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Sample records for 5 10 25

  1. 78 FR 66742 - Determination That MOBAN (Molindone Hydrochloride) Tablets (5 Milligrams, 10 Milligrams, 25...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-11-06

    ... Administration (FDA) has determined that MOBAN (molindone hydrochloride (HCl)) tablets (5 milligrams (mg), 10 mg, 25 mg, 50 mg, and 100 mg) and capsules (5 mg, 10 mg, and 25 mg) were not withdrawn from sale for... applications (ANDAs) for MOBAN (molindone HCl) tablets (5 mg, 10 mg, 25 mg, 50 mg, and 100......

  2. PM2.5 and PM10 Emission from agricultural soils by wind erosion

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Soil tillage and wind erosion are a major source of particulate matter less than 2.5 and 10 µm (PM2.5 and PM10) emission from cultivated soil. Fifteen cultivated soils collected from 5 states were tested as crushed (<2.0 mm) and uncrushed (natural aggregation) at 8, 10, and 13 m s-1 wind velocity in...

  3. 40 CFR Table C-4 to Subpart C of... - Test Specifications for PM10, PM2.5 and PM10-2.5 Candidate Equivalent Methods

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ...% 10% 2 10% 2 10% 2 10% 2 Precision of PM2.5 or PM10-2.5 candidate method, CP, each site 10% 2 15% 2 15% 2 15% 2 Slope of regression relationship 1 ± 0.10 1 ± 0.05 1 ± 0.10 1 ± 0.10 1 ± 0.10 1 ±...

  4. 40 CFR Table C-4 to Subpart C of... - Test Specifications for PM10, PM2.5 and PM10-2.5 Candidate Equivalent Methods

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ...% 10% 2 10% 2 10% 2 10% 2 Precision of PM2.5 or PM10-2.5 candidate method, CP, each site 10% 2 15% 2 15% 2 15% 2 Slope of regression relationship 1 ± 0.10 1 ± 0.05 1 ± 0.10 1 ± 0.10 1 ± 0.10 1 ±...

  5. Distribution of PM(2.5) and PM(10-2.5) in PM(10) fraction in ambient air due to vehicular pollution in Kolkata megacity.

    PubMed

    Das, Manab; Maiti, Subodh Kumar; Mukhopadhyay, Ujjal

    2006-11-01

    This research paper aims at establishing baseline PM(10) and PM(2.5) concentration levels, which could be effectively used to develop and upgrade the standards in air pollution in developing countries. The relative contribution of fine fractions (PM(2.5)) and coarser fractions (PM(10-2.5)) to PM(10) fractions were investigates in a megacity which is overcrowded and congested due to lack of road network and deteriorated air quality because of vehicular pollution. The present study was carried out during the winter of 2002. The average 24h PM(10) concentration was 304 microg/m(3), which is 3 times more than the Indian National Ambient Air Quality Standards (NAAQS) and higher PM(10) concentration was due to fine fraction (PM(2.5)) released by vehicular exhaust. The 24h average PM(2.5) concentration was found 179 microg/m(3), which is exceeded USEPA and EU standards of 65 and 50 microg/m(3) respectively for the winter. India does not have any PM(2.5) standards. The 24 h average PM(10-2.5) concentrations were found 126 microg/m(3). The PM(2.5) constituted more than 59% of PM(10) and whereas PM(10)-PM(2.5) fractions constituted 41% of PM(10). The correlation between PM(10) and PM(2.5) was found higher as PM(2.5) comprised major proportion of PM(10) fractions contributed by vehicular emissions.

  6. [Concentrations of PM10 and PM2.5 particulate material in the atmosphere of Rome].

    PubMed

    Marconi, A; Menichini, E; Ziemacki, G; Cattani, G; Stacchini, G

    2000-01-01

    Starting from 1993, various monitoring campaigns were carried out in Rome to determine PM10 and PM2.5. Their results are presented here cumulatively, with the aim of obtaining preliminary information on relationships among these size fractions, in various seasonal periods and in two sites with different characteristics (a road site and an urban background site in a public park). Particles were collected on filter and gravimetrically determined. Both PM10 and PM2.5 concentrations show temporal fluctuations with higher values during winter months. Background concentrations are lower than those contemporaneously measured at the road site only to a limited extent (10-17%). The contribution of PM2.5 to PM10 during the winter semester is higher than during the summer one (67 vs. 52%), with no substantial intersite differences.

  7. 40 CFR Table C-4 to Subpart C of... - Test Specifications for PM10, PM2.5 and PM10-2.5 Candidate Equivalent Methods

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ...% 10% 2 10% 2 10% 2 10% 2 Precision of PM2.5 or PM10-2.5 candidate method, CP, each site 10% 2 15% 2 15% 2 15% 2 Slope of regression relationship 1 ±0.10 1 ±0.05 1 ±0.10 1 ±0.10 1 ±0.10 1 ±0.12...

  8. Chemical composition of PM2.5 and PM10 in Mexico City during winter 1997.

    PubMed

    Chow, Judith C; Watson, John G; Edgerton, Sylvia A; Vega, Elizabeth

    2002-03-27

    PM2.5 and PM10 were measured over 24-h intervals at six core sites and at 25 satellite sites in and around Mexico City from 23 February to 22 March 1997. In addition, four 6-h samples were taken each day at three of the core sites. Sampling locations were selected to represent regional, central city, commercial, residential, and industrial portions of the city. Mass and light transmission concentrations were determined on all of the samples, while elements, ions and carbon were measured on approximately two-thirds of the samples. PM10 concentrations were highly variable, with almost three-fold differences between the highest and lowest concentrations. Fugitive dust was the major cause of PM10 differences, although carbon concentrations were also highly variable among the sampling sites. Approximately 50% of PM10 was in the PM2.5 fraction. The majority of PM mass was comprised of carbon, sulfate, nitrate, ammonium and crustal components, but in different proportions on different days and at different sites. The largest fine-particle components were carbonaceous aerosols, constituting approximately 50% of PM2.5 mass, followed by approximately 30% secondary inorganic aerosols and approximately 15% geological material. Geological material is the largest component of PM10, constituting approximately 50% of PM10 mass, followed by approximately 32% carbonaceous aerosols and approximately 17% secondary inorganic aerosols. Sulfate concentrations were twice as high as nitrate concentrations. Sulfate and nitrate were present as ammonium sulfate and ammonium nitrate. Approximately two-thirds of the ammonium sulfate measured in urban areas appears to have been transported from regions outside of the study domain, rather than formed from emissions in the urban area. Diurnal variations are apparent, with two-fold increases in concentration from night-time to daytime. Morning samples had the highest PM2.5 and PM10 mass, secondary inorganic aerosols and carbon concentrations

  9. The distribution of PM10 and PM2.5 carbonaceous aerosol in Baotou, China

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, Haijun; He, Jiang; Zhao, Boyi; Zhang, Lijun; Fan, Qingyun; Lü, Changwei; Dudagula; Liu, Tao; Yuan, Yinghui

    2016-09-01

    Particulate matter (PM), including PM10 and PM2.5, is one of the major impacts on air quality, visibility, climate change, earth radiation balance, and public health. Organic carbon (OC) and elemental carbon (EC) are the major components of PM. 804 samples (PM10 and PM2.5) were simultaneously collected from six urban sites covering 3 districts in Baotou, in January, April, September, and November 2014. As to a long-term study on the effects of carbonaceous aerosol, data were collected annually at Environmental Protection Agency of Baotou (EPB). The concentrations of PM10 and PM2.5, the spatial distribution and content of OC and EC, the relationship between OC and EC, and the formation of secondary organic carbon (SOC) have been investigated. The findings indicated that the concentrations of these particle matter are higher than that in US or European standards. The average concentrations of OC in PM10 and PM2.5 follow the order: January > November > April > September; and for EC in PM10 and PM2.5 follow the order: January > November > September > April. Affected by metrological factors, it was indicated that high wind speed and low relative humidity were beneficial for removal of OC and EC in January and November. Pearson correlations and cluster analysis on OC and EC concentrations in PM10 and PM2.5 with gaseous pollutants (SO2, NO2, and CO) suggested that OC shared the same emission sources with SO2 and CO from combustion, while EC's sources mainly came from vehicles exhaust and combustion which contributed to NO2 as well. The OC concentration is mainly primary in warm months, while it appears secondary in cold months in Baotou. There is a common characteristic among the cities with higher SOC in winter, wherever the coal combustion can lead to the severe pollution. This work is important for the construction of the database of OC and EC concentrations in PM10 and PM2.5 at spatial and time intervals, and it can provide scientific suggestion for similar PM

  10. 40 CFR 93.117 - Criteria and procedures: Compliance with PM10 and PM2.5 control measures.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... with PM10 and PM2.5 control measures. 93.117 Section 93.117 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL....117 Criteria and procedures: Compliance with PM10 and PM2.5 control measures. The FHWA/FTA project must comply with any PM10 and PM2.5 control measures in the applicable implementation plan....

  11. Weekly cycle of magnetic characteristics of PM2.5 and PM2.5-10 in Beijing, China

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    SHI, M.; Wu, H.; Zhang, S.; Li, H.; Yang, T.

    2013-12-01

    In urban areas,fine particle matter with aerodynamic diameter between 2.5 um and 10 um (PM2.5-10), and 2.5 um (PM2.5), as an important source of urban particulate matter (PM) pollutants, have significant negative effects on health, atmospheric visibility and climate. PM has increasingly become a significant index of indicating the atmospheric pollution of city. In recent years, Beijing, China has been listed as one of the most serious air pollution city in the world. In order to investigate the sources of air pollutants, a total of 283 pairs of PM2.5 and PM2.5-10 samples were collected daily from July, 2010 to June, 2011 in Beijing. Mineral magnetic properties and Scanning electron microscope (SEM) observations and energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (EDS) analyses of PM2.5 and PM2.5-10 were measured to verify the magnetic materials. Magnetic measures for PM indicated that the major magnetic phase was coarse-grained magnetite-like material. The χlf, χarm, SIRM and χarm/SIRM series of the PM2.5 and PM2.5-10 show seasonal dependences: high values in winter and low values in summer. In additional the parameters analyzed by Time-series methods show a strong cycle about 7 days above 95% confidence level. Weekly cycle of magnetic characteristics of PM2.5 and PM2.5-10 show different pattern: the concentration of magnetic particles in PM2.5-10 show high values in mid-week, and particle sizes is steady, while the concentration of magnetic particles in PM2.5 show reverse a weekly cycle pattern, and particle sizes is smaller in the mid-week.Microscopy analyses reveal basically three morphologies of magnetic grains: aggregate, spherules and angular particles. The ultrafine carbonaceous particles which tend to form complex clusters and chain-like structures, most likely come from coal burning and motor vehicle exhaust. Spherical particles in PM2.5 are dominantly composed of Fe, O and C, grain-diameters of particles range from 0.3 to 2 um. Angular particles of Fe

  12. Basic statistics of PM2.5 and PM10 in the atmosphere of Mexico City.

    PubMed

    Vega, E; Reyes, E; Sánchez, G; Ortiz, E; Ruiz, M; Chow, J; Watson, J; Edgerton, S

    2002-03-27

    The high levels of fine particulate matter in Mexico City are of concern since they may induce severe public health effects as well as the attenuation of visible light. Sequential filter samplers were used at six different sites from 23 February to 22 March 1997. The sampling campaign was carried out as part of the project 'Investigación sobre Materia Particulada y Deterioro Atmosferico-Aerosol and Visibility Evaluation Research'. This research was a cooperative project sponsored by PEMEX and by the US Department of Energy. Sampling sites represent the different land uses along the city, the northwest station, Tlalnepantla, is located in a mixed medium income residential and industrial area. The northeast station, Xalostoc, is located in a highly industrialized area, Netzahualcoyotl is located in a mixed land use area, mainly commercial and residential. Station La Merced is located in the commercial and administrative district downtown. The southwest station is located in the Pedregal de San Angel, in a high-income neighborhood, and the southeast station located in Cerro de la Estrella is a mixed medium income residential and commercial area. Samples were collected four times a day in Cerro de la Estrella (CES), La Merced (MER) and Xalostoc (XAL) with sampling periods of 6 h. In Pedregal (PED), Tlalnepantla (TLA) and Netzahualcoyot1 (NEZ) sampling periods were every 24 h. In this paper the basic statistics of PM2.5 and PM10 mass concentrations are presented. The average results showed that 49, 61, 46, 57, 51 and 44% of the PM10 consisted of PM2.5 for CES, MER, XAL, PED, TLA and NEZ, respectively. The 24-h average highest concentrations of PM25 and PM10 were registered at NEZ (184 and 267 microg/m3) and the lowest at PED (22 and 39 microg/m3). The highest PM10 correlations were between XAL-CES (0.79), PED-TLA (0.80). In contrast, the highest PM2.5 correlations were between CES-PED (0.74), MER-CES (0.73) and TLA-PED (0.72), showing a lower correlation than the PM10

  13. Particulate matter in California: part 2--Spatial, temporal, and compositional patterns of PM2.5, PM10-2.5, and PM10.

    PubMed

    Motallebi, Nehzat; Taylor, Clinton A; Croes, Bart E

    2003-12-01

    Geographic and temporal variations in the concentration and composition of particulate matter (PM) provide important insights into particle sources, atmospheric processes that influence particle formation, and PM management strategies. In the nonurban areas of California, annual-average PM2.5 and PM10 concentrations range from 3 to 10 microg/m3 and from 5 to 18 microg/m3, respectively. In the urban areas of California, annual-averages for PM2.5 range from 7 to 30 microg/m3, with observed 24-hr peaks reaching levels as high as 160 microg/m3. Within each air basin, exceedances are a mixture of isolated events as well as periods of elevated PM2.5 concentrations that are more prolonged and regional in nature. PM2.5 concentrations are generally highest during the winter months. The exception is the South Coast Air Basin, where fairly high values occur throughout the year. Annual-average PM2.5 mass, as well as the concentrations of major components, declined from 1988 to 2000. The declines are especially pronounced for the sulfate (SO4(2-)) and nitrate (NO3-) components of PM2.5 and PM10) and correlate with reductions in ambient levels of oxides of sulfur (SOx) and oxides of nitrogen (NOx). Annual averages for PM10-2.5 and PM10 exhibited similar downwind trends from 1994 to 1999, with a slightly less pronounced decrease in the coarse fraction.

  14. The hot corrosion of Co-25Cr-10Ni-5Ta-3Al-0.5Y alloy /S-57/

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Santoro, G. J.

    1978-01-01

    A cobalt-base alloy, Co-25Cr-10Ni-5Ta-3Al-0.5Y (S-57), was subjected to hot corrosion in Mach 0.3 burner-rig combustion gases at maximum alloy temperatures of 900 and 1000 C. Various salt concentrations were injected into the burner: 0.5, 2,5, and 10 parts per million synthetic sea salt and 4 parts per million sodium sulfate (Na2SO4). The extent of corrosion was determined by measuring the maximum depth of corrosion in the alloy, and the corrosion process was studied by metallography, X-ray diffraction, scanning electron microscopy, and electron microprobe analysis. While S-57 was found to possess only moderate oxidation resistance at these temperatures, this alloy resisted significant hot corrosion attack under all but the most severe test conditions. The process of hot corrosion attack under the most severe conditions of this study was primarily sulfidation.

  15. Chemical characterization and mass closure of PM10 and PM2.5 at an urban site in Karachi - Pakistan

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shahid, Imran; Kistler, Magdalena; Mukhtar, Azam; Ghauri, Badar M.; Ramirez-Santa Cruz, Carlos; Bauer, Heidi; Puxbaum, Hans

    2016-03-01

    A mass balance method is applied to assess main source contributions to PM2.5 and PM10 levels in Karachi. Carbonaceous species (elemental carbon, organic carbon, carbonate carbon), soluble ions (Ca++, Mg++, Na+, K+, NH4+, Cl-, NO3-, SO4-), saccharides (levoglucosan, galactosan, mannosan, sucrose, fructose, glucose, arabitol and mannitol) were determined in atmospheric fine (PM2.5) and coarse (PM10) aerosol samples collected under pre-monsoon conditions (March-April 2009) at an urban site in Karachi (Pakistan). The concentrations of PM2.5 and PM10 were found to be 75 μg/m3 and 437 μg/m3 respectively. The large difference between PM10 and PM2.5 originated predominantly from mineral dust. "Calcareous dust" and "siliceous dust" were the over all dominating material in PM, with 46% contribution to PM2.5 and 78% to PM10-2.5. Combustion particles and secondary organics (EC + OM) comprised 23% of PM2.5 and 6% of PM10-2.5. EC, as well as OC ambient levels were higher (59% and 56%) in PM10-2.5 than in PM2.5. Biomass burning contributed about 3% to PM2.5, and had a share of about 13% of "EC + OM" in PM2.5. The impact of bioaerosol (fungal spores) was minor and had a share of 1 and 2% of the OC in the PM2.5 and PM10-2.5 size fractions. In case of secondary inorganic aerosols, ammonium sulphate (NH4)2SO4 contributes 4.4% to PM2.5 and no detectable quantity were found in fraction PM10-2.5. The sea salt contribution is about 2% both to PM2.5 and PM10-2.5.

  16. Application of positive matrix factorization in characterization of PM(10) and PM(2.5) emission sources at urban roadside.

    PubMed

    Srimuruganandam, B; Shiva Nagendra, S M

    2012-06-01

    The 24-h average coarse (PM(10)) and fine (PM(2.5)) fraction of airborne particulate matter (PM) samples were collected for winter, summer and monsoon seasons during November 2008-April 2009 at an busy roadside in Chennai city, India. Results showed that the 24-h average ambient PM(10) and PM(2.5) concentrations were significantly higher in winter and monsoon seasons than in summer season. The 24-h average PM(10) concentration of weekdays was significantly higher (12-30%) than weekends of winter and monsoon seasons. On weekends, the PM(2.5) concentration was found to slightly higher (4-15%) in monsoon and summer seasons. The chemical composition of PM(10) and PM(2.5) masses showed a high concentration in winter followed by monsoon and summer seasons. The U.S.EPA-PMF (positive matrix factorization) version 3 was applied to identify the source contribution of ambient PM(10) and PM(2.5) concentrations at the study area. Results indicated that marine aerosol (40.4% in PM(10) and 21.5% in PM(2.5)) and secondary PM (22.9% in PM(10) and 42.1% in PM(2.5)) were found to be the major source contributors at the study site followed by the motor vehicles (16% in PM(10) and 6% in PM(2.5)), biomass burning (0.7% in PM(10) and 14% in PM(2.5)), tire and brake wear (4.1% in PM(10) and 5.4% in PM(2.5)), soil (3.4% in PM(10) and 4.3% in PM(2.5)) and other sources (12.7% in PM(10) and 6.8% in PM(2.5)).

  17. PM 2.5 and PM 10: The influence of sugarcane burning on potential cancer risk

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Silva, Flavio S.; Cristale, Joyce; André, Paulo A.; Saldiva, Paulo H. N.; Marchi, Mary R. R.

    2010-12-01

    In Brazil, sugarcane fields are often burned to facilitate manual harvesting, and this burning causes environmental pollution from the large amounts of soot released into the atmosphere. This material contains numerous organic compounds such as PAHs. In this study, the concentrations of PAHs in two particulate-matter fractions (PM 2.5 and PM 10) in the city of Araraquara (SE Brazil, with around 200,000 inhabitants and surrounded by sugarcane plantations) were determined during the sugarcane harvest (HV) and non-harvest (NHV) seasons in 2008 and 2009. The sampling strategy included four campaigns, with 60 samples in the NHV season and 220 samples in the HV season. The PM 2.5 and PM 10 fractions were collected using a dichotomous sampler (10 L min -1, 24 h) with Teflon™ filters. The filter sets were extracted (ultrasonic bath with hexane/acetone (1:1 v/v)) and analyzed by HPLC/Fluorescence. The median concentration for total PAHs (PM 2.5 in 2009) was 0.99 ng m -3 (NHV) and 3.3 ng m -3 (HV). In the HV season, the total concentration of carcinogenic PAHs (benz(a)anthracene, benzo(b)fluoranthene, benzo(k)fluoranthene, and benzo(a)pyrene) was 5 times higher than in the NHV season. B(a)P median concentrations were 0.017 ng m -3 and 0.12 ng m -3 for the NHV and HV seasons, respectively. The potential cancer risk associated with exposure through inhalation of these compounds was estimated based on the benzo[a]pyrene toxic equivalence (BaP eq), where the overall toxicity of a PAH mixture is defined by the concentration of each compound multiplied by its relative toxic equivalence factor (TEF). BaP eq median (2008 and 2009 years) ranged between 0.65 and 1.0 ng m -3 and 1.2-1.4 ng m -3 for the NHV and HV seasons, respectively. Considering that the maximum permissible BaP eq in ambient air is 1 ng m -3, related to the increased carcinogenic risk, our data suggest that the level of human exposure to PAHs in cities surrounded by sugarcane crops where the burning process is used

  18. Analysis of PM10, PM2.5, and PM2 5-10 concentrations in Santiago, Chile, from 1989 to 2001.

    PubMed

    Koutrakis, Petros; Sax, Sonja N; Sarnat, Jeremy A; Coull, Brent; Demokritou, Phil; Oyola, Pedro; Garcia, Javier; Gramsch, Ernesto

    2005-03-01

    Daily particle samples were collected in Santiago, Chile, at four urban locations from January 1, 1989, through December 31, 2001. Both fine PM with da < 2.5 microm (PM2.5) and coarse PM with 2.5 < da < 10 microm (PM2.5-10) were collected using dichotomous samplers. The inhalable particle fraction, PM10, was determined as the sum of fine and coarse concentrations. Wind speed, temperature and relative humidity (RH) were also measured continuously. Average concentrations of PM2.5 for the 1989-2001 period ranged from 38.5 microg/m3 to 53 microg/m3. For PM2.5-10 levels ranged from 35.8-48.2 microg/m3 and for PM10 results were 74.4-101.2 microg/m3 across the four sites. Both annual and daily PM2.5 and PM10 concentration levels exceeded the U.S. National Ambient Air Quality Standards and the European Union concentration limits. Mean PM2.5 levels during the cold season (April through September) were more than twice as high as those observed in the warm season (October through March); whereas coarse particle levels were similar in both seasons. PM concentration trends were investigated using regression models, controlling for site, weekday, month, wind speed, temperature, and RH. Results showed that PM2.5 concentrations decreased substantially, 52% over the 12-year period (1989-2000), whereas PM2.5-10 concentrations increased by approximately 50% in the first 5 years and then decreased by a similar percentage over the following 7 years. These decreases were evident even after controlling for significant climatic effects. These results suggest that the pollution reduction programs developed and implemented by the Comisión Nacional del Medio Ambiente (CONAMA) have been effective in reducing particle levels in the Santiago Metropolitan region. However, particle levels remain high and it is thus imperative that efforts to improve air quality continue.

  19. Global emissions of PM10 and PM2.5 from agricultural tillage and harvesting operations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, W.; Tong, D.; Lee, P.

    2014-12-01

    Soil particles emitted during agricultural activities is a major recurring source contributing to atmospheric aerosol loading. Emission inventories of agricultural dust emissions have been compiled in several regions. These inventories, compiled based on historic survey and activity data, may reflect the current emission strengths that introduce large uncertainties when they are used to drive chemical transport models. In addition, there is no global emission inventory of agricultural dust emissions required to support global air quality and climate modeling. In this study, we present our recent efforts to develop a global emission inventory of PM10 and PM2.5 released from field tillage and harvesting operations using an emission factors-based approach. Both major crops (e.g., wheat and corn) and forage production were considered. For each crop or forage, information of crop area, crop calendar, farming activities and emission factors of specified operations were assembled. The key issue of inventory compilation is the choice of suitable emission factors for specified operations over different parts of the world. Through careful review of published emission factors, we modified the traditional emission factor-based model by multiplying correction coefficient factors to reflect the relationship between emission factors, soil texture, and climate conditions. Then, the temporal (i.e., monthly) and spatial (i.e., 0.5º resolution) distribution of agricultural PM10 and PM2.5 emissions from each and all operations were estimated for each crop or forage. Finally, the emissions from individual crops were aggregated to assemble a global inventory from agricultural operations. The inventory was verified by comparing the new data with the existing agricultural fugitive dust inventory in North America and Europe, as well as satellite observations of anthropogenic agricultural dust emissions.

  20. Chemical Characterization of Outdoor and Subway Fine (PM2.51.0) and Coarse (PM102.5) Particulate Matter in Seoul (Korea) by Computer-Controlled Scanning Electron Microscopy (CCSEM)

    PubMed Central

    Byeon, Sang-Hoon; Willis, Robert; Peters, Thomas M.

    2015-01-01

    Outdoor and indoor (subway) samples were collected by passive sampling in urban Seoul (Korea) and analyzed with computer-controlled scanning electron microscopy coupled with energy dispersive x-ray spectroscopy (CCSEM-EDX). Soil/road dust particles accounted for 42%–60% (by weight) of fine particulate matter larger than 1 µm (PM2.51.0) in outdoor samples and 18% of PM2.51.0 in subway samples. Iron-containing particles accounted for only 3%–6% in outdoor samples but 69% in subway samples. Qualitatively similar results were found for coarse particulate matter (PM102.5) with soil/road dust particles dominating outdoor samples (66%–83%) and iron-containing particles contributing most to subway PM102.5 (44%). As expected, soil/road dust particles comprised a greater mass fraction of PM102.5 than PM2.51.0. Also as expected, the mass fraction of iron-containing particles was substantially less in PM102.5 than in PM2.51.0. Results of this study are consistent with known emission sources in the area and with previous studies, which showed high concentrations of iron-containing particles in the subway compared to outdoor sites. Thus, passive sampling with CCSEM-EDX offers an inexpensive means to assess PM2.51.0 and PM10-2.5 simultaneously and by composition at multiple locations. PMID:25689348

  1. Source Apportionment and Elemental Composition of PM2.5 and PM10 in Jeddah City, Saudi Arabia

    PubMed Central

    Khodeir, Mamdouh; Shamy, Magdy; Alghamdi, Mansour; Zhong, Mianhua; Sun, Hong; Costa, Max; Chen, Lung-Chi; Maciejczyk, Polina

    2014-01-01

    This paper presents the first comprehensive investigation of PM2.5 and PM10 composition and sources in Saudi Arabia. We conducted a multi-week multiple sites sampling campaign in Jeddah between June and September, 2011, and analyzed samples by XRF. The overall mean mass concentration was 28.4 ± 25.4 μg/m3 for PM2.5 and 87.3 ± 47.3 μg/m3 for PM10, with significant temporal and spatial variability. The average ratio of PM2.5/PM10 was 0.33. Chemical composition data were modeled using factor analysis with varimax orthogonal rotation to determine five and four particle source categories contributing significant amount of for PM2.5 and PM10 mass, respectively. In both PM2.5 and PM10 sources were (1) heavy oil combustion characterized by high Ni and V; (2) resuspended soil characterized by high concentrations of Ca, Fe, Al, and Si; and (3) marine aerosol. The two other sources in PM2.5 were (4) Cu/Zn source; (5) traffic source identified by presence of Pb, Br, and Se; while in PM10 it was a mixed industrial source. To estimate the mass contributions of each individual source category, the CAPs mass concentration was regressed against the factor scores. Cumulatively, resuspended soil and oil combustion contributed 77 and 82% mass of PM2.5 and PM10, respectively. PMID:24634602

  2. Urban aerosol in Oporto, Portugal: Chemical characterization of PM10 and PM2.5

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Custódio, Danilo; Ferreira, Catarina; Alves, Célia; Duarte, Mácio; Nunes, Teresa; Cerqueira, Mário; Pio, Casimiro; Frosini, Daniele; Colombi, Cristina; Gianelle, Vorne; Karanasiou, Angeliki; Querol, Xavier

    2014-05-01

    Several urban and industrial areas in Southern Europe are not capable of meeting the implemented EU standards for particulate matter. Efficient air quality management is required in order to ensure that the legal limits are not exceeded and that the consequences of poor air quality are controlled and minimized. Many aspects of the direct and indirect effects of suspended particulate matter on climate and public health are not well understood. The temporal variation of the chemical composition is still demanded, since it enables to adopt off-set strategies and to better estimate the magnitude of anthropogenic forcing on climate. This study aims to provide detailed information on concentrations and chemical composition of aerosol from Oporto city, an urban center in Southern Europe. This city is located near the coast line in the North of Portugal, being the country's second largest urban area. Moreover, Oporto city economic prospects depend heavily on a diversified industrial park, which contribute to air quality degradation. Another strong source of air pollution is traffic. The main objectives of this study are: 1) to characterize the chemical composition of PM10 and PM2.5 by setting up an orchestra of aerosol sampling devices in a strategic place in Oporto; 2) to identify the sources of particles exploring parameters such as organic and inorganic markers (e.g. sugars as tracers for biomass burning; metals and elemental carbon for industrial and vehicular emissions); 3) to evaluate long range transport of pollutants using back trajectory analysis. Here we present data obtained between January 2013 and January 2014 in a heavy traffic roadside sampling site located in the city center. Different PM10 and PM2.5 samplers were operated simultaneously in order to collect enough mass on different filter matrixes and to fulfill the requirements of analytical methodologies. More than 100 aerosol samples were collected and then analysed for their mass concentration and

  3. DEVELOPMENT AND EVALUATION OF A CONTINUOUS COARSE (PM10-PM2.5) PARTICLE MONITOR

    EPA Science Inventory

    In this paper, we describe the development and laboratory and field evaluation of a continuous coarse (2.5-10 um) particle mass (PM) monitor that can provide reliable measurements of the coarse mass (CM) concentrations in time intervals as short as 5-10 min. The operating princ...

  4. Motor vehicle contributions to ambient PM10 and PM2.5 at selected urban areas in the USA.

    PubMed

    Abu-Allaban, Mahmoud; Gillies, John A; Gertler, Alan W; Clayton, Russ; Proffitt, David

    2007-09-01

    A source apportionment study was carried out to estimate the contribution of motor vehicles to ambient particulate matter (PM) in selected urban areas in the USA. Measurements were performed at seven locations during the period September 7, 2000 through March 9, 2001. Measurements included integrated PM(2.5) and PM(10) concentrations and polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs). Ambient PM(2.5) and PM(10) were apportioned to their local sources using the chemical mass balance (CMB) receptor model and compared with results obtained using scanning electron microscopy (SEM). Results indicate that PM(2.5) components were mainly from combustion sources, including motor vehicles, and secondary species (nitrates and sulfates). PM(10) consisted mainly of geological material, in addition to emissions from combustion sources. The fractional contributions of motor vehicles to ambient PM were estimated to be in the range from 20 to 76% and from 35 to 92% for PM(2.5) and PM(10), respectively.

  5. TSP, PM10, and PM2.5 emissions from a beef cattle feedlot using the flux-gradient technique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bonifacio, Henry F.; Maghirang, Ronaldo G.; Trabue, Steven L.; McConnell, Laura L.; Prueger, John H.; Bonifacio, Edna R.

    2015-01-01

    Emissions data on air pollutants from large open-lot beef cattle feedlots are limited. This research was conducted to determine emissions of total suspended particulates (TSP) and particulate matter (PM10 and PM2.5) from a commercial beef cattle feedlot in Kansas (USA). Vertical particulate concentration profiles at the feedlot were measured using gravimetric samplers, and micrometeorological parameters were monitored with eddy covariance instrumentation during the nine 4- to 5-day intensive sampling campaigns from May 2010 through September 2011. Emission fluxes were determined from the measured concentration gradients and meteorological parameters using the flux-gradient technique. PM ratios based on calculated emission fluxes were 0.28 for PM2.5/PM10, 0.12 for PM2.5/TSP, and 0.24 for PM10/TSP, indicating that a large fraction of the PM emitted at the studied feedlot was in the coarse range of aerodynamic diameter, >10 μm. Median daily emission factors were 57, 21, and 11 kg 1000-head (hd)-1 d-1 for TSP (n = 20 days), PM10 (n = 19 days), and PM2.5 (n = 11 days), respectively. Cattle pen surface moisture contents of at least 20-30% significantly reduced both TSP and PM10 emissions, but moisture's effect on PM2.5 emissions was not established due to difficulty in measuring PM2.5 concentrations under low-PM conditions.

  6. March 10, 2006, Transportation Conformity Rule That Addresses Requirements for Project-level Conformity Determinations in PM2.5 and PM10 Nonattainment and Maintenance Areas

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    This final rule, published March 10, 2006, establishes requirements for project-level conformity determinations in particulate matter (PM) 2.5 nonattainment and maintenance areas, and revises existing requirements for projects in PM10 areas.

  7. Structure and magnetism of the Sm7.5Y2.5Fe90-xSix (x=0.0, 2.5, 5.0, 7.5 and 10) alloys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, W. Y.; Zhao, H.; Lai, Y. F.; Du, H. L.; Liu, S. Q.; Wang, C. S.; Han, J. Z.; Yang, Y. C.; Yu, X.; Qi, Z. Q.; Yang, J. B.

    2017-03-01

    Sm7.5Y2.5Fe90-xSix (x=0.0, 2.5, 5.0, 7.5 and 10) alloys have been prepared by arc melting method and equilibrium disordered Th2Zn17-type phases, (Sm,Y)2-y(Fe,Si)17+2y, with relative lower rare-earth content than the ordered Th2Zn17-type phase, have been obtained. Compared to the ordered Th2Zn17-type structure, the X-ray diffraction (XRD) intensity of the superstructure lines of the (Sm,Y)2-y(Fe,Si)17+2y decreases with the increase of the Si content and becomes zero for x=10. According to the refinement with the disordered Th2Zn17-type structure, the occupation rates of the R atoms at (3a) and (6c) sites tend to reach the same value with the increase of the Si content, and the lattice parameter a decreases while the lattice parameter c increases, leading to an increase of c/a. It was found that the atomic ratio of Fe(Si)/Sm(Y) in the disordered Th2Zn17-type structure increases with the increase of Si content and reaches a maximum value of 9.07 with x=10. The XRD diagrams of the magnetic aligned samples indicate that the easy magnetization direction (EMD) of the (Sm,Y)2-y(Fe,Si)17+2y is in the a-b plane, and the change of the EMD in a-b plane has also been observed due to the Si preferred site occupation. The remanence ratios along the easy direction are higher than that along hard direction; however, all the remanence ratios are less than 0.5. The magnetocrystalline anisotropy constant K increases first and then decreases with increasing the Si content. The Curie temperature of Sm7.5Y2.5Fe90-xSix alloys increases by about 65 K per Si. The saturation magnetization increases first and then decreases with a maximum of 135.5 emu/g observed for x=2.5 at room temperature.

  8. Contamination characteristics and possible sources of PM10 and PM2.5 in different functional areas of Shanghai, China

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Jun; Hu, Zimei; Chen, Yuanyuan; Chen, Zhenlou; Xu, Shiyuan

    2013-04-01

    From July 2009 through September 2010, PM10 and PM2.5 were collected at two different functional areas in Shanghai (Baoshan district, an industrial area, and Putuo district, a mixed-use area of residential, commercial, and educational compounds). In our analysis, 15 elements were determined using a 710-ES Inductively Coupled Plasma-Emission Spectrometer (ICP-AES). The contents of PM2.5, PM10, and metal elements at the two different sites were comparatively analyzed. The results show that the mean annual concentrations of PM10 and PM2.5 (149.22 μg m-3 and 103.07 μg m-3, respectively) in Baoshan district were significantly higher than those in Putuo district (97.44 μg m-3 and 62.25 μg m-3 respectively). The concentrations of PM10 and PM2.5 were both greatest in winter and lowest in summer, with the two different sites exhibiting the same seasonal variation. It was found that the proportions of 15 metal elements in PM10 and PM2.5 in Baoshan district were 20.49% and 20.56%, respectively, while the proportions in Putuo district were higher (25.98% and 25.93%, respectively). In addition, the proportions of eight heavy metals in PM10 and PM2.5 were 5.50% and 3.07%, respectively, for Baoshan district, while these proportions in Putuo district were 3.18% and 2.77%, respectively, indicating that heavy metal pollution is more pronounced in Baoshan district. Compared with cities in developed countries, the total levels of PM10, PM2.5 and heavy metals in Shanghai were slightly higher. Scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and principal component analysis (PCA) suggested that the possible sources of PM10 in Baoshan district were ground level fugitive dust, traffic sources, and industrial activities, whereas PM2.5 mainly originated from industrial activities, coal combustion, and traffic sources. The sources are same for PM10 and PM2.5 in Putuo region, which originate from traffic sources and ground level fugitive dust.

  9. Cyclone robber system PM2.5 emission factors and rates for cotton gins: Method 201A combination PM10 and PM2.5 sizing cyclones

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    This report is part of a project to characterize cotton gin emissions from the standpoint of stack sampling. In 2006, EPA finalized and published a more stringent standard for particulate matter with nominal diameter less than or equal to 2.5 µm (PM2.5). This created an urgent need to collect additi...

  10. First stage mote system PM2.5 emission factors and rates for cotton gins: Method 201A combination PM10 and PM2.5 sizing cyclones

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    This report is part of a project to characterize cotton gin emissions using stack sampling. In 2006, the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) finalized and published a more stringent standard for particulate matter with nominal diameter less than or equal to 2.5 µm (PM2.5). This created an urgent n...

  11. Master trash system PM2.5 emission factors and rates for cotton gins: Method 201A combination PM10 and PM2.5 sizing cyclones

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    This report is part of a project to characterize cotton gin emissions from the standpoint of stack sampling. In 2006, the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) finalized and published a more stringent standard for particulate matter with nominal diameter less than or equal to 2.5 µm (PM2.5). This cr...

  12. Mote cleaner system PM2.5 emission factors and rates for cotton gins: Method 201A combination PM10 and PM2.5 sizing cyclones

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    This report is part of a project to characterize cotton gin emissions from the standpoint of stack sampling. In 2006, EPA finalized and published a more stringent standard for particulate matter with nominal diameter less than or equal to 2.5 µm (PM2.5). This created an urgent need to collect additi...

  13. Overflow system PM2.5 emission factors and rates for cotton gins: Method 201A combination PM10 and PM2.5 sizing cyclones

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    This report is part of a project to characterize cotton gin emissions from the standpoint of stack sampling. In 2006, the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA), finalized and published a more stringent standard for particulate matter with nominal diameter less than or equal to 2.5 µm (PM2.5). This c...

  14. Mote trash system PM2.5 emission factors and rate for cotton gins: Method 201A combination PM10 and PM2.5 sizing cyclones

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    This report is part of a project to characterize cotton gin emissions from the standpoint of stack sampling. In 2006, the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) finalized and published a more stringent standard for particulate matter with nominal diameter less than or equal to 2.5 µm (PM2.5). This cr...

  15. Combined mote system PM2.5 emission factors and rates for cotton gins: Method 201A combination PM10 and PM2.5 sizing cyclones

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    This report is part of a project to characterize cotton gin emissions from the standpoint of stack sampling. In 2006, the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) finalized and published a more stringent standard for particulate matter with nominal diameter less than or equal to 2.5 µm (PM2.5). This cr...

  16. Mote cyclone robber system PM2.5 emission factors and rates for cotton gins: Method 201A combination PM10 and PM2.5 sizing cyclones

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    This report is part of a project to characterize cotton gin emissions from the standpoint of stack sampling. In 2006, the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) finalized and published a more stringent standard for particulate matter with nominal diameter less than or equal to 2.5 µm (PM2.5). This cr...

  17. Combined lint cleaning system PM2.5 emission factors and rates for cotton gins: Method 201A combination PM10 and PM2.5 sizing cyclones

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    This report is part of a project to characterize cotton gin emissions from the standpoint of stack sampling. In 2006, EPA finalized and published a more stringent standard for particulate matter with nominal diameter less than or equal to 2.5 µm (PM2.5). This created an urgent need to collect additi...

  18. Battery condenser system PM2.5 emission factors and rates for cotton gins: Method 201A combination PM10 and PM2.5 sizing cyclones

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    This report is part of a project to characterize cotton gin emissions from the standpoint of stack sampling. In 2006, EPA finalized and published a more stringent standard for particulate matter with nominal diameter less than or equal to 2.5 µm (PM2.5). This created an urgent need to collect additi...

  19. Characterization and Cytotoxicity of PM<0.2, PM0.2–2.5 and PM2.510 around MSWI in Shanghai, China

    PubMed Central

    Cao, Lingling; Zeng, Jianrong; Liu, Ke; Bao, Liangman; Li, Yan

    2015-01-01

    Background: The potential impact of municipal solid waste incineration (MSWI), which is an anthropogenic source of aerosol emissions, is of great public health concern. This study investigated the characterization and cytotoxic effects of ambient ultrafine particles (PM<0.2), fine particles (PM0.2–2.5) and coarse particles (PM2.510) collected around a municipal solid waste incineration (MSWI) plant in the Pudong district of Shanghai. Methods: Mass concentrations of trace elements in particulate matter (PM) samples were determined using ICP-MS (Inductively Coupled Plasma Mass Spectrometry). The cytotoxicity of sampled atmospheric PM was evaluated by cell viability and reactive oxygen species (ROS) levels in A549 cells. Result: The mass percentage of PM0.2–2.5 accounted for 72.91% of the total mass of PM. Crustal metals (Mg, Al, and Ti) were abundant in the coarse particles, while the anthropogenic elements (V, Ni, Cu, Zn, Cd, and Pb) were dominant in the fine particles. The enrichment factors of Zn, Cd and Pb in the fine and ultrafine particles were extremely high (>100). The cytotoxicity of the size-resolved particles was in the order of coarse particles < fine particles < ultrafine particles. Conclusions: Fine particles dominated the MSWI ambient particles. Emissions from the MSWI could bring contamination of anthropogenic elements (Zn, Cd and Pb) into ambient environment. The PM around the MSWI plant displayed an additive toxic effect, and the ultrafine and fine particles possessed higher biological toxicity than the coarse particles. PMID:25985309

  20. Concentrations and emission factors for PM2.5 and PM10 from road traffic in Sweden

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ferm, Martin; Sjöberg, Karin

    2015-10-01

    PM10 concentrations exceed the guidelines in some Swedish cities and the limit values will likely be further reduced in the future. In order to gain more knowledge of emission factors for road traffic and concentrations of PM10 and PM2.5, existing monitoring stations in two cities, Gothenburg and Umeå, with international E-road thoroughfares, were complemented with some PM2.5 measurements. Emission factors for PM10 and PM2.5 were estimated using NOX as a tracer. Monitoring data from kerbside and urban background sites in Gothenburg during 2006-2010 and in Umeå during 2006-2012 were used. NOX emissions were estimated from the traffic flow and emission factors calculated from the HBEFA3.1 model. PM2.5 constitutes the finer part of PM10. Emissions of the coarser part of PM10 (PM10-PM2.5) are suppressed when roads are wet and show a maximum during spring when the roads dry up and studded tyres are still used. Less than 1% of the road wear caused by studded tyres give rise to airborne PM2.5-10 particles. The NOX emission factors decrease with time in the used model, due to the renewal of the vehicle fleet. However, the NOX concentrations resulting from the roads show no clear trend. The air dispersion is an important factor controlling the PM concentration near the road. The dispersion has a minimum in winter and during midnight. The average street level concentrations of PM10 and PM2.5 in Gothenburg were 21 ± 20 and 8 ± 6 μg m-3 respectively, which is 36% and 22% higher than the urban background concentrations. Despite the four times lower traffic flow in Umeå compared to Gothenburg, the average particle concentrations were very similar; 21 ± 31 and 7 ± 5 μg m-3 for PM10 and PM2.5 respectively. These concentrations were, however, 108% and 55% higher than the urban background concentrations in Umeå. The emission factors for PM10 decreased with time, and the average factor was 0.06 g km-1 vehichle-1. The emission factors for PM2.5 are very uncertain due to the

  1. Comparisons of urban and rural PM10-2.5 and PM2.5 mass concentrations and semi-volatile fractions in Northeastern Colorado

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Clements, N.; Hannigan, M. P.; Miller, S. L.; Peel, J. L.; Milford, J. B.

    2015-09-01

    Coarse (PM10-2.5) and fine (PM2.5) particulate matter in the atmosphere adversely affect human health and influence climate. While PM2.5 is relatively well studied, less is known about the sources and fate of PM10-2.5. The Colorado Coarse Rural-Urban Sources and Health (CCRUSH) study measured PM10-2.5 and PM2.5 mass concentrations, as well as the fraction of semi-volatile material (SVM) in each size regime (SVM2.5, SVM10-2.5), for three years in Denver and comparatively rural Greeley, Colorado. Agricultural operations east of Greeley appear to have contributed to the peak PM10-2.5 concentrations there, but concentrations were generally lower in Greeley than in Denver. Traffic-influenced sites in Denver had PM10-2.5 concentrations that averaged from 14.6 to 19.7 μg m-3 and mean PM10-2.5/PM10 ratios of 0.56 to 0.70, higher than at residential sites in Denver or Greeley. PM10-2.5 concentrations were more temporally variable than PM2.5 concentrations. Concentrations of the two pollutants were not correlated. Spatial correlations of daily averaged PM10-2.5 concentrations ranged from 0.59 to 0.62 for pairs of sites in Denver and from 0.47 to 0.70 between Denver and Greeley. Compared to PM10-2.5, concentrations of PM2.5 were more correlated across sites within Denver and less correlated between Denver and Greeley. PM10-2.5 concentrations were highest during the summer and early fall, while PM2.5 and SVM2.5 concentrations peaked in winter during periodic multi-day inversions. SVM10-2.5 concentrations were low at all sites. Diurnal peaks in PM10-2.5 and PM2.5 concentrations corresponded to morning and afternoon peaks of traffic activity, and were enhanced by boundary layer dynamics. SVM2.5 concentrations peaked around noon on both weekdays and weekends. PM10-2.5 concentrations at sites located near highways generally increased with wind speeds above about 3 m s-1. Little wind speed dependence was observed for the residential sites in Denver and Greeley.

  2. Comparisons of urban and rural PM10-2.5 and PM2.5 mass concentrations and semi-volatile fractions in northeastern Colorado

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Clements, Nicholas; Hannigan, Michael P.; Miller, Shelly L.; Peel, Jennifer L.; Milford, Jana B.

    2016-06-01

    Coarse (PM10-2.5) and fine (PM2.5) particulate matter in the atmosphere adversely affect human health and influence climate. While PM2.5 is relatively well studied, less is known about the sources and fate of PM10-2.5. The Colorado Coarse Rural-Urban Sources and Health (CCRUSH) study measured PM10-2.5 and PM2.5 mass concentrations, as well as the fraction of semi-volatile material (SVM) in each size regime (SVM2.5, SVM10-2.5), from 2009 to early 2012 in Denver and comparatively rural Greeley, Colorado. Agricultural operations east of Greeley appear to have contributed to the peak PM10-2.5 concentrations there, but concentrations were generally lower in Greeley than in Denver. Traffic-influenced sites in Denver had PM10-2.5 concentrations that averaged from 14.6 to 19.7 µg m-3 and mean PM10-2.5 / PM10 ratios of 0.56 to 0.70, higher than at residential sites in Denver or Greeley. PM10-2.5 concentrations were more temporally variable than PM2.5 concentrations. Concentrations of the two pollutants were not correlated. Spatial correlations of daily averaged PM10-2.5 concentrations ranged from 0.59 to 0.62 for pairs of sites in Denver and from 0.47 to 0.70 between Denver and Greeley. Compared to PM10-2.5, concentrations of PM2.5 were more correlated across sites within Denver and less correlated between Denver and Greeley. PM10-2.5 concentrations were highest during the summer and early fall, while PM2.5 and SVM2.5 concentrations peaked in winter during periodic multi-day inversions. SVM10-2.5 concentrations were low at all sites. Diurnal peaks in PM10-2.5 and PM2.5 concentrations corresponded to morning and afternoon peaks of traffic activity, and were enhanced by boundary layer dynamics. SVM2.5 concentrations peaked around noon on both weekdays and weekends. PM10-2.5 concentrations at sites located near highways generally increased with wind speeds above about 3 m s-1. Little wind speed dependence was observed for the residential sites in Denver and Greeley. The mass

  3. Dust Monitoring on the Hanford Site: An Investigation into the Relationship Between TSP, PM-10, and PM-2.5

    SciTech Connect

    Schwartz, T.; Fitz, B.G.

