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Sample records for 4th postoperative day

  1. Air leakage on the postoperative day: powerful factor of postoperative recurrence after thoracoscopic bullectomy

    PubMed Central

    Jeon, Hyun Woo; Kye, Yeo Kon; Kim, Kyung Soo

    2016-01-01

    Background Primary spontaneous pneumothorax (PSP) is a relatively common disorder in young patients. Although various surgical techniques have been introduced, recurrence after video-assisted thoracoscopic surgery (VATS) remains high. The aim of study was to identify the risk factors for postoperative recurrence after thoracoscopic bullectomy in the spontaneous pneumothorax. Methods From January 2011 through March 2013, two hundreds and thirty two patients underwent surgery because of pneumothorax. Patients with a secondary pneumothorax, as well as cases of single port surgery, an open procedure, additional pleural procedure (pleurectomy, pleural abrasion) or lack of medical records were excluded. The records of 147 patients with PSP undergoing 3-port video-assisted thoracoscopic bullectomy with staple line coverage using an absorbable polyglycolic acid (PGA) sheet were retrospectively reviewed. Results The median age was 19 years (range, 11−34 years) with male predominance (87.8%). Median postoperative hospital stay was 3 days (range, 1−10 days) without mortality. Complications were developed in five patients. A total of 24 patients showed postoperative recurrence (16.3%). Younger age less than 17 years old and immediate postoperative air leakage were risk factors for postoperative recurrence after thoracoscopic bullectomy by multivariate analysis. Conclusions Immediate postoperative air leakage was the risk factor for postoperative recurrence. However, further study will be required for the correlation of air leakage with recurrence. PMID:26904217

  2. 90-day postoperative mortality is a legitimate measure of hepatopancreatobiliary surgical quality

    PubMed Central

    Mise, Yoshihiro; Vauthey, Jean-Nicolas; Zimmitti, Giuseppe; Parker, Nathan H.; Conrad, Claudius; Aloia, Thomas A.; Lee, Jeffery E.; Fleming, Jason B.; Katz, Matthew H. G.

    2015-01-01

    Objective To investigate the legitimacy of 90-day mortality as a measure of hepatopancreatobiliary quality. Summary Background Data The 90-day mortality rate has been increasingly but not universally reported after hepatopancreatobiliary surgery. The legitimacy of this definition as a measure of surgical quality has not been evaluated. Methods We retrospectively reviewed the causes of all deaths that occurred within 365 postoperative days in patients undergoing hepatectomy (n = 2811) and/or pancreatectomy (n = 1092) from January 1997 through December 2012. The rates of surgery-related, disease-related, and overall mortality within 30 days, within 30 days or during the index hospitalization, within 90 days, and within 180 days following surgery were calculated. Results Seventy-nine (3%) surgery-related deaths and 92 (3%) disease-related deaths occurred within 365 days after hepatectomy. Twenty (2%) surgery-related deaths and 112 (10%) disease-related deaths occurred within 365 days after pancreatectomy. The overall mortality rates at 99 day and 118 days optimally reflected surgery-related mortality following hepatobiliary and pancreatic operations, respectively. The 90-day overall mortality rate was a less sensitive but equivalently specific measure of surgery-related death. Conclusions and Relevance The 99-day and 118-day definitions of postoperative mortality optimally reflected surgery-related mortality following hepatobiliary and pancreatic operations, respectively. However, among commonly reported metrics, the 90-day overall mortality rate represents a legitimate measure of surgical quality. PMID:25590497

  3. Postoperative Pain, an Unmet Problem in Day or Overnight Italian Surgery Patients: A Prospective Study.

    PubMed

    Campagna, Sara; Antonielli D'Oulx, Maria Delfina; Paradiso, Rosetta; Perretta, Laura; Re Viglietti, Silvia; Berchialla, Paola; Dimonte, Valerio

    2016-01-01

    Background. Because of economic reasons, day surgery rates have steadily increased in many countries and the trend is to perform around 70% of all surgical procedures as day surgery. Literature shows that postoperative pain treatment remains unfulfilled in several fields such as orthopedic and general surgery patients. In Italy, the day surgery program is not yet under governmental authority and is managed regionally by local practices. Aim. To investigate the trends in pain intensity and its relation to type of surgeries and pain therapy protocols, in postoperative patients, discharged from three different Ambulatory Surgeries located in North West Italy (Piedmont region). Method. The present study enrolled 276 patients who undergone different surgical procedures in ambulatory regimen. Patients recorded postoperative pain score twice a day, compliance with prescribed drugs, and pain related reasons for contacting the hospital. Monitoring lasted for 7 days. Results. At discharge, 72% of patients were under weak opioids, 12% interrupted the treatment due to side effects, 17% of patients required extra drugs, and 15% contacted the hospital reporting pain problems. About 50% of patients experienced moderate pain during the first day after surgery. Results from our study show that most of the patients experienced avoidable pain after discharge.

  4. Postoperative Pain, an Unmet Problem in Day or Overnight Italian Surgery Patients: A Prospective Study

    PubMed Central

    Antonielli D'Oulx, Maria Delfina; Paradiso, Rosetta; Perretta, Laura; Dimonte, Valerio

    2016-01-01

    Background. Because of economic reasons, day surgery rates have steadily increased in many countries and the trend is to perform around 70% of all surgical procedures as day surgery. Literature shows that postoperative pain treatment remains unfulfilled in several fields such as orthopedic and general surgery patients. In Italy, the day surgery program is not yet under governmental authority and is managed regionally by local practices. Aim. To investigate the trends in pain intensity and its relation to type of surgeries and pain therapy protocols, in postoperative patients, discharged from three different Ambulatory Surgeries located in North West Italy (Piedmont region). Method. The present study enrolled 276 patients who undergone different surgical procedures in ambulatory regimen. Patients recorded postoperative pain score twice a day, compliance with prescribed drugs, and pain related reasons for contacting the hospital. Monitoring lasted for 7 days. Results. At discharge, 72% of patients were under weak opioids, 12% interrupted the treatment due to side effects, 17% of patients required extra drugs, and 15% contacted the hospital reporting pain problems. About 50% of patients experienced moderate pain during the first day after surgery. Results from our study show that most of the patients experienced avoidable pain after discharge. PMID:28115878

  5. Tranexamic acid mouthwash--a prospective randomized study of a 2-day regimen vs 5-day regimen to prevent postoperative bleeding in anticoagulated patients requiring dental extractions.

    PubMed

    Carter, G; Goss, A

    2003-10-01

    This prospective randomized study analyses the use of a prescribed 4.8% tranexamic acid post-operative mouthwash over 2 days vs 5 days to prevent bleeding in patients taking warfarin who require dental extractions. Eighty-five patients therapeutically anticoagulated with warfarin for various conditions, ranging in age from 21 to 86 years and requiring dental extractions, were randomly divided into two groups. Group A postoperatively received a 4.8% tranexamic acid mouthwash to be used over a 2-day period. Group B received the same mouthwash and instructions postoperatively, to be taken over 5 days. All procedures were performed on an ambulatory basis under local anaesthetic by the same surgeon. Patients were reviewed 1, 3, and 7 days postoperatively to assess bleeding. Eighty-two of the 85 patients encountered no postoperative problems. Two patients in group A and one in group B had minor postoperative bleeds that required minor ambulatory intervention to control. This study shows that a 2-day postoperative course of a 4.8% tranexamic acid mouthwash is as equally effective as a 5-day course in controlling haemostasis post-dental extractions in patient's anticoagulated with warfarin.

  6. Music benefits on postoperative distress and pain in pediatric day care surgery.

    PubMed

    Calcaterra, Valeria; Ostuni, Selene; Bonomelli, Irene; Mencherini, Simonetta; Brunero, Marco; Zambaiti, Elisa; Mannarino, Savina; Larizza, Daniela; Albertini, Riccardo; Tinelli, Carmine; Pelizzo, Gloria

    2014-08-12

    Postoperative effect of music listening has not been established in pediatric age. Response on postoperative distress and pain in pediatric day care surgery has been evaluated. Forty-two children were enrolled. Patients were randomly assigned to the music-group (music intervention during awakening period) or the non-music group (standard postoperative care). Slow and fast classical music and pauses were recorded and played via ambient speakers. Heart rate, blood pressure, oxygen saturation, glucose and cortisol levels, faces pain scale and Face, Legs, Activity, Cry, Consolability (FLACC) Pain Scale were considered as indicators of response to stress and pain experience. Music during awakening induced lower increase of systolic and diastolic blood pressure levels. The non-music group showed progressive increasing values of glycemia; in music-group the curve of glycemia presented a plateau pattern (P<0.001). Positive impact on reactions to pain was noted using the FLACC scale. Music improves cardiovascular parameters, stress-induced hyperglycemia. Amelioration on pain perception is more evident in older children. Positive effects seems to be achieved by the alternation of fast, slow rhythms and pauses even in pediatric age.

  7. The 4th Thermodynamic Principle?

    SciTech Connect

    Montero Garcia, Jose de la Luz; Novoa Blanco, Jesus Francisco

    2007-04-28

    It should be emphasized that the 4th Principle above formulated is a thermodynamic principle and, at the same time, is mechanical-quantum and relativist, as it should inevitably be and its absence has been one of main the theoretical limitations of the physical theory until today.We show that the theoretical discovery of Dimensional Primitive Octet of Matter, the 4th Thermodynamic Principle, the Quantum Hexet of Matter, the Global Hexagonal Subsystem of Fundamental Constants of Energy and the Measurement or Connected Global Scale or Universal Existential Interval of the Matter is that it is possible to be arrived at a global formulation of the four 'forces' or fundamental interactions of nature. The Einstein's golden dream is possible.

  8. Association between day of the week of elective surgery and postoperative mortality

    PubMed Central

    Dubois, Luc; Vogt, Kelly; Vinden, Chris; Winick-Ng, Jennifer; McClure, J. Andrew; Roshanov, Pavel S.; Bell, Chaim M.; Garg, Amit X.

    2017-01-01

    BACKGROUND: In prior studies, higher mortality was observed among patients who had elective surgery on a Friday rather than earlier in the week. We investigated whether mortality after elective surgery was associated with day of the week of surgery in a Canadian population and whether the association was influenced by surgeon experience and volume. METHODS: We conducted a population-based retrospective cohort study in the province of Ontario, Canada. We included adults who underwent 1 of 12 elective daytime surgical procedures from Apr. 1, 2002, to Dec. 31, 2012. The primary outcome was 30-day mortality. We used generalized estimating equations to compare outcomes for surgeries performed on different days of the week, adjusting for patient and surgeon factors. RESULTS: A total of 402 899 procedures performed by 1691 surgeons met our inclusion criteria. The median length of hospital stay was 6 (interquartile range 5–8) days. Surgeon experience varied significantly by day of week (p < 0.001), with surgeons operating on Fridays having the least experience. Nearly all of the patients who had their procedure on a Friday had postoperative care on the weekend, as compared with 49.1% of those whose surgery was on a Monday (p < 0.001). We found no difference in the 30-day mortality between procedures performed on Fridays and those performed on Mondays (adjusted odds ratio 1.08, 95% confidence interval 0.97–1.21). INTERPRETATION: Although surgeon experience differed across days of the week, the risk of 30-day mortality after elective surgery was similar regardless of which day of the week the procedure took place. PMID:27754897

  9. Staged liver resection for perihilar liver tumors using a tourniquet in the umbilical fissure and sequential portal vein embolization on the fourth postoperative day (a modified ALTPS).

    PubMed

    Robles Campos, Ricardo; Brusadin, Roberto; López Conesa, Asunción; Parrilla Paricio, Pascual

    2014-12-01

    Associating liver partition and portal vein ligation for staged hepatectomy (ALPPS) achieves the hypertrophy of the future liver remnant in seven days. We achieved the same hypertrophy placing a tourniquet in the parenchimal transection line associating a right portal vein ligation (associating liver tourniquet and right portal vein ligation for staged hepatectomy-ALTPS). In perihiliar tumors a«non touch» technique should be performed. ALPPS y ALTPS do not comply with this technical aspect because a dissection of the hilum is carried out in both procedures during the portal dissection. To avoid this problem we devised a new method called sequential ALTPS. It consists of placing a tourniquet in the umbilical fissure without ligation of the right portal vein during the first stage. Subsequently, on the 4(th) postoperative day we perform a percutaneous right portal vein embolization. We present the first case of this new technique in which we have obtained a hypertrophy of 77% of the future liver remnant seven days after portal vein embolization. In the second stage a right trisectionectomy was performed with inferior vena cava resection with a goretex graft replacement.

  10. Benefit of Oral Feeding as Early as One Day After Elective Surgery for Colorectal Cancer: Oral Feeding on First Versus Second Postoperative Day

    PubMed Central

    Fujii, Takaaki; Morita, Hiroki; Sutoh, Toshinaga; Yajima, Reina; Yamaguchi, Satoru; Tsutsumi, Soichi; Asao, Takayuki; Kuwano, Hiroyuki

    2014-01-01

    The optimal timing of early oral intake after surgery has not been fully established. The objective of this study was to compare early oral intake at postoperative day 1 after resection of colorectal cancer with that of day 2 to identify the optimal timing for resumption of oral intake in such patients. Consecutive patients with colorectal cancer who underwent elective colorectal resection were separated into two groups. Sixty-two patients began a liquid diet on the first postoperative day (POD1 group) and 58 patients began on POD2 (POD2 group) and advanced to a regular diet within the next 24 hours as tolerated. As for gastrointestinal recovery, the first passage of flatus was experienced, on average, on postoperative day 3.1 ± 1.0 in the POD2 group and on day 2.3 ± 0.7 in the POD1 group. The first defecation was also significantly earlier in patients in the POD1 group than those in the POD2 group (POD 3.2 ± 1.2 versus 4.2 ± 1.4, respectively). No statistical difference was found between the two groups in terms of postoperative complications. Our results suggest that very early feeding on POD1 after colorectal resection is safe and feasible and that induced a quicker recovery of postoperative gastrointestinal movement in patients. PMID:24833141

  11. Increased intraocular pressure on the first postoperative day following resident-performed cataract surgery

    PubMed Central

    Kim, J Y; Jo, M-W; Brauner, S C; Ferrufino-Ponce, Z; Ali, R; Cremers, S L; An Henderson, B

    2011-01-01

    Purpose The aim of this study was to investigate the incidence of intraocular pressure (IOP) elevation after resident-performed cataract surgery and to determine variables, which influence postoperative day 1 (POD1) IOP. Methods In all, 1111 consecutive cataract surgeries performed only by training residents between 1 July 2001 and 30 June 2006 were included. Elevated IOP was defined as ≥23 mm Hg. Surgeries were classified according to the presence of POD1-IOP elevation. Fisher's exact test and Student t-test were used to compare both groups. Multivariate analyses using generalized estimating equations were performed to investigate predictor variables associated with POD1-IOP elevation. Results The average preoperative IOP was 16.0±3.2 mm Hg and the average POD1-IOP was 19.3±7.1 mm Hg, reflecting a significant increase in IOP (P<0.001, paired t-test). The incidence of POD1-IOP elevation ≥23 mm Hg was 22.0% (244/1111). Presence of glaucoma and ocular hypertension, higher preoperative IOP, and longer axial length were frequently encountered variables in the POD1-IOP elevation group (all P<0.05). Using a multivariate analysis, presence of glaucoma (P=0.004, OR=2.38; 95% confidence interval (95% CI)=1.31–4.30), presence of ocular hypertension (P=0.003, OR=6.09; 95% CI=1.81–20.47), higher preoperative IOP (P<0.001, OR=3.73; 95% CI=1.92–7.25), and longer axial length (P=0.01, OR=1.15; 95% CI=1.03–1.29) were significant predictive factors for POD1-IOP elevation. Conclusions IOP elevation on the first postoperative day following resident-performed cataract surgery occurred frequently (22.0%). Increased early postoperative IOP was associated with presence of glaucoma and ocular hypertension, higher preoperative IOP, and longer axial length. PMID:21527959

  12. Very Early Colorectal Anastomotic Leakage within 5 Post-operative Days: a More Severe Subtype Needs Relaparatomy

    PubMed Central

    Li, Yi-Wei; Lian, Peng; Huang, Ben; Zheng, Hong-Tu; Wang, Ming-He; Gu, Wei-Lie; Li, Xin-Xiang; Xu, Ye; Cai, San-Jun

    2017-01-01

    Early anastomotic leakage (AL), usually defined as leakage within 30 post-operative days, represents a severe entity. However, mounting evidence has indicated that majorities of leakage occur within one week after surgery, making late AL rarity. Here we analyzed 101 consecutive colorectal AL, all of which occurred within 30 post-operative days, during Jan 2013 and Dec 2015 in cancer hospital of Fudan University. AL occurring within 5 post-operative days was defined as very early AL (vE-AL). We evaluated risk factors of vE-AL compared with non-vEAL and correlated with post-leakage peritonitis and need of relaparatomy. We found that AL occurred at median time of 7 days after surgery. 23 cases were vE-AL. Reconstruction of post-peritoneum for mid-low rectal carcinoma significantly reduced incidence of vE-AL compared with non-vE-AL (p = 0.042). Patients with vE-AL was associated with presence of peritonitis (p = 0.031), the latter significantly correlated with increased re-operation rate (p = 6.8E-13). Besides, patients with vE-AL trended to correlate with increased re-operation rate after leakage (p = 0.088). In concludsion, vE-AL occurring within 5 post-operative days represents a severe subtype associated with general peritonitis and need of relaparatomy. PMID:28084305

  13. Initiation of GnRH agonist treatment on 3-5 days postoperatively in endometriosis patients: a randomized controlled trial.

    PubMed

    Gong, Lili; Zhang, Shaofen; Han, Yi; Long, Qiqi; Zou, Shien; Cao, Yuankui

    2015-08-01

    Seventy patients with stage III or IV endometriosis were randomly assigned to 2 groups after conservative surgery. Group O (n = 35) received 3 cycles of a 28-day gonadotropin-releasing hormone agonist (GnRH-a) treatment (goserelin, 3.6 mg) starting 3-5 days postoperatively. Group M (n = 35) received the same treatment starting on days 1-5 of menstruation. Groups were further subdivided according to add-back treatment. Pre- and posttreated levels of estradiol (E2 ), follicle stimulating hormone (FSH), and luteinizing hormone (LH) and visual analog scale (VAS), Kupperman menopausal index (KMI), and bone mineral density (BMD) scores were recorded. The incidence of uterine bleeding was assessed. In both groups, serum levels of E2 , FSH, and LH and VAS scores decreased significantly after treatment. Spotting was the most frequent bleeding pattern. During cycle 1, the bleeding time in group M was much longer that than that in group O (P =.001), and the bleeding rate in group M was significantly higher than that in group O (P =.024, RR = 1.185). In patients with stage III or IV endometriosis, the efficacy of GnRH-a initiated 3-5 days postoperatively was equivalent to that of GnRH-a initiated on days 1-5 of menstruation. Female patients who initiated GnRH-a treatment 3-5 days postoperatively experienced less uterine bleeding during the first cycle of treatment.

  14. The Leap into 4th Grade

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Anderson, Mike

    2011-01-01

    Fourth grade is a pivotal year, in which students commonly face increased academic demands. According to Anderson, teachers can help students make a smooth transition to 4th grade by introducing these new challenges in ways that are in line with 4th graders' common developmental characteristics: incredible energy and emotion, industriousness and…

  15. Lymphopenia at 4 Days Postoperatively Is the Most Significant Laboratory Marker for Early Detection of Surgical Site Infection Following Posterior Lumbar Instrumentation Surgery

    PubMed Central

    Shigematsu, Hideki; Okuda, Akinori; Morimoto, Yasuhiko; Masuda, Keisuke; Nakajima, Hiroshi; Koizumi, Munehisa; Tanaka, Yasuhito

    2016-01-01

    Study Design Case control study. Purpose To identify the most significant laboratory marker for early detection of surgical site infection (SSI) using multiple logistic regression analysis. Overview of Literature SSI is a serious complication of spinal instrumentation surgery. Early diagnosis and treatment are crucial. Methods We retrospectively reviewed the laboratory data of patients who underwent posterior lumbar instrumentation surgery for degenerative spinal disease from January 2003 to December 2014. Six laboratory markers for early SSI detection were considered: renewed elevation of the white blood cell count, higher at 7 than 4 days postoperatively; renewed elevation of the C-reactive protein (CRP) level, higher at 7 than 4 days postoperatively; CRP level of >10 mg/dL at 4 days postoperatively; neutrophil percentage of >75% at 4 days postoperatively; lymphocyte percentage of <10% at 4 days postoperatively; and lymphocyte count of <1,000/µL at 4 days postoperatively. Results Ninety patients were enrolled; five developed deep SSI. Multivariate regression analysis showed that a lymphocyte count of <1,000/µL at 4 days postoperatively was the sole significant independent laboratory marker for early detection of SSI (p=0.037; odds ratio, 11.9; 95% confidence interval, 1.2–122.7). Conclusions A lymphocyte count of <1,000/µL at 4 days postoperatively is the most significant laboratory marker for early detection of SSI. PMID:27994779

  16. Science Content Courses: Workshop in Food Chemistry for 4th Grade School Teachers

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chaiyapechara, S.; Dong, F. M.

    2004-01-01

    A science content course in food chemistry was offered as a 4-day summer workshop from 1999 to 2001 to 4th grade school teachers in the Seattle School District. The objectives of the workshop were to increase the teachers' knowledge of food science, to perform simple experiments that could be used in the 4th grade classroom, and to help the…

  17. 166. GENERAL VIEW DOWN 4TH AVENUE. VIEW NORTHEAST DOWN 4TH ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    166. GENERAL VIEW DOWN 4TH AVENUE. VIEW NORTHEAST DOWN 4TH AVE. FROM BUILDING 44 SHOWING, FROM LEFT TO RIGHT, BUILDING 46, 48, 55, AND 50 (PART OF ENLISTED BARRACKS COMPLEX), AND BUILDINGS 17, 16, 484, 483, 374, AND 375 (IN THE WAREHOUSE COMPLEX). - Quonset Point Naval Air Station, Roger Williams Way, North Kingstown, Washington County, RI

  18. Peer Review Handbook 4th Edition, 2015

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    The 4th edition of EPA's Peer Review Handbook, 2015 is the most up to date version. It was prepared for the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency by Members of the Peer Review Advisory Group under the direction of EPA’s Science and Technology Policy Council

  19. Kids & Family Reading Report™. 4th Edition

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Scholastic Inc., 2013

    2013-01-01

    This report presents the 4th Edition of Scholastic's biannual study of children's and parents' attitudes and behaviors about reading. Much has changed since the first "Kids & Family Reading Report" was issued in 2006, but literacy remains the critical skill needed for school success. Today's children are growing up in a world full of…

  20. Systematic Review and Meta-Analysis of Pancreatic Amylase Value on Postoperative Day 1 After Pancreatic Resection to Predict Postoperative Pancreatic Fistula.

    PubMed

    Lu, Xiongxiong; Wang, Xinjing; Fang, Yuan; Chen, Hao; Peng, Chenghong; Li, Hongwei; Deng, Xiaxing; Shen, Baiyong

    2016-02-01

    Early detection of postoperative pancreatic fistula (POPF) may help to improve the outcome following pancreatic surgery, and exclusion of POPF may allow early drain removal which can accelerate recovery. The aim of this study was to evaluate the diagnostic accuracy of drain/plasma pancreatic amylase values on postoperative day 1 (DPA1/PPA1) in POPF by means of a systemic review and meta-analysis.Online journal databases and a manual search up to March 2015 were used. Studies clearly documenting DPA1 or PPA1 in predicting overall POPF (Grade 0 vs A+B+C) or clinically relevant POPF (Grade 0+A vs B+C) following pancreatic surgery were selected. Pooled predictive parameters were performed using STATA 12.0.Fifteen studies were finally identified with a total of 4331 patients. The pooled sensitivity and specificity of DPA1 were 0.92 (95% confidence interval (CI) 0.81-0.96) and 0.77 (95% CI 0.64-0.86) for predicting overall POPF and 0.79 (95% CI 0.61-0.90) and 0.83 (95% CI 0.74-0.89) for predicting clinically relevant POPF. The pooled sensitivity and specificity of PPA1 were 0.74 (95% CI 0.63-0.82) and 0.62 (95% CI 0.55-0.70) for overall POPF. After the DPA1 at/over cutoff values for overall POPF or clinically relevant POPF, corresponding post-test probability (Post-test (+)) (if pretest probability was 50%) was 80% and 82% respectively, while, if values were below the cutoff values, the post-test probability (Post-test (-)) was 10% and 20% respectively. Post-test (+) and Post-test (-) of PPA1 for overall POPF were 66% and 30% respectively. In subgroup analysis, the summary sensitivities of cutoff <1000 group and cutoff >1000 group were 0.96 (0.92-0.98) and 0.85 (0.64-0.95), respectively; the summary specificities were 0.59 (0.44-0.72) and 0.86 (0.80-0.91) respectively. Positive LR were 2.3 (1.7-3.3) and 6.2 (3.7-10.2) respectively. Negative LR were 0.06 (0.03-0.14) and 0.18 (0.07-0.47) respectively.DPA1 is a useful predictive test for overall POPF and clinically

  1. Perceived quality in Day Surgery Units Proposal of an enquiry postoperative questionnaire.

    PubMed

    Palumbo, Piergaspare; Perotti, Bruno; Amatucci, Chiara; Pangrazi, Maria Pia; Leuzzi, Barbara; Vietri, Francesco; Illuminati, Giulio

    2016-01-01

    La soddisfazione dei pazienti assume particolare importanza nell’attività chirurgica in Day Surgery, al fine di mantenere ed incrementare la domanda di prestazioni da parte dell’utenza ed inoltre di valutare le abilità e le competenze dello staff clinico dedicato. Sono stati valutati i risultati di un questionario somministrato dal 2007 al 2012, divisi in due gruppi, alla dimissione e a 30 giorni dall’intervento. Tali risultati hanno permesso di valutare i principali vantaggi e limiti del questionario in termini di comprensibilità, di corretto timing di somministrazione, e di utilità per lo staff clinico.

  2. Lymphopenia and Elevated Blood C-Reactive Protein Levels at Four Days Postoperatively Are Useful Markers for Early Detection of Surgical Site Infection Following Posterior Lumbar Instrumentation Surgery

    PubMed Central

    Shigematsu, Hideki; Koizumi, Munehisa; Nakajima, Hiroshi; Okuda, Akinori; Morimoto, Yasuhiko; Masuda, Keisuke; Tanaka, Yasuhito

    2016-01-01

    Study Design Case-control study. Purpose To identify the characteristics of candidate indexes for early detection of surgical site infection (SSI). Overview of Literature SSI is a serious complication of spinal instrumentation surgery. Early diagnosis and treatment are crucial for the welfare of the patient postoperation. Methods We retrospectively reviewed laboratory data of patients who underwent posterior lumbar instrumentation surgery for degenerative spine disease. The sensitivity and specificity of six laboratory markers for early detection of SSI were calculated: greater elevation of the white blood cell count at day 7 than at day 4 postoperatively, greater elevation of the C-reactive protein (CRP) level at day 7 than at day 4 postoperatively, a CRP level of >10 mg/dL at 4 days postoperatively, neutrophil percentage of >75% at 4 days postoperatively, a lymphocyte percentage of <10% at 4 days postoperatively, and a lymphocyte count of <1,000/µL at 4 days postoperatively. Statistical analysis was via Fisher's exact test and a p-value of <0.05 was considered significant. Results In total, 85 patients were enrolled. Of these, five patients developed deep SSI. The sensitivity and specificity of each index were as follows: index 1, 20.0% and 77.5%; index 2, 20.0% and 83.8%; index 3, 40.0% and 97.5%; index 4, 40.0% and 86.3%; index 5, 0% and 96.3%; and index 6, 80.0% and 80.0%. A significant difference was noted for indexes 3 and 6. Conclusions A CRP level of >10 mg/dL at 4 days postoperatively would be useful for definitive diagnosis of SSI, and a lymphocyte count of <1,000/µL at 4 days postoperatively would be a useful screening test for SSI. Although laboratory markers for early detection of SSI have been frequently reported, we believe that it is important to understand the characteristics of each index for a precise diagnosis. PMID:27114760

  3. Present-day challenges and future solutions in postoperative pain management: results from PainForum 2014

    PubMed Central

    Kuusniemi, Kristiina; Pöyhiä, Reino

    2016-01-01

    This paper is a summary of presentations on postoperative pain control by the authors at the 2014 PainForum meeting in People’s Republic of China. Postoperative pain is often untreated or undertreated and may lead to subsequent chronic pain syndromes. As more procedures migrate to the outpatient setting, postoperative pain control will become increasingly more challenging. Evidence-based guidelines for postoperative pain control recommend pain assessment using validated tools on a consistent basis. In this regard, consistency may be more important than the specific tool selected. Many hospitals have introduced a multidisciplinary acute pain service (APS), which has been associated with improved patient satisfaction and fewer adverse events. Patient education is an important component of postoperative pain control, which may be most effective when clinicians chose a multimodal approach, such as paracetamol (acetaminophen) and opioids. Opioids are a mainstay of postoperative pain control but require careful monitoring and management of side effects, such as nausea, vomiting, dizziness, and somnolence. Opioids may be administered using patient-controlled analgesia systems. Protocols for postoperative pain control can be very helpful to establish benchmarks for pain management and assure that clinicians adhere to evidence-based standards. The future of postoperative pain control around the world will likely involve more and better established APSs and greater communication between patients and clinicians about postoperative pain. The changes necessary to implement and move forward with APSs is not a single step but rather one of continuous improvement and ongoing change. PMID:26893579

  4. [Postoperative hypothyroidism].

    PubMed

    Olifirova, O S; Trynov, N N

    2015-01-01

    There is a number of factors such as the thyroidectomy and limiting subtotal thyroid resection against the background of euthyroidism and initial hypothyroidism (in any extent of operation) which leads to the prediction of early postoperative hypothyroidism origin during 10 days of the postoperative peri- od. The early postoperative hypothyroidism is accompanied by activation processes of lipid peroxide oxidation and at the same time by reduction of antioxidant protection.

  5. Removal of foley catheters in live donor kidney transplant recipients on postoperative day 1 does not increase the incidence of urine leaks.

    PubMed

    Siskind, Eric; Sameyah, Emil; Goncharuk, Edwin; Olsen, Elizabeth M; Feldman, Joshua; Giovinazzo, Katie; Blum, Mark; Tyrell, Richard; Evans, Cory; Kuncewitch, Michael; Alexander, Mohini; Israel, Ezra; Bhaskaran, Madhu; Calderon, Kellie; Jhaveri, Kenar D; Sachdeva, Mala; Bellucci, Alessandro; Mattana, Joseph; Fishbane, Steven; D'Agostino, Catherine; Coppa, Gene; Molmenti, Ernesto

    2013-03-01

    Catheterization of the urinary bladder during kidney transplantation is essential. The optimal time to remove the Foley catheter postoperatively is not universally defined. It is our practice to remove the Foley catheter on postoperative day 1 in live donor kidney transplant recipients who meet our standardized protocol criteria. We believe that early removal of Foley catheters increases patient comfort and mobility, decreases the risk of catheter associated urinary tract infections, and allows for decreased hospital length of stay. The hypothetical risk of early removal of Foley catheters would be the increased risk of urine leak. We reviewed 120 consecutive live donor kidney transplant recipients and found that there was not an increased incidence of urine leaks in patients whose Foley catheters were removed on postoperative day 1.

  6. Report of the 4th European Zebrafish Principal Investigator Meeting.

    PubMed

    Lopes, Susana S; Distel, Martin; Linker, Claudia; Fior, Rita; Monteiro, Rui; Bianco, Isaac H; Portugues, Ruben; Strähle, Uwe; Saúde, Leonor

    2016-12-01

    The European Zebrafish Principal Investigator Meeting (EZPM) is an ideal forum for group leaders using this fantastic animal model not only to discuss science but also to strengthen their interactions, to push forward technological advances, and to define guidelines for the use of this fish in research. The city of Lisbon (Portugal) was voted by the European group leaders to be the setting for the 4th EZPM, and the organizing committee, composed by Leonor Saúde (iMM Lisboa, PT), Susana Lopes (CEDOC, PT), Michael Orger (Champalimaud Foundation, PT), Rui Oliveira (ISPA, PT), and António Jacinto (CEDOC, PT), was very enthusiastic to organize a productive event. The 4th EZPM took place from March 15 to 19 at Pavilhão do Conhecimento, a Science Museum and Educational Center winner of The Great Prize FAD of Arquitecture 1999 and The Society for Environmental Graphic Design Award 2011. Over 5 days, 135 group leaders (89 men and 46 women) coming from 19 different European countries and also from the United States, Turkey, Israel, Chile, and Singapore presented and discussed their recent research achievements. In addition to the scientific oral and poster presentations, the group leaders gathered in very lively community sessions on morphants versus mutants (chaired by Didier Stainier, Max Planck Institute for Heart and Lung Research, DE), funding issues (chaired by Uwe Strahle, KIT-ITG, DE), and gender equality (chaired by Corinne Houart, KCL, United Kingdom). One of the highlights of the 4th EZPM was the guided visit to Oceanário de Lisboa, an international award-winning place that celebrates life with a stunning display of living aquatic creatures.

  7. On Postoperative Day Balloon Angioplasty for Salvage of Newly-Placed, Flow-Limiting Native Arteriovenous Fistula

    PubMed Central

    Park, Jae Young; Yoo, Chang Hyun

    2015-01-01

    Purpose: To report result and usefulness of immediate postoperative balloon angioplasty of de novo arteriovenous fistula (AVF) with limited flow just after creation. Materials and Methods: From January 1, 2012 to March 31, 2014, 1,270 patients received native AVF creations in a single vascular clinic. In twenty-four patients (1.9% of total AVF creation), immediate postoperative balloon angioplasty was performed because of limited flow on palpation (only pulsation or no thrill) just after AVF creation. Medical records were reviewed retrospectively; technical success (restoration of AVF flow)/clinical success (growing as functional AVF) rate, maturation time, primary patency rate and fistula survival outcome were analyzed during a mean 10.8 months of follow-up. Results: Technical/clinical success rate was 95.8% (23/24 cases); AVF flow was restored after balloon angioplasty, and all the flow-restorated AVFs grew as functional AVFs with mean±standard deviation, 4.5±1.5 weeks of maturation time. In seven (30.4%) patients, a secondary balloon angioplasty was needed to enhance maturation. The overall primary patency after immediate postoperative balloon angioplasty was 69.6% at 1 and 6 months and 59.0% at 12 months. There was 1 complication (operation site hematoma). Conclusion: Immediate postoperative balloon angioplasty for salvage of newly-placed, flow-limiting native AVF is a useful, effective and safe procedure. PMID:26217640

  8. ACSPRI 2014 4th International Social Science Methodology Conference Report

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2015-04-01

    behaviour (Ackland, 2014). Big Data and in particular, social media data, present both methodological challenges and opportunities in empirical social ...UNCLASSIFIED UNCLASSIFIED ACSPRI 2014 4th International Social Science Methodology Conference Report Elena Mazourenko Joint...interest to the Technology Forecasting and Futures (TFF) Group of JOAD presented at the ACSPRI 4th International Social Science Methodology conference

  9. Combination of general anesthesia and peripheral nerve block with low-dose ropivacaine reduces postoperative pain for several days after outpatient arthroscopy

    PubMed Central

    Büttner, Benedikt; Mansur, Ashham; Hinz, José; Erlenwein, Joachim; Bauer, Martin; Bergmann, Ingo

    2017-01-01

    Abstract Background: Effective methods for postoperative pain relief are an important concern in outpatient surgery. For arthroscopies we combine a single-shot peripheral nerve block using low-volume, low-concentration ropivacaine with general anesthesia. We hypothesized that the patients would have less postoperative pain and be more rapidly home ready than after general anesthesia alone. Methods: Patients (American Society of Anesthesiologists I–III, 18–80 years old) scheduled for outpatient arthroscopy on the upper or lower extremity were randomized to have either a combination of peripheral nerve block and general anesthesia (NB + GA, study group) or general anesthesia alone (GA, control group). The relevant nerve was localized by ultrasound and 10 mL ropivacaine 0.2% was injected. General anesthesia was with propofol and remifentanil. Numeric rating scales were used to assess pain and patient satisfaction in the recovery room, on the evening of surgery, and on the following 2 days. Results: A total of 120 patients participated in the study (NB + GA: 61; GA: 59). The percentage of patients reporting relevant pain in the recovery room were 0% versus 44% (P < 0.001), on the evening after surgery 3% versus 80% (P < 0.001), and on days 1 and 2 postsurgery 12% versus 73% and 12% versus 64% (NB + GA vs GA, respectively). Median time to home discharge was NB + GA 34.5 min (range 15–90) versus GA 55 min (20–115) (P < 0.001). Conclusions: The combination of a peripheral nerve block with low-dose ropivacaine and general anesthesia reduced postoperative pain compared with general anesthesia alone for several days after outpatient arthroscopy. It also shortened the time to home discharge. PMID:28178149

  10. Post-operative delirium is an independent predictor of 30-day hospital readmission after spine surgery in the elderly (≥65years old): A study of 453 consecutive elderly spine surgery patients.

    PubMed

    Elsamadicy, Aladine A; Wang, Timothy Y; Back, Adam G; Lydon, Emily; Reddy, Gireesh B; Karikari, Isaac O; Gottfried, Oren N

    2017-03-02

    In the last decade, costs of U.S. healthcare expenditures have been soaring, with billions of dollars spent on hospital readmissions. Identifying causes and risk factors can reduce soaring readmission rates and help lower healthcare costs. The aim of this is to determine if post-operative delirium in the elderly is an independent risk factor for 30-day hospital readmission after spine surgery. The medical records of 453 consecutive elderly (≥65years old) patients undergoing spine surgery at Duke University Medical Center from 2008 to 2010 were reviewed. We identified 17 (3.75%) patients who experienced post-operative delirium according to DSM-V criteria. Patient demographics, comorbidities, and post-operative complication rates were collected for each patient. Elderly patients experiencing post-operative delirium had an increased length of hospital stay (10.47days vs. 5.70days, p=0.009). Complication rates were similar between the cohorts with the post-operative delirium patients having increased UTI and superficial surgical site infections. In total, 12.14% of patients were re-admitted within 30-days of discharge, with post-operative delirium patients experiencing approximately a 4-fold increase in 30-day readmission rates (Delirium: 41.18% vs. No Delirium: 11.01%, p=0.002). In a multivariate logistic regression analysis, post-operative delirium is an independent predictor of 30-day readmission after spine surgery in the elderly (p=0.03). Elderly patients experiencing post-operative delirium after spine surgery is an independent risk factor for unplanned readmission within 30-days of discharge. Preventable measures and early awareness of post-operative delirium in the elderly may help reduce readmission rates.

  11. TAOK3, a novel genome-wide association study locus associated with morphine requirement and postoperative pain in a retrospective pediatric day surgery population

    PubMed Central

    Cook-Sather, Scott D.; Li, Jin; Goebel, Theodora K.; Sussman, Emily M.; Rehman, Mohamed A.; Hakonarson, Hakon

    2014-01-01

    Candidate gene studies have revealed limited genetic bases for opioid analgesic response variability. Genome-wide association studies (GWAS) facilitate impartial queries of common genetic variants, allowing identification of novel genetic contributions to drug effect. Illumina single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) arrays were used to investigate SNP associations with total morphine requirement as a quantitative trait locus and with postoperative pain in a retrospective population of opioid-naïve children age 4 – 18 y who had undergone day surgery tonsillectomy and adenoidectomy. In an independent replication cohort, significant GWAS-identified SNPs were assayed using Taqman probes. Among 617 comprehensively phenotyped children, the 277 subjects of European Caucasian (EC) ancestry demonstrated nominal association between morphine dose and a series of novel SNPs (top rs795484, p=1.01×10-6 and rs1277441, p=2.77×10-6) at the TAOK3 locus. Age, body mass index, and physical status were included covariates. Morphine requirement averaged 132.4 mcg/kg (SD 40.9). Each minor allele at rs795484 (G>A) contributed +17.6 mcg/kg (95% CI=10.7-24.4) to dose. Effect direction and magnitude were replicated in an independent cohort of 75 EC children (p<0.05). No association with morphine dose was detected in African Americans (AA) (n=241). Postoperative pain scores ≥ 7/10 were associated with rs795484 (G>A) in the EC cohort (OR=2.35, 95% CI=1.56-3.52, p<0.00005) and this association replicated in AA children (OR=1.76, 95% CI=1.14-2.71, p<0.01). Variants in TAOK3 encoding the serine/threonine-protein kinase, TAO3, are associated with increased morphine requirement in children of EC ancestry and with increased acute postoperative pain in both EC and AA subjects. PMID:24909733

  12. PREFACE: 4th International Hadron Physics Conference (TROIA'14)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dağ, Hüseyin; Erkol, Güray; Küçükarslan, Ayşe; Özpineci, Altuğ

    2014-11-01

    The 4th International Conference on Hadron Physics, TROIA'14, was held at Canakkale, Turkey on 1-5 July 2014. Ozyegin University, Middle East Technical University, Canakkale Onsekiz Mart University, Turkish Atomic Energy Authority and HadronPhysics2 Consortium sponsored the conference. It aimed at bringing together the experts and the young scientists working on experimental and theoretical hadron physics. About 50 participants from 10 countries attended the conference. The topics covered included: . Chiral Perturbation Theory . QCD Sum Rules . Effective Field Theory . Exotic Hadrons . Hadron Properties from Lattice QCD . Experimental Results and Future Perspectives . Hadronic Distribution Amplitudes The conference presentations were organized such that the morning sessions contained invited talks and afternoon sessions were devoted to contributed talks. The speakers of the invited talks were: C. Alexandrou, A. Gal, L. Tolos, J.R. Pelaez and M. Schindler. We had also guest speakers D. A. Demir and T. Senger. The conference venue was a resort hotel around Canakkale. As a social program, a guided full-day excursion to the excavation site of the ancient Troia town and Assos was organized. We believe that this conference provided a medium for young scientists and experts in the field to effectively communicate and share ideas. We would like to express our sincere thanks to supporting agencies and to all participants for their contributions and stimulating discussions. We are also grateful to the Scientific Secretary, Bora Işıldak, and all other members of the Organizing Committee for their patience and efforts. 30.10.2014 The Editors

  13. 4(th) HUPO Brain Proteome Project Workshop in Munich, Germany.

    PubMed

    Hamacher, Michael; Stephan, Christian; Palacios Bustamante, Nadine; van Hall, Andre; Marcus, Katrin; Meyer, Helmut E

    2006-01-01

    More than 70 interested colleagues attended the 4(th) Workshop of HUPO's Brain Proteome Project. The project was presented within nine talks mainly focusing on two running pilot studies as well as on data re-processing. A bioinformatics jamboree in Hinxton, UK, and the 5th Workshop taking place in Dublin next February were announced.

  14. 4th International Plant Biomechanics Conference Proceedings (Abstracts)

    SciTech Connect

    Frank W. Telewski; Lothar H. Koehler; Frank W. Ewers

    2003-07-20

    The 4th International Plant Biomechanics Conference facilitated an interdisciplinary exchange between scientists, engineers, and educators addressing the major questions encountered in the field of Plant Biomechanics. Subjects covered by the conference include: Evolution; Ecology; Mechanoreception; Cell Walls; Genetic Modification; Applied Biomechanics of Whole Plants, Plant Products, Fibers & Composites; Fluid Dynamics; Wood & Trees; Fracture Mechanics; Xylem Pressure & Water Transport; Modeling; and Introducing Plant Biomechanics in Secondary School Education.

  15. Summary of the 4th Nordic Symposium on Digital Pathology

    PubMed Central

    Lundström, Claes; Waltersson, Marie; Persson, Anders; Treanor, Darren

    2017-01-01

    The Nordic symposium on digital pathology (NDP) was created to promote knowledge exchange across stakeholders in health care, industry, and academia. In 2016, the 4th NDP installment took place in Linköping, Sweden, promoting development and collaboration in digital pathology for the benefit of routine care advances. This article summarizes the symposium, gathering 170 attendees from 13 countries. This summary also contains results from a survey on integrated diagnostics aspects, in particular radiology-pathology collaboration. PMID:28382222

  16. RAPP, a systematic e-assessment of postoperative recovery in patients undergoing day surgery: study protocol for a mixed-methods study design including a multicentre, two-group, parallel, single-blind randomised controlled trial and qualitative interview studies

    PubMed Central

    Dahlberg, K; Odencrants, S; Hagberg, L

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Day surgery is a well-established practice in many European countries, but only limited information is available regarding postoperative recovery at home though there is a current lack of a standard procedure regarding postoperative follow-up. Furthermore, there is also a need for improvement of modern technology in assessing patient-related outcomes such as mobile applications. This article describes the Recovery Assessment by Phone Points (RAPP) study protocol, a mixed-methods study to evaluate if a systematic e-assessment follow-up in patients undergoing day surgery is cost-effective and improves postoperative recovery, health and quality of life. Methods and analysis This study has a mixed-methods study design that includes a multicentre, two-group, parallel, single-blind randomised controlled trial and qualitative interview studies. 1000 patients >17 years of age who are undergoing day surgery will be randomly assigned to either e-assessed postoperative recovery follow-up daily in 14 days measured via smartphone app including the Swedish web-version of Quality of Recovery (SwQoR) or to standard care (ie, no follow-up). The primary aim is cost-effectiveness. Secondary aims are (A) to explore whether a systematic e-assessment follow-up after day surgery has a positive effect on postoperative recovery, health-related quality of life (QoL) and overall health; (B) to determine whether differences in postoperative recovery have an association with patient characteristic, type of surgery and anaesthesia; (C) to determine whether differences in health literacy have a substantial and distinct effect on postoperative recovery, health and QoL; and (D) to describe day surgery patient and staff experiences with a systematic e-assessment follow-up after day surgery. The primary aim will be measured at 2 weeks postoperatively and secondary outcomes (A–C) at 1 and 2 weeks and (D) at 1 and 4 months. Trial registration number NCT02492191; Pre

  17. 4TH Marine Division Operation Plan Number 49-44

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1944-12-26

    I / i i -4- A. o. o o o 3 4-’ 4TH MARINE DIVISION 54 OPERATION PLAN NO. 49-44 DECLASSIFIED IAW CLIASSIFICATION $4...INTO ENEMY HANDS. LUISrAR! UNCLASS0FIDo .-O UNCLASSIFIED ri LL!n .. I . 155 - - o.- sr Report Documentation Page Form ApprovedOMB No. 0704-0188 Public...the remainder of O-1 within Z, repared or further OPN PLAN 49-44 - 1 - O1 :?’:¢ . ... ~·~:~ I I - I --" , I %,"_’,: A I 1-W_ , - I I ---. -

  18. Transdermal Buprenorphine Patches for Postoperative Pain Control in Abdominal Surgery

    PubMed Central

    Kumar, Santosh; Singh, Prithvi Kumar; Verma, Reetu; Chandra, Girish; Bhatia, Vinod Kumar; Singh, Dinesh; Bogra, Jaishri

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Buprenorphine is a semi-synthetic derivative of thebaine; its low concentration is sufficient to provide effective pain relief. Aim To evaluate the efficacy of transdermal buprenorphine patch in postoperative pain management. Materials and Methods After ethical approval and taking informed consent from the patients, they were randomized into three groups (n=30 in each group) using a computer generated random number table. Group A: placebo patch; Group B: buprenorphine (10mg) patch and Group C: buprenorphine (20mg) patch. Haemodynamic and analgesic effects were compared by using analysis of variance (ANOVA) followed by Turkey’s post hoc test. The proportion of side effects was compared using the Chi-square test. Results Haemodynamic changes were not statistically different in all the three groups A, B and C, whereas at the end of surgery VAS score of Group A subjects was significantly higher (4.93±0.98) as compared to Group B (1.73±0.64) and Group C (1.40±0.50). On 2nd postoperative day, no pain was reported by the Group C patients and on 4th day after surgery, no pain was reported by Group B patients. Conclusion The transdermal buprenorphine patch (20mg) was effective in attenuating postoperative pain, maintaining haemodynamic stability requiring no rescue analgesia, with fewer postoperative rescue analgesic requirements in low dose of buprenorphine patch (10mg) group. PMID:27504383

  19. Rate of Missing Socioeconomic Factors in the 4th KNHANES.

    PubMed

    Park, Hyun Ah

    2012-11-01

    This study is to assess how missing values in socioeconomic status (SES) variables were handled in the Korean Journal of Family Medicine (KJFM) article using the Korea National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey (KNHANES) data and to estimate the rate of missing SES variables from the 4th KNHANES. We searched all original articles published in the KJFM from 2007 to 2011 and identified those that used KNHANES as their primary source of data. None of the 11 articles which presented KNHANES SES variables took into account of omitions in the analysis. The estimated rate of missing data on education, household income, marital status, and occupation data of the 4th KNHANES was 0.3 (0.05)%, 2.7 (0.2)%, 0.5 (0.1)%, and 9.4 (0.9)%, respectively. When all four variables were used simultaneously, the rates increased to 11.8 (0.9)%. Respondents with missing household income tended to be older (P < 0.001), less educated (P < 0.001), and more likely to be unemployed (P < 0.001), and widowed (P < 0.001). A similar relationship was shown for missing occupation data. Omissions in SES variables in KNHANES were related to certain characteristics of study participants. Researchers using KNHANES data should keep in mind the possible bias which can be introduced by missing SES values.

  20. [Postoperative pain in craniotomy].

    PubMed

    Peón, Andréa Ungaro; Diccini, Solange

    2005-01-01

    In the postoperative period, 47% to 75% of the patients report some degree of pain. This study aimed to evaluate pain in the pre and postoperative period of patients submitted to craniotomy. This prospective research was carried out at the neurosurgery unit of a large Brazilian hospital. For a quantitative evaluation of pain, the verbal numeric 0-10 rating scale was used. Forty patients with a mean age of 36 years were evaluated. In the preoperative period, 34 (85%) patients indicated headache as the main cause of pain. In the postoperative period, 37 (93%) patients complained of pain while three (7%) reported absence of pain. Pain peaks were observed on the 2nd postoperative day, when 12 (32%) of the patients reported severe pain and 10 (27%) moderate pain. Absence of severe pain occurred after the 8th postoperative day. It was concluded that protocols of analgesia in craniotomy are needed, such as training nurses to better evaluate and handle pain.

  1. Special Issue: 4th International Workshop on Space Radiation (IWSRR)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cucinotta, Francis A.

    2007-01-01

    This special issue of the journal "Radiation and Environmental Biophysics" contains 20 peer-reviewed papers contributed by leading space radiation researcher's world-wide attending the 4th IWSRR. Manuscripts cover a broad range of topics ranging from radiation environments and transport in shielding and planetary surfaces to new results in understanding the biological effects of protons and high-charge and energy (HZE) nuclei on the risk of cancer, and degenerative diseases such as central nervous system effects, heart disease, and cataracts. The issue provides a snapshot of the state-of-the-art of the research in this field, demonstrating both the important results gathered in the past few years with experiments at accelerators, and the need for more research to quantify the risk and develop countermeasures.

  2. 76 FR 37649 - Safety Zone; Northern California Annual Fireworks Events, July 4th Fireworks Display

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-06-28

    ... SECURITY Coast Guard 33 CFR Part 165 Safety Zone; Northern California Annual Fireworks Events, July 4th Fireworks Display AGENCY: Coast Guard, DHS. ACTION: Notice of enforcement of regulation. SUMMARY: The Coast Guard will enforce safety zone for the annual July 4th Fireworks Display (Tahoe City 4th of...

  3. America's Wild Horses. Five Day Lesson Plan and Workbook--4th Grade. Legend.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Weeks, Arlene E.

    This document contains a teaching guide and a children's activity book about the wild horses and burros living on Nevada public lands managed by the Bureau of Land Management (BLM). In 1971 Congress passed legislation to protect, manage, and control wild horses and burros on public lands. The BLM maintains 270 herd management areas in 10 states.…

  4. PREFACE: 4th International Conference on Mathematical Modeling in Physical Sciences (IC-MSquare2015)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vlachos, Dimitrios; Vagenas, Elias C.

    2015-09-01

    The 4th International Conference on Mathematical Modeling in Physical Sciences (IC-MSQUARE) took place in Mykonos, Greece, from Friday 5th June to Monday 8th June 2015. The Conference was attended by more than 150 participants and hosted about 200 oral, poster, and virtual presentations. There were more than 600 pre-registered authors. The 4th IC-MSQUARE consisted of different and diverging workshops and thus covered various research fields where Mathematical Modeling is used, such as Theoretical/Mathematical Physics, Neutrino Physics, Non-Integrable Systems, Dynamical Systems, Computational Nanoscience, Biological Physics, Computational Biomechanics, Complex Networks, Stochastic Modeling, Fractional Statistics, DNA Dynamics, Macroeconomics etc. The scientific program was rather intense as after the Keynote and Invited Talks in the morning, three parallel oral and one poster session were running every day. However, according to all attendees, the program was excellent with a high quality of talks creating an innovative and productive scientific environment for all attendees. We would like to thank the Keynote Speaker and the Invited Speakers for their significant contribution to IC-MSQUARE. We also would like to thank the Members of the International Advisory and Scientific Committees as well as the Members of the Organizing Committee.

  5. Managing haemophilia for life: 4th Haemophilia Global Summit.

    PubMed

    Astermark, J; Dolan, G; Hilberg, T; Jiménez-Yuste, V; Laffan, M; Lassila, R; Lobet, S; Martinoli, C; Perno, C-F

    2014-07-01

    The 4th Haemophilia Global Summit was held in Potsdam, Germany, in September 2013 and brought together an international faculty of haemophilia experts and delegates from multidisciplinary backgrounds. The programme was designed by an independent Scientific Steering Committee of haemophilia experts and explored global perspectives in haemophilia care, discussing practical approaches to the optimal management of haemophilia now and in the future. The topics outlined in this supplement were selected by the Scientific Steering Committee for their relevance and potential to influence haemophilia care globally. In this supplement from the meeting, Jan Astermark reviews current understanding of risk factors for the development of inhibitory antibodies and discusses whether this risk can be modulated and minimized. Factors key to the improvement of joint health in people with haemophilia are explored, with Carlo Martinoli and Víctor Jiménez-Yuste discussing the utility of ultrasound for the early detection of haemophilic arthropathy. Other aspects of care necessary for the prevention and management of joint disease in people with haemophilia are outlined by Thomas Hilberg and Sébastian Lobet, who highlight the therapeutic benefits of physiotherapy and sports therapy. Riitta Lassila and Carlo-Federico Perno describe current knowledge surrounding the risk of transmission of infectious agents via clotting factor concentrates. Finally, different types of extended half-life technology are evaluated by Mike Laffan, with a focus on the practicalities and challenges associated with these products.

  6. The 4th Concept Detector for the ILC

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mazzacane, A.

    2010-05-01

    The 4th Concept Detector is designed for high precision measurements of Physics processes accessible at ILC. It consists of four basic subsystems: a pixel vertex detector for high precision vertex definitions, impact parameter tagging and near-beam occupancy reduction; a cluster-counting low-mass drift chamber for robust pattern recognition with over 100 three-dimensional space-points each with about 55 μm resolution, 3.5% specific ionization measurement; a high precision dual-readout fiber calorimeter, complemented with an EM dual-readout crystal calorimeter, both with time-history readout, for the energy measurement of hadrons, jets, electrons, photons, missing momentum, and the tagging of muons; and, an iron-free dual-solenoid to return the flux and provide a second field region for the inverse direction bending of muons in a gas volume to achieve high acceptance and good muon momentum resolution. All four subsystems separately achieve the important scientific goal to be 2-to-10 times better than the already excellent LEP detectors, Aleph, Delphi, L3, and Opal. All four sub-detector will be described along with their performance and Physics capabilities obtained with full simulation studies.

  7. European Code against Cancer 4th Edition: Diet and cancer.

    PubMed

    Norat, Teresa; Scoccianti, Chiara; Boutron-Ruault, Marie-Christine; Anderson, Annie; Berrino, Franco; Cecchini, Michele; Espina, Carolina; Key, Tim; Leitzmann, Michael; Powers, Hilary; Wiseman, Martin; Romieu, Isabelle

    2015-12-01

    Lifestyle factors, including diet, have long been recognised as potentially important determinants of cancer risk. In addition to the significant role diet plays in affecting body fatness, a risk factor for several cancers, experimental studies have indicated that diet may influence the cancer process in several ways. Prospective studies have shown that dietary patterns characterised by higher intakes of fruits, vegetables, and whole-grain foods, and lower intakes of red and processed meats and salt, are related to reduced risks of death and cancer, and that a healthy diet can improve overall survival after diagnosis of breast and colorectal cancers. There is evidence that high intakes of fruit and vegetables may reduce the risk of cancers of the aerodigestive tract, and the evidence that dietary fibre protects against colorectal cancer is convincing. Red and processed meats increase the risk of colorectal cancer. Diets rich in high-calorie foods, such as fatty and sugary foods, may lead to increased calorie intake, thereby promoting obesity and leading to an increased risk of cancer. There is some evidence that sugary drinks are related to an increased risk of pancreatic cancer. Taking this evidence into account, the 4th edition of the European Code against Cancer recommends that people have a healthy diet to reduce their risk of cancer: they should eat plenty of whole grains, pulses, vegetables and fruits; limit high-calorie foods (foods high in sugar or fat); avoid sugary drinks and processed meat; and limit red meat and foods high in salt.

  8. European Code against Cancer, 4th Edition: Tobacco and cancer.

    PubMed

    Leon, Maria E; Peruga, Armando; McNeill, Ann; Kralikova, Eva; Guha, Neela; Minozzi, Silvia; Espina, Carolina; Schüz, Joachim

    2015-12-01

    Tobacco use, and in particular cigarette smoking, is the single largest preventable cause of cancer in the European Union (EU). All tobacco products contain a wide range of carcinogens. The main cancer-causing agents in tobacco smoke are polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons, tobacco-specific N-nitrosamines, aromatic amines, aldehydes, and certain volatile organic compounds. Tobacco consumers are also exposed to nicotine, leading to tobacco addiction in many users. Cigarette smoking causes cancer in multiple organs and is the main cause of lung cancer, responsible for approximately 82% of cases. In 2012, about 313,000 new cases of lung cancer and 268,000 lung cancer deaths were reported in the EU; 28% of adults in the EU smoked tobacco, and the overall prevalence of current use of smokeless tobacco products was almost 2%. Smokeless tobacco products, a heterogeneous category, are also carcinogenic but cause a lower burden of cancer deaths than tobacco smoking. One low-nitrosamine product, snus, is associated with much lower cancer risk than other smokeless tobacco products. Smoking generates second-hand smoke (SHS), an established cause of lung cancer, and inhalation of SHS by non-smokers is still common in indoor workplaces as well as indoor public places, and more so in the homes of smokers. Several interventions have proved effective for stopping smoking; the most effective intervention is the use of a combination of pharmacotherapy and behavioural support. Scientific evidence leads to the following two recommendations for individual action on tobacco in the 4th edition of the European Code Against Cancer: (1) "Do not smoke. Do not use any form of tobacco"; (2) "Make your home smoke-free. Support smoke-free policies in your workplace".

  9. Plasma-Based Studies on 4th Generation Light Sources

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, R W; Baldis, H A; Cauble, R C; Landen, O L; Wark, J S; Ng, A; Rose, S J; Lewis, C; Riley, D; Gauthier, J-C; Audebert, P

    2000-11-28

    The construction of a short pulse tunable x-ray laser source will be a watershed for plasma-based and warm dense matter research. The areas we will discuss below can be separated broadly into warn dense matter (WDM) research, laser probing of near solid density plasmas, and laser-plasma spectroscopy of ions in plasmas. The area of WDM refers to that part of the density-temperature phase space where the standard theories of condensed matter physics and/or plasma statistical physics are invalid. Warm dense matter, therefore, defines a region between solids and plasmas, a regime that is found in planetary interiors, cool dense stars, and in every plasma device where one starts from a solid, e.g., laser-solid matter produced plasma as well as all inertial fusion schemes. The study of dense plasmas has been severely hampered by the fact that laser-based methods have been unavailable. The single most useful diagnostic of local plasma conditions, e.g., the temperature (T{sub e}), the density (n{sub e}), and the ionization (Z), has been Thomson scattering. However, due to the fact that visible light will not propagate at electron densities, n{sub e}, {ge} 10{sup 22} cm{sup -3} implies dense plasmas can not be probed. The 4th generation sources, LCLS and Tesla will remove these restrictions. Laser-based plasma spectroscopic techniques have been used with great success to determine the line shapes of atomic transitions in plasmas, study the population kinetics of atomic systems embedded in plasmas, and look at redistribution of radiation. However. the possibilities end for plasmas with n{sub e} {ge} 10{sup 22} since light propagation through the medium is severely altered by the plasma. The entire field of high Z plasma kinetics from laser produced plasma will then be available to study with the tunable source.

  10. European Code against Cancer, 4th Edition: Cancer screening.

    PubMed

    Armaroli, Paola; Villain, Patricia; Suonio, Eero; Almonte, Maribel; Anttila, Ahti; Atkin, Wendy S; Dean, Peter B; de Koning, Harry J; Dillner, Lena; Herrero, Rolando; Kuipers, Ernst J; Lansdorp-Vogelaar, Iris; Minozzi, Silvia; Paci, Eugenio; Regula, Jaroslaw; Törnberg, Sven; Segnan, Nereo

    2015-12-01

    In order to update the previous version of the European Code against Cancer and formulate evidence-based recommendations, a systematic search of the literature was performed according to the methodology agreed by the Code Working Groups. Based on the review, the 4th edition of the European Code against Cancer recommends: "Take part in organized cancer screening programmes for: Bowel cancer (men and women); Breast cancer (women); Cervical cancer (women)." Organized screening programs are preferable because they provide better conditions to ensure that the Guidelines for Quality Assurance in Screening are followed in order to achieve the greatest benefit with the least harm. Screening is recommended only for those cancers where a demonstrated life-saving effect substantially outweighs the potential harm of examining very large numbers of people who may otherwise never have, or suffer from, these cancers, and when an adequate quality of the screening is achieved. EU citizens are recommended to participate in cancer screening each time an invitation from the national or regional screening program is received and after having read the information materials provided and carefully considered the potential benefits and harms of screening. Screening programs in the European Union vary with respect to the age groups invited and to the interval between invitations, depending on each country's cancer burden, local resources, and the type of screening test used For colorectal cancer, most programs in the EU invite men and women starting at the age of 50-60 years, and from then on every 2 years if the screening test is the guaiac-based fecal occult blood test or fecal immunochemical test, or every 10 years or more if the screening test is flexible sigmoidoscopy or total colonoscopy. Most programs continue sending invitations to screening up to the age of 70-75 years. For breast cancer, most programs in the EU invite women starting at the age of 50 years, and not before the age

  11. Efficacy and safety profile of combination of tramadol-diclofenac versus tramadol-paracetamol in patients with acute musculoskeletal conditions, postoperative pain, and acute flare of osteoarthritis and rheumatoid arthritis: a Phase III, 5-day open-label study

    PubMed Central

    Chandanwale, Ajay S; Sundar, Subramanian; Latchoumibady, Kaliaperumal; Biswas, Swati; Gabhane, Mukesh; Naik, Manoj; Patel, Kamlesh

    2014-01-01

    Objective We aimed to evaluate the safety and efficacy of a fixed-dose combination (FDC) of tramadol and diclofenac versus a standard approved FDC of tramadol and paracetamol, in patients with acute moderate to severe pain. Methods A total of 204 patients with moderate to severe pain due to acute musculoskeletal conditions (n=52), acute flare of osteoarthritis (n=52), acute flare of rheumatoid arthritis (n=50), or postoperative pain (n=50) were enrolled in the study at baseline. Each disease category was then randomized to receive either of two treatments for 5 days: group A received an FDC of immediate-release tramadol hydrochloride (50 mg) and sustained-release diclofenac sodium (75 mg) (one tablet, twice daily), and group B received an FDC of tramadol hydrochloride (37.5 mg) and paracetamol (325 mg) (two tablets every 4–6 hours, up to a maximum of eight tablets daily). The primary efficacy end points were reductions in pain intensity from baseline at day 3 and day 5 as assessed by a Visual Analog Scale (VAS) score. Results Group A showed a significant reduction in the VAS score for overall pain from baseline on day 3 (P=0.001) and day 5 (P<0.0001) as compared with group B. The combination of tramadol-diclofenac resulted in few mild to moderate adverse events (nausea, vomiting, epigastric pain, and gastritis), which required minimal management, without any treatment discontinuation. The number of adverse events in group A was nine (8.82%) compared with 22 (21.78%) in group B, after 5 days of treatment. Conclusion An FDC of tramadol-diclofenac showed a significantly greater reduction in pain intensity and was well tolerated compared with tramadol-paracetamol, resulting in better analgesia in patients suffering from moderate to severe pain due to acute musculoskeletal conditions, postoperative pain following orthopedic surgery, or acute flare of osteoarthritis and rheumatoid arthritis. PMID:25152629

  12. The school nutrition program's role in weight management of 4th grade elementary students

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    We are attempting to uncover the school nutrition program's role in weight management of 4th grade elementary students. Data was collected within a time frame for the food frequency questionnaire (FFQ) set at two months at the WT Cheney Elementary School and South Wood Elementary for 4th grade stud...

  13. 76 FR 37650 - Safety Zone; 4th of July Festival Berkeley Marina Fireworks Display Berkeley, CA

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-06-28

    ... SECURITY Coast Guard 33 CFR Part 165 RIN 1625-AA00 Safety Zone; 4th of July Festival Berkeley Marina Fireworks Display Berkeley, CA AGENCY: Coast Guard, DHS. ACTION: Temporary final rule. SUMMARY: The Coast... Berkeley Pier, Berkeley, CA in support of the 4th of July Festival Berkeley Marina Fireworks...

  14. The Effects of Cooperative Learning Strategies on Vocabulary Skills of 4th Grade Students

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bilen, Didem; Tavil, Zekiye Müge

    2015-01-01

    This study was carried out to investigate the effects of cooperative learning strategies on the vocabulary skills of 4th grade students. The study was also designed to ascertain the attitudes of the students in the experimental group towards cooperative learning. Out of 96 4th grade students enrolled in the private school where the study took…

  15. 75 FR 35649 - Safety Zone; Northern California Annual Fireworks Events, July 4th Fireworks Display

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-06-23

    ... SECURITY Coast Guard 33 CFR Part 165 Safety Zone; Northern California Annual Fireworks Events, July 4th Fireworks Display AGENCY: Coast Guard, DHS. ACTION: Notice of enforcement of regulation. SUMMARY: The Coast Guard will enforce the Tahoe City 4th of July Fireworks Display safety zone, from 9 a.m. through 10...

  16. CGH Supports World Cancer Day Every Day

    Cancer.gov

    We celebrate World Cancer Day every year on February 4th. This year the theme “We can. I can.” invites us to think not only about how we can work with one another to reduce the global burden of cancer, but how we as individuals can make a difference. Every day the staff at CGH work to establish and build upon programs that are aimed at improving the lives of people affected by cancer.

  17. Synapses as Therapeutic Targets for Autism Spectrum Disorders: An International Symposium Held in Pavia on July 4th, 2014

    PubMed Central

    Curatolo, Paolo; Ben-Ari, Yehezkel; Bozzi, Yuri; Catania, Maria Vincenza; D’Angelo, Egidio; Mapelli, Lisa; Oberman, Lindsay M.; Rosenmund, Christian; Cherubini, Enrico

    2014-01-01

    New progresses into the molecular and cellular mechanisms of autism spectrum disorders (ASDs) have been discussed in 1 day international symposium held in Pavia (Italy) on July 4th, 2014 entitled “synapses as therapeutic targets for autism spectrum disorders” (satellite of the FENS Forum for Neuroscience, Milan, 2014). In particular, world experts in the field have highlighted how animal models of ASDs have greatly advanced our understanding of the molecular pathways involved in synaptic dysfunction leading sometimes to “synaptic clinical trials” in children. PMID:25324723

  18. Synapses as therapeutic targets for autism spectrum disorders: an international symposium held in pavia on july 4th, 2014.

    PubMed

    Curatolo, Paolo; Ben-Ari, Yehezkel; Bozzi, Yuri; Catania, Maria Vincenza; D'Angelo, Egidio; Mapelli, Lisa; Oberman, Lindsay M; Rosenmund, Christian; Cherubini, Enrico

    2014-01-01

    New progresses into the molecular and cellular mechanisms of autism spectrum disorders (ASDs) have been discussed in 1 day international symposium held in Pavia (Italy) on July 4th, 2014 entitled "synapses as therapeutic targets for autism spectrum disorders" (satellite of the FENS Forum for Neuroscience, Milan, 2014). In particular, world experts in the field have highlighted how animal models of ASDs have greatly advanced our understanding of the molecular pathways involved in synaptic dysfunction leading sometimes to "synaptic clinical trials" in children.

