Science.gov

Sample records for 4th generation x-ray

  1. X-ray generator

    DOEpatents

    Dawson, John M.

    1976-01-01

    Apparatus and method for producing coherent secondary x-rays that are controlled as to direction by illuminating a mixture of high z and low z gases with an intense burst of primary x-rays. The primary x-rays are produced with a laser activated plasma, and these x-rays strip off the electrons of the high z atoms in the lasing medium, while the low z atoms retain their electrons. The neutral atoms transfer electrons to highly excited states of the highly striped high z ions giving an inverted population which produces the desired coherent x-rays. In one embodiment, a laser, light beam provides a laser spark that produces the intense burst of coherent x-rays that illuminates the mixture of high z and low z gases, whereby the high z atoms are stripped while the low z ones are not, giving the desired mixture of highly ionized and neutral atoms. To this end, the laser spark is produced by injecting a laser light beam, or a plurality of beams, into a first gas in a cylindrical container having an adjacent second gas layer co-axial therewith, the laser producing a plasma and the intense primary x-rays in the first gas, and the second gas containing the high and low atomic number elements for receiving the primary x-rays, whereupon the secondary x-rays are produced therein by stripping desired ions in a neutral gas and transfer of electrons to highly excited states of the stripped ions from the unionized atoms. Means for magnetically confining and stabilizing the plasma are disclosed for controlling the direction of the x-rays.

  2. Electromechanical x-ray generator

    DOEpatents

    Watson, Scott A; Platts, David; Sorensen, Eric B

    2016-05-03

    An electro-mechanical x-ray generator configured to obtain high-energy operation with favorable energy-weight scaling. The electro-mechanical x-ray generator may include a pair of capacitor plates. The capacitor plates may be charged to a predefined voltage and may be separated to generate higher voltages on the order of hundreds of kV in the AK gap. The high voltage may be generated in a vacuum tube.

  3. Large-format, high-speed, X-ray pnCCDs combined with electron and ion imaging spectrometers in a multipurpose chamber for experiments at 4th generation light sources

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Strüder, Lothar; Epp, Sascha; Rolles, Daniel; Hartmann, Robert; Holl, Peter; Lutz, Gerhard; Soltau, Heike; Eckart, Rouven; Reich, Christian; Heinzinger, Klaus; Thamm, Christian; Rudenko, Artem; Krasniqi, Faton; Kühnel, Kai-Uwe; Bauer, Christian; Schröter, Claus-Dieter; Moshammer, Robert; Techert, Simone; Miessner, Danilo; Porro, Matteo; Hälker, Olaf; Meidinger, Norbert; Kimmel, Nils; Andritschke, Robert; Schopper, Florian; Weidenspointner, Georg; Ziegler, Alexander; Pietschner, Daniel; Herrmann, Sven; Pietsch, Ullrich; Walenta, Albert; Leitenberger, Wolfram; Bostedt, Christoph; Möller, Thomas; Rupp, Daniela; Adolph, Marcus; Graafsma, Heinz; Hirsemann, Helmut; Gärtner, Klaus; Richter, Rainer; Foucar, Lutz; Shoeman, Robert L.; Schlichting, Ilme; Ullrich, Joachim

    2010-03-01

    Fourth generation accelerator-based light sources, such as VUV and X-ray Free Electron Lasers (FEL), deliver ultra-brilliant (˜10 12-10 13 photons per bunch) coherent radiation in femtosecond (˜10-100 fs) pulses and, thus, require novel focal plane instrumentation in order to fully exploit their unique capabilities. As an additional challenge for detection devices, existing (FLASH, Hamburg) and future FELs (LCLS, Menlo Park; SCSS, Hyogo and the European XFEL, Hamburg) cover a broad range of photon energies from the EUV to the X-ray regime with significantly different bandwidths and pulse structures reaching up to MHz micro-bunch repetition rates. Moreover, hundreds up to trillions of fragment particles, ions, electrons or scattered photons can emerge when a single light flash impinges on matter with intensities up to 10 22 W/cm 2. In order to meet these challenges, the Max Planck Advanced Study Group (ASG) within the Center for Free Electron Laser Science (CFEL) has designed the CFEL-ASG MultiPurpose (CAMP) chamber. It is equipped with specially developed photon and charged particle detection devices dedicated to cover large solid-angles. A variety of different targets are supported, such as atomic, (aligned) molecular and cluster jets, particle injectors for bio-samples or fixed target arrangements. CAMP houses 4π solid-angle ion and electron momentum imaging spectrometers ("reaction microscope", REMI, or "velocity map imaging", VMI) in a unique combination with novel, large-area, broadband (50 eV-25 keV), high-dynamic-range, single-photon-counting and imaging X-ray detectors based on the pnCCDs. This instrumentation allows a new class of coherent diffraction experiments in which both electron and ion emission from the target may be simultaneously monitored. This permits the investigation of dynamic processes in this new regime of ultra-intense, high-energy radiation—matter interaction. After an introduction into the salient features of the CAMP chamber and

  4. Capillary Optics generate stronger X-rays

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1996-01-01

    NASA scientist, in the Space Sciences lab at Marshall, works with capillary optics that generate more intense X-rays than conventional sources. This capability is useful in studying the structure of important proteins.

  5. Next-Generation X-Ray Astronomy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    White, Nicholas E.

    2012-04-01

    This review of future timing capabilities in X-ray astronomy includes missions in implementation (astro-h, gems, srg and astrosat), those under study (currently nicer, athena and loft), and new technologies that may be the seeds for future missions, such as lobster-eye optics. Those missions and technologies will offer exciting new capabilities that will take X-ray Astronomy into a new generation of achievements.

  6. 4th Generation ECR Ion Sources

    SciTech Connect

    Lyneis, Claude M.; Leitner, D.; Todd, D.S.; Sabbi, G.; Prestemon, S.; Caspi, S.; Ferracin, P.

    2008-12-01

    The concepts and technical challenges related to developing a 4th generation ECR ion source with an RF frequency greater than 40 GHz and magnetic confinement fields greater than twice Becr will be explored in this paper. Based on the semi-empirical frequency scaling of ECR plasma density with the square of operating frequency, there should be significant gains in performance over current 3rd generation ECR ion sources, which operate at RF frequencies between 20 and 30 GHz. While the 3rd generation ECR ion sources use NbTi superconducting solenoid and sextupole coils, the new sources will need to use different superconducting materials such as Nb3Sn to reach the required magnetic confinement, which scales linearly with RF frequency. Additional technical challenges include increased bremsstrahlung production, which may increase faster than the plasma density, bremsstrahlung heating of the cold mass and the availability of high power continuous wave microwave sources at these frequencies. With each generation of ECR ion sources, there are new challenges to be mastered, but the potential for higher performance and reduced cost of the associated accelerator continue to make this a promising avenue for development.

  7. Next Generation X-ray Polarimeter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hill-Kittle, Joe

    The emission regions of many types of X-ray sources are small and cannot be spatially resolved without interferometry techniques that haven't yet been developed. In order to understand the emission mechanisms and emission geometry, alternate measurement techniques are required. Most microphysical processes that affect X-rays, including scattering and magnetic emission processes are imprinted as polarization signatures. X-ray polarization also reveals exotic physical processes occurring in regions of very strong gravitational and magnetic fields. Observations of X-ray polarization will provide a measurement of the geometrical distribution of gas and magnetic fields without foreground depolarization that affects longer wavelengths (e.g. Faraday rotation in the radio). Emission from accretion disks has an inclination-dependent polarization. The polarization signature is modified by extreme gravitational forces, which bend light, essentially changing the contribution of each part of the disk to the integrated total intensity seen by distant observers. Because gravity has the largest effect on the innermost parts of the disk (which are the hottest, and thus contributes to more high energy photons), the energy dependent polarization is diagnostic of disk inclination, black hole mass and spin. Increasing the sensitive energy band will make these measurements possible. X-ray polarimetry will also enable the study of the origin of cosmic rays in the universe, the nature of black holes, the role of black holes in the evolution of galaxies, and the interaction of matter with the highest physically possible magnetic fields. These objectives address NASA's strategic interest in the origin, structure, and evolution of the universe. We propose a two-year effort to develop the Next Generation X-ray Polarimeter (NGXP) that will have more than ten times the sensitivity of the current state of the art. NGXP will make possible game changing measurements of classes of astrophysical

  8. Active x-ray optics for the next generation of x-ray telescopes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Atkins, Carolyn; Wang, Hongchang; Doel, Peter; Brooks, David; Thompson, Samantha; Feldman, Charlotte; Willingale, Richard; Button, Tim; Rodriguez Sanmartin, Daniel; Zhang, Dou; James, Ady; Theobald, Craig; Willis, Graham; Smith, Andrew D.

    2009-05-01

    The immediate future for X-ray astronomy is the need for high sensitivity, requiring large apertures and collecting areas, the newly combined NASA, ESA and JAXA mission IXO (International X-ray Observatory) is specifically designed to meet this need. However, looking beyond the next decade, there have been calls for an X-ray space telescope that can not only achieve this high sensitivity, but could also boast an angular resolution of 0.1 arc-seconds, a factor of five improvement on the Chandra X-ray Observatory. NASA's proposed Generation-X mission is designed to meet this demand; it has been suggested that the X-ray optics must be active in nature in order to achieve this desired resolution. The Smart X-ray Optics (SXO) project is a UK based consortium looking at the application of active/adaptive optics to both large and small scale devices, intended for astronomical and medical purposes respectively. With Generation-X in mind, an active elliptical prototype has been designed by the SXO consortium to perform point-to-point X-ray focussing, while simultaneously manipulating its optical surface to improve its initial resolution. Following the completion of the large scale SXO prototype, presented is an overview of the production and operation of the prototype, with emphasis on the X-ray environment and preliminary results.

  9. Apparatus for generating x-ray holograms

    DOEpatents

    Rhodes, C.K.; Boyer, K.; Solem, J.C.; Haddad, W.S.

    1990-09-11

    Apparatus for x-ray microholography of living biological materials. A Fourier transform holographic configuration is described as being most suitable for the 3-dimensional recording of the physical characteristics of biological specimens. The use of a spherical scatterer as a reference and a charge-coupled device two-dimensional detector array placed in the forward direction relative to the incident x-radiation for viewing electromagnetic radiation simultaneously scattered from both the specimen and the reference scatterer permits the ready reconstruction of the details of the specimen from the fringe pattern detected by the charge-coupled device. For example, by using a nickel reference scatter at 4.5 nm, sufficient reference illumination is provided over a wide enough angle to allow similar resolution in both transverse and longitudinal directions. Both laser and synchrotron radiation sources are feasible for generating microholographs. Operation in the water window (2.4 to 4.5 nm) should provide maximum contrast for features of the specimen and spatial resolution on the order of the wavelength of x-radiation should be possible in all three dimensions, which is sufficient for the visualization of many biological features. It is anticipated that the present apparatus will find utility in other areas as well where microscopic physical details of a specimen are important. A computational procedure which enables the holographic data collected by the detector to be used to correct for misalignments introduced by inexact knowledge of the relative positions of the spherical reference scatterer and the sample under investigation has been developed. If the correction is performed prior to reconstruction, full compensation can be achieved and a faithfully reconstructed image produced. 7 figs.

  10. Apparatus for generating x-ray holograms

    DOEpatents

    Rhodes, Charles K.; Boyer, Keith; Solem, Johndale C.; Haddad, Waleed S.

    1990-01-01

    Apparatus for x-ray microholography of living biological materials. A Fourier transform holographic configuration is described as being most suitable for the 3-dimensional recording of the physical characteristics of biological specimens. The use of a spherical scatterer as a reference and a charge-coupled device two-dimensional detector array placed in the forward direction relative to the incident x-radiation for viewing electromagnetic radiation simultaneously scattered from both the specimen and the reference scatterer permits the ready reconstruction of the details of the specimen from the fringe pattern detected by the charge-coupled device. For example, by using a nickel reference scatter at 4.5 nm, sufficient reference illumination is provided over a wide enough angle to allow similar resolution in both transverse and longitudinal directions. Both laser and synchrotron radiation sources are feasible for generating microholographs. Operation in the water window (2.4 to 4.5 nm) should provide maximum contrast for features of the specimen and spatial resolution on the order of the wavelength of x-radiation should be possible in all three dimensions, which is sufficient for the visualization of many biological features. It is anticipated that the present apparatus will find utility in other areas as well where microscopic physical details of a specimen are important. A computational procedure which enables the holographic data collected by the detector to be used to correct for misalignments introduced by inexact knowledge of the relative positions of the spherical reference scatterer and the sample under investigation has been developed. If the correction is performed prior to reconstruction, full compensation can be achieved and a faithfully reconstructed image produced.

  11. X-ray generation using carbon nanotubes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Parmee, Richard J.; Collins, Clare M.; Milne, William I.; Cole, Matthew T.

    2015-01-01

    Since the discovery of X-rays over a century ago the techniques applied to the engineering of X-ray sources have remained relatively unchanged. From the inception of thermionic electron sources, which, due to simplicity of fabrication, remain central to almost all X-ray applications, there have been few fundamental technological advances. However, with the emergence of ever more demanding medical and inspection techniques, including computed tomography and tomosynthesis, security inspection, high throughput manufacturing and radiotherapy, has resulted in a considerable level of interest in the development of new fabrication methods. The use of conventional thermionic sources is limited by their slow temporal response and large physical size. In response, field electron emission has emerged as a promising alternative means of deriving a highly controllable electron beam of a well-defined distribution. When coupled to the burgeoning field of nanomaterials, and in particular, carbon nanotubes, such systems present a unique technological opportunity. This review provides a summary of the current state-of-the-art in carbon nanotube-based field emission X-ray sources. We detail the various fabrication techniques and functional advantages associated with their use, including the ability to produce ever smaller electron beam assembles, shaped cathodes, enhanced temporal stability and emergent fast-switching pulsed sources. We conclude with an overview of some of the commercial progress made towards the realisation of an innovative and disruptive technology.

  12. Multilayers for next generation x-ray sources

    SciTech Connect

    Bajt, S; Chapman, H N; Spiller, E; Hau-Riege, S; Alameda, J; Nelson, A J; Walton, C C; Kjornrattanawanich, B; Aquila, A; Dollar, F; Gullikson, E; Tarrio, C

    2007-05-04

    Multilayers are artificially layered structures that can be used to create optics and optical elements for a broad range of x-ray wavelengths, or can be optimized for other applications. The development of next generation x-ray sources (synchrotrons and x-ray free electron lasers) requires advances in x-ray optics. Newly developed multilayer-based mirrors and optical elements enabled efficient band-pass filtering, focusing and time resolved measurements in recent FLASH (Free Electron LASer in Hamburg) experiments. These experiments are providing invaluable feedback on the response of the multilayer structures to high intensity, short pulsed x-ray sources. This information is crucial to design optics for future x-ray free electron lasers and to benchmark computer codes that simulate damage processes.

  13. Next-Generation X-Ray Astronomy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    White, Nicholas E.

    2011-01-01

    The future timing capabilities in X-ray astronomy will be reviewed. This will include reviewing the missions in implementation: Astro-H, GEMS, SRG, and ASTROSAT; those under study: currently ATHENA and LOFT; and new technologies that may enable future missions e.g. Lobster eye optics. These missions and technologies will bring exciting new capabilities across the entire time spectrum from micro-seconds to years that e.g. will allow us to probe close to the event horizon of black holes and constrain the equation of state of neutron stars.

  14. Generating revenue from X-ray waste.

    PubMed

    Hundal, Simon

    2013-09-01

    According to Betts Envirometal, experts in precious metal recovery from waste streams, and a provider of 'total waste management' solutions, 'disposing of hospital wastes isn't usually a glamorous subject, unless, of course, you know how to make money from it'. As general manager, Simon Hundal, explains, the company is seeking to 'revolutionise' how the NHS treats certain waste streams, and, in doing so, to encourage NHS Trust directors and governance managers to check their compliance with patient data retention guidelines as far as medical X-ray film, in particular, is concerned. PMID:24138001

  15. X-ray-generated ultrasonic signals - Characteristics and imaging applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sachse, W.; Kim, K. Y.; Pierce, W. F.

    1986-09-01

    Experiments dealing with the characterization of X-ray-generated ultrasonic signals in materials and their application to the imaging of material inhomogeneities are described. A linear relationship is established between the X-ray photon power and the generated ultrasonic signals. The directivity of the X-ray/acoustic source was found to resemble that of other thermoelastic sources. A new double-modulation measurement technique is described in which the magnitude and phase of the modulated acoustic signals are measured. Use of the technique is explored with various materials, incident beam sizes, and inclusions. The results of preliminary imaging experiments are described which were carried out with direct and double-modulated X-ray/acoustic signals. It is shown from these results that using the images generated at two modulation frequencies, identification of the spatial inhomogeneities in a specimen is possible.

  16. Interstellar dust as generator of x ray radiation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ibadov, Subhon

    1989-01-01

    The x ray generation due to arising of hot dense plasma balls at high-velocity (greater than or equal to 70 km/s) collisions of dust grains in the interstellar medium is considered. Analytical expressions for efficiency of conversions of colliding dust particle kinetic energy into x ray radiation are presented. The observed intensity distribution of the diffuse component of soft cosmic x rays (0.1 to 1 keV) may be partly caused by collisions between the dusty components of high velocity clouds and of the disk of the Galaxy.

  17. Pulsed x-ray generator for commercial gas lasers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bollanti, S.; Bonfigli, F.; Di Lazzaro, P.; Flora, F.; Giordano, G.; Letardi, T.; Murra, D.; Schina, G.; Zheng, C. E.

    2001-10-01

    We have designed and tested a 1-m-long x-ray diode based on innovative plasma cathodes, which exploit commercial spark plugs as electron emitters. Based on the results of a numerical study, we optimized both diode geometry (e.g., the angle between anode and cathode surfaces, the thickness of the Al window) and electrical circuitry (e.g., the capacitance in series to each spark plug, the peak voltage of the anode) of our x-ray generator. The overall result is a simple and efficient circuitry, giving a total diode current in excess of 2.1 kA with a breakdown voltage of 70 kV, which generates a 50 ns rise-time x-ray pulse with a spatially averaged dosage of up to 6×10-4 Gy when using a Pb-wrapped anode. The double-diode x-ray generator was operated for 1.5×106 shots at a repetition rate of up to 30 Hz, and the lifetime test was interrupted without any fault. During the lifetime test, it was not necessary to adjust any working parameter. At the end of the lifetime test, the x-ray emission uniformity was better than 80% along the longitudinal axis. This x-ray generator has a lifetime, reliability, and cost fitting the requirements of industrial users. Among the broad range of potential applications, this x-ray generator is particularly suitable to ionize discharge pumped gas lasers, like TEA CO2 and excimer lasers, including those operated by x-ray triggered discharges.

  18. Prepulse dependence in hard x-ray generation from microdroplets

    SciTech Connect

    Anand, M.; Kahaly, S.; Kumar, G. Ravindra; Sandhu, A. S.; Gibbon, P.; Krishnamurthy, M.

    2006-04-07

    We report on experiments which show that liquid microdroplets are very efficient in hard x-ray generation. We make a comparative study of hard x-ray emission from 15 {mu}m methanol microdroplets and a plain slab target of similar atomic composition at similar laser intensities. The hard X-ray yield from droplet plasmas is about 35 times more than that obtained from solid plasmas. A prepulse that is about 10ns and at least 2% in intensity of the main pulse is essential for hard x-ray generation from the droplets at about 1015 W cm-2. A hot electron temperature of 36 keV is measured from the droplets at 8 x 1014 W cm-2; three times higher intensity is needed to obtain similar hot electron temperature from solid plasmas that have similar atomic composition. We use 1D-PIC simulation to obtain qualitative correlation to the experimental observations.

  19. Next-generation detectors for x-ray astronomy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ambrosi, Richard M.; Holland, Andrew D.; Mukerjee, Kallol; Keay, Adam; Turner, Martin J. L.; Abbey, Antony F.; Hutchinson, Ian B.; Ashton, T. J. R.; Beardmore, Andrew P.; Short, Alexander D. T.; Pool, Peter J.; Burt, David; Vernon, D.

    2004-09-01

    The next generation of X-ray astronomy instruments will require position sensitive detectors in the form of charge coupled devices (CCDs) for X-ray spectroscopy and imaging that will have the ability to probe the X-ray universe with a greater efficiency. This will require the development of CCDs with structures that will improve on the quantum efficiency of the current state of the art over a broader spectral range in addition to reducing spectral features, which may affect spectral resolution and signal to background levels. These devices will also have to be designed to withstand the harsh radiation environments associated with orbits that extend beyond the Earth"s magnetosphere. The next generation X-ray telescopes will incorporate larger X-ray optics that will allow deeper observations of the X-ray universe and sensors will have to compensate for this by an increased readout speed. This study will aim to describe some of the results obtained from test CCD structures that may fit many of the requirements described above.

  20. Lightweight Target Generates Bright, Energetic X-Rays

    SciTech Connect

    Hazi, A

    2006-01-25

    Radiography with x rays is a long-established method to see inside objects, from human limbs to weapon parts. Livermore scientists have a continuing need for powerful x rays for such applications as backlighting, or illuminating, inertial confinement fusion (ICF) experiments and imaging still or exploding materials for the nation's Stockpile Stewardship Program. X-radiography is one of the prime diagnostics for ICF experiments because it captures the fine detail needed to determine what happens to nearly microscopic targets when they are compressed by laser light. For example, Livermore scientists participating in the National Ignition Facility's (NIF's) 18-month-long Early Light experimental campaign, which ended in 2004, used x rays to examine hydrodynamic instabilities in jets of plasma. In these experiments, one laser beam irradiated a solid target of titanium, causing it to form a high-temperature plasma that generated x rays of about 4.65 kiloelectronvolts (keV). These x rays backlit a jet of plasma formed when two other laser beams hit a plastic ablator and sent a shock to an aluminum washer. Livermore physicist Kevin Fournier of the Physics and Advanced Technologies Directorate leads a team that is working to increase the efficiency of converting laser energy into x rays so the resulting images provide more information about the object being illuminated. The main characteristics of x-ray sources are energy and brightness. ''As experimental targets get larger and as compression of the targets increases, the backlighter sources must be brighter and more energetic'', says Fournier. The more energetic the x rays, the further they penetrate an object. The brighter the source--that is, the more photons it has--the clearer the image. historically, researchers have used solid targets such as thin metal foils to generate x rays. however, when photon energies are greater than a few kiloelectronvolts, the conversion efficiency of solid targets is only a fraction of 1

  1. Possible planetary XRF instrument with X-ray generator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yin, Lo I.; Trombka, Jacob I.

    1986-01-01

    We explore in this paper the possibility of a planetary in situ XRF system using a newly developed battery-operated miniature X-ray generator as the excitation source. Furthermore, recent advances in refrigeration technology and HgI2 detectors make it possible to consider realistically the inclusion of a high-resolution energy-dispersive spectrometer as part of the system. It will be shown that by the simple coupling of the miniature X-ray generator and a standard Si(Li) detector qualitative characterization of geochemical samples can be easily carried out without elaborate calibrations and spectrum stripping. Similar battery-operated miniature X-ray generators with a variety of anodes are now commercially available.

  2. A laboratory model of post-Newtonian gravity with high power lasers and 4th generation light sources

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gregori, G.; Levy, M. C.; Wadud, M. A.; Crowley, B. J. B.; Bingham, R.

    2016-04-01

    Using the post-Newtonian formalism of gravity, we attempt to calculate the x-ray Thomson scattering cross section of electrons that are accelerated in the field of a high intensity optical laser. We show that our results are consistent with previous calculations, suggesting that the combination of high power laser and 4th generation light sources may become a powerful platform to test models exploring high order corrections to the Newtonian gravity.

  3. pyXSIM: Synthetic X-ray observations generator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    ZuHone, John A., Hallman, Eric. J.

    2016-08-01

    pyXSIM simulates X-ray observations from astrophysical sources. X-rays probe the high-energy universe, from hot galaxy clusters to compact objects such as neutron stars and black holes and many interesting sources in between. pyXSIM generates synthetic X-ray observations of these sources from a wide variety of models, whether from grid-based simulation codes such as FLASH (ascl:1010.082), Enzo (ascl:1010.072), and Athena (ascl:1010.014), to particle-based codes such as Gadget (ascl:0003.001) and AREPO, and even from datasets that have been created “by hand”, such as from NumPy arrays. pyXSIM can also manipulate the synthetic observations it produces in various ways and export the simulated X-ray events to other software packages to simulate the end products of specific X-ray observatories. pyXSIM is an implementation of the PHOX (ascl:1112.004) algorithm and was initially the photon_simulator analysis module in yt (ascl:1011.022); it is dependent on yt.

  4. Numerical simulations of x-ray generation in miltisectional FELs

    SciTech Connect

    Pitatelev, M.M.

    1995-12-31

    The process of x-ray generation in milticomponent FELs with alternate undulator and dispersion sections is investigate. The coptuter simulation was fulfilled for the ultrarelativistic electron beams. It was shown that the use of much number of dispersion sections allows to increase the gain considerably and to use more short magnetic systems.

  5. FY06 LDRD Final Report Next-generation x-ray optics: focusing hard x-rays

    SciTech Connect

    Pivovaroff, M; Soufli, R

    2007-03-01

    The original goal of our research was to open up a new class of scientific experiments by increasing the power of newly available x-ray sources by orders of magnitude. This was accomplished by developing a new generation of x-ray optics, based on hard x-ray (10-200 keV) reflective and diffractive focusing elements. The optical systems we envision begin with a core reflective optic, which has the ability to capture and concentrate x-rays across a wide range of energies and angles band, combined with diffractive optics, based on large-scale multilayer structures, that will further enhance the spatial, spectral and temporal resolving power of the system. Enabling technologies developed at LLNL such as precise mounting of thermally formed substrates, smoothing techniques and multilayer films of ultra-high reflectance and precision were crucial in the development and demonstration of our research objectives. Highlights of this phase of the project include: the design and fabrication of a concentrator optic for the Pleiades Thomson X-ray source located at LLNL, smoothing of glass substrates through application of polyimide films, and the design, fabrication and testing of novel volume multilayers structures. Part of our research into substrate smooth led to the development of a new technique (patent pending) to construct high-quality, inexpensive x-ray optics. This innovation resulted in LLNL constructing a x-ray optic for the CERN Axion Solar Telescope (CAST) and allowed LLNL to join the international experiment.

  6. Next-generation X-ray cluster surveys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Slack, N. W.; Ponman, T. J.

    2014-03-01

    Contemporary X-ray surveys have permitted rich galaxy clusters to be detected out to redshifts z > 1, but studies with next-generation instruments will allow this work to be extended to both higher redshift and lower cluster masses. Such studies have the potential to provide powerful constraints on the evolution of baryonic processes such as cooling and feedback within developing cosmic structures, provided that observational selection effects can be controlled. To explore this, we generate simulated surveys using the Wide Field Imager (WFI) instrument on International X-ray Observatory (IXO), studied in 2010 by NASA and ESA as a major next-generation X-ray observatory. A sample of observed groups and clusters is assembled and used to derive relationships between temperature and four cluster properties: M500, L500, core radius and β. These are coupled with an evolving population of dark matter haloes drawn from the Millennium Simulation to construct an evolving set of X-ray clusters which are cast into a lightcone and imaged using the main instrumental characteristics of the IXO WFI. State-of-the-art techniques are then employed for source detection and extension testing, to generate a simulated survey cluster catalogue. These simulations are used to explore the dependence of a next-generation survey on the evolution of cluster scaling relations, survey strategy (wide versus deep) and instrument point spread function (PSF). We find that a 1.8 Ms IXO survey gives a cluster sample three to five times larger for a wide survey compared to a deep survey. In both surveys, the strongest discrimination between different LX-T evolutionary models derives from galaxy groups, with T ˜ 1-2 keV. Deep surveys can be affected by cosmic variance within this temperature range, whilst wide surveys suffer from incompleteness, and hence are more vulnerable to biases arising from incomplete knowledge of the survey selection function. Degrading the telescope PSF is found to most

  7. 21 CFR 892.1700 - Diagnostic x-ray high voltage generator.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Diagnostic x-ray high voltage generator. 892.1700... (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES RADIOLOGY DEVICES Diagnostic Devices § 892.1700 Diagnostic x-ray high voltage generator. (a) Identification. A diagnostic x-ray high voltage generator is a device that is intended...

  8. 21 CFR 892.1700 - Diagnostic x-ray high voltage generator.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Diagnostic x-ray high voltage generator. 892.1700... (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES RADIOLOGY DEVICES Diagnostic Devices § 892.1700 Diagnostic x-ray high voltage generator. (a) Identification. A diagnostic x-ray high voltage generator is a device that is intended...

  9. 21 CFR 892.1700 - Diagnostic x-ray high voltage generator.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Diagnostic x-ray high voltage generator. 892.1700... (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES RADIOLOGY DEVICES Diagnostic Devices § 892.1700 Diagnostic x-ray high voltage generator. (a) Identification. A diagnostic x-ray high voltage generator is a device that is intended...

  10. 21 CFR 892.1700 - Diagnostic x-ray high voltage generator.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Diagnostic x-ray high voltage generator. 892.1700... (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES RADIOLOGY DEVICES Diagnostic Devices § 892.1700 Diagnostic x-ray high voltage generator. (a) Identification. A diagnostic x-ray high voltage generator is a device that is intended...

  11. 21 CFR 892.1700 - Diagnostic x-ray high voltage generator.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Diagnostic x-ray high voltage generator. 892.1700... (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES RADIOLOGY DEVICES Diagnostic Devices § 892.1700 Diagnostic x-ray high voltage generator. (a) Identification. A diagnostic x-ray high voltage generator is a device that is intended...

  12. Generation of Coherent X-Ray Radiation through Modulation Compression

    SciTech Connect

    Qiang, Ji; Wu, Juhao; /SLAC

    2012-06-12

    In this paper, we propose a scheme to generate tunable coherent X-ray radiation for future light source applications. This scheme uses an energy chirped electron beam, a laser modulator, a laser chirper and two bunch compressors to generate a prebunched kilo-Ampere current electron beam from a few tens Ampere electron beam out of a linac. The initial modulation energy wavelength can be compressed by a factor of 1 + h{sub b}R{sub 56}{sup a} in phase space, where h{sub b} is the energy bunch length chirp introduced by the laser chirper, R{sub 56}{sup a} is the momentum compaction factor of the first bunch compressor. As an illustration, we present an example to generate more than 400 MW, 170 attoseconds pulse, 1 nm coherent X-ray radiation using a 60 A electron beam out of the linac and 200 nm laser seed. Both the final wavelength and the radiation pulse length in the proposed scheme are tunable by adjusting the compression factor and the laser parameters.

  13. Generation of Coherent X-Ray Radiation Through Modulation Compression

    SciTech Connect

    Qiang, Ji; Wu, Juhao

    2010-12-14

    In this letter, we propose a scheme to generate tunable coherent X-ray radiation for future light source applications. This scheme uses an energy chirped electron beam, a laser modulators, a laser chirper and two bunch compressors to generate a prebunched kilo-Ampere current electron beam from a few tens Ampere electron beam out of a linac. The initial modulation energy wavelength can be compressed by a factor of 1 + h{sub b}R{sub 56}{sup a} phase space, where h{sub b} is the energy bunch length chirp introduced by the laser chirper, R{sub 56}{sup a} is the momentum compaction factor of the first bunch compressor. As an illustration, we present an example to generate more than 400 MW, 170 atto-seconds pulse, 1 nm coherent X-ray radiation using a 60 Ampere electron beam out. of the linac and 200 nm laser seed. Both the final wavelength and the radiation pulse length in the proposed scheme are tunable by adjusting the compression factor and the laser parameters.

  14. Compact high current generator for x-ray radiography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kharlov, A. V.; Kovalchuk, B. M.; Zorin, V. B.

    2006-12-01

    We report here a design of the portable high current generator, which can be used for a row of experiments and applications, including, but not limited to, X pinch, plasma focus, vacuum spark, etc. The X generator consists of the capacitor bank, multigap spark switch, load chamber, and built-in high voltage triggering generator. The capacitor bank consists of 12 General Atomics 35404 type capacitors (20nF, 25nH, 0.2Ω, 100kV). It stores ˜0.8kJ at 80kV charging voltage. Each three capacitors are commuted to a load by the multigap spark switch, which is able to commute by eight parallel channels. Switches operate in ambient air at atmospheric pressure. At 76kV charging voltage the generator provides ˜260kA with 120ns rise time and 5nH inductive load and ˜220kA with 145ns rise time and 10nH. Delay of output pulse relative to high voltage triggering pulse is ˜65ns with 5ns jitter. The dimensions of the generator are 1240×1240×225mm3 and the weight is ˜250kg, and only one high voltage power supply is required as additional equipment for the generator. The generator with a pumping system is placed on area about 0.5m2. Operation and handling are very simple, because no oil nor purified gases are required for the generator. The X generator has been successfully employed for experiments on the Ni X pinch load. X-ray pulse duration (full width at half maximum above 1keV) was about 5ns. Radiation yield Wr⩾500mJ was observed in the 1.2-1.5KeV range and Wr⩾20mJ in the 3-5keV energy range, which is comparable to results, obtained on the nanosecond accelerators. Clearly resolved images of 6μm wire indicate micron level size of hot spot. These results demonstrate possibility of this generator for application for x-ray backlighting.

  15. Compact high current generator for x-ray radiography

    SciTech Connect

    Kharlov, A. V.; Kovalchuk, B. M.; Zorin, V. B.

    2006-12-15

    We report here a design of the portable high current generator, which can be used for a row of experiments and applications, including, but not limited to, X pinch, plasma focus, vacuum spark, etc. The X generator consists of the capacitor bank, multigap spark switch, load chamber, and built-in high voltage triggering generator. The capacitor bank consists of 12 General Atomics 35404 type capacitors (20 nF, 25 nH, 0.2 {omega}, 100 kV). It stores {approx}0.8 kJ at 80 kV charging voltage. Each three capacitors are commuted to a load by the multigap spark switch, which is able to commute by eight parallel channels. Switches operate in ambient air at atmospheric pressure. At 76 kV charging voltage the generator provides {approx}260 kA with 120 ns rise time and 5 nH inductive load and {approx}220 kA with 145 ns rise time and 10 nH. Delay of output pulse relative to high voltage triggering pulse is {approx}65 ns with 5 ns jitter. The dimensions of the generator are 1240x1240x225 mm{sup 3} and the weight is {approx}250 kg, and only one high voltage power supply is required as additional equipment for the generator. The generator with a pumping system is placed on area about 0.5 m{sup 2}. Operation and handling are very simple, because no oil nor purified gases are required for the generator. The X generator has been successfully employed for experiments on the Ni X pinch load. X-ray pulse duration (full width at half maximum above 1 keV) was about 5 ns. Radiation yield W{sub r}{>=}500 mJ was observed in the 1.2-1.5 KeV range and W{sub r}{>=}20 mJ in the 3-5 keV energy range, which is comparable to results, obtained on the nanosecond accelerators. Clearly resolved images of 6 {mu}m wire indicate micron level size of hot spot. These results demonstrate possibility of this generator for application for x-ray backlighting.

  16. X rays generated in the interaction of subpicosecond laser pulses with solid targets

    SciTech Connect

    Kyrala, G.A.; Wahlin, E.K.; Fulton, R.D.; Schappert, G.T.; Jones, L.A.; Taylor, A.J.; Casperson, D.E.; Cobble, J.A.

    1991-01-01

    We are investigating the generation of short pulse short wavelength x-rays for pumping inner-shell x-ray lasers by photo-ionization. In contrast with previous proposals, we are looking at the use of a single line as an efficient means of pumping these lasers. As a first step we are optimizing the flashlamp x-ray conversion efficiency and characterizing the x-ray pulse length. 18 refs., 5 figs., 2 tabs.

  17. Design of wireless triggering pulse generation for x-ray medical system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ko, Dae-Sik; Lee, Jae-Cheol

    2007-12-01

    Digital x-ray imaging system is composed of an x-ray generator and a digital image acquisition system. In this paper, we designed a wireless trigger pulse generation circuit, detection trigger board, to capture the image accurately by established the synchronization between x-ray generator and digital image acquisition system and we analyzed its performance and compared to conventional method. There are two pulses generated by this study, the ACQ_START pulse, which indicates the detection of x-ray radiation from x-ray generator, and the ACQ_END pulse, which indicates the x-ray disappearance from x-ray generator. These trigger the image acquisition system of digital x-ray imaging system, to start the image capturing or to stop. Geiger tube were used to detect x-ray radiation from the air. Image acquisition is activated only this time between ACQ_START and ACQ_END signal. By detecting the x-ray radiation signal from the air and generate the trigger pulses, we can get more accurate timing for capturing the x-ray image. Also, owing to omitting the installation wire between x-ray generator and digital image acquisition system, Installation will be very easy. In addition to that, any type of x-ray generator can be installed without incompatibility. With this experiment, we tried to capture images of the resolution chart to compare the experimental result. We got 3.5 line pair / mm resolution at 20 mAs of x-ray level with resolution chart. This is same or better image comparing to conventional way.

  18. Characterization of X-ray generator beam profiles.

    SciTech Connect

    Mitchell, Dean J; Harding, Lee T.; Thoreson, Gregory G.; Theisen, Lisa Anne; Parmeter, John Ethan; Thompson, Kyle Richard

    2013-07-01

    T to compute the radiography properties of various materials, the flux profiles of X-ray sources must be characterized. This report describes the characterization of X-ray beam profiles from a Kimtron industrial 450 kVp radiography system with a Comet MXC-45 HP/11 bipolar oil-cooled X-ray tube. The empirical method described here uses a detector response function to derive photon flux profiles based on data collected with a small cadmium telluride detector. The flux profiles are then reduced to a simple parametric form that enables computation of beam profiles for arbitrary accelerator energies.

  19. Development of Partially-Coherent Wavefront Propagation Simulation Methods for 3rd and 4th Generation Synchrotron Radiation Sources.

    SciTech Connect

    Chubar O.; Berman, L; Chu, Y.S.; Fluerasu, A.; Hulbert, S.; Idir, M.; Kaznatcheev, K.; Shapiro, D.; Baltser, J.

    2012-04-04

    Partially-coherent wavefront propagation calculations have proven to be feasible and very beneficial in the design of beamlines for 3rd and 4th generation Synchrotron Radiation (SR) sources. These types of calculations use the framework of classical electrodynamics for the description, on the same accuracy level, of the emission by relativistic electrons moving in magnetic fields of accelerators, and the propagation of the emitted radiation wavefronts through beamline optical elements. This enables accurate prediction of performance characteristics for beamlines exploiting high SR brightness and/or high spectral flux. Detailed analysis of radiation degree of coherence, offered by the partially-coherent wavefront propagation method, is of paramount importance for modern storage-ring based SR sources, which, thanks to extremely small sub-nanometer-level electron beam emittances, produce substantial portions of coherent flux in X-ray spectral range. We describe the general approach to partially-coherent SR wavefront propagation simulations and present examples of such simulations performed using 'Synchrotron Radiation Workshop' (SRW) code for the parameters of hard X-ray undulator based beamlines at the National Synchrotron Light Source II (NSLS-II), Brookhaven National Laboratory. These examples illustrate general characteristics of partially-coherent undulator radiation beams in low-emittance SR sources, and demonstrate advantages of applying high-accuracy physical-optics simulations to the optimization and performance prediction of X-ray optical beamlines in these new sources.

  20. Comparison of Single Event Transients Generated by Short Pulsed X-Rays, Lasers and Heavy Ions

    SciTech Connect

    Cardoza, David; LaLumondiere, Stephen D.; Tockstein, Michael A.; Brewe, Dale L.; Wells, Nathan P.; Koga, Rokutaro; Gaab, K. M.; Lotshaw, William T.; Moss, Steven C.

    2014-12-01

    We report an experimental study of the transients generated by pulsed x-rays, heavy ions, and different laser wavelengths in a Si p-i-n photodiode. We compare the charge collected by all of the excitation methods to determine the equivalent LET for pulsed x-rays relative to heavy ions. Our comparisons show that pulsed x-rays from synchrotron sources can generate a large range of equivalent LET and generate transients similar to those excited by laser pulses and heavy ion strikes. We also look at how the pulse width of the transients changes for the different excitation methods. We show that the charge collected with pulsed x-rays is greater than expected as the x-ray photon energy increases. Combined with their capability of focusing to small spot sizes and of penetrating metallization, pulsed x-rays are a promising new tool for high resolution screening of SEE susceptibility

  1. Next generation x-ray all-sky monitor

    SciTech Connect

    Priedhorsky, W. C.; Peele, A. G.; Nugent, K. A.

    1997-01-10

    We set forth a conceptual design for x-ray all-sky monitor based on lobster-eye wide-field telescopes. This instrument, suitable for a small satellite, would monitor the flux of objects as faint as 2x10{sup -15} W/m{sup 2} (0.5-2.4 keV) on a daily basis with a signal-to-noise of 5. Sources would be located to 1-2 arc-minutes. Detailed simulations show that crosstalk from the cruciform lobster images would not significantly compromise performance. At this sensitivity limit, we could monitor not just x-ray binaries but fainter classes of x-ray sources. Hundreds of active galactic nuclei, coronal sources, and cataclysmic variables could be tracked on a daily basis. Large numbers of fast transients should be visible, including gamma-ray bursts and the soft x-ray breakout of nearby type II supernovae. Long-term x-ray measurements will advance our understanding of the geometries and perhaps masses of AGN, and coronal energy sources in stars.

  2. Long life electrodes for large-area x-ray generators

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rothe, Dietmar E. (Inventor)

    1991-01-01

    This invention is directed to rugged, reliable, and long-life electrodes for use in large-area, high-current-density electron gun and x-ray generators which are employed as contamination-free preionizers for high-energy pulsed gas lasers. The electron source at the cathode is a corona plasma formed at the interface between a conductor, or semiconductor, and a high-permittivity dielectric. Detailed descriptions are provided of a reliable cold plasma cathode, as well as an efficient liquid-cooled electron beam target (anode) and x-ray generator which concentrates the x-ray flux in the direction of an x-ray window.

  3. Difference-frequency generation of optical radiation from two-color x-ray pulses.

    PubMed

    Shwartz, E; Shwartz, S

    2015-03-23

    We describe the process of difference-frequency generation of short optical pulses from two-color X-ray pulses. By assuming 10¹¹ photons per X-ray pulse, we predict that the optical count rate can exceed 10⁷ photons per pulse. Similar to other effects involving nonlinear interactions of X-rays and optical radiation, the effect we describe can be used for microscopic studies of chemical bonds and as a probe for light-matter interactions on the atomic scale. Since the X-ray damage threshold is much higher than the optical damage threshold, the efficiency of difference-frequency generation from two X-ray pulses is expected to be orders of magnitude higher than the efficiency of effects such as sum/difference-frequency mixing between X-rays and optical intense short-pulse sources. PMID:25837087

  4. JLab CW Cryomodules for 4th Generation Light Sources

    SciTech Connect

    Rimmer, Robert; Bundy, Richard; Cheng, Guangfeng; Ciovati, Gianluigi; Clemens, William; Daly, Edward; Henry, James; Hicks, William; Kneisel, Peter; Manning, Stephen; Manus, Robert; Marhauser, Frank; Preble, Joseph; Reece, Charles; Smith, Karl; Stirbet, Mircea; Turlington, Larry; Wang, Haipeng; Wilson, Katherine

    2008-01-23

    Fourth generation light sources hold the prospect of unprecedented brightness and optical beam quality for a wide range of scientific applications. Many of the proposed new facilities will rely on large superconducting radio frequency (SRF) based linacs to provide high energy, low emittance CW electron beams. For high average power applications there is a growing acceptance of energy recovery linac (ERL) technology as the way to support large recirculating currents with modest RF power requirements. CW SRF and high current ERLs are two core competencies at Jefferson Lab. JLab has designed and built a number of CW cryomodules of several different types starting with the original CEBAF design, with variations for higher current in the two generations of JLab’s free-electron laser (FEL), through two intermediate prototypes to the final high-performance module for the 12 GeV upgrade. Each of these represent fully engineered and tested configurations with a variety of specifications that could be considered for possible use in fourth generation light sources. Furthermore JLab has been actively pursuing advanced concepts for highcurrent high-efficiency cryomodules for next generation ERL based FEL’s. These existing and proposed designs span the range from about 1mA single-pass to over 100 mA energy recovered current capability. Specialized configurations also exist for high-current non-energy recovered sections such as the injector region where very high RF power is required. We discuss the performance parameters of these existing and proposed designs and their suitability to different classes of fourth generation light sources.

  5. TID Test Results for 4th Generation iPad(TradeMark)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Guertin, S. M.; Allen, G. R.; McClure, S. S.; LaBel, K. A.

    2013-01-01

    TID testing of 4th generation iPads is reported. Of iPad subsystems, results indicate that the charging circuitry and display drivers fail at lowest TID levels. Details of construction are investigated for additional testing of components.

  6. The 4th Generation Light Source at Jefferson Lab

    SciTech Connect

    Stephen Benson; George Biallas; James Boyce; Donald Bullard; James Coleman; David Douglas; H. Dylla; Richard Evans; Pavel Evtushenko; Albert Grippo; Christopher Gould; Joseph Gubeli; David Hardy; Carlos Hernandez-Garcia; Kevin Jordan; John Klopf; Steven Moore; George Neil; Thomas Powers; Joseph Preble; Daniel Sexton; Michelle D. Shinn; Christopher Tennant; Richard Walker; Shukui Zhang; Gwyn Williams

    2007-04-25

    A number of "Grand Challenges" in Science have recently been identified in reports from The National Academy of Sciences, and the U.S. Dept. of Energy, Basic Energy Sciences. Many of these require a new generation of linac-based light source to study dynamical and non-linear phenomena in nanoscale samples. In this paper we present a summary of the properties of such light sources, comparing them with existing sources, and then describing in more detail a specific source at Jefferson Lab. Importantly, the JLab light source has developed some novel technology which is a critical enabler for other new light sources.

  7. Ultrashort hard x-ray pulses generated by 90 degrees Thomson scattering

    SciTech Connect

    Chin, A.H.; Schoenlein, R.W.; Glover, T.E.

    1997-04-01

    Ultrashort x-ray pulses permit observation of fast structural dynamics in a variety of condensed matter systems. The authors have generated 300 femtosecond, 30 keV x-ray pulses by 90 degrees Thomson scattering between femtosecond laser pulses and relativistic electrons. The x-ray and laser pulses are synchronized on a femtosecond time scale, an important prerequisite for ultrafast pump-probe spectroscopy. Analysis of the x-ray beam properties also allows for electron bunch characterization on a femtosecond time scale.

  8. X-Ray Measurements Of A Thermo Scientific P385 DD Neutron Generator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wharton, C. J.; Seabury, E. H.; Chichester, D. L.; Caffrey, A. J.; Simpson, J.; Lemchak, M.

    2011-06-01

    Idaho National Laboratory is experimenting with electrical neutron generators, as potential replacements for californium-252 radioisotopic neutron sources in its PINS prompt gamma-ray neutron activation analysis (PGNAA) system for the identification of military chemical warfare agents and explosives. In addition to neutron output, we have recently measured the x-ray output of the Thermo Scientific P385 deuterium-deuterium neutron generator. X rays are a normal byproduct from neutron generators, but depending on their intensity and energy, x rays can interfere with gamma rays from the object under test, increase gamma-spectrometer dead time, and reduce PGNAA system throughput. The P385 x-ray energy spectrum was measured with a high-purity germanium (HPGe) detector, and a broad peak is evident at about 70 keV. To identify the source of the x rays within the neutron generator assembly, it was scanned by collimated scintillation detectors along its long axis. At the strongest x-ray emission points, the generator also was rotated 60° between measurements. The scans show the primary source of x-ray emission from the P385 neutron generator is an area 60 mm from the neutron production target, in the vicinity of the ion source. Rotation of the neutron generator did not significantly alter the x-ray count rate, and its x-ray emission appears to be axially symmetric. A thin lead shield, 3.2 mm (1/8 inch) thick, reduced the 70-keV generator x rays to negligible levels.

  9. X-Ray Measurements Of A Thermo Scientific P385 DD Neutron Generator

    SciTech Connect

    Wharton, C. J.; Seabury, E. H.; Chichester, D. L.; Caffrey, A. J.; Simpson, J.; Lemchak, M.

    2011-06-01

    Idaho National Laboratory is experimenting with electrical neutron generators, as potential replacements for californium-252 radioisotopic neutron sources in its PINS prompt gamma-ray neutron activation analysis (PGNAA) system for the identification of military chemical warfare agents and explosives. In addition to neutron output, we have recently measured the x-ray output of the Thermo Scientific P385 deuterium-deuterium neutron generator. X rays are a normal byproduct from neutron generators, but depending on their intensity and energy, x rays can interfere with gamma rays from the object under test, increase gamma-spectrometer dead time, and reduce PGNAA system throughput. The P385 x-ray energy spectrum was measured with a high-purity germanium (HPGe) detector, and a broad peak is evident at about 70 keV. To identify the source of the x rays within the neutron generator assembly, it was scanned by collimated scintillation detectors along its long axis. At the strongest x-ray emission points, the generator also was rotated 60 deg. between measurements. The scans show the primary source of x-ray emission from the P385 neutron generator is an area 60 mm from the neutron production target, in the vicinity of the ion source. Rotation of the neutron generator did not significantly alter the x-ray count rate, and its x-ray emission appears to be axially symmetric. A thin lead shield, 3.2 mm (1/8 inch) thick, reduced the 70-keV generator x rays to negligible levels.

  10. The Next Generation of X-Ray Reflection Gratings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McEntaffer, Randall L.; Off-Plane X-ray Grating Spectrometer Team

    2014-01-01

    Future NASA X-ray Observatories will shed light on a variety of high-energy astrophysical phenomena. Off-plane reflection gratings can be used to provide high throughput and spectral resolution in the 0.3-2.0 keV band, allowing for unprecedented diagnostics of energetic astrophysical processes. A grating spectrometer consists of multiple aligned gratings intersecting the converging beam of a Wolter-I telescope. To achieve the performance requirements of future missions, these gratings must have a high precision, custom groove profile and be aligned overlap each spectrum at the focal plane. Here we report on the progress made on the development of these gratings during a recent NASA Strategic Astrophysics Technology grant. We have identified a novel grating fabrication method and have performed X-ray testing of prototype gratings. The performance of these gratings is consistent with high throughput and resolution. Furthermore, we have quantified our alignment tolerances and investigated alignment strategies and module mounts.

  11. Thermal management of next-generation contact-cooled synchrotron x-ray mirrors

    SciTech Connect

    Khounsary, A.

    1999-10-29

    In the past decade, several third-generation synchrotrons x-ray sources have been constructed and commissioned around the world. Many of the major problems in the development and design of the optical components capable of handling the extremely high heat loads of the generated x-ray beams have been resolved. It is expected, however, that in the next few years even more powerful x-ray beams will be produced at these facilities, for example, by increasing the particle beam current. In this paper, the design of a next generation of synchrotron x-ray mirrors is discussed. The author shows that the design of contact-cooled mirrors capable of handing x-ray beam heat fluxes in excess of 500 W/mm{sup 2} - or more than three times the present level - is well within reach, and the limiting factor is the thermal stress rather then thermally induced slope error.

  12. Laser produced plasma soft x-ray generation

    SciTech Connect

    Cerjan, C.; Rosen, M.D.

    1991-05-20

    The efficiency of soft x-ray production from laser-irradiated plasmas is simulated for two different spectral regions. These two regions, 14{Angstrom} {plus minus} 15% and 130{Angstrom} {plus minus} 1%, were chosen for proximity mask or point-projection technological applications. Relatively large conversion efficiencies were obtained from irradiation of a stainless steel target using the conditions suggested by recent Hampshire Instruments' experiments for proximity masking. Pulse-width and laser frequency parameter studies were performed for point-projection applications which suggest that the conversion applications which suggest that the conversion efficiency is sensitive to pulse-width but not to laser frequency. One of the critical components of any x-ray lithographic scheme is of course the x-ray laser source. There are two primary contenders for a reliable, efficient source currently: synchrotron radiation and spectral emission from laser produced plasma. The dominant issue for laser-plasma emission is the conversion efficiency -- output in the intended operating spectral region relative the required incident laser energy. Simulations are described in the following for both high and low energy spectral regions which have been suggested by either the proximity masking or point-projection technology.

  13. Three-dimensional X-ray observation of atmospheric biological samples by linear-array scanning-electron generation X-ray microscope system.

    PubMed

    Ogura, Toshihiko

    2011-01-01

    Recently, we developed a soft X-ray microscope called the scanning-electron generation X-ray microscope (SGXM), which consists of a simple X-ray detection system that detects X-rays emitted from the interaction between a scanning electron beam (EB) and the thin film of the sample mount. We present herein a three-dimensional (3D) X-ray detection system that is based on the SGXM technology and designed for studying atmospheric biological samples. This 3D X-ray detection system contains a linear X-ray photodiode (PD) array. The specimens are placed under a CuZn-coated Si₃N₄ thin film, which is attached to an atmospheric sample holder. Multiple tilt X-ray images of the samples are detected simultaneously by the linear array of X-ray PDs, and the 3D structure is calculated by a new 3D reconstruction method that uses a simulated-annealing algorithm. The resulting 3D models clearly reveal the inner structure of the bacterium. In addition, the proposed method can easily be used for diverse samples in a broad range of scientific fields.

  14. Three-Dimensional X-ray Observation of Atmospheric Biological Samples by Linear-Array Scanning-Electron Generation X-ray Microscope System

    PubMed Central

    Ogura, Toshihiko

    2011-01-01

    Recently, we developed a soft X-ray microscope called the scanning-electron generation X-ray microscope (SGXM), which consists of a simple X-ray detection system that detects X-rays emitted from the interaction between a scanning electron beam (EB) and the thin film of the sample mount. We present herein a three-dimensional (3D) X-ray detection system that is based on the SGXM technology and designed for studying atmospheric biological samples. This 3D X-ray detection system contains a linear X-ray photodiode (PD) array. The specimens are placed under a CuZn-coated Si3N4 thin film, which is attached to an atmospheric sample holder. Multiple tilt X-ray images of the samples are detected simultaneously by the linear array of X-ray PDs, and the 3D structure is calculated by a new 3D reconstruction method that uses a simulated-annealing algorithm. The resulting 3D models clearly reveal the inner structure of the bacterium. In addition, the proposed method can easily be used for diverse samples in a broad range of scientific fields. PMID:21731770

  15. Apparatus for setting exposure parameters of an X-ray generator

    SciTech Connect

    Kasa, Z.; Farkas, I.

    1989-03-07

    Apparatus is described for setting exposure parameters of an X-ray generator comprising: (a) an X-ray tube transformer, (b) a plurality of output terminals, on the X-ray tube transformer, (c) switching means connected to the output terminals, (d) a pair of high voltage lines selectively coupled to the output terminals by the switching means, (e) an X-ray tube, (f) exposure switching to the X-ray tube during a predetermined exposure period, (g) exposure means for determining a starting moment of an exposure period, (h) setting means for determining dosage of the exposure, (i) a filament transformer for heating a filament of the tube, (j) filament supply means for coupling a filament current selectable from a plurality of discrete current values to the filament transformer, and (k) a processor.

  16. Miniature, low-power X-ray tube using a microchannel electron generator electron source

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Elam, Wm. Timothy (Inventor); Kelliher, Warren C. (Inventor); Hershyn, William (Inventor); DeLong, David P. (Inventor)

    2011-01-01

    Embodiments of the invention provide a novel, low-power X-ray tube and X-ray generating system. Embodiments of the invention use a multichannel electron generator as the electron source, thereby increasing reliability and decreasing power consumption of the X-ray tube. Unlike tubes using a conventional filament that must be heated by a current power source, embodiments of the invention require only a voltage power source, use very little current, and have no cooling requirements. The microchannel electron generator comprises one or more microchannel plates (MCPs), Each MCP comprises a honeycomb assembly of a plurality of annular components, which may be stacked to increase electron intensity. The multichannel electron generator used enables directional control of electron flow. In addition, the multichannel electron generator used is more robust than conventional filaments, making the resulting X-ray tube very shock and vibration resistant.

  17. Accuracy evaluation of a Compton X-ray spectrometer with bremsstrahlung X-rays generated by a 6 MeV electron buncha)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kojima, Sadaoki; Arikawa, Yasunobu; Nishimura, Yasuhiko; Togawa, Hiromi; Zhang, Zhe; Ikenouchi, Takahito; Ozaki, Tetsuo; Morace, Alessio; Nagai, Takahiro; Abe, Yuki; Sakata, Shouhei; Inoue, Hiroaki; Utsugi, Masaru; Nakai, Mitsuo; Nishimura, Hiroaki; Shiraga, Hiroyuki; Kato, Ryukou; Fujioka, Shinsuke; Azechi, Hiroshi

    2014-11-01

    A Compton-scattering-based X-ray spectrometer is developed to obtain the energy distribution of fast electrons produced by intense laser and matter interactions. Bremsstrahlung X-rays generated by fast electrons in a material are used to measure fast electrons' energy distribution in matter. In the Compton X-ray spectrometer, X-rays are converted into recoil electrons by Compton scattering in a converter made from fused silica glass, and a magnet-based electron energy analyzer is used to measure the energy distribution of the electrons that recoil in the direction of the incident X-rays. The spectrum of the incident X-rays is reconstructed from the energy distribution of the recoil electrons. The accuracy of this spectrometer is evaluated using a quasi-monoenergetic 6 MeV electron bunch that emanates from a linear accelerator. An electron bunch is injected into a 1.5 mm thick tungsten plate to produce bremsstrahlung X-rays. The spectrum of these bremsstrahlung X-rays is obtained in the range from 1 to 9 MeV. The energy of the electrons in the bunch is estimated using a Monte Carlo simulation of particle-matter interactions. The result shows that the spectrometer's energy accuracy is ±0.5 MeV for 6.0 MeV electrons.

  18. Accuracy evaluation of a Compton X-ray spectrometer with bremsstrahlung X-rays generated by a 6 MeV electron bunch

    SciTech Connect

    Kojima, Sadaoki Arikawa, Yasunobu; Zhang, Zhe; Ikenouchi, Takahito; Morace, Alessio; Nagai, Takahiro; Abe, Yuki; Sakata, Shouhei; Inoue, Hiroaki; Utsugi, Masaru; Nakai, Mitsuo; Nishimura, Hiroaki; Shiraga, Hiroyuki; Fujioka, Shinsuke; Azechi, Hiroshi; Nishimura, Yasuhiko; Togawa, Hiromi; Ozaki, Tetsuo; Kato, Ryukou

    2014-11-15

    A Compton-scattering-based X-ray spectrometer is developed to obtain the energy distribution of fast electrons produced by intense laser and matter interactions. Bremsstrahlung X-rays generated by fast electrons in a material are used to measure fast electrons’ energy distribution in matter. In the Compton X-ray spectrometer, X-rays are converted into recoil electrons by Compton scattering in a converter made from fused silica glass, and a magnet-based electron energy analyzer is used to measure the energy distribution of the electrons that recoil in the direction of the incident X-rays. The spectrum of the incident X-rays is reconstructed from the energy distribution of the recoil electrons. The accuracy of this spectrometer is evaluated using a quasi-monoenergetic 6 MeV electron bunch that emanates from a linear accelerator. An electron bunch is injected into a 1.5 mm thick tungsten plate to produce bremsstrahlung X-rays. The spectrum of these bremsstrahlung X-rays is obtained in the range from 1 to 9 MeV. The energy of the electrons in the bunch is estimated using a Monte Carlo simulation of particle-matter interactions. The result shows that the spectrometer's energy accuracy is ±0.5 MeV for 6.0 MeV electrons.

  19. Properties and Applications of Laser Generated X-Ray Sources

    SciTech Connect

    Smith, R F; Key, M H

    2002-02-25

    The rapid development of laser technology and related progress in research using lasers is shifting the boundaries where laser based sources are preferred over other light sources particularly in the XUV and x-ray spectral region. Laser based sources have exceptional capability for short pulse and high brightness and with improvements in high repetition rate pulsed operation, such sources are also becoming more interesting for their average power capability. This study presents an evaluation of the current capabilities and near term future potential of laser based light sources and summarizes, for the purpose of comparison, the characteristics and near term prospects of sources based on synchrotron radiation and free electron lasers. Conclusions are drawn on areas where the development of laser based sources is most promising and competitive in terms of applications potential.

  20. The Operation Modes of Kharkov X-Ray Generator Based on Compton Scattering NESTOR

    SciTech Connect

    Bulyak, E.V.; Gladkikh, P.; Karnaukhov, I.M.; Mytsykov, A.; Shcherbakov, A.A.; Zelinsky, A.Y.; Tatchyn, R.; /SLAC, SSRL

    2005-05-09

    The results of theoretical and numerical considerations of linear Compton scattering are used to evaluate characteristics of X-rays produced by collision between a low emittance electron beam and intensive laser light in an X-ray generator NESTOR of NSC KIPT. Two main generation modes have been under consideration at preliminary NESTOR design. There are the operation mode for medicine 33.4 keV X-rays production using 43 Mev electron beam and Nd:YAG laser beam and higher energy X-rays production mode providing X-rays with energy up to 900 keV with 225 MeV electron beam and Nd:YAG laser beam. It was supposed to use an optical cavity for laser beam accumulation of about 2.6 m long and an interaction angle of about 3{sup o} in both operation modes. A few more operation modes provide possibility to expand operation range of NESTOR. Using interaction angle 10{sup o} and 150{sup o} along with optical resonator of 42 cm long and the second mode of laser light it is possible to produce X-rays in energy range from a few keV till 1.5 MeV. The intensity and spectral brightness of the X-rays is expected to be {approx} 10{sup 13} phot/s and {approx}10{sup 13} phot/s/mm{sup 2}/mrad{sup 2}/0.1%BW respectively.

  1. Femtosecond electron and x-ray generation by laser andplasma-based sources

    SciTech Connect

    Esarey, E.; Leemans, W.P.

    2000-02-01

    The generation of ultra-short x-rays by Thomson scattering intense laser pulses from electron beams is discussed, including recent experimental results and methods for enhancing the x-ray flux. A high flux of x-rays in a femtosecond pulse requires the generation of femtosecond electron bunches and a head-on Thomson scattering geometry. The generation of ultrashort electron bunches in a plasma-based accelerator with an injection technique that uses two colliding laser pulses is discussed. Simulations indicate the bunches as short as a few fs can be produced. Conversion of the fs electron pulse to a fs x-ray pulse can be accomplished by Bremsstrahlung or Thomson scattering.

  2. Wire array z-pinch insights for high x-ray power generation

    SciTech Connect

    Sanford, T.W.L.; Mock, R.C.; Nash, T.J.

    1998-08-01

    The discovery that the use of very large numbers of wires enables high x-ray power to be generated from wire-array z-pinches represents a breakthrough in load design for large pulsed power generators, and has permitted high temperatures to be generated in radiation cavities on Saturn. In this paper, changes in x-ray emission characteristics as a function of wire number, array mass, and load radius, for 20-mm-long aluminum arrays on Saturn that led to these breakthrough hohlraum results, are discussed and compared with a few related emission characteristics of high-wire-number aluminum and tungsten arrays on Z. X=ray measurement comparisons with analytic models and 2-D radiation-magnetohydrodynamic (RMHC) code simulations in the x-y and r-z planes provide confidence in the ability of the models and codes to predict future x-ray performance with very-large-number wire arrays.

  3. Titanium dioxide nanofiber-cotton targets for efficient multi-keV x-ray generation

    SciTech Connect

    Tanabe, Minoru; Nishimura, Hiroaki; Fujioka, Shinsuke; Nagai, Keiji; Yamamoto, Norimasa; Mima, Kunioki; Gu, Zhong-Ze; Pan, Chao; Girard, Frederic; Primout, Michel; Villette, Bruno; Brebion, Didier; Fournier, Kevin B.; Fujishima, Akira

    2008-08-04

    Multi-keV x-ray generation from low-density (27{+-}7 mg/cm{sup 3}) nanofiber-cotton targets composed of titanium dioxide has been investigated. The cotton targets were heated volumetrically and supersonically to a peak electron temperature of 2.3 keV, which is optimal to yield Ti K-shell x rays. Considerable enhancement of conversion efficiency [(3.7{+-}0.5)%] from incident laser energy into Ti K-shell x rays (4-6 keV band) was attained in comparison with that [(1.4{+-}0.9)%] for a planar Ti-foil target.

