Science.gov

Sample records for 5-10 times smaller

  1. Worlds Smaller than Saturn

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2001-03-01

    Computerized animations show the following: (1) an artist's conception of a Saturn-like extrasolar planet; (2) star and planet motion; and (3) young stellar disk and planet formation. Footage shows the outside of the Mauna Kea Observatories in Hawaii and Geoff Marcy and Paul Butler inside while they are processing information. Then a press conference,'Worlds Smaller than Saturn', is seen. Anne Kinney, Origins Science Director, NASA Headquarters, introduces Geoff Marcy, Paul Butler, Alan Boss, and Heidi Hammel. They discuss the discovery of the two new Saturn-sized extrasolar planets that are orbiting the stars HD46375 and 79 Seti, giving details on the search technique and size distribution. They then answer questions from the press.

  2. Worlds Smaller than Saturn

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2001-01-01

    Computerized animations show the following: (1) an artist's conception of a Saturn-like extrasolar planet; (2) star and planet motion; and (3) young stellar disk and planet formation. Footage shows the outside of the Mauna Kea Observatories in Hawaii and Geoff Marcy and Paul Butler inside while they are processing information. Then a press conference,'Worlds Smaller than Saturn', is seen. Anne Kinney, Origins Science Director, NASA Headquarters, introduces Geoff Marcy, Paul Butler, Alan Boss, and Heidi Hammel. They discuss the discovery of the two new Saturn-sized extrasolar planets that are orbiting the stars HD46375 and 79 Seti, giving details on the search technique and size distribution. They then answer questions from the press.

  3. Arrival time parametric imaging using Sonazoid-enhanced ultrasonography is useful for the detection of spoke-wheel patterns of focal nodular hyperplasia smaller than 3 cm

    PubMed Central

    WAKUI, NORITAKA; TAKAYAMA, RYUJI; KAMIYAMA, NAOHISA; KOBAYASHI, KOJIRO; MATSUI, DAIGO; MATSUKIYO, YASUSHI; KANEKAWA, TAKENORI; IKEHARA, TAKASHI; ISHII, KOJI; SUMINO, YASUKIYO

    2013-01-01

    It is considered difficult to make a definitive diagnosis of focal nodular hyperplasia (FNH) of <3 cm when using conventional diagnostic imaging modalities. Typical FNH imaging findings are: i) central scar formation, ii) nutrient vessels extending radially from the center and iii) the presence of Kupffer cells. In a clinical setting, identification of a spoke-wheel pattern formed by nutrient vessels extending radially is a key feature in the diagnosis of FNH. In this study, we investigated the detection rate of spoke-wheel patterns of FNH <3 cm using arrival time parametric imaging (At-PI) technology with Sonazoid-enhanced ultrasonography (US). Five patients with FNH <3 cm who had undergone Sonazoid-enhanced US at the Toho University Omori Medical Center between February 2008 and March 2009 were included in the study. The mean tumor diameter was 20.2±7.2 mm. Lesions were enhanced with 0.5 ml Sonazoid US contrast agent and a video of the procedure was saved and used for At-PI analysis of contrast agent dynamics in FNH. Three ultrasonographic specialists examined the images and made a diagnosis of FNH based on the findings of spoke-wheel patterns. Similarly, micro-flow imaging (MFI) was performed to evaluate the contrast agent dynamics in FNH. Using MFI, FNH was diagnosed in 3 of the 5 cases by the three specialists, whereas At-PI enabled the identification of spoke-wheel patterns in all 5 cases. At-PI using Sonazoid-enhanced US is superior for detecting spoke-wheel patterns of FNH <3 cm. PMID:23837029

  4. Accumulation of Giant Planet Atmospheres Around 5 -- 10 M⊕ Cores

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hubickyj, O.; Bodenheimer, P.; Lissauer, J. J.

    2004-12-01

    Observations of protoplanetary disks imply that gas giant planets form very quickly (≤ 10 Myr). Recent interior models of Jupiter suggest smaller core masses (0 -- 10 M⊕ ) than had been previously predicted (10 to 30 M⊕ ). We have computed evolutionary simulations of Jupiter based on the core accretion model of gas giant planet formation where we vary the grain opacity and the planetesimal surface density of the solar density of the solar nebula. We also explore the implications of halting the solid accretion at selected core mass values during the protoplanet's growth, thus simulating the presence of a competing embryo. The core accretion model states that a solid core is formed from the accretion of planetesimals in the solar nebular followed by the capture of a massive envelope from the solar nebula gas. Our simulations based on this model (Pollack et al. 1996) have been successful in explaining many features of the giant planets. Our most recent results (Hubickyj et al. 2004) demonstrate that decreasing the grain opacity reduces the formation time by more than half of that for models computed with full interstellar grain opacity values. In fact, it is the reduction of the grain opacity in the upper portion of the envelope with T < 500 K that governs the lowering of the formation time. Decreasing the surface density of the planetesimals lowers the final core mass of the protoplanet but increases the formation timescale. Finally, a core mass cutoff results in the reduction of the time needed for a protoplanet to evolve to the stage of runaway gas accretion provided the cutoff mass is not too small. Our models show that with reasonable parameters it is possible to form Jupiter by means of the core accretion process in 3 Myr or less. \\ref Hubickyj, O., P. Bodenheimer, & J. J. Lissauer 2004. Accumulation of giant planet atmospheres around 5 -- 10 M⊕ cores. In preparation. \\ref Pollack J. B., O. Hubickyj, P. Bodenheimer, J. J. Lissauer, M. Podolak, and Y

  5. Wavelet analysis of paleomagnetic data: 1. Characteristic average times (5 10 kyr) of variations in the geomagnetic field during and immediately before and after the Early Jaramillo reversal (Western Turkmenistan)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gurarii, G. Z.; Aleksyutin, M. V.; Ataev, N.

    2007-10-01

    Joint wavelet analysis of complete and downsampled series of paleomagnetic and petromagnetic characteristics of rocks in the Matuyama-Jaramillo transitional zone in the Adzhidere section is used to extract paleomagnetic data whose variations are associated with the geomagnetic field alone and data correlating with variations in petromagnetic parameters. It supposed that this correlation can be caused by an external factor affecting weak variations in the magnetic field and climatic changes reflected in the composition and amount of the ferromagnetic fraction in rocks. Preliminary data are obtained for the characteristic times of field variations at the time of accumulation of rocks in the transitional zone.

  6. Smaller insulators handle higher voltage

    SciTech Connect

    Wilt, G.

    1997-10-01

    Researcher at Lawrence Livermore have designed the Ultra High Gradient Insulator, a device that can reliably withstand electrical voltages four times greater than before. The Ultra-HGI is designed with alternating layers which divide voltages so finely that the chances of failure are small, and when they do occur, they are confined to a very small portion of the insulator.

  7. Improving the efficiency of smaller transport aircraft

    SciTech Connect

    Jones, R.T.

    1984-07-01

    Considered apart from its propulsive system the high altitude airplane itself adapted to higher flight altitudes than those in current use. Scaling on the assumption of constant aircraft density indicates that this conclusion applies most importantly to smaller transport aircraft. Climb to 60,000 ft could save time and energy for trips as short as 500 miles. A discussion of the effect of winglets on aircraft efficiency is presented. A 10% reduction of induced drag below that of a comparable elliptic wing can be achieved either by horizontal or vertical wing tip extensions.

  8. 34 CFR 5.10 - Public reading room.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 34 Education 1 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Public reading room. 5.10 Section 5.10 Education Office... Available to the Public § 5.10 Public reading room. (a) General. Pursuant to 5 U.S.C. 552(a)(2), the Department maintains a public reading room containing agency records that the FOIA requires to be...

  9. 34 CFR 5.10 - Public reading room.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 34 Education 1 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Public reading room. 5.10 Section 5.10 Education Office... Available to the Public § 5.10 Public reading room. (a) General. Pursuant to 5 U.S.C. 552(a)(2), the Department maintains a public reading room containing agency records that the FOIA requires to be...

  10. 34 CFR 5.10 - Public reading room.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 34 Education 1 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Public reading room. 5.10 Section 5.10 Education Office... Available to the Public § 5.10 Public reading room. (a) General. Pursuant to 5 U.S.C. 552(a)(2), the Department maintains a public reading room containing agency records that the FOIA requires to be...

  11. 1 CFR 5.10 - Forms of publication.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 1 General Provisions 1 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Forms of publication. 5.10 Section 5.10 General Provisions ADMINISTRATIVE COMMITTEE OF THE FEDERAL REGISTER THE FEDERAL REGISTER GENERAL § 5.10 Forms of publication. Pursuant to section 1506 of title 44, United States Code, the Administrative Committee...

  12. 1 CFR 5.10 - Forms of publication.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 1 General Provisions 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Forms of publication. 5.10 Section 5.10 General Provisions ADMINISTRATIVE COMMITTEE OF THE FEDERAL REGISTER THE FEDERAL REGISTER GENERAL § 5.10 Forms of publication. Pursuant to section 1506 of title 44, United States Code, the Administrative Committee...

  13. 1 CFR 5.10 - Forms of publication.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 1 General Provisions 1 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Forms of publication. 5.10 Section 5.10 General Provisions ADMINISTRATIVE COMMITTEE OF THE FEDERAL REGISTER THE FEDERAL REGISTER GENERAL § 5.10 Forms of publication. Pursuant to section 1506 of title 44, United States Code, the Administrative Committee...

  14. 1 CFR 5.10 - Forms of publication.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 1 General Provisions 1 2014-01-01 2012-01-01 true Forms of publication. 5.10 Section 5.10 General Provisions ADMINISTRATIVE COMMITTEE OF THE FEDERAL REGISTER THE FEDERAL REGISTER GENERAL § 5.10 Forms of publication. Pursuant to section 1506 of title 44, United States Code, the Administrative Committee...

  15. 1 CFR 5.10 - Forms of publication.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 1 General Provisions 1 2013-01-01 2012-01-01 true Forms of publication. 5.10 Section 5.10 General Provisions ADMINISTRATIVE COMMITTEE OF THE FEDERAL REGISTER THE FEDERAL REGISTER GENERAL § 5.10 Forms of publication. Pursuant to section 1506 of title 44, United States Code, the Administrative Committee...

  16. 34 CFR 5.10 - Public reading room.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 34 Education 1 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Public reading room. 5.10 Section 5.10 Education Office of the Secretary, Department of Education AVAILABILITY OF INFORMATION TO THE PUBLIC Agency Records Available to the Public § 5.10 Public reading room. (a) General. Pursuant to 5 U.S.C. 552(a)(2),...

  17. The First Exoplanet Smaller than the Earth

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ballard, Sarah

    2009-12-01

    Our team has collected good evidence for a planet smaller than the Earth transiting the nearby M-dwarf star GJ 436, which is already known to host a Neptune-sized planet. We first identified the signal in a 3-week-long photometric monitoring campaign by the NASA EPOXI Mission. Based on the EPOXI data, we predicted a transit event in an extant Spitzer 8-micron data set of this star. Our subsequent analysis of those Spitzer data confirmed the signal of the predicted depth and at the predicted time. However, the existing EPOXI and Spitzer data are not sufficient to support such an extraordinary claim. We propose to confirm the existence of this planet by observing the star for 18 hours spanning a predicted time of transit and at a wavelength where the signal-to-noise would provide an ironclad detection. With a radius only 75% that of the Earth, the new planet GJ 436c would be by far the smallest exoplanet yet discovered and indeed the first exoplanet akin to the terrestrial planets of the Solar system. Moreover, the star's low mass and nearby distance imply that the planetary mass could be estimated from a dedicated radial-velocity campaign. When combined with the radius estimate we will obtain from our proposed Spitzer data, this would provide the first constraint on the average density and hence bulk composition of an Earth-like exoplanet. We argue for Director's Discretionary Time based both on the compelling scientific opportunity to study an Earth-like exoplanet, and the fact that our prediction for the transit times degrades rapidly with time, making it imperative to obtain these observations in the 2010 Jan 14 - Feb 25 visibility window. If successful, our program would provide a dramatic example of the value of an extended Warm Mission during the coming years when humanity uncovers the population of rock and ice exoplanets orbiting nearby stars.

  18. 36 CFR 5.10 - Eating, drinking, or lodging establishments.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ..., Rocky Mountain, Sequoia-Kings Canyon, Yellowstone, and Yosemite National Parks may be operated without a... 36 Parks, Forests, and Public Property 1 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Eating, drinking, or lodging establishments. 5.10 Section 5.10 Parks, Forests, and Public Property NATIONAL PARK SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF...

  19. 36 CFR 5.10 - Eating, drinking, or lodging establishments.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ..., Rocky Mountain, Sequoia-Kings Canyon, Yellowstone, and Yosemite National Parks may be operated without a... 36 Parks, Forests, and Public Property 1 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Eating, drinking, or lodging establishments. 5.10 Section 5.10 Parks, Forests, and Public Property NATIONAL PARK SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF...

  20. 36 CFR 5.10 - Eating, drinking, or lodging establishments.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ..., Rocky Mountain, Sequoia-Kings Canyon, Yellowstone, and Yosemite National Parks may be operated without a... 36 Parks, Forests, and Public Property 1 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Eating, drinking, or lodging establishments. 5.10 Section 5.10 Parks, Forests, and Public Property NATIONAL PARK SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF...

  1. 36 CFR 5.10 - Eating, drinking, or lodging establishments.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ..., Rocky Mountain, Sequoia-Kings Canyon, Yellowstone, and Yosemite National Parks may be operated without a... 36 Parks, Forests, and Public Property 1 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Eating, drinking, or lodging establishments. 5.10 Section 5.10 Parks, Forests, and Public Property NATIONAL PARK SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF...

  2. 36 CFR 5.10 - Eating, drinking, or lodging establishments.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ..., Rocky Mountain, Sequoia-Kings Canyon, Yellowstone, and Yosemite National Parks may be operated without a... 36 Parks, Forests, and Public Property 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Eating, drinking, or lodging establishments. 5.10 Section 5.10 Parks, Forests, and Public Property NATIONAL PARK SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF...

  3. 18 CFR 5.10 - Scoping Document 2.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 18 Conservation of Power and Water Resources 1 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Scoping Document 2. 5.10 Section 5.10 Conservation of Power and Water Resources FEDERAL ENERGY REGULATORY COMMISSION, DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY REGULATIONS UNDER THE FEDERAL POWER ACT INTEGRATED LICENSE APPLICATION PROCESS §...

  4. 18 CFR 5.10 - Scoping Document 2.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 18 Conservation of Power and Water Resources 1 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Scoping Document 2. 5.10 Section 5.10 Conservation of Power and Water Resources FEDERAL ENERGY REGULATORY COMMISSION, DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY REGULATIONS UNDER THE FEDERAL POWER ACT INTEGRATED LICENSE APPLICATION PROCESS §...

  5. 18 CFR 5.10 - Scoping Document 2.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 18 Conservation of Power and Water Resources 1 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Scoping Document 2. 5.10 Section 5.10 Conservation of Power and Water Resources FEDERAL ENERGY REGULATORY COMMISSION, DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY REGULATIONS UNDER THE FEDERAL POWER ACT INTEGRATED LICENSE APPLICATION PROCESS §...

  6. 18 CFR 5.10 - Scoping Document 2.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 18 Conservation of Power and Water Resources 1 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Scoping Document 2. 5.10 Section 5.10 Conservation of Power and Water Resources FEDERAL ENERGY REGULATORY COMMISSION..., the Commission staff shall, if necessary, issue Scoping Document 2....

  7. 18 CFR 5.10 - Scoping Document 2.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 18 Conservation of Power and Water Resources 1 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Scoping Document 2. 5.10 Section 5.10 Conservation of Power and Water Resources FEDERAL ENERGY REGULATORY COMMISSION..., the Commission staff shall, if necessary, issue Scoping Document 2....

  8. Learning in Smaller Companies. Final Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Seagraves, Liz; Osborne, Mike; Neal, Peter; Dockrell, Richard; Hartshorn, Christina; Boyd, Alison

    The Learning in Smaller Companies (LISC) project was undertaken to develop links between academic institutions and work-based learning in Scotland. The University of Stirling worked with Falkirk College and Clackmannan College to create a number of work-based learning schemes for employers in small and medium-sized enterprises. The programs were…

  9. β-Nitro-5,10,15-tritolylcorroles

    PubMed Central

    Stefanelli, Manuela; Pomarico, Giuseppe; Tortora, Luca; Nardis, Sara; Fronczek, Frank R.; McCandless, Gregory T.; Smith, Kevin M.; Manowong, Machima; Chen, Ping; Kadish, Karl M.; Rosa, Angela; Ricciardi, Giampaolo; Paolesse, Roberto

    2012-01-01

    Functionalization of the β-pyrrolic positions of the corrole macrocycle with –NO2 groups is limited at present to metallocorrolates due to of the instability exhibited by corrole free bases under oxidizing conditions. A careful choice of the oxidant can limit the transformation of corroles into decomposition products or isocorrole species, preserving the corrole aromaticity, and thus allowing the insertion of nitro groups onto the corrole framework. Here we report results obtained by reacting 5,10,15-tritolylcorrole (TTCorrH3) with the AgNO2/NaNO2 system, to give mono- and di-nitrocorrole derivatives when stoichiometry is carefully controlled. Reactions were found to be regioselective, affording the 3-NO2TTCorrH3 and 3,17-(NO2)2TTCorrH3 isomers as the main products in the case of mono- and di-substitution, in 53 and 20% yields, respectively. In both cases, traces of other mono- and di-substituted isomers were detected, which were structurally characterized by X-ray crystallography. The influence of the β-nitro substituents on the corrole properties is studied in detail by UV-visible, electrochemical, and spectroelectrochemical characterization of these functionalized corroles. Density Functional Theory (DFT) and time-dependent DFT (TDDFT) calculations of the ground and excited state properties of these β-nitrocorrole derivatives also afforded significant information, closely matching the experimental observations. It is found that the β-NO2 substituents conjugate with the π-aromatic system of the macrocycle, which initiates significant changes in both the spectroscopic and redox properties of the so functionalized corroles. This effect is more pronounced when the nitro group is introduced at the 2-position, because in this case the conjugation is, for steric reasons, more efficient than in the 3-nitro isomer. PMID:22668242

  10. Supermassive Black Hole Mimics Smaller Cousins

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2002-06-01

    Scientists have caught a supermassive black hole in a distant galaxy in the act of spurting energy into a jet of electrons and magnetic fields four distinct times in the past three years, a celestial take on a Yellowstone geyser. This quasar-like "active" galaxy is essentially a scaled-up model of the so-called microquasars within our Milky Way Galaxy, which are smaller black holes with as much as ten times the mass of the sun. This means that scientists can now use their close-up view of microquasars to develop working models of the most massive and powerful black holes in the universe. Artist's Conception of 3C 120. Scene from an animation of 3C 120. CREDIT: Cosmovision These results -- published in the June 6 issue of Nature -- are the fruit of a three-year monitoring campaign with the National Science Foundation's Very Long Baseline Array (VLBA), a continent-wide radio-telescope system, and NASA's Rossi X-ray Timing Explorer. "This is the first direct, observational evidence of what we had suspected: The jets in active galaxies are powered by disks of hot gas orbiting around supermassive black holes," said Alan Marscher of the Institute for Astrophysical Research at Boston University, who led this international team of astronomers. Active galaxies are distant celestial objects with exceedingly bright cores, often radiating with the brilliance of thousands of ordinary galaxies, fueled by the gravity of a central million- to billion-solar-mass black hole pulling in copious amounts of interstellar gas. Marscher and his colleagues have established the first direct observational link between a supermassive black hole and its jet. The source is an active galaxy named 3C120 about 450 million light-years from Earth. This link has been observed in microquasars, several of which are scattered across the Milky Way Galaxy, but never before in active galaxies, because the scale (distance and time) is so much greater. The jets in galaxy 3C120 are streams of particles

  11. [Validity of the Reactive-Proactive-Aggression-Questionnaire for 5-10 Graders (RPA 5-10)].

    PubMed

    Beckers, Leif; Petermann, Franz

    2012-01-01

    A precondition of an appropriate treatment of aggressive children and youth is a specific diagnosis. The Reactive-Proactive-Aggression-Questionnaire for 5-10 Graders (RPA 5-10) assesses reactive and proactive aggression and different facets of the subtypes such as angry-aggression, defensive attribution of aggression, obtaining of resources and power/domination-aggression. This study proves the validity of the questionnaire by differential correlates based on a sample of 9 to 17 year-old students (N = 250). The scales of the RPA 5-10 were associated with anger, physical aggression, verbal aggression, conduct problems and decreased prosocial behaviour. Reactive aggression but not proactive aggression was related to hostility, emotional symptoms and peer relationship problems. The relations between reactive aggression and anger and emotional symptoms are based on angry-aggression. Contrary to predictions hyperactivity/inattention was associated with reactive but also with proactive aggression.

  12. Gasoline additive requirements for today's smaller engines

    SciTech Connect

    Udelhofen, J.H.; Zahalka, T.L

    1988-01-01

    The performance and driveability of today's smaller engines, particularly those with port fuel injectors, often are adversely affected by deposits at various places throughout the fuel induction system. These deposits can, however, be controlled by the use of optimal detergent additives, which are surface-active agents containing polar heads and hydrocarbon tails. For convenience in discussion, the gasoline detergents may be divided into two groups: low and high molecular weight. Low molecular weight detergents typically are more effective in forming protective films on metal surfaces, and high molecular weight detergents are more effective in dispersing deposit precursors.

  13. Alaska's North Slope: developing the smaller fields

    SciTech Connect

    Bradner, M.

    1984-08-13

    Oil development on Alaska's North Slope is entering a new phase. There is an increasing emphasis on reducing the high development cost of small, marginally-economic reservoirs near the large Prudhoe Bay oilfield. The exploration hunt for Arctic super-giants continues in the Beaufort Sea and in remote areas like the Arctic National Wildlife Refuge. But meanwhile, North Slope oil companies are paying more attention to smaller, undeveloped fields near Prudhoe. Kuparuk, west of Prudhoe, has been in production since 1981, for example, but next year Conoco will build facilities for the small Milne Point field, tying into infrastructure built for Kuparuk. Likewise, Lisburne and Endicott, two other fields now ready for development, will tie into the larger Prudhoe Bay pipeline system. 1 figure.

  14. Weekly cycle of magnetic characteristics of PM2.5 and PM2.5-10 in Beijing, China

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    SHI, M.; Wu, H.; Zhang, S.; Li, H.; Yang, T.

    2013-12-01

    In urban areas,fine particle matter with aerodynamic diameter between 2.5 um and 10 um (PM2.5-10), and 2.5 um (PM2.5), as an important source of urban particulate matter (PM) pollutants, have significant negative effects on health, atmospheric visibility and climate. PM has increasingly become a significant index of indicating the atmospheric pollution of city. In recent years, Beijing, China has been listed as one of the most serious air pollution city in the world. In order to investigate the sources of air pollutants, a total of 283 pairs of PM2.5 and PM2.5-10 samples were collected daily from July, 2010 to June, 2011 in Beijing. Mineral magnetic properties and Scanning electron microscope (SEM) observations and energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (EDS) analyses of PM2.5 and PM2.5-10 were measured to verify the magnetic materials. Magnetic measures for PM indicated that the major magnetic phase was coarse-grained magnetite-like material. The χlf, χarm, SIRM and χarm/SIRM series of the PM2.5 and PM2.5-10 show seasonal dependences: high values in winter and low values in summer. In additional the parameters analyzed by Time-series methods show a strong cycle about 7 days above 95% confidence level. Weekly cycle of magnetic characteristics of PM2.5 and PM2.5-10 show different pattern: the concentration of magnetic particles in PM2.5-10 show high values in mid-week, and particle sizes is steady, while the concentration of magnetic particles in PM2.5 show reverse a weekly cycle pattern, and particle sizes is smaller in the mid-week.Microscopy analyses reveal basically three morphologies of magnetic grains: aggregate, spherules and angular particles. The ultrafine carbonaceous particles which tend to form complex clusters and chain-like structures, most likely come from coal burning and motor vehicle exhaust. Spherical particles in PM2.5 are dominantly composed of Fe, O and C, grain-diameters of particles range from 0.3 to 2 um. Angular particles of Fe

  15. Marketing healthcare: lessons for smaller hospitals.

    PubMed

    Chowdhary, N R

    2000-02-01

    Recently, I have noted ubiquitous trends that lead me to conclude that we are on the brink of a fundamental change in the structure of healthcare delivery. Hospitals are changing. The hospital, that enduring and pervasive organization, which for decades has delivered the vast majority of acute care services is being re-conceptualized. Administrators and executives in today's hospitals are beginning to recognize the disaffection of constituents and the necessity to change from placing their own agenda or that of their profession over the needs of the customer. A lesson that is increasingly being heeded, particularly by the leading hospitals, is that a belief in one's own importance or a feeling of invulnerability represents an anachronistic stance. No hospital today can afford to retain a view that it is more important than the patients it serves, or that it is invulnerable. The external pressures are already clear--the actors, factors and forces in the external environment are forcing hospitals to re-evaluate efficiency, effectiveness and delivery arrangements. The rise to prominence of the outcomes movement is part of this trend. The present study was an attempt to assess the practices and trends in the modern smaller hospitals as a part of their strategy to match the competitive pressures.

  16. Partitioning a Gridded Rectangle into Smaller Rectangles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Klimesh, Matthew; Kiely, Aaron

    2004-01-01

    A relatively simple algorithm, devised for use in an image-data-compression application, partitions a rectangular pixelated image (or any other rectangle on which a regular rectangular grid has already been superimposed) into a specified number of smaller rectangles, hereafter denoted segments. The algorithm has the following properties: No floating-point operations are needed. The segments tend to be nearly square (in the sense that their widths and heights in pixel units tend to be nearly equal). The segments tend to have nearly equal areas. The algorithm yields valid results (no zero-width or zero-height segments) as long as the specified number of segments, s, does not exceed the number of pixels (equivalently, the number of grid cells). The inputs to the algorithm are the positive integer s plus the positive integers h and w, denoting the height and width, respectively, of the rectangle in pixel units. The limit on s for a valid result is given by s less than or equal to wh.

  17. BROWN DWARF DISKS AT AGES OF 5-10 Myr

    SciTech Connect

    Riaz, Basmah; Lodieu, Nicolas; Gizis, John E.

    2009-11-01

    We present Spitzer/IRAC and MIPS 24 mum observations for 28 brown dwarfs in the Upper Scorpius (UppSco) region. We find a disk fraction of 10.7%{sup +8.7%} {sub -3.3%}. One object shows a small excess at 24 mum but none at shorter wavelengths, and may be a candidate transition disk. Three objects show emission in the 10 mum silicate feature and we present compositional fits for these sources. Flat structures are observed for all disk sources in UppSco. Also presented are the MIPS/70 mum observations for the TW Hydrae Association brown dwarf 2MASS J1139511-315921. We discuss the structure and chemistry of brown dwarf disks at ages of approx5-10 Myr, and consider the possible effects of the brown dwarf densities in these clusters on the disk lifetimes.

  18. Hearing Impairment Is Associated with Smaller Brain Volume in Aging

    PubMed Central

    Rigters, Stephanie C.; Bos, Daniel; Metselaar, Mick; Roshchupkin, Gennady V.; Baatenburg de Jong, Robert J.; Ikram, M. Arfan; Vernooij, Meike W.; Goedegebure, André

    2017-01-01

    Although recent studies show that age-related hearing impairment is associated with cerebral changes, data from a population perspective are still lacking. Therefore, we studied the relation between hearing impairment and brain volume in a large elderly cohort. From the population-based Rotterdam Study, 2,908 participants (mean age 65 years, 56% female) underwent a pure-tone audiogram to quantify hearing impairment. By performing MR imaging of the brain we quantified global and regional brain tissue volumes (total brain volume, gray matter volume, white matter (WM) volume, and lobe-specific volumes). We used multiple linear regression models, adjusting for age, sex, head size, time between hearing test and MR imaging, and relevant cognitive and cardiovascular covariates. Furthermore, we performed voxel-based morphometry to explore sub-regional differences. We found that a higher pure-tone threshold was associated with a smaller total brain volume [difference in standardized brain volume per decibel increase in hearing threshold in the age-sex adjusted model: -0.003 (95% confidence interval -0.004; -0.001)]. Specifically, WM volume was associated. Both associations were more pronounced in the lower frequencies. All associations were consistently present in all brain lobes in the lower frequencies and in most lobes in the higher frequencies, and were independent of cognitive function and cardiovascular risk factors. In voxel-based analyses we found associations of hearing impairment with smaller white volumes and some smaller and larger gray volumes, yet these were statistically non-significant. Our findings demonstrate that hearing impairment in elderly is related to smaller total brain volume, independent of cognition and cardiovascular risk factors. This mainly seems to be driven by smaller WM volume, throughout the brain. PMID:28163683

  19. Devising rocket power for smaller engines

    SciTech Connect

    Burruss, R.

    1996-04-01

    Compact, high-power engines that burn fuel and oxygen could be made by winding copper tubing in a helix around boiler sections. With more than 1,000 horsepower per pound of engine weight, liquid-fueled rockets have the highest specific power of any engines designed for sustained operation. Yet those engines generally run for about only 1,000 seconds--nowhere near the sustained operation time for lower-power automotive and aircraft engines of more than 1,000 hours. In theory, at least, a fuel/oxygen rocket can be built that combines the best of both classes: high specific power (from perhaps two to 10 times that of a gas turbine) and a 1,000-hour service life. Such an engine would almost certainly be possible if the rocket`s exhaust gases could be simultaneously cooled and expanded by mixing water with the rocket`s exhaust and boiling it before it reaches the turbine. The technology itself is not new. variations of these rocket-turbine-type engines, for example, powered torpedoes during World War I. Some 30 years later, German V-2 rockets used fuel pumps, driven by the reaction of hydrogen peroxide with hydrocarbon fuels, to produce high-pressure steam that was directed against a turbine. Alternatively, fuel/oxygen combustion could produce steam to drive a piston engine. Either way, the challenge remains to construct a compact, long-service-life, high-specific-power boiler that burns fuel and oxygen. The new type of engine could be derived from recent research on electric vehicles (EVs).

  20. Big Results From a Smaller Gearbox

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2005-01-01

    Many people will be sad to see the Hubble Space Telescope go, as it was the first instrument of its kind to provide us with such a wealth of imagery and information about the galaxy. The telescope has served us well since its launch in spring of 1990, but it is nearly time for its retirement. The science, however, will continue, as NASA plans the launch of a new, more modern orbiting telescope, the James Webb Space Telescope. Named after the man who ran NASA from 1961 to 1968, years fraught with the anxiety and uncertainty of the Space Race, the scope is scheduled for launch in fall of 2011. It is designed to study the earliest galaxies and some of the first stars formed after the Big Bang. NASA scientists at the Goddard Space Flight Center are busy developing the technologies to build this new machine. Many of the new technologies are available for commercial licensing and development. For example, the NASA Planetary Gear System technology developed to give precise nanometer positioning capabilities for the James Webb Space Telescope is now being employed by Turnkey Design Services, LLC (TDS), of Blue Island, Illinois, to improve electric motors. This revolutionary piece of technology allows more efficient operation of the motors, and is more cost- effective than traditional gearbox designs.

  1. Smaller foraminifers of the Lower Permian from Western Tethys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Filimonova, T. V.

    2010-12-01

    Among the smaller foraminifers from the Lower Permian of Western Tethys (Pamir, Northern Afghanistan, Central and Eastern Iran, Armenia, and Turkey), foraminiferal assemblages characteristic of the Asselian, Sakmarian, Yakhtashian, Bolorian, and Kubergandian stages are distinguished. The first stratigraphic scheme based on smaller foraminifers is elaborated for the Lower Permian (Cisuralian Series) of Western Tethys. Eight biostratigraphic units distinguished in the Lower Permian and one in the Kubergandian Stage are ranked as beds with characteristic foraminiferal assemblages. At particular stratigraphic levels, the beds are recognizable in different paleogeographic provinces of the Tethyan Realm, which enables correlation between deposits concurrently accumulated under dissimilar climatic and facies conditions to be carried. Some of the distinguished beds are recognizable beyond the Tethyan Realm, for instance in the Donetsk basin, Cis-Urals, Pechora coal basin, and Spitsbergen. Among foraminifers that have been studied, 264 species and subspecies, including 16 new taxa, are identified. The following species and subspecies are identified and described for the first time: Hemigordius permicus beitepicus subsp. nov., H. pamiricus sp. nov., Neohemigordius afganicus sp. nov., N. carnicus sp. nov., N. bangi sp. nov., N. zulumarticus sp. nov., N. kubergandinicus sp. nov., Geinitzina grandella sp. nov., G. dentiformis sp. nov., G. bella sp. nov., Pachyphloia paraovata minima sp. nov., P. aucta sp. nov., Frondicularia porrecta sp. nov., Globivalvulina gigantea sp. nov., G. compacta sp. nov., and G. explicata sp. nov.

  2. Measurements on Superconducting Nanorings Smaller than the Coherence Length

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Snyder, Stephen; Erickson, Michael J.; Kinney, Joseph; Lee, Yeonbae; Nelson, J. J.; Goldman, Allen

    2012-02-01

    The Little-Parks experiment on superconducting cylinders is an important demonstration of fluxoid quantization in superconductors. The transition temperature oscillations in magnetic field have a period of h/2e for the micro cylinders in their studies, which was further evidence for Cooper paring at the time [W. A. Little, R. D. Parks, PRL 9, 9 (1964)]. However recent theoretical works have suggested that in superconducting loops smaller than the coherence length this period changes from h/2e to h/e, for details see [F. Loder, et al. PRB 78, 174526 (2008)] and references therein. The destructive regime has also been observed experimentally in cylinders whose diameter is small compared to the coherence length [Y. Liu, et al. Science 294, 2332 (2001)]. We present experimental work in an effort to achieve this limit in Al nanorings prepared by electron beam lithography. These measurements achieve a regime hitherto unexplored in nanorings with interesting consequences.

  3. Ten Indicators of Vitality in Smaller Academic Libraries

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pappas, David

    2009-01-01

    This paper provides a means of quickly ascertaining the relative health of smaller academic libraries by presenting a top ten list of vitality indicators. The list is based on an observational convenience sampling of thirty smaller academic libraries across the United States. The indicators making the list were those which appeared most often in…

  4. 13 CFR 107.710 - Requirement to finance smaller enterprises.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 13 Business Credit and Assistance 1 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Requirement to finance smaller enterprises. 107.710 Section 107.710 Business Credit and Assistance SMALL BUSINESS ADMINISTRATION SMALL... Small Business for Sbic Financing § 107.710 Requirement to finance smaller enterprises. Your...

  5. 13 CFR 107.710 - Requirement to finance smaller enterprises.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 13 Business Credit and Assistance 1 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Requirement to finance smaller enterprises. 107.710 Section 107.710 Business Credit and Assistance SMALL BUSINESS ADMINISTRATION SMALL... Small Business for Sbic Financing § 107.710 Requirement to finance smaller enterprises. Your...

  6. 13 CFR 107.710 - Requirement to finance smaller enterprises.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 13 Business Credit and Assistance 1 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Requirement to finance smaller enterprises. 107.710 Section 107.710 Business Credit and Assistance SMALL BUSINESS ADMINISTRATION SMALL... Small Business for Sbic Financing § 107.710 Requirement to finance smaller enterprises. Your...

  7. 13 CFR 107.710 - Requirement to finance smaller enterprises.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 13 Business Credit and Assistance 1 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Requirement to finance smaller enterprises. 107.710 Section 107.710 Business Credit and Assistance SMALL BUSINESS ADMINISTRATION SMALL... Small Business for Sbic Financing § 107.710 Requirement to finance smaller enterprises. Your...

  8. 13 CFR 107.710 - Requirement to finance smaller enterprises.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 13 Business Credit and Assistance 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Requirement to finance smaller enterprises. 107.710 Section 107.710 Business Credit and Assistance SMALL BUSINESS ADMINISTRATION SMALL... Small Business for Sbic Financing § 107.710 Requirement to finance smaller enterprises. Your...

  9. Health promotion in smaller workplaces in the United States.

    PubMed

    Harris, Jeffrey R; Hannon, Peggy A; Beresford, Shirley A A; Linnan, Laura A; McLellan, Deborah L

    2014-01-01

    Most American workplaces are smaller, with fewer than 1,000 employees. Many of these employees are low-wage earners and at increased risk for chronic diseases. Owing to the challenges smaller workplaces face to offering health-promotion programs, their employees often lack access to health-promotion opportunities available at larger workplaces. Many smaller employers do not offer health insurance, which is currently the major funding vehicle for health-promotion services. They also have few health-promotion vendors to serve them and low internal capacity for, and commitment to, delivery of on-site programs. The programs they offer, whether aimed at health promotion alone or integrated with health protection, are rarely comprehensive and are understudied. Research priorities for health promotion in smaller workplaces include developing programs feasible for the smallest workplaces with fewer than 20 employees. Policy priorities include incentives for smaller workplaces to implement comprehensive programs and an ongoing system for monitoring and evaluation.

  10. More, smaller bacteria in response to ocean's warming?

    PubMed

    Morán, Xosé Anxelu G; Alonso-Sáez, Laura; Nogueira, Enrique; Ducklow, Hugh W; González, Natalia; López-Urrutia, Ángel; Díaz-Pérez, Laura; Calvo-Díaz, Alejandra; Arandia-Gorostidi, Nestor; Huete-Stauffer, Tamara M

    2015-07-07

    Heterotrophic bacteria play a major role in organic matter cycling in the ocean. Although the high abundances and relatively fast growth rates of coastal surface bacterioplankton make them suitable sentinels of global change, past analyses have largely overlooked this functional group. Here, time series analysis of a decade of monthly observations in temperate Atlantic coastal waters revealed strong seasonal patterns in the abundance, size and biomass of the ubiquitous flow-cytometric groups of low (LNA) and high nucleic acid (HNA) content bacteria. Over this relatively short period, we also found that bacterioplankton cells were significantly smaller, a trend that is consistent with the hypothesized temperature-driven decrease in body size. Although decadal cell shrinking was observed for both groups, it was only LNA cells that were strongly coherent, with ecological theories linking temperature, abundance and individual size on both the seasonal and interannual scale. We explain this finding because, relative to their HNA counterparts, marine LNA bacteria are less diverse, dominated by members of the SAR11 clade. Temperature manipulation experiments in 2012 confirmed a direct effect of warming on bacterial size. Concurrent with rising temperatures in spring, significant decadal trends of increasing standing stocks (3% per year) accompanied by decreasing mean cell size (-1% per year) suggest a major shift in community structure, with a larger contribution of LNA bacteria to total biomass. The increasing prevalence of these typically oligotrophic taxa may severely impact marine food webs and carbon fluxes by an overall decrease in the efficiency of the biological pump.

  11. Assessing Retention Program Holding Power Effectiveness Across Smaller Community Colleges.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lee, Robert E.

    1988-01-01

    Analyzed use, holding power effectiveness, cost, staffing, and cost-effectiveness for seven retention programs across smaller community colleges (N=93). Results suggest that peer-related and adult learner interventions may be useful. (Author/NB)

  12. Smaller hippocampal volume predicts pathologic vulnerability to psychological trauma

    PubMed Central

    Gilbertson, Mark W.; Shenton, Martha E.; Ciszewski, Aleksandra; Kasai, Kiyoto; Lasko, Natasha B.; Orr, Scott P.; Pitman, Roger K.

    2010-01-01

    In animals, exposure to severe stress can damage the hippocampus. Recent human studies show smaller hippocampal volume in individuals with the stress-related psychiatric condition posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD). Does this represent the neurotoxic effect of trauma, or is smaller hippocampal volume a pre-existing condition that renders the brain more vulnerable to the development of pathological stress responses? In monozygotic twins discordant for trauma exposure, we found evidence that smaller hippocampi indeed constitute a risk factor for the development of stress-related psychopathology. Disorder severity in PTSD patients who were exposed to trauma was negatively correlated with the hippocampal volume of both the patients and the patients’ trauma-unexposed identical co-twin. Furthermore, severe PTSD twin pairs—both the trauma-exposed and unexposed members—had significantly smaller hippocampi than non-PTSD pairs. PMID:12379862

  13. Pheromone Chemistry of the Smaller European Elm Bark Beetle.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Beck, Keith

    1978-01-01

    Discusses the aggregation pheromone of the smaller European elm bark beetle, Scolytus multistriatus (Marsham), with emphasis on information that could be used in the classroom as a practical application of organic chemistry. (Author/GA)

  14. 132. Credit JTL. Smaller feeder pipes collecting seepage and water ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    132. Credit JTL. Smaller feeder pipes collecting seepage and water from springs for the Eagle Canyon flume. - Battle Creek Hydroelectric System, Battle Creek & Tributaries, Red Bluff, Tehama County, CA

  15. Defining Space Mission Architects for the Smaller Missions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Anderson, C.

    1999-01-01

    The definition of the Space Mission Architect (SMA) must be clear in both technical and human terms if we expect to train and/or to find people needed to architect the numbers of smaller missions expected in the future.

  16. Lower Permian smaller foraminifers from the Rahdar section, Central Iran

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Filimonova, T. V.; Gorgij, M. N.; Yarahmadzahi, H.; Leven, E. Ja.

    2015-07-01

    Smaller foraminifers from the Chili Formation recovered in the Rahdar section of the Kalmard tectonic block west of Tabas, Central Iran, are studied. Two smaller foraminiferal assemblages whose position in the section completely coincides with that of previously encountered Kalaktash and Halvan fusulinid complexes are recognized. The age of these Deckerella elegans- Nodosinelloides pinardae and Howchinella sossipatrovae assemblages is Sakmarian and late Sakmarian-early Artinskian (?), respectively. A new species Hemigordius rahdarensis Filimonova, sp. nov. is described.

  17. More, smaller bacteria in response to ocean's warming?

    PubMed Central

    Morán, Xosé Anxelu G.; Alonso-Sáez, Laura; Nogueira, Enrique; Ducklow, Hugh W.; González, Natalia; López-Urrutia, Ángel; Díaz-Pérez, Laura; Calvo-Díaz, Alejandra; Arandia-Gorostidi, Nestor; Huete-Stauffer, Tamara M.

    2015-01-01

    Heterotrophic bacteria play a major role in organic matter cycling in the ocean. Although the high abundances and relatively fast growth rates of coastal surface bacterioplankton make them suitable sentinels of global change, past analyses have largely overlooked this functional group. Here, time series analysis of a decade of monthly observations in temperate Atlantic coastal waters revealed strong seasonal patterns in the abundance, size and biomass of the ubiquitous flow-cytometric groups of low (LNA) and high nucleic acid (HNA) content bacteria. Over this relatively short period, we also found that bacterioplankton cells were significantly smaller, a trend that is consistent with the hypothesized temperature-driven decrease in body size. Although decadal cell shrinking was observed for both groups, it was only LNA cells that were strongly coherent, with ecological theories linking temperature, abundance and individual size on both the seasonal and interannual scale. We explain this finding because, relative to their HNA counterparts, marine LNA bacteria are less diverse, dominated by members of the SAR11 clade. Temperature manipulation experiments in 2012 confirmed a direct effect of warming on bacterial size. Concurrent with rising temperatures in spring, significant decadal trends of increasing standing stocks (3% per year) accompanied by decreasing mean cell size (−1% per year) suggest a major shift in community structure, with a larger contribution of LNA bacteria to total biomass. The increasing prevalence of these typically oligotrophic taxa may severely impact marine food webs and carbon fluxes by an overall decrease in the efficiency of the biological pump. PMID:26063843

  18. PEDOT polymer coatings facilitate smaller neural recording electrodes

    PubMed Central

    Ludwig, Kip A.; Langhals, Nicholas B.; Joseph, Mike D.; Richardson-Burns, Sarah M.; Hendricks, Jeffrey L.; Kipke, Daryl R.

    2012-01-01

    We investigated using poly(3,4-ethylenedioxythiophene) (PEDOT) to lower the impedance of small, gold recording electrodes with initial impedances outside of the effective recording range. Smaller electrode sites enable more densely packed arrays, increasing the number of input and output channels to and from the brain. Moreover, smaller electrode sizes promote smaller probe designs; decreasing the dimensions of the implanted probe has been demonstrated to decrease the inherent immune response, a known contributor to the failure of long-term implants. As expected, chronically implanted control electrodes were unable to record well-isolated unit activity, primarily as a result of a dramatically increased noise floor. Conversely, electrodes coated with PEDOT consistently recorded high-quality neural activity, and exhibited a much lower noise floor than controls. These results demonstrate that PEDOT coatings enable electrode designs 15 microns in diameter. PMID:21245527

  19. Smaller foraminifers from the Permian of Central Iran

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Filimonova, T. V.

    2013-01-01

    Six assemblages of smaller foraminifers are first distinguished and described from sections of the Kalmard tectonic block, Central Iran. The assemblages that have been studied are correlated with concurrent assemblages from the East European platform, Cis-Urals, Darvaz, Northern Pamir, and some other regions of the Tethyan Realm. The results of correlation and available data on fusulinids and conodonts occurring in association with smaller foraminifers are used for dating the assemblages whose distribution ranges span the stratigraphic interval from the early Sakmarian (lower assemblage) up to the Kubergandian (uppermost assemblage). New species Frondina iranica sp. nov. discovered in the study region is described.

  20. 41 CFR 102-5.10 - What does this part cover?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 41 Public Contracts and Property Management 3 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false What does this part cover? 102-5.10 Section 102-5.10 Public Contracts and Property Management Federal Property Management... transport employees between their homes and places of work....

  1. 41 CFR 102-5.10 - What does this part cover?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 41 Public Contracts and Property Management 3 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false What does this part cover? 102-5.10 Section 102-5.10 Public Contracts and Property Management Federal Property Management... transport employees between their homes and places of work....

  2. 41 CFR 102-5.10 - What does this part cover?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 41 Public Contracts and Property Management 3 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false What does this part cover? 102-5.10 Section 102-5.10 Public Contracts and Property Management Federal Property Management... transport employees between their homes and places of work....

  3. 43 CFR 5.10 - Can I appeal a decision not to issue a permit?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 43 Public Lands: Interior 1 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Can I appeal a decision not to issue a permit? 5.10 Section 5.10 Public Lands: Interior Office of the Secretary of the Interior COMMERCIAL FILMING AND SIMILAR PROJECTS AND STILL PHOTOGRAPHY ON CERTAIN AREAS UNDER DEPARTMENT JURISDICTION...

  4. 43 CFR 5.10 - Can I appeal a decision not to issue a permit?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 43 Public Lands: Interior 1 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Can I appeal a decision not to issue a permit? 5.10 Section 5.10 Public Lands: Interior Office of the Secretary of the Interior COMMERCIAL FILMING AND SIMILAR PROJECTS AND STILL PHOTOGRAPHY ON CERTAIN AREAS UNDER DEPARTMENT JURISDICTION...

  5. Comparing Approaches to Converting Large High Schools into Smaller Units

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Levine, Thomas H

    2011-01-01

    Scholars and reformers in the United States have called for converting large high schools into smaller units to provide a more effective, personal, and culturally responsive education for all students. Current literature argues that such "conversion high schools" should break into fully autonomous small schools rather than more…

  6. Competition, Connection, and Collaboration in Smaller German Programs

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Braunbeck, Helga G.

    2011-01-01

    The MLA Report on "Foreign Languages and Higher Education: New Structures for a Changed World" has been criticized for focusing its proposals on large German programs. This article attempts to show how some of its recommendations can also be implemented in smaller language programs. These programs exist within a network of relations to other…

  7. Library Homepage Design at Smaller Bachelor of Arts Institutions

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jones, Scott L.; Leonard, Kirsten

    2011-01-01

    This study examined the homepages of the libraries of 175 smaller bachelor of arts institutions, coding for the presence of 98 design elements. By reporting and examining the frequency of these features, the authors noted what is and is not common practice at these libraries. They found that only fourteen elements were present on at least half of…

  8. Pride and Prejudice: The Choice for the Smaller Law School.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Veitch, Edward

    1981-01-01

    The means required to establish a small, but quality, local law school are discussed. Facts about the Faculty of Law at the University of New Brunswick and arguments in favor of the enhancement in quality of the smaller law schools are presented. (MLW)

  9. The Underreported Use of Integrated Marketing Communication by Smaller Businesses.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Johnson, Ed

    This research suggests integrated marketing communication (IMC) is widely used by small business. In a survey of Midwest businesses, it was found that smaller business tend to integrate their marketing communication to the same extent as do larger businesses. Their advertising, P.R., and sales promotion are as likely to present a unified message,…

  10. Evidence that Smaller Schools Do Not Improve Student Achievement

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wainer, Howard; Zwerling, Harris L.

    2006-01-01

    If more small schools than "expected" are among the high achievers, then creating more small schools would raise achievement across the board, many proponents of small schools have argued. In this article, the authors challenge the faulty logic of such inferences. Many claims have been made about the advantages of smaller schools. One is…

  11. Entrepreneurship in Smaller Jurisdictions: Appraising a Glocal Elite

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Baldacchino, Godfrey

    2008-01-01

    Entrepreneurship on smaller (often island) jurisdictions tends to suffer from the same import-orientation or "cargo cult" that affects many other issues: entrepreneurs are rarely locally bred but are most often "imported", recruited after long stints in other, larger countries, or else must be suffered to spend regular time…

  12. Organizing Schools into Smaller Units: A Planning Guide.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Oxley, Diane

    The idea of organizing secondary schools into smaller units has gained support in the last decade. This guidebook is designed to support efforts to develop an effective small-unit plan for high schools. The first two sections highlight the benefits of small-unit organizations and identify the institutional barriers to implementation. Proponents of…

  13. Healthcare security staffing for smaller facilities: where science meets art.

    PubMed

    Warren, Bryan

    2013-01-01

    Obtaining effective security resourcing and staffing for smaller healthcare facilities presents many difficulties, according to the author In this article, he provides guidance to security practitioners on taking existing data and translating it into a language that administration will understand and appreciate.

  14. Implementation Study of Smaller Learning Communities. Final Report

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bernstein, Lawrence; Millsap, Mary Ann; Schimmenti, Jennifer; Page, Lindsay

    2008-01-01

    The Smaller Learning Communities (SLC) program was established in response to growing national concerns about students too often lost and alienated in large, impersonal high schools, as well as concerns about school safety and low levels of achievement and graduation for many students. Authorized under the "Elementary and Secondary Education Act,"…

  15. Employer Expectations: Could a Smaller Company Be for You?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hough, Susan

    You've probably heard a lot of stories about smaller companies such as the dictator, tyrant owner who micromanages everything you do, that small companies aren't as stable so you will have less job security or they can't afford to pay a decent salary. The information can be sometimes contradictory and confusing. One thing is certain, smaller companies dominate the landscape of job opportunities. It is estimated that two-thirds of all jobs are from small companies. Small companies are defined by the US Department of Labor as less than 500 employees (50 or less could better be defined as a startup company). Of course, a lot depends on the specific industry and how much automation a company may have. You will find that many in the industry will consider a small company to be under 200 employees, and a company that has 200-500 employees to be more of a midsize company.

  16. A big alligator snacks on a smaller alligator

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1998-01-01

    A large alligator attacks and eats a smaller one in a natural display of cannibalism. Although this event has been observed infrequently by Kennedy Space Center's staff photographers, it is common feeding behavior among the wild alligator population on the space center. Alligators are carnivorous and will eat any living thing that crosses their paths and is small enough for them to kill. For this reason, it is dangerous to feed wild alligators, and in Florida, it is also illegal. Kennedy Space Center is located on the Merritt Island National Wildlife Refuge which is operated by the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service.

  17. Kokes Awards for the 22nd North American Catalysis Society Meeting, June 5-10, 2011

    SciTech Connect

    Fabio H. Ribeiro

    2011-06-05

    The biennial North American Catalysis Society (NACS) Meetings are the premiere conferences in the area of catalysis, surface science, and reaction engineering. The 22nd meeting will be held the week of June 5-10, 2011 in Detroit, Michigan. The objective of the Meetings is to bring together leading researchers for intensive scientific exchange and interactions. Financial support that offsets some of the associated costs (specifically, registration fee, airline tickets, and hotel accommodations) would encourage graduate students, and for the first time undergraduate students, to attend and participate meaningfully in this conference. The funds sought in this proposal will help support the Richard J. Kokes Travel Award program. Graduate students eligible for these merit-based Awards are those who study at a North American university and who will present at the Meeting. We have currently 209 applications and we expect to be able to fund about half of them. The NACS has traditionally sought to encourage graduate student, and this year for the first time undergraduate studies, participation at the National Meetings and providing financial support is the most effective means to do so. Their attendance would contribute significantly to their scientific training and communication and presentation skills. They would be exposed to the leading researchers from the US and abroad; they would meet their peers from other universities; they would learn about cutting-edge results that could benefit their research projects; and they may become interested in becoming active participants in the catalysis community. These young investigators represent the next generation of scientists and engineers, and their proper training will lead to future scientific breakthroughs and technological innovations that benefit the US economy. Advances in catalysis can come in the form of more energy-efficient and environmentally-friendly chemical processes, improved fuel cell performance, efficient

  18. Wage and Salary Administration for Smaller Institutions of Higher Education. A Basic Guide to Management Practice.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    National Association of College and University Business Officers, Washington, DC.

    This manual provides a basic guide to wage and salary administration at smaller institutions of higher education--institutions with 400 or fewer full-time nonacademic employees and a relatively uncomplicated administrative organization. Emphasis is placed on definitions and benefits of the process, assigning responsibility and authority, deciding…

  19. VLSI technology for smaller, cheaper, faster return link systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nanzetta, Kathy; Ghuman, Parminder; Bennett, Toby; Solomon, Jeff; Dowling, Jason; Welling, John

    1994-01-01

    Very Large Scale Integration (VLSI) Application-specific Integrated Circuit (ASIC) technology has enabled substantially smaller, cheaper, and more capable telemetry data systems. However, the rapid growth in available ASIC fabrication densities has far outpaced the application of this technology to telemetry systems. Available densities have grown by well over an order magnitude since NASA's Goddard Space Flight Center (GSFC) first began developing ASIC's for ground telemetry systems in 1985. To take advantage of these higher integration levels, a new generation of ASIC's for return link telemetry processing is under development. These new submicron devices are designed to further reduce the cost and size of NASA return link processing systems while improving performance. This paper describes these highly integrated processing components.

  20. Early fluid resuscitation with hyperoncotic hydroxyethyl starch 200/0.5 (10%) in severe burn injury

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Introduction Despite large experience in the management of severe burn injury, there are still controversies regarding the best type of fluid resuscitation, especially during the first 24 hours after the trauma. Therefore, our study addressed the question whether hyperoncotic hydroxyethyl starch (HES) 200/0.5 (10%) administered in combination with crystalloids within the first 24 hours after injury is as effective as 'crystalloids only' in severe burn injury patients. Methods 30 consecutive patients were enrolled to this prospective interventional open label study and assigned either to a traditional 'crystalloids only' or to a 'HES 200/0.5 (10%)' volume resuscitation protocol. Total amount of fluid administration, complications such as pulmonary failure, abdominal compartment syndrome, sepsis, renal failure and overall mortality were assessed. Cox proportional hazard regression analysis was performed for binary outcomes and adjustment for potential confounders was done in the multivariate regression models. For continuous outcome parameters multiple linear regression analysis was used. Results Group differences between patients receiving crystalloids only or HES 200/0.5 (10%) were not statistically significant. However, a large effect towards increased overall mortality (adjusted hazard ratio 7.12; P = 0.16) in the HES 200/0.5 (10%) group as compared to the crystalloids only group (43.8% versus 14.3%) was present. Similarly, the incidence of renal failure was 25.0% in the HES 200/0.5 (10%) group versus 7.1% in the crystalloid only group (adjusted hazard ratio 6.16; P = 0.42). Conclusions This small study indicates that the application of hyperoncotic HES 200/0.5 (10%) within the first 24 hours after severe burn injury may be associated with fatal outcome and should therefore be used with caution. Trial registration NCT01120730. PMID:20584291

  1. Mission Assurance Versus Cost - Thinking in a Smaller Box

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ridley, A. J.; Cutler, J.; Nicholas, A. C.

    2011-12-01

    The cost to launch a space craft into orbit can be a significant percentage of the cost of a mission. This cost has driven space agencies to try to assure mission success by adding significant overhead on to the processes that are used to design, built and test instruments and space craft. This drive to assure mission success creates a feedback loop - the processes drive the cost up, which makes it even more important that the mission succeed, which drive more strict processes, which drive costs up, etc. Further, the probability of a launch vehicle failure can be higher than the probability of a satellite failure. Cost is typically driven down by mass production. This can not really be accomplished with typical satellite missions, due to the cost of the mission assurance and launches. On the other hand, there have been successful mass-produced satellites constellations, such as OrbComm, GPS and Iridium. Further, with miniaturization of instrumentation, it becomes possible to launch many extremely small satellites where normally one would launch one large satellite. This method has many advantages over typical missions: (1) the design of a single small satellite can be tested and verified through a secondary payload launch to assure that the design is sound; (2) the mass production cost is significantly smaller than building a single monolithic satellite; (3) constellation missions are inherently scalable, so it is easy to descope the mission if mass/cost/schedule become problematic; (4) some global-scale science questions can be address through relatively random orbits, so each of the constellation members could be launched as secondary payloads; (5) multiple smaller, cheaper launchers could be utilized instead of a single heavy lifting launch vehicle (which serves additionally to protect against a single launch failure also); and (6) most constellation missions can have built in robustness, such that if individual satellites fail, the system as a whole can still

  2. Solution-phase synthesis of smaller cuprous oxide nanocubes

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang Hui; Cui Zuolin

    2008-06-03

    Smaller cuprous oxides (Cu{sub 2}O) nanocubes were synthesized by solution-phase method at 160 deg. C, using ethylene glycol reducing Cu(NO{sub 3}){sub 2}.3H{sub 2}O with poly(vinylypyrrolidone) (pvp) as capping agent. The Cu{sub 2}O nanocubes were characterized by field-emission scanning electron microscopy (FE-SEM), transmission electron microscopy (TEM), selected area electron diffraction (SAED) and X-ray powder diffraction (XRD). SEM showed that most of Cu{sub 2}O nanocubes were uniform and monodisperse, with the average edge length about 130 nm. The TEM results were consistent with the SEM results. Selected area electron diffraction (SAED) suggested that as-prepared Cu{sub 2}O nanocubes were single crystalline. The geometric shape and size of Cu{sub 2}O nanoparticles were greatly affected by the presence of PVP and its molar ratio (in repeating unit) relative to copper nitrate, temperature and the concentration of Cu(NO{sub 3}){sub 2}.3H{sub 2}O. The mechanism of Cu{sub 2}O nanocubes formation was also discussed.

  3. 16 CFR 5.10 - Cross-reference to executive branch-wide regulations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... RULES OF PRACTICE STANDARDS OF CONDUCT Financial Disclosure Requirements § 5.10 Cross-reference to... the Federal Trade Commission are subject to and should refer to the executive branch-wide financial disclosure regulations at 5 CFR part 2634, and to the procedures for filing and review of...

  4. 17 CFR 5.10 - Risk assessment recordkeeping requirements for retail foreign exchange dealers.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 17 Commodity and Securities Exchanges 1 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Risk assessment recordkeeping... COMMODITY FUTURES TRADING COMMISSION OFF-EXCHANGE FOREIGN CURRENCY TRANSACTIONS § 5.10 Risk assessment... to § 240.17h-1T of this title, or such other risk assessment regulations as the Securities...

  5. 17 CFR 5.10 - Risk assessment recordkeeping requirements for retail foreign exchange dealers.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 17 Commodity and Securities Exchanges 1 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Risk assessment recordkeeping... COMMODITY FUTURES TRADING COMMISSION OFF-EXCHANGE FOREIGN CURRENCY TRANSACTIONS § 5.10 Risk assessment... to § 240.17h-1T of this title, or such other risk assessment regulations as the Securities...

  6. 17 CFR 5.10 - Risk assessment recordkeeping requirements for retail foreign exchange dealers.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 17 Commodity and Securities Exchanges 1 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Risk assessment recordkeeping... COMMODITY FUTURES TRADING COMMISSION OFF-EXCHANGE FOREIGN CURRENCY TRANSACTIONS § 5.10 Risk assessment... to § 240.17h-1T of this title, or such other risk assessment regulations as the Securities...

  7. 17 CFR 5.10 - Risk assessment recordkeeping requirements for retail foreign exchange dealers.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 17 Commodity and Securities Exchanges 1 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Risk assessment recordkeeping... COMMODITY FUTURES TRADING COMMISSION OFF-EXCHANGE FOREIGN CURRENCY TRANSACTIONS § 5.10 Risk assessment... to § 240.17h-1T of this title, or such other risk assessment regulations as the Securities...

  8. Teaching for Creativity by Science Teachers in Grades 5-10

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Al-Abdali, Nasser S.; Al-Balushi, Sulaiman M.

    2016-01-01

    This classroom observation study explored how science teachers (N = 22) teach for creativity in grades 5-10 in Oman. We designed an observation form with 4 main categories that targeted the instructional practices related to teaching for creativity: questioning strategy, teacher's responses to students' ideas, classroom activities to support…

  9. Laser Plasma Particle Accelerators: Large Fields for Smaller Facility Sources

    SciTech Connect

    Geddes, Cameron G.R.; Cormier-Michel, Estelle; Esarey, Eric H.; Schroeder, Carl B.; Vay, Jean-Luc; Leemans, Wim P.; Bruhwiler, David L.; Cary, John R.; Cowan, Ben; Durant, Marc; Hamill, Paul; Messmer, Peter; Mullowney, Paul; Nieter, Chet; Paul, Kevin; Shasharina, Svetlana; Veitzer, Seth; Weber, Gunther; Rubel, Oliver; Ushizima, Daniela; Bethel, Wes; Wu, John

    2009-03-20

    Compared to conventional particle accelerators, plasmas can sustain accelerating fields that are thousands of times higher. To exploit this ability, massively parallel SciDAC particle simulations provide physical insight into the development of next-generation accelerators that use laser-driven plasma waves. These plasma-based accelerators offer a path to more compact, ultra-fast particle and radiation sources for probing the subatomic world, for studying new materials and new technologies, and for medical applications.