    2004-01-01

    High levels of particulate matter (PM) are linked to some health problems and environmental issues. Air quality standards have been developed in hopes to reduce particulate matter problems. The most common fractions of particulate matter measured include PM2.5, PM10, and total suspended particles (TSP). The focus of this study was to evaluate relationships between PM2.5, PM10, and TSP concentrations specific to the Hanford Site, near Richland, Washington. Measurements of PM2.5 and PM10 concentrations continued while additional measurements of TSP were made over several summer months. Four sampling locations on the Hanford Site were used to compare spatial differences in the data. Comparison of the data revealed a strong linear correlation between PM10 and TSP for the time period evaluated. The correlation between PM2.5 and TSP was not as strong, and indicated that local sources rarely were above background measurements. This was supported by the correlation of ground level PM2.5 with PM2.5 concentrations measured on a near by mountain.

  4. Spatial distribution of particulate matter (PM10 and PM2.5) in Seoul Metropolitan Subway stations.

    PubMed

    Kim, Ki Youn; Kim, Yoon Shin; Roh, Young Man; Lee, Cheol Min; Kim, Chi Nyon

    2008-06-15

    The aims of this study are to examine the concentrations of PM10 and PM2.5 in areas within the Seoul Metropolitan Subway network and to provide fundamental data in order to protect respiratory health of subway workers and passengers from air pollutants. A total of 22 subway stations located on lines 1-4 were selected based on subway official's guidance. At these stations both subway worker areas (station offices, rest areas, ticket offices and driver compartments) and passengers areas (station precincts, subway carriages and platforms) were the sites used for measuring the levels of PM. The mean concentrations of PM10 and PM2.5 were relatively higher on platforms, inside subway carriages and in driver compartments than in the other areas monitored. The levels of PM10 and PM2.5 for station precincts and platforms exceeded the 24-h acceptable threshold limits of 150 microg/m3 for PM10 and 35 microg/m3 for PM2.5, which are regulated by the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA). However, levels measured in station and ticket offices fell below the respective threshold. The mean PM10 and PM2.5 concentrations on platforms located underground were significantly higher than those at ground level (p<0.05).

  5. Quantitative analysis on windblown dust concentrations of PM10 (PM2.5) during dust events in Mongolia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jugder, Dulam; Shinoda, Masato; Kimura, Reiji; Batbold, Altangerel; Amarjargal, Danzansambuu

    2014-09-01

    Dust concentration, wind speed and visibility, measured at four sites in the Gobi Desert and at a site in the steppe zone of Mongolia over a period of 4.5 years (January 2009 to May 2013), have been analyzed for their relationships, their effects on visibility, and for an estimate of the threshold wind necessary for dust emission in the region. Based on quantitative analysis on measurements, we evaluated that dust emission concentrations of 41-61 (20-24) μg m-3 of PM10 (PM2.5) are as the criterion between normal and hazy atmospheric conditions. With the arrival of dust events, wind-borne soil particulate matter (PM10, PM2.5) that originates in the Gobi Desert is changed dramatically. PM10 (PM2.5) concentrations increase by at least double or by several tens of times during severe dust events in comparison with the normal atmospheric condition. Ratio (PM2.5/PM10) between monthly means of PM10 and PM2.5 concentrations showed that anthropogenic particles were dominant in the ambient air of province centers in cool months (November to February). Threshold values of the onset of dust events were determined for PM10 (PM2.5) concentrations. According to the definition of dust storms, dust concentrations of PM10 corresponding to visibility of 1 km or less were determined at sites in the Gobi Desert and the steppe region. The threshold wind speeds during days with dust events were estimated at four sites in the Gobi Desert and compared each other. The threshold wind was higher at Sainshand and its cause might be due to smaller silt and clay fractions of soil.

  6. Understanding intra-neighborhood patterns in PM2.5 and PM10 using mobile monitoring in Braddock, PA

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Braddock, Pennsylvania is home to the Edgar Thomson Steel Works (ETSW), one of the few remaining active steel mills in the Pittsburgh region. An economically distressed area, Braddock exceeds average annual (>15 μg/m3) and daily (>35 μg/m3) National Ambient Air Quality Standards (NAAQS) for particulate matter (PM2.5). Methods A mobile air monitoring study was designed and implemented in morning and afternoon hours in the summer and winter (2010–2011) to explore the within-neighborhood spatial and temporal (within-day and between-day) variability in PM2.5 and PM10. Results Both pollutants displayed spatial variation between stops, and substantial temporal variation within and across study days. For summer morning sampling runs, site-specific mean PM2.5 ranged from 30.0 (SD = 3.3) to 55.1 (SD = 13.0) μg/m3. Mean PM10 ranged from 30.4 (SD = 2.5) to 69.7 (SD = 51.2) μg/m3, respectively. During summer months, afternoon concentrations were significantly lower than morning for both PM2.5 and PM10, potentially owing to morning subsidence inversions. Winter concentrations were lower than summer, on average, and showed lesser diurnal variation. Temperature, wind speed, and wind direction predicted significant variability in PM2.5 and PM10 in multiple linear regression models. Conclusions Data reveals significant morning versus afternoon variability and spatial variability in both PM2.5 and PM10 concentrations within Braddock. Information obtained on peak concentration periods, and the combined effects of industry, traffic, and elevation in this region informed the design of a larger stationary monitoring network. PMID:23051204

  7. Investigation into the Effect of Atmospheric Particulate Matter (PM2.5 and PM10) Concentrations on GPS Signals

    PubMed Central

    Lau, Lawrence; He, Jun

    2017-01-01

    The Global Positioning System (GPS) has been widely used in navigation, surveying, geophysical and geodynamic studies, machine guidance, etc. High-precision GPS applications such as geodetic surveying need millimeter and centimeter level accuracy. Since GPS signals are affected by atmospheric effects, methods of correcting or eliminating ionospheric and tropospheric bias are needed in GPS data processing. Relative positioning can be used to mitigate the atmospheric effect, but its efficiency depends on the baseline lengths. Air pollution is a serious problem globally, especially in developing countries that causes health problems to humans and damage to the ecosystem. Respirable suspended particles are coarse particles with a diameter of 10 micrometers or less, also known as PM10. Moreover, fine particles with a diameter of 2.5 micrometers or less are known as PM2.5. GPS signals travel through the atmosphere before arriving at receivers on the Earth’s surface, and the research question posed in this paper is: are GPS signals affected by the increased concentration of the PM2.5/PM10 particles? There is no standard model of the effect of PM2.5/PM10 particles on GPS signals in GPS data processing, although an approximate generic model of non-gaseous atmospheric constituents (<1 mm) can be found in the literature. This paper investigates the effect of the concentration of PM2.5/PM10 particles on GPS signals and validates the aforementioned approximate model with a carrier-to-noise ratio (CNR)-based empirical method. Both the approximate model and the empirical results show that the atmospheric PM2.5/PM10 particles and their concentrations have a negligible effect on GPS signals and the effect is comparable with the noise level of GPS measurements. PMID:28273798

  8. Investigation into the Effect of Atmospheric Particulate Matter (PM2.5 and PM10) Concentrations on GPS Signals.

    PubMed

    Lau, Lawrence; He, Jun

    2017-03-03

    The Global Positioning System (GPS) has been widely used in navigation, surveying, geophysical and geodynamic studies, machine guidance, etc. High-precision GPS applications such as geodetic surveying need millimeter and centimeter level accuracy. Since GPS signals are affected by atmospheric effects, methods of correcting or eliminating ionospheric and tropospheric bias are needed in GPS data processing. Relative positioning can be used to mitigate the atmospheric effect, but its efficiency depends on the baseline lengths. Air pollution is a serious problem globally, especially in developing countries that causes health problems to humans and damage to the ecosystem. Respirable suspended particles are coarse particles with a diameter of 10 micrometers or less, also known as PM10. Moreover, fine particles with a diameter of 2.5 micrometers or less are known as PM2.5. GPS signals travel through the atmosphere before arriving at receivers on the Earth's surface, and the research question posed in this paper is: are GPS signals affected by the increased concentration of the PM2.5/PM10 particles? There is no standard model of the effect of PM2.5/PM10 particles on GPS signals in GPS data processing, although an approximate generic model of non-gaseous atmospheric constituents (<1 mm) can be found in the literature. This paper investigates the effect of the concentration of PM2.5/PM10 particles on GPS signals and validates the aforementioned approximate model with a carrier-to-noise ratio (CNR)-based empirical method. Both the approximate model and the empirical results show that the atmospheric PM2.5/PM10 particles and their concentrations have a negligible effect on GPS signals and the effect is comparable with the noise level of GPS measurements.

  9. Organic and elemental carbon associated to PM10 and PM 2.5 at urban sites of northern Greece.

    PubMed

    Samara, Constantini; Voutsa, Dimitra; Kouras, Athanasios; Eleftheriadis, Kostas; Maggos, Thomas; Saraga, D; Petrakakis, M

    2014-02-01

    Organic carbon (OC) and elemental carbon (EC) concentrations, associated to PM10 and PM2.5 particle fractions, were concurrently determined during the warm and the cold months of the year (July-September 2011 and February-April 2012, respectively) at two urban sites in the city of Thessaloniki, northern Greece, an urban-traffic site (UT) and an urban-background site (UB). Concentrations at the UT site (11.3 ± 5.0 and 8.44 ± 4.08 14 μg m(-3) for OC10 and OC2.5 vs. 6.56 ± 2.14 and 5.29 ± 1.54 μg m(-3) for EC10 and EC2.5) were among the highest values reported for urban sites in European cities. Significantly lower concentrations were found at the UB site for both carbonaceous species, particularly for EC (6.62 ± 4.59 and 5.72 ± 4.36 μg m(-3) for OC10 and OC2.5 vs. 0.93 ± 0.61 and 0.69 ± 0.39 μg m(-3) for EC10 and EC2.5). Despite that, a negative UT-UB increment was frequently evidenced for OC2.5 and PM2.5 in the cold months possibly indicative of emissions from residential wood burning at the urban-background site. At both sites, cconcentrations of OC fractions were significantly higher in the cold months; on the contrary, EC fractions at the UT site were prominent in the warm season suggesting some influence from maritime emissions in the nearby harbor area. Secondary organic carbon, being estimated using the EC tracer method and seasonally minimum OC/EC ratios, was found to be an appreciable component of particle mass particularly in the cold season. The calculated secondary contributions to OC ranged between 35 and 59 % in the PM10 fraction, with relatively higher values in the PM2.5 fraction (39-61 %). The source origin of carbonaceous species was investigated by means of air parcel back trajectories, satellite fire maps, and concentration roses. A local origin was mainly concluded for OC and EC with limited possibility for long range transport of biomass (agricultural waste) burning aerosol.

  10. Chemical composition and source apportionment of PM10 and PM2.5 in different functional areas of Lanzhou, China.

    PubMed

    Qiu, Xionghui; Duan, Lei; Gao, Jian; Wang, Shulan; Chai, Fahe; Hu, Jun; Zhang, Jingqiao; Yun, Yaru

    2016-02-01

    To elucidate the air pollution characteristics of northern China, airborne PM10 (atmospheric dynamic equivalent diameter ≤ 10 μm) and PM2.5 (atmospheric dynamic equivalent diameter ≤ 2.5 μm) were sampled in three different functional areas (Yuzhong County, Xigu District and Chengguan District) of Lanzhou, and their chemical composition (elements, ions, carbonaceous species) was analyzed. The results demonstrated that the highest seasonal mean concentrations of PM10 (369.48 μg/m(3)) and PM2.5 (295.42 μg/m(3)) were detected in Xigu District in the winter, the lowest concentration of PM2.5 (53.15 μg/m(3)) was observed in Yuzhong District in the fall and PM10 (89.60 μg/m(3)) in Xigu District in the fall. The overall average OC/EC (organic carbon/elemental carbon) value was close to the representative OC/EC ratio for coal consumption, implying that the pollution of Lanzhou could be attributed to the burning of coal. The content of SNA (the sum of sulfate, nitrate, ammonium, SNA) in PM2.5 in Yuzhong County was generally lower than that at other sites in all seasons. The content of SNA in PM2.5 and PM10 in Yuzhong County was generally lower than that at other sites in all seasons (0.24-0.38), indicating that the conversion ratios from precursors to secondary aerosols in the low concentration area was slower than in the area with high and intense pollutants. Six primary particulate matter sources were chosen based on positive matrix factorization (PMF) analysis, and emissions from dust, secondary aerosols, and coal burning were identified to be the primary sources responsible for the particle pollution in Lanzhou.

  11. Trends in arsenic levels in PM10 and PM 2.5 aerosol fractions in an industrialized area.

    PubMed

    García-Aleix, J R; Delgado-Saborit, J M; Verdú-Martín, G; Amigó-Descarrega, J M; Esteve-Cano, V

    2014-01-01

    Arsenic is a toxic element that affects human health and is widely distributed in the environment. In the area of study, the main Spanish and second largest European industrial ceramic cluster, the main source of arsenic aerosol is related to the impurities in some boracic minerals used in the ceramic process. Epidemiological studies on cancer occurrence in Spain points out the study region as one with the greater risk of cancer. Concentrations of particulate matter and arsenic content in PM10 and PM2.5 were measured and characterized by ICP-MS in the area of study during the years 2005-2010. Concentrations of PM10 and its arsenic content range from 27 to 46 μg/m(3) and from 0.7 to 6 ng/m(3) in the industrial area, respectively, and from 25 to 40 μg/m(3) and from 0.7 to 2.8 ng/m(3) in the urban area, respectively. Concentrations of PM2.5 and its arsenic content range from 12 to 14 μg/m(3) and from 0.5 to 1.4 ng/m(3) in the urban background area, respectively. Most of the arsenic content is present in the fine fraction, with ratios of PM2.5/PM10 in the range of 0.65-0.87. PM10, PM2.5, and its arsenic content show a sharp decrease in recent years associated with the economic downturn, which severely hit the production of ceramic materials in the area under study. The sharp production decrease due to the economic crisis combined with several technological improvements in recent years such as substitution of boron, which contains As impurities as raw material, have reduced the concentrations of PM10, PM2.5, and As in air to an extent that currently meets the existing European regulations.

  12. Influence of tobacco smoke on carcinogenic PAH composition in indoor PM 10 and PM 2.5

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Slezakova, K.; Castro, D.; Pereira, M. C.; Morais, S.; Delerue-Matos, C.; Alvim-Ferraz, M. C.

    2009-12-01

    Because of the mutagenic and/or carcinogenic properties, Polycyclic Aromatic Hydrocarbons (PAH), have a direct impact on human population. Consequently, there is a widespread interest in analysing and evaluating the exposure to PAH in different indoor environments, influenced by different emission sources. The information on indoor PAH is still limited, mainly in terms of PAH distribution in indoor particles of different sizes; thus, this study evaluated the influence of tobacco smoke on PM 10 and PM 2.5 characteristics, namely on their PAH compositions, with further aim to understand the negative impact of tobacco smoke on human health. Samples were collected at one site influenced by tobacco smoke and at one reference (non-smoking) site using low-volume samplers; the analyses of 17 PAH were performed by Microwave Assisted Extraction combined with Liquid Chromatography (MAE-LC). At the site influenced by tobacco smoke PM concentrations were higher 650% for PM 10, and 720% for PM 2.5. When influenced by smoking, 4 ring PAH (fluoranthene, pyrene, and chrysene) were the most abundant PAH, with concentrations 4600-21 000% and 5100-20 800% higher than at the reference site for PM 10 and PM 2.5, respectively, accounting for 49% of total PAH (Σ PAH). Higher molecular weight PAH (5-6 rings) reached concentrations 300-1300% and 140-1700% higher for PM 10 and PM 2.5, respectively, at the site influenced by tobacco smoke. Considering 9 carcinogenic PAH this increase was 780% and 760% in PM 10 and PM 2.5, respectively, indicating the strong potential risk for human health. As different composition profiles of PAH in indoor PM were obtained for reference and smoking sites, those 9 carcinogens represented at the reference site 84% and 86% of Σ PAH in PM 10 and PM 2.5, respectively, and at the smoking site 56% and 55% of Σ PAH in PM 10 and PM 2.5, respectively. All PAH (including the carcinogenic ones) were mainly present in fine particles, which corresponds to a strong risk

  13. Source contributions to PM2.5 and PM10 at an urban background and a street location

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Keuken, M. P.; Moerman, M.; Voogt, M.; Blom, M.; Weijers, E. P.; Röckmann, T.; Dusek, U.

    2013-06-01

    The contribution of regional, urban and traffic sources to PM2.5 and PM10 in an urban area was investigated in this study. The chemical composition of PM2.5 and PM10 was measured over a year at a street location and up- and down-wind of the city of Rotterdam, the Netherlands. The 14C content in EC and OC concentrations was also determined, to distinguish the contribution from "modern" carbon (e.g., biogenic emissions, biomass burning and wildfires) and fossil fuel combustion. It was concluded that the urban background of PM2.5 and PM10 is dominated by the regional background, and that primary and secondary PM emission by urban sources contribute less than 15%. The 14C analysis revealed that 70% of OC originates from modern carbon and 30% from fossil fuel combustion. The corresponding percentages for EC are, respectively 17% and 83%. It is concluded that in particular the urban population living in street canyons with intense road traffic has potential health risks. This is due to exposure to elevated concentrations of a factor two for EC from exhaust emissions in PM2.5 and a factor 2-3 for heavy metals from brake and tyre wear, and re-suspended road dust in PM10. It follows that local air quality management may focus on local measures to street canyons with intense road traffic.

  14. CHANGES IN OPERATING PROCEDURES FOR AEROSOL CONCENTRATION UNIFORMITY FOR PM2.5 AND PM10 SAMPLER TESTING

    EPA Science Inventory

    This technical note documents changes in the standard operating procedures used at the Environmental Protection Agency's (U.S. EPA) aerosol testing wind tunnel facility for testing of particulate matter monitoring methods of PM2.5 and PM10. These changes are relative to the op...

  15. TSP, PM10, and PM2.5 emissions from a beef cattle feedlot using the flux-gradient technique

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Emissions data on air pollutants from large open-lot beef cattle feedlots are limited. This research was conducted to determine emissions of total suspended particulates (TSP) and particulate matter (PM10 and PM2.5) from a commercial beef cattle feedlot in Kansas (USA). Vertical particulate concentr...

  16. Water-soluble organic compounds (WSOCs) in PM2.5 and PM10 at a subtropical site of India

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khare, Puja; Baruah, B. P.; Rao, P. G.

    2011-11-01

    PM2.5 and PM10 samples collected at a suburban site of northeastern part of India have been analysed for particle mass, total carbon (TC), water-soluble total carbon (WSTC), water-soluble organic carbon (WSOC), water-soluble inorganic carbon (WSIC), organic acids (formic, acetic, proponoic and oxalic acids) along with inorganic ions (NO3-, SO42- and NH4-). Most of the PM10 consists of PM2.5 in the present site (ratio 54-74%). WSTC content in PM2.5 and PM10 corresponds to 21% and 16%, respectively, of their total particle masses. Thermo gravimetric analysis showed the presence of humic-like substances (16-22%) in particulate samples. Domestic heating and stagnant atmospheric conditions enhanced the levels of these carbonaceous compounds in PM2.5 and PM10 in winter. Qualitative estimation of various functional groups by Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) analysis indicates the presence of carboxylic, hydroxyl, aliphatic and aromatic hydrocarbons, amines and sulphurous compounds in these aerosols. Absolute principal component analysis applied on the aerosol data resolves four factors. These factors are associated with carbonaceous aerosols released from combustion of coal and wood, secondary inorganic and organic aerosols and water-soluble inorganic fraction.

  17. The direct influence of ship traffic on atmospheric PM2.5, PM10 and PAH in Venice.

    PubMed

    Contini, D; Gambaro, A; Belosi, F; De Pieri, S; Cairns, W R L; Donateo, A; Zanotto, E; Citron, M

    2011-09-01

    The direct influence of ship traffic on atmospheric levels of coarse and fine particulate matter (PM(2.5), PM(10)) and fifteen polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) has been estimated in the urban area of Venice. Data analysis has been performed on results collected at three sites over the summer, when ship traffic is at a maximum. Results indicate that monitoring of the PM daily concentrations is not sufficiently detailed for the evaluation of this contribution, even though it could be useful for specific markers such as PAHs. Therefore a new methodology, based on high temporal resolution measurements coupled with wind direction information and the database of ship passages of the Harbour Authority of Venice has been developed. The sampling sites were monitored with optical detectors (DustTrack(®) and Mie pDR-1200) operating at a high temporal resolution (20s and 1s respectively) for PM(2.5) and PM(10). PAH in the particulate and gas phases were recovered from quartz fibre filters and polyurethane foam plugs using pressurised solvent extraction, the extracts were then analysed by gas chromatography- high-resolution mass spectrometry. Our results shows that the direct contribution of ships traffic to PAHs in the gas phase is 10% while the contribution to PM(2.5) and to PM(10) is from 1% up to 8%.

  18. 40 CFR Table C-4 to Subpart C of... - Test Specifications for PM 10, PM 2.5 and PM 10-2.5 Candidate Equivalent Methods

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... method, CP, each site 10% 2 15% 2 15% 2 15% 2 Slope of regression relationship 1 ±0.10 1 ±0.05 1 ±0.10 1 ±0.10 1 ±0.10 1 ±0.12 Intercept of regression relationship, µg/m 3 0 ±5 0 ±1 Between: 13.55 −...

  19. 40 CFR Table C-4 to Subpart C of... - Test Specifications for PM 10, PM 2.5 and PM 10-2.5 Candidate Equivalent Methods

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... method, CP, each site 10% 2 15% 2 15% 2 15% 2 Slope of regression relationship 1 ±0.10 1 ±0.05 1 ±0.10 1 ±0.10 1 ±0.10 1 ±0.12 Intercept of regression relationship, µg/m 3 0 ±5 0 ±1 Between: 13.55 −...

  20. Proceedings of the National Technological Literacy Conference (10th, Arlington, Virginia, March 2-5, 1995).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cheek, Dennis W., Ed.; Cheek, Kim A., Ed.

    This collection of 20 papers represents the work of 24 authors with a variety of perspectives on the growth of the science, technology and society movement in the United States in the past 10 years. These essays are seen as a representative sample of the work of the movement. Divided into four sections, Section 1, "General Science, Technology and…

  1. The characteristic study of TSP, PM2.5-10 and PM2.5 in the rural site of central Taiwan.

    PubMed

    Fang, G C; Chang, C N; Wu, Y S; Fu, P C; Chang, K F; Yang, D G

    1999-08-01

    The total suspended particle (TSP), PM2.5-10 (aerodynamic diameter less than 10 microns) and PM2.5 concentration (aerodynamic diameter less than 2.5 microns) concentrations were sampled by PS-1 and Universal sampler on the roof (25 m) of the Medical and Engineering Building in the campus of Hungkuang Institute of Technology (HKIT) which is located at a height of 500 m on Da Du Mountain. The results indicated that average TSP, PM2.5-10 and PM2.5 concentrations are 0.42, 0.34 and 0.019 mg/m3 in the day time, respectively and are 0.32, 0.26 and 0.017 mg/m3 in the night time, respectively. The ratios of PM2.5-10/TSP were from 76% to 85% and from 50% to 91% for day and night period, respectively. It indicated that the major composition in the total suspended particles was PM2.5-10 in the rural site. The relationship between TSP and PM2.5-10 is TSP = 1.16PM2.5-10 + 0.027 and TSP = 1.01 PM2.5-10 + 0.058 in the day and night time, respectively. The correlation coefficient (R2) is 0.98 and 0.97 for day and night period, respectively. The relationship between PM2.5-10 and PM2.5 is PM2.5 = 0.0005PM2.5-10 + 0.019 and PM2.5 = 0.037PM2.5-10 + 0.0076 in the day and night period, respectively. The correlation coefficient (R2) is 3E-5 and 0.67 for day and night period, respectively. The relationships between TSP, PM2.5-10, PM2.5 particle concentrations and wind speed (R2) in the day time are 0.71, 0.64, 0.43, respectively and are 0.83, 0.79, 0.57, respectively in the night time. The proposed reasons are that there are more activities caused by people (students) and natural living animals which absorbed some of the particles during the day time. Thus, the correlation coefficients for the night time are better than those of day time. The particle size distributions are both bimodel in the day and night time. The major peaks in the day time appear in the particle diameter between 0.031-0.056 micron and 3.16-5.62 microns in the day period and appear between 0.017-0.031 micron and 1

  2. Syllabic (~2-5 Hz) and fluctuation (~1-10 Hz) ranges in speech and auditory processing

    PubMed Central

    Edwards, Erik; Chang, Edward F.

    2013-01-01

    Given recent interest in syllabic rates (~2-5 Hz) for speech processing, we review the perception of “fluctuation” range (~1-10 Hz) modulations during listening to speech and technical auditory stimuli (AM and FM tones and noises, and ripple sounds). We find evidence that the temporal modulation transfer function (TMTF) of human auditory perception is not simply low-pass in nature, but rather exhibits a peak in sensitivity in the syllabic range (~2-5 Hz). We also address human and animal neurophysiological evidence, and argue that this bandpass tuning arises at the thalamocortical level and is more associated with non-primary regions than primary regions of cortex. The bandpass rather than low-pass TMTF has implications for modeling auditory central physiology and speech processing: this implicates temporal contrast rather than simple temporal integration, with contrast enhancement for dynamic stimuli in the fluctuation range. PMID:24035819

  3. Mechanical Behaviors of Fe75Mo5P10C7.5B2.5 Bulk Metallic Glass under Torsional Loadings

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, Xinjian; Huang, Lu; Chen, Xu; Liaw, Peter K; An, Ke; Zhang, Tao

    2011-01-01

    Pure- and cyclic-torsional studies were conducted on a Fe{sub 75}Mo{sub 5}P{sub 10}C{sub 7.5}B{sub 2.5} (atomic percent, at.%) bulk-metallic glass at room temperature for an understanding of its damage and fracture mechanisms. Under pure-torsional loading, the metallic glass exhibited very little plastic strain before fracture. The fracture initiated along the maximum tensile-stress plane, which is about 45{sup o} to the axial direction. The shear-fracture strength ({approx}510 MPa) is much lower than the compressive-fracture strength ({approx}3280 MPa), which suggests that different deformation mechanisms be present under various loading modes. Instead of an apparent vein-type structure, the fracture morphologies revealed a crack-initiation site, a mirror region, a mist region, and a hackle region. Under cyclic-torsional loading, fatigue cracks initiated from casting defects, and propagate generally along the maximum tensile-stress plane. A slight cyclic-hardening behavior was observed in initial loading steps. The fatigue-fracture surface consists of three main regions: the fatigue crack-initiation, crack-propagation, and final-fast-fracture areas. The striations resulting from the blunting and re-sharpening of the fatigue crack tip were observed in the crack-propagation region. Based on these results, the damage and fracture mechanisms of the metallic glass induced by torsional loadings are elucidated.

  4. 40 CFR Figure C-4 to Subpart C of... - Illustration of the Minimum Limits for Correlation Coefficient for PM2.5 and PM102.5 Class II...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 5 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Illustration of the Minimum Limits for Correlation Coefficient for PM2.5 and PM10â2.5 Class II and III Methods C Figure C-4 to Subpart C of Part 53... Methods and Reference Methods Pt. 53, Subpt. C, Fig. C-4 Figure C-4 to Subpart C of Part...

  5. 40 CFR Figure C-4 to Subpart C of... - Illustration of the Minimum Limits for Correlation Coefficient for PM2.5 and PM102.5 Class II...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 5 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Illustration of the Minimum Limits for Correlation Coefficient for PM2.5 and PM10â2.5 Class II and III Methods C Figure C-4 to Subpart C of Part 53... Methods and Reference Methods Pt. 53, Subpt. C, Fig. C-4 Figure C-4 to Subpart C of Part...

  6. Determination of 5-log reduction times for food pathogens in acidified cucumbers during storage at 10 and 25 degrees C.

    PubMed

    Breidt, Fred; Hayes, Janet; McFeeters, Roger F

    2007-11-01

    Outbreaks of acid-resistant foodborne pathogens in acid foods with pH values below 4.0, including apple cider and orange juice, have raised concerns about the safety of acidified vegetable products. For acidified vegetable products with pH values between 3.3 and 4.6, previous research has demonstrated that thermal treatments are needed to achieve a 5-log reduction in the numbers of Escherichia coli O157:H7, Listeria monocytogenes, or Salmonella enterica. For some acidified vegetable products with a pH of 3.3 or below, heat processing can result in unacceptable product quality. The purpose of this study was to determine the holding times needed to achieve a 5-log reduction in E. coli O157:H7, L. monocytogenes, and S. enterica strains in acidified vegetable products with acetic acid as the primary acidulant, a pH of 3.3 or below, and a minimum equilibrated temperature of 10 degrees C. We found E. coli O157:H7 to be the most acid-resistant microorganism for the conditions tested, with a predicted time to achieve a 5-log reduction in cell numbers at 10 degrees C of 5.7 days, compared with 2.1 days (51 h) for Salmonella or 0.5 days (11.2 h) for Listeria. At 25 degrees C, the E. coli O157:H7 population achieved a 5-log reduction in 1.4 days (34.3 h).

  7. Bis(6-nitro-1,10-phenanthrolin-1-ium) 2,5-di-carb-oxy-terephthalate.

    PubMed

    Zhong, Kai-Long; Ni, Chao

    2014-03-01

    In the structure of the title 2:1 proton-transfer compound, 2C12H8N3O2 (+)·C10H4O8 (2-), the 6-nitro-1,10-phenanthroline mol-ecules act as proton sponges, accepting protons from pyromellitic acid. The -NO2 group of one of the 6-nitro-1,10-phenanthrolin-1-ium cations is disordered and was refined with a site-occupancy ratio of 0.624 (15):0.376 (15). Two -COOH(-COO(-)) groups of the 2,5-di-carb-oxy-terephthalate dianion are disordered and were refined with site-occupancy ratios of 0.769 (4):0.231 (4) and 0.766 (5):0.234 (5). The -NO2 group of the second cation is also disordered about a pseudo-twofold rotation axis and was refined with a site-occupancy ratio of 0.903 (3):0.097 (3). There is an intra-molecular O-H⋯O hydrogen bond in the anion. The phenanthroline rings of the two cations are inclined to one another by 31.3 (1)°. In the anions, considering the major components only, the carb-oxy-lic acid groups (-COOH) are inclined to the benzene ring by 17.3 (2) and 22.3 (3)°. The carboxyl-ate groups (-COO(-)) are twisted by 9.3 (2) and 13.6 (6)° with respect to the benzene ring. In the crystal, adjacent 2,5-di-carb-oxy-terephthalate anions are linked via O-H⋯O hydrogen bonds, forming chains propagating along [010]. The cations are attached to the chain of anions by N-H⋯O hydrogen bonds.

  8. Lattice distortion and stripelike antiferromagnetic order in Ca10(Pt3As8)(Fe2As2)5

    SciTech Connect

    Sapkota, Aashish; Tucker, Gregory S; Ramazanoglu, Mehmet; Tian, Wei; Ni, N; Cava, R J; McQueeney, Robert J; Goldman, Alan I; Kreyssig, Andreas

    2014-09-01

    Ca10(Pt3As8)(Fe2As2)5 is the parent compound for a class of Fe-based high-temperature superconductors where superconductivity with transition temperatures up to 30 K can be introduced by partial element substitution. We present a combined high-resolution high-energy x-ray diffraction and elastic neutron scattering study on a Ca10(Pt3As8)(Fe2As2)5 single crystal. This study reveals the microscopic nature of two distinct and continuous phase transitions to be very similar to other Fe-based high-temperature superconductors: an orthorhombic distortion of the high-temperature tetragonal Fe-As lattice below TS=110(2) K followed by stripelike antiferromagnetic ordering of the Fe moments below TN=96(2) K. These findings demonstrate that major features of the Fe-based high-temperature superconductors are very robust against variations in chemical constitution as well as structural imperfection of the layers separating the Fe-As layers from each other and confirms that the Fe-As layers primarily determine the physics in this class of material.

  9. Fine (PM2.5) and coarse (PM2.5-10) particulate matter on a heavily trafficked London highway: sources and processes.

    PubMed

    Charron, Aurelie; Harrison, Roy M

    2005-10-15

    A large dataset for PM2.5 and PMcoarse (PM2.5-10) concentrations monitored near a busy London highway (Marylebone Road) has been analyzed to define the factors that lead to high concentrations. The following have been highlighted as major influencing parameters: wind speed, prevailing wind direction (because of its role on the microscale dispersion within the street), the daily cycle of the atmospheric boundary layer (stable during the night/ convective and mixed during the day), and traffic density. The mainly diesel heavy-duty vehicles are the main source of fine particulate matter at Marylebone Road. In particular, lorries (trucks) dominate PM10 exhaust emissions which are mainly in the fine (<2.5 microm) size range. A strong correlation with PMcoarse suggests that the heavy-duty traffic is largely responsible for this component also. Substantial local increments in PM2.5 and PMcoarse due to traffic have been estimated and a large part of the increment in PMcoarse concentrations is inferred to arise from resuspended road dust emissions since the contribution of abrasion processes estimated from emission factors is modest. Despite the strong influence of traffic on PM concentrations measured at Marylebone Road the analysis of factors leading to the highest 5% of hourly concentrations of PM10 at Marylebone Road reveals that almost half of these events were due to building works. The other events occurred when all or most of the key factors occurred simultaneously (heavy traffic, poor dispersion, etc.). Some episodes of high PM2.5 concentrations were associated with long-range transport in which the regional PM2.5 constituted most of the local concentrations.

  10. Chemical and morphological properties of particulate matter (PM 10, PM 2.5) in school classrooms and outdoor air

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fromme, H.; Diemer, J.; Dietrich, S.; Cyrys, J.; Heinrich, J.; Lang, W.; Kiranoglu, M.; Twardella, D.

    Studies have shown high concentrations of particulate matter (PM) in schools. Further insights into the sources and the composition of these particles are needed. During school hours for a period of 6 weeks, outdoor air and the air in two classrooms were sampled. PM was measured gravimetrically, and PM filters were used for the determination of the elemental and organic carbon, light absorbance, and 10 water-soluble ions. Some filters were further analyzed by scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and energy dispersive microanalysis (EDX). The median PM 10 concentrations were 118.2 μg m -3 indoors and 24.2 μg m -3 outdoors; corresponding results for PM 2.5 were 37.4 μg m -3 indoors and 17.0 μg m -3 outdoors. Using PM 10 and PM 2.5 data, we calculated the following indoor/outdoor ratios: 0.3 and 0.4 (sulfate), 0.1 and 0.2 (nitrate), 0.1 and 0.3 (ammonium), and 1.4 and 1.6 (calcium). Using the measured sulfate content on PM filters as an indicator for ambient PM sources, we estimated that 43% of PM 2.5 and 24% of PM 10, respectively, were of ambient origin. The composition of the classrooms' PM (e.g., high calcium concentrations) and the findings from SEM/EDX suggest that the indoor PM consists mainly of earth crustal materials, detrition of the building materials and chalk. Physical activity of the pupils leads to resuspension of mainly indoor coarse particles and greatly contributes to increased PM 10 in classrooms. The concentration of fine particles caused by combustion processes indoors and outdoors is comparable. We conclude that PM measured in classrooms has major sources other than outdoor particles. Assuming that combustion-related particles and crustal materials vary in toxicity, our results support the hypothesis that indoor-generated PM may be less toxic compared to PM in ambient air.

  11. Trends and variability of atmospheric PM2.5 and PM10-2.5 concentration in the Po Valley, Italy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bigi, Alessandro; Ghermandi, Grazia

    2016-12-01

    The Po Valley is one of the largest European regions with a remarkably high concentration level of atmospheric pollutants, both for particulate and gaseous compounds. In the last decade stringent regulations on air quality standards and on anthropogenic emissions have been set by the European Commission, including also for PM2.5 and its main components since 2008. These regulations have led to an overall improvement in air quality across Europe, including the Po Valley and specifically PM10, as shown in a previous study by Bigi and Ghermandi (2014). In order to assess the trend and variability in PM2.5 in the Po Valley and its role in the decrease in PM10, we analysed daily gravimetric equivalent concentration of PM2.5 and of PM10-2.5 at 44 and 15 sites respectively across the Po Valley. The duration of the times series investigated in this work ranges from 7 to 10 years. For both PM sizes, the trend in deseasonalized monthly means, annual quantiles and in monthly frequency distribution was estimated: this showed a significant decreasing trend at several sites for both size fractions and mostly occurring in winter. All series were tested for a significant weekly periodicity (a proxy to estimate the impact of primary anthropogenic emissions), yielding positive results for summer PM2.5 and for summer and winter PM10-2.5. Hierarchical cluster analysis showed moderate variability in PM2.5 across the valley, with two to three main clusters, dividing the area in western, eastern and southern/Apennines foothill sectors. The trend in atmospheric concentration was compared with the time series of local emissions, vehicular fleet details and fuel sales, suggesting that the decrease in PM2.5 and in PM10 originates from a drop both in primary and in precursors of secondary inorganic aerosol emissions, largely ascribed to vehicular traffic. Potentially, the increase in biomass burning emissions in winter and the modest decrease in NH3 weaken an otherwise even larger drop in

  12. Weekly cycle of magnetic characteristics of the daily PM2.5 and PM2.5-10 in Beijing, China

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shi, Meinan; Wu, Huaichun; Zhang, Shihong; Li, Haiyan; Yang, Tianshui; Liu, Wei; Liu, He

    2014-12-01

    In recent years, Beijing has been shown to suffer one of the most serious air pollution problems of any major world city. The concentrations of particulate matter (PM) pollutants, PM2.5-10 and PM2.5, are commonly used as air pollution indexes. We conducted a detailed environmental magnetism study to investigate possible sources of air pollution in Beijing, China, using 283 pairs of the PM2.5 and PM2.5-10 samples collected daily from July 2010 to June 2011. Rock magnetic measurements, including magnetic susceptibility, anhysteretic remanent magnetization, isothermal remanent magnetization, saturation isothermal remanent magnetization, hysteresis loops, first-order reversal curves (FORCs), and thermomagnetism, indicate that the main magnetic mineral is low-coercivity pseudo-single domain (PSD) magnetite. Scanning electron microscope (SEM) observations and energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (EDS) analyses on the PM indicate that the major magnetic phase is coarse-grained magnetite, which is most likely from automobile exhausts and braking system debris. Magnetic parameters of PM2.5 and PM2.5-10 show significant seasonal patterns that may be attributed to domestic heating enhancing magnetization of the PM during late autumn to early spring. Power spectral analyses and box-whisker plots indicate that the magnetic parameters have strong weekly variations that may be due to traffic emissions. These results indicate that magnetic parameters can be used as efficient proxies for monitoring Beijing's air pollution, and that the atmospheric environment may be improved by controlling vehicle emissions.

  13. Quantification of Global Primary Emissions of PM2.5, PM10, and TSP from Combustion and Industrial Process Sources

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Ye; Tao, Shu

    2015-04-01

    Emission quantification of primary particulate matter (PM) is essential for assessment of its related climate and health impacts. To reduce uncertainty associated with global emissions of TSP, PM10 and PM2.5, we compiled data with high spatial (0.1° ×0.1° ) and sectorial (77 primary sources) resolutions for 2007 based on a newly released global fuel data product (PKU-FUEL-2007), and an emission factor database including emission factors measured recently in developing countries. Total emissions for TSP, PM10 and PM2.5 were estimated to be 162 (123-224), 99 (80-130), and 78 (64-101) Tg, respectively. Our estimates for developing countries are higher than those previously reported. Spatial bias associated with large countries could be reduced by using sub-national fuel consumption data. Despite the fact that most industrial and transport sources locate in urban areas, residential fuel consumptions are quite different between rural and urban areas, especially in developing countries. As a result, per person annual primary PM emission in rural areas are much higher than those in urban areas. Further, this difference in developed countries (12 and 2.8 kg PM2.5 for rural and urban areas) is larger than that in developing countries (8.4 and 4.6 kg PM2.5 for rural and urban areas). Additionally, we looked at temporal trends from 1960 to 2009 at country-scale resolution. Although total emissions are still increasing in developing countries, their intensities in terms of gross domestic production or energy consumption have decreased. PM emitted in developed countries is finer owing to a larger contribution from non-industrial sources, and use of abatement technologies. In contrast, countries like China, with strong industry emissions and limited abatement facilities, emit coarser PM. The health impacts of PM are intensified in hotspots and cities owing to covariance of sources and receptors. Although urbanization reduces the per person emission, overall health impacts

  14. Variability of levels and composition of PM10 and PM2.5 in the Barcelona metro system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Querol, X.; Moreno, T.; Karanasiou, A.; Reche, C.; Alastuey, A.; Viana, M.; Font, O.; Gil, J.; de Miguel, E.; Capdevila, M.

    2012-03-01

    From an environmental perspective, the underground metro system is one of the cleanest forms of public transportation in urban agglomerations. Current studies report contradicting results regarding air quality in the metro systems: whereas some reveal poor air quality, others report PM levels which are lower or of the same order of magnitude than those measured in traffic sites above ground level. The present work assesses summer indoor air quality and passenger exposure in the Barcelona metro, focusing on PM levels and their metal contents. In addition, the impact on indoor air quality of platform screen door systems (automated systems consisting of closed rail track and platforms) is evaluated, to determine whether these systems reduce passenger exposure to PM when compared with conventional systems (open tracks and platforms). In the Barcelona metro, PM levels inside the trains in summer are amongst the lowest reported for worldwide metro systems (11-32 μPM2.5 m-3). This is most probably due to the air conditioning system working in all carriages of the Barcelona metro during the whole year. On the platforms, levels were considerably higher, reaching mean levels of 59 and 88 μgPM2.5 m-3 in the new (L9) and old (L3) lines, respectively. PM10 data are also reported in the present study, but comparison with other metro systems is more difficult due to the scarcity of data compared with PM2.5. Results showed clear PM daily cycles, with a drastic increase from 06:00 to 07:00 a.m., a diurnal maximum from 07:00 a.m. to 10:00 p.m., and marked decreases between 10:00 p.m. and 05:00 a.m. The elements with the highest enrichment are those associated with wheel or brake abrasion products (Ba, Fe, Cu, Mn, Cr, Sb, As, Mo, Co, Sr, among others). Laminar hematite (Fe2O3) was the dominant particle type, being mainly originated by mechanical abrasion of the rail track and wheels. Regarding passenger exposure to PM inside the metro system, the contribution of commuting by metro

  15. 40 CFR Figure C-4 to Subpart C of... - Illustration of the Minimum Limits for Correlation Coefficient for PM2.5 and PM102.5 Class II...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 6 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Illustration of the Minimum Limits for Correlation Coefficient for PM2.5 and PM10â2.5 Class II and III Methods C Figure C-4 to Subpart C of Part 53... Methods and Reference Methods Pt. 53, Subpt. C, Fig. C-4 Figure C-4 to Subpart C of Part...

  16. Pulmonary toxicity study in rats with PM 10 and PM 2.5: Differential responses related to scale and composition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Wei; Lei, Tian; Lin, Zhi-Qing; Zhang, Hua-Shan; Yang, Dan-Feng; Xi, Zhu-Ge; Chen, Jian-Hua; Wang, Wei

    2011-02-01

    ObjectionTo study the pollution of atmospheric particles at winter in Beijing and compare the lung toxicity which induced by particle samples from different sampling sites. MethodWe collected samples from two sampling points during the winter for toxicity testing and chemical analysis. Wistar rats were administered with particles by intratracheal instillation. After exposure, biochemically index, esimmunity indexes, histopathology and DNA damage were detected in rat pulmonary cells. ResultThe elements with enrichment factors (EF) larger than 10 were As, Cd, Cu, Zn, S and Pb in the four experiment groups. The priority control of the total concentration of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) in PM 10 and PM 2.5 of Near-traffic source was much higher than that of Far-traffic source, it demonstrated that near the traffic source of PAHs pollution was heavier than that of Far-traffic source, as it was close to main roads Beiyuan Road, motor vehicle emissions were much higher. The pathology of lung showed that the degree of inflammation was increased with the particle diameter minished, it was the same as the detection of biochemical parameters such as lactate dehydrogenase (LDH), Total antioxidant status(T-AOC) and total protein (TP) in BALF and inflammation cytokine(interleukin-1, interleukin-6 and tumor necrosis factor-alpha) in lung homogenate. The indexes of DNA damage including the content of DNA and Olive empennage of PM 2.5 were significant higher than that of PM 10 at the same surveillance point ( P < 0.05), near-traffic particles were higher than the far-traffic particles at the same diameter, ( P < 0.05). ConclusionNear-traffic area particles had certain pollution at winter in Beijing. Meanwhile, atmospheric particulate matters on lung toxicity were related to the particles size and distance related sites which were exposed: smaller size, more toxicity; nearer from traffic, more toxicity.

  17. The stable carbon isotope composition of PM 2.5 and PM 10 in Mexico City Metropolitan Area air

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    López-Veneroni, D.

    The sources and distribution of carbon in ambient suspended particles (PM 2.5 and PM 10) of Mexico City Metropolitan Area (MCMA) air were traced using stable carbon isotopes ( 13C/ 12C). Tested potential sources included rural and agricultural soils, gasoline and diesel, liquefied-petroleum gas, volcanic ash, and street dust. The complete combustion of LP gas, diesel and gasoline yielded the lightest δ13C values (-27 to -29‰ vs. PDB), while street dust (PM 10) represented the isotopically heaviest endmember (-17‰). The δ13C values of rural soils from four geographically separated sites were similar (-20.7 ± 1.5‰). δ13C values of particles and soot from diesel and gasoline vehicle emissions and agricultural soils varied between -23 and -26‰. Ambient PM samples collected in November of 2000, and March and December of 2001 at three representative receptor sites of industrial, commercial and residential activities had a δ13C value centered around -25.1‰ in both fractions, resulting from common carbon sources. The predominant carbon sources to MCMA atmospheric particles were hydrocarbon combustion (diesel and/or gasoline) and particles of geological origin. The significantly depleted δ13C values from the industrial site reflect the input of diesel combustion by mobile and point source emissions. Based on stable carbon isotope mass balance, the carbon contribution of geological sources at the commercial and residential sites was approximately 73% for the PM 10 fraction and 54% for PM 2.5. Although not measured in this study, biomass-burning emissions from nearby forests are an important carbon source characterized by isotopically lighter values (-29‰), and can become a significant contributor (67%) of particulate carbon to MCMA air under the prevalence of southwesterly winds. Alternative sources of these 13C-depleted particles, such as cooking fires and municipal waste incineration, need to be assessed. Results show that stable carbon isotope

  18. 40 CFR 93.123 - Procedures for determining localized CO, PM10, and PM2.5 concentrations (hot-spot analysis).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... CO, PM10, and PM2.5 concentrations (hot-spot analysis). 93.123 Section 93.123 Protection of.... or the Federal Transit Laws § 93.123 Procedures for determining localized CO, PM10, and PM2.5 concentrations (hot-spot analysis). (a) CO hot-spot analysis. (1) The demonstrations required by §...

  19. 40 CFR 93.123 - Procedures for determining localized CO, PM10, and PM2.5 concentrations (hot-spot analysis).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... CO, PM10, and PM2.5 concentrations (hot-spot analysis). 93.123 Section 93.123 Protection of.... or the Federal Transit Laws § 93.123 Procedures for determining localized CO, PM10, and PM2.5 concentrations (hot-spot analysis). (a) CO hot-spot analysis. (1) The demonstrations required by §...

  20. 40 CFR 93.123 - Procedures for determining localized CO, PM10, and PM2.5 concentrations (hot-spot analysis).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... CO, PM10, and PM2.5 concentrations (hot-spot analysis). 93.123 Section 93.123 Protection of.... or the Federal Transit Laws § 93.123 Procedures for determining localized CO, PM10, and PM2.5 concentrations (hot-spot analysis). (a) CO hot-spot analysis. (1) The demonstrations required by §...

  1. 40 CFR 93.123 - Procedures for determining localized CO, PM10, and PM2.5 concentrations (hot-spot analysis).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... CO, PM10, and PM2.5 concentrations (hot-spot analysis). 93.123 Section 93.123 Protection of.... or the Federal Transit Laws § 93.123 Procedures for determining localized CO, PM10, and PM2.5 concentrations (hot-spot analysis). (a) CO hot-spot analysis. (1) The demonstrations required by §...

  2. GIS Assessment of the PM10, PM2.5 and PM1.0 Concentrations in Urban Area of Tehran in Warm and Cold Seasons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Halek, F.; Kavousi-rahim, A.