  19. 18. DETAILED OFFSHORE VIEW OF 4TH TEE, LOOKING NORTHWEST, SHOWING ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    18. DETAILED OFFSHORE VIEW OF 4TH TEE, LOOKING NORTHWEST, SHOWING TRANSITION FROM WOOD BENTS TO CONCRETE BENTS - Huntington Beach Municipal Pier, Pacific Coast Highway at Main Street, Huntington Beach, Orange County, CA

  20. Effect of day-case unilateral cochlear implantation in adults on general and disease-specific quality of life, postoperative complications and hearing results, tinnitus, vertigo and cost-effectiveness: protocol for a randomised controlled trial

    PubMed Central

    Derks, Laura S M; Wegner, Inge; Smit, Adriana L; Thomeer, Hans G X M; Topsakal, Vedat; Grolman, Wilko

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Cochlear implantation is an increasingly common procedure in the treatment of severe to profound sensorineural hearing loss (SNHL) in children and adults. It is often performed as a day-case procedure. The major drive towards day-case surgery has been from a logistical, economical and societal perspective, but we also speculate that the patient's quality of life (QoL) is at least equal to inpatient surgery if not increased as a result of rapid discharge and rehabilitation. Even though cochlear implantation seems well suited to a day-case approach and this even seems to be common practice in some countries, evidence is scarce and of low quality to guide us towards the preferred treatment option. Methods and analysis A single-centre, non-blinded, randomised, controlled trial was designed to (primarily) investigate the effect on general QoL of day-case cochlear implantation compared to inpatient cochlear implantation and (secondarily) the effect of both methods on (subjective) hearing improvement, disease-specific QoL, tinnitus, vertigo and cost-effectiveness. 30 adult patients with severe to profound bilateral postlingual SNHL who are eligible for unilateral cochlear implantation will be randomly assigned to either the day-case or inpatient treatment group. The outcome measures will be assessed using auditory evaluations, questionnaires (preoperatively, at 1-week, 3-week, 3-month and 1-year follow-up) and costs diaries (weekly during the first month postoperatively, after which once in a month until 1-year follow-up). Preoperative and postoperative outcomes will be compared. The difference in costs and benefit will be represented using the incremental cost utility/effectiveness ratio. The analyses will be carried out on an intention-to-treat basis. Ethics and dissemination This research protocol was approved by the Institutional Review Board of the UMC Utrecht (NL45590.041.13; V.5, November 2015). The trial results will be disseminated through peer

  1. Postoperative astigmatism.

    PubMed

    Swinger, C A

    1987-01-01

    With the numerous significant advances in surgical methodology--e.g., microinstrumentation, the operating microscope, the surgical keratometer, and intraocular lenses--that have been developed over the past two decades, both surgeons and patients have become increasingly aware of the final optic result of any surgical intervention. This is especially so since the development of refractive surgery, where good uncorrected vision is frequently the final arbiter of success. We have progressed to the stage where the optic manipulation of the cornea, whether intentional or otherwise, can be understood in terms of a number of variables. These include the preparation and closure of the surgical wound, the choice of suture material, and both intraoperative and postoperative manipulations. Where these have failed and postoperative astigmatism still occurs, a number of surgical procedures are available to reduce the astigmatic error to an acceptable level.

  2. Qualification of the 4th stage propulsor of the Brazilian launcher. SLV: A new sounding rocket

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boscov, Jayme; Toyama, Wilson Katsumi

    1989-06-01

    The development of the Satellite Launcher Vehicle (SLV) is presented. In particular, the attention is focused on the acquisition of the propulsion parameters of the 4th stage propulsor. The device feasibility analysis is considered. The system consists of a two staged sounding rocket. Its second stage contains the SVL, which can be launched by the 4th stage propulsor to a height range of about 50 to 60 km.

  3. Postoperative incentive spirometry use.

    PubMed

    Hassanzadeh, Hamid; Jain, Amit; Tan, Eric W; Stein, Benjamin E; Van Hoy, Megan L; Stewart, Nadine N; Lemma, Mesfin A

    2012-06-01

    The authors hypothesized that the use of incentive spirometry by orthopedic patients is less than the recommended level and is affected by patient-related factors and type of surgery. To determine its postoperative use, the authors prospectively surveyed all patients in their institution's general orthopedic ward who had undergone elective spine surgery or total knee or hip arthroplasty during a consecutive 3-month period in 2010, excluding patients with postoperative delirium or requiring a monitored bed. All 182 patients (74 men, 108 women; average age, 64.5 years; range, 32-88 years; spine group, n=55; arthroplasty group, n=127), per protocol, received preoperative spirometry education by a licensed respiratory therapist (recommended use, 10 times hourly) and reinforcement education by nurses. Patients were asked twice daily (morning and evening) regarding their spirometry use during the previous 1-hour period by a registered nurse on postoperative days 1 through 3. All data were collected by the same 2 nurses using the same standardized questionnaire. Spirometry use was correlated with surgery type, postoperative day/time, and patient's age and sex. Student's t test, Spearman test, and one-way analysis of variance were used to compare differences (P<.05). Spirometry use averaged 4.1 times per hour (range, 0-10 times). No statistical correlations were found between spirometry use and age. Sex did not influence spirometry use. The arthroplasty group reported significantly higher use than did the spine group: 4.3 and 3.5 times per hour, respectively. Mean use increased significantly between postoperative days 1, 2, and 3.

  4. PREFACE: CYGNUS 2013: 4th Workshop on Directional Detection of Dark Matter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Naka, Tatsuhiro; Miuchi, Kentaro

    2013-12-01

    It is a great pleasure to publish the proceedings of the 4th Workshop on Directional Detection of Dark Matter held in Toyama, Japan on 10-12 June 2013 (CYGNUS 2013). These proceedings contain written versions of the presentations made at CYGNUS 2013 as scientific outputs of the directional detection of dark matter. The GYGNUS workshop started in 2007 at Boulby Underground Laboratory (UK), followed by CYGNUS 2009 (MIT in Cambridge, Massachusetts, USA) and CYGNUS 2011 (AUSSOIS, France). CYGNUS 2013 was held by the combination of a two and a half days of scientific program and a half day visit to the underground laboratory (Kamioka Observatory) as a 'tradition' of CYGNUS workshops. The name 'CYGNUS' came from the fact that the 'dark matter wind' is expected to come from the direction of the constellation Cygnus due to the motion of the Solar system in the galaxy. A general aim of these CYGNUS workshops is to bring together the theoretical and experimental studies on the directional dark matter detection. Directional detection of dark matter is a promising approach to a 'clear detection' and also to 'further investigations' of galactic dark matter, or Weakly Interacting Massive Particles (WIMPs). Directional detection requires the simultaneous detection of the energy and track of low energy recoils. Among many technological challenges for the requirement above, three of them, namely size, background, and directionality (angular resolution and head-tail detection), are most important to demonstrate and improve the quality as a dark matter detector. In the workshop, up-to-date activities by the international reserchers are discussed. The workshop was a great success thanks to the oral contributions and fruitful discussions held throughout the workshop period. We hope that readers will remember and share the great enthusiasm shown during the CYGNUS 2013 workshop. The Editors Tatsuhiro Naka and Kentaro Miuchi

  5. Systematically frameshifting by deletion of every 4th or 4th and 5th nucleotides during mitochondrial transcription: RNA self-hybridization regulates delRNA expression.

    PubMed

    Seligmann, Hervé

    2016-01-01

    In mitochondria, secondary structures punctuate post-transcriptional RNA processing. Recently described transcripts match the human mitogenome after systematic deletions of every 4th, respectively every 4th and 5th nucleotides, called delRNAs. Here I explore predicted stem-loop hairpin formation by delRNAs, and their associations with delRNA transcription and detected peptides matching their translation. Despite missing 25, respectively 40% of the nucleotides in the original sequence, del-transformed sequences form significantly more secondary structures than corresponding randomly shuffled sequences, indicating biological function, independently of, and in combination with, previously detected delRNA and thereof translated peptides. Self-hybridization decreases delRNA abundances, indicating downregulation. Systematic deletions of the human mitogenome reveal new, unsuspected coding and structural informations.

  6. FOREWORD: 4th International Workshop on New Computational Methods for Inverse Problems (NCMIP2014)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2014-10-01

    This volume of Journal of Physics: Conference Series is dedicated to the scientific contributions presented during the 4th International Workshop on New Computational Methods for Inverse Problems, NCMIP 2014 (http://www.farman.ens-cachan.fr/NCMIP_2014.html). This workshop took place at Ecole Normale Supérieure de Cachan, on May 23, 2014. The prior editions of NCMIP also took place in Cachan, France, firstly within the scope of ValueTools Conference, in May 2011 (http://www.ncmip.org/2011/), and secondly at the initiative of Institut Farman, in May 2012 and May 2013, (http://www.farman.ens-cachan.fr/NCMIP_2012.html), (http://www.farman.ens-cachan.fr/NCMIP_2013.html). The New Computational Methods for Inverse Problems (NCMIP) Workshop focused on recent advances in the resolution of inverse problems. Indeed, inverse problems appear in numerous scientific areas such as geophysics, biological and medical imaging, material and structure characterization, electrical, mechanical and civil engineering, and finances. The resolution of inverse problems consists of estimating the parameters of the observed system or structure from data collected by an instrumental sensing or imaging device. Its success firstly requires the collection of relevant observation data. It also requires accurate models describing the physical interactions between the instrumental device and the observed system, as well as the intrinsic properties of the solution itself. Finally, it requires the design of robust, accurate and efficient inversion algorithms. Advanced sensor arrays and imaging devices provide high rate and high volume data; in this context, the efficient resolution of the inverse problem requires the joint development of new models and inversion methods, taking computational and implementation aspects into account. During this one-day workshop, researchers had the opportunity to bring to light and share new techniques and results in the field of inverse problems. The topics of the

  7. Postoperative hyperkalemia.

    PubMed

    Ayach, Taha; Nappo, Robert W; Paugh-Miller, Jennifer L; Ross, Edward A

    2015-03-01

    Hyperkalemia occurs frequently in hospitalized patients and is of particular concern for those who have undergone surgery, with postoperative care provided by clinicians of many disciplines. This review describes the normal physiology and how multiple perioperative factors can disrupt potassium homeostasis and lead to severe elevations in plasma potassium concentration. The pathophysiologic basis of diverse causes of hyperkalemia was used to broadly classify etiologies into those with altered potassium distribution (e.g. increased potassium release from cells or other transcellular shifts), reduced urinary excretion (e.g. reduced sodium delivery, volume depletion, and hypoaldosteronism), or an exogenous potassium load (e.g. blood transfusions). Surgical conditions of particular concern involve: rhabdomyolysis from malpositioning, trauma or medications; bariatric surgery; vascular procedures with tissue ischemia; acidosis; hypovolemia; and volume or blood product resuscitation. Certain acute conditions and chronic co-morbidities present particular risk. These include chronic kidney disease, diabetes mellitus, many outpatient preoperative medications (e.g. beta blockers, salt substitutes), and inpatient agents (e.g. succinylcholine, hyperosmolar volume expanders). Clinicians need to be aware of these pathophysiologic mechanisms for developing perioperative hyperkalemia as many of the risks can be minimized or avoided.

  8. Using 4th order Runge-Kutta method for solving a twisted Skyrme string equation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hadi, Miftachul; Anderson, Malcolm; Husein, Andri

    2016-03-01

    We study numerical solution, especially using 4th order Runge-Kutta method, for solving a twisted Skyrme string equation. We find numerically that the value of minimum energy per unit length of vortex solution for a twisted Skyrmion string is 20.37 × 1060 eV/m.

  9. Improving the Attitudes of 4th Graders toward Older People through a Multidimensional Intergenerational Program

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lynott, Patricia P.; Merola, Pamela R.

    2007-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to examine the effects of an intergenerational program on children's attitudes toward older people. Four 4th grade classes, one each during the years 2002 through 2005, participated in the study. The elders and school children engaged in meaningful activities over a 5 month period, including the performance of a play…

  10. 75 FR 34639 - Safety Zone; Reedville July 4th Celebration, Cockrell's Creek, Reedville, VA

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-06-18

    ... SECURITY Coast Guard 33 CFR Part 165 RIN 1625-AA00 Safety Zone; Reedville July 4th Celebration, Cockrell's... establishing a temporary safety zone on Cockrell's Creek in the vicinity of Reedville, Virginia in support of... impracticable. Delaying the effective date would be contrary to the safety zone's intended objectives...

  11. 77 FR 56208 - Filing Dates for the Kentucky Special Election in the 4th Congressional District

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-09-12

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office FEDERAL ELECTION COMMISSION Filing Dates for the Kentucky Special Election in the 4th Congressional District AGENCY: Federal Election Commission. ACTION: Notice of filing dates for special election. SUMMARY: Kentucky has scheduled a...

  12. 77 FR 39408 - Safety Zone; Buffalo July 4th Fireworks, Lake Erie, Buffalo, NY

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-07-03

    ... SECURITY Coast Guard 33 CFR Part 165 RIN 1625-AA00 Safety Zone; Buffalo July 4th Fireworks, Lake Erie, Buffalo, NY AGENCY: Coast Guard, DHS. ACTION: Temporary final rule. SUMMARY: The Coast Guard is establishing a temporary safety zone on Lake Erie, Buffalo, NY. This safety zone is intended to...

  13. MAIN GATE, INTERSECTION OF 4TH AVE (200 NORTH) AND N ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    MAIN GATE, INTERSECTION OF 4TH AVE (200 NORTH) AND N STREET (895 EAST), SALT LAKE CITY, UT. VIEW LOOKING EAST THROUGH MAIN CEMETERY GATE TO CEMETERY'S MAIN STREET, REPHOTOGRAPH OF HISTORIC SHIPLER PHOTO # 18276, UTAH STATE HISTORICAL SOCIETY COLLECTION. - Salt Lake City Cemetery, 200 N Street, Salt Lake City, Salt Lake County, UT

  14. Polarimetric Microwave Emission from Snow Surface: 4th Strokes Component Analysis

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The effect of ice on the polarimetric 4th Stokes component observations is investigated using WindSat data over Antarctica. The difference in the magnitude of the signal observed during (July 2003) and summer (February 2004) months is investigated using a second harmonic sine function of the azimuth...

  15. 33 CFR 165.166 - Safety Zone: Macy's July 4th Fireworks, East River, NY.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... Fireworks, East River, NY. 165.166 Section 165.166 Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT... § 165.166 Safety Zone: Macy's July 4th Fireworks, East River, NY. (a) Regulated area. The following area...) in length, carrying persons for the purpose of viewing the fireworks, may take position in an...

  16. 33 CFR 165.166 - Safety Zone: Macy's July 4th Fireworks, East River, NY.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... Fireworks, East River, NY. 165.166 Section 165.166 Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT... § 165.166 Safety Zone: Macy's July 4th Fireworks, East River, NY. (a) Regulated area. The following area...) in length, carrying persons for the purpose of viewing the fireworks, may take position in an...

  17. 33 CFR 165.166 - Safety Zone: Macy's July 4th Fireworks, East River, NY.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... Fireworks, East River, NY. 165.166 Section 165.166 Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT... § 165.166 Safety Zone: Macy's July 4th Fireworks, East River, NY. (a) Regulated area. The following area...) in length, carrying persons for the purpose of viewing the fireworks, may take position in an...

  18. 33 CFR 165.166 - Safety Zone: Macy's July 4th Fireworks, East River, NY.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... Fireworks, East River, NY. 165.166 Section 165.166 Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT... § 165.166 Safety Zone: Macy's July 4th Fireworks, East River, NY. (a) Regulated area. The following area...) in length, carrying persons for the purpose of viewing the fireworks, may take position in an...

  19. 33 CFR 165.166 - Safety Zone: Macy's July 4th Fireworks, East River, NY.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... Fireworks, East River, NY. 165.166 Section 165.166 Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT... § 165.166 Safety Zone: Macy's July 4th Fireworks, East River, NY. (a) Regulated area. The following area...) in length, carrying persons for the purpose of viewing the fireworks, may take position in an...

  20. 75 FR 33170 - Safety Zone; City of Martinez 4th of July Fireworks, Martinez, CA

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-06-11

    ... SECURITY Coast Guard 33 CFR Part 165 RIN 1625-AA00 Safety Zone; City of Martinez 4th of July Fireworks, Martinez, CA AGENCY: Coast Guard, DHS. ACTION: Temporary final rule. SUMMARY: The Coast Guard is establishing a temporary safety zone for the launching of fireworks being sponsored by the City of...

  1. 11. 4TH FLOOR, HOTEL SOAP LINE No. 6 TO NORTHEAST, ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    11. 4TH FLOOR, HOTEL SOAP LINE No. 6 TO NORTHEAST, WITH WRAPPER (LEFT), PRESS (CENTER), AND CUTTER (RIGHT, BEHIND CHUTE); BUCKET CONVEYOR AT RIGHT MOVED WASTE FROM PRESS TO 5TH FLOOR FOR RE-MANUFACTURE - Colgate & Company Jersey City Plant, Building No. B-14, 54-58 Grand Street, Jersey City, Hudson County, NJ

  2. Reading Development and Achievement of 4th-Grade Hmong Students

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mahowald, Megan; Loughnane, Megan

    2016-01-01

    Researchers and practitioners alike have noted that Hmong students in the United States do not achieve as well as their monolingual peers and other bilingual students. The current mixed-methods study is designed to describe reading development and achievement of 4th-grade Hmong students in one large, urban school district. This study explores the…

  3. 4th level of 1945 warehouse indicating drag conveyor. From here ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    4th level of 1945 warehouse indicating drag conveyor. From here screenings were pumped from the elevator leg to this conveyor. The grains were ground, then conveyed back down to the first floor for bagging. - Stewart Company Grain Elevator, 16 West Carson Street, Pittsburgh, Allegheny County, PA

  4. Morphine Plus Bupivacaine Vs. Morphine Peridural Analgesia in Abdominal Surgery: The Effects on Postoperative Course in Major Hepatobiliary Surgery

    PubMed Central

    Barzoi, G.; Carluccio, S.; Bianchi, B.; Vassia, S.; Colucci, G.

    2000-01-01

    Anaesthesia and surgical procedures lead to a reduction of intestinal motility, and opioids may produce a postoperative ileus, that might delay postoperative feeding. The aim of this prospective randomised study is to test whether or not different kinds of epidural analgesia (Group A: morphine 0.00 17 mg/kg/h and bupivacaine 0.125% – 0.058 mg/kg/h; Group B: morphine alone 0.035mg/kg/12h in the postoperative period) allow earlier postoperative enteral feeding, enhance intestinal motility a passage of flatus and help avoid complications, such as nausea, vomiting, ileus, diarrhoea, pneumonia or other infective diseases. We included in the study 60 patients (28 males and 32 females) with a mean age of 61.2 years (range 50–70) and with an ASA score of 2 or 3. All patients had hepato–biliary-pancreatic neoplasm and were candidates for major surgery. We compared two different pharmacological approaches, i.e., morphine plus bupivacaine (30 patients, Group A)versus morphine alone (30 patients, Group B). Each medication was administered by means of a thoracic epidural catheter for the control of postoperative pain. In the postoperative course we recorded every 6 hours peristaltic activity. We also noted morbidity (pneumonia, wound sepsis) and mortality. Effective peristalsis was present in all patients in Group A within the first six postoperative hours; in Group B, after 30 hours. Six patients in Group A had bowel motions in the first postoperative day, 11 in the second day, 10 in the third day and 3 in fourth day, while in Group B none in the first day, two in the second, 7 in the third, 15 in the fourth, and 6 in the fifth: the difference between the two groups was significant (P<0.05 in 1st, 2nd, 4th and 5th days). Pneumonia occurred in 2 patients of Group A, and in 10 of Group B (P<0.05). We conclude that epidural analgesia with morphine plus bupivacaine allowed a move rapid return to normal gut activity and early enteral nutrition compared with epidural analgesia

  5. Postoperative conversion disorder.

    PubMed

    Afolabi, Kola; Ali, Sameer; Gahtan, Vivian; Gorji, Reza; Li, Fenghua; Nussmeier, Nancy A

    2016-05-01

    Conversion disorder is a psychiatric disorder in which psychological stress causes neurologic deficits. A 28-year-old female surgical patient had uneventful general anesthesia and emergence but developed conversion disorder 1 hour postoperatively. She reported difficulty speaking, right-hand numbness and weakness, and right-leg paralysis. Neurologic examination and imaging revealed no neuronal damage, herniation, hemorrhage, or stroke. The patient mentioned failing examinations the day before surgery and discontinuing her prescribed antidepressant medication, leading us to diagnose conversion disorder, with eventual confirmation by neuroimaging and follow-up examinations.

  6. A global perspective for managing obesity and improving health: conventional treatment and surgical options: 4th Annual Obesity Summit, London, April 2016

    PubMed Central

    Ahmad, Adeel Nazir; Edwards, Kimberley L

    2016-01-01

    4th Annual Obesity Summit, London, 12–14 April 2016 There are more than 1.9 billion overweight people worldwide, culminating in high rates of Type 2 diabetes; and cardiovascular, digestive and other health problems. This makes obesity a startling phenomenon and a significant global health epidemic. To address this, The 2016 Obesity Summit, 4th in the series of obesity-related annual events organized by EuroSciCon, was held from 12 to 14 April 2016 at Cineworld, The O2 in London. This conference set the stage for three days of stimulating high-quality presentations on the advancements in obesity in an informal academic setting. Approximately 156 delegates including students, researchers, healthcare professionals and scientists from 36 countries around the world attended the event. This meeting report summarizes some of the most outstanding presentations. PMID:28116126

  7. A global perspective for managing obesity and improving health: conventional treatment and surgical options: 4th Annual Obesity Summit, London, April 2016.

    PubMed

    Ahmad, Adeel Nazir; Edwards, Kimberley L

    2016-12-01

    4th Annual Obesity Summit, London, 12-14 April 2016 There are more than 1.9 billion overweight people worldwide, culminating in high rates of Type 2 diabetes; and cardiovascular, digestive and other health problems. This makes obesity a startling phenomenon and a significant global health epidemic. To address this, The 2016 Obesity Summit, 4th in the series of obesity-related annual events organized by EuroSciCon, was held from 12 to 14 April 2016 at Cineworld, The O2 in London. This conference set the stage for three days of stimulating high-quality presentations on the advancements in obesity in an informal academic setting. Approximately 156 delegates including students, researchers, healthcare professionals and scientists from 36 countries around the world attended the event. This meeting report summarizes some of the most outstanding presentations.

  8. PREFACE: 4th Workshop on Theory, Modelling and Computational Methods for Semiconductors (TMCSIV)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tomić, Stanko; Probert, Matt; Migliorato, Max; Pal, Joydeep

    2014-06-01

    These conference proceedings contain the written papers of the contributions presented at the 4th International Conference on Theory, Modelling and Computational Methods for Semiconductor materials and nanostructures. The conference was held at the MediaCityUK, University of Salford, Manchester, UK on 22-24 January 2014. The previous conferences in this series took place in 2012 at the University of Leeds, in 2010 at St William's College, York and in 2008 at the University of Manchester, UK. The development of high-performance computer architectures is finally allowing the routine use of accurate methods for calculating the structural, thermodynamic, vibrational, optical and electronic properties of semiconductors and their hetero- and nano-structures. The scope of this conference embraces modelling, theory and the use of sophisticated computational tools in semiconductor science and technology, where there is substantial potential for time-saving in R&D. Theoretical approaches represented in this meeting included: Density Functional Theory, Semi-empirical Electronic Structure Methods, Multi-scale Approaches, Modelling of PV devices, Electron Transport, and Graphene. Topics included, but were not limited to: Optical Properties of Quantum Nanostructures including Colloids and Nanotubes, Plasmonics, Magnetic Semiconductors, Photonic Structures, and Electronic Devices. This workshop ran for three days, with the objective of bringing together UK and international leading experts in the theoretical modelling of Group IV, III-V and II-VI semiconductors, as well as students, postdocs and early-career researchers. The first day focused on providing an introduction and overview of this vast field, aimed particularly at students, with several lectures given by recognized experts in various theoretical approaches. The following two days showcased some of the best theoretical research carried out in the UK in this field, with several contributions also from representatives of

  9. Effects of Public Preschool Expenditures on the Test Scores of 4th Graders: Evidence from TIMSS

    PubMed Central

    Waldfogel, Jane; Zhai, Fuhua

    2011-01-01

    This study examines the effects of public preschool expenditures on the math and science scores of 4th graders, holding constant child, family, and school characteristics, other relevant social expenditures, and country and year effects, in seven Organization for Economic Co-operation and Development (OECD) countries -- Australia, Japan, Netherlands, New Zealand, Norway, U.K., and U.S -- using data from the 1995 and 2003 Trends in International Mathematics and Science Study (TIMSS). Our results indicate that there are small but significant positive effects of public preschool expenditures on the math and science scores of 4th graders and preschool expenditures reduce the risk of children scoring at the low level of proficiency. We also find some evidence that children from low-resource homes and homes where the test language is not always spoken may tend to gain more from increased public preschool expenditures than other children,. PMID:21442008

  10. A Generalized 4th-Order Runge-Kutta Method for the Gross-Pitaevskii Equation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kandes, Martin

    2015-04-01

    We present the implementation of a method-of-lines approach for numerically approximating solutions of the time-dependent Gross-Pitaevksii equation in non-uniformly rotating reference frames. Implemented in parallel using a hybrid MPI + OpenMP framework, which will allow for scalable, high-resolution numerical simulations, we utilize an explicit, generalized 4th-order Runge-Kutta time-integration scheme with 2nd- and 4th-order central differences to approximate the spatial derivatives in the equation. The principal objective of this project is to model the effect(s) of inertial forces on quantized vortices within weakly-interacting dilute atomic gas Bose-Einstein condensates in the mean-field limit of the Gross-Pitaevskii equation. Here, we discuss our work-to-date and preliminary results.

  11. 11th National Meeting of Organic Chemistry and 4th Meeting of Therapeutic Chemistry

    PubMed Central

    Sousa, Maria Emília; Araújo, Maria João; do Vale, Maria Luísa; Andrade, Paula B.; Branco, Paula; Gomes, Paula; Moreira, Rui; Pinho e Melo, Teresa M.V.D.; Freitas, Victor

    2016-01-01

    For the first time under the auspices of Sociedade Portuguesa de Química, the competences of two important fields of Chemistry are brought together into a single event, the 11st National Organic Chemistry Meeting and the the 4th National Medicinal Chemistry Meeting, to highlight complementarities and to promote new synergies. Abstracts of plenary lectures, oral communications, and posters presented during the meeting are collected in this report. PMID:27102166

  12. LESSONS LEARNED, HEADQUARTERS, 4TH BATTALION (AW)(SP), 60TH ARTILLERY

    DTIC Science & Technology

    The 4th Battalion (AW)(SP) 60th Artillery with attached Battery E (MG), 41st Artillery, remained assigned to I Field Force Vietnam, attached to I ...Battalion (AW)(SP), 60th Artillery, with attached Battery E (MG), 41st Artillery, was detached from 41st Artillery Group and fully attached to I Field Force...States and Free World Military Assistance Forces throughout the II Corps Tactical Zone and the I Corps Tactical Zone.

  13. 10. 4TH FLOOR, HOTEL SOAP LINE No. 6 TO SOUTHWEST, ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    10. 4TH FLOOR, HOTEL SOAP LINE No. 6 TO SOUTHWEST, WITH AUTOMATIC CUTTER (LEFT), PRESS (CENTER), AND WRAPPER (RIGHT); LARGE CHUTE AT CENTER FROM 5TH FLOOR BINS TO 3RD FLOOR SOAP MILLS; OVERHEAD AND FLOOR (LOWER RIGHT) FINISHED GOODS CONVEYORS TO G BLOCK (HAER NO. NJ-71-NN) - Colgate & Company Jersey City Plant, Building No. B-14, 54-58 Grand Street, Jersey City, Hudson County, NJ

  14. 11(th) National Meeting of Organic Chemistry and 4(th) Meeting of Therapeutic Chemistry.

    PubMed

    Sousa, Maria Emília; Araújo, Maria João; do Vale, Maria Luísa; Andrade, Paula B; Branco, Paula; Gomes, Paula; Moreira, Rui; Pinho E Melo, Teresa M V D; Freitas, Victor

    2016-03-17

    For the first time under the auspices of Sociedade Portuguesa de Química, the competences of two important fields of Chemistry are brought together into a single event, the 11st National Organic Chemistry Meeting and the the 4th National Medicinal Chemistry Meeting, to highlight complementarities and to promote new synergies. Abstracts of plenary lectures, oral communications, and posters presented during the meeting are collected in this report.

  15. [Experience with percutaneous endoscopic gastrostomy in the nutrition of a patient with 3rd and 4th degree facial burns].

    PubMed

    Halmy, C; Szücs, A; Gyökeres, T; Dékány, K; Mezeine, T I; Kertész, E

    1998-05-17

    Recovery after thermal injury depends in great proportion on nutrition. A major problem is accounted in patients with facial burn, because they can not be nourished per vias naturales. Eliminating disadvantages of parenteral nutrition, but utilizing the advantages of enteral nutrition, we have tried a new method of treatment in a patient whose case is presented. On the second day after injury a percutaneous endoscopic gastrostomy was made. On the 7th day after injury and on the 4th day from the beginning of enteral nutrition complete intake of food and liquid was assured through the percutaneous endoscopic gastrostoma. We had no complication related to the gastrostoma. Nutrition through the percutaneous endoscopic gastrostoma at our patient provided a "natural" route to assure liquid, electrolite and energy balance, prevented atrophy of intestinal mucosa and its metabolic and immunologic complications. With the use of percutaneous endoscopic gastrostoma the possible complications of central line catheter were omitted. Our opinion is that percutaneous endoscopic gastrostomy is a safe and effective method for the clinical nutrition of burned patients.

  16. Recovery from post-operative anaemia.

    PubMed

    Wallis, J P; Wells, A W; Whitehead, S; Brewster, N

    2005-10-01

    Acceptance of lower transfusion thresholds and shorter post-operative stays results in patients leaving hospital after surgery with lower haemoglobin (Hb) than previously. We undertook a prospective observational study to assess the haematological response to post-operative anaemia and to determine the utility of quality of life (QoL) measures in assessing the impact of anaemia on such patients. Thirty patients undergoing unilateral hip arthroplasty had blood samples taken and QoL questionnaires administered pre-operatively and at 7, 28 and 56 days post-operatively. Increased erythropoiesis was evident at day 7 post-operatively. Approximately two-thirds of the post-operative Hb deficit was corrected by day 28. There was evidence of functional iron deficiency in more than one-quarter of patients at day 56. QoL scores used did not show any relationship with Hb in the post-operative period. Red cell 2,3-diphosphoglycerate (2,3DPG) levels increased in proportion to the degree of post-operative anaemia. We concluded that substantial recovery of Hb occurs between day 7 and day 28 post-operatively. Complete recovery of Hb may be delayed beyond day 56 due to development of iron deficiency. Patients are at significant risk of developing post-operative iron deficiency depending on operative blood loss and pre-operative iron stores. Increased red cell 2,3DPG may offset the effect of anaemia on oxygen delivery. We found no evidence that anaemia produces a measurable effect on chosen QoL scores in the post-operative period.

  17. 78 FR 23866 - Safety Zone; Crescent City 4th of July Fireworks; Crescent City Harbor, Crescent City, CA

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-04-23

    ... SECURITY Coast Guard 33 CFR Part 165 RIN 1625-AA00 Safety Zone; Crescent City 4th of July Fireworks; Crescent City Harbor, Crescent City, CA AGENCY: Coast Guard, DHS. ACTION: Notice of proposed rulemaking... Crescent City, CA in support of the Crescent City 4th of July Fireworks on July 4, 2013. This safety...

  18. 78 FR 23869 - Safety Zone; Redwood City 4th of July Fireworks Show; Port of Redwood City, Redwood City, CA

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-04-23

    ... SECURITY Coast Guard 33 CFR Part 165 RIN 1625-AA00 Safety Zone; Redwood City 4th of July Fireworks Show; Port of Redwood City, Redwood City, CA AGENCY: Coast Guard, DHS. ACTION: Notice of proposed rulemaking... of Redwood City near Redwood City, CA in support of the Redwood City 4th of July Fireworks Show...

  19. PREFACE: The 4th Symposium on the Mechanics of Slender Structures (MoSS2013)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cao, Dengqing; Kaczmarczyk, Stefan

    2013-07-01

    This volume of Journal of Physics: Conference Series contains papers presented at the 4th Symposium on the Mechanics of Slender Structures (MoSS2013) run under the auspices of the Institute of Physics Applied Mechanics Group and hosted by Harbin Institute of Technology (China) from 7-9 January 2013. The conference has been organized in collaboration with the Technical Committee on Vibration and Sound of the American Society of Mechanical Engineers and follows a one day seminar on Ropes, Cables, Belts and Chains: Theory and Applications and the MoSS2006 symposium held at the University of Northampton (UK) in 2004 and 2006, respectively, the MoSS2008 symposium held at the University of Maryland Baltimore County (USA) in 2008 and the MoSS2010 symposium hosted by Mondragon University and held in San Sebastian (Spain) in 2010. The remit of the Symposium on the Mechanics of Slender Structures series involves a broad range of scientific areas. Applications of slender structures include terrestrial, marine and space systems. Moving elastic elements such as ropes, cables, belts and tethers are pivotal components of many engineering systems. Their lengths often vary when the system is in operation. The applications include vertical transportation installations and, more recently, space tether propulsion systems. Traction drive elevator installations employ ropes and belts of variable length as a means of suspension, and also for the compensation of tensile forces over the traction sheave. In cranes and mine hoists, cables and ropes are subject to length variation in order to carry payloads. Tethers experiencing extension and retraction are important components of offshore and marine installations, as well as being proposed for a variety of different space vehicle propulsion systems based on different applications of momentum exchange and electrodynamic interactions with planetary magnetic fields. Furthermore, cables and slender rods are used extensively in civil engineering

  20. Can astronomy enhance UNESCO World Heritage recognition? The paradigm of 4th Dynasty Egyptian pyramids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Belmonte, Juan Antonio

    2015-08-01

    The pyramids of Egypt, notably those of the 4th Dinasty as Giza, have always be considered an unmistikable part of human world heritage as the only surviving wonders of the Ancient World. Their majesty, technical hability and innovative character have always beeen considered as representative of ancient Egyptian ingenuity. However, past and present fringe theories about the pyramids and astronomy have always polluted the role of our discipline in the design, construction and symbolism of these impressive monuments. This is indeed unfear. Fortunately, things have started to change in the last couple of decades and now astronomy is interpreted as a neccessary tool for the correct interpretation of the astral eschatology present in the 5th and 6th Dynasty Texts of the Pyramids. Although the pyramid complexes of the 4th Dynasty are mute, there is however recent research showing that a strong astral symbolism could be hidden in many aspects of the complex architecture and in the design of these exceptional monuments. This idea comes from several hints obtained not only from planning and construction, but also from epigraphy and the analysis of celestial and local landscapes. Chronology also plays a most relevant role on this. The pyramid complexes of the 4th Dynasty at Meidum, Dahshur, Giza and Abu Rowash -- all of which enjoy UNESCO World Heritage recognition -- willl be scrutinized. As a consequence, we will show how astronomy can certainly enhance the face value of these extraordinary monuments as a definitive proof of the ancient Egyptian quest for Ma'at, i.e. their perennial obsesion for Cosmic Order.

  1. Proceedings of the 4th International Conference and Exhibition: World Congress on Superconductivity, volume 1

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Krishen, Kumar (Editor); Burnham, Calvin (Editor)

    1995-01-01

    The papers presented at the 4th International Conference Exhibition: World Congress on Superconductivity held at the Marriott Orlando World Center, Orlando, Florida, are contained in this document and encompass the research, technology, applications, funding, political, and social aspects of superconductivity. Specifically, the areas covered included: high-temperature materials; thin films; C-60 based superconductors; persistent magnetic fields and shielding; fabrication methodology; space applications; physical applications; performance characterization; device applications; weak link effects and flux motion; accelerator technology; superconductivity energy; storage; future research and development directions; medical applications; granular superconductors; wire fabrication technology; computer applications; technical and commercial challenges, and power and energy applications.

  2. Proceedings of the 4th International Workshop on Tritium Effects in Plasma Facing Components

    SciTech Connect

    R. A. Causey

    1999-02-01

    The 4th International Workshop on Tritium Effects in Plasma Facing Components was held in Santa Fe, New Mexico on May 14-15, 1998. This workshop occurs every two years, and has previously been held in Livermore/California, Nagoya/Japan, and the JRC-Ispra Site in Italy. The purpose of the workshop is to gather researchers involved in the topic of tritium migration, retention, and recycling in materials used to line magnetic fusion reactor walls and provide a forum for presentation and discussions in this area. This document provides an overall summary of the workshop, the workshop agenda, a summary of the presentations, and a list of attendees.

  3. Proceedings of the 4th International Conference and Exhibition: World Congress on Superconductivity, Volume 2

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Krishen, Kumar (Editor); Burnham, Calvin (Editor)

    1995-01-01

    This document contains papers presented at the 4th International Conference Exhibition: World Congress on Superconductivity held June 27-July 1, 1994 in Orlando, Florida. These documents encompass research, technology, applications, funding, political, and social aspects of superconductivity. The areas covered included: high-temperature materials; thin films; C-60 based superconductors; persistent magnetic fields and shielding; fabrication methodology; space applications; physical applications; performance characterization; device applications; weak link effects and flux motion; accelerator technology; superconductivity energy; storage; future research and development directions; medical applications; granular superconductors; wire fabrication technology; computer applications; technical and commercial challenges; and power and energy applications.

  4. Multi-Dimensional Asymptotically Stable 4th Order Accurate Schemes for the Diffusion Equation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Abarbanel, Saul; Ditkowski, Adi

    1996-01-01

    An algorithm is presented which solves the multi-dimensional diffusion equation on co mplex shapes to 4th-order accuracy and is asymptotically stable in time. This bounded-error result is achieved by constructing, on a rectangular grid, a differentiation matrix whose symmetric part is negative definite. The differentiation matrix accounts for the Dirichlet boundary condition by imposing penalty like terms. Numerical examples in 2-D show that the method is effective even where standard schemes, stable by traditional definitions fail.

  5. [Global Health. Information for change. 4th report of the Italian Observatory on Global Health].

    PubMed

    2011-01-01

    Global Health. Information for change. 4th report of the Italian Observatory on Global Health. InformAzione (InformAction) is the title of the last OISG report (Italian observatory on Global Health), dedicated to information and education, the essential bases for a conscious action aimed at decreasing inequalities. Increasing the investments in information, education and interventions oriented to global health may broaden the number of aware and informed citizens, able to start a dialogue, to make pressures to increase the interventions in favor of those in need.

  6. Design of a Nb3Sn Magnet for a 4th Generation ECR Ion Source

    SciTech Connect

    Prestemon, S,; Trillaud, F.; Caspi, S.; Ferracin, P.; Sabbi, G. L.; Lyneis, C. M.; Leitner, D.; Todd, D. S.; Hafalia, R.

    2008-08-17

    The next generation of Electron Cyclotron Resonant (ECR) ion sources are expected to operate at a heating radio frequency greater than 40 GHz. The existing 3rd generation systems, exemplified by the state of the art system VENUS, operate in the 10-28 GHz range, and use NbTi superconductors for the confinement coils. The magnetic field needed to confine the plasma scales with the rf frequency, resulting in peak fields on the magnets of the 4th generation system in excess of 10 T. High field superconductors such as Nb{sub 3}Sn must therefore be considered. The magnetic design of a 4th. generation ECR ion source operating at an rf frequency of 56 GHz is considered. The analysis considers both internal and external sextupole configurations, assuming commercially available Nb{sub 3}Sn material properties. Preliminary structural design issues are discussed based on the forces and margins associated with the coils in the different configurations, leading to quantitative data for the determination of a final magnet design.

  7. Computational aspects of the nonlinear normal mode initialization of the GLAS 4th order GCM

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Navon, I. M.; Bloom, S. C.; Takacs, L.

    1984-01-01

    Using the normal modes of the GLAS 4th Order Model, a Machenhauer nonlinear normal mode initialization (NLNMI) was carried out for the external vertical mode using the GLAS 4th Order shallow water equations model for an equivalent depth corresponding to that associated with the external vertical mode. A simple procedure was devised which was directed at identifying computational modes by following the rate of increase of BAL sub M, the partial (with respect to the zonal wavenumber m) sum of squares of the time change of the normal mode coefficients (for fixed vertical mode index) varying over the latitude index L of symmetric or antisymmetric gravity waves. A working algorithm is presented which speeds up the convergence of the iterative Machenhauer NLNMI. A 24 h integration using the NLNMI state was carried out using both Matsuno and leap-frog time-integration schemes; these runs were then compared to a 24 h integration starting from a non-initialized state. The maximal impact of the nonlinear normal mode initialization was found to occur 6-10 hours after the initial time.

  8. Spiritual Health Scale 2011: Defining and Measuring 4th Dimension of Health

    PubMed Central

    Dhar, Neera; Chaturvedi, SK; Nandan, Deoki

    2011-01-01

    In the midst of physical comforts provided by the unprecedented developments in all spheres of life, the humanity is at cross roads and looking at something beyond these means. Spirituality has now been identified globally as an important aspect for providing answers to many questions related to health and happiness. The World Health Organization is also keen at looking beyond physical, mental and social dimensions of the health, and the member countries are actively exploring the 4th Dimension of the health i.e. the spiritual health and its impact on the overall health and happiness of an individual. National Institute of Health and Family Welfare (NIHFW), realized this need and initiated a research study in this direction. In this study, an effort was made to define this 4th Dimension of health from a common worldly person's perspective and measure it. 3 Domains, 6 Constructs and 27 Determinants of spiritual health were identified through a scientific process. A statistically reliable and valid Spiritual Health Scale (SHS 2011) containing 114 items has been developed. Construct validity and test- retest reliability has been established for urban educated adult population. The scale is first of its kind in the world to measure the spiritual health of a common worldly person, which is devoid of religious and cultural bias. Its items have universal applicability. PMID:22279257

  9. A study of personality factors and interaction in 4th-year dental students and their teachers.

    PubMed

    Watts, T L; Millard, L

    1997-02-01

    No previous investigation has considered dental student and teaching staff opinions on their relationship with each other. In a day when students are increasingly asked for feedback on the quality of teaching by staff, such investigations are of particular interest. This exploratory study was designed to compare the personality characteristics of a clinical year of dental students with those of the teaching staff they most frequently encountered, and to investigate these factors for possible associations with the quality of perceived teaching-learning interaction between the 2 groups. A complete 4th year of dental students (n = 87), and those teachers whom they met regularly (n = 80), were asked to participate. Subjects completed a form of the Myers-Briggs personality questionnaire simplified for use in education, and were asked to assess their relationship with persons in the other group. All the students and 75% of the staff, after follow-up, returned usable data. There was close similarity between staff and student personality profiles, and perception of working relationships by both groups was largely independent of personality factors and temperament. There were differences in staff perception of their relationship with extrovert and introvert students. Students showed minor differences in their perception of staff relationships with respect to two other personality factors. These findings indicate a substantial similarity between staff and students, and suggest a mature and stable relationship between people in the 2 groups.

  10. Preoperative Sleep Disruption and Postoperative Delirium

    PubMed Central

    Leung, Jacqueline M.; Sands, Laura P.; Newman, Stacey; Meckler, Gabriela; Xie, Yimeng; Gay, Caryl; Lee, Kathryn

    2015-01-01

    Study Objectives: To describe preoperative and postoperative sleep disruption and its relationship to postoperative delirium. Design: Prospective cohort study with 6 time points (3 nights pre-hospitalization and 3 nights post-surgery). Setting: University medical center. Patients: The sample consisted of 50 English-speaking patients ≥ 40 years of age scheduled for major non-cardiac surgery, with an anticipated hospital stay ≥ 3 days. Interventions: None. Measurements and results: Sleep was measured before and after surgery for a total of 6 days using a wrist actigraph to quantify movement in a continuous fashion. Postoperative delirium was measured by a structured interview using the Confusion Assessment Method. Sleep variables for patients with (n = 7) and without (n = 43) postoperative delirium were compared using the unpaired Student t-tests or χ2 tests. Repeated measures analysis of variance for the 6 days was used to examine within-subject changes over time and between group differences. The mean age of the patients was 66 ± 11 years (range 43–91 years), and it was not associated with sleep variables or postoperative delirium. The incidence of postoperative delirium observed during any of the 3 postoperative days was 14%. For the 7 patients who subsequently developed postoperative delirium, wake after sleep onset (WASO) as a percentage of total sleep time was significantly higher (44% ± 22%) during the night before surgery compared to the patients who did not subsequently developed delirium (21% ± 20%, p = 0.012). This sleep disruption continued postoperatively, and to a greater extent, for the first 2 nights after surgery. Patients with WASO < 10% did not experience postoperative delirium. Self-reported sleep disturbance did not differ between patients with vs. without postoperative delirium. Conclusions: In this pilot study of adults over 40 years of age, sleep disruption was more severe before surgery in the patients who experienced postoperative

  11. [Giant cell tumor of the 4th metacarpal bone of the left hand. Apropos of a case].

    PubMed

    Kamel, E J; Pinto, J A; Potenza, L; Michelena, A; Perez Signini, F; Fuenmayor, A

    1983-01-01

    He is a 46 year old patient that consults on a tumor that deforms the back of his left hand. The X-ray examination shows a bone osteolytic tumor with complete dis appearance of the 4th metacarpal. Surgical removal of the tumor was practiced with immediate reconstruction of the 4th metacarpal by an oseo-iliac graft. Anatomopathological examination. It is an ovoid tumor 6.5 long and irregular surface.

  12. [Analysis of the 4th generation outer space bred Angelica dahurica by FTIR spectroscopy].

    PubMed

    Zhu, Yan-ying; Wu, Peng-le; Liu, Mei-yi; Wang, Zhi-zhou; Guo, Xi-hua; Guan, Ying

    2012-03-01

    The major components of the 4th generation outer space bred angelica and the ground group were determined and analyzed by Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR) and second derivative spectrum, considering the large mutation of the plants with space mutagenesis. The results show that the content of the coumarin (1741 cm(-1)), which is the main active components of the space angelica dahurica increased, and the content of the protein (1 459, 1 419 cm(-1)) and the fat (930 cm(-1)) increased slightly, whereas the content of the starch and the dietary fiber reduced drastically. There are obvious differences between the peak values of the second derivative spectra of the plants, revealing that the outer space angelica dahurica contained amine component at 1 279 cm(-1). Space mutation breeding is favor of breeding angelica with better idiosyncrasy.

  13. STO-2: Support for 4th Year Operations, Recovery, and Science ASU Co-I

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Groppi, Christopher

    This is a Co-Investigator proposal for "STO-2: Support for 4th Year Operations, Recovery, and Science" with Prof. Christopher K. Walker (University of Arizona) as PI. As a participant in the STO-2 mission, ASU will participate in instrument design and construction, mission I&T, flight operations and data analysis. ASU has unique capabilities in the field of direct metal micromachining, which it will bring to bear on the STO-2 cold optical assembly, flight mixers and LO hardware. In addition, our extensive experience with receiver integration and test will supplement the capabilities of the PI institution during the I&T phase at the University of Arizona, CSBF (Palestine, TX) and in Antarctica. Both the ASU PI and student will also participate in data analysis and publication after the flight.

  14. 4th generation of the 1st level surface detector trigger in the Pierre Auger Observator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Szadkowski, Z.

    The proposal of a new 4th generation of the Front-End with the advanced 1st level triggers for the Infill Array of the Pierre Auger Observatory and for the Auger North is described. Newest FPGA chips offer much higher capacity of logic registers and memories, as well as DSP blocks. The calibration channel, previously supported by an external dual-port RAM, has been fully implemented into FPGA chip, through a large internal memory. In turn DSP blocks allowed on implementation of much more sophisticated spectral trigger algorithms. A single chip simplified board design, newer architecture of FPGA reduced resouces utilization and power consumption. Higher sampling in the new Front- End in comparison with previous 40 MHz designs as well as free resources for new detection algotithms can be a good platform for CR radio detection technique at Auger enhancing a duty cycle for the detection of UHECR’s.

  15. The 4th Bologna Winter School: Hot Topics in Structural Genomics

    PubMed Central

    2003-01-01

    The 4th Bologna Winter School on Biotechnologies was held on 9–15 February 2003 at the University of Bologna, Italy, with the specific aim of discussing recent developments in bioinformatics. The school provided an opportunity for students and scientists to debate current problems in computational biology and possible solutions. The course, co-supported (as last year) by the European Science Foundation program on Functional Genomics, focused mainly on hot topics in structural genomics, including recent CASP and CAPRI results, recent and promising genomewide predictions, protein–protein and protein–DNA interaction predictions and genome functional annotation. The topics were organized into four main sections (http://www.biocomp.unibo.it). PMID:18629078

  16. Beyond the genomics blueprint: the 4th Human Variome Project Meeting, UNESCO, Paris, 2012.

    PubMed

    Kohonen-Corish, Maija R J; Smith, Timothy D; Robinson, Helen M

    2013-07-01

    The 4th Biennial Meeting of the Human Variome Project Consortium was held at the headquarters of the United Nations Educational, Scientific and Cultural Organization (UNESCO) in Paris, 11-15 June 2012. The Human Variome Project, a nongovernmental organization and an official partner of UNESCO, enables the routine collection, curation, interpretation, and sharing of information on all human genetic variation. This meeting was attended by more than 180 delegates from 39 countries and continued the theme of addressing issues of implementation in this unique project. The meeting was structured around the four main themes of the Human Variome Project strategic plan, "Project Roadmap 2012-2016": setting normative function, behaving ethically, sharing knowledge, and building capacity. During the meeting, the members held extensive discussions to formulate an action plan in the key areas of the Human Variome Project. The actions agreed on were promulgated at the Project's two Advisory Council and Scientific Advisory Committee postconference meetings.

  17. Giant viruses in the oceans: the 4th Algal Virus Workshop.

    PubMed

    Claverie, Jean-Michel

    2005-06-20

    Giant double-stranded DNA viruses (such as record breaking Acanthamoeba polyphaga Mimivirus), with particle sizes of 0.2 to 0.6 microm, genomes of 300 kbp to 1.200 kbp, and commensurate complex gene contents, constitute an evolutionary mystery. They challenge the common vision of viruses, traditionally seen as highly streamlined genomes optimally fitted to the smallest possible--filterable--package. Such giant viruses are now discovered in increasing numbers through the systematic sampling of ocean waters as well as freshwater aquatic environments, where they play a significant role in controlling phyto- and bacterio- plankton populations. The 4th Algal Virus Workshop showed that the study of these ecologically important viruses is now massively entering the genomic era, promising a better understanding of their diversity and, hopefully, some insights on their origin and the evolutionary forces that shaped their genomes.

  18. General Chemistry Collection for Students (CD-ROM), Abstract of Special Issue 16, 4th Edition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2000-07-01

    The General Chemistry Collection contains both new and previously published JCE Software programs that are intended for use by introductory-level chemistry students. These peer-reviewed programs for Macintosh and for Windows are available on a single CD-ROM for convenient distribution to and access by students, and the CD may be adopted for students to purchase as they would a textbook. General Chemistry Collection covers a broad range of topics providing students with interesting information, tutorials, and simulations that will be useful to them as they study chemistry for the first time. There are 22 programs included in the General Chemistry Collection 4th Edition. Their titles and the general chemistry topics they cover are listed in Table 1. Features in This Edition General Chemistry Collection, 4th edition includes:

    • Lessons for Introductory Chemistry and INQUAL-S, two new programs not previously published by JCE Software (abstracts appear below)
    • Writing Electron Dot Structures (1) and Viscosity Measurement: A Virtual Experiment for Windows (2), two programs published individually by JCE Software
    • Periodic Table Live! LE, a limited edition of Periodic Table Live!, 2nd Edition (3) (this replaces Chemistry Navigator (4) and Illustrated Periodic Table (5))
    • Many of the programs from previous editions (6)1
    Hardware and Software Requirements System requirements are given in Table 2. Some programs have additional requirements. See the individual program abstracts at JCE Online, or documentation included on the CD-ROM for more specific information. Licensing and Discounts for Adoptions The General Chemistry Collection is intended for use by individual students. Institutions and faculty members may adopt General Chemistry Collection 4th Edition as they would a textbook. We can arrange for CDs to be packaged with laboratory manuals or other course materials or to be sold for direct distribution to students through the campus

  19. Report of the 4th World Climate Research Programme International Conference on Reanalyses

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bosilovich, Michael G.; Rixen, Michel; van Oevelen, Peter; Asrar, Ghassem; Compo, Gilbert; Onogi, Kazutoshi; Simmons, Adrian; Trenberth, Kevin; Behringer, Dave; Bhuiyan, Tanvir Hossain; Capps, Shannon; Chaudhuri, Ayan; Chen, Junye; Chen, Linling; Colasacco-Thumm, Nicole; Escobar, Maria Gabriela; Ferguson, Craig R.; Ishibashi, Toshiyuki; Liberato, Margarida L. R.; Meng, Jesse; Molod, Andrea; Poli, Paul; Roundy, Joshua; Willett, Kate; Wollen, Jack

    2012-01-01

    The 4th WCRP International Conference on Reanalyses provided an opportunity for the international community to review and discuss the observational and modelling research, as well as process studies and uncertainties associated with reanalysis of the Earth System and its components. Characterizing the uncertainty and quality of reanalyses is a task that reaches far beyond the international community of producers, and into the interdisciplinary research community, especially those using reanalysis products in their research and applications. Reanalyses have progressed greatly even in the last 5 years, and newer ideas, projects and data are coming forward. While reanalysis has typically been carried out for the individual domains of atmosphere, ocean and land, it is now moving towards coupling using Earth system models. Observations are being reprocessed and they are providing improved quality for use in reanalysis. New applications are being investigated, and the need for climate reanalyses is as strong as ever. At the heart of it all, new investigators are exploring the possibilities for reanalysis, and developing new ideas in research and applications. Given the many centres creating reanalyses products (e.g. ocean, land and cryosphere research centres as well as NWP and atmospheric centers), and the development of new ideas (e.g. families of reanalyses), the total number of reanalyses is increasing greatly, with new and innovative diagnostics and output data. The need for reanalysis data is growing steadily, and likewise, the need for open discussion and comment on the data. The 4th Conference was convened to provide a forum for constructive discussion on the objectives, strengths and weaknesses of reanalyses, indicating potential development paths for the future.

  20. Food-based Science Curriculum Increases 4(th) Graders Multidisciplinary Science Knowledge.

    PubMed

    Hovland, Jana A; Carraway-Stage, Virginia G; Cela, Artenida; Collins, Caitlin; Díaz, Sebastián R; Collins, Angelo; Duffrin, Melani W

    2013-10-01

    Health professionals and policymakers are asking educators to place more emphasis on food and nutrition education. Integrating these topics into science curricula using hand-on, food-based activities may strengthen students' understanding of science concepts. The Food, Math, and Science Teaching Enhancement Resource (FoodMASTER) Initiative is a compilation of programs aimed at using food as a tool to teach mathematics and science. Previous studies have shown that students experiencing the FoodMASTER curriculum were very excited about the activities, became increasingly interested in the subject matter of food, and were able to conduct scientific observations. The purpose of this study was to: 1) assess 4(th) graders food-related multidisciplinary science knowledge, and 2) compare gains in food-related science knowledge after implementation of an integrated, food-based curriculum. During the 2009-2010 school year, FoodMASTER researchers implemented a hands-on, food-based intermediate curriculum in eighteen 4(th) grade classrooms in Ohio (n=9) and North Carolina (n=9). Sixteen classrooms in Ohio (n=8) and North Carolina (n=8), following their standard science curricula, served as comparison classrooms. Students completed a researcher-developed science knowledge exam, consisting of 13 multiple-choice questions administered pre- and post-test. Only subjects with pre- and post-test scores were entered into the sample (Intervention n=343; Control n=237). No significant differences were observed between groups at pre-test. At post-test, the intervention group scored (9.95±2.00) significantly higher (p=.000) than the control group (8.84±2.37) on a 13-point scale. These findings suggest the FoodMASTER intermediate curriculum is more effective than a standard science curriculum in increasing students' multidisciplinary science knowledge related to food.

  1. Food-based Science Curriculum Increases 4th Graders Multidisciplinary Science Knowledge

    PubMed Central

    Hovland, Jana A.; Carraway-Stage, Virginia G.; Cela, Artenida; Collins, Caitlin; Díaz, Sebastián R.; Collins, Angelo; Duffrin, Melani W.

    2013-01-01

    Health professionals and policymakers are asking educators to place more emphasis on food and nutrition education. Integrating these topics into science curricula using hand-on, food-based activities may strengthen students’ understanding of science concepts. The Food, Math, and Science Teaching Enhancement Resource (FoodMASTER) Initiative is a compilation of programs aimed at using food as a tool to teach mathematics and science. Previous studies have shown that students experiencing the FoodMASTER curriculum were very excited about the activities, became increasingly interested in the subject matter of food, and were able to conduct scientific observations. The purpose of this study was to: 1) assess 4th graders food-related multidisciplinary science knowledge, and 2) compare gains in food-related science knowledge after implementation of an integrated, food-based curriculum. During the 2009–2010 school year, FoodMASTER researchers implemented a hands-on, food-based intermediate curriculum in eighteen 4th grade classrooms in Ohio (n=9) and North Carolina (n=9). Sixteen classrooms in Ohio (n=8) and North Carolina (n=8), following their standard science curricula, served as comparison classrooms. Students completed a researcher-developed science knowledge exam, consisting of 13 multiple-choice questions administered pre- and post-test. Only subjects with pre- and post-test scores were entered into the sample (Intervention n=343; Control n=237). No significant differences were observed between groups at pre-test. At post-test, the intervention group scored (9.95±2.00) significantly higher (p=.000) than the control group (8.84±2.37) on a 13-point scale. These findings suggest the FoodMASTER intermediate curriculum is more effective than a standard science curriculum in increasing students’ multidisciplinary science knowledge related to food. PMID:25152539

  2. European Code against Cancer 4th Edition: Medical exposures, including hormone therapy, and cancer.

    PubMed

    Friis, Søren; Kesminiene, Ausrele; Espina, Carolina; Auvinen, Anssi; Straif, Kurt; Schüz, Joachim

    2015-12-01

    The 4th edition of the European Code against Cancer recommends limiting - or avoiding when possible - the use of hormone replacement therapy (HRT) because of the increased risk of cancer, nevertheless acknowledging that prescription of HRT may be indicated under certain medical conditions. Current evidence shows that HRT, generally prescribed as menopausal hormone therapy, is associated with an increased risk of cancers of the breast, endometrium, and ovary, with the risk pattern depending on factors such as the type of therapy (oestrogen-only or combined oestrogen-progestogen), duration of treatment, and initiation according to the time of menopause. Carcinogenicity has also been established for anti-neoplastic agents used in cancer therapy, immunosuppressants, oestrogen-progestogen contraceptives, and tamoxifen. Medical use of ionising radiation, an established carcinogen, can provide major health benefits; however, prudent practices need to be in place, with procedures and techniques providing the needed diagnostic information or therapeutic gain with the lowest possible radiation exposure. For pharmaceutical drugs and medical radiation exposure with convincing evidence on their carcinogenicity, health benefits have to be balanced against the risks; potential increases in long-term cancer risk should be considered in the context of the often substantial and immediate health benefits from diagnosis and/or treatment. Thus, apart from HRT, no general recommendations on reducing cancer risk were given for carcinogenic drugs and medical radiation in the 4th edition of European Code against Cancer. It is crucial that the application of these measures relies on medical expertise and thorough benefit-risk evaluation. This also pertains to cancer-preventive drugs, and self-medication with aspirin or other potential chemopreventive drugs is strongly discouraged because of the possibility of serious, potentially lethal, adverse events.

  3. Postoperative conversion disorder in a pediatric patient.

    PubMed

    Judge, Amy; Spielman, Fred

    2010-11-01

    According to the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual IV (DSM IV), conversion disorder is classified as a somatoform illness and defined as an alteration or loss of physical function because of the expression of an underlying psychological ailment. This condition, previously known as hysteria, hysterical neurosis, or conversion hysteria occurs rarely, with an incidence of 11-300 cases per 100,000 people (American Psychiatric Association. Diagnostic and statistical manual of mental disorders. 4th edn. Washington, DC: American Psychiatric Association, 1994). Presentation after an anesthetic is exceptional. After thorough review of the literature, fewer than 20 cases have been documented, with only two instances in patients younger than 18 years of age after general anesthesia; both were mild in nature. We present a severe case of postoperative conversion disorder that developed upon emergence from anesthesia in a previously healthy 16-year-old girl following direct laryngoscopy with vocal fold injection.

  4. Conditions for the generation of cytotoxic CD4+ Th cells that enhance CD8+ CTL-mediated tumor regression

    PubMed Central

    Li, Kunyu; Baird, Margaret; Yang, Jianping; Jackson, Chris; Ronchese, Franca; Young, Sarah

    2016-01-01

    Adoptive cell therapies (ACTs) using tumor-reactive T cells have shown clinical benefit and potential for cancer treatment. While the majority of the current ACT are focused on using CD8+ cytotoxic T lymphocytes (CTL), others have shown that the presence of tumor-reactive CD4+ T helper (Th) cells can greatly enhance the anti-tumor activity of CD8+ CTL. However, difficulties in obtaining adequate numbers of CD4+ Th cells through in vitro expansion can limit the application of CD4 Th cells in ACT. This study aims to optimize the culture conditions for mouse CD4 T cells to provide basic information for animal studies of ACT using CD4 T cells. Taking advantage of the antigen-specificity of CD4+ Th cells from OT-II transgenic mice, we examined different methodologies for generating antigen-specific CD4+ Th1 cells in vitro. We found that cells grown in complete advanced-DMEM/F12 medium supplemented with low-dose IL-2 and IL-7 induced substantial cell expansion. These Th cells were Th1-like, as they expressed multiple Th1-cytokines and exhibited antigen-specific cytotoxicity. In addition co-transfer of these CD4+ Th1-like cells with CD8+ CTL significantly enhanced tumor regression, leading to complete cure in 80% of mice bearing established B16-OVA. These observations indicate that the CD4+ Th1-like cells generated using the method we optimized are functionally active to eliminate their target cells, and can also assist CD8+ CTL to enhance tumor regression. The findings of this study provide valuable data for further research into in vitro expansion of CD4+ Th1-like cells, with potential applications to cancer treatment involving ACT. PMID:27588200

  5. PREFACE: 4th International Conference on Safe Production and Use of Nanomaterials (Nanosafe2014)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tardif, F.; Damlencourt, J.-F.; Schuster, F.; Gaultier, V.

    2015-05-01

    This volume contains a collection of contributions presented at the 4th International Conference on Safe Production and Use of Nanomaterials (NANOSAFE 2014) held in Grenoble, France, from 18th to 20th November 2014. The issues of fast progress in the field of Nanosafety are up to the potential benefits that nanotechnology can bring to mankind. Making more efficient - more sustainable - easier to share mineral resources, increasing the yields of new energy technologies, enabling drugs that act selectively and locally are just few examples of the wide range of nanomaterial applications that currently benefit humanity. Nevertheless, the dynamic development of nanomaterials requires the adhesion from the general public who rightly demand major progresses in Nanosafety as a prerequisite. This is our exciting responsibility and challenge! Following the successful outcome of the three past international conferences on safe production and use of nanomaterials: Nanosafe 2008, 2010 and 2012, the organizing committee has the pleasure to welcoming you again to Minatec, Grenoble with some of the most famous specialists in the field. This year, two new topics have been added dealing with the "New Application of Nanomaterials" and "Nano-responsible Development" in addition to the usual issues addressed in previous Nanosafe conferences such as Expology, Detection and Characterization, Toxicology, Environmental Interactions, Nanomaterials Release, Life Cycle Analysis, Regulation and Standardization, Risk Management. The debates in 2012 proved highly successful so this formula has been kept in 2014 with 3 round tables: Nano-Responsible Development, Risks and Benefits for the Environment, Toxicology Progress. In this 4th edition, there were more than 330 registered participants from 28 different countries including 160 oral presentation covering the whole Nanosafety issues in 12 sessions, satellite workshops and round tables. This high number of participants makes this edition one of

  6. 4th annual primary care ethics conference: ethics education and lifelong learning

    PubMed Central

    Spicer, John; McKenzie-Edwards, Emma; Misselbrook, David

    2014-01-01

    Primary care ethics is a field of study that has recently found new life, with calls to establish the relevance of ethical discussion in general practice, to gather a body of literature and to carve out an intellectual space for primary care on the academic landscape of bioethics. In this report, we reflect on the key strands of the 4th primary care ethics conference held at the Royal Society of Medicine, on a theme of ethics education and lifelong learning: first, to produce insights that have relevance for policy and practice; and second, to illustrate the idea that not only is ethics relevant in primary care, but primary care is relevant in medical ethics. Core themes included the advantages and disadvantages of prescriptive ways of doing ethics in education, ethical reflection and potential risk to professional status, the need to deal with societal change and to take on board the insights gained from empirical work, whether this is about different kinds of fatherhood, or work on the causes of moral distress in healthcare workers. PMID:25949739

  7. European Code against Cancer 4th Edition: Ionising and non-ionising radiation and cancer.

    PubMed

    McColl, Neil; Auvinen, Anssi; Kesminiene, Ausrele; Espina, Carolina; Erdmann, Friederike; de Vries, Esther; Greinert, Rüdiger; Harrison, John; Schüz, Joachim

    2015-12-01

    Ionising radiation can transfer sufficient energy to ionise molecules, and this can lead to chemical changes, including DNA damage in cells. Key evidence for the carcinogenicity of ionising radiation comes from: follow-up studies of the survivors of the atomic bombings in Japan; other epidemiological studies of groups that have been exposed to radiation from medical, occupational or environmental sources; experimental animal studies; and studies of cellular responses to radiation. Considering exposure to environmental ionising radiation, inhalation of naturally occurring radon is the major source of radiation in the population - in doses orders of magnitude higher than those from nuclear power production or nuclear fallout. Indoor exposure to radon and its decay products is an important cause of lung cancer; radon may cause approximately one in ten lung cancers in Europe. Exposures to radon in buildings can be reduced via a three-step process of identifying those with potentially elevated radon levels, measuring radon levels, and reducing exposure by installation of remediation systems. In the 4th Edition of the European Code against Cancer it is therefore recommended to: "Find out if you are exposed to radiation from naturally high radon levels in your home. Take action to reduce high radon levels". Non-ionising types of radiation (those with insufficient energy to ionise molecules) - including extremely low-frequency electric and magnetic fields as well as radiofrequency electromagnetic fields - are not an established cause of cancer and are therefore not addressed in the recommendations to reduce cancer risk.

  8. A Teaching Model for Scaffolding 4th Grade Students' Scientific Explanation Writing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Hsiu-Ting; Wang, Kuo-Hua

    2014-08-01

    Improving students scientific explanations is one major goal of science education. Both writing activities and concept mapping are reported as effective strategies for enhancing student learning of science. The purpose of this study was to examine the effect of a teaching model, named the DCI model, which integrates a Descriptive explanation writing activity, Concept mapping, and an Interpretive explanation writing activity, is introduced in a 4th grade science class to see if it would improve students' scientific explanations and understanding. A quasi-experimental design, including a non-randomized comparison group and a pre- and post-test design, was adopted for this study. An experimental group of 25 students were taught using the DCI teaching model, while a comparison group received a traditional lecture teaching. A rubric and content analysis was used to assess students' scientific explanations. The independent sample t test was used to measure difference in conceptual understanding between the two groups, before and after instruction. Then, the paired t test analysis was used to understand the promotion of the DCI teaching model. The results showed that students in the experimental group performed better than students in the comparison group, both in scientific concept understanding and explanation. Suggestions for using concept mapping and writing activities (the DCI teaching model) in science classes are provided in this study.

  9. Cutting orientations for non-complex parts in 4th axis machining

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Osman Zahid, M. N.; Case, K.; Watts, D. M.

    2016-02-01

    The application of Computer Numerically Controlled (CNC) machining for Rapid Manufacturing processes (CNC-RM) exploits the innate potential of 4th axis machining. The use of an indexer allows the workpiece to be rotated to various orientations which directly increased the region accessible to the cutting tool. However, in order to avoid thin webs and preserve tool life, cutting must be executed with a minimum of three orientations even for geometrically simple parts. Recent findings have suggested the separation of cutting orientations into roughing and finishing operations. Thus, the selection of orientations in finishing processes becomes more flexible and independent. This study was conducted to identify the effects of using a minimum of two cutting orientations in finishing operations for CNC-RM applications. This method is only applicable for non-complex parts where all the features can be machined from two directions. The results of the study illustrate the positive effects of minimizing the number of orientations. Despite improvement in machining operations, the complexity in defining the cutting orientations was also reduced.

  10. The relationship between snack intake and its availability of 4th-6th graders in Taiwan.

    PubMed

    Hang, Chi-Ming; Lin, Wei; Yang, Hsiao-Chi; Pan, Wen-Harn

    2007-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to examine the relationship between the snack intake and snack availability of elementary school children. Data analyzed were from 722 4th to 6th graders' food availability and food intake questionnaires collected in the Nutrition and Health Survey in Taiwan Elementary School Children 2001-2002. The snacks commonly eaten were divided into two groups. Healthy snacks included dairy products, 100% fruit juice and fresh fruits. Unhealthy snacks included high fat/sugar snacks, cookies, candy, carbonated/sugared beverages and fast food. Structural equating modeling was used to test the models that describe the availability and intake of two snack groups. Results indicated that parents' intake and children's preference were major predictors of children intake of both healthy and unhealthy snacks. Other than that, the intake of unhealthy snacks was positively associated with "purchase by children themselves" but not the intake of healthy snacks, which was influenced predominantly by "present in home". The results support the perception that a positive family food environment is important for improving children's diet quality. To build a healthy family food environment, parents have to not only provide healthy snacks but also limit the unhealthy snacks in home. In addition to that, the role modeling of parents as eating healthy snacks instead of unhealthy snacks themselves may help children to develop similar behaviors.