  4. Titanium dioxide nanofiber-cotton targets for efficient multi-keV x-ray generation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tanabe, Minoru; Nishimura, Hiroaki; Fujioka, Shinsuke; Nagai, Keiji; Yamamoto, Norimasa; Gu, Zhong-Ze; Pan, Chao; Girard, Frederic; Primout, Michel; Villette, Bruno; Brebion, Didier; Fournier, Kevin B.; Fujishima, Akira; Mima, Kunioki

    2008-08-01

    Multi-keV x-ray generation from low-density (27±7mg/cm3) nanofiber-cotton targets composed of titanium dioxide has been investigated. The cotton targets were heated volumetrically and supersonically to a peak electron temperature of 2.3keV, which is optimal to yield Ti K-shell x rays. Considerable enhancement of conversion efficiency [(3.7±0.5)%] from incident laser energy into Ti K-shell x rays (4-6keV band) was attained in comparison with that [(1.4±0.9)%] for a planar Ti-foil target.

  5. Fourth-generation X-ray sources: some possible applications to biology.

    PubMed

    Doniach, S

    2000-05-01

    The term 'fourth generation X-ray sources' has come to mean X-ray free-electron lasers which use multi-GeV electron beams from linear accelerators to generate X-rays by self-amplified stimulated emission when fired into long undulators. Properties of the radiation expected from such sources are reviewed briefly and two possible applications of the resulting pulsed highly collimated X-radiation to problems in biology are discussed: use of X-ray photon correlation spectroscopy to measure time correlations of atoms in protein crystals, and use of Mössbauer radiation extracted from the photon beams by resonant Bragg diffraction from (57)Fe-containing crystals, for MAD phasing of very large unit-cell biomolecular crystals and possibly for photon echo measurements.

  6. Generation Mechanisms UV and X-ray Emissions During SL9 Impact

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Waite, J. Hunter, Jr.

    1997-01-01

    The purpose of this grant was to study the ultraviolet and X-ray emissions associated with the impact of comet Shoemaker-Levy 9 with Jupiter. The University of Michigan task was primarily focused on theoretical calculations. The NAGW-4788 subtask was to be largely devoted to determining the constraints placed by the X-ray observations on the physical mechanisms responsible for the generation of the X-rays. Author summarized below the ROSAT observations and suggest a physical mechanism that can plausibly account for the observed emissions. It is hoped that the full set of activities can be completed at a later date. Further analysis of the ROSAT data acquired at the time of the impact was necessary to define the observational constraints on the magnetospheric-ionospheric processes involved in the excitation of the X-ray emissions associated with the fragment impacts. This analysis centered around improvements in the pointing accuracy and improvements in the timing information. Additional pointing information was made possible by the identification of the optical counterparts to the X-ray sources in the ROSAT field-of-view. Due to the large number of worldwide observers of the impacts, a serendipitous visible plate image from an observer in Venezuela provided a very accurate location of the present position of the X-ray source, virtually eliminating pointing errors in the data. Once refined, the pointing indicated that the two observed X-ray brightenings that were highly correlated in time with the K and P2 events were brightenings of the X-ray aurora (as identified in images prior to the impact).Appendix A "ROSAT observations of X-ray emissions from Jupiter during the impact of comet Shoemaker-Levy 9' also included.

  7. Generation of femtosecond to sub-femtosecond x-ray pulses in free-electron lasers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ding, Yuantao

    2015-05-01

    Generation of high power, femtosecond to sub-femtosecond x-ray pulses is attracting much attention within the x-ray free-electron laser (FEL) user community. At the existing FEL facilities, such as the Linac Coherent Light Source at SLAC, several methods have been developed to produce such short x-rays. Low-charge operation mode and emittance-spoiling scheme have successfully delivered short pulses for user experiments with duration less than 10 fs. A nonlinear compression mode has been recently developed and the pulse duration could be about 200 as. We will review the recent experimental progress at the LCLS for achieving few-femtosecond x-rays, and also discuss other short pulse schemes for reaching sub-femtosecond regime.

  8. Measuring the X-ray background in the reionization era with first generation 21 cm experiments

    SciTech Connect

    Christian, Pierre; Loeb, Abraham E-mail: aloeb@cfa.harvard.edu

    2013-09-01

    The X-ray background during the epoch of reionization is currently poorly constrained. We demonstrate that it is possible to use first generation 21 cm experiments to calibrate it. Using the semi-numerical simulation, 21cmFAST, we calculate the dependence of the 21 cm power spectrum on the X-ray background flux. Comparing the signal to the sensitivity of the Murchison Widefield Array (MWA) we find that in the redshift interval z =8-14 the 21 cm signal is detectable for certain values of the X-ray background. We show that there is no degeneracy between the X-ray production efficiency and the Lyα production efficiency and that the degeneracy with the ionization fraction of the intergalactic medium can be broken.

  9. Generation of X-rays from Comet C/Hyakutake 1996 B2

    PubMed

    Bingham; Dawson; Shapiro; Mendis; Kellett

    1997-01-01

    The instability resulting from the relative motion of newly picked-up cometary photoions and the solar wind generates lower hybrid waves that are capable of accelerating electrons to the keV range of energies. These electrons may be responsible for the x-rays from comet C/Hyakutake 1996 B2 seen by the Rontgen X-ray Satellite. The inferred x-ray photon power depends on the electron energy, with keV electrons providing values of photon power two orders of magnitude greater than 100 eV electrons. These observations and in particular, spectral resolution of the x-rays, should provide more insight into the composition of the comet.

  10. ANALYSIS AND MITIGATION OF X-RAY HAZARD GENERATED FROM HIGH INTENSITY LASER-TARGET INTERACTIONS

    SciTech Connect

    Qiu, R.; Liu, J.C.; Prinz, A.A.; Rokni, S.H.; Woods, M.; Xia, Z.; /SLAC

    2011-03-21

    Interaction of a high intensity laser with matter may generate an ionizing radiation hazard. Very limited studies have been made, however, on the laser-induced radiation protection issue. This work reviews available literature on the physics and characteristics of laser-induced X-ray hazards. Important aspects include the laser-to-electron energy conversion efficiency, electron angular distribution, electron energy spectrum and effective temperature, and bremsstrahlung production of X-rays in the target. The possible X-ray dose rates for several femtosecond Ti:sapphire laser systems used at SLAC, including the short pulse laser system for the Matter in Extreme Conditions Instrument (peak power 4 TW and peak intensity 2.4 x 10{sup 18} W/cm{sup 2}) were analysed. A graded approach to mitigate the laser-induced X-ray hazard with a combination of engineered and administrative controls is also proposed.

  11. A proposal for femtosecond x-ray generation in the SLC collider arcs

    SciTech Connect

    Frisch, J.C.

    1999-12-15

    The high-energy electron beam from the SLAC linac, in conjunction with the bunch compression of the existing SLC collider arcs, provides the opportunity for an extremely short pulse spontaneous emission x-ray source with high brightness. Experiments at the SLC have already demonstrated peak currents of 10 kA at 46 GeV. The addition of a relatively simple undulator in the reverse-bend section of the north arc can generate x-ray radiation of wavelength < 1 {angstrom} with peak brightness higher than any existing source. This could be used for testing x-ray diagnostics and to gain experience with short pulse x-ray experiments as a precursor to high brightness experiments with the Linac Coherent Light Source (LCLS). In addition, experiments with a short electron bunch, relevant to the LCLS and the Next Linear Collider (NLC) projects, might be carried out.

  12. Soft x-ray generation in gases with an ultrashort pulse laser

    SciTech Connect

    Ditmire, T R

    1996-01-08

    An experimental investigation of soft x-ray production resulting from the interaction of intense near infra-red laser radiation with gases is presented in this thesis. Specifically, soft x-ray generation through high order harmonic generation or exploiting intense inverse bremsstrahlung heating is examined. Most of these studies are conducted with femtosecond, terawatt class Cr:LiSrAlF{sub 6} (LiSAF) laser, though results derived from studies with other laser systems are presented as well. The majority of this work is devoted to experimental investigations, however, theoretical and computational models are developed to interpret the data. These studies are motivated by the possibility of utilizing the physics of intense laser/matter interactions as a potential compact source of bright x-rays. Consequently, the thrust of many of the experiments conducted is aimed at characterizing the x-rays produced for possible use in applications. In general, the studies of this manuscript fall into three categories. First, a unique 130 fs, 8 TW laser that is based on chirped pulse amplification, is described, and its performance is evaluated. The generation of x-rays through high order harmonics is then discussed with emphasis on characterizing and optimizing harmonic generation. Finally, the generation of strong, incoherent x-ray radiation by the intense irradiation of large (>1,000 atom) clusters in gas jets, is explored. The physics of laser energy absorption by clusters illuminated with intensities of 10{sup 15} to 10{sup 17} W/cm{sup 2} is considered in detail. X-ray spectroscopy of the hot plasmas that result from the irradiation of the clusters is conducted, and energy transport and kinetics issues in these plasmas are discussed.

  13. Laboratory Astrophysics with High Power Lasers and 4th Generation Light Sources

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gregori, Gianluca

    2013-10-01

    The combination of high power optical lasers and free electron lasers operating at short wavelength (in the x-ray regime) has opened new avenues for laboratory astrophysics, where exotic states of matter can now be generated and probed with high accuracy. We will review a few examples of recent experiments performed at the Linac Coherent Light Source (LCLS) free electron laser operating in Stanford (CA), but also discuss future applications. We will focus our discussion on the following three examples: 1) Laboratory analogues of white dwarf envelopes and the physics of strongly coupled plasmas near crystallization; 2) scaled laboratory experiments to investigate magnetized and radiative shocks; and 3) possible proposals for testing strong gravity analogues using x-ray Thomson scattering. This work was partially the European Research Council under the European Community's Seventh Framework Programme.

  14. Direct observation of unstained wet biological samples by scanning-electron generation X-ray microscopy.

    PubMed

    Ogura, Toshihiko

    2010-01-01

    Analytical tools of nanometre-scale resolution are indispensable in the fields of biology, physics and chemistry. One suitable tool, the soft X-ray microscope, provides high spatial resolution of visible light for wet specimens. For biological specimens, X-rays of water-window wavelength between carbon (284 eV; 4.3 nm) and oxygen (540 eV; 2.3 nm) absorption edges provide high-contrast imaging of biological samples in water. Among types of X-ray microscope, the transmission X-ray microscope using a synchrotron radiation source with diffractive zone plates offers the highest spatial resolution, approaching 15-10nm. However, even higher resolution is required to measure proteins and protein complexes in biological specimens; therefore, a new type of X-ray microscope with higher resolution that uses a simple light source is desirable. Here we report a novel scanning-electron generation X-ray microscope (SGXM) that demonstrates direct imaging of unstained wet biological specimens. We deposited wet yeasts in the space between two silicon nitride (Si(3)N(4)) films. A scanning electron beam of accelerating voltage 5 keV and current 1.6 nA irradiates the titanium (Ti)-coated Si(3)N(4) film, and the soft X-ray signal from it is detected by an X-ray photodiode (PD) placed below the sample. The SGXM can theoretically achieve better than 5 nm resolution. Our method can be utilized easily for various wet biological samples of bacteria, viruses, and protein complexes.

  15. Development of all-solid-state flash x-ray generator with photoconductive semiconductor switches.

    PubMed

    Xun, Ma; Jianjun, Deng; Hongwei, Liu; Jianqiang, Yuan; Jinfeng, Liu; Bing, Wei; Yanling, Qing; Wenhui, Han; Lingyun, Wang; Pin, Jiang; Hongtao, Li

    2014-09-01

    A compact, low-jitter, and high repetitive rate all-solid-state flash x-ray generator making use of photo conductive semiconductor switches was developed recently for the diagnostic purpose of some hydrokinetical experiments. The generator consisted of twelve stages of Blumlein pulse forming networks, and an industrial cold cathode diode was used to generate intense x-ray radiations with photon energy up to 220 keV. Test experiments showed that the generator could produce >1 kA electron beam currents and x-ray pulses with ~40 ns duration under 100 Hz repetitive rates at least (limited by the triggering laser on hand), also found was that the delay time of the cathode explosive emission is crucial to the energy transfer efficiency of the whole system. In addition, factors affecting the diode impedance, how the switching synchronization and diode impedance determining the allowable operation voltage were discussed. PMID:25273719

  16. Development of all-solid-state flash x-ray generator with photoconductive semiconductor switches

    SciTech Connect

    Xun, Ma; Jianjun, Deng; Hongwei, Liu; Jianqiang, Yuan; Jinfeng, Liu; Bing, Wei; Yanling, Qing; Wenhui, Han; Lingyun, Wang; Pin, Jiang; Hongtao, Li

    2014-09-15

    A compact, low-jitter, and high repetitive rate all-solid-state flash x-ray generator making use of photo conductive semiconductor switches was developed recently for the diagnostic purpose of some hydrokinetical experiments. The generator consisted of twelve stages of Blumlein pulse forming networks, and an industrial cold cathode diode was used to generate intense x-ray radiations with photon energy up to 220 keV. Test experiments showed that the generator could produce >1 kA electron beam currents and x-ray pulses with ∼40 ns duration under 100 Hz repetitive rates at least (limited by the triggering laser on hand), also found was that the delay time of the cathode explosive emission is crucial to the energy transfer efficiency of the whole system. In addition, factors affecting the diode impedance, how the switching synchronization and diode impedance determining the allowable operation voltage were discussed.

  17. U-shape rotating anti-cathode compact X-ray generator: 20 times stronger than the commercially available X-ray source.

    PubMed

    Sakabe, N; Sakabe, K; Ohsawa, S; Sakai, T; Kobayakawa, H; Sugimura, T; Ikeda, M; Tawada, M; Watanabe, N; Sasaki, K; Wakatsuki, M

    2013-11-01

    A new type of U-shape anti-cathode X-ray generator in which the inner surface of a cylindrical target is irradiated by an electron beam has been made by modifying a conventional rotating anti-cathode X-ray generator whose brightness in the catalog is 12 kW mm(-2). The target material (Cu), target radius (50 mm) and rotating speed (6,000 r.p.m.) were not changed in this modification. A brightness of 52 kW mm(-2) was obtained by this U-shape-type X-ray generator. This means that the brightness of the new type is 4.3 times greater than that of the old unmodified one. Furthermore, the new-type X-ray generator yielded a brightness of 129 kW mm(-2) by adding a carbon coating on the Cu target. This means an overall increase of brightness of ten times. The original generator has the highest brightness in the generators of the same class (having a radius of 50 mm and rotation speed of 6,000 r.p.m.). Observations showed that Cu Kα counts at vertical incidence of the electron beam onto the surface of the new target, which is initially optically smooth, decrease as the surface is roughened by a severe thermal stress caused by strong electron beam exposure. Further observation reveals, however, that oblique incidence of the electron beam onto the roughened surface drastically increased the X-ray output and amounts to twice as much as that from a smooth surface at vertical incidence. Thus, at the present stage, an overall increase of brightness has been realised at a level 20 times stronger than that of the original commercially offered X-ray generator that we modified.

  18. HEXITEC: A Next Generation Hard X-ray Detector for Solar Observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ryan, Daniel; Christe, Steven; Shih, Albert; Inglis, Andrew R.; Gregory, Kyle; Baumgartner, Wayne H.; Gaskin, Jessica; Wilson-Hodge, Colleen; Seller, Paul; Wilson, Matthew; Veale, Matthew C.; Panessa, Marco

    2016-05-01

    There is an increasing demand in solar physics for high resolution X-ray spectroscopic imaging. Such observations would present ground-breaking opportunities to study the poorly understood high energy processes in the solar corona such as solar flares, coronal heating, etc. However, such observations require a new breed of solid-state detectors sensititve to high energy X-rays with fine independent pixels to subsample the point spread function (PSF) of the X-ray optics. They must also be capable of handling very high count rates as photon fluxes from solar flares often cause pileup in current detectors. The Rutherford Appleton Laboratory (RAL) has recently developed a new Cadmium Telluride (CdTe) detector system, dubbed HEXITEC (High Energy X-ray Imaging Technology). It is an 80x80 array of 250 micron independent pixels sensitive in the 4--80 keV band and capable of a high full frame readout rate of 10 kHz. HEXITEC provides the smallest independently read out pixels currently available, and are well matched to the few arcsecond PSF produced by the current and next generation hard X-ray focusing optics. NASA's Goddard and Marshall Space Flight Centers are collaborating with RAL to develop these detectors for use on future space-borne hard X-ray focusing telescopes. In this poster we show the latest results on HEXITEC's imaging capability, high read out rate, and energy sensitivity and reveal it to be ideal for such future instruments. The potential observations obtained by combining HEXITEC with the next generation of X-ray focusing optics could to revolutionize our understanding of high energy processes in the solar corona.

  19. Generation of intense coherent soft x-ray with electron microbunches induced and frozen by lasers

    SciTech Connect

    Yu. L.H.

    1983-01-01

    We describe a new improved version of Transverse Optical Klystron Harmonic Generator that uses three lasers to replace the undulators in the modulator and radiator and freeze the electron microbunching. We show that intense soft x-rays can be generated.

  20. Characteristics of Radiation Generated with the X-ray Source NESTOR

    SciTech Connect

    Gladkikh, P.; Kovalyova, N.; Shcherbakov, A.; Zelinsky, A.

    2007-01-19

    The results of analytical calculations and numerical simulations of the basic SR characteristics, generated from bending magnets of the storage ring NESTOR and hard X-rays generated through Compton scattering of an intense laser beam by relativistic electron are presented in this work. It is shown that Compton X-ray source NESTOR which construction in NSC KIPT is supported with NATO grant number SfP-977982 covers radiation energy range from 0.3 eV till 1 MeV with photon flux of about 1010 - 1012 phot/s. The possible areas of radiation application of the storage ring NESTOR are given.

  1. Diamond planar refractive lenses for third- and fourth-generation X-ray sources.

    PubMed

    Nöhammer, Bernd; Hoszowska, Joanna; Freund, Andreas K; David, Christian

    2003-03-01

    The fabrication and testing of planar refractive hard X-ray lenses made from bulk CVD diamond substrates is reported. The lens structures were generated by electron-beam lithography and transferred by reactive-ion etching into the diamond. Various lens designs were fabricated and tested at 12.4 and 17.5 keV photon energy. Efficiencies of up to 71% and gains of up to 26 were achieved. A line focus of 3.2 micro m (FWHM) was measured. These lenses should be able to withstand the extreme flux densities expected at the planned fourth-generation X-ray sources.

  2. Demonstration of enhanced K-edge angiography using a cerium target x-ray generator

    SciTech Connect

    Sato, Eiichi; Tanaka, Etsuro; Mori, Hidezo; Kawai, Toshiaki; Ichimaru, Toshio; Sato, Shigehiro; Takayama, Kazuyoshi; Ido, Hideaki

    2004-11-01

    The cerium target x-ray generator is useful in order to perform enhanced K-edge angiography using a cone beam because K-series characteristic x rays from the cerium target are absorbed effectively by iodine-based contrast mediums. The x-ray generator consists of a main controller, a unit with a Cockcroft-Walton circuit and a fixed anode x-ray tube, and a personal computer. The tube is a glass-enclosed diode with a cerium target and a 0.5-mm-thick beryllium window. The maximum tube voltage and current were 65 kV and 0.4 mA, respectively, and the focal-spot sizes were 1.0x1.3 mm. Cerium K{alpha} lines were left using a barium sulfate filter, and the x-ray intensity was 0.48 {mu}C/kg at 1.0 m from the source with a tube voltage of 60 kV, a current of 0.40 mA, and an exposure time of 1.0 s. Angiography was performed with a computed radiography system using iodine-based microspheres. In coronary angiography of nonliving animals, we observed fine blood vessels of approximately 100 {mu}m with high contrasts.

  3. Short x-ray pulse generation using deflecting cavities at the Advanced Photon Source.

    SciTech Connect

    Sajaev, V.; Borland, M.; Chae, Y.-C.; Decker, G.; Dejus, R.; Emery, L.; Harkay, K.; Nassiri, A.; Shastri, S.; Waldschmidt, G.; Yang, B.; Anfinrud, P.; Dolgashev, V.; NIH; SLAC

    2007-11-11

    Storage-ring-based third-generation light sources can provide intense radiation pulses with durations as short as 100 ps. However, there is growing interest within the synchrotron radiation user community in performing experiments with much shorter X-ray pulses. Zholents et al. [Nucl. Instr. and Meth. A 425 (1999) 385] recently proposed using RF orbit deflection to generate sub-ps X-ray pulses. In this scheme, two deflecting cavities are used to deliver a longitudinally dependent vertical kick to the beam. An optical slit can then be used to slice out a short part of the radiation pulse. Implementation of this scheme is planned for one APS beamline in the near future. In this paper, we summarize our feasibility study of this method and the expected X-ray beam parameters. We find that a pulse length of less than two picoseconds can be achieved.

  4. Implosion dynamics and x-ray generation in small-diameter wire-array Z pinches.

    PubMed

    Ivanov, V V; Sotnikov, V I; Kindel, J M; Hakel, P; Mancini, R C; Astanovitskiy, A L; Haboub, A; Altemara, S D; Shevelko, A P; Kazakov, E D; Sasorov, P V

    2009-05-01

    It is known from experiments that the radiated x-ray energy appears to exceed the calculated implosion kinetic energy and Spitzer resistive heating [C. Deeney, Phys. Rev. A 44, 6762 (1991)] but possible mechanisms of the enhanced x-ray production are still being discussed. Enhanced plasma heating in small-diameter wire arrays with decreased calculated kinetic energy was investigated, and a review of experiments with cylindrical arrays of 1-16 mm in diameter on the 1 MA Zebra generator is presented in this paper. The implosion and x-ray generation in cylindrical wire arrays with different diameters were compared to find a transition from a regime where thermalization of the kinetic energy is the prevailing heating mechanism to regimes with other dominant mechanisms of plasma heating. Loads of 3-8 mm in diameter generate the highest x-ray power at the Zebra generator. The x-ray power falls in 1-2 mm loads which can be linked to the lower efficiency of plasma heating with the lack of kinetic energy. The electron temperature and density of the pinches also depend on the array diameter. In small-diameter arrays, 1-3 mm in diameter, ablating plasma accumulates in the inner volume much faster than in loads of 12-16 mm in diameter. Correlated bubblelike implosions were observed with multiframe shadowgraphy. Investigation of energy balance provides evidence for mechanisms of nonkinetic plasma heating in Z pinches. Formation and evolution of bright spots in Z pinches were studied with a time-gated pinhole camera. A comparison of x-ray images with shadowgrams shows that implosion bubbles can initiate bright spots in the pinch. Features of the implosions in small-diameter wire arrays are discussed to identify mechanisms of energy dissipation.

  5. Generation and dose distribution measurement of flash x-ray in KALI-5000 system.

    PubMed

    Menon, Rakhee; Roy, Amitava; Mitra, S; Sharma, A; Mondal, J; Mittal, K C; Nagesh, K V; Chakravarthy, D P

    2008-10-01

    Flash x-ray generation studies have been carried out in KALI-5000 Pulse power system. The intense relativistic electron beam has been bombarded on a tantalum target at anode to produce flash x-ray via bremsstrahlung conversion. The typical electron beam parameter was 360 kV, 18 kA, and 100 ns, with a few hundreds of A/cm(2) current density. The x-ray dose has been measured with calcium sulfate:dysposium (CaSO(4):Dy) thermoluminescent dosimeter and the axial dose distribution has been characterized. It has been observed that the on axis dose falls of with distance approximately 1/x(n), where n varies from 1.8 to 1.85. A maximum on axis dose of 46 mrad has been measured at 1 m distance from the source. A plastic scintillator with optical fiber coupled to a photomultiplier tube has been developed to measure the x-ray pulse width. The typical x-ray pulse width varied from 50 to 80 ns.

  6. Direct analysis of molybdenum target generated x-ray spectra with a portable device.

    PubMed

    Stumbo, S; Bottigli, U; Golosio, B; Oliva, P; Tangaro, S

    2004-10-01

    In routine applications, information about the photon flux of x-ray tubes is obtained from exposure measurements and cataloged spectra. This approach relies mainly on the assumption that the real spectrum is correctly approximated by the cataloged one, once the main characteristics of the tube such as voltage, target material, anode angle, and filters are taken account of. In practice, all this information is not always available. Moreover, x-ray tubes with the same characteristics may have different spectra. We describe an apparatus that should be useful for quality control in hospitals and for characterizing new radiographic systems. The apparatus analyzes the spectrum generated by an x-ray mammographic unit. It is based on a commercial CZT produced by AMPTEK Inc. and a set of tungsten collimator disks. The electronics of the CZT are modified so as to obtain a faster response. The signal is digitized using an analog to digital converter with a sampling frequency of up to 20 MHz. The whole signal produced by the x-ray tube is acquired and analyzed off-line in order to accurately recognize pile-up events and reconstruct the emitted spectrum. The energy resolution has been determined using a calibrated x-ray source. Spectra were validated by comparison of the HVL measured using an ionization chamber.

  7. Generation and dose distribution measurement of flash x-ray in KALI-5000 system

    SciTech Connect

    Menon, Rakhee; Roy, Amitava; Mitra, S.; Sharma, A.; Mondal, J.; Mittal, K. C.; Nagesh, K. V.; Chakravarthy, D. P.

    2008-10-15

    Flash x-ray generation studies have been carried out in KALI-5000 Pulse power system. The intense relativistic electron beam has been bombarded on a tantalum target at anode to produce flash x-ray via bremsstrahlung conversion. The typical electron beam parameter was 360 kV, 18 kA, and 100 ns, with a few hundreds of A/cm{sup 2} current density. The x-ray dose has been measured with calcium sulfate:dysposium (CaSO{sub 4}:Dy) thermoluminescent dosimeter and the axial dose distribution has been characterized. It has been observed that the on axis dose falls of with distance {approx}1/x{sup n}, where n varies from 1.8 to 1.85. A maximum on axis dose of 46 mrad has been measured at 1 m distance from the source. A plastic scintillator with optical fiber coupled to a photomultiplier tube has been developed to measure the x-ray pulse width. The typical x-ray pulse width varied from 50 to 80 ns.

  8. X-Ray Comb Generation from Nuclear-Resonance-Stabilized X-Ray Free-Electron Laser Oscillator for Fundamental Physics and Precision Metrology

    SciTech Connect

    Adams, B. W.; Kim, K. -J.

    2015-03-31

    An x-ray free-electron laser oscillator (XFELO) is a next-generation x-ray source, similar to free-electron laser oscillators at VUV and longer wavelengths but using crystals as high-reflectivity x-ray mirrors. Each output pulse from an XFELO is fully coherent with high spectral purity. The temporal coherence length can further be increased drastically, from picoseconds to microseconds or even longer, by phase-locking successive XFELO output pulses, using the narrow nuclear resonance lines of nuclei such as Fe-57 as a reference. We show that the phase fluctuation due to the seismic activities is controllable and that due to spontaneous emission is small. The fluctuation of electron-bunch spacing contributes mainly to the envelope fluctuation but not to the phase fluctuation. By counting the number of standing-wave maxima formed by the output of the nuclear-resonance-stabilized (NRS) XFELO over an optically known length, the wavelength of the nuclear resonance can be accurately measured, possibly leading to a new length or frequency standard at x-ray wavelengths. A NRS-XFELO will be an ideal source for experimental x-ray quantum optics as well as other fundamental physics. The technique can be refined for other, narrower resonances such as Ta-181 or Sc-45.

  9. Generation of bright isolated attosecond soft X-ray pulses driven by multicycle midinfrared lasers.

    PubMed

    Chen, Ming-Chang; Mancuso, Christopher; Hernández-García, Carlos; Dollar, Franklin; Galloway, Ben; Popmintchev, Dimitar; Huang, Pei-Chi; Walker, Barry; Plaja, Luis; Jaroń-Becker, Agnieszka A; Becker, Andreas; Murnane, Margaret M; Kapteyn, Henry C; Popmintchev, Tenio

    2014-06-10

    High harmonic generation driven by femtosecond lasers makes it possible to capture the fastest dynamics in molecules and materials. However, to date the shortest subfemtosecond (attosecond, 10(-18) s) pulses have been produced only in the extreme UV region of the spectrum below 100 eV, which limits the range of materials and molecular systems that can be explored. Here we experimentally demonstrate a remarkable convergence of physics: when midinfrared lasers are used to drive high harmonic generation, the conditions for optimal bright, soft X-ray generation naturally coincide with the generation of isolated attosecond pulses. The temporal window over which phase matching occurs shrinks rapidly with increasing driving laser wavelength, to the extent that bright isolated attosecond pulses are the norm for 2-µm driving lasers. Harnessing this realization, we experimentally demonstrate the generation of isolated soft X-ray attosecond pulses at photon energies up to 180 eV for the first time, to our knowledge, with a transform limit of 35 attoseconds (as), and a predicted linear chirp of 300 as. Most surprisingly, advanced theory shows that in contrast with as pulse generation in the extreme UV, long-duration, 10-cycle, driving laser pulses are required to generate isolated soft X-ray bursts efficiently, to mitigate group velocity walk-off between the laser and the X-ray fields that otherwise limit the conversion efficiency. Our work demonstrates a clear and straightforward approach for robustly generating bright isolated attosecond pulses of electromagnetic radiation throughout the soft X-ray region of the spectrum.

  10. Generation of bright isolated attosecond soft X-ray pulses driven by multicycle midinfrared lasers

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Ming-Chang; Mancuso, Christopher; Hernández-García, Carlos; Dollar, Franklin; Galloway, Ben; Popmintchev, Dimitar; Huang, Pei-Chi; Walker, Barry; Plaja, Luis; Jaroń-Becker, Agnieszka A.; Becker, Andreas; Murnane, Margaret M.; Kapteyn, Henry C.; Popmintchev, Tenio

    2014-01-01

    High harmonic generation driven by femtosecond lasers makes it possible to capture the fastest dynamics in molecules and materials. However, to date the shortest subfemtosecond (attosecond, 10−18 s) pulses have been produced only in the extreme UV region of the spectrum below 100 eV, which limits the range of materials and molecular systems that can be explored. Here we experimentally demonstrate a remarkable convergence of physics: when midinfrared lasers are used to drive high harmonic generation, the conditions for optimal bright, soft X-ray generation naturally coincide with the generation of isolated attosecond pulses. The temporal window over which phase matching occurs shrinks rapidly with increasing driving laser wavelength, to the extent that bright isolated attosecond pulses are the norm for 2-µm driving lasers. Harnessing this realization, we experimentally demonstrate the generation of isolated soft X-ray attosecond pulses at photon energies up to 180 eV for the first time, to our knowledge, with a transform limit of 35 attoseconds (as), and a predicted linear chirp of 300 as. Most surprisingly, advanced theory shows that in contrast with as pulse generation in the extreme UV, long-duration, 10-cycle, driving laser pulses are required to generate isolated soft X-ray bursts efficiently, to mitigate group velocity walk-off between the laser and the X-ray fields that otherwise limit the conversion efficiency. Our work demonstrates a clear and straightforward approach for robustly generating bright isolated attosecond pulses of electromagnetic radiation throughout the soft X-ray region of the spectrum. PMID:24850866

  11. Tuning the performance of organic spintronic devices using x-ray generated traps.

    PubMed

    Rybicki, J; Lin, R; Wang, F; Wohlgenannt, M; He, C; Sanders, T; Suzuki, Y

    2012-08-17

    X rays produced during electron-beam deposition of metallic electrodes drastically change the performance of organic spintronic devices. The x rays generate traps with an activation energy of ≈0.5  eV in a commonly used organic. These traps lead to a dramatic decrease in spin-diffusion length in organic spin valves. In organic magnetoresistive (OMAR) devices, however, the traps strongly enhance magnetoresistance. OMAR is an intrinsic magnetotransport phenomenon and does not rely on spin injection. We discuss our observations in the framework of currently existing theories. PMID:23006391

  12. Generation of hard x rays by femtosecond laser pulse interaction with solid targets in atmosphere.

    PubMed

    Zhidkov, Alexey G; Pikuz, Sergey A; Faenov, Anatoly Ya; Chefonov, Oleg V; Ovchinnikov, Andrey V; Agranat, Mikhail B; Zigler, Arie

    2012-03-01

    X ray radiation as high as 50 keV, including K(α) of Ba and Mo, have been observed from a solid target during the interaction of low energy ~0.65 mJ, 1 kHz 40 femtosecond laser pulses focused in air at atmospheric pressure. Energetic electrons generating such x rays are possibly produced when the field strength in laser pulse wake exceeds the runaway threshold in air. Two dimensional particle-in-cell simulations that include optical field ionization of air and elastic collisions support this mechanism.

  13. A practical method to generate brilliant hard x-rays with a tabletop electron storage ring

    SciTech Connect

    Yamada, H.; Amano, D.; Miyade, H.

    1995-12-31

    With electron storage rings not only synchrotron radiation(SR) but also bremsstrahlung(BS) from a thin target placed in the electron orbit are mechanisms to generate brilliant x-ray beams. The calculated brilliance of BS with a 50 MeV storage ring, which is nearly 10{sup 13} photons/s, mrad{sup 2}, mm{sup 2}, 0.1% band width for 100 keV x-rays, exceeds that of SR from a 1 GeV storage ring. This photon energy spectrum is almost constant and extend up to the electron energy. The reasons for this high brilliance with this new radiation scheme is that the electron beams penetrating the thin target are utilized repeatedly, the narrow angular divergence of BS is determined by the kinematics of relativistic electron as same as SR, and the x-ray source size of the order of 1 {mu}m is determined by the size of thin target instead of electron beam sizes. Continuous injection of electron beam to the storage ring at full energy is the way to keep high and constant beam current. Peak current and repetition rate determine x-ray out put power. Note that the power of x-ray beam is also provided from a RF cavity of the storage ring. In this paper we will report some experimental results and discuss further application on a coherent bremsstrahlung generated from a set of stacked foils placed in the electron orbit of the ring. Resulting from these investigations the photon storage ring which is based on a 50 MeV exact circular electron storage ring could provide wide range of coherent and incoherent radiations from far infrared to hard x-ray in a practical amount of radiation power.

  14. [Design of a high-voltage insulation testing system of X-ray high frequency generators].

    PubMed

    Huang, Yong; Mo, Guo-Ming; Wang, Yan; Wang, Hong-Zhi; Yu, Jie-Ying; Dai, Shu-Guang

    2007-09-01

    In this paper, we analyze the transformer of X-ray high-voltage high-frequency generators and, have designed and implemented a high-voltage insulation testing system for its oil tank using full-bridge series resonant soft switching PFM DC-DC converter.

  15. The Ultraviolet Surprise. Efficient Soft X-Ray High Harmonic Generation in Multiply-Ionized Plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    Popmintchev, Dimitar; Hernandez-Garcia, Carlos; Dollar, Franklin; Mancuso, Christopher; Perez-Hernandez, Jose A.; Chen, Ming-Chang; Hankla, Amelia; Gao, Xiaohui; Shim, Bonggu; Gaeta, Alexander L.; Tarazkar, Maryam; Romanov, Dmitri A.; Levis, Robert J.; Gaffney, Jim A.; Foord, Mark; Libby, Stephen B.; Jaron-Becker, Agnieskzka; Becker, Andreas; Plaja, Luis; Muranane, Margaret M.; Kapteyn, Henry C.; Popmintchev, Tenio

    2015-12-04

    High-harmonic generation is a universal response of matter to strong femtosecond laser fields, coherently upconverting light to much shorter wavelengths. Optimizing the conversion of laser light into soft x-rays typically demands a trade-off between two competing factors. Reduced quantum diffusion of the radiating electron wave function results in emission from each species which is highest when a short-wavelength ultraviolet driving laser is used. But, phase matching—the constructive addition of x-ray waves from a large number of atoms—favors longer-wavelength mid-infrared lasers. We identified a regime of high-harmonic generation driven by 40-cycle ultraviolet lasers in waveguides that can generate bright beams in the soft x-ray region of the spectrum, up to photon energies of 280 electron volts. Surprisingly, the high ultraviolet refractive indices of both neutral atoms and ions enabled effective phase matching, even in a multiply ionized plasma. We observed harmonics with very narrow linewidths, while calculations show that the x-rays emerge as nearly time-bandwidth–limited pulse trains of ~100 attoseconds.

  16. The Ultraviolet Surprise. Efficient Soft X-Ray High Harmonic Generation in Multiply-Ionized Plasmas

    DOE PAGES

    Popmintchev, Dimitar; Hernandez-Garcia, Carlos; Dollar, Franklin; Mancuso, Christopher; Perez-Hernandez, Jose A.; Chen, Ming-Chang; Hankla, Amelia; Gao, Xiaohui; Shim, Bonggu; Gaeta, Alexander L.; et al

    2015-12-04

    High-harmonic generation is a universal response of matter to strong femtosecond laser fields, coherently upconverting light to much shorter wavelengths. Optimizing the conversion of laser light into soft x-rays typically demands a trade-off between two competing factors. Reduced quantum diffusion of the radiating electron wave function results in emission from each species which is highest when a short-wavelength ultraviolet driving laser is used. But, phase matching—the constructive addition of x-ray waves from a large number of atoms—favors longer-wavelength mid-infrared lasers. We identified a regime of high-harmonic generation driven by 40-cycle ultraviolet lasers in waveguides that can generate bright beams inmore » the soft x-ray region of the spectrum, up to photon energies of 280 electron volts. Surprisingly, the high ultraviolet refractive indices of both neutral atoms and ions enabled effective phase matching, even in a multiply ionized plasma. We observed harmonics with very narrow linewidths, while calculations show that the x-rays emerge as nearly time-bandwidth–limited pulse trains of ~100 attoseconds.« less

  17. The ARC-EN-CIEL French 4th Generation Light Source

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bruni, C.; Couprie, M. E.; Chubar, O.; Loulergue, A.; Nahon, L.; Carré, B.; Garzella, D.; Labat, M.; Lambert, G.; Monot, P.; Jablonka, M.; Méot, F.; Mosnier, A.; Marquès, J. R.; Ortega, J. M.; Nutarelli, D.

    2007-01-01

    ARC-EN-CIEL (Accelerator-Radiation Complex for Enhanced Coherent Intense Extended Light) proposal is based on a CW 1 GeV superconducting linear accelerator delivering high charge, subpicosecond, low emittance electron bunches with a high repetition rate (1 kHz). The FEL uses High Harmonics Generation in gases in a High Gain Harmonic Generation scheme, leading to a rather compact solution. The radiation extends down to 0.8 nm with the non-linear harmonics and reproduces the good longitudinal and transverse coherence of the harmonics generated in gas. Optional beam loops, foreseen to increase the beam current or the energy, will accommodate infrared CSR source, femtosecond undulator sources in the VUV and X-ray ranges, and a FEL oscillator in the 10 nm range. An important synergy is expected between accelerator and laser communities, in particular for electron plasma acceleration tests.

  18. Excitation of XPS spectra from nanoscaled particles by local generation of x-rays

    SciTech Connect

    Mallinson, Christopher F.; Castle, James E.

    2015-09-15

    In preliminary work, the authors have shown that use of an aluminum substrate to support a distribution of copper particles enables their characteristic photoelectrons to be observed within the Auger electron spectrum generated by an incident electron beam. This observation raises the possibility of the use of chemical shifts and the corresponding Auger parameter to identify the chemical states present on the surface of individual submicrometer particles within a mixture. In this context, the technique has an advantage in that, unlike conventional Auger electron spectroscopy, the electron beam does not dwell on the particle but on the substrate adjacent to it. Given the importance, for both medical and toxicological reasons, of the surface composition of such particles, the authors have continued to explore the potential of this development. In this contribution, the authors show that proximal excitation of x-rays is equally successful with magnesium substrates. In some regions of the x-ray photoelectron spectrum, the much larger Auger peaks generated by the electron beam can cause inconvenient clustering of Auger and photoelectron peaks. As in conventional x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, the ability to switch between Al and Mg sources is useful in such situations. In this context, the authors have extended the studies to iron particles where the authors show that use of Al or Mg substrates, as necessary, can make a contribution to clear identification of individual components in the Fe 2p peaks. For this development in electron spectroscopy to achieve its full potential, it is necessary to optimize the beam conditions used to generate the local x-ray to give good selectivity of a given particle. Measurements made in support of this will be given. Of greater concern is a possible problem of local heating associated with x-ray generation. The authors continue to explore this problem and report some progress in minimizing heating of the particle while maintaining

  19. Design of a Nb3Sn Magnet for a 4th Generation ECR Ion Source

    SciTech Connect

    Prestemon, S,; Trillaud, F.; Caspi, S.; Ferracin, P.; Sabbi, G. L.; Lyneis, C. M.; Leitner, D.; Todd, D. S.; Hafalia, R.

    2008-08-17

    The next generation of Electron Cyclotron Resonant (ECR) ion sources are expected to operate at a heating radio frequency greater than 40 GHz. The existing 3rd generation systems, exemplified by the state of the art system VENUS, operate in the 10-28 GHz range, and use NbTi superconductors for the confinement coils. The magnetic field needed to confine the plasma scales with the rf frequency, resulting in peak fields on the magnets of the 4th generation system in excess of 10 T. High field superconductors such as Nb{sub 3}Sn must therefore be considered. The magnetic design of a 4th. generation ECR ion source operating at an rf frequency of 56 GHz is considered. The analysis considers both internal and external sextupole configurations, assuming commercially available Nb{sub 3}Sn material properties. Preliminary structural design issues are discussed based on the forces and margins associated with the coils in the different configurations, leading to quantitative data for the determination of a final magnet design.

  20. X-ray-generated heralded macroscopical quantum entanglement of two nuclear ensembles.

    PubMed

    Liao, Wen-Te; Keitel, Christoph H; Pálffy, Adriana

    2016-09-19

    Heralded entanglement between macroscopical samples is an important resource for present quantum technology protocols, allowing quantum communication over large distances. In such protocols, optical photons are typically used as information and entanglement carriers between macroscopic quantum memories placed in remote locations. Here we investigate theoretically a new implementation which employs more robust x-ray quanta to generate heralded entanglement between two crystal-hosted macroscopical nuclear ensembles. Mössbauer nuclei in the two crystals interact collectively with an x-ray spontaneous parametric down conversion photon that generates heralded macroscopical entanglement with coherence times of approximately 100 ns at room temperature. The quantum phase between the entangled crystals can be conveniently manipulated by magnetic field rotations at the samples. The inherent long nuclear coherence times allow also for mechanical manipulations of the samples, for instance to check the stability of entanglement in the x-ray setup. Our results pave the way for first quantum communication protocols that use x-ray qubits.

  1. X-ray-generated heralded macroscopical quantum entanglement of two nuclear ensembles

    PubMed Central

    Liao, Wen-Te; Keitel, Christoph H.; Pálffy, Adriana

    2016-01-01

    Heralded entanglement between macroscopical samples is an important resource for present quantum technology protocols, allowing quantum communication over large distances. In such protocols, optical photons are typically used as information and entanglement carriers between macroscopic quantum memories placed in remote locations. Here we investigate theoretically a new implementation which employs more robust x-ray quanta to generate heralded entanglement between two crystal-hosted macroscopical nuclear ensembles. Mössbauer nuclei in the two crystals interact collectively with an x-ray spontaneous parametric down conversion photon that generates heralded macroscopical entanglement with coherence times of approximately 100 ns at room temperature. The quantum phase between the entangled crystals can be conveniently manipulated by magnetic field rotations at the samples. The inherent long nuclear coherence times allow also for mechanical manipulations of the samples, for instance to check the stability of entanglement in the x-ray setup. Our results pave the way for first quantum communication protocols that use x-ray qubits. PMID:27640348

  2. X-ray-generated heralded macroscopical quantum entanglement of two nuclear ensembles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liao, Wen-Te; Keitel, Christoph H.; Pálffy, Adriana

    2016-09-01

    Heralded entanglement between macroscopical samples is an important resource for present quantum technology protocols, allowing quantum communication over large distances. In such protocols, optical photons are typically used as information and entanglement carriers between macroscopic quantum memories placed in remote locations. Here we investigate theoretically a new implementation which employs more robust x-ray quanta to generate heralded entanglement between two crystal-hosted macroscopical nuclear ensembles. Mössbauer nuclei in the two crystals interact collectively with an x-ray spontaneous parametric down conversion photon that generates heralded macroscopical entanglement with coherence times of approximately 100 ns at room temperature. The quantum phase between the entangled crystals can be conveniently manipulated by magnetic field rotations at the samples. The inherent long nuclear coherence times allow also for mechanical manipulations of the samples, for instance to check the stability of entanglement in the x-ray setup. Our results pave the way for first quantum communication protocols that use x-ray qubits.

  3. X-ray-generated heralded macroscopical quantum entanglement of two nuclear ensembles.

    PubMed

    Liao, Wen-Te; Keitel, Christoph H; Pálffy, Adriana

    2016-01-01

    Heralded entanglement between macroscopical samples is an important resource for present quantum technology protocols, allowing quantum communication over large distances. In such protocols, optical photons are typically used as information and entanglement carriers between macroscopic quantum memories placed in remote locations. Here we investigate theoretically a new implementation which employs more robust x-ray quanta to generate heralded entanglement between two crystal-hosted macroscopical nuclear ensembles. Mössbauer nuclei in the two crystals interact collectively with an x-ray spontaneous parametric down conversion photon that generates heralded macroscopical entanglement with coherence times of approximately 100 ns at room temperature. The quantum phase between the entangled crystals can be conveniently manipulated by magnetic field rotations at the samples. The inherent long nuclear coherence times allow also for mechanical manipulations of the samples, for instance to check the stability of entanglement in the x-ray setup. Our results pave the way for first quantum communication protocols that use x-ray qubits. PMID:27640348

  4. Coherent Soft X-Ray Generation in the Water Window with the EEHG Scheme

    SciTech Connect

    Xiang, D; Stupakov, G.; /SLAC

    2009-05-26

    Recently a scheme entitled echo-enabled harmonic generation (EEHG) was proposed for producing short wavelength FEL radiation that allows far higher harmonic numbers to be accessed as compared with the normal limit arising from incoherent energy spread. In this paper we study the feasibility of a single EEHG stage to generate coherent radiation in the 'water window' (2--4 nm wavelength) directly from a UV seed laser at 190-nm wavelength. We present time-dependent simulation results which demonstrate that the single-stage EEHG FEL can generate high power soft x-ray radiation in the water window with narrow bandwidth close to Fourier transform limit directly from a UV seed laser. The schemes to generate short x-ray pulse from femtosecond to attosecond using EEHG FEL are also discussed.

  5. Fully coherent hard X-ray generation by two-stage phase-merging enhanced harmonic generation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Guang-Lei; Zhang, Wei-Qing; Yang, Xue-Ming; Feng, Chao; Deng, Hai-Xiao

    2016-09-01

    Cascading stages of seeded free electron lasers (FELs) is a promising way to produce fully coherent X-ray radiation. We study a new approach to produce coherent hard X-rays by cascading the recently proposed phase-merging enhanced harmonic generation (PEHG) The scheme consists of one dogleg and two PEHG configurations, and may be one of the leading candidates for the extracted undulator branch in future X-ray FEL facilities. FEL physics studies show that such a scheme is feasible within the present technology and can provide high brightness X-ray radiation pulses with narrow bandwidth and full coherence The radiated peak power at 1 Å wavelength converted from an initial 200 nm seed laser is over 2 GW Supported by the National Natural Science Foundation of China (21127902 & 11322550) and Ten Thousand Talent Program

  6. Characterization of neutron yield and x-ray spectra of a High Flux Neutron Generator (HFNG)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nnamani, Nnaemeka; HFNG Collaboration

    2015-04-01

    The High Flux Neutron Generator (HFNG) is a DD plasma-based source, with a self-loading target intended for fundamental science and engineering applications, including 40 Ar/39 Ar geochronology, neutron cross section measurements, and radiation hardness testing of electronics. Our first estimate of the neutron yield, based on the population of the 4.486 hour 115 In isomer gave a neutron yield of the order 108 n/sec; optimization is ongoing to achieve the design target of 1011 n/sec. Preliminary x-ray spectra showed prominent energy peaks which are likely due to atomic line-emission from back-streaming electrons accelerated up to 100 keV impinging on various components of the HFNG chamber. Our x-ray and neutron diagnostics will aid us as we continue to evolve the design to suppress back-streaming electrons, necessary to achieve higher plasma beam currents, and thus higher neutron flux. This talk will focus on the characterization of the neutron yield and x-ray spectra during our tests. A collimation system is being installed near one of the chamber ports for improved observation of the x-ray spectra. This work is supported by NSF Grant No. EAR-0960138, U.S. DOE LBNL Contract No. DE-AC02-05CH11231, U.S. DOE LLNL Contract No. DE-AC52-07NA27344, and the UC Office of the President Award 12-LR-238745.

  7. High resolution hard x-ray microscope on a second generation synchrotron source

    SciTech Connect

    Tian Yangchao; Li Wenjie; Chen Jie; Liu Longhua; Liu Gang; Tian Jinping; Xiong Ying; Tkachuk, Andrei; Gelb, Jeff; Hsu, George; Yun Wenbing

    2008-10-15

    A full-field, transmission x-ray microscope (TXM) operating in the energy range of 7-11 keV has been installed at the U7A beamline at the National Synchrotron Radiation Laboratory, a second generation synchrotron source operating at 0.8 GeV. Although the photon flux at sample position in the operating energy range is significantly low due to its relatively large emittance, the TXM can get high quality x-ray images with a spatial resolution down to 50 nm with acceptable exposure time. This TXM operates in either absorption or Zernike phase contrast mode with similar resolution. This TXM is a powerful analytical tool for a wide range of scientific areas, especially studies on nanoscale phenomena and structural imaging in biology, materials science, and environmental science. We present here the property of the x-ray source, beamline design, and the operation and key optical components of the x-ray TXM. Plans to improve the throughput of the TXM will be discussed.

  8. High resolution hard x-ray microscope on a second generation synchrotron source.

    PubMed

    Tian, Yangchao; Li, Wenjie; Chen, Jie; Liu, Longhua; Liu, Gang; Tkachuk, Andrei; Tian, Jinping; Xiong, Ying; Gelb, Jeff; Hsu, George; Yun, Wenbing

    2008-10-01

    A full-field, transmission x-ray microscope (TXM) operating in the energy range of 7-11 keV has been installed at the U7A beamline at the National Synchrotron Radiation Laboratory, a second generation synchrotron source operating at 0.8 GeV. Although the photon flux at sample position in the operating energy range is significantly low due to its relatively large emittance, the TXM can get high quality x-ray images with a spatial resolution down to 50 nm with acceptable exposure time. This TXM operates in either absorption or Zernike phase contrast mode with similar resolution. This TXM is a powerful analytical tool for a wide range of scientific areas, especially studies on nanoscale phenomena and structural imaging in biology, materials science, and environmental science. We present here the property of the x-ray source, beamline design, and the operation and key optical components of the x-ray TXM. Plans to improve the throughput of the TXM will be discussed. PMID:19044720

  9. High resolution hard x-ray microscope on a second generation synchrotron source

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tian, Yangchao; Li, Wenjie; Chen, Jie; Liu, Longhua; Liu, Gang; Tkachuk, Andrei; Tian, Jinping; Xiong, Ying; Gelb, Jeff; Hsu, George; Yun, Wenbing

    2008-10-01

    A full-field, transmission x-ray microscope (TXM) operating in the energy range of 7-11 keV has been installed at the U7A beamline at the National Synchrotron Radiation Laboratory, a second generation synchrotron source operating at 0.8 GeV. Although the photon flux at sample position in the operating energy range is significantly low due to its relatively large emittance, the TXM can get high quality x-ray images with a spatial resolution down to 50 nm with acceptable exposure time. This TXM operates in either absorption or Zernike phase contrast mode with similar resolution. This TXM is a powerful analytical tool for a wide range of scientific areas, especially studies on nanoscale phenomena and structural imaging in biology, materials science, and environmental science. We present here the property of the x-ray source, beamline design, and the operation and key optical components of the x-ray TXM. Plans to improve the throughput of the TXM will be discussed.

  10. X-Ray Lasers

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chapline, George; Wood, Lowell

    1975-01-01

    Outlines the prospects of generating coherent x rays using high-power lasers and indentifies problem areas in their development. Indicates possible applications for coherent x rays in the fields of chemistry, biology, and crystallography. (GS)

  11. The Generation-X X-ray Observatory Vision Mission and Technology Study

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Figueroa-Feliciano, Enectali

    2004-01-01

    The new frontier in astrophysics is the study of the birth and evolution of the first stars, galaxies and black holes in the early Universe. X-ray astronomy opens a window into these objects by studying the emission from black holes, supernova explosions and the gamma-ray burst afterglows of massive stars. However, such objects are beyond the grasp of current or near-future observatories. X-ray imaging and spectroscopy of such distant objects will require an X-ray telescope with large collecting area and high angular resolution. Our team has conceived the Generation-X Vision Mission based on an X-ray observatory with 100 sq m collecting area at 1 keV (1000 times larger than Chandra) and 0.1 arcsecond angular resolution (several times better than Chandra and 50 times better than the Constellation-X resolution goal). Such an observatory would be capable of detecting the earliest black holes and galaxies in the Universe, and will also study extremes of density, gravity, magnetic fields, and kinetic energy which cannot be created in laboratories. NASA has selected the Generation-X mission for study under its Vision Mission Program. We describe the studies being performed to develop the mission concept and define candidate technologies and performance requirements for Generation-X. The baseline Generation-X mission involves four 8m diameter X-ray telescopes operating at Sun-Earth L2. We trade against an alternate concept of a single 26m diameter telescope with focal plane instruments on a separate spacecraft. A telescope of this size will require either robotic or human-assisted in-flight assembly. The required effective area implies that extremely lightweight grazing incidence X-ray optics must be developed. To achieve the required aerial density of at least 100 times lower than in Chandra, we will study 0.1mm thick mirrors which have active on-orbit figure control. We discuss the suite of required detectors, including a large FOV high angular resolution imager, a

  12. Adaptive grazing incidence optics for the next generation of x-ray observatories

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lillie, C.; Pearson, D.; Plinta, A.; Metro, B.; Lintz, E.; Shropshire, D.; Danner, R.

    2010-09-01

    Advances in X-ray astronomy require high spatial resolution and large collecting area. Unfortunately, X-ray telescopes with grazing incidence mirrors require hundreds of concentric mirror pairs to obtain the necessary collecting area, and these mirrors must be thin shells packed tightly together... They must also be light enough to be placed in orbit with existing launch vehicles, and able to be fabricated by the thousands for an affordable cost. The current state of the art in X-ray observatories is represented by NASA's Chandra X-ray observatory with 0.5 arc-second resolution, but only 400 cm2 of collecting area, and by ESA's XMM-Newton observatory with 4,300 cm2 of collecting area but only 15 arc-second resolution. The joint NASA/ESA/JAXA International X-ray Observatory (IXO), with {15,000 cm2 of collecting area and 5 arc-second resolution which is currently in the early study phase, is pushing the limits of passive mirror technology. The Generation-X mission is one of the Advanced Strategic Mission Concepts that NASA is considering for development in the post-2020 period. As currently conceived, Gen-X would be a follow-on to IXO with a collecting area >= 50 m2, a 60-m focal length and 0.1 arc-second spatial resolution. Gen-X would be launched in {2030 with a heavy lift Launch Vehicle to an L2 orbit. Active figure control will be necessary to meet the challenging requirements of the Gen-X optics. In this paper we present our adaptive grazing incidence mirror design and the results from laboratory tests of a prototype mirror.

  13. X-ray diffraction imaging--a multi-generational perspective.

    PubMed

    Harding, G

    2009-02-01

    A brief description is given of some applications of X-ray diffraction imaging (XDI) in security screening, including detection of narcotics and a wide range of explosives: organic (plastic) explosives, liquids, home-made explosives (HMEs) and special nuclear materials (SNMs). A Bayesian formulation of the "rare event scenario" is presented, allowing the probability to be quantified that an unlikely threat is indeed present when an uncertain detection system raises an alarm. Granted the utility of X-ray diffraction (XRD) as a significant screening modality for false-alarm resolution, the topic of its technological feasibility is addressed. It is shown that, in analogy to computed tomography, XDI permits a significant reduction to be achieved in measurement time per object volume element (voxel) compared with that of a classical X-ray diffractometer. This reduction can be accomplished by designing the XDI system to record energy-dispersive XRD profiles from many volume elements (object voxels) in parallel. A general scheme for designing "massively-parallel" (MP) XDI systems is presented. XDI configurations of the first generation (1 voxels(-1)), second generation (100 voxelss(-1)) and third generation (10(4) voxelss(-1)) are presented and discussed. Three alternative 3rd Generation XDI geometries, namely: direct fan-beam; parallel (waterfall) beam; and inverse fan-beam are compared with respect to technological realization. Directions for future development of XDI in screening applications are outlined. PMID:18805014

  14. Compact monochromatic flash x-ray generator utilizing a disk-cathode molybdenum tube.

    PubMed

    Sato, Eiichi; Tanaka, Etsuro; Mori, Hidezo; Kawai, Toshiaki; Ichimaru, Toshio; Sato, Shigehiro; Takayama, Kazuyoshi; Ido, Hideaki

    2005-01-01

    The high-voltage condensers in a polarity-inversion two-stage Marx surge generator are charged from -50 to -70 kV by a power supply, and the electric charges in the condensers are discharged to an x-ray tube after closing gap switches in the surge generator with a trigger device. The x-ray tube is a demountable diode, and the turbo molecular pump evacuates air from the tube with a pressure of approximately 1 mPa. Clean molybdenum Kalpha lines are produced using a 20 microm-thick zirconium filter, since the tube utilizes a disk cathode and a rod target, and bremsstrahlung rays are not emitted in the opposite direction to that of electron acceleration. At a charging voltage of -70 kV, the instantaneous tube voltage and current were 120 kV and 1.0 kA, respectively. The x-ray pulse widths were approximately 70 ns, and the generator produced instantaneous number of Kalpha photons was approximately 3 x 10(7) photons/cm2 per pulse at 0.5 m from the source of 3.0 mm in diameter.

  15. Compact monochromatic flash x-ray generator utilizing a disk-cathode molybdenum tube

    SciTech Connect

    Sato, Eiichi; Tanaka, Etsuro; Mori, Hidezo; Kawai, Toshiaki; Ichimaru, Toshio; Sato, Shigehiro; Takayama, Kazuyoshi; Ido, Hideaki

    2005-01-01

    The high-voltage condensers in a polarity-inversion two-stage Marx surge generator are charged from -50 to -70 kV by a power supply, and the electric charges in the condensers are discharged to an x-ray tube after closing gap switches in the surge generator with a trigger device. The x-ray tube is a demountable diode, and the turbo molecular pump evacuates air from the tube with a pressure of approximately 1 mPa. Clean molybdenum K{alpha} lines are produced using a 20 {mu}m-thick zirconium filter, since the tube utilizes a disk cathode and a rod target, and bremsstrahlung rays are not emitted in the opposite direction to that of electron acceleration. At a charging voltage of -70 kV, the instantaneous tube voltage and current were 120 kV and 1.0 kA, respectively. The x-ray pulse widths were approximately 70 ns, and the generator produced instantaneous number of K{alpha} photons was approximately 3x10{sup 7} photons/cm{sup 2} per pulse at 0.5 m from the source of 3.0 mm in diameter.

  16. Attosecond x-ray source generation from two-color polarized gating plasmonic field enhancement

    SciTech Connect

    Feng, Liqiang; Yuan, Minghu; Chu, Tianshu

    2013-12-15

    The plasmonic field enhancement from the vicinity of metallic nanostructures as well as the polarization gating technique has been utilized to the generation of the high order harmonic and the single attosecond x-ray source. Through numerical solution of the time-dependent Schrödinger equation, for moderate the inhomogeneity and the polarized angle of the two fields, we find that not only the harmonic plateau has been extended and enhanced but also the single short quantum path has been selected to contribute to the harmonic. As a result, a series of 50 as pulses around the extreme ultraviolet and the x-ray regions have been obtained. Furthermore, by investigating the other parameters effects on the harmonic emission, we find that this two-color polarized gating plasmonic field enhancement scheme can also be achieved by the multi-cycle pulses, which is much better for experimental realization.

  17. Flexible Field Emitter for X-ray Generation by Implanting CNTs into Nickel Foil.

    PubMed

    Sun, Bin; Wang, Yan; Ding, Guifu

    2016-12-01

    This paper reports on a flexible Ni micro wire with CNTs embedded into its surface. By using micromachining technology, for the first time, we could implant nanoscale materials into micro-scale metal substrate at room temperature. Thanks to the effective direct contact and the strong interactions between CNTs and the substrate, field emission current of 1.11 mA (current density of 22.2 mA/cm(2)) could be achieved from the micro wire. Moreover, the wire shows excellent mechanical properties for large amplitude bending, which is beneficial for geometric designing. To check the practical application of the wire, a simplified X-ray imaging system was set up by modifying a conventional tube. The gray shade that appears on the sensitive film after being exposed to the radiation confirms the X-ray generation. PMID:27613070

  18. Flexible Field Emitter for X-ray Generation by Implanting CNTs into Nickel Foil

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, Bin; Wang, Yan; Ding, Guifu

    2016-09-01

    This paper reports on a flexible Ni micro wire with CNTs embedded into its surface. By using micromachining technology, for the first time, we could implant nanoscale materials into micro-scale metal substrate at room temperature. Thanks to the effective direct contact and the strong interactions between CNTs and the substrate, field emission current of 1.11 mA (current density of 22.2 mA/cm2) could be achieved from the micro wire. Moreover, the wire shows excellent mechanical properties for large amplitude bending, which is beneficial for geometric designing. To check the practical application of the wire, a simplified X-ray imaging system was set up by modifying a conventional tube. The gray shade that appears on the sensitive film after being exposed to the radiation confirms the X-ray generation.

  19. Generation of subterawatt-attosecond pulses in a soft x-ray free-electron laser

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Senlin; Ding, Yuantao; Huang, Zhirong; Marcus, Gabriel

    2016-08-01

    We propose a novel scheme to generate attosecond soft x rays in a self-seeded free-electron laser (FEL) suitable for enabling attosecond spectroscopic investigations. A time-energy chirped electron bunch with additional sinusoidal energy modulation is adopted to produce a short seed pulse through a self-seeding monochromator. This short seed pulse, together with high electron current spikes and a cascaded delay setup, enables a high-efficiency FEL with a fresh bunch scheme. Simulations show that using the Linac Coherent Light Source (LCLS) parameters, soft x-ray pulses with a FWHM of 260 attoseconds and a peak power of 0.5 TW can be obtained. This scheme also has the feature of providing a stable central wavelength determined by the self-seeding monochromator.

  20. Application of a Theory for Generation of Soft X-Ray by Storage Rings and Its Use For X-Ray Lithography

    SciTech Connect

    Minkov, D.; Yamada, H.; Toyosugi, N.; Morita, M.; Yamaguchi, T.

    2007-01-19

    A theory has been developed for generation of soft X-ray transition radiation (TR) by storage ring synchrotrons. It takes into consideration that the dielectric constant of the TR target material is a complex number, utilizes an explicit expression for the number of passes of an injected electron through the target, and describes more precisely the absorption of TR in the target. Such TR can be used for performing X-ray lithography (XRL), and therefore a formula is included for the sensitivity of the photoresist used in XRL. TR targets for XRL can be optimized, based on finding a maximum of the resist sensitivity. Application of this theory to optimization of Mg target shows that a target containing only one Mg foil, with a thickness of about 245 nm is the best Mg target, for performing XRL by our storage ring synchrotron MIRRORCLE-20SX.