    2014-10-01

    In recent years, atmospheric models, such as GIS, are used for environmental analysis and the related management for supporting the environmental decision makers in different countries. In this study, concentrations of PM10, PM2.5 and PM1.0 are found in urban areas of Tehran in warm and cold seasons and the data applied in the related modelling, using Arc-GIS. For this purpose, samples were collected from 42 sites in an 18 km2 region located in the west and central parts of Tehran. The mean concentrations of PM1.0, PM2.5 and PM10 are found to be 13.14 μg/m3, 22.67 μg/m3 and 95.72 μg/m3 in the warm season; and 50.12 μg/m3, 70.72 μg/m3 and 193.86 μg/m3 in the cold season respectively. In this paper, with the aid of GIS, concentrations of the suspended particles were measured in 22 major hospitals, the patients in which are in contact with these pollutants. It was found the concentrations of the suspended particles were much higher in the cold season.

  3. Bis(6-nitro-1,10-phenanthrolin-1-ium) 2,5-di­carb­oxy­terephthalate

    PubMed Central

    Zhong, Kai-Long; Ni, Chao

    2014-01-01

    In the structure of the title 2:1 proton-transfer compound, 2C12H8N3O2 +·C10H4O8 2−, the 6-nitro-1,10-phenanthroline mol­ecules act as proton sponges, accepting protons from pyromellitic acid. The –NO2 group of one of the 6-nitro-1,10-phenanthrolin-1-ium cations is disordered and was refined with a site-occupancy ratio of 0.624 (15):0.376 (15). Two –COOH(–COO−) groups of the 2,5-di­carb­oxy­terephthalate dianion are disordered and were refined with site-occupancy ratios of 0.769 (4):0.231 (4) and 0.766 (5):0.234 (5). The –NO2 group of the second cation is also disordered about a pseudo-twofold rotation axis and was refined with a site-occupancy ratio of 0.903 (3):0.097 (3). There is an intra­molecular O—H⋯O hydrogen bond in the anion. The phenanthroline rings of the two cations are inclined to one another by 31.3 (1)°. In the anions, considering the major components only, the carb­oxy­lic acid groups (–COOH) are inclined to the benzene ring by 17.3 (2) and 22.3 (3)°. The carboxyl­ate groups (–COO−) are twisted by 9.3 (2) and 13.6 (6)° with respect to the benzene ring. In the crystal, adjacent 2,5-di­carb­oxy­terephthalate anions are linked via O—H⋯O hydrogen bonds, forming chains propagating along [010]. The cations are attached to the chain of anions by N—H⋯O hydrogen bonds. PMID:24764973

  4. Structure of the toxaphene compound 2,5-endo,6-exo,8,9,9,10,10-octachlorobornene-2: a temperature-dependent formation of two rotamers.

    PubMed

    Parlar, Harun; Burhenne, Jürgen; Coelhan, Mehmet; Vetter, Walter

    2005-03-15

    The irradiation of 2,2,3-exo,5-endo,6-exo,8,9,9,10,10-decachlorobornane in n-hexane at 254 nm leads to a spontaneous Cl2 elimination as the major reaction pathway. This results finally in the main product 2,5-endo,6-exo,8,9,9,10,10-octachlorobornene-2, of which the structure could be elucidated with the help of X-ray, 1H and 13C NMR, IR, and MS. Temperature-dependent 1H NMR spectroscopic investigations have shown that the -CHCl2 groups located at C1 and C7 are able to rotate slowly under normal circumstances. If such measurements, however, are exerted at low temperatures (-10 to -60 degrees C), so can be seen that two rotamers are formed due to the hindrance of the free rotation about the bonds C1-C10, C7-C8, and C7-C9, which for the first time could be revealed for a toxaphene compound. Furthermore, as all 1H NMR chlorobornane spectra known so far show only sharp and clear signals, it can be assumed that chlorobornane compounds as main toxaphene components have fixed bonds, which requires to indicate chlorine atoms within the tentacles such as "a", "b", and "c" for characterizing the correct position. Those fixed tentacles are probably the reason that many toxaphene congeners remain very stable in environmental compartments, and particularly the biotic and abiotic transformation may strongly be hindered by the inflexibility of the tentacles.

  5. Variability of levels and composition of PM10 and PM2.5 in the Barcelona metro system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Querol, X.; Moreno, T.; Karanasiou, A.; Reche, C.; Alastuey, A.; Viana, M.; Font, O.; Gil, J.; de Miguel, E.; Capdevila, M.

    2012-06-01

    From an environmental perspective, the underground metro system is one of the cleanest forms of public transportation in urban agglomerations. Current studies report contradicting results regarding air quality in the metro systems: whereas some reveal poor air quality, others report PM levels which are lower or of the same order of magnitude than those measured in traffic sites above ground level. The present work assesses summer and winter indoor air quality and passenger exposure in the Barcelona metro, focusing on PM levels and their metal contents. In addition, the impact on indoor air quality of platform screen door systems (automated systems consisting of closed rail track and platforms) is evaluated, to determine whether these systems reduce passenger exposure to PM when compared with conventional systems (open tracks and platforms). In the Barcelona metro PM levels inside the trains in summer are amongst the lowest reported for worldwide metro systems (11-32 μg m-3 PM2.5). This is most likely due to the air conditioning system working in all carriages of the Barcelona metro during the whole year. Levels were considerably higher on the platforms, reaching mean levels of 46 and 125 μg m3 in the new (L9) and old (L3) lines, respectively. PM10 data are also reported in the present study, but comparison with other metro systems is difficult due to the scarcity of data compared with PM2.5. Results showed distinct PM daily cycles, with a drastic increase from 06:00 to 07:00 a.m., a diurnal maximum from 07:00 to 10:00 p.m., and marked decrease between 10:00 p.m. and 05:00 a.m. The elements with the highest enrichment were those associated with wheel or brake abrasion products (Ba, Fe, Cu, Mn, Cr, Sb, As, Mo, Co, Sr, among others). Laminar hematite (Fe2O3) was the dominant particle type, being mainly originated by mechanical abrasion of the rail track and wheels. Regarding passenger exposure to PM, the contribution of commuting by metro was estimated to account

  6. Endotoxin in fine (PM 2.5) and coarse (PM 2.5-10) particle mass of ambient aerosols. A temporo-spatial analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Heinrich, Joachim; Pitz, Mike; Bischof, Wolfgang; Krug, Norbert; Borm, Paul J. A.

    Objectives: We collected fine (PM 2.5) and coarse (PM 2.5-10) particulate matter fractions in two areas ˜80 km apart and measured soluble endotoxin concentrations in both particle fractions. Here we report on temporo-spatial variation of endotoxin content in the collected particles. Methods: Dichotomous Anderson samplers were used to collect 21 weekly samples of PM 2.5 and PM 2.5-10 in both towns from January to June 2002. Each Teflon filter was water extracted and endotoxin was measured by a chromogenic Limulus Amoebocyte Lysate method. Endotoxin concentrations were expressed per mg of fine or mg of coarse mass and per sampled air volume (m 3). Results: For both cities, the mean endotoxin content in PM 2.5 was 1.2 EU mg -1; however the endotoxin content in the coarse fraction was ˜10 times higher compared to the fine mass fractions. Although endotoxin content is highly variable over time, a good correlation was observed between the two town sites for both fine ( r=0.85) and coarse PM ( r=0.88). The fluctuations of weekly endotoxin means were high in both areas suggesting a strong temporal dependence on particle source and composition. The endotoxin content in particles collected during May and June were two to four times higher than concentrations measured during the winter and early spring weeks. Conclusions: Ambient airborne endotoxin concentrations were detected in coarse and fine particle fraction, but 10-fold higher in the coarse PM. The strong seasonality and the week to week fluctuation of endotoxin content in PM indicate different biologic PM properties which might affect results of time series studies on short-term effects as well as in vitro studies and human exposure studies.

  7. Vertical differences in the composition of PM 10 and PM 2.5 in the urban atmosphere of Osaka, Japan

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sasaki, Kansuke; Sakamoto, Kazuhiko

    Vertical differences in PM 10 and PM 2.5 suspended particles were investigated using a building in Osaka, Japan. Samples were collected on the roof of the building (200 m above ground level) and on the ground during 5-9 August and 2-6 December 2002. In addition to determination of sample mass, concentrations have been analyzed for major chemical components including elemental carbon (EC) and organic carbon (OC). Particle mass concentrations of the samples collected at 200 m were lower than those collected on the ground. "Others" species, defined as the difference between the total particle mass and the sum of the masses of the measured species, dominantly accounted for the vertical difference in mass concentrations in summer, whereas EC and OC were the major contributors in winter. Vertical profiles of relative humidity observed simultaneously indicated that relative humidity on the ground was higher than that at 200 m during the summer sampling period. Hence, it is likely that the higher concentrations of "others" species in the samples collected on the ground were probably caused by water having been absorbed by deliquescent components of the particles. Vertical temperature profiles during the winter sampling period suggested that stable meteorological conditions in winter resulted in the accumulation of primary particles, mainly emitted from vehicle exhaust, leading to the high concentrations of EC and OC on the ground.

  8. PIXE analysis of PM2.5 and PM(2.5-10) for air quality assessment of Islamabad, Pakistan: application of chemometrics for source identification.

    PubMed

    Waheed, Shahida; Jaafar, Muhammad Z; Siddique, Naila; Markwitz, Andreas; Brereton, Richard G

    2012-01-01

    A Gent sampler was used to collect 379 pairs of filters from Nilore, a suburban area of Islamabad city. The study was designed to assess the concentration variations of trace elements in fine and coarse particulate matter due to anthropogenic activities and naturally occurring events. Source identification was performed by applying MATLAB software for principal component analysis (PCA), and cluster analysis (CA). The average fine and coarse particulate masses during the study period were 15.1 ± 11.9 and 37.3 ± 28.0 μg/m(3) respectively which complies with the 24-h air quality limits set by the government of Pakistan. The application of PCA to PM(2.5) data suggests the PM contribution from sources such as soil, automobile exhaust and coal combustion, road dust and wearing of tyres, wood combustion, biomass burning and fertilizers and fungicides whereas for the PM(2.5-10) data shows signatures of suspended soil, automobile exhaust, road dust and wearing of tyres, wood and biomass burning, refuse incineration, Ni smelter, fertilizers and fungicides are obtained. Cluster analysis of PM(2.5) and PM(2.5-10) datasets reveals that there are mainly three contributory pollution sources and these are suspended soil particles, automobile related sources and wood and coal combustion.

  9. Inhalable Microorganisms in Beijing’s PM2.5 and PM10 Pollutants during a Severe Smog Event

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Particulate matter (PM) air pollution poses a formidable public health threat to the city of Beijing. Among the various hazards of PM pollutants, microorganisms in PM2.5 and PM10 are thought to be responsible for various allergies and for the spread of respiratory diseases. While the physical and chemical properties of PM pollutants have been extensively studied, much less is known about the inhalable microorganisms. Most existing data on airborne microbial communities using 16S or 18S rRNA gene sequencing to categorize bacteria or fungi into the family or genus levels do not provide information on their allergenic and pathogenic potentials. Here we employed metagenomic methods to analyze the microbial composition of Beijing’s PM pollutants during a severe January smog event. We show that with sufficient sequencing depth, airborne microbes including bacteria, archaea, fungi, and dsDNA viruses can be identified at the species level. Our results suggested that the majority of the inhalable microorganisms were soil-associated and nonpathogenic to human. Nevertheless, the sequences of several respiratory microbial allergens and pathogens were identified and their relative abundance appeared to have increased with increased concentrations of PM pollution. Our findings may serve as an important reference for environmental scientists, health workers, and city planners. PMID:24456276

  10. A Study of metabolic transformation of organic and inorganic components in PM2.5 and PM10, South Korea

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, J.; Yoon, H.; Lee, M.

    2012-12-01

    The important factors of atmospheric particle matter (PM) are size, concentration, composition and toxicity which can considerably affect the possible human health problem, especially respiratory diseases, visibility reduction and climate change. PM2.5 and PM10 are complex mixture of ammonium sulfate, ammonium nitrate, organic carbon, inorganic carbon and inorganic constituents. Recently, most researches of source attribution and assessments of the relationship between health effects and particle concentrations have not taken advantage of the development in analytical tools measuring the detailed molecular structure and microstructure of particles and of the knowledge of particle formation mechanisms in combustion system. This study will combine variety analytical techniques that can provide structural and compositional information to determine the correlation between sources of hazardous material and physicochemical properties in aerosol particle. Inorganic metal can be rapidly quantifying to filter base using ED-XRF (Energy-dispersive X-ray fluorescence). Speciation and quantification of water soluble components applied HPLC-ICP-MS and LC-MS NMR (nuclear magnetic resonance). Afterward, we investigate metabolic transformations of atmospheric particle matter also using FE-TEM (Field Emission Transmission Electron Microscopy).

  11. Inhalable microorganisms in Beijing's PM2.5 and PM10 pollutants during a severe smog event.

    PubMed

    Cao, Chen; Jiang, Wenjun; Wang, Buying; Fang, Jianhuo; Lang, Jidong; Tian, Geng; Jiang, Jingkun; Zhu, Ting F

    2014-01-01

    Particulate matter (PM) air pollution poses a formidable public health threat to the city of Beijing. Among the various hazards of PM pollutants, microorganisms in PM2.5 and PM10 are thought to be responsible for various allergies and for the spread of respiratory diseases. While the physical and chemical properties of PM pollutants have been extensively studied, much less is known about the inhalable microorganisms. Most existing data on airborne microbial communities using 16S or 18S rRNA gene sequencing to categorize bacteria or fungi into the family or genus levels do not provide information on their allergenic and pathogenic potentials. Here we employed metagenomic methods to analyze the microbial composition of Beijing's PM pollutants during a severe January smog event. We show that with sufficient sequencing depth, airborne microbes including bacteria, archaea, fungi, and dsDNA viruses can be identified at the species level. Our results suggested that the majority of the inhalable microorganisms were soil-associated and nonpathogenic to human. Nevertheless, the sequences of several respiratory microbial allergens and pathogens were identified and their relative abundance appeared to have increased with increased concentrations of PM pollution. Our findings may serve as an important reference for environmental scientists, health workers, and city planners.

  12. Elemental compositions of PM10-2.5 and PM2.5 aerosols of a Nigerian urban city using ion beam analytical techniques

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ezeh, G. C.; Obioh, I. B.; Asubiojo, O. I.; Chiari, M.; Nava, S.; Calzolai, G.; Lucarelli, F.; Nuviadenu, C. K.

    2014-09-01

    The paucity of data on air quality studies in Nigeria prompted us to commence the sampling of particulate matter (PM10-2.5 and PM2.5) in Mushin Lagos, Nigeria. Both size-segregated fractions were collected using a double staged ‘Gent' stack filter unit sampler. Elemental characterization was carried out by Particle Induced X-ray Emission (PIXE) and Proton Induced γ-ray Emission (PIGE) techniques using an external ion beam set-up. Twenty-four elements (Na, Mg, Al, Si, P, S, Cl, K, Ca, Ti, V, Cr, Mn, Fe, Ni, Cu, Zn, Se, Br, Rb, Sr, Zr, Cs and Pb) were detected in both fractions and their concentrations were assessed. A study of their inter-elemental correlations indicated that some elements could have common source origins or similar chemical properties while enrichment factors (EF) displayed that most elements emanated from anthropogenic sources. Source apportionment studies are thus recommended.

  13. 46 CFR 111.25-5 - Marking.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 4 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Marking. 111.25-5 Section 111.25-5 Shipping COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY (CONTINUED) ELECTRICAL ENGINEERING ELECTRIC SYSTEMS-GENERAL REQUIREMENTS Motors § 111.25-5 Marking. (a) Each motor must have a marking or nameplate that meets either Section...

  14. 46 CFR 111.25-5 - Marking.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 4 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Marking. 111.25-5 Section 111.25-5 Shipping COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY (CONTINUED) ELECTRICAL ENGINEERING ELECTRIC SYSTEMS-GENERAL REQUIREMENTS Motors § 111.25-5 Marking. (a) Each motor must have a marking or nameplate that meets either Section...

  15. 46 CFR 111.25-5 - Marking.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 4 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Marking. 111.25-5 Section 111.25-5 Shipping COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY (CONTINUED) ELECTRICAL ENGINEERING ELECTRIC SYSTEMS-GENERAL REQUIREMENTS Motors § 111.25-5 Marking. (a) Each motor must have a marking or nameplate that meets either Section...

  16. 46 CFR 111.25-5 - Marking.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 4 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Marking. 111.25-5 Section 111.25-5 Shipping COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY (CONTINUED) ELECTRICAL ENGINEERING ELECTRIC SYSTEMS-GENERAL REQUIREMENTS Motors § 111.25-5 Marking. (a) Each motor must have a marking or nameplate that meets either Section...

  17. 46 CFR 111.25-5 - Marking.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 4 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Marking. 111.25-5 Section 111.25-5 Shipping COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY (CONTINUED) ELECTRICAL ENGINEERING ELECTRIC SYSTEMS-GENERAL REQUIREMENTS Motors § 111.25-5 Marking. (a) Each motor must have a marking or nameplate that meets either Section...

  18. Exposure of Particulate Matters PM10 and PM2.5 to Pregnant Ladies during First Trimester and its Impact on Adverse Birth Outcomes in Delhi, India

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kumar, S.; Goyal, P.

    2015-12-01

    The incessant exposure to criteria air pollutants at different level of concentrations is associated with adverse birth outcomes. The present study advocates the importance of the early period of pregnancy (first trimester) for association between growth in term of small gestational age (SGA) and birth weight (BW) with PM2.5 and PM10 for megacity Delhi. The association of PM10 and PM2.5 average concentration, SGA, pre term birth (PTB) and lower birth weight (LBW < 2500g or 5.5 pounds) outcomes have been investigated among 1749 live births in a large hospital during the year 2012 New Delhi, India. The air pollutants PM2.5 and PM10 have been used in single pollutant logistic regression models to estimate odds ratios (OR) for these outcomes. Growth in term of SGA is associated with PM2.5 levels (OR = 0.99, confidence interval (CI) = 0.99 - 1.0) and PM10 levels (OR= 0.99, CI= 0.99 - 1.001) in the first trimester of pregnancy. Birth weight outcome in terms of lower birth weight (LBW) has been found to be significantly associated with PM2.5 (OR= 0.99, CI = 0.98 - 1.00) exposure in the first trimester. A very significant decrease of 0.1% has been observed in growth of infant in terms of SGA with per 10 mg/m3 increase in PM2.5. Also, 0.1 % statistically significant adverse association of BW in terms of LBW has been found with per 10 mg/m3 increased vulnerability of PM2.5 during first trimester of gestation.

  19. Efficiency of Big Spring Number Eight (BSNE) and Modified Wilson and Cook (MWAC) samplers to collect PM10, PM2.5 and PM1

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mendez, Mariano J.; Funk, Roger; Buschiazzo, Daniel E.

    2016-06-01

    The internal efficiency of Big Spring Number Eight (BSNE) and Modified Wilson and Cook (MWAC) samplers for trapping PM10, PM2.5 and PM1 were tested in a wind tunnel, at two wind speeds (3.0 and 6.8 m s-1) in the saltation zone (SAZ) and the suspension zone (SAZ). PM concentrations measured in the inlet and the outlet of both samplers were correlated and the slopes of fitting equations were used for calculating sampling efficiencies. Results showed that BSNE efficiencies ranged from 12% to 32% for PM10, from 0% to 19% for PM2.5 and from 0% to 12% for PM1. The BSNE's efficiency decreased with decreasing particle sizes in SAZ and SUZ at both wind speeds as a consequence of the very low deposition velocity of the finest size particles. The BSNE's efficiency increased with increasing wind speed in SAZ for PM10 and PM2.5 and in SUZ for PM2.5. The MWAC's efficiency ranged from 1% to 20% for PM10, from 0% to 15% for PM2.5 and from 0% to 16% for PM1. The MWAC efficiency was 0% for PM10, PM2.5 and PM1 in the SUZ at 3 m s-1 and for PM2.5 and PM1 in the SUZ at 6.8 m s-1. These results provide evidence that the efficiency of BSNE and MWAC for trapping PM10 change with wind speed and position of the sampler. Results also show that BSNEs and MWACs can potentially be used for PM10 emission studies but more research is needed in order to understand and improve their efficiency.

  20. Bioequivalence and food effect of heat-stressed and non-heat-stressed dapagliflozin 2.5- and 10-mg tablets.

    PubMed

    LaCreta, Frank; Griffen, Steven C; Liu, Xiaoni; Smith, Charles; Hines, Carey; Volk, Kevin; Tejwani, Ravindra; Boulton, David W

    2016-09-10

    Physical storage of formulations may result in physical composition changes that affect pharmacokinetics. Dapagliflozin, an oral sodium-glucose cotransporter 2 inhibitor used for type 2 diabetes mellitus, stored under prolonged exposure to heat converts crystalline dapagliflozin to an amorphous form. Bioequivalence of the amorphous to crystalline form and food effects of each form in the 2.5-mg formulation are unknown. Two open-label, crossover, single-dose studies in healthy participants assessed pharmacokinetics for heat-stressed (HS) and non-heat-stressed (NH) dapagliflozin 10-mg (study 1, N=29, fasted+HS food effect) and 2.5-mg (study 2, N=28, fasted+HS and NH food effect) tablets. The 90% confidence intervals for geometric mean ratios of area under the concentration-time curve (AUC) and peak concentration (Cmax) for HS 2.5- and 10-mg tablets were within 80-125%, indicating bioequivalence. In the fed vs. fasted state for 2.5-mg and 10-mg HS tablets, AUCs were similar, time to Cmax was prolonged by 1.25h, and Cmax decreased by approximately 50%. No serious adverse events were reported. Given that dapagliflozin's efficacy is dependent upon AUC, it was concluded that HS and NH dapagliflozin tablets are bioequivalent in 2.5- and 10-mg doses with no clinically meaningful food effect for either form.

  1. Concentrations, correlations and chemical species of PM2.5/PM10 based on published data in China: Potential implications for the revised particulate standard.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Xuehua; Cao, Zhaoyu; Ma, Yujie; Wang, Linpeng; Wu, Ruidong; Wang, Wenxing

    2016-02-01

    Particulate matter (PM) has been of great concern in China due to the increasing haze pollution in recent years. In 2012, the Chinese national ambient air quality standard (NAAQS) was amended with a "more strict" regulation on the PM concentrations, i.e., 35 and 70 µg/m(3) for annual PM2.5 and PM10 averages, respectively (Grade-Ⅱ, GB3095-2012). To evaluate the potential of China to attain such new NAAQS and provide a more generalized chemical profile of PM in China, a comprehensive statistical analysis was carried out based on the published data of parallel PM2.5 and PM10 mass concentrations and chemical compositions of PM2.5 and PM10. The results show that most of the measured concentrations far exceed the new NAAQS. PM2.5 and PM10 show a strong positive correlation (R(2) = 0.87, p < 0.01) with PM2.5 accounting for about 65% of PM10, suggesting that the abatement of PM2.5 is crucial for reducing PM pollution and hence improving air quality in China. Organic carbon (OC), sulfate and crustal species are the three major components of PM. The NO3(-)/SO4(2-) ratios are 0.43 ± 0.26 in PM2.5 and 0.56 ± 0.29 in PM10, and the OC/EC ratios are 3.63 ± 1.73 in PM2.5 and 4.17 ± 2.09 in PM10, signifying that the stationary emissions from coal combustion remain the main PM source. An evaluation of PM2.5 situation in current China was carried out and the results show that it would take about 27 years to meet the limit value of 35 µg/m(3) in the revised standard, implying a rigorous challenge in PM2.5 control in China in the future.

  2. Mass concentration and elemental composition of indoor PM 2.5 and PM 10 in University rooms in Thessaloniki, northern Greece

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gemenetzis, Panagiotis; Moussas, Panagiotis; Arditsoglou, Anastasia; Samara, Constantini

    The mass concentration and the elemental composition of PM 2.5 and PM 10 were measured in 40 rooms (mainly offices or mixed office-lab rooms, and photocopying places) of the Aristotle University of Thessaloniki, northern Greece. A total of 27 major, minor and trace elements were determined by ED-XRF analysis. The PM 2.5/PM 10 concentration ratios averaged 0.8±0.2, while the corresponding elemental ratios ranged between 0.4±0.2 and 0.9±0.2. The concentrations of PM 2.5 and PM 10 were significantly higher (by 70% and 50%, respectively) in the smokers' rooms compared to the non-smokers' places. The total elemental concentrations were also higher in the smokers' rooms (11.5 vs 8.2 μg m -3 for PM 2.5, and 10.3 vs 7.6 μg m -3 for PM 2.5-10). Fine particle concentrations (PM 2.5) were found to be quite proportional to smoking strength. On the contrary, the two environments exhibited similar coarse (PM 2.5-10) particle fractions not related to the number of cigarettes smoked. A slight decrease of particle concentrations with increasing the floor level was also observed, particularly for PM 2.5, suggesting that high-level floors are less impacted by near ground-level sources like traffic emissions. Finally, the removal efficiency of air purification systems was evaluated.

  3. Ambiental dust speciation and metal content variation in TSP, PM 10 and PM 2.5 in urban atmospheric air of Harare (Zimbabwe).

    PubMed

    Kuvarega, A T; Taru, P

    2008-09-01

    Levels of TSP, PM(10) and PM(2.5) as well as levels of Pb, Co, Ni and Cd in TSP, PM(10) and PM(2.5) have been determined in atmospheric particulates collected at Loius Mountbatten School (Harare). The samples were collected for a period of 6 months from July to December 2002. The average levels of TSP, PM(10) and PM(2.5) measured at the site are 106.11, 59.70 and 40.55 mg m(-3) respectively. The average level of TSP at Loius Mountbatten School is 106.11 mg m(-3), which is higher than the annual WHO guideline limit of 90 mg m(-3). The average level of PM(10) measured at Loius Mountbatten School is 59.70 mg m(-3), and is higher than the US-EPA and UK-EU guideline limit of 50 mg m(-3). The average level of PM(2.5) measured at the site are also higher than the WHO and US-EPA annual guideline limit of 15 mg m(-3). The analysis of metal concentrations in TSP, PM(10) and PM(2.5) was done using Graphite Furnace Atomic Absorption Spectrometry (GFAAS). The analysis showed the following average elemental concentrations: 0.157 mg Pb m(-3) in TSP, 0.166 mg Pb m(-3) in PM(10), 0.185 mg Pb m(-3) in PM(2.5), 0.009 mg Co m(-3) in TSP, 0.007 mg Co m(-3) in PM(10), 0.011 mg Co m(-3) in PM(2.5), 0.223 mg Ni m(-3) in TSP, 0.166 mg Ni m(-3) in PM(10), 0.180 mg Ni m(-3) in PM(2.5) and 0.005 mg Cd m(-3) in TSP, 0.006 mg Cd m(-3) in PM(10), 0.005 mg Cd m(-3) in PM(2.5). The levels of Pb and Ni were generally higher than those of Co and Cd and this could have been due to high traffic volumes and various industrial activities in the Workington Industrial Area.

  4. 40 CFR 93.116 - Criteria and procedures: Localized CO, PM10, and PM2.5 violations (hot-spots).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 21 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Criteria and procedures: Localized CO....116 Criteria and procedures: Localized CO, PM10, and PM2.5 violations (hot-spots). (a) This paragraph applies at all times. The FHWA/FTA project must not cause or contribute to any new localized CO, PM10,...

  5. 40 CFR 93.116 - Criteria and procedures: Localized CO, PM10, and PM2.5 violations (hot-spots).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 21 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Criteria and procedures: Localized CO....116 Criteria and procedures: Localized CO, PM10, and PM2.5 violations (hot-spots). (a) This paragraph applies at all times. The FHWA/FTA project must not cause or contribute to any new localized CO, PM10,...

  6. 40 CFR 93.116 - Criteria and procedures: Localized CO, PM10, and PM2.5 violations (hot-spots).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 20 2014-07-01 2013-07-01 true Criteria and procedures: Localized CO....116 Criteria and procedures: Localized CO, PM10, and PM2.5 violations (hot-spots). (a) This paragraph applies at all times. The FHWA/FTA project must not cause or contribute to any new localized CO, PM10,...

  7. 40 CFR 93.123 - Procedures for determining localized CO, PM10, and PM2.5 concentrations (hot-spot analysis).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 20 2014-07-01 2013-07-01 true Procedures for determining localized CO... Transit Laws § 93.123 Procedures for determining localized CO, PM10, and PM2.5 concentrations (hot-spot analysis). (a) CO hot-spot analysis. (1) The demonstrations required by § 93.116 (“Localized CO, PM10,...

  8. 40 CFR 93.116 - Criteria and procedures: Localized CO, PM10, and PM2.5 violations (hot-spots).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 20 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Criteria and procedures: Localized CO....116 Criteria and procedures: Localized CO, PM10, and PM2.5 violations (hot-spots). (a) This paragraph applies at all times. The FHWA/FTA project must not cause or contribute to any new localized CO, PM10,...

  9. 40 CFR 93.116 - Criteria and procedures: Localized CO, PM10, and PM2.5 violations (hot-spots).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 20 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Criteria and procedures: Localized CO....116 Criteria and procedures: Localized CO, PM10, and PM2.5 violations (hot-spots). (a) This paragraph applies at all times. The FHWA/FTA project must not cause or contribute to any new localized CO, PM10,...

  10. Levels of PM2.5/PM10 and associated metal(loid)s in rural households of Henan Province, China.

    PubMed

    Wu, Fuyong; Wang, Wei; Man, Yu Bon; Chan, Chuen Yu; Liu, Wenxin; Tao, Shu; Wong, Ming Hung

    2015-04-15

    Although a majority of China's rural residents use solid fuels (biomass and coal) for household cooking and heating, clean energy such as electricity and liquid petroleum gas is becoming more popular in the rural area. Unfortunately, both solid fuels and clean energy could result in indoor air pollution. Daily respirable particulate matter (PM≤10 μm) and inhalable particulate matter (PM≤2.5 μm) were investigated in kitchens, sitting rooms and outdoor area in rural Henan during autumn (Sep to Oct 2012) and winter (Jan 2013). The results showed that PM (PM2.5 and PM10) and associated metal(loid)s varied among the two seasons and the four types of domestic energy used. Mean concentrations of PM2.5 and PM10 in kitchens during winter were 59.2-140.4% and 30.5-145.1% higher than those during autumn, respectively. Similar with the trends of PM2.5 and PM10, concentrations of As, Pb, Zn, Cd, Cu, Ni and Mn in household PM2.5 and PM10 were apparently higher in winter than those in autumn. The highest mean concentrations of PM2.5 and PM10 (368.5 and 588.7 μg m(-3)) were recorded in sitting rooms in Baofeng during winter, which were 5.7 and 3.9 times of corresponding health based guidelines for PM2.5 and PM10, respectively. Using coal can result in severe indoor air pollutants including PM and associated metal(loid)s compared with using crop residues, electricity and gas in rural Henan Province. Rural residents' exposure to PM2.5 and PM10 would be roughly reduced by 13.5-22.2% and 8.9-37.7% via replacing coal or crop residues with electricity. The present study suggested that increased use of electricity as domestic energy would effectively improve indoor air quality in rural China.

  11. Estimating daily PM2.5 and PM10 across the complex geo-climate region of Israel using MAIAC satellite-based AOD data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kloog, Itai; Sorek-Hamer, Meytar; Lyapustin, Alexei; Coull, Brent; Wang, Yujie; Just, Allan C.; Schwartz, Joel; Broday, David M.

    2015-12-01

    Estimates of exposure to PM2.5 are often derived from geographic characteristics based on land-use regression or from a limited number of fixed ground monitors. Remote sensing advances have integrated these approaches with satellite-based measures of aerosol optical depth (AOD), which is spatially and temporally resolved, allowing greater coverage for PM2.5 estimations. Israel is situated in a complex geo-climatic region with contrasting geographic and weather patterns, including both dark and bright surfaces within a relatively small area. Our goal was to examine the use of MODIS-based MAIAC data in Israel, and to explore the reliability of predicted PM2.5 and PM10 at a high spatiotemporal resolution. We applied a three stage process, including a daily calibration method based on a mixed effects model, to predict ground PM2.5 and PM10 over Israel. We later constructed daily predictions across Israel for 2003-2013 using spatial and temporal smoothing, to estimate AOD when satellite data were missing. Good model performance was achieved, with out-of-sample cross validation R2 values of 0.79 and 0.72 for PM10 and PM2.5, respectively. Model predictions had little bias, with cross-validated slopes (predicted vs. observed) of 0.99 for both the PM2.5 and PM10 models. To our knowledge, this is the first study that utilizes high resolution 1 km MAIAC AOD retrievals for PM prediction while accounting for geo-climate complexities, such as experienced in Israel. This novel model allowed the reconstruction of long- and short-term spatially resolved exposure to PM2.5 and PM10 in Israel, which could be used in the future for epidemiological studies.

  12. Source apportionment of PM10 and PM(2.5) at Tocopilla, Chile (22 degrees 05' S, 70 degrees 12' W).

    PubMed

    Jorquera, Héctor

    2009-06-01

    Tocopilla is located on the coast of Northern Chile, within an arid region that extends from 30 degrees S to the border with Perú. The major industrial activities are related to the copper mining industry. A measurement campaign was conducted during March and April 2006 to determine ambient PM10 and PM(2.5) concentrations in the city. The results showed significantly higher PM10 concentrations in the southern part of the city (117 microg/m3) compared with 79 and 80 (microg/m3) in the central and northern sites. By contrast, ambient PM2.5 concentrations had a more uniform spatial distribution across the city, around 20 (microg/m3). In order to conduct a source apportionment, daily PM10 and PM(2.5) samples were analyzed for elements by XRF. EPA's Positive Matrix Factorization software was used to interpret the results of the chemical compositions. The major source contributing to PM(2.5) at sites 1, 2 and 3, respectively are: (a) sulfates, with approximately 50% of PM2.5 concentrations at the three sites; (b) fugitive emissions from fertilizer storage and handling, with 16%, 21% and 10%; (c) Coal and residual oil combustion, with 15%, 15% and 4%; (d) Sea salt, 5%, 6% and 16%; (e) Copper ore processing, 4%, 5% and 15%; and (f) a mixed dust source with 11%, 7% and 4%. Results for PM10--at sites 1, 2 and 3, respectively--show that the major contributors are: (a) sea salt source with 36%, 32% and 36% of the PM10 concentration; (b) copper processing emissions mixed with airborne soil dust with 6.6%, 11.5% and 41%; (c) sulfates with 31%, 31% and 12%; (d) a mixed dust source with 16%, 12% and 10%, and (e) the fertilizer stockpile emissions, with 11%, 14% and 2% of the PM10 concentration. The high natural background of PM10 implies that major reductions in anthropogenic emissions of PM10 and SO2 would be required to attain ambient air quality standards for PM10; those reductions would curb down ambient PM(2.5) concentrations as well.

  13. Concentrations and light absorption characteristics of carbonaceous aerosol in PM2.5 and PM10 of Lhasa city, the Tibetan Plateau

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Chaoliu; Chen, Pengfei; Kang, Shichang; Yan, Fangping; Hu, Zhaofu; Qu, Bin; Sillanpää, Mika

    2016-02-01

    Light absorption properties of carbonaceous aerosol strongly influence the Earth's radiative balance, yet the related knowledge is limited for the Tibetan Plateau (TP), the highest and largest plateau in the world. In this study, organic carbon (OC), elemental carbon (EC) and water soluble organic carbon (WSOC) of PM2.5 and PM10 of Lhasa collected from May 2013 to March 2014 were studied. It showed that daily-average concentrations of OC, EC and WSOC of PM2.5 and PM10 were lower than those of other megacities. Lhasa PM2.5 was characterized by low OC/EC ratio (1.46 ± 0.55), which was similar to that of Lhasa roadside PM2.5 (1.25 ± 0.45), reflecting mainly direct influence of primary emissions and less secondary formation. Hence, although Lhasa atmosphere is relatively clean, it is intensively influenced by local vehicle emissions. Mass absorption cross-section of EC (MACEC) for both PM2.5 and PM10 at 632 nm were 7.19 ± 1.19 m2 g-1 and 7.98 ± 2.32 m2 g-1, respectively, both of which had similar variation patterns to OC/EC and secondary OC (SOC)/OC, indicating that the increase of MACEC might be caused by coating with organic aerosol. Additionally, the loading of EC for both PM2.5 and PM10 showed logarithmic relationships with those of optical attenuation (ATN) of EC, implying that the shadowing effect enhanced logarithmic with increased EC concentration. MAC of WSOC at 365 nm for PM2.5 (0.74 ± 0.22 m2 g-1) and PM10 (0.78 ± 0.21 m2 g-1) were also close to reported values of other cities mainly influenced by fossil combustion. Additionally, attenuation at 365 nm of WSOC of both PM2.5 and PM10 showed the same relationship with their WSOC concentrations, implying no difference for light absorption properties of WSOC for these two grain sizes.

  14. Emission and profile characteristic of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons in PM2.5 and PM10 from stationary sources based on dilution sampling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kong, Shaofei; Ji, Yaqin; Li, Zhiyong; Lu, Bing; Bai, Zhipeng

    2013-10-01

    The mass concentrations and profile characteristic for 18 kinds of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) in PM2.5 and PM10 from stack gases for six types of stationary sources in Shandong Province, China were studied by a dilution sampling system and GC-MS analysis method from February to March in 2010. The mass concentrations of PM2.5 and PM10 from the six types of stationary sources varied in 8.2-79.4 mg m-3 and 23.3-156.7 mg m-3, respectively. The total mass concentrations of analyzed PAHs in PM2.5 and PM10 were in the ranges of 0.40-94.35 μg m-3 and 9.16-122.91 μg m-3. The most toxic ashes were from sinter and coke oven for both PM2.5 and PM10 with high carcinogenic PAHs concentrations. BbF, Phe, NaP, BghiP, Pyr, BaP and BeP were abundant which was different from formers and one of the key reasons may be the differences of sampling methods. Diversities in PAHs compositions existed between fly ashes within PM2.5 and PM10 fractions for coke oven according to coefficient of divergence (CD) values. PAHs profiles for PM10 emitted from coke oven were different from those of other stationary sources (with CD values higher than 0.35) and for PM2.5, it was the same for sinter (with most CD values close to 0.30). There existed similar PAHs markers for fine particles emitted from stationary sources excepted for the sinter. For PM10, PAHs markers were primary 3-ring PAHs except for the coke oven with BbF, IND and BghiP as its signatures. Diagnostic ratios of BaA/(BaA + Chr), Flu/(Flu + Pyr), BaP/(BaP + BeP), BeP/BghiP and IND/(IND + BghiP) could be not well distinguished for the six types of stationary sources with the maximum/minimum ratios lower than 2 for both PM2.5 and PM10 of fly ashes which should be not used for source identification studies. The mass concentrations and source profiles of PAHs should be updated timely for size-differentiated fly ashes from various stationary sources by dilution sampling method.

  15. Anthropogenic and natural influence on the PM(10) and PM(2.5) aerosol in Madrid (Spain). Analysis of high concentration episodes.

    PubMed

    Artíñano, Begoña; Salvador, Pedro; Alonso, Diana G; Querol, Xavier; Alastuey, Andrés

    2003-01-01

    Non-mineral carbon is the main component of PM10 and PM2.5 at an urban roadside site in Madrid accounting for more than 50% of the total bulk mass in winter pollution episodes. In these cases a 70-80% of the particle mass is anthropogenic. Particles of crustal/mineral origin contribute significantly to the observed PM10 concentrations, especially in spring and summer. They have also been found in the PM2.5 fraction although secondary particles are the next most important contributor in this size. Long-range transport particle episodes of Saharan dust significantly contribute to exceedence of the new daily limiting PM10 value in the urban network and at nearby rural background stations. This type of long-range transport event also influences PM2.5 concentrations. The crustal contribution can account for up to 67 and 53% of the PM10 and PM2.5 bulk mass in such cases.

  16. 40 CFR 53.34 - Test procedure for methods for PM 10 and Class I methods for PM 2.5.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... AGENCY (CONTINUED) AIR PROGRAMS (CONTINUED) AMBIENT AIR MONITORING REFERENCE AND EQUIVALENT METHODS... for PM 10 methods and for Class I methods for PM 2.5 when the relationship between: (1) Measurements made by a candidate method, and (2) Measurements made by a corresponding reference method...

  17. Temporal variation of nitro-polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons in PM10 and PM2.5 collected in Northern Mexico City.

    PubMed

    Valle-Hernández, B L; Mugica-Alvarez, V; Salinas-Talavera, E; Amador-Muñoz, O; Murillo-Tovar, M A; Villalobos-Pietrini, R; De Vizcaya-Ruíz, A

    2010-10-15

    With the aim to determine the presence of individual nitro-PAH contained in particles in the atmosphere of Mexico City, a monitoring campaign for particulate matter (PM(10) and PM(2.5)) was carried out in Northern Mexico City, from April 2006 to February 2007. The PM(10) annual median concentration was 65.2μgm(-3) associated to 7.6μgm(-3) of solvent-extractable organic matter (SEOM) corresponding to 11.4% of the PM(10) concentration and 38.6μgm(-3) with 5.9μgm(-3) SEOM corresponding to 15.2% for PM(2.5). PM concentration and SEOM varied with the season and the particle size. The quantification of nitro-polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (nitro-PAH) was developed through the standards addition method under two schemes: reference standard with and without matrix, the former giving the best results. The recovery percentages varied with the extraction method within the 52 to 97% range depending on each nitro-PAH. The determination of the latter was effected with and without sample purification, also termed fractioning, giving similar results. 8 nitro-PAH were quantified, and their sum ranged from 111 to 819pgm(-3) for PM(10) and from 58 to 383pgm(-3) for PM(2.5), depending on the season. The greatest concentration was for 9-Nitroanthracene in PM(10) and PM(2.5), detected during the cold-dry season, with a median (10th-90th percentiles) concentration in 235pgm(-3) (66-449pgm(-3)) for PM(10) and 73pgm(-3) (18-117pgm(-3)) for PM(2.5). The correlation among mass concentrations of the nitro-PAH and criteria pollutants was statistically significant for some nitro-PAH with PM(10), SEOM in PM(10), SEOM in PM(2.5), NO(X), NO(2) and CO, suggesting either sources, primary or secondary origin. The measured concentrations of nitro-PAH were higher than those reported in other countries, but lower than those from Chinese cities. Knowledge of nitro-PAH atmospheric concentrations can aid during the surveillance of diseases (cardiovascular and cancer risk) associated with these

  18. Construction of a 5-Mb YAC contig from the putative 10q25 tumor-suppressor region for glioblastomas

    SciTech Connect

    Albarosa, R.; Finocchiaro, G.; Chiariello, E.

    1997-05-01

    During the final step of the malignant progression to glioblastoma multiforme (GBM), the most frequent and malignant of primary brain tumors, more than 90% of the cases exhibit loss of genetic material on chromosome 10. We previously identified a 4-cM deletion interval in the 10q24-qter region that is common to all the GBM we have examined. A contig of 20 YACs spanning the 5 Mb of chromosomal DNA in the region has been assembled. Overlaps between YACs have been verified by STS content, fingerprinting analysis, and/or Alu-Alu PCR. The contig contains 17 known microsatellite markers, 15 new STSs derived from the insert ends of YACs, 9 ESTs, and 11 other STSs, for a total of 52 STSs (average marker density 1/100 kb). The physical map of this region will facilitate the search for a candidate tumor-suppressor gene(s) that is inactivated during the formation of GBM. 20 refs., 2 figs., 2 tabs.

  19. First stage seed-cotton cleaning system PM2.5 emission factors and rates for cotton gins: Method 201A combination PM10 and PM2.5 sizing cyclones

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    This report is part of a project to characterize cotton gin emissions from the standpoint of stack sampling. In 2006, EPA finalized and published a more stringent standard for particulate matter with nominal diameter less than or equal to 2.5 µm (PM2.5). This created an urgent need to collect additi...

  20. Second stage seed-cotton cleaning system PM2.5 emission factors and rates for cotton gins: Method 201A combination PM10 and PM2.5 sizing cyclones

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    This report is part of a project to characterize cotton gin emissions from the standpoint of stack sampling. In 2006, EPA finalized and published a more stringent standard for particulate matter with nominal diameter less than or equal to 2.5 µm (PM2.5). This created an urgent need to collect additi...

  1. Second stage lint cleaning system PM2.5 emission factors and rates for cotton gins: Method 201A combination PM10 and PM2.5 sizing cyclones

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    This report is part of a project to characterize cotton gin emissions from the standpoint of stack sampling. In 2006, EPA finalized a more stringent standard for particulate matter with nominal diameter less than or equal to 2.5 µm (PM2.5). This created an urgent need to collect additional cotton gi...

  2. First stage lint cleaning system PM2.5 emission factors and rates for cotton gins: Method 201A combination PM10 and PM2.5 sizing cyclones

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    This report is part of a project to characterize cotton gin emissions from the standpoint of stack sampling. In 2006, EPA finalized and published a more stringent standard for particulate matter with nominal diameter less than or equal to 2.5 µm (PM2.5). This created an urgent need to collect additi...

  3. Second-stage mote system PM2.5 emission factors and rates for cotton gins: Method 201A combination PM10 and PM2.5 sizing cyclones

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    This report is part of a project to characterize cotton gin emissions from the standpoint of stack sampling. In 2006, the Environmental Protection Agencey (EPA) finalized and published a more stringent standard for particulate matter with nominal diameter less than or equal to 2.5 µm (PM2.5). This c...

  4. Cycling Stability Performance of La0.75Mg0.25Ni3.5Si0.10 Hydrogen Storage Alloy in Discharge-Charge System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Zhaojiang; Huang, Lei; Wan, Qi; Li, Xu; Guang, Ma; Li, Ping

    2014-12-01

    La0.75Mg0.25Ni3.5Si0.10 hydrogen storage alloy was prepared by vacuum induction melting furnace and subsequently heated treatment at 940°C for 8 h and cooled to room temperature in the oven. The electrochemical properties of La0.75Mg0.25Ni3.5Si0.10 compound were measured by LAND CT2001A battery test system. The morphologies of the samples were characterized by scanning electron microscopy (SEM). The surface state of samples was analyzed by X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS). It was found that the charge-discharge rate plays the key impact on the cycling stability of the alloy. During the cycle test, the prepared La0.75Mg0.25Ni3.5Si0.10 compound presented an excellent capacity retention at the charge-discharge of 1 C while the capacity of sample declined rapidly at 0.2 C. The excellent cycling stability performance of La0.75Mg0.25Ni3.5Si0.10 electrode at 1 C could be attributed to the less powder and less oxidation of surface effective active elements. The pulverization inevitably leads to the separation of the part of the cracking alloy and the electrode, resulting in reduction of the effective active substance and increasing attenuation of the capacity per cycle. In addition, on the analysis of the different cut-off potential effects on the electrode, it was found that the La0.75Mg0.25Ni3.5Si0.10 electrode shows good comprehensive electrochemical properties at 1 C cut-off 0.6-0.7 V. During charging, heavy overcharge will not be conducive to cycling stability performance during the charging test.

  5. Assessment of the long-term impacts of PM10 and PM2.5 particles from construction works on surrounding areas.

    PubMed

    Azarmi, Farhad; Kumar, Prashant; Marsh, Daniel; Fuller, Gary

    2016-02-01

    Construction activities are common across cities; however, the studies assessing their contribution to airborne PM10 (≤10 μm) and PM2.5 (≤2.5 μm) particles on the surrounding air quality are limited. Herein, we assessed the impact of PM10 and PM2.5 arising from construction works in and around London. Measurements were carried out at 17 different monitoring stations around three construction sites between January 2002 and December 2013. Tapered element oscillating microbalance (TEOM 1400) and OSIRIS (2315) particle monitors were used to measure the PM10 and PM2.5 fractions in the 0.1-10 μm size range along with the ambient meteorological data. The data was analysed using bivariate concentration polar plots and k-means clustering techniques. Daily mean concentrations of PM10 were found to exceed the European Union target limit value of 50 μg m(-3) at 11 monitoring stations but remained within the allowable 35 exceedences per year, except at two monitoring stations. In general, construction works were found to influence the downwind concentrations of PM10 relatively more than PM2.5. Splitting of the data between working (0800-1800 h; local time) and non-working (1800-0800 h) periods showed about 2.2-fold higher concentrations of PM10 during working hours when compared with non-working hours. However, these observations did not allow to conclude that this increase was from the construction site emissions. Together, the polar concentration plots and the k-means cluster analysis applied to a pair of monitoring stations across the construction sites (i.e. one in upwind and the other in downwind) confirmed the contribution of construction sources on the measured concentrations. Furthermore, pairing the monitoring stations downwind of the construction sites showed a logarithmic decrease (with R(2) about 0.9) in the PM10 and PM2.5 concentration with distance. Our findings clearly indicate an impact of construction activities on the nearby downwind areas and a need

  6. 44 CFR 5.25 - Available materials.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 44 Emergency Management and Assistance 1 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Available materials. 5.25... Agency Information, Rules, Orders, Policies, and Similar Material § 5.25 Available materials. FEMA materials which are available under this subpart are as follows: (a) Final opinions and orders made in...