  11. 4th-International Symposium on Ultrafast Surface Science - Final Report

    SciTech Connect

    Hrvoje Petek

    2005-01-26

    The 4-th International Symposium on Ultrafast Surface Dynamics (UDS4) was held at the Telluride Summer Research Center on June 22-27, 2003. The International Organizing Committee consisting of Hrvoje Petek (USA), Xiaoyang Zhu (USA), Pedro Echenique (Spain) and Maki Kawai (Japan) brought together a total of 51 participants 16 of whom were from Europe, 10 from Japan, and 25 from the USA. The focus of the conference was on ultrafast electron or light induced processes at well-defined surfaces. Ultrafast surface dynamics concerns the transfer of charge and energy at solid surfaces on the femtosecond time scale. These processes govern rates of fundamental steps in surface reactions, interfacial electron transfer in molecular electronics, and relaxation in spin transport. Recent developments in femtosecond laser technology make it possible to measure by a variety of nonlinear optical techniques directly in the time domain the microscopic rates underlying these interfacial processes. Parallel progress in scanning probe microscopy makes it possible at a single molecular level to perform the vibrational and electronic spectroscopy measurements, to induce reactions with tunneling electrons, and to observe their outcome. There is no doubt that successful development in the field of ultrafast surface dynamics will contribute to many important disciplines.

  12. A 4th-order reconfigurable analog baseband filter for software-defined radio applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Weiwei, Wang; Xuegui, Chang; Xiao, Wang; Kefeng, Han; Xi, Tan; Na, Yan; Hao, Min

    2011-04-01

    This paper presents a 4th-order reconfigurable analog baseband filter for software-defined radios. The design exploits an active-RC low pass filter (LPF) structure with digital assistant, which is flexible for tunability of filter characteristics, such as cut-off frequency, selectivity, type, noise, gain and power. A novel reconfigurable operational amplifier is proposed to realize the optimization of noise and scalability of power dissipation. The chip was fabricated in an SMIC 0.13 μm CMOS process. The main filter and frequency calibration circuit occupy 1.8 × 0.8 mm2 and 0.48 × 0.25 mm2 areas, respectively. The measurement results indicate that the filter provides Butterworth and Chebyshev responses with a wide frequency tuning range from 280 kHz to 15 MHz and a gain range from 0 to 18 dB. An IIP3 of 29 dBm is achieved under a 1.2 V power supply. The input inferred noise density varies from 41 to 133 according to a given standard, and the power consumptions are 5.46 mW for low band (from 280 kHz to 3 MHz) and 8.74 mW for high band (from 3 to 15 MHz) mode.

  13. Putting agent-based modeling to work: results of the 4th International Project Albert Workshop

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Horne, Gary E.; Bjorkman, Eileen A.; Colton, Trevor

    2002-07-01

    Project Albert is an initiative of the US Marine Corps which uses a series of new models and tools, multidisciplinary teams, and the scientific method to explore questions of interest to military planners. Project Albert attempts to address key areas that traditional modeling and simulation techniques often do not capture satisfactorily and uses two data management concepts, data farming and data mining, to assist in identifying areas of interest. The current suite of models used by Project Albert includes four agent-based models that allow agents to interact with each other and produce emergent behaviors. The 4th International Project Albert Workshop was held 6-9 August 2001 in Australia. Workshop participants split into five groups, each of which attempted to apply various combinations of the Project Albert models to answer a series of questions in five areas: Control Operations; Reconnaissance, Surveillance, and Intelligence Force Mix; Precision Maneuver; Mission Area Analysis; and Peace Support Operations. This paper focuses on the methodology used during the workshop, the results of the workshop, and a summary of follow-on work since the workshop.

  14. European Code against Cancer 4th Edition: Ultraviolet radiation and cancer.

    PubMed

    Greinert, Rüdiger; de Vries, Esther; Erdmann, Friederike; Espina, Carolina; Auvinen, Anssi; Kesminiene, Ausrele; Schüz, Joachim

    2015-12-01

    Ultraviolet radiation (UVR) is part of the electromagnetic spectrum emitted naturally from the sun or from artificial sources such as tanning devices. Acute skin reactions induced by UVR exposure are erythema (skin reddening), or sunburn, and the acquisition of a suntan triggered by UVR-induced DNA damage. UVR exposure is the main cause of skin cancer, including cutaneous malignant melanoma, basal-cell carcinoma, and squamous-cell carcinoma. Skin cancer is the most common cancer in fair-skinned populations, and its incidence has increased steeply over recent decades. According to estimates for 2012, about 100,000 new cases of cutaneous melanoma and about 22,000 deaths from it occurred in Europe. The main mechanisms by which UVR causes cancer are well understood. Exposure during childhood appears to be particularly harmful. Exposure to UVR is a risk factor modifiable by individuals' behaviour. Excessive exposure from natural sources can be avoided by seeking shade when the sun is strongest, by wearing appropriate clothing, and by appropriately applying sunscreens if direct sunlight is unavoidable. Exposure from artificial sources can be completely avoided by not using sunbeds. Beneficial effects of sun or UVR exposure, such as for vitamin D production, can be fully achieved while still avoiding too much sun exposure and the use of sunbeds. Taking all the scientific evidence together, the recommendation of the 4th edition of the European Code Against Cancer for ultraviolet radiation is: "Avoid too much sun, especially for children. Use sun protection. Do not use sunbeds."

  15. CD4(+) Th2 cells are directly regulated by IL-10 during allergic airway inflammation.

    PubMed

    Coomes, S M; Kannan, Y; Pelly, V S; Entwistle, L J; Guidi, R; Perez-Lloret, J; Nikolov, N; Müller, W; Wilson, M S

    2017-01-01

    Interleukin-10 (IL-10) is an important regulatory cytokine required to control allergy and asthma. IL-10-mediated regulation of T cell-mediated responses was previously thought to occur indirectly via antigen-presenting cells. However, IL-10 can act directly on regulatory T cells and T helper type 17 (Th17) cells. In the context of allergy, it is therefore unclear whether IL-10 can directly regulate T helper type 2 (Th2) cells and whether this is an important regulatory axis during allergic responses. We sought to determine whether IL-10 signaling in CD4(+) Th2 cells was an important mechanism of immune regulation during airway allergy. We demonstrate that IL-10 directly limits Th2 cell differentiation and survival in vitro and in vivo. Ablation of IL-10 signaling in Th2 cells led to enhanced Th2 cell survival and exacerbated pulmonary inflammation in a murine model of house dust mite allergy. Mechanistically, IL-10R signaling regulated the expression of several genes in Th2 cells, including granzyme B. Indeed, IL-10 increased granzyme B expression in Th2 cells and led to increased Th2 cell death, identifying an IL-10-regulated granzyme B axis in Th2 cells controlling Th2 cell survival. This study provides clear evidence that IL-10 exerts direct effects on Th2 cells, regulating the survival of Th2 cells and severity of Th2-mediated allergic airway inflammation.

  16. PREFACE: 4th National Conference on Processing and Characterization of Materials (NCPCM 2014)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2015-02-01

    This volume contains selected full length technical papers amongst forty oral presentations made in the 4th National Conference on Processing and Characterization of Materials (NCPCM 2014), NIT Rourkela, Rourkela, Odisha, India, December 5 - 6, 2014. The first conference of the NCPCM series was held at the same place in December 2011. Seeing the enthusiasm of the participants, it was decided to organize such conference in Rourkela every year. The basic idea was to establish a periodical national forum for multi-scale approaches in processing and characterization of materials in the eastern part of India. The conference NCPCM 2014 has successfully carried the tradition of previous conferences; more than fifty participants from twenty different organizations across India have registered. The conference was consisted of six technical sessions of about fifty contributory talks along with three keynote lectures. A metallography contest was also organized during the event. Out of these, thirty four best peer-reviewed contributions are published in this volume of IOP Conference Series: Materials Science and Engineering. We would like to thank all the contributors, members of the organizing committee, session chairs as well as colleagues and students who helped with the preparation of the conference and, particularly, with the preparation of this volume. We convey our heartiest gratitude to the sponsors and advertisers for their contribution.

  17. European Code against Cancer 4th Edition: 12 ways to reduce your cancer risk.

    PubMed

    Schüz, Joachim; Espina, Carolina; Villain, Patricia; Herrero, Rolando; Leon, Maria E; Minozzi, Silvia; Romieu, Isabelle; Segnan, Nereo; Wardle, Jane; Wiseman, Martin; Belardelli, Filippo; Bettcher, Douglas; Cavalli, Franco; Galea, Gauden; Lenoir, Gilbert; Martin-Moreno, Jose M; Nicula, Florian Alexandru; Olsen, Jørgen H; Patnick, Julietta; Primic-Zakelj, Maja; Puska, Pekka; van Leeuwen, Flora E; Wiestler, Otmar; Zatonski, Witold

    2015-12-01

    This overview describes the principles of the 4th edition of the European Code against Cancer and provides an introduction to the 12 recommendations to reduce cancer risk. Among the 504.6 million inhabitants of the member states of the European Union (EU28), there are annually 2.64 million new cancer cases and 1.28 million deaths from cancer. It is estimated that this cancer burden could be reduced by up to one half if scientific knowledge on causes of cancer could be translated into successful prevention. The Code is a preventive tool aimed to reduce the cancer burden by informing people how to avoid or reduce carcinogenic exposures, adopt behaviours to reduce the cancer risk, or to participate in organised intervention programmes. The Code should also form a base to guide national health policies in cancer prevention. The 12 recommendations are: not smoking or using other tobacco products; avoiding second-hand smoke; being a healthy body weight; encouraging physical activity; having a healthy diet; limiting alcohol consumption, with not drinking alcohol being better for cancer prevention; avoiding too much exposure to ultraviolet radiation; avoiding cancer-causing agents at the workplace; reducing exposure to high levels of radon; encouraging breastfeeding; limiting the use of hormone replacement therapy; participating in organised vaccination programmes against hepatitis B for newborns and human papillomavirus for girls; and participating in organised screening programmes for bowel cancer, breast cancer, and cervical cancer.

  18. Project ASTRO: Local Coalitions for Bringing Astronomers to 4th - 9th Grade Classrooms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fraknoi, Andrew

    1998-05-01

    We report on Project ASTRO, an NSF and NASA funded program that now links professional and amateur astronomers with local 4th through 9th grade teachers in 10 sites around the country. Each site matches and trains about 20-25 astronomer-teacher partnerships per year, focusing on hands-on, age-appropriate activities, demonstrations of the scientific method, as well as family and community outreach. Over 10,000 copies of the project's 813-page UNIVERSE AT YOUR FINGERTIPS resource and activity notebook (published by the A.S.P) are now in use in educational institututions around the world. The project's HOW-TO-MANUAL is being used as a practical guide to establishing astronomer-teacher partnerships where no formal ASTRO site exists, and a 12-minute video explaining and demonstrating the project is also available. In each of the ten sites, a coalition of educational and scientific institutions is assisting the project with in-kind donations, publicity, personnel, training, materials, etc. We are conducting an experiment (at the behest of NSF) to see to what degree the sites can become self-supporting over time. (One site, in Salt Lake City, has already received full funding from a local foundation.) We will discuss the progress of the project and will have a variety of sample materials available, including our annotated catalog of national astronomy and space science education projects (see associated URL).

  19. Postoperative pain assessment after septorhinoplasty.

    PubMed

    Wittekindt, D; Wittekindt, C; Schneider, G; Meissner, W; Guntinas-Lichius, O

    2012-06-01

    Postoperative pain after septorhinoplasty and its optimal management has not been described in detail. Fifty-two adult septorhinoplasty patients were included in a prospective cohort single center study. Patients' and surgical characteristics were evaluated. Outcome and process parameters were analyzed using the questionnaires of the German-wide project Quality Improvement in Postoperative Pain Management (QUIPS) on the first postoperative day. Pain during the first operative day after septorhinoplasty was moderate. Pain management predominately consisted of remifentanil intraoperatively, metamizole in the recovery room, in combination with piritramide in one-third of the patients, and metamizole on ward. Patients younger than 31 years were less satisfied with pain management (P = 0.018). Open rhinoplasty was associated with less satisfaction with pain management (P = 0.007). Use of rib grafts led to more mobility, breathing, sleeping and mood disturbances (P = 0.003, 0.047; 0.047; 0.022, respectively). Preoperative pain counseling was followed by higher satisfaction, less breathing and mood disturbances after surgery (P = 0.021; 0.004; 0.046, respectively). Opioids in the recovery room in addition to non-opioids and treatment with non-opioids on ward led to less maximal pain (P = 0.027 and 0.040, respectively). We conclude that QUIPS is an easy tool to evaluate the quality of postoperative pain management following rhinoplasty. Preoperative pain counseling, specific care for patients with rib grafts, consequent use of opioids in the recovery room in addition to non-opioids, and use of non-opioids on ward seem to be effective to improve pain management after septorhinoplasty.

  20. Day to Day

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jurecki, Dennis

    2006-01-01

    A clean, healthy and safe school provides students, faculty and staff with an environment conducive to learning and working. However, budget and staff reductions can lead to substandard cleaning practices and unsanitary conditions. Some school facility managers have been making the switch to a day-schedule to reduce security and energy costs, and…

  1. Understanding postoperative fatigue.

    PubMed

    Rose, E A; King, T C

    1978-07-01

    Performance characteristics of the central nervous, cardiovascular, respiratory and muscular systems in man postoperatively have received little investigative attention, despite the well known syndrome of postoperative fatigue. The impairmen in perception and psychomotor skills that has been shown to result from caloric restriction, bedrest, sedation and sleep deprivation suggests that a similar deficit may occur after surgical procedures. After a simple elective surgical procedure, maximal oxygen uptake decreases and the adaptability of heart rate to submaximal workloads is impaired. Similar deleterious effects on cardiorespiratory performance have been documented with starvation and bedrest; an understanding of cardiorespiratory performance postoperatively awaits further investigation. Maximal muscular force of contraction is also impaired by caloric restriction and bedrest, suggesting that similar effects may be seen in the postoperative state, although this has not been studied. A better understanding of the syndrome of postoperative fatigue could be achieved by a descriptive analysis of physiologic performance postoperatively. Such descriptive data could form the basis for objective evaluation of therapeutic measures intended to improve performance, such as nutritional supplementation and pharmacologic intervention. The observation that exercise with the patient in the supine position may decrease the impairment in maximal aerobic power otherwise expected in immobilized patients suggests that controlled exercise therapy may be of value in reducing physiologic impairment postoperatively.

  2. The Ratio of 2nd to 4th Digit Length in Korean Alcohol-dependent Patients

    PubMed Central

    Han, Changwoo; Bae, Hwallip; Lee, Yu-Sang; Won, Sung-Doo; Kim, Dai Jin

    2016-01-01

    Objective The ratio of 2nd to 4th digit length (2D:4D) is a sexually dimorphic trait. Men have a relatively shorter second digit than fourth digit. This ratio is thought to be influenced by higher prenatal testosterone level or greater sensitivity to androgen. The purpose of this study is to investigate the relationship between alcohol dependence and 2D:4D in a Korean sample and whether 2D:4D can be a biologic marker in alcohol dependence. Methods In this study, we recruited 87 male patients with alcohol dependence from the alcohol center of one psychiatric hospital and 52 healthy male volunteers who were all employees in the same hospital as controls. We captured images of the right and left hands of patients and controls using a scanner and extracted data with a graphics program. We measured the 2D:4D of each hand and compared the alcohol dependence group with the control group. We analyzed these ratios using an independent-samples t-test. Results The mean 2D:4D of patients was 0.934 (right hand) and 0.942 (left hand), while the mean 2D:4D of controls was 0.956 (right hand) and 0.958 (left hand). Values for both hands were significantly lower for patients than controls (p<0.001, right hand; p=0.004, left hand). Conclusion Patients who are alcohol dependent have a significantly lower 2D:4D than controls, similar to the results of previous studies, which suggest that a higher prenatal testosterone level in the gonadal period is related to alcoholism. Furthermore, 2D:4D is a possible predictive marker of alcohol dependence. PMID:27121425

  3. PREFACE: 4th International Conference on: Preservation and Conservation Issues in Digital Printing and Digital Photography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fricker, A.; Green, P.

    2010-04-01

    These conference proceedings contain the written papers of the contributions presented at the 4th International Conference on: Preservation and Conservation Issues in Digital Printing and Digital Photography. The conference was held at the Institute of Physics, London, UK on 27th-28th May 2010. Previous conferences in this series took place in 2000, 2003 and 2006. The aim of this conference series is to inform those responsible for the preservation of digitally printed materials about developments in digital photography and printing technologies. We aim to examine progress in research on inks and substrates and their significance for conservation and preservation issues and techniques. We also hope to develop links between related industries and the conservation/preservation world. Research areas explored in this conference include current developments and future trends in digital printing and photographic technologies; the effect of environmental, storage and salvage conditions on the durability of digital prints and photographs; image processing techniques; image permanence considerations and standards for fastness, permanence and the role of scanning and file formats. We would like to thank all participants for their contribution to the conference programme and these proceedings. Our thanks go to Ms C. Gu and Mr M. Sandy for chairing conference sessions. We are also grateful to Dawn Stewart and the Institute of Physics Conference Team for their invaluable support and assistance in arranging the conference and reception. Finally we would like to extend our thanks to the Society of Imaging Science and Technology (IS&T) for their sponsorship support. The Editors Acknowledgements Conference Organising Committee: Ms A Fricker and Dr. P Green (London College of Communication, University of the Arts London). Proceedings edited and compiled by Ms A Fricker and Dr. P Green.

  4. PREFACE: 4th International Workshop on Statistical Physics and Mathematics for Complex Systems (SPMCS)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Alexandre; Abe, Sumiyoshi; Li, Wei

    2015-04-01

    This volume contains 24 contributed papers presented at the 4th International Workshop on Statistical Physics and Mathematics for Complex Systems (SPMCS) held during October 12-16, 2014 in Yichang, China. Each paper was peer-reviewed by at least one referee chosen from a distinguished international panel. The previous three workshops of this series were organized in 2008, 2010, and 2012, in Le Mans, France, Wuhan, China, and Kazan, Russia, respectively. The SPMCS international workshop series is destined mainly to communicate and exchange research results and information on the fundamental challenges and questions in the vanguard of statistical physics, thermodynamics and mathematics for complex systems. More specifically, the topics of interest touch, but are not limited to, the following: • Fundamental aspects in the application of statistical physics and thermodynamics to complex systems and their modeling • Finite size and non-extensive system • Fluctuation theorems and equalities, quantum thermodynamics • Variational principle for random dynamics • Fractal geometry, fractional mathematics More than 50 participants from 7 countries participated in SPMCS-2014. 35 oral contributions were presented at the workshop. We would like to take this opportunity to thank the members of the Scientific Program Committee, many of whom acted as reviewers of the papers and responded promptly. We would also like to thank the organizing committee, the session chairs, the technicians and the students for the smooth running of the whole workshop. Thanks also go to China Three Gorges University who provided generous support for the conference venue, as well as exquisite refreshments for the tea breaks. The workshop was also partially supported by Central China Normal University and the Programme of Introducing Talents of Discipline to Universities under grant NO. B08033. Special thanks are due to Ms Juy Zhu who has done excellent editing work with great effort.

  5. Learning Natural Selection in 4th Grade with Multi-Agent-Based Computational Models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dickes, Amanda Catherine; Sengupta, Pratim

    2013-06-01

    In this paper, we investigate how elementary school students develop multi-level explanations of population dynamics in a simple predator-prey ecosystem, through scaffolded interactions with a multi-agent-based computational model (MABM). The term "agent" in an MABM indicates individual computational objects or actors (e.g., cars), and these agents obey simple rules assigned or manipulated by the user (e.g., speeding up, slowing down, etc.). It is the interactions between these agents, based on the rules assigned by the user, that give rise to emergent, aggregate-level behavior (e.g., formation and movement of the traffic jam). Natural selection is such an emergent phenomenon, which has been shown to be challenging for novices (K16 students) to understand. Whereas prior research on learning evolutionary phenomena with MABMs has typically focused on high school students and beyond, we investigate how elementary students (4th graders) develop multi-level explanations of some introductory aspects of natural selection—species differentiation and population change—through scaffolded interactions with an MABM that simulates predator-prey dynamics in a simple birds-butterflies ecosystem. We conducted a semi-clinical interview based study with ten participants, in which we focused on the following: a) identifying the nature of learners' initial interpretations of salient events or elements of the represented phenomena, b) identifying the roles these interpretations play in the development of their multi-level explanations, and c) how attending to different levels of the relevant phenomena can make explicit different mechanisms to the learners. In addition, our analysis also shows that although there were differences between high- and low-performing students (in terms of being able to explain population-level behaviors) in the pre-test, these differences disappeared in the post-test.

  6. 4th International Conference on Energy and Environment 2013 (ICEE 2013)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chakrabarty, Chandan Kumar; Shamsuddin, Abd Halim Bin; Ahmad, Ibrahim Bin; Desa, Mohamed Nor Bin Mohamed; Din, Norashidah Bte Md; Bte Mohd, Lariyah; Hamid, Nasri A.; See, Ong Hang; Hafiz Nagi, Farrukh; Yong, Lee Choon; Pasupuleti, Jagadeesh; Mei, Goh Su; Abdullah, Fairuz Bin; Satgunam, Meenaloshini

    2013-06-01

    The 4th International Conference on Energy & Environment 2013 (ICEE2013) was organized by the Universiti Tenaga Nasional (UNITEN) to provide a platform for creating and sharing ideas among engineers, researchers, scientists, industrialists and students in sustainable green energy and technologies. The theme 'Shaping a Sustainable Future through Advancement in Green Energy Technology' is in line with the University's vision to be a leading global energy university that shapes a sustainable future. The general scopes of the conference are renewable energy, smart grid, green technology, energy policies and economics, sustainable green energy and environment, sustainable education, international cooperation and innovation and technology transfer. Five international keynote speakers delivered their speeches in specialized areas of green energy technology and sustainability. In addition, the conference highlights several special parallel sessions by notable invited presenters in their niche areas, which are: Hybrid Energy Power Quality & Distributed Energy Smart Grid Nuclear Power & Technologies Geohazard Management Greener Environment for Sustainability Advances in Computational Fluid Dynamics The research papers presented in ICEE2013 are included in this volume of IOP Conference Series: Earth and Environmental Science (EES). EES is abstracted and indexed in SCOPUS, GeoBase, GeoRef, Compendex, Inspec, Chemical Abstracts Service, NASA Astrophysics Data System, and International Nuclear Information System (INIS). With the comprehensive programme outline, the organizing committee hopes that the ICEE2013 was a notable intellectual sharing session for the research and academic community in Malaysia and regionally. The organizing committee expresses gratitude to the ICEE2013 delegates for their great support and contributions to the event.

  7. Support for the 4th Pan-American Congress on Plants and Bioenergy

    SciTech Connect

    Carpita, Nicholas C.

    2016-01-25

    Intellectual Merit: Following the success of the first three Pan-American Congresses on Plants and BioEnergy held biennially, the 4th congress will be held at the University of Guelph, Canada June 4-7, 2014. We aim to continue a tradition of showcasing major advances in energy crop improvement yet keep in perspective the realities of the economic drivers and pressures that govern the translation of scientific success into a commercial success. The congress is endorsed by the American Society of Plant Biologists and the Canadian Society of Plant Biologists. The program will cover a range of disciplines, including algal and plant systems for bioenergy, plant genetics and genomics, gene discovery for improvement of bioenergy production and quality, regulatory mechanisms of synthesis and degradation, strategies for 3rd generation biofuel production and the promise of synthetic biology in production of biofuels and bio-based products, cropping systems and productivity for biomass production, and mitigation of environmental impacts of bioenergy production. Broader Impacts: We are requesting support to generate stipends for domestic and permanent-resident students, post-doctorals, and pre-tenured faculty members to attend and benefit from the outstanding program. The stipends will be limited to registration and on-site lodging costs, with partial support for travel in instances of great need. So that as great a number can benefit as possible, airfare costs will be provided for only applicants with great need. ASPB has endorsed this meeting and will assist in advertising and promoting the meeting. ASPB has a long-standing commitment to increase participation and advance the careers in plant biology of women, minorities and underrepresented scientists, and they will assist us in identifying worthy candidates.

  8. European Code against Cancer 4th Edition: Environment, occupation and cancer.

    PubMed

    Espina, Carolina; Straif, Kurt; Friis, Søren; Kogevinas, Manolis; Saracci, Rodolfo; Vainio, Harri; Schüz, Joachim

    2015-12-01

    People are exposed throughout life to a wide range of environmental and occupational pollutants from different sources at home, in the workplace or in the general environment - exposures that normally cannot be directly controlled by the individual. Several chemicals, metals, dusts, fibres, and occupations have been established to be causally associated with an increased risk of specific cancers, such as cancers of the lung, skin and urinary bladder, and mesothelioma. Significant amounts of air pollutants - mainly from road transport and industry - continue to be emitted in the European Union (EU); an increased occurrence of lung cancer has been attributed to air pollution even in areas below the EU limits for daily air pollution. Additionally, a wide range of pesticides as well as industrial and household chemicals may lead to widespread human exposure, mainly through food and water. For most environmental pollutants, the most effective measures are regulations and community actions aimed at reducing and eliminating the exposures. Thus, it is imperative to raise awareness about environmental and occupational carcinogens in order to motivate individuals to be proactive in advocating protection and supporting initiatives aimed at reducing pollution. Regulations are not homogeneous across EU countries, and protective measures in the workplace are not used consistently by all workers all the time; compliance with regulations needs to be continuously monitored and enforced. Therefore, the recommendation on Environment and Occupation of the 4th edition of the European Code against Cancer, focusing on what individuals can do to reduce their cancer risk, reads: "In the workplace, protect yourself against cancer-causing substances by following health and safety instructions."

  9. [Chronic postoperative pain].

    PubMed

    Cachemaille, Matthieu; Blanc, Catherine

    2016-06-22

    Chronic postoperative pain remains a frequent pathology whose global impact approximates 20 and 30% and accounts for 20% of the consultations in a pain center. Risk factors consider firstly each patient's feature and comorbidity and also different surgical procedures with their technical approach. Neuropathic pain compared to nociceptive pain is a great component in the postoperative period and needs to be recognized by specific tests (DN4). Pain prevention involves risk factors' detection, appropriate anesthetic support and effective postoperative pain management. Treatment is based on the type of pain and includes a multimodal analgesia with interventional pain therapy.

  10. [Characteristics of postoperative peritonitis].

    PubMed

    Lock, J F; Eckmann, C; Germer, C-T

    2016-01-01

    Postoperative peritonitis is still a life-threatening complication after abdominal surgery and approximately 10,000 patients annually develop postoperative peritonitis in Germany. Early recognition and diagnosis before the onset of sepsis has remained a clinical challenge as no single specific screening test is available. The aim of therapy is a rapid and effective control of the source of infection and antimicrobial therapy. After diagnosis of diffuse postoperative peritonitis surgical revision is usually inevitable after intestinal interventions. Peritonitis after liver, biliary or pancreatic surgery is managed as a rule by means of differentiated therapy approaches depending on the severity.

  11. 75 FR 34369 - Safety Zones; City of Chicago's July 4th Celebration Fireworks, Lake Michigan, Chicago, IL

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-06-17

    ... SECURITY Coast Guard 33 CFR Part 165 RIN 1625-AA00 Safety Zones; City of Chicago's July 4th Celebration Fireworks, Lake Michigan, Chicago, IL AGENCY: Coast Guard, DHS. ACTION: Temporary final rule. SUMMARY: The Coast Guard is establishing two temporary safety zones on Lake Michigan near Chicago, Illinois....

  12. 75 FR 22330 - Safety Zone; City of Chicago's July 4th Celebration Fireworks, Lake Michigan, Chicago, IL

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-04-28

    ... SECURITY Coast Guard 33 CFR Part 165 RIN 1625-AA00 Safety Zone; City of Chicago's July 4th Celebration Fireworks, Lake Michigan, Chicago, IL AGENCY: Coast Guard, DHS. ACTION: Notice of proposed rulemaking. SUMMARY: The Coast Guard proposes to establish a safety zone on Lake Michigan near Chicago, Illinois....

  13. Communicating Science to Impact Learning? A Phenomenological Inquiry into 4th and 5th Graders' Perceptions of Science Information Sources

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gelmez Burakgazi, Sevinc; Yildirim, Ali; Weeth Feinstein, Noah

    2016-01-01

    Rooted in science education and science communication studies, this study examines 4th and 5th grade students' perceptions of science information sources (SIS) and their use in communicating science to students. It combines situated learning theory with uses and gratifications theory in a qualitative phenomenological analysis. Data were gathered…

  14. Examining General and Specific Factors in the Dimensionality of Oral Language and Reading in 4th-10th Grades

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Foorman, Barbara R.; Koon, Sharon; Petscher, Yaacov; Mitchell, Alison; Truckenmiller, Adrea

    2015-01-01

    The objective of this study was to explore dimensions of oral language and reading and their influence on reading comprehension in a relatively understudied population--adolescent readers in 4th through 10th grades. The current study employed latent variable modeling of decoding fluency, vocabulary, syntax, and reading comprehension so as to…

  15. Comparative analysis of 1st, 2nd, and 4th year MD students' attitudes toward Complementary Alternative Medicine (CAM)

    PubMed Central

    Riccard, Christopher P; Skelton, Michele

    2008-01-01

    Background To identify and report the attitudes and beliefs of 1st, 2nd, and 4th year medical students toward complementary alternative medicine (CAM). Methods The previously validated and reliability tested CHBQ was administered to medical students attending the University of South Florida School of Medicine. Results Significant changes were found between both 1st (46.0 ± 7.7) and 4th (37.8 ± 15.7) year students and 2nd (48.3 ± 7.8) and 4th (37.8 ± 15.7) year students. No significant difference was found between 1st (46.0 ± 7.7) and 2nd (48.3 ± 7.8) year students. When comparing scores based on gender, a significant difference was present between males (41.2 ± 12.2) and females (46.1 ± 11.0). Conclusion CHBQ scores were significantly more positive in both 1st and 2nd year medical students in comparison with 4th year student's scores. These findings suggest that as student exposure to allopathic techniques and procedures increases during the last year of medical school, their attitudes toward CAM decrease. Females were also significantly more likely to have stronger positive attitudes toward CAM than males, though both genders represented an overall positive attitude toward CAM. PMID:18799010

  16. 75 FR 34379 - Safety Zone; Mackinac Island 4th of July Fireworks, Lake Huron, Mackinac Island, MI

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-06-17

    ... SECURITY Coast Guard 33 CFR Part 165 RIN 1625-AA00 Safety Zone; Mackinac Island 4th of July Fireworks, Lake Huron, Mackinac Island, MI AGENCY: Coast Guard, DHS. ACTION: Temporary final rule. SUMMARY: The Coast Guard is establishing a temporary safety zone on Lake Huron, Mackinac Island, Michigan. This zone...

  17. Proceedings of the International Conference on Educational Data Mining (EDM) (4th, Eindhoven, the Netherlands, July 6-8, 2011)

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pechenizkiy, Mykola; Calders, Toon; Conati, Cristina; Ventura, Sebastian; Romero, Cristobal; Stamper, John

    2011-01-01

    The 4th International Conference on Educational Data Mining (EDM 2011) brings together researchers from computer science, education, psychology, psychometrics, and statistics to analyze large datasets to answer educational research questions. The conference, held in Eindhoven, The Netherlands, July 6-9, 2011, follows the three previous editions…

  18. Using Inquiry-Based Instruction to Teach Research Methods to 4th-Grade Students in an Urban Setting

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hamm, Ellen M.; Cullen, Rebecca; Ciaravino, Melissa

    2013-01-01

    When a college professor who teaches research methods to graduate education students was approached by a local public urban elementary school to help them teach research skills to 4th-graders, it was thought that the process would be simple--take what we did at the college level and differentiate it for the childhood classroom. This article will…

  19. Native American Students' Understanding of Geologic Time Scale: 4th-8th Grade Ojibwe Students' Understanding of Earth's Geologic History

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nam, Younkyeong; Karahan, Engin; Roehrig, Gillian

    2016-01-01

    Geologic time scale is a very important concept for understanding long-term earth system events such as climate change. This study examines forty-three 4th-8th grade Native American--particularly Ojibwe tribe--students' understanding of relative ordering and absolute time of Earth's significant geological and biological events. This study also…

  20. 77 FR 39422 - Eighth Coast Guard District Annual Safety Zones; Niceville July 4th Fireworks Show; Boggy Bayou...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-07-03

    ... SECURITY Coast Guard 33 CFR Part 165 RIN 1625-AA00 Eighth Coast Guard District Annual Safety Zones; Niceville July 4th Fireworks Show; Boggy Bayou; Niceville, FL AGENCY: Coast Guard, DHS. ACTION: Notice of enforcement of regulation. SUMMARY: The Coast Guard will enforce a Safety Zone for the Niceville July...

  1. Impact of a Health and Media Literacy Curriculum on 4th-Grade Girls: A Qualitative Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fuller, Heidi A.; Damico, Amy M.; Rodgers, Shannon

    2004-01-01

    Recent research indicates that young girls are preoccupied with their body size and that the media may be a contributing factor. This study aimed to discover the impact of an interdisciplinary media literacy intervention curriculum on 4th-grade girls in an urban elementary school. The authors developed and implemented a series of lessons that…

  2. Analysis of Lexical Quality and Its Relation to Writing Quality for 4th Grade, Primary School Students in Chile

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gómez Vera, Gabriela; Sotomayor, Carmen; Bedwell, Percy; Domínguez, Ana María; Jéldrez, Elvira

    2016-01-01

    Few studies have addressed vocabulary quality in developing writing skill in Spanish. Even less addressed it within the Chilean educational system. The specific objective of this study was to characterize, using a comprehensive set of indicators, the quality of the vocabulary produced by Chilean 4th grade students. Based on a national writing…

  3. Teacher Implementation of Reform-Based Mathematics and Implications for Algebra Readiness: A Qualitative Study of 4th Grade Classrooms

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sher, Stephen Korb

    2011-01-01

    This study looked at 4th grade classrooms to see "how" teachers implement NCTM standards-based or reform-based mathematics instruction and then analyzed it for the capacity to improve students' "algebra readiness." The qualitative study was based on classroom observations, teacher and administrator interviews, and teacher surveys. The study took…

  4. 4th Annual SATN Conference 2011: Curriculum Transformation at Universities of Technology: Towards Development of New Generation Universities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mthembu, T.

    2012-01-01

    The South African Technology Network (SATN) would like to thank the Editor of the "South African Journal of Higher Education" (SAJHE) for the opportunity to publish papers read at the 4th Annual SATN Conference that was hosted by Central University of Technology and held in Bloemfontein in November 2011. The journal makes it possible for…

  5. Postoperative permanent pressure alopecia.

    PubMed

    Chang, Zi Yun; Ngian, Jan; Chong, Claudia; Chong, Chin Ted; Liew, Qui Yin

    2016-04-01

    A 49-year-old Chinese female underwent elective laparoscopic assisted Whipple's surgery lasting 12 h. This was complicated by postoperative pressure alopecia at the occipital area of the scalp. Pressure-induced hair loss after general anaesthesia is uncommon and typically temporary, but may be disconcerting to the patient. We report this case of postoperative permanent pressure alopecia due to its rarity in the anaesthesia/local literature, and review the risk factors for its development.

  6. 4th Rare Disease South Eastern Europe (See) Meeting Skopje, Macedonia (November 14th, 2015).

    PubMed

    Gucev, Zoran; Tasic, Velibor; Polenakovic, Momir

    2015-01-01

    The 4th meeting on rare diseases in South Eastern Europe (SEE) was held in Skopje, at the Macedonian Academy of Sciences and Arts (MASA) on the 14(th) of November 2015. The focuses were metabolic, rare brain diseases as well as the rare dysmorphic syndrome. The authors of the report are particularly keen on stating that one of the main goals of the meeting, namely to help the treatment of patients with rare disease has begun to bear fruits. The talk on an iminosugar-based pharmacological chaperone compound as a drug candidate for the treatment of GM1-gangliosidosis and mucopolysaccharidosis IVB (Morquio disease type B) was enlightening. To date, there is no treatment available to be offered to patients, but chaperones lead mutated proteins to adopt a native-like conformation and to successfully traffic to their normal cellular destination. DORPHAN is developing an iminosugar-based pharmacological chaperone compound for the treatment of GM1-gangliosidosis and mucopolysaccharidosis IVB. A talk on recent developments in the laboratory diagnosis of mucopolysaccharidoses (MPS) was particularly interesting, covering the laboratory diagnosis of the MPS diseases by a strategy of clinical examination, biochemical analysis of urine samples, enzyme tests and genetic characterization of underlying mutations. New techniques were developed, including analysis of urinary glycosaminoglycans with tandem mass spectrometry, miniaturized enzyme tests or novel synthetic substrates for enzyme assays using mass spectrometry detection of products using dried blood spots. Feasibility and cost-effectiveness of these methods in newborn screening programs have been demonstrated. Neuromuscular RDs, and especially familial amyloid polyneuropathy (FAP) were a topic of the Bulgarian colleagues. Diagnosis, screening and the role of microglia were also topics of particular interest. In summary, this year RD meeting was exciting and productive on a wide range of diseases and on a novel insights on

  7. PREFACE: 4th Global Conference on Materials Science and Engineering (CMSE 2015)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ruda, H. E.; Khotsianovsky, A.

    2015-12-01

    IOP Conference Series: Materials Science and Engineering is publishing a volume of conference proceedings that contains a selection of papers presented at the 4th Global Conference on Materials Science and Engineering (CMSE 2015), which is an annual event that started in 2012. CMSE 2015, technically supported by the Institute of Applied Physics and Materials Engineering of University of Macau, organized by Wuhan Advance Materials Society, was successfully held at the University of Macau-new campus located on Hengqin Island from August 3rd-6th, 2015. It aims to bring together leading academic scientists, researchers and scholars to exchange and share their experience and research results on all aspects of Materials Science and Engineering, and to discuss the practical challenges encountered and the solutions adopted. Macau, one of the two special administrative regions of the People's Republic of China, where East meets West, turned out to be an ideal meeting place for domestic and overseas participants of this annual international conference. The conference program included keynote presentations, special sessions, oral and poster contributions. From several hundred submissions, 52 of the most promising and mainstream, IOP-relevant, contributions were included in this volume. The submissions present original ideas or results of general significance, supported by clear reasoning, compelling evidence and methods, theories and practices relevant to the research. The authors state clearly the problems and the significance of their research to theory and practice. Being a successful conference, this event gathered more than 200 qualified and high-level researchers and experts from over 40 countries, including 10 keynote speakers from 6 countries, which created a good platform for worldwide researchers and engineers to enjoy the academic communication. Taking advantage of this opportunity, we would like to thank all participants of this conference, and particularly the

  8. Proceedings of the Biennial EO/EEO Research Symposium (4th) Held in Cocoa Beach, Florida on December 5-7, 2001

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2003-01-01

    PROCEEDINGS 4th Biennial EO/EEO Research Symposium December 5-7, 2001 Cocoa Beach, Florida Published January 2003 DEOMI Research Report 03-01...distribution unlimited 13. SUPPLEMENTARY NOTES Proceedings 4th Biennial EO/EEO Research Symposium, Held in Cocoa Beach, Florida on December 5-7...Prescribed by ANSI Std Z39-18 ii Proceedings 4th Biennial EO/EEO Research Symposium December 5-7, 2001 Cocoa Beach, Florida Sponsored

  9. STO-2: Support for 4th Year Operations, Recovery, and Science (JPL co-I)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kawamura, Jonathan

    Here we propose "STO-2: Support for 4th Year Operations, Recovery, and Science," a project being led by Dr. Christopher Walker of the University of Arizona. The Stratospheric TeraHertz Observatory was ready for its second Antarctic flight (STO-2) in the 2015-2016 austral summer. However, due to the late establishment of the stratospheric anti-cyclone and poor surface conditions, STO-2 was unable to launch. The decision was made to winter-over the STO-2 payload in its hangar for launch during the 2016-2017 Antarctic campaign. Funds to cover preparations and deployment of key members of the instrument team in support of the campaign are being provided by NASA under the existing grant. However, these funds are only sufficient to cover expenses up to December 31st, 2016. Here, we request resources for calendar year 2017 to support mission operations, payload recovery, and science operations. These elements will enable the team to deliver fully on STO-2's science mission, and maximize NASA's demonstrated investment in STO-2's success. STO-2 addresses a key problem in modern astrophysics: understanding the Life Cycle of the Interstellar Medium (ISM). STO-2 will survey approximately ˜ of the Southern Galactic Plane in the dominant interstellar cooling line [CII] (158 μm) and the important star formation tracer [NII] (205 μm). In addition, STO-2 will perform path finding observations of the 63 μm [OI] line toward selected regions. With 1 arcminute angular resolution, STO-2 will spatially resolve atomic, ionic and molecular clouds out to 10 kpc. The STO-2 survey will be conducted at unparalleled sensitivity levels. STO-2 will uniquely probe the pivotal formative and disruptive stages in the life cycle of interstellar clouds and the relationship between global star formation rates and the properties of the ISM. Combined with previous HI and CO surveys, STO-2 will create 3- dimensional maps of the structure, dynamics, turbulence, energy balance, and pressure of the Milky

  10. Something going on in Milan: a review of the 4th International PhD Student Cancer Conference.

    PubMed

    Segré, C

    2010-01-01

    The 4th International PhD Student Cancer Conference was held at the IFOM-IEO-Campus in Milan from 19-21 May 2010 http://www.semm.it/events_researchPast.phpThe Conference covered many topics related to cancer, from basic biology to clinical aspects of the disease. All attendees presented their research, by either giving a talk or presenting a poster. This conference is an opportunity to introduce PhD students to top cancer research institutes across Europe.THE CORE PARTICIPANTING INSTITUTES INCLUDED: European School of Molecular Medicine (SEMM)-IFOM-IEO Campus, MilanBeatson Institute for Cancer Research (BICR), GlasgowCambridge Research Institute (CRI), Cambridge, UKMRC Gray Institute of Radiation Biology (GIROB), OxfordLondon Research Institute (LRI), LondonPaterson Institute for Cancer Research (PICR), ManchesterThe Netherlands Cancer Institute (NKI), Amsterdam'You organizers have crushed all my prejudices towards Italians. Congratulations, I enjoyed the conference immensely!' Even if it might have sounded like rudeness for sure this was supposed to be a genuine compliment (at least, that's how we took it), also considering that it was told by a guy who himself was the fusion of two usually antithetical concepts: fashion style and English nationality.The year 2010 has marked an important event for Italian research in the international scientific panorama: the European School of Molecular Medicine (SEMM) had the honour to host the 4th International PhD Student Cancer Conference, which was held from 19-21 May 2010 at the IFOM-IEO-Campus (http://www.semm.it/events_researchPast.php) in Milan.The conference was attended by more than one hundred students, coming from a selection of cutting edge European institutes devoted to cancer research. The rationale behind it is the promotion of cooperation among young scientists across Europe to debate about science and to exchange ideas and experiences. But that is not all, it is also designed for PhD students to get in touch

  11. Laparoscopic Hepatectomy: Current State in Japan Based on the 4th Nationwide Questionnaire

    PubMed Central

    Katagiri, Satoshi; Ariizumi, Shun-ichi; Kotera, Yoshihito; Egawa, Hiroto; Wakabayashi, Go; Kaneko, Hironori; Yamamoto, Masakazu

    2017-01-01

    Purpose. Since laparoscopic hepatectomy (LH) became covered by national health insurance in April 2010 in Japan, the numbers of applied cases and institutions performing it have increased and the indication has expanded. We surveyed the current state and safety of LH in Japan. Methods. A questionnaire survey was performed in 41 institutions related to the Japanese Endoscopic Liver Surgery Study Group and 747 institutions certified by the Japanese Society of Gastroenterological Surgery, and responses concerning all 2962 cases of LH performed by August 2011 were obtained. Results. The surgical procedure employed was hemihepatectomy in 234 (8%), segmentectomy in 88 (3%), left lateral segmentectomy in 434 (15%), segmentectomy in 156 (5%), and partial resection in 1504 (51%) cases. The approach was pure laparoscopy in 1835 (63%), hand-assisted laparoscopic surgery in 201 (7%), and laparoscopy-assisted surgery in 926 (31%). Regarding perioperative complications, surgery was switched to laparotomy in 59 (2.0%), reoperation was performed in 4 (0.1%), and surgery-related death occurred in 2 (0.07%). Intraoperative accidents occurred in 68 (2.3%), and postoperative complications developed in 94 (3.2%). Conclusions. When the selection of cases is appropriate, LH for liver diseases can be safely performed. PMID:28386272

  12. A laboratory model of post-Newtonian gravity with high power lasers and 4th generation light sources

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gregori, G.; Levy, M. C.; Wadud, M. A.; Crowley, B. J. B.; Bingham, R.

    2016-04-01

    Using the post-Newtonian formalism of gravity, we attempt to calculate the x-ray Thomson scattering cross section of electrons that are accelerated in the field of a high intensity optical laser. We show that our results are consistent with previous calculations, suggesting that the combination of high power laser and 4th generation light sources may become a powerful platform to test models exploring high order corrections to the Newtonian gravity.

  13. Reliability of a new 4th generation FloTrac algorithm to track cardiac output changes in patients receiving phenylephrine.

    PubMed

    Ji, Fuhai; Li, Jian; Fleming, Neal; Rose, David; Liu, Hong

    2015-08-01

    Phenylephrine is often used to treat intra-operative hypotension. Previous studies have shown that the FloTrac cardiac monitor may overestimate cardiac output (CO) changes following phenylephrine administration. A new algorithm (4th generation) has been developed to improve performance in this setting. We performed a prospective observational study to assess the effects of phenylephrine administration on CO values measured by the 3rd and 4th generation FloTrac algorithms. 54 patients were enrolled in this study. We used the Nexfin, a pulse contour method shown to be insensitive to vasopressor administration, as the reference method. Radial arterial pressures were recorded continuously in patients undergoing surgery. Phenylephrine administration times were documented. Arterial pressure recordings were subsequently analyzed offline using three different pulse contour analysis algorithms: FloTrac 3rd generation (G3), FloTrac 4th generation (G4), and Nexfin (nf). One minute of hemodynamic measurements was analyzed immediately before phenylephrine administration and then repeated when the mean arterial pressure peaked. A total of 157 (4.6 ± 3.2 per patient, range 1-15) paired sets of hemodynamic recordings were analyzed. Phenylephrine induced a significant increase in stroke volume (SV) and CO with the FloTrac G3, but not with FloTrac G4 or Nexfin algorithms. Agreement between FloTrac G3 and Nexfin was: 0.23 ± 1.19 l/min and concordance was 51.1%. In contrast, agreement between FloTrac G4 and Nexfin was: 0.19 ± 0.86 l/min and concordance was 87.2%. In conclusion, the pulse contour method of measuring CO, as implemented in FloTrac 4th generation algorithm, has significantly improved its ability to track the changes in CO induced by phenylephrine.

  14. R&W Club Frederick Hosts 4th Annual Golf Tournament Benefiting The Children’s Inn at NIH | Poster

    Cancer.gov

    The R&W Club Frederick’s 4th Annual Golf Tournament to benefit the Children’s Inn at NIH teed off on time despite cloudy weather and scattered showers. Employees from NCI at Frederick, the main NIH campus, and Leidos Biomed, along with family and friends, came to enjoy an afternoon at the beautiful Maryland National Golf Club in Middletown and to support a wonderful charity.

  15. Working Group on Ice Forces (4th) State-of-the-Art Report Held in Iowa City, Iowa in 1986.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1989-02-01

    OTTAWA OF CANADA CANADA HYDRAULICS LABORATORY Preface The following papers comprise the contributions to the 4 th State-of-the-Art Report on Ice Forces...in developing an understanding of ice interacting with offshore structures. : Odes iili/or AjA Jordaan and McKenna follow with a description of the...and Moore follow with a more detailed look at ice impact loads on ship hulls. This review is based on full scale trials of several icebreaking vessels

  16. Annual Conference on Parent Education Proceedings (4th, Denton, Texas, February 9-10, 1996).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jacobson, Arminta, Ed.; And Others

    The goals of the 2-day interdisciplinary conference covered in these proceedings were to: (1) present a spectrum of program models, curriculum, and knowledge related to parent education, parent involvement, and parenting; (2) provide in-depth training in parent education; and (3) promote interaction and exchange of ideas. Included in the…

  17. Every Kid Counts in the District of Columbia: 4th Annual Fact Book, 1997.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    D.C. Kids Count Collaborative for Children and Families, Washington, DC.

    This Kids Count fact book is the fourth to report on the well-being of children and youth in the District of Columbia. The report's Executive Summary presents overall findings, and the bulk of the report presents trends in eight areas: (1) economic security; (2) family attachment and community support; (3) child day care; (4) homeless children and…

  18. Building Community: 4th-Grade Team Reaches through Classroom Walls to Collaborate

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chapman, Sue

    2014-01-01

    Imagine, for a second, a school where teachers see themselves as leaders and work together to ensure that all children have access to engaging, high quality instruction every day. How might these teachers define teacher leadership and articulate its purpose? What suggestions would they offer about how teacher leadership can be grown and supported?…

  19. Scholastic Inc. Pushing Coal: A 4th-Grade Curriculum Lies through Omission

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bigelow, Bill

    2011-01-01

    This author grew up thinking that Scholastic was the most trusted name in children's books--endorsed by the holy trinity of school, teacher, and parents. However, he now claims that, these days, among other enterprises, Scholastic produces propaganda for the coal industry and passes it off as curriculum. Scholastic has partnered with the American…

  20. Course review: the 4th Bob Huffstadt upper and lower limb flap dissection course.

    PubMed

    Dunne, Jonathan A

    2014-12-01

    The Bob Huffstadt course is a 2-day upper and lower limb flap dissection course held in Groningen, the Netherlands. The course is in English, with an international faculty of senior consultants from the Netherlands, Belgium, and United Kingdom. Faculty to participant ratio is 2:1, with 2 participants at each dissection table. The course is aimed at trainees in plastic surgery of all levels, and a comprehensive DVD is provided before the course, which demonstrates dissection of 35 flaps, ensuring those with little experience to have an understanding before dissection.This course offered a comprehensive overview with plenty of practical application. The course can greatly develop operative and theoretical knowledge, while also demonstrating a commitment for those wishing to pursue a career in plastic surgery. Longer courses are available; however, the 2-day course can already provide an excellent introduction for junior trainees. There are few flap courses in the United Kingdom and senior trainees may have difficulty acquiring a place as they book up well in advance. With reductions in operating time, trainees may welcome further experience and development of techniques in the dissection room.Most of both days were spent in the dissection room, raising flaps and receiving teaching from the faculty. Dissections included Foucher, Moberg, Becker, radial forearm, anterolateral thigh, and fibula flaps. Dissection specimens were fresh-frozen preparation, and 9 upper limb flaps were raised on the first day and 5 lower limb flaps on the second day. The faculty provided live demonstrations of perforator dissection, use of the hand-held Doppler, and tips and tricks. The last 2 hours of each day were spent with 2 lectures, including topics from the history of flaps and developments to challenging cases and reconstructive options.The course fee was 1000 euros, including a 5-course dinner, lunch on both days, and a drinks reception on the final evening. I would recommend this

  1. Postoperative intravenous morphine titration.

    PubMed

    Aubrun, F; Mazoit, J-X; Riou, B

    2012-02-01

    Relief of acute pain during the immediate postoperative period is an important task for anaesthetists. Morphine is widely used to control moderate-to-severe postoperative pain and the use of small i.v. boluses of morphine in the post-anaesthesia care unit allows a rapid titration of the dose needed for adequate pain relief. The essential principle of a titration regimen must be to adapt the morphine dose to the pain level. Although morphine would not appear to be the most appropriate choice for achieving rapid pain relief, this is the sole opioid assessed in many studies of immediate postoperative pain management using titration. More than 90% of the patients have pain relief using a protocol of morphine titration and the mean dose required to obtain pain relief is 12 (7) mg, after a median of four boluses. Sedation is frequent during i.v. morphine titration and should be considered as a morphine-related adverse event and not evidence of pain relief. The incidence of ventilatory depression is very low when the criteria to limit the dose of i.v. morphine are enforced. Morphine titration can be used with caution in elderly patients, in children, or in obese patients. In practice, i.v. morphine titration allows the physician to meet the needs of individual patients rapidly and limits the risk of overdose making this method the first step in postoperative pain management.

  2. VLAP: results immediately post-op

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cowles, Robert S.

    1996-05-01

    Visual laser ablation of the prostate (VLAP) has been shown to be as effective with fewer complications than TURP in the treatment of bladder outlet obstruction secondary to benign prostatic hyperplasia. Questions have been raised about VLAP regarding prolonged irritative and obstructive voiding symptoms postoperatively. It is postulated that these symptoms are due to the slow slough of necrotic debris following VLAP. In an effort to improve upon the technique of VLAP, patients underwent lasing of the prostate in the routine manner (2, 4, 8, and 10 o'clock positions with sixty watts for sixty seconds) using Nd:YAG free beam energy. A bladder neck incision was then performed using a contact laser fiber. International prostate symptom score assessments were done preoperatively; one week and six weeks postoperatively. Post void residual urine volumes and prostate size were also evaluated. The findings indicate that symptom scores and post void residual urine volumes have significantly improved within ten days postoperatively using this technique.

  3. Caldecott 4th bore tunnel project: influence of ground water flows and inflows triggered by tectonic fault zones?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Neuhuber, G.; G. Neuhuber1, W. Klary1, A. Nitschke1, B. Thapa2, Chris Risden3, T. Crampton4, D. Zerga5

    2011-12-01

    The 4th Bore is a highway tunnel on California State Route 24 currently under construction. The 4th Bore is undertaken by the California State Department of Transportation (CALTRANS) and the Contra Costa County Transportation Commission (CCTC) to alleviate traffic congestion on SR24 connecting the cities of Oakland and Orinda in the San Francisco East Bay Area. The cost for the 4th Bore is estimated at $ 390.8 Mill. The 3,249 ft long 4th Bore tunnel will have excavated dimensions of approximately 40 ft height and 49 ft width. A total of 7 cross passages will run between the 3rd and the new 4th bore. Geology and Hydrogeology: The project is located in the Oakland Berkeley Hills of the SF Bay Area. The Caldecott Tunnels lie within the easterly assemblage of the Hayward fault zone province which consists of a sequence of sedimentary and volcanic rocks that accumulated in the interval between about 16 and 8.4 Ma (Miocene). The basal rocks of these Tertiary deposits consist of deep marine basin sediments of the Monterey Group. These rocks are overlain uncomfortably by an interbedded sequence of terrestrial sediments (Orinda Formation) and volcanic rocks (Moraga Formation). The Tertiary rocks have been folded into large amplitude, NW trending folds that are cut by N trending strike and slip faults. The SF Bay Region, which is crossed by 4 major faults (San Gregorio, San Andreas, Hayward, and Calaveras), is considered one of the more seismically active regions of the world. The active Hayward fault lies 0.9mi to the west of the Caldecott Tunnels and is the closest major fault to the project area. The tunnel is at the moment under top heading construction: West Portal (360ft) and East Portal (1,968.5ft). While major faults typically influence groundwater flow, characterization of such influences is extremely difficult because of the heterogeneity of the hydraulic systems and the different lithological parameters and influences. Four major inactive fault zones striking

  4. Nursing documentation of postoperative pain management.

    PubMed

    Idvall, Ewa; Ehrenberg, Anna

    2002-11-01

    Previous studies have shown that nursing documentation is often deficient in its recording of pain assessment and treatment. In Sweden, documentation of the care process, including assessment, is a legal obligation. The aim of this study was to describe nursing documentation of postoperative pain management and nurses' perceptions of the records in relation to current regulations and guidelines. The sample included nursing records of postoperative care on the second postoperative day from 172 patients and 63 Registered Nurses from surgical wards in a central county hospital in Sweden. The records were reviewed for content and comprehensiveness based on regulations and guidelines for postoperative pain management. Three different auditing instruments were used. The nurses were asked if the documentation concurred with current regulations and guidelines. The result showed that pain assessment was based mainly on patients' self-report, but less than 10% of the records contained notes on systematic assessment with a pain assessment instrument. Pain location was documented in 50% of the records and pain character in 12%. About 73% of the nurses reported that the documentation concurred with current regulations and guidelines. The findings indicate that significant flaws existed in nurses' recording of postoperative pain management, of which the nurses were not aware.

  5. Comparison of methods to facilitate postoperative bowel function.

    PubMed

    Crainic, Christina; Erickson, Kathie; Gardner, Janet; Haberman, Sheri; Patten, Pam; Thomas, Pat; Hays, Victoria

    2009-01-01

    Improving postoperative return of bowel function after abdominal surgery is an important nursing and medical goal. One promising intervention to achieve this goal is to have patients chew gum several times per day in the early postoperative period to stimulate the cephalic-vagal reflex and bowel peristalsis. A study to determine if return of gastrointestinal function after abdominal surgery could be hastened by the simple intervention of chewing gum or sucking on hard candy three times per day is described.

  6. International Symposium on Stratified Flows (4th) Held in Grenoble, France on June 29-July 2, 1994. Volume 3

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1994-10-10

    differential geometry aproach to geophysical flows " - to be published in Phys.Letters A 9 The structure of the turbulent wake and the random internal wave field... flows , the Sc effects should come into play especially when Re drop to values of the order of [(cX/tX2 ,n(Sc) -2; such low Reynolds numbers are not...proceedings 29 June - 2 July 1994 4. Title & subtitle 5a. Contract or Grant # 4th International Symposium on Stratified Flows N00014-94-J-9018 5b

  7. 4th Quarter Transportation Report FY 2014: Radioactive Waste Shipments to and from the Nevada National Security Site (NNSS)

    SciTech Connect

    Gregory, Louis

    2014-12-02

    This report satisfies the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), National Nuclear Security Administration Nevada Field Office (NNSA/NFO) commitment to prepare a quarterly summary report of radioactive waste shipments to and from the Nevada National Security Site (NNSS) Radioactive Waste Management Complex (RWMC) at Area 5. There were no shipments sent for offsite treatment and returned to the NNSS this quarter. There was one shipment of two drums sent for offsite treatment and disposal. This report summarizes the 4th quarter of Fiscal Year (FY) 2014 low-level radioactive waste (LLW) and mixed low-level radioactive waste (MLLW) shipments. This report also includes annual summaries for FY 2014.

  8. Report on the 4'th scientific meeting of the "Verein zur Förderung des Wissenschaftlichen Nachwuchses in der Neurologie" (NEUROWIND e.V.) held in Motzen, Germany, Nov. 2'nd - Nov. 4'th, 2012.

    PubMed

    Linker, Ralf A; Meuth, Sven G; Magnus, Tim; Korn, Thomas; Kleinschnitz, Christoph

    2012-11-22

    From November 2nd - 4th 2012, the 4th NEUROWIND e.V. meeting was held in Motzen, Brandenburg, Germany. Again more than 60 participants, predominantly at the doctoral student or postdoc level, gathered to share their latest findings in the fields of neurovascular research, neurodegeneration and neuroinflammation. Like in the previous years, the symposium provided an excellent platform for scientific exchange and the presentation of innovative projects in the stimulating surroundings of the Brandenburg outback. This year's keynote lecture on the pathophysiological relevance of neuronal networks was given by Christian Gerloff, Head of the Department of Neurology at the University Clinic of Hamburg-Eppendorf. Another highlight of the meeting was the awarding of the NEUROWIND e.V. prize for young scientists working in the field of experimental neurology. The award is donated by the Merck Serono GmbH, Darmstadt, Germany and is endowed with 20.000 Euro. This year the jury decided unanimously to adjudge the award to Michael Gliem from the Department of Neurology at the University Clinic of Düsseldorf (group of Sebastian Jander), Germany, for his outstanding work on different macrophage subsets in the pathogenesis of ischemic stroke published in the Annals of Neurology in 2012.

  9. Keratophakia--postoperative astigmatism.

    PubMed

    Swinger, C A; Troutman, R C; Forman, J S

    1987-01-01

    Forty-nine cases of primary keratophakia and 13 cases of secondary keratophakia were analyzed for postoperative astigmatism. For primary cases, the surgically induced astigmatism was 1.55 D, whereas for secondary cases it was 0.19 D (insignificant). There was a tendency for both procedures to induce against-the-rule astigmatism, and both procedures were found capable of producing irregular astigmatism.

  10. Conference report: formulating better medicines for children: 4th European Paediatric Formulation Initiative conference.

    PubMed

    Walsh, Jennifer; Mills, Simon

    2013-01-01

    The fourth annual European Paediatric Formulation Initiative (EuPFI) conference on Formulating Better Medicines for Children was held on 19-20 September 2012 at the Institute of Molecular Genetics Congress Centre, Prague, Czech Republic. The 2-day conference concentrated on the latest advances, challenges and opportunities for developing medicinal products and administration devices for pediatric use, both from European and US perspectives. It was aimed specifically at providing exposure to emerging practical applications, and for illustrating remedies utilized by pediatric drug-development teams to overcome hurdles faced in developing medicines for pediatric patients. The conference format included plenary talks, focus sessions on each of the EuPFI work streams (extemporaneous preparations, excipients, pediatric administration devices, taste masking and taste assessment, age-appropriate formulations), case studies, soapbox sessions and a parallel poster display. This conference report summarizes the keynote lectures and also gives a flavor of other presentations and posters from the conference.

  11. Towards 4th generation biomaterials: a covalent hybrid polymer-ormoglass architecture

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sachot, N.; Mateos-Timoneda, M. A.; Planell, J. A.; Velders, A. H.; Lewandowska, M.; Engel, E.; Castaño, O.

    2015-09-01

    Hybrid materials are being extensively investigated with the aim of mimicking the ECM microenvironment to develop effective solutions for bone tissue engineering. However, the common drawbacks of a hybrid material are the lack of interactions between the scaffold's constituents and the masking of its bioactive phase. Conventional hybrids often degrade in a non-homogeneous manner and the biological response is far from optimal. We have developed a novel material with strong interactions between constituents. The bioactive phase is directly exposed on its surface mimicking the structure of the ECM of bone. Here, polylactic acid electrospun fibers have been successfully and reproducibly coated with a bioactive organically modified glass (ormoglass, Si-Ca-P2 system) covalently. In comparison with the pure polymeric mats, the fibers obtained showed improved hydrophilicity and mechanical properties, bioactive ion release, exhibited a nanoroughness and enabled good cell adhesion and spreading after just one day of culture (rMSCs and rEPCs). The fibers were coated with different ormoglass compositions to tailor their surface properties (roughness, stiffness, and morphology) by modifying the experimental parameters. Knowing that cells modulate their behavior according to the exposed physical and chemical signals, the development of this instructive material is a valuable advance in the design of functional regenerative biomaterials.Hybrid materials are being extensively investigated with the aim of mimicking the ECM microenvironment to develop effective solutions for bone tissue engineering. However, the common drawbacks of a hybrid material are the lack of interactions between the scaffold's constituents and the masking of its bioactive phase. Conventional hybrids often degrade in a non-homogeneous manner and the biological response is far from optimal. We have developed a novel material with strong interactions between constituents. The bioactive phase is directly exposed

  12. Seismically induced liquefaction structures in La Magdalena archaeological site, the 4th century AD Roman Complutum (Madrid, Spain)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rodríguez-Pascua, M. A.; Silva, P. G.; Perucha, M. A.; Giner-Robles, J. L.; Heras, C.; Bastida, A. B.; Carrasco, P.; Roquero, E.; Lario, J.; Bardaji, T.; Pérez-López, R.; Elez, J.

    2016-10-01

    The ancient Roman city of Complutum (Alcalá de Henares, Madrid), founded in the 1st century AD, was one of the most important cities of Hispania. The old Roman city was destroyed, abruptly abandoned, relocated close by and rebuilt during the late 4th century AD. Destruction of the city and its relocation has not yet been explained by archaeologists. In this paper, with our multidisciplinary approach, we identify and characterize earthquake archaeological effects (EAEs) affecting the archaeological site, the La Magdalena, an agricultural holding 4 km from the core of Complutum. The most important EAEs in the site are liquefactions (sand dikes and explosive sand-gravel craters) affecting Roman structures, such as water tanks (cisterns), houses and graves. Ground liquefaction generated significant ground cracks, explosive craters and folds in foundations of buildings. Several other Roman sites throughout the valley were also abandoned abruptly during the 4th century AD, in some cases with EAEs of similar origin. This suggests the occurrence of a 5.0-6.6 Mw seismic event in the zone, in accordance with the minimum empirical limit of seismically-induced liquefaction and the maximum surface rupture length of the Henares fault.

  13. Differences in Math Achievement between Boys and Girls in 4th and 8th Grade in Coeducational Orthodox Jewish Day Schools in the New York Metropolitan Area

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Witty, Emily Amie

    2012-01-01

    Gender differences in mathematics have been of particular interest over the past decades. Research has shown a disparity in mathematical proficiency between boys and girls depending on the area of mathematics tested, the age and grade of the student, and the structure of the test question (i.e., how the question is posed). Although, much of the…

  14. Modeling the Temporal Evolution of Postoperative Complications

    PubMed Central

    Feld, Shara I.; Cobian, Alexander G.; Tevis, Sarah E.; Kennedy, Gregory D.; Craven, Mark W.

    2016-01-01

    Post-operative complications have a significant impact on patient morbidity and mortality; these impacts are exacerbated when patients experience multiple complications. However, the task of modeling the temporal sequencing of complications has not been previously addressed. We present an approach based on Markov chain models for characterizing the temporal evolution of post-operative complications represented in the American College of Surgeons National Surgery Quality Improvement Program database. Our work demonstrates that the models have significant predictive value. In particular, an inhomogenous Markov chain model effectively predicts the development of serious complications (coma longer than a day, cardiac arrest, myocardial infarction, septic shock, renal failure, pneumonia) and interventional complications (unplanned re-intubation, longer than 2 days on a ventilator and bleeding transfusion). PMID:28269851

  15. Arctic sea-ice variability during the 4th IPY and beyond

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gascard, J. J.

    2009-12-01

    For a third year in a row, the Arctic sea-ice is receding in 2009 far beyond previous recorded summer minimum sea-ice extents. During IPY (2007-2008) in addition to a dramatic sea-ice retreat in the Arctic, we observed a contrasted situation represented by a large drop in Multi Year Ice (MYI) from 2007 to 2008 of about 1 million km2 compensated by an equivalent amount of First Year Ice (FYI) that survived summer melt in 2008. This FYI remained inside the Arctic Ocean (mostly in the Eurasian basin) for the whole summer and surprisingly it did not escape the Arctic Ocean through Fram Strait like it did usually in the past (in particular in 2005). Do we understand and are we able to explain this new situation which is a prerequisite for better prediction? Over the past 30 years, winters in the Arctic became milder and summers became longer. Number of cumulated freezing degree days decreased by more than 20% corresponding to a loss of 1m of sea-ice thickness. Largest sea surface temperatures (up to +10°C) were recorded during Falls delaying freeze up. Regarding the atmospheric circulation, we noticed a profound regime change from a multipolar Arctic Oscillation scheme responsible for most of the interannual sea-ice variability observed in a climatic sense during the past 20 to 30 years, to a new dipolar scheme characterized by a low pressure system installed over most of the Eurasian continent contrasting with a high pressure system extending all over the northern American continent. How this new atmospheric circulation regime was affecting sea-ice and why did it take place, are still unanswered questions. It seems like due to an intensification of meridional winds linked to the new dipolar atmospheric pattern, the transpolar sea-ice drift has accelerated. It is important to note that large scale and drastic thinning of Arctic sea-ice was reported during the mid 90s well before more recent dramatic sea ice retreat events were reported during IPY. It is quite clear

  16. An Ecological Study of Food Desert Prevalence and 4th Grade Academic Achievement in New York State School Districts

    PubMed Central

    Frndak, Seth E.

