17. Tumor-Infiltrating Immune Cells Promoting Tumor Invasion and Metastasis: Existing Theories

    PubMed Central

    Man, Yan-gao; Stojadinovic, Alexander; Mason, Jeffrey; Avital, Itzhak; Bilchik, Anton; Bruecher, Bjoern; Protic, Mladjan; Nissan, Aviram; Izadjoo, Mina; Zhang, Xichen; Jewett, Anahid

    2013-01-01

    It is a commonly held belief that infiltration of immune cells into tumor tissues and direct physical contact between tumor cells and infiltrated immune cells is associated with physical destructions of the tumor cells, reduction of the tumor burden, and improved clinical prognosis. An increasing number of studies, however, have suggested that aberrant infiltration of immune cells into tumor or normal tissues may promote tumor progression, invasion, and metastasis. Neither the primary reason for these contradictory observations, nor the mechanism for the reported diverse impact of tumor-infiltrating immune cells has been elucidated, making it difficult to judge the clinical implications of infiltration of immune cells within tumor tissues. This mini-review presents several existing hypotheses and models that favor the promoting impact of tumor-infiltrating immune cells on tumor invasion and metastasis, and also analyzes their strength and weakness. PMID:23386907

  18. Cancer stem cell plasticity and tumor hierarchy

    PubMed Central

    Cabrera, Marina Carla; Hollingsworth, Robert E; Hurt, Elaine M

    2015-01-01

    The origins of the complex process of intratumoral heterogeneity have been highly debated and different cellular mechanisms have been hypothesized to account for the diversity within a tumor. The clonal evolution and cancer stem cell (CSC) models have been proposed as drivers of this heterogeneity. However, the concept of cancer stem cell plasticity and bidirectional conversion between stem and non-stem cells has added additional complexity to these highly studied paradigms and may help explain the tumor heterogeneity observed in solid tumors. The process of cancer stem cell plasticity in which cancer cells harbor the dynamic ability of shifting from a non-CSC state to a CSC state and vice versa may be modulated by specific microenvironmental signals and cellular interactions arising in the tumor niche. In addition to promoting CSC plasticity, these interactions may contribute to the cellular transformation of tumor cells and affect response to chemotherapeutic and radiation treatments by providing CSCs protection from these agents. Herein, we review the literature in support of this dynamic CSC state, discuss the effectors of plasticity, and examine their role in the development and treatment of cancer. PMID:25621103

  19. Cancer stem cell plasticity and tumor hierarchy.

    PubMed

    Cabrera, Marina Carla; Hollingsworth, Robert E; Hurt, Elaine M

    2015-01-26

    The origins of the complex process of intratumoral heterogeneity have been highly debated and different cellular mechanisms have been hypothesized to account for the diversity within a tumor. The clonal evolution and cancer stem cell (CSC) models have been proposed as drivers of this heterogeneity. However, the concept of cancer stem cell plasticity and bidirectional conversion between stem and non-stem cells has added additional complexity to these highly studied paradigms and may help explain the tumor heterogeneity observed in solid tumors. The process of cancer stem cell plasticity in which cancer cells harbor the dynamic ability of shifting from a non-CSC state to a CSC state and vice versa may be modulated by specific microenvironmental signals and cellular interactions arising in the tumor niche. In addition to promoting CSC plasticity, these interactions may contribute to the cellular transformation of tumor cells and affect response to chemotherapeutic and radiation treatments by providing CSCs protection from these agents. Herein, we review the literature in support of this dynamic CSC state, discuss the effectors of plasticity, and examine their role in the development and treatment of cancer.

  20. Multi-targeted inhibition of tumor growth and lung metastasis by redox-sensitive shell crosslinked micelles loading disulfiram

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Duan, Xiaopin; Xiao, Jisheng; Yin, Qi; Zhang, Zhiwen; Yu, Haijun; Mao, Shirui; Li, Yaping

    2014-03-01

    Metastasis, the main cause of cancer related deaths, remains the greatest challenge in cancer treatment. Disulfiram (DSF), which has multi-targeted anti-tumor activity, was encapsulated into redox-sensitive shell crosslinked micelles to achieve intracellular targeted delivery and finally inhibit tumor growth and metastasis. The crosslinked micelles demonstrated good stability in circulation and specifically released DSF under a reductive environment that mimicked the intracellular conditions of tumor cells. As a result, the DSF-loaded redox-sensitive shell crosslinked micelles (DCMs) dramatically inhibited cell proliferation, induced cell apoptosis and suppressed cell invasion, as well as impairing tube formation of HMEC-1 cells. In addition, the DCMs could accumulate in tumor tissue and stay there for a long time, thereby causing significant inhibition of 4T1 tumor growth and marked prevention in lung metastasis of 4T1 tumors. These results suggested that DCMs could be a promising delivery system in inhibiting the growth and metastasis of breast cancer.

  1. SHIP represses lung inflammation and inhibits mammary tumor metastasis in BALB/c mice

    PubMed Central

    Hamilton, Melisa J.; Halvorsen, Elizabeth C.; LePard, Nancy E.; Bosiljcic, Momir; Ho, Victor W.; Lam, Vivian; Banáth, Judit

    2016-01-01

    SH2-containing-inositol-5′-phosphatase (SHIP) is a negative regulator of the phosphatidylinositol-3-kinase pathway in hematopoietic cells and limits the development of leukemias and lymphomas. The potential role of SHIP in solid tumor development and metastasis remains unknown. While SHIP restricts the aberrant development of myeloid cells in C57BL/6 mice, there are conflicting reports regarding the effect of SHIP deletion in BALB/c mice with important consequences for determining the influence of SHIP in different model tumor systems. We generated SHIP−/− BALB/c mice and challenged them with syngeneic non-metastatic 67NR or metastatic 4T1 mammary tumors. We demonstrate that SHIP restricts the development, alternative-activation, and immunosuppressive function of myeloid cells in tumor-free and tumor-bearing BALB/c mice. Tumor-free SHIP−/− BALB/c mice exhibited pulmonary inflammation, myeloid hyperplasia, and M2-polarized macrophages and this phenotype was greatly exacerbated by 4T1, but not 67NR, tumors. 4T1-bearing SHIP−/− mice rapidly lost weight and died from necrohemorrhagic inflammatory pulmonary disease, characterized by massive infiltration of pulmonary macrophages and myeloid-derived suppressor cells that were more M2-polarized and immunosuppressive than wild-type cells. Importantly, while SHIP loss did not affect primary tumor growth, 4T1-bearing SHIP−/− mice had 7.5-fold more metastatic tumor cells in their lungs than wild-type mice, consistent with the influence of immunosuppressive myeloid cells on metastatic growth. Our findings identify the hematopoietic cell-restricted protein SHIP as an intriguing target to influence the development of solid tumor metastases, and support development of SHIP agonists to prevent the accumulation of immunosuppressive myeloid cells and tumor metastases in the lungs to improve treatment of metastatic breast cancer. PMID:26683227

  2. SHIP represses lung inflammation and inhibits mammary tumor metastasis in BALB/c mice.

    PubMed

    Hamilton, Melisa J; Halvorsen, Elizabeth C; LePard, Nancy E; Bosiljcic, Momir; Ho, Victor W; Lam, Vivian; Banáth, Judit; Bennewith, Kevin L; Krystal, Gerald

    2016-01-26

    SH2-containing-inositol-5'-phosphatase (SHIP) is a negative regulator of the phosphatidylinositol-3-kinase pathway in hematopoietic cells and limits the development of leukemias and lymphomas. The potential role of SHIP in solid tumor development and metastasis remains unknown. While SHIP restricts the aberrant development of myeloid cells in C57BL/6 mice, there are conflicting reports regarding the effect of SHIP deletion in BALB/c mice with important consequences for determining the influence of SHIP in different model tumor systems. We generated SHIP-/- BALB/c mice and challenged them with syngeneic non-metastatic 67NR or metastatic 4T1 mammary tumors. We demonstrate that SHIP restricts the development, alternative-activation, and immunosuppressive function of myeloid cells in tumor-free and tumor-bearing BALB/c mice. Tumor-free SHIP-/- BALB/c mice exhibited pulmonary inflammation, myeloid hyperplasia, and M2-polarized macrophages and this phenotype was greatly exacerbated by 4T1, but not 67NR, tumors. 4T1-bearing SHIP-/- mice rapidly lost weight and died from necrohemorrhagic inflammatory pulmonary disease, characterized by massive infiltration of pulmonary macrophages and myeloid-derived suppressor cells that were more M2-polarized and immunosuppressive than wild-type cells. Importantly, while SHIP loss did not affect primary tumor growth, 4T1-bearing SHIP-/- mice had 7.5-fold more metastatic tumor cells in their lungs than wild-type mice, consistent with the influence of immunosuppressive myeloid cells on metastatic growth. Our findings identify the hematopoietic cell-restricted protein SHIP as an intriguing target to influence the development of solid tumor metastases, and support development of SHIP agonists to prevent the accumulation of immunosuppressive myeloid cells and tumor metastases in the lungs to improve treatment of metastatic breast cancer.

  3. Surgery and Combination Chemotherapy in Treating Children With Extracranial Germ Cell Tumors

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-05-06

    Childhood Embryonal Tumor; Childhood Extracranial Germ Cell Tumor; Childhood Extragonadal Germ Cell Tumor; Childhood Malignant Ovarian Germ Cell Tumor; Childhood Malignant Testicular Germ Cell Tumor; Childhood Teratoma; Ovarian Embryonal Carcinoma; Ovarian Yolk Sac Tumor; Stage II Malignant Testicular Germ Cell Tumor; Stage IIA Ovarian Germ Cell Tumor; Stage IIB Ovarian Germ Cell Tumor; Stage IIC Ovarian Germ Cell Tumor; Stage III Malignant Testicular Germ Cell Tumor; Stage IIIA Ovarian Germ Cell Tumor; Stage IIIB Ovarian Germ Cell Tumor; Stage IIIC Ovarian Germ Cell Tumor; Testicular Choriocarcinoma and Yolk Sac Tumor; Testicular Embryonal Carcinoma

  4. Circulating tumor cells in colorectal cancer patients.

    PubMed

    Torino, Francesco; Bonmassar, Enzo; Bonmassar, Laura; De Vecchis, Liana; Barnabei, Agnese; Zuppi, Cecilia; Capoluongo, Ettore; Aquino, Angelo

    2013-11-01

    The availability of sensitive methods has allowed the detailed study of circulating tumor cells only recently. Evolving evidence support the prognostic and predictive role of these cells in patients affected by several solid tumors, including colorectal cancer. Ongoing studies are aimed at confirming that the molecular characterization of circulating tumor cells in peripheral blood and in bone marrow of patients is a powerful tool to improve the patient risk-stratification, to monitor activity of the drugs, to develop more appropriate targeted therapies and tailored treatments. In parallel, results from these correlative studies promise to gain a better biological understanding of the metastatic process. The clinical utility of the detection of circulating tumor cells in patients affected by colorectal cancer is still hampered by a number of specific hurdles. Improvement in sensitivity and specificity of the available methods of detection, standardization of these methods and functional characterization of circulating tumor cells in well designed and statistically well powered studies are the key steps to reach these ambitious objectives in colorectal cancer patients as well.

  5. [Cell proliferation in salivary gland tumors].

    PubMed

    Frade González, C; García-Caballero, T; Lozano Ramírez, A; Labella Caballero, T

    2001-01-01

    Previous studies on cell proliferation in salivary gland tumors have shown the utility of immunostain with MIB1 in the differential diagnosis and prognosis of these neoplasms. We have carried out a study of 39 salivary gland tumors (17 benign), from different histological lineages. The immunocytochemical method used was the streptavidin--biotin--peroxidase complex which used the MIB1 monoclonal antibody. Benign tumors showed a low cell proliferation rates, below 5% with an overall average of 1.9%. The malignant tumors presented higher rates, with a middle value of 17.85%. Epidermoid carcinomas had the higher cell proliferation rates, with an average of 43%. In adenoid cystic carcinomas, we have observed that proliferation was greater at the peripheral level of tumor nests and cell surrounding the cystic structures. Neoplasms of low grade of malignancy presented lower cell proliferation rates. The MIB1 immunostain allowed to reach a differential diagnosis between pleomorphic adenoma and adenoid cystic carcinoma, specially in those cases in which there could be any doubt.

  6. High-Dose Thiotepa Plus Peripheral Stem Cell Transplantation in Treating Patients With Refractory Solid Tumors

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2013-03-06

    Brain and Central Nervous System Tumors; Childhood Germ Cell Tumor; Extragonadal Germ Cell Tumor; Ovarian Cancer; Retinoblastoma; Testicular Germ Cell Tumor; Unspecified Adult Solid Tumor, Protocol Specific; Unspecified Childhood Solid Tumor, Protocol Specific

  7. Immunosuppressive cells in tumor immune escape and metastasis.

    PubMed

    Liu, Yang; Cao, Xuetao

    2016-05-01

    Tumor immune escape and the initiation of metastasis are critical steps in malignant progression of tumors and have been implicated in the failure of some clinical cancer immunotherapy. Tumors develop numerous strategies to escape immune surveillance or metastasize: Tumors not only modulate the recruitment and expansion of immunosuppressive cell populations to develop the tumor microenvironment or pre-metastatic niche but also switch the phenotype and function of normal immune cells from a potentially tumor-reactive state to a tumor-promoting state. Immunosuppressive cells facilitate tumor immune escape by inhibiting antitumor immune responses and furthermore promote tumor metastasis by inducing immunosuppression, promoting tumor cell invasion and intravasation, establishing a pre-metastatic niche, facilitating epithelial-mesenchymal transition, and inducing angiogenesis at primary tumor or metastatic sites. Numerous translational studies indicate that it is possible to inhibit tumor immune escape and prevent tumor metastasis by blocking immunosuppressive cells and eliminating immunosuppressive mechanisms that are induced by either immunosuppressive cells or tumor cells. Furthermore, many clinical trials targeting immunosuppressive cells have also achieved good outcome. In this review, we focus on the underlying mechanisms of immunosuppressive cells in promoting tumor immune escape and metastasis, discuss our current understanding of the interactions between immunosuppressive cells and tumor cells in the tumor microenvironment, and suggest future research directions as well as potential clinical strategies in cancer immunotherapy.

  8. Ultrasound features of orbital granular cell tumor.

    PubMed

    Ayres, Bernadete; Miller, Neil R; Eberhart, Charles G; Dibernardo, Cathy W

    2009-01-01

    The authors report the echographic characteristics of a rare orbital granular cell tumor and correlate these findings with histopathology. A 56-year-old woman presented with proptosis. Complete ophthalmic and ultrasound examinations were performed. Ultrasound revealed an oval, well-outlined orbital mass in the intraconal space with low-medium reflectivity and regular internal structure. An orbitotomy with complete excision of the tumor was performed. Histopathologic evaluation showed sheets and nests of cells with abundant eosinophilic and granular cytoplasm in a uniform distribution throughout the lesion. The echographic characteristics correlated well with the morphologic surgical findings and the histologic architecture. This is the first report describing the echographic characteristics of orbital granular cell tumor.

  9. Giant Cell Tumor of Bone - An Overview

    PubMed Central

    Sobti, Anshul; Agrawal, Pranshu; Agarwala, Sanjay; Agarwal, Manish

    2016-01-01

    Giant Cell tumors (GCT) are benign tumors with potential for aggressive behavior and capacity to metastasize. Although rarely lethal, benign bone tumors may be associated with a substantial disturbance of the local bony architecture that can be particularly troublesome in peri-articular locations. Its histogenesis remains unclear. It is characterized by a proliferation of mononuclear stromal cells and the presence of many multi- nucleated giant cells with homogenous distribution. There is no widely held consensus regarding the ideal treatment method selection. There are advocates of varying surgical techniques ranging from intra-lesional curettage to wide resection. As most giant cell tumors are benign and are located near a joint in young adults, several authors favor an intralesional approach that preserves anatomy of bone in lieu of resection. Although GCT is classified as a benign lesion, few patients develop progressive lung metastases with poor outcomes. Treatment is mainly surgical. Options of chemotherapy and radiotherapy are reserved for selected cases. Recent advances in the understanding of pathogenesis are essential to develop new treatments for this locally destructive primary bone tumor. PMID:26894211

  10. The Effect of Stromal Integrin β3-Deficiency on Two Different Tumors in Mice

    PubMed Central

    Reigstad, Inga; Sortland, Kristina; Skogstrand, Trude; Reed, Rolf K.; Stuhr, Linda

    2016-01-01

    There is an increasing focus on the tumor microenvironment in carcinogenesis. Integrins are important receptors and adhesion molecules in this environment and have been shown to be involved in cell adhesion, proliferation, differentiation and migration. The present study aimed to evaluate the effect of stromal integrin β3-deficiency on tumor growth, angiogenesis, interstitial fluid pressure (PIF), fibrosis and metastasis in a murine breast cancer (4T1) and a prostate tumor (RM11) model. We showed that stromal integrin β3-deficiency led to an elevation in PIF that correlated to a shift towards thicker collagen fibrils in the 4T1 mammary tumor. In the RM11 prostate carcinoma model there was no effect of integrin β3-deficiency on PIF and collagen fibril thickness. These findings support the notion that changes in the collagen scaffold influence PIF, and also indicate that there must be important crosstalk between the stroma and tumor cells, in a tumor cell line specific manner. Furthermore, stromal integrin β3-deficiency had no effect on tumor growth or angiogenesis in both tumor models and no effect on lung metastasis in the 4T1 mammary tumor model. In conclusion, the stromal β3 integrin influence PIF, possibly via its effect on the structure of the collagen network, in a tumor cell line dependent manner. PMID:26771643

  11. Direct visualization of macrophage-assisted tumor cell intravasation in mammary tumors.

    PubMed

    Wyckoff, Jeffrey B; Wang, Yarong; Lin, Elaine Y; Li, Jiu-feng; Goswami, Sumanta; Stanley, E Richard; Segall, Jeffrey E; Pollard, Jeffrey W; Condeelis, John

    2007-03-15

    Although the presence of macrophages in tumors has been correlated with poor prognosis, until now there was no direct observation of how macrophages are involved in hematogenous metastasis. In this study, we use multiphoton microscopy to show, for the first time, that tumor cell intravasation occurs in association with perivascular macrophages in mammary tumors. Furthermore, we show that perivascular macrophages of the mammary tumor are associated with tumor cell intravasation in the absence of local angiogenesis. These results show that the interaction between macrophages and tumor cells lying in close proximity defines a microenvironment that is directly involved in the intravasation of cancer cells in mammary tumors.

  12. Regulatory T cells and tumor immunity.

    PubMed

    Chattopadhyay, Subhasis; Chakraborty, Nitya G; Mukherji, Bijay

    2005-12-01

    Central deletion of "self-reactive" T cells has been the textbook paradigm for inducing "self-tolerance" in the periphery and the concept of a role of T cell-mediated suppression in this process has long been controversial. A decisive shift in the opinion on suppressor T cells has lately occurred with the observations of Sakaguchi's group that linked a class of CD4+CD25+ T cells to the prevention of autoimmunity from neonatal thymectomy in mice. These CD4+CD25+ T cells have been named T regulatory (Treg) cells. They are believed to be selected in the thymus as an anti-self repertoire. Hence they were referred to as natural T regulatory (nTreg) cells. Presently, in addition to their role in autoimmunity, they are believed to exert regulatory function in infection, in transplantation immunity as well as in tumor immunity. In contrast to these nTreg cells, another class of CD4+ Treg cells also exercises regulatory function in the periphery. These Treg cells are also CD4+ T cells and after activation they also become phenotypically CD4+CD25+. They are, however induced in the periphery as Treg cells. Hence, they are termed as induced Treg (iTreg) cells. There are major differences in the biology of these two types of Treg cells. They differ in their requirements for activation and in their mode of action. Nonetheless, evidence indicates that both nTreg cells and iTreg cells are involved in the control of tumor immunity. The question of how to circumvent their regulatory constraints, therefore, has become a major challenge for tumor immunologists. PMID:15868167

  13. Combination of sunitinib with anti-tumor vaccination inhibits T cell priming and requires careful scheduling to achieve productive immunotherapy.

    PubMed

    Jaini, Ritika; Rayman, Patricia; Cohen, Peter A; Finke, James H; Tuohy, Vincent K

    2014-04-01

    Sunitinib, a protein tyrosine kinase inhibitor is the frontline therapy for renal and gastrointestinal cancers. We hypothesized that by virtue of its well documented tumor apoptosis and immune adjuvant properties, combination of Sunitinib with anti-tumor immunotherapeutics will provide synergistic inhibition of tumor growth. Our study was designed to evaluate the impact of Sunitinib on immunotherapy mediated anti-tumor immune responses and evaluate its efficacy as a combinatorial therapy with tumor targeted immunotherapeutic vaccination. Mice immunized with recombinant α-lactalbumin, a lactation protein expressed on majority of breast tumors were treated with 1 mg of Sunitinib for seven consecutive days beginning (1) concurrently, on the day of α-lactalbumin immunization or (2) sequentially, on day 9 after immunization. Ten-day lymph nodes or 21 day spleens were tested by ELISPOT assays and flow cytometry to evaluate responsiveness to α-lactalbumin immunization in presence of Sunitinib and distribution of cells involved in T cell antigen priming and proliferation in different lymphoid compartments. In addition, therapeutic efficacy of the α-lactalbumin/ Sunitinib combination was evaluated by monitoring tumor growth in the 4T1 transplanted tumor model. Our studies reveal that concurrent administration of Sunitinib with active vaccination against a targeted tumor antigen inhibits priming to the immunogen due to a drastic decrease in CD11b+CD11c+ antigen presenting cells, leading to failure of vaccination. However, sequential delivery of Sunitinib timed to avoid the priming phase of vaccination results in the desired vaccination mediated boost in immune responses.

  14. [Circulating tumor cells in head and neck cancer].

    PubMed

    Guntinas-Lichius, O; Pachmann, K

    2015-06-01

    Circulating tumor cells are defined as tumor cells which are circulating in the peripheral blood of the cancer patient. While several large studies have investigated the role of circulating tumor cells in other solid tumors, the importance of these tumor cells in patients with head and neck cancer was turned into the focus not until the recent years. In other solid tumor the presence of circulating tumor cells often seems to be a negative prognostic marker and seems to be a marker for therapy response. The present article wants to give an overview about the knowledge on circulating tumor cells and their clinical relevance in head and neck cancer. The methodology to detect circulating tumor cells will be critically reflected. The future potential of the detection of circulating tumor cells in head and neck cancer patients will be discussed.

  15. Tumor cohesion and glioblastoma cell dispersal

    PubMed Central

    Foty, Ramsey A

    2013-01-01

    Patients with glioblastoma typically present when tumors are at an advanced stage. Surgical resection, radiotherapy and adjuvant chemotherapy are currently the standard of care for glioblastoma. However, due to the infiltrative and dispersive nature of the tumor, recurrence rate remains high and typically results in very poor prognosis. Efforts to treat the primary tumor are, therefore, palliative rather than curative. From a practical perspective, controlling growth and dispersal of the recurrence may have a greater impact on disease-free survival, In order for cells to disperse, they must first detach from the mass. Preventing detachment may keep tumors that recur more localized and perhaps more amenable to therapy. Here we introduce a new perspective in which a quantifiable mechanical property, namely tissue surface tension, can provide novel information on tumor behavior. The overall theme of the discussion will attempt to integrate how adhesion molecules can alter a tumor’s mechanical properties and how, in turn, these properties can be modified to prevent tumor cell detachment and dispersal. PMID:23902244

  16. CDC20 maintains tumor initiating cells

    PubMed Central

    Xie, Qi; Wu, Qiulian; Mack, Stephen C.; Yang, Kailin; Kim, Leo; Hubert, Christopher G.; Flavahan, William A.; Chu, Chengwei; Bao, Shideng; Rich, Jeremy N.

    2015-01-01

    Glioblastoma is the most prevalent and lethal primary intrinsic brain tumor. Glioblastoma displays hierarchical arrangement with a population of self-renewing and tumorigenic glioma tumor initiating cells (TICs), or cancer stem cells. While non-neoplastic neural stem cells are generally quiescent, glioblastoma TICs are often proliferative with mitotic control offering a potential point of fragility. Here, we interrogate the role of cell-division cycle protein 20 (CDC20), an essential activator of anaphase-promoting complex (APC) E3 ubiquitination ligase, in the maintenance of TICs. By chromatin analysis and immunoblotting, CDC20 was preferentially expressed in TICs relative to matched non-TICs. Targeting CDC20 expression by RNA interference attenuated TIC proliferation, self-renewal and in vivo tumor growth. CDC20 disruption mediated its effects through induction of apoptosis and inhibition of cell cycle progression. CDC20 maintains TICs through degradation of p21CIP1/WAF1, a critical negative regulator of TICs. Inhibiting CDC20 stabilized p21CIP1/WAF1, resulting in repression of several genes critical to tumor growth and survival, including CDC25C, c-Myc and Survivin. Transcriptional control of CDC20 is mediated by FOXM1, a central transcription factor in TICs. These results suggest CDC20 is a critical regulator of TIC proliferation and survival, linking two key TIC nodes – FOXM1 and p21CIP1/WAF1 — elucidating a potential point for therapeutic intervention. PMID:25938542

  17. Combination Chemotherapy in Treating Young Patients With Recurrent or Resistant Malignant Germ Cell Tumors

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-04-12

    Childhood Extracranial Germ Cell Tumor; Childhood Extragonadal Germ Cell Tumor; Childhood Malignant Ovarian Germ Cell Tumor; Childhood Malignant Testicular Germ Cell Tumor; Ovarian Choriocarcinoma; Ovarian Embryonal Carcinoma; Ovarian Yolk Sac Tumor; Recurrent Childhood Malignant Germ Cell Tumor; Recurrent Malignant Testicular Germ Cell Tumor; Recurrent Ovarian Germ Cell Tumor; Testicular Choriocarcinoma; Testicular Choriocarcinoma and Embryonal Carcinoma; Testicular Choriocarcinoma and Yolk Sac Tumor; Testicular Embryonal Carcinoma; Testicular Embryonal Carcinoma and Yolk Sac Tumor; Testicular Yolk Sac Tumor

  18. Myeloid-derived cells are key targets of tumor immunotherapy

    PubMed Central

    Medina-Echeverz, José; Aranda, Fernando; Berraondo, Pedro

    2014-01-01

    Tumors are composed of heterogeneous cell populations recruited by cancer cells to promote growth and metastasis. Among cells comprising the tumor stroma, myeloid-derived cells play pleiotropic roles in supporting tumorigenesis at distinct stages of tumor development. The tumor-infiltrating myeloid cell contingent is composed of mast cells, neutrophils, dendritic cells, macrophages, and myeloid-derived suppressor cells. Such cells are capable of evading the hostile tumor environment typically prone to immune cell destruction and can even promote angiogenesis, chronic inflammation, and invasion. This paper briefly summarizes the different myeloid-derived subsets that promote tumor development and the strategies that have been used to counteract the protumorigenic activity of these cells. These strategies include myeloid cell depletion, reduction of recruitment, and inactivation or remodeling of cell phenotype. Combining drugs designed to target tumor myeloid cells with immunotherapies that effectively trigger antitumor adaptive immune responses holds great promise in the development of novel cancer treatments. PMID:25050208

  19. Circulating tumor cells: utopia or reality?

    PubMed

    Conteduca, Vincenza; Zamarchi, Rita; Rossi, Elisabetta; Condelli, Valentina; Troiani, Laura; Aieta, Michele

    2013-09-01

    Circulating tumor cells (CTCs) could be considered a sign of tumor aggressiveness, but highly sensitive and specific methods of CTC detection are necessary owing to the rarity and heterogeneity of CTCs in peripheral blood. This review summarizes recent studies on tumor biology, with particular attention to the metastatic cascade, and the molecular characterization and clinical significance of CTCs. Recent technological approaches to enrich and detect these cells and challenges of CTCs for individualized cancer treatment are also discussed. This review also provides an insight into the positive and negative features of the future potential applications of CTC detection, which sometimes remains still a 'utopia', but its actual utility remains among the fastest growing research fields in oncology. PMID:23980681

  20. Circulating tumor cells: utopia or reality?

    PubMed

    Conteduca, Vincenza; Zamarchi, Rita; Rossi, Elisabetta; Condelli, Valentina; Troiani, Laura; Aieta, Michele

    2013-09-01

    Circulating tumor cells (CTCs) could be considered a sign of tumor aggressiveness, but highly sensitive and specific methods of CTC detection are necessary owing to the rarity and heterogeneity of CTCs in peripheral blood. This review summarizes recent studies on tumor biology, with particular attention to the metastatic cascade, and the molecular characterization and clinical significance of CTCs. Recent technological approaches to enrich and detect these cells and challenges of CTCs for individualized cancer treatment are also discussed. This review also provides an insight into the positive and negative features of the future potential applications of CTC detection, which sometimes remains still a 'utopia', but its actual utility remains among the fastest growing research fields in oncology.

  1. Recurrent Giant Cell Tumor of Skull Combined with Multiple Aneurysms

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Dae Hwan

    2016-01-01

    Giant cell tumors are benign but locally invasive and frequently recur. Giant cell tumors of the skull are extremely rare. A patient underwent a surgery to remove a tumor, but the tumor recurred. Additionally, the patient developed multiple aneurysms. The patient underwent total tumor resection and trapping for the aneurysms, followed by radiotherapy. We report this rare case and suggest some possibilities for treating tumor growth combined with aneurysm development. PMID:27195256

  2. The relationship between nuclear DNA content in salivary gland tumors and prognosis. Comparison of mucoepidermoid tumors and acinic cell tumors.

    PubMed

    Hamper, K; Caselitz, J; Arps, H; Askensten, U; Auer, G; Seifert, G

    1989-01-01

    Differences in prognosis between salivary gland mucoepidermoid tumors and acinic cell tumors were compared by means of conventional histopathological grading and nuclear DNA content which was assessed cytochemically by a scanning cytophotometric procedure. The mucoepidermoid tumors were found to show a stronger correlation between histopathological grading and prognosis than did the acinic cell tumors. By using DNA quantification, valuable additional information could be obtained for predicting the behavior of the mucoepidermoid tumors, whereas there was no correlation between DNA content and prognosis for the acinic cell tumors. Regarding the relatively "benign" clinical course of most mucoepidermoid tumors, the term "tumor"--as proposed by the World Health Organization's classification--seems appropriate. In contrast, the more severe clinical courses of the acinic cell tumors justify the use of the term "carcinoma" instead.

  3. Transcapillary Trafficking of Clustered Circulating Tumor Cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Storey, Brian; Au, Sam; Chen, Yeng-Long; Sarioglu, Fatih; Javaid, Sarah; Haber, Daniel; Maheswaran, Shyamala; Stott, Shannon; Toner, Mehmet

    2015-11-01

    Aggregates of circulating tumor cells (CTC-clusters) are known to be more metastatic than equal numbers of singlet circulating tumor cells. Yet the mechanisms responsible for CTC-cluster dissemination and tumor seeding are still largely unknown. Without direct experimental evidence, it was assumed that because of their size, CTC-clusters would occlude and rupture capillaries. In this work, we have challenged this assumption by investigating the transit of CTC-clusters through microfluidic capillary constrictions under physiological pressures. Remarkably, cancer cell aggregates containing 2-20 cells were observed to successfully traverse constrictions 5-10 microns with over 90% efficiency. Clusters rapidly and reversibly reorganized into chain-like geometries to pass through constrictions in single file. This observation was verified by computational simulation of clusters modeled with physiological cell-cell interaction energies. Hydrodynamic analysis suggested that CTC-clusters were able to pass narrow constrictions by acting as individual cells in series, not as cohesive units. Upon exiting constrictions, clusters remained viable, proliferative and rapidly returned to `typical' cluster morphologies.

  4. Molecular Culprits Generating Brain Tumor Stem Cells

    PubMed Central

    Oh, Se-Yeong

    2013-01-01

    Despite current advances in multimodality therapies, such as surgery, radiotherapy, and chemotherapy, the outcome for patients with high-grade glioma remains fatal. Understanding how glioma cells resist various therapies may provide opportunities for developing new therapies. Accumulating evidence suggests that the main obstacle for successfully treating high-grade glioma is the existence of brain tumor stem cells (BTSCs), which share a number of cellular properties with adult stem cells, such as self-renewal and multipotent differentiation capabilities. Owing to their resistance to standard therapy coupled with their infiltrative nature, BTSCs are a primary cause of tumor recurrence post-therapy. Therefore, BTSCs are thought to be the main glioma cells representing a novel therapeutic target and should be eliminated to obtain successful treatment outcomes. PMID:24904883

  5. Platelets and tumor cells: a new form of border control

    PubMed Central

    Stanger, Ben Z.; Kahn, Mark L.

    2013-01-01

    Tumor metastasis is the primary cause of death due to cancer, but the mechanisms by which tumor cells metastasize remain incompletely understood. In this issue of CancerCell, Schumacher et al. suggest that ATP released from tumor-associated platelets in the blood facilitates tumor metastasis by relaxing endothelial barrier function. PMID:23845439

  6. Distribution of photosensitizers between tumor cells and tumor infiltrating host cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Korbelik, Mladen; Krosl, Gorazd

    1994-03-01

    Photofrin levels in different cellular populations constituting a murine FsaR fibrosarcoma were measured by flow cytometry. Both myeloid and lymphoid populations associated with the tumor were found to accumulate more photosensitizer on a per cell basis, on average, than the malignant cells. Macrophages, identified by the F4/80 antigen, exceeded other myeloid cells in Photofrin accumulation. It is shown that one of the factors involved is the variability in the photosensitizer content in cells located at different distances from the nearest blood vessel. This was investigated by a flow cytometry technique with the fluorescent stain Hoechst 33342, used to distinguish cells depending on their proximity to the tumor vasculature.

  7. The biology of circulating tumor cells.

    PubMed

    Pantel, K; Speicher, M R

    2016-03-10

    Metastasis is a biologically complex process consisting of numerous stochastic events which may tremendously differ across various cancer types. Circulating tumor cells (CTCs) are cells that are shed from primary tumors and metastatic deposits into the blood stream. CTCs bear a tremendous potential to improve our understanding of steps involved in the metastatic cascade, starting from intravasation of tumor cells into the circulation until the formation of clinically detectable metastasis. These efforts were propelled by novel high-resolution approaches to dissect the genomes and transcriptomes of CTCs. Furthermore, capturing of viable CTCs has paved the way for innovative culturing technologies to study fundamental characteristics of CTCs such as invasiveness, their kinetics and responses to selection barriers, such as given therapies. Hence the study of CTCs is not only instrumental as a basic research tool, but also allows the serial monitoring of tumor genotypes and may therefore provide predictive and prognostic biomarkers for clinicians. Here, we review how CTCs have contributed to significant insights into the metastatic process and how they may be utilized in clinical practice.

  8. Radionuclide bone scanning in giant cell tumor

    SciTech Connect

    Van Nostrand, D.; Madewell, J.E.; McNiesh, L.M.; Kyle, R.W.; Sweet, D.

    1986-03-01

    Radionuclide bone scan findings are described and correlated with pathology in 23 patients with giant cell tumor (GCT) of the bone. The degree of radionuclide activity was markedly increased in 20 (87%), minimally increased in three (13%), and decreased in none of the patients. Of the 23 patients with increased radioactivity, the pattern was diffuse in 11 (48%) and doughnut in 12 (52%). Extended patterns of radioactivity were present in 19 of 22 patients; however, none were associated with true tumor extension. Bone scanning did not aid in the detection of GCT, was nonspecific, and did not differentiate benign from malignant GCT. Although radioactivity extended beyond the radiographic abnormality in the majority of patients, this was most likely secondary to other bony abnormalities or local and/or regional hyperemia, and caution should be taken in ascribing this extension to either tumor or metastasis.

  9. Primary brain tumors, neural stem cell, and brain tumor cancer cells: where is the link?

    PubMed Central

    Germano, Isabelle; Swiss, Victoria; Casaccia, Patrizia

    2010-01-01

    The discovery of brain tumor-derived cells (BTSC) with the properties of stem cells has led to the formulation of the hypothesis that neural stem cells could be the cell of origin of primary brain tumors (PBT). In this review we present the most common molecular changes in PBT, define the criteria of identification of BTSC and discuss the similarities between the characteristics of these cells and those of the endogenous population of neural stem cells (NPCs) residing in germinal areas of the adult brain. Finally, we propose possible mechanisms of cancer initiation and progression and suggest a model of tumor initiation that includes intrinsic changes of resident NSC and potential changes in the microenvironment defining the niche where the NSC reside. PMID:20045420

  10. General Information about Childhood Extracranial Germ Cell Tumors

    MedlinePlus

    ... Germ Cell Tumors Treatment (PDQ®)–Patient Version General Information About Childhood Extracranial Germ Cell Tumors Go to ... the PDQ Pediatric Treatment Editorial Board . Clinical Trial Information A clinical trial is a study to answer ...

  11. Amplification of mouse mammary tumor virus genomes in non-mammary tumor cells.

    PubMed Central

    Racevskis, J; Beyer, H

    1989-01-01

    Extra proviral copies of mouse mammary tumor virus (MMTV) are known to be present in the genomes of certain T-cell lymphomas of mice. Analysis of additional non-mammary tumor cell types known to express MMTV transcripts and antigens revealed the presence of extra acquired MMTV proviruses in a pituitary tumor cell line, a macrophage line, and Leydig testicular tumor cells. The nature of the amplified MMTV proviruses in these various tumor cell types differed with regard to copy number and presence of alterations in the long terminal repeat region. Images PMID:2535749

  12. [Cancer stemness and circulating tumor cells].

    PubMed

    Saito, Tomoko; Mimori, Koshi

    2015-05-01

    The principle concept of cancer stem cells (CSCs) giving rise to the carcinogenesis, relapse or metastasis of malignancy is broadly recognized. On the other hand, circulating tumor cells (CTCs) also plays important roles in relapse or metastasis of malignancy, and there has been much focused on the association between CSCs and CTCs in cancer cases. The technical innovations for detection of CTCs enabled us to unveil the nature of CTCs. We now realize that CTCs isolated by cell surface antibodies, such as DCLK1, LGR5 indicated CSC properties, and CTCs with epitherial-mesenchymal transition(EMT) phenotype showed characteristics of CSCs. PMID:25985635

  13. HAMLET (human alpha-lactalbumin made lethal to tumor cells) triggers autophagic tumor cell death.

    PubMed

    Aits, Sonja; Gustafsson, Lotta; Hallgren, Oskar; Brest, Patrick; Gustafsson, Mattias; Trulsson, Maria; Mossberg, Ann-Kristin; Simon, Hans-Uwe; Mograbi, Baharia; Svanborg, Catharina

    2009-03-01

    HAMLET, a complex of partially unfolded alpha-lactalbumin and oleic acid, kills a wide range of tumor cells. Here we propose that HAMLET causes macroautophagy in tumor cells and that this contributes to their death. Cell death was accompanied by mitochondrial damage and a reduction in the level of active mTOR and HAMLET triggered extensive cytoplasmic vacuolization and the formation of double-membrane-enclosed vesicles typical of macroautophagy. In addition, HAMLET caused a change from uniform (LC3-I) to granular (LC3-II) staining in LC3-GFP-transfected cells reflecting LC3 translocation during macroautophagy, and this was blocked by the macroautophagy inhibitor 3-methyladenine. HAMLET also caused accumulation of LC3-II detected by Western blot when lysosomal degradation was inhibited suggesting that HAMLET caused an increase in autophagic flux. To determine if macroautophagy contributed to cell death, we used RNA interference against Beclin-1 and Atg5. Suppression of Beclin-1 and Atg5 improved the survival of HAMLET-treated tumor cells and inhibited the increase in granular LC3-GFP staining. The results show that HAMLET triggers macroautophagy in tumor cells and suggest that macroautophagy contributes to HAMLET-induced tumor cell death.

  14. Circulating Tumor Cells Measurements in Hepatocellular Carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Chiappini, Franck

    2012-01-01

    Liver cancer is the fifth most common cancer in men and the seventh in women. During the past 20 years, the incidence of HCC has tripled while the 5-year survival rate has remained below 12%. The presence of circulating tumor cells (CTC) reflects the aggressiveness nature of a tumor. Many attempts have been made to develop assays that reliably detect and enumerate the CTC during the development of the HCC. In this case, the challenges are (1) there are few markers specific to the HCC (tumor cells versus nontumor cells) and (2) they can be used to quantify the number of CTC in the bloodstream. Another technical challenge consists of finding few CTC mixed with million leukocytes and billion erythrocytes. CTC detection and identification can be used to estimate prognosis and may serve as an early marker to assess antitumor activity of treatment. CTC can also be used to predict progression-free survival and overall survival. CTC are an interesting source of biological information in order to understand dissemination, drug resistance, and treatment-induced cell death. Our aim is to review and analyze the different new methods existing to detect, enumerate, and characterize the CTC in the peripheral circulation of patients with HCC. PMID:22690340

  15. Signaling between tumor cells and the host bone marrow microenvironment.

    PubMed

    Kovacic, Natasa; Croucher, Peter I; McDonald, Michelle M

    2014-01-01

    Tumor cells with high skeletal homing affinity express numerous cell surface receptors that bind ligands produced in bone. Upon arrival, these cells survive in the host environment, encompassed in close proximity to bone marrow cells. Interactions between tumor cells and cells of the host microenvironment are essential to not only tumor cell survival but also their activation and proliferation into environment-modifying tumors. Through the production of RANKL, PTHrP, cytokines, and integrins, activated tumor cells stimulate osteoclastogenesis, enhance bone resorption, and subsequently release matrix-bound proteins that further promote tumor growth and bone resorption. In addition, alterations in the TGF-β/BMP and Wnt signaling pathways via tumor cell growth can either stimulate or suppress osteoblastic bone formation and function, leading to sclerotic or lytic bone disease, respectively. Hence, the presence of tumor cells in bone dysregulates bone remodeling, dramatically impairing skeletal integrity. Furthermore, through complex mechanisms, cells of the immune system interact with tumor cells to further impact bone remodeling. Lastly, with alterations in bone cell activity, the environment is permissive to promoting tumor growth further, suggesting an interdependence between tumor cells and bone cells in metastatic bone disease and multiple myeloma.

  16. Ectonucleotidases in Tumor Cells and Tumor-Associated Immune Cells: An Overview

    PubMed Central

    Bergamin, Letícia Scussel; Braganhol, Elizandra; Zanin, Rafael Fernandes; Edelweiss, Maria Isabel Albano; Battastini, Ana Maria Oliveira

    2012-01-01

    Increasing evidence points out that genetic alteration does not guarantee the development of a tumor and indicates that complex interactions of tumor cells with the microenvironment are fundamental to tumorigenesis. Among the pathological alterations that give tumor cells invasive potential, disruption of inflammatory response and the purinergic signaling are emerging as an important component of cancer progression. Nucleotide/nucleoside receptor-mediated cell communication is orchestrated by ectonucleotidases, which efficiently hydrolyze ATP, ADP, and AMP to adenosine. ATP can act as danger signaling whereas adenosine, acts as a negative feedback mechanism to limit inflammation. Many tumors exhibit alterations in ATP-metabolizing enzymes, which may contribute to the pathological events observed in solid cancer. In this paper, the main changes occurring in the expression and activity of ectonucleotidases in tumor cells as well as in tumor-associated immune cells are discussed. Furthermore, we focus on the understanding of the purinergic signaling primarily as exemplified by research done by the group on gliomas. PMID:23118517

  17. Juxtaglomerular cell tumor: A case report

    PubMed Central

    YANG, HONGYUAN; WANG, ZUFEI; JI, JIANSONG

    2016-01-01

    The current study reports the case of a 29-year-old female with a long-standing history of hypertension and headaches who presented to the Outpatient Clinic of The Central Hospital of Lishui (Lishui, Zhejiang, China). Abdominal ultrasound and contrast-enhanced computed tomography were performed, which showed a left renal neoplasm, prompting a diagnosis of renal angiomyolipoma or renal cell carcinoma. After a laparoscopic partial nephrectomy was performed, a number of different diagnoses were suggested by several pathologists from eight hospitals. Considering the patient's gender, age, medical history, histopathological features and immunohistochemistry, a final diagnosis of a juxtaglomerular cell tumor (JGCT) was established. The present study therefore indicates that the possibility of a JGCT should be considered when young adults present with renal parenchymatous tumors and high blood pressure. In addition, pathologists must take clinical information into account to form a precise diagnosis. PMID:26893753

  18. How does cancer cell metabolism affect tumor migration and invasion?

    PubMed

    Han, Tianyu; Kang, De; Ji, Daokun; Wang, Xiaoyu; Zhan, Weihua; Fu, Minggui; Xin, Hong-Bo; Wang, Jian-Bin

    2013-01-01

    Cancer metastasis is the major cause of cancer-associated death. Accordingly, identification of the regulatory mechanisms that control whether or not tumor cells become "directed walkers" is a crucial issue of cancer research. The deregulation of cell migration during cancer progression determines the capacity of tumor cells to escape from the primary tumors and invade adjacent tissues to finally form metastases. The ability to switch from a predominantly oxidative metabolism to glycolysis and the production of lactate even when oxygen is plentiful is a key characteristic of cancer cells. This metabolic switch, known as the Warburg effect, was first described in 1920s, and affected not only tumor cell growth but also tumor cell migration. In this review, we will focus on the recent studies on how cancer cell metabolism affects tumor cell migration and invasion. Understanding the new aspects on molecular mechanisms and signaling pathways controlling tumor cell migration is critical for development of therapeutic strategies for cancer patients.

  19. Single-cell analyses of circulating tumor cells

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Xi-Xi; Bai, Fan

    2015-01-01

    Circulating tumor cells (CTCs) are a population of tumor cells mediating metastasis, which results in most of the cancer related deaths. The number of CTCs in the peripheral blood of patients is rare, and many platforms have been launched for detection and enrichment of CTCs. Enumeration of CTCs has already been used as a prognosis marker predicting the survival rate of cancer patients. Yet CTCs should be more potential. Studies on CTCs at single cell level may help revealing the underlying mechanism of tumorigenesis and metastasis. Though far from developed, this area of study holds much promise in providing new clinical application and deep understanding towards metastasis and cancer development. PMID:26487963

  20. Single-cell analyses of circulating tumor cells.

    PubMed

    Chen, Xi-Xi; Bai, Fan

    2015-09-01

    Circulating tumor cells (CTCs) are a population of tumor cells mediating metastasis, which results in most of the cancer related deaths. The number of CTCs in the peripheral blood of patients is rare, and many platforms have been launched for detection and enrichment of CTCs. Enumeration of CTCs has already been used as a prognosis marker predicting the survival rate of cancer patients. Yet CTCs should be more potential. Studies on CTCs at single cell level may help revealing the underlying mechanism of tumorigenesis and metastasis. Though far from developed, this area of study holds much promise in providing new clinical application and deep understanding towards metastasis and cancer development.

  1. Regulatory T Cells in Tumor-Associated Tertiary Lymphoid Structures Suppress Anti-tumor T Cell Responses.

    PubMed

    Joshi, Nikhil S; Akama-Garren, Elliot H; Lu, Yisi; Lee, Da-Yae; Chang, Gregory P; Li, Amy; DuPage, Michel; Tammela, Tuomas; Kerper, Natanya R; Farago, Anna F; Robbins, Rebecca; Crowley, Denise M; Bronson, Roderick T; Jacks, Tyler

    2015-09-15

    Infiltration of regulatory T (Treg) cells into many tumor types correlates with poor patient prognoses. However, mechanisms of intratumoral Treg cell function remain to be elucidated. We investigated Treg cell function in a genetically engineered mouse model of lung adenocarcinoma and found that Treg cells suppressed anti-tumor responses in tumor-associated tertiary lymphoid structures (TA-TLSs). TA-TLSs have been described in human lung cancers, but their function remains to be determined. TLSs in this model were spatially associated with >90% of tumors and facilitated interactions between T cells and tumor-antigen-presenting dendritic cells (DCs). Costimulatory ligand expression by DCs and T cell proliferation rates increased in TA-TLSs upon Treg cell depletion, leading to tumor destruction. Thus, we propose that Treg cells in TA-TLSs can inhibit endogenous immune responses against tumors, and targeting these cells might provide therapeutic benefit for cancer patients.