  10. The characteristic study of TSP, PM2.5-10 and PM2.5 in the rural site of central Taiwan.

    PubMed

    Fang, G C; Chang, C N; Wu, Y S; Fu, P C; Chang, K F; Yang, D G

    1999-08-01

    The total suspended particle (TSP), PM2.5-10 (aerodynamic diameter less than 10 microns) and PM2.5 concentration (aerodynamic diameter less than 2.5 microns) concentrations were sampled by PS-1 and Universal sampler on the roof (25 m) of the Medical and Engineering Building in the campus of Hungkuang Institute of Technology (HKIT) which is located at a height of 500 m on Da Du Mountain. The results indicated that average TSP, PM2.5-10 and PM2.5 concentrations are 0.42, 0.34 and 0.019 mg/m3 in the day time, respectively and are 0.32, 0.26 and 0.017 mg/m3 in the night time, respectively. The ratios of PM2.5-10/TSP were from 76% to 85% and from 50% to 91% for day and night period, respectively. It indicated that the major composition in the total suspended particles was PM2.5-10 in the rural site. The relationship between TSP and PM2.5-10 is TSP = 1.16PM2.5-10 + 0.027 and TSP = 1.01 PM2.5-10 + 0.058 in the day and night time, respectively. The correlation coefficient (R2) is 0.98 and 0.97 for day and night period, respectively. The relationship between PM2.5-10 and PM2.5 is PM2.5 = 0.0005PM2.5-10 + 0.019 and PM2.5 = 0.037PM2.5-10 + 0.0076 in the day and night period, respectively. The correlation coefficient (R2) is 3E-5 and 0.67 for day and night period, respectively. The relationships between TSP, PM2.5-10, PM2.5 particle concentrations and wind speed (R2) in the day time are 0.71, 0.64, 0.43, respectively and are 0.83, 0.79, 0.57, respectively in the night time. The proposed reasons are that there are more activities caused by people (students) and natural living animals which absorbed some of the particles during the day time. Thus, the correlation coefficients for the night time are better than those of day time. The particle size distributions are both bimodel in the day and night time. The major peaks in the day time appear in the particle diameter between 0.031-0.056 micron and 3.16-5.62 microns in the day period and appear between 0.017-0.031 micron and 1

  11. 75 FR 35893 - Office of Elementary and Secondary Education Overview Information; Smaller Learning Communities...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-06-23

    ... Education Notice Inviting Applications for New Awards Using Fiscal Year (FY) 2009 Funds; Smaller Learning...; Smaller Learning Communities Program; Notice Inviting Applications for New Awards Using Fiscal Year (FY...: The application package on the Smaller Learning Communities Web site at...

  12. British Columbia: improving retention and recruitment in smaller communities.

    PubMed

    Healey-Ogden, Marion; Wejr, Patricia; Farrow, Catherine

    2012-03-01

    This pilot project involved the application, in Canada, of the innovative 80/20 staffing model to a hospital in a small rural setting. The model provides the voluntary participants with 20% of their salaried time off from direct patient care in order to pursue various types of professional development activities. The project, overseen by a steering committee, lasted from June 2009 to February 2010 and involved 14 nurses on the pediatric unit of Royal Inland Hospital in Kamloops, British Columbia. It entailed a collaborative partnership of the British Columbia Nurses' Union, Interior Health Authority, Thompson Rivers University and the British Columbia Ministry of Health, and aimed to demonstrate how professional development opportunities can improve recruitment and retention of nurses, quality of work life and quality of patient care.

  13. High-Arctic butterflies become smaller with rising temperatures

    PubMed Central

    Bowden, Joseph J.; Eskildsen, Anne; Hansen, Rikke R.; Olsen, Kent; Kurle, Carolyn M.; Høye, Toke T.

    2015-01-01

    The response of body size to increasing temperature constitutes a universal response to climate change that could strongly affect terrestrial ectotherms, but the magnitude and direction of such responses remain unknown in most species. The metabolic cost of increased temperature could reduce body size but long growing seasons could also increase body size as was recently shown in an Arctic spider species. Here, we present the longest known time series on body size variation in two High-Arctic butterfly species: Boloria chariclea and Colias hecla. We measured wing length of nearly 4500 individuals collected annually between 1996 and 2013 from Zackenberg, Greenland and found that wing length significantly decreased at a similar rate in both species in response to warmer summers. Body size is strongly related to dispersal capacity and fecundity and our results suggest that these Arctic species could face severe challenges in response to ongoing rapid climate change. PMID:26445981

  14. High-Arctic butterflies become smaller with rising temperatures.

    PubMed

    Bowden, Joseph J; Eskildsen, Anne; Hansen, Rikke R; Olsen, Kent; Kurle, Carolyn M; Høye, Toke T

    2015-10-01

    The response of body size to increasing temperature constitutes a universal response to climate change that could strongly affect terrestrial ectotherms, but the magnitude and direction of such responses remain unknown in most species. The metabolic cost of increased temperature could reduce body size but long growing seasons could also increase body size as was recently shown in an Arctic spider species. Here, we present the longest known time series on body size variation in two High-Arctic butterfly species: Boloria chariclea and Colias hecla. We measured wing length of nearly 4500 individuals collected annually between 1996 and 2013 from Zackenberg, Greenland and found that wing length significantly decreased at a similar rate in both species in response to warmer summers. Body size is strongly related to dispersal capacity and fecundity and our results suggest that these Arctic species could face severe challenges in response to ongoing rapid climate change.

  15. Chelation and fluorescence properties of tetraphenylporphyrin and 5,10,15,20-tetra(4-hydroxyphenyl)porphyrin in acetonitrile

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ivanova, Yu. B.; Parfenov, A. S.; Mamardashvili, N. Zh.

    2017-01-01

    The kinetics of complex formation between zinc and 5,10,15,20-tetraphenylporphyrin and 5,10,15,20-tetra(4-hydroxyphenyl)porphyrin in acetonitrile is studied in the temperature range from 298 to 318 K. The fluorescent properties of these compounds are examined, the emission in the red region of the spectrum is measured, and the fluorescence quantum yields are determined. It is found that although the electronic absorption spectra of the studied compounds are almost identical, hydroxyl substituents are observed to have a considerable effect on the chelating ability of ligands. The rate constant of the formation of ZnT(4-OH-Ph)P is thus approximately three times higher than that of ZnTPhP, with the energy consumption being lower (about 20 kJ mol-1). The calculated fluorescence quantum yields of H2TPhP, H2T(4-OH-Ph) P, ZnTPhP, and ZnT(4-OH-Ph)P in acetonitrile are half those in toluene, while the ratio between the quantum yields of ligands and their metal complexes is a constant equal to approximately 3 and does not depend on which solvent is used.

  16. Report examines links among women's equality, smaller families, healthier children.

    PubMed

    1997-06-01

    This article reports on a new study by Nancy Riley about the relationship between gender equality and fertility and mortality declines in developing countries. Findings indicate that mortality and fertility has declined in countries without gender equality. Fertility and child mortality decline is related to women's educational status and employment. Riley argues that women's power to make decisions about health care, contraception, and the timing and number of children, if affected by education and paid employment, is more likely to lower mortality and fertility. Women's power may decline in countries where women's education and employment are advanced, but their role in society remains that of mothers. All developing countries showed a relationship between the amount of education and family size and child health. Fertility tends to be lowest among highly educated women. However, women's education has a stronger effect on child health and mortality. Maternal education also affects child nutritional status. Women's education offers women the option of job opportunities and new values or ideas. Women's employment may result in increased resources and status or in poverty and heavy physical labor. Societal views of women's work may reflect an increased self-worth for working women or lower status or the failure of a husband to adequately provide for family welfare. The key to the impact of women's employment is whether work becomes a way to achieve greater power for women in decision making about child welfare and family planning. Employment outside the home educates. In most countries, women who worked for cash had fewer children, but differences in fertility between working and nonworking women range from small to large. Higher income for Nigerian women means more children. Women's work also has inconsistent effects on child health.

  17. The use of law to encourage smaller families in Singapore.

    PubMed

    Smith, T W

    1980-01-01

    To pursue its goal of rapid economic development, Singapore provides family planning services and has vigorously encouraged its citizens to limit family size. The government has legislated disincentives for families to have more than 2 children. This discussion reviews the history of these legal measures and their usefulness as a tool to promote social change and development. Singapore has used the law as a means to encourage family planning in order to supplement the overall thrust for economic development in the late 1960s. Freed from obligations to the Malaysian Federation and lacking the support of the British military as of 1969, Lee Kuan Yew led his people's economic development along a Western model. Reduction of population growth is an essential component of that model. Lee stressed family planning by providing clinics, by advertising, by promoting housing and lifestyles conducive to nuclear families, and by gradually adopting a set of laws favoring small families. These laws were introduced in different sectors of the economy at different times and were revised as social conditions changed. Typically, they set a minor monetary or priority penalty for parents of 3 or more children. The laws discourage additional births rather than prohibit them, guiding rather than forcing family planning decisions. To what extent the laws were the cause of decreasing family size in Singapore is uncertain, but they contributed to some extent to the country's phenomenal progress in income and lifestyle. The Abortion Act of 1969 legalized abortion on nonmedical grounds with the Singapore Family Planning and Population Board (SFPPB) approval. The Act was amended twice in 1974 to make abortions available "on demand." The charging of progressive delivery (accouchement) fees in government hospitals for mothers with 2 or more children might be considered as the focal point of the total disincentives system. The fees placed financial pressure directly on those who violated the

  18. Total synthesis and antileukemic evaluations of the phenazine 5,10-dioxide natural products iodinin, myxin and their derivatives.

    PubMed

    Viktorsson, Elvar Örn; Melling Grøthe, Bendik; Aesoy, Reidun; Sabir, Misbah; Snellingen, Simen; Prandina, Anthony; Høgmoen Åstrand, Ove Alexander; Bonge-Hansen, Tore; Døskeland, Stein Ove; Herfindal, Lars; Rongved, Pål

    2017-04-01

    A new efficient total synthesis of the phenazine 5,10-dioxide natural products iodinin and myxin and new compounds derived from them was achieved in few steps, a key-step being 1,6-dihydroxyphenazine di-N-oxidation. Analogues prepared from iodinin, including myxin and 2-ethoxy-2-oxoethoxy derivatives, had fully retained cytotoxic effect against human cancer cells (MOLM-13 leukemia) at atmospheric and low oxygen level. Moreover, iodinin was for the first time shown to be hypoxia selective. The structure-activity relationship for leukemia cell death induction revealed that the level of N-oxide functionality was essential for cytotoxicity. It also revealed that only one of the two phenolic functions is required for activity, allowing the other one to be modified without loss of potency.

  19. Structural distortions in 5-10 nm silver nanoparticles under high pressure

    SciTech Connect

    Koski, Kristie J.; Kamp, Noelle M.; Kunz, Martin; Knight, Jason K.; Alivisatos, A.P.; Smith, R.K.

    2008-10-13

    We present experimental evidence that silver nanoparticles in the size range of 5-10 nm undergo a reversible structural transformation under hydrostatic pressures up to 10 GPa. We have used x-ray diffraction with a synchrotron light source to investigate pressure-dependent and size-dependent trends in the crystal structure of silver nanoparticles in a hydrostatic medium compressed in a diamond-anvil cell. Results suggest a reversible linear pressure-dependent rhombohedral distortion which has not been previously observed in bulk silver. We propose a mechanism for this transition that considers the bond-length distribution in idealized multiply twinned icosahedral particles. To further support this hypothesis, we also show that similar measurements of single-crystal platinum nanoparticles reveal no such distortions.

  20. Warm-hot baryons comprise 5-10 per cent of filaments in the cosmic web.

    PubMed

    Eckert, Dominique; Jauzac, Mathilde; Shan, HuanYuan; Kneib, Jean-Paul; Erben, Thomas; Israel, Holger; Jullo, Eric; Klein, Matthias; Massey, Richard; Richard, Johan; Tchernin, Céline

    2015-12-03

    Observations of the cosmic microwave background indicate that baryons account for 5 per cent of the Universe's total energy content. In the local Universe, the census of all observed baryons falls short of this estimate by a factor of two. Cosmological simulations indicate that the missing baryons have not condensed into virialized haloes, but reside throughout the filaments of the cosmic web (where matter density is larger than average) as a low-density plasma at temperatures of 10(5)-10(7) kelvin, known as the warm-hot intergalactic medium. There have been previous claims of the detection of warm-hot baryons along the line of sight to distant blazars and of hot gas between interacting clusters. These observations were, however, unable to trace the large-scale filamentary structure, or to estimate the total amount of warm-hot baryons in a representative volume of the Universe. Here we report X-ray observations of filamentary structures of gas at 10(7) kelvin associated with the galaxy cluster Abell 2744. Previous observations of this cluster were unable to resolve and remove coincidental X-ray point sources. After subtracting these, we find hot gas structures that are coherent over scales of 8 megaparsecs. The filaments coincide with over-densities of galaxies and dark matter, with 5-10 per cent of their mass in baryonic gas. This gas has been heated up by the cluster's gravitational pull and is now feeding its core. Our findings strengthen evidence for a picture of the Universe in which a large fraction of the missing baryons reside in the filaments of the cosmic web.

  1. Seven novel mutations at the 5,10-methylenetetrahydrofolate reductase locus

    SciTech Connect

    Goyette, P.; Frosst, P.; Rosenblatt, D.S.; Rozen, R.

    1994-09-01

    5,10-methylenetetrahydrofolate reductase (MTHFR), a flavoprotein, catalyzes the conversion of 5,10-methylenetetrahydrofolate to 5-methyltetrahydrofolate, a cofactor for methionine synthase in the methylation of homocysteine to methionine. Severe MTHFR deficiency, which causes homocysteinemia, is an autosomal recessive disorder with variable clinical features; developmental delay, perinatal death, mental retardation and asymptomatic individuals have been observed. A milder deficiency has been reported in patients with cardiovascular disease. We have recently described the isolation of a cDNA for MTHFR and the identification of 2 mutations in patients with severe MTHFR deficiency. We report here the characterization of 7 additional mutations at this locus: 5 missense mutations and 2 splicing mutations. Mutation analysis was performed by SSCP on PCR products generated either from reverse transcription-PCR of patients` total fibroblast RNA or from PCR of patients` genomic DNA. The 5 missense mutations are as follows: 1 Arg to Cys substitution in a hydrophilic segment proposed to be the hinge region that connects the catalytic and regulatory domains, 2 different Arg to Cys substitutions in 2 patients whose enzymatic thermolability is responsive to FAD, 1 Thr to Met substitution affecting an evolutionarily-conserved residue and a Pro to Leu substitution. The 2 splicing mutations affect the 5{prime} splice site and the 3{prime} splice site of 2 introns, respectively. The 5{prime} splice site mutation generates a 57 bp in-frame deletion of the RNA through the utilization of a cryptic 5{prime} splice site within the coding sequence. The identification of 9 mutations at this locus has allowed us to make preliminary correlations between genotype and phenotype and to contribute to a structure:function analysis of the enzyme.

  2. Nickel removal from nickel-5,10,15,20-tetraphenylporphine using supercritical water in absence of catalyst: a basic study.

    PubMed

    Mandal, Pradip Chandra; Wahyudiono; Sasaki, Mitsuru; Goto, Motonobu

    2011-03-15

    Reactions of nickel-5,10,15,20-tetraphenylporphine (Ni-TPP) were studied in supercritical water in the presence of toluene without the addition of any catalyst, H(2) or H(2)S that is called a green process. The objective of this study was to remove nickel from Ni-TPP, the most common metal compound present in heavy crude, in high extent at low reaction time. All experiments were carried out in an 8.8 mL batch reactor fabricated from hastelloy C-276. The ability of supercritical water (SCW) to remove nickel from Ni-TPP was studied at temperatures of 450-490 °C and water partial pressures of 25-35 MPa. Water partial pressure had no effect on overall conversion at temperatures of 450 °C and a reaction time of 60 min. The overall Ni-TPP conversion was 89.80%, a figure above that of previous catalytic studies. The percentage of nickel removal was estimated as a function of reaction time and temperature. It were temperature 490 °C and pressure 25 MPa at reaction time 90 min where 65.68% nickel were removed by the action of SCW and toluene, as a co-solvent. It was determined that Ni-TPP undergoes a series of reactions, ending in demetallation and ring fragmentation. The obtained results suggest that supercritical water has a capability to remove nickel from Ni-TPP.

  3. The evaluation of smaller plasterboards on productivity, work demands and workload in construction workers.

    PubMed

    van der Molen, Henk F; Mol, Eric; Kuijer, P Paul F M; Frings-Dresen, Monique H W

    2007-09-01

    Manual handling of plasterboards in order to construct interior building walls is a risk factor for musculoskeletal complaints. Unfortunately, mechanical lifting aids to reduce the physical workload are impractical for this task. Therefore, the effect of smaller plasterboards on productivity, work demands and workload was evaluated in an exploratory study among experienced construction workers (n=4-8) at the worksite. The dimensions and weight of the conventional and smaller plasterboards (PB) were: PB120 (2440 x 1200 x 15 mm; 33 kg) and PB90 (2440 x 900 x 12.5 mm; 20 kg), respectively. Productivity was defined as meters of plasterboard mounted. Work demands were assessed by means of real time observations of tasks and activities. Workload was determined using continuous heart rate monitoring and subjective judgments of perceived workload. Productivity and total work time per working day did not differ between PB120 and PB90. Duration of mounting (29% increase) and anchoring (26% increase) were longer for PB90 than PB120. Duration of lifting, carrying and turning over plasterboards, and percentage of heart rate reserve showed no difference between PB120 and PB90. A majority of the workers preferred PB90. For the last two reasons and because PB90 weighs approximately 40% less than PB120, PB90 seems preferable. The workload in both conditions, however, was considered high.

  4. Folate metabolism gene 5,10-methylenetetrahydrofolate reductase (MTHFR) is associated with ADHD in myelomeningocele patients.

    PubMed

    Spellicy, Catherine J; Northrup, Hope; Fletcher, Jack M; Cirino, Paul T; Dennis, Maureen; Morrison, Alanna C; Martinez, Carla A; Au, Kit Sing

    2012-01-01

    The objective of this study was to examine the relation between the 5, 10-methylenetetrahydrofolate reductase (MTHFR) gene and behaviors related to attention- deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) in individuals with myelomeningocele. The rationale for the study was twofold: folate metabolizing genes, (e.g. MTHFR), are important not only in the etiology of neural tube defects but are also critical to cognitive function; and individuals with myelomeningocele have an elevated incidence of ADHD. Here, we tested 478 individuals with myelomeningocele for attention-deficit hyperactivity disorder behavior using the Swanson Nolan Achenbach Pelham-IV ADHD rating scale. Myelomeningocele participants in this group for whom DNAs were available were genotyped for seven single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in the MTHFR gene. The SNPs were evaluated for an association with manifestation of the ADHD phenotype in children with myelomeningocele. The data show that 28.7% of myelomeningocele participants exhibit rating scale elevations consistent with ADHD; of these 70.1% had scores consistent with the predominantly inattentive subtype. In addition, we also show a positive association between the SNP rs4846049 in the 3'-untranslated region of the MTHFR gene and the attention-deficit hyperactivity disorder phenotype in myelomeningocele participants. These results lend further support to the finding that behavior related to ADHD is more prevalent in patients with myelomeningocele than in the general population. These data also indicate the potential importance of the MTHFR gene in the etiology of the ADHD phenotype.

  5. Prevention of brain disease from severe 5,10-methylenetetrahydrofolate reductase deficiency.

    PubMed

    Strauss, Kevin A; Morton, D Holmes; Puffenberger, Erik G; Hendrickson, Christine; Robinson, Donna L; Wagner, Conrad; Stabler, Sally P; Allen, Robert H; Chwatko, Grazyna; Jakubowski, Hieronim; Niculescu, Mihai D; Mudd, S Harvey

    2007-06-01

    Over a four-year period, we collected clinical and biochemical data from five Amish children who were homozygous for missense mutations in 5,10-methylenetetrahydrofolate reductase (MTHFR c.1129C>T). The four oldest patients had irreversible brain damage prior to diagnosis. The youngest child, diagnosed and started on betaine therapy as a newborn, is healthy at her present age of three years. We compared biochemical data among four groups: 16 control subjects, eight heterozygous parents, and five affected children (for the latter group, both before and during treatment with betaine anhydrous). Plasma amino acid concentrations were used to estimate changes in cerebral methionine uptake resulting from betaine therapy. In all affected children, treatment with betaine (534+/-222 mg/kg/day) increased plasma S-adenosylmethionine, improved markers of tissue methyltransferase activity, and resulted in a threefold increase of calculated brain methionine uptake. Betaine therapy did not normalize plasma total homocysteine, nor did it correct cerebral 5-methyltetrahydrofolate deficiency. We conclude that when the 5-methyltetrahydrofolate content of brain tissue is low, dietary betaine sufficient to increase brain methionine uptake may compensate for impaired cerebral methionine recycling. To effectively support the metabolic requirements of rapid brain growth, a large dose of betaine should be started early in life.

  6. 5,10 Methylenetetrahydrofolate reductase genetic polymorphism as a risk factor for neural tube defects

    SciTech Connect

    Ou, C.Y.; Brown, V.K.; Khoury, M.J.

    1996-06-28

    Persons with a thermolabile form of the enzyme 5,10 methylenetetrahydrofolate reductase (MTHFR) have reduced enzyme activity and increased plasma homocysteine which can be lowered by supplemental folic acid. Thermolability of the enzyme has recently been shown to be caused by a common mutation (677C{sup {r_arrow}}T) in the MTHFR gene. We studied 41 fibroblast cultures from NTD-affected fetuses and compared their genotypes with those of 109 blood specimens from individuals in the general population. 677C{sup {r_arrow}}T homozygosity was associated with a 7.2 fold increased risk for NTDs (95% confidence interval: 1.8-30.3; p value: 0.001). These preliminary data suggest that the 677C{sup {r_arrow}}T polymorphism of the MTHFR gene is a risk factor for spina bifida and anencephaly that may provide a partial biologic explanation for why folic acid prevents these types of NTD. 13 refs., 1 fig., 1 tab.

  7. 5,10-Methylenetetrahydrofolate reductase deficiency with progressive polyneuropathy in an infant.

    PubMed

    Tsuji, Megumi; Takagi, Atsushi; Sameshima, Kiyoko; Iai, Mizue; Yamashita, Sumimasa; Shinbo, Hiroko; Furuya, Noritaka; Kurosawa, Kenji; Osaka, Hitoshi

    2011-06-01

    5,10-Methylenetetrahydrofolate reductase (MTHFR) deficiency is the most prevalent inborn error of folate metabolism, and has variable clinical manifestations from asymptomatic to severe psychomotor retardation, microcephalus and seizure. In untreated infantile cases, it predominantly affects the central nervous system, which is sometimes fatal. On the other hand, peripheral nerve involvement is uncommon. We present a severe infantile case of MTHFR deficiency that manifested unilateral phrenic nerve palsy with communicating hydrocephalus, developmental delay and died at 11months of age. An enzymatic study confirmed MTHFR deficiency with residual activity of 0.75% of mean control values in cultured fibroblasts. Mutation analysis of the MTHFR gene revealed homozygous, tandem missense mutations c.[446G>T; 447C>T] in exon 3 of the MTHFR gene converting glycine to valine (Gly149Val). In MTHFR deficiency, betaine may improve the symptoms if started immediately after birth by reducing the level of serum homocysteine and increasing that of methionine. Our results show that we should be aware of possible inborn errors of folate metabolism such as MTHFR deficiency, in infants with unexplained developmental delay manifesting rapidly progressive polyneuropathy.

  8. A Neptune-sized transiting planet closely orbiting a 5-10-million-year-old star

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    David, Trevor J.

    2016-10-01

    Theories of the formation and early evolution of planetary systems postulate that planets are born in circumstellar disks, and undergo radial migration during and after dissipation of the dust and gas disk from which they formed. The precise ages of meteorites indicate that planetesimals - the building blocks of planets - are produced within the first million years of a star's life. A prominent question is: how early can one find fully formed planets like those frequently detected on short orbital periods around mature stars? Some theories suggest the in situ formation of planets close to their host stars is unlikely and the existence of such planets is evidence for large scale migration. Other theories posit that planet assembly at small orbital separations may be common. Here we report on a newly-born, transiting planet orbiting its star every 5.4 days. The planet is 50 per cent larger than Neptune, and its mass is less than 3.6 times Jupiter (at 99.7 per cent confidence), with a true mass likely to be within a factor of several of Neptune's. The 5-10 million year old star has a tenuous dust disk extending outwards from about 2 times the Earth-Sun separation, in addition to the large planet located at less than one-twentieth the Earth-Sun separation.

  9. Warm-hot baryons comprise 5-10 per cent of filaments in the cosmic web

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eckert, Dominique; Jauzac, Mathilde; Shan, Huanyuan; Kneib, Jean-Paul; Erben, Thomas; Israel, Holger; Jullo, Eric; Klein, Matthias; Massey, Richard; Richard, Johan; Tchernin, Céline

    2015-12-01

    Observations of the cosmic microwave background indicate that baryons account for 5 per cent of the Universe’s total energy content. In the local Universe, the census of all observed baryons falls short of this estimate by a factor of two. Cosmological simulations indicate that the missing baryons have not condensed into virialized haloes, but reside throughout the filaments of the cosmic web (where matter density is larger than average) as a low-density plasma at temperatures of 105-107 kelvin, known as the warm-hot intergalactic medium. There have been previous claims of the detection of warm-hot baryons along the line of sight to distant blazars and of hot gas between interacting clusters. These observations were, however, unable to trace the large-scale filamentary structure, or to estimate the total amount of warm-hot baryons in a representative volume of the Universe. Here we report X-ray observations of filamentary structures of gas at 107 kelvin associated with the galaxy cluster Abell 2744. Previous observations of this cluster were unable to resolve and remove coincidental X-ray point sources. After subtracting these, we find hot gas structures that are coherent over scales of 8 megaparsecs. The filaments coincide with over-densities of galaxies and dark matter, with 5-10 per cent of their mass in baryonic gas. This gas has been heated up by the cluster’s gravitational pull and is now feeding its core. Our findings strengthen evidence for a picture of the Universe in which a large fraction of the missing baryons reside in the filaments of the cosmic web.

  10. Microwave soft x-ray microscopy for nanoscale magnetization dynamics in the 5-10 GHz frequency range

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bonetti, Stefano; Kukreja, Roopali; Chen, Zhao; Spoddig, Detlef; Ollefs, Katharina; Schöppner, Christian; Meckenstock, Ralf; Ney, Andreas; Pinto, Jude; Houanche, Richard; Frisch, Josef; Stöhr, Joachim; Dürr, Hermann A.; Ohldag, Hendrik

    2015-09-01

    We present a scanning transmission x-ray microscopy setup combined with a novel microwave synchronization scheme for studying high frequency magnetization dynamics at synchrotron light sources. The sensitivity necessary to detect small changes in the magnetization on short time scales and nanometer spatial dimensions is achieved by combining the excitation mechanism with single photon counting electronics that is locked to the synchrotron operation frequency. Our instrument is capable of creating direct images of dynamical phenomena in the 5-10 GHz range, with high spatial resolution. When used together with circularly polarized x-rays, the above capabilities can be combined to study magnetic phenomena at microwave frequencies, such as ferromagnetic resonance (FMR) and spin waves. We demonstrate the capabilities of our technique by presenting phase resolved images of a ˜6 GHz nanoscale spin wave generated by a spin torque oscillator, as well as the uniform ferromagnetic precession with ˜0.1° amplitude at ˜9 GHz in a micrometer-sized cobalt strip.

  11. A Neptune-sized transiting planet closely orbiting a 5-10-million-year-old star

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    David, Trevor J.; Hillenbrand, Lynne A.; Petigura, Erik A.; Carpenter, John M.; Crossfield, Ian J. M.; Hinkley, Sasha; Ciardi, David R.; Howard, Andrew W.; Isaacson, Howard T.; Cody, Ann Marie; Schlieder, Joshua E.; Beichman, Charles A.; Barenfeld, Scott A.

    2016-06-01

    Theories of the formation and early evolution of planetary systems postulate that planets are born in circumstellar disks, and undergo radial migration during and after dissipation of the dust and gas disk from which they formed. The precise ages of meteorites indicate that planetesimals—the building blocks of planets—are produced within the first million years of a star’s life. Fully formed planets are frequently detected on short orbital periods around mature stars. Some theories suggest that the in situ formation of planets close to their host stars is unlikely and that the existence of such planets is therefore evidence of large-scale migration. Other theories posit that planet assembly at small orbital separations may be common. Here we report a newly born, transiting planet orbiting its star with a period of 5.4 days. The planet is 50 per cent larger than Neptune, and its mass is less than 3.6 times that of Jupiter (at 99.7 per cent confidence), with a true mass likely to be similar to that of Neptune. The star is 5-10 million years old and has a tenuous dust disk extending outward from about twice the Earth-Sun separation, in addition to the fully formed planet located at less than one-twentieth of the Earth-Sun separation.

  12. Implications of smaller concentrations of stratospheric OH - A two-dimensional model study of ozone perturbations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Whitten, R. C.; Borucki, W. J.; Woodward, H. T.; Capone, L. A.; Riegel, C. A.; Turco, R. P.; Poppoff, I. G.; Santhanam, K.

    1981-01-01

    There is growing observational evidence that stratospheric OH concentrations are smaller than models have been predicting. Using very recent HOx reaction rate coefficient measurements in a two-dimensional photochemical model, results which support these observations are obtained. As a consequence of smaller OH concentrations, we show that perturbations of stratospheric ozone by NOx (SST emissions and nitrogen fertilizers) may be larger than expected, while perturbations due to added water vapor and chlorine (SSTs and chlorofluoromethanes, respectively) may be smaller.

  13. Structural investigation of 5,10-A2B2-type porphyrins: palladium(II) and zinc(II) complexes of 5,10-dibromo-15,20-bis(4-methylphenyl)porphyrin.

    PubMed

    Senge, Mathias O; Zawadzka, Monika

    2014-12-01

    The analysis of [5,10-dibromo-15,20-bis(4-methylphenyl)porphyrinato]palladium(II), [Pd(C34H22Br2N4)], and [5,10-dibromo-15,20-bis(4-methylphenyl)porphyrinato](methanol)zinc(II), [Zn(C34H22Br2N4)(CH4O)], reveals a small but localized influence of the bromine residues on the conformation of the macrocycle. A comparison of the 5,10-dibromo substituent pattern with literature data for 5,15-dibromoporphyrins shows similar in-plane distortions in both but a different mix of out-of-plane distortion modes for the different regiochemical arrangements.

  14. Where Is the Learning in Smaller Learning Communities? Academic Press, Social Support for Learning, and Academic Engagement in Smaller Learning Community Classrooms

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fischer, Christopher; Bol, Linda; Pribesh, Shana; Nunnery, John

    2013-01-01

    The extent to which smaller learning communities' (SLCs) focus on academic press and strong social relationships affects academic engagement among 9th graders in urban high schools was investigated. Data were collected through classroom observations, student questionnaires, and focus groups with teachers. Data were analyzed using descriptive…

  15. 29 CFR 403.4 - Simplified annual reports for smaller labor organizations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 29 Labor 2 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Simplified annual reports for smaller labor organizations..., DEPARTMENT OF LABOR LABOR-MANAGEMENT STANDARDS LABOR ORGANIZATION ANNUAL FINANCIAL REPORTS § 403.4 Simplified annual reports for smaller labor organizations. (a)(1) If a labor organization, not in trusteeship,...

  16. Unbalanced translocation in a mother and her son in one of two 5;10 translocation families

    SciTech Connect

    John, C.K.; Barber, I.; Collinson, M.N.

    1996-03-01

    We present two families with different distal long arm 5;10 translocations. In one family the propositus and his mother inherited the same derived chromosome 10 from the maternal grandfather who has a balanced t(5;10)(q35.3;q26.13). The phenotype of both the affected patients is milder and only partially overlaps with that of previous cases of distal 10q deletion. Other previously reported cases of transmitted imbalance are also remarkable for mild phenotype, occurrence of deletions rather than duplications and a strong bias toward maternal as opposed to paternal transmission. In the second family, the propositus inherited a derived chromosome 10 from his mother who carries a balanced t(5;10)(q35.1;q26.3) translocation; his clinical manifestations are consistent with an emerging phenotype for distal 5q duplications. 30 refs., 6 figs., 2 tabs.

  17. Smaller Cigarette Pack as a Commitment to Smoke Less? Insights from Behavioral Economics.

    PubMed

    Marti, Joachim; Sindelar, Jody

    2015-01-01

    Cigarettes are commonly sold in packs of 20 units and therefore little is known about the potential impact of pack size on consumption. Using insights from behavioral economics, we suggest that cigarette packs smaller than the standard size may help some smokers cut back and/or quit, consistent with their long-term goals. Results from an online hypothetical purchase experiment conducted in a sample of US smokers reveal that over a third of smokers are willing to pay a price premium to purchase in smaller quantities. Further, a desire to quit smoking and high self-control is associated with preference for a smaller pack. While we provide some preliminary evidence that smaller packs may be beneficial to certain types of smokers, further research should be conducted to assess whether the smaller pack size should be considered in the arsenal of tobacco control policies to help current smokers quit (JEL: I18; I12; D12).

  18. Smaller Cigarette Pack as a Commitment to Smoke Less? Insights from Behavioral Economics

    PubMed Central

    Marti, Joachim; Sindelar, Jody

    2015-01-01

    Cigarettes are commonly sold in packs of 20 units and therefore little is known about the potential impact of pack size on consumption. Using insights from behavioral economics, we suggest that cigarette packs smaller than the standard size may help some smokers cut back and/or quit, consistent with their long-term goals. Results from an online hypothetical purchase experiment conducted in a sample of US smokers reveal that over a third of smokers are willing to pay a price premium to purchase in smaller quantities. Further, a desire to quit smoking and high self-control is associated with preference for a smaller pack. While we provide some preliminary evidence that smaller packs may be beneficial to certain types of smokers, further research should be conducted to assess whether the smaller pack size should be considered in the arsenal of tobacco control policies to help current smokers quit (JEL: I18; I12; D12) PMID:26356844

  19. Accretion of the gaseous envelope of Jupiter around a 5 10 Earth-mass core

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hubickyj, Olenka; Bodenheimer, Peter; Lissauer, Jack J.

    2005-12-01

    New numerical simulations of the formation and evolution of Jupiter are presented. The formation model assumes that first a solid core of several M accretes from the planetesimals in the protoplanetary disk, and then the core captures a massive gaseous envelope from the protoplanetary disk. Earlier studies of the core accretion-gas capture model [Pollack, J.B., Hubickyj, O., Bodenheimer, P., Lissauer, J.J., Podolak, M., Greenzweig, Y., 1996. Icarus 124, 62-85] demonstrated that it was possible for Jupiter to accrete with a solid core of 10-30 M in a total formation time comparable to the observed lifetime of protoplanetary disks. Recent interior models of Jupiter and Saturn that agree with all observational constraints suggest that Jupiter's core mass is 0-11 M and Saturn's is 9-22 M [Saumon, G., Guillot, T., 2004. Astrophys. J. 609, 1170-1180]. We have computed simulations of the growth of Jupiter using various values for the opacity produced by grains in the protoplanet's atmosphere and for the initial planetesimal surface density, σ, in the protoplanetary disk. We also explore the implications of halting the solid accretion at selected core mass values during the protoplanet's growth. Halting planetesimal accretion at low core mass simulates the presence of a competing embryo, and decreasing the atmospheric opacity due to grains emulates the settling and coagulation of grains within the protoplanet's atmosphere. We examine the effects of adjusting these parameters to determine whether or not gas runaway can occur for small mass cores on a reasonable timescale. We compute four series of simulations with the latest version of our code, which contains updated equation of state and opacity tables as well as other improvements. Each series consists of a run without a cutoff in planetesimal accretion, plus up to three runs with a cutoff at a particular core mass. The first series of runs is computed with an atmospheric opacity due to grains (hereafter referred to as

  20. Ionospheric disturbance dynamo associated to a coronal hole: Case study of 5-10 April 2010

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fathy, I.; Amory-Mazaudier, C.; Fathy, A.; Mahrous, A. M.; Yumoto, K.; Ghamry, E.

    2014-05-01

    In this paper we study the planetary magnetic disturbance during the magnetic storm occurring on 5 April 2010 associated with high-speed solar wind stream due to a coronal hole following a coronal mass ejection. We separate the magnetic disturbance associated to the ionospheric disturbance dynamo (Ddyn) from the magnetic disturbance associated to the prompt penetration of magnetospheric electric field (DP2). This event exhibits different responses of ionospheric disturbance dynamo in the different longitude sectors (European-African, Asian, and American). The strongest effect is observed in the European-African sector. The Ddyn disturbance reduces the amplitude of the daytime H component at low latitudes during four consecutive days in agreement with the Blanc and Richmond's model of ionospheric disturbance dynamo. The amplitude of Ddyn decreased with time during the 4 days. We discuss its diverse worldwide effects. The observed signature of magnetic disturbance process in specific longitude sector is strongly dependent on which Earth's side faces the magnetic storms (i.e., there is a different response depending on which longitude sector is at noon when the SSC hits). Finally, we determined an average period of 22 h for Ddyn using wavelet analysis.

  1. Smaller, faster stomata: scaling of stomatal size, rate of response, and stomatal conductance

    PubMed Central

    Franks, Peter J.

    2013-01-01

    Maximum and minimum stomatal conductance, as well as stomatal size and rate of response, are known to vary widely across plant species, but the functional relationship between these static and dynamic stomatal properties is unknown. The objective of this study was to test three hypotheses: (i) operating stomatal conductance under standard conditions (g op) correlates with minimum stomatal conductance prior to morning light [g min(dawn)]; (ii) stomatal size (S) is negatively correlated with g op and the maximum rate of stomatal opening in response to light, (dg/dt)max; and (iii) g op correlates negatively with instantaneous water-use efficiency (WUE) despite positive correlations with maximum rate of carboxylation (Vc max) and light-saturated rate of electron transport (J max). Using five closely related species of the genus Banksia, the above variables were measured, and it was found that all three hypotheses were supported by the results. Overall, this indicates that leaves built for higher rates of gas exchange have smaller stomata and faster dynamic characteristics. With the aid of a stomatal control model, it is demonstrated that higher g op can potentially expose plants to larger tissue water potential gradients, and that faster stomatal response times can help offset this risk. PMID:23264516

  2. Independent practice associations and physician-hospital organizations can improve care management for smaller practices.

    PubMed

    Casalino, Lawrence P; Wu, Frances M; Ryan, Andrew M; Copeland, Kennon; Rittenhouse, Diane R; Ramsay, Patricia P; Shortell, Stephen M

    2013-08-01

    Pay-for-performance, public reporting, and accountable care organization programs place pressures on physicians to use health information technology and organized care management processes to improve the care they provide. But physician practices that are not large may lack the resources and size to implement such processes. We used data from a unique national survey of 1,164 practices with fewer than twenty physicians to provide the first information available on the extent to which independent practice associations (IPAs) and physician-hospital organizations (PHOs) might make it possible for these smaller practices to share resources to improve care. Nearly a quarter of the practices participated in an IPA or a PHO that accounted for a significant proportion of their patients. On average, practices participating in these organizations provided nearly three times as many care management processes for patients with chronic conditions as nonparticipating practices did (10.4 versus 3.8). Half of these processes were provided only by IPAs or PHOs. These organizations may provide a way for small and medium-size practices to systematically improve care and participate in accountable care organizations.

  3. New 5-aminoacyl-5,10-dihydro-11H-dibenzo[b,e][1,4]diazepin-11-ones with antiarrhythmic activity.

    PubMed

    Poppe, H; Kaverina, N V; Lyskovzev, V V; Egerland, U; Sauer, W; Lichoscherstow, A; Rüger, C; Skoldinow, A

    1997-11-01

    A series of new 5-substituted tricyclic 5,10-dihydro-11H-dibenzo[b,e][1,4]-diazepin-11-ones was identified as potential antiarrhythmic agents against bradyarrhythmias [1, 2]. The in vitro and in vivo interactions of the compounds with muscarinic receptors and the antiarrhythmic activity were examined. In receptor binding studies some derivatives showed a high affinity to the cardiac M2 receptor (Ki 10 nmol/l), an equal or smaller affinity to cortical M1 receptor and a lower affinity to the glandular M3 binding site. Functional experiments showed the derivatives as competitive antagonists with high affinity to the cardiac and smaller affinity to the intestinal muscarinic receptor. In vivo experiments correspond with the M2 selectivity. First the vagal or agonist-induced bradycardia was inhibited in rats and guinea pigs while the McNA-343 induced increase of blood pressure, methacholine-induced bronchi and bladder constriction as well as the salivation were inhibited only at higher doses. In conscious cats the tachycardia was examined in comparison with pupillomotoricity. The effect duration and the therapeutical range were determined in comparison to the M2 selective blocking agent AF-DX116. The antiarrhythmic activity was examined compared to quinidine sulfate in CaCl2-arrhythmia of rats, in atrial fibrillation and atrial flutter in dogs according to Scherf [2] and in electric induced atrial fibrillation under vagal stimulation in cats. In the atrial arrhythmias the derivatives are clearly longer effective than quinidine sulfate. The antiischemic activity was examined in the two-stages coronary ligature in dogs according to Harris. The long-running regularization of ectopies (about 2 h after i.v. injection) occurred without decrease of the heart rate, an effect particularly convenient to therapy of bradycardic dysrhythmias.

  4. 75 FR 37779 - Office of Elementary and Secondary Education; Smaller Learning Communities Program; Notice...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-06-30

    ... Office of Elementary and Secondary Education; Smaller Learning Communities Program; Notice Inviting... second sentence is removed and replaced with the following sentence: ``Therefore, we strongly encourage... Secretary for Elementary and Secondary Education. BILLING CODE 4000-01-P...

  5. DDO 68: A Flea with Smaller Fleas that on Him Prey

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Annibali, Francesca; Nipoti, Carlo; Ciotti, Luca; Tosi, Monica; Aloisi, Alessandra; Bellazzini, Michele; Cignoni, Michele; Cusano, Felice; Paris, Diego; Sacchi, Elena

    2016-08-01

    We present new photometry of the dwarf irregular galaxy DDO 68, one of the most metal-poor and least massive dwarfs, located in the Lynx-Cancer Void. The images were acquired with the Large Binocular Telescope in the g and r passbands and show unequivocally that DDO 68 has previously unknown stellar streams related to the accretion of at least two smaller companions: a flea with smaller fleas biting it, to put it in Jonathan Swift’s words (from Jonathan Swift’s On Poetry: a Rhapsody: So, naturalists observe, a flea/has smaller fleas that on him prey/and these have smaller still to bite em/and so proceed ad infinitum). Our data provide direct observational evidence of multiple galaxy merging occurring at very low galactic mass scales. We present the results of an N-body simulation of the interaction of three dwarf galaxies that reproduce well the main morphological features of DDO 68.

  6. Biomimetic oxidation of curcumin with hydrogen peroxide catalyzed by 5,10,15,20-tetraarylporphyrinatoiron(III) chlorides in dichloromethane.

    PubMed

    Chauhan, Shive Murat Singh; Kandadai, Appan Srinivas; Jain, Nidhi; Kumar, Anil

    2003-11-01

    The biomimetic oxidation of curcumin, a main turmeric pigment with hydrogen peroxide catalyzed by different 5,10,15,20-tetraarylporphyrinatoiron(III) chlorides [TAPFe(III)Cl] in dichloromethane has been studied to give a C-C coupled curcumin dimer in 40-70% yield. The structure of the dimer has been elucidated by (1)H-, (13)C-NMR, IR and FAB-Mass spectroscopic data.

  7. Organizational characteristics influence implementation of worksite health protection and promotion programs: Evidence from smaller businesses

    PubMed Central

    McLellan, Deborah L.; Cabán-Martinez, Alberto J.; Nelson, Candace C.; Pronk, Nicolaas P.; Katz, Jeffrey N.; Allen, Jennifer D.; Davis, Kia L.; Wagner, Gregory R.; Sorensen, Glorian

    2015-01-01

    Objective We explored associations between organizational factors (size, sector, leadership support, and organizational capacity) and implementation of Occupational Safety and Health (OSH) and Worksite Health Promotion (WHP) programs in smaller businesses. Methods We conducted a web-based survey of Human Resource Managers of 117 smaller businesses (<750 employees) and analyzed factors associated with implementation of OSH and WHP among these sites using multivariate analyses. Results Implementation of OSH but not WHP activities were related to industry sector (p= 0.003). Leadership support was positively associated with OSH activities (p<.001), but negatively associated with WHP implementation. Organizational capacity (budgets, staffing, and committee involvement) was associated with implementation of both OSH and WHP. Size was related to neither. Conclusions Leadership support and specifically allocated resources reflecting that support are important factors for implementing OSH and WHP in smaller organizations. PMID:26340290

  8. Poly(3,4-ethylenedioxythiophene) (PEDOT) polymer coatings facilitate smaller neural recording electrodes.

    PubMed

    Ludwig, Kip A; Langhals, Nicholas B; Joseph, Mike D; Richardson-Burns, Sarah M; Hendricks, Jeffrey L; Kipke, Daryl R

    2011-02-01

    We investigated using poly(3,4-ethylenedioxythiophene) (PEDOT) to lower the impedance of small, gold recording electrodes with initial impedances outside of the effective recording range. Smaller electrode sites enable more densely packed arrays, increasing the number of input and output channels to and from the brain. Moreover, smaller electrode sizes promote smaller probe designs; decreasing the dimensions of the implanted probe has been demonstrated to decrease the inherent immune response, a known contributor to the failure of long-term implants. As expected, chronically implanted control electrodes were unable to record well-isolated unit activity, primarily as a result of a dramatically increased noise floor. Conversely, electrodes coated with PEDOT consistently recorded high-quality neural activity, and exhibited a much lower noise floor than controls. These results demonstrate that PEDOT coatings enable electrode designs 15 µm in diameter.

  9. Early lung cancer detection project: Evaluation of 5, 10, 15, 20 tetrakis (4-carboxyphenyl) porphine (H{sub 2}TCPP). Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Tockman, M.S.

    1998-10-01

    The author evaluated a synthetic porphyrin, 5, 10, 15, 20 tetrakis (4-carboxyphenyl) porphene (H{sub 2}TCPP) as a marker of carcinogenesis. H{sub 2}TCPP was compared with two other carcinogenesis markers evaluated in the laboratory for their ability to detect exfoliated sputum cells undergoing transformation to lung cancer. In the present project the authors first established optimal conditions for cultured neoplastic and non-neoplastic (sputum) cells to take up H{sub 2}TCPP. This was accomplished using spectrofluorimetry and video-enhanced fluorescent microscopy to maximize H{sub 2}TCPP auto-fluorescence across a matrix of substrate conditions, including; reagent concentration, incubation time, temperature, and pH. The second aim was to validate H{sub 2}TCPP on clinical material obtained from subjects monitored in advance of clinical cancer and link those marker results with subsequent histologic confirmation of disease. This was accomplished by applying H{sub 2}TCPP to sputum specimens archived by the Frost Center at Johns Hopkins which maintains a record of the clinical course and long-term follow-up for the patients from whom the specimens were obtained. The authors have used fluorescent immunostaining and flow cytometry to compare uptake of these cytoplasmic Mabs to that of a potential new marker of carcinogenesis, 5, 10, 15, 20 tetrakis (4 carboxyphenyl) porphene (H{sub 2}TCPP). The nuclear uptake of H{sub 2}TCPP was compared to a standard quantitative fluorescent DNA marker (7-AAD).

  10. Addressing the Multiplication Makes Bigger and Division Makes Smaller Misconceptions via Prediction and Clickers

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lim, Kien H.

    2011-01-01

    This article presents a lesson that uses prediction items, clickers and visuals via PowerPoint slides to help prospective middle-school teachers address two common misconceptions: multiplication makes bigger and division makes smaller (MMB-DMS). Classroom research was conducted to explore the viability of such a lesson. Results show that the…

  11. Neonatal morbidity in growth-discordant monochorionic twins: comparison between the larger and the smaller twin.

    PubMed

    Lopriore, Enrico; Sluimers, Carolien; Pasman, Suzanne A; Middeldorp, Johanna M; Oepkes, Dick; Walther, Frans J

    2012-08-01

    Fetal growth restriction in singletons has been shown to enhance fetal lung maturation and reduce the risk of respiratory distress syndrome due to increased endogenous steroid production. However, data on lung maturation in growth-discordant monochorionic (thus, identical) twins are lacking. Our objective was to compare the risk of severe neonatal morbidity between the larger and the smaller twin in monochorionic twins with birth weight discordance (BWD). We included in the study all consecutive monochorionic diamniotic pregnancies with severe BWD (≥25%) and two live-born twins delivered at our center (n=47 twin pairs). We compared the incidence of neonatal morbidity, particularly respiratory distress syndrome (RDS), and cerebral lesions between the larger and the smaller co-twin. The incidence of severe neonatal morbidity in the larger and smaller twin was 38% (18/47) and 19% (9/47), respectively (odds ratio (OR) 2.66, 95% confidence interval (CI) 0.94-7.44) and was due primarily to the higher incidence of RDS, 32% (15/47) and 6% (3/47), respectively (OR 6.88, 95% CI 1.66-32.83). In conclusion, this study shows that the larger twin in monochorionic twin pairs with BWD is at increased risk of severe neonatal morbidity, particularly RDS, compared to the smaller twin.

  12. Smaller muscle ATP reduction in women than in men by repeated bouts of sprint exercise.

    PubMed

    Esbjörnsson-Liljedahl, Mona; Bodin, Kristina; Jansson, Eva

    2002-09-01

    It was hypothesized that the reduction of high-energy phosphates in muscle after repeated sprints is smaller in women than in men. Fifteen healthy and physically active women and men with an average age of 25 yr (range of 19-42 yr) performed three 30-s cycle sprints (Wingate test) with 20 min of rest between sprints. Repeated blood and muscle samples were obtained. Freeze-dried pooled muscle fibers of types I and II were analyzed for high-energy phosphates and their breakdown products and for glycogen. Accumulation of plasma ATP breakdown products, plasma catecholamines, and blood lactate, as well as glycogen reduction in type I fibers, was all lower in women than in men during sprint exercise. Repeated sprints induced smaller reduction of ATP and smaller accumulation of IMP and inosine in women than in men in type II muscle fibers, with no gender differences in changes of ATP and its breakdown products during the bouts of exercise themselves. This indicates that the smaller ATP reduction in women than in men during repeated sprints was created during recovery periods between the sprint exercises and that women possess a faster recovery of ATP via reamination of IMP during these recovery periods.

  13. Computer Center-Library Relations at Smaller Institutions: A Look from Both Sides.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hardesty, Larry

    1998-01-01

    Interviews with 51 librarians and 40 computer-center administrators at smaller colleges found that they face similar challenges in providing services and seeking economies but are uneasy about formal structural changes that bring their operations closer together. Reasons for their concern and implications for college administration are discussed,…

  14. The Conversion of Smaller Borane Fragments to Larger Structures. Systematics of Boron Hydride Reactions.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1984-12-31

    Robert W. Parry and Goji Kodama Contract DAAG-29-8rl-K-Ol0l S. PERFORMING ORGANIZATION NAME AND ADDRESS 10. PROGRAM ELEMENT. PROJECT, TASK S Department of...Entered; THE CONVERSION OF SMALLER BORANE FRAGMENTS TO LARGER STRUCTURES - SYSTEMATICS OF BORON HYDRIDE REACTIONS FINAL REPORT ROBERT W. PARRY AND GOJI

  15. Disadvantaged Students in the Early Grades: Will Smaller Classes Help Them?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Vaag Iversen, Jon Marius; Bonesrønning, Hans

    2013-01-01

    This paper uses data from the Norwegian elementary school to test whether students from disadvantaged backgrounds benefit from smaller classes. The data cover one cohort of fourth graders who have been treated in small versus large classes for a period of three years. The Norwegian class size rule of maximum 28 students is used to generate…

  16. 40 CFR 246.200-2 - Recommended procedures: High-grade paper recovery from smaller offices.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... offices. The recovery of high-grade paper generated by office facilities of less than 100 office workers... paper recovery from smaller offices. 246.200-2 Section 246.200-2 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) SOLID WASTES SOURCE SEPARATION FOR MATERIALS RECOVERY GUIDELINES...

  17. An Investigation of Higher-Order Thinking Skills in Smaller Learning Community Social Studies Classrooms

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fischer, Christopher; Bol, Linda; Pribesh, Shana

    2011-01-01

    This study investigated the extent to which higher-order thinking skills are promoted in social studies classes in high schools that are implementing smaller learning communities (SLCs). Data collection in this mixed-methods study included classroom observations and in-depth interviews. Findings indicated that higher-order thinking was rarely…

  18. Less depressive symptoms are associated with smaller hippocampus in subjective memory impairment.

    PubMed

    Kim, Min-Jeong; Seo, Sang Won; Kim, Geon Ha; Kim, Sung Tae; Lee, Jong-Min; Qiu, Anqi; Na, Duk L

    2013-01-01

    Although individuals with subjective memory impairment (SMI) tend to be at an increased risk for dementia and the majority of them have depressive symptoms, it remains unclear whether SMI with depression is associated with an increased or decreased risk of dementia. The purpose of this study was to investigate the relationship between depressive symptoms and hippocampal/amygdalar volume, a reliable biomarker in the prediction of progression to dementia in SMI. Ninety subjects with SMI participated in the study, and 28 healthy participants without memory complaints served as a normal control (NC) group. 3-D T1-weighted structural MRI scans were completed in all subjects. When the volumes of hippocampus and amygdala were compared among the groups, the SMI group showed significantly smaller volumes than the NC group. When multiple regression analysis was conducted in all subjects, neither hippocampal nor amygdalar volume showed significant interaction effect between group and Geriatric Depression Scale (GDS). However, when the analysis was conducted within each group, lower GDS score was associated with smaller hippocampal volume in the SMI group, and higher GDS score was associated with smaller amygdalar volume in the NC group. Thus, individuals with SMI and less depressive symptoms tend to have smaller hippocampus, which could be associated with more risk of dementia, than normal individuals.

  19. Endotoxin in fine (PM 2.5) and coarse (PM 2.5-10) particle mass of ambient aerosols. A temporo-spatial analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Heinrich, Joachim; Pitz, Mike; Bischof, Wolfgang; Krug, Norbert; Borm, Paul J. A.

    Objectives: We collected fine (PM 2.5) and coarse (PM 2.5-10) particulate matter fractions in two areas ˜80 km apart and measured soluble endotoxin concentrations in both particle fractions. Here we report on temporo-spatial variation of endotoxin content in the collected particles. Methods: Dichotomous Anderson samplers were used to collect 21 weekly samples of PM 2.5 and PM 2.5-10 in both towns from January to June 2002. Each Teflon filter was water extracted and endotoxin was measured by a chromogenic Limulus Amoebocyte Lysate method. Endotoxin concentrations were expressed per mg of fine or mg of coarse mass and per sampled air volume (m 3). Results: For both cities, the mean endotoxin content in PM 2.5 was 1.2 EU mg -1; however the endotoxin content in the coarse fraction was ˜10 times higher compared to the fine mass fractions. Although endotoxin content is highly variable over time, a good correlation was observed between the two town sites for both fine ( r=0.85) and coarse PM ( r=0.88). The fluctuations of weekly endotoxin means were high in both areas suggesting a strong temporal dependence on particle source and composition. The endotoxin content in particles collected during May and June were two to four times higher than concentrations measured during the winter and early spring weeks. Conclusions: Ambient airborne endotoxin concentrations were detected in coarse and fine particle fraction, but 10-fold higher in the coarse PM. The strong seasonality and the week to week fluctuation of endotoxin content in PM indicate different biologic PM properties which might affect results of time series studies on short-term effects as well as in vitro studies and human exposure studies.

  20. Cumulative Adversity and Smaller Gray Matter Volume in Medial Prefrontal, Anterior Cingulate, and Insula Regions

    PubMed Central

    Ansell, Emily B.; Rando, Kenneth; Tuit, Keri; Guarnaccia, Joseph; Sinha, Rajita

    2012-01-01

    Background Cumulative adversity and stress are associated with risk of psychiatric disorders. While basic science studies show repeated and chronic stress effects on prefrontal and limbic neurons, human studies examining cumulative stress and effects on brain morphology are rare. Thus, we assessed whether cumulative adversity is associated with differences in gray matter volume, particularly in regions regulating emotion, self-control, and top-down processing in a community sample. Methods One hundred three healthy community participants, aged 18 to 48 and 68% male, completed interview assessment of cumulative adversity and a structural magnetic resonance imaging protocol. Whole-brain voxel-based-morphometry analysis was performed adjusting for age, gender, and total intracranial volume. Results Cumulative adversity was associated with smaller volume in medial prefrontal cortex (PFC), insular cortex, and subgenual anterior cingulate regions (familywise error corrected, p <.001). Recent stressful life events were associated with smaller volume in two clusters: the medial PFC and the right insula. Life trauma was associated with smaller volume in the medial PFC, anterior cingulate, and subgenual regions. The interaction of greater subjective chronic stress and greater cumulative life events was associated with smaller volume in the orbitofrontal cortex, insula, and anterior and subgenual cingulate regions. Conclusions Current results demonstrate that increasing cumulative exposure to adverse life events is associated with smaller gray matter volume in key prefrontal and limbic regions involved in stress, emotion and reward regulation, and impulse control. These differences found in community participants may serve to mediate vulnerability to depression, addiction, and other stress-related psychopathology. PMID:22218286

  1. Does multiple seed loading in Blue Jays result in selective dispersal of smaller acorns?

    PubMed

    Bartlow, Andrew W; Kachmar, Michael; Lichti, Nathanael; Swihart, Robert K; Stratford, Jeffrey A; Steele, Michael A

    2011-09-01

    Studies from both tropical and temperate systems show that scatter-hoarding rodents selectively disperse larger seeds farther from their source than smaller seeds, potentially increasing seedling establishment in larger-seeded plants. Size-biased dispersal is evident in many oaks (Quercus) and is true both across and within species. Here, we predict that intraspecifc variation in seed size also influences acorn dispersal by the Blue Jay (Cyanocitta cristata Linnaeus), but in an opposite manner. Blue Jays are gape-limited and selectively disperse smaller acorn species (e.g. pin oaks [Quercus palustris Münchh]), but often carry several acorns in their crop during a single dispersal event. We predict that jays foraging on smaller acorns will load more seeds per trip and disperse seeds to greater distances than when single acorns are carried in the bill. To test this, we presented free-ranging Blue Jays with pin oak acorns of different sizes over a 2-year period. In each of 16 experimental trials, we monitored the birds at a feeding station with remote cameras and determined the number of acorns removed and the distance acorns were dispersed when cached. Jays were significantly more likely to engage in multiple seed loading with smaller seeds in both years of the study. During the second year, these smaller acorns were dispersed farther than larger acorns, and during the first year, larger acorns were dispersed farther, revealing an inconsistent response to seed size during our study. We suggest that in some circumstances, multiple seed loading by Blue Jays may favor dispersal in some plant species.

  2. How food marketers can sell smaller portions: Consumer insights and product innovation.

    PubMed

    Riis, J; Fisher, J O; Rowe, S

    2016-08-01

    Food portion size has been shown to be an important driver of energy intake. Despite the well acknowledged role of portion control in weight management, large portion sizes remain ubiquitous in the marketplace. Moving consumers towards consumption of smaller portion sizes will require changes in consumer behavior as well as changes in products available to consumers in a variety of settings. This special supplement presents cutting edge research aimed at understanding consumer behavior around portion size and innovations in product design that may promote the selection and consumption of smaller portion sizes. We identify further research that will be needed to translate basic behavioral findings into real world settings and to viable product development.

  3. Smaller pupil size and better proofreading performance with positive than with negative polarity displays.

    PubMed

    Piepenbrock, Cosima; Mayr, Susanne; Buchner, Axel

    2014-01-01

    The 'positive polarity advantage' describes the fact that reading performance is better for dark text on light background (positive polarity) than for light text on dark background (negative polarity). We investigated the underlying mechanism by assessing pupil size and proofreading performance when reading positive and negative polarity texts. In particular, we tested the display luminance hypothesis which postulates that the typically greater brightness of positive compared to negative polarity displays leads to smaller pupil sizes and, hence, a sharper retinal image and better perception of detail. Indeed, pupil sizes were smaller and proofreading performance was better with positive than with negative polarity displays. The results are compatible with the hypothesis that the positive polarity advantage is an effect of display luminance. Limitations of the study are being discussed.

  4. Origin of the smaller conductances of Rh, Pb, and Co atomic junctions in hydrogen environment

    SciTech Connect

    Li, Xue; Chen, Mingyan; Ye, Xiang; Xie, Yi-qun; Ke, San-huang

    2015-02-14

    We study theoretically the structural and electronic origins of the smaller conductances (one conductance quantum, G{sub 0}, and smaller) of Rh, Pb, and Co metal atomic junctions (MAJs) in a hydrogen environment, as were measured in recent experiments. For the Rh MAJs, the 1G{sub 0} conductance is attributed to a stable contact bridged by a single hydrogen molecule whose antibonding state provides a single transport channel. For the Pb and Co MAJs the 1G{sub 0} conductance is, however, ascribed to a linear atomic chain adsorbing two dissociated H atoms, which largely reduces the density of states at the Fermi energy with respect to the pure ones. On the other hand, the small conductances of 0.3G{sub 0} (Rh) and 0.2G{sub 0} (Co) are due to H-decorated atomic chains connected to electrodes by a H atom.

  5. Plant Proteins Are Smaller Because They Are Encoded by Fewer Exons than Animal Proteins.

    PubMed

    Ramírez-Sánchez, Obed; Pérez-Rodríguez, Paulino; Delaye, Luis; Tiessen, Axel

    2016-12-01

    Protein size is an important biochemical feature since longer proteins can harbor more domains and therefore can display more biological functionalities than shorter proteins. We found remarkable differences in protein length, exon structure, and domain count among different phylogenetic lineages. While eukaryotic proteins have an average size of 472 amino acid residues (aa), average protein sizes in plant genomes are smaller than those of animals and fungi. Proteins unique to plants are ∼81aa shorter than plant proteins conserved among other eukaryotic lineages. The smaller average size of plant proteins could neither be explained by endosymbiosis nor subcellular compartmentation nor exon size, but rather due to exon number. Metazoan proteins are encoded on average by ∼10 exons of small size [∼176 nucleotides (nt)]. Streptophyta have on average only ∼5.7 exons of medium size (∼230nt). Multicellular species code for large proteins by increasing the exon number, while most unicellular organisms employ rather larger exons (>400nt). Among subcellular compartments, membrane proteins are the largest (∼520aa), whereas the smallest proteins correspond to the gene ontology group of ribosome (∼240aa). Plant genes are encoded by half the number of exons and also contain fewer domains than animal proteins on average. Interestingly, endosymbiotic proteins that migrated to the plant nucleus became larger than their cyanobacterial orthologs. We thus conclude that plants have proteins larger than bacteria but smaller than animals or fungi. Compared to the average of eukaryotic species, plants have ∼34% more but ∼20% smaller proteins. This suggests that photosynthetic organisms are unique and deserve therefore special attention with regard to the evolutionary forces acting on their genomes and proteomes.