  1. Characterization of a next-generation piezo bimorph X-ray mirror for synchrotron beamlines

    PubMed Central

    Alcock, Simon G.; Nistea, Ioana; Sutter, John P.; Sawhney, Kawal; Fermé, Jean-Jacques; Thellièr, Christophe; Peverini, Luca

    2015-01-01

    Piezo bimorph mirrors are versatile active optics used on many synchrotron beamlines. However, many bimorphs suffer from the ‘junction effect’: a periodic deformation of the optical surface which causes major aberrations to the reflected X-ray beam. This effect is linked to the construction of such mirrors, where piezo ceramics are glued directly below the thin optical substrate. In order to address this problem, a next-generation bimorph with piezos bonded to the side faces of a monolithic substrate was developed at Thales-SESO and optimized at Diamond Light Source. Using metrology feedback from the Diamond-NOM, the optical slope error was reduced to ∼0.5 µrad r.m.s. for a range of ellipses. To maximize usability, a novel holder was built to accommodate the substrate in any orientation. When replacing a first-generation bimorph on a synchrotron beamline, the new mirror significantly improved the size and shape of the reflected X-ray beam. Most importantly, there was no evidence of the junction effect even after eight months of continuous beamline usage. It is hoped that this new design will reinvigorate the use of active bimorph optics at synchrotron and free-electron laser facilities to manipulate and correct X-ray wavefronts. PMID:25537582

  2. Characterization of a next-generation piezo bimorph X-ray mirror for synchrotron beamlines.

    PubMed

    Alcock, Simon G; Nistea, Ioana; Sutter, John P; Sawhney, Kawal; Fermé, Jean Jacques; Thellièr, Christophe; Peverini, Luca

    2015-01-01

    Piezo bimorph mirrors are versatile active optics used on many synchrotron beamlines. However, many bimorphs suffer from the `junction effect': a periodic deformation of the optical surface which causes major aberrations to the reflected X-ray beam. This effect is linked to the construction of such mirrors, where piezo ceramics are glued directly below the thin optical substrate. In order to address this problem, a next-generation bimorph with piezos bonded to the side faces of a monolithic substrate was developed at Thales-SESO and optimized at Diamond Light Source. Using metrology feedback from the Diamond-NOM, the optical slope error was reduced to ∼ 0.5 µrad r.m.s. for a range of ellipses. To maximize usability, a novel holder was built to accommodate the substrate in any orientation. When replacing a first-generation bimorph on a synchrotron beamline, the new mirror significantly improved the size and shape of the reflected X-ray beam. Most importantly, there was no evidence of the junction effect even after eight months of continuous beamline usage. It is hoped that this new design will reinvigorate the use of active bimorph optics at synchrotron and free-electron laser facilities to manipulate and correct X-ray wavefronts.

  3. Theoretical analysis of hard x-ray generation by nonperturbative interaction of ultrashort light pulses with a metal

    PubMed Central

    Weisshaupt, Jannick; Juvé, Vincent; Holtz, Marcel; Woerner, Michael; Elsaesser, Thomas

    2015-01-01

    The interaction of intense femtosecond pulses with metals allows for generating ultrashort hard x-rays. In contrast to plasma theories, tunneling from the target into vacuum is introduced as electron generation step, followed by vacuum acceleration in the laser field and re-entrance into the target to generate characteristic x-rays and Bremsstrahlung. For negligible space charge in vacuum, the Kα flux is proportional to the incident intensity and the wavelength squared, suggesting a strong enhancement of the x-ray flux by mid-infrared driving pulses. This prediction is in quantitative agreement with experiments on femtosecond Cu Kα generation. PMID:26798790

  4. 4th generation of the 1st level surface detector trigger in the Pierre Auger Observator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Szadkowski, Z.

    The proposal of a new 4th generation of the Front-End with the advanced 1st level triggers for the Infill Array of the Pierre Auger Observatory and for the Auger North is described. Newest FPGA chips offer much higher capacity of logic registers and memories, as well as DSP blocks. The calibration channel, previously supported by an external dual-port RAM, has been fully implemented into FPGA chip, through a large internal memory. In turn DSP blocks allowed on implementation of much more sophisticated spectral trigger algorithms. A single chip simplified board design, newer architecture of FPGA reduced resouces utilization and power consumption. Higher sampling in the new Front- End in comparison with previous 40 MHz designs as well as free resources for new detection algotithms can be a good platform for CR radio detection technique at Auger enhancing a duty cycle for the detection of UHECR’s.

  5. [Analysis of the 4th generation outer space bred Angelica dahurica by FTIR spectroscopy].

    PubMed

    Zhu, Yan-ying; Wu, Peng-le; Liu, Mei-yi; Wang, Zhi-zhou; Guo, Xi-hua; Guan, Ying

    2012-03-01

    The major components of the 4th generation outer space bred angelica and the ground group were determined and analyzed by Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR) and second derivative spectrum, considering the large mutation of the plants with space mutagenesis. The results show that the content of the coumarin (1741 cm(-1)), which is the main active components of the space angelica dahurica increased, and the content of the protein (1 459, 1 419 cm(-1)) and the fat (930 cm(-1)) increased slightly, whereas the content of the starch and the dietary fiber reduced drastically. There are obvious differences between the peak values of the second derivative spectra of the plants, revealing that the outer space angelica dahurica contained amine component at 1 279 cm(-1). Space mutation breeding is favor of breeding angelica with better idiosyncrasy.

  6. Visualization of x-ray computer tomography using computer-generated holography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Daibo, Masahiro; Tayama, Norio

    1998-09-01

    The theory converted from x-ray projection data to the hologram directly by combining the computer tomography (CT) with the computer generated hologram (CGH), is proposed. The purpose of this study is to offer the theory for realizing the all- electronic and high-speed seeing through 3D visualization system, which is for the application to medical diagnosis and non- destructive testing. First, the CT is expressed using the pseudo- inverse matrix which is obtained by the singular value decomposition. CGH is expressed in the matrix style. Next, `projection to hologram conversion' (PTHC) matrix is calculated by the multiplication of phase matrix of CGH with pseudo-inverse matrix of the CT. Finally, the projection vector is converted to the hologram vector directly, by multiplication of the PTHC matrix with the projection vector. Incorporating holographic analog computation into CT reconstruction, it becomes possible that the calculation amount is drastically reduced. We demonstrate the CT cross section which is reconstituted by He-Ne laser in the 3D space from the real x-ray projection data acquired by x-ray television equipment, using our direct conversion technique.

  7. Biostructural Science Inspired by Next-Generation X-Ray Sources.

    PubMed

    Gruner, Sol M; Lattman, Eaton E

    2015-01-01

    Next-generation synchrotron radiation sources, such as X-ray free-electron lasers, energy recovery linacs, and ultra-low-emittance storage rings, are catalyzing novel methods of biomolecular microcrystallography and solution scattering. These methods are described and future trends are predicted. Importantly, there is a growing realization that serial microcrystallography and certain cutting-edge solution scattering experiments can be performed at existing storage ring sources by utilizing new technology. In this sense, next-generation sources are serving two distinct functions, namely, provision of new capabilities that require the newer sources and inspiration of new methods that can be performed at existing sources.

  8. Phase-matched generation of coherent soft and hard X-rays using IR lasers

    DOEpatents

    Popmintchev, Tenio V.; Chen, Ming-Chang; Bahabad, Alon; Murnane, Margaret M.; Kapteyn, Henry C.

    2013-06-11

    Phase-matched high-order harmonic generation of soft and hard X-rays is accomplished using infrared driving lasers in a high-pressure non-linear medium. The pressure of the non-linear medium is increased to multi-atmospheres and a mid-IR (or higher) laser device provides the driving pulse. Based on this scaling, also a general method for global optimization of the flux of phase-matched high-order harmonic generation at a desired wavelength is designed.

  9. Ultrafast X-ray Sources

    SciTech Connect

    George Neil

    2010-04-19

    Since before the scattering of X-rays off of DNA led to the first understanding of the double helix structure, sources of X-rays have been an essential tool for scientists examining the structure and interactions of matter. The resolution of a microscope is proportional to the wavelength of light so x-rays can see much finer structures than visible light, down to single atoms. In addition, the energy of X-rays is resonant with the core atomic levels of atoms so with appropriate wavelengths the placement of specific atoms in a large molecule can be determined. Over 10,000 scientists use synchrotron sources, storage rings of high energy electrons, each year worldwide. As an example of such use, virtually every picture of a protein or drug molecule that one sees in the scientific press is a reconstruction based on X-ray scattering of synchrotron light from the crystallized form of that molecule. Unfortunately those pictures are static and proteins work through configuration (shape) changes in response to energy transfer. To understand how biological systems work requires following the energy flow to these molecules and tracking how shape changes drive their interaction with other molecules. We'd like to be able to freeze the action of these molecules at various steps along the way with an X-ray strobe light. How fast does it have to be? To actually get a picture of a molecule in a fixed configuration requires X-ray pulses as short as 30 femtoseconds (1/30 of a millionth of a millionth of a second). To capture the energy flow through changes in electronic levels requires a faster strobe, less than 1 femtosecond! And to acquire such information in smaller samples with higher accuracy demands brighter and brighter X-rays. Unfortunately modern synchrotrons (dubbed 3rd Generation Light Sources) cannot deliver such short bright pulses of X-rays. An entirely new approach is required, linear-accelerator (linac-)-based light sources termed 4th or Next Generation Light Sources

  10. Generation of phase - matched coherent point source in plasma media by propagated X-ray laser seeded beam

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pikuz, T.; Faenov, A.; Magnitskiy, S.; Nagorskiy, N.; Tanaka, M.; Ishino, M.; Nishikino, M.; Kando, M.; Kato, Y.; Kawachi, T.

    2016-03-01

    There is a significant interest in developing the coherent table-top X-ray lasers. Advent of plasma-based transient collisional excitation x-ray laser and particular, injection of coherent seeded beam, especially high-order harmonics, has tremendously improved the spatial coherence of such lasers, what allowed them to be the same widely used as synchrotron sources. Here we report experimental founding of unknown interference structure in a spatial profile of the output beam of the two-stage plasma X-ray laser. That allowed us experimental and theoretical discovering a new phenomenon consisted in a generation of phase-matched coherent point source in a laser plasma media by propagated X-ray laser seeded beam. This phenomenon could extend the applications of such x-ray lasers. For explanation of the observed phenomenon a new method of solving the standard system of Maxwell-Bloch equations has been developed. It was found that the interference pattern in the output laser beam was formed due to an emergence of phase-matched coherent virtual point source in the XRL amplifier and could be treated as the first observation of mirage phenomenon, analogous to the optical mirage, but in X-rays. The obtained results bring new comprehension into the physical nature of amplification of X-ray radiation in laser-induced plasma amplifiers and opening new opportunities for X-ray interferometry, holography and other applications, which requiring multiple rigidly phased sources of coherent radiation.

  11. Registration of 2D x-ray images to 3D MRI by generating pseudo-CT data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    van der Bom, M. J.; Pluim, J. P. W.; Gounis, M. J.; van de Kraats, E. B.; Sprinkhuizen, S. M.; Timmer, J.; Homan, R.; Bartels, L. W.

    2011-02-01

    Spatial and soft tissue information provided by magnetic resonance imaging can be very valuable during image-guided procedures, where usually only real-time two-dimensional (2D) x-ray images are available. Registration of 2D x-ray images to three-dimensional (3D) magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) data, acquired prior to the procedure, can provide optimal information to guide the procedure. However, registering x-ray images to MRI data is not a trivial task because of their fundamental difference in tissue contrast. This paper presents a technique that generates pseudo-computed tomography (CT) data from multi-spectral MRI acquisitions which is sufficiently similar to real CT data to enable registration of x-ray to MRI with comparable accuracy as registration of x-ray to CT. The method is based on a k-nearest-neighbors (kNN)-regression strategy which labels voxels of MRI data with CT Hounsfield Units. The regression method uses multi-spectral MRI intensities and intensity gradients as features to discriminate between various tissue types. The efficacy of using pseudo-CT data for registration of x-ray to MRI was tested on ex vivo animal data. 2D-3D registration experiments using CT and pseudo-CT data of multiple subjects were performed with a commonly used 2D-3D registration algorithm. On average, the median target registration error for registration of two x-ray images to MRI data was approximately 1 mm larger than for x-ray to CT registration. The authors have shown that pseudo-CT data generated from multi-spectral MRI facilitate registration of MRI to x-ray images. From the experiments it could be concluded that the accuracy achieved was comparable to that of registering x-ray images to CT data.

  12. Thermonuclear ignition by Z-pinch X-ray radiation produced by current of an explosive magnetic generator

    SciTech Connect

    Garanin, S. G.; Ivanovskiy, A. V.

    2015-12-15

    The scheme of a device based a superpower disk-type magnetic explosion generator to produce a pulse of X-ray radiation with the energy exceeding the target ignition threshold is described and validated.

  13. Biological X-ray spectroscopy on 3rd generation synchrotron radiation sources

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ralston, Corie Y.; Chen, Jie; Peng, Gang; George, Simon J.; van Elp, Jan; Cramer, Stephen P.

    1995-02-01

    Third generation synchrotron radiation sources such as the Advanced Light Source (ALS) at Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory deliver 1-2 orders of magnitude more monochromatic flux (and many orders of magnitude higher brightness) than previously available. This paper describes the ring and existing beamlines of the advanced light source, and plans for crystallography and elliptical wiggler stations are discussed. Using nickel metalloprotein spectra recorded at NSLS and SSRL as examples, this paper describes how the higher monochromatic flux available from the ALS will be used for biological soft X-ray spectroscopy.

  14. Femtosecond x-ray pulse generation with a compact electron storage ring

    SciTech Connect

    Yamada, H. |

    1996-04-01

    A novel method for generating brilliant x-ray beams is proposed, in which inelastic collisions of circulating relativistic electrons and a thin wire target are used. The high brilliance of this new photon source is based on narrow angular divergence due to the kinematics of relativistic electrons, and repeated use of electron beams. The estimated brilliance of this source in a 50-MeV electron storage ring is comparable to that of a compact synchrotron light source. {copyright} {ital 1996 American Institute of Physics.}

  15. SOFT X-RAY FEL BY CASCADING STAGES OF HIGH GAIN HARMONIC GENERATION.

    SciTech Connect

    YU,L.H.

    2003-04-17

    Short wavelength Free-Electron Lasers are perceived as the next generation of synchrotron light sources. In the past decade, significant advances have been made in the theory and technology of high brightness electron beams and single pass FELs. These developments facilitate the construction of practical VUV FELs and make x-ray FELs possible. Self-Amplified Spontaneous Emission (SASE) and High Gain Harmonic Generation (HGHG)[17-19] are the two leading candidates for x-ray FELs. The first lasing of HGHG proof-of-principle experiment succeeded in August, 1999 in Brookhaven National Laboratory. The experimental results agree with the theory prediction. Compared with SASE FEL, the following advantages of HGHG FEL were confirmed; (1) Better longitudinal coherence, and hence, much narrower bandwidth than SASE. (2) More stable central wavelength, (3) More stable output energy. In this introduction, we will first briefly describe the principle of HGHG in Section A. Then in Section B, we give a general description about how to produce soft x-ray by cascading HGHG scheme. In section 2, we give a detailed description of the system design. Then, in section 3, we give a description of an analytical estimate for the HGHG process, and the calculation of the parameters of different parts of the system. The estimate is found to agree with simulation within about a factor 2 for most cases we studied. The stability issue, the sensitivity to parameter variation, the harmonic contents of the final output, and the noise degradation issue of such HGHG scheme are discussed in Section 4. The results are presented in Section 4. Finally, in Section 5, we will give some discussion of the challenges in development of the system. The conclusion is given in Section 6.

  16. Measurement of the unstained biological sample by a novel scanning electron generation X-ray microscope based on SEM.

    PubMed

    Ogura, Toshihiko

    2009-08-01

    We introduced a novel X-ray microscope system based on scanning electron microscopy using thin film, which enables the measurement of unstained biological samples without damage. An unstained yeast sample was adsorbed under a titanium (Ti)-coated silicon nitride (Si3N4) film 90 nm thick. The X-ray signal from the film was detected by an X-ray photodiode (PD) placed below the sample. With an electron beam at 2.6 kV acceleration and 6.75 nA current, the yeast image is obtained using the X-ray PD. The image is created by soft X-rays from the Ti layer. The Ti layer is effective in generating the characteristic 2.7-nm wavelength X-rays by the irradiation of electrons. Furthermore, we investigated the electron trajectory and the generation of the characteristic X-rays within the Ti-coated Si3N4 film by Monte Carlo simulation. Our system can be easily utilized to observe various unstained biological samples of cells, bacteria, and viruses.

  17. Common features of particle beams and x-rays generated in a low energy dense plasma focus device

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Behbahani, R. A.; Xiao, C.

    2015-02-01

    Features of energetic charged particle beams and x-ray emission in a low energy (1-2 kJ) plasma focus (DPF) device are described and the possible mechanism are explained based on circuit analyses and energy balance in the DPF system. In particular, the resistance and the voltage across the plasma column are estimated to explain the mechanisms of the generation of particle beams and hard x-ray. The analysis shows that the total inductance of a DPF might have played a role for enhancement of the particle beams and x-ray emissions during the phase of anomalous resistance.

  18. Titanium-Dioxide Nano-Fiber-Cotton Targets for Efficient Multi-keV X-Ray Generation

    SciTech Connect

    Tanabe, M; Nishimura, H; Fujioka, S; Nagai, K; Yamamoto, N; Gu, Z; Pan, C; Girard, F; Primout, M; Villette, B; Brebion, D; Fournier, K B; Fujishima, A; Mima, K

    2008-06-12

    Multi-keV x-ray generation from low-density (27 {+-} 7 mg/cc) nano-fiber-cotton targets composed of titanium-dioxide has been investigated. The cotton targets were heated volumetrically and supersonically to a peak electron temperature of 2.3 keV, which is optimal to yield Ti K-shell x rays. Considerable enhancement of conversion efficiency (3.7 {+-} 0.5%) from incident laser energy into Ti K-shell x rays (4-6 keV band) was attained in comparison with that (1.4 {+-} 0.9%) for a planar Ti-foil target.

  19. Common features of particle beams and x-rays generated in a low energy dense plasma focus device

    SciTech Connect

    Behbahani, R. A.; Xiao, C.

    2015-02-15

    Features of energetic charged particle beams and x-ray emission in a low energy (1–2 kJ) plasma focus (DPF) device are described and the possible mechanism are explained based on circuit analyses and energy balance in the DPF system. In particular, the resistance and the voltage across the plasma column are estimated to explain the mechanisms of the generation of particle beams and hard x-ray. The analysis shows that the total inductance of a DPF might have played a role for enhancement of the particle beams and x-ray emissions during the phase of anomalous resistance.

  20. MOSFET dosimetry with high spatial resolution in intense synchrotron-generated x-ray microbeams

    SciTech Connect

    Siegbahn, E. A.; Braeuer-Krisch, E.; Bravin, A.; Nettelbeck, H.; Lerch, M. L. F.; Rosenfeld, A. B.

    2009-04-15

    Various dosimeters have been tested for assessing absorbed doses with microscopic spatial resolution in targets irradiated by high-flux, synchrotron-generated, low-energy ({approx}30-300 keV) x-ray microbeams. A MOSFET detector has been used for this study since its radio sensitive element, which is extraordinarily narrow ({approx}1 {mu}m), suits the main applications of interest, microbeam radiation biology and microbeam radiation therapy (MRT). In MRT, micrometer-wide, centimeter-high, and vertically oriented swaths of tissue are irradiated by arrays of rectangular x-ray microbeams produced by a multislit collimator (MSC). We used MOSFETs to measure the dose distribution, produced by arrays of x-ray microbeams shaped by two different MSCs, in a tissue-equivalent phantom. Doses were measured near the center of the arrays and maximum/minimum (peak/valley) dose ratios (PVDRs) were calculated to determine how variations in heights and in widths of the microbeams influenced this for the therapy, potentially important parameter. Monte Carlo (MC) simulations of the absorbed dose distribution in the phantom were also performed. The results show that when the heights of the irradiated swaths were below those applicable to clinical therapy (<1 mm) the MC simulations produce estimates of PVDRs that are up to a factor of 3 higher than the measured values. For arrays of higher microbeams (i.e., 25 {mu}mx1 cm instead of 25x500 {mu}m{sup 2}), this difference between measured and simulated PVDRs becomes less than 50%. Closer agreement was observed between the measured and simulated PVDRs for the Tecomet MSC (current collimator design) than for the Archer MSC. Sources of discrepancies between measured and simulated doses are discussed, of which the energy dependent response of the MOSFET was shown to be among the most important.

  1. Scattered hard X-ray and γ-ray generation from a chromatic electron beam

    SciTech Connect

    Coleman, J. E.; Welch, D. R.; Miller, C. L.

    2015-11-14

    An array of photon diagnostics has been deployed on a high power relativistic electron beam diode. Electrons are extracted through a 17.8 cm diode from the surface discharge of a carbon fiber velvet cathode with a nominal diode voltage of 3.8 MV. <10% of the 100 ns electron pulse is composed of off energy electrons (1–3 MeV) accelerated during the rise and fall of the pulse that impact the stainless steel beam pipe and generate a Bremsstrahlung spectrum of 0.1–3 MeV photons with a total count of 10{sup 11}. The principal objective of these experiments is to quantify the electron beam dynamics and spatial dynamics of the hard X-ray and γ-ray flux generated in the diode region. A qualitative comparison of experimental and calculated results are presented, including time and energy resolved electron beam propagation and scattered photon measurements with X-ray PIN diodes and a photomultiplier tube indicating a dose dependence on the diode voltage >V{sup 4} and detected photon counts of nearly 10{sup 6} at a radial distance of 1 m which corresponds to dose ∼40 μrad at 1 m.

  2. Scavenging of hydroxyl radicals generated in human plasma following X-ray irradiation.

    PubMed

    Hosokawa, Yoichiro; Sano, Tomoaki

    2015-11-01

    There are various antioxidant materials that scavenge free radicals in human plasma. It is possible that the radical-scavenging function causes a radiation protective effect in humans. This study estimated the hydroxyl (OH) radical-scavenging activity induced by X-ray irradiation in human plasma. The test subjects included 111 volunteers (75 males and 36 females) ranging from 22 to 35 years old (average, 24.0). OH radicals generated in irradiated human plasma were measured by electron spin resonance (ESR). The relationships between the amount of the OH radical and chemical and biological parameters [total protein, total cholesterol, triglycerides and hepatitis B surface (HBs) antibodies] were estimated in the plasma of the 111 volunteers by a multivariate analysis. The presence of HBs antibodies had the greatest influence on OH radical-scavenging activity. One volunteer who did not have the HBs antibody was given an inoculation of the hepatitis B vaccine. There was a remarkable decrease in the amount of OH radical generated from plasma after the HBs antibody was produced. The results indicate that the HBs antibody is an important factor for the scavenging of OH radicals initiated by X-ray irradiation in the human body.

  3. Performance of an electron gun for a high-brightness X-ray generator

    PubMed Central

    Sugimura, Takashi; Ohsawa, Satoshi; Ikeda, Mitsuo

    2008-01-01

    A prototype thermionic electron gun for a high-brightness X-ray generator has been developed. Its extraction voltage and design current are 60 kV and 100 mA (DC), respectively. The X-ray generator aims towards a maximum brilliance of 60 kW mm−2. The beam sizes at the rotating anticathode must therefore be within 1.0 mm × 0.1 mm and a small beam emittance is required. The fabricated electron gun optimizes an aperture grid and a Whenelt electrode. The performance of the prototype electron gun measured using pulsed-beam tests is as follows: maximum beam current, 85.7 mA; beam focus size at the rotating anticathode, 0.79 mm × 0.13 mm. In DC beam tests, FWHM beam sizes were measured to be 0.65 mm × 0.08 mm at the rotating anticathode with a beam current of 45 mA. The beam current recently reached ∼60 mA with some thermal problems. PMID:18421153

  4. Pulse-periodic generation of supershort avalanche electron beams and X-ray emission

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baksht, E. Kh.; Burachenko, A. G.; Erofeev, M. V.; Tarasenko, V. F.

    2014-05-01

    Pulse-periodic generation of supershort avalanche electron beams (SAEBs) and X-ray emission in nitrogen, as well as the transition from a single-pulse mode to a pulse-periodic mode with a high repetition frequency, was studied experimentally. It is shown that, in the pulse-periodic mode, the full width at halfmaximum of the SAEB is larger and the decrease rate of the gap voltage is lower than those in the single-pulse mode. It is found that, when the front duration of the voltage pulse at a nitrogen pressure of 90 Torr decreases from 2.5 to 0.3 ns, the X-ray exposure dose in the pulse-periodic mode increases by more than one order of magnitude and the number of SAEB electrons also increases. It is shown that, in the pulse-periodic mode of a diffuse discharge, gas heating in the discharge gap results in a severalfold increase in the SAEB amplitude (the number of electrons in the beam). At a generator voltage of 25 kV, nitrogen pressure of 90 Torr, and pulse repetition frequency of 3.5 kHz, a runaway electron beam was detected behind the anode foil.

  5. Scattered hard X-ray and γ-ray generation from a chromatic electron beam

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Coleman, J. E.; Welch, D. R.; Miller, C. L.

    2015-11-01

    An array of photon diagnostics has been deployed on a high power relativistic electron beam diode. Electrons are extracted through a 17.8 cm diode from the surface discharge of a carbon fiber velvet cathode with a nominal diode voltage of 3.8 MV. <10% of the 100 ns electron pulse is composed of off energy electrons (1-3 MeV) accelerated during the rise and fall of the pulse that impact the stainless steel beam pipe and generate a Bremsstrahlung spectrum of 0.1-3 MeV photons with a total count of 1011. The principal objective of these experiments is to quantify the electron beam dynamics and spatial dynamics of the hard X-ray and γ-ray flux generated in the diode region. A qualitative comparison of experimental and calculated results are presented, including time and energy resolved electron beam propagation and scattered photon measurements with X-ray PIN diodes and a photomultiplier tube indicating a dose dependence on the diode voltage >V4 and detected photon counts of nearly 106 at a radial distance of 1 m which corresponds to dose ˜40 μrad at 1 m.

  6. Conditions for the generation of cytotoxic CD4+ Th cells that enhance CD8+ CTL-mediated tumor regression

    PubMed Central

    Li, Kunyu; Baird, Margaret; Yang, Jianping; Jackson, Chris; Ronchese, Franca; Young, Sarah

    2016-01-01

    Adoptive cell therapies (ACTs) using tumor-reactive T cells have shown clinical benefit and potential for cancer treatment. While the majority of the current ACT are focused on using CD8+ cytotoxic T lymphocytes (CTL), others have shown that the presence of tumor-reactive CD4+ T helper (Th) cells can greatly enhance the anti-tumor activity of CD8+ CTL. However, difficulties in obtaining adequate numbers of CD4+ Th cells through in vitro expansion can limit the application of CD4 Th cells in ACT. This study aims to optimize the culture conditions for mouse CD4 T cells to provide basic information for animal studies of ACT using CD4 T cells. Taking advantage of the antigen-specificity of CD4+ Th cells from OT-II transgenic mice, we examined different methodologies for generating antigen-specific CD4+ Th1 cells in vitro. We found that cells grown in complete advanced-DMEM/F12 medium supplemented with low-dose IL-2 and IL-7 induced substantial cell expansion. These Th cells were Th1-like, as they expressed multiple Th1-cytokines and exhibited antigen-specific cytotoxicity. In addition co-transfer of these CD4+ Th1-like cells with CD8+ CTL significantly enhanced tumor regression, leading to complete cure in 80% of mice bearing established B16-OVA. These observations indicate that the CD4+ Th1-like cells generated using the method we optimized are functionally active to eliminate their target cells, and can also assist CD8+ CTL to enhance tumor regression. The findings of this study provide valuable data for further research into in vitro expansion of CD4+ Th1-like cells, with potential applications to cancer treatment involving ACT. PMID:27588200

  7. Conditions for the generation of cytotoxic CD4(+) Th cells that enhance CD8(+) CTL-mediated tumor regression.

    PubMed

    Li, Kunyu; Baird, Margaret; Yang, Jianping; Jackson, Chris; Ronchese, Franca; Young, Sarah

    2016-08-01

    Adoptive cell therapies (ACTs) using tumor-reactive T cells have shown clinical benefit and potential for cancer treatment. While the majority of the current ACT are focused on using CD8(+) cytotoxic T lymphocytes (CTL), others have shown that the presence of tumor-reactive CD4(+) T helper (Th) cells can greatly enhance the anti-tumor activity of CD8(+) CTL. However, difficulties in obtaining adequate numbers of CD4(+) Th cells through in vitro expansion can limit the application of CD4 Th cells in ACT. This study aims to optimize the culture conditions for mouse CD4 T cells to provide basic information for animal studies of ACT using CD4 T cells. Taking advantage of the antigen-specificity of CD4(+) Th cells from OT-II transgenic mice, we examined different methodologies for generating antigen-specific CD4(+) Th1 cells in vitro. We found that cells grown in complete advanced-DMEM/F12 medium supplemented with low-dose IL-2 and IL-7 induced substantial cell expansion. These Th cells were Th1-like, as they expressed multiple Th1-cytokines and exhibited antigen-specific cytotoxicity. In addition co-transfer of these CD4(+) Th1-like cells with CD8(+) CTL significantly enhanced tumor regression, leading to complete cure in 80% of mice bearing established B16-OVA. These observations indicate that the CD4(+) Th1-like cells generated using the method we optimized are functionally active to eliminate their target cells, and can also assist CD8(+) CTL to enhance tumor regression. The findings of this study provide valuable data for further research into in vitro expansion of CD4(+) Th1-like cells, with potential applications to cancer treatment involving ACT. PMID:27588200

  8. Moving-Article X-Ray Imaging System and Method for 3-D Image Generation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fernandez, Kenneth R. (Inventor)

    2012-01-01

    An x-ray imaging system and method for a moving article are provided for an article moved along a linear direction of travel while the article is exposed to non-overlapping x-ray beams. A plurality of parallel linear sensor arrays are disposed in the x-ray beams after they pass through the article. More specifically, a first half of the plurality are disposed in a first of the x-ray beams while a second half of the plurality are disposed in a second of the x-ray beams. Each of the parallel linear sensor arrays is oriented perpendicular to the linear direction of travel. Each of the parallel linear sensor arrays in the first half is matched to a corresponding one of the parallel linear sensor arrays in the second half in terms of an angular position in the first of the x-ray beams and the second of the x-ray beams, respectively.

  9. Investigation of gas generation in regenerative fuel cells by low-energy X-rays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Selamet, Omer Faruk; Deevanhxay, Phengxay; Tsushima, Shohji; Hirai, Shuichiro

    2015-11-01

    Gas generation and discharge behaviors in an operating regenerative fuel cell (RFC) are investigated using low-energy X-ray radiography. In situ visualization at high spatial and temporal resolution reveal dynamic and inhomogeneous behaviors of the gas generation in the membrane electrode assembly (MEA) in the RFC. Temporal and spatial variation of the gas thickness in the MEA is quantitatively discussed and shows an intermittent and periodic discharge processes of the gas generated by electrolysis, suggesting that the reaction sites in the catalyst layer and the discharging path of gas bubbles are well established in the MEA for the electrolysis. Larger gas accumulation and discharge in the gas diffusion layer (GDL) under the ribs are identified in comparison with those under the channels, which is attributed to the relatively longer path for accumulated gas under the ribs to be discharged into the flow channels.

  10. A bright attosecond x-ray pulse train generation in a double-laser-driven cone target

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hu, Li-Xiang; Yu, Tong-Pu; Shao, Fu-Qiu; Luo, Wen; Yin, Yan

    2016-06-01

    By using full three-dimensional particle-in-cell and Monte Carlo simulations, we investigate the generation of a high-brightness attosecond x-ray pulse train in a double-laser-driven cone target. The scheme makes use of two lasers: the first high-intensity laser with a laser peak intensity 1.37 × 1020 W/cm2 irradiates the cone and produces overdense attosecond electron bunches; the second counterpropagating weakly relativistic laser with a laser peak intensity 4.932 × 1017 W/cm2 interacts with the produced electron bunches and a bright x-ray pulse train is generated by Thomson backscattering of the second laser off the attosecond electron bunches. It is shown that the photon flux rises by 5 times using the cone target as compared with a normal channel. Meanwhile, the x-ray peak brightness increases significantly from 1.4 × 1021/(s mm2 mrad2 0.1 keV) to 6.0 × 1021/(s mm2 mrad2 0.1 keV), which is much higher than that of the Thomson x-ray source generated from traditional accelerators. We also discuss the influence of the laser and target parameters on the x-ray pulse properties. This compact bright x-ray source may have diverse applications, e.g., the study of electric dynamics and harmonics emission in the atomic scale.

  11. Coherent x-rays driven by ultrashort-pulse lasers: generation, application, and prospects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kapteyn, Henry C.

    2016-05-01

    Ultrashort laser pulses represent an ideal starting point for frequency conversion of light to almost any wavelength from the THz to x-rays. High-harmonic upconversion (HHG) is a unique process enabled by the combined strong field laser field and the few-cycle pulse duration of a femtosecond laser pulse. HHG makes it possible to generate coherent light in the spectral region from the vacuum-UV into the x-ray region at sub-nm wavelengths. HHG sources are now finding increasingly diverse application for both science and technology, in topics ranging from basic studies of atomic processes, to materials dynamics revealed through time and angle-resolved photoemission. Furthermore, the coherent nature of the HHG process makes possible unprecedented control over light in a new region of the spectrum, making it possible to, for example, control the polarization state and spectral bandwidth, creating the most complex time-domain waveforms ever measured and characterized. Here we review recent work, as well as efforts at commercial implementation of HHG sources.

  12. The Next Generation Atlas of Quasar Spectral Energy Distributions from Radio to X-Rays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shang, Zhaohui; Brotherton, Michael S.; Wills, Beverley J.; Wills, D.; Cales, Sabrina L.; Dale, Daniel A.; Green, Richard F.; Runnoe, Jessie C.; Nemmen, Rodrigo S.; Gallagher, Sarah C.; Ganguly, Rajib; Hines, Dean C.; Kelly, Benjamin J.; Kriss, Gerard A.; Li, Jun; Tang, Baitian; Xie, Yanxia

    2011-09-01

    We have produced the next generation of quasar spectral energy distributions (SEDs), essentially updating the work of Elvis et al. by using high-quality data obtained with several space- and ground-based telescopes, including NASA's Great Observatories. We present an atlas of SEDs of 85 optically bright, non-blazar quasars over the electromagnetic spectrum from radio to X-rays. The heterogeneous sample includes 27 radio-quiet and 58 radio-loud quasars. Most objects have quasi-simultaneous ultraviolet-optical spectroscopic data, supplemented with some far-ultraviolet spectra, and more than half also have Spitzer mid-infrared Infrared Spectrograph spectra. The X-ray spectral parameters are collected from the literature where available. The radio, far-infrared, and near-infrared photometric data are also obtained from either the literature or new observations. We construct composite SEDs for radio-loud and radio-quiet objects and compare these to those of Elvis et al., finding that ours have similar overall shapes, but our improved spectral resolution reveals more detailed features, especially in the mid- and near-infrared.

  13. THE NEXT GENERATION ATLAS OF QUASAR SPECTRAL ENERGY DISTRIBUTIONS FROM RADIO TO X-RAYS

    SciTech Connect

    Shang Zhaohui; Li Jun; Xie Yanxia; Brotherton, Michael S.; Cales, Sabrina L.; Dale, Daniel A.; Runnoe, Jessie C.; Kelly, Benjamin J.; Wills, Beverley J.; Wills, D.; Green, Richard F.; Nemmen, Rodrigo S.; Ganguly, Rajib; Hines, Dean C.; Kriss, Gerard A.; Tang, Baitian

    2011-09-01

    We have produced the next generation of quasar spectral energy distributions (SEDs), essentially updating the work of Elvis et al. by using high-quality data obtained with several space- and ground-based telescopes, including NASA's Great Observatories. We present an atlas of SEDs of 85 optically bright, non-blazar quasars over the electromagnetic spectrum from radio to X-rays. The heterogeneous sample includes 27 radio-quiet and 58 radio-loud quasars. Most objects have quasi-simultaneous ultraviolet-optical spectroscopic data, supplemented with some far-ultraviolet spectra, and more than half also have Spitzer mid-infrared Infrared Spectrograph spectra. The X-ray spectral parameters are collected from the literature where available. The radio, far-infrared, and near-infrared photometric data are also obtained from either the literature or new observations. We construct composite SEDs for radio-loud and radio-quiet objects and compare these to those of Elvis et al., finding that ours have similar overall shapes, but our improved spectral resolution reveals more detailed features, especially in the mid- and near-infrared.

  14. First results from a next-generation off-plane X-ray diffraction grating

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McEntaffer, Randall; DeRoo, Casey; Schultz, Ted; Gantner, Brennan; Tutt, James; Holland, Andrew; O'Dell, Stephen; Gaskin, Jessica; Kolodziejczak, Jeffrey; Zhang, William W.; Chan, Kai-Wing; Biskach, Michael; McClelland, Ryan; Iazikov, Dmitri; Wang, Xinpeng; Koecher, Larry

    2013-08-01

    Future NASA X-ray spectroscopy missions will require high throughput, high resolving power grating spectrometers. Off-plane reflection gratings are capable of meeting the performance requirements needed to realize the scientific goals of these missions. We have identified a novel grating fabrication method that utilizes common lithographic and microfabrication techniques to produce the high fidelity groove profile necessary to achieve this performance. Application of this process has produced an initial pre-master that exhibits a radial (variable line spacing along the groove dimension), high density (> 6000 grooves/mm), laminar profile. This pre-master has been tested for diffraction efficiency at the BESSY II synchrotron light facility and diffracts up to 55 % of incident light into usable spectral orders. Furthermore, tests of spectral resolving power show that these gratings are capable of obtaining resolving powers well above 1300 ( λ/Δ λ) with limitations due to the test apparatus, not the gratings. Obtaining these results has provided confidence that this fabrication process is capable of producing off-plane reflection gratings for the next generation of X-ray observatories.

  15. Constraining high-redshift X-ray sources with next generation 21-cm power spectrum measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ewall-Wice, Aaron; Hewitt, Jacqueline; Mesinger, Andrei; Dillon, Joshua S.; Liu, Adrian; Pober, Jonathan

    2016-05-01

    We use the Fisher matrix formalism and seminumerical simulations to derive quantitative predictions of the constraints that power spectrum measurements on next-generation interferometers, such as the Hydrogen Epoch of Reionization Array (HERA) and the Square Kilometre Array (SKA), will place on the characteristics of the X-ray sources that heated the high-redshift intergalactic medium. Incorporating observations between z = 5 and 25, we find that the proposed 331 element HERA and SKA phase 1 will be capable of placing ≲ 10 per cent constraints on the spectral properties of these first X-ray sources, even if one is unable to perform measurements within the foreground contaminated `wedge' or the FM band. When accounting for the enhancement in power spectrum amplitude from spin temperature fluctuations, we find that the observable signatures of reionization extend well beyond the peak in the power spectrum usually associated with it. We also find that lower redshift degeneracies between the signatures of heating and reionization physics lead to errors on reionization parameters that are significantly greater than previously predicted. Observations over the heating epoch are able to break these degeneracies and improve our constraints considerably. For these two reasons, 21-cm observations during the heating epoch significantly enhance our understanding of reionization as well.

  16. Flexible Field Emitter for X-ray Generation by Implanting CNTs into Nickel Foil.

    PubMed

    Sun, Bin; Wang, Yan; Ding, Guifu

    2016-12-01

    This paper reports a novel implanting micromachining technology. By using this method, for the first time, we could implant nano-scale materials into milli-scale metal substrates at room temperature. Ni-based flexible carbon nanotube (CNT) field emitters were fabricated by the novel micromachining method. By embedding CNT roots into Ni foil using polymer matrix as transfer media, effective direct contact between Ni and CNTs was achieved. As a result, our novel emitter shows relatively good field emission properties such as low turn-on field and good stability. Moreover, the emitter was highly flexible with preservation of the field emission properties. The excellent field emission characteristics attributed to the direct contact and the strong interactions between CNTs and the substrate. To check the practical application of the novel emitter, a simple X-ray imaging system was set up by modifying a traditional tube. The gray shadow that appears on the sensitive film after being exposed to the radiation confirms the successful generation of X-ray. PMID:27401089

  17. Flexible Field Emitter for X-ray Generation by Implanting CNTs into Nickel Foil

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, Bin; Wang, Yan; Ding, Guifu

    2016-07-01

    This paper reports a novel implanting micromachining technology. By using this method, for the first time, we could implant nano-scale materials into milli-scale metal substrates at room temperature. Ni-based flexible carbon nanotube (CNT) field emitters were fabricated by the novel micromachining method. By embedding CNT roots into Ni foil using polymer matrix as transfer media, effective direct contact between Ni and CNTs was achieved. As a result, our novel emitter shows relatively good field emission properties such as low turn-on field and good stability. Moreover, the emitter was highly flexible with preservation of the field emission properties. The excellent field emission characteristics attributed to the direct contact and the strong interactions between CNTs and the substrate. To check the practical application of the novel emitter, a simple X-ray imaging system was set up by modifying a traditional tube. The gray shadow that appears on the sensitive film after being exposed to the radiation confirms the successful generation of X-ray.

  18. Generation-X mirror technology development plan and the development of adjustable x-ray optics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reid, Paul B.; Davis, William; O'Dell, Stephen; Schwartz, Daniel A.; Tolier-McKinstry, Susan; Wilke, Rudeger H. T.; Zhang, William

    2009-08-01

    Generation-X is being studied as an extremely high resolution, very large area grazing incidence x-ray telescope. Under a NASA Advanced Mission Concepts Study, we have developed a technology plan designed to lead to the 0.1 arcsec (HPD) resolution adjustable optics with 50 square meters of effective area necessary to meet Generation-X requirements. We describe our plan in detail. In addition, we report on our development activities of adjustable grazing incidence optics via the fabrication of bimorph mirrors. We have successfully deposited thin-film piezo-electric material on the back surface of thin glass mirrors. We report on the electrical and mechanical properties of the bimorph mirrors. We also report on initial finite element modeling of adjustable grazing incidence mirrors; in particular, we examine the impact of how the mirrors are supported - the boundary conditions - on the deformations which can be achieved.

  19. Evidence of high harmonics from echo-enabled harmonic generation for seeding x-ray free electron lasers.

    PubMed

    Xiang, D; Colby, E; Dunning, M; Gilevich, S; Hast, C; Jobe, K; McCormick, D; Nelson, J; Raubenheimer, T O; Soong, K; Stupakov, G; Szalata, Z; Walz, D; Weathersby, S; Woodley, M

    2012-01-13

    Echo-enabled harmonic generation free electron lasers hold great promise for the generation of fully coherent radiation in x-ray wavelengths. Here we report the first evidence of high harmonics from the echo-enabled harmonic generation technique in the realistic scenario where the laser energy modulation is comparable to the beam slice energy spread. In this experiment, coherent radiation at the seventh harmonic of the second seed laser is generated when the energy modulation amplitude is about 2-3 times the slice energy spread. The experiment confirms the underlying physics of echo-enabled harmonic generation and may have a strong impact on emerging seeded x-ray free electron lasers that are capable of generating laserlike x rays which will advance many areas of science.

  20. Evidence of High Harmonics from Echo-Enabled Harmonic Generation for Seeding X-ray Free Electron Lasers

    SciTech Connect

    Xiang, D.; Colby, E.; Dunning, M.; Gilevich, S.; Hast, C.; Jobe, K.; McCormick, D.; Nelson, J.; Raubenheimer, T.O.; Soong, K.; Stupakov, G.; Szalata, Z.; Walz, D.; Weathersby, S.; Woodle, M.; /SLAC

    2012-02-15

    Echo-enabled harmonic generation free electron lasers hold great promise for the generation of fully coherent radiation in x-ray wavelengths. Here we report the first evidence of high harmonics from the echo-enabled harmonic generation technique in the realistic scenario where the laser energy modulation is comparable to the beam slice energy spread. In this experiment, coherent radiation at the seventh harmonic of the second seed laser is generated when the energy modulation amplitude is about 2-3 times the slice energy spread. The experiment confirms the underlying physics of echo-enabled harmonic generation and may have a strong impact on emerging seeded x-ray free electron lasers that are capable of generating laserlike x rays which will advance many areas of science.

  1. Next Generation Astronomical X-ray Optics: High Angular Resolution, Light Weight, and Low Production Cost

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zhang. W. W.; Biskach, M. P.; Blake, P. N.; Chan, K. W.; Gaskin, J. A.; Hong, M. L.; Jones, W. D.; Kolos, L. D.; Mazzarella, J. R.; McClelland, R. S.; O'Dell, S. L.; Saha, T. T.; Sharpe, M. V.

    2012-01-01

    X-ray astronomy depends on the availability of telescopes with high resolution and large photon collecting areas. Since x-ray observation can only be carried out above the atmosphere, these telescopes must be necessarily lightweight. Compounding the lightweight requirement is that an x-ray telescope consists of many nested concentric shells, which further require that x-ray mirrors must also be geometrically thin to achieve high packing efficiency. This double lightweight and geometrically thin requirement poses significant technical challenges in fabricating the mirrors and in integrating them into mirror assemblies. This paper reports on the approach, strategy and status of our x-ray optics development program whose objective is to meet these technical challenges at modest cost to enable future x-ray missions, including small Explorer missions in the near term, probe class missions in the medium term, and large flagship missions in the long term.

  2. A triboelectric closed loop band system for the generation of x-rays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Van Cleve, E.; Lucas, B.; Ganlieli, Z.; Wong, E. W.; Cortes, P.; Mehta, N.; Cuadra, D.; Fong, J.; Hansen, S.; Kotowski, A.; Camara, C. G.

    2015-08-01

    X-ray have been commercially produced using the same basic design since their discovery by Wilhelm Roentgen in 1895, for which he was awarded the first Nobel prize in physics. This technology requires high voltage elements, ultra high vacuum tubes, and high voltage electronics. The vacuum and high voltage drive up the price of x-ray technology and in order to bring down the cost, a brand new way to produce x-rays is needed. In 2008 Carlos Camara, Juan Escobar, Jonathan R. Hird, and Seth Putterman1 discovered that by pealing scotch tape in a vacuum you could create enough x-rays to take an x-ray radiograph of a finger. This lead to the formation of Tribogenics and the development of the rod and band x-ray architecture.

  3. Next Generation X-ray Optics: High Angular Resolution, Light Weight, and Low Production Cost

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, William

    2014-08-01

    Every conceivable future x-ray astronomical mission would require x-ray optics. These optics must meet the three-fold requirements of angular resolution, effective area, and cost.In this poster we will present the rationale, technical approach, and status of an x-ray optics technology development program that has been underway at Goddard Space Flight Center and Marshall Space Flight Center.

  4. Requirements for use of nonmedical x-ray generators at SLAC

    SciTech Connect

    Busick, D.D.

    1984-09-01

    The risks associated with use of x-ray equipment have long been recognized. While the relative frequency of x-ray damage is small, machine produced x-rays and large radiography sources continue to account for a large percentage of preventable radiation injuries reported worldwide. The intent of this report is to formalize SLAC's radiation safety program as it applies to radiation producing equipment (diffraction, fluorescence analysis and nondestructive testing). It does not apply to the two-mile linac, experimental areas or other x-ray producing equipment directly related to the high energy physics program. 4 refs., 3 figs., 1 tab.

  5. Directional properties of hard x-ray sources generated by tightly focused ultrafast laser pulses

    SciTech Connect

    Hou Bixue; Mordovanakis, Aghapi; Easter, James; Krushelnick, Karl; Nees, John A.

    2008-11-17

    Directional properties of ultrafast laser-based hard x-ray sources are experimentally studied using tightly focused approximately millijoule laser pulses incident on a bulk Mo target. Energy distributions of K{alpha} and total x rays, as well as source-size distributions are directionally resolved in vacuum and in flowing helium, respectively. Directional distributions of x-ray emission is more isotropic for p-polarized pump than for s-polarized. Based on source-size measurements, a simple two-location model, with expanded plasma and bulk material, is employed to represent the x-ray source profile.

  6. BEAM DYNAMICS STUDIES OF A HIGH-REPETITION RATE LINAC-DRIVER FOR A 4TH GENERATION LIGHT SOURCE

    SciTech Connect

    Ventturini, M.; Corlett, J.; Emma, P.; Papadopoulos, C.; Penn, G.; Placidi, M.; Qiang, J.; Reinsch, M.; Sannibale, F.; Steier, C.; Sun, C.; Wells, R.

    2012-05-18

    We present recent progress toward the design of a super-conducting linac driver for a high-repetition rate FEL-based soft x-ray light source. The machine is designed to accept beams generated by the APEX photo-cathode gun operating with MHz-range repetition rate and deliver them to an array of SASE and seeded FEL beamlines. We review the current baseline design and report results of beam dynamics studies.

  7. Generation of intense coherent attosecond X-ray pulses using relativistic electron mirrors

    SciTech Connect

    Kulagin, V V; Kornienko, V N; Cherepenin, Vladimir A; Suk, Hyyong

    2013-05-31

    We analyse the steepening of the leading edge of femtosecond petawatt pulses with the use of plasma layers and show that, at an electron density several times higher than the critical one, an asymmetric (in time domain) pulse can be produced with an amplitude of the first half-wave differing little from the maximum pulse amplitude. Using numerical simulation, we have studied the interaction of such pulses with nanometre-thick films, including the generation of relativistic electron mirrors and the reflection of a counterpropagating probe pulse from such mirrors. The resulting coherent X-ray pulses have a duration of {approx}120 as and a power of {approx}600 GW at a wavelength of {approx}13 nm. Our results demonstrate that the reflectivity of a relativistic electron mirror situated in the accelerating pulse field is independent of the probe pulse amplitude when it increases up to the accelerating pulse amplitude. (interaction of laser radiation with matter. laser plasma)

  8. Superconducting RF Deflecting Cavity Design and Prototype for Short X-ray Pulse Generation

    SciTech Connect

    Shi, Jiaru; Chen, H.; Tang, C.-X.; Cheng, Guangfeng; Ciovati, Gianluigi; Kneisel, Peter; Rimmer, Robert; Slack, Gary; Turlington, Larry; Wang, Haipeng; Li, D.; Nassiri, Alireza; Waldschmidt, G.J.

    2008-07-01

    Deflecting RF cavities are proposed to be used in generating short x-ray pulses (on ~1-picosecond order) at the Advanced Photon Source (APS) at Argonne National Laboratory (ANL)* using a novel scheme by Zholents**. To meet the required deflecting voltage, impedance budget from higher order, lower order and the same order modes (HOM, LOM and SOM) of the APS storage ring, extensive deflecting cavity design studies have been conducted with numerical simulations and cavity prototypes. In this paper, we report recent progress on a single cell S-band (2.8-GHz) superconducting deflecting cavity design with waveguide damping. A copper and a niobium prototype cavity were fabricated and tested, respectively to benchmark the cavity and damping designs. A new damping scheme has been proposed which provides stronger damping to both HOM and LOM by directly coupling to a damping waveguide on the cavity equator.

  9. Generation of strongly coupled Xe cluster nanoplasmas by low intensive soft x-ray laser irradiation

    SciTech Connect

    Namba, S.; Hasegawa, N.; Kishimoto, M.; Nishikino, M.; Kawachi, T.

    2012-07-11

    A seeding gas jet including Xe clusters was irradiated with a laser-driven plasma soft x-ray laser pulse ({lambda}=13.9 nm, {approx}7 ps, {<=}5 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 9} W/cm{sup 2}), where the laser photon energy is high enough to ionize 4d core electrons. In order to clarify how the innershell ionization followed by the Auger electron emission is affected under the intense laser irradiation, the electron energy distribution was measured. Photoelectron spectra showed that the peak position attributed to 4d hole shifted to lower energy and the spectral width was broadened with increasing cluster size. Moreover, the energy distribution exhibited that a strongly coupled cluster nanoplasma with several eV was generated.

  10. Hard x-ray generation by low energy, tightly focused laser pulses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Takano, K.; Nemoto, K.; Nayuki, T.; Oishi, Y.; Fujii, T.; Zhidkov, A.; Hotta, E.; Todoriki, M.; Hasegawa, S.

    2008-06-01

    The interaction of λ2 laser pulses with plasma is studied to scale the high-field physics from high power laser systems to low-energy, high-repetition-rate lasers. For this purpose, 20mJ, 40fs Ti:sapphire laser pulses were focused in a spot of 2.2×2.3μm2 with a maximum intensity of I ˜1019W/cm2. Efficient generations of energetic electrons (˜1MeV) and hard x-rays with energies of over 100keV were obtained by irradiating the low-energy, tightly focused laser pulses on a massive Cu target.

  11. Generation of X-ray radiation during planar channeling of relativistic electrons in crystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bashmakov, Yu. A.; Bondarenko, T. V.; Polozov, S. M.

    2016-07-01

    A classical model of the emission of radiation by relativistic electrons in a crystal has been developed using the form of the potential maximally close to its actual form. The dynamics of electrons with energies 20-25 MeV performing channeling in crystals is simulated numerically. The generation of electromagnetic radiation that accompanies this motion has been considered. It has been shown that, in the given electron energy range, this radiation corresponds to the X-ray spectral band with characteristic photon energies of up to 40 keV. The radiation yield is estimated. The requirements to the electron beam parameters are formulated based on the results of the simulation. It has been shown that numerical simulation gives results that correlate with the analytic results obtained earlier and with the experimental data.

  12. Simple Method to Generate Terawatt-Attosecond X-Ray Free-Electron-Laser Pulses.

    PubMed

    Prat, Eduard; Reiche, Sven

    2015-06-19

    X-ray free-electron lasers (XFELs) are cutting-edge research tools that produce almost fully coherent radiation with high power and short-pulse length with applications in multiple science fields. There is a strong demand to achieve even shorter pulses and higher radiation powers than the ones obtained at state-of-the-art XFEL facilities. In this context we propose a novel method to generate terawatt-attosecond XFEL pulses, where an XFEL pulse is pushed through several short good-beam regions of the electron bunch. In addition to the elements of conventional XFEL facilities, the method uses only a multiple-slotted foil and small electron delays between undulator sections. Our scheme is thus simple, compact, and easy to implement both in already operating as well as future XFEL projects. We present numerical simulations that confirm the feasibility and validity of our proposal.

  13. Intense high repetition rate Mo Kα x-ray source generated from laser solid interaction for imaging application

    SciTech Connect

    Huang, K.; Li, M. H.; Yan, W. C.; Ma, Y.; Zhao, J. R.; Li, Y. F.; Chen, L. M.; Guo, X.; Li, D. Z.; Chen, Y. P.; Zhang, J.

    2014-11-15

    We report an efficient Mo Kα x-ray source produced by interaction of femtosecond Ti: sapphire laser pulses with a solid Molybdenum target working at 1 kHz repetition rate. The generated Mo Kα x-ray intensity reaches to 4.7 × 10{sup 10} photons sr{sup −1} s{sup −1}, corresponding to an average power of 0.8 mW into 2π solid angle. The spatial resolution of this x-ray source is measured to be 26 lp/mm. With the high flux and high spatial resolution characteristics, high resolving in-line x-ray radiography was realized on test objects and large size biological samples within merely half a minute. This experiment shows the possibility of laser plasma hard x-ray source as a new low cost and high resolution system for radiography and its ability of ultrafast x-ray pump-probe study of matter.

  14. Real-time observation of coherent acoustic phonons generated by an acoustically mismatched optoacoustic transducer using x-ray diffraction

    SciTech Connect

    Persson, A. I. H.; Andreasson, B. P.; Enquist, H.; Jurgilaitis, A.; Larsson, J.

    2015-11-14

    The spectrum of laser-generated acoustic phonons in indium antimonide coated with a thin nickel film has been studied using time-resolved x-ray diffraction. Strain pulses that can be considered to be built up from coherent phonons were generated in the nickel film by absorption of short laser pulses. Acoustic reflections at the Ni–InSb interface leads to interference that strongly modifies the resulting phonon spectrum. The study was performed with high momentum transfer resolution together with high time resolution. This was achieved by using a third-generation synchrotron radiation source that provided a high-brightness beam and an ultrafast x-ray streak camera to obtain a temporal resolution of 10 ps. We also carried out simulations, using commercial finite element software packages and on-line dynamic diffraction tools. Using these tools, it is possible to calculate the time-resolved x-ray reflectivity from these complicated strain shapes. The acoustic pulses have a peak strain amplitude close to 1%, and we investigated the possibility to use this device as an x-ray switch. At a bright source optimized for hard x-ray generation, the low reflectivity may be an acceptable trade-off to obtain a pulse duration that is more than an order of magnitude shorter.

  15. Studies of the Origin of High-frequency Quasi-periodic Oscillations of Mass-accreting Black Holes in X-Ray Binaries with Next-generation X-Ray Telescopes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Beheshtipour, Banafsheh; Hoormann, Janie K.; Krawczynski, Henric

    2016-08-01

    Observations with RXTE (Rossi X-ray Timing Explorer) revealed the presence of high-frequency quasi-periodic oscillations (HFQPOs) of the X-ray flux from several accreting stellar-mass black holes. HFQPOs (and their counterparts at lower frequencies) may allow us to study general relativity in the regime of strong gravity. However, the observational evidence today does not yet allow us to distinguish between different HFQPO models. In this paper we use a general-relativistic ray-tracing code to investigate X-ray timing spectroscopy and polarization properties of HFQPOs in the orbiting Hotspot model. We study observational signatures for the particular case of the 166 Hz quasi-periodic oscillation (QPO) in the galactic binary GRS 1915+105. We conclude with a discussion of the observability of spectral signatures with a timing-spectroscopy experiment such as the LOFT (Large Observatory for X-ray Timing) and polarization signatures with space-borne X-ray polarimeters such as IXPE (Imaging X-ray Polarimetry Explorer), PolSTAR (Polarization Spectroscopic Telescope Array), PRAXyS(Polarimetry of Relativistic X-ray Sources), or XIPE (X-ray Imaging Polarimetry Explorer). A mission with high count rate such as LOFT would make it possible to get a QPO phase for each photon, enabling the study of the QPO-phase-resolved spectral shape and the correlation between this and the flux level. Owing to the short periods of the HFQPOs, first-generation X-ray polarimeters would not be able to assign a QPO phase to each photon. The study of QPO-phase-resolved polarization energy spectra would thus require simultaneous observations with a first-generation X-ray polarimeter and a LOFT-type mission.

  16. Detection of a Cool, Accretion-Shock-Generated X-Ray Plasma in EX Lupi During the 2008 Optical Eruption

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Teets, William K.; Weintraub, David A.; Kastner, Joel H.; Grosso, Nicholas; Hamaguchi, Kenji; Richmond, Michael

    2012-01-01

    EX Lupi is the prototype for a class of young, pre-main-sequence stars which are observed to undergo irregular, presumably accretion-generated, optical outbursts that result in a several magnitude rise of the optical flux. EX Lupi was observed to optically erupt in 2008 January, triggering Chandra ACIS Target of Opportunity observations shortly thereafter. We find very strong evidence that most of the X-ray emission in the first few months after the optical outburst is generated by accretion of circumstellar material onto the stellar photosphere. Specifically, we find a strong correlation between the decreasing optical and X-ray fluxes following the peak of the outburst in the optical, which suggests that these observed declines in both the optical and X-ray fluxes are the result of declining accretion rate. In addition, in our models of the X-ray spectrum, we find strong evidence for an approx 0.4 keV plasma component, as expected for accretion shocks on low-mass, pre-main-sequence stars. From 2008 March through October, this cool plasma component appeared to fade as EX Lupi returned to its quiescent level in the optical, consistent with a decrease in the overall emission measure of accretion-shock-generated plasma. The overall small increase of the X-ray flux during the optical outburst of EX Lupi is similar to what was observed in previous X-ray observations of the 2005 optical outburst of the EX Lupi-type star V1118 Ori but contrasts with the large increase of the X-ray flux from the erupting young star V1647 Ori during its 2003 and 2008 optical outbursts.

  17. High-gain harmonic generation of soft X-rays with the `fresh bunch` technique

    SciTech Connect

    Yu, Li-Hua; Ben-Zvi, I.

    1996-10-01

    We report numerical simulations (using the TDA code) and analytic verification of the generation of 64 {Angstrom} high power soft X- rays from an exponential regime single pass seeded FEL. The seed is generated in the FEL using the High Gain Harmonic Generation (HGHG) technique combined with the `Fresh bunch` technique. A seed pulse at 2944 {Angstrom} is generated by conventional laser techniques. The seed pulse produces an intense energy modulation of the rear part of a I GeV, 1245 {Angstrom} electron beam in a `modulator` wiggler. In the `radiator` wiggler, (resonant to 64 {Angstrom}), the energy modulation creates beam density modulation followed by radiation of the 46{sup th} harmonic of the seed. We use a magnetic delay to position the 64 A{Angstrom} radiation at the undisturbed front of the bunch to serve as a seed for a single pass, exponential growth FEL. After a 9 m long exponential section followed by a 7 m long tapered section the radiation power reaches 3.3 GW.

  18. Generating X-ray in MeV regime from interactions of mono-energetic electrons with Sn and Pb

    SciTech Connect

    Masalehdan, Hossein

    2012-09-06

    Quasi mono-energetic x-ray beams generated from thin targets by interaction of mono-energetic electron beams from 600 mJ, 80 fs laser pulse. A micron-scale laser-produced plasma creates, accelerates relativistic mono-energetic electron bunches. As such electrons propagate in the ion channel produced in the wake of the laser pulse; the accelerated electrons can interact with Sn, Pb targets and generate X-ray radiation of MeV energy and MeV/cm2 flux.

  19. Three-dimensional time and frequency-domain theory of femtosecond x-ray pulse generation through Thomson Scattering

    SciTech Connect

    Brown, W J; Hartemann, F V

    2004-01-27

    The generation of high intensity, ultra-short x-ray pulses enables exciting new experimental capabilities, such as femtosecond pump-probe experiments used to temporally resolve material structural dynamics on atomic time scales. Thomson backscattering of a high intensity laser pulse with a bright relativistic electron bunch is a promising method for producing such high brightness x-ray pulses in the 10-100 keV range within a compact facility. While a variety of methods for producing sub-picosecond x-ray bursts by Thomson scattering exist, including compression of the electron bunch to sub-picosecond bunch lengths and/or colliding a sub-picosecond laser pulse in a side-on geometry to minimize the interaction time, a promising alternative approach to achieving this goal while maintaining ultra-high brightness is the production of a time correlated (or chirped) x-ray pulse in conjunction with pulse slicing or compression. We present the results of a complete analysis of this process using a recently developed 3-D time and frequency-domain code for analyzing the spatial, temporal, and spectral properties an x-ray beam produced by relativistic Thomson scattering. Based on the relativistic differential cross section, this code has the capability to calculate time and space dependent spectra of the x-ray photons produced from linear Thomson scattering for both bandwidth-limited and chirped incident laser pulses. Spectral broadening of the scattered x-ray pulse resulting from the incident laser bandwidth, laser focus, and the transverse and longitudinal phase space of the electron beam were examined. Simulations of chirped x-ray pulse production using both a chirped electron beam and a chirped laser pulse are presented. Required electron beam and laser parameters are summarized by investigating the effects of beam emittance, energy spread, and laser bandwidth on the scattered x-ray spectrum. It is shown that sufficient temporal correlation in the scattered x-ray spectrum

  20. Design of a carbon-nanotube yarn field emitter for micro-focus X-ray generation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Hyun Suk; Castro, Edward Joseph D.; Lee, Choong Hun

    2016-08-01

    The field-emission (F-E) characteristics of multi-walled carbon-nanotube (MWCNT) yarn and its contribution to X-ray generation have been investigated in the current work. A dry spinning method was used to fabricateMWCNT yarn from superMWCNTs that had been fabricated by using microwave plasma-enhanced chemical vapor deposition (MW-PECVD). The F-E behavior of the MWCNT yarn followed the Fowler-Nordheim model. Compared to a MWCNT, the MWCNT yarn displayed a significant F-E capability in both the diode and the triode X-ray generation structures. The low-voltage F-E of the MWCNT yarn can be attributed to the field-enhancing effect of the yarn due to its shape and to the contribution of the high-aspect-ratio nanotubes that protrude from the sides of the yarn. The effect of filters on the development of X-ray images has also been demonstrated. The amount of exposure of the samples to X-rays was also manipulated. Results of this study indicate that the MWCNT yarn may be a good candidate for use in low-voltage F-E applications for X-ray imaging.

  1. Generating femtosecond X-ray pulses using an emittance-spoiling foil in free-electron lasers

    SciTech Connect

    Ding, Y. Coffee, R.; Decker, F.-J.; Emma, P.; Field, C.; Huang, Z.; Krejcik, P.; Krzywinski, J.; Loos, H.; Lutman, A.; Marinelli, A.; Maxwell, T. J.; Turner, J.; Behrens, C.; Helml, W.