  2. Regulatory T cells in tumor-associated tertiary lymphoid structures suppress anti-tumor T cell responses

    PubMed Central

    Joshi, Nikhil S.; Akama-Garren, Elliot H.; Lu, Yisi; Lee, Da-Yae; Chang, Gregory P.; Li, Amy; DuPage, Michel; Tammela, Tuomas; Kerper, Natanya R.; Farago, Anna F.; Robbins, Rebecca; Crowley, Denise M.; Bronson, Roderick T.; Jacks, Tyler

    2016-01-01

    SUMMARY Infiltration of regulatory T (Treg) cells into many tumor types correlates with poor patient prognoses. However, mechanisms of intratumoral Treg cell function remain to be elucidated. We investigated Treg cell function in a genetically-engineered mouse lung adenocarcinoma model and found Treg cells suppress anti-tumor responses in tumor-associated tertiary lymphoid structures (TA-TLS). TA-TLS have been described in human lung cancers, but their function remains to be determined. TLS in this model were spatially associated with >90% of tumors and facilitated interactions between T cells and tumor-antigen presenting dendritic cells (DCs). Costimulatory ligand expression by DCs and T cell proliferation rates increased in TA-TLS upon Treg cell depletion, leading to tumor destruction. Thus, we propose Treg cells in TA-TLS can inhibit endogenous immune responses against tumors, and targeting these cells may provide therapeutic benefit for cancer patients. PMID:26341400

  3. Vaccine-induced tumor regression requires a dynamic cooperation between T cells and myeloid cells at the tumor site

    PubMed Central

    Thoreau, Maxime; Penny, HweiXian Leong; Tan, KarWai; Regnier, Fabienne; Weiss, Julia Miriam; Lee, Bernett; Johannes, Ludger; Dransart, Estelle; Le Bon, Agnès; Abastado, Jean-Pierre; Tartour, Eric

    2015-01-01

    Most cancer immunotherapies under present investigation are based on the belief that cytotoxic T cells are the most important anti-tumoral immune cells, whereas intra-tumoral macrophages would rather play a pro-tumoral role. We have challenged this antagonistic point of view and searched for collaborative contributions by tumor-infiltrating T cells and macrophages, reminiscent of those observed in anti-infectious responses. We demonstrate that, in a model of therapeutic vaccination, cooperation between myeloid cells and T cells is indeed required for tumor rejection. Vaccination elicited an early rise of CD11b+ myeloid cells that preceded and conditioned the intra-tumoral accumulation of CD8+ T cells. Conversely, CD8+ T cells and IFNγ production activated myeloid cells were required for tumor regression. A 4-fold reduction of CD8+ T cell infiltrate in CXCR3KO mice did not prevent tumor regression, whereas a reduction of tumor-infiltrating myeloid cells significantly interfered with vaccine efficiency. We show that macrophages from regressing tumors can kill tumor cells in two ways: phagocytosis and TNFα release. Altogether, our data suggest new strategies to improve the efficiency of cancer immunotherapies, by promoting intra-tumoral cooperation between macrophages and T cells. PMID:26337837

  4. Vaccine-induced tumor regression requires a dynamic cooperation between T cells and myeloid cells at the tumor site.

    PubMed

    Thoreau, Maxime; Penny, HweiXian Leong; Tan, KarWai; Regnier, Fabienne; Weiss, Julia Miriam; Lee, Bernett; Johannes, Ludger; Dransart, Estelle; Le Bon, Agnès; Abastado, Jean-Pierre; Tartour, Eric; Trautmann, Alain; Bercovici, Nadège

    2015-09-29

    Most cancer immunotherapies under present investigation are based on the belief that cytotoxic T cells are the most important anti-tumoral immune cells, whereas intra-tumoral macrophages would rather play a pro-tumoral role. We have challenged this antagonistic point of view and searched for collaborative contributions by tumor-infiltrating T cells and macrophages, reminiscent of those observed in anti-infectious responses. We demonstrate that, in a model of therapeutic vaccination, cooperation between myeloid cells and T cells is indeed required for tumor rejection. Vaccination elicited an early rise of CD11b+ myeloid cells that preceded and conditioned the intra-tumoral accumulation of CD8+ T cells. Conversely, CD8+ T cells and IFNγ production activated myeloid cells were required for tumor regression. A 4-fold reduction of CD8+ T cell infiltrate in CXCR3KO mice did not prevent tumor regression, whereas a reduction of tumor-infiltrating myeloid cells significantly interfered with vaccine efficiency. We show that macrophages from regressing tumors can kill tumor cells in two ways: phagocytosis and TNFα release. Altogether, our data suggest new strategies to improve the efficiency of cancer immunotherapies, by promoting intra-tumoral cooperation between macrophages and T cells. PMID:26337837

  5. Lymphatic endothelial cells support tumor growth in breast cancer

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Esak; Pandey, Niranjan B.; Popel, Aleksander S.

    2014-01-01

    Tumor lymphatic vessels (LV) serve as a conduit of tumor cell dissemination, due to their leaky nature and secretion of tumor-recruiting factors. Though lymphatic endothelial cells (LEC) lining the LV express distinct factors (also called lymphangiocrine factors), these factors and their roles in the tumor microenvironment are not well understood. Here we employ LEC, microvascular endothelial cells (MEC), and human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVEC) cultured in triple-negative MDA-MB-231 tumor-conditioned media (TCM) to determine the factors that may be secreted by various EC in the MDA-MB-231 breast tumor. These factors will serve as endothelium derived signaling molecules in the tumor microenvironment. We co-injected these EC with MDA-MB-231 breast cancer cells into animals and showed that LEC support tumor growth, HUVEC have no significant effect on tumor growth, whereas MEC suppress it. Focusing on LEC-mediated tumor growth, we discovered that TCM-treated LEC (‘tumor-educated LEC') secrete high amounts of EGF and PDGF-BB, compared to normal LEC. LEC-secreted EGF promotes tumor cell proliferation. LEC-secreted PDGF-BB induces pericyte infiltration and angiogenesis. These lymphangiocrine factors may support tumor growth in the tumor microenvironment. This study shows that LV serve a novel role in the tumor microenvironment apart from their classical role as conduits of metastasis. PMID:25068296

  6. Circulating Tumor Cells in Breast Cancer Patients.

    PubMed

    Hall, Carolyn; Valad, Lily; Lucci, Anthony

    2016-01-01

    Breast cancer is the most commonly diagnosed cancer among women, resulting in an estimated 40,000 deaths in 2014.1 Metastasis, a complex, multi-step process, remains the primary cause of death for these patients. Although the mechanisms involved in metastasis have not been fully elucidated, considerable evidence suggests that metastatic spread is mediated by rare cells within the heterogeneous primary tumor that acquire the ability to invade into the bloodstream. In the bloodstream, they can travel to distant sites, sometimes remaining undetected and in a quiescent state for an extended period of time before they establish distant metastases in the bone, lung, liver, or brain. These occult micrometastatic cells (circulating tumor cells, CTCs) are rare, yet their prognostic significance has been demonstrated in both metastatic and non-metastatic breast cancer patients. Because repeated tumor tissue collection is typically not feasible and peripheral blood draws are minimally invasive, serial CTC enumeration might provide "real-time liquid biopsy" snapshots that could be used to identify early-stage breast cancer patients with micrometastatic disease who are at risk for disease progression and monitor treatment response in patients with advanced disease. In addition, characterizing CTCs might aid in the development of novel, personalized therapies aimed at eliminating micrometastases. This review describes current CTC isolation, detection, and characterization strategies in operable breast cancer. PMID:27481009

  7. Tumor-associated stromal cells as key contributors to the tumor microenvironment.

    PubMed

    Bussard, Karen M; Mutkus, Lysette; Stumpf, Kristina; Gomez-Manzano, Candelaria; Marini, Frank C

    2016-01-01

    The tumor microenvironment is a heterogeneous population of cells consisting of the tumor bulk plus supporting cells. It is becoming increasingly evident that these supporting cells are recruited by cancer cells from nearby endogenous host stroma and promote events such as tumor angiogenesis, proliferation, invasion, and metastasis, as well as mediate mechanisms of therapeutic resistance. In addition, recruited stromal cells range in type and include vascular endothelial cells, pericytes, adipocytes, fibroblasts, and bone-marrow mesenchymal stromal cells. During normal wound healing and inflammatory processes, local stromal cells change their phenotype to become that of reactive stroma. Under certain conditions, however, tumor cells can co-opt these reactive stromal cells and further transition them into tumor-associated stromal cells (TASCs). These TASCs express higher levels of proteins, including alpha-smooth muscle actin, fibroblast activating protein, and matrix metalloproteinases, compared with their normal, non-reactive counterparts. TASCs are also known to secrete many pro-tumorigenic factors, including IL-6, IL-8, stromal-derived factor-1 alpha, vascular endothelial growth factor, tenascin-C, and matrix metalloproteinases, among others, which recruit additional tumor and pro-tumorigenic cells to the developing microenvironment. Here, we review the current literature pertaining to the origins of recruited host stroma, contributions toward tumor progression, tumor-associated stromal cells, and mechanisms of crosstalk between endogenous host stroma and tumor cells. PMID:27515302

  8. Tumor-associated macrophages promote tumor cell proliferation in nasopharyngeal NK/T-cell lymphoma

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Yixiong; Fan, Linni; Wang, Yingmei; Li, Peifeng; Zhu, Jin; Wang, Lu; Zhang, Weichen; Zhang, Yuehua; Huang, Gaosheng

    2014-01-01

    Objective: To explore the relationship between the number of tumor-associated macrophages (TAMs) and proliferative activity of tumor cells and the relationship between two macrophage biomarkers CD68 and CD163 in nasopharyngeal NK/T-cell lymphoma. Methods: Immunohistochemistry was used to reconfirm the diagnosis of nasal NK/T-cell lymphoma and detect the numbers of TAMs and the ki-67 label index of the tumor cells in all 31 cases. In addition, 12 cases of inflammatory cases were collected as controls, for which the immunostaining of CD68 and CD163 were done as well. Then staining results were analyzed with Pearson correlation and t test. Results: The number of TAMs was positively correlated with tumor proliferative activity (P = 0.024) in nasopharyngeal NK/T-cell lymphoma. The expression of CD68 and CD163 was closely related (P = 0.009), and the positive rate of CD68 was generally higher than CD163, however there is no statistical significance. Conclusion: The increase in numbers of TAMs in nasopharyngeal NK/T-cell lymphoma is related to higher proliferative index, indicating the TAMs play an important role in tumor proliferation. Meanwhile both CD68 and CD163 might be the markers for TAMs but CD163 would be the better one. PMID:25337185

  9. Giant cell tumor of the spine.

    PubMed

    Ozaki, Toshifumi; Liljenqvist, Ulf; Halm, Henry; Hillmann, Axel; Gosheger, Georg; Winkelmann, Winfried

    2002-08-01

    Six patients with giant cell tumor of the spine had surgery between 1981 and 1995. Three lesions were located in the scrum, two lesions were in the thoracic spine, and one lesion was in the lumbar spine. Preoperatively, all patients had local pain and neurologic symptoms. Two patients had cement implanted after curettage or intralesional excision of the sacral tumor; one patient had a local relapse. After the second curettage and cement implantation, the tumor was controlled. One patient with a sacral lesion had marginal excision and spondylodesis; no relapse developed. Two patients with thoracic lesions had planned marginal excision and spondylodesis; the margins finally became intralesional, but no relapse developed. One patient with a lumbar lesion had incomplete removal of the tumor and received postoperative irradiation. At the final followup (median, 69 months), five of six patients were disease-free and one patient died of disease progression. Two of the five surviving patients had pain after standing or neurologic problems. Although some contamination occurred, planning a marginal excision of the lesion seems beneficial for vertebral lesions above the sacrum. Total sacrectomy of a sacral lesion seems to be too invasive when cement implantation can control the lesion. PMID:12151896

  10. Colon tumor cells grown in NASA Bioreactor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2001-01-01

    These photos compare the results of colon carcinoma cells grown in a NASA Bioreactor flown on the STS-70 Space Shuttle in 1995 flight and ground control experiments. The cells grown in microgravity (left) have aggregated to form masses that are larger and more similar to tissue found in the body than the cells cultured on the ground (right). The principal investigator is Milburn Jessup of the University of Texas M. D. Anderson Cancer Center. The NASA Bioreactor provides a low turbulence culture environment which promotes the formation of large, three-dimensional cell clusters. Due to their high level of cellular organization and specialization, samples constructed in the bioreactor more closely resemble the original tumor or tissue found in the body. NASA-sponsored bioreactor research has been instrumental in helping scientists to better understand normal and cancerous tissue development. In cooperation with the medical community, the bioreactor design is being used to prepare better models of human colon, prostate, breast and ovarian tumors. Cartilage, bone marrow, heart muscle, skeletal muscle, pancreatic islet cells, liver and kidney are just a few of the normal tissues being cultured in rotating bioreactors by investigators. Cell constructs grown in a rotating bioreactor on Earth (left) eventually become too large to stay suspended in the nutrient media. In the microgravity of orbit, the cells stay suspended. Rotation then is needed for gentle stirring to replenish the media around the cells. The work is sponsored by NASA's Office of Biological and Physical Research. The bioreactor is managed by the Biotechnology Cell Science Program at NASA's Johnson Space Center (JSC). Credit: NASA and University of Texas M. D. Anderson Cancer Center.

  11. Granular Cell Tumor of the Toe: A Case Report

    PubMed Central

    Tamborini, Federico; Cherubino, Mario; Scamoni, Stefano; Valdatta, Luigi A.

    2010-01-01

    Granular cell tumor is a rare tumor of unknown etiology that more commonly affects the oral cavity but can also occur at other sites. The majorities of granular cell tumors are benign and present as a singular dermal nodule. We discuss a case of granular cell tumor of the fourth toe in a 54-year-old patient that was treated with conservative surgery, instead of amputation, and reconstruction with a dermal regeneration template. PMID:20862204

  12. Granular cell tumor presenting as a large leg mass.

    PubMed

    Andalib, Ali; Heidary, Mohsen; Sajadieh-Khajouei, Sahar

    2014-10-01

    Granular cell tumor is a rare benign neoplasm most commonly appears in the head and neck region, especially in the tongue, cheek mucosa, and palate. Occurrence in limbs is even rarer. These tumors account for approximately 0.5% of all soft tissue tumors. Granular cell tumor can also affect other organs including skin, breast, and lungs. Local recurrence and metastasis is potentially higher in malignant forms with poor prognosis in respect to the benign counterparts. The average diameter of the tumor is usually about 2-3 cm. We report a granular cell tumor in the leg with an unusual size. PMID:25692157

  13. Standard-Dose Combination Chemotherapy or High-Dose Combination Chemotherapy and Stem Cell Transplant in Treating Patients With Relapsed or Refractory Germ Cell Tumors

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-07-26

    Germ Cell Tumor; Teratoma; Choriocarcinoma; Germinoma; Mixed Germ Cell Tumor; Yolk Sac Tumor; Childhood Teratoma; Malignant Germ Cell Neoplasm; Extragonadal Seminoma; Non-seminomatous Germ Cell Tumor; Seminoma

  14. Inflammatory cell infiltration of tumors: Jekyll or Hyde.

    PubMed

    Talmadge, James E; Donkor, Moses; Scholar, Eric

    2007-12-01

    Inflammatory cell infiltration of tumors contributes either positively or negatively to tumor invasion, growth, metastasis, and patient outcomes, creating a Dr. Jekyll or Mr. Hyde conundrum when examining mechanisms of action. This is due to tumor heterogeneity and the diversity of the inflammatory cell phenotypes that infiltrate primary and metastatic lesions. Tumor infiltration by macrophages is generally associated with neoangiogenesis and negative outcomes, whereas dendritic cell (DC) infiltration is typically associated with a positive clinical outcome in association with their ability to present tumor antigens (Ags) and induce Ag-specific T cell responses. Myeloid-derived suppressor cells (MDSCs) also infiltrate tumors, inhibiting immune responses and facilitating tumor growth and metastasis. In contrast, T cell infiltration of tumors provides a positive prognostic surrogate, although subset analyses suggest that not all infiltrating T cells predict a positive outcome. In general, infiltration by CD8(+) T cells predicts a positive outcome, while CD4(+) cells predict a negative outcome. Therefore, the analysis of cellular phenotypes and potentially spatial distribution of infiltrating cells are critical for an accurate assessment of outcome. Similarly, cellular infiltration of metastatic foci is also a critical parameter for inducing therapeutic responses, as well as establishing tumor dormancy. Current strategies for cellular, gene, and molecular therapies are focused on the manipulation of infiltrating cellular populations. Within this review, we discuss the role of tumor infiltrating, myeloid-monocytic cells, and T lymphocytes, as well as their potential for tumor control, immunosuppression, and facilitation of metastasis. PMID:17717638

  15. Automated genotyping of circulating tumor cells.

    PubMed

    Stakenborg, Tim; Liu, Chengxun; Henry, Olivier; Borgen, Elin; Laddach, Nadja; Roeser, Tina; Ritzi-Lehnert, Marion; Fermér, Christian; Hauch, Sigfried; O'Sullivan, Ciara K; Lagae, Liesbet

    2010-09-01

    Cancer remains a prominent health concern in modern societies. Continuous innovations and introduction of new technologies are essential to level or reduce current healthcare spending. A diagnostic platform to detect circulating tumor cells (CTCs) in peripheral blood may be most promising in this respect. CTCs have been proposed as a minimally invasive, prognostic and predictive marker to reflect the biological characteristics of tumors and are implemented in an increasing number of clinical studies. Still, their detection remains a challenge as they may occur at concentrations below one single cell per ml of blood. To facilitate their detection, here we describe microfluidic modules to isolate and genotype CTCs directly from clinical blood samples. In a first cell isolation and detection module, the CTCs are immunomagnetically enriched, separated and counted. In a second module and after cell lysis, the mRNA is reversely transcripted to cDNA, followed by a multiplex ligation probe amplification of 20 specific genetic markers and two control fragments. Following the multiplex ligation probe amplification reaction, the amplified fragments are electrochemically detected in a third and final module. Besides the design of the modules, their functionality is described using control samples. Further testing using clinical samples and integration of all modules in a single, fully automated smart miniaturized system will enable minimal invasive testing for frequent detection and characterization of CTCs.

  16. Isolation of Circulating Tumor Cells by Dielectrophoresis

    PubMed Central

    Gascoyne, Peter R. C.; Shim, Sangjo

    2014-01-01

    Dielectrophoresis (DEP) is an electrokinetic method that allows intrinsic dielectric properties of suspended cells to be exploited for discrimination and separation. It has emerged as a promising method for isolating circulation tumor cells (CTCs) from blood. DEP-isolation of CTCs is independent of cell surface markers. Furthermore, isolated CTCs are viable and can be maintained in culture, suggesting that DEP methods should be more generally applicable than antibody-based approaches. The aim of this article is to review and synthesize for both oncologists and biomedical engineers interested in CTC isolation the pertinent characteristics of DEP and CTCs. The aim is to promote an understanding of the factors involved in realizing DEP-based instruments having both sufficient discrimination and throughput to allow routine analysis of CTCs in clinical practice. The article brings together: (a) the principles of DEP; (b) the biological basis for the dielectric differences between CTCs and blood cells; (c) why such differences are expected to be present for all types of tumors; and (d) instrumentation requirements to process 10 mL blood specimens in less than 1 h to enable routine clinical analysis. The force equilibrium method of dielectrophoretic field-flow fractionation (DEP-FFF) is shown to offer higher discrimination and throughput than earlier DEP trapping methods and to be applicable to clinical studies. PMID:24662940

  17. Ablative Tumor Radiation Can Change the Tumor Immune Cell Microenvironment to Induce Durable Complete Remissions

    PubMed Central

    Filatenkov, Alexander; Baker, Jeanette; Mueller, Antonia M.S.; Kenkel, Justin; Ahn, G-One; Dutt, Suparna; Zhang, Nigel; Kohrt, Holbrook; Jensen, Kent; Dejbakhsh-Jones, Sussan; Shizuru, Judith A.; Negrin, Robert N.; Engleman, Edgar G.; Strober, Samuel

    2015-01-01

    Purpose The goals of the study were to elucidate the immune mechanisms that contribute to desirable complete remissions of murine colon tumors treated with single radiation dose of 30 Gy. This dose is at the upper end of the ablative range used clinically to treat advanced or metastatic colorectal, liver, and non-small cell lung tumors. Experimental design Changes in the tumor immune microenvironment of single tumor nodules exposed to radiation were studied using 21 day (>1 cm in diameter) CT26 and MC38 colon tumors. These are well-characterized weakly immunogenic tumors. Results We found that the high dose radiation transformed the immunosuppressive tumor microenvironment resulting in an intense CD8+ T cell tumor infiltrate, and a loss of myeloid derived suppressor cells (MDSCs). The change was dependent on antigen cross-presenting CD8+ dendritic cells, secretion of IFN-γ, and CD4+ T cells expressing CD40L. Anti-tumor CD8+ T cells entered tumors shortly after radiotherapy, reversed MDSC infiltration, and mediated durable remissions in an IFN-γ dependent manner. Interestingly, extended fractionated radiation regimen did not result in robust CD8+ T cell infiltration. Conclusion For immunologically sensitive tumors, these results indicate that remissions induced by a short course of high dose radiation therapy depend on the development of anti-tumor immunity that is reflected by the nature and kinetics of changes induced in the tumor cell microenvironment. These results suggest that systematic examination of the tumor immune microenvironment may help in optimizing the radiation regimen used to treat tumors by adding a robust immune response. PMID:25869387

  18. Acoustic separation of circulating tumor cells.

    PubMed

    Li, Peng; Mao, Zhangming; Peng, Zhangli; Zhou, Lanlan; Chen, Yuchao; Huang, Po-Hsun; Truica, Cristina I; Drabick, Joseph J; El-Deiry, Wafik S; Dao, Ming; Suresh, Subra; Huang, Tony Jun

    2015-04-21

    Circulating tumor cells (CTCs) are important targets for cancer biology studies. To further elucidate the role of CTCs in cancer metastasis and prognosis, effective methods for isolating extremely rare tumor cells from peripheral blood must be developed. Acoustic-based methods, which are known to preserve the integrity, functionality, and viability of biological cells using label-free and contact-free sorting, have thus far not been successfully developed to isolate rare CTCs using clinical samples from cancer patients owing to technical constraints, insufficient throughput, and lack of long-term device stability. In this work, we demonstrate the development of an acoustic-based microfluidic device that is capable of high-throughput separation of CTCs from peripheral blood samples obtained from cancer patients. Our method uses tilted-angle standing surface acoustic waves. Parametric numerical simulations were performed to design optimum device geometry, tilt angle, and cell throughput that is more than 20 times higher than previously possible for such devices. We first validated the capability of this device by successfully separating low concentrations (∼100 cells/mL) of a variety of cancer cells from cell culture lines from WBCs with a recovery rate better than 83%. We then demonstrated the isolation of CTCs in blood samples obtained from patients with breast cancer. Our acoustic-based separation method thus offers the potential to serve as an invaluable supplemental tool in cancer research, diagnostics, drug efficacy assessment, and therapeutics owing to its excellent biocompatibility, simple design, and label-free automated operation while offering the capability to isolate rare CTCs in a viable state.

  19. Acoustic separation of circulating tumor cells

    PubMed Central

    Li, Peng; Mao, Zhangming; Peng, Zhangli; Zhou, Lanlan; Chen, Yuchao; Huang, Po-Hsun; Truica, Cristina I.; Drabick, Joseph J.; El-Deiry, Wafik S.; Dao, Ming; Suresh, Subra; Huang, Tony Jun

    2015-01-01

    Circulating tumor cells (CTCs) are important targets for cancer biology studies. To further elucidate the role of CTCs in cancer metastasis and prognosis, effective methods for isolating extremely rare tumor cells from peripheral blood must be developed. Acoustic-based methods, which are known to preserve the integrity, functionality, and viability of biological cells using label-free and contact-free sorting, have thus far not been successfully developed to isolate rare CTCs using clinical samples from cancer patients owing to technical constraints, insufficient throughput, and lack of long-term device stability. In this work, we demonstrate the development of an acoustic-based microfluidic device that is capable of high-throughput separation of CTCs from peripheral blood samples obtained from cancer patients. Our method uses tilted-angle standing surface acoustic waves. Parametric numerical simulations were performed to design optimum device geometry, tilt angle, and cell throughput that is more than 20 times higher than previously possible for such devices. We first validated the capability of this device by successfully separating low concentrations (∼100 cells/mL) of a variety of cancer cells from cell culture lines from WBCs with a recovery rate better than 83%. We then demonstrated the isolation of CTCs in blood samples obtained from patients with breast cancer. Our acoustic-based separation method thus offers the potential to serve as an invaluable supplemental tool in cancer research, diagnostics, drug efficacy assessment, and therapeutics owing to its excellent biocompatibility, simple design, and label-free automated operation while offering the capability to isolate rare CTCs in a viable state. PMID:25848039

  20. Acoustic separation of circulating tumor cells.

    PubMed

    Li, Peng; Mao, Zhangming; Peng, Zhangli; Zhou, Lanlan; Chen, Yuchao; Huang, Po-Hsun; Truica, Cristina I; Drabick, Joseph J; El-Deiry, Wafik S; Dao, Ming; Suresh, Subra; Huang, Tony Jun

    2015-04-21

    Circulating tumor cells (CTCs) are important targets for cancer biology studies. To further elucidate the role of CTCs in cancer metastasis and prognosis, effective methods for isolating extremely rare tumor cells from peripheral blood must be developed. Acoustic-based methods, which are known to preserve the integrity, functionality, and viability of biological cells using label-free and contact-free sorting, have thus far not been successfully developed to isolate rare CTCs using clinical samples from cancer patients owing to technical constraints, insufficient throughput, and lack of long-term device stability. In this work, we demonstrate the development of an acoustic-based microfluidic device that is capable of high-throughput separation of CTCs from peripheral blood samples obtained from cancer patients. Our method uses tilted-angle standing surface acoustic waves. Parametric numerical simulations were performed to design optimum device geometry, tilt angle, and cell throughput that is more than 20 times higher than previously possible for such devices. We first validated the capability of this device by successfully separating low concentrations (∼100 cells/mL) of a variety of cancer cells from cell culture lines from WBCs with a recovery rate better than 83%. We then demonstrated the isolation of CTCs in blood samples obtained from patients with breast cancer. Our acoustic-based separation method thus offers the potential to serve as an invaluable supplemental tool in cancer research, diagnostics, drug efficacy assessment, and therapeutics owing to its excellent biocompatibility, simple design, and label-free automated operation while offering the capability to isolate rare CTCs in a viable state. PMID:25848039

  1. Inhibition of metastatic tumor growth and metastasis via targeting metastatic breast cancer by chlorotoxin-modified liposomes.

    PubMed

    Qin, Chao; He, Bing; Dai, Wenbing; Zhang, Hua; Wang, Xueqing; Wang, Jiancheng; Zhang, Xuan; Wang, Guangji; Yin, Lifang; Zhang, Qiang

    2014-10-01

    A liposome system modified with chlorotoxin (ClTx), a scorpion venom peptide previously utilized for targeting brain tumors, was established. Its targeting efficiency and antimetastasis behavior against metastatic breast cancer highly expressed MMP-2, the receptor of ClTx, were investigated. 4T1, a metastatic breast cancer cell line derived from a murine breast tumor, was selected as the cell model. As results, the ClTx-modified liposomes displayed specific binding to 4T1 as determined by flow cytometry and confocal imaging. The cytotoxicity assay revealed that the ClTx modification increased the toxicity compared with nonmodified liposomes. In addition, the modified liposomes also exhibited high in vivo targeting efficiency in the BALB/c mice bearing 4T1 tumors. Importantly, this system inhibited the growth of metastatic tumor and prevented the incidence of lung metastasis in mice bearing 4T1 tumors with only low systemic toxicity. The data obtained from the in vitro and in vivo studies confirmed that the ClTx-modified liposomes increased the drug delivery to metastatic breast cancers. This study proved that the ClTx-modified liposomes had targeting ability to metastatic breast cancer in addition to brain cancer, and displayed an obvious antimetastasis effect. Generally, it may provide a promising strategy for metastatic breast cancer therapy.

  2. T cells from the tumor microenvironment of patients with progressive myeloma can generate strong, tumor-specific cytolytic responses to autologous, tumor-loaded dendritic cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dhodapkar, Madhav V.; Krasovsky, Joseph; Olson, Kara

    2002-10-01

    Most untreated cancer patients develop progressive tumors. We tested the capacity of T lymphocytes from patients with clinically progressive, multiple myeloma to develop killer function against fresh autologous tumor. In this malignancy, it is feasible to reproducibly evaluate freshly isolated tumor cells and T cells from the marrow tumor environment. When we did this with seven consecutive patients, with all clinical stages of disease, we did not detect reactivity to autologous cancer cells. However, both cytolytic and IFN--producing responses to autologous myeloma were generated in six of seven patients after stimulation ex vivo with dendritic cells that had processed autologous tumor cells. The antitumor effectors recognized fresh autologous tumor but not nontumor cells in the bone marrow, myeloma cell lines, dendritic cells loaded with tumor-derived Ig, or allogeneic tumor. Importantly, these CD8+ effectors developed with similar efficiency by using T cells from both the blood and the bone marrow tumor environment. Therefore, even in the setting of clinical tumor progression, the tumor bed of myeloma patients contains T cells that can be activated readily by dendritic cells to kill primary autologous tumor.

  3. The Carbamoylmannose Moiety of Bleomycin Mediates Selective Tumor Cell Targeting

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Recently, we reported that both bleomycin (BLM) and its disaccharide, conjugated to the cyanine dye Cy5**, bound selectively to cancer cells. Thus, the disaccharide moiety alone recapitulates the tumor cell targeting properties of BLM. Here, we demonstrate that the conjugate of the BLM carbamoylmannose moiety with Cy5** showed tumor cell selective binding and also enhanced cellular uptake in most cancer cell lines. The carbamoyl functionality was required for tumor cell targeting. A dye conjugate prepared from a trivalent cluster of carbamoylmannose exhibited levels of tumor cell binding and internalization significantly greater than those of the simple carbamoylmannose–dye conjugate, consistent with a possible multivalent receptor. PMID:24811347

  4. Risk assessment of thyroid follicular cell tumors.

    PubMed Central

    Hill, R N; Crisp, T M; Hurley, P M; Rosenthal, S L; Singh, D V

    1998-01-01

    Thyroid follicular cell tumors arise in rodents from mutations, perturbations of thyroid and pituitary hormone status with increased stimulation of thyroid cell growth by thyroid-stimulating hormone (TSH), or a combination of the two. The only known human thyroid carcinogen is ionizing radiation. It is not known for certain whether chemicals that affect thyroid cell growth lead to human thyroid cancer. The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency applies the following science policy positions: 1) chemically induced rodent thyroid tumors are presumed to be relevant to humans; 2) when interspecies information is lacking, the default is to assume comparable carcinogenic sensitivity in rodents and humans; 3) adverse rodent noncancer thyroid effects due to chemically induced thyroid-pituitary disruption are presumed to be relevant to humans; 4) linear dose-response considerations are applied to thyroid cancer induced by chemical substances that either do not disrupt thyroid functioning or lack mode of action information; 5) nonlinear thyroid cancer dose-response considerations are applied to chemicals that reduce thyroid hormone levels, increase TSH and thyroid cell division, and are judged to lack mutagenic activity; and 6) nonlinear considerations may be applied in thyroid cancer dose-response assessments on a case-by-case basis for chemicals that disrupt thyroid-pituitary functioning and demonstrate some mutagenic activity. Required data for risk assessment purposes is mode of action information on mutagenicity, increases in follicular cell growth (cell size and number) and thyroid gland weight, thyroid-pituitary hormones, site of action, correlations between doses producing thyroid effects and cancer, and reversibility of effects when dosing ceases. Images Figure 1 Figure 2 Figure 3 PMID:9681971

  5. Late Relapse of Testicular Germ Cell Tumors.

    PubMed

    O'Shaughnessy, Matthew J; Feldman, Darren R; Carver, Brett S; Sheinfeld, Joel

    2015-08-01

    Germ cell tumors of the testis have an overall survival rate greater than 90% as a result of a successful multidisciplinary approach to management. Late relapse affects a subset of patients however, and tends to be chemorefractory and the overall prognosis is poor. Surgery is the mainstay in management of late relapse but salvage chemotherapy can be successful. In this review, the clinical presentation and detection of late relapse, clinical outcomes, and predictors of survival in late relapse and the importance of a multidisciplinary treatment approach for successful management of late relapse are discussed. PMID:26216823

  6. Tumoral expression of IL-33 inhibits tumor growth and modifies the tumor microenvironment through CD8+ T and NK cells

    PubMed Central

    Gao, Xin; Wang, Xuefeng; Yang, Qianting; Zhao, Xin; Wen, Wen; Li, Gang; Lu, Junfeng; Qin, Wenxin; Qi, Yuan; Xie, Fang; Jiang, Jingting; Wu, Changping; Zhang, Xueguang; Chen, Xinchun; Turnquist, Heth; Zhu, Yibei; Lu, Binfeng

    2014-01-01

    Cancer immunotherapy has shown great promise as a new standard cancer therapeutic modality. However, the response rates are limited for current approach that depends on enhancing spontaneous antitumor immune responses. Therefore, increasing tumor immunogenicity by expressing appropriate cytokines should further improve the current immunotherapy. Interleukin-33 is a member of the IL-1 family of cytokines and is released by necrotic epithelial cells or activated innate immune cells and is thus considered a “danger” signal. The role of IL-33 in promoting type 2 immune responses and tissue inflammation has been well established. However, whether IL-33 drives antitumor immune responses is controversial. Our previous work established that IL-33 promoted the function of CD8+ T cells. Here, we showed that the expression of IL-33 in two types of cancer cells potently inhibited tumor growth and metastasis. Mechanistically, IL-33 increased numbers and IFNγ production by CD8+ T and NK cells in tumor tissues, thereby inducing a tumor microenvironment favoring tumor eradication. Importantly, IL-33 greatly increased tumor-antigen-specific CD8+ T cells. Furthermore, both NK and CD8+ T cells were required for the antitumor effect of IL-33. Moreover, depletion of regulatory T cells (Treg) worked synergistically with IL-33 expression for tumor elimination. Our studies established “alarmin” IL-33 as a promising new cytokine for tumor immunotherapy through promoting cancer-eradicating type 1 immune responses. PMID:25429071

  7. Single Unpurified Breast Tumor-Initiating Cells from Multiple Mouse Models Efficiently Elicit Tumors in Immune-Competent Hosts

    PubMed Central

    Kurpios, Natasza A.; Girgis-Gabardo, Adele; Hallett, Robin M.; Rogers, Stephen; Gludish, David W.; Kockeritz, Lisa; Woodgett, James; Cardiff, Robert; Hassell, John A.

    2013-01-01

    The tumor-initiating cell (TIC) frequency of bulk tumor cell populations is one of the criteria used to distinguish malignancies that follow the cancer stem cell model from those that do not. However, tumor-initiating cell frequencies may be influenced by experimental conditions and the extent to which tumors have progressed, parameters that are not always addressed in studies of these cells. We employed limiting dilution cell transplantation of minimally manipulated tumor cells from mammary tumors of several transgenic mouse models to determine their tumor-initiating cell frequency. We determined whether the tumors that formed following tumor cell transplantation phenocopied the primary tumors from which they were isolated and whether they could be serially transplanted. Finally we investigated whether propagating primary tumor cells in different tissue culture conditions affected their resident tumor-initiating cell frequency. We found that tumor-initiating cells comprised between 15% and 50% of the bulk tumor cell population in multiple independent mammary tumors from three different transgenic mouse models of breast cancer. Culture of primary mammary tumor cells in chemically-defined, serum-free medium as non-adherent tumorspheres preserved TIC frequency to levels similar to that of the primary tumors from which they were established. By contrast, propagating the primary tumor cells in serum-containing medium as adherent populations resulted in a several thousand-fold reduction in their tumor-initiating cell fraction. Our findings suggest that experimental conditions, including the sensitivity of the transplantation assay, can dramatically affect estimates of tumor initiating cell frequency. Moreover, conditional on cell culture conditions, the tumor-initiating cell fraction of bulk mouse mammary tumor cell preparations can either be maintained at high or low frequency in vitro thus permitting comparative studies of tumorigenic and non-tumorigenic cancer cells

  8. Glucosamine and N-acetyl glucosamine as new CEST MRI agents for molecular imaging of tumors.

    PubMed

    Rivlin, Michal; Navon, Gil

    2016-01-01

    The efficacy of glucosamine (GlcN) and N-acetyl glucosamine (GlcNAc) as agents for chemical exchange saturation transfer (CEST) magnetic resonance molecular imaging of tumors is demonstrated. Both agents reflect the metabolic activity and malignancy of the tumors. The method was tested in two types of tumors implanted orthotopically in mice: 4T1 (mouse mammary cancer cells) and MCF7 (human mammary cancer cells). 4T1 is a more aggressive type of tumor than MCF7 and exhibited a larger CEST effect. Two methods of administration of the agents, intravenous (IV) and oral (PO), gave similar results. The CEST MRI observation of lung metastasis was confirmed by histology. The potential of the clinical application of CEST MRI with these agents for cancer diagnosis is strengthened by their lack of toxicity as can be indicated from their wide use as food supplements. PMID:27600054

  9. Glucosamine and N-acetyl glucosamine as new CEST MRI agents for molecular imaging of tumors

    PubMed Central

    Rivlin, Michal; Navon, Gil

    2016-01-01

    The efficacy of glucosamine (GlcN) and N-acetyl glucosamine (GlcNAc) as agents for chemical exchange saturation transfer (CEST) magnetic resonance molecular imaging of tumors is demonstrated. Both agents reflect the metabolic activity and malignancy of the tumors. The method was tested in two types of tumors implanted orthotopically in mice: 4T1 (mouse mammary cancer cells) and MCF7 (human mammary cancer cells). 4T1 is a more aggressive type of tumor than MCF7 and exhibited a larger CEST effect. Two methods of administration of the agents, intravenous (IV) and oral (PO), gave similar results. The CEST MRI observation of lung metastasis was confirmed by histology. The potential of the clinical application of CEST MRI with these agents for cancer diagnosis is strengthened by their lack of toxicity as can be indicated from their wide use as food supplements. PMID:27600054

  10. A think tank of TINK/TANKs: tumor-infiltrating/tumor-associated natural killer cells in tumor progression and angiogenesis.

    PubMed

    Bruno, Antonino; Ferlazzo, Guido; Albini, Adriana; Noonan, Douglas M

    2014-08-01

    Tumor-infiltrating leukocytes are often induced by the cancer microenvironment to display a protumor, proangiogenic phenotype. This "polarization" has been described for several myeloid cells, in particular macrophages. Natural killer (NK) cells represent another population of innate immune cells able to infiltrate tumors. The role of NK in tumor progression and angiogenesis has not yet been fully investigated. Several studies have shown that tumor-infiltrating NK (here referred to as "TINKs") and tumor-associated NK (altered peripheral NK cells, which here we call "TANKs") are compromised in their ability to lysew tumor cells. Recent data have suggested that they are potentially protumorigenic and can also acquire a proangiogenic phenotype. Here we review the properties of TINKs and TANKs and compare their activities to that of NK cells endowed with a physiological proangiogenic phenotype, in particular decidual NK cells. We speculate on the potential origins of TINKs and TANKs and on the immune signals involved in their differentiation and polarization. The TINK and TANK phenotype has broad implications in the immune response to tumors, ranging from a deficient control of cancer and cancer stem cells to an altered crosstalk with other relevant players of the immune response, such as dendritic cells, to induction of cancer angiogenesis. With this recently acquired knowledge that has not yet been put into perspective, we point out new potential avenues for therapeutic intervention involving NK cells as a target or an ally in oncology.

  11. Solid Tumor Therapy Using a Cannon and Pawn Combination Strategy.

    PubMed

    Song, Wantong; Tang, Zhaohui; Zhang, Dawei; Wen, Xue; Lv, Shixian; Liu, Zhilin; Deng, Mingxiao; Chen, Xuesi

    2016-01-01

    Nanocarrier-based anti-tumor drugs hold great promise for reducing side effects and improving tumor-site drug retention in the treatment of solid tumors. However, therapeutic outcomes are still limited, primarily due to a lack of drug penetration within most tumor tissues. Herein, we propose a strategy using a nanocarrier-based combination of vascular disrupting agents (VDAs) and cytotoxic drugs for solid tumor therapy. Specifically, combretastatin A-4 (CA4) serves as a "cannon" by eradicating tumor cells at a distance from blood vessels; concomitantly, doxorubicin (DOX) serves as a "pawn" by killing tumor cells in close proximity to blood vessels. This "cannon and pawn" combination strategy acts without a need to penetrate every tumor cell and is expected to eliminate all tumor cells in a solid tumor. In a murine C26 colon tumor model, this strategy proved effective in eradicating greater than 94% of tumor cells and efficiently inhibited tumor growth with a weekly injection. In large solid tumor models (C26 and 4T1 tumors with volumes of approximately 250 mm(3)), this strategy also proved effective for inhibiting tumor growth. These results showing remarkable inhibition of tumor growth provide a valuable therapeutic choice for solid tumor therapy. PMID:27217835

  12. Solid Tumor Therapy Using a Cannon and Pawn Combination Strategy

    PubMed Central

    Song, Wantong; Tang, Zhaohui; Zhang, Dawei; Wen, Xue; Lv, Shixian; Liu, Zhilin; Deng, Mingxiao; Chen, Xuesi

    2016-01-01

    Nanocarrier-based anti-tumor drugs hold great promise for reducing side effects and improving tumor-site drug retention in the treatment of solid tumors. However, therapeutic outcomes are still limited, primarily due to a lack of drug penetration within most tumor tissues. Herein, we propose a strategy using a nanocarrier-based combination of vascular disrupting agents (VDAs) and cytotoxic drugs for solid tumor therapy. Specifically, combretastatin A-4 (CA4) serves as a “cannon” by eradicating tumor cells at a distance from blood vessels; concomitantly, doxorubicin (DOX) serves as a “pawn” by killing tumor cells in close proximity to blood vessels. This “cannon and pawn” combination strategy acts without a need to penetrate every tumor cell and is expected to eliminate all tumor cells in a solid tumor. In a murine C26 colon tumor model, this strategy proved effective in eradicating greater than 94% of tumor cells and efficiently inhibited tumor growth with a weekly injection. In large solid tumor models (C26 and 4T1 tumors with volumes of approximately 250 mm3), this strategy also proved effective for inhibiting tumor growth. These results showing remarkable inhibition of tumor growth provide a valuable therapeutic choice for solid tumor therapy. PMID:27217835

  13. Non-coding RNAs regulate tumor cell plasticity.

    PubMed

    Liu, Bodu; Sun, Lijuan; Song, Erwei

    2013-10-01

    Tumor metastasis is one of the most serious challenges for human cancers as the majority of deaths caused by cancer are associated with metastasis, rather than the primary tumor. Recent studies have demonstrated that tumor cell plasticity plays a critical role in tumor metastasis by giving rise to various cell types which is necessary for tumor to invade adjacent tissues and form distant metastasis. These include differentiation of cancer stem cells (CSCs), or epithelial-mesenchymal transition (EMT) and its reverse process, mesenchymal-epithelial transition (MET). A growing body of evidence has demonstrated that the biology of tumor cell plasticity is tightly linked to functions of non-coding RNAs (ncRNAs), especially microRNAs (miRNAs) and long non-coding RNAs (lncRNAs). Therefore, understanding the mechanisms how non-coding RNAs regulate tumor cell plasticity is essential for discovery of new diagnostic markers and therapeutic targets to overcome metastasis.

  14. Expression of hyaluronidase by tumor cells induces angiogenesis in vivo.

    PubMed Central

    Liu, D; Pearlman, E; Diaconu, E; Guo, K; Mori, H; Haqqi, T; Markowitz, S; Willson, J; Sy, M S

    1996-01-01

    Hyaluronic acid is a proteoglycan present in the extracellular matrix and is important for the maintenance of tissue architecture. Depolymerization of hyaluronic acid may facilitate tumor invasion. In addition, oligosaccharides of hyaluronic acid have been reported to induce angiogenesis. We report here that a hyaluronidase similar to the one on human sperm is expressed by metastatic human melanoma, colon carcinoma, and glioblastoma cell lines and by tumor biopsies from patients with colorectal carcinomas, but not by tissues from normal colon. Moreover, angiogenesis is induced by hyaluronidase+ tumor cells but not hyaluronidase- tumor cells and can be blocked by an inhibitor of hyaluronidase. Tumor cells thus use hyaluronidase as one of the "molecular saboteurs" to depolymerize hyaluronic acid to facilitate invasion. As a consequence, breakdown products of hyaluronic acid can further promote tumor establishment by inducing angiogenesis. Hyaluronidase on tumor cells may provide a target for anti-neoplastic drugs. Images Fig. 1 Fig. 2 Fig. 3 PMID:8755562

  15. Tumor-Induced Myeloid-Derived Suppressor Cells.

    PubMed

    De Sanctis, Francesco; Bronte, Vincenzo; Ugel, Stefano

    2016-06-01

    Myeloid-derived suppressor cells (MDSCs) represent a heterogeneous, immune-suppressive leukocyte population that develops systemically and infiltrates tumors. MDSCs can restrain the immune response through different mechanisms including essential metabolite consumption, reactive oxygen and nitrogen species production, as well as display of inhibitory surface molecules that alter T-cell trafficking and viability. Moreover, MDSCs play a role in tumor progression, acting directly on tumor cells and promoting cancer stemness, angiogenesis, stroma deposition, epithelial-to-mesenchymal transition, and metastasis formation. Many biological and pharmaceutical drugs affect MDSC expansion and functions in preclinical tumor models and patients, often reversing host immune dysfunctions and allowing a more effective tumor immunotherapy.

  16. Circulating Tumor Cell and Cell-free Circulating Tumor DNA in Lung Cancer.

    PubMed

    Nurwidya, Fariz; Zaini, Jamal; Putra, Andika Chandra; Andarini, Sita; Hudoyo, Achmad; Syahruddin, Elisna; Yunus, Faisal

    2016-09-01

    Circulating tumor cells (CTCs) are tumor cells that are separated from the primary site or metastatic lesion and disseminate in blood circulation. CTCs are considered to be part of the long process of cancer metastasis. As a 'liquid biopsy', CTC molecular examination and investigation of single cancer cells create an important opportunity for providing an understanding of cancer biology and the process of metastasis. In the last decade, we have seen dramatic development in defining the role of CTCs in lung cancer in terms of diagnosis, genomic alteration determination, treatment response and, finally, prognosis prediction. The aims of this review are to understand the basic biology and to review methods of detection of CTCs that apply to the various types of solid tumor. Furthermore, we explored clinical applications, including treatment monitoring to anticipate therapy resistance as well as biomarker analysis, in the context of lung cancer. We also explored the potential use of cell-free circulating tumor DNA (ctDNA) in the genomic alteration analysis of lung cancer. PMID:27689025

  17. Circulating Tumor Cell and Cell-free Circulating Tumor DNA in Lung Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Zaini, Jamal; Putra, Andika Chandra; Andarini, Sita; Hudoyo, Achmad; Syahruddin, Elisna; Yunus, Faisal

    2016-01-01

    Circulating tumor cells (CTCs) are tumor cells that are separated from the primary site or metastatic lesion and disseminate in blood circulation. CTCs are considered to be part of the long process of cancer metastasis. As a 'liquid biopsy', CTC molecular examination and investigation of single cancer cells create an important opportunity for providing an understanding of cancer biology and the process of metastasis. In the last decade, we have seen dramatic development in defining the role of CTCs in lung cancer in terms of diagnosis, genomic alteration determination, treatment response and, finally, prognosis prediction. The aims of this review are to understand the basic biology and to review methods of detection of CTCs that apply to the various types of solid tumor. Furthermore, we explored clinical applications, including treatment monitoring to anticipate therapy resistance as well as biomarker analysis, in the context of lung cancer. We also explored the potential use of cell-free circulating tumor DNA (ctDNA) in the genomic alteration analysis of lung cancer. PMID:27689025

  18. Circulating Tumor Cell and Cell-free Circulating Tumor DNA in Lung Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Zaini, Jamal; Putra, Andika Chandra; Andarini, Sita; Hudoyo, Achmad; Syahruddin, Elisna; Yunus, Faisal

    2016-01-01

    Circulating tumor cells (CTCs) are tumor cells that are separated from the primary site or metastatic lesion and disseminate in blood circulation. CTCs are considered to be part of the long process of cancer metastasis. As a 'liquid biopsy', CTC molecular examination and investigation of single cancer cells create an important opportunity for providing an understanding of cancer biology and the process of metastasis. In the last decade, we have seen dramatic development in defining the role of CTCs in lung cancer in terms of diagnosis, genomic alteration determination, treatment response and, finally, prognosis prediction. The aims of this review are to understand the basic biology and to review methods of detection of CTCs that apply to the various types of solid tumor. Furthermore, we explored clinical applications, including treatment monitoring to anticipate therapy resistance as well as biomarker analysis, in the context of lung cancer. We also explored the potential use of cell-free circulating tumor DNA (ctDNA) in the genomic alteration analysis of lung cancer.