  6. Method of using 5,10,15,20-tetrakis(carboxyphenyl)porphine for detecting cancers of the lung

    DOEpatents

    Cole, D.A.; Moody, D.C. III; Ellinwood, L.E.; Klein, M.G.

    1992-11-10

    A method is described for using tetra-aryl porphyrins for and, in particular, 5,10,15,20-tetrakis(4-carboxyphenyl)porphine as a fluorescent tracer for cancers of the lung, and as a radiotracer therefor as a complex with [sup 67]Cu. The latter complex also provides a source of beta radiation for selective destruction of lung malignancies as well as gamma radiation useful for image analysis of the lungs by single photon emission computed tomography, as an example, both in vivo. Copper-64 may be substituted for the [sup 67]Cu if only radiotracer characteristics are of interest. This lighter isotope of copper is a positron emitter, and positron emission tomography techniques can be used to locate the malignant tissue mass. 1 figure.

  7. Method using 5,10,15,20-tetrakis(4-carboxyphenyl)porphine for treating cancers of the lung

    DOEpatents

    Cole, Dean A.; Moody, III, David C.; Ellinwood, L. Edward; Klein, M. Gerard

    1995-01-01

    Method using tetra-aryl porphyrins for and, in particular, 5,10,15,20-tetrakis(4-carboxyphenyl)porphine as a fluorescent tracer for cancers of the lung, and as a radiotracer therefor as a complex with .sup.67 Cu. The latter complex also provides a source of beta radiation for selective destruction of lung malignancies as well as gamma radiation useful for image analysis of the situs thereof by single photon emission computed tomography, as an example, both in vivo. Copper-64 may be substituted for the .sup.67 Cu if only radiotracer characteristics are of interest. This lighter isotope of copper is a positron emitter, and positron emission tomography techniques can be used to locate the malignant tissue mass.

  8. Method of using 5,10,15,20-tetrakis(carboxyphenyl)porphine for detecting cancers of the lung

    DOEpatents

    Cole, Dean A.; Moody, III, David C.; Ellinwood, L. Edward; Klein, M. Gerard

    1992-01-01

    Method using tetra-aryl porphyrins for and, in particular, 5,10,15,20-tetrakis(4-carboxyphenyl)porphine as a fluorescent tracer for cancers of the lung, and as a radiotracer therefor as a complex with .sup.67 Cu. The latter complex also provides a source of beta radiation for selective destruction of lung malignancies as well as gamma radiation useful for image analysis of the situs thereof by single photon emission computed tomography, as an example, both in vivo. Copper-64 may be substituted for the .sup.67 Cu if only radiotracer characteristics are of interest. This lighter isotope of copper is a positron emitter, and positron emission tomography techniques cna be used to locate the malignant tissue mass.

  9. Comparison of flexible ureterorenoscopy and mini-percutaneous nephrolithotomy in treatment of lower calyceal stones smaller than 2 cm.

    PubMed

    Akbulut, Fatih; Kucuktopcu, Onur; Kandemir, Emre; Sonmezay, Erkan; Simsek, Abdulmuttalip; Ozgor, Faruk; Binbay, Murat; Muslumanoglu, Ahmet Yaser; Gurbuz, Gokhan

    2016-01-01

    To compare the outcomes of flexible ureterorenoscopy (F-URS) and mini-percutaneous nephrolithotomy (mini-PNL) in the treatment of lower calyceal stones smaller than 2 cm. Patients who underwent F-URS and mini-PNL for the treatment of lower calyceal stones smaller than 2 cm between March 2009 and December 2014 were retrospectively evaluated. Ninety-four patients were divided into two groups by treatment modality: F-URS (Group 1: 63 patients) and mini-PNL (Group 2: 31 patients). All patients were preoperatively diagnosed with intravenous pyelography or computed tomography. Success rates for F-URS and mini-PNL at postoperative first month were 85.7% and 90.3%, respectively. Operation time, fluoroscopy time, and hospitalization time for F-URS and mini-PNL patients were 44.40 min, 2.9 min, 22.4 h, and 91.9 min, 6.4 min, and 63.8 h, respectively. All three parameters were significantly shorter among the F-URS group (p < 0.001). Postoperative hemoglobin drop was significantly lower in F-URS group compared to mini-PNL group (0.39 mg/dL vs. 1.15 mg/dL, p = 0.001). A comparison of complications according to the Clavien classification demonstrated significant differences between the groups (p = 0.001). More patients in the F-URS groups require antibiotics due to urinary tract infection, and more patients in the mini-PNL group required ureteral double J catheter insertion under general anesthesia. Although both F-URS and mini-PNL have similar success rates for the treatment of lower calyceal stones, F-URS appears to be more favorable due to shorter fluoroscopy and hospitalization times; and lower hemoglobin drops. Multicenter and studies using higher patient volumes are needed to confirm these findings.

  10. Smaller = Denser, and the Brain Knows It: Natural Statistics of Object Density Shape Weight Expectations

    PubMed Central

    Peters, Megan A. K.; Balzer, Jonathan; Shams, Ladan

    2015-01-01

    If one nondescript object’s volume is twice that of another, is it necessarily twice as heavy? As larger objects are typically heavier than smaller ones, one might assume humans use such heuristics in preparing to lift novel objects if other informative cues (e.g., material, previous lifts) are unavailable. However, it is also known that humans are sensitive to statistical properties of our environments, and that such sensitivity can bias perception. Here we asked whether statistical regularities in properties of liftable, everyday objects would bias human observers’ predictions about objects’ weight relationships. We developed state-of-the-art computer vision techniques to precisely measure the volume of everyday objects, and also measured their weight. We discovered that for liftable man-made objects, “twice as large” doesn’t mean “twice as heavy”: Smaller objects are typically denser, following a power function of volume. Interestingly, this “smaller is denser” relationship does not hold for natural or unliftable objects, suggesting some ideal density range for objects designed to be lifted. We then asked human observers to predict weight relationships between novel objects without lifting them; crucially, these weight predictions quantitatively match typical weight relationships shown by similarly-sized objects in everyday environments. These results indicate that the human brain represents the statistics of everyday objects and that this representation can be quantitatively abstracted and applied to novel objects. Finally, that the brain possesses and can use precise knowledge of the nonlinear association between size and weight carries important implications for implementation of forward models of motor control in artificial systems. PMID:25768977

  11. Possible origin of the smaller-than-universal percolation-conductivity exponent in the continuum

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Balberg, I.; Azulay, D.; Goldstein, Y.; Jedrzejewski, J.

    2016-06-01

    For quite a few systems in the continuum, such as carbon nanotube polymer composites and segregated composites, percolation electrical conductivity exponents that are much smaller than the universal value have been reported. This is unexpected in view of the classical lattice percolation theory. Here we provide a simple general phenomenological model that accounts for such observations within the framework of universality. We suggest that these small value exponents are due to the interplay between the connectivity and the structural variations that follow the increase of the fractional volume content of the conducting phase.

  12. Possible origin of the smaller-than-universal percolation-conductivity exponent in the continuum.

    PubMed

    Balberg, I; Azulay, D; Goldstein, Y; Jedrzejewski, J

    2016-06-01

    For quite a few systems in the continuum, such as carbon nanotube polymer composites and segregated composites, percolation electrical conductivity exponents that are much smaller than the universal value have been reported. This is unexpected in view of the classical lattice percolation theory. Here we provide a simple general phenomenological model that accounts for such observations within the framework of universality. We suggest that these small value exponents are due to the interplay between the connectivity and the structural variations that follow the increase of the fractional volume content of the conducting phase.

  13. Why have not the hairs on the feet of gecko been smaller?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Su, Yewang; He, Shijie; Hwang, Keh-Chih; Ji, Baohua

    2012-10-01

    The nanometer size of the tiny hair is the key to the secret of strong stickiness of gecko's feet, by which the hair can achieve the maximum adhesion strength that is insensitive to the interfacial flaws with substrate surface. But the question why the hairs have not been smaller is not answered yet. In this study, we derived a geometric parameter of the surface structures considering lateral interaction among hairs, which gives a critical size below which these hairs will bunch together and cause failure of the adhesion, suggesting a lower limit of the dimension of hairs on gecko's feet.

  14. Do open access biomedical journals benefit smaller countries? The Slovenian experience.

    PubMed

    Turk, Nana

    2011-06-01

    Scientists from smaller countries have problems gaining visibility for their research. Does open access publishing provide a solution? Slovenia is a small country with around 5000 medical doctors, 1300 dentists and 1000 pharmacists. A search of Slovenia's Bibliographic database was carried out to identity all biomedical journals and those which are open access. Slovenia has 18 medical open access journals, but none has an impact factor and only 10 are indexed by Slovenian and international bibliographic databases. The visibility and quality of medical papers is poor. The solution might be to reduce the number of journals and encourage Slovenian scientists to publish their best articles in them.

  15. INCREASED AIRWAYS INFLAMMATION AND MODIFIED BAL CELL SURFACE PHENOTYPES IN ASTHMATICS EXPOSED TO COARSE SIZE (PM2.5-10) CONCENTRATED AMBIENT PARTICLES (CAPS)

    EPA Science Inventory

    Although associations between inhalation of PM10 and disease morbidity and mortality appear stronger for fine (PM2.5) vs coarse (PM2.5-10) or ultrafine/UF (PM<0.1) PM. In vitro studies suggest that PM2.5-10 are more potent in inducing pro-inflammatory cytokine responses from alve...

  16. Smaller intracranial volume in prodromal Huntington's disease: evidence for abnormal neurodevelopment

    PubMed Central

    Nopoulos, Peggy C.; Aylward, Elizabeth H.; Ross, Christopher A.; Mills, James A.; Langbehn, Douglas R.; Johnson, Hans J.; Magnotta, Vincent A.; Pierson, Ronald K.; Beglinger, Leigh J.; Nance, Martha A.; Barker, Roger A.

    2011-01-01

    Huntington’s disease is an autosomal dominant brain disease. Although conceptualized as a neurodegenerative disease of the striatum, a growing number of studies challenge this classic concept of Huntington’s disease aetiology. Intracranial volume is the tissue and fluid within the calvarium and is a representation of the maximal brain growth obtained during development. The current study reports intracranial volume obtained from an magnetic resonance imaging brain scan in a sample of subjects (n = 707) who have undergone presymptomatic gene testing. Participants who are gene-expanded but not yet manifesting the disease (prodromal Huntington’s disease) are compared with subjects who are non-gene expanded. The prodromal males had significantly smaller intracranial volume measures with a mean volume that was 4% lower compared with controls. Although the prodromal females had smaller intracranial volume measures compared with their controls, this was not significant. The current findings suggest that mutant huntingtin can cause abnormal development, which may contribute to the pathogenesis of Huntington’s disease. PMID:20923788

  17. Use of precracked Charpy and smaller specimens to establish the master curve

    SciTech Connect

    Sokolov, M.A.; McCabe, D.E.; Nanstad, R.K.; Davidov, Y.A.

    1997-12-01

    The current provisions used in the U.S. Code of Federal Regulations for the determination of the fracture toughness of reactor pressure vessel steels employs an assumption that there is a direct correlation between K{sub Ic} lower-bound toughness and the Charpy V-notch transition curve. Such correlations are subject to scatter from both approaches which weakens the reliability of fracture mechanics-based analyses. In this study, precracked Charpy and smaller size specimens are used in three-point static bend testing to develop fracture mechanics based K{sub k} values. The testing is performed under carefully controlled conditions such that the values can be used to predict the fracture toughness performance of large specimens. The concept of a universal transition curve (master curve) is applied. Data scatter that is characteristic of commercial grade steels and their weldments is handled by Weibull statistical modeling. The master curve is developed to describe the median K{sub Jc} fracture toughness for 1T size compact specimens. Size effects are modeled using weakest-link theory and are studied for different specimen geometries. It is shown that precracked Charpy specimens when tested within their confined validity limits follow the weakest-link size-adjustment trend and predict the fracture toughness of larger specimens. Specimens of smaller than Charpy sizes (5 mm thick) exhibit some disparities in results relative to weakest-link size adjustment prediction suggesting that application of such adjustment to very small specimens may have some limitations.

  18. Addressing the multiplication makes bigger and division makes smaller misconceptions via prediction and clickers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lim, Kien H.

    2011-12-01

    This article presents a lesson that uses prediction items, clickers and visuals via PowerPoint slides to help prospective middle-school teachers address two common misconceptions: multiplication makes bigger and division makes smaller (MMB-DMS). Classroom research was conducted to explore the viability of such a lesson. Results show that the lesson was effective in creating awareness that multiplication does not always make bigger and division does not always makes smaller, uncovering students' misconceptions, and providing opportunities for students to learn from mistakes. Students liked the activity for various reasons, such as getting to learn certain mathematical ideas, to think about the problems, to work in groups and to have fun. The lesson was implemented slightly differently in two classes. The class with an additional phase involving prediction and voting via clickers in the PowerPoint lesson showed a gain of 36 points (an effect size of 1.3 standard deviations, SDs) from the pre-test to the exit-test whereas, the comparison class showed a gain of 25 points (an effect size of 0.87 SDs). In terms of students' written responses with regards to addressing the MMB-DMS misconceptions, there was however not much difference between the two classes.

  19. HIV-Associated Distal Neuropathic Pain is Associated with Smaller Total Cerebral Cortical Gray Matter

    PubMed Central

    Keltner, John R.; Fennema-Notestine, Christine; Vaida, Florin; Wang, Dongzhe; Franklin, Donald R.; Dworkin, Robert H.; Sanders, Chelsea; McCutchan, J. Allen; Archibald, Sarah L.; Miller, David J.; Kesidis, George; Cushman, Clint; Kim, Sung Min; Abramson, Ian; Taylor, Michael J.; Theilmann, Rebecca J.; Julaton, Michelle D.; Notestine, Randy J.; Corkran, Stephanie; Cherner, Mariana; Duarte, Nichole A.; Alexander, Terry; Robinson-Papp, Jessica; Gelman, Benjamin B.; Simpson, David M.; Collier, Ann C.; Marra, Christina M.; Morgello, Susan; Brown, Greg; Grant, Igor; Atkinson, J. Hampton; Jernigan, Terry L.; Ellis, Ronald J.

    2014-01-01

    Despite modern antiretroviral therapy, HIV-associated sensory neuropathy affects over 50% of HIV patients. The clinical expression of HIV neuropathy is highly variable: many individuals report few symptoms, but about half report distal neuropathic pain (DNP), making it one of the most prevalent, disabling and treatment-resistant complications of HIV disease. The presence and intensity of pain is not fully explained by the degree of peripheral nerve damage, making it unclear why some patients do, and others do not, report pain. To better understand central nervous system contributions to HIV DNP, we performed a cross-sectional analysis of structural magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) volumes in 241 HIV-infected participants from an observational multi-site cohort study at five US sites (CNS HIV Antiretroviral Treatment Effects Research Study, CHARTER). The association between DNP and the structural imaging outcomes was investigated using both linear and nonlinear (Gaussian Kernel support vector) multivariable regression, controlling for key demographic and clinical variables. Severity of DNP symptoms was correlated with smaller total cerebral cortical gray matter volume (R = −0.24; p = 0.004). Understanding the mechanisms for this association between smaller total cortical volumes and DNP may provide insight into HIV DNP chronicity and treatment-resistance. PMID:24549970

  20. HIV-associated distal neuropathic pain is associated with smaller total cerebral cortical gray matter.

    PubMed

    Keltner, John R; Fennema-Notestine, Christine; Vaida, Florin; Wang, Dongzhe; Franklin, Donald R; Dworkin, Robert H; Sanders, Chelsea; McCutchan, J Allen; Archibald, Sarah L; Miller, David J; Kesidis, George; Cushman, Clint; Kim, Sung Min; Abramson, Ian; Taylor, Michael J; Theilmann, Rebecca J; Julaton, Michelle D; Notestine, Randy J; Corkran, Stephanie; Cherner, Mariana; Duarte, Nichole A; Alexander, Terry; Robinson-Papp, Jessica; Gelman, Benjamin B; Simpson, David M; Collier, Ann C; Marra, Christina M; Morgello, Susan; Brown, Greg; Grant, Igor; Atkinson, J Hampton; Jernigan, Terry L; Ellis, Ronald J

    2014-06-01

    Despite modern antiretroviral therapy, HIV-associated sensory neuropathy affects over 50 % of HIV patients. The clinical expression of HIV neuropathy is highly variable: many individuals report few symptoms, but about half report distal neuropathic pain (DNP), making it one of the most prevalent, disabling, and treatment-resistant complications of HIV disease. The presence and intensity of pain is not fully explained by the degree of peripheral nerve damage, making it unclear why some patients do, and others do not, report pain. To better understand central nervous system contributions to HIV DNP, we performed a cross-sectional analysis of structural magnetic resonance imaging volumes in 241 HIV-infected participants from an observational multi-site cohort study at five US sites (CNS HIV Anti-Retroviral Treatment Effects Research Study, CHARTER). The association between DNP and the structural imaging outcomes was investigated using both linear and nonlinear (Gaussian Kernel support vector) multivariable regression, controlling for key demographic and clinical variables. Severity of DNP symptoms was correlated with smaller total cerebral cortical gray matter volume (r = -0.24; p = 0.004). Understanding the mechanisms for this association between smaller total cortical volumes and DNP may provide insight into HIV DNP chronicity and treatment-resistance.

  1. Winged queens replaced by reproductives smaller than workers in Mystrium ants

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Molet, Mathieu; Peeters, Christian; Fisher, Brian L.

    2007-04-01

    In ants, winged queens that are specialized for independent colony foundation can be replaced by wingless reproductives better adapted for colony fission. We studied this shift in reproductive strategy by comparing two Mystrium species from Madagascar using morphometry, allometry and dissections. Mystrium rogeri has a single dealate queen in each colony with a larger thorax than workers and similar mandibles that allow these queens to hunt during non-claustral foundation. In contrast, Mystrium ‘red’ lacks winged queens and half of the female adults belong to a wingless ‘intermorph’ caste smaller and allometrically distinct from the workers. Intermorphs have functional ovaries and spermatheca while those of workers are degenerate. Intermorphs care for brood and a few mate and reproduce making them an all-purpose caste that takes charge of both work and reproduction. However, their mandibles are reduced and inappropriate for hunting centipedes, unlike the workers’ mandibles. This together with their small thorax disallow them to perform independent colony foundation, and colonies reproduce by fission. M. rogeri workers have mandibles polymorphic in size and shape, which allow for all tasks from brood care to hunting. In M. ‘red’, colonial investment in reproduction has shifted from producing expensive winged queens to more numerous helpers. M. ‘red’ intermorphs are the first case of reproductives smaller than workers in ants and illustrate their potential to diversify their caste system for better colonial economy.

  2. Synthesis and properties of 5,10,15,20-tetra(4-lauroylimidophenyl)porphyrin and its metal complexes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, Er-jun; Cheng, Xiu-li; Wang, Dong; Tang, Xue-xin; Yu, Shuang-jiang; Shi, Tong-shun

    2007-11-01

    Transition metal complexes of 5,10,15,20-tetra(4-lauroylimidophenyl)porphyrin TLPPM [M = Mn(Cl), Fe(Cl), Co, Ni, Cu, Zn] have been synthesized and characterized by means of elemental analyses, UV-VIS spectra, infrared spectra, 1H NMR spectra, molar conductance, differential scanning calorimetry (DSC), polarized optical microscopy (POM), cyclic voltammetry, luminescence spectra and surface photovoltage spectroscopies. The porphyrin ligand shows liquid crystalline behaviour, and it exhibits a high phase transition temperature 182 °C and a broad mesophase temperature span, 88 °C. The oxidation and reduction properties of the compounds were investigated by cyclic voltammetry. The photovoltaic properties and charge transfer process of the compounds were investigated by surface photovoltage spectroscopy (SPS) and electric field-induced surface photovoltage spectroscopic (EFISPS) techniques, which revealed that all the compounds are p-type semiconductors. Quantum yields of the S 1 → S 0 fluorescence were measured at room temperature. These studies will contribute to further choice and application of the liquid crystals.

  3. Insights into severe 5,10-methylenetetrahydrofolate reductase deficiency: molecular genetic and enzymatic characterization of 76 patients.

    PubMed

    Burda, Patricie; Schäfer, Alexandra; Suormala, Terttu; Rummel, Till; Bürer, Céline; Heuberger, Dorothea; Frapolli, Michele; Giunta, Cecilia; Sokolová, Jitka; Vlášková, Hana; Kožich, Viktor; Koch, Hans Georg; Fowler, Brian; Froese, D Sean; Baumgartner, Matthias R

    2015-06-01

    5,10-Methylenetetrahydrofolate reductase (MTHFR) deficiency is the most common inherited disorder of folate metabolism and causes severe hyperhomocysteinaemia. To better understand the relationship between mutation and function, we performed molecular genetic analysis of 76 MTHFR deficient patients, followed by extensive enzymatic characterization of fibroblasts from 72 of these. A deleterious mutation was detected on each of the 152 patient alleles, with one allele harboring two mutations. Sixty five different mutations (42 novel) were detected, including a common splicing mutation (c.1542G>A) found in 21 alleles. Using an enzyme assay in the physiological direction, we found residual activity (1.7%-42% of control) in 42 cell lines, of which 28 showed reduced affinity for nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide phosphate (NADPH), one reduced affinity for methylenetetrahydrofolate, five flavin adenine dinucleotide-responsiveness, and 24 abnormal kinetics of S-adenosylmethionine inhibition. Missense mutations causing virtually absent activity were found exclusively in the N-terminal catalytic domain, whereas missense mutations in the C-terminal regulatory domain caused decreased NADPH binding and disturbed inhibition by S-adenosylmethionine. Characterization of patients in this way provides a basis for improved diagnosis using expanded enzymatic criteria, increases understanding of the molecular basis of MTHFR dysfunction, and points to the possible role of cofactor or substrate in the treatment of patients with specific mutations.

  4. Effect of multivitamins on plasma homocysteine in patients with the 5,10 methylenetetrahydrofolate reductase C677T homozygous state.

    PubMed

    Dell'edera, Domenico; Tinelli, Andrea; Milazzo, Giusi Natalia; Malvasi, Antonio; Domenico, Carone; Pacella, Elena; Pierluigi, Compagnoni; Giuseppe, Tarantino; Marcello, Guido; Francesco, Lomurno; Epifania, Annunziata Anna

    2013-08-01

    The role of hyperhomocysteinemia (HHcy) as a cardiovascular risk factor remains a matter of debate, while it correlates with folates, it demonstrates inverse correlation with plasma homocysteine (Hcy) levels and vitamin B12 levels and reduces plasma Hcy levels following supplementation with multivitamins. The purpose of this study was to demonstrate that administering multivitamins at specific doses for 90 days restores normal plasma Hcy levels in women who are homozygous for the thermolabile variant of 5,10 methylenetetrahydrofolate reductase (MTHFR C677T). We enrolled 106 healthy females aged between 30 and 42 years, who were non-smokers, non-vegetarian, normotensive and who had no history of food abuse in the previous months. Only females were enrolled in order to rule out any bias due to the variation in Hcy plasma concentrations between males and females. Patient blood sampling was performed in order to determine plasma Hcy, serum folic acid and vitamin B12 levels. Furthermore, molecular characterization of the C677T polymorphism present in the MTHFR gene, was also performed. The results of this study demonstrated that supplementation with specific multivitamins restores normal plasma Hcy levels, regardless of the MTHFR genotype. Furthermore, it is unnecessary to adminster high doses of folate to reduce plasma Hcy levels, and administering high doses of folate may cause pro-inflammatory and pro-proliferative effects.

  5. 5,10-Methylenetetrahydrofolate reductase (MTHFR), methionine synthase (MTRR), and methionine synthase reductase (MTR) gene polymorphisms and adult meningioma risk.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Jun; Zhou, Yan-Wen; Shi, Hua-Ping; Wang, Yan-Zhong; Li, Gui-Ling; Yu, Hai-Tao; Xie, Xin-You

    2013-11-01

    The causes of meningiomas are not well understood. Folate metabolism gene polymorphisms have been shown to be associated with various human cancers. It is still controversial and ambiguous between the functional polymorphisms of folate metabolism genes 5,10-methylenetetrahydrofolate reductase (MTHFR), methionine synthase (MTRR), and methionine synthase reductase (MTR) and risk of adult meningioma. A population-based case–control study involving 600 meningioma patients (World Health Organization [WHO] Grade I, 391 cases; WHO Grade II, 167 cases; WHO Grade III, 42 cases) and 600 controls was done for the MTHFR C677T and A1298C, MTRR A66G, and MTR A2756G variants in Chinese Han population. The folate metabolism gene polymorphisms were determined by using a polymerase chain reaction–restriction fragment length polymorphism assay. Meningioma cases had a significantly lower frequency of MTHFR 677 TT genotype [odds ratio (OR) = 0.49, 95 % confidence interval (CI) 0.33–0.74; P = 0.001] and T allele (OR = 0.80, 95 % CI 0.67–0.95; P = 0.01) than controls. A significant association between risk of meningioma and MTRR 66 GG (OR = 1.41, 95 % CI 1.02–1.96; P = 0.04) was also observed. When stratifying by the WHO grade of meningioma, no association was found. Our study suggested that MTHFR C677T and MTRR A66G variants may affect the risk of adult meningioma in Chinese Han population.

  6. DNA Physical Mapping via the Controlled Translocation of Single Molecules through a 5-10nm Silicon Nitride Nanopore

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stein, Derek; Reisner, Walter; Jiang, Zhijun; Hagerty, Nick; Wood, Charles; Chan, Jason

    2009-03-01

    The ability to map the binding position of sequence-specific markers, including transcription-factors, protein-nucleic acids (PNAs) or deactivated restriction enzymes, along a single DNA molecule in a nanofluidic device would be of key importance for the life-sciences. Such markers could give an indication of the active genes at particular stage in a cell's transcriptional cycle, pinpoint the location of mutations or even provide a DNA barcode that could aid in genomics applications. We have developed a setup consisting of a 5-10 nm nanopore in a 20nm thick silicon nitride film coupled to an optical tweezer setup. The translocation of DNA across the nanopore can be detected via blockades in the electrical current through the pore. By anchoring one end of the translocating DNA to an optically trapped microsphere, we hope to stretch out the molecule in the nanopore and control the translocation speed, enabling us to slowly scan across the genome and detect changes in the baseline current due to the presence of bound markers.

  7. The Problem with Big Data: Operating on Smaller Datasets to Bridge the Implementation Gap

    PubMed Central

    Mann, Richard P.; Mushtaq, Faisal; White, Alan D.; Mata-Cervantes, Gabriel; Pike, Tom; Coker, Dalton; Murdoch, Stuart; Hiles, Tim; Smith, Clare; Berridge, David; Hinchliffe, Suzanne; Hall, Geoff; Smye, Stephen; Wilkie, Richard M.; Lodge, J. Peter A.; Mon-Williams, Mark

    2016-01-01

    Big datasets have the potential to revolutionize public health. However, there is a mismatch between the political and scientific optimism surrounding big data and the public’s perception of its benefit. We suggest a systematic and concerted emphasis on developing models derived from smaller datasets to illustrate to the public how big data can produce tangible benefits in the long term. In order to highlight the immediate value of a small data approach, we produced a proof-of-concept model predicting hospital length of stay. The results demonstrate that existing small datasets can be used to create models that generate a reasonable prediction, facilitating health-care delivery. We propose that greater attention (and funding) needs to be directed toward the utilization of existing information resources in parallel with current efforts to create and exploit “big data.” PMID:27990415

  8. An improved smaller biotin ligase for BioID proximity labeling

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Dae In; Jensen, Samuel C.; Noble, Kyle A.; KC, Birendra; Roux, Kenneth H.; Motamedchaboki, Khatereh; Roux, Kyle J.

    2016-01-01

    The BioID method uses a promiscuous biotin ligase to detect protein–protein associations as well as proximate proteins in living cells. Here we report improvements to the BioID method centered on BioID2, a substantially smaller promiscuous biotin ligase. BioID2 enables more-selective targeting of fusion proteins, requires less biotin supplementation, and exhibits enhanced labeling of proximate proteins. Thus BioID2 improves the efficiency of screening for protein–protein associations. We also demonstrate that the biotinylation range of BioID2 can be considerably modulated using flexible linkers, thus enabling application-specific adjustment of the biotin-labeling radius. PMID:26912792

  9. The Problem with Big Data: Operating on Smaller Datasets to Bridge the Implementation Gap.

    PubMed

    Mann, Richard P; Mushtaq, Faisal; White, Alan D; Mata-Cervantes, Gabriel; Pike, Tom; Coker, Dalton; Murdoch, Stuart; Hiles, Tim; Smith, Clare; Berridge, David; Hinchliffe, Suzanne; Hall, Geoff; Smye, Stephen; Wilkie, Richard M; Lodge, J Peter A; Mon-Williams, Mark

    2016-01-01

    Big datasets have the potential to revolutionize public health. However, there is a mismatch between the political and scientific optimism surrounding big data and the public's perception of its benefit. We suggest a systematic and concerted emphasis on developing models derived from smaller datasets to illustrate to the public how big data can produce tangible benefits in the long term. In order to highlight the immediate value of a small data approach, we produced a proof-of-concept model predicting hospital length of stay. The results demonstrate that existing small datasets can be used to create models that generate a reasonable prediction, facilitating health-care delivery. We propose that greater attention (and funding) needs to be directed toward the utilization of existing information resources in parallel with current efforts to create and exploit "big data."

  10. A robust and fast line segment detector based on top-down smaller eigenvalue analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Dong; Wang, Yongtao; Tang, Zhi; Lu, Xiaoqing

    2014-01-01

    In this paper, we propose a robust and fast line segment detector, which achieves accurate results with a controlled number of false detections and requires no parameter tuning. It consists of three steps: first, we propose a novel edge point chaining method to extract Canny edge segments (i.e., contiguous chains of Canny edge points) from the input image; second, we propose a top-down scheme based on smaller eigenvalue analysis to extract line segments within each obtained edge segment; third, we employ Desolneux et al.'s method to reject false detections. Experiments demonstrate that it is very efficient and more robust than two state of the art methods—LSD and EDLines.

  11. Opportunities and barriers for smaller portions in food service: lessons from marketing and behavioral economics

    PubMed Central

    Riis, J

    2014-01-01

    This paper uses the frameworks and evidence from marketing and behavioral economics to highlight the opportunities and barriers for portion control in food service environments. Applying Kahneman's ‘thinking fast and slow' concepts, it describes 10 strategies that can be effective in ‘tricking' the consumer's fast cognitive system to make better decisions and in triggering the slow cognitive system to help prevent the fast system from making bad decisions. These strategies include shrinking defaults, elongating packages, increasing the visibility of small portions, offering more mixed virtue options, adding more small sizes, offering ‘right-sized' standard portions, using meaningful size labels, adopting linear pricing, using temporal landmarks to push smaller portions and facilitating pre-commitment. For each of these strategies, I discuss the specific cost and revenue barriers that a food service operator would face if the strategy were adopted. PMID:25033960

  12. Scattering and Absorption Properties of Polydisperse Wavelength-sized Particles Covered with Much Smaller Grains

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dlugach, Jana M.; Mishchenko, Michael I.; Mackowski, Daniel W.

    2012-01-01

    Using the results of direct, numerically exact computer solutions of the Maxwell equations, we analyze scattering and absorption characteristics of polydisperse compound particles in the form of wavelength-sized spheres covered with a large number of much smaller spherical grains.The results pertain to the complex refractive indices1.55 + i0.0003,1.55 + i0.3, and 3 + i0.1. We show that the optical effects of dusting wavelength-sized hosts by microscopic grains can vary depending on the number and size of the grains as well as on the complex refractive index. Our computations also demonstrate the high efficiency of the new superposition T-matrix code developed for use on distributed memory computer clusters.

  13. Smaller-loss planar SPP transmission line than conventional microstrip in microwave frequencies

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Hao Chi; Zhang, Qian; Liu, Jun Feng; Tang, Wenxuan; Fan, Yifeng; Cui, Tie Jun

    2016-01-01

    Transmission line is a basic component in all passive devices, integrated circuits, and systems. Microstrip is the most popular transmission line in the microwave and millimeter-wave frequencies, and has been widely used in current electronic devices, circuits, and systems. One of the important issues to be solved in such applications is the relatively large transmission loss of microstrip. Here, we propose a method to reduce the loss of microwave transmission line based on the designable wavenumber of spoof surface plasmon polaritons (SPPs). Using this characteristic, we analyze and experimentally demonstrate the low-loss feature of the SPP transmission line through the perturbation method and S-parameter measurements, respectively. Both simulation and experimental results show that the SPP transmission line has much smaller transmission loss than traditional microstrip with the same size in the microwave frequencies. Hence, the spoof SPP transmission line may make a big step forward in the low-loss circuits and systems. PMID:26983911

  14. Scattering and absorption properties of polydisperse wavelength-sized particles covered with much smaller grains

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dlugach, Janna M.; Mishchenko, Michael I.; Mackowski, Daniel W.

    2012-12-01

    Using the results of direct, numerically exact computer solutions of the Maxwell equations, we analyze scattering and absorption characteristics of polydisperse compound particles in the form of wavelength-sized spheres covered with a large number of much smaller spherical grains. The results pertain to the complex refractive indices 1.55+i0.0003, 1.55+i0.3, and 3+i0.1. We show that the optical effects of “dusting” wavelength-sized hosts by microscopic grains can vary depending on the number and size of the grains as well as on the complex refractive index. Our computations also demonstrate the high efficiency of the new superposition T-matrix code developed for use on distributed memory computer clusters.

  15. Opportunities and barriers for smaller portions in food service: lessons from marketing and behavioral economics.

    PubMed

    Riis, J

    2014-07-01

    This paper uses the frameworks and evidence from marketing and behavioral economics to highlight the opportunities and barriers for portion control in food service environments. Applying Kahneman's 'thinking fast and slow' concepts, it describes 10 strategies that can be effective in 'tricking' the consumer's fast cognitive system to make better decisions and in triggering the slow cognitive system to help prevent the fast system from making bad decisions. These strategies include shrinking defaults, elongating packages, increasing the visibility of small portions, offering more mixed virtue options, adding more small sizes, offering 'right-sized' standard portions, using meaningful size labels, adopting linear pricing, using temporal landmarks to push smaller portions and facilitating pre-commitment. For each of these strategies, I discuss the specific cost and revenue barriers that a food service operator would face if the strategy were adopted.

  16. Micrometeoroid Impacts on the Hubble Space Telescope Wide Field and Planetary Camera 2: Smaller Particle Impacts

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ross, D. K.; Anz-Meador, P.; Liou, J.C.; Opiela, J.; Kearsley, A. T.; Grime, G.; Webb, R.; Jeynes, C.; Palitsin, V.; Colaux, J.; Griffin, T.; Gerlach, L.; Wozniakiewicz, P. J.; Price, M. C.; Burchell, M. J.; Cole, M. J.

    2014-01-01

    The radiator shield on the Wide Field and Planetary Camera 2 (WFPC2) was subject to optical inspection following return from the Hubble Space Telescope (HST) in 2009. The survey revealed over 600 impact features of > 300 micrometers diameter, from exposure in space for 16 years. Subsequently, an international collaborative programme of analysis was organized to determine the origin of hypervelocity particles responsible for the damage. Here we describe examples of the numerous smaller micrometeoroid (MM) impact features (< 700 micrometers diameter) which excavated zinc orthotitanate (ZOT) paint from the radiator surface, but did not incorporate material from underlying Al alloy; larger impacts are described by [3]. We discuss recognition and interpretation of impactor remains, and MM compositions found on WFPC2.

  17. From passive tool holders to microsurgeons: safer, smaller, smarter surgical robots.

    PubMed

    Bergeles, Christos; Yang, Guang-Zhong

    2014-05-01

    Within only a few decades from its initial introduction, the field of surgical robotics has evolved into a dynamic and rapidly growing research area with increasing clinical uptake worldwide. Initially introduced for stereotaxic neurosurgery, surgical robots are now involved in an increasing number of procedures, demonstrating their practical clinical potential while propelling further advances in surgical innovations. Emerging platforms are also able to perform complex interventions through only a single-entry incision, and navigate through natural anatomical pathways in a tethered or wireless fashion. New devices facilitate superhuman dexterity and enable the performance of surgical steps that are otherwise impossible. They also allow seamless integration of microimaging techniques at the cellular level, significantly expanding the capabilities of surgeons. This paper provides an overview of the significant achievements in surgical robotics and identifies the current trends and future research directions of the field in making surgical robots safer, smaller, and smarter.

  18. Smaller-loss planar SPP transmission line than conventional microstrip in microwave frequencies.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Hao Chi; Zhang, Qian; Liu, Jun Feng; Tang, Wenxuan; Fan, Yifeng; Cui, Tie Jun

    2016-03-17

    Transmission line is a basic component in all passive devices, integrated circuits, and systems. Microstrip is the most popular transmission line in the microwave and millimeter-wave frequencies, and has been widely used in current electronic devices, circuits, and systems. One of the important issues to be solved in such applications is the relatively large transmission loss of microstrip. Here, we propose a method to reduce the loss of microwave transmission line based on the designable wavenumber of spoof surface plasmon polaritons (SPPs). Using this characteristic, we analyze and experimentally demonstrate the low-loss feature of the SPP transmission line through the perturbation method and S-parameter measurements, respectively. Both simulation and experimental results show that the SPP transmission line has much smaller transmission loss than traditional microstrip with the same size in the microwave frequencies. Hence, the spoof SPP transmission line may make a big step forward in the low-loss circuits and systems.

  19. Smaller-loss planar SPP transmission line than conventional microstrip in microwave frequencies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Hao Chi; Zhang, Qian; Liu, Jun Feng; Tang, Wenxuan; Fan, Yifeng; Cui, Tie Jun

    2016-03-01

    Transmission line is a basic component in all passive devices, integrated circuits, and systems. Microstrip is the most popular transmission line in the microwave and millimeter-wave frequencies, and has been widely used in current electronic devices, circuits, and systems. One of the important issues to be solved in such applications is the relatively large transmission loss of microstrip. Here, we propose a method to reduce the loss of microwave transmission line based on the designable wavenumber of spoof surface plasmon polaritons (SPPs). Using this characteristic, we analyze and experimentally demonstrate the low-loss feature of the SPP transmission line through the perturbation method and S-parameter measurements, respectively. Both simulation and experimental results show that the SPP transmission line has much smaller transmission loss than traditional microstrip with the same size in the microwave frequencies. Hence, the spoof SPP transmission line may make a big step forward in the low-loss circuits and systems.

  20. Polymorphisms of 5,10-methylenetetrahydrofolate reductase and thymidylate synthase, dietary folate intake, and the risk of leukemia in adults.

    PubMed

    Liu, Ping; Zhang, Min; Xie, Xing; Jin, Jie; Holman, C D'Arcy J

    2016-03-01

    The 5,10-methylenetetrahydrofolate reductase (MTHFR) and thymidylate synthase (TS) are critical enzymes in folate metabolism. Previous studies have reported conflicting results on the associations between MTHFR/TS polymorphisms and adult leukemia risk, which may due to the lack of information on folate intake. We investigated the risks of adult leukemia with genetic polymorphisms of folate metabolic enzymes (MTHFR C677T, A1298C, and TS) and evaluated if the associations varied by dietary folate intake from a multicenter case-control study conducted in Chinese. This study comprised 442 incident adult leukemia cases and 442 outpatient controls, individually matched to cases by gender, birth quinquennium, and study site. Genotypes were determined by a polymerase chain reaction (PCR) or PCR-based restriction fragment length polymorphism assay. Dietary folate intake was assessed by face-to-face interviews using a validated food-frequency questionnaire. The MTHFR 677TT genotype conferred a significant higher risk of leukemia in males than in females and exhibited an increased risk of acute myeloid leukemia (AML) but a decreased risk of acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL). The MTHFR 1298AC genotype appeared to decrease the risks of leukemia in both genders, in AML and ALL. Stratified analysis by dietary folate intake showed the increased risks of leukemia with the MTHFR 677TT and TS 2R3R/2R2R genotypes were only significant in individuals with low folate intake. A significant interaction between TS polymorphism and dietary folate intake was observed (P = 0.03). This study suggests that dietary folate intake and gender may modify the associations between MTHFR/TS polymorphisms and adult leukemia risk.

  1. Oxidation of tertiary benzamides by 5,10,15,20-tetraphenylporphyrinatoironIII chloride-tert-butylhydroperoxide.

    PubMed

    Constantino, Luis; Iley, Jim

    2004-07-07

    Tertiary benzamides are oxidized by the 5,10,15,20-tetraphenylporphyrinatoiron(III) chloride-Bu'(t)OOH system at the alpha-position of the N-alkyl groups. The major products are N-acylamides, although small amounts of secondary amides, the products of dealkylation, are also formed. Plots of initial rate versus initial substrate concentration for these reactions are curved, suggesting formation of an oxidant-substrate complex. The reaction rates are almost insensitive to the substituent in the benzamide moiety, but there is a kinetic deuterium isotope effect of 5.6 for the reaction of the N,N-(CH(3))(2) and N,N-(CD(3))(2) compounds. Comparison of the reaction products from N-alkyl-N-methylbenzamides reveals that, for all compounds studied except N-cyclopropyl-N-methylbenzamide, oxidation of the alkyl group is preferred, strongly so (by a factor of ca. 8) for N-allyl-N-methylbenzamide. In contrast to microsomal oxidation, there is no steric hindrance to oxidation of an isopropyl group. Thus, we propose that these reactions proceed via hydrogen atom abstraction to form an alpha-carbon-centred radical and we attribute the observed diminished reactivity of the N-cyclopropyl group to its known reluctance to form a cyclopropyl radical. Oxidation of N-methyl-N-(2,2,3,3-tetramethylcyclopropyl)methylbenzamide provides preliminary evidence for rearrangement of an intermediate radical. While it remains unclear how these reactions proceed directly to the N-acyl products, we have established that N-hydroxymethyl, N-alkoxymethyl and N-alkylperoxymethyl intermediates are not involved.

  2. Evidence for smaller extents of the northwestern Greenland Ice Sheet and North Ice Cap during the Holocene

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kelly, M. A.; Osterberg, E. C.; Axford, Y.; Bigl, M.; Birkel, S. D.; Corbett, L. B.; Roy, E. P.; Thompson, J. T.; Whitecloud, S.

    2013-12-01

    rooted in ground material and exposed along a shear plane in the GrIS are ~170-390 cal yr BP. Four ages of plant fragments within ice in a shear plane in the NIC margin are ~600-950 cal yr BP. Since these organic remains have been transported from beneath the GrIS and NIC, respectively, they indicate times of smaller than present ice extents. Together these plants provide evidence that the northwestern GrIS was smaller than at present at ~4600-4800 and ~170-390 cal yr BP. Advance to the modern GrIS extent was likely underway at of after ~170 cal yr BP. NIC was smaller than at present at ~600-950 cal yr. Our ongoing research is investigating the climatic conditions during these times and the relationship of these restricted ice extents to those documented elsewhere on Greenland as well as on Baffin Island.

  3. Higher circulating parathormone is associated with smaller and weaker bones in obese children.

    PubMed

    Radetti, Giorgio; Franceschi, Roberto; Adami, Silvano; Longhi, Silvia; Rossini, Maurizio; Gatti, Davide

    2014-07-01

    Obese children have disadvantageous bone geometry, bone of low quality, and reduced strength at non-weight-bearing skeletal sites. The aim of our study was to investigate the role of parathormone (PTH) and the Wnt/β-catenin signaling pathway and its inhibitors, sclerostin and Dickkopf-1 (DKK1), as negative modulators of fat mass on bone. This was a cross-sectional observational study performed in 44 (26 males and 18 females) obese subjects, aged 11.41 ± 2.61 years. Thirty-seven normal-weight, healthy children (22 males and 15 females) of the same chronological age served as controls for the biochemical parameters and bone markers, while the data on bone geometry were evaluated according to our normative data obtained previously in a group of 325 control children. Digitalized X-rays were evaluated at the level of the second metacarpal bone for the determination of bone geometry: total cross-sectional area (TCSA), cortical area (CA), medullary area (MA), and bone strength (bending breaking resistance index [BBRI]). Serum bone markers (intact procollagen-1N-terminal propeptide [P1NP] and serum carboxy-terminal telopeptide of collagen-1 [CTX]), sclerostin, DKK1, PTH, 25-hydroxyvitamin D and were also measured. Data for TCSA, CA, MA, and BBRI are expressed as a standard deviation score in order to normalize them for age and sex. TCSA (mean ± SD, -2.92 ± 2.71), CA (-0.60 ± 0.82), MA (-0.45 ± 1.14), and BBRI (-2.65 ± 2.31) were all significantly smaller than in controls (p < 0.01). Serum PTH (36.27 ± 23.89 vs. 19.33 ± 11.37 pg/mL) and CTX (1.55 ± 0.44 vs. 1.34 ± 0.46 ng/mL) were significantly increased (p < 0.05) in the obese children compared to controls, while sclerostin was significantly decreased (24.67 ± 10.06 vs. 30.42 ± 11.01 pmol/L, p < 0.05). P1NP was also significantly increased (p < 0.01). PTH was negatively correlated with TCSA, CA, and BBRI. Bone turnover is higher in obese children than in controls, and this is associated with smaller and

  4. Leber's hereditary optic neuropathy differentially affects smaller axons in the optic nerve.

    PubMed Central

    Sadun, A A; Win, P H; Ross-Cisneros, F N; Walker, S O; Carelli, V

    2000-01-01

    losses of the papillomacular bundle. The present study extends these findings to demonstrate a relative preservation of the M-cells in the optic nerve as reflected by the nerve fiber spectral profile. This selective loss of smaller fibers and their corresponding smaller retinal ganglion cells may, in addition to explaining the clinical features in LHON, provide valuable insights as to the exact pathophysiologic mechanisms by which mitochondrial impairment may induce apoptosis in vulnerable neurons. Images FIGURE 1A FIGURE 1B FIGURE 2A FIGURE 2B FIGURE 3A FIGURE 3B FIGURE 4 A FIGURE 4 B FIGURE 4 C FIGURE 4 D FIGURE 4 E FIGURE 4 F PMID:11190025

  5. Small mammals and high elevation vegetation in Yosemite National Park could be responding to smaller temperature increases than previously reported

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Conklin, D. R.; Daly, C.

    2009-12-01

    Recent research related the dynamics of Sierra Nevada subalpine conifers to 20th century warming, and used temperature records from Yosemite National Park headquarters and two other locations outside the Park to estimate a 3.7°C rise in average minimum temperature. More recently, observed elevational shifts of small mammals in Yosemite National Park were linked to the same upward trend in minimum monthly temperatures. However, our analysis of spatially explicit, monthly time series of temperatures, derived using the PRISM model, suggests that the large increase in minimum monthly temperatures may be limited to Yosemite Valley, where the Park headquarters itself is located. PRISM bases its interpolations on observations from 195 temperature recording stations within and near Yosemite National Park. Minimum monthly temperatures over most of the Park do not show a centennial-scale trend, but for the final quarter of the century they do trend upwards by 1°C. Our new estimate of the spatial and temporal pattern of 20th century changes in minimum temperatures in the Park could affect conclusions about the relative importance for subalpine conifers of the centennial trend compared to interdecadal variability of temperature. It also raises a question of whether the elevational shifts of the mammals took place only in the latter part of the century, and in response to smaller temperature increases. It challenges us to accept that these plants and animals are responding to smaller changes in minimum temperatures than previously estimated or else to find reasons other than an increase in minimum temperatures for the changes that have been documented, by these and other studies, over the last century in Yosemite.

  6. Quality of the log-geometric distribution extrapolation for smaller undiscovered oil and gas pool size

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Chenglin, L.; Charpentier, R.R.

    2010-01-01

    The U.S. Geological Survey procedure for the estimation of the general form of the parent distribution requires that the parameters of the log-geometric distribution be calculated and analyzed for the sensitivity of these parameters to different conditions. In this study, we derive the shape factor of a log-geometric distribution from the ratio of frequencies between adjacent bins. The shape factor has a log straight-line relationship with the ratio of frequencies. Additionally, the calculation equations of a ratio of the mean size to the lower size-class boundary are deduced. For a specific log-geometric distribution, we find that the ratio of the mean size to the lower size-class boundary is the same. We apply our analysis to simulations based on oil and gas pool distributions from four petroleum systems of Alberta, Canada and four generated distributions. Each petroleum system in Alberta has a different shape factor. Generally, the shape factors in the four petroleum systems stabilize with the increase of discovered pool numbers. For a log-geometric distribution, the shape factor becomes stable when discovered pool numbers exceed 50 and the shape factor is influenced by the exploration efficiency when the exploration efficiency is less than 1. The simulation results show that calculated shape factors increase with those of the parent distributions, and undiscovered oil and gas resources estimated through the log-geometric distribution extrapolation are smaller than the actual values. ?? 2010 International Association for Mathematical Geology.

  7. High proportion of smaller ranged hummingbird species coincides with ecological specialization across the Americas

    PubMed Central

    Martín González, Ana M.; Maruyama, Pietro K.; Sandel, Brody; Vizentin-Bugoni, Jeferson; Schleuning, Matthias; Abrahamczyk, Stefan; Alarcón, Ruben; Araujo, Andréa C.; Araújo, Francielle P.; Mendes de Azevedo, Severino; Baquero, Andrea C.; Cotton, Peter A.; Ingversen, Tanja Toftemark; Kohler, Glauco; Lara, Carlos; Guedes Las-Casas, Flor Maria; Machado, Adriana O.; Machado, Caio Graco; Maglianesi, María Alejandra; Moura, Alan Cerqueira; Nogués-Bravo, David; Oliveira, Genilda M.; Oliveira, Paulo E.; Ornelas, Juan Francisco; Rodrigues, Licléia da Cruz; Rosero-Lasprilla, Liliana; Rui, Ana Maria; Sazima, Marlies; Timmermann, Allan; Varassin, Isabela Galarda; Wang, Zhiheng; Watts, Stella; Fjeldså, Jon; Svenning, Jens-Christian; Rahbek, Carsten; Dalsgaard, Bo

    2016-01-01

    Ecological communities that experience stable climate conditions have been speculated to preserve more specialized interspecific associations and have higher proportions of smaller ranged species (SRS). Thus, areas with disproportionally large numbers of SRS are expected to coincide geographically with a high degree of community-level ecological specialization, but this suggestion remains poorly supported with empirical evidence. Here, we analysed data for hummingbird resource specialization, range size, contemporary climate, and Late Quaternary climate stability for 46 hummingbird–plant mutualistic networks distributed across the Americas, representing 130 hummingbird species (ca 40% of all hummingbird species). We demonstrate a positive relationship between the proportion of SRS of hummingbirds and community-level specialization, i.e. the division of the floral niche among coexisting hummingbird species. This relationship remained strong even when accounting for climate, furthermore, the effect of SRS on specialization was far stronger than the effect of specialization on SRS, suggesting that climate largely influences specialization through species' range-size dynamics. Irrespective of the exact mechanism involved, our results indicate that communities consisting of higher proportions of SRS may be vulnerable to disturbance not only because of their small geographical ranges, but also because of their high degree of specialization. PMID:26842573

  8. A heterodyne interferometer with periodic nonlinearities smaller than ±10 pm

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Weichert, C.; Köchert, P.; Köning, R.; Flügge, J.; Andreas, B.; Kuetgens, U.; Yacoot, A.

    2012-09-01

    The PTB developed a new optical heterodyne interferometer in the context of the European joint research project ‘Nanotrace’. A new optical concept using plane-parallel plates and spatially separated input beams to minimize the periodic nonlinearities was realized. Furthermore, the interferometer has the resolution of a double-path interferometer, compensates for possible angle variations between the mirrors and the interferometer optics and offers a minimal path difference between the reference and the measurement arm. Additionally, a new heterodyne phase evaluation based on an analogue to digital converter board with embedded field programmable gate arrays was developed, providing a high-resolving capability in the single-digit picometre range. The nonlinearities were characterized by a comparison with an x-ray interferometer, over a measurement range of 2.2 periods of the optical interferometer. Assuming an error-free x-ray interferometer, the nonlinearities are considered to be the deviation of the measured displacement from a best-fit line. For the proposed interferometer, nonlinearities smaller than ±10 pm were observed without any quadrature fringe correction.

  9. Randomized denoising autoencoders for smaller and efficient imaging based AD clinical trials.

    PubMed

    Ithapul, Vamsi K; Singh, Vikas; Okonkwo, Ozioma; Johnson, Sterling C

    2014-01-01

    There is growing body of research devoted to designing imaging-based biomarkers that identify Alzheimer's disease (AD) in its prodromal stage using statistical machine learning methods. Recently several authors investigated how clinical trials for AD can be made more efficient (i.e., smaller sample size) using predictive measures from such classification methods. In this paper, we explain why predictive measures given by such SVM type objectives may be less than ideal for use in the setting described above. We give a solution based on a novel deep learning model, randomized denoising autoencoders (rDA), which regresses on training labels y while also accounting for the variance, a property which is very useful for clinical trial design. Our results give strong improvements in sample size estimates over strategies based on multi-kernel learning. Also, rDA predictions appear to more accurately correlate to stages of disease. Separately, our formulation empirically shows how deep architectures can be applied in the large d, small n regime--the default situation in medical imaging. This result is of independent interest.

  10. Multiple Smaller Missions as a Direct Pathway to Mars Sample Return

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Niles, P. B.; Draper, D. S.; Evans, C. A.; Gibson, E. K.; Graham, L. D.; Jones, J. H.; Lederer, S. M.; Ming, D.; Seaman, C. H.; Archer, P. D.; Andrews-Hanna, J.; Baldridge, A. M.; Bourke, M. C.; Crown, D. A.; Fries, M.; Knudson, A. T.; Michalski, J.; Dobrea, E. Noe; Vaniman, D.; Weitz, C. M.; Williams, R. M. E.; Bell, J. F., III; Knauth, L. P.

    2012-01-01

    Recent discoveries by the Mars Exploration Rovers, Mars Express, Mars Odyssey, and Mars Reconnaissance Orbiter spacecraft include multiple, tantalizing astrobiological targets representing both past and present environments on Mars. The most desirable path to Mars Sample Return (MSR) would be to collect and return samples from that site which provides the clearest examples of the variety of rock types considered a high priority for sample return (pristine igneous, sedimentary, and hydrothermal). Here we propose an MSR architecture in which the next steps (potentially launched in 2018) would entail a series of smaller missions, including caching, to multiple landing sites to verify the presence of high priority sample return targets through in situ analyses. This alternative architecture to one flagship-class sample caching mission to a single site would preserve a direct path to MSR as stipulated by the Planetary Decadal Survey, while permitting investigation of diverse deposit types and providing comparison of the site of returned samples to other aqueous environments on early Mars

  11. Redesign of an AC Magnetic Susceptometer for Measurements in Smaller Samples

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vargas, Andres; Fukuda, Ryan; Sunny, Smitha; Ho, Pei-Chun

    2013-03-01

    A new AC magnetic susceptometer was created for the purpose of measuring the magnetic properties of smaller samples, such as nanoparticles that are currently being synthesized in our lab. The susceptometer consists of a primary coil, a secondary coil, and a sample holder. The primary coil is the outer component of the susceptometer, which provides a magnetic field when current is applied due to Ampere's Law. Inside of the primary coil lies the secondary coil, which has two oppositely wound solenoids; they are oppositely wound to reduce background signal. The sample holder lies inside of the secondary coil with the sample. All of these go inside of a beryllium copper casing for protection. We tested the susceptometer by looking for the ferromagnetic phase transition of an 11 mg Gd sample. A ~ 100 μ A AC current was applied to the primary coil, which created a magnetic field that polarized the magnetic moments in the sample. This induced a voltage on the secondary coil, which is proportional to the magnetic susceptibility. We measured the temperature dependency of the induced voltage from 10 K to 300 K. The results showed a sharp increase in the induced voltage around 293K, which agrees with the known ferromagnetic transition of Gd. Research at CSU-Fresno is supported by NSF DMR-1104544. Felipe Vargas is also supported by Undergraduate Research Grant and Faculty-Sponsored Student Research Award at CSU Fresno.

  12. High proportion of smaller ranged hummingbird species coincides with ecological specialization across the Americas.

    PubMed

    Sonne, Jesper; Martín González, Ana M; Maruyama, Pietro K; Sandel, Brody; Vizentin-Bugoni, Jeferson; Schleuning, Matthias; Abrahamczyk, Stefan; Alarcón, Ruben; Araujo, Andréa C; Araújo, Francielle P; Mendes de Azevedo, Severino; Baquero, Andrea C; Cotton, Peter A; Ingversen, Tanja Toftemark; Kohler, Glauco; Lara, Carlos; Guedes Las-Casas, Flor Maria; Machado, Adriana O; Machado, Caio Graco; Maglianesi, María Alejandra; Moura, Alan Cerqueira; Nogués-Bravo, David; Oliveira, Genilda M; Oliveira, Paulo E; Ornelas, Juan Francisco; Rodrigues, Licléia da Cruz; Rosero-Lasprilla, Liliana; Rui, Ana Maria; Sazima, Marlies; Timmermann, Allan; Varassin, Isabela Galarda; Wang, Zhiheng; Watts, Stella; Fjeldså, Jon; Svenning, Jens-Christian; Rahbek, Carsten; Dalsgaard, Bo

    2016-02-10

    Ecological communities that experience stable climate conditions have been speculated to preserve more specialized interspecific associations and have higher proportions of smaller ranged species (SRS). Thus, areas with disproportionally large numbers of SRS are expected to coincide geographically with a high degree of community-level ecological specialization, but this suggestion remains poorly supported with empirical evidence. Here, we analysed data for hummingbird resource specialization, range size, contemporary climate, and Late Quaternary climate stability for 46 hummingbird-plant mutualistic networks distributed across the Americas, representing 130 hummingbird species (ca 40% of all hummingbird species). We demonstrate a positive relationship between the proportion of SRS of hummingbirds and community-level specialization, i.e. the division of the floral niche among coexisting hummingbird species. This relationship remained strong even when accounting for climate, furthermore, the effect of SRS on specialization was far stronger than the effect of specialization on SRS, suggesting that climate largely influences specialization through species' range-size dynamics. Irrespective of the exact mechanism involved, our results indicate that communities consisting of higher proportions of SRS may be vulnerable to disturbance not only because of their small geographical ranges, but also because of their high degree of specialization.

  13. Epidemiological implications of mobility between a large urban centre and smaller satellite cities.

    PubMed

    Arino, Julien; Portet, Stéphanie

    2015-11-01

    An SIR infectious disease propagation model is considered that incorporates mobility of individuals between a large urban centre and smaller satellite cities. Because of the difference in population sizes, the urban centre has standard incidence and satellite cities have mass action incidence. It is shown that the general basic reproduction number [Formula: see text] acts as a threshold between global asymptotic stability of the disease free equilibrium and disease persistence. The case of Winnipeg (MB, Canada) and some neighbouring satellite communities is then considered numerically to complement the mathematical analysis, highlighting the importance of taking into account not only [Formula: see text] but also other measures of disease severity. It is found that the large urban centre governs most of the behaviour of the general system and control of the spread is better achieved by targeting it rather than reducing movement between the units. Also, the capacity of a satellite city to affect the general system depends on its population size and its connectivity to the main urban centre.

  14. Origin of giant viruses from smaller DNA viruses not from a fourth domain of cellular life

    PubMed Central

    Yutin, Natalya; Wolf, Yuri I.; Koonin, Eugene V.

    2015-01-01

    The numerous and diverse eukaryotic viruses with large double-stranded DNA genomes that at least partially reproduce in the cytoplasm of infected cells apparently evolved from a single virus ancestor. This major group of viruses is known as Nucleocytoplasmic Large DNA Viruses (NCLDV) or the proposed order Megavirales. Among the “Megavirales”, there are three groups of giant viruses with genomes exceeding 500 kb, namely Mimiviruses, Pithoviruses, and Pandoraviruses that hold the current record of viral genome size, about 2.5 Mb. Phylogenetic analysis of conserved, ancestral NLCDV genes clearly shows that these three groups of giant viruses have three distinct origins within the “Megavirales”. The Mimiviruses constitute a distinct family that is distantly related to Phycodnaviridae, Pandoraviruses originate from a common ancestor with Coccolithoviruses within the Phycodnaviridae family, and Pithoviruses are related to Iridoviridae and Marseilleviridae. Maximum likelihood reconstruction of gene gain and loss events during the evolution of the “Megavirales” indicates that each group of giant viruses evolved from viruses with substantially smaller and simpler gene repertoires. Initial phylogenetic analysis of universal genes, such as translation system components, encoded by some giant viruses, in particular Mimiviruses, has led to the hypothesis that giant viruses descend from a fourth, probably extinct domain of cellular life. The results of our comprehensive phylogenomic analysis of giant viruses refute the fourth domain hypothesis and instead indicate that the universal genes have been independently acquired by different giant viruses from their eukaryotic hosts. PMID:25042053

  15. Any effects of social orientation priming on object-location memory are smaller than initially reported.

    PubMed

    Drouin, Héloïse; Davidson, Patrick S R

    2015-12-01

    It has previously been reported that priming a collectivistic social orientation (compared with an individualistic one) boosts object-location memory (Kühnen & Oyserman, 2002; Oyserman, Sorensen, Reber, & Chen, 2009). We conducted 4 experiments to replicate this reported effect, using the same methods as in those initial reports. In Experiment 1 (n = 145), we found a hint of a priming effect on object-location memory, but also an unanticipated interaction between priming and gender. In Experiment 2 (n = 90), we included gender as a formal factor and doubled the "dosage" of the priming, yet did not see any priming effects on memory. In Experiment 3 (n = 101), we octupled the priming "dosage" and again saw no significant effects on memory. Finally, in Experiment 4 (n = 102), we performed an exact replication of the methods of the original reports and again found no priming effects on memory. Any effects of this type of social orientation priming on object-location memory appear to be smaller and/or less robust than initially thought.

  16. Origin of giant viruses from smaller DNA viruses not from a fourth domain of cellular life.

    PubMed

    Yutin, Natalya; Wolf, Yuri I; Koonin, Eugene V

    2014-10-01

    The numerous and diverse eukaryotic viruses with large double-stranded DNA genomes that at least partially reproduce in the cytoplasm of infected cells apparently evolved from a single virus ancestor. This major group of viruses is known as Nucleocytoplasmic Large DNA Viruses (NCLDV) or the proposed order Megavirales. Among the "Megavirales", there are three groups of giant viruses with genomes exceeding 500kb, namely Mimiviruses, Pithoviruses, and Pandoraviruses that hold the current record of viral genome size, about 2.5Mb. Phylogenetic analysis of conserved, ancestral NLCDV genes clearly shows that these three groups of giant viruses have three distinct origins within the "Megavirales". The Mimiviruses constitute a distinct family that is distantly related to Phycodnaviridae, Pandoraviruses originate from a common ancestor with Coccolithoviruses within the Phycodnaviridae family, and Pithoviruses are related to Iridoviridae and Marseilleviridae. Maximum likelihood reconstruction of gene gain and loss events during the evolution of the "Megavirales" indicates that each group of giant viruses evolved from viruses with substantially smaller and simpler gene repertoires. Initial phylogenetic analysis of universal genes, such as translation system components, encoded by some giant viruses, in particular Mimiviruses, has led to the hypothesis that giant viruses descend from a fourth, probably extinct domain of cellular life. The results of our comprehensive phylogenomic analysis of giant viruses refute the fourth domain hypothesis and instead indicate that the universal genes have been independently acquired by different giant viruses from their eukaryotic hosts.