    2015-11-09

    Generation of femtosecond to sub-femtosecond pulses is attracting much attention in X-ray free-electron laser user community. One method is to use a slotted, emittance-spoiling foil which was proposed before (P. Emma et al., Phys. Rev. Lett. 92, 074801 (2004)) and has been widely used at the Linac Coherent Light Source. Direct experimental characterization of the slotted-foil performance was previously unfeasible due to a lack of appropriate diagnostics. With a recently installed X-band radio-frequency transverse deflector, we are able to characterize the electron bunch spoiling effect and X-ray pulse when using the slotted foil. We show that few-femtosecond X-ray pulses are generated with flexible control of the single-pulse duration or double-pulse separation with comparison to the theoretical model.

  2. Generating femtosecond X-ray pulses using an emittance-spoiling foil in free-electron lasers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ding, Y.; Behrens, C.; Coffee, R.; Decker, F.-J.; Emma, P.; Field, C.; Helml, W.; Huang, Z.; Krejcik, P.; Krzywinski, J.; Loos, H.; Lutman, A.; Marinelli, A.; Maxwell, T. J.; Turner, J.

    2015-11-01

    Generation of femtosecond to sub-femtosecond pulses is attracting much attention in X-ray free-electron laser user community. One method is to use a slotted, emittance-spoiling foil which was proposed before (P. Emma et al., Phys. Rev. Lett. 92, 074801 (2004)) and has been widely used at the Linac Coherent Light Source. Direct experimental characterization of the slotted-foil performance was previously unfeasible due to a lack of appropriate diagnostics. With a recently installed X-band radio-frequency transverse deflector, we are able to characterize the electron bunch spoiling effect and X-ray pulse when using the slotted foil. We show that few-femtosecond X-ray pulses are generated with flexible control of the single-pulse duration or double-pulse separation with comparison to the theoretical model.

  3. Laser wakefield generated X-ray probe for femtosecond time-resolved measurements of ionization states of warm dense aluminum

    SciTech Connect

    Mo, M. Z.; Chen, Z.; Tsui, Y. Y.; Fedosejevs, R.; Fourmaux, S.; Saraf, A.; Otani, K.; Kieffer, J. C.; Ng, A.

    2013-12-15

    We have developed a laser wakefield generated X-ray probe to directly measure the temporal evolution of the ionization states in warm dense aluminum by means of absorption spectroscopy. As a promising alternative to the free electron excited X-ray sources, Betatron X-ray radiation, with femtosecond pulse duration, provides a new technique to diagnose femtosecond to picosecond transitions in the atomic structure. The X-ray probe system consists of an adjustable Kirkpatrick-Baez (KB) microscope for focusing the Betatron emission to a small probe spot on the sample being measured, and a flat Potassium Acid Phthalate Bragg crystal spectrometer to measure the transmitted X-ray spectrum in the region of the aluminum K-edge absorption lines. An X-ray focal spot size of around 50 μm was achieved after reflection from the platinum-coated 10-cm-long KB microscope mirrors. Shot to shot positioning stability of the Betatron radiation was measured resulting in an rms shot to shot variation in spatial pointing on the sample of 16 μm. The entire probe setup had a spectral resolution of ∼1.5 eV, a detection bandwidth of ∼24 eV, and an overall photon throughput efficiency of the order of 10{sup −5}. Approximately 10 photons were detected by the X-ray CCD per laser shot within the spectrally resolved detection band. Thus, it is expected that hundreds of shots will be required per absorption spectrum to clearly observe the K-shell absorption features expected from the ionization states of the warm dense aluminum.

  4. Laser wakefield generated X-ray probe for femtosecond time-resolved measurements of ionization states of warm dense aluminum

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mo, M. Z.; Chen, Z.; Fourmaux, S.; Saraf, A.; Otani, K.; Kieffer, J. C.; Tsui, Y. Y.; Ng, A.; Fedosejevs, R.

    2013-12-01

    We have developed a laser wakefield generated X-ray probe to directly measure the temporal evolution of the ionization states in warm dense aluminum by means of absorption spectroscopy. As a promising alternative to the free electron excited X-ray sources, Betatron X-ray radiation, with femtosecond pulse duration, provides a new technique to diagnose femtosecond to picosecond transitions in the atomic structure. The X-ray probe system consists of an adjustable Kirkpatrick-Baez (KB) microscope for focusing the Betatron emission to a small probe spot on the sample being measured, and a flat Potassium Acid Phthalate Bragg crystal spectrometer to measure the transmitted X-ray spectrum in the region of the aluminum K-edge absorption lines. An X-ray focal spot size of around 50 μm was achieved after reflection from the platinum-coated 10-cm-long KB microscope mirrors. Shot to shot positioning stability of the Betatron radiation was measured resulting in an rms shot to shot variation in spatial pointing on the sample of 16 μm. The entire probe setup had a spectral resolution of ˜1.5 eV, a detection bandwidth of ˜24 eV, and an overall photon throughput efficiency of the order of 10-5. Approximately 10 photons were detected by the X-ray CCD per laser shot within the spectrally resolved detection band. Thus, it is expected that hundreds of shots will be required per absorption spectrum to clearly observe the K-shell absorption features expected from the ionization states of the warm dense aluminum.

  5. Laser wakefield generated X-ray probe for femtosecond time-resolved measurements of ionization states of warm dense aluminum.

    PubMed

    Mo, M Z; Chen, Z; Fourmaux, S; Saraf, A; Otani, K; Kieffer, J C; Tsui, Y Y; Ng, A; Fedosejevs, R

    2013-12-01

    We have developed a laser wakefield generated X-ray probe to directly measure the temporal evolution of the ionization states in warm dense aluminum by means of absorption spectroscopy. As a promising alternative to the free electron excited X-ray sources, Betatron X-ray radiation, with femtosecond pulse duration, provides a new technique to diagnose femtosecond to picosecond transitions in the atomic structure. The X-ray probe system consists of an adjustable Kirkpatrick-Baez (KB) microscope for focusing the Betatron emission to a small probe spot on the sample being measured, and a flat Potassium Acid Phthalate Bragg crystal spectrometer to measure the transmitted X-ray spectrum in the region of the aluminum K-edge absorption lines. An X-ray focal spot size of around 50 μm was achieved after reflection from the platinum-coated 10-cm-long KB microscope mirrors. Shot to shot positioning stability of the Betatron radiation was measured resulting in an rms shot to shot variation in spatial pointing on the sample of 16 μm. The entire probe setup had a spectral resolution of ~1.5 eV, a detection bandwidth of ~24 eV, and an overall photon throughput efficiency of the order of 10(-5). Approximately 10 photons were detected by the X-ray CCD per laser shot within the spectrally resolved detection band. Thus, it is expected that hundreds of shots will be required per absorption spectrum to clearly observe the K-shell absorption features expected from the ionization states of the warm dense aluminum. PMID:24387419

  6. Reliability of a new 4th generation FloTrac algorithm to track cardiac output changes in patients receiving phenylephrine.

    PubMed

    Ji, Fuhai; Li, Jian; Fleming, Neal; Rose, David; Liu, Hong

    2015-08-01

    Phenylephrine is often used to treat intra-operative hypotension. Previous studies have shown that the FloTrac cardiac monitor may overestimate cardiac output (CO) changes following phenylephrine administration. A new algorithm (4th generation) has been developed to improve performance in this setting. We performed a prospective observational study to assess the effects of phenylephrine administration on CO values measured by the 3rd and 4th generation FloTrac algorithms. 54 patients were enrolled in this study. We used the Nexfin, a pulse contour method shown to be insensitive to vasopressor administration, as the reference method. Radial arterial pressures were recorded continuously in patients undergoing surgery. Phenylephrine administration times were documented. Arterial pressure recordings were subsequently analyzed offline using three different pulse contour analysis algorithms: FloTrac 3rd generation (G3), FloTrac 4th generation (G4), and Nexfin (nf). One minute of hemodynamic measurements was analyzed immediately before phenylephrine administration and then repeated when the mean arterial pressure peaked. A total of 157 (4.6 ± 3.2 per patient, range 1-15) paired sets of hemodynamic recordings were analyzed. Phenylephrine induced a significant increase in stroke volume (SV) and CO with the FloTrac G3, but not with FloTrac G4 or Nexfin algorithms. Agreement between FloTrac G3 and Nexfin was: 0.23 ± 1.19 l/min and concordance was 51.1%. In contrast, agreement between FloTrac G4 and Nexfin was: 0.19 ± 0.86 l/min and concordance was 87.2%. In conclusion, the pulse contour method of measuring CO, as implemented in FloTrac 4th generation algorithm, has significantly improved its ability to track the changes in CO induced by phenylephrine.

  7. Status of the LBL experiment on femtosecond x-ray generation through 90{degree} Thomson scattering

    SciTech Connect

    Leemans, W.; Chattopadhyay, S.; Conde, M.; Glover, E.; Kim, K.J.; Schoenlein, R.; Shank, C.V.

    1994-06-01

    A status report on the generation of femtosecond X-ray pulses through 90{degrees} Thompson scattering is presented. The experiment involves a relativistic electron beam (tunable from 25--50 MeV) with a bunch length of 10 ps containing 1 {minus}2 nC, and a ultrashort pulse (50--200 fs), high power (4 TW) 0.8 {mu}m Ti:Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} laser system. Both beams are focussed down to about a 50 {mu}m waist size and intersect at 90{degrees}. The laser field acts as an electromagnetic undulator for the relativistic electron beam generating radiation upshifted by 2 {gamma}{sup 2} and a pulse length given by the transit time of the laser beam across the electron beam. For a 50 MeV electron beam we expect 10{sup 5} photons at 0.4 {angstrom} (10% bandwidth) in a cone angle of 6 mrad in a 170 fs pulse.

  8. Ionization injection effects in x-ray spectra generated by betatron oscillations in a laser wakefield accelerator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Behm, K. T.; Zhao, T. Z.; Cole, J. M.; Maksimchuk, A.; Mangles, S. P. D.; Nees, J.; Wood, J. C.; Yanovsky, V.; Krushelnick, K.; Thomas, A. G. R.

    2016-05-01

    Single photon counting techniques were used with an x-ray CCD camera to measure features of synchrotron-like x-ray spectra generated by betatron oscillations of electrons in a laser wakefield accelerator (LWFA) with different injection techniques. Measurements were made using the Hercules laser system at the University of Michigan. With a single stage gas cell, we demonstrate that pure helium gas in our wakefield accelerator will produce spectra with higher critical energies than when helium mixed with nitrogen is used. This result was not evident when a two stage gas cell was used.

  9. AGN feedback on the cluster and galactic scales: What the next generation of X-ray observatories should deliver

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Heinz, Sebastian

    2014-08-01

    Chandra observations of the X-ray atmospheres of galaxy clusters and early type galaxies show that AGN feedback is a critical ingredient in the low-redshift evolution of cosmic structure. However, Chandra observations of these systems are photon-starved, and key questions that can only be addressed by high-resolution imaging spectroscopy are left unanswered. I will discuss the prospects of the next generation of X-ray observatories for answering some of these key questions, and why high spatial resolution is critical if we want to settle the question of the hot-halo/radio mode of AGN feedback in galaxies.

  10. Investigating radial wire array Z pinches as a compact x-ray source on the Saturn generator

    DOE PAGES

    Ampleford, David J.; Bland, S. N.; Jennings, Christopher A.; Lebedev, S. V.; Chittenden, J. P.; Cuneo, Michael E.; McBride, Ryan D.; Jones, Brent Manley; Hall, G. N.; Suzuki-Vidal, F.; et al

    2015-08-27

    Radial wire array z pinches, where wires are positioned radially outward from a central cathode to a concentric anode, can act as a compact bright x-ray source that could potentially be used to drive a hohlraum. Experiments were performed on the 7-MA Saturn generator using radial wire arrays. These experiments studied a number of potential risks in scaling radial wire arrays up from the 1-MA level, where they have been shown to be a promising compact X-ray source. Data indicates that at 7 MA, radial wire arrays can radiate ~9 TW with 10-ns full-width at half-maximum from a compact pinch.

  11. Generation of hard x rays by femtosecond laser pulse interaction with Cu in laminar helium flow in ambient air

    SciTech Connect

    Hou Bixue; Easter, James; Krushelnick, Karl; Nees, John A.

    2008-04-21

    Hard x rays are generated in laminar helium flow in atmosphere (without a vacuum vessel) through the interaction of tightly focused 35 fs laser pulses of varying energy with a Cu target. The energy conversion efficiency from laser to K{alpha} x rays is measured to be 5.4x10{sup -6}, giving a flux of 5.9x10{sup 9} photons/s into 2{pi} sr from a source measuring approximately 9x12 {mu}m{sup 2} in size (verticalxhorizontal). Results are compared to those measured in vacuum and in static helium environments.

  12. Diagnostic copper imaging of Menkes disease by synchrotron radiation-generated X-ray fluorescence analysis.

    PubMed

    Kinebuchi, Miyuki; Matsuura, Akihiro; Kiyono, Tohru; Nomura, Yumiko; Kimura, Sachiko

    2016-01-01

    Copper (Cu) is an indispensable metal for normal development and function of humans, especially in central nervous system (CNS). However, its redox activity requires accurate Cu transport system. ATP7A, a main Cu(2+) transporting-ATPase, is necessary to efflux Cu across the plasma membrane and synthesize cuproenzymes. Menkes disease (MD) is caused by mutations in ATP7A gene. Clinically, MD is Cu deficiency syndrome and is treated with Cu-histidine injections soon after definite diagnosis. But outcome of the most remains poor. To estimate the standard therapy, Cu distribution in the treated classic MD patients is analyzed by synchrotron-generated X-ray fluorescence technique (SR-XRF), which identifies and quantifies an individual atom up to at subcellular level of resolution with wide detection area. SR-XRF analysis newly reveals that Cu exists in spinal cord parenchyma and flows out via venous and lymph systems. By systemic analysis, excess Cu is detected in the proximal tubular cells of the kidney, the mucosal epithelial cells of the intestine, and the lymph and venous systems. The current study suggests that the standard therapy supply almost enough Cu for patient tissues. But given Cu passes through the tissues to venous and lymph systems, or accumulate in the cells responsible for Cu absorption. PMID:27629586

  13. ATHENA: system design and implementation for a next generation x-ray telescope

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ayre, M.; Bavdaz, M.; Ferreira, I.; Wille, E.; Lumb, D.; Linder, M.

    2015-08-01

    ATHENA, Europe's next generation x-ray telescope, has recently been selected for the 'L2' slot in ESA's Cosmic Vision Programme, with a mandate to address the 'Hot and Energetic Universe' Cosmic Vision science theme. The mission is currently in the Assessment/Definition Phase (A/B1), with a view to formal adoption after a successful System Requirements Review in 2019. This paper will describe the reference mission architecture and spacecraft design produced during Phase 0 by the ESA Concurrent Design Facility (CDF), in response to the technical requirements and programmatic boundary conditions. The main technical requirements and their mapping to resulting design choices will be presented, at both mission and spacecraft level. An overview of the spacecraft design down to subsystem level will then be presented (including the telescope and instruments), remarking on the critically-enabling technologies where appropriate. Finally, a programmatic overview will be given of the on-going Assessment Phase, and a snapshot of the prospects for securing the `as-proposed' mission within the cost envelope will be given.

  14. Diagnostic copper imaging of Menkes disease by synchrotron radiation-generated X-ray fluorescence analysis

    PubMed Central

    Kinebuchi, Miyuki; Matsuura, Akihiro; Kiyono, Tohru; Nomura, Yumiko; Kimura, Sachiko

    2016-01-01

    Copper (Cu) is an indispensable metal for normal development and function of humans, especially in central nervous system (CNS). However, its redox activity requires accurate Cu transport system. ATP7A, a main Cu2+ transporting-ATPase, is necessary to efflux Cu across the plasma membrane and synthesize cuproenzymes. Menkes disease (MD) is caused by mutations in ATP7A gene. Clinically, MD is Cu deficiency syndrome and is treated with Cu-histidine injections soon after definite diagnosis. But outcome of the most remains poor. To estimate the standard therapy, Cu distribution in the treated classic MD patients is analyzed by synchrotron-generated X-ray fluorescence technique (SR-XRF), which identifies and quantifies an individual atom up to at subcellular level of resolution with wide detection area. SR-XRF analysis newly reveals that Cu exists in spinal cord parenchyma and flows out via venous and lymph systems. By systemic analysis, excess Cu is detected in the proximal tubular cells of the kidney, the mucosal epithelial cells of the intestine, and the lymph and venous systems. The current study suggests that the standard therapy supply almost enough Cu for patient tissues. But given Cu passes through the tissues to venous and lymph systems, or accumulate in the cells responsible for Cu absorption. PMID:27629586

  15. Generation of bright attosecond x-ray pulse trains via Thomson scattering from laser-plasma accelerators.

    PubMed

    Luo, W; Yu, T P; Chen, M; Song, Y M; Zhu, Z C; Ma, Y Y; Zhuo, H B

    2014-12-29

    Generation of attosecond x-ray pulse attracts more and more attention within the advanced light source user community due to its potentially wide applications. Here we propose an all-optical scheme to generate bright, attosecond hard x-ray pulse trains by Thomson backscattering of similarly structured electron beams produced in a vacuum channel by a tightly focused laser pulse. Design parameters for a proof-of-concept experiment are presented and demonstrated by using a particle-in-cell code and a four-dimensional laser-Compton scattering simulation code to model both the laser-based electron acceleration and Thomson scattering processes. Trains of 200 attosecond duration hard x-ray pulses holding stable longitudinal spacing with photon energies approaching 50 keV and maximum achievable peak brightness up to 1020 photons/s/mm2/mrad2/0.1%BW for each micro-bunch are observed. The suggested physical scheme for attosecond x-ray pulse trains generation may directly access the fastest time scales relevant to electron dynamics in atoms, molecules and materials.

  16. Assessment of different computational models for generation of x-ray spectra in diagnostic radiology and mammography

    SciTech Connect

    Ay, M.R.; Sarkar, S.; Shahriari, M.; Sardari, D.; Zaidi, H.

    2005-06-15

    Different computational methods based on empirical or semi-empirical models and sophisticated Monte Carlo calculations have been proposed for prediction of x-ray spectra both in diagnostic radiology and mammography. In this work, the x-ray spectra predicted by various computational models used in the diagnostic radiology and mammography energy range have been assessed by comparison with measured spectra and their effect on the calculation of absorbed dose and effective dose (ED) imparted to the adult ORNL hermaphroditic phantom quantified. This includes empirical models (TASMIP and MASMIP), semi-empirical models (X-rayb and m, X-raytbc, XCOMP, IPEM, Tucker et al., and Blough et al.), and Monte Carlo modeling (EGS4, ITS3.0, and MCNP4C). As part of the comparative assessment, the K x-ray yield, transmission curves, and half value layers (HVLs) have been calculated for the spectra generated with all computational models at different tube voltages. The measured x-ray spectra agreed well with the generated spectra when using X-raytbc and IPEM in diagnostic radiology and mammography energy ranges, respectively. Despite the systematic differences between the simulated and reference spectra for some models, the student's t-test statistical analysis showed there is no statistically significant difference between measured and generated spectra for all computational models investigated in this study. The MCNP4C-based Monte Carlo calculations showed there is no discernable discrepancy in the calculation of absorbed dose and ED in the adult ORNL hermaphroditic phantom when using different computational models for generating the x-ray spectra. Nevertheless, given the limited flexibility of the empirical and semi-empirical models, the spectra obtained through Monte Carlo modeling offer several advantages by providing detailed information about the interactions in the target and filters, which is relevant for the design of new target and filter combinations and optimization of

  17. X-ray crystallography

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2001-01-01

    X-rays diffracted from a well-ordered protein crystal create sharp patterns of scattered light on film. A computer can use these patterns to generate a model of a protein molecule. To analyze the selected crystal, an X-ray crystallographer shines X-rays through the crystal. Unlike a single dental X-ray, which produces a shadow image of a tooth, these X-rays have to be taken many times from different angles to produce a pattern from the scattered light, a map of the intensity of the X-rays after they diffract through the crystal. The X-rays bounce off the electron clouds that form the outer structure of each atom. A flawed crystal will yield a blurry pattern; a well-ordered protein crystal yields a series of sharp diffraction patterns. From these patterns, researchers build an electron density map. With powerful computers and a lot of calculations, scientists can use the electron density patterns to determine the structure of the protein and make a computer-generated model of the structure. The models let researchers improve their understanding of how the protein functions. They also allow scientists to look for receptor sites and active areas that control a protein's function and role in the progress of diseases. From there, pharmaceutical researchers can design molecules that fit the active site, much like a key and lock, so that the protein is locked without affecting the rest of the body. This is called structure-based drug design.

  18. Tunable X-ray source

    DOEpatents

    Boyce, James R.

    2011-02-08

    A method for the production of X-ray bunches tunable in both time and energy level by generating multiple photon, X-ray, beams through the use of Thomson scattering. The method of the present invention simultaneously produces two X-ray pulses that are tunable in energy and/or time.

  19. Compact hohlraum configuration with parallel planar-wire-array x-ray sources at the 1.7-MA Zebra generator.

    PubMed

    Kantsyrev, V L; Chuvatin, A S; Rudakov, L I; Velikovich, A L; Shrestha, I K; Esaulov, A A; Safronova, A S; Shlyaptseva, V V; Osborne, G C; Astanovitsky, A L; Weller, M E; Stafford, A; Schultz, K A; Cooper, M C; Cuneo, M E; Jones, B; Vesey, R A

    2014-12-01

    A compact Z-pinch x-ray hohlraum design with parallel-driven x-ray sources is experimentally demonstrated in a configuration with a central target and tailored shine shields at a 1.7-MA Zebra generator. Driving in parallel two magnetically decoupled compact double-planar-wire Z pinches has demonstrated the generation of synchronized x-ray bursts that correlated well in time with x-ray emission from a central reemission target. Good agreement between simulated and measured hohlraum radiation temperature of the central target is shown. The advantages of compact hohlraum design applications for multi-MA facilities are discussed.

  20. Next Generation X-ray Optics: High Angular Resolution, Light Weight, and Low Production Cost

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, William; NGXO

    2014-01-01

    X-ray telescopes are essential to the future of x-ray astronomy. In this talk I will describe a comprehensive program to advance the technology for x-ray telescopes well beyond the state of the art represented by the dour missions currently in operations: Chandra, XMM-Newton, Suzaku, and NuSTAR. This program will address the three key issues in making an x-ray telescope: (1) angular resolution, (2) effective area per unit mass, and (3) cost per unit effective area. The objectives of this technology program are (1) in the near term, to enable Explorer-class x-ray missions and an IXO-type mission, and (2) in the long term, to enable a flagship x-ray mission with sub-arcsecond angular resolution and multi-square-meter effective area, at an affordable cost. We pursue two approaches concurrently, emphasizing the first approach in the near term (2-5 years) and the second in the long term (4-10 years). The first approach is precision slumping of borosilicate glass sheets. By design and choice at the outset, this technique makes lightweight and low-cost mirrors. The development program will continue to improve angular resolution, to enable the production of 5-arcsecond x-ray telescopes, to support Explorer-class missions and one or more missions to supersede the original IXO mission. The second approach is precision polishing and light-weighting of single-crystal silicon mirrors. This approach benefits from two recent commercial developments: (1) the inexpensive and abundant availability of large blocks of monocrystalline silicon, and (2) revolutionary advances in deterministic, precision polishing of mirrors. By design and choice at the outset, this technique is capable of producing lightweight mirrors with sub-arcsecond angular resolution. The development program will increase the efficiency and reduce the cost of the polishing and the light-weighting processes, to enable the production of lightweight sub-arcsecond x-ray telescopes. Concurrent with the fabrication of

  1. Generating Ultrashort Coherent Soft X-ray Radiation in Storage Rings Using Angular-modulated Electron Beams

    SciTech Connect

    Xiang, D.; Wan, W.; /LBL, Berkeley

    2010-08-23

    A technique is proposed to generate ultrashort coherent soft x-ray radiation in storage rings using angular-modulated electron beams. In the scheme a laser operating in the TEM01 mode is first used to modulate the angular distribution of the electron beam in an undulator. After passing through a special beam line with non-zero transfer matrix element R{sub 54}, the angular modulation is converted to density modulation which contains considerable higher harmonic contents of the laser. It is found that the harmonic number can be one or two orders of magnitude higher than the standard coherent harmonic generation method which relies on beam energy modulation. The technique has the potential of generating femtosecond coherent soft x-ray radiation directly from an infrared seed laser and may open new research opportunities for ultrafast sciences in storage rings.

  2. Athena as the next generation X-ray observatory: Solar system targets and exoplanets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Branduardi-Raymont, Graziella; Sciortino, Salvatore

    Athena studies of the solar system, by providing ever deeper insights in the complex workings of planetary magnetospheres and exospheres, will answer many of the questions left open by the pioneering work of Chandra and XMM-Newton and will add enormously to our understanding of the interactions of space plasmas and magnetic fields. The non-dispersive character of X-IFU spectroscopy will enable Jupiter’s auroral and scattered solar emissions, and the Io Plasma Torus, to be mapped spatially and spectrally at high resolution; will enable surface composition analysis through fluorescence spectra of the Galilean satellites; will establish how planetary exospheres, such as Mars’, and comets respond to the interaction with the solar wind, in a global way that in situ measurements cannot provide. The X-IFU, with its two orders of magnitude improved effective area over current spectrometers, will push the search for auroral X-ray emission on Saturn to much fainter limits, and set very sensitive constraints on Uranus X-ray emission. Athena will explore the magnetic interplay between stars and planets in X-rays by searching for X-ray spectral variability over the planet's orbital phases and for systems of different orbital eccentricity, and will investigate ingress/eclipse/egress effects for transiting hot-Jupiter exoplanets; again instrumental to this will be the vastly improved signal-to-noise ratio provided by Athena over that achieved by XMM-Newton or Chandra.

  3. Simbol-X: A New Generation Soft/Hard X-ray Telescope

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Slane, Patrick O.; Romaine, S.; Murray, S. S.; Brissenden, R.; Elvis, M.; Gorenstein, P.; Steel, S.; O'Dell, S.; Kolodziejczak, J.; Ramsey, B.; Angelini, L.; Citterio, O.; Pareschi, G.

    2008-03-01

    Simbol-X is arguably the most powerful broad-band focusing hard (0.5-80 keV) X-ray telescope operating in the 2013 timeframe. The combination of good angular resolution, broad energy response, and efficient observing provided by a good field of view and high orbit will provide a very large increase in sensitivity in a hitherto relatively unexplored spectral region. This will enable key scientific investigations including a census of supermassive black holes in the crucial energy range in which the cosmic X-ray background peaks, measurements of the geometry and dynamics of accretion in black hole binaries, characterization of hard X-ray sources in the Galactic center, and the nature and origin of energetic particles in galaxy clusters and supernova remnants. Its single optics module contains a set of nested nickel shells coated with multilayers to boost the high-energy response and the field of view. Its focal plane detectors are a novel hybrid configuration, with thick-depletion silicon providing the low energy response, and Cadmium Telluride the high energy response. To achieve the long focal length necessary for large collecting areas at high energies, the optics and detectors are on separate high-earth-orbit formation-flying spacecrafts, 20 m apart. We describe a proposed US participation in the Simbol-X program to provide technical expertise in the area of multilayer coatings for the X-ray optics; expertise in science and the X-ray testing and calibration of the flight optics; and support as a data analysis, Guest Investigator, and archiving center. The use of the NASA DSN Goldstone station, as a complement to the Malindi tracking station,will also be provided.

  4. Characterisation of flash X-ray source generated by Kali-1000 Pulse Power System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Satyanarayana, N.; Durga Prasada Rao, A.; Mittal, K. C.

    2016-02-01

    The electron beam-driven Rod Pinch Diode (RPD) is presently fielded on KALI-1000 Pulse Power System at Bhabha Atomic Research Centre, Visakhapatnam and is a leading candidate for future flash X-ray radiographic sources. The diode is capable of producing less than 2-mm radiation spot sizes and greater than 350 milli rads of dose measured at 1 m from the X-ray source. KALI-1000 Pulse Power Source is capable of delivering up to 600 kV using a Tesla Transformer with Demineralized Insulated Transmission Line (DITL), the diode typically operates between 250-330 kV . Since the radiation dose has a power-law dependence on diode voltage, this limits the dose production on KALI-1000 system. Radiation dose with angular variation is measured using thermoluminescent detectors (TLD's) and the X-ray spot size is measured using pin hole arrangement with image plate (IP) to obtain the time-integrated source profile as well as a time-resolved spot diagnostic. An X-ray pinhole camera was used to pick out where the energetic e-beam connects to the anode. Ideally the diode should function such that the radiation is emitted from the tip. The camera was mounted perpendicular to the machine's axis to view the radiation from the tip. Comparison of the spot sizes of the X-ray sources obtained by the pin hole and rolled edge arrangements was carried and results obtained by both the techniques are with in ± 10% of the average values.

  5. X-ray contact microscopy using a plasma source generated by long and short (120ns and 10ns) excimer laser pulses

    SciTech Connect

    Cotton, R.; Bollanti, S.; Di Lazzaro, P.

    1995-12-31

    Soft X-ray contact microscopy (SXCM), using a pulsed X-ray source, offers the possibility of imaging the ultrastructure of living biological systems at sub-50nm resolution. The authors have developed a pulsed plasma X-ray source for this application, generated by the large volume XeCl laser Hercules. Various unstable optical resonator configurations were employed to achieve a high laser intensity to increase the conversion efficiency to water window X-rays (280--530 eV). Optimum plasma conditions for SXCM are discussed, including the effect of pulse duration on image resolution. Soft X-ray contact images of Chlamydomonas dysosmos (unicellular alga) and the cyanobacteria Leptolyngbya are shown. In addition, the potential of producing a movie film of the development of X-ray images within the photoresist (acting as the recording medium) is discussed, following the resist development while viewing by atomic force microscopy.

  6. Laboratory x ray lasers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Matthews, D. L.

    1989-08-01

    One of the most innovative spinoffs of ICF technology and physics was the development of the x ray wavelength laser. The first incontrovertible demonstration of this type of laser came from LLNL in 1984 using the Novette laser to pump a selenium foil target. The power and energy of Novette were then needed to produce a column of plasma of sufficient length to achieve a sufficient gainlength product (approximately 5.5, this corresponds to an amplification of approximately 250X) that could unquestionably illustrate the lasing effect. LLNL ICF expertise was also required to develop time-resolved spectrometers used to view the lasing transitions at approximately 20 nm, a region of the XUV spectrum normally dominated by high backgrounds. The design of the x ray laser amplifier, which required maintaining nonequilibrium level populations in a tailored plasma having the proper conditions for gain and x ray laser beam propagation, was accomplished with modified versions of ICF kinetics and hydrodynamics codes. Since the first demonstration, progress in the development of the x ray laser was rapid. New achievements include production of megawatt power levels at 20 nm, amplified spontaneous emission levels approaching saturation intensity GL of approximately 17 at 20 nm, efficiency (x ray laser energy/pump energy) approximately 10(exp 6), the demonstration of double and triple pass amplification (hinting at the possibility of producing x ray wavelength resonators), the focusing of x ray lasers to pump other types of lasers and the first demonstration of an x ray hologram produced by an x ray laser. The generation of amplification at ever shorter wavelength is possible using various types of inversion schemes. We depict below this progress benchmarked against production of gain in the water window (2.2 to 4.4 nm,), where applications to biological imaging may be facilitated.

  7. Narrow-band GeV photons generated from an x-ray free-electron laser oscillator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hajima, Ryoichi; Fujiwara, Mamoru

    2016-02-01

    We propose a scheme to generate narrow-band GeV photons, γ -rays, via Compton scattering of hard x-ray photons in an x-ray free-electron laser oscillator. Generated γ -rays show a narrow-band spectrum with a sharp peak, ˜0.1 % (FWHM), due to large momentum transfer from electrons to photons. The γ -ray beam has a spectral density of ˜102 ph /(MeV s ) with a typical set of parameters based on a 7-GeV electron beam operated at 3-MHz repetition, Such γ -rays will be a unique probe for studying hadron physics. Features of the γ -ray source, flux, spectrum, polarization, tunability and energy resolution are discussed.

  8. High-Flux Femtosecond X-Ray Emission from Controlled Generation of Annular Electron Beams in a Laser Wakefield Accelerator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, T. Z.; Behm, K.; Dong, C. F.; Davoine, X.; Kalmykov, S. Y.; Petrov, V.; Chvykov, V.; Cummings, P.; Hou, B.; Maksimchuk, A.; Nees, J. A.; Yanovsky, V.; Thomas, A. G. R.; Krushelnick, K.

    2016-08-01

    Annular quasimonoenergetic electron beams with a mean energy in the range 200-400 MeV and charge on the order of several picocoulombs were generated in a laser wakefield accelerator and subsequently accelerated using a plasma afterburner in a two-stage gas cell. Generation of these beams is associated with injection occurring on the density down ramp between the stages. This well-localized injection produces a bunch of electrons performing coherent betatron oscillations in the wakefield, resulting in a significant increase in the x-ray yield. Annular electron distributions are detected in 40% of shots under optimal conditions. Simultaneous control of the pulse duration and frequency chirp enables optimization of both the energy and the energy spread of the annular beam and boosts the radiant energy per unit charge by almost an order of magnitude. These well-defined annular distributions of electrons are a promising source of high-brightness laser plasma-based x rays.

  9. First results of KALI-30 GW with 1 MV flash X-rays generation and characterization by Imaging plate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sharma, A.; Shaikh, A. M.; Senthil, K.; Mitra, S.; Chandra, R.; Vishnu, S.; Sandeep, S.; Roy, A.; Rakhee, M.; Sharma, V.; Danish, M. B.; Kolge, T. S.; Ranjeet, K.; Agrawal, R.; Saroj, P. C.; Tewari, S. V.; Mittal, K. C.

    2014-07-01

    The design, development and commissioning of 1 MV pulsed electron accelerator producing Flash X-Rays is described in this paper. This pulsed power system is based on bipolar MARX generator and Blumlein followed by Explosive electron emission diode assembly. The peak pulsed power is ~ 30 GW. The electron energies in the range of 400 keV to 1030 keV are produced and delivered to experimental load of Industrial diode. Electrons are emitted from a stainless steel ring at ground potential by explosive field emission and bombard the anode tungsten pin for flash X-rays generation. The relativistic electron beam has been simulated within the diode chamber and pattern shows the beam propagation. Imaging plates are used to characterize the source size and optimization has been reported.

  10. Effect of a pulsating electric field on ECR heating in the CERA-RX(C) X-ray generator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Balmashnov, A. A.; Kalashnikov, A. V.; Kalashnikov, V. V.; Stepina, S. P.; Umnov, A. M.

    2016-03-01

    3D particle-in-cell plasma simulations for the field configurations implemented in the CERA-RX(C) ECR X-ray generator (2.45 GHz) have been conducted. Dependences of the energy spectra of electrons incident on the target electrode on the amplitude and frequency of pulsations of the electric field in a megahertz range are derived. The simulation data are compared with the results of the full-scale experiment.

  11. Testing quantum mechanics in non-Minkowski space-time with high power lasers and 4(th) generation light sources.

    PubMed

    Crowley, B J B; Bingham, R; Evans, R G; Gericke, D O; Landen, O L; Murphy, C D; Norreys, P A; Rose, S J; Tschentscher, Th; Wang, C H-T; Wark, J S; Gregori, G

    2012-01-01

    A common misperception of quantum gravity is that it requires accessing energies up to the Planck scale of 10¹⁹ GeV, which is unattainable from any conceivable particle collider. Thanks to the development of ultra-high intensity optical lasers, very large accelerations can be now the reached at their focal spot, thus mimicking, by virtue of the equivalence principle, a non Minkowski space-time. Here we derive a semiclassical extension of quantum mechanics that applies to different metrics, but under the assumption of weak gravity. We use our results to show that Thomson scattering of photons by uniformly accelerated electrons predicts an observable effect depending upon acceleration and local metric. In the laboratory frame, a broadening of the Thomson scattered x ray light from a fourth generation light source can be used to detect the modification of the metric associated to electrons accelerated in the field of a high power optical laser.

  12. Testing quantum mechanics in non-Minkowski space-time with high power lasers and 4th generation light sources

    PubMed Central

    Crowley, B. J. B.; Bingham, R.; Evans, R. G.; Gericke, D. O.; Landen, O. L.; Murphy, C. D.; Norreys, P. A.; Rose, S. J.; Tschentscher, Th; Wang, C. H.-T; Wark, J. S.; Gregori, G.

    2012-01-01

    A common misperception of quantum gravity is that it requires accessing energies up to the Planck scale of 1019 GeV, which is unattainable from any conceivable particle collider. Thanks to the development of ultra-high intensity optical lasers, very large accelerations can be now the reached at their focal spot, thus mimicking, by virtue of the equivalence principle, a non Minkowski space-time. Here we derive a semiclassical extension of quantum mechanics that applies to different metrics, but under the assumption of weak gravity. We use our results to show that Thomson scattering of photons by uniformly accelerated electrons predicts an observable effect depending upon acceleration and local metric. In the laboratory frame, a broadening of the Thomson scattered x ray light from a fourth generation light source can be used to detect the modification of the metric associated to electrons accelerated in the field of a high power optical laser. PMID:22768381

  13. Simultaneous generation of quasi-monoenergetic electron and betatron X-rays from nitrogen gas via ionization injection

    SciTech Connect

    Huang, K.; Yan, W. C.; Li, M. H.; Tao, M. Z.; Ma, Y.; Zhao, J. R.; Chen, L. M.; Li, D. Z.; Chen, Z. Y.; Ge, X. L.; Liu, F.; Hafz, N. M.; Zhang, J.

    2014-11-17

    Upon the interaction of 60 TW Ti: sapphire laser pulses with 4 mm long supersonic nitrogen gas jet, a directional x-ray emission was generated along with the generation of stable quasi-monoenergetic electron beams having a peak energy of 130 MeV and a relative energy spread of ∼ 20%. The betatron x-ray emission had a small divergence of 7.5 mrad and a critical energy of 4 keV. The laser wakefield acceleration process was stimulated in a background plasma density of merely 5.4 × 10{sup 17 }cm{sup −3} utilizing ionization injection. The non-self-focusing and stable propagation of the laser pulse in the pure nitrogen gaseous plasma should be responsible for the simultaneous generation of the high-quality X-ray and electron beams. Those ultra-short and naturally-synchronized beams could be applicable to ultrafast pump-probe experiments.

  14. Generation of large-bandwidth x-ray free-electron-laser pulses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saa Hernandez, Angela; Prat, Eduard; Bettoni, Simona; Beutner, Bolko; Reiche, Sven

    2016-09-01

    X-ray free-electron lasers (XFELs) are modern research tools in disciplines such as biology, material science, chemistry, and physics. Besides the standard operation that aims at minimizing the bandwidth of the produced XFEL radiation, there is a strong scientific demand to produce large-bandwidth XFEL pulses for several applications such as nanocrystallography, stimulated Raman spectroscopy, and multiwavelength anomalous diffraction. We present a self-consistent method that maximizes the XFEL pulse bandwidth by systematically maximizing the energy chirp of the electron beam at the undulator entrance. This is achieved by optimizing the compression scheme and the electron distribution at the source in an iterative back-and-forward tracking. Start-to-end numerical simulations show that a relative bandwidth of 3.25% full-width can be achieved for the hard x-ray pulses in the SwissFEL case.

  15. Atomic Data Needs for the New Generation of X-ray Observatories

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Garcia, Javier; 6174967980

    2016-06-01

    Modeling X-ray spectra produced by photoionized plasmas is crucial for the physical interpretation of many astrophysical sources. These models rely on theoretical and numerical techniques, but importantly also on the availability of reliable atomic data. The need for accurate data continues to grow with the advent of new and more sensitive instruments. I will describe atomic-data requirements for addressing three astrophysical problems: (1) atomic, molecular, and dust absorption in the ISM; (2) detection and characterization of inner-shell lines from various trace elements or Fe-peak elements (e.g., P, K, Cr, Mn, Co); and (3) modeling X-ray spectra reflected from black hole accretion disks in the high-density limit. I will discuss the importance ofthese studies, and the limitations of the theoretical models presently being used to fit data from such current missions as NuSTAR and Astro-H (Hitomi).

  16. Instrumentation for a next-generation x-ray all-sky monitor

    SciTech Connect

    Peele, A. G.

    1999-12-15

    We have proposed an x-ray all-sky monitor for a small satellite mission that will be ten times more sensitive than past monitors and that opens up a new band of the soft x-ray spectrum (0.1-3.0 keV) for study. We discuss three approaches to the construction of the optics. The first method, well within the reach of existing technology, is to approximate the lobster-eye geometry by building crossed arrays of planar reflectors, this gives great control over the reflecting surface but is limited in terms of resolution at the baseline 4 arc minute level. The second method is to use microchannel plates; this technology has the potential to greatly exceed the baseline resolution and sensitivity but is yet to be fully demonstrated. The third method, while still in its infancy, may yet prove to be the most powerful; this approach relies on photolithography to expose a substrate that can then be developed and replicated. The scientific case for this mission is almost too broad to state here. The instrument we describe will allow investigation of the long term light curves of thousands of AGN, it will detect thousands of transients, including GRBs and type II supernova, and the stellar coronae of hundreds of the brightest x-ray stars can be monitored. In addition the classical objectives of all-sky monitors--long-term all-sky archive and watchdog alert to new events--will be fulfilled at an unprecedented level. We also note that by opening up a little-explored band of the x-ray sky the opportunity for new discovery is presented. A satisfying example of entering new territory while still retaining the guarantee of expanding the domain of existing research.

  17. Design of Hanford Site 4th Generation Multi Function Corrosion Monitoring System

    SciTech Connect

    NORMAN, E.C.

    2000-08-30

    This document describes the design of the fourth-generation corrosion monitoring system scheduled to be installed in DST 241-AN-104 early in fiscal year 2001. A fourth-generation multi-function corrosion monitoring system has been designed for installation into a DST in the 241-AN farm at the Hanford Site in FY 2001. Improvements and upgrades from the third-generation system (installed in 241-AN-105) that have been incorporated into the fourth-generation system include: Addition of a built-in water lance to assist installation of probe into tanks with a hard crust layer at the surface of the waste; and Improvement of the electrode mounting apparatus used to attach the corrosion monitoring electrodes to the stainless steel probe body (new design simplifies probe assembly/wiring). These new features improve on the third-generation design and yield a system that is easier to fabricate and install, provides for a better understanding of the relationship between corrosion and other tank operating parameters, and optimizes the use of the riser that houses the probe in the tank.

  18. Relativistically Self-Channeled Femtosecond Terawatt Lasers for High-Field Physics and X-Ray Generation

    SciTech Connect

    Borisov, A.B.; Boyer, K.; Cameron, S.M.; Luk, T.S.; McPherson, A.; Nelson, T.; Rhodes, C.K.

    1999-01-01

    Optical channeling or refractive guiding processes involving the nonlinear interaction of intense femtosecond optical pulses with matter in the self-focussing regime has created exciting opportunities for next-generation laser plasma-based x-ray sources and directed energy applications. This fundamentally new form of extended paraxial electromagnetic propagation in nonlinear dispersive media such as underdense plasma is attributed to the interplay between normal optical diffraction and intensity-dependent nonlinear focussing and refraction contributions in the dielectric response. Superposition of these mechanisms on the intrinsic index profile acts to confine the propagating energy in a dynamic self-guiding longitudinal waveguide structure which is stable for power transmission and robust compression. The laser-driven channels are hypothesized to support a degree of solitonic transport behavior, simultaneously stable in the space and time domains (group velocity dispersion balances self-phase modulation), and are believed to be self-compensating for diffraction and dispersion over many Rayleigh lengths in contrast with the defining characteristics of conventional diffractive imaging and beamforming. By combining concentrated power deposition with well-ordered spatial localization, this phenomena will also create new possibilities for production and regulation of physical interactions, including electron beams, enhanced material coupling, and self-modulated plasma wakefields, over extended gain distances with unprecedented energy densities. Harmonious combination of short-pulse x-ray production with plasma channeling resulting from a relativistic charge displacement nonlinearity mechanism in the terawatt regime (10{sup 18} W/cm{sup 2}) has been shown to generate high-field conditions conducive to efficient multi-kilovolt x-ray amplification and peak spectral brightness. Channeled optical propagation with intense short-pulse lasers is expected to impact several

  19. SuperHERO: The Next Generation Hard X-Ray HEROES Telescope

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wilson-Hodge, Colleen A.; Gaskin, Jessica A.; Christe, Steven D.; Elsner, Ronald F.; Ramsey, Brian D.; Seller, Paul; Shih, Albert Y.; Stuchlik, David W.; Swartz, Douglas A.; Tenant, Allyn F.; Wilson, Matthew D.

    2014-01-01

    SuperHERO is a new high-sensitivity Long Duration Balloon (LDB)-capable, hard-x-ray (20-75 keV) telescope for making novel astrophysics and heliophysics observations. The proposed SuperHERO payload will be developed jointly by the Astrophysics Office at NASA Marshall Space Flight Center, the Solar Physics Laboratory and Wallops Flight Facility at NASA Goddard Space Flight Center. SuperHERO is a follow-on payload to the High Energy Replicated Optics to Explore the Sun (HEROES) balloon-borne telescope that recently launched from Fort Sumner, NM in September of 2013. The HEROES core instrument is a hard x-ray telescope consisting of x-ray 109 optics configured into 8 modules. Each module is aligned to a matching gas-filled detector at a focal length of 6 m. SuperHERO will make significant improvements to the HEROES payload, including: new solid-state multi-pixel CdTe detectors, additional optics, the Wallops Arc-Second Pointer, alignment monitoring systems and lighter gondola.

  20. SuperHERO: The Next Generation Hard X-ray HEROES Telescope

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gaskin, Jessica A.; Christe, Steven D.; Wilson-Hodge, Colleen; Shih, Albert Y. M.; Ramsey, Brian D.; Tennant, Allyn F.; Swartz, Douglas A.

    2014-01-01

    SuperHERO is a new high-sensitivity Long Duration Balloon (LDB)-capable, hard-x-ray (20-75 keV) telescope for making novel astrophysics and heliophysics observations. The proposed SuperHERO payload will be developed jointly by the Astrophysics Office at NASA Marshall Space Flight Center, the Solar Physics Laboratory and Wallops Flight Facility at NASA Goddard Space Flight Center. SuperHERO is a follow-on payload to the High Energy Replicated Optics to Explore the Sun (HEROES) balloon-borne telescope that recently launched from Fort Sumner, NM in September of 2013. The HEROES core instrument is a hard x-ray telescope consisting of x-ray 109 optics configured into 8 modules. Each module is aligned to a matching gas-filled detector at a focal length of 6 m. SuperHERO will make significant improvements to the HEROES payload, including: new solid-state multi-pixel CdTe detectors, additional optics, the Wallops Arc-Second Pointer, alignment monitoring systems and lighter gondola.

  1. Double-confocal resonator for X-ray generation via intracavity Thomson scattering

    SciTech Connect

    Xie, M.

    1995-12-31

    There has been a growing interest in developing compact X-ray sources through Thomson scattering of a laser beam by a relativistic electron beam. For higher X-ray flux it is desirable to have the scattering to occur inside an optical resonator where the laser power is higher. In this paper I propose a double-confocal resonator design optimized for head-on Thomson scattering inside an FEL oscillator and analyze its performance taking into account the diffraction and FEL gain. A double confocal resonator is equivalent to two confocal resonators in series. Such a resonator has several advantages: it couples electron beam through and X-ray out of the cavity with holes on cavity mirrors, thus allowing the system to be compact; it supports the FEL mode with minimal diffraction loss through the holes; it provides a laser focus in the forward direction for a better mode overlap with the electron beam; and it provides a focus at the same location in the backward direction for higher Thomson scattering efficiency; in addition, the mode size at the focal point and hence the Rayleigh range can be adjusted simply through intracavity apertures; furthermore, it gives a large mode size at the mirrors to reduce power loading. Simulations as well as analytical results will be presented. Also other configurations of intracavity Thomson scattering where the double-confocal resonator could be useful will be discussed.

  2. DynamiX, numerical tool for design of next-generation x-ray telescopes.

    PubMed

    Chauvin, Maxime; Roques, Jean-Pierre

    2010-07-20

    We present a new code aimed at the simulation of grazing-incidence x-ray telescopes subject to deformations and demonstrate its ability with two test cases: the Simbol-X and the International X-ray Observatory (IXO) missions. The code, based on Monte Carlo ray tracing, computes the full photon trajectories up to the detector plane, accounting for the x-ray interactions and for the telescope motion and deformation. The simulation produces images and spectra for any telescope configuration using Wolter I mirrors and semiconductor detectors. This numerical tool allows us to study the telescope performance in terms of angular resolution, effective area, and detector efficiency, accounting for the telescope behavior. We have implemented an image reconstruction method based on the measurement of the detector drifts by an optical sensor metrology. Using an accurate metrology, this method allows us to recover the loss of angular resolution induced by the telescope instability. In the framework of the Simbol-X mission, this code was used to study the impacts of the parameters on the telescope performance. In this paper we present detailed performance analysis of Simbol-X, taking into account the satellite motions and the image reconstruction. To illustrate the versatility of the code, we present an additional performance analysis with a particular configuration of IXO.

  3. Columnar recombination for X-ray generated electron-holes in amorphous selenium and its significance in a-Se x-ray detectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bubon, O.; Jandieri, K.; Baranovskii, S. D.; Kasap, S. O.; Reznik, A.

    2016-03-01

    Although amorphous selenium (a-Se) has a long and successful history of application in optical and X-ray imaging, some of its fundamental properties are still puzzling. In particularly, the mechanism of carrier recombination following x-ray excitation and electric field and temperature dependences of the electron-hole pair creation energy (Wehp) remain unclear. Using the combination of X-ray photocurrent and pulse height spectroscopy measurements, we measure Wehp in a wide range of temperatures (218-320 K) and electric fields (10-100 V/µm) and show that the conventional columnar recombination model which assumes Langevin recombination within a column (a primary electron track) fails to explain experimental results in a wide range of electric fields and temperatures. The reason for the failure of the conventional model is revealed in this work, and the theory of the columnar recombination is modified to include the saturation of the recombination rate at high electric field in order to account for the experimental results in the entire range of fields and temperatures.

  4. 53 W average power few-cycle fiber laser system generating soft x rays up to the water window.

    PubMed

    Rothhardt, Jan; Hädrich, Steffen; Klenke, Arno; Demmler, Stefan; Hoffmann, Armin; Gotschall, Thomas; Eidam, Tino; Krebs, Manuel; Limpert, Jens; Tünnermann, Andreas

    2014-09-01

    We report on a few-cycle laser system delivering sub-8-fs pulses with 353 μJ pulse energy and 25 GW of peak power at up to 150 kHz repetition rate. The corresponding average output power is as high as 53 W, which represents the highest average power obtained from any few-cycle laser architecture so far. The combination of both high average and high peak power provides unique opportunities for applications. We demonstrate high harmonic generation up to the water window and record-high photon flux in the soft x-ray spectral region. This tabletop source of high-photon flux soft x rays will, for example, enable coherent diffractive imaging with sub-10-nm resolution in the near future.

  5. Rare decays of the Z and the standard model, 4th generation, and beyond

    SciTech Connect

    Weiler, T.J.

    1989-01-01

    Several issues in rare decays of the Z are addressed. The rate for flavor-changing Z decay grows as the fourth power of the fermion masses internal to the quantum loop, and so offers a window to the existence of ultraheavy (m > M{sub W}) fermions. In the standard model, with three generations, BR(Z {yields} bs) < 10{sup -7} and BR(Z{yields}tc)<10{sup -13}. With four generations, BR(Z {yields} bb{sub 4}) may be as large as 10{sup -5} if m{sub b4} < M{sub Z}; and similarly for BR(Z {yields} N{sub 4}v), where N{sub 4} is the possibly heavy fourth generation neutrino. In supersymmetric and other two Higgs doublet models, BR(Z {yields} tc) may be as large as 5 {times} 10{sup -6} in the three generation scheme. With minimal supersymmetry, the reaction Z {yields} H{gamma} is guaranteed to go, with a parameter-dependent branching ratio of 10{sup -6 {plus minus} 3}. With mirror fermions or exotic E{sub 6} fermions, the branching ratios for Z {yields} ct (70 GeV), Z {yields} {mu}{tau}, and Z {yields} bb{sub 4} (70 GeV) are typically 10{sup -4}, 10{sup -4}, and 10{sup -3} respectively, clearly measurable at LEP. Depending on unknown quark masses, the Z may mix with vector (b{sub 4}{bar b}{sub 4}) and the W may mix with vector (t{bar b}) or (t{bar s}). CP violating asymmetries in flavor-changing Z decay are immeasurably small in the standard model, but may be large in supersymmetric and other nonstandard models. 28 refs.

  6. X-ray spectral diagnostics of laser harmonic generation in the interaction of relativistic femtosecond laser pulses with clusters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Faenov, A. Ya; Oks, E.; Dalimier, E.; Skobelev, I. Yu; Pikuz, S. A.; Pikuz, T. A.; Zhvaniya, I. A.; Fukuda, Y.; Andreev, A.; Koga, J.; Sakaki, H.; Kotaki, H.; Pirozhkov, A. S.; Hayashi, Y.; Kawachi, T.; Kando, M.; Kondo, K.; Zhidkov, A. G.; Kodama, R.

    2016-04-01

    It is shown that the production of X-ray emission spectra in the interaction of high-intensity laser radiation with cluster targets may be affected by the bichromatic oscillating electric field arising from the generation of the second harmonic of laser radiation. A technique is proposed for diagnosing harmonic generation in laser - cluster interactions using the spectral line profiles of multiply charged helium ions. The efficiency of second harmonic generation at a laser intensity of 3 × 1018 W cm-2 is shown to amount to about 2%.

  7. Electron acceleration and generation of high-brilliance x-ray radiation in kilojoule, subpicosecond laser-plasma interactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ferri, J.; Davoine, X.; Kalmykov, S. Y.; Lifschitz, A.

    2016-10-01

    Petawatt, picosecond laser pulses offer rich opportunities in generating synchrotron x-rays. This paper concentrates on the regimes accessible with the PETAL laser, which is a part of the Laser Megajoule (LMJ) facility. We explore two physically distinct scenarios through Particle-in-Cell simulations. The first one realizes in a dense plasma, such that the period of electron Langmuir oscillations is much shorter than the pulse duration. Hallmarks of this regime are longitudinal breakup ("self-modulation") of the picosecond-scale laser pulse and excitation of a rapidly evolving broken plasma wake. It is found that electron beams with a charge of several tens of nC can be obtained, with a quasi-Maxwellian energy distribution extending to a few-GeV level. In the second scenario, at lower plasma densities, the pulse is shorter than the electron plasma period. The pulse blows out plasma electrons, creating a single accelerating cavity, while injection on the density downramp creates a nC quasi-monoenergetic electron bunch within the cavity. This bunch accelerates without degradation beyond 1 GeV. The x-ray sources in the self-modulated regime offer a high number of photons (˜1 012) with the slowly decaying energy spectra extending beyond 60 keV. In turn, quasimonoenergetic character of the electron beam in the blowout regime results in the synchrotron-like spectra with the critical energy around 10 MeV and a number of photons >1 09 . Yet, much smaller source duration and transverse size increase the x-ray brilliance by more than an order of magnitude against the self-modulated case, also favoring high spatial and temporal resolution in x-ray imaging. In all explored cases, accelerated electrons emit synchrotron x-rays of high brilliance, B >1 020 photons /s /mm2/mrad2/0.1 %BW . Synchrotron sources driven by picosecond kilojoule lasers may thus find an application in x-ray diagnostics on such facilities such as the LMJ or National Ignition Facility (NIF).

  8. Tunable coherent radiation at soft X-ray wavelengths: Generation and interferometric applications

    SciTech Connect

    Rosfjord, Kristine Marie

    2004-07-01

    The availability of high power, spectrally and spatially coherent soft x-rays (SXR) would facilitate a wide variety of experiments as this energy region covers the primary resonances of many magnetic and biological materials. Specifically, there are the carbon and oxygen K-edges that are critical for biological imaging in the water window and the L-edges of iron, nickel, and cobalt for which imaging and scattering studies can be performed. A new coherent soft X-ray branchline at the Advanced Light Source has begun operation (beamline 12.0.2). Using the third harmonic from an 8 cm period undulator, this branch delivers coherent soft x-rays with photon energies ranging from 200eV to 1keV. This branchline is composed of two sub-branches one at 14X demagnification and the other 8X demagnification. The former is optimized for use at 500eV and the latter at 800eV. Here the expected power from the third harmonic of this undulator and the beamline design and characterization is presented. The characterization includes measurements on available photon flux as well as a series of double pinhole experiments to determine the coherence factor with respect to transverse distance. The first high quality Airy patterns at SXR wavelengths are created with this new beamline. The operation of this new beamline allows for interferometry to be performed in the SXR region. Here an interferometric experiment designed to directly determine the index of refraction of a material under test is performed. Measurements are first made in the EUV region using an established beamline (beamline12.0.1) to measure silicon, ruthenium and tantalum silicon nitride. This work is then extended to the SXR region using beamline 12.0.2 to test chromium and vanadium.

  9. Measurements of laser generated soft X-ray emission from irradiated gold foils

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Davis, J. S.; Frank, Y.; Raicher, E.; Fraenkel, M.; Keiter, P. A.; Klein, S. R.; Drake, R. P.; Shvarts, D.

    2016-11-01

    Soft x-ray emission from laser irradiated gold foils was measured at the Omega-60 laser system using the Dante photodiode array. The foils were heated with 2 kJ, 6 ns laser pulses and foil thicknesses were varied between 0.5, 1.0, and 2.0 μm. Initial Dante analysis indicates peak emission temperatures of roughly 100 eV and 80 eV for the 0.5 μm and 1.0 μm thick foils, respectively, with little measurable emission from the 2.0 μm foils.

  10. Two-Chicane Compressed Harmonic Generation of Soft X-Rays

    SciTech Connect

    Ratner, Daniel; Huang, Z.; Chao, A.; /SLAC

    2010-07-30

    We propose a simple single-stage scheme to produce fully coherent 3nm radiation. Seeding an electron bunch prior to compression simultaneously shortens the laser wavelength and duration, and increases the modulation amplitude. The final X-ray wavelength is tunable by controlling the compression factor with the RF phase. We propose a two chicane scheme that allows for nearly arbitrary modulation amplitudes, extending the method to photocathode beams. We also show that transportation of fine compressed modulation structure is feasible due to a canceling effect of the second chicane.

  11. A new generation of detectors for scanning x-ray beam imaging systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rommel, J. Martin

    2016-01-01

    Scanning x-ray beam imaging systems were first developed by American Science and Engineering, Inc. (AS&E) in the early 1970s [1]. Since then, these systems have found a wide range of applications in security inspection and non-destructive testing. Large-area detectors are most frequently used to collect backscattered radiation but smaller transmission detectors are also employed for selected applications. Until recently, only two basic detector designs have been used: large scintillator blocks with attached photomultiplier tubes (PMTs) or large-volume light-sealed boxes, lined with scintillating screens and port windows for PMTs. In both cases, the detectors have required considerable depth to provide acceptable light collection efficiency. A new design recently developed by AS&E relies on wavelength shifting fibres (WSF) for light collection. For the first time, this approach enables the construction of thin large-area detectors. Stacking layers of WSF ribbons and scintillating screens in varying combinations enables optimization of the detection efficiency for different applications. Taking separate readings from different layers provides an energy-sensitive signal combination. Energy sensitivity can be improved further by adding filtration between the signal channels. Several prototype configurations have been built and characterized for both backscatter and transmission imaging. A WSF-based detector has been commercialized for a transmission x-ray imaging application.

  12. Quasimonochromatic x-ray backlighting on the COrnell Beam Research Accelerator (COBRA) pulsed power generator

    SciTech Connect

    Knapp, P. F.; Greenly, J. B.; Gourdain, P. A.; Hoyt, C. L.; Pikuz, S. A.; Shelkovenko, T. A.; Hammer, D. A.

    2010-10-15

    Monochromatic x-ray backlighting has been employed with great success for imaging of plasmas with strong self-emission such as x-pinches and wire array z-pinches. However, implementation of a monochromatic backlighting system typically requires extremely high quality spherically bent crystals which are difficult to manufacture and can be prohibitively expensive. Furthermore, the crystal must have a direct line of sight to the object, which typically emits copious amounts of radiation and debris. We present a quasimonochromatic x-ray backlighting system which employs an elliptically bent mica crystal as the dispersive element. In this scheme a narrow band of continuum radiation is selected for imaging, instead of line radiation in the case of monochromatic imaging. The flat piece of mica is bent using a simple four-point bending apparatus that allows the curvature of the crystal to be adjusted in situ for imaging in the desired wavelength band. This system has the advantage that it is very cost effective, has a large aperture, and is extremely flexible. The principles of operation of the system are discussed and its performance is analyzed.

  13. NADPH oxidase-mediated generation of reactive oxygen species: A new mechanism for X-ray-induced HeLa cell death

    SciTech Connect

    Liu Qing; He Xiaoqing; Liu Yongsheng; Du Bingbing; Wang Xiaoyan; Zhang Weisheng; Jia Pengfei; Dong Jingmei; Ma Jianxiu; Wang Xiaohu; Li Sha; Zhang Hong

    2008-12-19

    Oxidative damage is an important mechanism in X-ray-induced cell death. Radiolysis of water molecules is a source of reactive oxygen species (ROS) that contribute to X-ray-induced cell death. In this study, we showed by ROS detection and a cell survival assay that NADPH oxidase has a very important role in X-ray-induced cell death. Under X-ray irradiation, the upregulation of the expression of NADPH oxidase membrane subunit gp91{sup phox} was dose-dependent. Meanwhile, the cytoplasmic subunit p47{sup phox} was translocated to the cell membrane and localized with p22{sup phox} and gp91{sup phox} to form reactive NADPH oxidase. Our data suggest, for the first time, that NADPH oxidase-mediated generation of ROS is an important contributor to X-ray-induced cell death. This suggests a new target for combined gene transfer and radiotherapy.

  14. X-Ray Radiation Measurements With Photodiodes In Plasmas Generated By 1017 W/Cm2 Intensity Krf Excimer Laser Pulses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rácz, E.; Földes, I. B.; Ryć, L.

    2006-01-01

    Experiments were carried out using a prepulse-free hybrid KrF excimer-dye laser system (700fs pulse duration, 248nm wavelength, 15mJ pulse energy). The intensity of the p-polarized, focused laser beam was 1.5ṡ1017 W/cm2. Vacuum ultraviolet (VUV) and x-rays from solid state laser plasmas were generated in the laser-plasma interaction of subpicosecond laser pulses of nonrelativistic laser intensities. An x-ray sensitive FLM photodiode (ITE, Warsaw) was used to detect x-rays between 1-19 keV in front of the targets. The diode was filtered by a 4μm Al foil. The dependence of the x-ray flux on laser intensity and the angular distribution of x-rays for aluminum and copper targets in the half space of the front side of the targets were investigated.

  15. (Cd,Mn)Te detectors for characterization of x-ray emissions generated during laser-driven fusion experiments

    SciTech Connect

    Cross,A.S.; Knauer, J. P.; Mycielski, A.; Kochanowska, D.; Wiktowska-Baran, M.; Jakiela, R.; Domagala, J.; Cui, Y.; James, R.; Sobolewski, R.