    2014-01-01

    Background This ecological study examines the relationship between food desert prevalence and academic achievement at the school district level. Design and methods Sample included 232 suburban and urban school districts in New York State. Multiple open-source databases were merged to obtain: 4th grade science, English and math scores, school district demographic composition (NYS Report Card), regional socioeconomic indicators (American Community Survey), school district quality (US Common Core of Data), and food desert data (USDA Food Desert Atlas). Multiple regression models assessed the percentage of variation in achievement scores explained by food desert variables, after controlling for additional predictors. Results The proportion of individuals living in food deserts significantly explained 4th grade achievement scores, after accounting for additional predictors. School districts with higher proportions of individuals living in food desert regions demonstrated lower 4th grade achievement across science, English and math. Conclusions Food deserts appear to be related to academic achievement at the school district level among urban and suburban regions. Further research is needed to better understand how food access is associated with academic achievement at the individual level. Significance for public health The prevalence of food deserts in the United States is of national concern. As poor nutrition in United States children continues to spark debate, food deserts are being evaluated as potential sources of low fruit and vegetable intake and high obesity rates. Cognitive development and IQ have been linked to nutrition patterns, suggesting that children in food desert regions may have a disadvantage academically. This research evaluates if an ecological relationship between food desert prevalence and academic achievement at the school district level can be demonstrated. Results suggest that food desert prevalence may relate to poor academic performance at

  17. Postoperative fluid management

    PubMed Central

    Kayilioglu, Selami Ilgaz; Dinc, Tolga; Sozen, Isa; Bostanoglu, Akin; Cete, Mukerrem; Coskun, Faruk

    2015-01-01

    Postoperative care units are run by an anesthesiologist or a surgeon, or a team formed of both. Management of postoperative fluid therapy should be done considering both patients’ status and intraoperative events. Types of the fluids, amount of the fluid given and timing of the administration are the main topics that determine the fluid management strategy. The main goal of fluid resuscitation is to provide adequate tissue perfusion without harming the patient. The endothelial glycocalyx dysfunction and fluid shift to extracellular compartment should be considered wisely. Fluid management must be done based on patient’s body fluid status. Patients who are responsive to fluids can benefit from fluid resuscitation, whereas patients who are not fluid responsive are more likely to suffer complications of over-hydration. Therefore, common use of central venous pressure measurement, which is proved to be inefficient to predict fluid responsiveness, should be avoided. Goal directed strategy is the most rational approach to assess the patient and maintain optimum fluid balance. However, accessible and applicable monitoring tools for determining patient’s actual fluid need should be further studied and universalized. The debate around colloids and crystalloids should also be considered with goal directed therapies. Advantages and disadvantages of each solution must be evaluated with the patient’s specific condition. PMID:26261771

  18. STO-2: Support for 4th Year Operations, Recovery, and Science: Smithsonian Astrophysical Observatory Co-I

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stark, Antony

    The Lead Proposal for this investigation originates from the University of Arizona, Steward Observatory under Principal Investigator Dr. Christopher K. Walker. The Smithsonian Astrophysical Observatory (SAO) is pleased to submit this subsidiary proposal for engineering and scientific collaboration on the reflight of the Stratospheric TeraHertz Observatory (STO-2). This proposal covers Support for 4th Year Operations, Recovery, and Science as a result of the failure to launch due to weather in the 2015-2016 season. The Institutional Principal Investigator for the SAO effort is Antony A. Stark, and scientific Co-Investigators Gary Melnick, Volker Tolls, and Matthew Ashby. SAO will provide pre-flight engineering and flight monitoring support for the second Long Duration Flight (LDF) from McMurdo Sound in Antarctica. Subsequent to the flight, SAO Co-Is will contribute to data management and analysis, scientific interpretation, publication of results, and public distribution of data.

  19. 4th Annual Conference for African-American Researchers in the Mathematical Sciences (CAARMS4). Preliminary Program

    SciTech Connect

    Tapia, Richard

    1998-06-01

    In June, The Center for Research on Parallel Computation (CRPC), an NSF-funded Science and Technology Center, hosted the 4th Annual Conference for African-American Reserachers in the Mathematical Sciences (CAARMS4) at Rice University. The main goal of this conference was to highlight current work by African-American researchers and graduate students in mathematics. This conference strengthened the mathematical sciences by encouraging the increased participation of African-American and underrepresented groups into the field, facilitating working relationships between them and helping to cultivate their careers. In addition to the talks there was a graduate student poster session and tutorials on topics in mathematics and computer science. These talks, presentations, and discussions brought a broader perspective to the critical issues involving minority participation in mathematics.

  20. Medical Standby: An Experience at the 4(th) National Youth Camping and Motivation Program Organized by Maksak Malaysia.

    PubMed

    Zakaria, Mohd Idzwan; Isa, Ridzuan Mohd; Shah Che Hamzah, Mohd Shaharudin; Ayob, Noor Azleen

    2006-01-01

    Medical standby is the provision of emergency medical care and first aid for participants and/or spectators in a pre-planned event. This article describes the framework and the demographics of a medical standby at the 4(th) National Youth Camping and Motivation Program in Pasir Puteh, Kelantan from 30(th) July until the 3(rd) August 2004. The framework of the medical team is described based on the work process of any medical stand by. A medical encounter form was created for the medical standby defining the type of case seen (medical or trauma), name, age, race and diagnosis of the patient. We concluded that interagency collaboration during the initial planning and during the event itself is needed to ensure the smooth running of the medical standby. Most of the medical encounters were minor illnesses which are similar to previous studies and there was no case transferred to the hospital during that period.

  1. Macracanthorhynchus hirudinaceus Eggs in Canine Coprolite from the Sasanian Era in Iran (4th/5th Century CE)

    PubMed Central

    MOWLAVI, Gholamreza; MAKKI, Mahsasadat; HEIDARI, Zahra; REZAEIAN, Mostafa; MOHEBALI, Mehdi; ARAUJO, Adauto; BOENKE, Nicole; AALI, Abolfazl; STOLLNER, Thomas; MOBEDI, Iraj

    2015-01-01

    Present paper is the second publication introducing the paleoparasitological findings from animal coprolites obtained from archeological site of Chehrabad salt mine in northwestern Iran. The current archeological site is located in northwest of Iran, dated to the Sassanian Era (4th/5th century CE). In the summer 2012 the carnivore coprolite was obtained within the layers in the mine and were thoroughly analyzed for parasites using TSP rehydration technique. Eggs of 0 were successfully retrieved from the examined coprolite and were confidently identified based on reliable references. Identifying of M. hirudinaceus eggs in paleofeces with clear appearance as demonstrated herein, is much due to appropriate preservation condition has been existed in the salt mine .The present finding could be regarded as the oldest acanthocephalan infection in Iran. PMID:26246822

  2. Medical Standby: An Experience at the 4th National Youth Camping and Motivation Program Organized by Maksak Malaysia

    PubMed Central

    Zakaria, Mohd Idzwan; Isa, Ridzuan Mohd; Shah Che Hamzah, Mohd Shaharudin; Ayob, Noor Azleen

    2006-01-01

    Medical standby is the provision of emergency medical care and first aid for participants and/or spectators in a pre-planned event. This article describes the framework and the demographics of a medical standby at the 4th National Youth Camping and Motivation Program in Pasir Puteh, Kelantan from 30th July until the 3rd August 2004. The framework of the medical team is described based on the work process of any medical stand by. A medical encounter form was created for the medical standby defining the type of case seen (medical or trauma), name, age, race and diagnosis of the patient. We concluded that interagency collaboration during the initial planning and during the event itself is needed to ensure the smooth running of the medical standby. Most of the medical encounters were minor illnesses which are similar to previous studies and there was no case transferred to the hospital during that period. PMID:22589590

  3. Characterization of γ and γ' phases in 2nd and 4th generation single crystal nickel-base superalloys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zietara, Maciej; Neumeier, Steffen; Göken, Mathias; Czyrska-Filemonowicz, Aleksandra

    2017-01-01

    A Ni based single crystal superalloy from the 2nd generation, PWA 1484, and one from the 4th generation, PWA 1497, were comparatively studied by scanning electron microscopy, energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy and nanoindentation technique in an atomic force microscope (NI-AFM) after high temperature creep deformation. During primary creep of both generations of superalloys, γ' precipitates start to coalesce and grow directionally. Further creep deformation leads to the topological inversion and coarsening of the rafted microstructure. The NI-AFM technique was used for measurements of the hardness of the γ and γ' phases in as-received and creep deformed samples in various conditions. The g matrix of the PWA 1497 superalloy is on average 0.8 GPa harder than that of PWA 1484 that can be explained by higher content of Re and Ru, since they partition predominantly to the matrix phase.

  4. Preoperative anemia and postoperative outcomes after hepatectomy

    PubMed Central

    Tohme, Samer; Varley, Patrick R.; Landsittel, Douglas P.; Chidi, Alexis P.; Tsung, Allan

    2015-01-01

    Background Preoperative anaemia is associated with adverse outcomes after surgery but outcomes after liver surgery specifically are not well established. We aimed to analyze the incidence of and effects of preoperative anemia on morbidity and mortality in patients undergoing liver resection. Methods All elective hepatectomies performed for the period 2005–2012 recorded in the American College of Surgeons' National Surgical Quality Improvement Program (ACS-NSQIP) database were evaluated. We obtained anonymized data for 30-day mortality and major morbidity (one or more major complication), demographics, and preoperative and perioperative risk factors. We used multivariable logistic regression models to assess the adjusted effect of anemia, which was defined as (hematocrit <39% in men, <36% in women), on postoperative outcomes. Results We obtained data for 12,987 patients, of whom 4260 (32.8%) had preoperative anemia. Patients with preoperative anemia experienced higher postoperative major morbidity and mortality rates compared to those without anemia. After adjustment for predefined variables, preoperative anemia was an independent risk factor for postoperative major morbidity (adjusted OR 1.21, 1.09–1.33). After adjustment, there was no significant difference in postoperative mortality for patients with or without preoperative anemia (adjusted OR 0.88, 0.66–1.16). Conclusion Preoperative anemia is independently associated with an increased risk of major morbidity in patients undergoing hepatectomy. Therefore, it is crucial to readdress preoperative blood management in anemic patients prior to hepatectomy. PMID:27017165

  5. [Postoperative analgesia and dexamethasone].

    PubMed

    Miralles, F S; Cárceles, M D; Micol, J A; Hernández, J; del Pino, A

    1989-01-01

    A randomized, double-blind, prospective study was carried out in 100 patients who had undergone some type of surgical treatment in order to evaluate the degree of pain and relief of pain, the degree of achieved analgesia according to the opinion of the observer and consumption of analgesic agents. The evaluation was carried out on seven occasions during the first 12 hours of the postoperative period. Patients received dexamethasone (4 mg before or after the operation or 8 mg after the operation), 6-methylprednisolone (16 mg at the end of the operation) or nothing (control group). Regardless of type, dose or timing of administration of the drugs, all patients receiving corticosteroids presented less pain, more relief of pain (expressed by themselves or in opinion of the observer) and needed lower doses of analgesics during the studied time.

  6. Imaging of postoperative shoulder instability.

    PubMed

    De Filippo, M; Pesce, A; Barile, A; Borgia, D; Zappia, M; Romano, A; Pogliacomi, F; Verdano, M; Pellegrini, A; Johnson, K

    2017-03-01

    Postoperative imaging in shoulder instability is still a challenge for radiologists due to various postsurgical anatomical findings that could be considered pathologic in treated shoulder. For this reason is very important a deep knowledge about surgical procedures, anatomical changes after surgery and the appropriate diagnostic imaging modalities to work up the symptomatic postoperative shoulder. Postoperative imaging options include use conventional radiography, magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), MRI arthrography, computed tomography (CT) and CT arthrography. The purpose of our review is to explain the different surgical procedures and to describe postoperative changes detected with radiological imaging.

  7. Dinosaur Day!

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nakamura, Sandra; Baptiste, H. Prentice

    2006-01-01

    In this article, the authors describe how they capitalized on their first-grade students' love of dinosaurs by hosting a fun-filled Dinosaur Day in their classroom. On Dinosaur Day, students rotated through four dinosaur-related learning stations that integrated science content with art, language arts, math, and history in a fun and time-efficient…

  8. CEMI Days

    SciTech Connect

    2015-07-01

    CEMI Days are an important channel of engagement between DOE and the manufacturing industry to identify challenges and opportunities for increasing U.S. manufacturing competitiveness. CEMI Days that are held at manufacturing companies’ facilities can include tours of R&D operations or other points of interest determined by the host company.

  9. Hypothermic anesthesia attenuates postoperative proteolysis.

    PubMed Central

    Johnson, D J; Brooks, D C; Pressler, V M; Hulton, N R; Colpoys, M F; Smith, R J; Wilmore, D W

    1986-01-01

    The catabolic response that commonly occurs after major operation is characterized by net skeletal muscle proteolysis and accelerated nitrogen excretion. This response was absent in patients undergoing cardiac surgical procedures associated with the combination of cardiopulmonary bypass, narcotic anesthesia, neuromuscular blockade, and hypothermia. Forearm nitrogen release was 422 +/- 492 nmol/100 ml X min on the first postoperative day, approximately 25% of preoperative values (1677 +/- 411, p less than 0.05). Nitrogen excretion and the degree of negative nitrogen balance were comparable to levels observed in nonstressed, fasting subjects. The potential role of hypothermia, high-dose fentanyl anesthesia, and neuromuscular blockade in modifying the catabolic response to laparotomy and retroperitoneal dissection was further evaluated in animal studies. Six hours after operation, amino acid nitrogen release from the hindquarter was 84% less than control values (p less than 0.05). Nitrogen excretion and urea production were also reduced compared to normothermic controls. It is concluded that the combination of hypothermia, narcotic anesthesia, and neuromuscular blockade attenuates the catabolic response to injury and thus may be useful in the care of critically ill surgical patients. PMID:3767477

  10. Career Day

    NASA Video Gallery

    NASA's 2013 Career Days was a joint collaboration between NASA Langley and the Newport News Shipbuilding where 600 high school students from Virginia took on two design challenges -- designing a ca...

  11. 78 FR 38200 - Safety Zones; Annual Independence Day Fireworks Displays, Skagway, Haines, and Wrangell, AK

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-06-26

    ... SECURITY Coast Guard 33 CFR Part 165 RIN 1625-AA00 Safety Zones; Annual Independence Day Fireworks Displays... hazards associated with the annual ] Independence Day Fireworks Displays held in each location. This rule... July 4th of each year to celebrate Independence Day. The fireworks will be launched from a barge...

  12. [A development of Byzantine Christian charities during the 4(th)-7(th) centuries and the birth of the hospital].

    PubMed

    Nam, Sung Hyun

    2015-04-01

    This study aims to examine the beginning and the development of Christian Charities during the 4(th)-6(th) centuries which would eventually result in the birth of the hospital in modern sense in the first half of the 7(th) century. For this purpose, I looked carefully into various primary sources concerning the early Christian institutions for the poor and the sick. Above all, it's proper to note that the first xenodocheion where hospitality was combined with a systematic caring, is concerned with the Trinitarian debate of the 4(th) century. In 356, Eustathios, one of the leaders of homoiousios group, established xenodocheion to care for the sick and the lepers in Sebaste of Armenia, whereas his opponent Aetios, doctor and leader of the heteroousios party, was reckoned to have combined the medical treatment with his clerical activities. Then, Basil of Caesarea, disciple of Eustathios of Sebaste, also founded in 372 a magnificent benevolent complex named 'Basileias' after its founder. I scrupulously analysed several contemporary materials mentioning the charitable institution of Caesarea which was called alternatively katagogia, ptochotropheion, xenodocheion. John Chrysostome also founded several nosokomeia in Constantinople at the end of the 4(th) century and the beginning of the 5(th) century. Apparently, the contemporary sources mention that doctors existed for these Charities, but there is no sufficient proof that these 'Christian Hospitals,' Basileias or nosokomeia of Constantinople were hospitals in modern sense. Imperial constitutions began to mention ptochotropheion, xenodocheion and orphanotropheion since the second half of the 5(th) century and then some Justinian laws evoked nosokomium, brephotrophia, gerontocomia. These laws reveal that 'Christian Hospitals' were well clarified and deeply rooted in Byzantine society already in these periods. And then, new benevolent institutions emerged in the 6(th) century: nosokomeia for a specific class and

  13. Overcoming CD4 Th1 Cell Fate Restrictions to Sustain Antiviral CD8 T Cells and Control Persistent Virus Infection.

    PubMed

    Snell, Laura M; Osokine, Ivan; Yamada, Douglas H; De la Fuente, Justin Rafael; Elsaesser, Heidi J; Brooks, David G

    2016-09-20

    Viral persistence specifically inhibits CD4 Th1 responses and promotes Tfh immunity, but the mechanisms that suppress Th1 cells and the disease consequences of their loss are unclear. Here, we demonstrate that the loss of CD4 Th1 cells specifically leads to progressive CD8 T cell decline and dysfunction during viral persistence. Therapeutically reconstituting CD4 Th1 cells restored CD4 T cell polyfunctionality, enhanced antiviral CD8 T cell numbers and function, and enabled viral control. Mechanistically, combined interaction of PD-L1 and IL-10 by suppressive dendritic cell subsets inhibited new CD4 Th1 cells in both acute and persistent virus infection, demonstrating an unrecognized suppressive function for PD-L1 in virus infection. Thus, the loss of CD4 Th1 cells is a key event leading to progressive CD8 T cell demise during viral persistence with important implications for restoring antiviral CD8 T cell immunity to control persistent viral infection.

  14. The St. Jude Cancer Education for Children Program Pilot Study: Determining the Knowledge Acquisition and Retention of 4th-Grade Students.

    PubMed

    Ayers, Katherine; Villalobos, Aubrey Van Kirk; Li, Zhenghong; Krasin, Matthew

    2016-03-01

    In 2006, St. Jude Children's Research Hospital began developing a school-based outreach program known as the St. Jude Cancer Education for Children Program (SJCECP). The program aimed to teach children about cancer and healthy habits that can prevent the formation of cancers into adulthood. During the 2010-2011 academic years, we conducted a pilot evaluation of the SJCECP curriculum, with the primary objective of evaluating the impact of the intervention on knowledge acquisition and retention among 4th-grade students participating in the program. Seven local schools and 481 students from the Memphis area participated in the program evaluation. The results of this study show that 4th-grade students are able to acquire gains in knowledge related to cells, cancer, and healthy living after receiving the SJCECP intervention. We conclude that the program can be a useful tool for improving knowledge of cancer concepts at the 4th-grade level.

  15. Quality of Education Predicts Performance on the Wide Range Achievement Test-4th Edition Word Reading Subtest

    PubMed Central

    Sayegh, Philip; Arentoft, Alyssa; Thaler, Nicholas S.; Dean, Andy C.; Thames, April D.

    2014-01-01

    The current study examined whether self-rated education quality predicts Wide Range Achievement Test-4th Edition (WRAT-4) Word Reading subtest and neurocognitive performance, and aimed to establish this subtest's construct validity as an educational quality measure. In a community-based adult sample (N = 106), we tested whether education quality both increased the prediction of Word Reading scores beyond demographic variables and predicted global neurocognitive functioning after adjusting for WRAT-4. As expected, race/ethnicity and education predicted WRAT-4 reading performance. Hierarchical regression revealed that when including education quality, the amount of WRAT-4's explained variance increased significantly, with race/ethnicity and both education quality and years as significant predictors. Finally, WRAT-4 scores, but not education quality, predicted neurocognitive performance. Results support WRAT-4 Word Reading as a valid proxy measure for education quality and a key predictor of neurocognitive performance. Future research should examine these findings in larger, more diverse samples to determine their robust nature. PMID:25404004

  16. 1:1 Ground-track resonance in a uniformly rotating 4th degree and order gravitational field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Feng, Jinglang; Noomen, Ron; Hou, Xiyun; Visser, Pieter; Yuan, Jianping

    2017-01-01

    Using a gravitational field truncated at the 4th degree and order, the 1:1 ground-track resonance is studied. To address the main properties of this resonance, a 1-degree of freedom (1-DOF) system is firstly studied. Equilibrium points (EPs), stability and resonance width are obtained. Different from previous studies, the inclusion of non-spherical terms higher than degree and order 2 introduces new phenomena. For a further study about this resonance, a 2-DOF model which includes a main resonance term (the 1-DOF system) and a perturbing resonance term is studied. With the aid of Poincaré sections, the generation of chaos in the phase space is studied in detail by addressing the overlap process of these two resonances with arbitrary combinations of eccentricity ( e) and inclination ( i). Retrograde orbits, near circular orbits and near polar orbits are found to have better stability against the perturbation of the second resonance. The situations of complete chaos are estimated in the e-i plane. By applying the maximum Lyapunov Characteristic Exponent (LCE), chaos is characterized quantitatively and similar conclusions can be achieved. This study is applied to three asteroids 1996 HW1, Vesta and Betulia, but the conclusions are not restricted to them.

  17. 4th International Meeting on Single Nucleotide Polymorphism and Complex Genome Analysis. Various uses for DNA variations.

    PubMed

    Brookes, Anthony J

    2002-02-01

    At the 4th International Meeting on Single Nucleotide Polymorphism and Complex Genome Analysis (Stockholm, Sweden, 10th-14th October 2001), approximately 100 scientists from more than 20 nations undertook a probing review of latest developments in the field. Despite impressive and still ongoing activities towards SNP discovery and validation, plus efforts towards haplotype exploitation, it was clear that supporting technologies for genotyping are way behind where they need to be. Innate complexity and large variances in aspects of genome function together pose immense challenges that are difficult to surmount in the human situation. In contrast, studies in simpler organisms and population/evolutionary genetics studies are yielding important new insights. Breakthroughs that are being made in understanding the genetic etiology of complex disease tend to involve genes of larger effect or extremely well merited candidates. Linkage studies and proximal phenotypes are being recommended, though the best way forward is still hotly debated. Consequently, many diverse and ambitious projects are underway, from which the data itself will eventually show what is and is not possible.

  18. Communicating Science to Impact Learning? A Phenomenological Inquiry into 4th and 5th Graders' Perceptions of Science Information Sources

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gelmez Burakgazi, Sevinc; Yildirim, Ali; Weeth Feinstein, Noah

    2016-04-01

    Rooted in science education and science communication studies, this study examines 4th and 5th grade students' perceptions of science information sources (SIS) and their use in communicating science to students. It combines situated learning theory with uses and gratifications theory in a qualitative phenomenological analysis. Data were gathered through classroom observations and interviews in four Turkish elementary schools. Focus group interviews with 47 students and individual interviews with 17 teachers and 10 parents were conducted. Participants identified a wide range of SIS, including TV, magazines, newspapers, internet, peers, teachers, families, science centers/museums, science exhibitions, textbooks, science books, and science camps. Students reported using various SIS in school-based and non-school contexts to satisfy their cognitive, affective, personal, and social integrative needs. SIS were used for science courses, homework/project assignments, examination/test preparations, and individual science-related research. Students assessed SIS in terms of the perceived accessibility of the sources, the quality of the content, and the content presentation. In particular, some sources such as teachers, families, TV, science magazines, textbooks, and science centers/museums ("directive sources") predictably led students to other sources such as teachers, families, internet, and science books ("directed sources"). A small number of sources crossed context boundaries, being useful in both school and out. Results shed light on the connection between science education and science communication in terms of promoting science learning.

  19. Development of partially-coherent wavefront propagation simulation methods for 3rd and 4th generation synchrotron radiation sources

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chubar, Oleg; Berman, Lonny; Chu, Yong S.; Fluerasu, Andrei; Hulbert, Steve; Idir, Mourad; Kaznatcheev, Konstantine; Shapiro, David; Shen, Qun; Baltser, Jana

    2011-09-01

    Partially-coherent wavefront propagation calculations have proven to be feasible and very beneficial in the design of beamlines for 3rd and 4th generation Synchrotron Radiation (SR) sources. These types of calculations use the framework of classical electrodynamics for the description, on the same accuracy level, of the emission by relativistic electrons moving in magnetic fields of accelerators, and the propagation of the emitted radiation wavefronts through beamline optical elements. This enables accurate prediction of performance characteristics for beamlines exploiting high SR brightness and/or high spectral flux. Detailed analysis of radiation degree of coherence, offered by the partially-coherent wavefront propagation method, is of paramount importance for modern storage-ring based SR sources, which, thanks to extremely small sub-nanometer-level electron beam emittances, produce substantial portions of coherent flux in X-ray spectral range. We describe the general approach to partially-coherent SR wavefront propagation simulations and present examples of such simulations performed using "Synchrotron Radiation Workshop" (SRW) code for the parameters of hard X-ray undulator based beamlines at the National Synchrotron Light Source II (NSLS-II), Brookhaven National Laboratory. These examples illustrate general characteristics of partially-coherent undulator radiation beams in low-emittance SR sources, and demonstrate advantages of applying high-accuracy physical-optics simulations to the optimization and performance prediction of X-ray optical beamlines in these new sources.

  20. Identification of DRG-1 As a Melanoma-Associated Antigen Recognized by CD4+ Th1 Cells

    PubMed Central

    Kiniwa, Yukiko; Li, Jiang; Wang, Mingjun; Sun, Chuang; Lee, Jeffrey E.; Wang, Rong-Fu; Wang, Helen Y.

    2015-01-01

    Immunotherapy has emerged as a promising strategy for the treatment of metastatic melanoma. Clinical studies have demonstrated the feasibility of cancer immunotherapy using tumor antigens recognized by CD8+ T cells. However, the overall immune responses induced by these antigens are too weak and transient to induce tumor regression in the majority of patients who received immunization. A growing body of evidence suggests that CD4+ T helper (Th) cells play an important role in antitumor immunity. Therefore, the identification of MHC class II-restricted tumor antigens capable of stimulating CD4+ T cells may provide opportunities for developing effective cancer vaccines. To this end, we describe the identification of developmentally regulated GTP-binding protein 1 (DRG-1) as a melanoma-associated antigen recognized by HLA-DR11-restricted CD4+ Th1 cells. Epitope mapping analysis showed that the DRG1248-268 epitope of DRG-1 was required for T cell recognition. Reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction revealed that DRG-1 was highly expressed in melanoma cell lines but not in normal tissues. DRG-1 knockdown by lentiviral-based shRNA suppressed melanoma cell proliferation and soft agar colony formation. Taken together, these data suggest that DRG-1 plays an important role in melanoma cell growth and transformation, indicating that DRG1 may represent a novel target for CD4+ T cell-mediated immunotherapy in melanoma. PMID:25993655

  1. [Effects of a Kampo medicine on postoperative infection].

    PubMed

    Iwagaki, Hiromi; Saito, Shinya

    2013-09-01

    We studied the effects of preoperative administration of Hochuekkito (TJ-41) on the host response of patients undergoing gastrectomy or colectomy in a prospective, randomized, multicenter clinical trial. Forty-eight patients were randomized into two groups: one received 7.5 g/day of TJ-41 for 7 days before surgery (n = 22); and the other served as the control group (n = 26). The body temperature and pulse rate in patients in the TJ41 group were significantly better controlled during the study compared with those in the control group. The concentration of serum cortisol on the first postoperative day in the TJ-41 group was also significantly lower compared with that in the control group. These results clearly indicate that the preoperative administration of TJ-41 may ameliorate an excessive postoperative inflammatory response and prolonged immunosuppressed state, resulting in fewer postoperative infectious complications.

  2. Update from the 4th Edition of the World Health Organization Classification of Head and Neck Tumours: Odontogenic and Maxillofacial Bone Tumors.

    PubMed

    Wright, John M; Vered, Marilena

    2017-03-01

    The 4th edition of the World Health Organization's Classification of Head and Neck Tumours was published in January of 2017. This article provides a summary of the changes to Chapter 4 Tumours of the oral cavity and mobile tongue and Chapter 8 Odontogenic and maxillofacial bone tumours. Odontogenic cysts which were eliminated from the 3rd 2005 edition were included in the 4th edition as well as other unique allied conditons of the jaws. Many new tumors published since 2005 have been included in the 2017 classification.

  3. Capitol Day

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2009-01-01

    Stennis Space Center Director Gene Goldman visits with Mississippi Gov. Haley Barbour during NASA Day at the Capitol activities on Feb. 19. During the visit, Goldman presented the governor with a model of the J-2X rocket engine currently in development. Stennis engineers did early component testing for the new engine.

  4. Inspire Day

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bohach, Barbara M.; Meade, Birgitta

    2014-01-01

    The authors collaborated on hosting a "Spring Inspire Day." planned and delivered by preservice elementary teachers as a social studies/science methods project. Projects that have authentic application opportunities can make learning meaningful for prospective teachers as well as elementary students. With the impetus for an integrated…

  5. EDITORIAL: Special issue containing papers presented at the 4th IAEA Technical Meeting on the Theory of Plasma Instabilities Special issue containing papers presented at the 4th IAEA Technical Meeting on the Theory of Plasma Instabilities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Itoh, K.; Wilson, H. R.

    2010-05-01

    The 4th IAEA technical meeting (TM) on the Theory of Plasma Instabilities was held in Kyoto, May 18th--20th 2009, following the first (Seeon), second (Trieste) and third (York) meetings in this series. This IAEA-TM was motivated by the recent advances in theoretical methodology, the rapid progress in observations of laboratory and astrophysical plasmas and the evolution of fusion research as we approach the ITER era. The international advisory committee (IAC) and local organizing committee (LOC), the members of which are listed below, collaborated to define the scope and the content of the scientific programme. Young scientists were actively encouraged to participate in this TM to help stimulate their future research careers and raise their international profiles. Through these young scientists, the IAEA-TM planned to identify the future directions of research. About 90 researchers, from 13 countries and the IAEA, participated in this IAEA-TM, with 72 scientific presentations. The talks and posters generated enthusiastic discussions, contributing to the vibrancy of the meeting. This special issue of Nuclear Fusion consists of a cluster of papers, reporting some of the main contributions to the IAEA-TM. The articles in this cluster are representative of the scientific width of presentations at the meeting, spanning topics from micro-turbulence to large-scale MHD dynamics and from transport to detailed analysis of diagnostics. They demonstrate the quality and depth of the research presented at the conference. List of IAC (alphabetical order): B. Breizman (USA), S. Guenter (Germany), T. S. Hahm (USA), K. Itoh (Japan, Chair of 2009), Ya. I. Kolesnichenko (Ukraine), A. G. Peeters (UK), H. Wilson (UK) List of LOC (alphabetical order): A. Fukuyama, R. Horiuchi, S.-I. Itoh, N. Kasuya, Y. Kishimoto (co-chair), K. Kusano, J. Li, K. Mima, S. Murakami, H. Naitou, N. Nakajima, Y. Nakamura, H. Ohtani, S. Okamura, T. Ozeki, S. Sudo (co-chair), H. Sugama, Y. Todo, S. Tokuda, S

  6. Postoperative complications of spine surgery.

    PubMed

    Swann, Matthew C; Hoes, Kathryn S; Aoun, Salah G; McDonagh, David L

    2016-03-01

    A variety of surgical approaches are available for the treatment of spine diseases. Complications can arise intraoperatively, in the immediate postoperative period, or in a delayed fashion. These complications may lead to severe or even permanent morbidity if left unrecognized and untreated [1-4]. Here we review a range of complications in the early postoperative period from more benign complications such as postoperative nausea and vomiting (PONV) to more feared complications leading to permanent loss of neurological function or death [5]. Perioperative pain management is covered in a separate review (Chapter 8).

  7. [Management of postoperative pancreatic fistula].

    PubMed

    Hackert, T; Büchler, M W

    2015-06-01

    The occurrence of a postoperative pancreatic fistula is one of the most important complications following pancreatic resections. The frequency of this complication varies between 3 % after pancreatic head resection and up to 35 % following distal pancreatectomy. In 2005, the international definition of postoperative pancreatic fistula was standardized according to the approach of the International Study Group of Pancreatic Surgery (ISGPS) including an A-C grading system of the severity. Consequently, results from different studies have become comparable and the historically reported fistula rates can be evaluated more critically. The present review summarises the currently available data on incidence, risk factors, fistula-associated complications and management of postoperative pancreatic fistula.

  8. Imaging of the Postoperative Orbit.

    PubMed

    Learned, Kim O; Nasseri, Farbod; Mohan, Suyash

    2015-08-01

    Imaging evaluation of the postoperative orbit remains challenging even for the expert neuroradiologist. This article provides a simplified framework for understanding the complex postoperative appearances of the orbit, in an attempt to enhance the diagnostic accuracy of postoperative computed tomography and MR imaging of the orbit. Readers are familiarized with the normal appearances of common eye procedures and orbit reconstructions to help avoid interpretative pitfalls. Also reviewed are imaging features of common surgical complications, and evaluation of residual/recurrent neoplasm in the setting of oncologic imaging surveillance.

  9. [Postoperative imaging of the shoulder].

    PubMed

    Wörtler, K; Rummeny, E J

    2004-06-01

    Correct interpretation of imaging findings in the postoperative shoulder is impaired by surgical distortion of normal anatomy and possible artifacts. Advanced postoperative imaging of the shoulder in addition to the selection of the best suited modality necessitates familiarity with the surgical procedure that has been performed and its consecutive morphological changes. This article reviews the most common arthroscopic and open techniques used for treatment of shoulder instability, lesions of the superior labral-bicipital complex, primary impingement, and rotator cuff tears, their typical postoperative imaging findings, as well as the diagnostic performance of cross sectional imaging techniques in the detection of recurrent lesions and complications.

  10. Laparoscopic Surgery Can Reduce Postoperative Edema Compared with Open Surgery

    PubMed Central

    Guo, Dong; Gong, Jianfeng; Cao, Lei; Wei, Yao; Guo, Zhen

    2016-01-01

    Aim. The study aimed to investigate the impact of laparoscopic surgery and open surgery on postoperative edema in Crohn's disease. Methods. Patients who required enterectomy were divided into open group (Group O) and laparoscopic group (Group L). Edema was measured using bioelectrical impedance analysis preoperatively (PRE) and on postoperative day 3 (POD3) and postoperative day 5 (POD5). The postoperative edema was divided into slight edema and edema by an edema index, defined as the ratio of total extracellular water to total body water. Results. Patients who underwent laparoscopic surgery had better clinical outcomes and lower levels of inflammatory and stress markers. A total of 31 patients (26.05%) developed slight edema and 53 patients (44.54%) developed edema on POD3. More patients developed postoperative edema in Group O than in Group L on POD3 (p = 0.006). The value of the edema index of Group O was higher than that of Group L on POD3 and POD5 (0.402 ± 0.010 versus 0.397 ± 0.008, p = 0.001; 0.401 ± 0.009 versus 0.395 ± 0.007, p = 0.039, resp.). Conclusions. Compared with open surgery, laparoscopic surgery can reduce postoperative edema, which may contribute to the better outcomes of laparoscopic surgery over open surgery. PMID:27777583

  11. 34 CFR 300.11 - Day; business day; school day.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 34 Education 2 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Day; business day; school day. 300.11 Section 300.11... CHILDREN WITH DISABILITIES General Definitions Used in This Part § 300.11 Day; business day; school day. (a) Day means calendar day unless otherwise indicated as business day or school day. (b) Business...

  12. 34 CFR 300.11 - Day; business day; school day.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 34 Education 2 2011-07-01 2010-07-01 true Day; business day; school day. 300.11 Section 300.11... CHILDREN WITH DISABILITIES General Definitions Used in This Part § 300.11 Day; business day; school day. (a) Day means calendar day unless otherwise indicated as business day or school day. (b) Business...

  13. Takotsubo Cardiomyopathy Occurring in the Postoperative Period.

    PubMed

    Deniz, Süleyman; Bakal, Ömer; İnangil, Gökhan; Şen, Hüseyin; Özkan, Sezai

    2015-02-01

    Takotsubo cardiomyopathy simulates acute myocardial infarction, and it is characterised by reversible left ventricular failure. A case of Takotsubo cardiomyopathy diagnosed after emergency angiography performed in a patient with evidence of acute myocardial infarction in the postoperative period will be described in this report. Transurethral resection of a bladder tumour (TUR-BT) was performed in a 92-year-old male patient by the urology clinic. The patient was transferred to the post-anaesthesia care unit after the operation. An echocardiography was performed because of the sudden onset of dyspnoea, tachycardia (140-150 beats per minute, rhythm-atrial fibrillation) and ST-segment elevation on electrocardiography (ECG) at the first postoperative hour, and midapical dyskinesia was detected at the patient. An immediate angiography was performed due to suspicion of acute coronary syndrome. Patent coronary arteries and temporary aneurysmatic dilatation of the apex of the heart were revealed by angiography. As a result of these findings, the patient was diagnosed with Takotsubo cardiomyopathy by the cardiology service. The patient was discharged uneventfully following 10 days in the intensive care unit. Aneurysm of the apex of the left ventricle and normal anatomy of the coronary arteries in the angiography have diagnostic value for Takotsubo cardiomyopathy. Diuretics (furosemide) and beta-blockers (metoprolol) are commonly used for the treatment of Takotsubo cardiomyopathy. Even though Takotsubo cardiomyopathy is a rare and benign disease, it should be kept in mind in patients suspected for acute myocardial infarction in the postoperative period.

  14. Reduction of postoperative adhesion development.

    PubMed

    Diamond, Michael P

    2016-10-01

    Despite use of meticulous surgical techniques, and regardless of surgical access via laparotomy or laparoscopy, postoperative adhesions develop in the vast majority of women undergoing abdominopelvic surgery. Such adhesions represent not only adhesion reformation at sites of adhesiolysis, but also de novo adhesion formation at sites of surgical procedures. Application of antiadhesion adjuvants compliment the benefits of meticulous surgical techniques, providing an opportunity to further reduce postoperative adhesion development. Improved understanding of the pathophysiology of adhesion development and distinguishing variations in the molecular biologic mechanisms from adhesion-free peritoneal repair represent future opportunities to improve the reduction of postoperative adhesions. Optimization of the reduction of postoperative adhesions will likely require identification of unique, personalized approaches in each individual, representing interindividual variation in peritoneal repair processes.

  15. Benefits of a 4th Ice Class in the Simulated Radar Reflectivities of Convective Systems Using a Bulk Microphysics Scheme

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lang, Stephen E.; Tao, Wei-Kuo; Chern, Jiun-Dar; Wu, Di; Li, Xiaowen

    2015-01-01

    Numerous cloud microphysical schemes designed for cloud and mesoscale models are currently in use, ranging from simple bulk to multi-moment, multi-class to explicit bin schemes. This study details the benefits of adding a 4th ice class (hail) to an already improved 3-class ice bulk microphysics scheme developed for the Goddard Cumulus Ensemble model based on Rutledge and Hobbs (1983,1984). Besides the addition and modification of several hail processes from Lin et al. (1983), further modifications were made to the 3-ice processes, including allowing greater ice super saturation and mitigating spurious evaporationsublimation in the saturation adjustment scheme, allowing graupelhail to become snow via vapor growth and hail to become graupel via riming, and the inclusion of a rain evaporation correction and vapor diffusivity factor. The improved 3-ice snowgraupel size-mapping schemes were adjusted to be more stable at higher mixing rations and to increase the aggregation effect for snow. A snow density mapping was also added. The new scheme was applied to an intense continental squall line and a weaker, loosely-organized continental case using three different hail intercepts. Peak simulated reflectivities agree well with radar for both the intense and weaker case and were better than earlier 3-ice versions when using a moderate and large intercept for hail, respectively. Simulated reflectivity distributions versus height were also improved versus radar in both cases compared to earlier 3-ice versions. The bin-based rain evaporation correction affected the squall line case more but did not change the overall agreement in reflectivity distributions.

  16. [Level of smoking of 3rd and 4th grade students studying health and related factors: follow-up study].

    PubMed

    Göktalay, Tuğba; Cengiz Özyurt, Beyhan; Sakar Coşkun, Ayşin; Celik, Pinar

    2011-01-01

    The levels of smoking of 1st and 2nd year students at Faculty of Medicine and Manisa School of Health at Celal Bayar University were investigated in 2006-2007. This study is carried out in order to see if there is a change in the same students' level of smoking while they are in 3rd and 4th year. In addition, the study aimed to examine the factors affecting the level of use and attitudes towards the law effectuated in July 19, 2009. This is a follow-up study with 80.42% return rate. A 26-item structured questionnaire was administered. The participants filled out the questionnaires under supervision of the researchers in their classrooms. The University Institutional Review Board approved the study. The total of participants (263) of the follow-up study included 189 female and 74 male. The rate of experimenting with smoking was 49% with the mean age of 15.7 (SD= 4.01 years). The mean age of experimenting with smoking was the earliest on male students studying at faculty of medicine. The level of smoking was found to be the most on females, studying at faculty of medicine and staying at the dormitory, with smoking parents (p< 0.05). The most important reason to begin smoking was curiosity (55.2%) while bad breath and yellowing of teeth were the reasons to quit (91.7%). 83.3% of the students thought that the law will be effective on quit smoking. The level of both experimenting and use of smoking has been increased over time. It is suggested that medical students' awareness about the danger of smoking should be raised at earlier grades. In addition, lectures should be offered to students at School of Health and they should be encouraged to unite in order to fight with smoking.

  17. Meeting Materials for the 4th NRC Meeting on the Guidance for and the Review of EPA's Toxicological Assessment of Inorganic Arsenic

    EPA Science Inventory

    On December 2-3, 2015, the National Research Council (NRC) hosted the 4th meeting of the committee formed to peer review the draft IRIS assessment of inorganic arsenic. EPA presented background and overview materials during the public session on December 2nd. This information co...

  18. The Attitude of the Students towards the Value of "Paying Attention to Being Healthy" in 4th Grade Elementary Social Sciences Course

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tahiroglu, Mustafa; Cetin, Turhan

    2012-01-01

    This study was aimed to define the teaching of the value of "Paying Attention to Being Healthy" in 4th grade elementary Social Sciences course and to determine the students' attitude towards this value. To reach this goal, activities to teach the value of paying attention to being healthy were prepared and conducted. The effect of these…

  19. Autism: Proceedings of Annual Meeting of the National Society for Autistic Children (4th, June 22-24, 1972, Flint Michigan).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    National Society for Autistic Children, Syracuse, NY.

    Presented are proceedings of the 4th annual (1972) meeting of the National Society for Autistic Children including 11 papers given at the meeting. Listed are officers and board members of the society, the convention committee members, and recipients of citations and awards. The president's report notes past goals, accomplishments, and future…

  20. The Effect of Direct Instruction Strategy on Math Achievement of Primary 4th and 5th Grade Students with Learning Difficulties

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Al-Makahleh, Ahmad Abdulhameed Aufan

    2011-01-01

    This study seeks to verify the effect of direct instruction strategy on Math achievment of students with learning difficulties in the fourth and fifth grade levels and measure the improvement in their attitudes to Mathematics. Sample consisted of sixty (60) students with Math learning difficulties attending 4th and 5th grade level resource rooms…

  1. U.S. Dietary and Physical Activity Guideline Knowledge and Corresponding Behaviors among 4th and 5th Grade Students: A Multi-Site Pilot Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bea, Jennifer W.; Martinez, Stephanie; Armstrong-Florian, Traci; Farrell, Vanessa; Martinez, Cathy; Whitmer, Evelyn; Hartz, Vern; Blake, Samuel; Nicolini, Ariana; Misner, Scottie

    2014-01-01

    Knowledge of U.S. dietary and physical activity recommendations and corresponding behaviors were surveyed among 4th and 5th graders in five Arizona counties to determine the need for related education in SNAP-Ed eligible schools. A <70% target response rate was the criterion. Participants correctly identified recommendations for: fruit, 20%;…

  2. The Effect of the Conceptual Change Oriented Instruction through Cooperative Learning on 4th Grade Students' Understanding of Earth and Sky Concepts

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Celikten, Oksan; Ipekcioglu, Sevgi; Ertepinar, Hamide; Geban, Omer

    2012-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to compare the effectiveness of the conceptual change oriented instruction through cooperative learning (CCICL) and traditional science instruction (TI) on 4th grade students' understanding of earth and sky concepts and their attitudes toward earth and sky concepts. In this study, 56 fourth grade students from the…

  3. Nation and Language: Modern Aspects of Socio-Linguistic Development. Proceedings of the 4th International Conference (Lithuania, October 21-22, 2010)

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Online Submission, 2010

    2010-01-01

    The 4th international conference "Nation and Language: Modern Aspects of Socio-Linguistic Development" continues an eight-year old tradition. The conference is organized by Kaunas University of Technology Panevezys Institute and aims to bring scientists and researchers together for a general scientific discussion on new trends in…

  4. The Relationship of Values in Elementary School 4th Grade Social Studies Textbook with the Attainments and Their Level of Being Included in Student Workbooks

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kilic, Abdurrahman

    2012-01-01

    In this study, the relationship of values in elementary school 4th grade Social Studies textbook with the attainments and their level of being included in student workbook are tried to be determined. Case study, which is a qualitative research method, was applied for this research. To collect data, document analysis technique, which is among the…

  5. Postoperative electromyographic profile in human jejunum.

    PubMed Central

    Ducerf, C; Duchamp, C; Pouyet, M

    1992-01-01

    The postoperative electromyographic profile of the proximal jejunum and its evolution during recovery from surgery were defined in fasted humans after cholecystectomy. An intraluminal probe supporting four groups of bipolar electrodes was transnasally inserted at the end of surgery to allow continuous recording of jejunal electrical activity over 4 consecutive days. Electromyographic activity was characterized by an early reappearance of phase 3 of migrating myoelectric complexes (MMC) lasting 5.2 +/- 0.6 minutes and occurring at 38.1 +/- 3.1-minute intervals at day 1 after surgery. During the 4 days after surgery, there was an increased duration of MMC, mainly consisting of phase 2 occurrence with an increased duration and lengthening of the MMC cycle. The amplitude of spikes during phase 3 increased. During the postoperative period, characterized by an inversion of the circadian rhythm, the velocity of propagation was higher (p less than 0.05) between 18:00 and 06:00 (4.0 +/- 0.5 cm/minute) than between 06:00 and 18:00 (3.1 +/- 0.3 cm/minute). In contrast, the duration of phase 2 was lower during nighttime (18:00 to 06:00) than during daytime. The authors conclude that during the early (1 to 2 days) period after cholecystectomy, the jejunal electromyographic activity is limited to phase 3 activity, but that a normal fasted pattern is recovered after 4 days. A progressive reorganization and coordination of the intestinal tract may account for this delay. PMID:1543395

  6. A Brief Boot Camp for 4th-Year Medical Students Entering into Pediatric and Family Medicine Residencies

    PubMed Central

    Adler, Mark; Mangold, Karen; Trainor, Jennifer

    2016-01-01

    The transition from medical student to intern is a challenging process characterized by a steep learning curve. Focused courses targeting skills necessary for success as a resident have increased self-perceived preparedness, confidence, and medical knowledge. Our aim was to create a brief educational intervention for 4th-year medical students entering pediatric, family practice, and medicine/pediatric residencies to target skills necessary for an internship. The curriculum used a combination of didactic presentations, small group discussions, role-playing, facilitated debriefing, and simulation-based education. Participants completed an objective structured clinical exam requiring synthesis and application of multiple boot camp elements before and after the elective. Participants completed anonymous surveys assessing self-perceived preparedness for an internship, overall and in regards to specific skills, before the elective and after the course. Participants were asked to provide feedback about the course. Using checklists to assess performance, students showed an improvement in performing infant lumbar punctures (47.2% vs 77.0%; p < 0.01, 95% CI for the difference 0.2, 0.4%) and providing signout (2.5 vs. 3.9 (5-point scale) p < 0.01, 95% CI for the difference 0.6, 2.3). They did not show an improvement in communication with a parent. Participants demonstrated an increase in self-reported preparedness for all targeted skills, except for obtaining consults and interprofessional communication. There was no increase in reported overall preparedness. All participants agreed with the statements, “The facilitators presented the material in an effective manner,” “I took away ideas I plan to implement in internship,” and “I think all students should participate in a similar experience.” When asked to assess the usefulness of individual modules, all except order writing received a mean Likert score > 4. A focused boot camp addressing key knowledge and skills

  7. A Brief Boot Camp for 4th-Year Medical Students Entering into Pediatric and Family Medicine Residencies.

    PubMed

    Burns, Rebekah; Adler, Mark; Mangold, Karen; Trainor, Jennifer

    2016-02-09

    The transition from medical student to intern is a challenging process characterized by a steep learning curve. Focused courses targeting skills necessary for success as a resident have increased self-perceived preparedness, confidence, and medical knowledge. Our aim was to create a brief educational intervention for 4th-year medical students entering pediatric, family practice, and medicine/pediatric residencies to target skills necessary for an internship. The curriculum used a combination of didactic presentations, small group discussions, role-playing, facilitated debriefing, and simulation-based education. Participants completed an objective structured clinical exam requiring synthesis and application of multiple boot camp elements before and after the elective. Participants completed anonymous surveys assessing self-perceived preparedness for an internship, overall and in regards to specific skills, before the elective and after the course. Participants were asked to provide feedback about the course. Using checklists to assess performance, students showed an improvement in performing infant lumbar punctures (47.2% vs 77.0%; p < 0.01, 95% CI for the difference 0.2, 0.4%) and providing signout (2.5 vs. 3.9 (5-point scale) p < 0.01, 95% CI for the difference 0.6, 2.3). They did not show an improvement in communication with a parent. Participants demonstrated an increase in self-reported preparedness for all targeted skills, except for obtaining consults and interprofessional communication. There was no increase in reported overall preparedness. All participants agreed with the statements, "The facilitators presented the material in an effective manner," "I took away ideas I plan to implement in internship," and "I think all students should participate in a similar experience." When asked to assess the usefulness of individual modules, all except order writing received a mean Likert score > 4. A focused boot camp addressing key knowledge and skills required for

  8. PREFACE: 9th World Congress on Computational Mechanics and 4th Asian Pacific Congress on Computational Mechanics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khalili, N.; Valliappan, S.; Li, Q.; Russell, A.

    2010-07-01

    The use for mathematical models of natural phenomena has underpinned science and engineering for centuries, but until the advent of modern computers and computational methods, the full utility of most of these models remained outside the reach of the engineering communities. Since World War II, advances in computational methods have transformed the way engineering and science is undertaken throughout the world. Today, theories of mechanics of solids and fluids, electromagnetism, heat transfer, plasma physics, and other scientific disciplines are implemented through computational methods in engineering analysis, design, manufacturing, and in studying broad classes of physical phenomena. The discipline concerned with the application of computational methods is now a key area of research, education, and application throughout the world. In the early 1980's, the International Association for Computational Mechanics (IACM) was founded to promote activities related to computational mechanics and has made impressive progress. The most important scientific event of IACM is the World Congress on Computational Mechanics. The first was held in Austin (USA) in 1986 and then in Stuttgart (Germany) in 1990, Chiba (Japan) in 1994, Buenos Aires (Argentina) in 1998, Vienna (Austria) in 2002, Beijing (China) in 2004, Los Angeles (USA) in 2006 and Venice, Italy; in 2008. The 9th World Congress on Computational Mechanics is held in conjunction with the 4th Asian Pacific Congress on Computational Mechanics under the auspices of Australian Association for Computational Mechanics (AACM), Asian Pacific Association for Computational Mechanics (APACM) and International Association for Computational Mechanics (IACM). The 1st Asian Pacific Congress was in Sydney (Australia) in 2001, then in Beijing (China) in 2004 and Kyoto (Japan) in 2007. The WCCM/APCOM 2010 publications consist of a printed book of abstracts given to delegates, along with 247 full length peer reviewed papers published with

  9. Perioperative Non-Invasive Indocyanine Green-Clearance Testing to Predict Postoperative Outcome after Liver Resection

    PubMed Central

    Haegele, Stefanie; Reiter, Silvia; Wanek, David; Offensperger, Florian; Pereyra, David; Stremitzer, Stefan; Fleischmann, Edith; Brostjan, Christine; Gruenberger, Thomas; Starlinger, Patrick

    2016-01-01

    Background Postoperative liver dysfunction may lead to morbidity and mortality after liver resection. Preoperative liver function assessment is critical to identify preexisting liver dysfunction in patients prior to resection. The aim of this study was to evaluate the predictive potential of perioperative indocyanine green (ICG)-clearance testing to prevent postoperative liver dysfunction and morbidity using standardized outcome parameters in a routine Western-clinical-setting. Study Design 137 patients undergoing partial hepatectomy between 2011 and 2013, at the general hospital of Vienna, were included. ICG-clearance was recorded one day prior to surgery as well as on the first and fifth postoperative day. Postoperative liver dysfunction was defined according to the International Study Group of Liver Surgery and evaluation of morbidity was based on the Dindo-Clavien classification. Statistical analyses were based on non-parametric tests. Results Preoperative reduced ICG—plasma disappearance rate (PDR) as well as increased ICG—retention rate at 15 min (R15) were able to significantly predict postoperative liver dysfunction (Area under the curve = PDR: 0.716, P = 0.018; R15: 0.719, P = 0.016). Furthermore, PDR <17%/min. or R15 >8%, were able to accurately predict postoperative complications prior to surgery. In addition to this, ICG-clearance on postoperative day 1 comparably predicted postoperative liver dysfunction (Area under the curve = PDR: 0.895; R15: 0.893; both P <0.001), specifically, PDR <10%/min or R15 >20% on postoperative day 1 predicted poor postoperative outcome. Conclusion PDR and R15 may represent useful parameters to distinguish preoperative high and low risk patients in a Western collective as well as on postoperative day 1, to identify patients who require closer monitoring for potential complications. PMID:27812143

  10. Post-operative urinary retention.

    PubMed

    Steggall, Martin; Treacy, Colm; Jones, Mark

    Urinary retention is a common complication of surgery and anaesthesia. The risk of post-operative urinary retention is increased following certain surgical procedures and anaesthetic modalities, and with patients' advancing age. Patients at increased risk of post-operative urinary retention should be identified before surgery or the condition should be identified and treated in a timely manner following surgery. If conservative measures do not help the patient to pass urine, the bladder will need to be drained using either an intermittent catheter or an indwelling urethral catheter, which can result in catheter-associated urinary tract infections. This article provides an overview of normal bladder function, risk factors for developing post-operative urinary retention, and treatment options. Guidance drawn from the literature aims to assist nurses in identifying at-risk patients and inform patient care.

  11. Assessment of pain during rest and during activities in the postoperative period of cardiac surgery

    PubMed Central

    de Mello, Larissa Coelho; Rosatti, Silvio Fernando Castro; Hortense, Priscilla

    2014-01-01

    Objective to assess the intensity and site of pain after Cardiac Surgery through sternotomy during rest and while performing five activities. Method descriptive study with a prospective cohort design. A total of 48 individuals participated in the study. A Multidimensional Scale for Pain Assessment was used. Results postoperative pain from cardiac surgery was moderate during rest and decreased over time. Pain was also moderate during activities performed on the 1st and 2nd postoperative days and decreased from the 3rd postoperative day, with the exception of coughing, which diminished only on the 6th postoperative day. Coughing, turning over, deep breathing and rest are presented in decreased order of intensity. The region of the sternum was the most frequently reported site of pain. Conclusion the assessment of pain in the individuals who underwent cardiac surgery during rest and during activities is extremely important to adapt management and avoid postoperative complications and delayed surgical recovery. PMID:24553714

  12. STO-2: Support for 4th Year Operations, Recovery, and Science JHU/APL Co-I

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bernasconi, Pietro

    This is a collaboration Co-I Institution proposal for the proposal "STO-2: Support for 4th Year Operations, Recovery, and Science" whose lead proposal is submitted by the University of Arizona with Dr. Christofer Walker as PI. STO-2 was flight-ready in the 2015-2016 austral summer. However, due to the late establishment of the stratospheric anti-cyclone and poor surface conditions, STO-2 was unable to launch. The decision was made to winter-over the STO-2 payload in its hangar for launch during the 2016-2017 Antarctic campaign. Funds to cover preparations and deployment of key members of the instrument team in support of the campaign are being provided by NASA under the existing grant. However, these funds are only sufficient to cover expenses up to approximately December 31st. Here we request supplemental funds to cover costs associated with STO-2 operations and recovery beyond this date. STO-2 will address a key problem in modern astrophysics, understanding the Life Cycle of the Interstellar Medium (ISM). STO-2 will survey approximately 1/4 of the Southern Galactic Plane in the dominant interstellar cooling line [CII] (158 μm) and the important star formation tracer [NII] (205 μm). In addition, STO-2 will perform path finding observations of the 63 μm [OI] line toward selected regions. With 1 arcminute angular resolution, STO-2 will spatially resolve atomic, ionic and molecular clouds out to 10 kpc. The STO-2 survey will be conducted at unparalleled sensitivity levels. STO-2 will uniquely probe the pivotal formative and disruptive stages in the life cycle of interstellar clouds and the relationship between global star formation rates and the properties of the ISM. Combined with previous HI and CO surveys, STO-2 will create 3-dimensional maps of the structure, dynamics, turbulence, energy balance, and pressure of the Milky Way's ISM, as well as the star formation rate. Once we gain an understanding of the relationship between ISM properties and star formation

  13. Biological Damage Threshold Induced by Ultrashort Fundamental, 2nd, and 4th Harmonic Light Pulses from a Mode-Locked Nd: Glass Laser.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1980-12-01

    BY ULTRASHORT FUNDAMENTAL, 2ND, AND 4TH HARMONIC LIGHT PULSES 00 , FROM A MODE-LOCKED Nd:GLASS LASER C Adam P. Bruckner, Ph.D. J. Michael Schurr, Ph.D...Medicine, Aerospace Medical Division, AFSC, Brooks Air Force Base, Texas. Dr. Taboada (USAFSAM/RZL) was the Laboratory Project Scientist-in-Charge. When... TABOADA , Ph.D. /AONN E. PICKERING, M.S. Project Scientist Chief, Radiation Sciences Division ROY L. DEHART Colonel, USAF, MC Commander UNCLASSIFIED S

  14. Ovarian and adipose tissue dysfunction in polycystic ovary syndrome: report of the 4th special scientific meeting of the Androgen Excess and PCOS Society

    PubMed Central

    Yildiz, Bulent O.; Azziz, Ricardo

    2013-01-01

    Significant advances have been made in our understanding of ovarian dysfunction in polycystic ovary syndrome (PCOS), and alterations in adipose tissue function are likely to play an important role in its pathophysiology. This review highlights the principal novel concepts presented at the 4th special scientific meeting of the Androgen Excess and PCOS Society, “Ovarian and Adipose Tissue Dysfunction: Potential Roles in Polycystic Ovary Syndrome,” which occurred on June 6, 2008 in San Francisco, California. PMID:19394000

  15. 78 FR 39998 - Safety Zone; Grand Haven 4th of July Fireworks; Grand River; Grand Haven, MI

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-07-03

    ... wait for a comment period to run would be both impracticable because it would inhibit the Coast Guard's... the same reasons discussed in the preceding paragraph, waiting for a 30 day notice period to run would... and Regulatory Review, and ] does not require an assessment of potential costs and benefits...

  16. A new postoperative otoplasty dressing technique using cyanoacrylate tissue adhesives.

    PubMed

    Vetter, Miriam; Foehn, Matthias; Wedler, Volker

    2010-04-01

    There are many techniques for cosmetic surgery of the ears and also many different procedures for postoperative treatment. The postoperative dressing is described as important for a successful outcome. We present our method of postoperative dressing in the form of liquid bonding. Cyanoacrylate tissue adhesives as liquid bonding agents are used for fixation of the pinna at the mastoid area. After 10-14 days the bonding can be easily removed. No huge dressings, tapes, or plasters are necessary. The patients are satisfied with the light dressing; they do not feel ashamed to appear in public. We have found this dressing technique to be simple and economical, especially because of the use of the bonding for skin closure before. It can be used after otoplasty with an anterior or a posterior approach.

  17. Future perspectives in melanoma research : Meeting report from the "Melanoma Bridge". Napoli, December 1st-4th 2015.

    PubMed

    Ascierto, Paolo A; Agarwala, Sanjiv; Botti, Gerardo; Cesano, Alessandra; Ciliberto, Gennaro; Davies, Michael A; Demaria, Sandra; Dummer, Reinhard; Eggermont, Alexander M; Ferrone, Soldano; Fu, Yang Xin; Gajewski, Thomas F; Garbe, Claus; Huber, Veronica; Khleif, Samir; Krauthammer, Michael; Lo, Roger S; Masucci, Giuseppe; Palmieri, Giuseppe; Postow, Michael; Puzanov, Igor; Silk, Ann; Spranger, Stefani; Stroncek, David F; Tarhini, Ahmad; Taube, Janis M; Testori, Alessandro; Wang, Ena; Wargo, Jennifer A; Yee, Cassian; Zarour, Hassane; Zitvogel, Laurence; Fox, Bernard A; Mozzillo, Nicola; Marincola, Francesco M; Thurin, Magdalena

    2016-11-15

    The sixth "Melanoma Bridge Meeting" took place in Naples, Italy, December 1st-4th, 2015. The four sessions at this meeting were focused on: (1) molecular and immune advances; (2) combination therapies; (3) news in immunotherapy; and 4) tumor microenvironment and biomarkers. Recent advances in tumor biology and immunology has led to the development of new targeted and immunotherapeutic agents that prolong progression-free survival (PFS) and overall survival (OS) of cancer patients. Immunotherapies in particular have emerged as highly successful approaches to treat patients with cancer including melanoma, non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC), renal cell carcinoma (RCC), bladder cancer, and Hodgkin's disease. Specifically, many clinical successes have been using checkpoint receptor blockade, including T cell inhibitory receptors such as cytotoxic T-lymphocyte-associated antigen 4 (CTLA-4) and the programmed cell death-1 (PD-1) and its ligand PD-L1. Despite demonstrated successes, responses to immunotherapy interventions occur only in a minority of patients. Attempts are being made to improve responses to immunotherapy by developing biomarkers. Optimizing biomarkers for immunotherapy could help properly select patients for treatment and help to monitor response, progression and resistance that are critical challenges for the immuno-oncology (IO) field. Importantly, biomarkers could help to design rational combination therapies. In addition, biomarkers may help to define mechanism of action of different agents, dose selection and to sequence drug combinations. However, biomarkers and assays development to guide cancer immunotherapy is highly challenging for several reasons: (i) multiplicity of immunotherapy agents with different mechanisms of action including immunotherapies that target activating and inhibitory T cell receptors (e.g., CTLA-4, PD-1, etc.); adoptive T cell therapies that include tissue infiltrating lymphocytes (TILs), chimeric antigen receptors (CARs), and

  18. Guest Editor's introduction: Selected papers from the 4th USENIX Conference on Object-Oriented Technologies and Systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sventek, Joe

    1998-12-01

    Hewlett-Packard Laboratories, 1501 Page Mill Road, Palo Alto, CA 94304, USA Introduction The USENIX Conference on Object-Oriented Technologies and Systems (COOTS) is held annually in the late spring. The conference evolved from a set of C++ workshops that were held under the auspices of USENIX, the first of which met in 1989. Given the growing diverse interest in object-oriented technologies, the C++ focus of the workshop eventually became too narrow, with the result that the scope was widened in 1995 to include object-oriented technologies and systems. COOTS is intended to showcase advanced R&D efforts in object-oriented technologies and software systems. The conference emphasizes experimental research and experience gained by using object-oriented techniques and languages to build complex software systems that meet real-world needs. COOTS solicits papers in the following general areas: application of, and experiences with, object-oriented technologies in particular domains (e.g. financial, medical, telecommunication); the architecture and implementation of distributed object systems (e.g. CORBA, DCOM, RMI); object-oriented programming and specification languages; object-oriented design and analysis. The 4th meeting of COOTS was held 27 - 30 April 1998 at the El Dorado Hotel, Santa Fe, New Mexico, USA. Several tutorials were given. The technical program proper consisted of a single track of six sessions, with three paper presentations per session. A keynote address and a provocative panel session rounded out the technical program. The program committee reviewed 56 papers, selecting the best 18 for presentation in the technical sessions. While we solicit papers across the spectrum of applications of object-oriented technologies, this year there was a predominance of distributed, object-oriented papers. The accepted papers reflected this asymmetry, with 15 papers on distributed objects and 3 papers on object-oriented languages. The papers in this special issue are

  19. Are we ready for day-case partial nephrectomy?

    PubMed

    Bernhard, Jean-Christophe; Payan, Anne; Bensadoun, Henri; Cornelis, François; Pierquet, Grégory; Pasticier, Gilles; Robert, Grégoire; Capon, Grégoire; Ravaud, Alain; Ferriere, Jean-Marie

    2016-06-01

    Fast-track and day-case surgeries are gaining more and more importance. Their development was eased by the diffusion of minimal invasive surgical strategies and the consequential morbidity reduction. In the field of kidney cancer, seven cases of ambulatory radical nephrectomy were previously reported in the international literature. Regarding robotic partial nephrectomy (PN), short postoperative pathways resulting in patients' discharge on postoperative day 1 were shown to be safe and feasible. We report our initial experience of robot-assisted PN discharged on postoperative day zero and discuss the criteria for adequate patient selection. Indeed, outpatient PN will obviously not be suitable for all patients, and careful selection will be mandatory. Both specific baseline patient's factors and postoperative events will have to be recognized for the first ones and prevented for the second ones. Safety, patient satisfaction, cost efficiency, and reproducibility will be the key factors to assess and promote day-case PN.

  20. Common Post-Op Ear Drops Tied to Eardrum Perforations in Kids

    MedlinePlus

    ... gov/news/fullstory_164372.html Common Post-Op Ear Drops Tied to Eardrum Perforations in Kids Rate ... 2017 (HealthDay News) -- Children who suffer through multiple ear infections are often candidates for ear tube surgery. ...

  1. Preoperative anxiety and emergence delirium and postoperative maladaptive behaviors.

    PubMed

    Kain, Zeev N; Caldwell-Andrews, Alison A; Maranets, Inna; McClain, Brenda; Gaal, Dorothy; Mayes, Linda C; Feng, Rui; Zhang, Heping

    2004-12-01

    Based on previous studies, we hypothesized that the clinical phenomena of preoperative anxiety, emergence delirium, and postoperative maladaptive behavioral changes were closely related. We examined this issue using data obtained by our laboratory over the past 6 years. Only children who underwent surgery and general anesthesia using sevoflurane/O(2)/N(2)O and who did not receive midazolam were recruited. Children's anxiety was assessed preoperatively with the modified Yale Preoperative Anxiety Scale (mYPAS), emergence delirium was assessed in the postanesthesia care unit, and behavioral changes were assessed with the Post Hospital Behavior Questionnaire (PHBQ) on postoperative days 1, 2, 3, 7, and 14. Regression analysis showed that the odds of having marked symptoms of emergence delirium increased by 10% for each increment of 10 points in the child's state anxiety score (mYPAS). The odds ratio of having new-onset postoperative maladaptive behavior changes was 1.43 for children with marked emergence status as compared with children with no symptoms of emergence delirium. A 10-point increase in state anxiety scores led to a 12.5% increase in the odds that the child would have a new-onset maladaptive behavioral change after the surgery. This finding is highly significant to practicing clinicians, who can now predict the development of adverse postoperative phenomena, such as emergence delirium and postoperative behavioral changes, based on levels of preoperative anxiety.

  2. Postoperative Pain in Children After Dentistry Under General Anesthesia

    PubMed Central

    Wong, Michelle; Copp, Peter E.; Haas, Daniel A.

    2015-01-01

    The objective of this study was to determine the prevalence, severity, and duration of postoperative pain in children undergoing general anesthesia for dentistry. This prospective cross-sectional study included 33 American Society of Anesthesiology (ASA) Class I and II children 4–6 years old requiring multiple dental procedures, including at least 1 extraction, and/or pulpectomy, and/or pulpotomy of the primary dentition. Exclusion criteria were children who were developmentally delayed, cognitively impaired, born prematurely, taking psychotropic medications, or recorded baseline pain or analgesic use. The primary outcome of pain was measured by parents using the validated Faces Pain Scale-Revised (FPS-R) and Parents' Postoperative Pain Measure (PPPM) during the first 72 hours at home. The results showed that moderate-to-severe postoperative pain, defined as FPS-R ≥ 6, was reported in 48.5% of children. The prevalence of moderate-to-severe pain was 29.0% by FPS-R and 40.0% by PPPM at 2 hours after discharge. Pain subsided over 3 days. Postoperative pain scores increased significantly from baseline (P < .001, Wilcoxon matched pairs signed rank test). Moderately good correlation between the 2 pain measures existed 2 and 12 hours from discharge (Spearman rhos correlation coefficients of 0.604 and 0.603, P < .005). In conclusion, children do experience moderate-to-severe pain postoperatively. Although parents successfully used pain scales, they infrequently administered analgesics. PMID:26650492

  3. Proceedings of the Systems Reengineering Technology Workshop (4th) held in Monterey, California on February 8 - 10, 1994

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1994-09-01

    REPORT SECURITY CLASSIFICATION lb. RESTRICTIVE MARKINGS UNCLASSIFIED 2a. SECURITY CLASSIFICATION AUTHORITY 3. DISTRIBUTIOWAVAULABIUTY OF REPORT 2b... AUTHOR (S) Bruce I. Blum. editor 13a. TYPE OF REPORT 13b. TIME COVERED 14. DATE OF REPORT (Year, Month, Day) 15. PAGECOUNT Technical Memorandum FROM TO...are as long (or short) as they needed to be to convey what the authors believe is important. As the organizers of this I workshop, we hope that those

  4. Postoperative singultus: an osteopathic approach.

    PubMed

    Petree, Kristie; Bruner, Jonathan

    2015-03-01

    Singultus, or hiccups, is a common medical condition. Despite exponential leaps in medicine, the pathophysiologic cause remains poorly defined. Persistent singultus has been associated with conditions such as pulmonary embolism and myocardial infarction. Singultus is also a well-known postoperative complication. The criterion standard of care for patients with singultus involves ruling out lethal pathologic causes, attempting physical stimulation with Valsava maneuvers or drinking water, and, if no relief has been achieved, administering drugs to ease the symptoms. The authors report a case of a man whose postoperative singultus was successfully managed with osteopathic manipulative treatment. This approach addresses many of the possible underlying neuromechanical causes of the aberrant reflex with minimal potential for adverse effects. Physicians should consider osteopathic manipulative treatment in the care of patients with singultus.