  7. 44 CFR 5.25 - Available materials.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 44 Emergency Management and Assistance 1 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Available materials. 5.25... Agency Information, Rules, Orders, Policies, and Similar Material § 5.25 Available materials. FEMA materials which are available under this subpart are as follows: (a) Final opinions and orders made in...

  8. 44 CFR 5.25 - Available materials.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 44 Emergency Management and Assistance 1 2012-10-01 2011-10-01 true Available materials. 5.25... Agency Information, Rules, Orders, Policies, and Similar Material § 5.25 Available materials. FEMA materials which are available under this subpart are as follows: (a) Final opinions and orders made in...

  9. 44 CFR 5.25 - Available materials.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 44 Emergency Management and Assistance 1 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Available materials. 5.25... Agency Information, Rules, Orders, Policies, and Similar Material § 5.25 Available materials. FEMA materials which are available under this subpart are as follows: (a) Final opinions and orders made in...

  10. 44 CFR 5.25 - Available materials.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 44 Emergency Management and Assistance 1 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Available materials. 5.25... Agency Information, Rules, Orders, Policies, and Similar Material § 5.25 Available materials. FEMA materials which are available under this subpart are as follows: (a) Final opinions and orders made in...

  11. Receptor modeling of PM2.5, PM10 and TSP in different seasons and long-range transport analysis at a coastal site of Tianjin, China.

    PubMed

    Kong, Shaofei; Han, Bin; Bai, Zhipeng; Chen, Li; Shi, Jianwu; Xu, Zhun

    2010-09-15

    Atmospheric particulate matter (PM(2.5), PM(10) and TSP) were sampled synchronously during three monitoring campaigns from June 2007 to February 2008 at a coastal site in TEDA of Tianjin, China. Chemical compositions including 19 elements, 6 water-solubility ions, organic and elemental carbon were determined. principle components analysis (PCA) and chemical mass balance modeling (CMB) were applied to determine the PM sources and their contributions with the assistance of NSS SO(4)(2)(-), the mass ratios of NO(3)(-) to SO(4)(2)(-) and OC to EC. Air mass backward trajectory model was compared with source apportionment results to evaluate the origin of PM. Results showed that NSS SO(4)(2)(-) values for PM(2.5) were 2147.38, 1701.26 and 239.80 ng/m(3) in summer, autumn and winter, reflecting the influence of sources from local emissions. Most of it was below zero in summer for PM(10) indicating the influence of sea salt. The ratios of NO(3)(-) to SO(4)(2)(-) was 0.19 for PM(2.5), 0.18 for PM(10) and 0.19 for TSP in winter indicating high amounts of coal consumed for heating purpose. Higher OC/EC values (mostly larger than 2.5) demonstrated that secondary organic aerosol was abundant at this site. The major sources were construction activities, road dust, vehicle emissions, marine aerosol, metal manufacturing, secondary sulfate aerosols, soil dust, biomass burning, some pharmaceutics industries and fuel-oil combustion according to PCA. Coal combustion, marine aerosol, vehicular emission and soil dust explained 5-31%, 1-13%, 13-44% and 3-46% for PM(2.5), PM(10) and TSP, respectively. Backward trajectory analysis showed air parcels originating from sea accounted for 39% in summer, while in autumn and winter the air parcels were mainly related to continental origin.

  12. The Exposure Uncertainty Analysis: The Association between Birth Weight and Trimester Specific Exposure to Particulate Matter (PM2.5 vs. PM10)

    PubMed Central

    Kumar, Naresh

    2016-01-01

    Often spatiotemporal resolution/scale of environmental and health data do not align. Therefore, researchers compute exposure by interpolation or by aggregating data to coarse spatiotemporal scales. The latter is often preferred because of sparse geographic coverage of environmental monitoring, as interpolation method cannot reliably compute exposure using the small sample of sparse data points. This paper presents a methodology of diagnosing the levels of uncertainty in exposure at a given distance and time interval, and examines the effects of particulate matter (PM) ≤2.5 µm and ≤10 µm in diameter (PM2.5 and PM10, respectively) on birth weight (BW) and low birth weight (LBW), i.e., birth weight <2500 g in Chicago (IL, USA), accounting for exposure uncertainty. Two important findings emerge from this paper. First, uncertainty in PM exposure increases significantly with the increase in distance from the monitoring stations, e.g., 50.6% and 38.5% uncertainty in PM10 and PM2.5 exposure respectively for 0.058° (~6.4 km) distance from the monitoring stations. Second, BW was inversely associated with PM2.5 exposure, and PM2.5 exposure during the first trimester and entire gestation period showed a stronger association with BW than the exposure during the second and third trimesters. But PM10 did not show any significant association with BW and LBW. These findings suggest that distance and time intervals need to be chosen with care to compute exposure, and account for the uncertainty to reliably assess the adverse health risks of exposure. PMID:27649214

  13. 10 Yr Spatial and Temporal Trends of PM2.5 Concentrations in the Southeastern US Estimated Using High-resolution Satellite Data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hu, X.; Waller, L. A.; Lyapustin, A.; Wang, Y.; Liu, Y.

    2013-01-01

    Long-term PM2.5 exposure has been reported to be associated with various adverse health outcomes. However, most ground monitors are located in urban areas, leading to a potentially biased representation of the true regional PM2.5 levels. To facilitate epidemiological studies, accurate estimates of spatiotemporally continuous distribution of PM2.5 concentrations are essential. Satellite-retrieved aerosol optical depth (AOD) has been widely used for PM2.5 concentration estimation due to its comprehensive spatial coverage. Nevertheless, an inherent disadvantage of current AOD products is their coarse spatial resolutions. For instance, the spatial resolutions of the Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) and the Multiangle Imaging SpectroRadiometer (MISR) are 10 km and 17.6 km, respectively. In this paper, a new AOD product with 1 km spatial resolution retrieved by the multi-angle implementation of atmospheric correction (MAIAC) algorithm was used. A two-stage model was developed to account for both spatial and temporal variability in the PM2.5-AOD relationship by incorporating the MAIAC AOD, meteorological fields, and land use variables as predictors. Our study area is in the southeastern US, centered at the Atlanta Metro area, and data from 2001 to 2010 were collected from various sources. The model was fitted for each year individually, and we obtained model fitting R2 ranging from 0.71 to 0.85, MPE from 1.73 to 2.50 g m3, and RMSPE from 2.75 to 4.10 g m3. In addition, we found cross validation R2 ranging from 0.62 to 0.78, MPE from 2.00 to 3.01 g m3, and RMSPE from 3.12 to 5.00 g m3, indicating a good agreement between the estimated and observed values. Spatial trends show that high PM2.5 levels occurred in urban areas and along major highways, while low concentrations appeared in rural or mountainous areas. A time series analysis was conducted to examine temporal trends of PM2.5 concentrations in the study area from 2001 to 2010. The results showed

  14. Comparative PM10-PM2.5 source contribution study at rural, urban and industrial sites during PM episodes in Eastern Spain.

    PubMed

    Rodríguez, Sergio; Querol, Xavier; Alastuey, Andrés; Viana, María-Mar; Alarcón, Marta; Mantilla, Enrique; Ruiz, C R

    2004-07-26

    In this study a set of 340 PM10 and PM2.5 samples collected throughout 16 months at rural, an urban kerbside and an industrial background site (affected by the emissions from the ceramic manufacture and other activities) were interpreted. On the regional scale, the main PM10 sources were mineral dust (mainly Al2O3, Fe, Ti, Sr, CaCO3, Mg, Mn and K), emissions derived from power generation (SO4=, V, Zn and Ni), vehicle exhausts (organic and elemental carbon, NO3- and trace elements) and marine aerosol (Na, Cl and Mg). The latter was not identified in PM2.5. At the industrial site, additional PM10 sources were identified (tile covering in the ceramic production, petrochemical emissions and bio-mass burning from a large orange tree cultivation area). The contribution of each PM source to PM10 and PM2.5 levels experiences significant variations depending on the type of PM episode (Local-urban mainly in autumn-winter, regional mainly in summer, African or Atlantic episode), which are discussed in this study. The results show that it would be very difficult to meet the EU limit values for PM10 established for 2010. The annual mean PM levels are 22.0 microg PM10/m3 at the rural and 49.5 microg PM10/m3 and 33.9 microg PM2.5/m3 at the urban site. The natural contribution in this region, estimated at 6 microg/m3 of natural mineral dust (resulting from the African events and natural resuspension) and 2 microg/m3 of marine aerosol, accounts for 40% of the 2010 EU annual limit value (20 microg PM10/m3). Mineral dust concentrations at the urban and industrial sites are higher than those at the rural site because of the urban road dust and the ceramic-production contributions, respectively. At the urban site, the vehicle exhaust contribution (17 microg/m3) alone is very close to the 2010 EU PM10 limit value. At the rural site, the African dust is the main contributor to PM10 levels during the highest daily mean PM10 events (100th-97th percentile range). At the urban site, the

  15. Characterization of PAHs and metals in indoor/outdoor PM10/PM2.5/PM1 in a retirement home and a school dormitory.

    PubMed

    Hassanvand, Mohammad Sadegh; Naddafi, Kazem; Faridi, Sasan; Nabizadeh, Ramin; Sowlat, Mohammad Hossein; Momeniha, Fatemeh; Gholampour, Akbar; Arhami, Mohammad; Kashani, Homa; Zare, Ahad; Niazi, Sadegh; Rastkari, Noushin; Nazmara, Shahrokh; Ghani, Maryam; Yunesian, Masud

    2015-09-15

    In the present work, we investigated the characteristics of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) and metal(loid)s in indoor/outdoor PM10, PM2.5, and PM1 in a retirement home and a school dormitory in Tehran from May 2012 to May 2013. The results indicated that the annual levels of indoor and outdoor PM10 and PM2.5 were much higher than the guidelines issued by the World Health Organization (WHO). The most abundant detected metal(loid)s in PM were Si, Fe, Zn, Al, and Pb. We found higher percentages of metal(loid)s in smaller size fractions of PM. Additionally, the results showed that the total PAHs (ƩPAHs) bound to PM were predominantly (83-88%) found in PM2.5, which can penetrate deep into the alveolar regions of the lungs. In general, carcinogenic PAHs accounted for 40-47% of the total PAHs concentrations; furthermore, the smaller the particle size, the higher the percentage of carcinogenic PAHs. The percentages of trace metal(loid)s and carcinogenic PAHs in PM2.5 mass were almost twice as high as those in PM10. This can most likely be responsible for the fact that PM2.5 can cause more adverse health effects than PM10 can. The average BaP-equivalent carcinogenic (BaP-TEQ) levels both indoors and outdoors considerably exceeded the maximum permissible risk level of 1 ng/m(3) of BaP. The enrichment factors and diagnostic ratios indicated that combustion-related anthropogenic sources, such as gasoline- and diesel-fueled vehicles as well as natural gas combustion, were the major sources of PAHs and trace metal(loid)s bound to PM.

  16. Combined optical parametric oscillator with continuous tuning of radiation wavelength in the spectral range 2.510.8 μm

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kolker, D. B.; Sherstov, I. V.; Kostyukova, N. Yu.; Boyko, A. A.; Zenov, K. G.; Pustovalova, R. V.

    2017-02-01

    A combined optical parametric oscillator (OPO) with continuous tuning of the radiation wavelength in the spectral range 2.510.8 μm, optically pumped with the radiation from a Q-switched Nd : YLF laser (1.053 μm), is developed and tested. The oscillation is provided by an OPO1 based on a MgO : PPLN ‘fan-out’ structure in the spectral region 2.5–4.5 μm and by an OPO2 based on HgGa2S4 nonlinear crystals in the spectral region 4.18–10.8 μm, respectively. The angles of phase matching are measured for the HgGa2S4 crystals in the spectral range 4.18–10.8 μm for the type II conversion (eo-e), which virtually coincide with the calculated ones. The experimental absorption spectra of a gas mixture in the range 2.510.8 μm obtained using a gas-filled sealed-off photoacoustic cell are presented.

  17. Developing Street-Level PM2.5 and PM10 Land Use Regression Models in High-Density Hong Kong with Urban Morphological Factors.

    PubMed

    Shi, Yuan; Lau, Kevin Ka-Lun; Ng, Edward

    2016-08-02

    Monitoring street-level particulates is essential to air quality management but challenging in high-density Hong Kong due to limitations in local monitoring network and the complexities of street environment. By employing vehicle-based mobile measurements, land use regression (LUR) models were developed to estimate the spatial variation of PM2.5 and PM10 in the downtown area of Hong Kong. Sampling runs were conducted along routes measuring a total of 30 km during a selected measurement period of total 14 days. In total, 321 independent variables were examined to develop LUR models by using stepwise regression with PM2.5 and PM10 as dependent variables. Approximately, 10% increases in the model adjusted R(2) were achieved by integrating urban/building morphology as independent variables into the LUR models. Resultant LUR models show that the most decisive factors on street-level air quality in Hong Kong are frontal area index, an urban/building morphological parameter, and road network line density and traffic volume, two parameters of road traffic. The adjusted R(2) of the final LUR models of PM2.5 and PM10 are 0.633 and 0.707, respectively. These results indicate that urban morphology is more decisive to the street-level air quality in high-density cities than other cities. Air pollution hotspots were also identified based on the LUR mapping.

  18. Estimation of the direct and indirect impacts of fireworks on the physicochemical characteristics of atmospheric PM10 and PM2.5

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tian, Y. Z.; Wang, J.; Peng, X.; Shi, G. L.; Feng, Y. C.

    2014-09-01

    To quantify the total, direct and indirect impacts of fireworks individually, size-resolved PM samples were collected before, during and after a Chinese folk festival (Chinese New Year) in a megacity in China. Through chemical analysis and morphological characterisation, a strong influence of fireworks on the physicochemical characteristics of PM10 and PM2.5 was observed. The concentrations of many species exhibited an increasing trend during the heavy-firework period, especially for K+, Mg2+ and Cr; the results of the non-sea-salt ions demonstrated an anthropogenic influence on K+ and Mg2+. Then, source apportionment was conducted by receptor models and peak analysis (PA). The total influence of the fireworks was quantified by positive matrix factorisation (PMF), showing that the fireworks contributed higher fractions (23.40% for PM10 and 29.66% for PM2.5) during the heavy-firework period than during the light-firework period (4.28% for PM10 and 7.18% for PM2.5). The profiles of the total fireworks obtained by two independent methods (PMF and peak analysis) were consistent, with higher abundances of K+, Al, Si, Ca and organic carbon (OC). Finally, the individual contributions of the direct and indirect impacts of fireworks were quantified by chemical mass balance (CMB). The percentage contributions of resuspended dust, biomass combustion and direct fireworks were 36.8 ± 8.37%, 14.1 ± 2.82% and 44.4 ± 8.26%, respectively, for PM10 and 34.9 ± 4.19%, 16.6 ± 3.05% and 52.5 ± 9.69%, respectively, for PM2.5, in terms of the total fireworks. The quantification of the total, direct and indirect impacts of fireworks in the ambient PM gives a original contribution for understanding the physicochemical characteristics and mechanisms of such high-intensity anthropogenic activities.

  19. Water soluble aerosols and gases at a UK background site - Part 1: Controls of PM2.5 and PM10 aerosol composition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Twigg, M. M.; Di Marco, C. F.; Leeson, S.; van Dijk, N.; Jones, M. R.; Leith, I. D.; Morrison, E.; Coyle, M.; Proost, R.; Peeters, A. N. M.; Lemon, E.; Frelink, T.; Braban, C. F.; Nemitz, E.; Cape, J. N.

    2015-07-01

    There is limited availability of long-term, high temporal resolution, chemically speciated aerosol measurements which can provide further insight into the health and environmental impacts of particulate matter. The Monitor for AeRosols and Gases (MARGA, Applikon B.V., NL) allows for the characterisation of the inorganic components of PM10 and PM2.5 (NH4+, NO3-, SO42-, Cl-, Na+, K+, Ca2+, Mg2+) and inorganic reactive gases (NH3, SO2, HCl, HONO and HNO3) at hourly resolution. The following study presents 6.5 years (June 2006 to December 2012) of quasi-continuous observations of PM2.5 and PM10 using the MARGA at the UK EMEP supersite, Auchencorth Moss, SE Scotland. Auchencorth Moss was found to be representative of a remote European site with average total water soluble inorganic mass of PM2.5 of 3.82 μg m-3. Anthropogenically derived secondary inorganic aerosols (sum of NH4+, NO3- and nss-SO42-) were the dominating species (63 %) of PM2.5. In terms of equivalent concentrations, NH4+ provided the single largest contribution to PM2.5 fraction in all seasons. Sea salt was the main component (73 %) of the PMcoarse fraction (PM10-PM2.5), though NO3- was also found to make a relatively large contribution to the measured mass (17 %) providing evidence of considerable processing of sea salt in the coarse mode. There was on occasions evidence of aerosol from combustion events being transported to the site in 2012 as high K+ concentrations (deviating from the known ratio in sea salt) coincided with increases in black carbon at the site. Pollution events in PM10 (defined as concentrations > 12 μg m-3) were on average dominated by NH4+ and NO3-, where smaller loadings at the site tended to be dominated by sea salt. As with other western European sites, the charge balance of the inorganic components resolved were biased towards cations, suggesting the aerosol was basic or more likely that organic acids contributed to the charge balance. This study demonstrates the UK

  20. Water soluble aerosols and gases at a UK background site - Part 1: Controls of PM2.5 and PM10 aerosol composition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Twigg, M. M.; Di Marco, C. F.; Leeson, S.; van Dijk, N.; Jones, M. R.; Leith, I. D.; Morrison, E.; Coyle, M.; Proost, R.; Peeters, A. N. M.; Lemon, E.; Frelink, T.; Braban, C. F.; Nemitz, E.; Cape, J. N.

    2015-02-01

    There is limited availability of long-term, high temporal resolution, chemically speciated aerosol measurements, which can lead to further insight into the health and environmental impacts of particulate matter. The Monitor for AeRosols and Gases (MARGA, Applikon B.V., NL) allows characterisation of the inorganic components of PM10 and PM2.5 (NH4+, NO3-, SO42-, Cl-, Na+, K+, Ca2+, Mg2+) and inorganic reactive gases (NH3, SO2, HCl, HONO and HNO3) at hourly resolution. The following study presents 6.5 years (June 2006 to December 2012) of quasi-continuous observations of PM2.5 and PM10 using the MARGA at the UK EMEP "Supersite", Auchencorth Moss, SE Scotland. Auchencorth Moss was found to be representative of a remote European site with average total water soluble inorganic mass of PM2.5 of 3.82 μg m-3. Anthropogenically derived secondary inorganic aerosols (sum of NH4+, NO3- and nss-SO42-), were the dominating species (63%) of PM2.5. In terms of equivalent concentrations, NH4+ provided the single largest contribution to PM2.5 fraction in all seasons. Sea salt, was the main component (73%) of the PMcoarse fraction (PM10-PM2.5), though NO3- was also found to make a relatively large contribution to the measured mass (17%) as providing evidence of considerable processing of sea salt in the coarse mode. There was on occasions evidence of aerosol from combustion events being transported to the site in 2012 as high K+ concentrations (deviating from the known ratio in sea salt) coincided with increases in black carbon at the site. Pollution events in PM10 (defined as concentrations > 12 μg m-3) were on average dominated by NH4+ and NO3-, where as smaller loadings at the site tended to be dominated by sea salt. As with other Western European sites, the charge balance of the inorganic components resolved were biased towards cations, suggesting the aerosol was basic or more likely, that organic acids contributed to the charge

  1. PM10 and PM2.5 and health risk assessment for heavy metals in a typical factory for cathode ray tube television recycling.

    PubMed

    Fang, Wenxiong; Yang, Yichen; Xu, Zhenming

    2013-01-01

    The representative waste television recycling process was chosen as the object of this study, including manual dismantling and mechanical separation of printed circuit boards (PCBs) and cathode ray tubes (CRTs) in two independent workshops. During these recycling processes, fine particulate matter and heavy metals will be released into the air to impact the environment and the health of the workers. The mass concentrations of PM2.5 (particles below 2.5 μm diameter) in mechanical and dismantling workshops ranged from 252.6 to 290.8 μg/m(3) and from 112.7 to 169.4 μg/m(3), respectively. The average concentration of PM2.5 around the workshop was 98.5 μg/m(3). Meanwhile, the contents of PM10 (particles below 10 μm diameter) were all below the risk threshold, except that (360.4 μg/m(3)) monitored in the mechanical workshop. In two workshops, Pb (20.46 and 6.935 mg/g) was the most enriched metal in the PM2.5 samples, while in PM10, the concentration of Cu (27.76 and 31.80 mg/g) was the largest. The concentration of Cd was the least in both PM10 and PM2.5. Health risk assessment showed that the total hazard indexes for non-carcinogenic metal in PM2.5 monitored in mechanical and dismantling workshops and in the southeast of the workshops were 7.61, 3.01, and 1.57, respectively, all above the safety level. Furthermore, Pb (7.28 and 3.01) might possibly have a non-carcinogenic effect on the workers in two workshops, and the sequence of the hazard quotient (HQ) through the three exposure ways was ingestion > dermal contact > inhalation. The lifetime cancer risk of four targeted metals was Cr > Ni > Pb > Cd, which could be proven in all monitoring samples. This study aims to provide a large amount of valid data for the State Environmental Protection Department to develop relevant environmental standards and for companies to improve the waste television recycling system to be more efficiently and environmentally friendly.

  2. Water soluble inorganic species of PM10 and PM2.5 at an urban site of Delhi, India: Seasonal variability and sources

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saxena, Mohit; Sharma, A.; Sen, A.; Saxena, Priyanka; Saraswati; Mandal, T. K.; Sharma, S. K.; Sharma, C.

    2017-02-01

    Comprehensive data of 2 years (2013-2014) of water soluble inorganic species (WSIS) in the particulate matter (PM10: mean: 233.0 ± 124.6 μg m- 3 and PM2.5: mean: 108.0 ± 86.5 μg m- 3) have been used to study seasonal effect on the variation of total WSIS concentration, composition variability of inorganic aerosols and extent to which secondary formation of sulfate and nitrate aerosol occurred from their precursor gases. Mean concentrations of total WSIS in PM10 and PM2.5 were 82.12 ± 72.15 μg m- 3 and 54.03 ± 49.22 μg m- 3, respectively during the study period. Concentrations of total WSIS (PM10: 140.11 ± 90.67 μg m- 3; PM2.5: 74.41 ± 47.55 μg m- 3) during winter season was recorded higher than summer, monsoon and spring seasons. Significant correlation (p < 0.01) between NH4+ and Cl-, SO42 -, NO3- in PM10 and PM2.5, respectively indicates NH4+ as the major cation species for the neutralization of acidic components in the winter season. On the contrary, in summer season Ca2 +, Mg2 +, Na+ and K+ were the alkaline species responsible for the neutralization of acidic components in the PM10 samples. Principal Component Analysis (PCA) showed that secondary aerosol, biomass burning and soil driven dust were the possible sources that explained 70% of the total variance. Cluster analysis and Concentration Weighted Trajectory (CWT) analysis for different season depicts the advection of air masses over the continental landmasses of Afghanistan (summer season), northwestern region of Pakistan (summer and winter season), marine region (monsoon season) and adjoining states of Delhi. These air masses from different regions could be the cause of an increase in PM10 and PM2.5 aerosol over the study site.

  3. PM10 and PM2.5 chemical source profiles with optical attenuation and health risk indicators of paved and unpaved road dust in Bhopal, India.

    PubMed

    Samiksha, Shilpi; Sunder Raman, Ramya; Nirmalkar, Jayant; Kumar, Samresh; Sirvaiya, Rohit

    2017-03-01

    Size classified (PM10 and PM2.5) paved and unpaved road dust chemical source profiles, optical attenuation and potential health risk from exposure to these sources are reported in this study. A total of 45 samples from 9 paved road and 6 unpaved road sites located in and around Bhopal were re-suspended in the laboratory, collected onto filter substrates and subjected to a variety of chemical analyses. In general, road dust was enriched (compared to upper continental crustal abundance) in anthropogenic pollutants including Sb, Cu, Zn, Co, and Pb. Organic and elemental carbon (OC/EC) in PM10 and PM2.5 size fractions were 50-75% higher in paved road dust compared to their counterparts in unpaved road dust. Further, the results suggest that when it is not possible to include carbon fractions in source profiles, the inclusion of optical attenuation is likely to enhance the source resolution of receptor models. Additionally, profiles obtained in this study were not very similar to the US EPA SPECIATE composite profiles for PM10 and PM2.5, for both sources. Specifically, the mass fractions of Si, Fe, OC, and EC were most different between SPECIATE composite profiles and Bhopal composite profiles. An estimate of health indicators for Bhopal road dust revealed that although Cr was only marginally enriched, its inhalation may pose a health risk. The estimates of potential lifetime incremental cancer risk induced by the inhalation of Cr in paved and unpaved road dust (PM10 and PM2.5) for both adults and children were higher than the baseline values of acceptable risk. These results suggest that road dust Cr induced carcinogenic risk should be further investigated.

  4. Phthalate esters (PAEs) in indoor PM10/PM2.5 and human exposure to PAEs via inhalation of indoor air in Tianjin, China

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Leibo; Wang, Fumei; Ji, Yaqin; Jiao, Jiao; Zou, Dekun; Liu, Lingling; Shan, Chunyan; Bai, Zhipeng; Sun, Zengrong

    2014-03-01

    In this study, filter samples of six Phthalate esters (PAEs) in indoor PM10 and PM2.5 were collected from thirteen homes in Tianjin, China. The results showed that the concentrations of Σ6PAEs in indoor PM10 and PM2.5 were in the range of 13.878-1591.277 ng m-3 and 7.266-1244.178 ng m-3, respectively. Dibutyl phthalate (DBP) was the most abundant compounds followed by di-2-ethylhexyl phthalate (DEHP) in indoor PM10 and PM2.5. Whereas DBP and dimethyl phthalate (DMP) were the predominant compounds in indoor air (gas-phase + particle-phase), the median values were 573.467 and 368.364 ng m-3 respectively. The earlier construction time, the lesser indoor area, the old decoration, the very crowded items coated with plastic and a lower frequency of dusting may lead to a higher level of PAEs in indoor environment. The six PAEs in indoor PM10 and PM2.5 were higher in summer than those in winter. The daily intake (DI) of six PAEs for five age groups through air inhalation in indoor air in Tianjin was estimated. The results indicated that the highest exposure dose was DBP in every age group, and infants experienced the highest total DIs (median: 664.332 ng kg-bw-1 day-1) to ∑6PAEs, whereas adults experienced the lowest total DIs (median: 155.850 ng kg-bw-1 day-1) to ∑6PAEs. So, more attention should be paid on infants in the aspect of indoor inhalation exposure to PAEs.

  5. Spatial and temporal variation of phthalic acid esters (PAEs) in atmospheric PM10 and PM2.5 and the influence of ambient temperature in Tianjin, China

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kong, Shaofei; Ji, Yaqin; Liu, Lingling; Chen, Li; Zhao, Xueyan; Wang, Jiajun; Bai, Zhipeng; Sun, Zengrong

    2013-08-01

    Phthalic acid esters (PAEs) are produced in large amounts throughout the world and are excessively used in various industries, which have posed a serious threat to human health and the environment. An investigation of six major PAEs congeners in atmospheric PM10 and PM2.5 was synchronously conducted at seven sites belonging to different functional zones in spring, summer and winter in Tianjin, China in 2010. Results showed that the average concentrations of DMP, DEP, DBP, BBP, DEHP and DOP in PM10 were 0.88, 0.73, 12.90, 0.15, 98.29 and 0.83 ng m-3, respectively, and in PM2.5, they were 0.54, 0.30, 8.72, 0.08, 75.68 and 0.33 ng m-3, respectively. DEHP and DBP were the predominant species. The industrial site exhibited highest PAEs values as 135.9 ± 202.8 ng m-3. In winter, the detected percentages for DOP were low. The other five PAEs concentrations were higher in winter than those in spring and summer, which may be related to the influence of emission sources, meteorological parameters and the chemical-physical characteristic of themselves. Except for DOP, other PAEs were negatively correlated with ambient temperature and the relationships were the best fitted as exponential forms. Significant positive correlations were found for PAEs in PM2.5 and PM10, indicating common sources. The PM2.5/PM10 ratios (0.53-0.70) for the six PAEs concentrations suggested that they were preferentially concentrated in finer particles. Principal component analysis indicated the emission from cosmetics and personal care products, plasticizers and sewage and industrial wastewater may be important sources for PAEs in atmospheric particulate matter in Tianjin.

  6. EVALUATION OF THE SMPS-APS SYSTEM AS A CONTINUOUS MONITOR FOR MEASURING PM2.5, PM10 AND COARSE (PM2.5-10) CONCENTRATIONS. (R827352C011)

    EPA Science Inventory

    Respirable particulate matter (PM) has been linked to mortality and morbidity by a variety of epidemiological studies. This research has led to the creation of a new PM standard for particles with diameters <2.5 μm (PM2.5). Since the conclusion of these studie...

  7. 46 CFR 188.10-25 - Explosive.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 7 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Explosive. 188.10-25 Section 188.10-25 Shipping COAST... Definition of Terms Used in This Subchapter § 188.10-25 Explosive. This term means a chemical compound or... release of gas and heat. Explosives are discussed in more detail in 49 CFR parts 171-179....

  8. 46 CFR 188.10-25 - Explosive.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 7 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Explosive. 188.10-25 Section 188.10-25 Shipping COAST... Definition of Terms Used in This Subchapter § 188.10-25 Explosive. This term means a chemical compound or... release of gas and heat. Explosives are discussed in more detail in 49 CFR parts 171-179....

  9. 46 CFR 188.10-25 - Explosive.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 7 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Explosive. 188.10-25 Section 188.10-25 Shipping COAST... Definition of Terms Used in This Subchapter § 188.10-25 Explosive. This term means a chemical compound or... release of gas and heat. Explosives are discussed in more detail in 49 CFR parts 171-179....

  10. 46 CFR 188.10-25 - Explosive.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 7 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Explosive. 188.10-25 Section 188.10-25 Shipping COAST... Definition of Terms Used in This Subchapter § 188.10-25 Explosive. This term means a chemical compound or... release of gas and heat. Explosives are discussed in more detail in 49 CFR parts 171-179....

  11. 46 CFR 188.10-25 - Explosive.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 7 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Explosive. 188.10-25 Section 188.10-25 Shipping COAST... Definition of Terms Used in This Subchapter § 188.10-25 Explosive. This term means a chemical compound or... release of gas and heat. Explosives are discussed in more detail in 49 CFR parts 171-179....

  12. 46 CFR 90.10-25 - Ocean.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 4 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Ocean. 90.10-25 Section 90.10-25 Shipping COAST GUARD... Terms Used in This Subchapter § 90.10-25 Ocean. Under this designation shall be included all vessels navigating the waters of any ocean or the Gulf of Mexico more than 20 nautical miles offshore....

  13. 46 CFR 90.10-25 - Ocean.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 4 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Ocean. 90.10-25 Section 90.10-25 Shipping COAST GUARD... Terms Used in This Subchapter § 90.10-25 Ocean. Under this designation shall be included all vessels navigating the waters of any ocean or the Gulf of Mexico more than 20 nautical miles offshore....

  14. 46 CFR 90.10-25 - Ocean.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 4 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Ocean. 90.10-25 Section 90.10-25 Shipping COAST GUARD... Terms Used in This Subchapter § 90.10-25 Ocean. Under this designation shall be included all vessels navigating the waters of any ocean or the Gulf of Mexico more than 20 nautical miles offshore....

  15. 46 CFR 194.10-25 - Ventilation.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... CONTROL OF EXPLOSIVES AND OTHER HAZARDOUS MATERIALS Magazines § 194.10-25 Ventilation. (a) Integral magazines. (1) All integral magazines shall be provided with natural or mechanical ventilation. Design... 46 Shipping 7 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Ventilation. 194.10-25 Section 194.10-25 Shipping...

  16. 46 CFR 194.10-25 - Ventilation.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... CONTROL OF EXPLOSIVES AND OTHER HAZARDOUS MATERIALS Magazines § 194.10-25 Ventilation. (a) Integral magazines. (1) All integral magazines shall be provided with natural or mechanical ventilation. Design... 46 Shipping 7 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Ventilation. 194.10-25 Section 194.10-25 Shipping...

  17. 46 CFR 194.10-25 - Ventilation.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... CONTROL OF EXPLOSIVES AND OTHER HAZARDOUS MATERIALS Magazines § 194.10-25 Ventilation. (a) Integral magazines. (1) All integral magazines shall be provided with natural or mechanical ventilation. Design... 46 Shipping 7 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Ventilation. 194.10-25 Section 194.10-25 Shipping...

  18. 46 CFR 194.10-25 - Ventilation.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... CONTROL OF EXPLOSIVES AND OTHER HAZARDOUS MATERIALS Magazines § 194.10-25 Ventilation. (a) Integral magazines. (1) All integral magazines shall be provided with natural or mechanical ventilation. Design... 46 Shipping 7 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Ventilation. 194.10-25 Section 194.10-25 Shipping...

  19. 46 CFR 90.10-25 - Ocean.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 4 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Ocean. 90.10-25 Section 90.10-25 Shipping COAST GUARD... Terms Used in This Subchapter § 90.10-25 Ocean. Under this designation shall be included all vessels navigating the waters of any ocean or the Gulf of Mexico more than 20 nautical miles offshore....

  20. 46 CFR 90.10-25 - Ocean.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 4 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Ocean. 90.10-25 Section 90.10-25 Shipping COAST GUARD... Terms Used in This Subchapter § 90.10-25 Ocean. Under this designation shall be included all vessels navigating the waters of any ocean or the Gulf of Mexico more than 20 nautical miles offshore....

  1. Developmental Exposure to 1.0 or 2.5 mg/kg of Dibutyltin Dichloride Does Not Impair Immune Function in Sprague-Dawley Rats.

    PubMed

    DeWitt, Jamie C; Copeland, Carey B; Luebke, Robert W

    2006-12-01

    Organotins are used commercially as pesticides, antifouling agents, and stabilizers for polyvinyl chloride (PVC) pipe. Mono-and di-substituted butyltins, used in PVC pipe production, are of concern to the United States EPA, they leach from supply pipes into drinking water and are reported multisystem toxicants. We assessed immune function in Sprague-Dawley rats after developmental dibutyltin dichloride (DBTC) exposure. Pregnant rats were given drinking water containing 0, 10, or 25 mg/L of DBTC (final concentration) in 0.5% Alkamuls from gestational Day (GD) 6 through weaning of pups (37 days total). Approximate doses to dams: 1 and 2.5 mg DBTC/kg body weight (BW) during gestation, or 2.0 and 4.4 mg DBTC/kg BW while nursing. Litters were sexed, weighed, and culled to 4 males and 4 females per dam on postnatal Day (PND) 2. Beginning on PND3, litters of half of the dams per dose were gavaged with 0, 1.0, or 2.5 mg DBTC/kg BW 3X/week for 10 doses (maternal + direct treatment); remaining litters were exposed indirectly via lactation (maternal treatment). BW of litters exposed to 2.5 mg DBTC/kg BW was 10-20% lower (p < or = 0.05) relative to other groups from PND14 (males) or PND17 (females) through PND37. Delayed-type hypersensitivity (DTH), antibody synthesis, and natural killer (NK) cell activity were evaluated in immunologically mature offspring (N = 6/sex/group). DTH responses and antibody synthesis did not differ by dose, sex, or exposure. NK cell activity in the 10 mg DBTC/L maternal only group was greater in male offspring than in female. In female offspring from the maternal + direct group, cytotoxicity increased by dose at the 25:1 effector:target cell ratio. Our data suggest that developmental immunotoxicity from DBTC-tainted drinking water is unlikely as the concentrations we used were several orders of magnitude higher than concentrations expected to leach from PVC pipes.

  2. The effect of outdoor air and indoor human activity on mass concentrations of PM(10), PM(2.5), and PM(1) in a classroom.

    PubMed

    Branis, Martin; Rezácová, Pavla; Domasová, Markéta

    2005-10-01

    The 12-h mass concentration of PM(10), PM(2.5), and PM(1) was measured in a lecturing room by means of three co-located Harvard impactors. The filters were changed at 8 AM and at 8 PM to cover the periods of presence and absence of students. Concentrations were assessed by gravimetry. Ambient PM(10) data were available for corresponding 12-h intervals from the nearest state air-quality-monitoring network station. The data were pooled into four periods according to the presence and absence of students-Monday-Thursday day (workday daytime), Monday-Thursday night (workday night), Friday-Sunday day (weekend daytime), and Friday-Sunday night (weekend night). Average indoor workday daytime concentrations were 42.3, 21.9 and 13.7 microgm(-3), workday night were 20.9, 19.1 and 15.2 microgm(-3), weekend daytime were 21.9, 18.1 and 11.4 microgm(-3), and weekend night were 24.5, 21.3, and 15.6 microgm(-3) for PM(10), PM(2.5), and PM(1), respectively. The highest 12-h mean, median, and maximum (42.3, 43.0, and 76.2 microgm(-3), respectively) indoor concentrations were recorded on workdays during the daytime for PM(10). The statistically significant (r=0.68,P<0.0009) correlation between the number of students per hour per day and the indoor coarse fraction calculated as PM(10--2.5) during daytime on workdays indicates that the presence of people is an important source of coarse particles indoor. On workdays, the daytime PM(10) indoor/outdoor ratio was positively associated (r=0.93) with an increasing indoor coarse fraction (PM(10--2.5)), also indicating that an important portion of indoor PM(10) had its source inside the classroom. With the exception of the calculated coarse fraction (PM(10--2.5)), all of the measured indoor particulate matter fractions were significantly highly correlated with outdoor PM(10) and negatively correlated with wind velocity, showing that outdoor levels of particles influence their indoor concentrations.

  3. Water soluble organic carbon in aerosols (PM1, PM2.5, PM10) and various precipitation forms (rain, snow, mixed) over the southern Baltic Sea station.

    PubMed

    Witkowska, Agnieszka; Lewandowska, Anita U

    2016-12-15

    In the urbanized coastal zone of the Southern Baltic, complex measurements of water soluble organic carbon (WSOC) were conducted between 2012 and 2015, involving atmospheric precipitation in its various forms (rain, snow, mixed) and PM1, PM2.5 and PM10 aerosols. WSOC constituted about 60% of the organic carbon mass in aerosols of various sizes. The average concentration of WSOC was equal to 2.6μg∙m(-3) in PM1, 3.6μg∙m(-3) in PM2.5 and 4.4μg∙m(-3) in PM10. The lowest concentration of WSOC was noted in summer as a result of effective removal of this compound with rainfall. The highest WSOC concentrations in PM2.5 and PM10 aerosols were measured in spring, which should be associated with developing vegetation on land and in the sea. On the other hand, the highest WSOC concentrations in PM1 occurred in winter at low air temperatures and greatest atmospheric stability, when there were increased carbon emissions from fuel combustion in the communal-utility sector and from transportation. WSOC concentrations in precipitation were determined by its form. Mixed precipitation turned out to be the richest in soluble organic carbon (5.1mg·dm(-3)), while snow contained the least WSOC (1.7mg·dm(-3)). Snow and rain cleaned carbon compounds from the atmosphere more effectively when precipitation lasted longer than 24h, while in the case of mixed precipitation WSOC was removed most effectively within the first 24h.

  4. Source apportionment to PM10 and PM2.5 at multiple sites in the Bay of Gibraltar (S Spain) by PMF: estimate of shipping emission

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pandolfi, M.; Gonzalez-Castanedo, Y.; Alastuey, A.; Pey, J.; Querol, X.; de La Rosa, J. D.

    2009-04-01

    The recognized adverse health effect of the PM10 and PM2.5 particles leads to an increasing demand of a more efficient control of pollutant emissions especially in industrial and/or urban sites. The degree with which the control of the emissions can be accomplished depends on the identification of the pollutant sources and the estimation of their contribution. The chemical speciation of ambient PM coupled with receptor modelling can be considered as a powerful tool to estimate origin of the sources and their contribution to the PM10 and PM2.5 fractions. This work aims to evaluate the effect on air quality of the anthropogenic activities performed in one of the most important industrial estates of Southern Spain located in the Bay of Gibraltar. The area under study is characterized by the presence of metallurgy industries and oil refineries around which four urban agglomerates are located, namely: Los Barrios (36°11'7.39"N, 5°29'33.89"O), La Linea (36° 9'40.24"N, 5°20'53.72"O), Algeciras (36°7'47.21"N, 5°26'51.71"O) y Puente Mayorga (36°10'54.60"N, 5°23'8.32"O). Traffic is consequently another important source of pollutants in the considered area together with an intense shipping activity. The estimation of the pollutant sources and their contribution was obtained by applying the Positive Matrix Factorization (PMF) model to the PM10 and PM2.5 levels and chemical speciation data simultaneously obtained in the four urban agglomerates during a period of 4 years (March 2003 - December 2007). Given the small size of the area under study, the PM data collected in all the four stations was simultaneously introduced within the PMF model. This procedure allowed the PMF to use a higher number of data rather than using the 4 database separately, thus improving the performances of the model. Following this procedure a total of 567 and 341 samples for the PM10 and PM2.5 fractions respectively were introduced within the PMF. Moreover, before running the model, a detailed

  5. Study of PM10 and PM2.5 levels in three European cities: Analysis of intra and inter urban variations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kassomenos, P. A.; Vardoulakis, S.; Chaloulakou, A.; Paschalidou, A. K.; Grivas, G.; Borge, R.; Lumbreras, J.

    2014-04-01

    In the present paper, 1-year PM10 and PM2.5 data from roadside and urban background monitoring stations in Athens (Greece), Madrid (Spain) and London (UK) are analysed in relation to other air pollutants (NO, NO2, NOx, CO, O3 and SO2) and several meteorological parameters (wind velocity, temperature, relative humidity, precipitation, solar radiation and atmospheric pressure), in order to investigate the sources and factors affecting particulate pollution in large European cities. Principal component and regression analyses are therefore used to quantify the contribution of both combustion and non-combustion sources to the PM10 and PM2.5 levels observed. The analysis reveals that the EU legislated PM10 and PM2.5 limit values are frequently breached, forming a potential public health hazard in the areas studied. The seasonal variability patterns of particulates varies among cities and sites, with Athens and Madrid presenting higher PM10 concentrations during the warm period and suggesting the larger relative contribution of secondary and natural particles during hot and dry days. It is estimated that the contribution of non-combustion sources varies substantially among cities, sites and seasons and ranges between 38-67% and 40-62% in London, 26-50% and 20-62% in Athens, and 31-58% and 33-68% in Madrid, for both PM10 and PM2.5. Higher contributions from non-combustion sources are found at urban background sites in all three cities, whereas in the traffic sites the seasonal differences are smaller. In addition, the non-combustion fraction of both particle metrics is higher during the warm season at all sites. On the whole, the analysis provides evidence of the substantial impact of non-combustion sources on local air quality in all three cities. While vehicular exhaust emissions carry a large part of the risk posed on human health by particle exposure, it is most likely that mitigation measures designed for their reduction will have a major effect only at traffic sites

  6. 10 CFR 10.25 - NRC Hearing Counsel.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 1 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false NRC Hearing Counsel. 10.25 Section 10.25 Energy NUCLEAR... NATIONAL SECURITY INFORMATION OR AN EMPLOYMENT CLEARANCE Procedures § 10.25 NRC Hearing Counsel. (a) Hearing Counsel assigned pursuant to § 10.24 will, before the scheduling of the hearing, review...

  7. 10 CFR 10.25 - NRC Hearing Counsel.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 1 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false NRC Hearing Counsel. 10.25 Section 10.25 Energy NUCLEAR... NATIONAL SECURITY INFORMATION OR AN EMPLOYMENT CLEARANCE Procedures § 10.25 NRC Hearing Counsel. (a) Hearing Counsel assigned pursuant to § 10.24 will, before the scheduling of the hearing, review...

  8. 10 CFR 10.25 - NRC Hearing Counsel.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 1 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false NRC Hearing Counsel. 10.25 Section 10.25 Energy NUCLEAR... NATIONAL SECURITY INFORMATION OR AN EMPLOYMENT CLEARANCE Procedures § 10.25 NRC Hearing Counsel. (a) Hearing Counsel assigned pursuant to § 10.24 will, before the scheduling of the hearing, review...

  9. 10 CFR 10.25 - NRC Hearing Counsel.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 1 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false NRC Hearing Counsel. 10.25 Section 10.25 Energy NUCLEAR... NATIONAL SECURITY INFORMATION OR AN EMPLOYMENT CLEARANCE Procedures § 10.25 NRC Hearing Counsel. (a) Hearing Counsel assigned pursuant to § 10.24 will, before the scheduling of the hearing, review...

  10. 10 CFR 10.25 - NRC Hearing Counsel.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false NRC Hearing Counsel. 10.25 Section 10.25 Energy NUCLEAR... NATIONAL SECURITY INFORMATION OR AN EMPLOYMENT CLEARANCE Procedures § 10.25 NRC Hearing Counsel. (a) Hearing Counsel assigned pursuant to § 10.24 will, before the scheduling of the hearing, review...

  11. Stochastic univariate and multivariate time series analysis of PM2.5 and PM10 air pollution: A comparative case study for Plovdiv and Asenovgrad, Bulgaria

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gocheva-Ilieva, S.; Stoimenova, M.; Ivanov, A.; Voynikova, D.; Iliev, I.

    2016-10-01

    Fine particulate matter PM2.5 and PM10 air pollutants are a serious problem in many urban areas affecting both the health of the population and the environment as a whole. The availability of large data arrays for the levels of these pollutants makes it possible to perform statistical analysis, to obtain relevant information, and to find patterns within the data. Research in this field is particularly topical for a number of Bulgarian cities, European country, where in recent years regulatory air pollution health limits are constantly being exceeded. This paper examines average daily data for air pollution with PM2.5 and PM10, collected by 3 monitoring stations in the cities of Plovdiv and Asenovgrad between 2011 and 2016. The goal is to find and analyze actual relationships in data time series, to build adequate mathematical models, and to develop short-term forecasts. Modeling is carried out by stochastic univariate and multivariate time series analysis, based on Box-Jenkins methodology. The best models are selected following initial transformation of the data and using a set of standard and robust statistical criteria. The Mathematica and SPSS software were used to perform calculations. This examination showed measured concentrations of PM2.5 and PM10 in the region of Plovdiv and Asenovgrad regularly exceed permissible European and national health and safety thresholds. We obtained adequate stochastic models with high statistical fit with the data and good quality forecasting when compared against actual measurements. The mathematical approach applied provides an independent alternative to standard official monitoring and control means for air pollution in urban areas.

  12. Magnetic and transport properties of iron-platinum arsenide Ca10(Pt4-δAs8)(Fe2-xPtxAs2)5 single crystal

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ding, Qing-Ping; Tsuchiya, Yuji; Mohan, Shyam; Taen, Toshihiro; Nakajima, Yasuyuki; Tamegai, Tsuyoshi

    2012-03-01

    We report superconducting properties of single crystalline Ca10(Pt4-δAs8)(Fe2-xPtxAs2)5 by x-ray diffraction, magnetization, resistivity, and magneto-optical imaging measurements. The magnetization measurements reveal a fish-tail hysteresis loop and relatively high critical current density Jc ˜ 0.8 × 105 A/cm2 at low temperatures. The exponential temperature dependence of Jc, which arises from the nonlinear effective flux-creep activation energy, has been observed. The upper critical field determined by resistive transition shows a relatively large anisotropy. The magneto-optical images reveal a homogenous current flow within the crystal.