  17. Kinetic Spectrophotometric Determination of Trace Cadmium in Environmental Fresh Water with 5,10,15,20-Tetraphenyl-21H,23H-porphinetetrasulfonic Acid.

    PubMed

    Sasaki, Yuya; Yamamoto, Natsuki; Suzuki, Yasutada; Ueta, Ikuo; Kawakubo, Susumu

    2015-01-01

    Cadmium-catalyzed complexation of zinc with 5,10,15,20-tetraphenyl-21H,23H-porphinetetrasulfonic acid (TPPS) was monitored spectrophotometrically. A kinetic parameter for the determination was obtained under kinetic consideration. Absorbance of zinc-TPPS at a fixed reaction time was proportional to the concentration of cadmium at pH 8 and 25°C. Tolerable concentration of interfering ions were 200, 200, 2000, 50, 500 and 1 μg L(-1) for Mg(II), Al(III), Ca(II), Fe(III), Zn(II) and Hg(II), respectively, in the determination of 20 μg L(-1) of cadmium, indicating Ca(II) and Mg(II) interferes with the analysis of natural fresh water. Such interference became tolerable at 5 mg L(-1) by the addition of an excess Ca(II) (50 mg L(-1)) in the reacting solution of sample and cadmium standards. A calibration curve of Cd(II) was linear up to 100 μg L(-1) with a detection limit of 2 μg L(-1). The reliability of the proposed method was confirmed by the recovery test of cadmium spiked into tap, river and reservoir water samples.

  18. Snake Cathelicidin NA-CATH and Smaller Helical Antimicrobial Peptides Are Effective against Burkholderia thailandensis

    PubMed Central

    Blower, Ryan J.; Barksdale, Stephanie M.; van Hoek, Monique L.

    2015-01-01

    Burkholderia thailandensis is a Gram-negative soil bacterium used as a model organism for B. pseudomallei, the causative agent of melioidosis and an organism classified category B priority pathogen and a Tier 1 select agent for its potential use as a biological weapon. Burkholderia species are reportedly “highly resistant” to antimicrobial agents, including cyclic peptide antibiotics, due to multiple resistance systems, a hypothesis we decided to test using antimicrobial (host defense) peptides. In this study, a number of cationic antimicrobial peptides (CAMPs) were tested in vitro against B. thailandensis for both antimicrobial activity and inhibition of biofilm formation. Here, we report that the Chinese cobra (Naja atra) cathelicidin NA-CATH was significantly antimicrobial against B. thailandensis. Additional cathelicidins, including the human cathelicidin LL-37, a sheep cathelicidin SMAP-29, and some smaller ATRA peptide derivatives of NA-CATH were also effective. The D-enantiomer of one small peptide (ATRA-1A) was found to be antimicrobial as well, with EC50 in the range of the L-enantiomer. Our results also demonstrate that human alpha-defensins (HNP-1 & -2) and a short beta-defensin-derived peptide (Peptide 4 of hBD-3) were not bactericidal against B. thailandensis. We also found that the cathelicidin peptides, including LL-37, NA-CATH, and SMAP-29, possessed significant ability to prevent biofilm formation of B. thailandensis. Additionally, we show that LL-37 and its D-enantiomer D-LL-37 can disperse pre-formed biofilms. These results demonstrate that although B. thailandensis is highly resistant to many antibiotics, cyclic peptide antibiotics such as polymyxin B, and defensing peptides, some antimicrobial peptides including the elapid snake cathelicidin NA-CATH exert significant antimicrobial and antibiofilm activity towards B. thailandensis. PMID:26196513

  19. THE MASS-RADIUS RELATION FOR 65 EXOPLANETS SMALLER THAN 4 EARTH RADII

    SciTech Connect

    Weiss, Lauren M.; Marcy, Geoffrey W.

    2014-03-01

    We study the masses and radii of 65 exoplanets smaller than 4 R {sub ⊕} with orbital periods shorter than 100 days. We calculate the weighted mean densities of planets in bins of 0.5 R {sub ⊕} and identify a density maximum of 7.6  g cm{sup –3} at 1.4 R {sub ⊕}. On average, planets with radii up to R {sub P} = 1.5 R {sub ⊕} increase in density with increasing radius. Above 1.5 R {sub ⊕}, the average planet density rapidly decreases with increasing radius, indicating that these planets have a large fraction of volatiles by volume overlying a rocky core. Including the solar system terrestrial planets with the exoplanets below 1.5 R {sub ⊕}, we find ρ{sub P} = 2.43 + 3.39(R {sub P}/R {sub ⊕}) g cm{sup –3} for R {sub P} < 1.5 R {sub ⊕}, which is consistent with rocky compositions. For 1.5 ≤ R {sub P}/R {sub ⊕} < 4, we find M {sub P}/M {sub ⊕} = 2.69(R {sub P}/R {sub ⊕}){sup 0.93}. The rms of planet masses to the fit between 1.5 and 4 R {sub ⊕} is 4.3 M {sub ⊕} with reduced χ{sup 2} = 6.2. The large scatter indicates a diversity in planet composition at a given radius. The compositional diversity can be due to planets of a given volume (as determined by their large H/He envelopes) containing rocky cores of different masses or compositions.

  20. In vivo and in vitro estrogenic profile of 17β-amino-1,3,5(10)estratrien-3-ol.

    PubMed

    Lemini, Cristina; Jaimez, Ruth; Pozas, Rocio; Franco, Yanira; Avila, María Estela; Figueroa, Alejandra; Medina, Martha; Lemus, Ana Elena; García-Becerra, Rocío; Ordaz-Rosado, David; Larrea, Fernando

    2015-03-01

    17β-amino-1,3,5(10)estratrien-3-ol (17βAE2), is the 17β-aminoestrogens prototype possessing anticoagulant activity, contrasting with the procoagulant effects of 17β-estradiol (17βE2). Its estrogenicity profile has not been reported, and it was evaluated by uterotrophic assay, estrogen receptor binding affinity and its ability to induce gene transcription of the human estrogen receptor (hER)α mediated in a Saccharomyces cerevisiae yeast expression system. Additionally, 17βAE2 and 17αAE2 were compared with 17βE2 in HeLa cells co-transfected with expression vectors for hERα or hERβ subtypes and for an estrogen-responsive reporter gene. Immature female CD1 mice and Wistar rats (21 days old) were treated for three days with 17βAE2 (10-5000 μg/kg), 17βE2 (0.001-1000 μg/kg) or vehicle (propylenglycol 10 ml/kg) and uterine weights were estimated. 17βAE2 increased uterine weight in a dose-dependent manner. The effective dose (ED)50 uterine weight values: 17βAE2=552 and 764 μg/kg (17βE2=4.8 and 16 μg/kg) and their relative uterotrophic potency were 0.86 and 2.1 (17βE2=100) in mice and rats, respectively. 17βAE2 competed with [(3)H]E2 for the estrogen receptor. The 17βAE2 relative binding affinities (RBAs) were: 0.074; Ki=2.2×10(-6)M (17βE2=100; Ki=1.6×10(-9)M); 0.029 and Ki=3.8×10(-6)M (17βE2=100; Ki=1.1×10(-9)M) for mice and rats uteri respectively. 17βAE2 activated hERα-mediated β-galactosidase transcription activity in the yeast system co-transfected with hERα gene. 17βAE2 effective concentration (EC)50=1.82 μM (17βE2=2.14 nM) with a relative potency of 0.12 (17βE2=100). These transactivation effects were abolished by the antagonist fulvestrant (ICI 182,780), similarly to 17βE2. 17βAE2 and 17αAE2 bind with low relative affinity to hERα and hERβ. Both induced hER-mediated reporter gene transactivation in a dose-response manner. The overall results provide evidence that 17βAE2 has a weak agonist estrogenic action greatly mediated

  1. The 600-Pound Gorilla: Why a Smaller Department of Defense Is in the Best Interest of the United States

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2012-03-15

    SUBTITLE The 600-Pound Gorilla : Why a Smaller Department of Defense is in the Best Interest of the United States 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER N/A 5b. GRANT...The 600-Pound Gorilla : \\Vhy a Smaller Department of Defense Is in the Best Interest of the United States SUBMITTED IN PARTIAL FULFILLMENT OF THE...Date: <:!..# G<o /g ii EXECUTIVE SUMMARY Title: The 600-Pound Gorilla : Why a Smaller Department of Defense is in the Best Interest of the

  2. Twentieth-century shifts in forest structure in California: Denser forests, smaller trees, and increased dominance of oaks

    PubMed Central

    McIntyre, Patrick J.; Thorne, James H.; Dolanc, Christopher R.; Flint, Alan L.; Flint, Lorraine E.; Kelly, Maggi; Ackerly, David D.

    2015-01-01

    We document changes in forest structure between historical (1930s) and contemporary (2000s) surveys of California vegetation through comparisons of tree abundance and size across the state and within several ecoregions. Across California, tree density in forested regions increased by 30% between the two time periods, whereas forest biomass in the same regions declined, as indicated by a 19% reduction in basal area. These changes reflect a demographic shift in forest structure: larger trees (>61 cm diameter at breast height) have declined, whereas smaller trees (<30 cm) have increased. Large tree declines were found in all surveyed regions of California, whereas small tree increases were found in every region except the south and central coast. Large tree declines were more severe in areas experiencing greater increases in climatic water deficit since the 1930s, based on a hydrologic model of water balance for historical climates through the 20th century. Forest composition in California in the last century has also shifted toward increased dominance by oaks relative to pines, a pattern consistent with warming and increased water stress, and also with paleohistoric shifts in vegetation in California over the last 150,000 y. PMID:25605888

  3. Twentieth-century shifts in forest structure in California: Denser forests, smaller trees, and increased dominance of oaks.

    PubMed

    McIntyre, Patrick J; Thorne, James H; Dolanc, Christopher R; Flint, Alan L; Flint, Lorraine E; Kelly, Maggi; Ackerly, David D

    2015-02-03

    We document changes in forest structure between historical (1930s) and contemporary (2000s) surveys of California vegetation through comparisons of tree abundance and size across the state and within several ecoregions. Across California, tree density in forested regions increased by 30% between the two time periods, whereas forest biomass in the same regions declined, as indicated by a 19% reduction in basal area. These changes reflect a demographic shift in forest structure: larger trees (>61 cm diameter at breast height) have declined, whereas smaller trees (<30 cm) have increased. Large tree declines were found in all surveyed regions of California, whereas small tree increases were found in every region except the south and central coast. Large tree declines were more severe in areas experiencing greater increases in climatic water deficit since the 1930s, based on a hydrologic model of water balance for historical climates through the 20th century. Forest composition in California in the last century has also shifted toward increased dominance by oaks relative to pines, a pattern consistent with warming and increased water stress, and also with paleohistoric shifts in vegetation in California over the last 150,000 y.

  4. Twentieth-century shifts in forest structure in California: Denser forests, smaller trees, and increased dominance of oaks

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    McIntyre, Patrick J.; Thorne, James H.; Dolanc, Christopher R.; Flint, Alan L.; Flint, Lorraine E.; Kelly, Maggi; Ackerly, David D.

    2015-01-01

    We document changes in forest structure between historical(1930s) and contemporary (2000s) surveys of California vegetation through comparisons of tree abundance and size across the state and within several ecoregions. Across California, tree density in forested regions increased by 30% between the two time periods, whereas forest biomass in the same regions declined, as indicated by a 19% reduction in basal area. These changes reflect a demographic shift in forest structure: larger trees (>61 cm diameter at breast height) have declined, whereas smaller trees ( < 30 cm) have increased. Large tree declines were found in all surveyed regions of California, whereas small tree increases were found in every region except the south and central coast. Large tree declines were more severe in areas experiencing greater increases in climaticwater deficit since the 1930s, based on a hydrologicmodel of water balance for historical climates through the 20th century. Forest composition in California in the last century has also shifted toward increased dominance by oaks relative to pines, a pattern consistent with warming and increased water stress, and also with paleohistoric shifts in vegetation in California over the last 150,000 y.

  5. Ultrafast relaxation dynamics of 5,10,15,20-meso-tetrakis pentafluorophenyl porphyrin studied by fluorescence up-conversion and transient absorption spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Kumar, P Hemant; Venkatesh, Yeduru; Siva, Doddi; Ramakrishna, B; Bangal, Prakriti Ranjan

    2015-02-26

    The ultrafast photophysical characterization of 5,10,15,20-meso-tetrakis pentafluorophenyl porphyrin (H2F20TPP) in 4:1 dichloromethane (DCM) and tetrahydrofuran (THF) solution has been done in the femtosecond-picosecond time domain, by combining fluorescence up-conversion and femtosecond transient absorption spectroscopy. Fluorescence up-conversion studies on H2F20TPP were done demonstrating fluorescence dynamics over the whole spectral range from 440 to 650 nm when excited at 405 nm, 360.5 cm(-1) excess vibrational energy of Soret band (411 nm). Single-exponential decay with ∼160 ± 50 fs lifetime of Soret fluorescence (also called S2 fluorescence or B band fluorescence) at around 440 nm was observed. On going from 440 nm, S2 fluorescence to S1 fluorescence, (Q-band) around 640 nm (wavelength of 0-0 transition in the stationary spectrum), single-exponential fluorescence time profile turns into a multiexponential time profile and it could be resolved critically into five-exponential components. An ultrafast rise component with ∼160 ± 50 fs followed by two decay components: a very fast decay component with 200 ± 50 fs time constant and another relatively slower 1.8 ± 0.5 ps decay component. Next, a very prominent rise component with 105 ± 30 ps lifetime followed by long-lived 10 ns decay component. The initial rise of S1 (Q-band) fluorescence around 640 nm agreed with the decay time of S2 (Soret or B band) fluorescence indicates that internal conversion (IC) from relaxed S2 to vibrationally excited S1 occurs in the ∼160 fs time scale and subsequent very fast decay with 200 fs time constant, which is assigned to be intramolecular vibrational dephasing or redistribution. The 1.8 ps decay component of S1 fluorescence is attributed to be "hot" fluorescence from vibrationally excited S1 state, and it reveals the vibrational relaxation time induced by elastic or quasi-elastic collision with solvent molecules. The 105 ps rise component is the creation time of the

  6. Comparison of retrograde intrarenal surgery and mini-percutaneous nephrolithotomy in management of lower-pole renal stones with a diameter of smaller than 15 mm.

    PubMed

    Kirac, Mustafa; Bozkurt, Ömer Faruk; Tunc, Lutfi; Guneri, Cagri; Unsal, Ali; Biri, Hasan

    2013-06-01

    The aim of this study was to compare the outcomes of retrograde intrarenal surgery (RIRS) and miniaturized percutaneous nephrolithotomy (mini-PNL) in management of lower-pole renal stones with a diameter smaller than 15 mm. Between December 2009 and July 2012, the patients with the diagnosis of lower-pole stones were evaluated by ultrasonography, intravenous pyelography and computed tomography. The records of 73 evaluable patients who underwent mini-PNL (n = 37) or RIRS (n = 36) for lower-pole (LP) stones with diameter smaller than 15 mm were reviewed retrospectively. Of the 73 patients, 37 underwent mini-PNL and 36 underwent RIRS. The stone-free rates were 89.1 and 88.8 % for mini-PNL and RIRS groups, respectively. The mean operation time was 53.7 ± 14.5 in the mini-PNL group but 66.4 ± 15.8 in the RIRS group (P = 0.01). The mean fluoroscopy times and hospitalization times were significantly higher in the mini-PNL group. There was no major complication in any patient. RIRS and mini-PNL are safe and effective methods for treatment of LP calculi with a diameter smaller than 15 mm. RIRS is a non-invasive and feasible treatment option, and has also short hospitalization time, low morbidity and complication rate. It may be an alternative of mini-PNL in the treatment LP calculi with smaller than 15 mm.

  7. Little Fish in a Big Pond: Towards Research Performance Metrics for Smaller Institutions

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kitt, Sharon; Wearne, Jonathan

    2013-01-01

    Each year, institutions eagerly await reports from "Shanghai Jiao Tong University," "Times Higher," "QS," and other organisations that create and publish international rankings of university performance. The metrics included in league tables and rankings--research income, research staff, number of doctoral candidates,…

  8. More Use Almost Always Means a Smaller Frequency Effect: Aging, Bilingualism, and the Weaker Links Hypothesis

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gollan, Tamar H.; Montoya, Rosa I.; Cera, Cynthia; Sandoval, Tiffany C.

    2008-01-01

    The "weaker links" hypothesis proposes that bilinguals are disadvantaged relative to monolinguals on speaking tasks because they divide frequency-of-use between two languages. To test this proposal, we contrasted the effects of increased word use associated with monolingualism, language dominance, and increased age on picture naming times. In two…

  9. Synthesis and properties of 5,10,15,20-tetrakis[4-(3-N,N-dimethylaminopropoxy)phenyl] chlorin as potential broad-spectrum antimicrobial photosensitizers.

    PubMed

    Ferreyra, Darío D; Reynoso, Eugenia; Cordero, Paula; Spesia, Mariana B; Alvarez, M Gabriela; Milanesio, M Elisa; Durantini, Edgardo N

    2016-05-01

    A novel 5,10,15,20-tetrakis[4-(3-N,N-dimethylaminopropoxy)phenyl]chlorin (TAPC) was synthesized by reduction of the corresponding porphyrin TAPP with p-toluenesulfonhydrazide, followed by selective oxidation with o-chloranil. Spectroscopic properties and the photodynamic activity of these photosensitizers were compared in N,N-dimethylformamide. An increase in the absorption band at 650nm was found for the chlorin derivative with respect to TAPP. These photosensitizers emit red fluorescence with quantum yields of 0.15. Both compounds were able to photosensitize singlet molecular oxygen with quantum yields of about 0.5. Also, the formation of superoxide anion radical was detected in the presence of TAPC or TAPP and NADH. Photodynamic inactivation was investigated on a Gram-positive bacterium Staphylococcus aureus, a Gram-negative bacterium Escherichia coli and a fungal yeast Candida albicans cells. In vitro experiments showed that TAPC or TAPP were rapidly bound to microbial cells at short incubation periods. These photosensitizers, without intrinsic positive charges, contain four basic amino groups. These substituents can be protonated at physiological pH, increasing the interaction with the cell envelopment. Photosensitized inactivation improved with an increase of both photosensitizer concentrations and irradiation times. After 15min irradiation, a 7 log reduction of S. aureus was found for treated with 1μM photosensitizer. Similar result was obtained with E. coli after using 5μM photosensitizer and 30min irradiation. Also, the last conditions produced a decrease of 5 log in C. albicans cells. Therefore, TAPC was highly effective as a broad-spectrum antimicrobial photosensitizer.

  10. HOTTER, SMALLER, DENSER, FASTER...AND NEARLY-PERFECT: WHAT IS THE MATTER AT RHIC?

    SciTech Connect

    STEINBERG,P.

    2006-07-03

    The experimental and theoretical status of the ''near perfect fluid'' at RHIC is discussed. While the hydrodynamic paradigm for understanding collisions at RHIC is well established, there remain many important open questions to address in order to understand its relevance and scope. It is also a crucial issue to understand how the early equilibration is achieved, requiring insight into the active degrees of freedom at early times.

  11. Choosing the Larger versus Choosing the Smaller: Asymmetries in the Size Congruity Effect

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Arend, Isabel; Henik, Avishai

    2015-01-01

    The size congruity effect (SiCE) shows that number and physical size interact as magnitudes. That is, response times are faster when number and size are congruent (e.g., 2 4) than when they are incongruent (e.g., 2 4). A shared representational system has been the most influential account for the SiCE. Recently, this account has been challenged by…

  12. How do you design randomised trials for smaller populations? A framework.

    PubMed

    Parmar, Mahesh K B; Sydes, Matthew R; Morris, Tim P

    2016-11-25

    How should we approach trial design when we can get some, but not all, of the way to the numbers required for a randomised phase III trial?We present an ordered framework for designing randomised trials to address the problem when the ideal sample size is considered larger than the number of participants that can be recruited in a reasonable time frame. Staying with the frequentist approach that is well accepted and understood in large trials, we propose a framework that includes small alterations to the design parameters. These aim to increase the numbers achievable and also potentially reduce the sample size target. The first step should always be to attempt to extend collaborations, consider broadening eligibility criteria and increase the accrual time or follow-up time. The second set of ordered considerations are the choice of research arm, outcome measures, power and target effect. If the revised design is still not feasible, in the third step we propose moving from two- to one-sided significance tests, changing the type I error rate, using covariate information at the design stage, re-randomising patients and borrowing external information.We discuss the benefits of some of these possible changes and warn against others. We illustrate, with a worked example based on the Euramos-1 trial, the application of this framework in designing a trial that is feasible, while still providing a good evidence base to evaluate a research treatment.This framework would allow appropriate evaluation of treatments when large-scale phase III trials are not possible, but where the need for high-quality randomised data is as pressing as it is for common diseases.

  13. Effects of dietary glycerin inclusion at 0, 5, 10, and 15% of dry matter on energy metabolism and nutrient balance in finishing beef steers

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Expansion of the biodiesel industry has increased the glycerin (GLY) supply. Glycerin is an energy-dense feed that can be used in ruminant species; however, the energy value of GLY is not known. Therefore, the effects of GLY inclusion at 0%, 5%, 10%, and 15% in dry-rolled corn (DRC)-based diets we...

  14. Effects of dietary glycerin inclusion at 0, 5, 10, and 15 percent of dry matter on energy metabolism and nutrient balance in finishing beef steers

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Expansion of the biodiesel industry has increased the glycerin (GLY) supply. Glycerin is an energy-dense feed that can be used in ruminant species; however, the energy value of GLY is not known. Therefore, the effects of GLY inclusion at 0%, 5%, 10%, and 15% on energy balance in finishing cattle d...

  15. 21 CFR 73.3120 - 16,17-Dimethoxydinaphtho [1,2,3-cd:3′,2′,1′-lm] perylene-5,10-dione.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 1 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false 16,17-Dimethoxydinaphtho perylene-5,10-dione. 73.3120 Section 73.3120 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN... to exceed the minimum reasonably required to accomplish the intended coloring effect....

  16. 21 CFR 73.3120 - 16,17-Dimethoxydinaphtho [1,2,3-cd:3′,2′,1′-lm] perylene-5,10-dione.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 1 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false 16,17-Dimethoxydinaphtho perylene-5,10-dione. 73.3120 Section 73.3120 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN... to exceed the minimum reasonably required to accomplish the intended coloring effect....

  17. Smaller to larger biomolecule detection using a lab-built surface plasmon resonance based instrument

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lukose, J.; Kulal, V.; Chidangil, S.; Sinha, R. K.

    2016-10-01

    We have developed a low-cost surface plasmon resonance (SPR) instrument based on the Kretschmann configuration for biosensing applications. The fabricated instrument is capable of operating in both angular and intensity interrogation schemes. The proposed sensor has proved enormously versatile by detecting a range of analytes with low to high molecular weights. The refractive index based sensor has been used for detecting the variation in the concentration of the aqueous solution of glucose and glycerine. Real time immobilization of protein molecules, bovine serum albumin on a gold (Au) film surface, has also been detected using the SPR imaging technique. Alkanethiol functionalization of the Au surface was performed, and bovine serum albumin was immobilized onto the carboxyl functionalized surface using amine reactive cross linker chemistry. In future, the present approach can also be utilized for the selective detection of a wide range of target biomolecules with the help of specific capture probes, as well as for monitoring protein-drug interactions.

  18. On-chip polarimetry for high-throughput screening of nanoliter and smaller sample volumes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bornhop, Darryl J. (Inventor); Dotson, Stephen (Inventor); Bachmann, Brian O. (Inventor)

    2012-01-01

    A polarimetry technique for measuring optical activity that is particularly suited for high throughput screening employs a chip or substrate (22) having one or more microfluidic channels (26) formed therein. A polarized laser beam (14) is directed onto optically active samples that are disposed in the channels. The incident laser beam interacts with the optically active molecules in the sample, which slightly alter the polarization of the laser beam as it passes multiple times through the sample. Interference fringe patterns (28) are generated by the interaction of the laser beam with the sample and the channel walls. A photodetector (34) is positioned to receive the interference fringe patterns and generate an output signal that is input to a computer or other analyzer (38) for analyzing the signal and determining the rotation of plane polarized light by optically active material in the channel from polarization rotation calculations.

  19. Synthesis and Characterization of L-Lysine Conjugated Silver Nanoparticles Smaller Than 10 nM

    PubMed Central

    Bonor, Jeremy; Reddy, Vandhana; Akkiraju, Hemanth; Dhurjati, Prasad; Nohe, Anja

    2015-01-01

    A rapid and convenient batch method for synthesizing lysine-conjugated silver nanoparticles of approximately 5 nm of size was developed. Nanoparticles of size less than 100 nm exhibit significant medical potential. L-Lysine demonstrates potential for therapeutic applications and silver nanoparticles are an optimal choice for drug delivery because of its intrinsic anti-platelet, anti-bacterial and anti-inflammatory capabilities. Current synthesis protocols for Lysine-capped particles under 10 nm are time consuming and tedious and allow only for the sythesis of small quantities of particles. The synthesis of Lysin-capped silver nanoparticles was based on the reaction in which AgNO3 was reduced by excess NaBH4. L-Lysine, a known essential amino acid, served as the capping agent to minimize initial aggregation. The particles were then separated by size chromatography. Capping occurred through the amide bond on L-Lysine as determined by FT-IR. The conjugation of the particle to the amide bond is important, since this leaves the amino group of Lysine open to further modifications. The particles were further characterized in regards to their shape, size and stability. Finally we demonstrated that the synthesized particles exhibit limited to no toxicity in cells, using HEK 293 cell line as a model system. Our sythesis protocol can be successfully used for scale-up and synthesis of high quantities of nanoparticles. PMID:26478827

  20. Distributions of p-values smaller than .05 in psychology: what is going on?

    PubMed Central

    van Aert, Robbie C.M.; Nuijten, Michèle B.; Wicherts, Jelte M.; van Assen, Marcel A.L.M.

    2016-01-01

    Previous studies provided mixed findings on pecularities in p-value distributions in psychology. This paper examined 258,050 test results across 30,710 articles from eight high impact journals to investigate the existence of a peculiar prevalence of p-values just below .05 (i.e., a bump) in the psychological literature, and a potential increase thereof over time. We indeed found evidence for a bump just below .05 in the distribution of exactly reported p-values in the journals Developmental Psychology, Journal of Applied Psychology, and Journal of Personality and Social Psychology, but the bump did not increase over the years and disappeared when using recalculated p-values. We found clear and direct evidence for the QRP “incorrect rounding of p-value” (John, Loewenstein & Prelec, 2012) in all psychology journals. Finally, we also investigated monotonic excess of p-values, an effect of certain QRPs that has been neglected in previous research, and developed two measures to detect this by modeling the distributions of statistically significant p-values. Using simulations and applying the two measures to the retrieved test results, we argue that, although one of the measures suggests the use of QRPs in psychology, it is difficult to draw general conclusions concerning QRPs based on modeling of p-value distributions. PMID:27077017

  1. Is 26 + 26 smaller than 24 + 28? Estimating the approximate magnitude of repeated versus different numbers.

    PubMed

    Charras, Pom; Brod, Garvin; Lupiáñez, Juan

    2012-01-01

    It has recently been suggested that regardless of the dimension at hand (i.e., numerosity, length, time), similar operational mechanisms are involved in the comparison process based on approximate magnitude representation. One piece of evidence for this hypothesis lies in the presence of similar behavioral effects for any comparison (i.e., the distance effect). In the case of length comparison, the comparison process can be biased by summation toward either an underestimation or an overestimation: The sum of equal-size stimuli is underestimated, whereas the sum of different-size stimuli is overestimated. Relying on the hypothesis that similar operational mechanisms underlie the comparison process of any magnitude, we aim at extending these findings to another magnitude dimension. A number comparison task with digit numbers was used in the two experiments reported presently. The objective was to investigate whether summation also biases magnitude representation of numerical and symbolic information. The results provided evidence that the summation bias can also apply to numerical magnitude comparison, since the sum of repeated numbers (26 + 26) was underestimated whereas the sum of different numbers (24 + 28) was overestimated. We propose that these effects could be accounted for by a heuristic linking cognitive effort and magnitude estimation.

  2. How well can regional fluxes be derived from smaller-scale estimates?

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Moore, Kathleen E.; Fitzjarrald, David R.; Ritter, John A.

    1992-01-01

    Regional surface fluxes are essential lower boundary conditions for large scale numerical weather and climate models and are the elements of global budgets of important trace gases. Surface properties affecting the exchange of heat, moisture, momentum and trace gases vary with length scales from one meter to hundreds of km. A classical difficulty is that fluxes have been measured directly only at points or along lines. The process of scaling up observations limited in space and/or time to represent larger areas was done by assigning properties to surface classes and combining estimated or calculated fluxes using an area weighted average. It is not clear that a simple area weighted average is sufficient to produce the large scale from the small scale, chiefly due to the effect of internal boundary layers, nor is it known how important the uncertainty is to large scale model outcomes. Simultaneous aircraft and tower data obtained in the relatively simple terrain of the western Alaska tundra were used to determine the extent to which surface type variation can be related to fluxes of heat, moisture, and other properties. Surface type was classified as lake or land with aircraft borne infrared thermometer, and flight level heat and moisture fluxes were related to surface type. The magnitude and variety of sampling errors inherent in eddy correlation flux estimation place limits on how well any flux can be known even in simple geometries.

  3. Smaller than expected cognitive deficits in schizophrenia patients from the population-representative ABC catchment cohort.

    PubMed

    Lennertz, Leonhard; An der Heiden, Wolfram; Kronacher, Regina; Schulze-Rauschenbach, Svenja; Maier, Wolfgang; Häfner, Heinz; Wagner, Michael

    2016-08-01

    Most neuropsychological studies on schizophrenia suffer from sample selection bias, with male and chronic patients being overrepresented. This probably leads to an overestimation of cognitive impairments. The present study aimed to provide a less biased estimate of cognitive functions in schizophrenia using a population-representative catchment area sample. Schizophrenia patients (N = 89) from the prospective Mannheim ABC cohort were assessed 14 years after disease onset and first diagnosis, using a comprehensive neuropsychological test battery. A healthy control group (N = 90) was carefully matched according to age, gender, and geographic region (city, rural surrounds). The present sample was representative for the initial ABC cohort. In the comprehensive neuropsychological assessment, the schizophrenia patients were only moderately impaired as compared to the healthy control group (d = 0.56 for a general cognitive index, d = 0.42 for verbal memory, d = 0.61 for executive functions, d = 0.69 for attention). Only 33 % of the schizophrenia patients scored one standard deviation unit below the healthy control group in the general cognitive index. Neuropsychological performance did not correlate with measures of the clinical course including age at onset, number of hospital admissions, and time in paid work. Thus, in this population-representative sample of schizophrenia patients, neuropsychological deficits were less pronounced than expected from meta-analyses. In agreement with other epidemiological studies, this suggests a less devastating picture of cognition in schizophrenia.

  4. Velocities of Thwaites Glacier and smaller glaciers along the Marie Byrd Land coast, West Antarctica

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Rosanova, C.E.; Lucchitta, B.K.; Ferrigno, J.G.

    1998-01-01

    Average velocities for time intervals ranging from <1 to 15 years were measured by tracking ice-surface patterns on sequential Landsat and European Remote-sensing Satellite synthetic aperture radar images. Velocities of Thwaites Glacier range from 2.2 km a-1 above the grounding line to 3.4 km a-1 at the limit of measurements on Thwaites Glacier ice tongue. The glacier increases in velocity by about 1 km a-1 where it crosses the grounding line. Over the period 1984-93, Thwaites Glacier ice tongue accelerated by about 0.6 km a-1. Velocities of the floating part of several minor glaciers and some ice shelves are also determined: Land Glacier, 1.7-1.9 km a-1; DeVicq Glacier, 0.7-1.1 km a-1; Dotson Ice Shelf, 0.2-0.5 km a-1; Getz Ice Shelf, 0.2-0.8 km a-1; and Sulzberger Ice Shelf, 0.01-0.02 km a-1. The high velocities along the Marie Byrd Land coast are consistent with the high precipitation rates over West Antarctica and, for some of the glaciers, the lack of buttressing ice shelves.

  5. Synthesis and biological evaluation of some 10-substituted 2,3-dihydroimidazo[2,1-b]quinazolin-5(10H)-ones, a new class of bronchodilators.

    PubMed

    Hardtmann, G E; Koletar, G; Pfister, O R; Gogerty, J H; Iorio, L C

    1975-05-01

    On treatment of N-substituted isatoic anhydrides with 2-methylmercaptoimidazolines, 10-substituted imidazo[2,1-b]quinazolin-5(10H)-ones are obtained. Several members of this class exhibited pronounced broncholytic activity. The structure-activity relationships (based on results obtained in the guinea pig histamine aerosol test) of these nonsympathomimetic bronchodilators are discussed. In addition, the detailed pharmacological evaluation of two analogs found to be five to ten times more active than theophyline as bronchodilators without having central nervous system or cardiovascular side effects is described.

  6. Race Disparities and Decreasing Birth Weight: Are All Babies Getting Smaller?

    PubMed

    Catov, Janet M; Lee, MinJae; Roberts, James M; Xu, Jia; Simhan, Hyagriv N

    2016-01-01

    The mean infant birth weight in the United States increased for decades, but it might now be decreasing. Given race disparities in fetal growth, we explored race-specific trends in birth weight at Magee-Womens Hospital, Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania, from 1997 to 2011. Among singleton births delivered at 37-41 weeks (n = 70,607), we evaluated the proportions who were small for gestational age and large for gestational age and changes in mean birth weights over time. Results were stratified by maternal race/ethnicity. Since 1997, the number of infants born small for their gestational ages increased (8.7%-9.9%), whereas the number born large for their gestational ages decreased (8.9%-7.7%). After adjustment for gestational week at birth, maternal characteristics, and pregnancy conditions, birth weight decreased by 2.20 g per year (P < 0.0001). Decreases were greater for spontaneous births. Reductions were significantly greater in infants born to African-American women than in those born to white women (-3.78 vs. -1.88 per year; P for interaction = 0.010). Quantile regression models indicated that birth weight decreased across the entire distribution, but reductions among infants born to African-American women were limited to those in the upper quartile after accounting for maternal factors. Limiting the analysis to low-risk women eliminated birth weight reductions. Birth weight has decreased in recent years, and reductions were greater in infants born to African-American women. These trends might be explained by accumulation of risk factors such as hypertension and prepregnancy obesity that disproportionately affect African-American women. Our results raise the possibility of worsening race disparities in fetal growth.

  7. Interpretation of Continental Scale Gravity Signatures from GOCE at Smaller Scale Mineral Hosting outcrops

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Braitenberg, C. F.

    2014-12-01

    The GOCE gravity field is globally homogeneous at the resolution of about 50km or better allowing for the first time to analyze tectonic structures on the continental scale. Geologic correlation studies propose to continue the tectonic lineaments across continents to the pre-breakup position. Tectonic events that induce density changes, as metamorphic events and magmatic events, should then show up in the gravity field. Applying geodynamic plate reconstructions to the GOCE gravity field places today's observed field at the pre-breakup position (Braitenberg, 2014). The same reconstruction can be applied to the seismic velocity models, to allow a joint gravity-velocity analysis. The geophysical fields bear information to control the likeliness of the hypothesized continuation of lineations. Total absence of a signal, makes the cross-continental continuation of the lineament unprobable, as continental-wide lineaments are controlled by rheologic and compositional differences of crust and upper mantle. Special attention is given to Greenstone belts, which are associated to a class of important mineralizations. The outcrops are limited in extent, but are associated with a much broader gravity signature, which cannot be explained by the outcropping masses alone. The gravity requires a mass source residing at lower crustal level, giving evidence of the mantle-crust melting processes influencing the tectonic characteristic at surface. The study is carried out over the African and South American continents. Reference Braitenberg C. (2014). Exploration of tectonic structures with GOCE in Africa and across-continents. International Journal of Applied Earth Observation and Geoinformation, doi:10.1016/j.jag.2014.013

  8. Smaller, Scale-Free Gene Networks Increase Quantitative Trait Heritability and Result in Faster Population Recovery

    PubMed Central

    Malcom, Jacob W.

    2011-01-01

    One of the goals of biology is to bridge levels of organization. Recent technological advances are enabling us to span from genetic sequence to traits, and then from traits to ecological dynamics. The quantitative genetics parameter heritability describes how quickly a trait can evolve, and in turn describes how quickly a population can recover from an environmental change. Here I propose that we can link the details of the genetic architecture of a quantitative trait—i.e., the number of underlying genes and their relationships in a network—to population recovery rates by way of heritability. I test this hypothesis using a set of agent-based models in which individuals possess one of two network topologies or a linear genotype-phenotype map, 16–256 genes underlying the trait, and a variety of mutation and recombination rates and degrees of environmental change. I find that the network architectures introduce extensive directional epistasis that systematically hides and reveals additive genetic variance and affects heritability: network size, topology, and recombination explain 81% of the variance in average heritability in a stable environment. Network size and topology, the width of the fitness function, pre-change additive variance, and certain interactions account for ∼75% of the variance in population recovery times after a sudden environmental change. These results suggest that not only the amount of additive variance, but importantly the number of loci across which it is distributed, is important in regulating the rate at which a trait can evolve and populations can recover. Taken in conjunction with previous research focused on differences in degree of network connectivity, these results provide a set of theoretical expectations and testable hypotheses for biologists working to span levels of organization from the genotype to the phenotype, and from the phenotype to the environment. PMID:21347400

  9. Synthesis and unusual properties of the first 2,3,7,8,12,13,17,18-octabromo-5,10,15,20-tetraalkylporphyrin

    SciTech Connect

    NELSON,NORA Y.; MEDFORTH,CRAIG J.; NURCO,DANIEL J.; JIA,SONG-LING; SHELNUTT,JOHN A.; SMITH,KEVIN M.

    2000-03-06

    The new perhalogenated porphyrin 2,3,7,8,12,13,17,18-octabromo-5,10,15,20-tetrakis(trifluoromethyl)porphinato-nickel(II) exhibits several striking features, including an extremely ruffled macrocycle with a very short Ni-N distance, an unusually red-shifted optical spectrum, and, surprisingly, hindered rotation of the meso-trifluoromethyl substituents ({Delta}G{sub 278}{sup +} = 47 kJ/mol).

  10. Ultrasound-assisted one-pot, three-component synthesis of 1H-pyrazolo[1,2-b]phthalazine-5,10-diones.

    PubMed

    Nabid, Mohammad Reza; Rezaei, Seyed Jamal Tabatabaei; Ghahremanzadeh, Ramin; Bazgir, Ayoob

    2010-01-01

    Triethylamine was found to be an efficient catalyst for the synthesis of 1H-pyrazolo[1,2-b]phthalazine-5,10-diones by one-pot reaction of phthalhydrazide, aromatic aldehydes, and malononitrile or ethyl cyanoacetate in ethanol under ultrasonic irradiation. The advantages of this method are the use of an inexpensive and readily available catalyst, easy workup, improved yields, and the use of ethanol as a solvent that is considered to be relatively environmentally benign.

  11. Examining Behavioral, Relational, and Cognitive Engagement in Smaller Learning Communities: A Case Study of Reform in One Suburban District

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Davis, Heather A.; Chang, Mei-Lin; Andrzejewski, Carey E.; Poirier, Ryan R.

    2010-01-01

    The purpose of this project was to examine the impact of Smaller Learning Community reform on students' behavioral, relational, and cognitive engagement in a suburban school district experiencing urbanization. We describe a project in which we evaluated the engagement of a cohort of 8th grade students as they transitioned to high school (n = 605).…

  12. Examining the Rule of Thumb of Not Using Multilevel Modeling: The "Design Effect Smaller than Two" Rule

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lai, Mark H. C.; Kwok, Oi-man

    2015-01-01

    Educational researchers commonly use the rule of thumb of "design effect smaller than 2" as the justification of not accounting for the multilevel or clustered structure in their data. The rule, however, has not yet been systematically studied in previous research. In the present study, we generated data from three different models…

  13. An Investigation Examining the Perceived Implications of Principal Leadership Changing a Large Comprehensive High School into Smaller Learning Communities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Miller, Raymond J.

    2012-01-01

    The purpose of this qualitative case study was to examine the perceived implications that principal leadership has on transforming a large comprehensive high school into smaller learning communities (SLCs); and to speculate on possible factors that contribute to the change process after the implementation of SLCs. The study explores the roles,…

  14. What Students Need, What Students Say They Want: Student Perspectives on the Promise of Smaller Learning Communities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Armstead, Cathleen L.; Bessell, Ann G.; Sembiante, Sabrina; Plaza, Miriam Pacheco

    2010-01-01

    Despite the wealth of studies on smaller learning communities (SLCs), student voices are missing from the debate on high school reform. This article examines how students experience SLCs. A participatory research method, data-in-a-day was used to provide a systematic and inclusive method for gathering data on student perceptions. Data-in-a-day is…

  15. Novel Phenazine 5,10-Dioxides Release •OH in Simulated Hypoxia and Induce Reduction of Tumour Volume In Vivo

    PubMed Central

    Lavaggi, María L.; Cabrera, Mauricio; Pintos, Cristina; Arredondo, Carolina; Pachón, Gisela; Rodríguez, Jorge; Raymondo, Stella; Pacheco, José Pedro; Cascante, Marta; Olea-Azar, Claudio; López de Ceráin, Adela; Monge, Antonio; Cerecetto, Hugo; González, Mercedes

    2011-01-01

    Phenazine 5,10-dioxides (PDOs) are a new class of bioreductive cytotoxins, which could act towards tumours containing hypoxic regions. The PDOs selective-hypoxic bioreduction was probed in vitro; however, the mechanism of action has not been completely explained. Besides, PDOs in vivo antitumour activities have not been demonstrated hitherto. We study the mechanism of hypoxic/normoxic cytotoxicity of PDO representative members. Electron spin resonance is used to confirm •OH production, alkaline comet assay to determine genotoxicity, and gel electrophoresis and flow cytometry to analyze DNA fragmentation and cell cycle distribution. Chemically induced rat breast tumours are employed to evaluate in vivo activities. For the most selective cytotoxin, 7(8)-bromo-2-hydroxyphenazine 5,10-dioxide (PDO1), exclusive hypoxic •OH production is evidenced, while for the unselective ones, •OH is produced in both conditions (normoxia and simulated hypoxia). In normoxia (Caco-2 cells), PDO1 induces cell-cycle arrest and DNA fragmentation but does not significantly induce apoptosis neither at IC50 nor IC80. No difference in the comet-assay scores are observed in normoxia and simulated hypoxia being the unselective 2-amino-7(8)-bromophenazine 5,10-dioxide (PDO2) the most genotoxic. The in vivo efficacy with the absence of systemic toxicity of PDO1 and PDO2 is checked out. Results from this study highlight the potential of PDOs as new therapeutics for cancer. PMID:22084710

  16. Weekly cycle of magnetic characteristics of the daily PM2.5 and PM2.5-10 in Beijing, China

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shi, Meinan; Wu, Huaichun; Zhang, Shihong; Li, Haiyan; Yang, Tianshui; Liu, Wei; Liu, He

    2014-12-01

    In recent years, Beijing has been shown to suffer one of the most serious air pollution problems of any major world city. The concentrations of particulate matter (PM) pollutants, PM2.5-10 and PM2.5, are commonly used as air pollution indexes. We conducted a detailed environmental magnetism study to investigate possible sources of air pollution in Beijing, China, using 283 pairs of the PM2.5 and PM2.5-10 samples collected daily from July 2010 to June 2011. Rock magnetic measurements, including magnetic susceptibility, anhysteretic remanent magnetization, isothermal remanent magnetization, saturation isothermal remanent magnetization, hysteresis loops, first-order reversal curves (FORCs), and thermomagnetism, indicate that the main magnetic mineral is low-coercivity pseudo-single domain (PSD) magnetite. Scanning electron microscope (SEM) observations and energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (EDS) analyses on the PM indicate that the major magnetic phase is coarse-grained magnetite, which is most likely from automobile exhausts and braking system debris. Magnetic parameters of PM2.5 and PM2.5-10 show significant seasonal patterns that may be attributed to domestic heating enhancing magnetization of the PM during late autumn to early spring. Power spectral analyses and box-whisker plots indicate that the magnetic parameters have strong weekly variations that may be due to traffic emissions. These results indicate that magnetic parameters can be used as efficient proxies for monitoring Beijing's air pollution, and that the atmospheric environment may be improved by controlling vehicle emissions.

  17. Detection of gamma-ray emission in the region of the supernova remnants G296.5+10.0 and G166.0+4.3

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Araya, Miguel

    2013-09-01

    52 months of accumulated observations by the Large Area Telescope onboard the Fermi Gamma-ray Space Telescope in the region of the supernova remnants G296.5+10.0 (PKS 1209-51/52) and G166.0+4.3 (VRO 42.05.01) are analysed. GeV emission is detected coincident with the position of the sources at the ≃5σ and 11σ levels above the background, respectively, for the best-fitting spectral and spatial scenarios. The gamma-ray spectrum of the sources can be described with a power law in energy. G166.0+4.3 shows a soft GeV spectrum while that of G296.5+10.0 is flat (in the νFν representation). The origin of the gamma-ray emission from the sources is explored. Both leptonic and hadronic mechanisms can account for the high-energy emission from G296.5+10.0, while a leptonic scenario is preferred for G166.0+4.3.

  18. Healthy Homes/Healthy Kids: A Randomized Trial of a Pediatric Primary Care Based Obesity Prevention Intervention for At-Risk 5-10 Year Olds

    PubMed Central

    Sherwood, Nancy E.; Levy, Rona L.; Langer, Shelby L.; Senso, Meghan M.; Crain, A. Lauren; Hayes, Marcia G.; Anderson, Julie D.; Seburg, Elisabeth M.; Jeffery, Robert W.

    2014-01-01

    Pediatric primary care is an important setting in which to address obesity prevention, yet relatively few interventions have been evaluated and even fewer have been shown to be effective. The development and evaluation of cost-effective approaches to obesity prevention that leverage opportunities of direct access to families in the pediatric primary care setting, overcome barriers to implementation in busy practice settings, and facilitate sustained involvement of parents is an important public health priority. The goal of the Healthy Homes/Healthy Kids (HHHK 5-10) randomized controlled trial is to evaluate the efficacy of a relatively low-cost primary care-based obesity prevention intervention aimed at 5 to 10 year old children who are at risk for obesity. Four hundred twenty one parent/child dyads were recruited and randomized to either the obesity prevention arm or a contact control condition that focuses on safety and injury prevention. The HHHK 5-10 obesity prevention intervention combines brief counseling with a pediatric primary care provider during routine well-child visits and follow-up telephone coaching that supports parents in making home environmental changes to support healthful eating, activity patterns, and body weight. The contact control condition combines the same provider counseling with telephone coaching focused on safety and injury prevention messages. This manuscript describes the study design and baseline characteristics of participants enrolled in the HHHK 5-10 trial. PMID:23816490

  19. a Smaller Scale

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Takemae, Seiji; Kirwin, Peter; McIntosh, Gordon

    2013-01-01

    In this paper, we describe a lab activity for measuring a spherical balloon's circumference. The procedure we discuss is based on the method used by Eratosthenes to measure the Earth's circumference.

  20. Making Microbiology Even Smaller!

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Young, Linda Mull; Motz, Vicki Abrams

    2013-01-01

    We outline protocols for producing slant-minis (SLINIs) and mini-deeps (MEEPs) and examples of their use in simple microbiology experiments suitable for high school students. The principal benefits of these protocols are decreased cost associated with significantly reduced media use; easier, less expensive disposal of waste; and increased safety…

  1. Sharing Smaller Pies.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bender, Tom

    This paper details the unfavorable predicament of the United States as a consequence of using much of its own non-renewable material and energy resources. As a consequence, the United States will soon be subject to the political and economic conditions imposed upon it by other nations. The United States must begin to implement adjustments to the…

  2. Staffing Smaller Police Agencies

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rivero, David A.; Colombo, Michael

    2010-01-01

    All aspects of police work are challenging both professionally and personally. Police officers are accustomed to shift work, mandatory overtime, schedule adjustments for training, holidays and disasters, recalls and required off-duty court appearances. Police officers traditionally work eight hours per day, five day weeks (otherwise known as a 5/8…

  3. Learning in Smaller Organisations.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Penn, David W.; Ang'wa, William; Forster, R.; Heydon, G.; Richardson, Susan J.

    1998-01-01

    A study investigated 43 small businesses in terms of adaptability, planning, information/knowledge, human resource development, and growth. Results showed a paternalistic culture, informal learning, and emphasis on individual character and organizational growth. Findings suggest a need for nonmainstream approaches to human resource development in…

  4. Whole genomic analysis of bovine group A rotavirus strains A5-10 and A5-13 provides evidence for close evolutionary relationship with human rotaviruses.

    PubMed

    Komoto, Satoshi; Pongsuwanna, Yaowapa; Tacharoenmuang, Ratana; Guntapong, Ratigorn; Ide, Tomihiko; Higo-Moriguchi, Kyoko; Tsuji, Takao; Yoshikawa, Tetsushi; Taniguchi, Koki

    2016-11-15

    Bovine group A rotavirus (RVA) is an important cause of acute diarrhea in calves worldwide. In order to obtain precise information on the origin and evolutionary dynamics of bovine RVA strains, we determined and analyzed the complete nucleotide sequences of the whole genomes of six archival bovine RVA strains; four Thai strains (RVA/Cow-tc/THA/A5-10/1988/G8P[1], RVA/Cow-tc/THA/A5-13/1988/G8P[1], RVA/Cow-tc/THA/61A/1989/G10P[5], and RVA/Cow-tc/THA/A44/1989/G10P[11]), one American strain (RVA/Cow-tc/USA/B223/1983/G10P[11]), and one Japanese strain (RVA/Cow-tc/JPN/KK3/1983/G10P[11]). On whole genomic analysis, the 11 gene segments of strains A5-10, A5-13, 61A, A44, B223, and KK3 were found to be considerably genetically diverse, but to share a conserved non-G/P genotype constellation except for the NSP1 gene (I2-R2-C2-M2-(A3/11/13/14)-N2-T6-E2-H3), which is commonly found in RVA strains from artiodactyls such as cattle. Furthermore, phylogenetic analysis revealed that most genes of the six strains were genetically related to bovine and bovine-like strains. Of note is that the VP1, VP3, and NSP2 genes of strains A5-10 and A5-13 exhibited a closer relationship with the cognate genes of human DS-1-like strains than those of other RVA strains. Furthermore, the VP6 genes of strains A5-10 and A5-13 appeared to be equally related to both human DS-1-like and bovine strains. Thus, strains A5-10 and A5-13 were suggested to be derived from the same evolutionary origin as human DS-1-like strains, and were assumed to be examples of bovine RVA strains that provide direct evidence for a close evolutionary relationship between bovine and human DS-1-like strains. Our findings will provide important insights into the origin of bovine RVA strains, and into evolutionary links between bovine and human RVA strains.

  5. The Nonlinear Stability of L 4 in the R3BP when the Smaller Primary is a Heterogeneous Spheroid

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shalini, Kumari; Suraj, Md Sanam; Aggarwal, Rajiv

    2017-03-01

    We have investigated the nonlinear stability of the triangular libration point L 4 in the R3BP when the smaller primary is a heterogeneous spheroid with three layers having different densities. We observe that in the nonlinear sense, the triangular libration is stable in the range of linear stability 0< μ< μ c , a critical value of mass parameter μ, except for three mass ratios μ 1^' },μ 2^' }, μ 3^' } at which Moser's theorem is not applicable.

  6. Loosening quantum confinement: observation of real conductivity caused by hole polarons in semiconductor nanocrystals smaller than the Bohr radius.

    PubMed

    Ulbricht, Ronald; Pijpers, Joep J H; Groeneveld, Esther; Koole, Rolf; Donega, Celso de Mello; Vanmaekelbergh, Daniel; Delerue, Christophe; Allan, Guy; Bonn, Mischa

    2012-09-12

    We report on the gradual evolution of the conductivity of spherical CdTe nanocrystals of increasing size from the regime of strong quantum confinement with truly discrete energy levels to the regime of weak confinement with closely spaced hole states. We use the high-frequency (terahertz) real and imaginary conductivities of optically injected carriers in the nanocrystals to report on the degree of quantum confinement. For the smaller CdTe nanocrystals (3 nm < radius < 5 nm), the complex terahertz conductivity is purely imaginary. For nanocrystals with radii exceeding 5 nm, we observe the onset of real conductivity, which is attributed to the increasingly smaller separation between the hole states. Remarkably, this onset occurs for a nanocrystal radius significantly smaller than the bulk exciton Bohr radius a(B) ∼ 7 nm and cannot be explained by purely electronic transitions between hole states, as evidenced by tight-binding calculations. The real-valued conductivity observed in the larger nanocrystals can be explained by the emergence of mixed carrier-phonon, that is, polaron, states due to hole transitions that become resonant with, and couple strongly to, optical phonon modes for larger QDs. These polaron states possess larger oscillator strengths and broader absorption, and thereby give rise to enhanced real conductivity within the nanocrystals despite the confinement.

  7. Application of a model for delivering occupational safety and health to smaller businesses: Case studies from the US

    PubMed Central

    Cunningham, Thomas R.; Sinclair, Raymond

    2015-01-01

    Smaller firms are the majority in every industry in the US, and they endure a greater burden of occupational injuries, illnesses, and fatalities than larger firms. Smaller firms often lack the necessary resources for effective occupational safety and health activities, and many require external assistance with safety and health programming. Based on previous work by researchers in Europe and New Zealand, NIOSH researchers developed for occupational safety and health intervention in small businesses. This model was evaluated with several intermediary organizations. Four case studies which describe efforts to reach small businesses with occupational safety and health assistance include the following: trenching safety training for construction, basic compliance and hazard recognition for general industry, expanded safety and health training for restaurants, and fall prevention and respirator training for boat repair contractors. Successful efforts included participation by the initiator among the intermediaries’ planning activities, alignment of small business needs with intermediary offerings, continued monitoring of intermediary activities by the initiator, and strong leadership for occupational safety and health among intermediaries. Common challenges were a lack of resources among intermediaries, lack of opportunities for in-person meetings between intermediaries and the initiator, and balancing the exchanges in the initiator–intermediary–small business relationships. The model offers some encouragement that initiator organizations can contribute to sustainable OSH assistance for small firms, but they must depend on intermediaries who have compatible interests in smaller businesses and they must work to understand the small business social system. PMID:26300585

  8. Application of a model for delivering occupational safety and health to smaller businesses: Case studies from the US.

    PubMed

    Cunningham, Thomas R; Sinclair, Raymond

    2015-01-01

    Smaller firms are the majority in every industry in the US, and they endure a greater burden of occupational injuries, illnesses, and fatalities than larger firms. Smaller firms often lack the necessary resources for effective occupational safety and health activities, and many require external assistance with safety and health programming. Based on previous work by researchers in Europe and New Zealand, NIOSH researchers developed for occupational safety and health intervention in small businesses. This model was evaluated with several intermediary organizations. Four case studies which describe efforts to reach small businesses with occupational safety and health assistance include the following: trenching safety training for construction, basic compliance and hazard recognition for general industry, expanded safety and health training for restaurants, and fall prevention and respirator training for boat repair contractors. Successful efforts included participation by the initiator among the intermediaries' planning activities, alignment of small business needs with intermediary offerings, continued monitoring of intermediary activities by the initiator, and strong leadership for occupational safety and health among intermediaries. Common challenges were a lack of resources among intermediaries, lack of opportunities for in-person meetings between intermediaries and the initiator, and balancing the exchanges in the initiator-intermediary-small business relationships. The model offers some encouragement that initiator organizations can contribute to sustainable OSH assistance for small firms, but they must depend on intermediaries who have compatible interests in smaller businesses and they must work to understand the small business social system.

  9. Smaller splenium in children with nonverbal learning disability compared to controls, high-functioning autism and ADHD.

    PubMed

    Fine, Jodene Goldenring; Musielak, Kayla A; Semrud-Clikeman, Margaret

    2014-01-01

    The current study investigated morphological differences in the corpus callosum in children ages 8 to 18 years old with nonverbal learning disability (NLD; n = 19), high-functioning autism (HFA; n = 23), predominantly inattentive ADHD (ADHD:PI; n = 23), and combined type ADHD (ADHD:C; n = 25), as well as those demonstrating typical development (n = 57). Midsagittal area of the corpus callosum and five midsagittal anterior-to-posterior corpus callosum segments were examined using magnetic resonance imaging. Controlling for midsagittal brain area and age, no group differences were found for total corpus callosum area. This finding indicates that higher functioning children on the autistic spectrum do not have smaller corpus callosi as has been found in previous research with heterogeneous samples. Following segmentation of the corpus callosum, the NLD group was observed to have significantly smaller splenia compared to all other groups. Smaller splenia in the NLD group was associated with lower WASI PIQ scores but not WASI VIQ scores. Children with HFA were observed to have larger midbody areas than children with NLD and neurotypically developing children. Children with HFA and NLD demonstrated behavioral symptoms of inattention and hyperactivity similar to the ADHD groups indicating that corpus callosum differences seen in the NLD and HFA groups are not related to these behaviors.

  10. Chromophore-modified antitumor anthracenediones: synthesis, DNA binding, and cytotoxic activity of 1,4-bis[(aminoalkyl)amino]benzo[g]-phthalazine-5,10-diones.

    PubMed

    Gandolfi, C A; Beggiolin, G; Menta, E; Palumbo, M; Sissi, C; Spinelli, S; Johnson, F

    1995-02-03

    As part of a program aimed at exploring the effect of the introduction of heteroatoms into the anthracene-9,10-dione chromophore, we have synthesized novel 1,4-bis[(aminoalkyl)amino]-benzo[g]phthalazine-5,10-diones (BPDs) 1 which are related to the antitumor agents ametantrone and mitoxantrone. Derivatives 1 were prepared by chromic acid oxidation of acylated benzo[g]phthalazines 5 followed by acid hydrolysis or by silylation-amination of 5,10-dihydroxybenzo[g]phthalazine-1,4-dione (8). The 1-[(aminoalkyl)amino]-4-amino congeners 2 were isolated in low yields as byproducts from the oxidation of 5. Against a panel of human tumor cell lines, the benzo[g]phthalazine-5,10-diones 1 and 2 exhibited cytotoxic activity comparable or even superior to that of mitoxantrone. In compounds 1, structure-activity relationships different than those operative in the carbocyclic series appeared to emerge. DNA-binding studies with the ametantrone-like compound 1c and its single-armed congener 2c indicated that the introduction of a 2,3-diaza subunit into the anthracene-9,10-dione chromophore reduces the affinity of the drug for DNA in comparison with ametantrone. On the other hand, the number of side-chain groups does not affect binding to a great extent. These findings seem to suggest mechanisms of cell death other than those induced by simple interaction of the 1,4-BPDs 1 and 2 with DNA.

  11. Level and Contamination Assessment of Environmentally Sensitive Elements in Smaller than 100 μm Street Dust Particles from Xining, China

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Ni; Lu, Xinwei; Chao, Shigang

    2014-01-01

    Concentrations of the environmentally sensitive elements (ESEs) As, Co, Cu, Mn, Ni, Pb, V and Zn in smaller than 100 μm street dust particles from Xining were measured using X-ray fluorescence spectrometry and their contamination levels were assessed based on enrichment factor (EF), geoaccumulation index (Igeo) and pollution load index (PLI). The concentrations of As, Co, Cu, Mn, Ni, Pb, V and Zn in smaller than 100 μm street dust particles from Xining are 0.1–0.8, 2.7–10.9, 0.7–5.2, 0.3–1.1, 0.6–2.5, 1.2–11.1, 0.7–1.3 and 0.4–2.9 times the background values of Qinghai soil, respectively. The calculated EF and Igeo values reveal the order Co > Pb > Cu > Zn > V > Ni > Mn > As. The EF and Igeo values of Co, Cu, Pb and Zn are higher indicating that there is considerable pollution by these elements in smaller than 100 μm street dust particles, especially for Co. The EF and Igeo of Mn, Ni and V are lower and the assessment results indicate an absence of distinct Mn, Ni and V pollution in the studied samples. The mean value of PLIsite is 1.14, indicating a slightly pollution in the whole city of Xining. The order of PLIarea for the five tested districts is Center District (CD) > East District (ED) > West District (WD) > North District (ND) > South District (SD), showing that ESEs pollution in the South District is the lightest while it is the highest in the Central District. PMID:24590050

  12. Photophysical Characterization and in Vitro Phototoxicity Evaluation of 5,10,15,20-Tetra(quinolin-2-yl)porphyrin as a Potential Sensitizer for Photodynamic Therapy.

    PubMed

    Costa, Letícia D; e Silva, Joana de A; Fonseca, Sofia M; Arranja, Cláudia T; Urbano, Ana M; Sobral, Abilio J F N

    2016-03-31

    Photodynamic therapy (PDT) is a selective and minimally invasive therapeutic approach, involving the combination of a light-sensitive compound, called a photosensitizer (PS), visible light and molecular oxygen. The interaction of these per se harmless agents results in the production of reactive species. This triggers a series of cellular events that culminate in the selective destruction of cancer cells, inside which the photosensitizer preferentially accumulates. The search for ideal PDT photosensitizers has been a very active field of research, with a special focus on porphyrins and porphyrin-related macrocycle molecules. The present study describes the photophysical characterization and in vitro phototoxicity evaluation of 5,10,15,20-tetra(quinolin-2-yl)porphyrin (2-TQP) as a potential PDT photosensitizer. Molar absorption coefficients were determined from the corresponding absorption spectrum, the fluorescence quantum yield was calculated using 5,10,15,20-tetraphenylporphyrin (TPP) as a standard and the quantum yield of singlet oxygen generation was determined by direct phosphorescence measurements. Toxicity evaluations (in the presence and absence of irradiation) were performed against HT29 colorectal adenocarcinoma cancer cells. The results from this preliminary study show that the hydrophobic 2-TQP fulfills several critical requirements for a good PDT photosensitizer, namely a high quantum yield of singlet oxygen generation (Φ∆ 0.62), absence of dark toxicity and significant in vitro phototoxicity for concentrations in the micromolar range.