    2008-10-19

    We present our measurements of (Cd,Mn)Te photoconductive detectors (PCDs), fabricated for the goal of measuring both the temporal and spectral dependences of X-ray emissions generated from laser-illuminated targets during the inertial confinement fusion experiments. Our Cd{sub 1-x}Mn{sub x}Te (x = 0.05) single crystals, doped with V, were grown using a vertical Bridgman method and, subsequently, annealed in Cd for the highest resistivity ({approx}10{sup 10} {Omega}cm) and a good mobility-lifetime product ({approx}10{sup -3} cm{sup 2}/V). The 1-mm- and 2.3-mm-thick detectors were placed in the same housing as two 1-mm-thick diamond PCDs. All devices were pre-screened by a 7.6-mm-thick Be X-ray filter with a frequency cutoff of 1 keV. The incident shots from the OMEGA laser were 1-ns-long square pulses with energies ranging from 2.3 kJ to 22.6 kJ, and the PCDs were biased with 5000 V/cm. The response amplitudes and rise times of our (Cd,Mn)Te PCDs were comparable with the diamond detector performance, while the decay times were 4 to 10 times longer and in the 2-5 ns range. We observed two X-ray emission events separated by 1.24 ns. The first was identified as caused by heating of the target and creating a hot corona, while the second one was from the resulting compressed core. For comparison purposes, our testing was performed using {approx}1 keV X-ray photons, optimal for the diamond PCD. According to the presented simulations, however, at X-ray energies >10 keV diamond absorption efficiency drops to <50%, whereas for (Cd,Mn)Te the drop occurs at {approx}100 keV with near perfect, 100% absorption, up to 50 keV.

  16. Effects of Plant Cell Wall Matrix Polysaccharides on Bacterial Cellulose Structure Studied with Vibrational Sum Frequency Generation Spectroscopy and X-ray Diffraction

    SciTech Connect

    Park, Yong Bum; Lee, Christopher M; Kafle, Kabindra; Park, Sunkyu; Cosgrove, Daniel; Kim, Seong H

    2014-07-14

    The crystallinity, allomorph content, and mesoscale ordering of cellulose produced by Gluconacetobacter xylinus cultured with different plant cell wall matrix polysaccharides were studied with vibrational sum frequency generation (SFG) spectroscopy and X-ray diffraction (XRD).

  17. Generation of X-rays and neutrons with a RF-discharge

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schneider, R. T.

    1982-01-01

    An experimental study concerning disk shaped plasma structures was performed. Such disk-shaped structures can be obtained using an rf discharge in hydrogen. The applied frequency was 1-2 Mhz. In case of operation in deuterium it was found that the discharge emits neutrons and X-rays, although the applied voltage is only 2 kV. This phenomenon was explained by assuming formation of plasma cavitons which are surrounded by high electric fields. The condition for formation of these cavitons is that the applied rf frequency is equal to the plasma frequency. The ions trapped in these resonance structures acquire sufficient energy that they can undergo fusion reactions with the ions in the surrounding gas.

  18. Supersonic Heat Wave Propagation in Laser-Produced Underdense Plasma for Efficient X-Ray Generation

    SciTech Connect

    Tanabe, M; Nishimura, H; Fujioka, S; Nagai, K; Iwamae, A; Ohnishi, N; Fournier, K B; Girard, F; Primout, M; Villette, B; Tobin, M; Mima, K

    2008-06-12

    We have observed supersonic heat wave propagation in a low-density aerogel target ({rho} {approx} 3.2 mg/cc) irradiated at the intensity of 4 x 10{sup 14} W/cm{sup 2}. The heat wave propagation was measured with a time-resolved x-ray imaging diagnostics, and the results were compared with simulations made with the two-dimensional radiation-hydrodynamic code, RAICHO. Propagation velocity of the ionization front gradually decreased as the wave propagates into the target. The reason of decrease is due to increase of laser absorption region as the front propagates and interplay of hydrodynamic motion and reflection of laser propagation. These features are well reported with the simulation.

  19. SuperHERO: the next generation hard x-ray HEROES telescope

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gaskin, Jessica A.; Christe, Steven D.; Elsner, Ronald F.; Kilaru, Kiranmayee; Ramsey, Brian D.; Seller, Paul; Shih, Albert Y.; Stuchlik, David W.; Swartz, Douglas A.; Tennant, Allyn F.; Weddendorf, Bruce; Wilson, Matthew D.; Wilson-Hodge, Colleen A.

    2014-07-01

    SuperHERO is a new high-resolution, Long Duration Balloon-capable, hard-x-ray (20-75 keV) focusing telescope for making novel astrophysics and heliophysics observations. The SuperHERO payload, currently in its proposal phase, is being developed jointly by the Astrophysics Office at NASA Marshall Space Flight Center and the Solar Physics Laboratory and the Wallops Flight Facility at NASA Goddard Space Flight Center. SuperHERO is a follow-on payload to the High Energy Replicated Optics to Explore the Sun (HEROES) balloon-borne telescope that recently flew from Fort Sumner, NM in September of 2013, and will utilize many of the same features. Significant enhancements to the HEROES payload will be made, including the addition of optics, novel solid-state multi-pixel CdTe detectors, integration of the Wallops Arc-Second Pointer and a significantly lighter gondola suitable for Long Duration Flights.

  20. Evidence for nanoparticles in microwave-generated fireballs observed by synchrotron x-ray scattering.

    PubMed

    Mitchell, J B A; LeGarrec, J L; Sztucki, M; Narayanan, T; Dikhtyar, V; Jerby, E

    2008-02-15

    The small-angle x-ray scattering method has been applied to study fireballs ejected into the air from molten hot spots in borosilicate glass by localized microwaves [V. Dikhtyar and E. Jerby, Phys. Rev. Lett. 96 045002 (2006)10.1103/PhysRevLett.96.045002]. The fireball's particle size distribution, density, and decay rate in atmospheric pressure were measured. The results show that the fireballs contain particles with a mean size of approximately 50 nm with average number densities on the order of approximately 10(9). Hence, fireballs can be considered as a dusty plasma which consists of an ensemble of charged nanoparticles in the plasma volume. This finding is likened to the ball-lightning phenomenon explained by the formation of an oxidizing particle network liberated by lightning striking the ground [J. Abrahamson and J. Dinniss, Nature (London) 403, 519 (2000)10.1038/35000525]. PMID:18352481

  1. Evidence for nanoparticles in microwave-generated fireballs observed by synchrotron x-ray scattering.

    PubMed

    Mitchell, J B A; LeGarrec, J L; Sztucki, M; Narayanan, T; Dikhtyar, V; Jerby, E

    2008-02-15

    The small-angle x-ray scattering method has been applied to study fireballs ejected into the air from molten hot spots in borosilicate glass by localized microwaves [V. Dikhtyar and E. Jerby, Phys. Rev. Lett. 96 045002 (2006)10.1103/PhysRevLett.96.045002]. The fireball's particle size distribution, density, and decay rate in atmospheric pressure were measured. The results show that the fireballs contain particles with a mean size of approximately 50 nm with average number densities on the order of approximately 10(9). Hence, fireballs can be considered as a dusty plasma which consists of an ensemble of charged nanoparticles in the plasma volume. This finding is likened to the ball-lightning phenomenon explained by the formation of an oxidizing particle network liberated by lightning striking the ground [J. Abrahamson and J. Dinniss, Nature (London) 403, 519 (2000)10.1038/35000525].

  2. Evidence for Nanoparticles in Microwave-Generated Fireballs Observed by Synchrotron X-Ray Scattering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mitchell, J. B. A.; Legarrec, J. L.; Sztucki, M.; Narayanan, T.; Dikhtyar, V.; Jerby, E.

    2008-02-01

    The small-angle x-ray scattering method has been applied to study fireballs ejected into the air from molten hot spots in borosilicate glass by localized microwaves [V. Dikhtyar and E. Jerby, Phys. Rev. Lett.PRLTAO0031-9007 96 045002 (2006)10.1103/PhysRevLett.96.045002]. The fireball’s particle size distribution, density, and decay rate in atmospheric pressure were measured. The results show that the fireballs contain particles with a mean size of ˜50nm with average number densities on the order of ˜109. Hence, fireballs can be considered as a dusty plasma which consists of an ensemble of charged nanoparticles in the plasma volume. This finding is likened to the ball-lightning phenomenon explained by the formation of an oxidizing particle network liberated by lightning striking the ground [J. Abrahamson and J. Dinniss, Nature (London)NATUAS0028-0836 403, 519 (2000)10.1038/35000525].

  3. Evidence for Nanoparticles in Microwave-Generated Fireballs Observed by Synchrotron X-Ray Scattering

    SciTech Connect

    Mitchell, J. B. A.; Le Garrec, J. L.; Sztucki, M.; Narayanan, T.; Dikhtyar, V.; Jerby, E.

    2008-02-15

    The small-angle x-ray scattering method has been applied to study fireballs ejected into the air from molten hot spots in borosilicate glass by localized microwaves [V. Dikhtyar and E. Jerby, Phys. Rev. Lett. 96 045002 (2006)]. The fireball's particle size distribution, density, and decay rate in atmospheric pressure were measured. The results show that the fireballs contain particles with a mean size of {approx}50 nm with average number densities on the order of {approx}10{sup 9}. Hence, fireballs can be considered as a dusty plasma which consists of an ensemble of charged nanoparticles in the plasma volume. This finding is likened to the ball-lightning phenomenon explained by the formation of an oxidizing particle network liberated by lightning striking the ground [J. Abrahamson and J. Dinniss, Nature (London) 403, 519 (2000)].

  4. In-pixel conversion with a 10 bit SAR ADC for next generation X-ray FELs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lodola, L.; Batignani, G.; Benkechkache, M. A.; Bettarini, S.; Casarosa, G.; Comotti, D.; Dalla Betta, G. F.; Fabris, L.; Forti, F.; Grassi, M.; Latreche, S.; Malcovati, P.; Manghisoni, M.; Mendicino, R.; Morsani, F.; Paladino, A.; Pancheri, L.; Paoloni, E.; Ratti, L.; Re, V.; Rizzo, G.; Traversi, G.; Vacchi, C.; Verzellesi, G.; Xu, H.

    2016-07-01

    This work presents the design of an interleaved Successive Approximation Register (SAR) ADC, part of the readout channel for the PixFEL detector. The PixFEL project aims at substantially advancing the state-of-the-art in the field of 2D X-ray imaging for applications at the next generation Free Electron Laser (FEL) facilities. For this purpose, the collaboration is developing the fundamental microelectronic building blocks for the readout channel. This work focuses on the design of the ADC carried out in a 65 nm CMOS technology. To obtain a good tradeoff between power consumption, conversion speed and area occupation, an interleaved SAR ADC architecture was adopted.

  5. MARS-a project of the diffraction-limited fourth generation X-ray source based on supermicrotron

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kulipanov, G. N.; Skrinsky, A. N.; Vinokurov, N. A.

    2001-07-01

    The new approach for the fourth generation X-ray source-Multiturn Accelerator-Recuperator Source (MARS)-was proposed recently. The installation consists of the radiofrequency (RF) multiturn accelerator (similar to the race-track microtron) and long undulator(s). After passing through the undulator(s) the electron beam is decelerated in the same RF accelerating structure. Such energy recovery reduces dramatically the radiation hazard and decreases the required RF power. In this paper we present a more detail explanation of this scheme, and specify further the parameter limitations and requirements for the accelerator.

  6. Generation of coherent soft x-rays using a single-pass free-electron laser amplifier

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, T.F.; Goldstein, J.C.; Newnam, B.E.; McVey, B.D.

    1988-01-01

    We consider a single-pass free-electron laser (FEL) amplifier, driven by an rf-linac followed by a damping ring for reduced emittance, for use in generating coherent light in the soft x-ray region. The dependence of the optical gain on electron-beam quality, studied with the three-dimensional FEL simulation code FELEX, is given and related to the expected power of self-amplified spontaneous emission. We discuss issues for the damping ring designed to achieve the required electron beam quality. The idea of a multipass regenerative amplifier is also presented.

  7. Pyroelectric and ferroelectric semiconductors: dynamic holographic grating recording, generation of self-focused electron beam, X-rays, and neutrons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kukhtarev, N. V.; Kukhtareva, T. V.; Land, P.; Wang, J. C.

    2007-09-01

    Optical and electrical effects in semiconductors and ferroelectric crystals will be modeled. Standard photorefractive equations are supplemented by the equation of state for the polarization density following Devonshire-Ginsburg-Landau (DGL) approach. We have derived equations for pyroelectric and photogalvanic contribution to the holographic grating recording in ferroelectric materials. We will consider double-functional holographic interferometer, based on holographic pyroelectric current and optical beam coupling. Crystal electrostatic accelerators, based on charging of ferroelectric crystals by pyroelectric and photogalvanic effects are discussed in relation to generation of self-focused electron beam, X-rays and neutrons.

  8. Second Harmonic Generation with the GaAs Thin Film in the Soft X-Ray Region

    SciTech Connect

    Takayama, Yasuhiro; Shibasaki, Koutatsu; Sasaki, Naoya; Nakayama, Yuji; Nishihata, Keisuke; Yoneda, Yuichi; Yoshida, Tetsuo; Nakamura, Satoshi; Ishii, Hiroyoshi; Myayhara, Tsuneaki; Okabayashi, Jun; Kanai, Ken; Oshima, Masaharu; Yamamoto, Shigeru

    2007-01-19

    We have constructed an instrument for observing the second harmonic generation (SHG) in the soft x-ray region. The two beams are focused on the GaAs thin film, and the scattered beam corresponding to the SHG signal is detected by a photomultiplier tube (PMT). For detecting the small signal of the SHG, we have developed a novel modulation technique with a piezo actuator and a digital lock-in amplifier. The result of the experiment is almost consistent with the assumption that the SHG has been detected in our experiment.

  9. Research and development of an electron beam focusing system for a high-brightness X-ray generator.

    PubMed

    Sakai, Takeshi; Ohsawa, Satoshi; Sakabe, Noriyoshi; Sugimura, Takashi; Ikeda, Mitsuo

    2011-01-01

    A new type of rotating anticathode X-ray generator, where an electron beam of up to 60 keV irradiates the inner surface of a U-shaped Cu anticathode, has achieved a beam brilliance of 130 kW mm(-2) (at 2.3 kW). A higher-flux electron beam is expected from simulation by optimizing the geometry of a combined-function-type magnet instead of the fringing field of the bending magnet. In order to minimize the size of the X-ray source the electron beam has been focused over a short distance by a new combined-function bending magnet, whose geometrical shape was determined by simulation using the Opera-3D, General Particle Tracer and CST-STUDIO codes. The result of the simulation clearly shows that the role of combined functions in both the bending and the steering magnets is important for focusing the beam to a small size. FWHM sizes of the beam are predicted by simulation to be 0.45 mm (horizontal) and 0.05 mm (vertical) for a 120 keV/75 mA beam, of which the effective brilliance is about 500 kW mm(-2) on the supposition of a two-dimensional Gaussian distribution. High-power tests have begun using a high-voltage 120 kV/75 mA power supply for the X-ray generator instead of 60 kV/100 mA. The beam focus size on the target will be verified in the experiments. PMID:21169692

  10. Research and development of an electron beam focusing system for a high-brightness X-ray generator

    PubMed Central

    Sakai, Takeshi; Ohsawa, Satoshi; Sakabe, Noriyoshi; Sugimura, Takashi; Ikeda, Mitsuo

    2011-01-01

    A new type of rotating anticathode X-ray generator, where an electron beam of up to 60 keV irradiates the inner surface of a U-shaped Cu anticathode, has achieved a beam brilliance of 130 kW mm−2 (at 2.3 kW). A higher-flux electron beam is expected from simulation by optimizing the geometry of a combined-function-type magnet instead of the fringing field of the bending magnet. In order to minimize the size of the X-ray source the electron beam has been focused over a short distance by a new combined-function bending magnet, whose geometrical shape was determined by simulation using the Opera-3D, General Particle Tracer and CST-STUDIO codes. The result of the simulation clearly shows that the role of combined functions in both the bending and the steering magnets is important for focusing the beam to a small size. FWHM sizes of the beam are predicted by simulation to be 0.45 mm (horizontal) and 0.05 mm (vertical) for a 120 keV/75 mA beam, of which the effective brilliance is about 500 kW mm−2 on the supposition of a two-dimensional Gaussian distribution. High-power tests have begun using a high-voltage 120 kV/75 mA power supply for the X-ray generator instead of 60 kV/100 mA. The beam focus size on the target will be verified in the experiments. PMID:21169692

  11. SuperHERO: The Next Generation Hard X-Ray Focusing Telescope

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gaskin, Jessica; Wilson-Hodge, Colleen; Ramsey, Brian; Elsner, Ronald; Tennant, Allyn F.; Kilaru, Kiranmayee; Swartz, Douglas A.; Christe, Steven; Shih, Albert Y.; Baganoff, Frederick K.; Seller, Paul; Wilson, Matthew; Stuchlik, David

    2015-01-01

    SuperHERO is a balloon-borne hard x-ray (20-75 keV) telescope that couples high-angular resolution (~20 arcsecs) electroformed-nickel grazing incidence optics to state-of-the-art fine pixel-pitch (250 µm) Cadmium-Telluride detectors with a 6 m focal length. This telescope, currently in the proposal phase, will have the highest angular resolution of any hard x-ray telescope to date, and comparable energy resolution to that of the Nuclear Spectroscopic Telescope Array. The high angular resolution afforded by focusing optics is essential for mitigating source confusion in crowded fields, for direct imaging of extended sources on fine spatial scales, and for efficient observing through greatly-increased sensitivity. As such, the primary astronomical targets are the Galactic Center, pulsar-powered synchrotron nebulae and diffusive shock accelerated sites in supernova remnants. To facilitate solar observations, the SuperHERO detectors have a high processing rate of ~10 kHz over the entire 80x80 pixel array, or over 5M photons per second over the detector area. The current SuperHERO configuration has a total on-axis effective area of 145 cm2 at 30 keV and a field of view of ~7 arcmin FWHM at 30 keV (simulated). The optics, developed at NASA Marshall Space Flight Center, have significant flight heritage as similar mirrors have flown on balloon payloads, sounding rockets and a satellite mission. The detectors, developed at Rutherford Appleton Laboratory (RAL), utilize the novel HEXITEC Application Specific Integrated Circuit. RAL has been working on these and similar detectors for over a decade for applications ranging from medical to defense. NASA Goddard Space Flight Center, working with RAL and MSFC has been adapting these detectors for flight, with good progress. The telescope will reside on a carbon-composite frame that will integrate the Wallops Arc Second Pointer. This design will allow for Long Duration Balloon flights from Antarctica that can last up to 4 weeks

  12. Laser plasma cryogenic target on translating substrate for generation of continuously repetitive EUV and soft X-ray pulses

    SciTech Connect

    Amano, Sho

    2014-06-15

    To generate continuously repetitive EUV and soft X-ray pulses with various wavelengths from laser-produced plasmas, a one-dimensionally translating substrate system with a closed He gas cryostat that can continuously supply various cryogenic targets for ∼10 Hz laser pulses has been developed. The system was successfully operated at a lowest temperature of 15 K and at a maximum up-down speed of 12 mm/s. Solid Ar, Kr, and Xe layers were formed, and their growth rates and the laser crater sizes on them were studied. By optimization of the operational parameters in accordance with our design rule, it was shown that stable output power was achieved continuously from the plasma emission at frequencies of 1–10 Hz. The average soft X-ray and EUV powers obtained were 19 mW at 3.2 nm, 33 mW at 10.0 nm, and 66 mW at 10.8 nm, with 10% bandwidths, from the Ar, Kr, and Xe solid targets, respectively, with a laser power of 1 W. We will be able to achieve higher frequencies using a high beam quality laser that produces smaller craters, and can expect higher powers. Although only Ar, Kr, and Xe gases were tested in this study, the target system achieved a temperature of 15 K and can thus solidify almost all target gases, apart from H and He, and can continuously supply the solid target. The use of various target materials will enable expansion of the EUV and soft X-ray emission wavelength range.

  13. Laser plasma cryogenic target on translating substrate for generation of continuously repetitive EUV and soft X-ray pulses.

    PubMed

    Amano, Sho

    2014-06-01

    To generate continuously repetitive EUV and soft X-ray pulses with various wavelengths from laser-produced plasmas, a one-dimensionally translating substrate system with a closed He gas cryostat that can continuously supply various cryogenic targets for ~10 Hz laser pulses has been developed. The system was successfully operated at a lowest temperature of 15 K and at a maximum up-down speed of 12 mm/s. Solid Ar, Kr, and Xe layers were formed, and their growth rates and the laser crater sizes on them were studied. By optimization of the operational parameters in accordance with our design rule, it was shown that stable output power was achieved continuously from the plasma emission at frequencies of 1-10 Hz. The average soft X-ray and EUV powers obtained were 19 mW at 3.2 nm, 33 mW at 10.0 nm, and 66 mW at 10.8 nm, with 10% bandwidths, from the Ar, Kr, and Xe solid targets, respectively, with a laser power of 1 W. We will be able to achieve higher frequencies using a high beam quality laser that produces smaller craters, and can expect higher powers. Although only Ar, Kr, and Xe gases were tested in this study, the target system achieved a temperature of 15 K and can thus solidify almost all target gases, apart from H and He, and can continuously supply the solid target. The use of various target materials will enable expansion of the EUV and soft X-ray emission wavelength range. PMID:24985796

  14. High-Flux Femtosecond X-Ray Emission from Controlled Generation of Annular Electron Beams in a Laser Wakefield Accelerator.

    PubMed

    Zhao, T Z; Behm, K; Dong, C F; Davoine, X; Kalmykov, S Y; Petrov, V; Chvykov, V; Cummings, P; Hou, B; Maksimchuk, A; Nees, J A; Yanovsky, V; Thomas, A G R; Krushelnick, K

    2016-08-26

    Annular quasimonoenergetic electron beams with a mean energy in the range 200-400 MeV and charge on the order of several picocoulombs were generated in a laser wakefield accelerator and subsequently accelerated using a plasma afterburner in a two-stage gas cell. Generation of these beams is associated with injection occurring on the density down ramp between the stages. This well-localized injection produces a bunch of electrons performing coherent betatron oscillations in the wakefield, resulting in a significant increase in the x-ray yield. Annular electron distributions are detected in 40% of shots under optimal conditions. Simultaneous control of the pulse duration and frequency chirp enables optimization of both the energy and the energy spread of the annular beam and boosts the radiant energy per unit charge by almost an order of magnitude. These well-defined annular distributions of electrons are a promising source of high-brightness laser plasma-based x rays. PMID:27610860

  15. High speed optical and X-ray methods for evaluating laser-generated shock-wave in materials

    SciTech Connect

    Paisley, D.; Swift, D.

    2000-11-01

    Optical diagnostic techniques including interferometry, electronic streak photography, and transient x-ray diffraction are used to study the dynamic material response to shock loading by direct laser irradiation and impact by laser-launched plates. The Los Alamos Trident laser is one of several lasers that have been used to generate shocks of 10 Kbar to several Mbar in single crystal and polycrystalline materials. Incorporating optical velocity interferometry (line-VISAR and point-VISAR) with transient x-ray diffraction can provide a complete understanding of the dynamic material response to shock compression and release. Laser-launched flyer plates provide an ideal method to generate one-dimensional shocks in materials. The quality of the one-dimensionality of the launch and acceleration of plates is evaluated by line-imaging VISA.R. The line-imaging VISAR images the fringes along a line across the diameter of the plate. Each fringe maxima and minima provide acceleration and velocity information at the specific point on the plate. By varying the fringe constant number of fringes and fringe spacing on the plate, detailed experimental data can be obtained. For our experiments, most plates are 3-mm diameter and accelerated to 0.2-->6 km/sec.

  16. Femtosecond laser-induced hard X-ray generation in air from a solution flow of Au nano-sphere suspension using an automatic positioning system.

    PubMed

    Hsu, Wei-Hung; Masim, Frances Camille P; Porta, Matteo; Nguyen, Mai Thanh; Yonezawa, Tetsu; Balčytis, Armandas; Wang, Xuewen; Rosa, Lorenzo; Juodkazis, Saulius; Hatanaka, Koji

    2016-09-01

    Femtosecond laser-induced hard X-ray generation in air from a 100-µm-thick solution film of distilled water or Au nano-sphere suspension was carried out by using a newly-developed automatic positioning system with 1-µm precision. By positioning the solution film for the highest X-ray intensity, the optimum position shifted upstream as the laser power increased due to breakdown. Optimized positioning allowed us to control X-ray intensity with high fidelity. X-ray generation from Au nano-sphere suspension and distilled water showed different power scaling. Linear and nonlinear absorption mechanism are analyzed together with numerical modeling of light delivery. PMID:27607607

  17. Efficient multi-keV x-ray source generated by nanosecond laser pulse irradiated multi-layer thin foils target

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tu, Shao-yong; Hu, Guang-yue; Miao, Wen-yong; Zhao, Bin; Zheng, Jian; Yuan, Yong-teng; Zhan, Xia-yu; Hou, Li-fei; Jiang, Shao-en; Ding, Yong-kun

    2014-04-01

    A new target configuration is proposed to generate efficient multi-keV x-ray source using multiple thin foils as x-ray emitters. The target was constructed with several layers of thin foils, which were placed with a specific, optimized spacing. The thin foils are burned though one by one by a nanosecond-long laser pulse, which produced a very large, hot, underdense plasma. One-dimensional radiation hydrodynamic simulations show that the emission region and the multi-keV x-ray flux generated by multi-layer thin foil target are similar to that of the low-density gas or foam target, which is currently a bright multi-keV x-ray source generated by laser heating. Detailed analysis of a range of foil thicknesses showed that a layer-thickness of 0.1 μm is thin enough to generate an efficient multi-keV x-ray source. Additionally, this type of target can be easily manufactured, compared with the complex techniques for fabrication of low-density foam targets. Our preliminary experimental results also verified that the size of multi-keV x-ray emission region could be enhanced significantly by using a multi-layer Ti thin foil target.

  18. The development and characterization of a first generation carbon nanotube x-ray based microbeam radiation therapy system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hadsell, Michael John, Jr.

    Microbeam radiation therapy (MRT) is a new type of cancer treatment currently being studied at scattered synchrotron sites throughout the world. It has been shown to be capable of ablating aggressive brain tumors in rats while almost completely sparing the surrounding normal tissue. This promising technique has yet to find its way to the clinic, however, because the radiobiological mechanisms behind its efficacy are still largely unknown. This is partly due to the lack of a compact device that could facilitate more large scale research. The challenges inherent to creating a compact device lie within the structure of MRT, which uses parallel arrays of ultra high-dose, orthovoltage, microplanar beams on the order of 100mum thick and separated by four to ten times their width. Because of focal spot limitations, current commercial orthovoltage devices are simply not capable of creating such arrays at dose rates high enough for effective treatment while maintaining the microbeam pattern necessary to retain the high therapeutic ratio of the technique. Therefore, the development of a compact MRT device using carbon nanotube (CNT) cathode based X-ray technology is presented here. CNT cathodes have been shown to be capable of creating novel focal spot arrays on a single anode while being robust enough for long-term use in X-ray tubes. Using these cathodes, an X-ray tube with a single focal line has been created for the delivery of MRT dose distributions in radiobiological studies on small animals. In this work, the development process and final design of this specialized device will be detailed, along with the optimization and stabilization of its use for small animal studies. In addition, a detailed characterization of its final capabilities will be given; including a comprehensive measurement of its X-ray focal line dimensions, a description and evaluation of its collimator alignment and microbeam dimensions, and a full-scale phantom-based quantification of its dosimetric

  19. Route to optimal generation of soft X-ray high harmonics with synthesized two-color laser pulses

    PubMed Central

    Jin, Cheng; Wang, Guoli; Le, Anh-Thu; Lin, C. D.

    2014-01-01

    High harmonics extending to X-rays have been generated from gases by intense lasers. To establish these coherent broadband radiations as an all-purpose tabletop light source for general applications in science and technology, new methods are needed to overcome the present low conversion efficiencies. Here we show that the conversion efficiency may be drastically increased with an optimized two-color pulse. By employing an optimally synthesized 2-µm mid-infrared laser and a small amount of its third harmonic, we show that harmonic yields from sub- to few-keV energy can be increased typically by ten-fold over the optimized single-color one. By combining with favorable phase-matching and together with the emerging high-repetition MHz mid-infrared lasers, we anticipate efficiency of harmonic yields can be increased by four to five orders in the near future, thus paving the way for employing high harmonics as useful broadband tabletop light sources from the extreme ultraviolet to the X-rays, as well as providing new tools for interrogating ultrafast dynamics of matter at attosecond timescales. PMID:25400015

  20. Focusing X-Ray Telescopes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    O'Dell, Stephen; Brissenden, Roger; Davis, William; Elsner, Ronald; Elvis, Martin; Freeman, Mark; Gaetz, Terrance; Gorenstein, Paul; Gubarev, Mikhall; Jerlus, Diab; Juda, Michael; Kolodziejczak, Jeffrey; Murray, Stephen; Petre, Robert; Podgorski, William; Ramsey, Brian; Reid, Paul; Saha, Timo; Wolk, Scott; Troller-McKinstry, Susan; Weisskopf, Martin; Wilke, Rudeger; Zhang, William

    2010-01-01

    During the half-century history of x-ray astronomy, focusing x-ray telescopes, through increased effective area and finer angular resolution, have improved sensitivity by 8 orders of magnitude. Here, we review previous and current x-ray-telescope missions. Next, we describe the planned next-generation x-ray-astronomy facility, the International X-ray Observatory (IXO). We conclude with an overview of a concept for the next next-generation facility, Generation X. Its scientific objectives will require very large areas (about 10,000 sq m) of highly-nested, lightweight grazing-incidence mirrors, with exceptional (about 0.1-arcsec) resolution. Achieving this angular resolution with lightweight mirrors will likely require on-orbit adjustment of alignment and figure.

  1. Inner-Shell Photon-Ionized X-Ray Laser at 45(Angstrom)

    SciTech Connect

    Weber, F; Celliers, P; Moon, S; Snavely, R; Da Silva, L

    2002-02-01

    This report summarizes the major accomplishments of this three-year Laboratory Directed Research and Development (LDRD) Lab Wide (LW) project entitled, ''An Inner-Shell Photo-Ionized X-Ray Laser at 45 {angstrom}'', tracking code 99-LW-042. The most significant accomplishments of this project include the design of a suitable x-ray laser target, the invention of a measurement technique for the determination of rise times of x-ray pulses on the order of 50 femtoseconds, and a novel setup for generating a traveling wave with an ultrashort optical laser pulse. The pump probe technique for rise time measurement will allow us to detect ultrashort x-ray pulses, whose generation by means of a variety of 4th generation light sources is currently under planning elsewhere.

  2. In operando x-ray tomography for next-generation batteries: a systematic approach to monitor reaction product distribution and transport processes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schröder, D.; Bender, C. L.; Arlt, T.; Osenberg, M.; Hilger, A.; Risse, S.; Ballauff, M.; Manke, I.; Janek, J.

    2016-10-01

    Computed tomography with x-rays is a powerful tool to analyze the complex reaction and transport processes that occur inside electrochemical storage devices. To this day, a better insight into the occurring processes is needed and will yield improvements in energy density and cycling stability of next-generation batteries. Herein we present general considerations for the use of x-ray tomography of batteries to gain a detailed insight during operation. Furthermore, we present examples for the tomography of zinc-oxygen batteries, sodium-oxygen batteries and metal-sulfur batteries, elucidating performance limiting degradation processes such as dendrite formation and loss of liquid electrolyte. With the method applied, we aim to establish an effective link between the battery and x-ray community by offering a guideline on how to apply x-ray tomography to propel research on battery materials and entire batteries.

  3. X-ray and runaway electron generation in repetitive pulsed discharges in atmospheric pressure air with a point-to-plane gap

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shao, Tao; Tarasenko, Victor F.; Zhang, Cheng; Shut'ko, Yuliya V.; Yan, Ping

    2011-05-01

    In this paper, using two repetitive nanosecond generators, x-rays were detected in atmospheric air with a highly inhomogeneous electric field by a point-to- plane gap. The rise times of the generators were about 15 and 1 ns. The x-rays were directly measured by various dosimeters and a NaI scintillator with a photomultiplier tube. X-rays were detected in the continuous mode at pulse repetition frequency up to 1 kHz and a voltage pulse rise time of ˜15 ns. It is shown that the maximum x-ray intensity is attainable at different pulse repetition frequencies depending on the voltage pulse parameters and cathode design. In atmospheric pressure air the x-ray intensity is found to increase with increasing the pulse repetition frequency up to 1 kHz. It is confirmed that the maximum x-ray intensity is attained in a diffuse discharge in a point-to-plane gap.

  4. X-ray and runaway electron generation in repetitive pulsed discharges in atmospheric pressure air with a point-to-plane gap

    SciTech Connect

    Shao Tao; Yan Ping; Tarasenko, Victor F.; Shut'ko, Yuliya V.; Zhang Cheng

    2011-05-15

    In this paper, using two repetitive nanosecond generators, x-rays were detected in atmospheric air with a highly inhomogeneous electric field by a point-to- plane gap. The rise times of the generators were about 15 and 1 ns. The x-rays were directly measured by various dosimeters and a NaI scintillator with a photomultiplier tube. X-rays were detected in the continuous mode at pulse repetition frequency up to 1 kHz and a voltage pulse rise time of {approx}15 ns. It is shown that the maximum x-ray intensity is attainable at different pulse repetition frequencies depending on the voltage pulse parameters and cathode design. In atmospheric pressure air the x-ray intensity is found to increase with increasing the pulse repetition frequency up to 1 kHz. It is confirmed that the maximum x-ray intensity is attained in a diffuse discharge in a point-to-plane gap.

  5. Compact x-ray source and panel

    DOEpatents

    Sampayon, Stephen E.

    2008-02-12

    A compact, self-contained x-ray source, and a compact x-ray source panel having a plurality of such x-ray sources arranged in a preferably broad-area pixelized array. Each x-ray source includes an electron source for producing an electron beam, an x-ray conversion target, and a multilayer insulator separating the electron source and the x-ray conversion target from each other. The multi-layer insulator preferably has a cylindrical configuration with a plurality of alternating insulator and conductor layers surrounding an acceleration channel leading from the electron source to the x-ray conversion target. A power source is connected to each x-ray source of the array to produce an accelerating gradient between the electron source and x-ray conversion target in any one or more of the x-ray sources independent of other x-ray sources in the array, so as to accelerate an electron beam towards the x-ray conversion target. The multilayer insulator enables relatively short separation distances between the electron source and the x-ray conversion target so that a thin panel is possible for compactness. This is due to the ability of the plurality of alternating insulator and conductor layers of the multilayer insulators to resist surface flashover when sufficiently high acceleration energies necessary for x-ray generation are supplied by the power source to the x-ray sources.

  6. Joint x-ray

    MedlinePlus

    X-ray - joint; Arthrography; Arthrogram ... x-ray technologist will help you position the joint to be x-rayed on the table. Once in place, pictures are taken. The joint may be moved into other positions for more ...

  7. Chest X-Ray

    MedlinePlus

    ... by: Image/Video Gallery Your radiologist explains chest x-ray. Transcript Welcome to Radiology Info dot org! Hello, ... you about chest radiography also known as chest x-rays. Chest x-rays are the most commonly performed ...

  8. Cosmic x ray physics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mccammon, Dan; Cox, D. P.; Kraushaar, W. L.; Sanders, W. T.

    1991-01-01

    The annual progress report on Cosmic X Ray Physics for the period 1 Jan. to 31 Dec. 1990 is presented. Topics studied include: soft x ray background, new sounding rocket payload: x ray calorimeter, and theoretical studies.

  9. Cosmic x ray physics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mccammon, Dan; Cox, D. P.; Kraushaar, W. L.; Sanders, W. T.

    1990-01-01

    The annual progress report on Cosmic X Ray Physics is presented. Topics studied include: the soft x ray background, proportional counter and filter calibrations, the new sounding rocket payload: X Ray Calorimeter, and theoretical studies.

  10. Generation of high-photon flux-coherent soft x-ray radiation with few-cycle pulses.

    PubMed

    Demmler, Stefan; Rothhardt, Jan; Hädrich, Steffen; Krebs, Manuel; Hage, Arvid; Limpert, Jens; Tünnermann, Andreas

    2013-12-01

    We present a tabletop source of coherent soft x-ray radiation with high-photon flux. Two-cycle pulses delivered by a fiber-laser-pumped optical parametric chirped-pulse amplifier operating at 180 kHz repetition rate are upconverted via high harmonic generation in neon to photon energies beyond 200 eV. A maximum photon flux of 1.3·10(8) photons/s is achieved within a 1% bandwidth at 125 eV photon energy. This corresponds to a conversion efficiency of ~10(-9), which can be reached due to a gas jet simultaneously providing a high target density and phase matching. Further scaling potential toward higher photon flux as well as higher photon energies are discussed.

  11. Generation of high-photon flux-coherent soft x-ray radiation with few-cycle pulses.

    PubMed

    Demmler, Stefan; Rothhardt, Jan; Hädrich, Steffen; Krebs, Manuel; Hage, Arvid; Limpert, Jens; Tünnermann, Andreas

    2013-12-01

    We present a tabletop source of coherent soft x-ray radiation with high-photon flux. Two-cycle pulses delivered by a fiber-laser-pumped optical parametric chirped-pulse amplifier operating at 180 kHz repetition rate are upconverted via high harmonic generation in neon to photon energies beyond 200 eV. A maximum photon flux of 1.3·10(8) photons/s is achieved within a 1% bandwidth at 125 eV photon energy. This corresponds to a conversion efficiency of ~10(-9), which can be reached due to a gas jet simultaneously providing a high target density and phase matching. Further scaling potential toward higher photon flux as well as higher photon energies are discussed. PMID:24281507

  12. Generation and Propagation of a Picosecond Acoustic Pulse at a Buried Interface: Time-Resolved X-Ray Diffraction Measurements

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, S.H.; Cavalieri, A.L.; Fritz, D.M.; Swan, M.C.; Reis, D.A.; Hegde, R.S.; Reason, M.; Goldman, R.S.

    2005-12-09

    We report on the propagation of coherent acoustic wave packets in (001) surface oriented Al{sub 0.3}Ga{sub 0.7}As/GaAs heterostructure, generated through localized femtosecond photoexcitation of the GaAs. Transient structural changes in both the substrate and film are measured with picosecond time-resolved x-ray diffraction. The data indicate an elastic response consisting of unipolar compression pulses of a few hundred picosecond duration traveling along [001] and [001] directions that are produced by predominately impulsive stress. The transmission and reflection of the strain pulses are in agreement with an acoustic mismatch model of the heterostructure and free-space interfaces.

  13. Hot Electron Diagnostics using X-rays and Cerenkov Radiation

    SciTech Connect

    Stein, J; Fill, E E; Pretzler, G; Brandl, F; Kuba, J; Habs, D

    2003-12-21

    The propagation of laser-generated hot electrons through matter and across narrow vacuum gaps is studied. We use the ATLAS titanium-sapphire laser of Max-Planck-Institut fuer Quantenoptik to irradiate 10 {proportional_to}m to 100 {proportional_to}m thick copper foils at intensities up to 10{sup 19} W/cm{sup 2}, generating electrons with temperatures in the MeV-range. After propagating through the target the electrons are detected via Cerenkov radiation generated in a suitable medium and by hard X-rays emitted from an X-ray ''fluor''. In some experiments a plastic scintillator was used to monitor the electrons. These diagnostics allow to characterize the electrons with respect to their energy, number and directionality. We also investigate the propagation of the hot electrons across narrow vacuum gaps, with a width ranging from several 100 {proportional_to}m down to 25 {proportional_to}m. The effect of self-generated fields in preventing electrons to cross the gap is demonstrated. Implications of these experiments with respect to pumping of X-ray lasers, isochoric heating by X-rays and developing optics for 4th-generation light sources will be discussed.

  14. 4th Annual SATN Conference 2011: Curriculum Transformation at Universities of Technology: Towards Development of New Generation Universities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mthembu, T.

    2012-01-01

    The South African Technology Network (SATN) would like to thank the Editor of the "South African Journal of Higher Education" (SAJHE) for the opportunity to publish papers read at the 4th Annual SATN Conference that was hosted by Central University of Technology and held in Bloemfontein in November 2011. The journal makes it possible for…

  15. Modular approach to achieving the next-generation X-ray light source

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Biedron, S. G.; Milton, S. V.; Freund, H. P.

    2001-12-01

    A modular approach to the next-generation light source is described. The "modules" include photocathode, radio-frequency, electron guns and their associated drive-laser systems, linear accelerators, bunch-compression systems, seed laser systems, planar undulators, two-undulator harmonic generation schemes, high-gain harmonic generation systems, nonlinear higher harmonics, and wavelength shifting. These modules will be helpful in distributing the next-generation light source to many more laboratories than the current single-pass, high-gain free-electron laser designs permit, due to both monetary and/or physical space constraints.

  16. X-Ray photonics: X-rays inspire electron movies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vrakking, Marc J. J.; Elsaesser, Thomas

    2012-10-01

    The advent of high-energy, short-pulse X-ray sources based on free-electron lasers, laser plasmas and high-harmonic generation is now making it possible to probe the dynamics of electrons within molecules.

  17. Center for X-Ray Optics, 1986

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1987-07-01

    The Center for X-Ray Optics has made substantial progress during the past year on the development of very high resolution x-ray technologies, the generation of coherent radiation at x-ray wavelengths, and, based on these new developments, had embarked on several scientific investigations that would not otherwise have been possible. The investigations covered in this report are topics on x-ray sources, x-ray imaging and applications, soft x-ray spectroscopy, synchrotron radiation, advanced light source and magnet structures for undulators and wigglers. (LSP)

  18. The PixFEL project: Progress towards a fine pitch X-ray imaging camera for next generation FEL facilities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rizzo, G.; Batignani, G.; Benkechkache, M. A.; Bettarini, S.; Casarosa, G.; Comotti, D.; Dalla Betta, G.-F.; Fabris, L.; Forti, F.; Grassi, M.; Lodola, L.; Malcovati, P.; Manghisoni, M.; Mendicino, R.; Morsani, F.; Paladino, A.; Pancheri, L.; Paoloni, E.; Ratti, L.; Re, V.; Traversi, G.; Vacchi, C.; Verzellesi, G.; Xu, H.

    2016-07-01

    The INFN PixFEL project is developing the fundamental building blocks for a large area X-ray imaging camera to be deployed at next generation free electron laser (FEL) facilities with unprecedented intensity. Improvement in performance beyond the state of art in imaging instrumentation will be explored adopting advanced technologies like active edge sensors, a 65 nm node CMOS process and vertical integration. These are the key ingredients of the PixFEL project to realize a seamless large area focal plane instrument composed by a matrix of multilayer four-side buttable tiles. In order to minimize the dead area and reduce ambiguities in image reconstruction, a fine pitch active edge thick sensor is being optimized to cope with very high intensity photon flux, up to 104 photons per pixel, in the range from 1 to 10 keV. A low noise analog front-end channel with this wide dynamic range and a novel dynamic compression feature, together with a low power 10 bit analog to digital conversion up to 5 MHz, has been realized in a 110 μm pitch with a 65 nm CMOS process. Vertical interconnection of two CMOS tiers will be also explored in the future to build a four-side buttable readout chip with high density memories. In the long run the objective of the PixFEL project is to build a flexible X-ray imaging camera for operation both in burst mode, like at the European X-FEL, or in continuous mode with the high frame rates anticipated for future FEL facilities.

  19. Absorbed dose-to-water protocol applied to synchrotron-generated x-rays at very high dose rates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fournier, P.; Crosbie, J. C.; Cornelius, I.; Berkvens, P.; Donzelli, M.; Clavel, A. H.; Rosenfeld, A. B.; Petasecca, M.; Lerch, M. L. F.; Bräuer-Krisch, E.

    2016-07-01

    Microbeam radiation therapy (MRT) is a new radiation treatment modality in the pre-clinical stage of development at the ID17 Biomedical Beamline of the European synchrotron radiation facility (ESRF) in Grenoble, France. MRT exploits the dose volume effect that is made possible through the spatial fractionation of the high dose rate synchrotron-generated x-ray beam into an array of microbeams. As an important step towards the development of a dosimetry protocol for MRT, we have applied the International Atomic Energy Agency’s TRS 398 absorbed dose-to-water protocol to the synchrotron x-ray beam in the case of the broad beam irradiation geometry (i.e. prior to spatial fractionation into microbeams). The very high dose rates observed here mean the ion recombination correction factor, k s , is the most challenging to quantify of all the necessary corrections to apply for ionization chamber based absolute dosimetry. In the course of this study, we have developed a new method, the so called ‘current ramping’ method, to determine k s for the specific irradiation and filtering conditions typically utilized throughout the development of MRT. Using the new approach we deduced an ion recombination correction factor of 1.047 for the maximum ESRF storage ring current (200 mA) under typical beam spectral filtering conditions in MRT. MRT trials are currently underway with veterinary patients at the ESRF that require additional filtering, and we have estimated a correction factor of 1.025 for these filtration conditions for the same ESRF storage ring current. The protocol described herein provides reference dosimetry data for the associated Treatment Planning System utilized in the current veterinary trials and anticipated future human clinical trials.

  20. Absorbed dose-to-water protocol applied to synchrotron-generated x-rays at very high dose rates.

    PubMed

    Fournier, P; Crosbie, J C; Cornelius, I; Berkvens, P; Donzelli, M; Clavel, A H; Rosenfeld, A B; Petasecca, M; Lerch, M L F; Bräuer-Krisch, E

    2016-07-21

    Microbeam radiation therapy (MRT) is a new radiation treatment modality in the pre-clinical stage of development at the ID17 Biomedical Beamline of the European synchrotron radiation facility (ESRF) in Grenoble, France. MRT exploits the dose volume effect that is made possible through the spatial fractionation of the high dose rate synchrotron-generated x-ray beam into an array of microbeams. As an important step towards the development of a dosimetry protocol for MRT, we have applied the International Atomic Energy Agency's TRS 398 absorbed dose-to-water protocol to the synchrotron x-ray beam in the case of the broad beam irradiation geometry (i.e. prior to spatial fractionation into microbeams). The very high dose rates observed here mean the ion recombination correction factor, k s , is the most challenging to quantify of all the necessary corrections to apply for ionization chamber based absolute dosimetry. In the course of this study, we have developed a new method, the so called 'current ramping' method, to determine k s for the specific irradiation and filtering conditions typically utilized throughout the development of MRT. Using the new approach we deduced an ion recombination correction factor of 1.047 for the maximum ESRF storage ring current (200 mA) under typical beam spectral filtering conditions in MRT. MRT trials are currently underway with veterinary patients at the ESRF that require additional filtering, and we have estimated a correction factor of 1.025 for these filtration conditions for the same ESRF storage ring current. The protocol described herein provides reference dosimetry data for the associated Treatment Planning System utilized in the current veterinary trials and anticipated future human clinical trials. PMID:27366861

  1. Harmonic generation in VUV/x-ray range at the Duke storage ring FEL using electron beam outcoupling

    SciTech Connect

    Litvinenko, V.N.; Burnham, B.; Madey, J.M.J.

    1995-12-31

    We suggest using the OK-4 FEL operating in giant pulse mode to generate intracavity optical power at a level of hundreds of megawatts. These levels of power are sufficient to generate harmonics in the electron beam density. The prebunched electron beam then radiates coherently in an additional wiggler which is tuned on a harmonic of the OK-4 wavelength. The electron beam is turned by an achromatic bend into this wiggler, and harmonic radiation propagates with a small angle with respect to the OK-4 optical axis. This radiation will pass around the mirror of the OK-4 optical cavity and can then be utilized. This electron outcoupling scheme was suggested by N.A. Vinokurov as a method of optics independent outcoupling for high power FELs where electron beam bunching is provided in the master oscillator. This scheme is perfectly suited for optics independent harmonic generation. We suggest to operate the OK-4 FEL as a master oscillator in the UV range of 100 to 250 nm where conventional optics are available. This harmonic generation scheme would allow us to cover the VUV and soft X-Ray range with tunable coherent radiation. In this paper we present the possible layout of this system at the Duke storage ring and its expected operating parameters.

  2. Chest x-ray

    MedlinePlus

    Chest radiography; Serial chest x-ray; X-ray - chest ... You stand in front of the x-ray machine. You will be told to hold your breath when the x-ray is taken. Two images are usually taken. You will ...

  3. Diffractive imaging using a polychromatic high-harmonic generation soft-x-ray source

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dilanian, Ruben A.; Chen, Bo; Williams, Garth J.; Quiney, Harry M.; Nugent, Keith A.; Teichmann, Sven; Hannaford, Peter; Dao, Lap V.; Peele, Andrew G.

    2009-07-01

    A new approach to diffractive imaging using polychromatic diffraction data is described. The method is tested using simulated and experimental data and is shown to yield high-quality reconstructions. Diffraction data produced using a high-harmonic generation source are considered explicitly here. The formalism can be readily adapted, however, to any short-wavelength source producing a discrete spectrum and possessing sufficient spatial coherence.

  4. X-ray FEL based on harmonics generation and electron beam outcoupling

    SciTech Connect

    Litvinenko, V.N.; Burnham, B.

    1995-12-31

    Electron beam outcoupling was suggested by N. A. Vinokurov as a method of optics independent outcoupling for high power FELs. The bunching of the electron beam is provided in a master oscillator. The prebunched electron beam then radiates coherently into an additional wiggler called the radiator. The electron beam is turned by an achromatic bend into this wiggler and its radiation propagates with a small angle with respect to the OK-4 optical axis. Thus, the radiation will pass around the mirror of the master oscillator optical cavity and can then be utilized. This scheme is perfectly suited for harmonic generation if the radiator wiggler is tuned on one of the master oscillator wavelength harmonics. This system is reminiscent of a klystron operating on a harmonic of the reference frequency. In this paper we present the theory of this device, its spectral and spatial characteristics of radiation, the optimization of the master oscillator, the achromatic bend and bunching for harmonic generation, and influence of beam parameters (energy spread, emittance, etc.) on generated power. Examples of possible storage ring and linac driven systems are discussed.

  5. X-ray burst sources

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lewin, W. H. G.

    1986-01-01

    There are about 100 bright X-ray sources in the Galaxy that are accretion-driven systems composed of a neutron star and a low mass companion that fills its critical Roche lobe. Many of these systems generate recurring X-ray bursts that are the result of thermonuclear flashes in the neutron star's surface layers, and are accompanied by a somewhat delayed optical burst due to X-ray heating of accretion disk. The Rapid Burster discovered in 1976 exhibits an interval between bursts that is strongly correlated with the energy in the preceding burst. There is no optical identification for this object.

  6. X-Ray Imaging System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    1986-01-01

    The FluoroScan Imaging System is a high resolution, low radiation device for viewing stationary or moving objects. It resulted from NASA technology developed for x-ray astronomy and Goddard application to a low intensity x-ray imaging scope. FlouroScan Imaging Systems, Inc, (formerly HealthMate, Inc.), a NASA licensee, further refined the FluoroScan System. It is used for examining fractures, placement of catheters, and in veterinary medicine. Its major components include an x-ray generator, scintillator, visible light image intensifier and video display. It is small, light and maneuverable.

  7. A High Efficiency Grazing Incidence Pumped X-ray Laser

    SciTech Connect

    Dunn, J; Keenan, R; Price, D F; Patel, P K; Smith, R F; Shlyaptsev, V N

    2006-08-31

    The main objective of the project is to demonstrate a proof-of-principle, new type of high efficiency, short wavelength x-ray laser source that will operate at unprecedented high repetition rates (10Hz) that could be scaled to 1kHz or higher. The development of a high average power, tabletop x-ray laser would serve to complement the wavelength range of 3rd and future 4th generation light sources, e.g. the LCLS, being developed by DOE-Basic Energy Sciences. The latter are large, expensive, central, synchrotron-based facilities while the tabletop x-ray laser is compact, high-power laser-driven, and relatively inexpensive. The demonstration of such a unique, ultra-fast source would allow us to attract funding from DOE-BES, NSF and other agencies to pursue probing of diverse materials undergoing ultrafast changes. Secondly, this capability would have a profound impact on the semiconductor industry since a coherent x-ray laser source would be ideal for ''at wavelength'' {approx}13 nm metrology and microscopy of optics and masks used in EUV lithography. The project has major technical challenges. We will perform grazing-incidence pumped laser-plasma experiments in flat or groove targets which are required to improve the pumping efficiency by ten times. Plasma density characterization using our existing unique picosecond x-ray laser interferometry of laser-irradiated targets is necessary. Simulations of optical laser propagation as well as x-ray laser production and propagation through freely expanding and confined plasma geometries are essential. The research would be conducted using the Physics Directorate Callisto and COMET high power lasers. At the end of the project, we expect to have a high-efficiency x-ray laser scheme operating below 20 nm at 10Hz with a pulse duration of {approx}2 ps. This will represent the state-of-the-art in x-ray lasers and would be a major step forward from our present picosecond laser-driven x-ray lasers. There is an added bonus of creating

  8. Soft x-ray imaging of intracellular granules of filamentous cyanobacterium generating musty smell in Lake Biwa

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Takemoto, K.; Mizuta, G.; Yamamoto, A.; Yoshimura, M.; Ichise, S.; Namba, H.; Kihara, H.

    2013-10-01

    A planktonic blue-green algae, which are currently identified as Phormidium tenue, was observed by a soft x-ray microscopy (XM) for comparing a musty smell generating green strain (PTG) and a non-smell brown strain (PTB). By XM, cells were clearly imaged, and several intracellular granules which could not be observed under a light microscope were visualized. The diameter of granules was about 0.5-1 μm, and one or a few granules were seen in a cell. XM analyses showed that width of cells and sizes of intracellular granules were quite different between PTG and PTB strains. To study the granules observed by XM, transmission in more detail, transmission electron microscopy (TEM) and indirect fluorescent-antibody technique (IFA) were applied. By TEM, carboxysomes, thylakoids and polyphosphate granules were observed. IFA showed the presence of carboxysomes. Results lead to the conclusion that intracellular granules observed under XM are carboxysomes or polyphosphate granules. These results demonstrate that soft XM is effective for analyzing fine structures of small organisms such as cyanobacterium, and for discriminating the strains which generates musty smells from others.

  9. Lorentz drift compensation in high harmonic generation in the soft and hard X-ray regions of the spectrum.

    PubMed

    Galloway, Benjamin R; Popmintchev, Dimitar; Pisanty, Emilio; Hickstein, Daniel D; Murnane, Margaret M; Kapteyn, Henry C; Popmintchev, Tenio

    2016-09-19

    We present a semi-classical study of the effects of the Lorentz force on electrons during high harmonic generation in the soft and hard X-ray regions driven by near- and mid-infrared lasers with wavelengths from 0.8 to 20 μm, and at intensities below 1015 W/cm2. The transverse extent of the longitudinal Lorentz drift is compared for both Gaussian focus and waveguide geometries. Both geometries exhibit a longitudinal electric field component that cancels the magnetic Lorentz drift in some regions of the focus, once each full optical cycle. We show that the Lorentz force contributes a super-Gaussian scaling which acts in addition to the dominant high harmonic flux scaling of λ-(5-6) due to quantum diffusion. We predict that the high harmonic yield will be reduced for driving wavelengths > 6 μm, and that the presence of dynamic spatial mode asymmetries results in the generation of both even and odd harmonic orders. Remarkably, we show that under realistic conditions, the recollision process can be controlled and does not shut off completely even for wavelengths >10 μm and recollision energies greater than 15 keV. PMID:27661918

  10. Automatic segmentation of rotational x-ray images for anatomic intra-procedural surface generation in atrial fibrillation ablation procedures.

    PubMed

    Manzke, Robert; Meyer, Carsten; Ecabert, Olivier; Peters, Jochen; Noordhoek, Niels J; Thiagalingam, Aravinda; Reddy, Vivek Y; Chan, Raymond C; Weese, Jürgen

    2010-02-01

    Since the introduction of 3-D rotational X-ray imaging, protocols for 3-D rotational coronary artery imaging have become widely available in routine clinical practice. Intra-procedural cardiac imaging in a computed tomography (CT)-like fashion has been particularly compelling due to the reduction of clinical overhead and ability to characterize anatomy at the time of intervention. We previously introduced a clinically feasible approach for imaging the left atrium and pulmonary veins (LAPVs) with short contrast bolus injections and scan times of approximately 4 -10 s. The resulting data have sufficient image quality for intra-procedural use during electro-anatomic mapping (EAM) and interventional guidance in atrial fibrillation (AF) ablation procedures. In this paper, we present a novel technique to intra-procedural surface generation which integrates fully-automated segmentation of the LAPVs for guidance in AF ablation interventions. Contrast-enhanced rotational X-ray angiography (3-D RA) acquisitions in combination with filtered-back-projection-based reconstruction allows for volumetric interrogation of LAPV anatomy in near-real-time. An automatic model-based segmentation algorithm allows for fast and accurate LAPV mesh generation despite the challenges posed by image quality; relative to pre-procedural cardiac CT/MR, 3-D RA images suffer from more artifacts and reduced signal-to-noise. We validate our integrated method by comparing 1) automatic and manual segmentations of intra-procedural 3-D RA data, 2) automatic segmentations of intra-procedural 3-D RA and pre-procedural CT/MR data, and 3) intra-procedural EAM point cloud data with automatic segmentations of 3-D RA and CT/MR data. Our validation results for automatically segmented intra-procedural 3-D RA data show average segmentation errors of 1) approximately 1.3 mm compared with manual 3-D RA segmentations 2) approximately 2.3 mm compared with automatic segmentation of pre-procedural CT/MR data and 3

  11. Design and characterization of electron beam focusing for X-ray generation in novel medical imaging architecture

    SciTech Connect

    Bogdan Neculaes, V. Zou, Yun; Zavodszky, Peter; Inzinna, Louis; Zhang, Xi; Conway, Kenneth; Caiafa, Antonio; Frutschy, Kristopher; Waters, William; De Man, Bruno

    2014-05-15

    A novel electron beam focusing scheme for medical X-ray sources is described in this paper. Most vacuum based medical X-ray sources today employ a tungsten filament operated in temperature limited regime, with electrostatic focusing tabs for limited range beam optics. This paper presents the electron beam optics designed for the first distributed X-ray source in the world for Computed Tomography (CT) applications. This distributed source includes 32 electron beamlets in a common vacuum chamber, with 32 circular dispenser cathodes operated in space charge limited regime, where the initial circular beam is transformed into an elliptical beam before being collected at the anode. The electron beam optics designed and validated here are at the heart of the first Inverse Geometry CT system, with potential benefits in terms of improved image quality and dramatic X-ray dose reduction for the patient.

  12. Design and characterization of electron beam focusing for X-ray generation in novel medical imaging architecturea

    PubMed Central

    Bogdan Neculaes, V.; Zou, Yun; Zavodszky, Peter; Inzinna, Louis; Zhang, Xi; Conway, Kenneth; Caiafa, Antonio; Frutschy, Kristopher; Waters, William; De Man, Bruno

    2014-01-01

    A novel electron beam focusing scheme for medical X-ray sources is described in this paper. Most vacuum based medical X-ray sources today employ a tungsten filament operated in temperature limited regime, with electrostatic focusing tabs for limited range beam optics. This paper presents the electron beam optics designed for the first distributed X-ray source in the world for Computed Tomography (CT) applications. This distributed source includes 32 electron beamlets in a common vacuum chamber, with 32 circular dispenser cathodes operated in space charge limited regime, where the initial circular beam is transformed into an elliptical beam before being collected at the anode. The electron beam optics designed and validated here are at the heart of the first Inverse Geometry CT system, with potential benefits in terms of improved image quality and dramatic X-ray dose reduction for the patient. PMID:24826066

  13. EFFECTS OF LASER RADIATION ON MATTER. LASER PLASMA: Feasibility of generation of picosecond and subpicosecond x-ray pulses in thin films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gordienko, Vyacheslav M.; Dzhidzhoev, M. S.; Kolchin, V. V.; Magnitskiy, Sergey A.; Platonenko, Viktor T.; Savel'ev, Andrei B.; Tarasevitch, A. P.

    1995-02-01

    The characteristics of a femtosecond laser plasma, formed by irradiation of a thin freely suspended carbon film, are investigated numerically. It is shown that the use of thin films can increase considerably the electron temperature of a femtosecond laser plasma and make it possible to generate x-rays of shorter wavelengths. This method can also be used to increase the efficiency of conversion of the energy of laser pulses into the radiation emitted by hydrogen-like carbon ions without a significant increase in the duration of x-ray pulses.

  14. Analysis of the photoneutron activation effects generated by 9 MeV X-ray in a container cargo inspection facility.

    PubMed

    Cho, Young Ho; Kang, Bo Sun

    2010-06-01

    The X-ray container cargo inspection facility is extensively implemented with the key objective to counter international terrorism and illicit smuggling of the contraband items via the ports. However, activation products are generated from photoneutron capture reactions in the high-energy X-ray container cargo inspection facility. The activation products release inherent delayed radiations which occupational workers are exposed to. In this study, the activation products are estimated using Monte Carlo method and radiation safety of the facility in terms of occupational dose is reviewed. PMID:20159916

  15. The Maria-Goeppert-Mayer Award Lecture: The Science of Ultrashort Pulse Generation, in the Visible and X-Ray Regions of the Spectrum

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Murnane, Margaret M.

    1997-04-01

    Ultrashort x-ray pulses give researchers a new window through which to view the natural world, with the ability to spatially and temporally resolve processes basic to material and chemical systems. In the 1990's, there has been a revolution in the technology of laser sources, resulting in the ability to simply and reliably produce light pulses as short as 3 optical cycles in duration, both in the visible and the x-ray region of the spectrum. Also, powerful new techniques to obtain accurate pictures of the exact shape of these ultrashort light pulses have been developed, which are revolutionizing the way we think about and use light. Finally, using harmonic techniques to up-convert visible light into the x-ray region, we can generate coherent and tunable light below 5 nm, with unprecedented short duration (3-10 fs).

  16. Atmospheric electron x-ray spectrometer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Feldman, Jason E. (Inventor); George, Thomas (Inventor); Wilcox, Jaroslava Z. (Inventor)

    2002-01-01

    The present invention comprises an apparatus for performing in-situ elemental analyses of surfaces. The invention comprises an atmospheric electron x-ray spectrometer with an electron column which generates, accelerates, and focuses electrons in a column which is isolated from ambient pressure by a:thin, electron transparent membrane. After passing through the membrane, the electrons impinge on the sample in atmosphere to generate characteristic x-rays. An x-ray detector, shaping amplifier, and multi-channel analyzer are used for x-ray detection and signal analysis. By comparing the resultant data to known x-ray spectral signatures, the elemental composition of the surface can be determined.

  17. Thoracic spine x-ray

    MedlinePlus

    Vertebral radiography; X-ray - spine; Thoracic x-ray; Spine x-ray; Thoracic spine films; Back films ... care provider's office. You will lie on the x-ray table in different positions. If the x-ray ...

  18. X-Ray Imaging System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1991-01-01

    The Model 60007A InnerView Real-time X-ray Imaging System, produced by National Imaging Systems, a division of FlouroScan Imaging Systems, Inc. (formerly HealthMate, Inc.), Northbrook, IL, is a third generation spinoff from x-ray astronomy technology. Goddard Space Flight Center developed the original technology into the Lixiscope, a small, portable, minimal radiation x-ray instrument that could be used at the scene of an accident. FlouroScan Imaging Systems, Inc., adapted this technology to develop the FlouroScan, a low-intensity, x-ray system that could be used without the lead aprons, film badges and lead-lined walls that conventional systems require. The InnerView is a spinoff of non-destructive testing and product inspection.

  19. Dental x-rays

    MedlinePlus

    X-ray - teeth; Radiograph - dental; Bitewings; Periapical film; Panoramic film; Digital image ... dentist's office. There are many types of dental x-rays. Some of them are: Bitewing. Shows the crown ...

  20. X-ray (image)

    MedlinePlus

    X-rays are a form of ionizing radiation that can penetrate the body to form an image on ... will be shades of gray depending on density. X-rays can provide information about obstructions, tumors, and other ...

  1. X Ray Topography

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Balchin, A. A.

    1974-01-01

    Discusses some aspects in X-ray topography, including formation of dislocations, characteristics of stacking faults, x-ray contrast in defect inspection, Berg-Barrett technique, and Lang traversing crystal and Borrmann's methods. (CC)

  2. Comets: mechanisms of x-ray activity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ibadov, Subhon

    2016-07-01

    Basic mechanisms of X-ray activity of comets are considered, including D-D mechanism corresponding to generation of X-rays due to production of hot short-living plasma clumps at high-velocity collisions between cometary and interplanetary dust particles as well as M-M one corresponding to production of X-rays due to recombination of multicharge ions of solar wind plasma via charge exchange process at their collisions with molecules/atoms of the cometary atmospheres. Peculiarities of the variation of the comet X-ray spectrum and X-ray luminosity with variation of its heliocentric distance are revealed.

