Science.gov

Sample records for 5-10 times smaller

  1. Correcting the hooking effect in satellite altimetry data for time series estimation over smaller rivers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boergens, Eva; Dettmering, Denise; Schwatke, Christian

    2015-04-01

    Since many years the numbers of in-situ gauging stations are declining. Satellite altimetry can be used as a gap-filler even over smaller inland waters like rivers. However, since altimetry measurements are not designed for inland water bodies a special data handling is necessary in order to estimate reliable water level heights over inland waters. We developed a new routine for estimating water level heights over smaller inland waters with satellite altimetry by correcting the hooking effect. The hooking effect occurs when the altimeter is not measuring in nadir before and after passing a water body due to the stronger reflectance of the water than the surrounding land surface. These off-nadir measurements, together with the motion of the satellite, lead to overlong ranges and heights declining in a parabolic shape. The vertex of this parabola is on the water surface. Therefore, by estimating the parabola we are able to determine the water level height without the need of any point over the water body itself. For estimating the parabola we only use selected measurements which are effected by the hooking effect. The applied search approach is based on the RANSAC algorithm (random sample consensus) which is a non-deterministic algorithm especially designed for finding geometric entities in point clouds with many outliers. With the hooking effect correction we are able to retrieve water level height time series from the Mekong River from Envisat and Saral/Altika high frequency data. It is possible to determine reliable time series even if the river has only a width of 500m or less. The expected annual variations are clearly depicted and the comparison of the time series with available in-situ gauging data shows a very good agreement.

  2. Worlds Smaller than Saturn

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2001-01-01

    Computerized animations show the following: (1) an artist's conception of a Saturn-like extrasolar planet; (2) star and planet motion; and (3) young stellar disk and planet formation. Footage shows the outside of the Mauna Kea Observatories in Hawaii and Geoff Marcy and Paul Butler inside while they are processing information. Then a press conference,'Worlds Smaller than Saturn', is seen. Anne Kinney, Origins Science Director, NASA Headquarters, introduces Geoff Marcy, Paul Butler, Alan Boss, and Heidi Hammel. They discuss the discovery of the two new Saturn-sized extrasolar planets that are orbiting the stars HD46375 and 79 Seti, giving details on the search technique and size distribution. They then answer questions from the press.

  3. Wellness strategies for smaller businesses.

    PubMed

    Neely, Marc

    2012-01-01

    While innovative smaller companies are implementing employee wellness programs, many smaller firms may point to a lack of resources, such as staffing and financial resources, to establish and sustain a wellness program. The uncertain economy and rising health care costs have caused many smaller businesses to focus on core business strategies to keep the doors open and the business going. However, innovative companies realize that building a culture of health is a long-term business strategy directly related to improving the bottom line. This article highlights one company's approach to wellness and the results of the company's programs. It also outlines the components of a successful wellness program and suggests practical implementation steps for smaller businesses.

  4. Chernobyl Birds Have Smaller Brains

    PubMed Central

    Møller, Anders Pape; Bonisoli-Alquati, Andea; Rudolfsen, Geir; Mousseau, Timothy A.

    2011-01-01

    Background Animals living in areas contaminated by radioactive material from Chernobyl suffer from increased oxidative stress and low levels of antioxidants. Therefore, normal development of the nervous system is jeopardized as reflected by high frequencies of developmental errors, reduced brain size and impaired cognitive abilities in humans. Alternatively, associations between psychological effects and radiation have been attributed to post-traumatic stress in humans. Methodology/Principal Finding Here we used an extensive sample of 550 birds belonging to 48 species to test the prediction that even in the absence of post-traumatic stress, there is a negative association between relative brain size and level of background radiation. We found a negative association between brain size as reflected by external head volume and level of background radiation, independent of structural body size and body mass. The observed reduction in brain size in relation to background radiation amounted to 5% across the range of almost a factor 5,000 in radiation level. Species differed significantly in reduction in brain size with increasing background radiation, and brain size was the only morphological character that showed a negative relationship with radiation. Brain size was significantly smaller in yearlings than in older individuals. Conclusions/Significance Low dose radiation can have significant effects on normal brain development as reflected by brain size and therefore potentially cognitive ability. The fact that brain size was smaller in yearlings than in older individuals implies that there was significant directional selection on brain size with individuals with larger brains experiencing a viability advantage. PMID:21390202

  5. Improving the efficiency of smaller transport aircraft

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jones, R. T.

    1984-01-01

    Considered apart from its propulsive system the high altitude airplane itself adapted to higher flight altitudes than those in current use. Scaling on the assumption of constant aircraft density indicates that this conclusion applies most importantly to smaller transport aircraft. Climb to 60,000 ft could save time and energy for trips as short as 500 miles. A discussion of the effect of winglets on aircraft efficiency is presented. A 10% reduction of induced drag below that of a comparable elliptic wing can be achieved either by horizontal or vertical wing tip extensions.

  6. Improving the efficiency of smaller transport aircraft

    SciTech Connect

    Jones, R.T.

    1984-07-01

    Considered apart from its propulsive system the high altitude airplane itself adapted to higher flight altitudes than those in current use. Scaling on the assumption of constant aircraft density indicates that this conclusion applies most importantly to smaller transport aircraft. Climb to 60,000 ft could save time and energy for trips as short as 500 miles. A discussion of the effect of winglets on aircraft efficiency is presented. A 10% reduction of induced drag below that of a comparable elliptic wing can be achieved either by horizontal or vertical wing tip extensions.

  7. 1 CFR 5.10 - Forms of publication.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 1 General Provisions 1 2013-01-01 2012-01-01 true Forms of publication. 5.10 Section 5.10 General Provisions ADMINISTRATIVE COMMITTEE OF THE FEDERAL REGISTER THE FEDERAL REGISTER GENERAL § 5.10 Forms of publication. Pursuant to section 1506 of title 44, United States Code, the Administrative Committee...

  8. 1 CFR 5.10 - Forms of publication.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 1 General Provisions 1 2014-01-01 2012-01-01 true Forms of publication. 5.10 Section 5.10 General Provisions ADMINISTRATIVE COMMITTEE OF THE FEDERAL REGISTER THE FEDERAL REGISTER GENERAL § 5.10 Forms of publication. Pursuant to section 1506 of title 44, United States Code, the Administrative Committee...

  9. 1 CFR 5.10 - Forms of publication.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 1 General Provisions 1 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Forms of publication. 5.10 Section 5.10 General Provisions ADMINISTRATIVE COMMITTEE OF THE FEDERAL REGISTER THE FEDERAL REGISTER GENERAL § 5.10 Forms of publication. Pursuant to section 1506 of title 44, United States Code, the Administrative Committee...

  10. 34 CFR 5.10 - Public reading room.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 34 Education 1 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Public reading room. 5.10 Section 5.10 Education Office... Available to the Public § 5.10 Public reading room. (a) General. Pursuant to 5 U.S.C. 552(a)(2), the Department maintains a public reading room containing agency records that the FOIA requires to be...

  11. 34 CFR 5.10 - Public reading room.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 34 Education 1 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Public reading room. 5.10 Section 5.10 Education Office... Available to the Public § 5.10 Public reading room. (a) General. Pursuant to 5 U.S.C. 552(a)(2), the Department maintains a public reading room containing agency records that the FOIA requires to be...

  12. 34 CFR 5.10 - Public reading room.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 34 Education 1 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Public reading room. 5.10 Section 5.10 Education Office... Available to the Public § 5.10 Public reading room. (a) General. Pursuant to 5 U.S.C. 552(a)(2), the Department maintains a public reading room containing agency records that the FOIA requires to be...

  13. 34 CFR 5.10 - Public reading room.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 34 Education 1 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Public reading room. 5.10 Section 5.10 Education Office... Available to the Public § 5.10 Public reading room. (a) General. Pursuant to 5 U.S.C. 552(a)(2), the Department maintains a public reading room containing agency records that the FOIA requires to be...

  14. 36 CFR 5.10 - Eating, drinking, or lodging establishments.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 36 Parks, Forests, and Public Property 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Eating, drinking, or lodging establishments. 5.10 Section 5.10 Parks, Forests, and Public Property NATIONAL PARK SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR COMMERCIAL AND PRIVATE OPERATIONS § 5.10 Eating, drinking, or lodging establishments. (a)...

  15. 36 CFR 5.10 - Eating, drinking, or lodging establishments.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 36 Parks, Forests, and Public Property 1 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Eating, drinking, or lodging establishments. 5.10 Section 5.10 Parks, Forests, and Public Property NATIONAL PARK SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR COMMERCIAL AND PRIVATE OPERATIONS § 5.10 Eating, drinking, or lodging establishments. (a)...

  16. 6 CFR 5.10 - Preservation of records.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 6 Domestic Security 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Preservation of records. 5.10 Section 5.10 Domestic Security DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY, OFFICE OF THE SECRETARY DISCLOSURE OF RECORDS AND INFORMATION Freedom of Information Act § 5.10 Preservation of records. Each component shall preserve...

  17. 1 CFR 5.10 - Forms of publication.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 1 General Provisions 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Forms of publication. 5.10 Section 5.10 General Provisions ADMINISTRATIVE COMMITTEE OF THE FEDERAL REGISTER THE FEDERAL REGISTER GENERAL § 5.10 Forms of publication. Pursuant to section 1506 of title 44, United States Code, the Administrative Committee...

  18. 1 CFR 5.10 - Forms of publication.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 1 General Provisions 1 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Forms of publication. 5.10 Section 5.10 General Provisions ADMINISTRATIVE COMMITTEE OF THE FEDERAL REGISTER THE FEDERAL REGISTER GENERAL § 5.10 Forms of publication. Pursuant to section 1506 of title 44, United States Code, the Administrative Committee...

  19. Economic characteristics of a smaller, simpler reactor

    SciTech Connect

    LaBar, M.; Bowers, H.

    1988-01-01

    Reduced load growth and heightened concern with economic risk has led to an expressed utility preference for smaller capacity additions. The Modular High Temperature Reactor (MHTGR) plant has been developed as a small, simple plant that has limited financial risk and is economically competitive with comparatively sized coal plants. Competitive economics is achieved by the simplifications made possible in a small MHTGR, reduction in the quantity of nuclear grade construction and design standardization and certification. Assessments show the MHTGR plant to have an economic advantage over coal plants for plant sizes from 270 MWe to 1080 MWe. Financial risk is limited by small unit sizes and short lead times that allow incremental deployment. Evaluations show the MHTGR incremental deployment capability to reduce negative cash flows by almost a factor of 2 relative to that required by a single large nuclear plant.

  20. 36 CFR 5.10 - Eating, drinking, or lodging establishments.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ..., Rocky Mountain, Sequoia-Kings Canyon, Yellowstone, and Yosemite National Parks may be operated without a... 36 Parks, Forests, and Public Property 1 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Eating, drinking, or lodging establishments. 5.10 Section 5.10 Parks, Forests, and Public Property NATIONAL PARK SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF...

  1. 30 CFR 5.10 - Purpose and scope.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... MINING PRODUCTS FEES FOR TESTING, EVALUATION, AND APPROVAL OF MINING PRODUCTS § 5.10 Purpose and scope... proportionate share of management, administration and operation of the Approval and Certification Center...

  2. β-Nitro-5,10,15-tritolylcorroles

    PubMed Central

    Stefanelli, Manuela; Pomarico, Giuseppe; Tortora, Luca; Nardis, Sara; Fronczek, Frank R.; McCandless, Gregory T.; Smith, Kevin M.; Manowong, Machima; Chen, Ping; Kadish, Karl M.; Rosa, Angela; Ricciardi, Giampaolo; Paolesse, Roberto

    2012-01-01

    Functionalization of the β-pyrrolic positions of the corrole macrocycle with –NO2 groups is limited at present to metallocorrolates due to of the instability exhibited by corrole free bases under oxidizing conditions. A careful choice of the oxidant can limit the transformation of corroles into decomposition products or isocorrole species, preserving the corrole aromaticity, and thus allowing the insertion of nitro groups onto the corrole framework. Here we report results obtained by reacting 5,10,15-tritolylcorrole (TTCorrH3) with the AgNO2/NaNO2 system, to give mono- and di-nitrocorrole derivatives when stoichiometry is carefully controlled. Reactions were found to be regioselective, affording the 3-NO2TTCorrH3 and 3,17-(NO2)2TTCorrH3 isomers as the main products in the case of mono- and di-substitution, in 53 and 20% yields, respectively. In both cases, traces of other mono- and di-substituted isomers were detected, which were structurally characterized by X-ray crystallography. The influence of the β-nitro substituents on the corrole properties is studied in detail by UV-visible, electrochemical, and spectroelectrochemical characterization of these functionalized corroles. Density Functional Theory (DFT) and time-dependent DFT (TDDFT) calculations of the ground and excited state properties of these β-nitrocorrole derivatives also afforded significant information, closely matching the experimental observations. It is found that the β-NO2 substituents conjugate with the π-aromatic system of the macrocycle, which initiates significant changes in both the spectroscopic and redox properties of the so functionalized corroles. This effect is more pronounced when the nitro group is introduced at the 2-position, because in this case the conjugation is, for steric reasons, more efficient than in the 3-nitro isomer. PMID:22668242

  3. Learning in Smaller Companies. Final Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Seagraves, Liz; Osborne, Mike; Neal, Peter; Dockrell, Richard; Hartshorn, Christina; Boyd, Alison

    The Learning in Smaller Companies (LISC) project was undertaken to develop links between academic institutions and work-based learning in Scotland. The University of Stirling worked with Falkirk College and Clackmannan College to create a number of work-based learning schemes for employers in small and medium-sized enterprises. The programs were…

  4. 30 CFR 5.10 - Purpose and scope.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... Resources MINE SAFETY AND HEALTH ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF LABOR TESTING, EVALUATION, AND APPROVAL OF MINING PRODUCTS FEES FOR TESTING, EVALUATION, AND APPROVAL OF MINING PRODUCTS § 5.10 Purpose and scope... (investigators), including administrative review of applications, analysis of drawings, technical...

  5. 30 CFR 5.10 - Purpose and scope.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... Resources MINE SAFETY AND HEALTH ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF LABOR TESTING, EVALUATION, AND APPROVAL OF MINING PRODUCTS FEES FOR TESTING, EVALUATION, AND APPROVAL OF MINING PRODUCTS § 5.10 Purpose and scope... (investigators), including administrative review of applications, analysis of drawings, technical...

  6. 36 CFR 5.10 - Eating, drinking, or lodging establishments.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 36 Parks, Forests, and Public Property 1 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Eating, drinking, or lodging... INTERIOR COMMERCIAL AND PRIVATE OPERATIONS § 5.10 Eating, drinking, or lodging establishments. (a) No establishment offering food, drink, or lodging for sale on any privately owned lands under the...

  7. 36 CFR 5.10 - Eating, drinking, or lodging establishments.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 36 Parks, Forests, and Public Property 1 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Eating, drinking, or lodging... INTERIOR COMMERCIAL AND PRIVATE OPERATIONS § 5.10 Eating, drinking, or lodging establishments. (a) No establishment offering food, drink, or lodging for sale on any privately owned lands under the...

  8. Supermassive Black Hole Mimics Smaller Cousins

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2002-06-01

    Scientists have caught a supermassive black hole in a distant galaxy in the act of spurting energy into a jet of electrons and magnetic fields four distinct times in the past three years, a celestial take on a Yellowstone geyser. This quasar-like "active" galaxy is essentially a scaled-up model of the so-called microquasars within our Milky Way Galaxy, which are smaller black holes with as much as ten times the mass of the sun. This means that scientists can now use their close-up view of microquasars to develop working models of the most massive and powerful black holes in the universe. Artist's Conception of 3C 120. Scene from an animation of 3C 120. CREDIT: Cosmovision These results -- published in the June 6 issue of Nature -- are the fruit of a three-year monitoring campaign with the National Science Foundation's Very Long Baseline Array (VLBA), a continent-wide radio-telescope system, and NASA's Rossi X-ray Timing Explorer. "This is the first direct, observational evidence of what we had suspected: The jets in active galaxies are powered by disks of hot gas orbiting around supermassive black holes," said Alan Marscher of the Institute for Astrophysical Research at Boston University, who led this international team of astronomers. Active galaxies are distant celestial objects with exceedingly bright cores, often radiating with the brilliance of thousands of ordinary galaxies, fueled by the gravity of a central million- to billion-solar-mass black hole pulling in copious amounts of interstellar gas. Marscher and his colleagues have established the first direct observational link between a supermassive black hole and its jet. The source is an active galaxy named 3C120 about 450 million light-years from Earth. This link has been observed in microquasars, several of which are scattered across the Milky Way Galaxy, but never before in active galaxies, because the scale (distance and time) is so much greater. The jets in galaxy 3C120 are streams of particles

  9. Weekly cycle of magnetic characteristics of PM2.5 and PM2.5-10 in Beijing, China

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    SHI, M.; Wu, H.; Zhang, S.; Li, H.; Yang, T.

    2013-12-01

    In urban areas,fine particle matter with aerodynamic diameter between 2.5 um and 10 um (PM2.5-10), and 2.5 um (PM2.5), as an important source of urban particulate matter (PM) pollutants, have significant negative effects on health, atmospheric visibility and climate. PM has increasingly become a significant index of indicating the atmospheric pollution of city. In recent years, Beijing, China has been listed as one of the most serious air pollution city in the world. In order to investigate the sources of air pollutants, a total of 283 pairs of PM2.5 and PM2.5-10 samples were collected daily from July, 2010 to June, 2011 in Beijing. Mineral magnetic properties and Scanning electron microscope (SEM) observations and energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (EDS) analyses of PM2.5 and PM2.5-10 were measured to verify the magnetic materials. Magnetic measures for PM indicated that the major magnetic phase was coarse-grained magnetite-like material. The χlf, χarm, SIRM and χarm/SIRM series of the PM2.5 and PM2.5-10 show seasonal dependences: high values in winter and low values in summer. In additional the parameters analyzed by Time-series methods show a strong cycle about 7 days above 95% confidence level. Weekly cycle of magnetic characteristics of PM2.5 and PM2.5-10 show different pattern: the concentration of magnetic particles in PM2.5-10 show high values in mid-week, and particle sizes is steady, while the concentration of magnetic particles in PM2.5 show reverse a weekly cycle pattern, and particle sizes is smaller in the mid-week.Microscopy analyses reveal basically three morphologies of magnetic grains: aggregate, spherules and angular particles. The ultrafine carbonaceous particles which tend to form complex clusters and chain-like structures, most likely come from coal burning and motor vehicle exhaust. Spherical particles in PM2.5 are dominantly composed of Fe, O and C, grain-diameters of particles range from 0.3 to 2 um. Angular particles of Fe

  10. Entrepreneurship in Smaller Jurisdictions: Appraising a Glocal Elite

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Baldacchino, Godfrey

    2008-01-01

    Entrepreneurship on smaller (often island) jurisdictions tends to suffer from the same import-orientation or "cargo cult" that affects many other issues: entrepreneurs are rarely locally bred but are most often "imported", recruited after long stints in other, larger countries, or else must be suffered to spend regular time away in the metropole.…

  11. Partitioning a Gridded Rectangle into Smaller Rectangles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Klimesh, Matthew; Kiely, Aaron

    2004-01-01

    A relatively simple algorithm, devised for use in an image-data-compression application, partitions a rectangular pixelated image (or any other rectangle on which a regular rectangular grid has already been superimposed) into a specified number of smaller rectangles, hereafter denoted segments. The algorithm has the following properties: No floating-point operations are needed. The segments tend to be nearly square (in the sense that their widths and heights in pixel units tend to be nearly equal). The segments tend to have nearly equal areas. The algorithm yields valid results (no zero-width or zero-height segments) as long as the specified number of segments, s, does not exceed the number of pixels (equivalently, the number of grid cells). The inputs to the algorithm are the positive integer s plus the positive integers h and w, denoting the height and width, respectively, of the rectangle in pixel units. The limit on s for a valid result is given by s less than or equal to wh.

  12. Galactic surveys: Small galaxies are growing smaller

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Phillipps, Steve

    2004-12-01

    Galaxies are not always giant collections of billions of stars. Since the 1930s, when Harlow Shapley discovered the first dwarf spheroidal galaxies, technology has allowed the detection of ever fainter galaxies in our immediate neighbourhood. Our galaxy is now known to have a whole retinue of very small satellite galaxies, the lowest luminosity examples of which can hardly outshine one massive star. Some galaxies appear to be getting physically smaller. Evidence for this is found in the streams of stars detected around our galaxy and elsewhere and in galaxies that appear to have had their outer regions truncated. Recent surveys of galaxy clusters have revealed another new class of object, the ultra-compact dwarfs. Though no less luminous than other dwarf galaxies, their physical sizes, of order 20 pc, are far below anything previously seen. They are reminiscent of the nuclei of dE,N type galaxies and may well be descended from them via some destructive processes within galaxy clusters.

  13. BROWN DWARF DISKS AT AGES OF 5-10 Myr

    SciTech Connect

    Riaz, Basmah; Lodieu, Nicolas; Gizis, John E.

    2009-11-01

    We present Spitzer/IRAC and MIPS 24 mum observations for 28 brown dwarfs in the Upper Scorpius (UppSco) region. We find a disk fraction of 10.7%{sup +8.7%} {sub -3.3%}. One object shows a small excess at 24 mum but none at shorter wavelengths, and may be a candidate transition disk. Three objects show emission in the 10 mum silicate feature and we present compositional fits for these sources. Flat structures are observed for all disk sources in UppSco. Also presented are the MIPS/70 mum observations for the TW Hydrae Association brown dwarf 2MASS J1139511-315921. We discuss the structure and chemistry of brown dwarf disks at ages of approx5-10 Myr, and consider the possible effects of the brown dwarf densities in these clusters on the disk lifetimes.

  14. 75 FR 35881 - Smaller Learning Communities Program

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-06-23

    ...-effective to provide for common planning time during--rather than after the school day--and therefore... individual planning time during the school day to develop and prepare lessons, review and grade student work... believe that prioritizing funds for effective teacher planning, professional development,...

  15. Big Results From a Smaller Gearbox

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2005-01-01

    Many people will be sad to see the Hubble Space Telescope go, as it was the first instrument of its kind to provide us with such a wealth of imagery and information about the galaxy. The telescope has served us well since its launch in spring of 1990, but it is nearly time for its retirement. The science, however, will continue, as NASA plans the launch of a new, more modern orbiting telescope, the James Webb Space Telescope. Named after the man who ran NASA from 1961 to 1968, years fraught with the anxiety and uncertainty of the Space Race, the scope is scheduled for launch in fall of 2011. It is designed to study the earliest galaxies and some of the first stars formed after the Big Bang. NASA scientists at the Goddard Space Flight Center are busy developing the technologies to build this new machine. Many of the new technologies are available for commercial licensing and development. For example, the NASA Planetary Gear System technology developed to give precise nanometer positioning capabilities for the James Webb Space Telescope is now being employed by Turnkey Design Services, LLC (TDS), of Blue Island, Illinois, to improve electric motors. This revolutionary piece of technology allows more efficient operation of the motors, and is more cost- effective than traditional gearbox designs.

  16. 13 CFR 107.710 - Requirement to finance smaller enterprises.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... enterprises. 107.710 Section 107.710 Business Credit and Assistance SMALL BUSINESS ADMINISTRATION SMALL... Small Business for Sbic Financing § 107.710 Requirement to finance smaller enterprises. Your Portfolio must include Financings to Smaller Enterprises. (a) Definition of Smaller Enterprise. A...

  17. 13 CFR 107.710 - Requirement to finance smaller enterprises.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... enterprises. 107.710 Section 107.710 Business Credit and Assistance SMALL BUSINESS ADMINISTRATION SMALL... Small Business for Sbic Financing § 107.710 Requirement to finance smaller enterprises. Your Portfolio must include Financings to Smaller Enterprises. (a) Definition of Smaller Enterprise. A...

  18. 13 CFR 107.710 - Requirement to finance smaller enterprises.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... enterprises. 107.710 Section 107.710 Business Credit and Assistance SMALL BUSINESS ADMINISTRATION SMALL... Small Business for Sbic Financing § 107.710 Requirement to finance smaller enterprises. Your Portfolio must include Financings to Smaller Enterprises. (a) Definition of Smaller Enterprise. A...

  19. 13 CFR 107.710 - Requirement to finance smaller enterprises.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 13 Business Credit and Assistance 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Requirement to finance smaller enterprises. 107.710 Section 107.710 Business Credit and Assistance SMALL BUSINESS ADMINISTRATION SMALL... Small Business for Sbic Financing § 107.710 Requirement to finance smaller enterprises. Your...

  20. 13 CFR 107.710 - Requirement to finance smaller enterprises.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 13 Business Credit and Assistance 1 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Requirement to finance smaller enterprises. 107.710 Section 107.710 Business Credit and Assistance SMALL BUSINESS ADMINISTRATION SMALL... Small Business for Sbic Financing § 107.710 Requirement to finance smaller enterprises. Your...

  1. More, smaller bacteria in response to ocean's warming?

    PubMed

    Morán, Xosé Anxelu G; Alonso-Sáez, Laura; Nogueira, Enrique; Ducklow, Hugh W; González, Natalia; López-Urrutia, Ángel; Díaz-Pérez, Laura; Calvo-Díaz, Alejandra; Arandia-Gorostidi, Nestor; Huete-Stauffer, Tamara M

    2015-07-01

    Heterotrophic bacteria play a major role in organic matter cycling in the ocean. Although the high abundances and relatively fast growth rates of coastal surface bacterioplankton make them suitable sentinels of global change, past analyses have largely overlooked this functional group. Here, time series analysis of a decade of monthly observations in temperate Atlantic coastal waters revealed strong seasonal patterns in the abundance, size and biomass of the ubiquitous flow-cytometric groups of low (LNA) and high nucleic acid (HNA) content bacteria. Over this relatively short period, we also found that bacterioplankton cells were significantly smaller, a trend that is consistent with the hypothesized temperature-driven decrease in body size. Although decadal cell shrinking was observed for both groups, it was only LNA cells that were strongly coherent, with ecological theories linking temperature, abundance and individual size on both the seasonal and interannual scale. We explain this finding because, relative to their HNA counterparts, marine LNA bacteria are less diverse, dominated by members of the SAR11 clade. Temperature manipulation experiments in 2012 confirmed a direct effect of warming on bacterial size. Concurrent with rising temperatures in spring, significant decadal trends of increasing standing stocks (3% per year) accompanied by decreasing mean cell size (-1% per year) suggest a major shift in community structure, with a larger contribution of LNA bacteria to total biomass. The increasing prevalence of these typically oligotrophic taxa may severely impact marine food webs and carbon fluxes by an overall decrease in the efficiency of the biological pump.

  2. Pheromone Chemistry of the Smaller European Elm Bark Beetle.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Beck, Keith

    1978-01-01

    Discusses the aggregation pheromone of the smaller European elm bark beetle, Scolytus multistriatus (Marsham), with emphasis on information that could be used in the classroom as a practical application of organic chemistry. (Author/GA)

  3. 21. GENERAL VIEW OF MOTOR GENERATOR WITH SMALLER GENERATOR IN ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    21. GENERAL VIEW OF MOTOR GENERATOR WITH SMALLER GENERATOR IN FOREGROUND TO PROVIDE EXCITATION FOR LARGER DC UNIT - Georgetown Steam Plant, South Warsaw Street, King County Airport, Seattle, King County, WA

  4. 132. Credit JTL. Smaller feeder pipes collecting seepage and water ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    132. Credit JTL. Smaller feeder pipes collecting seepage and water from springs for the Eagle Canyon flume. - Battle Creek Hydroelectric System, Battle Creek & Tributaries, Red Bluff, Tehama County, CA

  5. Lower Permian smaller foraminifers from the Rahdar section, Central Iran

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Filimonova, T. V.; Gorgij, M. N.; Yarahmadzahi, H.; Leven, E. Ja.

    2015-07-01

    Smaller foraminifers from the Chili Formation recovered in the Rahdar section of the Kalmard tectonic block west of Tabas, Central Iran, are studied. Two smaller foraminiferal assemblages whose position in the section completely coincides with that of previously encountered Kalaktash and Halvan fusulinid complexes are recognized. The age of these Deckerella elegans- Nodosinelloides pinardae and Howchinella sossipatrovae assemblages is Sakmarian and late Sakmarian-early Artinskian (?), respectively. A new species Hemigordius rahdarensis Filimonova, sp. nov. is described.

  6. 43 CFR 5.10 - Can I appeal a decision not to issue a permit?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 43 Public Lands: Interior 1 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Can I appeal a decision not to issue a permit? 5.10 Section 5.10 Public Lands: Interior Office of the Secretary of the Interior COMMERCIAL FILMING AND SIMILAR PROJECTS AND STILL PHOTOGRAPHY ON CERTAIN AREAS UNDER DEPARTMENT JURISDICTION...

  7. 43 CFR 5.10 - Can I appeal a decision not to issue a permit?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 43 Public Lands: Interior 1 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Can I appeal a decision not to issue a permit? 5.10 Section 5.10 Public Lands: Interior Office of the Secretary of the Interior COMMERCIAL FILMING AND SIMILAR PROJECTS AND STILL PHOTOGRAPHY ON CERTAIN AREAS UNDER DEPARTMENT JURISDICTION...

  8. 41 CFR 102-5.10 - What does this part cover?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 41 Public Contracts and Property Management 3 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false What does this part cover? 102-5.10 Section 102-5.10 Public Contracts and Property Management Federal Property Management... transport employees between their homes and places of work....

  9. 17 CFR 5.10 - Risk assessment recordkeeping requirements for retail foreign exchange dealers.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... requirements for retail foreign exchange dealers. 5.10 Section 5.10 Commodity and Securities Exchanges... recordkeeping requirements for retail foreign exchange dealers. (a) Requirement to maintain and preserve information. (1) Each retail foreign exchange dealer registered with the Commission pursuant to section...

  10. More, smaller bacteria in response to ocean's warming?

    PubMed Central

    Morán, Xosé Anxelu G.; Alonso-Sáez, Laura; Nogueira, Enrique; Ducklow, Hugh W.; González, Natalia; López-Urrutia, Ángel; Díaz-Pérez, Laura; Calvo-Díaz, Alejandra; Arandia-Gorostidi, Nestor; Huete-Stauffer, Tamara M.

    2015-01-01

    Heterotrophic bacteria play a major role in organic matter cycling in the ocean. Although the high abundances and relatively fast growth rates of coastal surface bacterioplankton make them suitable sentinels of global change, past analyses have largely overlooked this functional group. Here, time series analysis of a decade of monthly observations in temperate Atlantic coastal waters revealed strong seasonal patterns in the abundance, size and biomass of the ubiquitous flow-cytometric groups of low (LNA) and high nucleic acid (HNA) content bacteria. Over this relatively short period, we also found that bacterioplankton cells were significantly smaller, a trend that is consistent with the hypothesized temperature-driven decrease in body size. Although decadal cell shrinking was observed for both groups, it was only LNA cells that were strongly coherent, with ecological theories linking temperature, abundance and individual size on both the seasonal and interannual scale. We explain this finding because, relative to their HNA counterparts, marine LNA bacteria are less diverse, dominated by members of the SAR11 clade. Temperature manipulation experiments in 2012 confirmed a direct effect of warming on bacterial size. Concurrent with rising temperatures in spring, significant decadal trends of increasing standing stocks (3% per year) accompanied by decreasing mean cell size (−1% per year) suggest a major shift in community structure, with a larger contribution of LNA bacteria to total biomass. The increasing prevalence of these typically oligotrophic taxa may severely impact marine food webs and carbon fluxes by an overall decrease in the efficiency of the biological pump. PMID:26063843

  11. Even on Finite Test Sets Smaller Nets may Perform Better.

    PubMed

    ELSKEN, THOMAS

    1997-03-01

    For feedforward multilayered neural nets we state conditions on the transfer function f under which such nets are uniquely defined by their mappings (up to trivial manipulations). More important we give sufficient conditions on f such that for two arbitrary structures having different numbers of layers there is a finite test set S on which the optimal smaller net performs better. That is there exist weights and thresholds for the smaller structure such that the resulting net has an error (with respect to S) which is less than that of the bigger net, no matter how the weights and thresholds are chosen for the latter. Copyright 1997 Elsevier Science Ltd. All Rights Reserved.

  12. Healthcare security staffing for smaller facilities: where science meets art.

    PubMed

    Warren, Bryan

    2013-01-01

    Obtaining effective security resourcing and staffing for smaller healthcare facilities presents many difficulties, according to the author In this article, he provides guidance to security practitioners on taking existing data and translating it into a language that administration will understand and appreciate.

  13. Implementation Study of Smaller Learning Communities. Final Report

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bernstein, Lawrence; Millsap, Mary Ann; Schimmenti, Jennifer; Page, Lindsay

    2008-01-01

    The Smaller Learning Communities (SLC) program was established in response to growing national concerns about students too often lost and alienated in large, impersonal high schools, as well as concerns about school safety and low levels of achievement and graduation for many students. Authorized under the "Elementary and Secondary Education Act,"…

  14. Evidence that Smaller Schools Do Not Improve Student Achievement

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wainer, Howard; Zwerling, Harris L.

    2006-01-01

    If more small schools than "expected" are among the high achievers, then creating more small schools would raise achievement across the board, many proponents of small schools have argued. In this article, the authors challenge the faulty logic of such inferences. Many claims have been made about the advantages of smaller schools. One is that,…

  15. GENERAL VIEW OF CHAPEL (smaller than church; to right of ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    GENERAL VIEW OF CHAPEL (smaller than church; to right of church). NOTE SERRATED PARAPET AND THE FAMOUS "ROSE WINDOW" IN CENTER. ALSO NOTE BUTTRESSES. SOUTH SIDE. Duplicate color view of HABS TX-333-B-1 - Mission San Jose y San Miguel de Aguayo, Chapel, 6539 San Jose Road, San Antonio, Bexar County, TX

  16. 1. GENERAL VIEW OF CHAPEL (smaller than church; to right ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    1. GENERAL VIEW OF CHAPEL (smaller than church; to right of church). NOTE SERRATED PARAPET AND THE FAMOUS 'ROSE WINDOW' IN CENTER. ALSO NOTE BUTTRESSES. SOUTH SIDE. - Mission San Jose y San Miguel de Aguayo, Chapel, 6539 San Jose Road, San Antonio, Bexar County, TX

  17. Comparing Approaches to Converting Large High Schools into Smaller Units

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Levine, Thomas H

    2011-01-01

    Scholars and reformers in the United States have called for converting large high schools into smaller units to provide a more effective, personal, and culturally responsive education for all students. Current literature argues that such "conversion high schools" should break into fully autonomous small schools rather than more interdependent…

  18. National Impact for Pre-Implementation of Smaller Learning Communities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Torrez, Alex E.; Kritsonis, William A.

    2008-01-01

    This article clearly defines the three crucial pre-implementation principles to maximize the success of Smaller Learning Communities (SLC) in large high schools. Establishing clear understanding for the need of the SLC initiative is the first of these principles. Long term commitment to a sustained plan for relevant SLC professional learning…

  19. Implementation Study of Smaller Learning Communities: Final Report. Report Highlights

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    US Department of Education, 2008

    2008-01-01

    The Smaller Learning Communities (SLC) program was established in response to growing national concerns about students too often lost and alienated in large, impersonal high schools, as well as concerns about school safety and low levels of achievement and graduation for many students. This brief report presents highlights from the Final Report,…

  20. The Underreported Use of Integrated Marketing Communication by Smaller Businesses.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Johnson, Ed

    This research suggests integrated marketing communication (IMC) is widely used by small business. In a survey of Midwest businesses, it was found that smaller business tend to integrate their marketing communication to the same extent as do larger businesses. Their advertising, P.R., and sales promotion are as likely to present a unified message,…

  1. Smaller nets may perform better: special transfer functions.

    PubMed

    Elsken, T

    1999-06-01

    In an earlier study we stated sufficient conditions on the transfer function f of a feedforward multilayered neural net such that the output on R(n) defines the net up to trivial changes and smaller nets can have better performance on finite sets. Here we prove that 1/(1+e(-x)), tanhx, (1-e(-x))/(1+e(-x)) and invtanx satisfy these conditions.

  2. Kokes Awards for the 22nd North American Catalysis Society Meeting, June 5-10, 2011

    SciTech Connect

    Fabio H. Ribeiro

    2011-06-05

    The biennial North American Catalysis Society (NACS) Meetings are the premiere conferences in the area of catalysis, surface science, and reaction engineering. The 22nd meeting will be held the week of June 5-10, 2011 in Detroit, Michigan. The objective of the Meetings is to bring together leading researchers for intensive scientific exchange and interactions. Financial support that offsets some of the associated costs (specifically, registration fee, airline tickets, and hotel accommodations) would encourage graduate students, and for the first time undergraduate students, to attend and participate meaningfully in this conference. The funds sought in this proposal will help support the Richard J. Kokes Travel Award program. Graduate students eligible for these merit-based Awards are those who study at a North American university and who will present at the Meeting. We have currently 209 applications and we expect to be able to fund about half of them. The NACS has traditionally sought to encourage graduate student, and this year for the first time undergraduate studies, participation at the National Meetings and providing financial support is the most effective means to do so. Their attendance would contribute significantly to their scientific training and communication and presentation skills. They would be exposed to the leading researchers from the US and abroad; they would meet their peers from other universities; they would learn about cutting-edge results that could benefit their research projects; and they may become interested in becoming active participants in the catalysis community. These young investigators represent the next generation of scientists and engineers, and their proper training will lead to future scientific breakthroughs and technological innovations that benefit the US economy. Advances in catalysis can come in the form of more energy-efficient and environmentally-friendly chemical processes, improved fuel cell performance, efficient

  3. A big alligator snacks on a smaller alligator

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1998-01-01

    A large alligator attacks and eats a smaller one in a natural display of cannibalism. Although this event has been observed infrequently by Kennedy Space Center's staff photographers, it is common feeding behavior among the wild alligator population on the space center. Alligators are carnivorous and will eat any living thing that crosses their paths and is small enough for them to kill. For this reason, it is dangerous to feed wild alligators, and in Florida, it is also illegal. Kennedy Space Center is located on the Merritt Island National Wildlife Refuge which is operated by the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service.

  4. Flies developed smaller cells when temperature fluctuated more frequently.

    PubMed

    Czarnoleski, Marcin; Dragosz-Kluska, Dominika; Angilletta, Michael J

    2015-12-01

    Changes in cell size might be an important component of adaptation to thermal heterogeneity. Although Drosophila melanogaster develops smaller cells at fluctuating temperatures, we do not know whether this response depends on the frequency or amplitude of thermal change. In a laboratory experiment, we exposed flies to either frequent or infrequent fluctuations between 17 and 27 °C, while controlling the total exposure to each temperature. Flies emerged from these treatments with similar body sizes, but flies at more frequent fluctuations emerged earlier and had smaller epidermal cells for a given body size. Tissue built from small cells has more nuclei for transcription, shorter distances between cell compartments, and a larger surface area for transport across membranes. Therefore, we hypothesize that physiological effects of small cells reduce lags in metabolic activity and enhance performance of flies during warming. For plasticity of cell size to confer a fitness advantage, this hypothetical benefit must outweigh the cost of maintaining a greater area of plasma membrane.

  5. Radial velocities with CRIRES. Pushing precision down to 5-10 m/s

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Figueira, P.; Pepe, F.; Melo, C. H. F.; Santos, N. C.; Lovis, C.; Mayor, M.; Queloz, D.; Smette, A.; Udry, S.

    2010-02-01

    With the advent of high-resolution infrared spectrographs, radial relocity (RV) searches enter into a new domain. As of today, the most important technical question to address is which wavelength reference is the most suitable for high-precision RV measurements. In this work we use atmospheric absorption features as wavelength reference on CRIRES data obtained on two programs and three different targets. We analyzed the data from the TW Hya campaign again, reaching a dispersion of about 6 m/s on the RV standard on a time scale of roughly 1 week. We confirm that there is a low-amplitude RV signal on TW Hya itself, with an amplitude roughly 3 times smaller than the one reported at visible wavelengths. We present RV measurements of Gl 86 as well, showing that our approach is capable of detecting the signal induced by a planet and correctly quantifying it. Our data show that CRIRES is capable of reaching an RV precision of less than 10 m/s on a time scale of one week. The limitations of this particular approach are discussed, along with the limiting factors on RV precision in the IR in a general way. The implications of this work on the design of future dedicated IR spectrographs are addressed as well. Based on observations taken at the VLT (Paranal), under programs 280.C-5064(A) and 60.A-9051(A), and with the CORALIE spectrograph at the Euler Swiss telescope (La Silla). Tables 2 and 3 are only available in electronic form at the CDS via anonymous ftp to cdsarc.u-strasbg.fr (130.79.128.5) or via http://cdsweb.u-strasbg.fr/cgi-bin/qcat?J/A+A/511/A55

  6. Teaching for Creativity by Science Teachers in Grades 5-10

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Al-Abdali, Nasser S.; Al-Balushi, Sulaiman M.

    2016-01-01

    This classroom observation study explored how science teachers (N = 22) teach for creativity in grades 5-10 in Oman. We designed an observation form with 4 main categories that targeted the instructional practices related to teaching for creativity: questioning strategy, teacher's responses to students' ideas, classroom activities to support…

  7. The corrole and ferrocene marriage: 5,10,15-triferrocenylcorrolato Cu.

    PubMed

    Pomarico, Giuseppe; Vecchi, Andrea; Mandoj, Federica; Bortolini, Olga; Cicero, Daniel O; Galloni, Pierluca; Paolesse, Roberto

    2014-04-21

    Two synthetic routes have been defined for the preparation of a 5,10,15-triferrocenylcorrole Cu derivative. This complex has been characterized and the preliminary electrochemical investigation shows a strong interaction among the corrole and meso ferrocenyl substituents. The results obtained suggest that peculiar properties are gained by combining the eccentric characteristics of ferrocenyl substitution with the corrole macrocycle. PMID:24616907

  8. An integrated design of microspeaker module with smaller volume

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Dan-Ping; Sun, Peng; Kwon, Joong-Hak; Hwang, Sang-Moon

    2014-05-01

    Microspeaker modules within mobile phones need to be smaller to offer competitive acoustic performance. Generally, a microspeaker module consists of a speaker unit and an enclosure. Typically, microspeaker module design focuses on miniaturization of either the speaker unit or the enclosure individually, using the other part of the module as a design constraint. However, it is difficult to maintain suitable acoustic performance when the total volume (sum of the back volume and the speaker unit) is significantly reduced. We adopted an integrated design method to overcome this issue. The electromagnetic characteristics of microspeaker were analyzed using the finite element method (FEM). According to the FEM, the average axial electromagnetic force per current increased 29%, and the total volume decreased 31% for the integrated design, as compared to the conventional design while maintaining the same perfect acoustic characteristics. The simulation results indicated that the module resonance frequency and sound pressure level are maintained in the integrated design. Prototypes were constructed to experimentally verify the simulation results.

  9. Effects on cardiovascular risk factors of weight losses limited to 5-10.

    PubMed

    Brown, Joshua D; Buscemi, Joanna; Milsom, Vanessa; Malcolm, Robert; O'Neil, Patrick M

    2016-09-01

    Little is known about the cardiovascular effects of modest weight loss. To determine whether weight losses limited to 5-10 % are sufficient to produce cardiovascular health benefits, data from 401 overweight and obese adults who enrolled in a behavioral weight loss program from 2003 to 2011 were analyzed. Primary outcomes were changes in fasting glucose, triglycerides, and cholesterol. Patients who lost 5-10 % showed significant reductions in triglycerides, total cholesterol, and low-density lipoprotein (LDL) cholesterol. Patients who lost >10 % experienced significantly greater improvements in triglycerides, total cholesterol, and LDL cholesterol than patients losing less. For higher-risk patients, those who lost 5-10 % significantly reduced fasting glucose, triglycerides, and total cholesterol; those who lost >10 % improved on all risk factors (except HDL cholesterol) and to a significantly greater degree than those losing less. Five to 10 % weight losses produced improvements in cardiovascular risk factors, but greater weight losses were associated with even greater improvement. PMID:27528523

  10. Smaller, Lower-Power Fast-Neutron Scintillation Detectors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Patel, Jagdish; Blaes, Brent

    2008-01-01

    Scintillation-based fast-neutron detectors that are smaller and less power-hungry than mainstream scintillation-based fast-neutron detectors are undergoing development. There are numerous applications for such detectors in monitoring fast-neutron fluxes from nuclear reactors, nuclear materials, and natural sources, both on Earth and in outer space. A particularly important terrestrial application for small, low-power, portable fast-neutron detectors lies in the requirement to scan for nuclear materials in cargo and baggage arriving at international transportation facilities. The present development of miniature, low-power scintillation-based fast-neutron detectors exploits recent advances in the fabrication of avalanche photodiodes (APDs). Basically, such a detector includes a plastic scintillator, typically between 300 and 400 m thick with very thin silver mirror coating on all its faces except the one bonded to an APD. All photons generated from scintillation are thus internally reflected and eventually directed to the APD. This design affords not only compactness but also tight optical coupling for utilization of a relatively large proportion of the scintillation light. The combination of this tight coupling and the avalanche-multiplication gain (typically between 750 and 1,000) of the APD is expected to have enough sensitivity to enable monitoring of a fast-neutron flux as small as 1,000 cm(exp -2)s(exp -1). Moreover, pulse-height analysis can be expected to provide information on the kinetic energies of incident neutrons. It has been estimated that a complete, fully developed fast-neutron detector of this type, would be characterized by linear dimensions of the order of 10 cm or less, a mass of no more than about 0.5 kg, and a power demand of no more than a few watts.

  11. Laser Plasma Particle Accelerators: Large Fields for Smaller Facility Sources

    SciTech Connect

    Geddes, Cameron G.R.; Cormier-Michel, Estelle; Esarey, Eric H.; Schroeder, Carl B.; Vay, Jean-Luc; Leemans, Wim P.; Bruhwiler, David L.; Cary, John R.; Cowan, Ben; Durant, Marc; Hamill, Paul; Messmer, Peter; Mullowney, Paul; Nieter, Chet; Paul, Kevin; Shasharina, Svetlana; Veitzer, Seth; Weber, Gunther; Rubel, Oliver; Ushizima, Daniela; Bethel, Wes; Wu, John

    2009-03-20

    Compared to conventional particle accelerators, plasmas can sustain accelerating fields that are thousands of times higher. To exploit this ability, massively parallel SciDAC particle simulations provide physical insight into the development of next-generation accelerators that use laser-driven plasma waves. These plasma-based accelerators offer a path to more compact, ultra-fast particle and radiation sources for probing the subatomic world, for studying new materials and new technologies, and for medical applications.

  12. Purification and characterization of NADP(+)-dependent 5,10-methylenetetrahydrofolate dehydrogenase from Peptostreptococcus productus marburg.

    PubMed Central

    Wohlfarth, G; Geerligs, G; Diekert, G

    1991-01-01

    The 5,10-methylenetetrahydrofolate dehydrogenase of heterotrophically grown Peptostreptococcus productus Marburg was purified to apparent homogeneity. The purified enzyme catalyzed the reversible oxidation of methylenetetrahydrofolate with NADP+ as the electron acceptor at a specific activity of 627 U/mg of protein. The Km values for methylenetetrahydrofolate and for NADP+ were 27 and 113 microM, respectively. The enzyme, which lacked 5,10-methenyltetrahydrofolate cyclohydrolase activity, was insensitive to oxygen and was thermolabile at temperatures above 40 degrees C. The apparent molecular mass of the enzyme was estimated by gel filtration to be 66 kDa. Sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis revealed the presence of a single subunit of 34 kDa, accounting for a dimeric alpha 2 structure of the enzyme. Kinetic studies on the initial reaction velocities with different concentrations of both substrates in the absence and presence of NADPH as the reaction product were interpreted to indicate that the enzyme followed a sequential reaction mechanism. After gentle ultracentrifugation of crude extracts, the enzyme was recovered to greater than 95% in the soluble (supernatant) fraction. Sodium (10 microM to 10 mM) had no effect on enzymatic activity. The data were taken to indicate that the enzyme was similar to the methylenetetrahydrofolate dehydrogenases of other homoacetogenic bacteria and that the enzyme is not involved in energy conservation of P. productus. PMID:1899860

  13. High-Arctic butterflies become smaller with rising temperatures.

    PubMed

    Bowden, Joseph J; Eskildsen, Anne; Hansen, Rikke R; Olsen, Kent; Kurle, Carolyn M; Høye, Toke T

    2015-10-01

    The response of body size to increasing temperature constitutes a universal response to climate change that could strongly affect terrestrial ectotherms, but the magnitude and direction of such responses remain unknown in most species. The metabolic cost of increased temperature could reduce body size but long growing seasons could also increase body size as was recently shown in an Arctic spider species. Here, we present the longest known time series on body size variation in two High-Arctic butterfly species: Boloria chariclea and Colias hecla. We measured wing length of nearly 4500 individuals collected annually between 1996 and 2013 from Zackenberg, Greenland and found that wing length significantly decreased at a similar rate in both species in response to warmer summers. Body size is strongly related to dispersal capacity and fecundity and our results suggest that these Arctic species could face severe challenges in response to ongoing rapid climate change. PMID:26445981

  14. Structural distortions in 5-10 nm silver nanoparticles under high pressure

    SciTech Connect

    Koski, Kristie J.; Kamp, Noelle M.; Kunz, Martin; Knight, Jason K.; Alivisatos, A.P.; Smith, R.K.

    2008-10-13

    We present experimental evidence that silver nanoparticles in the size range of 5-10 nm undergo a reversible structural transformation under hydrostatic pressures up to 10 GPa. We have used x-ray diffraction with a synchrotron light source to investigate pressure-dependent and size-dependent trends in the crystal structure of silver nanoparticles in a hydrostatic medium compressed in a diamond-anvil cell. Results suggest a reversible linear pressure-dependent rhombohedral distortion which has not been previously observed in bulk silver. We propose a mechanism for this transition that considers the bond-length distribution in idealized multiply twinned icosahedral particles. To further support this hypothesis, we also show that similar measurements of single-crystal platinum nanoparticles reveal no such distortions.

  15. Warm-hot baryons comprise 5-10 per cent of filaments in the cosmic web.

    PubMed

    Eckert, Dominique; Jauzac, Mathilde; Shan, HuanYuan; Kneib, Jean-Paul; Erben, Thomas; Israel, Holger; Jullo, Eric; Klein, Matthias; Massey, Richard; Richard, Johan; Tchernin, Céline

    2015-12-01

    Observations of the cosmic microwave background indicate that baryons account for 5 per cent of the Universe's total energy content. In the local Universe, the census of all observed baryons falls short of this estimate by a factor of two. Cosmological simulations indicate that the missing baryons have not condensed into virialized haloes, but reside throughout the filaments of the cosmic web (where matter density is larger than average) as a low-density plasma at temperatures of 10(5)-10(7) kelvin, known as the warm-hot intergalactic medium. There have been previous claims of the detection of warm-hot baryons along the line of sight to distant blazars and of hot gas between interacting clusters. These observations were, however, unable to trace the large-scale filamentary structure, or to estimate the total amount of warm-hot baryons in a representative volume of the Universe. Here we report X-ray observations of filamentary structures of gas at 10(7) kelvin associated with the galaxy cluster Abell 2744. Previous observations of this cluster were unable to resolve and remove coincidental X-ray point sources. After subtracting these, we find hot gas structures that are coherent over scales of 8 megaparsecs. The filaments coincide with over-densities of galaxies and dark matter, with 5-10 per cent of their mass in baryonic gas. This gas has been heated up by the cluster's gravitational pull and is now feeding its core. Our findings strengthen evidence for a picture of the Universe in which a large fraction of the missing baryons reside in the filaments of the cosmic web. PMID:26632589

  16. Seven novel mutations at the 5,10-methylenetetrahydrofolate reductase locus

    SciTech Connect

    Goyette, P.; Frosst, P.; Rosenblatt, D.S.; Rozen, R.

    1994-09-01

    5,10-methylenetetrahydrofolate reductase (MTHFR), a flavoprotein, catalyzes the conversion of 5,10-methylenetetrahydrofolate to 5-methyltetrahydrofolate, a cofactor for methionine synthase in the methylation of homocysteine to methionine. Severe MTHFR deficiency, which causes homocysteinemia, is an autosomal recessive disorder with variable clinical features; developmental delay, perinatal death, mental retardation and asymptomatic individuals have been observed. A milder deficiency has been reported in patients with cardiovascular disease. We have recently described the isolation of a cDNA for MTHFR and the identification of 2 mutations in patients with severe MTHFR deficiency. We report here the characterization of 7 additional mutations at this locus: 5 missense mutations and 2 splicing mutations. Mutation analysis was performed by SSCP on PCR products generated either from reverse transcription-PCR of patients` total fibroblast RNA or from PCR of patients` genomic DNA. The 5 missense mutations are as follows: 1 Arg to Cys substitution in a hydrophilic segment proposed to be the hinge region that connects the catalytic and regulatory domains, 2 different Arg to Cys substitutions in 2 patients whose enzymatic thermolability is responsive to FAD, 1 Thr to Met substitution affecting an evolutionarily-conserved residue and a Pro to Leu substitution. The 2 splicing mutations affect the 5{prime} splice site and the 3{prime} splice site of 2 introns, respectively. The 5{prime} splice site mutation generates a 57 bp in-frame deletion of the RNA through the utilization of a cryptic 5{prime} splice site within the coding sequence. The identification of 9 mutations at this locus has allowed us to make preliminary correlations between genotype and phenotype and to contribute to a structure:function analysis of the enzyme.

  17. Warm-hot baryons comprise 5-10 per cent of filaments in the cosmic web.

    PubMed

    Eckert, Dominique; Jauzac, Mathilde; Shan, HuanYuan; Kneib, Jean-Paul; Erben, Thomas; Israel, Holger; Jullo, Eric; Klein, Matthias; Massey, Richard; Richard, Johan; Tchernin, Céline

    2015-12-01

    Observations of the cosmic microwave background indicate that baryons account for 5 per cent of the Universe's total energy content. In the local Universe, the census of all observed baryons falls short of this estimate by a factor of two. Cosmological simulations indicate that the missing baryons have not condensed into virialized haloes, but reside throughout the filaments of the cosmic web (where matter density is larger than average) as a low-density plasma at temperatures of 10(5)-10(7) kelvin, known as the warm-hot intergalactic medium. There have been previous claims of the detection of warm-hot baryons along the line of sight to distant blazars and of hot gas between interacting clusters. These observations were, however, unable to trace the large-scale filamentary structure, or to estimate the total amount of warm-hot baryons in a representative volume of the Universe. Here we report X-ray observations of filamentary structures of gas at 10(7) kelvin associated with the galaxy cluster Abell 2744. Previous observations of this cluster were unable to resolve and remove coincidental X-ray point sources. After subtracting these, we find hot gas structures that are coherent over scales of 8 megaparsecs. The filaments coincide with over-densities of galaxies and dark matter, with 5-10 per cent of their mass in baryonic gas. This gas has been heated up by the cluster's gravitational pull and is now feeding its core. Our findings strengthen evidence for a picture of the Universe in which a large fraction of the missing baryons reside in the filaments of the cosmic web.

  18. Report examines links among women's equality, smaller families, healthier children.

    PubMed

    1997-06-01

    This article reports on a new study by Nancy Riley about the relationship between gender equality and fertility and mortality declines in developing countries. Findings indicate that mortality and fertility has declined in countries without gender equality. Fertility and child mortality decline is related to women's educational status and employment. Riley argues that women's power to make decisions about health care, contraception, and the timing and number of children, if affected by education and paid employment, is more likely to lower mortality and fertility. Women's power may decline in countries where women's education and employment are advanced, but their role in society remains that of mothers. All developing countries showed a relationship between the amount of education and family size and child health. Fertility tends to be lowest among highly educated women. However, women's education has a stronger effect on child health and mortality. Maternal education also affects child nutritional status. Women's education offers women the option of job opportunities and new values or ideas. Women's employment may result in increased resources and status or in poverty and heavy physical labor. Societal views of women's work may reflect an increased self-worth for working women or lower status or the failure of a husband to adequately provide for family welfare. The key to the impact of women's employment is whether work becomes a way to achieve greater power for women in decision making about child welfare and family planning. Employment outside the home educates. In most countries, women who worked for cash had fewer children, but differences in fertility between working and nonworking women range from small to large. Higher income for Nigerian women means more children. Women's work also has inconsistent effects on child health.

  19. The use of law to encourage smaller families in Singapore.

    PubMed

    Smith, T W

    1980-01-01

    To pursue its goal of rapid economic development, Singapore provides family planning services and has vigorously encouraged its citizens to limit family size. The government has legislated disincentives for families to have more than 2 children. This discussion reviews the history of these legal measures and their usefulness as a tool to promote social change and development. Singapore has used the law as a means to encourage family planning in order to supplement the overall thrust for economic development in the late 1960s. Freed from obligations to the Malaysian Federation and lacking the support of the British military as of 1969, Lee Kuan Yew led his people's economic development along a Western model. Reduction of population growth is an essential component of that model. Lee stressed family planning by providing clinics, by advertising, by promoting housing and lifestyles conducive to nuclear families, and by gradually adopting a set of laws favoring small families. These laws were introduced in different sectors of the economy at different times and were revised as social conditions changed. Typically, they set a minor monetary or priority penalty for parents of 3 or more children. The laws discourage additional births rather than prohibit them, guiding rather than forcing family planning decisions. To what extent the laws were the cause of decreasing family size in Singapore is uncertain, but they contributed to some extent to the country's phenomenal progress in income and lifestyle. The Abortion Act of 1969 legalized abortion on nonmedical grounds with the Singapore Family Planning and Population Board (SFPPB) approval. The Act was amended twice in 1974 to make abortions available "on demand." The charging of progressive delivery (accouchement) fees in government hospitals for mothers with 2 or more children might be considered as the focal point of the total disincentives system. The fees placed financial pressure directly on those who violated the

  20. The use of law to encourage smaller families in Singapore.

    PubMed

    Smith, T W

    1980-01-01

    To pursue its goal of rapid economic development, Singapore provides family planning services and has vigorously encouraged its citizens to limit family size. The government has legislated disincentives for families to have more than 2 children. This discussion reviews the history of these legal measures and their usefulness as a tool to promote social change and development. Singapore has used the law as a means to encourage family planning in order to supplement the overall thrust for economic development in the late 1960s. Freed from obligations to the Malaysian Federation and lacking the support of the British military as of 1969, Lee Kuan Yew led his people's economic development along a Western model. Reduction of population growth is an essential component of that model. Lee stressed family planning by providing clinics, by advertising, by promoting housing and lifestyles conducive to nuclear families, and by gradually adopting a set of laws favoring small families. These laws were introduced in different sectors of the economy at different times and were revised as social conditions changed. Typically, they set a minor monetary or priority penalty for parents of 3 or more children. The laws discourage additional births rather than prohibit them, guiding rather than forcing family planning decisions. To what extent the laws were the cause of decreasing family size in Singapore is uncertain, but they contributed to some extent to the country's phenomenal progress in income and lifestyle. The Abortion Act of 1969 legalized abortion on nonmedical grounds with the Singapore Family Planning and Population Board (SFPPB) approval. The Act was amended twice in 1974 to make abortions available "on demand." The charging of progressive delivery (accouchement) fees in government hospitals for mothers with 2 or more children might be considered as the focal point of the total disincentives system. The fees placed financial pressure directly on those who violated the

  1. Treatment of the edentulous atrophic maxilla using zygomatic implants: evaluation of survival rates over 5-10 years.

    PubMed

    Yates, J M; Brook, I M; Patel, R R; Wragg, P F; Atkins, S A; El-Awa, A; Bakri, I; Bolt, R

    2014-02-01

    The aim of this retrospective observational cohort study was to analyse and report the 5-10-year survival rates of endosseous zygomatic implants used in the rehabilitation of the atrophic maxilla. Forty-three consecutive zygomatic implant placements in 25 patients were evaluated over a 5-10-year period. All zygomatic implant surgery was carried out under general anaesthesia. Nobel Biocare zygomatic machined-surface implants were used, and placement was undertaken using the modified sinus slot method. The main outcome measures and determinants for success were survival of the restored implants and the proportion of originally planned prostheses delivered to patients. Of the 25 patients treated, 12 were male and 13 were female; 19 were non-smokers, and the mean age at time of surgery was 64 years. Patients were treatment-planned for implant-retained bridgework, a removable prosthesis retained by fixed cast gold or milled titanium beams, or magnet-retained removable prostheses. A combination of zygomatic and conventional implants was used in all but one patient. In this study it was shown that the overall success rate for zygomatic implants was 86%, with six of the implants either failing to integrate or requiring removal due to persistent infection associated with the maxillary sinus. All patients received their planned prosthesis, although in six cases the method of retention required modification. This study illustrates that zygomatic implants are a successful and important treatment option when trying to restore the atrophic maxilla, with the potential to avoid additional augmentation/grafting procedures and resulting in a high long-term success rate. PMID:24120903

  2. 5,10 Methylenetetrahydrofolate reductase genetic polymorphism as a risk factor for neural tube defects

    SciTech Connect

    Ou, C.Y.; Brown, V.K.; Khoury, M.J.

    1996-06-28

    Persons with a thermolabile form of the enzyme 5,10 methylenetetrahydrofolate reductase (MTHFR) have reduced enzyme activity and increased plasma homocysteine which can be lowered by supplemental folic acid. Thermolability of the enzyme has recently been shown to be caused by a common mutation (677C{sup {r_arrow}}T) in the MTHFR gene. We studied 41 fibroblast cultures from NTD-affected fetuses and compared their genotypes with those of 109 blood specimens from individuals in the general population. 677C{sup {r_arrow}}T homozygosity was associated with a 7.2 fold increased risk for NTDs (95% confidence interval: 1.8-30.3; p value: 0.001). These preliminary data suggest that the 677C{sup {r_arrow}}T polymorphism of the MTHFR gene is a risk factor for spina bifida and anencephaly that may provide a partial biologic explanation for why folic acid prevents these types of NTD. 13 refs., 1 fig., 1 tab.

  3. Folate metabolism gene 5,10-methylenetetrahydrofolate reductase (MTHFR) is associated with ADHD in myelomeningocele patients.

    PubMed

    Spellicy, Catherine J; Northrup, Hope; Fletcher, Jack M; Cirino, Paul T; Dennis, Maureen; Morrison, Alanna C; Martinez, Carla A; Au, Kit Sing

    2012-01-01

    The objective of this study was to examine the relation between the 5, 10-methylenetetrahydrofolate reductase (MTHFR) gene and behaviors related to attention- deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) in individuals with myelomeningocele. The rationale for the study was twofold: folate metabolizing genes, (e.g. MTHFR), are important not only in the etiology of neural tube defects but are also critical to cognitive function; and individuals with myelomeningocele have an elevated incidence of ADHD. Here, we tested 478 individuals with myelomeningocele for attention-deficit hyperactivity disorder behavior using the Swanson Nolan Achenbach Pelham-IV ADHD rating scale. Myelomeningocele participants in this group for whom DNAs were available were genotyped for seven single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in the MTHFR gene. The SNPs were evaluated for an association with manifestation of the ADHD phenotype in children with myelomeningocele. The data show that 28.7% of myelomeningocele participants exhibit rating scale elevations consistent with ADHD; of these 70.1% had scores consistent with the predominantly inattentive subtype. In addition, we also show a positive association between the SNP rs4846049 in the 3'-untranslated region of the MTHFR gene and the attention-deficit hyperactivity disorder phenotype in myelomeningocele participants. These results lend further support to the finding that behavior related to ADHD is more prevalent in patients with myelomeningocele than in the general population. These data also indicate the potential importance of the MTHFR gene in the etiology of the ADHD phenotype. PMID:23227261

  4. A Neptune-sized transiting planet closely orbiting a 5-10-million-year-old star

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    David, Trevor J.

    2016-10-01

    Theories of the formation and early evolution of planetary systems postulate that planets are born in circumstellar disks, and undergo radial migration during and after dissipation of the dust and gas disk from which they formed. The precise ages of meteorites indicate that planetesimals - the building blocks of planets - are produced within the first million years of a star's life. A prominent question is: how early can one find fully formed planets like those frequently detected on short orbital periods around mature stars? Some theories suggest the in situ formation of planets close to their host stars is unlikely and the existence of such planets is evidence for large scale migration. Other theories posit that planet assembly at small orbital separations may be common. Here we report on a newly-born, transiting planet orbiting its star every 5.4 days. The planet is 50 per cent larger than Neptune, and its mass is less than 3.6 times Jupiter (at 99.7 per cent confidence), with a true mass likely to be within a factor of several of Neptune's. The 5-10 million year old star has a tenuous dust disk extending outwards from about 2 times the Earth-Sun separation, in addition to the large planet located at less than one-twentieth the Earth-Sun separation.

  5. Substrate specificity of mammalian folylpolyglutamate synthetase for 5,10-dideazatetrahydrofolate analogs.

    PubMed

    Habeck, L L; Mendelsohn, L G; Shih, C; Taylor, E C; Colman, P D; Gossett, L S; Leitner, T A; Schultz, R M; Andis, S L; Moran, R G

    1995-08-01

    The metabolism of 5,10-dideazatetrahydrofolate (DDATHF [lometrexol]) to polyglutamate derivatives by folylpoly-gamma-glutamate synthetase (FPGS) plays a central role in the activity of this compound as an antineoplastic agent. The availability of a series of DDATHF derivatives differing in structure throughout the molecule has allowed a study of the structural requirements for substrate activity with mouse liver and hog liver FPGS. Kinetics of the polyglutamation reaction in vitro have been related to the potency of these compounds as inhibitors of the growth of human CEM leukemic cells. The structure-activity relationships for enzyme from both sources were nearly identical. FPGS from both species showed a broad acceptance for structural changes in the pyridopyrimidine ring, in the phenyl group, and in the intermediate bridge region, with structural changes in these regions being reflected in changes in Km for FPGS but much more modest alterations in Vmax. The data suggested that the phenyl ring was not contributing to any pi-pi hydrophobic interactions. It appeared to function primarily in maintaining a favorable distance between the pyridopyrimidine ring and the glutamate side chain. The lowest Km values were found for DDATHF analogs in which there were small alterations at the 10 position, e.g., 5-deazatetrahydrofolate, 10-methyl-DDATHF, and 10-formyl-5-deazatetrahydrofolate; the first-order rate constants for these substrates were the highest in this series, an indication of the efficiency of polyglutamation at low substrate concentrations. After correction for the intrinsic inhibitory activity of the parent DDATHF analog as an inhibitor of the target enzyme, the first-order rate constants for FPGS were found to be predictive of the potency of tumor cell growth inhibition for most of the compounds in this structural series.

  6. Warm-hot baryons comprise 5-10 per cent of filaments in the cosmic web

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eckert, Dominique; Jauzac, Mathilde; Shan, Huanyuan; Kneib, Jean-Paul; Erben, Thomas; Israel, Holger; Jullo, Eric; Klein, Matthias; Massey, Richard; Richard, Johan; Tchernin, Céline

    2015-12-01

    Observations of the cosmic microwave background indicate that baryons account for 5 per cent of the Universe’s total energy content. In the local Universe, the census of all observed baryons falls short of this estimate by a factor of two. Cosmological simulations indicate that the missing baryons have not condensed into virialized haloes, but reside throughout the filaments of the cosmic web (where matter density is larger than average) as a low-density plasma at temperatures of 105-107 kelvin, known as the warm-hot intergalactic medium. There have been previous claims of the detection of warm-hot baryons along the line of sight to distant blazars and of hot gas between interacting clusters. These observations were, however, unable to trace the large-scale filamentary structure, or to estimate the total amount of warm-hot baryons in a representative volume of the Universe. Here we report X-ray observations of filamentary structures of gas at 107 kelvin associated with the galaxy cluster Abell 2744. Previous observations of this cluster were unable to resolve and remove coincidental X-ray point sources. After subtracting these, we find hot gas structures that are coherent over scales of 8 megaparsecs. The filaments coincide with over-densities of galaxies and dark matter, with 5-10 per cent of their mass in baryonic gas. This gas has been heated up by the cluster’s gravitational pull and is now feeding its core. Our findings strengthen evidence for a picture of the Universe in which a large fraction of the missing baryons reside in the filaments of the cosmic web.