  19. Bilateral acinous cell tumors of the parotid gland.

    PubMed

    Nelson, D W; Nichols, R D; Fine, G

    1978-12-01

    Acinous cell tumors are uncommon neoplasms which arise either from the secretory cells of the salivary gland acini or from pluripotential duct cells and occur almost exclusively in the parotid gland. Nine previous instances of the bilateral occurrence of this tumor in the parotid gland have been reported. We present a tenth case and illustrate several aspects of the clinical behavior of this unique tumor. The histological pattern of this type of tumor was considered universally to be benign until 1953 when attention was called to a malignant variant. It is difficult to find reference to a benign form after that time. It is, in fact, impossible to forecast the clinical behavior of an individual specimen based upon its histopathology. In order to recognize this unpredictability, the World Health Organization Classification of Epithelial Tumors of Salivary Gland Origin proposed a category, "Acinic Cell Tumors," separate from clearly benign or malignant neoplasms. Later, attention was called to the grammatical designation, "acinous cell tumor." Because acinous cell tumors are uncommon, numerically significant series are gathered from several institutions or over several decades during which treatment methods vary widely. This makes it difficult to accept the validity of conclusions based upon the reported data. There is, however, a clearly documented tendency of the tumor to recur after long symptomless intervals so that extended follow-up is necessary before "cure" is established. Treatment of acinous cell tumors is surgical. The value of radiation therapy in the management of recurrent tumors is not firmly established.

  20. Tumor infiltrating immune cells in gliomas and meningiomas.

    PubMed

    Domingues, Patrícia; González-Tablas, María; Otero, Álvaro; Pascual, Daniel; Miranda, David; Ruiz, Laura; Sousa, Pablo; Ciudad, Juana; Gonçalves, Jesús María; Lopes, María Celeste; Orfao, Alberto; Tabernero, María Dolores

    2016-03-01

    Tumor-infiltrating immune cells are part of a complex microenvironment that promotes and/or regulates tumor development and growth. Depending on the type of cells and their functional interactions, immune cells may play a key role in suppressing the tumor or in providing support for tumor growth, with relevant effects on patient behavior. In recent years, important advances have been achieved in the characterization of immune cell infiltrates in central nervous system (CNS) tumors, but their role in tumorigenesis and patient behavior still remain poorly understood. Overall, these studies have shown significant but variable levels of infiltration of CNS tumors by macrophage/microglial cells (TAM) and to a less extent also lymphocytes (particularly T-cells and NK cells, and less frequently also B-cells). Of note, TAM infiltrate gliomas at moderate numbers where they frequently show an immune suppressive phenotype and functional behavior; in contrast, infiltration by TAM may be very pronounced in meningiomas, particularly in cases that carry isolated monosomy 22, where the immune infiltrates also contain greater numbers of cytotoxic T and NK-cells associated with an enhanced anti-tumoral immune response. In line with this, the presence of regulatory T cells, is usually limited to a small fraction of all meningiomas, while frequently found in gliomas. Despite these differences between gliomas and meningiomas, both tumors show heterogeneous levels of infiltration by immune cells with variable functionality. In this review we summarize current knowledge about tumor-infiltrating immune cells in the two most common types of CNS tumors-gliomas and meningiomas-, as well as the role that such immune cells may play in the tumor microenvironment in controlling and/or promoting tumor development, growth and control.

  1. Tumor-induced myeloid deviation: when myeloid-derived suppressor cells meet tumor-associated macrophages

    PubMed Central

    Ugel, Stefano; De Sanctis, Francesco; Mandruzzato, Susanna; Bronte, Vincenzo

    2015-01-01

    The generation of an inflammatory environment is favorable and often decisive for the growth of both primary tumors and metastases. Tumor cells either express membrane molecules or release tumor-derived soluble factors able to alter myelopoiesis. Tumor-reprogrammed myeloid cells not only create a tolerogenic environment by blocking T cell functions and proliferation, but also directly drive tumor growth by promoting cancer stemness, angiogenesis, stroma deposition, epithelial-to-mesenchymal transition, and metastasis formation. In this Review, we discuss the interplay between immunosuppressive and protumoral myeloid cells and detail their immune-regulatory mechanisms, the molecular pathways involved in their differentiation, as well as their potential role as prognostic and diagnostic biomarkers and prospective targets for innovative approaches to treat tumor-bearing hosts. PMID:26325033

  2. Tumor-induced myeloid deviation: when myeloid-derived suppressor cells meet tumor-associated macrophages.

    PubMed

    Ugel, Stefano; De Sanctis, Francesco; Mandruzzato, Susanna; Bronte, Vincenzo

    2015-09-01

    The generation of an inflammatory environment is favorable and often decisive for the growth of both primary tumors and metastases. Tumor cells either express membrane molecules or release tumor-derived soluble factors able to alter myelopoiesis. Tumor-reprogrammed myeloid cells not only create a tolerogenic environment by blocking T cell functions and proliferation, but also directly drive tumor growth by promoting cancer stemness, angiogenesis, stroma deposition, epithelial-to-mesenchymal transition, and metastasis formation. In this Review, we discuss the interplay between immunosuppressive and protumoral myeloid cells and detail their immune-regulatory mechanisms, the molecular pathways involved in their differentiation, as well as their potential role as prognostic and diagnostic biomarkers and prospective targets for innovative approaches to treat tumor-bearing hosts.

  3. Clear cell tumors of the lower respiratory tract.

    PubMed

    Gaffey, M J; Mills, S E; Ritter, J H

    1997-11-01

    Clear cell tumors of the lower respiratory tract comprise a diverse group of lesions. The prototypical lesion is the benign clear cell tumor or "sugar tumor," a tumor of enigmatic histogenesis, whose name derives from the high glycogen content of the cells. Analogous to the salivary gland lesion of the same name, acinic cell tumors may also occur in the tracheobroncheal tree. The topic of "clear cell carcinoma" is discussed, which in the opinion of the authors does not constitute a distinct tumor entity. A discussion of potential lesion metastatic to the lung with clear cell histology is also presented. Histological details of the various entities are discussed, as well as the significant histochemical, immunohistological, and electron microscopic features; in particular, such findings that are relevant to differential diagnosis are stressed, including the distinction of primary and metastatic lesions.

  4. [Prevalence and clinicopathological characteristics of giant cell tumors].

    PubMed

    Estrada-Villaseñor, E G; Linares-González, L M; Delgado-Cedillo, E A; González-Guzmán, R; Rico-Martínez, G

    2015-01-01

    The frequency of giant cell tumors reported in the literature is very variable. Considering that our population has its own features, which distinguish it from the Anglo-Saxon and Asian populations, we think that both the frequency and the clinical characteristics of giant cell tumors in our population are different. The major aim of this paper was to determine the frequency and clinicopathological characteristics of giant cell tumors of the bone. A cross-sectional descriptive study was conducted of the cases diagnosed at our service as giant cell tumors of the bone from January to December 2013. The electronic clinical records, radiologic records and histologic slides from each case were reviewed. Giant cell tumors represented 17% of total bone tumors and 28% of benign tumors. Patients included 13 females and 18 males. The most frequent locations of giant cell tumors were: the proximal tibia, 9 cases (29%), and the distal femur, 6 cases (19%). Forty-five percent of giant cell tumors were associated with aneurysmal bone cyst (ABC) (14 cases) and one case (3%) was malignant. The frequency of giant cell tumors in this case series was intermediate, that is, higher than the one reported in Anglo-Saxon countries (usually low), but without reaching the frequency rates reported in Asian countries (high).

  5. [Prevalence and clinicopathological characteristics of giant cell tumors].

    PubMed

    Estrada-Villaseñor, E G; Linares-González, L M; Delgado-Cedillo, E A; González-Guzmán, R; Rico-Martínez, G

    2015-01-01

    The frequency of giant cell tumors reported in the literature is very variable. Considering that our population has its own features, which distinguish it from the Anglo-Saxon and Asian populations, we think that both the frequency and the clinical characteristics of giant cell tumors in our population are different. The major aim of this paper was to determine the frequency and clinicopathological characteristics of giant cell tumors of the bone. A cross-sectional descriptive study was conducted of the cases diagnosed at our service as giant cell tumors of the bone from January to December 2013. The electronic clinical records, radiologic records and histologic slides from each case were reviewed. Giant cell tumors represented 17% of total bone tumors and 28% of benign tumors. Patients included 13 females and 18 males. The most frequent locations of giant cell tumors were: the proximal tibia, 9 cases (29%), and the distal femur, 6 cases (19%). Forty-five percent of giant cell tumors were associated with aneurysmal bone cyst (ABC) (14 cases) and one case (3%) was malignant. The frequency of giant cell tumors in this case series was intermediate, that is, higher than the one reported in Anglo-Saxon countries (usually low), but without reaching the frequency rates reported in Asian countries (high). PMID:27403516

  6. Tumor Heterogeneity, Single-Cell Sequencing, and Drug Resistance

    PubMed Central

    Schmidt, Felix; Efferth, Thomas

    2016-01-01

    Tumor heterogeneity has been compared with Darwinian evolution and survival of the fittest. The evolutionary ecosystem of tumors consisting of heterogeneous tumor cell populations represents a considerable challenge to tumor therapy, since all genetically and phenotypically different subpopulations have to be efficiently killed by therapy. Otherwise, even small surviving subpopulations may cause repopulation and refractory tumors. Single-cell sequencing allows for a better understanding of the genomic principles of tumor heterogeneity and represents the basis for more successful tumor treatments. The isolation and sequencing of single tumor cells still represents a considerable technical challenge and consists of three major steps: (1) single cell isolation (e.g., by laser-capture microdissection), fluorescence-activated cell sorting, micromanipulation, whole genome amplification (e.g., with the help of Phi29 DNA polymerase), and transcriptome-wide next generation sequencing technologies (e.g., 454 pyrosequencing, Illumina sequencing, and other systems). Data demonstrating the feasibility of single-cell sequencing for monitoring the emergence of drug-resistant cell clones in patient samples are discussed herein. It is envisioned that single-cell sequencing will be a valuable asset to assist the design of regimens for personalized tumor therapies based on tumor subpopulation-specific genetic alterations in individual patients. PMID:27322289

  7. Tumor-Related Methylated Cell-Free DNA and Circulating Tumor Cells in Melanoma

    PubMed Central

    Salvianti, Francesca; Orlando, Claudio; Massi, Daniela; De Giorgi, Vincenzo; Grazzini, Marta; Pazzagli, Mario; Pinzani, Pamela

    2016-01-01

    Solid tumor release into the circulation cell-free DNA (cfDNA) and circulating tumor cells (CTCs) which represent promising biomarkers for cancer diagnosis. Circulating tumor DNA may be studied in plasma from cancer patients by detecting tumor specific alterations, such as genetic or epigenetic modifications. Ras association domain family 1 isoform A (RASSF1A) is a tumor suppressor gene silenced by promoter hypermethylation in a variety of human cancers including melanoma. The aim of the present study was to assess the diagnostic performance of a tumor-related methylated cfDNA marker in melanoma patients and to compare this parameter with the presence of CTCs. RASSF1A promoter methylation was quantified in cfDNA by qPCR in a consecutive series of 84 melanoma patients and 68 healthy controls. In a subset of 68 cases, the presence of CTCs was assessed by a filtration method (Isolation by Size of Epithelial Tumor Cells, ISET) as well as by an indirect method based on the detection of tyrosinase mRNA by RT-qPCR. The distribution of RASSF1A methylated cfDNA was investigated in cases and controls and the predictive capability of this parameter was assessed by means of the area under the ROC curve (AUC). The percentage of cases with methylated RASSF1A promoter in cfDNA was significantly higher in each class of melanoma patients (in situ, invasive and metastatic) than in healthy subjects (Pearson chi-squared test, p < 0.001). The concentration of RASSF1A methylated cfDNA in the subjects with a detectable quantity of methylated alleles was significantly higher in melanoma patients than in controls. The biomarker showed a good predictive capability (in terms of AUC) in discriminating between melanoma patients and healthy controls. This epigenetic marker associated to cfDNA did not show a significant correlation with the presence of CTCs, but, when the two parameters are jointly considered, we obtain a higher sensitivity of the detection of positive cases in invasive and

  8. Experimental Adaptation of Rotaviruses to Tumor Cell Lines

    PubMed Central

    Guerrero, Carlos A.; Guerrero, Rafael A.; Silva, Elver; Acosta, Orlando; Barreto, Emiliano

    2016-01-01

    A number of viruses show a naturally extended tropism for tumor cells whereas other viruses have been genetically modified or adapted to infect tumor cells. Oncolytic viruses have become a promising tool for treating some cancers by inducing cell lysis or immune response to tumor cells. In the present work, rotavirus strains TRF-41 (G5) (porcine), RRV (G3) (simian), UK (G6-P5) (bovine), Ym (G11-P9) (porcine), ECwt (murine), Wa (G1-P8), Wi61 (G9) and M69 (G8) (human), and five wild-type human rotavirus isolates were passaged multiple times in different human tumor cell lines and then combined in five different ways before additional multiple passages in tumor cell lines. Cell death caused by the tumor cell-adapted isolates was characterized using Hoechst, propidium iodide, 7-AAD, Annexin V, TUNEL, and anti-poly-(ADP ribose) polymerase (PARP) and -phospho-histone H2A.X antibodies. Multiple passages of the combined rotaviruses in tumor cell lines led to a successful infection of these cells, suggesting a gain-of-function by the acquisition of greater infectious capacity as compared with that of the parental rotaviruses. The electropherotype profiles suggest that unique tumor cell-adapted isolates were derived from reassortment of parental rotaviruses. Infection produced by such rotavirus isolates induced chromatin modifications compatible with apoptotic cell death. PMID:26828934

  9. The metabolic advantage of tumor cells

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    1- Oncogenes express proteins of "Tyrosine kinase receptor pathways", a receptor family including insulin or IGF-Growth Hormone receptors. Other oncogenes alter the PP2A phosphatase brake over these kinases. 2- Experiments on pancreatectomized animals; treated with pure insulin or total pancreatic extracts, showed that choline in the extract, preserved them from hepatomas. Since choline is a methyle donor, and since methylation regulates PP2A, the choline protection may result from PP2A methylation, which then attenuates kinases. 3- Moreover, kinases activated by the boosted signaling pathway inactivate pyruvate kinase and pyruvate dehydrogenase. In addition, demethylated PP2A would no longer dephosphorylate these enzymes. A "bottleneck" between glycolysis and the oxidative-citrate cycle interrupts the glycolytic pyruvate supply now provided via proteolysis and alanine transamination. This pyruvate forms lactate (Warburg effect) and NAD+ for glycolysis. Lipolysis and fatty acids provide acetyl CoA; the citrate condensation increases, unusual oxaloacetate sources are available. ATP citrate lyase follows, supporting aberrant transaminations with glutaminolysis and tumor lipogenesis. Truncated urea cycles, increased polyamine synthesis, consume the methyl donor SAM favoring carcinogenesis. 4- The decrease of butyrate, a histone deacetylase inhibitor, elicits epigenic changes (PETEN, P53, IGFBP decrease; hexokinase, fetal-genes-M2, increase) 5- IGFBP stops binding the IGF - IGFR complex, it is perhaps no longer inherited by a single mitotic daughter cell; leading to two daughter cells with a mitotic capability. 6- An excess of IGF induces a decrease of the major histocompatibility complex MHC1, Natural killer lymphocytes should eliminate such cells that start the tumor, unless the fever prostaglandin PGE2 or inflammation, inhibit them... PMID:21649891

  10. Cystic granular cell tumor mimicking Rathke cleft cyst.

    PubMed

    Mumert, Michael L; Walsh, Michael T; Chin, Steven S; Couldwell, William T

    2011-02-01

    Symptomatic granular cell tumors of the neurohypophysis are a rarely reported entity. To the authors' knowledge, they report the first fully described case of a symptomatic granular cell tumor with a large cystic component. A 31-year-old woman presented with headaches and visual complaints with imaging findings confirming a cystic sellar and suprasellar mass. The lesion was resected, and histological examination confirmed the diagnosis. The literature has shown that granular cell tumors are rarely reported as being symptomatic but may actually be a fairly common finding in autopsy studies. The authors review the literature with a specific focus on radiographic findings in patients with symptomatic granular cell tumors.

  11. Principles of treatment for mast cell tumors.

    PubMed

    Govier, Susanne M

    2003-05-01

    Mast cell tumors (MCT) are the most common malignant cutaneous tumors that occur in dogs. They are most commonly found on the trunk, accounting for approximately 50% to 60% of all sites. MCTs associated with the limbs account for approximately 25% of all sites. Cutaneous MCTs have a wide variety of clinical appearances. Histologic grade is the most consistent prognostic factor available for dogs. MCTs located at 'nail bed' (subungual), inguinal/preputial area, and any mucocutaneous area like perineum or oral cavity carry a guarded prognosis and tend to metastasize. MCTs usually exfoliate well and are cytologically distinct. The extent of staging procedures following fine-needle aspirate cytologic diagnosis is based on the presence or absence of negative prognostic indicators. Surgery is the treatment of choice for solitary MCTs with no evidence of metastasis. Reponses rates to chemotherapy, (partial response) as high as 78% have been reported, and preliminary evidence suggests that multiagent (prednisone and vinblastine) protocols may confer a higher response rate than single-agent therapy. MCTs are the second most common cutaneous tumor in the cat. There are two distinct forms of cutaneous MCTs in the cat. The more common form is the mastocytic form, and the less common is the histiocytic form. Unlike in the dog, the head and neck are the most common sites for MCTs in the cat followed by the trunk and limbs. Cats with disseminated forms of MCT often present with systemic signs of illness, which include depression, anorexia, weight loss, and vomiting. The diagnosis and staging of MCTs in cats is similar to that in the dog. As with dogs with cutaneous MCTs, surgery is the treatment of choice. Little is known about the effectiveness of adjunctive chemotherapy options for cutaneous MCTs. Adjunctive chemotherapy does not appear to increase survival times.

  12. The chemosensitivity of testicular germ cell tumors.

    PubMed

    Voutsadakis, Ioannis A

    2014-04-01

    Although rare cancers overall, testicular germ cell tumors (TGCTs) are the most common type of cancer in young males below 40 years of age. Both subtypes of TGCTs, i.e., seminomas and non-seminomas, are highly curable and the majority of even metastatic patients may expect to be cured. These high cure rates are not due to the indolent nature of these cancers, but rather to their sensitivity to chemotherapy (and for seminomas to radiotherapy). The delineation of the cause of chemosensitivity at the molecular level is of paramount importance, because it may provide insights into the minority of TGCTs that are chemo-resistant and, thereby, provide opportunities for specific therapeutic interventions aimed at reverting them to chemosensitivity. In addition, delineation of the molecular basis of TGCT chemo-sensitivity may be informative for the cause of chemo-resistance of other more common types of cancer and, thus, may create new therapeutic leads. p53, a frequently mutated tumor suppressor in cancers in general, is not mutated in TGCTs, a fact that has implications for their chemo-sensitivity. Oct4, an embryonic transcription factor, is uniformly expressed in the seminoma and embryonic carcinoma components of non-seminomas, and its interplay with p53 may be important in the chemotherapy response of these tumors. This interplay, together with other features of TGCTs such as the gain of genetic material from the short arm of chromosome 12 and the association with disorders of testicular development, will be discussed in this paper and integrated in a unifying hypothesis that may explain their chemo-sensitivity. PMID:24692098

  13. DAPK loss in colon cancer tumor buds: implications for migration capacity of disseminating tumor cells

    PubMed Central

    Karamitopoulou, Eva; Dawson, Heather; Koelzer, Viktor Hendrik; Agaimy, Abbas; Garreis, Fabian; Söder, Stephan; Laqua, William; Lugli, Alessandro; Hartmann, Arndt; Rau, Tilman T.; Schneider-Stock, Regine

    2015-01-01

    Defining new therapeutic strategies to overcome therapy resistance due to tumor heterogeneity in colon cancer is challenging. One option is to explore the molecular profile of aggressive disseminating tumor cells. The cytoskeleton-associated Death-associated protein kinase (DAPK) is involved in the cross talk between tumor and immune cells at the invasion front of colorectal cancer. Here dedifferentiated tumor cells histologically defined as tumor budding are associated with a high risk of metastasis and poor prognosis. Analyzing samples from 144 colorectal cancer patients we investigated immunhistochemical DAPK expression in different tumor regions such as center, invasion front, and buds. Functional consequences for tumor aggressiveness were studied in a panel of colon tumor cell lines using different migration, wound healing, and invasion assays. DAPK levels were experimentally modified by siRNA transfection and overexpression as well as inhibitor treatments. We found that DAPK expression was reduced towards the invasion front and was nearly absent in tumor buds. Applying the ECIS system with HCT116 and HCT116 stable lentiviral DAPK knock down cells (HCTshDAPK) we identified an important role for DAPK in decreasing the migratory capacity whereas proliferation was not affected. Furthermore, the migration pattern differed with HCTshDAPK cells showing a cluster-like migration of tumor cell groups. DAPK inhibitor treatment revealed that the migration rate was independent of DAPK's catalytic activity. Modulation of DAPK expression level in SW480 and DLD1 colorectal cancer cells significantly influenced wound closure rate. DAPK seems to be a major player that influences the migratory capability of disseminating tumor cells and possibly affects the dynamic interface between pro- and anti-survival factors at the invasion front of colorectal cancer. This interesting and new finding requires further evaluation. PMID:26405175

  14. Newcastle disease virus selectively kills human tumor cells.

    PubMed

    Reichard, K W; Lorence, R M; Cascino, C J; Peeples, M E; Walter, R J; Fernando, M B; Reyes, H M; Greager, J A

    1992-05-01

    Newcastle disease virus (NDV), strain 73-T, has previously been shown to be cytolytic to mouse tumor cells. In this study, we have evaluated the ability of NDV to replicate in and kill human tumor cells in culture and in athymic mice. Plaque assays were used to determine the cytolytic activity of NDV on six human tumor cell lines, fibrosarcoma (HT1080), osteosarcoma (KHOS), cervical carcinoma (KB8-5-11), bladder carcinoma (HCV29T), neuroblastoma (IMR32), and Wilm's tumor (G104), and on nine different normal human fibroblast lines. NDV formed plaques on all tumor cells tested as well as on chick embryo cells (CEC), the native host for NDV. Plaques did not form on any of the normal fibroblast lines. To detect NDV replication, virus yield assays were performed which measured virus particles in infected cell culture supernatants. Virus yield increased 10,000-fold within 24 hr in tumor and CEC supernatants. Titers remained near zero in normal fibroblast supernatants. In vivo tumoricidal activity was evaluated in athymic nude Balb-c mice by subcutaneous injection of 9 x 10(6) tumor cells followed by intralesional injection of either live or heat-killed NDV (1.0 x 10(6) plaque forming units [PFU]), or medium. After live NDV treatment, tumor regression occurred in 10 out of 11 mice bearing KB8-5-11 tumors, 8 out of 8 with HT-1080 tumors, and 6 out of 7 with IMR-32 tumors. After treatment with heat-killed NDV no regression occurred (P less than 0.01, Fisher's exact test). Nontumor-bearing mice injected with 1.0 x 10(8) PFU of NDV remained healthy. These results indicate that NDV efficiently and selectively replicates in and kills tumor cells, but not normal cells, and that intralesional NDV causes complete tumor regression in athymic mice with a high therapeutic index.

  15. Mathematical Modeling of Tumor Cell Growth and Immune System Interactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rihan, Fathalla A.; Safan, Muntaser; Abdeen, Mohamed A.; Abdel-Rahman, Duaa H.

    In this paper, we provide a family of ordinary and delay differential equations to describe the dynamics of tumor-growth and immunotherapy interactions. We explore the effects of adoptive cellular immunotherapy on the model and describe under what circumstances the tumor can be eliminated. The possibility of clearing the tumor, with a strategy, is based on two parameters in the model: the rate of influx of the effector cells, and the rate of influx of IL2. The critical tumor-growth rate, below which endemic tumor does not exist, has been found. One can use the model to make predictions about tumor-dormancy.

  16. Dendritic-tumor fusion cells in cancer immunotherapy.

    PubMed

    Takakura, Kazuki; Kajihara, Mikio; Ito, Zensho; Ohkusa, Toshifumi; Gong, Jianlin; Koido, Shigeo

    2015-03-01

    A promising area of clinical investigation is the use of cancer immunotherapy to treat cancer patients. Dendritic cells (DCs) operate as professional antigen-presenting cells (APCs) and play a critical role in the induction of antitumor immune responses. Thus, DC-based cancer immunotherapy represents a powerful strategy. One DC-based cancer immunotherapy strategy that has been investigated is the administration of fusion cells generated with DCs and whole tumor cells (DC-tumor fusion cells). The DC-tumor fusion cells can process a broad array of tumor-associated antigens (TAAs), including unidentified molecules, and present them through major histocompatibility complex (MHC) class I and II pathways in the context of co-stimulatory signals. Improving the therapeutic efficacy of DC-tumor fusion cell-based cancer immunotherapy requires increased immunogenicity of DCs and whole tumor cells. We discuss the potential ability of DC-tumor fusion cells to activate antigen-specific T cells and strategies to improve the immunogenicity of DC-tumor fusion cells as anticancer vaccines.

  17. Dendritic-tumor fusion cells in cancer immunotherapy.

    PubMed

    Takakura, Kazuki; Kajihara, Mikio; Ito, Zensho; Ohkusa, Toshifumi; Gong, Jianlin; Koido, Shigeo

    2015-03-01

    A promising area of clinical investigation is the use of cancer immunotherapy to treat cancer patients. Dendritic cells (DCs) operate as professional antigen-presenting cells (APCs) and play a critical role in the induction of antitumor immune responses. Thus, DC-based cancer immunotherapy represents a powerful strategy. One DC-based cancer immunotherapy strategy that has been investigated is the administration of fusion cells generated with DCs and whole tumor cells (DC-tumor fusion cells). The DC-tumor fusion cells can process a broad array of tumor-associated antigens (TAAs), including unidentified molecules, and present them through major histocompatibility complex (MHC) class I and II pathways in the context of co-stimulatory signals. Improving the therapeutic efficacy of DC-tumor fusion cell-based cancer immunotherapy requires increased immunogenicity of DCs and whole tumor cells. We discuss the potential ability of DC-tumor fusion cells to activate antigen-specific T cells and strategies to improve the immunogenicity of DC-tumor fusion cells as anticancer vaccines. PMID:25828520

  18. Transcriptional targeting of tumor endothelial cells for gene therapy

    PubMed Central

    Dong, Zhihong; Nör, Jacques E.

    2009-01-01

    It is well known that angiogenesis plays a critical role in the pathobiology of tumors. Recent clinical trials have shown that inhibition of angiogenesis can be an effective therapeutic strategy for patients with cancer. However, one of the outstanding issues in anti-angiogenic treatment for cancer is the development of toxicities related to off-target effects of drugs. Transcriptional targeting of tumor endothelial cells involves the use of specific promoters for selective expression of therapeutic genes in the endothelial cells lining the blood vessels of tumors. Recently, several genes that are expressed specifically in tumor-associated endothelial cells have been identified and characterized. These discoveries have enhanced the prospectus of transcriptionaly targeting tumor endothelial cells for cancer gene therapy. In this manuscript, we review the promoters, vectors, and therapeutic genes that have been used for transcriptional targeting of tumor endothelial cells, and discuss the prospects of such approaches for cancer gene therapy. PMID:19393703

  19. Stem and progenitor cell-mediated tumor selective gene therapy.

    PubMed

    Aboody, K S; Najbauer, J; Danks, M K

    2008-05-01

    The poor prognosis for patients with aggressive or metastatic tumors and the toxic side effects of currently available treatments necessitate the development of more effective tumor-selective therapies. Stem/progenitor cells display inherent tumor-tropic properties that can be exploited for targeted delivery of anticancer genes to invasive and metastatic tumors. Therapeutic genes that have been inserted into stem cells and delivered to tumors with high selectivity include prodrug-activating enzymes (cytosine deaminase, carboxylesterase, thymidine kinase), interleukins (IL-2, IL-4, IL-12, IL-23), interferon-beta, apoptosis-promoting genes (tumor necrosis factor-related apoptosis-inducing ligand) and metalloproteinases (PEX). We and others have demonstrated that neural and mesenchymal stem cells can deliver therapeutic genes to elicit a significant antitumor response in animal models of intracranial glioma, medulloblastoma, melanoma brain metastasis, disseminated neuroblastoma and breast cancer lung metastasis. Most studies reported reduction in tumor volume (up to 90%) and increased survival of tumor-bearing animals. Complete cures have also been achieved (90% disease-free survival for >1 year of mice bearing disseminated neuroblastoma tumors). As we learn more about the biology of stem cells and the molecular mechanisms that mediate their tumor-tropism and we identify efficacious gene products for specific tumor types, the clinical utility of cell-based delivery strategies becomes increasingly evident.

  20. Radiofrequency thermal ablation of breast tumors combined with intralesional administration of IL-7 and IL-15 augments anti-tumor immune responses and inhibits tumor development and metastasis

    PubMed Central

    Habibi, Mehran; Kmieciak, Maciej; Graham, Laura; Morales, Johanna K; Bear, Harry D; Manjili, Masoud H

    2008-01-01

    Tumor development or recurrence is always a matter of concern following radiofrequency thermal ablation (RFA) of tumors. To determine whether combining RFA with immunologically active cytokines might induce tumor-specific immune responses against mammary carcinoma and inhibit tumor development or metastasis, we evaluated intralesional injection of IL-7 and IL-15 in RFA-treated murine tumors. We used two different breast carcinoma models: neu-overexpressing mouse mammary carcinoma (MMC) in FVBN202 transgenic mouse and 4T1 tumors in Balb/c mouse. MMC tend to relapse even in the presence of neu-specific immune responses, and 4T1 is a weakly immunogenic, aggressive and highly metastatic transplantable tumor. In vivo growth of both of these tumors is also associated with increased numbers of CD11b+Gr1+ myeloid-derived suppressor cells (MDSC). We showed for the first time that unlike RFA alone, RFA combined with the administration of intralesional IL-7 and IL-15 (after RFA), induced immune responses to tumors, inhibited tumor development and lung metastasis, and reduced MDSC. PMID:18425677

  1. Novel recombinant protein FlaA N/C increases tumor radiosensitivity via NF-κB signaling in murine breast cancer cells

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Ying; Wu, Dongming; Fan, Yuanchun; Li, Peigeng; Du, Hongfei; Shi, Jiao; Wang, Dan; Zhou, Xiaoping

    2016-01-01

    The recombinant protein flagellin A (FlaA) N/C, derived from the flagellin protein of Legionella pneumophila, has been shown to increase the expression of cytoprotective cytokines, activate the nuclear factor-κB (NF-κB) signaling pathway, and increase the survival of mice following total body irradiation. Determi ning whether FlaA N/C has a sensitizing effect on tumor radiation or a direct tumoricidal effect is critical for its application as an effective radiation protection agent. The present study investigated the molecular mechanism underlying the tumor radiosensitivity of FlaA N/C. FlaA N/C was found to increase tumor apoptosis and autophagy, regulate the cell cycle and increase radiosensitivity in 4T1 tumor cells. Furthermore, FlaA N/C was found to promote radiosensitivity by activating NF-κB signaling. Finally, the present study analyzed FlaA N/C-enhanced radiosensitivity in animal models, and FlaA N/C was found to significantly prolong the survival period of mice after total body radiation. This indicates that FlaA N/C might be a novel radiation sensitizer in tumor radiation therapy. PMID:27703525

  2. Failure of anti tumor-derived endothelial cell immunotherapy depends on augmentation of tumor hypoxia.

    PubMed

    Pezzolo, Annalisa; Marimpietri, Danilo; Raffaghello, Lizzia; Cocco, Claudia; Pistorio, Angela; Gambini, Claudio; Cilli, Michele; Horenstein, Alberto; Malavasi, Fabio; Pistoia, Vito

    2014-11-15

    We have previously demonstrated that Tenascin-C (TNC)(+) human neuroblastoma (NB) cells transdifferentiate into tumor-derived endothelial cells (TDEC), which have been detected both in primary tumors and in tumors formed by human NB cell lines in immunodeficient mice. TDEC are genetically unstable and may favor tumor progression, suggesting that their elimination could reduce tumor growth and dissemination. So far, TDEC have never been targeted by antibody-mediated immunotherapy in any of the tumor models investigated. To address this issue, immunodeficient mice carrying orthotopic NB formed by the HTLA-230 human cell line were treated with TDEC-targeting cytotoxic human (h)CD31, that spares host-derived endothelial cells, or isotype-matched mAbs. hCD31 mAb treatment did not affect survival of NB-bearing mice, but increased significantly hypoxia in tumor microenvironment, where apoptotic and proliferating TDEC coexisted, indicating the occurrence of vascular remodeling. Tumor cells from hCD31 mAb treated mice showed i) up-regulation of epithelial-mesenchymal transition (EMT)-related and vascular mimicry (VM)-related gene expression, ii) expression of endothelial (i.e. CD31 and VE-cadherin) and EMT-associated (i.e. Twist-1, N-cadherin and TNC) immunophenotypic markers, and iii) up-regulation of high mobility group box-1 (HMGB-1) expression. In vitro experiments with two NB cell lines showed that hypoxia was the common driver of all the above phenomena and that human recombinant HMGB-1 amplified EMT and TDEC trans-differentiation. In conclusion, TDEC targeting with hCD31 mAb increases tumor hypoxia, setting the stage for the occurrence of EMT and of new waves of TDEC trans-differentiation. These adaptive responses to the changes induced by immunotherapy in the tumor microenvironment allow tumor cells to escape from the effects of hCD31 mAb.

  3. ELECTRON MICROSCOPY OF PLASMA-CELL TUMORS OF THE MOUSE

    PubMed Central

    Parsons, D. F.; Darden, E. B.; Lindsley, D. L.; Pratt, Guthrie T.

    1961-01-01

    An electron microscope study was made of a series of transplanted MPC-1 plasma-cell tumors carried by BALB/c mice. Large numbers of particles similar in morphology to virus particles were present inside the endoplasmic reticulum of tumor plasma cells. Very few particles were seen outside the cells or in ultracentrifuged preparations of the plasma or ascites fluid. In very early tumors particles were occasionally seen free in the cytoplasm adjacent to finely granular material. In general, the distribution of these particles inside endoplasmic reticulum is similar in early and late tumors. A few transplanted X5563 tumors of C3H mice were also examined. Large numbers of particles were found in the region of the Golgi apparatus in late X5663 tumors. A newly described cytoplasmic structure of plasma cells, here called a "granular body," appears to be associated with the formation of the particles. Particles present in MPC-1 tumors are exclusively of a doughnut form, whereas some of those in the inclusions of the late X5563 tumors show a dense center. Normal plasma cells, produced by inoculation of a modified Freund adjuvant into BALB/c mice. have been compared morphologically with tumor plasma cells of both tumor lines. PMID:13733008

  4. Tumor-Initiating Cells and Methods of Use

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hlatky, Lynn (Inventor)

    2014-01-01

    Provided herein are an isolated or enriched population of tumor initiating cells derived from normal cells, cells susceptible to neoplasia, or neoplastic cells. Methods of use of the cells for screening for anti-hyperproliferative agents, and use of the cells for animal models of hyperproliferative disorders including metastatic cancer, diagnostic methods, and therapeutic methods are provided.

  5. Tumor-derived IL-35 promotes tumor growth by enhancing myeloid cell accumulation and angiogenesis.

    PubMed

    Wang, Zhihui; Liu, Jin-Qing; Liu, Zhenzhen; Shen, Rulong; Zhang, Guoqiang; Xu, Jianping; Basu, Sujit; Feng, Youmei; Bai, Xue-Feng

    2013-03-01

    IL-35 is a member of the IL-12 family of cytokines that is comprised of an IL-12 p35 subunit and an IL-12 p40-related protein subunit, EBV-induced gene 3 (EBI3). IL-35 functions through IL-35R and has a potent immune-suppressive activity. Although IL-35 was demonstrated to be produced by regulatory T cells, gene-expression analysis revealed that it is likely to have a wider distribution, including expression in cancer cells. In this study, we demonstrated that IL-35 is produced in human cancer tissues, such as large B cell lymphoma, nasopharyngeal carcinoma, and melanoma. To determine the roles of tumor-derived IL-35 in tumorigenesis and tumor immunity, we generated IL-35-producing plasmacytoma J558 and B16 melanoma cells and observed that the expression of IL-35 in cancer cells does not affect their growth and survival in vitro, but it stimulates tumorigenesis in both immune-competent and Rag1/2-deficient mice. Tumor-derived IL-35 increases CD11b(+)Gr1(+) myeloid cell accumulation in the tumor microenvironment and, thereby, promotes tumor angiogenesis. In immune-competent mice, spontaneous CTL responses to tumors are diminished. IL-35 does not directly inhibit tumor Ag-specific CD8(+) T cell activation, differentiation, and effector functions. However, IL-35-treated cancer cells had increased expression of gp130 and reduced sensitivity to CTL destruction. Thus, our study indicates novel functions for IL-35 in promoting tumor growth via the enhancement of myeloid cell accumulation, tumor angiogenesis, and suppression of tumor immunity.

  6. Antitumor efficacy of vaccinia virus-modified tumor cell vaccine

    SciTech Connect

    Ito, T.; Wang, D.Q.; Maru, M.; Nakajima, K.; Kato, S.; Kurimura, T.; Wakamiya, N. )

    1990-11-01

    The antitumor efficacies of vaccinia virus-modified tumor cell vaccines were examined in murine syngeneic MH134 and X5563 tumor cells. UV-inactivated vaccinia virus was inoculated i.p. into C3H/HeN mice that had received whole body X-irradiation at 150 rads. After 3 weeks, the vaccines were administered i.p. 3 times at weekly intervals. One week after the last injection, mice were challenged i.p. with various doses of syngeneic MH134 or X5563 viable tumor cells. Four methods were used for preparing tumor cell vaccines: X-ray irradiation; fixation with paraformaldehyde for 1 h or 3 months; and purification of the membrane fraction. All four vaccines were effective, but the former two vaccines were the most effective. A mixture of the membrane fraction of untreated tumor cells and UV-inactivated vaccinia virus also had an antitumor effect. These results indicate that vaccine with the complete cell structure is the most effective. The membrane fraction of UV-inactivated vaccinia virus-absorbed tumor cells was also effective. UV-inactivated vaccinia virus can react with not only intact tumor cells but also the purified membrane fraction of tumor cells and augment antitumor activity.

  7. Distinctive responses of brain tumor cells to TLR2 ligands.

    PubMed

    Yoon, Hee Jung; Jeon, Sae-Bom; Koh, Han Seok; Song, Jae-Young; Kim, Sang Soo; Kim, In-Hoo; Park, Eun Jung

    2015-05-01

    Malignant brain tumor mass contains significant numbers of infiltrating glial cells that may intimately interact with tumor cells and influence cancer treatments. Understanding of characteristic discrepancies between normal GLIA and tumor cells would, therefore, be valuable for improving anticancer therapeutics. Here, we report distinct differences in toll-like receptors (TLR)-2-mediated responses between normal glia and primary brain tumor cell lines. We found that tyrosine phosphorylation of STAT1 by TLR2 ligands and its downstream events did not occur in mouse, rat, or human brain tumor cell lines, but were markedly induced in normal primary microglia and astrocytes. Using TLR2-deficient, interferon (IFN)-γ-deficient, and IFNγ-receptor-1-deficient mice, we revealed that the impaired phosphorylation of STAT1 might be linked with defective TLR2 system in tumor cells, and that a TLR2-dependent pathway, not IFNγ-receptor machinery, might be critical for tyrosine STAT1 phosphorylation by TLR2 ligands. We also found that TLR2 and its heterodimeric partners, TLR1 and 6, on brain tumor cells failed to properly respond to TLR2 ligands, and representative TLR2-dependent cellular events, such as inflammatory responses and cell death, were not detected in brain tumor cells. Similar results were obtained in in vitro and in vivo experiments using orthotopic mouse and rat brain tumor models. Collectively, these results suggest that primary brain tumor cells may exhibit a distinctive dysfunction of TLR2-associated responses, resulting in abnormal signaling and cellular events. Careful targeting of this distinctive property could serve as the basis for effective therapeutic approaches against primary brain tumors.

  8. A Study of CD45RA+ Depleted Haploidentical Stem Cell Transplantation in Children With Relapsed or Refractory Solid Tumors and Lymphomas

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-10-18

    Ewing Sarcoma; Gastrointestinal Tumor; Germ Cell Tumor; Hepatic Tumor; Lymphoma; Wilms Tumor; Rhabdoid Tumor; Clear Cell Carcinoma; Renal Cell Carcinoma; Melanoma; Neuroblastoma; Rhabdomyosarcoma; Non-rhabdomyosarcoma

  9. A Rare Cause of Prepubertal Gynecomastia: Sertoli Cell Tumor

    PubMed Central

    Dursun, Fatma; Su Dur, Şeyma Meliha; Şahin, Ceyhan; Kırmızıbekmez, Heves; Karabulut, Murat Hakan; Yörük, Asım

    2015-01-01

    Prepubertal gynecomastia due to testis tumors is a very rare condition. Nearly 5% of the patients with testicular mass present with gynecomastia. Sertoli cell tumors are sporadic in 60% of the reported cases, while the remaining is a component of multiple neoplasia syndromes such as Peutz-Jeghers syndrome and Carney complex. We present a 4-year-old boy with gynecomastia due to Sertoli cell tumor with no evidence of Peutz-Jeghers syndrome or Carney complex. PMID:26366315

  10. Multiple skin tumors of indeterminate cells in an adult.

    PubMed

    Kolde, G; Bröcker, E B

    1986-10-01

    An adult patient with multiple unusual histiocytic tumors of the skin is described. As shown by immunohistologic study, electron microscopy, and immunoelectron microscopy, the tumors represent circumscribed proliferations of the Langerhans cell-related indeterminate dendritic cells of the skin. This distinct cutaneous histiocytosis may represent a paraneoplastic syndrome.

  11. "Flagellated" cancer cells propel anti-tumor immunity.

    PubMed

    Garaude, Johan; Blander, J Magarian

    2012-09-01

    The use of innate immune receptor agonists in cancer therapies has suffered from many drawbacks. Our recent observations suggest that some of these hurdles can be overcome by introducing flagellin into tumor cells to promote tumor antigen presentation by dendritic cells (DCs) and simultaneously trigger two types of pattern recognition receptors (PRRs).

  12. Intraorbital Granular Cell Tumor Ophthalmologic and Radiologic Findings

    PubMed Central

    de la Vega, Gabriela; Villegas, Victor M; Velazquez, Jose; Barrios, Mirelys; Murray, Timothy G; Elhammady, Mohamed Samy

    2015-01-01

    Granular cell tumor is a rare soft tissue neoplasm that commonly affects the head and neck regions. We describe a case of a granular cell tumor of the orbit including its clinical presentation, histopathology, and magnetic resonance imaging findings. PMID:25963156

  13. Tanaka Circulating Tumor Cells (CTCs) — EDRN Public Portal

    Cancer.gov

    Circulating tumor cells (CTC) can be found and quantitatively evaluated with a semiautomated system (CellSearch) in patients with primary lung cancer. CTC count is a useful diagnostic marker to predict development of distant metastasis.

  14. Targeting Mitochondrial Function to Treat Quiescent Tumor Cells in Solid Tumors

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Xiaonan; de Milito, Angelo; Olofsson, Maria Hägg; Gullbo, Joachim; D’Arcy, Padraig; Linder, Stig

    2015-01-01

    The disorganized nature of tumor vasculature results in the generation of microenvironments characterized by nutrient starvation, hypoxia and accumulation of acidic metabolites. Tumor cell populations in such areas are often slowly proliferating and thus refractory to chemotherapeutical drugs that are dependent on an active cell cycle. There is an urgent need for alternative therapeutic interventions that circumvent growth dependency. The screening of drug libraries using multicellular tumor spheroids (MCTS) or glucose-starved tumor cells has led to the identification of several compounds with promising therapeutic potential and that display activity on quiescent tumor cells. Interestingly, a common theme of these drug screens is the recurrent identification of agents that affect mitochondrial function. Such data suggest that, contrary to the classical Warburg view, tumor cells in nutritionally-compromised microenvironments are dependent on mitochondrial function for energy metabolism and survival. These findings suggest that mitochondria may represent an “Achilles heel” for the survival of slowly-proliferating tumor cells and suggest strategies for the development of therapy to target these cell populations. PMID:26580606

  15. Increased efficiency of immunotherapy using irradiated tumor cells.

    PubMed

    Wu, J M; Fitzgerald, J; Sonis, S; Ravikumar, T; Wilson, R

    1987-01-01

    The efficacy of irradiated tumor cells combined with chemotherapy or non-specific immunostimulation with complete Freund's adjuvant was tested in a model of minimal residual tumor-bearing syngeneic mice. Male C57BL/6J mice were innoculated in the right rear leg with live tumor cells from a methylcholanthrene induced fibrosarcoma. The tumor was resected when it reached 0.7 cm in diameter and animals were treated with doses of irradiated tumor cells (XTC) from the primary tumor ranging in number from 1 X 10(3) to 9 X 10(3). Best survival was noted using 5 X 10(3) XTC combined with irradiated tumor cells of liver or pulmonary metastases origin, complete Freund's adjuvant or cytoxan. The combination of irradiated tumor cells of metastatic origin did not enhance the therapeutic effect of XTC alone. Freund's adjuvant was not of benefit in enhancing the efficacy of XTC. However, improved survival was noted when chemotherapy in the form of cytoxan was used to supplement XTC. Our data suggests that XTC is more efficacious as a mode of immunotherapy than are live tumor cells. The dose of XTC used is critical in determining its effect. Chemotherapy appears to enhance the benefit of XTC.

  16. Cancer stem cells and the tumor microenvironment: interplay in tumor heterogeneity.

    PubMed

    Albini, Adriana; Bruno, Antonino; Gallo, Cristina; Pajardi, Giorgio; Noonan, Douglas M; Dallaglio, Katiuscia

    2015-01-01

    Tumor cells able to recapitulate tumor heterogeneity have been tracked, isolated and characterized in different tumor types, and are commonly named Cancer Stem Cells or Cancer Initiating Cells (CSC/CIC). CSC/CIC are disseminated in the tumor mass and are resistant to anti-cancer therapies and adverse conditions. They are able to divide into another stem cell and a "proliferating" cancer cell. They appear to be responsible for disease recurrence and metastatic dissemination even after apparent eradication of the primary tumor. The modulation of CSC/CIC activities by the tumor microenvironment (TUMIC) is still poorly known. CSC/CIC may mutually interact with the TUMIC in a special and unique manner depending on the TUMIC cells or proteins encountered. The TUMIC consists of extracellular matrix components as well as cellular players among which endothelial, stromal and immune cells, providing and responding to signals to/from the CSC/CIC. This interplay can contribute to the mechanisms through which CSC/CIC may reside in a dormant state in a tissue for years, later giving rise to tumor recurrence or metastasis in patients. Different TUMIC components, including the connective tissue, can differentially activate CIC/CSC in different areas of a tumor and contribute to the generation of cancer heterogeneity. Here, we review possible networking activities between the different components of the tumor microenvironment and CSC/CIC, with a focus on its role in tumor heterogeneity and progression. We also summarize novel therapeutic options that could target both CSC/CIC and the microenvironment to elude resistance mechanisms activated by CSC/CIC, responsible for disease recurrence and metastases. PMID:26291921

  17. Actively targeted delivery of anticancer drug to tumor cells by redox-responsive star-shaped micelles.

    PubMed

    Shi, Chunli; Guo, Xing; Qu, Qianqian; Tang, Zhaomin; Wang, Yi; Zhou, Shaobing

    2014-10-01

    In cancer therapy nanocargos based on star-shaped polymer exhibit unique features such as better stability, smaller size distribution and higher drug capacity in comparison to linear polymeric micelles. In this study, we developed a multifunctional star-shaped micellar system by combination of active targeting ability and redox-responsive behavior. The star-shaped micelles with good stability were self-assembled from four-arm poly(ε-caprolactone)-poly(ethylene glycol) copolymer. The redox-responsive behaviors of these micelles triggered by glutathione were evaluated from the changes of micellar size, morphology and molecular weight. In vitro drug release profiles exhibited that in a stimulated normal physiological environment, the redox-responsive star-shaped micelles could maintain good stability, whereas in a reducing and acid environment similar with that of tumor cells, the encapsulated agent was promptly released. In vitro cellular uptake and subcellular localization of these micelles were further studied with confocal laser scanning microscopy and flow cytometry against the human cervical cancer cell line HeLa. In vivo and ex vivo DOX fluorescence imaging displayed that these FA-functionalized star-shaped micelles possessed much better specificity to target solid tumor. Both the qualitative and quantitative results of the antitumor effect in 4T1 tumor-bearing BALB/c mice demonstrated that these redox-responsive star-shaped micelles have a high therapeutic efficiency to artificial solid tumor. Therefore, the multifunctional star-shaped micelles are a potential platform for targeted anticancer drug delivery.