  3. K-edge x-ray-absorption spectroscopy of laser-generated Kr{sup +} and Kr{sup 2+}

    SciTech Connect

    Southworth, S. H.; Arms, D. A.; Dufresne, E. M.; Dunford, R. W.; Ederer, D. L.; Hoehr, C.; Kanter, E. P.; Kraessig, B.; Landahl, E. C.; Peterson, E. R.; Rudati, J.; Santra, R.; Walko, D. A.; Young, L.

    2007-10-15

    Tunable, polarized, microfocused x-ray pulses were used to record x-ray absorption spectra across the K edges of Kr{sup +} and Kr{sup 2+} produced by laser ionization of Kr. Prominent 1s{yields}4p and 5p excitations are observed below the 1s ionization thresholds in accord with calculated transition energies and probabilities. Due to alignment of 4p hole states in the laser-ionization process, the Kr{sup +} 1s{yields}4p cross section varies with respect to the angle between the laser and x-ray polarization vectors. This effect is used to determine the Kr{sup +} 4p{sub 3/2} and 4p{sub 1/2} quantum state populations, and these are compared with results of an adiabatic strong-field ionization theory that includes spin-orbit coupling.

  4. K-edge x-ray absorption spectroscopy of laser-generated Kr{sup +} and Kr{sup 2+}.

    SciTech Connect

    Southworth, S. H.; Arms, D. A.; Dufresne, E. M.; Dunford, R. W.; Ederer, D. L.; Hoehr, C.; Kanter, E. P.; Krassig, B.; Landahl, E. C.; Peterson, E. R.; Rudati, J.; Santra, R.; Walko, D. A.; Young, L.

    2007-10-01

    Tunable, polarized, microfocused x-ray pulses were used to record x-ray absorption spectra across the K edges of Kr{sup +} and Kr{sup 2+} produced by laser ionization of Kr. Prominent 1s {yields} 4p and 5p excitations are observed below the 1s ionization thresholds in accord with calculated transition energies and probabilities. Due to alignment of 4p hole states in the laser-ionization process, the Kr{sup +} 1s {yields} 4p cross section varies with respect to the angle between the laser and x-ray polarization vectors. This effect is used to determine the Kr{sup +} 4p{sub 3/2} and 4p{sub 1/2} quantum state populations, and these are compared with results of an adiabatic strong-field ionization theory that includes spin-orbit coupling.

  5. X-Ray Imaging

    MedlinePlus

    ... Brain Surgery Imaging Clinical Trials Basics Patient Information X-Ray Imaging Print This Page X-ray imaging is perhaps the most familiar type of imaging. Images produced by X-rays are due to the different absorption rates of ...

  6. X-Rays

    MedlinePlus

    X-rays are a type of radiation called electromagnetic waves. X-ray imaging creates pictures of the inside of your ... different amounts of radiation. Calcium in bones absorbs x-rays the most, so bones look white. Fat and ...

  7. Hand x-ray

    MedlinePlus

    X-ray - hand ... A hand x-ray is taken in a hospital radiology department or your health care provider's office by an ... technician. You will be asked to place your hand on the x-ray table, and keep it ...

  8. Direct density measurement of shock-compressed iron using hard x rays generated by a short laser pulse.

    PubMed

    Brambrink, E; Wei, H G; Barbrel, B; Audebert, P; Benuzzi-Mounaix, A; Boehly, T; Endo, T; Gregory, C D; Kimura, T; Kodama, R; Ozaki, N; Park, H-S; Koenig, M

    2009-11-01

    We present the application of short-pulse laser-driven hard x rays (>40 keV) for the direct density measurement of iron compressed by a laser-driven shock. By using an on-shot calibration of the spectral absorption, we are able to obtain line densities with 5%-10% precision, although the x-ray source is not monochromatic. We also discuss possibilities for increasing the precision, which would be an improvement for equation of state measurements. PMID:20365083

  9. Tunable coherent soft X-ray source based on the generation of high-order harmonic of femtosecond laser radiation in gas-filled capillaries

    SciTech Connect

    Malkov, Yu A; Yashunin, D A; Kiselev, A M; Stepanov, A N; Andreev, N E

    2014-05-30

    We have carried out experimental and theoretical investigations of a tunable coherent soft X-ray radiation source in the 30 – 52 nm wavelength range based on the generation of high-order harmonics of femtosecond laser radiation propagating in a dielectric xenon-filled capillary. The long path of laser pulse propagation through the capillary permits tuning the generated harmonic wavelengths to almost completely span the range under consideration. (interaction of radiation with matter)

  10. Diffraction leveraged modulation of X-ray pulses using MEMS-based X-ray optics

    DOEpatents

    Lopez, Daniel; Shenoy, Gopal; Wang, Jin; Walko, Donald A.; Jung, Il-Woong; Mukhopadhyay, Deepkishore

    2016-08-09

    A method and apparatus are provided for implementing Bragg-diffraction leveraged modulation of X-ray pulses using MicroElectroMechanical systems (MEMS) based diffractive optics. An oscillating crystalline MEMS device generates a controllable time-window for diffraction of the incident X-ray radiation. The Bragg-diffraction leveraged modulation of X-ray pulses includes isolating a particular pulse, spatially separating individual pulses, and spreading a single pulse from an X-ray pulse-train.

  11. Tabletop coherent diffractive microscopy with soft x-ray illumination from high harmonic generation at 29 nm and 13.5 nm

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Raymondson, Daisy Arrelle

    Soft x-ray microscopy allows imaging at higher resolution than is possible with optical wavelengths. At the same time, it allows imaging of the internal structure of thick samples that cannot be viewed with electron microscopy. Optics for the soft x-ray region of the spectrum are limited, but coherent diffractive imaging techniques use computerized image reconstruction in place of a lens to form high-resolution images with x-rays. This dissertation presents a practical soft x-ray diffractive microscope with sub-100 nm resolution using tabletop coherent soft x-rays at 13.5 nm and 29 nm [1]. This represents the first demonstration of tabletop coherent imaging with 13.5 nm from high harmonics. Images with holography and phase retrieval are shown, with near-diffraction-limited resolution down to 53 nm [2--4]. The first tabletop diffractive images of biological samples with 13.5 nm and 29 nm beams are also shown [5]. This thesis also presents work on the construction of a high-power, high-repetition-rate laser amplifier implementing carrier-envelope phase stabilization. CEP stabilization provides unprecedented levels of control over the full electric field of an ultrafast laser. The first stage of the amplifier was stabilized to 250 mrad CEP noise on 100s timescales. The route to stabilizing the full 10 kHz, 30 W amplifier is outlined. This laser will be used for future coherent diffractive imaging applications at using high harmonic generation at 13.5 nm and shorter wavelengths, and will also be used for time-resolved studies of molecular dissociation [6].

  12. Multi-mJ mid-infrared kHz OPCPA and Yb-doped pump lasers for tabletop coherent soft x-ray generation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lai, Chien-Jen; Hong, Kyung-Han; Siqueira, Jonathas P.; Krogen, Peter; Chang, Chun-Lin; Stein, Gregory J.; Liang, Houkun; Keathley, Phillip D.; Laurent, Guillaume; Moses, Jeffrey; Zapata, Luis E.; Kärtner, Franz X.

    2015-09-01

    We present our recent progress on the development of a mid-infrared (mid-IR), multi-mJ, kHz optical parametric chirped-pulse amplification (OPCPA) system, pumped by a homebuilt picosecond cryogenic Yb:YAG chirped-pulse amplifier, and its application to soft x-ray high-order harmonic generation. The cryogenic Yb:YAG laser operating at 1 kHz repetition rate delivers 42 mJ, 17 ps, 1.03 μm pulses to pump the OPCPA system. Efficient second and fourth harmonic generations from the Yb:YAG system are demonstrated, which provide the pumping capability for OPCPA at various wavelengths. The mid-IR OPCPA system produces 2.6 mJ, 39 fs, 2.1 μm pulses with good beam quality (M 2 = ∼1.5) at 1 kHz repetition rate. The output pulses of the OPCPA are used to generate high-order harmonics in both gas cell and hollow-core fiber targets. A photon flux of ∼2 × 108 photon/s/1% bandwidth at 160 eV in Ar is measured while the cutoff is 190 eV. The direct measurements of the photon flux from x-ray photodiodes have confirmed the generation of water-window soft x-ray photons with a flux ∼106 photon/s/1% bandwidth at 330 eV in Ne. The demonstrated OPCPA and Yb:YAG pump laser technologies provide an excellent platform of energy and power scalable few-cycle mid-IR sources that are suitable for high-flux tabletop coherent soft x-ray generation.

  13. Generation of Bright, Spatially Coherent Soft X-Ray High Harmonics in a Hollow Waveguide Using Two-Color Synthesized Laser Pulses.

    PubMed

    Jin, Cheng; Stein, Gregory J; Hong, Kyung-Han; Lin, C D

    2015-07-24

    We investigate the efficient generation of low-divergence high-order harmonics driven by waveform-optimized laser pulses in a gas-filled hollow waveguide. The drive waveform is obtained by synthesizing two-color laser pulses, optimized such that highest harmonic yields are emitted from each atom. Optimization of the gas pressure and waveguide configuration has enabled us to produce bright and spatially coherent harmonics extending from the extreme ultraviolet to soft x rays. Our study on the interplay among waveguide mode, atomic dispersion, and plasma effect uncovers how dynamic phase matching is accomplished and how an optimized waveform is maintained when optimal waveguide parameters (radius and length) and gas pressure are identified. Our analysis should help laboratory development in the generation of high-flux bright coherent soft x rays as tabletop light sources for applications. PMID:26252685

  14. Nonlinearly generated harmonic signals in ultra-small waveguides with magnetic films: Tunable enhancements of 2nd and 4th harmonics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marsh, J.; Zagorodnii, V.; Celinski, Z.; Camley, R. E.

    2012-03-01

    The nonlinear generation of high harmonic signals (up to 5th harmonic) is explored in an ultra-small waveguide which contains a thin ferromagnetic film. The strength of the different harmonics is highly tunable. In particular, the power in the 2nd and 4th harmonic signals may be enhanced by over two orders of magnitude by varying the direction of a static magnetic field with respect to the long axis of the waveguide. In contrast, the 3rd and 5th harmonics are relatively insensitive to the direction of the magnetic field. The experimental results are explained by analytical and numerical calculations.

  15. Reflection soft X-ray microscope and method

    DOEpatents

    Suckewer, S.; Skinner, C.H.; Rosser, R.

    1993-01-05

    A reflection soft X-ray microscope is provided by generating soft X-ray beams, condensing the X-ray beams to strike a surface of an object at a predetermined angle, and focusing the X-ray beams reflected from the surface onto a detector, for recording an image of the surface or near surface features of the object under observation.

  16. Reflection soft X-ray microscope and method

    DOEpatents

    Suckewer, Szymon; Skinner, Charles H.; Rosser, Roy

    1993-01-01

    A reflection soft X-ray microscope is provided by generating soft X-ray beams, condensing the X-ray beams to strike a surface of an object at a predetermined angle, and focusing the X-ray beams reflected from the surface onto a detector, for recording an image of the surface or near surface features of the object under observation.

  17. Panoramic Dental X-Ray

    MedlinePlus

    ... X-ray? What is Panoramic X-ray? Panoramic radiography , also called panoramic x-ray , is a two- ... Exams Dental Cone Beam CT X-ray, Interventional Radiology and Nuclear Medicine Radiation Safety About this Site ...

  18. Analysis of nanometer-isolated trench diffract aerial image of both conventional and second-generation synchrotron-based proximity x-ray lithography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xie, Changqing; Chen, Dapeng; Liu, Ming; Ye, Tianchun; Yi, Futing

    2005-01-01

    In this paper, Beam Propagation Method (BPM) with Fast Fourier Transforms(FFT) is employed to efficiently calculate the diffract image in the wafer plane for both conventional and second generation synchrotron-based proximity x-ray lithography(PXL). In the simulation, a dark-field isolated space pattern silicon nitride/Ta x-ray mask is used for conventional PXL and a diamond /Ta x-ray mask is used for second generation PXL, the diffract image"s dependency on absorber thickness, mask-wafer gap, effective total blur, linewidth and absorber sidewall slope has been numerically evaluated. For conventional PXL, in order to obtain a isolated trench resolution of 50nm, the mask-wafer gap should be controlled below 5 micron, the optimization condition is mask-wafer gap 5 micron, Ta absorber thickness 300nm, effective total blur 10nm, absorber sidewall slope 3°, the corresponding aerial image contrast is 0.457; For second generation, in order to obtain a isolated trench resolution of 50nm, the mask-wafer gap can be as large as 10 micron. In order to obtain a isolated trench resolution of 35nm, mask-wafer gap should be controlled below 5 micron.

  19. Method of Generating X-Ray Diffraction Data for Integral Detection of Twin Defects in Super-Hetero-Epitaxial Materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Park, Yeonjoon (Inventor); Choi, Sang Hyouk (Inventor); King, Glen C. (Inventor); Elliott, James R. (Inventor)

    2009-01-01

    A method provides X-ray diffraction (XRD) data suitable for integral detection of a twin defect in a strained or lattice-matched epitaxial material made from components having crystal structures having symme try belonging to different space groups. The material is mounted in a n X-ray diffraction (XRD) system. In one embodiment, the XRD system's goniometer angle Omega is set equal to (Theta(sub B)-Beta) where The ta(sub B) is a Bragg angle for a designated crystal plane of the allo y that is disposed at a non-perpendicular orientation with respect to the {111) crystal plane, and Beta is the angle between the designate d crystal plane and a { 111 } crystal plane of one of the epitaxial components. The XRD system's detector angle is set equal to (Theta(su b B)+Beta). The material can be rotated through an angle of azimuthal rotation Phi about the axis aligned with the material. Using the det ector, the intensity of the X-ray diffraction is recorded at least at the angle at which the twin defect occurs.

  20. X-ray binaries

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1976-01-01

    Satellite X-ray experiments and ground-based programs aimed at observation of X-ray binaries are discussed. Experiments aboard OAO-3, OSO-8, Ariel 5, Uhuru, and Skylab are included along with rocket and ground-based observations. Major topics covered are: Her X-1, Cyg X-3, Cen X-3, Cyg X-1, the transient source A0620-00, other possible X-ray binaries, and plans and prospects for future observational programs.

  1. Dependence of optimal initial density on laser parameters for multi-keV x-ray radiators generated by nanosecond laser-produced underdense plasma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tu, Shao-yong; Yuan, Yong-teng; Hu, Guang-yue; Miao, Wen-yong; Zhao, Bin; Zheng, Jian; Jiang, Shao-en; Ding, Yong-kun

    2016-01-01

    Efficient multi-keV x-ray sources can be produced using nanosecond laser pulse-heated middle-Z underdense plasmas generated using gas or foam. Previous experimental results show that an optimal initial target density exists for efficient multi-keV x-ray emission at which the laser ionization wave is supersonic. Here we explore the influence of the laser intensity and the pulse duration on this optimal initial target density via a one-dimensional radiation hydrodynamic simulation. The simulation shows that the optimal initial density is sensitive to both the laser intensity and the pulse duration. However, the speed of the supersonic ionization wave at the end of the laser irradiation is always maintained at 1.5 to 1.7 times that of the ion acoustic wave under the optimal initial density conditions.

  2. Start-to-end simulation of x-ray radiation of a next generation light source using the real number of electrons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qiang, J.; Corlett, J.; Mitchell, C. E.; Papadopoulos, C. F.; Penn, G.; Placidi, M.; Reinsch, M.; Ryne, R. D.; Sannibale, F.; Sun, C.; Venturini, M.; Emma, P.; Reiche, S.

    2014-03-01

    In this paper we report on start-to-end simulation of a next generation light source based on a high repetition rate free electron laser (FEL) driven by a CW superconducting linac. The simulation integrated the entire system in a seamless start-to-end model, including birth of photoelectrons, transport of electron beam through 600 m of the accelerator beam delivery system, and generation of coherent x-ray radiation in a two-stage self-seeding undulator beam line. The entire simulation used the real number of electrons (˜2 billion electrons/bunch) to capture the details of the physical shot noise without resorting to artificial filtering to suppress numerical noise. The simulation results shed light on several issues including the importance of space-charge effects near the laser heater and the reliability of x-ray radiation power predictions when using a smaller number of simulation particles. The results show that the microbunching instability in the linac can be controlled with 15 keV uncorrelated energy spread induced by a laser heater and demonstrate that high brightness and flux 1 nm x-ray radiation (˜1012 photons/pulse) with fully spatial and temporal coherence is achievable.

  3. X-rays surgical revolution.

    PubMed

    Toledo-Pereyra, Luis H

    2009-01-01

    Wilhelm Roentgen (1845-1923) created a surgical revolution with the discovery of the X-rays in late 1895 and the subsequent introduction of this technique for the management of surgical patients. No other physician or scientist had ever imagined such a powerful and worthwhile discovery. Other scientists paved the way for Roentgen to approach the use of these new X-rays for medical purposes. In this way, initially, and prior to Roentgen, Thompson, Hertz, and Lenard applied themselves to the early developments of this technology. They made good advances but never reached the clearly defined understanding brought about by Roentgen. The use of a Crookes tube, a barium platinocyanide screen, with fluorescent light and the generation of energy to propagate the cathode rays were the necessary elements for the conception of an X-ray picture. On November 8, 1895, Roentgen began his experiments on X-ray technology when he found that some kind of rays were being produced by the glass of the tube opposite to the cathode. The development of a photograph successfully completed this early imaging process. After six intense weeks of research, on December 22, he obtained a photograph of the hand of his wife, the first X-ray ever made. This would be a major contribution to the world of medicine and surgery.

  4. X-ray transmissive debris shield

    DOEpatents

    Spielman, Rick B.

    1994-01-01

    A composite window structure is described for transmitting x-ray radiation and for shielding radiation generated debris. In particular, separate layers of different x-ray transmissive materials are laminated together to form a high strength, x-ray transmissive debris shield which is particularly suited for use in high energy fluences. In one embodiment, the composite window comprises alternating layers of beryllium and a thermoset polymer.

  5. Topological X-Rays and MRIs

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lynch, Mark

    2002-01-01

    Let K be a compact subset of the interior of the unit disk D in the plane and suppose one can't see through the boundary of D and identify K. However, assume that one can take "topological X-rays" of D which measure the "density" of K along the lines of the X-rays. By taking these X-rays from all directions, a "topological MRI" is generated for…

  6. Controlling X-rays With Light

    SciTech Connect

    Glover, Ernie; Hertlein, Marcus; Southworth, Steve; Allison, Tom; van Tilborg, Jeroen; Kanter, Elliot; Krassig, B.; Varma, H.; Rude, Bruce; Santra, Robin; Belkacem, Ali; Young, Linda

    2010-08-02

    Ultrafast x-ray science is an exciting frontier that promises the visualization of electronic, atomic and molecular dynamics on atomic time and length scales. A largelyunexplored area of ultrafast x-ray science is the use of light to control how x-rays interact with matter. In order to extend control concepts established for long wavelengthprobes to the x-ray regime, the optical control field must drive a coherent electronic response on a timescale comparable to femtosecond core-hole lifetimes. An intense field is required to achieve this rapid response. Here an intense optical control pulse isobserved to efficiently modulate photoelectric absorption for x-rays and to create an ultrafast transparency window. We demonstrate an application of x-ray transparencyrelevant to ultrafast x-ray sources: an all-photonic temporal cross-correlation measurement of a femtosecond x-ray pulse. The ability to control x-ray/matterinteractions with light will create new opportunities at current and next-generation x-ray light sources.

  7. Efficient 2(nd) and 4(th) harmonic generation of a single-frequency, continuous-wave fiber amplifier.

    PubMed

    Sudmeyer, Thomas; Imai, Yutaka; Masuda, Hisashi; Eguchi, Naoya; Saito, Masaki; Kubota, Shigeo

    2008-02-01

    We demonstrate efficient cavity-enhanced second and fourth harmonic generation of an air-cooled, continuous-wave (cw), single-frequency 1064 nm fiber-amplifier system. The second harmonic generator achieves up to 88% total external conversion efficiency, generating more than 20-W power at 532 nm wavelength in a diffraction-limited beam (M(2) < 1.05). The nonlinear medium is a critically phase-matched, 20-mm long, anti-reflection (AR) coated LBO crystal operated at 25 degrees C. The fourth harmonic generator is based on an AR-coated, Czochralski-grown beta-BaB(2)O(4) (BBO) crystal optimized for low loss and high damage threshold. Up to 12.2 W of 266-nm deep-UV (DUV) output is obtained using a 6-mm long critically phase-matched BBO operated at 40 degrees C. This power level is more than two times higher than previously reported for cw 266-nm generation. The total external conversion efficiency from the fundamental at 1064 nm to the fourth harmonic at 266 nm is >50%.

  8. A Next-Generation Hard X-Ray Nanoprobe Beamline for In Situ Studies of Energy Materials and Devices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maser, Jörg; Lai, Barry; Buonassisi, Tonio; Cai, Zhonghou; Chen, Si; Finney, Lydia; Gleber, Sophie-Charlotte; Jacobsen, Chris; Preissner, Curt; Roehrig, Chris; Rose, Volker; Shu, Deming; Vine, David; Vogt, Stefan

    2014-01-01

    The Advanced Photon Source is developing a suite of new X-ray beamlines to study materials and devices across many length scales and under real conditions. One of the flagship beamlines of the APS upgrade is the In Situ Nanoprobe (ISN) beamline, which will provide in situ and operando characterization of advanced energy materials and devices under varying temperatures, gas ambients, and applied fields, at previously unavailable spatial resolution and throughput. Examples of materials systems include inorganic and organic photovoltaic systems, advanced battery systems, fuel cell components, nanoelectronic devices, advanced building materials and other scientifically and technologically relevant systems. To characterize these systems at very high spatial resolution and trace sensitivity, the ISN will use both nanofocusing mirrors and diffractive optics to achieve spots sizes as small as 20 nm. Nanofocusing mirrors in Kirkpatrick-Baez geometry will provide several orders of magnitude increase in photon flux at a spatial resolution of 50 nm. Diffractive optics such as zone plates and/or multilayer Laue lenses will provide a highest spatial resolution of 20 nm. Coherent diffraction methods will be used to study even small specimen features with sub-10 nm relevant length scale. A high-throughput data acquisition system will be employed to significantly increase operations efficiency and usability of the instrument. The ISN will provide full spectroscopy capabilities to study the chemical state of most materials in the periodic table, and enable X-ray fluorescence tomography. In situ electrical characterization will enable operando studies of energy and electronic devices such as photovoltaic systems and batteries. We describe the optical concept for the ISN beamline, the technical design, and the approach for enabling a broad variety of in situ studies. We furthermore discuss the application of hard X-ray microscopy to study defects in multi-crystalline solar cells, one

  9. A Next-Generation Hard X-Ray Nanoprobe Beamline for In Situ Studies of Energy Materials and Devices

    SciTech Connect

    Maser, Jong; Lai, Barry; Buonassisi, Toni; Cai, Zhonghou; Chen, Si; Finney, Lydia; Gleber, Sophie-Charlotte; Jacobsen, Chris; Preissner, Curt; Chris Roehrig; Rose, Volker; Shu, Deming; Vine, David; Vogt, Stefan

    2013-08-20

    The Advanced Photon Source is developing a suite of new X-ray beamlines to study materials and devices across many length scales and under real conditions. One of the flagship beamlines of the APS upgrade is the In Situ Nanoprobe (ISN) beamline, which will provide in situ and operando characterization of advanced energy materials and devices under varying temperatures, gas ambients, and applied fields, at previously unavailable spatial resolution and throughput. Examples of materials systems include inorganic and organic photovoltaic systems, advanced battery systems, fuel cell components, nanoelectronic devices, advanced building materials and other scientifically and technologically relevant systems. To characterize these systems at very high spatial resolution and trace sensitivity, the ISN will use both nanofocusing mirrors and diffractive optics to achieve spots sizes as small as 20 nm. Nanofocusing mirrors in Kirkpatrick–Baez geometry will provide several orders of magnitude increase in photon flux at a spatial resolution of 50 nm. Diffractive optics such as zone plates and/or multilayer Laue lenses will provide a highest spatial resolution of 20 nm. Coherent diffraction methods will be used to study even small specimen features with sub-10 nm relevant length scale. A high-throughput data acquisition system will be employed to significantly increase operations efficiency and usability of the instrument. The ISN will provide full spectroscopy capabilities to study the chemical state of most materials in the periodic table, and enable X-ray fluorescence tomography. In situ electrical characterization will enable operando studies of energy and electronic devices such as photovoltaic systems and batteries. We also describe the optical concept for the ISN beamline, the technical design, and the approach for enabling a broad variety of in situ studies. Furthermore, we discuss the application of hard X-ray microscopy to study defects in multi-crystalline solar

  10. Origin of a Raman scattering peak generated in single-walled carbon nanotubes by X-ray irradiation and subsequent thermal annealing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Murakami, Toshiya; Matsuda, Mitsuaki; Kisoda, Kenji; Itoh, Chihiro

    2016-08-01

    We have found that a Raman scattering (RS) peak around 1870 cm-1 was produced by the annealing of the X-ray irradiated film of single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWNTs) at 450 oC. The intensity of 1870-cm-1 peak showed a maximum at the probe energy of 2.3 eV for the RS spectroscopy with various probe lasers. Both the peak position and the probe-energy dependence were almost identical to those of the one-dimensional carbon chains previously reported in multi-walled carbon nanotubes. Consequently, we concluded that the 1870-cm-1 peak found in the present study is attributed to carbon chains. The formation of carbon chains by the annealing at temperature lower than 500 oC is firstly reported by the present study. The carbon chains would be formed by aggregation of the interstitial carbons, which are formed as a counterpart of carbon vacancies by X-ray irradiation diffused on SWNT walls. The result indicates that the combination of X-ray irradiation and subsequent thermal annealing is a feasible tool for generating new nanostructures in SWNT.

  11. HYBRID Simulations of Diffraction-Limited Focusing with Kirkpatrick-Baez Mirrors for a Next-Generation In Situ Hard X-ray Nanoprobe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maser, Jörg; Shi, Xianbo; Reininger, Ruben; Lai, Barry; Vogt, Stefan

    2016-02-01

    Next-generation hard X-ray nanoprobe beamlines such as the In Situ Nanoprobe (ISN) beamline being planned at the Advanced Photon Source aim at providing very high spatial resolution while also enabling very high focused flux, to study complex materials and devices using fast, multidimensional imaging across many length scales. The ISN will use diffractive optics to focus X-rays with a bandpass of ∆E/E = 10-4 into a focal spot of 20 nm or below. Reflective optics in Kirkpatrick-Baez geometry will be used to focus X-rays with a bandpass as large as ∆E/E = 10-2 into a focal spot of 50 nm. Diffraction-limited focusing with reflective optics is achieved by spatial filtering and use of a very long, vertically focusing mirror. To quantify the performance of the ISN beamline, we have simulated the propagation of both partially and fully coherent wavefronts from the undulator source, through the ISN beamline and into the mirror-based focal spot. Simulations were carried out using the recently developed software "HYBRID."

  12. X-ray beamsplitter

    DOEpatents

    Ceglio, N.M.; Stearns, D.G.; Hawryluk, A.M.; Barbee, T.W. Jr.

    1987-08-07

    An x-ray beamsplitter which splits an x-ray beam into two coherent parts by reflecting and transmitting some fraction of an incident beam has applications for x-ray interferometry, x-ray holography, x-ray beam manipulation, and x-ray laser cavity output couplers. The beamsplitter is formed of a wavelength selective multilayer thin film supported by a very thin x-ray transparent membrane. The beamsplitter resonantly transmits and reflects x-rays through thin film interference effects. A thin film is formed of 5--50 pairs of alternate Mo/Si layers with a period of 20--250 A. The support membrane is 10--200 nm of silicon nitride or boron nitride. The multilayer/support membrane structure is formed across a window in a substrate by first forming the structure on a solid substrate and then forming a window in the substrate to leave a free-standing structure over the window. 6 figs.

  13. X-ray beamsplitter

    DOEpatents

    Ceglio, Natale M.; Stearns, Daniel S.; Hawryluk, Andrew M.; Barbee, Jr., Troy W.

    1989-01-01

    An x-ray beamsplitter which splits an x-ray beam into two coherent parts by reflecting and transmitting some fraction of an incident beam has applications for x-ray interferometry, x-ray holography, x-ray beam manipulation, and x-ray laser cavity output couplers. The beamsplitter is formed of a wavelength selective multilayer thin film supported by a very thin x-ray transparent membrane. The beamsplitter resonantly transmits and reflects x-rays through thin film interference effects. A thin film is formed of 5-50 pairs of alternate Mo/Si layers with a period of 20-250 A. The support membrane is 10-200 nm of silicon nitride or boron nitride. The multilayer/support membrane structure is formed across a window in a substrate by first forming the structure on a solid substrate and then forming a window in the substrate to leave a free-standing structure over the window.

  14. X-ray Spectrometry.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Markowicz, Andrzej A.; Van Grieken, Rene E.

    1984-01-01

    Provided is a selective literature survey of X-ray spectrometry from late 1981 to late 1983. Literature examined focuses on: excitation (photon and electron excitation and particle-induced X-ray emission; detection (wavelength-dispersive and energy-dispersive spectrometry); instrumentation and techniques; and on such quantitative analytical…

  15. X-ray

    MedlinePlus

    ... is very low. Most experts feel that the benefits of appropriate x-ray imaging greatly outweigh any risks. Young children and babies in the womb are more sensitive to the risks of x-rays. Tell your health care provider if you think you might be pregnant.

  16. In vivo crystallography at X-ray free-electron lasers: the next generation of structural biology?

    PubMed

    Gallat, François-Xavier; Matsugaki, Naohiro; Coussens, Nathan P; Yagi, Koichiro J; Boudes, Marion; Higashi, Tetsuya; Tsuji, Daisuke; Tatano, Yutaka; Suzuki, Mamoru; Mizohata, Eiichi; Tono, Kensuke; Joti, Yasumasa; Kameshima, Takashi; Park, Jaehyun; Song, Changyong; Hatsui, Takaki; Yabashi, Makina; Nango, Eriko; Itoh, Kohji; Coulibaly, Fasséli; Tobe, Stephen; Ramaswamy, S; Stay, Barbara; Iwata, So; Chavas, Leonard M G

    2014-07-17

    The serendipitous discovery of the spontaneous growth of protein crystals inside cells has opened the field of crystallography to chemically unmodified samples directly available from their natural environment. On the one hand, through in vivo crystallography, protocols for protein crystal preparation can be highly simplified, although the technique suffers from difficulties in sampling, particularly in the extraction of the crystals from the cells partly due to their small sizes. On the other hand, the extremely intense X-ray pulses emerging from X-ray free-electron laser (XFEL) sources, along with the appearance of serial femtosecond crystallography (SFX) is a milestone for radiation damage-free protein structural studies but requires micrometre-size crystals. The combination of SFX with in vivo crystallography has the potential to boost the applicability of these techniques, eventually bringing the field to the point where in vitro sample manipulations will no longer be required, and direct imaging of the crystals from within the cells will be achievable. To fully appreciate the diverse aspects of sample characterization, handling and analysis, SFX experiments at the Japanese SPring-8 angstrom compact free-electron laser were scheduled on various types of in vivo grown crystals. The first experiments have demonstrated the feasibility of the approach and suggest that future in vivo crystallography applications at XFELs will be another alternative to nano-crystallography.

  17. In Situ Investigations of Laser-Generated Ligand-Free Platinum Nanoparticles by X-ray Absorption Spectroscopy: How Does the Immediate Environment Influence the Particle Surface?

    PubMed

    Fischer, Mathias; Hormes, Josef; Marzun, Galina; Wagener, Philipp; Hagemann, Ulrich; Barcikowski, Stephan

    2016-09-01

    Pulsed laser ablation in liquid (PLAL) has proven its usefulness as a nanoparticle (NP) synthesis method alternative to traditional chemical reduction methods, where the absence of any molecular ligands or residual reactants makes laser-generated nanoparticles ideal reference materials for charge-transfer experiments. We synthesized additive-free platinum nanoparticles by PLAL and in-situ characterized their interaction with H2O, sodium phosphate buffer, and sodium citrate as well as a TiO2 support by X-ray absorption fine structure (XAFS), i.e., X-ray absorption near-edge structure (XANES) and extended X-ray absorption fine structure (EXAFS). Differences in the white-line intensity among the colloidal particles in the three liquids indicate that the respective NP-solvent interaction varies in strength. The ions added ex situ diffuse through the particles' electric double layer and interact electrostatically with the Stern plane. Consequently, these ions weaken the interaction of the functional OH groups that are bound to the partially oxidized platinum surfaces and cause their partial reduction. Comparing XAFS spectra of laser-generated Pt NPs in citrate with wet-chemically synthesized ones (both ligand-covered) indicates different types of Pt-O bonds: a Pt(IV)O2 type in the case of wet-chemical NPs and a Pt(II)O type in the case of laser-generated NPs. A comparison of unsupported laser-generated platinum NPs in H2O with TiO2-supported ones shows no white-line intensity differences and also an identical number of Pt-O bonds in both cases. This suggests that in the deposition process at least part of the double-layer coating stays intact and that the ligand-free Pt particle properties are preserved in the TiO2-supported Pt particles, relevant for heterogeneous catalysis. PMID:27489980

  18. Lumbosacral spine x-ray

    MedlinePlus

    X-ray - lumbosacral spine; X-ray - lower spine ... The test is done in a hospital x-ray department or your health care provider's office by an x-ray technician. You will be asked to lie on the x-ray table ...

  19. X-ray laser

    DOEpatents

    Nilsen, Joseph

    1991-01-01

    An X-ray laser (10) that lases between the K edges of carbon and oxygen, i.e. between 44 and 23 Angstroms, is provided. The laser comprises a silicon (12) and dysprosium (14) foil combination (16) that is driven by two beams (18, 20) of intense line focused (22, 24) optical laser radiation. Ground state nickel-like dysprosium ions (34) are resonantly photo-pumped to their upper X-ray laser state by line emission from hydrogen-like silicon ions (32). The novel X-ray laser should prove especially useful for the microscopy of biological specimens.

  20. Gas dynamics and heat transfer in a packed pebble-bed reactor for the 4th generation nuclear energy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abdulmohsin, Rahman

    -AlOx-Al junctions, we show that, despite excellent temperature stability, temperature fluctuations induce observable critical current fluctuations. Particularly, becuase 1/ f critical current noise has decreased with improved fabrication techniques in recent years, it is important to understand and eliminate this additional noise source. Next, we introduce a numerical method of calculating the mean square flux noise F2 from independently fluctuating spins on the surface of thin-film loops of arbitrary geometry. By reciprocity, F2 is proportional to Br2 , where B(r) is the magnetic field generated by a circulating current around the loop and r varies over the loop surface. By discretizing the loop nonuniformly, we efficiently and accurately compute the current distribution and resulting magnetic field, which may vary rapidly across the loop. We use this method to compute F2 in a number of scenarios in which we systematically vary physical parameters of the loop. We compare our simulations to an earlier analytic result predicting that F2 ∝ R/W in the limit where the loop radius R is much greater than the linewidth W. We further show that the previously neglected contribution of edge spins to F2 is significant---even dominant---in narrow-linewidth loops. To calculate theoretical dephasing rates in qubits, we consider flux noise with a spectral density Sphi( f) = A2/ (f/1 Hz) alpha, where A is of the order of 1 muphi 0 Hz--1/2 and 0.6 ≤ alpha ≤ 1.2; applied flux, our calculations of the dependence of the pure dephasing time tau φ Ramsey and echo pulse sequences on alpha for fixed A show that tauφ decreases rapidly as alpha is reduced. We find that tauφ is relatively insensitive to the noise bandwidth, f1 ≤ f ≤ f2 for all alpha provided the ultraviolet cutoff frequency f2 > 1/tauφ. We calculate the ratio tauφ,E/tau φ, R of the echo (E) and Ramsey (R) sequences, and the dependence of the decay function on alpha and f2. We investigate the case in which S phi(f0) is fixed

  1. Generation and characterization of plasma channels in gas puff targets using soft X-ray radiography technique

    SciTech Connect

    Wachulak, P. W. Bartnik, A.; Jarocki, R.; Fok, T.; Węgrzyński, Ł.; Kostecki, J.; Szczurek, M.; Jabczyński, J.; Fiedorowicz, H.

    2014-10-15

    We present our recent results of a formation and characterization of plasma channels in elongated krypton and xenon gas puff targets. The study of their formation and temporal expansion was carried out using a combination of a soft X-ray radiography (shadowgraphy) and pinhole camera imaging. Two high-energy short laser pulses were used to produce the channels. When a pumping laser pulse was shaped into a line focus, using cylindrical and spherical lenses, the channels were not produced because much smaller energy density was deposited in the gas puff target. However, when a point focus was obtained, using just a spherical lens, the plasma channels appeared. The channels were up to 9 mm in length, had a quite uniform density profile, and expanded in time with velocities of about 2 cm/μs.

  2. The Wakefield Effects of Pulsed Crab Cavities at the Advanced Photon Source for Short-X-ray Pulse Generation

    SciTech Connect

    Chae, Y.-C.; Waldschmidt, G.; Dolgashev, V.; /SLAC

    2007-11-07

    In recent years we have explored the application to the Advanced Photon Source (APS) of Zholents' crab-cavity based scheme for production of short x-ray pulses. As a near-term project, the APS has elected to pursue a pulsed system using room-temperature cavities. The cavity design has been optimized to heavily damp parasitic modes while maintaining large shunt impedance for the deflecting dipole mode. We evaluated a system consisting of three crab cavities as an impedance source and determined their effect on the single- and multi-bunch instabilities. In the single-bunch instability we used the APS impedance model as the reference system in order to predict the overall performance of the ring when the crab cavities are installed in the future. For multi-bunch instabilities we used a realistic fill pattern, including hybrid-fill, and tracked multiple bunches where each bunch was treated as soft in distribution.

  3. Superconducting Multi-Cell Deflecting Cavity for Short-Pulse X-Ray Generation at the Advanced Photon Source

    SciTech Connect

    G.J. Waldschmidt, L.H. Morrison, R. Nassiri, R.A. Rimmer, K. Tian, H. Wang

    2009-05-01

    A superconducting multi-cell cavity for the production of short x-ray pulses at the Advanced Photon Source (APS) has been explored as an alternative to a single-cell cavity design in order to improve the packing factor and potentially reduce the number of high-power RF systems and low-level RF controls required. The cavity will operate at 2815 MHz in the APS storage ring and will require heavy damping of parasitic modes to maintain stable beam operation. Novel on-cell dampers, attached directly to the cavity body, have been utilized by taking advantage of the magnetic field null on the equatorial plane in order to enhance damping. Design issues and simulation results will be discussed.

  4. Experimental results from high-intensity sources of monochromatic X-rays generated by 10-38 MeV protons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Avaldi, L.; Bassi, S.; Castiglioni, M.; Milazzo, M.; Silari, M.; Weckermann, B.

    1990-12-01

    The performance of a high intensity X-ray source generated by proton bombardment of pure elemental targets has been investigated experimentally. The K α yields of several thick targets of pure elemental composition have been measured at proton energies between 12 and 38 MeV. The measured yields ((3-5 × 10 10 photons/(s μA sr)) compare favourably with the expected values, while a sensible background contribution from nuclear processes asks for a careful experimental arrangement in order to use this source for XRF analyses.

  5. X-rays from intermediate mass stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Robrade, Jan

    I will review the X-ray properties of intermediate mass stars and discuss possible X-ray generating mechanisms. Main-sequence stars of spectral type mid B to mid A neither drive sufficiently strong winds to produce shock generated X-rays, nor possess an outer convection zone to generate dynamo driven magnetic activity and coronae. Consequently they should be virtually X-ray dark and occasionally detected X-ray emission was usually attributed to undetected low-mass companions. However, in magnetic intermediate mass stars, the Ap/Bp stars, a different X-ray production mechanism may operate. It is termed the magnetically channeled wind-shock model, where the stellar wind from both hemispheres is channelled towards the equatorial plane, collides and forms a rigidly rotating disk around the star. The strong shocks of the nearly head-on wind collision as well as the existence of magnetically confined plasma in a dynamic circumstellar disk can lead to diverse X-ray phenomena. In this sense Ap/Bp stars bridge the 'classical' X-ray regimes of cool and hot stars.

  6. Hard X-Ray Emission from X-Ray Bursters

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Halpern, Jules P.; Kaaret, Philip

    1999-01-01

    The scientific goal of this project is to study the hard x-ray emission from x-ray bursters. One target of opportunity observation was made for this investigation during 1997. We obtained 38ks of data on the source 4UI705-44. The project is closely related to "Monitoring x-ray emission from x-ray bursters", and "Long-Term Hard X-Ray Monitoring of X-Ray Bursters."

  7. Observation of femtosecond X-ray interactions with matter using an X-ray-X-ray pump-probe scheme.

    PubMed

    Inoue, Ichiro; Inubushi, Yuichi; Sato, Takahiro; Tono, Kensuke; Katayama, Tetsuo; Kameshima, Takashi; Ogawa, Kanade; Togashi, Tadashi; Owada, Shigeki; Amemiya, Yoshiyuki; Tanaka, Takashi; Hara, Toru; Yabashi, Makina

    2016-02-01

    Resolution in the X-ray structure determination of noncrystalline samples has been limited to several tens of nanometers, because deep X-ray irradiation required for enhanced resolution causes radiation damage to samples. However, theoretical studies predict that the femtosecond (fs) durations of X-ray free-electron laser (XFEL) pulses make it possible to record scattering signals before the initiation of X-ray damage processes; thus, an ultraintense X-ray beam can be used beyond the conventional limit of radiation dose. Here, we verify this scenario by directly observing femtosecond X-ray damage processes in diamond irradiated with extraordinarily intense (∼10(19) W/cm(2)) XFEL pulses. An X-ray pump-probe diffraction scheme was developed in this study; tightly focused double-5-fs XFEL pulses with time separations ranging from sub-fs to 80 fs were used to excite (i.e., pump) the diamond and characterize (i.e., probe) the temporal changes of the crystalline structures through Bragg reflection. It was found that the pump and probe diffraction intensities remain almost constant for shorter time separations of the double pulse, whereas the probe diffraction intensities decreased after 20 fs following pump pulse irradiation due to the X-ray-induced atomic displacement. This result indicates that sub-10-fs XFEL pulses enable conductions of damageless structural determinations and supports the validity of the theoretical predictions of ultraintense X-ray-matter interactions. The X-ray pump-probe scheme demonstrated here would be effective for understanding ultraintense X-ray-matter interactions, which will greatly stimulate advanced XFEL applications, such as atomic structure determination of a single molecule and generation of exotic matters with high energy densities. PMID:26811449

  8. Observation of femtosecond X-ray interactions with matter using an X-ray-X-ray pump-probe scheme.

    PubMed

    Inoue, Ichiro; Inubushi, Yuichi; Sato, Takahiro; Tono, Kensuke; Katayama, Tetsuo; Kameshima, Takashi; Ogawa, Kanade; Togashi, Tadashi; Owada, Shigeki; Amemiya, Yoshiyuki; Tanaka, Takashi; Hara, Toru; Yabashi, Makina

    2016-02-01

    Resolution in the X-ray structure determination of noncrystalline samples has been limited to several tens of nanometers, because deep X-ray irradiation required for enhanced resolution causes radiation damage to samples. However, theoretical studies predict that the femtosecond (fs) durations of X-ray free-electron laser (XFEL) pulses make it possible to record scattering signals before the initiation of X-ray damage processes; thus, an ultraintense X-ray beam can be used beyond the conventional limit of radiation dose. Here, we verify this scenario by directly observing femtosecond X-ray damage processes in diamond irradiated with extraordinarily intense (∼10(19) W/cm(2)) XFEL pulses. An X-ray pump-probe diffraction scheme was developed in this study; tightly focused double-5-fs XFEL pulses with time separations ranging from sub-fs to 80 fs were used to excite (i.e., pump) the diamond and characterize (i.e., probe) the temporal changes of the crystalline structures through Bragg reflection. It was found that the pump and probe diffraction intensities remain almost constant for shorter time separations of the double pulse, whereas the probe diffraction intensities decreased after 20 fs following pump pulse irradiation due to the X-ray-induced atomic displacement. This result indicates that sub-10-fs XFEL pulses enable conductions of damageless structural determinations and supports the validity of the theoretical predictions of ultraintense X-ray-matter interactions. The X-ray pump-probe scheme demonstrated here would be effective for understanding ultraintense X-ray-matter interactions, which will greatly stimulate advanced XFEL applications, such as atomic structure determination of a single molecule and generation of exotic matters with high energy densities.

  9. X-rays and magnetism.

    PubMed

    Fischer, Peter; Ohldag, Hendrik

    2015-09-01

    Magnetism is among the most active and attractive areas in modern solid state physics because of intriguing phenomena interesting to fundamental research and a manifold of technological applications. State-of-the-art synthesis of advanced magnetic materials, e.g. in hybrid structures paves the way to new functionalities. To characterize modern magnetic materials and the associated magnetic phenomena, polarized x-rays have emerged as unique probes due to their specific interaction with magnetic materials. A large variety of spectroscopic and microscopic techniques have been developed to quantify in an element, valence and site-sensitive way properties of ferro-, ferri-, and antiferromagnetic systems, such as spin and orbital moments, and to image nanoscale spin textures and their dynamics with sub-ns time and almost 10 nm spatial resolution. The enormous intensity of x-rays and their degree of coherence at next generation x-ray facilities will open the fsec time window to magnetic studies addressing fundamental time scales in magnetism with nanometer spatial resolution. This review will give an introduction into contemporary topics of nanoscale magnetic materials and provide an overview of analytical spectroscopy and microscopy tools based on x-ray dichroism effects. Selected examples of current research will demonstrate the potential and future directions of these techniques.

  10. X-ray (image)

    MedlinePlus

    ... a form of electromagnetic radiation, just like visible light. Structures that are dense (such as bone) will block most of the x-ray particles, and will appear white. Metal and contrast media (special dye used to highlight ...

  11. Pelvis x-ray

    MedlinePlus

    X-ray - pelvis ... Tumors Degenerative conditions of bones in the hips, pelvis, and upper legs ... hip joint Tumors of the bones of the pelvis Sacroiliitis (inflammation of the area where the sacrum ...

  12. Medical X-Rays

    MedlinePlus

    ... Diagnostic X-Ray Equipment Compliance Program Guidance Manual CP 7386.003 Field Compliance Testing of Diagnostic (Medical) ... and Exporting Electronic Products Compliance Program Guidance Manual CP 7386.003 Field Compliance Testing of Diagnostic (Medical) ...

  13. X-Ray Diffraction.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Smith, D. K.; Smith, K. L.

    1980-01-01

    Reviews applications in research and analytical characterization of compounds and materials in the field of X-ray diffraction, emphasizing new developments in applications and instrumentation in both single crystal and powder diffraction. Cites 414 references. (CS)

  14. X-ray - skeleton

    MedlinePlus

    ... is used to look for: Fractures or broken bone Cancer that has spread to other areas of the ... 2014:chap 8. Read More Bone tumor Broken bone Cancer Metastasis Osteomyelitis X-ray Update Date 5/9/ ...

  15. Feasibility Study for a Seeded Hard X-ray Source Based on a Two-Stage Echo-Enabled Harmonic Generation FEL

    SciTech Connect

    Xiang, Dao; Huang, Z.; Ratner, D.; Stupakov, G.; /SLAC

    2009-12-11

    We propose and analyze a scheme to achieve a seeded hard x-ray source based on a two-stage echo-enabled harmonic generation (EEHG) FEL. In the scheme an 180 nm seed laser covering the whole bunch is first used to modulate the beam when beam energy is 2 GeV. After passing through a strong chicane complicated fine structures are introduced into the phase space. The beam is again modulated by a short 180 nm laser that only interacts with the rear part of the beam and accelerated to 6 GeV. A chicane is then used to convert the energy modulation imparted to the rear part of the beam into density modulation. The density-modulated beam is sent through a radiator to generate intense 6 nm radiation which will be used to interact with the front fresh part of the bunch. Finally we generate in the front part of the beam density modulation at the 1199th harmonic of the seed laser. We will discuss the issues related to the realization of the seeded hard x-ray FEL.

  16. Cosmic x ray physics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mccammon, Dan; Cox, D. P.; Kraushaar, W. L.; Sanders, W. T.

    1992-01-01

    This final report covers the period 1 January 1985 - 31 March 1992. It is divided into the following sections: the soft x-ray background; proportional counter and filter calibrations; sounding rocket flight preparations; new sounding rocket payload: x-ray calorimeter; and theoretical studies. Staff, publications, conference proceedings, invited talks, contributed talks, colloquia and seminars, public service lectures, and Ph. D. theses are listed.

  17. 600 eV falcon-linac thomson x-ray source

    SciTech Connect

    Crane, J K; LeSage, G P; Ditmire, T; Cross, R; Wharton, K; Moffitt, K; Cowan, T E; Hays, G; Tsai, V; Anderson, G; Shuttlesworth, R; Springer, P

    2000-12-15

    The advent of 3rd generation light sources such as the Advanced Light Source (ALS) at LBL, and the Advanced Photon Source at Argonne, have produced a revolution in x-ray probing of dense matter during the past decade. These machines use electron-synchrotrons in conjunction with undulator stages to produce 100 psec x-ray pulses with photon energies of several kiloelectronvolts (keV). The applications for x-ray probing of matter are numerous and diverse with experiments in medicine and biology, semiconductors and materials science, and plasma and solid state physics. In spite of the success of the 3rd generation light sources there is strong motivation to push the capabilities of x-ray probing into new realms, requiring shorter pulses, higher brightness and harder x-rays. A 4th generation light source, the Linac Coherent Light Source (LCLS), is being considered at the Stanford Linear Accelerator [1]. The LCLS will produce multi-kilovolt x-rays of subpicosecond duration that are 10 orders of magnitude brighter than today's 3rd generation light sources.[1] Although the LCLS will provide unprecedented capability for performing time-resolved x-ray probing of ultrafast phenomena at solid densities, this machine will not be completed for many years. In the meantime there is a serious need for an ultrashort-pulse, high-brightness, hard x-ray source that is capable of probing deep into high-Z solid materials to measure dynamic effects that occur on picosecond time scales. Such an instrument would be ideal for probing the effects of shock propagation in solids using Bragg and Laue diffraction. These techniques can be used to look at phase transitions, melting and recrystallization, and the propagation of defects and dislocations well below the surface in solid materials. [2] These types of dynamic phenomena undermine the mechanical properties of metals and are of general interest in solid state physics, materials science, metallurgy, and have specific relevance to stockpile

  18. Thermal and resonance neutrons generated by various electron and X-ray therapeutic beams from medical linacs installed in polish oncological centers

    PubMed Central

    Konefał, Adam; Orlef, Andrzej; Łaciak, Marcin; Ciba, Aleksander; Szewczuk, Marek

    2012-01-01

    Background High-energy photon and electron therapeutic beams generated in medical linear accelerators can cause the electronuclear and photonuclear reactions in which neutrons with a broad energy spectrum are produced. A low-energy component of this neutron radiation induces simple capture reactions from which various radioisotopes originate and in which the radioactivity of a linac head and various objects in the treatment room appear. Aim The aim of this paper is to present the results of the thermal/resonance neutron fluence measurements during therapeutic beam emission and exemplary spectra of gamma radiation emitted by medical linac components activated in neutron reactions for four X-ray beams and for four electron beams generated by various manufacturers’ accelerators installed in typical concrete bunkers in Polish oncological centers. Materials and methods The measurements of neutron fluence were performed with the use of the induced activity method, whereas the spectra of gamma radiation from decays of the resulting radioisotopes were measured by means of a portable high-purity germanium detector set for field spectroscopy. Results The fluence of thermal neutrons as well as resonance neutrons connected with the emission of a 20 MV X-ray beam is ∼106 neutrons/cm2 per 1 Gy of a dose in water at a reference depth. It is about one order of magnitude greater than that for the 15 MV X-ray beams and about two orders of magnitude greater than for the 18–22 MeV electron beams regardless of the type of an accelerator. Conclusion The thermal as well as resonance neutron fluence depends strongly on the type and the nominal potential of a therapeutic beam. It is greater for X-ray beams than for electrons. The accelerator accessories and other large objects should not be stored in a treatment room during high-energy therapeutic beam emission to avoid their activation caused by thermal and resonance neutrons. Half-lives of the radioisotopes originating from

  19. X-ray Pulse Length Characterization using the Surface Magneto Optic Kerr Effect

    SciTech Connect

    Krejcik, P.; /SLAC

    2006-10-04

    It will be challenging to measure the temporal profile of the hard X-ray SASE beam independently from the electron beam in the LCLS and other 4th generation light sources. A fast interaction mechanism is needed that can be probed by an ultrafast laser pulse in a pump-probe experiment. It is proposed to exploit the rotation in polarization of light reflected from a thin magnetized film, known as the surface magneto optic Kerr effect (SMOKE), to witness the absorption of the x-ray pulse in the thin film. The change in spin orbit coupling induced by the x-ray pulse occurs on the subfemtosecond time scale and changes the polarization of the probe beam. The limitation to the technique lies with the bandwidth of the probe laser pulse and how short the optical pulse can be made. The SMOKE mechanism will be described and the choices of materials for use with 1.5 {angstrom} x-rays. A schematic description of the pump-probe geometry for x-ray diagnosis is also described.

  20. Heterojunction of Zinc Blende/Wurtzite in Zn1-xCdxS Solid Solution for Efficient Solar Hydrogen Generation: X-ray Absorption/Diffraction Approaches.

    PubMed

    Hsu, Ying-Ya; Suen, Nian-Tzu; Chang, Chung-Chieh; Hung, Sung-Fu; Chen, Chi-Liang; Chan, Ting-Shan; Dong, Chung-Li; Chan, Chih-Chieh; Chen, San-Yuan; Chen, Hao Ming

    2015-10-14

    In the past decade, inorganic semiconductors have been successfully demonstrated as light absorbers in efficient solar water splitting to generate chemical fuels. Pseudobinary semiconductors Zn1-xCdxS (0≤x≤1) have exhibited a superior photocatalytic reactivity of H2 production from splitting of water by artificial solar irradiation without any metal catalysts. However, most studies had revealed that the extremely high efficiency with an optimal content of Zn1-xCdxS solid solution was determined as a result of elevating the conduction band minimum (CBM) and the width of bandgap. In addition to corresponding band structure and bandgap, the local crystal structure should be taken into account as well to determine its photocatalytic performance. Herein, we demonstrated the correlations between the photocatalytic activity and structural properties that were first studied through synchrotron X-ray diffraction and X-ray absorption spectroscopy. The crystal structure transformed from zinc blende to coexisted phases of major zinc blende and minor wurtzite phases at a critical point. The heterojunction formed by coexistence of zinc blende and wurtzite phases in the Zn1-xCdxS solid solution can significantly improve the separation and migration of photoinduced electron-hole pairs. Besides, X-ray absorption spectra and UV-vis spectra revealed that the bandgap of the Zn0.45Cd0.55S sample extended into the region of visible light because of the incorporation of Cd element in the sample. These results provided a significant progress toward the realization of the photoelectrochemical mechanism in heterojunction between zinc blende and wurtzite phases, which can effectively separate the charge-carriers and further suppress their recombination to enhance the photocatalytic reactivity.

  1. Z-Pinch Generated X-Rays in Static-Wall Hohlraum Geometry Demonstrate Potential for Indirect-Drive ICF Studies

    SciTech Connect

    Sandord, T.W.L.; Olson, R.E.; Chandler, G.A.; Hebron, D.E.; Mock, R.C.; Leeper, R.J.; Nash, T.J.; Ruggles, L.E.; Simpson, W.W.; Struve, K.W.; Vesey, R.A.; Bowers, R.L.; Matuska, W.; Peterson, D.L.; Peterson, R.R.

    1999-08-25

    Hohlraums of full ignition scale (6-mm diameter by 7-mm length) have been heated by x-rays from a z-pinch target on Z to a variety of temperatures and pulse shapes which can be used to simulate the early phases of the National Ignition Facility (NIF) temperature drive. The pulse shape is varied by changing the on-axis target of the z pinch in a static-wall-hohlraum geometry. A 2-{micro}m-thick walled Cu cylindrical target of 8-mm diameter filled with 10 mg/cm{sup 3} CH, for example, produces foot-pulse conditions of {minus}85 eV for a duration of {approximately} 10 ns, while a solid cylindrical target of 5-mm diameter and 14-mg/cm{sup 3} CH generates first-step-pulse conditions of {approximately} 122 eV for a duration of a few ns. Alternatively, reducing the hohlraum size (to 4-mm diameter by 4-mm length) with the latter target has increased the peak temperature to {approximately} 150 eV, which is characteristic of a second-step-pulse temperature. In general, the temperature T of these x-ray driven hohlraums is in agreement with the Planckian relation (T-(P/A){sup 1/4}). P is the measured x-ray input power and A is the surface area of the hohlraum. Fully-integrated 2-D radiation-hydrodynamic simulations of the z pinch and subsequent hohlraum heating show plasma densities within the useful volume of the hohlraums to be on the order of air or less.

  2. Numerical analysis of experiments on the generation of shock waves in aluminium under indirect (X-ray) action on the Iskra-5 facility

    SciTech Connect

    Bondarenko, S V; Dolgoleva, G V; Novikova, E A

    2013-07-31

    The dynamics of laser and X-ray radiation fields in experiments with cylindrical converter boxes (illuminators), which had earlier been carried out on the Iskra-5 laser facility (the second harmonic of iodine laser radiation, {lambda} = 0.66 {mu}m) was investigated in a sector approximation using the SND-LIRA numerical technique. In these experiments, the X-ray radiation temperature in the box was determined by measuring the velocity of the shock wave generated in the sample under investigation, which was located at the end of the cylindrical illuminator. Through simulations were made using the SND-LIRA code, which took into account the absorption of laser driver radiation at the box walls, the production of quasithermal radiation, as well as the formation and propagation of the shock wave in the sample under investigation. An analysis of the experiments permits determining the electron thermal flux limiter f: for f = 0.03 it is possible to match the experimental scaling data for X-ray in-box radiation temperature to the data of our simulations. The shock velocities obtained from the simulations are also consistent with experimental data. In particular, in the experiment with six laser beams (and a laser energy E{sub L} = 1380 J introduced into the box) the velocity of the shock front (determined from the position of a laser mark) after passage through a 50-{mu}m thick base aluminium layer was equal to 35{+-}1.6 km s{sup -1}, and in simulations to 36 km s{sup -1}. In the experiment with four laser beams (for E{sub L} = 850 J) the shock velocity (measured from the difference of transit times through the base aluminium layer and an additional thin aluminium platelet) was equal to 30{+-}3.6 km s{sup -1}, and in simulations to 30 km s{sup -1}. (interaction of laser radiation with matter)

  3. Cross calibration of AGFA-D7 x-ray film against direct exposure film from 2 to 8.5 keV using laser generated x-rays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kyrala, George A.

    2006-05-01

    Direct exposure film (DEF) is being discontinued. DEF film has been the workhorse in inertial confinement fusion (ICF) research and is used to record x-ray images and spectra. A previous search for a replacement [K. M. Chandler et al., Rev. Sci. Instrum. 76, 113111 (2005)] did not consider AGFA film. We present comparisons using the results of measurements using AGFA-D7 film, XAR, TMG, and Biomax-MS films in the same spectrometer recording a gold spectrum in the 2-4keV range and the iron spectrum in the 5-8.5keV range. AGFA film was found to have some unique properties useful in x-ray spectroscopy and imaging, especially when signal strength is not a concern.

  4. Note: On the generation of sub-300 keV flash-X-rays using rod-pinch diode: An experimental investigation

    SciTech Connect

    Satyanarayana, N.; Rajawat, R. K.; Basu, Shibaji; Rao, A. Durga Prasad; Mittal, K. C.

    2014-09-15

    Generation of flash X-rays (FXRs) at less than 500 keV is described with emphasis on experimental investigation. The pulser is a Tesla transformer-Water transmission line based pulsed power generator operating in double resonance mode to power a rod-pinch diode. The configuration of aspect ratio reported here falls much below the normally reported ratios for the rod-pinch diode operation. Experimental investigation at such low pulsed voltage has revealed “flowering” of the anode tip and “pitting” of the perspex window. A possible explanation in terms of Lorentz body force is discussed rather than the pinch mechanism generally suggested in literature. The experimental investigation for the FXR generation is corroborated by measuring the radiation dose using CaSO{sub 4} (Dy) thermo luminescent dosimeters.

  5. Dynamical coherent illumination for X-ray microscopy at 3rd generation synchrotron radiation sources: First results with X-rays at the Ca-K edge (4 keV)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oestreich, S.; Rostaing, G.; Niemann, B.; Kaulich, B.; Salomé, M.; Susini, J.; Barrett, R.

    2000-05-01

    Dynamical coherent illumination is a way to deal with the illumination problems which emerge from the use of low emittance sources at recent synchrotron radiation sources for a transmission X-ray microscope (TXM). An illumination system, which uses two rotating mirrors to provide dynamical coherent illumination has been realized and tested at the TXM at ESRF's ID 21 Beamline. First results are presented and compared to results obtained with partial coherent illumination.

  6. Accelerator-driven X-ray Sources

    SciTech Connect

    Nguyen, Dinh Cong

    2015-11-09

    After an introduction which mentions x-ray tubes and storage rings and gives a brief review of special relativity, the subject is treated under the following topics and subtopics: synchrotron radiation (bending magnet radiation, wiggler radiation, undulator radiation, brightness and brilliance definition, synchrotron radiation facilities), x-ray free-electron lasers (linac-driven X-ray FEL, FEL interactions, self-amplified spontaneous emission (SASE), SASE self-seeding, fourth-generation light source facilities), and other X-ray sources (energy recovery linacs, Inverse Compton scattering, laser wakefield accelerator driven X-ray sources. In summary, accelerator-based light sources cover the entire electromagnetic spectrum. Synchrotron radiation (bending magnet, wiggler and undulator radiation) has unique properties that can be tailored to the users’ needs: bending magnet and wiggler radiation is broadband, undulator radiation has narrow spectral lines. X-ray FELs are the brightest coherent X-ray sources with high photon flux, femtosecond pulses, full transverse coherence, partial temporal coherence (SASE), and narrow spectral lines with seeding techniques. New developments in electron accelerators and radiation production can potentially lead to more compact sources of coherent X-rays.

  7. Tracking Changes in Absorptivity, Stiffness, and Organic Chemical Composition in Laboratory Generated HULIS SOA using Atomic Force Microscopy and X-ray Microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hawkins, L. N.; Lemire, A.; Kong, W.

    2014-12-01

    Light absorbing organic compounds are among the many products of aqueous phase secondary organic aerosol formation. Once formed, these compounds can alter the optical and material properties of SOA in ways that impact their ability to scatter and absorb solar radiation, deliquesce and evaporate quickly during cloud cycling, and react with gas phase species such as oxidants. To quantify these effects, we have characterized the changes in UV-visible absorption, stiffness, and particle shape that occur when aqueous SOA is exposed to repeated wet-dry cycles and photooxidation. Material properties were measured with Atomic Force Microscopy of atomized laboratory generated SOA; this material was created by combining glyoxal, methylglyoxal, or glycolaldehyde with ammonium sulfate, glycine, or methylamine in solution and either spray drying or evaporating the bulk solution. In addition to optical and material properties, changes in organic functional groups were tracked using scanning transmission x-ray microscopy (STXM) of the near carbon edge x-ray absorption fine structure (NEXAFS). Photooxidation experiments of the same aqueous SOA revealed concomitant changes in the organic functional groups and light absorption spectra, along with measurable changes in particle stiffness.

  8. Multicolor, time-gated, soft x-ray pinhole imaging of wire array and gas puff Z pinches on the Z and Saturn pulsed power generators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jones, B.; Coverdale, C. A.; Nielsen, D. S.; Jones, M. C.; Deeney, C.; Serrano, J. D.; Nielsen-Weber, L. B.; Meyer, C. J.; Apruzese, J. P.; Clark, R. W.; Coleman, P. L.