  13. Antibody persistence and the effect of a booster dose given 5, 10 or 15 years after vaccinating preadolescents with a recombinant hepatitis B vaccine.

    PubMed

    Gilca, Vladimir; De Serres, Gaston; Boulianne, Nicole; Murphy, Donald; De Wals, Philippe; Ouakki, Manale; Trudeau, Gisele; Massé, Richard; Dionne, Marc

    2013-01-07

    The persistence of antibody obtained post-vaccination of preadolescents with three doses of Engerix-B and the effect of a booster administered 5, 10 or 15 years later were monitored in 663 vaccinees. Five, 10 and 15 years post-vaccination >94% of subjects had detectable antibodies and 88.2%, 86.4% and 76.7% had a titre ≥10 IU/L; GMTs were 269 IU/L, 169 IU/L and 51 IU/L, respectively; 99.1-100% vaccinees reached a titre ≥10 IU/l post-booster. GMTs were 118012 IU/L, 32477 IU/L, and 13946 IU/L when the booster was administered 5, 10 or 15 years post-vaccination, respectively. We conclude that vaccination induces immunity in the great majority of vaccinees for at least 15 years. The response to a booster dose suggests persistence of immune memory in almost all vaccinees. Although a booster dose increases substantially anti-HBs titres, the clinical relevance of such an increase remains unknown. These results do not support the need of a booster for at least 15 years when vaccinating preadolescents with Engerix-B.

  14. PIXE analysis of PM2.5 and PM(2.5-10) for air quality assessment of Islamabad, Pakistan: application of chemometrics for source identification.

    PubMed

    Waheed, Shahida; Jaafar, Muhammad Z; Siddique, Naila; Markwitz, Andreas; Brereton, Richard G

    2012-01-01

    A Gent sampler was used to collect 379 pairs of filters from Nilore, a suburban area of Islamabad city. The study was designed to assess the concentration variations of trace elements in fine and coarse particulate matter due to anthropogenic activities and naturally occurring events. Source identification was performed by applying MATLAB software for principal component analysis (PCA), and cluster analysis (CA). The average fine and coarse particulate masses during the study period were 15.1 ± 11.9 and 37.3 ± 28.0 μg/m(3) respectively which complies with the 24-h air quality limits set by the government of Pakistan. The application of PCA to PM(2.5) data suggests the PM contribution from sources such as soil, automobile exhaust and coal combustion, road dust and wearing of tyres, wood combustion, biomass burning and fertilizers and fungicides whereas for the PM(2.5-10) data shows signatures of suspended soil, automobile exhaust, road dust and wearing of tyres, wood and biomass burning, refuse incineration, Ni smelter, fertilizers and fungicides are obtained. Cluster analysis of PM(2.5) and PM(2.5-10) datasets reveals that there are mainly three contributory pollution sources and these are suspended soil particles, automobile related sources and wood and coal combustion.

  15. Larger antelopes are sensitive to heat stress throughout all seasons but smaller antelopes only during summer in an African semi-arid environment.

    PubMed

    Shrestha, A K; van Wieren, S E; van Langevelde, F; Fuller, A; Hetem, R S; Meyer, L; de Bie, S; Prins, H H T

    2014-01-01

    Heat stress can limit the activity time budget of ungulates due to hyperthermia, which is relevant for African antelopes in ecosystems where temperature routinely increases above 40 °C. Body size influences this thermal sensitivity as large bodied ungulates have a lower surface area to volume ratio than smaller ungulates, and therefore a reduced heat dissipation capacity. We tested whether the activity pattern during the day of three antelope species of different body size-eland, blue wildebeest and impala-is negatively correlated with the pattern of black globe temperature (BGT) during the day of the ten hottest days and each season in a South African semi-arid ecosystem. Furthermore, we tested whether the larger bodied eland and wildebeest are less active than the smaller impala during the hottest days and seasons. Our results show that indeed BGT was negatively correlated with the diurnal activity of eland, wildebeest and impala, particularly during summer. During spring, only the activity of the larger bodied eland and wildebeest was negatively influenced by BGT, but not for the smallest of the three species, the impala. We argue that spring, with its high heat stress, coupled with poor forage and water availability, could be critical for survival of these large African antelopes. Our study contributes to understanding how endothermic animals can cope with extreme climatic conditions, which are expected to occur more frequently due to climate change.

  16. Larger antelopes are sensitive to heat stress throughout all seasons but smaller antelopes only during summer in an African semi-arid environment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shrestha, A. K.; van Wieren, S. E.; van Langevelde, F.; Fuller, A.; Hetem, R. S.; Meyer, L.; de Bie, S.; Prins, H. H. T.

    2014-01-01

    Heat stress can limit the activity time budget of ungulates due to hyperthermia, which is relevant for African antelopes in ecosystems where temperature routinely increases above 40 °C. Body size influences this thermal sensitivity as large bodied ungulates have a lower surface area to volume ratio than smaller ungulates, and therefore a reduced heat dissipation capacity. We tested whether the activity pattern during the day of three antelope species of different body size—eland, blue wildebeest and impala—is negatively correlated with the pattern of black globe temperature (BGT) during the day of the ten hottest days and each season in a South African semi-arid ecosystem. Furthermore, we tested whether the larger bodied eland and wildebeest are less active than the smaller impala during the hottest days and seasons. Our results show that indeed BGT was negatively correlated with the diurnal activity of eland, wildebeest and impala, particularly during summer. During spring, only the activity of the larger bodied eland and wildebeest was negatively influenced by BGT, but not for the smallest of the three species, the impala. We argue that spring, with its high heat stress, coupled with poor forage and water availability, could be critical for survival of these large African antelopes. Our study contributes to understanding how endothermic animals can cope with extreme climatic conditions, which are expected to occur more frequently due to climate change.

  17. Analysis of PM10, PM2.5, and PM2 5-10 concentrations in Santiago, Chile, from 1989 to 2001.

    PubMed

    Koutrakis, Petros; Sax, Sonja N; Sarnat, Jeremy A; Coull, Brent; Demokritou, Phil; Oyola, Pedro; Garcia, Javier; Gramsch, Ernesto

    2005-03-01

    Daily particle samples were collected in Santiago, Chile, at four urban locations from January 1, 1989, through December 31, 2001. Both fine PM with da < 2.5 microm (PM2.5) and coarse PM with 2.5 < da < 10 microm (PM2.5-10) were collected using dichotomous samplers. The inhalable particle fraction, PM10, was determined as the sum of fine and coarse concentrations. Wind speed, temperature and relative humidity (RH) were also measured continuously. Average concentrations of PM2.5 for the 1989-2001 period ranged from 38.5 microg/m3 to 53 microg/m3. For PM2.5-10 levels ranged from 35.8-48.2 microg/m3 and for PM10 results were 74.4-101.2 microg/m3 across the four sites. Both annual and daily PM2.5 and PM10 concentration levels exceeded the U.S. National Ambient Air Quality Standards and the European Union concentration limits. Mean PM2.5 levels during the cold season (April through September) were more than twice as high as those observed in the warm season (October through March); whereas coarse particle levels were similar in both seasons. PM concentration trends were investigated using regression models, controlling for site, weekday, month, wind speed, temperature, and RH. Results showed that PM2.5 concentrations decreased substantially, 52% over the 12-year period (1989-2000), whereas PM2.5-10 concentrations increased by approximately 50% in the first 5 years and then decreased by a similar percentage over the following 7 years. These decreases were evident even after controlling for significant climatic effects. These results suggest that the pollution reduction programs developed and implemented by the Comisión Nacional del Medio Ambiente (CONAMA) have been effective in reducing particle levels in the Santiago Metropolitan region. However, particle levels remain high and it is thus imperative that efforts to improve air quality continue.

  18. Comet 81p/Wild 2: The Updated Stardust Coma Dust Fluence Measurement for Smaller (Sub 10-Micrometre) Particles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Price, M. C.; Kearsley, A. T.; Burchell, M. J.; Horz, Friedrich; Cole, M. J.

    2009-01-01

    Micrometre and smaller scale dust within cometary comae can be observed by telescopic remote sensing spectroscopy [1] and the particle size and abundance can be measured by in situ spacecraft impact detectors [2]. Initial interpretation of the samples returned from comet 81P/Wild 2 by the Stardust spacecraft [3] appears to show that very fine dust contributes not only a small fraction of the solid mass, but is also relatively sparse [4], with a low negative power function describing grain size distribution, contrasting with an apparent abundance indicated by the on-board Dust Flux Monitor Instrument (DFMI) [5] operational during the encounter. For particles above 10 m diameter there is good correspondence between results from the DFMI and the particle size inferred from experimental calibration [6] of measured aerogel track and aluminium foil crater dimensions (as seen in Figure 4 of [4]). However, divergence between data-sets becomes apparent at smaller sizes, especially submicrometre, where the returned sample data are based upon location and measurement of tiny craters found by electron microscopy of Al foils. Here effects of detection efficiency tail-off at each search magnification can be seen in the down-scale flattening of each scale component, but are reliably compensated by sensible extrapolation between segments. There is also no evidence of malfunction in the operation of DFMI during passage through the coma (S. Green, personal comm.), so can the two data sets be reconciled?

  19. Comparison between 5,10,15,20-tetraaryl- and 5,15-diarylporphyrins as photosensitizers: synthesis, photodynamic activity, and quantitative structure-activity relationship modeling.

    PubMed

    Banfi, Stefano; Caruso, Enrico; Buccafurni, Loredana; Murano, Roberto; Monti, Elena; Gariboldi, Marzia; Papa, Ester; Gramatica, Paola

    2006-06-01

    The synthesis of a panel of seven nonsymmetric 5,10,15,20-tetraarylporphyrins, 13 symmetric and nonsymmetric 5,15-diarylporphyrins, and one 5,15-diarylchlorin is described. In vitro photodynamic activities on HCT116 human colon adenocarcinoma cells were evaluated by standard cytotoxicity assays. A predictive quantitative structure-activity relationship (QSAR) regression model, based on theoretical holistic molecular descriptors, of a series of 34 tetrapyrrolic photosensitizers (PSs), including the 24 compounds synthesized in this work, was developed to describe the relationship between structural features and photodynamic activity. The present study demonstrates that structural features significantly influence the photodynamic activity of tetrapyrrolic derivatives: diaryl compounds were more active with respect to the tetraarylporphyrins, and among the diaryl derivatives, hydroxy-substituted compounds were more effective than the corresponding methoxy-substituted ones. Furthermore, three monoarylporphyrins, isolated as byproducts during diarylporphyrin synthesis, were considered for both photodynamic and QSAR studies; surprisingly they were found to be particularly active photosensitizers.

  20. Photodynamic antimicrobial chemotherapy activity of (5,10,15,20-tetrakis(4-(4-carboxyphenycarbonoimidoyl)phenyl)porphyrinato) chloro gallium(III).

    PubMed

    Managa, Muthumuni; Amuhaya, Edith K; Nyokong, Tebello

    2015-12-05

    (5,10,15,20-Tetrakis(4-(4-carboxyphenycarbonoimidoyl)phenyl)porphyrinato) chloro gallium(III) (complex 1) was conjugated to platinum nanoparticles (PtNPs) (represented as 1-PtNPs). The resulting conjugate showed 18 nm red shift in the Soret band when compared to 1 alone. Complex 1 and 1-PtNPs showed promising photodynamic antimicrobial chemotherapy (PACT) activity against Staphylococcus aureus, Escherichia coli and Candida albicans in solution where the log reductions obtained were 4.92, 3.76, and 3.95, respectively for 1-PtNPs. The singlet oxygen quantum yields obtained were higher at 0.56 for 1-PtNPs in DMF while that of 1 was 0.52 in the same solvent. This resulted in improved PACT activity for 1-PtNPs compared to 1 alone.

  1. An in vitro enzymatic assay to measure transcription inhibition by gallium(III) and H3 5,10,15-tris(pentafluorophenyl)corroles.

    PubMed

    Tang, Grace Y; Pribisko, Melanie A; Henning, Ryan K; Lim, Punnajit; Termini, John; Gray, Harry B; Grubbs, Robert H

    2015-03-18

    Chemotherapy often involves broad-spectrum cytotoxic agents with many side effects and limited targeting. Corroles are a class of tetrapyrrolic macrocycles that exhibit differential cytostatic and cytotoxic properties in specific cell lines, depending on the identities of the chelated metal and functional groups. The unique behavior of functionalized corroles towards specific cell lines introduces the possibility of targeted chemotherapy. Many anticancer drugs are evaluated by their ability to inhibit RNA transcription. Here we present a step-by-step protocol for RNA transcription in the presence of known and potential inhibitors. The evaluation of the RNA products of the transcription reaction by gel electrophoresis and UV-Vis spectroscopy provides information on inhibitive properties of potential anticancer drug candidates and, with modifications to the assay, more about their mechanism of action. Little is known about the molecular mechanism of action of corrole cytotoxicity. In this experiment, we consider two corrole compounds: gallium(III) 5,10,15-(tris)pentafluorophenylcorrole (Ga(tpfc)) and freebase analogue 5,10,15-(tris)pentafluorophenylcorrole (tpfc). An RNA transcription assay was used to examine the inhibitive properties of the corroles. Five transcription reactions were prepared: DNA treated with Actinomycin D, triptolide, Ga(tpfc), tpfc at a [complex]:[template DNA base] ratio of 0.01, respectively, and an untreated control. The transcription reactions were analyzed after 4 hr using agarose gel electrophoresis and UV-Vis spectroscopy. There is clear inhibition by Ga(tpfc), Actinomycin D, and triptolide. This RNA transcription assay can be modified to provide more mechanistic detail by varying the concentrations of the anticancer complex, DNA, or polymerase enzyme, or by incubating the DNA or polymerase with the complexes prior to RNA transcription; these modifications would differentiate between an inhibition mechanism involving the DNA or the enzyme

  2. Larger N2 and smaller early contingent negative variation during the processing of uncertainty about future emotional events.

    PubMed

    Lin, Huiyan; Gao, Hongwei; You, Jin; Liang, Jiafeng; Ma, Junpeng; Yang, Nan; Xu, Huan; Jin, Hua

    2014-12-01

    Uncertainty increases individuals' anxiety and fear. Identifying its neural processing may contribute to understanding the detrimental effects of uncertainty on well-being and psychological symptoms. Using high temporal resolution event-related potentials (ERPs), employing the classical paradigm in which neutral signs were used as certain and uncertain cues and anticipating arousal-balanced positive and negative pictures, the present study aimed to further investigate the temporal dynamics of brain activation by uncertainty about future emotional events. ERPs were recorded while participants observed uncertain cues and certain cues about future positive and negative pictures. Results showed that the uncertain cues produced larger N2 than did the certain cues about both future positive and negative pictures, and uncertain cues produced smaller early contingent negative variation (CNV) than did the certain cues about future negative pictures. The results provide evidence that the specific processing of uncertainty about future emotional events occurs at different cognitive stages.

  3. Graphene-based ultrathin microporous carbon with smaller sulfur molecules for excellent rate performance of lithium-sulfur cathode

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peng, Zhenhuan; Fang, Wenying; Zhao, Hongbin; Fang, Jianhui; Cheng, Hongwei; Doan, The Nam Long; Xu, Jiaqiang; Chen, Pu

    2015-05-01

    Ultrathin microporous carbon (UMPC) for lithium-sulfur (Li-S) cathode with uniform pore width of approximately 0.6 nm and dozens nm in thickness is synthesized with graphene oxide as template by glucose hydrothermal carbonization and surfactant-assisted assembling method. The UMPC supplies desirable S pregnancy space and the intimate contact between UMPC and S, therefore improving the conductivity of S@UMPC composite and dynamic performance. Smaller sulfur molecules limited in UMPC thoroughly prevent the formation of electrolyte-soluble polysulfides, hence excellent cycling performance with 900 mAh g-1 after 150 cycles is kept. Ultrathin three-dimensional carbon nanosheets are significant to fast electron transfer and Li+ diffusion contributing to excellent dynamic performance (710 mAh g-1 at 3 C).

  4. Selection criteria of the addendum modification coefficients of spur gear pairs with smaller number of pinion teeth

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Atanasiu, V.; Oprişan, C.; Leohchi, D.

    2016-08-01

    A design procedure for the optimum distribution of the addendum modification coefficients of spur gear pairs with smaller number of pinion teeth is presented for the case of a fixed centred distance. The geometrical, kinematics and load capacity criteria are considered in the design analysis. The geometric and kinematics criteria are used to prevent the negative phenomena of the generating and engagement processes. The relation between the contact pressure of meshing teeth and specific sliding are analysed in relation with addendum modification coefficients. A dynamic model is developed to simulate the load sharing characteristics through a mesh cycle. The specific phenomenon of contact tooth pairs alternation during mesh cycle is integrated in this dynamic load modelling. A comparative study is included, which shows the effects of the distribution factor of the addendum modification coefficients on the contact surface characteristics of the gear pairs.

  5. Recombinant albumins containing additional peptide sequences smaller than barbourin retain the ability of barbourin-albumin to inhibit platelet aggregation.

    PubMed

    Sheffield, William P; Wilson, Brianna; Eltringham-Smith, Louise J; Gataiance, Sharon; Bhakta, Varsha

    2005-05-01

    The previously described fusion protein BLAH(6) (Marques JA et al.,Thromb Haemost 2001; 86: 902-8) is a recombinant protein that combines the small disintegrin barbourin with hexahistidine-tagged rabbit serumalbumin (RSA) produced in Pichia pastoris yeast. We sought to determine: (1) if BLAH(6) was immunogenic; and (2) if its barbourin domain could be productively replaced with smaller peptides. Purified BLAH(6) was injected into rabbits, and anti-barbourin antibodies were universally detected in plasma 28 days later; BLAH(6) was, however, equally effective in reducing platelet aggregation in both naive and pre-treated rabbits. Thrombocytopenia was not observed, and complexing BLAH(6) to alpha(IIb)beta(3) had no effect on antibody detection. The barbourin moiety of BLAH(6) was replaced with each of four sequences: Pep I (VCKGDWPC); PepII (VCRGDWPC); PepIII (bar-bourin 41-54); and PepIV (LPSPGDWR). The corresponding fusion proteins were tested for their ability to inhibit ADP-induced platelet aggregation. PepIII-LAH(6) inhibited neither rabbit nor human platelets. PepI-LAH(6) and PepIV-LAH(6) inhibited rabbit platelet aggregation as effectively as BLAH(6), but PepIV-LAH(6) did not inhibit human platelet aggregation. PepI-LAH(6) and PepIILAH(6) inhibited human platelet aggregation with IC(50)s 10- and 20-fold higher than BLAH(6). Cross-immunoprecipitation assays with human platelet lysates confirmed that all proteins and peptides interacted with the platelet integrin alpha(IIb)beta(3), but with greatly varying affinities. Our results suggest that the antiplatelet activity of BLAH(6) can be retained in albumin fusion proteins in which smaller peptides replace the barbourin domain; these proteins may be less immunogenic than BLAH(6).

  6. A large QTL for fear and anxiety mapped using an F2 cross can be dissected into multiple smaller QTLs

    PubMed Central

    Parker, Clarissa C.; Sokoloff, Greta; Leung, Emily; Kirkpatrick, Stacey L.; Palmer, Abraham A.

    2013-01-01

    Using chromosome substitution strains (CSS), we previously identified a large quantitative trait locus (QTL) for conditioned fear (CF) on mouse chromosome 10. Here, we used an F2 cross between CSS-10 and C57BL/6J (B6) to localize that QTL to distal chromosome 10. That QTL accounted for all of the difference between CSS-10 and B6. We then produced congenic strains to fine-map that interval. We identified two congenic strains that captured some or all of the QTL. The larger congenic strain (Line 1; 122.387121 – 129.068 Mb; build 37) appeared to account for all of the difference between CSS-10 and B6. The smaller congenic strain (Line 2; 127.277–129.068 Mb) was intermediate between CSS-10 and B6. We used haplotype mapping followed by qPCR to identify one gene that was differentially expressed in both lines relative to B6 (Rnf41) and one that was differentially expressed between only Line 1 and B6 (Shmt2). These cis-eQTLs may cause the behavioral QTLs; however, further studies are required to validate these candidate genes. More generally, our observation that a large QTL mapped using CSS and F2 crosses can be dissected into multiple smaller QTLs demonstrates a weaknesses of two-stage approaches that seek to use coarse mapping to identify large regions followed by fine-mapping. Indeed, additional dissection of these congenic strains might result in further subdivision of these QTL regions. Despite these limitations we have successfully fine mapped two QTLs to small regions and identified putative candidate genes, demonstrating that the congenic approach can be effective for fine mapping QTLs. PMID:23876074

  7. A large QTL for fear and anxiety mapped using an F2 cross can be dissected into multiple smaller QTLs.

    PubMed

    Parker, C C; Sokoloff, G; Leung, E; Kirkpatrick, S L; Palmer, A A

    2013-10-01

    Using chromosome substitution strains (CSS), we previously identified a large quantitative trait locus (QTL) for conditioned fear (CF) on mouse chromosome 10. Here, we used an F2 cross between CSS-10 and C57BL/6J (B6) to localize that QTL to distal chromosome 10. That QTL accounted for all the difference between CSS-10 and B6. We then produced congenic strains to fine-map that interval. We identified two congenic strains that captured some or all the QTL. The larger congenic strain (Line 1: 122.387121-129.068 Mb; build 37) appeared to account for all the difference between CSS-10 and B6. The smaller congenic strain (Line 2: 127.277-129.068 Mb) was intermediate between CSS-10 and B6. We used haplotype mapping followed by quantitative polymerase chain reaction to identify one gene that was differentially expressed in both lines relative to B6 (Rnf41) and one that was differentially expressed between only Line 1 and B6 (Shmt2). These cis-eQTLs may cause the behavioral QTLs; however, further studies are required to validate these candidate genes. More generally, our observation that a large QTL mapped using CSS and F2 crosses can be dissected into multiple smaller QTLs shows a weaknesses of two-stage approaches that seek to use coarse mapping to identify large regions followed by fine-mapping. Indeed, additional dissection of these congenic strains might result in further subdivision of these QTL regions. Despite these limitations, we have successfully fine-mapped two QTLs to small regions and identified putative candidate genes, showing that the congenic approach can be effective for fine-mapping QTLs.

  8. THE RELATIONSHIP BETWEEN REAL-TIME AND TIME-INTEGRATED COARSE (2.5-10MM), INTERMEDIATE (1-2.5MM), AND FINE (<2.5MM) PARTICULATE MATTER IN THE LOS ANGELES BASIN

    EPA Science Inventory

    Population exposure to ambient particulate matter (PM) has received considerable attention due to the association between ambient particulate concentrations and mortality. Current toxicological and epidemiological studies and controlled human and animal exposures suggest that a...

  9. Effects of dietary glycerin inclusion at 0, 5, 10, and 15 percent of dry matter on energy metabolism and nutrient balance in finishing beef steers.

    PubMed

    Hales, K E; Foote, A P; Brown-Brandl, T M; Freetly, H C

    2015-01-01

    Expansion of the biodiesel industry has increased the glycerin (GLY) supply. Glycerin is an energy-dense feed that can be used in ruminant species; however, the energy value of GLY is not known. Therefore, the effects of GLY inclusion at 0, 5, 10, and 15% on energy balance in finishing cattle diets were evaluated in 8 steers (BW = 503 kg) using a replicated Latin square design. Data were analyzed with the fixed effects of dietary treatment and period, and the random effects of square and steer within square were included in the model. Contrast statements were used to separate linear and quadratic effects of GLY inclusion. Glycerin replaced dry-rolled corn (DRC) at 0, 5, 10, and 15% of dietary DM. Dry matter intake decreased linearly (P = 0.02) as GLY increased in the diet. As a proportion of GE intake, fecal energy loss tended to decrease linearly (P < 0.07), and DE also tended to increase linearly (P = 0.07) as dietary level of GLY increased. Urinary energy loss was not different (P > 0.31) as a proportion of GE as GLY increased in the diet. Methane energy loss as a proportion of GE intake tended to respond quadratically (P = 0.10), decreasing from 0 to 10% GLY inclusion and increasing thereafter. As a proportion of GE intake, ME tended to respond quadratically (P = 0.10), increasing from 0 to 10% GLY and then decreasing. As a proportion of GE intake, heat production increased linearly (P = 0.02) as GLY increased in the diet. Additionally, as a proportion of GE intake, retained energy (RE) tended to respond quadratically (P = 0.07), increasing from 0 to 10% GLY inclusion and decreasing thereafter. As a proportion of N intake, urinary and fecal N excretion increased linearly (P < 0.04) as GLY increased in the diet. Furthermore, grams of N retained and N retained as a percent of N intake both decreased linearly (P < 0.02) as GLY increased in the diet. Total DM digestibility tended (P < 0.10) to respond quadratically, increasing at a decreasing rate from 0 to 5% GLY

  10. A smaller Macadamia from a more vagile tribe: inference of phylogenetic relationships, divergence times, and diaspore evolution in Macadamia and relatives (tribe Macadamieae; Proteaceae).

    PubMed

    Mast, Austin R; Willis, Crystal L; Jones, Eric H; Downs, Katherine M; Weston, Peter H

    2008-07-01

    Tribe Macadamieae (91 spp., 16 genera; Proteaceae) is widespread across the southern hemisphere on all major fragments of Gondwana except New Zealand and India. Macadamia is cultivated outside its natural range as a "nut" crop (notably in Hawaii, where it is the principal orchard crop). We sampled seven DNA regions and 53 morphological characters from the tribe to infer its phylogeny and address the common assumption that the distribution of the extant diversity of the tribe arose by the rafting of ancestors on Gondwanan fragments. Macadamia proves to be paraphyletic with respect to the African genus Brabejum, the South American genus Panopsis, and the Australian species Orites megacarpus. We erect two new generic names, Nothorites and Lasjia, to produce monophyly at that rank. The earliest disjunctions in the tribe are inferred to be the result of long-distance dispersal out of Australia (with one possible exception), rather than vicariance. Evolution of tardy fruit dehiscence is correlated with these dispersals, and the onset of the Antarctic Circumpolar Current (ACC) precedes them. We suggest that the ancestors of extant diversity arrived on their respective continents via the ACC, and we recognize that this is a mechanism precluded, rather than facilitated, by Gondwana's terrestrial continuity.

  11. Smaller Footprint Drilling System for Deep and Hard Rock Environments; Feasibility of Ultra-High-Speed Diamond Drilling

    SciTech Connect

    Arnis Judzis; Alan Black; Homer Robertson

    2006-03-01

    The two phase program addresses long-term developments in deep well and hard rock drilling. TerraTek believes that significant improvements in drilling deep hard rock will be obtained by applying ultra-high rotational speeds (greater than 10,000 rpm). The work includes a feasibility of concept research effort aimed at development that will ultimately result in the ability to reliably drill ''faster and deeper'' possibly with smaller, more mobile rigs. The principle focus is on demonstration testing of diamond bits rotating at speeds in excess of 10,000 rpm to achieve high rate of penetration (ROP) rock cutting with substantially lower inputs of energy and loads. The significance of the ultra-high rotary speed drilling system is the ability to drill into rock at very low weights on bit and possibly lower energy levels. The drilling and coring industry today does not practice this technology. The highest rotary speed systems in oil field and mining drilling and coring today run less than 10,000 rpm--usually well below 5,000 rpm. This document details the progress to date on the program entitled ''Smaller Footprint Drilling System for Deep and Hard Rock Environments: Feasibility of Ultra-High-Speed Diamond Drilling'' for the period starting 1 October 2004 through 30 September 2005. Additionally, research activity from 1 October 2005 through 28 February 2006 is included in this report: (1) TerraTek reviewed applicable literature and documentation and convened a project kick-off meeting with Industry Advisors in attendance. (2) TerraTek designed and planned Phase I bench scale experiments. Some difficulties continue in obtaining ultra-high speed motors. Improvements have been made to the loading mechanism and the rotational speed monitoring instrumentation. New drill bit designs have been provided to vendors for production. A more consistent product is required to minimize the differences in bit performance. A test matrix for the final core bit testing program has been

  12. Superfund record of decision (EPA Region 1): Loring Air Force Base, Operable Units 3, 5, 10, and 11, Limestone, ME, August 21, 1998

    SciTech Connect

    1999-03-01

    The Loring Air Force Base National Priorities List (NPL) Site is located in Aroostook County, Maine. This decision document presents the selected remedial actions for the source areas at the following sites located within OUs 3, 5, 10, and 11 at the Site: OU3 - Explosive Ordnance Disposal (EOD) Range Outdoor Firing Range; OU5 -- Base Exchange Service Station (BXSS); OU10 -- Pumphouse (PH) 8210; PH 8270; Former Solvent Storage Building (FSSB); and OU11 -- Refueling Maintenance Shop Area (RMSA); Vehicle Maintenance Building (VMB); The USAF has evaluated the potential risks to human health and the environment at each of the these sites and developed the site-specific remediation goals for the source areas at each of these sites based on the future land use determinations made in the April 1996 Record of Decision (PB96-963703) for the Disposal of Loring Air Force Base, Maine. Therefore, the No Further CERCLA Action decisions for the source areas at each of these sites is based on the assumption that future land use at each site shall be in accordance with the Disposal ROD (i.e., that real property comprising the site shall be parceled, disposed of, and reused in accordance with the Disposal ROD).

  13. 5,10b-Ethanophenanthridine amaryllidaceae alkaloids inspire the discovery of novel bicyclic ring systems with activity against drug resistant cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Henry, Sean; Kidner, Ria; Reisenauer, Mary R; Magedov, Igor V; Kiss, Robert; Mathieu, Véronique; Lefranc, Florence; Dasari, Ramesh; Evidente, Antonio; Yu, Xiaojie; Ma, Xiuye; Pertsemlidis, Alexander; Cencic, Regina; Pelletier, Jerry; Cavazos, David A; Brenner, Andrew J; Aksenov, Alexander V; Rogelj, Snezna; Kornienko, Alexander; Frolova, Liliya V

    2016-09-14

    Plants of the Amaryllidaceae family produce a large variety of alkaloids and non-basic secondary metabolites, many of which are investigated for their promising anticancer activities. Of these, crinine-type alkaloids based on the 5,10b-ethanophenanthridine ring system were recently shown to be effective at inhibiting proliferation of cancer cells resistant to various pro-apoptotic stimuli and representing tumors with dismal prognoses refractory to current chemotherapy, such as glioma, melanoma, non-small-cell lung, esophageal, head and neck cancers, among others. Using this discovery as a starting point and taking advantage of a concise biomimetic route to the crinine skeleton, a collection of crinine analogues were synthetically prepared and evaluated against cancer cells. The compounds exhibited single-digit micromolar activities and retained this activity in a variety of drug-resistant cancer cell cultures. This investigation resulted in the discovery of new bicyclic ring systems with significant potential in the development of effective clinical cancer drugs capable of overcoming cancer chemotherapy resistance.

  14. The effect of laser activation of 5,10,15,20-tetra-sulphophenyl-porphyrin loaded in K562 cells and human normal mononuclear cells.

    PubMed

    Constantin, Carolina; Neagu, Monica; Manda, Gina; Ion, Rodica-Mariana; Iordăchescu, Dana Iord

    2004-01-01

    Photodynamic therapy (PDT) is a relatively new type of treatment in cancer, based on a photosensitizer, visible light and molecular oxygen. Reactive oxygen species are generated, causing tumor cells death by apoptosis or necrosis. Significant nowadays research efforts are focused on finding new photosensitizers with antineoplastic activity and an acceptable toxicological profile. Although consistent information exists regarding PDT in solid tumors, relatively few data are available for PDT of blood cancers. Therefore, we carried out a comparative study on lymphoblastic K562 cells and human normal peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC) treated at a density of 2 x 10(5) cells/mL with 5,10,15,20-tetra-sulphophenyl-porphyrin (TSPP) and then irradiated with He-Ne laser light (lamda = 632.8 nm). The following cell functions were investigated: viability, multiplication, RNA synthesis, total RNA levels and apoptosis. After irradiation, the viability of TSPP-loaded tumor cells decrease, the multiplication rate and the total RNA level are drastically reduced and cells undergo apoptosis. TSPP alone loaded into cells but not activated by irradiation, does not affect these cell parameters. Human normal PBMC subjected to TSPP loading and laser-irradiation develop a different cellular response, their viability and proliferative capacity not being altered by experimental PDT. Accordingly, it appears that TSPP is a non-aggressive compound for cellular physiology and becomes cytotoxic only by irradiation; moreover laser-activated TSPP affects only cells that have a tumoral pattern.

  15. Molecular structure, UV/vis spectra, and cyclic voltammograms of Mn(II), Co(II), and Zn(II) 5,10,15,20-tetraphenyl-21-oxaporphyrins.

    PubMed

    Stute, Silvio; Götzke, Linda; Meyer, Dirk; Merroun, Mohamed L; Rapta, Peter; Kataeva, Olga; Seichter, Wilhelm; Gloe, Kerstin; Dunsch, Lothar; Gloe, Karsten

    2013-02-04

    The 5,10,15,20-tetraphenyl-21-oxaporphyrin complexes of Mn(II), Co(II), and Zn(II) have been crystallized and studied by X-ray diffraction, NMR and UV/vis spectroscopy, and mass spectrometry as well as cyclic voltammetry. The X-ray structure of the earlier described Cu(II) complex is also reported. All complex structures possess a five-coordinate, approximately square-pyramidal geometry with a slight deviation of the heteroaromatic moieties from planarity. The packing structures are characterized by parallel strands of complex molecules interacting by weak hydrogen bonds. In the case of Zn(II) an octahedral complex has also been isolated using a side-chain hydroxy functionalized oxaporphyrin ligand; the structure was verified by NMR and EXAFS spectroscopy. Cyclic voltammetry studies reveal that the reduction of the complex bound Mn(II), Co(II), and Zn(II) ions is a ligand-centered process whereas the first oxidation step depends on the metal ion present.

  16. Synthesis of 21,23-selenium- and tellurium-substituted 5-porphomethenes, 5,10-porphodimethenes, 5,15-porphodimethenes, and porphotrimethenes and their interactions with mercury.

    PubMed

    Ahmad, Sohail; Yadav, Kumar Karitkey; Bhattacharya, Soumee; Chauhan, Prashant; Chauhan, S M S

    2015-04-17

    The 3+1 condensation of symmetrical 16-Selena/telluratripyrranes with symmetrical selenophene-2,5-diols/tellurophene-2,5-diols in the presence of BF3-etheratre or BF3-methanol followed by oxidation with DDQ gave 5,10-porphodimethenes, whereas the process with unsymmetrical selenophene-2,5-diols/tellurophene-2,5-diols gave 5-porphomethenes. In addition, the reaction of unsymmetrical 16-Selena/telluratripyrranes with symmetrical selenophene-2,5-diols/tellurophene-2,5-diols gave the corresponding porphotrimethenes, whereas the process with unsymmetrical selenophene-2,5-diols/tellurophene-2,5-diols gave the 5,15-porphodimethenes. The structures of different products were characterized by IR, (1)H and (13)C NMR, (1)H-(1)H COSY, CHN analysis, and mass spectrometry. The binding of mercury with the calix[4]phyrins mentioned above had been observed in the decreasing order of porphodimethenes > porphomethenes > porphotrimethenes by UV-vis and (1)H NMR spectroscopy.

  17. Crystal structure of 16-ferrocenylmethyl-3β-hydroxy­estra-1,3,5(10)-trien-17-one: a potential chemotherapeutic drug

    PubMed Central

    Carmona-Negrón, José A.; Flores-Rivera, Mariola M.; Díaz-Reyes, Zaibeth; Moore, Curtis E.; Rheigold, Arnold L.; Meléndez, Enrique

    2016-01-01

    A new ferrocene complex, 16-ferrocenylmethyl-3β-hy­droxy­estra-1,3,5(10)-trien-17-one dimethyl sulfoxide monosolvate, [Fe(C5H5)(C24H27O2)]·C2H6OS, has been synthesized and structurally characterized by single-crystal X-ray diffraction techniques. The mol­ecule crystallizes in the space group P21 with one mol­ecule of dimethyl sulfoxide. A hydrogen bond links the phenol group and the dimethyl sulfoxide O atom, with an O⋯O distance of 2.655 (5) Å. The ferrocene group is positioned in the β face of the estrone moiety, with an O—C—C—C torsion angle of 44.1 (5)°, and the carbonyl bond length of the hormone moiety is 1.216 (5) Å, typical of a C=O double bond. The average Fe—C bond length of the substituted Cp ring [Fe—C(Cp*)] is similar to that of the unsubstituted one [Fe—C(Cp)], i.e. 2.048 (3) versus 2.040 (12) Å. The structure of the complex is compared with those of estrone and eth­oxy­methyl­estrone. PMID:27308062

  18. Elevated total plasma homocysteine and 667C{r_arrow}T mutation of the 5,10-methylenetetrahydrofolate reductase gene in thrombotic vascular disease

    SciTech Connect

    De Franchis, R.; Sebastio, G.; Andria, G.

    1996-07-01

    Moderate elevation of total plasma homocysteine (tHcy) has been reported as an independent risk factor for thrombotic vascular disease, a well-known multifactorial disorder. Possible genetic causes of elevated tHcy include defects of the sulfur-containing amino acids metabolism due to deficiencies of cystathionine {Beta}-synthase, of 5,10-methylenetetrahydrofolate reductase (MTHFR), and of the enzymes of cobalamin metabolism. An impaired activity of MTHFR due to a thermolabile form of the enzyme has been observed in {le}28% of hyperhomocysteinemic patients with premature vascular disease. More recently, the molecular basis of such enzymatic thermolability has been related to a common mutation of the MTHFR gene, causing a C-to-T substitution at nt 677 (677C{r_arrow}T). This mutation was found in 38% of unselected chromosomes from 57 French Canadian individuals. The homozygous state for the mutation was present in 12% of these subjects and correlated with significantly elevated tHcy. Preliminary evidence indicates that the frequency of homozygotes for the 677C{r_arrow}T mutation may vary significantly in populations from different geographic areas. 5 refs., 2 tabs.

  19. Genotype prevalence and allele frequencies of 5,10-methylenetetrahydrofolate reductase (MTHFR) C677T mutation in two caste groups of India.

    PubMed

    Rai, V; Yadav, U; Kumar, P

    2012-06-15

    The aim of the present study was to investigate the distribution of 5,10-methylenetetrahydrofolate reductase (MTHFR) polymorphism in two caste group populations of eastern Uttar Pradesh. This mutation has been suggested to be positively associated with the risk of several congenital and multifactorial disorders. Frequency of mutant T allele differs in various ethnic and geographical populations of the world. MTHFR C677T mutation analysis was carried out by PCR-RFLP (Polymerase Chain Reaction-Restriction Fragment Length Polymorphism) method and the samples studied were randomly selected from the healthy individuals belonging to two caste populations. In Brahmin samples, genotype frequencies of CC, CT and TT were 0.727, 0.25 and 0.023 respectively whereas in Rajput samples, CC genotype was observed in 88 samples, CT genotype in 25 and TT genotype was found in 2 samples. Frequency of mutant T allele was found to be 0.147 in Brahmin and 0.126 in Rajput populations. The percentage of CT genotype and C allele were high in both the populations.

  20. Mössbauer effect study of tight spin coupling in oxidized chloro-5,10,15,20- tetra(mesityl)porphyrinatoiron(III)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boso, Brian; Lang, George; McMurry, Thomas J.; Groves, John T.

    1983-08-01

    Mössbauer spectra of a polycrystalline form of oxidized chloro-5,10,15,20-tetra(mesityl)porphyrin- atoiron(III) [Fe(TMP)Cl], compound A, were recorded over a range of temperatures (4.2-195 K) and magnetic fields (0-6 T). These spectra of compound A exhibit magnetic features which are markedly different from those of the analogous protein complexes, horse radish peroxidase compound I (HRP-I) and compound ES of cytochrome c peroxidase, even though chemical evidence and optical spectroscopy indicate that compound A is similar to the others in comprising a Fe(IV) complex within a porphyrin cation radical. We interpret the data by employing a spin Hamiltonian model in which the central Fe(IV) complex, with S=1, is tightly coupled to a S=1/2 system of the oxidized porphyrin to yield a net S=3/2 system as suggested by the susceptibility measurements. The theoretical treatment yields information on the d-electron energies which is similar to that more directly available in the peroxidase spectra. The strength of the axial crystal field is found to increase progressively in the series HRP-I, ES, compound A, while the spin coupling in A is the strongest of the three by several orders of magnitude. The good fits to experimental data confirm the efficacy of the theoretical treatment which may be applicable to a variety of other coupled systems.

  1. Novel nanomaterials based on 5,10,15,20-tetrakis(3,4-dimethoxyphenyl)-21H,23H-porphyrin entrapped in silica matrices

    SciTech Connect

    Fagadar-Cosma, Eugenia; Enache, Corina; Vlascici, Dana; Fagadar-Cosma, Gheorghe; Vasile, Mihaela; Bazylak, Grzegorz

    2009-12-15

    The present study is dealing with the obtaining of transparent hybrid silica materials encapsulating 5,10,15,20-tetrakis(3,4-dimethoxyphenyl)-21H,23H-porphyrin designated for advanced optoelectronic devices. The porphyrin was synthesized by three methods: an Adler-type reaction between pyrrole and 3,4-dimethoxybenzaldehyde in propionic acid medium; by Lindsey condensation of pyrrole with 3,4-dimethoxybenzaldehyde in the presence of BF{sub 3}.OEt{sub 2} and by a multicomponent reaction by simultaneously using of pyrrole and two different aldehydes: 3,4-dimethoxybenzaldehyde and 3-hydroxybenzaldehyde. The 3,4-dimethoxyphenyl substituted porphyrin was characterized by HPLC, TLC, UV-vis, FT-IR, {sup 1}H NMR and {sup 13}C NMR analysis. Excitation and emission spectra were also discussed in terms of pH conditions. The hybrid materials, consisting in the porphyrin encapsulated in silica matrices, have been prepared successfully via the two steps acid-base catalyzed hydrolysis and condensation of tetraethylorthosilicate using different approaches of the sol-gel process: in situ, by impregnation and by sonication. The synthetic conditions and the compositions were monitored and characterized by using spectroscopic methods such as FT-IR, fluorescence and UV-vis. Atomic force microscopy (AFM) has been applied to observe the columnar or pyramidal nanostructures which are formed by the immobilization of porphyrin on the silica matrices.

  2. Two Color Populations of Kuiper Belt and Centaur Objects and the Smaller Orbital Inclinations of Red Centaur Objects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tegler, S. C.; Romanishin, W.; Consolmagno, G. J.; J., S.

    2016-12-01

    We present new optical colors for 28 Kuiper Belt objects (KBOs) and 35 Centaur objects measured with the 1.8 m Vatican Advanced Technology Telescope and the 4.3 m Discovery Channel Telescope. By combining these new colors with our previously published colors, we increase the sample size of our survey to 154 objects. Our survey is unique in that the uncertainties in our color measurements are less than half the uncertainties in the color measurements reported by other researchers in the literature. Small uncertainties are essential for discerning between a unimodal and a bimodal distribution of colors for these objects as well as detecting correlations between colors and orbital elements. From our survey, it appears red Centaurs have a broader color distribution than gray Centaurs. We find red Centaurs have a smaller orbital inclination angle distribution than gray Centaurs at the 99.3% confidence level. Furthermore, we find that our entire sample of KBOs and Centaurs exhibits bimodal colors at the 99.4 % confidence level. KBOs and Centaurs with H V > 7.0 have bimodal colors at the 99.96% confidence level and KBOs with H V < 6.0 have bimodal colors at the 96% confidence level.

  3. Waterborne cues from crabs induce thicker skeletons, smaller gonads and size-specific changes in growth rate in sea urchins.

    PubMed

    Selden, Rebecca; Johnson, Amy S; Ellers, Olaf

    2009-01-01

    Indirect predator-induced effects on growth, morphology and reproduction have been extensively studied in marine invertebrates but usually without consideration of size-specific effects and not at all in post-metamorphic echinoids. Urchins are an unusually good system, in which, to study size effects because individuals of various ages within one species span four orders of magnitude in weight while retaining a nearly isometric morphology. We tracked growth of urchins, Strongylocentrotus droebachiensis (0.013-161.385 g), in the presence or absence of waterborne cues from predatory Jonah crabs, Cancer borealis. We ran experiments at ambient temperatures, once for 4 weeks during summer and again, with a second set of urchins, for 22 weeks over winter. We used a scaled, cube-root transformation of weight for measuring size more precisely and for equalizing variance across sizes. Growth rate of the smallest urchins (summer: <17 mm diameter; winter: <7 mm diameter) decreased by 40-42% in response to crab cues. In contrast, growth rate of larger urchins was unaffected in the summer and increased in response to crab scent by 7% in the winter. At the end of the 22-week experiment, additional gonadal and skeletal variables were measured. Cue-exposed urchins developed heavier, thicker skeletons and smaller gonads, but no differences in spine length or jaw size. The differences depended on urchin size, suggesting that there are size-specific shifts in gonadal and somatic investment in urchins.

  4. Lipoprotein hydrophobic core lipids are partially extruded to surface in smaller HDL: "Herniated" HDL, a common feature in diabetes.

    PubMed

    Amigó, Núria; Mallol, Roger; Heras, Mercedes; Martínez-Hervás, Sergio; Blanco Vaca, Francisco; Escolà-Gil, Joan Carles; Plana, Núria; Yanes, Óscar; Masana, Lluís; Correig, Xavier

    2016-01-18

    Recent studies have shown that pharmacological increases in HDL cholesterol concentrations do not necessarily translate into clinical benefits for patients, raising concerns about its predictive value for cardiovascular events. Here we hypothesize that the size-modulated lipid distribution within HDL particles is compromised in metabolic disorders that have abnormal HDL particle sizes, such as type 2 diabetes mellitus (DM2). By using NMR spectroscopy combined with a biochemical volumetric model we determined the size and spatial lipid distribution of HDL subclasses in a cohort of 26 controls and 29 DM2 patients before and after two drug treatments, one with niacin plus laropiprant and another with fenofibrate as an add-on to simvastatin. We further characterized the HDL surface properties using atomic force microscopy and fluorescent probes to show an abnormal lipid distribution within smaller HDL particles, a subclass particularly enriched in the DM2 patients. The reduction in the size, force cholesterol esters and triglycerides to emerge from the HDL core to the surface, making the outer surface of HDL more hydrophobic. Interestingly, pharmacological interventions had no effect on this undesired configuration, which may explain the lack of clinical benefits in DM2 subjects.

  5. Bubbling bed catalytic hydropyrolysis process utilizing larger catalyst particles and smaller biomass particles featuring an anti-slugging reactor

    SciTech Connect

    Marker, Terry L; Felix, Larry G; Linck, Martin B; Roberts, Michael J

    2014-09-23

    This invention relates to a process for thermochemically transforming biomass or other oxygenated feedstocks into high quality liquid hydrocarbon fuels. In particular, a catalytic hydropyrolysis reactor, containing a deep bed of fluidized catalyst particles is utilized to accept particles of biomass or other oxygenated feedstocks that are significantly smaller than the particles of catalyst in the fluidized bed. The reactor features an insert or other structure disposed within the reactor vessel that inhibits slugging of the bed and thereby minimizes attrition of the catalyst. Within the bed, the biomass feedstock is converted into a vapor-phase product, containing hydrocarbon molecules and other process vapors, and an entrained solid char product, which is separated from the vapor stream after the vapor stream has been exhausted from the top of the reactor. When the product vapor stream is cooled to ambient temperatures, a significant proportion of the hydrocarbons in the product vapor stream can be recovered as a liquid stream of hydrophobic hydrocarbons, with properties consistent with those of gasoline, kerosene, and diesel fuel. Separate streams of gasoline, kerosene, and diesel fuel may also be obtained, either via selective condensation of each type of fuel, or via later distillation of the combined hydrocarbon liquid.

  6. CONCEPTUAL DESIGN FOR A RADICALLY SMALLER, HIGHLY ADAPTIVE AND APPLICATION-FLEXIBLE MINING MACHINE FOR UTILITY AND DEVELOPMENT WORK

    SciTech Connect

    Andrew H. Stern

    2004-12-20

    The aim of this research project was to develop a preliminary ''conceptual design'' for a radically smaller, highly adaptive and application-flexible underground coal mining machine, for performing non-production utility work and/or also undertake limited production mining for the recovery of reserves that would otherwise be lost. Whereas historically, mining philosophies have reflected a shift to increasing larger mechanized systems [such as the continuous miner (CM)], specific mining operations that do not benefit from the economy of the large mining equipment are often ignored or addressed with significant inefficiencies. Developing this prototype concept will create a new class of equipment that can provide opportunities to re-think the very structure of the mining system across a broad range of possibilities, not able to be met by existing machinery. The approach involved pooling the collective input from mining professionals, using a structured listing of desired inputs in the form of a questionnaire, which was used to define the range of desired design specifications. From these inputs, a conceptual specification was blended, by the author, to embody the general concurrence of mission concepts for this machine.

  7. Ravens, New Caledonian crows and jackdaws parallel great apes in motor self-regulation despite smaller brains

    PubMed Central

    Kabadayi, Can; Taylor, Lucy A.; von Bayern, Auguste M. P.; Osvath, Mathias

    2016-01-01

    Overriding motor impulses instigated by salient perceptual stimuli represent a fundamental inhibitory skill. Such motor self-regulation facilitates more rational behaviour, as it brings economy into the bodily interaction with the physical and social world. It also underlies certain complex cognitive processes including decision making. Recently, MacLean et al. (MacLean et al. 2014 Proc. Natl Acad. Sci. USA 111, 2140–2148. (doi:10.1073/pnas.1323533111)) conducted a large-scale study involving 36 species, comparing motor self-regulation across taxa. They concluded that absolute brain size predicts level of performance. The great apes were most successful. Only a few of the species tested were birds. Given birds' small brain size—in absolute terms—yet flexible behaviour, their motor self-regulation calls for closer study. Corvids exhibit some of the largest relative avian brain sizes—although small in absolute measure—as well as the most flexible cognition in the animal kingdom. We therefore tested ravens, New Caledonian crows and jackdaws in the so-called cylinder task. We found performance indistinguishable from that of great apes despite the much smaller brains. We found both absolute and relative brain volume to be a reliable predictor of performance within Aves. The complex cognition of corvids is often likened to that of great apes; our results show further that they share similar fundamental cognitive mechanisms. PMID:27152224

  8. Soft x-ray transmission grating spectrometer for X-ray Surveyor and smaller missions with high resolving power

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Heilmann, Ralf K.; Bruccoleri, Alexander; Schattenburg, Mark; Kolodziejczak, jeffery; Gaskin, Jessica; O'Dell, Stephen L.

    2017-01-01

    A number of high priority subjects in astrophysics are addressed by a state-of-the-art soft x-ray grating spectrometer, e.g. the role of Active Galactic Nuclei in galaxy and star formation, characterization of the WHIM and the “missing baryon” problem, characterization of halos around the Milky Way and nearby galaxies, and stellar coronae and surrounding winds and disks. An Explorer-scale, large-area (A > 1,000 cm2), high resolving power (R > 3,000) soft x-ray grating spectrometer is highly feasible based on Critical-Angle Transmission (CAT) grating technology, even for telescopes with angular resolution of 5-10 arcsec. Significantly higher performance could be provided by a CAT grating spectrometer on an X-ray-Surveyor-type mission (A > 4,000 cm2, R > 5,000). CAT gratings combine advantages of blazed reflection gratings (high efficiency, use of higher orders) with those of transmission gratings (low mass, relaxed alignment tolerances and temperature requirements, transparent at higher energies) with minimal mission resource requirements. Blazing is achieved through grazing-incidence reflection off the smooth silicon grating bar sidewalls. Silicon is well matched to the soft x-ray band, and 30% absolute diffraction efficiency has been acheived with clear paths for further improvement. CAT gratings with sidewalls made of high-Z elements allow extension of blazing to higher energies and larger dispersion angles, enabling higher resolving power at shorter wavelengths. X-ray data from CAT gratings coated with a thin layer of platinum using atomic layer deposition demonstrate efficient blazing to higher energies and much larger blaze angles than possible with silicon alone. Measurements of the resolving power of a breadboard CAT grating spectrometer consisting of a Wolter-I slumped-glass focusing optic from GSFC and CAT gratings, taken at the MSFC Stray Light Facility, have demonstrated resolving power > 10,000. Thus currently fabricated CAT gratings are compatible

  9. The High Arctic Magnetic High - The Geophysical Manifestation of a Large (1.36 x 10e6 km2) and Voluminous (5-10 x 10e6 km3) Igneous Province

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saltus, Richard; Oakey, Gordon; Miller, Elizabeth; Jackson, Ruth

    2013-04-01

    The High Arctic Magnetic High (HAMH) dominates the magnetic anomaly field of the Earth north of about 75°N; this magnetic domain consists of very high amplitude magnetic highs and lows with variable orientations. The HAMH is visible on satellite magnetic compilations (e.g., MF6) with anomaly amplitudes greater than 200 nT indicating it is a globally significant feature. The magnetic potential of this magnetic feature is a single large intensity high indicative of a large volume of magnetic material in the crust. The map area of this magnetic domain is roughly 1.36 x 10e6 km2. Geographically the HAMH lies within the Amerasian Basin adjacent to the Lomonosov Ridge, encompasses the region of the Alpha and Mendeleev Ridges, and extends beneath the northern portions of the Canada Basin. Ocean floor geomorphology, limited seismic and sonobouy data, sparse dredge samples, and dated samples from the perimeter of the Arctic Ocean are consistent with the interpretation of the HAMH as the geophysical manifestation of a Large Igneous Province. The designation "High Arctic Large Igneous Province (HALIP)" has been applied to portions of the Arctic perimeter based on geologic mapping and sampling. The designation "Alpha/Mendeleev Large Igneous Province (AMLIP)" has been applied to the offshore Alpha/Mendeleev region (e.g., Grantz et al., 2009) with boundaries defined, in large part, by magnetic anomaly patterns. We have constructed 2D and 3D models of the HAMH to investigate the structure and geometry of this significant crustal feature. We estimate the overall volume of magnetic material as between 5-10 x 10e6 km3. The area and volume of this feature are comparable with estimates for the Deccan Traps and the North Atlantic Igneous Province, but are significantly smaller than the Kerguellen or Ontong Java Plateaus (based on tables in Coffin and Eldholm, 1994). In detail we find significant correlation between shorter wavelength portions of this magnetic feature and the

  10. HUBBLE FRONTIER FIELDS FIRST COMPLETE CLUSTER DATA: FAINT GALAXIES AT z ∼ 5-10 FOR UV LUMINOSITY FUNCTIONS AND COSMIC REIONIZATION

    SciTech Connect

    Ishigaki, Masafumi; Ouchi, Masami; Ono, Yoshiaki; Kawamata, Ryota; Shimasaku, Kazuhiro; Oguri, Masamune

    2015-01-20

    We present comprehensive analyses of faint dropout galaxies up to z ∼ 10 with the first full-depth data set of the A2744 lensing cluster and parallel fields observed by the Hubble Frontier Fields (HFF) program. We identify 54 dropouts at z ∼ 5-10 in the HFF fields and enlarge the size of the z ∼ 9 galaxy sample obtained to date. Although the number of highly magnified (μ ∼ 10) galaxies is small because of the tiny survey volume of strong lensing, our study reaches the galaxies' intrinsic luminosities comparable to the deepest-field HUDF studies. We derive UV luminosity functions with these faint dropouts, carefully evaluating by intensive simulations the combination of observational incompleteness and lensing effects in the image plane, including magnification, distortion, and multiplication of images, with the evaluation of mass model dependencies. Our results confirm that the faint-end slope, α, is as steep as –2 at z ∼ 6-8 and strengthen the evidence for the rapid decrease of UV luminosity densities, ρ{sub UV}, at z > 8 from the large z ∼ 9 sample. We examine whether the rapid ρ{sub UV} decrease trend can be reconciled with the large Thomson scattering optical depth, τ{sub e}, measured by cosmic microwave background experiments, allowing a large space of free parameters, such as an average ionizing photon escape fraction and a stellar-population-dependent conversion factor. No parameter set can reproduce both the rapid ρ{sub UV} decrease and the large τ {sub e}. It is possible that the ρ{sub UV} decrease moderates at z ≳ 11, that the free parameters significantly evolve toward high z, or that there exist additional sources of reionization such as X-ray binaries and faint active galactic nuclei.

  11. Fine (PM2.5) and coarse (PM2.5-10) particulate matter on a heavily trafficked London highway: sources and processes.

    PubMed

    Charron, Aurelie; Harrison, Roy M

    2005-10-15

    A large dataset for PM2.5 and PMcoarse (PM2.5-10) concentrations monitored near a busy London highway (Marylebone Road) has been analyzed to define the factors that lead to high concentrations. The following have been highlighted as major influencing parameters: wind speed, prevailing wind direction (because of its role on the microscale dispersion within the street), the daily cycle of the atmospheric boundary layer (stable during the night/ convective and mixed during the day), and traffic density. The mainly diesel heavy-duty vehicles are the main source of fine particulate matter at Marylebone Road. In particular, lorries (trucks) dominate PM10 exhaust emissions which are mainly in the fine (<2.5 microm) size range. A strong correlation with PMcoarse suggests that the heavy-duty traffic is largely responsible for this component also. Substantial local increments in PM2.5 and PMcoarse due to traffic have been estimated and a large part of the increment in PMcoarse concentrations is inferred to arise from resuspended road dust emissions since the contribution of abrasion processes estimated from emission factors is modest. Despite the strong influence of traffic on PM concentrations measured at Marylebone Road the analysis of factors leading to the highest 5% of hourly concentrations of PM10 at Marylebone Road reveals that almost half of these events were due to building works. The other events occurred when all or most of the key factors occurred simultaneously (heavy traffic, poor dispersion, etc.). Some episodes of high PM2.5 concentrations were associated with long-range transport in which the regional PM2.5 constituted most of the local concentrations.

  12. Smaller Footprint Drilling System for Deep and Hard Rock Environments; Feasibility of Ultra-High-Speed Diamond Drilling

    SciTech Connect

    TerraTek, A Schlumberger Company

    2008-12-31

    The two phase program addresses long-term developments in deep well and hard rock drilling. TerraTek believes that significant improvements in drilling deep hard rock will be obtained by applying ultra-high rotational speeds (greater than 10,000 rpm). The work includes a feasibility of concept research effort aimed at development that will ultimately result in the ability to reliably drill 'faster and deeper' possibly with smaller, more mobile rigs. The principle focus is on demonstration testing of diamond bits rotating at speeds in excess of 10,000 rpm to achieve high rate of penetration (ROP) rock cutting with substantially lower inputs of energy and loads. The significance of the 'ultra-high rotary speed drilling system' is the ability to drill into rock at very low weights on bit and possibly lower energy levels. The drilling and coring industry today does not practice this technology. The highest rotary speed systems in oil field and mining drilling and coring today run less than 10,000 rpm - usually well below 5,000 rpm. This document provides the progress through two phases of the program entitled 'Smaller Footprint Drilling System for Deep and Hard Rock Environments: Feasibility of Ultra-High-Speed Diamond Drilling' for the period starting 30 June 2003 and concluding 31 March 2009. The accomplishments of Phases 1 and 2 are summarized as follows: (1) TerraTek reviewed applicable literature and documentation and convened a project kick-off meeting with Industry Advisors in attendance (see Black and Judzis); (2) TerraTek designed and planned Phase I bench scale experiments (See Black and Judzis). Improvements were made to the loading mechanism and the rotational speed monitoring instrumentation. New drill bit designs were developed to provided a more consistent product with consistent performance. A test matrix for the final core bit testing program was completed; (3) TerraTek concluded small-scale cutting performance tests; (4) Analysis of Phase 1 data

  13. SMALLER FOOTPRINT DRILLING SYSTEM FOR DEEP AND HARD ROCK ENVIRONMENTS; FEASIBILITY OF ULTRA-HIGH SPEED DIAMOND DRILLING

    SciTech Connect

    Alan Black; Arnis Judzis

    2004-10-01

    The two phase program addresses long-term developments in deep well and hard rock drilling. TerraTek believes that significant improvements in drilling deep hard rock will be obtained by applying ultra-high (greater than 10,000 rpm) rotational speeds. The work includes a feasibility of concept research effort aimed at development and test results that will ultimately result in the ability to reliably drill ''faster and deeper'' possibly with rigs having a smaller footprint to be more mobile. The principle focus is on demonstration testing of diamond bits rotating at speeds in excess of 10,000 rpm to achieve high rate of penetration rock cutting with substantially lower inputs of energy and loads. The project draws on TerraTek results submitted to NASA's ''Drilling on Mars'' program. The objective of that program was to demonstrate miniaturization of a robust and mobile drilling system that expends small amounts of energy. TerraTek successfully tested ultrahigh speed ({approx}40,000 rpm) small kerf diamond coring. Adaptation to the oilfield will require innovative bit designs for full hole drilling or continuous coring and the eventual development of downhole ultra-high speed drives. For domestic operations involving hard rock and deep oil and gas plays, improvements in penetration rates is an opportunity to reduce well costs and make viable certain field developments. An estimate of North American hard rock drilling costs is in excess of $1,200 MM. Thus potential savings of $200 MM to $600 MM are possible if drilling rates are doubled [assuming bit life is reasonable]. The net result for operators is improved profit margin as well as an improved position on reserves. The significance of the ''ultra-high rotary speed drilling system'' is the ability to drill into rock at very low weights on bit and possibly lower energy levels. The drilling and coring industry today does not practice this technology. The highest rotary speed systems in oil field and mining drilling

  14. SMALLER FOOTPRINT DRILLING SYSTEM FOR DEEP AND HARD ROCK ENVIRONMENTS; FEASIBILITY OF ULTRA-HIGH SPEED DIAMOND DRILLING

    SciTech Connect

    Alan Black; Arnis Judzis

    2004-10-01

    The two phase program addresses long-term developments in deep well and hard rock drilling. TerraTek believes that significant improvements in drilling deep hard rock will be obtained by applying ultra-high (greater than 10,000 rpm) rotational speeds. The work includes a feasibility of concept research effort aimed at development and test results that will ultimately result in the ability to reliably drill ''faster and deeper'' possibly with rigs having a smaller footprint to be more mobile. The principle focus is on demonstration testing of diamond bits rotating at speeds in excess of 10,000 rpm to achieve high rate of penetration rock cutting with substantially lower inputs of energy and loads. The project draws on TerraTek results submitted to NASA's ''Drilling on Mars'' program. The objective of that program was to demonstrate miniaturization of a robust and mobile drilling system that expends small amounts of energy. TerraTek successfully tested ultrahigh speed ({approx}40,000 rpm) small kerf diamond coring. Adaptation to the oilfield will require innovative bit designs for full hole drilling or continuous coring and the eventual development of downhole ultra-high speed drives. For domestic operations involving hard rock and deep oil and gas plays, improvements in penetration rates is an opportunity to reduce well costs and make viable certain field developments. An estimate of North American hard rock drilling costs is in excess of $1,200 MM. Thus potential savings of $200 MM to $600 MM are possible if drilling rates are doubled [assuming bit life is reasonable]. The net result for operators is improved profit margin as well as an improved position on reserves. The significance of the ''ultra-high rotary speed drilling system'' is the ability to drill into rock at very low weights on bit and possibly lower energy levels. The drilling and coring industry today does not practice this technology. The highest rotary speed systems in oil field and mining drilling

  15. Smaller Footprint Drilling System for Deep and Hard Rock Environments; Feasibility of Ultra-High-Speed Diamond Drilling

    SciTech Connect

    Arnis Judzis; Homer Robertson; Alan Black

    2006-06-22

    The two phase program addresses long-term developments in deep well and hard rock drilling. TerraTek believes that significant improvements in drilling deep hard rock will be obtained by applying ultra-high rotational speeds (greater than 10,000 rpm). The work includes a feasibility of concept research effort aimed at development that will ultimately result in the ability to reliably drill ''faster and deeper'' possibly with smaller, more mobile rigs. The principle focus is on demonstration testing of diamond bits rotating at speeds in excess of 10,000 rpm to achieve high rate of penetration (ROP) rock cutting with substantially lower inputs of energy and loads. The significance of the ''ultra-high rotary speed drilling system'' is the ability to drill into rock at very low weights on bit and possibly lower energy levels. The drilling and coring industry today does not practice this technology. The highest rotary speed systems in oil field and mining drilling and coring today run less than 10,000 rpm-usually well below 5,000 rpm. This document details the progress at the end of Phase 1 on the program entitled ''Smaller Footprint Drilling System for Deep and Hard Rock Environments: Feasibility of Ultra-High-Speed Diamond Drilling'' for the period starting 1 March 2006 and concluding 30 June 2006. (Note: Results from 1 September 2005 through 28 February 2006 were included in the previous report (see Judzis, Black, and Robertson)). Summarizing the accomplished during Phase 1: {lg_bullet} TerraTek reviewed applicable literature and documentation and convened a project kickoff meeting with Industry Advisors in attendance (see Black and Judzis). {lg_bullet} TerraTek designed and planned Phase I bench scale experiments (See Black and Judzis). Some difficulties continued in obtaining ultra-high speed motors. Improvements were made to the loading mechanism and the rotational speed monitoring instrumentation. New drill bit designs were developed to provided a more consistent

  16. Community Effects on Teacher Involvement in School Development Activity: A Study of Teachers in Cities, Smaller Towns and Rural Areas in Norway.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Midthassel, Unni Vere; Manger, Terje; Torsheim, Torbjorn

    2002-01-01

    Examined the effects of community type on teacher involvement in school development activity (SDA). Data on urban, small town, and rural teachers indicated that teachers in smaller towns were more involved in SDA than those in rural areas, while the differences between cities and smaller towns were not statistically significant. The impact of…

  17. Size Matters a Lot: Drought-Affected Italian Oaks Are Smaller and Show Lower Growth Prior to Tree Death.

    PubMed

    Colangelo, Michele; Camarero, Jesús J; Borghetti, Marco; Gazol, Antonio; Gentilesca, Tiziana; Ripullone, Francesco

    2017-01-01

    Hydraulic theory suggests that tall trees are at greater risk of drought-triggered death caused by hydraulic failure than small trees. In addition the drop in growth, observed in several tree species prior to death, is often interpreted as an early-warning signal of impending death. We test these hypotheses by comparing size, growth, and wood-anatomy patterns of living and now-dead trees in two Italian oak forests showing recent mortality episodes. The mortality probability of trees is modeled as a function of recent growth and tree size. Drift-diffusion-jump (DDJ) metrics are used to detect early-warning signals. We found that the tallest trees of the anisohydric Italian oak better survived drought contrary to what was predicted by the theory. Dead trees were characterized by a lower height and radial-growth trend than living trees in both study sites. The growth reduction of now-dead trees started about 10 years prior to their death and after two severe spring droughts during the early 2000s. This critical transition in growth was detected by DDJ metrics in the most affected site. Dead trees were also more sensitive to drought stress in this site indicating different susceptibility to water shortage between trees. Dead trees did not form earlywood vessels with smaller lumen diameter than surviving trees but tended to form wider latewood vessels with a higher percentage of vessel area. Since living and dead trees showed similar competition we did not expect that moderate thinning and a reduction in tree density would increase the short-term survival probability of trees.