  18. Solid tumor therapy by selectively targeting stromal endothelial cells.

    PubMed

    Liu, Shihui; Liu, Jie; Ma, Qian; Cao, Liu; Fattah, Rasem J; Yu, Zuxi; Bugge, Thomas H; Finkel, Toren; Leppla, Stephen H

    2016-07-12

    Engineered tumor-targeted anthrax lethal toxin proteins have been shown to strongly suppress growth of solid tumors in mice. These toxins work through the native toxin receptors tumor endothelium marker-8 and capillary morphogenesis protein-2 (CMG2), which, in other contexts, have been described as markers of tumor endothelium. We found that neither receptor is required for tumor growth. We further demonstrate that tumor cells, which are resistant to the toxin when grown in vitro, become highly sensitive when implanted in mice. Using a range of tissue-specific loss-of-function and gain-of-function genetic models, we determined that this in vivo toxin sensitivity requires CMG2 expression on host-derived tumor endothelial cells. Notably, engineered toxins were shown to suppress the proliferation of isolated tumor endothelial cells. Finally, we demonstrate that administering an immunosuppressive regimen allows animals to receive multiple toxin dosages and thereby produces a strong and durable antitumor effect. The ability to give repeated doses of toxins, coupled with the specific targeting of tumor endothelial cells, suggests that our strategy should be efficacious for a wide range of solid tumors. PMID:27357689

  19. Biodegradable polymeric micelle-encapsulated doxorubicin suppresses tumor metastasis by killing circulating tumor cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Deng, Senyi; Wu, Qinjie; Zhao, Yuwei; Zheng, Xin; Wu, Ni; Pang, Jing; Li, Xuejing; Bi, Cheng; Liu, Xinyu; Yang, Li; Liu, Lei; Su, Weijun; Wei, Yuquan; Gong, Changyang

    2015-03-01

    Circulating tumor cells (CTCs) play a crucial role in tumor metastasis, but it is rare for any chemotherapy regimen to focus on killing CTCs. Herein, we describe doxorubicin (Dox) micelles that showed anti-metastatic activity by killing CTCs. Dox micelles with a small particle size and high encapsulation efficiency were obtained using a pH-induced self-assembly method. Compared with free Dox, Dox micelles exhibited improved cytotoxicity, apoptosis induction, and cellular uptake. In addition, Dox micelles showed a sustained release behavior in vitro, and in a transgenic zebrafish model, Dox micelles exhibited a longer circulation time and lower extravasation from blood vessels into surrounding tissues. Anti-tumor and anti-metastatic activities of Dox micelles were investigated in transgenic zebrafish and mouse models. In transgenic zebrafish, Dox micelles inhibited tumor growth and prolonged the survival of tumor-bearing zebrafish. Furthermore, Dox micelles suppressed tumor metastasis by killing CTCs. In addition, improved anti-tumor and anti-metastatic activities were also confirmed in mouse tumor models, where immunofluorescent staining of tumors indicated that Dox micelles induced more apoptosis and showed fewer proliferation-positive cells. There were decreased side effects in transgenic zebrafish and mice after administration of Dox micelles. In conclusion, Dox micelles showed stronger anti-tumor and anti-metastatic activities and decreased side effects both in vitro and in vivo, which may have potential applications in cancer therapy.

  20. Immunocompetent cells in benign and malignant salivary gland tumors.

    PubMed

    Kärjä, V J; Syrjänen, K J; Syrjänen, S M

    1996-10-01

    IgA-, IgG, and IgM-producing plasma cells as well as 3- and T-lymphocytes were immunophenotyped and quantitated in a series of 216 benign and malignant salivary gland tumors, with special emphasis placed on the clinical behavior of the tumors. Highest number of plasma cells were found in mucoepidermoid carcinomas, where IgG-plasma cells were the sole Ig-class secreted. No IgA-immunoreactivity was found in adenoid cystic, undifferentiated, acinic cell, carcinoma in pleomorphic adenoma, and mucoepidermoid carcinomas. In squamous cell carcinomas, the number of IgM-plasma cells was higher than that in other salivary gland tumors. Basal cell adenomas contained only IgM-positive plasma cells. In logistic regression analysis, IgG- and IgM-producing plasma cells in malignant salivary gland tumors were related to an increased tumor diameter (p = 0.022 and 0.046, respectively). In benign tumors, neither clinical nor prognostic value could be attributed to the distribution of plasma cells. T-cells and B-cells were present in 63.9% and 33.8% of all tumors, found in 63.8% and 26.7% (p = 0.0048) of the benign tumors, and in 64.1% and 41.7% (not significant) of the malignant tumors, respectively. The presence of T- of B-lymphocytes was of no prognostic significance in malignant tumors. In benign tumors, however, the mean age of the patients was significantly higher (p = 0.010) and the mean time to recurrence significantly shorter (p = 0.018) in patients with tumors containing T-cells than in those devoid of these cells. In conclusion, the cell-mediated immunity (T-cells and their subsets) seems to play a more important role in pathogenesis and prognostication of salivary gland neoplasms than do the cells of the B-cell lineage, and, clearly, further studies are needed to elucidate these issues.

  1. Tumor-stem cells interactions by fluorescence imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meleshina, Aleksandra V.; Cherkasova, Elena I.; Sergeeva, Ekaterina; Turchin, Ilya V.; Kiseleva, Ekaterina V.; Dashinimaev, Erdem B.; Shirmanova, Marina V.; Zagaynova, Elena V.

    2013-02-01

    Recently, great deal of interest is investigation the function of the stem cells (SC) in tumors. In this study, we studied «recipient-tumor- fluorescent stem cells » system using the methods of in vivo imaging and laser scanning microscopy (LSM). We used adipose-derived adult stem (ADAS) cells of human lentiviral transfected with the gene of fluorescent protein Turbo FP635. ADAS cells were administrated into nude mice with transplanted tumor HeLa Kyoto (human cervical carcinoma) at different stages of tumor growth (0-8 days) intravenously or into tumor. In vivo imaging was performed on the experimental setup for epi - luminescence bioimaging (IAP RAS, Nizhny Novgorod). The results of the imaging showed localization of fluorophore tagged stem cells in the spleen on day 5-9 after injection. The sensitivity of the technique may be improved by spectral separation autofluorescence and fluorescence of stem cells. We compared the results of in vivo imaging and confocal laser scanning microscopy (LSM 510 META, Carl Zeiss, Germany). Internal organs of the animals and tumor tissue were investigated. It was shown that with i.v. injection of ADAS, bright fluorescent structures with spectral characteristics corresponding to TurboFP635 protein are locally accumulated in the marrow, lungs and tumors of animals. These findings indicate that ADAS cells integrate in the animal body with transplanted tumor and can be identified by fluorescence bioimaging techniques in vivo and ex vivo.

  2. Refractory sacrococcygeal germ cell tumor in Schinzel-Giedion syndrome.

    PubMed

    Kishimoto, Kenji; Kobayashi, Ryoji; Yonemaru, Nozomi; Yamamoto, Hiroshi; Tsujioka, Takao; Sano, Hirozumi; Suzuki, Daisuke; Yasuda, Kazue; Suzuki, Masahiko; Ando, Akiko; Tonoki, Hidefumi; Iizuka, Susumu; Uetake, Kimiaki; Kobayashi, Kunihiko

    2015-05-01

    We describe a boy with Schinzel-Giedion syndrome who developed refractory sacrococcygeal germ cell tumor with elements of embryonal carcinoma and immature teratoma. He developed local recurrence soon after tumor resection. The tumor was highly resistant to platinum-based combination chemotherapy, local irradiation, and salvage chemotherapy. Frequent infections resulted in a delay in treatment, although apparent fragility had not been observed clinically. He died from tumor progression at 32 months of age. Intensification of chemotherapy does not seem to be feasible for tumors in patients with Schinzel-Giedion syndrome. PMID:25171454

  3. Necrosis avid near infrared fluorescent cyanines for imaging cell death and their use to monitor therapeutic efficacy in mouse tumor models

    PubMed Central

    Xie, Bangwen; Stammes, Marieke A.; van Driel, Pieter B.A.A.; Cruz, Luis J.; Knol-Blankevoort, Vicky T.; Löwik, Martijn A.M.; Mezzanotte, Laura; Que, Ivo; Chan, Alan; van den Wijngaard, Jeroen P.H.M.; Siebes, Maria; Gottschalk, Sven; Razansky, Daniel; Ntziachristos, Vasilis; Keereweer, Stijn; Horobin, Richard W.; Hoehn, Mathias; Kaijzel, Eric L.; van Beek, Ermond R.; Snoeks, Thomas J.A.; Löwik, Clemens W.G.M.

    2015-01-01

    Quantification of tumor necrosis in cancer patients is of diagnostic value as the amount of necrosis is correlated with disease prognosis and it could also be used to predict early efficacy of anti-cancer treatments. In the present study, we identified two near infrared fluorescent (NIRF) carboxylated cyanines, HQ5 and IRDye 800CW (800CW), which possess strong necrosis avidity. In vitro studies showed that both dyes selectively bind to cytoplasmic proteins of dead cells that have lost membrane integrity. Affinity for cytoplasmic proteins was confirmed using quantitative structure activity relations modeling. In vivo results, using NIRF and optoacoustic imaging, confirmed the necrosis avid properties of HQ5 and 800CW in a mouse 4T1 breast cancer tumor model of spontaneous necrosis. Finally, in a mouse EL4 lymphoma tumor model, already 24 h post chemotherapy, a significant increase in 800CW fluorescence intensity was observed in treated compared to untreated tumors. In conclusion, we show, for the first time, that the NIRF carboxylated cyanines HQ5 and 800CW possess strong necrosis avid properties in vitro and in vivo. When translated to the clinic, these dyes may be used for diagnostic or prognostic purposes and for monitoring in vivo tumor response early after the start of treatment. PMID:26472022

  4. Metformin selectively affects human glioblastoma tumor-initiating cell viability

    PubMed Central

    Würth, Roberto; Pattarozzi, Alessandra; Gatti, Monica; Bajetto, Adirana; Corsaro, Alessandro; Parodi, Alessia; Sirito, Rodolfo; Massollo, Michela; Marini, Cecilia; Zona, Gianluigi; Fenoglio, Daniela; Sambuceti, Gianmario; Filaci, Gilberto; Daga, Antonio; Barbieri, Federica; Florio, Tullio

    2013-01-01

    Cancer stem cell theory postulates that a small population of tumor-initiating cells is responsible for the development, progression and recurrence of several malignancies, including glioblastoma. In this perspective, tumor-initiating cells represent the most relevant target to obtain effective cancer treatment. Metformin, a first-line drug for type II diabetes, was reported to possess anticancer properties affecting the survival of cancer stem cells in breast cancer models. We report that metformin treatment reduced the proliferation rate of tumor-initiating cell-enriched cultures isolated from four human glioblastomas. Metformin also impairs tumor-initiating cell spherogenesis, indicating a direct effect on self-renewal mechanisms. Interestingly, analyzing by FACS the antiproliferative effects of metformin on CD133-expressing subpopulation, a component of glioblastoma cancer stem cells, a higher reduction of proliferation was observed as compared with CD133-negative cells, suggesting a certain degree of cancer stem cell selectivity in its effects. In fact, glioblastoma cell differentiation strongly reduced sensitivity to metformin treatment. Metformin effects in tumor-initiating cell-enriched cultures were associated with a powerful inhibition of Akt-dependent cell survival pathway, while this pathway was not affected in differentiated cells. The specificity of metformin antiproliferative effects toward glioblastoma tumor-initiating cells was confirmed by the lack of significant inhibition of normal human stem cells (umbilical cord-derived mesenchymal stem cells) in vitro proliferation after metformin exposure. Altogether, these data clearly suggest that metformin exerts antiproliferative activity on glioblastoma cells, showing a higher specificity toward tumor-initiating cells, and that the inhibition of Akt pathway may represent a possible intracellular target of this effect. PMID:23255107

  5. T Cells Contribute to Tumor Progression by Favoring Pro-Tumoral Properties of Intra-Tumoral Myeloid Cells in a Mouse Model for Spontaneous Melanoma

    PubMed Central

    Caron, Jonathan; Douguet, Laetitia; Garcette, Marylène; Kato, Masashi; Avril, Marie-Françoise; Abastado, Jean-Pierre; Bercovici, Nadège; Lucas, Bruno; Prévost-Blondel, Armelle

    2011-01-01

    Tumors affect myelopoeisis and induce the expansion of myeloid cells with immunosuppressive activity. In the MT/ret model of spontaneous metastatic melanoma, myeloid cells are the most abundant tumor infiltrating hematopoietic population and their proportion is highest in the most aggressive cutaneous metastasis. Our data suggest that the tumor microenvironment favors polarization of myeloid cells into type 2 cells characterized by F4/80 expression, a weak capacity to secrete IL-12 and a high production of arginase. Myeloid cells from tumor and spleen of MT/ret mice inhibit T cell proliferation and IFNγ secretion. Interestingly, T cells play a role in type 2 polarization of myeloid cells. Indeed, intra-tumoral myeloid cells from MT/ret mice lacking T cells are not only less suppressive towards T cells than corresponding cells from wild-type MT/ret mice, but they also inhibit more efficiently melanoma cell proliferation. Thus, our data support the existence of a vicious circle, in which T cells may favor cancer development by establishing an environment that is likely to skew myeloid cell immunity toward a tumor promoting response that, in turn, suppresses immune effector cell functions. PMID:21633700

  6. Immune signature of tumor infiltrating immune cells in renal cancer

    PubMed Central

    Geissler, Katharina; Fornara, Paolo; Lautenschläger, Christine; Holzhausen, Hans-Jürgen; Seliger, Barbara; Riemann, Dagmar

    2015-01-01

    Tumor-associated immune cells have been discussed as an essential factor for the prediction of the outcome of tumor patients. Lymphocyte-specific genes are associated with a favorable prognosis in colorectal cancer but with poor survival in renal cell carcinoma (RCC). Flow cytometric analyses combined with immunohistochemistry were performed to study the phenotypic profiles of tumor infiltrating lymphocytes (TIL) and the frequency of T cells and macrophages in RCC lesions. Data were correlated with clinicopathological parameters and survival of patients. Comparing oncocytoma and clear cell (cc)RCC, T cell numbers as well as activation-associated T cell markers were higher in ccRCC, whereas the frequency of NK cells was higher in oncocytoma. An intratumoral increase of T cell numbers was found with higher tumor grades (G1:G2:G3/4 = 1:3:4). Tumor-associated macrophages slightly increased with dedifferentiation, although the macrophage-to-T cell ratio was highest in G1 tumor lesions. A high expression of CD57 was found in T cells of early tumor grades, whereas T cells in dedifferentiated RCC lesions expressed higher levels of CD69 and CTLA4. TIL composition did not differ between older (>70 y) and younger (<58 y) patients. Enhanced patients’ survival was associated with a higher percentage of tumor infiltrating NK cells and Th1 markers, e.g. HLA-DR+ and CXCR3+ T cells, whereas a high number of T cells, especially with high CD69 expression correlated with a worse prognosis of patients. Our results suggest that immunomonitoring of RCC patients might represent a useful tool for the prediction of the outcome of RCC patients. PMID:25949868

  7. X-ray sensitivity of human tumor cells in vitro

    SciTech Connect

    Weichselbaum, R.R.; Nove, J.; Little, J.B.

    1980-04-01

    Clonally-derived cells from ten human malignant tumors considered radiocurable (breast, neuroblastoma, medulloblastoma) or non-radiocurable (osteosarcoma, hypernephroma, glioblastoma, melanoma) were studied in cell culture and their in vitro x-ray survival curve parameters determined (anti n, D/sub 0/). There were no significant differences among the tumor cell lines suggesting that survival parameters in vitro do not explain differences in clinical radiocurability. Preliminary investigation with density inhibited human tumor cells indicate that such an approach may yield information regarding inherent cellular differences in radiocurability.

  8. Tumor-Targeted Nanomedicines

    PubMed Central

    ElBayoumi, Tamer A.; Torchilin, Vladimir P.

    2009-01-01

    Purpose The efficacy of drug delivery systems can be enhanced by making them target-specific via the attachment of various ligands. We attempted to enhance tumor accumulation and therapeutic effect of doxorubicin-loaded long-circulating PEGylated liposomes (Doxil®, ALZA Corp.) by coupling to their surface the anti-cancer monoclonal antibody 2C5 (mAb 2C5) with nuclesome (NS)-restricted activity, that can recognize the surface of various tumor but not normal cells and specifically targets pharmaceutical carriers to tumor cells in vitro and in vivo. Following earlier in vitro results with various cancer cell lines, the mAb 2C5-liposomes were studied in vivo vs. plain and non-specific IgG-liposomes. Experimental design Antibody coupling to Doxil® was performed via the “post-insertion” technique. Using 111In-labeled liposomes, the tissue biodistribution and pharmacokinetic profile were studied, as well as their accumulation in tumors in mice was followed by the whole-body γ-scintigraphic imaging. Therapeutic efficacy of mAb 2C5-targeted Doxil® vs. non-specific IgG-modified and original Doxil® controls was followed by registering live tumor growth and determining tumor weights upon mice sacrifice. Results mAb2C5 antibody-targeted liposomes demonstrate enhanced accumulation in tumors, and the in vivo therapeutic activity of the mAb 2C5-Doxil® treatment was found to be significantly superior, resulting in final tumor weights of only 25-40% compared to all Doxil® control treatments, when tested against the subcutaneous primary murine tumors of 4T1 and C26 and human PC3 tumor in nude mice. Conclusions Our results demonstrate the remarkable capability of 2C5-targeted Doxil® to specifically deliver its cargo into various tumors significantly increasing the efficacy of therapy. PMID:19276264

  9. Malignant phyllodes tumors display mesenchymal stem cell features and aldehyde dehydrogenase/disialoganglioside identify their tumor stem cells

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Introduction Although breast phyllodes tumors are rare, there is no effective therapy other than surgery. Little is known about their tumor biology. A malignant phyllodes tumor contains heterologous stromal elements, and can transform into rhabdomyosarcoma, liposarcoma and osteosarcoma. These versatile properties prompted us to explore their possible relationship to mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) and to search for the presence of cancer stem cells (CSCs) in phyllodes tumors. Methods Paraffin sections of malignant phyllodes tumors were examined for various markers by immunohistochemical staining. Xenografts of human primary phyllodes tumors were established by injecting freshly isolated tumor cells into the mammary fat pad of non-obese diabetic-severe combined immunodeficient (NOD-SCID) mice. To search for CSCs, xenografted tumor cells were sorted into various subpopulations by flow cytometry and examined for their in vitro mammosphere forming capacity, in vivo tumorigenicity in NOD-SCID mice and their ability to undergo differentiation. Results Immunohistochemical analysis revealed the expression of the following 10 markers: CD44, CD29, CD106, CD166, CD105, CD90, disialoganglioside (GD2), CD117, Aldehyde dehydrogenase 1 (ALDH), and Oct-4, and 7 clinically relevant markers (CD10, CD34, p53, p63, Ki-67, Bcl-2, vimentin, and Globo H) in all 51 malignant phyllodes tumors examined, albeit to different extents. Four xenografts were successfully established from human primary phyllodes tumors. In vitro, ALDH+ cells sorted from xenografts displayed approximately 10-fold greater mammosphere-forming capacity than ALDH- cells. GD2+ cells showed a 3.9-fold greater capacity than GD2- cells. ALDH+/GD2+cells displayed 12.8-fold greater mammosphere forming ability than ALDH-/GD2- cells. In vivo, the tumor-initiating frequency of ALDH+/GD2+ cells were up to 33-fold higher than that of ALDH+ cells, with as few as 50 ALDH+/GD2+ cells being sufficient for engraftment. Moreover, we

  10. Hypoxic cell turnover in different solid tumor lines

    SciTech Connect

    Ljungkvist, Anna S.E. . E-mail: a.ljungkvist@rther.umcn.nl; Bussink, Johan; Kaanders, Johannes H.A.M.; Rijken, Paulus F.J.W.; Begg, Adrian C.; Raleigh, James A.; Kogel, Albert J. van der

    2005-07-15

    Purpose: Most solid tumors contain hypoxic cells, and the amount of tumor hypoxia has been shown to have a negative impact on the outcome of radiotherapy. The efficacy of combined modality treatments depends both on the sequence and timing of the treatments. Hypoxic cell turnover in tumors may be important for optimal scheduling of combined modality treatments, especially when hypoxic cell targeting is involved. Methods and Materials: Previously we have shown that a double bioreductive hypoxic marker assay could be used to detect changes of tumor hypoxia in relation to the tumor vasculature after carbogen and hydralazine treatments. This assay was used in the current study to establish the turnover rate of hypoxic cells in three different tumor models. The first hypoxic marker, pimonidazole, was administered at variable times before tumor harvest, and the second hypoxic marker, CCI-103F, was injected at a fixed time before harvest. Hypoxic cell turnover was defined as loss of pimonidazole (first marker) relative to CCI-103F (second marker). Results: The half-life of hypoxic cell turnover was 17 h in the murine C38 colon carcinoma line, 23 h and 49 h in the human xenograft lines MEC82 and SCCNij3, respectively. Within 24 h, loss of pimonidazole-stained areas in C38 and MEC82 occurred concurrent with the appearance of pimonidazole positive cell debris in necrotic regions. In C38 and MEC82, most of the hypoxic cells had disappeared after 48 h, whereas in SCCNij3, viable cells that had been labeled with pimonidazole were still observed after 5 days. Conclusions: The present study demonstrates that the double hypoxia marker assay can be used to study changes in both the proportion of hypoxic tumor cells and their lifespan at the same time. The present study shows that large differences in hypoxic cell turnover rates may exist among tumor lines, with half-lives ranging from 17-49 h.

  11. Tumor cell lysates as immunogenic sources for cancer vaccine design

    PubMed Central

    González, Fermín E; Gleisner, Alejandra; Falcón-Beas, Felipe; Osorio, Fabiola; López, Mercedes N; Salazar-Onfray, Flavio

    2015-01-01

    Autologous dendritic cells (DCs) loaded with tumor-associated antigens (TAAs) are a promising immunological tool for cancer therapy. These stimulate the antitumor response and immunological memory generation. Nevertheless, many patients remain refractory to DC approaches. Antigen (Ag) delivery to DCs is relevant to vaccine success, and antigen peptides, tumor-associated proteins, tumor cells, autologous tumor lysates, and tumor-derived mRNA have been tested as Ag sources. Recently, DCs loaded with allogeneic tumor cell lysates were used to induce a potent immunological response. This strategy provides a reproducible pool of almost all potential Ags suitable for patient use, independent of MHC haplotypes or autologous tumor tissue availability. However, optimizing autologous tumor cell lysate preparation is crucial to enhancing efficacy. This review considers the role of cancer cell-derived lysates as a relevant source of antigens and as an activating factor for ex vivo therapeutic DCs capable of responding to neoplastic cells. These promising therapies are associated with the prolonged survival of advanced cancer patients. PMID:25625929

  12. Ovarian Tumor Cells Studied Aboard the International Space Station (ISS)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2001-01-01

    In August 2001, principal investigator Jeanne Becker sent human ovarian tumor cells to the International Space Station (ISS) aboard the STS-105 mission. The tumor cells were cultured in microgravity for a 14 day growth period and were analyzed for changes in the rate of cell growth and synthesis of associated proteins. In addition, they were evaluated for the expression of several proteins that are the products of oncogenes, which cause the transformation of normal cells into cancer cells. This photo, which was taken by astronaut Frank Culbertson who conducted the experiment for Dr. Becker, shows two cell culture bags containing LN1 ovarian carcinoma cell cultures.

  13. Endothelial cell tumor growth is Ape/ref-1 dependent.

    PubMed

    Biswas, Ayan; Khanna, Savita; Roy, Sashwati; Pan, Xueliang; Sen, Chandan K; Gordillo, Gayle M

    2015-09-01

    Tumor-forming endothelial cells have highly elevated levels of Nox-4 that release H2O2 into the nucleus, which is generally not compatible with cell survival. We sought to identify compensatory mechanisms that enable tumor-forming endothelial cells to survive and proliferate under these conditions. Ape-1/ref-1 (Apex-1) is a multifunctional protein that promotes DNA binding of redox-sensitive transcription factors, such as AP-1, and repairs oxidative DNA damage. A validated mouse endothelial cell (EOMA) tumor model was used to demonstrate that Nox-4-derived H2O2 causes DNA oxidation that induces Apex-1 expression. Apex-1 functions as a chaperone to keep transcription factors in a reduced state. In EOMA cells Apex-1 enables AP-1 binding to the monocyte chemoattractant protein-1 (mcp-1) promoter and expression of that protein is required for endothelial cell tumor formation. Intraperitoneal injection of the small molecule inhibitor E3330, which specifically targets Apex-1 redox-sensitive functions, resulted in a 50% decrease in tumor volume compared with mice injected with vehicle control (n = 6 per group), indicating that endothelial cell tumor proliferation is dependent on Apex-1 expression. These are the first reported results to establish Nox-4 induction of Apex-1 as a mechanism promoting endothelial cell tumor formation.

  14. Adjuvants for enhancing the immunogenicity of whole tumor cell vaccines.

    PubMed

    Chiang, Cheryl Lai-Lai; Kandalaft, Lana E; Coukos, George

    2011-01-01

    Whole tumor cell lysates can serve as excellent multivalent vaccines for priming tumor-specific CD8(+) and CD4(+) T cells. Whole cell vaccines can be prepared with hypochlorous acid oxidation, UVB-irradiation and repeat cycles of freeze and thaw. One major obstacle to successful immunotherapy is breaking self-tolerance to tumor antigens. Clinically approved adjuvants, including Montanide™ ISA-51 and 720, and keyhole-limpet proteins can be used to enhance tumor cell immunogenicity by stimulating both humoral and cellular anti-tumor responses. Other potential adjuvants, such as Toll-like receptor agonists (e.g., CpG, MPLA and PolyI:C), and cytokines (e.g., granulocyte-macrophage colony stimulating factor), have also been investigated. PMID:21557641

  15. Random migration precedes stable target cell interactions of tumor-infiltrating T cells.

    PubMed

    Mrass, Paulus; Takano, Hajime; Ng, Lai Guan; Daxini, Sachin; Lasaro, Marcio O; Iparraguirre, Amaya; Cavanagh, Lois L; von Andrian, Ulrich H; Ertl, Hildegund C J; Haydon, Philip G; Weninger, Wolfgang

    2006-11-27

    The tumor microenvironment is composed of an intricate mixture of tumor and host-derived cells that engage in a continuous interplay. T cells are particularly important in this context as they may recognize tumor-associated antigens and induce tumor regression. However, the precise identity of cells targeted by tumor-infiltrating T lymphocytes (TILs) as well as the kinetics and anatomy of TIL-target cell interactions within tumors are incompletely understood. Furthermore, the spatiotemporal conditions of TIL locomotion through the tumor stroma, as a prerequisite for establishing contact with target cells, have not been analyzed. These shortcomings limit the rational design of immunotherapeutic strategies that aim to overcome tumor-immune evasion. We have used two-photon microscopy to determine, in a dynamic manner, the requirements leading to tumor regression by TILs. Key observations were that TILs migrated randomly throughout the tumor microenvironment and that, in the absence of cognate antigen, they were incapable of sustaining active migration. Furthermore, TILs in regressing tumors formed long-lasting (>or=30 min), cognate antigen-dependent contacts with tumor cells. Finally, TILs physically interacted with macrophages, suggesting tumor antigen cross-presentation by these cells. Our results demonstrate that recognition of cognate antigen within tumors is a critical determinant of optimal TIL migration and target cell interactions, and argue against TIL guidance by long-range chemokine gradients.

  16. Circulating tumor cells in lung cancer.

    PubMed

    Young, Rachel; Pailler, Emma; Billiot, Fanny; Drusch, Françoise; Barthelemy, Amélie; Oulhen, Marianne; Besse, Benjamin; Soria, Jean-Charles; Farace, Françoise; Vielh, Philippe

    2012-01-01

    Circulating tumor cells (CTCs) have emerged as potential biomarkers in several cancers such as colon, prostate, and breast carcinomas, with a correlation between CTC number and patient prognosis being established by independent research groups. The detection and enumeration of CTCs, however, is still a developing field, with no universal method of detection suitable for all types of cancer. CTC detection in lung cancer in particular has proven difficult to perform, as CTCs in this type of cancer often present with nonepithelial characteristics. Moreover, as many detection methods rely on the use of epithelial markers to identify CTCs, the loss of these markers during epithelial-to-mesenchymal transition in certain metastatic cancers can render these methods ineffective. The development of personalized medicine has led to an increase in the advancement of molecular characterization of CTCs. The application of techniques such as FISH and RT-PCR to detect EGFR, HER2, and KRAS abnormalities in lung, breast, and colon cancer, for example, could be used to characterize CTCs in real time. The use of CTCs as a 'liquid biopsy' is therefore an exciting possibility providing information on patient prognosis and treatment efficacy. This review summarizes the state of CTC detection today, with particular emphasis on lung cancer, and discusses the future applications of CTCs in helping the clinician to develop new strategies in patient treatment. PMID:23207444

  17. IR-780 Dye as a Sonosensitizer for Sonodynamic Therapy of Breast Tumor

    PubMed Central

    Li, Yekuo; Zhou, Qunfang; Deng, Zhiting; Pan, Min; Liu, Xin; Wu, Junru; Yan, Fei; Zheng, Hairong

    2016-01-01

    Sonodynamic therapy (SDT) has become a new modality for cancer therapy through activating certain chemical sensitizers by ultrasound (US). Discovery and development of novel sonosensitizers are attracting extensive attentions. Here, we introduce IR-780 iodide, a lipophilic heptamethine dye with a peak optical absorption of 780 nm wavelength, which can function as SDT agents for breast cancer treatment. The in vitro cellular uptake, cell viability, and the generation levels of reactive oxygen species (ROS) were examined by using 4T1 breast cancer cells incubated with various concentrations of IR-780 followed by US irradiation. Our results showed a dose- and time-dependent cellular uptake of IR-780 iodide in 4T1 cancer cells. Significant lower viabilities and more necrotic/apoptotic cells were found when these cancer cells were treated with IR-780 iodide with US irradiation. Further analyzing the generation of ROS demonstrated significant increase of 1O2 level and H2O2, but not ⋅OH in the SDT-treated cells. The in vivo anti-tumor efficacy of SDT with IR-780 revealed significant tumor growth inhibition of xenografts of 4T1 cancer cells; it was further confirmed by histological analysis and TUNEL staining. Our results strongly suggest that SDT combined with IR-780 may provide a promising strategy for tumor treatment with minimal side effects. PMID:27174006

  18. Galectin-3 Determines Tumor Cell Adaptive Strategies in Stressed Tumor Microenvironments.

    PubMed

    Cardoso, Ana Carolina Ferreira; Andrade, Luciana Nogueira de Sousa; Bustos, Silvina Odete; Chammas, Roger

    2016-01-01

    Galectin-3 is a member of the β-galactoside-binding lectin family, whose expression is often dysregulated in cancers. While galectin-3 is usually an intracellular protein found in the nucleus and in the cytoplasm, under certain conditions, galectin-3 can be secreted by an yet unknown mechanism. Under stressing conditions (e.g., hypoxia and nutrient deprivation) galectin-3 is upregulated, through the activity of transcription factors, such as HIF-1α and NF-κB. Here, we review evidence that indicates a positive role for galectin-3 in MAPK family signal transduction, leading to cell proliferation and cell survival. Galectin-3 serves as a scaffold protein, which favors the spatial organization of signaling proteins as K-RAS. Upon secretion, extracellular galectin-3 interacts with a variety of cell surface glycoproteins, such as growth factor receptors, integrins, cadherins, and members of the Notch family, among other glycoproteins, besides different extracellular matrix molecules. Through its ability to oligomerize, galectin-3 forms lectin lattices that act as scaffolds that sustain the spatial organization of signaling receptors on the cell surface, dictating its maintenance on the plasma membrane or their endocytosis. Galectin-3 induces tumor cell, endothelial cell, and leukocyte migration, favoring either the exit of tumor cells from a stressed microenvironment or the entry of endothelial cells and leukocytes, such as monocytes/macrophages into the tumor organoid. Therefore, galectin-3 plays homeostatic roles in tumors, as (i) it favors tumor cell adaptation for survival in stressed conditions; (ii) upon secretion, galectin-3 induces tumor cell detachment and migration; and (iii) it attracts monocyte/macrophage and endothelial cells to the tumor mass, inducing both directly and indirectly the process of angiogenesis. The two latter activities are potentially targetable, and specific interventions may be designed to counteract the protumoral role of extracellular

  19. Galectin-3 Determines Tumor Cell Adaptive Strategies in Stressed Tumor Microenvironments

    PubMed Central

    Cardoso, Ana Carolina Ferreira; Andrade, Luciana Nogueira de Sousa; Bustos, Silvina Odete; Chammas, Roger

    2016-01-01

    Galectin-3 is a member of the β-galactoside-binding lectin family, whose expression is often dysregulated in cancers. While galectin-3 is usually an intracellular protein found in the nucleus and in the cytoplasm, under certain conditions, galectin-3 can be secreted by an yet unknown mechanism. Under stressing conditions (e.g., hypoxia and nutrient deprivation) galectin-3 is upregulated, through the activity of transcription factors, such as HIF-1α and NF-κB. Here, we review evidence that indicates a positive role for galectin-3 in MAPK family signal transduction, leading to cell proliferation and cell survival. Galectin-3 serves as a scaffold protein, which favors the spatial organization of signaling proteins as K-RAS. Upon secretion, extracellular galectin-3 interacts with a variety of cell surface glycoproteins, such as growth factor receptors, integrins, cadherins, and members of the Notch family, among other glycoproteins, besides different extracellular matrix molecules. Through its ability to oligomerize, galectin-3 forms lectin lattices that act as scaffolds that sustain the spatial organization of signaling receptors on the cell surface, dictating its maintenance on the plasma membrane or their endocytosis. Galectin-3 induces tumor cell, endothelial cell, and leukocyte migration, favoring either the exit of tumor cells from a stressed microenvironment or the entry of endothelial cells and leukocytes, such as monocytes/macrophages into the tumor organoid. Therefore, galectin-3 plays homeostatic roles in tumors, as (i) it favors tumor cell adaptation for survival in stressed conditions; (ii) upon secretion, galectin-3 induces tumor cell detachment and migration; and (iii) it attracts monocyte/macrophage and endothelial cells to the tumor mass, inducing both directly and indirectly the process of angiogenesis. The two latter activities are potentially targetable, and specific interventions may be designed to counteract the protumoral role of extracellular

  20. T Cell Metabolic Fitness in Anti-Tumor Immunity

    PubMed Central

    Siska, Peter J.; Rathmell, Jeffrey C.

    2015-01-01

    SUMMARY T cell metabolism plays a central role to support and shape immune responses and may play a key role in anti-tumor immunity. T cell metabolism is normally held under tight regulation in an immune response of glycolysis to promote effector T cell expansion and function. However, tumors may deplete nutrients, generate toxic products, or stimulate conserved negative feedback mechanisms, such as through PD-1, to impair effector T cell nutrient uptake and metabolic fitness. In addition, regulatory T cells are favored in low glucose conditions and may inhibit anti-tumor immune responses. Here we review how the tumor microenvironment modifies metabolic and functional pathways in T cells and how these changes may uncover new targets and challenges for cancer immunotherapy and treatment. PMID:25773310

  1. Genetic background affects susceptibility to tumoral stem cell reprogramming

    PubMed Central

    García-Ramírez, Idoia; Ruiz-Roca, Lucía; Martín-Lorenzo, Alberto; Blanco, Óscar; García-Cenador, María Begoña; García-Criado, Francisco Javier; Vicente-Dueñas, Carolina; Sánchez-García, Isidro

    2013-01-01

    The latest studies of the interactions between oncogenes and its target cell have shown that certain oncogenes may act as passengers to reprogram tissue-specific stem/progenitor cell into a malignant cancer stem cell state. In this study, we show that the genetic background influences this tumoral stem cell reprogramming capacity of the oncogenes using as a model the Sca1-BCRABLp210 mice, where the type of tumor they develop, chronic myeloid leukemia (CML), is a function of tumoral stem cell reprogramming. Sca1-BCRABLp210 mice containing FVB genetic components were significantly more resistant to CML. However, pure Sca1-BCRABLp210 FVB mice developed thymomas that were not seen in the Sca1-BCRABLp210 mice into the B6 background. Collectively, our results demonstrate for the first time that tumoral stem cell reprogramming fate is subject to polymorphic genetic control. PMID:23839033

  2. Plasma-activated medium induced apoptosis on tumor cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hori, Masaru; Tanaka, Hiromasa; Mizuno, Masaaki; Nakamura, Kae; Kajiyama, Hiroaki; Takeda, Keigo; Ishikawa, Kenji; Kano, Hiroyuki; Kikkawa, Fumitaka

    2013-09-01

    The non-equilibrium atmospheric pressure plasma (NEAPP) has attracted attention in cancer therapy. In this study, the fresh medium was treated with our developed NEAPP, ultra-high electron density (approximately 2 × 1016 cm-3). The medium called the plasma-activated medium (PAM) killed not normal cells but tumor cells through induction of apoptosis. Cell proliferation assays showed that the tumor cells were selectively killed by the PAM. Those cells induced apoptosis using an apoptotic molecular marker, cleaved Caspase3/7. The molecular mechanisms of PAM-mediated apoptosis in the tumor cells were also found that the PAM downregulated the expression of AKT kinase, a marker molecule in a survival signal transduction pathway. These results suggest that PAM may be a promising tool for tumor therapy by downregulating the survival signals in cancers.

  3. Multifunctional T Lymphocytes Generated After Therapy With an Antitumor Gallotanin-Rich Normalized Fraction Are Related to Primary Tumor Size Reduction in a Breast Cancer Model.

    PubMed

    Urueña, Claudia; Gomez, Alejandra; Sandoval, Tito; Hernandez, John; Li, Shaoping; Barreto, Alfonso; Fiorentino, Susana

    2015-09-01

    Natural compounds are promising sources for anticancer therapies because of their multifunctional activity and low toxicity. Although the host immune response (IR) is clearly implicated in tumor control, the relationship between natural therapies and IR has not yet been elucidated. The present work evaluates IR induction after treatment with a gallotannin-rich fraction from Caesalpinia spinosa (P2Et). Breast tumor 4T1 cells were used to evaluate antitumor properties and IR activation. Apoptosis and expression of immunogenic cell death (ICD) markers were assessed in vitro, whereas IR and postvaccination tumor evolution were assessed in vivo. P2Et fraction induced apoptotic cell death, displaying phosphatidylserine externalization and DNA fragmentation. ICD markers such as calreticulin, high-mobility group box 1 translocation from nuclei to cytoplasm, and ATP secretion were observed. Primary tumor control was improved by vaccination with P2Et-pretreated 4T1 cells (t-P2Et), yielding long-lasting ex vivo multifunctional CD4(+) and CD8(+) T lymphocytes (interleukin [IL]-2(+), tumor necrosis factor [TNF]-α(+), interferon [IFN]-γ(+)) that secrete IL-2, TNF-α, IL-4, IL-5, and IFN-γ after specific 4T1 cell stimulation. The present study constitutes the first demonstration of a long-lasting antitumor IR induction and primary tumor reduction induced by a complex natural fraction. These data reveal the potential use of this fraction as an adjuvant in breast cancer treatment.

  4. Adenovirus-mediated gene transfer to tumor cells.

    PubMed

    Cascalló, Manel; Alemany, Ramon

    2004-01-01

    Cell transduction in vitro is only the first step toward proving that a genetherapy vector can be useful to treat tumors. However, tumor targeting in vivo is now the milestone for gene therapy to succeed against disseminated cancer. Therefore, most valuable information is obtained from studies of vector biodistribution. Owing to the hepatotropism of adenoviral vectors, a particularly important parameter is the tumor/liver ratio. This ratio can be given at the level of gene expression if the amount of transgene expression is measured. To optimize the targeting, however, the levels of viral particles that reach the tumor compared to other organs must be studied. Most of this chapter deals with methods to quantify the virus fate in tumor-bearing animals. We present a radioactive labeling method that can be used to study biodistribution. After a small section dealing with tumor models, we describe methods to quantify different parameters related to adenovirus-mediated tumor targeting. PMID:14970588

  5. Lymphocyte response to autochthonous human solid tumor cells: relationship to histological types and tumor load.

    PubMed

    Kurosu, Y; Honjo, H; Hironaka, T; Morita, K

    1979-12-01

    Mixed lymphocyte--tumor cell cultures were made with materials from patients with various histological types of cancer. In 25 out of 89 patients, positive lymphocyte response to tumor cells was observed. There appeared to be an inverse relationship between the frequency of positive responses and extent of the disease. Patients with neuroblastoma, however, showed more frequent positive responses in cases of widespread disease. The data obtained may have valuable clinical implications, supporting the possibility of immunotherapy of cancer patients.

  6. S-100 Negative Granular Cell Tumor of the Oral Cavity.

    PubMed

    Solomon, Lynn W; Velez, Ines

    2016-09-01

    Classic granular cell tumor is a mesenchymal neoplasm that commonly occurs on the skin, but is not infrequently found in the oral cavity, primarily on the dorsal tongue. Diagnosis is usually straightforward with hematoxylin and eosin stained slides. Immunohistochemical studies on classic granular cell tumor shows positive immunostaining for S-100 and vimentin, while CD68 is variably positive. We report a case of otherwise unremarkable oral granular cell tumor that was immunohistochemically negative for S-100, and positive for vimentin and CD68, and discuss the differential diagnosis. The results of the immunohistochemical studies in our case are compared with those of classic S-100 positive oral granular cell tumors, as well as cutaneous and oral S-100 negative granular cell tumors. Classic S-100 positive granular cell tumors and S-100 negative granular cell tumors of the oral cavity can only be distinguished by immunohistochemical studies; however, the necessity of this distinction is unclear, as both are benign lesions in which recurrence is unlikely.

  7. [The tumoral stroma, a breeding ground for cancer cells].

    PubMed

    Buache, Émilie; Rio, Marie-Christine

    2014-04-01

    Carcinomas are constituted by malignant epithelial cells and the tumor microenvironment also called tumoral stroma. The present non-exhaustive review will focus on cellular and molecular key events implicating cancer-associated fibroblasts (CAF) and the extracellular matrix (ECM) in the stroma remodeling processes occuring during tumor invasive steps. We will also discuss the place of the stroma in the cancerology today, the recent progresses done and its usefulness to design new therapies.

  8. Circulating Tumor Cell Composition in Renal Cell Carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Bublitz, Kira; Lazaridis, Lazaros; Goergens, André; Giebel, Bernd; Schuler, Martin; Hoffmann, Andreas-Claudius

    2016-01-01

    Purpose Due to their minimal-invasive yet potentially current character circulating tumor cells (CTC) might be useful as a “liquid biopsy” in solid tumors. However, successful application in metastatic renal cell carcinoma (mRCC) has been very limited so far. High plasticity and heterogeneity of CTC morphology challenges currently available enrichment and detection techniques with EpCAM as the usual surface marker being underrepresented in mRCC. We recently described a method that enables us to identify and characterize non-hematopoietic cells in the peripheral blood stream with varying characteristics and define CTC subgroups that distinctly associate to clinical parameters. With this pilot study we wanted to scrutinize feasibility of this approach and its potential usage in clinical studies. Experimental Design Peripheral blood was drawn from 14 consecutive mRCC patients at the West German Cancer Center and CTC profiles were analyzed by Multi-Parameter Immunofluorescence Microscopy (MPIM). Additionally angiogenesis-related genes were measured by quantitative RT-PCR analysis. Results We detected CTC with epithelial, mesenchymal, stem cell-like or mixed-cell characteristics at different time-points during anti-angiogenic therapy. The presence and quantity of N-cadherin-positive or CD133-positive CTC was associated with inferior PFS. There was an inverse correlation between high expression of HIF1A, VEGFA, VEGFR and FGFR and the presence of N-cadherin-positive and CD133-positive CTC. Conclusions Patients with mRCC exhibit distinct CTC profiles that may implicate differences in therapeutic outcome. Prospective evaluation of phenotypic and genetic CTC profiling as prognostic and predictive biomarker in mRCC is warranted. PMID:27101285

  9. Tumor-derived chemokine MCP-1/CCL2 is sufficient for mediating tumor tropism of adoptively transferred T cells.

    PubMed

    Brown, Christine E; Vishwanath, Reena P; Aguilar, Brenda; Starr, Renate; Najbauer, Joseph; Aboody, Karen S; Jensen, Michael C

    2007-09-01

    To exert a therapeutic effect, adoptively transferred tumor-specific CTLs must traffic to sites of tumor burden, exit the circulation, and infiltrate the tumor microenvironment. In this study, we examine the ability of adoptively transferred human CTL to traffic to tumors with disparate chemokine secretion profiles independent of tumor Ag recognition. Using a combination of in vivo tumor tropism studies and in vitro biophotonic chemotaxis assays, we observed that cell lines derived from glioma, medulloblastoma, and renal cell carcinoma efficiently chemoattracted ex vivo-expanded primary human T cells. We compared the chemokines secreted by tumor cell lines with high chemotactic activity with those that failed to elicit T cell chemotaxis (Daudi lymphoma, 10HTB neuroblastoma, and A2058 melanoma cells) and found a correlation between tumor-derived production of MCP-1/CCL2 (> or =10 ng/ml) and T cell chemotaxis. Chemokine immunodepletion studies confirmed that tumor-derived MCP-1 elicits effector T cell chemotaxis. Moreover, MCP-1 is sufficient for in vivo T cell tumor tropism as evidenced by the selective accumulation of i.v. administered firefly luciferase-expressing T cells in intracerebral xenografts of tumor transfectants secreting MCP-1. These studies suggest that the capacity of adoptively transferred T cells to home to tumors may be, in part, dictated by the species and amounts of tumor-derived chemokines, in particular MCP-1.

  10. Apoptosis and tumor cell death in response to HAMLET (human alpha-lactalbumin made lethal to tumor cells).

    PubMed

    Hallgren, Oskar; Aits, Sonja; Brest, Patrick; Gustafsson, Lotta; Mossberg, Ann-Kristin; Wullt, Björn; Svanborg, Catharina

    2008-01-01

    HAMLET (human alpha-lactalbumin made lethal to tumor cells) is a molecular complex derived from human milk that kills tumor cells by a process resembling programmed cell death. The complex consists of partially unfolded alpha-lactalbumin and oleic acid, and both the protein and the fatty acid are required for cell death. HAMLET has broad antitumor activity in vitro, and its therapeutic effect has been confirmed in vivo in a human glioblastoma rat xenograft model, in patients with skin papillomas and in patients with bladder cancer. The mechanisms of tumor cell death remain unclear, however. Immediately after the encounter with tumor cells, HAMLET invades the cells and causes mitochondrial membrane depolarization, cytochrome c release, phosphatidyl serine exposure, and a low caspase response. A fraction of the cells undergoes morphological changes characteristic of apoptosis, but caspase inhibition does not rescue the cells and Bcl-2 overexpression or altered p53 status does not influence the sensitivity of tumor cells to HAMLET. HAMLET also creates a state of unfolded protein overload and activates 20S proteasomes, which contributes to cell death. In parallel, HAMLET translocates to tumor cell nuclei, where high-affinity interactions with histones cause chromatin disruption, loss of transcription, and nuclear condensation. The dying cells also show morphological changes compatible with macroautophagy, and recent studies indicate that macroautophagy is involved in the cell death response to HAMLET. The results suggest that HAMLET, like a hydra with many heads, may interact with several crucial cellular organelles, thereby activating several forms of cell death, in parallel. This complexity might underlie the rapid death response of tumor cells and the broad antitumor activity of HAMLET.

  11. NK Cells and γδ T Cells Mediate Resistance to Polyomavirus–Induced Tumors

    PubMed Central

    Mishra, Rabinarayan; Chen, Alex T.; Welsh, Raymond M.; Szomolanyi-Tsuda, Eva

    2010-01-01

    NK and γδ T cells can eliminate tumor cells in many experimental models, but their effect on the development of tumors caused by virus infections in vivo is not known. Polyomavirus (PyV) induces tumors in neonatally infected mice of susceptible strains and in adult mice with certain immune deficiencies, and CD8+ αβ T cells are regarded as the main effectors in anti-tumor immunity. Here we report that adult TCRβ knockout (KO) mice that lack αβ but have γδ T cells remain tumor-free after PyV infection, whereas TCRβ×δ KO mice that lack all T cells develop tumors. In addition, E26 mice, which lack NK and T cells, develop the tumors earlier than TCRβ×δ KO mice. These observations implicate γδ T and NK cells in the resistance to PyV-induced tumors. Cell lines established from PyV-induced tumors activate NK and γδ T cells both in culture and in vivo and express Rae-1, an NKG2D ligand. Moreover, these PyV tumor cells are killed by NK cells in vitro, and this cytotoxicity is prevented by treatment with NKG2D-blocking antibodies. Our findings demonstrate a protective role for NK and γδ T cells against naturally occurring virus-induced tumors and suggest the involvement of NKG2D-mediated mechanisms. PMID:20523894

  12. Multipotent Mesenchymal Stromal Cells: Possible Culprits in Solid Tumors?

    PubMed Central

    Johann, Pascal David; Müller, Ingo

    2015-01-01

    The clinical use of bone marrow derived multipotent mesenchymal stromal cells (BM-MSCs) in different settings ranging from tissue engineering to immunotherapies has prompted investigations on the properties of these cells in a variety of other tissues. Particularly the role of MSCs in solid tumors has been the subject of many experimental approaches. While a clear phenotypical distinction of tumor associated fibroblasts (TAFs) and MSCs within the tumor microenvironment is still missing, the homing of bone marrow MSCs in tumor sites has been extensively studied. Both, tumor-promoting and tumor-inhibiting effects of BM-MSCs have been described in this context. This ambiguity requires a reappraisal of the different studies and experimental methods employed. Here, we review the current literature on tumor-promoting and tumor-inhibiting effects of BM-MSCs with a particular emphasis on their interplay with components of the immune system and also highlight a potential role of MSCs as cell of origin for certain mesenchymal tumors. PMID:26273308

  13. Granular cell tumor of hypopharynx: report of a rare case.

    PubMed

    Honda, Keigo; Tanaka, Shinzo; Kishimoto, Masanao; Iwai, Koji; Tamaki, Hisanobu; Asato, Ryo; Ito, Juichi

    2007-02-01

    Granular cell tumor is a rare tumor, probably of Schwann cell origin. The head and neck are most frequently affected, but hypopharyngeal lesion is extremely rare. We report the seventh case of hypopharyngeal granular cell tumor. Immunohistochemical staining for S100 protein is helpful for the correct diagnosis. There is some possibility of malignancy despite absence of histological evidence, thus the treatment is exclusively surgical resection. The microlaryngoscopic approach is feasible for hypopharyngeal lesions in most cases. Recurrence can occur even after appropriate resection.