  5. Postoperative (pressure) alopecia following sacrocolpopexy.

    PubMed

    Bagaria, Madhu; Luck, Ali Maria

    2015-06-01

    Postoperative alopecia is a rare occurrence seen after a variety of surgical procedures performed under general anesthesia. The speculated cause is pressure-induced ischemia due to prolonged head immobilization. This case describes a patient who developed this complication after undergoing sacrocolpopexy. A 57-year-old postmenopausal Caucasian female was consented to undergo a robotic-assisted sacrocolpopexy, perineoplasty, and midurethral sling with possible conversion to an open procedure. The indication was symptomatic proximal and distal rectocele with foreshortened vagina. It was converted to laparotomy due to difficult presacral dissection. Her total operative time was 540 with 240 min in the Trendelenburg position. No intraoperative hypotension or excessive blood loss was noted. She started complaining of scalp pain in the postoperative recovery area. She developed soreness, crusting, and later alopecia in the same area. It was noted at her 3-week office visit. Referral was made for dermatology and anesthesiology evaluation. There was spontaneous full recovery by the 5th month. Postoperative alopecia is a rare condition mimicking alopecia areata but it is preceded by inciting events. There is some evidence to suggest that it is a preventable condition by frequent head repositioning during surgery. This case report is intended to increase the surgeon's awareness about this rare complication as its occurrence can be distressing for the patient.

  6. Preoperative anemia increases postoperative morbidity in elective cranial neurosurgery

    PubMed Central

    Bydon, Mohamad; Abt, Nicholas B.; Macki, Mohamed; Brem, Henry; Huang, Judy; Bydon, Ali; Tamargo, Rafael J.

    2014-01-01

    Background: Preoperative anemia may affect postoperative mortality and morbidity following elective cranial operations. Methods: The American College of Surgeons National Surgical Quality Improvement Program (NSQIP) database was used to identify elective cranial neurosurgical cases (2006-2012). Morbidity was defined as wound infection, systemic infection, cardiac, respiratory, renal, neurologic, and thromboembolic events, and unplanned returns to the operating room. For 30-day postoperative mortality and morbidity, adjusted odds ratios (ORs) were estimated with multivariable logistic regression. Results: Of 8015 patients who underwent elective cranial neurosurgery, 1710 patients (21.4%) were anemic. Anemic patients had an increased 30-day mortality of 4.1% versus 1.3% in non-anemic patients (P < 0.001) and an increased 30-day morbidity rate of 25.9% versus 14.14% in non-anemic patients (P < 0.001). The 30-day morbidity rates for all patients undergoing cranial procedures were stratified by diagnosis: 26.5% aneurysm, 24.7% sellar tumor, 19.7% extra-axial tumor, 14.8% intra-axial tumor, 14.4% arteriovenous malformation, and 5.6% pain. Following multivariable regression, the 30-day mortality in anemic patients was threefold higher than in non-anemic patients (4.1% vs 1.3%; OR = 2.77; 95% CI: 1.65-4.66). The odds of postoperative morbidity in anemic patients were significantly higher than in non-anemic patients (OR = 1.29; 95% CI: 1.03-1.61). There was a significant difference in postoperative morbidity event odds with a hematocrit level above (OR = 1.07; 95% CI: 0.78-1.48) and below (OR = 2.30; 95% CI: 1.55-3.42) 33% [hemoglobin (Hgb) 11 g/dl]. Conclusions: Preoperative anemia in elective cranial neurosurgery was independently associated with an increased risk of 30-day postoperative mortality and morbidity when compared to non-anemic patients. A hematocrit level below 33% (Hgb 11 g/dl) was associated with a significant increase in postoperative morbidity. PMID

  7. Prevention of postoperative tooth sensitivity: a preliminary clinical trial.

    PubMed

    Sobral, M A P; Garone-Netto, N; Luz, M A A C; Santos, A P

    2005-09-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate clinically the effects of pre-treatments with a 35% hydroxyethyl metacrylate/5% glutaraldehyde dentine desensitizer (Gluma Desensitizer) and a 2% chlorexidine-based cavity disinfectant (Cav-Clean) on postoperative sensitivity. Three premolar teeth with no pain symptoms were selected from each one of 17 patients, totalling 51 teeth, for which Class II restoration using a composite was indicated. Each one of the three premolar teeth of the same patient was submitted to a different treatment. After acid etching, only a dental adhesive was applied to the first tooth, which served as the control. Gluma Desensitizer dentinal desensitizer was applied to the second premolar tooth prior to applying the dental adhesive. Cav-Clean cavity disinfectant was used on the third premolar tooth before applying the dental adhesive. Only one tooth was restored per session, and all premolar teeth were restored with a condensable composite, according to current restoration technique guidelines. Sensitivity to different stimuli (cold, heat, sweet and dental floss) was assessed on Day 1, Day 4 and Day 7 by questionnaire following restorative procedures. The results of this clinical research showed that, as far as the investigated stimuli and postoperative course are concerned, there was no statistically significant difference in the three different treatments (P>0.05). Postoperative sensitivity resulting from Class II restorations using composite resin cannot be completely eliminated with the prior use of a dentinal desensitizer or a cavity disinfectant. In day-to-day clinical treatment, postoperative sensitivity may possibly be related to the technique employed.

  8. Effect of olfactory and visual stimuli on the orientation of the 4th instar larvae of the stem borer Chilo partellus swinhoe (Lepidoptera: Pyralidae).

    PubMed

    Tokro, P G; Saxena, K N

    1991-01-01

    The orientational responses of 4th instar larvae of Chilo partellus to different sources of stimuli being artificial diet, leaves and stems of maize and sorghum were tested, under free choice and no-choice situations. Larvae were attracted to maize and sorghum in a moderate to high degree dependent on what choice they were given. The orientational preference of the larvae, offered a choice between the visual and the odour sources, depended upon their stimulating capacities which were represented by the percentages of individuals responding to the sources of stimuli. Odour played a greater role than visual stimuli in this close range attraction when the two competed with each other.

  9. [Tumors of the 4th ventricle and the craniospinal transitional zone. Review of patients of the Neurosurgical Clinic of the Department of Medicine of the Karl Marx University].

    PubMed

    Niebeling, H G; Fried, H; Goldhahn, W E; Skrzypczak, J; Brachmann, J; Eichler, I

    1983-01-01

    From a total of 1,028 infratentorial tumours operated on at the Neurosurgical Hospital of the Section Medicine of the Karl-Marx University Leipzig in the last 30 years, 167 tumours in the region of the 4th ventrical have been selected. Their statistical processing was carried out with respect to specific localisation, average age, kind of tumour, sex, clinical findings, duration of case history, application of instrumental diagnostic procedures and radicality of operation, success and failure. Some fundamental conclussions are drawn. A subdivision in detail will be contained in the following articles based on this material.

  10. Global challenges in the management of congenital cataract: proceedings of the 4th International Congenital Cataract Symposium held on March 7, 2014, New York, New York.

    PubMed

    Lenhart, Phoebe D; Courtright, Paul; Wilson, M Edward; Lewallen, Susan; Taylor, David Samuel; Ventura, Marcelo C; Bowman, Richard; Woodward, Lee; Ditta, Lauren C; Kruger, Stacey; Haddad, Danny; El Shakankiri, Nihal; Rai, Salma Kc; Bailey, Tehara; Lambert, Scott R

    2015-04-01

    Childhood cataracts have become a leading cause of preventable childhood blindness in many areas of the world. Here we summarize regional focus group discussions from the 4th Annual International Congenital Cataract Symposium on the current situation, challenges, and recommendations for the management of congenital cataracts in sub-Saharan Africa, the Middle East and North Africa, South Asia, Central America, South America, and developed nations. Strategies for managing congenital cataracts must be adapted and developed according to regional conditions. A basic framework for acceptable outcomes must focus on developing systems to address the critical components of education, access, quality care, and good follow-up.

  11. Predicting postoperative fever and bacterial colonization on packing material following endoscopic endonasal surgery.

    PubMed

    Nomura, Kazuhiro; Yamanaka, Yurika; Sekine, Yasuhiro; Yamamoto, Hiroki; Esu, Yoshihiko; Hara, Mariko; Hasegawa, Masayo; Shinnabe, Akihiro; Kanazawa, Hiromi; Kakuta, Risako; Ozawa, Daiki; Hidaka, Hiroshi; Katori, Yukio; Yoshida, Naohiro

    2017-01-01

    Postoperative fever following endoscopic endonasal surgery is a rare occurrence of concern to surgeons. To elucidate preoperative and operative predictors of postoperative fever, we analyzed the characteristics of patients and their perioperative background in association with postoperative fever. A retrospective review of 371 patients who had undergone endoscopic endonasal surgery was conducted. Predictors, including intake of antibiotics, steroids, history of asthma, preoperative nasal bacterial culture, duration of operation, duration of packing and intraoperative intravenous antibiotics on the occurrence of postoperative fever, and bacterial colonization on the packing material, were analyzed retrospectively. Fever (≥38 °C) occurred in 63 (17 %) patients. Most incidences of fever occurred on postoperative day one. In majority of these cases, the fever subsided after removal of the packing material without further antibiotic administration. However, one patient who experienced persistent fever after the removal of packing material developed meningitis. History of asthma, prolonged operation time (≥108 min), and intravenous cefazolin administration instead of cefmetazole were associated with postoperative fever. Odds ratios (ORs) for each were 2.3, 4.6, and 2.0, respectively. Positive preoperative bacterial colonization was associated with postoperative bacterial colonization on the packing material (OR 2.3). Postoperative fever subsided in most patients after removal of the packing material. When this postoperative fever persists, its underlying cause should be examined.

  12. Optimal Timing for Hemoglobin Concentration Determination after Total Knee Arthroplasty: Day 1 versus Day 2

    PubMed Central

    Khalfaoui, Mahdi Yacine; Godavitarne, Charles; Wilkinson, Michael C P

    2017-01-01

    Purpose Postoperative hemoglobin (Hb) determination remains an essential parameter for quantifying blood loss following total knee replacement (TKR) surgery and guiding transfusion practice. In this study we aimed to ascertain the optimal timing for Hb determination postoperatively and assess its relationship to serum hematocrit (Hct). Materials and Methods This was a retrospective cohort analysis of 61 consecutive patients undergoing preoperative, day 1 and day 2 Hb and Hct concentration determination following TKR surgery. This was a single centre study in the United Kingdom. Results The mean fall in Hb concentration at day 1 was 2.9 g/dL in comparison to 3.3 g/dL at day 2. This indicated a significant difference of 0.39 g/dL (p=0.023). A total of 5 patients required blood transfusions following day 2 Hb determination. Postoperative Hct values varied in close relation with the Hb concentration with no significant differences demonstrated. Our study reveals a significant change between day 1 and day 2 Hb concentrations following TKR surgery, with no significant differing information provided through Hct determination. Conclusions Our results support the use of delayed routine testing at day 2 following surgery as it is likely to more accurately reflect ongoing hidden blood loss into the joint cavity and within soft tissue planes. PMID:28231649

  13. Differences in postoperative opioid consumption in patients prescribed patient-controlled analgesia versus intramuscular injection.

    PubMed

    Everett, Bronwyn; Salamonson, Yenna

    2005-12-01

    The purpose of this study was to examine differences in opioid consumption in patients prescribed patient-controlled analgesia (PCA) versus intramuscular injection (IMI) in the early postoperative period after open abdominal surgery. A retrospective audit of 115 patients elicited demographic and clinical data. No significant differences were found between the demographic variables of the PCA and IMI groups. There was a significant difference in the mean opioid dose used during the first 3 postoperative days (p < .01). Mean opioid consumption was 136.89 mg for the PCA group and 50.79 mg for the IMI group. Although there was a reduction in the amount of opioid consumed over the first 3 postoperative days, the PCA group consistently consumed more opioid analgesia compared with the IMI group. Furthermore, there was a disproportionate reduction in opioid consumption between the two groups from Day 1 (r = .34; p < .01) to Day 3 (r = .14; p = .14). This study shows that the amount of analgesia consumed during the postoperative period by patients who had abdominal surgery varied markedly depending on the mode of analgesia (PCA or IMI). The difference in analgesic consumption was also found to increase throughout the 3-day postoperative period. This divergence in the amount of opioid consumption between patients who were prescribed PCA and patients who were prescribed IM analgesia heightens the need for vigilance in assessment and management of pain during the early postoperative period, particularly in patients prescribed IM analgesia on an "as-needed" basis.

  14. Postoperative Hyperthermia of Unknown Origin Treated With Dantrolene Sodium

    PubMed Central

    Inada, Hirohito; Jinno, Shigeharu; Kohase, Hikaru; Fukayama, Haruhisa; Umino, Masahiro

    2005-01-01

    An 11-year-old girl was scheduled for alveolar cleft bone grafting with an iliac bone under general anesthesia. Anesthesia was performed with 70% nitrous oxide, 30% oxygen, and propofol. On the first and second postoperative day, persistent hyperthermia was observed. Because the administration of diclofenac sodium had not been effective for the hyperthermia, dantrolene sodium was given. Her body temperature gradually dropped and returned to normal level on the fifth postoperative day. The hyperthermia in the present case might have been caused by a rapidly elevated muscle metabolism in response to pain and stress after the propofol anesthesia. The oral administration of dantrolene sodium successfully lowered the patient's high body temperature. PMID:15859445

  15. Humoral immunity and CD4+ Th1 cells are both necessary for a fully protective immune response upon secondary infection with Brucella melitensis.

    PubMed

    Vitry, Marie-Alice; Hanot Mambres, Delphine; De Trez, Carl; Akira, Shizuo; Ryffel, Bernhard; Letesson, Jean-Jacques; Muraille, Eric

    2014-04-15

    Brucella spp are intracellular bacteria that cause brucellosis, one of the most common zoonoses in the world. Given the serious medical consequences of this disease, a safe and effective human vaccine is urgently needed. Efforts to develop this vaccine have been hampered by our lack of understanding of what constitutes a protective memory response against Brucella. In this study, we characterize the cells and signaling pathways implicated in the generation of a protective immune memory response following priming by the injection of heat-killed or live Brucella melitensis 16M. Using a panel of gene-deficient mice, we demonstrated that during a secondary recall response, both the Brucella-specific humoral response and CD4+ Th1 cells must act together to confer protective immunity in the spleen to B. melitensis infection. Humoral protective immunity is induced by the inoculation of both heat-killed and live bacteria, and its development does not require T cells, MyD88/IL-12p35 signaling pathways, or an activation-induced deaminase-mediated isotype switch. In striking contrast, the presence of memory IFN-γ-producing CD4+ Th1 cells requires the administration of live bacteria and functional MyD88/IL-12p35 pathways. In summary, our work identifies several immune markers closely associated with protective immune memory and could help to define a rational strategy to obtain an effective human vaccine against brucellosis.

  16. The effects of Western music on postoperative pain in Taiwan.

    PubMed

    Good, M; Chin, C C

    1998-02-01

    Music is a method nurses can use to help relieve pain, however little is known about its effectiveness across cultures. In this study, Western music was tested for its effectiveness in reducing postoperative pain in 38 Taiwanese patients, and its acceptability was explored. A pretest and post-test experimental design was used with visual analogue scales to measure sensation and distress of pain. Before surgery, subjects were randomly assigned to receive tape recorded music or the usual care. Those who were assigned to the music group chose among 5 types of sedative music. On postoperative Day 1 and Day 2, the effectiveness of the tape-recorded music was investigated during 15 minutes of rest in bed. Patients were interviewed on Day 3 to determine their liking for the music, its calming effects, and the helpfulness of the music. Repeated measures analysis of variance showed a significant interaction between time and group in the distress of pain on Day 1, but not on Day 2, and in pain sensation on Day 2, but not Day 1. Subjects from Taiwan were similar to subjects in a previous study in the United States in their liking for the music, and in reports of the helpfulness of the music for pain sensation and distress, but fewer Taiwanese found the music calming, and they had different choices: more chose harp music and fewer chose jazz than subjects in the U.S. study, and some would prefer Buddhist hymns or popular songs heard in Taiwan. Findings support the use of culturally acceptable music in addition to analgesic medication for the sensation and distress of postoperative pain.

  17. Pulmonary artery stump thrombosis developed during the late postoperative period

    PubMed Central

    Kaya, Seyda Ors; Samancilar, Ozgur; Ceylan, Kenan Can

    2016-01-01

    A 73-year-old man underwent left pneumonectomy for squamous cell lung carcinoma 3 years ago. The postoperative and follow-up periods were uneventful. A thrombus was detected in the left pulmonary artery stump during the last chest computed tomography (CT) scan. Anticoagulant treatment was applied: intravenous heparin for 3 days followed by oral warfarin. The follow-up chest CT examination revealed regression in the size of the thrombus. PMID:27785144

  18. Markov Chain evaluation of acute postoperative pain transition states

    PubMed Central

    Tighe, Patrick J.; Bzdega, Matthew; Fillingim, Roger B.; Rashidi, Parisa; Aytug, Haldun

    2016-01-01

    Prior investigations on acute postoperative pain dynamicity have focused on daily pain assessments, and so were unable to examine intra-day variations in acute pain intensity. We analyzed 476,108 postoperative acute pain intensity ratings clinically documented on postoperative days 1 to 7 from 8,346 surgical patients using Markov Chain modeling to describe how patients are likely to transition from one pain state to another in a probabilistic fashion. The Markov Chain was found to be irreducible and positive recurrent, with no absorbing states. Transition probabilities ranged from 0.0031 for the transition from state 10 to state 1, to 0.69 for the transition from state zero to state zero. The greatest density of transitions was noted in the diagonal region of the transition matrix, suggesting that patients were generally most likely to transition to the same pain state as their current state. There were also slightly increased probability densities in transitioning to a state of asleep or zero from the current state. Examination of the number of steps required to traverse from a particular first pain score to a target state suggested that overall, fewer steps were required to reach a state of zero (range 6.1–8.8 steps) or asleep (range 9.1–11) than were required to reach a mild pain intensity state. Our results suggest that Markov Chains are a feasible method for describing probabilistic postoperative pain trajectories, pointing toward the possibility of using Markov decision processes to model sequential interactions between pain intensity ratings and postoperative analgesic interventions. PMID:26588689

  19. [Postoperative radiotherapy of prostate cancer].

    PubMed

    Guérif, S; Latorzeff, I; Lagrange, J-L; Hennequin, C; Supiot, S; Garcia, A; François, P; Soulié, M; Richaud, P; Salomon, L

    2014-10-01

    Between 10 and 40% of patients who have undergone a radical prostatectomy may have a biologic recurrence. Local or distant failure represents the possible patterns of relapse. Patients at high-risk for local relapse have extraprostatic disease, positive surgical margins or seminal vesicles infiltration or high Gleason score at pathology. Three phase-III randomized clinical trials have shown that, for these patients, adjuvant irradiation reduces the risk of tumoral progression without higher toxicity. Salvage radiotherapy for late relapse allows a disease control in 60-70% of the cases. Several research in order to improve the therapeutic ratio of the radiotherapy after prostatectomy are evaluate in the French Groupe d'Étude des Tumeurs Urogénitales (Gétug) and of the French association of urology (Afu). The Gétug-Afu 17 trial will provide answers to the question of the optimal moment for postoperative radiotherapy for pT3-4 R1 pN0 Nx patients, with the objective of comparing an immediate treatment to a differed early treatment initiated at biological recurrence. The Gétug-Afu 22 questions the place of a short hormonetherapy combined with image-guided, intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) in adjuvant situation for a detectable prostate specific antigen (PSA). The implementation of a multicenter quality control within the Gétug-Afu in order to harmonize a modern postoperative radiotherapy will allow the development of a dose escalation IMRT after surgery.

  20. Postoperative discomfort of dental rehabilitation under general anesthesia

    PubMed Central

    Cantekin, Kenan; Yildirim, Mustafa Denizhan; Delikan, Ebru; Çetin, Seçil

    2014-01-01

    Objective: To find out postoperative discomfort in children undergoing dental rehabilitation under general anesthesia (DRGA). Methods: This study involved 78 (4 to 10 year-old) healthy patients who were scheduled for DRGA and were needed extensive dental treatment because of severe caries, and showed high dental fear and/or behavioral management problems. The children had to be fit for DRGA administration by fulfilling the American Society of Anesthesiologists physical status I or II and no associated mental health or communication problems. Data were collected by structured interview either face to face (immediately post operation) or using a telephone (post operation after discharge). One of the study’s investigators recorded all data related to the immediate postoperative period during the child’s stay in the post-anesthesia care unit (PACU). The questionnaire consisted of questions related to postoperative problems experienced by the patient in the period after their day-stay attendance. The questionnaire, consisting of questions regarding and generally related to the child’s activities. In addition, pain was assessed using the face, legs, activity, cry, consolability (FLACC) scale. Results: The prevalence of postoperative problems was 46 out of 78 (59%). The mean FLACC score was 1.8 (SD=2.1). Some of the patients having more than one reported problem. Forty-one percent of the children showed nasal discomfort (P<0.01). Thirty-three percent and 43% of the children experienced throat or mouth discomfort. The most common experienced postoperative symptom after DRGA was bleeding. Nasal bleeding, however, was an uncommon complication and did not cause serious morbidity or mortality in children intubated nasotracheally. In addition, postoperative discomfort was related to number of the extractions. Children who had 4 or more extractions were more likely to experience pain. Findings associated with other bodily functions were assessed. Nausea and vomiting were

  1. 34 CFR 300.11 - Day; business day; school day.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 34 Education 2 2014-07-01 2013-07-01 true Day; business day; school day. 300.11 Section 300.11 Education Regulations of the Offices of the Department of Education (Continued) OFFICE OF SPECIAL EDUCATION AND REHABILITATIVE SERVICES, DEPARTMENT OF EDUCATION ASSISTANCE TO STATES FOR THE EDUCATION...

  2. 34 CFR 300.11 - Day; business day; school day.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 34 Education 2 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Day; business day; school day. 300.11 Section 300.11 Education Regulations of the Offices of the Department of Education (Continued) OFFICE OF SPECIAL EDUCATION AND REHABILITATIVE SERVICES, DEPARTMENT OF EDUCATION ASSISTANCE TO STATES FOR THE EDUCATION...

  3. 34 CFR 300.11 - Day; business day; school day.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 34 Education 2 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Day; business day; school day. 300.11 Section 300.11 Education Regulations of the Offices of the Department of Education (Continued) OFFICE OF SPECIAL EDUCATION AND REHABILITATIVE SERVICES, DEPARTMENT OF EDUCATION ASSISTANCE TO STATES FOR THE EDUCATION...

  4. Uniform qualitative electrophysiological changes in postoperative rest tremor.

    PubMed

    Kovacs, Norbert; Balas, Istvan; Illes, Zsolt; Kellenyi, Lorant; Doczi, Tamas P; Czopf, Jozsef; Poto, Laszlo; Nagy, Ferenc

    2006-03-01

    Ablation and deep brain stimulation (DBS) can treat pharmacologically uncontrollable tremor. Here, we compared the postoperative electrophysiological changes in resting hand tremor after 32 ablations and 12 DBS implantations in patients with severe tremor-dominant idiopathic Parkinson's disease (PD) and essential tremor (ET). Short- and long-term accelerometric data were acquired after surgery and were compared to the preoperative tremor. After effective surgical treatments, significant rest tremor reduction and increase in both frequency and approximate entropy (ApEn) were detected in all PD cases, irrespective of the type and target of intervention. However, the long-term effect of DBS implantation on tremor reduction was significantly better compared to that after ablative treatments. In cases of thalamotomy, the postoperative increase in frequency and ApEn was significantly larger in essential tremor compared to PD, suggesting that the etiology of tremor may influence the size of the similar changes. However, cases where clinical tremor re-emerged 6 to 12 months after the surgery, no change in frequency and ApEn was detected on the second postoperative day, despite an initial tremor reduction and clinical improvement similar to the effective operations. Our results suggest that uniform postoperative changes in rest tremor and the increase in frequency and ApEn could be due to attenuation of pathological oscillators and might be immediate indicators of the effectiveness of neurosurgical treatments relieving tremor.

  5. Climatic changes and social transformations in the Near East and North Africa during the 'long' 4th millennium BC: A comparative study of environmental and archaeological evidence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Clarke, Joanne; Brooks, Nick; Banning, Edward B.; Bar-Matthews, Miryam; Campbell, Stuart; Clare, Lee; Cremaschi, Mauro; di Lernia, Savino; Drake, Nick; Gallinaro, Marina; Manning, Sturt; Nicoll, Kathleen; Philip, Graham; Rosen, Steve; Schoop, Ulf-Dietrich; Tafuri, Mary Anne; Weninger, Bernhard; Zerboni, Andrea

    2016-03-01

    This paper explores the possible links between rapid climate change (RCC) and social change in the Near East and surrounding regions (Anatolia, central Syria, southern Israel, Mesopotamia, Cyprus and eastern and central Sahara) during the 'long' 4th millennium (∼4500-3000) BC. Twenty terrestrial and 20 marine climate proxies are used to identify long-term trends in humidity involving transitions from humid to arid conditions and vice versa. The frequency distribution of episodes of relative aridity across these records is calculated for the period 6300-2000 BC, so that the results may be interpreted in the context of the established arid episodes associated with RCC around 6200 and 2200 BC (the 8.2 and 4.2 kyr events). We identify two distinct episodes of heightened aridity in the early-mid 4th, and late 4th millennium BC. These episodes cluster strongly at 3600-3700 and 3100-3300 BC. There is also evidence of localised aridity spikes in the 5th and 6th millennia BC. These results are used as context for the interpretation of regional and local archaeological records with a particular focus on case studies from western Syria, the middle Euphrates, southern Israel and Cyprus. Interpretation of the records involves the construction of plausible narratives of human-climate interaction informed by concepts of adaptation and resilience from the literature on contemporary (i.e. 21st century) climate change and adaptation. The results are presented alongside well-documented examples of climatically-influenced societal change in the central and eastern Sahara, where detailed geomorphological studies of ancient environments have been undertaken in tandem with archaeological research. While the narratives for the Near East and Eastern Mediterranean remain somewhat speculative, the use of resilience and adaptation frameworks allows for a more nuanced treatment of human-climate interactions and recognises the diversity and context-specificity of human responses to climatic

  6. Does Apolipoprotein E Genotype Increase Risk of Postoperative Delirium?

    PubMed Central

    Vasunilashorn, Sarinnapha; Ngo, Long; Kosar, Cyrus M.; Fong, Tamara G.; Jones, Richard N.

    2015-01-01

    Objectives To determine whether Apolipoprotein E (ApoE) is associated with postoperative delirium incidence, severity, and duration in older patients free of dementia at baseline. Design, Setting, Participants We examined 557 non-demented patients age ≥70 undergoing major non-cardiac surgery enrolled in the Successful Aging after Elective Surgery (SAGES) Study. Measurements We considered three ApoE measures: ε2, ε4 carriers vs. non-carriers, and a three-category ApoE measure. Delirium was determined using the Confusion Assessment Method (CAM) and chart review. We used generalized linear models to estimate the association between ApoE and delirium incidence, severity (peak CAM Severity [CAM-S] score), and days. Results ApoE ε2 and ε4 was present in 15% and 19% respectively, and postoperative delirium occurred in 24%. Among patients with delirium, the mean peak CAM-S score was 8.0 (standard deviation 4), with most patients experiencing one or two delirium days (51% or 28%, respectively). After adjusting for age, sex, surgical procedure, and preoperative cognitive function, ApoE ε4 and ε2 carrier status were not associated with postoperative delirium: RR for ε4=1.0, 95% confidence interval (CI) 0.7-1.5 and RR for ε2=0.9, 95% CI 0.6-1.4. No association between ApoE and delirium severity or number of delirium days was observed. Conclusions In older surgery patients free of dementia, our findings do not support the hypothesis that the ApoE genotype does not confer either risk or protection in postoperative delirium incidence, severity, or duration. Thus, an important genetic risk factor for Alzheimer's Disease does not affect risk of delirium. PMID:26238230

  7. Computed tomography of the postoperative lumbar spine

    SciTech Connect

    Teplick, J.G.; Haskin, M.E.

    1983-11-01

    In the postoperative patient ordinary radiographs of the spine generally add very little information, revealing the usual postoperative bone changes and often postoperative narrowing of the intervertebral space. Myelography may sometimes be informative, showing evidence of focal arachnoiditis or a focal defect at the surgical site. However, the latter finding is difficult to interpret. As experience with high-resolution CT scanning of the lumbar spine has been increasing, it is becoming apparent that this noninvasive and easily performed study can give considerably more information about the postoperative spine than any of the other current imaging methods. About 750 patients with previous lumbar laminectomies had CT scanning within a 28 month period.

  8. Post-operative morbidity following the use of the inverted periosteal graft: A case series.

    PubMed

    Gupta, Gazal Kaushelendra; Kulkarni, Mihir Raghavendra; Thomas, Betsy Sara

    2014-01-01

    Post-operative complications following flap surgeries or mucogingival procedures are important factors influencing patient's perception of periodontal procedures. Hence, it is important to foresee such complications and take adequate measures pre- and post-operatively. We treated five consecutive cases of gingival recession in the maxillary canine-premolar area using the inverted periosteal graft with a coronally positioned flap technique. Following each of these surgeries, the patients complained of post-operative swelling the next day involving the canine space or buccal space area. The swelling persisted for at least 5 days, however, it was painless. This paper highlights the post-operative complications associated with the said procedure and makes a case for detail enquiry in the form of controlled studies.

  9. Effects of ketoprofen for prevention of postoperative cognitive dysfunction in aged rats.

    PubMed

    Kawano, Takashi; Takahashi, Tetsuya; Iwata, Hideki; Morikawa, Akihiro; Imori, Satoko; Waki, Sayaka; Tamura, Takahiko; Yamazaki, Fumimoto; Eguchi, Satoru; Kumagai, Naoko; Yokoyama, Masataka

    2014-12-01

    Postoperative cognitive dysfunction is a common geriatric complication that may be associated with increased mortality. Here, we investigated the effects of postoperative analgesia with ketoprofen on cognitive functions in aged animals and compared its effectiveness to morphine. Rats were randomly allocated to one of four groups: isoflurane anesthesia without surgery (group C), isoflurane anesthesia with laparotomy (group IL), and isoflurane anesthesia with laparotomy plus postoperative analgesia with ketoprofen or morphine. There was no difference in postoperative locomotor activity among groups. In group IL, postoperative pain levels assessed by the Rat Grimace Scale significantly increased until 8 h after surgery, which was similarly inhibited by both ketoprofen and morphine. Cognitive function was assessed using radial arm maze testing for 12 consecutive days from postoperative day 3. Results showed that the number of memory errors in group IL were significantly higher than those in goup C. However, both ketoprofen and morphine could attenuate the increase in memory errors following surgery to a similar degree. Conversely, ketoprofen showed no effect on cognitive function in the nonsurgical rats that did not experience pain. Our findings suggest that postoperative analgesia with ketoprofen can prevent the development of surgery-associated memory deficits via its pain-relieving effects.

  10. Comparison of the Richmond HRR 4th edition and Farnsworth-Munsell 100 Hue Test for quantitative assessment of tritan color deficiencies.

    PubMed

    Foote, Katharina G; Neitz, Maureen; Neitz, Jay

    2014-04-01

    Drugs and environmental factors can induce tritan deficiencies. The Farnsworth-Munsell (FM) 100 Hue Test has become the gold standard in measuring these acquired defects. However, the test is time consuming, and color discrimination is confounded by concentration and patience. Here, we describe a test that compares six tritan plates from the HRR Pseudoisochromatic Plates 4th edition to 16 FM 100 Hue tritan caps. CIE Standard Illuminant C was reduced over five light intensities to simulate the effects of acquired losses in the S-cone pathway. Both tests showed quantitative differences in error rates with all light levels; thus they could serve equally well for assessing acquired deficiencies. However, compared to the FM 100, the HRR took subjects about 20-40 s per trial, making it more practical.

  11. Computational modes and the Machenauer N.L.N.M.I. of the GLAS 4th order model. [NonLinear Normal Mode Initialization in numerical weather forecasting

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Navon, I. M.; Bloom, S.; Takacs, L. L.

    1985-01-01

    An attempt was made to use the GLAS global 4th order shallow water equations to perform a Machenhauer nonlinear normal mode initialization (NLNMI) for the external vertical mode. A new algorithm was defined for identifying and filtering out computational modes which affect the convergence of the Machenhauer iterative procedure. The computational modes and zonal waves were linearly initialized and gravitational modes were nonlinearly initialized. The Machenhauer NLNMI was insensitive to the absence of high zonal wave numbers. The effects of the Machenhauer scheme were evaluated by performing 24 hr integrations with nondissipative and dissipative explicit time integration models. The NLNMI was found to be inferior to the Rasch (1984) pseudo-secant technique for obtaining convergence when the time scales of nonlinear forcing were much smaller than the time scales expected from the natural frequency of the mode.

  12. THE 4th SCHIZOPHRENIA INTERNATIONAL RESEARCH SOCIETY CONFERENCE, 5–9 APRIL 2014, FLORENCE, ITALY: A summary of topics and trends

    PubMed Central

    Abayomi, Olukayode; Amato, Davide; Bailey, Candace; Bitanihirwe, Byron; Bowen, Lynneice; Burshtein, Shimon; Cullen, Alexis; Fusté, Montserrat; Herrmann, Ana P; Khodaie, Babak; Kilian, Sanja; Lang, Qortni A; Manning, Elizabeth E; Massuda, Raffael; Nurjono, Milawaty; Sadiq, Sarosh; Sanchez-Gutierrez, Teresa; Sheinbaum, Tamara; Shivakumar, Venkataram; Simon, Nicholas; Spiteri-Staines, Anneliese; Sirijit, Suttajit; Toftdahl, Nanna Gilliam; Wadehra, Sunali; Wang, Yi; Wigton, Rebekah; Wright, Susan; Yagoda, Sergey; Zaytseva, Yuliya; O’Shea, Anne; DeLisi, Lynn E.

    2015-01-01

    The 4th Schizophrenia International Research Society Conference was held in Florence, Italy, April 5–9, 2014.and this year had as its emphasis, “Fostering Collaboration in Schizophrenia Research”. Student travel awardees served as rapporteurs for each oral session, summarized the important contributions of each session and then each report was integrated into a final summary of data discussed at the entire conference by topic. It is hoped that by combining data from different presentations, patterns of interest will emerge and thus lead to new progress for the future. In addition, the following report provides an overview of the conference for those who were present, but could not participate in all sessions, and those who did not have the opportunity to attend, but who would be interested in an update on current investigations ongoing in the field of schizophrenia research. PMID:25306204

  13. Development of a low-noise, 4th-order readout ASIC for CdZnTe detectors in gamma spectrometer applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Jia; Su, Lin; Wei, Xiaomin; Zheng, Ran; Hu, Yann

    2016-09-01

    This paper presents an ASIC readout circuit development, which aims to achieve low noise. In order to compensate the leakage current and improve gain, a dual-stage CSA has been utilized. A 4th-order high-linearity shaper is proposed to obtain a Semi-Gaussian wave and further decrease the noise induced by the leakage current. The ASIC has been designed and fabricated in a standard commercial 2P4M 0.35 μm CMOS process. Die area of one channel is about 1190 μm×147 μm. The input charge range is 1.8 fC. The peaking time can be adjusted from 1 μs to 3 μs. Measured ENC is about 55e- (rms) at input capacitor of 0 F. The gain is 271 mV/fC at the peaking time of 1 μs.

  14. Prediction of early postoperative infections in pediatric liver transplantation by logistic regression

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Uzunova, Yordanka; Prodanova, Krasimira; Spassov, Lubomir

    2016-12-01

    Orthotopic liver transplantation (OLT) is the only curative treatment for end-stage liver disease. Early diagnosis and treatment of infections after OLT are usually associated with improved outcomes. This study's objective is to identify reliable factors that can predict postoperative infectious morbidity. 27 children were included in the analysis. They underwent liver transplantation in our department. The correlation between two parameters (the level of blood glucose at 5th postoperative day and the duration of the anhepatic phase) and postoperative infections was analyzed, using univariate analysis. In this analysis, an independent predictive factor was derived which adequately identifies patients at risk of infectious complications after a liver transplantation.

  15. The method of early postoperative alimentation by needle-catheter jejunostomy.

    PubMed

    Bodoky, G; Harsányi, L

    1989-01-01

    It is well established that the nutritional state greatly influences tolerance during the operation. Authors present a new procedure for the early postoperative enteral alimentation having not been used in Hungary so far. Twelve hours after operation, a pump-operated, gradually increasing amount of oligopeptide food-preparation and concentrate is introduced continuously into the second jejunal loop intraoperatively. Using this method, a caloric intake of 9572 kJ can be achieved already from the fourth postoperative day onwards. Based on our experience gained from 32 patients, the method can be recommended for an up-to-date postoperative enteral alimentation.

  16. Limbic system development underlies the emergence of classical fear conditioning during the 3rd and 4th weeks of life in the rat

    PubMed Central

    Deal, Alex L.; Erickson, Kristen J.; Shiers, Stephanie I.; Burman, Michael A.

    2016-01-01

    Classical fear conditioning creates an association between an aversive stimulus and a neutral stimulus. Although the requisite neural circuitry is well understood in mature organisms, the development of these circuits is less well studied. The current experiments examine the ontogeny of fear conditioning and relate it to neuronal activation assessed through immediate early gene (IEG) expression in the amygdala, hippocampus, perirhinal cortex, and hypothalamus of periweanling rats. Rat pups were fear conditioned, or not, during the 3rd or 4th weeks of life. Neuronal activation was assessed by quantifying expression of FBJ osteosarcoma oncogene (FOS) using immunohistochemistry (IHC) in Experiment 1. Fos and early growth response gene-1 (EGR1) expression was assessed using qRT-PCR in Experiment 2. Behavioral data confirm that both auditory and contextual fear continue to emerge between PD 17 and 24. The IEG expression data are highly consistent with these behavioral results. IHC results demonstrate significantly more FOS protein expression in the basal amygdala of fear conditioned PD 23 subjects compared to control subjects, but no significant difference at PD 17. qRT-PCR results suggest specific activation of the amygdala only in older subjects during auditory fear expression. A similar effect of age and conditioning status was also observed in the perirhinal cortex during both contextual and auditory fear expression. Overall, the development of fear conditioning occurring between the 3rd and 4th weeks of life appears to be at least partly attributable to changes in activation of the amygdala and perirhinal cortex during fear conditioning or expression. PMID:26820587

  17. Probing ultra-fast processes with high dynamic range at 4th-generation light sources: Arrival time and intensity binning at unprecedented repetition rates

    PubMed Central

    Kovalev, S.; Green, B.; Golz, T.; Maehrlein, S.; Stojanovic, N.; Fisher, A. S.; Kampfrath, T.; Gensch, M.

    2017-01-01

    Understanding dynamics on ultrafast timescales enables unique and new insights into important processes in the materials and life sciences. In this respect, the fundamental pump-probe approach based on ultra-short photon pulses aims at the creation of stroboscopic movies. Performing such experiments at one of the many recently established accelerator-based 4th-generation light sources such as free-electron lasers or superradiant THz sources allows an enormous widening of the accessible parameter space for the excitation and/or probing light pulses. Compared to table-top devices, critical issues of this type of experiment are fluctuations of the timing between the accelerator and external laser systems and intensity instabilities of the accelerator-based photon sources. Existing solutions have so far been only demonstrated at low repetition rates and/or achieved a limited dynamic range in comparison to table-top experiments, while the 4th generation of accelerator-based light sources is based on superconducting radio-frequency technology, which enables operation at MHz or even GHz repetition rates. In this article, we present the successful demonstration of ultra-fast accelerator-laser pump-probe experiments performed at an unprecedentedly high repetition rate in the few-hundred-kHz regime and with a currently achievable optimal time resolution of 13 fs (rms). Our scheme, based on the pulse-resolved detection of multiple beam parameters relevant for the experiment, allows us to achieve an excellent sensitivity in real-world ultra-fast experiments, as demonstrated for the example of THz-field-driven coherent spin precession. PMID:28382317

  18. Probing ultra-fast processes with high dynamic range at 4th-generation light sources: Arrival time and intensity binning at unprecedented repetition rates.

    PubMed

    Kovalev, S; Green, B; Golz, T; Maehrlein, S; Stojanovic, N; Fisher, A S; Kampfrath, T; Gensch, M

    2017-03-01

    Understanding dynamics on ultrafast timescales enables unique and new insights into important processes in the materials and life sciences. In this respect, the fundamental pump-probe approach based on ultra-short photon pulses aims at the creation of stroboscopic movies. Performing such experiments at one of the many recently established accelerator-based 4th-generation light sources such as free-electron lasers or superradiant THz sources allows an enormous widening of the accessible parameter space for the excitation and/or probing light pulses. Compared to table-top devices, critical issues of this type of experiment are fluctuations of the timing between the accelerator and external laser systems and intensity instabilities of the accelerator-based photon sources. Existing solutions have so far been only demonstrated at low repetition rates and/or achieved a limited dynamic range in comparison to table-top experiments, while the 4th generation of accelerator-based light sources is based on superconducting radio-frequency technology, which enables operation at MHz or even GHz repetition rates. In this article, we present the successful demonstration of ultra-fast accelerator-laser pump-probe experiments performed at an unprecedentedly high repetition rate in the few-hundred-kHz regime and with a currently achievable optimal time resolution of 13 fs (rms). Our scheme, based on the pulse-resolved detection of multiple beam parameters relevant for the experiment, allows us to achieve an excellent sensitivity in real-world ultra-fast experiments, as demonstrated for the example of THz-field-driven coherent spin precession.

  19. Early diagnosis of acute postoperative renal transplant rejection

    SciTech Connect

    Tisdale, P.L.; Collier, B.D.; Kauffman, H.M.; Adams, M.B.; Isitman, A.T.; Hellman, R.S.; Rao, S.A.; Joestgen, T.; Krohn, L.

    1985-05-01

    A prospective evaluation of In-111 labeled autologous platelet scintigraphy for the early diagnosis of acute postoperative renal transplant rejection was undertaken. To date, 28 consecutive patients between 7 and 14 days post-op have been injected with 500..mu..Ci of In-111 platelets followed by imaging at 24 and 48 hours. Activity within the renal transplant exceeding activity in the adjacent iliac vessels was considered to be evidence of rejection, and both chemical evidence and clinical impression of rejection at 5 days after completion of imaging was accepted as proof of ongoing or incipient rejection at the time of scintigraphy. In addition, to visual inspection, independent quantitative analysis compared the area-normalized activity over the transplant with the adjacent iliac vessels (normal <1.0). For 5 patients, positive In-111 scintigraphy was present before convincing clinical evidence of rejection. In-111 platelet scintigraphy is useful not only to confirm the clinical diagnosis of rejection but also to establish the early, pre-clinical diagnosis of incipient acute postoperative renal transplant rejection.

  20. Postoperative Endophthalmitis Caused by Staphylococcus haemolyticus following Femtosecond Cataract Surgery

    PubMed Central

    Wong, Margaret; Baumrind, Benjamin R.; Frank, James H.; Halpern, Robert L.

    2015-01-01

    A 53-year-old Caucasian man underwent femtosecond cataract surgery and then presented with pain and hand motions vision 1 day following surgery. Anterior segment examination showed a 2-mm-layered hypopyon, a well-centered intraocular lens in the sulcus, and an obscured view to the fundus. B-scan ultrasonography showed significant vitritis and that the retina was attached. A tap and an injection of vancomycin 1 mg per 0.1 ml and of ceftazidime 2.25 mg per 0.1 ml were performed. The tap eventually yielded culture results positive for Staphylococcus haemolyticus, which was sensitive to vancomycin. We report a case of endophthalmitis that occurred on postoperative day 1 following complicated cataract surgery. This is an uncommon bacterium that is not widely reported in the literature as a cause of endophthalmitis in the postoperative period. We urge clinicians to consider S. haemolyticus as an offending agent, especially when the infection presents very early and aggressively in the postoperative period. PMID:26951642

  1. Predictors of Postoperative Complications After Trimodality Therapy for Esophageal Cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Jingya; Wei, Caimiao; Tucker, Susan L.; Myles, Bevan; Palmer, Matthew; Hofstetter, Wayne L.; Swisher, Stephen G.; Ajani, Jaffer A.; Cox, James D.; Komaki, Ritsuko; Liao, Zhongxing; Lin, Steven H.

    2013-08-01

    Purpose: While trimodality therapy for esophageal cancer has improved patient outcomes, surgical complication rates remain high. The goal of this study was to identify modifiable factors associated with postoperative complications after neoadjuvant chemoradiation. Methods and Materials: From 1998 to 2011, 444 patients were treated at our institution with surgical resection after chemoradiation. Postoperative (pulmonary, gastrointestinal [GI], cardiac, wound healing) complications were recorded up to 30 days postoperatively. Kruskal-Wallis tests and χ{sup 2} or Fisher exact tests were used to assess associations between continuous and categorical variables. Multivariate logistic regression tested the association between perioperative complications and patient or treatment factors that were significant on univariate analysis. Results: The most frequent postoperative complications after trimodality therapy were pulmonary (25%) and GI (23%). Lung capacity and the type of radiation modality used were independent predictors of pulmonary and GI complications. After adjusting for confounding factors, pulmonary and GI complications were increased in patients treated with 3-dimensional conformal radiation therapy (3D-CRT) versus intensity modulated radiation therapy (IMRT; odds ratio [OR], 2.018; 95% confidence interval [CI], 1.104-3.688; OR, 1.704; 95% CI, 1.03-2.82, respectively) and for patients treated with 3D-CRT versus proton beam therapy (PBT; OR, 3.154; 95% CI, 1.365-7.289; OR, 1.55; 95% CI, 0.78-3.08, respectively). Mean lung radiation dose (MLD) was strongly associated with pulmonary complications, and the differences in toxicities seen for the radiation modalities could be fully accounted for by the MLD delivered by each of the modalities. Conclusions: The radiation modality used can be a strong mitigating factor of postoperative complications after neoadjuvant chemoradiation.

  2. When Every Day Is Professional Development Day

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tienken, Christopher H.; Stonaker, Lew

    2007-01-01

    In the Monroe Township (New Jersey) Public Schools, teachers' learning occurs daily, not just on one day in October and February. Central office and school-level administrators foster job-embedded teacher growth. Every day is a professional development day in the district, but that has not always been so. How did the district become a system with…

  3. Topical fluorouracil. II. Postoperative administration in an animal model of glaucoma filtering surgery.

    PubMed

    Heuer, D K; Gressel, M G; Parrish, R K; Folberg, R; Dillberger, J E; Altman, N H

    1986-01-01

    Unilateral posterior lip sclerectomies were performed in ten owl monkeys. Five milligrams of fluorouracil was injected subconjunctivally in each operated eye immediately after surgery. Three drops (approximately 2.4 mg/drop) of fluorouracil were instilled ten minutes apart in each operated eye twice daily on postoperative days 1 through 7 and once daily on postoperative days 8 through 15, 17, 19, and 21. One monkey died on the seventh postoperative day; its death could not be attributed to systemic fluorouracil toxicity. All of the operated eyes had filtering blebs after the full course of fluorouracil, but seven also had corneal epithelial defects. By the seventh postoperative week, two of the operated eyes manifested moderately severe corneal opacification. Ten weeks postoperatively, the electroretinographic a- and b-wave amplitudes averaged 17% and 12% less, respectively, in the seven operated eyes without clinically significant corneal opacification than in the unoperated fellow eyes. Only two eyes had blebs after the 12th postoperative week. Histopathologic examination was performed on five eyes, of which only two revealed patent sclerostomies. Although topical fluorouracil appears to delay bleb scarring, the corneal findings suggest that it may be more toxic than subconjunctival fluorouracil.

  4. Which deep breathing device should the postoperative patient use?

    PubMed

    Lederer, D H; Van de Water, J M; Indech, R B

    1980-05-01

    A study was undertaken to compare the use of three types of deep-breathing devices in patients undergoing upper-abdominal operations. Seventy-nine patients were divided into three groups, each receiving preoperative bedside testing of pulmonary function and instruction in the use of one of three randomly assigned deep-breathing devices thought to be representative of those currently available (Triflo II, Bartlett-Edwards Incentive Spirometer, or Spirocare). Repeat testing and instruction were provided daily during each of the first five postoperative days. There were few statistically significant differences in pulmonary function, vital signs and white blood cell count, and no difference in length of postoperative stay. No device was uniformly acceptable to patients, and none was used as frequently as recommended. When left at the bedside and only one daily reinforcement of instructions, the three devices showed no clinically important differences.

  5. Principles of postoperative anterior cruciate ligament rehabilitation

    PubMed Central

    Saka, Tolga

    2014-01-01

    It is known that anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) reconstruction needs to be combined with detailed postoperative rehabilitation in order for patients to return to their pre-injury activity levels, and that the rehabilitation process is as important as the reconstruction surgery. Literature studies focus on how early in the postoperative ACL rehabilitation period rehabilitation modalities can be initiated. Despite the sheer number of studies on this topic, postoperative ACL rehabilitation protocols have not been standardized yet. Could common, “ossified” knowledge or modalities really prove themselves in the literature? Could questions such as “is postoperative brace use really necessary?”, “what are the benefits of early restoration of the range of motion (ROM)?”, “to what extent is neuromuscular electrical stimulation (NMES) effective in the protection from muscular atrophy?”, “how early can proprioception training and open chain exercises begin?”, “should strengthening training start in the immediate postoperative period?” be answered for sure? My aim is to review postoperative brace use, early ROM restoration, NMES, proprioception, open/closed chain exercises and early strengthening, which are common modalities in the very comprehensive theme of postoperative ACL rehabilitation, on the basis of several studies (Level of Evidence 1 and 2) and to present the commonly accepted ways they are presently used. Moreover, I have presented the objectives of postoperative ACL rehabilitation in tables and recent miscellaneous studies in the last chapter of the paper. PMID:25232521

  6. Epidural Analgesia in the Postoperative Period

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2001-10-01

    violations. VI ABSTRACT Postoperative pain is an unwanted side effect of surgery, and is associated with many postoperative complications...This descriptive study was conducted to determine which surgical patients experienced the most analgesia with the fewest side effects when...epidural medication, side effects , incidence of breakthrough pain, and treatments were recorded and cross-tabulated. The following surgical categories

  7. One-Day vs Two-Day Epidural Analgesia for Total Knee Arthroplasty (TKA): A Retrospective Cohort Study

    PubMed Central

    Corbett, Kelly L; Reichmann, William M; Katz, Jeffrey N; Beagan, Carolyn; Corsello, Paul; Ghazinouri, Roya; Dang, Bachyen; Mikulinsky, Regina; Losina, Elena; Wright, John

    2010-01-01

    Introduction: Over 500,000 total knee arthroplasties (TKAs) are performed annually in the US, yet postoperative pain management varies widely. In patients managed with epidural analgesia, the epidural catheter is generally removed on the second postoperative day. We compared in-hospital outcomes associated with removing the epidural catheter on postoperative day 1 (POD1-group) vs on postoperative day 2 (POD2-group) among patients undergoing TKA. Methods: We identified 89 patients who had TKA performed by a single surgeon from January through July 2007, and who were managed with epidural analgesia. This study took advantage of a change of policy from removing the epidural on the second postoperative day prior to March 2007 (n = 34) to removing the epidural on the first postoperative day thereafter (n = 55). Data were obtained by medical record review and analyzed with bivariate and multivariate techniques. Outcomes included knee range of motion (ROM), pain (0-10 scale), distance walked, narcotic usage, and length of stay. Results: The mean patient age was 68 ± 10 years. We did not identify clinically important differences in preoperative characteristics across groups. Patients in the POD1- group had a shorter length of stay (median of 3 vs 4 days in the POD2-group, p<0.001). The POD1-group also walked a greater distance on the second postoperative day (mean of 38 feet vs 9 feet in the POD2-group, p < 0.002). We did not observe a difference between the two groups with respect to change in passive ROM, pain on the second postoperative day, or narcotic usage. The POD1-group had more restricted continuous passive motion settings on the second postoperative day than the POD2-group (50° vs 65°, p = 0.031), and the POD1-group had somewhat worse passive range of motion at discharge (e.g. passive flexion 82o vs 76o in the POD2- group, p = 0.078). Conclusion: The balance between a shorter hospital stay and earlier walking achievement with the POD1-strategy-- vs better ROM

  8. Postoperative surgical complications of lymphadenohysterocolpectomy

    PubMed Central

    Marin, F; Pleşca, M; Bordea, CI; Voinea, SC; Burlănescu, I; Ichim, E; Jianu, CG; Nicolăescu, RR; Teodosie, MP; Maher, K; Blidaru, A

    2014-01-01

    Rationale The current standard surgical treatment for the cervix and uterine cancer is the radical hysterectomy (lymphadenohysterocolpectomy). This has the risk of intraoperative accidents and postoperative associated morbidity. Objective The purpose of this article is the evaluation and quantification of the associated complications in comparison to the postoperative morbidity which resulted after different types of radical hysterectomy. Methods and results Patients were divided according to the type of surgery performed as follows: for cervical cancer – group A- 37 classic radical hysterectomies Class III Piver - Rutledge -Smith ( PRS ), group B -208 modified radical hysterectomies Class II PRS and for uterine cancer- group C -79 extended hysterectomies with pelvic lymphadenectomy from which 17 patients with paraaortic lymphnode biopsy . All patients performed preoperative radiotherapy and 88 of them associated radiosensitization. Discussion Early complications were intra-abdominal bleeding ( 2.7% Class III PRS vs 0.48% Class II PRS), supra-aponeurotic hematoma ( 5.4% III vs 2.4% II) , dynamic ileus (2.7% III vs 0.96% II) and uro - genital fistulas (5.4% III vs 0.96% II).The late complications were the bladder dysfunction (21.6% III vs 16.35% II) , lower limb lymphedema (13.5% III vs 11.5% II), urethral strictures (10.8% III vs 4.8% II) , incisional hernias ( 8.1% III vs 7.2% II), persistent pelvic pain (18.91% III vs 7.7% II), bowel obstruction (5.4% III vs 1.4% II) and deterioration of sexual function (83.3% III vs 53.8% II). PRS class II radical hysterectomy is associated with fewer complications than PRS class III radical hysterectomy , except for the complications of lymphadenectomy . A new method that might reduce these complications is a selective lymphadenectomy represented by sentinel node biopsy . In conclusion PRS class II radical hysterectomy associated with neoadjuvant radiotherapy is a therapeutic option for the incipient stages of cervical cancer

  9. The 4th R: Reasoning.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Miles, Curtis

    1983-01-01

    Reviews sources of information on materials for teaching reasoning with a microcomputer. Suggests microcomputer magazines, catalogs of commercial materials, CONDUIT (a nonprofit organization devoted to educational computer use), and local microcomputer users groups. Lists Apple II software for strategy games with reasoning applications. (DMM)

  10. Modern Physics, 4th edition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tipler, Paul A.; Llewellyn, Ralph

    The new edition of the classic text for the intermediate-level modern physics course, revised and updated to take students to the forefront of contemporary research and applications across the full spectrum of science and technology."

  11. Installation Contracting Course (4th)

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1991-09-27

    increasingly having to cope with the presence of endangered species (e.g., the desert tortoise at Fort Irwin and the red cockaded woodpecker at Fort Bragg). 3...the ears." Robert Burton Anatomy of Melancholy "Democritus to the Reader" I. INTRODUCTION. A. References. 1. FAR SUBPART 33.2; DFARS 33.232; AFARS

  12. The Effect of Diclofenac Mouthwash on Periodontal Postoperative Pain

    PubMed Central

    Yaghini, Jaber; Abed, Ahmad Moghareh; Mostafavi, Seyed Abolfazl; Roshanzamir, Najmeh

    2011-01-01

    Background: The need to relieve pain and inflammation after periodontal surgery and the side effects of systemic drugs and advantages of topical drugs, made us to evaluate the effect of Diclofenac mouthwash on periodontal postoperative pain. Methods: In this double-blind, randomized clinical trial study 20 quadrants of 10 patients(n = 20) aged between 22-54 who also acted as their own controls, were treated using Modified Widman Flap procedure in two quadrants of the same jaw with one month interval between the operations. After the operation in addition to ibuprofen 400 mg, one quadrant randomly received Diclofenac mouthwash (0/01%) for 30 seconds, 4 times a day (for a week) and for the contrary quadrant, ibuprofen and placebo mouthwash was given to be used in the same manner. The patients scored the number of ibuprofen consumption and their pain intensity based on VAS index in a questionnaire in days 1, 2, 3 and the first week after operation. The findings were analysed using two-way ANOVA, t-test and Wilcoxon. P-value less than 0.05 considered to be significant. Results: There was a significant difference between the mean values of pain intensity of two quadrants in four periods (P = 0.031). But, there was no significant difference between the average ibuprofen consumption in two groups (P = 0.51). Postoperative satisfaction was not significantly different in two quadrants (P = 0.059). 60% of patients preferred Diclofenac mouthwash. Conclusion: Diclofenac mouthwash was effective in reducing postoperative periodontal pain but it seems that it isn’t enough to control postoperative pain on its own. PMID:22013478

  13. Postoperative radicular neuroma. Case report.

    PubMed

    Erman, T; Tuna, M; Göçer, A I; Idan, F; Akgül, E; Zorludemir, S

    2001-11-15

    Lumbar discectomy is the most common surgical procedure performed in neurosurgery clinics. Such a large number of procedures underscore not only the prevalence of conditions such as intervertebral disc herniation, but also the strong belief of surgeons that the operation does provide benefits to patients suffering from sciatica. In spite of this belief, sciatic pain may continue after the surgery. The recurrence of sciatic and/or back pain after primary discectomy is called the "failed back surgery syndrome." The rate of the complications involved in standard lumbar discectomy ranges from 5.4 to 14%. One of the complications of the lumbar disc surgery is nerve root injury. The complication rate of this injury ranges from 0.7 to 2.2%. Postoperative radicular neuroma must be considered in differential diagnosis for the patient who has failed back surgery syndrome. In this study the authors evaluate a patient who had undergone surgery for lumbar disc herniation and suffered intractable pain. A traumatic radicular neuroma is demonstrated and the pertinent literature is presented.

  14. Management of postoperative spinal infections

    PubMed Central

    Hegde, Vishal; Meredith, Dennis S; Kepler, Christopher K; Huang, Russel C

    2012-01-01

    Postoperative surgical site infection (SSI) is a common complication after posterior lumbar spine surgery. This review details an approach to the prevention, diagnosis and treatment of SSIs. Factors contributing to the development of a SSI can be split into three categories: (1) microbiological factors; (2) factors related to the patient and their spinal pathology; and (3) factors relating to the surgical procedure. SSI is most commonly caused by Staphylococcus aureus. The virulence of the organism causing the SSI can affect its presentation. SSI can be prevented by careful adherence to aseptic technique, prophylactic antibiotics, avoiding myonecrosis by frequently releasing retractors and preoperatively optimizing modifiable patient factors. Increasing pain is commonly the only symptom of a SSI and can lead to a delay in diagnosis. C-reactive protein and magnetic resonance imaging can help establish the diagnosis. Treatment requires acquiring intra-operative cultures to guide future antibiotic therapy and surgical debridement of all necrotic tissue. A SSI can usually be adequately treated without removing spinal instrumentation. A multidisciplinary approach to SSIs is important. It is useful to involve an infectious disease specialist and use minimum serial bactericidal titers to enhance the effectiveness of antibiotic therapy. A plastic surgeon should also be involved in those cases of severe infection that require repeat debridement and delayed closure. PMID:23330073

  15. [Postoperative long-term feeding with maltose supplementation].

    PubMed

    Zentai, A K; Boerner, D; Kühnle, H F

    1979-01-01

    2 litres of a 40% carbohydrate combination solution consisting of glucose, fructose, xylitol and maltose in the ratio 1:1:1:1 were infused together with 1 litre of 8% amino acid solution (aminomel L 8 oKH salvia) over a period of 24 hours for 4 days to 16 patients who had undergone gastric resection by the Billroth II procedure. Since maltose is partly excreted as glucose, maltose and glucose were jointly balanced. The joint conversion was, on average, 75, the fructose conversion 97 and the xylitol conversion 94%. The mean conversion of the 4 carbohydrates was about 85% corresponding to 2800 kcal (11,720 joule) daily. The nitrogen balance showed initally a slight catabolism. The serum insulin level rose significantly and simultaneously there was inhibition of lipolysis. The metabolic state and tolerance parameters remained in the normal range. The only side-effects noted were an increasing activity of the alkaline phosphatase and a significant elevation of the gamma-GT on the 4th day. The administration of relatively large quantities of maltose and glucose in combination with fructose and xylitol does not appear to produce any notable advantages.

  16. A Kinesthetic Learning Approach to Earth Science for 3rd and 4th Grade Students on the Pajarito Plateau, Los Alamos, NM

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wershow, H. N.; Green, M.; Stocker, A.; Staires, D.

    2010-12-01

    Current efforts towards Earth Science literacy in New Mexico are guided by the New Mexico Science Benchmarks [1]. We are geoscience professionals in Los Alamos, NM who believe there is an important role for non-traditional educators utilizing innovative teaching methods. We propose to further Earth Science literacy for local 3rd and 4th grade students using a kinesthetic learning approach, with the goal of fostering an interactive relationship between the students and their geologic environment. We will be working in partnership with the Pajarito Environmental Education Center (PEEC), which teaches the natural heritage of the Pajarito Plateau to 3rd and 4th grade students from the surrounding area, as well as the Family YMCA’s Adventure Programs Director. The Pajarito Plateau provides a remarkable geologic classroom because minimal structural features complicate the stratigraphy and dramatic volcanic and erosional processes are plainly on display and easily accessible. Our methodology consists of two approaches. First, we will build an interpretive display of the local geology at PEEC that will highlight prominent rock formations and geologic processes seen on a daily basis. It will include a simplified stratigraphic section with field specimens and a map linked to each specimen’s location to encourage further exploration. Second, we will develop and implement a kinesthetic curriculum for an exploratory field class. Active engagement with geologic phenomena will take place in many forms, such as a scavenger hunt for precipitated crystals in the vesicles of basalt flows and a search for progressively smaller rhyodacite clasts scattered along an actively eroding canyon. We believe students will be more receptive to origin explanations when they possess a piece of the story. Students will be provided with field books to make drawings of geologic features. This will encourage independent assessment of phenomena and introduce the skill of scientific observation. We

  17. Postoperative high-dose intravenous iron sucrose with low dose erythropoietin therapy after total hip replacement.

    PubMed

    Yoon, Jiyeol; Kim, Sungmin; Lee, Soo Chan; Lim, Hongsub

    2010-12-01

    Erythropoietin combined with parenteral iron sucrose therapy is an alternative to blood transfusion in anemic patients. It was shown to be effective in surgical patients in several previous studies when used in conjunction with other methods. However, there are no guidelines about safety limits in dosage amounts or intervals. In this study, we report a case of significant postoperative hemorrhage managed with high dose parenteral iron sucrose, low dose erythropoietin, vitamin B(12), vitamin C, and folic acid. An 80-year-old female patient presented for severe anemia after a total hip arthroplasty and refused an allogenic blood transfusion as treatment. The preoperative hemoglobin of 12.2 g/dL decreased to 5.3 g/dL postoperatively. She received the aforementioned combination of iron sucrose, erythropoietin, and vitamins. A total of 1,500 mg of intravenous iron sucrose was given postoperatively for 6 consecutive days. Erythropoietin was also administered at 2,000 IU every other day for a total of 12,000 IU. The patient was discharged in good condition on the twelfth postoperative day with a hemoglobin of 8.5 g/dL. Her hemoglobin was at 11.2 g/dL on the twentieth postoperative day.

  18. Deep brain stimulation: postoperative issues.

    PubMed

    Deuschl, Günther; Herzog, Jan; Kleiner-Fisman, Galit; Kubu, Cynthia; Lozano, Andres M; Lyons, Kelly E; Rodriguez-Oroz, Maria C; Tamma, Filippo; Tröster, Alexander I; Vitek, Jerrold L; Volkmann, Jens; Voon, Valerie

    2006-06-01

    Numerous factors need to be taken into account when managing a patient with Parkinson's disease (PD) after deep brain stimulation (DBS). Questions such as when to begin programming, how to conduct a programming screen, how to assess the effects of programming, and how to titrate stimulation and medication for each of the targeted sites need to be addressed. Follow-up care should be determined, including patient adjustments of stimulation, timing of follow-up visits and telephone contact with the patient, and stimulation and medication conditions during the follow-up assessments. A management plan for problems that can arise after DBS such as weight gain, dyskinesia, axial symptoms, speech dysfunction, muscle contractions, paresthesia, eyelid, ocular and visual disturbances, and behavioral and cognitive problems should be developed. Long-term complications such as infection or erosion, loss of effect, intermittent stimulation, tolerance, and pain or discomfort can develop and need to be managed. Other factors that need consideration are social and job-related factors, development of dementia, general medical issues, and lifestyle changes. This report from the Consensus on Deep Brain Stimulation for Parkinson's Disease, a project commissioned by the Congress of Neurological Surgeons and the Movement Disorder Society, outlines answers to a series of questions developed to address all aspects of DBS postoperative management and decision-making with a systematic overview of the literature (until mid-2004) and by the expert opinion of the authors. The report has been endorsed by the Scientific Issues Committee of the Movement Disorder Society and the American Society of Stereotactic and Functional Neurosurgery.

  19. [Postoperative complications in plastic surgery].

    PubMed

    Vogt, P M

    2009-09-01

    aspects of postoperative complication management in plastic surgery.

  20. Gender differences in post-operative pain and patient controlled analgesia use among adolescent surgical patients.

    PubMed

    Logan, Deirdre E; Rose, John B

    2004-06-01

    The aim of this study was to explore gender differences in anticipatory emotional distress, coping strategies, post-operative pain perception, and patient-controlled analgesia (PCA) use among adolescent surgical patients. One hundred and two 12-18-year-old adolescents undergoing surgeries with overnight hospital stay were recruited. Participants completed pre-operative measures of anxiety and anticipated pain. Post-operatively, they reported on coping skills, post-operative anxiety, and pain. Data on PCA use were recorded from medical records. Girls reported higher levels of pre-operative state anxiety and anticipated more pain. After surgery, girls and boys differed on their lowest daily pain ratings and average daily pain ratings, with girls reporting more pain in both cases. Reports of highest daily pain were similar across genders. Gender was found to moderate the relationship between anticipatory distress and post-operative pain, such that higher anticipatory distress before surgery predicted more post-operative pain for girls, but not for boys. Patterns of PCA use did not vary by gender on post-operative days 0 or 1. Findings suggest that adolescent boys' and girls' pain experiences are different in several important respects, although somewhat less divergent than has been reported in samples of adult males and females. Results have implications for the development of targeted intervention strategies to help adolescents cope effectively with acute post-operative pain.

  1. Schoolwide Literacy Days.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Polder, Darlene D.

    2000-01-01

    Describes 10 "literacy day" activities that one California elementary school has used successfully schoolwide, typically one such day per month, to make reading fun and purposeful, while developing a sense of community. Includes: spread-a-quilt day; teacher exchange day; turn off the TV; Dr. Seuss day; community readers; schoolwide…

  2. Efficacy of Postoperative Prophylactic Antibiotic Therapy in Third Molar Surgery

    PubMed Central

    Reddy B, Praveen

    2014-01-01

    Introduction: Surgical extraction of mandibular third molar is the most frequently performed procedure in oral surgery. This procedure is associated with significant postoperative sequelae such as trismus, swelling, pain and infection. The need of antibiotic therapy during the removal of mandibular third molar has been a contentious issue. Method: This study investigated a regimen by using amoxycillin and metronidazole in one group and without using antibiotics in the other. Both the groups were assessed postoperatively on the 1st, 2nd, 5th, 7th and 10th days by the same observer for post operative mouth opening (interincisal distance), presence of a purulent discharge at the site of surgery, pain and swelling. Result: Overall, no statistically significant difference was seen between both the treatment groups when interincisal distance, pain, swelling and purulent discharge were considered. Conclusion: The results of this study failed to show any advantage which was associated with the routine postoperative use of antibiotics in asymptomatic third molar surgeries. PMID:24995236

  3. Nurses' strategies for managing pain in the postoperative setting.

    PubMed

    Manias, Elizabeth; Bucknall, Tracey; Botti, Mari

    2005-03-01

    Acute pain is a significant problem in the postoperative setting. Patients report a lack of information about pain-control measures and ineffective pain control. Nurses continue to rely on pharmacologic measures and tend to under-administer analgesics. The purpose of this study was to determine the strategies nurses used to manage patients' pain in the postoperative setting. It also sought to examine the effect of context, including organization of care, nurses' prioritization of work activities, and pressures during a working shift, on their pain-management strategies. An observational design was used in two surgical units of a metropolitan teaching hospital in Melbourne, Australia. Six fixed observation times were identified as key periods for pain activities, each comprising a 2-hour duration. An observation period was examined at least 12 times, resulting in the completion of 74 observations and the identification of 316 pain cases. Fifty-two nurses were observed during their normal day's work with postoperative patients. Six themes were identified: managing pain effectively; prioritizing pain experiences for pain management; missing pain cues for pain management; regulators and enforcers of pain management; preventing pain; and reactive management of pain. The findings highlighted the critical nature of communication between clinicians and patients and among clinicians. It also demonstrated the influence of time on management strategies and the relative importance that nurses place on nonpharmacologic measures in actual practice. This research, which portrays what happens in actual clinical practice, has facilitated the identification of new data that were not evident from other research studies.