  13. Correlating bioaerosol load with PM2.5 and PM10cf concentrations: a comparison between natural desert and urban-fringe aerosols

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boreson, Justin; Dillner, Ann M.; Peccia, Jordan

    2004-11-01

    Seasonal allergies and microbial mediated respiratory diseases, can coincide with elevated particulate matter concentrations, often when dry desert soils are disturbed. In addition to effects from the allergens, allergic and asthmatic responses may be enhanced when chemical and biological constituents of particulate matter (PM) are combined together. Because of these associations and also the recent regulatory and health-related interests of monitoring PM2.5, separately from total PM10, the biological loading between the fine (dp<2.5 μm) and coarse (2.5 μm10 μm) size ranges of PM was studied. To investigate spatial and seasonal differences of biological loading within PM, 24-h fine and coarse PM fractions were collected at a natural desert area and an urban fringe site located in the expanding Phoenix, Arizona metropolitan area during winter, spring, and summer seasons. Elemental carbon and inorganic ions were measured to determine the relative influence that anthropogenic sources, such as traffic, had on the aerosol composition. Total protein concentration was used as a surrogate measure of total biological concentration within the PM2.5 and PM10cf (coarse fraction) size ranges. In all seasons, coarse protein at the urban fringe was consistently higher than the natural desert. When high-anthropogenic PM events were separated from the data set, a positive significant correlation (p<0.05) was found between protein and coarse PM fraction, but not in the fine fraction. An 18S rDNA clone library was developed from PM10 aerosol samples to characterize the type and phylogenetic diversity of airborne eukaryotic (non-bacterial) microorganisms existing in ambient PM for the urban fringe and natural desert. Both sites contained allergenic organisms. Some groups of eukaryotic species were exclusive to only one of the sites. The natural desert contained more species of Basidiomycota fungi and the urban fringe contained more species of green plants, suggesting that the

  14. Superconductivity in Ca10(Ir4As8)(Fe2As2)5 with Square-Planar Coordination of Iridium

    PubMed Central

    Kudo, Kazutaka; Mitsuoka, Daisuke; Takasuga, Masaya; Sugiyama, Yuki; Sugawara, Kento; Katayama, Naoyuki; Sawa, Hiroshi; Kubo, Hiroaki S.; Takamori, Kenta; Ichioka, Masanori; Fujii, Tatsuo; Mizokawa, Takashi; Nohara, Minoru

    2013-01-01

    We report the unprecedented square-planar coordination of iridium in the iron iridium arsenide Ca10(Ir4As8)(Fe2As2)5. This material experiences superconductivity at 16 K. X-ray photoemission spectroscopy and first-principles band calculation suggest Ir(II) oxidation state, which yields electrically conductive Ir4As8 layers. Such metallic spacer layers are thought to enhance the interlayer coupling of Fe2As2, in which superconductivity emerges, thus offering a way to control the superconducting transition temperature. PMID:24173038

  15. Elemental characterization of PM2.5 and PM10 emitted from light duty vehicles in the Washburn Tunnel of Houston, Texas: release of rhodium, palladium, and platinum.

    PubMed

    Bozlaker, Ayşe; Spada, Nicholas J; Fraser, Matthew P; Chellam, Shankararaman

    2014-01-01

    We report the elemental composition, including Rh, Pd, and Pt, of total (i.e., tailpipe and nontailpipe) PM2.5 and PM10 emissions from predominantly gasoline-driven light-duty vehicles (LDVs) traversing the Washburn Tunnel in Houston, Texas during November and December, 2012. Using a novel sample preparation and dynamic reaction cell-quadrupole-inductively coupled plasma-mass spectrometry technique, we quantify the emission of numerous representative, transition, and lanthanoid elements. Two sets of time integrated PM samples were collected over 3-4week duration both inside the tunnel as well as from the tunnel ventilation air supply to derive accurate LDV source profiles incorporating three platinum group elements (PGEs) for the first time. Average Rh, Pd, and Pt concentrations from the tunnel ventilation air supply were 1.5, 11.1, and 4.5pgm(-3) in PM2.5 and 3.8, 23.1, and 15.1pgm(-3) in PM10, respectively. Rh, Pd, and Pt levels were elevated inside the Washburn Tunnel reaching 12.5, 91.1, and 30.1pgm(-3) in PM2.5 and 36.3, 214, and 61.1pgm(-3) in PM10, respectively. Significantly higher enrichment factors of Cu, Zr, Rh, Pd, Sb, and Pt (referenced to Ti in the upper continental crust) inside the tunnel compared with the ventilation air supply suggested that they are unique elemental tracers of PM derived from gasoline-driven LDVs. This highlights the importance of advancing methods to quantify the trace level PGE emissions as a technique to more accurately estimate LDVs' contributions to airborne PM. Using the emission profile based on PGEs and ambient quantification, mass balancing revealed that approximately half the fine PM mass in the tunnel could be attributed to tailpipe emissions, approximately one-quarter to road dust, with smaller contributions from brake (7%) and tire (3%) wear. On the other hand, PM10 mostly originated from resuspended road dust (∼50%), with progressively lower contributions from tailpipe emissions (14%), brake wear (9%), and tire

  16. Characteristics of water-soluble inorganic ions in PM2.5 and PM 2.5-10 in the coastal urban agglomeration along the Western Taiwan Strait Region, China.

    PubMed

    Yin, Liqian; Niu, Zhenchuan; Chen, Xiaoqiu; Chen, Jinsheng; Zhang, Fuwang; Xu, Lingling

    2014-04-01

    PM2.5 and PM2.5-10 aerosol samples were collected in four seasons during November 2010, January, April, and August 2011 at 13 urban/suburban sites and one background site in Western Taiwan Straits Region (WTSR), which is the coastal area with rapid urbanization, high population density, and deteriorating air quality. The 10 days average PM2.5 concentrations were 92.92, 51.96, 74.48, and 89.69 μg/m(3) in spring, summer, autumn, and winter, respectively, exceeding the Chinese ambient air quality standard for annual average value of PM2.5 (grade II, 35 μg/m(3)). Temporal distribution of water-soluble inorganic ions (WSIIs) in PM2.5 was coincident with PM2.5 mass concentrations, showing highest in spring, lowest in summer, and middle in autumn and winter. WSIIs took considerable proportion (42.2 ∼ 50.1 %) in PM2.5 and PM2.5-10. Generally, urban/suburban sites had obviously suffered severer pollution of fine particles compared with the background site. The WSIIs concentrations and characteristics were closely related to the local anthropogenic activities and natural environment, urban sites in cities with higher urbanization level, or sites with weaker diffuse condition suffered severer WSIIs pollution. Fossil fuel combustion, traffic emissions, crustal/soil dust, municipal constructions, and sea salt and biomass burnings were the major potential sources of WSIIs in PM2.5 in WTSR according to the result of principal component analysis.

  17. Variability of aerosols and chemical composition of PM10, PM2.5 and PM1 on a platform of the Prague underground metro

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cusack, M.; Talbot, N.; Ondráček, J.; Minguillón, M. C.; Martins, V.; Klouda, K.; Schwarz, J.; Ždímal, V.

    2015-10-01

    Measurements of PM10, PM2.5 and PM1 and particle number concentration and size distribution were measured for 24 h on a platform of the Prague underground metro in October 2013. The three PM fractions were analysed for major and minor elements, secondary inorganic aerosols (SIA) and total carbon (TC). Measurements were performed both when the metro was inoperative and closed to the public (referred to as background), and when the metro was in operation and open to passengers. PM concentrations were elevated during both periods, but were substantially increased in the coarse fraction during hours when the metro was in operation. Average PM concentrations were 214.8, 93.9 and 44.8 μg m-3 for PM10, PM2.5 and PM1, respectively (determined gravimetrically). Average particle number concentrations were 8.5 × 103 cm-3 for background hours and 11.5 × 103 cm-3 during operational hours. Particle number concentrations were found to not vary as significantly as PM concentrations throughout the day. Variations in PM were strongly governed by passing trains, with highest concentrations recorded during rush hour. When trains were less frequent, PM concentrations were shown to fluctuate in unison with the entrance and exit of trains (as shown by wind velocity measured on the platform). PM was found to be highly enriched with iron, especially in the coarse fraction, comprising 46% of PM10 (98.9 μg m-3). This reduces to 6.7 μg m-3 during background hours, proving that the trains themselves were the main source of iron, most probably from wheel-rail mechanical abrasion. Other enriched elements relative to background hours included Ba, Cu, Mn, Cr, Mo, Ni and Co, among others. Many of these elements exhibited a similar size distribution, further indicating their sources were common and were attributed to train operations.

  18. Efficacy of a combination of imidacloprid 10%/moxidectin 2.5% spot-on (Advocate® for dogs) in the prevention of canine spirocercosis (Spirocerca lupi).

    PubMed

    Le Sueur, Christophe; Bour, Sophie; Schaper, Roland

    2010-11-01

    The nematode Spirocerca lupi is a major canine parasite in warm regions of the world, classically causing parasitic nodules in the esophagus, aortic aneurysms, and spondylitis. This study evaluated the preventive efficacy of monthly treatment with imidacloprid 10%/moxidectin 2.5% spot-on (Advocate® for dogs) administered over a period of 9 months in young dogs naturally exposed to S. lupi on Réunion island. One hundred and twelve puppies, aged from 2.0 to 4.0 months and with a negative spirocerca fecal examination at inclusion, completed the study. They were randomly allocated to two groups. Group A puppies (n=58) received nine spot-on treatments with Advocate® at the minimum dose of 2.5 mg moxidectin/kg bw at monthly intervals. Control group B puppies (n=54) received no treatment for S. lupi. During the study, regular clinical and fecal examinations were performed, as was final upper gastrointestinal endoscopy. Endoscopy showed that 19 dogs from group B had spirocerca nodules, corresponding to a prevalence of 35.2% in dogs aged 12 to 14 months. In contrast, only one dog from group A had a nodule, corresponding to a preventive efficacy of 94.7% (p<0.0001). None of the 378 fecal examinations were positive for spirocerca. This study confirms a high prevalence of canine spirocercosis on Réunion and shows that infestation occurs in very young puppies. Furthermore, it demonstrates that monthly spot-on administration of a combination of imidacloprid 10%/moxidectin 2.5% (Advocate® for dogs) in puppies starting at the age of 2 to 4 months achieves effective and safe prevention of canine spirocercosis.

  19. Safety and efficacy of 10% imidacloprid+2.5% moxidectin for the treatment of Dirofilaria immitis circulating microfilariae in experimentally infected dogs.

    PubMed

    McCall, John W; Arther, Robert; Davis, Wendell; Settje, Terry

    2014-11-15

    A controlled laboratory study was conducted to establish the safety and efficacy of 10% imidacloprid+2.5% moxidectin topical solution (Advantage Multi® for Dogs, Bayer HealthCare, Shawnee, KS) for the treatment of circulating Dirofilaria immitis microfilariae in dogs. Twenty beagles were experimentally infected with D. immitis via surgical implantation of 10 pairs of adult worms (Pepper strain, TRS Labs) from donor dogs on Day -82. Between Days -7 and -1, physical examinations were performed, chest radiographs were taken, and blood and urine samples were collected for microfilariae counts, serum chemistry, complete blood counts, and urinalysis. Each dog was required to have a mean pretreatment count of at least 300 mf/ml of blood. On Day -1, all 20 dogs were randomized by mean pretreatment microfilarial counts to two study groups (10 animals/group). Animals in Group 1 were treated on Days 0 and 28 with 10% imidacloprid+2.5% moxidectin topical solution at the minimum label dose of 0.1 ml/kg. Group 2 animals served as negative controls and were treated on Days 0 and 28 with mineral oil at an equivalent volume as for the study solution. All dogs were observed hourly for 8h after treatment, again at 12h, and then once daily on all other study days. Blood samples for microfilarial counts were collected daily for 3 days after treatment and then weekly for 6 weeks. The percentage reduction in microfilariae was determined by comparing the geometric mean number of circulating microfilariae remaining in Group 1 dogs with the mean counts remaining in control dogs. Group 1 mean microfilarial counts were reduced 93.1% three days following the first treatment and by >99% on Days 14 through 42. Group 1 had significantly fewer (p<0.05) microfilariae compared with Group 2 counts on Days 28 and 42. In addition, log-transformed geometric mean microfilarial counts were significantly different between the two groups (p<0.05) using separate repeated measures analysis of covariance for

  20. Clinical evaluation of the safety and efficacy of 10% imidacloprid + 2.5% moxidectin topical solution for the treatment of ear mite (Otodectes cynotis) infestations in dogs.

    PubMed

    Arther, R G; Davis, W L; Jacobsen, J A; Lewis, V A; Settje, T L

    2015-05-30

    A clinical field investigation was conducted to evaluate the safety and efficacy of 10% imidacloprid/2.5% moxidectin for the treatment of ear mites (Otodectes cynotis) in dogs. The study was a multi-centered, blinded, positive controlled, randomized clinical trial conducted under field conditions with privately owned pets. A total of 17 veterinary clinics enrolled cases for the study. An otoscopic examination was performed to confirm the presence of O. cynotis residing in the ear of the dog prior to enrollment. A single-dog household was enrolled in the study if the dog had 5 or more ear mites and an acceptable physical examination. A multi-dog household was eligible if at least one dog in the household had 5 or more mites and all dogs in the household had acceptable physical exams and met the inclusion criteria. Qualified households were randomly assigned to treatments to receive either 10% imidacloprid+2.5% moxidectin topical solution or topical selamectin solution (positive control product) according to a pre-designated enrollment ratio of 2:1, respectively. If more than one dog in a multiple dog household had adequate numbers of ear mites, one dog was randomly selected to represent the household for efficacy evaluation prior to treatment. Treatments were administered twice per label and dose banding directions for each product approximately 28 days apart (Days 0 and 28), by the dog's owner at the study site. All dogs in a household were treated on the same day and with the same product. The owners completed a post-treatment observation form one day after each treatment. Post-treatment otoscopic examinations were performed by the investigators or attending veterinarian on Days 28 and 56. Physical examinations were performed on Days 0 and 56. One hundred and four (104) households were evaluated for efficacy on SD 28, and 102 households were evaluated for efficacy on SD 56. The dogs' ages ranged from 2 months to 16 years. A total of 247 dogs were evaluated for

  1. Main components and human health risks assessment of PM10, PM2.5, and PM1 in two areas influenced by cement plants

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sánchez-Soberón, Francisco; Rovira, Joaquim; Mari, Montse; Sierra, Jordi; Nadal, Martí; Domingo, José L.; Schuhmacher, Marta

    2015-11-01

    Particulate matter (PM) is widely recorded as a source of diseases, being more harmful those particles with smaller size. PM is released to the environment as a consequence of different activities, being one of them cement production. The objective of this pilot study was to characterize PM of different sizes around cement facilities to have a preliminary approach of their origin, and evaluate their potential health risks. For that purpose, three fractions of PM (10, 2.5, and 1) were collected in the nearby area of two cement plants with different backgrounds (urban and rural) in different seasons. Subsequently, main components, outdoor and indoor concentrations, exposure, and human health risks were assessed. Greatest levels of PM1, organic matter, and metals were found in urban location, especially in winter. Consequently, environmental exposure and human health risks registered their highest values in the urban plant during wintertime. Exposure was higher for indoor activities, expressing some metals their peak values in the PM1 fraction. Non-carcinogenic risks were below the safety threshold (HQ < 1). Carcinogenic risks for most of the metals were below the limit of 10-5, except for Cr (VI), which exceeded it in both locations, but being in the range considered as assumable (10-6-10-4).

  2. Risk assessment of heavy metals in road and soil dusts within PM2.5, PM10 and PM100 fractions in Dongying city, Shandong Province, China.

    PubMed

    Kong, Shaofei; Lu, Bing; Ji, Yaqin; Zhao, Xueyan; Bai, Zhipeng; Xu, Yonghai; Liu, Yong; Jiang, Hua

    2012-03-01

    15 road and 14 soil dust samples were collected from an oilfield city, Dongying, from 11/2009-4/2010 and analyzed by inductively coupled plasma-mass spectroscopy (ICP-MS) for V, Cr, Mn, Co, Ni, Cu, Zn, As, Cd and Pb within PM(2.5), PM(10) and PM(100) fractions synchronously. Metal concentrations, sources and human health risk were studied. Results showed that both soil and road dust exhibited higher values for Mn and Zn and lower values for Co and Cd for the three fractions. Mass concentration ratios of PM(2.5)/PM(10) and PM(10)/PM(100) for metals in road and soil dust indicate that most of the heavy metals tend to concentrate in fine particles. Geoaccumulation index and enrichment factors analysis showed that Cu, Zn and Cd exhibited moderate or heavy contamination and significant enrichment, indicating the influence of anthropogenic sources. Vanadium, Cr, Mn and Co were mostly not enriched and were mainly influenced by crustal sources. For Ni, As and Pb, they ranged from not enriched to moderately enriched and were influenced by both crustal materials and anthropogenic sources. The conclusions were confirmed by multivariate analysis methods. Principle component analysis revealed that the major sources were vehicle emission, industrial activities, coal combustion, agricultural activities and crustal materials. The risk assessment results indicated that metal ingestion appeared to be the main exposure route followed by dermal contact. The most likely cause for cancer and other health risks are both the fine particles of soil and road dusts.

  3. Characterizing metal(loid) solubility in airborne PM10, PM2.5 and PM1 in Frankfurt, Germany using simulated lung fluids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wiseman, Clare L. S.; Zereini, Fathi

    2014-06-01

    The purpose of this study is to assess the solubility of traffic-related metal(loid)s associated with airborne PM of human health concern, employing a physiologically-based extraction test with simulated lung fluids (artificial lysosomal fluid (ALF) and Gamble's solution). Airborne PM (PM10, PM2.5 and PM1) samples were collected in Frankfurt am Main, Germany, using a high volume sampler. Following extraction of the soluble metal(loid) fractions, sample filters were digested with a high pressure asher. Metal(loid) concentrations (As, Ce, Co, Cr, Cu, Mn, Ni, Pb, Sb, Ti and V) were determined in extracts and digests per ICP-Q-MS. All metal(loid)s occurred at detectable concentrations in the three airborne PM fractions. Copper was the most abundant element in mass terms, with mean concentrations of 105 and 53 ng/m3 in PM10 and PM2.5, respectively. Many of the metal(loid)s were observed to be soluble in simulated lung fluids, with Cu, As, V and Sb demonstrating the highest overall mobility in airborne PM. For instance, all four elements associated with PM10 had a solubility of >80% in ALF (24 h). Clearly, solubility is strongly pH dependent, as reflected by the higher relative mobility of samples extracted with the acidic ALF. Given their demonstrated solubility, this study provides indirect evidence that a number of toxic metal(loid)s are likely to possess an enhanced pulmonary toxic potential upon their inhalation. The co-presence of many toxic elements of concern in airborne PM suggests an assessment of health risk must consider the possible interactive impacts of multi-element exposures.

  4. Efficacy of moxidectin 2.5% and imidacloprid 10% in the treatment of ocular thelaziosis by Thelazia callipaeda in naturally infected dogs.

    PubMed

    Otranto, Domenico; Colella, Vito; Crescenzo, Giuseppe; Solari Basano, Fabrizio; Nazzari, Roberto; Capelli, Gioia; Petry, Gabriele; Schaper, Roland; Pollmeier, Matthias; Mallia, Egidio; Dantas-Torres, Filipe; Lia, Riccardo Paolo

    2016-08-30

    Thelazia callipaeda (Spirurida, Thelaziidae) has been documented as agent of ocular infection in domestic animals (dogs and cats), wildlife (e.g., foxes, hares, rabbits), and humans. In the last two decades, this parasitosis has been increasingly reported in several European countries. Both adult and larval stages of the eyeworm are responsible for symptoms ranging from mild (e.g., lacrimation, ocular discharge, epiphora) to severe (e.g., conjunctivitis, keratitis, and corneal opacity or ulcers). The present study evaluated the clinical efficacy and safety of imidacloprid 10% and moxidectin 2.5% spot on (Advocate(®), Bayer Animal Health) in comparison to milbemycin oxime/praziquantel tablets (Milbemax(®), Novartis-Animal Health), as positive control, in the treatment of canine thelaziosis in naturally infected dogs and, a third group was used as an untreated control. Forty-seven dogs (27 females and 20 males) harbouring at least one live adult worm of T. callipaeda in one eye were enrolled from an endemic area of southern Italy. Each dog was then weighed and assigned in accordance with a random treatment allocation plan to one of the treatment groups (G1: imidacloprid 10% and moxidectin 2.5% spot on, G2: Untreated control and G3: milbemycin oxime/praziquantel tablets). On Day (D) 7, 14, 28 and 35 dogs were physically examined and the infection level was assessed by examination of both eyes, including conjunctival pouch and third eyelid for live adult T. callipaeda count and clinical scores. Dogs in G1 were treated on D0 and D28, whereas those in G3 on D0 and D7. Efficacy in G1 was 100% at each day post treatment (p<0.01). For the G3 group efficacy was 57.39% on D7 (p<0.05), 92.79% on D14 and 100% on D28 and D35 (p<0.01). The application of the spot on formulation moxidectin 2.5% and imidacloprid 10% was highly effective in the treatment of canine thelaziosis caused by T. callipaeda. Advocate(®) spot on can be recommended for the control of T. callipaeda

  5. Syllabic (∼2-5 Hz) and fluctuation (∼1-10 Hz) ranges in speech and auditory processing.

    PubMed

    Edwards, Erik; Chang, Edward F

    2013-11-01

    Given recent interest in syllabic rates (∼2-5 Hz) for speech processing, we review the perception of "fluctuation" range (∼1-10 Hz) modulations during listening to speech and technical auditory stimuli (AM and FM tones and noises, and ripple sounds). We find evidence that the temporal modulation transfer function (TMTF) of human auditory perception is not simply low-pass in nature, but rather exhibits a peak in sensitivity in the syllabic range (∼2-5 Hz). We also address human and animal neurophysiological evidence, and argue that this bandpass tuning arises at the thalamocortical level and is more associated with non-primary regions than primary regions of cortex. The bandpass rather than low-pass TMTF has implications for modeling auditory central physiology and speech processing: this implicates temporal contrast rather than simple temporal integration, with contrast enhancement for dynamic stimuli in the fluctuation range. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled "Communication Sounds and the Brain: New Directions and Perspectives".

  6. Analysis of space shuttle orbiter entry dynamics from Mach 10 to Mach 2.5 with the November 1976 flight control system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Powell, R. W.; Stone, H. W.

    1980-01-01

    A six-degree-of-freedom simulation analysis was performed for the space shuttle orbiter entry from Mach 10 to Mach 2.5 with realistic off-nominal conditions using the flight control system referred to as the November 1976 Integrated Digital Autopilot. The off-nominal conditions included: (1) aerodynamic uncertainties in extrapolating from wind tunnel of flight characteristics, (2) error in deriving angle of attack from onboard instrumentation, (3) failure of two of the four reaction control-system thrusters on each side (design specification), and (4) lateral center-of-gravity offset. Many combinations of these off-nominal conditions resulted in a loss of the orbiter. Control-system modifications were identified to prevent this possibility.

  7. 40 CFR Figure C-4 to Subpart C of... - Illustration of the Minimum Limits for Correlation Coefficient for PM 2.5 and PM 10-2,5 Class II...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 6 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Illustration of the Minimum Limits for Correlation Coefficient for PM 2.5 and PM 10-2,5 Class II and III Methods C Figure C-4 to Subpart C of Part 53... Methods and Reference Methods Pt. 53, Subpt. C, Fig. C-4 Figure C-4 to Subpart C of Part...

  8. 40 CFR Figure C-4 to Subpart C of... - Illustration of the Minimum Limits for Correlation Coefficient for PM 2.5 and PM 10-2.5 Class II...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 6 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Illustration of the Minimum Limits for Correlation Coefficient for PM 2.5 and PM 10-2.5 Class II and III Methods C Figure C-4 to Subpart C of Part 53... Methods and Reference Methods Pt. 53, Subpt. C, Fig. C-4 Figure C-4 to Subpart C of Part...

  9. The use of total susceptibility in the analysis of long term PM10 (PM2.5) collected at Hungarian air quality monitoring stations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Márton, Emö; Domján, Ádám; Lautner, Péter; Szentmarjay, Tibor; Uram, János

    2013-04-01

    Air monitoring stations in Hungary are operated by Environmental, Nature Conservancy and Water Pollution Inspectorates, according to the CEN/TC 264 European Union standards. PM10 samples are collected on a 24-hour basis, for two weeks in February, in May, in August and in November. About 720m3 air is pumped through quartz filters daily. Mass measurements and toxic metal analysis (As, Pb, Cd, Ni) are made on each filter (Whatmann DHA-80 PAH, 150 mm diameter) by the inspectorates. We have carried out low field magnetic susceptibility measurements using a KLY-2 instrument on all PM10 samples collected at 9 stations from 2009 on (a total of more than 2000 filters). One station, located far from direct sources, monitors background pollution. Here PM2.5 was also collected in two-week runs, seven times during the period of 2009-2012 and made available for the non-destructive magnetic susceptibility measurements. Due to the rather weak magnetic signal, the susceptibility of each PM-10 sample was computed from 10, that of each PM2.5 sample from 20 measurements. Corrections were made for the susceptibility of the sample holder, for the unpolluted filter (provided with each of the two-week runs), and for the plastic bag containing the samples. The susceptibilities of the PM10 samples were analyzed from different aspects, like the degree of magnetic pollution at different stations, daily and seasonal variations of the total and mass susceptibilities compared to the mass of the pollutants and in relation to the concentrations of the toxic elements. As expected, the lowest total and mass susceptibilities characterize the background station (pollution arrives mostly from distant sources, Vienna, Bratislava or even the Sudeten), while the highest values were measured for an industrial town with heavy traffic. At the background station the mass of the PM10 and PM2.5, respectively for the same period are quite similar, while the magnetic susceptibilities are usually higher in the

  10. A multivariate study for characterizing particulate matter (PM(10), PM(2.5), and PM(1)) in Seoul metropolitan subway stations, Korea.

    PubMed

    Kwon, Soon-Bark; Jeong, Wootae; Park, Duckshin; Kim, Ki-Tae; Cho, Kyung Hwa

    2015-10-30

    Given that around eight million commuters use the Seoul Metropolitan Subway (SMS) each day, the indoor air quality (IAQ) of its stations has attracted much public attention. We have monitored the concentration of particulate matters (PMx) (i.e., PM10, PM2.5, and PM1) in six major transfer stations per minute for three weeks during the summer, autumn, and winter in 2014 and 2015. The data were analyzed to investigate the relationship between PMx concentration and multivariate environmental factors using statistical methods. The average PM concentration observed was approximately two or three times higher than outdoor PM10 concentration, showing similar temporal patterns at concourses and platforms. This implies that outdoor PM10 is the most significant factor in controlling indoor PM concentration. In addition, the station depth and number of trains passing through stations were found to be additional influences on PMx. Principal component analysis (PCA) and self-organizing map (SOM) were employed, through which we found that the number of trains influences PM concentration in the vicinity of platforms only, and PMx hotspots were determined. This study identifies the external and internal factors affecting PMx characteristics in six SMS stations, which can assist in the development of effective IAQ management plans to improve public health.

  11. Number size distribution, mass concentration, and particle composition of PM1, PM2.5, and PM10 in bag filling areas of carbon black production.

    PubMed

    Kuhlbusch, T A J; Neumann, S; Fissan, H

    2004-10-01

    Number size characteristics and PM10 mass concentrations of particles emitted during the packaging of various kinds of carbon blacks were measured continuously in the bag filling areas of three carbon black plants and concurrently at ambient comparison sites. PM10, PM2.5, and PM1 dust fractions were also determined in the bag filling areas. The filter samples were then analyzed for elemental and organic carbon. Comparisons of the measured number size distributions and mass concentrations during bag filling activities with those measured parallel at the ambient site and with those determined during nonworking periods in the work area enabled the characterization of emitted particles. PM10 mass concentrations were consistently elevated (up to a factor of 20 compared to ambient concentrations) during working periods in the bag filling area. Detailed analysis revealed that the carbon black particles released by bag filling activities had a size distribution starting at approximately 400 nm aerodynamic diameter (dae) with modes around 1 microm dae and > 8 microm dae. Ultrafine particles (< 100 nm dae), detected in the bag filling areas, were most likely attributed to noncarbon black sources such as forklift and gas heater emissions.

  12. 10 CFR 61.25 - Changes.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 2 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Changes. 61.25 Section 61.25 Energy NUCLEAR REGULATORY COMMISSION (CONTINUED) LICENSING REQUIREMENTS FOR LAND DISPOSAL OF RADIOACTIVE WASTE Licenses § 61.25 Changes. (a) Except as provided for in specific license conditions, the licensee shall not make changes in...

  13. 10 CFR 61.25 - Changes.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 2 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Changes. 61.25 Section 61.25 Energy NUCLEAR REGULATORY COMMISSION (CONTINUED) LICENSING REQUIREMENTS FOR LAND DISPOSAL OF RADIOACTIVE WASTE Licenses § 61.25 Changes. (a) Except as provided for in specific license conditions, the licensee shall not make changes in...

  14. 10 CFR 61.25 - Changes.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 2 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Changes. 61.25 Section 61.25 Energy NUCLEAR REGULATORY COMMISSION (CONTINUED) LICENSING REQUIREMENTS FOR LAND DISPOSAL OF RADIOACTIVE WASTE Licenses § 61.25 Changes. (a) Except as provided for in specific license conditions, the licensee shall not make changes in...

  15. 10 CFR 61.25 - Changes.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 2 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Changes. 61.25 Section 61.25 Energy NUCLEAR REGULATORY COMMISSION (CONTINUED) LICENSING REQUIREMENTS FOR LAND DISPOSAL OF RADIOACTIVE WASTE Licenses § 61.25 Changes. (a) Except as provided for in specific license conditions, the licensee shall not make changes in...

  16. 10 CFR 61.25 - Changes.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 2 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Changes. 61.25 Section 61.25 Energy NUCLEAR REGULATORY COMMISSION (CONTINUED) LICENSING REQUIREMENTS FOR LAND DISPOSAL OF RADIOACTIVE WASTE Licenses § 61.25 Changes. (a) Except as provided for in specific license conditions, the licensee shall not make changes in...

  17. 10 CFR 36.25 - Shielding.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 1 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Shielding. 36.25 Section 36.25 Energy NUCLEAR REGULATORY COMMISSION LICENSES AND RADIATION SAFETY REQUIREMENTS FOR IRRADIATORS Design and Performance Requirements for Irradiators § 36.25 Shielding. (a) The radiation dose rate in areas that are normally occupied...

  18. 10 CFR 13.25 - Fees.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 1 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Fees. 13.25 Section 13.25 Energy NUCLEAR REGULATORY COMMISSION PROGRAM FRAUD CIVIL REMEDIES § 13.25 Fees. The party requesting a subpoena shall pay the cost of the fees and mileage of any witness subpoenaed in the amounts that would be payable to a witness in...

  19. 10 CFR 13.25 - Fees.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 1 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Fees. 13.25 Section 13.25 Energy NUCLEAR REGULATORY COMMISSION PROGRAM FRAUD CIVIL REMEDIES § 13.25 Fees. The party requesting a subpoena shall pay the cost of the fees and mileage of any witness subpoenaed in the amounts that would be payable to a witness in...

  20. 10 CFR 13.25 - Fees.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Fees. 13.25 Section 13.25 Energy NUCLEAR REGULATORY COMMISSION PROGRAM FRAUD CIVIL REMEDIES § 13.25 Fees. The party requesting a subpoena shall pay the cost of the fees and mileage of any witness subpoenaed in the amounts that would be payable to a witness in...

  1. 10 CFR 13.25 - Fees.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 1 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Fees. 13.25 Section 13.25 Energy NUCLEAR REGULATORY COMMISSION PROGRAM FRAUD CIVIL REMEDIES § 13.25 Fees. The party requesting a subpoena shall pay the cost of the fees and mileage of any witness subpoenaed in the amounts that would be payable to a witness in...

  2. 10 CFR 25.39 - Criminal penalties.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Criminal penalties. 25.39 Section 25.39 Energy NUCLEAR REGULATORY COMMISSION ACCESS AUTHORIZATION Violations § 25.39 Criminal penalties. (a) Section 223 of the Atomic Energy Act of 1954, as amended, provides for criminal sanctions for willful violation...

  3. 10 CFR 429.25 - Television sets.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 3 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Television sets. 429.25 Section 429.25 Energy DEPARTMENT... COMMERCIAL AND INDUSTRIAL EQUIPMENT Certification § 429.25 Television sets. (a) Sampling plan for selection of units for testing. (1) The requirements of § 429.11 are applicable to televisions; and (2)...

  4. 10 CFR 440.25 - Reports.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 3 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Reports. 440.25 Section 440.25 Energy DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY ENERGY CONSERVATION WEATHERIZATION ASSISTANCE FOR LOW-INCOME PERSONS § 440.25 Reports. DOE may require any recipient of financial assistance under this part to provide, in such form as may be...

  5. 10 CFR 1013.25 - Witness fees.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 4 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Witness fees. 1013.25 Section 1013.25 Energy DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY (GENERAL PROVISIONS) PROGRAM FRAUD CIVIL REMEDIES AND PROCEDURES § 1013.25 Witness fees. The party... that would be payable to a witness in a proceeding in United States District Court. A check for...

  6. 10 CFR 1017.25 - Reproduction.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 4 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Reproduction. 1017.25 Section 1017.25 Energy DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY (GENERAL PROVISIONS) IDENTIFICATION AND PROTECTION OF UNCLASSIFIED CONTROLLED NUCLEAR INFORMATION Physical Protection Requirements § 1017.25 Reproduction. A document marked as containing UCNI may...

  7. 10 CFR 1017.25 - Reproduction.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 4 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Reproduction. 1017.25 Section 1017.25 Energy DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY (GENERAL PROVISIONS) IDENTIFICATION AND PROTECTION OF UNCLASSIFIED CONTROLLED NUCLEAR INFORMATION Physical Protection Requirements § 1017.25 Reproduction. A document marked as containing UCNI may...

  8. 10 CFR 1017.25 - Reproduction.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 4 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Reproduction. 1017.25 Section 1017.25 Energy DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY (GENERAL PROVISIONS) IDENTIFICATION AND PROTECTION OF UNCLASSIFIED CONTROLLED NUCLEAR INFORMATION Physical Protection Requirements § 1017.25 Reproduction. A document marked as containing UCNI may...

  9. 10 CFR 1017.25 - Reproduction.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 4 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Reproduction. 1017.25 Section 1017.25 Energy DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY (GENERAL PROVISIONS) IDENTIFICATION AND PROTECTION OF UNCLASSIFIED CONTROLLED NUCLEAR INFORMATION Physical Protection Requirements § 1017.25 Reproduction. A document marked as containing UCNI may...

  10. 10 CFR 1017.25 - Reproduction.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 4 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Reproduction. 1017.25 Section 1017.25 Energy DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY (GENERAL PROVISIONS) IDENTIFICATION AND PROTECTION OF UNCLASSIFIED CONTROLLED NUCLEAR INFORMATION Physical Protection Requirements § 1017.25 Reproduction. A document marked as containing UCNI may...

  11. Forecasting urban PM10 and PM2.5 pollution episodes in very stable nocturnal conditions and complex terrain using WRF-Chem CO tracer model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saide, Pablo E.; Carmichael, Gregory R.; Spak, Scott N.; Gallardo, Laura; Osses, Axel E.; Mena-Carrasco, Marcelo A.; Pagowski, Mariusz

    2011-05-01

    This study presents a system to predict high pollution events that develop in connection with enhanced subsidence due to coastal lows, particularly in winter over Santiago de Chile. An accurate forecast of these episodes is of interest since the local government is entitled by law to take actions in advance to prevent public exposure to PM10 concentrations in excess of 150 μg m -3 (24 h running averages). The forecasting system is based on accurately simulating carbon monoxide (CO) as a PM10/PM2.5 surrogate, since during episodes and within the city there is a high correlation (over 0.95) among these pollutants. Thus, by accurately forecasting CO, which behaves closely to a tracer on this scale, a PM estimate can be made without involving aerosol-chemistry modeling. Nevertheless, the very stable nocturnal conditions over steep topography associated with maxima in concentrations are hard to represent in models. Here we propose a forecast system based on the WRF-Chem model with optimum settings, determined through extensive testing, that best describe both meteorological and air quality available measurements. Some of the important configurations choices involve the boundary layer (PBL) scheme, model grid resolution (both vertical and horizontal), meteorological initial and boundary conditions and spatial and temporal distribution of the emissions. A forecast for the 2008 winter is performed showing that this forecasting system is able to perform similarly to the authority decision for PM10 and better than persistence when forecasting PM10 and PM2.5 high pollution episodes. Problems regarding false alarm predictions could be related to different uncertainties in the model such as day to day emission variability, inability of the model to completely resolve the complex topography and inaccuracy in meteorological initial and boundary conditions. Finally, according to our simulations, emissions from previous days dominate episode concentrations, which highlights the

  12. A 10-year observation of PM2.5-bound nickel in Xi’an, China: Effects of source control on its trend and associated health risks

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Hongmei; Ho, Steven Sai Hang; Cao, Junji; Guinot, Benjamin; Kan, Haidong; Shen, Zhenxing; Ho, Kin Fai; Liu, Suixin; Zhao, Zhuzi; Li, Jianjun; Zhang, Ningning; Zhu, Chongshu; Zhang, Qian; Huang, Rujin

    2017-01-01

    This study presents the first long term (10-year period, 2004–2013) datasets of PM2.5-bound nickel (Ni) concentration obtained from the daily sample in urban of Xi’an, Northwestern China. The Ni concentration trend, pollution sources, and the potential health risks associated to Ni were investigated. The Ni concentrations increased from 2004 to 2008, but then decreased due to coal consumption reduction, energy structure reconstruction, tighter emission rules and the improvement of the industrial and motor vehicle waste control techniques. With the comparison of distributions between workday and non-workday periods, the effectiveness of local and regional air pollution control policies and contributions of hypothetical Ni sources (industrial and automobile exhausts) were evaluated, demonstrating the health benefits to the populations during the ten years. Mean Ni cancer risk was higher than the threshold value of 10−6, suggesting that carcinogenic Ni still was a concern to the residents. Our findings conclude that there are still needs to establish more strict strategies and guidelines for atmospheric Ni in our living area, assisting to balance the relationship between economic growth and environmental conservation in China. PMID:28117355

  13. A 10-year observation of PM2.5-bound nickel in Xi’an, China: Effects of source control on its trend and associated health risks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Hongmei; Ho, Steven Sai Hang; Cao, Junji; Guinot, Benjamin; Kan, Haidong; Shen, Zhenxing; Ho, Kin Fai; Liu, Suixin; Zhao, Zhuzi; Li, Jianjun; Zhang, Ningning; Zhu, Chongshu; Zhang, Qian; Huang, Rujin

    2017-01-01

    This study presents the first long term (10-year period, 2004–2013) datasets of PM2.5-bound nickel (Ni) concentration obtained from the daily sample in urban of Xi’an, Northwestern China. The Ni concentration trend, pollution sources, and the potential health risks associated to Ni were investigated. The Ni concentrations increased from 2004 to 2008, but then decreased due to coal consumption reduction, energy structure reconstruction, tighter emission rules and the improvement of the industrial and motor vehicle waste control techniques. With the comparison of distributions between workday and non-workday periods, the effectiveness of local and regional air pollution control policies and contributions of hypothetical Ni sources (industrial and automobile exhausts) were evaluated, demonstrating the health benefits to the populations during the ten years. Mean Ni cancer risk was higher than the threshold value of 10‑6, suggesting that carcinogenic Ni still was a concern to the residents. Our findings conclude that there are still needs to establish more strict strategies and guidelines for atmospheric Ni in our living area, assisting to balance the relationship between economic growth and environmental conservation in China.

  14. Trace metals in PM10 and PM 2.5 samples collected in a highly industrialized chemical/petrochemical area and its urbanized surroundings.

    PubMed

    dos Anjos Paulino, Silvia; Oliveira, Rafael Lopes; Loyola, Josiane; Minho, Alan Silva; Arbilla, Graciela; Quiterio, Simone Lorena; Escaleira, Viviane

    2014-05-01

    The aim of this study was to determine the potential impact of a highly industrialized area on its urbanized surroundings. The area studied is home to a refinery, a thermoelectric plant and several petrochemical facilities industries. The concentrations of twelve elements were determined in PM10 and PM2.5 samples collected along a busy highway and near the petrochemical complex. Significantly higher concentrations of Ca, Mg, Mn, Fe, Cu and Al were observed in the petrochemical zone, but principal component analysis revealed similar patterns for both the highway site and a site approximately 1.5 km from the petrochemical complex, suggesting that the main pollution source in the area is vehicular flux. Higher concentrations in the industrial area may be attributed to intense diesel-powered truck and bus traffic movement, mainly due to the transport of supplies, fuel and gas. The observed concentrations of the elements Cr, Co, Ni, Cd and Pb were always lower than the detection limits of the technique used.

  15. 40 CFR Figure C-3 to Subpart C of... - Illustration of the Slope and Intercept Limits for Class II and Class III PM102.5 Candidate...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 5 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Illustration of the Slope and Intercept Limits for Class II and Class III PM10â2.5 Candidate Equivalent Methods C Figure C-3 to Subpart C of Part...—Illustration of the Slope and Intercept Limits for Class II and Class III PM102.5 Candidate Equivalent...

  16. 40 CFR Figure C-3 to Subpart C of... - Illustration of the Slope and Intercept Limits for Class II and Class III PM102.5 Candidate...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 5 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Illustration of the Slope and Intercept Limits for Class II and Class III PM10â2.5 Candidate Equivalent Methods C Figure C-3 to Subpart C of Part...—Illustration of the Slope and Intercept Limits for Class II and Class III PM102.5 Candidate Equivalent...

  17. Source identification and apportionment of PM2.5 and PM2.5-10 in iron and steel scrap smelting factory environment using PMF, PCFA and UNMIX receptor models.

    PubMed

    Ogundele, Lasun T; Owoade, Oyediran K; Olise, Felix S; Hopke, Philip K

    2016-10-01

    To identify the potential sources responsible for the particulate matter emission from secondary iron and steel smelting factory environment, PM2.5 and PM2.5-10 particles were collected using the low-volume air samplers twice a week for a year. The samples were analyzed for the elemental and black carbon content using x-ray fluorescence spectrometer and optical transmissometer, respectively. The average mass concentrations were 216.26, 151.68, and 138. 62 μg/m(3) for PM2.5 and 331.36, 190.01, and 184.60 μg/m(3) for PM2.5-10 for the production, outside M1 and outside M2 sites, respectively. The same size resolved data set were used as input for the positive matrix factorization (PMF), principal component factor analysis (PCFA), and Unmix (UNMIX) receptor modeling in order to identify the possible sources of particulate matter and their contribution. The PMF resolved four sources with their respective contributions were metal processing (33 %), e-waste (33 %), diesel emission (22 %) and soil (12 %) for PM2.5, and coking (50 %), soil (29 %), metal processing (16 %) and diesel combustion (5 %) for PM2.5-10. PCFA identified soil, metal processing, Pb source, and diesel combustion contributing 45, 41, 9, and 5 %, respectively to PM2.5 while metal processing, soil, coal combustion and open burning contributed 43, 38, 12, and 7 %, respectively to the PM2.5-10. Also, UNMIX identified metal processing, soil, and diesel emission with 43, 42 and 15 % contributions, respectively for the fine fraction, and metal processing (71 %), soil (21 %) and unidentified source (1 %) for the coarse fraction. The study concluded that metal processing and e-waste are the major sources contributing to the fine fraction while coking and soil contributed to the coarse fraction within the factory environment. The application of PMF, PCFA and UNMIX receptor models improved the source identification and apportionment of particulate matter drive in the study area.

  18. 25 CFR 17.10 - Record.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 25 Indians 1 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Record. 17.10 Section 17.10 Indians BUREAU OF INDIAN AFFAIRS, DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR PROBATE ACTION ON WILLS OF OSAGE INDIANS § 17.10 Record. After the hearing or hearings on the will have been terminated the special attorney shall make up the record...

  19. 25 CFR 502.10 - Gaming operation.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 25 Indians 2 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Gaming operation. 502.10 Section 502.10 Indians NATIONAL INDIAN GAMING COMMISSION, DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR GENERAL PROVISIONS DEFINITIONS OF THIS CHAPTER § 502.10 Gaming operation. Gaming operation means each economic entity that is licensed by a...

  20. 25 CFR 502.10 - Gaming operation.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 25 Indians 2 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Gaming operation. 502.10 Section 502.10 Indians NATIONAL INDIAN GAMING COMMISSION, DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR GENERAL PROVISIONS DEFINITIONS OF THIS CHAPTER § 502.10 Gaming operation. Gaming operation means each economic entity that is licensed by a...

  1. 25 CFR 502.10 - Gaming operation.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 25 Indians 2 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Gaming operation. 502.10 Section 502.10 Indians NATIONAL INDIAN GAMING COMMISSION, DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR GENERAL PROVISIONS DEFINITIONS OF THIS CHAPTER § 502.10 Gaming operation. Gaming operation means each economic entity that is licensed by a...

  2. 25 CFR 502.10 - Gaming operation.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 25 Indians 2 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Gaming operation. 502.10 Section 502.10 Indians NATIONAL INDIAN GAMING COMMISSION, DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR GENERAL PROVISIONS DEFINITIONS OF THIS CHAPTER § 502.10 Gaming operation. Gaming operation means each economic entity that is licensed by a...

  3. 25 CFR 41.10 - Technical assistance.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... COLLEGES AND NAVAJO COMMUNITY COLLEGE Tribally Controlled Community Colleges § 41.10 Technical assistance... Community College's request in writing. In any case, where the type and source of technical assistance is... 25 Indians 1 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Technical assistance. 41.10 Section 41.10 Indians...

  4. 25 CFR 502.10 - Gaming operation.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 25 Indians 2 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Gaming operation. 502.10 Section 502.10 Indians NATIONAL....10 Gaming operation. Gaming operation means each economic entity that is licensed by a tribe, operates the games, receives the revenues, issues the prizes, and pays the expenses. A gaming operation...

  5. 10 CFR 10.5 - Definitions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 1 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Definitions. 10.5 Section 10.5 Energy NUCLEAR REGULATORY COMMISSION CRITERIA AND PROCEDURES FOR DETERMINING ELIGIBILITY FOR ACCESS TO RESTRICTED DATA OR NATIONAL SECURITY INFORMATION OR AN EMPLOYMENT CLEARANCE General Provisions § 10.5 Definitions. Access...

  6. 10 CFR 10.5 - Definitions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Definitions. 10.5 Section 10.5 Energy NUCLEAR REGULATORY COMMISSION CRITERIA AND PROCEDURES FOR DETERMINING ELIGIBILITY FOR ACCESS TO RESTRICTED DATA OR NATIONAL SECURITY INFORMATION OR AN EMPLOYMENT CLEARANCE General Provisions § 10.5 Definitions. Access...

  7. 10 CFR 10.5 - Definitions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 1 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Definitions. 10.5 Section 10.5 Energy NUCLEAR REGULATORY COMMISSION CRITERIA AND PROCEDURES FOR DETERMINING ELIGIBILITY FOR ACCESS TO RESTRICTED DATA OR NATIONAL SECURITY INFORMATION OR AN EMPLOYMENT CLEARANCE General Provisions § 10.5 Definitions. Access...

  8. 10 CFR 10.5 - Definitions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 1 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Definitions. 10.5 Section 10.5 Energy NUCLEAR REGULATORY COMMISSION CRITERIA AND PROCEDURES FOR DETERMINING ELIGIBILITY FOR ACCESS TO RESTRICTED DATA OR NATIONAL SECURITY INFORMATION OR AN EMPLOYMENT CLEARANCE General Provisions § 10.5 Definitions. Access...

  9. 10 CFR 10.5 - Definitions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 1 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Definitions. 10.5 Section 10.5 Energy NUCLEAR REGULATORY COMMISSION CRITERIA AND PROCEDURES FOR DETERMINING ELIGIBILITY FOR ACCESS TO RESTRICTED DATA OR NATIONAL SECURITY INFORMATION OR AN EMPLOYMENT CLEARANCE General Provisions § 10.5 Definitions. Access...