  7. Less Daily Computer Use is Related to Smaller Hippocampal Volumes in Cognitively Intact Elderly

    PubMed Central

    Silbert, Lisa C.; Dodge, Hiroko H.; Lahna, David; Promjunyakul, Nutta-on; Austin, Daniel; Mattek, Nora; Erten-Lyons, Deniz; Kaye, Jeffrey A.

    2016-01-01

    Background: Computer use is becoming a common activity in the daily life of older individuals and declines over time in those with mild cognitive impairment (MCI). The relationship between daily computer use (DCU) and imaging markers of neurodegeneration is unknown. Objective:The objective of this study was to examine the relationship between average DCU and volumetric markers of neurodegeneration on brain MRI. Methods: Cognitively intact volunteers enrolled in the Intelligent Systems for Assessing Aging Change study underwent MRI. Total in-home computer use per day was calculated using mouse movement detection and averaged over a one-month period surrounding the MRI. Spearman’s rank order correlation (univariate analysis) and linear regression models (multivariate analysis) examined hippocampal, gray matter (GM), white matter hyperintensity (WMH), and ventricular cerebral spinal fluid (vCSF) volumes in relation to DCU. A voxel-based morphometry analysis identified relationships between regional GM density and DCU. Results: Twenty-seven cognitively intact participants used their computer for 51.3 minutes per day on average. Less DCU was associated with smaller hippocampal volumes (r = 0.48, p = 0.01), but not total GM, WMH, or vCSF volumes. After adjusting for age, education, and gender, less DCU remained associated with smaller hippocampal volume (p = 0.01). Voxel-wise analysis demonstrated that less daily computer use was associated with decreased GM density in the bilateral hippocampi and temporal lobes. Conclusions: Less daily computer use is associated with smaller brain volume in regions that are integral to memory function and known to be involved early with Alzheimer’s pathology and conversion to dementia. Continuous monitoring of daily computer use may detect signs of preclinical neurodegeneration in older individuals at risk for dementia. PMID:26967228

  8. Microwave soft x-ray microscopy for nanoscale magnetization dynamics in the 5-10 GHz frequency range.

    PubMed

    Bonetti, Stefano; Kukreja, Roopali; Chen, Zhao; Spoddig, Detlef; Ollefs, Katharina; Schöppner, Christian; Meckenstock, Ralf; Ney, Andreas; Pinto, Jude; Houanche, Richard; Frisch, Josef; Stöhr, Joachim; Dürr, Hermann A; Ohldag, Hendrik

    2015-09-01

    We present a scanning transmission x-ray microscopy setup combined with a novel microwave synchronization scheme for studying high frequency magnetization dynamics at synchrotron light sources. The sensitivity necessary to detect small changes in the magnetization on short time scales and nanometer spatial dimensions is achieved by combining the excitation mechanism with single photon counting electronics that is locked to the synchrotron operation frequency. Our instrument is capable of creating direct images of dynamical phenomena in the 5-10 GHz range, with high spatial resolution. When used together with circularly polarized x-rays, the above capabilities can be combined to study magnetic phenomena at microwave frequencies, such as ferromagnetic resonance (FMR) and spin waves. We demonstrate the capabilities of our technique by presenting phase resolved images of a ∼6 GHz nanoscale spin wave generated by a spin torque oscillator, as well as the uniform ferromagnetic precession with ∼0.1° amplitude at ∼9 GHz in a micrometer-sized cobalt strip. PMID:26429444

  9. Solvent effect on the nonlinear absorption of 5,10-A(2)B(2) meso substituted porphyrins.

    PubMed

    Zawadzka, Monika; Wang, Jun; Blau, Werner J; Senge, Mathias O

    2013-10-01

    The effect of the solvent on the nonlinear absorptive properties of two series of 5,10-A2B2 porphyrins was investigated with an open Z-scan technique in the ns time regime. The recorded responses, which varied between compounds and solvents, were fitted to a four-level model where the one-photon excited state absorption is followed by a two-photon process arising from the higher excited states. For most of the compounds the positive nonlinear absorption in toluene was stronger than that in DMF and chloroform. This was attributed to enhanced two-photon absorption in toluene. For DMF and chloroform the solvent effects were most likely to be compound specific. It was demonstrated that the high saturation intensity of two-photon absorption shifts the RSA/SA turnover into a higher fluence range, which is desirable for optical limiting applications. This saturation intensity of two-photon absorption varied between compounds and solvents. Additionally, nonlinear scattering contributed strongly to the open Z-scan responses for many compounds in chlorobenzene and chloroform-chlorobenzene solutions. This was associated with the photodegradation of chlorobenzene.

  10. A Neptune-sized transiting planet closely orbiting a 5-10-million-year-old star

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    David, Trevor J.; Hillenbrand, Lynne A.; Petigura, Erik A.; Carpenter, John M.; Crossfield, Ian J. M.; Hinkley, Sasha; Ciardi, David R.; Howard, Andrew W.; Isaacson, Howard T.; Cody, Ann Marie; Schlieder, Joshua E.; Beichman, Charles A.; Barenfeld, Scott A.

    2016-06-01

    Theories of the formation and early evolution of planetary systems postulate that planets are born in circumstellar disks, and undergo radial migration during and after dissipation of the dust and gas disk from which they formed. The precise ages of meteorites indicate that planetesimals—the building blocks of planets—are produced within the first million years of a star’s life. Fully formed planets are frequently detected on short orbital periods around mature stars. Some theories suggest that the in situ formation of planets close to their host stars is unlikely and that the existence of such planets is therefore evidence of large-scale migration. Other theories posit that planet assembly at small orbital separations may be common. Here we report a newly born, transiting planet orbiting its star with a period of 5.4 days. The planet is 50 per cent larger than Neptune, and its mass is less than 3.6 times that of Jupiter (at 99.7 per cent confidence), with a true mass likely to be similar to that of Neptune. The star is 5-10 million years old and has a tenuous dust disk extending outward from about twice the Earth-Sun separation, in addition to the fully formed planet located at less than one-twentieth of the Earth-Sun separation.

  11. Stability and prediction of physical activity in 5-, 10-, and 28-year follow-up studies among industrial employees.

    PubMed

    Kirjonen, J; Telama, R; Luukkonen, R; Kääriä, S; Kaila-Kangas, L; Leino-Arjas, P

    2006-06-01

    The aim of the study was to examine the stability of voluntary and household physical activity (PA) and to compare it with that of the use of the most common stimulants. The prospective cohort study comprised of follow-ups at 5, 10, and 28 years at baseline in 1973 in four plants of an industrial corporation in Finland. A systematic, non-proportional sample (n=902, age range 18-64 years) stratified for age, gender, and occupational status was drawn from the employees. Scores of PA were based on a questionnaire and interviews. Logistic regression models with proportional odds assumptions were counted. The 5-year stability (Spearman's rho) of PA time was 0.44 (PA intensity 0.44), the respective 10-year coefficient was 0.26 (0.32), and that in the 28-year follow-up was 0.18 (0.20). The stability of PA decreased rapidly from 1973 to 1983 and more slowly thereafter. Changes along the follow-up reflect a polarization of the distributions of PA within the sample. Age and an initially low level of activity were the strongest predictors of inactivity. The stability coefficient of smoking and alcohol consumption was twice as high as that of PA. Stimulant use was a greater factor in the individual's lifestyle than PA. PMID:16643199

  12. Microwave soft x-ray microscopy for nanoscale magnetization dynamics in the 5-10 GHz frequency range

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bonetti, Stefano; Kukreja, Roopali; Chen, Zhao; Spoddig, Detlef; Ollefs, Katharina; Schöppner, Christian; Meckenstock, Ralf; Ney, Andreas; Pinto, Jude; Houanche, Richard; Frisch, Josef; Stöhr, Joachim; Dürr, Hermann A.; Ohldag, Hendrik

    2015-09-01

    We present a scanning transmission x-ray microscopy setup combined with a novel microwave synchronization scheme for studying high frequency magnetization dynamics at synchrotron light sources. The sensitivity necessary to detect small changes in the magnetization on short time scales and nanometer spatial dimensions is achieved by combining the excitation mechanism with single photon counting electronics that is locked to the synchrotron operation frequency. Our instrument is capable of creating direct images of dynamical phenomena in the 5-10 GHz range, with high spatial resolution. When used together with circularly polarized x-rays, the above capabilities can be combined to study magnetic phenomena at microwave frequencies, such as ferromagnetic resonance (FMR) and spin waves. We demonstrate the capabilities of our technique by presenting phase resolved images of a ˜6 GHz nanoscale spin wave generated by a spin torque oscillator, as well as the uniform ferromagnetic precession with ˜0.1° amplitude at ˜9 GHz in a micrometer-sized cobalt strip.

  13. In vitro cytotoxicity assessment of [5,10,15,20-tetra (4-sulfophenyl) porphyrin] on tumor and nontumor cell lines

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alexandrova, R.; Sabotinov, O.; Stoykova, Elena V.; Ion, Rodica-Mariana; Shurulinkov, Stanislav; Minchev, Georgi

    2004-06-01

    In this study we evaluate the cytotoxicity of 5,10,15,20- tetra (4-sulfophenyl) porphyrins on a tumor cell line LSCC-SF-Mc29, obtained from a transplantable chicken hepatoma induced by the myelocytomatosis virus Mc29, a timor line LSR-SF-SR, obtained from a transplantable sarcoma in rat induced by Rous sarcoma virus strain Schmidt-Ruppin and for normal mouse cell line (BALB/c-3T3-A31) and bovine kidney cell line (MDBK). The cells were exposed to irradiation from a pulsed CuBr vapor laser system at 510.6 nm and 578.2 nm at fluence rate 50 mW/cm2 and pulse frequency rate 20 kHz. The viability of cells was determined by the neutral red uptake cytotoxicity assay. The light dose-response curves and light exposures that ensure viability drop to 50 % were obtained for each cell line. The cytotoxic effect of TS4PP is most distinguished for LSCC-SF-Mc29. The bovine cell line is more vulnerable than the mouse line, especially at 510.6 nm. The 2-4 times higher viability of the normal cell lines in comparison with the tumor lines has been obtained.

  14. Uncooled infrared detectors toward smaller pixel pitch with newly proposed pixel structure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tohyama, Shigeru; Sasaki, Tokuhito; Endoh, Tsutomu; Sano, Masahiko; Katoh, Kouji; Kurashina, Seiji; Miyoshi, Masaru; Yamazaki, Takao; Ueno, Munetaka; Katayama, Haruyoshi; Imai, Tadashi

    2011-06-01

    Since authors have successfully demonstrated uncooled infrared (IR) focal plane array (FPA) with 23.5 um pixel pitch, it has been widely utilized for commercial applications such as thermography, security camera and so on. One of the key issues for uncooled IR detector technology is to shrink the pixel size. The smaller the pixel pitch, the more the IR camera products become compact and the less cost. This paper proposes a new pixel structure with a diaphragm and beams which are placed in different level, to realize an uncooled IRFPA with smaller pixel pitch )<=17 μm). The upper level consists of diaphragm with VOx bolometer and IR absorber layers, while the lower level consists of the two beams, which are designed to place on the adjacent pixels. The test devices of this pixel design with 12 um, 15 um and 17 um pitch have been fabricated on the Si ROIC of QVGA (320 × 240) with 23.5 um pitch. Their performances reveal nearly equal to the IRFPA with 23.5 um pitch. For example, noise equivalent temperature difference (NETD) of 12 μm pixel is 63.1 mK with thermal time constant of 14.5 msec. In addition, this new structure is expected to be more effective for the existing IRFPA with 23.5 um pitch in order to improve the IR responsivity.

  15. Towards smaller and faster gas chromatography-mass spectrometry systems for field chemical detection.

    PubMed

    Smith, P A; Sng, M T; Eckenrode, B A; Leow, S Y; Koch, D; Erickson, R P; Jackson Lepage, C R; Hook, G L

    2005-03-01

    Gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS) is already an important laboratory method, but new sampling techniques and column heating approaches will expand and improve its usefulness for detection and identification of unknown chemicals in field settings. In order to demonstrate commercially-available technical advances for both sampling and column heating, we used solid phase microextraction (SPME) sampling of both water and air systems, followed by immediate analysis with a resistively heated analytical column and mass spectrometric detection. High-concern compounds ranging from 140 to 466 amu were analyzed to show the applicability of these techniques to emergency situations impacting public health. A field portable (about 35 kg) GC-MS system was used for analysis of water samples with a resistively heated analytical column externally mounted as a retrofit using the air bath oven of the original instrument design to heat transfer lines. The system used to analyze air samples included a laboratory mass spectrometer with a dedicated resistive column heating arrangement (no legacy air bath column oven). The combined sampling and analysis time was less than 10 min for both air and water sample types. By combining dedicated resistive column heating with smaller mass spectrometry systems designed specificallyfor use in the field, substantially smaller high performance field-portable instrumentation will be possible.

  16. Evidence for Extended (5-10 Ma) Emplacement of Ferrar Dolerite from 40Ar-39Ar Geochronology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Knight, K. B.; Renne, P. R.

    2005-12-01

    Antarctica's Ferrar large igneous province (LIP) is dominated by dolerites linked in time, space and geochemical character with the nearby Kirkpatrick basalts, and more broadly, with magmas preserved in Dronning Maud Land (Antarctica), the Karoo LIP (southern Africa) and the Chon Aike LIP (Patagonia). Together, these magmatic bodies represent an estimated emplacement volume of ~3 x 106 km3, correlated with the break-up and post-break-up activity of the Gondwana supercontinent in the middle Jurassic. Plagioclase separates from 9 Ferrar dolerites exposed across the Dry Valleys of the Transantarctic Mountains were analyzed using the 40Ar-39Ar method. Detailed apparent age spectra reveal a range of well-defined plateau ages. Four samples yield indistinguishable ages with a weighted mean age 180.0 ± 0.5 Ma. The remaining 5 samples yield statistically distinct and significantly younger plateau ages, decreasing to as young as ca. 173 Ma. These ages may represent emplacement and/or cooling ages (below ~300°C, the approximate closure temperature for argon in plagioclase). Spectacular exposure and preservation of the Ferrar intrusive complex has led to increased interest in development of models of magma mush formation and emplacement. These data provide quantitative constraints for models of magma emplacement for the Ferrar, suggesting either the presence of long-lived magma chambers or sufficient thermal insulation or input to allow heterogeneous slow cooling of the Ferrar dolerites. The suggestion of protracted (5-10 Ma) intrusive activity supports previous geochronology data reported from Dronning Maud Land and the Ferrar, as well as the broad temporal picture arising around the time of Gondwana break-up.

  17. Structural investigation of 5,10-A2B2-type porphyrins: palladium(II) and zinc(II) complexes of 5,10-dibromo-15,20-bis(4-methylphenyl)porphyrin.

    PubMed

    Senge, Mathias O; Zawadzka, Monika

    2014-12-01

    The analysis of [5,10-dibromo-15,20-bis(4-methylphenyl)porphyrinato]palladium(II), [Pd(C34H22Br2N4)], and [5,10-dibromo-15,20-bis(4-methylphenyl)porphyrinato](methanol)zinc(II), [Zn(C34H22Br2N4)(CH4O)], reveals a small but localized influence of the bromine residues on the conformation of the macrocycle. A comparison of the 5,10-dibromo substituent pattern with literature data for 5,15-dibromoporphyrins shows similar in-plane distortions in both but a different mix of out-of-plane distortion modes for the different regiochemical arrangements.

  18. Do women with smaller breasts perform better in long-distance running?

    PubMed

    Brown, Nicola; Scurr, Joanna

    2016-11-01

    Literature has established that a range of physiological, biomechanical, and training variables influence marathon performance. The influence of anthropometric characteristics has also received attention. However, despite major marathons exceeding 40,000 participants and approximately a third of these runners being female, no data exist on the influence of the breast on running performance. This cross-sectional study aimed to explore the impact of breast mass on marathon finish time. One hundred and sixty-eight of 321 female marathon runners contacted completed an on-line survey focusing on marathon performance during the 2012 London marathon. Participants were categorised as smaller (<500 g, 54%) or larger breasted (>500 g, 46%). Regression analysis identified that 24% of marathon performance variance could be explained by body mass index (BMI), but breast mass improved the model to explain 28% of performance variation. The model determined that for women with 32/34 or 36/38 underband each increase in cup size equates to a performance decrement of 4.6 min or 8.6 min, equivalent to 34.4 min difference between a woman with 36A compared to 36DD breast size. Larger breasted runners had greater BMIs, completed less marathons and had slower marathon finish times (316 ± 48 min) compared to smaller breasted runners (281 ± 51 min). Twenty-five per cent less larger breasted women finished in the fastest quartile. These results suggest that differences in breast mass are an important factor for female athletes and should be considered in future research in this area.

  19. Do women with smaller breasts perform better in long-distance running?

    PubMed

    Brown, Nicola; Scurr, Joanna

    2016-11-01

    Literature has established that a range of physiological, biomechanical, and training variables influence marathon performance. The influence of anthropometric characteristics has also received attention. However, despite major marathons exceeding 40,000 participants and approximately a third of these runners being female, no data exist on the influence of the breast on running performance. This cross-sectional study aimed to explore the impact of breast mass on marathon finish time. One hundred and sixty-eight of 321 female marathon runners contacted completed an on-line survey focusing on marathon performance during the 2012 London marathon. Participants were categorised as smaller (<500 g, 54%) or larger breasted (>500 g, 46%). Regression analysis identified that 24% of marathon performance variance could be explained by body mass index (BMI), but breast mass improved the model to explain 28% of performance variation. The model determined that for women with 32/34 or 36/38 underband each increase in cup size equates to a performance decrement of 4.6 min or 8.6 min, equivalent to 34.4 min difference between a woman with 36A compared to 36DD breast size. Larger breasted runners had greater BMIs, completed less marathons and had slower marathon finish times (316 ± 48 min) compared to smaller breasted runners (281 ± 51 min). Twenty-five per cent less larger breasted women finished in the fastest quartile. These results suggest that differences in breast mass are an important factor for female athletes and should be considered in future research in this area. PMID:27467184

  20. Implications of smaller concentrations of stratospheric OH - A two-dimensional model study of ozone perturbations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Whitten, R. C.; Borucki, W. J.; Woodward, H. T.; Capone, L. A.; Riegel, C. A.; Turco, R. P.; Poppoff, I. G.; Santhanam, K.

    1981-01-01

    There is growing observational evidence that stratospheric OH concentrations are smaller than models have been predicting. Using very recent HOx reaction rate coefficient measurements in a two-dimensional photochemical model, results which support these observations are obtained. As a consequence of smaller OH concentrations, we show that perturbations of stratospheric ozone by NOx (SST emissions and nitrogen fertilizers) may be larger than expected, while perturbations due to added water vapor and chlorine (SSTs and chlorofluoromethanes, respectively) may be smaller.

  1. Flight speeds of swifts (Apus apus): seasonal differences smaller than expected.

    PubMed

    Henningsson, P; Karlsson, H; Bäckman, J; Alerstam, T; Hedenström, A

    2009-07-01

    We have studied the nocturnal flight behaviour of the common swift (Apus apus L.), by the use of a tracking radar. Birds were tracked from Lund University in southern Sweden during spring migration, summer roosting flights and autumn migration. Flight speeds were compared with predictions from flight mechanical and optimal migration theories. During spring, flight speeds were predicted to be higher than during both summer and autumn due to time restriction. In such cases, birds fly at a flight speed that maximizes the overall speed of migration. For summer roosting flights, speeds were predicted to be lower than during both spring and autumn since the predicted flight speed is the minimum power speed that involves the lowest energy consumption per unit time. During autumn, we expected flight speeds to be higher than during summer but lower than during spring since the expected flight speed is the maximum range speed, which involves the lowest energy consumption per unit distance. Flight speeds during spring were indeed higher than during both summer and autumn, which indicates time-selected spring migration. Speeds during autumn migration were very similar to those recorded during summer roosting flights. The general result shows that swifts change their flight speed between different flight behaviours to a smaller extent than expected. Furthermore, the difference between flight speeds during migration and roosting among swifts was found to be less pronounced than previously recorded.

  2. Where Is the Learning in Smaller Learning Communities? Academic Press, Social Support for Learning, and Academic Engagement in Smaller Learning Community Classrooms

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fischer, Christopher; Bol, Linda; Pribesh, Shana; Nunnery, John

    2013-01-01

    The extent to which smaller learning communities' (SLCs) focus on academic press and strong social relationships affects academic engagement among 9th graders in urban high schools was investigated. Data were collected through classroom observations, student questionnaires, and focus groups with teachers. Data were analyzed using descriptive…

  3. Cytotoxicity of PM(2.5) and PM(2.5--10) ambient air pollutants assessed by the MTT and the Comet assays.

    PubMed

    Hsiao, W L; Mo, Z Y; Fang, M; Shi, X M; Wang, F

    2000-11-20

    Ambient air particulate matters are classified into two distinct modes in size distribution, namely the coarse and fine particles. Correlation between high particulate concentration and adverse effects on human populations has long been recognized, however, the toxicology of these adverse effects has not been clarified. In the current report, the cytotoxic effects of the solvent-extractable organic compounds (SEOC) from fine particles smaller than 2.5 microm (PM(2.5)) and from coarse particles between 2.5-10 microm (PM(2.5-10)) were studied. Nine 24h consecutive monthly samples were tested to determine the correlation between cytotoxicity and total SEOC in two size fractions of particulate air pollution. Cytotoxicity of SEOC was measured by two micro-scale mammalian cells-based bioassays: the MTT cell proliferation assay, and the Comet assay for the detection of DNA damage. A well-defined mammalian cell line - Rat 6 rodent fibroblast was employed in the study. The SEOC extracts of air particulate matters were sub divided into two equal parts. One part was dissolved in DMSO, the other in KOH/hexane and then conjugated with bovine serum albumin to produce a lipid-soluble fraction for testing. The DMSO fraction would contain mainly the polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAH), alkanes and alkanols, while the lipid-soluble fraction would be enriched with fatty acids. The results from MTT assay showed that cytotoxicity of the PM(2.5) was much more severe than the PM(2.5-10), suggesting that toxic SEOC were confined to the fine particles. By and large, the DMSO solubles were much more toxic than the lipid solubles. The degree of cytotoxicity of the DMSO soluble samples is positively correlated to the amount of particulates present in the ambient air. For the PM(2.5), the winter samples were significantly more toxic than the summer samples in terms of cell killing, which seemed to be a direct reflection of the total loading of organic matter in the samples. Results from

  4. Synthesis and anti-tubercular activity of N(2)-arylbenzo[g]isoquinoline-5,10-dione-3-iminium bromides.

    PubMed

    Rotthier, G; Cappoen, D; Nguyen, Quang Trung; Dang Thi, Tuyet Anh; Mathys, V; Nguyen, Van Tuyen; Huygen, K; Maes, L; Cos, P; Abbaspour Tehrani, K

    2016-02-14

    Tuberculosis has remained a challenge for medicinal chemists worldwide. In the framework of a collaborative program to identify and evaluate novel antitubercular candidate compounds, the biological properties of benzo[g]isoquinoline-5,10-diones have been found to be very promising. In this paper we have further expanded the library by incorporation of an amidinium moiety into the benzo[g]isoquinoline-5,10-dione scaffold. The presence of this functional group also increased the solubility of the quinones in polar solvents. To this purpose N(2)-arylbenzo[g]isoquinoline-5,10-dione-3-iminium bromides were synthesized in a straightforward way by means of a reaction of anilines with 2-(bromomethyl)-3-(cyanomethyl)-1,4-dimethoxynaphthalene. Following the biological evaluation, N(2)-(4-chlorophenyl)-5,10-dioxobenzo[g]isoquinoline-3(2H)-iminium bromide (MIC = 1.16 μM, CC50 = 28.51 μM, SI = 24.58) was selected as the most promising representative. Apart from the nano-molar anti-mycobacterial activity, the compound was able to target intracellular residing Mycobacterium tuberculosis and the susceptibility of a multi-drug-resistant strain towards the compound was confirmed.

  5. The 5-10 keV AGN luminosity function at 0.01 < z < 4.0

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fotopoulou, S.; Buchner, J.; Georgantopoulos, I.; Hasinger, G.; Salvato, M.; Georgakakis, A.; Cappelluti, N.; Ranalli, P.; Hsu, L. T.; Brusa, M.; Comastri, A.; Miyaji, T.; Nandra, K.; Aird, J.; Paltani, S.

    2016-03-01

    The active galactic nuclei (AGN) X-ray luminosity function traces actively accreting supermassive black holes and is essential for the study of the properties of the AGN population, black hole evolution, and galaxy-black hole coevolution. Up to now, the AGN luminosity function has been estimated several times in soft (0.5-2 keV) and hard X-rays (2-10 keV). AGN selection in these energy ranges often suffers from identification and redshift incompleteness and, at the same time, photoelectric absorption can obscure a significant amount of the X-ray radiation. We estimate the evolution of the luminosity function in the 5-10 keV band, where we effectively avoid the absorbed part of the spectrum, rendering absorption corrections unnecessary up to NH ~ 1023 cm-2. Our dataset is a compilation of six wide, and deep fields: MAXI, HBSS, XMM-COSMOS, Lockman Hole, XMM-CDFS, AEGIS-XD, Chandra-COSMOS, and Chandra-CDFS. This extensive sample of ~1110 AGN (0.01 < z < 4.0, 41 < log Lx < 46) is 98% redshift complete with 68% spectroscopic redshifts. For sources lacking a spectroscopic redshift estimation we use the probability distribution function of photometric redshift estimation specifically tuned for AGN, and a flat probability distribution function for sources with no redshift information. We use Bayesian analysis to select the best parametric model from simple pure luminosity and pure density evolution to more complicated luminosity and density evolution and luminosity-dependent density evolution (LDDE). We estimate the model parameters that describe best our dataset separately for each survey and for the combined sample. We show that, according to Bayesian model selection, the preferred model for our dataset is the LDDE. Our estimation of the AGN luminosity function does not require any assumption on the AGN absorption and is in good agreement with previous works in the 2-10 keV energy band based on X-ray hardness ratios to model the absorption in AGN up to redshift three

  6. 2012 VIBRATIONAL SPECTROSCOPY GORDON RESEARCH CONFERENCE, AUGUST 5-10, 2012

    SciTech Connect

    Geiger, Franz

    2012-08-10

    The Vibrational Spectroscopy conference brings together experimentalists and theoreticians working at the frontiers of modern vibrational spectroscopy, with a special emphasis on spectroscopies that probe the structure and dynamics of molecules in gases, liquids, and at interfaces. The conference explores the wide range of state-of-the-art techniques based on vibrational motion. These techniques span the fields of time-domain, high-resolution frequency-domain, spatially-resolved, nonlinear, and multidimensional spectroscopies. The conference highlights both the application of these techniques in chemistry, materials, biology, the environment, and medicine as well as the development of theoretical models that enable one to connect spectroscopic signatures to underlying molecular motions including chemical reaction dynamics. The conference goal is to advance the field of vibrational spectroscopy by bringing together a collection of researchers who share common interests and who will gain from discussing work at the forefront of several connected areas. The intent is to emphasize the insights and understanding that studies of vibrations provide about a variety of molecular systems ranging from small polyatomic molecules to large biomolecules, nanomaterials, and environmental systems.

  7. Ionospheric disturbance dynamo associated to a coronal hole: Case study of 5-10 April 2010

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fathy, I.; Amory-Mazaudier, C.; Fathy, A.; Mahrous, A. M.; Yumoto, K.; Ghamry, E.

    2014-05-01

    In this paper we study the planetary magnetic disturbance during the magnetic storm occurring on 5 April 2010 associated with high-speed solar wind stream due to a coronal hole following a coronal mass ejection. We separate the magnetic disturbance associated to the ionospheric disturbance dynamo (Ddyn) from the magnetic disturbance associated to the prompt penetration of magnetospheric electric field (DP2). This event exhibits different responses of ionospheric disturbance dynamo in the different longitude sectors (European-African, Asian, and American). The strongest effect is observed in the European-African sector. The Ddyn disturbance reduces the amplitude of the daytime H component at low latitudes during four consecutive days in agreement with the Blanc and Richmond's model of ionospheric disturbance dynamo. The amplitude of Ddyn decreased with time during the 4 days. We discuss its diverse worldwide effects. The observed signature of magnetic disturbance process in specific longitude sector is strongly dependent on which Earth's side faces the magnetic storms (i.e., there is a different response depending on which longitude sector is at noon when the SSC hits). Finally, we determined an average period of 22 h for Ddyn using wavelet analysis.

  8. 75 FR 37779 - Office of Elementary and Secondary Education; Smaller Learning Communities Program; Notice...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-06-30

    ... published in the Federal Register (75 FR 35894) a notice inviting applications for new awards using fiscal year (FY) 2009 funds for the Smaller Learning Communities Program. There are errors in two of the dates... Office of Elementary and Secondary Education; Smaller Learning Communities Program; Notice...

  9. Smaller Cigarette Pack as a Commitment to Smoke Less? Insights from Behavioral Economics.

    PubMed

    Marti, Joachim; Sindelar, Jody

    2015-01-01

    Cigarettes are commonly sold in packs of 20 units and therefore little is known about the potential impact of pack size on consumption. Using insights from behavioral economics, we suggest that cigarette packs smaller than the standard size may help some smokers cut back and/or quit, consistent with their long-term goals. Results from an online hypothetical purchase experiment conducted in a sample of US smokers reveal that over a third of smokers are willing to pay a price premium to purchase in smaller quantities. Further, a desire to quit smoking and high self-control is associated with preference for a smaller pack. While we provide some preliminary evidence that smaller packs may be beneficial to certain types of smokers, further research should be conducted to assess whether the smaller pack size should be considered in the arsenal of tobacco control policies to help current smokers quit (JEL: I18; I12; D12). PMID:26356844

  10. Smaller Cigarette Pack as a Commitment to Smoke Less? Insights from Behavioral Economics.

    PubMed

    Marti, Joachim; Sindelar, Jody

    2015-01-01

    Cigarettes are commonly sold in packs of 20 units and therefore little is known about the potential impact of pack size on consumption. Using insights from behavioral economics, we suggest that cigarette packs smaller than the standard size may help some smokers cut back and/or quit, consistent with their long-term goals. Results from an online hypothetical purchase experiment conducted in a sample of US smokers reveal that over a third of smokers are willing to pay a price premium to purchase in smaller quantities. Further, a desire to quit smoking and high self-control is associated with preference for a smaller pack. While we provide some preliminary evidence that smaller packs may be beneficial to certain types of smokers, further research should be conducted to assess whether the smaller pack size should be considered in the arsenal of tobacco control policies to help current smokers quit (JEL: I18; I12; D12).

  11. Smaller Cigarette Pack as a Commitment to Smoke Less? Insights from Behavioral Economics

    PubMed Central

    Marti, Joachim; Sindelar, Jody

    2015-01-01

    Cigarettes are commonly sold in packs of 20 units and therefore little is known about the potential impact of pack size on consumption. Using insights from behavioral economics, we suggest that cigarette packs smaller than the standard size may help some smokers cut back and/or quit, consistent with their long-term goals. Results from an online hypothetical purchase experiment conducted in a sample of US smokers reveal that over a third of smokers are willing to pay a price premium to purchase in smaller quantities. Further, a desire to quit smoking and high self-control is associated with preference for a smaller pack. While we provide some preliminary evidence that smaller packs may be beneficial to certain types of smokers, further research should be conducted to assess whether the smaller pack size should be considered in the arsenal of tobacco control policies to help current smokers quit (JEL: I18; I12; D12) PMID:26356844

  12. Independent practice associations and physician-hospital organizations can improve care management for smaller practices.

    PubMed

    Casalino, Lawrence P; Wu, Frances M; Ryan, Andrew M; Copeland, Kennon; Rittenhouse, Diane R; Ramsay, Patricia P; Shortell, Stephen M

    2013-08-01

    Pay-for-performance, public reporting, and accountable care organization programs place pressures on physicians to use health information technology and organized care management processes to improve the care they provide. But physician practices that are not large may lack the resources and size to implement such processes. We used data from a unique national survey of 1,164 practices with fewer than twenty physicians to provide the first information available on the extent to which independent practice associations (IPAs) and physician-hospital organizations (PHOs) might make it possible for these smaller practices to share resources to improve care. Nearly a quarter of the practices participated in an IPA or a PHO that accounted for a significant proportion of their patients. On average, practices participating in these organizations provided nearly three times as many care management processes for patients with chronic conditions as nonparticipating practices did (10.4 versus 3.8). Half of these processes were provided only by IPAs or PHOs. These organizations may provide a way for small and medium-size practices to systematically improve care and participate in accountable care organizations. PMID:23918481

  13. Smaller, faster stomata: scaling of stomatal size, rate of response, and stomatal conductance

    PubMed Central

    Franks, Peter J.

    2013-01-01

    Maximum and minimum stomatal conductance, as well as stomatal size and rate of response, are known to vary widely across plant species, but the functional relationship between these static and dynamic stomatal properties is unknown. The objective of this study was to test three hypotheses: (i) operating stomatal conductance under standard conditions (g op) correlates with minimum stomatal conductance prior to morning light [g min(dawn)]; (ii) stomatal size (S) is negatively correlated with g op and the maximum rate of stomatal opening in response to light, (dg/dt)max; and (iii) g op correlates negatively with instantaneous water-use efficiency (WUE) despite positive correlations with maximum rate of carboxylation (Vc max) and light-saturated rate of electron transport (J max). Using five closely related species of the genus Banksia, the above variables were measured, and it was found that all three hypotheses were supported by the results. Overall, this indicates that leaves built for higher rates of gas exchange have smaller stomata and faster dynamic characteristics. With the aid of a stomatal control model, it is demonstrated that higher g op can potentially expose plants to larger tissue water potential gradients, and that faster stomatal response times can help offset this risk. PMID:23264516

  14. Independent practice associations and physician-hospital organizations can improve care management for smaller practices.

    PubMed

    Casalino, Lawrence P; Wu, Frances M; Ryan, Andrew M; Copeland, Kennon; Rittenhouse, Diane R; Ramsay, Patricia P; Shortell, Stephen M

    2013-08-01

    Pay-for-performance, public reporting, and accountable care organization programs place pressures on physicians to use health information technology and organized care management processes to improve the care they provide. But physician practices that are not large may lack the resources and size to implement such processes. We used data from a unique national survey of 1,164 practices with fewer than twenty physicians to provide the first information available on the extent to which independent practice associations (IPAs) and physician-hospital organizations (PHOs) might make it possible for these smaller practices to share resources to improve care. Nearly a quarter of the practices participated in an IPA or a PHO that accounted for a significant proportion of their patients. On average, practices participating in these organizations provided nearly three times as many care management processes for patients with chronic conditions as nonparticipating practices did (10.4 versus 3.8). Half of these processes were provided only by IPAs or PHOs. These organizations may provide a way for small and medium-size practices to systematically improve care and participate in accountable care organizations.

  15. Chronic malnutrition favours smaller critical size for metamorphosis initiation in Drosophila melanogaster.

    PubMed

    Vijendravarma, R K; Narasimha, S; Kawecki, T J

    2012-02-01

    Critical size at which metamorphosis is initiated represents an important checkpoint in insect development. Here, we use experimental evolution in Drosophila melanogaster to test the long-standing hypothesis that larval malnutrition should favour a smaller critical size. We report that six fly populations subject to 112 generations of laboratory natural selection on an extremely poor larval food evolved an 18% smaller critical size (compared to six unselected control populations). Thus, even though critical size is not plastic with respect to nutrition, smaller critical size can evolve as an adaptation to nutritional stress. We also demonstrate that this reduction in critical size (rather than differences in growth rate) mediates a trade-off in body weight that the selected populations experience on standard food, on which they show a 15-17% smaller adult body weight. This illustrates how developmental mechanisms that control life history may shape constraints and trade-offs in life history evolution.

  16. DDO 68: A Flea with Smaller Fleas that on Him Prey

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Annibali, Francesca; Nipoti, Carlo; Ciotti, Luca; Tosi, Monica; Aloisi, Alessandra; Bellazzini, Michele; Cignoni, Michele; Cusano, Felice; Paris, Diego; Sacchi, Elena

    2016-08-01

    We present new photometry of the dwarf irregular galaxy DDO 68, one of the most metal-poor and least massive dwarfs, located in the Lynx-Cancer Void. The images were acquired with the Large Binocular Telescope in the g and r passbands and show unequivocally that DDO 68 has previously unknown stellar streams related to the accretion of at least two smaller companions: a flea with smaller fleas biting it, to put it in Jonathan Swift’s words (from Jonathan Swift’s On Poetry: a Rhapsody: So, naturalists observe, a flea/has smaller fleas that on him prey/and these have smaller still to bite em/and so proceed ad infinitum). Our data provide direct observational evidence of multiple galaxy merging occurring at very low galactic mass scales. We present the results of an N-body simulation of the interaction of three dwarf galaxies that reproduce well the main morphological features of DDO 68.

  17. USArray recordings of infrasound generated by the Chelyabinsk Meteor and other, smaller bolides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de Groot-Hedlin, Catherine; Hedlin, Michael

    2014-05-01

    A small asteroid that entered Earth's atmosphere near the city of Chelyabinsk, Russia, generated infrasound signals that were recorded by USArray barometers at distances from 6000-10000 km from the source. The infrasound recordings made of this event by these arrays are unprecedented, due to rarity of this type of event and the high density and spatial extent of the recording network. Signal characteristics vary across the network; infrasound arrivals recorded in Alaska and along the U.S. northwest coast had higher velocities and higher frequency content than those recorded in the eastern part of the network. The recorded pressure amplitudes at Alaska sites were significantly larger than for the remaining stations. Atmospheric specifications of global wind and sound speeds indicate the presence of a stratospheric duct for propagation to Alaska and stations along the northwest coast; however, most USarray stations lie within a thermospheric duct. Raytrace modeling confirms that, at stations in Alaska and the northwest U.S., the arrival times and durations of stratospherically ducted rays are consistent with observed arrivals at frequencies above the microbarom band. At lower frequencies, arrival times are consistent with thermospheric ducting at stations across the network. Estimates of infrasound attenuation from the Chelyabisk meteor to the recording sites were made using an attenuation formula derived from parabolic equation simulations. The results suggest that, under the assumption that infrasound was radiated isotropically from the Chelyabinsk meteor, thermospheric returns have higher than expected amplitudes as compared to stratospheric returns at the same frequencies. We examine in greater detail our assumption of isotropic infrasound radiation from a bolide explosion using a number of much smaller fireball events observed at seismic and infrasound sensors at the USArray.

  18. Unexpected female preference for smaller males in the marbled goby Pomatoschistus marmoratus.

    PubMed

    Locatello, L; Mazzoldi, C; Santon, M; Sparaciari, S; Rasotto, M B

    2016-09-01

    The study tested the role of body size and of nest size in female mate choice in the marbled goby, Pomatoschistus marmoratus. The results show a female preference for smaller males, supporting the idea that smaller males may be preferred to larger ones in the absence of male-male competition. No effect of nest size was detected, suggesting that other nest characteristics, beyond nest size, may be implicated. PMID:27292828

  19. Early lung cancer detection project: Evaluation of 5, 10, 15, 20 tetrakis (4-carboxyphenyl) porphine (H{sub 2}TCPP). Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Tockman, M.S.

    1998-10-01

    The author evaluated a synthetic porphyrin, 5, 10, 15, 20 tetrakis (4-carboxyphenyl) porphene (H{sub 2}TCPP) as a marker of carcinogenesis. H{sub 2}TCPP was compared with two other carcinogenesis markers evaluated in the laboratory for their ability to detect exfoliated sputum cells undergoing transformation to lung cancer. In the present project the authors first established optimal conditions for cultured neoplastic and non-neoplastic (sputum) cells to take up H{sub 2}TCPP. This was accomplished using spectrofluorimetry and video-enhanced fluorescent microscopy to maximize H{sub 2}TCPP auto-fluorescence across a matrix of substrate conditions, including; reagent concentration, incubation time, temperature, and pH. The second aim was to validate H{sub 2}TCPP on clinical material obtained from subjects monitored in advance of clinical cancer and link those marker results with subsequent histologic confirmation of disease. This was accomplished by applying H{sub 2}TCPP to sputum specimens archived by the Frost Center at Johns Hopkins which maintains a record of the clinical course and long-term follow-up for the patients from whom the specimens were obtained. The authors have used fluorescent immunostaining and flow cytometry to compare uptake of these cytoplasmic Mabs to that of a potential new marker of carcinogenesis, 5, 10, 15, 20 tetrakis (4 carboxyphenyl) porphene (H{sub 2}TCPP). The nuclear uptake of H{sub 2}TCPP was compared to a standard quantitative fluorescent DNA marker (7-AAD).

  20. Endotoxin in fine (PM 2.5) and coarse (PM 2.5-10) particle mass of ambient aerosols. A temporo-spatial analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Heinrich, Joachim; Pitz, Mike; Bischof, Wolfgang; Krug, Norbert; Borm, Paul J. A.

    Objectives: We collected fine (PM 2.5) and coarse (PM 2.5-10) particulate matter fractions in two areas ˜80 km apart and measured soluble endotoxin concentrations in both particle fractions. Here we report on temporo-spatial variation of endotoxin content in the collected particles. Methods: Dichotomous Anderson samplers were used to collect 21 weekly samples of PM 2.5 and PM 2.5-10 in both towns from January to June 2002. Each Teflon filter was water extracted and endotoxin was measured by a chromogenic Limulus Amoebocyte Lysate method. Endotoxin concentrations were expressed per mg of fine or mg of coarse mass and per sampled air volume (m 3). Results: For both cities, the mean endotoxin content in PM 2.5 was 1.2 EU mg -1; however the endotoxin content in the coarse fraction was ˜10 times higher compared to the fine mass fractions. Although endotoxin content is highly variable over time, a good correlation was observed between the two town sites for both fine ( r=0.85) and coarse PM ( r=0.88). The fluctuations of weekly endotoxin means were high in both areas suggesting a strong temporal dependence on particle source and composition. The endotoxin content in particles collected during May and June were two to four times higher than concentrations measured during the winter and early spring weeks. Conclusions: Ambient airborne endotoxin concentrations were detected in coarse and fine particle fraction, but 10-fold higher in the coarse PM. The strong seasonality and the week to week fluctuation of endotoxin content in PM indicate different biologic PM properties which might affect results of time series studies on short-term effects as well as in vitro studies and human exposure studies.

  1. Uncooled infrared detectors toward smaller pixel pitch with newly proposed pixel structure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tohyama, Shigeru; Sasaki, Tokuhito; Endoh, Tsutomu; Sano, Masahiko; Kato, Koji; Kurashina, Seiji; Miyoshi, Masaru; Yamazaki, Takao; Ueno, Munetaka; Katayama, Haruyoshi; Imai, Tadashi

    2013-12-01

    An uncooled infrared (IR) focal plane array (FPA) with 23.5 μm pixel pitch has been successfully demonstrated and has found wide commercial applications in the areas of thermography, security cameras, and other applications. One of the key issues for uncooled IRFPA technology is to shrink the pixel pitch because the size of the pixel pitch determines the overall size of the FPA, which, in turn, determines the cost of the IR camera products. This paper proposes an innovative pixel structure with a diaphragm and beams placed in different levels to realize an uncooled IRFPA with smaller pixel pitch (≦17 μm). The upper level consists of a diaphragm with VOx bolometer and IR absorber layers, while the lower level consists of the two beams, which are designed to be placed on the adjacent pixels. The test devices of this pixel design with 12, 15, and 17 μm pitch have been fabricated on the Si read-out integrated circuit (ROIC) of quarter video graphics array (QVGA) (320×240) with 23.5 μm pitch. Their performances are nearly equal to those of the IRFPA with 23.5 μm pitch. For example, a noise equivalent temperature difference of 12 μm pixel is 63.1 mK for F/1 optics with the thermal time constant of 14.5 ms. Then, the proposed structure is shown to be effective for the existing IRFPA with 23.5 μm pitch because of the improvements in IR sensitivity. Furthermore, the advanced pixel structure that has the beams composed of two levels are demonstrated to be realizable.

  2. Structure and stability of H+ associates of (5,10,15,20-tetraphenylporphinato)silver(II) in trifluoroacetic acid

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bichan, N. G.; Tyulyaeva, E. Yu.; Lomova, T. N.

    2014-08-01

    Direct experimental confirmation of the formation of ion-molecular associates of (5,10,15,20-tetraphenyl-21H,23H-porphinato)silver(II) (AgTPP) with solvent protons in CF3COOH is obtained by means of 1H NMR spectroscopy. Their structure and spectral properties, as well as the kinetics of dissociation on metal-nitrogen bonds, depending on the concentration of CF3COOH (89-100%) and temperature (298-328 K), are studied It is shown that AgTPP acts as a C-base during the formation of H+ associates, the coordination centers of which have a high stability.

  3. Simulating the magnetized liner inertial fusion plasma confinement with smaller-scale experiments [Simulating the MagLIF plasma confinement with smaller-scale experiments

    SciTech Connect

    Ryutov, D. D.; Cuneo, M. E.; Herrmann, M. C.; Sinars, D. B.; Slutz, S. A.

    2012-06-20

    The recently proposed magnetized liner inertial fusion approach to a Z-pinch driven fusion [Slutz et al., Phys. Plasmas17, 056303 (2010)] is based on the use of an axial magnetic field to provide plasma thermal insulation from the walls of the imploding liner. The characteristic plasma transport regimes in the proposed approach cover parameter domains that have not been studied yet in either magnetic confinement or inertial confinement experiments. In this article, an analysis is presented of the scalability of the key physical processes that determine the plasma confinement. The dimensionless scaling parameters are identified and conclusion is drawn that the plasma behavior in scaled-down experiments can correctly represent the full-scale plasma, provided these parameters are approximately the same in two systems. Furthermore, this observation is important in that smaller-scale experiments typically have better diagnostic access and more experiments per year are possible.

  4. Organizational characteristics influence implementation of worksite health protection and promotion programs: Evidence from smaller businesses

    PubMed Central

    McLellan, Deborah L.; Cabán-Martinez, Alberto J.; Nelson, Candace C.; Pronk, Nicolaas P.; Katz, Jeffrey N.; Allen, Jennifer D.; Davis, Kia L.; Wagner, Gregory R.; Sorensen, Glorian

    2015-01-01

    Objective We explored associations between organizational factors (size, sector, leadership support, and organizational capacity) and implementation of Occupational Safety and Health (OSH) and Worksite Health Promotion (WHP) programs in smaller businesses. Methods We conducted a web-based survey of Human Resource Managers of 117 smaller businesses (<750 employees) and analyzed factors associated with implementation of OSH and WHP among these sites using multivariate analyses. Results Implementation of OSH but not WHP activities were related to industry sector (p= 0.003). Leadership support was positively associated with OSH activities (p<.001), but negatively associated with WHP implementation. Organizational capacity (budgets, staffing, and committee involvement) was associated with implementation of both OSH and WHP. Size was related to neither. Conclusions Leadership support and specifically allocated resources reflecting that support are important factors for implementing OSH and WHP in smaller organizations. PMID:26340290

  5. Disadvantaged Students in the Early Grades: Will Smaller Classes Help Them?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Vaag Iversen, Jon Marius; Bonesrønning, Hans

    2013-01-01

    This paper uses data from the Norwegian elementary school to test whether students from disadvantaged backgrounds benefit from smaller classes. The data cover one cohort of fourth graders who have been treated in small versus large classes for a period of three years. The Norwegian class size rule of maximum 28 students is used to generate…

  6. Smaller muscle ATP reduction in women than in men by repeated bouts of sprint exercise.

    PubMed

    Esbjörnsson-Liljedahl, Mona; Bodin, Kristina; Jansson, Eva

    2002-09-01

    It was hypothesized that the reduction of high-energy phosphates in muscle after repeated sprints is smaller in women than in men. Fifteen healthy and physically active women and men with an average age of 25 yr (range of 19-42 yr) performed three 30-s cycle sprints (Wingate test) with 20 min of rest between sprints. Repeated blood and muscle samples were obtained. Freeze-dried pooled muscle fibers of types I and II were analyzed for high-energy phosphates and their breakdown products and for glycogen. Accumulation of plasma ATP breakdown products, plasma catecholamines, and blood lactate, as well as glycogen reduction in type I fibers, was all lower in women than in men during sprint exercise. Repeated sprints induced smaller reduction of ATP and smaller accumulation of IMP and inosine in women than in men in type II muscle fibers, with no gender differences in changes of ATP and its breakdown products during the bouts of exercise themselves. This indicates that the smaller ATP reduction in women than in men during repeated sprints was created during recovery periods between the sprint exercises and that women possess a faster recovery of ATP via reamination of IMP during these recovery periods.

  7. Neonatal morbidity in growth-discordant monochorionic twins: comparison between the larger and the smaller twin.

    PubMed

    Lopriore, Enrico; Sluimers, Carolien; Pasman, Suzanne A; Middeldorp, Johanna M; Oepkes, Dick; Walther, Frans J

    2012-08-01

    Fetal growth restriction in singletons has been shown to enhance fetal lung maturation and reduce the risk of respiratory distress syndrome due to increased endogenous steroid production. However, data on lung maturation in growth-discordant monochorionic (thus, identical) twins are lacking. Our objective was to compare the risk of severe neonatal morbidity between the larger and the smaller twin in monochorionic twins with birth weight discordance (BWD). We included in the study all consecutive monochorionic diamniotic pregnancies with severe BWD (≥25%) and two live-born twins delivered at our center (n=47 twin pairs). We compared the incidence of neonatal morbidity, particularly respiratory distress syndrome (RDS), and cerebral lesions between the larger and the smaller co-twin. The incidence of severe neonatal morbidity in the larger and smaller twin was 38% (18/47) and 19% (9/47), respectively (odds ratio (OR) 2.66, 95% confidence interval (CI) 0.94-7.44) and was due primarily to the higher incidence of RDS, 32% (15/47) and 6% (3/47), respectively (OR 6.88, 95% CI 1.66-32.83). In conclusion, this study shows that the larger twin in monochorionic twin pairs with BWD is at increased risk of severe neonatal morbidity, particularly RDS, compared to the smaller twin. PMID:22854118

  8. Focus on California's Class-Size Reduction: Smaller Classes Aim To Launch Early Literacy.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McRobbie, Joan

    Smaller class sizes in California were viewed as a way to improve K-3 education, especially in the area of literacy. The urgency to act prompted state leaders to adopt class-size reduction (CSR) without knowing for sure that it would work and without establishing a formal procedure for evaluating the program. This report looks at past research on…

  9. An Investigation of Higher-Order Thinking Skills in Smaller Learning Community Social Studies Classrooms

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fischer, Christopher; Bol, Linda; Pribesh, Shana

    2011-01-01

    This study investigated the extent to which higher-order thinking skills are promoted in social studies classes in high schools that are implementing smaller learning communities (SLCs). Data collection in this mixed-methods study included classroom observations and in-depth interviews. Findings indicated that higher-order thinking was rarely…

  10. What Research Tells Us about the Impact and Challenges of Smaller Learning Communities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Levine, Thomas H.

    2010-01-01

    In the United States, considerable financial and human resources have been devoted to breaking some large high schools into smaller learning communities (SLCs). This article reviews research that compares SLCs to comprehensive high schools on a variety of measures. Extant research neither supports nor refutes the promise of SLCs to improve…

  11. Building Comprehensive High School Guidance Programs through the Smaller Learning Communities Model

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Harper, Geralyn

    2013-01-01

    Despite many reform initiatives, including the federally funded initiative titled the Smaller Learning Communities' (SLC) Model, many students are still underexposed to comprehensive guidance programs. The purpose of this mixed method project study was to examine which components in a comprehensive guidance program for the learning academies…

  12. Does multiple seed loading in Blue Jays result in selective dispersal of smaller acorns?

    PubMed

    Bartlow, Andrew W; Kachmar, Michael; Lichti, Nathanael; Swihart, Robert K; Stratford, Jeffrey A; Steele, Michael A

    2011-09-01

    Studies from both tropical and temperate systems show that scatter-hoarding rodents selectively disperse larger seeds farther from their source than smaller seeds, potentially increasing seedling establishment in larger-seeded plants. Size-biased dispersal is evident in many oaks (Quercus) and is true both across and within species. Here, we predict that intraspecifc variation in seed size also influences acorn dispersal by the Blue Jay (Cyanocitta cristata Linnaeus), but in an opposite manner. Blue Jays are gape-limited and selectively disperse smaller acorn species (e.g. pin oaks [Quercus palustris Münchh]), but often carry several acorns in their crop during a single dispersal event. We predict that jays foraging on smaller acorns will load more seeds per trip and disperse seeds to greater distances than when single acorns are carried in the bill. To test this, we presented free-ranging Blue Jays with pin oak acorns of different sizes over a 2-year period. In each of 16 experimental trials, we monitored the birds at a feeding station with remote cameras and determined the number of acorns removed and the distance acorns were dispersed when cached. Jays were significantly more likely to engage in multiple seed loading with smaller seeds in both years of the study. During the second year, these smaller acorns were dispersed farther than larger acorns, and during the first year, larger acorns were dispersed farther, revealing an inconsistent response to seed size during our study. We suggest that in some circumstances, multiple seed loading by Blue Jays may favor dispersal in some plant species.

  13. Method of using 5,10,15,20-tetrakis(carboxyphenyl)porphine for detecting cancers of the lung

    DOEpatents

    Cole, D.A.; Moody, D.C. III; Ellinwood, L.E.; Klein, M.G.

    1992-11-10

    A method is described for using tetra-aryl porphyrins for and, in particular, 5,10,15,20-tetrakis(4-carboxyphenyl)porphine as a fluorescent tracer for cancers of the lung, and as a radiotracer therefor as a complex with [sup 67]Cu. The latter complex also provides a source of beta radiation for selective destruction of lung malignancies as well as gamma radiation useful for image analysis of the lungs by single photon emission computed tomography, as an example, both in vivo. Copper-64 may be substituted for the [sup 67]Cu if only radiotracer characteristics are of interest. This lighter isotope of copper is a positron emitter, and positron emission tomography techniques can be used to locate the malignant tissue mass. 1 figure.

  14. Method using 5,10,15,20-tetrakis(4-carboxyphenyl)porphine for treating cancers of the lung

    DOEpatents

    Cole, Dean A.; Moody, III, David C.; Ellinwood, L. Edward; Klein, M. Gerard

    1995-01-01

    Method using tetra-aryl porphyrins for and, in particular, 5,10,15,20-tetrakis(4-carboxyphenyl)porphine as a fluorescent tracer for cancers of the lung, and as a radiotracer therefor as a complex with .sup.67 Cu. The latter complex also provides a source of beta radiation for selective destruction of lung malignancies as well as gamma radiation useful for image analysis of the situs thereof by single photon emission computed tomography, as an example, both in vivo. Copper-64 may be substituted for the .sup.67 Cu if only radiotracer characteristics are of interest. This lighter isotope of copper is a positron emitter, and positron emission tomography techniques can be used to locate the malignant tissue mass.

  15. Method of using 5,10,15,20-tetrakis(carboxyphenyl)porphine for detecting cancers of the lung

    DOEpatents

    Cole, Dean A.; Moody, III, David C.; Ellinwood, L. Edward; Klein, M. Gerard

    1992-01-01

    Method using tetra-aryl porphyrins for and, in particular, 5,10,15,20-tetrakis(4-carboxyphenyl)porphine as a fluorescent tracer for cancers of the lung, and as a radiotracer therefor as a complex with .sup.67 Cu. The latter complex also provides a source of beta radiation for selective destruction of lung malignancies as well as gamma radiation useful for image analysis of the situs thereof by single photon emission computed tomography, as an example, both in vivo. Copper-64 may be substituted for the .sup.67 Cu if only radiotracer characteristics are of interest. This lighter isotope of copper is a positron emitter, and positron emission tomography techniques cna be used to locate the malignant tissue mass.

  16. Presence of the 5,10-methylenetetrahydrofolate reductase C677T mutation in Puerto Rican patients with neural tube defects.

    PubMed

    García-Fragoso, Lourdes; García-García, Inés; de la Vega, Alberto; Renta, Jessicca; Cadilla, Carmen L

    2002-01-01

    Folic acid supplementation can reduce the incidence of neural tube defects. The first reported genetic risk factor for neural tube defects is a C677T mutation in the 5,10-methylenetetrahydrofolate reductase gene, resulting in decreased activity of the enzyme. We examined the enzyme mutation role of methylenetetrahydrofolate reductase in the etiology of neural tube defects in our population. The study group consisted of 204 Puerto Rican individuals including 37 pregnant females with a prenatal diagnosis of neural tube defects in their fetuses, 31 newborns, 36 fathers, and 100 healthy adults. The prevalence of the C677T mutation was examined. Homozygosity for the alanine to valine substitution (TT) was observed in 9% of the controls and 19% of the mothers with children with neural tube defects. Our results indicate that the presence of the T allele at the methylenetetrahydrofolate reductase 677 position may increase the risk of giving birth to an infant with a neural tube defect.

  17. Leaning to the left makes the Eiffel Tower seem smaller: posture-modulated estimation.

    PubMed

    Eerland, Anita; Guadalupe, Tulio M; Zwaan, Rolf A

    2011-12-01

    In two experiments, we investigated whether body posture influences people's estimation of quantities. According to the mental-number-line theory, people mentally represent numbers along a line with smaller numbers on the left and larger numbers on the right. We hypothesized that surreptitiously making people lean to the right or to the left would affect their quantitative estimates. Participants answered estimation questions while standing on a Wii Balance Board. Posture was manipulated within subjects so that participants answered some questions while they leaned slightly to the left, some questions while they leaned slightly to the right, and some questions while they stood upright. Crucially, participants were not aware of this manipulation. Estimates were significantly smaller when participants leaned to the left than when they leaned to the right.

  18. Anomalous cyclic voltammetric response from pores smaller than ion size by voltage-induced force.

    PubMed

    Yang, Cheol-Min; Jung, Hwan Jung; Kim, Yong Jung

    2015-05-15

    Nanoporous carbons, with different micropore size distributions, were prepared based on waste coffee grounds by a chemical activation process in order to elucidate the correlation between desolvated ions and pores smaller than the sizes of ions using an organic electrolyte. The pore structure of the coffee-based nanoporous carbon was strongly dependent on the heat-treatment temperature prior to the activation process. Cyclic voltammograms of the nanoporous carbons mainly dominated by the smaller pore relative to that of the bare ion size clearly showed deviation from an ideal feature of the current response. It was clearly envisaged that even a bare ion of a size larger than the pore size can penetrate into the pore by voltage-induced force. PMID:25668782

  19. Capture of PM-10 and smaller particulate using pulse-jet filters

    SciTech Connect

    Gregg, W.W.

    1994-12-31

    Particle matter of 10 micron or smaller diameter (PM-10) has been identified as a hazard. This is due to the tendency of these particles to be inhaled and retained in the human body. Some studies have identified the particles in smaller ranges (e.g. PM-2.5) as even greater hazards. Regulatory authorities are placing emphasis on identifying PM-10 emissions and controlling such emissions. The four standard particulate control technologies (Mechanical Collector, Wet Scrubber, Fabric Filter, Electrostatic Precipitator) can capture particles in this PM-10 range but standard design mechanical collectors and wet scrubbers will not capture these particles efficiently. Fabric filters and electrostatic precipitators will capture these fine particles efficiently but capture larger particles with greater efficiency. Therefore, the emission from all these devices are predominantly in the PM-10 range.

  20. Time?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Amoroso, Richard L.

    2013-09-01

    The concept of time in the `clockwork' Newtonian world was irrelevant; and has generally been ignored until recently by several generations of physicists since the implementation of quantum mechanics. We will set aside the utility of time as a property relating to physical calculations of events relating to a metrics line element or as an aspect of the transformation of a particles motion/interaction in a coordinate system or in relation to thermodynamics etc., i.e. we will discard all the usual uses of time as a concept used to circularly define physical parameters in terms of other physical parameters; concentrating instead on time as an aspect of the fundamental cosmic topology of our virtual reality especially as it inseparably relates to the nature and role of the observer in natural science.

  1. Longitudinal Evidence for Smaller Hippocampus Volume as a Vulnerability Factor for Perceived Stress

    PubMed Central

    Lindgren, Lenita; Bergdahl, Jan; Nyberg, Lars

    2016-01-01

    Hippocampal volume has been found to be smaller in individuals with stress-related disorders, but it remains unclear whether smaller volume is a consequence of stress or rather a vulnerability factor. Here, we examined this issue by relating stress levels to hippocampal volumes in healthy participants examined every 5 years in a longitudinal population-based study. Based on scores of 25- to 60-year–old participants on the perceived stress questionnaire, we defined moderately to high (n = 35) and low (n = 76) stress groups. The groups were re-examined after 5 years (at the 6th study wave). Historical data on subjective stress were available up to 10 years prior to Wave 5. At the first MRI session, the moderately to high stress group had a significantly smaller hippocampal volume, as measured by FreeSurfer (version 5.3), compared with the low-stress group. At follow-up, group differences in stress levels and hippocampal volume remained unchanged. In retrospective analyses of subjective stress, the observed group difference in stress was found to be stable. The long-term stability of group differences in perceived stress and hippocampal volume suggests that a small hippocampal volume may be a vulnerability factor for stress-related disorders. PMID:27230217

  2. INCREASED AIRWAYS INFLAMMATION AND MODIFIED BAL CELL SURFACE PHENOTYPES IN ASTHMATICS EXPOSED TO COARSE SIZE (PM2.5-10) CONCENTRATED AMBIENT PARTICLES (CAPS)

    EPA Science Inventory

    Although associations between inhalation of PM10 and disease morbidity and mortality appear stronger for fine (PM2.5) vs coarse (PM2.5-10) or ultrafine/UF (PM<0.1) PM. In vitro studies suggest that PM2.5-10 are more potent in inducing pro-inflammatory cytokine responses from alve...

  3. Effect of multivitamins on plasma homocysteine in patients with the 5,10 methylenetetrahydrofolate reductase C677T homozygous state.

    PubMed

    Dell'edera, Domenico; Tinelli, Andrea; Milazzo, Giusi Natalia; Malvasi, Antonio; Domenico, Carone; Pacella, Elena; Pierluigi, Compagnoni; Giuseppe, Tarantino; Marcello, Guido; Francesco, Lomurno; Epifania, Annunziata Anna

    2013-08-01

    The role of hyperhomocysteinemia (HHcy) as a cardiovascular risk factor remains a matter of debate, while it correlates with folates, it demonstrates inverse correlation with plasma homocysteine (Hcy) levels and vitamin B12 levels and reduces plasma Hcy levels following supplementation with multivitamins. The purpose of this study was to demonstrate that administering multivitamins at specific doses for 90 days restores normal plasma Hcy levels in women who are homozygous for the thermolabile variant of 5,10 methylenetetrahydrofolate reductase (MTHFR C677T). We enrolled 106 healthy females aged between 30 and 42 years, who were non-smokers, non-vegetarian, normotensive and who had no history of food abuse in the previous months. Only females were enrolled in order to rule out any bias due to the variation in Hcy plasma concentrations between males and females. Patient blood sampling was performed in order to determine plasma Hcy, serum folic acid and vitamin B12 levels. Furthermore, molecular characterization of the C677T polymorphism present in the MTHFR gene, was also performed. The results of this study demonstrated that supplementation with specific multivitamins restores normal plasma Hcy levels, regardless of the MTHFR genotype. Furthermore, it is unnecessary to adminster high doses of folate to reduce plasma Hcy levels, and administering high doses of folate may cause pro-inflammatory and pro-proliferative effects. PMID:23818036

  4. DNA Physical Mapping via the Controlled Translocation of Single Molecules through a 5-10nm Silicon Nitride Nanopore

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stein, Derek; Reisner, Walter; Jiang, Zhijun; Hagerty, Nick; Wood, Charles; Chan, Jason

    2009-03-01

    The ability to map the binding position of sequence-specific markers, including transcription-factors, protein-nucleic acids (PNAs) or deactivated restriction enzymes, along a single DNA molecule in a nanofluidic device would be of key importance for the life-sciences. Such markers could give an indication of the active genes at particular stage in a cell's transcriptional cycle, pinpoint the location of mutations or even provide a DNA barcode that could aid in genomics applications. We have developed a setup consisting of a 5-10 nm nanopore in a 20nm thick silicon nitride film coupled to an optical tweezer setup. The translocation of DNA across the nanopore can be detected via blockades in the electrical current through the pore. By anchoring one end of the translocating DNA to an optically trapped microsphere, we hope to stretch out the molecule in the nanopore and control the translocation speed, enabling us to slowly scan across the genome and detect changes in the baseline current due to the presence of bound markers.

  5. Comparison of flexible ureterorenoscopy and mini-percutaneous nephrolithotomy in treatment of lower calyceal stones smaller than 2 cm.

    PubMed

    Akbulut, Fatih; Kucuktopcu, Onur; Kandemir, Emre; Sonmezay, Erkan; Simsek, Abdulmuttalip; Ozgor, Faruk; Binbay, Murat; Muslumanoglu, Ahmet Yaser; Gurbuz, Gokhan

    2016-01-01

    To compare the outcomes of flexible ureterorenoscopy (F-URS) and mini-percutaneous nephrolithotomy (mini-PNL) in the treatment of lower calyceal stones smaller than 2 cm. Patients who underwent F-URS and mini-PNL for the treatment of lower calyceal stones smaller than 2 cm between March 2009 and December 2014 were retrospectively evaluated. Ninety-four patients were divided into two groups by treatment modality: F-URS (Group 1: 63 patients) and mini-PNL (Group 2: 31 patients). All patients were preoperatively diagnosed with intravenous pyelography or computed tomography. Success rates for F-URS and mini-PNL at postoperative first month were 85.7% and 90.3%, respectively. Operation time, fluoroscopy time, and hospitalization time for F-URS and mini-PNL patients were 44.40 min, 2.9 min, 22.4 h, and 91.9 min, 6.4 min, and 63.8 h, respectively. All three parameters were significantly shorter among the F-URS group (p < 0.001). Postoperative hemoglobin drop was significantly lower in F-URS group compared to mini-PNL group (0.39 mg/dL vs. 1.15 mg/dL, p = 0.001). A comparison of complications according to the Clavien classification demonstrated significant differences between the groups (p = 0.001). More patients in the F-URS groups require antibiotics due to urinary tract infection, and more patients in the mini-PNL group required ureteral double J catheter insertion under general anesthesia. Although both F-URS and mini-PNL have similar success rates for the treatment of lower calyceal stones, F-URS appears to be more favorable due to shorter fluoroscopy and hospitalization times; and lower hemoglobin drops. Multicenter and studies using higher patient volumes are needed to confirm these findings.

  6. Comparison of flexible ureterorenoscopy and mini-percutaneous nephrolithotomy in treatment of lower calyceal stones smaller than 2 cm.

    PubMed

    Akbulut, Fatih; Kucuktopcu, Onur; Kandemir, Emre; Sonmezay, Erkan; Simsek, Abdulmuttalip; Ozgor, Faruk; Binbay, Murat; Muslumanoglu, Ahmet Yaser; Gurbuz, Gokhan

    2016-01-01

    To compare the outcomes of flexible ureterorenoscopy (F-URS) and mini-percutaneous nephrolithotomy (mini-PNL) in the treatment of lower calyceal stones smaller than 2 cm. Patients who underwent F-URS and mini-PNL for the treatment of lower calyceal stones smaller than 2 cm between March 2009 and December 2014 were retrospectively evaluated. Ninety-four patients were divided into two groups by treatment modality: F-URS (Group 1: 63 patients) and mini-PNL (Group 2: 31 patients). All patients were preoperatively diagnosed with intravenous pyelography or computed tomography. Success rates for F-URS and mini-PNL at postoperative first month were 85.7% and 90.3%, respectively. Operation time, fluoroscopy time, and hospitalization time for F-URS and mini-PNL patients were 44.40 min, 2.9 min, 22.4 h, and 91.9 min, 6.4 min, and 63.8 h, respectively. All three parameters were significantly shorter among the F-URS group (p < 0.001). Postoperative hemoglobin drop was significantly lower in F-URS group compared to mini-PNL group (0.39 mg/dL vs. 1.15 mg/dL, p = 0.001). A comparison of complications according to the Clavien classification demonstrated significant differences between the groups (p = 0.001). More patients in the F-URS groups require antibiotics due to urinary tract infection, and more patients in the mini-PNL group required ureteral double J catheter insertion under general anesthesia. Although both F-URS and mini-PNL have similar success rates for the treatment of lower calyceal stones, F-URS appears to be more favorable due to shorter fluoroscopy and hospitalization times; and lower hemoglobin drops. Multicenter and studies using higher patient volumes are needed to confirm these findings. PMID:26727075

  7. Smaller = Denser, and the Brain Knows It: Natural Statistics of Object Density Shape Weight Expectations

    PubMed Central

    Peters, Megan A. K.; Balzer, Jonathan; Shams, Ladan

    2015-01-01

    If one nondescript object’s volume is twice that of another, is it necessarily twice as heavy? As larger objects are typically heavier than smaller ones, one might assume humans use such heuristics in preparing to lift novel objects if other informative cues (e.g., material, previous lifts) are unavailable. However, it is also known that humans are sensitive to statistical properties of our environments, and that such sensitivity can bias perception. Here we asked whether statistical regularities in properties of liftable, everyday objects would bias human observers’ predictions about objects’ weight relationships. We developed state-of-the-art computer vision techniques to precisely measure the volume of everyday objects, and also measured their weight. We discovered that for liftable man-made objects, “twice as large” doesn’t mean “twice as heavy”: Smaller objects are typically denser, following a power function of volume. Interestingly, this “smaller is denser” relationship does not hold for natural or unliftable objects, suggesting some ideal density range for objects designed to be lifted. We then asked human observers to predict weight relationships between novel objects without lifting them; crucially, these weight predictions quantitatively match typical weight relationships shown by similarly-sized objects in everyday environments. These results indicate that the human brain represents the statistics of everyday objects and that this representation can be quantitatively abstracted and applied to novel objects. Finally, that the brain possesses and can use precise knowledge of the nonlinear association between size and weight carries important implications for implementation of forward models of motor control in artificial systems. PMID:25768977

  8. Small amplitude solitons in a warm plasma with smaller and higher order relativistic effects

    SciTech Connect

    Kalita, B. C.; Das, R.