  4. Postoperative nausea and vomiting: A simple yet complex problem

    PubMed Central

    Shaikh, Safiya Imtiaz; Nagarekha, D.; Hegade, Ganapati; Marutheesh, M.

    2016-01-01

    Postoperative nausea and vomiting (PONV) is one of the complex and significant problems in anesthesia practice, with growing trend toward ambulatory and day care surgeries. This review focuses on pathophysiology, pharmacological prophylaxis, and rescue therapy for PONV. We searched the Medline and PubMed database for articles published in English from 1991 to 2014 while writing this review using “postoperative nausea and vomiting, PONV, nausea-vomiting, PONV prophylaxis, and rescue” as keywords. PONV is influenced by multiple factors which are related to the patient, surgery, and pre-, intra-, and post-operative anesthesia factors. The risk of PONV can be assessed using a scoring system such as Apfel simplified scoring system which is based on four independent risk predictors. PONV prophylaxis is administered to patients with medium and high risks based on this scoring system. Newer drugs such as neurokinin-1 receptor antagonist (aprepitant) are used along with serotonin (5-hydroxytryptamine subtype 3) receptor antagonist, corticosteroids, anticholinergics, antihistaminics, and butyrophenones for PONV prophylaxis. Combination of drugs from different classes with different mechanism of action are administered for optimized efficacy in adults with moderate risk for PONV. Multimodal approach with combination of pharmacological and nonpharmacological prophylaxis along with interventions that reduce baseline risk is employed in patients with high PONV risk. PMID:27746521

  5. [Late postoperative apnea in a premature newborn infant].

    PubMed

    Marco, J; Mohamed-Mabrok, M; Battich, I; Torres, J; Moral, V

    1992-01-01

    We report the case of a premature newborn child (36 weeks) who was operated on a teratoma of the sacrum when he was 12 days old and weighed 2,950 g. The patient presented a late postoperative apnea 17 hours after anesthesia. The anesthetic technique consisted of lumbar epidural blockade with 0.33% bupivacaine at a dose of 2.25 ml and superficial inhalation anesthesia with 0.5% isoflurane. Relaxing muscular agents used in this case were succinylcholine (3 mg) for orotracheal intubation and pancuronium bromide (0.3 mg) for maintaining the anesthetic level. The immediate postoperative phase was uneventful but 17 hours after surgery the patient presented apnea, bradycardia (40 beats/min), and marked cyanosis requiring assisted ventilation with bag and mask during 3 min and initial cardiac massage. Recovery of heart rate was immediate and recovery of ventilation was progressive. The patient was treated with caffeine during one week and no relapses occurred. Pneumocardiographic recordings obtained later on revealed sporadic short lasting episodes of apnea (shorter than 15 s) sometimes associated with bradycardia (40 beats/min lower than baseline). There were no apparent intercurrent or precipitating factors for this apnea. We believe that the present clinical picture corresponds to a late postoperative apnea of unknown origin which required reanimation measures and that until present, there are no reported complications of the anesthetic technique that can explain this episode.

  6. Adult Day Care

    MedlinePlus

    ... Page Resize Text Printer Friendly Online Chat Adult Day Care Adult Day Care Centers are designed to provide care and ... adults who need assistance or supervision during the day. Programs offer relief to family members and caregivers, ...

  7. European guidelines for empirical antibacterial therapy for febrile neutropenic patients in the era of growing resistance: summary of the 2011 4th European Conference on Infections in Leukemia.

    PubMed

    Averbuch, Diana; Orasch, Christina; Cordonnier, Catherine; Livermore, David M; Mikulska, Malgorzata; Viscoli, Claudio; Gyssens, Inge C; Kern, Winfried V; Klyasova, Galina; Marchetti, Oscar; Engelhard, Dan; Akova, Murat

    2013-12-01

    Owing to increasing resistance and the limited arsenal of new antibiotics, especially against Gram-negative pathogens, carefully designed antibiotic regimens are obligatory for febrile neutropenic patients, along with effective infection control. The Expert Group of the 4(th) European Conference on Infections in Leukemia has developed guidelines for initial empirical therapy in febrile neutropenic patients, based on: i) the local resistance epidemiology; and ii) the patient's risk factors for resistant bacteria and for a complicated clinical course. An 'escalation' approach, avoiding empirical carbapenems and combinations, should be employed in patients without particular risk factors. A 'de-escalation' approach, with initial broad-spectrum antibiotics or combinations, should be used only in those patients with: i) known prior colonization or infection with resistant pathogens; or ii) complicated presentation; or iii) in centers where resistant pathogens are prevalent at the onset of febrile neutropenia. In the latter case, infection control and antibiotic stewardship also need urgent review. Modification of the initial regimen at 72-96 h should be based on the patient's clinical course and the microbiological results. Discontinuation of antibiotics after 72 h or later should be considered in neutropenic patients with fever of unknown origin who are hemodynamically stable since presentation and afebrile for at least 48 h, irrespective of neutrophil count and expected duration of neutropenia. This strategy aims to minimize the collateral damage associated with antibiotic overuse, and the further selection of resistance.

  8. Status and Trend of Regal Fritillary (Speyeria idalia) (Lepidoptera: Nymphalidae) in the 4th of July Butterfly Count Program in 1977–2014

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Regal Fritillary (Speyeria idalia) primarily inhabits prairie, a native grassland of central North America, and occurs rarely in nonprairie grasslands further east. This butterfly has experienced widespread decline and marked range contraction. We analyze Regal Fritillary incidence and abundance during 1977–2014 in 4th of July Butterfly Counts, an annual census of butterflies in North America. Volunteers count within the same 24 km diameter circle each year. Only 6% of counts in range reported a Regal, while 18% of counts in core range in the Midwest and Great Plains did. 99.9% of Regal individuals occurred in core range. Only four circles east of core range reported this species, and only during the first half of the study period. All individuals reported west of its main range occurred in two circles in Colorado in the second half of the study. The number of counts per year and survey effort per count increased during the study. During 1991–2014, >31 counts occurred per year in core Regal range, compared to 0–23 during 1975–1990. During 1991–2014, all measures of Regal presence and abundance declined, most significantly. These results agree with other sources that Regal Fritillary has contracted its range and declined in abundance. PMID:27239370

  9. A 4th-order band-pass filter using differential readout of two in-phase actuated contour-mode resonators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yagubizade, Hadi; Darvishi, Milad; Elwenspoek, Miko C.; Tas, Niels R.

    2013-10-01

    A 4th-order band-pass filter (BPF) based on the subtraction of two 2nd-order contour-mode Lamb-wave resonators is presented. The resonators have slightly different resonance frequencies around 380 MHz. Each resonator consists of a 500 nm pulsed-laser deposited lead zirconate titanate (PZT) thin-film on top of a 3 μm silicon (PZT-on-Si). The resonators are actuated in-phase, and their outputs are subtracted. Utilizing this technique, the feed-through signals are eliminated while the outputs of the resonators are added up constructively, due to the phase difference between the two output signals. The BPF is presented using 50 Ω termination with a bandwidth of approximately 3.9 MHz and 43 dB stopband rejection. This technique provides further opportunities for MEMS filter design in addition to existing methods, i.e., mechanical and/or electrical coupling. It also resolves the design issue associated with high feed-through when exploiting piezoelectric materials with high-dielectric constant like PZT.

  10. Dynamics of the properties of steppe paleosols of the Sarmatian time (2nd century BC-4th century AD) in relation to secular variations in climatic humidity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Demkin, V. A.; Zolotareva, B. N.; Demkina, T. S.; Khomutova, T. E.; Kashirskaya, N. N.; El'Tsov, M. V.; Udal'Tsov, S. N.

    2012-02-01

    Paleosols buried under kurgans of the Early (2nd-1st centuries BC), Middle (1st-2nd centuries AD) and Late (2nd-IV centuries AD) Sarmatian epochs were studied in dry steppes and desert steppes of the Lower Volga region (the Privolzhskaya and Ergeni Uplands and the Caspian Lowland). It was found that temporal variations in the morphological, chemical, microbiological, and magnetic properties of the paleosols in the interval of 2200-1600 BP were characterized by the cyclic pattern related to secular dynamics of climatic humidity with changes in the mean annual precipitation of ±30-50 mm. These climate changes did not transform chestnut paleosols and paleosolonetzes at the type or subtype taxonomic levels. However, they led to certain changes in the humus, carbonate, and salt profiles of the soils; in the character of solonetzic horizon B1; and in the state of microbial communities. According to these data, the Sarmatian time was characterized by alternation of micropluvial and microarid stages lasting fro about 100-200 years. In particular, the stages of humidization were observed in the 1st century BC-1st century AD and in the 4th century AD; the most arid conditions were observed in the second half of the 2nd and the first half of the 3rd century AD.

  11. Evidence of human-induced morphodynamic changes along the Campania coastal areas (southern Italy) since the 3rd-4th cent. AD

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Russo Ermolli, Elda; Romano, Paola; Liuzza, Viviana; Amato, Vincenzo; Ruello, Maria Rosaria; Di Donato, Valentino

    2014-05-01

    Campania has always offered suitable climatic and physiographic conditions for human settlements since prehistoric times. In particular, many Graeco-Roman towns developed along its coasts starting from the 7th-6th cent. BC. In the last decade, geoarchaelogical surveys have been carried out in the archaeological excavations of Neapolis, Paestum and Elea-Velia allowing the main steps of the landscape evolution around these towns to be defined in detail. The greek town of Neapolis rose in the late 6th cent. BC [1] on a terrace overlooking a low-relief rocky coast surrounded by volcanic hills. Port activities developed in a protected bay facing the town from the 4th-2nd cent. BC up to the 4th cent. AD, as testified by the discovery of structures and shipwrecks [2, 3, 4]. Starting from the 3rd cent. AD a spit bar formed at the bay entrance causing the progressive establishment of a lagoon which was gradually filled up by alluvial inputs and completely closed in the 5th cent. AD. During the same period, episodes of increased alluvial inputs were also recorded further west along the coast, where a narrow sandy beach formed at the cliff toe. The greek town of Poseidonia, renamed Paestum by the Romans, was founded in the 540 BC on a travertine terrace facing the sandy littoral of a prograding coastal plain [5]. In front of the main town door, a coastal lagoon developed thanks to the growth of a dune ridge and was probably used for harbor activities [5]. After this period the shoreline shifted seawards, another dune ridge formed and the back-ridge depression was filled with fluvial-marshy deposits, slowly drying up. Phases of travertine deposition, which characterized the SE sector of the plain all along the Holocene, were recorded in the northern and southern quarters of the town in historical times and were connected to the abandonment of the town in the early Medieval times. The greek colony of Elea-Velia was located on top of a siliciclastic promontory where the ruins of

  12. [Report of the World Federation of Neurosurgical Societies (WFNS) international course and Cameroon Neurosurgery Society Congress (CNS) Yaoundé (Cameroon), 1st--4th October 2007].

    PubMed

    Eyenga, V C; Ndoumbe, A; Eloundou, N J

    2008-04-01

    Neurosurgery remains a very marginal activity in sub-Saharan Africa. In this part of the world which counts nearly 40 countries, some do not have a single neurosurgeon, some have one to five, the number of ten neurosurgeons per country remaining an exception! In its concern of popularizing and of developing neurosurgery worldwide, the WFNS organized an international course in Africa, October 2007 2nd-3rd in Yaoundé (Cameroon). The Cameroon Neurosurgery Society (CNS) took this opportunity to organize its very first congress in the presence of the WFNS delegation from October 1st to 4th, 2007. The joint meeting with the WFNS was baptized the "African Week of Neurosurgery". This special event was a first in sub-Saharan Africa. The delegation of the WFNS, led by Professor J. Brotchi (Belgium) President of the WFNS, was made up of Professors A. Sousa (Brazil), Mr. Choux (France), N. Tribolet (Swiss), M. Arraez (Spain), A. Bricolo (Italy), A. Kamlichi (Morocco), G. Dechambenoit (France), K. Kalangu (Zimbabwe). Twenty three neurosurgeons coming from nine African countries (Cameroon, Nigeria, Gabon, Congo, Niger, Burkina Faso, Ivory Coast, Senegal, and Guinea) took an active part in work. The scientific success of this event led to the creation of the "Association of Neurological Surgeons of Africa (ANSA)" which will be the WFNS-Africa interface in order to insure the development of neurosurgery in Africa.

  13. Update from the 4th Edition of the World Health Organization Classification of Head and Neck Tumours: Tumors of the Salivary Gland.

    PubMed

    Seethala, Raja R; Stenman, Göran

    2017-03-01

    The salivary gland section in the 4th edition of the World Health Organization classification of head and neck tumors features the description and inclusion of several entities, the most significant of which is represented by (mammary analogue) secretory carcinoma. This entity was extracted mainly from acinic cell carcinoma based on recapitulation of breast secretory carcinoma and a shared ETV6-NTRK3 gene fusion. Also new is the subsection of "Other epithelial lesions," for which key entities include sclerosing polycystic adenosis and intercalated duct hyperplasia. Many entities have been compressed into their broader categories given clinical and morphologic similarities, or transitioned to a different grouping as was the case with low-grade cribriform cystadenocarcinoma reclassified as intraductal carcinoma (with the applied qualifier of low-grade). Specific grade has been removed from the names of the salivary gland entities such as polymorphous adenocarcinoma, providing pathologists flexibility in assigning grade and allowing for recognition of a broader spectrum within an entity. Cribriform adenocarcinoma of (minor) salivary gland origin continues to be divisive in terms of whether it should be recognized as a distinct category. This chapter also features new key concepts such as high-grade transformation. The new paradigm of translocations and gene fusions being common in salivary gland tumors is featured heavily in this chapter.

  14. The structure of Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders (4th edition, text revision) personality disorder symptoms in a large national sample.

    PubMed

    Trull, Timothy J; Vergés, Alvaro; Wood, Phillip K; Jahng, Seungmin; Sher, Kenneth J

    2012-10-01

    We examined the latent structure underlying the criteria for DSM-IV-TR (American Psychiatric Association, 2000, Diagnostic and statistical manual of mental disorders (4th ed., text revision). Washington, DC: Author.) personality disorders in a large nationally representative sample of U.S. adults. Personality disorder symptom data were collected using a structured diagnostic interview from approximately 35,000 adults assessed over two waves of data collection in the National Epidemiologic Survey on Alcohol and Related Conditions. Our analyses suggested that a seven-factor solution provided the best fit for the data, and these factors were marked primarily by one or at most two personality disorder criteria sets. A series of regression analyses that used external validators tapping Axis I psychopathology, treatment for mental health problems, functioning scores, interpersonal conflict, and suicidal ideation and behavior provided support for the seven-factor solution. We discuss these findings in the context of previous studies that have examined the structure underlying the personality disorder criteria as well as the current proposals for DSM-5 personality disorders.

  15. European guidelines for empirical antibacterial therapy for febrile neutropenic patients in the era of growing resistance: summary of the 2011 4th European Conference on Infections in Leukemia

    PubMed Central

    Averbuch, Diana; Orasch, Christina; Cordonnier, Catherine; Livermore, David M.; Mikulska, Małgorzata; Viscoli, Claudio; Gyssens, Inge C.; Kern, Winfried V.; Klyasova, Galina; Marchetti, Oscar; Engelhard, Dan; Akova, Murat

    2013-01-01

    Owing to increasing resistance and the limited arsenal of new antibiotics, especially against Gram-negative pathogens, carefully designed antibiotic regimens are obligatory for febrile neutropenic patients, along with effective infection control. The Expert Group of the 4th European Conference on Infections in Leukemia has developed guidelines for initial empirical therapy in febrile neutropenic patients, based on: i) the local resistance epidemiology; and ii) the patient’s risk factors for resistant bacteria and for a complicated clinical course. An ‘escalation’ approach, avoiding empirical carbapenems and combinations, should be employed in patients without particular risk factors. A ‘de-escalation’ approach, with initial broad-spectrum antibiotics or combinations, should be used only in those patients with: i) known prior colonization or infection with resistant pathogens; or ii) complicated presentation; or iii) in centers where resistant pathogens are prevalent at the onset of febrile neutropenia. In the latter case, infection control and antibiotic stewardship also need urgent review. Modification of the initial regimen at 72–96 h should be based on the patient’s clinical course and the microbiological results. Discontinuation of antibiotics after 72 h or later should be considered in neutropenic patients with fever of unknown origin who are hemodynamically stable since presentation and afebrile for at least 48 h, irrespective of neutrophil count and expected duration of neutropenia. This strategy aims to minimize the collateral damage associated with antibiotic overuse, and the further selection of resistance. PMID:24323983

  16. Preliminary Study on LiF4-ThF4-PuF4 Utilization as Fuel Salt of miniFUJI Molten Salt Reactor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Waris, Abdul; Aji, Indarta K.; Pramuditya, Syeilendra; Widayani; Irwanto, Dwi

    2016-08-01

    miniFUJI reactor is molten salt reactor (MSR) which is one type of the Generation IV nuclear energy systems. The original miniFUJI reactor design uses LiF-BeF2-ThF4-233UF4 as a fuel salt. In the present study, the use of LiF4-ThF4-PuF4 as fuel salt instead of LiF-BeF2-ThF4-UF4 will be discussed. The neutronics cell calculation has been performed by using PIJ (collision probability method code) routine of SRAC 2006 code, with the nuclear data library is JENDL-4.0. The results reveal that the reactor can attain the criticality condition with the plutonium concentration in the fuel salt is equal to 9.16% or more. The conversion ratio diminishes with the enlarging of plutonium concentration in the fuel. The neutron spectrum of miniFUJI MSR with plutonium fuel becomes harder compared to that of the 233U fuel.

  17. Frequency Drift Rate Investigation of Solar Radio Burst Type II Due to Coronal Mass Ejections Occurrence on 4th November 2015 Captured by CALLISTO at Sumedang-Indonesia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Batubara, M.; Manik, T.; Suryana, R.; Lathif, M.; Sitompul, P.; Zamzam, M.; Mumtahana, F.

    2017-03-01

    The formations type of solar radio bursts can be known base on the frequency range that is detected. The CALLISTO system works with a wide band of the frequency making it possible to detect several types of solar burst. Indonesia exactly at Sumedang, CALLISTO system detected the formation of solar radio bursts forms of type II for the first time on 5 November 2014. On the other side, CALLISTO spectrometer detects and traces the phenomenon of CME (Coronal Mass Ejections) which causes the solar radio burst type II occurrence. In this paper will be calculated frequency drift rate during the occurrence of solar radio bursts of type II phenomenon on 4th November 2015 at 03:30 UT. The results of these calculations will be discussed as a related study of drift rate during the phenomenon of burst type II radio bursts associated with CME. The obtained drift rate during the solar radio bursts events above 2.8 MHz / s with low drift rate so that the speed of the CME that occurred only about 790 km / s as shown from LASCO.

  18. Pulmonary tuberculosis presenting as post-operative fever of unknown origin.

    PubMed

    Bogue, Patrick; Bolland, Mhairi; How, Peter; Benziger, Harrison

    2017-01-06

    Post-operative fever is common following emergency surgery. Investigation and management of post-operative fever can be challenging when a clear source of sepsis is not evident or the underlying source of infection is not recognised. We herein report a case of secondary pulmonary tuberculosis presenting as post-operative fever following emergency laparotomy for a perforated duodenal ulcer. This case of tuberculosis was diagnosed on day 41 post-operatively and prior inconclusive results meant that we relied mainly on re-visiting history and examination in order to identify 3 targeted investigations: plain chest X-ray, sputum sample and blood test. Accordingly, the co-management of this complex patient achieved a good outcome.

  19. Day-case surgery: enhanced recovery with flumazenil.

    PubMed Central

    Birch, B R; Anson, K M; Clifford, E; Miller, R A

    1990-01-01

    In an open, randomized, parallel group study of 84 adult patients undergoing elective day-case urological surgery the specific benzodiazepine antagonist flumazenil was shown to reverse effectively subjective postoperative sedation due to midazolam and enabled 83% of patients to recover and be ready for potential discharge within 15 min of surgery (control group 24% p less than 0.001). The significantly shorter recovery time has benefits in terms of increased patient cooperation and reduced demands on postoperative nursing care. The implications of these findings for day-case surgery are discussed. PMID:2118572

  20. CD4+ Th1 cells promote CD8+ Tc1 cell survival, memory response, tumor localization and therapy by targeted delivery of interleukin 2 via acquired pMHC I complexes.

    PubMed

    Huang, Hui; Hao, Siguo; Li, Fang; Ye, Zhenmin; Yang, Junbao; Xiang, Jim

    2007-02-01

    The cooperative role of CD4+ helper T (Th) cells has been reported for CD8+ cytotoxic T (Tc) cells in tumor eradication. However, its molecular mechanisms have not been well elucidated. We have recently demonstrated that CD4+ Th cells can acquire major histocompatibility complex/peptide I (pMHC I) complexes and costimulatory molecules by dendritic cell (DC) activation, and further stimulate naïve CD8+ T cell proliferation and activation. In this study, we used CD4+ Th1 and CD8+ Tc1 cells derived from ovalbumin (OVA)-specific T cell receptor (TCR) transgenic OT II and OT I mice to study CD4+ Th1 cell's help effects on active CD8+ Tc1 cells and the molecular mechanisms involved in CD8+ Tc1-cell immunotherapy of OVA-expressing EG7 tumors. Our data showed that CD4+ Th1 cells with acquired pMHC I by OVA-pulsed DC (DCOVA) stimulation are capable of prolonging survival and reducing apoptosis formation of active CD8+ Tc1 cells in vitro, and promoting CD8+ Tc1 cell tumor localization and memory responses in vivo by 3-folds. A combined adoptive T-cell therapy of CD8+ Tc1 with CD4+ Th1 cells resulted in regression of well-established EG7 tumors (5 mm in diameter) in all 10/10 mice. The CD4+ Th1's help effect is mediated via the helper cytokine IL-2 specifically targeted to CD8+ Tc1 cells in vivo by acquired pMHC I complexes. Taken together, these results will have important implications for designing adoptive T-cell immunotherapy protocols in treatment of solid tumors.

  1. [Non-invasive mechanical ventilation in postoperative patients. A clinical review].

    PubMed

    Esquinas, A M; Jover, J L; Úbeda, A; Belda, F J

    2015-11-01

    Non-invasive ventilation (NIV) is a method of ventilatory support that is increasing in importance day by day in the management of postoperative respiratory failure. Its role in the prevention and treatment of atelectasis is particularly important in the in the period after thoracic and abdominal surgeries. Similarly, in the transplanted patient, NIV can shorten the time of invasive mechanical ventilation, reducing the risk of infectious complications in these high-risk patients. It has been performed A systematic review of the literature has been performed, including examining the technical, clinical experiences and recommendations concerning the application of NIV in the postoperative period.

  2. Reducing Unnecessary Postoperative Complete Blood Count Testing in the Pediatric Intensive Care Unit

    PubMed Central

    Dewan, Maya; Galvez, Jorge; Polsky, Tracey; Kreher, Genna; Kraus, Blair; Ahumada, Luis; McCloskey, John; Wolfe, Heather

    2017-01-01

    Context: Complete blood count (CBC) testing commonly occurs to determine the need for blood transfusions after surgical procedures. Many clinicians believe postoperative CBCs are “routine.” Objective: To decrease unnecessary routine CBC testing in a low-risk cohort of postoperative patients in the pediatric intensive care unit (PICU) at The Children’s Hospital of Philadelphia by 50% in 6 months. Design: Quality-improvement study. Data from our institution regarding frequency of ordering laboratory studies and transfusion requirements were collected for prior quality-improvement work demonstrating the safety and feasibility of avoiding routine postoperative CBCs in this cohort. Baseline survey data were gathered from key stakeholders on attitudes about and utilization of routine postoperative laboratory testing. Patient and clinician data were shared with all PICU clinicians. Simple Plan-Do-Study-Act cycles involving education, audit, and feedback were put into place. Main Outcome Measures: Percentage of postoperative patients receiving CBCs within 48 hours of PICU admission. Balancing measures were hemoglobin level below 8 g/dL in patients for whom CBCs were sent and blood transfusions up to 7 days postoperatively for any patients in this cohort. Results: Sustained decreases below our 50% goal were seen after our interventions. There were no hemoglobin results below 8 g/dL or surgery-related blood transfusions in this cohort within 7 days of surgery. Estimated hospital charges related to routine postoperative CBCs decreased by 87% during 6 postintervention months. Conclusion: A simple approach to a systemic problem in the PICU of unnecessary laboratory testing is feasible and effective. By using local historical data, we were able to identify a cohort of patients for whom routine postoperative CBC testing is unnecessary. PMID:28241909

  3. Postoperative Delirium in the Geriatric Patient

    PubMed Central

    Schenning, Katie J.; Deiner, Stacie G.

    2015-01-01

    SYNOPSIS Postoperative delirium, a common complication in older surgical patients, is independently associated with increased morbidity and mortality. Patients over the age of 65 years receive greater than 1/3 of the over 40 million anesthetics delivered yearly in the United States. This number is expected to increase with the aging of the population. Thus, it is increasingly important that perioperative clinicians who care for geriatric patients have an understanding of the complex syndrome of postoperative delirium. PMID:26315635

  4. Epidural Analgesia in the Postoperative Period

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2001-10-01

    an unwanted side effect of surgery, and is associated with many postoperative complications. This descriptive study was conducted to determine which...surgical patients experienced the most analgesia with the fewest side effects when receiving epidural analgesia in the postoperative period. A...hospital. A description of the patients age, gender, type of surgery, type of epidural medication, side effects , incidence of breakthrough pain, and

  5. [Caloric substrates in postoperative parenteral nutrition].

    PubMed

    De Salvo, L; Romairone, E; Ansaldo, G L; Mattioli, G

    1991-05-31

    The paper describes the carbohydrate, lipidic and nitrogen metabolism of the postoperative period which is subdivided into an early and a late phase. Since the metabolism of caloric substrates in the early postoperative period is a stress metabolism with glucose intolerance and wide protein catabolism, the authors emphasise that an insufficient caloric intake is worse than the fasting state and suggest that alternative caloric sources, such as branched chain amino acids, fatty acids and, even, ketonic bodies, should be used.

  6. Effect of unrestricted bottle-feeding on early postoperative course after cleft palate repair.

    PubMed

    Kim, Eun Key; Lee, Taik Jong; Chae, Soo Wook

    2009-09-01

    Although bottle-feeding after cheiloplasty is widely accepted, postoperative feeding regimen after palatoplasty is still controversial. The aim of this prospective randomized study was to evaluate the effect of bottle-feeding on early postoperative course after palatoplasty in a relatively homogeneous group of patients. Eighty-two consecutive patients with nonsyndromic cleft palate undergoing 2-flap palatoplasty by a single surgeon were randomized to feeding from a bottle with the usual nipple (G1, N = 42) or to feeding with a spoon, cup, or syringe (G2, N = 40). Complication rates, postoperative sedative use, oral intake for the first 6 days, and relative weight gain at 1 and 2 months were compared. There were no significant complications such as bleeding or respiratory problem. The overall complication rate including wound dehiscence and oronasal fistula was similar in G1 and G2 (11.9% versus 12.5%, P = 1.000) as was postoperative sedative use and mean daily oral intake for the first 5 days. Mean intake on the sixth day was significantly higher in G1. There were no significant between-group differences in relative weight gain after 1 and 2 months. In conclusion, bottle-feeding had no adverse effect on the early postoperative course after palatoplasty including complication rate, oral intake, and weight gain. These findings suggest that an unrestricted feeding regimen is appropriate immediately after palatoplasty.

  7. Adult Day Services

    MedlinePlus

    A Smart Choice Adult Day Services Comparison At-a-Glance 1 Adult Day Services Assisted Living Home Care Nursing Homes Live at home with family ... supervision Nursing care available as needed during the day Flexibility to receive care only on days when ...

  8. [Postoperative peritonitis: pronostic factors of mortality].

    PubMed

    Marzougui, Y; Missaoui, K; Hannachi, Z; Dhibi, Y; Kouka, J; Dziri, C; Houissa, M

    2014-01-01

    The postoperative peritonitis (POP) remains formidable conditions due to a high mortality rate of between 20 and 80%. The purpose of this study is to identify risk factors for mortality. This study is a retrospective, descriptive analysis carried out over a period of 09 years (1/1/2003 - 30/11/2011) and interesting 102 patients supported for POP following general surgery. Achieved in department of General Surgery B Charles Nicolle hospital Tunis. The parameters measured included epidemiological data, data related to the Initial Surgical Intervention and reoperation for POP, terms of management and evolution. Bacteriological data were also seized. The incidence of POP was 0.90%. The average age of our patients was 58 +/- 19 years with a sex ratio of 1.08. Forty-seven percent of our patients belonged to the ASAII class. The initial operation was performed urgently in 49 patients (48%) with a majority belonging to the class II Altemeier (49.01%). Colorectal pathology (373%) and hepatobiliay (176%) were the most frequent reasons for the initial intervention. The frequency of clinical signs were fever (75.5%), hypothermia (6.9%), abdominal pain (725%), abdominal distension (46.1%), productive gastric aspiration (30.4%), abdominal defense (25.5%), externalizing the digestive fluid (25.5%), vomiting (19.6%), diarrhea (12.7%), tachycardia (569%), oliguria (42.2%), respiratory failure (40.2%), hypotension (35.3%), neuropsychiatric disorders ( 23.5%) and jaundice (69%). The treatment period was 2.95 +/- 3.16 days. The surgical recovery time was 78 days +/- 5.66. At the time of reoperation, the APACHE II score was 8.43 +/- 6.26 and 25.1 +/- MPI score 8.53. The POP was generalized in 52.9% of cases with purulent peritoneal fluid in 51% of cases. The most common cause was the dropping of the anastomosis (59.8%). Empirical antibiotic therapy was appropriate in 69.44 % of cases. The mortality rate was 39.2%. Multivariate analysis using multiple logistic regression identified the

  9. Ribavirin exerts differential effects on functions of Cd4+ Th1, Th2, and regulatory T cell clones in hepatitis C.

    PubMed

    Langhans, Bettina; Nischalke, Hans Dieter; Arndt, Simone; Braunschweiger, Ingrid; Nattermann, Jacob; Sauerbruch, Tilman; Spengler, Ulrich

    2012-01-01

    Ribavirin improves outcomes of therapy in chronic hepatitis C but its mode of action has still remained unclear. Since ribavirin has been proposed to modulate the host's T cell responses, we studied its direct effects on CD4(+) T cell clones with diverse functional polarization which had been generated from patients with chronic hepatitis C. We analysed in vitro proliferation ([(3)H] thymidine uptake) and cytokine responses (IL-10, IFN-gamma) at varying concentrations of ribavirin (0-10 µg/ml) in 8, 9 and 7 CD4(+) TH1, TH2 and regulatory T cell (Treg) clones, respectively. In co-culture experiments, we further determined effects of ribarivin on inhibition of TH1 and TH2 effector cells by Treg clones. All clones had been generated from peripheral blood of patients with chronic hepatitis C in the presence of HCV core protein. Ribavirin enhanced proliferation of T effector cells and increased production of IFN-gamma in TH1 clones, but had only little effect on IL-10 secretion in TH2 clones. However, ribavirin markedly inhibited IL-10 release in Treg clones in a dose dependent fashion. These Treg clones suppressed proliferation of T effector clones by their IL-10 secretion, and in co-culture assays ribavirin reversed Treg-mediated suppression of T effector cells. Our in vitro data suggest that--in addition to its immunostimulatory effects on TH1 cells--ribavirin can inhibit functions of HCV-specific Tregs and thus reverses Treg-mediated suppression of T effector cells in chronic hepatitis C.

  10. Application of the FUN3D Unstructured-Grid Navier-Stokes Solver to the 4th AIAA Drag Prediction Workshop Cases

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lee-Rausch, Elizabeth M.; Hammond, Dana P.; Nielsen, Eric J.; Pirzadeh, S. Z.; Rumsey, Christopher L.

    2010-01-01

    FUN3D Navier-Stokes solutions were computed for the 4th AIAA Drag Prediction Workshop grid convergence study, downwash study, and Reynolds number study on a set of node-based mixed-element grids. All of the baseline tetrahedral grids were generated with the VGRID (developmental) advancing-layer and advancing-front grid generation software package following the gridding guidelines developed for the workshop. With maximum grid sizes exceeding 100 million nodes, the grid convergence study was particularly challenging for the node-based unstructured grid generators and flow solvers. At the time of the workshop, the super-fine grid with 105 million nodes and 600 million elements was the largest grid known to have been generated using VGRID. FUN3D Version 11.0 has a completely new pre- and post-processing paradigm that has been incorporated directly into the solver and functions entirely in a parallel, distributed memory environment. This feature allowed for practical pre-processing and solution times on the largest unstructured-grid size requested for the workshop. For the constant-lift grid convergence case, the convergence of total drag is approximately second-order on the finest three grids. The variation in total drag between the finest two grids is only 2 counts. At the finest grid levels, only small variations in wing and tail pressure distributions are seen with grid refinement. Similarly, a small wing side-of-body separation also shows little variation at the finest grid levels. Overall, the FUN3D results compare well with the structured-grid code CFL3D. The FUN3D downwash study and Reynolds number study results compare well with the range of results shown in the workshop presentations.

  11. Changes in the regional prevalence of child obesity in 4th, 8th, and 11th grade students in Texas from 2000-2002 to 2004-2005.

    PubMed

    Hoelscher, Deanna M; Kelder, Steven H; Pérez, Adriana; Day, R Sue; Benoit, Julia S; Frankowski, Ralph F; Walker, Joey L; Lee, Eun S

    2010-07-01

    Although national and state estimates of child obesity are available, data at these levels are insufficient to monitor effects of local obesity prevention initiatives. The purpose of this study was to examine regional changes in the prevalence of obesity due to statewide policies and programs among children in grades 4, 8, and 11 in Texas Health Services Regions (HSRs) between 2000-2002 and 2004-2005, and nine selected counties in 2004-2005. A cross-sectional, probability-based sample of 23,190 Texas students in grades 4, 8, and 11 were weighed and measured to obtain BMI. Obesity was >95th percentile for BMI by age/sex using Centers for Disease Control and Prevention growth charts. Child obesity prevalence significantly decreased between 2000-2002 and 2004-2005 for 4th grade students in the El Paso HSR (-7.0%, P = 0.005). A leveling off in the prevalence of obesity was noted for all other regions for grades 4, 8, and 11. County-level data supported the statistically significant decreases noted in the El Paso region. The reduction of child obesity levels observed in the El Paso area is one of the few examples of effective programs and policies based on a population-wide survey: in this region, a local foundation funded extensive regional implementation of community programs for obesity prevention, including an evidence-based elementary school-based health promotion program, adult nutrition and physical activity programs, and a radio and television advertising campaign. Results emphasize the need for sustained school, community, and policy efforts, and that these efforts can result in decreases in child obesity at the population level.

  12. Second-generation surveillance for HIV/AIDS in Pakistan: results from the 4th round of Integrated Behavior and Biological Survey 2011–2012

    PubMed Central

    Emmanuel, Faran; Salim, Momina; Akhtar, Naeem; Arshad, Salwa; Reza, Tahira Ezra

    2013-01-01

    Objectives In an effort to fully analyse and understand the HIV situation and its epidemiology in Pakistan, a bilateral collaboration between the National AIDS Control Program and the Canadian International Development Agency resulted in the establishment of an effective second-generation surveillance (SGS) system for HIV/AIDS between 2004 and 2012 in accordance with the published guidelines. This paper presents findings from the 4th round of SGS. Methods A mapping exercise was initially conducted for size estimations of the key vulnerable populations: people who inject drugs (PWIDs), male sex workers (MSWs), hijra sex workers (HSWs), and female sex workers (FSWs), followed by an Integrated Behavioral and Biological Surveillance in 20 selected cities across Pakistan. Results The estimated sizes of the four key populations mapped in the 20 cities were 89 178 FSWs, 46 351 PWIDs, 23 317 HSWs and 19 119 MSWs. The HIV sero-prevalence among PWIDs was the highest among all key populations surveyed at 37.8% (CI 37.3 to 38.3) nationally, followed by a prevalence of 7.2% (CI 6.8 to 7.5) among HSWs, 3.1% (CI 2.8 to 3.4) among MSWs and 0.8% (CI 0.4 to 1.0) for FSWs. Various key risk behaviours, that is, sharing of syringes by PWIDs and inconsistent use of condoms by sex workers, were documented. Conclusions Pakistan's HIV epidemic that once was characterised primarily by transmission among PWIDs is now increasingly characterised by significant sexual transmission, and all types of sex workers (male, hijra and female) exhibit epidemiological proportions of infection. There is a need to develop concrete strategic plans for each vulnerable subpopulation, initially focusing prevention resources on those with a higher risk or vulnerability. PMID:23912818

  13. Management of acute postoperative pain with continuous intercostal nerve block after single port video-assisted thoracoscopic anatomic resection

    PubMed Central

    Hsieh, Ming-Ju; Wang, Kuo-Cheng; Liu, Hung-Pin; Gonzalez-Rivas, Diego; Wu, Ching-Yang; Liu, Yun-Hen; Wu, Yi-Cheng; Chao, Yin-Kai

    2016-01-01

    Background Effective postoperative pain control for thoracic surgery is very important, not only because it reduces pulmonary complications but also because it accelerates the pace of recovery. Moreover, it increases patients’ satisfaction with the surgery. In this study, we present a simple approach involving the safe placement of intercostal catheter (ICC) after single port video-assisted thoracoscopic surgery (VATS) anatomic resection and we evaluate postoperative analgesic function with and without it. Methods We identified patients who underwent single port anatomic resection with ICC placed intraoperatively as a route for continuous postoperative levobupivacaine (0.5%) administration and retrospectively compared them with a group of single port anatomic resection patients without ICC. The operation time, postoperative day 0, 1, 2, 3 and discharge day pain score, triflow numbers, narcotic requirements, drainage duration and post-operative hospital stay were compared. Results In total, 78 patients were enrolled in the final analysis (39 patients with ICC and 39 without). We found patients with ICC had less pain sensation numerical rating scale (NRS) on postoperative day 0, 1 (P=0.023, <0.001) and better triflow performance on postoperative day 1 and 2 (P=0.015, 0.032). In addition, lower IV form morphine usage frequency and dosage (P=0.009, 0.017), shorter chest tube drainage duration (P=0.001) and postoperative stay (P=0.005) were observed in the ICC group. Conclusions Continuous intercostal nerve blockade by placing an ICC intraoperatively provides effective analgesia for patients undergoing single port VATS anatomic resection. This may be considered a viable alternative for postoperative pain management. PMID:28149550

  14. Postoperative analgesia comparing levobupivacaine and ropivacaine for brachial plexus block

    PubMed Central

    Watanabe, Kunitaro; Tokumine, Joho; Lefor, Alan Kawarai; Moriyama, Kumi; Sakamoto, Hideaki; Inoue, Tetsuo; Yorozu, Tomoko

    2017-01-01

    Abstract Background: On a pharmacologic basis, levobupivacaine is expected to last longer than ropivacaine. However, most reports of these anesthetics for brachial plexus block do not suggest a difference in analgesic effect. The aim of this study is to compare the postoperative analgesic effects of levobupivacaine and ropivacaine when used for treating ultrasound-guided brachial plexus block. Methods: A total of 62 patients undergoing orthopedic surgery procedures were prospectively enrolled and randomized to receive levobupivacaine (group L, N = 31) or ropivacaine (group R, N = 31). The duration of analgesia, offset time of motor block, need for rescue analgesics, and sleep disturbance on the night of surgery were recorded. Pain score was recorded on the day of surgery, and on postoperative days 1 and 2. Results: There was no difference in the time interval until the first request for pain medication comparing the two groups (group L: 15.6 [11.4, 16.8] hours; group R: 12.5 [9.4, 16.0] hours, P = 0.32). There was no difference in the duration of motor block (group L: 12.2 [7.6, 14.4] hours; group R: 9.4 [7.9, 13.2] hours, P = 0.44), pain score (P = 0.92), need for rescue analgesics (group L: 55%; group R: 65%, P = 0.6), or rate of sleep disturbance (group L: 61%, group R: 58%, P = 1.0) on comparing the two groups. Conclusions: There was no difference in postoperative analgesia comparing levobupivacaine and ropivacaine when used for brachial plexus block. PMID:28328862

  15. Risk factors for postoperative complications in total thyroidectomy

    PubMed Central

    Caulley, Lisa; Johnson-Obaseki, Stephanie; Luo, Lindy; Javidnia, Hedyeh

    2017-01-01

    Abstract Thyroid cancer incidence is increasing, and with it, an increase in total thyroidectomy. There are limited studies comparing outcomes in total thyroidectomy performed in the inpatient versus outpatient setting. The objective of this study was to perform a comparative analysis of risk factors and outcomes of postoperative morbidity and mortality in total thyroidectomy performed as an inpatient versus outpatient surgery. Retrospective cohort study of data from the 2005 to 2014 multi-institutional, risk-adjusted American College of Surgeons National Surgical Quality Improvement Program (ACS-NSQIP) database. A multivariate regression model with corresponding odds ratios and 95% confidence intervals was used to determine 30-day morbidity and mortality after total thyroidectomies, and also risk factors of postoperative outcomes. From 2005 to 2014, 40,025 total thyroidectomies were performed (48.5% inpatient, 51.5% outpatient). The 30-day complication rate for all total thyroidectomies was 7.74%. Multivariate logistic regression analysis was performed to control for potential confounding variables. Preoperative factors that affected complications rates for inpatient thyroidectomies included: age ≥70, non-Caucasian race, dependent functional status, history of congestive heart failure, smoking history, bleeding disorder, wound infection, and preoperative sepsis (P < 0.05). In addition, preoperative factors affecting complications in thyroidectomy performed as an outpatient surgery included malignant thyroid pathology (P  0.05). We identified a subset of preoperative conditions that affect risk of complications after total thyroidectomy. Recommendations for patient selection for outpatient total thyroidectomies should be modified to account for pre-existing conditions that increase the risk of postoperative morbidity. PMID:28151852

  16. A Post-operative Feeding Protocol to Improve Outcomes for Neonates With Critical Congenital Heart Disease.

    PubMed

    Newcombe, Jennifer; Fry-Bowers, Eileen

    2017-01-04

    Neonates with critical congenital heart disease (CCHD) are vulnerable to malnutrition during the post-operative period due to hypermetabolism and hypercatabolism. To improve nutritional outcomes during hospitalization, a nurse led post-operative enteral feeding protocol was implemented at a large U.S. children's hospital. During an eight-month implementation period, twenty-one neonates met protocol inclusion criteria. Days for neonates to achieve goal caloric feedings (120kcal/kg/day) were decreased. A one-way repeated measures analysis of variance showed serum albumin levels and serial anthropometric measurements improved significantly throughout hospitalization (p<0.005). Results from this quality improvement project show standardizing nutritional care for neonates with CCHD during the post-operative period is an effective way to improve nutritional outcomes and shorten length of hospital stay.

  17. Spinal epidural abscess and meningitis following short-term epidural catheterisation for postoperative analgaesia.

    PubMed

    van Rappard, Juliaan R M; Tolenaar, Jip L; Smits, Anke B; Go, Peter M N Y H

    2015-08-20

    We present a case of a patient with a spinal epidural abscess (SEA) and meningitis following short-term epidural catheterisation for postoperative pain relief after a laparoscopic sigmoid resection. On the fifth postoperative day, 2 days after removal of the epidural catheter, the patient developed high fever, leucocytosis and elevated C reactive protein. Blood cultures showed a methicillin-sensitive Staphylococcus aureus infection. A photon emission tomography scan revealed increased activity of the spinal canal, suggesting S. aureus meningitis. A gadolinium-enhanced MRI showed a SEA that was localised at the epidural catheter insertion site. Conservative management with intravenous flucloxacillin was initiated, as no neurological deficits were seen. At last follow-up, 8 weeks postoperatively, the patient showed complete recovery.

  18. How Do 4th, 5th, and 6th Grade Students' Categories of Cognitive Reflections in Interviews on Derivational Morphology Compare to Their Upper Level Spelling Inventory Orthographic Knowledge?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Smith, Darcie D.

    2012-01-01

    Eighty-seven 4th, 5th and 6th grade students were administered the "Derivational Relatedness Interview" (DRI) (Templeton, Smith, Moloney, Van Pelt, & Ives, 2009). The purpose of this instrument is to explore students' understanding of derivational morphology. During the same week, the subjects were also administered an Upper…

  19. Every Day Is National Lab Day

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bull, Glen

    2010-01-01

    President Barack Obama recently issued a call for increased hands-on learning in U.S. schools in an address at the National Academy of Sciences. Obama concluded that the future of the United States depends on one's ability to encourage young people to "create, and build, and invent." In this article, the author discusses National Lab Day (NLD)…

  20. Surgical audit in day care myringoplasty.

    PubMed

    Subramaniam, S; Abdul, R

    2006-10-01

    Day-case surgery is preferred for adults, allowing post-operative fast recovery in family environment and support. Myringoplasty using the traditional method of underlay temporalis fascia or tragal perichondrium is usually performed as an in-patient. From 2003 to 2004, 22 myringoplasty procedures were performed in a dedicated day surgery unit at the Hospital Melaka. We report the retrospectively review of the outcome results of these procedures. None of the patients need admission overnight. There were no surgical or anesthetic complications noted and this series suggests that day-case surgery is a safe and desirable practice for patients undergoing myringoplasty. However, there should be the facility for admission if required.

  1. Alveolar recruitment strategy during cardiopulmonary bypass does not improve postoperative gas exchange and lung function.

    PubMed

    Scherer, Mirela; Dettmer, Sebastian; Meininger, Dirk; Deschka, Heinz; Geyer, Galina; Regulla, Caroline; Moritz, Anton

    2009-03-01

    Pulmonary dysfunction with impairment of lung function and oxygenation is one of the most serious problems in the early postoperative period after cardiac surgery. In this study we investigated the effect of alveolar recruitment strategy during cardiopulmonary bypass on postoperative gas exchange and lung function. This prospective randomized study included 32 patients undergoing elective myocardial revascularization with cardiopulmonary bypass. In 16 patients 5 cm H(2)O of positive end-expiratory pressure was applied after intubation and maintained until extubation (Group I). In the other 16 patients (group II) a positive end expiratory pressure (PEEP) of 5 cm H(2)O was maintained as well but was increased to 14 cm H(2)O every 20 min for 2 min during cross clamp. Measurements were taken preoperatively, before skin incision, before and after (3, 24, 48 h) cardiopulmonary bypass and before discharge (6th postoperative day). Postoperative gas exchange, extravascular lung water and lung function showed no significant difference between the groups. Postoperative pulmonary function variables were lower in both groups compared to baseline values. In patients with normal preoperative pulmonary function, application of an alveolar recruitment strategy during cardiopulmonary bypass does not improve postoperative gas exchange and lung function after cardiac surgery.

  2. Effect of different adhesive strategies on the post-operative sensitivity of class I composite restorations

    PubMed Central

    Sancakli, Hande Sar; Yildiz, Esra; Bayrak, Isil; Ozel, Sevda

    2014-01-01

    Objective: To evaluate the post-operative sensitivity of occlusal restorations using different dentin adhesives performed by an undergraduate and a post-doctorate dentist. Materials and Methods: One hundred and eighty-eight molar occlusal restorations were placed in 39 patients (ages between 18 and 30) using 3 different kind of adhesive systems; Optibond FL (OBF), Clearfil Protect Bond (CPB), and iBond (IB) by a post-doctorate dentist or a fifth-year dental student according to the manufacturers’ instructions. Post-operative sensitivity to cold and air was evaluated using a Visual Analog Scale (VAS) after 24 hours, 30, 90, and 180 days. Data were analyzed using the Mann-Whitney U and Friedman tests (P < 0.05). Results: Post-operative sensitivity scores for OBF and CPB were higher for the dental student (P < 0.05), while IB scores did not differ statistical significantly according to the operator (P > 0.05). Conclusion: Operator skill and experience appears to play a role in determining the outcome of post-operative sensitivity of multi-step adhesive systems although the post-operative sensitivity was low. It is suggested that the less experienced clinicians (rather than experienced clinicians) should better use the self-etching dentin bonding systems with reduced application steps to minimize the potential risk of post-operative sensitivity of dental adhesives. PMID:24966741

  3. Prediction of adrenocortical insufficiency after pituitary adenoma surgery using postoperative basal cortisol levels.

    PubMed

    Hána, V; JeŽková, J; Kosák, M; Kršek, M; Marek, J; Netuka, D; Hill, M; Hána, V

    2015-01-01

    Our aim was to analyze the correlation of early postoperative cortisol levels in patients after transsphenoidal pituitary adenoma surgery compared to the standard dose ACTH test and Insulin tolerance test (ITT) several months later. We retrospectively reviewed data from 94 patients operated for pituitary adenoma in years 2009-2012. The comparison of day 7 (median) postoperative basal cortisol levels and 3.6 months (median) after pituitary adenoma surgery stimulation test - standard dose 250 microg 1-24ACTH test in 83 patients or ITT in 11 patients were performed. All 16 patients with early postoperative cortisol levels >500 nmol/l proved a sufficient response in the stimulation tests. At basal cortisol levels of 370-500 nmol/l the sufficient response was found in 96 % (27/28) of patients. In the postoperative basal cortisol levels 200-370 nmol/l we found a preserved corticotroph axis later on in 88 % (28/32) of cases. Patients with basal cortisol levels 100-200 nmol/l had a maintained corticotroph axis function in 8/11 cases - 73 %. All patients with an early postoperative basal cortisol level above 500 nmol/l proved in the stimulation tests a preserved corticotroph axis function. The interval 370-500 nmol/l showed a minimal risk of postoperative adrenal insufficiency.

  4. Randomized Clinical Trial for Early Postoperative Complications of Ex-PRESS Implantation versus Trabeculectomy: Complications Postoperatively of Ex-PRESS versus Trabeculectomy Study (CPETS).

    PubMed

    Arimura, Shogo; Takihara, Yuji; Miyake, Seiji; Iwasaki, Kentaro; Gozawa, Makoto; Matsumura, Takehiro; Tomomatsu, Takeshi; Takamura, Yoshihiro; Inatani, Masaru

    2016-05-17

    We compared early postoperative complications between trabeculectomy and Ex-PRESS implantation. Enrolled patients with 39 primary open-angle or 25 exfoliative glaucoma were randomly assigned to receive trabeculectomy (trabeculectomy group) or Ex-PRESS implantation (Ex-PRESS group). Primary outcomes were early postoperative complications, including postoperative anterior chamber inflammation, frequencies of hyphema, flat anterior chamber, choroidal detachment, hypotonic maculopathy, and the change of visual acuity. The postoperative flare values in trabeculectomy group were higher than those in the Ex-PRESS group (overall, P = 0.004; and 10 days, P = 0.02). Hyphema occurred significantly more frequently in the trabeculectomy group (P = 0.0025). There were no significant differences of the other primary outcomes between the two groups. Additionally, duration of anterior chamber opening was significantly shorter in the Ex-PRESS group (P = 0.0002) and the eyes that had iris contact with Ex-PRESS tube had significantly shallower anterior chambers than did the eyes without the iris contact (P = 0.013). The Ex-PRESS implantation prevented early postoperative inflammation and hyphema in the anterior chamber and shortened the duration of anterior chamber opening. Iris contact with the Ex-PRESS tube occurred more frequently in eyes with open-angle glaucoma and shallow anterior chambers.

  5. [Postoperative necrotizing fasciitis: a rare and fatal complication].

    PubMed

    Ghezala, Hassen Ben; Feriani, Najla

    2016-01-01

    Postoperative parietal complications can be exceptionally severe and serious threatening vital prognosis. Necrotizing fasciitis is a rare infection of the skin and deep subcutaneous tissues, spreading along fascia and adipose tissue. It is mainly caused by group A streptococcus (streptococcus pyogenes) but also by other bacteria such as Vibrio vulnificus, Clostridium perfringens or Bacteroides fragilis. Necrotizing fasciitis is a real surgical and medical emergency. We report, in this study, a very rare case of abdominal parietal gangrene occurring in a 75-year-old woman on the fifth day after surgery for an ovarian cyst. Evolution was marked by occurrence of a refractory septic shock with a rapidly fatal course on the third day of management.

  6. Golden Helix Pharmacogenomics Days: educational activities on pharmacogenomics and personalized medicine.

    PubMed

    Squassina, Alessio; Severino, Giovanni; Grech, Godfrey; Fenech, Anthony; Borg, Joseph; Patrinos, George P

    2012-04-01

    The Golden Helix Pharmacogenomics Days are high-profile international educational scientific meetings discussing pharmacogenomics and personalized medicine. Here, we provide an overview of the scientific lectures and the topics discussed during the 4th Golden Helix Pharmacogenomics Day, held in Cagliari, Italy, on 7 October 2011, and the 5th Golden Helix Pharmacogenomics Day, that was held in Msida, Malta, on 3 December 2011. The scientific programs of both events included scientific and company lectures on pharmacogenomics, bioinformatics and personalized medicine by local and international speakers from Europe and the USA.

  7. Every Day Is Mathematical

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Barger, Rita H.; Jarrah, Adeeb M.

    2012-01-01

    March 14 is special because it is Pi Day. Mathematics is celebrated on that day because the date, 3-14, replicates the first three digits of pi. Pi-related songs, websites, trivia facts, and more are at the fingertips of interested teachers and students. Less celebrated, but still fairly well known, is National Metric Day, which falls on October…

  8. Day Care: Everybody's Problem.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Office of Child Development (DHEW), Washington, DC.

    This document reports on statistics regarding the need for day care facilities for children under the age of six. It also gives suggestions for making better use of local day care resources. Statistics show that: (1) There are more than 5 million children in this country under the age of 6 whose mothers work; (2) There are licensed day care…

  9. Growing degree day calculator

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Degree-day benchmarks indicate discrete biological events in the development of insect pests. For the Sparganothis fruitworm, we have isolated all key development events and linked them to degree-day accumulations. These degree-day accumulations can greatly improve treatment timings for cranberry IP...

  10. Day Care Evaluation Manual.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Council for Community Services in Metropolitan Chicago, IL.

    This manual presents instruments for evaluating the program and facilities of day care centers and family day care homes serving nonhandicapped children aged 3-5. Chapter 1 discusses child care evaluation in general and outlines the rationale underlying this evaluation system (including the principle that day care evaluation should assess program…

  11. Ultrasound-guided quadratus lumborum block as a postoperative analgesic technique for laparotomy.

    PubMed

    Kadam, Vasanth Rao

    2013-10-01

    The quadratus lumborum (QL) block as a postoperative analgesic method following abdominal surgery has been described by Blanco for superficial surgeries but not used for major laparotomy. This ipsilateral QL block had low pain scores and opioid use on day one with sensory block upto T8-L1. The options of various volume used and pros and cons are discussed.

  12. Postoperative maladaptive behavioral changes in children.

    PubMed

    Yuki, Koichi; Daaboul, Dima G

    2011-06-01

    Induction of anesthesia can be a very stressful period for a child and his family and can be associated with increased risk of psychological disturbances. These disturbances are categorized as preoperative anxiety, emergence delirium and postoperative behavioral changes. Several tools have been developed to measure these psychological manifestations as well as the baseline personality traits of these patients. Postoperative negative behavioral changes, such as sleep and eating disorders, separation anxiety, temper tantrum, aggression toward authorities, may occur in up to 60% of all children undergoing general anesthesia. Several studies found a strong association between these postoperative behavioral changes, the distress of the child on induction and his individual personality characteristics, although a cause-effect relationship could not be determined. Understanding the risk factors for behavior changes helps us determine the best way for prevention and treatment of these changes in the perioperative period.

  13. Simplified cesarean section: a strategic surgical approach to minimize postoperative infectious morbidity.

    PubMed

    Pelosi

    1998-07-01

    Objective: A simplified method of cesarean delivery aimed at minimizing postoperative morbidity is illustrated.Methods: Two hundred consecutive cesarean deliveries were performed by the authors' simplified cesarean technique. Mean patient age was 27 years (range 17-46), and mean weight was 169 pounds (range 112-414). Indications for cesarean delivery included dystocia or failure to progress in labor (38%), repeat cesarean (32%), malpresentation (11.5%), fetal distress (9.5%), and other (9%).Results: Simplified cesarean delivery was successfully completed in all cases. Mean operating time was 16 minutes (range 9-33), mean blood loss was 460 mL (range 100-1150), and mean postsurgical hospitalization time was 72 hours (range 36-120). No bowel, bladder, or vascular injuries occurred. Postoperative febrile morbidity occurred in one patient (0.5%), ileus occurred in one patient (0.5%), and blood transfusion was administered to one patient (0.5%). No cases of wound infection, wound dehiscence, hematoma, or incisional hernia occurred. All patients were ambulatory on the first postoperative day. All but one patient (99.5%) tolerated a regular diet on the first postoperative day.Conclusions: The authors' technique of cesarean section appears to be a safe and efficient method for cesarean delivery associated with minimal postoperative infectious morbidity and rapid resumption of bowel and ambulatory function.

  14. Effects of lidocaine and adrenaline combination on postoperative edema and ecchymosis in rhinoplasty.

    PubMed

    Gun, R; Yorgancılar, E; Yıldırım, M; Bakır, S; Topcu, I; Akkus, Z

    2011-07-01

    Nasal osteotomies are the most important cause of periorbital edema and ecchymosis. Injection of lidocaine and adrenaline is recommended to reduce bleeding. Whilst the lidocaine and adrenaline combination (LAC) is claimed to reduce postoperative ecchymosis and edema, this effect remains to be proven conclusively. This study, on 48 patients, was designed to investigate the effects of LAC injection on postoperative edema/ecchymosis in rhinoplasty. LAC was applied at a random side prior to the lateral osteotomy. The opposite side was used as a control. The relationship between edema/ecchymosis and the degree of LAC on the injected and uninjected sides was evaluated on the first, third and seventh day postoperatively. The relationships between edema and ecchymosis with operation time and intraoperative systolic blood pressure were also evaluated. Bleeding was reduced on the side treated with LAC (p=0.050). The degrees of edema/ecchymosis increased with increases in the duration of operation and the systolic blood pressure on the first postoperative day for the LAC-applied side (p<0.05). This correlation was not observed on the opposite side (p>0.05). Application of LAC reduces bleeding during rhinoplasty and pain control postoperatively but reduced edema and ecchymosis should not be expected following LAC application.

  15. Orthotopic liver transplantation: reversible Doppler US findings in the immediate postoperative period.

    PubMed

    Sanyal, Rupan; Lall, Chandana G; Lamba, Ramit; Verma, Sadhna; Shah, Shetal N; Tirkes, Temel; Berry, William A; Sandrasegaran, Kumaresan

    2012-01-01

    Orthotopic liver transplantation (OLT) is the only definitive treatment for irreversible acute liver failure and chronic liver disease. In the immediate postoperative period after OLT, patients are closely monitored with Doppler ultrasonography (US) to detect treatable vascular complications and ensure graft survival. The first postoperative Doppler US examination is performed fairly early on the first postoperative day, before surgical wound closure has been performed. The immediate postoperative images, obtained when the effects of surgery are very recent, often reveal an array of findings that may appear alarming but that tend to normalize within a few days and are compatible with changes related to the surgery itself. These findings include a starry-sky appearance of reperfusion hepatic edema, transient foci of increased echogenicity, pneumobilia, small fluid collections, perihepatic hematomas, pleural effusion, temporary elevation of hepatic arterial velocity, transient elevation of resistive index (RI), decreased RI with tardus parvus waveform, increased portal venous flow and mono- or biphasic waveforms of the hepatic veins. Most of these changes revert to normal in the first postoperative week; deterioration atypical of transient changes requires further evaluation.

  16. Antinociceptive effects of vitexin in a mouse model of postoperative pain

    PubMed Central

    Zhu, Qing; Mao, Li-Na; Liu, Cheng-Peng; Sun, Yue-Hua; Jiang, Bo; Zhang, Wei; Li, Jun-Xu

    2016-01-01

    Vitexin, a C-glycosylated flavone present in several medicinal herbs, has showed various pharmacological activities including antinociception. The present study investigated the antinociceptive effects of vitexin in a mouse model of postoperative pain. This model was prepared by making a surgical incision on the right hindpaw and von Frey filament test was used to assess mechanical hyperalgesia. Isobolographical analysis method was used to examine the interaction between vitexin and acetaminophen. A reliable mechanical hyperalgesia was observed at 2 h post-surgery and lasted for 4 days. Acute vitexin administration (3–10 mg/kg, i.p.) dose-dependently relieved this hyperalgesia, which was also observed from 1 to 3 days post-surgery during repeated daily treatment. However, repeated vitexin administration prior to surgery had no preventive value. The 10 mg/kg vitexin-induced antinociception was blocked by the opioid receptor antagonist naltrexone or the GABAA receptor antagonist bicuculline. The doses of vitexin used did not significantly suppress the locomotor activity. In addition, the combination of vitexin and acetaminophen produced an infra-additive effect in postoperative pain. Together, though vitexin-acetaminophen combination may not be useful for treating postoperative pain, vitexin exerts behaviorally-specific antinociception against postoperative pain mediated through opioid receptors and GABAA receptors, suggesting that vitexin may be useful for the control of postoperative pain. PMID:26763934

  17. Dysfunction of pre- and post-operative cardiac autonomic nervous system in elderly patients with diabetes mellitus.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Junlong; Tu, Weifeng; Dai, Jianqiang; Lv, Qing; Yang, Xiaoqi

    2011-01-01

    The pre- and post-operative cardiac autonomic nervous functions were compared in elderly, non-cardiac surgery patients with diabetes mellitus (DM) and without diabetes mellitus (NDM). A group of 30 unpremedicated elderly patients scheduled to undergo elective non-cardiac surgery were studied, including 15 DM patients and 15 NDM patients. Each component of heart rate variability (HRV) analysis in the frequency domain was monitored with Holter during the nights of the day before and on 1st and 2nd day after operation. After surgery, total power (TP), high frequency (HF), low frequency (LF) and very low frequency (VLF) significantly decreased as compared to the baseline values before operation in both groups (p<0.05). The LF/HF ratio was significantly changed in DM group but did not change in NDM group. On the 2nd postoperative day, TP, HF, LF and VLF in DM group were further decreased as compared to those on the 1st postoperative day and were significantly lower than those in NDM group (p<0.01 or 0.05), but these indices in NDM group did not show significant decreases. Surgery induced the cardiac autonomic nervous dysfunction in elderly patients not only with DM but also without diabetes. On the 2nd postoperative day, the disturbances of cardiac autonomic nervous activity were more sever in DM patients, compared to the 1st postoperative day, but was not significantly more sever than in the NDM patients.

  18. New Wisdom to Defy an Old Enemy: Summary from a scientific symposium at the 4th Influenza Vaccines for the World (IVW) 2012 Congress, 11 October, Valencia, Spain.

    PubMed

    Poland, Gregory A; Fleming, Douglas M; Treanor, John J; Maraskovsky, Eugene; Luke, Thomas C; Ball, Emma M A; Poland, Caroline M

    2013-04-17

    Both seasonal and pandemic influenza cause considerable morbidity and mortality globally. In addition, the ongoing threat of new, unpredictable influenza pandemics from emerging variant strains cannot be underestimated. Recently bioCSL (previously known as CSL Biotherapies) sponsored a symposium 'New Wisdom to Defy an Old Enemy' at the 4th Influenza Vaccines for the World Congress in Valencia, Spain. This symposium brought together a renowned faculty of experts to discuss lessons from past experience, novel influenza vaccine developments, and new methods to increase vaccine acceptance and coverage. Specific topics reviewed and discussed included new vaccine development efforts focused on improving efficacy via alternative administration routes, dose modifications, improved adjuvants, and the use of master donor viruses. Improved safety was also discussed, particularly the new finding of an excess of febrile reactions isolated to children who received the 2010 Southern Hemisphere (SH) trivalent inactivated influenza vaccine (TIV). Significant work has been done to both identify the cause and minimize the risk of febrile reactions in children. Other novel prophylactic and therapeutic advances were discussed including immunotherapy. Standard IVIg and hIVIg have been used in ferret studies and human case reports with promising results. New adjuvants, such as ISCOMATRIX™ adjuvant, were noted to provide single-dose, prolonged protection with seasonal vaccine after lethal H5N1 virus challenge in a ferret model of human influenza disease. The data suggest that adjuvanted seasonal influenza vaccines may provide broader protection than unadjuvanted vaccines. The use of an antigen-formulated vaccine to induce broad protection between pandemics that could bridge the gap between pandemic declaration and the production of a homologous vaccine was also discussed. Finally, despite the availability of effective vaccines, most current efforts to increase influenza vaccine coverage

  19. Management of postoperative complications: general approach.

    PubMed

    Sanguineti, V Ana; Wild, Jason R; Fain, Mindy J

    2014-05-01

    The goal of postoperative management is to promote early mobility and avoid postoperative complications, recognizing the potentially devastating impact of complications on elderly patients with hip fracture. The recommended approach involves early mobilization; freedom from tethers (indwelling urinary catheters and other devices); effective pain control; treating malnutrition; preventing pressure ulcers; reducing risk for pulmonary, urinary, and wound infections; and managing cognition. This carefully structured and patient-centered management provides older, vulnerable patients their best chance of returning to their previous level of functioning as quickly and safety as possible.

  20. Pathogenesis of postoperative oral surgical pain.

    PubMed Central

    Ong, Cliff K. S.; Seymour, R. A.

    2003-01-01

    Pain is a major postoperative symptom in many oral surgical procedures. It is a complex and variable phenomenon that can be influenced by many factors. Good management of oral surgical pain requires a detailed understanding of the pathogenesis of surgical pain. This article aims at reviewing postoperative pain from a broad perspective by looking into the nociception, neuroanatomy, neurophysiology, and neuropharmacology of pain. Therapeutic recommendations are made after reviewing the evidence from the literature for maximizing the efficacy of pain management techniques for oral surgical pain. PMID:12722900

  1. Postoperative global amnesia reversed with flumazenil.

    PubMed

    Rinehart, Joseph B; Baker, Brandee; Raphael, Darren

    2012-07-01

    Global postoperative amnesia (profound anterograde and retrograde amnesia) is rare and usually attributed to transient global amnesia-a poorly understood condition with no broadly accepted mechanism. We report an incident of probable transient global amnesia in a patient after endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatogram under general anesthesia, which was successfully treated with flumazenil. On the basis of the results of flumazenil administration in this and a previous case report, we would recommend a trial dose of 0.2 mg for cases of global postoperative amnesia, repeated if the first dose seems effective.

  2. Fish Oil and Post-Operative Atrial Fibrillation – Results of the Omega-3 Fatty Acids for Prevention of Post-Operative Atrial Fibrillation (OPERA) Trial

    PubMed Central

    Mozaffarian, Dariush; Marchioli, Roberto; Macchia, Alejandro; Silletta, Maria G.; Ferrazzi, Paolo; Gardner, Timothy J.; Latini, Roberto; Libby, Peter; Lombardi, Federico; O’Gara, Patrick T.; Page, Richard L.; Tavazzi, Luigi; Tognoni, Gianni

    2013-01-01

    Context Post-operative atrial fibrillation/flutter (AF) is one of the most common complications of cardiac surgery and significantly increases morbidity and healthcare utilization. A few small trials have evaluated whether long-chain n-3-polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFA) reduce post-op AF, with mixed results. Objective To determine whether peri-operative n-3-PUFA supplementation reduces post-op AF. Design Randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled, multinational, clinical trial. Patients A total of 1,516 patients scheduled for cardiac surgery across 28 centers in the US, Italy, and Argentina, enrolled between Aug 2010 and Jun 2012. Inclusion criteria were broad; the main exclusions were regular use of fish oil or absence of sinus rhythm at enrollment. Forty-eight percent of screened patients and 94% of eligible patients were enrolled. Intervention Patients were randomized to receive fish oil (1 g capsules containing ≥840 mg n-3-PUFA as ethyl esters) or placebo, with pre-operative loading of 10g over 3-5 days (or 8g over 2 days) followed post-operatively by 2g/d until hospital discharge or post-op day10, whichever first. Main Outcome Measures The primary endpoint was occurrence of post-op AF >30 sec. We also evaluated post-op AF lasting >1hr, resulting in symptoms, or treated with cardioversion; other secondary post-op AF endpoints; other tachyarrhythmias; hospital utilization; and major adverse cardiovascular events, 30-day mortality, bleeding, and other adverse events. All endpoints and analyses plans were prespecified. Results At enrollment, mean±SD age was 64±13 years, 72.2% were male, and 51.8% had planned valvular surgery. The primary endpoint occurred in 233 (30.7%) and 227 (30.0%) patients assigned to placebo and n-3-PUFA, respectively (OR=0.96, 95%CI=0.77-1.20; P=0.74). None of the secondary endpoints were significantly different, including post-op AF that was sustained, symptomatic, or treated (n=231 [30.5%] vs. n=224 [29.6%], P=0.70) or number of

  3. Propofol for Anesthesia and Postoperative Sedation Resulted in Fewer Inflammatory Responses than Sevoflurane Anesthesia and Midazolam Sedation after Thoracoabdominal Esophagectomy.