  10. 10 CFR 15.25 - Personal interviews.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Personal interviews. 15.25 Section 15.25 Energy NUCLEAR... interviews. (a) The NRC may seek an interview with the debtor at the offices of the NRC when— (1) A matter...; or (3) An agreement for payment might be negotiated. (b) The NRC shall grant an interview with...

  11. 10 CFR 37.25 - Background investigations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 1 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Background investigations. 37.25 Section 37.25 Energy NUCLEAR REGULATORY COMMISSION PHYSICAL PROTECTION OF CATEGORY 1 AND CATEGORY 2 QUANTITIES OF RADIOACTIVE... at a minimum: (1) Fingerprinting and an FBI identification and criminal history records check...

  12. Interrogating the superconductor Ca10(Pt4As8)(Fe2−xPtxAs2)5 Layer-by-layer

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Jisun; Nam, Hyoungdo; Li, Guorong; Karki, A. B.; Wang, Zhen; Zhu, Yimei; Shih, Chih-Kang; Zhang, Jiandi; Jin, Rongying; Plummer, E. W.

    2016-01-01

    Ever since the discovery of high-Tc superconductivity in layered cuprates, the roles that individual layers play have been debated, due to difficulty in layer-by-layer characterization. While there is similar challenge in many Fe-based layered superconductors, the newly-discovered Ca10(Pt4As8)(Fe2As2)5 provides opportunities to explore superconductivity layer by layer, because it contains both superconducting building blocks (Fe2As2 layers) and intermediate Pt4As8 layers. Cleaving a single crystal under ultra-high vacuum results in multiple terminations: an ordered Pt4As8 layer, two reconstructed Ca layers on the top of a Pt4As8 layer, and disordered Ca layer on the top of Fe2As2 layer. The electronic properties of individual layers are studied using scanning tunneling microscopy/spectroscopy (STM/S), which reveals different spectra for each surface. Remarkably superconducting coherence peaks are seen only on the ordered Ca/Pt4As8 layer. Our results indicate that an ordered structure with proper charge balance is required in order to preserve superconductivity. PMID:27739517

  13. Interrogating the superconductor Ca-10(Pt4As8)(Fe2-xPtxAs2)5 Layer-by-layer

    DOE PAGES

    Kim, Jisun; Zhu, Yimei; Nam, Hyoungdo; ...

    2016-10-14

    Ever since the discovery of high-Tc superconductivity in layered cuprates, the roles that individual layers play have been debated, due to difficulty in layer-by-layer characterization. While there is similar challenge in many Fe-based layered superconductors, the newly-discovered Ca10(Pt4As8)(Fe2As2)5 provides opportunities to explore superconductivity layer by layer, because it contains both superconducting building blocks (Fe2As2 layers) and intermediate Pt4As8 layers. Cleaving a single crystal under ultra-high vacuum results in multiple terminations: an ordered Pt4As8 layer, two reconstructed Ca layers on the top of a Pt4As8 layer, and disordered Ca layer on the top of Fe2As2 layer. The electronic properties of individualmore » layers are studied using scanning tunneling microscopy/spectroscopy (STM/S), which reveals different spectra for each surface. Remarkably superconducting coherence peaks are seen only on the ordered Ca/Pt4As8 layer. Our results indicate that an ordered structure with proper charge balance is required in order to preserve superconductivity.« less

  14. Interrogating the superconductor Ca10(Pt4As8)(Fe2-xPtxAs2)5 Layer-by-layer.

    PubMed

    Kim, Jisun; Nam, Hyoungdo; Li, Guorong; Karki, A B; Wang, Zhen; Zhu, Yimei; Shih, Chih-Kang; Zhang, Jiandi; Jin, Rongying; Plummer, E W

    2016-10-14

    Ever since the discovery of high-Tc superconductivity in layered cuprates, the roles that individual layers play have been debated, due to difficulty in layer-by-layer characterization. While there is similar challenge in many Fe-based layered superconductors, the newly-discovered Ca10(Pt4As8)(Fe2As2)5 provides opportunities to explore superconductivity layer by layer, because it contains both superconducting building blocks (Fe2As2 layers) and intermediate Pt4As8 layers. Cleaving a single crystal under ultra-high vacuum results in multiple terminations: an ordered Pt4As8 layer, two reconstructed Ca layers on the top of a Pt4As8 layer, and disordered Ca layer on the top of Fe2As2 layer. The electronic properties of individual layers are studied using scanning tunneling microscopy/spectroscopy (STM/S), which reveals different spectra for each surface. Remarkably superconducting coherence peaks are seen only on the ordered Ca/Pt4As8 layer. Our results indicate that an ordered structure with proper charge balance is required in order to preserve superconductivity.

  15. Final Report on EURAMET key comparison (EURAMET.M.M-K2.5) of 10 kg mass standards in stainless steel (Project code: EURAMET 1222)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vámossy, Csilla; Bulku, Defrim; Borys, Michael; Alisic, Sejla; Boskovic, Tamara; Zelenka, Zoltan

    2015-01-01

    The report describes a European regional key comparison of a stainless steel 10 kg standard as a multiple of the kilogram carried out under the auspices of EURAMET and designated Project 1222. This comparison is also a KCDB Regional Key Comparison, registered as EURAMET.M.M-K2.5. The objectives of this comparison are to check the measurement capabilities in the field of mass of the participating national laboratories, to facilitate the demonstration of metrological equivalence between the laboratories in Europe, and to check or support the validity of quoted calibration measurement capabilities (CMC). This comparison provides a link to CCM.M-K2. BEV (Austria) was the pilot laboratory and the provider of the transfer standard. Main text. To reach the main text of this paper, click on Final Report. Note that this text is that which appears in Appendix B of the BIPM key comparison database kcdb.bipm.org/. The final report has been peer-reviewed and approved for publication by CCM, according to the provisions of the CIPM Mutual Recognition Arrangement (CIPM MRA).

  16. 46 CFR 54.25-5 - Corrosion allowance.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 2 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Corrosion allowance. 54.25-5 Section 54.25-5 Shipping COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY (CONTINUED) MARINE ENGINEERING PRESSURE VESSELS Construction With Carbon, Alloy, and Heat Treated Steels § 54.25-5 Corrosion allowance. The corrosion...

  17. 46 CFR 54.25-5 - Corrosion allowance.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 2 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Corrosion allowance. 54.25-5 Section 54.25-5 Shipping COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY (CONTINUED) MARINE ENGINEERING PRESSURE VESSELS Construction With Carbon, Alloy, and Heat Treated Steels § 54.25-5 Corrosion allowance. The corrosion...

  18. 46 CFR 54.25-5 - Corrosion allowance.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 2 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Corrosion allowance. 54.25-5 Section 54.25-5 Shipping COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY (CONTINUED) MARINE ENGINEERING PRESSURE VESSELS Construction With Carbon, Alloy, and Heat Treated Steels § 54.25-5 Corrosion allowance. The corrosion...

  19. 46 CFR 25.26-5 - Commercial fishing industry vessels.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 1 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Commercial fishing industry vessels. 25.26-5 Section 25.26-5 Shipping COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY UNINSPECTED VESSELS REQUIREMENTS Emergency Position Indicating Radio Beacons (EPIRB) § 25.26-5 Commercial fishing industry vessels. (a) The owner of...

  20. 46 CFR 25.26-5 - Commercial fishing industry vessels.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 1 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Commercial fishing industry vessels. 25.26-5 Section 25.26-5 Shipping COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY UNINSPECTED VESSELS REQUIREMENTS Emergency Position Indicating Radio Beacons (EPIRB) § 25.26-5 Commercial fishing industry vessels. (a) The owner of...

  1. 46 CFR 25.26-5 - Commercial fishing industry vessels.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 1 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Commercial fishing industry vessels. 25.26-5 Section 25.26-5 Shipping COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY UNINSPECTED VESSELS REQUIREMENTS Emergency Position Indicating Radio Beacons (EPIRB) § 25.26-5 Commercial fishing industry vessels. (a) The owner of...

  2. 46 CFR 62.25-5 - All control systems.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 2 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false All control systems. 62.25-5 Section 62.25-5 Shipping COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY (CONTINUED) MARINE ENGINEERING VITAL SYSTEM AUTOMATION General Requirements for All Automated Vital Systems § 62.25-5 All control systems. (a) Local and...

  3. 46 CFR 62.25-5 - All control systems.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 2 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false All control systems. 62.25-5 Section 62.25-5 Shipping COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY (CONTINUED) MARINE ENGINEERING VITAL SYSTEM AUTOMATION General Requirements for All Automated Vital Systems § 62.25-5 All control systems. (a) Local and...

  4. 46 CFR 62.25-5 - All control systems.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 2 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false All control systems. 62.25-5 Section 62.25-5 Shipping COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY (CONTINUED) MARINE ENGINEERING VITAL SYSTEM AUTOMATION General Requirements for All Automated Vital Systems § 62.25-5 All control systems. (a) Local and...

  5. 46 CFR 54.25-5 - Corrosion allowance.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 2 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Corrosion allowance. 54.25-5 Section 54.25-5 Shipping COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY (CONTINUED) MARINE ENGINEERING PRESSURE VESSELS Construction With Carbon, Alloy, and Heat Treated Steels § 54.25-5 Corrosion allowance. The corrosion...

  6. 46 CFR 54.25-5 - Corrosion allowance.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 2 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Corrosion allowance. 54.25-5 Section 54.25-5 Shipping COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY (CONTINUED) MARINE ENGINEERING PRESSURE VESSELS Construction With Carbon, Alloy, and Heat Treated Steels § 54.25-5 Corrosion allowance. The corrosion...

  7. 46 CFR 25.26-5 - Commercial fishing industry vessels.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 1 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Commercial fishing industry vessels. 25.26-5 Section 25.26-5 Shipping COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY UNINSPECTED VESSELS REQUIREMENTS Emergency Position Indicating Radio Beacons (EPIRB) § 25.26-5 Commercial fishing industry vessels. (a) The owner of...

  8. 46 CFR 25.26-5 - Commercial fishing industry vessels.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 1 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Commercial fishing industry vessels. 25.26-5 Section 25.26-5 Shipping COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY UNINSPECTED VESSELS REQUIREMENTS Emergency Position Indicating Radio Beacons (EPIRB) § 25.26-5 Commercial fishing industry vessels. (a) The owner of...

  9. 46 CFR 62.25-5 - All control systems.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 2 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false All control systems. 62.25-5 Section 62.25-5 Shipping... General Requirements for All Automated Vital Systems § 62.25-5 All control systems. (a) Local and remote... while the turning gear is engaged. (b) Automatic control systems must be stable over the entire range...

  10. 46 CFR 62.25-5 - All control systems.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 2 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false All control systems. 62.25-5 Section 62.25-5 Shipping... General Requirements for All Automated Vital Systems § 62.25-5 All control systems. (a) Local and remote... while the turning gear is engaged. (b) Automatic control systems must be stable over the entire range...

  11. 46 CFR 113.25-5 - Location of contact makers.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 4 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Location of contact makers. 113.25-5 Section 113.25-5... ALARM SYSTEMS AND EQUIPMENT General Emergency Alarm Systems § 113.25-5 Location of contact makers. (a... miscellaneous vessel must have a manually operated contact maker for the general emergency alarm system: (1)...

  12. 45 CFR 2.5 - Subpoenas duces tecum.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 45 Public Welfare 1 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Subpoenas duces tecum. 2.5 Section 2.5 Public Welfare DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES GENERAL ADMINISTRATION TESTIMONY BY EMPLOYEES AND PRODUCTION OF DOCUMENTS IN PROCEEDINGS WHERE THE UNITED STATES IS NOT A PARTY § 2.5 Subpoenas duces tecum. (a) Whenever a subpoena duces tecum has...

  13. 46 CFR 194.10-25 - Ventilation.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... CONTROL OF EXPLOSIVES AND OTHER HAZARDOUS MATERIALS Magazines § 194.10-25 Ventilation. (a) Integral magazines. (1) All integral magazines shall be provided with natural or mechanical ventilation....

  14. 33 CFR 66.10-5-66.10-10 - [Reserved

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 1 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false 66.10-5-66.10-10 Section 66.10-5-66.10-10 Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY AIDS TO NAVIGATION PRIVATE AIDS TO NAVIGATION Uniform State Waterway Marking System §§ 66.10-5—66.10-10...

  15. 33 CFR 66.10-5-66.10-10 - [Reserved

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false 66.10-5-66.10-10 Section 66.10-5-66.10-10 Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY AIDS TO NAVIGATION PRIVATE AIDS TO NAVIGATION Uniform State Waterway Marking System §§ 66.10-5—66.10-10...

  16. 40 CFR 53.34 - Test procedure for methods for PM10 and Class I methods for PM2.5.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... (or the same sample, if applicable) at each of one or more test sites (as required) is such that the... must be made, or derived from particulate samples collected, at not less than two test sites, each of... subpart. Only one test site is required, and the site need only meet the PM2.5 ambient...

  17. 40 CFR 53.34 - Test procedure for methods for PM10 and Class I methods for PM2.5.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... (CONTINUED) AIR PROGRAMS (CONTINUED) AMBIENT AIR MONITORING REFERENCE AND EQUIVALENT METHODS Procedures for... for Class I methods for PM2.5 when the relationship between: (1) Measurements made by a candidate method, and (2) Measurements made by a corresponding reference method on simultaneously collected...

  18. 40 CFR 53.34 - Test procedure for methods for PM10 and Class I methods for PM2.5.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... (CONTINUED) AIR PROGRAMS (CONTINUED) AMBIENT AIR MONITORING REFERENCE AND EQUIVALENT METHODS Procedures for... for Class I methods for PM2.5 when the relationship between: (1) Measurements made by a candidate method, and (2) Measurements made by a corresponding reference method on simultaneously collected...

  19. 40 CFR Figure C-3 to Subpart C of... - Illustration of the Slope and Intercept Limits for Class II and Class III PM102.5 Candidate...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 6 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Illustration of the Slope and Intercept Limits for Class II and Class III PM10â2.5 Candidate Equivalent Methods C Figure C-3 to Subpart C of Part...—Illustration of the Slope and Intercept Limits for Class II and Class III PM102.5 Candidate Equivalent...

  20. Development of a source oriented version of the WRF/Chem model and its application to the California Regional PM10/PM2.5 Air Quality Study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, H.; DeNero, S. P.; Joe, D. K.; Lee, H.-H.; Chen, S.-H.; Michalakes, J.; Kleeman, M. J.

    2013-06-01

    A source-oriented representation of airborne particulate matter was added to the Weather Research & Forecasting (WRF) model with chemistry (WRF/Chem). The source-oriented aerosol separately tracks primary particles with different hygroscopic properties rather than instantaneously combining them into an internal mixture. The source-oriented approach avoids artificially mixing light absorbing black + brown carbon particles with materials such as sulfate that would encourage the formation of additional coatings. Source-oriented particles undergo coagulation and gas-particle conversion, but these processes are considered in a dynamic framework that realistically "ages" primary particles over hours and days in the atmosphere. The source-oriented WRF/Chem model more accurately predicts radiative feedbacks from anthropogenic aerosols compared to models that make internal mixing or other artificial mixing assumptions. A three-week stagnation episode (15 December 2000 to 6 January 2001) during the California Regional PM10/PM2.5 Air Quality Study (CRPAQS) was chosen for the initial application of the new modeling system. Emissions were obtained from the California Air Resources Board. Gas-phase reactions were modeled with the SAPRC90 photochemical mechanism. Gas-particle conversion was modeled as a dynamic process with semi-volatile vapor pressures at the particle surface calculated using ISORROPIA. Source oriented calculations were performed for 8 particle size fractions ranging from 0.01-10 μm particle diameters with a spatial resolution of 4 km and hourly time resolution. Primary particles emitted from diesel engines, wood smoke, high sulfur fuel combustion, food cooking, and other anthropogenic sources were tracked separately throughout the simulation as they aged in the atmosphere. Results show that the source-oriented representation of particles with meteorological feedbacks in WRF/Chem changes the aerosol extinction coefficients, downward shortwave flux, and primary

  1. 25 CFR 63.10 - Purpose.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 25 Indians 1 2012-04-01 2011-04-01 true Purpose. 63.10 Section 63.10 Indians BUREAU OF INDIAN AFFAIRS, DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR TRIBAL GOVERNMENT INDIAN CHILD PROTECTION AND FAMILY VIOLENCE... service as mandated by the Indian Child Protection and Family Violence Prevention Act; and (b)...

  2. 25 CFR 63.10 - Purpose.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 25 Indians 1 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Purpose. 63.10 Section 63.10 Indians BUREAU OF INDIAN AFFAIRS, DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR TRIBAL GOVERNMENT INDIAN CHILD PROTECTION AND FAMILY VIOLENCE... service as mandated by the Indian Child Protection and Family Violence Prevention Act; and (b)...

  3. 25 CFR 63.10 - Purpose.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 25 Indians 1 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Purpose. 63.10 Section 63.10 Indians BUREAU OF INDIAN AFFAIRS, DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR TRIBAL GOVERNMENT INDIAN CHILD PROTECTION AND FAMILY VIOLENCE... service as mandated by the Indian Child Protection and Family Violence Prevention Act; and (b)...

  4. 25 CFR 63.10 - Purpose.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 25 Indians 1 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Purpose. 63.10 Section 63.10 Indians BUREAU OF INDIAN AFFAIRS, DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR TRIBAL GOVERNMENT INDIAN CHILD PROTECTION AND FAMILY VIOLENCE... service as mandated by the Indian Child Protection and Family Violence Prevention Act; and (b)...

  5. 25 CFR 63.10 - Purpose.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 25 Indians 1 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Purpose. 63.10 Section 63.10 Indians BUREAU OF INDIAN AFFAIRS, DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR TRIBAL GOVERNMENT INDIAN CHILD PROTECTION AND FAMILY VIOLENCE... service as mandated by the Indian Child Protection and Family Violence Prevention Act; and (b)...

  6. 25 CFR 173.10 - Payments.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 25 Indians 1 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Payments. 173.10 Section 173.10 Indians BUREAU OF INDIAN AFFAIRS, DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR LAND AND WATER CONCESSIONS, PERMITS AND LEASES ON LANDS WITHDRAWN OR... amount accruing under a temporary permit shall be paid at the time the application is filed....

  7. A pilot trial evaluating the efficacy of a 10% imidacloprid/2.5% moxidectin spot-on formulation in the treatment of natural nasal capillariosis in dogs.

    PubMed

    Veronesi, Fabrizia; Morganti, Giulia; Di Cesare, Angela; Schaper, Roland; Traversa, Donato

    2014-02-24

    The efficacy and safety of a spot-on formulation containing 10% imidacloprid and 2.5% moxidectin (Advocate(®), Bayer Animal Health GmbH, Leverkusen, Germany) were evaluated in a pilot trial for the treatment of canine nasal capillariosis caused by Capillaria boehmi (syn. Eucoleus boehmi). Sixteen dogs copromicroscopically positive for C. boehmi eggs were confirmed, either by rhinoscopy or species-specific PCR-coupled sequencing assays, as being affected by nasal capillariosis. The animals were randomly allocated to two different study groups, i.e. one (Group T) treated with Advocate(®) and one (Group C) left untreated, in a ratio of 1:1. The animals underwent clinical examination and quantitative copromicroscopy for C. boehmi eggs on Days -6 and -2 (baseline) and Day 28 ± 2 (post-baseline). Animals in Group T received Advocate(®) on Day 0. On Day 28 ± 2 the efficacy of the treatment (Group T) or the persistence of the infection (Group C) was confirmed by rhinoscopy or, alternatively, by molecular procedures. Seven of the eight dogs in Group T were negative on Day 28 ± 2 (reduction of baseline faecal egg counts by 99.14%), while for one dog a second treatment on Day 28 ± 2 was necessary to clear the infection, as demonstrated on Day 56 ± 2 (reduction of baseline faecal egg counts by 100% in Group T). Seven animals in Group C received a rescue dose of Advocate(®) on Day 28 ± 2 and scored microscopically and molecularly negative for the parasite on Day 56 ± 2, thus increasing the reduction of post-baseline egg counts to 99.57% after a single administration. These promising results show that Advocate(®) spot-on is an effective formulation for the treatment of canine nasal capillariosis under field conditions.

  8. Characterization of PM10 and PM2.5 and associated heavy metals at the crossroads and urban background site in Zabrze, Upper Silesia, Poland, during the smog episodes.

    PubMed

    Pastuszka, Jozef S; Rogula-Kozłowska, Wioletta; Zajusz-Zubek, Elwira

    2010-09-01

    The concentrations of seven heavy metals (Cd, Cr, Cu, Fe, Mn, Ni, and Pb) associated with PM10 and PM2.5 at the crossroads and the background sites have been studied in Zabrze, Poland, during smog episodes. Although the background level was unusually elevated due to both high particulate emission from the industrial and municipal sources and smog favorable meteorological conditions, significant increase of the concentration of PM2.5 and PM10 as well as associated heavy metals in the roadside air compared to the urban background has been documented. The average daily difference between the roadside and corresponding urban background aerosol concentration was equal to 39.5 microg m(-3) for PM10 and 41.2 microg m(-3) for PM2.5. The highest levels of the studied metals in Zabrze appeared for iron carried by PM10 particles: 1,706 (background) and 28,557 ng m(-3) (crossroads). The lowest concentration level (in PM10) has been found for cadmium: 7 and 77 ng m(-3) in the background and crossroads site, respectively. Also the concentrations of heavy metals carried by the fine particles (PM2.5) were very high in Zabrze during the smog episodes. Concentrations of all studied metals associated with PM10 increased at the roadside compared to the background about ten times (one order) while metals contained in PM2.5 showed two to three times elevated concentrations (except Fe-five times and Cr-no increase).

  9. 21 CFR 25.5 - Terminology.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 1 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Terminology. 25.5 Section 25.5 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES GENERAL ENVIRONMENTAL IMPACT CONSIDERATIONS General Provisions § 25.5 Terminology. (a) Definitions that apply to the terms used in this...

  10. 12 CFR 2.5 - Bank compensation.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... be credited to an affiliate operating under the Bank Holding Company Act of 1956, 12 U.S.C. 1841 et... 12 Banks and Banking 1 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Bank compensation. 2.5 Section 2.5 Banks and Banking COMPTROLLER OF THE CURRENCY, DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY SALES OF CREDIT LIFE INSURANCE § 2.5...

  11. 12 CFR 2.5 - Bank compensation.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... be credited to an affiliate operating under the Bank Holding Company Act of 1956, 12 U.S.C. 1841 et... 12 Banks and Banking 1 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Bank compensation. 2.5 Section 2.5 Banks and Banking COMPTROLLER OF THE CURRENCY, DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY SALES OF CREDIT LIFE INSURANCE § 2.5...

  12. 7 CFR 25.5 - Waivers.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Waivers. 25.5 Section 25.5 Agriculture Office of the Secretary of Agriculture RURAL EMPOWERMENT ZONES AND ENTERPRISE COMMUNITIES General Provisions § 25.5 Waivers. The Secretary may waive any provision of this part in any particular case for good cause,...

  13. 12 CFR 2.5 - Bank compensation.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 12 Banks and Banking 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Bank compensation. 2.5 Section 2.5 Banks and Banking COMPTROLLER OF THE CURRENCY, DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY SALES OF CREDIT LIFE INSURANCE § 2.5 Bank... the bank's loan customers. (b) Income derived from credit life insurance sales to loan customers...

  14. 28 CFR 2.5 - Sentence aggregation.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 28 Judicial Administration 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Sentence aggregation. 2.5 Section 2.5 Judicial Administration DEPARTMENT OF JUSTICE PAROLE, RELEASE, SUPERVISION AND RECOMMITMENT OF PRISONERS, YOUTH OFFENDERS, AND JUVENILE DELINQUENTS United States Code Prisoners and Parolees § 2.5...

  15. 27 CFR 5.25 - Application.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 27 Alcohol, Tobacco Products and Firearms 1 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Application. 5.25 Section 5.25 Alcohol, Tobacco Products and Firearms ALCOHOL AND TOBACCO TAX AND TRADE BUREAU, DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY ALCOHOL LABELING AND ADVERTISING OF DISTILLED SPIRITS Formulas § 5.25 Application....

  16. 27 CFR 5.25 - Application.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 27 Alcohol, Tobacco Products and Firearms 1 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Application. 5.25 Section 5.25 Alcohol, Tobacco Products and Firearms ALCOHOL AND TOBACCO TAX AND TRADE BUREAU, DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY LIQUORS LABELING AND ADVERTISING OF DISTILLED SPIRITS Formulas § 5.25 Application....

  17. 27 CFR 5.25 - Application.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 27 Alcohol, Tobacco Products and Firearms 1 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Application. 5.25 Section 5.25 Alcohol, Tobacco Products and Firearms ALCOHOL AND TOBACCO TAX AND TRADE BUREAU, DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY LIQUORS LABELING AND ADVERTISING OF DISTILLED SPIRITS Formulas § 5.25 Application....

  18. 27 CFR 5.25 - Application.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 27 Alcohol, Tobacco Products and Firearms 1 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Application. 5.25 Section 5.25 Alcohol, Tobacco Products and Firearms ALCOHOL AND TOBACCO TAX AND TRADE BUREAU, DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY ALCOHOL LABELING AND ADVERTISING OF DISTILLED SPIRITS Formulas § 5.25 Application....

  19. 27 CFR 5.25 - Application.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 27 Alcohol, Tobacco Products and Firearms 1 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Application. 5.25 Section 5.25 Alcohol, Tobacco Products and Firearms ALCOHOL AND TOBACCO TAX AND TRADE BUREAU, DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY LIQUORS LABELING AND ADVERTISING OF DISTILLED SPIRITS Formulas § 5.25 Application....

  20. 40 CFR 25.10 - Rulemaking.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... RESOURCE CONSERVATION AND RECOVERY ACT, THE SAFE DRINKING WATER ACT, AND THE CLEAN WATER ACT § 25.10... of paragraph (a) of this section or with the State's administrative procedures act, if one exists... a State's administrative procedures act, the State's law shall apply....

  1. 40 CFR 25.10 - Rulemaking.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... RESOURCE CONSERVATION AND RECOVERY ACT, THE SAFE DRINKING WATER ACT, AND THE CLEAN WATER ACT § 25.10... of paragraph (a) of this section or with the State's administrative procedures act, if one exists... a State's administrative procedures act, the State's law shall apply....

  2. 40 CFR 25.10 - Rulemaking.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... RESOURCE CONSERVATION AND RECOVERY ACT, THE SAFE DRINKING WATER ACT, AND THE CLEAN WATER ACT § 25.10... of paragraph (a) of this section or with the State's administrative procedures act, if one exists... a State's administrative procedures act, the State's law shall apply....

  3. 40 CFR 25.10 - Rulemaking.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... RESOURCE CONSERVATION AND RECOVERY ACT, THE SAFE DRINKING WATER ACT, AND THE CLEAN WATER ACT § 25.10... of paragraph (a) of this section or with the State's administrative procedures act, if one exists... a State's administrative procedures act, the State's law shall apply....

  4. 40 CFR 25.10 - Rulemaking.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... RESOURCE CONSERVATION AND RECOVERY ACT, THE SAFE DRINKING WATER ACT, AND THE CLEAN WATER ACT § 25.10... of paragraph (a) of this section or with the State's administrative procedures act, if one exists... a State's administrative procedures act, the State's law shall apply....

  5. Development of a source oriented version of the WRF/Chem model and its application to the California regional PM10 / PM2.5 air quality study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, H.; DeNero, S. P.; Joe, D. K.; Lee, H.-H.; Chen, S.-H.; Michalakes, J.; Kleeman, M. J.

    2014-01-01

    A source-oriented version of the Weather Research and Forecasting model with chemistry (SOWC, hereinafter) was developed. SOWC separately tracks primary particles with different hygroscopic properties rather than instantaneously combining them into an internal mixture. This approach avoids artificially mixing light absorbing black + brown carbon particles with materials such as sulfate that would encourage the formation of additional coatings. Source-oriented particles undergo coagulation and gas-particle conversion, but these processes are considered in a dynamic framework that realistically "ages" primary particles over hours and days in the atmosphere. SOWC more realistically predicts radiative feedbacks from anthropogenic aerosols compared to models that make internal mixing or other artificial mixing assumptions. A three-week stagnation episode (15 December 2000 to 6 January 2001) in the San Joaquin Valley (SJV) during the California Regional PM10 / PM2.5 Air Quality Study (CRPAQS) was chosen for the initial application of the new modeling system. Primary particles emitted from diesel engines, wood smoke, high-sulfur fuel combustion, food cooking, and other anthropogenic sources were tracked separately throughout the simulation as they aged in the atmosphere. Differences were identified between predictions from the source oriented vs. the internally mixed representation of particles with meteorological feedbacks in WRF/Chem for a number of meteorological parameters: aerosol extinction coefficients, downward shortwave flux, planetary boundary layer depth, and primary and secondary particulate matter concentrations. Comparisons with observations show that SOWC predicts particle scattering coefficients more accurately than the internally mixed model. Downward shortwave radiation predicted by SOWC is enhanced by ~1% at ground level chiefly because diesel engine particles in the source-oriented mixture are not artificially coated with material that increases their

  6. 25 Years of Landsat 5

    NASA Video Gallery

    Twenty-two years beyond its primary mission lifetime, Landsat 5 is still going strong. It has charted urban growth in Las Vegas, monitored fire scars in Yellowstone National Park, and tracked the r...

  7. Sub-Area. 2.5 Demonstration of Promising Energy Storage Technologies Project Type. Flywheel Energy Storage Demonstration Revision: V1.0

    SciTech Connect

    None, None

    2015-12-30

    In this program, Amber Kinetics designed, built, and tested a sub-­scale 5 kWh engineering prototype flywheel system. Applying lessons learned from the engineering prototype, Amber Kinetics then designed, built and tested full-­size, commercial-­scale 25 kWh flywheel systems. The systems underwent basic functional qualification testing before being installed, sequentially, at the company’s outdoor test site in Alameda, CA for full-­speed field-testing. The primary considerations in testing the prototype units were to demonstrate the functionality of the system, verify the frequencies of resonant modes, and quantify spinning losses and motor/generator efficiency.

  8. The Possibility of Using as a Photogrammetric Base the 1:25,000 Map for Photogrammetric Mapping at Scales of 1:10,000 and 1:5,000 -- Czechoslovakia --

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2015-08-25

    MAPPING AT SCALES OF 1:10,000 AND lr.5,000 ; .• ,’ j L ~c.:...:; ;"": - Czechoslovakia - by Vaclav Pichlik ~ \\ ’, ~;~·--"’ ,~· :.. :.!, j...25,000 HAP FOR PHCTOGRAPETRIC MAPPHG AT SCALES OF Is 10,000 AND 1:5,000 [Following is a translation of an article by Vaclav PichHk inX Czechoslovak...Czechoslovakia, as soon as mapping at ^e 1.25,000 sc-w « completed, «oik started on topographic napping at the 1:10,000 scale and in some localities

  9. Activation volume in heterogeneous deformation of Mg{sub 65}Cu{sub 12.5}Ni{sub 12.5}(Ce{sub 75}La{sub 25}){sub 10} metallic glass

    SciTech Connect

    Thurieau, Nicolas; Perrière, Loïc; Laurent-Brocq, Mathilde; Champion, Yannick

    2015-11-28

    Depth variation at constant load in instrumented nano-indentation was used to measure activation volume controlling shear band formation in the Mg{sub 65}Cu{sub 12.5}Ni{sub 12.5}(Ce{sub 75}La{sub 25}){sub 10} metallic glass. A series of measurements revealed a large scattering of the data spanning from 100 Å{sup 3} to 800 Å{sup 3}. The distribution of values, which is not following a normal one, may be attributed to the atomic structure of metallic glasses with the absence of long range order, leading to different volume fraction of shear bands for independent experiments. Activation volume is analyzed considering the variation of shear band volume fraction leading to a unique value of a true activation volume. An interpretation for the distribution of values is proposed.

  10. Effect of the current annealing (without and with tensile stress) on the soft magnetic behaviour of Fe73.5-x(Co0.5Ni0.5)xSi13.5B9Nb3Cu1 alloy ribbons (x = 2.5, 5 and 10).

    PubMed

    Iturriza, N; Nazmunnahar, M; Dominguez, L; González, J; del Val, J J

    2012-06-01

    Experimental data on microstructural (crystalline volume fraction, grain size) and magnetic (coercive field) properties in amorphous and nanocrystalline Fe73.5-x(Co0.5Ni0.5)xSi13.5B9Nb3Cu1 alloy ribbons (x = 2.5, 5 and 10) are presented. Nanocrystalline structure was developed by annealing the precursor amorphous ribbons by current annealing (CA) and stress-current-annealing (SA). Microstructural analysis of the treated ribbons using X-ray Diffraction showed a high content of amorphous phase in the bulk. In addition, substantial changes in the crystalline state such as grain size of the samples annealed at different conditions were observed. The alloy composition also affects greatly the grain size,: increasing the (Co,Ni) content leads to higher values of the average grain size. The evolutions of the coercive field with the two kinds of thermal treatment were analysed, allowing us to conclude that the addition of (Co,Ni) tends to reduce the magnetic softness character of the original material, while the treated SA samples show higher coercivities higher than those treated without by CA.

  11. Fibroblast growth factor 10 gene regulation in the second heart field by Tbx1, Nkx2-5, and Islet1 reveals a genetic switch for down-regulation in the myocardium.

    PubMed

    Watanabe, Yusuke; Zaffran, Stéphane; Kuroiwa, Atsushi; Higuchi, Hiroaki; Ogura, Toshihiko; Harvey, Richard P; Kelly, Robert G; Buckingham, Margaret

    2012-11-06

    During cardiogenesis, Fibroblast Growth Factor (Fgf10) is expressed in the anterior second heart field. Together with Fibroblast growth factor 8 (Fgf8), Fgf10 promotes the proliferation of these cardiac progenitor cells that form the arterial pole of the heart. We have identified a 1.7-kb region in the first intron of Fgf10 that is necessary and sufficient to direct transgene expression in this cardiac context. The 1.7-kb sequence is directly controlled by T-box transcription factor 1 (Tbx1) in anterior second heart field cells that contribute to the outflow tract. It also responds to both NK2 transcription factor related, locus 5 (Nkx2-5) and ISL1 transcription factor, LIM/homeodomain (Islet1), acting through overlapping sites. Mutation of these sites reduces transgene expression in the anterior second heart field where the Fgf10 regulatory element is activated by Islet1 via direct binding in vivo. Analysis of the response to Nkx2-5 loss- and Isl1 gain-of-function genetic backgrounds indicates that the observed up-regulation of its activity in Nkx2-5 mutant hearts, reflecting that of Fgf10, is due to the absence of Nkx2-5 repression and to up-regulation of Isl1, normally repressed in the myocardium by Nkx2-5. ChIP experiments show strong binding of Nkx2-5 in differentiated myocardium. Molecular and genetic analysis of the Fgf10 cardiac element therefore reveals how key cardiac transcription factors orchestrate gene expression in the anterior second heart field and how genes, such as Fgf10, normally expressed in the progenitor cell population, are repressed when these cells enter the heart and differentiate into myocardium. Our findings provide a paradigm for transcriptional mechanisms that underlie the changes in regulatory networks during the transition from progenitor state to that of the differentiated tissue.

  12. Fibroblast growth factor 10 gene regulation in the second heart field by Tbx1, Nkx2-5, and Islet1 reveals a genetic switch for down-regulation in the myocardium

    PubMed Central

    Watanabe, Yusuke; Zaffran, Stéphane; Kuroiwa, Atsushi; Higuchi, Hiroaki; Ogura, Toshihiko; Harvey, Richard P.; Kelly, Robert G.; Buckingham, Margaret

    2012-01-01

    During cardiogenesis, Fibroblast Growth Factor (Fgf10) is expressed in the anterior second heart field. Together with Fibroblast growth factor 8 (Fgf8), Fgf10 promotes the proliferation of these cardiac progenitor cells that form the arterial pole of the heart. We have identified a 1.7-kb region in the first intron of Fgf10 that is necessary and sufficient to direct transgene expression in this cardiac context. The 1.7-kb sequence is directly controlled by T-box transcription factor 1 (Tbx1) in anterior second heart field cells that contribute to the outflow tract. It also responds to both NK2 transcription factor related, locus 5 (Nkx2-5) and ISL1 transcription factor, LIM/homeodomain (Islet1), acting through overlapping sites. Mutation of these sites reduces transgene expression in the anterior second heart field where the Fgf10 regulatory element is activated by Islet1 via direct binding in vivo. Analysis of the response to Nkx2-5 loss- and Isl1 gain-of-function genetic backgrounds indicates that the observed up-regulation of its activity in Nkx2-5 mutant hearts, reflecting that of Fgf10, is due to the absence of Nkx2-5 repression and to up-regulation of Isl1, normally repressed in the myocardium by Nkx2-5. ChIP experiments show strong binding of Nkx2-5 in differentiated myocardium. Molecular and genetic analysis of the Fgf10 cardiac element therefore reveals how key cardiac transcription factors orchestrate gene expression in the anterior second heart field and how genes, such as Fgf10, normally expressed in the progenitor cell population, are repressed when these cells enter the heart and differentiate into myocardium. Our findings provide a paradigm for transcriptional mechanisms that underlie the changes in regulatory networks during the transition from progenitor state to that of the differentiated tissue. PMID:23093675

  13. Motor transport related harmful PM2.5 and PM10: from onroad measurements to the modelling of air pollution by neural network approach on street and urban level

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lozhkina, O.; Lozhkin, V.; Nevmerzhitsky, N.; Tarkhov, D.; Vasilyev, A.

    2016-11-01

    The level of PM10 and PM2.5 concentrations in the air on seven roads in St. Petersburg, Russia, were investigated using gravimetry and nephelometry measurement techniques in 2013-2015. The effects of meteorological conditions (temperature, relative humidity, wind direction, and speed) and the intensity of traffic flows on the results of the measurements were also evaluated. On the base of the measurements, there was developed a neural network modelling approach that allowed to quantify exhaust / non-exhaust PM10 and PM 2.5 emissions and carry out numerical investigations of air pollution by transport related PM2.5 and PM10 on street and urban level in St. Petersburg.

  14. A 0.06 mm2 1.0 V 2.5 mW 10 bit 250 MS/s current-steering D/A converter in 65 nm GP CMOS process

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yawei, Guo; Li, Li; Peng, Ou; Zhida, Hui; Xu, Cheng; Xiaoyang, Zeng

    2014-06-01

    A 10 bit 250 MS/s current-steering digital-to-analog converter is presented. Only standard VT core devices are available for the sake of simplicity and low cost. In order to meet the INL performance, a Monte Carlo model is built to analyze the impact of mismatch on integral nonlinearity (INL) yield with both end-point line and best-fit line. A formula is derived for the relationship of INL and output impedance. The relation of dynamic range and output impedance is also discussed. The double centroid layout is adopted for the current source array in order to mitigate the effect of electrical, process, and temperature gradient. An adapted current mirror is used to overcome the gate leakage of the current source array, which cannot be ignored in the 65 nm GP CMOS process. The digital-to-analog converter occupies 0.06 mm2, and consumes 2.5 mW from a single 1.0 V supply at 250 MS/s.

  15. 75 FR 14259 - Transportation Conformity Rule PM2.5

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-03-24

    ... Protection Agency 40 CFR Part 93 Transportation Conformity Rule PM2.5 and PM10 Amendments; Final Rule #0;#0...; ] ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY 40 CFR Part 93 RIN 2060-AP29 Transportation Conformity Rule PM 2.5 and PM 10... amending the transportation conformity rule to finalize provisions that were proposed on May 15,...

  16. 46 CFR 63.25-5 - Fired thermal fluid heaters.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 2 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Fired thermal fluid heaters. 63.25-5 Section 63.25-5... heaters. (a) Construction. Fired thermal fluid heaters must meet the requirements of part 52 of this chapter, as applicable. (b) Controls. Fired thermal fluid heaters must have a low fluid level...

  17. 5 CFR 1215.25 - Collection.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 5 Administrative Personnel 3 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Collection. 1215.25 Section 1215.25... Collection § 1215.25 Collection. (a) The MSPB will take aggressive action to collect debts and reduce delinquencies. Collection efforts shall include sending to the debtor's last known address a total of...

  18. Polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) in atmospheric PM2.5 and PM10 at a coal-based industrial city: Implication for PAH control at industrial agglomeration regions, China

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Di; Wang, Zongshuang; Chen, Jianhua; Kong, Shaofei; Fu, Xiao; Deng, Hongbing; Shao, Guofan; Wu, Gang

    2014-11-01

    Eighteen polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) in PM2.5 and PM10 are identified and quantified at five sites of E'erduosi in 2005 by GC-MS. Total PAH concentrations in PM2.5 and PM10 are in the ranges of 0.58-145.01 ng m- 3 and 5.80-180.32 ng m- 3 for the five sites, decreasing as coal-chemical base site (ZGE) > heavy industrial site (QPJ) > residential site with heavy traffic (DS) > suburban site surrounded by grassland (HJQ) > background site (QGN) for both PM2.5 and PM10. PAH concentrations in the coal-chemical base site are 250 and 31.1 times of those in the background site. Flu, Pyr, Chr, BbF, BeP, IND and BghiP are abundant for the coal-chemical base site, totally accounting for 75% of the PAH concentrations. 4, 5 and 6 rings PAHs are dominant, accounting for 88.9-94.2% and 90.5-94.1% of PAHs in PM2.5 and PM10, respectively. Combustion-derived PAH concentrations cover 42%-84% and 75%-82% of PAHs in PM2.5 and PM10, indicating large amounts of combustion sources existed for them in E'erduosi. PAH compositions between PM2.5 and PM10 are quite different from each other for sites with few human activities (HJQ and QGN) by coefficient of divergence analysis. Results obtained from principal component analysis and diagnostic ratios indicate that coal combustion, vehicle emission, wood combustion and industrial processes are the main sources for PAHs in E'erduosi. According to BaP equivalent concentration, the potential health risk of PAHs in PM2.5 at the two industrial sites ZGE and QPJ are 537 and 460 times of those for the background site. And they are 4.3 and 3.7 times of those for the residential site. The potential PAH pollution in particles at other industrial agglomeration regions that occurred in China in recent years should be paid attention by the local government.

  19. 36 CFR 2.5 - Research specimens.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... superintendent approves a written research proposal and determines that the collection will benefit science or... 36 Parks, Forests, and Public Property 1 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Research specimens. 2.5... PROTECTION, PUBLIC USE AND RECREATION § 2.5 Research specimens. (a) Taking plants, fish, wildlife, rocks...

  20. 12 CFR 2.5 - Bank compensation.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 12 Banks and Banking 1 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Bank compensation. 2.5 Section 2.5 Banks and... compensation. (a) Nothing contained in this part prohibits a bank employee, officer, director, or principal... turn over to the bank as compensation all income received from the sale of the credit life insurance...

  1. 12 CFR 2.5 - Bank compensation.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 12 Banks and Banking 1 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Bank compensation. 2.5 Section 2.5 Banks and... compensation. (a) Nothing contained in this part prohibits a bank employee, officer, director, or principal... turn over to the bank as compensation all income received from the sale of the credit life insurance...

  2. 21 CFR 25.5 - Terminology.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... effect, or if the drug is a new molecular entity. The term “use” also encompasses disposal of FDA... 21 Food and Drugs 1 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Terminology. 25.5 Section 25.5 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES GENERAL ENVIRONMENTAL...

  3. 21 CFR 25.5 - Terminology.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... effect, or if the drug is a new molecular entity. The term “use” also encompasses disposal of FDA... 21 Food and Drugs 1 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Terminology. 25.5 Section 25.5 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES GENERAL ENVIRONMENTAL...

  4. 36 CFR 2.5 - Research specimens.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 36 Parks, Forests, and Public Property 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Research specimens. 2.5... PROTECTION, PUBLIC USE AND RECREATION § 2.5 Research specimens. (a) Taking plants, fish, wildlife, rocks or... Federal agency for the purpose of research, baseline inventories, monitoring, impact analysis, group...

  5. 28 CFR 2.5 - Sentence aggregation.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 28 Judicial Administration 1 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Sentence aggregation. 2.5 Section 2.5 Judicial Administration DEPARTMENT OF JUSTICE PAROLE, RELEASE, SUPERVISION AND RECOMMITMENT OF PRISONERS... by the Commission pursuant to these rules, and the prisoner has a single parole eligibility date...

  6. 28 CFR 2.5 - Sentence aggregation.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 28 Judicial Administration 1 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Sentence aggregation. 2.5 Section 2.5 Judicial Administration DEPARTMENT OF JUSTICE PAROLE, RELEASE, SUPERVISION AND RECOMMITMENT OF PRISONERS... by the Commission pursuant to these rules, and the prisoner has a single parole eligibility date...

  7. 28 CFR 2.5 - Sentence aggregation.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 28 Judicial Administration 1 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Sentence aggregation. 2.5 Section 2.5 Judicial Administration DEPARTMENT OF JUSTICE PAROLE, RELEASE, SUPERVISION AND RECOMMITMENT OF PRISONERS... by the Commission pursuant to these rules, and the prisoner has a single parole eligibility date...

  8. 28 CFR 2.5 - Sentence aggregation.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 28 Judicial Administration 1 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Sentence aggregation. 2.5 Section 2.5 Judicial Administration DEPARTMENT OF JUSTICE PAROLE, RELEASE, SUPERVISION AND RECOMMITMENT OF PRISONERS... by the Commission pursuant to these rules, and the prisoner has a single parole eligibility date...

  9. 36 CFR 2.5 - Research specimens.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 36 Parks, Forests, and Public Property 1 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Research specimens. 2.5... PROTECTION, PUBLIC USE AND RECREATION § 2.5 Research specimens. (a) Taking plants, fish, wildlife, rocks or... Federal agency for the purpose of research, baseline inventories, monitoring, impact analysis, group...

  10. Analysis of sex differences in open-water ultra-distance swimming performances in the FINA World Cup races in 5 km, 10 km and 25 km from 2000 to 2012

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background The present study investigated the changes in swimming speeds and sex differences for elite male and female swimmers competing in 5 km, 10 km and 25 km open-water FINA World Cup races held between 2000 and 2012. Methods The changes in swimming speeds and sex differences across years were analysed using linear, non-linear, and multi-level regression analyses for the annual fastest and the annual ten fastest competitors. Results For the annual fastest, swimming speed remained stable for men and women in 5 km (5.50 ± 0.21 and 5.08 ± 0.19 km/h, respectively), in 10 km (5.38 ± 0.21 and 5.05 ± 0.26 km/h, respectively) and in 25 km (5.03 ± 0.32 and 4.58 ± 0.27 km/h, respectively). In the annual ten fastest, swimming speed remained constant in 5 km in women (5.02 ± 0.19 km/h) but decreased significantly and linearly in men from 5.42 ± 0.03 km/h to 5.39 ± 0.02 km/h. In 10 km, swimming speed increased significantly and linearly in women from 4.75 ± 0.01 km/h to 5.74 ± 0.01 km/h but remained stable in men at 5.36 ± 0.21 km/h. In 25 km, swimming speed decreased significantly and linearly in women from 4.60 ± 0.06 km/h to 4.44 ± 0.08 km/h but remained unchanged at 4.93 ± 0.34 km/h in men. For the annual fastest, the sex difference in swimming speed remained unchanged in 5 km (7.6 ± 3.0%), 10 km (6.1 ± 2.5%) and 25 km (9.0 ± 3.7%). For the annual ten fastest, the sex difference remained stable in 5 km at 7.6 ± 0.6%, decreased significantly and linearly in 10 km from 7.7 ± 0.7% to 1.2 ± 0.3% and increased significantly and linearly from 4.7 ± 1.4% to 9.6 ± 1.5% in 25 km. Conclusions To summarize, elite female open-water ultra-distance swimmers improved in 10 km but impaired in 25 km leading to a linear decrease in sex difference in 10 km and a linear increase in sex difference in 25 km. The linear changes in sex differences

  11. The Internet Time Lag: Anticipating the Long-Term Consequences of the Information Revolution. A Report of the Annual Aspen Institute Roundtable on Information Technology (10th, Aspen, Colorado, August 2-5, 2001).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schwartz, Evan I.