    2007-07-15

    Solitons have been investigated in a warm plasma through the Korteweg-de Vries (KdV) equation, considering a smaller relativistic effect for {gamma}{approx_equal}O(v{sup 2}/c{sup 2}) and {gamma}{sub e}{approx_equal}O(u{sup 2}/c{sup 2}) and higher relativistic effects for {gamma}{approx_equal}O(v{sup 4}/c{sup 4}) and {gamma}{sub e}{approx_equal}O(u{sup 4/}c{sup 4}). Compressive fast ion-acoustic solitons are observed to exist in the entire range (u{sub 0}-v{sub 0}) subject to a suitable mathematical condition satisfied by the initial streaming velocities u{sub 0},v{sub 0} of the electrons and the ions, respectively, electron to ion mass ratio Q(=m{sub e}/m{sub i}) and ion to electron temperature ratio {sigma}(=T{sub i}/T{sub e}). Further, rarefactive solitons of pretty small amplitudes are observed in the small upper range of |u{sub 0}-v{sub 0}| for higher order relativistic effect which are found to change parabolically. It is essentially important to report in our model of plasma, that the higher order relativistic effect slows down the soliton speed to V{<=}0.10 for all temperature ratios {sigma} for small amplitude waves. On the other hand, the smaller order relativistic effect permits the soliton to exist even at a relatively much higher speed V<0.30. Solitons of high (negligible) amplitudes are found to generate at the smaller (greater) difference of initial streamings (u{sub 0}-v{sub 0}) corresponding to both the relativistic effects.

  9. Do open access biomedical journals benefit smaller countries? The Slovenian experience.

    PubMed

    Turk, Nana

    2011-06-01

    Scientists from smaller countries have problems gaining visibility for their research. Does open access publishing provide a solution? Slovenia is a small country with around 5000 medical doctors, 1300 dentists and 1000 pharmacists. A search of Slovenia's Bibliographic database was carried out to identity all biomedical journals and those which are open access. Slovenia has 18 medical open access journals, but none has an impact factor and only 10 are indexed by Slovenian and international bibliographic databases. The visibility and quality of medical papers is poor. The solution might be to reduce the number of journals and encourage Slovenian scientists to publish their best articles in them. PMID:21564498

  10. Why have not the hairs on the feet of gecko been smaller?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Su, Yewang; He, Shijie; Hwang, Keh-Chih; Ji, Baohua

    2012-10-01

    The nanometer size of the tiny hair is the key to the secret of strong stickiness of gecko's feet, by which the hair can achieve the maximum adhesion strength that is insensitive to the interfacial flaws with substrate surface. But the question why the hairs have not been smaller is not answered yet. In this study, we derived a geometric parameter of the surface structures considering lateral interaction among hairs, which gives a critical size below which these hairs will bunch together and cause failure of the adhesion, suggesting a lower limit of the dimension of hairs on gecko's feet.

  11. Possible origin of the smaller-than-universal percolation-conductivity exponent in the continuum.

    PubMed

    Balberg, I; Azulay, D; Goldstein, Y; Jedrzejewski, J

    2016-06-01

    For quite a few systems in the continuum, such as carbon nanotube polymer composites and segregated composites, percolation electrical conductivity exponents that are much smaller than the universal value have been reported. This is unexpected in view of the classical lattice percolation theory. Here we provide a simple general phenomenological model that accounts for such observations within the framework of universality. We suggest that these small value exponents are due to the interplay between the connectivity and the structural variations that follow the increase of the fractional volume content of the conducting phase. PMID:27415233

  12. Winged queens replaced by reproductives smaller than workers in Mystrium ants

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Molet, Mathieu; Peeters, Christian; Fisher, Brian L.

    2007-04-01

    In ants, winged queens that are specialized for independent colony foundation can be replaced by wingless reproductives better adapted for colony fission. We studied this shift in reproductive strategy by comparing two Mystrium species from Madagascar using morphometry, allometry and dissections. Mystrium rogeri has a single dealate queen in each colony with a larger thorax than workers and similar mandibles that allow these queens to hunt during non-claustral foundation. In contrast, Mystrium ‘red’ lacks winged queens and half of the female adults belong to a wingless ‘intermorph’ caste smaller and allometrically distinct from the workers. Intermorphs have functional ovaries and spermatheca while those of workers are degenerate. Intermorphs care for brood and a few mate and reproduce making them an all-purpose caste that takes charge of both work and reproduction. However, their mandibles are reduced and inappropriate for hunting centipedes, unlike the workers’ mandibles. This together with their small thorax disallow them to perform independent colony foundation, and colonies reproduce by fission. M. rogeri workers have mandibles polymorphic in size and shape, which allow for all tasks from brood care to hunting. In M. ‘red’, colonial investment in reproduction has shifted from producing expensive winged queens to more numerous helpers. M. ‘red’ intermorphs are the first case of reproductives smaller than workers in ants and illustrate their potential to diversify their caste system for better colonial economy.

  13. Evidence for smaller right amygdala volumes in posttraumatic stress disorder following childhood trauma.

    PubMed

    Veer, Ilya M; Oei, Nicole Y L; van Buchem, Mark A; Spinhoven, Philip; Elzinga, Bernet M; Rombouts, Serge A R B

    2015-09-30

    Hippocampus and amygdala volumes in posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) related to childhood trauma are relatively understudied, albeit the potential importance to the disorder. Whereas some studies reported smaller hippocampal volumes, little evidence was found for abnormal amygdala volumes. Here we investigated hippocampus and amygdala volumes and shapes in an adult sample of PTSD patients related to childhood trauma. T1-weighted MR images were acquired from 12 female PTSD patients with trauma related to physical, sexual, and/or emotional abuse before age 18, and from 12 matched controls. Hippocampus and amygdala were segmented, and volumes were calculated and corrected for the total intracranial volume. Additionally, a shape analysis was done on the surface of the structures to explore abnormalities in specific subnuclei. Smaller right amygdala volumes were found in PTSD patients as compared with the controls. This difference appeared to be located specifically in the basolateral and superficial nuclei groups. Severity of sexual abuse during childhood was negatively correlated with the size of the amygdala. No difference in hippocampal volumes was found. Although our results are not conclusive, traumatic events in childhood might impede normal development of the amygdala, which could render a person more vulnerable to develop PTSD later in life. PMID:26211620

  14. Diversity of larger consumers enhances interference competition effects on smaller competitors.

    PubMed

    Nascimento, Francisco J A; Karlson, Agnes M L; Näslund, Johan; Elmgren, Ragnar

    2011-06-01

    Competition between large and small species for the same food is common in a number of ecosystems including aquatic ones. How diversity of larger consumers affects the access of smaller competitors to a limiting resource is not well understood. We tested experimentally how species richness (0-3 spp.) of benthic deposit-feeding macrofauna changes meiofaunal ostracods' incorporation of fresh organic matter from a stable-isotope-labeled cyanobacterial bloom, using fauna from the species-poor Baltic Sea. Presence of macrofauna mostly decreased meiofaunal incorporation of bloom material, depending on the macrofauna species present. As expected, the species identity of macrofauna influenced the incorporation of organic matter by meiofauna. Interestingly, our results show that, in addition, species richness of the macrofauna significantly reduced meiofauna incorporation of freshly settled nitrogen and carbon. With more than one macrofauna species, the reduction was always greater than expected from the single-species treatments. Field data from the Baltic Sea showed a negative correlation between macrofauna diversity and meiofaunal ostracod abundance, as expected from the experimental results. We argue that this is caused by interference competition, due to spatial niche differentiation between macrofauna species reducing the sediment volume in which ostracods can feed undisturbed by larger competitors. Interference from macrofauna significantly reduces organic matter incorporation by meiofauna, indicating that diversity of larger consumers is an important factor controlling the access of smaller competitors to a limiting food resource.

  15. Distinct foods with smaller unit would be an effective approach to achieve sustainable weight loss.

    PubMed

    Chang, Un Jae; Suh, Hyung Joo; Yang, Sun Ok; Hong, Yang Hee; Kim, Young Suk; Kim, Jin Man; Jung, Eun Young

    2012-01-01

    We studied the effects of food type and food unit size on food intake and satiety using fried rice mixed with Kimchi in healthy Korean young women (n=31). Amorphous fried rice (1st week), distinct large fried rice balls (100 g/unit, 2nd week) and distinct small fried rice balls (20 g/unit, 3rd week) were served in the same content and volume (500 g). Subjects ate significantly (p<.001) less distinct large fried rice balls (243.5 g) compared to amorphous fried rice (317.2 g). Despite consuming more amorphous fried rice, subjects did not feel significantly fuller after eating amorphous fried rice compared to distinct large fried rice balls. When distinct fried rice balls were served as smaller unit, subjects ate significantly less them (small unit; 190.6 g vs. large unit; 243.5 g, p<.01). Although subjects ate more distinct fried rice balls provided as large unit, they rated similar satiety and hunger levels for distinct small and distinct large fried rice balls. In conclusion, we propose that distinct foods with smaller unit would be an effective approach to achieve sustainable weight loss. PMID:22177403

  16. HIV-Associated Distal Neuropathic Pain is Associated with Smaller Total Cerebral Cortical Gray Matter

    PubMed Central

    Keltner, John R.; Fennema-Notestine, Christine; Vaida, Florin; Wang, Dongzhe; Franklin, Donald R.; Dworkin, Robert H.; Sanders, Chelsea; McCutchan, J. Allen; Archibald, Sarah L.; Miller, David J.; Kesidis, George; Cushman, Clint; Kim, Sung Min; Abramson, Ian; Taylor, Michael J.; Theilmann, Rebecca J.; Julaton, Michelle D.; Notestine, Randy J.; Corkran, Stephanie; Cherner, Mariana; Duarte, Nichole A.; Alexander, Terry; Robinson-Papp, Jessica; Gelman, Benjamin B.; Simpson, David M.; Collier, Ann C.; Marra, Christina M.; Morgello, Susan; Brown, Greg; Grant, Igor; Atkinson, J. Hampton; Jernigan, Terry L.; Ellis, Ronald J.

    2014-01-01

    Despite modern antiretroviral therapy, HIV-associated sensory neuropathy affects over 50% of HIV patients. The clinical expression of HIV neuropathy is highly variable: many individuals report few symptoms, but about half report distal neuropathic pain (DNP), making it one of the most prevalent, disabling and treatment-resistant complications of HIV disease. The presence and intensity of pain is not fully explained by the degree of peripheral nerve damage, making it unclear why some patients do, and others do not, report pain. To better understand central nervous system contributions to HIV DNP, we performed a cross-sectional analysis of structural magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) volumes in 241 HIV-infected participants from an observational multi-site cohort study at five US sites (CNS HIV Antiretroviral Treatment Effects Research Study, CHARTER). The association between DNP and the structural imaging outcomes was investigated using both linear and nonlinear (Gaussian Kernel support vector) multivariable regression, controlling for key demographic and clinical variables. Severity of DNP symptoms was correlated with smaller total cerebral cortical gray matter volume (R = −0.24; p = 0.004). Understanding the mechanisms for this association between smaller total cortical volumes and DNP may provide insight into HIV DNP chronicity and treatment-resistance. PMID:24549970

  17. Mechanism of cytotoxicity of 5,10-dideazatetrahydrofolic acid in human ovarian carcinoma cells in vitro and modulation of the drug activity by folic or folinic acid.

    PubMed Central

    Erba, E.; Sen, S.; Sessa, C.; Vikhanskaya, F. L.; D'Incalci, M.

    1994-01-01

    Inhibition of clonogenic potential by the glycinamideribonucleosyl transformylase inhibitor 5,10-dideazatetrahydrofolic acid (DDATHF, Lometrexol) was evaluated in vitro in a human ovarian carcinoma cell line, SW626. Drug-induced inhibition of clonogenic potential is a function of the dose and time of exposure and is independent of the formation of DNA single-strand breaks or de novo synthesis of protein. Simultaneous treatment with 100 microM hypoxanthine completely prevented the inhibition of clonogenic potential caused by 0.5 microM DDATHF. DDATHF blocked cells in the early-middle S-phases of the cell cycle, and there was a corresponding marked reduction in the rate of DNA synthesis after drug withdrawal. The cytotoxic potential of DDATHF was modulated by the folic acid concentration present in the medium. In a medium containing 0.22 microM folic acid, DDATHF cytotoxicity was at least 100 times that in a regular medium containing 2.22 microM folic acid, levels which, however, are about 100 times those found in human plasma. DDATHF cytotoxicity differed moderately when folic acid concentrations varied between 0.22 and 0 microM, suggesting that folic acid does not necessarily antagonise DDATHF anti-tumour activity. Folinic acid at a concentration as low as 0.1 microM can completely rescue cells when given simultaneously with 0.5 microM DDATHF. When folinic acid was given 24 h after DDATHF, a reversal of cytotoxicity was observed at 0.5 and 1 microM, but to a much lesser extent than simultaneous treatment. When folinic acid was added after 48 or 72 h of DDATHF washout, even at a high concentration and for a long time, no reduction in DDATHF cytotoxicity was found. In conclusion, the study highlights the modulation of DDATHF cytotoxicity by folic acid or by folinic acid and provides further rationale for in vivo clinical investigation with these combinations. PMID:8297715

  18. From passive tool holders to microsurgeons: safer, smaller, smarter surgical robots.

    PubMed

    Bergeles, Christos; Yang, Guang-Zhong

    2014-05-01

    Within only a few decades from its initial introduction, the field of surgical robotics has evolved into a dynamic and rapidly growing research area with increasing clinical uptake worldwide. Initially introduced for stereotaxic neurosurgery, surgical robots are now involved in an increasing number of procedures, demonstrating their practical clinical potential while propelling further advances in surgical innovations. Emerging platforms are also able to perform complex interventions through only a single-entry incision, and navigate through natural anatomical pathways in a tethered or wireless fashion. New devices facilitate superhuman dexterity and enable the performance of surgical steps that are otherwise impossible. They also allow seamless integration of microimaging techniques at the cellular level, significantly expanding the capabilities of surgeons. This paper provides an overview of the significant achievements in surgical robotics and identifies the current trends and future research directions of the field in making surgical robots safer, smaller, and smarter.

  19. Evaluation of load-carrying capacity of oils in IAE gear machine with smaller oil volume

    SciTech Connect

    Zaskal'ko, P.P.; Krysin, V.D.; Zabelin, A.V.

    1983-09-01

    The qualification test method used for evaluating the load carrying properties of oils in the IAE gear machine requires too high an oil sample, and so a modified lubricant system with a smaller sample was used in evaluation. But as this method was suitable only for low viscosity oils, another version was proposed and is tested in this paper. Tests were run on five oil samples. It is found that the standard and experimental methods for evaluation of the load carrying capacity of lubricating oils in the IAE gear machine give practically the same results and are characterized by high precision. The new method makes it possible to carry out the evaluation with a 0.8-1 liter sample rather than the 9 liter sample required in the standard method.

  20. English vowel spaces produced by Japanese speakers: the smaller point vowels' and the greater schwas'.

    PubMed

    Tomita, Kaoru; Yamada, Jun; Takatsuka, Shigenobu

    2010-10-01

    This study investigated how Japanese-speaking learners of English pronounce the three point vowels /i/, /u/, and /a/ appearing in the first and second monosyllabic words of English noun phrases, and the schwa /ə/ appearing in English disyllabic words. First and second formant (F1 and F2) values were measured for four Japanese speakers and two American English speakers. The hypothesis that the area encompassed by the point vowels in the F1-F2 vowel space tends to be smaller for the Japanese speakers than for the English speakers was verified. The hypothesis that the area formed by the three schwas in chicke_n, spoonfu_l, and Tarza_n is greater for the Japanese speakers than for the English speakers and its related hypothesis were largely upheld. Implications for further research are briefly discussed.

  1. Scattering and Absorption Properties of Polydisperse Wavelength-sized Particles Covered with Much Smaller Grains

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dlugach, Jana M.; Mishchenko, Michael I.; Mackowski, Daniel W.

    2012-01-01

    Using the results of direct, numerically exact computer solutions of the Maxwell equations, we analyze scattering and absorption characteristics of polydisperse compound particles in the form of wavelength-sized spheres covered with a large number of much smaller spherical grains.The results pertain to the complex refractive indices1.55 + i0.0003,1.55 + i0.3, and 3 + i0.1. We show that the optical effects of dusting wavelength-sized hosts by microscopic grains can vary depending on the number and size of the grains as well as on the complex refractive index. Our computations also demonstrate the high efficiency of the new superposition T-matrix code developed for use on distributed memory computer clusters.

  2. Smaller-loss planar SPP transmission line than conventional microstrip in microwave frequencies

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Hao Chi; Zhang, Qian; Liu, Jun Feng; Tang, Wenxuan; Fan, Yifeng; Cui, Tie Jun

    2016-01-01

    Transmission line is a basic component in all passive devices, integrated circuits, and systems. Microstrip is the most popular transmission line in the microwave and millimeter-wave frequencies, and has been widely used in current electronic devices, circuits, and systems. One of the important issues to be solved in such applications is the relatively large transmission loss of microstrip. Here, we propose a method to reduce the loss of microwave transmission line based on the designable wavenumber of spoof surface plasmon polaritons (SPPs). Using this characteristic, we analyze and experimentally demonstrate the low-loss feature of the SPP transmission line through the perturbation method and S-parameter measurements, respectively. Both simulation and experimental results show that the SPP transmission line has much smaller transmission loss than traditional microstrip with the same size in the microwave frequencies. Hence, the spoof SPP transmission line may make a big step forward in the low-loss circuits and systems. PMID:26983911

  3. Opportunities and barriers for smaller portions in food service: lessons from marketing and behavioral economics.

    PubMed

    Riis, J

    2014-07-01

    This paper uses the frameworks and evidence from marketing and behavioral economics to highlight the opportunities and barriers for portion control in food service environments. Applying Kahneman's 'thinking fast and slow' concepts, it describes 10 strategies that can be effective in 'tricking' the consumer's fast cognitive system to make better decisions and in triggering the slow cognitive system to help prevent the fast system from making bad decisions. These strategies include shrinking defaults, elongating packages, increasing the visibility of small portions, offering more mixed virtue options, adding more small sizes, offering 'right-sized' standard portions, using meaningful size labels, adopting linear pricing, using temporal landmarks to push smaller portions and facilitating pre-commitment. For each of these strategies, I discuss the specific cost and revenue barriers that a food service operator would face if the strategy were adopted.

  4. Opportunities and barriers for smaller portions in food service: lessons from marketing and behavioral economics.

    PubMed

    Riis, J

    2014-07-01

    This paper uses the frameworks and evidence from marketing and behavioral economics to highlight the opportunities and barriers for portion control in food service environments. Applying Kahneman's 'thinking fast and slow' concepts, it describes 10 strategies that can be effective in 'tricking' the consumer's fast cognitive system to make better decisions and in triggering the slow cognitive system to help prevent the fast system from making bad decisions. These strategies include shrinking defaults, elongating packages, increasing the visibility of small portions, offering more mixed virtue options, adding more small sizes, offering 'right-sized' standard portions, using meaningful size labels, adopting linear pricing, using temporal landmarks to push smaller portions and facilitating pre-commitment. For each of these strategies, I discuss the specific cost and revenue barriers that a food service operator would face if the strategy were adopted. PMID:25033960

  5. An improved smaller biotin ligase for BioID proximity labeling

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Dae In; Jensen, Samuel C.; Noble, Kyle A.; KC, Birendra; Roux, Kenneth H.; Motamedchaboki, Khatereh; Roux, Kyle J.

    2016-01-01

    The BioID method uses a promiscuous biotin ligase to detect protein–protein associations as well as proximate proteins in living cells. Here we report improvements to the BioID method centered on BioID2, a substantially smaller promiscuous biotin ligase. BioID2 enables more-selective targeting of fusion proteins, requires less biotin supplementation, and exhibits enhanced labeling of proximate proteins. Thus BioID2 improves the efficiency of screening for protein–protein associations. We also demonstrate that the biotinylation range of BioID2 can be considerably modulated using flexible linkers, thus enabling application-specific adjustment of the biotin-labeling radius. PMID:26912792

  6. Opportunities and barriers for smaller portions in food service: lessons from marketing and behavioral economics

    PubMed Central

    Riis, J

    2014-01-01

    This paper uses the frameworks and evidence from marketing and behavioral economics to highlight the opportunities and barriers for portion control in food service environments. Applying Kahneman's ‘thinking fast and slow' concepts, it describes 10 strategies that can be effective in ‘tricking' the consumer's fast cognitive system to make better decisions and in triggering the slow cognitive system to help prevent the fast system from making bad decisions. These strategies include shrinking defaults, elongating packages, increasing the visibility of small portions, offering more mixed virtue options, adding more small sizes, offering ‘right-sized' standard portions, using meaningful size labels, adopting linear pricing, using temporal landmarks to push smaller portions and facilitating pre-commitment. For each of these strategies, I discuss the specific cost and revenue barriers that a food service operator would face if the strategy were adopted. PMID:25033960

  7. Simulating the magnetized liner inertial fusion plasma confinement with smaller-scale experiments

    SciTech Connect

    Ryutov, D. D.; Cuneo, M. E.; Herrmann, M. C.; Sinars, D. B.; Slutz, S. A.

    2012-06-15

    The recently proposed magnetized liner inertial fusion approach to a Z-pinch driven fusion [Slutz et al., Phys. Plasmas 17, 056303 (2010)] is based on the use of an axial magnetic field to provide plasma thermal insulation from the walls of the imploding liner. The characteristic plasma transport regimes in the proposed approach cover parameter domains that have not been studied yet in either magnetic confinement or inertial confinement experiments. In this article, an analysis is presented of the scalability of the key physical processes that determine the plasma confinement. The dimensionless scaling parameters are identified and conclusion is drawn that the plasma behavior in scaled-down experiments can correctly represent the full-scale plasma, provided these parameters are approximately the same in two systems. This observation is important in that smaller-scale experiments typically have better diagnostic access and more experiments per year are possible.

  8. Micrometeoroid Impacts on the Hubble Space Telescope Wide Field and Planetary Camera 2: Smaller Particle Impacts

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ross, D. K.; Anz-Meador, P.; Liou, J.C.; Opiela, J.; Kearsley, A. T.; Grime, G.; Webb, R.; Jeynes, C.; Palitsin, V.; Colaux, J.; Griffin, T.; Gerlach, L.; Wozniakiewicz, P. J.; Price, M. C.; Burchell, M. J.; Cole, M. J.

    2014-01-01

    The radiator shield on the Wide Field and Planetary Camera 2 (WFPC2) was subject to optical inspection following return from the Hubble Space Telescope (HST) in 2009. The survey revealed over 600 impact features of > 300 micrometers diameter, from exposure in space for 16 years. Subsequently, an international collaborative programme of analysis was organized to determine the origin of hypervelocity particles responsible for the damage. Here we describe examples of the numerous smaller micrometeoroid (MM) impact features (< 700 micrometers diameter) which excavated zinc orthotitanate (ZOT) paint from the radiator surface, but did not incorporate material from underlying Al alloy; larger impacts are described by [3]. We discuss recognition and interpretation of impactor remains, and MM compositions found on WFPC2.

  9. A robust and fast line segment detector based on top-down smaller eigenvalue analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Dong; Wang, Yongtao; Tang, Zhi; Lu, Xiaoqing

    2014-01-01

    In this paper, we propose a robust and fast line segment detector, which achieves accurate results with a controlled number of false detections and requires no parameter tuning. It consists of three steps: first, we propose a novel edge point chaining method to extract Canny edge segments (i.e., contiguous chains of Canny edge points) from the input image; second, we propose a top-down scheme based on smaller eigenvalue analysis to extract line segments within each obtained edge segment; third, we employ Desolneux et al.'s method to reject false detections. Experiments demonstrate that it is very efficient and more robust than two state of the art methods—LSD and EDLines.

  10. ACL-Injured Subjects Have Smaller ACLs Than Matched Controls: An MRI Study

    PubMed Central

    Chaudhari, Ajit M.W.; Zelman, Eric A.; Flanigan, David C.; Kaeding, Christopher C.; Nagaraja, Haikady N.

    2013-01-01

    Background Very few studies examining the predisposing anatomical factors leading to anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) injuries have examined the ACL itself, and none of these directly examined the difference in ACL properties between injured and matched control subjects. Hypothesis ACL total volume of people who have experienced a non-contact ACL injury is smaller than that of matched controls. Methods Contours of the ACL were manually identified in sagittal MR images and volumes were calculated for 27 contralateral, healthy knees of individuals after non-contact ACL injury and for 27 control subjects matched for gender, height, age, and weight. Validation of this method was performed on 5 porcine knees. Stepwise multiple regression was used to determine the difference in ACL volume between injured and control subjects while considering gender, height, weight, and age as potential covariates. Results Contralateral ACL volume for injured subjects was significantly smaller than non-injured subjects (p=0.0208) by 231 mm3 after adjusting for weight, which was also a significant contributor to ACL volume (p<0.0001). At the average body mass of 72.7kg, subjects with a non-contact ACL injury had an average contralateral ACL volume of 1921 mm3, while the corresponding control group had an average volume of 2151 mm3. Gender, height, and age were not significant when weight was included in the regression model. Conclusions This study shows that there are anthropometric differences between the knees of subjects with a non-contact ACL injury and those without an ACL injury, suggesting that ACL volume may play a direct role in non-contact ACL injury. PMID:19307330

  11. Smaller tumor size is associated with poor survival in T4b colon cancer

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Ben; Feng, Yang; Mo, Shao-Bo; Cai, San-Jun; Huang, Li-Yong

    2016-01-01

    AIM: To hypothesize that in patients with colon cancer showing heavy intestinal wall invasion without distant metastasis (T4bN0-2M0), small tumor size would correlate with more aggressive tumor behaviors and therefore poorer cancer-specific survival (CSS). METHODS: We analyzed T4bN0-2M0 colon cancer patients in the Surveillance, Epidemiology and End Results (SEER) database. A preliminary analysis of T4bN0-2M0 colon cancer patients at the Fudan University Shanghai Cancer Center is also presented. RESULTS: A total of 1734 T4bN0-2M0 colon cancer patients from the SEER database were included. Kaplan-Meier analysis revealed decreasing CSS with decreasing tumor size (P < 0.001). Subgroup analysis showed a significant association between poorer CSS with smaller tumor size in T4bN0 patients (P = 0.024), and a trend of association in T4bN1 (P = 0.182) and T4bN2 patients (P = 0.191). Multivariate analysis identified tumor size as an independent prognostic factor for CSS in T4bN0-2M0 patients (P = 0.024). Preliminary analysis of Fudan University Shanghai Cancer Center samples suggested the 5-year CSS was 50.0%, 72.9% and 77.1% in patients with tumors ≤ 4.0 cm, 4.0-7.0 cm and ≥ 7.0 cm. CONCLUSION: Smaller tumor size is associated with poorer CSS in the T4bN0-2M0 subset of colon cancer, particularly in the T4bN0M0 subgroup. PMID:27547015

  12. New algorithm for detecting smaller retinal blood vessels in fundus images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    LeAnder, Robert; Bidari, Praveen I.; Mohammed, Tauseef A.; Das, Moumita; Umbaugh, Scott E.

    2010-03-01

    About 4.1 million Americans suffer from diabetic retinopathy. To help automatically diagnose various stages of the disease, a new blood-vessel-segmentation algorithm based on spatial high-pass filtering was developed to automatically segment blood vessels, including the smaller ones, with low noise. Methods: Image database: Forty, 584 x 565-pixel images were collected from the DRIVE image database. Preprocessing: Green-band extraction was used to obtain better contrast, which facilitated better visualization of retinal blood vessels. A spatial highpass filter of mask-size 11 was applied. A histogram stretch was performed to enhance contrast. A median filter was applied to mitigate noise. At this point, the gray-scale image was converted to a binary image using a binary thresholding operation. Then, a NOT operation was performed by gray-level value inversion between 0 and 255. Postprocessing: The resulting image was AND-ed with its corresponding ring mask to remove the outer-ring (lens-edge) artifact. At this point, the above algorithm steps had extracted most of the major and minor vessels, with some intersections and bifurcations missing. Vessel segments were reintegrated using the Hough transform. Results: After applying the Hough transform, both the average peak SNR and the RMS error improved by 10%. Pratt's Figure of Merit (PFM) was decreased by 6%. Those averages were better than [1] by 10-30%. Conclusions: The new algorithm successfully preserved the details of smaller blood vessels and should prove successful as a segmentation step for automatically identifying diseases that affect retinal blood vessels.

  13. Iodinin (1,6-Dihydroxyphenazine 5,10-Dioxide) from Streptosporangium sp. Induces Apoptosis Selectively in Myeloid Leukemia Cell Lines and Patient Cells

    PubMed Central

    Myhren, Lene E.; Nygaard, Gyrid; Gausdal, Gro; Sletta, Håvard; Teigen, Knut; Degnes, Kristin F.; Zahlsen, Kolbjørn; Brunsvik, Anders; Bruserud, Øystein; Døskeland, Stein Ove; Selheim, Frode; Herfindal, Lars

    2013-01-01

    Despite recent improvement in therapy, acute myeloid leukemia (AML) is still associated with high lethality. In the presented study, we analyzed the bioactive compound iodinin (1,6-dihydroxyphenazine 5,10-dioxide) from a marine actinomycetes bacterium for the ability to induce cell death in a range of cell types. Iodinin showed selective toxicity to AML and acute promyelocytic (APL) leukemia cells, with EC50 values for cell death up to 40 times lower for leukemia cells when compared with normal cells. Iodinin also successfully induced cell death in patient-derived leukemia cells or cell lines with features associated with poor prognostic such as FLT3 internal tandem duplications or mutated/deficient p53. The cell death had typical apoptotic morphology, and activation of apoptotic signaling proteins like caspase-3. Molecular modeling suggested that iodinin could intercalate between bases in the DNA in a way similar to the anti-cancer drug daunorubicin (DNR), causing DNA-strand breaks. Iodinin induced apoptosis in several therapy-resistant AML-patient blasts, but to a low degree in peripheral blood leukocytes, and in contrast to DNR, not in rat cardiomyoblasts. The low activity towards normal cell types that are usually affected by anti-leukemia therapy suggests that iodinin and related compounds represent promising structures in the development of anti-cancer therapy. PMID:23364682

  14. Study of solar features causing GMSs with 250c'gamma' 'smaller than' H 'smaller than' 400'gamma' during the period 1999-2010

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kumar, Rajiv

    2016-07-01

    The effect of solar features on geospheric conditions leading to geomagnetic storms (GMSs) with planetary index,A P ≥ 20 and the range of horizontal component of the Earth's magnetic field H such that 250γ time between the explosion on the Sun and maximum activity lies between 58 and 118 h causing GMSs at the Earth. Keywords Geomagnetic storm solar flares active

  15. Evidence for smaller extents of the northwestern Greenland Ice Sheet and North Ice Cap during the Holocene

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kelly, M. A.; Osterberg, E. C.; Axford, Y.; Bigl, M.; Birkel, S. D.; Corbett, L. B.; Roy, E. P.; Thompson, J. T.; Whitecloud, S.

    2013-12-01

    rooted in ground material and exposed along a shear plane in the GrIS are ~170-390 cal yr BP. Four ages of plant fragments within ice in a shear plane in the NIC margin are ~600-950 cal yr BP. Since these organic remains have been transported from beneath the GrIS and NIC, respectively, they indicate times of smaller than present ice extents. Together these plants provide evidence that the northwestern GrIS was smaller than at present at ~4600-4800 and ~170-390 cal yr BP. Advance to the modern GrIS extent was likely underway at of after ~170 cal yr BP. NIC was smaller than at present at ~600-950 cal yr. Our ongoing research is investigating the climatic conditions during these times and the relationship of these restricted ice extents to those documented elsewhere on Greenland as well as on Baffin Island.

  16. Challenges of Improving the Evidence Base in Smaller Surgical Specialties, as Highlighted by a Systematic Review of Gastroschisis Management

    PubMed Central

    Allin, Benjamin S. R.; Tse, Win Hou W.; Marven, Sean; Johnson, Paul R. V.; Knight, Marian

    2015-01-01

    Objective To identify methods of improving the evidence base in smaller surgical specialties, using a systematic review of gastroschisis management as an example. Background Operative primary fascial closure (OPFC), and silo placement with staged reduction and delayed closure (SR) are the most commonly used methods of gastroschisis closure. Relative merits of each are unclear. Methods A systematic review and meta-analysis was performed comparing outcomes following OPFC and SR in infants with simple gastroschisis. Primary outcomes of interest were mortality, length of hospitalization and time to full enteral feeding. Results 751 unique articles were identified. Eight met the inclusion criteria. None were randomized controlled trials. 488 infants underwent OPFC and 316 underwent SR. Multiple studies were excluded because they included heterogeneous populations and mixed intervention groups. Length of stay was significantly longer in the SR group (mean difference 8.97 days, 95% CI 2.14–15.80 days), as was number of post-operative days to complete enteral feeding (mean difference 7.19 days, 95%CI 2.01–12.36 days). Mortality was not statistically significantly different, although the odds of death were raised in the SR group (OR 1.96, 95%CI 0.71–5.35). Conclusions Despite showing some benefit of OPFC over SR, our results are tempered by the low quality of the available studies, which were small and variably reported. Coordinating research through a National Paediatric Surgical Trials Unit could alleviate many of these problems. A similar national approach could be used in other smaller surgical specialties. PMID:25621838

  17. Origin of giant viruses from smaller DNA viruses not from a fourth domain of cellular life.

    PubMed

    Yutin, Natalya; Wolf, Yuri I; Koonin, Eugene V

    2014-10-01

    The numerous and diverse eukaryotic viruses with large double-stranded DNA genomes that at least partially reproduce in the cytoplasm of infected cells apparently evolved from a single virus ancestor. This major group of viruses is known as Nucleocytoplasmic Large DNA Viruses (NCLDV) or the proposed order Megavirales. Among the "Megavirales", there are three groups of giant viruses with genomes exceeding 500kb, namely Mimiviruses, Pithoviruses, and Pandoraviruses that hold the current record of viral genome size, about 2.5Mb. Phylogenetic analysis of conserved, ancestral NLCDV genes clearly shows that these three groups of giant viruses have three distinct origins within the "Megavirales". The Mimiviruses constitute a distinct family that is distantly related to Phycodnaviridae, Pandoraviruses originate from a common ancestor with Coccolithoviruses within the Phycodnaviridae family, and Pithoviruses are related to Iridoviridae and Marseilleviridae. Maximum likelihood reconstruction of gene gain and loss events during the evolution of the "Megavirales" indicates that each group of giant viruses evolved from viruses with substantially smaller and simpler gene repertoires. Initial phylogenetic analysis of universal genes, such as translation system components, encoded by some giant viruses, in particular Mimiviruses, has led to the hypothesis that giant viruses descend from a fourth, probably extinct domain of cellular life. The results of our comprehensive phylogenomic analysis of giant viruses refute the fourth domain hypothesis and instead indicate that the universal genes have been independently acquired by different giant viruses from their eukaryotic hosts.

  18. High proportion of smaller ranged hummingbird species coincides with ecological specialization across the Americas.

    PubMed

    Sonne, Jesper; Martín González, Ana M; Maruyama, Pietro K; Sandel, Brody; Vizentin-Bugoni, Jeferson; Schleuning, Matthias; Abrahamczyk, Stefan; Alarcón, Ruben; Araujo, Andréa C; Araújo, Francielle P; Mendes de Azevedo, Severino; Baquero, Andrea C; Cotton, Peter A; Ingversen, Tanja Toftemark; Kohler, Glauco; Lara, Carlos; Guedes Las-Casas, Flor Maria; Machado, Adriana O; Machado, Caio Graco; Maglianesi, María Alejandra; Moura, Alan Cerqueira; Nogués-Bravo, David; Oliveira, Genilda M; Oliveira, Paulo E; Ornelas, Juan Francisco; Rodrigues, Licléia da Cruz; Rosero-Lasprilla, Liliana; Rui, Ana Maria; Sazima, Marlies; Timmermann, Allan; Varassin, Isabela Galarda; Wang, Zhiheng; Watts, Stella; Fjeldså, Jon; Svenning, Jens-Christian; Rahbek, Carsten; Dalsgaard, Bo

    2016-02-10

    Ecological communities that experience stable climate conditions have been speculated to preserve more specialized interspecific associations and have higher proportions of smaller ranged species (SRS). Thus, areas with disproportionally large numbers of SRS are expected to coincide geographically with a high degree of community-level ecological specialization, but this suggestion remains poorly supported with empirical evidence. Here, we analysed data for hummingbird resource specialization, range size, contemporary climate, and Late Quaternary climate stability for 46 hummingbird-plant mutualistic networks distributed across the Americas, representing 130 hummingbird species (ca 40% of all hummingbird species). We demonstrate a positive relationship between the proportion of SRS of hummingbirds and community-level specialization, i.e. the division of the floral niche among coexisting hummingbird species. This relationship remained strong even when accounting for climate, furthermore, the effect of SRS on specialization was far stronger than the effect of specialization on SRS, suggesting that climate largely influences specialization through species' range-size dynamics. Irrespective of the exact mechanism involved, our results indicate that communities consisting of higher proportions of SRS may be vulnerable to disturbance not only because of their small geographical ranges, but also because of their high degree of specialization. PMID:26842573

  19. Deficit of reactor antineutrinos at distances smaller than 100 m and inverse β decay

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ivanov, A. N.; Höllwieser, R.; Troitskaya, N. I.; Wellenzohn, M.; Zherebtsov, O. M.; Serebrov, A. P.

    2013-11-01

    We analyze a change in a deficit of reactor antineutrinos at distances smaller than 100m by changing the lifetime of the neutron from τn=885.7s to τn=879.6s, calculated for the axial coupling constants λ=-1.2694 and λ=-1.2750, respectively, to get a result corresponding the new world average value τn=880.1(1.1)s. We calculate the angular distribution and cross section for the inverse β decay, taking into account the contributions of the “weak magnetism” and the neutron recoil to next-to-leading order in the large baryon mass expansion and the radiative corrections of order α/π˜10-3, calculated to leading order in the large baryon mass expansion. We obtain an increase of a deficit of reactor antineutrinos of about 0.734%. We discuss a universality of radiative corrections to order α to the neutrino (antineutrino) reactions induced by weak charged currents, pointed out by Kurylov, Ramsey-Musolf, and Vogel [Phys. Rev. CPRVCAN0556-281310.1103/PhysRevC.67.035502 67, 035502 (2003)], and calculate the antineutrino-energy spectrum of the neutron β- decay to order α/π and taking into account the contributions of the weak magnetism and the proton recoil.

  20. Smaller Forbush Decreases in Solar Cycle 24: Effect of the Weak CME Field Strength?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thakur, N.

    2015-12-01

    A Forbush decrease (FD) is a sudden depression in the intensity of galactic cosmic ray (GCR) background, followed by a gradual recovery. One of the major causes of FDs is the presence of magnetic structures such as magnetic clouds (MCs) or corotating interaction regions (CIRs) that have enhanced magnetic field, which can scatter particles away reducing the observed GCR intensity. Recent work (Gopalswamy et al. 2014, GRL 41, 2673) suggests that coronal mass ejections (CMEs) are expanding anomalously in solar cycle 24 due to the reduced total pressure in the ambient medium. One of the consequences of the anomalous expansion is the reduced magnetic content of MCs, so we expect subdued FDs in cycle 24. In this paper, we present preliminary results from a survey of FDs during MC events in cycle 24 in comparison with those in cycle 23. We find that only ~17% FDs in cycle 24 had an amplitude >3%, as compared to ~31% in cycle 23. This result is consistent with the difference in the maximum magnetic field intensities (Bmax) of MCs in the two cycles: only ~ 10% of MCs in cycle 24 have Bmax>20nT, compared to 22% in cycle 23, confirming that MCs of cycle 24 have weaker magnetic field content. Therefore, we suggest that weaker magnetic field intensity in the magnetic clouds of cycle 24 has led to FDs with smaller amplitudes.

  1. Why droplet dimension can be larger than, equal to, or smaller than the nanowire dimension

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mohammad, S. Noor

    2009-11-01

    Droplets play central roles in the nanowire (NW) growth by vapor phase mechanisms. These mechanisms include vapor-liquid-solid (VLS), vapor-solid-solid or vapor-solid (VSS), vapor-quasisolid-solid or vapor-quasiliquid-solid (VQS), oxide-assisted growth (OAG), and self-catalytic growth (SCG) mechanisms. Fundamentals of the shape, size, characteristics, and dynamics of droplets and the impacts of them on the NW growth, have been studied. The influence of growth techniques, growth parameters (e.g., growth temperature, partial pressure, gas flow rates, etc.), thermodynamic conditions, surface and interface energy, molar volume, chemical potentials, etc. have been considered on the shapes and sizes of droplets. A model has been presented to explain why droplets can be larger than, equal to, or smaller than the associated NWs. Various growth techniques have been analyzed to understand defects created in NWs. Photoluminescence characteristics have been presented to quantify the roles of droplets in the creation of NW defects. The study highlights the importance of the purity of the droplet material. It attests to the superiority of the SCG mechanism, and clarifies the differences between the VSS, VQS, VLS, and SCG mechanisms. It explains why droplets produced by some mechanisms are visible but droplets produced by some other mechanisms are not visible. It elucidates the formation mechanisms of very large and very small droplets, and discusses the ground rules for droplets creating necked NWs. It puts forth reasons to demonstrate that very large droplets may not behave as droplets.

  2. Origin of giant viruses from smaller DNA viruses not from a fourth domain of cellular life

    PubMed Central

    Yutin, Natalya; Wolf, Yuri I.; Koonin, Eugene V.

    2015-01-01

    The numerous and diverse eukaryotic viruses with large double-stranded DNA genomes that at least partially reproduce in the cytoplasm of infected cells apparently evolved from a single virus ancestor. This major group of viruses is known as Nucleocytoplasmic Large DNA Viruses (NCLDV) or the proposed order Megavirales. Among the “Megavirales”, there are three groups of giant viruses with genomes exceeding 500 kb, namely Mimiviruses, Pithoviruses, and Pandoraviruses that hold the current record of viral genome size, about 2.5 Mb. Phylogenetic analysis of conserved, ancestral NLCDV genes clearly shows that these three groups of giant viruses have three distinct origins within the “Megavirales”. The Mimiviruses constitute a distinct family that is distantly related to Phycodnaviridae, Pandoraviruses originate from a common ancestor with Coccolithoviruses within the Phycodnaviridae family, and Pithoviruses are related to Iridoviridae and Marseilleviridae. Maximum likelihood reconstruction of gene gain and loss events during the evolution of the “Megavirales” indicates that each group of giant viruses evolved from viruses with substantially smaller and simpler gene repertoires. Initial phylogenetic analysis of universal genes, such as translation system components, encoded by some giant viruses, in particular Mimiviruses, has led to the hypothesis that giant viruses descend from a fourth, probably extinct domain of cellular life. The results of our comprehensive phylogenomic analysis of giant viruses refute the fourth domain hypothesis and instead indicate that the universal genes have been independently acquired by different giant viruses from their eukaryotic hosts. PMID:25042053

  3. High proportion of smaller ranged hummingbird species coincides with ecological specialization across the Americas.

    PubMed

    Sonne, Jesper; Martín González, Ana M; Maruyama, Pietro K; Sandel, Brody; Vizentin-Bugoni, Jeferson; Schleuning, Matthias; Abrahamczyk, Stefan; Alarcón, Ruben; Araujo, Andréa C; Araújo, Francielle P; Mendes de Azevedo, Severino; Baquero, Andrea C; Cotton, Peter A; Ingversen, Tanja Toftemark; Kohler, Glauco; Lara, Carlos; Guedes Las-Casas, Flor Maria; Machado, Adriana O; Machado, Caio Graco; Maglianesi, María Alejandra; Moura, Alan Cerqueira; Nogués-Bravo, David; Oliveira, Genilda M; Oliveira, Paulo E; Ornelas, Juan Francisco; Rodrigues, Licléia da Cruz; Rosero-Lasprilla, Liliana; Rui, Ana Maria; Sazima, Marlies; Timmermann, Allan; Varassin, Isabela Galarda; Wang, Zhiheng; Watts, Stella; Fjeldså, Jon; Svenning, Jens-Christian; Rahbek, Carsten; Dalsgaard, Bo

    2016-02-10

    Ecological communities that experience stable climate conditions have been speculated to preserve more specialized interspecific associations and have higher proportions of smaller ranged species (SRS). Thus, areas with disproportionally large numbers of SRS are expected to coincide geographically with a high degree of community-level ecological specialization, but this suggestion remains poorly supported with empirical evidence. Here, we analysed data for hummingbird resource specialization, range size, contemporary climate, and Late Quaternary climate stability for 46 hummingbird-plant mutualistic networks distributed across the Americas, representing 130 hummingbird species (ca 40% of all hummingbird species). We demonstrate a positive relationship between the proportion of SRS of hummingbirds and community-level specialization, i.e. the division of the floral niche among coexisting hummingbird species. This relationship remained strong even when accounting for climate, furthermore, the effect of SRS on specialization was far stronger than the effect of specialization on SRS, suggesting that climate largely influences specialization through species' range-size dynamics. Irrespective of the exact mechanism involved, our results indicate that communities consisting of higher proportions of SRS may be vulnerable to disturbance not only because of their small geographical ranges, but also because of their high degree of specialization.

  4. Multiple Smaller Missions as a Direct Pathway to Mars Sample Return

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Niles, P. B.; Draper, D. S.; Evans, C. A.; Gibson, E. K.; Graham, L. D.; Jones, J. H.; Lederer, S. M.; Ming, D.; Seaman, C. H.; Archer, P. D.; Andrews-Hanna, J.; Baldridge, A. M.; Bourke, M. C.; Crown, D. A.; Fries, M.; Knudson, A. T.; Michalski, J.; Dobrea, E. Noe; Vaniman, D.; Weitz, C. M.; Williams, R. M. E.; Bell, J. F., III; Knauth, L. P.

    2012-01-01

    Recent discoveries by the Mars Exploration Rovers, Mars Express, Mars Odyssey, and Mars Reconnaissance Orbiter spacecraft include multiple, tantalizing astrobiological targets representing both past and present environments on Mars. The most desirable path to Mars Sample Return (MSR) would be to collect and return samples from that site which provides the clearest examples of the variety of rock types considered a high priority for sample return (pristine igneous, sedimentary, and hydrothermal). Here we propose an MSR architecture in which the next steps (potentially launched in 2018) would entail a series of smaller missions, including caching, to multiple landing sites to verify the presence of high priority sample return targets through in situ analyses. This alternative architecture to one flagship-class sample caching mission to a single site would preserve a direct path to MSR as stipulated by the Planetary Decadal Survey, while permitting investigation of diverse deposit types and providing comparison of the site of returned samples to other aqueous environments on early Mars

  5. Analysis of the subcellular targeting of the smaller replicase protein of Pelargonium flower break virus.

    PubMed

    Martínez-Turiño, Sandra; Hernández, Carmen

    2012-02-01

    Replication of all positive RNA viruses occurs in association with intracellular membranes. In many cases, the mechanism of membrane targeting is unknown and there appears to be no correlation between virus phylogeny and the membrane systems recruited for replication. Pelargonium flower break virus (PFBV, genus Carmovirus, family Tombusviridae) encodes two proteins, p27 and its read-through product p86 (the viral RNA dependent-RNA polymerase), that are essential for replication. Recent reports with other members of the family Tombusviridae have shown that the smaller replicase protein is targeted to specific intracellular membranes and it is assumed to determine the subcellular localization of the replication complex. Using in vivo expression of green fluorescent protein (GFP) fusions in plant and yeast cells, we show here that PFBV p27 localizes in mitochondria. The same localization pattern was found for p86 that contains the p27 sequence at its N-terminus. Cellular fractionation of p27GFP-expressing cells confirmed the confocal microscopy observations and biochemical treatments suggested a tight association of the protein to membranes. Analysis of deletion mutants allowed identification of two regions required for targeting of p27 to mitochondria. These regions mapped toward the N- and C-terminus of the protein, respectively, and could function independently though with distinct efficiency. In an attempt to search for putative cellular factors involved in p27 localization, the subcellular distribution of the protein was checked in a selected series of knockout yeast strains and the outcome of this approach is discussed.

  6. [Prevalence of anemia, iron and folate deficiency in children 7 years smaller. Costa Rica, 1996].

    PubMed

    Cunningham, L; Blanco, A; Rodríguez, S; Ascencio, M

    2001-03-01

    In 1996, were studied in Costa Rica 961 children with ages between one and six years, with representation for metropolitan, urban and rural zones of the country. The classification approaches applied were emitted by the Pan-American Health Organization and the World Health Organization. The preschooler population presented in the national environment a prevalence of anemia of 26.3% (children from 1 to 4 years with hemoglobin < 11.0 g/dL and those from 5 to 6 years old with hemoglobin < 12.0 g/dL). The prevalence of Iron depletion (Ferritin < 12 ng/mL) and iron deficiency (Ferritin < 24 ng/mL) were 24.4% and 53.8%, respectively. The folate deficiency (< 6.0 ng/mL) was 11.4%. The iron deficiency was higher in children smaller than 4 years, being the maximum deficiency in the 1 year-old (75%). More than 40% of the preschool children presented sub-clinical deficiency of iron; of them, 10% showed severe deficiency of iron without presence of anemia. The children from the rural area presented the highest prevalence of anemia and iron depletion, while the metropolitan area met more frequency with iron deficiency. The nutritional anemias still constitute a moderate problem of public health in Costa Rica. The main cause is iron deficiency, associated in small proportion with folate deficiency and other factors associated with the erythropoiesis.

  7. Characterization of viral and human RNAs smaller than canonical MicroRNAs.

    PubMed

    Li, Zhihua; Kim, Sang Woo; Lin, Yuefeng; Moore, Patrick S; Chang, Yuan; John, Bino

    2009-12-01

    Recently identified small (20 to 40 bases) RNAs, such as microRNAs (miRNAs) and endogenous small interfering RNAs (siRNAs) participate in important cellular pathways. In this report, we systematically characterized several novel features of human and viral RNA products smaller than miRNAs. We found that Kaposi sarcoma-associated herpesvirus K12-1 miRNA (23 bases) associates with a distinct, unusually small (17-base) RNA (usRNA) that can effectively downregulate a K12-1 miRNA target, human RAD21, suggesting that stable degradation-like products may also contribute to gene regulation. High-throughput sequencing reveals a diverse set of human miRNA-derived usRNAs and other non-miRNA-derived usRNAs. Human miRNA-derived usRNAs preferentially match to 5' ends of miRNAs and are also more likely to associate with the siRNA effector protein Ago2 than with Ago1. Many non-miRNA-derived usRNAs associate with Ago proteins and also frequently contain C-rich 3'-specific motifs that are overrepresented in comparison to Piwi-interacting RNAs and transcription start site-associated RNAs. We postulate that approximately 30% of usRNAs could have evolved to participate in biological processes, including gene silencing. PMID:19812168

  8. Randomized denoising autoencoders for smaller and efficient imaging based AD clinical trials

    PubMed Central

    Ithapu, Vamsi K.; Singh, Vikas; Okonkwo, Ozioma; Johnson, Sterling C.

    2015-01-01

    There is growing body of research devoted to designing imaging-based biomarkers that identify Alzheimer’s disease (AD) in its prodromal stage using statistical machine learning methods. Recently several authors investigated how clinical trials for AD can be made more efficient (i.e., smaller sample size) using predictive measures from such classification methods. In this paper, we explain why predictive measures given by such SVM type objectives may be less than ideal for use in the setting described above. We give a solution based on a novel deep learning model, randomized denoising autoencoders (rDA), which regresses on training labels y while also accounting for the variance, a property which is very useful for clinical trial design. Our results give strong improvements in sample size estimates over strategies based on multi-kernel learning. Also, rDA predictions appear to more accurately correlate to stages of disease. Separately, our formulation empirically shows how deep architectures can be applied in the large d, small n regime — the default situation in medical imaging. This result is of independent interest. PMID:25485413

  9. Quality of the log-geometric distribution extrapolation for smaller undiscovered oil and gas pool size

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Chenglin, L.; Charpentier, R.R.

    2010-01-01

    The U.S. Geological Survey procedure for the estimation of the general form of the parent distribution requires that the parameters of the log-geometric distribution be calculated and analyzed for the sensitivity of these parameters to different conditions. In this study, we derive the shape factor of a log-geometric distribution from the ratio of frequencies between adjacent bins. The shape factor has a log straight-line relationship with the ratio of frequencies. Additionally, the calculation equations of a ratio of the mean size to the lower size-class boundary are deduced. For a specific log-geometric distribution, we find that the ratio of the mean size to the lower size-class boundary is the same. We apply our analysis to simulations based on oil and gas pool distributions from four petroleum systems of Alberta, Canada and four generated distributions. Each petroleum system in Alberta has a different shape factor. Generally, the shape factors in the four petroleum systems stabilize with the increase of discovered pool numbers. For a log-geometric distribution, the shape factor becomes stable when discovered pool numbers exceed 50 and the shape factor is influenced by the exploration efficiency when the exploration efficiency is less than 1. The simulation results show that calculated shape factors increase with those of the parent distributions, and undiscovered oil and gas resources estimated through the log-geometric distribution extrapolation are smaller than the actual values. ?? 2010 International Association for Mathematical Geology.

  10. The effect of introducing a smaller and lighter basketball on female basketball players' shot accuracy.

    PubMed

    Podmenik, Nadja; Leskošek, Bojan; Erčulj, Frane

    2012-03-01

    Our study examined whether the introduction of a smaller and lighter basketball (no. 6) affected the accuracy of female basketball players' shots at the basket. The International Basketball Federation (FIBA) introduced a size 6 ball in the 2004/2005 season to improve the efficiency and accuracy of technical elements, primarily shots at the basket. The sample for this study included 573 European female basketball players who were members of national teams that had qualified for the senior women's European championships in 2001, 2003, 2005 and 2007. A size 7 (larger and heavier) basketball was used by 286 players in 1,870 matches, and a size 6 basketball was used by 287 players in 1,966 matches. The players were categorised into three playing positions: guards, forwards and centres. The results revealed that statistically significant changes by year occurred only in terms of the percentage of successful free throws. With the size 6 basketball, this percentage decreased. Statistically significant differences between the playing positions were observed in terms of the percentage of field goals worth three points (between guards and forwards) and two points (between guards and centres). The results show that the introduction of the size 6 basketball did not lead to improvement in shooting accuracy (the opposite was found for free throws), although the number of three-point shots increased.

  11. Synthesis and evaluation of new antitumor 3-aminomethyl-4,11-dihydroxynaphtho[2,3-f]indole-5,10-diones.

    PubMed

    Shchekotikhin, Andrey E; Glazunova, Valeria A; Dezhenkova, Lyubov G; Luzikov, Yuri N; Buyanov, Vladimir N; Treshalina, Helena M; Lesnaya, Nina A; Romanenko, Vladimir I; Kaluzhny, Dmitry N; Balzarini, Jan; Agama, Keli; Pommier, Yves; Shtil, Alexander A; Preobrazhenskaya, Maria N

    2014-10-30

    A series of new 3-aminomethyl-4,11-dihydroxynaphtho[2,3-f]indole-5,10-diones 6-13 bearing the cyclic diamine in the position 3 of the indole ring was synthesized. The majority of new compounds demonstrated a superior cytotoxicity than doxorubicin against a panel of mammalian tumor cells with determinants of altered drug response, that is, Pgp expression or p53 inactivation. For naphtho[2,3-f]indole-5,10-diones 6-9 bearing 3-aminopyrrolidine in the side chains, the ability to bind double-stranded DNA and inhibit topoisomerases 1 and 2 mediated relaxation of supercoiled DNA were demonstrated. Only one isomer, (R)-4,11-dihydroxy-3-((pyrrolidin-3-ylamino)methyl)-1H-naphtho[2,3-f]indole-5,10-dione (7) induced the formation of specific DNA cleavage products similar to the known topoisomerase 1 inhibitors camptothecin and indenoisoquinoline MJ-III-65, suggesting a role of the structure of the side chain of 3-aminomethylnaphtho[2,3-f]indole-5,10-diones in interaction with the target. Compound 7 demonstrated an antitumor activity in mice with P388 leukemia transplants whereas its enantiomer 6 was inactive. Thus, 3-aminomethyl derivatives of 4,11-dihydroxynaphtho[2,3-f]indole-5,10-dione emerge as a new prospective chemotype for the search of antitumor agents.

  12. 3-Aminomethyl derivatives of 4,11-dihydroxynaphtho[2,3-f]indole-5,10-dione for circumvention of anticancer drug resistance.

    PubMed

    Shchekotikhin, Andrey E; Shtil, Alexander A; Luzikov, Yuri N; Bobrysheva, Tatyana V; Buyanov, Vladimir N; Preobrazhenskaya, Maria N

    2005-03-15

    A series of 3-aminomethyl derivatives of 4,11-dihydroxynaphtho[2,3-f]indole-5,10-dione was synthesized by Mannich reaction or by the transamination of 3-dimethylaminomethyl 4,11-dihydroxy- or 4,11-dimethoxynaphtho[2,3-f]indole-5,10-dione. The potency of novel derivatives was tested on a National Cancer Institute panel of 60 human tumor cell lines as well as in cells with genetically defined determinants of cytotoxic drug resistance, P-glycoprotein (Pgp) expression, and p53 inactivation. Mannich derivatives of 4,11-dihydroxynaphtho[2,3-f]indole-5,10-dione with an additional amino function in their side chain, demonstrated equal cytotoxicity against the parental K562 leukemia cells and their Pgp-positive subline, whereas the latter showed approximately 7-fold resistance to adriamycin, a Pgp transported drug. 3-(1-Piperazinyl)methyl and 3-(quinuclidin-3-yl)aminomethyl derivatives of 4,11-dihydroxynaphtho[2,3-f]indole-5,10-dione killed HCT116 colon carcinoma cells (carrying wild type p53) and their p53-null variant within the similar range of concentrations. We conclude that Mannich modification of 4,11-dihydroxynaphtho[2,3-f]indole-5,10-dione, especially when cyclic diamine (e.g., piperazine, quinuclidine) is used, confers an important feature to the resulting compounds, namely, the potency for tumor cells otherwise resistant to a variety of anticancer drugs.

  13. Measurement of testicular volume in smaller testes: how accurate is the conventional orchidometer?

    PubMed

    Lin, Chih-Chieh; Huang, William J S; Chen, Kuang-Kuo

    2009-01-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the accuracy of different methods, including the Seager orchidometer (SO) and ultrasonography (US), for assessing testicular volume of smaller testes (testes volume less than 18 mL). Moreover, the equations used for the calculations--the Hansen formula (length [L] x width [W](2) x 0.52, equation A), the prolate ellipsoid formula (L x W x height [H] x 0.52, equation B), and the Lambert equation (L x W x H x 0.71, equation C)--were also examined and compared with the gold standard testicular volume obtained by water displacement (Archimedes principle). In this study, 30 testes from 15 men, mean age 75.3 (+/-8.3) years, were included. They all had advanced prostate cancer and were admitted for orchiectomy. Before the procedure, all the testes were assessed using SO and US. The dimensions were then input into each equation to obtain the volume estimates. The testicular volume by water displacement was 8.1 +/- 3.5 mL. Correlation coefficients (R(2)) of the 2 different methods (SO, US) to the gold standard were 0.70 and 0.85, respectively. The calculated testicular volumes were 9.2 +/- 3.9 mL (measured by SO, equation A), 11.9 +/- 5.2 mL (measured by SO, equation C), 7.3 +/- 4.2 mL (measured by US, equation A), 6.5 +/- 3.3 mL (measured by US, equation B) and 8.9 +/- 4.5 mL (measured by US, equation C). Only the mean size measured by US and volume calculated with the Hansen equation (equation A) and the mean size measured by US and volume calculated with the Lambert equation (equation C) showed no significant differences when compared with the volumes estimated by water displacement (mean difference 0.81 mL, P = .053, and 0.81 mL, P = .056, respectively). Based on our measurements, we categorized testicular volume by different cutoff values (7.0 mL, 7.5 mL, 8.0 mL, and 8.5 mL) to calculate a new constant for use in the Hansen equation. The new constant was 0.59. We then reexamined the equations using the new 0.59 constant, and found

  14. Behavioral inhibition in childhood predicts smaller hippocampal volume in adolescent offspring of parents with panic disorder

    PubMed Central

    Schwartz, C E; Kunwar, P S; Hirshfeld-Becker, D R; Henin, A; Vangel, M G; Rauch, S L; Biederman, J; Rosenbaum, J F

    2015-01-01

    Behavioral inhibition (BI) is a genetically influenced behavioral profile seen in 15–20% of 2-year-old children. Children with BI are timid with people, objects and situations that are novel or unfamiliar, and are more reactive physiologically to these challenges as evidenced by higher heart rate, pupillary dilation, vocal cord tension and higher levels of cortisol. BI predisposes to the later development of anxiety, depression and substance abuse. Reduced hippocampal volumes have been observed in anxiety disorders, depression and posttraumatic stress disorder. Animal models have demonstrated that chronic stress can damage the hippocampal formation and implicated cortisol in these effects. We, therefore, hypothesized that the hippocampi of late adolescents who had been behaviorally inhibited as children would be smaller compared with those who had not been inhibited. Hippocampal volume was measured with high-resolution structural magnetic resonance imaging in 43 females and 40 males at 17 years of age who were determined to be BI+ or BI− based on behaviors observed in the laboratory as young children. BI in childhood predicted reduced hippocampal volumes in the adolescents who were offspring of parents with panic disorder, or panic disorder with comorbid major depression. We discuss genetic and environmental factors emanating from both child and parent that may explain these findings. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first study to demonstrate a relationship between the most extensively studied form of temperamentally based human trait anxiety, BI, and hippocampal structure. The reduction in hippocampal volume, as reported by us, suggests a role for the hippocampus in human trait anxiety and anxiety disorder that warrants further investigation. PMID:26196438

  15. Automated cerebellar segmentation: Validation and application to detect smaller volumes in children prenatally exposed to alcohol☆

    PubMed Central

    Cardenas, Valerie A.; Price, Mathew; Infante, M. Alejandra; Moore, Eileen M.; Mattson, Sarah N.; Riley, Edward P.; Fein, George

    2014-01-01

    Objective To validate an automated cerebellar segmentation method based on active shape and appearance modeling and then segment the cerebellum on images acquired from adolescents with histories of prenatal alcohol exposure (PAE) and non-exposed controls (NC). Methods Automated segmentations of the total cerebellum, right and left cerebellar hemispheres, and three vermal lobes (anterior, lobules I–V; superior posterior, lobules VI–VII; inferior posterior, lobules VIII–X) were compared to expert manual labelings on 20 subjects, studied twice, that were not used for model training. The method was also used to segment the cerebellum on 11 PAE and 9 NC adolescents. Results The test–retest intraclass correlation coefficients (ICCs) of the automated method were greater than 0.94 for all cerebellar volume and mid-sagittal vermal area measures, comparable or better than the test–retest ICCs for manual measurement (all ICCs > 0.92). The ICCs computed on all four cerebellar measurements (manual and automated measures on the repeat scans) to compare comparability were above 0.97 for non-vermis parcels, and above 0.89 for vermis parcels. When applied to patients, the automated method detected smaller cerebellar volumes and mid-sagittal areas in the PAE group compared to controls (p < 0.05 for all regions except the superior posterior lobe, consistent with prior studies). Discussion These results demonstrate excellent reliability and validity of automated cerebellar volume and mid-sagittal area measurements, compared to manual measurements. These data also illustrate that this new technology for automatically delineating the cerebellum leads to conclusions regarding the effects of prenatal alcohol exposure on the cerebellum consistent with prior studies that used labor intensive manual delineation, even with a very small sample. PMID:25061566

  16. Preliminary experience with cryoablation of renal lesions smaller than 4 centimeters.

    PubMed

    Khorsandi, Moez; Foy, Reginald C; Chong, Wui; Hoenig, David M; Cohen, Jeffrey K; Rukstalis, Daniel B

    2002-05-01

    Nephron-sparing surgical techniques represent an attractive treatment approach for small renal lesions that are limited only by potential operative morbidity. This study tests the hypothesis that an alternative strategy of in situ cryoablation of these lesions may further reduce the incidence of complications with similar efficacy. Beginning August 1996,17 patients were enrolled in an institutional review board-approved protocol for open renal cryoablation for lesions smaller than 4 cm in diameter. The median age was 62 years (range, 35-75 years). The median preoperative lesion size was 2.0 cm (range, 1.1-4.2 cm) determined with either computed tomography or magnetic resonance imaging. A double freeze-thaw technique to -180 degrees C was used under direct intraoperative ultrasound monitoring. The median length of follow-up was 30 months (range, 10-60 months), with 8 patients followed up for more than 20 months. The procedure was accomplished in 3 hours (range, 2.25-4.25 hours) through a 5-cm to 7-cm subcostal incision. The median blood loss was 100 mL, and the median hospital stay was 2 days (range, 2-8 days). The median intraoperative lesion was 2.4 cm, which was not statistically different from preoperative measurements. Postoperative serum creatinine levels were unchanged except for a transient increase from 5.5 mg/dL to 7.0 mg/dL in one patient. Follow-up magnetic resonance imaging scans have demonstrated infarction and a reduction of lesion size in 15 of 16 cases. The size of one patient's mass was unchanged after 3 months. Renal cryoablation via an open approach is associated with few complications and represents a viable alternative to extirpative surgical techniques. The open exposure provides an accurate assessment of the renal unit with definitive ultrasound visualization.

  17. Visceral pleural invasion is not predictive of survival in lung cancer patients with smaller tumor size

    PubMed Central

    David, E; Thall, PF; Kalhor, N; Hofstetter, WL; Rice, DC; Roth, JA; Swisher, SG; Walsh, GL; Vaporciyan, AA; Wei, C; Mehran, RJ

    2015-01-01

    Background Visceral pleural invasion (VPI) is used as an indicator of adverse prognosis in non-small cell lung carcinoma (NSCLC). The purpose of this retrospective study was to evaluate the impact of VPI on disease-free survival (DFS) and overall survival (OS) in patients with node-negative NSCLC. Methods Between 1998 and 2009, 1166 patients with pathological N0M0 NSCLC underwent surgical resection by lobectomy. 214 patients with VPI were compared to 952 without. Results Median follow-up was 59 months. In multivariate analysis, VPI, larger tumor size, older age, female gender, and poor performance status were significantly associated with decreased OS. In contrast, larger tumor size, female gender, and poor performance, but notably not VPI, were associated with decreased DFS. After examining interactive effects of VPI and T subgroups, we found that VPI did not significantly affect either OS or DFS in the subgroups of patients with smaller tumor sizes T1a, T1b, or T2a. In contrast, a deleterious effect of VPI on DFS was seen for tumors > 5cm, T2b and T3, with the VPI-T3 interaction effect on DFS being statistically significant but not for OS. Conclusions The effect of VPI on survival in NSCLC varies greatly with tumor size, with VPI not strongly associated with OS or DFS in tumors less than 5cm, but showing large negative effects on DFS for T2b and T3 tumors. Using VPI to upstage T1 tumors to a higher T category is not warranted, since it would misrepresent these VPI-T subgroup effects. PMID:23643547

  18. Snake Cathelicidin NA-CATH and Smaller Helical Antimicrobial Peptides Are Effective against Burkholderia thailandensis

    PubMed Central

    Blower, Ryan J.; Barksdale, Stephanie M.; van Hoek, Monique L.