  14. Molecular Connections between Cancer Cell Metabolism and the Tumor Microenvironment

    PubMed Central

    Justus, Calvin R.; Sanderlin, Edward J.; Yang, Li V.

    2015-01-01

    Cancer cells preferentially utilize glycolysis, instead of oxidative phosphorylation, for metabolism even in the presence of oxygen. This phenomenon of aerobic glycolysis, referred to as the “Warburg effect”, commonly exists in a variety of tumors. Recent studies further demonstrate that both genetic factors such as oncogenes and tumor suppressors and microenvironmental factors such as spatial hypoxia and acidosis can regulate the glycolytic metabolism of cancer cells. Reciprocally, altered cancer cell metabolism can modulate the tumor microenvironment which plays important roles in cancer cell somatic evolution, metastasis, and therapeutic response. In this article, we review the progression of current understandings on the molecular interaction between cancer cell metabolism and the tumor microenvironment. In addition, we discuss the implications of these interactions in cancer therapy and chemoprevention. PMID:25988385

  15. Pancreatic Tumor Cell Secreted CCN1/Cyr61 Promotes Endothelial cell migration and Aberrant Neovascularization

    PubMed Central

    Maity, Gargi; Mehta, Smita; Haque, Inamul; Dhar, Kakali; Sarkar, Sandipto; Banerjee, Sushanta K.; Banerjee, Snigdha

    2014-01-01

    The complex signaling networks between cancer cells and adjacent endothelial cells make it challenging to unravel how cancer cells send extracellular messages to promote aberrant vascularization or tumor angiogenesis. Here, in vitro and in vivo models show that pancreatic cancer cell generated unique microenvironments can underlie endothelial cell migration and tumor angiogenesis. Mechanistically, we find that pancreatic cancer cell secreted CCN1/Cyr61 matricellular protein rewires the microenvironment to promote endothelial cell migration and tumor angiogenesis. This event can be overcome by Sonic Hedgehog (SHh) antibody treatment. Collectively, these studies identify a novel CCN1 signaling program in pancreatic cancer cells which activates SHh through autocrine-paracrine circuits to promote endothelial cell migration and tumor angiogenesis and suggests that CCN1 signaling of pancreatic cancer cells is vital for the regulation of tumor angiogenesis. Thus CCN1 signaling could be an ideal target for tumor vascular disruption in pancreatic cancer. PMID:24833309

  16. Tumor cell vascular mimicry: Novel targeting opportunity in melanoma.

    PubMed

    Hendrix, Mary J C; Seftor, Elisabeth A; Seftor, Richard E B; Chao, Jun-Tzu; Chien, Du-Shieng; Chu, Yi-Wen

    2016-03-01

    In 1999, the American Journal of Pathology published an article, entitled "Vascular channel formation by human melanoma cells in vivo and in vitro: vasculogenic mimicry" by Maniotis and colleagues, which ignited a spirited debate for several years and earned the journal's distinction of a "citation classic" (Maniotis et al., 1999). Tumor cell vasculogenic mimicry (VM), also known as vascular mimicry, describes the plasticity of aggressive cancer cells forming de novo vascular networks and is associated with the malignant phenotype and poor clinical outcome. The tumor cells capable of VM share the commonality of a stem cell-like, transendothelial phenotype, which may be induced by hypoxia. Since its introduction as a novel paradigm for melanoma tumor perfusion, many studies have contributed new findings illuminating the underlying molecular pathways supporting VM in a variety of tumors, including carcinomas, sarcomas, glioblastomas, astrocytomas, and melanomas. Of special significance is the lack of effectiveness of angiogenesis inhibitors on tumor cell VM, suggesting a selective resistance by this phenotype to conventional therapy. Facilitating the functional plasticity of tumor cell VM are key proteins associated with vascular, stem cell, extracellular matrix, and hypoxia-related signaling pathways--each deserving serious consideration as potential therapeutic targets and diagnostic indicators of the aggressive, metastatic phenotype. This review highlights seminal findings pertinent to VM, including the effects of a novel, small molecular compound, CVM-1118, currently under clinical development to target VM, and illuminates important molecular pathways involved in the suppression of this plastic, aggressive phenotype, using melanoma as a model.

  17. Influence of preharvest tumor cell contamination in bone marrow or blood does not predict resultant tumor cell contamination of granulocyte colony-stimulating factor mobilized stem cells.

    PubMed

    Krüger, W; Kröger, N; Tögel, F; Badbaran, A; Renges, H; Gieseking, F; Gutensohn, K; Jänicke, F; Zander, A R

    2001-04-01

    Tumor cell contamination of stem cell collections harvested from breast cancer patients is a common phenomenon described by several investigators but with findings that vary among reports. Although so-called co-mobilization of these cells has been hypothesized, the origin of tumor cell contamination in stem cells is still unknown. A total of 47 G-CSF mobilized stem cell grafts from patients with nodal-positive (n = 30), chemosensitive metastatic (n = 11), and 5 women with inflammatory breast cancer were evaluated for cancer cells by immunocytochemistry. Additionally, 40 bone marrow aspirations and 23 peripheral blood samples collected prior to apheresis and after one to two cycles of conventional chemotherapy were available for examination. Tumor cell contamination of leukapheresis correlated best with preharvest blood state. This was valid when the nominal (positive/negative) presence of tumor cells in blood was compared to the nominal presence of tumor cells in apheresis samples and when the it was correlated to the tumor cell load of apheresis samples (TCL = tumor cells per 10(6) nucleated cells investigated). The correlation between blood and stem cells was better (nominal and quantitative) than that between marrow and stem cells, despite the larger sample size of marrow aspirations. The presence or absence of cancer cells in apheresis samples could not be safely predicted by the presence or absence of tumor cells in marrow or blood alone. Diagnostic specificity seems to improve from a combination of results from marrow and blood analysis. No correlation was found in quantitative analysis of tumor cell contamination between marrow and blood. In conclusion, the results suggest that blood and bone marrow represent different compartments for epithelial cancer cells and that contaminating tumor cells in stem cell harvests may be derived from the blood and/or marrow compartment. The tumor cell contamination of a stem cell harvest cannot be safely predicted by a

  18. Fes tyrosine kinase expression in the tumor niche correlates with enhanced tumor growth, angiogenesis, circulating tumor cells, metastasis, and infiltrating macrophages.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Shengnan; Chitu, Violeta; Stanley, E Richard; Elliott, Bruce E; Greer, Peter A

    2011-02-15

    Fes is a protein tyrosine kinase with cell autonomous oncogenic activities that are well established in cell culture and animal models, but its involvement in human cancer has been unclear. Abundant expression of Fes in vascular endothelial cells and myeloid cell lineages prompted us to explore roles for Fes in the tumor microenvironment. In an orthotopic mouse model of breast cancer, we found that loss of Fes in the host correlated with reductions in engrafted tumor growth rates, metastasis, and circulating tumor cells. The tumor microenvironment in Fes-deficient mice also showed reduced vascularity and fewer macrophages. In co-culture with tumor cells, Fes-deficient macrophages also poorly promoted tumor cell invasive behavior. Taken together, our observations argue that Fes inhibition might provide therapeutic benefits in breast cancer, in part by attenuating tumor-associated angiogenesis and the metastasis-promoting functions of tumor-associated macrophages.

  19. miRNA dynamics in tumor-infiltrating myeloid cells modulating tumor progression in pancreatic cancer.

    PubMed

    Mühlberg, Leonie; Kühnemuth, Benjamin; Costello, Eithne; Shaw, Victoria; Sipos, Bence; Huber, Magdalena; Griesmann, Heidi; Krug, Sebastian; Schober, Marvin; Gress, Thomas M; Michl, Patrick

    2016-06-01

    Myeloid cells including tumor-associated macrophages (TAM) and myeloid-derived suppressor cells (MDSC) are known as important mediators of tumor progression in solid tumors such as pancreatic cancer. Infiltrating myeloid cells have been identified not only in invasive tumors, but also in early pre-invasive pancreatic intraepithelial precursor lesions (PanIN). The functional dynamics of myeloid cells during carcinogenesis is largely unknown. We aimed to systematically elucidate phenotypic and transcriptional changes in infiltrating myeloid cells during carcinogenesis and tumor progression in a genetic mouse model of pancreatic cancer. Using murine pancreatic myeloid cells isolated from the genetic mouse model at different time points during carcinogenesis, we examined both established markers of macrophage polarization using RT-PCR and FACS as well as transcriptional changes focusing on miRNA profiling. Myeloid cells isolated during carcinogenesis showed a simultaneous increase of established markers of M1 and M2 polarization during carcinogenesis, indicating that phenotypic changes of myeloid cells during carcinogenesis do not follow the established M1/M2 classification. MiRNA profiling revealed distinct regulations of several miRNAs already present in myeloid cells infiltrating pre-invasive PanIN lesions. Among them miRNA-21 was significantly increased in myeloid cells surrounding both PanIN lesions and invasive cancers. Functionally, miRNA-21-5p and -3p altered expression of the immune-modulating cytokines CXCL-10 and CCL-3 respectively. Our data indicate that miRNAs are dynamically regulated in infiltrating myeloid cells during carcinogenesis and mediate their functional phenotype by facilitating an immune-suppressive tumor-promoting micro-milieu. PMID:27471627

  20. Bystander effect-mediated therapy of experimental brain tumor by genetically engineered tumor cells.

    PubMed

    Namba, H; Tagawa, M; Iwadate, Y; Kimura, M; Sueyoshi, K; Sakiyama, S

    1998-01-01

    Transfer of the herpes simplex virus-thymidine kinase (HSV-tk) gene, followed by administration of ganciclovir (GCV), generates the "bystander effect," in which HSV-tk-negative wild-type cells, as well as HSV-tk-expressing cells, are killed by GCV. To eradicate an intracranial tumor by this bystander effect, we injected the tumor cells transduced with the HSV-tk gene (TK cells) in the vicinity of the preimplanted wild-type tumor and then administered GCV. Wild-type 9L-gliosarcoma cells (1 x 10[5]) were implanted into the brain of syngeneic Fisher rats. On the next day, rats were injected with TK cells (1 x 10(5) or 3 x 10[5]) or medium alone at the same brain coordinate and then treated with GCV or saline. Administration of GCV significantly prolonged the survival of the rats injected with TK cells compared with that injected with medium alone (p < 0.01). Reduction in tumor size and retardation of tumor growth were observed by serial magnetic resonance imaging in the rats that received the combination of TK cells and GCV. The results show that the bystander effect is also achieved in vivo even when TK cells and wild-type cells are not simultaneously implanted. This treatment modality circumvents potential risks accompanied with in vivo gene transfer. Because there remained substantially no HSV-tk-positive cells in the recurrent tumors, this modality offers a "safe" therapeutic strategy against human malignant gliomas. PMID:9458237

  1. Engineered three-dimensional microfluidic device for interrogating cell-cell interactions in the tumor microenvironment

    PubMed Central

    Hockemeyer, K.; Janetopoulos, C.; Terekhov, A.; Hofmeister, W.; Vilgelm, A.; Costa, Lino; Wikswo, J. P.; Richmond, A.

    2014-01-01

    Stromal cells in the tumor microenvironment play a key role in the metastatic properties of a tumor. It is recognized that cancer-associated fibroblasts (CAFs) and endothelial cells secrete factors capable of influencing tumor cell migration into the blood or lymphatic vessels. We developed a microfluidic device that can be used to image the interactions between stromal cells and tumor cell spheroids in a three dimensional (3D) microenvironment while enabling external control of interstitial flow at an interface, which supports endothelial cells. The apparatus couples a 200-μm channel with a semicircular well to mimic the interface of a blood vessel with the stroma, and the design allows for visualization of the interactions of interstitial flow, endothelial cells, leukocytes, and fibroblasts with the tumor cells. We observed that normal tissue-associated fibroblasts (NAFs) contribute to the “single file” pattern of migration of tumor cells from the spheroid in the 3D microenvironment. In contrast, CAFs induce a rapid dispersion of tumor cells out of the spheroid with migration into the 3D matrix. Moreover, treatment of tumor spheroid cultures with the chemokine CXCL12 mimics the effect of the CAFs, resulting in similar patterns of dispersal of the tumor cells from the spheroid. Conversely, addition of CXCL12 to co-cultures of NAFs with tumor spheroids did not mimic the effects observed with CAF co-cultures, suggesting that NAFs produce factors that stabilize the tumor spheroids to reduce their migration in response to CXCL12. PMID:25379090

  2. Increased IMP dehydrogenase gene expression in solid tumor tissues and tumor cell lines

    SciTech Connect

    Collart, F.R.; Chubb, C.B.; Mirkin, B.L.; Huberman, E.

    1992-07-10

    IMP dehydrogenase, a regulatory enzyme of guanine nucleotide biosynthesis, may play a role in cell proliferation and malignancy. To assess this possibility, we examined IMP dehydrogenase expression in a series of human solid tumor tissues and tumor cell lines in comparison with their normal counterparts. Increased IMP dehydrogenase gene expression was observed in brain tumors relative to normal brain tissue and in sarcoma cells relative to normal fibroblasts. Similarly, in several B- and T-lymphoid leukemia cell lines, elevated levels of IMP dehydrogenase mRNA and cellular enzyme were observed in comparison with the levels in peripheral blood lymphocytes. These results are consistent with an association between increased IMP dehydrogenase expression and either enhanced cell proliferation or malignant transformation.

  3. Targeting Tumor Vasculature Endothelial Cells and Tumor Cells for Immunotherapy of Human Melanoma in a Mouse Xenograft Model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hu, Zhiwei; Sun, Ying; Garen, Alan

    1999-07-01

    An immunotherapy treatment for cancer that targets both the tumor vasculature and tumor cells has shown promising results in a severe combined immunodeficient mouse xenograft model of human melanoma. The treatment involves systemic delivery of an immunoconjugate molecule composed of a tumor-targeting domain conjugated to the Fc effector domain of human IgG1. The effector domain induces a cytolytic immune response against the targeted cells by natural killer cells and complement. Two types of targeting domains were used. One targeting domain is a human single-chain Fv molecule that binds to a chondroitin sulfate proteoglycan expressed on the surface of most human melanoma cells. Another targeting domain is factor VII (fVII), a zymogen that binds with high specificity and affinity to the transmembrane receptor tissue factor (TF) to initiate the blood coagulation cascade. TF is expressed by endothelial cells lining the tumor vasculature but not the normal vasculature, and also by many types of tumor cells including melanoma. Because the binding of a fVII immunoconjugate to TF might cause disseminated intravascular coagulation, the active site of fVII was mutated to inhibit coagulation without affecting the affinity for TF. The immunoconjugates were encoded as secreted molecules in a replication-defective adenovirus vector, which was injected into the tail vein of severe combined immunodeficient mice. The results demonstrate that a mutated fVII immunoconjugate, administered separately or together with a single-chain Fv immunoconjugate that binds to the tumor cells, can inhibit the growth or cause regression of an established human tumor xenograft. This procedure could be effective in treating a broad spectrum of human solid tumors that express TF on vascular endothelial cells and tumor cells.

  4. Identification of peptides that bind to irradiated pancreatic tumor cells

    SciTech Connect

    Huang Canhui; Liu, Xiang Y.; Rehemtulla, Alnawaz; Lawrence, Theodore S. . E-mail: tsl@med.umich.edu

    2005-08-01

    Purpose: Peptides targeting tumor vascular cells or tumor cells themselves have the potential to be used as vectors for delivering either DNA in gene therapy or antitumor agents in chemotherapy. We wished to determine if peptides identified by phage display could be used to target irradiated pancreatic cancer cells. Methods and Materials: Irradiated Capan-2 cells were incubated with 5 x 10{sup 12} plaque-forming units of a phage display library. Internalized phage were recovered and absorbed against unirradiated cells. After five such cycles of enrichment, the recovered phage were subjected to DNA sequencing analysis and synthetic peptides made. The binding of both phage and synthetic peptides was evaluated by fluorescence staining and flow cytometry in vitro and in vivo. Results: We identified one 12-mer peptide (PA1) that binds to irradiated Capan-2 pancreatic adenocarcinoma cells but not to unirradiated cells. The binding of peptide was significant after 48 h incubation with cells. In vivo experiments with Capan-2 xenografts in nude mice demonstrated that these small peptides are able to penetrate tumor tissue after intravenous injections and bind specifically to irradiated tumor cells. Conclusion: These data suggest that peptides can be identified that target tumors with radiation-induced cell markers and may be clinically useful.

  5. Dissecting Social Cell Biology and Tumors Using Drosophila Genetics

    PubMed Central

    Pastor-Pareja, José Carlos; Xu, Tian

    2014-01-01

    Cancer was seen for a long time as a strictly cell-autonomous process in which oncogenes and tumor-suppressor mutations drive clonal cell expansions. Research in the past decade, however, paints a more integrative picture of communication and interplay between neighboring cells in tissues. It is increasingly clear as well that tumors, far from being homogenous lumps of cells, consist of different cell types that function together as complex tissue-level communities. The repertoire of interactive cell behaviors and the quantity of cellular players involved call for a social cell biology that investigates these interactions. Research into this social cell biology is critical for understanding development of normal and tumoral tissues. Such complex social cell biology interactions can be parsed in Drosophila. Techniques in Drosophila for analysis of gene function and clonal behavior allow us to generate tumors and dissect their complex interactive biology with cellular resolution. Here, we review recent Drosophila research aimed at understanding tissue-level biology and social cell interactions in tumors, highlighting the principles these studies reveal. PMID:23988119

  6. Comparison of cytotoxic T lymphocyte responses against pancreatic cancer induced by dendritic cells transfected with total tumor RNA and fusion hybrided with tumor cell

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Jiang; Li, Hong-Yu; Wang, Di; Shao, Xiao-Dong

    2015-01-01

    Pancreatic cancer (PC) is a deadly human malignancy. Dendritic cell (DC)-based immunotherapy with whole tumor antigens demonstrates potential efficiency in cancer treatment. Tumor RNA and tumor fusion hybrid cells are sources of whole tumor antigens for preparing DC tumor vaccines. However, the efficacy of these sources in eliciting immune responses against PC has not yet to be directly compared. In the present study, patient-derived PC cells and DCs were fused (DC–tumor hybrids) and primary cultured PC cell-derived total RNA was electroporated into autologous DCs (DC–tumor RNA). The antitumor immune responses induced by DC–tumor hybrids and DC–tumor RNA were compared directly. The results showed that both RNA and hybrid methodologies could induce tumor-specific cytotoxic T lymphocyte (CTL) responses, but pulsing DCs with total tumor RNA could induce a higher frequency of activated CTLs and T-helper cells than fusing DCs with autologous tumor cells. In addition, DC–tumor RNA triggered stronger autologous tumor cell lysis than DC–tumor hybrids. It could be concluded that DCs pulsed with whole tumor RNA are superior to those fused with tumor cells in priming anti-PC CTL responses. Electroporation with total tumor RNA may be more suitable for DC-based PC vaccination. PMID:25736302

  7. Depletion of Mouse Cells from Human Tumor Xenografts Significantly Improves Downstream Analysis of Target Cells.

    PubMed

    Agorku, David J; Tomiuk, Stefan; Klingner, Kerstin; Wild, Stefan; Rüberg, Silvia; Zatrieb, Lisa; Bosio, Andreas; Schueler, Julia; Hardt, Olaf

    2016-01-01

    The use of in vitro cell line models for cancer research has been a useful tool. However, it has been shown that these models fail to reliably mimic patient tumors in different assays(1). Human tumor xenografts represent the gold standard with respect to tumor biology, drug discovery, and metastasis research (2-4). Tumor xenografts can be derived from different types of material like tumor cell lines, tumor tissue from primary patient tumors(4) or serially transplanted tumors. When propagated in vivo, xenografted tissue is infiltrated and vascularized by cells of mouse origin. Multiple factors such as the tumor entity, the origin of xenografted material, growth rate and region of transplantation influence the composition and the amount of mouse cells present in tumor xenografts. However, even when these factors are kept constant, the degree of mouse cell contamination is highly variable. Contaminating mouse cells significantly impair downstream analyses of human tumor xenografts. As mouse fibroblasts show high plating efficacies and proliferation rates, they tend to overgrow cultures of human tumor cells, especially slowly proliferating subpopulations. Mouse cell derived DNA, mRNA, and protein components can bias downstream gene expression analysis, next-generation sequencing, as well as proteome analysis (5). To overcome these limitations, we have developed a fast and easy method to isolate untouched human tumor cells from xenografted tumor tissue. This procedure is based on the comprehensive depletion of cells of mouse origin by combining automated tissue dissociation with the benchtop tissue dissociator and magnetic cell sorting. Here, we demonstrate that human target cells can be can be obtained with purities higher than 96% within less than 20 min independent of the tumor type. PMID:27501218

  8. Current challenges in metastasis: disseminated and circulating tumor cells detection.

    PubMed

    Shahneh, Fatemeh Zare

    2013-01-01

    Metastatic dissemination of the primary tumor is responsible for the majority of cancer-related morbidity and mortality. Detection of disseminated tumor cells in the bone marrow and circulating tumor cells in the peripheral blood is associated with early metastatic recurrence in cancer. Circulating tumor cells (CTCs) shed from the site of disease in metastatic or primary tumor that can be recognized and enriched in the peripheral blood of cancer patients. The detection of rare circulating tumor cells (CTC) is an objective of numerous oncologists' researches. Circulating tumor cells have the potential to help to detect cancer recurrence at its earlier stage, determine therapy resistance before full blown progression, distinguish molecular changes during treatment, monitor efficacy therapy during treatment, guide therapy choice, and predict clinical outcome. In future perspective, standardization of the different enrichment methods in clinical trial is integrated. Developments in CTC detection methods will improve a wide range of clinical applications, as well as the discovery of biomarkers to predict treatment responses and disease progression. In order to identifying, several techniques have been applied to detect and isolate CTC in a heterogeneous population for management and monitoring response to therapy in clinical course in patients with localized or metastatic disease.

  9. Mesothelin-Targeted CARs: Driving T cells to Solid Tumors

    PubMed Central

    Morello, Aurore; Sadelain, Michel; Adusumilli, Prasad S.

    2015-01-01

    Chimeric antigen receptors (CARs) are synthetic receptors that target T cells to cell-surface antigens and augment T-cell function and persistence. Mesothelin is a cell-surface antigen implicated in tumor invasion, which is highly expressed in mesothelioma, lung, pancreas, breast, ovarian, and other cancers. Its low-level expression in mesothelia however commands thoughtful therapeutic interventions. Encouragingly, recent clinical trials evaluating active immunization or immune-conjugates in patients with pancreatic adenocarcinoma or mesothelioma have shown responses without toxicity. Altogether, these findings and preclinical CAR therapy models using either systemic or regional T-cell delivery argue favorably for mesothelin CAR therapy in multiple solid tumors. PMID:26503962

  10. Chimeric antigen receptor T-cell therapy for solid tumors

    PubMed Central

    Newick, Kheng; Moon, Edmund; Albelda, Steven M

    2016-01-01

    Chimeric antigen receptor (CAR) T cells are engineered constructs composed of synthetic receptors that direct T cells to surface antigens for subsequent elimination. Many CAR constructs are also manufactured with elements that augment T-cell persistence and activity. To date, CAR T cells have demonstrated tremendous success in eradicating hematological malignancies (e.g., CD19 CARs in leukemias). This success is not yet extrapolated to solid tumors, and the reasons for this are being actively investigated. Here in this mini-review, we discuss some of the key hurdles encountered by CAR T cells in the solid tumor microenvironment. PMID:27162934

  11. (Study of plant cells and tumors): Progress report

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1989-01-01

    Studies of the cell and molecular biology of animal cell tumors has long been recognized as a fertile and productive area for obtaining new and fundamental insights into mechanisms regulating the growth and differentiation of animal cells. As a novel approach to studying similar phenomena in plant cells, we have isolated a number of tumors in the small cruciferous plant Arabidopsis thaliana and have begun to characterize these at the cellular and molecular levels. Studies at the cellular level should lead to new insights into the relationships between hormones, cell growth and cell differentiation, while studies at the molecular level may reveal and allow us to isolate genes involved either in the hormone response, or in other important aspects of the cells' growth regulatory network. Tumors were induced on the plant by irradiation of seed or seedlings with Co-60 gamma rays. When placed in culture, these tumors were able to grow on hormone-free medium, in contrast to normal plant tissues which requires both an auxin and a cytokinin for growth. In the first phase of this project, we have concentrated on characterizing the growth, general phenotype, and hormonal sensitivity of the tumors. These studies will lead into a molecular analysis of the changes expressed in each tumor which may be responsible for the altered phenotype. 7 refs., 1 tab.

  12. Allogeneic IgG combined with dendritic cell stimuli induces anti-tumor T cell immunity

    PubMed Central

    Carmi, Yaron; Spitzer, Matthew H.; Linde, Ian L.; Burt, Bryan M; Prestwood, Tyler R.; Perlman, Nikola; Davidson, Matthew G.; Kenkel, Justin A.; Segal, Ehud; Pusapati, Ganesh V.; Bhattacharya, Nupur; Engleman, Edgar G.

    2015-01-01

    While cancers grow in their hosts and evade host immunity through immunoediting and immunosuppression1–5, tumors are rarely transmissible between individuals. Much like transplanted allogeneic organs, allogeneic tumors are reliably rejected by host T cells, even when the tumor and host share the same major histocompatibility complex (MHC) alleles, the most potent determinants of transplant rejection6–10. How such tumor-eradicating immunity is initiated remains unknown, though elucidating this process could provide a roadmap for inducing similar responses against naturally arising tumors. We found that allogeneic tumor rejection is initiated by naturally occurring tumor-binding IgG antibodies, which enable dendritic cells (DC) to internalize tumor antigens and subsequently activate tumor-reactive T cells. We exploited this mechanism to successfully treat autologous and autochthonous tumors. Either systemic administration of DC loaded with allogeneic IgG (alloIgG)-coated tumor cells or intratumoral injection of alloIgG in combination with DC stimuli induced potent T cell mediated anti-tumor immune responses, resulting in tumor eradication in mouse models of melanoma, pancreas, lung and breast cancer. Moreover, this strategy led to eradication of distant tumors and metastases, as well as the injected primary tumors. To assess the clinical relevance of these findings, we studied antibodies and cells from patients with lung cancer. T cells from these patients responded vigorously to autologous tumor antigens after culture with alloIgG-loaded DC, recapitulating our findings in mice. These results reveal that tumor-binding alloIgG can induce powerful anti-tumor immunity that can be exploited for cancer immunotherapy. PMID:25924063

  13. Significance of Circulating Tumor Cells in Soft Tissue Sarcoma

    PubMed Central

    Nicolazzo, Chiara; Gradilone, Angela

    2015-01-01

    Circulating tumor cells can be detected from the peripheral blood of cancer patients. Their prognostic value has been established in the last 10 years for metastatic colorectal, breast, and prostate cancer. On the contrary their presence in patients affected by sarcomas has been poorly investigated. The discovery of EpCAM mRNA expression in different sarcoma cell lines and in a small cohort of metastatic sarcoma patients supports further investigations on these rare tumors to deepen the importance of CTC isolation. Although it is not clear whether EpCAM expression might be originally present on tumor sarcoma cells or acquired during the mesenchymal-epithelial transition, the discovery of EpCAM on circulating sarcoma cells opens a new scenario in CTC detection in patients affected by a rare mesenchymal tumor. PMID:26167450

  14. The Role of Tumor Cell-Derived Connective Tissue Growth Factor (CTGF/CCN2) in Pancreatic Tumor Growth

    PubMed Central

    Bennewith, Kevin L.; Huang, Xin; Ham, Christine M.; Graves, Edward E.; Erler, Janine T.; Kambham, Neeraja; Feazell, Jonathan; Yang, George P.; Koong, Albert

    2009-01-01

    Pancreatic cancer is highly aggressive and refractory to existing therapies. Connective tissue growth factor (CTGF/CCN2) is a fibrosis-related gene that is thought to play a role in pancreatic tumor progression. However, CCN2 can be expressed in a variety of cell types, and the contribution of CCN2 derived from either tumor cells or stromal cells as it affects the growth of pancreatic tumors is unknown. Using genetic inhibition of CCN2, we have discovered that CCN2 derived from tumor cells is a critical regulator of pancreatic tumor growth. Pancreatic tumor cells derived from CCN2 shRNA-expressing clones showed dramatically reduced growth in soft agar and when implanted subcutaneously. We also observed a role for CCN2 in the growth of pancreatic tumors implanted orthotopically, with tumor volume measurements obtained by PET imaging. Mechanistically, CCN2 protects cells from hypoxia-mediated apoptosis, providing an in vivo selection for tumor cells that express high levels of CCN2. We found that CCN2 expression and secretion was increased in hypoxic pancreatic tumor cells in vitro, and we observed co-localization of CCN2 and hypoxia in pancreatic tumor xenografts and clinical pancreatic adenocarcinomas. Furthermore, we found increased CCN2 staining in clinical pancreatic tumor tissue relative to stromal cells surrounding the tumor, supporting our assertion that tumor cell-derived CCN2 is important for pancreatic tumor growth. Taken together, these data improve our understanding of the mechanisms responsible for pancreatic tumor growth and progression, and also indicate that CCN2 produced by tumor cells represents a viable therapeutic target for the treatment of pancreatic cancer. PMID:19179545

  15. Perivascular epithelioid cell tumor of the liver coexisting with a gastrointestinal stromal tumor.

    PubMed

    Paiva, Carlos Eduardo; Moraes Neto, Francisco Alves; Agaimy, Abbas; Custodio Domingues, Maria Aparecida; Rogatto, Silvia Regina

    2008-02-01

    Approximately 10% of patients with gastrointestinal stromal tumors (GIST) develop other neoplasms, either synchronously or metachronously. In this report we describe coexistence of a gastrointestinal stromal tumor and a hepatic perivascular epithelioid cell tumor (PEComa) in a 51-year-old woman with no evidence of tuberous sclerosis. A subcapsular hepatic nodule (0.8 cm in diameter) was found during surgery for symptomatic gastric neoplasm (15 cm in diameter) arising from the lesser curvature. Both tumors revealed histomorphological and immunohistochemical features confirming a diagnosis of a small incidental hepatic PEComa and a high risky extramural gastric GIST, respectively. The patient remained disease-free 25 mo after surgery with no evidence of tumor recurrence or new neoplasms. To our knowledge, this is the first report of PEComa in a patient with GIST. Hepatic lesions detected synchronously or metachronously in patients with GISTs may represent histogenetically distinct lesions and should be sampled to confirm or exclude metastatic GISTs.

  16. Training stem cells for treatment of malignant brain tumors

    PubMed Central

    Li, Shengwen Calvin; Kabeer, Mustafa H; Vu, Long T; Keschrumrus, Vic; Yin, Hong Zhen; Dethlefs, Brent A; Zhong, Jiang F; Weiss, John H; Loudon, William G

    2014-01-01

    The treatment of malignant brain tumors remains a challenge. Stem cell technology has been applied in the treatment of brain tumors largely because of the ability of some stem cells to infiltrate into regions within the brain where tumor cells migrate as shown in preclinical studies. However, not all of these efforts can translate in the effective treatment that improves the quality of life for patients. Here, we perform a literature review to identify the problems in the field. Given the lack of efficacy of most stem cell-based agents used in the treatment of malignant brain tumors, we found that stem cell distribution (i.e., only a fraction of stem cells applied capable of targeting tumors) are among the limiting factors. We provide guidelines for potential improvements in stem cell distribution. Specifically, we use an engineered tissue graft platform that replicates the in vivo microenvironment, and provide our data to validate that this culture platform is viable for producing stem cells that have better stem cell distribution than with the Petri dish culture system. PMID:25258664

  17. Apoptosis by Direct Current Treatment in Tumor Cells and Tissues

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Hongbae; Sim, Sungbo; Ahn, Saeyoung

    2003-10-01

    Electric field induces cell fusion, electroporation on biological cells, including apoptosis. Apoptosis is expressed in a series of natural enzymatic reactions for the natural elimination of unhealthy, genetically damaged, or otherwise aberrant cells that are not needed or not advantageous to the well-being of the organism. Its markers involve cell shrinkage, activation of intracellular caspase proteases, externalization of phosphatidylserine at the plasma membrane, and fragmentation of DNA. Direct electric fields using direct current have been exploited recently to investigate its effects on tumor cells and tissues, but the mechanism of direct electric fields has not been exhibited clearly other than by electroosmosis or pH changes. Direct electric field induces apoptosis in tumor cells cultured and tumor tissues as indicated by cell shrinkage, DNA fragmentation and tumor suppression. In our experiment that direct electric field was applied to tumor tissues via two needle electrodes inserted into tumor tissue 5mm at distance in parallel, pH changes resulted from electrochemical reaction, exhibiting about pH 9.0, 1.83, 2.0 in the vicinity of cathodic and anodic electrode, and at their mid-point, respectively. DNA fragmentation of tumor tissues destructed by direct electric field was analyzed by Tunel assay by ApopTag technology. As a result of this analysis, it showed that apoptosis in tumor tissue destructed was increased up to 59.1normal(control) tissues, showing 41.1, 31.1cathodic tissues. In vitro cell survival was exhibited that it was decreased with enhancing electric current intensity in the same condition of electrical charge 5C having different time applied. We will show results of apoptosis analyzed by flow cytometry in vitro.

  18. Mediastinal germ cell tumors: a radiologic-pathologic review.

    PubMed

    Drevelegas, A; Palladas, P; Scordalaki, A

    2001-01-01

    Germ cell tumors of the mediastinum are histologically identical to those found in the testes and ovaries. Early diagnosis and treatment improve the survival rate. Imaging studies of teratoma demonstrate a rounded, often lobulated heterogeneous mass containing soft tissue elements with fluid and fat attenuation. Calcification is present in 20-43% of cases. Seminomas are large masses of homogeneous soft tissue attenuation. Malignant nonseminomatous germ cell tumors are heterogeneous tumors with irregular borders due to invasion of adjacent structures. CT shows the location and extent of the tumors as well as intrinsic elements including soft tissue, fat, fluid, and calcification. CT is the modality of choice for the diagnostic evaluation of these tumors. MRI reveals masses of heterogeneous signal intensity, is more sensitive in depicting infiltration of the adjacent structures by fat plane obliteration, and is performed as an ancillary study.

  19. LOXL2 in epithelial cell plasticity and tumor progression.

    PubMed

    Cano, Amparo; Santamaría, Patricia G; Moreno-Bueno, Gema

    2012-09-01

    Several members of the lysyl oxidase family have recently emerged as important regulators of tumor progression. Among them, LOXL2 has been shown to be involved in tumor progression and metastasis of several tumor types, including breast carcinomas. Secreted LOXL2 participates in the remodeling of the extracellular matrix of the tumor microenvironment, in a similar fashion to prototypical lysyl oxidase. In addition, new intracellular functions of LOXL2 have been described, such as its involvement in the regulation of the epithelial-to-mesenchymal transition, epithelial cell polarity and differentiation mediated by transcriptional repression mechanisms. Importantly, intracellular (perinuclear) expression of LOXL2 is associated with poor prognosis and distant metastasis of specific tumor types, such as larynx squamous cell carcinoma and basal breast carcinomas. These recent findings open new avenues for the therapeutic utility of LOXL2.

  20. Improved Methods to Generate Spheroid Cultures from Tumor Cells, Tumor Cells & Fibroblasts or Tumor-Fragments: Microenvironment, Microvesicles and MiRNA

    PubMed Central

    Lao, Zheng; Kelly, Catherine J.; Yang, Xiang-Yang; Jenkins, W. Timothy; Toorens, Erik; Ganguly, Tapan; Evans, Sydney M.; Koch, Cameron J.

    2015-01-01

    Diagnostic and prognostic indicators are key components to achieve the goal of personalized cancer therapy. Two distinct approaches to this goal include predicting response by genetic analysis and direct testing of possible therapies using cultures derived from biopsy specimens. Optimally, the latter method requires a rapid assessment, but growing xenograft tumors or developing patient-derived cell lines can involve a great deal of time and expense. Furthermore, tumor cells have much different responses when grown in 2D versus 3D tissue environments. Using a modification of existing methods, we show that it is possible to make tumor-fragment (TF) spheroids in only 2–3 days. TF spheroids appear to closely model characteristics of the original tumor and may be used to assess critical therapy-modulating features of the microenvironment such as hypoxia. A similar method allows the reproducible development of spheroids from mixed tumor cells and fibroblasts (mixed-cell spheroids). Prior literature reports have shown highly variable development and properties of mixed-cell spheroids and this has hampered the detailed study of how individual tumor-cell components interact. In this study, we illustrate this approach and describe similarities and differences using two tumor models (U87 glioma and SQ20B squamous-cell carcinoma) with supporting data from additional cell lines. We show that U87 and SQ20B spheroids predict a key microenvironmental factor in tumors (hypoxia) and that SQ20B cells and spheroids generate similar numbers of microvesicles. We also present pilot data for miRNA expression under conditions of cells, tumors, and TF spheroids. PMID:26208323

  1. DNA Analysis in Samples From Younger Patients With Germ Cell Tumors and Their Parents or Siblings

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-10-05

    Childhood Malignant Ovarian Germ Cell Tumor; Childhood Malignant Testicular Germ Cell Tumor; Ovarian Choriocarcinoma; Ovarian Embryonal Carcinoma; Ovarian Mixed Germ Cell Tumor; Ovarian Teratoma; Ovarian Yolk Sac Tumor; Testicular Choriocarcinoma; Testicular Embryonal Carcinoma; Testicular Seminoma; Testicular Teratoma; Testicular Yolk Sac Tumor

  2. [Application of dendritic cells in clinical tumor therapy].

    PubMed

    Li, Yan; Xian, Li-jian

    2002-04-01

    The active immunotherapy of dendritic cells is hot in tumor therapy research area. This article is a review of the source of dendritic cells, loading antigen, immunotherapy pathway, clinical application, choice of patients, and so on. It makes preparation for further research of dendritic cells. PMID:12452029

  3. Cell survival as a determinant of tumor cure for rat 9L subcutaneous tumors following microwave-induced hyperthermia.

    PubMed

    Wallen, C A; Michaelson, S M; Wheeler, K T

    1982-01-01

    The relationship of cell survival to tumor cure after local hyperthermia treatment was studied in subcutaneous 9L rat tumors. Tumors weighing 0.2-0.4 g were heated to 42.5, 43.0, 44.0 and 45.0 degrees C by local exposure to 2450 MHz microwaves. Cell survival data was obtained by an in vivo to in vitro colony forming technique and a cell survival curve was constructed for each temperature as a function of exposure duration (0-180 min). Cell survival followed a simple exponential function with an increasingly steeper slope as temperature increased. At 44 degrees C, it was observed that cells from large tumors (1.0-1.4 g) were inactivated at the same rate as those from small tumors. When tumor response was monitored in the small tumors for 90 days following treatment, a direct correlation between the percentage of tumor cures and time at 44 degrees C (0-60 min) was observed; therefore, at 44 degrees C, tumor cure was exponentially related to cell survival in this range. However, when approximately the same cell survival was obtained with 3 other temperature--time regimens, the resulting percentage of tumor cures was not the same. These results indicate that while cell survival is related to tumor cure, it is probably not the primary determinant of tumor response following local hyperthermia in these 9L subcutaneous tumors.

  4. Circulating Tumor Cells and Circulating Tumor DNA: Challenges and Opportunities on the Path to Clinical Utility.

    PubMed

    Ignatiadis, Michail; Lee, Mark; Jeffrey, Stefanie S

    2015-11-01

    Recent technological advances have enabled the detection and detailed characterization of circulating tumor cells (CTC) and circulating tumor DNA (ctDNA) in blood samples from patients with cancer. Often referred to as a "liquid biopsy," CTCs and ctDNA are expected to provide real-time monitoring of tumor evolution and therapeutic efficacy, with the potential for improved cancer diagnosis and treatment. In this review, we focus on these opportunities as well as the challenges that should be addressed so that these tools may eventually be implemented into routine clinical care.

  5. Immunotherapy with autologous dendritic cells and tumor antigens for children with refractory malignant solid tumors.

    PubMed

    Suminoe, Aiko; Matsuzaki, Akinobu; Hattori, Hiroyoshi; Koga, Yuhki; Hara, Toshiro

    2009-09-01

    Immature DCs were generated from the peripheral blood monocytes from five children with refractory solid tumors (Ewing sarcoma, synovial sarcoma, neuroblastoma) using GM-CSF and IL-4. These DCs were then pulsed with tumor-specific synthetic peptides or tumor lysates in the presence of the immunogenic protein KLH for 12 h. Pulsed DCs were administered subcutaneously every one or two weeks in an outpatient setting without any toxicity. In one patient with Ewing sarcoma, the residual tumor disappeared following autologous PBSCT and DC therapy, and a complete remission has been maintained for 77 months. In two patients with synovial sarcoma or with neuroblastoma, growth of the tumors was temporally suppressed for one and 10 months, respectively, followed by their exacerbation. A DTH response was detected against KLH in all five patients and against the tumor lysate in one patient. In the patients with a possible DC-mediated anti-tumor effect, the number of CD8(+) HLA-DR(+) lymphocytes and INF-gamma(+)CD8(+) lymphocytes increased and an elevation of the NK cell cytotoxic activity was observed during and/or after DC therapy. DC-based immunotherapy may therefore be a feasible, well-tolerated and promising approach in the treatment of children with refractory malignant tumors.

  6. Targeting tissue factor on tumor vascular endothelial cells and tumor cells for immunotherapy in mouse models of prostatic cancer.

    PubMed

    Hu, Z; Garen, A

    2001-10-01

    The efficacy and safety of an immunoconjugate (icon) molecule, composed of a mutated mouse factor VII (mfVII) targeting domain and the Fc effector domain of an IgG1 Ig (mfVII/Fc icon), was tested with a severe combined immunodeficient (SCID) mouse model of human prostatic cancer and an immunocompetent mouse model of mouse prostatic cancer. The SCID mice were first injected s.c. with a human prostatic tumor line, forming a skin tumor that produces a high blood titer of prostate-specific antigen and metastasizes to bone. The icon was encoded in a replication-incompetent adenoviral vector that was injected directly into the skin tumor. The tumor cells infected by the vector synthesize and secrete the icon into the blood, and the blood-borne icon binds with high affinity and specificity to mouse tissue factor expressed on endothelial cells lining the lumen of the tumor vasculature and to human tissue factor expressed on the tumor cells. The Fc domain of the icon activates a cytolytic immune attack against cells that bind the icon. The immunotherapy tests in SCID mice demonstrated that intratumoral injections of the adenoviral vector encoding the mfVII/human Fc icon resulted in long-term regression of the injected human prostatic tumor and also of a distant uninjected tumor, without associated toxicity to the mice. Comparable results were obtained with a SCID mouse model of human melanoma. At the end of the experiments the mice appeared to be free of viable tumor cells. This protocol also could be efficacious for treating cancer patients who have vascularized tumors.

  7. Targeting tissue factor on tumor vascular endothelial cells and tumor cells for immunotherapy in mouse models of prostatic cancer.

    PubMed

    Hu, Z; Garen, A

    2001-10-01

    The efficacy and safety of an immunoconjugate (icon) molecule, composed of a mutated mouse factor VII (mfVII) targeting domain and the Fc effector domain of an IgG1 Ig (mfVII/Fc icon), was tested with a severe combined immunodeficient (SCID) mouse model of human prostatic cancer and an immunocompetent mouse model of mouse prostatic cancer. The SCID mice were first injected s.c. with a human prostatic tumor line, forming a skin tumor that produces a high blood titer of prostate-specific antigen and metastasizes to bone. The icon was encoded in a replication-incompetent adenoviral vector that was injected directly into the skin tumor. The tumor cells infected by the vector synthesize and secrete the icon into the blood, and the blood-borne icon binds with high affinity and specificity to mouse tissue factor expressed on endothelial cells lining the lumen of the tumor vasculature and to human tissue factor expressed on the tumor cells. The Fc domain of the icon activates a cytolytic immune attack against cells that bind the icon. The immunotherapy tests in SCID mice demonstrated that intratumoral injections of the adenoviral vector encoding the mfVII/human Fc icon resulted in long-term regression of the injected human prostatic tumor and also of a distant uninjected tumor, without associated toxicity to the mice. Comparable results were obtained with a SCID mouse model of human melanoma. At the end of the experiments the mice appeared to be free of viable tumor cells. This protocol also could be efficacious for treating cancer patients who have vascularized tumors. PMID:11593034

  8. Targeting Survivin Enhances Chemosensitivity in Retinoblastoma Cells and Orthotopic Tumors

    PubMed Central

    Rucker, Natalie; Wong, Sam; Lederman, Ariel; Kim, Jonathan; Gomer, Charles

    2016-01-01

    Treatments for retinoblastoma (Rb) vary depending on the size and location of the intraocular lesions and include chemotherapy and radiation therapy. We examined whether agents used to treat Rb induce a pro-survival phenotype associated with increased expression of survivin, a member of the inhibitor of apoptosis family of proteins. We document that exposure to carboplatin, topotecan or radiation resulted in elevated expression of survivin in two human Rb cell lines but not in normal retinal pigmented epithelial (RPE) cells. Cellular levels of survivin were attenuated in Rb cells exposed to an imidazolium-based survivin suppressant, Sepantronium bromide (YM155). Protein expression patterns of survivin in RPE cells were not altered following treatment protocols involving exposure to YM155. Including YM155 with chemotherapy or radiation increased levels of apoptosis in Rb cells but not in RPE cells. Intraocular luciferase expressing Rb tumors were generated from the Rb cell lines and used to evaluate the effects of carboplatin and YM155 on in-vivo survivin expression and tumor growth. Carboplatin induced expression of survivin while carboplatin combined with YM155 reduced survivin expression in tumor bearing eyes. The combination protocol was also most effective in reducing the rate of tumor regrowth. These results indicate that targeted inhibition of the anti-apoptotic protein survivin provides a therapeutic advantage for Rb cells and tumors treated with chemotherapy. PMID:27050416

  9. Targeting Survivin Enhances Chemosensitivity in Retinoblastoma Cells and Orthotopic Tumors.

    PubMed

    Ferrario, Angela; Luna, Marian; Rucker, Natalie; Wong, Sam; Lederman, Ariel; Kim, Jonathan; Gomer, Charles

    2016-01-01

    Treatments for retinoblastoma (Rb) vary depending on the size and location of the intraocular lesions and include chemotherapy and radiation therapy. We examined whether agents used to treat Rb induce a pro-survival phenotype associated with increased expression of survivin, a member of the inhibitor of apoptosis family of proteins. We document that exposure to carboplatin, topotecan or radiation resulted in elevated expression of survivin in two human Rb cell lines but not in normal retinal pigmented epithelial (RPE) cells. Cellular levels of survivin were attenuated in Rb cells exposed to an imidazolium-based survivin suppressant, Sepantronium bromide (YM155). Protein expression patterns of survivin in RPE cells were not altered following treatment protocols involving exposure to YM155. Including YM155 with chemotherapy or radiation increased levels of apoptosis in Rb cells but not in RPE cells. Intraocular luciferase expressing Rb tumors were generated from the Rb cell lines and used to evaluate the effects of carboplatin and YM155 on in-vivo survivin expression and tumor growth. Carboplatin induced expression of survivin while carboplatin combined with YM155 reduced survivin expression in tumor bearing eyes. The combination protocol was also most effective in reducing the rate of tumor regrowth. These results indicate that targeted inhibition of the anti-apoptotic protein survivin provides a therapeutic advantage for Rb cells and tumors treated with chemotherapy. PMID:27050416

  10. An increase of B cells in the tumor-bearing state has the potential to induce anti-tumor immunity.

    PubMed

    Ito, O; Harada, M; Takenoyama, M; Sumichika, H; Matsuzaki, G; Nomoto, K

    1996-01-01

    We investigated the role of an increased amount of B cells in the tumor-bearing state. The proportion of B cells increased concomitantly with tumor development in the regional lymph nodes (LN) of BALB/c mice bearing Meth A fibrosarcoma (Meth A). Tumor development was accompanied by an increased level of IgG antibodies against Meth A. CD4+ T cells of the regional LN in the early tumor-bearing stage produced significant levels of interferon-gamma and interleukin-4 in response to in vitro stimulation with coated anti-CD3 monoclonal antibody, whereas such capacities decreased in the late tumor-bearing stage. In a tumor-neutralizing assay, the growth of Meth A was significantly suppressed by a co-inoculation with splenic B cells from BALB/c mice in the late tumor-bearing state. This suppression of Meth A growth was tumor-specific and was abolished by the in vivo depletion of either CD4+ or CD8+ T cells. These findings thus suggest that tumor development was accompanied by an increase of B cells and tumor-specific IgG production, but such kinetic changes were not the result of a preferential activation of Th2 type CD4+ T cells. Furthermore, our results indicate that the increase of B cells in the tumor-bearing state has the potential to induce anti-tumor-specific T cell immunity.