    This is a report of the 10th annual Aspen Institute Roundtable on Information Technology (Aspen, Colorado, August 2-5, 2001). Participants were also polled after the events of September 11, and these comments have been integrated into the report. The mission of this report is to take a wide-ranging look at the trends that are defining the next new…

  12. The exposure assessment of airborne particulates matter (PM10 & PM2.5) towards building occupants: A case study at KL Sentral, Kuala Lumpur, Malaysia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mohddin, S. A.; Aminuddin, N. M.

    2014-02-01

    Airborne particulates have been recognized as a crucial pollutant of indoor air. These pollutants can contribute towards poor indoor air quality (IAQ), which may affect human health in immediate or long term. This study aims to determine the level of IAQ and the effects of particulate towards occupants of office buildings (the office buildings selected for the case study are SSM, KTMB and MRCB at KL Sentral). The objectives of study are (i) to measure the level of airborne particulates that contribute to the IAQ during working hours, (ii) to compare the level of airborne particulates with the existing guidelines and standards of IAQ in Malaysia and other Asian countries and (iii) to assess the symptoms associated with airborne particulates among the building occupants, which were achieved through primary data collection (case study or site survey, structured interview and questionnaire survey) and supported by literature reviews. The results showed that the mass concentration level of airborne particulates within the areas has exceeded the allowable limit of 0.15mg/m3 by IAQ Code of Practice, 2005 of the Department of Safety and Health (DOSH), Malaysia and 0.05mg/m3 by the Department of Environmental (DOE) (outdoor) of 8 hours continuous sampling. Based on the findings, the highest mass concentration values measured is 2.581 mg/m3 at lobby of SSM building which is the highest recorded 17 times higher from the maximum limit recommended by DOSH than the others. This is due to the nearby construction works and the high numbers of particulates are generated from various types of vehicles for transportation surrounding KL Sentral. Therefore, the development of Malaysian Ambient Air Quality Guidelines on PM2.5 as one of the crucial parameters is highly recommended.

  13. 46 CFR 25.25-5 - Life preservers and other lifesaving equipment required.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 1 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Life preservers and other lifesaving equipment required... REQUIREMENTS Life Preservers and Other Lifesaving Equipment § 25.25-5 Life preservers and other lifesaving... must have at least one life preserver (Type I PFD), buoyant vest (Type II PFD), or marine...

  14. 46 CFR 25.25-5 - Life preservers and other lifesaving equipment required.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 1 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Life preservers and other lifesaving equipment required... REQUIREMENTS Life Preservers and Other Lifesaving Equipment § 25.25-5 Life preservers and other lifesaving... must have at least one life preserver (Type I PFD), buoyant vest (Type II PFD), or marine...

  15. 46 CFR 25.25-5 - Life preservers and other lifesaving equipment required.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 1 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Life preservers and other lifesaving equipment required... REQUIREMENTS Life Preservers and Other Lifesaving Equipment § 25.25-5 Life preservers and other lifesaving... must have at least one life preserver (Type I PFD), buoyant vest (Type II PFD), or marine...

  16. 5 CFR 1312.25 - Storage.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ..., DECLASSIFICATION AND SAFEGUARDING OF NATIONAL SECURITY INFORMATION Control and Accountability of Classified Information § 1312.25 Storage. All classified material in the possession of OMB will be stored in a GSA... 5 Administrative Personnel 3 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Storage. 1312.25 Section...

  17. 5 CFR 1312.25 - Storage.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 5 Administrative Personnel 3 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Storage. 1312.25 Section 1312.25 Administrative Personnel OFFICE OF MANAGEMENT AND BUDGET OMB DIRECTIVES CLASSIFICATION, DOWNGRADING... service, or at least once a year. Knowledge of combinations will be limited to the minimum number...

  18. Electrochemical and photoelectrochemical oxidation of 5-hydroxymethylfurfural to 2,5-furandicarboxylic acid and 2,5-diformylfuran

    DOEpatents

    Choi, Kyoung-Shin; Cha, Hyun Gil

    2017-03-21

    Electrochemical and photoelectrochemical cells for the oxidation of 5-hydroxymethylfurfural to 2,5-furandicarboxylic acid and/or 2,5-diformylfuran are provided. Also provided are methods of using the cells to carry out the electrochemical and photoelectrochemical oxidation of 5-hydroxymethylfurfural to 2,5-furandicarboxylic acid and/or 2,5-diformylfuran.

  19. 40 CFR 25.5 - Public hearings.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... RESOURCE CONSERVATION AND RECOVERY ACT, THE SAFE DRINKING WATER ACT, AND THE CLEAN WATER ACT § 25.5 Public... the three Acts shall meet the following minimum requirements. These requirements are subordinate...

  20. 40 CFR 25.5 - Public hearings.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... RESOURCE CONSERVATION AND RECOVERY ACT, THE SAFE DRINKING WATER ACT, AND THE CLEAN WATER ACT § 25.5 Public... the three Acts shall meet the following minimum requirements. These requirements are subordinate...

  1. 40 CFR 25.5 - Public hearings.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... RESOURCE CONSERVATION AND RECOVERY ACT, THE SAFE DRINKING WATER ACT, AND THE CLEAN WATER ACT § 25.5 Public... the three Acts shall meet the following minimum requirements. These requirements are subordinate...

  2. 46 CFR 76.25-5 - Zoning.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... System, Details § 76.25-5 Zoning. (a) The automatic sprinkling system shall be divided into separate... more than 250 sprinkler heads. (c) The sprinkling zone may cover more than one deck, in which case,...

  3. 25 CFR 168.5 - Grazing capacity.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 25 Indians 1 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Grazing capacity. 168.5 Section 168.5 Indians BUREAU OF INDIAN AFFAIRS, DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR LAND AND WATER GRAZING REGULATIONS FOR THE HOPI PARTITIONED LANDS AREA § 168.5 Grazing capacity. (a) The Area Director shall prescribe the maximum number of...

  4. 25 CFR 168.5 - Grazing capacity.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 25 Indians 1 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Grazing capacity. 168.5 Section 168.5 Indians BUREAU OF INDIAN AFFAIRS, DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR LAND AND WATER GRAZING REGULATIONS FOR THE HOPI PARTITIONED LANDS AREA § 168.5 Grazing capacity. (a) The Area Director shall prescribe the maximum number of...

  5. 25 CFR 40.5 - Repayments.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 25 Indians 1 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Repayments. 40.5 Section 40.5 Indians BUREAU OF INDIAN AFFAIRS, DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR EDUCATION ADMINISTRATION OF EDUCATIONAL LOANS, GRANTS AND OTHER ASSISTANCE FOR HIGHER EDUCATION § 40.5 Repayments. Repayment schedules for educational loans may provide...

  6. 25 CFR 40.5 - Repayments.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 25 Indians 1 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Repayments. 40.5 Section 40.5 Indians BUREAU OF INDIAN AFFAIRS, DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR EDUCATION ADMINISTRATION OF EDUCATIONAL LOANS, GRANTS AND OTHER ASSISTANCE FOR HIGHER EDUCATION § 40.5 Repayments. Repayment schedules for educational loans may provide...

  7. 25 CFR 558.5 - License suspension.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 25 Indians 2 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false License suspension. 558.5 Section 558.5 Indians NATIONAL... MANAGEMENT OFFICIALS § 558.5 License suspension. (a) If, after the issuance of a gaming license, the... tribe shall suspend such license and shall notify in writing the licensee of the suspension and...

  8. 25 CFR 40.5 - Repayments.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 25 Indians 1 2012-04-01 2011-04-01 true Repayments. 40.5 Section 40.5 Indians BUREAU OF INDIAN AFFAIRS, DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR EDUCATION ADMINISTRATION OF EDUCATIONAL LOANS, GRANTS AND OTHER ASSISTANCE FOR HIGHER EDUCATION § 40.5 Repayments. Repayment schedules for educational loans may provide...

  9. 25 CFR 175.5 - Operations manual.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 25 Indians 1 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Operations manual. 175.5 Section 175.5 Indians BUREAU OF INDIAN AFFAIRS, DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR LAND AND WATER INDIAN ELECTRIC POWER UTILITIES General Provisions § 175.5 Operations manual. (a) The Area Director shall establish an operations manual for...

  10. 25 CFR 175.5 - Operations manual.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 25 Indians 1 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Operations manual. 175.5 Section 175.5 Indians BUREAU OF INDIAN AFFAIRS, DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR LAND AND WATER INDIAN ELECTRIC POWER UTILITIES General Provisions § 175.5 Operations manual. (a) The Area Director shall establish an operations manual for...

  11. 25 CFR 175.5 - Operations manual.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 25 Indians 1 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Operations manual. 175.5 Section 175.5 Indians BUREAU OF INDIAN AFFAIRS, DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR LAND AND WATER INDIAN ELECTRIC POWER UTILITIES General Provisions § 175.5 Operations manual. (a) The Area Director shall establish an operations manual for...

  12. 25 CFR 175.5 - Operations manual.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 25 Indians 1 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Operations manual. 175.5 Section 175.5 Indians BUREAU OF INDIAN AFFAIRS, DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR LAND AND WATER INDIAN ELECTRIC POWER UTILITIES General Provisions § 175.5 Operations manual. (a) The Area Director shall establish an operations manual for...

  13. 25 CFR 175.5 - Operations manual.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 25 Indians 1 2012-04-01 2011-04-01 true Operations manual. 175.5 Section 175.5 Indians BUREAU OF INDIAN AFFAIRS, DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR LAND AND WATER INDIAN ELECTRIC POWER UTILITIES General Provisions § 175.5 Operations manual. (a) The Area Director shall establish an operations manual for...

  14. 25 CFR 168.5 - Grazing capacity.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 25 Indians 1 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Grazing capacity. 168.5 Section 168.5 Indians BUREAU OF INDIAN AFFAIRS, DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR LAND AND WATER GRAZING REGULATIONS FOR THE HOPI PARTITIONED LANDS AREA § 168.5 Grazing capacity. (a) The Area Director shall prescribe the maximum number of...

  15. 25 CFR 168.5 - Grazing capacity.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 25 Indians 1 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Grazing capacity. 168.5 Section 168.5 Indians BUREAU OF INDIAN AFFAIRS, DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR LAND AND WATER GRAZING REGULATIONS FOR THE HOPI PARTITIONED LANDS AREA § 168.5 Grazing capacity. (a) The Area Director shall prescribe the maximum number of...

  16. 25 CFR 168.5 - Grazing capacity.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 25 Indians 1 2012-04-01 2011-04-01 true Grazing capacity. 168.5 Section 168.5 Indians BUREAU OF INDIAN AFFAIRS, DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR LAND AND WATER GRAZING REGULATIONS FOR THE HOPI PARTITIONED LANDS AREA § 168.5 Grazing capacity. (a) The Area Director shall prescribe the maximum number of...

  17. Study of the chemical elements and polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons in atmospheric particles of PM 10 and PM 2.5 in the urban and rural areas of South Brazil

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dallarosa, Juliana; Calesso Teixeira, Elba; Meira, Lindolfo; Wiegand, Flavio

    2008-07-01

    The purpose of this work is to study the chemical elements and PAHs associated with atmospheric particulate in samples of PM 10 collected in the Metropolitan Area of Porto Alegre—MAPA, Rio Grande do Sul, Brazil. In addition, to study the chemical elements associated with particles of different fractions of PM 10-2.5 and PM 2.5 using dichotomous sampling, in urban (MAPA) and rural areas. Two types of samplers were used: HV PM 10 and Dichotomous (PM 10-2.5 and PM 2.5). Samples were collected during 2002 and 2005. The concentration of the elements Si, S, Cl, K, Ca, Ti, V, Cr, Mn, Fe, Ni, Cu, and Zn was determined by PIXE (Particle-Induced X-ray Emission), while the concentrations of 16 major PAHs were determined according to EPA with a gas chromatograph coupled to a mass spectrometer (GS/MS). Results showed that elements of anthropogenic origin (V, Zn, Cr, Ni, Cu, and S) were mainly associated with the fraction PM 2.5, while the soil dust (Si, Al, Ti and Fe) were found mainly on fraction PM 10-2.5. In samples of PM 10, the most frequent PAHs found were Bgp, Flt, BaA, Chr, B(b + k)F, BaP and Dba. The types of emission and their association with the atmospheric parameters were studied applying the statistical analysis of the principal component method. The main sources found in the area under study were vehicles, industries (steel mills and a coal-fired power station), dust, sea breeze, and burning.

  18. PM2.5 emission elemental composition.

    PubMed

    Mugica, Violetta; Mugica, Francisco; Torres, M; Figueroa, J

    2008-03-17

    A field study was carried out from 2003 to 2004 with the aim to develop the PM2.5 emission source profiles from light duty gasoline and heavy-duty diesel vehicles, as well as emission source profiles from waste incineration, wood burning and meatbroiling. Over 25 chemical species were quantified from the fine particles emitted by the different combustion sources investigated, including organic and elemental carbon, ions and elements. The OC/TC ratio found in the different PM2.5 profiles was dissimilar as well as the sulfate, nitrate, ammonium, soil species and trace element content. Consequently these combustion emission profiles could be used in source reconciliation studies for fine particles.A field study was carried out from 2003 to 2004 with the aim to develop the PM2.5 emission source profiles from light-duty gasoline and heavy-duty diesel vehicles, as well as emission source profiles from waste incineration, wood burning, LP gas combustion, and meat broiling. Over 25 chemical species were quantified from the fine particles emitted by the different combustion sources investigated, including organic and elemental carbon, ions, and elements. The OC/TC ratio found in the different PM2.5 profiles was dissimilar as well as the sulfate, nitrate, ammonium, soil species, and trace element content. Consequently, these combustion emission profiles could be used in source reconciliation studies for fine particles.

  19. 25 CFR 217.5 - Management decisions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 25 Indians 1 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Management decisions. 217.5 Section 217.5 Indians BUREAU OF INDIAN AFFAIRS, DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR ENERGY AND MINERALS MANAGEMENT OF TRIBAL ASSETS OF UTE... Management decisions. In arriving at management decisions concerning the assets, the business committee...

  20. 25 CFR 217.5 - Management decisions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 25 Indians 1 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Management decisions. 217.5 Section 217.5 Indians BUREAU OF INDIAN AFFAIRS, DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR ENERGY AND MINERALS MANAGEMENT OF TRIBAL ASSETS OF UTE... Management decisions. In arriving at management decisions concerning the assets, the business committee...

  1. 25 CFR 217.5 - Management decisions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 25 Indians 1 2012-04-01 2011-04-01 true Management decisions. 217.5 Section 217.5 Indians BUREAU OF INDIAN AFFAIRS, DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR ENERGY AND MINERALS MANAGEMENT OF TRIBAL ASSETS OF UTE... Management decisions. In arriving at management decisions concerning the assets, the business committee...

  2. 25 CFR 217.5 - Management decisions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 25 Indians 1 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Management decisions. 217.5 Section 217.5 Indians BUREAU OF INDIAN AFFAIRS, DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR ENERGY AND MINERALS MANAGEMENT OF TRIBAL ASSETS OF UTE... Management decisions. In arriving at management decisions concerning the assets, the business committee...

  3. 25 CFR 217.5 - Management decisions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 25 Indians 1 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Management decisions. 217.5 Section 217.5 Indians BUREAU OF INDIAN AFFAIRS, DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR ENERGY AND MINERALS MANAGEMENT OF TRIBAL ASSETS OF UTE... Management decisions. In arriving at management decisions concerning the assets, the business committee...

  4. 46 CFR 62.25-10 - Manual alternate control systems.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 2 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Manual alternate control systems. 62.25-10 Section 62.25-10 Shipping COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY (CONTINUED) MARINE ENGINEERING VITAL SYSTEM AUTOMATION General Requirements for All Automated Vital Systems § 62.25-10 Manual alternate control...

  5. 46 CFR 62.25-10 - Manual alternate control systems.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 2 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Manual alternate control systems. 62.25-10 Section 62.25-10 Shipping COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY (CONTINUED) MARINE ENGINEERING VITAL SYSTEM AUTOMATION General Requirements for All Automated Vital Systems § 62.25-10 Manual alternate control...

  6. 46 CFR 62.25-10 - Manual alternate control systems.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 2 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Manual alternate control systems. 62.25-10 Section 62.25-10 Shipping COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY (CONTINUED) MARINE ENGINEERING VITAL SYSTEM AUTOMATION General Requirements for All Automated Vital Systems § 62.25-10 Manual alternate control...

  7. 46 CFR 189.25-10 - Scope of inspection.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 7 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Scope of inspection. 189.25-10 Section 189.25-10 Shipping COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY (CONTINUED) OCEANOGRAPHIC RESEARCH VESSELS INSPECTION AND CERTIFICATION Inspection for Certification § 189.25-10 Scope of inspection. (a) The inspection...

  8. 46 CFR 105.10-25 - Commercial fishing vessel.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 4 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Commercial fishing vessel. 105.10-25 Section 105.10-25... COMMERCIAL FISHING VESSELS DISPENSING PETROLEUM PRODUCTS Definition of Terms Used in This Part § 105.10-25 Commercial fishing vessel. (a) The term commercial fishing vessel includes fishing vessels, cannery...

  9. 46 CFR 105.10-25 - Commercial fishing vessel.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 4 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Commercial fishing vessel. 105.10-25 Section 105.10-25... COMMERCIAL FISHING VESSELS DISPENSING PETROLEUM PRODUCTS Definition of Terms Used in This Part § 105.10-25 Commercial fishing vessel. (a) The term commercial fishing vessel includes fishing vessels, cannery...

  10. 46 CFR 92.25-10 - Storm rails.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 4 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Storm rails. 92.25-10 Section 92.25-10 Shipping COAST... ARRANGEMENT Rails and Guards § 92.25-10 Storm rails. (a) On vessels in ocean and coastwise service, suitable storm rails shall be installed in all passageways and at the deckhouse sides where persons on...

  11. 46 CFR 92.25-10 - Storm rails.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 4 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Storm rails. 92.25-10 Section 92.25-10 Shipping COAST... ARRANGEMENT Rails and Guards § 92.25-10 Storm rails. (a) On vessels in ocean and coastwise service, suitable storm rails shall be installed in all passageways and at the deckhouse sides where persons on...

  12. 46 CFR 92.25-10 - Storm rails.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 4 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Storm rails. 92.25-10 Section 92.25-10 Shipping COAST... ARRANGEMENT Rails and Guards § 92.25-10 Storm rails. (a) On vessels in ocean and coastwise service, suitable storm rails shall be installed in all passageways and at the deckhouse sides where persons on...

  13. 46 CFR 92.25-10 - Storm rails.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 4 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Storm rails. 92.25-10 Section 92.25-10 Shipping COAST... ARRANGEMENT Rails and Guards § 92.25-10 Storm rails. (a) On vessels in ocean and coastwise service, suitable storm rails shall be installed in all passageways and at the deckhouse sides where persons on...

  14. 46 CFR 190.25-10 - Storm rails.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 7 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Storm rails. 190.25-10 Section 190.25-10 Shipping COAST... ARRANGEMENT Rails and Guards § 190.25-10 Storm rails. (a) On vessels in ocean and coastwise service, suitable storm rails shall be installed in all passageways and at the deckhouse sides where persons on...

  15. 46 CFR 190.25-10 - Storm rails.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 7 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Storm rails. 190.25-10 Section 190.25-10 Shipping COAST... ARRANGEMENT Rails and Guards § 190.25-10 Storm rails. (a) On vessels in ocean and coastwise service, suitable storm rails shall be installed in all passageways and at the deckhouse sides where persons on...

  16. 46 CFR 190.25-10 - Storm rails.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 7 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Storm rails. 190.25-10 Section 190.25-10 Shipping COAST... ARRANGEMENT Rails and Guards § 190.25-10 Storm rails. (a) On vessels in ocean and coastwise service, suitable storm rails shall be installed in all passageways and at the deckhouse sides where persons on...

  17. 46 CFR 190.25-10 - Storm rails.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 7 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Storm rails. 190.25-10 Section 190.25-10 Shipping COAST... ARRANGEMENT Rails and Guards § 190.25-10 Storm rails. (a) On vessels in ocean and coastwise service, suitable storm rails shall be installed in all passageways and at the deckhouse sides where persons on...

  18. 46 CFR 92.25-10 - Storm rails.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 4 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Storm rails. 92.25-10 Section 92.25-10 Shipping COAST... ARRANGEMENT Rails and Guards § 92.25-10 Storm rails. (a) On vessels in ocean and coastwise service, suitable storm rails shall be installed in all passageways and at the deckhouse sides where persons on...

  19. 46 CFR 190.25-10 - Storm rails.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 7 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Storm rails. 190.25-10 Section 190.25-10 Shipping COAST... ARRANGEMENT Rails and Guards § 190.25-10 Storm rails. (a) On vessels in ocean and coastwise service, suitable storm rails shall be installed in all passageways and at the deckhouse sides where persons on...

  20. 46 CFR 50.10-25 - Coast Guard Symbol.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 2 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Coast Guard Symbol. 50.10-25 Section 50.10-25 Shipping COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY (CONTINUED) MARINE ENGINEERING GENERAL PROVISIONS Definition of Terms Used in This Subchapter § 50.10-25 Coast Guard Symbol. (a) The term Coast Guard...

  1. 46 CFR 50.10-25 - Coast Guard Symbol.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 2 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Coast Guard Symbol. 50.10-25 Section 50.10-25 Shipping COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY (CONTINUED) MARINE ENGINEERING GENERAL PROVISIONS Definition of Terms Used in This Subchapter § 50.10-25 Coast Guard Symbol. (a) The term Coast Guard...

  2. 46 CFR 50.10-25 - Coast Guard Symbol.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 2 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Coast Guard Symbol. 50.10-25 Section 50.10-25 Shipping COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY (CONTINUED) MARINE ENGINEERING GENERAL PROVISIONS Definition of Terms Used in This Subchapter § 50.10-25 Coast Guard Symbol. (a) The term Coast Guard...

  3. 46 CFR 50.10-25 - Coast Guard Symbol.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 2 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Coast Guard Symbol. 50.10-25 Section 50.10-25 Shipping COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY (CONTINUED) MARINE ENGINEERING GENERAL PROVISIONS Definition of Terms Used in This Subchapter § 50.10-25 Coast Guard Symbol. (a) The term Coast Guard...

  4. 46 CFR 50.10-25 - Coast Guard Symbol.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 2 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Coast Guard Symbol. 50.10-25 Section 50.10-25 Shipping COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY (CONTINUED) MARINE ENGINEERING GENERAL PROVISIONS Definition of Terms Used in This Subchapter § 50.10-25 Coast Guard Symbol. (a) The term Coast Guard...

  5. 46 CFR 34.25-10 - Controls-T/ALL.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 1 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Controls-T/ALL. 34.25-10 Section 34.25-10 Shipping COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY TANK VESSELS FIREFIGHTING EQUIPMENT Water Spray Extinguishing Systems, Details § 34.25-10 Controls—T/ALL. (a) There shall be one control valve for the operation of...

  6. 43 CFR 2522.5 - Act of February 25, 1925.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 43 Public Lands: Interior 2 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Act of February 25, 1925. 2522.5 Section 2522.5 Public Lands: Interior Regulations Relating to Public Lands (Continued) BUREAU OF LAND MANAGEMENT, DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR LAND RESOURCE MANAGEMENT (2000) DESERT-LAND ENTRIES Extensions of...

  7. 43 CFR 2522.5 - Act of February 25, 1925.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 43 Public Lands: Interior 2 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Act of February 25, 1925. 2522.5 Section 2522.5 Public Lands: Interior Regulations Relating to Public Lands (Continued) BUREAU OF LAND MANAGEMENT, DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR LAND RESOURCE MANAGEMENT (2000) DESERT-LAND ENTRIES Extensions of...

  8. 43 CFR 2522.5 - Act of February 25, 1925.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 43 Public Lands: Interior 2 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Act of February 25, 1925. 2522.5 Section 2522.5 Public Lands: Interior Regulations Relating to Public Lands (Continued) BUREAU OF LAND MANAGEMENT, DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR LAND RESOURCE MANAGEMENT (2000) DESERT-LAND ENTRIES Extensions of...

  9. 43 CFR 2522.5 - Act of February 25, 1925.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 43 Public Lands: Interior 2 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Act of February 25, 1925. 2522.5 Section 2522.5 Public Lands: Interior Regulations Relating to Public Lands (Continued) BUREAU OF LAND MANAGEMENT, DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR LAND RESOURCE MANAGEMENT (2000) DESERT-LAND ENTRIES Extensions of...

  10. 46 CFR 62.25-10 - Manual alternate control systems.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 2 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Manual alternate control systems. 62.25-10 Section 62.25... AUTOMATION General Requirements for All Automated Vital Systems § 62.25-10 Manual alternate control systems. (a) Manual alternate control systems must— (1) Be operable in an emergency and after a remote...

  11. 46 CFR 62.25-10 - Manual alternate control systems.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 2 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Manual alternate control systems. 62.25-10 Section 62.25... AUTOMATION General Requirements for All Automated Vital Systems § 62.25-10 Manual alternate control systems. (a) Manual alternate control systems must— (1) Be operable in an emergency and after a remote...

  12. Turbojet-exhaust-nozzle secondary-airflow pumping as an exit control of an inlet-stability bypass system for a Mach 2.5 axisymmetric mixed-compression inlet. [Lewis 10- by 10-ft. supersonic wind tunnel test

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sanders, B. W.

    1980-01-01

    The throat of a Mach 2.5 inlet that was attached to a turbojet engine was fitted with large, porous bleed areas to provide a stability bypass system that would allow a large, stable airflow range. Exhaust-nozzle, secondary-airflow pumping was used as the exit control for the stability bypass airflow. Propulsion system response and stability bypass performance were obtained for several transient airflow disturbances, both internal and external. Internal airflow disturbances included reductions in overboard bypass airflow, power lever angle, and primary-nozzle area, as well as compressor stall. Nozzle secondary pumping as a stability bypass exit control can provide the inlet with a large stability margin with no adverse effects on propulsion system performance.

  13. 40 CFR 25.5 - Public hearings.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... RESOURCE CONSERVATION AND RECOVERY ACT, THE SAFE DRINKING WATER ACT, AND THE CLEAN WATER ACT § 25.5 Public... discussion of the agency's tentative determination on major issues (if any), information on the availability... inform the audience of the issues involved in the decision to be made, the considerations the agency...

  14. 46 CFR 58.25-5 - General.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ...; and (3) Propulsion machinery for an integrated system of propulsion and steering. (g) Except on a vessel with an integrated system of propulsion and steering, no thruster may count as part of a vessel's... SYSTEMS Steering Gear § 58.25-5 General. (a) Definitions. Ancillary steering equipment means...

  15. 40 CFR 25.5 - Public hearings.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... RESOURCE CONSERVATION AND RECOVERY ACT, THE SAFE DRINKING WATER ACT, AND THE CLEAN WATER ACT § 25.5 Public... discussion of the agency's tentative determination on major issues (if any), information on the availability... inform the audience of the issues involved in the decision to be made, the considerations the agency...

  16. Kerb and urban increment of highly time-resolved trace elements in PM10, PM2.5 and PM1.0 winter aerosol in London during ClearfLo 2012

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Visser, S.; Slowik, J. G.; Furger, M.; Zotter, P.; Bukowiecki, N.; Dressler, R.; Flechsig, U.; Appel, K.; Green, D. C.; Tremper, A. H.; Young, D. E.; Williams, P. I.; Allan, J. D.; Herndon, S. C.; Williams, L. R.; Mohr, C.; Xu, L.; Ng, N. L.; Detournay, A.; Barlow, J. F.; Halios, C. H.; Fleming, Z. L.; Baltensperger, U.; Prévôt, A. S. H.

    2014-06-01

    Ambient concentrations of trace elements with 2 h time resolution were measured in PM10-2.5, PM2.5-1.0 and PM1.0-0.3 size ranges at kerbside, urban background and rural sites in London during winter 2012. Samples were collected using rotating drum impactors (RDIs) and subsequently analysed with synchrotron radiation-induced X-ray fluorescence spectrometry (SR-XRF). Quantification of kerb and urban increments (defined as kerb-to-urban and urban-to-rural concentration ratios, respectively), and assessment of diurnal and weekly variability provided insight into sources governing urban air quality and the effects of urban micro-environments on human exposure. Traffic-related elements yielded the highest kerb increments, with values in the range of 11.6 to 18.5 for SW winds (3.6-9.4 for NE) observed for elements influenced by brake wear (e.g. Cu, Sb, Ba) and 5.6 to 8.0 for SW (2.6-6.5 for NE) for other traffic-related processes (e.g. Cr, Fe, Zn). Kerb increments for these elements were highest in the PM10-2.5 mass fraction, roughly 3 times that of the PM1.0-0.3 fraction. These elements also showed the highest urban increments (∼3.0), although no difference was observed between brake wear and other traffic-related elements. Traffic-related elements exhibited higher concentrations during morning and evening rush hour, and on weekdays compared to weekends, with the strongest trends observed at the kerbside site, and additionally enhanced by winds coming directly from the road, consistent with street canyon effects. Elements related to mineral dust (e.g. Al, Ca, Sr) showed significant influences from traffic-induced resuspension, as evidenced by moderate kerb (2.0-4.1 for SW, 1.4-2.1 for NE) and urban (1.7-2.3) increments and increased concentrations during peak traffic flow. Elements related to regional transport showed no significant enhancement at kerb or urban sites, with the exception of PM10-2.5 sea salt (factor of 1.5-2.0), which may be influenced by traffic

  17. Kerb and urban increment of highly time-resolved trace elements in PM10, PM2.5 and PM1.0 winter aerosol in London during ClearfLo 2012

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Visser, S.; Slowik, J. G.; Furger, M.; Zotter, P.; Bukowiecki, N.; Dressler, R.; Flechsig, U.; Appel, K.; Green, D. C.; Tremper, A. H.; Young, D. E.; Williams, P. I.; Allan, J. D.; Herndon, S. C.; Williams, L. R.; Mohr, C.; Xu, L.; Ng, N. L.; Detournay, A.; Barlow, J. F.; Halios, C. H.; Fleming, Z. L.; Baltensperger, U.; Prévôt, A. S. H.

    2015-03-01

    Ambient concentrations of trace elements with 2 h time resolution were measured in PM10-2.5, PM2.5-1.0 and PM1.0-0.3 size ranges at kerbside, urban background and rural sites in London during winter 2012. Samples were collected using rotating drum impactors (RDIs) and subsequently analysed with synchrotron radiation-induced X-ray fluorescence spectrometry (SR-XRF). Quantification of kerb and urban increments (defined as kerb-to-urban and urban-to-rural concentration ratios, respectively), and assessment of diurnal and weekly variability provided insight into sources governing urban air quality and the effects of urban micro-environments on human exposure. Traffic-related elements yielded the highest kerb increments, with values in the range of 10.4 to 16.6 for SW winds (3.3-6.9 for NE) observed for elements influenced by brake wear (e.g. Cu, Sb, Ba) and 5.7 to 8.2 for SW (2.6-3.0 for NE) for other traffic-related processes (e.g. Cr, Fe, Zn). Kerb increments for these elements were highest in the PM10-2.5 mass fraction, roughly twice that of the PM1.0-0.3 fraction. These elements also showed the highest urban increments (~ 3.0), although no difference was observed between brake wear and other traffic-related elements. All elements influenced by traffic exhibited higher concentrations during morning and evening rush hours, and on weekdays compared to weekends, with the strongest trends observed at the kerbside site, and additionally enhanced by winds coming directly from the road, consistent with street canyon effects. Elements related to mineral dust (e.g. Al, Si, Ca, Sr) showed significant influences from traffic-induced resuspension, as evidenced by moderate kerb (3.4-5.4 for SW, 1.7-2.3 for NE) and urban (~ 2) increments and increased concentrations during peak traffic flow. Elements related to regional transport showed no significant enhancement at kerb or urban sites, with the exception of PM10-2.5 sea salt (factor of up to 2), which may be influenced by

  18. 10 CFR 1016.25 - Protective personnel.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY (GENERAL PROVISIONS) SAFEGUARDING OF RESTRICTED DATA Physical Security § 1016.25... shall: (a) Possess a “Q” or “L” security clearance or access authorization or “Q(X)” or “L(X)” access authorization if the Restricted Data being protected is classified Confidential, or a “Q” security clearance...

  19. 10 CFR 25.5 - Definitions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... classified information. Act means the Atomic Energy Act of 1954 (68 Stat. 919), as amended. Certificate... information means either classified National Security Information, Restricted Data, or Formerly Restricted Data or any one of them. It is the generic term for information requiring protection in the interest...

  20. 25 CFR 214.10 - Royalty rates.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ...) For gold, silver, or copper lessee shall pay quarterly a royalty of 10 percent to be computed on the... crude material, and 60 cents per ton on refined substances. (d) For substances other than gold, silver, copper, lead, zinc, coal, and asphaltum the lessee shall pay quarterly a royalty of 10 percent of...

  1. 25 CFR 214.10 - Royalty rates.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ...) For gold, silver, or copper lessee shall pay quarterly a royalty of 10 percent to be computed on the... crude material, and 60 cents per ton on refined substances. (d) For substances other than gold, silver, copper, lead, zinc, coal, and asphaltum the lessee shall pay quarterly a royalty of 10 percent of...

  2. Characteristics of trace metals in fine (PM2.5) and inhalable (PM10) particles and its health risk assessment along with in-silico approach in indoor environment of India

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Satsangi, P. Gursumeeran; Yadav, Suman; Pipal, Atar Singh; Kumbhar, Navanath

    2014-08-01

    Indoor concentrations of fine (PM2.5: aerodynamic diameter ≤ 2.5) and inhalable (PM10: aerodynamic diameter ≤ 10 μm) particles and its associated toxic metals are of concern now-a-days due to its effects on human health and environment. PM10 and PM2.5 samples were collected from indoor microenvironments on glass fiber and PTFE filter paper using low volume air sampler in Pune. The average concentration of PM2.5 and PM10 were 89.7 ± 43.2 μg m-3 and 138.2 ± 68.2 μg m-3 at urban site while it was 197.5 ± 84.3 and 287 ± 92 μg m-3 at rural site. Trace metals such as Cd, Co, Cr, Cu, Fe, Mn, Pb, Sb and Zn in particulate matter were estimated by ICP-AES. Concentrations of crustal metals were found to be higher than the carcinogenic metals in both the microenvironments. On the contrary the soluble and bio-availability fraction of carcinogenic metals were found higher thus it may cause the higher risk to human health. Therefore, cancer risk assessment of carcinogenic metals; Cr, Ni and Cd was calculated. Among the carcinogenic metals, Ni showed highest cancer risk in indoor PM. The higher cancer risk assessment of Ni has been supported by In-silico study which suggested that Ni actively formed co-ordination complex with histone proteins (i.e. H3-Ni/H4-Ni) by maintaining strong hydrogen bonding interactions with Asp and Glu residues of nucleosomal proteins. Present In-silico study of Ni-histone complexes will help to emphasize the possible role of Asp and Glu residues in DNA methylation, deacetylation and ubiquitinations of nucleosomal proteins. Hence, this study could pave the way to understand the structural consequence of Ni in nucleosomal proteins and its impact on epigenetic changes which ultimately cause lung and nasal cancer.

  3. 21 CFR 25.10 - Policies and NEPA planning.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 1 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Policies and NEPA planning. 25.10 Section 25.10... ENVIRONMENTAL IMPACT CONSIDERATIONS General Provisions § 25.10 Policies and NEPA planning. (a) All FDA's... future generations. (b) Assessment of environmental factors continues throughout planning and...

  4. Growth of single-crystal Ca10(Pt4As8)(Fe(1.8)Pt(0.2)As2)5 nanowhiskers with superconductivity up to 33 K.

    PubMed

    Li, Jun; Yuan, Jie; Tang, Dai-Ming; Zhang, Shou-Bao; Li, Meng-Yue; Guo, Yan-Feng; Tsujimoto, Yoshihiro; Hatano, Takeshi; Arisawa, Shunichi; Golberg, Dmitri; Wang, Hua-Bing; Yamaura, Kazunari; Takayama-Muromachi, Eiji

    2012-03-07

    Single-crystal Ca(10)(Pt(4)As(8))(Fe(1.8)Pt(0.2)As(2))(5) superconducting (SC) nanowhiskers with widths down to hundreds of nanometers were successfully grown in a Ta capsule in an evacuated quartz tube by a flux method. Magnetic and electrical properties measurements demonstrate that the whiskers have excellent crystallinity with critical temperature of up to 33 K, upper critical field of 52.8 T, and critical current density of J(c) of 6.0 × 10(5) A/cm(2) (at 26 K). Since cuprate high-T(c) SC whiskers are fragile ceramics, the present intermetallic SC whiskers with high T(c) have better opportunities for device applications. Moreover, although the growth mechanism is not understood well, the technique can be potentially useful for growth of other whiskers containing toxic elements.

  5. PATRAN 2.5/EAL interface guide

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Feldhaus, Winifred S.

    1994-01-01

    The PATRAN/EA interface guide describes two programs, EALPAT and PATEAL. EALPAT reads an EAL LO1 file and translates the model and results into a PATRAN 2.5 neutral file, element results file, and nodal results file. An EAL model can be color coded in PATRAN, and geometry, loads, boundary conditions, section and material properties, rigid masses, springs, and beam orientations can be plotted and debugged. EAL results can be brought into PATRAN as element or nodal quantities and displayed as deformed plots, animated shapes, color coded elements, or color filled contour plots. PATEAL converts a PATRAN 2.5 data base into an EAL runstream. Geometry, including all element types, alternate coordinate systems, material properties, section properties, loads and boundary conditions are all converted. EALPAT and PATEAL can also be used together with the PATNAS translator from PDA Engineering to convert an EAL runstream to an MSC/NASTRAN bulk data file.

  6. Ambient Particulate Matter (PM2.5/PM10) Exposure and Emergency Department Visits for Acute Myocardial Infarction in Chaoyang District, Beijing, China During 2014: A Case-Crossover Study

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Qian; Qi, Weipeng; Yao, Wei; Wang, Mei; Chen, Yiyong; Zhou, Yujie

    2016-01-01

    Background Epidemiology studies have shown a consistently increased risk of acute myocardial infarction (AMI) correlated with particulate matter (PM) exposure. However, little is known about the association with specific AMI subtypes. In this work, we investigated the association between short-term PM exposure and emergency department visits (EDVs) for AMI, ST-elevation myocardial infarction (STEMI), and non-ST-elevation myocardial infarction (NSTEMI). Methods We based this case-crossover study on 2749 patients from Chaoyang District hospitalized with AMI in Anzhen Hospital during 2014. Meteorological and air pollution data were collected during this period. We used a time-stratified case-crossover design with lag model, adjusted for meteorological conditions and/or other gaseous pollutants, to estimate risk of EDVs for AMI, STEMI, and NSTEMI. We conducted stratified analyses by gender, age, season, and comorbid conditions to examine potential effect modification. Results We found that each 10 µg/m3 increment of PM2.5 concentration (1-day lagged) was associated with an increased risk of EDVs for STEMI (OR 1.05; 95% CI, 1.00–1.11). We found no association of PM2.5 concentration with overall AMI or NSTEMI. No effect modification was found when stratified by gender, season, or comorbid conditions, even though the effect size was larger in patients who were male, smokers, and comorbid with hypertension. Patients aged ≥65 years showed a significantly increased risk of STEMI associated with PM2.5 in the previous day than those aged <65 years. Conclusions Our study indicated a transient effect of short-term PM2.5 exposure on EDVs for STEMI. Patients aged ≥65 years appeared to be particularly susceptible. Our findings suggest that studies of the association between PM exposure and AMI should consider AMI subtypes, lag times, and individual characteristics. PMID:27064131

  7. Structure and magnetic properties of Ba{sub 5}Ce{sub 1.25}Mn{sub 3.75}O{sub 15}, a new 10H-polytype in the Ba-Ce-Mn-O system

    SciTech Connect

    Macias, Mario A.; Mentre, Olivier; Cuello, Gabriel J.; Gauthier, Gilles H.

    2013-02-15

    Based on the peculiar magnetic properties that are observed in pseudo one-dimensional manganites, we decided to synthesize the new Ba{sub 5}Ce{sub 1.25}Mn{sub 3.75}O{sub 15} compound. The preparation was performed by solid state reaction in air at about 1350 Degree-Sign C, for which we found that the compound crystallizes in a hexagonal symmetry with space group P6{sub 3}/mmc (No-194) and cell parameters a=b=5.7861(2) A and c=23.902(1) A. The structural description was correlated with neutron diffraction and bond valence calculations, confirming the presence of Ce{sup 4+} and Mn{sup 4+} segregated in the different crystallographic positions. Ba{sub 5}Ce{sub 1.25}Mn{sub 3.75}O{sub 15} displays evidence for strong AFM couplings already set at room temperature. The main arrangement of Mn{sup 4+} in magnetically isolated tetramers of face-sharing octahedra is responsible for a metamagnetic-like transition around 50 K. - Graphical abstract: The new Ba{sub 5}Ce{sub 1.25}Mn{sub 3.75}O{sub 15} polytype shows strong AFM couplings in magnetically isolated [Ce{sub 0.25}Mn{sub 3.75}O{sub 15}] tetramers of face-sharing octahedral, resulting in a metamagnetic-like transition around 50 K. Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Ba{sub 5}Ce{sub 1.25}Mn{sub 3.75}O{sub 15}, a new 10H polytype, has been prepared in the Ba-Ce-Mn-O system. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The compound crystallizes in the P6{sub 3}/mmc space group with (cchhh){sub 2} stacking sequence. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer [Ce{sub 0.25}Mn{sub 3.75}O{sub 15}] tetramers are separated by [CeO{sub 6}] octahedra in the structure. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Instead of robust AFM ordering, a metamagnetic-like transition is found around 50 K.

  8. The efficacy of a topically applied imidacloprid 10 % / moxidectin 2.5 % formulation (Advocate®, Advantage® Multi, Bayer) against Immature and Adult Spirocerca lupi worms in experimentally infected dogs.

    PubMed

    Austin, Clinton M; Kok, Dawie J; Crafford, Dionne; Schaper, Roland

    2013-08-01

    This study investigated the efficacy and safety of an imidacloprid 10 %/moxidectin 2.5 % spot-on combination (Advocate®, Advantage® Multi, Bayer) against immature and mature stages of Spirocerca lupi in experimentally infected dogs. 24 dogs were allocated to 3 groups and infected with approximately 10 L3 larvae of S. lupi orally on study day (SD) +2, +14, +28 and +42. Group 1 remained as untreated control group. Group 2 dogs were treated on SD –28, 0, and thereafter monthly until Day 280 (12 treatments). Group 3 dogs were treated weekly on 19 occasions starting on SD +170. The dosage for all treatments was the licensed dose of 1025 mg imidacloprid/2.5–6.25 mg moxidectin per kg body weight. All dogs were examined on SD +169 or +176 by endoscopy. Group 3 dogs were additionally examined approximately every two weeks up to Day 296. On Day +308 or +310, all dogs were necropsied to recover S. lupi worms and to quantify lesions in the thoracic aorta and oesophagus. Dogs in the control group were adequately infected with S. lupi, demonstrated by the extensive damage to the thoracic aorta, the nodules in the oesophagus and the large numbers of worms recovered. In total 144 worms were collected (geometric mean of 16.8 worms per dog). Dogs in group 2 had no or very slight damage to the thoracic aorta and no nodules or worms in the oesophagus, indicating 100 % efficacy of the monthly treatments. Dogs in group 3 were also adequately infected, showing nodules in the oesophagus before initiation of weekly treatment, and at necropsy extensive damage was seen in the thoracic aorta. After treatment, three dogs of 8 still had a few nodules and in total three worms (GM of 0.25 per dog) were recovered, demonstrating an efficacy of 98.5 % against adult S. lupi. All dogs tolerated the treatment well and no treatment- related adverse events occurred.

  9. 25 CFR 214.10 - Royalty rates.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ..., OKLAHOMA, FOR MINING, EXCEPT OIL AND GAS § 214.10 Royalty rates. Royalties will be required as follows... concentrates of such mineral bears to the total amount of dirt or rock actually mined, except as stipulated in... constructed for royalties on lead, but in so doing it would be necessary to bear in mind that the base...

  10. 25 CFR 46.10 - Eligible activities.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... INDIAN AFFAIRS, DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR EDUCATION ADULT EDUCATION PROGRAM General Provisions § 46.10 Eligible activities. (a) Subject to availability of funds, funds appropriated for the BIA's Adult Education Program may be used to support local projects or programs designed to: (1) Enable Indian adults to...

  11. 46 CFR 112.25-10 - Transfer of emergency loads.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 4 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Transfer of emergency loads. 112.25-10 Section 112.25-10 Shipping COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY (CONTINUED) ELECTRICAL ENGINEERING EMERGENCY LIGHTING AND POWER SYSTEMS Emergency Systems Having an Automatic Starting Diesel Engine or Gas Turbine...

  12. 46 CFR 112.25-10 - Transfer of emergency loads.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 4 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Transfer of emergency loads. 112.25-10 Section 112.25-10 Shipping COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY (CONTINUED) ELECTRICAL ENGINEERING EMERGENCY LIGHTING AND POWER SYSTEMS Emergency Systems Having an Automatic Starting Diesel Engine or Gas Turbine...

  13. 46 CFR 112.25-10 - Transfer of emergency loads.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 4 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Transfer of emergency loads. 112.25-10 Section 112.25-10 Shipping COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY (CONTINUED) ELECTRICAL ENGINEERING EMERGENCY LIGHTING AND POWER SYSTEMS Emergency Systems Having an Automatic Starting Diesel Engine or Gas Turbine...

  14. 46 CFR 112.25-10 - Transfer of emergency loads.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 4 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Transfer of emergency loads. 112.25-10 Section 112.25-10 Shipping COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY (CONTINUED) ELECTRICAL ENGINEERING EMERGENCY LIGHTING AND POWER SYSTEMS Emergency Systems Having an Automatic Starting Diesel Engine or Gas Turbine...

  15. 46 CFR 112.25-10 - Transfer of emergency loads.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 4 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Transfer of emergency loads. 112.25-10 Section 112.25-10 Shipping COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY (CONTINUED) ELECTRICAL ENGINEERING EMERGENCY LIGHTING AND POWER SYSTEMS Emergency Systems Having an Automatic Starting Diesel Engine or Gas Turbine...

  16. 46 CFR 25.10-3 - Navigation light certification requirements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 1 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Navigation light certification requirements. 25.10-3... Navigation Lights § 25.10-3 Navigation light certification requirements. (a) Except as provided by paragraph (b) of this section, each navigation light must— (1) Meet the technical standards of the...

  17. 46 CFR 25.10-3 - Navigation light certification requirements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 1 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Navigation light certification requirements. 25.10-3... Navigation Lights § 25.10-3 Navigation light certification requirements. (a) Except as provided by paragraph (b) of this section, each navigation light must— (1) Meet the technical standards of the...

  18. 46 CFR 25.10-3 - Navigation light certification requirements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 1 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Navigation light certification requirements. 25.10-3... Navigation Lights § 25.10-3 Navigation light certification requirements. (a) Except as provided by paragraph (b) of this section, each navigation light must— (1) Meet the technical standards of the...

  19. 46 CFR 25.10-3 - Navigation light certification requirements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 1 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Navigation light certification requirements. 25.10-3... Navigation Lights § 25.10-3 Navigation light certification requirements. (a) Except as provided by paragraph (b) of this section, each navigation light must— (1) Meet the technical standards of the...

  20. 46 CFR 25.10-3 - Navigation light certification requirements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 1 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Navigation light certification requirements. 25.10-3... Navigation Lights § 25.10-3 Navigation light certification requirements. (a) Except as provided by paragraph (b) of this section, each navigation light must— (1) Meet the technical standards of the...

  1. 46 CFR 2.10-25 - Definitions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... for hire; (2) That is chartered and carrying more than 12 passengers; (3) That is a submersible vessel...-submersible MODU means a mobile offshore drilling unit with the main deck connected to an underwater hull by...) That is a submersible vessel carrying at least one passenger for hire; or (5) That is a ferry...

  2. 46 CFR 2.10-25 - Definitions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... for hire; (2) That is chartered and carrying more than 12 passengers; (3) That is a submersible vessel...-submersible MODU means a mobile offshore drilling unit with the main deck connected to an underwater hull by...) That is a submersible vessel carrying at least one passenger for hire; or (5) That is a ferry...