    2015-01-01

    Burkholderia thailandensis is a Gram-negative soil bacterium used as a model organism for B. pseudomallei, the causative agent of melioidosis and an organism classified category B priority pathogen and a Tier 1 select agent for its potential use as a biological weapon. Burkholderia species are reportedly “highly resistant” to antimicrobial agents, including cyclic peptide antibiotics, due to multiple resistance systems, a hypothesis we decided to test using antimicrobial (host defense) peptides. In this study, a number of cationic antimicrobial peptides (CAMPs) were tested in vitro against B. thailandensis for both antimicrobial activity and inhibition of biofilm formation. Here, we report that the Chinese cobra (Naja atra) cathelicidin NA-CATH was significantly antimicrobial against B. thailandensis. Additional cathelicidins, including the human cathelicidin LL-37, a sheep cathelicidin SMAP-29, and some smaller ATRA peptide derivatives of NA-CATH were also effective. The D-enantiomer of one small peptide (ATRA-1A) was found to be antimicrobial as well, with EC50 in the range of the L-enantiomer. Our results also demonstrate that human alpha-defensins (HNP-1 & -2) and a short beta-defensin-derived peptide (Peptide 4 of hBD-3) were not bactericidal against B. thailandensis. We also found that the cathelicidin peptides, including LL-37, NA-CATH, and SMAP-29, possessed significant ability to prevent biofilm formation of B. thailandensis. Additionally, we show that LL-37 and its D-enantiomer D-LL-37 can disperse pre-formed biofilms. These results demonstrate that although B. thailandensis is highly resistant to many antibiotics, cyclic peptide antibiotics such as polymyxin B, and defensing peptides, some antimicrobial peptides including the elapid snake cathelicidin NA-CATH exert significant antimicrobial and antibiofilm activity towards B. thailandensis. PMID:26196513

  19. Behavioral inhibition in childhood predicts smaller hippocampal volume in adolescent offspring of parents with panic disorder.

    PubMed

    Schwartz, C E; Kunwar, P S; Hirshfeld-Becker, D R; Henin, A; Vangel, M G; Rauch, S L; Biederman, J; Rosenbaum, J F

    2015-01-01

    Behavioral inhibition (BI) is a genetically influenced behavioral profile seen in 15-20% of 2-year-old children. Children with BI are timid with people, objects and situations that are novel or unfamiliar, and are more reactive physiologically to these challenges as evidenced by higher heart rate, pupillary dilation, vocal cord tension and higher levels of cortisol. BI predisposes to the later development of anxiety, depression and substance abuse. Reduced hippocampal volumes have been observed in anxiety disorders, depression and posttraumatic stress disorder. Animal models have demonstrated that chronic stress can damage the hippocampal formation and implicated cortisol in these effects. We, therefore, hypothesized that the hippocampi of late adolescents who had been behaviorally inhibited as children would be smaller compared with those who had not been inhibited. Hippocampal volume was measured with high-resolution structural magnetic resonance imaging in 43 females and 40 males at 17 years of age who were determined to be BI+ or BI- based on behaviors observed in the laboratory as young children. BI in childhood predicted reduced hippocampal volumes in the adolescents who were offspring of parents with panic disorder, or panic disorder with comorbid major depression. We discuss genetic and environmental factors emanating from both child and parent that may explain these findings. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first study to demonstrate a relationship between the most extensively studied form of temperamentally based human trait anxiety, BI, and hippocampal structure. The reduction in hippocampal volume, as reported by us, suggests a role for the hippocampus in human trait anxiety and anxiety disorder that warrants further investigation. PMID:26196438

  20. Indium gallium arsenide imaging with smaller cameras, higher-resolution arrays, and greater material sensitivity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ettenberg, Martin H.; Cohen, Marshall J.; Brubaker, Robert M.; Lange, Michael J.; O'Grady, Matthew T.; Olsen, Gregory H.

    2002-08-01

    Indium Gallium Arsenide (InGaAs) photodiode arrays have numerous commercial, industrial, and military applications. During the past 10 years, great strides have been made in the development of these devices starting with simple 256-element linear photodiode arrays and progressing to the large 640 x 512 element area arrays now readily available. Linear arrays are offered with 512 elements on a 25 micron pitch with no defective pixels, and are used in spectroscopic monitors for wavelength division multiplexing (WDM) systems as well as in machine vision applications. A 320 x 240 solid-state array operates at room temperature, which allows development of a camera which is smaller than 25 cm3 in volume, weighs less than 100 g and uses less than 750 mW of power. Two dimensional focal plane arrays and cameras have been manufactured with detectivity, D*, greater than 1014 cm-(root)Hz/W at room temperature and have demonstrated the ability to image at night. Cameras are also critical tools for the assembly and performance monitoring of optical switches and add-drop multiplexers in the telecommunications industry. These same cameras are used for the inspection of silicon wafers and fine art, laser beam profiling, and metals manufacturing. By varying the Indium content, InGaAs photodiode arrays can be tailored to cover the entire short-wave infrared spectrum from 1.0 micron to 2.5 microns. InGaAs focal plane arrays and cameras sensitive to 2.0 micron wavelength light are now available in 320 x 240 formats.

  1. Snake Cathelicidin NA-CATH and Smaller Helical Antimicrobial Peptides Are Effective against Burkholderia thailandensis.

    PubMed

    Blower, Ryan J; Barksdale, Stephanie M; van Hoek, Monique L

    2015-01-01

    Burkholderia thailandensis is a Gram-negative soil bacterium used as a model organism for B. pseudomallei, the causative agent of melioidosis and an organism classified category B priority pathogen and a Tier 1 select agent for its potential use as a biological weapon. Burkholderia species are reportedly "highly resistant" to antimicrobial agents, including cyclic peptide antibiotics, due to multiple resistance systems, a hypothesis we decided to test using antimicrobial (host defense) peptides. In this study, a number of cationic antimicrobial peptides (CAMPs) were tested in vitro against B. thailandensis for both antimicrobial activity and inhibition of biofilm formation. Here, we report that the Chinese cobra (Naja atra) cathelicidin NA-CATH was significantly antimicrobial against B. thailandensis. Additional cathelicidins, including the human cathelicidin LL-37, a sheep cathelicidin SMAP-29, and some smaller ATRA peptide derivatives of NA-CATH were also effective. The D-enantiomer of one small peptide (ATRA-1A) was found to be antimicrobial as well, with EC50 in the range of the L-enantiomer. Our results also demonstrate that human alpha-defensins (HNP-1 & -2) and a short beta-defensin-derived peptide (Peptide 4 of hBD-3) were not bactericidal against B. thailandensis. We also found that the cathelicidin peptides, including LL-37, NA-CATH, and SMAP-29, possessed significant ability to prevent biofilm formation of B. thailandensis. Additionally, we show that LL-37 and its D-enantiomer D-LL-37 can disperse pre-formed biofilms. These results demonstrate that although B. thailandensis is highly resistant to many antibiotics, cyclic peptide antibiotics such as polymyxin B, and defensing peptides, some antimicrobial peptides including the elapid snake cathelicidin NA-CATH exert significant antimicrobial and antibiofilm activity towards B. thailandensis. PMID:26196513

  2. Fewer but not smaller schools in declining fish and krill populations.

    PubMed

    Brierley, Andrew S; Cox, Martin J

    2015-01-01

    Many pelagic species (species that live in the water column), including herring and krill, aggregate to form schools, shoals, or swarms (hereafter simply "schools," although the words are not synonyms). Schools provide benefits to individual members, including locomotory economy and protection from predators that prey on individuals, but paradoxically make schooling species energetically viable and commercially attractive targets for predators of groups and for fishers. Large schools are easier to find and yield greater prey/catch than small schools, and there is a requirement from fields as diverse as theoretical ecology and fisheries management to understand whether and how aggregation sizes change with changing population size. We collated data from vertical echosounder surveys of taxonomically diverse pelagic stocks from geographically diverse ecosystems. The data contain common significant positive linear stock-biomass to school-number relationships. They show that the numbers of schools in the stocks change with changing stock biomass and suggest that the distributions of school sizes do not change with stock biomass. New data that we collected using a multibeam sonar, which can image entire schools, contained the same stock-biomass to school-number relationship and confirm that the distribution of school sizes is not related to changing stock size: put simply, as stocks decline, individuals are distributed among fewer schools, not smaller schools. Since school characteristics affect catchability (the ease or difficulty with which fishers can capture target species) and availability of prey to predators, our findings have commercial and ecological implications, particularly within the aspirational framework of ecosystem-based management of marine systems.

  3. THE MASS-RADIUS RELATION FOR 65 EXOPLANETS SMALLER THAN 4 EARTH RADII

    SciTech Connect

    Weiss, Lauren M.; Marcy, Geoffrey W.

    2014-03-01

    We study the masses and radii of 65 exoplanets smaller than 4 R {sub ⊕} with orbital periods shorter than 100 days. We calculate the weighted mean densities of planets in bins of 0.5 R {sub ⊕} and identify a density maximum of 7.6  g cm{sup –3} at 1.4 R {sub ⊕}. On average, planets with radii up to R {sub P} = 1.5 R {sub ⊕} increase in density with increasing radius. Above 1.5 R {sub ⊕}, the average planet density rapidly decreases with increasing radius, indicating that these planets have a large fraction of volatiles by volume overlying a rocky core. Including the solar system terrestrial planets with the exoplanets below 1.5 R {sub ⊕}, we find ρ{sub P} = 2.43 + 3.39(R {sub P}/R {sub ⊕}) g cm{sup –3} for R {sub P} < 1.5 R {sub ⊕}, which is consistent with rocky compositions. For 1.5 ≤ R {sub P}/R {sub ⊕} < 4, we find M {sub P}/M {sub ⊕} = 2.69(R {sub P}/R {sub ⊕}){sup 0.93}. The rms of planet masses to the fit between 1.5 and 4 R {sub ⊕} is 4.3 M {sub ⊕} with reduced χ{sup 2} = 6.2. The large scatter indicates a diversity in planet composition at a given radius. The compositional diversity can be due to planets of a given volume (as determined by their large H/He envelopes) containing rocky cores of different masses or compositions.

  4. Comparison of retrograde intrarenal surgery and mini-percutaneous nephrolithotomy in management of lower-pole renal stones with a diameter of smaller than 15 mm.

    PubMed

    Kirac, Mustafa; Bozkurt, Ömer Faruk; Tunc, Lutfi; Guneri, Cagri; Unsal, Ali; Biri, Hasan

    2013-06-01

    The aim of this study was to compare the outcomes of retrograde intrarenal surgery (RIRS) and miniaturized percutaneous nephrolithotomy (mini-PNL) in management of lower-pole renal stones with a diameter smaller than 15 mm. Between December 2009 and July 2012, the patients with the diagnosis of lower-pole stones were evaluated by ultrasonography, intravenous pyelography and computed tomography. The records of 73 evaluable patients who underwent mini-PNL (n = 37) or RIRS (n = 36) for lower-pole (LP) stones with diameter smaller than 15 mm were reviewed retrospectively. Of the 73 patients, 37 underwent mini-PNL and 36 underwent RIRS. The stone-free rates were 89.1 and 88.8 % for mini-PNL and RIRS groups, respectively. The mean operation time was 53.7 ± 14.5 in the mini-PNL group but 66.4 ± 15.8 in the RIRS group (P = 0.01). The mean fluoroscopy times and hospitalization times were significantly higher in the mini-PNL group. There was no major complication in any patient. RIRS and mini-PNL are safe and effective methods for treatment of LP calculi with a diameter smaller than 15 mm. RIRS is a non-invasive and feasible treatment option, and has also short hospitalization time, low morbidity and complication rate. It may be an alternative of mini-PNL in the treatment LP calculi with smaller than 15 mm.

  5. Twentieth-century shifts in forest structure in California: Denser forests, smaller trees, and increased dominance of oaks.

    PubMed

    McIntyre, Patrick J; Thorne, James H; Dolanc, Christopher R; Flint, Alan L; Flint, Lorraine E; Kelly, Maggi; Ackerly, David D

    2015-02-01

    We document changes in forest structure between historical (1930s) and contemporary (2000s) surveys of California vegetation through comparisons of tree abundance and size across the state and within several ecoregions. Across California, tree density in forested regions increased by 30% between the two time periods, whereas forest biomass in the same regions declined, as indicated by a 19% reduction in basal area. These changes reflect a demographic shift in forest structure: larger trees (>61 cm diameter at breast height) have declined, whereas smaller trees (<30 cm) have increased. Large tree declines were found in all surveyed regions of California, whereas small tree increases were found in every region except the south and central coast. Large tree declines were more severe in areas experiencing greater increases in climatic water deficit since the 1930s, based on a hydrologic model of water balance for historical climates through the 20th century. Forest composition in California in the last century has also shifted toward increased dominance by oaks relative to pines, a pattern consistent with warming and increased water stress, and also with paleohistoric shifts in vegetation in California over the last 150,000 y. PMID:25605888

  6. Twentieth-century shifts in forest structure in California: Denser forests, smaller trees, and increased dominance of oaks.

    PubMed

    McIntyre, Patrick J; Thorne, James H; Dolanc, Christopher R; Flint, Alan L; Flint, Lorraine E; Kelly, Maggi; Ackerly, David D

    2015-02-01

    We document changes in forest structure between historical (1930s) and contemporary (2000s) surveys of California vegetation through comparisons of tree abundance and size across the state and within several ecoregions. Across California, tree density in forested regions increased by 30% between the two time periods, whereas forest biomass in the same regions declined, as indicated by a 19% reduction in basal area. These changes reflect a demographic shift in forest structure: larger trees (>61 cm diameter at breast height) have declined, whereas smaller trees (<30 cm) have increased. Large tree declines were found in all surveyed regions of California, whereas small tree increases were found in every region except the south and central coast. Large tree declines were more severe in areas experiencing greater increases in climatic water deficit since the 1930s, based on a hydrologic model of water balance for historical climates through the 20th century. Forest composition in California in the last century has also shifted toward increased dominance by oaks relative to pines, a pattern consistent with warming and increased water stress, and also with paleohistoric shifts in vegetation in California over the last 150,000 y.

  7. Prospective randomized trial comparing shock wave lithotripsy and flexible ureterorenoscopy for lower pole stones smaller than 1 cm.

    PubMed

    Sener, Nevzat Can; Imamoglu, M Abdurrahim; Bas, Okan; Ozturk, Ufuk; Goktug, H N Goksel; Tuygun, Can; Bakirtas, Hasan

    2014-04-01

    In this study, we aimed to compare the success and complications of flexible ureterorenoscopy (F-URS) with its advanced technology and the accomplished method of shock wave lithotripsy (SWL) in the treatment of lower pole stones smaller than 1 cm. One hundred and forty patients were randomized as 70 undergoing SWL (Group 1) and 70 undergoing F-URS (Group 2). Patients were evaluated by plain X-ray and urinary ultrasound 1 week and after 3 months following SWL. The same procedure was done for F-URS patients 1 week after surgery and after 3 months. Success rates were established the day following the procedure and after 3 months. Fragmentation less than 3 mm was considered success. Mean operative time was 44 ± 7.4 min for Group 2 and mean fluoroscopy duration was 51 ± 12 s. In F-URS group, all the patients were stone free after 3 months (100 %). Group 1 had 2.7 ± 0.4 sessions of SWL. Sixty-four patients were stone free in that group after 3 months (91.5 %). The procedure yielded significant success in FURS group, even though patients underwent SWL for 2.7 ± 0.4 sessions and F-URS for 1 session (p < 0.05). With higher success and similar complication rates, fewer sessions per treatment, and advances in technology and experience, we believe F-URS has a potential to be the first treatment option over SWL in the future.

  8. 21 CFR 73.3120 - 16,17-Dimethoxydinaphtho [1,2,3-cd:3′,2′,1′-lm] perylene-5,10-dione.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 1 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false 16,17-Dimethoxydinaphtho perylene-5,10-dione. 73.3120 Section 73.3120 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES GENERAL LISTING OF COLOR ADDITIVES EXEMPT FROM CERTIFICATION Medical Devices § 73.3120...

  9. 21 CFR 73.3120 - 16,17-Dimethoxydinaphtho [1,2,3-cd:3′,2′,1′-lm] perylene-5,10-dione.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 1 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false 16,17-Dimethoxydinaphtho perylene-5,10-dione. 73.3120 Section 73.3120 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES GENERAL LISTING OF COLOR ADDITIVES EXEMPT FROM CERTIFICATION Medical Devices § 73.3120...

  10. 21 CFR 73.3120 - 16,17-Dimethoxydinaphtho [1,2,3-cd:3′,2′,1′-lm] perylene-5,10-dione.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 1 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false 16,17-Dimethoxydinaphtho perylene-5,10-dione. 73.3120 Section 73.3120 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES GENERAL LISTING OF COLOR ADDITIVES EXEMPT FROM CERTIFICATION Medical Devices § 73.3120...

  11. Mannose-Binding Lectin Deficiency Is Associated With Smaller Infarction Size and Favorable Outcome in Ischemic Stroke Patients

    PubMed Central

    Fluri, Felix; Schuetz, Philipp; Bingisser, Roland; Kappos, Ludwig; Steck, Andreas J.; Engelter, Stefan T.; Mueller, Beat; Christ-Crain, Mirjam; Trendelenburg, Marten

    2011-01-01

    Background The Mannose-binding lectin (MBL) pathway of complement plays a pivotal role in the pathogenesis of ischemia/reperfusion (I/R) injury after experimental ischemic stroke. As comparable data in human ischemic stroke are limited, we investigated in more detail the association of MBL deficiency with infarction volume and functional outcome in a large cohort of patients receiving intravenous thrombolysis or conservative treatment. Methodology/Principal Findings In a post hoc analysis of a prospective cohort study, admission MBL concentrations were determined in 353 consecutive patients with an acute ischemic stroke of whom 287 and 66 patients received conservative and thrombolytic treatment, respectively. Stroke severity, infarction volume, and functional outcome were studied in relation to MBL concentrations at presentation to the emergency department. MBL levels on admission were not influenced by the time from symptom onset to presentation (p = 0.53). In the conservative treatment group patients with mild strokes at presentation, small infarction volumes or favorable outcomes after three months demonstrated 1.5 to 2.6-fold lower median MBL levels (p = 0.025, p = 0.0027 and p = 0.046, respectively) compared to patients with more severe strokes. Moreover, MBL deficient patients (<100 ng/ml) were subject to a considerably decreased risk of an unfavorable outcome three months after ischemic stroke (adjusted odds ratio 0.38, p<0.05) and showed smaller lesion volumes (mean size 0.6 vs. 18.4 ml, p = 0.0025). In contrast, no association of MBL concentration with infarction volume or functional outcome was found in the thrombolysis group. However, the small sample size limits the significance of this observation. Conclusions MBL deficiency is associated with smaller cerebral infarcts and favorable outcome in patients receiving conservative treatment. Our data suggest an important role of the lectin pathway in the pathophysiology of cerebral I

  12. Little Fish in a Big Pond: Towards Research Performance Metrics for Smaller Institutions

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kitt, Sharon; Wearne, Jonathan

    2013-01-01

    Each year, institutions eagerly await reports from "Shanghai Jiao Tong University," "Times Higher," "QS," and other organisations that create and publish international rankings of university performance. The metrics included in league tables and rankings--research income, research staff, number of doctoral candidates,…

  13. Crystal structure and hydrogen bonding study of (10E)-2,2-dimethyl-3,4-dihydro-2H-benzo[g]chromene-5,10-dione 10-oxime derived from α-lapachone.

    PubMed

    da Silva, Andrea R; Herbst, Marcelo H; Ferreira, Aurelio B B; da Silva, Ari M; Visentin, Lorenzo C

    2011-01-27

    The compound (10E)-2,2-dimethyl-3,4-dihydro-2H-benzo[g]chromene-5,10-dione-10-oxime (1) was synthesized from a-lapachone and hydroxylamine chloride in alkaline medium. Single-crystals suitable for X-ray diffraction measurements were grown from an ethanol solution, and the crystal structure of the title molecule is reported for the first time. The title molecule was also characterized by ¹H- and ¹³C-NMR in CDCl₃ solution, FTIR and MS. The crystal structure of 1 shows an E stereochemistry and dimers formed through classical hydrogen bonds.

  14. Choosing the Larger versus Choosing the Smaller: Asymmetries in the Size Congruity Effect

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Arend, Isabel; Henik, Avishai

    2015-01-01

    The size congruity effect (SiCE) shows that number and physical size interact as magnitudes. That is, response times are faster when number and size are congruent (e.g., 2 4) than when they are incongruent (e.g., 2 4). A shared representational system has been the most influential account for the SiCE. Recently, this account has been challenged by…

  15. HOTTER, SMALLER, DENSER, FASTER...AND NEARLY-PERFECT: WHAT IS THE MATTER AT RHIC?

    SciTech Connect

    STEINBERG,P.

    2006-07-03

    The experimental and theoretical status of the ''near perfect fluid'' at RHIC is discussed. While the hydrodynamic paradigm for understanding collisions at RHIC is well established, there remain many important open questions to address in order to understand its relevance and scope. It is also a crucial issue to understand how the early equilibration is achieved, requiring insight into the active degrees of freedom at early times.

  16. On-chip polarimetry for high-throughput screening of nanoliter and smaller sample volumes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bornhop, Darryl J. (Inventor); Dotson, Stephen (Inventor); Bachmann, Brian O. (Inventor)

    2012-01-01

    A polarimetry technique for measuring optical activity that is particularly suited for high throughput screening employs a chip or substrate (22) having one or more microfluidic channels (26) formed therein. A polarized laser beam (14) is directed onto optically active samples that are disposed in the channels. The incident laser beam interacts with the optically active molecules in the sample, which slightly alter the polarization of the laser beam as it passes multiple times through the sample. Interference fringe patterns (28) are generated by the interaction of the laser beam with the sample and the channel walls. A photodetector (34) is positioned to receive the interference fringe patterns and generate an output signal that is input to a computer or other analyzer (38) for analyzing the signal and determining the rotation of plane polarized light by optically active material in the channel from polarization rotation calculations.

  17. Smaller to larger biomolecule detection using a lab-built surface plasmon resonance based instrument

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lukose, J.; Kulal, V.; Chidangil, S.; Sinha, R. K.

    2016-10-01

    We have developed a low-cost surface plasmon resonance (SPR) instrument based on the Kretschmann configuration for biosensing applications. The fabricated instrument is capable of operating in both angular and intensity interrogation schemes. The proposed sensor has proved enormously versatile by detecting a range of analytes with low to high molecular weights. The refractive index based sensor has been used for detecting the variation in the concentration of the aqueous solution of glucose and glycerine. Real time immobilization of protein molecules, bovine serum albumin on a gold (Au) film surface, has also been detected using the SPR imaging technique. Alkanethiol functionalization of the Au surface was performed, and bovine serum albumin was immobilized onto the carboxyl functionalized surface using amine reactive cross linker chemistry. In future, the present approach can also be utilized for the selective detection of a wide range of target biomolecules with the help of specific capture probes, as well as for monitoring protein-drug interactions.

  18. Distributions of p-values smaller than .05 in psychology: what is going on?

    PubMed Central

    van Aert, Robbie C.M.; Nuijten, Michèle B.; Wicherts, Jelte M.; van Assen, Marcel A.L.M.

    2016-01-01

    Previous studies provided mixed findings on pecularities in p-value distributions in psychology. This paper examined 258,050 test results across 30,710 articles from eight high impact journals to investigate the existence of a peculiar prevalence of p-values just below .05 (i.e., a bump) in the psychological literature, and a potential increase thereof over time. We indeed found evidence for a bump just below .05 in the distribution of exactly reported p-values in the journals Developmental Psychology, Journal of Applied Psychology, and Journal of Personality and Social Psychology, but the bump did not increase over the years and disappeared when using recalculated p-values. We found clear and direct evidence for the QRP “incorrect rounding of p-value” (John, Loewenstein & Prelec, 2012) in all psychology journals. Finally, we also investigated monotonic excess of p-values, an effect of certain QRPs that has been neglected in previous research, and developed two measures to detect this by modeling the distributions of statistically significant p-values. Using simulations and applying the two measures to the retrieved test results, we argue that, although one of the measures suggests the use of QRPs in psychology, it is difficult to draw general conclusions concerning QRPs based on modeling of p-value distributions. PMID:27077017

  19. How well can regional fluxes be derived from smaller-scale estimates?

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Moore, Kathleen E.; Fitzjarrald, David R.; Ritter, John A.

    1993-01-01

    Regional surface fluxes are essential lower boundary conditions for large scale numerical weather and climate models and are the elements of global budgets of important trace gases. Surface properties affecting the exchange of heat, moisture, momentum and trace gases vary with length scales from one meter to hundreds of km. A classical difficulty is that fluxes have been measured directly only at points or along lines. The process of scaling up observations limited in space and/or time to represent larger areas was done by assigning properties to surface classes and combining estimated or calculated fluxes using an area weighted average. It is not clear that a simple area weighted average is sufficient to produce the large scale from the small scale, chiefly due to the effect of internal boundary layers, nor is it known how important the uncertainty is to large scale model outcomes. Simultaneous aircraft and tower data obtained in the relatively simple terrain of the western Alaska tundra were used to determine the extent to which surface type variation can be related to fluxes of heat, moisture, and other properties. Surface type was classified as lake or land with aircraft borne infrared thermometer, and flight level heat and moisture fluxes were related to surface type. The magnitude and variety of sampling errors inherent in eddy correlation flux estimation place limits on how well any flux can be known even in simple geometries.

  20. How well can regional fluxes be derived from smaller-scale estimates?

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Moore, Kathleen E.; Fitzjarrald, David R.; Ritter, John A.

    1992-01-01

    Regional surface fluxes are essential lower boundary conditions for large scale numerical weather and climate models and are the elements of global budgets of important trace gases. Surface properties affecting the exchange of heat, moisture, momentum and trace gases vary with length scales from one meter to hundreds of km. A classical difficulty is that fluxes have been measured directly only at points or along lines. The process of scaling up observations limited in space and/or time to represent larger areas was done by assigning properties to surface classes and combining estimated or calculated fluxes using an area weighted average. It is not clear that a simple area weighted average is sufficient to produce the large scale from the small scale, chiefly due to the effect of internal boundary layers, nor is it known how important the uncertainty is to large scale model outcomes. Simultaneous aircraft and tower data obtained in the relatively simple terrain of the western Alaska tundra were used to determine the extent to which surface type variation can be related to fluxes of heat, moisture, and other properties. Surface type was classified as lake or land with aircraft borne infrared thermometer, and flight level heat and moisture fluxes were related to surface type. The magnitude and variety of sampling errors inherent in eddy correlation flux estimation place limits on how well any flux can be known even in simple geometries.

  1. Velocities of Thwaites Glacier and smaller glaciers along the Marie Byrd Land coast, West Antarctica

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Rosanova, C.E.; Lucchitta, B.K.; Ferrigno, J.G.

    1998-01-01

    Average velocities for time intervals ranging from <1 to 15 years were measured by tracking ice-surface patterns on sequential Landsat and European Remote-sensing Satellite synthetic aperture radar images. Velocities of Thwaites Glacier range from 2.2 km a-1 above the grounding line to 3.4 km a-1 at the limit of measurements on Thwaites Glacier ice tongue. The glacier increases in velocity by about 1 km a-1 where it crosses the grounding line. Over the period 1984-93, Thwaites Glacier ice tongue accelerated by about 0.6 km a-1. Velocities of the floating part of several minor glaciers and some ice shelves are also determined: Land Glacier, 1.7-1.9 km a-1; DeVicq Glacier, 0.7-1.1 km a-1; Dotson Ice Shelf, 0.2-0.5 km a-1; Getz Ice Shelf, 0.2-0.8 km a-1; and Sulzberger Ice Shelf, 0.01-0.02 km a-1. The high velocities along the Marie Byrd Land coast are consistent with the high precipitation rates over West Antarctica and, for some of the glaciers, the lack of buttressing ice shelves.

  2. UHP lamps for projection systems: getting always brighter, smaller, and even more colorful

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Weichmann, Ulrich; Giese, Hermann; Hechtfischer, Ulrich; Heusler, Gero; Koerber, Achim; Moench, Holger; Noertemann, Folke-Charlotte; Pekarski, Pavel; Pollmann-Retsch, Jens; Ritz, Arnd

    2004-05-01

    The past decade has seen a rapid development of projection systems. Projectors as small as only a few liters in size deliver several thousand screen lumens and are, with an efficacy of over 10 lm/W, the most efficient display systems realized today. This has been made possible by breakthroughs in lamp technology, particularly by the development of the UHP-lamp. This broadband light source with its outstanding brightness and lifetimes of over 10000 hours is ideal for projection applications. In this paper we want to describe three major technological trend lines in the development of UHP-lamps over the past decade: First, there is a trend towards brighter projectors, which is fostered by a brightness increase of the UHP-lamps. At the same time, projectors have seen a dramatic reduction in size, which has been made possible mostly by reducing lamp- and driver-size by even a factor of 10. This was only possible by the development of new ignition concepts as well as new optical designs of the reflector. And finally, UHP-lamps have seen quite some improvement in color rendering by using even higher pressures and shorter arc gaps. This allows for more colorful pictures and even more efficient projector designs.

  3. The SE sector of the Middle Weichselian Eurasian Ice Sheet was much smaller than assumed

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Räsänen, Matti E.; Huitti, Janne V.; Bhattarai, Saroj; Harvey, Jerry; Huttunen, Sanna

    2015-08-01

    Quaternary climatic and glacial history must be known in order to understand future environments. Reconstructions of the last Weichselian glacial cycle 117,000-11,700 years (kyr) ago propose that S Finland, adjacent Russia and the Baltic countries in the SE sector of the Eurasian Ice Sheet (EIS), were glaciated during the Middle Weichselian time [marine isotope stage (MIS) 4, 71-57 kyr ago] and that this glaciation was preceded in S Finland by an Early Weichselian interstadial (MIS 5c, 105-93 kyr ago) with pine forest. We apply glacial sequence stratigraphy to isolated Late Pleistocene onshore outcrop sections and show, that these events did not take place. The one Late Weichselian glaciation (MIS 2, 29-11 kyr ago) was preceded in S Finland by a nearly 90 kyr non-glacial period, featuring tundra with permafrost and probably birch forest. Our new Middle Weichselian paleoenvironmental scenario revises the configuration and hydrology of the S part of EIS and gives new setting for the evolution of Scandinavian biota. If future development during the coming glacial cycle proves to be similar, the high-level nuclear waste stored in the bedrock of SW Finland should be located deeper than currently planned, i.e. below any possible future permafrost.

  4. Healthy Homes/Healthy Kids: A Randomized Trial of a Pediatric Primary Care Based Obesity Prevention Intervention for At-Risk 5-10 Year Olds

    PubMed Central

    Sherwood, Nancy E.; Levy, Rona L.; Langer, Shelby L.; Senso, Meghan M.; Crain, A. Lauren; Hayes, Marcia G.; Anderson, Julie D.; Seburg, Elisabeth M.; Jeffery, Robert W.

    2014-01-01

    Pediatric primary care is an important setting in which to address obesity prevention, yet relatively few interventions have been evaluated and even fewer have been shown to be effective. The development and evaluation of cost-effective approaches to obesity prevention that leverage opportunities of direct access to families in the pediatric primary care setting, overcome barriers to implementation in busy practice settings, and facilitate sustained involvement of parents is an important public health priority. The goal of the Healthy Homes/Healthy Kids (HHHK 5-10) randomized controlled trial is to evaluate the efficacy of a relatively low-cost primary care-based obesity prevention intervention aimed at 5 to 10 year old children who are at risk for obesity. Four hundred twenty one parent/child dyads were recruited and randomized to either the obesity prevention arm or a contact control condition that focuses on safety and injury prevention. The HHHK 5-10 obesity prevention intervention combines brief counseling with a pediatric primary care provider during routine well-child visits and follow-up telephone coaching that supports parents in making home environmental changes to support healthful eating, activity patterns, and body weight. The contact control condition combines the same provider counseling with telephone coaching focused on safety and injury prevention messages. This manuscript describes the study design and baseline characteristics of participants enrolled in the HHHK 5-10 trial. PMID:23816490

  5. Healthy Homes/Healthy Kids: a randomized trial of a pediatric primary care-based obesity prevention intervention for at-risk 5-10 year olds.

    PubMed

    Sherwood, Nancy E; Levy, Rona L; Langer, Shelby L; Senso, Meghan M; Crain, A Lauren; Hayes, Marcia G; Anderson, Julie D; Seburg, Elisabeth M; Jeffery, Robert W

    2013-09-01

    Pediatric primary care is an important setting in which to address obesity prevention, yet relatively few interventions have been evaluated and even fewer have been shown to be effective. The development and evaluation of cost-effective approaches to obesity prevention that leverage opportunities of direct access to families in the pediatric primary care setting, overcome barriers to implementation in busy practice settings, and facilitate sustained involvement of parents is an important public health priority. The goal of the Healthy Homes/Healthy Kids (HHHK 5-10) randomized controlled trial is to evaluate the efficacy of a relatively low-cost primary care-based obesity prevention intervention aimed at 5 to 10 year old children who are at risk for obesity. Four hundred twenty one parent/child dyads were recruited and randomized to either the obesity prevention arm or a Contact Control condition that focuses on safety and injury prevention. The HHHK 5-10 obesity prevention intervention combines brief counseling with a pediatric primary care provider during routine well child visits and follow-up telephone coaching that supports parents in making home environmental changes to support healthful eating, activity patterns, and body weight. The Contact Control condition combines the same provider counseling with telephone coaching focused on safety and injury prevention messages. This manuscript describes the study design and baseline characteristics of participants enrolled in the HHHK 5-10 trial. PMID:23816490

  6. Weekly cycle of magnetic characteristics of the daily PM2.5 and PM2.5-10 in Beijing, China

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shi, Meinan; Wu, Huaichun; Zhang, Shihong; Li, Haiyan; Yang, Tianshui; Liu, Wei; Liu, He

    2014-12-01

    In recent years, Beijing has been shown to suffer one of the most serious air pollution problems of any major world city. The concentrations of particulate matter (PM) pollutants, PM2.5-10 and PM2.5, are commonly used as air pollution indexes. We conducted a detailed environmental magnetism study to investigate possible sources of air pollution in Beijing, China, using 283 pairs of the PM2.5 and PM2.5-10 samples collected daily from July 2010 to June 2011. Rock magnetic measurements, including magnetic susceptibility, anhysteretic remanent magnetization, isothermal remanent magnetization, saturation isothermal remanent magnetization, hysteresis loops, first-order reversal curves (FORCs), and thermomagnetism, indicate that the main magnetic mineral is low-coercivity pseudo-single domain (PSD) magnetite. Scanning electron microscope (SEM) observations and energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (EDS) analyses on the PM indicate that the major magnetic phase is coarse-grained magnetite, which is most likely from automobile exhausts and braking system debris. Magnetic parameters of PM2.5 and PM2.5-10 show significant seasonal patterns that may be attributed to domestic heating enhancing magnetization of the PM during late autumn to early spring. Power spectral analyses and box-whisker plots indicate that the magnetic parameters have strong weekly variations that may be due to traffic emissions. These results indicate that magnetic parameters can be used as efficient proxies for monitoring Beijing's air pollution, and that the atmospheric environment may be improved by controlling vehicle emissions.

  7. An Investigation Examining the Perceived Implications of Principal Leadership Changing a Large Comprehensive High School into Smaller Learning Communities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Miller, Raymond J.

    2012-01-01

    The purpose of this qualitative case study was to examine the perceived implications that principal leadership has on transforming a large comprehensive high school into smaller learning communities (SLCs); and to speculate on possible factors that contribute to the change process after the implementation of SLCs. The study explores the roles,…

  8. Examining the Rule of Thumb of Not Using Multilevel Modeling: The "Design Effect Smaller than Two" Rule

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lai, Mark H. C.; Kwok, Oi-man

    2015-01-01

    Educational researchers commonly use the rule of thumb of "design effect smaller than 2" as the justification of not accounting for the multilevel or clustered structure in their data. The rule, however, has not yet been systematically studied in previous research. In the present study, we generated data from three different models…

  9. Examining Behavioral, Relational, and Cognitive Engagement in Smaller Learning Communities: A Case Study of Reform in One Suburban District

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Davis, Heather A.; Chang, Mei-Lin; Andrzejewski, Carey E.; Poirier, Ryan R.

    2010-01-01

    The purpose of this project was to examine the impact of Smaller Learning Community reform on students' behavioral, relational, and cognitive engagement in a suburban school district experiencing urbanization. We describe a project in which we evaluated the engagement of a cohort of 8th grade students as they transitioned to high school (n = 605).…

  10. Revenue Generation and Resource Allocation and Deployment Practices in Smaller Learning Communities: Lessons Learned from Three High Schools

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Springer, Matthew G.; Houck, Eric A.; Ceperley, Patricia E.; Hange, Jane

    2007-01-01

    The primary objective of this study was to examine revenue generation and resource allocation and deployment practices associated with the implementation of three smaller learning communities (SLC) project high schools in a single school district. The study used a variation of Levin and McEwan's (2001) ingredients approach. District- and…

  11. What Students Need, What Students Say They Want: Student Perspectives on the Promise of Smaller Learning Communities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Armstead, Cathleen L.; Bessell, Ann G.; Sembiante, Sabrina; Plaza, Miriam Pacheco

    2010-01-01

    Despite the wealth of studies on smaller learning communities (SLCs), student voices are missing from the debate on high school reform. This article examines how students experience SLCs. A participatory research method, data-in-a-day was used to provide a systematic and inclusive method for gathering data on student perceptions. Data-in-a-day is…

  12. Chromophore-modified antitumor anthracenediones: synthesis, DNA binding, and cytotoxic activity of 1,4-bis[(aminoalkyl)amino]benzo[g]-phthalazine-5,10-diones.

    PubMed

    Gandolfi, C A; Beggiolin, G; Menta, E; Palumbo, M; Sissi, C; Spinelli, S; Johnson, F

    1995-02-01

    As part of a program aimed at exploring the effect of the introduction of heteroatoms into the anthracene-9,10-dione chromophore, we have synthesized novel 1,4-bis[(aminoalkyl)amino]-benzo[g]phthalazine-5,10-diones (BPDs) 1 which are related to the antitumor agents ametantrone and mitoxantrone. Derivatives 1 were prepared by chromic acid oxidation of acylated benzo[g]phthalazines 5 followed by acid hydrolysis or by silylation-amination of 5,10-dihydroxybenzo[g]phthalazine-1,4-dione (8). The 1-[(aminoalkyl)amino]-4-amino congeners 2 were isolated in low yields as byproducts from the oxidation of 5. Against a panel of human tumor cell lines, the benzo[g]phthalazine-5,10-diones 1 and 2 exhibited cytotoxic activity comparable or even superior to that of mitoxantrone. In compounds 1, structure-activity relationships different than those operative in the carbocyclic series appeared to emerge. DNA-binding studies with the ametantrone-like compound 1c and its single-armed congener 2c indicated that the introduction of a 2,3-diaza subunit into the anthracene-9,10-dione chromophore reduces the affinity of the drug for DNA in comparison with ametantrone. On the other hand, the number of side-chain groups does not affect binding to a great extent. These findings seem to suggest mechanisms of cell death other than those induced by simple interaction of the 1,4-BPDs 1 and 2 with DNA.

  13. Influence of meteorological conditions on PM 2.5 and PM 2.5-10 concentrations during the monsoon season in Hanoi, Vietnam

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hien, P. D.; Bac, V. T.; Tham, H. C.; Nhan, D. D.; Vinh, L. D.

    Twenty-four hour samples of air particulate matter with aerodynamic diameters from 2 to 10 μm (PM 10) and <2.5 μm (PM 2.5) were collected in Hanoi throughout 1 year since August 1998. The air sampler was located in a meteorological garden where routine surface observations and upper air radiosoundings were conducted. Very high PM 2.5 and PM 2.5-10 concentrations were observed in conjunction with the occurrence of nocturnal radiation inversions from October to December and subsidence temperature inversions (STI) from January to March. In the first case, the PM 2.5-10 fraction was much enhanced and particulate pollution was significantly higher at night than in daytime. During the occurence of STIs particulate mass was almost evenly distributed among the two fractions and no significant diurnal variations in concentrations were observed. In summer (May-September) particulate pollution was much lower than in winter. The multiple regression of 24-h particulate concentrations against meteorological parameters for both the winter and summer monsoon periods shows that the most important determinants of PM 2.5 are wind speed and air temperature, while rainfall and relative humidity largely control the daily variations of PM 2.5-10, indicating the high abundance of soil dust in this fraction. As to turbulence parameters, among the determinants of 24-h particulate concentrations are the vertical gradients of potential temperature and wind speed recorded at 06.30 and 18.30, respectively. Meteorological parameters could explain from 60% to 74% of the day-to-day variations of particulate concentrations.

  14. Making Microbiology Even Smaller!

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Young, Linda Mull; Motz, Vicki Abrams

    2013-01-01

    We outline protocols for producing slant-minis (SLINIs) and mini-deeps (MEEPs) and examples of their use in simple microbiology experiments suitable for high school students. The principal benefits of these protocols are decreased cost associated with significantly reduced media use; easier, less expensive disposal of waste; and increased safety…

  15. Staffing Smaller Police Agencies

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rivero, David A.; Colombo, Michael

    2010-01-01

    All aspects of police work are challenging both professionally and personally. Police officers are accustomed to shift work, mandatory overtime, schedule adjustments for training, holidays and disasters, recalls and required off-duty court appearances. Police officers traditionally work eight hours per day, five day weeks (otherwise known as a 5/8…

  16. Smaller hospitals accept advertising.

    PubMed

    Mackesy, R

    1988-07-01

    Administrators at small- and medium-sized hospitals gradually have accepted the role of marketing in their organizations, albeit at a much slower rate than larger institutions. This update of a 1983 survey tracks the increasing competitiveness, complexity and specialization of providing health care and of advertising a small hospital's services. PMID:10288550

  17. a Smaller Scale

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Takemae, Seiji; Kirwin, Peter; McIntosh, Gordon

    2013-01-01

    In this paper, we describe a lab activity for measuring a spherical balloon's circumference. The procedure we discuss is based on the method used by Eratosthenes to measure the Earth's circumference.

  18. Sharing Smaller Pies.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bender, Tom

    This paper details the unfavorable predicament of the United States as a consequence of using much of its own non-renewable material and energy resources. As a consequence, the United States will soon be subject to the political and economic conditions imposed upon it by other nations. The United States must begin to implement adjustments to the…

  19. Photophysical Characterization and in Vitro Phototoxicity Evaluation of 5,10,15,20-Tetra(quinolin-2-yl)porphyrin as a Potential Sensitizer for Photodynamic Therapy.

    PubMed

    Costa, Letícia D; e Silva, Joana de A; Fonseca, Sofia M; Arranja, Cláudia T; Urbano, Ana M; Sobral, Abilio J F N

    2016-03-31

    Photodynamic therapy (PDT) is a selective and minimally invasive therapeutic approach, involving the combination of a light-sensitive compound, called a photosensitizer (PS), visible light and molecular oxygen. The interaction of these per se harmless agents results in the production of reactive species. This triggers a series of cellular events that culminate in the selective destruction of cancer cells, inside which the photosensitizer preferentially accumulates. The search for ideal PDT photosensitizers has been a very active field of research, with a special focus on porphyrins and porphyrin-related macrocycle molecules. The present study describes the photophysical characterization and in vitro phototoxicity evaluation of 5,10,15,20-tetra(quinolin-2-yl)porphyrin (2-TQP) as a potential PDT photosensitizer. Molar absorption coefficients were determined from the corresponding absorption spectrum, the fluorescence quantum yield was calculated using 5,10,15,20-tetraphenylporphyrin (TPP) as a standard and the quantum yield of singlet oxygen generation was determined by direct phosphorescence measurements. Toxicity evaluations (in the presence and absence of irradiation) were performed against HT29 colorectal adenocarcinoma cancer cells. The results from this preliminary study show that the hydrophobic 2-TQP fulfills several critical requirements for a good PDT photosensitizer, namely a high quantum yield of singlet oxygen generation (Φ∆ 0.62), absence of dark toxicity and significant in vitro phototoxicity for concentrations in the micromolar range.

  20. Effects of Heating on Proportions of Azaspiracids 1-10 in Mussels (Mytilus edulis) and Identification of Carboxylated Precursors for Azaspiracids 5, 10, 13, and 15.

    PubMed

    Kilcoyne, Jane; McCarron, Pearse; Hess, Philipp; Miles, Christopher O

    2015-12-30

    Azaspiracids (AZAs) are marine biotoxins that induce human illness following the consumption of contaminated shellfish. European Union regulation stipulates that only raw shellfish are tested, yet shellfish are often cooked prior to consumption. Analysis of raw and heat-treated mussels (Mytilus edulis) naturally contaminated with AZAs revealed significant differences (up to 4.6-fold) in AZA1-3 (1-3) and 6 (6) values due to heat-induced chemical conversions. Consistent with previous studies, high levels of 3 and 6 were detected in some samples that were otherwise below the limit of quantitation before heating. Relative to 1, in heat-treated mussels the average (n = 40) levels of 3 (range, 11-502%) and 6 (range, 3-170%) were 62 and 31%, respectively. AZA4 (4) (range, <1-27%), AZA5 (5) (range, 1-21%), and AZA8 (8) (range, 1-27%) were each ∼5%, whereas AZA7 (7), AZA9 (9), and AZA10 (10) (range, <1-8%) were each under 1.5%. Levels of 5, 10, AZA13 (13), and AZA15 (15) increased after heating, leading to the identification of novel carboxylated AZA precursors in raw shellfish extracts, which were shown by deuterium labeling to be precursors for 5, 10, 13, and 15.

  1. Fine (PM2.5), coarse (PM2.5-10), and metallic elements of suspended particulates for incense burning at Tzu Yun Yen temple in central Taiwan.

    PubMed

    Fang, Guor-Cheng; Chang, Cheng-Nan; Chu, Chia-Chium; Wu, Yuh-Shen; Pi-Cheng Fu, Peter; Chang, Shyh-Chyi; Yang, I-Lin

    2003-06-01

    Ambient suspended particulate concentrations were measured at Tzu Yun Yen temple (120 degrees, 34('), 10(") E; 24 degrees, 16('), 12(") N) in this study. This is representative of incense burning and semi-open sampling sites. The Universal-sampler collected fine and coarse particle material was used to measure suspended particulate concentrations, and sampling periods were from 16/08/2001 to 2/1/2002 at Tzu Yun Yen temple. In addition, metallic element concentrations, compositions of PM(2.5) and PM(2.5-10) for incense burning at Tzu Yun Yen temple were also analyzed in this study. The PM(2.5)/PM(10) ratios ranged between 31% and 87% and averaged 70+/-11% during incense the burning period, respectively. The median metallic element concentration order for these elements is Fe>Zn>Cr>Cd>Pb>Mn>Ni>Cu in fine particles (PM(2.5)) at the Tzu Yun Yen temple sampling site. The median metallic element concentration order for these elements is Fe>Zn>Cr>Pb>Cd>Ni>Mn>Cu in coarse particle (PM(2.5-10)) at the Tzu Yun Yen temple sampling site. Fine particulates (PM(2.5)) are the main portion of PM(10) at Tzu Yun Yen temple in this study. From the point of view of PM(10), these data reflect that the elements Fe, Zn, and Cr were the major elements distributed at Tzu Yun Yen temple in this study.

  2. Smaller genitals at school age in boys whose mothers were exposed to non-persistent pesticides in early pregnancy.

    PubMed

    Wohlfahrt-Veje, C; Andersen, H R; Jensen, T K; Grandjean, P; Skakkebaek, N E; Main, K M

    2012-06-01

    Endocrine disrupting chemicals are believed to play a role in the development of the testicular dysgenesis syndrome. Many pesticides are known to have endocrine disrupting abilities. In a previous study, sons of women who were occupationally exposed to non-persistent pesticides in early pregnancy showed signs of impaired reproductive function (reduced genital size and altered serum hormone concentrations) at three months of age. To assess the possible long-term effects of prenatal pesticide exposure, the boys were re-examined at 6-11 years. The 94 boys (59 exposed, 35 unexposed) underwent genital examinations including ultrasound of testicular volumes, puberty staging (Tanner), anthropometry, and blood sampling. Only a few of the boys had reached puberty (n = 3). Among prepubescent boys, testicular volume and penile length (age- and weight-adjusted) were reduced if mothers were exposed to pesticides. The effects were associated with the maternal exposure levels, so that high-exposed boys had smaller genitals than medium-exposed boys, who had smaller genitals than those who were unexposed. Boys of mothers in the high exposure group (n = 23) had 24.7% smaller testes (95% CI: -62.2; -10.1) and 9.4% shorter penile length (95% CI: -16.8; -1.1) compared with the unexposed. The testicular volume and penile length at school age could be tracked to measures from the same boys made at 3 months, e.g. those that had small testes at school age also had small testes at 3 months. Pituitary and testicular hormone serum concentrations did not differ between exposed and unexposed boys. Eight prenatally exposed boys had genital malformations (no unexposed). These boys had smaller testis, shorter penile length and lower inhibin B concentrations than prepubertal boys without genital malformations. The findings support the results obtained at three months of age and indicate that prenatal pesticide exposure has long-term effects on reproductive function in boys.

  3. The Nonlinear Stability of L 4 in the R3BP when the Smaller Primary is a Heterogeneous Spheroid

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shalini, Kumari; Suraj, Md Sanam; Aggarwal, Rajiv

    2016-09-01

    We have investigated the nonlinear stability of the triangular libration point L 4 in the R3BP when the smaller primary is a heterogeneous spheroid with three layers having different densities. We observe that in the nonlinear sense, the triangular libration is stable in the range of linear stability 0<μ<μ c , a critical value of mass parameter μ, except for three mass ratios μ 1^' },μ 2^' }, μ 3^' } at which Moser's theorem is not applicable.

  4. Application of a model for delivering occupational safety and health to smaller businesses: Case studies from the US

    PubMed Central

    Cunningham, Thomas R.; Sinclair, Raymond

    2015-01-01

    Smaller firms are the majority in every industry in the US, and they endure a greater burden of occupational injuries, illnesses, and fatalities than larger firms. Smaller firms often lack the necessary resources for effective occupational safety and health activities, and many require external assistance with safety and health programming. Based on previous work by researchers in Europe and New Zealand, NIOSH researchers developed for occupational safety and health intervention in small businesses. This model was evaluated with several intermediary organizations. Four case studies which describe efforts to reach small businesses with occupational safety and health assistance include the following: trenching safety training for construction, basic compliance and hazard recognition for general industry, expanded safety and health training for restaurants, and fall prevention and respirator training for boat repair contractors. Successful efforts included participation by the initiator among the intermediaries’ planning activities, alignment of small business needs with intermediary offerings, continued monitoring of intermediary activities by the initiator, and strong leadership for occupational safety and health among intermediaries. Common challenges were a lack of resources among intermediaries, lack of opportunities for in-person meetings between intermediaries and the initiator, and balancing the exchanges in the initiator–intermediary–small business relationships. The model offers some encouragement that initiator organizations can contribute to sustainable OSH assistance for small firms, but they must depend on intermediaries who have compatible interests in smaller businesses and they must work to understand the small business social system. PMID:26300585

  5. Difficulty in defecation in infants with gastroesophageal reflux treated with smaller volume feeds thickened with rice cereal.

    PubMed

    Mascarenhas, Ryan; Landry, Lisa; Khoshoo, Vikram

    2005-10-01

    We prospectively evaluated the incidence of difficulty in defecation in infants with gastroesophageal reflux who were treated with smaller volume feeds thickened with rice cereal and also assessed the effect of changing the cereal to oatmeal. We evaluated 53 thriving infants with uncomplicated gastroesophageal reflux who were treated with smaller volume feeds thickened with rice cereal. Parents maintained records of bowel movements for 7 days. Rice was substituted by oatmeal cereal in those infants developing difficulty in defecation and another 7 days' record was kept. Of the 53 infants enrolled, 34 (64%) reported no difficulty in defecation, 8 (15%) reported mild difficulty, and 11 (21%) reported severe difficulty in defecation during rice-based feedings. In these symptomatic 19 infants, after rice was substituted by oatmeal cereal, 10 infants (52.6%) reported no symptoms, 6 (31.6%) had mild symptoms, and 3 (15.8%) continued to have severe symptoms. We conclude that difficulty in defecation is common during treatment of infants with gastroesophageal reflux with smaller volume feeds thickened with rice cereal. Substitution of rice with oatmeal cereal results in partial or complete resolution of symptoms in most of these infants.

  6. Recommendation for Using Smaller (0.1 micro sign) Pore-Size Media for Filtration in Salt Waste Processing Project

    SciTech Connect

    Poirier, M.R.

    2003-05-02

    Based on experimental studies with simulated and actual wastes, we recommend adopting the use of 0.1-micron pore-size, sintered stainless-steel filter elements within the design of the Salt Waste Processing Facility. Furthermore, adopting the smaller pore size elements for the Actinide Removal Process would result in a significant risk to the start-up schedule due to delays for buying, installing, and testing new equipment. The existing 0.5-micron pore-size filters will provide nearly equivalent service with no additional capital investment. Unless the planned filter test at Building 512-S fails to meet specifications, the project should proceed with the existing equipment, including spares. When the existing equipment reaches the end of the service life, management can consider replacement with the smaller pore-size elements. The laboratory studies indicate that use of the smaller pore size equipment will result in greater protection against particulate fines passing to downstream facilities while giving equivalent or superior processing rates than provided by the 0.5-micron elements.

  7. Smaller splenium in children with nonverbal learning disability compared to controls, high-functioning autism and ADHD.

    PubMed

    Fine, Jodene Goldenring; Musielak, Kayla A; Semrud-Clikeman, Margaret

    2014-01-01

    The current study investigated morphological differences in the corpus callosum in children ages 8 to 18 years old with nonverbal learning disability (NLD; n = 19), high-functioning autism (HFA; n = 23), predominantly inattentive ADHD (ADHD:PI; n = 23), and combined type ADHD (ADHD:C; n = 25), as well as those demonstrating typical development (n = 57). Midsagittal area of the corpus callosum and five midsagittal anterior-to-posterior corpus callosum segments were examined using magnetic resonance imaging. Controlling for midsagittal brain area and age, no group differences were found for total corpus callosum area. This finding indicates that higher functioning children on the autistic spectrum do not have smaller corpus callosi as has been found in previous research with heterogeneous samples. Following segmentation of the corpus callosum, the NLD group was observed to have significantly smaller splenia compared to all other groups. Smaller splenia in the NLD group was associated with lower WASI PIQ scores but not WASI VIQ scores. Children with HFA were observed to have larger midbody areas than children with NLD and neurotypically developing children. Children with HFA and NLD demonstrated behavioral symptoms of inattention and hyperactivity similar to the ADHD groups indicating that corpus callosum differences seen in the NLD and HFA groups are not related to these behaviors. PMID:24215424

  8. Synthesis and Characterization of 4,11-Diaminoanthra[2,3-b]furan-5,10-diones: Tumor Cell Apoptosis through tNOX-Modulated NAD(+)/NADH Ratio and SIRT1.

    PubMed

    Tikhomirov, Alexander S; Shchekotikhin, Andrey E; Lee, Yi-Hui; Chen, Yi-Ann; Yeh, Chia-An; Tatarskiy, Victor V; Dezhenkova, Lyubov G; Glazunova, Valeria A; Balzarini, Jan; Shtil, Alexander A; Preobrazhenskaya, Maria N; Chueh, Pin Ju

    2015-12-24

    A series of new 4,11-diaminoanthra[2,3-b]furan-5,10-dione derivatives with different side chains were synthesized. Selected 2-unsubstituted derivatives 11-14 showed high antiproliferative potency on a panel of mammalian tumor cell lines including multidrug resistance variants. Compounds 11-14 utilized multiple mechanisms of cytotoxicity including inhibition of Top1/Top2-mediated DNA relaxation, reduced NAD(+)/NADH ratio through tNOX inhibition, suppression of a NAD(+)-dependent sirtuin 1 (SIRT1) deacetylase activity, and activation of caspase-mediated apoptosis. Here, for the first time, we report that tumor-associated NADH oxidase (tNOX) and SIRT1 are important cellular targets of antitumor anthracene-9,10-diones.

  9. Analysis of PM10, PM2.5, and PM2 5-10 concentrations in Santiago, Chile, from 1989 to 2001.

    PubMed

    Koutrakis, Petros; Sax, Sonja N; Sarnat, Jeremy A; Coull, Brent; Demokritou, Phil; Oyola, Pedro; Garcia, Javier; Gramsch, Ernesto

    2005-03-01

    Daily particle samples were collected in Santiago, Chile, at four urban locations from January 1, 1989, through December 31, 2001. Both fine PM with da < 2.5 microm (PM2.5) and coarse PM with 2.5 < da < 10 microm (PM2.5-10) were collected using dichotomous samplers. The inhalable particle fraction, PM10, was determined as the sum of fine and coarse concentrations. Wind speed, temperature and relative humidity (RH) were also measured continuously. Average concentrations of PM2.5 for the 1989-2001 period ranged from 38.5 microg/m3 to 53 microg/m3. For PM2.5-10 levels ranged from 35.8-48.2 microg/m3 and for PM10 results were 74.4-101.2 microg/m3 across the four sites. Both annual and daily PM2.5 and PM10 concentration levels exceeded the U.S. National Ambient Air Quality Standards and the European Union concentration limits. Mean PM2.5 levels during the cold season (April through September) were more than twice as high as those observed in the warm season (October through March); whereas coarse particle levels were similar in both seasons. PM concentration trends were investigated using regression models, controlling for site, weekday, month, wind speed, temperature, and RH. Results showed that PM2.5 concentrations decreased substantially, 52% over the 12-year period (1989-2000), whereas PM2.5-10 concentrations increased by approximately 50% in the first 5 years and then decreased by a similar percentage over the following 7 years. These decreases were evident even after controlling for significant climatic effects. These results suggest that the pollution reduction programs developed and implemented by the Comisión Nacional del Medio Ambiente (CONAMA) have been effective in reducing particle levels in the Santiago Metropolitan region. However, particle levels remain high and it is thus imperative that efforts to improve air quality continue.

  10. Level and Contamination Assessment of Environmentally Sensitive Elements in Smaller than 100 μm Street Dust Particles from Xining, China

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Ni; Lu, Xinwei; Chao, Shigang

    2014-01-01

    Concentrations of the environmentally sensitive elements (ESEs) As, Co, Cu, Mn, Ni, Pb, V and Zn in smaller than 100 μm street dust particles from Xining were measured using X-ray fluorescence spectrometry and their contamination levels were assessed based on enrichment factor (EF), geoaccumulation index (Igeo) and pollution load index (PLI). The concentrations of As, Co, Cu, Mn, Ni, Pb, V and Zn in smaller than 100 μm street dust particles from Xining are 0.1–0.8, 2.7–10.9, 0.7–5.2, 0.3–1.1, 0.6–2.5, 1.2–11.1, 0.7–1.3 and 0.4–2.9 times the background values of Qinghai soil, respectively. The calculated EF and Igeo values reveal the order Co > Pb > Cu > Zn > V > Ni > Mn > As. The EF and Igeo values of Co, Cu, Pb and Zn are higher indicating that there is considerable pollution by these elements in smaller than 100 μm street dust particles, especially for Co. The EF and Igeo of Mn, Ni and V are lower and the assessment results indicate an absence of distinct Mn, Ni and V pollution in the studied samples. The mean value of PLIsite is 1.14, indicating a slightly pollution in the whole city of Xining. The order of PLIarea for the five tested districts is Center District (CD) > East District (ED) > West District (WD) > North District (ND) > South District (SD), showing that ESEs pollution in the South District is the lightest while it is the highest in the Central District. PMID:24590050

  11. Glass Forming Ability and Kinetic Characters of Paramagnetic Nd60Co40-xAlx(x=5, 10, 15) Bulk Metallic Glasses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xia, L.; Dong, Y. D.

    Paramagnetic Nd60Co40-xAlx(x=5, 10, 15) bulk metallic glasses (BMGs) were prepared in the shape of rods 2 mm in diameter by suction casting. The ternary alloys have shown distinct glass transitions in Differential Scanning Calorimetry (DSC) measurements and excellent glass-forming ability. The glass transition and crystallization behaviors as well as their kinetics have been studied. The reduced glass transition temperature and the supercooled liquid region of the alloys were found to increase with the increasing content of Al. The role of Al was discussed. The parameter γ defined by Liu et al. was employed to discuss the glass-forming ability of the alloys and the critical cooling rates as well as the critical section thickness of the alloys were predicted accordingly.

  12. Comparison between 5,10,15,20-tetraaryl- and 5,15-diarylporphyrins as photosensitizers: synthesis, photodynamic activity, and quantitative structure-activity relationship modeling.

    PubMed

    Banfi, Stefano; Caruso, Enrico; Buccafurni, Loredana; Murano, Roberto; Monti, Elena; Gariboldi, Marzia; Papa, Ester; Gramatica, Paola

    2006-06-01

    The synthesis of a panel of seven nonsymmetric 5,10,15,20-tetraarylporphyrins, 13 symmetric and nonsymmetric 5,15-diarylporphyrins, and one 5,15-diarylchlorin is described. In vitro photodynamic activities on HCT116 human colon adenocarcinoma cells were evaluated by standard cytotoxicity assays. A predictive quantitative structure-activity relationship (QSAR) regression model, based on theoretical holistic molecular descriptors, of a series of 34 tetrapyrrolic photosensitizers (PSs), including the 24 compounds synthesized in this work, was developed to describe the relationship between structural features and photodynamic activity. The present study demonstrates that structural features significantly influence the photodynamic activity of tetrapyrrolic derivatives: diaryl compounds were more active with respect to the tetraarylporphyrins, and among the diaryl derivatives, hydroxy-substituted compounds were more effective than the corresponding methoxy-substituted ones. Furthermore, three monoarylporphyrins, isolated as byproducts during diarylporphyrin synthesis, were considered for both photodynamic and QSAR studies; surprisingly they were found to be particularly active photosensitizers.

  13. 5,10-Methylenetetrahydrofolate reductase polymorphisms and pharmacogenetics: a new role of single nucleotide polymorphisms in the folate metabolic pathway in human health and disease.

    PubMed

    Kim, Young-In

    2005-11-01

    Knowledge about the role of folate, a water-soluble B vitamin, and single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in the folate metabolic pathway in human health and disease has been rapidly expanding. Recently, functionally significant SNPs in 5,10-methylenetetrahydrofolate reductase (MTHFR), a critical enzyme for intracellular folate homeostasis and metabolism, have been identified and characterized. An emerging body of in vitro and clinical evidence suggests that these MTHFR SNPs may be an important pharmacogenetic determinant of predicting response to and toxicity of methotrexate and 5-fluorouracil-based cancer and anti-inflammatory treatments because of their well-defined and highly relevant biochemical effects on intracellular folate composition and one-carbon transfer reactions.

  14. Photodynamic antimicrobial chemotherapy activity of (5,10,15,20-tetrakis(4-(4-carboxyphenycarbonoimidoyl)phenyl)porphyrinato) chloro gallium(III).

    PubMed

    Managa, Muthumuni; Amuhaya, Edith K; Nyokong, Tebello

    2015-12-01

    (5,10,15,20-Tetrakis(4-(4-carboxyphenycarbonoimidoyl)phenyl)porphyrinato) chloro gallium(III) (complex 1) was conjugated to platinum nanoparticles (PtNPs) (represented as 1-PtNPs). The resulting conjugate showed 18 nm red shift in the Soret band when compared to 1 alone. Complex 1 and 1-PtNPs showed promising photodynamic antimicrobial chemotherapy (PACT) activity against Staphylococcus aureus, Escherichia coli and Candida albicans in solution where the log reductions obtained were 4.92, 3.76, and 3.95, respectively for 1-PtNPs. The singlet oxygen quantum yields obtained were higher at 0.56 for 1-PtNPs in DMF while that of 1 was 0.52 in the same solvent. This resulted in improved PACT activity for 1-PtNPs compared to 1 alone.

  15. Oxyfunctionalization of unactivated C-H bonds in triterpenoids with tert-butylhydroperoxide catalyzed by meso-5,10,15,20-tetramesitylporphyrinate osmium(II) carbonyl complex.

    PubMed

    Ogawa, Shoujiro; Wakatsuki, Yasuo; Makino, Mitsuko; Fujimoto, Yasuo; Yasukawa, Ken; Kikuchi, Takashi; Ukiya, Motohiko; Akihisa, Toshihiro; Iida, Takashi

    2010-02-01

    A system consisting of meso-5,10,15,20-tetramesitylporphyrinate osmium(II) carbonyl complex [Os(TMP)CO] as a precatalyst and tert-butylhydroperoxide (TBHP) as an oxygen donor is shown to be an efficient, regioselective oxidant system for the allylic oxidation, ketonization and hydroxylation of unactivated C-H bonds in a series of the peracetate derivatives of penta- and tetracyclic triterpenoids. Treatment of the substrates with this oxidant system afforded a variety of novel or scarce oxygenated derivatives in one-step. Structures of the isolated components, after chromatographic separation, were determined by spectroscopic methods including GC-MS and shift-correlated 2D-NMR techniques. Factors governing the regioselectivity and the possible mechanism for the oxyfunctionalization of the unactivated carbons are also discussed.

  16. An in vitro enzymatic assay to measure transcription inhibition by gallium(III) and H3 5,10,15-tris(pentafluorophenyl)corroles.

    PubMed

    Tang, Grace Y; Pribisko, Melanie A; Henning, Ryan K; Lim, Punnajit; Termini, John; Gray, Harry B; Grubbs, Robert H

    2015-03-18

    Chemotherapy often involves broad-spectrum cytotoxic agents with many side effects and limited targeting. Corroles are a class of tetrapyrrolic macrocycles that exhibit differential cytostatic and cytotoxic properties in specific cell lines, depending on the identities of the chelated metal and functional groups. The unique behavior of functionalized corroles towards specific cell lines introduces the possibility of targeted chemotherapy. Many anticancer drugs are evaluated by their ability to inhibit RNA transcription. Here we present a step-by-step protocol for RNA transcription in the presence of known and potential inhibitors. The evaluation of the RNA products of the transcription reaction by gel electrophoresis and UV-Vis spectroscopy provides information on inhibitive properties of potential anticancer drug candidates and, with modifications to the assay, more about their mechanism of action. Little is known about the molecular mechanism of action of corrole cytotoxicity. In this experiment, we consider two corrole compounds: gallium(III) 5,10,15-(tris)pentafluorophenylcorrole (Ga(tpfc)) and freebase analogue 5,10,15-(tris)pentafluorophenylcorrole (tpfc). An RNA transcription assay was used to examine the inhibitive properties of the corroles. Five transcription reactions were prepared: DNA treated with Actinomycin D, triptolide, Ga(tpfc), tpfc at a [complex]:[template DNA base] ratio of 0.01, respectively, and an untreated control. The transcription reactions were analyzed after 4 hr using agarose gel electrophoresis and UV-Vis spectroscopy. There is clear inhibition by Ga(tpfc), Actinomycin D, and triptolide. This RNA transcription assay can be modified to provide more mechanistic detail by varying the concentrations of the anticancer complex, DNA, or polymerase enzyme, or by incubating the DNA or polymerase with the complexes prior to RNA transcription; these modifications would differentiate between an inhibition mechanism involving the DNA or the enzyme

  17. Larger antelopes are sensitive to heat stress throughout all seasons but smaller antelopes only during summer in an African semi-arid environment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shrestha, A. K.; van Wieren, S. E.; van Langevelde, F.; Fuller, A.; Hetem, R. S.; Meyer, L.; de Bie, S.; Prins, H. H. T.