    PubMed

    Nakanuno, Ryuichi; Yasuda, Toshimichi; Hamada, Hiroshi; Yoshikawa, Hiroshi; Nakamura, Ryuji; Saeki, Noboru; Kawamoto, Masashi

    2015-09-01

    Responses to surgical stress can be modulated by anesthetics. We prospectively compared the effects of two different anesthetic/sedative techniques on the peak postoperative bladder temperature (BT) and the postoperative C-reactive protein (CRP) level. Twenty patients who were scheduled to undergo elective thoracoabdominal esophagectomy were allocated to receive either propofol anesthesia followed by propofol sedation (PP group, n = 10) or sevoflurane anesthesia followed by midazolam sedation (SM group, n = 10). In each case, the patient's peak bladder temperature was measured on the morning after surgery, and their serum CRP levels were assessed on postoperative days (POD) 1, 2, and 3. The patients' postoperative clinical courses were also evaluated. The peak postoperative BT (degrees C) (37.6 ± 0.4 vs. 38.2 ± 0.6, respectively; p < 0.05) and the CRP level on POD 2 (mg/dl) (14.3 ± 3.9 vs. 20.6 ± 3.9, respectively; p < 0.05) were lower in the PP group than in the SM group. The peak postoperative BT was positively correlated with the CRP level on POD 2 (R = 0.533, p < 0.05). There were no significant differences between the clinical course-related parameters in both groups. Propofol anesthesia and postoperative propofol sedation resulted in a reduced peak postoperative BT and lower CRP levels on POD 2 after esophagectomy than sevoflurane anesthesia followed by midazolam sedation.

  4. Locoregional immunotherapy of malignant effusion from colorectal cancer using the streptococcal preparation OK-432 plus interleukin-2: induction of autologous tumor-reactive CD4+ Th1 killer lymphocytes.

    PubMed

    Yamaguchi, Y; Miyahara, E; Ohshita, A; Kawabuchi, Y; Ohta, K; Shimizu, K; Minami, K; Hihara, J; Sawamura, A; Toge, T

    2003-11-17

    effusion lymphocytes from the other patients. Taken together, it is suggested that locoregional administration of OK-432 plus IL-2 is highly effective for the management of malignant effusion from colorectal cancer. OK-432 plus IL-2 induces autologous tumour-reactive CD4+ Th1 killer lymphocytes, which recognise tumour antigen(s) presented with HLA class II molecules on effusion tumour cells by means of preferential usage of TCRVbeta20. The clonotypic PCR using the TCRVbeta20-CDR3 sequences may be informative for treating malignant effusion from colorectal cancer using OK-432 plus IL-2.

  5. The development of a small bowel volvulus in the early postoperative period following a distal gastrectomy: report of a case.

    PubMed

    Sakamoto, T; Miyata, M; Nakamuro, M; Izukura, M; Kamiike, W; Matsuda, H

    1994-01-01

    A 51-year-old Japanese man who underwent a standard distal gastrectomy for cancer of the stomach developed abdominal pain when oral intake was commenced on the 6th postoperative day after an uneventful postoperative course. Complete obstruction of the jejunum led to a sudden deterioration in his general condition and a laparotomy was performed, revealing counterclockwise rotation of the mesenterium. The necrotic portion of the small intestine was removed, while 10 cm of the upper jejunum and 100 cm of the terminal ileum were preserved. His second postoperative course was uneventful apart from the development of "intestinal hurry," which is now under medical control 9 months after his second laparotomy.

  6. Comparison between IV Paracetamol and Tramadol for Postoperative Analgesia in Patients Undergoing Laparoscopic Cholecystectomy

    PubMed Central

    Singh, Vivek

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Efforts to use safer drug with minimal side effects for postoperative analgesia are growing day by day for surgeries of shorter duration or which may require day care only, search for ideal agent has been a never ending process. Aim The aim of the present study was to compare the efficacy of intravenous Paracetamol and Tramadol for postoperative analgesia in patients undergoing laparoscopic cholecystectomy. Materials and Methods This study was done at Department of Anaesthesiology, Era’s Medical College, Lucknow, India. Sixty ASA-I or II patients between 18-55 years of age, scheduled for laparoscopic cholecystectomy were randomly allocated to two groups of 30 each. Group A received IV infusion of paracetamol 1g in 100 ml solution, while Group B received IV infusion of Tramadol 100 mg in 100 ml NS at 0 (first complain of pain postoperatively), 6, 12 and 18 hours respectively. Pain intensity was measured by a 10 point Visual Analogue Scale (0→no pain and 10→worst imaginable pain) VAS at T(0)→just before analgesic administration, at 0.5, 1.5, 3, 6, 12, 18 and 24 hours thereafter, in addition to HR, SBP, DBP. Statistical Analysis: Chi-square test, Student t-test and p-values <0.05 was considered significant. Results During postoperative follow-up intervals, paracetamol showed significantly lower VAS scores as compared to tramadol at 1.5 hour, 3 hour, 6 hour, 12 hour and 24 hour follow up intervals. One patient in tramadol group had nausea postoperatively (p>0.05). No adverse effect attributable to paracetamol was noticed. Conclusion Intravenous Paracetamol can be advocated as an effective and safe analgesic agent for postoperative pain relief. PMID:27656532

  7. A prospective study on postoperative discomfort after 20-gauge pars plana vitrectomy

    PubMed Central

    Yu, Ji-guo; Ni, Fang; Xiang, Yi; Feng, Yi-fan; Wang, Jue; Fu, Xun-an

    2015-01-01

    Purpose To evaluate postoperative pain and other irritation symptoms after 20-gauge (20G) pars plana vitrectomy. Materials and methods A total of 110 consecutive patients were enrolled in our studies, and 87 patients who underwent the conventional 20G pars plana vitrectomy were included in the final analysis. All vitrectomies were performed using the same surgical technique by the same surgeon. Patients were examined before surgery and 1 day, 3 days, 7 days, 1 month, and 2 months postoperatively. The main outcome measures include patient age and sex, intraocular pressure (IOP), ocular pain, pain score, pain medication use, and other irritation symptoms comprising itching, foreign body sensation, burning, photophobia, and dryness. The pain was evaluated using the Numerical Rating Scale scored from 0 to 10. Results Postoperative pain was relatively common during the first day after surgery, as it was reported by 43 (49.4%) patients. Then, the prevalence gradually decreased to eleven (12.6%) patients at 2 months. Most patients reported mild or moderate pain, with a pain score of 1–5, but only four patients were given analgesics for ocular pain. A postoperative rise of IOP was noted in 25 patients at day 1. Most of these patients with high IOP reported moderate pain. Other ocular irritation symptoms were varied after surgery. There was still one-quarter of patients that had foreign body sensation and dryness symptoms at month 2 after surgery. Conclusion Mild and moderate ocular pain were relatively common after 20G vitrectomy, which is more often associated with elevated IOP. Other irritation symptoms were also presented after surgery and could affect the life quality of patients. Therefore, the discomforts after 20G pars plana vitrectomy should be of concern, and timely management should be provided as part of routine postoperative care. PMID:26244010

  8. The surgical team and outcomes management: focus on postoperative ileus.

    PubMed

    Carter, Susan

    2006-04-01

    Postoperative ileus (POI) is defined as the impairment of bowel motility that occurs almost universally after major open abdominal procedures, as well as other abdominal and nonabdominal procedures. For the majority of affected patients, POI generally lasts approximately three to five days, but longer duration is not uncommon. The causes of POI are multifactorial, but can be broadly categorized into two groups: those related to the surgical procedure and those related to pharmacologic interventions (opioids). The fact that POI is generally transient and therefore self-limited should not deter the surgical team from seeking improved ways to mitigate its associated adverse effects, which can be substantial and immensely uncomfortable for the patient, and can have far-reaching implications regarding overall hospitalization costs for many types of surgeries. Optimization of POI management and prevention efforts is a responsibility of all members of the surgical team and can drastically affect the overall clinical outcome of major abdominal surgery. Depending on the individual team member's role, different perspectives and strategies may be used to achieve improved outcomes, including but not limited to hospitalization costs related to care and length of stay, resource utilization, and, perhaps most critically, patient quality of life not only immediately after surgery but also after discharge. The ability to reliably and significantly decrease the duration of POI should be readily recognized as an important objective in the management of this condition. Opioids will continue to be a mainstay of postoperative care regimens, but new agents such as peripherally acting mu-opioid-receptor antagonists may offer a unique clinical advantage by helping to reduce the adverse gastrointestinal effects of opioids while preserving their desired benefits for postoperative analgesia.

  9. Postoperative chylothorax: a case for recycling?

    PubMed

    Thomson, I A; Simms, M H

    1993-08-01

    Postoperative chylothorax in a patient who was rapidly deteriorating despite conservative treatment is described. A system of recycling chyle from the pleural space through a filter and pump into the subclavian vein is discussed. The history of reinfusion of chyle is reviewed.

  10. Postoperative nausea and vomiting following orthognathic surgery

    PubMed Central

    Phillips, C.; Brookes, C. D.; Rich, J.; Arbon, J.; Turvey, T. A.

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to assess the incidence and risk factors associated with postoperative nausea (PON) and vomiting (POV) after orthognathic surgery. A review of the clinical records of consecutively enrolled subjects (2008–2012) at a single academic institution was conducted between 9/2013 and 3/2014. Data on the occurrence of PON and POV and potential patient-related, intraoperative, and postoperative explanatory factors were extracted from the medical records. Logistic models were used for the presence/absence of postoperative nausea and vomiting separately. Data from 204 subjects were analyzed: 63% were female, 72% Caucasian, and the median age was 19 years. Thirty-three percent had a mandibular osteotomy alone, 27% a maxillary osteotomy alone, and 40% had bimaxillary osteotomies. Sixty-seven percent experienced PON and 27% experienced POV. The most important risk factors for PON in this series were female gender, increased intravenous fluids, and the use of nitrous oxide, and for POV were race, additional procedures, and morphine administration. The incidence of PON and POV following orthognathic surgery in the current cohort of patients, after the introduction of the updated 2007 consensus guidelines for the management of postoperative nausea and vomiting, has not decreased substantially from that reported in 2003–2004. PMID:25655765

  11. Advancing Age and 30-Day Adverse Outcomes Following Non-Emergent General Surgical Operations

    PubMed Central

    Gajdos, Csaba; Kile, Deidre; Hawn, Mary T.; Finlayson, Emily; Henderson, William G.; Robinson, Thomas N.

    2014-01-01

    Background While some single center studies have demonstrated that major surgical operations are safe to perform in older adults, most multicenter database studies find advancing age to independently predict adverse postoperative outcomes. We hypothesized that thirty-day postoperative mortality, complications, failure to rescue rates and postoperative length of stay will increase with advancing age. Design Retrospective cohort study. Setting Hospitals participating in the American College of Surgeons National Surgical Quality Improvement Program (ACS-NSQIP) Participants Patients undergoing non-emergent major general surgical operations between 2005 and 2008 were studied. Measures Postoperative outcomes of interest were complications occurring within 30 days of the index operation, return to OR within 30 days, failure to rescue after a postoperative complication, post-surgical length of stay and 30 day mortality. Results A total of 165,600 patients were studied. The rates of postoperative mortality, overall morbidity, and each type of postoperative complication increased as age increased. The rates of failure to rescue after each type of postoperative complication also increased with age. Mortality rates in patients ≥80 following renal insufficiency (43.3%), stroke (36.5%), myocardial infarction (35.6%), and pulmonary complications (25-39%) were particularly high. Median postoperative length of stay increased with age following surgical site infection, UTI, pneumonia, return to OR, and overall morbidity, but not after venous thromboembolism, stroke, myocardial infarction, renal insufficiency, failure to wean from the ventilator or reintubations. Conclusion Thirty-day mortality, complications and failure to rescue rates increase with advancing age following non-emergent general surgical operations. Patients over 80 years of age have especially high mortality following renal, cardiovascular, and pulmonary complications. As patient age advances, surgeons need to be

  12. Prevalence of acute post-operative pain in patients in adult age-group undergoing inpatient abdominal surgery and correlation of intensity of pain and satisfaction with analgesic management: A cross-sectional single institute-based study

    PubMed Central

    Singh, Prashant Kumar; Saikia, Priyam; Lahakar, Mangala

    2016-01-01

    Background and Aims: Considering the paucity of regional data, this study was designed to investigate the prevalence of post-operative pain and determine if there exists any correlation between the intensity of post-operative pain and patient's level of satisfaction with their pain management after inpatient abdominal surgery at an academic tertiary care government centre. Methods: Pain intensity was measured in 120 patients with numeric rating scale at the fifth post-operative hour, second and third post-operative day. A questionnaire was used to measure the level of satisfaction with nurse's and doctor's response to their pain and overall pain management. Results: The prevalence of post-operative pain was 84.17%, 92.5% and 96.66% at the fifth post-operative hour, second and third post-operative day, respectively. Less number of patients experienced severe intensity pain on the third post-operative day (P = 0.00046), whereas the number of patients experiencing mild pain increased (P < 0.000) compared to the fifth post-operative hour. The number of patients with complete analgesia decreased on the third post-operative day (P = 0.001 compared to fifth post-operative day). The Spearman correlation coefficient between pain score on the third post-operative day and level of satisfaction with nurse's response, doctor's response to pain and the overall pain management was − 0.0218 (P = 0.8107), 0.1307 (P = 0.1553) and 0.0743 (P = 0.4195), respectively. Conclusion: There is a high prevalence of acute post-operative pain in patients undergoing inpatient abdominal surgery at our institute. There is a weak correlation between the intensity of pain and level of satisfaction with pain management. PMID:27761037

  13. Effect of azidocillin, erythromycin, clindamycin and doxycycline on postoperative complications after surgical removal of impacted mandibular third molars.

    PubMed

    Bystedt, H; Nord, C E; Nordenram, A

    1980-06-01

    Treatment of osteitis after surgical removal of the third molar of the mandible is still a clinical problem. A total of 140 patients undergoing operations for removal of an impacted third molar of the mandible, were included in a double-blind study. Placebo or antibiotics - azidocillin, erythromycin, clindamycin and doxycycline - were given to the patients preoperatively and for the following 7 days. The concentrations in serum, alveolar serum and mandibular bone were measured and the postoperative courses - pain, trismus, swelling and wound-healing - were recorded. No correlation was obtained between the antibiotic concentration and the postoperative complaints, except in the azidocillin group on day 2, in which fewer complaints were noticed in patients with high concentrations of the drug at the time of operations. The 80 patients in the antibiotic groups responded significantly better with respect to wound-healing than the 60 patients in the placebo groups. Only 15 operations lasted more than 15 min and the three of them which subsequently resulted in alveolitis were in the placebo groups. Antibiotics significantly reduced pain on day 7 postoperatively. In general, no statistically significant differences in trismus and swelling could be demonstrated between the patient groups. However, there was a significant difference between the placebo and doxycycline groups with respect to swelling (day 2 postoperative, P < 0.01; day 5 postoperative, P < 0.05). Thus systemically administered antibiotics offered only slight advantages in routine operations of impacted third mandibular molars, but could decrease the rate of infections after traumatic operations.

  14. Hybrid minimally invasive esophagectomy for cancer: impact on postoperative inflammatory and nutritional status.

    PubMed

    Scarpa, M; Cavallin, F; Saadeh, L M; Pinto, E; Alfieri, R; Cagol, M; Da Roit, A; Pizzolato, E; Noaro, G; Pozza, G; Castoro, C

    2016-11-01

    The purpose of this case-control study was to evaluate the impact of hybrid minimally invasive esophagectomy for cancer on surgical stress response and nutritional status. All 34 consecutive patients undergoing hybrid minimally invasive esophagectomy for cancer at our surgical unit between 2008 and 2013 were retrospectively compared with 34 patients undergoing esophagectomy with open gastric tubulization (open), matched for neoadjuvant therapy, pathological stage, gender and age. Demographic data, tumor features and postoperative course (including quality of life and systemic inflammatory and nutritional status) were compared. Postoperative course was similar in terms of complication rate. Length of stay in intensive care unit was shorter in patients undergoing hybrid minimally invasive esophagectomy (P = 0.002). In the first postoperative day, patients undergoing hybrid minimally invasive esophagectomy had lower C-reactive protein levels (P = 0.001) and white cell blood count (P = 0.05), and higher albumin serum level (P = 0.001). In this group, albumin remained higher also at third (P = 0.06) and seventh (P = 0.008) postoperative day, and C-reactive protein resulted lower at third post day (P = 0.04). Hybrid minimally invasive esophagectomy significantly improved the systemic inflammatory and catabolic response to surgical trauma, contributing to a shorter length of stay in intensive care unit.

  15. Influence of state anxiety and trate anxiety in postoperative in oral surgery

    PubMed Central

    Recio-Lora, Concha; Castillo-Dalí, Gabriel; Ruiz-de-León-Hernández, Gonzalo; Hita-Iglesias, Pilar; Serrera-Figallo, Maria A.; Segura-Egea, Juan J.; Gutiérrez-Pérez, José L

    2014-01-01

    Introduction: The aim of this article was to study the influence of anxiety (both state and trait) in postoperative recovery after extraction of third molar together, to establish the role of each of the aspects of anxiety in the results you obtained in an independent and complementary way. Material and Methods: We performed a prospective study of a consecutive series of 88 patients who underwent lower third molar extractions. Before being provided with any information about the operation, patients were asked to complete the Spielberger State-Trait Anxiety Inventory-Trait and State. We have evaluated postoperative swelling and pain, patients completed a 10-point visual analog scale (VAS) at home each day (at approximately the same time of day as the operation) until day 8 after surgery, when the sutures were removed. Results: Regarding postoperative variables between positive and negative trait anxiety groups, consumption of analgesic drugs was higher in positive trait anxiety group in a statistically significant way, while these differences were detected only on specific occasions regarding pain and swelling. Discussion: In the present study, anxiety was taken into account and showed a significant effect in explaining postoperative pain and taking analgesics. Key words:Anxiety, satisfaction, third molar surgery, Spielberger state-trait anxiety inventory. PMID:24608206

  16. Postoperative adjuvant therapy of breast cancer. Oncology Overview

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1984-12-01

    Oncology Overviews are a service of the International Cancer Research Data Bank (ICRDB) Program of the National Cancer Institute, intended to facilitate and promote the exchange of information between cancer scientists by keeping them aware of literature related to their research being published by other laboratories throughout the world. Each Oncology Overview represents a survey of the literature associated with a selected area of cancer research. It contains abstracts of articles which have been selected and organized by researchers associated with the field. Contents: Postoperative chemotherapy; Postoperative radiotherapy; Postoperative hormone therapy; Postoperative immunotherapy and chemoimmunotherapy; Postoperative multimodal therapy; Prognostic factors in postoperative adjuvant therapy.

  17. [Infants in Day Care].

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pawl, Jeree, Ed.; And Others

    1990-01-01

    This newsletter theme issue looks at infant day care models including those emphasizing early intervention with special needs infants. The lead article, "Infants in Day Care: Reflections on Experiences, Expectations and Relationships," by Jeree H. Pawl, stresses the importance of understanding infants' and toddlers' capacities and needs in…

  18. Rainy Day Activities.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Texas Child Care, 1997

    1997-01-01

    Experienced caregivers plan ahead for rainy days. This article describes specific rainy day activities for young children, such as books and crafts to learn about rain (rain in a jar, making a rainbow), simple cooking activities (taffy pull, cinnamon candy tea), and games (mummy wrap, hunt the thimble, rain lotto). (EV)

  19. Science Challenge Day

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Siegel, Deborah

    2013-01-01

    Science fairs can be good motivators, but as extracurricular activities, they leave some students behind. However, by staging a Science Challenge Day at school, educators can involve all students in doing everything from choosing activities to judging projects. This article presents a model for running a successful Science Challenge Day. The…

  20. RED-LETTER DAYS

    EPA Science Inventory

    The word "red-letter" is an adjective meaning "of special significance." It's origin is from the practice of marking Christian holy days in red letters on calendars. The "red-letter days" to which I refer occurred while I was a graduate student of ...

  1. Family Science Day

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McCubbins, Sara; Thomas, Bethany; Vetere, Michael

    2014-01-01

    This article describes a family-friendly science day event that encourages scientific discovery through hands-on activities, while also providing an opportunity to learn about scientific careers from actual research scientists and science educators, thereby raising awareness of the importance of STEM in our society. The one-day event bought…

  2. The Presidents' Day Game

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Maxwell, D. Jackson

    2008-01-01

    The history behind the holiday commonly called "Presidents' Day" is a bit confusing. It started as a federal holiday called Washington's Birthday. It was a day set aside to honor George Washington for his accomplishments as a founding father of the country. Later, many northern states began to recognize Abraham Lincoln's Birthday as well for his…

  3. Day of the Dead

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dann, Tammy; Murphy, Amy

    2012-01-01

    Foreign Language in Elementary School (FLES) teachers in the West Des Moines schools incorporate the Day of the Dead into the fourth grade curriculum each year. The teachers discuss the Day of the Dead celebration at the Art Center, and many ask for volunteers from fourth grade to participate in the event. Student presentations include a wide…

  4. School Building Day, 2001.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Council of Educational Facility Planners, International, Scottsdale, AZ.

    This document presents information and development materials about "School Building Day" (an event spotlighting the school facility and developing support and pride in the community's schools) to help local school districts conduct their own "School Building Day" to be held on April 20th of 2001. Included are lists of suggested…

  5. Convergent Validity of Three Methods for Measuring Postoperative Complications

    PubMed Central

    Fritz, Bradley A.; Escallier, Krisztina E.; Abdallah, Arbi Ben; Oberhaus, Jordan; Becker, Jennifer; Geczi, Kristin; McKinnon, Sherry; Helsten, Dan L.; Sharma, Anshuman; Wildes, Troy S.; Avidan, Michael S.

    2016-01-01

    Background Anesthesiologists need tools to accurately track postoperative outcomes. The accuracy of patient report in identifying a wide variety of postoperative complications after diverse surgical procedures has not previously been investigated. Methods In this cohort study, 1,578 adult surgical patients completed a survey at least 30 days after their procedure asking if they had experienced any of 18 complications while in the hospital after surgery. Patient responses were compared to the results of an automated electronic chart review and (for a random subset of 750 patients) to a manual chart review. Results from automated chart review were also compared to those from manual chart review. Forty-two randomly selected patients were contacted by telephone to explore reasons for discrepancies between patient report and manual chart review. Results Comparisons between patient report, automated chart review, and manual chart review demonstrated poor-to-moderate positive agreement (range, 0 to 58%) and excellent negative agreement (range, 82 to 100%). Discordance between patient report and manual chart review was frequently explicable by patients reporting events that happened outside the time period of interest. Conclusions Patient report can provide information about subjective experiences or events that happen after hospital discharge, but often yields different results from chart review for specific in-hospital complications. Effective in-hospital communication with patients and thoughtful survey design may increase the quality of patient-reported complication data. PMID:27028469

  6. Respiratory stimulant drugs in the post-operative setting.

    PubMed

    Golder, Francis J; Hewitt, Matthew M; McLeod, James F

    2013-11-01

    Drug-induced respiratory depression (DIRD) is a common problem encountered post-operatively and can persist for days after surgery. It is not always possible to predict the timing or severity of DIRD due to the number of contributing factors. A safe and effective respiratory stimulant could improve patient care by avoiding the use of reversal agents (e.g., naloxone, which reverses analgesia as well as respiratory depression) thereby permitting better pain management by enabling the use of higher doses of analgesics, facilitate weaning from prolonged ventilation, and ameliorate sleep-disordered breathing peri-operatively. The purpose of this review is to discuss the current pharmaceutical armamentarium of drugs (doxapram and almitrine) that are licensed for use in humans as respiratory stimulants and that could be used to reverse drug-induced respiratory depression in the post-operative period. We also discuss new chemical entities (AMPAkines and GAL-021) that have been recently evaluated in Phase 1 clinical trials and where the initial regulatory registration would be as a respiratory stimulant.

  7. Development and implementation of a dedicated postoperative evaluation service to improve compliance of postoperative visits

    PubMed Central

    Vacanti, Joshua Charles; Urman, Richard Dennis; Sarin, Pankaj; Liu, Xiaoxia; Kodali, Bhavani Shankar

    2015-01-01

    Background and Aims: Postoperative patient evaluation is an integral component of perioperative care. An audit of our anesthesia department's records demonstrated a compliance rate of <50%. We postulated that the development of clinical anesthesia service dedicated to performing such evaluations would improve compliance significantly. Materials and Methods: This retrospective study examined postoperative follow-up completion rate at a large academic center. Data were collected from 58,000 anesthetics during three periods, between each of which an intervention was introduced. The first period examined completion rate when postoperative evaluations were left to the team performing the anesthetic. During the second period, this task was delegated to groups of anesthesiologists based on surgical subspecialty; these smaller groups utilized rotating residents. The third period examined completion rate after implementation of a postoperative evaluation service. All periods utilized the department's electronics database to identify operative patients. The number of adverse anesthesia events reported was also recorded. Results: A significant difference in the proportions of compliance with postoperative evaluations among all three periods was detected. Compliance was 47% during period one and improved to 66% during period two. During period three, which employed a postoperative evaluation service, compliance was 83%. The number of adverse events reported per month increased significantly following the first study period from 95 reported monthly events to 215 and 201 in the second and third periods, respectively. Conclusion: By creating a dedicated postoperative evaluation service using available technology, we improved postoperative evaluation completion rate from 47% to 83%, and demonstrated a significant increase in the number of adverse events reported. Based on this, we support the deployment of a dedicated service as a quality improvement initiative. PMID:25788778

  8. [Effect of practical use of preoperative immunonutrition with impact on prevention of postoperative pneumonia after esophagectomy].

    PubMed

    Kano, Masayuki; Nabeya, Yoshihiro; Akutsu, Yasunori; Shuto, Kiyohiko; Uesato, Masaya; Miyazawa, Yukimasa; Matsubara, Hisahiro

    2009-11-01

    To clarify the clinical benefits of administering immune-enhancing diet, Impact,we examined retrospectively the effect of preoperative immunonutrition with Impact on prevention of postoperative pneumonia after esophagectomy. In 47 patients without preoperative radiotherapy, no patient who preoperatively administered Impact>or=2,250 mL failed to develop pneumonia. The patients whose postoperative hospital stay was more than 30 days were administered Impactpostoperative pneumonia and a long hospital stay after surgery.

  9. Surgical Treatment of Orbital Blowout Fractures: Complications and Postoperative Care Patterns.

    PubMed

    Shew, Matthew; Carlisle, Michael P; Lu, Guanning Nina; Humphrey, Clinton; Kriet, J David

    2016-11-01

    Orbital fractures are a common result of facial trauma. Sequelae and indications for repair include enophthalmos and/or diplopia from extraocular muscle entrapment. Alloplastic implant placement with careful release of periorbital fat and extraocular muscles can effectively restore extraocular movements, orbital integrity, and anatomic volume. However, rare but devastating complications such as retrobulbar hematoma (RBH) can occur after repair, which pose a risk of permanent vision loss if not addressed emergently. For this reason, some surgeons take the precaution of admitting patients for 24-hour postoperative vision checks, while others do not. The incidence of postoperative RBH has not been previously reported and existing data are limited to case reports. Our aim was to examine national trends in postoperative management and to report the incidence of immediate postoperative complications at our institution following orbital repair. A retrospective assessment of orbital blowout fractures was undertaken to assess immediate postoperative complications including RBH. Only patients treated by a senior surgeon in the Department of Otolaryngology were included in the review. In addition, we surveyed AO North America (AONA) Craniomaxillofacial faculty to assess current trends in postoperative management. There were 80 patients treated surgically for orbital blowout fractures over a 9.5-year period. Nearly all patients were observed overnight (74%) or longer (25%) due to other trauma. Average length of stay was 17 hours for those observed overnight. There was one (1.3%) patient with RBH, who was treated and recovered without sequelae. Results of the survey indicated that a majority (64%) of responders observe postoperative patients overnight. Twenty-nine percent of responders indicated that they send patients home the same day of surgery. Performance of more than 20 orbital repairs annually significantly increased the likelihood that faculty would manage patients on

  10. Preoperative concentration of beta-lipotropin immunoreactive material in cerebrospinal fluid: a predictor of postoperative pain?

    PubMed

    Matejec, Reginald; Schulz, Axel; Mühling, Jörg; Uhlich, Holger; Bödeker, Rolf-Hasso; Hempelmann, Gunter; Teschemacher, Hansjörg

    2006-02-01

    Levels of beta-endorphin immunoreactive material (IRM) in cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) have been reported to correlate inversely with postoperative morphine requirement. Considering proopiomelanocortin (POMC) derivatives as predictors for sensitivity to postoperative pain, we determined authentic beta-endorphin (beta-endorphin(1-31)), beta-lipotropin IRM, N-acetyl-beta-endorphin IRM and ACTH in CSF of 17 patients undergoing hip or knee arthroplasty, before surgery (t(A)), immediately after termination of propofol infusion and still under spinal anesthesia (t(B)), under postoperative pain (t(C)) and one day after surgery (t(D)); patients rated their severity of pain on a visual analogue scale (VAS) at those four times. In all patients CSF concentrations of N-acetyl-beta-endorphin IRM and beta-lipotropin IRM were found to be increased after terminating the propofol infusion with spinal anesthesia still effective at t(B). Patients did not feel pain at times t(A), t(B) or t(D); however, they reported moderate to considerable pain at t(C). There were no correlations of postoperative pain severity at t(C) with ACTH, beta-endorphin(1-31) or N-acetyl-beta-endorphin IRM concentrations in CSF. In contrast, we observed significant inverse correlations (Spearman's rank correlation coefficients between -0.83 and -0.85, p<0.01) for postoperative pain severity with beta-lipotropin IRM concentrations in CSF at t(C), and, in addition, at t(A), t(B) and t(D); thus, postoperative pain severity appeared to be dependent on a central system controlling sensitivity to pain, linked to a POMC system releasing beta-lipotropin IRM into CSF and already active at times t(A) and t(B). We conclude that beta-lipotropin IRM in CSF might be considered to serve as a predictor of sensitivity to postoperative pain.

  11. A comparative study of postoperative pain for open thyroidectomy versus bilateral axillo-breast approach robotic thyroidectomy using a self-reporting application for iPad

    PubMed Central

    Chai, Young Jun; Song, Junho; Kang, Jiyoung; Woo, Jung-Woo; Song, Ra-Yeong; Kwon, Hyungju; Kim, Su-Jin; Choi, June Young

    2016-01-01

    Purpose Postoperative pain for robotic thyroid surgeries including bilateral axillo-breast approach (BABA) has not been well studied. In this study, we have developed a self-reporting application (SRA) for iPad and prospectively collected pain scores from open thyroidectomy (OT) and BABA robotic thyroidectomy (RT) patients. Methods Female patients who underwent total thyroidectomy for papillary thyroid carcinoma were included. Patients recorded pain scores for throat, anterior neck, posterior neck, chest, and back on postoperative days 1, 2, and 3. Once discharged, on postoperative day 14, a survey was also conducted on satisfaction of SRA and cosmesis. Results A total of 54 patients were enrolled (27 BABA RT and 27 OT). There were no significant differences between the 2 groups in clinicopathological characteristics and postoperative complication rates. Postoperative pain scores at days 1, 2, 3, and 14 were not significantly different between the groups for throat, anterior neck, posterior neck, or back. Postoperative analgesic requirements were similar between the 2 groups. Wound satisfaction scores were significantly higher in the BABA RT group (BABA RT 7.4 vs. OT 5.7; P = 0.016). Satisfaction scores for the usefulness of SRA were above 7.2 for all four questionnaire items on the 10-point scale. Conclusion Postoperative pain for BABA RT is equivalent to OT but offers greater cosmetic satisfaction for patients. A mobile device application such as SRA may facilitate proper assessment and management of pain in postoperative patients. PMID:27186567

  12. Postoperative irradiation impairs or enhances wound strength depending on time of administration

    SciTech Connect

    Vegesna, V.; McBride, W.H.; Withers, H.R.

    1995-08-01

    Irradiation can complicate surgical wound healing, yet little is known of the importance of the time between surgery and irradiation on this process. This study investigated the impact of post-operative irradiation on gain in wound tensile strength in a murine skin model. Irradiation on the same day as wounding or to 2-day-old wounds reduced wound tensile strength. In contrast, postoperative irradiation delivered at 7, 9 and 14 days transiently enhanced wound tensile strength, as measure d 3 but not 4 or 5 weeks later. This effect was independent of the inclusion (hemi-body) or exclusion (skin alone) of the hematopoietic system in the field of irradiation. Radiation-enhanced wound tensile strength was greater and occurred earlier after higher radiation doses. Even though the effect of irradiation in enhancing wound tensile strength is transitory, it could be important in assisting early wound healing. 14 refs., 3 figs., 1 tab.

  13. An interesting case of acute, severe postoperative hyponatraemia following carotid endarterectomy.

    PubMed

    Parkinson, Fran; Hopper, Andrew Neil; Eggert, Sabine; Ferguson, Colin J

    2013-05-30

    A 62-year-old man with no major comorbidities became acutely hyponatraemic on the second postoperative day following a routine carotid endarterectomy. He developed a headache, became hypertensive and confused, and then had a seizure and required intubation and admission to the intensive care unit. A CT angiogram of his head and carotid arteries was normal, as was a subsequent MRI head. His serum and urine osmolality were low. He was treated by fluid restriction and his hyponatraemia resolved over 3 days. On discontinuation of sedation the patient woke up appropriately. The cause of his hyponatraemia was initially a mystery but when questioned by the medical team he admitted that he drank about 5 litres of water in the afternoon on the second postoperative day. At this point the diagnosis of dilutional hypervolaemic hyponatraemia secondary to water intoxication could be made.

  14. Use of postoperative irradiation for the prevention of heterotopic bone formation after total hip replacement

    SciTech Connect

    Sylvester, J.E.; Greenberg, P.; Selch, M.T.; Thomas, B.J.; Amstutz, H.

    1988-03-01

    Formation of heterotopic bone (HTB) following total hip replacement may partially or completely ankylose the joint space, causing pain and/or limiting the range of motion. Patients at high risk for formation of HTB postoperatively include those with previous HTB formation, heterotopic osteoarthritis, and active rheumatoid spondylitis. Patients in these high risk groups have a 63-69% incidence of post-operative HTB formation, usually seen radiographically by 2 months post-operation. From 1980-1986 twenty-nine hips in 28 consecutively treated patients were irradiated post-operatively at the UCLA Center for the Health Sciences. The indication for irradiation was documented HTB formation previously in 26 of the 27 hips presented below. From 1980-1982 patients received 20 Gray (Gy) in 2 Gy fractions; from 1982-1986 the dose was reduced to 10 Gy in 2 Gy fractions. Twenty-seven hips in 26 patients completed therapy and were available for evaluation, with a minimum of 2 month follow-up, and a median follow-up of 12 months. Three of 27 hips developed significant HTB (Brooker grade III or IV) post-operatively, whereas 5 of 27 hips developed minor, nonsymptomatic HTB (Brooker grade I). When irradiation was begun by postoperative day 4, 0 of 17 hips formed significant HTB. If irradiation began after post-operative day 4, 3 of 10 hips formed significant HTB (Brooker grade III or IV). These 3 hips received doses of 10 Gy in one hip and 20 Gy in the other 2 hips. There were no differences in the incidence or severity of side effects in the 10 Gy vs. the 20 Gy treatment groups. Eighteen hips received 10 Gy, 8 hips 20 Gy and, 1 hip 12 Gy. In conclusion, 10 Gy in 5 fractions appears as effective as 20 Gy in 10 fractions at preventing post-operative formation of HTB. For optimal results, treatment should begin as early as possible prior to post-operative day 4.

  15. The Effect of Immunonutrition on the Postoperative Complications in Thymoma with Myasthenia Gravis

    PubMed Central

    Xin, Yanzhong; Cai, Hongfei; Wu, Lihui

    2016-01-01

    Object. To test whether preoperative immunonutrition is efficacious in reducing postoperative complications in patients of thymoma with myasthenia gravis (MG). Material and Methods. A total of 244 patients operated on for thymoma with myasthenia gravis were prospectively assigned to two groups, each receiving seven-day preoperative and seven-day postoperative nutrition. The patients in immunonutrition group were given oral immunonutrition (IN). The patients in control group received oral standard nutrition. Immunonutritional and inflammatory biomarkers (IgA, IgG, IgM, CD3t, CD4t, CD8t, CD4t/CD8t ratio, NK-cell, prealbumin, albumin, white blood cells counts, and C-reactive protein) and clinical variables (age, gender, BMI, performance status, type of thymoma, type of MG, operative time, pathology, operative approach, postoperative complications, quantity of drainage, hospital stays) were examined. Results. A significant reduction in the length of hospital stay, quantity of drainage, and postoperative complications was observed in the IN group (p < 0.05). An increase in the level of IgA, IgG, IgM, CD3+T, CD4+T, CD4+T/CD8+T, WBC, CRP, and NK-cell in the IN group was observed after thymectomy, while a decrease was seen with regard to prealbumin and albumin (p < 0.05). Conclusion. Preoperative immunonutrition support is effective in reducing postoperative complications in patients of thymoma with MG. It helps to lower the risk of postoperative infectious complications and hospital stays. PMID:27956763

  16. Effects of remifentanil versus nitrous oxide on postoperative nausea, vomiting, and pain in patients receiving thyroidectomy

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Min Kyoung; Yi, Myung Sub; Kang, Hyun; Choi, Geun-Joo

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Remifentanil and nitrous oxide (N2O) are 2 commonly used anesthetic agents. Both these agents are known risk factors for postoperative nausea and vomiting (PONV). However, remifentanil and N2O have not been directly compared in a published study. Remifentanil can induce acute tolerance or hyperalgesia, thus affecting postoperative pain. The objective of this retrospective study is to compare the effects of remifentanil and N2O on PONV and pain in patients receiving intravenous patient-controlled analgesia (IV-PCA) after thyroidectomy. We analyzed the electronic medical records of 992 patients receiving fentanyl-based IV-PCA after thyroidectomy at Chung-Ang University Hospital from January 1, 2010 to April 30, 2016. We categorized the patients according to anesthetic agents used: group N2O (n = 745) and group remifentanil (n = 247). The propensity score matching method was used to match patients in the 2 groups based on their covariates. Finally, 128 matched subjects were selected from each group. There were no differences between groups for all covariates after propensity score matching. The numeric rating scale for nausea (0.55 ± 0.88 vs 0.27 ± 0.76, P = 0.01) was higher and complete response (88 [68.8%] vs 106 [82.8%], P = 0.001) was lower in group N2O compared with group remifentanil on postoperative day 0. However, the visual analog scale score for pain (3.47 ± 2.02 vs 3.97 ± 1.48, P = 0.025) was higher in group remifentanil than group N2O on postoperative day 0. In patients receiving IV-PCA after thyroidectomy, postoperative nausea was lower but postoperative pain was higher in group remifentanil. PMID:27741140

  17. Efficacy of intra-articular magnesium for postoperative analgesia in total hip arthroplasty

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Xinxian; Wen, Hong; Hu, Yuezheng; Liu, Zhongtang; Pan, Xiaoyun

    2017-01-01

    The aim of the present study was to compare the efficacy of intra-articular magnesium sulphate and a saline placebo for postoperative pain control following total hip arthroplasty (THA). Sixty patients underwent THA and were randomly allocated into two groups to receive intra-articular injections of either 10 ml magnesium sulphate (100 mg/ml; magnesium group, n=30) or 10 ml normal saline solution (control group, n=30). Postoperative analgesia was maintained by intravenous morphine injection. The outcome measurements were visual analogue score (VAS), morphine consumption and Harris hip score (HHS). The two groups were well matched. The outcome of VAS at rest was significantly lower at postoperative hours 6 and 12 in the magnesium group as compared with the control group, although the difference was insignificant preoperatively and at postoperative hours 2, 4, 24 and 48, and days 3, 7 and 14. This indicator during activity was also lower in the magnesium group at postoperative hour 24 than that of the control group, although the difference was insignificant preoperatively and at hour 48, and days 7 and 14. The consumption of morphine (the total quantity) at 0–6, 6–12 and 0–48 h in the magnesium group was significantly lower than in the control group, although no significant differences were observed at 12–24 and 24–48 h between the groups. The improvements of HHS from preoperative to postoperative scores were statistically significant, however, no significant differences were identified between groups. Thus, the findings indicate that intra-articular magnesium sulphate injections provided improved pain control and reduced the need for morphine when compared with a saline placebo following THA. PMID:28357078

  18. Influence of ethnicity on the perception and treatment of early post-operative pain

    PubMed Central

    Scott, Simon; Griffin-Teall, Nicola; Thompson, Jonathan

    2015-01-01

    Background: Previous studies indicated that patients from Black, Asian and minority ethnic (BAME) groups tend to receive less analgesics compared to Caucasian (White) patients after similar surgical procedures. Most such data originated from North America and suggested that health-care professionals may perceive the expression of excessive pain by BAME patient groups as an exaggerated response to pain, rather than sub-optimal treatment. There are limited data comparing acute pain management between South Asian and White British patients. Objective: We aimed to investigate correlation between patients’ ethnicity and disparities of early post-operative pain perception/management, in an ethnically diverse population. Methods: We conducted a retrospective case note review of acute post-operative pain after total abdominal hysterectomy (TAH) in 60 South Asian and 60 age-matched White British females. Data for 140 variables (pre-, intra- and post-operative) for each patient were recorded. We used propensity score matching to produce 30 closely matched patients in each group minimizing effects of recorded co-variates. Data were analysed with and without propensity score matching. Results: There were no significant differences in acute post-operative pain scores, morphine requirements, pain management, adverse effects or duration of post-operative care unit stay between South Asian and White British patients. The median duration of hospital stay of South Asian patients was longer (4.5 days versus 3.0 days, p < 0.001). Conclusion: We conclude that in an institution where both patients and health-care professionals are from an ethnically diverse population, neither post-operative pain nor pain management are influenced significantly by South Asian ethnicity. PMID:26516573

  19. Intraoperative bradycardia and postoperative hyperkalemia in patients undergoing endoscopic third ventriculostomy.

    PubMed

    Anandh, B; Madhusudan Reddy, K R; Mohanty, A; Umamaheswara Rao, G S; Chandramouli, B A

    2002-09-01

    During our initial experience with endoscopic third ventriculostomies, we observed intraoperative bradycardia and postoperative hyperkalemia. The present study was carried out to verify the consistency of these initial observations. Intraoperative heart rate (HR) changes and postoperative serum K + changes were studied prospectively in 20 patients of endoscopic third ventriculostomy. Another 6 patients who underwent endoscopic procedures other than ventriculostomy acted as controls. The anaesthetic technique and intraoperative and postoperative fluid regimen were similar in all patients. Serum K + concentrations were measured intraoperatively and once a day for the next 5 days. The third ventriculostomy group exhibited a significant slowing of the heart rate during the fenestration of the floor of the third ventricle (112 +/- 26 to 101 +/- 28 bpm, p < 0.001) and also at the time of the reversal of the neuromuscular block at the end of surgery (104 +/- 29 to 96 +/- 33 bpm, p < 0.01). The control group did not exhibit similar changes in the heart rate. The postoperative increase in serum K + values in the ventriculostomy group (0.82 +/- 0.55 mmol/L) was higher than that in the control group (0.10 +/- 0.44 mmol/L) (p < 0.01). Endoscopic third ventriculostomy is associated with a significant bradycardia at the time of fenestration and at the time of reversal of the neuromuscular block. The procedure is also associated with a postoperative increase in serum K + values. We propose a mechanism involving distortion of the posterior hypothalamus, which accounts for the bradycardia and postoperative hyperkalemia.

  20. Effectiveness of Submucosal Dexamethasone to Control Postoperative Pain & Swelling in Apicectomy of Maxillary Anterior Teeth

    PubMed Central

    Shah, Shahzad Ali; Khan, Irfanullah; Shah, Humera Shahzad

    2011-01-01

    Purpose The purpose of this study was to evaluate the effect of submucosal dexamethasone injection to control postoperative pain and swelling in apicectomy of maxillary anterior teeth. Methods A randomized, controlled trial comprising 60 adult patients (68.3% male, 31.7% female) with no local or systemic problems was conducted. Patients were randomly divided into two groups: Group A was given 4mg dexamethasone injection perioperatively. Group B (control group) was treated conventionally without any steroid injection. Postoperative pain and swelling was evaluated using a visual analog scale (VAS). Objective measurements of facial pain and swelling were performed daily up to six days postoperatively. Results Dexamethasone group showed significant reduction in pain and swelling postoperatively compared with the control. Conclusion Submucosal dexamethasone 4mg injection is an effective therapeutic strategy for swift and comfortable improvement after surgical procedure and has a significant effect on reducing postoperative pain and swelling. The treatment offers a simple, safe, painless, noninvasive and cost effective therapeutic option for moderate and severe cases. PMID:23267293

  1. Thermography as a quantitative imaging method for assessing postoperative inflammation

    PubMed Central

    Christensen, J; Matzen, LH; Vaeth, M; Schou, S; Wenzel, A

    2012-01-01

    Objective To assess differences in skin temperature between the operated and control side of the face after mandibular third molar surgery using thermography. Methods 127 patients had 1 mandibular third molar removed. Before the surgery, standardized thermograms were taken of both sides of the patient's face using a Flir ThermaCam™ E320 (Precisions Teknik AB, Halmstad, Sweden). The imaging procedure was repeated 2 days and 7 days after surgery. A region of interest including the third molar region was marked on each image. The mean temperature within each region of interest was calculated. The difference between sides and over time were assessed using paired t-tests. Results No significant difference was found between the operated side and the control side either before or 7 days after surgery (p > 0.3). The temperature of the operated side (mean: 32.39 °C, range: 28.9–35.3 °C) was higher than that of the control side (mean: 32.06 °C, range: 28.5–35.0 °C) 2 days after surgery [0.33 °C, 95% confidence interval (CI): 0.22–0.44 °C, p < 0.001]. No significant difference was found between the pre-operative and the 7-day post-operative temperature (p > 0.1). After 2 days, the operated side was not significantly different from the temperature pre-operatively (p = 0.12), whereas the control side had a lower temperature (0.57 °C, 95% CI: 0.29–0.86 °C, p < 0.001). Conclusions Thermography seems useful for quantitative assessment of inflammation between the intervention side and the control side after surgical removal of mandibular third molars. However, thermography cannot be used to assess absolute temperature changes due to normal variations in skin temperature over time. PMID:22752326

  2. Factors affecting postoperative range of motion after total knee arthroplasty.

    PubMed

    Gatha, Nehal M; Clarke, Henry D; Fuchs, Robin; Scuderi, Giles R; Insall, John N

    2004-10-01

    One hundred thirty five patients with osteoarthritis who underwent total knee arthroplasty (TKA) were evaluated to determine whether specific pre- and postoperative variables were correlated with the postoperative range of motion. Age, sex, pre- and postoperative range of motion, pre- and postoperative Knee Society scores, intraoperative patellar thickness before and after resurfacing, pre- and postoperative radiographic patellar height (as determined by the Insall-Salvati and Blackburn-Peel ratios), and preoperative radiographic alignment were recorded for each patient. Regression analysis was performed to identify whether any variables were correlated with the postoperative range of motion or Knee Society scores. The only variable that was significantly correlated with postoperative range of motion was the preoperative range of motion. This study suggests that among the variables evaluated, the preoperative range of motion was the only significant predictor of postoperative range of motion.

  3. Day care health risks

    MedlinePlus

    ... This infection causes diarrhea, stomach cramps, and gas. Ear infections, colds, coughs, sore throats, and runny noses ... Head lice and scabies are other common health problems that occur in day care centers. You can ...

  4. Career Day 2012

    NASA Video Gallery

    More than 200 high school juniors and seniors with interests in science, technology, engineering and math met one-on-one with professionals at NASA's Langley Research Center during Career Day 2012,...

  5. Pregnancy - identifying fertile days

    MedlinePlus

    ... between days 7 and 20 of a woman's menstrual cycle. In order to become pregnant, having sex every ... hours of ovulation. If you have an irregular menstrual cycle, an ovulation predictor kit can help you know ...

  6. Temporal variability of readmission determinants in postoperative vascular surgery patients

    PubMed Central

    Lin, MJ; Baky, F; Housley, BC; Kelly, N; Pletcher, E; Balshi, JD; Stawicki, SP; Evans, DC

    2016-01-01

    Introduction: Clinical information continues to be limited regarding changes in the temporal risk profile for readmissions during the initial postoperative year in vascular surgery patients. We set out to describe the associations between demographics, clinical outcomes, comorbidity indices, and hospital readmissions in a sample of patients undergoing common extremity revascularization or dialysis access (ERDA) procedures. We hypothesized that factors independently associated with readmission will evolve from “short-term” to “long-term” determinants at 30-, 180-, and 360-day postoperative cutoff points. Methods: Following IRB approval, medical records of patients who underwent ERDA at two institutions were retrospectively reviewed between 2008 and 2014. Abstracted data included patient demographics, procedural characteristics, the American Society of Anesthesiologists score, Goldman Criteria for perioperative cardiac assessment, the Charlson comorbidity index, morbidity, mortality, and readmission (at 30-, 180-, and 360-days). Univariate analyses were performed for readmissions at each specified time point. Variables reaching statistical significance of P < 0.20 were included in multivariate analyses for factors independently associated with readmission. Results: A total of 450 of 744 patients who underwent ERDA with complete medical records were included. Patients underwent either an extremity revascularization (e.g. bypass or endarterectomy, 406/450) or a noncatheter dialysis access procedure (44/450). Sample characteristics included 262 (58.2%) females, mean age 61.4 ± 12.9 years, 63 (14%) emergent procedures, and median operative time 164 min. Median hospital length of stay (index admission) was 4 days. Cumulative readmission rates at 30-, 180-, and 360-day were 12%, 27%, and 35%, respectively. Corresponding mortality rates were 3%, 7%, and 9%. Key factors independently associated with 30-, 180-, and 360-day readmissions evolved over the study period

  7. [The endoscopic management of postoperative biliary fistulae].

    PubMed

    Uribarrena, R; Simón, M A; Sebastián, J J; Gomollón, F; Bajador, E; Botella, M T; Cabrera, T

    1994-10-01

    We report a series of 15 patients with a postoperative biliary fistula treated by endoscopic sphincterotomy. The exact location of the bile leak was revealed by ERCP in 13 cases (87%): cystic duct remnant in 6 (39%), intrahepatic biliary tree in 4 (26%), and main bile duct in 3 (20%). In all cases a distal obstacle (ie: retained stones, hydatid material) to bile flow was also found in ERCP. Treatment consisted of endoscopic sphincterotomy and subsequent removal of the distal obstacle, and could be completed in 13 (87%) cases. In our experience the treatment of postoperative biliary fistula with a distal obstruction bile flow by endoscopic sphincterotomy is a safe and effective procedure, and should be recommended as the first option in those patients.

  8. Post-operative pulmonary complications after thoracotomy

    PubMed Central

    Sengupta, Saikat

    2015-01-01

    Pulmonary complications are a major cause of morbidity and mortality in the post-operative period after thoracotomy. The type of complications and the severity of complications depend on the type of thoracic surgery that has been performed as well as on the patient's pre-operative medical status. Risk stratification can help in predicting the possibility of the post-operative complications. Certain airway complications are more prone to develop with thoracic surgery. Vocal cord injuries, bronchopleural fistulae, pulmonary emboli and post-thoracic surgery non-cardiogenic pulmonary oedema are some of the unique complications that occur in this subset of patients. The major pulmonary complications such as atelectasis, bronchospasm and pneumonia can lead to respiratory failure. This review was compiled after a search for search terms within ‘post-operative pulmonary complications after thoracic surgery and thoracotomy’ on search engines including PubMed and standard text references on the subject from 2000 to 2015. PMID:26556921

  9. Postoperative pelvic pain: An imaging approach.

    PubMed

    Farah, H; Laurent, N; Phalippou, J; Bazot, M; Giraudet, G; Serb, T; Poncelet, E

    2015-10-01

    Postoperative pelvic pain after gynecological surgery is a readily detected but unspecific sign of complication. Imaging as a complement to physical examination helps establish the etiological diagnosis. In the context of emergency surgery, vascular, urinary and digestive injuries constitute the most frequent intraoperative complications. During the follow-up of patients who had undergone pelvic surgery, imaging should be performed to detect recurrent disease, postoperative fibrosis, adhesions and more specific complications related to prosthetic material. Current guidelines recommend using pelvic ultrasonography as the first line imaging modality whereas the use of pelvic computed tomography and/or magnetic resonance imaging should be restricted to specific situations, depending on local availability of equipment and suspected disease.

  10. Stennis Day Camper

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2005-01-01

    Sara Beth Casey, 5, proudly displays her artwork, 'Planets.' Sara Beth created the art as a student of Stennis Day Camp, a free camp for Stennis Space Center employees' children whose schools have not resumed since Hurricane Katrina hit the region on Aug. 29. The camp has registered nearly 200 children and averages 100 children each day. The camp will continue until all schools are back in session.

  11. Sun-Earth Days

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thieman, J.; Ng, C.; Lewis, E.; Cline, T.

    2010-08-01

    Sun-Earth Day is a well-coordinated series of programs, resources and events under a unique yearly theme highlighting the fundamentals of heliophysics research and missions. A menu of activities, conducted throughout the year, inspire and educate participants. Sun-Earth Day itself can vary in date, but usually is identified by a celebration on or near the spring equinox. Through the Sun-Earth Day framework we have been able to offer a series of coordinated events that promote and highlight the Sun, its connection to Earth and the other planets. Sun-Earth Day events are hosted by educators, museums, amateur astronomers and scientists and occur at schools, community groups, parks, planetaria and science centers around the globe. Sun-Earth Day raises the awareness and knowledge of formal and informal education audiences concerning space weather and heliophysics. By building on the success of Sun-Earth Day yearly celebrations, we seek to affect people of all backgrounds and ages with the wonders of heliophysics science, discovery, and exploration in ways that are both tangible and meaningful to their lives.

  12. Estimation of Genetic Parameters for First Lactation Monthly Test-day Milk Yields using Random Regression Test Day Model in Karan Fries Cattle.

    PubMed

    Singh, Ajay; Singh, Avtar; Singh, Manvendra; Prakash, Ved; Ambhore, G S; Sahoo, S K; Dash, Soumya

    2016-06-01

    A single trait linear mixed random regression test-day model was applied for the first time for analyzing the first lactation monthly test-day milk yield records in Karan Fries cattle. The test-day milk yield data was modeled using a random regression model (RRM) considering different order of Legendre polynomial for the additive genetic effect (4th order) and the permanent environmental effect (5th order). Data pertaining to 1,583 lactation records spread over a period of 30 years were recorded and analyzed in the study. The variance component, heritability and genetic correlations among test-day milk yields were estimated using RRM. RRM heritability estimates of test-day milk yield varied from 0.11 to 0.22 in different test-day records. The estimates of genetic correlations between different test-day milk yields ranged 0.01 (test-day 1 [TD-1] and TD-11) to 0.99 (TD-4 and TD-5). The magnitudes of genetic correlations between test-day milk yields decreased as the interval between test-days increased and adjacent test-day had higher correlations. Additive genetic and permanent environment variances were higher for test-day milk yields at both ends of lactation. The residual variance was observed to be lower than the permanent environment variance for all the test-day milk yields.

  13. Postoperative Rehabilitation After Rotator Cuff Repair

    PubMed Central

    Mollison, Scott; Shin, Jason J.; Glogau, Alexander; Beavis, R. Cole

    2017-01-01

    Background: Postoperative rehabilitation after arthroscopic rotator cuff repair (ARCR) remains controversial and suffers from limited high-quality evidence. Therefore, appropriate use criteria must partially depend on expert opinion. Hypothesis/Purpose: The purpose of the study was to determine and report on the standard and modified rehabilitation protocols after ARCR used by member orthopaedic surgeons of the American Orthopaedic Society for Sports Medicine (AOSSM) and the Arthroscopy Association of North America (AANA). We hypothesized that there will exist a high degree of variability among rehabilitation protocols. We also predict that surgeons will be prescribing accelerated rehabilitation. Study Design: Cross-sectional study; Level of evidence, 4. Methods: A 29-question survey in English language was sent to all 3106 associate and active members of the AOSSM and the AANA. The questionnaire consisted of 4 categories: standard postoperative protocol, modification to postoperative rehabilitation, operative technique, and surgeon demographic data. Via email, the survey was sent on September 4, 2013. Results: The average response rate per question was 22.7%, representing an average of 704 total responses per question. The most common immobilization device was an abduction pillow sling with the arm in neutral or slight internal rotation (70%). Surgeons tended toward later unrestricted passive shoulder range of motion at 6 to 7 weeks (35%). Strengthening exercises were most commonly prescribed between 6 weeks and 3 months (56%). Unrestricted return to activities was most commonly allowed at 5 to 6 months. The majority of the respondents agreed that they would change their protocol based on differences expressed in this survey. Conclusion: There is tremendous variability in postoperative rehabilitation protocols after ARCR. Five of 10 questions regarding standard rehabilitation reached a consensus statement. Contrary to our hypothesis, there was a trend toward later

  14. Postoperative radiation and implant capsule contraction

    SciTech Connect

    Caffee, H.H.; Mendenhall, N.P.; Mendenhall, W.M.; Bova, F.J.

    1988-01-01

    Occasionally radiation is required as adjunctive therapy following mastectomy for breast cancer. The effects of radiation on a developing implant capsule are unknown, but they are very important in relation to the increased use of immediate reconstruction. Experiments were performed on rabbits to study the effects of postoperative radiation therapy on capsule contraction and thickness. The results of these experiments suggest that radiation has no effect on implant capsules.

  15. Postoperative Chemoradiotherapy for Extrahepatic Bile Duct Cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Park, Jin-hong; Choi, Eun Kyung; Ahn, Seung Do; Lee, Sang-wook; Song, Si Yeol; Yoon, Sang Min; Kim, Young Seok; Lee, Yu Sun; Lee, Sung-Gyu; Hwang, Shin; Lee, Young-Joo; Park, Kwang-Min; Kim, Tae Won; Chang, Heung Moon; Lee, Jae-Lyun; Kim, Jong Hoon

    2011-03-01

    Purpose: To evaluate the effect of postoperative concurrent chemoradiotherapy using three-dimensional conformal radiotherapy and to identify the prognostic factors that influence survival in patients with extrahepatic bile duct cancer. Methods and Materials: We retrospectively analyzed the data from 101 patients with extrahepatic bile duct cancer who had undergone postoperative concurrent chemoradiotherapy using three-dimensional conformal radiotherapy. Of the 101 patients, 52 (51%) had undergone complete resection (R0 resection) and 49 (49%) had microscopic or macroscopic residual tumors (R1 or R2 resection). The median radiation dose was 50 Gy. Also, 85 patients (84%) underwent concurrent chemotherapy with 5-fluorouracil. Results: The median follow-up period was 47 months for the surviving patients. The 5-year overall survival rate was 34% for all patients. A comparison between patients with R0 and R1 resection indicated no significant difference in the 5-year overall survival (44% vs. 33%, p = .2779), progression-free survival (35% vs. 22%, p = .3107), or locoregional progression-free survival (75% vs. 63%, p = .2784) rates. An analysis of the first failure site in the 89 patients with R0 or R1 resection indicated isolated locoregional recurrence in 7 patients. Elevated postoperative carbohydrate antigen 19-9 level was an independent prognostic factor for overall survival (p = .001) and progression-free survival (p = .033). A total of 3 patients developed Grade 3 or greater late toxicity. Conclusion: Adjuvant concurrent chemoradiotherapy using three-dimensional conformal radiotherapy appears to improve locoregional control and survival in extrahepatic bile duct cancer patients with R1 resection. The postoperative carbohydrate antigen 19-9 level might be a useful prognostic marker to select patients for more intensified adjuvant therapy.

  16. Predicting postoperative gait in cerebral palsy.

    PubMed

    Galarraga C, Omar A; Vigneron, Vincent; Dorizzi, Bernadette; Khouri, Néjib; Desailly, Eric

    2016-11-09

    In this work, postoperative lower limb kinematics are predicted with respect to preoperative kinematics, physical examination and surgery data. Data of 115 children with cerebral palsy that have undergone single-event multilevel surgery were considered. Preoperative data dimension was reduced utilizing principal component analysis. Then, multiple linear regressions with 80% confidence intervals were performed between postoperative kinematics and bilateral preoperative kinematics, 36 physical examination variables and combinations of 9 different surgical procedures. The mean prediction errors on test vary from 4° (pelvic obliquity and hip adduction) to 10° (hip rotation and foot progression), depending on the kinematic angle. The unilateral mean sizes of the confidence intervals vary from 5° to 15°. Frontal plane angles are predicted with the lowest errors, however the same performance is achieved when considering the postoperative average signals. Sagittal plane angles are better predicted than transverse plane angles, with statistical differences with respect to the average postoperative kinematics for both plane's angles except for ankle dorsiflexion. The mean prediction errors are smaller than the variability of gait parameters in cerebral palsy. The performance of the system is independent of the preoperative state severity of the patient. Even if the system is not yet accurate enough to define a surgery plan, it shows an unbiased estimation of the most likely outcome, which can be useful for both the clinician and the patient. More patients' data are necessary for improving the precision of the model in order to predict the kinematic outcome of a large number of possible surgeries and gait patterns.

  17. Stair-Climbing Test Predicts Postoperative Cardiopulmonary Complications and Hospital Stay in Patients with Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Dong, Jingsi; Mao, Yousheng; Li, Jiagen; He, Jie

    2017-01-01

    Background There is currently no reliable method to predict major postoperative cardiopulmonary complications for patients with non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC). In this study, we hypothesized that exercise oxygen desaturation (EOD) and heart rate change results in a stair-climbing test (SCT) would predict postoperative cardiopulmonary complications for patients with NSCLC. Material/Methods We examined 171 patients (41 females and 130 males) with NSCLC by preoperative SCT from January 2010 to July 2015. Among them, 27 underwent wedge resection, 122 underwent lobectomy, and 22 underwent pneumonectomy. The correlation between postoperative cardiopulmonary complications and parameters of SCT and pulmonary function test (PFT) parameters were analyzed retrospectively. Results The overall 30-day postoperative morbidity of the patients was 46/171 (26.9%), with death occurring in 3/171(1.8%). The age, FEV1%, MVV, height of climbing, EOD, and heart rate change were found to be significantly different between the group with postoperative cardiopulmonary complications and those without. Binary logistic regression analysis showed that EOD and heart rate change were independently correlated with postoperative cardiopulmonary complications. In addition, a model predicting the probability of postoperative cardiopulmonary complication based on logistic regression for multivariable analysis was used to confirm our findings. Conclusions A symptom-limited SCT with oxygen saturation monitoring is a safe, simple, and low-cost method to evaluate cardiopulmonary function preoperatively. PMID:28336909

  18. Stair-Climbing Test Predicts Postoperative Cardiopulmonary Complications and Hospital Stay in Patients with Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer.

    PubMed

    Dong, Jingsi; Mao, Yousheng; Li, Jiagen; He, Jie

    2017-03-24

    BACKGROUND There is currently no reliable method to predict major postoperative cardiopulmonary complications for patients with non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC). In this study, we hypothesized that exercise oxygen desaturation (EOD) and heart rate change results in a stair-climbing test (SCT) would predict postoperative cardiopulmonary complications for patients with NSCLC. MATERIAL AND METHODS We examined 171 patients (41 females and 130 males) with NSCLC by preoperative SCT from January 2010 to July 2015. Among them, 27 underwent wedge resection, 122 underwent lobectomy, and 22 underwent pneumonectomy. The correlation between postoperative cardiopulmonary complications and parameters of SCT and pulmonary function test (PFT) parameters were analyzed retrospectively. RESULTS The overall 30-day postoperative morbidity of the patients was 46/171 (26.9%), with death occurring in 3/171(1.8%). The age, FEV1%, MVV, height of climbing, EOD, and heart rate change were found to be significantly different between the group with postoperative cardiopulmonary complications and those without. Binary logistic regression analysis showed that EOD and heart rate change were independently correlated with postoperative cardiopulmonary complications. In addition, a model predicting the probability of postoperative cardiopulmonary complication based on logistic regression for multivariable analysis was used to confirm our findings. CONCLUSIONS A symptom-limited SCT with oxygen saturation monitoring is a safe, simple, and low-cost method to evaluate cardiopulmonary function preoperatively.

  19. Serving Deaf-Blind Children. Theme of the International Conference on Deaf-Blind Children (4th, 22-27 August 1971, Perkins School for the Blind).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Perkins School for the Blind, Watertown, MA.

    Presented are 30 papers given at a 5-day international conference on serving deaf-blind children. Additionally provided are the conference agenda, a review of the conference, reports of the nominations and resolutions committees, and a list of conference participants. Among the papers are the following titles: "Programs for Non-Verbal Children",…

  20. A TGF-B homologue identified from Ascaris suum 4th stage larvae (L4): Evidence for development-related transcription and incomplete gene splicing

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Ascaris species represent the most prevalent parasitic worm infecting humans and swine worldwide. During the infection process, A. suum L4 establish in the jejunum and develop into adults. However, a large percentage of L4 spontaneously cure to the ileum at 14 to 21 days after inoculation (dpi), and...

  1. Relationship between anesthesia and postoperative endophthalmitis

    PubMed Central

    Lai, Hou-Chuan; Tseng, Wei-Cheng; Pao, Shu-I; Wong, Chih-Shung; Huang, Ren-Chih; Chan, Wei-Hung; Wu, Zhi-Fu

    2017-01-01

    Abstract Previous study showed that patients under general anesthesia (GA) had nasopharyngeal secretions on the face at the end of ocular surgery, especially in propofol-based total intravenous anesthesia (TIVA), it might induce postoperative endophthalmitis. Therefore, we conducted a retrospective study to compare the incidence of endophthalmitis after ocular surgery under topical, inhalation anesthesia, and propofol-based TIVA in our medical center from 2011 to 2015. A total of 21,032 patients were included, and we evaluated epidemiologic factors, systemic diseases, other ocular pathologic characteristics, complications during the surgery, technique of ocular surgery, method of antibiotic prophylaxis, vitreous culture, and vision outcome in these patients. Fifteen endophthalmitis cases among 21,032 operations reported, equaling an incidence of 0.071%. The incidence rates under topical, inhalation anesthesia, and propofol-based TIVA were 0.083%, 0.039%, and 0%, respectively (P = 0.39). Moreover, the risk of endophthalmitis under GA (0.024%) was significantly lower than topical anesthesia (0.083%) (P < 0.001). We also found that elder was the risk factor for endophthalmitis following ocular surgery. In conclusion, propofol-based TIVA or inhalation anesthesia did not increase the risk of endophthalmitis after ocular surgery. Thus, GA was not a risk factor for postoperative endophthalmitis. By contrast, elder was the risk factor for postoperative endophthalmitis. PMID:28328861

  2. Periprosthetic Infection following Primary Hip and Knee Arthroplasty: The Impact of Limiting the Postoperative Surveillance Period.

    PubMed

    Roth, Virginia R; Mitchell, Robyn; Vachon, Julie; Alexandre, Stéphanie; Amaratunga, Kanchana; Smith, Stephanie; Vearncombe, Mary; Davis, Ian; Mertz, Dominik; Henderson, Elizabeth; John, Michael; Johnston, Lynn; Lemieux, Camille; Pelude, Linda; Gravel, Denise

    2017-02-01

    BACKGROUND Hip and knee arthroplasty infections are associated with considerable healthcare costs. The merits of reducing the postoperative surveillance period from 1 year to 90 days have been debated. OBJECTIVES To report the first pan-Canadian hip and knee periprosthetic joint infection (PJI) rates and to describe the implications of a shorter (90-day) postoperative surveillance period. METHODS Prospective surveillance for infection following hip and knee arthroplasty was conducted by hospitals participating in the Canadian Nosocomial Infection Surveillance Program (CNISP) using standard surveillance definitions. RESULTS Overall hip and knee PJI rates were 1.64 and 1.52 per 100 procedures, respectively. Deep incisional and organ-space hip and knee PJI rates were 0.96 and 0.71, respectively. In total, 93% of hip PJIs and 92% of knee PJIs were identified within 90 days, with a median time to detection of 21 days. However, 11%-16% of deep incisional and organ-space infections were not detected within 90 days. This rate was reduced to 3%-4% at 180 days post procedure. Anaerobic and polymicrobial infections had the shortest median time from procedure to detection (17 and 18 days, respectively) compared with infections due to other microorganisms, including Staphylococcus aureus. CONCLUSIONS PJI rates were similar to those reported elsewhere, although differences in national surveillance systems limit direct comparisons. Our results suggest that a postoperative surveillance period of 90 days will detect the majority of PJIs; however, up to 16% of deep incisional and organ-space infections may be missed. Extending the surveillance period to 180 days could allow for a better estimate of disease burden. Infect Control Hosp Epidemiol 2017;38:147-153.