  3. 46 CFR 2.10-25 - Definitions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... for hire; (2) That is chartered and carrying more than 12 passengers; (3) That is a submersible vessel...-submersible MODU means a mobile offshore drilling unit with the main deck connected to an underwater hull by...) That is a submersible vessel carrying at least one passenger for hire; or (5) That is a ferry...

  4. Spatial-temporal analysis and projection of extreme particulate matter (PM10 and PM2.5) levels using association rules: A case study of the Jing-Jin-Ji region, China

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qin, Shanshan; Liu, Feng; Wang, Chen; Song, Yiliao; Qu, Jiansheng

    2015-11-01

    The Jing-Jin-Ji region of Northern China has experienced serious extreme PM concentrations, which could exert considerable negative impacts on human health. However, only small studies have focused on extreme PM concentrations. Therefore, joint regional PM research and air pollution control has become an urgent issue in this region. To characterize PM pollution, PM10 and PM2.5 hourly samples were collected from 13 cities in Jing-Jin-Ji region for one year. This study initially analyzed extreme PM data using the Apriori algorithm to mine quantitative association rules in PM spatial and temporal variations and intercity influences. The results indicate that 1) the association rules of intercity PM are distinctive, and do not completely rely on their spatial distributions; 2) extreme PM concentrations frequently occur in southern cities, presenting stronger spatial and temporal associations than in northern cities; 3) the strength of the spatial and temporal associations of intercity PM2.5 are more substantial than those of intercity PM10.

  5. 10MeV 25KW industrial electron LINAC

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kamino, Y.

    1998-06-01

    A 10MeV 25KW plus class electron LINAC was developed for sterilisation of medical devices. The LINAC composed of a standing wave type single cavity prebuncher and a 2m electro-plated travelling wave guide uses a 5MW 2856MHz pulse klystron as an RF source and provides 25KW beam power at the Ti alloy beam window stably after the energy analysing magnet with 10MeV plus-minus 1 MeV energy slit. The practical maximum beam power reached 29 KW and this demonstrated the LINAC as one of the most powerful S-band electron LINACs in the world. The control of the LINAC is fully automated and the "One-Button Operation" is realised, which is valuable for easy operation as a plant system. 2 systems have been delivered and are being operated stably.

  6. General 2.5 power law of metallic glasses

    PubMed Central

    Zeng, Qiaoshi; Lin, Yu; Liu, Yijin; Zeng, Zhidan; Shi, Crystal Y.; Zhang, Bo; Lou, Hongbo; Sinogeikin, Stanislav V.; Kono, Yoshio; Kenney-Benson, Curtis; Park, Changyong; Yang, Wenge; Wang, Weihua; Sheng, Hongwei; Mao, Ho-kwang; Mao, Wendy L.

    2016-01-01

    Metallic glass (MG) is an important new category of materials, but very few rigorous laws are currently known for defining its “disordered” structure. Recently we found that under compression, the volume (V) of an MG changes precisely to the 2.5 power of its principal diffraction peak position (1/q1). In the present study, we find that this 2.5 power law holds even through the first-order polyamorphic transition of a Ce68Al10Cu20Co2 MG. This transition is, in effect, the equivalent of a continuous “composition” change of 4f-localized “big Ce” to 4f-itinerant “small Ce,” indicating the 2.5 power law is general for tuning with composition. The exactness and universality imply that the 2.5 power law may be a general rule defining the structure of MGs. PMID:26831105

  7. Addressing Global Mortality from Ambient PM2.5.

    PubMed

    Apte, Joshua S; Marshall, Julian D; Cohen, Aaron J; Brauer, Michael

    2015-07-07

    Ambient fine particulate matter (PM2.5) has a large and well-documented global burden of disease. Our analysis uses high-resolution (10 km, global-coverage) concentration data and cause-specific integrated exposure-response (IER) functions developed for the Global Burden of Disease 2010 to assess how regional and global improvements in ambient air quality could reduce attributable mortality from PM2.5. Overall, an aggressive global program of PM2.5 mitigation in line with WHO interim guidelines could avoid 750 000 (23%) of the 3.2 million deaths per year currently (ca. 2010) attributable to ambient PM2.5. Modest improvements in PM2.5 in relatively clean regions (North America, Europe) would result in surprisingly large avoided mortality, owing to demographic factors and the nonlinear concentration-response relationship that describes the risk of particulate matter in relation to several important causes of death. In contrast, major improvements in air quality would be required to substantially reduce mortality from PM2.5 in more polluted regions, such as China and India. Moreover, forecasted demographic and epidemiological transitions in India and China imply that to keep PM2.5-attributable mortality rates (deaths per 100 000 people per year) constant, average PM2.5 levels would need to decline by ∼20-30% over the next 15 years merely to offset increases in PM2.5-attributable mortality from aging populations. An effective program to deliver clean air to the world's most polluted regions could avoid several hundred thousand premature deaths each year.

  8. Evaluation of the Adulticidal Efficacy of Imidacloprid 10 %/Moxidectin 2.5 % (w/v) Spot-on (Advocate®, Advantage® Multi) against Dirofilaria repens in Experimentally Infected Dogs.

    PubMed

    Petry, Gabriele; Genchi, Marco; Schmidt, Holger; Schaper, Roland; Lawrenz, Bettina; Genchi, Claudio

    2015-08-01

    This study aimed to evaluate the efficacy of imidacloprid 10 %/moxidectin 2.5 % (w/v) spot-on (Advocate®/Advantage® Multi, Bayer) against adult Dirofilaria repens in a blinded, placebo-controlled randomised laboratory study. Twenty-four Beagle dogs were experimentally infected with approximately 75 infective D. repens larvae each on study day (SD) 0. Treatment was initiated on SD 228 after patency had been confirmed in 21 dogs, using a modified Knott Test. Eleven dogs received monthly treatments with imidacloprid/moxidectin at the minimum therapeutic dose (10 mg/kg imidacloprid and 2.5 mg/kg moxidectin) for six consecutive months and 12 control dogs were treated with a placebo formulation. Approximately one month after the last treatment, all dogs were euthanised and necropsied for the detection of D. repens worms. Eleven control dogs harboured live adult D. repens (range 2-11, geometric mean 5.44). Eight of 11 imidacloprid/moxidectin-treated dogs were free of live worms. The live worm count was reduced by 96.2 % (range 0-1, geometric mean 0.21). The majority of dead worms were encapsulated and degenerated. After the first treatment, Knott Tests were negative in all imidacloprid/moxidectin-treated dogs and this status was maintained in 10 dogs until study end. One dog showed a low microfilariae count (1 and 4/mL) on four occasions but was also negative before necropsy. The treatment was well tolerated by all study animals. It is concluded that six consecutive monthly treatments with imidacloprid/moxidectin spot-on are effective and safe against adult D. repens and provide an option for preventing the further spread of this zoonotic parasite.

  9. Disability-adjusted life years and economic cost assessment of the health effects related to PM2.5 and PM10 pollution in Mumbai and Delhi, in India from 1991 to 2015.

    PubMed

    Maji, Kamal Jyoti; Dikshit, Anil Kumar; Deshpande, Ashok

    2016-12-15

    Particulate air pollution is becoming a serious public health concern in urban cities in India due to air pollution-related health effects associated with disability-adjusted life years (DALYs) and economic loss. To obtain the quantitative result of health impact of particulate matter (PM) in most populated Mumbai City and most polluted Delhi City in India, an epidemiology-based exposure-response function has been used to calculate the attributable number of mortality and morbidity cases from 1991 to 2015 in a 5-year interval and the subsequent DALYs, and economic cost is estimated of the health damage based on unit values of the health outcomes. Here, we report the attributable number of mortality due to PM10 in Mumbai and Delhi increased to 32,014 and 48,651 in 2015 compared with 19,291 and 19,716 in year 1995. And annual average mortality due to PM2.5 in Mumbai and Delhi was 10,880 and 10,900. Premature cerebrovascular disease (CEV), ischemic heart disease (IHD), and chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) causes are about 35.3, 33.3, and 22.9% of PM2.5-attributable mortalities. Total DALYs due to PM10 increased from 0.34 million to 0.51 million in Mumbai and 0.34 million to 0.75 million in Delhi from average year 1995 to 2015. Among all health outcomes, mortality and chronic bronchitis shared about 95% of the total DALYs. Due to PM10, the estimated total economic cost at constant price year 2005 US$ increased from 2680.87 million to 4269.60 million for Mumbai City and 2714.10 million to 6394.74 million for Delhi City, from 1995 to 2015, and the total amount accounting about 1.01% of India's gross domestic product (GDP). A crucial presumption is that in 2030, PM10 levels would have to decline by 44% (Mumbai) and 67% (Delhi) absolutely to maintain the same health outcomes in year 2015 levels. The results will help policy makers from pollution control board for further cost-benefit analyses of air pollution management programs in Mumbai and Delhi.

  10. Oxidative potential of coarse particulate matter (PM102.5) and its relation to water solubility and sources of trace elements and metals in the Los Angeles Basin

    PubMed Central

    Shirmohammadi, Farimah; Hasheminassab, Sina; Wang, Dongbin; Saffari, Arian; Schauer, James J.; Shafer, Martin M.; Delfino, Ralph J.; Sioutas, Constantinos

    2015-01-01

    In this study, potential sources of water-soluble (WS) and water-insoluble (WI) fractions of metals and trace elements in coarse particulate matter (CPM) (PM102.5, 2.510 μm) were identified and their association with the redox properties of CPM, measured by means of reactive oxygen species (ROS), was explored. CPM was collected during 2012–2013 in Central Los Angeles (LA) and 2013–2014 in Anaheim, CA. Generally, WI components contributed to a larger fraction of CPM ROS activity (as much as 64% and 54% at Central LA and Anaheim, respectively). Two major source factors were identified by Principal Component Analysis for both the WS and WI fractions: vehicular abrasion and re-suspended road dust. Univariate analysis indicated that several species were correlated with CPM ROS activity: In WS fraction, metals such as Mn, Fe, Cd and Zn were associated with WS ROS, while in WI fraction Ti, Fe, Ni, Pb and Cr had the highest correlations with WI ROS activity. Multiple linear regression analysis revealed that both vehicular abrasion and re-suspension of road dust were associated with WS ROS activity, while only vehicular abrasion contributed significantly to the WI ROS activity. Moreover, comparison with previous studies indicated that the ROS activity of CPM has increased in the past 5 years in Central LA. We attribute this increase mainly to the elevated levels of re-suspension of road dust caused by the increase in vehicle speed and number of trucks in recent years in this area, reaffirming the growing importance of non-tailpipe traffic emissions on CPM toxicity. PMID:26560404

  11. 10 CFR 34.25 - Radiation survey instruments.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 1 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Radiation survey instruments. 34.25 Section 34.25 Energy NUCLEAR REGULATORY COMMISSION LICENSES FOR INDUSTRIAL RADIOGRAPHY AND RADIATION SAFETY REQUIREMENTS FOR INDUSTRIAL RADIOGRAPHIC OPERATIONS Equipment § 34.25 Radiation survey instruments. (a) The licensee...

  12. 10 CFR 34.25 - Radiation survey instruments.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 1 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Radiation survey instruments. 34.25 Section 34.25 Energy NUCLEAR REGULATORY COMMISSION LICENSES FOR INDUSTRIAL RADIOGRAPHY AND RADIATION SAFETY REQUIREMENTS FOR INDUSTRIAL RADIOGRAPHIC OPERATIONS Equipment § 34.25 Radiation survey instruments. (a) The licensee...

  13. 10 CFR 52.25 - Extent of activities permitted.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 2 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Extent of activities permitted. 52.25 Section 52.25 Energy NUCLEAR REGULATORY COMMISSION (CONTINUED) LICENSES, CERTIFICATIONS, AND APPROVALS FOR NUCLEAR POWER PLANTS Early Site Permits § 52.25 Extent of activities permitted. If the activities authorized by §...

  14. 10 CFR 52.25 - Extent of activities permitted.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 2 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Extent of activities permitted. 52.25 Section 52.25 Energy NUCLEAR REGULATORY COMMISSION (CONTINUED) LICENSES, CERTIFICATIONS, AND APPROVALS FOR NUCLEAR POWER PLANTS Early Site Permits § 52.25 Extent of activities permitted. If the activities authorized by §...

  15. 10 CFR 52.25 - Extent of activities permitted.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 2 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Extent of activities permitted. 52.25 Section 52.25 Energy NUCLEAR REGULATORY COMMISSION (CONTINUED) LICENSES, CERTIFICATIONS, AND APPROVALS FOR NUCLEAR POWER PLANTS Early Site Permits § 52.25 Extent of activities permitted. If the activities authorized by §...

  16. 10 CFR 25.29 - Reinstatement of access authorization.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Reinstatement of access authorization. 25.29 Section 25.29 Energy NUCLEAR REGULATORY COMMISSION ACCESS AUTHORIZATION Access Authorizations § 25.29 Reinstatement of access authorization. (a) An access authorization can be reinstated provided that: (1) No more than...

  17. 10 CFR 25.33 - Termination of access authorizations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Termination of access authorizations. 25.33 Section 25.33 Energy NUCLEAR REGULATORY COMMISSION ACCESS AUTHORIZATION Access Authorizations § 25.33 Termination of access authorizations. (a) Access authorizations will be terminated when: (1) An access authorization...

  18. 10 CFR 52.25 - Extent of activities permitted.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 2 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Extent of activities permitted. 52.25 Section 52.25 Energy NUCLEAR REGULATORY COMMISSION (CONTINUED) LICENSES, CERTIFICATIONS, AND APPROVALS FOR NUCLEAR POWER PLANTS Early Site Permits § 52.25 Extent of activities permitted. If the activities authorized by §...

  19. 10 CFR 820.25 - Final notice of violation.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 4 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Final notice of violation. 820.25 Section 820.25 Energy DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY PROCEDURAL RULES FOR DOE NUCLEAR ACTIVITIES Enforcement Process § 820.25 Final notice of... determines that a person violated or is continuing to violate a provision of the Act or a DOE Nuclear...

  20. 10 CFR 850.25 - Exposure reduction and minimization.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 4 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Exposure reduction and minimization. 850.25 Section 850.25 Energy DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY CHRONIC BERYLLIUM DISEASE PREVENTION PROGRAM Specific Program Requirements § 850.25 Exposure reduction and minimization. (a) The responsible employer must ensure that no worker...

  1. 10 CFR 850.25 - Exposure reduction and minimization.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 4 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Exposure reduction and minimization. 850.25 Section 850.25 Energy DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY CHRONIC BERYLLIUM DISEASE PREVENTION PROGRAM Specific Program Requirements § 850.25 Exposure reduction and minimization. (a) The responsible employer must ensure that no worker...

  2. 10 CFR 850.25 - Exposure reduction and minimization.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 4 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Exposure reduction and minimization. 850.25 Section 850.25 Energy DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY CHRONIC BERYLLIUM DISEASE PREVENTION PROGRAM Specific Program Requirements § 850.25 Exposure reduction and minimization. (a) The responsible employer must ensure that no worker...

  3. 10 CFR 850.25 - Exposure reduction and minimization.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 4 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Exposure reduction and minimization. 850.25 Section 850.25 Energy DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY CHRONIC BERYLLIUM DISEASE PREVENTION PROGRAM Specific Program Requirements § 850.25 Exposure reduction and minimization. (a) The responsible employer must ensure that no worker...

  4. 10 CFR 850.25 - Exposure reduction and minimization.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 4 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Exposure reduction and minimization. 850.25 Section 850.25 Energy DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY CHRONIC BERYLLIUM DISEASE PREVENTION PROGRAM Specific Program Requirements § 850.25 Exposure reduction and minimization. (a) The responsible employer must ensure that no worker...

  5. 10 CFR 71.24-71.25 - [Reserved

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 2 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false 71.24-71.25 Section 71.24-71.25 Energy NUCLEAR REGULATORY COMMISSION (CONTINUED) PACKAGING AND TRANSPORTATION OF RADIOACTIVE MATERIAL General Licenses §§ 71.24-71.25...

  6. 10 CFR 429.25 - Television sets. [Reserved

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 3 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Television sets. 429.25 Section 429.25 Energy DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY ENERGY CONSERVATION CERTIFICATION, COMPLIANCE, AND ENFORCEMENT FOR CONSUMER PRODUCTS AND COMMERCIAL AND INDUSTRIAL EQUIPMENT Certification § 429.25 Television sets....

  7. 10 CFR 429.25 - Television sets. [Reserved

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 3 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Television sets. 429.25 Section 429.25 Energy DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY ENERGY CONSERVATION CERTIFICATION, COMPLIANCE, AND ENFORCEMENT FOR CONSUMER PRODUCTS AND COMMERCIAL AND INDUSTRIAL EQUIPMENT Certification § 429.25 Television sets....

  8. 10 CFR 473.25 - Reviewability of certification.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 3 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Reviewability of certification. 473.25 Section 473.25 Energy DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY ENERGY CONSERVATION AUTOMOTIVE PROPULSION RESEARCH AND DEVELOPMENT Review and Certification of Grants, Cooperative Agreements, Contracts, and Projects § 473.25 Reviewability of...

  9. 10 CFR 473.25 - Reviewability of certification.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 3 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Reviewability of certification. 473.25 Section 473.25 Energy DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY ENERGY CONSERVATION AUTOMOTIVE PROPULSION RESEARCH AND DEVELOPMENT Review and Certification of Grants, Cooperative Agreements, Contracts, and Projects § 473.25 Reviewability of...

  10. 10 CFR 473.25 - Reviewability of certification.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 3 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Reviewability of certification. 473.25 Section 473.25 Energy DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY ENERGY CONSERVATION AUTOMOTIVE PROPULSION RESEARCH AND DEVELOPMENT Review and Certification of Grants, Cooperative Agreements, Contracts, and Projects § 473.25 Reviewability of...

  11. 21 CFR 25.10 - Policies and NEPA planning.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 1 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Policies and NEPA planning. 25.10 Section 25.10 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES GENERAL... environmental effects. (d) Environmental documents shall concentrate on timely and significant issues, not...

  12. 21 CFR 25.10 - Policies and NEPA planning.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 1 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Policies and NEPA planning. 25.10 Section 25.10 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES GENERAL... environmental effects. (d) Environmental documents shall concentrate on timely and significant issues, not...

  13. 33 CFR 67.10-25 - Application for tests.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 1 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Application for tests. 67.10-25 Section 67.10-25 Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY AIDS TO NAVIGATION AIDS TO NAVIGATION ON ARTIFICIAL ISLANDS AND FIXED STRUCTURES General Requirements for...

  14. 33 CFR 67.10-25 - Application for tests.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 1 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Application for tests. 67.10-25 Section 67.10-25 Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY AIDS TO NAVIGATION AIDS TO NAVIGATION ON ARTIFICIAL ISLANDS AND FIXED STRUCTURES General Requirements for...

  15. 33 CFR 67.10-25 - Application for tests.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 1 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Application for tests. 67.10-25 Section 67.10-25 Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY AIDS TO NAVIGATION AIDS TO NAVIGATION ON ARTIFICIAL ISLANDS AND FIXED STRUCTURES General Requirements for...

  16. 33 CFR 67.10-25 - Application for tests.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Application for tests. 67.10-25 Section 67.10-25 Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY AIDS TO NAVIGATION AIDS TO NAVIGATION ON ARTIFICIAL ISLANDS AND FIXED STRUCTURES General Requirements for...

  17. 33 CFR 67.10-25 - Application for tests.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 1 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Application for tests. 67.10-25 Section 67.10-25 Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY AIDS TO NAVIGATION AIDS TO NAVIGATION ON ARTIFICIAL ISLANDS AND FIXED STRUCTURES General Requirements for...

  18. 33 CFR 67.25-10 - Sound signal.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 1 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Sound signal. 67.25-10 Section 67... AIDS TO NAVIGATION ON ARTIFICIAL ISLANDS AND FIXED STRUCTURES Class âBâ Requirements § 67.25-10 Sound signal. (a) The owner of a Class “B” structure shall: (1) Install a sound signal that has a rated...

  19. 33 CFR 67.25-10 - Sound signal.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 1 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Sound signal. 67.25-10 Section 67... AIDS TO NAVIGATION ON ARTIFICIAL ISLANDS AND FIXED STRUCTURES Class âBâ Requirements § 67.25-10 Sound signal. (a) The owner of a Class “B” structure shall: (1) Install a sound signal that has a rated...

  20. 33 CFR 67.25-10 - Sound signal.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Sound signal. 67.25-10 Section 67... AIDS TO NAVIGATION ON ARTIFICIAL ISLANDS AND FIXED STRUCTURES Class âBâ Requirements § 67.25-10 Sound signal. (a) The owner of a Class “B” structure shall: (1) Install a sound signal that has a rated...

  1. 33 CFR 67.25-10 - Sound signal.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 1 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Sound signal. 67.25-10 Section 67... AIDS TO NAVIGATION ON ARTIFICIAL ISLANDS AND FIXED STRUCTURES Class âBâ Requirements § 67.25-10 Sound signal. (a) The owner of a Class “B” structure shall: (1) Install a sound signal that has a rated...

  2. 33 CFR 67.25-10 - Sound signal.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 1 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Sound signal. 67.25-10 Section 67... AIDS TO NAVIGATION ON ARTIFICIAL ISLANDS AND FIXED STRUCTURES Class âBâ Requirements § 67.25-10 Sound signal. (a) The owner of a Class “B” structure shall: (1) Install a sound signal that has a rated...

  3. Chemical PM2.5 Speciation in Major Cities Worldwide

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Snider, Graydon; Weagle, Crystal; Brauer, Michael; Cohen, Aaron; Gibson, Mark; Liu, Yang; Martins, Vanderlei; Rudich, Yinon; Martin, Randall

    2016-04-01

    We examined the chemical composition of fine particulate matter (PM2.5) across 13 globally dispersed urban locations (including Atlanta, Buenos Aires, Beijing, Manila, and Dhaka), as part of the Surface PARTiculate mAtter Network (SPARTAN). At each site sampling was conducted over 4 to 24 months for the years 2013 to 2015. Analysis of filter samples revealed that several PM2.5 chemical components varied by more than an order of magnitude between sites. Ammonium sulfate ranged from 2 μg m-3 (Ilorin) to 17 μg m-3 (Kanpur). Ammonium nitrate ranged from 0.2 μg m-3 (Atlanta) to 6.7 μg m-3 (Kanpur). Effective black carbon ranged from 0.4 μg m-3 (Atlanta) to 5 μg m-3 (Dhaka and Kanpur). The all-site mean values of major PM2.5 constituents were ammonium sulfate (20 ± 10 %), crustal material (12 ± 6.5%), effective black carbon (10 ± 7.4 %), ammonium nitrate (3.7 ± 2.5%), sea salt (2.2 ± 1.5%), trace element oxides (0.9 ± 0.7 %), water (7.2 ± 3.0%) and residue materials (44 ± 24%). Based on the evaluation with collocated studies we treated residue material as mostly organic. Major ions generally agreed well with previous studies at the same urban locations (e.g. sulfate fractions agreed within 4% for eight out of 11 collocation comparisons). Enhanced crustal material (CM) concentrations with high Zn:Al ratios at large cities (e.g. Hanoi, Dhaka, Manila) imply significant anthropogenic CM contributions that deserve more attention. Detailed chemical speciation also aided our characterization of site-specific PM2.5 water retention. The expected water contribution to aerosols was calculated via the hygroscopicity parameter for each filter. Hourly PM2.5 at specified relative humidity (35%) was inferred from nephelometer measurements of light scatter at ambient relative humidity and 9-day filter measurements of PM2.5 mass. Our PM2.5 estimates compared favorably with a beta attenuation monitor (BAM) at the nearby US embassy in Beijing, with a coefficient of variation

  4. 2,5-diketopiperazines as neuroprotective agents.

    PubMed

    Cornacchia, C; Cacciatore, I; Baldassarre, L; Mollica, A; Feliciani, F; Pinnen, F

    2012-01-01

    2,5-diketopiperazines are the simplest cyclic peptides found in nature, commonly biosynthesized from amino acids by different organisms, and represent a promising class of biologically active natural products. Their peculiar heterocyclic structure confers high stability against the proteolysis and constitutes a structural requirement for the active intestinal absorption. Furthermore, the diketopiperazine-based motif is considered as a novel brain shuttle for the delivery of drugs with limited ability to cross the blood-brain barrier (BBB) and can be proposed as an ideal candidate for the rational development of new therapeutic agents. Although these cyclic peptides have been known since the beginning of the 20th century, only recently have they attracted substantial interest with respect to the wide spectrum of their biological properties, including antitumor, antiviral, antifungal, antibacterial and antihyperglycemic activities. In addition to these, the most challenging function of the diketopiperazine derivatives is related with their remarkable neuroprotective and nootropic activity. The aim of the present paper is to provide an overview of the two major classes of diketopiperazines, the TRH-related and the unsaturated derivatives both characterized by a significant ability to protect against neurotoxicity in several experimental models. The neuroprotective profile of these compounds suggests that they may have a future utility in the therapy of neuronal degeneration in vivo, potentially through several different mechanisms.

  5. 46 CFR 189.25-5 - Application for a Certificate of Inspection.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 7 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Application for a Certificate of Inspection. 189.25-5 Section 189.25-5 Shipping COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY (CONTINUED) OCEANOGRAPHIC RESEARCH VESSELS INSPECTION AND CERTIFICATION Inspection for Certification § 189.25-5 Application for a...

  6. 46 CFR 189.25-5 - Application for a Certificate of Inspection.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 7 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Application for a Certificate of Inspection. 189.25-5 Section 189.25-5 Shipping COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY (CONTINUED) OCEANOGRAPHIC RESEARCH VESSELS INSPECTION AND CERTIFICATION Inspection for Certification § 189.25-5 Application for a...

  7. 46 CFR 42.25-5 - Definitions of terms used in this subpart.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 2 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Definitions of terms used in this subpart. 42.25-5 Section 42.25-5 Shipping COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY (CONTINUED) LOAD LINES DOMESTIC AND FOREIGN VOYAGES BY SEA Special Requirements for Vessels Assigned Timber Freeboards § 42.25-5 Definitions of terms used in this subpart. (a)...

  8. 46 CFR 42.25-5 - Definitions of terms used in this subpart.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 2 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Definitions of terms used in this subpart. 42.25-5 Section 42.25-5 Shipping COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY (CONTINUED) LOAD LINES DOMESTIC AND FOREIGN VOYAGES BY SEA Special Requirements for Vessels Assigned Timber Freeboards § 42.25-5 Definitions of terms used in this subpart. (a)...

  9. 46 CFR 34.25-5 - Capacity and arrangement-T/ALL.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 1 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Capacity and arrangement-T/ALL. 34.25-5 Section 34.25-5 Shipping COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY TANK VESSELS FIREFIGHTING EQUIPMENT Water Spray Extinguishing Systems, Details § 34.25-5 Capacity and arrangement—T/ALL. (a) The capacity and arrangement...

  10. 1H, 13C NMR spectral and single crystal structural studies of toxaphene congeners. Quantum chemical calculations for preferred conformers of 2,5- endo,6- exo,8,9,9,10,10-octachloro-2-bornene and their DFT/GIAO 13C chemical shifts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Laihia, K.; Valkonen, A.; Kolehmainen, E.; Suontamo, R.; Nissinen, M.; Nikiforov, V.; Selivanov, S.

    2005-11-01

    The 1H and 13C NMR chemical shifts for six toxaphene congeners: 2- exo,3- endo,6- exo,8,9,10-hexachloro- ( 1), 2- exo,3- endo,5- exo,9,9,10,10-heptachloro- ( 2), 2- exo,3- endo,6- exo,8,9,10,10-heptachloro- ( 3), 2- exo,3- endo,5- exo,6- endo,8,9,10-heptachloro- ( 4), 2- exo,3- endo,5- exo,6- endo,8,9,9,10-octachlorobornane ( 5) and 2,5- endo,6- exo,8,9,9,10,10-octachloro-2-bornene ( 6) are reported. Their chemical shift assignments have been obtained by means of Pulsed Field Gradient (PFG) Double Quantum Filtered (DQF) 1H, 1H correlation spectroscopy (COSY), PFG 1H, 13C Heteronuclear Multiple Quantum Coherence (HMQC) and PFG 1H, 13C Heteronuclear Multiple Bond Correlation (HMBC) experiments. A single crystal X-ray structural analysis was made for compounds 1, 3, 4 and 6. The prevalences of two octachlorobornene rotamers ( 6 a, 6 b) were elucidated by ab initio MO method and single point DFT/GIAO calculations for 13C chemical shifts. Theoretical calculations proved that the single crystal structure of 6 corresponds its most stable conformer in solution.

  11. 40 CFR Table E-1 to Subpart E of... - Summary of Test Requirements for Reference and Class I Equivalent Methods for PM 2.5 and PM 10-2.5

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ....3. Sec. 7.4.4. Sec. 7.4.5. § 53.54 Power interruption test Sample flow rate1. Mean 2. Regulation 3. Meas. accuracy 4. CV accuracy 5. Occurrence time of power interruptions 6. Elapsed sample time 7... pressure drop to simulate loaded filter (d) 6 power interruptions of various durations Sec. 7.4.1.Sec....

  12. 40 CFR Table E-1 to Subpart E of... - Summary of Test Requirements for Reference and Class I Equivalent Methods for PM 2.5 and PM 10-2.5

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ....3. Sec. 7.4.4. Sec. 7.4.5. § 53.54 Power interruption test Sample flow rate1. Mean 2. Regulation 3. Meas. accuracy 4. CV accuracy 5. Occurrence time of power interruptions 6. Elapsed sample time 7... pressure drop to simulate loaded filter (d) 6 power interruptions of various durations Sec. 7.4.1.Sec....

  13. 40 CFR Table E-1 to Subpart E of... - Summary of Test Requirements for Reference and Class I Equivalent Methods for PM2.5 and PM10-2.5

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ....3. Sec. 7.4.4. Sec. 7.4.5. § 53.54 Power interruption test Sample flow rate1. Mean 2. Regulation 3. Meas. accuracy 4. CV accuracy 5. Occurrence time of power interruptions 6. Elapsed sample time 7... pressure drop to simulate loaded filter (d) 6 power interruptions of various durations Sec. 7.4.1.Sec....

  14. 25 CFR 163.10 - Management of Indian forest land.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 25 Indians 1 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Management of Indian forest land. 163.10 Section 163.10 Indians BUREAU OF INDIAN AFFAIRS, DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR LAND AND WATER GENERAL FORESTRY REGULATIONS Forest Management and Operations § 163.10 Management of Indian forest land. (a) The Secretary...

  15. 25 CFR 163.10 - Management of Indian forest land.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 25 Indians 1 2012-04-01 2011-04-01 true Management of Indian forest land. 163.10 Section 163.10 Indians BUREAU OF INDIAN AFFAIRS, DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR LAND AND WATER GENERAL FORESTRY REGULATIONS Forest Management and Operations § 163.10 Management of Indian forest land. (a) The Secretary...

  16. 25 CFR 163.10 - Management of Indian forest land.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 25 Indians 1 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Management of Indian forest land. 163.10 Section 163.10 Indians BUREAU OF INDIAN AFFAIRS, DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR LAND AND WATER GENERAL FORESTRY REGULATIONS Forest Management and Operations § 163.10 Management of Indian forest land. (a) The Secretary...

  17. 25 CFR 163.10 - Management of Indian forest land.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 25 Indians 1 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Management of Indian forest land. 163.10 Section 163.10 Indians BUREAU OF INDIAN AFFAIRS, DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR LAND AND WATER GENERAL FORESTRY REGULATIONS Forest Management and Operations § 163.10 Management of Indian forest land. (a) The Secretary...

  18. 25 CFR 163.10 - Management of Indian forest land.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 25 Indians 1 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Management of Indian forest land. 163.10 Section 163.10 Indians BUREAU OF INDIAN AFFAIRS, DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR LAND AND WATER GENERAL FORESTRY REGULATIONS Forest Management and Operations § 163.10 Management of Indian forest land. (a) The Secretary...

  19. 25 CFR 151.10 - On-reservation acquisitions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 25 Indians 1 2012-04-01 2011-04-01 true On-reservation acquisitions. 151.10 Section 151.10 Indians BUREAU OF INDIAN AFFAIRS, DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR LAND AND WATER LAND ACQUISITIONS § 151.10 On... in trust status when the land is located within or contiguous to an Indian reservation, and...

  20. 25 CFR 151.10 - On-reservation acquisitions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 25 Indians 1 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false On-reservation acquisitions. 151.10 Section 151.10 Indians BUREAU OF INDIAN AFFAIRS, DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR LAND AND WATER LAND ACQUISITIONS § 151.10 On... in trust status when the land is located within or contiguous to an Indian reservation, and...

  1. 25 CFR 151.10 - On-reservation acquisitions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 25 Indians 1 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false On-reservation acquisitions. 151.10 Section 151.10 Indians BUREAU OF INDIAN AFFAIRS, DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR LAND AND WATER LAND ACQUISITIONS § 151.10 On... in trust status when the land is located within or contiguous to an Indian reservation, and...

  2. 25 CFR 151.10 - On-reservation acquisitions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 25 Indians 1 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false On-reservation acquisitions. 151.10 Section 151.10 Indians BUREAU OF INDIAN AFFAIRS, DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR LAND AND WATER LAND ACQUISITIONS § 151.10 On... in trust status when the land is located within or contiguous to an Indian reservation, and...

  3. 25 CFR 226.10 - Term of lease.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 25 Indians 1 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Term of lease. 226.10 Section 226.10 Indians BUREAU OF... AND GAS MINING Leasing Procedure, Rental and Royalty § 226.10 Term of lease. Leases issued hereunder..., and so stated in the notice of sale of such leases and so long thereafter as the minerals...

  4. 25 CFR 167.10 - Special grazing permits.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 25 Indians 1 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Special grazing permits. 167.10 Section 167.10 Indians BUREAU OF INDIAN AFFAIRS, DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR LAND AND WATER NAVAJO GRAZING REGULATIONS § 167.10 Special grazing permits. The problem of special grazing permits shall be settled by the Bureau of...

  5. 25 CFR 167.10 - Special grazing permits.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 25 Indians 1 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Special grazing permits. 167.10 Section 167.10 Indians BUREAU OF INDIAN AFFAIRS, DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR LAND AND WATER NAVAJO GRAZING REGULATIONS § 167.10 Special grazing permits. The problem of special grazing permits shall be settled by the Bureau of...

  6. 25 CFR 117.10 - Purchase of automotive equipment.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 25 Indians 1 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Purchase of automotive equipment. 117.10 Section 117.10... COMPETENCY § 117.10 Purchase of automotive equipment. The superintendent may disburse from the surplus funds of an adult Indian not to exceed $2,000 for the purchase of automotive equipment when the...

  7. 25 CFR 117.10 - Purchase of automotive equipment.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 25 Indians 1 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Purchase of automotive equipment. 117.10 Section 117.10... COMPETENCY § 117.10 Purchase of automotive equipment. The superintendent may disburse from the surplus funds of an adult Indian not to exceed $2,000 for the purchase of automotive equipment when the...

  8. 25 CFR 117.10 - Purchase of automotive equipment.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 25 Indians 1 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Purchase of automotive equipment. 117.10 Section 117.10... COMPETENCY § 117.10 Purchase of automotive equipment. The superintendent may disburse from the surplus funds of an adult Indian not to exceed $2,000 for the purchase of automotive equipment when the...

  9. 25 CFR 117.10 - Purchase of automotive equipment.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 25 Indians 1 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Purchase of automotive equipment. 117.10 Section 117.10... COMPETENCY § 117.10 Purchase of automotive equipment. The superintendent may disburse from the surplus funds of an adult Indian not to exceed $2,000 for the purchase of automotive equipment when the...

  10. 25 CFR 117.10 - Purchase of automotive equipment.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 25 Indians 1 2012-04-01 2011-04-01 true Purchase of automotive equipment. 117.10 Section 117.10... COMPETENCY § 117.10 Purchase of automotive equipment. The superintendent may disburse from the surplus funds of an adult Indian not to exceed $2,000 for the purchase of automotive equipment when the...

  11. 10 CFR 430.25 - Laboratory Accreditation Program.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 3 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Laboratory Accreditation Program. 430.25 Section 430.25 Energy DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY ENERGY CONSERVATION ENERGY CONSERVATION PROGRAM FOR CONSUMER PRODUCTS Test... that test for compliance with standards for fluorescent lamp ballast luminous efficiency (BLE),...

  12. 10 CFR 430.25 - Laboratory Accreditation Program.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 3 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Laboratory Accreditation Program. 430.25 Section 430.25 Energy DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY ENERGY CONSERVATION ENERGY CONSERVATION PROGRAM FOR CONSUMER PRODUCTS Test... NVLAP. NVLAP is a program of the National Institute of Standards and Technology, U.S. Department...

  13. 10 CFR 430.25 - Laboratory Accreditation Program.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 3 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Laboratory Accreditation Program. 430.25 Section 430.25 Energy DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY ENERGY CONSERVATION ENERGY CONSERVATION PROGRAM FOR CONSUMER PRODUCTS Test... NVLAP. NVLAP is a program of the National Institute of Standards and Technology, U.S. Department...

  14. 10 CFR 950.25 - Calculation of covered costs.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 4 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Calculation of covered costs. 950.25 Section 950.25 Energy... Calculation of covered costs. (a) The Claims Administrator shall calculate the allowable amount of the covered... duration of covered delay to the extent the debt obligation was included in the calculation of the...

  15. 46 CFR 59.10-25 - Stayed areas.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... VESSELS AND APPURTENANCES Welding Repairs to Boilers and Pressure Vessels in -Service § 59.10-25 Stayed areas. Welding repairs are permitted in staybolted areas or areas adequately stayed by other means...

  16. 46 CFR 59.10-25 - Stayed areas.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... VESSELS AND APPURTENANCES Welding Repairs to Boilers and Pressure Vessels in -Service § 59.10-25 Stayed areas. Welding repairs are permitted in staybolted areas or areas adequately stayed by other means...

  17. 46 CFR 59.10-25 - Stayed areas.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... VESSELS AND APPURTENANCES Welding Repairs to Boilers and Pressure Vessels in -Service § 59.10-25 Stayed areas. Welding repairs are permitted in staybolted areas or areas adequately stayed by other means...

  18. 46 CFR 59.10-25 - Stayed areas.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... VESSELS AND APPURTENANCES Welding Repairs to Boilers and Pressure Vessels in -Service § 59.10-25 Stayed areas. Welding repairs are permitted in staybolted areas or areas adequately stayed by other means...

  19. 46 CFR 59.10-25 - Stayed areas.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... VESSELS AND APPURTENANCES Welding Repairs to Boilers and Pressure Vessels in -Service § 59.10-25 Stayed areas. Welding repairs are permitted in staybolted areas or areas adequately stayed by other means...

  20. 40 CFR Table E-1 to Subpart E of... - Summary of Test Requirements for Reference and Class I Equivalent Methods for PM2.5 and PM10-2.5

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ....3. Sec. 7.4.4. Sec. 7.4.5. § 53.54 Power interruption test Sample flow rate1. Mean 2. Regulation 3... facility External leakage: 80 mL/min, maxInternal leakage: 80 mL/min, max Controlled leak flow rate of 80 mL/ min Sec. 7.4.6. § 53.53 Base flow rate test Sample flow rate1. Mean 2. Regulation 3....

  1. 40 CFR Table E-1 to Subpart E of... - Summary of Test Requirements for Reference and Class I Equivalent Methods for PM2.5 and PM10-2.5

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ....3. Sec. 7.4.4. Sec. 7.4.5. § 53.54 Power interruption test Sample flow rate1. Mean 2. Regulation 3... facility External leakage: 80 mL/min, maxInternal leakage: 80 mL/min, max Controlled leak flow rate of 80 mL/ min Sec. 7.4.6. § 53.53 Base flow rate test Sample flow rate1. Mean 2. Regulation 3....

  2. 46 CFR 59.10-5 - Cracks.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 2 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Cracks. 59.10-5 Section 59.10-5 Shipping COAST GUARD... APPURTENANCES Welding Repairs to Boilers and Pressure Vessels in -Service § 59.10-5 Cracks. (a) Cracks extending... cracks are veed out so that complete penetration of the weld metal is secured. (b) Circumferential...

  3. 46 CFR 105.10-5 - Approved.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 4 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Approved. 105.10-5 Section 105.10-5 Shipping COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY (CONTINUED) CARGO AND MISCELLANEOUS VESSELS COMMERCIAL FISHING VESSELS DISPENSING PETROLEUM PRODUCTS Definition of Terms Used in This Part § 105.10-5 Approved. (a) The...

  4. Manipulation of polar order in the "empty" tetragonal tungsten bronzes: Ba4-xSrxDy0.67□1.33Nb10O30, x = 0, 0.25, 0.5, 1, 2, 3

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gardner, Jonathan; Morrison, Finlay D.

    2016-08-01

    A series of "empty" tetragonal tungsten bronze (TTB) ferroelectrics, Ba4-xSrxDy0.67□1.33Nb10O30 (x = 0, 0.25, 0.5, 1, 2, 3; □ = vacancy), is reported. With increasing x the unit cell contracts in both the ab plane and c-axis; x ≤ 1 compounds are normal ferroelectrics (FE) with decreasing TC as x increases, while x ≥ 2 are relaxor ferroelectrics (RFE) with associated frequency dependent permittivity peaks and with similar Tm and Tf (Vogel-Fulcher freezing temperatures) values. This observation is rationalised by differing cation occupancies: for x ≤ 1, Sr2+ principally occupies the A2-site (co-occupied by Ba2+ with the A1-site occupied by Dy3+ and vacancies); for x ≥ 2 significant Sr A1-site occupation leads to the observed RFE characteristics. This FE to RFE crossover is consistent with a previously proposed TTB crystal chemical framework where both a decrease in average A-site size and concurrent increase in A1-site tolerance factor (tA1) favour destabilization of long range polar order and relaxor behaviour. The effect of increasing tA1 as a result of Sr occupancy at the A1 site is dominant in the compounds reported here.

  5. Evaluation of the efficacy and safety of imidacloprid 10% plus moxidectin 2.5% spot-on in the treatment of generalized demodicosis in dogs: results of a European field study.

    PubMed

    Heine, J; Krieger, K; Dumont, P; Hellmann, K

    2005-10-01

    Efficacy and safety of the test product imidacloprid 10%+moxidectin 2.5% spot on (Advocate, Advantage multi) in the treatment of canine generalized demodicosis were evaluated in a multi-centre, controlled, randomized, blinded field study in Albania, France, and Germany. The study was conducted according to a non-inferiority design to demonstrate that the efficacy of the test product is not inferior to that of a control product containing milbemycin oxime (Interceptor, tablets for oral application). Of the 72 dogs enrolled, all of which expressed clinical signs of generalized demodicosis, 63 completed the study. Of these, 30 dogs were treated 2-4 times, at 4-week intervals, with the test product at the recommended dose of at least 0.1 ml/kg body weight. Thirty-three dogs were treated daily for two to four periods of 4 weeks with the control product according to label instructions (0.5-1 or 1-2 mg/kg body weight). Presence of mites in deep skin scrapings and clinical improvement were assessed 3-6 times at each inspection at 4-week intervals. Treatment was discontinued in dogs negative for mites on two subsequent examinations 4 weeks apart or at the last examination on day 84. At the end of the trial, dogs in both groups showed a similar clinical improvement. No Demodex mites were detected in 26 of 30 dogs treated with imidacloprid/moxidectin and in 29 of 33 dogs treated with milbemycin oxime. Statistical evaluation confirmed that the efficacy of the test product in the treatment of generalized canine demodicosis was not inferior to that of milbemycin oxime.

  6. 25 CFR 168.10 - Conservation and land use provisions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 25 Indians 1 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Conservation and land use provisions. 168.10 Section 168... FOR THE HOPI PARTITIONED LANDS AREA § 168.10 Conservation and land use provisions. Grazing operations shall be conducted in accordance with recognized principles of good range management....

  7. 25 CFR 168.10 - Conservation and land use provisions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 25 Indians 1 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Conservation and land use provisions. 168.10 Section 168... FOR THE HOPI PARTITIONED LANDS AREA § 168.10 Conservation and land use provisions. Grazing operations shall be conducted in accordance with recognized principles of good range management....

  8. 25 CFR 168.10 - Conservation and land use provisions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 25 Indians 1 2012-04-01 2011-04-01 true Conservation and land use provisions. 168.10 Section 168... FOR THE HOPI PARTITIONED LANDS AREA § 168.10 Conservation and land use provisions. Grazing operations shall be conducted in accordance with recognized principles of good range management....

  9. 25 CFR 168.10 - Conservation and land use provisions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 25 Indians 1 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Conservation and land use provisions. 168.10 Section 168... FOR THE HOPI PARTITIONED LANDS AREA § 168.10 Conservation and land use provisions. Grazing operations shall be conducted in accordance with recognized principles of good range management....

  10. 25 CFR 168.10 - Conservation and land use provisions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 25 Indians 1 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Conservation and land use provisions. 168.10 Section 168... FOR THE HOPI PARTITIONED LANDS AREA § 168.10 Conservation and land use provisions. Grazing operations shall be conducted in accordance with recognized principles of good range management....

  11. 25 CFR 91.10 - Renting of improvements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 25 Indians 1 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Renting of improvements. 91.10 Section 91.10 Indians BUREAU OF INDIAN AFFAIRS, DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR TRIBAL GOVERNMENT GOVERNMENT OF INDIAN VILLAGES... Superintendent and such tenant expelled from the village reserve. The application and certificate of...

  12. 25 CFR 91.10 - Renting of improvements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 25 Indians 1 2012-04-01 2011-04-01 true Renting of improvements. 91.10 Section 91.10 Indians BUREAU OF INDIAN AFFAIRS, DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR TRIBAL GOVERNMENT GOVERNMENT OF INDIAN VILLAGES... Superintendent and such tenant expelled from the village reserve. The application and certificate of...

  13. 25 CFR 91.10 - Renting of improvements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 25 Indians 1 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Renting of improvements. 91.10 Section 91.10 Indians BUREAU OF INDIAN AFFAIRS, DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR TRIBAL GOVERNMENT GOVERNMENT OF INDIAN VILLAGES... Superintendent and such tenant expelled from the village reserve. The application and certificate of...

  14. 25 CFR 91.10 - Renting of improvements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 25 Indians 1 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Renting of improvements. 91.10 Section 91.10 Indians BUREAU OF INDIAN AFFAIRS, DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR TRIBAL GOVERNMENT GOVERNMENT OF INDIAN VILLAGES... Superintendent and such tenant expelled from the village reserve. The application and certificate of...

  15. 25 CFR 91.10 - Renting of improvements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 25 Indians 1 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Renting of improvements. 91.10 Section 91.10 Indians BUREAU OF INDIAN AFFAIRS, DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR TRIBAL GOVERNMENT GOVERNMENT OF INDIAN VILLAGES... Superintendent and such tenant expelled from the village reserve. The application and certificate of...

  16. 25 CFR 175.10 - Revenues collected from power operations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... POWER UTILITIES Service Fees, Electric Power Rates and Revenues § 175.10 Revenues collected from power operations. The Area Director shall set service fees and electric power rates in accordance with the... 25 Indians 1 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Revenues collected from power operations. 175.10...

  17. 25 CFR 175.10 - Revenues collected from power operations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... POWER UTILITIES Service Fees, Electric Power Rates and Revenues § 175.10 Revenues collected from power operations. The Area Director shall set service fees and electric power rates in accordance with the... 25 Indians 1 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Revenues collected from power operations. 175.10...

  18. 25 CFR 175.10 - Revenues collected from power operations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... POWER UTILITIES Service Fees, Electric Power Rates and Revenues § 175.10 Revenues collected from power operations. The Area Director shall set service fees and electric power rates in accordance with the... 25 Indians 1 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Revenues collected from power operations. 175.10...

  19. 25 CFR 175.10 - Revenues collected from power operations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... POWER UTILITIES Service Fees, Electric Power Rates and Revenues § 175.10 Revenues collected from power operations. The Area Director shall set service fees and electric power rates in accordance with the... 25 Indians 1 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Revenues collected from power operations. 175.10...

  20. 25 CFR 175.10 - Revenues collected from power operations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... POWER UTILITIES Service Fees, Electric Power Rates and Revenues § 175.10 Revenues collected from power operations. The Area Director shall set service fees and electric power rates in accordance with the... 25 Indians 1 2012-04-01 2011-04-01 true Revenues collected from power operations. 175.10...