    2014-01-01

    Heat stress can limit the activity time budget of ungulates due to hyperthermia, which is relevant for African antelopes in ecosystems where temperature routinely increases above 40 °C. Body size influences this thermal sensitivity as large bodied ungulates have a lower surface area to volume ratio than smaller ungulates, and therefore a reduced heat dissipation capacity. We tested whether the activity pattern during the day of three antelope species of different body size—eland, blue wildebeest and impala—is negatively correlated with the pattern of black globe temperature (BGT) during the day of the ten hottest days and each season in a South African semi-arid ecosystem. Furthermore, we tested whether the larger bodied eland and wildebeest are less active than the smaller impala during the hottest days and seasons. Our results show that indeed BGT was negatively correlated with the diurnal activity of eland, wildebeest and impala, particularly during summer. During spring, only the activity of the larger bodied eland and wildebeest was negatively influenced by BGT, but not for the smallest of the three species, the impala. We argue that spring, with its high heat stress, coupled with poor forage and water availability, could be critical for survival of these large African antelopes. Our study contributes to understanding how endothermic animals can cope with extreme climatic conditions, which are expected to occur more frequently due to climate change.

  18. Larger antelopes are sensitive to heat stress throughout all seasons but smaller antelopes only during summer in an African semi-arid environment.

    PubMed

    Shrestha, A K; van Wieren, S E; van Langevelde, F; Fuller, A; Hetem, R S; Meyer, L; de Bie, S; Prins, H H T

    2014-01-01

    Heat stress can limit the activity time budget of ungulates due to hyperthermia, which is relevant for African antelopes in ecosystems where temperature routinely increases above 40 °C. Body size influences this thermal sensitivity as large bodied ungulates have a lower surface area to volume ratio than smaller ungulates, and therefore a reduced heat dissipation capacity. We tested whether the activity pattern during the day of three antelope species of different body size-eland, blue wildebeest and impala-is negatively correlated with the pattern of black globe temperature (BGT) during the day of the ten hottest days and each season in a South African semi-arid ecosystem. Furthermore, we tested whether the larger bodied eland and wildebeest are less active than the smaller impala during the hottest days and seasons. Our results show that indeed BGT was negatively correlated with the diurnal activity of eland, wildebeest and impala, particularly during summer. During spring, only the activity of the larger bodied eland and wildebeest was negatively influenced by BGT, but not for the smallest of the three species, the impala. We argue that spring, with its high heat stress, coupled with poor forage and water availability, could be critical for survival of these large African antelopes. Our study contributes to understanding how endothermic animals can cope with extreme climatic conditions, which are expected to occur more frequently due to climate change.

  19. Comet 81p/Wild 2: The Updated Stardust Coma Dust Fluence Measurement for Smaller (Sub 10-Micrometre) Particles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Price, M. C.; Kearsley, A. T.; Burchell, M. J.; Horz, Friedrich; Cole, M. J.

    2009-01-01

    Micrometre and smaller scale dust within cometary comae can be observed by telescopic remote sensing spectroscopy [1] and the particle size and abundance can be measured by in situ spacecraft impact detectors [2]. Initial interpretation of the samples returned from comet 81P/Wild 2 by the Stardust spacecraft [3] appears to show that very fine dust contributes not only a small fraction of the solid mass, but is also relatively sparse [4], with a low negative power function describing grain size distribution, contrasting with an apparent abundance indicated by the on-board Dust Flux Monitor Instrument (DFMI) [5] operational during the encounter. For particles above 10 m diameter there is good correspondence between results from the DFMI and the particle size inferred from experimental calibration [6] of measured aerogel track and aluminium foil crater dimensions (as seen in Figure 4 of [4]). However, divergence between data-sets becomes apparent at smaller sizes, especially submicrometre, where the returned sample data are based upon location and measurement of tiny craters found by electron microscopy of Al foils. Here effects of detection efficiency tail-off at each search magnification can be seen in the down-scale flattening of each scale component, but are reliably compensated by sensible extrapolation between segments. There is also no evidence of malfunction in the operation of DFMI during passage through the coma (S. Green, personal comm.), so can the two data sets be reconciled?

  20. Post-traumatic stress symptoms correlate with smaller subgenual cingulate, caudate, and insula volumes in unmedicated combat veterans.

    PubMed

    Herringa, Ryan; Phillips, Mary; Almeida, Jorge; Insana, Salvatore; Germain, Anne

    2012-01-01

    Prior studies have examined differences in brain volume between patients with post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD) and control subjects. Convergent findings include smaller hippocampus and medial prefrontal cortex volumes in PTSD. However, post-traumatic stress symptoms (PTSS) exist on a spectrum, and neural changes may occur beyond the diagnostic threshold of PTSD. We examined the relationship between PTSS and gray matter among combat-exposed U.S. military veterans. Structural brain magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) was obtained on 28 combat veterans from Operations Enduring and Iraqi Freedom. PTSS were assessed using the Clinician-Administered PTSD Scale (CAPS). Thirteen subjects met criteria for PTSD. Subjects were unmedicated, and free of major comorbid psychiatric disorders. Images were analyzed using voxel-based morphometry, and regressed against the total CAPS score and trauma load. Images were subsequently analyzed by diagnosis of PTSD vs. non-PTSD. CAPS scores were inversely correlated with volumes of the subgenual cingulate (sgACC), caudate, hypothalamus, insula, and left middle temporal gyrus (MTG). Group contrast revealed smaller sgACC, caudate, hypothalamus, left insula, left MTG, and right MFG in the PTSD group. PTSS are associated with abnormalities in limbic structures that may underlie the pathophysiology of PTSD. These abnormalities exist on a continuum with PTSS, beyond a diagnosis of PTSD.

  1. THE RELATIONSHIP BETWEEN REAL-TIME AND TIME-INTEGRATED COARSE (2.5-10MM), INTERMEDIATE (1-2.5MM), AND FINE (<2.5MM) PARTICULATE MATTER IN THE LOS ANGELES BASIN

    EPA Science Inventory

    Population exposure to ambient particulate matter (PM) has received considerable attention due to the association between ambient particulate concentrations and mortality. Current toxicological and epidemiological studies and controlled human and animal exposures suggest that a...

  2. Effects of dietary glycerin inclusion at 0, 5, 10, and 15 percent of dry matter on energy metabolism and nutrient balance in finishing beef steers.

    PubMed

    Hales, K E; Foote, A P; Brown-Brandl, T M; Freetly, H C

    2015-01-01

    Expansion of the biodiesel industry has increased the glycerin (GLY) supply. Glycerin is an energy-dense feed that can be used in ruminant species; however, the energy value of GLY is not known. Therefore, the effects of GLY inclusion at 0, 5, 10, and 15% on energy balance in finishing cattle diets were evaluated in 8 steers (BW = 503 kg) using a replicated Latin square design. Data were analyzed with the fixed effects of dietary treatment and period, and the random effects of square and steer within square were included in the model. Contrast statements were used to separate linear and quadratic effects of GLY inclusion. Glycerin replaced dry-rolled corn (DRC) at 0, 5, 10, and 15% of dietary DM. Dry matter intake decreased linearly (P = 0.02) as GLY increased in the diet. As a proportion of GE intake, fecal energy loss tended to decrease linearly (P < 0.07), and DE also tended to increase linearly (P = 0.07) as dietary level of GLY increased. Urinary energy loss was not different (P > 0.31) as a proportion of GE as GLY increased in the diet. Methane energy loss as a proportion of GE intake tended to respond quadratically (P = 0.10), decreasing from 0 to 10% GLY inclusion and increasing thereafter. As a proportion of GE intake, ME tended to respond quadratically (P = 0.10), increasing from 0 to 10% GLY and then decreasing. As a proportion of GE intake, heat production increased linearly (P = 0.02) as GLY increased in the diet. Additionally, as a proportion of GE intake, retained energy (RE) tended to respond quadratically (P = 0.07), increasing from 0 to 10% GLY inclusion and decreasing thereafter. As a proportion of N intake, urinary and fecal N excretion increased linearly (P < 0.04) as GLY increased in the diet. Furthermore, grams of N retained and N retained as a percent of N intake both decreased linearly (P < 0.02) as GLY increased in the diet. Total DM digestibility tended (P < 0.10) to respond quadratically, increasing at a decreasing rate from 0 to 5% GLY

  3. Wide-band (2.5 - 10.5 µm), high-frame rate IRFPAs based on high-operability MCT on silicon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Crosbie, Michael J.; Giess, Jean; Gordon, Neil T.; Hall, David J.; Hails, Janet E.; Lees, David J.; Little, Christopher J.; Phillips, Tim S.

    2010-04-01

    We have previously presented results from our mercury cadmium telluride (MCT, Hg1-xCdxTe) growth on silicon substrate technology for different applications, including negative luminescence, long waveband and mid/long dual waveband infrared imaging. In this paper, we review recent developments in QinetiQ's combined molecular beam epitaxy (MBE) and metal-organic vapor phase epitaxy (MOVPE) MCT growth on silicon; including MCT defect density, uniformity and reproducibility. We also present a new small-format (128 x 128) focal plane array (FPA) for high frame-rate applications. A custom high-speed readout integrated circuit (ROIC) was developed with a large pitch and large charge storage aimed at producing a very high performance FPA (NETD ~10mK) operating at frame rates up to 2kHz for the full array. The array design allows random addressing and this allows the maximum frame rate to be increased as the window size is reduced. A broadband (2.5-10.5 μm) MCT heterostructure was designed and grown by the MBE/MOVPE technique onto silicon substrates. FPAs were fabricated using our standard techniques; wet-etched mesa diodes passivated with epitaxial CdTe and flip-chip bonded to the ROIC. The resulting focal plane arrays were characterized at the maximum frame rate and shown to have the high operabilities and low NETD values characteristic of our LWIR MCT on silicon technology.

  4. Crystal structure of 16-ferrocenylmethyl-3β-hydroxy­estra-1,3,5(10)-trien-17-one: a potential chemotherapeutic drug

    PubMed Central

    Carmona-Negrón, José A.; Flores-Rivera, Mariola M.; Díaz-Reyes, Zaibeth; Moore, Curtis E.; Rheigold, Arnold L.; Meléndez, Enrique

    2016-01-01

    A new ferrocene complex, 16-ferrocenylmethyl-3β-hy­droxy­estra-1,3,5(10)-trien-17-one dimethyl sulfoxide monosolvate, [Fe(C5H5)(C24H27O2)]·C2H6OS, has been synthesized and structurally characterized by single-crystal X-ray diffraction techniques. The mol­ecule crystallizes in the space group P21 with one mol­ecule of dimethyl sulfoxide. A hydrogen bond links the phenol group and the dimethyl sulfoxide O atom, with an O⋯O distance of 2.655 (5) Å. The ferrocene group is positioned in the β face of the estrone moiety, with an O—C—C—C torsion angle of 44.1 (5)°, and the carbonyl bond length of the hormone moiety is 1.216 (5) Å, typical of a C=O double bond. The average Fe—C bond length of the substituted Cp ring [Fe—C(Cp*)] is similar to that of the unsubstituted one [Fe—C(Cp)], i.e. 2.048 (3) versus 2.040 (12) Å. The structure of the complex is compared with those of estrone and eth­oxy­methyl­estrone. PMID:27308062

  5. Synthesis of 21,23-selenium- and tellurium-substituted 5-porphomethenes, 5,10-porphodimethenes, 5,15-porphodimethenes, and porphotrimethenes and their interactions with mercury.

    PubMed

    Ahmad, Sohail; Yadav, Kumar Karitkey; Bhattacharya, Soumee; Chauhan, Prashant; Chauhan, S M S

    2015-04-17

    The 3+1 condensation of symmetrical 16-Selena/telluratripyrranes with symmetrical selenophene-2,5-diols/tellurophene-2,5-diols in the presence of BF3-etheratre or BF3-methanol followed by oxidation with DDQ gave 5,10-porphodimethenes, whereas the process with unsymmetrical selenophene-2,5-diols/tellurophene-2,5-diols gave 5-porphomethenes. In addition, the reaction of unsymmetrical 16-Selena/telluratripyrranes with symmetrical selenophene-2,5-diols/tellurophene-2,5-diols gave the corresponding porphotrimethenes, whereas the process with unsymmetrical selenophene-2,5-diols/tellurophene-2,5-diols gave the 5,15-porphodimethenes. The structures of different products were characterized by IR, (1)H and (13)C NMR, (1)H-(1)H COSY, CHN analysis, and mass spectrometry. The binding of mercury with the calix[4]phyrins mentioned above had been observed in the decreasing order of porphodimethenes > porphomethenes > porphotrimethenes by UV-vis and (1)H NMR spectroscopy.

  6. Solvent effects on spectrophotometric titrations and vibrational spectroscopy of 5,10,15-triphenyl-20-(4-hydroxyphenyl)porphyrin in aqueous DMF.

    PubMed

    Guo, Hongwei; Jiang, Junguang; Shi, Yingyan; Wang, Yuling; Dong, Shaojun

    2007-05-01

    The spectrophotometric titration by sodium hydroxide of 5,10,15-triphenyl-20-(4-hydroxyphenyl)porphyrin ((OH)(1)PH(2)) is studied as a function of solvent composition of DMF-H(2)O binary solvent mixture ([OH(-)]=0.04 M). Combining the structure changes of the porphyrin and the "four orbital" model of Gouterman, many features of the optical spectra of this deprotonated para-hydroxy-substituted tetraphenylporphyrin in different composition of binary solvent mixtures can be rationalized. In highly aqueous solvents, the changes of the titration curves are shown to be mainly due to hydrogen-bonding of the oxygen of the phenoxide anion group by the hydroxylic solvent, Which decreases the energy of the phenoxide anion pi orbital. Thus the phenoxide anion pi orbital cannot cross over the porphyrin pi orbital being a different HOMO. However, its energy is close to that of the porphyrin pi orbitals. As a result, in the visible region, no charge-transfer band is observed, while in the visible-near region, the Soret peak split into two components. In nonaqueous solvents, the changes are mainly attributed to further deprotonation of pyrrolic-Hs of (OH)(1)PH(2) by NaOH and coordination with two sodium ions to form the sodium complex of (OH)(1)PH(2), which turns hyperporphyrin spectra of deprotonated of phenolic-H of (OH)(1)PH(2) into three-banded spectra of regular metalloporphyrin.

  7. The frequent 5,10-methylenetetrahydrofolate reductase C677T polymorphism is associated with a common haplotype in whites, Japanese, and Africans.

    PubMed

    Rosenberg, Nurit; Murata, Mitsuru; Ikeda, Yasuo; Opare-Sem, Ohene; Zivelin, Ariella; Geffen, Eli; Seligsohn, Uri

    2002-03-01

    The common 5,10-methylenetetrahydrofolate reductase (MTHFR) C677T polymorphism causes decreased activity of this enzyme and can be associated with mild-to-moderate hyperhomocysteinemia in homozygotes, particularly when there is folic acid deficiency, as well as with vascular dementia, arterial thrombosis, venous thrombosis, neural-tube defects, and fetal loss. When folic acid intake is sufficient, homozygotes for MTHFR 677T appear to be protected against colon cancer and acute lymphatic leukemia, and fetuses bearing this genotype have an augmented survival. The distribution of MTHFR 677T is worldwide, but its frequency in different populations varies extensively. In the present study, we addressed the question of whether the MTHFR 677T alteration has an ancestral origin or has occurred repeatedly. We analyzed the frequency distribution of the previously described polymorphism A1298C in exon 7 and of three intronic dimorphisms, in white Israelis (Jews and Arabs), Japanese, and Ghanaian Africans. The 677T allele was, remarkably, associated with one haplotype, G-T-A-C, in white and Japanese homozygotes. Among the Africans, analysis of maximum likelihood also disclosed an association with the G-T-A-C haplotype, although none of the 174 subjects examined was homozygous for MTHFR 677T. These results suggest that the MTHFR 677T alteration occurred on a founder haplotype that may have had a selective advantage. PMID:11781870

  8. Mössbauer effect study of tight spin coupling in oxidized chloro-5,10,15,20- tetra(mesityl)porphyrinatoiron(III)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boso, Brian; Lang, George; McMurry, Thomas J.; Groves, John T.

    1983-08-01

    Mössbauer spectra of a polycrystalline form of oxidized chloro-5,10,15,20-tetra(mesityl)porphyrin- atoiron(III) [Fe(TMP)Cl], compound A, were recorded over a range of temperatures (4.2-195 K) and magnetic fields (0-6 T). These spectra of compound A exhibit magnetic features which are markedly different from those of the analogous protein complexes, horse radish peroxidase compound I (HRP-I) and compound ES of cytochrome c peroxidase, even though chemical evidence and optical spectroscopy indicate that compound A is similar to the others in comprising a Fe(IV) complex within a porphyrin cation radical. We interpret the data by employing a spin Hamiltonian model in which the central Fe(IV) complex, with S=1, is tightly coupled to a S=1/2 system of the oxidized porphyrin to yield a net S=3/2 system as suggested by the susceptibility measurements. The theoretical treatment yields information on the d-electron energies which is similar to that more directly available in the peroxidase spectra. The strength of the axial crystal field is found to increase progressively in the series HRP-I, ES, compound A, while the spin coupling in A is the strongest of the three by several orders of magnitude. The good fits to experimental data confirm the efficacy of the theoretical treatment which may be applicable to a variety of other coupled systems.

  9. The effect of laser activation of 5,10,15,20-tetra-sulphophenyl-porphyrin loaded in K562 cells and human normal mononuclear cells.

    PubMed

    Constantin, Carolina; Neagu, Monica; Manda, Gina; Ion, Rodica-Mariana; Iordăchescu, Dana Iord

    2004-01-01

    Photodynamic therapy (PDT) is a relatively new type of treatment in cancer, based on a photosensitizer, visible light and molecular oxygen. Reactive oxygen species are generated, causing tumor cells death by apoptosis or necrosis. Significant nowadays research efforts are focused on finding new photosensitizers with antineoplastic activity and an acceptable toxicological profile. Although consistent information exists regarding PDT in solid tumors, relatively few data are available for PDT of blood cancers. Therefore, we carried out a comparative study on lymphoblastic K562 cells and human normal peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC) treated at a density of 2 x 10(5) cells/mL with 5,10,15,20-tetra-sulphophenyl-porphyrin (TSPP) and then irradiated with He-Ne laser light (lamda = 632.8 nm). The following cell functions were investigated: viability, multiplication, RNA synthesis, total RNA levels and apoptosis. After irradiation, the viability of TSPP-loaded tumor cells decrease, the multiplication rate and the total RNA level are drastically reduced and cells undergo apoptosis. TSPP alone loaded into cells but not activated by irradiation, does not affect these cell parameters. Human normal PBMC subjected to TSPP loading and laser-irradiation develop a different cellular response, their viability and proliferative capacity not being altered by experimental PDT. Accordingly, it appears that TSPP is a non-aggressive compound for cellular physiology and becomes cytotoxic only by irradiation; moreover laser-activated TSPP affects only cells that have a tumoral pattern.

  10. Novel nanomaterials based on 5,10,15,20-tetrakis(3,4-dimethoxyphenyl)-21H,23H-porphyrin entrapped in silica matrices

    SciTech Connect

    Fagadar-Cosma, Eugenia; Enache, Corina; Vlascici, Dana; Fagadar-Cosma, Gheorghe; Vasile, Mihaela; Bazylak, Grzegorz

    2009-12-15

    The present study is dealing with the obtaining of transparent hybrid silica materials encapsulating 5,10,15,20-tetrakis(3,4-dimethoxyphenyl)-21H,23H-porphyrin designated for advanced optoelectronic devices. The porphyrin was synthesized by three methods: an Adler-type reaction between pyrrole and 3,4-dimethoxybenzaldehyde in propionic acid medium; by Lindsey condensation of pyrrole with 3,4-dimethoxybenzaldehyde in the presence of BF{sub 3}.OEt{sub 2} and by a multicomponent reaction by simultaneously using of pyrrole and two different aldehydes: 3,4-dimethoxybenzaldehyde and 3-hydroxybenzaldehyde. The 3,4-dimethoxyphenyl substituted porphyrin was characterized by HPLC, TLC, UV-vis, FT-IR, {sup 1}H NMR and {sup 13}C NMR analysis. Excitation and emission spectra were also discussed in terms of pH conditions. The hybrid materials, consisting in the porphyrin encapsulated in silica matrices, have been prepared successfully via the two steps acid-base catalyzed hydrolysis and condensation of tetraethylorthosilicate using different approaches of the sol-gel process: in situ, by impregnation and by sonication. The synthetic conditions and the compositions were monitored and characterized by using spectroscopic methods such as FT-IR, fluorescence and UV-vis. Atomic force microscopy (AFM) has been applied to observe the columnar or pyramidal nanostructures which are formed by the immobilization of porphyrin on the silica matrices.

  11. Selection criteria of the addendum modification coefficients of spur gear pairs with smaller number of pinion teeth

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Atanasiu, V.; Oprişan, C.; Leohchi, D.

    2016-08-01

    A design procedure for the optimum distribution of the addendum modification coefficients of spur gear pairs with smaller number of pinion teeth is presented for the case of a fixed centred distance. The geometrical, kinematics and load capacity criteria are considered in the design analysis. The geometric and kinematics criteria are used to prevent the negative phenomena of the generating and engagement processes. The relation between the contact pressure of meshing teeth and specific sliding are analysed in relation with addendum modification coefficients. A dynamic model is developed to simulate the load sharing characteristics through a mesh cycle. The specific phenomenon of contact tooth pairs alternation during mesh cycle is integrated in this dynamic load modelling. A comparative study is included, which shows the effects of the distribution factor of the addendum modification coefficients on the contact surface characteristics of the gear pairs.

  12. Recombinant albumins containing additional peptide sequences smaller than barbourin retain the ability of barbourin-albumin to inhibit platelet aggregation.

    PubMed

    Sheffield, William P; Wilson, Brianna; Eltringham-Smith, Louise J; Gataiance, Sharon; Bhakta, Varsha

    2005-05-01

    The previously described fusion protein BLAH(6) (Marques JA et al.,Thromb Haemost 2001; 86: 902-8) is a recombinant protein that combines the small disintegrin barbourin with hexahistidine-tagged rabbit serumalbumin (RSA) produced in Pichia pastoris yeast. We sought to determine: (1) if BLAH(6) was immunogenic; and (2) if its barbourin domain could be productively replaced with smaller peptides. Purified BLAH(6) was injected into rabbits, and anti-barbourin antibodies were universally detected in plasma 28 days later; BLAH(6) was, however, equally effective in reducing platelet aggregation in both naive and pre-treated rabbits. Thrombocytopenia was not observed, and complexing BLAH(6) to alpha(IIb)beta(3) had no effect on antibody detection. The barbourin moiety of BLAH(6) was replaced with each of four sequences: Pep I (VCKGDWPC); PepII (VCRGDWPC); PepIII (bar-bourin 41-54); and PepIV (LPSPGDWR). The corresponding fusion proteins were tested for their ability to inhibit ADP-induced platelet aggregation. PepIII-LAH(6) inhibited neither rabbit nor human platelets. PepI-LAH(6) and PepIV-LAH(6) inhibited rabbit platelet aggregation as effectively as BLAH(6), but PepIV-LAH(6) did not inhibit human platelet aggregation. PepI-LAH(6) and PepIILAH(6) inhibited human platelet aggregation with IC(50)s 10- and 20-fold higher than BLAH(6). Cross-immunoprecipitation assays with human platelet lysates confirmed that all proteins and peptides interacted with the platelet integrin alpha(IIb)beta(3), but with greatly varying affinities. Our results suggest that the antiplatelet activity of BLAH(6) can be retained in albumin fusion proteins in which smaller peptides replace the barbourin domain; these proteins may be less immunogenic than BLAH(6).

  13. The High Arctic Magnetic High - The Geophysical Manifestation of a Large (1.36 x 10e6 km2) and Voluminous (5-10 x 10e6 km3) Igneous Province

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saltus, Richard; Oakey, Gordon; Miller, Elizabeth; Jackson, Ruth

    2013-04-01

    The High Arctic Magnetic High (HAMH) dominates the magnetic anomaly field of the Earth north of about 75°N; this magnetic domain consists of very high amplitude magnetic highs and lows with variable orientations. The HAMH is visible on satellite magnetic compilations (e.g., MF6) with anomaly amplitudes greater than 200 nT indicating it is a globally significant feature. The magnetic potential of this magnetic feature is a single large intensity high indicative of a large volume of magnetic material in the crust. The map area of this magnetic domain is roughly 1.36 x 10e6 km2. Geographically the HAMH lies within the Amerasian Basin adjacent to the Lomonosov Ridge, encompasses the region of the Alpha and Mendeleev Ridges, and extends beneath the northern portions of the Canada Basin. Ocean floor geomorphology, limited seismic and sonobouy data, sparse dredge samples, and dated samples from the perimeter of the Arctic Ocean are consistent with the interpretation of the HAMH as the geophysical manifestation of a Large Igneous Province. The designation "High Arctic Large Igneous Province (HALIP)" has been applied to portions of the Arctic perimeter based on geologic mapping and sampling. The designation "Alpha/Mendeleev Large Igneous Province (AMLIP)" has been applied to the offshore Alpha/Mendeleev region (e.g., Grantz et al., 2009) with boundaries defined, in large part, by magnetic anomaly patterns. We have constructed 2D and 3D models of the HAMH to investigate the structure and geometry of this significant crustal feature. We estimate the overall volume of magnetic material as between 5-10 x 10e6 km3. The area and volume of this feature are comparable with estimates for the Deccan Traps and the North Atlantic Igneous Province, but are significantly smaller than the Kerguellen or Ontong Java Plateaus (based on tables in Coffin and Eldholm, 1994). In detail we find significant correlation between shorter wavelength portions of this magnetic feature and the

  14. A smaller Macadamia from a more vagile tribe: inference of phylogenetic relationships, divergence times, and diaspore evolution in Macadamia and relatives (tribe Macadamieae; Proteaceae).

    PubMed

    Mast, Austin R; Willis, Crystal L; Jones, Eric H; Downs, Katherine M; Weston, Peter H

    2008-07-01

    Tribe Macadamieae (91 spp., 16 genera; Proteaceae) is widespread across the southern hemisphere on all major fragments of Gondwana except New Zealand and India. Macadamia is cultivated outside its natural range as a "nut" crop (notably in Hawaii, where it is the principal orchard crop). We sampled seven DNA regions and 53 morphological characters from the tribe to infer its phylogeny and address the common assumption that the distribution of the extant diversity of the tribe arose by the rafting of ancestors on Gondwanan fragments. Macadamia proves to be paraphyletic with respect to the African genus Brabejum, the South American genus Panopsis, and the Australian species Orites megacarpus. We erect two new generic names, Nothorites and Lasjia, to produce monophyly at that rank. The earliest disjunctions in the tribe are inferred to be the result of long-distance dispersal out of Australia (with one possible exception), rather than vicariance. Evolution of tardy fruit dehiscence is correlated with these dispersals, and the onset of the Antarctic Circumpolar Current (ACC) precedes them. We suggest that the ancestors of extant diversity arrived on their respective continents via the ACC, and we recognize that this is a mechanism precluded, rather than facilitated, by Gondwana's terrestrial continuity.

  15. A smaller Macadamia from a more vagile tribe: inference of phylogenetic relationships, divergence times, and diaspore evolution in Macadamia and relatives (tribe Macadamieae; Proteaceae).

    PubMed

    Mast, Austin R; Willis, Crystal L; Jones, Eric H; Downs, Katherine M; Weston, Peter H

    2008-07-01

    Tribe Macadamieae (91 spp., 16 genera; Proteaceae) is widespread across the southern hemisphere on all major fragments of Gondwana except New Zealand and India. Macadamia is cultivated outside its natural range as a "nut" crop (notably in Hawaii, where it is the principal orchard crop). We sampled seven DNA regions and 53 morphological characters from the tribe to infer its phylogeny and address the common assumption that the distribution of the extant diversity of the tribe arose by the rafting of ancestors on Gondwanan fragments. Macadamia proves to be paraphyletic with respect to the African genus Brabejum, the South American genus Panopsis, and the Australian species Orites megacarpus. We erect two new generic names, Nothorites and Lasjia, to produce monophyly at that rank. The earliest disjunctions in the tribe are inferred to be the result of long-distance dispersal out of Australia (with one possible exception), rather than vicariance. Evolution of tardy fruit dehiscence is correlated with these dispersals, and the onset of the Antarctic Circumpolar Current (ACC) precedes them. We suggest that the ancestors of extant diversity arrived on their respective continents via the ACC, and we recognize that this is a mechanism precluded, rather than facilitated, by Gondwana's terrestrial continuity. PMID:21632410

  16. HUBBLE FRONTIER FIELDS FIRST COMPLETE CLUSTER DATA: FAINT GALAXIES AT z ∼ 5-10 FOR UV LUMINOSITY FUNCTIONS AND COSMIC REIONIZATION

    SciTech Connect

    Ishigaki, Masafumi; Ouchi, Masami; Ono, Yoshiaki; Kawamata, Ryota; Shimasaku, Kazuhiro; Oguri, Masamune

    2015-01-20

    We present comprehensive analyses of faint dropout galaxies up to z ∼ 10 with the first full-depth data set of the A2744 lensing cluster and parallel fields observed by the Hubble Frontier Fields (HFF) program. We identify 54 dropouts at z ∼ 5-10 in the HFF fields and enlarge the size of the z ∼ 9 galaxy sample obtained to date. Although the number of highly magnified (μ ∼ 10) galaxies is small because of the tiny survey volume of strong lensing, our study reaches the galaxies' intrinsic luminosities comparable to the deepest-field HUDF studies. We derive UV luminosity functions with these faint dropouts, carefully evaluating by intensive simulations the combination of observational incompleteness and lensing effects in the image plane, including magnification, distortion, and multiplication of images, with the evaluation of mass model dependencies. Our results confirm that the faint-end slope, α, is as steep as –2 at z ∼ 6-8 and strengthen the evidence for the rapid decrease of UV luminosity densities, ρ{sub UV}, at z > 8 from the large z ∼ 9 sample. We examine whether the rapid ρ{sub UV} decrease trend can be reconciled with the large Thomson scattering optical depth, τ{sub e}, measured by cosmic microwave background experiments, allowing a large space of free parameters, such as an average ionizing photon escape fraction and a stellar-population-dependent conversion factor. No parameter set can reproduce both the rapid ρ{sub UV} decrease and the large τ {sub e}. It is possible that the ρ{sub UV} decrease moderates at z ≳ 11, that the free parameters significantly evolve toward high z, or that there exist additional sources of reionization such as X-ray binaries and faint active galactic nuclei.

  17. Manganese [III] Tetrakis [5,10,15,20]-Benzoic Acid Porphyrin Reduces Adiposity and Improves Insulin Action in Mice with Pre-Existing Obesity

    PubMed Central

    Brestoff, Jonathan R.; Brodsky, Tim; Sosinsky, Alexandra Z.; McLoughlin, Ryan; Stansky, Elena; Fussell, Leila; Sheppard, Aaron; DiSanto-Rose, Maria; Kershaw, Erin E.; Reynolds, Thomas H.

    2015-01-01

    The superoxide dismutase mimetic manganese [III] tetrakis [5,10,15,20]-benzoic acid porphyrin (MnTBAP) is a potent antioxidant compound that has been shown to limit weight gain during short-term high fat feeding without preventing insulin resistance. However, whether MnTBAP has therapeutic potential to treat pre-existing obesity and insulin resistance remains unknown. To investigate this, mice were treated with MnTBAP or vehicle during the last five weeks of a 24-week high fat diet (HFD) regimen. MnTBAP treatment significantly decreased body weight and reduced white adipose tissue (WAT) mass in mice fed a HFD and a low fat diet (LFD). The reduction in adiposity was associated with decreased caloric intake without significantly altering energy expenditure, indicating that MnTBAP decreases adiposity in part by modulating energy balance. MnTBAP treatment also improved insulin action in HFD-fed mice, a physiologic response that was associated with increased protein kinase B (PKB) phosphorylation and expression in muscle and WAT. Since MnTBAP is a metalloporphyrin molecule, we hypothesized that its ability to promote weight loss and improve insulin sensitivity was regulated by heme oxygenase-1 (HO-1), in a similar fashion as cobalt protoporphyrins. Despite MnTBAP treatment increasing HO-1 expression, administration of the potent HO-1 inhibitor tin mesoporphyrin (SnMP) did not block the ability of MnTBAP to alter caloric intake, adiposity, or insulin action, suggesting that MnTBAP influences these metabolic processes independent of HO-1. These data demonstrate that MnTBAP can ameliorate pre-existing obesity and improve insulin action by reducing caloric intake and increasing PKB phosphorylation and expression. PMID:26397111

  18. Effects of coarse chalk dust particles (2.5-10 μm) on respiratory burst and oxidative stress in alveolar macrophages.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Yuexia; Yang, Zhenhua; Feng, Yan; Li, Ruijin; Zhang, Quanxi; Geng, Hong; Dong, Chuan

    2015-08-01

    The main aim of the present study was to examine in vitro responses of rat alveolar macrophages (AMs) exposed to coarse chalk dust particles (particulate matter in the size range 2.5-10 μm, PM(coarse)) by respiratory burst and oxidative stress. Chalk PM(coarse)-induced respiratory burst in AMs was measured by using a luminol-dependent chemiluminescence (CL) method. Also, the cell viability; lactate dehydrogenase (LDH) release; levels of cellular superoxide dismutase (SOD), catalase (CAT), glutathione (GSH), malondialdehyde (MDA), and acid phosphatase (ACP); plasma membrane ATPase; and extracellular nitric oxide (NO) level were determined 4 h following the treatment with the different dosages of chalk PM(coarse). The results showed that chalk PM(coarse) initiated the respiratory burst of AMs as indicated by strong CL, which was inhibited by diphenyleneiodonium chloride and L-N-nitro-L-arginine methyl ester hydrochloride. It suggested that chalk PM(coarse) induced the production of reactive oxygen species (ROS) and reactive nitrogen species (RNS) in AMs. This hypothesis was confirmed by the fact that chalk PM(coarse) resulted in a significant decrease of intracellular SOD, GSH, ACP, and ATPase levels and a notable increase of intracellular CAT, MDA content, and extracellular NO level, consequently leading to a decrease of the cell viability and a increase of LDH release. It was concluded that AMs exposed to chalk PM(coarse) can suffer from cytotoxicity which may be mediated by generation of excessive ROS/RNS. Graphical Abstract The possible mechanism of coarse chalk particles-induced adverse effects in AMs.

  19. Smaller Footprint Drilling System for Deep and Hard Rock Environments; Feasibility of Ultra-High-Speed Diamond Drilling

    SciTech Connect

    Arnis Judzis; Alan Black; Homer Robertson

    2006-03-01

    The two phase program addresses long-term developments in deep well and hard rock drilling. TerraTek believes that significant improvements in drilling deep hard rock will be obtained by applying ultra-high rotational speeds (greater than 10,000 rpm). The work includes a feasibility of concept research effort aimed at development that will ultimately result in the ability to reliably drill ''faster and deeper'' possibly with smaller, more mobile rigs. The principle focus is on demonstration testing of diamond bits rotating at speeds in excess of 10,000 rpm to achieve high rate of penetration (ROP) rock cutting with substantially lower inputs of energy and loads. The significance of the ultra-high rotary speed drilling system is the ability to drill into rock at very low weights on bit and possibly lower energy levels. The drilling and coring industry today does not practice this technology. The highest rotary speed systems in oil field and mining drilling and coring today run less than 10,000 rpm--usually well below 5,000 rpm. This document details the progress to date on the program entitled ''Smaller Footprint Drilling System for Deep and Hard Rock Environments: Feasibility of Ultra-High-Speed Diamond Drilling'' for the period starting 1 October 2004 through 30 September 2005. Additionally, research activity from 1 October 2005 through 28 February 2006 is included in this report: (1) TerraTek reviewed applicable literature and documentation and convened a project kick-off meeting with Industry Advisors in attendance. (2) TerraTek designed and planned Phase I bench scale experiments. Some difficulties continue in obtaining ultra-high speed motors. Improvements have been made to the loading mechanism and the rotational speed monitoring instrumentation. New drill bit designs have been provided to vendors for production. A more consistent product is required to minimize the differences in bit performance. A test matrix for the final core bit testing program has been

  20. Using a smaller dining plate does not suppress food intake from a buffet lunch meal in overweight, unrestrained women.

    PubMed

    Yip, Wilson; Wiessing, Katy R; Budgett, Stephanie; Poppitt, Sally D

    2013-10-01

    The aim of the study was to determine whether plate size affects ad libitum energy intake (EI) at a buffet-style lunch in overweight, yet unrestrained women. Twenty overweight/obese (BMI=25-40 kg/m(2)) women attended two study visits, and were randomly assigned to small (19.5 cm) or large (26.5 cm) diameter plate size at a free choice lunch meal. At 9 am participants were given a small (0.5 MJ) breakfast, followed at 12 noon by the lunch meal from which they ate ad lib until comfortably full. Mean (SEM) EI at lunch was 3975 (239)kJ and 3901 (249) kJ respectively for small and large plate size. There was no detectable difference in EI between the two plate sizes (P>0.05). When in a raised state of hunger and offered a palatable buffet meal, altering the diameter of the dining plate onto which food was self-served did not significantly alter ad lib EI. We conclude there was no evidence that a smaller plate suppressed EI in a group of unrestrained, overweight women encouraged to eat to appetite from a wide choice of items. Whether plate size is a useful cue for portion size, and hence control of EI, in individuals actively restricting intake however remains possible, and requires investigation.

  1. Bubbling bed catalytic hydropyrolysis process utilizing larger catalyst particles and smaller biomass particles featuring an anti-slugging reactor

    DOEpatents

    Marker, Terry L; Felix, Larry G; Linck, Martin B; Roberts, Michael J

    2014-09-23

    This invention relates to a process for thermochemically transforming biomass or other oxygenated feedstocks into high quality liquid hydrocarbon fuels. In particular, a catalytic hydropyrolysis reactor, containing a deep bed of fluidized catalyst particles is utilized to accept particles of biomass or other oxygenated feedstocks that are significantly smaller than the particles of catalyst in the fluidized bed. The reactor features an insert or other structure disposed within the reactor vessel that inhibits slugging of the bed and thereby minimizes attrition of the catalyst. Within the bed, the biomass feedstock is converted into a vapor-phase product, containing hydrocarbon molecules and other process vapors, and an entrained solid char product, which is separated from the vapor stream after the vapor stream has been exhausted from the top of the reactor. When the product vapor stream is cooled to ambient temperatures, a significant proportion of the hydrocarbons in the product vapor stream can be recovered as a liquid stream of hydrophobic hydrocarbons, with properties consistent with those of gasoline, kerosene, and diesel fuel. Separate streams of gasoline, kerosene, and diesel fuel may also be obtained, either via selective condensation of each type of fuel, or via later distillation of the combined hydrocarbon liquid.

  2. Ravens, New Caledonian crows and jackdaws parallel great apes in motor self-regulation despite smaller brains

    PubMed Central

    Kabadayi, Can; Taylor, Lucy A.; von Bayern, Auguste M. P.; Osvath, Mathias

    2016-01-01

    Overriding motor impulses instigated by salient perceptual stimuli represent a fundamental inhibitory skill. Such motor self-regulation facilitates more rational behaviour, as it brings economy into the bodily interaction with the physical and social world. It also underlies certain complex cognitive processes including decision making. Recently, MacLean et al. (MacLean et al. 2014 Proc. Natl Acad. Sci. USA 111, 2140–2148. (doi:10.1073/pnas.1323533111)) conducted a large-scale study involving 36 species, comparing motor self-regulation across taxa. They concluded that absolute brain size predicts level of performance. The great apes were most successful. Only a few of the species tested were birds. Given birds' small brain size—in absolute terms—yet flexible behaviour, their motor self-regulation calls for closer study. Corvids exhibit some of the largest relative avian brain sizes—although small in absolute measure—as well as the most flexible cognition in the animal kingdom. We therefore tested ravens, New Caledonian crows and jackdaws in the so-called cylinder task. We found performance indistinguishable from that of great apes despite the much smaller brains. We found both absolute and relative brain volume to be a reliable predictor of performance within Aves. The complex cognition of corvids is often likened to that of great apes; our results show further that they share similar fundamental cognitive mechanisms. PMID:27152224

  3. Using a smaller dining plate does not suppress food intake from a buffet lunch meal in overweight, unrestrained women.

    PubMed

    Yip, Wilson; Wiessing, Katy R; Budgett, Stephanie; Poppitt, Sally D

    2013-10-01

    The aim of the study was to determine whether plate size affects ad libitum energy intake (EI) at a buffet-style lunch in overweight, yet unrestrained women. Twenty overweight/obese (BMI=25-40 kg/m(2)) women attended two study visits, and were randomly assigned to small (19.5 cm) or large (26.5 cm) diameter plate size at a free choice lunch meal. At 9 am participants were given a small (0.5 MJ) breakfast, followed at 12 noon by the lunch meal from which they ate ad lib until comfortably full. Mean (SEM) EI at lunch was 3975 (239)kJ and 3901 (249) kJ respectively for small and large plate size. There was no detectable difference in EI between the two plate sizes (P>0.05). When in a raised state of hunger and offered a palatable buffet meal, altering the diameter of the dining plate onto which food was self-served did not significantly alter ad lib EI. We conclude there was no evidence that a smaller plate suppressed EI in a group of unrestrained, overweight women encouraged to eat to appetite from a wide choice of items. Whether plate size is a useful cue for portion size, and hence control of EI, in individuals actively restricting intake however remains possible, and requires investigation. PMID:23727256

  4. First fixations in face processing: the more diagnostic they are the smaller the face-inversion effect.

    PubMed

    Hills, Peter J; Cooper, Rachel E; Pake, J Michael

    2013-02-01

    Hills, Ross, and Lewis (2011) introduced the concept that the face-inversion effect may, in part, be carried by the first feature attended to, since the first feature fixated upon is different for upright and inverted faces. An eye-tracking study that directly assesses this hypothesis by using fixation crosses to guide attention to the eye or mouth region of the to-be-presented upright and inverted faces was devised. Recognition was better when the fixation cross appeared at the eye region than at the mouth region. The face-inversion effect was smaller when the eyes were cued than when the mouth was cued or when there was no cueing. The eye-tracking measures confirmed that the fixation crosses attracted the first fixation but did not affect other measures of eye-movements. Furthermore, the location of the first fixation predicted recognition accuracy: when the first fixation was to the eyes, recognition accuracy was higher than when the first fixation was to the mouth, irrespective of facial orientation. The results suggest that the first facial feature attended to is more predictive of recognition accuracy than the face orientation in which they are presented.

  5. Higher Media Multi-Tasking Activity Is Associated with Smaller Gray-Matter Density in the Anterior Cingulate Cortex

    PubMed Central

    Loh, Kep Kee; Kanai, Ryota

    2014-01-01

    Media multitasking, or the concurrent consumption of multiple media forms, is increasingly prevalent in today’s society and has been associated with negative psychosocial and cognitive impacts. Individuals who engage in heavier media-multitasking are found to perform worse on cognitive control tasks and exhibit more socio-emotional difficulties. However, the neural processes associated with media multi-tasking remain unexplored. The present study investigated relationships between media multitasking activity and brain structure. Research has demonstrated that brain structure can be altered upon prolonged exposure to novel environments and experience. Thus, we expected differential engagements in media multitasking to correlate with brain structure variability. This was confirmed via Voxel-Based Morphometry (VBM) analyses: Individuals with higher Media Multitasking Index (MMI) scores had smaller gray matter density in the anterior cingulate cortex (ACC). Functional connectivity between this ACC region and the precuneus was negatively associated with MMI. Our findings suggest a possible structural correlate for the observed decreased cognitive control performance and socio-emotional regulation in heavy media-multitaskers. While the cross-sectional nature of our study does not allow us to specify the direction of causality, our results brought to light novel associations between individual media multitasking behaviors and ACC structure differences. PMID:25250778

  6. Lipoprotein hydrophobic core lipids are partially extruded to surface in smaller HDL: "Herniated" HDL, a common feature in diabetes.

    PubMed

    Amigó, Núria; Mallol, Roger; Heras, Mercedes; Martínez-Hervás, Sergio; Blanco Vaca, Francisco; Escolà-Gil, Joan Carles; Plana, Núria; Yanes, Óscar; Masana, Lluís; Correig, Xavier

    2016-01-18

    Recent studies have shown that pharmacological increases in HDL cholesterol concentrations do not necessarily translate into clinical benefits for patients, raising concerns about its predictive value for cardiovascular events. Here we hypothesize that the size-modulated lipid distribution within HDL particles is compromised in metabolic disorders that have abnormal HDL particle sizes, such as type 2 diabetes mellitus (DM2). By using NMR spectroscopy combined with a biochemical volumetric model we determined the size and spatial lipid distribution of HDL subclasses in a cohort of 26 controls and 29 DM2 patients before and after two drug treatments, one with niacin plus laropiprant and another with fenofibrate as an add-on to simvastatin. We further characterized the HDL surface properties using atomic force microscopy and fluorescent probes to show an abnormal lipid distribution within smaller HDL particles, a subclass particularly enriched in the DM2 patients. The reduction in the size, force cholesterol esters and triglycerides to emerge from the HDL core to the surface, making the outer surface of HDL more hydrophobic. Interestingly, pharmacological interventions had no effect on this undesired configuration, which may explain the lack of clinical benefits in DM2 subjects.

  7. CONCEPTUAL DESIGN FOR A RADICALLY SMALLER, HIGHLY ADAPTIVE AND APPLICATION-FLEXIBLE MINING MACHINE FOR UTILITY AND DEVELOPMENT WORK

    SciTech Connect

    Andrew H. Stern

    2004-12-20

    The aim of this research project was to develop a preliminary ''conceptual design'' for a radically smaller, highly adaptive and application-flexible underground coal mining machine, for performing non-production utility work and/or also undertake limited production mining for the recovery of reserves that would otherwise be lost. Whereas historically, mining philosophies have reflected a shift to increasing larger mechanized systems [such as the continuous miner (CM)], specific mining operations that do not benefit from the economy of the large mining equipment are often ignored or addressed with significant inefficiencies. Developing this prototype concept will create a new class of equipment that can provide opportunities to re-think the very structure of the mining system across a broad range of possibilities, not able to be met by existing machinery. The approach involved pooling the collective input from mining professionals, using a structured listing of desired inputs in the form of a questionnaire, which was used to define the range of desired design specifications. From these inputs, a conceptual specification was blended, by the author, to embody the general concurrence of mission concepts for this machine.

  8. Ravens, New Caledonian crows and jackdaws parallel great apes in motor self-regulation despite smaller brains.

    PubMed

    Kabadayi, Can; Taylor, Lucy A; von Bayern, Auguste M P; Osvath, Mathias

    2016-04-01

    Overriding motor impulses instigated by salient perceptual stimuli represent a fundamental inhibitory skill. Such motor self-regulation facilitates more rational behaviour, as it brings economy into the bodily interaction with the physical and social world. It also underlies certain complex cognitive processes including decision making. Recently, MacLean et al. (MacLean et al. 2014 Proc. Natl Acad. Sci. USA 111, 2140-2148. (doi:10.1073/pnas.1323533111)) conducted a large-scale study involving 36 species, comparing motor self-regulation across taxa. They concluded that absolute brain size predicts level of performance. The great apes were most successful. Only a few of the species tested were birds. Given birds' small brain size-in absolute terms-yet flexible behaviour, their motor self-regulation calls for closer study. Corvids exhibit some of the largest relative avian brain sizes-although small in absolute measure-as well as the most flexible cognition in the animal kingdom. We therefore tested ravens, New Caledonian crows and jackdaws in the so-called cylinder task. We found performance indistinguishable from that of great apes despite the much smaller brains. We found both absolute and relative brain volume to be a reliable predictor of performance within Aves. The complex cognition of corvids is often likened to that of great apes; our results show further that they share similar fundamental cognitive mechanisms. PMID:27152224

  9. Higher media multi-tasking activity is associated with smaller gray-matter density in the anterior cingulate cortex.

    PubMed

    Loh, Kep Kee; Kanai, Ryota

    2014-01-01

    Media multitasking, or the concurrent consumption of multiple media forms, is increasingly prevalent in today's society and has been associated with negative psychosocial and cognitive impacts. Individuals who engage in heavier media-multitasking are found to perform worse on cognitive control tasks and exhibit more socio-emotional difficulties. However, the neural processes associated with media multi-tasking remain unexplored. The present study investigated relationships between media multitasking activity and brain structure. Research has demonstrated that brain structure can be altered upon prolonged exposure to novel environments and experience. Thus, we expected differential engagements in media multitasking to correlate with brain structure variability. This was confirmed via Voxel-Based Morphometry (VBM) analyses: Individuals with higher Media Multitasking Index (MMI) scores had smaller gray matter density in the anterior cingulate cortex (ACC). Functional connectivity between this ACC region and the precuneus was negatively associated with MMI. Our findings suggest a possible structural correlate for the observed decreased cognitive control performance and socio-emotional regulation in heavy media-multitaskers. While the cross-sectional nature of our study does not allow us to specify the direction of causality, our results brought to light novel associations between individual media multitasking behaviors and ACC structure differences.

  10. 21 CFR 73.3117 - 16,23-Dihydrodinaphtho[2,3-a:2′,3′-i] naphth [2′,3′:6,7] indolo [2,3-c] carbazole-5,10,15,17,22...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ..., DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES GENERAL LISTING OF COLOR ADDITIVES EXEMPT FROM CERTIFICATION Medical Devices § 73.3117 16,23-Dihydrodinaphtho naphth indolo carbazole-5,10,15,17,22,24-hexone. (a)...

  11. 21 CFR 73.3117 - 16,23-Dihydrodinaphtho[2,3-a:2′,3′-i] naphth [2′,3′:6,7] indolo [2,3-c] carbazole-5,10,15,17,22...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ..., DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES GENERAL LISTING OF COLOR ADDITIVES EXEMPT FROM CERTIFICATION Medical Devices § 73.3117 16,23-Dihydrodinaphtho naphth indolo carbazole-5,10,15,17,22,24-hexone. (a)...

  12. Synthesis and photocytotoxicity of S-glucosylated 5,10,15,20-Tetrakis(tetrafluorophenyl)porphyrin metal complexes as efficient (1)O(2)-generating glycoconjugates.

    PubMed

    Hirohara, Shiho; Obata, Makoto; Alitomo, Hiroki; Sharyo, Kohei; Ando, Tsuyoshi; Yano, Shigenobu; Tanihara, Masao

    2009-05-20

    5,10,15,20-Tetrakis(4-(2,3,4,6-tetra-O-acetyl-beta-d-glucopyranosylthio)-2,3,5,6-tetrafluorophenyl)porphyrin 2a and its Zn(II), Pd(II), and Pt(II) complexes 2b, 2c, and 2d were prepared in excellent yields by nucleophilic substitution of the corresponding free-base porphyrin and metalloporphyrins with acetyl 2,3,4,6-tetra-O-acetyl-1-thio-beta-d-glucopyranoside. Deprotection of 2a, 2b, 2c, and 2d by alkaline hydrolysis afforded the corresponding S-glucosylated porphyrin 3a and its metal complexes 3b, 3c, and 3d. The structures and purity of all new photosensitizers were confirmed by elemental analysis and (1)H, (13)C, and (19)F NMR, UV-vis, and steady-state luminescence spectroscopy. The relative efficiency of singlet oxygen ((1)O(2)) production increased in the order of free-base fluoroporphyrins (2a and 3a) < Zn(II) complexes (2b and 3b) < Pd(II) complexes (2c and 3c), which can be explained in terms of the heavy-atom effect, while the (1)O(2)-producing efficiency of Pt(II) complexes (2d and 3d) were exceptionally low. In vitro photocytotoxicity of these eight S-glucosylated photosensitizers was examined in HeLa cells. Although all protected photosensitizers 2a, 2b, 2c, and 2d showed no photocytotoxicity, the photosensitizers 3a, 3b, and 3c exerted potent photocytotoxicity. These results clearly indicated that the sugar moieties of 3a, 3b, and 3c act as not only water-solubility-enhancing functionalities but also cellular-uptake-enhancing elements. Photocytotoxicity testing of 3a, 3b, and 3c in the presence of reactive oxygen species inhibitors suggested that (1)O(2) is the major mediator of cell death. Hence, the Zn(II) and Pd(II) complexes 3b and 3c are promising photosensitizers having cellular uptake-facilitating units (sugar moieties) and enhanced (1)O(2) generation due to the heavy-atom effect.

  13. Associations of Sarcopenic Obesity and Dynapenic Obesity with Bone Mineral Density and Incident Fractures Over 5-10 Years in Community-Dwelling Older Adults.

    PubMed

    Scott, David; Chandrasekara, Sahan D; Laslett, Laura L; Cicuttini, Flavia; Ebeling, Peter R; Jones, Graeme

    2016-07-01

    The purpose of this study is to determine whether low muscle mass (sarcopenia) or strength (dynapenia), in the presence of obesity, are associated with increased risk for osteoporosis and non-vertebral fracture over 5-10 years in community-dwelling older adults. N = 1089 volunteers (mean ± SD age 62 ± 7 years; 51 % female) participated at baseline and 761 attended follow-up clinics (mean 5.1 ± 0.5 years later). Total body, total hip and spine BMD, and appendicular lean and total fat mass were assessed by DXA. Sarcopenic obesity and dynapenic obesity were defined as the lowest sex-specific tertiles for appendicular lean mass or lower-limb strength, respectively, and the highest sex-specific tertile for total fat mass. Fractures were self-reported on three occasions over 10.7 ± 0.7 years in 563 participants. Obese alone participants had significantly higher BMD at all sites compared with non-sarcopenic non-obese. Sarcopenic obese and dynapenic obese men had lower spine and total body BMD, respectively, and sarcopenic obese women had lower total hip BMD, compared with obese alone (all P < 0.05). Sarcopenic obese men had higher non-vertebral fracture rates compared to non-sarcopenic non-obese (incidence rate ratio: 3.0; 95 % CI 1.7-5.5), and obese alone (3.6; 1.7-7.4). Sarcopenic obese women had higher fracture rates compared with obese alone (2.8; 1.4-5.6), but this was non-significant after adjustment for total hip BMD. Sarcopenic and dynapenic obese older adults may have increased risk of osteoporosis and non-vertebral fracture relative to obese alone counterparts. Sarcopenic and dynapenic obese individuals potentially represent a subset of the obese older adult population who require closer monitoring of bone health during ageing. PMID:26939775

  14. Community Effects on Teacher Involvement in School Development Activity: A Study of Teachers in Cities, Smaller Towns and Rural Areas in Norway.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Midthassel, Unni Vere; Manger, Terje; Torsheim, Torbjorn

    2002-01-01

    Examined the effects of community type on teacher involvement in school development activity (SDA). Data on urban, small town, and rural teachers indicated that teachers in smaller towns were more involved in SDA than those in rural areas, while the differences between cities and smaller towns were not statistically significant. The impact of…

  15. Smaller Footprint Drilling System for Deep and Hard Rock Environments; Feasibility of Ultra-High-Speed Diamond Drilling

    SciTech Connect

    TerraTek, A Schlumberger Company

    2008-12-31

    The two phase program addresses long-term developments in deep well and hard rock drilling. TerraTek believes that significant improvements in drilling deep hard rock will be obtained by applying ultra-high rotational speeds (greater than 10,000 rpm). The work includes a feasibility of concept research effort aimed at development that will ultimately result in the ability to reliably drill 'faster and deeper' possibly with smaller, more mobile rigs. The principle focus is on demonstration testing of diamond bits rotating at speeds in excess of 10,000 rpm to achieve high rate of penetration (ROP) rock cutting with substantially lower inputs of energy and loads. The significance of the 'ultra-high rotary speed drilling system' is the ability to drill into rock at very low weights on bit and possibly lower energy levels. The drilling and coring industry today does not practice this technology. The highest rotary speed systems in oil field and mining drilling and coring today run less than 10,000 rpm - usually well below 5,000 rpm. This document provides the progress through two phases of the program entitled 'Smaller Footprint Drilling System for Deep and Hard Rock Environments: Feasibility of Ultra-High-Speed Diamond Drilling' for the period starting 30 June 2003 and concluding 31 March 2009. The accomplishments of Phases 1 and 2 are summarized as follows: (1) TerraTek reviewed applicable literature and documentation and convened a project kick-off meeting with Industry Advisors in attendance (see Black and Judzis); (2) TerraTek designed and planned Phase I bench scale experiments (See Black and Judzis). Improvements were made to the loading mechanism and the rotational speed monitoring instrumentation. New drill bit designs were developed to provided a more consistent product with consistent performance. A test matrix for the final core bit testing program was completed; (3) TerraTek concluded small-scale cutting performance tests; (4) Analysis of Phase 1 data

  16. SMALLER FOOTPRINT DRILLING SYSTEM FOR DEEP AND HARD ROCK ENVIRONMENTS; FEASIBILITY OF ULTRA-HIGH SPEED DIAMOND DRILLING

    SciTech Connect

    Alan Black; Arnis Judzis

    2004-10-01

    The two phase program addresses long-term developments in deep well and hard rock drilling. TerraTek believes that significant improvements in drilling deep hard rock will be obtained by applying ultra-high (greater than 10,000 rpm) rotational speeds. The work includes a feasibility of concept research effort aimed at development and test results that will ultimately result in the ability to reliably drill ''faster and deeper'' possibly with rigs having a smaller footprint to be more mobile. The principle focus is on demonstration testing of diamond bits rotating at speeds in excess of 10,000 rpm to achieve high rate of penetration rock cutting with substantially lower inputs of energy and loads. The project draws on TerraTek results submitted to NASA's ''Drilling on Mars'' program. The objective of that program was to demonstrate miniaturization of a robust and mobile drilling system that expends small amounts of energy. TerraTek successfully tested ultrahigh speed ({approx}40,000 rpm) small kerf diamond coring. Adaptation to the oilfield will require innovative bit designs for full hole drilling or continuous coring and the eventual development of downhole ultra-high speed drives. For domestic operations involving hard rock and deep oil and gas plays, improvements in penetration rates is an opportunity to reduce well costs and make viable certain field developments. An estimate of North American hard rock drilling costs is in excess of $1,200 MM. Thus potential savings of $200 MM to $600 MM are possible if drilling rates are doubled [assuming bit life is reasonable]. The net result for operators is improved profit margin as well as an improved position on reserves. The significance of the ''ultra-high rotary speed drilling system'' is the ability to drill into rock at very low weights on bit and possibly lower energy levels. The drilling and coring industry today does not practice this technology. The highest rotary speed systems in oil field and mining drilling

  17. SMALLER FOOTPRINT DRILLING SYSTEM FOR DEEP AND HARD ROCK ENVIRONMENTS; FEASIBILITY OF ULTRA-HIGH SPEED DIAMOND DRILLING

    SciTech Connect

    Alan Black; Arnis Judzis

    2004-10-01

    The two phase program addresses long-term developments in deep well and hard rock drilling. TerraTek believes that significant improvements in drilling deep hard rock will be obtained by applying ultra-high (greater than 10,000 rpm) rotational speeds. The work includes a feasibility of concept research effort aimed at development and test results that will ultimately result in the ability to reliably drill ''faster and deeper'' possibly with rigs having a smaller footprint to be more mobile. The principle focus is on demonstration testing of diamond bits rotating at speeds in excess of 10,000 rpm to achieve high rate of penetration rock cutting with substantially lower inputs of energy and loads. The project draws on TerraTek results submitted to NASA's ''Drilling on Mars'' program. The objective of that program was to demonstrate miniaturization of a robust and mobile drilling system that expends small amounts of energy. TerraTek successfully tested ultrahigh speed ({approx}40,000 rpm) small kerf diamond coring. Adaptation to the oilfield will require innovative bit designs for full hole drilling or continuous coring and the eventual development of downhole ultra-high speed drives. For domestic operations involving hard rock and deep oil and gas plays, improvements in penetration rates is an opportunity to reduce well costs and make viable certain field developments. An estimate of North American hard rock drilling costs is in excess of $1,200 MM. Thus potential savings of $200 MM to $600 MM are possible if drilling rates are doubled [assuming bit life is reasonable]. The net result for operators is improved profit margin as well as an improved position on reserves. The significance of the ''ultra-high rotary speed drilling system'' is the ability to drill into rock at very low weights on bit and possibly lower energy levels. The drilling and coring industry today does not practice this technology. The highest rotary speed systems in oil field and mining drilling

  18. Smaller Footprint Drilling System for Deep and Hard Rock Environments; Feasibility of Ultra-High-Speed Diamond Drilling

    SciTech Connect

    Arnis Judzis; Homer Robertson; Alan Black

    2006-06-22

    The two phase program addresses long-term developments in deep well and hard rock drilling. TerraTek believes that significant improvements in drilling deep hard rock will be obtained by applying ultra-high rotational speeds (greater than 10,000 rpm). The work includes a feasibility of concept research effort aimed at development that will ultimately result in the ability to reliably drill ''faster and deeper'' possibly with smaller, more mobile rigs. The principle focus is on demonstration testing of diamond bits rotating at speeds in excess of 10,000 rpm to achieve high rate of penetration (ROP) rock cutting with substantially lower inputs of energy and loads. The significance of the ''ultra-high rotary speed drilling system'' is the ability to drill into rock at very low weights on bit and possibly lower energy levels. The drilling and coring industry today does not practice this technology. The highest rotary speed systems in oil field and mining drilling and coring today run less than 10,000 rpm-usually well below 5,000 rpm. This document details the progress at the end of Phase 1 on the program entitled ''Smaller Footprint Drilling System for Deep and Hard Rock Environments: Feasibility of Ultra-High-Speed Diamond Drilling'' for the period starting 1 March 2006 and concluding 30 June 2006. (Note: Results from 1 September 2005 through 28 February 2006 were included in the previous report (see Judzis, Black, and Robertson)). Summarizing the accomplished during Phase 1: {lg_bullet} TerraTek reviewed applicable literature and documentation and convened a project kickoff meeting with Industry Advisors in attendance (see Black and Judzis). {lg_bullet} TerraTek designed and planned Phase I bench scale experiments (See Black and Judzis). Some difficulties continued in obtaining ultra-high speed motors. Improvements were made to the loading mechanism and the rotational speed monitoring instrumentation. New drill bit designs were developed to provided a more consistent

  19. High temperatures result in smaller nurseries which lower reproduction of pollinators and parasites in a brood site pollination mutualism.

    PubMed

    Krishnan, Anusha; Pramanik, Gautam Kumar; Revadi, Santosh V; Venkateswaran, Vignesh; Borges, Renee M

    2014-01-01

    In a nursery pollination mutualism, we asked whether environmental factors affected reproduction of mutualistic pollinators, non-mutualistic parasites and seed production via seasonal changes in plant traits such as inflorescence size and within-tree reproductive phenology. We examined seasonal variation in reproduction in Ficus racemosa community members that utilise enclosed inflorescences called syconia as nurseries. Temperature, relative humidity and rainfall defined four seasons: winter; hot days, cold nights; summer and wet seasons. Syconium volumes were highest in winter and lowest in summer, and affected syconium contents positively across all seasons. Greater transpiration from the nurseries was possibly responsible for smaller syconia in summer. The 3-5°C increase in mean temperatures between the cooler seasons and summer reduced fig wasp reproduction and increased seed production nearly two-fold. Yet, seed and pollinator progeny production were never negatively related in any season confirming the mutualistic fig-pollinator association across seasons. Non-pollinator parasites affected seed production negatively in some seasons, but had a surprisingly positive relationship with pollinators in most seasons. While within-tree reproductive phenology did not vary across seasons, its effect on syconium inhabitants varied with season. In all seasons, within-tree reproductive asynchrony affected parasite reproduction negatively, whereas it had a positive effect on pollinator reproduction in winter and a negative effect in summer. Seasonally variable syconium volumes probably caused the differential effect of within-tree reproductive phenology on pollinator reproduction. Within-tree reproductive asynchrony itself was positively affected by intra-tree variation in syconium contents and volume, creating a unique feedback loop which varied across seasons. Therefore, nursery size affected fig wasp reproduction, seed production and within-tree reproductive phenology

  20. High temperatures result in smaller nurseries which lower reproduction of pollinators and parasites in a brood site pollination mutualism.

    PubMed

    Krishnan, Anusha; Pramanik, Gautam Kumar; Revadi, Santosh V; Venkateswaran, Vignesh; Borges, Renee M

    2014-01-01

    In a nursery pollination mutualism, we asked whether environmental factors affected reproduction of mutualistic pollinators, non-mutualistic parasites and seed production via seasonal changes in plant traits such as inflorescence size and within-tree reproductive phenology. We examined seasonal variation in reproduction in Ficus racemosa community members that utilise enclosed inflorescences called syconia as nurseries. Temperature, relative humidity and rainfall defined four seasons: winter; hot days, cold nights; summer and wet seasons. Syconium volumes were highest in winter and lowest in summer, and affected syconium contents positively across all seasons. Greater transpiration from the nurseries was possibly responsible for smaller syconia in summer. The 3-5°C increase in mean temperatures between the cooler seasons and summer reduced fig wasp reproduction and increased seed production nearly two-fold. Yet, seed and pollinator progeny production were never negatively related in any season confirming the mutualistic fig-pollinator association across seasons. Non-pollinator parasites affected seed production negatively in some seasons, but had a surprisingly positive relationship with pollinators in most seasons. While within-tree reproductive phenology did not vary across seasons, its effect on syconium inhabitants varied with season. In all seasons, within-tree reproductive asynchrony affected parasite reproduction negatively, whereas it had a positive effect on pollinator reproduction in winter and a negative effect in summer. Seasonally variable syconium volumes probably caused the differential effect of within-tree reproductive phenology on pollinator reproduction. Within-tree reproductive asynchrony itself was positively affected by intra-tree variation in syconium contents and volume, creating a unique feedback loop which varied across seasons. Therefore, nursery size affected fig wasp reproduction, seed production and within-tree reproductive phenology

  1. High Temperatures Result in Smaller Nurseries which Lower Reproduction of Pollinators and Parasites in a Brood Site Pollination Mutualism

    PubMed Central

    Krishnan, Anusha; Pramanik, Gautam Kumar; Revadi, Santosh V.; Venkateswaran, Vignesh; Borges, Renee M.

    2014-01-01

    In a nursery pollination mutualism, we asked whether environmental factors affected reproduction of mutualistic pollinators, non-mutualistic parasites and seed production via seasonal changes in plant traits such as inflorescence size and within-tree reproductive phenology. We examined seasonal variation in reproduction in Ficus racemosa community members that utilise enclosed inflorescences called syconia as nurseries. Temperature, relative humidity and rainfall defined four seasons: winter; hot days, cold nights; summer and wet seasons. Syconium volumes were highest in winter and lowest in summer, and affected syconium contents positively across all seasons. Greater transpiration from the nurseries was possibly responsible for smaller syconia in summer. The 3–5°C increase in mean temperatures between the cooler seasons and summer reduced fig wasp reproduction and increased seed production nearly two-fold. Yet, seed and pollinator progeny production were never negatively related in any season confirming the mutualistic fig–pollinator association across seasons. Non-pollinator parasites affected seed production negatively in some seasons, but had a surprisingly positive relationship with pollinators in most seasons. While within-tree reproductive phenology did not vary across seasons, its effect on syconium inhabitants varied with season. In all seasons, within-tree reproductive asynchrony affected parasite reproduction negatively, whereas it had a positive effect on pollinator reproduction in winter and a negative effect in summer. Seasonally variable syconium volumes probably caused the differential effect of within-tree reproductive phenology on pollinator reproduction. Within-tree reproductive asynchrony itself was positively affected by intra-tree variation in syconium contents and volume, creating a unique feedback loop which varied across seasons. Therefore, nursery size affected fig wasp reproduction, seed production and within-tree reproductive

  2. Theoretical analysis of aqueous solutions of mixed strong electrolytes by a smaller-ion shell electrostatic model

    SciTech Connect

    Fraenkel, Dan

    2014-02-07

    In spite of the great importance of mixed electrolytes in science and technology, no compelling theoretical explanation has been offered yet for the thermodynamic behavior of such systems, such as their deviation from ideality and the variation of their excess functions with ionic composition and concentration. Using the newly introduced Smaller-ion Shell treatment – an extension of the Debye–Hückel theory to ions of dissimilar size (hence DH–SiS) – simple analytic mathematical expressions can be derived for the mean and single-ion activity coefficients of binary electrolyte components of ternary ionic systems. Such expressions are based on modifying the parallel DH–SiS equations for pure binary ionic systems, by adding to the three ion-size parameters – a (of counterions), b{sub +} (of positive coions), and b{sub −} (of negative coions) – a fourth parameter. For the (+ + −) system, this is “b{sub ++},” the contact distance between non-coion cations. b{sub ++} is derived from fits with experiment and, like the other b’s, is constant at varying ion concentration and combination. Four case studies are presented: (1) HCl–NaCl–H{sub 2}O, (2) HCl–NH{sub 4}Cl–H{sub 2}O, (3) (0.01 M HX)–MX–H{sub 2}O with X = Cl, Br, and with M = Li, Na, K, Cs, and (4) HCl–MCl{sub n}–H{sub 2}O with n = 2, M = Sr, Ba; and n = 3, M = Al, Ce. In all cases, theory is fully consistent with experiment when using a of the measured binary electrolyte as the sole fitting parameter. DH–SiS is thus shown to explain known “mysteries” in the behavior of ternary electrolytes, including Harned rule, and to adequately predict the pH of acid solutions in which ionized salts are present at different concentrations.