  11. Tumor senescence and radioresistant tumor-initiating cells (TICs): let sleeping dogs lie!

    PubMed

    Zafarana, Gaetano; Bristow, Robert G

    2010-01-01

    Preclinical data from cell lines and experimental tumors support the concept that breast cancer-derived tumor-initiating cells (TICs) are relatively resistant to ionizing radiation and chemotherapy. This could be a major determinant of tumor recurrence following treatment. Increased clonogenic survival is observed in CD24-/low/CD44+ TICs derived from mammosphere cultures and is associated with (a) reduced production of reactive oxygen species, (b) attenuated activation of γH2AX and CHK2-p53 DNA damage signaling pathways, (c) reduced propensity for ionizing radiation-induced apoptosis, and (d) altered DNA double-strand or DNA single-strand break repair. However, recent data have shed further light on TIC radioresistance as irradiated TICs are resistant to tumor cell senescence following DNA damage. Taken together, the cumulative data support a model in which DNA damage signaling and repair pathways are altered in TICs and lead to an altered mode of cell death with unique consequences for long-term clonogen survival. The study of TIC senescence lays the foundation for future experiments in isogenic models designed to directly test the capacity for senescence and local control (that is, not solely local regression) and spontaneous metastases following treatment in vivo. The study also supports the targeting of tumor cell senescence pathways to increase TIC clonogen kill if the targeting also maintains the therapeutic ratio.

  12. Glycan Sulfation Modulates Dendritic Cell Biology and Tumor Growth.

    PubMed

    El Ghazal, Roland; Yin, Xin; Johns, Scott C; Swanson, Lee; Macal, Monica; Ghosh, Pradipta; Zuniga, Elina I; Fuster, Mark M

    2016-05-01

    In cancer, proteoglycans have been found to play roles in facilitating the actions of growth factors, and effecting matrix invasion and remodeling. However, little is known regarding the genetic and functional importance of glycan chains displayed by proteoglycans on dendritic cells (DCs) in cancer immunity. In lung carcinoma, among other solid tumors, tumor-associated DCs play largely subversive/suppressive roles, promoting tumor growth and progression. Herein, we show that targeting of DC glycan sulfation through mutation in the heparan sulfate biosynthetic enzyme N-deacetylase/N-sulfotransferase-1 (Ndst1) in mice increased DC maturation and inhibited trafficking of DCs to draining lymph nodes. Lymphatic-driven DC migration and chemokine (CCL21)-dependent activation of a major signaling pathway required for DC migration (as measured by phospho-Akt) were sensitive to Ndst1 mutation in DCs. Lewis lung carcinoma tumors in mice deficient in Ndst1 were reduced in size. Purified CD11c+ cells from the tumors, which contain the tumor-infiltrating DC population, showed a similar phenotype in mutant cells. These features were replicated in mice deficient in syndecan-4, the major heparan sulfate proteoglycan expressed on the DC surface: Tumors were growth-impaired in syndecan-4-deficient mice and were characterized by increased infiltration by mature DCs. Tumors on the mutant background also showed greater infiltration by NK cells and NKT cells. These findings indicate the genetic importance of DC heparan sulfate proteoglycans in tumor growth and may guide therapeutic development of novel strategies to target syndecan-4 and heparan sulfate in cancer.

  13. Glycan Sulfation Modulates Dendritic Cell Biology and Tumor Growth.

    PubMed

    El Ghazal, Roland; Yin, Xin; Johns, Scott C; Swanson, Lee; Macal, Monica; Ghosh, Pradipta; Zuniga, Elina I; Fuster, Mark M

    2016-05-01

    In cancer, proteoglycans have been found to play roles in facilitating the actions of growth factors, and effecting matrix invasion and remodeling. However, little is known regarding the genetic and functional importance of glycan chains displayed by proteoglycans on dendritic cells (DCs) in cancer immunity. In lung carcinoma, among other solid tumors, tumor-associated DCs play largely subversive/suppressive roles, promoting tumor growth and progression. Herein, we show that targeting of DC glycan sulfation through mutation in the heparan sulfate biosynthetic enzyme N-deacetylase/N-sulfotransferase-1 (Ndst1) in mice increased DC maturation and inhibited trafficking of DCs to draining lymph nodes. Lymphatic-driven DC migration and chemokine (CCL21)-dependent activation of a major signaling pathway required for DC migration (as measured by phospho-Akt) were sensitive to Ndst1 mutation in DCs. Lewis lung carcinoma tumors in mice deficient in Ndst1 were reduced in size. Purified CD11c+ cells from the tumors, which contain the tumor-infiltrating DC population, showed a similar phenotype in mutant cells. These features were replicated in mice deficient in syndecan-4, the major heparan sulfate proteoglycan expressed on the DC surface: Tumors were growth-impaired in syndecan-4-deficient mice and were characterized by increased infiltration by mature DCs. Tumors on the mutant background also showed greater infiltration by NK cells and NKT cells. These findings indicate the genetic importance of DC heparan sulfate proteoglycans in tumor growth and may guide therapeutic development of novel strategies to target syndecan-4 and heparan sulfate in cancer. PMID:27237321

  14. Tumor-derived death receptor 6 modulates dendritic cell development.

    PubMed

    DeRosa, David C; Ryan, Paul J; Okragly, Angela; Witcher, Derrick R; Benschop, Robert J

    2008-06-01

    Studies in murine models of cancer as well as in cancer patients have demonstrated that the immune response to cancer is often compromised. This paradigm is viewed as one of the major mechanisms of tumor escape. Many therapies focus on employing the professional antigen presenting dendritic cells (DC) as a strategy to overcome immune inhibition in cancer patients. Death receptor 6 (DR6) is an orphan member of the tumor necrosis factor receptor superfamily (TNFRSF21). It is overexpressed on many tumor cells and DR6(-/-) mice display altered immunity. We investigated whether DR6 plays a role in tumorigenesis by negatively affecting the generation of anti-tumor activity. We show that DR6 is uniquely cleaved from the cell surface of tumor cell lines by the membrane-associated matrix metalloproteinase (MMP)-14, which is often overexpressed on tumor cells and is associated with malignancy. We also demonstrate that >50% of monocytes differentiating into DC die when the extracellular domain of DR6 is present. In addition, DR6 affects the cell surface phenotype of the resulting immature DC and changes their cytokine production upon stimulation with LPS/IFN-gamma. The effects of DR6 are mostly amended when these immature DC are matured with IL-1beta/TNF-alpha, as measured by cell surface phenotype and their ability to present antigen. These results implicate MMP-14 and DR6 as a mechanism tumor cells can employ to actively escape detection by the immune system by affecting the generation of antigen presenting cells.

  15. Analysis of circulating tumor cells derived from advanced gastric cancer.

    PubMed

    Toyoshima, Kosei; Hayashi, Akira; Kashiwagi, Masahide; Hayashi, Naoko; Iwatsuki, Masaaki; Ishimoto, Takatsugu; Baba, Yoshifumi; Baba, Hideo; Ohta, Yoshikazu

    2015-08-15

    Studies in circulating tumor cells (CTCs) have proceeded to be accepted as prognostic markers in several types of cancers. But they are still limited because many are mainly from enumeration of CTCs. Here, we tried to evaluate the tumorigenicity of CTCs from advanced gastric cancer patients (n = 42). Peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC) from the patients were separated into CD45 negative and positive fractions and both were subcutaneously injected into immunodeficient mice. Within 5 months nine tumor-like-structures from six patients but not from healthy volunteers were established. They were durable for passages and all had been confirmed human origin. Eight of the nine tumor-like-structures were from nonauthorized CTC containing cells expressing CD45 and B-cell markers. On the contrary, one of them was developed from CD45(-) PBMC fraction of a patient with bone marrow metastasis reflecting authorized CTCs. Histopathology showed common features with that of original gastric tumor. The cells isolated from the tumor-like-structure expressed EpCAM and CEA further supporting they were from the original tumor. Moreover the cells were CD44 positive to varying degree and a limiting dilution study showed that the CD44(+/high) fraction had tumorigenicity. The CD44 was dominantly in the form of CD44 variant 8-10. The CD44(+/high) cells had higher expression of the glutamate/cysteine transporter xCT compared with the CD44(-/low) cells. Our results showed the existence of tumor-initiating cells in blood of advanced gastric cancer patients and they could be a therapeutic target and prospective tool for further investigations.

  16. Localized expression of GITR-L in the tumor microenvironment promotes CD8+ T cell dependent anti-tumor immunity

    PubMed Central

    Cho, John S.; Hsu, Jeffrey V.; Morrison, Sherie L.

    2009-01-01

    The systemic administration of an agonist antibody against glucocorticoid-induced tumor necrosis factor receptor related (GITR) protein has been shown to be effective in overcoming immune tolerance and promoting tumor rejection in a variety of murine tumor models. However, little is known regarding the functional consequence of ligation of GITR with its natural ligand (GITR-L) in the context of regulatory T cell (Treg) suppression in vivo. To determine the mechanism of GITR-L action in vivo, we generated a panel of tumor cell clones that express varying levels of GITR-L. The ectopic expression of GITR-L on the tumor cell surface was sufficient to enhance anti-tumor immunity and delay tumor growth in syngeneic BALB/c mice. Within the range examined, the extent of anti-tumor activity in vivo did not correlate with the level of GITR-L expression, as all clones tested exhibited a similar delay in tumor growth. The localized expression of GITR-L on the tumor cells led to a significant increase in CD8+ T cell infiltration into the tumor compared to control tumors. The increased proportion of CD8+ T cells was only observed locally at the tumor site and was not seen in the tumor draining lymph node. Depletion studies showed that CD8+ T cells, but not CD4+ T cells, were required for GITR-L mediated protection against tumor growth. These studies demonstrate that signaling between GITR-L and GITR in the tumor microenvironment promotes the infiltration of CD8+ T cells, which are essential for controlling tumor growth. PMID:19018533

  17. Adult granulosa cell tumor of the testis masquerading as hydrocele

    PubMed Central

    Vallonthaiel, Archana George; Kakkar, Aanchal; Singh, Animesh; Dogra, Prem N; Ray, Ruma

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT Adult testicular granulosa cell tumor is a rare, potentially malignant sex cord-stromal tumor, of which 30 cases have been described to date. We report the case of a 43-year-old male who complained of a left testicular swelling. Scrotal ultrasound showed a cystic lesion, suggestive of hydrocele. However, due to a clinical suspicion of a solid-cystic neoplasm, a high inguinal orchidectomy was performed, which, on pathological examination, was diagnosed as adult granulosa cell tumor. Adult testicular granulosa cell tumors have aggressive behaviour as compared to their ovarian counterparts. They may rarely be predominantly cystic and present as hydrocele. Lymph node and distant metastases have been reported in few cases. Role of MIB-1 labelling index in prognostication is not well defined. Therefore, their recognition and documentation of their behaviour is important from a diagnostic, prognostic and therapeutic point of view. PMID:26742984

  18. Akt-dependent metabolic reprogramming regulates tumor cell histone acetylation

    PubMed Central

    Snyder, Nathaniel W.; Wei, Shuanzeng; Venneti, Sriram; Worth, Andrew J.; Yuan, Zuo-Fei; Lim, Hee-Woong; Liu, Shichong; Jackson, Ellen; Aiello, Nicole M.; Haas, Naomi B.; Rebbeck, Timothy R.; Judkins, Alexander; Won, Kyoung-Jae; Chodosh, Lewis A.; Garcia, Benjamin A.; Stanger, Ben Z.; Feldman, Michael D.; Blair, Ian A.; Wellen, Kathryn E.

    2014-01-01

    SUMMARY Histone acetylation plays important roles in gene regulation, DNA replication, and the response to DNA damage, and it is frequently deregulated in tumors. We postulated that tumor cell histone acetylation levels are determined in part by changes in acetyl-CoA availability mediated by oncogenic metabolic reprogramming. Here, we demonstrate that acetyl-CoA is dynamically regulated by glucose availability in cancer cells and that the ratio of acetyl-CoA: coenzyme A within the nucleus modulates global histone acetylation levels. In vivo, expression of oncogenic Kras or Akt stimulates histone acetylation changes that precede tumor development. Furthermore, we show that Akt's effects on histone acetylation are mediated through the metabolic enzyme ATP-citrate lyase (ACLY), and that pAkt(Ser473) levels correlate significantly with histone acetylation marks in human gliomas and prostate tumors. The data implicate acetyl-CoA metabolism as a key determinant of histone acetylation levels in cancer cells. PMID:24998913

  19. Mitochondrial control by DRP1 in brain tumor initiating cells.

    PubMed

    Xie, Qi; Wu, Qiulian; Horbinski, Craig M; Flavahan, William A; Yang, Kailin; Zhou, Wenchao; Dombrowski, Stephen M; Huang, Zhi; Fang, Xiaoguang; Shi, Yu; Ferguson, Ashley N; Kashatus, David F; Bao, Shideng; Rich, Jeremy N

    2015-04-01

    Brain tumor initiating cells (BTICs) co-opt the neuronal high affinity glucose transporter, GLUT3, to withstand metabolic stress. We investigated another mechanism critical to brain metabolism, mitochondrial morphology, in BTICs. BTIC mitochondria were fragmented relative to non-BTIC tumor cell mitochondria, suggesting that BTICs increase mitochondrial fission. The essential mediator of mitochondrial fission, dynamin-related protein 1 (DRP1), showed activating phosphorylation in BTICs and inhibitory phosphorylation in non-BTIC tumor cells. Targeting DRP1 using RNA interference or pharmacologic inhibition induced BTIC apoptosis and inhibited tumor growth. Downstream, DRP1 activity regulated the essential metabolic stress sensor, AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK), and targeting AMPK rescued the effects of DRP1 disruption. Cyclin-dependent kinase 5 (CDK5) phosphorylated DRP1 to increase its activity in BTICs, whereas Ca(2+)-calmodulin-dependent protein kinase 2 (CAMK2) inhibited DRP1 in non-BTIC tumor cells, suggesting that tumor cell differentiation induces a regulatory switch in mitochondrial morphology. DRP1 activation correlated with poor prognosis in glioblastoma, suggesting that mitochondrial dynamics may represent a therapeutic target for BTICs. PMID:25730670

  20. Characterization of tumor infiltrating natural killer cell subset.

    PubMed

    Levi, Inbar; Amsalem, Hagai; Nissan, Aviram; Darash-Yahana, Merav; Peretz, Tamar; Mandelboim, Ofer; Rachmilewitz, Jacob

    2015-05-30

    The presence of tumor-infiltrating Natural Killer (NK) within a tumor bed may be indicative of an ongoing immune response toward the tumor. However, many studies have shown that an intense NK infiltration, is associated with advanced disease and may even facilitate cancer development. The exact role of the tumor infiltrating NK cells and the correlation between their presence and poor prognosis remains unclear. Interestingly, during pregnancy high numbers of a specific NK subset, CD56(bright)CD16(dim), are accumulated within first trimester deciduas. These decidual NK (dNK) cells are unique in their gene expression pattern secret angiogenic factors that induce vascular growth. In the present study we demonstrate a significant enrichment of a CD56(brigh)CD16(dim) NK cells within tumors. These NK cells express several dNK markers including VEGF. Hence, this study adds new insights into the identity of tumor residual NK cells, which has clear implications for the treatment of human cancer. PMID:26079948

  1. The metabolic interactions between tumor cells and tumor-associated stroma (TAS) in prostatic cancer.

    PubMed

    Giatromanolaki, Alexandra; Koukourakis, Michael I; Koutsopoulos, Anastasios; Mendrinos, Savvas; Sivridis, Efthimios

    2012-11-01

    Tumor-associated stroma (TAS) is not simply a supporting element for cancer cells, but plays an important role in tumor growth, invasion and metastasis. Changes on the level of stromal constituents, such as loss of Caveolin-1 and increased thymidine phosphorylase (TP) expression, have been associated with tumor aggressiveness. The mutual cooperation between stromal fibroblasts and cancer cells is another distinguishing feature, which has recently emerged. In this investigation, both the loss of Caveolin-1 and the increased TP expression in the prostatic TAS was associated with high Gleason score (p = 0.0002 and 0.003, respectively); the two proteins were acting both independently and synergistically. In addition, TP was significantly associated with high stromal Ki-67 (MIB1) proliferation index (p = 0.03). Analysis of the metabolic interactions between stromal and epithelial elements showed that, while prostatic cancer cells express principally (> 91%) lactate dehydrogenase-5 (LDH-5) (anaerobic metabolism), the tumor-associated fibroblasts/myofibroblasts (TAFs) express largely (67.8%) LDH-1 (aerobic metabolism)-the terms TAFs and TAS are used interchangeably. These two isoenzyme pathways act complementary; the LDH-5 pathway converts pyruvate to lactate, whereas the LDH-1 enzyme system utilizes the secreted metabolite lactate to produce pyruvate, essential for continuous energy supply to tumor cells. Monocarboxylate transporter-1 (MCT-1)-the main facilitator of lactate uptake in tumor cells, was expressed exclusively in prostate cancer cells and related directly to LDH-5 overexpression. These findings support and extend our previous studies on energy recycling between the aerobic stroma and the anaerobic cancer cells within the framework of Warburg effect.

  2. IL-12 secreting tumor-targeted chimeric antigen receptor T cells eradicate ovarian tumors in vivo

    PubMed Central

    Koneru, Mythili; Purdon, Terence J.; Spriggs, David; Koneru, Susmith; Brentjens, Renier J.

    2015-01-01

    A novel approach for the treatment of ovarian cancer includes immunotherapy with genetically engineered T cells targeted to ovarian cancer cell antigens. Using retroviral transduction, T cells can be created that express an artificial T cell receptor (TCR) termed a chimeric antigen receptor (CAR). We have generated a CAR, 4H11-28z, specific to MUC-16ecto antigen, which is the over-expressed on a majority of ovarian tumor cells and is the retained portion of MUC-16 after cleavage of CA-125. We previously demonstrated that T cells modified to express the 4H11-28z CAR eradicate orthotopic human ovarian cancer xenografts in SCID-Beige mice. However, despite the ability of CAR T cells to localize to tumors, their activation in the clinical setting can be inhibited by the tumor microenvironment, as is commonly seen for endogenous antitumor immune response. To potentially overcome this limitation, we have recently developed a construct that co-expresses both MUC16ecto CAR and IL-12 (4H11-28z/IL-12). In vitro, 4H11-28z/IL-12 CAR T cells show enhanced proliferation and robust IFNγ secretion compared to 4H11-28z CAR T cells. In SCID-Beige mice with human ovarian cancer xenografts, IL-12 secreting CAR T cells exhibit enhanced antitumor efficacy as determined by increased survival, prolonged persistence of T cells, and higher systemic IFNγ. Furthermore, in anticipation of translating these results into a phase I clinical trial which will be the first to study IL-12 secreting CAR T cells in ovarian cancer, an elimination gene has been included to allow for deletion of CAR T cells in the context of unforeseen or off-tumor on-target toxicity. PMID:25949921

  3. Alvocidib and Oxaliplatin With or Without Fluorouracil and Leucovorin Calcium in Treating Patients With Relapsed or Refractory Germ Cell Tumors

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2015-05-11

    Recurrent Extragonadal Seminoma; Recurrent Malignant Extragonadal Germ Cell Tumor; Recurrent Malignant Extragonadal Non-Seminomatous Germ Cell Tumor; Recurrent Malignant Testicular Germ Cell Tumor; Recurrent Ovarian Germ Cell Tumor; Stage III Testicular Cancer; Stage IV Extragonadal Non-Seminomatous Germ Cell Tumor; Stage IV Extragonadal Seminoma; Stage IV Ovarian Germ Cell Tumor

  4. Dietary soy isoflavones increase metastasis to lungs in an experimental model of breast cancer with bone micro-tumors.

    PubMed

    Yang, Xujuan; Belosay, Aashvini; Hartman, James A; Song, Huaxin; Zhang, Yukun; Wang, Wendan; Doerge, Daniel R; Helferich, William G

    2015-04-01

    Bone is one of the most common sites for metastasis in breast cancer (BC). Micro-metastasis in bone marrow was detected in 30% of patients with stage I, II, or III BC at primary surgery and is a strong indicator of poor prognosis. The role dietary soy isoflavones play in BC with bone micro-metastasis is unclear. In this study, we examined the effects of genistein, daidzein, (-)-equol or a mixture of soy isoflavones on BC with bone micro-metastasis using an experimental model of murine mammary cancer 4T1 cells engineered with luciferase. A small number (1000) of 4T1 cells were injected into the tibia of female Balb/c mice to establish micro-tumors in bone. Soy isoflavones were supplemented in the AIN-93G diet at 750 mg/kg and were provided to mice from 3 weeks before to 3 weeks after cell injection. Bioluminescent imaging was conducted on day 2 (D2), D6, D8, D16 and D20 post cell injection and the results indicated dietary soy isoflavones enhanced the growth of bone micro-tumors on D8. Furthermore, dietary soy isoflavones stimulated metastatic tumor formation in lungs and increased Ki-67 protein expression in these metastasized tumors. In vitro, soy isoflavones (<10 µM) had limited effects on the growth, motility or invasion of 4T1 cells. Thus, the in vivo stimulatory effect could be likely due to systemic effects between the host, 4T1 tumors and soy isoflavones. In conclusion, soy isoflavones stimulate BC with bone micro-metastasis in mice and further investigations are needed regarding their consumption by BC survivors.

  5. MUC-1 Tumor Antigen Agonist Epitopes for Enhancing T-cell Responses to Human Tumors | NCI Technology Transfer Center | TTC

    Cancer.gov

    Scientists at NIH have identified 7 new agonist epitopes of the MUC-1 tumor associated antigen. Compared to their native epitope counterparts, peptides reflecting these agonist epitopes have been shown to enhance the generation of human tumor cells, which in turn have a greater ability to kill human tumor cells endogenously expressing the native MUC-1 epitope.

  6. Biodegradable polymeric micelle-encapsulated quercetin suppresses tumor growth and metastasis in both transgenic zebrafish and mouse models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Qinjie; Deng, Senyi; Li, Ling; Sun, Lu; Yang, Xi; Liu, Xinyu; Liu, Lei; Qian, Zhiyong; Wei, Yuquan; Gong, Changyang

    2013-11-01

    Quercetin (Que) loaded polymeric micelles were prepared to obtain an aqueous formulation of Que with enhanced anti-tumor and anti-metastasis activities. A simple solid dispersion method was used, and the obtained Que micelles had a small particle size (about 31 nm), high drug loading, and high encapsulation efficiency. Que micelles showed improved cellular uptake, an enhanced apoptosis induction effect, and stronger inhibitory effects on proliferation, migration, and invasion of 4T1 cells than free Que. The enhanced in vitro antiangiogenesis effects of Que micelles were proved by the results that Que micelles significantly suppressed proliferation, migration, invasion, and tube formation of human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVECs). Subsequently, transgenic zebrafish models were employed to investigate anti-tumor and anti-metastasis effects of Que micelles, in which stronger inhibitory effects of Que micelles were observed on embryonic angiogenesis, tumor-induced angiogenesis, tumor growth, and tumor metastasis. Furthermore, in a subcutaneous 4T1 tumor model, Que micelles were more effective in suppressing tumor growth and spontaneous pulmonary metastasis, and prolonging the survival of tumor-bearing mice. Besides, immunohistochemical and immunofluorescent assays suggested that tumors in the Que micelle-treated group showed more apoptosis, fewer microvessels, and fewer proliferation-positive cells. In conclusion, Que micelles, which are synthesized as an aqueous formulation of Que, possess enhanced anti-tumor and anti-metastasis activity, which can serve as potential candidates for cancer therapy.

  7. Nexavar/Stivarga and Viagra Interact to Kill Tumor Cells

    PubMed Central

    Tavallai, Mehrad; Hamed, Hossein A.; Roberts, Jane L.; Cruickshanks, Nichola; Chuckalovcak, John; Poklepovic, Andrew; Booth, Laurence

    2015-01-01

    We determined whether the multi‐kinase inhibitor sorafenib or its derivative regorafenib interacted with phosphodiesterase 5 (PDE5) inhibitors such as Viagra (sildenafil) to kill tumor cells. PDE5 and PDGFRα/β were over‐expressed in liver tumors compared to normal liver tissue. In multiple cell types in vitro sorafenib/regorafenib and PDE5 inhibitors interacted in a greater than additive fashion to cause tumor cell death, regardless of whether cells were grown in 10 or 100% human serum. Knock down of PDE5 or of PDGFRα/β recapitulated the effects of the individual drugs. The drug combination increased ROS/RNS levels that were causal in cell killing. Inhibition of CD95/FADD/caspase 8 signaling suppressed drug combination toxicity. Knock down of ULK‐1, Beclin1, or ATG5 suppressed drug combination lethality. The drug combination inactivated ERK, AKT, p70 S6K, and mTOR and activated JNK. The drug combination also reduced mTOR protein expression. Activation of ERK or AKT was modestly protective whereas re‐expression of an activated mTOR protein or inhibition of JNK signaling almost abolished drug combination toxicity. Sildenafil and sorafenib/regorafenib interacted in vivo to suppress xenograft tumor growth using liver and colon cancer cells. From multiplex assays on tumor tissue and plasma, we discovered that increased FGF levels and ERBB1 and AKT phosphorylation were biomarkers that were directly associated with lower levels of cell killing by ‘rafenib + sildenafil. Our data are now being translated into the clinic for further determination as to whether this drug combination is a useful anti‐tumor therapy for solid tumor patients. J. Cell. Physiol. 230: 2281–2298, 2015. © 2015 The Authors. Journal of Cellular Physiology Published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc. PMID:25704960

  8. Three-dimensional chemotaxis-driven aggregation of tumor cells

    PubMed Central

    Puliafito, Alberto; De Simone, Alessandro; Seano, Giorgio; Gagliardi, Paolo Armando; Di Blasio, Laura; Chianale, Federica; Gamba, Andrea; Primo, Luca; Celani, Antonio

    2015-01-01

    One of the most important steps in tumor progression involves the transformation from a differentiated epithelial phenotype to an aggressive, highly motile phenotype, where tumor cells invade neighboring tissues. Invasion can occur either by isolated mesenchymal cells or by aggregates that migrate collectively and do not lose completely the epithelial phenotype. Here, we show that, in a three-dimensional cancer cell culture, collective migration of cells eventually leads to aggregation in large clusters. We present quantitative measurements of cluster velocity, coalescence rates, and proliferation rates. These results cannot be explained in terms of random aggregation. Instead, a model of chemotaxis-driven aggregation – mediated by a diffusible attractant – is able to capture several quantitative aspects of our results. Experimental assays of chemotaxis towards culture conditioned media confirm this hypothesis. Theoretical and numerical results further suggest an important role for chemotactic-driven aggregation in spreading and survival of tumor cells. PMID:26471876

  9. HAMLET interacts with histones and chromatin in tumor cell nuclei.

    PubMed

    Düringer, Caroline; Hamiche, Ali; Gustafsson, Lotta; Kimura, Hiroshi; Svanborg, Catharina

    2003-10-24

    HAMLET is a folding variant of human alpha-lactalbumin in an active complex with oleic acid. HAMLET selectively enters tumor cells, accumulates in their nuclei and induces apoptosis-like cell death. This study examined the interactions of HAMLET with nuclear constituents and identified histones as targets. HAMLET was found to bind histone H3 strongly and to lesser extent histones H4 and H2B. The specificity of these interactions was confirmed using BIAcore technology and chromatin assembly assays. In vivo in tumor cells, HAMLET co-localized with histones and perturbed the chromatin structure; HAMLET was found associated with chromatin in an insoluble nuclear fraction resistant to salt extraction. In vitro, HAMLET bound strongly to histones and impaired their deposition on DNA. We conclude that HAMLET interacts with histones and chromatin in tumor cell nuclei and propose that this interaction locks the cells into the death pathway by irreversibly disrupting chromatin organization.

  10. Integrins and bone metastasis: integrating tumor cell and stromal cell interactions.

    PubMed

    Schneider, Jochen G; Amend, Sarah R; Weilbaecher, Katherine N

    2011-01-01

    Integrins on both tumor cells and the supporting host stromal cells in bone (osteoclasts, new blood vessels, inflammatory cells, platelets and bone marrow stromal cells) play key roles in enhancing bone metastasis. Tumor cells localize to specific tissues through integrin-mediated contacts with extracellular matrix and stromal cells. Integrin expression and signaling are perturbed in cancer cells, allowing them to "escape" from cell-cell and cell-matrix tethers, invade, migrate and colonize within new tissues and matrices. Integrin signaling through αvβ3 and VLA-4 on tumor cells can promote tumor metastasis to and proliferation in the bone microenvironment. Osteoclast (OC) mediated bone resorption is a critical component of bone metastasis and can promote tumor growth in bone and αvβ3 integrins are critical to OC function and development. Tumors in the bone microenvironment can recruit new blood vessel formation, platelets, pro-tumor immune cells and bone marrow stromal cells that promote tumor growth and invasion in bone. Integrins and their ligands play critical roles in platelet aggregation (αvβ3 and αIIbβ3), hematopoietic cell mobilization (VLA-4 and osteopontin), neoangiogenesis (αvβ3, αvβ5, α6β4, and β1 integrin) and stromal function (osteopontin and VLA-4). Integrins are involved in the pathogenesis of bone metastasis at many levels and further study to define integrin dysregulation by cancer will yield new therapeutic targets for the prevention and treatment of bone metastasis.

  11. Suppressive effects of tumor cell-derived 5'-deoxy-5'-methylthioadenosine on human T cells.

    PubMed

    Henrich, Frederik C; Singer, Katrin; Poller, Kerstin; Bernhardt, Luise; Strobl, Carolin D; Limm, Katharina; Ritter, Axel P; Gottfried, Eva; Völkl, Simon; Jacobs, Benedikt; Peter, Katrin; Mougiakakos, Dimitrios; Dettmer, Katja; Oefner, Peter J; Bosserhoff, Anja-Katrin; Kreutz, Marina P; Aigner, Michael; Mackensen, Andreas

    2016-08-01

    The immunosuppressive tumor microenvironment represents one of the main obstacles for immunotherapy of cancer. The tumor milieu is among others shaped by tumor metabolites such as 5'-deoxy-5'-methylthioadenosine (MTA). Increased intratumoral MTA levels result from a lack of the MTA-catabolizing enzyme methylthioadenosine phosphorylase (MTAP) in tumor cells and are found in various tumor entities. Here, we demonstrate that MTA suppresses proliferation, activation, differentiation, and effector function of antigen-specific T cells without eliciting cell death. Conversely, if MTA is added to highly activated T cells, MTA exerts cytotoxic effects on T cells. We identified the Akt pathway, a critical signal pathway for T cell activation, as a target of MTA, while, for example, p38 remained unaffected. Next, we provide evidence that MTA exerts its immunosuppressive effects by interfering with protein methylation in T cells. To confirm the relevance of the suppressive effects of exogenously added MTA on human T cells, we used an MTAP-deficient tumor cell-line that was stably transfected with the MTAP-coding sequence. We observed that T cells stimulated with MTAP-transfected tumor cells revealed a higher proliferative capacity compared to T cells stimulated with Mock-transfected cells. In conclusion, our findings reveal a novel immune evasion strategy of human tumor cells that could be of interest for therapeutic targeting. PMID:27622058

  12. Extraosseous Benign Notochordal Cell Tumor Originating in the Lung

    PubMed Central

    Takahashi, Yusuke; Motoi, Toru; Harada, Masahiko; Fukuda, Yumiko; Hishima, Tsunekazu; Horio, Hirotoshi

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Benign notochordal cell tumors (BNCTs) are tumors originating in the axial skeleton, where chordomas occur. Although very rare, some cases of extraosseous chordoma, such as in the soft tissue and lungs, have been reported. We report a case of a primary tumor showing the notochordal characteristics of BNCTs within the axial skeleton. An asymptomatic 57-year-old woman presented with an abnormal shadow on her chest radiograph; chest computed tomography revealed a well-defined round nodule. The resected sample tissue contained a jelly-like small nodule. Histologically, it was identified as a BNCT, based on minimal nuclear atypia, extremely low mitotic activity within the tumor cells lying in a sheet-like arrangement, and focal immunopositivity for brachyury. This is the third case report of BNCT originating in the lungs; BNCTs are considered asymptomatic tumors that are identified by using highly developed chest imaging technology; however, our findings also suggest that these notochordal tumors may potentially originate from extraosseous sites that lack ideal precursor cells. Our case suggests that notochordal tumors can arise from organs that are unrelated to known notochordal development. PMID:25569657

  13. Coupling Immunodeficiency factors to a normal cell system growing conjointly with tumor cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shojania Feizabadi, Mitra; Witten, Tarynn M.

    2014-03-01

    In this work, we modify Witten's conjoint normal-tumor cell model in order to incorporate the presence of a simple immune system. We first examine the behavior of normal and tumor cells when tumor cells interact with surrounding normal cells. We then extend our model and add the effects of a simple immune system, immune-suppression factors and immune-chemotherapeutics agents. The evolution of the system variables is investigated via computer simulation. We show that the evolution of normal and tumor cells population is significantly affected by the choice of drug or immunodeficiency.

  14. Local hyperthermia treatment of tumors induces CD8+ T cell-mediated resistance against distal and secondary tumors

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Peisheng; Chen, Lei; Baird, Jason R.; Demidenko, Eugene; Turk, Mary Jo; Hoopes, P. Jack; Conejo-Garcia, Jose R.; Fiering, Steven

    2014-01-01

    Combinatorial use of iron oxide nanoparticles (IONPs) and an alternating magnetic filed (AMF) can induce local hyperthermia in tumors in a controlled and uniform manner. Heating B16 primary tumors at 43°C for 30 minutes activated dendritic cells (DCs) and subsequently CD8+ T cells in the draining lymph node (dLN) and conferred resistance against rechallenge with B16 (but not unrelated Lewis Lung carcinoma) given 7 days post hyperthermia on both the primary tumor side and the contralateral side in a CD8+ T cell-dependent manner. Mice with heated primary tumors also resisted rechallenge given 30 days post hyperthermia. Mice with larger heated primary tumors had greater resistance to secondary tumors. No rechallenge resistance occurred when tumors were heated at 45°C. Our results demonstrate the promising potential of local hyperthermia treatment applied to identified tumors in inducing anti-tumor immune responses that reduce the risk of recurrence and metastasis. PMID:24566274

  15. Combination treatment with decitabine and ionizing radiation enhances tumor cells susceptibility of T cells

    PubMed Central

    Son, Cheol-Hun; Lee, Hong-Rae; Koh, Eun-Kyoung; Shin, Dong-Yeok; Bae, Jae-Ho; Yang, Kwangmo; Park, You-Soo

    2016-01-01

    Decitabine has been found to have anti-metabolic and anti-tumor activities in various tumor cells. Recently, the use of decitabine in combination with other conventional therapies reportedly resulted in improved anti-tumor activity against various tumors. Ionizing radiation (IR) is widely used as a cancer treatment. Decitabine and IR improve immunogenicity and susceptibility of tumor cells to immune cells by up-regulating the expression of various molecules such as major histocompatibility complex (MHC) class I; natural-killer group 2, member D (NKG2D) ligands; and co-stimulatory molecules. However, the effects of combining decitabine and IR therapies are largely unknown. Our results indicate that decitabine or IR treatment upregulates MHC class I, along with various co-stimulatory molecules in target tumor cells. Furthermore, decitabine and IR combination treatment further upregulates MHC class I, along with the co-stimulatory molecules, when compared to the effect of each treatment alone. Importantly, decitabine treatment further enhanced T cell-mediated cytotoxicity and release of IFN- γ against target tumor cells which is induced by IR. Interestingly, decitabine did not affect NKG2D ligand expression or NK cell-mediated cytotoxicity in target tumor cells. These observations suggest that decitabine may be used as a useful immunomodulator to sensitize tumor cells in combination with other tumor therapies. PMID:27671170

  16. Oral solitary fibrous tumor: a cytogenetic analysis of tumor cells in culture with literature review.

    PubMed

    Swelam, Wael M; Cheng, Jun; Ida-Yonemochi, Hiroko; Maruyama, Satoshi; Saku, Takashi

    2009-10-15

    Solitary fibrous tumor (SFT) is an uncommon spindle-cell neoplasm of mesenchymal origin. Because the pathogenetic background of SFT is still controversial, cytogenetic analysis could help in tumor diagnosis and prognosis. In this study, cultured SFT cells from a lower lip lesion that presented characteristic immunopositivity for CD34, vimentin, CD99, and BCL2 showed a unique cytogenetic finding: 46,XX,inv(2)(p21q35),t(3;12)(q25;q15). To our knowledge, this is the third report of cytogenetic result of a case involving the oral cavity. The SFT cells in culture that maintained their immunohistochemical expression of diagnostic molecules, showed unique chromosomal changes previously unreported when compared with already documented ones. Our data suggest that the complicated pathogenetic nature of SFT is possibly tumor- or organ-related.

  17. Zeeman spectroscopy of the internal transition 4T1 to 6A1 of Fe3+ ions in wurtzite GaN

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Neuschl, B.; Gödecke, M. L.; Thonke, K.; Lipski, F.; Klein, M.; Scholz, F.; Feneberg, M.

    2015-12-01

    Internal transitions of Fe3+ ions in wurtzite gallium nitride were analyzed by means of photoluminescence, Zeeman, and transmission spectroscopy in order to investigate the fine structure. Magnetic fields up to 14 T were applied perpendicular or parallel to the crystal c-axis, causing a characteristic splitting pattern of the luminescence related to the transition from the 4T1 excited state to the 6A1 ground state of Fe3+. The complete Hamiltonian matrix is constructed taking into account the crystal field in cubic and trigonal symmetry, spin-orbit interaction, and the influence of external magnetic fields. Numerical solution yields the exact energy level scheme of the excited state 4G of Fe3+ ions in GaN, which partly revises assumptions based on a qualitative treatment considering group theory only and invoking the influence of a Jahn-Teller effect. The coincidence of the calculated energy levels with the experimental data verifies the derived fine structure of the 3d metal ion.

  18. Equipotent generation of protective antitumor immunity by various methods of dendritic cell loading with whole cell tumor antigens.

    PubMed

    Lambert, L A; Gibson, G R; Maloney, M; Barth, R J

    2001-01-01

    Multiple clinically applicable methods have been used to induce dendritic cells (DCs) to express whole cell tumor antigens, including pulsing DCs with tumor lysate, and mixing DCs with apoptotic or live tumor cells. Herein we demonstrate, using two different tumor systems, that these methods are equipotent inducers of systemic antitumor immunity. Furthermore, tumor lysate pulsed DC vaccines generate more potent antitumor immunity than immunization with irradiated tumor cells plus the classic adjuvant, Corynebacterium parvum. PMID:11394500

  19. IL-12 could induce monocytic tumor cells directional differentiation.

    PubMed

    Ma, Ting-Ting; Wu, Bi-Tao; Lin, Yan; Xiong, Hai-Yu; Wang, Qin; Li, Zi-Wei; Cheng, Feng; Tu, Zhi-Guang

    2015-04-01

    Interleukin-12 (IL-12), a member of interleukin family, plays a critical role in immune responses and anti-tumor activity. In this study, the effects of IL-12 on monocytic tumor cell lines differentiation to macrophagocyte and its likely mechanism was investigated. We examined the differentiation markers, morphological and functional changes, and possible mechanism in IL-12-treated THP-1 and U937 cells. It was found that IL-12 could up-regulated macrophage surface marker CD68 and CD11b expression in a time-dependent manner. Morphologically, after IL-12 treatment, THP-1 and U937 cells became round or irregular shape, even stretched many cell membrane protuberances; some cell nuclei became fuzzy or completely disappeared, and the chromatin appeared dense and cordlike. Furthermore, IL-12-induced monocytic tumor cell differentiation was accompanied by the growth arrest with G1-phase accumulation and S-phase reduction; apoptosis increased with anti-apoptosis protein Bcl-2 down-expression and pro-apoptosis protein Fas up-regulation, and enhanced phagocytosis function. The IL-12-induced macrophage differentiation of THP-1 and U937 cells was associated with the up-regulation of c-fms expression and the CSF-1R Tyr 809 site phosphorylation. These findings have revealed that IL-12 could induce monocytic tumor cells directional differentiation into macrophage-like cells, and its mechanism is possible connected with the up-regulation of c-fms expression and the phosphorylation of CSF-1R Tyr-809 site.

  20. Glioma Cells in the Tumor Periphery Have a Stem Cell Phenotype.

    PubMed

    Munthe, Sune; Petterson, Stine Asferg; Dahlrot, Rikke Hedegaard; Poulsen, Frantz Rom; Hansen, Steinbjørn; Kristensen, Bjarne Winther

    2016-01-01

    Gliomas are highly infiltrative tumors incurable with surgery. Although surgery removes the bulk tumor, tumor cells in the periphery are left behind resulting in tumor relapses. The aim of the present study was to characterize the phenotype of tumor cells in the periphery focusing on tumor stemness, proliferation and chemo-resistance. This was investigated in situ in patient glioma tissue as well as in orthotopic glioblastoma xenografts. We identified 26 gliomas having the R132 mutation in Isocitrate DeHydrogenase 1 (mIDH1). A double immunofluorescence approach identifying mIDH1 positive tumor cells and a panel of markers was used. The panel comprised of six stem cell-related markers (CD133, Musashi-1, Bmi-1, Sox-2, Nestin and Glut-3), a proliferation marker (Ki-67) as well as a chemo-resistance marker (MGMT). Computer-based automated classifiers were designed to measure the mIDH1 positive nucleus area-fraction of the chosen markers. Moreover, orthotopic glioblastoma xenografts from five different patient-derived spheroid cultures were obtained and the tumor cells identified by human specific immunohistochemical markers. The results showed that tumor cells in the periphery of patient gliomas expressed stem cell markers, however for most markers at a significantly lower level than in the tumor core. The Ki-67 level was slightly reduced in the periphery, whereas the MGMT level was similar. In orthotopic glioblastoma xenografts all markers showed similar levels in the core and periphery. In conclusion tumor cells in the periphery of patient gliomas have a stem cell phenotype, although it is less pronounced than in the tumor core. Novel therapies aiming at preventing recurrence should therefore take tumor stemness into account. Migrating cells in orthotopic glioblastoma xenografts preserve expression and stem cell markers. The orthotopic model therefore has a promising translational potential. PMID:27171431

  1. Glioma Cells in the Tumor Periphery Have a Stem Cell Phenotype

    PubMed Central

    Munthe, Sune; Petterson, Stine Asferg; Dahlrot, Rikke Hedegaard; Poulsen, Frantz Rom; Hansen, Steinbjørn; Kristensen, Bjarne Winther

    2016-01-01

    Gliomas are highly infiltrative tumors incurable with surgery. Although surgery removes the bulk tumor, tumor cells in the periphery are left behind resulting in tumor relapses. The aim of the present study was to characterize the phenotype of tumor cells in the periphery focusing on tumor stemness, proliferation and chemo-resistance. This was investigated in situ in patient glioma tissue as well as in orthotopic glioblastoma xenografts. We identified 26 gliomas having the R132 mutation in Isocitrate DeHydrogenase 1 (mIDH1). A double immunofluorescence approach identifying mIDH1 positive tumor cells and a panel of markers was used. The panel comprised of six stem cell-related markers (CD133, Musashi-1, Bmi-1, Sox-2, Nestin and Glut-3), a proliferation marker (Ki-67) as well as a chemo-resistance marker (MGMT). Computer-based automated classifiers were designed to measure the mIDH1 positive nucleus area-fraction of the chosen markers. Moreover, orthotopic glioblastoma xenografts from five different patient-derived spheroid cultures were obtained and the tumor cells identified by human specific immunohistochemical markers. The results showed that tumor cells in the periphery of patient gliomas expressed stem cell markers, however for most markers at a significantly lower level than in the tumor core. The Ki-67 level was slightly reduced in the periphery, whereas the MGMT level was similar. In orthotopic glioblastoma xenografts all markers showed similar levels in the core and periphery. In conclusion tumor cells in the periphery of patient gliomas have a stem cell phenotype, although it is less pronounced than in the tumor core. Novel therapies aiming at preventing recurrence should therefore take tumor stemness into account. Migrating cells in orthotopic glioblastoma xenografts preserve expression and stem cell markers. The orthotopic model therefore has a promising translational potential. PMID:27171431

  2. Nexavar/Stivarga and viagra interact to kill tumor cells.

    PubMed

    Tavallai, Mehrad; Hamed, Hossein A; Roberts, Jane L; Cruickshanks, Nichola; Chuckalovcak, John; Poklepovic, Andrew; Booth, Laurence; Dent, Paul

    2015-09-01

    We determined whether the multi-kinase inhibitor sorafenib or its derivative regorafenib interacted with phosphodiesterase 5 (PDE5) inhibitors such as Viagra (sildenafil) to kill tumor cells. PDE5 and PDGFRα/β were over-expressed in liver tumors compared to normal liver tissue. In multiple cell types in vitro sorafenib/regorafenib and PDE5 inhibitors interacted in a greater than additive fashion to cause tumor cell death, regardless of whether cells were grown in 10 or 100% human serum. Knock down of PDE5 or of PDGFRα/β recapitulated the effects of the individual drugs. The drug combination increased ROS/RNS levels that were causal in cell killing. Inhibition of CD95/FADD/caspase 8 signaling suppressed drug combination toxicity. Knock down of ULK-1, Beclin1, or ATG5 suppressed drug combination lethality. The drug combination inactivated ERK, AKT, p70 S6K, and mTOR and activated JNK. The drug combination also reduced mTOR protein expression. Activation of ERK or AKT was modestly protective whereas re-expression of an activated mTOR protein or inhibition of JNK signaling almost abolished drug combination toxicity. Sildenafil and sorafenib/regorafenib interacted in vivo to suppress xenograft tumor growth using liver and colon cancer cells. From multiplex assays on tumor tissue and plasma, we discovered that increased FGF levels and ERBB1 and AKT phosphorylation were biomarkers that were directly associated with lower levels of cell killing by 'rafenib + sildenafil. Our data are now being translated into the clinic for further determination as to whether this drug combination is a useful anti-tumor therapy for solid tumor patients. PMID:25704960

  3. Endothelial Cells Enhance Tumor Cell Invasion through a Crosstalk Mediated by CXC Chemokine Signaling1

    PubMed Central

    Warner, Kristy A; Miyazawa, Marta; Cordeiro, Mabel M R; Love, William J; Pinsky, Matthew S; Neiva, Kathleen G; Spalding, Aaron C; Nör, Jacques E

    2008-01-01

    Field cancerization involves the lateral spread of premalignant or malignant disease and contributes to the recurrence of head and neck tumors. The overall hypothesis underlying this work is that endothelial cells actively participate in tumor cell invasion by secreting chemokines and creating a chemotactic gradient for tumor cells. Here we demonstrate that conditioned medium from head and neck tumor cells enhance Bcl-2 expression in neovascular endothelial cells. Oral squamous cell carcinoma-3 (OSCC3) and Kaposi's sarcoma (SLK) show enhanced invasiveness when cocultured with pools of human dermal microvascular endothelial cells stably expressing Bcl-2 (HDMEC-Bcl-2), compared to cocultures with empty vector controls (HDMEC-LXSN). Xenografted OSCC3 tumors vascularized with HDMEC-Bcl-2 presented higher local invasion than OSCC3 tumors vascularized with control HDMEC-LXSN. CXCL1 and CXCL8 were upregulated in primary endothelial cells exposed to vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF), as well as in HDMEC-Bcl-2. Notably, blockade of CXCR2 signaling, but not CXCR1, inhibited OSCC3 and SLK invasion toward endothelial cells. These data demonstrate that CXC chemokines secreted by endothelial cells induce tumor cell invasion and suggest that the process of lateral spread of tumor cells observed in field cancerization is guided by chemotactic signals that originated from endothelial cells. PMID:18283335

  4. Antitumor cell-complex vaccines employing genetically modified tumor cells and fibroblasts.

    PubMed

    Miguel, Antonio; Herrero, María José; Sendra, Luis; Botella, Rafael; Diaz, Ana; Algás, Rosa; Aliño, Salvador F

    2014-02-19

    The present study evaluates the immune response mediated by vaccination with cell complexes composed of irradiated B16 tumor cells and mouse fibroblasts genetically modified to produce GM-CSF. The animals were vaccinated with free B16 cells or cell complexes. We employed two gene plasmid constructions: one high producer (pMok) and a low producer (p2F). Tumor transplant was performed by injection of B16 tumor cells. Plasma levels of total IgG and its subtypes were measured by ELISA. Tumor volumes were measured and survival curves were obtained. The study resulted in a cell complex vaccine able to stimulate the immune system to produce specific anti-tumor membrane proteins (TMP) IgG. In the groups vaccinated with cells transfected with the low producer plasmid, IgG production was higher when we used free B16 cell rather than cell complexes. Nonspecific autoimmune response caused by cell complex was not greater than that induced by the tumor cells alone. Groups vaccinated with B16 transfected with low producer plasmid reached a tumor growth delay of 92% (p ≤ 0.01). When vaccinated with cell complex, the best group was that transfected with high producer plasmid, reaching a tumor growth inhibition of 56% (p ≤ 0.05). Significant survival (40%) was only observed in the groups vaccinated with free transfected B16 cells.