    2008-10-01

    A multicolor, time-gated, soft x-ray pinhole imaging instrument is fielded as part of the core diagnostic set on the 25 MA Z machine [M. E. Savage et al., in Proceedings of the Pulsed Power Plasma Sciences Conference (IEEE, New York, 2007), p. 979] for studying intense wire array and gas puff Z-pinch soft x-ray sources. Pinhole images are reflected from a planar multilayer mirror, passing 277 eV photons with <10 eV bandwidth. An adjacent pinhole camera uses filtration alone to view 1-10 keV photons simultaneously. Overlaying these data provides composite images that contain both spectral as well as spatial information, allowing for the study of radiation production in dense Z-pinch plasmas. Cu wire arrays at 20 MA on Z show the implosion of a colder cloud of material onto a hot dense core where K-shell photons are excited. A 528 eV imaging configuration has been developed on the 8 MA Saturn generator [R. B. Spielman et al., and A. I. P. Conf, Proc. 195, 3 (1989)] for imaging a bright Li-like Ar L-shell line. Ar gas puff Z pinches show an intense K-shell emission from a zippering stagnation front with L-shell emission dominating as the plasma cools.

  9. Multicolor, time-gated, soft x-ray pinhole imaging of wire array and gas puff Z pinches on the Z and Saturn pulsed power generators

    SciTech Connect

    Jones, B.; Coverdale, C. A.; Nielsen, D. S.; Jones, M. C.; Deeney, C.; Serrano, J. D.; Nielsen-Weber, L. B.; Meyer, C. J.; Apruzese, J. P.; Clark, R. W.; Coleman, P. L.

    2008-10-15

    A multicolor, time-gated, soft x-ray pinhole imaging instrument is fielded as part of the core diagnostic set on the 25 MA Z machine [M. E. Savage et al., in Proceedings of the Pulsed Power Plasma Sciences Conference (IEEE, New York, 2007), p. 979] for studying intense wire array and gas puff Z-pinch soft x-ray sources. Pinhole images are reflected from a planar multilayer mirror, passing 277 eV photons with <10 eV bandwidth. An adjacent pinhole camera uses filtration alone to view 1-10 keV photons simultaneously. Overlaying these data provides composite images that contain both spectral as well as spatial information, allowing for the study of radiation production in dense Z-pinch plasmas. Cu wire arrays at 20 MA on Z show the implosion of a colder cloud of material onto a hot dense core where K-shell photons are excited. A 528 eV imaging configuration has been developed on the 8 MA Saturn generator [R. B. Spielman et al., and A. I. P. Conf, Proc. 195, 3 (1989)] for imaging a bright Li-like Ar L-shell line. Ar gas puff Z pinches show an intense K-shell emission from a zippering stagnation front with L-shell emission dominating as the plasma cools.

  10. Multicolor, time-gated, soft x-ray pinhole imaging of wire array and gas puff Z pinches on the Z and Saturn pulsed power generators.

    PubMed

    Jones, B; Coverdale, C A; Nielsen, D S; Jones, M C; Deeney, C; Serrano, J D; Nielsen-Weber, L B; Meyer, C J; Apruzese, J P; Clark, R W; Coleman, P L

    2008-10-01

    A multicolor, time-gated, soft x-ray pinhole imaging instrument is fielded as part of the core diagnostic set on the 25 MA Z machine [M. E. Savage et al., in Proceedings of the Pulsed Power Plasma Sciences Conference (IEEE, New York, 2007), p. 979] for studying intense wire array and gas puff Z-pinch soft x-ray sources. Pinhole images are reflected from a planar multilayer mirror, passing 277 eV photons with <10 eV bandwidth. An adjacent pinhole camera uses filtration alone to view 1-10 keV photons simultaneously. Overlaying these data provides composite images that contain both spectral as well as spatial information, allowing for the study of radiation production in dense Z-pinch plasmas. Cu wire arrays at 20 MA on Z show the implosion of a colder cloud of material onto a hot dense core where K-shell photons are excited. A 528 eV imaging configuration has been developed on the 8 MA Saturn generator [R. B. Spielman et al., and A. I. P. Conf, Proc. 195, 3 (1989)] for imaging a bright Li-like Ar L-shell line. Ar gas puff Z pinches show an intense K-shell emission from a zippering stagnation front with L-shell emission dominating as the plasma cools.

  11. Simulation of ultraviolet- and soft X-ray-pulse generation as a result of cooperative recombination of excitons in diamond nanocrystals embedded in a polymer film

    SciTech Connect

    Kukushkin, V. A.

    2013-11-15

    Using numerical simulation, it is shown that the recombination of free excitons photoexcited in diamond nanocrystals embedded in a polymer film can occur in the cooperative mode. It is found that this mode can be implemented despite the fact that diamond is an 'indirect' semiconductor. It is shown that the power of the generated radiation at the pulse peak during the cooperative recombination of free excitons can exceed that of the incoherent spontaneous emission of the same initial number of free excitons by more than an order of magnitude. Finally, it is shown that the process under consideration can be used to generate picosecond pulses of ultraviolet and soft X-ray electromagnetic field at a wavelength of 235 nm.

  12. Microgap x-ray detector

    DOEpatents

    Wuest, Craig R.; Bionta, Richard M.; Ables, Elden

    1994-01-01

    An x-ray detector which provides for the conversion of x-ray photons into photoelectrons and subsequent amplification of these photoelectrons through the generation of electron avalanches in a thin gas-filled region subject to a high electric potential. The detector comprises a cathode (photocathode) and an anode separated by the thin, gas-filled region. The cathode may comprise a substrate, such a beryllium, coated with a layer of high atomic number material, such as gold, while the anode can be a single conducting plane of material, such as gold, or a plane of resistive material, such as chromium/silicon monoxide, or multiple areas of conductive or resistive material, mounted on a substrate composed of glass, plastic or ceramic. The charge collected from each electron avalanche by the anode is passed through processing electronics to a point of use, such as an oscilloscope.

  13. Microgap x-ray detector

    DOEpatents

    Wuest, C.R.; Bionta, R.M.; Ables, E.

    1994-05-03

    An x-ray detector is disclosed which provides for the conversion of x-ray photons into photoelectrons and subsequent amplification of these photoelectrons through the generation of electron avalanches in a thin gas-filled region subject to a high electric potential. The detector comprises a cathode (photocathode) and an anode separated by the thin, gas-filled region. The cathode may comprise a substrate, such a beryllium, coated with a layer of high atomic number material, such as gold, while the anode can be a single conducting plane of material, such as gold, or a plane of resistive material, such as chromium/silicon monoxide, or multiple areas of conductive or resistive material, mounted on a substrate composed of glass, plastic or ceramic. The charge collected from each electron avalanche by the anode is passed through processing electronics to a point of use, such as an oscilloscope. 3 figures.

  14. Quantitative Measurements of X-ray Intensity

    SciTech Connect

    Haugh, M. J., Schneider, M.

    2011-09-01

    This chapter describes the characterization of several X-ray sources and their use in calibrating different types of X-ray cameras at National Security Technologies, LLC (NSTec). The cameras are employed in experimental plasma studies at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL), including the National Ignition Facility (NIF). The sources provide X-rays in the energy range from several hundred eV to 110 keV. The key to this effort is measuring the X-ray beam intensity accurately and traceable to international standards. This is accomplished using photodiodes of several types that are calibrated using radioactive sources and a synchrotron source using methods and materials that are traceable to the U.S. National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST). The accreditation procedures are described. The chapter begins with an introduction to the fundamental concepts of X-ray physics. The types of X-ray sources that are used for device calibration are described. The next section describes the photodiode types that are used for measuring X-ray intensity: power measuring photodiodes, energy dispersive photodiodes, and cameras comprising photodiodes as pixel elements. Following their description, the methods used to calibrate the primary detectors, the power measuring photodiodes and the energy dispersive photodiodes, as well as the method used to get traceability to international standards are described. The X-ray source beams can then be measured using the primary detectors. The final section then describes the use of the calibrated X-ray beams to calibrate X-ray cameras. Many of the references are web sites that provide databases, explanations of the data and how it was generated, and data calculations for specific cases. Several general reference books related to the major topics are included. Papers expanding some subjects are cited.

  15. Toward active x-ray telescopes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    O'Dell, Stephen L.; Atkins, Carolyn; Button, Timothy W.; Cotroneo, Vincenzo; Davis, William N.; Doel, Peter; Feldman, Charlotte H.; Freeman, Mark D.; Gubarev, Mikhail V.; Kolodziejczak, Jeffery J.; Michette, Alan G.; Ramsey, Brian D.; Reid, Paul B.; Rodriguez Sanmartin, Daniel; Saha, Timo T.; Schwartz, Daniel A.; Trolier-McKinstry, Susan; Wilke, Rudeger H. T.; Willingale, Richard; Zhang, William W.

    2011-09-01

    Future x-ray observatories will require high-resolution (< 1") optics with very-large-aperture (> 25 m2) areas. Even with the next generation of heavy-lift launch vehicles, launch-mass constraints and aperture-area requirements will limit the areal density of the grazing-incidence mirrors to about 1 kg/m2 or less. Achieving sub-arcsecond x-ray imaging with such lightweight mirrors will require excellent mirror surfaces, precise and stable alignment, and exceptional stiffness or deformation compensation. Attaining and maintaining alignment and figure control will likely involve active (in-space adjustable) x-ray optics. In contrast with infrared and visible astronomy, active optics for x-ray astronomy is in its infancy. In the middle of the past decade, two efforts began to advance technologies for adaptive x-ray telescopes: The Smart X-ray Optics (SXO) Basic Technology project in the United Kingdom (UK) and the Generation-X (Gen-X) concept studies in the United States (US). This paper discusses relevant technological issues and summarizes progress toward active x-ray telescopes.

  16. Toward Adaptive X-Ray Telescopes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    O'Dell, Stephen L.; Atkins, Carolyn; Button, Tim W.; Cotroneo, Vincenzo; Davis, William N.; Doel, Peer; Feldman, Charlotte H.; Freeman, Mark D.; Gubarev, Mikhail V.; Kolodziejczak, Jeffrey J.; Michette, Alan G.; Ramsey, Brian D.; Reid, Paul B.; Rodriguez Sanmartin, Daniel; Saha, Timo T.; Schwartz, Daniel A.; Trolier-McKinstry, Susan; Wilke, Rudeger H. T.; Willingale, Richard; Zhang, William W.

    2011-01-01

    Future x-ray observatories will require high-resolution (less than 1 inch) optics with very-large-aperture (greater than 25 square meter) areas. Even with the next generation of heavy-lift launch vehicles, launch-mass constraints and aperture-area requirements will limit the surface areal density of the grazing-incidence mirrors to about 1 kilogram per square meter or less. Achieving sub-arcsecond x-ray imaging with such lightweight mirrors will require excellent mirror surfaces, precise and stable alignment, and exceptional stiffness or deformation compensation. Attaining and maintaining alignment and figure control will likely involve adaptive (in-space adjustable) x-ray optics. In contrast with infrared and visible astronomy, adaptive optics for x-ray astronomy is in its infancy. In the middle of the past decade, two efforts began to advance technologies for adaptive x-ray telescopes: The Generation-X (Gen-X) concept studies in the United States, and the Smart X-ray Optics (SXO) Basic Technology project in the United Kingdom. This paper discusses relevant technological issues and summarizes progress toward adaptive x-ray telescopes.

  17. Phosphor Scanner For Imaging X-Ray Diffraction

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Carter, Daniel C.; Hecht, Diana L.; Witherow, William K.

    1992-01-01

    Improved optoelectronic scanning apparatus generates digitized image of x-ray image recorded in phosphor. Scanning fiber-optic probe supplies laser light stimulating luminescence in areas of phosphor exposed to x rays. Luminescence passes through probe and fiber to integrating sphere and photomultiplier. Sensitivity and resolution exceed previously available scanners. Intended for use in x-ray crystallography, medical radiography, and molecular biology.

  18. 21 CFR 892.1680 - Stationary x-ray system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Stationary x-ray system. 892.1680 Section 892.1680...) MEDICAL DEVICES RADIOLOGY DEVICES Diagnostic Devices § 892.1680 Stationary x-ray system. (a) Identification. A stationary x-ray system is a permanently installed diagnostic system intended to generate...

  19. 21 CFR 892.1720 - Mobile x-ray system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Mobile x-ray system. 892.1720 Section 892.1720...) MEDICAL DEVICES RADIOLOGY DEVICES Diagnostic Devices § 892.1720 Mobile x-ray system. (a) Identification. A mobile x-ray system is a transportable device system intended to be used to generate and control...

  20. 21 CFR 892.1720 - Mobile x-ray system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Mobile x-ray system. 892.1720 Section 892.1720...) MEDICAL DEVICES RADIOLOGY DEVICES Diagnostic Devices § 892.1720 Mobile x-ray system. (a) Identification. A mobile x-ray system is a transportable device system intended to be used to generate and control...

  1. 21 CFR 892.1680 - Stationary x-ray system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Stationary x-ray system. 892.1680 Section 892.1680...) MEDICAL DEVICES RADIOLOGY DEVICES Diagnostic Devices § 892.1680 Stationary x-ray system. (a) Identification. A stationary x-ray system is a permanently installed diagnostic system intended to generate...

  2. 21 CFR 892.1720 - Mobile x-ray system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Mobile x-ray system. 892.1720 Section 892.1720...) MEDICAL DEVICES RADIOLOGY DEVICES Diagnostic Devices § 892.1720 Mobile x-ray system. (a) Identification. A mobile x-ray system is a transportable device system intended to be used to generate and control...

  3. 21 CFR 892.1680 - Stationary x-ray system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Stationary x-ray system. 892.1680 Section 892.1680...) MEDICAL DEVICES RADIOLOGY DEVICES Diagnostic Devices § 892.1680 Stationary x-ray system. (a) Identification. A stationary x-ray system is a permanently installed diagnostic system intended to generate...

  4. 21 CFR 892.1680 - Stationary x-ray system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Stationary x-ray system. 892.1680 Section 892.1680...) MEDICAL DEVICES RADIOLOGY DEVICES Diagnostic Devices § 892.1680 Stationary x-ray system. (a) Identification. A stationary x-ray system is a permanently installed diagnostic system intended to generate...

  5. 21 CFR 892.1680 - Stationary x-ray system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Stationary x-ray system. 892.1680 Section 892.1680...) MEDICAL DEVICES RADIOLOGY DEVICES Diagnostic Devices § 892.1680 Stationary x-ray system. (a) Identification. A stationary x-ray system is a permanently installed diagnostic system intended to generate...

  6. 21 CFR 892.1720 - Mobile x-ray system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Mobile x-ray system. 892.1720 Section 892.1720...) MEDICAL DEVICES RADIOLOGY DEVICES Diagnostic Devices § 892.1720 Mobile x-ray system. (a) Identification. A mobile x-ray system is a transportable device system intended to be used to generate and control...

  7. 21 CFR 892.1720 - Mobile x-ray system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Mobile x-ray system. 892.1720 Section 892.1720...) MEDICAL DEVICES RADIOLOGY DEVICES Diagnostic Devices § 892.1720 Mobile x-ray system. (a) Identification. A mobile x-ray system is a transportable device system intended to be used to generate and control...

  8. On the generation of bulk microdefects in phosphorus-diffused monocrystalline silicon solar wafers after a high-thermal treatment studied by X-ray topography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    González-Mañas, M.; Vallejo, B.; Caballero, M. A.

    2014-09-01

    Oxygen is the most important impurity in free dislocation Czochralski silicon single crystals incorporated interstitially during the growth. The knowledge of oxygen behavior after thermal processes is of great technological importance, since different kinds of bulk microdefects such us SiO2 precipitates, dislocation loops and stacking faults can be generated. In monocrystalline silicon solar cell manufacturing fabrication, there are several high-thermal treatments. The first is the diffusion process at 850-900 °C. Three different kinds of phosphorus diffusion wafers, standard PO3Cl liquid, spray-on and screen printing, were comparatively studied by X-ray topography showing that phosphorus diffusion improves the crystal quality by a gettering process whose best efficiency is in PO3Cl-diffused wafers. Later, another fabrication high-thermal step is for instance the rear surface passivation taking place at temperatures from 800 to 1,050 °C. For this reason, it is important to study how a high-thermal treatment at 1,000 °C affects the different phosphorus-diffused wafers mentioned above. To evaluate and characterize the possible defects induced by the oxygen precipitation, X-ray topography has been employed. Results show that annealed wafers are not perfect crystals; the oxygen precipitation induces the generation of bulk microdefects whose kind, size and density depend on the diffusion method employed. In PO3Cl and spray-on diffused wafers, retardation in the oxygen precipitation process takes place after annealing, while in screen printing this process is recovered and a kind of mixed defects between dislocation loops and platelet precipitates is generated.

  9. X-ray beam finder

    DOEpatents

    Gilbert, H.W.

    1983-06-16

    An X-ray beam finder for locating a focal spot of an X-ray tube includes a mass of X-ray opaque material having first and second axially-aligned, parallel-opposed faces connected by a plurality of substantially identical parallel holes perpendicular to the faces and a film holder for holding X-ray sensitive film tightly against one face while the other face is placed in contact with the window of an X-ray head.

  10. TU-A-9A-07: X-Ray Acoustic Computed Tomography (XACT): 100% Sensitivity to X-Ray Absorption

    SciTech Connect

    Xiang, L; Ahmad, M; Nikoozadeh, A; Pratx, G; Khuri-Yakub, B; Xing, L

    2014-06-15

    Purpose: To assess whether X-ray acoustic computed tomography (XACT) is more sensitive to X-ray absorption than that of the conventional X-ray imaging. Methods: First, a theoretical model was built to analyze the X-ray absorption sensitivity of XACT imaging and conventional X-ray imaging. Second, an XACT imaging system was developed to evaluate the X-ray induced acoustic signal generation as well as the sensitivity improvement over transmission x-ray imaging. Ultra-short x-ray pulses (60-nanosecond) were generated from an X-ray source operated at the energy of 150 kVp with a 10-Hz repetition rate. The X-ray pulse was synchronized with the acoustic detection via a x-ray scintillation triggering to acquire the X-ray induced acoustic signal. Results: Theoretical analysis shows that X-ray induced acoustic signal is sensitive only to the X-ray absorption, while completely insensitive to out the X-ray scattering and fluorescence. XACT has reduced background and increased contrast-to-noise ratio, and therefore has increased sensitivity compared to transmission x-ray imaging. For a 50-μm size, gadolinium insertion in tissue exposed to 40 keV X-rays; the sensitivity of XACT imaging is about 28.9 times higher than that of conventional X-ray imaging. Conclusion: X-ray acoustic computer tomography (XACT) as a new imaging modality combines X-ray absorption contrast and high ultrasonic resolution in a single modality. It is feasible to improve the imaging sensitivity with XACT imaging compared with conventional X-ray imaging. Taking advantage of the high ultrasonic resolution, it is possible to perform 3-D imaging with a single x-ray pulse with arrays of transducers without any mechanical motion of the imaging system. This single-shot capability offers the potential of reducing radiation dose by a factor of 1000, and imaging 100 times faster when compared to the conventional X-ray CT, and thus revolutionizing x-ray imaging applications in medicine and biology. The authors

  11. Compact X-ray sources: X-rays from self-reflection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mangles, Stuart P. D.

    2012-05-01

    Laser-based particle acceleration offers a way to reduce the size of hard-X-ray sources. Scientists have now developed a simple scheme that produces a bright flash of hard X-rays by using a single laser pulse both to generate and to scatter an electron beam.

  12. Large Area X-Ray Spectroscopy Mission

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tananbaum, H.

    1997-01-01

    The Large Area X-ray Spectroscopy (LAXS) mission concept study continues to evolve strongly following the merging of the LAXS mission with the Next Generation X-ray Observatory (NGXO, PI: Nick White) into the re-named High Throughput X-ray Spectroscopy (HTXS) Mission. HTXS retains key elements of the LAXS proposal, including the use of multiple satellites for risk-reduction and cost savings. A key achievement of the program has been the recommendation by the Structure and Evolution of the Universe (SEUS) (April 1997) for a new start for the HTXS mission in the 2000-2004 timeframe.

  13. Fabrication of large area X-ray diffraction grating for X-ray phase imaging

    SciTech Connect

    Noda, Daiji; Tokuoka, Atsushi; Katori, Megumi; Minamiyama, Yasuto; Yamashita, Kenji; Nishida, Satoshi; Hattori, Tadashi

    2012-07-31

    X-ray lithography, which uses highly directional synchrotron radiation, is one of the technologies that can be used for fabricating micrometer-sized structures. In X-ray lithography, the accuracy of the fabricated structure depends largely on the accuracy of the X-ray mask. Since X-ray radiation is highly directional, a micro-fabrication technology that produces un-tapered and high aspect ratio highly absorbent structures on a low absorbent membrane is required. Conventionally, a resin material is used as the support membrane for large area X-ray masks. However, resin membranes have the disadvantage that they can sag after several cycles of X-ray exposure due to the heat generated by the X-rays. Therefore, we proposed and used thin carbon wafers for the membrane material because carbon has an extremely small thermal expansion coefficient. We fabricated new carbon membrane X-ray masks, and these results of X-ray lithography demonstrate the superior performance.

  14. A Compact Monitoring System for Recording X-Rays, Gamma Rays and Neutrons Generated By Atmospheric Lightning Discharges and Other Natural Phenomena

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martin, I. M.; Alves, M. A.

    2009-12-01

    The generation of X-rays, gamma-rays and neutrons by atmospheric lightning discharges has been predicted by different researchers several decades ago. But only within the last 25 years the first experimental evidences of events relating the generation of these radiations with lightning have been made; since then there is a continuing effort to collect more information about this type of phenomenon. In this study we describe a compact monitoring system to detect simultaneously X-rays, gamma-rays and neutrons using rather inexpensive off-the-shelf commercial detectors (Micro Roengten Radiation Monitor, 8-inch gamma tube coupled to a 3x3 inch sodium iodide [Nai(Tl)] crystal, Ludlum He-3 neutron detector) and accompanying computer interfaces. The system is extremely portable and can be powered with small automotive batteries, if necessary. Measurements are performed at ground-level. Preliminary measurements have already yielded positive results, e.g., changes in the neutron flux related to a lightning discharge and varying weather conditions have been observed in the city of Sao Jose dos Campos, Brazil (23° 11‧ 11″S, 45° 52‧ 43″ W, 600 m above sea level). This a pilot study, in the near future a larger number of these compact monitoring system will be installed in different location in order to increase the area coverage. Although the main objective of the study is to detect high-energy events produced by lightning discharges, the monitoring system will also be able to detect changes in the radiation background produced by other natural phenomena.

  15. X-ray induced singlet oxygen generation by nanoparticle-photosensitizer conjugates for photodynamic therapy: determination of singlet oxygen quantum yield.

    PubMed

    Clement, Sandhya; Deng, Wei; Camilleri, Elizabeth; Wilson, Brian C; Goldys, Ewa M

    2016-01-01

    Singlet oxygen is a primary cytotoxic agent in photodynamic therapy. We show that CeF3 nanoparticles, pure as well as conjugated through electrostatic interaction with the photosensitizer verteporfin, are able to generate singlet oxygen as a result of UV light and 8 keV X-ray irradiation. The X-ray stimulated singlet oxygen quantum yield was determined to be 0.79 ± 0.05 for the conjugate with 31 verteporfin molecules per CeF3 nanoparticle, the highest conjugation level used. From this result we estimate the singlet oxygen dose generated from CeF3-verteporfin conjugates for a therapeutic dose of 60 Gy of ionizing radiation at energies of 6 MeV and 30 keV to be (1.2 ± 0.7) × 10(8) and (2.0 ± 0.1) × 10(9) singlet oxygen molecules per cell, respectively. These are comparable with cytotoxic doses of 5 × 10(7)-2 × 10(9) singlet oxygen molecules per cell reported in the literature for photodynamic therapy using light activation. We confirmed that the CeF3-VP conjugates enhanced cell killing with 6 MeV radiation. This work confirms the feasibility of using X- or γ- ray activated nanoparticle-photosensitizer conjugates, either to supplement the radiation treatment of cancer, or as an independent treatment modality.

  16. X-ray induced singlet oxygen generation by nanoparticle-photosensitizer conjugates for photodynamic therapy: determination of singlet oxygen quantum yield

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Clement, Sandhya; Deng, Wei; Camilleri, Elizabeth; Wilson, Brian C.; Goldys, Ewa M.

    2016-01-01

    Singlet oxygen is a primary cytotoxic agent in photodynamic therapy. We show that CeF3 nanoparticles, pure as well as conjugated through electrostatic interaction with the photosensitizer verteporfin, are able to generate singlet oxygen as a result of UV light and 8 keV X-ray irradiation. The X-ray stimulated singlet oxygen quantum yield was determined to be 0.79 ± 0.05 for the conjugate with 31 verteporfin molecules per CeF3 nanoparticle, the highest conjugation level used. From this result we estimate the singlet oxygen dose generated from CeF3-verteporfin conjugates for a therapeutic dose of 60 Gy of ionizing radiation at energies of 6 MeV and 30 keV to be (1.2 ± 0.7) × 108 and (2.0 ± 0.1) × 109 singlet oxygen molecules per cell, respectively. These are comparable with cytotoxic doses of 5 × 107-2 × 109 singlet oxygen molecules per cell reported in the literature for photodynamic therapy using light activation. We confirmed that the CeF3-VP conjugates enhanced cell killing with 6 MeV radiation. This work confirms the feasibility of using X- or γ- ray activated nanoparticle-photosensitizer conjugates, either to supplement the radiation treatment of cancer, or as an independent treatment modality.

  17. X-ray induced singlet oxygen generation by nanoparticle-photosensitizer conjugates for photodynamic therapy: determination of singlet oxygen quantum yield

    PubMed Central

    Clement, Sandhya; Deng, Wei; Camilleri, Elizabeth; Wilson, Brian C.; Goldys, Ewa M.

    2016-01-01

    Singlet oxygen is a primary cytotoxic agent in photodynamic therapy. We show that CeF3 nanoparticles, pure as well as conjugated through electrostatic interaction with the photosensitizer verteporfin, are able to generate singlet oxygen as a result of UV light and 8 keV X-ray irradiation. The X-ray stimulated singlet oxygen quantum yield was determined to be 0.79 ± 0.05 for the conjugate with 31 verteporfin molecules per CeF3 nanoparticle, the highest conjugation level used. From this result we estimate the singlet oxygen dose generated from CeF3-verteporfin conjugates for a therapeutic dose of 60 Gy of ionizing radiation at energies of 6 MeV and 30 keV to be (1.2 ± 0.7) × 108 and (2.0 ± 0.1) × 109 singlet oxygen molecules per cell, respectively. These are comparable with cytotoxic doses of 5 × 107–2 × 109 singlet oxygen molecules per cell reported in the literature for photodynamic therapy using light activation. We confirmed that the CeF3-VP conjugates enhanced cell killing with 6 MeV radiation. This work confirms the feasibility of using X- or γ- ray activated nanoparticle-photosensitizer conjugates, either to supplement the radiation treatment of cancer, or as an independent treatment modality. PMID:26818819

  18. A new x-ray scatter reduction method based on frequency division multiplexing x-ray imaging technique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, J.; Chang, S.; Lu, J. P.; Zhou, O.

    2012-03-01

    X-ray scatter may significantly degrade imaging performance in x-ray radiography applications, including flatpanel detector-based x-ray imaging, tomosynthesis, and cone-beam CT (CBCT), primarily due to their large projection field sizes. It results in soft tissue contrast reduction, potentially severe image artifacts, and increased patient dose. Several different approaches have been developed to reject the scatter contributions, including analytical calculation, empirical algorithms, Monte-Carlo simulation, blocker based measurement, and slot scan technique. We recently developed a new x-ray scatter rejection method based on nanotechnology-enabled frequency division multiplexing x-ray (FDMX) imaging technique. The key enabling technology is the carbon nanotube (CNT)-based multi-beam field emission x-ray (MBFEX) source technology. The proposed FDMX imaging system has a MBFEX source with an array of x-ray tubes. The x-ray radiation from each individual x-ray tube is modulated at a certain given frequency. The collimated x-ray beams passed through the object and were captured by a high speed x-ray detector. A demultiplexing algorithm was applied to reject the scatter radiation from the primary radiation based on their different modulation frequencies. The x-ray images generated by the FDMX imaging technique clearly demonstrated improved imaging quality in terms of lower scatter-to-primary-ratio (SPR) and higher contrast-to-noise-ratio (CNR). It shows great potential of improving x-ray imaging performance and reducing patient dose.

  19. First in-situ monitoring of CO2 delivery to the mantle followed by compression melting, using synchrotron generated X-ray diffraction.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hammouda, Tahar; Chantel, Julien; Manthilake, Geeth; Guignard, Jérémy; Crichton, Wilson; Gaillard, Fabrice

    2014-05-01

    Melting of peridotite + CO2 upon compression has been directly monitored in situ, for the first time. We have combined high pressure experiments in the multianvil apparatus with synchrotron-generated X-ray diffraction, in order to monitor sample decarbonation upon heating, followed by melting upon compression. Experiments were performed in the model system CaO-MgO-SiO2+CO2, using dolomite and silicates contained in graphite capsules as starting material. Save Al, starting composition was aimed at reproducing peridotitic system. The sample was first compressed at room temperature, then heated. Decarbonation was observed at 2.2 GPa and 1100°C. After further heating to 1300°C, pressure was increased. Melting was observed at 2.7 GPa, while temperature was kept at 1300°C. All transformations were followed using X-ray diffraction. Starting with silicate + carbonate mixtures, we were thus able to keep CO2 fluid in the experimental sample at high P and T, up to the solidus. Concerning carbon recycling at subduction zones, it is known that CO2 is a non-wetting fluid in silicate aggregates. Therefore, any CO2 resulting from carbonate breakdown likely remains trapped at grain corners either in the subducted lithosphere or in the mantle wedge before eventually being trapped in mantle minerals as fluid inclusions, due to dynamic recrystallization. In this way, CO2 released from the slab may be spread laterally due to mantle convection. Entrainment to further depths by deep subduction or in convection cells induces CO2 introduction to depth wherein the solidus can be crossed, due to pressure increase. The solidus corresponds to the so-called carbonate ledge, beyond which carbonatitic melts are produced. Therefore, compression melting of CO2-bearing lithologies is a way to produce carbonatitic melts at depths corresponding to about 80 km. This mechanism is a viable explanation for the observed geophysical anomalies, such as those revealed by electrical conductivity

  20. X-ray lithography masking

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smith, Henry I. (Inventor); Lim, Michael (Inventor); Carter, James (Inventor); Schattenburg, Mark (Inventor)

    1998-01-01

    X-ray masking apparatus includes a frame having a supporting rim surrounding an x-ray transparent region, a thin membrane of hard inorganic x-ray transparent material attached at its periphery to the supporting rim covering the x-ray transparent region and a layer of x-ray opaque material on the thin membrane inside the x-ray transparent region arranged in a pattern to selectively transmit x-ray energy entering the x-ray transparent region through the membrane to a predetermined image plane separated from the layer by the thin membrane. A method of making the masking apparatus includes depositing back and front layers of hard inorganic x-ray transparent material on front and back surfaces of a substrate, depositing back and front layers of reinforcing material on the back and front layers, respectively, of the hard inorganic x-ray transparent material, removing the material including at least a portion of the substrate and the back layers of an inside region adjacent to the front layer of hard inorganic x-ray transparent material, removing a portion of the front layer of reinforcing material opposite the inside region to expose the surface of the front layer of hard inorganic x-ray transparent material separated from the inside region by the latter front layer, and depositing a layer of x-ray opaque material on the surface of the latter front layer adjacent to the inside region.

  1. X-ray Spectrometer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Porter, F. Scott

    2004-01-01

    The X-ray Spectrometer (XRS) instrument is a revolutionary non-dispersive spectrometer that will form the basis for the Astro-E2 observatory to be launched in 2005. We have recently installed a flight spare X R S microcalorimeter spectrometer at the EBIT-I facility at LLNL replacing the XRS from the earlier Astro-E mission and providing twice the resolution. The X R S microcalorimeter is an x-ray detector that senses the heat deposited by the incident photon. It achieves a high energy resolution by operating at 0.06K and by carefully controlling the heat capacity and thermal conductance. The XRS/EBIT instrument has 32 pixels in a square geometry and achieves an energy resolution of 6 eV at 6 keV, with a bandpass from 0.1 to 12 keV (or more at higher operating temperature). The instrument allows detailed studies of the x-ray line emission of laboratory plasmas. The XRS/EBIT also provides an extensive calibration "library" for the Astro-E2 observatory.

  2. X-Ray Astronomy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wu, S. T.

    2000-01-01

    Dr. S. N. Zhang has lead a seven member group (Dr. Yuxin Feng, Mr. XuejunSun, Mr. Yongzhong Chen, Mr. Jun Lin, Mr. Yangsen Yao, and Ms. Xiaoling Zhang). This group has carried out the following activities: continued data analysis from space astrophysical missions CGRO, RXTE, ASCA and Chandra. Significant scientific results have been produced as results of their work. They discovered the three-layered accretion disk structure around black holes in X-ray binaries; their paper on this discovery is to appear in the prestigious Science magazine. They have also developed a new method for energy spectral analysis of black hole X-ray binaries; four papers on this topics were presented at the most recent Atlanta AAS meeting. They have also carried Monte-Carlo simulations of X-ray detectors, in support to the hardware development efforts at Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC). These computation-intensive simulations have been carried out entirely on the computers at UAH. They have also carried out extensive simulations for astrophysical applications, taking advantage of the Monte-Carlo simulation codes developed previously at MSFC and further improved at UAH for detector simulations. One refereed paper and one contribution to conference proceedings have been resulted from this effort.

  3. Monitoring X-Ray Emission from X-Ray Bursters

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kaaret, Philip

    1998-01-01

    The goal of this investigation was to use the All-Sky Monitor on the Rossi X-Ray Timing Explorer (RXTE) in combination with the Burst and Transient Source Experiment on the Compton Gamma-Ray Observatory to simultaneously measure the x-ray (2-12 keV) and hard x-ray (20-100 keV) emission from x-ray bursters. The investigation was successful. We made the first simultaneous measurement of hard and soft x-ray emission and found a strong anticorrelation of hard and soft x-ray emission from the X-Ray Burster 4U 0614+091. The monitoring performed under this investigation was also important in triggering target of opportunity observations of x-ray bursters made under the investigation hard x-ray emission of x-ray bursters approved for RXTE cycles 1 and 2. These observations lead to a number of papers on high-frequency quasi-periodic oscillations and on hard x-ray emission from the x-ray bursters 4U 0614+091 and 4U 1705-44.

  4. Tsinghua Thomson scattering X-ray source

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tang, Chuanxiang; Huang, Wenhui; Li, Renkai; Du, Yingchao; Yan, Lixin; Shi, Jiaru; Du, Qiang; Yu, Peicheng; Chen, Huaibi; Du, Taibin; Cheng, Cheng; Lin, Yuzheng

    2009-09-01

    We proposed the Tsinghua Thomson scattering X-ray (TTX) source as an ultra-fast, high flux source for advanced X-ray imaging studies and applications. A linac system, which consists of an S-band photocathode RF gun, a SLAC type 3 m traveling wave tube and two X-band structures, generates ultra-short, high brightness electron pulses to scatter with tera-watt femto-second laser pulses. A compact low energy electron storage ring is also designed to dramatically enhance the average X-ray flux. In this paper, we present the simulation studies and optimized parameters of the electron and X-ray pulses. The construction and commissioning status of TTX is also reported.

  5. Experimental X-Ray Ghost Imaging.

    PubMed

    Pelliccia, Daniele; Rack, Alexander; Scheel, Mario; Cantelli, Valentina; Paganin, David M

    2016-09-01

    We report an experimental proof of principle for ghost imaging in the hard-x-ray energy range. We use a synchrotron x-ray beam that is split using a thin crystal in Laue diffraction geometry. With an ultrafast imaging camera, we are able to image x rays generated by isolated electron bunches. At this time scale, the shot noise of the synchrotron emission process is measurable as speckles, leading to speckle correlation between the two beams. The integrated transmitted intensity from a sample located in the first beam is correlated with the spatially resolved intensity measured in the second, empty, beam to retrieve the shadow of the sample. The demonstration of ghost imaging with hard x rays may open the way to protocols to reduce radiation damage in medical imaging and in nondestructive structural characterization using free electron lasers. PMID:27661687

  6. Laboratory Data for X-Ray Astronomy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Beiersdorfer, P.; Brown, G. V.; Chen, H.; Gu, M.-F.; Kahn, S. M.; Lepson, J. K.; Savin, D. W.; Utter, S. B.

    2000-01-01

    Laboratory facilities have made great strides in producing large sets of reliable data for X-ray astronomy, which include ionization and recombination cross sections needed for charge balance calculations as well as the atomic data needed for interpreting X-ray line formation. We discuss data from the new generation sources and pay special attention to the LLNL electron beam ion trap experiment, which is unique in its ability to provide direct laboratory access to spectral data under precisely controlled conditions that simulate those found in many astrophysical plasmas. Examples of spectral data obtained in the 1-160 A wavelength range are given illustrating the type of laboratory X-ray data produced in support of such missions as Chandra, X-Ray Multi-Mirror telescope (XMM), Advanced Satellite for Cosmology and Astrophysics (ASCA) and Extreme Ultraviolet Explorer Satellite (EUVE).

  7. Experimental X-Ray Ghost Imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pelliccia, Daniele; Rack, Alexander; Scheel, Mario; Cantelli, Valentina; Paganin, David M.

    2016-09-01

    We report an experimental proof of principle for ghost imaging in the hard-x-ray energy range. We use a synchrotron x-ray beam that is split using a thin crystal in Laue diffraction geometry. With an ultrafast imaging camera, we are able to image x rays generated by isolated electron bunches. At this time scale, the shot noise of the synchrotron emission process is measurable as speckles, leading to speckle correlation between the two beams. The integrated transmitted intensity from a sample located in the first beam is correlated with the spatially resolved intensity measured in the second, empty, beam to retrieve the shadow of the sample. The demonstration of ghost imaging with hard x rays may open the way to protocols to reduce radiation damage in medical imaging and in nondestructive structural characterization using free electron lasers.

  8. Ab initio calculations of atomic coherence excited by optical pulses: CEP effects and generation of X-ray radiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dhayal, Suman; Rostovtsev, Yuri

    2011-03-01

    Recent progress in ultrashort, e.g. attosecond, laser technology allows to obtain ultra-strong fields which can be of the same order of magnitude as the electric field created by an atomic nucleus. Interaction of such strong and broadband field with atomic systems even under the action of a far-off resonance strong pulse of laser radiation should be revisited. As we have shown, such pulses can excite remarkable coherence on high frequency transitions. We have found and analyzed analitical solutions for various pulse shapes. We have developed new mechanisms of efficient atomic coherent excitation by using two-frequency laser pulses and via tunneling through electric fields. We have done ab initio calculations using TDDFT for several atoms and simple molecules interacting with strong optical fields. We compare efficiency generation with the efficiency of high harmonic generation approach, and discuss the CEP effects and possible applications of the results obtained to cooperative generation of XUV radiation. The efficiency of XUV generation is calculated for particular candidates for XUV radiation such as H (100 nm) and He (50 nm) atoms and H-like ions (Li 2+ (30 nm), as well as Ar 8+ and Xe 8+ (30-50 nm).

  9. SAS 3 survey of the soft X-ray background

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Marshall, F. J.; Clark, G. W.

    1984-01-01

    The results of a survey of the soft X-ray sky in the C band (0.10-0.28keV) are reported. The observations were carried out using two independent flow proportional counters on board the SAS 3 X-ray satellite which had a total angular resolution of 2.9 deg FWHM, and a total exposure of 2.2 x 10 to the 4th per sq cm s sr. It is found that C band counting rates were generally inversely correlated with the column density of the neutral hydrogen on all angular scales down to the lowest angular resolution of the detectors. In the region 90-180 deg l and 0-10 deg b, the relation between C-band rates and the column densities of neutral hydrogen was fitted with a residual rms deviation of less than 13 percent by a two-component numerical model of the X-ray background. For the apparent attenuation column density a value of 2.7 x 10 to the 20th per sq cm was obtained. On the basis of a computer simulation of the SAS 3 data, it is shown that the observed clumping of interstellar matter was consistent with the magnitude of spatial fluctuations in the C-band map. When the background rates were subtracted from the survey map, the subsequent map showed foreground emission and absorption features with improved sensitivity and clarity. A series of computer-generated maps incorporating the SAS 3 data is given in an appendix.

  10. Cosmic X-ray physics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mccammon, D.; Cox, D. P.; Kraushaar, W. L.; Sanders, W. T.

    1987-01-01

    The soft X-ray sky survey data are combined with the results from the UXT sounding rocket payload. Very strong constraints can then be placed on models of the origin of the soft diffuse background. Additional observational constraints force more complicated and realistic models. Significant progress was made in the extraction of more detailed spectral information from the UXT data set. Work was begun on a second generation proportional counter response model. The first flight of the sounding rocket will have a collimator to study the diffuse background.

  11. X-ray laser driven gold targets

    SciTech Connect

    Petrova, Tz. B. Whitney, K. G.; Davis, J.

    2014-03-15

    The femtosecond population dynamics of gold irradiated by a coherent high-intensity (>10{sup 17} W/cm{sup 2}) x-ray laser pulse is investigated theoretically. There are two aspects to the assembled model. One is the construction of a detailed model of platinum-like gold inclusive of all inner-shell states that are created by photoionization of atomic gold and decay either by radiative or Auger processes. Second is the computation of the population dynamics that ensues when an x-ray pulse is absorbed in gold. The hole state generation depends on the intensity and wavelength of the driving x-ray pulse. The excited state populations reached during a few femtosecond timescales are high enough to generate population inversions, whose gain coefficients are calculated. These amplified lines in the emitted x-ray spectrum provide important diagnostics of the radiation dynamics and also suggest a nonlinear way to increase the frequency of the coherent output x-ray pulses relative to the frequency of the driver input x-ray pulse.

  12. Apparatus for monitoring X-ray beam alignment

    DOEpatents

    Steinmeyer, P.A.

    1991-10-08

    A self-contained, hand-held apparatus is provided for monitoring alignment of an X-ray beam in an instrument employing an X-ray source. The apparatus includes a transducer assembly containing a photoresistor for providing a range of electrical signals responsive to a range of X-ray beam intensities from the X-ray beam being aligned. A circuit, powered by a 7.5 VDC power supply and containing an audio frequency pulse generator whose frequency varies with the resistance of the photoresistor, is provided for generating a range of audible sounds. A portion of the audible range corresponds to low X-ray beam intensity. Another portion of the audible range corresponds to high X-ray beam intensity. The transducer assembly may include an a photoresistor, a thin layer of X-ray fluorescent material, and a filter layer transparent to X-rays but opaque to visible light. X-rays from the beam undergoing alignment penetrate the filter layer and excite the layer of fluorescent material. The light emitted from the fluorescent material alters the resistance of the photoresistor which is in the electrical circuit including the audio pulse generator and a speaker. In employing the apparatus, the X-ray beam is aligned to a complete alignment by adjusting the X-ray beam to produce an audible sound of the maximum frequency. 2 figures.

  13. Diffractive imaging of highly focused X-ray fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Quiney, H. M.; Peele, A. G.; Cai, Z.; Paterson, D.; Nugent, K. A.

    2006-02-01

    The rapid development of new sources of coherent X-rays, such as third-generation synchrotrons, high-harmonic-generation lasers and X-ray free-electron lasers, has led to the emergence of the new field of X-ray coherent science. The extension of coherent methods to the X-ray regime makes possible methods such as coherent diffraction, X-ray photon-correlation spectroscopy, speckle interferometry and ultrafast probing at atomic resolution and femtosecond timescales. Despite rapid improvements in the resolution that conventional X-ray optics can achieve, new methods for manipulating X-rays are required to push this to the atomic scale. Here we demonstrate a coherent imaging technique that enables us to image the complex field at the focus of an X-ray zone plate without the need for conventional X-ray lenses. There are no fundamental limits on the resolution of this lensless imaging technique other than the wavelength of the X-rays themselves. The ability to characterize the beam with one measurement makes the method ideally suited to characterizing the fields generated by pulsed coherent X-ray sources.

  14. Apparatus for monitoring X-ray beam alignment

    DOEpatents

    Steinmeyer, Peter A.

    1991-10-08

    A self-contained, hand-held apparatus is provided for minitoring alignment of an X-ray beam in an instrument employing an X-ray source. The apparatus includes a transducer assembly containing a photoresistor for providing a range of electrical signals responsive to a range of X-ray beam intensities from the X-ray beam being aligned. A circuit, powered by a 7.5 VDC power supply and containing an audio frequency pulse generator whose frequency varies with the resistance of the photoresistor, is provided for generating a range of audible sounds. A portion of the audible range corresponds to low X-ray beam intensity. Another portion of the audible range corresponds to high X-ray beam intensity. The transducer assembly may include an a photoresistor, a thin layer of X-ray fluorescent material, and a filter layer transparent to X-rays but opaque to visible light. X-rays from the beam undergoing alignment penetrate the filter layer and excite the layer of fluorescent material. The light emitted from the fluorescent material alters the resistance of the photoresistor which is in the electrical circuit including the audio pulse generator and a speaker. In employing the apparatus, the X-ray beam is aligned to a complete alignment by adjusting the X-ray beam to produce an audible sound of the maximum frequency.

  15. Fluctuation X-Ray Scattering

    SciTech Connect

    Saldin, PI: D. K.; Co-I's: J. C. H. Spence and P. Fromme

    2013-01-25

    The work supported by the grant was aimed at developing novel methods of finding the structures of biomolecules using x-rays from novel sources such as the x-ray free electron laser and modern synchrotrons

  16. Dual X-ray absorptiometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Altman, Albert; Aaron, Ronald

    2012-07-01

    Dual X-ray absorptiometry is widely used in analyzing body composition and imaging. Both the method and its limitations are related to the Compton and photoelectric contributions to the X-ray attenuation coefficients of materials.

  17. Proceedings of the workshop on X-ray computed microtomography

    SciTech Connect

    1998-02-01

    This report consists of vugraphs from the nine presentations at the conference. Titles of the presentations are: CMT: Applications and Techniques; Computer Microtomography Using X-rays from Third Generation Synchrotron X-ray; Approaches to Soft-X-ray Nanotomography; Diffraction Enhanced Tomography; X-ray Computed Microtomography Applications at the NSLS; XCMT Applications in Forestry and Forest Products; 3DMA: Investigating Three Dimensional Pore Geometry from High Resolution Images; X-ray Computed Microtomography Studies of Volcanic Rock; and 3-D Visualization of Tomographic Volumes.

  18. Generation of circularly polarized radiation from a compact plasma-based extreme ultraviolet light source for tabletop X-ray magnetic circular dichroism studies.

    PubMed

    Wilson, Daniel; Rudolf, Denis; Weier, Christian; Adam, Roman; Winkler, Gerrit; Frömter, Robert; Danylyuk, Serhiy; Bergmann, Klaus; Grützmacher, Detlev; Schneider, Claus M; Juschkin, Larissa

    2014-10-01

    Generation of circularly polarized light in the extreme ultraviolet (EUV) spectral region (about 25 eV-250 eV) is highly desirable for applications in spectroscopy and microscopy but very challenging to achieve in a small-scale laboratory. We present a compact apparatus for generation of linearly and circularly polarized EUV radiation from a gas-discharge plasma light source between 50 eV and 70 eV photon energy. In this spectral range, the 3p absorption edges of Fe (54 eV), Co (60 eV), and Ni (67 eV) offer a high magnetic contrast often employed for magneto-optical and electron spectroscopy as well as for magnetic imaging. We simulated and designed an instrument for generation of linearly and circularly polarized EUV radiation and performed polarimetric measurements of the degree of linear and circular polarization. Furthermore, we demonstrate first measurements of the X-ray magnetic circular dichroism at the Co 3p absorption edge with a plasma-based EUV light source. Our approach opens the door for laboratory-based, element-selective spectroscopy of magnetic materials and spectro-microscopy of ferromagnetic domains. PMID:25362374

  19. Generation of circularly polarized radiation from a compact plasma-based extreme ultraviolet light source for tabletop X-ray magnetic circular dichroism studies

    SciTech Connect

    Wilson, Daniel; Rudolf, Denis Juschkin, Larissa; Weier, Christian; Adam, Roman; Schneider, Claus M.; Winkler, Gerrit; Frömter, Robert; Danylyuk, Serhiy; Bergmann, Klaus; Grützmacher, Detlev

    2014-10-15

    Generation of circularly polarized light in the extreme ultraviolet (EUV) spectral region (about 25 eV–250 eV) is highly desirable for applications in spectroscopy and microscopy but very challenging to achieve in a small-scale laboratory. We present a compact apparatus for generation of linearly and circularly polarized EUV radiation from a gas-discharge plasma light source between 50 eV and 70 eV photon energy. In this spectral range, the 3p absorption edges of Fe (54 eV), Co (60 eV), and Ni (67 eV) offer a high magnetic contrast often employed for magneto-optical and electron spectroscopy as well as for magnetic imaging. We simulated and designed an instrument for generation of linearly and circularly polarized EUV radiation and performed polarimetric measurements of the degree of linear and circular polarization. Furthermore, we demonstrate first measurements of the X-ray magnetic circular dichroism at the Co 3p absorption edge with a plasma-based EUV light source. Our approach opens the door for laboratory-based, element-selective spectroscopy of magnetic materials and spectro-microscopy of ferromagnetic domains.

  20. Development of a lab-scale, high-resolution, tube-generated X-ray computed-tomography system for three-dimensional (3D) materials characterization

    SciTech Connect

    Mertens, J.C.E. Williams, J.J. Chawla, Nikhilesh

    2014-06-01

    The design and construction of a modular high resolution X-ray computed tomography (XCT) system is highlighted in this paper. The design approach is detailed for meeting a specified set of instrument performance goals tailored towards experimental versatility and high resolution imaging. The XCT tool is unique in the detector and X-ray source design configuration, enabling control in the balance between detection efficiency and spatial resolution. The system package is also unique: The sample manipulation approach implemented enables a wide gamut of in situ experimentation to analyze structure evolution under applied stimulus, by optimizing scan conditions through a high degree of controllability. The component selection and design process is detailed: Incorporated components are specified, custom designs are shared, and the approach for their integration into a fully functional XCT scanner is provided. Custom designs discussed include the dual-target X-ray source cradle which maintains position and trajectory of the beam between the two X-ray target configurations with respect to a scintillator mounting and positioning assembly and the imaging sensor, as well as a novel large-format X-ray detector with enhanced adaptability. The instrument is discussed from an operational point of view, including the details of data acquisition and processing implemented for 3D imaging via micro-CT. The performance of the instrument is demonstrated on a silica-glass particle/hydroxyl-terminated-polybutadiene (HTPB) matrix binder PBX simulant. Post-scan data processing, specifically segmentation of the sample's relevant microstructure from the 3D reconstruction, is provided to demonstrate the utility of the instrument. - Highlights: • Custom built X-ray tomography system for microstructural characterization • Detector design for maximizing polychromatic X-ray detection efficiency • X-ray design offered for maximizing X-ray flux with respect to imaging resolution • Novel lab

  1. X-ray Crystallography Facility

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2000-01-01

    Edward Snell, a National Research Council research fellow at NASA's Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC), prepares a protein crystal for analysis by x-ray crystallography as part of NASA's structural biology program. The small, individual crystals are bombarded with x-rays to produce diffraction patterns, a map of the intensity of the x-rays as they reflect through the crystal.

  2. X-ray absorption fine structure measurement with a 9 V electric battery x-ray emitter

    SciTech Connect

    Mitsuya, Shota; Ishii, Hideshi; Kawai, Jun; Tanaka, Keiichi

    2006-09-25

    X-ray absorption spectral analysis is a well known technique for analyzing the chemical environment of an element in a specimen. It has been believed that high intensity and monochromatized x rays such as the synchrotron radiation are required for an x-ray absorption experiment. In the present study, however, we demonstrate that the x-ray absorption spectral measurement of transition metal foils with an energy resolution of 10 eV is possible with a combination of a 9 V dry electric battery pyroelectric x-ray generator and a superconducting microcalorimeter.

  3. Dislocation generation related to micro-cracks in Si wafers: High temperature in situ study with white beam X-ray topography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Danilewsky, A.; Wittge, J.; Hess, A.; Cröll, A.; Allen, D.; McNally, P.; Vagovič, P.; Cecilia, A.; Li, Z.; Baumbach, T.; Gorostegui-Colinas, E.; Elizalde, M. R.

    2010-02-01

    The generation and propagation of dislocations in Si at high temperature is observed in situ with white beam X-ray topography. For the heating experiments a double ellipsoidal mirror furnace was installed at the Topo-Tomo beamline of the ANKA synchrotron light source, Research Centre Karlsruhe, Germany. Details of the experimental set-up and the first results on the occurrence of dislocations are presented. Artificial damage was generated in commercial (1 0 0) Si wafers using a nanoindenter with various loads. The applied forces for each set of indents were varied from 100 to 500 mN, respectively. After heating to approx. 790 °C large area transmission topographs were taken every 30 min which were then compared to room temperature topographs before and after heating. At the outset straight 60°-dislocations with b = a/2<1 1 0> originate from the 500 mN indents into the direction of the strongest temperature gradient. After 60 min at constant temperature an increase in the length and number of the dislocations in other directions is also observed. As a result of the continual thermal stressing dislocations develop from the 100 mN indents too.

  4. X-ray curing of composite materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Berejka, Anthony J.; Cleland, M. R.; Galloway, R. A.; Gregoire, O.

    2005-12-01

    The development of high current electron beam (EB) accelerators makes it possible to consider X-ray processing for industrial applications. The well-known inefficiency in converting electron beams to X-rays still affords better overall process efficiency when compared with historic thermal processes. X-ray processing permits depth of penetration of ionizing radiation into a material and, when derived from high current accelerators, can yield process through-puts comparable to low powered EB devices. X-rays are generated at lower dose-rates which are controlled by equipment and process parameters. Two feasibility studies were conducted which illustrate the potential for X-ray processing: (1) the curing of a reactive monomeric impregnant in a thick cross-section block of wood and (2) the curing of the matrix binder in fiber reinforced composites while the composite material was still constrained within a metal mold used to form an article. The ability to control dose-rate and to penetrate thick materials, such as the walls of a metal mold, indicate that X-ray processing can be of significant industrial interest.

  5. Compton backscattered collmated X-ray source

    DOEpatents

    Ruth, Ronald D.; Huang, Zhirong

    2000-01-01

    A high-intensity, inexpensive and collimated x-ray source for applications such as x-ray lithography is disclosed. An intense pulse from a high power laser, stored in a high-finesse resonator, repetitively collides nearly head-on with and Compton backscatters off a bunched electron beam, having relatively low energy and circulating in a compact storage ring. Both the laser and the electron beams are tightly focused and matched at the interaction region inside the optical resonator. The laser-electron interaction not only gives rise to x-rays at the desired wavelength, but also cools and stabilizes the electrons against intrabeam scattering and Coulomb repulsion with each other in the storage ring. This cooling provides a compact, intense bunch of electrons suitable for many applications. In particular, a sufficient amount of x-rays can be generated by this device to make it an excellent and flexible Compton backscattered x-ray (CBX) source for high throughput x-ray lithography and many other applications.

  6. Compton backscattered collimated x-ray source

    DOEpatents

    Ruth, R.D.; Huang, Z.

    1998-10-20

    A high-intensity, inexpensive and collimated x-ray source is disclosed for applications such as x-ray lithography is disclosed. An intense pulse from a high power laser, stored in a high-finesse resonator, repetitively collides nearly head-on with and Compton backscatters off a bunched electron beam, having relatively low energy and circulating in a compact storage ring. Both the laser and the electron beams are tightly focused and matched at the interaction region inside the optical resonator. The laser-electron interaction not only gives rise to x-rays at the desired wavelength, but also cools and stabilizes the electrons against intrabeam scattering and Coulomb repulsion with each other in the storage ring. This cooling provides a compact, intense bunch of electrons suitable for many applications. In particular, a sufficient amount of x-rays can be generated by this device to make it an excellent and flexible Compton backscattered x-ray (CBX) source for high throughput x-ray lithography and many other applications. 4 figs.

  7. Compton backscattered collimated x-ray source

    DOEpatents

    Ruth, Ronald D.; Huang, Zhirong

    1998-01-01

    A high-intensity, inexpensive and collimated x-ray source for applications such as x-ray lithography is disclosed. An intense pulse from a high power laser, stored in a high-finesse resonator, repetitively collides nearly head-on with and Compton backscatters off a bunched electron beam, having relatively low energy and circulating in a compact storage ring. Both the laser and the electron beams are tightly focused and matched at the interaction region inside the optical resonator. The laser-electron interaction not only gives rise to x-rays at the desired wavelength, but also cools and stabilizes the electrons against intrabeam scattering and Coulomb repulsion with each other in the storage ring. This cooling provides a compact, intense bunch of electrons suitable for many applications. In particular, a sufficient amount of x-rays can be generated by this device to make it an excellent and flexible Compton backscattered x-ray (CBX) source for high throughput x-ray lithography and many other applications.

  8. Structural factors affecting pore space transformation during hydrocarbon generation in source rock (shales): laboratory experiments and X-ray microtomography/SEM study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Giliazetdinova, Dina; Korost, Dmitry; Gerke, Kirill

    2015-04-01

    Oil and gas generation is a complex superposition of processes which take place in the interiors and are not readily observable in nature in human life time-frames. During burial of the source rocks organic matter is transformed into a mixture of high-molecular compounds - precursors of oil and gas (kerogen). Specific thermobaric conditions trigger formation of low molecular weight hydrocarbon compounds. Generation of sufficient quantities of hydrocarbons leads to the primary fluid migration. For series of our experiments we selected mainly siliceous-carbonate composition shale rocks from Domanic horizon of South-Tatar arch. Rock samples were heated in the pyrolyzer to temperatures closely corresponding to different catagenesis stages. X-ray microtomography method was used to monitor changes in the morphology of the pore space within studied shale rocks. By routine measurements we made sure that all samples (10 in total) had similar composition of organic and mineral phases. All samples in the collection were grouped according to initial structure and amount of organics and processed separately to: 1) study the influence of organic matter content on the changing morphology of the rock under thermal effects; 2) study the effect of initial structure on the primary migration processes for samples with similar organic matter content. An additional experiment was conducted to study the dynamics of changes in the structure of the pore space and prove the validity of our approach. At each stage of heating the morphology of altered rocks was characterized by formation of new pores and channels connecting primary voids. However, it was noted that the samples with a relatively low content of the organic matter had less changes in pore space morphology, in contrast to rocks with a high organic content. Second part of the study also revealed significant differences in resulting pore structures depending on initial structure of the unaltered rocks and connectivity of original

  9. Electron beam injected into ground generates subsoil x-rays that may deactivate concealed electronics used to trigger explosive devices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Retsky, Michael

    2008-04-01

    Explosively formed projectiles (EFP) are a major problem in terrorism and asymmetrical warfare. EFPs are often triggered by ordinary infrared motion detectors. A potential weak link is that such electronics are not hardened to ionizing radiation and can latch-up or enter other inoperative states after exposure to a single short event of ionizing radiation. While these can often be repaired with a power restart, they also can produce shorts and permanent damage. A problem of course is that we do not want to add radiation exposure to the long list of war related hazards. Biological systems are highly sensitive to integrated dosage but show no particular sensitivity to short pulses. There may be a way to generate short pulsed subsoil radiation to deactivate concealed electronics without introducing radiation hazards to military personnel and civilian bystanders. Electron beams of 30 MeV that can be produced by portable linear accelerators (linacs) propagate >20 m in air and 10-12 cm in soil. X-radiation is produced by bremsstrahlung and occurs subsoil beneath the point of impact and is mostly forward directed. Linacs 1.5 m long can produce 66 MWatt pulses of subsoil x-radiation 1 microsecond or less in duration. Untested as yet, such a device could be mounted on a robotic vehicle that precedes a military convoy and deactivates any concealed electronics within 10-20 meters on either side of the road.

  10. X-ray satellite

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1985-01-01

    An overview of the second quarter 1985 development of the X-ray satellite project is presented. It is shown that the project is proceeding according to plan and that the projected launch date of September 9, 1987 is on schedule. An overview of the work completed and underway on the systems, subsystems, payload, assembly, ground equipment and interfaces is presented. Problem areas shown include cost increases in the area of focal instrumentation, the star sensor light scattering requirements, and postponements in the data transmission subsystems.

  11. SMM x ray polychromator

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Saba, J. L. R.

    1993-01-01

    The objective of the X-ray Polychromator (XRP) experiment was to study the physical properties of solar flare plasma and its relation to the parent active region to understand better the flare mechanism and related solar activity. Observations were made to determine the temperature, density, and dynamic structure of the pre-flare and flare plasma as a function of wavelength, space and time, the extent to which the flare plasma departs from thermal equilibrium, and the variation of this departure with time. The experiment also determines the temperature and density structure of active regions and flare-induced changes in the regions.

  12. Soft x-ray lasers

    SciTech Connect

    Matthews, D.L.; Rosen, M.D.

    1988-12-01

    One of the elusive dreams of laser physicists has been the development of an x-ray laser. After 25 years of waiting, the x-ray laser has at last entered the scientific scene, although those now in operation are still laboratory prototypes. They produce soft x rays down to about five nanometers. X-ray lasers retain the usual characteristics of their optical counterparts: a very tight beam, spatial and temporal coherence, and extreme brightness. Present x-ray lasers are nearly 100 times brighter that the next most powerful x-ray source in the world: the electron synchrotron. Although Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) is widely known for its hard-x-ray laser program which has potential applications in the Strategic Defense Initiative, the soft x-ray lasers have no direct military applications. These lasers, and the scientific tools that result from their development, may one day have a place in the design and diagnosis of both laser fusion and hard x-ray lasers. The soft x-ray lasers now in operation at the LLNL have shown great promise but are still in the primitive state. Once x-ray lasers become reliable, efficient, and economical, they will have several important applications. Chief among them might be the creation of holograms of microscopic biological structures too small to be investigated with visible light. 5 figs.

  13. X-ray lithography source

    DOEpatents

    Piestrup, M.A.; Boyers, D.G.; Pincus, C.

    1991-12-31

    A high-intensity, inexpensive X-ray source for X-ray lithography for the production of integrated circuits is disclosed. Foil stacks are bombarded with a high-energy electron beam of 25 to 250 MeV to produce a flux of soft X-rays of 500 eV to 3 keV. Methods of increasing the total X-ray power and making the cross section of the X-ray beam uniform are described. Methods of obtaining the desired X-ray-beam field size, optimum frequency spectrum and eliminating the neutron flux are all described. A method of obtaining a plurality of station operation is also described which makes the process more efficient and economical. The satisfying of these issues makes transition radiation an excellent moderate-priced X-ray source for lithography. 26 figures.

  14. X-ray lithography source

    DOEpatents

    Piestrup, Melvin A.; Boyers, David G.; Pincus, Cary

    1991-01-01

    A high-intensity, inexpensive X-ray source for X-ray lithography for the production of integrated circuits. Foil stacks are bombarded with a high-energy electron beam of 25 to 250 MeV to produce a flux of soft X-rays of 500 eV to 3 keV. Methods of increasing the total X-ray power and making the cross section of the X-ray beam uniform are described. Methods of obtaining the desired X-ray-beam field size, optimum frequency spectrum and elminating the neutron flux are all described. A method of obtaining a plurality of station operation is also described which makes the process more efficient and economical. The satisfying of these issues makes transition radiation an exellent moderate-priced X-ray source for lithography.

  15. Monitoring X-Ray Emission from X-Ray Bursters

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Halpern, Jules P.; Kaaret, Philip

    1999-01-01

    The scientific goal of this project was to monitor a selected sample of x-ray bursters using data from the All-Sky Monitor (ASM) on the Rossi X-Ray Timing Explorer together with data from the Burst and Transient Source Experiment (BATSE) on the Compton Gamma-Ray Observatory to study the long-term temporal evolution of these sources in the x-ray and hard x-ray bands. The project was closely related to "Long-Term Hard X-Ray Monitoring of X-Ray Bursters", NASA project NAG5-3891, and and "Hard x-ray emission of x-ray bursters", NASA project NAG5-4633, and shares publications in common with both of these. The project involved preparation of software for use in monitoring and then the actual monitoring itself. These efforts have lead to results directly from the ASM data and also from Target of Opportunity Observations (TOO) made with the Rossi X-Ray Timing Explorer based on detection of transient hard x-ray outbursts with the ASM and BATSE.