  3. Measuring thermal behavior in smaller insects: A case study in Drosophila melanogaster demonstrates effects of sex, geographic origin, and rearing temperature on adult behavior.

    PubMed

    Rajpurohit, Subhash; Schmidt, Paul S

    2016-10-01

    Measuring thermal behavior in smaller insects is particularly challenging. In this study, we describe a new horizontal thermal gradient apparatus designed to study adult thermal behavior in small insects and apply it using D. melanogaster as a model and case study. Specifically, we used this apparatus and associated methodology to examine the effects of sex, geographic origin, and developmental rearing temperature on temperature preferences exhibited by adults in a controlled laboratory environment. The thermal gradient established by the apparatus was stable over diurnal and calendar time. Furthermore, the distribution of adult flies across thermal habitats within the apparatus remained stable following the period of acclimation, as evidenced by the high degree of repeatability across both biological and technical replicates. Our data demonstrate significant and predictable variation in temperature preference for all 3 assayed variables. Behaviorally, females were more sensitive than males to higher temperatures. Flies originating from high latitude, temperate populations exhibited a greater preference for cooler temperatures; conversely, flies originating from low latitude, tropical habitats demonstrated a relative preference for higher temperatures. Similarly, larval rearing temperature was positively associated with adult thermal behavior: low culture temperatures increased the relative adult preference for cooler temperatures, and this response was distinct between the sexes and for flies from the temperate and subtropical geographic regions. Together, these results demonstrate that the temperature chamber apparatus elicits robust, predictable, and quantifiable thermal preference behavior that could readily be applied to other taxa to examine the role of temperature-mediated behavior in a variety of contexts.

  4. In vitro photodynamic activity of chloro(5,10,15,20-tetraphenylporphyrinato)indium(III) loaded-poly(lactide-co-glycolide) nanoparticles in LNCaP prostate tumour cells.

    PubMed

    da Silva, André Romero; Inada, Natalia Mayumi; Rettori, Daniel; Baratti, Mariana Ozello; Vercesi, Anibal Eugenio; Jorge, Renato Atilio

    2009-02-01

    In(III)-meso-tetraphenylporphyrin (InTPP) was encapsulated into nanoparticles (smaller than 200 nm) of poly(d,l-lactide-co-glycolide) (PLGA) using the emulsification-evaporation technique. The photodynamic efficacy of InTPP-loaded nanoparticles and its cellular uptake was investigated with LNCaP prostate tumour cells, in comparison with the free InTPP. The effects of incubation time (1-3h), drug concentration (1.8-7.7 micromol/L) and incident light dose (15-45 J/cm(2)) with both encapsulated and free InTPP were studied. The type of cell death induced by the photochemical process using both encapsulated and free InTPP was also investigated. Cell viability was reduced more significantly with increasing values of these effects for InTPP-loaded nanoparticles than with the free drug. The cellular death induced by both encapsulated and free InTPP was preponderantly apoptotic. Confocal laser scanning microscopy data showed that the InTPP-loaded nanoparticles, as well free InTPP, were localized in the cells, and always in the perinuclear region. Encapsulated InTPP was measured by the intensity of fluorescence intensity of cell extracts and was three times more internalized into the cells than was the free InTPP. Electron paramagnetic resonance experiments corroborated the participation of singlet oxygen in the photocytotoxic effect of nanoparticles loaded with InTPP. PMID:19070504

  5. Potassium monopersulfate oxidation of 2,4,6-tribromophenol catalyzed by a SiO2-supported iron(III)-5,10,15,20-tetrakis(4-carboxyphenyl)porphyrin.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Qianqian; Mizutani, Yusuke; Maeno, Shohei; Nishimoto, Ryo; Miyamoto, Takafumi; Fukushima, Masami

    2013-01-01

    Iron(III)-porphyrin complexes are generally regarded as green catalysts, since they mimic the catalytic center of cytochrome-P450 and widely used as green catalysts for degrading halogenated phenols in wastewater, such as landfill leachates. However, iron(III)-porphyrins are deactivated by self-oxidation in the presence of an oxygen donor, such as KHSO5. In the present study, to enhance the reusability of an iron(III)-porphyrin catalyst, iron(III)-5,10,15,20-tetrakis(4-carboxyphenyl) porphyrin (FeTCPP) was immobilized on a functionalized silica gel. The oxidative degradation of 2,4,6-tribromophenol (TrBP), a widely used brominated flame retardant that is found in landfill leachates, was examined using the prepared catalyst. In addition, the influence of humic substances (HSs), major components of leachates, on the TrBP oxidation was investigated. Concerning the effect of pH, more than 90% of the TrBP was degraded in the pH range of 3-8 in the absence of HS, while the optimal pH for the reaction was in the range of pH 5-7 in the presence of HS. Although the oxidation of TrBP was inhibited in the presence of HSs, more than 90% of the TrBP was degraded in the presence of 50 mg L(-1) of HS. Thus, the prepared catalyst, SiO2-FeTCPP, showed a high catalytic activity and could be reused up to 10 times even in the presence of HS. PMID:23947696

  6. Percutaneous ethanol injection therapy is comparable to radiofrequency ablation in hepatocellular carcinoma smaller than 1.5 cm

    PubMed Central

    Yu, Su Jong; Yoon, Jung-Hwan; Lee, Jeong Min; Lee, Jae Young; Kim, Se Hyung; Cho, Young Youn; Yoo, Jeong-Ju; Lee, Minjong; Lee, Dong Hyeon; Cho, Yuri; Cho, Eun Ju; Lee, Jeong-Hoon; Kim, Yoon Jun; Kim, Chung Yong

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Although percutaneous ethanol injection therapy (PEIT) is best indicated for patients with small hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC), the survival advantage of PEIT needs confirmation in real-world practice. This study was approved by the institutional review board, and the informed consent was waived. The study included 535 consecutive patients with newly diagnosed early stage (Barcelona Clinic Liver Cancer [BCLC] 0 or A) HCC who underwent initially radiofrequency ablation (RFA) (n = 288) or PEIT (n = 247) from January 2005 to December 2010. The primary outcome was overall survival (OS) and the secondary outcome was time to progression (TTP). The longest diameters of tumors of the groups differed significantly and larger for RFA group than PEIT group (P < 0.001; 1.94 ± 0.65 cm vs 1.60 ± 0.50 cm, respectively). The 5-year OS rates were 72.2% in the RFA group and 67.4% in the PEIT group (P = 0.608). Even after propensity score matching, OS rates between the 2 groups were similar (5-year OS: 72.8% with RFA [n = 175] and 68.0% with PEIT [n = 175]) (P = 0.709). Moreover, in patients with the longest diameter of tumors (≤1.5 cm), multivariate Cox regression analysis showed that the treatment modality was not a significant prognosticator for OS (hazard ratio [HR], 1.690; 95% confidence interval [CI], 0.828–3.449; P = 0.149) and time to progression (HR, 1.160; 95% CI, 0.773–1.740; P = 0.474). PEIT and RFA show equal effectiveness in treating HCCs <1.5 cm in terms of OS and time to progression. PMID:27583865

  7. Influence of stellar multiplicity on planet formation. II. Planets are less common in multiple-star systems with separations smaller than 1500 AU

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Ji; Fischer, Debra A.; Xie, Ji-Wei; Ciardi, David R.

    2014-08-20

    Almost half of the stellar systems in the solar neighborhood are made up of multiple stars. In multiple-star systems, planet formation is under the dynamical influence of stellar companions, and the planet occurrence rate is expected to be different from that of single stars. There have been numerous studies on the planet occurrence rate of single star systems. However, to fully understand planet formation, the planet occurrence rate in multiple-star systems needs to be addressed. In this work, we infer the planet occurrence rate in multiple-star systems by measuring the stellar multiplicity rate for planet host stars. For a subsample of 56 Kepler planet host stars, we use adaptive optics (AO) imaging and the radial velocity (RV) technique to search for stellar companions. The combination of these two techniques results in high search completeness for stellar companions. We detect 59 visual stellar companions to 25 planet host stars with AO data. Three stellar companions are within 2'' and 27 within 6''. We also detect two possible stellar companions (KOI 5 and KOI 69) showing long-term RV acceleration. After correcting for a bias against planet detection in multiple-star systems due to flux contamination, we find that planet formation is suppressed in multiple-star systems with separations smaller than 1500 AU. Specifically, we find that compared to single star systems, planets in multiple-star systems occur 4.5 ± 3.2, 2.6 ± 1.0, and 1.7 ± 0.5 times less frequently when a stellar companion is present at a distance of 10, 100, and 1000 AU, respectively. This conclusion applies only to circumstellar planets; the planet occurrence rate for circumbinary planets requires further investigation.

  8. Is fracture a bigger problem for smaller animals? Force and fracture scaling for a simple model of cutting, puncture and crushing.

    PubMed

    Schofield, Robert M S; Choi, Seunghee; Coon, Joshua J; Goggans, Matthew Scott; Kreisman, Thomas F; Silver, Daniel M; Nesson, Michael H

    2016-06-01

    Many of the materials that are challenging for large animals to cut or puncture are also cut and punctured by much smaller organisms that are limited to much smaller forces. Small organisms can overcome their force limitations by using sharper tools, but one drawback may be an increased susceptibility to fracture. We use simple contact mechanics models to estimate how much smaller the diameter of the tips or edges of tools such as teeth, claws and cutting blades must be in smaller organisms in order for them to puncture or cut the same materials as larger organisms. In order to produce the same maximum stress when maximum force scales as the square of body length, the diameter of the tool region that is in contact with the target material must scale isometrically for punch-like tools (e.g. scorpion stings) on thick targets, and for crushing tools (e.g. molars). For punch-like tools on thin targets, and for cutting blades on thick targets, the tip or edge diameters must be even smaller than expected from isometry in smaller animals. The diameters of a small sample of unworn punch-like tools from a large range of animal sizes are consistent with the model, scaling isometrically or more steeply (positively allometric). In addition, we find that the force required to puncture a thin target using real biological tools scales linearly with tip diameter, as predicted by the model. We argue that, for smaller tools, the minimum energy to fracture the tool will be a greater fraction of the minimum energy required to puncture the target, making fracture more likely. Finally, energy stored in tool bending, relative to the energy to fracture the tool, increases rapidly with the aspect ratio (length/width), and we expect that smaller organisms often have to employ higher aspect ratio tools in order to puncture or cut to the required depth with available force. The extra stored energy in higher aspect ratio tools is likely to increase the probability of fracture. We discuss some

  9. Synthesis, Cytotoxic and Contraceptive Activity of 6,8,9-Trihydroxy-2-methyl-2H-naphtho[2,3-b]pyran-5,10-dione, a Pigment of Echinothrix diadema, and its Analogs.

    PubMed

    Pokhilo, Natalia D; Melman, Galina I; Kiseleva, Marina I; Denisenko, Vladimir A; Anufriev, Victor Ph

    2015-07-01

    6,8,9-Trihydroxy-2-methyl-2H-naphtho[2,3-b]pyran-5,10-dion, a pigment of the sea urchin Echinothrix diadema, and six analogs were synthesized. The cytotoxic activity and contraceptive properties of the synthesized pyranonaphthazarins have been investigated using the sperm and eggs of the sea urchin Strongylocentrotus intermedius.

  10. Application of an octa-anionic 5,10,15,20-tetra[3,5-(nido-carboranylmethyl)phenyl]porphyrin (H2OCP) as dual sensitizer for BNCT and PDT

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The applications of the octa-anionic 5,10,15,20-tetra[3,5-(nidocarboranylmethyl) phenyl]porphyrin (H2OCP) as a boron delivery agent in boron neutron capture therapy (BNCT) and a photosensitizer in photodynamic therapy (PDT) have been investigated. Using F98 Rat glioma cells, we evaluated the cytotox...

  11. The first series of 4,11-bis[(2-aminoethyl)amino]anthra[2,3-b]furan-5,10-diones: Synthesis and anti-proliferative characteristics.

    PubMed

    Shchekotikhin, Andrey E; Glazunova, Valeria A; Dezhenkova, Lyubov G; Shevtsova, Elena K; Traven', Valery F; Balzarini, Jan; Huang, Hsu-Shan; Shtil, Alexander A; Preobrazhenskaya, Maria N

    2011-01-01

    We developed the synthesis of a series of furan-fused tetracyclic analogues of the antitumor agent ametantrone. The reactions included nucleophilic substitution of propoxy groups in 4,11-dipropoxyanthra[2,3-b]furan-5,10-diones with ethylenediamines, producing the derivatives of 4,11-diaminoanthra[2,3-b]furan-5,10-dione in good yields. Studies of anti-proliferative activity on a panel of mammalian tumor cell lines demonstrated that anthra[2,3-b]furan-5,10-diones were the most potent derivatives among heteroarene-fused ametantrone analogues with one heteroatom. We identified several compounds that evoked a growth inhibitory effect at submicromolar concentrations. The anthra[2,3-b]furan-5,10-dione 9 with distal methylamino groups was markedly potent against drug-resistant cell lines with P-glycoprotein overexpression or p53 gene deletion. Furthermore, this derivative attenuated in vitro topoisomerase I-mediated DNA uncoiling at low micromolar concentrations. These results demonstrate that anthrafurandiones are a new class of heterocyclic anthraquinone derivatives with the properties potentially valuable for anticancer therapy.

  12. 21 CFR 73.3117 - 16,23-Dihydrodinaphtho[2,3-a:2′,3′-i] naphth [2′,3′:6,7] indolo [2,3-c] carbazole-5,10,15,17,22...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... Federal Food, Drug, and Cosmetic Act with respect to the contact lens in which the color additive is used... 21 Food and Drugs 1 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false 16,23-Dihydrodinaphtho naphth indolo carbazole-5,10,15,17,22,24-hexone. 73.3117 Section 73.3117 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG...

  13. The smaller, the better? The size effect of alginate beads carrying plant growth-promoting bacteria for seed coating.

    PubMed

    Berninger, Teresa; Mitter, Birgit; Preininger, Claudia

    2016-01-01

    A range of lab-scale methods for encapsulation of plant growth-promoting bacteria in alginate beads intended for seed coating was evaluated: contact-spotting, extrusion through syringe with/without vibration, ejection by robotic liquid handler, extrusion by centrifugal force and commercial devices (nanodispenser, aerodynamically assisted jetting, encapsulator). Two methods were selected based on throughput (encapsulator: 1.5-5 mL/min; syringe with subsequent pulverisation: 5 mL/min). Four bead sizes (55 ± 39 μm, 104 ± 23 μm, 188 ± 16 μm and 336 ± 20 μm after lyophilisation) were produced. Bacterial viability, release, bead morphology, seed surface coverage and attrition were investigated. Release from the smallest bead size was approximately 10 times higher than from the largest. Seed surface coverage was highest (69 ± 3%) when alginate beads produced with nozzle size 80 μm were applied. Pulverised macro-beads are an alternative option, if high throughput is top priority. PMID:26791103

  14. More use almost always a means a smaller frequency effect: Aging, bilingualism, and the weaker links hypothesis

    PubMed Central

    Gollan, Tamar H.; Montoya, Rosa I.; Cera, Cynthia; Sandoval, Tiffany C.

    2008-01-01

    The “weaker links” hypothesis proposes that bilinguals are disadvantaged relative to monolinguals on speaking tasks because they divide frequency-of-use between two languages. To test this proposal we contrasted the effects of increased word use associated with monolingualism, language dominance, and increased age on picture naming times. In two experiments, younger and older bilinguals and monolinguals named pictures with high- or low-frequency names in English and (if bilingual) also in Spanish. In Experiment 1, slowing related to bilingualism and language dominance was greater for producing low- than high-frequency names. In Experiment 2, slowing related to aging was greater for producing low-frequency names in the dominant language, but when speaking the nondominant language, increased age attenuated frequency effects and age-related slowing was limited exclusively to high-frequency names. These results challenge competition based accounts of bilingual disadvantages in language production, and illustrate how between-group processing differences may emerge from cognitive mechanisms general to all speakers. PMID:19343088

  15. Higher intron loss rate in Arabidopsis thaliana than A. lyrata is consistent with stronger selection for a smaller genome.

    PubMed

    Fawcett, Jeffrey A; Rouzé, Pierre; Van de Peer, Yves

    2012-02-01

    The number of introns varies considerably among different organisms. This can be explained by the differences in the rates of intron gain and loss. Two factors that are likely to influence these rates are selection for or against introns and the mutation rate that generates the novel intron or the intronless copy. Although it has been speculated that stronger selection for a compact genome might result in a higher rate of intron loss and a lower rate of intron gain, clear evidence is lacking, and the role of selection in determining these rates has not been established. Here, we studied the gain and loss of introns in the two closely related species Arabidopsis thaliana and A. lyrata as it was recently shown that A. thaliana has been undergoing a faster genome reduction driven by selection. We found that A. thaliana has lost six times more introns than A. lyrata since the divergence of the two species but gained very few introns. We suggest that stronger selection for genome reduction probably resulted in the much higher intron loss rate in A. thaliana, although further analysis is required as we could not find evidence that the loss rate increased in A. thaliana as opposed to having decreased in A. lyrata compared with the rate in the common ancestor. We also examined the pattern of the intron gains and losses to better understand the mechanisms by which they occur. Microsimilarity was detected between the splice sites of several gained and lost introns, suggesting that nonhomologous end joining repair of double-strand breaks might be a common pathway not only for intron gain but also for intron loss.

  16. Lower vapor concentrations in solvent workplaces in larger-scale enterprises than in smaller-scale enterprises, and exceptions.

    PubMed

    Ukai, Hirohiko; Okamoto, Satoru; Takada, Shiro; Yamada, Chikahisa; Ikeda, Masayuki

    2004-04-01

    The aim of the present study was to investigate the relationship between environmental vapor concentrations in organic solvent workplaces and size of enterprises, and to examine if occupational hygiene conditions were better in larger-scale enterprises. For this purpose, a total of 3,567 solvent workplaces were surveyed for environmental solvent vapor concentrations in 1999 to 2002. The results were classified by the size of enterprises (taking the number of employees as an indicator) and by the type of solvent work. It was observed that the vapor concentration in a typical small-scale enterprise was approximately three times as high as that in the large-scale enterprise, although the administrative control levels were not exceeded in general. The proportion of testing and research work (with less use of organic solvents and thus low vapor concentrations) among all solvent workplaces was higher in large-scale enterprises than in small-scale enterprises. The vapor concentrations in this type of workplace did not differ however irrespective of the enterprise size. Further comparison in various types of solvent workplaces disclosed similar size-dependent difference in workplaces for degreasing, cleaning, wiping, printing, and surface coating. In painting and solvent-drying work, in contrast, there was no difference in environmental concentration regardless of the size of enterprises, possibly because environmental improvement of this type of workplaces was technically more difficult than others. Thus, it was concluded that large-scale enterprises generally had better control of work environments than small-scale enterprises, with possible exceptions of painting work and solvent-drying work. PMID:15128177

  17. The ups and downs of global motion perception: a paradoxical advantage for smaller stimuli in the aging visual system

    PubMed Central

    Hutchinson, Claire V.; Ledgeway, Tim; Allen, Harriet A.

    2014-01-01

    Recent evidence suggests that normal aging is typically accompanied by impairment in the ability to perceive the global (overall) motion of visual objects in the world. The purpose of this study was to examine the interplay between age-related changes in the ability to perceive translational global motion (up vs. down) and important factors such as the spatial extent (size) over which movement occurs and how cluttered the moving elements are (density). We used random dot kinematograms (RDKs) and measured motion coherence thresholds (% signal elements required to reliably discriminate global direction) for young and older adults. We did so as a function of the number and density of local signal elements, and the aperture area in which they were displayed. We found that older adults’ performance was relatively unaffected by changes in aperture size, the number and density of local elements in the display. In young adults, performance was also insensitive to element number and density but was modulated markedly by display size, such that motion coherence thresholds decreased as aperture area increased (participants required fewer local elements to move coherently to determine the overall image direction). With the smallest apertures tested, young participants’ motion coherence thresholds were considerably higher (~1.5 times worse) than those of their older counterparts. Therefore, when RDK size is relatively small, older participants were actually better than young participants at processing global motion. These findings suggest that the normal (disease-free) aging process does not lead to a general decline in perceptual ability and in some cases may be visually advantageous. The results have important implications for the understanding of the consequences of aging on visual function and a number of potential explanations are explored. These include age-related changes in spatial summation, reduced cortical inhibition, neural blur and attentional resource

  18. Protein Thermostability Is Owing to Their Preferences to Non-Polar Smaller Volume Amino Acids, Variations in Residual Physico-Chemical Properties and More Salt-Bridges

    PubMed Central

    Panja, Anindya Sundar; Bandopadhyay, Bidyut; Maiti, Smarajit

    2015-01-01

    <0.001, respectively) in thermophilic and GLU-ARG is higher in the mesophilic proteins. The Ramachandran plot/ data suggest a higher abundance of the helix, left-handed helix, sheet, nonplanar peptide and lower occurrence of cis peptide, loop/ turn and outlier in thermophiles. Pearson’s correlation result suggests that the isoelectric points of mesophilic and thermophilic proteins are positively correlated (r = 0.93 and 0.84, respectively; p<0.001) to their corresponding charges. And their hydrophilicity is negatively associated with the corresponding hydrophobicity (r = -0.493, p<0.001 and r = -0.324, p<0.05) suggesting their reciprocal evolvement. Conclusions Present results for the first time with this large amount of datasets and multiple contributing factors suggest the greater occurrence of hydrophobicity, salt-bridges and smaller volume nonpolar residues (Gly, Ala and Val) and lesser occurrence of bulky polar residues in the thermophilic proteins. A more stoichiometric relationship amongst these factors minimized the hindrance due to side chain burial and increased compactness and secondary structural stability in thermophilic proteins. PMID:26177372

  19. Smaller magnets for smarter minds?

    PubMed

    Muggleton, Neil; Walsh, Vincent

    2012-09-01

    Human brain stimulation for therapeutic purposes has many short- and long-term limitations. The possibility of implanting magnetic, rather than electrical, stimulation devices would present a possible solution to some of the problems. The development of a new microscopic magnetic stimulation device provides a glimpse of the realisation.

  20. Think Big, Bigger ... and Smaller

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nisbett, Richard E.

    2010-01-01

    One important principle of social psychology, writes Nisbett, is that some big-seeming interventions have little or no effect. This article discusses a number of cases from the field of education that confirm this principle. For example, Head Start seems like a big intervention, but research has indicated that its effects on academic achievement…

  1. Bigger chairs at smaller tables.

    PubMed

    Ende, Jack

    2013-07-01

    As noted in the commentary by Kastor, chairs of academic clinical departments in medical schools now find themselves beleaguered by issues and responsibilities-and in reporting relationships-that are beyond the traditional scope of those positions. The situation is particularly acute in departments of medicine. This commentary suggests that departments of medicine have become too large and that chairs are no longer able to focus on the more traditional missions of the department of medicine, most notably direct clinical care and teaching. An argument is made for limiting the scope of departments' clinical and research programs, thereby enabling academic chairs to regain the level of prominence and satisfaction that has traditionally been associated with those distinguished positions. PMID:23799439

  2. Shrinking Endowments Are Smaller Targets

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Field, Kelly

    2008-01-01

    This article reports that if there's a silver lining in the dark cloud hanging over campus budgets, it may be that colleges' investment losses could ease Congress's demands for mandatory endowment payouts, at least in the short term. In part that's because colleges tend to spend greater portions of their assets when endowments dip, even if overall…

  3. Smaller Fleas: Viruses of Microorganisms

    PubMed Central

    Hyman, Paul; Abedon, Stephen T.

    2012-01-01

    Life forms can be roughly differentiated into those that are microscopic versus those that are not as well as those that are multicellular and those that, instead, are unicellular. Cellular organisms seem generally able to host viruses, and this propensity carries over to those that are both microscopic and less than truly multicellular. These viruses of microorganisms, or VoMs, in fact exist as the world's most abundant somewhat autonomous genetic entities and include the viruses of domain Bacteria (bacteriophages), the viruses of domain Archaea (archaeal viruses), the viruses of protists, the viruses of microscopic fungi such as yeasts (mycoviruses), and even the viruses of other viruses (satellite viruses). In this paper we provide an introduction to the concept of viruses of microorganisms, a.k.a., viruses of microbes. We provide broad discussion particularly of VoM diversity. VoM diversity currently spans, in total, at least three-dozen virus families. This is roughly ten families per category—bacterial, archaeal, fungal, and protist—with some virus families infecting more than one of these microorganism major taxa. Such estimations, however, will vary with further discovery and taxon assignment and also are dependent upon what forms of life one includes among microorganisms. PMID:24278736

  4. Connector Mechanism Has Smaller Stroke

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Milam, M. Bruce

    1992-01-01

    System for connecting electrical and/or fluid lines includes mechanism reducing length of stroke necessary to make or break connections. Feature enables connection and disconnection in confined space, and compensates for misalignment between connectors. Connector in active member moves upward at twice the speed of downward stroke of passive member. Stroke amplified within connector system. Applications include connections between modular electronic units, coupled vehicles, and hydraulic systems.

  5. Smaller fleas: viruses of microorganisms.

    PubMed

    Hyman, Paul; Abedon, Stephen T

    2012-01-01

    Life forms can be roughly differentiated into those that are microscopic versus those that are not as well as those that are multicellular and those that, instead, are unicellular. Cellular organisms seem generally able to host viruses, and this propensity carries over to those that are both microscopic and less than truly multicellular. These viruses of microorganisms, or VoMs, in fact exist as the world's most abundant somewhat autonomous genetic entities and include the viruses of domain Bacteria (bacteriophages), the viruses of domain Archaea (archaeal viruses), the viruses of protists, the viruses of microscopic fungi such as yeasts (mycoviruses), and even the viruses of other viruses (satellite viruses). In this paper we provide an introduction to the concept of viruses of microorganisms, a.k.a., viruses of microbes. We provide broad discussion particularly of VoM diversity. VoM diversity currently spans, in total, at least three-dozen virus families. This is roughly ten families per category-bacterial, archaeal, fungal, and protist-with some virus families infecting more than one of these microorganism major taxa. Such estimations, however, will vary with further discovery and taxon assignment and also are dependent upon what forms of life one includes among microorganisms.

  6. This Week @ NASA - 11/5/10

    NASA Video Gallery

    The Postponement of Mission STS-133 tops the billboard on This Week @ NASA. Also, EPOXI meets a Comet, NASA and LEGO build a future together, Administrator Bolden heralds ten years of ISS, KSC Twee...

  7. nem_spread Ver. 5.10

    2009-06-08

    Nem_spread reads it's input command file (default name nem_spread.inp), takes the named ExodusII geometry definition and spreads out the geometry (and optionally results) contained in that file out to a parallel disk system. The decomposition is taken from a scalar Nemesis load balance file generated by the companion utility nem_slice.

  8. Novel multi-targeting anthra[2,3-b]thiophene-5,10-diones with guanidine-containing side chains: interaction with telomeric G-quadruplex, inhibition of telomerase and topoisomerase I and cytotoxic properties.

    PubMed

    Ilyinsky, Nikolay S; Shchyolkina, Anna K; Borisova, Olga F; Mamaeva, Olga K; Zvereva, Maria I; Azhibek, Dulat M; Livshits, Mikhail A; Mitkevich, Vladimir A; Balzarini, Jan; Sinkevich, Yuri B; Luzikov, Yuri N; Dezhenkova, Lybov G; Kolotova, Ekaterina S; Shtil, Alexander A; Shchekotikhin, Andrey E; Kaluzhny, Dmitry N

    2014-10-01

    Novel generations of antitumor anthraquinones are expected to be advantageous over the conventional chemotherapeutic agents. Previous structure-activity relationship studies demonstrated an importance of the positively charged side chains conjugated to anthra[2,3-b]thiophene-5,10-dione scaffolds. Exploring a role of individual side chain moieties in binding to the duplex and G-quadruplex DNA, modulation of telomerase and topoisomerase I activities, intracellular accumulation and cytostatic potency, we herein analyzed a series of reported and newly synthesized guanidine-containing derivatives of anthra[2,3-b]thiophene-5,10-dione. We found that the number of cationic side chains (namely, two) is critical for a tight interaction with human telomeric G-quadruplex (TelQ). Along with a larger drug-TelQ association constant, the telomerase attenuation by anthrathiophenediones with two basic groups in the side chains was more pronounced than by the analogs bearing one basic group. For mono-guanidinated compounds the substituent with the amino group in the side chain provided better TelQ affinity than the methylamine residue. The intracellular uptake of the mono-guanidino derivative with two side chains was >2-fold higher than the respective value for the bis(guanidino) derivative. This difference can explain a lower antiproliferative potency of bis(guanidine) containing compounds. Thus, the modifications of side chains of anthra[2,3-b]thiophene-5,10-dione differently modulated drug-target interactions and cellular effects. Nevertheless, the selected compound 11-(3-aminopropylamino)-4-(2-guanidinoethylamino)anthra[2,3-b]thiophene-5,10-dione 13 demonstrated a high affinity to TelQ and the ability to stabilize the quadruplex structure. These properties were paralleled by reasonable potency of 13 as a telomerase/topoisomerase I inhibitor and an antiproliferative agent. These results indicate that the structural elements of anthra[2,3-b]thiophene-5,10-dione derivatives can be

  9. Design, synthesis, and biological evaluation of 1,2,3-trisubstituted-1,4-dihydrobenzo[g]quinoxaline-5,10-diones and related compounds as antifungal and antibacterial agents.

    PubMed

    Tandon, Vishnu K; Yadav, Dharmendra B; Maurya, Hardesh K; Chaturvedi, Ashok K; Shukla, Praveen K

    2006-09-01

    A series of (S)-N-(3-chloro-1,4-naphthoquinon-2-yl)-alpha-amino acid ethyl esters 3 and 1,2,3-trisubstituted-1,4-dihydrobenzo[g]quinoxaline-5,10-diones 6-23 were synthesized and evaluated for antifungal and antibacterial activities. The structure-activity relationship of these compounds was studied and the results show that the compounds 3a and 3b exhibited in vitro antifungal activity against Candida albicans, Cryptococcus neoformans, and Sporothrix schenckii whereas compounds 12 and 22 showed in vitro antibacterial activity against Klebsiella pneumoniae and Escherichia coli.

  10. Source identification and apportionment of PM2.5 and PM2.5-10 in iron and steel scrap smelting factory environment using PMF, PCFA and UNMIX receptor models.

    PubMed

    Ogundele, Lasun T; Owoade, Oyediran K; Olise, Felix S; Hopke, Philip K

    2016-10-01

    To identify the potential sources responsible for the particulate matter emission from secondary iron and steel smelting factory environment, PM2.5 and PM2.5-10 particles were collected using the low-volume air samplers twice a week for a year. The samples were analyzed for the elemental and black carbon content using x-ray fluorescence spectrometer and optical transmissometer, respectively. The average mass concentrations were 216.26, 151.68, and 138. 62 μg/m(3) for PM2.5 and 331.36, 190.01, and 184.60 μg/m(3) for PM2.5-10 for the production, outside M1 and outside M2 sites, respectively. The same size resolved data set were used as input for the positive matrix factorization (PMF), principal component factor analysis (PCFA), and Unmix (UNMIX) receptor modeling in order to identify the possible sources of particulate matter and their contribution. The PMF resolved four sources with their respective contributions were metal processing (33 %), e-waste (33 %), diesel emission (22 %) and soil (12 %) for PM2.5, and coking (50 %), soil (29 %), metal processing (16 %) and diesel combustion (5 %) for PM2.5-10. PCFA identified soil, metal processing, Pb source, and diesel combustion contributing 45, 41, 9, and 5 %, respectively to PM2.5 while metal processing, soil, coal combustion and open burning contributed 43, 38, 12, and 7 %, respectively to the PM2.5-10. Also, UNMIX identified metal processing, soil, and diesel emission with 43, 42 and 15 % contributions, respectively for the fine fraction, and metal processing (71 %), soil (21 %) and unidentified source (1 %) for the coarse fraction. The study concluded that metal processing and e-waste are the major sources contributing to the fine fraction while coking and soil contributed to the coarse fraction within the factory environment. The application of PMF, PCFA and UNMIX receptor models improved the source identification and apportionment of particulate matter drive in the study area. PMID:27645143

  11. Source identification and apportionment of PM2.5 and PM2.5-10 in iron and steel scrap smelting factory environment using PMF, PCFA and UNMIX receptor models.

    PubMed

    Ogundele, Lasun T; Owoade, Oyediran K; Olise, Felix S; Hopke, Philip K

    2016-10-01

    To identify the potential sources responsible for the particulate matter emission from secondary iron and steel smelting factory environment, PM2.5 and PM2.5-10 particles were collected using the low-volume air samplers twice a week for a year. The samples were analyzed for the elemental and black carbon content using x-ray fluorescence spectrometer and optical transmissometer, respectively. The average mass concentrations were 216.26, 151.68, and 138. 62 μg/m(3) for PM2.5 and 331.36, 190.01, and 184.60 μg/m(3) for PM2.5-10 for the production, outside M1 and outside M2 sites, respectively. The same size resolved data set were used as input for the positive matrix factorization (PMF), principal component factor analysis (PCFA), and Unmix (UNMIX) receptor modeling in order to identify the possible sources of particulate matter and their contribution. The PMF resolved four sources with their respective contributions were metal processing (33 %), e-waste (33 %), diesel emission (22 %) and soil (12 %) for PM2.5, and coking (50 %), soil (29 %), metal processing (16 %) and diesel combustion (5 %) for PM2.5-10. PCFA identified soil, metal processing, Pb source, and diesel combustion contributing 45, 41, 9, and 5 %, respectively to PM2.5 while metal processing, soil, coal combustion and open burning contributed 43, 38, 12, and 7 %, respectively to the PM2.5-10. Also, UNMIX identified metal processing, soil, and diesel emission with 43, 42 and 15 % contributions, respectively for the fine fraction, and metal processing (71 %), soil (21 %) and unidentified source (1 %) for the coarse fraction. The study concluded that metal processing and e-waste are the major sources contributing to the fine fraction while coking and soil contributed to the coarse fraction within the factory environment. The application of PMF, PCFA and UNMIX receptor models improved the source identification and apportionment of particulate matter drive in the study area.

  12. Two phosphoenolpyruvate carboxykinases coexist in the Crassulacean Acid Metabolism plant Ananas comosus. Isolation and characterization of the smaller 65 kDa form.

    PubMed

    Martín, Mariana; Rius, Sebastián Pablo; Podestá, Florencio Esteban

    2011-06-01

    Two phosphoenolpyruvate carboxykinase (PEPCK, EC 4.1.1.49) isoforms of 74 and 65 kDa were found to coexist in vivo in pineapple leaves, a constitutive Crassulacean Acid Metabolism plant. The 65 kDa form was not the result of proteolytic cleavage of the larger form since extraction methods reported to prevent PEPCK proteolysis in other plant tissues failed to yield a single immunoreactive PEPCK polypeptide in leaf extracts. In this work, the smaller form of 65 kDa was purified to homogeneity and physically and kinetically characterized and showed parameters compatible with a fully active enzyme. The specific activity was nearly twice higher for decarboxylation of oxaloacetate when compared to carboxylation of phosphoenolpyruvate. Kinetic parameters fell within the range of those estimated for other plant PEPCKs. Its activity was affected by several metabolites, as shown by inhibition by 3-phosphoglycerate, citrate, malate, fructose-1,6-bisphosphate, l-asparagine and activation of the decarboxylating activity by succinate. A break in the Arrhenius plot at about 30°C indicates that PEPCK structure is responsive to changes in temperature. The results indicate that pineapple leaves contain two PEPCK forms. The biochemical characterization of the smaller isoform performed in this work suggests that it could participate in both carbon and nitrogen metabolism in vivo by acting as a decarboxylase.

  13. Computing excess functions of ionic solutions: the smaller-ion shell model versus the primitive model. 2. Ion-size parameters.

    PubMed

    Fraenkel, Dan

    2015-01-13

    A recent Monte Carlo (MC) simulation study of the primitive model (PM) of ionic solutions ( Abbas, Z. et al. J. Phys. Chem. B 2009 , 113 , 5905 ) has resulted in an extensive "mapping" of real aqueous solutions of 1-1, 2-1, and 3-1 binary electrolytes and a list of "recommended ionic radii" for many ions. For the smaller cations, the model-experiment fitting process gave much larger radii than the respective crystallographic radii, and those cations were therefore claimed to be hydrated. In Part 1 (DOI 10.1021/ct5006938 ) of the present work, the above study for the unrestricted PM - dubbed MC-UPM - has been confronted with the Smaller-ion Shell (SiS) treatment ( Fraenkel, D. Mol. Phys. 2010 , 108 , 1435 ), or "DH-SiS", by comparing the range and quality of model-experiment fits of the mean ionic activity coefficient as a function of ionic concentration. Here I compare the ion-size parameters (ISPs) of "best fit" of the two models and argue that since ISPs derived from DH-SiS are identical with (or close to) crystallographic or thermochemical ionic diameters for both cations and anions, and they do not depend on the counterion - they are more reliable, as physicochemical entities, than the PM-derived "recommended ionic radii".

  14. Amphidynamic crystals of a steroidal bicyclo[2.2.2]octane rotor: a high symmetry group that rotates faster than smaller methyl and methoxy groups.

    PubMed

    Rodríguez-Molina, Braulio; Pérez-Estrada, Salvador; Garcia-Garibay, Miguel A

    2013-07-17

    The synthesis, crystallization, single crystal X-ray structure, and solid state dynamics of molecular rotor 3 provided with a high symmetry order and relatively cylindrical bicyclo[2.2.2]octane (BCO) rotator linked to mestranol fragments were investigated in this work. By use of solid state (13)C NMR, three rotating fragments were identified within the molecule: the BCO, the C19 methoxy and the C18 methyl groups. To determine the dynamics of the BCO group in crystals of 3 by variable temperature (1)H spin-lattice relaxation (VT (1)H T1), we determined the (1)H T1 contributions from the methoxy group C19 by carrying out measurements with the methoxy-deuterated isotopologue rotor 3-d6. The contributions from the quaternary methyl group C18 were estimated by considering the differences between the VT (1)H T1 of mestranol 8 and methoxy-deuterated mestranol 8-d3. From these studies it was determined that the BCO rotator in 3 has an activation energy of only 1.15 kcal mol(-1), with a barrier for site exchange that is smaller than those of methyl (E(a) = 1.35 kcal mol(-1)) and methoxy groups (E(a) = 1.92 kcal mol(-1)), despite their smaller moments of inertia and surface areas.

  15. Effects of collision energy and rotational quantum number on stereodynamics of the reactions: H(2S) + NH( υ = 0, j = 0, 2, 5, 10)→N(4S) + H2

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Wei; Yu, Yong-Jiang; Zhao, Gang; Yang, Chuan-Lu

    2016-08-01

    The stereodynamical properties of H(2S) + NH(v = 0, j = 0, 2, 5, 10) → N(4S) + H2 reactions are studied in this paper by using the quasi-classical trajectory (QCT) method with different collision energies on the double many-body expansion (DMBE) potential energy surface (PES) (Poveda L A and Varandas A J C 2005 Phys. Chem. Chem. Phys. 7 2867). In a range of collision energy from 2 to 20 kcal/mol, the vibrational rotational quantum numbers of the NH molecules are specifically investigated on v = 0 and j = 0, 2, 5, 10 respectively. The distributions of P(θ r ), P(ϕ r ), P(θ r ,ϕ r ), (2π/σ)(dσ 00/dω t ) differential cross-section (DCSs) and integral cross-sections(ICSs) are calculated. The ICSs, computed for collision energies from 2 kcal/mol to 20 kcal/mol, for the ground state are in good agreement with the cited data. The results show that the reagent rotational quantum number and initial collision energy both have a significant effect on the distributions of the k - j ‧, the k - k ‧- j ‧, and the k - k ‧ correlations. In addition, the DCS is found to be susceptible to collision energy, but it is not significantly affected by the rotational excitation of reagent. Project supported by the Natural Science Foundation of Shandong Province, China (Grant No. 2016ZRB01066) and the University Student’s Science and Technology Innovation Fund of Ludong University, China (Grant No. 131007).

  16. Effects of collision energy and rotational quantum number on stereodynamics of the reactions: H(2S) + NH( υ = 0, j = 0, 2, 5, 10)→N(4S) + H2

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Wei; Yu, Yong-Jiang; Zhao, Gang; Yang, Chuan-Lu

    2016-08-01

    The stereodynamical properties of H(2S) + NH(v = 0, j = 0, 2, 5, 10) → N(4S) + H2 reactions are studied in this paper by using the quasi-classical trajectory (QCT) method with different collision energies on the double many-body expansion (DMBE) potential energy surface (PES) (Poveda L A and Varandas A J C 2005 Phys. Chem. Chem. Phys. 7 2867). In a range of collision energy from 2 to 20 kcal/mol, the vibrational rotational quantum numbers of the NH molecules are specifically investigated on v = 0 and j = 0, 2, 5, 10 respectively. The distributions of P(θ r ), P(ϕ r ), P(θ r ,ϕ r ), (2π/σ)(dσ 00/dω t ) differential cross-section (DCSs) and integral cross-sections(ICSs) are calculated. The ICSs, computed for collision energies from 2 kcal/mol to 20 kcal/mol, for the ground state are in good agreement with the cited data. The results show that the reagent rotational quantum number and initial collision energy both have a significant effect on the distributions of the k – j ‧, the k – k ‧– j ‧, and the k – k ‧ correlations. In addition, the DCS is found to be susceptible to collision energy, but it is not significantly affected by the rotational excitation of reagent. Project supported by the Natural Science Foundation of Shandong Province, China (Grant No. 2016ZRB01066) and the University Student’s Science and Technology Innovation Fund of Ludong University, China (Grant No. 131007).

  17. A Selection for Assembly Reveals That a Single Amino Acid Mutant of the Bacteriophage MS2 Coat Protein Forms a Smaller Virus-like Particle.

    PubMed

    Asensio, Michael A; Morella, Norma M; Jakobson, Christopher M; Hartman, Emily C; Glasgow, Jeff E; Sankaran, Banumathi; Zwart, Peter H; Tullman-Ercek, Danielle

    2016-09-14

    Virus-like particles are used to encapsulate drugs, imaging agents, enzymes, and other biologically active molecules in order to enhance their function. However, the size of most virus-like particles is inflexible, precluding the design of appropriately sized containers for different applications. Here, we describe a chromatographic selection for virus-like particle assembly. Using this selection, we identified a single amino acid substitution to the coat protein of bacteriophage MS2 that mediates a uniform switch in particle geometry from T = 3 to T = 1 icosahedral symmetry. The resulting smaller particle retains the ability to be disassembled and reassembled in vitro and to be chemically modified to load cargo into its interior cavity. The pair of 27 and 17 nm MS2 particles will allow direct examination of the effect of size on function in established applications of virus-like particles, including drug delivery and imaging. PMID:27549001

  18. OBJECTS APPEAR SMALLER AS THEY RECEDE: HOW PROPER MOTIONS CAN DIRECTLY REVEAL THE COSMIC EXPANSION, PROVIDE GEOMETRIC DISTANCES, AND MEASURE THE HUBBLE CONSTANT

    SciTech Connect

    Darling, Jeremy

    2013-11-10

    Objects and structures gravitationally decoupled from the Hubble expansion will appear to shrink in angular size as the universe expands. Observations of extragalactic proper motions can thus directly reveal the cosmic expansion. Relatively static structures such as galaxies or galaxy clusters can potentially be used to measure the Hubble constant, and test masses in large scale structures can measure the overdensity. Since recession velocities and angular separations can be precisely measured, apparent proper motions can also provide geometric distance measurements to static structures. The apparent fractional angular compression of static objects is 15 μas yr{sup –1} in the local universe; this motion is modulated by the overdensity in dynamic expansion-decoupled structures. We use the Titov et al. quasar proper motion catalog to examine the pairwise proper motion of a sparse network of test masses. Small-separation pairs (<200 Mpc comoving) are too few to measure the expected effect, yielding an inconclusive 8.3 ± 14.9 μas yr{sup –1}. Large-separation pairs (200-1500 Mpc) show no net convergence or divergence for z < 1, –2.7 ± 3.7 μas yr{sup –1}, consistent with pure Hubble expansion and significantly inconsistent with static structures, as expected. For all pairs a 'null test' gives –0.36 ± 0.62 μas yr{sup –1}, consistent with Hubble expansion and excludes a static locus at ∼5-10σ significance for z ≅ 0.5-2.0. The observed large-separation pairs provide a reference frame for small-separation pairs that will significantly deviate from the Hubble flow. The current limitation is the number of small-separation objects with precise astrometry, but Gaia will address this and will likely detect the cosmic recession.

  19. Modification of yield and composition of essential oils by distillation time

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Field and laboratory experiments were conducted to model the length of the steam distillation time (DT) on essential oil yield and oil composition of peppermint, lemongrass, and palmarosa oils. The DTs tested were 1.25, 2.5, 5, 10, 20, 40, 80, and 160 min for peppermint, and 1.25, 2.5, 5, 10, 20, 40...

  20. Generic delimitations, biogeography and evolution in the tribe Coleeae (Bignoniaceae), endemic to Madagascar and the smaller islands of the western Indian Ocean.

    PubMed

    Callmander, Martin W; Phillipson, Peter B; Plunkett, Gregory M; Edwards, Molly B; Buerki, Sven

    2016-03-01

    This study presents the most complete generic phylogenetic framework to date for the tribe Coleeae (Bignoniaceae), which is endemic to Madagascar and the other smaller islands in the western part of the Indian Ocean. The study is based on plastid and nuclear DNA regions and includes 47 species representing the five currently recognized genera (including all the species occurring in the western Indian Ocean region). Bayesian and maximum likelihood analyses supported (i) the monophyly of the tribe, (ii) the monophyly of Phylloctenium, Phyllarthron and Rhodocolea and (iii) the paraphyly of Colea due to the inclusion of species of Ophiocolea. The latter genus was also recovered paraphyletic due to the inclusion of two species of Colea (C. decora and C. labatii). The taxonomic implications of the mutual paraphyly of these two genera are discussed in light of morphological evidence, and it is concluded that the two genera should be merged, and the necessary new nomenclatural combinations are provided. The phylogenetic framework shows Phylloctenium, which is endemic to Madagascar and restricted to dry ecosystems, as basal and sister to the rest of the tribe, suggesting Madagascar to be the centre of origin of this clade. The remaining genera are diversified mostly in humid ecosystems, with evidence of multiple dispersals to the neighboring islands, including at least two to the Comoros, one to Mauritius and one to the Seychelles. Finally, we hypothesize that the ecological success of this tribe might have been triggered by a shift of fruit-dispersal mode from wind to lemur.

  1. Phase Transitions of PYR14-TFSI as a Function of Pressure and Temperature: the Competition between Smaller Volume and Lower Energy Conformer.

    PubMed

    Capitani, F; Trequattrini, F; Palumbo, O; Paolone, A; Postorino, P

    2016-03-24

    A detailed Raman study has been carried out on the ionic liquid 1-butyl-1-methylpyrrolidinium bis(trifluoromethanesulfonyl)imide (PYR14-TFSI) over a wide pressure (0-8 GPa) and temperature (100-300 K) range. The explored thermodynamic region allowed us to study the evolution of the system across different solid and liquid phases. Calculated Raman spectra remarkably helped in the spectral data analysis. In particular, the pressure behavior of the most intense Raman peak and the shape analysis of the ruby fluorescence (used as a local pressure gauge) allowed us to identify a liquid-solid transition around 2.2 GPa at T = 300 K. The low-frequency Raman signal as well as the absence of remarkable spectral shape modifications on crossing the above threshold and the comparison with the spectra of the crystalline phase suggest a glassy nature of the high-pressure phase. A detailed analysis of the pressure dependence of the relative concentration of two conformers of TFSI allowed us to obtain an estimate of the volume variation between trans-TFSI and the smaller cis-TFSI, which is the favored configuration on applying the pressure. Finally, the combined use of both visual inspection and Raman spectroscopy confirmed the peculiar sequence of phase transitions observed as a function of temperature at ambient pressure and the different spectral/morphological characteristics of the two crystalline phases. PMID:26937556

  2. Lipoprotein hydrophobic core lipids are partially extruded to surface in smaller HDL: “Herniated” HDL, a common feature in diabetes

    PubMed Central

    Amigó, Núria; Mallol, Roger; Heras, Mercedes; Martínez-Hervás, Sergio; Blanco-Vaca, Francisco; Escolà-Gil, Joan Carles; Plana, Núria; Yanes, Óscar; Masana, Lluís; Correig, Xavier

    2016-01-01

    Recent studies have shown that pharmacological increases in HDL cholesterol concentrations do not necessarily translate into clinical benefits for patients, raising concerns about its predictive value for cardiovascular events. Here we hypothesize that the size-modulated lipid distribution within HDL particles is compromised in metabolic disorders that have abnormal HDL particle sizes, such as type 2 diabetes mellitus (DM2). By using NMR spectroscopy combined with a biochemical volumetric model we determined the size and spatial lipid distribution of HDL subclasses in a cohort of 26 controls and 29 DM2 patients before and after two drug treatments, one with niacin plus laropiprant and another with fenofibrate as an add-on to simvastatin. We further characterized the HDL surface properties using atomic force microscopy and fluorescent probes to show an abnormal lipid distribution within smaller HDL particles, a subclass particularly enriched in the DM2 patients. The reduction in the size, force cholesterol esters and triglycerides to emerge from the HDL core to the surface, making the outer surface of HDL more hydrophobic. Interestingly, pharmacological interventions had no effect on this undesired configuration, which may explain the lack of clinical benefits in DM2 subjects. PMID:26778677

  3. A smaller magnitude of exercise-induced hypoalgesia in African Americans compared to non-Hispanic Whites: A potential influence of physical activity.

    PubMed

    Umeda, Masataka; Kempka, Laura E; Greenlee, Brennan T; Weatherby, Amy C

    2016-01-01

    This study compared exercise-induced hypoalgesia (EIH) between African Americans (AAs, n=16) and non-Hispanic Whites (NHWs, n=16), and examined the potential influence of physical activity (PA) on the racial/ethnic difference in EIH. The PA levels were quantified using a questionnaire, and intensity of electrical stimulus to produce moderate pain was individually determined. Participants squeezed a hand dynamometer at 25% of their maximal strength for three minutes, followed by a three-minute post-exercise rest. Numeric ratings to electrical stimulus at the pre-determined intensity were recorded every one minute during and after exercise. Compared to NHWs, AAs reported less lifestyle PA. Both AAs and NHWs showed EIH, but AAs exhibited a smaller magnitude of EIH than NHWs. However, this difference in EIH disappeared after controlling for the lifestyle PA levels. The results suggest that AAs exhibit less efficient pain modulation than NHWs, and AAs' reduced PA could potentially explain the observed difference in EIH. PMID:26607443

  4. Selective formation of silver(i) bis-phospholane macrocycles and further evidence that gold(i) is smaller than silver(i).

    PubMed

    Streitberger, Markus; Schmied, Andy; Hoy, Reinhard; Hey-Hawkins, Evamarie

    2016-08-01

    A new synthetic approach to highly flexible bis-phospholanes from 1-benzylphospholane (1) as starting material is described. Silver(i) macrocycles containing 16 ([Ag2(μ-3a)2](BF4)2, 4), 20 ([Ag2(μ-3b)2](BF4)2, 5), 24 ([Ag2(μ-3c)2](BF4)2, 6), and 28 ([Ag2(μ-3d)2](BF4)2, 7) atoms in the ring were obtained in one step from AgBF4 and the respective bis-phospholane (C4H8P)(CH2)n(PC4H8) (n = 5, 7, 9, 11; 3a-d) in excellent yields. Comparison of 6 with the previously reported isomorphous complex [Au2(μ-3c)2](BF4)2 gave further evidence that gold(i) is significantly smaller than silver(i). All complexes were fully characterized by NMR and IR spectroscopy, mass spectrometry, and X-ray diffraction. PMID:27221148

  5. Faster cognitive decline in the years prior to MR imaging is associated with smaller hippocampal volumes in cognitively healthy older persons

    PubMed Central

    Fleischman, Debra A.; Yu, Lei; Arfanakis, Konstantinos; Han, S. Duke; Barnes, Lisa L.; Arvanitakis, Zoe; Boyle, Patricia A.; Bennett, David A.

    2013-01-01

    Early identification of persons at risk for cognitive decline in aging is critical to optimizing treatment to delay or avoid a clinical diagnosis of mild cognitive impairment (MCI) or dementia due to Alzheimer's disease (AD). To accomplish early identification, it is essential that trajectories of cognitive change be characterized and associations with established biomarkers of MCI and AD be examined during the phase in which older persons are considered cognitively healthy. Here we examined the association of rate of cognitive decline in the years leading up to structural magnetic resonance imaging with an established biomarker, hippocampal volume. The sample comprised 211 participants of the Rush Memory and Aging Project who had an average of 5.5 years of cognitive data prior to structural scanning. Results showed that there was significant variability in the trajectories of cognitive change prior to imaging and that faster cognitive decline was associated with smaller hippocampal volumes. Domain-specific analyses suggested that this association was primarily driven by decline in working memory. The results emphasize the importance of closely examining cognitive change and its association with brain structure during the years in which older persons are considered cognitively healthy. PMID:23760360

  6. Predation of Egg Masses of Oriental Tea Tortrix Homona magnanima Diakonoff and Smaller Tea Tortrix Adoxophyes honmai Yasuda by Valencia Slug Lehmannia valentiana (Férussac)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kosugi, Yukio

    The ability of the Valencia slug Lehmannia valentiana (Férussac) to prey upon egg masses of the Oriental tea tortrix Homona magnanima Diakonoff (OTT) and the Smaller tea tortrix Adoxophyes honmai Yasuda (STT) was investigated in a rearing cage and in tea fields. In the cage, Valencia slugs prey upon an average of 6.1 to 9.3 egg masses of OTT out of placed 20 egg masses per night. In the case of STT the slugs preyed upon an average of 14.3 egg masses out of 20 egg masses per night. The total number of eggs preyed upon by a Valencia slug was equivalent to the number of eggs oviposited by one OTT female or two STT females. In tea fields, Valencia slugs preyed upon the egg masses of OTT that were both experimentally attached to tea leaves and oviposited on the leaves. The number of egg masses preyed upon by slugs differed among the tea fields, and it tended to be related to the number of slugs captured in traps. Copper sprayed on the egg masses of tea tortrix had no influence on predation by Valencia slugs, however, spraying of organophosphorus and carbamate insecticides did have an influence on slugs predation.

  7. People with older age and lower FEV1%pred tend to have a smaller FVC than VC in pre-bronchodilator spirometry.

    PubMed

    Wang, Wenqiao; Ma, Dedong; Li, Tiantian; Ying, Yangyang; Xiao, Wei

    2014-04-01

    We enrolled 1772 subjects who underwent pulmonary function test before preoperative examination in our study. Pre-bronchodilator forced expiratory volume in one second (FEV1), vital capacity (VC) and forced vital capacity (FVC) were measured as primary data. According to the numerical relationship between VCmax and FVC, two groups were divided: VCmax>FVC and VCmax=FVC. Age, gender, height, weight, BMI and FEV1/FVC, FEV1%pred, FEV1/VCmax were compared between the two groups. Using multivariate logistic regression, factors related to classification of VCmax=FVC or VCmax>FVC were estimated. Of the 1772 spirometric results analyzed, 614 (34.65%) with VCmax=FVC and 1158 (65.35%) with VCmax>FVC were identified. Compared to VCmax=FVC group, subjects in VCmax>FVC group have older age (95%CI [1.50, 3.99], P<0.001), lower FEV1%pred (95%CI [-12.22, -8.07], P<0.001) and lower FEV1/VCmax (95%CI [-0.07, -0.05], P<0.001), parameters such as height, weight, BMI, FEV1/FVC showed no statistical significance. We made a conclusion that people with older age and lower FEV1%pred tend to have a smaller FVC than VC in pre-bronchdilator spirometry.

  8. Smaller and larger deletions of the Williams Beuren syndrome region implicate genes involved in mild facial phenotype, epilepsy and autistic traits

    PubMed Central

    Fusco, Carmela; Micale, Lucia; Augello, Bartolomeo; Teresa Pellico, Maria; Menghini, Deny; Alfieri, Paolo; Cristina Digilio, Maria; Mandriani, Barbara; Carella, Massimo; Palumbo, Orazio; Vicari, Stefano; Merla, Giuseppe

    2014-01-01

    Williams Beuren syndrome (WBS) is a multisystemic disorder caused by a hemizygous deletion of 1.5 Mb on chromosome 7q11.23 spanning 28 genes. A few patients with larger and smaller WBS deletion have been reported. They show clinical features that vary between isolated SVAS to the full spectrum of WBS phenotype, associated with epilepsy or autism spectrum behavior. Here we describe four patients with atypical WBS 7q11.23 deletions. Two carry ∼3.5 Mb larger deletion towards the telomere that includes Huntingtin-interacting protein 1 (HIP1) and tyrosine 3-monooxygenase/tryptophan 5-monooxigenase activation protein gamma (YWHAG) genes. Other two carry a shorter deletion of ∼1.2 Mb at centromeric side that excludes the distal WBS genes BAZ1B and FZD9. Along with previously reported cases, genotype–phenotype correlation in the patients described here further suggests that haploinsufficiency of HIP1 and YWHAG might cause the severe neurological and neuropsychological deficits including epilepsy and autistic traits, and that the preservation of BAZ1B and FZD9 genes may be related to mild facial features and moderate neuropsychological deficits. This report highlights the importance to characterize additional patients with 7q11.23 atypical deletions comparing neuropsychological and clinical features between these individuals to shed light on the pathogenic role of genes within and flanking the WBS region. PMID:23756441

  9. Generic delimitations, biogeography and evolution in the tribe Coleeae (Bignoniaceae), endemic to Madagascar and the smaller islands of the western Indian Ocean.

    PubMed

    Callmander, Martin W; Phillipson, Peter B; Plunkett, Gregory M; Edwards, Molly B; Buerki, Sven

    2016-03-01

    This study presents the most complete generic phylogenetic framework to date for the tribe Coleeae (Bignoniaceae), which is endemic to Madagascar and the other smaller islands in the western part of the Indian Ocean. The study is based on plastid and nuclear DNA regions and includes 47 species representing the five currently recognized genera (including all the species occurring in the western Indian Ocean region). Bayesian and maximum likelihood analyses supported (i) the monophyly of the tribe, (ii) the monophyly of Phylloctenium, Phyllarthron and Rhodocolea and (iii) the paraphyly of Colea due to the inclusion of species of Ophiocolea. The latter genus was also recovered paraphyletic due to the inclusion of two species of Colea (C. decora and C. labatii). The taxonomic implications of the mutual paraphyly of these two genera are discussed in light of morphological evidence, and it is concluded that the two genera should be merged, and the necessary new nomenclatural combinations are provided. The phylogenetic framework shows Phylloctenium, which is endemic to Madagascar and restricted to dry ecosystems, as basal and sister to the rest of the tribe, suggesting Madagascar to be the centre of origin of this clade. The remaining genera are diversified mostly in humid ecosystems, with evidence of multiple dispersals to the neighboring islands, including at least two to the Comoros, one to Mauritius and one to the Seychelles. Finally, we hypothesize that the ecological success of this tribe might have been triggered by a shift of fruit-dispersal mode from wind to lemur. PMID:26712485

  10. Smaller and larger deletions of the Williams Beuren syndrome region implicate genes involved in mild facial phenotype, epilepsy and autistic traits.

    PubMed

    Fusco, Carmela; Micale, Lucia; Augello, Bartolomeo; Teresa Pellico, Maria; Menghini, Deny; Alfieri, Paolo; Cristina Digilio, Maria; Mandriani, Barbara; Carella, Massimo; Palumbo, Orazio; Vicari, Stefano; Merla, Giuseppe

    2014-01-01

    Williams Beuren syndrome (WBS) is a multisystemic disorder caused by a hemizygous deletion of 1.5 Mb on chromosome 7q11.23 spanning 28 genes. A few patients with larger and smaller WBS deletion have been reported. They show clinical features that vary between isolated SVAS to the full spectrum of WBS phenotype, associated with epilepsy or autism spectrum behavior. Here we describe four patients with atypical WBS 7q11.23 deletions. Two carry ~3.5 Mb larger deletion towards the telomere that includes Huntingtin-interacting protein 1 (HIP1) and tyrosine 3-monooxygenase/tryptophan 5-monooxigenase activation protein gamma (YWHAG) genes. Other two carry a shorter deletion of ~1.2 Mb at centromeric side that excludes the distal WBS genes BAZ1B and FZD9. Along with previously reported cases, genotype-phenotype correlation in the patients described here further suggests that haploinsufficiency of HIP1 and YWHAG might cause the severe neurological and neuropsychological deficits including epilepsy and autistic traits, and that the preservation of BAZ1B and FZD9 genes may be related to mild facial features and moderate neuropsychological deficits. This report highlights the importance to characterize additional patients with 7q11.23 atypical deletions comparing neuropsychological and clinical features between these individuals to shed light on the pathogenic role of genes within and flanking the WBS region.

  11. Crystal structure of bis­(benzyl­amine-κN)[5,10,15,20-tetra­kis­(4-chloro­phen­yl)porphyrinato-κ4 N]iron(II) n-hexane monosolvate

    PubMed Central

    Dhifaoui, Selma; Harhouri, Wafa; Bujacz, Anna; Nasri, Habib

    2016-01-01

    In the title compound, [FeII(C44H24Cl4N4)(C6H5CH2NH2)2]·C6H14 or [FeII(TPP-Cl)(BzNH2)2]·n-hexane [where TPP-Cl and BzNH2 are 5,10,15,20-tetra­kis­(4-chloro­phen­yl)porphyrinate and benzyl­amine ligands, respectively], the FeII cation lies on an inversion centre and is octa­hedrally coordinated by the four pyrrole N atoms of the porphyrin ligand in the equatorial plane and by two amine N atoms of the benzyl­amine ligand in the axial sites. The crystal structure also contains one inversion-symmetric n-hexane solvent mol­ecule per complex mol­ecule. The average Fe—Npyrrole bond length [1.994 (3) Å] indicates a low-spin complex. The crystal packing is sustained by N—H⋯Cl and C—H⋯Cl hydrogen-bonding inter­actions and by C—H⋯π inter­molecular inter­actions, leading to a three-dimensional network structure. PMID:26870596

  12. Electrical and physical characterization of the Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}/p-GaSb interface for 1%, 5%, 10%, and 22% (NH{sub 4}){sub 2}S surface treatments

    SciTech Connect

    Peralagu, Uthayasankaran Thayne, Iain G.; Povey, Ian M.; Carolan, Patrick; Lin, Jun; Hurley, Paul K.; Contreras-Guerrero, Rocio; Droopad, Ravi

    2014-10-20

    In this work, the impact of ammonium sulfide ((NH{sub 4}){sub 2}S) surface treatment on the electrical passivation of the Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}/p-GaSb interface is studied for varying sulfide concentrations. Prior to atomic layer deposition of Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}, GaSb surfaces were treated in 1%, 5%, 10%, and 22% (NH{sub 4}){sub 2}S solutions for 10 min at 295 K. The smallest stretch-out and flatband voltage shifts coupled with the largest capacitance swing, as indicated by capacitance-voltage (CV) measurements, were obtained for the 1% treatment. The resulting interface defect trap density (D{sub it}) distribution showed a minimum value of 4 × 10{sup 12 }cm{sup −2}eV{sup −1} at E{sub v} + 0.27 eV. Transmission electron microscopy and atomic force microscopy examination revealed the formation of interfacial layers and increased roughness at the Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}/p-GaSb interface of samples treated with 10% and 22% (NH{sub 4}){sub 2}S. In combination, these effects degrade the interface quality as reflected in the CV characteristics.

  13. Crystal structure of di­aqua­[5,10,15,20-tetra­kis­(4-bromo­phen­yl)porphyrinato-κ4 N]magnesium

    PubMed Central

    Amiri, Nesrine; Nasri, Soumaya; Roisnel, Thierry; Simonneaux, Gérard; Nasri, Habib

    2015-01-01

    The title compound, [Mg(C44H24Br4N4)(H2O)2] or [Mg(TBrPP)(H2O)2], where TBrPP is the 5,10,15,20-tetra­kis­(4-bromo­phen­yl)porphyrinato ligand, was obtained unintentionally as a by-product of the reaction of the [Mg(TBrPP)] complex with an excess of di­methyl­glyoxime in di­chloro­methane. The entire mol­ecule exhibits point group symmetry 4/m. In the asymmetric unit, except for two C atoms of the phenyl ring, all other atoms lie on special positions. The MgII atom is situated at a site with symmetry 4/m, while the N and the C atoms of the porphyrin macrocycle, as well as two C atoms of the phenyl ring and the Br atom lie in the mirror plane containing the porphyrin core. The H atoms of the axially bonded water mol­ecule are incompatible with the fourfold rotation axis and are disordered over two sites. In the crystal, mol­ecules are packed in rows along [001]. Weak inter­molecular C—H⋯π and C—H⋯Br inter­actions, as well as O—H⋯Br hydrogen bonds, stabilize the crystal packing. PMID:25844215

  14. Reversible thermally induced phase transition in ordered domains of Co(II)-5,10,15,20-tetrakis-(3,5-di-tert-butylphenyl)-porphyrin on Cu(111)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stark, Michael; Ditze, Stefanie; Thomann, Michael; Lungerich, Dominik; Jux, Norbert; Steinrück, Hans-Peter; Marbach, Hubertus

    2016-08-01

    We investigated the adsorption behavior of Co(II)-5,10,15,20-tetrakis-(3,5-di-tert-butylphenyl)-porphyrin (CoTTBPP) on Cu(111) by scanning tunneling microscopy (STM). At room temperature (RT), the coverage dependent adsorption behavior follows an expected scheme: at low coverage step decoration is found, which evolves into supramolecular domains with a hexagonal order at higher coverage. Interestingly, upon cooling the sample to 180 K the occurrence of a clearly distinguishable coexisting herringbone phase is observed. Upon heating to RT again, the herringbone phase vanishes. Thus a temperature dependent, fully reversible phase transition was observed. High resolution STM micrographs allow for the determination of the intramolecular conformations which are different for the two supramolecular arrangements. In addition, we studied the bias voltage dependent appearance of the molecule in STM and assigned a dominant contribution of the central Co at negative bias voltages close to the Fermi edge to the occupied dz2 orbital. Interestingly, the herringbone phase, which dominates at 180 K, exhibits a significantly higher molecular density than the monomodal hexagonal arrangement at RT, which is in line with the "normal" behavior of freezing substances.