  5. Antitumor Cell-Complex Vaccines Employing Genetically Modified Tumor Cells and Fibroblasts

    PubMed Central

    Miguel, Antonio; Herrero, María José; Sendra, Luis; Botella, Rafael; Diaz, Ana; Algás, Rosa; Aliño, Salvador F.

    2014-01-01

    The present study evaluates the immune response mediated by vaccination with cell complexes composed of irradiated B16 tumor cells and mouse fibroblasts genetically modified to produce GM-CSF. The animals were vaccinated with free B16 cells or cell complexes. We employed two gene plasmid constructions: one high producer (pMok) and a low producer (p2F). Tumor transplant was performed by injection of B16 tumor cells. Plasma levels of total IgG and its subtypes were measured by ELISA. Tumor volumes were measured and survival curves were obtained. The study resulted in a cell complex vaccine able to stimulate the immune system to produce specific anti-tumor membrane proteins (TMP) IgG. In the groups vaccinated with cells transfected with the low producer plasmid, IgG production was higher when we used free B16 cell rather than cell complexes. Nonspecific autoimmune response caused by cell complex was not greater than that induced by the tumor cells alone. Groups vaccinated with B16 transfected with low producer plasmid reached a tumor growth delay of 92% (p ≤ 0.01). When vaccinated with cell complex, the best group was that transfected with high producer plasmid, reaching a tumor growth inhibition of 56% (p ≤ 0.05). Significant survival (40%) was only observed in the groups vaccinated with free transfected B16 cells. PMID:24556729

  6. Standardized orthotopic xenografts in zebrafish reveal glioma cell-line-specific characteristics and tumor cell heterogeneity

    PubMed Central

    Welker, Alessandra M.; Jaros, Brian D.; Puduvalli, Vinay K.; Imitola, Jaime; Kaur, Balveen; Beattie, Christine E.

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Glioblastoma (GBM) is a deadly brain cancer, for which few effective drug treatments are available. Several studies have used zebrafish models to study GBM, but a standardized approach to modeling GBM in zebrafish was lacking to date, preventing comparison of data across studies. Here, we describe a new, standardized orthotopic xenotransplant model of GBM in zebrafish. Dose-response survival assays were used to define the optimal number of cells for tumor formation. Techniques to measure tumor burden and cell spread within the brain over real time were optimized using mouse neural stem cells as control transplants. Applying this standardized approach, we transplanted two patient-derived GBM cell lines, serum-grown adherent cells and neurospheres, into the midbrain region of embryonic zebrafish and analyzed transplanted larvae over time. Progressive brain tumor growth and premature larval death were observed using both cell lines; however, fewer transplanted neurosphere cells were needed for tumor growth and lethality. Tumors were heterogeneous, containing both cells expressing stem cell markers and cells expressing markers of differentiation. A small proportion of transplanted neurosphere cells expressed glial fibrillary acidic protein (GFAP) or vimentin, markers of more differentiated cells, but this number increased significantly during tumor growth, indicating that these cells undergo differentiation in vivo. By contrast, most serum-grown adherent cells expressed GFAP and vimentin at the earliest times examined post-transplant. Both cell types produced brain tumors that contained Sox2+ cells, indicative of tumor stem cells. Transplanted larvae were treated with currently used GBM therapeutics, temozolomide or bortezomib, and this resulted in a reduction in tumor volume in vivo and an increase in survival. The standardized model reported here facilitates robust and reproducible analysis of glioblastoma tumor cells in real time and provides a platform for

  7. Somatostatin receptor subtypes in neuroendocrine tumor cell lines and tumor tissues.

    PubMed

    Jonas, S; John, M; Boese-Landgraf, J; Häring, R; Prevost, G; Thomas, F; Rosewicz, S; Riecken, E O; Wiedenmann, B; Neuhaus, P

    1995-01-01

    Somatostatin receptor scintigraphy (SRS) is positive in approximately 80% of all patients who have been found to have neuroendocrine (NE) gastroenteropancreatic (GEP) tumors. The reasons for negative results are unclear. The aim of the present study was identification of the specific somatostatin receptor (SSTR) subtypes that are responsible for the in vivo binding of the widely used somatostatin (SST) analogues octreotide and lanreotide in human neuroendocrine gastroenteropancreatic tumors. Ten patients were subjected to SRS with radiolabeled octreotide. Following surgical resection, tumor tissues were analyzed for SSTR subtype mRNA expression by the reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR). In addition, SSTR subtype transcripts were investigated by Northern blot analysis and RT-PCR in neuroendocrine tumor cell lines. Expression of SSTR at the protein level was studied by chemical cross-linking experiments. Three patients were negative by SRS. However, RT-PCR revealed most prominently SSTR 2 expression in all tumor specimens. In addition, all tumor tissues analyzed by chemical crosslinking exhibited SST-14 binding sites, indicating that at least some NE tumors were false-negative on SRS.

  8. Differential effects of serine proteases on the migration of normal and tumor cells: implications for tumor microenvironment.

    PubMed

    Elzer, Kirsten L; Heitzman, Deborah A; Chernin, Mitchell I; Novak, Josef F

    2008-12-01

    The supporting role of proteases in tumor progression and invasion is well known; however, the use of proteases as therapeutic agents has also been demonstrated. In this article, the authors report on the differential effects of exogenous serine proteases on the motility of tumor and normal cells. The treatment of normal and tumor cells with a single dose of pancreatic serine proteases, trypsin (TR) and chymotrypsin (CH), leads to a concentration-dependent response by cells, first accelerating and then slowing mobility. Tumor cells are 10 to 20 times more sensitive to exogenous TR/CH, suggesting that a single dose of proteases may cause discordant movements of normal and tumor cells within the tumor environment. The inhibitory effects of TR on cell motility are contradicted by thrombin (TH), particularly in the regulation of normal cells' migration. The purpose of this investigation was to ascertain the role of protease-activated receptors (PARs) in terms of normal and tumor cell motility. Duplicate treatments with proteases resulted in diminished mobility of both normal and tumor cells. Repeated application of TR and TH in 1-hour treatment intervals initially desensitizes cell surface PARs. However, cell surface PARs reappear regardless of subsequent protease treatments in both normal and tumor cells. The resensitization process is retarded in tumor cells when compared with normal cells. This is evidenced by lower expression of PARs as well as by their relocalization at the tumor cell surfaces. Under these conditions, normal cells remain responsive to exogenous proteases in terms of cell motility. Exogenous proteases do not modulate motility of repeatedly stimulated tumor cells, and consequently, the migration of tumor cells appears disconnected from the PAR signaling pathways. The use of activating peptides in lieu of the cognate proteases for a given PAR system indicated that proteases may act through additional targets not regulated by PAR signaling. We

  9. Effects of Charged Particles on Human Tumor Cells

    PubMed Central

    Held, Kathryn D.; Kawamura, Hidemasa; Kaminuma, Takuya; Paz, Athena Evalour S.; Yoshida, Yukari; Liu, Qi; Willers, Henning; Takahashi, Akihisa

    2016-01-01

    The use of charged particle therapy in cancer treatment is growing rapidly, in large part because the exquisite dose localization of charged particles allows for higher radiation doses to be given to tumor tissue while normal tissues are exposed to lower doses and decreased volumes of normal tissues are irradiated. In addition, charged particles heavier than protons have substantial potential clinical advantages because of their additional biological effects, including greater cell killing effectiveness, decreased radiation resistance of hypoxic cells in tumors, and reduced cell cycle dependence of radiation response. These biological advantages depend on many factors, such as endpoint, cell or tissue type, dose, dose rate or fractionation, charged particle type and energy, and oxygen concentration. This review summarizes the unique biological advantages of charged particle therapy and highlights recent research and areas of particular research needs, such as quantification of relative biological effectiveness (RBE) for various tumor types and radiation qualities, role of genetic background of tumor cells in determining response to charged particles, sensitivity of cancer stem-like cells to charged particles, role of charged particles in tumors with hypoxic fractions, and importance of fractionation, including use of hypofractionation, with charged particles. PMID:26904502

  10. Waves of ratcheting cancer cells in growing tumor tissue layer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Taeseok; Kwon, Tae; Kim, Hyun; Lee, Kyoung; CenterCell Dynamics Team

    2015-03-01

    Over many years researchers have shown that the mechanical forces generated by, and acting on, tissues influence the way they grow, develop and migrate. As for cancer research goes, understanding the role of these forces may even be as influential as deciphering the relevant genetic and molecular basis. Often the key issues in the field of cancer mechanics are to understand the interplay of mechanics and chemistry. In this study, we discuss very intriguing population density waves observed in slowly proliferating of tumor cell layers. The temporal periods are around 4 hr and their wavelength is in the order of 1 mm. Tumor cell layer, which is initially plated in a small disk area, expands as a band of tumor cells is ``ratcheting'' in concert in radially outward direction. By adding Cytochalasin D and Latrunculin B, an inhibitor of actin polymerization, or Mytomycin, a chemotherapeutic agent, we could halt and modulate the wave activities reversibly. The observed waves are visually quite similar to those of chemotaxing dictyostelium discodium amoeba population, which are driven by nonlinear chemical reaction-diffusion waves of cAMP. So far, we have not been able to show any relevant chemo-attractants inducing the collective behavior of these tumor cells. Researchers have been investigating how forces from both within and outside developing cancer cells interact in intricate feedback loops. This work reports the example of periodic density waves of tumor cells with an explanation purely based on nonlinear mechanics.

  11. Modified Bleomycin Disaccharides Exhibiting Improved Tumor Cell Targeting

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    The bleomycins (BLMs) are a family of antitumor antibiotics used clinically for anticancer chemotherapy. Their antitumor selectivity derives at least in part from their ability to target tumor cells, a property that resides in the carbohydrate moiety of the antitumor agent. In earlier studies, we have demonstrated that the tumor cell selectivity resides in the mannose carbamoyl moiety of the BLM saccharide and that both the BLM disaccharide and monosaccharide containing the carbamoyl moiety were capable of the delivery/uptake of a conjugated cyanine dye into cultured cancer cell lines. Presently, the nature of the participation of the carbamoyl moiety has been explored further to provide compounds of utility for defining the nature of the mechanism of tumor cell recognition and uptake by BLM saccharides and in the hope that more efficient compounds could be identified. A library of seven disaccharide–Cy5** dye conjugates was prepared that are structural analogues of the BLM disaccharide. These differed from the natural BLM disaccharide in the position, orientation, and substitution of the carbamoyl group. Studies of these compounds in four matched sets of tumor and normal cell lines revealed a few that were both tumor cell selective and internalized 2–4-fold more efficiently than the natural BLM disaccharide. PMID:25272367

  12. HAMLET binding to α-actinin facilitates tumor cell detachment.

    PubMed

    Trulsson, Maria; Yu, Hao; Gisselsson, Lennart; Chao, Yinxia; Urbano, Alexander; Aits, Sonja; Mossberg, Ann-Kristin; Svanborg, Catharina

    2011-03-08

    Cell adhesion is tightly regulated by specific molecular interactions and detachment from the extracellular matrix modifies proliferation and survival. HAMLET (Human Alpha-lactalbumin Made LEthal to Tumor cells) is a protein-lipid complex with tumoricidal activity that also triggers tumor cell detachment in vitro and in vivo, suggesting that molecular interactions defining detachment are perturbed in cancer cells. To identify such interactions, cell membrane extracts were used in Far-western blots and HAMLET was shown to bind α-actinins; major F-actin cross-linking proteins and focal adhesion constituents. Synthetic peptide mapping revealed that HAMLET binds to the N-terminal actin-binding domain as well as the integrin-binding domain of α-actinin-4. By co-immunoprecipitation of extracts from HAMLET-treated cancer cells, an interaction with α-actinin-1 and -4 was observed. Inhibition of α-actinin-1 and α-actinin-4 expression by siRNA transfection increased detachment, while α-actinin-4-GFP over-expression significantly delayed rounding up and detachment of tumor cells in response to HAMLET. In response to HAMLET, adherent tumor cells rounded up and detached, suggesting a loss of the actin cytoskeletal organization. These changes were accompanied by a reduction in β1 integrin staining and a decrease in FAK and ERK1/2 phosphorylation, consistent with a disruption of integrin-dependent cell adhesion signaling. Detachment per se did not increase cell death during the 22 hour experimental period, regardless of α-actinin-4 and α-actinin-1 expression levels but adherent cells with low α-actinin levels showed increased death in response to HAMLET. The results suggest that the interaction between HAMLET and α-actinins promotes tumor cell detachment. As α-actinins also associate with signaling molecules, cytoplasmic domains of transmembrane receptors and ion channels, additional α-actinin-dependent mechanisms are discussed.

  13. Direct tumor recognition by a human CD4+ T-cell subset potently mediates tumor growth inhibition and orchestrates anti-tumor immune responses

    PubMed Central

    Matsuzaki, Junko; Tsuji, Takemasa; Luescher, Immanuel F.; Shiku, Hiroshi; Mineno, Junichi; Okamoto, Sachiko; Old, Lloyd J.; Shrikant, Protul; Gnjatic, Sacha; Odunsi, Kunle

    2015-01-01

    Tumor antigen-specific CD4+ T cells generally orchestrate and regulate immune cells to provide immune surveillance against malignancy. However, activation of antigen-specific CD4+ T cells is restricted at local tumor sites where antigen-presenting cells (APCs) are frequently dysfunctional, which can cause rapid exhaustion of anti-tumor immune responses. Herein, we characterize anti-tumor effects of a unique human CD4+ helper T-cell subset that directly recognizes the cytoplasmic tumor antigen, NY-ESO-1, presented by MHC class II on cancer cells. Upon direct recognition of cancer cells, tumor-recognizing CD4+ T cells (TR-CD4) potently induced IFN-γ-dependent growth arrest in cancer cells. In addition, direct recognition of cancer cells triggers TR-CD4 to provide help to NY-ESO-1-specific CD8+ T cells by enhancing cytotoxic activity, and improving viability and proliferation in the absence of APCs. Notably, the TR-CD4 either alone or in collaboration with CD8+ T cells significantly inhibited tumor growth in vivo in a xenograft model. Finally, retroviral gene-engineering with T cell receptor (TCR) derived from TR-CD4 produced large numbers of functional TR-CD4. These observations provide mechanistic insights into the role of TR-CD4 in tumor immunity, and suggest that approaches to utilize TR-CD4 will augment anti-tumor immune responses for durable therapeutic efficacy in cancer patients. PMID:26447332

  14. Glioblastoma: A Pathogenic Crosstalk between Tumor Cells and Pericytes

    PubMed Central

    Redondo-Garcia, Carolina; Martinez, Salvador

    2014-01-01

    Cancers likely originate in progenitor zones containing stem cells and perivascular stromal cells. Much evidence suggests stromal cells play a central role in tumor initiation and progression. Brain perivascular cells (pericytes) are contractile and function normally to regulate vessel tone and morphology, have stem cell properties, are interconvertible with macrophages and are involved in new vessel formation during angiogenesis. Nevertheless, how pericytes contribute to brain tumor infiltration is not known. In this study we have investigated the underlying mechanism by which the most lethal brain cancer, Glioblastoma Multiforme (GBM) interacts with pre-existing blood vessels (co-option) to promote tumor initiation and progression. Here, using mouse xenografts and laminin-coated silicone substrates, we show that GBM malignancy proceeds via specific and previously unknown interactions of tumor cells with brain pericytes. Two-photon and confocal live imaging revealed that GBM cells employ novel, Cdc42-dependent and actin-based cytoplasmic extensions, that we call flectopodia, to modify the normal contractile activity of pericytes. This results in the co-option of modified pre-existing blood vessels that support the expansion of the tumor margin. Furthermore, our data provide evidence for GBM cell/pericyte fusion-hybrids, some of which are located on abnormally constricted vessels ahead of the tumor and linked to tumor-promoting hypoxia. Remarkably, inhibiting Cdc42 function impairs vessel co-option and converts pericytes to a phagocytic/macrophage-like phenotype, thus favoring an innate immune response against the tumor. Our work, therefore, identifies for the first time a key GBM contact-dependent interaction that switches pericyte function from tumor-suppressor to tumor-promoter, indicating that GBM may harbor the seeds of its own destruction. These data support the development of therapeutic strategies directed against co-option (preventing incorporation and

  15. Circulating tumor cells and circulating tumor DNA for precision medicine: dream or reality?

    PubMed

    Ignatiadis, M; Dawson, S-J

    2014-12-01

    Next-generation sequencing studies have provided further evidence to support the notion that cancer is a disease characterized by Darwinian evolution. Today, we often fail to capture this evolution and treatment decisions, even in the metastatic setting, are often based on analysis of primary tumor diagnosed years ago. Currently, this is considered a major reason for treatment failures in cancer care. Recent technological advances in the detection and characterization of circulating tumor cells and circulating tumor DNA might address this and allow for treatment tailoring based on real-time monitoring of tumor evolution. In this review, we summarize the most important recent findings in the field, focusing on challenges and opportunities in moving these tools forward in clinical practice.

  16. B7-1/CD80-transduced tumor cells elicit better systemic immunity than wild-type tumor cells admixed with Corynebacterium parvum.

    PubMed

    Chen, L; McGowan, P; Ashe, S; Johnston, J V; Hellström, I; Hellström, K E

    1994-10-15

    Tumor cells genetically modified by transduction of B7 (B7-1/CD80), a natural ligand for the T-cell costimulatory molecules CD28 and CTLA-4, can elicit potent tumor immunity, and they can be effective for treatment of established cancers in animal models. In this study, three tumor lines, the EL4 lymphoma, the P815 mastocytoma, and the MCA102 sarcoma were transduced with recombinant retrovirus containing the murine B7 gene, and their potency to induce systemic immunity protective against challenge with wild-type tumor was compared to that of the same tumor cells admixed with the commonly used adjuvant Corynebacterium parvum. While admixture of tumor cells with C. parvum resulted in complete regression of tumors in syngeneic mice, it did not induce protective immunity against a subsequent challenge of wild-type cells from any of the 3 tumors tested. In contrast, B7-transduced EL4 and P815 tumors regressed locally and induced a potent systemic immunity to wild-type tumors and a higher level of cytotoxic T-cell activity than did tumor cells admixed with C. parvum. No systemic immunity was induced by B7-transduced nonimmunogenic MCA102 sarcoma cells. Our results demonstrate that immunogenic tumor cells transduced with the B7 gene are superior to tumor cells mixed with C. parvum for the induction of systemic tumor immunity. PMID:7522958

  17. Intracellular particle tracking as a tool for tumor cell characterization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Yixuan; Schnekenburger, Juergen; Duits, Michael H. G.

    2009-11-01

    We studied the dynamics of two types of intracellular probe particles, ballistically injected latex spheres and endogenous granules, in tumor cell lines of differerent metastatic potential: breast tumor cells (MCF-7 malignant, MCF-10A benign) and pancreas adenocarcinoma (PaTu8988T malignant, PaTu8988S benign). For both tissue types and for both probes, the mean squared displacement (MSD) function measured in the malignant cells was substantially larger than in the benign cells. Only a few cells were needed to characterize the tissue as malignant or benign based on their MSD, since variations in MSD within the same cell line were relatively small. These findings suggest that intracellular particle tracking (IPT) can serve as a simple and reliable method for characterization of cell states obtained from a small amount of cell sample. Mechanical analysis of the same cell lines with atomic force microscopy (AFM) in force-distance mode revealed that AFM could distinguish between the benign and malignant breast cancer cells but not the pancreatic tumor cell lines. This underlines the potential value of IPT as a complementary nanomechanical tool for studying cell-state-dependent mechanical properties.

  18. [Principles of adoptive cell therapy based on "Tumor Infiltrating Lymphocytes"].

    PubMed

    Martins, Filipe; Orcurto, Angela; Michielin, Olivier; Coukos, George

    2016-05-18

    Adoptive cell therapy consists in the use of T lymphocytes for therapeutic purposes. Up to now, of limited use in clinical practice for logistical reasons, technical progress and substantial level of evidence obtained in the last decade allow its arrival in universitary hospitals. We will principally discuss the administration of expanded tumor infiltrating T cells in the treatment of metastatic melanoma. This treatment modality exploits the natural specificity of these cells and aims to potentiate their effectiveness. This personalized immunotherapy detains a potential for expansion to many other advanced tumor types. PMID:27424426

  19. Renal cell carcinoma with areas mimicking renal angiomyoadenomatous tumor/clear cell papillary renal cell carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Petersson, Fredrik; Grossmann, Petr; Hora, Milan; Sperga, Maris; Montiel, Delia Perez; Martinek, Petr; Gutierrez, Maria Evelyn Cortes; Bulimbasic, Stela; Michal, Michal; Branzovsky, Jindrich; Hes, Ondrej

    2013-07-01

    We present a cohort of 8 renal carcinomas that displayed a variable (5%-95% extent) light microscopic appearance of renal angiomyoadenomatous tumor/clear cell papillary renal cell carcinoma (RAT/CCPRCC) without fulfilling the criteria for these tumors. All but 1 case predominantly (75%-95% extent) showed histopathologic features of conventional clear cell renal cell carcinoma. In 5 of 7 cases with mostly conventional clear renal cell carcinoma (CRCC) morphology, a diagnosis of CRCC was supported by the molecular genetic findings (presence of von Hippel-Lindau tumor suppressor [VHL] mutation and/or VHL promoter methylation and/or loss of heterozygosity [LOH] for 3p). Of the other 2 cases with predominantly characteristic CRCC morphology, 1 tumor did not reveal any VHL mutation, VHL promoter methylation, or LOH for 3p, and both chromosomes 7 and 17 were disomic, whereas the other tumor displayed polysomy for chromosomes 7 and 17 and no VHL mutation, VHL promoter methylation, or LOH for 3p. One tumor was composed primarily (95%) of distinctly RAT/CCPRCC-like morphology, and this tumor harbored a VHL mutation and displayed polysomy for chromosomes 7 and 17. Of the 5 cases with both histomorphologic features and molecular genetic findings of CRCC, we detected significant immunoreactivity for α-methylacyl-CoA racemase in 2 cases and strong diffuse immunopositivity for cytokeratin 7 in 3 cases. Despite the combination of positivity for α-methylacyl-CoA racemase and cytokeratin 7 in 2 cases, there was nothing to suggest of the possibility of a conventional papillary renal cell carcinoma with a predominance of clear cells.

  20. Tumor associated macrophage expressing CD204 is associated with tumor aggressiveness of esophageal squamous cell carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Shigeoka, Manabu; Urakawa, Naoki; Nakamura, Tetsu; Nishio, Mari; Watajima, Taketo; Kuroda, Daisuke; Komori, Takahide; Kakeji, Yoshihiro; Semba, Shuho; Yokozaki, Hiroshi

    2013-08-01

    Tumor associated macrophages (TAMs) are the most abundant cancer stromal cells educated by tumor microenvironment to acquire trophic functions facilitating angiogenesis, matrix breakdown and cancer cell motility. Tumor associated macrophages have anti-inflammatory properties or "alternatively" activated (M2) phenotype expressing CD204 and/or CD163. To know the role of TAMs in the growth and progression of esophageal squamous cell carcinomas (ESCCs), we calculated intratumoral CD204, CD163 or CD68 expressing macrophage count (MϕC) and CD34-positive microvessel density (MVD) by immunohistochemistry in 70 cases of surgically resected ESCCs and compared them with the clinicopathological factors and prognosis of patients. MϕC had positive linear association with MVD. High CD204(+) MϕC were significantly correlated with more malignant phenotypes including depth of tumor invasion, lymph and blood vessel invasion, lymph node metastasis as well as clinical stages. On the other hand, CD163(+) MϕC did not associate with these clinicopathological factors with the exception of depth of tumor invasion and blood vessel invasion. Patients with high CD204(+) MϕC ESCCs showed poor disease-free survival (P = 0.021). Conditioned media of five ESCC cell lines (TE-8, -9, -10, -11 and -15) induced mRNA as well as protein expression of CD204 but not of CD163 with upregulation of vascular endothelial growth factor-A mRNA in TPA treated human acute monocytic leukemia cell line THP-1. These results overall indicate that CD204 is a useful marker for TAMs contributing to the angiogenesis, progression and prognosis of ESCCs whose specific tumor microenvironment may educate macrophages to be CD204(+) M2 TAMs.

  1. Immunohistochemical localization of endothelial cell markers in solitary fibrous tumor.

    PubMed

    Sawada, Namie; Ishiwata, Toshiyuki; Naito, Zenya; Maeda, Shotaro; Sugisaki, Yuichi; Asano, Goro

    2002-12-01

    Solitary fibrous tumor (SFT) is an uncommon tumor first reported in the pleura, but recently described in other tissues. CD34, which is expressed in hematopoietic stem cells, endothelial progenitor cells and vascular endothelial cells, is observed in most SFT and some investigators believe that its expression is a definitive marker of this tumor. In the present study, the expression of vascular endothelial cell markers, such as vascular endothelial growth factor receptor (VEGFR)-1 (flt-1), VEGFR-2 (flk-1/KDR), Tie-2 and c-Met, was examined in SFT to clarify the relationship between SFT and endothelial cells. By immunohistochemical staining of tumor cells from 26 patients, VEGFR-1 was detected in 24 (92%), VEGFR-2 in five (19%), Tie-2 in 14 (54%), and c-Met, a specific receptor of hepatocyte growth factor (HGF) in 23 patients (88%). Furthermore, VEGFR-3 (flt-4) immunoreactivity was detected in eight of 26 patients (31%). In contrast, VEGF, VEGF-C and HGF, which are ligands for the receptors, were not localized in the SFT cells. These findings indicate that most SFT may closely relate to vascular or lymphatic endothelial cells and the endothelial growth factors may contribute to the growth of SFT in a paracrine manner.

  2. Curcumin targets fibroblast–tumor cell interactions in oral squamous cell carcinoma

    SciTech Connect

    Dudás, József; Fullár, Alexandra; Romani, Angela; Pritz, Christian; Kovalszky, Ilona; Hans Schartinger, Volker; Mathias Sprinzl, Georg; Riechelmann, Herbert

    2013-04-01

    Co-culture of periodontal ligament fibroblasts (PDLs) and SCC-25 oral squamous carcinoma cells (OSCC) results in conversion of PDLs into carcinoma-associated fibroblasts (CAFs) and induces epithelial-to mesenchymal transition (EMT) of OSCC tumor cells. We hypothesized that Curcumin targets this dynamic mutual interaction between CAFs and tumor cells. Normal and 2 μM Curcumin-treated co-culture were performed for 4 days, followed by analysis of tumor cell invasivity, mRNA/protein expression of EMT-markers and mediators, activity measure of matrix metalloproteinase 9 (MMP-9), and western blot analysis of signal transduction in tumor cells and fibroblasts. In Curcumin-treated co-culture, in tumor cells, the levels of nuclear factor κB (NFκBα) and early response kinase (ERK)—decreased, in fibroblasts, integrin αv protein synthesis decreased compared to corresponding cells in normal co-culture. The signal modulatory changes induced by Curcumin caused decreased release of EMT-mediators in CAFs and reversal of EMT in tumor cells, which was associated with decreased invasion. These data confirm the palliative potential of Curcumin in clinical application. - Graphical abstract: Co-culture of periodontal ligament fibroblasts (PDLs) and SCC-25 oral squamous carcinoma cells (OSCC) results in conversion of PDLs into carcinoma-associated fibroblasts (CAFs) and induces epithelial-to mesenchymal transition (EMT) of tumor cells. Curcumin targets this dynamic mutual interaction between CAFs and tumor cells by inhibiting the production of EMT mediators in CAFs and by modification of intracellular signaling in tumor cells. This causes less invasivity and reversal of EMT in tumor cells. Highlights: ► Curcumin targets tumor–fibroblast interaction in head and neck cancer. ► Curcumin suppresses mediators of epithelial–mesenchymal transition. ► Curcumin decreases the invasivity of tumor cells.

  3. Clustering of brain tumor cells: a first step for understanding tumor recurrence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khain, Evgeniy; Nowicki, M. O.; Chiocca, E. A.; Lawler, S. E.; Schneider-Mizell, C. M.; Sander, L. M.

    2012-02-01

    Glioblastoma tumors are highly invasive; therefore the overall prognosis of patients remains poor, despite major improvements in treatment techniques. Cancer cells detach from the inner tumor core and actively migrate away [1]; eventually these invasive cells might form clusters, which can develop to recurrent tumors. In vitro experiments in collagen gel [1] followed the clustering dynamics of different glioma cell lines. Based on the experimental data, we formulated a stochastic model for cell dynamics, which identified two mechanisms of clustering. First, there is a critical value of the strength of adhesion; above the threshold, large clusters grow from a homogeneous suspension of cells; below it, the system remains homogeneous, similarly to the ordinary phase separation. Second, when cells form a cluster, there is evidence that their proliferation rate increases. We confirmed the theoretical predictions in a separate cell migration experiment on a substrate and found that both mechanisms are crucial for cluster formation and growth [2]. In addition to their medical importance, these phenomena present exciting examples of pattern formation and collective cell behavior in intrinsically non-equilibrium systems [3]. [4pt] [1] A. M. Stein et al, Biophys. J., 92, 356 (2007). [0pt] [2] E. Khain et al, EPL 88, 28006 (2009). [0pt] [3] E. Khain et al, Phys. Rev. E. 83, 031920 (2011).

  4. Dynamic Fluctuation of Circulating Tumor Cells during Cancer Progression.

    PubMed

    Juratli, Mazen A; Sarimollaoglu, Mustafa; Nedosekin, Dmitry A; Melerzanov, Alexander V; Zharov, Vladimir P; Galanzha, Ekaterina I

    2014-01-01

    Circulating tumor cells (CTCs) are a promising diagnostic and prognostic biomarker for metastatic tumors. We demonstrate that CTCs' diagnostic value might be increased through real-time monitoring of CTC dynamics. Using preclinical animal models of breast cancer and melanoma and in vivo flow cytometry with photoacoustic and fluorescence detection schematics, we show that CTC count does not always correlate with the primary tumor size. Individual analysis elucidated many cases where the highest level of CTCs was detected before the primary tumor starts progressing. This phenomenon could be attributed to aggressive tumors developing from cancer stem cells. Furthermore, real-time continuous monitoring of CTCs reveals that they occur at highly variable rates in a detection point over a period of time (e.g., a range of 0-54 CTCs per 5 min). These same fluctuations in CTC numbers were observed in vivo in epithelial and non-epithelial metastatic tumors, in different stages of tumor progression, and in different vessels. These temporal CTC fluctuations can explain false negative results of a one-time snapshot test in humans. Indeed, we observed wide variations in the number of CTCs in subsequent blood samples taken from the same metastatic melanoma patient, with some samples being CTC-free. If these phenomena are confirmed in our ongoing in vivo clinical trials, this could support a personalized strategy of CTC monitoring for cancer patients. PMID:24434542

  5. Modern Interpretation of Giant Cell Tumor of Bone: Predominantly Osteoclastogenic Stromal Tumor

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Yuhree; Nizami, Saqib; Goto, Hana

    2012-01-01

    Owing to striking features of numerous multinucleated cells and bone destruction, giant cell tumor (GCT) of bone, often called as osteoclastoma, has drawn major attractions from orthopaedic surgeons, pathologists, and radiologists. The name GCT or osteoclastoma gives a false impression of a tumor comprising of proliferating osteoclasts or osteoclast precursors. The underlying mechanisms for excessive osteoclastogenesis are intriguing and GCT has served as an exciting disease model representing a paradigm of osteoclastogenesis for bone biologists. The modern interpretation of GCT is predominantly osteoclastogenic stromal cell tumors of mesenchymal origin. A diverse array of inflammatory cytokines and chemokines disrupts osteoblastic differentiation and promotes the formation of excessive multi-nucleated osteoclastic cells. Pro-osteoclastogenic cytokines such as receptor activator of nuclear factor kappa-B ligand (RANKL), interleukin (IL)-6, and tumor necrosis factor (TNF) as well as monocyte-recruiting chemokines such as stromal cell-derived factor-1 (SDF-1) and monocyte chemoattractant protein (MCP)-1 participate in unfavorable osteoclastogenesis and bone destruction. This model represents a self-sufficient osteoclastogenic paracrine loop in a localized area. Consistent with this paradigm, a recombinant RANK-Fc protein and bisphosphonates are currently being tried for GCT treatment in addition to surgical excision and conventional topical adjuvant therapies. PMID:22662295

  6. Reactive Oxygen Species in Normal and Tumor Stem Cells

    PubMed Central

    Zhou, Daohong; Shao, Lijian; Spitz, Douglas R.

    2014-01-01

    Reactive oxygen species (ROS) play an important role in determining the fate of normal stem cells. Low levels of ROS are required for stem cells to maintain quiescence and self-renewal. Increases in ROS production cause stem cell proliferation/differentiation, senescence, and apoptosis in a dose-dependent manner, leading to their exhaustion. Therefore, the production of ROS in stem cells is tightly regulated to ensure that they have the ability to maintain tissue homeostasis and repair damaged tissues for the life span of an organism. In this chapter, we discuss how the production of ROS in normal stem cells is regulated by various intrinsic and extrinsic factors and how the fate of these cells is altered by the dysregulation of ROS production under various pathological conditions. In addition, the implications of the aberrant production of ROS by tumor stem cells for tumor progression and treatment are also discussed. PMID:24974178

  7. Tumor homing cell penetrating peptide decorated nanoparticles used for enhancing tumor targeting delivery and therapy.

    PubMed

    Gao, Huile; Zhang, Qianyu; Yang, Yuting; Jiang, Xinguo; He, Qin

    2015-01-15

    Specific targeting ability and good tissue penetration are two critical requirements for tumor targeted delivery systems. Systematical selected peptides from a library may meet these two requirements. RLW was such a cell penetrating peptide that could specifically target to non-small cell lung cancer cells (A549). In this study, RLW was linked onto nanoparticles (RNPs) and then the RNPs were used for lung cancer targeting delivery. A traditional cell penetrating peptide, R8 (RRRRRRRR), was used as control. In vitro cellular uptake study demonstrated that modification with RLW specifically enhanced the uptake by A549 cells rather than human umbilical vein endothelial cells, while modification with R8 increased the uptake by both cells. Furthermore, the modification with RLW specifically elevated the penetration into A549 tumor spheroids rather than glioma cell (U87, used as in vivo control) spheroids. And the in vivo imaging further demonstrated RNPs could target to A549 xenografts rather than U87 xenografts. Importantly, the distribution of RNPs in normal organs was approximately the same as that of unmodified nanoparticles. However, R8 modified nanoparticles elevated the distribution in almost all the tissues. These results demonstrated that RLW was superior in A549 tumor targeted delivery. After loaded with docetaxel, an anti-microtube agent, different formulations could effectively induce the A549 cell apoptosis, and inhibit the growth of A549 spheroids in vitro. While in vivo, RNPs displayed the best antitumor effect. The tumor volume was significantly lower than other groups, which was only 33.3% as that of saline group. In conclusion, in vitro RLW could specifically target to A549 cells and enhance the cytotoxicity of docetaxel. In vivo, RLW could significantly enhance the A549 xenografts targeting delivery and led to improved antitumor effect.

  8. Cystic trophoblastic tumor: a nonaggressive lesion in postchemotherapy resections of patients with testicular germ cell tumors.

    PubMed

    Ulbright, Thomas M; Henley, John D; Cummings, Oscar W; Foster, Richard S; Cheng, Liang

    2004-09-01

    Cystic trophoblastic tumor (CTT) is an uncommon lesion that is usually seen after chemotherapy in patients with testicular germ cell tumors. Its clinical significance has not been well studied. We identified 17 patients with CTT in retroperitoneal lymph node dissections (RPLNDs) after cisplatin-based chemotherapy for testicular germ cell tumors. None had other forms of persistent germ cell tumor except for teratoma, and no patient received additional chemotherapy after RPLND. At the time of RPLND, 7 patients were known to have had normal serum levels of beta-subunit of human chorionic gonadotropin (beta-hCG), whereas 5 had relatively mild elevations (1.6-165 mIU/mL, median, 8.0 mIU/mL). The CTTs consisted of circumscribed, small cysts, usually multifocal, lined by mostly mononucleated trophoblast cells with abundant eosinophilic cytoplasm, often with smudged nuclei and showing only infrequent mitotic figures. Although the epithelial lining was often stratified to several layers in thickness or formed intracystic papillary tufts, solid proliferations of trophoblast cells within the stroma were absent, as were clearly biphasic admixtures of mononucleated and multinucleated trophoblast cells. The cysts were either empty or contained fibrinoid material and were set in a hypocellular, fibrous stroma with adjacent teratoma. Stains for hCG highlighted rare cells. On follow-up of 15 patients, 11 were disease free (mean, 80 months). Three recurred with serum alpha-fetoprotein elevations at 25, 31, and 107 months, respectively, and one with beta-hCG elevation at 2 months. The latter patient, however, also had unresected mediastinal tumor postchemotherapy. We conclude that the finding of CTT in postchemotherapy resections does not warrant additional chemotherapy. Its clinical significance appears similar to that of residual teratoma.

  9. Gonadal vein tumor thrombosis due to renal cell carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Haghighatkhah, Hamidreza; Karimi, Mohammad Ali; Taheri, Morteza Sanei

    2015-01-01

    Renal cell carcinoma (RCC) had a tendency to extend into the renal vein and inferior vena cava, while extension into the gonadal vein has been rarely reported. Gonadal vein tumor thrombosis appears as an enhancing filling defect within the dilated gonadal vein anterior to the psoas muscle and shows an enhancement pattern identical to that of the original tumor. The possibility of gonadal vein thrombosis should be kept in mind when looking at an imaging study of patients with RCC.

  10. Tumors skew endothelial cells to disrupt NK cell, T-cell and macrophage functions

    PubMed Central

    Mulligan, Jennifer K.; Lathers, Deanne M. R.

    2012-01-01

    Introduction Patients and mice with solid tumors, such as Lewis lung carcinoma (LLC), have defects in functions of immune effector cells. Endothelial cells, a component of the tumor vasculature, are potential regulators of immune cell functions. Therefore, these studies examined the impact of exposure to LLC tumor on the ability of endothelial cells to modulate immune cell functions. Materials and methods Endothelial cells were pre-treated with LLC tumor-conditioned medium (EndoT-sup) for 24 h. Control endothelial cells that were exposed to medium (EndoMedia) or epithelial cell-conditioned medium (EndoEpi-sup). After the initial 24 h incubation, endothelial cells were washed and fresh media was added. Cells were allowed to incubate for an additional 24 h. Supernatants from EndoMedia, EndoEpi-sup or EndoT-sup were collected and assayed for immune modulatory products and for immune modulatory activity. Results Supernatant from EndoT-sup contained increased levels of PGE2, IL-6 and VEGF as compared to EndoMedia and EndoEpi-sup controls. NK cell activity, as measured by TNF-α and IFN-γ secretion, was increased following exposure to media conditioned by EndoMedia and EndoEpi-sup. Exposure of NK cells to supernatants of EndoT-sup, also increases TNF-α and IFN-γ secretion, but to a lesser extent than by EndoMedia and EndoEpi-sup. Examination of macrophage functions demonstrated that supernatant from EndoT-sup decreased microbead phagocytosis and increased production of the immune suppressive mediators, IL-10 and PGE2. Lastly, T-cell responses to stimulation with anti-CD3 in the presence of supernatants from EndoT-sup were examined. IFN-γ production by CD8+ T-cells was reduced after exposure to EndoT-sup-conditioned medium, as compared to cells treatments with medium or control conditioned medium. Production of IFN-γ by CD4+ T-cells exposed to EndoT-sup was not altered. Conclusions Taken together, these studies demonstrate that tumors skew endothelial cells to

  11. Mechanical Disruption of Tumors by Iron Particles and Magnetic Field Application Results in Increased Anti-Tumor Immune Responses

    PubMed Central

    Bouchlaka, Myriam N.; Sckisel, Gail D.; Wilkins, Danice; Maverakis, Emanual; Monjazeb, Arta M.; Fung, Maxwell; Welniak, Lisbeth; Redelman, Doug; Fuchs, Alan; Evrensel, Cahit A.; Murphy, William J.

    2012-01-01

    The primary tumor represents a potential source of antigens for priming immune responses for disseminated disease. Current means of debulking tumors involves the use of cytoreductive conditioning that impairs immune cells or removal by surgery. We hypothesized that activation of the immune system could occur through the localized release of tumor antigens and induction of tumor death due to physical disruption of tumor architecture and destruction of the primary tumor in situ. This was accomplished by intratumor injection of magneto-rheological fluid (MRF) consisting of iron microparticles, in Balb/c mice bearing orthotopic 4T1 breast cancer, followed by local application of a magnetic field resulting in immediate coalescence of the particles, tumor cell death, slower growth of primary tumors as well as decreased tumor progression in distant sites and metastatic spread. This treatment was associated with increased activation of DCs in the draining lymph nodes and recruitment of both DCs and CD8(+)T cells to the tumor. The particles remained within the tumor and no toxicities were observed. The immune induction observed was significantly greater compared to cryoablation. Further anti-tumor effects were observed when MRF/magnet therapy was combined with systemic low dose immunotherapy. Thus, mechanical disruption of the primary tumor with MRF/magnetic field application represents a novel means to induce systemic immune activation in cancer. PMID:23133545

  12. Microvascular Transport and Tumor Cell Adhesion in the Microcirculation

    PubMed Central

    Fu, Bingmei M.; Liu, Yang

    2016-01-01

    One critical step in tumor metastasis is tumor cell adhesion to the endothelium forming the microvessel wall. Understanding this step may lead to new therapeutic concepts for tumor metastasis. Vascular endothelium forming the microvessel wall and the glycocalyx layer at its surface are the principal barriers to, and regulators of the material exchange between circulating blood and body tissues. The cleft between adjacent ECs (interendothelial cleft) is the principal pathway for water and solutes transport through the microvessel wall in health. It is also suggested to be the pathway for high molecular weight plasma proteins, leukocytes and tumor cells across microvessel walls in disease. Thus the first part of the review introduced the mathematical models for water and solutes transport through the interendothelial cleft. These models, combined with the experimental results from in vivo animal studies and electron microscopic observations, are used to evaluate the role of the endothelial surface glycocalyx, the junction strand geometry in the interendothelial cleft, and the surrounding extracellular matrix and tissue cells, as the determinants of microvascular transport. The second part of the review demonstrated how the microvascular permeability, hydrodynamic factors, microvascular geometry and cell adhesion molecules affect tumor cell adhesion in the microcirculation. PMID:22476895

  13. [Hormonal therapy of advanced or relapsed ovarian granulosa cell tumor].

    PubMed

    Sun, H; Bai, P

    2016-07-01

    Ovarian granulosa cell tumor is a rare gynecologic malignancy with hormonal activity. Surgical excision is the standard treatment for this disease. Most patients present excellent short term prognosis, however, late relapse often occurs, even after many years. Viable treatments of advanced or relapsed granulosa cell tumor are still limited, and the optimal therapy method has not been established. Compared with chemotherapy and radiotherapy, hormonal therapy is a well-tolerated treatment which can be administrated over a long period of time without serious side effects, and the combined application of hormones may achieve a better outcome. Therefore, hormonal therapy has been suggested as a potential treatment option for patients with advanced or relapsed granulosa cell tumor, and to extend the tumor-free interval and attenuate the disease progression. Future researches should be focused on the identification of the hormonal therapy which may provide the greatest clinical benefit, comparing and analyzing the effects of different combined therapeutic regimens of hormone drugs, and on the synthesis of drugs highly activating estrogen receptor β expressed in the granulosa cell tumor cells. PMID:27531259

  14. Correlation of proliferative and clonogenic tumor cells in multiple myeloma

    SciTech Connect

    Karp, J.E.; Burke, P.J.; Saylor, P.L.; Humphrey, R.L.

    1984-09-01

    To expand on the findings from previous clinical trials that the growth of residual tumor is increased at a predictable time following initial drug administration, malignant plasma cells from bone marrows of patients with multiple myeloma (MM) were examined for changes in proliferation and clonogenicity induced in vivo by cyclophosphamide and in vitro by drug-induced humoral stimulatory activity. Peak plasma cell (/sup 3/H)thymidine labeling index (LI) occurred predictably following drug and paralleled changes in agar colony formation by marrow cells obtained during therapy. Colony-forming capacity of pretreatment MM marrow populations was enhanced when those cells were cultured with humoral stimulatory activity, similar to the increased colony formation detected in Day 9 postcyclophosphamide marrows at the time of peak plasma cell LI. To further define a relationship between proliferative plasma cells and colony-forming tumor cells, MM marrows were fractionated by sedimentation on an isokinetic gradient. Enrichment of a proliferative tumor cell cohort was achieved, evidenced by (/sup 3/H)thymidine LI. Colony-forming cells were also enriched by isokinetic gradient sedimentation, and agar colony formation by MM marrow cell fractions correlated with the kinetic characteristics of the isolated subpopulations. These studies of whole and fractionated human MM marrow cell populations suggest that the kinetically active cells which are induced to proliferate in vivo and in vitro are closely related to the clonogenic tumor cells which produce colonies in agar and which, like those cells measured by (/sup 3/H)thymidine LI, respond to growth stimulation by drug-induced humoral stimulatory activity.

  15. T Cells as Antigen Carriers for Anti-tumor Vaccination.

    PubMed

    Traversari, Catia; Russo, Vincenzo

    2016-01-01

    The exploitation of the physiologic processing and presenting machinery of dendritic cells (DCs) by in vivo loading of tumor-associated antigens may improve the immunogenic potential and clinical efficacy of DC-based cancer vaccines. The approach developed by our group was based on the clinical observation that some patients treated with the infusion of donor lymphocytes transduced to express the HSV-TK suicide gene for relapse of hematologic malignancies, after allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation, developed a T cell-mediated immune response specifically directed against the HSV-TK gene product.We demonstrated that lymphocytes genetically modified to express HSV-TK as well as self/tumor antigens, acting as antigen carriers, efficiently target DCs in vivo in tumor-bearing mice. The infusion of TRP-2-transduced lymphocytes induced the establishment of protective immunity and long-term memory in tumor-bearing mice by cross-presentation of the antigen mediated by the CD11c(+)CD8a(+) DCs subset. A similar approach was applied in a clinical setting. Ten patients affected by MAGE-3(+) metastatic melanoma were treated with autologous lymphocytes retrovirally transduced to express the MAGE-3 tumor antigen. In three patients, the treatment led to the increase of MAGE-3 specific CD8+ and CD4+ effectors and the development of long-term memory, which ultimately correlated with a favorable clinical outcome. Transduced lymphocytes represent an efficient way for in vivo loading of tumor-associated antigens of DCs.