  18. Small, Smaller, Smallest: The Origins and Evolution of Ancient Dual Symbioses in a Phloem-Feeding Insect

    PubMed Central

    Bennett, Gordon M.; Moran, Nancy A.

    2013-01-01

    Many insects rely on bacterial symbionts with tiny genomes specialized for provisioning nutrients lacking in host diets. Xylem sap and phloem sap are both deficient as insect diets, but differ dramatically in nutrient content, potentially affecting symbiont genome evolution. For sap-feeding insects, sequenced symbiont genomes are available only for phloem-feeding examples from the suborder Sternorrhyncha and xylem-feeding examples from the suborder Auchenorrhyncha, confounding comparisons. We sequenced genomes of the obligate symbionts, Sulcia muelleri and Nasuia deltocephalinicola, of the phloem-feeding pest insect, Macrosteles quadrilineatus (Auchenorrhyncha: Cicadellidae). Our results reveal that Nasuia-ALF has the smallest bacterial genome yet sequenced (112 kb), and that the Sulcia-ALF genome (190 kb) is smaller than that of Sulcia in other insect lineages. Together, these symbionts retain the capability to synthesize the 10 essential amino acids, as observed for several symbiont pairs from xylem-feeding Auchenorrhyncha. Nasuia retains genes enabling synthesis of two amino acids, DNA replication, transcription, and translation. Both symbionts have lost genes underlying ATP synthesis through oxidative phosphorylation, possibly as a consequence of the enriched sugar content of phloem. Shared genomic features, including reassignment of the UGA codon from Stop to tryptophan, and phylogenetic results suggest that Nasuia-ALF is most closely related to Zinderia, the betaproteobacterial symbiont of spittlebugs. Thus, Nasuia/Zinderia and Sulcia likely represent ancient associates that have co-resided in hosts since the divergence of leafhoppers and spittlebugs >200 Ma, and possibly since the origin of the Auchenorrhyncha, >260 Ma. PMID:23918810

  19. Adults with dyslexia can use cues to orient and constrain attention but have a smaller and weaker attention spotlight.

    PubMed

    Moores, Elisabeth; Tsouknida, Effie; Romani, Cristina

    2015-06-01

    We report results from two experiments assessing distribution of attention and cue use in adults with dyslexia (AwD) and in a group of typically reading controls. Experiment 1 showed normal effects of cueing in AwD, with faster responses when probes were presented within a cued area and normal effects of eccentricity and stimulus onset asynchrony (SOA). In addition, AwD showed stronger benefits of a longer SOA when they had to move attention farther, and stronger effects of inclusion on the left, suggesting that cueing is particularly important in more difficult conditions. Experiment 2 tested the use of cues in a texture detection task involving a wider range of eccentricities and a shorter SOA. In this paradigm, focused attention at the central location is actually detrimental and cueing further reduces performance. Thus, if AwD have a more distributed attention, they should show a reduced performance drop at central locations and, if they do not use cues, they should show less negative effects of cueing. In contrast, AwD showed a larger drop and a positive effect of cueing. These results are better accounted for by a smaller and weaker spotlight of attention. Performance does not decrease at central locations because the attentional spotlight is already deployed with maximum intensity, which cannot be further enhanced at central locations. Instead, use of cueing helps to focus limited resources. Cues orient attention to the right area without enhancing it to the point where this is detrimental for texture detection. Implications for reading are discussed.

  20. Theoretical analysis of aqueous solutions of mixed strong electrolytes by a smaller-ion shell electrostatic model

    SciTech Connect

    Fraenkel, Dan

    2014-02-07

    In spite of the great importance of mixed electrolytes in science and technology, no compelling theoretical explanation has been offered yet for the thermodynamic behavior of such systems, such as their deviation from ideality and the variation of their excess functions with ionic composition and concentration. Using the newly introduced Smaller-ion Shell treatment – an extension of the Debye–Hückel theory to ions of dissimilar size (hence DH–SiS) – simple analytic mathematical expressions can be derived for the mean and single-ion activity coefficients of binary electrolyte components of ternary ionic systems. Such expressions are based on modifying the parallel DH–SiS equations for pure binary ionic systems, by adding to the three ion-size parameters – a (of counterions), b{sub +} (of positive coions), and b{sub −} (of negative coions) – a fourth parameter. For the (+ + −) system, this is “b{sub ++},” the contact distance between non-coion cations. b{sub ++} is derived from fits with experiment and, like the other b’s, is constant at varying ion concentration and combination. Four case studies are presented: (1) HCl–NaCl–H{sub 2}O, (2) HCl–NH{sub 4}Cl–H{sub 2}O, (3) (0.01 M HX)–MX–H{sub 2}O with X = Cl, Br, and with M = Li, Na, K, Cs, and (4) HCl–MCl{sub n}–H{sub 2}O with n = 2, M = Sr, Ba; and n = 3, M = Al, Ce. In all cases, theory is fully consistent with experiment when using a of the measured binary electrolyte as the sole fitting parameter. DH–SiS is thus shown to explain known “mysteries” in the behavior of ternary electrolytes, including Harned rule, and to adequately predict the pH of acid solutions in which ionized salts are present at different concentrations.

  1. Theoretical analysis of aqueous solutions of mixed strong electrolytes by a smaller-ion shell electrostatic model.

    PubMed

    Fraenkel, Dan

    2014-02-07

    In spite of the great importance of mixed electrolytes in science and technology, no compelling theoretical explanation has been offered yet for the thermodynamic behavior of such systems, such as their deviation from ideality and the variation of their excess functions with ionic composition and concentration. Using the newly introduced Smaller-ion Shell treatment - an extension of the Debye-Hückel theory to ions of dissimilar size (hence DH-SiS) - simple analytic mathematical expressions can be derived for the mean and single-ion activity coefficients of binary electrolyte components of ternary ionic systems. Such expressions are based on modifying the parallel DH-SiS equations for pure binary ionic systems, by adding to the three ion-size parameters - a (of counterions), b+ (of positive coions), and b- (of negative coions) - a fourth parameter. For the (+ + -) system, this is "b++," the contact distance between non-coion cations. b++ is derived from fits with experiment and, like the other b's, is constant at varying ion concentration and combination. Four case studies are presented: (1) HCl-NaCl-H2O, (2) HCl-NH4Cl-H2O, (3) (0.01 M HX)-MX-H2O with X = Cl, Br, and with M = Li, Na, K, Cs, and (4) HCl-MCln-H2O with n = 2, M = Sr, Ba; and n = 3, M = Al, Ce. In all cases, theory is fully consistent with experiment when using a of the measured binary electrolyte as the sole fitting parameter. DH-SiS is thus shown to explain known "mysteries" in the behavior of ternary electrolytes, including Harned rule, and to adequately predict the pH of acid solutions in which ionized salts are present at different concentrations.

  2. High Temperatures Result in Smaller Nurseries which Lower Reproduction of Pollinators and Parasites in a Brood Site Pollination Mutualism

    PubMed Central

    Krishnan, Anusha; Pramanik, Gautam Kumar; Revadi, Santosh V.; Venkateswaran, Vignesh; Borges, Renee M.

    2014-01-01

    In a nursery pollination mutualism, we asked whether environmental factors affected reproduction of mutualistic pollinators, non-mutualistic parasites and seed production via seasonal changes in plant traits such as inflorescence size and within-tree reproductive phenology. We examined seasonal variation in reproduction in Ficus racemosa community members that utilise enclosed inflorescences called syconia as nurseries. Temperature, relative humidity and rainfall defined four seasons: winter; hot days, cold nights; summer and wet seasons. Syconium volumes were highest in winter and lowest in summer, and affected syconium contents positively across all seasons. Greater transpiration from the nurseries was possibly responsible for smaller syconia in summer. The 3–5°C increase in mean temperatures between the cooler seasons and summer reduced fig wasp reproduction and increased seed production nearly two-fold. Yet, seed and pollinator progeny production were never negatively related in any season confirming the mutualistic fig–pollinator association across seasons. Non-pollinator parasites affected seed production negatively in some seasons, but had a surprisingly positive relationship with pollinators in most seasons. While within-tree reproductive phenology did not vary across seasons, its effect on syconium inhabitants varied with season. In all seasons, within-tree reproductive asynchrony affected parasite reproduction negatively, whereas it had a positive effect on pollinator reproduction in winter and a negative effect in summer. Seasonally variable syconium volumes probably caused the differential effect of within-tree reproductive phenology on pollinator reproduction. Within-tree reproductive asynchrony itself was positively affected by intra-tree variation in syconium contents and volume, creating a unique feedback loop which varied across seasons. Therefore, nursery size affected fig wasp reproduction, seed production and within-tree reproductive

  3. High temperatures result in smaller nurseries which lower reproduction of pollinators and parasites in a brood site pollination mutualism.

    PubMed

    Krishnan, Anusha; Pramanik, Gautam Kumar; Revadi, Santosh V; Venkateswaran, Vignesh; Borges, Renee M

    2014-01-01

    In a nursery pollination mutualism, we asked whether environmental factors affected reproduction of mutualistic pollinators, non-mutualistic parasites and seed production via seasonal changes in plant traits such as inflorescence size and within-tree reproductive phenology. We examined seasonal variation in reproduction in Ficus racemosa community members that utilise enclosed inflorescences called syconia as nurseries. Temperature, relative humidity and rainfall defined four seasons: winter; hot days, cold nights; summer and wet seasons. Syconium volumes were highest in winter and lowest in summer, and affected syconium contents positively across all seasons. Greater transpiration from the nurseries was possibly responsible for smaller syconia in summer. The 3-5°C increase in mean temperatures between the cooler seasons and summer reduced fig wasp reproduction and increased seed production nearly two-fold. Yet, seed and pollinator progeny production were never negatively related in any season confirming the mutualistic fig-pollinator association across seasons. Non-pollinator parasites affected seed production negatively in some seasons, but had a surprisingly positive relationship with pollinators in most seasons. While within-tree reproductive phenology did not vary across seasons, its effect on syconium inhabitants varied with season. In all seasons, within-tree reproductive asynchrony affected parasite reproduction negatively, whereas it had a positive effect on pollinator reproduction in winter and a negative effect in summer. Seasonally variable syconium volumes probably caused the differential effect of within-tree reproductive phenology on pollinator reproduction. Within-tree reproductive asynchrony itself was positively affected by intra-tree variation in syconium contents and volume, creating a unique feedback loop which varied across seasons. Therefore, nursery size affected fig wasp reproduction, seed production and within-tree reproductive phenology

  4. Size Matters a Lot: Drought-Affected Italian Oaks Are Smaller and Show Lower Growth Prior to Tree Death

    PubMed Central

    Colangelo, Michele; Camarero, Jesús J.; Borghetti, Marco; Gazol, Antonio; Gentilesca, Tiziana; Ripullone, Francesco

    2017-01-01

    Hydraulic theory suggests that tall trees are at greater risk of drought-triggered death caused by hydraulic failure than small trees. In addition the drop in growth, observed in several tree species prior to death, is often interpreted as an early-warning signal of impending death. We test these hypotheses by comparing size, growth, and wood-anatomy patterns of living and now-dead trees in two Italian oak forests showing recent mortality episodes. The mortality probability of trees is modeled as a function of recent growth and tree size. Drift-diffusion-jump (DDJ) metrics are used to detect early-warning signals. We found that the tallest trees of the anisohydric Italian oak better survived drought contrary to what was predicted by the theory. Dead trees were characterized by a lower height and radial-growth trend than living trees in both study sites. The growth reduction of now-dead trees started about 10 years prior to their death and after two severe spring droughts during the early 2000s. This critical transition in growth was detected by DDJ metrics in the most affected site. Dead trees were also more sensitive to drought stress in this site indicating different susceptibility to water shortage between trees. Dead trees did not form earlywood vessels with smaller lumen diameter than surviving trees but tended to form wider latewood vessels with a higher percentage of vessel area. Since living and dead trees showed similar competition we did not expect that moderate thinning and a reduction in tree density would increase the short-term survival probability of trees. PMID:28270816

  5. Percutaneous ethanol injection therapy is comparable to radiofrequency ablation in hepatocellular carcinoma smaller than 1.5 cm

    PubMed Central

    Yu, Su Jong; Yoon, Jung-Hwan; Lee, Jeong Min; Lee, Jae Young; Kim, Se Hyung; Cho, Young Youn; Yoo, Jeong-Ju; Lee, Minjong; Lee, Dong Hyeon; Cho, Yuri; Cho, Eun Ju; Lee, Jeong-Hoon; Kim, Yoon Jun; Kim, Chung Yong

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Although percutaneous ethanol injection therapy (PEIT) is best indicated for patients with small hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC), the survival advantage of PEIT needs confirmation in real-world practice. This study was approved by the institutional review board, and the informed consent was waived. The study included 535 consecutive patients with newly diagnosed early stage (Barcelona Clinic Liver Cancer [BCLC] 0 or A) HCC who underwent initially radiofrequency ablation (RFA) (n = 288) or PEIT (n = 247) from January 2005 to December 2010. The primary outcome was overall survival (OS) and the secondary outcome was time to progression (TTP). The longest diameters of tumors of the groups differed significantly and larger for RFA group than PEIT group (P < 0.001; 1.94 ± 0.65 cm vs 1.60 ± 0.50 cm, respectively). The 5-year OS rates were 72.2% in the RFA group and 67.4% in the PEIT group (P = 0.608). Even after propensity score matching, OS rates between the 2 groups were similar (5-year OS: 72.8% with RFA [n = 175] and 68.0% with PEIT [n = 175]) (P = 0.709). Moreover, in patients with the longest diameter of tumors (≤1.5 cm), multivariate Cox regression analysis showed that the treatment modality was not a significant prognosticator for OS (hazard ratio [HR], 1.690; 95% confidence interval [CI], 0.828–3.449; P = 0.149) and time to progression (HR, 1.160; 95% CI, 0.773–1.740; P = 0.474). PEIT and RFA show equal effectiveness in treating HCCs <1.5 cm in terms of OS and time to progression. PMID:27583865

  6. Influence of stellar multiplicity on planet formation. II. Planets are less common in multiple-star systems with separations smaller than 1500 AU

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Ji; Fischer, Debra A.; Xie, Ji-Wei; Ciardi, David R.

    2014-08-20

    Almost half of the stellar systems in the solar neighborhood are made up of multiple stars. In multiple-star systems, planet formation is under the dynamical influence of stellar companions, and the planet occurrence rate is expected to be different from that of single stars. There have been numerous studies on the planet occurrence rate of single star systems. However, to fully understand planet formation, the planet occurrence rate in multiple-star systems needs to be addressed. In this work, we infer the planet occurrence rate in multiple-star systems by measuring the stellar multiplicity rate for planet host stars. For a subsample of 56 Kepler planet host stars, we use adaptive optics (AO) imaging and the radial velocity (RV) technique to search for stellar companions. The combination of these two techniques results in high search completeness for stellar companions. We detect 59 visual stellar companions to 25 planet host stars with AO data. Three stellar companions are within 2'' and 27 within 6''. We also detect two possible stellar companions (KOI 5 and KOI 69) showing long-term RV acceleration. After correcting for a bias against planet detection in multiple-star systems due to flux contamination, we find that planet formation is suppressed in multiple-star systems with separations smaller than 1500 AU. Specifically, we find that compared to single star systems, planets in multiple-star systems occur 4.5 ± 3.2, 2.6 ± 1.0, and 1.7 ± 0.5 times less frequently when a stellar companion is present at a distance of 10, 100, and 1000 AU, respectively. This conclusion applies only to circumstellar planets; the planet occurrence rate for circumbinary planets requires further investigation.

  7. More use almost always a means a smaller frequency effect: Aging, bilingualism, and the weaker links hypothesis

    PubMed Central

    Gollan, Tamar H.; Montoya, Rosa I.; Cera, Cynthia; Sandoval, Tiffany C.

    2008-01-01

    The “weaker links” hypothesis proposes that bilinguals are disadvantaged relative to monolinguals on speaking tasks because they divide frequency-of-use between two languages. To test this proposal we contrasted the effects of increased word use associated with monolingualism, language dominance, and increased age on picture naming times. In two experiments, younger and older bilinguals and monolinguals named pictures with high- or low-frequency names in English and (if bilingual) also in Spanish. In Experiment 1, slowing related to bilingualism and language dominance was greater for producing low- than high-frequency names. In Experiment 2, slowing related to aging was greater for producing low-frequency names in the dominant language, but when speaking the nondominant language, increased age attenuated frequency effects and age-related slowing was limited exclusively to high-frequency names. These results challenge competition based accounts of bilingual disadvantages in language production, and illustrate how between-group processing differences may emerge from cognitive mechanisms general to all speakers. PMID:19343088

  8. The smaller, the better? The size effect of alginate beads carrying plant growth-promoting bacteria for seed coating.

    PubMed

    Berninger, Teresa; Mitter, Birgit; Preininger, Claudia

    2016-01-01

    A range of lab-scale methods for encapsulation of plant growth-promoting bacteria in alginate beads intended for seed coating was evaluated: contact-spotting, extrusion through syringe with/without vibration, ejection by robotic liquid handler, extrusion by centrifugal force and commercial devices (nanodispenser, aerodynamically assisted jetting, encapsulator). Two methods were selected based on throughput (encapsulator: 1.5-5 mL/min; syringe with subsequent pulverisation: 5 mL/min). Four bead sizes (55 ± 39 μm, 104 ± 23 μm, 188 ± 16 μm and 336 ± 20 μm after lyophilisation) were produced. Bacterial viability, release, bead morphology, seed surface coverage and attrition were investigated. Release from the smallest bead size was approximately 10 times higher than from the largest. Seed surface coverage was highest (69 ± 3%) when alginate beads produced with nozzle size 80 μm were applied. Pulverised macro-beads are an alternative option, if high throughput is top priority.

  9. Hole transporting material 5, 10, 15-tribenzyl-5H-diindolo[3, 2-a:3‧, 2‧-c]-carbazole for efficient optoelectronic applications as an active layer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zheng, Yan-Qiong; J. Potscavage, William, Jr.; Zhang, Jian-Hua; Wei, Bin; Huang, Rong-Juan

    2015-02-01

    In order to explore the novel application of the transparent hole-transporting material 5,10,15-tribenzyl-5H-diindolo[3,2-a:3‧,2‧-c]-carbazole (TBDI), in this article TBDI is used as an active layer but not a buffer layer in a photodetector (PD), organic light-emitting diode (OLED), and organic photovoltaic cell (OPV) for the first time. Firstly, the absorption and emission spectra of a blend layer comprised of TBDI and electron-transporting material bis-(2-methyl-8-quinolinate) 4-phenylphenolate (BAlq) are investigated. Based on the absorption properties, an organic PD with a peak absorption at 320 nm is fabricated, and a relatively-high detectivity of 2.44 × 1011 cm·Hz1/2/W under 320-nm illumination is obtained. The TBDI/tris (8-hydroxyquinoline) aluminum (Alq3) OLED device exhibits a comparable external quantum efficiency and current efficiency to a traditional 4, 4-bis[N-(1-naphthyl)-N-phenyl-amino]biphenyl (α-NPD)/Alq3 OLED. A C70-based Schottky junction with 5 wt%-TBDI yields a power conversion efficiency of 5.0%, which is much higher than 1.7% for an α-NPD-based junction in the same configuration. These results suggest that TBDI has some promising properties which are in favor of the hole-transporting in Schottky junctions with a low-concentration donor. Project supported by the Funding Program for World-Leading Innovative R & D on Science and Technology (FIRST) from JSPS, the Fund from the Science and Technology Commission of Shanghai Municipality, China (Grant Nos. 14DZ2280900 and 14XD1401800), and the Natural Science Foundation of Shanghai (Grant No. 15ZR1416600).

  10. Higher intron loss rate in Arabidopsis thaliana than A. lyrata is consistent with stronger selection for a smaller genome.

    PubMed

    Fawcett, Jeffrey A; Rouzé, Pierre; Van de Peer, Yves

    2012-02-01

    The number of introns varies considerably among different organisms. This can be explained by the differences in the rates of intron gain and loss. Two factors that are likely to influence these rates are selection for or against introns and the mutation rate that generates the novel intron or the intronless copy. Although it has been speculated that stronger selection for a compact genome might result in a higher rate of intron loss and a lower rate of intron gain, clear evidence is lacking, and the role of selection in determining these rates has not been established. Here, we studied the gain and loss of introns in the two closely related species Arabidopsis thaliana and A. lyrata as it was recently shown that A. thaliana has been undergoing a faster genome reduction driven by selection. We found that A. thaliana has lost six times more introns than A. lyrata since the divergence of the two species but gained very few introns. We suggest that stronger selection for genome reduction probably resulted in the much higher intron loss rate in A. thaliana, although further analysis is required as we could not find evidence that the loss rate increased in A. thaliana as opposed to having decreased in A. lyrata compared with the rate in the common ancestor. We also examined the pattern of the intron gains and losses to better understand the mechanisms by which they occur. Microsimilarity was detected between the splice sites of several gained and lost introns, suggesting that nonhomologous end joining repair of double-strand breaks might be a common pathway not only for intron gain but also for intron loss.

  11. Protein Thermostability Is Owing to Their Preferences to Non-Polar Smaller Volume Amino Acids, Variations in Residual Physico-Chemical Properties and More Salt-Bridges

    PubMed Central

    Panja, Anindya Sundar; Bandopadhyay, Bidyut; Maiti, Smarajit

    2015-01-01

    <0.001, respectively) in thermophilic and GLU-ARG is higher in the mesophilic proteins. The Ramachandran plot/ data suggest a higher abundance of the helix, left-handed helix, sheet, nonplanar peptide and lower occurrence of cis peptide, loop/ turn and outlier in thermophiles. Pearson’s correlation result suggests that the isoelectric points of mesophilic and thermophilic proteins are positively correlated (r = 0.93 and 0.84, respectively; p<0.001) to their corresponding charges. And their hydrophilicity is negatively associated with the corresponding hydrophobicity (r = -0.493, p<0.001 and r = -0.324, p<0.05) suggesting their reciprocal evolvement. Conclusions Present results for the first time with this large amount of datasets and multiple contributing factors suggest the greater occurrence of hydrophobicity, salt-bridges and smaller volume nonpolar residues (Gly, Ala and Val) and lesser occurrence of bulky polar residues in the thermophilic proteins. A more stoichiometric relationship amongst these factors minimized the hindrance due to side chain burial and increased compactness and secondary structural stability in thermophilic proteins. PMID:26177372

  12. Older poor-sleeping women display a smaller evening increase in melatonin secretion and lower values of melatonin and core body temperature than good sleepers.

    PubMed

    Olbrich, Denise; Dittmar, Manuela

    2011-10-01

    Melatonin concentration and core body temperature (CBT) follow endogenous circadian biological rhythms. In the evening, melatonin level increases and CBT decreases. These changes are involved in the regulation of the sleep-wake cycle. Therefore, the authors hypothesized that age-related changes in these rhythms affect sleep quality in older people. In a cross-sectional study design, 11 older poor-sleeping women (aged 62-72 yrs) and 9 older good-sleeping women (60-82 yrs) were compared with 10 younger good-sleeping women (23-28 yrs). The older groups were matched by age and body mass index. Sleep quality was assessed by the Pittsburgh Sleep Quality Index questionnaire. As an indicator of CBT, oral temperature was measured at 1-h intervals from 17:00 to 24:00 h. At the same time points, saliva samples were collected for determining melatonin levels by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA). The dim light melatonin onset (DLMO), characterizing the onset of melatonin production, was calculated. Evening changes in melatonin and CBT levels were tested by the Friedman test. Group comparisons were performed with independent samples tests. Predictors of sleep-onset latency (SOL) were assessed by regression analysis. Results show that the mean CBT decreased in the evening from 17:00 to 24:00 h in both young women (from 36.57°C to 36.25°C, p < .001) and older women (from 36.58°C to 35.88°C, p < .001), being lowest in the older poor sleepers (p < .05). During the same time period, mean melatonin levels increased in young women (from 16.2 to 54.1 pg/mL, p < .001) and older women (from 10.0 to 23.5 pg/mL, p < .001), being lowest among the older poor sleepers (from 20:00 to 24:00 h, p < .05 vs. young women). Older poor sleepers also showed a smaller increase in melatonin level from 17:00 to 24:00 h than older good sleepers (mean ± SD: 7.0 ± 9.63 pg/mL vs. 15.6 ± 24.1 pg/mL, p = .013). Accordingly, the DLMO occurred at similar times in young (20:10

  13. Application of an octa-anionic 5,10,15,20-tetra[3,5-(nido-carboranylmethyl)phenyl]porphyrin (H2OCP) as dual sensitizer for BNCT and PDT

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The applications of the octa-anionic 5,10,15,20-tetra[3,5-(nidocarboranylmethyl) phenyl]porphyrin (H2OCP) as a boron delivery agent in boron neutron capture therapy (BNCT) and a photosensitizer in photodynamic therapy (PDT) have been investigated. Using F98 Rat glioma cells, we evaluated the cytotox...

  14. The first series of 4,11-bis[(2-aminoethyl)amino]anthra[2,3-b]furan-5,10-diones: Synthesis and anti-proliferative characteristics.

    PubMed

    Shchekotikhin, Andrey E; Glazunova, Valeria A; Dezhenkova, Lyubov G; Shevtsova, Elena K; Traven', Valery F; Balzarini, Jan; Huang, Hsu-Shan; Shtil, Alexander A; Preobrazhenskaya, Maria N

    2011-01-01

    We developed the synthesis of a series of furan-fused tetracyclic analogues of the antitumor agent ametantrone. The reactions included nucleophilic substitution of propoxy groups in 4,11-dipropoxyanthra[2,3-b]furan-5,10-diones with ethylenediamines, producing the derivatives of 4,11-diaminoanthra[2,3-b]furan-5,10-dione in good yields. Studies of anti-proliferative activity on a panel of mammalian tumor cell lines demonstrated that anthra[2,3-b]furan-5,10-diones were the most potent derivatives among heteroarene-fused ametantrone analogues with one heteroatom. We identified several compounds that evoked a growth inhibitory effect at submicromolar concentrations. The anthra[2,3-b]furan-5,10-dione 9 with distal methylamino groups was markedly potent against drug-resistant cell lines with P-glycoprotein overexpression or p53 gene deletion. Furthermore, this derivative attenuated in vitro topoisomerase I-mediated DNA uncoiling at low micromolar concentrations. These results demonstrate that anthrafurandiones are a new class of heterocyclic anthraquinone derivatives with the properties potentially valuable for anticancer therapy.

  15. 21 CFR 73.3117 - 16,23-Dihydrodinaphtho[2,3-a:2′,3′-i] naphth [2′,3′:6,7] indolo [2,3-c] carbazole-5,10,15,17,22...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 1 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false 16,23-Dihydrodinaphtho naphth indolo carbazole-5,10,15,17,22,24-hexone. 73.3117 Section 73.3117 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION... minimum reasonably required to accomplish the intended coloring effect. (2) Authorization for this...

  16. 21 CFR 73.3117 - 16,23-Dihydrodinaphtho[2,3-a:2′,3′-i] naphth [2′,3′:6,7] indolo [2,3-c] carbazole-5,10,15,17,22...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 1 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false 16,23-Dihydrodinaphtho naphth indolo carbazole-5,10,15,17,22,24-hexone. 73.3117 Section 73.3117 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION... minimum reasonably required to accomplish the intended coloring effect. (2) Authorization for this...

  17. [Pharmacological and toxicological investigation of 2,2-diethyl-2,3,5,10-tetrahydro-1H-pyrazolo(1,2-b)phthalazine-1,3-dione, a new compound with anti-inflammatory activity].

    PubMed

    Dalla Vedova, R; Cadel, S; D'Alò, G

    1980-06-01

    As part of research on 1H-pyrazole[1,2-b]phthalazine compounds with anti-inflammatory activity, the results of preliminary pharmacological and toxicological investigation of 2,2-diethyl-2,2,5,10-tetrahydro-1H-pyrazolo[1,2-b]phthalazine-1,3-dione are reported.

  18. Shrinking Endowments Are Smaller Targets

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Field, Kelly

    2008-01-01

    This article reports that if there's a silver lining in the dark cloud hanging over campus budgets, it may be that colleges' investment losses could ease Congress's demands for mandatory endowment payouts, at least in the short term. In part that's because colleges tend to spend greater portions of their assets when endowments dip, even if overall…

  19. Smaller Fleas: Viruses of Microorganisms

    PubMed Central

    Hyman, Paul; Abedon, Stephen T.

    2012-01-01

    Life forms can be roughly differentiated into those that are microscopic versus those that are not as well as those that are multicellular and those that, instead, are unicellular. Cellular organisms seem generally able to host viruses, and this propensity carries over to those that are both microscopic and less than truly multicellular. These viruses of microorganisms, or VoMs, in fact exist as the world's most abundant somewhat autonomous genetic entities and include the viruses of domain Bacteria (bacteriophages), the viruses of domain Archaea (archaeal viruses), the viruses of protists, the viruses of microscopic fungi such as yeasts (mycoviruses), and even the viruses of other viruses (satellite viruses). In this paper we provide an introduction to the concept of viruses of microorganisms, a.k.a., viruses of microbes. We provide broad discussion particularly of VoM diversity. VoM diversity currently spans, in total, at least three-dozen virus families. This is roughly ten families per category—bacterial, archaeal, fungal, and protist—with some virus families infecting more than one of these microorganism major taxa. Such estimations, however, will vary with further discovery and taxon assignment and also are dependent upon what forms of life one includes among microorganisms. PMID:24278736

  20. Smaller magnets for smarter minds?

    PubMed

    Muggleton, Neil; Walsh, Vincent

    2012-09-01

    Human brain stimulation for therapeutic purposes has many short- and long-term limitations. The possibility of implanting magnetic, rather than electrical, stimulation devices would present a possible solution to some of the problems. The development of a new microscopic magnetic stimulation device provides a glimpse of the realisation.

  1. Connector Mechanism Has Smaller Stroke

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Milam, M. Bruce

    1992-01-01

    System for connecting electrical and/or fluid lines includes mechanism reducing length of stroke necessary to make or break connections. Feature enables connection and disconnection in confined space, and compensates for misalignment between connectors. Connector in active member moves upward at twice the speed of downward stroke of passive member. Stroke amplified within connector system. Applications include connections between modular electronic units, coupled vehicles, and hydraulic systems.

  2. Crash Impact Demonstration. (pt 5/10)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1984-01-01

    This clip: Wide shot of impact, front/port side showing a large volume of AMK flowing over the fuselage, and the effects on the occupants. With narration. Background: On December 1st, 1984, a remote controlled 4 engined transport jet took off from Edwards AFB, CA and crashed into a barren patch of nearby desert. This Controlled Impact Demonstration was a joint R&D program by the FAA and NASA. The FAA designed the C.I.D. to underscore results of exhaustive research in two areas of aircraft safety: improved crash protection and reduced post-crash fire hazards.Despite the fact the crash did not go exactly as designed C.I.D.did achieve its primary objectives.The analysis of C.I.D. data continues. The CID's crash wothiness tests were as important to the FAA as the fire safety tests. The crash protection objectives were: 1st: To obtain data on impact forces and their transmission thru the structure to the seats and occupants. 2nd: To evaluate the performance of existing and advanced energy absorbing seats. 3rd :To compare tests used to predict structural behaviour with an actual crash. AMK (anti-misting kerosene) fuel was employed in the test. The FAA has examined AMK's potential for protecting commercial transports from ignition of misted fuels. All research indicated that AMK would be effective in preventing this problem. The C.I.D. was an opportunity to use AMK in a realistic, impact-survivable crash.

  3. This Week @ NASA - 11/5/10

    NASA Video Gallery

    The Postponement of Mission STS-133 tops the billboard on This Week @ NASA. Also, EPOXI meets a Comet, NASA and LEGO build a future together, Administrator Bolden heralds ten years of ISS, KSC Twee...

  4. nem_spread Ver. 5.10

    SciTech Connect

    HENNIGAN, GARY; SHADID, JOHN; SJAARDEMA, GREGORY; HUTCHINSON, SCOTT

    2009-06-08

    Nem_spread reads it's input command file (default name nem_spread.inp), takes the named ExodusII geometry definition and spreads out the geometry (and optionally results) contained in that file out to a parallel disk system. The decomposition is taken from a scalar Nemesis load balance file generated by the companion utility nem_slice.

  5. Conversion of 5(10)-oestrene-3 beta,17 beta-diol to 19-nor-4-ene-3-ketosteroids by luteal cells in vitro: possible involvement of the 3 beta-hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase/isomerase.

    PubMed

    Lee, C M; Tekpetey, F R; Armstrong, D T; Khalil, M W

    1991-05-01

    We have previously suggested that in porcine granulosa cells, a putative intermediate, 5(10)-oestrene-3,17-dione is involved in 4-oestrene-3,17-dione (19-norandrostenedione; 19-norA) and 4-oestren-17 beta-ol-3-one (19-nortestosterone: 19-norT) formation from C19 aromatizable androgens. In this study, luteal cells prepared from porcine, bovine and rat corpora lutea by centrifugal elutriation were used as a source of 3 beta-hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase/isomerase in order to investigate the role of this enzyme in the biosynthesis of 19-norsteroids. Small porcine luteal cells made mainly 19-norT and large porcine luteal cells 19-norA from 5(10)-oestrene-3 beta,17 beta-diol, the reduced product of the putative intermediate 5(10)-oestrene-3,17-dione. However, neither small nor large cells metabolized androstenedione to 19-norsteroids. Serum and serum plus LH significantly stimulated formation of both 19-norA and 19-norT from 5(10)-oestrene-3 beta,17 beta-diol, compared with controls. Inhibitors of the 3 beta-hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase/isomerase (trilostane and cyanoketone) significantly reduced formation of 19-norT in small porcine luteal cells and 19-norA in large porcine luteal cells, although they were effective at different concentrations in each cell type. In parallel incubations, formation of [4-14C]androstenedione from added [4-14C]dehydroepiandrosterone was also inhibited by cyanoketone in both small and large porcine luteal cells in a dose-dependent manner; however, trilostane (up to 100 mumol/l) did not inhibit androstenedione formation in large porcine luteal cells. In addition, the decrease in progesterone synthesis induced by trilostane and cyanoketone (100 mumol/l each) was accompanied by a parallel accumulation of pregnenolone in both cell types. These results suggest that 3 beta-hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase/isomerase, or a closely related enzyme, present in small and large porcine luteal cells can convert added 5(10)-3 beta-hydroxysteroids into 19-nor-4

  6. Greater loss in muscle mass and function but smaller metabolic alterations in older compared with younger men following 2 wk of bed rest and recovery.

    PubMed

    Pišot, Rado; Marusic, Uros; Biolo, Gianni; Mazzucco, Sara; Lazzer, Stefano; Grassi, Bruno; Reggiani, Carlo; Toniolo, Luana; di Prampero, Pietro Enrico; Passaro, Angelina; Narici, Marco; Mohammed, Shahid; Rittweger, Joern; Gasparini, Mladen; Gabrijelčič Blenkuš, Mojca; Šimunič, Boštjan

    2016-04-15

    This investigation aimed to compare the response of young and older adult men to bed rest (BR) and subsequent rehabilitation (R). Sixteen older (OM, age 55-65 yr) and seven young (YM, age 18-30 yr) men were exposed to a 14-day period of BR followed by 14 days of R. Quadriceps muscle volume (QVOL), force (QF), and explosive power (QP) of leg extensors; single-fiber isometric force (Fo); peak aerobic power (V̇o2peak); gait stride length; and three metabolic parameters, Matsuda index of insulin sensitivity, postprandial lipid curve, and homocysteine plasma level, were measured before and after BR and after R. Following BR, QVOL was smaller in OM (-8.3%) than in YM (-5.7%,P= 0.031); QF (-13.2%,P= 0.001), QP (-12.3%,P= 0.001), and gait stride length (-9.9%,P= 0.002) were smaller only in OM. Fo was significantly smaller in both YM (-32.0%) and OM (-16.4%) without significant differences between groups. V̇o2peakdecreased more in OM (-15.3%) than in YM (-7.6%,P< 0.001). Instead, the Matsuda index fell to a greater extent in YM than in OM (-46.0% vs. -19.8%, respectively,P= 0.003), whereas increases in postprandial lipid curve (+47.2%,P= 0.013) and homocysteine concentration (+26.3%,P= 0.027) were observed only in YM. Importantly, after R, the recovery of several parameters, among them QVOL, QP, and V̇o2peak, was not complete in OM, whereas Fo did not recover in either age group. The results show that the effect of inactivity on muscle mass and function is greater in OM, whereas metabolic alterations are greater in YM. Furthermore, these findings show that the recovery of preinactivity conditions is slower in OM.

  7. Large Soluble Oligomers of Amyloid β-Protein from Alzheimer Brain Are Far Less Neuroactive Than the Smaller Oligomers to Which They Dissociate.

    PubMed

    Yang, Ting; Li, Shaomin; Xu, Huixin; Walsh, Dominic M; Selkoe, Dennis J

    2017-01-04

    Soluble oligomers of amyloid β-protein (oAβ) isolated from the brains of Alzheimer's disease (AD) patients have been shown experimentally (in the absence of amyloid plaques) to impair hippocampal synaptic plasticity, decrease synapses, induce tau hyperphosphorylation and neuritic dystrophy, activate microglial inflammation, and impair memory in normal adult rodents. Nevertheless, there has been controversy about what types of oligomers actually confer these AD-like phenotypes. Here, we show that the vast majority of soluble Aβ species obtained from brains of humans who died with confirmed AD elute at high molecular weight (HMW) on nondenaturing size-exclusion chromatography. These species have little or no cytotoxic activity in several bioassays. However, incubation of HMW oAβ in mildly alkaline buffer led to their quantitative dissociation into low molecular weight oligomers (∼8-70 kDa), and these were now far more bioactive: they impaired hippocampal LTP, decreased neuronal levels of β2-adrenergic receptors, and activated microglia in wt mice in vivo Thus, most soluble Aβ assemblies in AD cortex are large and inactive but under certain circumstances can dissociate into smaller, highly bioactive species. Insoluble amyloid plaques likely sequester soluble HMW oligomers, limiting their potential to dissociate. We conclude that conditions that destabilize HMW oligomers or retard the sequestration of their smaller, more bioactive components are important drivers of Aβ toxicity. Selectively targeting these small, cytotoxic forms should be therapeutically beneficial.

  8. Cyanidin-3-glucoside derived from black soybeans ameliorate type 2 diabetes through the induction of differentiation of preadipocytes into smaller and insulin-sensitive adipocytes.

    PubMed

    Matsukawa, Toshiya; Inaguma, Tetsuya; Han, Junkyu; Villareal, Myra O; Isoda, Hiroko

    2015-08-01

    Black soybean is a health food has been reported to have antidiabetes effect. The onset of diabetes is closely associated with adipocyte differentiation, and at present, the effect of black soybean on adipocyte differentiation is unknown. Here, we investigated the antidiabetes effect of black soybean, and its anthocyanin cyanidin-3-glucoside (Cy3G), on adipocyte differentiation. Orally administered black soybean seed coat extract (BSSCE) reduced the body and white adipose tissue (WAT) weight of db/db mice accompanied by a decrease in the size of adipocytes in WAT. Furthermore, 3T3-Ll cells treated with BSSCE and Cy3G were observed to differentiate into smaller adipocytes which correlated with increased PPARγ and C/EBPα gene expressions, increased adiponectin secretion, decreased tumor necrosis factor-α secretion, activation of insulin signalling and increased glucose uptake. C2C12 myotubes cultured with conditioned medium, obtained from 3T3-L1 adipocyte cultures treated with Cy3G, also showed significantly increased expression of PGC-1α, SIRT1 and UCP-3 genes. Here we report that BSSCE, as well as its active compound Cy3G, has antidiabetes effects on db/db mice by promoting adipocyte differentiation. This notion is supported by BSSCE and Cy3G inducing the differentiation of 3T3-L1 preadipocytes into smaller, insulin-sensitive adipocytes, and it induced the activation of skeletal muscle metabolism. This is the first report on the modulation effect of Cy3G on adipocyte differentiation.

  9. Amphidynamic Crystals of a Steroidal Bicyclo[2.2.2]octane Rotor: A High Symmetry Group that Rotates Faster than Smaller Methyl and Methoxy Groups

    PubMed Central

    Rodríguez-Molina, Braulio; Pérez-Estrada, Salvador

    2013-01-01

    The synthesis, crystallization, single crystal X-ray structure, and solid state dynamics of molecular rotor 3 provided with a high symmetry order and relatively cylindrical bicyclo[2.2.2]octane (BCO) rotator linked to mestranol fragments were investigated in this work. Using solid state 13C NMR, three rotating fragments were identified within the molecule: the BCO, the C19 methoxy and the C18 methyl groups. To determine the dynamics of the BCO group in crystals of 3 by variable temperature 1H spin-lattice relaxation (VT 1H–T1), we determined the 1H–T1 contributions from the methoxy group C19 by carrying out measurements with the methoxy-deuterated isotopologue rotor 3-d6. The contributions from the quaternary methyl group C18 were estimated by considering the differences between the VT 1H–T1 of mestranol 8 and methoxy-deuterated mestranol 8-d3. From these studies it was determined that the BCO rotator in 3 has an activation energy of only 1.15 kcal mol−1, with a barrier for site exchange that is smaller than those of methyl (Ea = 1.35 kcal mol−1) and methoxy groups (Ea = 1.91 kcal mol−1), despite their smaller moments of inertia and surface areas. PMID:23796326

  10. Initial basal cell carcinomas diagnosed in the National Campaign for Skin Cancer Prevention are smaller than those identified by the conventional medical referral system*

    PubMed Central

    Wakiyama, Thweicyka Pinheiro; França, Maria Laura Marconi; Carvalho, Larissa Pierri; Marques, Mariangela Esther Alencar; Miot, Hélio Amante; Schmitt, Juliano Vilaverde

    2017-01-01

    BACKGROUND Basal cell carcinoma is the malignant tumor most often diagnosed in the National Campaign for Skin Cancer Prevention (NCSCP). Little is known about the profile of these lesions compared to the profile of lesions diagnosed by conventional routes of public dermatological care. OBJECTIVE To identify if basal cell carcinomas identified in prevention campaigns and referred to surgery are smaller than those routinely removed in a same medical institution. METHODS Cross-sectional study including tumors routed from 2011-2014 campaigns and 84 anatomopathological reports of outpatients. RESULTS The campaigns identified 223 individuals with suspicious lesions among 2,531 examinations (9%), with 116 basal cell carcinomas removed. Anatomopathological examinations revealed that the primary lesions identified in the national campaigns were smaller than those referred to surgery by the conventional routes of public health care (28 [13-50] x 38 [20-113] mm2, p <0.01). On the other hand, after a mean follow-up of 15.6 ± 10.3 months, 31% of cases identified in campaigns showed new basal cell carcinoma lesions. STUDY LIMITATIONS Retrospective study and inaccuracies in the measurements of the lesions. CONCLUSIONS The NCSCP promotes an earlier treatment of basal cell carcinomas compared to patients referred to surgery by the conventional routes of public health care, which can result in lower morbidity rates and better prognosis. PMID:28225952

  11. Effect of larval growth conditions on adult body mass and long-distance flight endurance in a wood-boring beetle: Do smaller beetles fly better?

    PubMed

    Brown, Stav; Soroker, Victoria; Ribak, Gal

    2017-02-22

    The tropical fig borer, Batocera rufomaculata De Geer, is a large beetle that is a pest on a number of fruit trees, including fig and mango. Adults feed on the leaves and twigs and females lay their eggs under the bark of the tree. The larvae bore into the tree trunk, causing substantial damage that may lead to the collapse and death of the host tree. We studied how larval development under inferior feeding conditions (experienced during development in dying trees) affects flight endurance in the adult insect. We grew larvae either in their natural host or on sawdust enriched with stale fig tree twigs. Flight endurance of the adults was measured using a custom-built flight-mill. Beetles emerging from the natural host were significantly larger but flew shorter distances than beetles reared on less favourable substrates. There was no difference in the allometric slope of wing area with body mass between the beetles groups; however flight muscle mass scaled with total body mass with an exponent significantly lower than 1.0. Hence, smaller beetles had proportionally larger flight muscles. These findings suggest that beetles that developed smaller as a result from poor nutritional conditions in deteriorating hosts, are better equipped to fly longer distances in search of a new host tree.

  12. Two phosphoenolpyruvate carboxykinases coexist in the Crassulacean Acid Metabolism plant Ananas comosus. Isolation and characterization of the smaller 65 kDa form.

    PubMed

    Martín, Mariana; Rius, Sebastián Pablo; Podestá, Florencio Esteban

    2011-06-01

    Two phosphoenolpyruvate carboxykinase (PEPCK, EC 4.1.1.49) isoforms of 74 and 65 kDa were found to coexist in vivo in pineapple leaves, a constitutive Crassulacean Acid Metabolism plant. The 65 kDa form was not the result of proteolytic cleavage of the larger form since extraction methods reported to prevent PEPCK proteolysis in other plant tissues failed to yield a single immunoreactive PEPCK polypeptide in leaf extracts. In this work, the smaller form of 65 kDa was purified to homogeneity and physically and kinetically characterized and showed parameters compatible with a fully active enzyme. The specific activity was nearly twice higher for decarboxylation of oxaloacetate when compared to carboxylation of phosphoenolpyruvate. Kinetic parameters fell within the range of those estimated for other plant PEPCKs. Its activity was affected by several metabolites, as shown by inhibition by 3-phosphoglycerate, citrate, malate, fructose-1,6-bisphosphate, l-asparagine and activation of the decarboxylating activity by succinate. A break in the Arrhenius plot at about 30°C indicates that PEPCK structure is responsive to changes in temperature. The results indicate that pineapple leaves contain two PEPCK forms. The biochemical characterization of the smaller isoform performed in this work suggests that it could participate in both carbon and nitrogen metabolism in vivo by acting as a decarboxylase.

  13. Source identification and apportionment of PM2.5 and PM2.5-10 in iron and steel scrap smelting factory environment using PMF, PCFA and UNMIX receptor models.

    PubMed

    Ogundele, Lasun T; Owoade, Oyediran K; Olise, Felix S; Hopke, Philip K

    2016-10-01

    To identify the potential sources responsible for the particulate matter emission from secondary iron and steel smelting factory environment, PM2.5 and PM2.5-10 particles were collected using the low-volume air samplers twice a week for a year. The samples were analyzed for the elemental and black carbon content using x-ray fluorescence spectrometer and optical transmissometer, respectively. The average mass concentrations were 216.26, 151.68, and 138. 62 μg/m(3) for PM2.5 and 331.36, 190.01, and 184.60 μg/m(3) for PM2.5-10 for the production, outside M1 and outside M2 sites, respectively. The same size resolved data set were used as input for the positive matrix factorization (PMF), principal component factor analysis (PCFA), and Unmix (UNMIX) receptor modeling in order to identify the possible sources of particulate matter and their contribution. The PMF resolved four sources with their respective contributions were metal processing (33 %), e-waste (33 %), diesel emission (22 %) and soil (12 %) for PM2.5, and coking (50 %), soil (29 %), metal processing (16 %) and diesel combustion (5 %) for PM2.5-10. PCFA identified soil, metal processing, Pb source, and diesel combustion contributing 45, 41, 9, and 5 %, respectively to PM2.5 while metal processing, soil, coal combustion and open burning contributed 43, 38, 12, and 7 %, respectively to the PM2.5-10. Also, UNMIX identified metal processing, soil, and diesel emission with 43, 42 and 15 % contributions, respectively for the fine fraction, and metal processing (71 %), soil (21 %) and unidentified source (1 %) for the coarse fraction. The study concluded that metal processing and e-waste are the major sources contributing to the fine fraction while coking and soil contributed to the coarse fraction within the factory environment. The application of PMF, PCFA and UNMIX receptor models improved the source identification and apportionment of particulate matter drive in the study area.

  14. A novel synthesis and pharmacological evaluation of a potential dopamine D1/D2 agonist: 1-propyl-1,2,3,4,4a,5,10,10a-octahydrobenzo[g]quinoline-6,7-diol.

    PubMed

    Liu, Danyang; Dijkstra, Durk; de Vries, Jan B; Wikström, Håkan V

    2008-03-15

    Previously, we have demonstrated that enone prodrugs of dopaminergic catecholamines represent a new type of dopamine (DA) agonist. Trans-1-propyl-1,2,3,4,4a,5,10,10a-octahydrobenzo[g]quinoline-6,7-diol (TL-334), the active form of trans-1-propyl-2,3,4,4a,5,7,8,9,10,10a-decahydro-1H-benzo[g]quinolin-6-one (GMC-6650), in vivo showed an extremely potent dopaminergic activity. Here, we report a novel synthesis and a pharmacological evaluation of TL-334 by means of microdialysis.

  15. Synthesis and evaluation of (17 alpha,20E)-21-(/sup 125/I)iodo-19-norpregna-1,3,5(10),20-tetraene-3,17 -diol and (17 alpha,20E)-21-(/sup 125/I)iodo-11 beta-methoxy-19-norpregna-1,3,5(10),20-tetraene-3,17-diol (17 alpha-(iodovinyl)estradiol derivatives) as high specific activity potential radiopharmaceuticals

    SciTech Connect

    Nakatsuka, I.; Ferreira, N.L.; Eckelman, W.C.; Francis, B.E.; Rzeszotarski, W.J.; Gibson, R.E.; Jagoda, E.M.; Reba, R.C.

    1984-10-01

    Two 17 alpha-(/sup 125/I)iodovinyl estradiol derivatives 4b,d possessing high specific activity have been prepared and tested as potential radiopharmaceuticals. The use of the 3-acetyl derivatives 2c,e and the replacement of iodine monochloride with sodium iodide and Chloramine-T in THF/phosphate buffer (pH 7.0) permitted us to synthesize no-carrier-added (17 alpha,20E)-21-(/sup 125/I)iodo-19-norpregna-1,3,5(10),20-tetraene-3,17-d iol (4b) and (17 alpha,20E)-21-(/sup 125/I)iodo-11 beta-methoxy-19-norpregna-1,3,5(10),20-tetraene-3,17-diol (4d) with 50% radiochemical yield and high purity. Although the specific activity represents only half of the theoretical value in some cases, this modified approach is a substantial improvement over the previously published method. Our preliminary distribution studies indicate that although both 4b and 4d localize in the tissues known to have a large concentration of estrogen receptors, 4d accumulates in higher amounts in target tissues and provides a high target to nontarget ratio.

  16. OBJECTS APPEAR SMALLER AS THEY RECEDE: HOW PROPER MOTIONS CAN DIRECTLY REVEAL THE COSMIC EXPANSION, PROVIDE GEOMETRIC DISTANCES, AND MEASURE THE HUBBLE CONSTANT

    SciTech Connect

    Darling, Jeremy

    2013-11-10

    Objects and structures gravitationally decoupled from the Hubble expansion will appear to shrink in angular size as the universe expands. Observations of extragalactic proper motions can thus directly reveal the cosmic expansion. Relatively static structures such as galaxies or galaxy clusters can potentially be used to measure the Hubble constant, and test masses in large scale structures can measure the overdensity. Since recession velocities and angular separations can be precisely measured, apparent proper motions can also provide geometric distance measurements to static structures. The apparent fractional angular compression of static objects is 15 μas yr{sup –1} in the local universe; this motion is modulated by the overdensity in dynamic expansion-decoupled structures. We use the Titov et al. quasar proper motion catalog to examine the pairwise proper motion of a sparse network of test masses. Small-separation pairs (<200 Mpc comoving) are too few to measure the expected effect, yielding an inconclusive 8.3 ± 14.9 μas yr{sup –1}. Large-separation pairs (200-1500 Mpc) show no net convergence or divergence for z < 1, –2.7 ± 3.7 μas yr{sup –1}, consistent with pure Hubble expansion and significantly inconsistent with static structures, as expected. For all pairs a 'null test' gives –0.36 ± 0.62 μas yr{sup –1}, consistent with Hubble expansion and excludes a static locus at ∼5-10σ significance for z ≅ 0.5-2.0. The observed large-separation pairs provide a reference frame for small-separation pairs that will significantly deviate from the Hubble flow. The current limitation is the number of small-separation objects with precise astrometry, but Gaia will address this and will likely detect the cosmic recession.

  17. Redetermination of cyclo-tetra-kis-(μ-5,10,15,20-tetra-4-pyridyl-porphyrinato)tetra-zinc(II) dimethyl-formamide octa-solvate trihydrate at 100 K.

    PubMed

    Seidel, Rüdiger W; Graf, Jürgen; Goddard, Richard; Oppel, Iris M

    2011-01-22

    The structure of the title compound, [Zn(4)(C(40)H(24)N(8))(4)]·8C(3)H(7)NO·3H(2)O, has been redetermined at 100 K. The redetermination is of significantly higher precision and gives further insight into the disorder of pyridyl groups and solvent mol-ecules. The mol-ecules of (5,10,15,20-tetra-4-pyridyl-porphyrinato)zinc(II) (ZnTPyP) form homomolecular cyclic tetra-mers by coordination of a peripheral pyridyl group to the central Zn atom of an adjacent symmetry-related mol-ecule. The tetra-mer so formed exhibits mol-ecular S(4) symmetry and is located about a crystallographic fourfold rotoinversion axis. Severely disordered dimethyl-formamide and water mol-ecules are present in the crystal, the contributions of which were omitted from refinement. Inter-molecular C-H⋯N hydrogen bonding is observed.

  18. Ring fusion strategy for the synthesis of anthra[2,3-d]oxazole-2-thione-5,10-dione homologues as DNA topoisomerase inhibitors and as antitumor agents.

    PubMed

    Chen, Chun-Liang; Liu, Fei-Lan; Lee, Chia-Chung; Chen, Tsung-Chih; Chang, Wen-Wei; Guh, Jih-Hwa; Ahmed Ali, Ahmed Atef; Chang, Deh-Ming; Huang, Hsu-Shan

    2014-11-24

    The efficient synthesis of mono-substituted anthraquinones and ring fusion into anthra[2,3-d]oxazole-2-thione-5,10-dione derivatives were developed, and all the compounds were tested for their cytotoxicity against PC-3 cancer cell lines. Compounds 8, 14, 17 and 23 were selected by the NCI and 12, 17 and 19 were evaluated for topoisomerase I-mediated DNA relaxation. Among them, 17 appeared to be the most active compound of this series and not only showed higher inhibition when indicated from the low IC50 values against PC-3 cancer cell line but also attenuated the in vitro topoisomerase I-mediated DNA relaxation at low micromolar concentrations. All test compounds exhibited different cytostatic and cytotoxic activities for further developing potential anticancer drugs.

  19. A synchrotron study of [5,10,15,20-tetrakis(3-cyanophenyl)porphyrinato-κ(4)N(5),N(10),N(15),N(20)]copper(II) nitrobenzene trisolvate at 80 K.

    PubMed

    Seidel, Rüdiger W; Goddard, Richard; Mayer-Gall, Thomas; Oppel, Iris M

    2016-11-01

    Porphyrin assemblies display interesting photophysical properties and a relatively high thermal stability. Moreover, meso-functionalized porphyrins with virtually fourfold symmetry can be relatively readily synthesized from pyrrole and the appropriate aldehyde. A number of metallo derivatives of 5,10,15,20-tetrakis(4-cyanophenyl)porphyrin, where the N atom of the linear cyano group can act both as a donor for coordination bonds or as an acceptor for hydrogen bonds, have been structurally characterized by single-crystal X-ray analysis. The supramolecular and structural chemistry of the corresponding 2- and 3-cyanophenyl isomers of the parent porphyrin, however, has remained largely unexplored. The crystal structure of [5,10,15,20-tetrakis(3-cyanophenyl)porphyrinato]copper(II) (CuTCNPP) nitrobenzene trisolvate, [Cu(C48H24N8)]·3C6H5NO2, has been determined at 80 K by synchrotron single-crystal X-ray diffraction. CuTCNPP exhibits a C2h-symmetric ααββ conformation, despite an unsymmetrical crystal environment, and is situated on a crystallographic centre of symmetry. The Cu(II) ion adopts a genuine square-planar coordination by the four pyrrole N atoms. The 24-membered porphyrin ring system shows no marked deviation from planarity. In the crystal, the CuTCNPP molecules and two nitrobenzene molecules are face-to-face stacked in an alternating fashion, resulting in corrugated layers. The remaining nitrobenzene guest molecule per CuTCNPP resides in the region between four neighbouring columnar stacks of CuTCNPP and sandwiched nitrobenzene molecules, and is disordered over four positions about a centre of symmetry.

  20. Characteristics of water-soluble inorganic ions in PM2.5 and PM 2.5-10 in the coastal urban agglomeration along the Western Taiwan Strait Region, China.

    PubMed

    Yin, Liqian; Niu, Zhenchuan; Chen, Xiaoqiu; Chen, Jinsheng; Zhang, Fuwang; Xu, Lingling

    2014-04-01

    PM2.5 and PM2.5-10 aerosol samples were collected in four seasons during November 2010, January, April, and August 2011 at 13 urban/suburban sites and one background site in Western Taiwan Straits Region (WTSR), which is the coastal area with rapid urbanization, high population density, and deteriorating air quality. The 10 days average PM2.5 concentrations were 92.92, 51.96, 74.48, and 89.69 μg/m(3) in spring, summer, autumn, and winter, respectively, exceeding the Chinese ambient air quality standard for annual average value of PM2.5 (grade II, 35 μg/m(3)). Temporal distribution of water-soluble inorganic ions (WSIIs) in PM2.5 was coincident with PM2.5 mass concentrations, showing highest in spring, lowest in summer, and middle in autumn and winter. WSIIs took considerable proportion (42.2 ∼ 50.1 %) in PM2.5 and PM2.5-10. Generally, urban/suburban sites had obviously suffered severer pollution of fine particles compared with the background site. The WSIIs concentrations and characteristics were closely related to the local anthropogenic activities and natural environment, urban sites in cities with higher urbanization level, or sites with weaker diffuse condition suffered severer WSIIs pollution. Fossil fuel combustion, traffic emissions, crustal/soil dust, municipal constructions, and sea salt and biomass burnings were the major potential sources of WSIIs in PM2.5 in WTSR according to the result of principal component analysis.