  3. The Efficacy of Acupuncture in Post-Operative Pain Management: A Systematic Review and Meta-Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Ming-Shun; Chen, Kee-Hsin; Chen, I-Fan; Huang, Shihping Kevin; Tzeng, Pei-Chuan; Yeh, Mei-Ling; Lee, Fei-Peng; Lin, Jaung-Geng; Chen, Chiehfeng

    2016-01-01

    Background Postoperative pain resulting from surgical trauma is a significant challenge for healthcare providers. Opioid analgesics are commonly used to treat postoperative pain; however, these drugs are associated with a number of undesirable side effects. Objective This systematic review and meta-analysis evaluated the effectiveness of acupuncture and acupuncture-related techniques in treating postoperative pain. Data Source MEDLINE, Cochrane Library, and EMBASE databases were searched until Sep 30, 2014. Study Eligibility Criteria Randomized controlled trials of adult subjects (≥ 18 years) who had undergone surgery and who had received acupuncture, electroacupuncture, or acupoint electrical stimulation for managing acute post-operative pain were included. Results We found that patients treated with acupuncture or related techniques had less pain and used less opioid analgesics on Day 1 after surgery compared with those treated with control (P < 0.001). Sensitivity analysis using the leave-one-out approach indicated the findings are reliable and are not dependent on any one study. In addition, no publication bias was detected. Subgroup analysis indicated that conventional acupuncture and transcutaneous electric acupoint stimulation (TEAS) were associated with less postoperative pain one day following surgery than control treatment, while electroacupuncture was similar to control (P = 0.116). TEAS was associated with significantly greater reduction in opioid analgesic use on Day 1 post surgery than control (P < 0.001); however conventional acupuncture and electroacupuncture showed no benefit in reducing opioid analgesic use compared with control (P ≥ 0.142). Conclusion Our findings indicate that certain modes of acupuncture improved postoperative pain on the first day after surgery and reduced opioid use. Our findings support the use of acupuncture as adjuvant therapy in treating postoperative pain. PMID:26959661

  4. Hyperbaric oxygen preconditioning attenuates postoperative cognitive impairment in aged rats.

    PubMed

    Sun, Li; Xie, Keliang; Zhang, Changsheng; Song, Rui; Zhang, Hong

    2014-06-18

    Cognitive decline after surgery in the elderly population is a major clinical problem with high morbidity. Hyperbaric oxygen (HBO) preconditioning can induce significant neuroprotection against acute neurological injury. We hypothesized that HBO preconditioning would prevent the development of postoperative cognitive impairment. Elderly male rats (20 months old) underwent stabilized tibial fracture operation under general anesthesia after HBO preconditioning (once a day for 5 days). Separate cohorts of animals were tested for cognitive function with fear conditioning and Y-maze tests, or euthanized at different times to assess the blood-brain barrier integrity, systemic and hippocampal proinflammatory cytokines, and caspase-3 activity. Animals exhibited significant cognitive impairment evidenced by a decreased percentage of freezing time and an increased number of learning trials on days 1, 3, and 7 after surgery, which were significantly prevented by HBO preconditioning. Furthermore, HBO preconditioning significantly ameliorated the increase in serum and hippocampal proinflammatory cytokines tumor necrosis factor-α, interleukin-1 β (IL-1β), IL-6, and high-mobility group protein 1 in surgery-challenged animals. Moreover, HBO preconditioning markedly improved blood-brain barrier integrity and caspase-3 activity in the hippocampus of surgery-challenged animals. These findings suggest that HBO preconditioning could significantly mitigate surgery-induced cognitive impairment, which is strongly associated with the reduction of systemic and hippocampal proinflammatory cytokines and caspase-3 activity.

  5. Octreotide for treatment of postoperative alimentary tract fistulas.

    PubMed

    Paran, H; Neufeld, D; Kaplan, O; Klausner, J; Freund, U

    1995-01-01

    Eighteen patients with postoperative fistulas of the gastrointestinal tract were treated with the somatostatin analog octreotide between November 1989 and November 1992. Fourteen patients had enterocutaneous fistulas: seven from the duodenum and seven from the ileum. Another three patients had pancreatic fistulas, and one patient had a biliary fistula. Within 24 hours of octreotide treatment, a mean reduction of 52% in the intestinal fistulas' output, 40% in the pancreatic fistulas, and 30% in the biliary fistula was noted. In the intestinal fistulas group the closure rate was 72% after a mean of 11 days. Early closure (mean 6 days) was achieved in all three pancreatic fistulas. In the patient with the biliary fistula a 30% reduction was observed twice following the administration of octreotide, and an increase occurred when it was withheld. The reduction rate of the secretions in high-output intestinal fistulas (> 500 ml/day) was higher than in the low-output fistulas (63 +/- 8% versus 39 +/- 4%, p < 0.05). Fistula output and the initial response to octreotide treatment had no value in predicting spontaneous healing. In conclusion, octreotide is a valuable tool for the conservative treatment of fistulas of the digestive tract. It is especially valuable for management of high-output enteric fistulas and pancreatic fistulas.

  6. The effect of various kinematics on postoperative pain after instrumentation: a prospective, randomized clinical study

    PubMed Central

    Arslan, Hakan; Khalilov, Ruslan; Doğanay, Ezgi; Karatas, Ertugrul

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Objective: To evaluate various kinematic movements on postoperative pain using a Reciproc system. Material and Methods: Fifty-six molar teeth were divided into four groups according to kinematics as follows: continuous rotation, 360° CCW – 30° CW, 270° CCW – 30° CW, and 150° CCW – 30° CW. Preoperative and postoperative pain levels using visual analogue scale (VAS), percussion pain, and analgesic intake were recorded for each subject. Postoperative pain levels at 1, 3, 5, and 7 d were evaluated. Data were analyzed statistically using the Kruskal-Walis, Mann-Whitney-U, one-way analysis of variance, and chi-square tests (p=0.05). Results: Continuous rotation resulted in more pain at Day 1 when compared with the reciprocating groups (360° CCW – 30° CW and 270° CCW – 30° C) (p<0.05). Conclusions: Continuous rotation resulted in more postoperative pain at Day 1 than in reciprocating groups, and thereafter no significant pain was found among the groups. PMID:27812621

  7. Postoperative Pain Management in Latino Families: Parent Beliefs about Analgesics Predict Analgesic Doses Provided to Children

    PubMed Central

    Rosales, Alvina; Fortier, Michelle A.; Campos, Belinda; Kain, Zeev N.

    2015-01-01

    Background/Objectives The present study examined whether parental perceptions of children’s pain impacted home-based pain management following outpatient surgery in a sample of Latino families from low socioeconomic backgrounds. Methods Latino parents of children (n = 161) who underwent outpatient surgery were recruited for this study and completed measures assessing attitudes on pain and analgesic use (Parental Pain Expression Perceptions and Medication Attitudes Questionnaire) before their child’s surgery. Parents also rated their child’s pain after their child’s surgery using the Parent Postoperative Pain Measure and collected data on the amount of analgesics they gave to their child on the first postoperative day. Hierarchical regression analyses examined whether parental attitudes predicted pain assessment and management at home. Results A majority of parents reported multiple misconceptions regarding children’s pain and fears of side effects as well as avoidance of analgesic use. For example, over 80% reported believing that a child always tells their parents when they are in pain. Hierarchical regression analyses found that more fear and avoidance regarding analgesic use for children’s pain predicted parents’ providing fewer doses of analgesic to their children on the first postoperative day (β = −0.21, p = 0.028). Conclusions Preoperative parents’ beliefs regarding analgesics for treatment of children’s pain may adversely impact parent postoperative analgesic administration at home in Latino families. PMID:26792407

  8. State anxiety and depression as factors modulating and influencing postoperative pain in dental implant surgery. A prospective clinical survey

    PubMed Central

    Gómez-de Diego, Rafael; Cutando-Soriano, Antonio; Montero-Martín, Javier; Prados-Frutos, Juan C.

    2014-01-01

    Objetives: To determine whether preoperative state anxiety and depression modulate or influence objective and subjective postoperative pain following dental implant insertion. Study Design: Prospective, clinical study with 7-day follow-up of a sample of 105 subjects who preoperatively completed the state anxiety questionnaire (STAI-E) and Beck Depression Inventory (BDI) and postoperatively, at 2 and 7 days, recorded objective pain with the Semmes-Weinstein mechanical esthesiometer (SW test) and subjective pain with the Visual Analog Scale (VAS). Results: 85.6% and 81.5% of patients, respectively, recorded no signs of state anxiety or depression. The correlation between anxiety and depression for both maxillary bones was the lower (P=0.02). The correlation between subjective and objective pain at 2 and 7 days, and the anatomic regions intervened, was statistically significant in the mandible at day 7 (P<0.01), and highly significant (P<0.001) for the other variables. The correlation between state anxiety and objective pain at day 7 was nearly statistically significant (P=0.07). Conclusions: The correlation between state anxiety and depression, and objective and subjective pain at day 7 was not statistically significant. A strong correlation was found between objective and subjective pain in the immediate postoperative period. Key words:Anxiety, depression, postoperative pain, dental implants. PMID:24880447

  9. Jupiter Night and Day

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2001-01-01

    Day and night side narrow angle images taken on January 1, 2001 illustrating storms visible on the day side which are the sources of visible lightning when viewed on the night side. The images have been enhanced in contrast. Note the two day-side occurrences of high clouds, in the upper and lower parts of the image, are coincident with lightning storms seen on the darkside. The storms occur at 34.5 degrees and 23.5 degrees North latitude, within one degree of the latitudes at which similar lightning features were detected by the Galileo spacecraft. The images were taken at different times. The storms' longitudinal separation changes from one image to the next because the winds carrying them blow at different speeds at the two latitudes.

  10. [The effect of lung diminishing interventions on immediate postoperative lung function and their modification by various forms of analgesia].

    PubMed

    Horch, R; Krönung, G; Westhofen, P; Giebel, G D

    1990-01-01

    The influence of different lung resection methods on pulmonary function was studied in 34 patients suffering from bronchial carcinoma. Daily measurements from the 1st to 10th postoperative day reveal the greatest losses of function after right upper lobectomy. Lower lobectomies or left upper lobectomy resulted in a less extensive loss of function. Recovery of function mainly occurs in the first 4 days after operation. Centrally acting analgetics are followed by a loss in pulmonary function whereas locally applied analgetics improve early postoperative function.

  11. Effects on postoperative salivary cortisol of relaxation/music and patient teaching about pain management.

    PubMed

    Good, Marion; Albert, Jeffrey M; Arafah, Baha; Anderson, Gene Cranston; Wotman, Stephen; Cong, Xiaomei; Lane, Deforia; Ahn, Sukhee

    2013-07-01

    The physiological and psychological stress of surgery and postoperative pain can leave patients more susceptible to infection and complications. The present study was designed to determine whether two interventions, patient teaching (PT) for pain management and relaxation/music (RM), reduced cortisol levels, an indicator of stress, following abdominal surgery. Patients (18-75 years) were randomly assigned to receive PT, RM, a combination of the two, or usual care; the 205 patients with both pre- and posttest cortisol values were analyzed. A 2 × 2 factorial design was used to compare groups for PT effects and RM effects. Stress was measured by salivary cortisol before and after 20-min tests of the interventions in the morning and afternoon of postoperative Day 2. Saliva was stimulated with lemon juice and analyzed with high-sensitivity salivary cortisol enzyme immunoassay. Comparisons using analysis of covariance (ANCOVA), controlling for baseline levels, showed no PT effect or RM effect on cortisol in the morning or afternoon. Post hoc ANCOVA showed no significant effects when intervention groups were compared to the control group. Although in previous studies, RM reduced pain and music reduced cortisol on Day 1, in the present study the cortisol response to surgery was not attenuated by PT or RM on Day 2. The RM intervention can be used for pain but needs to be further tested for effects on plasma cortisol in abdominal surgery patients on their first postoperative day.

  12. Increased Risk of Postthoracotomy Pain Syndrome in Patients with Prolonged Hospitalization and Increased Postoperative Opioid Use

    PubMed Central

    Jacob, Adam K.; Passe, Melissa A.; Mantilla, Carlos B.

    2016-01-01

    Background. Postthoracotomy pain syndrome (PTPS) is unfortunately very common following thoracotomy and results in decreased quality of life. The purpose of this retrospective study was to determine perioperative patient, surgical, and analgesic characteristics associated with the development of PTPS. Methods. Sixty-six patients who presented to the Mayo Clinic Rochester Pain Clinic were diagnosed with PTPS 2 months or more after thoracotomy with postoperative epidural analgesia. These patients were matched with sixty-six control patients who underwent thoracotomy with postoperative epidural analgesia and were never diagnosed with PTPS. Results. Median (IQR) hospital stay was significantly different between control patients (5 days (4, 6)) compared with PTPS patients (6 days (5, 8)), P < 0.02. The total opioid equivalent utilized in oral morphine equivalents in milligrams for the first three days postoperatively was significantly different between control patients and PTPS patients. The median (IQR) total opioid equivalent utilized was 237 (73, 508) for controls and 366 (116, 874) for PTPS patients (P < 0.005). Conclusion. Patients with a prolonged hospital stay after thoracotomy were at an increased risk of developing PTPS, and this is a novel finding. Patients who utilize higher oral morphine equivalents for the first 3 days were also at increased risk for PTPS. PMID:27340565

  13. Negative oncologic impact of poor postoperative pain control in left-sided pancreatic cancer

    PubMed Central

    Min, Eun-Ki; Chong, Jae Uk; Hwang, Ho Kyoung; Pae, Sang Joon; Kang, Chang Moo; Lee, Woo Jung

    2017-01-01

    AIM To investigate the association between postoperative pain control and oncologic outcomes in resected pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma (PDAC). METHODS From January 2009 to December 2014, 221 patients were diagnosed with PDAC and underwent resection with curative intent. Retrospective review of the patients was performed based on electronic medical records system. One patient without records of numerical rating scale (NRS) pain intensity scores was excluded and eight patients who underwent total pancreatectomy were also excluded. NRS scores during 7 postoperative days following resection of PDAC were reviewed along with clinicopathologic characteristics. Patients were stratified into a good pain control group and a poor pain control group according to the difference in average pain intensity between the early (POD 1, 2, 3) and late (POD 5, 7) postoperative periods. Cox-proportional hazards multivariate analysis was performed to determine association between postoperative pain control and oncologic outcomes. RESULTS A total of 212 patients were dichotomized into good pain control group (n = 162) and poor pain control group (n = 66). Median follow-up period was 17 mo. A negative impact of poor postoperative pain control on overall survival (OS) was observed in the group of patients receiving distal pancreatectomy (DP group; 42.0 mo vs 5.0 mo, P = 0.001). Poor postoperative pain control was also associated with poor disease-free survival (DFS) in the DP group (18.0 mo vs 8.0 mo, P = 0.001). Patients undergoing pancreaticoduodenectomy or pylorus-preserving pancreaticoduodenectomy (PD group) did not show associations between postoperative pain control and oncologic outcomes. Poor patients’ perceived pain control was revealed as an independent risk factor of both DFS (HR = 4.157; 95%CI: 1.938-8.915; P < 0.001) and OS (HR = 4.741; 95%CI: 2.214-10.153; P < 0.001) in resected left-sided pancreatic cancer. CONCLUSION Adequate postoperative pain relief during the early

  14. Impact of hypertonic saline on postoperative complications for patients undergoing upper gastrointestinal surgery

    PubMed Central

    Hong, Siqi; Shang, Qingjuan; Geng, Qiankun; Yang, Yang; Wang, Yan; Guo, Chunbao

    2017-01-01

    Abstract The aim of this study was to explore the impact of 3% hypertonic saline (HS) intragastric administration for patients who underwent upper gastrointestinal surgery. During the postoperative period, 3% HS has been suggested as a means to improve the intestinal edema and reduce gastrointestinal complications. The medical records of 111 patients with HS intragastric administration following upper gastrointestinal surgery and 268 patients, served as control, were reviewed retrospectively. Propensity score matching was performed to adjust for selected baseline variables. Clinical outcomes, including early gastrointestinal function recovery, postoperative complications, and length of hospital stay, were compared according to the HS intragastric administration or not. HS intragastric administration was associated with prompt postoperative gastrointestinal function recovery, including first flatus (risk ratio [RR], 1.32; 95% confidence interval [CI], 0.89–1.65; P = 0.048) and feeding within 3 postoperative days (RR (95% CI), 0.57 (0.49–0.77); P = 0.036). Early ileus occurred in 25 of 108 patients with HS treatment versus 36 of 108 patients without HS treatment (RR (95% CI), 1.43 (0.63–2.15); P = 0.065). The patients with HS experienced a lower overall postoperative complication (odds ratio [OD] 0.57; 95% CI, 0.33–1.09; P = 0.063), including trend toward a decrease for infectious complications (15[13.9] vs 23[21.3]; P = 0.11; OD, 0.59; 95% CI, 0.29–1.22). There was a decreased incidence of anastomotic leakage (1[0.9] vs 7[6.5]; P = 0.033) and postoperative ileuas (5[4.6%] vs 11[10.2%]; P = 0.096) in the HS administration patients. Our study demonstrated beneficial postoperative clinical effects of HS intragastric administration in patients who had undergone upper gastrointestinal surgery, such as prompt postoperative gastrointestinal function recovery and reduced overall postoperative complications, which may be attributed to a

  15. Postoperative complications after thoracic surgery for lung cancer.

    PubMed

    Maugeri, Laura; Corbo, Giuseppe Maria; Valente, Salvatore

    2004-01-01

    Postoperative complications and related risk factors after lung reduction surgery are analyzed based on a review of the literature. In particular the pathogenesis of some of postoperative respiratory disorders is carefully assessed. Most commonly cardiac arrhythmias, respiratory failure, bronchopleural fistula are observed. Main risk factors for postoperative complications are old age, chronic obstructive pulmonary disease, coronary disease, poor nutritional state, neoadjuvant therapy. Attention should be paid to all these factors, both in preoperative assessment and postoperative care, to prevent and promptly treat postoperative complications.

  16. 21-Day Content Screen

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    Under PRIA, EPA has 21 days after it receives the pesticide application and the fee to conduct an initial screen of the application’s contents for completeness and for the applicant to make necessary corrections. This page provides the checklists we use.

  17. Day Care: Nutrition.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Foster, Florence P.; And Others

    This collection of 12 short, bilingual papers on nutrition and preschool children is part of a series of papers on various aspects of day care published by the Canadian Department of Health and Welfare. Each paper is presented in both English and French. Topics dealt with include an overview of children's nutritional needs; development of…

  18. 90-Day Cycle Handbook

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Park, Sandra; Takahashi, Sola

    2013-01-01

    90-Day Cycles are a disciplined and structured form of inquiry designed to produce and test knowledge syntheses, prototyped processes, or products in support of improvement work. With any type of activity, organizations inevitably encounter roadblocks to improving performance and outcomes. These barriers might include intractable problems at…

  19. We Love Science Day.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kepler, Lynne

    1986-01-01

    Describes the goals and outcomes of the "We Love Science Day" programs that resulted from the inservice course, "Creative Integration of Science in Elementary Education" for Pennsylvania teachers. Provides samples of the hands-on activities that were offered to students, parents, and teachers. Includes a calendar of…

  20. Word of the Day

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Abrar-Ul-Hassan, Shahid

    2010-01-01

    Independent lexical development initiatives empower and equip language learners with skills to boost their lexical repertoires. Language instructors can train learners to be autonomous word learners. A sample activity, namely word of the day, is presented in this article. The activity is an independent lexical learning task, which aims to develop…

  1. Every Child, Every Day

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Allington, Richard L.; Gabriel, Rachael E.

    2012-01-01

    We know more now than we ever did before about how to make every child a successful reader, write Allington and Gabriel in this research review. Yet, few students regularly receive the best reading instruction we know how to give. The authors present research supporting their recommendation that every child, every day, should (1) read something he…

  2. Make a Splash Day

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Coverdale, Greg; Rust, April; Jensen, Belinda

    2004-01-01

    At the annual, all-day events-sponsored by Project WET (Water Education for Teachers) and held in nearly every state across the country each September--students participate in interactive activities and exhibits to learn about water resources and explore how human behaviors, such as development and recreation, can affect the quality of the…

  3. Sun-Earth Day

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2007-01-01

    Michael Sandras, a member of the Pontchartrain Astronomical Society, explains his solar telescope to students of Second Street in Bay St. Louis, Hancock County and Nicholson elementary schools in StenniSphere's Millennium Hall on April 10. The students participated in several hands-on activities at Stennis Space Center's Sun-Earth Day celebration.

  4. An Earth Day Reader.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Moser, Don, Ed.

    1990-01-01

    Presents what the author believes to be some of the most important environmental books published since Earth Day 1970. Discusses each selection and how it provides the historical background, basic information, and appreciation necessary to understand the character of our environmental dilemma and our need to address it. (MCO)

  5. First Day of School

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bort, Nancy

    2004-01-01

    In this brief article, the author, a science teacher at F. C. Hammond Middle School in Alexandria, Virginia, describes how the setting up of a simple science experiment on the first day of school can get students excited about learning science. The experiment involves heating a small amount of water in a flask, then covering the opening of the…

  6. One Play a Day

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Blankenship, Mark

    2007-01-01

    Undergraduate theater students rarely get the chance to work on a major world premiere, but this year hundreds of them will. Currently, more than 70 colleges and universities are participating in "365 Days/365 Plays," an ambitious project from Pulitzer Prize-winning playwright Suzan-Lori Parks. Every week, as they mount their portion of this epic…

  7. Fabulous Weather Day

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Marshall, Candice; Mogil, H. Michael

    2007-01-01

    Each year, first graders at Kensington Parkwood Elementary School in Kensington, Maryland, look forward to Fabulous Weather Day. Students learn how meteorologists collect data about the weather, how they study wind, temperature, precipitation, basic types/characteristics of clouds, and how they forecast. The project helps the students grow in…

  8. Oxidative Stress Biomarkers and Incidence of Postoperative Atrial Fibrillation in the Omega-3 Fatty Acids for Prevention of Postoperative Atrial Fibrillation (OPERA) Trial

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Jason H Y; Marchioli, Roberto; Silletta, Maria G; Masson, Serge; Sellke, Frank W; Libby, Peter; Milne, Ginger L; Brown, Nancy J; Lombardi, Federico; Damiano, Ralph J; Marsala, Joann; Rinaldi, Mauro; Domenech, Alberto; Simon, Caterina; Tavazzi, Luigi; Mozaffarian, Dariush

    2015-01-01

    Background Animal study results point to oxidative stress as a key mechanism triggering postoperative atrial fibrillation (PoAF), yet the extent to which specific biomarkers of oxidative stress might relate to PoAF risk in humans remains speculative. Methods and Results We assessed the association of validated, fatty acid–derived oxidative stress biomarkers (F2-isoprostanes, isofurans, and F3-isoprostanes) in plasma and urine, with incident PoAF among 551 cardiac surgery patients. Biomarkers were measured at enrollment, the end of surgery, and postoperative day 2. PoAF lasting ≥30 seconds was confirmed with rhythm strip or electrocardiography and centrally adjudicated. Outcomes were assessed until hospital discharge or postoperative day 10, whichever occurred first. Urine level of each oxidative stress biomarker rose at the end of surgery (2- to 3-fold over baseline, P<0.001) and subsequently declined to concentrations comparable to baseline by postoperative day 2. In contrast, plasma concentrations remained relatively stable throughout the perioperative course. Urine F2-isoprostanes and isofurans at the end of surgery were 20% and 50% higher in subjects who developed PoAF (P≤0.009). While baseline biomarker levels did not associate significantly with PoAF, end of surgery and postoperative day 2 isoprostanes and isofurans demonstrated relatively linear associations with PoAF. For example, the end of surgery extreme quartile multivariate adjusted OR (95% CI) for urine isofurans and F3-isoprostanes were 1.95 (1.05 to 3.62; P for trend=0.01) and 2.10 (1.04 to 2.25, P for trend=0.04), respectively. The associations of biomarkers with PoAF varied little by demographics, surgery type, and medication use (P≥0.29 for each). Conclusions These novel results add to accumulating evidence supporting the likely key pathogenic role of elevated oxidative stress in PoAF. Clinical Trial Registration URL: Clinicaltrials.gov Unique identifier: NCT00970489. PMID:25994442

  9. [Readaptation after total intravenous anesthesia in one-day surgery].

    PubMed

    Buravtsev, V A; Medvinskiĭ, I D

    1997-01-01

    The authors analyze the stages of readaptation and recovery of clear consciousness in the immediate postoperative period in 200 patients administered one of the four variants of intravenous anesthesia in a one-day surgical hospital. The purpose of this work was to optimize the anesthetic care and the readaptation period. The stages of readaptation were assessed by psychophysiological testing. This process coursed most smoothly after propofol-phentanyl and hypnomidate-phentanyl anesthesia. Readaptation after sombrevin-phentanyl coursed reliably slower. The longest recovery was observed after calipsol-diazepam anesthesia, despite drug stimulation. This type of narcosis is irrational for one-day surgery, for it requires prolonged postoperative monitoring and thus makes the hospital stay longer.

  10. The Postoperative Pain Assessment Skills pilot trial

    PubMed Central

    McGillion, Michael; Dubrowski, Adam; Stremler, Robyn; Watt-Watson, Judy; Campbell, Fiona; McCartney, Colin; Victor, J Charles; Wiseman, Jeffrey; Snell, Linda; Costello, Judy; Robb, Anja; Nelson, Sioban; Stinson, Jennifer; Hunter, Judith; Dao, Thuan; Promislow, Sara; McNaughton, Nancy; White, Scott; Shobbrook, Cindy; Jeffs, Lianne; Mauch, Kianda; Leegaard, Marit; Beattie, W Scott; Schreiber, Martin; Silver, Ivan

    2011-01-01

    BACKGROUND/OBJECTIVES: Pain-related misbeliefs among health care professionals (HCPs) are common and contribute to ineffective postoperative pain assessment. While standardized patients (SPs) have been effectively used to improve HCPs’ assessment skills, not all centres have SP programs. The present equivalence randomized controlled pilot trial examined the efficacy of an alternative simulation method – deteriorating patient-based simulation (DPS) – versus SPs for improving HCPs’ pain knowledge and assessment skills. METHODS: Seventy-two HCPs were randomly assigned to a 3 h SP or DPS simulation intervention. Measures were recorded at baseline, immediate postintervention and two months postintervention. The primary outcome was HCPs’ pain assessment performance as measured by the postoperative Pain Assessment Skills Tool (PAST). Secondary outcomes included HCPs knowledge of pain-related misbeliefs, and perceived satisfaction and quality of the simulation. These outcomes were measured by the Pain Beliefs Scale (PBS), the Satisfaction with Simulated Learning Scale (SSLS) and the Simulation Design Scale (SDS), respectively. Student’s t tests were used to test for overall group differences in postintervention PAST, SSLS and SDS scores. One-way analysis of covariance tested for overall group differences in PBS scores. RESULTS: DPS and SP groups did not differ on post-test PAST, SSLS or SDS scores. Knowledge of pain-related misbeliefs was also similar between groups. CONCLUSIONS: These pilot data suggest that DPS is an effective simulation alternative for HCPs’ education on postoperative pain assessment, with improvements in performance and knowledge comparable with SP-based simulation. An equivalence trial to examine the effectiveness of deteriorating patient-based simulation versus standardized patients is warranted. PMID:22184553

  11. Effectiveness of postoperative intravenous acetaminophen (Acelio) after gastrectomy: A propensity score-matched analysis.

    PubMed

    Ohkura, Yu; Haruta, Shusuke; Shindoh, Junichi; Tanaka, Tsuyoshi; Ueno, Masaki; Udagawa, Harushi

    2016-11-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the efficacy of postoperative scheduled intravenous acetaminophen to reduce the opioid use and enhance recovery after gastrectomy.Opioid use is reportedly associated with delayed recovery of gastrointestinal (GI) peristalsis and postoperative nausea/vomiting (PONV) despite of acceptable efficacy for pain control.Of 147 and 96 consecutive patients who underwent gastrectomy for gastric cancer before and after introduction of postoperative scheduled intravenous acetaminophen, propensity score matched population was created and short-term clinical outcomes were compared.Significant defervescence was demonstrated in Acetaminophen group (A-group) compared with control group (C-group) during the perioperative period (P < 0.001), whereas no significant difference was observed in postoperative inflammatory parameters. The incidence of postoperative complications was similar between the groups. The number of patient-controlled analgesia (PCA) pushes was significantly reduced in the A-group (P = 0.007) and the frequency of use of other nonopioid analgesics was also significantly reduced in the A-group (P < 0.001). Both daily and cumulative opioid use was significantly reduced in the A-group (P < 0.001). The time to first flatus and defecation was decreased in the A-group (P < 0.001 and P = 0.038, respectively). The incidence of PONV was significantly reduced from 26.0% to 12.5% after introduction of intravenous acetaminophen (P = 0.017), and hospital stay tended to be decreased in the A-group (13.2 vs 14.7 days, P = 0.069)Postoperative scheduled intravenous acetaminophen decreased opioid use and may be associated with enhanced recovery after gastrectomy.

  12. Predictive Role of Intraoperative Plasma Fibrinogen for Postoperative Portal Venous Flow in Living Donor Liver Transplantation.

    PubMed

    Chae, Min Suk; Park, Chul Soo; Oh, Su A; Hong, Sang Hyun

    2017-02-14

    BACKGROUND Previous studies have reported poor graft regeneration after living donor liver transplantation (LDLT) due to inappropriate portal venous flow (PVF). In this study, we investigated the perioperative factors affecting postoperative PVF after LDLT. MATERIAL AND METHODS The perioperative data of 366 LDLT patients were retrospectively reviewed. The average PVF on postoperative days 1, 3, and 5 was measured and dichotomized at a cut-off value for patient survival of 1,477 mL/min. Perioperative variables, including coagulation profiles, were compared between high and low postoperative PVF groups. The factors potentially significant (p<0.1) for a low postoperative PVF were evaluated in a univariate analysis, followed by the development of a predictive model for a low postoperative PVF. RESULTS A low post-LDLT PVF was determined in 113 patients (30.9%). The univariate analysis identified systemic hypertension, LDLT duration, average mean blood pressure, and insulin administration as the significantly related factors. Other significant factors were a plasma fibrinogen, at the anhepatic phase and 1 h after graft reperfusion, as well as the platelet count at the anhepatic phase. After multivariate adjustment, plasma fibrinogen 1 h after graft reperfusion against a recipient background of systemic hypertension was independently associated with a low mean postoperative PVF. CONCLUSIONS A low mean PVF during the early post-LDLT period was independently related to the plasma fibrinogen level 1 h after graft reperfusion, and to a history of systemic hypertension. Thus, the practice of aggressive supplementation of plasma fibrinogen during the immediate post-reperfusion period merits serious consideration.

  13. Incidence, Predictors, and Impact of Postoperative Atrial Fibrillation after Coronary Artery Bypass Grafting in Military Veterans

    PubMed Central

    Cornwell, Lorraine D.; Bakshi, Ankur; Rachlin, Eric; Preventza, Ourania; Rosengart, Todd K.; Coselli, Joseph S.; LeMaire, Scott A.; Petersen, Nancy J.; Pattakos, Greg; Bakaeen, Faisal G.

    2016-01-01

    Little is known about the frequency and clinical implications of postoperative atrial fibrillation in military veterans who undergo coronary artery bypass grafting (CABG). We examined long-term survival data, clinical outcomes, and associated risk factors in this population. We retrospectively reviewed baseline, intraoperative, and postoperative data from 1,248 consecutive patients with similar baseline risk profiles who underwent primary isolated CABG at a Veterans Affairs hospital from October 2006 through March 2013. Multivariable logistic regression identified predictors of postoperative atrial fibrillation. Kaplan-Meier analysis was used to evaluate long-term survival (the primary outcome measure), morbidity, and length of hospital stay. Postoperative atrial fibrillation occurred in 215 patients (17.2%). Independent predictors of this sequela were age ≥65 years (odds ratios [95% confidence intervals], 1.7 [1.3–2.4] for patients of age 65–75 yr and 2.6 [1.4–4.8] for patients >75 yr) and body mass index ≥30 kg/m2 (2.0 [1.2–3.2]). Length of stay was longer for patients with postoperative atrial fibrillation than for those without (12.7 ± 6.6 vs 10.3 ± 8.9 d; P ≤0.0001), and the respective 30-day mortality rate was higher (1.9% vs 0.4%; P=0.014). Seven-year survival rates did not differ significantly. Older and obese patients are particularly at risk of postoperative atrial fibrillation after CABG. Patients who develop the sequela have longer hospital stays than, but similar long-term survival rates to, patients who do not. PMID:27777519

  14. The role of age and comorbidities in postoperative outcome of mitral valve repair

    PubMed Central

    Bonnet, Vincent; Boisselier, Clément; Saplacan, Vladimir; Belin, Annette; Gérard, Jean-Louis; Fellahi, Jean-Luc; Hanouz, Jean-Luc; Fischer, Marc-Olivier

    2016-01-01

    Abstract The average age of patients undergoing mitral valve repair is increasing each year. This retrospective study aimed to compare postoperative complications of mitral valve repair (known to be especially high-risk) between 2 age groups: under and over the age of 80. Patients who underwent mitral valve repair were divided into 2 groups: group 1 (<80 years old) and group 2 (≥80 years old). Baseline characteristics, pre- and postoperative hemodynamic data, surgical characteristics, and postoperative follow-up data until hospital discharge were collected. A total of 308 patients were included: 264 in group 1 (age 63 ± 13 years) and 44 in group 2 (age 83 ± 2 years). Older patients had more comorbidities (atrial fibrillation, history of cardiac decompensation, systemic hypertension, pulmonary hypertension, and chronic kidney disease) and they presented more postoperative complications (50.0% vs 33.7%; P = 0.043), with a longer hospital stay (8.9 ± 6.9 vs 6.6 ± 4.6 days; P = 0.005). To assess the burden of age, a propensity score was awarded to postoperative complications. Active smoking, chronic pulmonary disease, chronic kidney disease, associated ischemic heart disease, obesity, and cardio pulmonary by-pass duration were described as independent risk factors. When matched on this propensity score, there was no difference in morbidity or mortality between group 1 and group 2. Older patients suffered more postoperative complications, which were related to their comorbidities and not only to their age. PMID:27336886

  15. [Postoperative radiation therapy in lung carcinom].

    PubMed

    Bouchaab, H; Peters, S; Ozsahin, M; Peguret, N; Gonzales, M; Lovis, A

    2014-05-21

    Locally advanced non-small-cell lung carcinoma (NSCLC) is a very heterogeous disease, the role of postoperative radiation therapy (PORT) in pN2 patients with completly resected NSCLC remains controversial. Although an improvment in local control has been described in several studies, the effect on survival has been contradictory or inconclusive. Retrospective evaluation suggest a positive effect of PORT in high risk patients with pN2 disease: RI-resected NSCLC, bulky and multilevel N2. However further evaluation of PORT in prospectively randomized studies in completely resected pN2 NSCLC is needed.

  16. [Report of the 4th International Conference on Envenomations by Snakebites and Scorpion Stings in Africa, Dakar, April 25-29, 2011].

    PubMed

    Chippaux, J-P; Diouf, A; Massougbodji, A; Stock, R P; Kane, O; Dièye, A M; Lam Faye, A; Mbaye Sène, M; Parra, H-J

    2012-08-01

    The authors present a summary of the proceedings and the recommendations of the Fourth International Conference on Envenomations by Snakebites and Scorpion Stings in Africa, held from 25 to 29 April 2011 in Dakar. After a two-day workshop for Senegalese health personnel on the most relevant aspects of the management of envenomations, about 270 participants met to share their experiences in the field. Nearly a hundred oral and poster presentations were made on the epidemiology of snakebites and scorpion stings in Africa, the composition and action of venoms and the manufacture and use of antivenoms. The last day was devoted to an institutional debate involving experts, representatives of national health authorities and concerned professionals (physicians, pharmacists, nurses and traditional healers) as well as members of the pharmaceutical industry to discuss and elaborate a set of recommendations. It was agreed that it is necessary to improve knowledge of the epidemiological situation by case reporting. Quality control of antivenoms and procedures for their registration at the level of national health authorities should aim at improving the distribution of safe and effective antivenoms in peripheral health centers for the better assessment of victims. It was also recommended that adequate training should be provided for health personnel in all aspects of medical management of envenomations. Equitable distribution of funding and the establishment of a network of African experts were also discussed in the conference.

  17. Kindergarten Evaluation Study: Full-Day Alternate Day Programs.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Minnesota State Dept. of Education, St. Paul.

    In this evaluation study, two groups of children who attended kindergarten either one-half day every day or full-day on alternate days were compared. An opinion survey was conducted to obtain the observations of parents, kindergarten teachers, and elementary principals in relation to the all-day alternate day schedule in 55 school districts. Data…

  18. Flight Day 2 Highlights

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2003-01-01

    The STS-107 second flight day begins with a shot of the Spacehab Research Double Module. Live presentations of experiments underway inside of the Spacehab Module are presented. Six experiments are shown. As part of the Space Technology and Research Student Payload, students from Australia, China, Israel, Japan, New York, and Liechtenstein are studying the effect that microgravity has on ants, spiders, silkworms, fish, bees, granular materials, and crystals. Mission Specialist Kalpana Chawla is seen working with the zeolite crystal growth experiment.

  19. Microgravity Day for Educators

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2001-01-01

    The arnual conference for the Educator Resource Center Network (ERCN) Coordinators was held at Glenn Research Center at Lewis Field in Cleveland, Ohio. The conference included participants from NASA's Educator Resource Centers located throughout the country. The Microgravity Science Division at Glenn sponsored a Microgravity Day for all the conference participants. Kathy Higgins of the National Center for Microgravity Research at GRC explains educational resources to teachers. This image is from a digital still camera; higher resolution is not available.

  20. Preoperative use of incentive spirometry does not affect postoperative lung function in bariatric surgery.

    PubMed

    Cattano, Davide; Altamirano, Alfonso; Vannucci, Andrea; Melnikov, Vladimir; Cone, Chelsea; Hagberg, Carin A

    2010-11-01

    Morbidly obese patients undergoing general anesthesia for laparoscopic bariatric surgery are considered at increased risk of a postoperative decrease in lung function. The purpose of this study was to determine whether a systematic use of incentive spirometry (IS) prior to surgery could help patients to preserve their respiratory function better in the postoperative period. Forty-one morbidly obese (body mass index [BMI] > 40 kg/m²) candidates for laparoscopic bariatric surgery were consented in the study. All patients were taught how to use an incentive spirometer but then were randomized blindly into 2 groups. The control group was instructed to use the incentive spirometer for 3 breaths, once per day. The treatment group was requested to use the incentive spirometer for 10 breaths, 5 times per day. Twenty experimental (mean BMI of 48.9 ± 5.67 kg/m²) and 21 control patients (mean BMI of 48.3 ± 6.96 kg/m²) were studied. The initial mean inspiratory capacity (IC) was 2155 ± 650.08 (SD) cc and 2171 ± 762.98 cc in the experimental and control groups, respectively. On the day of surgery, the mean IC was 2275 ± 777.56 cc versus 2254.76 ± 808.84 cc, respectively. On postoperative day 1, both groups experienced a significant drop of their IC, with volumes of 1458 ± 613.87 cc (t test P < 0.001) and 1557.89 ± 814.67 cc (t test P < 0.010), respectively. Our results suggest that preoperative use of the IS does not lead to significant improvements of inspiratory capacity and that it is a not a useful resource to prevent postoperative decrease in lung function.

  1. The 4th International Symposium for Arctic Science and the 3rd International Conference for Arctic Research Planning, the science symposium of Arctic Science Summit Week 2015 (ISAR-4/ICARPIII)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wadhams, Peter; Kodama, Yuji; Yamanouchi, Takashi

    2016-09-01

    The 4th International Symposium for Arctic Research (ISAR-4) with the theme of "Rapid change of the Arctic climate system and its global influence" was held as the science symposium of the Arctic Science Summit Week 2015, together with the 3rd International Conference for Arctic Research Planning (ICARPIII) with the theme of "Integrating Arctic Research: a Roadmap for the Future," in Toyama, Japan, from April 27 to April 30, 2015. There were 340 oral and 177 poster presentations, totalling 511 presentations. Among them, 38 papers were submitted to this special issue and 30 were accepted. 16 sessions in which those accepted papers were presented are described.

  2. [Bacteriological profile and antibiotic treatment of postoperative peritonitis].

    PubMed

    Missaoui, K; Marzougui, Y; Kouka, J; Dhibi, Y; Hannachi, Z; Dziri, C; Houissa, M

    2014-01-01

    During the postoperative peritonitis (PPO) the main stay of treatment is the choice of probabilistic antibiotictherapy, it is also the main prognostic factor The aim of our study was to identify anappropriate antibiotic protocol to the current ecology of our unit. It was a retrospective study including 102 patients over a period of 09 years from 1 January 2003 to 3O November 2011. All of them are supported for the treatments off postoperative peritonitis in surgical intensive care unit of a service of general surgery a university hospital Charles Nicolle of Tunis. All bacteriological data (germs and sensitivity), and the terms of therapeutic modality for the empirical antibiotic therapy were listed. The incidence of PPO was Q90%.The average age of our patients was 57 +/- 18 years. The sex ratio was 1.08. One hundred and seven (107) microorganisms were isolated from 72 samples (44 microbial mono, 28 multi microbial). The frequency of gram-positive cocci (GPC) was 16.82%, the Gram-negative bacilli (BGN) was 82.2%. The Enterobacteriaceae have proved particularity resistant. Thus, the ampicillin resistance was 87.14%, that the C3G was 33.80%, the Piperacillin to Tazobactam combination, was 36.5% and that the association Ticarcillin-clavulanic acid was 43.6%. For non-fermenting BGN, Pseudomonas aeruginosa was sensitive to ticarcillin in 80% of cases, to ceftazidime in 66.6% of cases, PiperacillinTazobactam--in 71.43% of cases, imipenem in 85 72% of cases, colimycin in 100% of cases and Amiklin in 71.43% of cases. For CGP, enterococci were resistant to ampicillin in 50% of cases and vancomycin in 0% of cases. The majority of patients received triple antibiotic therapy (59.8%) or combination therapy (34.3%). The main associations were: cefotaxime + Gentamycin + Metronidazole (35.2%), Amikacin Imipenem + + Metronidazole (12.7%), Imipenem + amikacin (9.8%), Piperacillin / Tazobactam + amikacin (9.8%) + amikacin and ertapenem (5.88%). Probabilitic antibiotic therapy was

  3. PEarly Postoperative Emergency Department Care of Abdominal Transplant Recipients1

    PubMed Central

    McElroy, Lisa M.; Schmidt, Kathryn A.; Richards, Christopher T.; Lapin, Brittany; Abecassis, Michael M.; Holl, Jane L.; Adams, James; Ladner, Daniela P.

    2015-01-01

    Background Research on post-transplant care has predominantly focused on predictors of readmission with little attention to emergency department (ED) visits. The goal of this study was to describe early postoperative ED care of transplant recipients. Methods A secondary database analysis of adult patients who underwent abdominal organ transplantation between January 1, 2008 and December 31, 2013 and sought ED care within one year post-transplantation was conducted. Survival was compared using the Kaplan-Meier method with log-rank test. Cox proportional hazards regression analysis was performed to adjust for pertinent covariates. Results A total of 1,900 abdominal organ transplants were performed during the study period. Of these, 37% (N=711) transplant recipients sought care in the ED (1,343 total visits) with 1.89 mean ED visits per recipient. Of recipients seen in the ED, 58% received a kidney transplant and 28% received a liver transplant, with 45% of recipients presenting within the first 60 postoperative days. The most common chief complaints were gastroenterological (17%) and abnormal laboratory values or vital signs (17%). In total, 74% of recipients were readmitted and 50% of admitted patients were discharged in less than 24 hours. Transplant recipients with ED visits had lower 3-year graft (81% vs. 87%; p<0.001) and patient (89% vs. 93%; p=0.002) survival. Conclusion Transplant recipients have a high frequency of ED visits in the first post-transplantation year and high rates of subsequent hospital admission. Further investigation is needed to understand what drives recipient presentation to the ED and create care models that achieve the best outcomes. PMID:26050012

  4. Postoperative cognitive changes after total knee arthroplasty under regional anesthesia

    PubMed Central

    Jeon, Young-Tae; Kim, Byung-Gun; Park, Young Ho; Sohn, Hye-Min; Kim, Jungeun; Kim, Seung Chan; An, Seong Soo; Kim, SangYun

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Background: The type of postoperative cognitive decline after surgery under spinal anesthesia is unknown. We investigated the type of postoperative cognitive decline after total knee arthroplasty (TKA). Neuropsychological testing was conducted and the changes in cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) biomarkers after surgery were evaluated. Methods: Fifteen patients who required bilateral TKA at a 1-week interval under spinal anesthesia were included. Neuropsychological tests were performed twice, once the day before the first operation and just before the second operation (usually 1 week after the first test) to determine cognitive decline. Validated neuropsychological tests were used to examine 4 types of cognitive decline: memory, frontal-executive, language-semantic, and others. Concentrations of CSF amyloid peptide, tau protein, and S100B were measured twice during spinal anesthesia at a 1-week interval. The patients showed poor performance in frontal-executive function (forward digit span, semantic fluency, letter-phonemic fluency, and Stroop color reading) at the second compared to the first neuropsychological assessment. Results: S100B concentration decreased significantly 1 week after the operation compared to the basal value (638 ± 178 vs 509 ± 167 pg/mL) (P = 0.019). Amyloid protein β1–42, total tau, and phosphorylated tau concentrations tended to decrease but the changes were not significant. Conclusion: Our results suggest that frontal-executive function declined 1 week after TKA under spinal anesthesia. The CSF biomarker analysis indicated that TKA under regional anesthesia might not cause neuronal damage. PMID:28033253

  5. Surgically placed abdominal wall catheters on postoperative analgesia and outcomes after living liver donation.

    PubMed

    Khan, James; Katz, Joel; Montbriand, Janice; Ladak, Salima; McCluskey, Stuart; Srinivas, Coimbatore; Ko, Raynauld; Grant, David; Bradbury, Ashleene; LeManach, Yannick; Clarke, Hance

    2015-04-01

    Living donor liver resections are associated with significant postoperative pain. Epidural analgesia is the gold standard for postoperative pain management, although it is often refused or contraindicated. Surgically placed abdominal wall catheters (AWCs) are a novel pain modality that can potentially provide pain relief for those patients who are unable to receive an epidural. A retrospective review was performed at a single center. Patients were categorized according to their postoperative pain modality: intravenous (IV) patient-controlled analgesia (PCA), AWCs with IV PCA, or patient-controlled epidural analgesia (PCEA). Pain scores, opioid consumption, and outcomes were compared for the first 3 postoperative days. Propensity score matches (PSMs) were performed to adjust for covariates and to confirm the primary analysis. The AWC group had significantly lower mean morphine-equivalent consumption on postoperative day 3 [18.1 mg, standard error (SE)=3.1 versus 28.2 mg, SE=3.0; P=0.02] and mean cumulative morphine-equivalent consumption (97.2 mg, SE=7.2 versus 121.0 mg, SE=9.1; P=0.04) in comparison with the IV PCA group; the difference in cumulative-morphine equivalent remained significant in the PSMs. AWC pain scores were higher than those in the PCEA group and were similar to the those in the IV PCA group. The AWC group had a lower incidence of pruritus and a shorter hospital stay in comparison with the PCEA group and had a lower incidence of sedation in comparison with both groups. Time to ambulation, nausea, and vomiting were comparable among all 3 groups. The PSMs confirmed all results except for a decrease in the length of stay in comparison with PCEA. AWCs may be an alternative to epidural analgesia after living donor liver resections. Randomized trials are needed to verify the benefits of AWCs, including the safety and adverse effects.

  6. Impact of early postoperative enteral nutrition on clinical outcomes in patients with gastric cancer.

    PubMed

    Li, B; Liu, H Y; Guo, S H; Sun, P; Gong, F M; Jia, B Q

    2015-06-29

    The impact of early enteral nutrition (EEN) on clinical outcomes of gastric cancer patients was investigated. Three hundred pa-tients undergoing gastric cancer surgery from July 2010 to May 2014 were randomly divided into experimental and control groups (n = 150/group). Experimental group patients received enteral nutrition in water during the early postoperative period. Control group patients received conventional perioperative treatment. Patients' clinical outcomes, post-operative immune function, and nutritional statuses were compared, which revealed that the postoperative fever duration (80.2 ± 6.0 vs 88.1 ± 8.1 h, P < 0.05), anal exhaust time (78.8 ± 9.3 vs 85.3 ± 8.4 h, P < 0.05), and length of hospitalization (7.73 ± 2.13 vs 9.77 ± 1.76 days, P < 0.01) differed significantly. Treatment costs in thousands of dol-lars were 31.24 ± 3.21 for the experimental group and 35.61 ± 2.32 for the control group; this difference was statistically significant (P < 0.01). The incidence of postoperative complications did not significantly differ between the experimental and control groups [14.0% (21/150) vs 17.3% (26/150), P > 0.05]. At postoperative days 3 and 7, the CD3(+), CD4(+), natural killer cell, albumin, and prealbumin levels and CD4(+)/CD8(+) ra-tio were significantly higher in the experimental group than the control group (all P < 0.05). CD8(+) cell counts were significantly lower in the experimental group than the control group (P < 0.05). Postsurgical oral EEN can improve nutritional status and immune function and promote early recovery of intestinal function in patients with gastric cancer.

  7. Preoperative platelet count and postoperative blood loss in patients undergoing hip surgery: an inverse correlation.

    PubMed

    Monreal, M; Lafoz, E; Llamazares, J; Roncales, J; Roca, J; Granero, X

    1996-01-01

    In a previous study we tried to assess the clinical usefulness of platelet count (PlC) to confirm whether postoperative pulmonary embolism could be suspected early. Unexpectedly, the 19 patients who subsequently developed pulmonary embolism had significantly lower mean PlC levels even before surgery. In an attempt to discover whether the preoperative PlC levels were associated with a different incidence of postoperative blood loss, we decided to retrospectively study the relationship between preoperative PlC levels and the consequences of blood loss. There were 459 consecutive patients undergoing hip surgery. After excluding 5 patients who died during the first 3 postoperative days, and 16 patients who bled from a definitive anatomic site, there were 438 patients. Blood loss was considered to be excessive when two or more of the following conditions were present: (1) total transfusion requirements exceeding 1,000 ml whole blood or 2 units of packed red cells; (2) a drop in hemoglobin level of 5 g/dl or more, and (3) a hemoglobin level below 8 g/dl at any moment during the first 8 postoperative days. Blood loss was considered to be excessive in 91 patients. Preoperative PlC levels were significantly lower in these patients as compared to patients without the condition (204 +/- 52 vs. 236 +/- 79 x 10(9) liter-1; p = 0.0002). When patients were classified according to the quartiles of preoperative PlC, the odds ratio of developing excessive blood loss was 0.69 (95% CI: 0.38-1.26) in patients in the second quartile; 0.57 (95% CI: 0.30-1.06) in the third quartile, and 0.27 (95% CI: 0.13-0.57) in patients in the highest quartile. After adjusting for age, sex, type of surgery and type of prophylaxis, the preoperative PlC levels maintained a statistically significant inverse correlation with postoperative blood loss.

  8. Dexmedetomidine improves early postoperative cognitive dysfunction in aged mice.

    PubMed

    Qian, Xiao-Lan; Zhang, Wei; Liu, Ming-Zheng; Zhou, Yu-Bing; Zhang, Jing-Min; Han, Li; Peng, You-Mei; Jiang, Jin-hua; Wang, Qing-Duan

    2015-01-05

    Postoperative cognitive dysfunction (POCD) is a frequent complication following major surgery in the elderly. However, the exact pathogenic mechanisms are still unknown. Dexmedetomidine, a selective alpha 2 adrenal receptor agonist, was revealed anesthesia and brain protective role. The present study aimed to examine whether dexmedetomdine protects against POCD induced by major surgical trauma under general anesthesia in aged mice. In the present study, cognitive function was assessed by Y-maze. Proinflammatory cytokines interleukin-1β (IL-1β) and tumor necrosis factor (TNF-α), apoptosis-related factor caspase-3 and Bax were detected by real-time PCR, Western blot or immunohistochemistry. The results showed that anesthesia alone caused weak cognitive dysfunction on the first day after general anesthesia. Cognitive function in mice with splenectomy under general anesthesia was significantly exacerbated at the first and third days after surgery, and was significantly improved by dexmedetomidine administration. Splenectomy increased the expression of IL-1β, TNF-α, Bax and caspase-3 in hippocampus. These changes were significantly inversed by dexmedetomidine. These results suggest that hippocampal inflammatory response and neuronal apoptosis may contribute to POCD, and selective alpha 2 adrenal receptor excitation play a protective role.

  9. EARLY POSTOPERATIVE COMPLICATIONS IN ROUX-EN-Y GASTRIC BYPASS

    PubMed Central

    STOLL, Aluisio; ROSIN, Leandro; DIAS, Mariana Fernandes; MARQUIOTTI, Bruna; GUGELMIN, Giovana; STOLL, Gabriela Fanezzi

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Background: Roux-en-Y gastric bypass is one of the most common bariatric surgery and leads to considerable weight loss in the first months. Aim: To quantify the main early postoperative complications in patients submitted to the gastric bypass. Method: Observational retrospective cohort. Data of 1051 patients with class II obesity associated with comorbidities or class III obesity submitted to the gastric bypass with 30 days of follow-up starting from the date of the surgery. Results: The age average was 36 years with a predominance of females (81.1%). The mean preoperative body mass index was 43 kg/m². The major complication was fistula (2.3%), followed by intestinal obstruction (0.5%) and pulmonary embolism (0.5%). Death occurred in 0.6% of the cases. Conclusion: In the period of 30 days after surgery the overall complication rate was 3.8%; reoperation was necessary in 2.6% and death occurred in 0.6%. Fistula was the main complication and the leading cause of hospitalization in intensive care unit, reoperation and death. PMID:27683781

  10. [Postoperative findings in the spinal column].

    PubMed

    Lieb, J M; Ulmer, S; Kelm, J; Shariat, K; Stippich, C; Ahlhelm, F J

    2011-09-01

    Postoperative imaging after spinal surgery is usually performed to document the correct positioning of implants or to rule out complications if patients still suffer from pain after surgery. Depending on the question various imaging modalities can be used all of which have benefits and limitations. Conventional X-ray is used for the documentation of the correct positioning of spinal implants, stability (olisthesis) and during follow-up to rule out fractures or instability of the implants, whereas soft tissue changes cannot be completely assessed. Besides these indications, imaging is usually performed because of ongoing symptoms (pain for the most part) of the patients. Soft tissue changes including persistent or recurrent herniated disc tissue, hematoma or infection can best be depicted using magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) which should be performed within the immediate postoperative period to be able to distinguish physiological development of scar tissue from inflammatory changes in the area of the surgical approach. Often imaging alone cannot differentiate between these and imaging can therefore only be considered as an adjunct. Computed tomography is the modality of choice for the evaluation of bony structures and an adjunct of new therapies such as image-guided application of cement for kyphoplasty or vertebroplasty.

  11. [Postoperative management of hip and knee endoprostheses].

    PubMed

    Seitz, S; Rüther, W

    2012-10-01

    Rheumatoid arthritis is often accompanied by massive destruction of the smaller and larger joints even with early therapy using antirheumatic drugs. In these cases total joint arthroplasty is the only surgical option, especially for the knee and hip joint. Knowledge of the specific disease-related postoperative characteristics is a prerequisite for the successful treatment of patients with rheumatoid arthritis. As dislocation of the arthroplastic joint does not occur more often in rheumatoid arthritis, the risk of periprosthetic infection is increased due to the use of biologicals. Therefore, a perioperative optimization is obligatory. In order to facilitate independence in daily living physiotherapy in combination with aids such as arthritis crutches, gripping pliers or raised toilet seat need to be started as soon as possible after surgical treatment. To achieve this goal it is recommended to refer patients with inflammatory arthritis to inpatient rehabilitation facilities. With respect to the specific postoperative treatment after joint replacement the long-term results are comparable with those from patients with primary osteoarthritis.

  12. Postoperative Alterations in Taste and Smell

    PubMed Central

    Elterman, Kelly Galina; Mallampati, Seshagiri Rao; Kaye, Alan David; Urman, Richard Dennis

    2014-01-01

    Context: Alterations in taste and smell, including but not limited to anosmia, ageusia, hypogeusia, and dysgeusia, have been described in association with various medications, including anesthetic agents. Frequently, these symptoms occur 1-2 weeks after medication administration and last several months. While such a phenomenon is a rare occurrence, it nonetheless can significantly impact patients’ satisfaction and quality of life. Evidence Acquisition: The methodology consisted of a thorough literature search using the MEDLINE and Cochrane databases utilizing keywords such as anosmia, ageusia, olfactory disorders, postoperative, and anesthesia. Results: Our results yielded several previously published case report, and were not limited to a specific type of anesthesia. Based on available literature, we review the physiology of taste and smell as well as the medications associated with loss of these senses. We describe perioperative agents that could lead to postoperative complications associated with anosmia and and ageusia. Conclusions: Based on available literature recommendations for anesthesiologists caring for patients at risk for this occurrence are presented in this review. The symptoms are usually temporary as in the majority of the patients the sensory receptor cells are able to regenerate themselves after injury. Anesthesia providers need to aware of this phenomenon to be able to reassure patients and possibly avoid anesthetic techniques associated with anosmia and ageusia. PMID:25599025

  13. Percutaneous management of postoperative anastomotic biliary strictures.

    PubMed

    Saad, Wael E A

    2008-06-01

    Postoperative anastomotic biliary strictures can occur after surgery in bile ducts belonging to transplanted or native (nontransplanted) livers. The majority of postoperative anastomotic strictures encountered by interventional radiologists are most likely in liver transplant recipients due to the large and growing liver transplant recipient population worldwide compared with patients with native livers and biliary enteric anastomoses. They occur after 2.5 to 13% of liver transplantations and they represent at least one-half of biliary strictures encountered after liver transplantation. Anastomotic biliary strictures are considered technical in nature, accentuated by fibrosis and scarring that may be secondary to, if not exacerbated by, graft ischemia. There are numerous variables in the percutaneous transhepatic balloon dilation protocols applied to treat anastomotic biliary strictures. These include (1) types of balloons, (2) how long balloons are inflated, (3) how frequently patients return for additional dilation sessions, and (4) the interval(s) at which they return. No alteration in these variables has proven to improve long-term patency. In addition, new technology such as cutting balloons and stents has not been fully evaluated to determine their effect on long-term patency. The current article describes the overall theme of balloon dilation protocols for the management of anastomotic biliary strictures and discusses possible future management of such strictures.

  14. Comparison of oral versus sublingual piroxicam during postoperative pain management after lower third molar extraction.

    PubMed

    Trindade, P A K; Giglio, F P M; Colombini-Ishikiriama, B L; Calvo, A M; Modena, K C S; Ribeiro, D A; Dionísio, T J; Brozoski, D T; Lauris, J R P; Faria, F A C; Santos, C F

    2011-03-01

    In this study, 53 patients received piroxicam, administered orally or sublingually, after undergoing removal of symmetrically positioned lower third molars, during two separate appointments. This study used a randomized, blind, cross-over protocol. Objective and subjective parameters were recorded for comparison of postoperative results for 7 days after surgery. Patients treated with oral or sublingual piroxicam reported low postoperative pain scores. The patients who received piroxicam orally took a similar average amount of analgesic rescue medication compared with patients who received piroxicam sublingually (p>0.05). Patients exhibited similar values for mouth opening measured just before surgery and immediately following suture removal 7 days later (p>0.05), and showed no significant differences between routes of piroxicam administration for swelling control during the second or seventh postoperative days (p>0.05). In summary, pain, trismus and swelling after lower third molar extraction, independent of surgical difficulty, could be controlled by piroxicam 20mg administered orally or sublingually and no significant differences were observed between the route of delivery used in this study.

  15. Effect of Acupuncture on Postoperative Ileus after Distal Gastrectomy for Gastric Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Jung, Se Yun; Chae, Hyun Dong; Kang, Ung Rae; Kwak, Min Ah

    2017-01-01

    Purpose Acupuncture has recently been accepted as a treatment option for managing postoperative ileus (POI) and various functional gastrointestinal disorders. Therefore, we conducted a prospective randomized study to evaluate the effect of acupuncture on POI and other surgical outcomes in patients who underwent gastric surgery. Materials and Methods Thirty-six patients who underwent distal gastrectomy for gastric cancer from March to December 2015 were randomly assigned to acupuncture or non-acupuncture (NA) groups at 1:1 ratio. The acupuncture treatment was administered treatment once daily for 5 consecutive days starting at postoperative day 1. The primary outcome measure was the number of remnant sitz markers in the small intestine on abdominal radiograph. The secondary outcome measure was the surgical outcome, including the times to first flatus, first defecation, start of water intake, and start of soft diet, as well as length of hospital stay and laboratory findings. Results The acupuncture group had significantly fewer remnant sitz markers in the small intestine on postoperative days 3 and 5 compared to those in the NA group. A significant difference was observed in the numbers of remnant sitz markers in the small intestine with respect to group differences by time (P<0.0001). The acupuncture group showed relatively better surgical outcomes than those in the NA group, but the differences were not statistically significant. Conclusions In this clinical trial, acupuncture promoted the passage of sitz markers, which may reflect the possibility of reducing POI after distal gastrectomy. PMID:28337359

  16. Hypothermia Increases Tissue Plasminogen Activator Expression and Decreases Post-Operative Intra-Abdominal Adhesion

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Chien-Chang; Wang, Hsuan-Mao; Chou, Tzung-Hsin; Wu, Meng-Che; Hsueh, Kuang-Lung; Chen, Shyr-Chyr

    2016-01-01

    Background Therapeutic hypothermia during operation decreases postoperative intra-abdominal adhesion formation. We sought to determine the most appropriate duration of hypothermia, and whether hypothermia affects the expression of tissue plasminogen activator (tPA). Methods 80 male BALB/c mice weighing 25–30 g are randomized into one of five groups: adhesion model with infusion of 15°C saline for 15 minutes (A); 30 minutes (B); 45 minute (C); adhesion model without infusion of cold saline (D); and sham operation without infusion of cold saline (E). Adhesion scores and tPA levels in the peritoneum fluid levels were analyzed on postoperative days 1, 7, and 14. Results On day 14, the cold saline infusion groups (A, B, and C) had lower adhesion scores than the without infusion of cold saline group (D). However, only group B (cold saline infusion for 30 minutes) had a significantly lower adhesion scores than group D. Also, group B was found to have 3.4 fold, 2.3 fold, and 2.2 fold higher levels of tPA than group D on days 1, 7, and 14 respectively. Conclusions Our results suggest that cold saline infusion for 30 minutes was the optimum duration to decrease postoperative intra-abdominal adhesion formation. The decrease in the adhesion formations could be partly due to an increase in the level of tPA. PMID:27583464

  17. Postoperative complications and overall survival after pancreaticoduodenectomy for pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Pugalenthi, Amudhan; Protic, Mladjan; Gonen, Mithat; Kingham, T. Peter; D’ Angelica, Michael I.; Dematteo, Ronald P.; Fong, Yuman; Jarnagin, William R.; Allen, Peter J.

    2016-01-01

    INTRODUCTION Pancreaticoduodenectomy (PD) performed for pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma (PDA) has a postoperative morbidity of 40–50%. In this study, we analyzed the impact of high grade complications after PD for PDA on overall survival. METHODS 596 patients that underwent PD for PDA between 2001–2009 were identified from a prospective database. Complications were defined and graded (1–5) as per our Institutional Surgical Secondary Events Program. High grade complications were defined as ≥ grade 3. Postoperative mortality (≤ 90 days) was excluded. Univariate and multivariate analyses were performed to identify factors associated with overall survival. RESULTS Median survival was 24 months. Overall complication rate was 51% (301/596). Low grade complications were recorded in 266 patients (45%) and high grade complications in 22% (n= 129). Our 90 day mortality was 3.7% (n= 22). Anastomotic fistula/ leak/abscess rate was 14% (n= 82). Multivariate Cox-Regression analysis identified node positivity, estimated blood loss (EBL) > 600 ml, length of stay (LOS) > 10 days, margin positivity and vascular procedures as predictors of decreased overall survival (p < 0.05). High grade complications were not associated with overall survival (p = 0.948). CONCLUSION In this study, the occurrence of high grade postoperative complications was not associated with overall survival. PMID:26678349

  18. Postoperative bleeding risk for cutaneous surgery in the head and neck region with continued phenprocoumon therapy.

    PubMed

    Eichhorn, Wolfgang; Barsukov, Evgeny; Al-Dam, Ahmed; Gröbe, Alexander; Smeets, Ralf; Eichhorn, Marc; Heiland, Max; Kluwe, Lan; Blessmann, Marco

    2014-07-01

    In a total of 171 surgical procedures for lesions in the head and neck region in patients in whom phenprocoumon therapy was not stopped, 16 (9%) postoperative bleeding events were observed over a follow-up period of two weeks. Local measures were sufficient in all cases except one severe case where blood transfusion was needed and anticoagulant treatment was stopped for 7 days. The bleeding risk was significantly higher for the surgical procedures of the nose than those in other areas (21% versus 6%, P = 0.014), but was not influenced by the international normalized ratio (INR) of blood coagulation, size, site and type of the lesion, surgical procedure, and sex and age of the patients. The bleeding rate in patients not on any anticoagulation therapy was significantly lower (6/211 = 3%). Across both groups, just over 80% of the bleeding episodes were within the first two days (55% on the same day and 32% on the next day) of the surgery. No bleeding was recorded after 5 days. Our data suggest that cutaneous surgery in the head and neck region can be safely performed with continued phenprocoumon therapy in most cases in an INR range of 1.3-3.4, but rarely severe bleeding does occur and can be managed with a close-contact follow-up and with 24-h on call services during the first two days postoperatively.

  19. Early enteral nutrition therapy in congenital cardiac repair postoperatively: A randomized, controlled pilot study

    PubMed Central

    Sahu, Manoj Kumar; Singal, Anuradha; Menon, Ramesh; Singh, Sarvesh Pal; Mohan, Alka; Manral, Mala; Singh, Divya; Devagouru, V.; Talwar, Sachin; Choudhary, Shiv Kumar

    2016-01-01

    Background and Objectives: Adequate nutritional supplementation in infants with cardiac malformations after surgical repair is a challenge. Critically ill infants in the early postoperative period are in a catabolic stress. The mismatch between estimated energy requirement (EER) and the intake in the postoperative period is multifactorial, predisposing them to complications such as immune deficiency, more infection, and growth failure. This study aimed to assess the feasibility and efficacy of enriched breast milk feed on postoperative recovery and growth of infants after open heart surgery. Methodology: Fifty infants <6 months of age were prospectively randomized in the trial for enteral nutrition (EN) postoperatively from day 1 to 10, after obtaining the Institute Ethics Committee's approval. They were equally divided into two groups on the basis of the feed they received: Control group was fed with expressed breast milk (EBM; 0.65 kcal/ml) and intervention group was fed with EBM + energy supplementation/fortification with human milk fortifier (7.5 kcal/2 g)/Simyl medium-chain triglyceride oil (7.8 kcal/ml). Energy need for each infant was calculated as per EER at 90 kcal/kg/day, as the target requirement. The intra- and post-operative variables such as cardiopulmonary bypass and aortic cross-clamp times, ventilation duration, Intensive Care Unit (ICU), and hospital length of stay and mortality were recorded. Anthropometric and hematological parameters and infection control data were recorded in a predesigned pro forma. Data were analyzed using Stata 14.1 software. Results: The duration of mechanical ventilation, length of ICU stay (LOIS), length of hospital stay (LOHS), infection rate, and mortality rate were lower in the intervention group compared to the control group although none of the differences were statistically significant. Infants in control group needed mechanical ventilation for about a day more (i.e., 153.6 ± 149.0 h vs. 123.2 ± 107.0 h; P = 0

  20. Surgical outcomes associated with postoperative atrial fibrillation after robotic-assisted pulmonary lobectomy: retrospective review of 208 consecutive cases

    PubMed Central

    Ng, Emily P.; Velez-Cubian, Frank O.; Rodriguez, Kathryn L.; Thau, Matthew R.; Moodie, Carla C.; Garrett, Joseph R.; Fontaine, Jacques P.

    2016-01-01

    Background In this study, we sought to investigate the effect of post-operative atrial fibrillation (POAF) after robotic-assisted video-thoracoscopic pulmonary lobectomy on comorbid postoperative complications, chest tube duration, and hospital length of stay (LOS). Methods We retrospectively analyzed prospectively collected data from 208 consecutive patients who underwent robotic-assisted pulmonary lobectomy by one surgeon for known or suspected lung cancer. Postoperatively, 39 (18.8%) of these patients experienced POAF during their hospital stay. The occurrence of postoperative complications other than POAF, chest tube duration, and hospital LOS were analyzed in patients with POAF and without POAF. Statistical significance (P≤0.05) was determined by unpaired Student’s t-test or by Chi-square test. Results Of patients with POAF, 46% also had other concurrent postoperative complications, while only 31% of patients without POAF experienced complications. The average number of postoperative complications experienced by patients with POAF was significantly higher than that experienced by those without POAF (0.9 vs. 0.4, P<0.05). Median chest tube duration in POAF patients (6 days) was significantly higher than in patients without POAF (4 days). A similar result was also seen with hospital LOS, with the median hospital LOS of 8 days in POAF patients being significantly longer than in those without POAF, whose median hospital LOS was 4 days. No other significant difference was detected between the two groups of patients. Conclusions This study demonstrated the association between the incidence of POAF and a more complicated hospital course. Further studies are needed to determine whether confounders were involved in this association. PMID:27621862