  16. Analysis of x-ray bright spots from triple and single combined Cu and Al planar wire arrays on the 1MA pulsed power generator at UNR

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Safronova, A. S.; Kantsyrev, V. L.; Esaulov, A. A.; Ouart, N. D.; Yilmaz, M. F.; Weller, M. E.; Williamson, K. M.; Shlyaptseva, V.; Shrestha, I.; Osborne, G. C.; Coverdale, C. A.; Deeney, C.

    2008-11-01

    The recently discovered implosion features of double planar wire arrays, such as the two step precursor formation with the independent implosion of wire arrays made from different materials and bright spot generation in a central precursor column early in time [Kantsyrev et al, PoP 15, 030704 (2008)], led to new experiments with combined triple planar wire arrays (TPWA). Combined TPWA include three planar wire rows that are parallel to each other and made of either Cu or Al alloyed wires. New x-ray data for two configurations (Al/Cu/Al and Cu/Al/Cu) are considered and compared with each other, with the results from combined single planar wire arrays of the same materials, and with Cu uniform cylindrical wire arrays. Emphasis is made on the study of bright spot formation, which is a signature of implosions of planar wire arrays and can be significant for other wire array configurations as well. Work was supported by NNSA/DOE under Coop. Agr. DE-FC52-06NA27588, DE-FC52-06NA27586, and in part by DE-FC52-06NA27616. Sandia is a multi-program laboratory operated by Sandia Corporation, a Lockheed Martin Company, for the US DOE under Contract DE-AC04-94AL85000.

  17. Automatic generation of time resolved motion vector fields of coronary arteries and 4D surface extraction using rotational x-ray angiography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jandt, Uwe; Schäfer, Dirk; Grass, Michael; Rasche, Volker

    2009-01-01

    Rotational coronary angiography provides a multitude of x-ray projections of the contrast agent enhanced coronary arteries along a given trajectory with parallel ECG recording. These data can be used to derive motion information of the coronary arteries including vessel displacement and pulsation. In this paper, a fully automated algorithm to generate 4D motion vector fields for coronary arteries from multi-phase 3D centerline data is presented. The algorithm computes similarity measures of centerline segments at different cardiac phases and defines corresponding centerline segments as those with highest similarity. In order to achieve an excellent matching accuracy, an increasing number of bifurcations is included as reference points in an iterative manner. Based on the motion data, time-dependent vessel surface extraction is performed on the projections without the need of prior reconstruction. The algorithm accuracy is evaluated quantitatively on phantom data. The magnitude of longitudinal errors (parallel to the centerline) reaches approx. 0.50 mm and is thus more than twice as large as the transversal 3D extraction errors of the underlying multi-phase 3D centerline data. It is shown that the algorithm can extract asymmetric stenoses accurately. The feasibility on clinical data is demonstrated on five different cases. The ability of the algorithm to extract time-dependent surface data, e.g. for quantification of pulsating stenosis is demonstrated.

  18. Hard x-ray nanoprobe based on refractive x-ray lenses

    SciTech Connect

    Schroer, C.G.; Kurapova, O.; Patommel, J.; Boye, P.; Feldkamp, J.; Lengeler, B.; Burghammer, M.; Riekel, C.; Vincze, L.; Hart, A. van der; Kuechler, M.

    2005-09-19

    Based on nanofocusing refractive x-ray lenses a hard x-ray scanning microscope is currently being developed and is being implemented at beamline ID13 of the European Synchrotron Radiation Facility (Grenoble, France). It can be operated in transmission, fluorescence, and diffraction mode. Tomographic scanning allows one to determine the inner structure of a specimen. In this device, a monochromatic (E=21 keV) hard x-ray nanobeam with a lateral extension of 47x55 nm{sup 2} was generated. Further reduction of the beam size to below 20 nm is targeted.

  19. Control Scheme for Quickly Starting X-ray Tube

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nakahama, Masayuki; Nakanishi, Toshiki; Ishitobi, Manabu; Ito, Tuyoshi; Hosoda, Kenichi

    A control scheme for quickly starting a portable X-ray generator used in the livestock industry is proposed in this paper. A portable X-ray generator used to take X-ray images of animals such as horses, sheep and dogs should be capable of starting quickly because it is difficult for veterinarians to take X-ray images of animals at their timing. In order to develop a scheme for starting the X-ray tube quickly, it is necessary to analysis the X-ray tube. However, such an analysis has not been discussed until now. First, the states of an X-ray tube are classified into the temperature-limited state and the space-charge-limited state. Furthermore, existence of “mixed state” that comprises both is newly proposed in this paper. From these analyses, a novel scheme for quickly starting an X-ray generator is proposed; this scheme is considered with the characteristics of the X-ray tube. The proposed X-ray system that is capable of starting quickly is evaluated on the basis of experimental results.

  20. Pore-space alteration in source rock (shales) during hydrocarbons generation: X-ray microtomography and pore-scale modelling study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Korost, Dmitry; Gerke, Kirill; Akhmanov, Grigory; Vasilyev, Roman; Čapek, Pavel; Karsanina, Marina; Nadezhkin, Dmitry

    2013-04-01

    Hydrocarbons (HC) are generated from solid organic matter (kerogen) due to thermocatalytic reactions. The rate of such reactions shows direct correlation with temperature and depends on the depth of source rock burial. Burial of sedimentary rock is also inevitably accompanied by its structural alteration owing to compaction, dehydration and re-crystallization. Processes of HC generation, primary migration and structural changes are inaccessible for direct observation in nature, but they can be studied in laboratory experiments. Modern technical facilities of laboratories make it possible to carry out experiments on HC generation from the organic-rich rocks at a completely new level (Kobchenko et al., 2011). Some new technologies, including X-ray microtomography and pore-scale modeling, allow us to carry out a step-by-step description of such processes and their development, and to study their reflection in alterations of rock structure. Experiments were carried out with a clayey-carbonate rock sample of the Domanic Formaition taken at a depth of 1939 m from borehole drilled in the central part of the Melekes depression (West Tatar arch, Russia). The rock chosen fits the very essential requirements for studying HC generation under laboratory conditions - high organic matter content and its low metamorphic grade. Our work aimed such a study in an undisturbed rock sample by heating it in nitrogen atmosphere based on a specified temperature regime in a RockEval6 analyzer and monitoring alterations in the pore space structure. Observations were carried out with a SkyScan-1172 X-ray microtomography scanner (resulting scan resolution of 1 µm). A cylinder, 4 mm in diameter, was prepared from the rock sample for the pyrolitic and microtomographic analyses. Scanning procedures were carried out in 5 runs. Temperature interval for each run had to match the most important stage of HC generation in the source rock, namely: (1) original structure; (2) 100-300˚? - discharge of

  1. Hard X-Ray Emission of X-Ray Bursters

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kaaret, P.

    1999-01-01

    The primary goal of this proposal was to perform an accurate measurement of the broadband x-ray spectrum of a neutron-star low-mass x-ray binary found in a hard x-ray state. This goal was accomplished using data obtained under another proposal, which has provided exciting new information on the hard x-ray emission of neutron-star low-mass x-ray binaries. In "BeppoSAX Observations of the Atoll X-Ray Binary 4U0614+091", we present our analysis of the spectrum of 4U0614+091 over the energy band from 0.3-150 keV. Our data confirm the presence of a hard x-ray tail that can be modeled as thermal Comptonization of low-energy photons on electrons having a very high temperature, greater than 220 keV, or as a non-thermal powerlaw. Such a very hard x-ray spectrum has not been previously seen from neutron-star low-mass x-ray binaries. We also detected a spectral feature that can be interpreted as reprocessing, via Compton reflection, of the direct emission by an optically-thick disk and found a correlation between the photon index of the power-law tail and the fraction of radiation reflected which is similar to the correlation found for black hole candidate x-ray binaries and Seyfert galaxies. A secondary goal was to measure the timing properties of the x-ray emission from neutronstar low-mass x-ray binaries in their low/hard states.

  2. X-ray Surveyor Discussion Session Results from the X-ray Vision Workshop

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Allured, Ryan; Arenberg, Jonathan; Bogdan, Akos; Canning, Rebecca; Churazov, Eugene; Civano, Francesca; Clarke, Tracy; Corrales, Lia; Di Matteo, Tiziana; Elvis, Martin; Fabbiano, Giuseppina; Falcone, Abe; Garcia, Javier; Gaskin, Jessica; Goldman, Itzhak; Kargaltsev, Oleg; Klinger, Noel; Laming, Martin; McNamara, Brian; Markevitch, Maxim; Marshall, Herman; Mosquera, Ana; Mroczkowski, Anthony; Natarajan, Priyamvada; Nielsen, Joey; Nowak, Michael; Ozel, Feryal; Poppenhaeger, Katja; Porquet, Delphine; Randall, Scott; Schwartz, Daniel; Swartz, Douglas A.; Temim, Tea; Van Weeren, Reinout; Weisskopf, Martin; Zhuravleva, Irina; ZuHone, John A.

    2015-10-01

    This paper summarizes the results of a brainstorming session held during the X-ray Vision Workshop (Oct 6-8, 2015, Washington DC). The workshop was convened to discuss the scientific potential of the X-ray Surveyor mission. The X-ray Surveyor concept, which was defined by the Astrophysics Roadmap, is to effect a 100-fold gain in survey and spectroscopic capability over the Chandra X-ray Observatory, while at least matching Chandra’s sub-arcsecond imaging capability. This paper is intended to inform interested scientists of the growing discussion in our community and to solicit their input in the area of new science that a next generation high-resolution X-ray Observatory may provide for astrophysics. This paper is not an official document and is certainly not the definitive science case for an X-ray Surveyor mission. It is, instead, an early input to this discussion, which we hope will lead to a full reference white paper on the X-Ray Surveyor concept.

  3. 21 CFR 892.1760 - Diagnostic x-ray tube housing assembly.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Diagnostic x-ray tube housing assembly. 892.1760... (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES RADIOLOGY DEVICES Diagnostic Devices § 892.1760 Diagnostic x-ray tube housing assembly. (a) Identification. A diagnostic x-ray tube housing assembly is an x-ray generating tube...

  4. 21 CFR 892.5930 - Therapeutic x-ray tube housing assembly.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Therapeutic x-ray tube housing assembly. 892.5930... (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES RADIOLOGY DEVICES Therapeutic Devices § 892.5930 Therapeutic x-ray tube housing assembly. (a) Identification. A therapeutic x-ray tube housing assembly is an x-ray generating tube...

  5. 21 CFR 892.1760 - Diagnostic x-ray tube housing assembly.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Diagnostic x-ray tube housing assembly. 892.1760... (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES RADIOLOGY DEVICES Diagnostic Devices § 892.1760 Diagnostic x-ray tube housing assembly. (a) Identification. A diagnostic x-ray tube housing assembly is an x-ray generating tube...

  6. 21 CFR 892.5930 - Therapeutic x-ray tube housing assembly.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Therapeutic x-ray tube housing assembly. 892.5930... (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES RADIOLOGY DEVICES Therapeutic Devices § 892.5930 Therapeutic x-ray tube housing assembly. (a) Identification. A therapeutic x-ray tube housing assembly is an x-ray generating tube...

  7. 21 CFR 892.5930 - Therapeutic x-ray tube housing assembly.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Therapeutic x-ray tube housing assembly. 892.5930... (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES RADIOLOGY DEVICES Therapeutic Devices § 892.5930 Therapeutic x-ray tube housing assembly. (a) Identification. A therapeutic x-ray tube housing assembly is an x-ray generating tube...

  8. 21 CFR 892.1760 - Diagnostic x-ray tube housing assembly.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Diagnostic x-ray tube housing assembly. 892.1760... (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES RADIOLOGY DEVICES Diagnostic Devices § 892.1760 Diagnostic x-ray tube housing assembly. (a) Identification. A diagnostic x-ray tube housing assembly is an x-ray generating tube...

  9. 21 CFR 892.5930 - Therapeutic x-ray tube housing assembly.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Therapeutic x-ray tube housing assembly. 892.5930... (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES RADIOLOGY DEVICES Therapeutic Devices § 892.5930 Therapeutic x-ray tube housing assembly. (a) Identification. A therapeutic x-ray tube housing assembly is an x-ray generating tube...

  10. 21 CFR 892.5930 - Therapeutic x-ray tube housing assembly.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Therapeutic x-ray tube housing assembly. 892.5930... (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES RADIOLOGY DEVICES Therapeutic Devices § 892.5930 Therapeutic x-ray tube housing assembly. (a) Identification. A therapeutic x-ray tube housing assembly is an x-ray generating tube...

  11. 21 CFR 892.1760 - Diagnostic x-ray tube housing assembly.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Diagnostic x-ray tube housing assembly. 892.1760... (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES RADIOLOGY DEVICES Diagnostic Devices § 892.1760 Diagnostic x-ray tube housing assembly. (a) Identification. A diagnostic x-ray tube housing assembly is an x-ray generating tube...

  12. 21 CFR 892.1760 - Diagnostic x-ray tube housing assembly.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Diagnostic x-ray tube housing assembly. 892.1760... (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES RADIOLOGY DEVICES Diagnostic Devices § 892.1760 Diagnostic x-ray tube housing assembly. (a) Identification. A diagnostic x-ray tube housing assembly is an x-ray generating tube...

  13. Nanofocusing Parabolic Refractive X-Ray Lenses

    SciTech Connect

    Schroer, C.G.; Kuhlmann, M.; Hunger, U.T.; Guenzler, T.F.; Kurapova, O.; Feste, S.; Lengeler, B.; Drakopoulos, M.; Somogyi, A.; Simionovici, A. S.; Snigirev, A.; Snigireva, I.

    2004-05-12

    Parabolic refractive x-ray lenses with short focal distance can generate intensive hard x-ray microbeams with lateral extensions in the 100nm range even at short distance from a synchrotron radiation source. We have fabricated planar parabolic lenses made of silicon that have a focal distance in the range of a few millimeters at hard x-ray energies. In a crossed geometry, two lenses were used to generate a microbeam with a lateral size of 330nm by 110nm at 25keV in a distance of 41.8m from the synchrotron radiation source. First microdiffraction and fluorescence microtomography experiments were carried out with these lenses. Using diamond as lens material, microbeams with lateral size down to 20nm and below are conceivable in the energy range from 10 to 100keV.

  14. Solar X-ray physics

    SciTech Connect

    Bornmann, P.L. )

    1991-01-01

    Research on solar X-ray phenomena performed by American scientists during 1987-1990 is reviewed. Major topics discussed include solar images observed during quiescent times, the processes observed during solar flares, and the coronal, interplanetary, and terrestrial phenomena associated with solar X-ray flares. Particular attention is given to the hard X-ray emission observed at the start of the flare, the energy transfer to the soft X-ray emitting plasma, the late resolution of the flare as observed in soft X-ray, and the rate of occurrence of solar flares as a function of time and latitude. Pertinent aspects of nonflaring, coronal X-ray emission and stellar flares are also discussed. 175 refs.

  15. Miniature x-ray source

    DOEpatents

    Trebes, James E.; Stone, Gary F.; Bell, Perry M.; Robinson, Ronald B.; Chornenky, Victor I.

    2002-01-01

    A miniature x-ray source capable of producing broad spectrum x-ray emission over a wide range of x-ray energies. The miniature x-ray source comprises a compact vacuum tube assembly containing a cathode, an anode, a high voltage feedthru for delivering high voltage to the anode, a getter for maintaining high vacuum, a connection for an initial vacuum pump down and crimp-off, and a high voltage connection for attaching a compact high voltage cable to the high voltage feedthru. At least a portion of the vacuum tube wall is highly x-ray transparent and made, for example, from boron nitride. The compact size and potential for remote operation allows the x-ray source, for example, to be placed adjacent to a material sample undergoing analysis or in proximity to the region to be treated for medical applications.

  16. Topological X-Rays Revisited

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lynch, Mark

    2012-01-01

    We continue our study of topological X-rays begun in Lynch ["Topological X-rays and MRI's," iJMEST 33(3) (2002), pp. 389-392]. We modify our definition of a topological magnetic resonance imaging and give an affirmative answer to the question posed there: Can we identify a closed set in a box by defining X-rays to probe the interior and without…

  17. Development of an x-ray Talbot-Lau moire deflectometer for fast density profile measurements of dense plasmas generated by beam-target interactions

    SciTech Connect

    Clayton, Dan; Berninger, M; Meidinger, A; Stutman, Dan; Valdivia, Maria Pia

    2015-05-01

    For the first time an x-ray Talbot-Lau moire deflectometer is being developed that will use a flash tube source and fast detector for dynamic density gradient measurements. In Talbot-Lau moire deflectometry, an x-ray grating makes an image of itself on a second grating (the Talbot effect) to produce a moire pattern on a detector. The test object is placed between these gratings, with variations in index of refraction changing the pattern. A third grating in front of an incoherent x-ray source produces an array of coherent sources. With a 150 kV x-ray flash tube as the source, the gratings are placed in a glancing angle setup for performance at ~60 keV. The detector is a gated CCD with a fast scintillator for x-ray conversion. This diagnostic, designed for the Dual-Axis Radiographic Hydrodynamic Test facility (DARHT) at Los Alamos National Laboratory, measures the density profile of dense plasma plumes ejected from beam-target interactions. DARHT has two high-current, pulsed, inductive linear electron accelerators with bremsstrahlung targets at the end of each beam line to create 2-D radiographic images of hydrodynamic tests. One multi-pulse accelerator has up to four beam pulses striking the same target within 2 μs. Computer simulations that model target evolution and ejected material between pulses are used to design these targets for optimal radiographic performance; the x-ray deflectometer will directly measure density gradients in the ejected plumes and provide the first experimental constraints to these models. During the first year, currently underway, the diagnostic systems are being designed. In year two, the flash tube and fast detector will be deployed at DARHT for radiographic imaging while the deflectometer is built and tested on the bench with a continuous source. Finally, in year three, the fast deflectometer will be installed on DARHT and density measurements will be performed.

  18. [The X-Ray Fluorescence Spectrometer Based on Pyroelectric Effect].

    PubMed

    Dong, Yi-fan; Fan, Rui-rui; Guo, Dong-ya; Zhang, Chun-lei; Gao, Min; Wang, Jin-zhou; Liu, Ya-qing; Zhou, Da-wei; Wang, Huan-yu

    2016-02-01

    Pyroelectric X-ray generator is implemented, and an X-ray fluorescence spectrometer is accomplished by combining the pyroelectric X-ray generator with a high energy resolution silicon drift detector. Firstly, the parameters of the X-ray generator are decided by analyzing and calculating the influence of the thickness of the pyroelectriccrystal and the thickness of the target on emitted X-ray. Secondly, the emitted X-ray is measured. The energy of emitted X-ray is from 1 to 27 keV, containing the characteristic X-ray of Cu and Ta, and the max counting rate is more than 3 000 per second. The measurement also proves that the detector of the spectrometer has a high energy resolution which the FWMH is 210 eV at 8. 05 keV. Lastly, samples of Fe, Ti, Cr and high-Ti basalt are analyzed using the spectrometer, and the results are agreed with the elements of the samples. It shows that the spectrometer consisting of a pyroelectric X-ray generator and a silicon drift detector is effective for element analysis. Additionally, because each part of the spectrometer has a small volume, it can be easily modified to a portable one which is suitable for non-destructive, on-site and quick element analysis. PMID:27209767

  19. [The X-Ray Fluorescence Spectrometer Based on Pyroelectric Effect].

    PubMed

    Dong, Yi-fan; Fan, Rui-rui; Guo, Dong-ya; Zhang, Chun-lei; Gao, Min; Wang, Jin-zhou; Liu, Ya-qing; Zhou, Da-wei; Wang, Huan-yu

    2016-02-01

    Pyroelectric X-ray generator is implemented, and an X-ray fluorescence spectrometer is accomplished by combining the pyroelectric X-ray generator with a high energy resolution silicon drift detector. Firstly, the parameters of the X-ray generator are decided by analyzing and calculating the influence of the thickness of the pyroelectriccrystal and the thickness of the target on emitted X-ray. Secondly, the emitted X-ray is measured. The energy of emitted X-ray is from 1 to 27 keV, containing the characteristic X-ray of Cu and Ta, and the max counting rate is more than 3 000 per second. The measurement also proves that the detector of the spectrometer has a high energy resolution which the FWMH is 210 eV at 8. 05 keV. Lastly, samples of Fe, Ti, Cr and high-Ti basalt are analyzed using the spectrometer, and the results are agreed with the elements of the samples. It shows that the spectrometer consisting of a pyroelectric X-ray generator and a silicon drift detector is effective for element analysis. Additionally, because each part of the spectrometer has a small volume, it can be easily modified to a portable one which is suitable for non-destructive, on-site and quick element analysis.

  20. X-ray Absorption Spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Yano, Junko; Yachandra, Vittal K.

    2009-07-09

    This review gives a brief description of the theory and application of X-ray absorption spectroscopy, both X-ray absorption near edge structure (XANES) and extended X-ray absorption fine structure (EXAFS), especially, pertaining to photosynthesis. The advantages and limitations of the methods are discussed. Recent advances in extended EXAFS and polarized EXAFS using oriented membranes and single crystals are explained. Developments in theory in understanding the XANES spectra are described. The application of X-ray absorption spectroscopy to the study of the Mn4Ca cluster in Photosystem II is presented.

  1. Polarisation modulation in X-ray binaries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ingram, Adam; Maccarone, Thomas

    2016-07-01

    X-ray polarimetry promises to provide a powerful new lever arm for studying accretion onto black holes with the next generation of X-ray telescopes. I will discuss how polarisation can be used to help constrain the physical origin of quasi-periodic oscillations (QPOs) observed in the X-ray light curves of accreting black holes. QPOs may be signatures of the frame dragging effect: in General Relativity, a spinning black hole twists up the surrounding space-time, causing vertical precession of nearby orbits. In the truncated disc / precessing inner flow model, the entire inner accretion flow precesses as a solid body causing a modulation in the X-ray flux through solid angle and Doppler effects. This model also predicts the observed polarisation of the X-ray signal to vary quasi-periodically. I will summarise our work to model the polarisation signal from a precessing accretion flow, starting with simple assumptions about the emission mechanism but taking General Relativity fully into account. We find that it should be possible to measure the predicted modulation in polarisation degree for a reasonable region of parameter space with a polarimeter capable of detecting ~60 counts per second from a bright black hole binary. I will also show that sensitivity can be greatly improved by correlating the signal with a high count rate reference band signal.

  2. X-ray optics of gold nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Letfullin, Renat R; Rice, Colin E W; George, Thomas F

    2014-11-01

    Gold nanoparticles have been investigated as contrast agents for traditional x-ray medical procedures, utilizing the strong absorption characteristics of the nanoparticles to enhance the contrast of the detected x-ray image. Here we use the Kramers-Kronig relation for complex atomic scattering factors to find the real and imaginary parts of the index of refraction for the medium composed of single-element materials or compounds in the x-ray range of the spectrum. These complex index of refraction values are then plugged into a Lorenz-Mie theory to calculate the absorption efficiency of various size gold nanoparticles for photon energies in the 1-100 keV range. Since the output from most medical diagnostic x-ray devices follows a wide and filtered spectrum of photon energies, we introduce and compute the effective intensity-absorption-efficiency values for gold nanoparticles of radii varying from 5 to 50 nm, where we use the TASMIP model to integrate over all spectral energies generated by typical tungsten anode x-ray tubes with kilovolt potentials ranging from 50 to 150 kVp.

  3. Ultrafast X-Ray Coherent Control

    SciTech Connect

    Reis, David

    2009-05-01

    This main purpose of this grant was to develop the nascent eld of ultrafast x-ray science using accelerator-based sources, and originally developed from an idea that a laser could modulate the di racting properties of a x-ray di racting crystal on a fast enough time scale to switch out in time a shorter slice from the already short x-ray pulses from a synchrotron. The research was carried out primarily at the Advanced Photon Source (APS) sector 7 at Argonne National Laboratory and the Sub-Picosecond Pulse Source (SPPS) at SLAC; in anticipation of the Linac Coherent Light Source (LCLS) x-ray free electron laser that became operational in 2009 at SLAC (all National User Facilities operated by BES). The research centered on the generation, control and measurement of atomic-scale dynamics in atomic, molecular optical and condensed matter systems with temporal and spatial resolution . It helped develop the ultrafast physics, techniques and scienti c case for using the unprecedented characteristics of the LCLS. The project has been very successful with results have been disseminated widely and in top journals, have been well cited in the eld, and have laid the foundation for many experiments being performed on the LCLS, the world's rst hard x-ray free electron laser.

  4. Optics for coherent X-ray applications

    PubMed Central

    Yabashi, Makina; Tono, Kensuke; Mimura, Hidekazu; Matsuyama, Satoshi; Yamauchi, Kazuto; Tanaka, Takashi; Tanaka, Hitoshi; Tamasaku, Kenji; Ohashi, Haruhiko; Goto, Shunji; Ishikawa, Tetsuya

    2014-01-01

    Developments of X-ray optics for full utilization of diffraction-limited storage rings (DLSRs) are presented. The expected performance of DLSRs is introduced using the design parameters of SPring-8 II. To develop optical elements applicable to manipulation of coherent X-rays, advanced technologies on precise processing and metrology were invented. With propagation-based coherent X-rays at the 1 km beamline of SPring-8, a beryllium window fabricated with the physical-vapour-deposition method was found to have ideal speckle-free properties. The elastic emission machining method was utilized for developing reflective mirrors without distortion of the wavefronts. The method was further applied to production of diffraction-limited focusing mirrors generating the smallest spot size in the sub-10 nm regime. To enable production of ultra-intense nanobeams at DLSRs, a low-vibration cooling system for a high-heat-load monochromator and advanced diagnostic systems to characterize X-ray beam properties precisely were developed. Finally, new experimental schemes for combinative nano-analysis and spectroscopy realised with novel X-ray optics are discussed. PMID:25177986

  5. Radiographic X-Ray Pulse Jitter

    SciTech Connect

    Mitton, C. V., Good, D. E., Henderson, D. J., Hogge, K. W.

    2011-01-15

    The Dual Beam Radiographic Facility consists of two identical radiographic sources. Major components of the machines are: Marx generator, water-filled pulse-forming line (PFL), water-filled coaxial transmission line, three-cell inductive voltage adder, and rod-pinch diode. The diode pulse has the following electrical specifications: 2.25-MV, 60-kA, 60-ns. Each source has the following x-ray parameters: 1-mm-diameter spot size, 4-rad at 1 m, 50-ns full width half max. The x-ray pulse is measured with PIN diode detectors. The sources were developed to produce high resolution images on single-shot, high-value experiments. For this application it is desirable to maintain a high level of reproducibility in source output. X-ray pulse jitter is a key metric for analysis of reproducibility. We will give measurements of x-ray jitter for each machine. It is expected that x-ray pulse jitter is predominantly due to PFL switch jitter, and therefore a correlation of the two will be discussed.

  6. Ultra-short wavelength x-ray system

    DOEpatents

    Umstadter, Donald; He, Fei; Lau, Yue-Ying

    2008-01-22

    A method and apparatus to generate a beam of coherent light including x-rays or XUV by colliding a high-intensity laser pulse with an electron beam that is accelerated by a synchronized laser pulse. Applications include x-ray and EUV lithography, protein structural analysis, plasma diagnostics, x-ray diffraction, crack analysis, non-destructive testing, surface science and ultrafast science.

  7. ANL CT Reconstruction Algorithm for Utilizing Digital X-ray

    2004-05-01

    Reconstructs X-ray computed tomographic images from large data sets known as 16-bit binary sinograms when using a massively parallelized computer architecture such as a Beowuif cluster by parallelizing the X-ray CT reconstruction routine. The algorithm uses the concept of generation of an image from carefully obtained multiple 1-D or 2-D X-ray projections. The individual projections are filtered using a digital Fast Fourier Transform. The literature refers to this as filtered back projection.

  8. Neuropathology of ablation of rat gliosarcomas and contiguous brain tissues using a microplanar beam of synchrotron-wiggler-generated X rays.

    PubMed

    Laissue, J A; Geiser, G; Spanne, P O; Dilmanian, F A; Gebbers, J O; Geiser, M; Wu, X Y; Makar, M S; Micca, P L; Nawrocky, M M; Joel, D D; Slatkin, D N

    1998-11-23

    Adult-rat-brain tissues display an unusually high resistance to necrosis when serially irradiated with parallel, thin slices of a microplanar (i.e., microscopically thin and macroscopically broad) beam of synchrotron-wiggler-generated, approx. 35-120 keV (median approx. 50 keV) Gd-filtered X rays at skin-entrance absorbed doses of 312 to 5000 Gy per slice. Such microplanar beams were used to irradiate young adult rats bearing right frontocerebral 9L gliosarcomas (approx. 4 mm diameter), through a volume of tissue containing the tumor and contiguous brain tissue, either in a single array or in 2 orthogonally crossed arrays of tissue slices. Each array included 101 parallel microplanar slices, 100 microm center-to-center distance, each slice being approx. 25 microm wide and 12 mm high, with skin-entrance absorbed doses of 312.5 Gy or 625 Gy per slice. Compared with unirradiated controls with a median survival time of 20 days after tumor initiation, the median survival time was extended in irradiated rats by 139 days (625 Gy, crossed arrays), 96 days (312 Gy, crossed arrays) or 24 days (625 Gy, single array). The tumors disappeared in 22 of the 36 irradiated rats, 4/11 even after unidirectional microbeam irradiation. The extent and severity of radiation damage to the normal brain in rats with or without tumor was graded histopathologically. Correlation of those grades with radiation doses shows that loss of tissue structure was confined to beam-crossing regions and that only minor damage was done to zones of the brain irradiated unidirectionally.

  9. European XFEL: Soft X-Ray instrumentation

    SciTech Connect

    Molodtsov, S. L.

    2011-12-15

    The currently constructed European X-Ray Free Electron Laser (XFEL) will generate new knowledge in almost all the technical and scientific disciplines that are shaping our daily life-including nanotechnology, medicine, pharmaceutics, chemistry, materials science, power engineering and electronics. On 8 January 2009, civil engineering work (tunnels, shafts, halls) has been started at all three construction sites. In this presentation status and parameters of the European XFEL facility and instrumentation as well as planned research applications particularly in the range of soft X-rays are reviewed.

  10. Single Particle X-ray Diffractive Imaging

    SciTech Connect

    Bogan, M J; Benner, W H; Boutet, S; Rohner, U; Frank, M; Seibert, M; Maia, F; Barty, A; Bajt, S; Riot, V; Woods, B; Marchesini, S; Hau-Riege, S P; Svenda, M; Marklund, E; Spiller, E; Hajdu, J; Chapman, H N

    2007-10-01

    In nanotechnology, strategies for the creation and manipulation of nanoparticles in the gas phase are critically important for surface modification and substrate-free characterization. Recent coherent diffractive imaging with intense femtosecond X-ray pulses has verified the capability of single-shot imaging of nanoscale objects at sub-optical resolutions beyond the radiation-induced damage threshold. By intercepting electrospray-generated particles with a single 15 femtosecond soft-X-ray pulse, we demonstrate diffractive imaging of a nanoscale specimen in free flight for the first time, an important step toward imaging uncrystallized biomolecules.

  11. Single particle X-ray diffractive imaging.

    PubMed

    Bogan, Michael J; Benner, W Henry; Boutet, Sébastien; Rohner, Urs; Frank, Matthias; Barty, Anton; Seibert, M Marvin; Maia, Filipe; Marchesini, Stefano; Bajt, Sasa; Woods, Bruce; Riot, Vincent; Hau-Riege, Stefan P; Svenda, Martin; Marklund, Erik; Spiller, Eberhard; Hajdu, Janos; Chapman, Henry N

    2008-01-01

    In nanotechnology, strategies for the creation and manipulation of nanoparticles in the gas phase are critically important for surface modification and substrate-free characterization. Recent coherent diffractive imaging with intense femtosecond X-ray pulses has verified the capability of single-shot imaging of nanoscale objects at suboptical resolutions beyond the radiation-induced damage threshold. By intercepting electrospray-generated particles with a single 15 femtosecond soft-X-ray pulse, we demonstrate diffractive imaging of a nanoscale specimen in free flight for the first time, an important step toward imaging uncrystallized biomolecules.

  12. Laboratory Data for X-Ray Astronomy

    SciTech Connect

    Beiersdorfer, P.; Brown, G.V.; Chen, H.; Gu, M.F.; Kahn, S.M.; Lepson, J.K.; Savin, D.W.; Utter, S.B.

    2000-03-02

    Laboratory facilities have made great strides in producing large sets of reliable data for X-ray astronomy, which include ionization and recombination cross sections needed for charge balance calculations as well as the atomic data needed for interpreting X-ray line formation. We discuss data from the new generation sources and pay special attention to the LLNL electron beam ion trap experiment, which is unique in it's ability to provide direct laboratory access to spectral data under precisely controlled conditions that simulate those found in many astrophysical plasmas. Examples of spectral data obtained in the 1-160 A wavelength range are given illustrating the type of laboratory X-ray data produced in support of such missions as Chandra, XMM, ASCA and EUVE.

  13. X-Ray Calorimeter Arrays for Astrophysics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kilbourne, Caroline A.

    2009-01-01

    High-resolution x-ray spectroscopy is a powerful tool for studying the evolving universe. The grating spectrometers on the XMM and Chandra satellites started a new era in x-ray astronomy, but there remains a need for instrumentation that can provide higher spectral resolution with high throughput in the Fe-K band (around 6 keV) and can enable imaging spectroscopy of extended sources, such as supernova remnants and galaxy clusters. The instrumentation needed is a broad-band imaging spectrometer - basically an x-ray camera that can distinguish tens of thousands of x-ray colors. The potential benefits to astrophysics of using a low-temperature calorimeter to determine the energy of an incident x-ray photon via measurement of a small change in temperature was first articulated by S. H. Moseley over two decades ago. In the time since, technological progress has been steady, though full realization in an orbiting x-ray telescope is still awaited. A low-temperature calorimeter can be characterized by the type of thermometer it uses, and three types presently dominate the field. The first two types are temperature-sensitive resistors - semiconductors in the metal-insulator transition and superconductors operated in the superconducting-normal transition. The third type uses a paramagnetic thermometer. These types can be considered the three generations of x-ray calorimeters; by now each has demonstrated a resolving power of 2000 at 6 keV, but only a semiconductor calorimeter system has been developed to spaceflight readiness. The Soft X-ray Spectrometer on Astro-H, expected to launch in 2013, will use an array of silicon thermistors with I-IgTe x-ray absorbers that will operate at 50 mK. Both the semiconductor and superconductor calorimeters have been implemented in small arrays, kilo-pixel arrays of the superconducting calorimeters are just now being produced, and it is anticipated that much larger arrays will require the non-dissipative advantage of magnetic thermometers.

  14. Transmission-type microfocus x-ray tube using carbon nanotube field emitters

    SciTech Connect

    Heo, Sung Hwan; Ihsan, Aamir; Cho, Sung Oh

    2007-04-30

    A microfocus x-ray tube that can generate x rays with the focal spot size less than 5 {mu}m has been demonstrated using carbon nanotube (CNT) field emitters. A CNT cathode on a sharp tungsten tip, a magnetic solenoid lens, and a transmission-type x-ray target were adopted for the microfocus x-ray tube. The design characteristics and the operation performance of the microfocus x-ray tube are presented. Due to the small focal spot size, clear x-ray radiographic images of 6 {mu}m bars and x-ray images with the magnification factor of higher than 230 were obtained.

  15. X-ray Microscopy Beamlines at SSRF--Present Status and Future Plan

    SciTech Connect

    Xu, H.; Yu, X.; Tai, R.

    2011-09-09

    The Shanghai Synchrotron Radiation Facility (SSRF) is a 3.5-GeV third-generation light source. The facility has been open for user experiments since May, 2009. This high-brightness x-ray source is an ideal platform for x-ray microscopy. Presently, SSRF has three beamlines related to x-ray microscopy or imaging, namely the soft x-ray spectromicroscopy beamline (STXM), the hard x-ray microfocusing beamline, and the x-ray imaging beamline. The construction of SSRF phase-II beamlines will be carried out during 2011-2017. Seven additional beamlines for x-ray microscopy or imaging will be built.

  16. EPR-Spin Trapping and Flow Cytometric Studies of Free Radicals Generated Using Cold Atmospheric Argon Plasma and X-Ray Irradiation in Aqueous Solutions and Intracellular Milieu.

    PubMed

    Uchiyama, Hidefumi; Zhao, Qing-Li; Hassan, Mariame Ali; Andocs, Gabor; Nojima, Nobuyuki; Takeda, Keigo; Ishikawa, Kenji; Hori, Masaru; Kondo, Takashi

    2015-01-01

    Electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR)-spin trapping and flow cytometry were used to identify free radicals generated using argon-cold atmospheric plasma (Ar-CAP) in aqueous solutions and intracellularly in comparison with those generated by X-irradiation. Ar-CAP was generated using a high-voltage power supply unit with low-frequency excitation. The characteristics of Ar-CAP were estimated by vacuum UV absorption and emission spectra measurements. Hydroxyl (·OH) radicals and hydrogen (H) atoms in aqueous solutions were identified with the spin traps 5,5-dimethyl-1-pyrroline N-oxide (DMPO), 3,3,5,5-tetramethyl-1-pyrroline-N-oxide (M4PO), and phenyl N-t-butylnitrone (PBN). The occurrence of Ar-CAP-induced pyrolysis was evaluated using the spin trap 3,5-dibromo-4-nitrosobenzene sulfonate (DBNBS) in aqueous solutions of DNA constituents, sodium acetate, and L-alanine. Human lymphoma U937 cells were used to study intracellular oxidative stress using five fluorescent probes with different affinities to a number of reactive species. The analysis and quantification of EPR spectra revealed the formation of enormous amounts of ·OH radicals using Ar-CAP compared with that by X-irradiation. Very small amounts of H atoms were detected whereas nitric oxide was not found. The formation of ·OH radicals depended on the type of rare gas used and the yield correlated inversely with ionization energy in the order of krypton > argon = neon > helium. No pyrolysis radicals were detected in aqueous solutions exposed to Ar-CAP. Intracellularly, ·OH, H2O2, which is the recombination product of ·OH, and OCl- were the most likely formed reactive oxygen species after exposure to Ar-CAP. Intracellularly, there was no practical evidence for the formation of NO whereas very small amounts of superoxides were formed. Despite the superiority of Ar-CAP in forming ·OH radicals, the exposure to X-rays proved more lethal. The mechanism of free radical formation in aqueous solutions and an

  17. EPR-Spin Trapping and Flow Cytometric Studies of Free Radicals Generated Using Cold Atmospheric Argon Plasma and X-Ray Irradiation in Aqueous Solutions and Intracellular Milieu

    PubMed Central

    Uchiyama, Hidefumi; Zhao, Qing-Li; Hassan, Mariame Ali; Andocs, Gabor; Nojima, Nobuyuki; Takeda, Keigo; Ishikawa, Kenji; Hori, Masaru; Kondo, Takashi

    2015-01-01

    Electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR)-spin trapping and flow cytometry were used to identify free radicals generated using argon-cold atmospheric plasma (Ar-CAP) in aqueous solutions and intracellularly in comparison with those generated by X-irradiation. Ar-CAP was generated using a high-voltage power supply unit with low-frequency excitation. The characteristics of Ar-CAP were estimated by vacuum UV absorption and emission spectra measurements. Hydroxyl (·OH) radicals and hydrogen (H) atoms in aqueous solutions were identified with the spin traps 5,5-dimethyl-1-pyrroline N-oxide (DMPO), 3,3,5,5-tetramethyl-1-pyrroline-N-oxide (M4PO), and phenyl N-t-butylnitrone (PBN). The occurrence of Ar-CAP-induced pyrolysis was evaluated using the spin trap 3,5-dibromo-4-nitrosobenzene sulfonate (DBNBS) in aqueous solutions of DNA constituents, sodium acetate, and L-alanine. Human lymphoma U937 cells were used to study intracellular oxidative stress using five fluorescent probes with different affinities to a number of reactive species. The analysis and quantification of EPR spectra revealed the formation of enormous amounts of ·OH radicals using Ar-CAP compared with that by X-irradiation. Very small amounts of H atoms were detected whereas nitric oxide was not found. The formation of ·OH radicals depended on the type of rare gas used and the yield correlated inversely with ionization energy in the order of krypton > argon = neon > helium. No pyrolysis radicals were detected in aqueous solutions exposed to Ar-CAP. Intracellularly, ·OH, H2O2, which is the recombination product of ·OH, and OCl- were the most likely formed reactive oxygen species after exposure to Ar-CAP. Intracellularly, there was no practical evidence for the formation of NO whereas very small amounts of superoxides were formed. Despite the superiority of Ar-CAP in forming ·OH radicals, the exposure to X-rays proved more lethal. The mechanism of free radical formation in aqueous solutions and an

  18. EPR-Spin Trapping and Flow Cytometric Studies of Free Radicals Generated Using Cold Atmospheric Argon Plasma and X-Ray Irradiation in Aqueous Solutions and Intracellular Milieu.

    PubMed

    Uchiyama, Hidefumi; Zhao, Qing-Li; Hassan, Mariame Ali; Andocs, Gabor; Nojima, Nobuyuki; Takeda, Keigo; Ishikawa, Kenji; Hori, Masaru; Kondo, Takashi

    2015-01-01

    Electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR)-spin trapping and flow cytometry were used to identify free radicals generated using argon-cold atmospheric plasma (Ar-CAP) in aqueous solutions and intracellularly in comparison with those generated by X-irradiation. Ar-CAP was generated using a high-voltage power supply unit with low-frequency excitation. The characteristics of Ar-CAP were estimated by vacuum UV absorption and emission spectra measurements. Hydroxyl (·OH) radicals and hydrogen (H) atoms in aqueous solutions were identified with the spin traps 5,5-dimethyl-1-pyrroline N-oxide (DMPO), 3,3,5,5-tetramethyl-1-pyrroline-N-oxide (M4PO), and phenyl N-t-butylnitrone (PBN). The occurrence of Ar-CAP-induced pyrolysis was evaluated using the spin trap 3,5-dibromo-4-nitrosobenzene sulfonate (DBNBS) in aqueous solutions of DNA constituents, sodium acetate, and L-alanine. Human lymphoma U937 cells were used to study intracellular oxidative stress using five fluorescent probes with different affinities to a number of reactive species. The analysis and quantification of EPR spectra revealed the formation of enormous amounts of ·OH radicals using Ar-CAP compared with that by X-irradiation. Very small amounts of H atoms were detected whereas nitric oxide was not found. The formation of ·OH radicals depended on the type of rare gas used and the yield correlated inversely with ionization energy in the order of krypton > argon = neon > helium. No pyrolysis radicals were detected in aqueous solutions exposed to Ar-CAP. Intracellularly, ·OH, H2O2, which is the recombination product of ·OH, and OCl- were the most likely formed reactive oxygen species after exposure to Ar-CAP. Intracellularly, there was no practical evidence for the formation of NO whereas very small amounts of superoxides were formed. Despite the superiority of Ar-CAP in forming ·OH radicals, the exposure to X-rays proved more lethal. The mechanism of free radical formation in aqueous solutions and an

  19. Fabrication process for a gradient index x-ray lens

    DOEpatents

    Bionta, R.M.; Makowiecki, D.M.; Skulina, K.M.

    1995-01-17

    A process is disclosed for fabricating high efficiency x-ray lenses that operate in the 0.5-4.0 keV region suitable for use in biological imaging, surface science, and x-ray lithography of integrated circuits. The gradient index x-ray optics fabrication process broadly involves co-sputtering multi-layers of film on a wire, followed by slicing and mounting on block, and then ion beam thinning to a thickness determined by periodic testing for efficiency. The process enables the fabrication of transmissive gradient index x-ray optics for the 0.5-4.0 keV energy range. This process allows the fabrication of optical elements for the next generation of imaging and x-ray lithography instruments in the soft x-ray region. 13 figures.

  20. Fabrication process for a gradient index x-ray lens

    DOEpatents

    Bionta, Richard M.; Makowiecki, Daniel M.; Skulina, Kenneth M.

    1995-01-01

    A process for fabricating high efficiency x-ray lenses that operate in the 0.5-4.0 keV region suitable for use in biological imaging, surface science, and x-ray lithography of integrated circuits. The gradient index x-ray optics fabrication process broadly involves co-sputtering multi-layers of film on a wire, followed by slicing and mounting on block, and then ion beam thinning to a thickness determined by periodic testing for efficiency. The process enables the fabrication of transmissive gradient index x-ray optics for the 0.5-4.0 keV energy range. This process allows the fabrication of optical elements for the next generation of imaging and x-ray lithography instruments m the soft x-ray region.

  1. X-ray emission from active galactic nuclei

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mushotzky, R.

    1985-01-01

    It is often held that the X-ray emission from active galactic nuclei (AGN) arises from a region close to the central energy source. Thus X-ray observations may provide the best constraints on the central engine. In particular, the shape of the X-ray continuum gives information about the mechanism for photon generation, X-ray time variability data can constrain the size and mass of the continuum source, and X-ray occultation data give constraints on the relative sizes of the continuum source and the intervening absorbing material (often assumed to be the broad line clouds). In addition, since a fair fraction of the total energy of an AGN is emitted at X-ray wavelengths, direct measurement of the amount and spectral form of this radiation is important for modeling of the optically emitting clouds.

  2. X-ray beam pointer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nelson, C. W.

    1980-01-01

    Inexpensive, readily assembled pointer aims X-ray machine for welded assembly radiographs. Plumb bob used for vertical alinement and yardstick used to visualize X-ray paths were inconvenient and inaccurate. Pointer cuts alinement time by one-half and eliminates necessity of retakes. For 3,000 weld radiographs, pointer will save 300 worker-hours and significant materials costs.

  3. X-ray based extensometry

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jordan, E. H.; Pease, D. M.

    1988-01-01

    A totally new method of extensometry using an X-ray beam was proposed. The intent of the method is to provide a non-contacting technique that is immune to problems associated with density variations in gaseous environments that plague optical methods. X-rays are virtually unrefractable even by solids. The new method utilizes X-ray induced X-ray fluorescence or X-ray induced optical fluorescence of targets that have melting temperatures of over 3000 F. Many different variations of the basic approaches are possible. In the year completed, preliminary experiments were completed which strongly suggest that the method is feasible. The X-ray induced optical fluorescence method appears to be limited to temperatures below roughly 1600 F because of the overwhelming thermal optical radiation. The X-ray induced X-ray fluorescence scheme appears feasible up to very high temperatures. In this system there will be an unknown tradeoff between frequency response, cost, and accuracy. The exact tradeoff can only be estimated. It appears that for thermomechanical tests with cycle times on the order of minutes a very reasonable system may be feasible. The intended applications involve very high temperatures in both materials testing and monitoring component testing. Gas turbine engines, rocket engines, and hypersonic vehicles (NASP) all involve measurement needs that could partially be met by the proposed technology.

  4. A laboratory-based hard x-ray monochromator for high-resolution x-ray emission spectroscopy and x-ray absorption near edge structure measurements

    SciTech Connect

    Seidler, G. T. Mortensen, D. R.; Remesnik, A. J.; Pacold, J. I.; Ball, N. A.; Barry, N.; Styczinski, M.; Hoidn, O. R.

    2014-11-15

    We report the development of a laboratory-based Rowland-circle monochromator that incorporates a low power x-ray (bremsstrahlung) tube source, a spherically bent crystal analyzer, and an energy-resolving solid-state detector. This relatively inexpensive, introductory level instrument achieves 1-eV energy resolution for photon energies of ∼5 keV to ∼10 keV while also demonstrating a net efficiency previously seen only in laboratory monochromators having much coarser energy resolution. Despite the use of only a compact, air-cooled 10 W x-ray tube, we find count rates for nonresonant x-ray emission spectroscopy comparable to those achieved at monochromatized spectroscopy beamlines at synchrotron light sources. For x-ray absorption near edge structure, the monochromatized flux is small (due to the use of a low-powered x-ray generator) but still useful for routine transmission-mode studies of concentrated samples. These results indicate that upgrading to a standard commercial high-power line-focused x-ray tube or rotating anode x-ray generator would result in monochromatized fluxes of order 10{sup 6}–10{sup 7} photons/s with no loss in energy resolution. This work establishes core technical capabilities for a rejuvenation of laboratory-based hard x-ray spectroscopies that could have special relevance for contemporary research on catalytic or electrical energy storage systems using transition-metal, lanthanide, or noble-metal active species.

  5. A laboratory-based hard x-ray monochromator for high-resolution x-ray emission spectroscopy and x-ray absorption near edge structure measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Seidler, G. T.; Mortensen, D. R.; Remesnik, A. J.; Pacold, J. I.; Ball, N. A.; Barry, N.; Styczinski, M.; Hoidn, O. R.

    2014-11-01

    We report the development of a laboratory-based Rowland-circle monochromator that incorporates a low power x-ray (bremsstrahlung) tube source, a spherically bent crystal analyzer, and an energy-resolving solid-state detector. This relatively inexpensive, introductory level instrument achieves 1-eV energy resolution for photon energies of ˜5 keV to ˜10 keV while also demonstrating a net efficiency previously seen only in laboratory monochromators having much coarser energy resolution. Despite the use of only a compact, air-cooled 10 W x-ray tube, we find count rates for nonresonant x-ray emission spectroscopy comparable to those achieved at monochromatized spectroscopy beamlines at synchrotron light sources. For x-ray absorption near edge structure, the monochromatized flux is small (due to the use of a low-powered x-ray generator) but still useful for routine transmission-mode studies of concentrated samples. These results indicate that upgrading to a standard commercial high-power line-focused x-ray tube or rotating anode x-ray generator would result in monochromatized fluxes of order 106-107 photons/s with no loss in energy resolution. This work establishes core technical capabilities for a rejuvenation of laboratory-based hard x-ray spectroscopies that could have special relevance for contemporary research on catalytic or electrical energy storage systems using transition-metal, lanthanide, or noble-metal active species.

  6. X-Ray Tomographic Reconstruction

    SciTech Connect

    Bonnie Schmittberger

    2010-08-25

    Tomographic scans have revolutionized imaging techniques used in medical and biological research by resolving individual sample slices instead of several superimposed images that are obtained from regular x-ray scans. X-Ray fluorescence computed tomography, a more specific tomography technique, bombards the sample with synchrotron x-rays and detects the fluorescent photons emitted from the sample. However, since x-rays are attenuated as they pass through the sample, tomographic scans often produce images with erroneous low densities in areas where the x-rays have already passed through most of the sample. To correct for this and correctly reconstruct the data in order to obtain the most accurate images, a program employing iterative methods based on the inverse Radon transform was written. Applying this reconstruction method to a tomographic image recovered some of the lost densities, providing a more accurate image from which element concentrations and internal structure can be determined.

  7. X-ray shearing interferometer

    DOEpatents

    Koch, Jeffrey A.

    2003-07-08

    An x-ray interferometer for analyzing high density plasmas and optically opaque materials includes a point-like x-ray source for providing a broadband x-ray source. The x-rays are directed through a target material and then are reflected by a high-quality ellipsoidally-bent imaging crystal to a diffraction grating disposed at 1.times. magnification. A spherically-bent imaging crystal is employed when the x-rays that are incident on the crystal surface are normal to that surface. The diffraction grating produces multiple beams which interfere with one another to produce an interference pattern which contains information about the target. A detector is disposed at the position of the image of the target produced by the interfering beams.

  8. Hetero-site-specific X-ray pump-probe spectroscopy for femtosecond intramolecular dynamics

    DOE PAGES

    Picón, A.; Lehmann, C. S.; Bostedt, C.; Rudenko, A.; Marinelli, A.; Osipov, T.; Rolles, D.; Berrah, N.; Bomme, C.; Bucher, M.; et al

    2016-05-23

    New capabilities at X-ray free-electron laser facilities allow the generation of two-colour femtosecond X-ray pulses, opening the possibility of performing ultrafast studies of X-ray-induced phenomena. Specifically, the experimental realization of hetero-site-specific X-ray-pump/X-ray-probe spectroscopy is of special interest, in which an X-ray pump pulse is absorbed at one site within a molecule and an X-ray probe pulse follows the X-ray-induced dynamics at another site within the same molecule. In this paper, we show experimental evidence of a hetero-site pump-probe signal. By using two-colour 10-fs X-ray pulses, we are able to observe the femtosecond time dependence for the formation of F ionsmore » during the fragmentation of XeF2 molecules following X-ray absorption at the Xe site.« less

  9. Hetero-site-specific X-ray pump-probe spectroscopy for femtosecond intramolecular dynamics

    PubMed Central

    Picón, A.; Lehmann, C. S.; Bostedt, C.; Rudenko, A.; Marinelli, A.; Osipov, T.; Rolles, D.; Berrah, N.; Bomme, C.; Bucher, M.; Doumy, G.; Erk, B.; Ferguson, K. R.; Gorkhover, T.; Ho, P. J.; Kanter, E. P.; Krässig, B.; Krzywinski, J.; Lutman, A. A.; March, A. M.; Moonshiram, D.; Ray, D.; Young, L.; Pratt, S. T.; Southworth, S. H.

    2016-01-01

    New capabilities at X-ray free-electron laser facilities allow the generation of two-colour femtosecond X-ray pulses, opening the possibility of performing ultrafast studies of X-ray-induced phenomena. Particularly, the experimental realization of hetero-site-specific X-ray-pump/X-ray-probe spectroscopy is of special interest, in which an X-ray pump pulse is absorbed at one site within a molecule and an X-ray probe pulse follows the X-ray-induced dynamics at another site within the same molecule. Here we show experimental evidence of a hetero-site pump-probe signal. By using two-colour 10-fs X-ray pulses, we are able to observe the femtosecond time dependence for the formation of F ions during the fragmentation of XeF2 molecules following X-ray absorption at the Xe site. PMID:27212390

  10. Hard X-Ray Emission of X-Ray Bursters

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kaaret, Phillip

    1997-01-01

    The main results from this investigation were serendipitous. The long observation approved for the study of the hard X-ray emission of X-ray bursters lead, instead, to one of the largest early samples of the behavior of fast quasi-periodic oscillations (QPOS) in an atoll sources. Our analysis of this data set lead to the several important discoveries including the existence of a robust correlation between QPO frequency and the flux of a soft blackbody component of the X-ray spectrum in the atoll source 4U 0614+091.

  11. Hard x-ray scanning microscopy with coherent radiation: Beyond the resolution of conventional x-ray microscopes

    SciTech Connect

    Schropp, A.; Hoppe, R.; Patommel, J.; Samberg, D.; Seiboth, F.; Stephan, S.; Schroer, C. G.; Wellenreuther, G.; Falkenberg, G.

    2012-06-18

    We demonstrate x-ray scanning coherent diffraction microscopy (ptychography) with 10 nm spatial resolution, clearly exceeding the resolution limits of conventional hard x-ray microscopy. The spatial resolution in a ptychogram is shown to depend on the shape (structure factor) of a feature and can vary for different features in the object. In addition, the resolution and contrast are shown to increase with increasing coherent fluence. For an optimal ptychographic x-ray microscope, this implies a source with highest possible brilliance and an x-ray optic with a large numerical aperture to generate the optimal probe beam.

  12. The 4th Thermodynamic Principle?

    SciTech Connect

    Montero Garcia, Jose de la Luz; Novoa Blanco, Jesus Francisco

    2007-04-28

    It should be emphasized that the 4th Principle above formulated is a thermodynamic principle and, at the same time, is mechanical-quantum and relativist, as it should inevitably be and its absence has been one of main the theoretical limitations of the physical theory until today.We show that the theoretical discovery of Dimensional Primitive Octet of Matter, the 4th Thermodynamic Principle, the Quantum Hexet of Matter, the Global Hexagonal Subsystem of Fundamental Constants of Energy and the Measurement or Connected Global Scale or Universal Existential Interval of the Matter is that it is possible to be arrived at a global formulation of the four 'forces' or fundamental interactions of nature. The Einstein's golden dream is possible.

  13. Generation of runaway electrons and X-ray emission during breakdown of atmospheric-pressure air by voltage pulses with an ∼0.5-μs front duration

    SciTech Connect

    Kostyrya, I. D.; Tarasenko, V. F.

    2015-03-15

    Results are presented from experiments on the generation of runaway electron beams and X-ray emission in atmospheric-pressure air by using voltage pulses with an ∼0.5-μs front duration. It is shown that the use of small-curvature-radius spherical cathodes (or other cathodes with small curvature radii) decreases the intensity of the runaway electron beam and X-ray emission. It is found that, at sufficiently high voltages at the electrode gap (U{sub m} ∼ 100 kV), the gap breakdown, the formation of a spark channel, and the generation of a runaway electron beam occur over less than 10 ns. At high values of U{sub m} behind the anode that were reached by increasing the cathode size and the electrode gap length, a supershort avalanche electron beam with a full width at half-maximum (FWHM) of up to ∼100 ps was detected. At voltages of ∼50 kV, the second breakdown regime was revealed in which a runaway electron beam with an FWHM of ∼2 ns was generated, whereas the FWHM of the X-ray pulse increased to ∼100 ns. It is established that the energy of the bulk of runaway electrons decreases with increasing voltage front duration and is ⩽30 keV in the first regime and ⩽10 keV in the second regime.

  14. High Resolution X-ray-Induced Acoustic Tomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xiang, Liangzhong; Tang, Shanshan; Ahmad, Moiz; Xing, Lei

    2016-05-01

    Absorption based CT imaging has been an invaluable tool in medical diagnosis, biology, and materials science. However, CT requires a large set of projection data and high radiation dose to achieve superior image quality. In this letter, we report a new imaging modality, X-ray Induced Acoustic Tomography (XACT), which takes advantages of high sensitivity to X-ray absorption and high ultrasonic resolution in a single modality. A single projection X-ray exposure is sufficient to generate acoustic signals in 3D space because the X-ray generated acoustic waves are of a spherical nature and propagate in all directions from their point of generation. We demonstrate the successful reconstruction of gold fiducial markers with a spatial resolution of about 350 μm. XACT reveals a new imaging mechanism and provides uncharted opportunities for structural determination with X-ray.

  15. High Resolution X-ray-Induced Acoustic Tomography

    PubMed Central

    Xiang, Liangzhong; Tang, Shanshan; Ahmad, Moiz; Xing, Lei

    2016-01-01

    Absorption based CT imaging has been an invaluable tool in medical diagnosis, biology, and materials science. However, CT requires a large set of projection data and high radiation dose to achieve superior image quality. In this letter, we report a new imaging modality, X-ray Induced Acoustic Tomography (XACT), which takes advantages of high sensitivity to X-ray absorption and high ultrasonic resolution in a single modality. A single projection X-ray exposure is sufficient to generate acoustic signals in 3D space because the X-ray generated acoustic waves are of a spherical nature and propagate in all directions from their point of generation. We demonstrate the successful reconstruction of gold fiducial markers with a spatial resolution of about 350 μm. XACT reveals a new imaging mechanism and provides uncharted opportunities for structural determination with X-ray. PMID:27189746

  16. PixFEL: developing a fine pitch, fast 2D X-ray imager for the next generation X-FELs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ratti, L.; Comotti, D.; Fabris, L.; Grassi, M.; Lodola, L.; Malcovati, P.; Manghisoni, M.; Re, V.; Traversi, G.; Vacchi, C.; Bettarini, S.; Casarosa, G.; Forti, F.; Morsani, F.; Paladino, A.; Paoloni, E.; Rizzo, G.; Benkechkache, M. A.; Dalla Betta, G.-F.; Mendicino, R.; Pancheri, L.; Verzellesi, G.; Xu, H.

    2015-10-01

    The PixFEL project is conceived as the first stage of a long term research program aiming at the development of advanced X-ray imaging instrumentation for applications at the free electron laser (FEL) facilities. The project aims at substantially advancing the state-of-the-art in the field of 2D X-ray imaging by exploring cutting-edge solutions for sensor development, for integration processes and for readout channel architectures. The main focus is on the development of the fundamental microelectronic building blocks for detector readout and on the technologies for the assembly of a multilayer module with minimum dead area. This work serves the purpose of introducing the main features of the project, together with the simulation results leading to the first prototyping run.

  17. Origin of the cosmic x-ray background

    SciTech Connect

    Margon, B.

    1983-01-01

    Since 1962, it has been known that every part of the sky emits a uniform glow of x-rays. After two decades of intense study the origin of this diffuse x-ray background is still a subject of controversy. The near perfect isotropy of the x-ray background is clearly a vital clue to its origin. A second clue to the origin of the x-ray background arises from the fact that it is x-radiation tha is generated, rather than some longer wavelength radiation. Two hypotheses of the origin of this x-ray background are discussed. One hypothesis is that the x-ray background can be attributed to bremsstrahlung from a hot intergalactic medium. The second hypothesis is that the x-ray background originates from a large number of quasars. Because there is no estimate independent of the intensity of the x-ray background of how much hot intergalactic medium exists (if any), there is a real possibility that both sources contribute to the observed x-rays. (SC)

  18. Luminescence properties after X-ray irradiation for dosimetry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hong, Duk-Geun; Kim, Myung-Jin

    2016-05-01

    To investigate the luminescence characteristics after exposure to X-ray radiation, we developed an independent, small X-ray irradiation system comprising a Varian VF-50J mini X-ray generator, a Pb collimator, a delay shutter, and an Al absorber. With this system, the apparent dose rate increased linearly to 0.8 Gy/s against the emission current for a 50 kV anode potential when the shutter was delayed for an initial 4 s and the Al absorber was 300 µm thick. In addition, an approximately 20 mm diameter sample area was irradiated homogeneously with X rays. Based on three-dimensional (3D) thermoluminescence (TL) spectra, the small X-ray irradiator was considered comparable to the conventional 90Sr/90Y beta source even though the TL intensity from beta irradiation was higher than that from X-ray irradiation. The single aliquot regenerative (SAR) growth curve for the small X-ray irradiator was identical to that for the beta source. Therefore, we concluded that the characteristics of the small X-ray irradiator and the conventional 90Sr/90Y beta source were similar and that X ray irradiation had the potential for being suitable for use in luminescence dosimetry.

  19. Studies on the effective energy of x-rays generated by ECR and their use for the calibration of thermoluminescent dosimeter badges in low energy region

    SciTech Connect

    Baskaran, R.; Selvakumaran, T.S.

    2005-04-01

    The effective energy of electron cyclotron resonance (ECR) x-ray source has been altered by keeping a target disk at the cavity wall in the exit port. The source has been tuned for the effective energy of 40 and 70 keV. The use of the source for the calibration of thermoluminescent dosimeter badges in the low energy region (<150 keV) has been explored.

  20. Ultrafast x-ray-induced nuclear dynamics in diatomic molecules using femtosecond x-ray-pump-x-ray-probe spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lehmann, C. S.; Picón, A.; Bostedt, C.; Rudenko, A.; Marinelli, A.; Moonshiram, D.; Osipov, T.; Rolles, D.; Berrah, N.; Bomme, C.; Bucher, M.; Doumy, G.; Erk, B.; Ferguson, K. R.; Gorkhover, T.; Ho, P. J.; Kanter, E. P.; Krässig, B.; Krzywinski, J.; Lutman, A. A.; March, A. M.; Ray, D.; Young, L.; Pratt, S. T.; Southworth, S. H.

    2016-07-01

    The capability of generating two intense, femtosecond x-ray pulses with a controlled time delay opens the possibility of performing time-resolved experiments for x-ray-induced phenomena. We have applied this capability to study the photoinduced dynamics in diatomic molecules. In molecules composed of low-Z elements, K -shell ionization creates a core-hole state in which the main decay mode is an Auger process involving two electrons in the valence shell. After Auger decay, the nuclear wave packets of the transient two-valence-hole states continue evolving on the femtosecond time scale, leading either to separated atomic ions or long-lived quasibound states. By using an x-ray pump and an x-ray probe pulse tuned above the K -shell ionization threshold of the nitrogen molecule, we are able to observe ion dissociation in progress by measuring the time-dependent kinetic energy releases of different breakup channels. We simulated the measurements on N2 with a molecular dynamics model that accounts for K -shell ionization, Auger decay, and the time evolution of the nuclear wave packets. In addition to explaining the time-dependent feature in the measured kinetic energy release distributions from the dissociative states, the simulation also reveals the contributions of quasibound states.