  16. Electrogene therapy with interleukin-12 in canine mast cell tumors

    PubMed Central

    Pavlin, Darja; Cemazar, Maja; Cör, Andrej; Sersa, Gregor; Pogacnik, Azra; Tozon, Natasa

    2011-01-01

    Background Mast cell tumors (MCT) are the most common malignant cutaneous tumors in dogs with extremely variable biological behaviour. Different treatment approaches can be used in canine cutaneous MCT, with surgical excision being the treatment of choice. In this study, electrogene therapy (EGT) as a new therapeutic approach to canine MCTs, was established. Materials and methods. Eight dogs with a total of eleven cutaneous MCTs were treated with intratumoral EGT using DNA plasmid encoding human interleukin-12 (IL-12). The local response to the therapy was evaluated by repeated measurements of tumor size and histological examination of treated tumors. A possible systemic response was assessed by determination of IL-12 and interferon- γ (IFN-γ) in patients’ sera. The occurence of side effects was monitored with weekly clinical examinations of treated animals and by performing basic bloodwork, consisting of the complete bloodcount and determination of selected biochemistry parameters. Results Intratumoral EGT with IL-12 elicits significant reduction of treated tumors’ size, ranging from 13% to 83% (median 50%) of the initial tumor volume. Additionally, a change in the histological structure of treated nodules was seen. There was a reduction in number of malignant mast cells and inflammatory cell infiltration of treated tumors. Systemic release of IL-12 in four patients was detected, without any noticeable local or systemic side effects. Conclusions These data suggest that intratumoral EGT with plasmid encoding IL-12 may be useful in the treatment of canine MCTs, exerting a local antitumor effect. PMID:22933932

  17. Identification of Novel Tumor-Associated Cell Surface Sialoglycoproteins in Human Glioblastoma Tumors Using Quantitative Proteomics

    PubMed Central

    Autelitano, François; Loyaux, Denis; Roudières, Sébastien; Déon, Catherine; Guette, Frédérique; Fabre, Philippe; Ping, Qinggong; Wang, Su; Auvergne, Romane; Badarinarayana, Vasudeo; Smith, Michael; Guillemot, Jean-Claude; Goldman, Steven A.; Natesan, Sridaran; Ferrara, Pascual; August, Paul

    2014-01-01

    Glioblastoma multiform (GBM) remains clinical indication with significant “unmet medical need”. Innovative new therapy to eliminate residual tumor cells and prevent tumor recurrences is critically needed for this deadly disease. A major challenge of GBM research has been the identification of novel molecular therapeutic targets and accurate diagnostic/prognostic biomarkers. Many of the current clinical therapeutic targets of immunotoxins and ligand-directed toxins for high-grade glioma (HGG) cells are surface sialylated glycoproteins. Therefore, methods that systematically and quantitatively analyze cell surface sialoglycoproteins in human clinical tumor samples would be useful for the identification of potential diagnostic markers and therapeutic targets for malignant gliomas. In this study, we used the bioorthogonal chemical reporter strategy (BOCR) in combination with label-free quantitative mass spectrometry (LFQ-MS) to characterize and accurately quantify the individual cell surface sialoproteome in human GBM tissues, in fetal, adult human astrocytes, and in human neural progenitor cells (NPCs). We identified and quantified a total of 843 proteins, including 801 glycoproteins. Among the 843 proteins, 606 (72%) are known cell surface or secreted glycoproteins, including 156 CD-antigens, all major classes of cell surface receptor proteins, transporters, and adhesion proteins. Our findings identified several known as well as new cell surface antigens whose expression is predominantly restricted to human GBM tumors as confirmed by microarray transcription profiling, quantitative RT-PCR and immunohistochemical staining. This report presents the comprehensive identification of new biomarkers and therapeutic targets for the treatment of malignant gliomas using quantitative sialoglycoproteomics with clinically relevant, patient derived primary glioma cells. PMID:25360666

  18. Regulation of Proliferation-Survival Decisions during Tumor Cell Hypoxia

    PubMed Central

    Schmaltz, Cornelius; Hardenbergh, Patricia Harrigan; Wells, Audrey; Fisher, David E.

    1998-01-01

    Hypoxia may influence tumor biology in paradoxically opposing ways: it is lethal as a direct stress trigger, yet hypoxic zones in solid tumors harbor viable cells which are particularly resistant to treatment and contribute importantly to disease relapse. To examine mechanisms underlying growth-survival decisions during hypoxia, we have compared genetically related transformed and untransformed fibroblast cells in vitro for proliferation, survival, clonogenicity, cell cycle, and p53 expression. Hypoxia induces G0/G1 arrest in primary fibroblasts but triggers apoptosis in oncogene-transformed derivatives. Unexpectedly, the mechanism of apoptosis is seen to require accumulated acidosis and is rescued by enhanced buffering. The direct effect of hypoxia under nonacidotic conditions is unique to transformed cells in that they override the hypoxic G0/G1 arrest of primary cells. Moreover, when uncoupled from acidosis, hypoxia enhances tumor cell viability and clonogenicity relative to normoxia. p53 is correspondingly upregulated in response to hypoxia-induced acidosis but downregulated during hypoxia without acidosis. Hypoxia may thus produce both treatment resistance and a growth advantage. Given strong evidence that hypoxic regions in solid tumors are often nonacidotic (G. Helmlinger, F. Yuan, M. Dellian, and R. K. Jain, Nat. Med. 3:177–182, 1997), this behavior may influence relapse and implicates such cells as potentially important therapeutic targets. PMID:9566903

  19. Interleukin-8 derived from local tissue-resident stromal cells promotes tumor cell invasion.

    PubMed

    Welte, Gabriel; Alt, Eckhard; Devarajan, Eswaran; Krishnappa, Srinivasalu; Jotzu, Constantin; Song, Yao-Hua

    2012-11-01

    The aim of this study is to evaluate the role of adipose tissue resident stromal cells on tumor cell invasion. Our data show that a subpopulation of adipose tissue derived stromal cells expressing Nestin, NG2, α-smooth muscle actin and PDGFR-α migrate toward the cancer cells. Microarray analysis revealed the upregulation of IL-8 in the migrated cells. We demonstrated that stromal cell derived IL-8 promote the invasion and the anchorage-independent growth of cancer cells. We conclude that human breast cancer cells attract a subpopulation of stromal cells that secrete IL-8 to promote tumor cell invasion in a paracrine fashion.

  20. Sheep stromal-epithelial cell interactions and ovarian tumor progression.

    PubMed

    Wang-Johanning, Feng; Huang, Miao; Liu, Jinsong; Rycaj, Kiera; Plummer, Joshua B; Barnhart, Kirstin F; Satterfield, William C; Johanning, Gary L

    2007-11-15

    Previous studies suggest that underlying ovarian stromal cues may regulate the ovarian surface epithelium. However, little is known about the interaction between ovarian stromal cells (OSC) and ovarian surface epithelial cells (OSE) under normal physiologic and pathologic conditions, largely because of the lack of a suitable model. In the current study, the OSC obtained from a sheep were immortalized with SV-40 T/t antigen (designated IOSC) and telomerase reverse transcriptase (designated IOSCH), followed by transfection with the oncogenic allele of the human H-Ras oncogene (designated IOSChR). IOSC cells transfected with H-Ras before immortalization with telomerase were designated IOSCRH. These sheep OSCs were used in both in vitro and in vivo model systems to evaluate mechanisms by which OSCs influence ovarian tumor progression. Normal sheep OSCs were found to inhibit the growth of SKOV3 and OVCAR3 human ovarian cancer cells, but not normal sheep OSE and human OSE cells (hOSE137 cells). In contrast, IOSChR and IOSCRH cells stimulated the growth of normal sheep and human OSE cells, as well as cancer cells. These findings were confirmed by in vivo studies. Our data provide compelling support for the importance of stromal-epithelial cell interactions during tumor progression, and show for the first time that immortalized and transformed OSCs promote growth of ovarian epithelial tumors.

  1. Filtration parameters influencing circulating tumor cell enrichment from whole blood.

    PubMed

    Coumans, Frank A W; van Dalum, Guus; Beck, Markus; Terstappen, Leon W M M

    2013-01-01

    Filtration can achieve circulating tumor cell (CTC) enrichment from blood. Key parameters such as flow-rate, applied pressure, and fixation, vary largely between assays and their influence is not well understood. Here, we used a filtration system, to monitor these parameters and determine their relationships. Whole blood, or its components, with and without spiked tumor cells were filtered through track-etched filters. We characterize cells passing through filter pores by their apparent viscosity; the viscosity of a fluid that would pass with the same flow. We measured a ratio of 5·10(4)∶10(2)∶1 for the apparent viscosities of 15 µm diameter MDA-231 cells, 10 µm white cells and 90 fl red cells passing through a 5 µm pore. Fixation increases the pressure needed to pass cells through 8 µm pores 25-fold and halves the recovery of spiked tumor cells. Filtration should be performed on unfixed samples at a pressure of ∼10 mbar for a 1 cm(2) track-etched filter with 5 µm pores. At this pressure MDA-231 cells move through the filter in 1 hour. If fixation is needed for sample preservation, a gentle fixative should be selected. The difference in apparent viscosity between CTC and blood cells is key in optimizing recovery of CTC.

  2. Filtration Parameters Influencing Circulating Tumor Cell Enrichment from Whole Blood

    PubMed Central

    Beck, Markus; Terstappen, Leon W. M. M.

    2013-01-01

    Filtration can achieve circulating tumor cell (CTC) enrichment from blood. Key parameters such as flow-rate, applied pressure, and fixation, vary largely between assays and their influence is not well understood. Here, we used a filtration system, to monitor these parameters and determine their relationships. Whole blood, or its components, with and without spiked tumor cells were filtered through track-etched filters. We characterize cells passing through filter pores by their apparent viscosity; the viscosity of a fluid that would pass with the same flow. We measured a ratio of 5·104∶102∶1 for the apparent viscosities of 15 µm diameter MDA-231 cells, 10 µm white cells and 90 fl red cells passing through a 5 µm pore. Fixation increases the pressure needed to pass cells through 8 µm pores 25-fold and halves the recovery of spiked tumor cells. Filtration should be performed on unfixed samples at a pressure of ∼10 mbar for a 1 cm2 track-etched filter with 5 µm pores. At this pressure MDA-231 cells move through the filter in 1 hour. If fixation is needed for sample preservation, a gentle fixative should be selected. The difference in apparent viscosity between CTC and blood cells is key in optimizing recovery of CTC. PMID:23658615

  3. Capacity of tumor necrosis factor to augment lymphocyte-mediated tumor cell lysis of malignant mesothelioma

    SciTech Connect

    Bowman, R.V.; Manning, L.S.; Davis, M.R.; Robinson, B.W. )

    1991-01-01

    Recombinant human tumor necrosis factor (rHuTNF) was evaluated both for direct anti-tumor action against human malignant mesothelioma and for its capacity to augment the generation and lytic phases of lymphocyte-mediated cytotoxicity against this tumor. rHuTNF was directly toxic by MTT assay to one of two mesothelioma cell lines evaluated, but had no effect on susceptibility to subsequent lymphocyte-mediated lysis of either line. TNF alone was incapable of generating anti-mesothelioma lymphokine-activated killer cell (LAK) activity. Furthermore, it did not augment the degree or LAK activity produced by submaximal interleukin-2 (IL-2) concentrations nor did it augment lysis of mesothelioma cells by natural killer (NK) or LAK effector cells during the 4-hr 51chromium release cytolytic reaction. The studies also suggest that mesothelioma targets are less responsive to TNF plus submaximal IL-2 concentrations than the standard LAK sensitive target Daudi, raising the possibility that intermediate LAK sensitive tumors such as mesothelioma may require separate and specific evaluation in immunomodulation studies. This in vitro study indicates that use of low-dose rHuTNF and IL-2 is unlikely to be an effective substitute for high-dose IL-2 in generation and maintenance of LAK activity in adoptive immunotherapy for mesothelioma.

  4. Do Circulating Tumor Cells, Exosomes, and Circulating Tumor Nucleic Acids Have Clinical Utility?

    PubMed Central

    Gold, Bert; Cankovic, Milena; Furtado, Larissa V.; Meier, Frederick; Gocke, Christopher D.

    2016-01-01

    Diagnosing and screening for tumors through noninvasive means represent an important paradigm shift in precision medicine. In contrast to tissue biopsy, detection of circulating tumor cells (CTCs) and circulating tumor nucleic acids provides a minimally invasive method for predictive and prognostic marker detection. This allows early and serial assessment of metastatic disease, including follow-up during remission, characterization of treatment effects, and clonal evolution. Isolation and characterization of CTCs and circulating tumor DNA (ctDNA) are likely to improve cancer diagnosis, treatment, and minimal residual disease monitoring. However, more trials are required to validate the clinical utility of precise molecular markers for a variety of tumor types. This review focuses on the clinical utility of CTCs and ctDNA testing in patients with solid tumors, including somatic and epigenetic alterations that can be detected. A comparison of methods used to isolate and detect CTCs and some of the intricacies of the characterization of the ctDNA are also provided. PMID:25908243

  5. Autologous hematopoietic stem cell transplantation for pediatric solid tumors.

    PubMed

    Hale, Gregory A

    2005-10-01

    While advances in the treatment of pediatric cancers have increased cure rates, children with metastatic or recurrent solid tumors have a dismal prognosis despite initial transient responses to therapy. Autologous hematopoietic stem cell transplantation takes advantage of the steep dose-response relationship observed with many chemotherapeutic agents. While clearly demonstrated to improve outcomes in patients with metastatic neuroblastoma, autologous hematopoietic stem cell transplantation is also frequently used to treat patients with other high-risk diseases such as Ewing sarcoma, osteosarcoma, rhabdomyosarcoma, Wilms' tumor, retinoblastoma, germ cell tumors, lymphomas and brain tumors. Most published experience consists of retrospective, single-arm studies; randomized clinical trials are lacking, due in part to the rarity of pediatric cancers treatable by autologous hematopoietic stem cell transplantation. These published literature demonstrate that autologous hematopoietic stem cell transplantation results in most cases in equivalent or superior outcomes when compared with conventional therapies. However, patient heterogeneity, patient selection, graft characteristics and processing and the varied conditioning regimens are additional factors to consider. Since the inception of autologous hematopoietic stem cell transplantation, regimen-related toxicity has markedly decreased and the vast majority of treatment failures are now due to disease recurrence. Prospective clinical trials are needed to identify specific high-risk patient populations, with randomization (when possible) to compare outcomes of patients undergoing autologous hematopoietic stem cell transplantation with those receiving standard therapy. In addition, investigators need to better define the role of autologous hematopoietic stem cell transplantation in these solid tumors, particularly in combination with other therapeutic modalities such as immunotherapy and novel cell processing methodologies.

  6. Cutaneous mast cell tumor (Mastocytoma): Cyto- histopathological and haematological investigations

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Cutaneous mast cell tumours (MCTs) are the most common skin tumours in dogs. Due to the prevalence of canine MCTs and the variable biologic behavior of this disease, accurate prognostication and a thorough understanding of MCT biology are critical for the treatment of this disease. A cytologic diagnosis of mast cell tumor with evidence of prior hemorrhage was made, and the masses were surgically removed. Cytological evaluation of fine-needle aspirates from the cutaneous mass from the axillary comprised many well-differentiated, highly granulated mast cells with moderate numbers of eosinophils. Nuclei were varied in size and shape with high nuclear’to’cytoplasmic ratio, prominent nucleoli, marked atypical and mitotic figures. Microscopically, mass consisted of sheets of neoplastic round cells that formed nonencapsulated nodules in the dermis and infiltrated into the adjacent dermal collagen, and also there was diffuse subcutis invasion of round to pleomorphic tumor cells. Tumor cells had moderate to abundant cytoplasm, round to ovoid nuclei with scattered chromatin, and mitotic figures. In this tumor, cytoplasmic granules showed atypical metachromasia. In addition, eosinophils were scattered among the mast cells at the periphery of the nodules. The presence of eosinophils and the observation, at high magnification, of cells with cytoplasmic metachromatic granules. Invasion of the deep subcutaneous fat or cutaneous muscles were a common feature of grade III tumour. Finally, a diagnosis of grade III cutaneous mast cell tumor was made. Virtual slides The virtual slide(s) of this article can be found here: http://www.diagnosticpathology.diagnomx.eu/vs/4755249151157024. PMID:24444100

  7. Epigenetics: a way to understand the origin and biology of testicular germ cell tumors.

    PubMed

    Okamoto, Keisei

    2012-06-01

    Testicular germ cell tumors are neoplasms carrying two unique features. First, testicular germ cell tumors have a pluripotential nature and show protean histology ranging from that of germ cells to embryonal and differentiated somatic cells. Therefore, testicular germ cell tumors are interesting resources positioned at a crossroad in developmental and neoplastic processes. The second unique feature of testicular germ cell tumors is their exquisite sensitivity to cisplatin-based chemotherapy. This review summarizes recent research progress in the epigenetics of testicular germ cell tumors in an attempt to explain the abovementioned biological and clinical characteristics of testicular germ cell tumors.

  8. Imatinib potentiates anti-tumor T cell responses in gastrointestinal stromal tumor through the inhibition of Ido

    PubMed Central

    Balachandran, Vinod P.; Cavnar, Michael J.; Zeng, Shan; Bamboat, Zubin M.; Ocuin, Lee M.; Obaid, Hebroon; Sorenson, Eric C.; Popow, Rachel; Ariyan, Charlotte; Rossi, Ferdinand; Besmer, Peter; Guo, Tianhua; Antonescu, Cristina R.; Taguchi, Takahiro; Yuan, Jianda; Wolchok, Jedd D.; Allison, James P.; DeMatteo, Ronald P.

    2012-01-01

    Imatinib mesylate targets mutated KIT oncoproteins in gastrointestinal stromal tumor (GIST) and achieves a clinical response in 80% of patients. The mechanism is believed to depend predominantly on the inhibition of KIT-driven signals for tumor cell survival and proliferation. Using a mouse model of spontaneous GIST, we found that the immune system contributes substantially to the anti-tumor effects of imatinib. Imatinib therapy activated CD8+ T cells and induced regulatory T cell (T reg) apoptosis within the tumor by reducing tumor cell expression of the immunosuppressive enzyme indoleamine 2,3-dioxygenase (Ido). Concurrent immunotherapy augmented the efficacy of imatinib in mouse GIST. In freshly obtained human GIST specimens, the T cell profile correlated with imatinib sensitivity and IDO expression. Thus, T cells are critical to the anti-tumor effects of imatinib in GIST and concomitant immunotherapy may further improve outcome in human cancers treated with targeted agents. PMID:21873989

  9. Cell biological mechanisms of multidrug resistance in tumors.

    PubMed

    Simon, S M; Schindler, M

    1994-04-26

    Multidrug resistance (MDR) is a generic term for the variety of strategies tumor cells use to evade the cytotoxic effects of anticancer drugs. MDR is characterized by a decreased sensitivity of tumor cells not only to the drug employed for chemotherapy but also to a broad spectrum of drugs with neither obvious structural homology nor common targets. This pleiotropic resistance is one of the major obstacles to the successful treatment of tumors. MDR may result from structural or functional changes at the plasma membrane or within the cytoplasm, cellular compartments, or nucleus. Molecular mechanisms of MDR are discussed in terms of modifications in detoxification and DNA repair pathways, changes in cellular sites of drug sequestration, decreases in drug-target affinity, synthesis of specific drug inhibitors within cells, altered or inappropriate targeting of proteins, and accelerated removal or secretion of drugs.

  10. [Tumor Cells and Micro-environment in Brain Metastases].

    PubMed

    Zhong, Wen; Hu, Chengping

    2016-09-20

    Improvements in survival and quality of life of patients with lung cancer had been achieved due to the progression of early diagnosis and precision medicine at recent years, however, until now, treatments targeted at lesions in central nervous system are far from satisfying, thus threatening livelihood of patients involved. After all, in the issue of prophylaxis and therapeutics of brain metastases, it is crucial to learn about the biological behavior of tumor cells in brain metastases and its mechanism underlying, and the hypothesis "seed and soil", that is, tumor cells would generate series of adaptive changes to fit in the new environment, is liable to help explain this process well. In this assay, we reviewed documents concerning tumor cells, brain micro-environments and their interactions in brain metastases, aiming to provide novel insight into the treatments of brain metastases. PMID:27666556

  11. Granular cell tumor in a child: An uncommon cutaneous presentation

    PubMed Central

    Daulatabad, Deepashree; Grover, Chander; Tanveer, Nadeem; Bansal, Divya

    2016-01-01

    Granular cell tumors (GCTs) are uncommon soft tissue tumors which present as papulonodular lesions and are often diagnosed histopathologically. These usually develop in adulthood and are considered to be of Schwann cell origin. Most of the lesions are benign, but malignant lesions with poor prognosis are known to occur. We report a case of GCT in a 9-year-old girl presenting as an isolated lesion simulating an acrochordon. The histopathological and immunohistochemical evaluation showing polygonal granular cells positive for S-100 and neuron-specific enolase, and negative for cytokeratin and desmin helped clinch the diagnosis. Complete excision under local anesthesia was done. The atypical clinical morphology and diagnostic histopathology of this uncommon entity are presented to aid the clinician in recognizing it. These tumors are mostly benign, rarely malignant, with the latter category having a poor prognosis. A near-complete excision is recommended in view of the minimal risk of malignant transformation. PMID:27730035

  12. Cell Biological Mechanisms of Multidrug Resistance in Tumors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Simon, Sanford M.; Schindler, Melvin

    1994-04-01

    Multidrug resistance (MDR) is a generic term for the variety of strategies tumor cells use to evade the cytotoxic effects of anticancer drugs. MDR is characterized by a decreased sensitivity of tumor cells not only to the drug employed for chemotherapy but also to a broad spectrum of drugs with neither obvious structural homology nor common targets. This pleotropic resistance is one of the major obstacles to the successful treatment of tumors. MDR may result from structural or functional changes at the plasma membrane or within the cytoplasm, cellular compartments, or nucleus. Molecular mechanisms of MDR are discussed in terms of modifications in detoxification and DNA repair pathways, changes in cellular sites of drug sequestration, decreases in drug-target affinity, synthesis of specific drug inhibitors within cells, altered or inappropriate targeting of proteins, and accelerated removal or secretion of drugs.

  13. Salvage Therapy for Patients With Germ Cell Tumor.

    PubMed

    Rashdan, Sawsan; Einhorn, Lawrence H

    2016-05-01

    The introduction of cisplatin combination chemotherapy, 40 years ago, transformed metastatic testicular germ cell tumors from an almost uniformly fatal disease into a model for a curable neoplasm. Before the era of platinum combination chemotherapy, the 5-year survival rate among men with metastatic testicular germ cell tumors was 5% to 10%. Currently, the 5-year survival rate is 80% for patients with metastatic disease and 95% overall. Despite the substantial advances in the treatment of germ cell tumors, 20% to 30% of patients will relapse after first-line chemotherapy and will require additional salvage therapies. Standard-dose or high-dose chemotherapy can cure ≤ 50% of these patients. Relapses after high-dose chemotherapy generally carry a poor prognosis; however, cure is still possible in a small percentage of patients by using further salvage chemotherapy or salvage surgery. PMID:27170693

  14. Characterization of DNA Methylation in Circulating Tumor Cells

    PubMed Central

    Pixberg, Constantin F.; Schulz, Wolfgang A.; Stoecklein, Nikolas H.; Neves, Rui P. L.

    2015-01-01

    Epigenetics contributes to molecular mechanisms leading to tumor cell transformation and systemic progression of cancer. However, the dynamics of epigenetic remodeling during metastasis remains unexplored. In this context, circulating tumor cells (CTCs) might enable a direct insight into epigenetic mechanisms relevant for metastasis by providing direct access to systemic cancer. CTCs can be used as prognostic markers in cancer patients and are regarded as potential metastatic precursor cells. However, despite substantial technical progress, the detection and molecular characterization of CTCs remain challenging, in particular the analysis of DNA methylation. As recent studies have started to address the epigenetic state of CTCs, we discuss here the potential of such investigations to elucidate mechanisms of metastasis and to develop tumor biomarkers. PMID:26506390

  15. Spectrum of germ cell tumors: from head to toe.

    PubMed

    Ueno, Teruko; Tanaka, Yumiko Oishi; Nagata, Michio; Tsunoda, Hajime; Anno, Izumi; Ishikawa, Shigemi; Kawai, Koji; Itai, Yuji

    2004-01-01

    Germ cell tumors (GCTs) occur most frequently in the gonads and are relatively rare in other sites, such as the pineal gland, neurohypophysis, mediastinum, and retroperitoneum. GCTs are thought to originate from primordial germ cells, which migrate to the primitive gonadal glands in the urogenital ridge. Extragonadal GCTs might also originate from these cells when the cells are sequestered during their migration. Pathologic subtypes of GCTs vary, and the prevalence of mixed tumors is high. These factors produce a diversity of radiologic findings and make prospective radiologic diagnosis difficult in many cases. However, similar radiologic findings have been observed in pathologically equivalent tumors in varying sites. Seminomas appear as uniformly solid, lobulated masses with fibrovascular septa that enhance intensely. Nonseminomatous GCTs appear as heterogeneous masses with areas of necrosis, hemorrhage, or cystic degeneration. Fat and calcifications are hallmarks of teratomas, most of which are benign. In immature teratomas, scattered fat and calcification within larger solid components are occasionally seen. These imaging characteristics reflect the pathologic features of each tumor, and histologically similar GCTs at varying sites have similar radiologic features. Knowledge of the pathologic appearances of GCTs and their corresponding radiologic appearances will allow radiologists to diagnose these tumors correctly. PMID:15026588

  16. Niche Appropriation by Drosophila Intestinal Stem Cell Tumors

    PubMed Central

    Patel, Parthive H.; Dutta, Devanjali; Edgar, Bruce A.

    2015-01-01

    Mutations that inhibit differentiation in stem cell lineages are a common early step in cancer development, but precisely how a loss of differentiation initiates tumorigenesis is unclear. We investigated Drosophila intestinal stem cell (ISC) tumors generated by suppressing Notch (N) signaling, which blocks differentiation. Notch-defective ISCs require stress-induced divisions for tumor initiation and an autocrine EGFR ligand, Spitz, during early tumor growth. Upon achieving a critical mass these tumors displace surrounding enterocytes, competing with them for basement membrane space and causing their detachment, extrusion and apoptosis. This loss of epithelial integrity induces JNK and Yki/YAP activity in enterocytes and, consequently, their expression of stress-dependent cytokines (Upd2, Upd3). These paracrine signals, normally used within the stem cell niche to trigger regeneration, propel tumor growth without the need for secondary mutations in growth signaling pathways. The appropriation of niche signaling by differentiation-defective stem cells may be a common mechanism of early tumorigenesis. PMID:26237646

  17. Microfluidic Device for Studying Tumor Cell Extravasation in Cancer Metastasis

    SciTech Connect

    Lin, Henry K; Thundat, Thomas George; Evans III, Boyd Mccutchen; Datar, Ram H; Reese, Benjamin E; Zheng, Siyang

    2010-01-01

    Metastasis is the process by which cancer spreads to form secondary tumors at downstream locations throughout the body. This uncontrolled spreading is the leading cause of death in patients with epithelial cancers and is the main reason that suppressing and targeting cancer has proven to be so challenging. Tumor cell extravasation is one of the key steps in cancer s progression towards a metastatic state. This occurs when circulating tumor cells found within the blood stream are able to transmigrate through the endothelium lining and basement membrane of the vasculature to form metastatic tumors at secondary sites within the body. Predicting the likelihood of this occurrence in patients, or being able to determine specific markers involved in this process could lead to preventative measures targeting these types of cancer; moreover, this may lead to the discovery of novel anti-metastatic drugs. We have developed a microfluidic device that has shown the extravasation of fluorescently labeled tumor cells across an endothelial cell lined membrane coated with matrigel followed by the formation of colonies. This device provides the advantages of combining a controlled environment, mimicking that found within the body, with real-time monitoring capabilities allowing for the study of these biomarkers and cellular interactions along with other potential mechanisms involved in the process of extravasation.

  18. Epigenetics, Nervous System Tumors, and Cancer Stem Cells

    PubMed Central

    Qureshi, Irfan A.; Mehler, Mark F.

    2011-01-01

    Recent advances have begun to elucidate how epigenetic regulatory mechanisms are responsible for establishing and maintaining cell identity during development and adult life and how the disruption of these processes is, not surprisingly, one of the hallmarks of cancer. In this review, we describe the major epigenetic mechanisms (i.e., DNA methylation, histone and chromatin modification, non-coding RNA deployment, RNA editing, and nuclear reorganization) and discuss the broad spectrum of epigenetic alterations that have been uncovered in pediatric and adult nervous system tumors. We also highlight emerging evidence that suggests epigenetic deregulation is a characteristic feature of so-called cancer stem cells (CSCs), which are thought to be present in a range of nervous system tumors and responsible for tumor maintenance, progression, treatment resistance, and recurrence. We believe that better understanding how epigenetic mechanisms operate in neural cells and identifying the etiologies and consequences of epigenetic deregulation in tumor cells and CSCs, in particular, are likely to promote the development of enhanced molecular diagnostics and more targeted and effective therapeutic agents for treating recalcitrant nervous system tumors. PMID:24212967

  19. Establishment of a rat nasal epithelial tumor cell line.

    PubMed

    Hood, A T; Currie, D; Garte, S J

    1987-04-01

    A new cell line designated NAS 2BL has been established from a rat nasal tumor induced by inhalation of the direct-acting carcinogen methylmethane sulfonate. The cells are epithelial in morphology, have a generation time of 34 h, require 10% fetal bovine serum for optimal growth, and exhibit keratinization at confluence. The karyotype is aneuploid, with several marker chromosomes, and the cells are transformed by the criterion of nude mouse tumorigenicity.

  20. T-cell-mediated suppression of anti-tumor immunity. An explanation for progressive growth of an immunogenic tumor

    PubMed Central

    1980-01-01

    The results of this paper are consistent with the hypothesis that progressive growth of the Meth A fibrosarcoma evokes the generation of a T-cell-mediated mechanism of immunosuppression that prevents this highly immunogenic tumor from being rejected by its immunocompetent host. It was shown that it is possible to cause the regression of large, established Meth A tumors by intravenous infusion of tumor- sensitized T cells from immune donors, but only if the tumors are growing in T-cell-deficient recipients. It was also shown that the adoptive T-cell-mediated regression of tumors in such recipients can be prevented by prior infusion of splenic T cells from T-cell-intact, tumor-bearing donors. The results leave little doubt that the presence of suppressor T cells in T-cell-intact, tumor-bearing mice is responsible for the loss of an earlier generated state of concomitant immunity, and for the inability of intravenously infused, sensitized T cells to cause tumor regression. Because the presence of suppressor T cells generated in response to the Meth A did not suppress the capacity of Meth A-bearing mice to generate and express immunity against a tumor allograft, it is obvious that they were not in a state of generalized immunosuppression. PMID:6444236

  1. Hedgehog signaling in myofibroblasts directly promotes prostate tumor cell growth†

    PubMed Central

    Domenech, Maribella; Bjerregaard, Robert; Bushman, Wade; Beebe, David J.

    2012-01-01

    Despite strong evidence for the involvement of the stroma in Hedgehog signaling, little is known about the identity of the stromal cells and the signaling mechanisms that mediate the growth promoting effect of Hh signaling. We developed an in vitro co-culture model using microchannel technology to examine the effect of paracrine Hh signaling on proliferation of prostate cancer cells. We show here that activation of Hh signaling in myofibroblasts is sufficient to accelerate tumor cell growth. This effect was independent of any direct effect of Hh ligand on tumor cells or other cellular components of the tumor stroma. Further, the trophic effect of Hh pathway activation in myofibroblasts does not require collaboration of other elements of the stroma or direct physical interaction with the cancer cells. By isolating the tropic effect of Hh pathway activation in prostate stroma, we have taken the first step toward identifying cell-specific mechanisms that mediate the effect of paracrine Hh signaling on tumor growth. PMID:22234342

  2. Thoughts about cancer stem cells in solid tumors.

    PubMed

    La Porta, Caterina Am

    2012-03-26

    Cancer chemotherapy efficacy is frequently impaired by either intrinsic or acquired tumor resistance. A fundamental problem in cancer research is identifying the cell type that is capable of sustaining neoplastic growth and its origin from normal tissue cells. In recent years, the cancer stem cell (CSC) theory has changed the classical view of tumor growth and therefore the therapeutic perspective. Overcoming intrinsic and acquired resistance of cancer stem/progenitor cells to current clinical treatments represents a major challenge in treating and curing the most aggressive and metastatic cancers. On the other hand, the identification of CSCs in vivo and in vitro relies on specific surface markers that should allow the sorting cancer cells into phenotypically distinct subpopulations. In the present review, recent papers published on CSCs in solid tumors (breast, prostate, brain and melanoma) are discussed, highlighting critical points such as the choice of markers to sort CSCs and mouse models to demonstrate that CSCs are able to replicate the original tumor. A discussion of the possible role of aldehyde dehydrogenase and CXCR6 biomarkers as signaling molecules in CSCs and normal stem cells is also discussed. The author believes that efforts have to be made to investigate the functional and biological properties of putative CSCs in cancer. Developing diagnostic/prognostic tools to follow cancer development is also a challenge. In this connection it would be useful to develop a multidisciplinary approach combining mathematics, physics and biology which merges experimental approaches and theory. Biological models alone are probably unable to resolve the problem completely.

  3. Dual targeted polymeric nanoparticles based on tumor endothelium and tumor cells for enhanced antitumor drug delivery.

    PubMed

    Gupta, Madhu; Chashoo, Gousia; Sharma, Parduman Raj; Saxena, Ajit Kumar; Gupta, Prem Narayan; Agrawal, Govind Prasad; Vyas, Suresh Prasad

    2014-03-01

    Some specific types of tumor cells and tumor endothelial cells represented CD13 proteins and act as receptors for Asn-Gly-Arg (NGR) motifs containing peptide. These CD13 receptors can be specifically recognized and bind through the specific sequence of cyclic NGR (cNGR) peptide and presented more affinity and specificity toward them. The cNGR peptide was conjugated to the poly(ethylene glycol) (PEG) terminal end in the poly(lactic-co-glycolic) acid PLGA-PEG block copolymer. Then, the ligand conjugated nanoparticles (cNGR-DNB-NPs) encapsulating docetaxel (DTX) were synthesized from preformed block copolymer by the emulsion/solvent evaporation method and characterized for different parameters. The various studies such as in vitro cytotoxicity, cell apoptosis, and cell cycle analysis presented the enhanced therapeutic potential of cNGR-DNB-NPs. The higher cellular uptake was also found in cNGR peptide anchored NPs into HUVEC and HT-1080 cells. However, free cNGR could inhibit receptor mediated intracellular uptake of NPs into both types of cells at 37 and 4 °C temperatures, revealing the involvement of receptor-mediated endocytosis. The in vivo biodistribution and antitumor efficacy studies indicated that targeted NPs have a higher therapeutic efficacy through targeting the tumor-specific site. Therefore, the study exhibited that cNGR-functionalized PEG-PLGA-NPs could be a promising approach for therapeutic applications to efficient antitumor drug delivery.

  4. Disrupting Hypoxia-Induced Bicarbonate Transport Acidifies Tumor Cells and Suppresses Tumor Growth.

    PubMed

    McIntyre, Alan; Hulikova, Alzbeta; Ledaki, Ioanna; Snell, Cameron; Singleton, Dean; Steers, Graham; Seden, Peter; Jones, Dylan; Bridges, Esther; Wigfield, Simon; Li, Ji-Liang; Russell, Angela; Swietach, Pawel; Harris, Adrian L

    2016-07-01

    Tumor hypoxia is associated clinically with therapeutic resistance and poor patient outcomes. One feature of tumor hypoxia is activated expression of carbonic anhydrase IX (CA9), a regulator of pH and tumor growth. In this study, we investigated the hypothesis that impeding the reuptake of bicarbonate produced extracellularly by CA9 could exacerbate the intracellular acidity produced by hypoxic conditions, perhaps compromising cell growth and viability as a result. In 8 of 10 cancer cell lines, we found that hypoxia induced the expression of at least one bicarbonate transporter. The most robust and frequent inductions were of the sodium-driven bicarbonate transporters SLC4A4 and SLC4A9, which rely upon both HIF1α and HIF2α activity for their expression. In cancer cell spheroids, SLC4A4 or SLC4A9 disruption by either genetic or pharmaceutical approaches acidified intracellular pH and reduced cell growth. Furthermore, treatment of spheroids with S0859, a small-molecule inhibitor of sodium-driven bicarbonate transporters, increased apoptosis in the cell lines tested. Finally, RNAi-mediated attenuation of SLC4A9 increased apoptosis in MDA-MB-231 breast cancer spheroids and dramatically reduced growth of MDA-MB-231 breast tumors or U87 gliomas in murine xenografts. Our findings suggest that disrupting pH homeostasis by blocking bicarbonate import might broadly relieve the common resistance of hypoxic tumors to anticancer therapy. Cancer Res; 76(13); 3744-55. ©2016 AACR. PMID:27197160

  5. Inhibition of tumor-cell attachment to extracellular matrix as a method for preventing tumor recurrence in a surgical wound.

    PubMed Central

    Whalen, G F; Ingber, D E

    1989-01-01

    Studies with four different transplantable murine tumors demonstrated that surgical instruments contaminated by contact with a tumor mass could produce tumors in a surgical wound. Eighty-seven per cent of mice with wounds made by invisibly contaminated scissors developed tumors. Irrigation with water did not prevent tumor growth. Before spilled tumor cells can invade and grow into a recurrence in the wound site, they must first attach to underlying extracellular matrix. We have devised a simple in vitro assay to identify inhibitors of tumor-cell attachment to develop therapeutic compounds that can prevent tumor-cell reimplantation. Various test compounds, including proteases (trypsin and Dispase), known modulators of matrix metabolism (proline analogues, cycloheximide, heparin, cortisone, cortexolone, and heparin-steroid combinations), large molecular weight polymers (agarose, dextran, polyethylene oxide), and synthetic fibronectin peptides were tested for their ability to inhibit mouse melanoma (B16-F10) cell attachment to gelatinized dishes. Most of these compounds had little or no effect on tumor-cell adhesion when cells were plated in serum-containing medium. However we identified three compounds that inhibited tumor-cell attachment in a reversible fashion: (1) a specific inhibitor of collagen deposition (L-azetidine-2-carboxylic acid); (2) a bacterial neutral protease (Dispase); and (3) synthetic fibronectin peptides that contained the arginine-glycine-asparate (RGD) sequence that is responsible for cell binding. Dispase and the RGD-containing peptides also inhibited cell implantation and prevented tumor formation in a surgical wound. We propose that inhibitors of attachment might be used either alone or with other biologic modifiers to prohibit implantation of free tumor cells at the time of surgery and thus, to prevent local tumor recurrence. PMID:2686568

  6. The microenvironment reprograms circuits in tumor cells

    PubMed Central

    Cai, Qingchun; Xu, Yan

    2015-01-01

    In the course of multistep oncogenesis, initially normal cells acquire several new functions that render them malignant. We have recently demonstrated that the peritoneal microenvironment promotes resistance to anoikis in ovarian cancer cells by reprogramming SRC/AKT/ERK signaling and metabolism. These findings have prognostic and therapeutic implications. PMID:27308400

  7. Human T Cell Crosstalk Is Induced by Tumor Membrane Transfer

    PubMed Central

    Uzana, Ronny; Eisenberg, Galit; Merims, Sharon; Frankenburg, Shoshana; Pato, Aviad; Yefenof, Eitan; Engelstein, Roni; Peretz, Tamar

    2015-01-01

    Trogocytosis is a contact-dependent unidirectional transfer of membrane fragments between immune effector cells and their targets, initially detected in T cells following interaction with professional antigen presenting cells (APC). Previously, we have demonstrated that trogocytosis also takes place between melanoma-specific cytotoxic T lymphocytes (CTLs) and their cognate tumors. In the present study, we took this finding a step further, focusing on the ability of melanoma membrane-imprinted CD8+ T cells to act as APCs (CD8+T-APCs). We demonstrate that, following trogocytosis, CD8+T-APCs directly present a variety of melanoma derived peptides to fraternal T cells with the same TCR specificity or to T cells with different TCRs. The resulting T cell-T cell immune synapse leads to (1) Activation of effector CTLs, as determined by proliferation, cytokine secretion and degranulation; (2) Fratricide (killing) of CD8+T-APCs by the activated CTLs. Thus, trogocytosis enables cross-reactivity among CD8+ T cells with interchanging roles of effectors and APCs. This dual function of tumor-reactive CTLs may hint at their ability to amplify or restrict reactivity against the tumor and participate in modulation of the anti-cancer immune response. PMID:25671577

  8. Tumor suppressors status in cancer cell line Encyclopedia.

    PubMed

    Sonkin, Dmitriy; Hassan, Mehedi; Murphy, Denis J; Tatarinova, Tatiana V

    2013-08-01

    Tumor suppressors play a major role in the etiology of human cancer, and typically achieve a tumor-promoting effect upon complete functional inactivation. Bi-allelic inactivation of tumor suppressors may occur through genetic mechanisms (such as loss of function mutation, copy number (CN) loss, or loss of heterozygosity (LOH)), epigenetic mechanisms (such as promoter methylation or histone modification), or a combination of the two. We report systematically derived status of 69 known or putative tumor suppressors, across 799 samples of the Cancer Cell Line Encyclopedia. In order to generate such resource we constructed a novel comprehensive computational framework for the assessment of tumor suppressor functional "status". This approach utilizes several orthogonal genomic data types, including mutation data, copy number, LOH and expression. Through correlation with additional data types (compound sensitivity and gene set activity) we show that this integrative method provides a more accurate assessment of tumor suppressor status than can be inferred by expression, copy number, or mutation alone. This approach has the potential for a more realistic assessment of tumor suppressor genes for both basic and translational oncology research.

  9. Alterations in cell cycle regulation in mouse skin tumors.

    PubMed

    Balasubramanian, S; Ahmad, N; Jeedigunta, S; Mukhtar, H

    1998-02-24

    The connection between cell cycle and cancer has become obvious in as much as it is considered that dysregulated cellular proliferation is a hallmark of cancer. In many studies, the dysregulation of the cyclin-cdk-cki network has been reported in experimental animal and human tumors, but to our knowledge a complete profile of alterations in regulatory molecules in any tumor model system is lacking. In this study, we assessed the expression of various cyclins, cyclin dependent kinases, and cyclin kinase inhibitors in chemically induced squamous papillomas in SENCAR mouse skin. Western blot analysis data showed a significant upregulation of cyclins (31, 6, 19, and 12 folds elevation for cyclin-D1, D2, E, and A, respectively) in tumors compared to the normal skin. The protein expression of the cdk (1, 2, and 4) was also found to be elevated in tumors compared to normal skin (33 fold for cdk1, 14 fold for cdk2, and 9 fold for cdk4). In tumors, compared to the normal skin, a significant increase in the level of protein expression of p27 and p57 (4 and 3 fold, respectively) was evident. In normal skin, p16 and p21 were not detectable but significant expression of these proteins was detected in tumors. Taken together, these data provide evidence that cell cycle deregulation in G1-phase is a critical event during the course of two stage skin carcinogenesis. This may have relevance to epithelial cancers in general.

  10. Let-7 Sensitizes KRAS Mutant Tumor Cells to Chemotherapy

    PubMed Central

    Dai, Xin; Jiang, Ying; Tan, Chalet

    2015-01-01

    KRAS is the most commonly mutated oncogene in human cancers and is associated with poor prognosis and drug resistance. Let-7 is a family of tumor suppressor microRNAs that are frequently suppressed in solid tumors, where KRAS mutations are highly prevalent. In this study, we investigated the potential use of let-7 as a chemosensitizer. We found that let-7b repletion selectively sensitized KRAS mutant tumor cells to the cytotoxicity of paclitaxel and gemcitabine. Transfection of let-7b mimic downregulated the expression of mutant but not wild-type KRAS. Combination of let-7b mimic with paclitaxel or gemcitabine diminished MEK/ERK and PI3K/AKT signaling concurrently, triggered the onset of apoptosis, and reverted the epithelial-mesenchymal transition in KRAS mutant tumor cells. In addition, let-7b repletion downregulated the expression of β-tubulin III and ribonucleotide reductase subunit M2, two proteins known to mediate tumor resistance to paclitaxel and gemcitabine, respectively. Let-7 may represent a new class of chemosensitizer for the treatment of KRAS mutant tumors. PMID:25946136

  11. Giant Cell Tumor within the Proximal Tibia after ACL Reconstruction.

    PubMed

    Takahashi, Takashi; MacCormick, Lauren; Ellermann, Jutta; Clohisy, Denis; Marette, Shelly

    2016-01-01

    26-year-old female with prior anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction developed an enlarging lytic bone lesion around the tibial screw with sequential imaging over the course of one year demonstrating progression of this finding, which was confirmed histologically to be a giant cell tumor of bone. The lesion originated around the postoperative bed, making the diagnosis challenging during the early course of the presentation. The case demonstrates giant cell tumor which originated in the metaphysis and subsequently grew to involve the epiphysis; therefore, early course of the disease not involving the epiphysis should not exclude this diagnosis. PMID:26981302

  12. Giant Cell Tumor within the Proximal Tibia after ACL Reconstruction

    PubMed Central

    Takahashi, Takashi; MacCormick, Lauren; Ellermann, Jutta; Clohisy, Denis; Marette, Shelly

    2016-01-01

    26-year-old female with prior anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction developed an enlarging lytic bone lesion around the tibial screw with sequential imaging over the course of one year demonstrating progression of this finding, which was confirmed histologically to be a giant cell tumor of bone. The lesion originated around the postoperative bed, making the diagnosis challenging during the early course of the presentation. The case demonstrates giant cell tumor which originated in the metaphysis and subsequently grew to involve the epiphysis; therefore, early course of the disease not involving the epiphysis should not exclude this diagnosis. PMID:26981302

  13. Busulfan, Melphalan, Topotecan Hydrochloride, and a Stem Cell Transplant in Treating Patients With Newly Diagnosed or Relapsed Solid Tumor

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-05-04

    Solid Tumor; Adult Central Nervous System Germ Cell Tumor; Adult Rhabdomyosarcoma; Childhood Central Nervous System Germ Cell Tumor; Childhood Soft Tissue Sarcoma; Ewing Sarcoma; Metastatic Ewing Sarcoma/Peripheral Primitive Neuroectodermal Tumor; Ovarian Mixed Germ Cell Tumor; Previously Untreated Childhood Rhabdomyosarcoma; Recurrent Adult Brain Tumor; Recurrent Adult Soft Tissue Sarcoma; Recurrent Childhood Brain Stem Glioma; Recurrent Childhood Cerebellar Astrocytoma; Recurrent Childhood Cerebral Astrocytoma; Recurrent Childhood Ependymoma; Recurrent Childhood Malignant Germ Cell Tumor; Recurrent Childhood Medulloblastoma; Recurrent Childhood Pineoblastoma; Recurrent Childhood Supratentorial Primitive Neuroectodermal Tumor; Recurrent Childhood Visual Pathway and Hypothalamic Glioma; Recurrent Childhood Visual Pathway Glioma; Recurrent Ewing Sarcoma/Peripheral Primitive Neuroectodermal Tumor; Recurrent Extragonadal Germ Cell Tumor; Recurrent Extragonadal Non-seminomatous Germ Cell Tumor; Recurrent Malignant Testicular Germ Cell Tumor; Recurrent Neuroblastoma; Recurrent Ovarian Germ Cell Tumor; Recurrent Wilms Tumor and Other Childhood Kidney Tumors; Unspecified Adult Solid Tumor, Protocol Specific; Unspecified Childhood Solid Tumor, Protocol Specific

  14. Role of curcumin-dependent modulation of tumor microenvironment of a murine T cell lymphoma in altered regulation of tumor cell survival

    SciTech Connect

    Vishvakarma, Naveen Kumar; Kumar, Anjani; Singh, Sukh Mahendra

    2011-05-01

    Using a murine model of a T cell lymphoma, in the present study, we report that tumor growth retarding action of curcumin involves modulation of some crucial parameters of tumor microenvironment regulating tumor progression. Curcumin-administration to tumor-bearing host caused an altered pH regulation in tumor cells associated with alteration in expression of cell survival and apoptosis regulatory proteins and genes. Nevertheless, an alteration was also observed in biophysical parameters of tumor microenvironment responsible for modulation of tumor growth pertaining to hypoxia, tumor acidosis, and glucose metabolism. The study thus sheds new light with respect to the antineoplastic action of curcumin against a tumor-bearing host with progressively growing tumor of hematological origin. This will help in optimizing application of the drug and anticancer research and therapy. - Graphical Abstract: Display Omitted

  15. The Metastasis-Promoting Roles of Tumor-Associated Immune Cells

    PubMed Central

    Smith, Heath A.; Kang, Yibin

    2013-01-01

    Tumor metastasis is driven not only by the accumulation of intrinsic alterations in malignant cells, but also by the interactions of cancer cells with various stromal cell components of the tumor microenvironment. In particular, inflammation and infiltration of the tumor tissue by host immune cells, such as tumor-associated macrophages, myeloid-derived suppressor cells, and regulatory T cells have been shown to support tumor growth in addition to invasion and metastasis. Each step of tumor development, from initiation through metastatic spread, is promoted by communication between tumor and immune cells via the secretion of cytokines, growth factors and proteases that remodel the tumor microenvironment. Invasion and metastasis requires neovascularization, breakdown of the basement membrane, and remodeling of the extracellular matrix for tumor cell invasion and extravasation into the blood and lymphatic vessels. The subsequent dissemination of tumor cells to distant organ sites necessitates a treacherous journey through the vasculature, which is fostered by close association with platelets and macrophages. Additionally, the establishment of the pre-metastatic niche and specific metastasis organ tropism is fostered by neutrophils and bone marrow-derived hematopoietic immune progenitor cells and other inflammatory cytokines derived from tumor