  15. Synthesis, FT–IR characterization and crystal structure of aqua­(5,10,15,20-tetra­phenyl­porphyrinato-κ4 N)manganese(III) tri­fluoro­methane­sulfonate

    PubMed Central

    Harhouri, Wafa; Mchiri, Chadlia; Najmudin, Shabir; Bonifácio, Cecilia; Nasri, Habib

    2016-01-01

    In the title salt, [Mn(C44H28N4)(H2O)](CF3SO3) or [MnIII(TPP)(H2O)](CF3SO3) (where TPP is the dianion of 5,10,15,20-tetra­phenyl­porphyrin), the MnIII cation is chelated by the four pyrrole N atoms of the porphyrinate anion and additionally coordinated by an aqua ligand in an apical site, completing the distorted square-pyramidal coordination environment. The average Mn—N(pyrrole) bond length is 1.998 (9) Å and the Mn—O(aqua) bond length is 2.1057 (15) Å. The central MnIII ion is displaced by 0.1575 (5) Å from the N4C20 mean plane of the porphyrinate anion towards the apical aqua ligand. The porphyrinate macrocycle exhibits a moderate ruffling and strong saddle deformations. In the crystal lattice, the [MnIII(TPP)(H2O)]+ cation and the tri­fluoro­methane­sulfonate counter-ions are arranged in alternating planes packed along [001]. The components are linked together through O—H⋯O hydrogen bonds and much weaker C—H⋯O and C—H⋯F inter­actions. The crystal packing is further stabilized by weak C—H⋯π inter­actions involving the pyrrole and phenyl rings of the porphyrin moieties. PMID:27308027

  16. Crystal structure of chlorido­{5,10,15,20-tetra­kis­[2-(2,2-di­methyl­propanamido)­phen­yl]porphyrinato-κ4 N}iron(III)

    PubMed Central

    Awasabisah, Dennis; Powell, Douglas R.; Richter-Addo, George B.

    2015-01-01

    The title compound, [Fe(C64H64N8O4)Cl], is a five-coordinate square-pyramidal porphyrin complex with a chloride ion in the axial position, being coordinated from the protected side of the porphyrin; the FeIII atom is displaced by 0.474 (5) Å from the 24-atom mean plane of the porphyrin core towards the chloride. The porphyrin moiety is a ‘picket-fence’ 5,10,15,20-tetra­kis­[2-(2,2-di­methyl­propanamido)­phen­yl]porph­yrinate (por) group. The Fe—Cl bond length is 2.221 (2) Å and the Fe—N(por) bond lengths are in the range 2.043 (5)–2.063 (5) Å. The supra­molecular architecture of the crystal is sustained by C—H⋯O inter­actions between the pyrrolic and phenyl H atoms of one mol­ecule and the carbonyl O atoms of the 2,2-di­methyl­propanamido groups of adjacent mol­ecules. The methyl groups of three of the four tert-butyl substituents exhibited rotational disorder over two positions. The investigated crystal was twinned by a twofold rotation about the (001) axis with a refined twin ratio of 0.4086 (16). PMID:25878847

  17. Ligand 5,10,15,20-tetra(N-methyl-4-pyridyl)porphine (TMPyP4) prefers the parallel propeller-type human telomeric G-quadruplex DNA over its other polymorphs.

    PubMed

    Ali, Asfa; Bansal, Manju; Bhattacharya, Santanu

    2015-01-01

    The binding of ligand 5,10,15,20-tetra(N-methyl-4-pyridyl)porphine (TMPyP4) with telomeric and genomic G-quadruplex DNA has been extensively studied. However, a comparative study of interactions of TMPyP4 with different conformations of human telomeric G-quadruplex DNA, namely, parallel propeller-type (PP), antiparallel basket-type (AB), and mixed hybrid-type (MH) G-quadruplex DNA, has not been done. We considered all the possible binding sites in each of the G-quadruplex DNA structures and docked TMPyP4 to each one of them. The resultant most potent sites for binding were analyzed from the mean binding free energy of the complexes. Molecular dynamics simulations were then carried out, and analysis of the binding free energy of the TMPyP4-G-quadruplex complex showed that the binding of TMPyP4 with parallel propeller-type G-quadruplex DNA is preferred over the other two G-quadruplex DNA conformations. The results obtained from the change in solvent excluded surface area (SESA) and solvent accessible surface area (SASA) also support the more pronounced binding of the ligand with the parallel propeller-type G-quadruplex DNA.

  18. Crystal structure of bis-(4-nitro-aniline-κN (1))(5,10,15,20-tetra-phenyl-por-phy-rin-ato-κ(4) N)cobalt(III) chloride di-chloro-methane monosolvate.

    PubMed

    Belghith, Yassine; Mansour, Anissa; Nasri, Habib

    2014-09-01

    The reaction of [Co(III)(TPP)Cl] (TPP is the dianion of 5,10,15,20-tetra-phenyl-porphyrin) with an excess of 4-nitro-aniline in di-chloro-methane leads to the title compound, [Co(III)(C44H28N4)(C6H6N2O2)2]Cl·CH2Cl2. The Co(III) ion lies on an inversion centre and is octa-hedrally coordinated by two N atoms of the NH2 groups of the two 4-nitro-aniline trans-axial ligands and four pyrrole N atoms of the porphyrin. The asymmetric unit contains one half of the [Co(III)(TPP)(4-nitro-aniline)2](+) ion complex, one chloride counter-ion (lying on a twofold rotation axis) and one half di-chloro-methane solvent mol-ecule, where the C atom lies on a twofold rotation axis. The average equatorial Co-N(pyrrole) distance (Co-Np) is 1.982 (2) Å and the axial Co-N(4-nitro-aniline) bond length is 2.006 (2) Å. The crystal packing is stabilized by an N-H⋯Cl hydrogen bond between the N atom of the amino group of the 4-nitro-aniline axial ligand and the chloride counter-ion. The supra-molecular architecture is further stabilized by weak C-H⋯π inter-actions. PMID:25309176

  19. The skeletal muscle cross sectional area in long-term bisphosphonate users is smaller than that of bone mineral density-matched controls with increased serum pentosidine concentrations.

    PubMed

    Uchiyama, Shigeharu; Ikegami, Shota; Kamimura, Mikio; Mukaiyama, Keijiro; Nakamura, Yukio; Nonaka, Kiichi; Kato, Hiroyuki

    2015-06-01

    Bisphosphonates are effective in increasing bone mineral density (BMD), but fragility fractures can still occur despite bisphosphonate treatment. The purpose of this study was to determine if long-term bisphosphonate users have characteristic findings in the musculoskeletal system, which could put them at risk of developing typical or atypical femoral fractures. We recruited 40 female patients who had taken bisphosphonates for more than 3 years. The control group included 60 volunteers who were matched by age, body mass index, and dual-energy X-ray absorptiometry-derived BMDs. We measured the skeletal muscle cross sectional area around the proximal thigh and buckling ratio of the femoral neck using quantitative computed tomography (qCT) and several biochemical markers of bone metabolism. Those parameters were compared between the groups. While no significant differences of buckling ratio derived from qCT were detected, the skeletal muscle cross sectional area was significantly smaller in the long-term bisphosphonate users than in the controls. Furthermore, the serum pentosidine level was significantly higher in the bisphosphonate users than in the controls. To determine if those differences were attributable to bisphosphonate treatment, we further compared those parameters between before and after 3 years of bisphosphonate treatment in 32 patients. After 3 years of bisphosphonate treatment, the BMD of the femoral neck and serum pentosidine level increased but not the skeletal muscle cross sectional area. In the present study, the skeletal muscle mass did not match the bone mass in long-term bisphosphonate users, thus suggesting that increases in BMD by bisphosphonates are unlikely to have secondary positive effects on the surrounding skeletal muscles. Also, serum pentosidine levels were greater in the long-term bisphosphonate users. Further study is necessary to test if such patients are prone to develop typical or atypical femoral fractures. PMID:25708052

  20. Alternative splicing generates a smaller assortment of CaV2.1 transcripts in cerebellar Purkinje cells than in the cerebellum.

    PubMed

    Kanumilli, Srinivasan; Tringham, Elizabeth W; Payne, C Elizabeth; Dupere, Jonathan R B; Venkateswarlu, Kanamarlapudi; Usowicz, Maria M

    2006-01-12

    P/Q-type calcium channels control many calcium-driven functions in the brain. The CACNA1A gene encoding the pore-forming CaV2.1 (alpha1A) subunit of P/Q-type channels undergoes alternative splicing at multiple loci. This results in channel variants with different phenotypes. However, the combinatorial patterns of alternative splice events at two or more loci, and hence the diversity of CaV2.1 transcripts, are incompletely defined for specific brain regions and types of brain neurons. Using RT-PCR and splice variant-specific primers, we have identified multiple CaV2.1 transcript variants defined by different pairs of splice events in the cerebellum of adult rat. We have uncovered new splice variations between exons 28 and 34 (some of which predict a premature stop codon) and a new variation in exon 47 (which predicts a novel extended COOH-terminus). Single cell RT-PCR reveals that each individual cerebellar Purkinje neuron also expresses multiple alternative CaV2.1 transcripts, but the assortment is smaller than in the cerebellum. Two of these variants encode different extended COOH-termini which are not the same as those previously reported in Purkinje cells of the mouse. Our patch-clamp recordings show that calcium channel currents in the soma and dendrites of Purkinje cells are largely inhibited by a concentration of omega-agatoxin IVA selective for P-type over Q-type channels, suggesting that the different transcripts may form phenotypic variants of P-type calcium channels in Purkinje cells. These results expand the known diversity of CaV2.1 transcripts in cerebellar Purkinje cells, and propose the selective expression of distinct assortments of CaV2.1 transcripts in different brain neurons and species.

  1. Decisive evidence on a smaller-than-you-think phenomenon: revisiting the "1-in-X" effect on subjective medical probabilities.

    PubMed

    Sirota, Miroslav; Juanchich, Marie; Kostopoulou, Olga; Hanak, Robert

    2014-05-01

    Accurate perception of medical probabilities communicated to patients is a cornerstone of informed decision making. People, however, are prone to biases in probability perception. Recently, Pighin and others extended the list of such biases with evidence that "1-in-X" ratios (e.g., "1 in 12") led to greater perceived probability and worry about health outcomes than "N-in-X*N" ratios (e.g., "10 in 120"). Subsequently, the recommendation was to avoid using "1-in-X" ratios when communicating probabilistic information to patients. To warrant such a recommendation, we conducted 5 well-powered replications and synthesized the available data. We found that 3 out of the 5 replications yielded statistically nonsignificant findings. In addition, our results showed that the "1-in-X" effect was not moderated by numeracy, cognitive reflection, age, or gender. To quantify the evidence for the effect, we conducted a Bayes factor meta-analysis and a traditional meta-analysis of our 5 studies and those of Pighin and others (11 comparisons, N = 1131). The meta-analytical Bayes factor, which allowed assessment of the evidence for the null hypothesis, was very low, providing decisive evidence to support the existence of the "1-in-X" effect. The traditional meta-analysis showed that the overall effect was significant (Hedges' g = 0.42, 95% CI 0.29-0.54). Overall, we provide decisive evidence for the existence of the "1-in-X" effect but suggest that it is smaller than previously estimated. Theoretical and practical implications are discussed. PMID:24310649

  2. Effect of solvent permittivity on the thermodynamic behavior of HCl solutions: analysis using the smaller-ion shell model of strong electrolytes.

    PubMed

    Fraenkel, Dan

    2011-12-15

    The recently introduced smaller-ion shell (SiS) treatment of strong binary electrolyte solutions [Fraenkel, D. Mol. Phys. 2010, 108, 1435] that extends the Debye-Hückel theory to size-dissimilar ions is very effective for many electrolytes of various families up to moderate ionic concentration. The (molal) mean ionic activity coefficient, γ(±), as a function of the reciprocal screening length, κ, hence ionic strength, I, is given by an analytic mathematical expression that incorporates the three ion-size parameters (ISPs). Experimental γ(±) data are fitted with calculated values derived from ISPs that seem to adequately represent the relevant mean effective ionic sizes. The SiS analysis has been lately shown effective for aqueous HCl, HBr, HI, and HClO(4) at 25 °C, at which the solvent permittivity, ε, is 78.4 [Fraenkel, D. J. Phys. Chem. B 2011, 115, 557]. In this paper, the behavior of HCl in solvents ranging in ε between approximately 10 and 80 is analyzed and discussed. The SiS treatment is found again suitable for computing γ(±) values that agree with experiment. Within the concentration range of the available experimental data, ion pairing is not indicated and, contrary to literature claims, HCl appears fully ionized even at 0.5 m (molal) with ε < 10. ISPs do not seem to be affected by temperature, but co-ion ISPs increase linearly with 1/ε. The chemical nature of the solution has no observable effect on γ(±) and on ISPs. The present analysis supports the view that electrolyte theories in which the solvent is considered at the McMillan-Mayer level can be successful and valuable.

  3. Robe's restricted problem of 2+2 bodies when the bigger primary is a Roche ellipsoid and the smaller primary is an oblate body

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kaur, Bhavneet; Aggarwal, Rajiv

    2014-01-01

    In this problem, one of the primaries of mass m 1 is a Roche ellipsoid filled with a homogeneous incompressible fluid of density ρ 1. The smaller primary of mass m 2 is an oblate body outside the Ellipsoid. The third and the fourth bodies (of mass m 3 and m 4 respectively) are small solid spheres of density ρ 3 and ρ 4 respectively inside the Ellipsoid, with the assumption that the mass and the radius of the third and the fourth body are infinitesimal. We assume that m 2 is describing a circle around m 1. The masses m 3 and m 4 mutually attract each other, do not influence the motions of m 1 and m 2 but are influenced by them. We have extended the Robe's restricted three-body problem to 2+2 body problem under the assumption that the fluid body assumes the shape of the Roche ellipsoid (Chandrashekhar in Ellipsoidal figures of equilibrium, Chap. 8, Dover, New York, 1987). We have taken into consideration all the three components of the pressure field in deriving the expression for the buoyancy force viz (i) due to the own gravitational field of the fluid (ii) that originating in the attraction of m 2 (iii) that arising from the centrifugal force. In this paper, equilibrium solutions of m 3 and m 4 and their linear stability are analyzed. We have proved that there exist only six equilibrium solutions of the system, provided they lie within the Roche ellipsoid. In a system where the primaries are considered as Earth-Moon and m 3, m 4 as submarines, the equilibrium solutions of m 3 and m 4 respectively when the displacement is given in the direction of x 1-axis or x 2-axis are unstable.

  4. Crystal structure of (4-cyano­pyridine-κN){5,10,15,20-tetrakis[4-(benzoyloxy)phenyl]porphyrinato-κ4 N}zinc–4-cyano­pyridine (1/1)

    PubMed Central

    Nasri, Soumaya; Amiri, Nesrine; Turowska-Tyrk, Ilona; Daran, Jean-Claude; Nasri, Habib

    2016-01-01

    In the title compound, [Zn(C72H44N4O8)(C6H4N2)]·C6H4N2 or [Zn(TPBP)(4-CNpy]·(4-CNpy) [where TPBP and 4-CNpy are 5,10,15,20-(tetra­phenyl­benzoate)porphyrinate and 4-cyano­pyridine, respectively], the ZnII cation is chelated by four pyrrole-N atoms of the porphyrinate anion and coordinated by a pyridyl-N atom of the 4-CNpy axial ligand in a distorted square-pyramidal geometry. The average Zn—N(pyrrole) bond length is 2.060 (6) Å and the Zn—N(4-CNpy) bond length is 2.159 (2) Å. The zinc cation is displaced by 0.319 (1) Å from the N4C20 mean plane of the porphyrinate anion toward the 4-cyano­pyridine axial ligand. This porphyrinate macrocycle exhibits major saddle and moderate ruffling and doming deformations. In the crystal, the [Zn(TPBP)(4-CNpy)] complex mol­ecules are linked together via weak C—H⋯N, C—H⋯O and C—H⋯π inter­actions, forming supra­molecular channels parallel to the c axis. The non-coordinating 4-cyano­pyridine mol­ecules are located in the channels and linked with the complex mol­ecules, via weak C—H⋯N inter­actions and π-π stacking or via weak C—H⋯O and C—H⋯π inter­actions. The non-coordinating 4-cyano­pyridine mol­ecule is disordered over two positions with an occupancy ratio of 0.666 (4):0.334 (4). PMID:26958379

  5. The model homologue of the partially defective human 5,10-methylenetetrahydrofolate reductase, considered as a risk factor for stroke due to increased homocysteine level, can be protected and reactivated by heat shock proteins.

    PubMed

    Grabowski, Michał; Banecki, Bogdan; Kadziński, Leszek; Jakóbkiewicz-Banecka, Joanna; Gabig-Cimińska, Magdalena; Węgrzyn, Alicja; Węgrzyn, Grzegorz; Banecka-Majkutewicz, Zyta

    2016-10-01

    The A222 V substitution in the human MTHFR gene product (5,10-methylenetetrahydrofolate reductase) is responsible for a decreased activity of this enzyme. This may cause an increased homocysteine level, considered as a risk factor for arteriosclerosis and stroke. The bacterial homologue of the human enzyme, MetF, has been found to be a useful model in genetic and biochemical studies. The similarity of Escherichia coli MetF and human MTHFR proteins is so high that particular mutations in the corresponding human gene can be reflected by the bacterial mutants. For example, the A222 V substitution in MTHFR (caused by the C667T substitution in the MTHFR gene) can be ascribed to the A117 V substitution in MetF. Here, it is reported that a temperature-sensitive MetF117 (A117 V) protein can be partially protected from a thermal inactivation by the heat shock proteins from the Hsp70/100 systems. Moreover, activity of the thermally denatured enzyme can be partially restored by the same heat shock proteins. High temperature protein G (HtpG) had no effect on MetF117 activity in both experimental systems. The presented results indicate that functions of heat shock proteins may be required for maintenance of the MetF117 function. This may have implications for the mechanisms of arteriosclerosis and stroke, especially in the light of previous findings that the A222 V MTHFR polymorphism may be a risk factor for stroke, as well as recently published results which demonstrated the increased levels of antibodies against heat shock proteins in stroke patients. PMID:27234992

  6. Crystal structure of an unknown solvate of (piperazine-κN){5,10,15,20-tetra-kis-[4-(benzo-yloxy)phen-yl]porphyrinato-κ(4) N}zinc.

    PubMed

    Nasri, Soumaya; Ezzayani, Khaireddine; Turowska-Tyrk, Ilona; Roisnel, Thierry; Nasri, Habib

    2016-07-01

    The title compound, [Zn(C72H44N4O8)(C4H10N2)] or [Zn(TPBP)(pipz] (where TPBP and pipz are 5,10,15,20-tetra-kis-[4-(benzo-yloxy)phen-yl]porphyrinato and piperazine ligands respectively), features a distorted square-pyramidal coordin-ation geometry about the central Zn(II) atom. This central atom is chelated by the four N atoms of the porphyrinate anion and further coordinated by a nitro-gen atom of the piperazine axial ligand, which adopts a chair confirmation. The average Zn-N(pyrrole) bond length is 2.078 (7) Å and the Zn- N(pipz) bond length is 2.1274 (19) Å. The zinc cation is displaced by 0.4365 (4) Å from the N4C20 mean plane of the porphyrinate anion toward the piperazine axial ligand. This porphyrinate macrocycle exhibits major saddle and moderate ruffling deformations. In the crystal, the supra-molecular structure is made by parallel pairs of layers along (100), with an inter-layer distance of 4.100 Å while the distance between two pairs of layers is 4.047 Å. A region of electron density was treated with the SQUEEZE [Spek (2015 ▸). Acta Cryst. C71, 9-18] procedure in PLATON following unsuccessful attempts to model it as being part of disordered n-hexane solvent and water mol-ecules. The given chemical formula and other crystal data do not take into account these solvent mol-ecules.

  7. Crystal structure of an unknown solvate of (piperazine-κN){5,10,15,20-tetra­kis­[4-(benzo­yloxy)phen­yl]porphyrinato-κ4 N}zinc

    PubMed Central

    Nasri, Soumaya; Ezzayani, Khaireddine; Turowska-Tyrk, Ilona; Roisnel, Thierry; Nasri, Habib

    2016-01-01

    The title compound, [Zn(C72H44N4O8)(C4H10N2)] or [Zn(TPBP)(pipz] (where TPBP and pipz are 5,10,15,20-tetra­kis­[4-(benzo­yloxy)phen­yl]porphyrinato and piperazine ligands respectively), features a distorted square-pyramidal coordin­ation geometry about the central ZnII atom. This central atom is chelated by the four N atoms of the porphyrinate anion and further coordinated by a nitro­gen atom of the piperazine axial ligand, which adopts a chair confirmation. The average Zn—N(pyrrole) bond length is 2.078 (7) Å and the Zn— N(pipz) bond length is 2.1274 (19) Å. The zinc cation is displaced by 0.4365 (4) Å from the N4C20 mean plane of the porphyrinate anion toward the piperazine axial ligand. This porphyrinate macrocycle exhibits major saddle and moderate ruffling deformations. In the crystal, the supra­molecular structure is made by parallel pairs of layers along (100), with an inter­layer distance of 4.100 Å while the distance between two pairs of layers is 4.047 Å. A region of electron density was treated with the SQUEEZE [Spek (2015 ▸). Acta Cryst. C71, 9–18] procedure in PLATON following unsuccessful attempts to model it as being part of disordered n-hexane solvent and water mol­ecules. The given chemical formula and other crystal data do not take into account these solvent mol­ecules. PMID:27555935

  8. Crystal structure of an unknown solvate of (piperazine-κN){5,10,15,20-tetra-kis-[4-(benzo-yloxy)phen-yl]porphyrinato-κ(4) N}zinc.

    PubMed

    Nasri, Soumaya; Ezzayani, Khaireddine; Turowska-Tyrk, Ilona; Roisnel, Thierry; Nasri, Habib

    2016-07-01

    The title compound, [Zn(C72H44N4O8)(C4H10N2)] or [Zn(TPBP)(pipz] (where TPBP and pipz are 5,10,15,20-tetra-kis-[4-(benzo-yloxy)phen-yl]porphyrinato and piperazine ligands respectively), features a distorted square-pyramidal coordin-ation geometry about the central Zn(II) atom. This central atom is chelated by the four N atoms of the porphyrinate anion and further coordinated by a nitro-gen atom of the piperazine axial ligand, which adopts a chair confirmation. The average Zn-N(pyrrole) bond length is 2.078 (7) Å and the Zn- N(pipz) bond length is 2.1274 (19) Å. The zinc cation is displaced by 0.4365 (4) Å from the N4C20 mean plane of the porphyrinate anion toward the piperazine axial ligand. This porphyrinate macrocycle exhibits major saddle and moderate ruffling deformations. In the crystal, the supra-molecular structure is made by parallel pairs of layers along (100), with an inter-layer distance of 4.100 Å while the distance between two pairs of layers is 4.047 Å. A region of electron density was treated with the SQUEEZE [Spek (2015 ▸). Acta Cryst. C71, 9-18] procedure in PLATON following unsuccessful attempts to model it as being part of disordered n-hexane solvent and water mol-ecules. The given chemical formula and other crystal data do not take into account these solvent mol-ecules. PMID:27555935

  9. Endovascular Therapy in Strokes with ASPECTS 5-7 May Result in Smaller Infarcts and Better Outcomes as Compared to Medical Treatment Alone

    PubMed Central

    Noorian, Ali Reza; Rangaraju, Srikant; Sun, Chung-Huan; Owada, Kumiko; Nahab, Fadi; Belagaje, Samir R.; Anderson, Aaron M.; Frankel, Michael R.; Nogueira, Raul G.

    2015-01-01

    Introduction Intra-arterial therapy (IAT) for large vessel occlusion strokes (LVOS) has been increasingly utilized. The benefit of IAT in patients with midrange Alberta Stroke Program Early Computed Tomography Score (ASPECTS) remains to be established. Materials and Methods This was a retrospective analysis of LVOS with ASPECTS 5-7 treated with IAT (n = 86) or medical therapy alone (intravenous tissue plasminogen activator; n = 15) at two centers from 2009 to 2012. Definitions were as follows: symptomatic intracranial hemorrhage = any parenchymal hematoma; successful reperfusion = mTICI ≥2b; good and acceptable outcomes = 90-day mRS 0-2 and 0-3, respectively. Final infarct volumes (FIV) were calculated based on 24-hour CT/MRI scans. Results Mean age (67 ± 14 vs. 67 ± 19 years) and baseline NIHSS (20 ± 5 vs. 20 ± 6) were similar in the two groups. Successful reperfusion was achieved in 58 (67%) IAT patients. Symptomatic and asymptomatic intracranial hemorrhage occurred in 9 (10%) and 31 (36%) IAT patients, respectively. The proportion of 90-day good and acceptable outcomes was 20 (17/86) and 33% (28/86), respectively. Successful IAT reperfusion was associated with smaller FIV (p = 0.015) and higher rates of good (p = 0.01) and acceptable (p = 0.014) outcomes. There was a strong trend towards a higher hemicraniectomy requirement in medically as compared to endovascularly treated patients (20 vs. 6%; p = 0.06) despite similar in-hospital mortality. The median FIV was significantly lower with IAT versus medical therapy [80 ml (interquartile range, 38-122) vs. 190 ml (121-267); p = 0.015]. Conclusions Despite a relatively low probability of achieving functional independence, IAT in LVOS patients with ASPECTS 5-7 appears to result in lower degrees of disability and may lessen the need for hemicraniectomy. Therefore, it may be a reasonable option for patients and families who favor a shift from severe to moderate disability. PMID:26600794

  10. Intratumoral treatment of smaller mouse neuroblastoma tumors with a recombinant protein consisting of IL-2 linked to the hu14.18 antibody increases intratumoral CD8+ T and NK cells and improves survival.

    PubMed

    Yang, Richard K; Kalogriopoulos, Nicholas A; Rakhmilevich, Alexander L; Ranheim, Erik A; Seo, Songwon; Kim, Kyungmann; Alderson, Kory L; Gan, Jacek; Reisfeld, Ralph A; Gillies, Stephen D; Hank, Jacquelyn A; Sondel, Paul M

    2013-08-01

    Hu14.18-IL2 is an immunocytokine (IC) consisting of human IL-2 linked to hu14.18 mAb, which recognizes GD2 disialoganglioside. Phase II clinical trials of intravenous-hu14.18-IL2 (IV-IC) in neuroblastoma and melanoma are underway, and have already demonstrated activity in neuroblastoma. In our Phase II trial, lower neuroblastoma burden at the time of treatment was associated with a greater likelihood of clinical response to IV-IC. We have previously shown that intratumoral-hu14.18-IL2 (IT-IC) compared to IV-IC results in enhanced local and systemic antitumor activity in tumor-bearing mice. We utilized a mouse model to investigate the impact of tumor burden on hu14.18-IL2 treatment efficacy in IV- versus IT-treated animals. Studies presented here describe the analyses of tumor burden at the initiation of treatment and its effects on treatment efficacy, survival, and tumor-infiltrating leukocytes in A/J mice bearing subcutaneous NXS2 neuroblastoma. We show that smaller tumor burden at treatment initiation is associated with increased infiltration of NK and CD8+ T cells and increased overall survival. NXS2 tumor shrinkage shortly after completion of the 3 days of hu14.18-IL2 treatment is necessary for long-term survival. This model demonstrates that tumor size is a strong predictor of hu14.18-IL2-induced lymphocyte infiltration and treatment outcome.

  11. Investigation of the interactions between Pt(II) and Pd(II) derivatives of 5,10,15,20-tetrakis (N-methyl-4-pyridyl) porphyrin and G-quadruplex DNA.

    PubMed

    Sabharwal, Navin C; Mendoza, Oscar; Nicoludis, John M; Ruan, Thomas; Mergny, Jean-Louis; Yatsunyk, Liliya A

    2016-04-01

    G-quadruplexes are non-canonical DNA structures formed by guanine-rich DNA sequences that are implicated in cancer and aging. Understanding how small molecule ligands interact with quadruplexes is essential both to the development of novel anticancer therapeutics and to the design of new quadruplex-selective probes needed for elucidation of quadruplex biological functions. In this work, UV-visible, fluorescence, and circular dichroism spectroscopies, fluorescence resonance energy transfer (FRET) melting assays, and resonance light scattering were used to investigate how the Pt(II) and Pd(II) derivatives of the well-studied 5,10,15,20-tetrakis(N-methyl-4-pyridyl)porphyrin (TMPyP4) interact with quadruplexes formed by the human telomeric DNA, Tel22, and by the G-rich sequences from oncogene promoters. Our results suggest that Pt- and PdTMPyP4 interact with Tel22 via efficient π-π stacking with a binding affinity of 10(6)-10(7) M(-1). Under porphyrin excess, PtTMPyP4 aggregates using Tel22 as a template; the aggregates reach maximum size at [PtTMPyP4]/[Tel22] ~8 and dissolve at [PtTMPyP4]/[Tel22] ≤ 2. FRET assays reveal that both porphyrins are excellent stabilizers of human telomeric DNA, with stabilization temperature of 30.7 ± 0.6 °C for PtTMPyP4 and 30.9 ± 0.4 °C for PdTMPyP4 at [PtTMPyP4]/[Tel22] = 2 in K(+) buffer, values significantly higher as compared to those for TMPyP4. The porphyrins display modest selectivity for quadruplex vs. duplex DNA, with selectivity ratios of 150 and 330 for Pt- and PdTMPyP4, respectively. This selectivity was confirmed by observed 'light switch' effect: fluorescence of PtTMPyP4 increases significantly in the presence of a variety of DNA secondary structures, yet the strongest effect is produced by quadruplex DNA. PMID:26748794

  12. Does size matter? Comparison of body temperature and activity of free-living Arabian oryx (Oryx leucoryx) and the smaller Arabian sand gazelle (Gazella subgutturosa marica) in the Saudi desert.

    PubMed

    Hetem, Robyn Sheila; Strauss, Willem Maartin; Fick, Linda Gayle; Maloney, Shane Kevin; Meyer, Leith Carl Rodney; Shobrak, Mohammed; Fuller, Andrea; Mitchell, Duncan

    2012-04-01

    Heterothermy, a variability in body temperature beyond the normal limits of homeothermy, is widely viewed as a key adaptation of arid-adapted ungulates. However, desert ungulates with a small body mass, i.e. a relatively large surface area-to-volume ratio and a small thermal inertia, are theoretically less likely to employ adaptive heterothermy than are larger ungulates. We measured body temperature and activity patterns, using implanted data loggers, in free-ranging Arabian oryx (Oryx leucoryx, ±70 kg) and the smaller Arabian sand gazelle (Gazella subgutturosa marica, ±15 kg) inhabiting the same Arabian desert environment, at the same time. Compared to oryx, sand gazelle had higher mean daily body temperatures (F(1,6) = 47.3, P = 0.0005), higher minimum daily body temperatures (F(1,6) = 42.6, P = 0.0006) and higher maximum daily body temperatures (F(1,6) = 11.0, P = 0.02). Despite these differences, both species responded similarly to changes in environmental conditions. As predicted for adaptive heterothermy, maximum daily body temperature increased (F(1,6) = 84.0, P < 0.0001), minimum daily body temperature decreased (F(1,6) = 92.2, P < 0.0001), and daily body temperature amplitude increased (F(1,6) = 97.6, P < 0.0001) as conditions got progressively hotter and drier. There were no species differences in activity levels, however, both gazelle and oryx showed a biphasic or crepuscular rhythm during the warm wet season but shifted to a more nocturnal rhythm during the hot dry season. Activity was attenuated during the heat of the day at times when both species selected cool microclimates. These two species of Arabian ungulates employ heterothermy, cathemerality and shade seeking very similarly to survive the extreme, arid conditions of Arabian deserts, despite their size difference.

  13. Does size matter? Comparison of body temperature and activity of free-living Arabian oryx (Oryx leucoryx) and the smaller Arabian sand gazelle (Gazella subgutturosa marica) in the Saudi desert.

    PubMed

    Hetem, Robyn Sheila; Strauss, Willem Maartin; Fick, Linda Gayle; Maloney, Shane Kevin; Meyer, Leith Carl Rodney; Shobrak, Mohammed; Fuller, Andrea; Mitchell, Duncan

    2012-04-01

    Heterothermy, a variability in body temperature beyond the normal limits of homeothermy, is widely viewed as a key adaptation of arid-adapted ungulates. However, desert ungulates with a small body mass, i.e. a relatively large surface area-to-volume ratio and a small thermal inertia, are theoretically less likely to employ adaptive heterothermy than are larger ungulates. We measured body temperature and activity patterns, using implanted data loggers, in free-ranging Arabian oryx (Oryx leucoryx, ±70 kg) and the smaller Arabian sand gazelle (Gazella subgutturosa marica, ±15 kg) inhabiting the same Arabian desert environment, at the same time. Compared to oryx, sand gazelle had higher mean daily body temperatures (F(1,6) = 47.3, P = 0.0005), higher minimum daily body temperatures (F(1,6) = 42.6, P = 0.0006) and higher maximum daily body temperatures (F(1,6) = 11.0, P = 0.02). Despite these differences, both species responded similarly to changes in environmental conditions. As predicted for adaptive heterothermy, maximum daily body temperature increased (F(1,6) = 84.0, P < 0.0001), minimum daily body temperature decreased (F(1,6) = 92.2, P < 0.0001), and daily body temperature amplitude increased (F(1,6) = 97.6, P < 0.0001) as conditions got progressively hotter and drier. There were no species differences in activity levels, however, both gazelle and oryx showed a biphasic or crepuscular rhythm during the warm wet season but shifted to a more nocturnal rhythm during the hot dry season. Activity was attenuated during the heat of the day at times when both species selected cool microclimates. These two species of Arabian ungulates employ heterothermy, cathemerality and shade seeking very similarly to survive the extreme, arid conditions of Arabian deserts, despite their size difference. PMID:22001971

  14. Excitotoxic brain damage involves early peroxynitrite formation in a model of Huntington's disease in rats: protective role of iron porphyrinate 5,10,15,20-tetrakis (4-sulfonatophenyl)porphyrinate iron (III).

    PubMed

    Pérez-De La Cruz, V; González-Cortés, C; Galván-Arzate, S; Medina-Campos, O N; Pérez-Severiano, F; Ali, S F; Pedraza-Chaverrí, J; Santamaría, A

    2005-01-01

    Oxidative/nitrosative stress is involved in NMDA receptor-mediated excitotoxic brain damage produced by the glutamate analog quinolinic acid. The purpose of this work was to study a possible role of peroxynitrite, a reactive oxygen/nitrogen species, in the course of excitotoxic events evoked by quinolinic acid in the brain. The effects of Fe(TPPS) (5,10,15,20-tetrakis (4-sulfonatophenyl)porphyrinate iron (III)), an iron porphyrinate and putative peroxynitrite decomposition catalyst, were tested on lipid peroxidation and mitochondrial function in brain synaptic vesicles exposed to quinolinic acid, as well as on peroxynitrite formation, nitric oxide synthase and superoxide dismutase activities, lipid peroxidation, caspase-3-like activation, DNA fragmentation, and GABA levels in striatal tissue from rats lesioned by quinolinic acid. Circling behavior was also evaluated. Increasing concentrations of Fe(TPPS) reduced lipid peroxidation and mitochondrial dysfunction induced by quinolinic acid (100 microM) in synaptic vesicles in a concentration-dependent manner (10-800 microM). In addition, Fe(TPPS) (10 mg/kg, i.p.) administered 2 h before the striatal lesions, prevented the formation of peroxynitrite, the increased nitric oxide synthase activity, the decreased superoxide dismutase activity and the increased lipid peroxidation induced by quinolinic acid (240 nmol/microl) 120 min after the toxin infusion. Enhanced caspase-3-like activity and DNA fragmentation were also reduced by the porphyrinate 24 h after the injection of the excitotoxin. Circling behavior from quinolinic acid-treated rats was abolished by Fe(TPPS) six days after quinolinic acid injection, while the striatal levels of GABA, measured one day later, were partially recovered. The protective effects that Fe(TPPS) exerted on quinolinic acid-induced lipid peroxidation and mitochondrial dysfunction in synaptic vesicles suggest a primary action of the porphyrinate as an antioxidant molecule. In vivo findings

  15. Percutaneous ethanol injection therapy is comparable to radiofrequency ablation in hepatocellular carcinoma smaller than 1.5 cm: A matched case-control comparative analysis.

    PubMed

    Yu, Su Jong; Yoon, Jung-Hwan; Lee, Jeong Min; Lee, Jae Young; Kim, Se Hyung; Cho, Young Youn; Yoo, Jeong-Ju; Lee, Minjong; Lee, Dong Hyeon; Cho, Yuri; Cho, Eun Ju; Lee, Jeong-Hoon; Kim, Yoon Jun; Kim, Chung Yong

    2016-08-01

    Although percutaneous ethanol injection therapy (PEIT) is best indicated for patients with small hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC), the survival advantage of PEIT needs confirmation in real-world practice. This study was approved by the institutional review board, and the informed consent was waived. The study included 535 consecutive patients with newly diagnosed early stage (Barcelona Clinic Liver Cancer [BCLC] 0 or A) HCC who underwent initially radiofrequency ablation (RFA) (n = 288) or PEIT (n = 247) from January 2005 to December 2010. The primary outcome was overall survival (OS) and the secondary outcome was time to progression (TTP). The longest diameters of tumors of the groups differed significantly and larger for RFA group than PEIT group (P < 0.001; 1.94 ± 0.65 cm vs 1.60 ± 0.50 cm, respectively). The 5-year OS rates were 72.2% in the RFA group and 67.4% in the PEIT group (P = 0.608). Even after propensity score matching, OS rates between the 2 groups were similar (5-year OS: 72.8% with RFA [n = 175] and 68.0% with PEIT [n = 175]) (P = 0.709). Moreover, in patients with the longest diameter of tumors (≤1.5 cm), multivariate Cox regression analysis showed that the treatment modality was not a significant prognosticator for OS (hazard ratio [HR], 1.690; 95% confidence interval [CI], 0.828-3.449; P = 0.149) and time to progression (HR, 1.160; 95% CI, 0.773-1.740; P = 0.474). PEIT and RFA show equal effectiveness in treating HCCs <1.5 cm in terms of OS and time to progression. PMID:27583865

  16. Small Sample Properties of Bayesian Multivariate Autoregressive Time Series Models

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Price, Larry R.

    2012-01-01

    The aim of this study was to compare the small sample (N = 1, 3, 5, 10, 15) performance of a Bayesian multivariate vector autoregressive (BVAR-SEM) time series model relative to frequentist power and parameter estimation bias. A multivariate autoregressive model was developed based on correlated autoregressive time series vectors of varying…

  17. Coral record of paleoseismic uplifts at Ranongga Island, Western Solomon Islands megathrust: Was the 2007 Mw 8.1 event smaller than usual?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Taylor, F. W.; Thirumalai, K.; Shen, C.; WU, C.; Papabatu, A.; Lavier, L. L.; Bevis, M. G.

    2012-12-01

    The timing and amount of vertical displacements associated with past megathrust earthquakes provide the best available insights into the amounts of interplate slip that have been accommodated as coseismic slip versus other mechanisms. At Ranongga Island, Western Solomon Islands, a Mw 8.1 earthquake in 2007 helps us to calibrate the relationship between a megathrust rupture and the geography and amounts of vertical displacement recorded by reef crest corals. Along the coasts of Ranongga, parts of which have uplifted at mean rates exceeding 5 mm/yr, we discovered corals that had been raised by a series of earthquakes in the millennia before the 2007 event. The penultimate earthquake (pre-2007), which occurred around 600 years ago (U-series calendar year), was manifest as a 'level' of raised corals about 1.6 m above the 2007 level. However, in the decades preceding the 2007 event (which had imposed a coseismic uplift of 1.3 m), rapid subsidence had subtracted significant amounts of uplift imposed by the penultimate earthquake. Similarly, the sequence of three additional uplift events, preceding the penultimate event, extending to elevations up to 16 m higher than the corals raised by the 2007 event, appear to have been larger uplifts than the 2007 event. This suggests two things: 1. Many previous megathrust events caused more uplift and perhaps involved greater interplate coseismic slip, and 2. There are too few megathrust rupture events to account for the approximately 80-100 m of plate convergence that must be processed each millennium. Thus, a significant amount of plate convergence must be accommodated by mechanisms other than coseismic slip.

  18. Reconstruction of peak water levels, peak discharges and long-term occurrence of extreme- as well as smaller pre-instrumental flood events of river Aare, Limmat, Reuss, Rhine and Saane in Switzerland. Part I

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wetter, Oliver; Tuttenuj, Daniel

    2016-04-01

    systematically analysed the period from 1446-1542 and could prove a large number of pre-instrumental flood events of river Rhine, Birs, Birsig and Wiese in Basel. All in all the weekly led account books contained 54 Rhine flood events, whereas chroniclers and annalists only recorded seven floods during the same period. This is a ratio of almost eight to one. This large difference points to the significantly sharper "observation skills" of the account books towards smaller floods, which may be explained by the fact that bridges can be endangered by relatively small floods because of driftwood, whereas it is known that chroniclers or annalists were predominantly focussing on spectacular (extreme) flood events. We [Oliver Wetter and Daniel Tuttenuj] are now able to present first preliminary results of reconstructed peak water levels and peak discharges of pre instrumental river Aare-, Emme-, Limmat-, Reuss-, Rhine- and Saane floods. These first results clearly show the strengths as well as the limits of the data and method used, depending mainly on the river types. Of the above mentioned rivers only the floods of river Emme could not be reconstructed whereas the long-term development of peak water levels and peak discharges of the other rivers clearly correlate with major local and supra-regional Swiss flood corrections over time. PhD student Daniel Tuttenuj is going to present the results for river Emme and Saane (see Abstract Daniel Tuttenuj), whereas Dr Oliver Wetter is going to present the results for the other rivers and gives a first insight on long-term recurring periods of smaller river Birs-, Birsig-, Rhine- and Wiese flood events based on the analysis of the weekly led account books "Wochenausgabenbücher der Stadt Basel" (see also Abstract of Daniel Tuttenuj).

  19. Reconstruction of peak water levels, peak discharges and long-term occurrence of extreme- as well as smaller pre-instrumental flood events of river Aare, Limmat, Reuss, Rhine and Saane in Switzerland. Part II.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tuttenuj, Daniel; Wetter, Oliver

    2016-04-01

    contained 54 Rhine flood events, whereas chroniclers and annalists only recorded seven floods during the same period. This is a ratio of almost eight to one. This large difference points to the significantly sharper "observation skills" of the account books towards smaller floods, which may be explained by the fact that bridges can be endangered by relatively small floods because of driftwood, whereas it is known that chroniclers or annalists were predominantly focussing on spectacular (extreme) flood events. We [Oliver Wetter and Daniel Tuttenuj] are now able to present first preliminary results of reconstructed peak water levels and peak discharges of pre instrumental river Aare-, Emme-, Limmat-, Reuss-, Rhine- and Saane floods. These first results clearly show the strengths as well as the limits of the data and method used, depending mainly on the river types. Of the above mentioned rivers only the floods of river Emme could not be reconstructed whereas the long-term development of peak water levels and peak discharges of the other rivers clearly correlate with major local and supra-regional Swiss flood corrections over time. PhD student Daniel Tuttenuj is going to present the results of river Emme and Saane, whereas Dr Oliver Wetter is going to present the results for the other rivers and gives a first insight on long-term recurring periods of smaller river Birs, Birsig, Rhine and Wiese flood events based on the analysis of the weekly led account books "Wochenausgabenbücher der Stadt Basel" (see Abstract Oliver Wetter).

  20. Determination of the stereoisomers in aqueous medium and serum and validation studies of racemic aminoalkanol derivatives of 1,7-dimethyl-8,9-diphenyl-4-azatricyclo[5.2.1.0(2,6) ]dec-8-ene-3,5,10-trione, potential new anticancer drugs, by capillary electrophoresis.

    PubMed

    Grodner, Błażej; Łukaszkiewicz, Jacek; Napiórkowska, Mariola

    2016-08-01

    A new method for the determination of the stereoisomers, in aqueous medium and serum, of the racemic aminoalkanol derivatives I and II of 1,7-dimethyl-8,9-diphenyl-4-azatricyclo[5.2.1.0(2,6) ]dec-8-ene-3,5,10-trione, which were found in earlier studies to be potential anticancer drugs, was developed and validated. The optimized conditions included 25 mM phosphate buffer adjusted to pH 2.5, containing γ-cyclodextrin at a concentration of 5% m/v, as background electrolyte, an applied voltage of +10 kV, and a temperature of 25°C. Separations were carried out using a fused-silica capillary. The developed method of determining the enantiomers of compounds I(S), I(R) and II(S), II(R) was characterized by the following parameters: a detection time within 10.8 min, a detection limit in the range of 141.2-141.7 ng/mL using the UV absorption detection at 200 nm. Good linearity (R(2) = 0.9989-0.9998) was achieved within the range of concentrations studied. A very good extraction yield of 95.4-99.7% was achieved, and recoveries were carried out from both aqueous solutions and matrix serum. The repeatability of the method for peak areas with an accuracy of the determined concentrations of the analytes in the range of 1.43-1.89%, and limits of quantitation in the range of 432.4-436.3 ng/mL were achieved. PMID:27421088

  1. Pure manganese(III) 5,10,15,20-tetrakis(4-benzoic acid)porphyrin (MnTBAP) is not a superoxide dismutase mimic in aqueous systems: a case of structure-activity relationship as a watchdog mechanism in experimental therapeutics and biology.

    PubMed

    Rebouças, Júlio S; Spasojević, Ivan; Batinić-Haberle, Ines

    2008-02-01

    Superoxide is involved in a plethora of pathological and physiological processes via oxidative stress and/or signal transduction pathways. Superoxide dismutase (SOD) mimics have, thus, been actively sought for clinical and mechanistic purposes. Manganese(III) 5,10,15,20-tetrakis(4-benzoic acid)porphyrin (MnTBAP) is one of the most intensely explored "SOD mimics" in biology and medicine. However, we show here that this claimed SOD activity of MnTBAP in aqueous media is not corroborated by comprehensive structure-activity relationship studies for a wide set of Mn porphyrins and that MnTBAP from usual commercial sources contains different amounts of noninnocent trace impurities (Mn clusters), which inhibited xanthine oxidase and had SOD activity in their own right. In addition, the preparation and thorough characterization of a high-purity MnTBAP is presented for the first time and confirmed that pure MnTBAP has no SOD activity in aqueous medium. These findings call for an assessment of the relevance and suitability of using MnTBAP (or its impurities) as a mechanistic probe and antioxidant therapeutic; conclusions on the physiological and pathological role of superoxide derived from studies using MnTBAP of uncertain purity should be examined judiciously. An unequivocal distinction between the biological effects due to MnTBAP and that of its impurities can only be unambiguously made if a pure sample is/was used. This work also illustrates the contribution of fundamental structure-activity relationship studies not only for drug design and optimization, but also as a "watchdog" mechanism for checking/spotting eventual incongruence of drug activity in chemical and biological settings. PMID:18046586

  2. Decay of ground motion peak values is faster for smaller magnitude events: investigation of the role played by the attenuation and the scattering effects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dujardin, A.; Courboulex, F.; Causse, M.; Traversa, P.

    2013-12-01

    The decay of ground motion peak values (PGA, PGV ...) with distance is a parameter of great importance in the prediction of ground motion for seismic hazard assessment. This decay appears to be dependent on the size of the earthquakes: faster for small than for large earthquakes. This has been observed many times in real databases and is now included in most of the Ground Motion Prediction Equations (GMPEs). Nevertheless, the physical causes of these differences have never been clearly identified. In order to understand and quantify this effect we explore the influence two of major processes: the anelastic attenuation and the scattering effects. We first performed synthetic tests using the stochastic simulation program SMSIM (Boore 2003) and we generate temporal series at different distances and different magnitudes for different values of the quality factor (Q(f)) which describe the anelastic attenuation. We observe that the decay of ground motion peak values (especially PGA and PGV) is strongly dependent on the spectral shape of the Fourier spectrum. Due to the fact that the small earthquakes have higher frequency content, they are more affected by attenuation than larger earthquakes, and therefore the decay of PGA with distance is faster. We propose an analytical formulation that predicts this effect with a given stress drop and a Q factor value and assuming an omega square spectrum for the source. We then test the influence of the combination of source and path effects (i.e. interactions between Green and source functions) and the generation of constructive and destructive interferences in complex medium. We realized simulations by means of the discrete wave number technique in a 1D layered medium. If the medium is complex enough, interactions between Green's and source function lead to constructive interferences. This effect is more important when the source duration is longer (i.e. the magnitude is important), and we show that even without anelastic

  3. Solar time, legal time, time in use

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guinot, Bernard

    2011-08-01

    The International Conference held in 1884 at Washington defined a universal time as the mean solar time at the Greenwich meridian (GMT). Now, the Universal Time, version UT1, is strictly defined as proportional to the angle of rotation of the Earth in space. In this evolution, the departure of UT1 from GMT does not exceed one or two seconds. This is quite negligible when compared with the departure between the solar time and the legal time of citizens, which may exceed two hours without raising protests.

  4. Smaller Coaxial-View Welding Torch

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gangl, Kenneth J.

    1991-01-01

    Coaxial-view torch for gas/tungsten arc welding has only two-thirds length and width of its predecessor. Shape and size similar to that of commercial arc-welding torch (Linde HW-27 or equivalent), even though it contains lens system. Collet that holds electrode has unique design allowing greater passage of light. Used in small spaces previously inaccessible, also introduced into production welding operations with minimum of disturbance.

  5. Impact looks real, the catastrophe smaller

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kerr, R. A.

    1981-11-01

    Alterations in the estimated effects of a large body impacting the earth 65 million years ago are discussed with 0.5 micron particles calculated to have agglomerated and precipitated from the atmosphere within three to six months of impact. The fossil record is cited to show that mass plant and animal extinction did not proceed at a pace consistent with a three year darkness due to atmospheric particle suspension. Geochemical observations have revealed the presence of world-wide iridium anomalies, similar to those which would be left from a meteorite impact, in the Cretaceous-Tertiary boundary, but in no other sedimentary layer; it is noted that terrestrial iridium deposition mechanisms are not fully understood. Difficulties are expressed for determining the order of events that occurred at disparate sites of the globe at the same precise instant 65 million years ago.

  6. A Big Idea: Smaller High Schools

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Shakrani, Sharif

    2008-01-01

    Growing concern about the quality of public education in the United States has driven numerous educational reform efforts across the last three decades. These reforms include increased accountability as exemplified by various requirements of the federal No Child Left Behind Act, the introduction of new curriculum and instructional methods in…

  7. Does a Smaller Waist Mean Smelly Breath?

    MedlinePlus

    ... overnight on the surface of the tongue when saliva production is diminished." ; Tips to combat halitosis: ; 1. Drink ... after meals can help keep bad breath away. Saliva production increases during chewing and this can help neutralize ...

  8. 75 FR 16082 - Smaller Learning Communities Program

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-03-31

    ... Rulemaking Record: On request we will provide an appropriate accommodation or auxiliary aid to an individual... auxiliary aid, please contact the person listed under FOR FURTHER INFORMATION CONTACT. Purpose of Program... April 28, 2005 (70 FR 22233) (the 2005 SLC NFP). (c) The notice of final priority, requirements,...

  9. Large communications platforms versus smaller satellites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1979-01-01

    Communications systems using large platforms are compared with systems using conventional satellites. Systems models were generated and compared for U.S. domestic application and for 1 INTELSAT's international and domestic transponder lease application. Technology advances were assumed the platforms and the evolution of conventional satellites.

  10. Online Database Searching in Smaller Public Libraries.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Roose, Tina

    1983-01-01

    Online database searching experiences of nine Illinois public libraries--Arlington Heights, Deerfield, Elk Grove Village, Evanston, Glenview, Northbrook, Schaumburg Township, Waukegan, Wilmette--are discussed, noting search costs, user charges, popular databases, library acquisition, interaction with users, and staff training. Three sources are…

  11. With World Growing Smaller, IB Gets Big

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cech, Scott J.

    2007-01-01

    The perception that the Geneva, Switzerland-based International Baccalaureate Organization's academic programs offer just what American students need in today's more globally competitive environment seems to be catching on. After decades of obscurity and slow expansion, the pace of growth in IB--including courses of study for the primary and…

  12. APPLIED PHYSICS: Smaller, Faster Midinfrared Lasers.

    PubMed

    Faist, J

    2000-12-01

    Semiconductor lasers are small, efficient devices that are used widely as optical sources in telecommunication systems and CD-ROM and DVD optical memory drives. In his Perspective, Faist highlights the work by Paiella et al., who expand the range of operation of these devices substantially by demonstrating midinfrared lasers that emit picosecond pulses. Faist particularly stresses the innovative technique used by the authors, which may also allow new frequencies, for example in the terahertz frequency range, to be generated. PMID:17798209

  13. A blueprint for smaller local acute hospitals.

    PubMed

    Baillie, Jonathan

    2011-02-01

    Giving his presentation as one of three speakers in a Architects for Health (AfH)-led session addressing the broader topic of "How to achieve excellence in an age of austerity" at last October's Healthcare Estates conference, Mungo Smith, a founding director and design lead at leading UK healthcare architects MAAP, discussed a booklet he recently co-authored with Andy Black, chair of international healthcare strategic consultancy Durrow, and Johannes Eggen, a partner at NSW Architects and Planners in Oslo. In it the authors argue that there is no reason why "gold standard" acute hospital care cannot be cost-effectively delivered from small, well-equipped local hospitals in the future, but that achieving this will require "a number of (current) NHS conventions to be defied".

  14. Management Information for the Smaller Bookstore

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gehm, Rudy

    1977-01-01

    Guidelines are offered for bookstore managers with a minimal background in accounting or finance. Two journals need to be maintained--a "Sales Journal" and a modified "Cash Disbursements Journal"--to record daily sales and summaries of the number and value of invoices and credits passed for payment or deduction by department. (LBH)

  15. Reinventing Time

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Technology Teacher, 2004

    2004-01-01

    What do planet Earth, a swinging pendulum, a quartz crystal, and a Cesium atom have in common? They have all been used by humans to measure time. They represent humanity's progress through time in measuring time itself. But what is it, really, that humans set out to measure? Before time could be measured, somebody had to decide what to actually…

  16. Flushing Time

    EPA Science Inventory

    The flushing time of an estuary is generally defined as the turnover time of fresh water in the estuary, that is, the time required to replace the fresh water contained in the estuary with freshwater inflow. Thus, the flushing time of an estuary is the ratio of the volume of fres...

  17. Time outs

    MedlinePlus

    ... shouting, threatening, or spanking. Time out removes your child from the behavior. It gives you and your child time to ... you really want to work on with your child. Use time out consistently with these behaviors. Take care not to overuse time out. Only ...

  18. Contextual Effects on Number-Time Interaction

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lu, Aitao; Hodges, Bert; Zhang, Jijia; Zhang, John X.

    2009-01-01

    Time perception has long been known to be affected by numerical representations. Recent studies further demonstrate that when participants estimate the duration of Arabic numbers, number magnitude, though task-irrelevant, biases duration judgment to produce underestimation for smaller numbers and overestimation for larger numbers. Such effects…

  19. Entropic Time

    SciTech Connect

    Caticha, Ariel

    2011-03-14

    The formulation of quantum mechanics within the framework of entropic dynamics includes several new elements. In this paper we concentrate on one of them: the implications for the theory of time. Entropic time is introduced as a book-keeping device to keep track of the accumulation of changes. One new feature is that, unlike other concepts of time appearing in the so-called fundamental laws of physics, entropic time incorporates a natural distinction between past and future.

  20. Geologic Time.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Newman, William L.

    One of a series of general interest publications on science topics, the booklet provides those interested in geologic time with an introduction to the subject. Separate sections discuss the relative time scale, major divisions in geologic time, index fossils used as guides for telling the age of rocks, the atomic scale, and the age of the earth.…

  1. Time Honoured

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Campbell, Mora; Timmerman, Peter

    2007-01-01

    The vast majority of literature and practices in environmental education focuses on places and spaces. Little attention has been paid to time and temporalities as elements of environments, and the ways in which how we experience time affects our experience of place. This paper is an examination of the ways in which reflection on time can be…

  2. The Heliosphere in Time

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McCracken, Ken; Beer, Juerg; Steinhilber, Friedhelm; Abreu, Jose

    2013-06-01

    The paleo-cosmic ray records are used to study the properties of the heliosphere and solar processes over the past 9300 years. They show that both varied greatly over that time, ranging from ˜26 "Grand Minima" of duration 50-100 yr when the Sun was inactive, to periods similar to the past 50 years of strong solar activity. This shows that the detailed information regarding the heliosphere gained during the "space era" represents an extreme case, and is not representative of the majority of the past 9300 yr. The data confirm that the 11 and 22-year cycles of solar activity continued through the Spoerer and Maunder Grand Minima. Throughout the 9300 yr interval, "Grand Minima" usually occurred in groups of 2 to 4, similar to the group of four that occurred in the interval 1000-1800 AD. The groups are separated by ˜1000 yr intervals without Grand Minima. Frequency spectra of the full 9300 yr record show that the heliospheric and solar phenomena exhibit >10 well-defined and persistent periodicities. We speculate that the solar dynamo exhibits a 2300 yr periodicity, wherein it alternates between two different states of activity. In the first (˜800 yr duration) solar activity weakens greatly every 100-200 yr resulting in a sequence of Grand Minima, while in the other, the solar dynamo suffers smaller changes; the centenary scale solar and heliospheric changes are smaller, being similar to those that occurred in the interval 1890-1910. The paleo-cosmic ray evidence suggests that the Sun has now entered this more uniform period of activity, following the sequence of Grand Minima (Wolf, Spoerer, Maunder, and Dalton) that occurred between 1000 and 1800 AD.

  3. Reducing neural network training time with parallel processing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rogers, James L., Jr.; Lamarsh, William J., II

    1995-01-01

    Obtaining optimal solutions for engineering design problems is often expensive because the process typically requires numerous iterations involving analysis and optimization programs. Previous research has shown that a near optimum solution can be obtained in less time by simulating a slow, expensive analysis with a fast, inexpensive neural network. A new approach has been developed to further reduce this time. This approach decomposes a large neural network into many smaller neural networks that can be trained in parallel. Guidelines are developed to avoid some of the pitfalls when training smaller neural networks in parallel. These guidelines allow the engineer: to determine the number of nodes on the hidden layer of the smaller neural networks; to choose the initial training weights; and to select a network configuration that will capture the interactions among the smaller neural networks. This paper presents results describing how these guidelines are developed.

  4. TIMING APPARATUS

    DOEpatents

    Bennett, A.E.; Geisow, J.C.H.

    1956-04-17

    The timing device comprises an escapement wheel and pallet, a spring drive to rotate the escapement wheel to a zero position, means to wind the pretensioned spring proportional to the desired signal time, and a cam mechanism to control an electrical signal switch by energizing the switch when the spring has been wound to the desired position, and deenergizing it when it reaches the zero position. This device produces an accurately timed signal variably witain the control of the operator.

  5. Time Management

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stoilov, Todor, Ed.

    2012-01-01

    The time management is worthy goal of many human activities. It concerns variety problems related to goals definition, assessment of available resources, control of management policies, scheduling of decisions. This book is an attempt to illustrate the decision making process in time management for different success stories, which can be used as…

  6. Managing Time.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Murphy, Linda; Della Corte, Suzanne

    1991-01-01

    This newsletter issue discusses time management techniques for parents of special needs children. Techniques include changing one's attitudes about perfection, prioritizing tasks, having a back-up plan, learning to say "no," asking for help, keeping things simple, hiring others, using waiting time wisely, and doing two things at once. Household…

  7. Turnover Time

    EPA Science Inventory

    Ecosystems contain energy and materials such as carbon, nitrogen, phosphorus, and water, and are open to their flow-through. Turnover time refers to the amount of time required for replacement by flow-through of the energy or substance of interest contained in the system, and is ...

  8. Pluto Time

    NASA Video Gallery

    If you stood on Pluto at noon and looked around, the landscape would be illuminated about as brightly as on Earth soon after sunset. The team for NASA's New Horizons mission dubbed this "Pluto Time...

  9. Time out

    MedlinePlus

    ... but no more than 5 minutes. Once your child shows bad behavior, explain clearly what the unacceptable behavior is, and ... time out. Be ready with praise if your child stops the behavior. If the behavior does not stop, tell your ...

  10. Thrombin Time

    MedlinePlus

    ... monitor unfractionated heparin therapy and to detect heparin contamination in a blood sample. While it is still ... thrombin time may sometimes be ordered when heparin contamination of a sample is suspected or when a ...

  11. Timing During Interruptions in Timing

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fortin, Claudette; Bedard, Marie-Claude; Champagne, Julie

    2005-01-01

    Duration and location of breaks in time interval production were manipulated in various conditions of stimulus presentation (Experiments 1-4). Produced intervals shortened and then stabilized as break duration lengthened, suggesting that participants used the break as a preparatory period to restart timing as quickly as possible at the end of the…

  12. About time

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Denning, Peter J.

    1990-01-01

    Time has historically been a measure of progress of recurrent physical processes. Coordination of future actions, prediction of future events, and assigning order to events are three practical reasons for implementing clocks and signalling mechanisms. In large networks of computers, these needs lead to the problem of synchronizing the clocks throughout the network. Recent methods allow this to be done in large networks with precision around 1 millisecond despite mean message exchange times near 5 milliseconds. These methods are discussed.

  13. Arctic palaeosalinities during late Cainozoic time

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Herman, Y.; O'Neil, J.R.

    1975-01-01

    DURING the late Cainozoic, alternations between interglacial and glacial conditions, manifested by waning and waxing of continental ice sheets coincided with the rise and fall of seawater temperatures. Our palaeontological and oxygen isotope data indicate that although the major oceans and low latititude seas underwent large temperature variations, ??? 5-10 ??C, Arctic water temperatures remained near freezing point for at least the past 3 Myr, the time interval represented by the longest studied cores. We have determined palaeotemperatures from the ratio of left to right coiling Globigerina pachyderma1-3 and calculated palaeosalinities using the oxygen isotope palaeotemperature expression of Epstein et al.4. ?? 1975 Nature Publishing Group.

  14. The "Smaller" the School, the Better? The Smaller Learning Communities (SLC) Program in US High Schools

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lee, Moosung; Friedrich, Tom

    2007-01-01

    Given the widening achievement gap between whites and students of color in US schools, Small Learning Communities have emerged as a reform measure claimed to boost achievement in general and among racial minorities. This article examines this claim by reviewing the major policy documents and literature on SLC and analyzing SLC using Frank's (1972)…

  15. Sharing resources: opportunities for smaller primary care practices to increase their capacity for patient care. Findings from the 2009 Commonwealth Fund International Health Policy Survey of Primary Care Physicians.

    PubMed

    Fryer, Ashley-Kay; Doty, Michelle M; Audet, Anne-Marie J

    2011-03-01

    Most Americans get their health care in small physician practices. Yet, small practice settings are often unable to provide the same range of services or partici­pate in quality improvement initiatives as large practices because they lack the staff, infor­mation technology, and office systems. One promising strategy is to share clinical sup­port services and information systems with other practices. New findings from the 2009 Commonwealth Fund International Health Policy Survey of Primary Care Physicians suggest smaller practices that share resources are more likely than those without shared resources to have advanced electronic medical records and health information technology, routinely track and manage patient information, have after-hours care arrangements, and engage in quality monitoring and benchmarking. This issue brief highlights strategies that can increase resources among small- and medium-sized practices and efforts supported by states, the private sector, and the Affordable Care Act that encourage the expansion of shared-resource models.

  16. Orientational ordering of colloidal dispersions by application of time-dependent external forces.

    PubMed

    Moths, Brian; Witten, T A

    2013-08-01

    We discuss a method of organizing incoherent motion of a colloidal suspension to produce synchronized, coherent motion, extending the discussion of our recent Letter [Moths and Witten, Phys. Rev. Lett. 110, 028301 (2013)]. The method does not require interaction between the objects. Instead, the effect is controlled by the "twist matrix" which gives the angular velocity of an asymmetric object in a fluid resulting from a weak external force. We analyze the two types of forcing considered in the Letter: a force alternating between two directions and a continuously rotating force. For the alternating force, we justify the claim of the Letter that under appropriate forcing conditions, the orientational entropy of the objects decreases indefinitely with time, on average. We provide a bound on that rate in terms of the twist matrix. For the case of rotating force, we derive conditions for phased-locked motion of the objects to the force and prove that there is only one stable phase-locked orientation under these conditions. We find numerically that the fastest alignment typically occurs for tilt angles of order unity. We discuss how the alignment effect scales with the object size for external forcing caused by gravity or an electric field. Under practical forcing conditions we estimate that the alignment should persist despite rotational diffusion for objects larger than about 10 microns. Potential misalignment owing to hydrodynamic interaction of the objects is estimated to be negligible at volume fractions smaller than about 10(-4.5) (10(-3)) when the forcing is gravitational (electrophoretic).

  17. Number Time

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Herrera, Terese A.

    2004-01-01

    This article features Number Time, a site developed by the British Broadcasting Corporation (BBC) for young mathematics learners, located at www.bbc.co.uk/schools/numbertime. The site uses interactive animation to help children in pre-K through grade 2 understand and practice number basics. Users will find online games, videos that tell number…

  18. Geologic Time.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Albritton, Claude C., Jr.

    1984-01-01

    Discusses the historical development of the concept of geologic time. Develops the topic by using the major discoveries of geologists, beginning with Steno and following through to the discovery and use of radiometric dating. An extensive reference list is provided. (JM)

  19. Xeroderma pigmentosum group E and DDB2, a smaller subunit of damage-specific DNA binding protein: proposed classification of xeroderma pigmentosum, Cockayne syndrome, and ultraviolet-sensitive syndrome.

    PubMed

    Itoh, Toshiki

    2006-02-01

    Xeroderma pigmentosum is a rare photosensitive syndrome that comprises eight different genetic diseases (A to G; variant (V)). Although genotype-phenotype correlations have been evaluated in most XP groups, the relationship between the E subgroup of xeroderma pigmentosum (XP-E) and damage-specific DNA binding protein (DDB) still remained a mystery. Recent studies have provided new insight for XP-E and the role(s) of DDB2, a smaller subunit of DDB. Reclassification studies have confirmed that mutations in DDB2 give rise to XP-E. The mouse model of XP-E demonstrated that DDB2 was well conserved between mouse and human and was critical in controlling proper cell-survival through regulating the tumor suppressor p53-mediated responses after ultraviolet (UV)-irradiation: i.e. defective DDB2 causes the resistance to cell-killing by UV-irradiation due to decreased p53-mediated apoptosis. These phenotypes are unique to XP-E because other XP groups show normal (XP-V) or hypersensitivity (XP-A, B, C, D, F, and G) to UV-irradiation. Thus XP-E is defined as a skin cancer prone disease with unique resistance to UV-irradiation. PMID:16325378

  20. Improvements of Travel-time Tomography Models from Joint Inversion of Multi-channel and Wide-angle Seismic Data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Begović, Slaven; Ranero, César; Sallarès, Valentí; Meléndez, Adrià; Grevemeyer, Ingo

    2016-04-01

    Commonly multichannel seismic reflection (MCS) and wide-angle seismic (WAS) data are modeled and interpreted with different approaches. Conventional travel-time tomography models using solely WAS data lack the resolution to define the model properties and, particularly, the geometry of geologic boundaries (reflectors) with the required accuracy, specially in the shallow complex upper geological layers. We plan to mitigate this issue by combining these two different data sets, specifically taking advantage of the high redundancy of multichannel seismic (MCS) data, integrated with wide-angle seismic (WAS) data into a common inversion scheme to obtain higher-resolution velocity models (Vp), decrease Vp uncertainty and improve the geometry of reflectors. To do so, we have adapted the tomo2d and tomo3d joint refraction and reflection travel time tomography codes (Korenaga et al, 2000; Meléndez et al, 2015) to deal with streamer data and MCS acquisition geometries. The scheme results in a joint travel-time tomographic inversion based on integrated travel-time information from refracted and reflected phases from WAS data and reflected identified in the MCS common depth point (CDP) or shot gathers. To illustrate the advantages of a common inversion approach we have compared the modeling results for synthetic data sets using two different travel-time inversion strategies: We have produced seismic velocity models and reflector geometries following typical refraction and reflection travel-time tomographic strategy modeling just WAS data with a typical acquisition geometry (one OBS each 10 km). Second, we performed joint inversion of two types of seismic data sets, integrating two coincident data sets consisting of MCS data collected with a 8 km-long streamer and the WAS data into a common inversion scheme. Our synthetic results of the joint inversion indicate a 5-10 times smaller ray travel-time misfit in the deeper parts of the model, compared to models obtained using just

  1. Radioimmunoassay of norethindrone (17 alpha-ethynyl-17 beta-hydroxy-4-estren-3-one) and ethynyl-estradiol (17 alpha-ethynyl-1,3,5, (10)-estratien-3, 17 beta-diol). Application to human plasma determination of norethindrone after oral administration of this steroid.