  1. Effects of collision energy and rotational quantum number on stereodynamics of the reactions: H(2S) + NH( υ = 0, j = 0, 2, 5, 10)→N(4S) + H2

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Wei; Yu, Yong-Jiang; Zhao, Gang; Yang, Chuan-Lu

    2016-08-01

    The stereodynamical properties of H(2S) + NH(v = 0, j = 0, 2, 5, 10) → N(4S) + H2 reactions are studied in this paper by using the quasi-classical trajectory (QCT) method with different collision energies on the double many-body expansion (DMBE) potential energy surface (PES) (Poveda L A and Varandas A J C 2005 Phys. Chem. Chem. Phys. 7 2867). In a range of collision energy from 2 to 20 kcal/mol, the vibrational rotational quantum numbers of the NH molecules are specifically investigated on v = 0 and j = 0, 2, 5, 10 respectively. The distributions of P(θ r ), P(ϕ r ), P(θ r ,ϕ r ), (2π/σ)(dσ 00/dω t ) differential cross-section (DCSs) and integral cross-sections(ICSs) are calculated. The ICSs, computed for collision energies from 2 kcal/mol to 20 kcal/mol, for the ground state are in good agreement with the cited data. The results show that the reagent rotational quantum number and initial collision energy both have a significant effect on the distributions of the k - j ‧, the k - k ‧- j ‧, and the k - k ‧ correlations. In addition, the DCS is found to be susceptible to collision energy, but it is not significantly affected by the rotational excitation of reagent. Project supported by the Natural Science Foundation of Shandong Province, China (Grant No. 2016ZRB01066) and the University Student’s Science and Technology Innovation Fund of Ludong University, China (Grant No. 131007).

  2. Low plasma ApoE levels are associated with smaller hippocampal size in the Alzheimer’s Disease Neuroimaging Initiative (ADNI) cohort

    PubMed Central

    Teng, Edmond; Chow, Nicole; Hwang, Kristy S.; Thompson, Paul M.; Gylys, Karen H.; Cole, Gregory M.; Jack, Clifford R.; Shaw, Leslie M.; Trojanowski, John Q.; Soares, Holly D.; Weiner, Michael W.; Apostolova, Liana G.

    2014-01-01

    Apoliproprotein E (APOE) genotype is the strongest known genetic risk factor for sporadic Alzheimer’s disease (AD), but the utility of plasma ApoE levels for assessing the severity of underlying neurodegenerative changes remains uncertain. Here we examined cross-sectional associations between plasma ApoE levels and volumetric magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) indices of the hippocampus from 541 participants [57 with normal cognition (NC), 375 with mild cognitive impairment (MCI), and 109 with mild AD] who were enrolled in the Alzheimer’s Disease Neuroimaging Initiative. Across the NC and MCI groups, lower plasma ApoE levels were significantly correlated with smaller hippocampal size, as measured by either hippocampal volume or hippocampal radial distance. These associations were driven primarily by findings from carriers of an APOE ε4 allele, and are consistent with prior reports that lower plasma ApoE levels correlate with greater global cortical Pittsburgh Compound B retention. In this high-risk group, plasma ApoE levels may represent a peripheral marker of underlying AD neuropathology in nondemented elderly individuals. PMID:25547651

  3. Smaller Feedback ERN Amplitudes During the BART are Associated with a Greater Family History Density of Alcohol Problems in Treatment-Naïve Alcoholics

    PubMed Central

    Fein, George; Chang, Maria

    2008-01-01

    BACKGROUND Alcoholism is characterized by impaired decision-making (i.e., choosing intoxication in the face of mounting negative consequences). This impairment may involve a reduced brain response to the negative consequences of behavior, which supports an inclination to engage in risky behaviors. The feedback error-related negativity (F-ERN) is hypothesized to reflect the valence attached to the negative consequences of behavior. Performance on the Balloon Analogue Risk Task (BART) measures risk-taking propensity. We recorded F-ERNs during the BART and during a BART simulation, where individuals observed the rewards and consequences of (someone else’s) BART performance. METHODS EEGs were recorded on 22 actively drinking, treatment-naïve alcoholics during the BART and BART simulation. F-ERNs were measured and their association with psychological and alcohol use measures was examined. RESULTS F-ERNs over fronto-central electrode sites were observed to balloon pops in the BART and BART simulation. F-ERNs during the BART were more than twice the amplitude of F-ERNs during the BART simulation. Smaller F-ERN amplitudes from the BART (but not the BART simulation) were associated with a greater family history density of alcohol problems. CONCLUSION The results suggest a possible link between the genetic vulnerability toward developing alcoholism and the brain’s response to the negative consequences of behavior. PMID:17869027

  4. Aging and glial responses to lipopolysaccharide in vitro: greater induction of IL-1 and IL-6, but smaller induction of neurotoxicity.

    PubMed

    Xie, Zhong; Morgan, Todd E; Rozovsky, Irina; Finch, Caleb E

    2003-07-01

    Glial activation during aging was analyzed in primary glia cultured from brain regions sampled across the life span. An initial study showed that phenotypes of activated astrocytes and microglia from aging rat cerebral cortex persisted in primary cultures (Neurobiol. Aging 19 (1998), 97). We extend these findings by examining effects of age on the activation of glial cultures from adult rat brain in response to lipopolysaccharide (LPS), an inflammatory stimulus. Mixed glia from F344 male rats, aged 3 and 24 months, cultured from cerebral cortex (Cx), hippocampus (Hc), and striatum (St), were assayed for cytokines implicated in Alzheimer's disease: IL-1alpha, IL-1beta, IL-6, and TNF-alpha. Regional differences across all age groups included consistently lower expression of these cytokines in glia derived from Cx than Hc and St. Aging increased basal IL-6 mRNA and secretion by >or=3-fold in glia from Cx and Hc. Aging also increased LPS-induced IL-1 and IL-6 in Hc more than in Cx, whereas no significant effects of age were seen in St-derived glial cytokines. TNF-alpha secretion did not differ by donor age (basal or LPS-induced). Nitric oxide production by microglia from Cx of aging brains showed a smaller induction in response to LPS, with proportionately less neurotoxicity. Thus, glial activation during aging shows regional selectivity in cytokine expression, with opposite effects of aging on the increased inducibility of IL-1 and IL-6 vs the decreased production of nitric oxide.

  5. Generic delimitations, biogeography and evolution in the tribe Coleeae (Bignoniaceae), endemic to Madagascar and the smaller islands of the western Indian Ocean.

    PubMed

    Callmander, Martin W; Phillipson, Peter B; Plunkett, Gregory M; Edwards, Molly B; Buerki, Sven

    2016-03-01

    This study presents the most complete generic phylogenetic framework to date for the tribe Coleeae (Bignoniaceae), which is endemic to Madagascar and the other smaller islands in the western part of the Indian Ocean. The study is based on plastid and nuclear DNA regions and includes 47 species representing the five currently recognized genera (including all the species occurring in the western Indian Ocean region). Bayesian and maximum likelihood analyses supported (i) the monophyly of the tribe, (ii) the monophyly of Phylloctenium, Phyllarthron and Rhodocolea and (iii) the paraphyly of Colea due to the inclusion of species of Ophiocolea. The latter genus was also recovered paraphyletic due to the inclusion of two species of Colea (C. decora and C. labatii). The taxonomic implications of the mutual paraphyly of these two genera are discussed in light of morphological evidence, and it is concluded that the two genera should be merged, and the necessary new nomenclatural combinations are provided. The phylogenetic framework shows Phylloctenium, which is endemic to Madagascar and restricted to dry ecosystems, as basal and sister to the rest of the tribe, suggesting Madagascar to be the centre of origin of this clade. The remaining genera are diversified mostly in humid ecosystems, with evidence of multiple dispersals to the neighboring islands, including at least two to the Comoros, one to Mauritius and one to the Seychelles. Finally, we hypothesize that the ecological success of this tribe might have been triggered by a shift of fruit-dispersal mode from wind to lemur.

  6. Tracking "apolar" NMe4+ ions within two polyoxothiomolybdates that have the same pores: smaller clathrate and larger highly porous clusters in action.

    PubMed

    Korenev, Vladimir S; Boulay, Antoine G; Haouas, Mohamed; Bannani, Fatma; Fedin, Vladimir P; Sokolov, Maxim N; Terazzi, Emmanuel; Garai, Somenath; Müller, Achim; Taulelle, Francis; Marrot, Jérôme; Leclerc, Nathalie; Floquet, Sébastien; Cadot, Emmanuel

    2014-03-10

    Two nanosized polyoxothiometalates were synthesized based on linking oxomolybdate building blocks with {Mo2O2S2}(2+) groups. Remarkably, both compounds are formed selectively primarily upon changing the related concentrations in a logical way; they exhibit common structural features based on the same {Mo9O6S3}-type pores, which result in connections between {Mo6O21} pentagons and {Mo2O2S2}(2+) linkers. Whereas the much larger spherical Mo132-type Keplerate contains twenty pores, the smaller Mo63 -type cluster remarkably contains only two. The two compounds and a similar Keplerate exhibit interesting supramolecular properties related to interactions with the unusual predominantly apolar NMe4(+) cations. Structural characterization of the Mo63 -type compound reveals in the solid state a clathrate-like species that contains four NMe4(+) cations embedded in two types of structurally well-adapted pockets. Related NMR spectroscopic investigations in solution using NMe4(+) as the NMR spectroscopic probe are in agreement with the solid-state description. (1)H NMR spectroscopic experiments (1D variable-temperature, 2D total correlation spectroscopy (TOCSY), exchange spectroscopy (EXSY), and diffusion-ordered spectroscopy (DOSY)) feature firmly immobilized and mobile NMe4(+) ions in relationship with the type of host-guest arrangements. The use of the (1)H NMR DOSY spectroscopic methodology has been successfully applied to track the interactions of the NMe4(+) cations with the {Mo9O6S3} pores of a sulfurated Keplerate, thereby allowing the first quantitative analysis of this type of plugging process. The stability constant K=(210±20) mol(-1)  L is discussed related to the character of the process.

  7. The large episomes of Butyrivibrio proteoclasticus B316T have arisen through intragenomic gene shuttling from the chromosome to smaller Butyrivibrio-specific plasmids.

    PubMed

    Yeoman, Carl J; Kelly, William J; Rakonjac, Jasna; Leahy, Sinead C; Altermann, Eric; Attwood, Graeme T

    2011-07-01

    The genome of Butyrivibrio proteoclasticus B316(T) contains three large episomes including a 302 kb chromid (BPc2) and two large plasmids of 361 (pCY360) and 186 kb (pCY186). The two plasmids are largely cryptic and it is therefore difficult to gauge their contributions or importance to the biology of B. proteoclasticus. Here, we provide evidence that at least BPc2 and pCY360 are essential as neither could be cured using several previously described curing techniques. We show that BPc2 exists at a copy number of 1, while pCY360 and pCY186 exist at copy numbers of 4 and 0.9, respectively. Yet the transcriptional activities of each episome are much less than that of the 3.5 Mb chromosome. Codon usage analyses did not support the hypothesis that the genes of all three episomes were acquired horizontally. Instead our analyses suggest that the vast majority of genes on each episome were transferred from the 3.5 Mb B. proteoclasticus chromosome. Analysis of their replication origins, however, suggests the plasmid backbones share an evolutionary lineage with the smaller Butyrivibrio specific plasmids, pRJF1 and pRJF2. A survey of 13 species of the Butyrivibrio/Pseudobutyrivibrio assemblage identified similar large episomes in nine strains. DNA hybridization experiments revealed none contained an rRNA operon and only a 145 kb episome from Pseudobutyrivibrioruminis possessed an ortholog of the pCY360 plasmid replication initiation protein. The size and distribution of episomes within the nine strains of Butyrivibrio/Pseudobutyrivibrio showed no correlation with 16S rRNA based phylogeny, leading to a hypothesis that the large episomes of Butyrivibrio spp., have arisen through intragenomic gene transfer events from the chromosome to small horizontally acquired elements.

  8. Carriers of Loss-of-Function Mutations in EXT Display Impaired Pancreatic Beta-Cell Reserve Due to Smaller Pancreas Volume

    PubMed Central

    Hassing, H . Carlijne; Kruit, Janine K.; Witjes, Julia J.; van de Sande, Michiel A. J.; Nederveen, Aart J.; Xu, Ding; Dallinga-Thie, Geesje M.; Esko, Jeffrey D.; Stroes, Erik S. G.; Nieuwdorp, Max

    2014-01-01

    Exotosin (EXT) proteins are involved in the chain elongation step of heparan sulfate (HS) biosynthesis, which is intricately involved in organ development. Loss of function mutations (LOF) in EXT1 and EXT2 result in hereditary exostoses (HME). Interestingly, HS plays a role in pancreas development and beta-cell function, and genetic variations in EXT2 are associated with an increased risk for type 2 diabetes mellitus. We hypothesized that loss of function of EXT1 or EXT2 in subjects with hereditary multiple exostoses (HME) affects pancreatic insulin secretion capacity and development. We performed an oral glucose tolerance test (OGTT) followed by hyperglycemic clamps to investigate first-phase glucose-stimulated insulin secretion (GSIS) in HME patients and age and gender matched non-affected relatives. Pancreas volume was assessed with magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). OGTT did not reveal significant differences in glucose disposal, but there was a markedly lower GSIS in HME subjects during hyperglycemic clamp (iAUC HME: 0.72 [0.46–1.16] vs. controls 1.53 [0.69–3.36] nmol·l−1·min−1, p<0.05). Maximal insulin response following arginine challenge was also significantly attenuated (iAUC HME: 7.14 [4.22–10.5] vs. controls 10.2 [7.91–12.70] nmol·l−1·min−1 p<0.05), indicative of an impaired beta-cell reserve. MRI revealed a significantly smaller pancreatic volume in HME subjects (HME: 72.0±15.8 vs. controls 96.5±26.0 cm3 p = 0.04). In conclusion, loss of function of EXT proteins may affect beta-cell mass and insulin secretion capacity in humans, and render subjects at a higher risk of developing type 2 diabetes when exposed to environmental risk factors. PMID:25541963

  9. Decisive evidence on a smaller-than-you-think phenomenon: revisiting the "1-in-X" effect on subjective medical probabilities.

    PubMed

    Sirota, Miroslav; Juanchich, Marie; Kostopoulou, Olga; Hanak, Robert

    2014-05-01

    Accurate perception of medical probabilities communicated to patients is a cornerstone of informed decision making. People, however, are prone to biases in probability perception. Recently, Pighin and others extended the list of such biases with evidence that "1-in-X" ratios (e.g., "1 in 12") led to greater perceived probability and worry about health outcomes than "N-in-X*N" ratios (e.g., "10 in 120"). Subsequently, the recommendation was to avoid using "1-in-X" ratios when communicating probabilistic information to patients. To warrant such a recommendation, we conducted 5 well-powered replications and synthesized the available data. We found that 3 out of the 5 replications yielded statistically nonsignificant findings. In addition, our results showed that the "1-in-X" effect was not moderated by numeracy, cognitive reflection, age, or gender. To quantify the evidence for the effect, we conducted a Bayes factor meta-analysis and a traditional meta-analysis of our 5 studies and those of Pighin and others (11 comparisons, N = 1131). The meta-analytical Bayes factor, which allowed assessment of the evidence for the null hypothesis, was very low, providing decisive evidence to support the existence of the "1-in-X" effect. The traditional meta-analysis showed that the overall effect was significant (Hedges' g = 0.42, 95% CI 0.29-0.54). Overall, we provide decisive evidence for the existence of the "1-in-X" effect but suggest that it is smaller than previously estimated. Theoretical and practical implications are discussed.

  10. Quantum optics: Quiet moments in time

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bellini, Marco

    2017-01-01

    'Squeezed' light exhibits smaller quantum fluctuations than no light at all. Localized squeezed regions have now been produced along an infrared light wave and probed with unprecedented time resolution. See Letter p.376

  11. Synthesis, FT–IR characterization and crystal structure of aqua­(5,10,15,20-tetra­phenyl­porphyrinato-κ4 N)manganese(III) tri­fluoro­methane­sulfonate

    PubMed Central

    Harhouri, Wafa; Mchiri, Chadlia; Najmudin, Shabir; Bonifácio, Cecilia; Nasri, Habib

    2016-01-01

    In the title salt, [Mn(C44H28N4)(H2O)](CF3SO3) or [MnIII(TPP)(H2O)](CF3SO3) (where TPP is the dianion of 5,10,15,20-tetra­phenyl­porphyrin), the MnIII cation is chelated by the four pyrrole N atoms of the porphyrinate anion and additionally coordinated by an aqua ligand in an apical site, completing the distorted square-pyramidal coordination environment. The average Mn—N(pyrrole) bond length is 1.998 (9) Å and the Mn—O(aqua) bond length is 2.1057 (15) Å. The central MnIII ion is displaced by 0.1575 (5) Å from the N4C20 mean plane of the porphyrinate anion towards the apical aqua ligand. The porphyrinate macrocycle exhibits a moderate ruffling and strong saddle deformations. In the crystal lattice, the [MnIII(TPP)(H2O)]+ cation and the tri­fluoro­methane­sulfonate counter-ions are arranged in alternating planes packed along [001]. The components are linked together through O—H⋯O hydrogen bonds and much weaker C—H⋯O and C—H⋯F inter­actions. The crystal packing is further stabilized by weak C—H⋯π inter­actions involving the pyrrole and phenyl rings of the porphyrin moieties. PMID:27308027

  12. A comparative study of the interaction of 5,10,15,20-tetrakis (N-methylpyridinium-4-yl)porphyrin and its zinc complex with DNA using fluorescence spectroscopy and topoisomerisation.

    PubMed Central

    Kelly, J M; Murphy, M J; McConnell, D J; OhUigin, C

    1985-01-01

    Binding of 5,10,15,20-tetrakis (N-methylpyridinium-4-yl)porphyrin (H2TMPyP4+) and its zinc complex (ZnTMPyP4+) to DNA is demonstrated by their coelectrophoresis and by absorption and fluorescence spectroscopic methods. Topoisomerisation of pBR322 DNA shows that H2TMPyP4+ unwinds DNA as efficiently as ethidium bromide showing that it intercalates at many sites. ZnTMPyP4+ may cause limited unwinding. Marked changes in the fluorescence spectra of the porphyrins are found in the presence of DNA. The fluorescence intensity of either H2TMPyP4+ or ZnTMPyP4+ is enhanced in the presence of poly (d(A-T)), whereas in the presence of poly (d(G-C] the fluorescence intensity of ZnTMPyP4+ is only slightly affected and that of H2TMPyP4+ markedly reduced. Both the porphyrins photosensitize the cleavage of DNA in aerated solution upon visible light irradiation. Images PMID:2987789

  13. Redetermination of cyclo-tetra­kis­(μ-5,10,15,20-tetra-4-pyridyl­porphyrinato)tetra­zinc(II) dimethyl­formamide octa­solvate trihydrate at 100 K

    PubMed Central

    Seidel, Rüdiger W.; Graf, Jürgen; Goddard, Richard; Oppel, Iris M.

    2011-01-01

    The structure of the title compound, [Zn4(C40H24N8)4]·8C3H7NO·3H2O, has been redetermined at 100 K. The redetermination is of significantly higher precision and gives further insight into the disorder of pyridyl groups and solvent mol­ecules. The mol­ecules of (5,10,15,20-tetra-4-pyridyl­porphyrinato)zinc(II) (ZnTPyP) form homomolecular cyclic tetra­mers by coordination of a peripheral pyridyl group to the central Zn atom of an adjacent symmetry-related mol­ecule. The tetra­mer so formed exhibits mol­ecular S 4 symmetry and is located about a crystallographic fourfold rotoinversion axis. Severely disordered dimethyl­formamide and water mol­ecules are present in the crystal, the contributions of which were omitted from refinement. Inter­molecular C—H⋯N hydrogen bonding is observed. PMID:21522892

  14. A method for the detection of alcohol vapours based on optical sensing of magnesium 5,10,15,20-tetraphenyl porphyrin thin film by an optical spectrometer and principal component analysis.

    PubMed

    Kladsomboon, Sumana; Kerdcharoen, Teerakiat

    2012-12-13

    In this work we have proposed a method for the detection of alcohol vapours, i.e. methanol, ethanol and isopropanol, based on the optical sensing response of magnesium 5,10,15,20-tetraphenyl porphyrin (MgTPP) thin films, as measured by optical spectrometry with the assistance of chemometric analysis. We have implemented a scheme which allows a laboratory UV-vis spectrometer to act as a so-called "electronic nose" with very little modification. MgTPP thin films were prepared by a spin coating technique, using chloroform as the solvent, and then subjected to thermal annealing at 280°C in an argon atmosphere. These MgTPP optical gas sensors presented significant responses with methanol compared to ethanol and isopropanol, based on the dynamic flow of alcohol vapours at the same mol% of alcohol concentration. Density functional theory (DFT) calculations were performed to model the underlying mechanism of this selectivity. The performance of the optical gas sensors was optimised by varying the fabrication parameters. It is hoped that the MgTPP thin film together with an off-the-shelf optical spectrometer and a simple chemometrics algorithm can be a valuable tool for the analysis of alcoholic content in the beverage industry.

  15. Di-μ-azido-bis­(μ-1,4,7,10,13,16-hexa­oxacyclo­octa­deca­ne)bis­(5,10,15,20-tetra­phenyl­porphyrinato)dicadmium­disodium

    PubMed Central

    Toumi, Hamza; Amiri, Nesrine; Belkhiria, Mohamed Salah; Daran, Jean-Claude; Nasri, Habib

    2012-01-01

    The asymmetric unit of the title compound, [Cd2Na2(N3)2(C44H28N4)2(C12H24O6)2], consists of one half of the dimeric complex; the tetra­nuclear mol­ecule lies about an inversion centre. The CdII atom is coordinated by the four pyrrole N atoms of the 5,10,15,20-tetra­phenyl­porphyrinate ligand and one N atom of the axial azide ligand in a square-pyramidal geometry. The azide group is also linked to the NaI atom, which is surrounded by one 18-crown-6 molecule and additionally bonded to a second 18-crown-6 molecule trans to the azide group. The porphyrin core exhibits a major doming distortion (∼40%) and the crystal structure is stabilized by weak C—H⋯π inter­actions. The mol­ecular structure features weak intra­molecular hydrogen bonds: two O—H⋯O inter­actions within the 18-crown-6 mol­ecule and one C—H(18-crown-6)⋯N(azido) contact. PMID:23468761

  16. Crystal structure of di­aqua­[5,10,15,20-tetra­kis­(4-bromo­phen­yl)porphyrinato-κ4 N]magnesium

    PubMed Central

    Amiri, Nesrine; Nasri, Soumaya; Roisnel, Thierry; Simonneaux, Gérard; Nasri, Habib

    2015-01-01

    The title compound, [Mg(C44H24Br4N4)(H2O)2] or [Mg(TBrPP)(H2O)2], where TBrPP is the 5,10,15,20-tetra­kis­(4-bromo­phen­yl)porphyrinato ligand, was obtained unintentionally as a by-product of the reaction of the [Mg(TBrPP)] complex with an excess of di­methyl­glyoxime in di­chloro­methane. The entire mol­ecule exhibits point group symmetry 4/m. In the asymmetric unit, except for two C atoms of the phenyl ring, all other atoms lie on special positions. The MgII atom is situated at a site with symmetry 4/m, while the N and the C atoms of the porphyrin macrocycle, as well as two C atoms of the phenyl ring and the Br atom lie in the mirror plane containing the porphyrin core. The H atoms of the axially bonded water mol­ecule are incompatible with the fourfold rotation axis and are disordered over two sites. In the crystal, mol­ecules are packed in rows along [001]. Weak inter­molecular C—H⋯π and C—H⋯Br inter­actions, as well as O—H⋯Br hydrogen bonds, stabilize the crystal packing. PMID:25844215

  17. Modification of yield and composition of essential oils by distillation time

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Field and laboratory experiments were conducted to model the length of the steam distillation time (DT) on essential oil yield and oil composition of peppermint, lemongrass, and palmarosa oils. The DTs tested were 1.25, 2.5, 5, 10, 20, 40, 80, and 160 min for peppermint, and 1.25, 2.5, 5, 10, 20, 40...

  18. The model homologue of the partially defective human 5,10-methylenetetrahydrofolate reductase, considered as a risk factor for stroke due to increased homocysteine level, can be protected and reactivated by heat shock proteins.

    PubMed

    Grabowski, Michał; Banecki, Bogdan; Kadziński, Leszek; Jakóbkiewicz-Banecka, Joanna; Gabig-Cimińska, Magdalena; Węgrzyn, Alicja; Węgrzyn, Grzegorz; Banecka-Majkutewicz, Zyta

    2016-10-01

    The A222 V substitution in the human MTHFR gene product (5,10-methylenetetrahydrofolate reductase) is responsible for a decreased activity of this enzyme. This may cause an increased homocysteine level, considered as a risk factor for arteriosclerosis and stroke. The bacterial homologue of the human enzyme, MetF, has been found to be a useful model in genetic and biochemical studies. The similarity of Escherichia coli MetF and human MTHFR proteins is so high that particular mutations in the corresponding human gene can be reflected by the bacterial mutants. For example, the A222 V substitution in MTHFR (caused by the C667T substitution in the MTHFR gene) can be ascribed to the A117 V substitution in MetF. Here, it is reported that a temperature-sensitive MetF117 (A117 V) protein can be partially protected from a thermal inactivation by the heat shock proteins from the Hsp70/100 systems. Moreover, activity of the thermally denatured enzyme can be partially restored by the same heat shock proteins. High temperature protein G (HtpG) had no effect on MetF117 activity in both experimental systems. The presented results indicate that functions of heat shock proteins may be required for maintenance of the MetF117 function. This may have implications for the mechanisms of arteriosclerosis and stroke, especially in the light of previous findings that the A222 V MTHFR polymorphism may be a risk factor for stroke, as well as recently published results which demonstrated the increased levels of antibodies against heat shock proteins in stroke patients.

  19. Crystal structure of an unknown solvate of (piperazine-κN){5,10,15,20-tetra­kis­[4-(benzo­yloxy)phen­yl]porphyrinato-κ4 N}zinc

    PubMed Central

    Nasri, Soumaya; Ezzayani, Khaireddine; Turowska-Tyrk, Ilona; Roisnel, Thierry; Nasri, Habib

    2016-01-01

    The title compound, [Zn(C72H44N4O8)(C4H10N2)] or [Zn(TPBP)(pipz] (where TPBP and pipz are 5,10,15,20-tetra­kis­[4-(benzo­yloxy)phen­yl]porphyrinato and piperazine ligands respectively), features a distorted square-pyramidal coordin­ation geometry about the central ZnII atom. This central atom is chelated by the four N atoms of the porphyrinate anion and further coordinated by a nitro­gen atom of the piperazine axial ligand, which adopts a chair confirmation. The average Zn—N(pyrrole) bond length is 2.078 (7) Å and the Zn— N(pipz) bond length is 2.1274 (19) Å. The zinc cation is displaced by 0.4365 (4) Å from the N4C20 mean plane of the porphyrinate anion toward the piperazine axial ligand. This porphyrinate macrocycle exhibits major saddle and moderate ruffling deformations. In the crystal, the supra­molecular structure is made by parallel pairs of layers along (100), with an inter­layer distance of 4.100 Å while the distance between two pairs of layers is 4.047 Å. A region of electron density was treated with the SQUEEZE [Spek (2015 ▸). Acta Cryst. C71, 9–18] procedure in PLATON following unsuccessful attempts to model it as being part of disordered n-hexane solvent and water mol­ecules. The given chemical formula and other crystal data do not take into account these solvent mol­ecules. PMID:27555935

  20. Crystal structure of an unknown solvate of (piperazine-κN){5,10,15,20-tetra-kis-[4-(benzo-yloxy)phen-yl]porphyrinato-κ(4) N}zinc.

    PubMed

    Nasri, Soumaya; Ezzayani, Khaireddine; Turowska-Tyrk, Ilona; Roisnel, Thierry; Nasri, Habib

    2016-07-01

    The title compound, [Zn(C72H44N4O8)(C4H10N2)] or [Zn(TPBP)(pipz] (where TPBP and pipz are 5,10,15,20-tetra-kis-[4-(benzo-yloxy)phen-yl]porphyrinato and piperazine ligands respectively), features a distorted square-pyramidal coordin-ation geometry about the central Zn(II) atom. This central atom is chelated by the four N atoms of the porphyrinate anion and further coordinated by a nitro-gen atom of the piperazine axial ligand, which adopts a chair confirmation. The average Zn-N(pyrrole) bond length is 2.078 (7) Å and the Zn- N(pipz) bond length is 2.1274 (19) Å. The zinc cation is displaced by 0.4365 (4) Å from the N4C20 mean plane of the porphyrinate anion toward the piperazine axial ligand. This porphyrinate macrocycle exhibits major saddle and moderate ruffling deformations. In the crystal, the supra-molecular structure is made by parallel pairs of layers along (100), with an inter-layer distance of 4.100 Å while the distance between two pairs of layers is 4.047 Å. A region of electron density was treated with the SQUEEZE [Spek (2015 ▸). Acta Cryst. C71, 9-18] procedure in PLATON following unsuccessful attempts to model it as being part of disordered n-hexane solvent and water mol-ecules. The given chemical formula and other crystal data do not take into account these solvent mol-ecules.

  1. Crystal structure of (4-cyano­pyridine-κN){5,10,15,20-tetrakis[4-(benzoyloxy)phenyl]porphyrinato-κ4 N}zinc–4-cyano­pyridine (1/1)

    PubMed Central

    Nasri, Soumaya; Amiri, Nesrine; Turowska-Tyrk, Ilona; Daran, Jean-Claude; Nasri, Habib

    2016-01-01

    In the title compound, [Zn(C72H44N4O8)(C6H4N2)]·C6H4N2 or [Zn(TPBP)(4-CNpy]·(4-CNpy) [where TPBP and 4-CNpy are 5,10,15,20-(tetra­phenyl­benzoate)porphyrinate and 4-cyano­pyridine, respectively], the ZnII cation is chelated by four pyrrole-N atoms of the porphyrinate anion and coordinated by a pyridyl-N atom of the 4-CNpy axial ligand in a distorted square-pyramidal geometry. The average Zn—N(pyrrole) bond length is 2.060 (6) Å and the Zn—N(4-CNpy) bond length is 2.159 (2) Å. The zinc cation is displaced by 0.319 (1) Å from the N4C20 mean plane of the porphyrinate anion toward the 4-cyano­pyridine axial ligand. This porphyrinate macrocycle exhibits major saddle and moderate ruffling and doming deformations. In the crystal, the [Zn(TPBP)(4-CNpy)] complex mol­ecules are linked together via weak C—H⋯N, C—H⋯O and C—H⋯π inter­actions, forming supra­molecular channels parallel to the c axis. The non-coordinating 4-cyano­pyridine mol­ecules are located in the channels and linked with the complex mol­ecules, via weak C—H⋯N inter­actions and π-π stacking or via weak C—H⋯O and C—H⋯π inter­actions. The non-coordinating 4-cyano­pyridine mol­ecule is disordered over two positions with an occupancy ratio of 0.666 (4):0.334 (4). PMID:26958379

  2. Does size matter? Comparison of body temperature and activity of free-living Arabian oryx (Oryx leucoryx) and the smaller Arabian sand gazelle (Gazella subgutturosa marica) in the Saudi desert.

    PubMed

    Hetem, Robyn Sheila; Strauss, Willem Maartin; Fick, Linda Gayle; Maloney, Shane Kevin; Meyer, Leith Carl Rodney; Shobrak, Mohammed; Fuller, Andrea; Mitchell, Duncan

    2012-04-01

    Heterothermy, a variability in body temperature beyond the normal limits of homeothermy, is widely viewed as a key adaptation of arid-adapted ungulates. However, desert ungulates with a small body mass, i.e. a relatively large surface area-to-volume ratio and a small thermal inertia, are theoretically less likely to employ adaptive heterothermy than are larger ungulates. We measured body temperature and activity patterns, using implanted data loggers, in free-ranging Arabian oryx (Oryx leucoryx, ±70 kg) and the smaller Arabian sand gazelle (Gazella subgutturosa marica, ±15 kg) inhabiting the same Arabian desert environment, at the same time. Compared to oryx, sand gazelle had higher mean daily body temperatures (F(1,6) = 47.3, P = 0.0005), higher minimum daily body temperatures (F(1,6) = 42.6, P = 0.0006) and higher maximum daily body temperatures (F(1,6) = 11.0, P = 0.02). Despite these differences, both species responded similarly to changes in environmental conditions. As predicted for adaptive heterothermy, maximum daily body temperature increased (F(1,6) = 84.0, P < 0.0001), minimum daily body temperature decreased (F(1,6) = 92.2, P < 0.0001), and daily body temperature amplitude increased (F(1,6) = 97.6, P < 0.0001) as conditions got progressively hotter and drier. There were no species differences in activity levels, however, both gazelle and oryx showed a biphasic or crepuscular rhythm during the warm wet season but shifted to a more nocturnal rhythm during the hot dry season. Activity was attenuated during the heat of the day at times when both species selected cool microclimates. These two species of Arabian ungulates employ heterothermy, cathemerality and shade seeking very similarly to survive the extreme, arid conditions of Arabian deserts, despite their size difference.

  3. The prediction of fast stream front arrivals at the earth on the basis of solar wind measurements at smaller solar distances

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rosenbauer, H.; Schwenn, R.; Bame, S. J.

    1978-01-01

    The problems involved in the prediction of the arrival of fast solar wind streams at the earth on the basis of measurements made by space probes in the region between 0.3 and 1 AU are discussed. It is shown that arrival time predictions accurate to within a few hours that can be made at least as long as the large scale conditions on the Sun are relatively stationary as observed near the time of solar minimum. However, the latitudinal extent of the respective high speed streams is found to be important for making quantitative predictions. Coronal data sufficient for locating the sources of high speed streams can improve the precision of these predictions.

  4. Transition Path Time Distribution, Tunneling Times, Friction, and Uncertainty

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pollak, Eli

    2017-02-01

    A quantum mechanical transition path time probability distribution is formulated and its properties are studied using a parabolic barrier potential model. The average transit time is well defined and readily calculated. It is smaller than the analogous classical mechanical average transit time, vanishing at the crossover temperature. It provides a direct route for determining tunneling times. The average time may be also used to define a coarse grained momentum of the system for the passage from one side of the barrier to the other. The product of the uncertainty in this coarse grained momentum with the uncertainty in the location of the particle is shown under certain conditions to be smaller than the ℏ/2 formal uncertainty limit. The model is generalized to include friction in the form of a bilinear interaction with a harmonic bath. Using an Ohmic friction model one finds that increasing the friction, increases the transition time. Only moderate values of the reduced friction coefficient are needed for the quantum transition time and coarse grained uncertainty to approach the classical limit which is smaller than ℏ/2 when the friction is not too small. These results show how one obtains classical dynamics from a pure quantum system without invoking any further assumptions, approximations, or postulates.

  5. Effects of elevated root zone CO2 on xerophytic shrubs in re-vegetated sandy dunes at smaller spatial and temporal scales.

    PubMed

    Lei, Huang; Zhishan, Zhang

    2015-01-01

    The below-ground CO2 concentration in some crusted soils or flooded fields is usually ten or hundred times larger than the normal levels. Recently, a large number of studies have focused on elevated CO2 in the atmosphere; however, only few have examined the influence of elevated root zone CO2 on plant growth and vegetation succession. In the present study, a closed-air CO2 enrichment (CACE) system was designed to simulate elevated CO2 concentrations in the root zones. The physio-ecological characteristics of two typical xerophytic shrubs C. korshinskii and A. ordosica in re-vegetated desert areas were investigated at different soil CO2 concentrations from March 2011 to October 2013. Results showed that plant growth, phenophase, photosynthetic rate, stomatal conductance, transpiration rate, and water use efficiency for the two xerophytic shrubs were all increased at first and then decreased with increasing soil CO2 concentrations, and the optimal soil CO2 concentration thresholds for C. korshinskii and A. ordosica were 0.554 and 0.317%, respectively. And A. ordosica was more tolerate to root zone CO2 variation when compared with C. korshinskii, possible reasons and vegetation succession were also discussed.

  6. Excitotoxic brain damage involves early peroxynitrite formation in a model of Huntington's disease in rats: protective role of iron porphyrinate 5,10,15,20-tetrakis (4-sulfonatophenyl)porphyrinate iron (III).

    PubMed

    Pérez-De La Cruz, V; González-Cortés, C; Galván-Arzate, S; Medina-Campos, O N; Pérez-Severiano, F; Ali, S F; Pedraza-Chaverrí, J; Santamaría, A

    2005-01-01

    Oxidative/nitrosative stress is involved in NMDA receptor-mediated excitotoxic brain damage produced by the glutamate analog quinolinic acid. The purpose of this work was to study a possible role of peroxynitrite, a reactive oxygen/nitrogen species, in the course of excitotoxic events evoked by quinolinic acid in the brain. The effects of Fe(TPPS) (5,10,15,20-tetrakis (4-sulfonatophenyl)porphyrinate iron (III)), an iron porphyrinate and putative peroxynitrite decomposition catalyst, were tested on lipid peroxidation and mitochondrial function in brain synaptic vesicles exposed to quinolinic acid, as well as on peroxynitrite formation, nitric oxide synthase and superoxide dismutase activities, lipid peroxidation, caspase-3-like activation, DNA fragmentation, and GABA levels in striatal tissue from rats lesioned by quinolinic acid. Circling behavior was also evaluated. Increasing concentrations of Fe(TPPS) reduced lipid peroxidation and mitochondrial dysfunction induced by quinolinic acid (100 microM) in synaptic vesicles in a concentration-dependent manner (10-800 microM). In addition, Fe(TPPS) (10 mg/kg, i.p.) administered 2 h before the striatal lesions, prevented the formation of peroxynitrite, the increased nitric oxide synthase activity, the decreased superoxide dismutase activity and the increased lipid peroxidation induced by quinolinic acid (240 nmol/microl) 120 min after the toxin infusion. Enhanced caspase-3-like activity and DNA fragmentation were also reduced by the porphyrinate 24 h after the injection of the excitotoxin. Circling behavior from quinolinic acid-treated rats was abolished by Fe(TPPS) six days after quinolinic acid injection, while the striatal levels of GABA, measured one day later, were partially recovered. The protective effects that Fe(TPPS) exerted on quinolinic acid-induced lipid peroxidation and mitochondrial dysfunction in synaptic vesicles suggest a primary action of the porphyrinate as an antioxidant molecule. In vivo findings

  7. Turbulent coagulation of particles smaller than the length scales of turbulence and equilibrium sorption of phenanthrene to clay: Implications for pollutant transport in the estuarine water column

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brunk, Brett Kenneth

    1997-11-01

    Pollutant and particle transport in estuaries is affected by a multitude of physical, chemical and biological processes. In this research the importance of equilibrium sorption and turbulent coagulation were studied. Sorption in estuaries was modeled using phenanthrene, bacterial extracellular polymer and kaolinite clay as surrogates for a hydrophobic organic pollutant, dissolved organic matter and inorganic suspended sediment, respectively. Experiments over a range of estuarine salinities showed that ionic strength had the largest effect on the extent of sorption, while the effect of extracellular polymer coatings on the mineral surfaces was insignificant. Further calculations using typical estuarine suspended sediment concentrations indicated that equilibrium sorption could not fully account for the solid/solution phase distribution of hydrophobic organic compounds in the estuarine water column. For particles that are small compared to the length scales of turbulence, the rate of coagulation is related to the dynamics of the smallest turbulent eddies since they have the highest shear rate. Experimental and theoretical effort focused on determining the coagulation rate of spherical particles in isotropic turbulence. A pair diffusion approximation valid for rapidly fluctuating flows was used to calculate the rate of coagulation in a randomly varying isotropic linear flow field. Dynamic simulations of particle coagulation in Gaussian turbulence were computed over a range of representative values of particle-particle interactions (i.e, hydrodynamic interactions and van der Waals attraction) and total strain (i.e., the product of the strain rate and its time scale). The computed coagulation rates for isotropic turbulence differed from analytical approximations valid at large and small total strain. As expected, particle interactions were found to be significant. Experimental measurements of coagulation in grid-generated turbulence were obtained by measuring the loss

  8. Reconstruction of peak water levels, peak discharges and long-term occurrence of extreme- as well as smaller pre-instrumental flood events of river Aare, Limmat, Reuss, Rhine and Saane in Switzerland. Part I

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wetter, Oliver; Tuttenuj, Daniel

    2016-04-01

    systematically analysed the period from 1446-1542 and could prove a large number of pre-instrumental flood events of river Rhine, Birs, Birsig and Wiese in Basel. All in all the weekly led account books contained 54 Rhine flood events, whereas chroniclers and annalists only recorded seven floods during the same period. This is a ratio of almost eight to one. This large difference points to the significantly sharper "observation skills" of the account books towards smaller floods, which may be explained by the fact that bridges can be endangered by relatively small floods because of driftwood, whereas it is known that chroniclers or annalists were predominantly focussing on spectacular (extreme) flood events. We [Oliver Wetter and Daniel Tuttenuj] are now able to present first preliminary results of reconstructed peak water levels and peak discharges of pre instrumental river Aare-, Emme-, Limmat-, Reuss-, Rhine- and Saane floods. These first results clearly show the strengths as well as the limits of the data and method used, depending mainly on the river types. Of the above mentioned rivers only the floods of river Emme could not be reconstructed whereas the long-term development of peak water levels and peak discharges of the other rivers clearly correlate with major local and supra-regional Swiss flood corrections over time. PhD student Daniel Tuttenuj is going to present the results for river Emme and Saane (see Abstract Daniel Tuttenuj), whereas Dr Oliver Wetter is going to present the results for the other rivers and gives a first insight on long-term recurring periods of smaller river Birs-, Birsig-, Rhine- and Wiese flood events based on the analysis of the weekly led account books "Wochenausgabenbücher der Stadt Basel" (see also Abstract of Daniel Tuttenuj).

  9. Reconstruction of peak water levels, peak discharges and long-term occurrence of extreme- as well as smaller pre-instrumental flood events of river Aare, Limmat, Reuss, Rhine and Saane in Switzerland. Part II.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tuttenuj, Daniel; Wetter, Oliver

    2016-04-01

    contained 54 Rhine flood events, whereas chroniclers and annalists only recorded seven floods during the same period. This is a ratio of almost eight to one. This large difference points to the significantly sharper "observation skills" of the account books towards smaller floods, which may be explained by the fact that bridges can be endangered by relatively small floods because of driftwood, whereas it is known that chroniclers or annalists were predominantly focussing on spectacular (extreme) flood events. We [Oliver Wetter and Daniel Tuttenuj] are now able to present first preliminary results of reconstructed peak water levels and peak discharges of pre instrumental river Aare-, Emme-, Limmat-, Reuss-, Rhine- and Saane floods. These first results clearly show the strengths as well as the limits of the data and method used, depending mainly on the river types. Of the above mentioned rivers only the floods of river Emme could not be reconstructed whereas the long-term development of peak water levels and peak discharges of the other rivers clearly correlate with major local and supra-regional Swiss flood corrections over time. PhD student Daniel Tuttenuj is going to present the results of river Emme and Saane, whereas Dr Oliver Wetter is going to present the results for the other rivers and gives a first insight on long-term recurring periods of smaller river Birs, Birsig, Rhine and Wiese flood events based on the analysis of the weekly led account books "Wochenausgabenbücher der Stadt Basel" (see Abstract Oliver Wetter).

  10. Organizational Learning and the Leadership Skill of Time Travel.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Shea, Gregory P.; Gilmore, Thomas N.

    1997-01-01

    Discusses "Histories of the future," a technique in which people imagine themselves 5-10 years ahead and look back over the time period enables the invention of possible options. Notes leaders can use this "time travel" skill to help organizations prepare for change. (SK)

  11. Small Sample Properties of Bayesian Multivariate Autoregressive Time Series Models

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Price, Larry R.

    2012-01-01

    The aim of this study was to compare the small sample (N = 1, 3, 5, 10, 15) performance of a Bayesian multivariate vector autoregressive (BVAR-SEM) time series model relative to frequentist power and parameter estimation bias. A multivariate autoregressive model was developed based on correlated autoregressive time series vectors of varying…

  12. Smaller Communities Program: Grant and Wheeler Counties, Oregon. Combined Economic Base Report and Applicant Potential Report; An Evaluation of the Economic and Human Resources of a Rural Oregon County.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Oregon State Dept. of Employment, Salem.

    Prepared by the Smaller Communities Services Program of the Oregon Department of Employment, this 1968 report summarizes the program findings with relation to Grant and Wheeler counties, Oregon. As stated, the overall objective of the program was promotion of the economic adjustment of specific rural, low-income areas--including the occupational…

  13. There Are Better Ways. Building Smaller, Safer, Effective and Efficient Public Schools. New Ideas for School Construction in North Carolina and a Model for Implementation. New Ideas, Number 1.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Haynes, Doug; Hood, John

    This paper offers unconventional and innovative ideas for school planning and construction in North Carolina for creating smaller and safer community schools in response to rising enrollment, tight budgets, and dwindling school space. Often using examples from across the country, the paper discusses school construction costs and economy of scale…

  14. 75 FR 35881 - Smaller Learning Communities Program

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-06-23

    ... section 1116 of the Elementary and Secondary Education Act of 1965, as amended (ESEA). (b) Schools that... opportunities to support similar evaluations of practices, programs, or strategies implemented by high schools... Catalog of Federal Domestic Assistance (CFDA) Number: 84.215L. AGENCY: Office of Elementary and...

  15. With World Growing Smaller, IB Gets Big

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cech, Scott J.

    2007-01-01

    The perception that the Geneva, Switzerland-based International Baccalaureate Organization's academic programs offer just what American students need in today's more globally competitive environment seems to be catching on. After decades of obscurity and slow expansion, the pace of growth in IB--including courses of study for the primary and…

  16. Smaller Coaxial-View Welding Torch

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gangl, Kenneth J.

    1991-01-01

    Coaxial-view torch for gas/tungsten arc welding has only two-thirds length and width of its predecessor. Shape and size similar to that of commercial arc-welding torch (Linde HW-27 or equivalent), even though it contains lens system. Collet that holds electrode has unique design allowing greater passage of light. Used in small spaces previously inaccessible, also introduced into production welding operations with minimum of disturbance.

  17. Bigger Dreams in a Smaller World

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Conoley, Jane Close

    2008-01-01

    To answer the editor's question "What are the major challenges faced by teacher education in an increasing global society?" many issues deserve notice. They may be summarized as building the will, the space, the capacity, and the evidence. The author starts with an assumption that, at least rhetorically, is not controversial. Teacher…

  18. Smaller Satellite Operations Near Geostationary Orbit

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2007-09-01

    prematurely expend the onboard fuel supply preventing completion of its secondary mission to pass within 100 kilometers of the asteroid Geographos...that has been created to perform proximity operations around another satellite has been surrounded by negative publicity. Americans that fear this

  19. Helping smaller communities meet environmental needs

    SciTech Connect

    McCoy-Thompson, S. )

    1990-03-01

    This paper describes efforts of the International City Management Association (ICMA) to identify and facilitate environmental infrastructure development and information exchanges. The EPA is financing two ICMA endeavors: the Public Private Partnerships Program (P3) and the Peer Exchange Program. The P3 program will fund a number of demonstration sites in the areas of solid waste management, wastewater treatment and groundwater protection. The sites will be used to demonstrate innovative financial, legal and contractual arrangements that benefit infrastructure development. The Peer Exchange Program will bring together local officials for information sharing and technology transfer.

  20. Effective Crisis Management at the Smaller Campus.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    DeWitt, Robert C.

    Pennsylvania State University Beaver Campus developed crisis guidelines and a formal working relationship with a local community mental health center in order to be able to deal with on-campus crises and their followup. The guidelines provide each employee with a single, easy-to-follow document that outlines the decision making process to be…

  1. Online Database Searching in Smaller Public Libraries.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Roose, Tina

    1983-01-01

    Online database searching experiences of nine Illinois public libraries--Arlington Heights, Deerfield, Elk Grove Village, Evanston, Glenview, Northbrook, Schaumburg Township, Waukegan, Wilmette--are discussed, noting search costs, user charges, popular databases, library acquisition, interaction with users, and staff training. Three sources are…

  2. Are there species smaller than 1 mm?

    PubMed Central

    Rossberg, Axel G.; Rogers, Tim; McKane, Alan J.

    2013-01-01

    The rapid advance in genetic sequencing technologies has provided an unprecedented amount of data on the biodiversity of meiofauna. It was hoped that these data would allow the identification and counting of species, distinguished as tight clusters of similar genomes. Surprisingly, this appears not to be the case. Here, we begin a theoretical discussion of this phenomenon, drawing on an individual-based ecological model to inform our arguments. The determining factor in the emergence (or not) of distinguishable genetic clusters in the model is the product of population size with mutation rate—a measure of the adaptability of the population as a whole. This result suggests that indeed one should not expect to observe clearly distinguishable species groupings in data gathered from ultrasequencing of meiofauna. PMID:23884092

  3. Large communications platforms versus smaller satellites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1979-01-01

    Communications systems using large platforms are compared with systems using conventional satellites. Systems models were generated and compared for U.S. domestic application and for 1 INTELSAT's international and domestic transponder lease application. Technology advances were assumed the platforms and the evolution of conventional satellites.

  4. 75 FR 16082 - Smaller Learning Communities Program

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-03-31

    ... significantly increased student achievement in reading or mathematics and narrowed achievement gaps by... reading/language arts and mathematics assessments and (2) high school graduation rates (these two... arts and mathematics assessments used by the State to determine whether a school has made...

  5. Does a Smaller Waist Mean Smelly Breath?

    MedlinePlus

    ... from the breakdown of food particles that produce sulfur compounds, and from bacteria on the gums and ... DDS, MAGD. " High-protein foods can produce more sulfur compounds, especially overnight on the surface of the ...

  6. Shortening of alkaline DNA unwinding time does not interfere with detecting DNA damage to mouse and human spermatozoa in the comet assay.

    PubMed

    Kusakabe, Hirokazu; Tateno, Hiroyuki

    2011-01-01

    The comet assay was performed on mouse and human spermatozoa to examine the effect of alkaline DNA unwinding time. The spermatozoa were treated in vitro with the DNA-damaging agents, methyl methanesulfonate (MMS) or hydrogen peroxide (H₂O₂), and then embedded in agarose gel on glass slides. The slides were immersed in alkaline solution (> pH 13) for 1, 5, 10 and 20 min, and then subjected to the electrophoresis under neutral conditions. In mouse spermatozoa, comet tails seen in solvent controls became brighter and longer as the alkaline DNA unwinding time increased. However, in the MMS-treated mouse spermatozoa, a smaller difference in the damage from that in the solvent control was seen with time within a dose. DNA damage induced by H₂O₂ could also be detected accurately after alkali treatment for 1-20 min. In human spermatozoa, DNA damage induced by MMS and H₂O₂ could be detected in a dose-dependent manner after alkali treatment for 1 min. The ability of the comet assay to detect DNA damage was not adversely affected by the short period (1 min) of the alkaline DNA unwinding time.

  7. Turbulencelike Behavior of Seismic Time Series

    SciTech Connect

    Manshour, P.; Saberi, S.; Sahimi, Muhammad; Peinke, J.; Pacheco, Amalio F.; Rahimi Tabar, M. Reza

    2009-01-09

    We report on a stochastic analysis of Earth's vertical velocity time series by using methods originally developed for complex hierarchical systems and, in particular, for turbulent flows. Analysis of the fluctuations of the detrended increments of the series reveals a pronounced transition in their probability density function from Gaussian to non-Gaussian. The transition occurs 5-10 hours prior to a moderate or large earthquake, hence representing a new and reliable precursor for detecting such earthquakes.

  8. Cell lipid metabolism modulators 2-bromopalmitate, D609, monensin, U18666A and probucol shift discoidal HDL formation to the smaller-sized particles: implications for the mechanism of HDL assembly.

    PubMed

    Quach, Duyen; Vitali, Cecilia; La, Fiona M; Xiao, Angel X; Millar, John S; Tang, Chongren; Rader, Daniel J; Phillips, Michael C; Lyssenko, Nicholas N

    2016-12-01

    ATP-binding cassette transporter A1 (ABCA1) mediates formation of disc-shaped high-density lipoprotein (HDL) from cell lipid and lipid-free apolipoprotein A-I (apo A-I). Discoidal HDL particles are heterogeneous in physicochemical characteristics for reasons that are understood incompletely. Discoidal lipoprotein particles similar in characteristics and heterogeneity to cell-formed discoidal HDL can be reconstituted from purified lipids and apo A-I by cell-free, physicochemical methods. The heterogeneity of reconstituted HDL (rHDL) is sensitive to the lipid composition of the starting lipid/apo A-I mixture. To determine whether the heterogeneity of cell-formed HDL is similarly sensitive to changes in cell lipids, we investigated four compounds that have well-established effects on cell lipid metabolism and ABCA1-mediated cell cholesterol efflux. 2-Bromopalmitate, D609, monensin and U18666A decreased formation of the larger-sized, but dramatically increased formation of the smaller-sized HDL. 2-Bromopalmitate did not appear to affect ABCA1 activity, subcellular localization or oligomerization, but induced dissolution of the cholesterol-phospholipid complexes in the plasma membrane. Arachidonic and linoleic acids shifted HDL formation to the smaller-sized species. Tangier disease mutations and inhibitors of ABCA1 activity wheat germ agglutinin and AG 490 reduced formation of both larger-sized and smaller-sized HDL. The effect of probucol was similar to the effect of 2-bromopalmitate. Taking rHDL formation as a paradigm, we propose that ABCA1 mutations and activity inhibitors reduce the amount of cell lipid available for HDL formation, and the compounds in the 2-bromopalmitate group and the polyunsaturated fatty acids change cell lipid composition from one that favors formation of the larger-sized HDL particles to one that favors formation of the smaller-sized species.

  9. Time outs

    MedlinePlus

    ... this page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/patientinstructions/000756.htm Time outs To use the sharing features on this ... children, 2 to 12 years old. Why Does Time out Work? When you put children in time ...

  10. Time Out for Time Management.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Herr, Judy; And Others

    1995-01-01

    Discusses time management skills, noting that effective time management entails awareness of such things as how we use time and when our mental energy peaks and falls. Offers time management suggestions for day-care administrators such as developing a realistic "to-do" list, scheduling uninterrupted time to engage in important tasks, and limiting…

  11. Flushing Time

    EPA Science Inventory

    The flushing time of an estuary is generally defined as the turnover time of fresh water in the estuary, that is, the time required to replace the fresh water contained in the estuary with freshwater inflow. Thus, the flushing time of an estuary is the ratio of the volume of fres...

  12. Reinventing Time

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Technology Teacher, 2004

    2004-01-01

    What do planet Earth, a swinging pendulum, a quartz crystal, and a Cesium atom have in common? They have all been used by humans to measure time. They represent humanity's progress through time in measuring time itself. But what is it, really, that humans set out to measure? Before time could be measured, somebody had to decide what to actually…

  13. Chua's Time

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Buscarino, Arturo; Fortuna, Luigi; Frasca, Mattia

    2013-01-01

    We discuss the relationship between the idea of time of the philosopher Bergson and the concept of time recurrence in chaotic systems. By taking into account the Chua's circuit, we saw that the "Chua's time", i.e., the average recurrence time of trajectories in the Chua's circuit, is able to qualitatively represent the features of the Bergon's time. Numerical and experimental results are presented.

  14. Contextual Effects on Number-Time Interaction

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lu, Aitao; Hodges, Bert; Zhang, Jijia; Zhang, John X.

    2009-01-01

    Time perception has long been known to be affected by numerical representations. Recent studies further demonstrate that when participants estimate the duration of Arabic numbers, number magnitude, though task-irrelevant, biases duration judgment to produce underestimation for smaller numbers and overestimation for larger numbers. Such effects…

  15. EGFR mutations are associated with higher incidence of distant metastases and smaller tumor size in patients with non-small-cell lung cancer based on PET/CT scan.

    PubMed

    Guan, Jian; Chen, Min; Xiao, Nanjie; Li, Lu; Zhang, Yue; Li, Qinyang; Yang, Mi; Liu, Laiyu; Chen, Longhua

    2016-01-01

    The study aimed to explore the correlation of epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) mutation with tumor node metastasis (TNM) stage in patients with non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC) who underwent positron emission tomography/computed tomography (PET/CT) scan. Patients diagnosed with NSCLC who underwent EGFR mutation status testing and PET/CT or PET/CT plus brain magnetic resonance imaging scan at initial diagnosis in Nanfang Hospital between July 2010 and June 2014 were consecutively enrolled. The correlation of EGFR mutation status with TNM stage and distant metastasis organs including brain, bone, liver, pleural, adrenals and contralateral lobe of lung were analyzed. A total of 401 patients were enrolled. Tumor size in EGFR mutation group was significantly smaller than the wild-type group (P < 0.001). Further, patients with EGFR mutations were demonstrated significantly more frequent in patients with distant metastasis than non-metastasis (45.7 vs 32.2 %, P = 0.007). The rates of bone (32.2 vs 22.8 %, P = 0.007) and brain (16.3 vs 9.4 %, P = 0.008) metastasis were significantly higher in EGFR mutation group than the wild-type group. In the subgroup of 199 metastatic NSCLC patients, patients with EGFR mutation were significantly associated with a smaller tumor size (P = 0.013) and earlier N stage (P = 0.033). Of note, compared with the EGFR wild-type group, patients had a higher likelihood of developing brain plus bone metastases at initial diagnosis of EGFR mutation group (20.9 vs 7.5 %, P = 0.018). Taken together, we identify that EGFR mutations might associate with more aggressive tumor progression than the wild types in NSCLC. In addition, patients with tumor having EGFR mutation had a smaller tumor size than without mutation.

  16. Entropic Time

    SciTech Connect

    Caticha, Ariel

    2011-03-14

    The formulation of quantum mechanics within the framework of entropic dynamics includes several new elements. In this paper we concentrate on one of them: the implications for the theory of time. Entropic time is introduced as a book-keeping device to keep track of the accumulation of changes. One new feature is that, unlike other concepts of time appearing in the so-called fundamental laws of physics, entropic time incorporates a natural distinction between past and future.

  17. 30 CFR 5.10 - Purpose and scope.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... subchapter. This part includes the management and calculation of these fees. (b) The services for which fees... to process the application; (2) Clerical services, computer tracking and status reporting, records... proportionate share of management, administration and operation of the Approval and Certification Center...

  18. 29 CFR 5.10 - Restitution, criminal action.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... SUBJECT TO THE CONTRACT WORK HOURS AND SAFETY STANDARDS ACT) Davis-Bacon and Related Acts Provisions and... fide fringe benefits within the meaning of section 1(b)(2) of the Davis-Bacon Act. (b) In cases...

  19. 29 CFR 5.10 - Restitution, criminal action.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... SUBJECT TO THE CONTRACT WORK HOURS AND SAFETY STANDARDS ACT) Davis-Bacon and Related Acts Provisions and... fide fringe benefits within the meaning of section 1(b)(2) of the Davis-Bacon Act. (b) In cases...

  20. 29 CFR 5.10 - Restitution, criminal action.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... SUBJECT TO THE CONTRACT WORK HOURS AND SAFETY STANDARDS ACT) Davis-Bacon and Related Acts Provisions and... fide fringe benefits within the meaning of section 1(b)(2) of the Davis-Bacon Act. (b) In cases...

  1. 29 CFR 5.10 - Restitution, criminal action.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... SUBJECT TO THE CONTRACT WORK HOURS AND SAFETY STANDARDS ACT) Davis-Bacon and Related Acts Provisions and... fide fringe benefits within the meaning of section 1(b)(2) of the Davis-Bacon Act. (b) In cases...

  2. 29 CFR 5.10 - Restitution, criminal action.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... SUBJECT TO THE CONTRACT WORK HOURS AND SAFETY STANDARDS ACT) Davis-Bacon and Related Acts Provisions and... fide fringe benefits within the meaning of section 1(b)(2) of the Davis-Bacon Act. (b) In cases...

  3. Time Honoured

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Campbell, Mora; Timmerman, Peter

    2007-01-01

    The vast majority of literature and practices in environmental education focuses on places and spaces. Little attention has been paid to time and temporalities as elements of environments, and the ways in which how we experience time affects our experience of place. This paper is an examination of the ways in which reflection on time can be…

  4. Geologic Time.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Newman, William L.

    One of a series of general interest publications on science topics, the booklet provides those interested in geologic time with an introduction to the subject. Separate sections discuss the relative time scale, major divisions in geologic time, index fossils used as guides for telling the age of rocks, the atomic scale, and the age of the earth.…

  5. Study on steady-state response of a vertical axis automatic washing machine with a hydraulic balancer using a new approach and a method for getting a smaller deflection angle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Hai-Wei; Zhang, Qiu-Ju; Fan, Sheng-Yao

    2011-04-01

    A new approach is used in this paper to analyze steady-state response of a vertical axis automatic washing machine with a hydraulic balancer and a method for getting a smaller deflection angle of the washing/drying assembly is presented. First, a mathematical model of the vertical axis washing machine and a numerical description of the hydraulic balancer are described and a vibration model for the vertical axis washing machine with a hydraulic balancer is built. Second, the vibration model is transformed into an autonomous form whose equilibrium point can be used to analyze dynamics of the washing machine at the steady state. Because the autonomous form can be solved by the Newton-Raphson method which requires only a few iterations, it provides a much faster approach for analyzing steady-state response of the spin drying process than traditional numerical integration methods. Five parameters influencing the spin drying process are considered, and the balancer's importance in reducing vibrations at the steady state is illustrated. Third, the equilibrium conditions of the centrifugal forces acting on the clothes, the washing/drying assembly and the balancer are considered, and a governing equation for getting a smaller deflection angle of the washing/drying assembly is derived. At last, parameters in the governing equation, especially those related to the hydraulic balancer, are discussed.

  6. Reducing neural network training time with parallel processing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rogers, James L., Jr.; Lamarsh, William J., II

    1995-01-01

    Obtaining optimal solutions for engineering design problems is often expensive because the process typically requires numerous iterations involving analysis and optimization programs. Previous research has shown that a near optimum solution can be obtained in less time by simulating a slow, expensive analysis with a fast, inexpensive neural network. A new approach has been developed to further reduce this time. This approach decomposes a large neural network into many smaller neural networks that can be trained in parallel. Guidelines are developed to avoid some of the pitfalls when training smaller neural networks in parallel. These guidelines allow the engineer: to determine the number of nodes on the hidden layer of the smaller neural networks; to choose the initial training weights; and to select a network configuration that will capture the interactions among the smaller neural networks. This paper presents results describing how these guidelines are developed.

  7. TIMING APPARATUS

    DOEpatents

    Bennett, A.E.; Geisow, J.C.H.