    PubMed

    Pasqualini, J R; Castellet, R; Portois, M C; Hill, J L; Kincl, F A; Cortes-Prieto, J

    1975-01-01

    The experiment conditions for the evaluation of Norethindrone (17 alpha-Ethynyl-17 beta-hydroxy-4-estren-3-one, NET) and Ethynyl-estradiol (17 alpha-ethynyl-1, 3, 5 (10) estratrien-3, 17 beta-diol, EE) by radioimmunoassay are described. A minimal quantity of 25 pg of these two steroids could be evaluated using different reduced metabolites of NET, very little cross reaction is observed with 200 pg of these metabolites. No effect was observed with estradiol for the EE-antiserum. The NET-antiserum was used to evaluate this steroid and ethynodiol diacetate after oral administration to female volunteers. Maximal values in the plasma (2-3% of the administered dose) was found between 1-3 h after administration and at 24 h a concentration of 0.1-0.3% still remained in the plasma.

  2. Neural mechanisms of timing control in a coincident timing task.

    PubMed

    Masaki, Hiroaki; Sommer, Werner; Takasawa, Noriyoshi; Yamazaki, Katuo

    2012-04-01

    Many ball sports such as tennis or baseball require precise temporal anticipation of both sensory input and motor output (i.e., receptor anticipation and effector anticipation, respectively) and close performance monitoring. We investigated the neural mechanisms underlying timing control and performance monitoring in a coincident timing task involving both types of anticipations. Peak force for two time-to-peak force (TTP) conditions-recorded with a force-sensitive key-was required to coincide with a specific position of a stimulus rotating either slow or fast on a clock face while the contingent negative variation (CNV) and the motor-elicited negativity were recorded. Absolute timing error was generally smaller for short TTP (high velocity) conditions. CNV amplitudes increased with both faster stimulus velocity and longer TTPs possibly reflecting increased motor programming efforts. In addition, the motor-elicited negativity was largest in the slow stimulus/short TTP condition, probably representing some forms of performance monitoring as well as shorter response duration. Our findings indicate that the coincident timing task is a good model for real-life situations of tool use. PMID:22415201

  3. Neural mechanisms of timing control in a coincident timing task.

    PubMed

    Masaki, Hiroaki; Sommer, Werner; Takasawa, Noriyoshi; Yamazaki, Katuo

    2012-04-01

    Many ball sports such as tennis or baseball require precise temporal anticipation of both sensory input and motor output (i.e., receptor anticipation and effector anticipation, respectively) and close performance monitoring. We investigated the neural mechanisms underlying timing control and performance monitoring in a coincident timing task involving both types of anticipations. Peak force for two time-to-peak force (TTP) conditions-recorded with a force-sensitive key-was required to coincide with a specific position of a stimulus rotating either slow or fast on a clock face while the contingent negative variation (CNV) and the motor-elicited negativity were recorded. Absolute timing error was generally smaller for short TTP (high velocity) conditions. CNV amplitudes increased with both faster stimulus velocity and longer TTPs possibly reflecting increased motor programming efforts. In addition, the motor-elicited negativity was largest in the slow stimulus/short TTP condition, probably representing some forms of performance monitoring as well as shorter response duration. Our findings indicate that the coincident timing task is a good model for real-life situations of tool use.

  4. Real time mass flow computer for Arc Jet Wind Tunnel

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vidal, J.

    1978-01-01

    Experiments at the Arc Jet Tunnel at Ames Research Center have typical run times of 5-10 sec during which the test model is subjected to an environment simulating reentry into Jupiter. Previous real-time determination of mass flow required off-line manual computations from taped or strip chart data. The present paper describes a computer which provides personnel with real-time computations of mass flow. Using an 8-bit microprocessor and standard TTL interface circuitry, the unit interrogates temperature and pressure instruments with other parameters to compute mass flow.

  5. Does Long-Term High Fat Diet Always Lead to Smaller Hippocampi Volumes, Metabolite Concentrations, and Worse Learning and Memory? A Magnetic Resonance and Behavioral Study in Wistar Rats

    PubMed Central

    Setkowicz, Zuzanna; Gaździńska, Agata; Osoba, Joanna J.; Karwowska, Karolina; Majka, Piotr; Orzeł, Jarosław; Kossowski, Bartosz; Bogorodzki, Piotr; Janeczko, Krzysztof; Wyleżoł, Mariusz; Gazdzinski, Stefan P.

    2015-01-01

    Background Obesity is a worldwide epidemic with more than 600 million affected individuals. Human studies have demonstrated some alterations in brains of otherwise healthy obese individuals and elevated risk of neurodegenerative disease of old age; these studies have also pointed to slightly diminished memory and executive functions among healthy obese individuals. Similar findings were obtained in animal models of obesity induced by high fat diet. On the other hand, low carbohydrate high fat diets are currently promoted for losing weight (e.g., Atkin’s style diets). However, the long-term effects of such diets are not known. Additionally, high fat diets leading to (mild) ketonemia were shown to improve brain function in elderly humans and in some animal models. Aim To evaluate the hypothesis that long-term use of a high fat diet was associated with decreases in spatial memory, smaller hippocampi and hippocampi metabolite concentrations in Wistar rats. Methods Twenty five male Wistar rats were put on high fat diet (HFD; 60% calories from fat, 30% from carbohydrates) on their 55th day of life, while 25 control male rats (CONs) remained on chow. Adequate levels of essential nutrients were provided. Both groups underwent memory tests in 8-arm radial maze at 3rd, 6th, 9th, and 12th month. 1H magnetic resonance spectroscopy was employed to measure concentrations of tNAA (marker of neuronal integrity) at one month and one year, whereas MRI was used to evaluate hippocampal volumes. Results Obese rats (OBRs) consumed similar amount of calories as CONs, but less proteins. However, their protein intake was within recommended amounts. Throughout the experiment OBRs had statistically higher concentrations of blood ketone bodies than CONs, but still within normal values. At post-mortem assessment, OBRs had 38% larger fat deposits than CONs (p<0.05), as evaluated by volume of epididymis fat, an acknowledged marker of fat deposits in rats. Contrary to our expectations, OBRs had

  6. Optimal time step for incompressible SPH

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Violeau, Damien; Leroy, Agnès

    2015-05-01

    A classical incompressible algorithm for Smoothed Particle Hydrodynamics (ISPH) is analyzed in terms of critical time step for numerical stability. For this purpose, a theoretical linear stability analysis is conducted for unbounded homogeneous flows, leading to an analytical formula for the maximum CFL (Courant-Friedrichs-Lewy) number as a function of the Fourier number. This gives the maximum time step as a function of the fluid viscosity, the flow velocity scale and the SPH discretization size (kernel standard deviation). Importantly, the maximum CFL number at large Reynolds number appears twice smaller than with the traditional Weakly Compressible (WCSPH) approach. As a consequence, the optimal time step for ISPH is only five times larger than with WCSPH. The theory agrees very well with numerical data for two usual kernels in a 2-D periodic flow. On the other hand, numerical experiments in a plane Poiseuille flow show that the theory overestimates the maximum allowed time step for small Reynolds numbers.

  7. Species differences in the pharmacokinetics of KW-7158 [(2S)-(+)-3,3,3-Trifluoro-2-hydroxy-2-methyl-N-(5,5,10-trioxo-4,10-dihydrothieno[3,2-c][1]benzothiepin-9-yl)propanamide]: formation of hydrolyzed metabolite in human and animals.

    PubMed

    Maeda, Hiroshi; Kodaira, Hiroshi; Fujita, Kazuhiro; Kobayashi, Hiroyuki; Ushiki, Junko; Nakanishi, Takeo; Tamai, Ikumi

    2012-07-01

    Species differences in the pharmacokinetics of KW-7158 [(2S)-(+)-3,3,3-Trifluoro-2-hydroxy-2-methyl-N-(5,5,10-trioxo-4,10-dihydrothieno[3,2-c][1]benzothiepin-9-yl)propanamide] were studied in in vivo and in vitro experiments. The exposure ratio of hydrolyzed metabolite (M2, primary metabolite in human plasma)/KW-7158 was higher than the ratio of thiophen-to-furan converted metabolite (M1)/KW-7158 in human subjects after oral administration, but the mouse, rat and dog studies gave opposite results. M2 was produced in the highest amount by the 9000g supernatant of small intestine, followed by that of liver and kidney in human subjects. After correction for protein contents, the results obtained suggested that the small intestine plays a major role in the metabolism to M2 for the first pass effect after oral administration of KW-7158. The formation of M2 was independent of the presence of NADPH and was inhibited by various esterase inhibitors. These observations suggested that the predominant enzymes or isozymes involved in the formation of M2 are esterases, which differ between humans and animals. Such differences may be one of the reasons for the species differences in the pharmacokinetics of KW-7158 between humans and animals.

  8. Ring-strain release in neutral and dicationic 7,8,17,18-tetra-bromo-5,10,15,20-tetra-phenyl-porphyrin: crystal structures of C44H26Br4N4 and C44H28Br4N4 (2+)·2ClO4 (-)·3CH2Cl2.

    PubMed

    Scheidt, W Robert; Duval, Hugues F; Oliver, Allen G

    2016-06-01

    Two porphyrin complexes were studied to determine the effects of protonation on ring deformation within the porphyrin. The porphyrin 7,8,17,18-tetra-bromo-5,10,15,20-tetra-phenyl-porphyrin, C44H26Br4N4, was selected because the neutral species is readily doubly protonated to yield a dication, which was crystallized here with perchlorate counter-ions as a di-chloro-methane tris-olvate, C44H28Br4N4 (2+)·2ClO4 (-)·3CH2Cl2. The centrosymmetric neutral species is observed to have a mild 'ruffling' of the pyrrole rings and is essentially planar throughout; intra-molecular N-H⋯N hydrogen bonds occur. In contrast, the dication exhibits considerable deformation, with the pyrrole rings oriented well out of the plane of the porphyrin, resulting in a 'saddle' conformation of the ring. The charged species forms N-H⋯O hydrogen bonds to the perchlorate anions, which lie above and below the plane of the porphyrin ring. Distortions to the planarity of the pyrrole rings in both cases are very minor. The characterization of the neutral species represents a low-temperature redetermination of the previous room-temperature analyses [Zou et al. (1995 ▸). Acta Cryst. C51, 760-761; Rayati et al. (2008 ▸). Polyhedron, pp. 2285-2290], which showed disorder and physically unrealistic displacement parameters. PMID:27308051

  9. The overdiagnosis nightmare: a time for caution.

    PubMed

    Ciatto, Stefano

    2009-12-16

    Overdiagnosis (and overtreatment) of cancers not bound to become symptomatic during lifetime is an unavoidable drawback of mammography screening. The magnitude of overdiagnosis has been estimated to be in the range of 5-10%, and thus acceptable in view of screening benefits as to reduced mortality. In a recent research article in BMC Women's Health, Jørgensen, Zahl and Gøtzsche suggest that overdiagnosis may be as high as 33%, based on their analysis of breast cancer incidence in screened and non-screened areas in Denmark. Here we consider how reliable such analyses can be, why it might have been useful to adjust comparisons between screened and non-screened areas for early detection lead time, and what further evidence might be needed to build on or confirm these results.

  10. Crystal structure of di-aqua-[5,10,15,20-tetra-kis-(4-meth-oxy-phen-yl)porphyrinato-κ(4) N]iron(III) di-aqua-(18-crown-6)potassium bis-(tri-fluoro-methane-sulfonate)-18-crown-6 (1/2).

    PubMed

    Ben Haj Hassen, Leila; Denden, Zouhour; Rousselin, Yoann; Nasri, Habib

    2015-12-01

    In the title compound, [Fe(III)(C48H36N4O2)(H2O)2][K(C12H24O6)(H2O)2](SO3CF3)2·2C12H24O6, the Fe(III) atom is situated on an inversion centre and is octa-hedrally coordin-ated by four pyrrole N atoms of the deprotenated 5,10,15,20-tetra-kis-(4-meth-oxy-phen-yl)porphyrinate ligand and two water mol-ecules. The average equatorial Fe-N(pyrrole) bond length [2.043 (6) Å] is consistent with a high-spin (S = 5/2) iron(III) metalloporphyrin derivative. The K(+) cation, which also lies on an inversion centre, is chelated by the six O atoms of one 18-crown-6 mol-ecule and is additionally coordinated by two water mol-ecules in a distorted hexa-gonal-bipyramidal geometry. In the crystal, the cations, anions and one non-coordinating 18-crown-6 mol-ecule are linked by classical O-H⋯O hydrogen bonds and non-conventional C-H⋯O hydrogen bonds, leading to a one-dimensional supra-molecular architecture along [10-1]. The crystal packing is further stabilized by weak C-H⋯π inter-actions involving pyrrole and phenyl rings of the porphyrins, as well as weak C-H⋯F contacts involving the (SO3CF3)(-) counter-ion and the 18-crown-6 mol-ecules. PMID:26870431

  11. Ring-strain release in neutral and dicationic 7,8,17,18-tetra­bromo-5,10,15,20-tetra­phenyl­porphyrin: crystal structures of C44H26Br4N4 and C44H28Br4N4 2+·2ClO4 −·3CH2Cl2

    PubMed Central

    Scheidt, W. Robert; Duval, Hugues F.; Oliver, Allen G.

    2016-01-01

    Two porphyrin complexes were studied to determine the effects of protonation on ring deformation within the porphyrin. The porphyrin 7,8,17,18-tetra­bromo-5,10,15,20-tetra­phenyl­porphyrin, C44H26Br4N4, was selected because the neutral species is readily doubly protonated to yield a dication, which was crystallized here with perchlorate counter-ions as a di­chloro­methane tris­olvate, C44H28Br4N4 2+·2ClO4 −·3CH2Cl2. The centrosymmetric neutral species is observed to have a mild ‘ruffling’ of the pyrrole rings and is essentially planar throughout; intra­molecular N—H⋯N hydrogen bonds occur. In contrast, the dication exhibits considerable deformation, with the pyrrole rings oriented well out of the plane of the porphyrin, resulting in a ‘saddle’ conformation of the ring. The charged species forms N—H⋯O hydrogen bonds to the perchlorate anions, which lie above and below the plane of the porphyrin ring. Distortions to the planarity of the pyrrole rings in both cases are very minor. The characterization of the neutral species represents a low-temperature redetermination of the previous room-temperature analyses [Zou et al. (1995 ▸). Acta Cryst. C51, 760–761; Rayati et al. (2008 ▸). Polyhedron, pp. 2285–2290], which showed disorder and physically unrealistic displacement parameters. PMID:27308051

  12. Time Delays of Blazar Flares Observed at Different Wavebands

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Marscher, Alan P.

    2000-01-01

    Correlated variability at different frequencies can probe the structure and physics of the jet of a blazar on size scales much smaller than can be resolved by telescopes and interferometers. I discuss some observations of frequency dependent time lags and how these place constraints on models for the nonthermal emission in blazars. The time lags can be either positive (high frequency variations leading those at lower frequencies) or negative, while simultaneous flares are also possible.

  13. Real-Time Reed-Solomon Decoder

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Maki, Gary K.; Cameron, Kelly B.; Owsley, Patrick A.

    1994-01-01

    Generic Reed-Solomon decoder fast enough to correct errors in real time in practical applications designed to be implemented in fewer and smaller very-large-scale integrated, VLSI, circuit chips. Configured to operate in pipelined manner. One outstanding aspect of decoder design is that Euclid multiplier and divider modules contain Galoisfield multipliers configured as combinational-logic cells. Operates at speeds greater than older multipliers. Cellular configuration highly regular and requires little interconnection area, making it ideal for implementation in extraordinarily dense VLSI circuitry. Flight electronics single chip version of this technology implemented and available.

  14. Time constants of flat superconducting cables

    SciTech Connect

    Takacs, S.; Yamamoto, J.

    1997-06-01

    The frequency dependence of coupling losses is calculated for flat superconducting cables, including the electromagnetic coupling between different current loops on the cable. It is shown that there are two characteristic time constants for both parallel and transverse coupling losses. The values of these time constants {tau}{sub 0} and {tau}{sub 1} are calculated by introducing effective inductances for the current loops. In both cases, {tau}{sub 1} is considerably smaller than {tau}{sub 0}. As the most important methods of determining {tau}{sub 0} from AC losses - namely, the limiting slope of loss/cycle at zero frequency and the position of the maximum loss/cycle vs. frequency - estimate {tau}{sub 0} and {tau}{sub 1}, respectively, the results are important for practical measurements and evaluation of time constants from AC losses. At larger frequencies, the losses are more likely to those in normal conductors (skin effect). The calculation schemes can be applied to cables with closely wound strands (like the cable-in-conduit conductors), too. However, several other effects should be considered being different and/or more important with respect to other cable types (demagnetization factor of strands and cables, larger regions near the cable edges, smaller number of strands and subcables, etc.).

  15. Making Time for Family.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Newman, Rita

    1998-01-01

    Reviews Covey's "7 Habits of Effective Families," noting that time plays an important part in each habit. Discusses several important "time" issues for families: time to plan for time, time for awareness of quality time, time to have two-way communication, time for family moments, and time to reflect. Includes suggestions for family activities in…

  16. The Time-Pressure Illusion: Discretionary Time vs. Free Time

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Goodin, Robert E.; Rice, James Mahmud; Bittman, Michael; Saunders, Peter

    2005-01-01

    People's welfare is a function of both time and money. People can--and, it is said, increasingly do--suffer time-poverty as well as money-poverty. It is undeniably true that people feel increasingly time pressured, particularly in dual-earner households. But much of the time devoted to paid and unpaid tasks is over and above that which is strictly…

  17. Human Time-Frequency Acuity Beats the Fourier Uncertainty Principle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oppenheim, Jacob N.; Magnasco, Marcelo O.

    2013-01-01

    The time-frequency uncertainty principle states that the product of the temporal and frequency extents of a signal cannot be smaller than 1/(4π). We study human ability to simultaneously judge the frequency and the timing of a sound. Our subjects often exceeded the uncertainty limit, sometimes by more than tenfold, mostly through remarkable timing acuity. Our results establish a lower bound for the nonlinearity and complexity of the algorithms employed by our brains in parsing transient sounds, rule out simple “linear filter” models of early auditory processing, and highlight timing acuity as a central feature in auditory object processing.

  18. Human time-frequency acuity beats the Fourier uncertainty principle.

    PubMed

    Oppenheim, Jacob N; Magnasco, Marcelo O

    2013-01-25

    The time-frequency uncertainty principle states that the product of the temporal and frequency extents of a signal cannot be smaller than 1/(4 π). We study human ability to simultaneously judge the frequency and the timing of a sound. Our subjects often exceeded the uncertainty limit, sometimes by more than tenfold, mostly through remarkable timing acuity. Our results establish a lower bound for the nonlinearity and complexity of the algorithms employed by our brains in parsing transient sounds, rule out simple "linear filter" models of early auditory processing, and highlight timing acuity as a central feature in auditory object processing.

  19. Joint Travel-time Inversion of Streamer and OBS Seismic Data for Improved Velocity Models and Interplate Boundary Geometry in Subduction Zone

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Begovic, S.; Ranero, C. R.; Sallares, V.; Melendez, A.; Grevemeyer, I.

    2015-12-01

    We combine wide-angle (WAS) seismic and multichannel seismic reflection (MCS) data acquired in the northern Chile subduction zone during the CINCA'95 survey into a common inversion scheme to obtain high-resolution image of upper plate and inter-plate boundary, and to characterize seismic velocity (Vp) as well as tectonic structure across ~300 km long, E-W profile, 21.30°S. To illustrate the advantages of a common inversion approach we have compared the modeling results using two different travel-time inversion strategies: First, we have produced seismic velocity and inter-plate boundary geometry using the WAS data, recorded on 19 OBH (Ocean Bottom Hydrophones) and 6 land stations following a typical joint refraction and reflection travel-time tomography strategy. In particular, the WAS model is obtained using tomo2d tomographic inversion code (Korenaga et al, 2000) and applying layer-stripping method. Second, to compare structure, physical properties and rupture characteristics we jointly invert two types of seismic data sets, integrating multichannel seismic (MCS) data collected with a 3 km long streamer with the OBS wide-angle seismic (WAS) data described above into a common inversion scheme. To do so, we have adapted tomo2d to deal with streamer data. The scheme results in a joint travel time tomographic inversion based on integrated travel time information from refracted and reflected from WAS data and reflected phases from the top of the basement and the inter-plate boundaries identified in the MCS shot gathers. Our first results of the joint inversion indicate a 5 - 10 times smaller ray travel-time misfit in the deeper parts of the model around the interplate boundary, compared to models obtained inverting with just wide-angle seismic data. Interpretation of the joint WAS-MCS velocity model, and MCS images provide improved models of physical properties of the upper plate and around inter-plate boundary. In turn this will help to better understand

  20. Fluctuations, under time reversal, of the natural time and the entropy distinguish similar looking electric signals of different dynamics

    SciTech Connect

    Varotsos, P. A.; Sarlis, N. V.; Skordas, E. S.; Lazaridou, M. S.

    2008-01-01

    We show that the scale dependence of the fluctuations of the natural time itself under time reversal provides a useful tool for the discrimination of seismic electric signals (critical dynamics) from noises emitted from man-made sources, as well as for the determination of the scaling exponent. We present recent data of electric signals detected at the Earth's surface, which confirm that the value of the entropy in natural time as well as its value under time reversal are smaller than that of the entropy of a 'uniform' distribution.

  1. The Sub 0.1 fm Experimental Value of the Electron Radius, the Inability to Create or Annihilate an Electron even by TeV Energies, the Impossibility of Kinetic Energy Transfer to an Electron from a Particle of a 10^5 Times Smaller Mass, the Belief in Mass-Energy Equivalence (MEE) and the Electron Positron Lattice (EPOLA) Model of Space

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Simhony, Menahem

    2003-04-01

    Scientists would not believe that the appearance and disappearance of rabbits in a magic box means their creation and annihilation by energy signals. However the belief in MEE made the results of the Anderson Experiment (1932) be accepted as creation and annihilation of particles out of and into energy, though never since was there a single electron created or annihilated in empy space, even now with muli TeV energies, and though phenomena obtain simple physical explanations as due to the epola structure of space,1, while the MEE fails. E.g., MEE yields the 2.82 fm value for the "classical electron radius" while scattering of fast electron beams proves (since the 1980's) that the electron radius must be below 0.1fm, and the value obtained then in the epola model is 0.094fm. Thus the density of matter in the electron is 3 10^17 kg/m^3, as in all stable nuclear particles known on earth. Another crush of MEE is the physically impossible direct transfer of kinetic energy from a several eV photon to a free electron of 511,000 eV MEE, as in Einstein's 1905 interpretation of the photo-electric effect. The solution is that the acting particle is an epola electron or positron that momentarily carries the photon energy and is thus able to transfer it to a nuclear particle of comparable mass. See:1.M.Simhony, Invitation to the Natural Physics of Matter, Space, and Radiation, World Scientific, 1994, ISBN 981-02-1649-1. Website: www.word1.co.il/physics

  2. Time on Your Hands: Modeling Time

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Finson, Kevin; Beaver, John

    2007-01-01

    Building physical models relative to a concept can be an important activity to help students develop and manipulate abstract ideas and mental models that often prove difficult to grasp. One such concept is "time". A method for helping students understand the cyclical nature of time involves the construction of a Time Zone Calculator through a…

  3. The Future of Smalltown and Rural America: The Impact on Small Business. Hearings before the Subcommittee on Small Business Problems in Smaller Towns and Urban Areas of the Select Committee on Small Business, House of Representatives, Ninety-Second Congress, Second Session Pursuant to H. Res. 5 and 19, May 2, 3, and 4, 1972.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Congress of the U.S., Washington, DC. House Select Committee on Small Business.

    Printed for use by the Select Committee on Small Business (House of Representatives), these hearings present the testimony of 23 individuals on "The Future of Smalltown and Rural America: The Impact on Small Business" held before the Subcommittee on Small Business Problems in Smaller Towns and Urban Areas (May 2-4, 1972). These hearings present…

  4. Discrete time learning control in nonlinear systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Longman, Richard W.; Chang, Chi-Kuang; Phan, Minh

    1992-01-01

    In this paper digital learning control methods are developed primarily for use in single-input, single-output nonlinear dynamic systems. Conditions for convergence of the basic form of learning control based on integral control concepts are given, and shown to be satisfied by a large class of nonlinear problems. It is shown that it is not the gross nonlinearities of the differential equations that matter in the convergence, but rather the much smaller nonlinearities that can manifest themselves during the short time interval of one sample time. New algorithms are developed that eliminate restrictions on the size of the learning gain, and on knowledge of the appropriate sign of the learning gain, for convergence to zero error in tracking a feasible desired output trajectory. It is shown that one of the new algorithms can give guaranteed convergence in the presence of actuator saturation constraints, and indicate when the requested trajectory is beyond the actuator capabilities.

  5. Prothrombin time (PT)

    MedlinePlus

    PT; Pro-time; Anticoagulant-prothrombin time; Clotting time: protime; INR; International normalized ratio ... PT is measured in seconds. Most of the time, results are given as what is called INR ( ...

  6. Financial time series: A physics perspective

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gopikrishnan, Parameswaran; Plerou, Vasiliki; Amaral, Luis A. N.; Rosenow, Bernd; Stanley, H. Eugene

    2000-06-01

    Physicists in the last few years have started applying concepts and methods of statistical physics to understand economic phenomena. The word ``econophysics'' is sometimes used to refer to this work. One reason for this interest is the fact that Economic systems such as financial markets are examples of complex interacting systems for which a huge amount of data exist and it is possible that economic problems viewed from a different perspective might yield new results. This article reviews the results of a few recent phenomenological studies focused on understanding the distinctive statistical properties of financial time series. We discuss three recent results-(i) The probability distribution of stock price fluctuations: Stock price fluctuations occur in all magnitudes, in analogy to earthquakes-from tiny fluctuations to very drastic events, such as market crashes, eg., the crash of October 19th 1987, sometimes referred to as ``Black Monday''. The distribution of price fluctuations decays with a power-law tail well outside the Lévy stable regime and describes fluctuations that differ by as much as 8 orders of magnitude. In addition, this distribution preserves its functional form for fluctuations on time scales that differ by 3 orders of magnitude, from 1 min up to approximately 10 days. (ii) Correlations in financial time series: While price fluctuations themselves have rapidly decaying correlations, the magnitude of fluctuations measured by either the absolute value or the square of the price fluctuations has correlations that decay as a power-law and persist for several months. (iii) Correlations among different companies: The third result bears on the application of random matrix theory to understand the correlations among price fluctuations of any two different stocks. From a study of the eigenvalue statistics of the cross-correlation matrix constructed from price fluctuations of the leading 1000 stocks, we find that the largest 5-10% of the eigenvalues and

  7. Limits on neutron Lorentz violation from pulsar timing

    SciTech Connect

    Altschul, Brett

    2007-01-15

    Pulsars are the most accurate naturally occurring clocks, and data about them can be used to set bounds on neutron-sector Lorentz violations. If SO(3) rotation symmetry is completely broken for neutrons, then pulsars' rotation speeds will vary periodically. Pulsar timing data limits the relevant Lorentz-violating coefficients to be smaller than 1.7x10{sup -8} at at least 90% confidence.

  8. Times of Our Lives.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ramsay, John G.

    2001-01-01

    Lists activities parents can build into their schedules to strengthen their families and help their students succeed, noting the three keys to scheduling during the school year (clarity, discipline, and flexibility). Activities involve: getting ready time, teaching time, friend time, playtime, reading time, down time, adventure time, practice…

  9. Fragment-based activity space: smaller is better.

    PubMed

    Hesterkamp, Thomas; Whittaker, Mark

    2008-06-01

    Fragment-based drug discovery has the potential to supersede traditional high throughput screening based drug discovery for molecular targets amenable to structure determination. This is because the chemical diversity coverage is better accomplished by a fragment collection of reasonable size than by larger HTS collections. Furthermore, fragments have the potential to be efficient target binders with higher probability than more elaborated drug-like compounds. The selection of the fragment screening technique is driven by sensitivity and throughput considerations, and we advocate in the present article the use of high concentration bioassays in conjunction with NMR-based hit confirmation. Subsequent ligand X-ray structure determination of the fragment ligand in complex with the target protein by co-crystallisation or crystal soaking can focus on confirmed binders.

  10. They are smaller, but these systems produce mighty reports.

    PubMed

    Botvin, Judith D

    2004-01-01

    The first place winner, Commonwealth Health Corporation, Bowling Green, Ky., has a successful cost-saving story. Designed in-house, with donated printing, it cost a mere 54 cents per unit. Little Company of Mary Hospital, Evergreen Park, Ill., wins second place with a publication that enlisted the help of many personnel. University Health Care System, Augusta, Ga., third place winner, uses dramatic graphics to observe its 185th anniversary. Princeton HealthCare System, Princeton, N.J., receives special recognition for the clarity and effectiveness of its four-page report. PMID:15666990

  11. Smaller but Fully Functional Backshell for Cable Connector

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stephenson, Gregory

    2009-01-01

    An improved design for the backshell of a connector for a shielded, multiplewire cable reduces the size of the backshell, relative to traditional designs of backshells of otherwise identical cable connectors. Notwithstanding the reduction in size, the design provides all the functionality typically demanded of such a backshell, including (1) termination of the cable shield (that is, grounding of the shield to the backshell), (2) strain relief for the cable, and (3) protection against electromagnetic interference (EMI).

  12. Super liquid-repellent layers: The smaller the better.

    PubMed

    Butt, Hans-Jürgen; Vollmer, Doris; Papadopoulos, Periklis

    2015-08-01

    Super liquid-repellent layers need to have a high impalement pressure and high contact angles, in particular a high apparent receding contact angle. Here, we demonstrate that to achieve both, the features constituting the layer should be as small as possible. Therefore, two models for super liquid-repellent layers are theoretically analyzed: A superhydrophobic layer consisting of an array of cylindrical micropillars and a superamphiphobic layer of an array of pillars of spheres. For the cylindrical micropillars a simple expression for the apparent receding contact angle is derived. It is based on a force balance rather than a thermodynamic approach. The model is supported by confocal microscope images of a water drop on an array of hydrophobic cylindrical pillars. The ratio of the width of a pillar w to the center-to-center spacing a is a primary factor in controlling the receding angle. Keeping the ratio w/a constant, the absolute size of surface features should be as small as possible, to maximize the impalement pressure.

  13. Community reaction to aircraft noise around smaller city airports

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Connor, W. K.; Patterson, H. P.

    1972-01-01

    The results are presented of a study of community reaction to jet aircraft noise in the vicinity of airports in Chattanooga, Tennessee, and Reno, Nevada. These cities were surveyed in order to obtain data for comparison with that obtained in larger cities during a previous study. (The cities studied earlier were Boston, Chicago, Dallas, Denver, Los Angeles, Miami, and New York.) The purpose of the present effort was to observe the relative reaction under conditions of lower noise exposure and in less highly urbanized areas, and to test the previously developed predictive equation for annoyance under such circumstances. In Chattanooga and Reno a total of 1960 personal interviews based upon questionnaires were obtained. Aircraft noise measurements were made concurrently and aircraft operations logs were maintained for several weeks in each city to permit computation of noise exposures. The survey respondents were chosen randomly from various exposure zones.

  14. An Analysis of Substance Use among Adolescents from Smaller Places.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Donnermeyer, Joseph F.; Scheer, Scott D.

    2001-01-01

    Examines substance use trends among rural 12th-grade students, 1976-97, based on the national triennial study "Monitoring the Future." Finds that youth from more rural locations generally displayed lower rates of substance use, but as urbanization spread, differences declined. Compares data on farm, rural nonfarm, and small-town youth in both…

  15. Cities: A Window into Larger and Smaller Worlds

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sassen, Saskia

    2012-01-01

    Cities are complex systems. But they are incomplete systems. In this incompleteness lies the possibility of making--making the urban, the political, the civic, a history. The urban is not alone in having these characteristics, but these characteristics are a necessary part of the DNA of the urban. Every city is distinct and so is every discipline…

  16. Block Copolymer Bottlebrushes: New Routes to Ever Smaller Microdomain Sizes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mahanthappa, Mahesh; Speetjens, Frank

    Block copolymer self-assembly presents exciting opportunities for the development of nanotemplates for advanced lithography applications, wherein the microdomain sizes (~10-100 nm) are governed by the total copolymer degree of polymerization, N. However, this methodology is limited in its smallest achievable length scale, since AB diblock copolymers self-assemble only above a critical N that depends on the magnitude of the effective segmental interaction parameter χAB. Numerous recent reports have focused on developing ``high χAB'' AB diblocks that self-assemble at low values of N. In this talk we explore the ability of non-linear polymer architectures to induce block copolymer ordering at reduced length scales. Thus, we describe the melt and thin-film self-assembly behavior of block copolymer bottlebrushes derived from linking the block junctions of low molecular weight AB diblocks. We quantitatively demonstrate that increasing the bottlebrush backbone degree of polymerization (Nbackbone) results in a larger reduction in the critical copolymer arm degree of polymerization (Narm) required for self-assembly, thus reducing the length scales at which these materials self-assemble.

  17. Hydrogen peroxide propulsion for smaller satellites (SSC98-VIII-1)

    SciTech Connect

    Whitehead, J C

    1998-07-13

    As satellite designs shrink, providing maneuvering and control capability falls outside the realm of available propulsion technology. While cold gas has been used on the smallest satellites, hydrogen peroxide propellant is suggested as the next step in performance and cost before hydrazine. Minimal toxicity and a small scale enable benchtop propellant preparation and development testing. Progress toward low-cost thrusters and self-pressurizing tank systems is described.

  18. Smaller and Better: The University of Michigan Experience.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Melchiori, Gerlinda S.

    1982-01-01

    Several hierarchical and sequential reduction options are discussed. The institutional shrinkage process implemented at the University of Michigan is described, including across-the-board cuts, reduction of nonacademic programs, long-range faculty reduction procedures, and program discontinuance. (Author/MLW)

  19. Abstracts in Relation to Larger and Smaller Discourse Structures.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Manning, Alan D.

    1990-01-01

    Proposes a unified theory of discourse form to explain (1) why writing textbooks consistently recognize just two polar types of abstract; (2) why students often produce adequate descriptive abstracts but not adequate summary abstracts; and (3) how a short paraphrase differs formally and conceptually from a summary abstract. (KEH)

  20. Atmospheric sounding with infrasonic waves: from larger to smaller scale

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lalande, J.; Waxler, R.; Lonzaga, J. B.; Assink, J. D.

    2013-12-01

    Infrasonic waves propagate at long range through atmospheric ducts resulting from the stratification of atmospheric properties. Infrasonic wave propagation studies are conducted using atmospheric specifications that combine Numerical Weather Prediction (NWP) and climatological models. The former is defined over spatio-temporal grid that does not allow to describe small-scale structures of the atmosphere such as gravity waves, while the latter is derived through multi-year statistical analysis and, consequently, misses some significant spatio-temporal variabilities. As infrasonic waves integrate atmospheric information along their propagation paths, it is now recognized that infrasonic observations is a valuable tool to investigate the atmospheric structure. Our research intends to develop techniques to study atmospheric properties by mean of infrasonic observations. We will present two strategies which serve different purposes, one is based on the use of infrasonic kinematic properties to derive atmospheric updates in the middle atmosphere and the lower thermosphere through a Monte-Carlo based algorithm, the other one intend to study the interaction of infrasound waves with internal gravity waves in order to understand the long-tail behaviour observed in infrasound broadband signals.

  1. Fleas and smaller fleas: virotherapy for parasite infections.

    PubMed

    Hyman, Paul; Atterbury, Robert; Barrow, Paul

    2013-05-01

    Bacteriophages are viruses of bacteria that are used for controlling bacterial food-borne pathogens and have been proposed for more extensive usage in infection control. Protists are now recognised to harbour viruses and virus-like particles. We propose that investigation of their prevalence in parasites be intensified. We also propose that such viruses might be considered for virotherapy to control certain parasite infections of man and animals.

  2. Smaller and Faster: Nanoscale structures probed at radio frequencies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cleland, Andrew N.

    2004-03-01

    We describe our development of a range of different nanomechanical and nanoelectronic structures, probed by radiofrequency electronics. These devices have permitted the development of integrated displacement sensors using quantum point contacts and single electron transistors, the development of mechanically suspended nanobolometers using superconductor-insulator-normal metal (SIN) tunnel junction thermometers, and the development of radiofrequency nanoscale calorimeters. This talk will provide an overview to our past achievements, and point to possible future directions.

  3. Minority Gaps Smaller in Some Pentagon Schools. The Achievement Gap.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Viadero, Debra

    2000-01-01

    This third in a four-part series on why academic achievement gaps exist explains how U.S. Department of Defense schools for children of military families offer lessons on how to raise academic achievement among minority students. Minority students in these schools do better than their counterparts almost anywhere in the United States on…

  4. Minimal genome: Worthwhile or worthless efforts toward being smaller?

    PubMed

    Choe, Donghui; Cho, Suhyung; Kim, Sun Chang; Cho, Byung-Kwan

    2016-02-01

    Microbial cells are versatile hosts for the production of value-added products due to the well-established background knowledge, various genetic tools, and ease of manipulation. Despite those advantages, efficiency of newly incorporated synthetic pathways in microbial cells is frequently limited by innate metabolism, product toxicity, and growth-mediated genetic instability. To overcome those obstacles, a minimal genome harboring only the essential set of genes was proposed, which is a fascinating concept with potential for use as a platform strain. Here, we review the currently available artificial reduced genomes and discuss the prospects for extending use of the genome-reduced strains as programmable chasses. The genome-reduced strains generally showed comparable growth to and higher productivity than their ancestral strains. In Escherichia coli, about 300 genes are estimated as the minimal number of genes under laboratory conditions. However, recent advances revealed that there are non-essential components in essential genes, suggesting that the design principle of minimal genomes should be reconstructed. Current technology is not efficient enough to reduce large amount of interspaced genomic regions or to synthesize the genome. Furthermore, construction of minimal genome frequently has failed due to lack of genomic information. Technological breakthroughs and intense systematic studies on genomes remain tasks.

  5. Laboratory 20-km cycle time trial reproducibility.

    PubMed

    Zavorsky, G S; Murias, J M; Gow, J; Kim, D J; Poulin-Harnois, C; Kubow, S; Lands, L C

    2007-09-01

    This study evaluated the reproducibility of laboratory based 20-km time trials in well trained versus recreational cyclists. Eighteen cyclists (age = 34 +/- 8 yrs; body mass index = 23.1 +/- 2.2 kg/m (2); VO(2max) = 4.19 +/- 0.65 L/min) completed three 20-km time trials over a month on a Velotron cycle ergometer. Average power output (PO) (W), speed, and heart rate (HR) were significantly lower in the first time trial compared to the second and third time trial. The coefficients of variation (CV) between the second and third trial of the top eight performers for average PO, time to completion, and speed were 1.2 %, 0.6 %, 0.5 %, respectively, compared to 4.8 %, 2.0 %, and 2.3 % for the bottom ten. In addition, the average HR, VO(2), and percentage of VO(2max) were similar between trials. This study demonstrated that (1) a familiarization session improves the reliability of the measurements (i.e., average PO, time to completion and speed), and (2) the CV was much smaller for the best performers.

  6. Entropy of seismic electric signals: Analysis in natural time under time reversal

    SciTech Connect

    Varotsos, P.A.; Skordas, E.S.; Sarlis, N.V.; Lazaridou, M.S.; Tanaka, H.K.

    2006-03-15

    Electric signals have been recently recorded at the Earth's surface with amplitudes appreciably larger than those hitherto reported. Their entropy in natural time is smaller than that of a 'uniform' distribution. The same holds for their entropy upon time reversal. Such a behavior, which is also found by numerical simulations in fractional Brownian motion time series and in an on-off intermittency model, stems from infinitely ranged long range temporal correlations and hence these signals are probably seismic electric signal activities (critical dynamics). This classification is strikingly confirmed since three strong nearby earthquakes occurred (which is an extremely unusual fact) after the original submission of the present paper. The entropy fluctuations are found to increase upon approaching bursting, which is reminiscent of the behavior identifying sudden cardiac death individuals when analyzing their electrocardiograms.

  7. Intelligence, Inspection Time, and Decision Time.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bates, Timothy C.; Eysenck, Hans J.

    1993-01-01

    Relationships among Multidimensional Aptitude Battery scores, inspection time, choice reaction time, and the odd-man procedure were investigated for 63 female and 25 male adults. No significant relationships were found for these mental speed measures and the Eysenck Personality Questionnaire-Revised dimensions of extraversion, neuroticism, and…

  8. Ethyl 2-amino-4-(3-chloro-phen-yl)-5,10-dioxo-5,10-dihydro-4H-benzo[g]chromene-3-carboxyl-ate.

    PubMed

    Hu, Xiao; Lei, Song; Yao, Chang-Sheng

    2009-05-20

    The title mol-ecule, C(22)H(16)ClNO(5), was obtained by the reaction of (E)-ethyl 3-(3-chloro-phen-yl)-2-cyano-acrylate and 2-hydroxy-naphthalene-1,4-dione catalysed by triethylamine in ethanol. In the crystal structure, the chlorobenzene ring makes a dihedral angle of 88.63 (4)° with the fused ring system. The six-membered ring formed by an intra-molecular N-H⋯O hydrogen bond is almost planar. The crystal packing is stabilized by N-H⋯O hydrogen bonds.

  9. From Time to Time: Processing Time Reference Violations in Dutch

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dragoy, Olga; Stowe, Laurie A.; Bos, Laura S.; Bastiaanse, Roelien

    2012-01-01

    Time reference in Indo-European languages is marked on the verb. With tensed verb forms, the speaker can refer to the past (wrote, has written), present (writes, is writing) or future (will write). Reference to the past through verb morphology has been shown to be particularly vulnerable in agrammatic aphasia and both agrammatic and…

  10. Time-frequency decomposition of click evoked otoacoustic emissions in children.

    PubMed

    Mishra, Srikanta K; Biswal, Milan

    2016-05-01

    Determining the time-frequency distributions of click-evoked otoacoustic emissions (CEOAEs) are scientifically and clinically relevant because of their relationship with cochlear mechanisms. This study investigated the time-frequency properties of CEOAEs in 5-10 year old children. In the first part, we examined the feasibility of the S transform to characterize the time-frequency features of CEOAEs. A synthetic signal with known gammatones was analyzed using the S transform, as well as a wavelet transform with the basis function used traditionally for CEOAE analysis. The S and wavelet transforms provided similar representations of the gammatones of the synthetic signal in the mid and high frequencies. However, the S transform yielded a slightly more precise time-frequency representation at low frequencies (500 and 707 Hz). In the second part, we applied the S transform to compare the time-frequency distribution of CEOAEs between adults and children. Several confounding variables, such as spontaneous emissions and potential efferent effects from the use of higher click rates, were considered for obtaining reliable CEOAE recordings. The results revealed that the emission level, level versus frequency plot, latency, and latency versus frequency plot in 5-10 year old children are adult-like. The time-frequency characteristics of CEOAEs in 5-10 year old children are consistent with the maturation of various aspects of cochlear mechanics, including the basal to apical transition. In sum, the description of the time-frequency features in children and the use of the S transform to decompose CEOAEs, are novel aspects of this study. The S transform can be used as an alternative approach to characterize the time-frequency distribution of CEOAEs.

  11. Time Devours Things: How Impulsivity and Time Affect Temporal Decisions in Pathological Gamblers

    PubMed Central

    Grecucci, Alessandro; Giorgetta, Cinzia; Rattin, Andrea; Guerreschi, Cesare; Sanfey, Alan G.; Bonini, Nicolao

    2014-01-01

    Impulsivity is associated with several psychiatric disorders in which the loss of control of a specific behavior determines the syndrome itself. One particularly interesting population characterized by reported high impulsivity and problematic decision-making are those diagnosed with pathological gambling. However the association between impulsivity and decision making in pathological gambling has been only partially confirmed until now. We tested 23 normal controls and 23 diagnosed pathological gamblers in an intertemporal choice task, as well as other personality trait measurements. Results showed that gamblers scored higher on impulsivity questionnaires, and selected a higher percentage of impatient choices (higher percentage of smaller, sooner rewards), when compared to normal controls. Moreover, gamblers were faster in terms of reaction times at selecting the smaller, sooner options and discounted rewards more rapidly over time. Importantly, regression analyses clarified that self-reported measures of impulsivity played a significant role in biasing decisions towards small but more rapidly available rewards. In the present study we found evidence for impulsivity in personality traits and decisions in pathological gamblers relative to controls. We conclude by speculating on the need to incorporate impulsivity and decision biases in the conceptualization of pathological gambling for a better understanding and treatment of this pathology. PMID:25296184

  12. Time domain reflectometry in time variant plasmas

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Scherner, Michael J.

    1992-01-01

    The effects of time-dependent electron density fluctuations on a synthesized time domain reflectometry response of a one-dimensional cold plasma sheath are considered. Numerical solutions of the Helmholtz wave equation, which describes the electric field of a normally incident plane wave in a specified static electron density profile, are used. A study of the effects of Doppler shifts resulting from moving density fluctuations in the electron density profile of the sheath is included. Varying electron density levels corrupt time domain and distance measurements. Reducing or modulating the electron density levels of a given electron density profile affects the time domain response of a plasma and results in motion of the turning point, and the effective motion has a significant effect on measuring electron density locations.

  13. On Time-II: Newton's Time.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Raju, C. K.

    1991-01-01

    A study of time in Newtonian physics is presented. Newton's laws of motion, falsifiability and physical theories, laws of motion and law of gravitation, and Laplace's demon are discussed. Short bibliographic sketches of Laplace and Karl Popper are included. (KR)

  14. Occupational Cohort Time Scales

    PubMed Central

    Roth, H. Daniel

    2015-01-01

    Purpose: This study explores how highly correlated time variables (occupational cohort time scales) contribute to confounding and ambiguity of interpretation. Methods: Occupational cohort time scales were identified and organized through simple equations of three time scales (relational triads) and the connections between these triads (time scale web). The behavior of the time scales was examined when constraints were imposed on variable ranges and interrelationships. Results: Constraints on a time scale in a triad create high correlations between the other two time scales. These correlations combine with the connections between relational triads to produce association paths. High correlation between time scales leads to ambiguity of interpretation. Conclusions: Understanding the properties of occupational cohort time scales, their relational triads, and the time scale web is helpful in understanding the origins of otherwise obscure confounding bias and ambiguity of interpretation. PMID:25647318

  15. Time on timing: Dissociating premature responding from interval sensitivity in Parkinson's disease

    PubMed Central

    Nombela, Cristina; Wolpe, Noham; Barker, Roger A.; Rowe, James B.

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Background Parkinson's disease (PD) can cause impulsivity with premature responses, but there are several potential mechanisms. We proposed a distinction between poor decision‐making and the distortion of temporal perception. Both effects may be present and interact, but with different clinical and pharmacological correlates. Objectives This study assessed premature responding during time perception in PD. Methods In this study, 18 PD patients and 19 age‐matched controls completed 2 temporal discrimination tasks (bisection and trisection) and a baseline reaction‐time task. Timing sensitivity and decision‐making processes were quantified by response and response time. An extended version of the modified difference model was used to examine the precision of time representation and the modulation of response time by stimulus ambiguity. Results In the bisection task, patients had a lower bisection point (P < .05) and reduced timing sensitivity when compared with controls (P < .001). In the trisection task, patients showed lower sensitivity in discriminating between short and medium standards (P < .05). The impairment in timing sensitivity correlated positively with patients' levodopa dose equivalent (P < .05). Critically, patients had disproportionately faster response times when compared with controls in more ambiguous conditions, and the degree of acceleration of response time increased with disease severity (P < .05). Computational modeling indicated that patients had poorer precision in time representation and stronger modulation of response time by task ambiguity, leading to smaller scaling of the decision latency (P < .05). Conclusions These findings suggest that timing deficits in PD cannot be solely attributed to perceptual distortions, but are also associated with impulsive decision strategies that bias patients toward premature responses. © 2016 The Authors. Movement Disorders published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc. on

  16. Time Integration Schemes for the Unsteady Navier-stokes Equations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bijl, Hester; Carpenter, Mark H.; Vatsa, Veer N.

    2001-01-01

    The efficiency and accuracy of several time integration schemes are investigated for the unsteady Navier-Stokes equations. This study focuses on the efficiency of higher-order Runge-Kutta schemes in comparison with the popular Backward Differencing Formulations. For this comparison an unsteady two-dimensional laminar flow problem is chosen, i.e., flow around a circular cylinder at Re = 1200. It is concluded that for realistic error tolerances (smaller than 10(exp -1)) fourth-and fifth-order Runge-Kutta schemes are the most efficient. For reasons of robustness and computer storage, the fourth-order Runge-Kutta method is recommended. The efficiency of the fourth-order Runge-Kutta scheme exceeds that of second-order Backward Difference Formula by a factor of 2.5 at engineering error tolerance levels (10(exp -1) to 10(exp -2)). Efficiency gains are more dramatic at smaller tolerances.

  17. A Journey in Space-Time

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kazanas, Demos

    2006-01-01

    The Universe was born about 10 billion years ago in an explosion we now call the Big Bang, which continues until today. While Cosmology was born only after the formulation of General Relativity by Einstein, it is quite amazing that the same equations can be derived from purely Newtonian Physics. I will present such a formulation of the evolution of the Universe and will also present a summary of the developments in Cosmology the past 20 or so years. These have been driven mainly by the development of new techniques and missions to probe the Universe in it's largest scales. At the same time, observations at smaller scales have also given us a picture of the evolution of the structure (galaxies, stars) that are necessary for the development of life. I will close with some speculation on the recently discovered acceleration of the Universe and its implications for it's far future.

  18. Robust solid 129Xe longitudinal relaxation times

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Limes, M. E.; Ma, Z. L.; Sorte, E. G.; Saam, B.

    2016-09-01

    We find that if solid xenon is formed from liquid xenon, denoted "ice," there is a 10% increase in 129Xe longitudinal relaxation T1 time (taken at 77 K and 2 T) over a trickle-freeze formation, denoted "snow." Forming xenon ice also gives an unprecedented reproducibility of 129Xe T1 measurements across a range of 77-150 K. This temperature dependence roughly follows the theory of spin rotation mediated by Raman scattering of harmonic phonons, though it results in a smaller-than-predicted spin-rotation coupling strength cK 0/h . Enriched ice 129Xe T1 experiments show no isotopic dependence of bulk relaxation mechanisms at 77 K and at kilogauss fields.

  19. Time left: linear versus logarithmic subjective time.

    PubMed

    Gibbon, J; Church, R M

    1981-04-01

    In two experiments, subjects were given a choice between a standard fixed interval to reinforcement and the time left to reinforcement in an elapsing comparison interval. In Experiment 1, rats were trained to respond on a comparison 60-sec fixed-interval schedule on one lever and a standard 30-sec fixed-interval schedule on a second lever. Then combined trials were given that began with the entry of the comparison 60-sec lever, followed by the standard 30-sec lever after 15, 30, or 45 sec. Rats preferred to respond on the standard lever when it entered early (at 15 sec), they preferred to respond on the comparison lever when the standard entered late (at 45 sec), and they were approximately indifferent between the two levers when the standard entered halfway through the comparison interval so that the remaining time to food was equal on both levers. In Experiment 2, pigeons were trained to choose between the time left to food in an elapsing comparison interval (C sec long) and a standard fixed interval one half as long (S = C/2) in a concurrent-chains paradigm. Birds came to choose the standard early and the comparison late in the trial interval. The indifference point was linearly related to the midpoint of the elapsing C interval at a variety of S,C pairs. The results of both experiments are consistent with a Scalar Timing theory in which subjective time is linear in real time and memory variance is scalar, and they are inconsistent with a logarithmic time scale.

  20. Synchronized time stamp support

    SciTech Connect

    Kowalkowski, J.

    1994-02-16

    New software has been added to IOC core to maintain time stamps. The new software has the ability to maintain time stamps over all IOCs on a network. The purpose of this paper is to explain how EPICS will synchronize the time stamps. In addition, this paper will explain how to configure and use the new EPICS time stamp support software.

  1. Time Management for Directors

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jaffe, Ellen Hofstetter

    2005-01-01

    Time management is a skill. Like any new skill, it takes time and commitment to develop. A frequent complaint of center directors is not having enough time. Most work extremely long hours and still feel they are not getting enough done. This article presents ideas on how to manage time and work smarter, not harder. These ideas are the following:…

  2. Time and Teaching

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McEwan, Anna E.

    2012-01-01

    This essay invites reflection on the phenomena of time as it impacts the day-to-day life of teachers. It also explores assumptions about time and teaching in three areas: first, beliefs about the force of time and the teacher's struggle to control it; second, beliefs about the potential of time and the benefits of its passing for teachers and…

  3. Review of time scales. [Universal Time-Ephemeris Time-International Atomic Time

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Guinot, B.

    1974-01-01

    The basic time scales are presented: International Atomic Time, Universal Time, and Universal Time (Coordinated). These scales must be maintained in order to satisfy specific requirements. It is shown how they are obtained and made available at a very high level of precision.

  4. Energy current imaging method for time reversal in elastic media

    SciTech Connect

    Anderson, Brian E; Ulrich, Timothy J; Le Bas, Pierre - Yves A; Larmat, Carene; Johnson, Paul A; Guyer, Robert A; Griffa, Michele

    2009-01-01

    An energy current imaging method is presented for use in locating sources of wave energy during the back propagation stage of the time reversal process. During the back propagation phase of an ideal time reversal experiment, wave energy coalesces from all angles of incidence to recreate the source event; after the recreation, wave energy diverges in every direction. An energy current imaging method based on this convergence/divergence behavior has been developed. The energy current imaging method yields a smaller spatial distribution for source reconstruction than is possible with traditional energy imaging methods.

  5. Neural Correlates of the Time Marker for the Perception of Event Timing

    PubMed Central

    Qi, Liang; Terada, Yoshikazu; Nishida, Shin’ya

    2016-01-01

    While sensory processing latency, inferred from the manual reaction time (RT), is substantially affected by diverse stimulus parameters, subjective temporal judgments are relatively accurate. The neural mechanisms underlying this timing perception remain obscure. Here, we measured human neural activity by magnetoencephalography while participants performed a simultaneity judgment task between the onset of random-dot coherent motion and a beep. In a separate session, participants performed an RT task for the same stimuli. We analyzed the relationship between neural activity evoked by motion onset and point of subjective simultaneity (PSS) or RT. The effect of motion coherence was smaller for PSS than RT, but changes in RT and PSS could both be predicted by the time at which an integrated sensory response crossed a threshold. The task differences could be ascribed to the lower threshold for PSS than for RT. In agreement with the psychophysical threshold difference, the participants reported longer delays in their motor response from the subjective motion onset for weaker stimuli. However, they could not judge the timing of stimuli weaker than the detection threshold. A possible interpretation of the present findings is that the brain assigns the time marker for timing perception prior to stimulus detection, but the time marker is available only after stimulus detection. PMID:27679810

  6. Neural Correlates of the Time Marker for the Perception of Event Timing

    PubMed Central

    Qi, Liang; Terada, Yoshikazu; Nishida, Shin’ya

    2016-01-01

    While sensory processing latency, inferred from the manual reaction time (RT), is substantially affected by diverse stimulus parameters, subjective temporal judgments are relatively accurate. The neural mechanisms underlying this timing perception remain obscure. Here, we measured human neural activity by magnetoencephalography while participants performed a simultaneity judgment task between the onset of random-dot coherent motion and a beep. In a separate session, participants performed an RT task for the same stimuli. We analyzed the relationship between neural activity evoked by motion onset and point of subjective simultaneity (PSS) or RT. The effect of motion coherence was smaller for PSS than RT, but changes in RT and PSS could both be predicted by the time at which an integrated sensory response crossed a threshold. The task differences could be ascribed to the lower threshold for PSS than for RT. In agreement with the psychophysical threshold difference, the participants reported longer delays in their motor response from the subjective motion onset for weaker stimuli. However, they could not judge the timing of stimuli weaker than the detection threshold. A possible interpretation of the present findings is that the brain assigns the time marker for timing perception prior to stimulus detection, but the time marker is available only after stimulus detection.

  7. Ignition timing control

    SciTech Connect

    Lambert, J.E.; Bedross, G.M.

    1993-05-25

    An engine ignition control system for controlling the timing of the spark for initiating burning in the combustion chamber of a four stroke cycle, single cylinder, internal combustion engine is described; said engine having a cylinder, a piston in said cylinder, a crankshaft connected to said piston, said piston being adapted to reciprocate between a top dead center position and a bottom dead center position; a speed sensor means for developing periodic sensor voltage timing pulses, the cycle time between timing pulses being an indication of engine crankshaft speed; means for developing ignition timing pulses, each timing pulse having a leading edge corresponding to a voltage change in a timing voltage pulse and a trailing edge corresponding to an opposite voltage change in a timing voltage pulse; means for developing a spark voltage including an ignition coil and a source of ignition coil current, said spark voltage occurring at a coil primary current interrupt point; means for measuring in real-time, cycle time and a timing pulse time for one engine cycle; and means for computing an optimum delay time from the leading edge of a timing pulse for said one cycle to said interrupt point whereby combustion is initiated at a time in advance of the top dead center position.

  8. Rhythm, Timing and the Timing of Rhythm

    PubMed Central

    Arvaniti, Amalia

    2009-01-01

    This article reviews the evidence for rhythmic categorization that has emerged on the basis of rhythm metrics, and argues that the metrics are unreliable predictors of rhythm which provide no more than a crude measure of timing. It is further argued that timing is distinct from rhythm and that equating them has led to circularity and a psychologically questionable conceptualization of rhythm in speech. It is thus proposed that research on rhythm be based on the same principles for all languages, something that does not apply to the widely accepted division of languages into stress- and syllable-timed. The hypothesis is advanced that these universal principles are grouping and prominence and evidence to support it is provided. PMID:19390230

  9. Ensemble Pulsar Time Scale

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yin, D. S.; Gao, Y. P.; Zhao, S. H.

    2016-05-01

    Millisecond pulsars can generate another type of time scale that is totally independent of the atomic time scale, because the physical mechanisms of the pulsar time scale and the atomic time scale are quite different from each other. Usually the pulsar timing observational data are not evenly sampled, and the internals between data points range from several hours to more than half a month. What's more, these data sets are sparse. And all these make it difficult to generate an ensemble pulsar time scale. Hence, a new algorithm to calculate the ensemble pulsar time scale is proposed. Firstly, we use cubic spline interpolation to densify the data set, and make the intervals between data points even. Then, we employ the Vondrak filter to smooth the data set, and get rid of high-frequency noise, finally adopt the weighted average method to generate the ensemble pulsar time scale. The pulsar timing residuals represent clock difference between the pulsar time and atomic time, and the high precision pulsar timing data mean the clock difference measurement between the pulsar time and atomic time with a high signal to noise ratio, which is fundamental to generate pulsar time. We use the latest released NANOGRAV (North American Nanohertz Observatory for Gravitational Waves) 9-year data set to generate the ensemble pulsar time scale. This data set is from the newest NANOGRAV data release, which includes 9-year observational data of 37 millisecond pulsars using the 100-meter Green Bank telescope and 305-meter Arecibo telescope. We find that the algorithm used in this paper can lower the influence caused by noises in timing residuals, and improve long-term stability of pulsar time. Results show that the long-term (> 1 yr) frequency stability of the pulsar time is better than 3.4×10-15.

  10. Carbon Residence Times in Pedogenic Carbonate Pools

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Monger, H.; Feng, Y.; Karnjanapiboonwang, A.

    2013-12-01

    Soil carbonate is a huge pool of terrestrial carbon that contains at least 930 to 940 Pg C and has influx rates on the order of 1 to 12 g CaCO3/m2/yr. Such large mass to flux ratios yield long mean residence times for carbon (e.g., 85,000 years)--assuming steady state. Like other global carbon pools, the soil carbonate pool has smaller sub-pools with higher influx rates and shorter mean residence times. For example, pedogenic carbonate in coppice dunes known to have formed since 1858 and carbonate formed on lithic artifacts in soils at archaeology sites suggests mean residence times can be as short as 120 years--again assuming steady state. Harder to assess are efflux rates as CO2 emissions or bicarbonate leaching. Some Bowen-ratio studies have nevertheless found evidence for CO2 emissions resulting from carbonate dissolution, and other studies have found evidence for bicarbonate leaching based on dissolution pipes through calcic horizons using soil morphology studies. Since an understanding of mean residence times are prerequisite for a better understanding of soil carbonate in the global carbon cycle, especially in a scenario of an expanding Aridosphere, more influx and efflux measurements are needed to evaluate the possibility of carbon sequestration by soil carbonate in hyperarid, arid, semiarid, or subhumid soils.

  11. Neuropharmacology of timing and time perception.

    PubMed

    Meck, W H

    1996-06-01

    Time is a guiding force in the behavior of all organisms. For both a rat in an experimental setting (e.g. Skinner box) trying to predict when reinforcement will be delivered and a human in a restaurant waiting for his dinner to be served an accurate perception of time is an important determinant of behavior. Recent research has used a combination of pharmacological and behavioral manipulations to gain a fuller understanding of how temporal information is processed. A psychological model of duration discrimination that differentiates the speed of an internal clock used for the registration of current sensory input from the speed of the memory-storage process used for the representation of the durations of prior stimulus events has proven useful in integrating these findings. Current pharmacological research suggests that different stages of temporal processing may involve separate brain regions and be modified by different neurotransmitter systems. For example, the internal clock used to time durations in the seconds-to-minutes range appears linked to dopamine (DA) function in the basal ganglia, while temporal memory and attentional mechanisms appear linked to acetylcholine (ACh) function in the frontal cortex. These two systems are connected by frontal-striatal loops, thus allowing for the completion of the timing sequences involved in duration discrimination.

  12. [Time perceptions and representations].

    PubMed

    Tordjman, S

    2015-09-01

    Representations of time and time measurements depend on subjective constructs that vary according to changes in our concepts, beliefs, societal needs and technical advances. Similarly, the past, the future and the present are subjective representations that depend on each individual's psychic time and biological time. Therefore, there is no single, one-size-fits-all time for everyone, but rather a different, subjective time for each individual. We need to acknowledge the existence of different inter-individual times but also intra-individual times, to which different functions and different rhythms are attached, depending on the system of reference. However, the construction of these time perceptions and representations is influenced by objective factors (physiological, physical and cognitive) related to neuroscience which will be presented and discussed in this article. Thus, studying representation and perception of time lies at the crossroads between neuroscience, human sciences and philosophy. Furthermore, it is possible to identify several constants among the many and various representations of time and their corresponding measures, regardless of the system of time reference. These include the notion of movements repeated in a stable rhythmic pattern involving the recurrence of the same interval of time, which enables us to define units of time of equal and invariable duration. This rhythmicity is also found at a physiological level and contributes through circadian rhythms, in particular the melatonin rhythm, to the existence of a biological time. Alterations of temporality in mental disorders will be also discussed in this article illustrated by certain developmental disorders such as autism spectrum disorders. In particular, the hypothesis will be developed that children with autism would need to create discontinuity out of continuity through stereotyped behaviors and/or interests. This discontinuity repeated at regular intervals could have been

  13. Cosmic gravitational background radiation as a basis of Karolyhazy hazy space-time

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ma, Guang-Wen

    1998-03-01

    It is argued that the Karolyhazy hazy space-time should be related with the cosmic gravitational background radiation. A scheme to establish their relation is proposed. The Diosi-Lukacs type electromagnetic radiation is re-calculated. The result is smaller by 57 orders of magnitude than that of Diosi and Lukacs.

  14. Peripheral Nerve Conduction Velocity, Reaction Time, and Intelligence: An Attempt to Replicate Vernon and Mori.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wickett, John C.; Vernon, Philip A.

    1994-01-01

    In a study involving 38 adult females, nerve conduction velocity (NCV) did not correlate with intelligence or reaction time. A reanalysis of the Vernon and Mori data showed a possible sex difference in relation to NCV and intelligence, with the correlation between these variables much smaller in females than males. (SLD)

  15. Time in Cortical Circuits

    PubMed Central

    Shadlen, Michael N.; Jazayeri, Mehrdad; Nobre, Anna C.; Buonomano, Dean V.

    2015-01-01

    Time is central to cognition. However, the neural basis for time-dependent cognition remains poorly understood. We explore how the temporal features of neural activity in cortical circuits and their capacity for plasticity can contribute to time-dependent cognition over short time scales. This neural activity is linked to cognition that operates in the present or anticipates events or stimuli in the near future. We focus on deliberation and planning in the context of decision making as a cognitive process that integrates information across time. We progress to consider how temporal expectations of the future modulate perception. We propose that understanding the neural basis for how the brain tells time and operates in time will be necessary to develop general models of cognition. SIGNIFICANCE STATEMENT Time is central to cognition. However, the neural basis for time-dependent cognition remains poorly understood. We explore how the temporal features of neural activity in cortical circuits and their capacity for plasticity can contribute to time-dependent cognition over short time scales. We propose that understanding the neural basis for how the brain tells time and operates in time will be necessary to develop general models of cognition. PMID:26468192

  16. Real-time operating system timing jitter and its impact on motor control

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Proctor, Frederick M.; Shackleford, William P.

    2001-12-01

    General-purpose microprocessors are increasingly being used for control applications due to their widespread availability and software support for non-control functions like networking and operator interfaces. Two classes of real-time operating systems (RTOS) exist for these systems. The traditional RTOS serves as the sole operating system, and provides all OS services. Examples include ETS, LynxOS, QNX, Windows CE and VxWorks. RTOS extensions add real-time scheduling capabilities to non-real-time OSes, and provide minimal services needed for the time-critical portions of an application. Examples include RTAI and RTL for Linux, and HyperKernel, OnTime and RTX for Windows NT. Timing jitter is an issue in these systems, due to hardware effects such as bus locking, caches and pipelines, and software effects from mutual exclusion resource locks, non-preemtible critical sections, disabled interrupts, and multiple code paths in the scheduler. Jitter is typically on the order of a microsecond to a few tens of microseconds for hard real-time operating systems, and ranges from milliseconds to seconds in the worst case for soft real-time operating systems. The question of its significance on the performance of a controller arises. Naturally, the smaller the scheduling period required for a control task, the more significant is the impact of timing jitter. Aside from this intuitive relationship is the greater significance of timing on open-loop control, such as for stepper motors, than for closed-loop control, such as for servo motors. Techniques for measuring timing jitter are discussed, and comparisons between various platforms are presented. Techniques to reduce jitter or mitigate its effects are presented. The impact of jitter on stepper motor control is analyzed.

  17. Screen time and children

    MedlinePlus

    "Screen time" is a term used for activities done in front of a screen, such as watching TV, working on a computer, or playing video games. Screen time is sedentary activity, meaning you are being physically ...

  18. America's Family Time Famine.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mattox, Jr., William R.

    1990-01-01

    Parents spend increasingly less time with their children because of the pressures of dual careers and single parenthood. Economic pressures and social values have affected sharing of family time. Studies show both parents and children consider spending time together the most important element in improving family life. (BC)

  19. Neural timing nets.

    PubMed

    Cariani, P A

    2001-01-01

    Formulations of artificial neural networks are directly related to assumptions about neural coding in the brain. Traditional connectionist networks assume channel-based rate coding, while time-delay networks convert temporally-coded inputs into rate-coded outputs. Neural timing nets that operate on time structured input spike trains to produce meaningful time-structured outputs are proposed. Basic computational properties of simple feedforward and recurrent timing nets are outlined and applied to auditory computations. Feed-forward timing nets consist of arrays of coincidence detectors connected via tapped delay lines. These temporal sieves extract common spike patterns in their inputs that can subserve extraction of common fundamental frequencies (periodicity pitch) and common spectrum (timbre). Feedforward timing nets can also be used to separate time-shifted patterns, fusing patterns with similar internal temporal structure and spatially segregating different ones. Simple recurrent timing nets consisting of arrays of delay loops amplify and separate recurring time patterns. Single- and multichannel recurrent timing nets are presented that demonstrate the separation of concurrent, double vowels. Timing nets constitute a new and general neural network strategy for performing temporal computations on neural spike trains: extraction of common periodicities, detection of recurring temporal patterns, and formation and separation of invariant spike patterns that subserve auditory objects.

  20. The Myth of Time.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hantula, James

    This paper offers a variety of approaches to teaching the concept of time. Many social studies courses traditionally emphasize time as measured by clocks and as useful for recording when events occur in relation to each other. In addition to this approach, the author suggests that students should reflect upon four other modes of time. These are…