    1956-04-17

    The timing device comprises an escapement wheel and pallet, a spring drive to rotate the escapement wheel to a zero position, means to wind the pretensioned spring proportional to the desired signal time, and a cam mechanism to control an electrical signal switch by energizing the switch when the spring has been wound to the desired position, and deenergizing it when it reaches the zero position. This device produces an accurately timed signal variably witain the control of the operator.

  8. Geologic time

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Newman, William L.

    2000-01-01

    The Earth is very old 4 1/2 billion years or more according to recent estimates. This vast span of time, called geologic time by earth scientists, is difficult to comprehend in the familiar time units of months and years, or even centuries. How then do scientists reckon geologic time, and why do they believe the Earth is so old? A great part of the secret of the Earth's age is locked up in its rocks, and our centuries-old search for the key led to the beginning and nourished the growth of geologic science.

  9. Dynamical instability in surface permeability characteristics of building sandstones in response to salt accumulation over time

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McCabe, S.; McKinley, J. M.; Gomez-Heras, M.; Smith, B. J.

    2011-07-01

    This paper explores how the surface permeability of sandstone blocks changes over time in response to repeated salt weathering cycles. Surface permeability controls the amount of moisture and dissolved salt that can penetrate in and facilitate decay. Connected pores permit the movement of moisture (and hence soluble salts) into the stone interior, and where areas are more or less permeable soluble salts may migrate along preferred pathways at differential rates. Previous research has shown that salts can accumulate in the near-surface zone and lead to partial pore blocking which influences subsequent moisture ingress and causes rapid salt accumulation in the near-surface zone. Two parallel salt weathering simulations were carried out on blocks of Peakmoor Sandstone of different volumes. Blocks were removed from simulations after 2, 5, 10, 20 and 60 cycles. Permeability measurements were taken for these blocks at a resolution of 20 mm, providing a grid of 100 permeability values for each surface. The geostatistical technique of ordinary kriging was applied to the data to produce a smoothed interpolation of permeability for these surfaces, and hence improve understanding of the evolution of permeability over time in response to repeated salt weathering cycles. Results illustrate the different responses of the sandstone blocks of different volumes to repeated salt weathering cycles. In both cases, after an initial subtle decline in the permeability (reflecting pore blocking), the permeability starts to increase — reflected in a rise in mean, maximum and minimum values. However, between 10 and 20 cycles, there is a jump in the mean and range permeability of the group A block surfaces coinciding with the onset of meaningful debris release. After 60 cycles, the range of permeability in the group A block surface had increased markedly, suggesting the development of a secondary permeability. The concept of dynamic instability and divergent behaviour is applied at the

  10. Time Management

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stoilov, Todor, Ed.

    2012-01-01

    The time management is worthy goal of many human activities. It concerns variety problems related to goals definition, assessment of available resources, control of management policies, scheduling of decisions. This book is an attempt to illustrate the decision making process in time management for different success stories, which can be used as…

  11. On Time

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cattaneo, Alberto S.; Schiavina, Michele

    2017-02-01

    This note describes the restoration of time in one-dimensional parameterization-invariant (hence timeless) models, namely, the classically equivalent Jacobi action and gravity coupled to matter. It also serves as a timely introduction by examples to the classical and quantum BV-BFV formalism as well as to the AKSZ method.

  12. Turnover Time

    EPA Science Inventory

    Ecosystems contain energy and materials such as carbon, nitrogen, phosphorus, and water, and are open to their flow-through. Turnover time refers to the amount of time required for replacement by flow-through of the energy or substance of interest contained in the system, and is ...

  13. Pluto Time

    NASA Video Gallery

    If you stood on Pluto at noon and looked around, the landscape would be illuminated about as brightly as on Earth soon after sunset. The team for NASA's New Horizons mission dubbed this "Pluto Time...

  14. Time out

    MedlinePlus

    ... but no more than 5 minutes. Once your child shows bad behavior, explain clearly what the unacceptable behavior is, and ... time out. Be ready with praise if your child stops the behavior. If the behavior does not stop, tell your ...

  15. About time

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Denning, Peter J.

    1990-01-01

    Time has historically been a measure of progress of recurrent physical processes. Coordination of future actions, prediction of future events, and assigning order to events are three practical reasons for implementing clocks and signalling mechanisms. In large networks of computers, these needs lead to the problem of synchronizing the clocks throughout the network. Recent methods allow this to be done in large networks with precision around 1 millisecond despite mean message exchange times near 5 milliseconds. These methods are discussed.

  16. Brain Time and Physical Time

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fidelman, Uri

    The hemispheric paradigm verifies Kant's suggestion that time and space are our subjective modes of perceiving experience. Time and space are two modes of organizing the sensory input by the l- and right-hemispheric neural mechanisms, respectively. The neural structures of the l- and right-hemispheric mechanisms force our consciousness to perceive time as one-dimensional and propagating from the past towards the future, and space as a simultaneously perceived multidimensional structure. The introduction of temporal propagation from the future towards the past by Feynman and other physicists caused the transfer of the concept time from the l hemisphere (which cannot perceive this change of the temporal direction) to the right one. This transfer requires and allows for the introduction of additional temporal axes in order to solve paradoxes in physics.

  17. Arctic palaeosalinities during late Cainozoic time

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Herman, Y.; O'Neil, J.R.

    1975-01-01

    DURING the late Cainozoic, alternations between interglacial and glacial conditions, manifested by waning and waxing of continental ice sheets coincided with the rise and fall of seawater temperatures. Our palaeontological and oxygen isotope data indicate that although the major oceans and low latititude seas underwent large temperature variations, ??? 5-10 ??C, Arctic water temperatures remained near freezing point for at least the past 3 Myr, the time interval represented by the longest studied cores. We have determined palaeotemperatures from the ratio of left to right coiling Globigerina pachyderma1-3 and calculated palaeosalinities using the oxygen isotope palaeotemperature expression of Epstein et al.4. ?? 1975 Nature Publishing Group.

  18. Martian atmospheric chemistry during the time of low water abundance

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nair, Hari; Allen, Mark; Yung, Yuk L.; Clancy, R. Todd

    1992-01-01

    The importance of odd hydrogen (or HO(x)) radicals in the catalytic recombination of carbon monoxide and oxygen in the Martian atmosphere is a well known fact. The inclusion of recent chemical kinetics data, specifically temperature-dependent CO2 absorption cross sections, into our one dimensional photochemical model shows that HO(x) is too efficient in this regard. The absorption cross sections of CO2 are smaller than previously assumed; this leads to a reduction in the photolysis rate of CO2 while the photolysis rate of H2O has increased. As a consequence the predicted mixing ratio of CO in our models is substantially less than the observed value of 6.5(10)(exp -4). Simultaneous measurements of water, ozone, and carbon monoxide were obtained in the Martian atmosphere in early Dec. 1990 (L(sub s) for Mars was 344 deg.).

  19. Number Time

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Herrera, Terese A.

    2004-01-01

    This article features Number Time, a site developed by the British Broadcasting Corporation (BBC) for young mathematics learners, located at www.bbc.co.uk/schools/numbertime. The site uses interactive animation to help children in pre-K through grade 2 understand and practice number basics. Users will find online games, videos that tell number…

  20. Geologic Time.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Albritton, Claude C., Jr.

    1984-01-01

    Discusses the historical development of the concept of geologic time. Develops the topic by using the major discoveries of geologists, beginning with Steno and following through to the discovery and use of radiometric dating. An extensive reference list is provided. (JM)

  1. Time Critical

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Covault, Craig

    2005-01-01

    NASA's decision to slip launch of the space shuttle return-to-flight mission to no earlier than May 22 will provide engineers more time to complete final, rigorous assessments before the orbiter Discovery's final Flight Readiness Review (FRR). That FRR is now planned for May 10-11. It will be used by NASA and contractor managers to reaffirm the readiness of all program elements to support the new target to return the U.S. space program to manned launch operations. It will also enable them to better raise any final issues that could slip the target again, if necessary, to complete more work and documentation.

  2. Time management problems and discounted utility.

    PubMed

    König, Cornelius J; Kleinmann, Martin

    2007-05-01

    The lens of behavioral decision theory offers a new perspective for research on time management. The basic idea of this approach is that people discount future consequences of their time management decisions, meaning that they work on tasks with smaller but sooner outcomes rather than on tasks with larger but later outcomes. The authors performed 2 experimental studies to test whether people are sensitive to differences in the discounted utility of time management decisions. In Experiment 1, they used vignettes of typical time management situations; Experiment 2 was a laboratory simulation (an in-basket task that was part of a training assessment). Participants in both studies were German students. As expected, manipulating the discounted utility of options resulted in different time management decisions. In Experiment 1, reactions to time management situations were judged as less likely if the reactions had lower discounted utilities. In Experiment 2, people spent less time on an interruption.

  3. Stochastic Control with Exit Time and Constraints, Application to Small Time Attainability of Sets

    SciTech Connect

    Buckdahn, Rainer Quincampoix, Marc Rainer, Catherine Rascanu, Aurel

    2004-03-15

    We study the existence of a solution of controlled stochastic differential equations remaining in a given set of constraints at any time smaller than the exit time of a given open set.We also investigate the small time attainability of a given closed set K, i.e., the property that, for all arbitrary small time horizon T and for all initial condition in a sufficiently small neighborhood of K, there exists a solution to the controlled stochastic differential equation which reaches K before T.

  4. Organizational and Non-Organizational Influences on Job Attitudes of Part-Time and Full-Time Employees.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1980-02-01

    AD-AO82 568 ILLINOIS UNIV AT URBANA-CHAMPAIGN DEPT OF PSYCHOLOGY F/S 5/10 ORGANIZATIONAL AND NON-ORGANIZATIONAL INFLUENCES ON JOB ATTITUD-.ETC(U) FEB...Department of Psychology Urbana -Champaign II ~ ~ 1. 7-~ c~.6 so03..31� ORGANIZATIONAL AND NON-ORGANIZATIONAL INFLUENCES ON JOB ATTITUDES OF PART-TIME...organization. Finally, relations of non-organizational social influences with measures of psychological attachment were equivalently high for both part

  5. Synthesis in Escherichia coli of two smaller enzymically active analogues of Coxiella burnetii macrophage infectivity potentiator (CbMip) protein utilizing a single open reading frame from the cbmip gene.

    PubMed Central

    Mo, Y Y; Seshu, J; Wang, D; Mallavia, L P

    1998-01-01

    FK506-binding proteins (FKBPs) have been identified in a variety of eukaryotic and prokaryotic organisms. Macrophage infectivity potentiator (CbMip, 23.5 kDa) protein of the obligate intracellular bacterium, Coxiella burnetii, was shown previously to belong to the family of FKBPs based on sequence homology and peptidyl-prolyl cis/trans isomerase (PPIase) activity. Further characterization of the cbmip gene has identified two additional proteins with molecular masses of 15.5 and 15.0 kDa that are synthesized, in addition to the 23.5 kDa CbMip, when expressed in Escherichia coli. Amino acid sequencing at the N-terminus combined with transcription and translation fusion expression revealed that the two proteins were synthesized from the same open reading frame of the cbmip gene, but starting at different internal translation start codons, probably by translational reinitiation. When the internal methionines serving as start sites were replaced with lysine by site-directed mutagenesis, the synthesis of 15.5 and 15.0 kDa proteins was abolished even though the synthesis of 23.5 kDa CbMip was intact. This confirmed that the 15.5 and 15.0 kDa proteins are indeed generated by translational reinitiation and are not degradation products of the 23.5 kDa protein. Like other FKBPs, both 15.5 and 15.0 kDa proteins exhibit PPIase activity. Because they share significant sequence homology with FKBPs and have a similar PPIase activity, 15.5 and 15. 0 kDa proteins are designated as C. burnetii FKBP (Cb-FKBP) analogues I and II, respectively. TnphoA mutagenesis demonstrated that whereas the large protein (CbMip) is secreted, Cb-FKBP analogues I and II are cytoplasmic, indicating that structural variations could allow for different subcellular compartmentalization of similar proteins. Western-blot analysis of lysates of purified C. burnetii using a CbMip-specific monoclonal antibody revealed the presence of a protein migrating at approximately 15 kDa, indicating the presence of smaller

  6. The modulation of implicit magnitude on time estimates.

    PubMed

    Ma, Qingxia; Yang, Zhen; Zhang, Zhijie

    2012-01-01

    Studies in time and quantity have shown that explicit magnitude (e.g. Arabic numerals, luminance, or size) modulates time estimates with smaller magnitude biasing the judgment of time towards underestimation and larger magnitude towards overestimation. However, few studies have examined the effect of implicit magnitude on time estimates. The current study used a duration estimation task to investigate the effects of implicit magnitude on time estimation in three experiments. During the duration estimation task, the target words named objects of various lengths (Experiment 1), weights (Experiment 2) and volumes (Experiment 3) were presented on the screen and participants were asked to reproduce the amount of time the words remained on the screen via button presses. Results indicated that the time estimates were modulated by the implicit magnitude of the word's referent with words named objects of smaller magnitude (shorter, lighter, or smaller) being judged to last a shorter time, and words named objects of greater magnitude (longer, heavier, or bigger) being judged to last a longer time. These findings were consistent with previous studies examining the effect of implicit spatial length on time estimates. More importantly, current results extended the implicit magnitude of length to the implicit magnitude of weight and volume and demonstrated a functional interaction between time and implicit magnitude in all three aspects of quantity, suggesting a common generalized magnitude system. These results provided new evidence to support a theory of magnitude (ATOM).

  7. Time-of-flight measurements

    SciTech Connect

    Atwood, W.B.

    1980-10-01

    Time of flight (TOF) measurements are used in high energy particle physics experiments to: (1) distinguish background from events and (2) identify particle types. An example of background separation is shown. These data come from a coincidence electro-production experiment performed at SLAC. The reaction being studied was e + p ..-->.. e' + p' + X where the e(p) stand for an initial and detected electron (proton) and X is a produced but undetected final state with a mass in the rho meson region. The relative time between the detection of an electron and a proton in two of the spectrometers in End Station A is plotted. Data for two different kinematic settings taken in the experiment are shown. The time resolution has been partially corrected for the various flight paths through the instruments and the difference in time resolutions between the two settings results mainly from the incompleteness of this correction. The signal height above the background depends on the time resolution, ..delta.. tau. The chance background is proportional to the product of the electron counting rate, the proton counting rate, and ..delta.. tau. Smaller ..delta.. tau means that higher electron and proton counting rates may be tolerated and result in a similar signal-to-noise ratio.

  8. U.S. National Security Strategy - The Magnitude of Second and Third-Order Effects on Smaller Nations: The Cases of Lebanon During the Cold War and Pakistan During the Global War on Terrorism

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2007-11-02

    first ruler and founding father, Muhammed Ali Jinnah . Pakistanis are more likely to identify themselves by their ethnic or linguistic group than by their...South Asia has favored India since the partition of the subcontinent in 1947. In its quest to counter India’s regional influence, Pakistan’s foreign...arguably the first time since partition , the US finds itself on reasonably good terms with both India and Pakistan. Whether the US can parlay its

  9. Optimal time step for incompressible SPH

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Violeau, Damien; Leroy, Agnès

    2015-05-01

    A classical incompressible algorithm for Smoothed Particle Hydrodynamics (ISPH) is analyzed in terms of critical time step for numerical stability. For this purpose, a theoretical linear stability analysis is conducted for unbounded homogeneous flows, leading to an analytical formula for the maximum CFL (Courant-Friedrichs-Lewy) number as a function of the Fourier number. This gives the maximum time step as a function of the fluid viscosity, the flow velocity scale and the SPH discretization size (kernel standard deviation). Importantly, the maximum CFL number at large Reynolds number appears twice smaller than with the traditional Weakly Compressible (WCSPH) approach. As a consequence, the optimal time step for ISPH is only five times larger than with WCSPH. The theory agrees very well with numerical data for two usual kernels in a 2-D periodic flow. On the other hand, numerical experiments in a plane Poiseuille flow show that the theory overestimates the maximum allowed time step for small Reynolds numbers.

  10. Improved singular spectrum analysis for time series with missing data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shen, Y.; Peng, F.; Li, B.

    2015-07-01

    Singular spectrum analysis (SSA) is a powerful technique for time series analysis. Based on the property that the original time series can be reproduced from its principal components, this contribution develops an improved SSA (ISSA) for processing the incomplete time series and the modified SSA (SSAM) of Schoellhamer (2001) is its special case. The approach is evaluated with the synthetic and real incomplete time series data of suspended-sediment concentration from San Francisco Bay. The result from the synthetic time series with missing data shows that the relative errors of the principal components reconstructed by ISSA are much smaller than those reconstructed by SSAM. Moreover, when the percentage of the missing data over the whole time series reaches 60 %, the improvements of relative errors are up to 19.64, 41.34, 23.27 and 50.30 % for the first four principal components, respectively. Both the mean absolute error and mean root mean squared error of the reconstructed time series by ISSA are also smaller than those by SSAM. The respective improvements are 34.45 and 33.91 % when the missing data accounts for 60 %. The results from real incomplete time series also show that the standard deviation (SD) derived by ISSA is 12.27 mg L-1, smaller than the 13.48 mg L-1 derived by SSAM.

  11. Improved singular spectrum analysis for time series with missing data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shen, Y.; Peng, F.; Li, B.

    2014-12-01

    Singular spectrum analysis (SSA) is a powerful technique for time series analysis. Based on the property that the original time series can be reproduced from its principal components, this contribution will develop an improved SSA (ISSA) for processing the incomplete time series and the modified SSA (SSAM) of Schoellhamer (2001) is its special case. The approach was evaluated with the synthetic and real incomplete time series data of suspended-sediment concentration from San Francisco Bay. The result from the synthetic time series with missing data shows that the relative errors of the principal components reconstructed by ISSA are much smaller than those reconstructed by SSAM. Moreover, when the percentage of the missing data over the whole time series reaches 60%, the improvements of relative errors are up to 19.64, 41.34, 23.27 and 50.30% for the first four principal components, respectively. Besides, both the mean absolute errors and mean root mean squared errors of the reconstructed time series by ISSA are also much smaller than those by SSAM. The respective improvements are 34.45 and 33.91% when the missing data accounts for 60%. The results from real incomplete time series also show that the SD derived by ISSA is 12.27 mg L-1, smaller than 13.48 mg L-1 derived by SSAM.

  12. Crystal structure of di­aqua­[5,10,15,20-tetra­kis­(4-meth­oxy­phen­yl)porphyrinato-κ4 N]iron(III) di­aqua­(18-crown-6)potassium bis­(tri­fluoro­methane­sulfonate)–18-crown-6 (1/2)

    PubMed Central

    Ben Haj Hassen, Leila; Denden, Zouhour; Rousselin, Yoann; Nasri, Habib

    2015-01-01

    In the title compound, [FeIII(C48H36N4O2)(H2O)2][K(C12H24O6)(H2O)2](SO3CF3)2·2C12H24O6, the FeIII atom is situated on an inversion centre and is octa­hedrally coordin­ated by four pyrrole N atoms of the deprotenated 5,10,15,20-tetra­kis­(4-meth­oxy­phen­yl)porphyrinate ligand and two water mol­ecules. The average equatorial Fe—N(pyrrole) bond length [2.043 (6) Å] is consistent with a high-spin (S = 5/2) iron(III) metalloporphyrin derivative. The K+ cation, which also lies on an inversion centre, is chelated by the six O atoms of one 18-crown-6 mol­ecule and is additionally coordinated by two water mol­ecules in a distorted hexa­gonal–bipyramidal geometry. In the crystal, the cations, anions and one non-coordinating 18-crown-6 mol­ecule are linked by classical O—H⋯O hydrogen bonds and non-conventional C—H⋯O hydrogen bonds, leading to a one-dimensional supra­molecular architecture along [10-1]. The crystal packing is further stabilized by weak C—H⋯π inter­actions involving pyrrole and phenyl rings of the porphyrins, as well as weak C—H⋯F contacts involving the (SO3CF3)− counter-ion and the 18-crown-6 mol­ecules. PMID:26870431

  13. Ring-strain release in neutral and dicationic 7,8,17,18-tetra­bromo-5,10,15,20-tetra­phenyl­porphyrin: crystal structures of C44H26Br4N4 and C44H28Br4N4 2+·2ClO4 −·3CH2Cl2

    PubMed Central

    Scheidt, W. Robert; Duval, Hugues F.; Oliver, Allen G.

    2016-01-01

    Two porphyrin complexes were studied to determine the effects of protonation on ring deformation within the porphyrin. The porphyrin 7,8,17,18-tetra­bromo-5,10,15,20-tetra­phenyl­porphyrin, C44H26Br4N4, was selected because the neutral species is readily doubly protonated to yield a dication, which was crystallized here with perchlorate counter-ions as a di­chloro­methane tris­olvate, C44H28Br4N4 2+·2ClO4 −·3CH2Cl2. The centrosymmetric neutral species is observed to have a mild ‘ruffling’ of the pyrrole rings and is essentially planar throughout; intra­molecular N—H⋯N hydrogen bonds occur. In contrast, the dication exhibits considerable deformation, with the pyrrole rings oriented well out of the plane of the porphyrin, resulting in a ‘saddle’ conformation of the ring. The charged species forms N—H⋯O hydrogen bonds to the perchlorate anions, which lie above and below the plane of the porphyrin ring. Distortions to the planarity of the pyrrole rings in both cases are very minor. The characterization of the neutral species represents a low-temperature redetermination of the previous room-temperature analyses [Zou et al. (1995 ▸). Acta Cryst. C51, 760–761; Rayati et al. (2008 ▸). Polyhedron, pp. 2285–2290], which showed disorder and physically unrealistic displacement parameters. PMID:27308051

  14. Determining the turnover time of mercury-contaminated fine-grained sediment in the gravel bed of the South River, Virginia using Pb-210, Be-7 and Cs-137

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pomraning, S. N.; Pizzuto, J. E.; Jurk, D.

    2010-12-01

    Fine-grained sediment and associated contaminants mediate important geochemical cycles in the hyporheic zone of gravel-bed rivers, but the turnover time of fine particles in these environments has rarely been measured. We analyzed the activities of Pb-210, Cs-137 and Be-7 in samples from four cores obtained on November 2, 2009 from a representative section of the bed composed of a mixture of sand, pebbles, and cobbles. The median grain size is 25.5 mm, the 84th percentile grain diameter is 57.8 mm, and 5.7% of the bed is composed of sediment smaller than 2 mm (sand sized or smaller sediment). The cores were sampled at five centimeter depth increments and each sample was sieved to extract the silt- and clay-sized particles. After freeze-drying the samples, equivalent depth intervals from all the cores were combined to yield a spatially averaged sample with depth intervals of 0-5 cm, 5-10 cm, 10-15 cm, 15-20 cm and 20-25 cm. Radionuclide activities were measured using a Canberra low energy germanium detector (model GL2020R). Activities of Pb-210 at the time of deposition were estimated from suspended sediment samples collected during a high flow event (recurrence interval 0.24 years) that occurred on November 13, 2009. At a depth of 2.5 cm, the Pb-210 dating indicates that the silt-clay fine fraction of the hyporheic zone is 21.3 years old; fine sediment at a depth of 17.5 cm is 29.3 years old. Assuming that the time-averaged bed elevation has not changed over time, and that sediment at depth is periodically removed by scour and subsequently replaced by fill, methods of reservoir theory suggest that the turnover time of silt- and clay-sized particles in the hyporheic zone is about two years. Because deep scour events are apparently relatively rare, approximately 21 years are required to rework 90% of the bed. These results have important implications for contaminant remediation. Even if all ongoing sources of mercury to the South River are removed, several decades

  15. Time Delays of Blazar Flares Observed at Different Wavebands

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Marscher, Alan P.

    2000-01-01

    Correlated variability at different frequencies can probe the structure and physics of the jet of a blazar on size scales much smaller than can be resolved by telescopes and interferometers. I discuss some observations of frequency dependent time lags and how these place constraints on models for the nonthermal emission in blazars. The time lags can be either positive (high frequency variations leading those at lower frequencies) or negative, while simultaneous flares are also possible.

  16. Response time accuracy in Apple Macintosh computers.

    PubMed

    Neath, Ian; Earle, Avery; Hallett, Darcy; Surprenant, Aimée M

    2011-06-01

    The accuracy and variability of response times (RTs) collected on stock Apple Macintosh computers using USB keyboards was assessed. A photodiode detected a change in the screen's luminosity and triggered a solenoid that pressed a key on the keyboard. The RTs collected in this way were reliable, but could be as much as 100 ms too long. The standard deviation of the measured RTs varied between 2.5 and 10 ms, and the distributions approximated a normal distribution. Surprisingly, two recent Apple-branded USB keyboards differed in their accuracy by as much as 20 ms. The most accurate RTs were collected when an external CRT was used to display the stimuli and Psychtoolbox was able to synchronize presentation with the screen refresh. We conclude that RTs collected on stock iMacs can detect a difference as small as 5-10 ms under realistic conditions, and this dictates which types of research should or should not use these systems.

  17. Prospective evaluation of cell kinetics, yields and donor experiences during a single large-volume apheresis versus two smaller volume consecutive day collections of allogeneic peripheral blood stem cells.

    PubMed

    Bolan, Charles D; Carter, Charles S; Wesley, Robert A; Yau, Yu Ying; Barrett, A John; Childs, Richard W; Read, Elizabeth J; Leitman, Susan F

    2003-03-01

    We report cell kinetics, yields and donation experiences of 20 demographically matched allogeneic peripheral blood stem cell (PBSC) donors who were prospectively assigned to undergo either a single 25 l or two consecutive daily 15 l (15 l x 2) apheresis procedures. Procedures were performed using prophylactic intravenous calcium administration after standard granulocyte colony-stimulating factor (GCSF) mobilization (10 microg/kg/d). Central line placements (two each), initial CD34 cell counts (0.077 vs 0.078 x 10(9)/l) and yields (7.9 vs 8.1 x 10(8) CD34 cells) were similar in the two groups; however, 25 l donors spent significantly less time both in the clinic (7.5 vs 10.8 h) and with central venous catheters in place (8.5 vs 29.5 h) than 15 l x 2 donors. End-procedure platelet counts were below 100 x 10(9)/l in one out of 10 25 l donors versus five out of 10 in 15 l x 2 donors (41%vs 53% mean decrease in platelet counts, P = 0.02). PBSC collection efficiency increased by 37% after 15 l of the 25-l volume had been processed, compared with no significant change during 15 l x 2 procedures. Results similar to these prospective findings were also observed in CD34 yields, symptoms and platelet counts in additional 25 l and 15 l procedures performed during the same period and evaluated retrospectively. This study indicates that a single 25-l apheresis procedure results in similar yields and symptoms, but less donor thrombocytopenia and inconvenience than two consecutive daily 15-l procedures.

  18. Real-Time Reed-Solomon Decoder

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Maki, Gary K.; Cameron, Kelly B.; Owsley, Patrick A.

    1994-01-01

    Generic Reed-Solomon decoder fast enough to correct errors in real time in practical applications designed to be implemented in fewer and smaller very-large-scale integrated, VLSI, circuit chips. Configured to operate in pipelined manner. One outstanding aspect of decoder design is that Euclid multiplier and divider modules contain Galoisfield multipliers configured as combinational-logic cells. Operates at speeds greater than older multipliers. Cellular configuration highly regular and requires little interconnection area, making it ideal for implementation in extraordinarily dense VLSI circuitry. Flight electronics single chip version of this technology implemented and available.

  19. Time constants of flat superconducting cables

    SciTech Connect

    Takacs, S.; Yamamoto, J.

    1997-06-01

    The frequency dependence of coupling losses is calculated for flat superconducting cables, including the electromagnetic coupling between different current loops on the cable. It is shown that there are two characteristic time constants for both parallel and transverse coupling losses. The values of these time constants {tau}{sub 0} and {tau}{sub 1} are calculated by introducing effective inductances for the current loops. In both cases, {tau}{sub 1} is considerably smaller than {tau}{sub 0}. As the most important methods of determining {tau}{sub 0} from AC losses - namely, the limiting slope of loss/cycle at zero frequency and the position of the maximum loss/cycle vs. frequency - estimate {tau}{sub 0} and {tau}{sub 1}, respectively, the results are important for practical measurements and evaluation of time constants from AC losses. At larger frequencies, the losses are more likely to those in normal conductors (skin effect). The calculation schemes can be applied to cables with closely wound strands (like the cable-in-conduit conductors), too. However, several other effects should be considered being different and/or more important with respect to other cable types (demagnetization factor of strands and cables, larger regions near the cable edges, smaller number of strands and subcables, etc.).

  20. Transient nanobubbles in short-time electrolysis.

    PubMed

    Svetovoy, Vitaly B; Sanders, Remco G P; Elwenspoek, Miko C

    2013-05-08

    Water electrolysis in a microsystem is observed and analyzed on a short-time scale of ∼10 μs. The very unusual properties of the process are stressed. An extremely high current density is observed because the process is not limited by the diffusion of electroactive species. The high current is accompanied by a high relative supersaturation, S > 1000, that results in homogeneous nucleation of bubbles. On the short-time scale only nanobubbles can be formed. These nanobubbles densely cover the electrodes and aggregate at a later time to microbubbles. The effect is significantly intensified with a small increase of temperature. Application of alternating polarity voltage pulses produces bubbles containing a mixture of hydrogen and oxygen. Spontaneous reaction between gases is observed for stoichiometric bubbles with sizes smaller than ∼150 nm. Such bubbles disintegrate violently affecting the surfaces of the electrodes.

  1. Human Time-Frequency Acuity Beats the Fourier Uncertainty Principle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oppenheim, Jacob N.; Magnasco, Marcelo O.

    2013-01-01

    The time-frequency uncertainty principle states that the product of the temporal and frequency extents of a signal cannot be smaller than 1/(4π). We study human ability to simultaneously judge the frequency and the timing of a sound. Our subjects often exceeded the uncertainty limit, sometimes by more than tenfold, mostly through remarkable timing acuity. Our results establish a lower bound for the nonlinearity and complexity of the algorithms employed by our brains in parsing transient sounds, rule out simple “linear filter” models of early auditory processing, and highlight timing acuity as a central feature in auditory object processing.

  2. Human time-frequency acuity beats the Fourier uncertainty principle.

    PubMed

    Oppenheim, Jacob N; Magnasco, Marcelo O

    2013-01-25

    The time-frequency uncertainty principle states that the product of the temporal and frequency extents of a signal cannot be smaller than 1/(4 π). We study human ability to simultaneously judge the frequency and the timing of a sound. Our subjects often exceeded the uncertainty limit, sometimes by more than tenfold, mostly through remarkable timing acuity. Our results establish a lower bound for the nonlinearity and complexity of the algorithms employed by our brains in parsing transient sounds, rule out simple "linear filter" models of early auditory processing, and highlight timing acuity as a central feature in auditory object processing.

  3. The Time-Pressure Illusion: Discretionary Time vs. Free Time

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Goodin, Robert E.; Rice, James Mahmud; Bittman, Michael; Saunders, Peter

    2005-01-01

    People's welfare is a function of both time and money. People can--and, it is said, increasingly do--suffer time-poverty as well as money-poverty. It is undeniably true that people feel increasingly time pressured, particularly in dual-earner households. But much of the time devoted to paid and unpaid tasks is over and above that which is strictly…

  4. Precondition of time required for the generation of methane hydrate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rezničák, Štefan; Malcho, Milan; Siažik, Ján

    2016-06-01

    The paper deals with methane hydrates generated from natural gas. Methane hydrates in nature. Thermobaric conditions necessary for their generation from the natural gas, composition of december 2015 from the company SPP - distribúcia, a.s. It deals with the estimated time of their formation, at a constant pressures of 5, 10 and 15 MPa and at different subcooling temperature. Determination the temperature required for the generation of methane hydrates at these pressures and temperature range based on the equation from research by Kim et. al..

  5. Babies Need Tummy Time

    MedlinePlus

    ... sharing on social media links Babies Need Tummy Time! Page Content Tummy Time is not only an ... of your baby’s normal growth. What Is Tummy Time? Tummy Time describes the times when you place ...

  6. Bunched-beam measurements of very smaller currents at ASTRID

    SciTech Connect

    Abildskov, F.; Mo/ller, S.P.

    1997-01-01

    Stored currents in low-energy ion storage rings, like ASTRID, are often very small. Absolute current measurements are nevertheless important for absolute measurements of cross sections and also for machine operation purposes. Experimental results, using a beam charge monitor (BCM) from Bergoz, are shown for both light ions (H{sup {minus}}) and heavy ions (N{sub 2}{sup +}). The velocities are low, {beta}{approximately}0.001 to 0.05, and the detected currents are in the 0.1- to 2-{mu}A range. The storage ring ASTRID, where the measurements are made, will be described. The principle of the BCM will be briefly mentioned, and the obtained performance (resolution, stability, noise, etc.) will be given. {copyright} {ital 1997 American Institute of Physics.}

  7. Utility of Inferential Norming with Smaller Sample Sizes

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Zhu, Jianjun; Chen, Hsin-Yi

    2011-01-01

    We examined the utility of inferential norming using small samples drawn from the larger "Wechsler Intelligence Scales for Children-Fourth Edition" (WISC-IV) standardization data set. The quality of the norms was estimated with multiple indexes such as polynomial curve fit, percentage of cases receiving the same score, average absolute…

  8. Hydrogen peroxide propulsion for smaller satellites (SSC98-VIII-1)

    SciTech Connect

    Whitehead, J C

    1998-07-13

    As satellite designs shrink, providing maneuvering and control capability falls outside the realm of available propulsion technology. While cold gas has been used on the smallest satellites, hydrogen peroxide propellant is suggested as the next step in performance and cost before hydrazine. Minimal toxicity and a small scale enable benchtop propellant preparation and development testing. Progress toward low-cost thrusters and self-pressurizing tank systems is described.

  9. Potential Global Partners for Smaller-Scale Contingencies

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2000-08-01

    community to resolve. In the past, the code of international conduct, first established by the Treaty of Westphalia in 1648, applied. This code forbids...world’s oldest humanitarian organization, founded in 1099 by the armies of the First Crusade. It uses the Maltese Cross as its insignia. It is an Order of...provide or arrange locally for critical resources needed by the force. Five types of commercial operators are discussed in Chapter VIII. The first

  10. Growing Down -- Increasing Diversity as the Army Gets Smaller

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2012-03-19

    F. Kennedy administration’s attempt to discern the effect of increasing diversity on military efficiency led to the formation of the Gesell Committee...named after its chairman, U.S. Federal Judge Gerhard A. Gesell .4 Although the Fahy and Gesell committees were formed with the task of assessing...military. The Gesell Committee, on the other hand, was more concerned with developing a new equal treatment strategy than assessing the existing

  11. When the darker eye has the smaller pupil.

    PubMed

    Wallis, David H; Granet, David B; Levi, Leah

    2003-06-01

    Waardenburg and congenital Horner syndromes are both recognized causes of congenital hypochromic iris heterochromia. Each has been linked to disruptions in the pathway of tyrosinase induction, thus leading to a deficiency in melanin production of the iris. These syndromes must be considered in the differential diagnosis of a patient presenting with heterochromia iridis. We present the case of a 20-month old boy afflicted with both congenital Horner syndrome and Waardenburg syndrome, type II. In contrast to the more common presentation of congenital Horner syndrome, the affected iris in this case was the darker of the two because of the effects of the concomitant Waardenburg syndrome on the contralateral iris pigmentation. We are unaware of any other cases presenting with both Horner and Waardenburg syndromes and believe that this case serves as an excellent opportunity to briefly review the pathophysiology involved with these disorders.

  12. An Analysis of Substance Use among Adolescents from Smaller Places.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Donnermeyer, Joseph F.; Scheer, Scott D.

    2001-01-01

    Examines substance use trends among rural 12th-grade students, 1976-97, based on the national triennial study "Monitoring the Future." Finds that youth from more rural locations generally displayed lower rates of substance use, but as urbanization spread, differences declined. Compares data on farm, rural nonfarm, and small-town youth in both…

  13. Cities: A Window into Larger and Smaller Worlds

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sassen, Saskia

    2012-01-01

    Cities are complex systems. But they are incomplete systems. In this incompleteness lies the possibility of making--making the urban, the political, the civic, a history. The urban is not alone in having these characteristics, but these characteristics are a necessary part of the DNA of the urban. Every city is distinct and so is every discipline…

  14. Community reaction to aircraft noise around smaller city airports

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Connor, W. K.; Patterson, H. P.

    1972-01-01

    The results are presented of a study of community reaction to jet aircraft noise in the vicinity of airports in Chattanooga, Tennessee, and Reno, Nevada. These cities were surveyed in order to obtain data for comparison with that obtained in larger cities during a previous study. (The cities studied earlier were Boston, Chicago, Dallas, Denver, Los Angeles, Miami, and New York.) The purpose of the present effort was to observe the relative reaction under conditions of lower noise exposure and in less highly urbanized areas, and to test the previously developed predictive equation for annoyance under such circumstances. In Chattanooga and Reno a total of 1960 personal interviews based upon questionnaires were obtained. Aircraft noise measurements were made concurrently and aircraft operations logs were maintained for several weeks in each city to permit computation of noise exposures. The survey respondents were chosen randomly from various exposure zones.

  15. Higher brightness laser diodes with smaller slow axis divergence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, Wenyang; Pathak, Rajiv; Campbell, Geoff; Eppich, Henry; Jacob, J. H.; Chin, Aland; Fryer, Jack

    2013-02-01

    The slow axis (SA) divergence of 20% fill-factor, 980nm, laser diodes (LDs) have been investigated under short pulsed (SP) and continuous (CW) operation. By analyzing the data collected under these two modes of operation, one finds that the SA divergence can be separated into two components: an intrinsic divergence and a thermally induced divergence. At low injected current and power, the intrinsic SA divergence is dominant while at high power their magnitudes are approximately equal. The thermal gradient across the broad stripe is negligible under SP operation and, the SA divergence increased at a much slower rate as a function of injected current, thereby increasing the brightness of the LD by 2X. SRL has redesigned microchannel coolers that remove the thermal gradient under CW operation thereby eliminating the thermally induced SA divergence resulting in LDs that are 2X brighter at 300W/bar.

  16. Smaller cities can now benefit from landfill gas

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1984-01-01

    Florence, Alabama, population 38,000, has developed a system with the help of the Monsanto company, to use the gas generated in it's 21 acre landfill of household waste. A compressor and prism separator system is used to separate methane from the gas generated under anaerobic conditions in the waste. The methane is then piped into the city's gas distribution system and a number of it's vehicles have been equipped to run on natural gas. Payback for the prism system is reckoned at five years, but is site specific although it is well adapted for landfills of various sizes.

  17. Time on Your Hands: Modeling Time

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Finson, Kevin; Beaver, John

    2007-01-01

    Building physical models relative to a concept can be an important activity to help students develop and manipulate abstract ideas and mental models that often prove difficult to grasp. One such concept is "time". A method for helping students understand the cyclical nature of time involves the construction of a Time Zone Calculator through a…

  18. 'Stutter timing' for charge decay time measurement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chubb, John; Harbour, John; Pavey, Ian

    2011-06-01

    The paper describes the approach of 'stutter timing' that has been developed to improve the accuracy of measuring charge decay times in the presence of noise in compact and portable charge decay test instrumentation. The approach involves starting and stopping the timing clock as the noisy signal rises above and falls below the target threshold voltage level.

  19. Speech Recognition Using Neural Nets and Dynamic Time Warping

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1988-12-01

    AFIT/GEO/ENG/88D-1 SPEECH RECOGNITION USING NEURAL NETS AND DYNAMIC TIME WARPING THESIS Presented to the Faculty of the School of Engineering ... Engineering Gary Dean Barmore, B.S., B.S.E.E Capt, USAF December, 1988 Approved for public release; distribution unlimited Preface The purpose of this...input vector (. is smaller than the distance between any other node’s weight vector and the input vector. Hence, a sequence of input vectors

  20. Limits on neutron Lorentz violation from pulsar timing

    SciTech Connect

    Altschul, Brett

    2007-01-15

    Pulsars are the most accurate naturally occurring clocks, and data about them can be used to set bounds on neutron-sector Lorentz violations. If SO(3) rotation symmetry is completely broken for neutrons, then pulsars' rotation speeds will vary periodically. Pulsar timing data limits the relevant Lorentz-violating coefficients to be smaller than 1.7x10{sup -8} at at least 90% confidence.

  1. On reevaluation rate in discrete time Hogg-Huberman model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tanaka, Toshijiro; Shibata, Junko; Inoue, Masayoshi

    2002-06-01

    The discrete time Hogg-Huberman model is extended to a case with time-dependent reevaluation rate at which agents using one resource decide to evaluate their resource choice. In this paper the time dependence of the reevaluation rate is determined by states of the system. The dynamical behavior of the extended Hogg-Huberman model is discussed. It is found that the change of fraction of agents using resource 1 is suppressed to be smaller than that in the case of constant reevaluation rate.

  2. Time crystals from minimum time uncertainty

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Faizal, Mir; Khalil, Mohammed M.; Das, Saurya

    2016-01-01

    Motivated by the Generalized Uncertainty Principle, covariance, and a minimum measurable time, we propose a deformation of the Heisenberg algebra and show that this leads to corrections to all quantum mechanical systems. We also demonstrate that such a deformation implies a discrete spectrum for time. In other words, time behaves like a crystal. As an application of our formalism, we analyze the effect of such a deformation on the rate of spontaneous emission in a hydrogen atom.

  3. Did time begin? Will time end?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Frampton, Paul H.,

    ch. 1. Why do many other scientists believe time began at a big bang? -- ch. 2. Smoothness of the universe -- ch. 3. Structure in the universe -- ch. 4. Dark matter and dark energy -- ch. 5. Composition of the universe's energy -- ch. 6. Possible futures of the universe -- ch. 7. Advantages of cyclic cosmology -- ch. 8. Summary of answers to the questions: did time begin? Will time end?

  4. Relationship between quantum speed limit time and memory time in a photonic-band-gap environment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, J.; Wu, Y. N.; Mo, M. L.; Zhang, H. Z.

    2016-12-01

    Non-Markovian effect is found to be able to decrease the quantum speed limit (QSL) time, and hence to enhance the intrinsic speed of quantum evolution. Although a reservoir with larger degree of non-Markovianity may seem like it should cause smaller QSL times, this seemingly intuitive thinking may not always be true. We illustrate this by investigating the QSL time of a qubit that is coupled to a two-band photonic-band-gap (PBG) environment. We show how the QSL time is influenced by the coherent property of the reservoir and the band-gap width. In particular, we find that the decrease of the QSL time is not attributed to the increasing non-Markovianity, while the memory time of the environment can be seen as an essential reflection to the QSL time. So, the QSL time provides a further insight and sharper identification of memory time in a PBG environment. We also discuss a feasible experimental realization of our prediction.

  5. Relationship between quantum speed limit time and memory time in a photonic-band-gap environment

    PubMed Central

    Wang, J.; Wu, Y. N.; Mo, M. L.; Zhang, H. Z.

    2016-01-01

    Non-Markovian effect is found to be able to decrease the quantum speed limit (QSL) time, and hence to enhance the intrinsic speed of quantum evolution. Although a reservoir with larger degree of non-Markovianity may seem like it should cause smaller QSL times, this seemingly intuitive thinking may not always be true. We illustrate this by investigating the QSL time of a qubit that is coupled to a two-band photonic-band-gap (PBG) environment. We show how the QSL time is influenced by the coherent property of the reservoir and the band-gap width. In particular, we find that the decrease of the QSL time is not attributed to the increasing non-Markovianity, while the memory time of the environment can be seen as an essential reflection to the QSL time. So, the QSL time provides a further insight and sharper identification of memory time in a PBG environment. We also discuss a feasible experimental realization of our prediction. PMID:28008937

  6. Group Time: Building Language at Group Time

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Church, Ellen Booth

    2004-01-01

    This article features energizing and surprising activities for children at group time. In the drawing activity, children are asked to give instructions on how to draw a picture using vocabulary and descriptive language. In the mailbox activity, children will be surprised to discover that they have mail at group time. Mailboxes can be used for…

  7. Intelligence, Inspection Time, and Decision Time.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bates, Timothy C.; Eysenck, Hans J.

    1993-01-01

    Relationships among Multidimensional Aptitude Battery scores, inspection time, choice reaction time, and the odd-man procedure were investigated for 63 female and 25 male adults. No significant relationships were found for these mental speed measures and the Eysenck Personality Questionnaire-Revised dimensions of extraversion, neuroticism, and…

  8. Personnel real time dosimetry in interventional radiology.

    PubMed

    Servoli, L; Bissi, L; Fabiani, S; Magalotti, D; Placidi, P; Scorzoni, A; Calandra, A; Cicioni, R; Chiocchini, S; Dipilato, A C; Forini, N; Paolucci, M; Di Lorenzo, R; Cappotto, F P; Scarpignato, M; Maselli, A; Pentiricci, A

    2016-12-01

    Interventional radiology and hemodynamic procedures have rapidly grown in number in the past decade, increasing the importance of personnel dosimetry not only for patients but also for medical staff. The optimization of the absorbed dose during operations is one of the goals that fostered the development of real-time dosimetric systems. Indeed, introducing proper procedure optimization, like correlating dose rate measurements with medical staff position inside the operating room, the absorbed dose could be reduced. Real-time dose measurements would greatly facilitate this task through real-time monitoring and automatic data recording. Besides real-time dose monitoring could allow automatic data recording. In this work, we will describe the calibration and validation of a wireless real-time prototype dosimeter based on a new sensor device (CMOS imager). The validation measurement campaign in clinical conditions has demonstrated the prototype capability of measuring dose-rates with a frequency in the range of few Hz, and an uncertainty smaller than 10%.

  9. Time scales involved in emergent market coherence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kwapień, J.; Drożdż, S.; Speth, J.

    2004-06-01

    In addressing the question of the time scales characteristic for the market formation, we analyze high-frequency tick-by-tick data from the NYSE and from the German market. By using returns on various time scales ranging from seconds or minutes up to 2 days, we compare magnitude of the largest eigenvalue of the correlation matrix for the same set of securities but for different time scales. For various sets of stocks of different capitalization (and the average trading frequency), we observe a significant elevation of the largest eigenvalue with increasing time scale. Our results from the correlation matrix study can be considered as a manifestation of the so-called Epps effect. There is no unique explanation of this effect and it seems that many different factors play a role here. One of such factors is randomness in transaction moments for different stocks. Another interesting conclusion to be drawn from our results is that in the contemporary markets the emergence of significant correlations occurs on time scales much smaller than in the more distant history.

  10. Time's Arrows Today

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Savitt, Steven F.

    1997-06-01

    Introduction; Part I. Cosmology and Time's Arrow: 1. Time, gravity, and quantum mechanics W. Unruh; 2. Cosmology, time's arrow, and that old double standard H. Price; Part II. Quantum Theory and Time's Arrow: 3. Time's arrow and the quantum measurement problem A. Leggett; 4. Time, decoherence, and 'reversible' measurements P. Stamp; 5. Time flows, non-locality, and measurement in quantum mechanics S. McCall; 6. Stochastically branching spacetime topology R. Douglas; Part III. Thermodynamics and Time's Arrow: 7. The elusive object of desire: in pursuit of the kinetic equations and the second law L. Sklar; 8. Time in experience and in theoretical description of the world L. Sklar; 9. When and why does entropy increase? M. Barrett and E. Sober; Part IV. Time Travel and Time's Arrow: 10. Closed causal chains P Horwich; 11. Recent work on time travel J. Earman.

  11. From Time to Time: Processing Time Reference Violations in Dutch

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dragoy, Olga; Stowe, Laurie A.; Bos, Laura S.; Bastiaanse, Roelien

    2012-01-01

    Time reference in Indo-European languages is marked on the verb. With tensed verb forms, the speaker can refer to the past (wrote, has written), present (writes, is writing) or future (will write). Reference to the past through verb morphology has been shown to be particularly vulnerable in agrammatic aphasia and both agrammatic and…

  12. On the time required to freeze water

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Espinosa, J. R.; Navarro, C.; Sanz, E.; Valeriani, C.; Vega, C.

    2016-12-01

    By using the seeding technique the nucleation rate for the formation of ice at room pressure will be estimated for the TIP4P/ICE model using longer runs and a smaller grid of temperatures than in the previous work. The growth rate of ice will be determined for TIP4P/ICE and for the mW model of water. Although TIP4P/ICE and mW have a similar melting point and melting enthalpy, they differ significantly in the dynamics of freezing. The nucleation rate of mW is lower than that of TIP4P/ICE due to its higher interfacial free energy. Experimental results for the nucleation rate of ice are between the predictions of these two models when obtained from the seeding technique, although closer to the predictions of TIP4P/ICE. The growth rate of ice for the mW model is four orders of magnitude larger than for TIP4P/ICE. Avrami's expression is used to estimate the crystallization time from the values of the nucleation and growth rates. For mW the minimum in the crystallization time is found at approximately 85 K below the melting point and its value is of about a few ns, in agreement with the results obtained from brute force simulations by Moore and Molinero. For the TIP4P/ICE the minimum is found at about 55 K below the melting point, but its value is about ten microseconds. This value is compatible with the minimum cooling rate required to avoid the formation of ice and obtaining a glass phase. The crossover from the nucleation controlled crystallization to the growth controlled crystallization will be discussed for systems of finite size. This crossover could explain the apparent discrepancy between the values of J obtained by different experimental groups for temperatures below 230 K and should be considered as an alternative hypothesis to the two previously suggested: internal pressure and/or surface freezing effects. A maximum in the compressibility was found for the TIP4P/ICE model in supercooled water. The relaxation time is much smaller than the crystallization time

  13. Time-frequency decomposition of click evoked otoacoustic emissions in children.

    PubMed

    Mishra, Srikanta K; Biswal, Milan

    2016-05-01

    Determining the time-frequency distributions of click-evoked otoacoustic emissions (CEOAEs) are scientifically and clinically relevant because of their relationship with cochlear mechanisms. This study investigated the time-frequency properties of CEOAEs in 5-10 year old children. In the first part, we examined the feasibility of the S transform to characterize the time-frequency features of CEOAEs. A synthetic signal with known gammatones was analyzed using the S transform, as well as a wavelet transform with the basis function used traditionally for CEOAE analysis. The S and wavelet transforms provided similar representations of the gammatones of the synthetic signal in the mid and high frequencies. However, the S transform yielded a slightly more precise time-frequency representation at low frequencies (500 and 707 Hz). In the second part, we applied the S transform to compare the time-frequency distribution of CEOAEs between adults and children. Several confounding variables, such as spontaneous emissions and potential efferent effects from the use of higher click rates, were considered for obtaining reliable CEOAE recordings. The results revealed that the emission level, level versus frequency plot, latency, and latency versus frequency plot in 5-10 year old children are adult-like. The time-frequency characteristics of CEOAEs in 5-10 year old children are consistent with the maturation of various aspects of cochlear mechanics, including the basal to apical transition. In sum, the description of the time-frequency features in children and the use of the S transform to decompose CEOAEs, are novel aspects of this study. The S transform can be used as an alternative approach to characterize the time-frequency distribution of CEOAEs.

  14. On Time-II: Newton's Time.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Raju, C. K.

    1991-01-01

    A study of time in Newtonian physics is presented. Newton's laws of motion, falsifiability and physical theories, laws of motion and law of gravitation, and Laplace's demon are discussed. Short bibliographic sketches of Laplace and Karl Popper are included. (KR)

  15. Time domain reflectometry in time variant plasmas

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Scherner, Michael J.

    1992-01-01

    The effects of time-dependent electron density fluctuations on a synthesized time domain reflectometry response of a one-dimensional cold plasma sheath are considered. Numerical solutions of the Helmholtz wave equation, which describes the electric field of a normally incident plane wave in a specified static electron density profile, are used. A study of the effects of Doppler shifts resulting from moving density fluctuations in the electron density profile of the sheath is included. Varying electron density levels corrupt time domain and distance measurements. Reducing or modulating the electron density levels of a given electron density profile affects the time domain response of a plasma and results in motion of the turning point, and the effective motion has a significant effect on measuring electron density locations.

  16. Cosmological consequences of a time-dependent Λ term

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carvalho, J. C.; Lima, J. A. S.; Waga, I.

    1992-09-01

    The phenomenological approach to investigate the decay of the effective cosmological constant, as recently proposed by Chen and Wu, is generalized to include a term proportional to H2 on the time dependence of Λ, where H is the Hubble parameter. This new term can modify some features of the standard Friedmann-Robertson-Walker model and its free parameter may be adjusted in accordance with nucleosynthesis constraints. The model also allows a deceleration parameter q0 assuming negative values so that the density parameter Ω0 is smaller than 2/3 and the age of the Universe is always bigger than H-10. In these cases, the usual matter creation rate appearing in models with a decaying vacuum energy is smaller than the one present in the steady-state model.

  17. Chebyshev matrix product state approach for time evolution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Halimeh, Jad C.; Kolley, Fabian; McCulloch, Ian P.

    2015-09-01

    We present and test a new algorithm for time-evolving quantum many-body systems initially proposed by Holzner et al. [Phys. Rev. B 83, 195115 (2011), 10.1103/PhysRevB.83.195115]. The approach is based on merging the matrix product state (MPS) formalism with the method of expanding the time-evolution operator in Chebyshev polynomials. We calculate time-dependent observables of a system of hardcore bosons quenched under the Bose-Hubbard Hamiltonian on a one-dimensional lattice. We compare the new algorithm to more standard methods using the MPS architecture. We find that the Chebyshev method gives numerically exact results for small times. However, the reachable times are smaller than the ones obtained with the other state-of-the-art methods. We further extend the new method using a spectral-decomposition-based projective scheme that utilizes an effective bandwidth significantly smaller than the full bandwidth, leading to longer evolution times than the nonprojective method and more efficient information storage, data compression, and less computational effort.

  18. Time on timing: Dissociating premature responding from interval sensitivity in Parkinson's disease

    PubMed Central

    Nombela, Cristina; Wolpe, Noham; Barker, Roger A.; Rowe, James B.

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Background Parkinson's disease (PD) can cause impulsivity with premature responses, but there are several potential mechanisms. We proposed a distinction between poor decision‐making and the distortion of temporal perception. Both effects may be present and interact, but with different clinical and pharmacological correlates. Objectives This study assessed premature responding during time perception in PD. Methods In this study, 18 PD patients and 19 age‐matched controls completed 2 temporal discrimination tasks (bisection and trisection) and a baseline reaction‐time task. Timing sensitivity and decision‐making processes were quantified by response and response time. An extended version of the modified difference model was used to examine the precision of time representation and the modulation of response time by stimulus ambiguity. Results In the bisection task, patients had a lower bisection point (P < .05) and reduced timing sensitivity when compared with controls (P < .001). In the trisection task, patients showed lower sensitivity in discriminating between short and medium standards (P < .05). The impairment in timing sensitivity correlated positively with patients' levodopa dose equivalent (P < .05). Critically, patients had disproportionately faster response times when compared with controls in more ambiguous conditions, and the degree of acceleration of response time increased with disease severity (P < .05). Computational modeling indicated that patients had poorer precision in time representation and stronger modulation of response time by task ambiguity, leading to smaller scaling of the decision latency (P < .05). Conclusions These findings suggest that timing deficits in PD cannot be solely attributed to perceptual distortions, but are also associated with impulsive decision strategies that bias patients toward premature responses. © 2016 The Authors. Movement Disorders published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc. on

  19. Comprehensive time average digital holographic vibrometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Psota, Pavel; Lédl, Vít; Doleček, Roman; Mokrý, Pavel; Vojtíšek, Petr; Václavík, Jan

    2016-12-01

    This paper presents a method that simultaneously deals with drawbacks of time-average digital holography: limited measurement range, limited spatial resolution, and quantitative analysis of the measured Bessel fringe patterns. When the frequency of the reference wave is shifted by an integer multiple of frequency at which the object oscillates, the measurement range of the method can be shifted either to smaller or to larger vibration amplitudes. In addition, phase modulation of the reference wave is used to obtain a sequence of phase-modulated fringe patterns. Such fringe patterns can be combined by means of phase-shifting algorithms, and amplitudes of vibrations can be straightforwardly computed. This approach independently calculates the amplitude values in every single pixel. The frequency shift and phase modulation are realized by proper control of Bragg cells and therefore no additional hardware is required.

  20. A Journey in Space-Time

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kazanas, Demos

    2006-01-01

    The Universe was born about 10 billion years ago in an explosion we now call the Big Bang, which continues until today. While Cosmology was born only after the formulation of General Relativity by Einstein, it is quite amazing that the same equations can be derived from purely Newtonian Physics. I will present such a formulation of the evolution of the Universe and will also present a summary of the developments in Cosmology the past 20 or so years. These have been driven mainly by the development of new techniques and missions to probe the Universe in it's largest scales. At the same time, observations at smaller scales have also given us a picture of the evolution of the structure (galaxies, stars) that are necessary for the development of life. I will close with some speculation on the recently discovered acceleration of the Universe and its implications for it's far future.

  1. Marriage timing of Chinese American and Japanese American women.

    PubMed

    Ferguson, S J

    1995-05-01

    "Using U.S. census data, this study examines the differences in marriage rates and timing among White, Chinese American, and Japanese American women. An accelerated time model estimates the duration until marriage for each racial-ethnic group while controlling for nativity, education, birth cohort, ancestry, and English proficiency. Results show that White women have the shortest duration until marriage, with a smaller percentage remaining never married. Chinese American and Japanese American women delay first marriage longer and have higher percentages of never married women."

  2. Review of time scales. [Universal Time-Ephemeris Time-International Atomic Time

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Guinot, B.

    1974-01-01

    The basic time scales are presented: International Atomic Time, Universal Time, and Universal Time (Coordinated). These scales must be maintained in order to satisfy specific requirements. It is shown how they are obtained and made available at a very high level of precision.

  3. Time and Teaching

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McEwan, Anna E.

    2012-01-01

    This essay invites reflection on the phenomena of time as it impacts the day-to-day life of teachers. It also explores assumptions about time and teaching in three areas: first, beliefs about the force of time and the teacher's struggle to control it; second, beliefs about the potential of time and the benefits of its passing for teachers and…

  4. Synchronized time stamp support

    SciTech Connect

    Kowalkowski, J.

    1994-02-16

    New software has been added to IOC core to maintain time stamps. The new software has the ability to maintain time stamps over all IOCs on a network. The purpose of this paper is to explain how EPICS will synchronize the time stamps. In addition, this paper will explain how to configure and use the new EPICS time stamp support software.

  5. Time Management for Directors

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jaffe, Ellen Hofstetter

    2005-01-01

    Time management is a skill. Like any new skill, it takes time and commitment to develop. A frequent complaint of center directors is not having enough time. Most work extremely long hours and still feel they are not getting enough done. This article presents ideas on how to manage time and work smarter, not harder. These ideas are the following:…

  6. Neural Correlates of the Time Marker for the Perception of Event Timing

    PubMed Central

    Qi, Liang; Terada, Yoshikazu; Nishida, Shin’ya

    2016-01-01

    While sensory processing latency, inferred from the manual reaction time (RT), is substantially affected by diverse stimulus parameters, subjective temporal judgments are relatively accurate. The neural mechanisms underlying this timing perception remain obscure. Here, we measured human neural activity by magnetoencephalography while participants performed a simultaneity judgment task between the onset of random-dot coherent motion and a beep. In a separate session, participants performed an RT task for the same stimuli. We analyzed the relationship between neural activity evoked by motion onset and point of subjective simultaneity (PSS) or RT. The effect of motion coherence was smaller for PSS than RT, but changes in RT and PSS could both be predicted by the time at which an integrated sensory response crossed a threshold. The task differences could be ascribed to the lower threshold for PSS than for RT. In agreement with the psychophysical threshold difference, the participants reported longer delays in their motor response from the subjective motion onset for weaker stimuli. However, they could not judge the timing of stimuli weaker than the detection threshold. A possible interpretation of the present findings is that the brain assigns the time marker for timing perception prior to stimulus detection, but the time marker is available only after stimulus detection. PMID:27679810

  7. Rhythm, Timing and the Timing of Rhythm

    PubMed Central

    Arvaniti, Amalia

    2009-01-01

    This article reviews the evidence for rhythmic categorization that has emerged on the basis of rhythm metrics, and argues that the metrics are unreliable predictors of rhythm which provide no more than a crude measure of timing. It is further argued that timing is distinct from rhythm and that equating them has led to circularity and a psychologically questionable conceptualization of rhythm in speech. It is thus proposed that research on rhythm be based on the same principles for all languages, something that does not apply to the widely accepted division of languages into stress- and syllable-timed. The hypothesis is advanced that these universal principles are grouping and prominence and evidence to support it is provided. PMID:19390230

  8. Ensemble Pulsar Time Scale

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yin, D. S.; Gao, Y. P.; Zhao, S. H.

    2016-05-01

    Millisecond pulsars can generate another type of time scale that is totally independent of the atomic time scale, because the physical mechanisms of the pulsar time scale and the atomic time scale are quite different from each other. Usually the pulsar timing observational data are not evenly sampled, and the internals between data points range from several hours to more than half a month. What's more, these data sets are sparse. And all these make it difficult to generate an ensemble pulsar time scale. Hence, a new algorithm to calculate the ensemble pulsar time scale is proposed. Firstly, we use cubic spline interpolation to densify the data set, and make the intervals between data points even. Then, we employ the Vondrak filter to smooth the data set, and get rid of high-frequency noise, finally adopt the weighted average method to generate the ensemble pulsar time scale. The pulsar timing residuals represent clock difference between the pulsar time and atomic time, and the high precision pulsar timing data mean the clock difference measurement between the pulsar time and atomic time with a high signal to noise ratio, which is fundamental to generate pulsar time. We use the latest released NANOGRAV (North American Nanohertz Observatory for Gravitational Waves) 9-year data set to generate the ensemble pulsar time scale. This data set is from the newest NANOGRAV data release, which includes 9-year observational data of 37 millisecond pulsars using the 100-meter Green Bank telescope and 305-meter Arecibo telescope. We find that the algorithm used in this paper can lower the influence caused by noises in timing residuals, and improve long-term stability of pulsar time. Results show that the long-term (> 1 yr) frequency stability of the pulsar time is better than 3.4×10-15.

  9. Icosahedral quasicrystals of intermetallic compounds are icosahedral twins of cubic crystals of three kinds, consisting of large (about 5000 atoms) icosahedral complexes in either a cubic body-centered or a cubic face-centered arrangement or smaller (about 1350 atoms) icosahedral complexes in the beta-tungsten arrangement.

    PubMed

    Pauling, L

    1989-11-01

    The twofold-axis electron-diffraction photographs of icosahedral quasicrystals are of three kinds, reflecting three different structures of the cubic crystals that by icosahedral twinning form the quasicrystals. The first kind, represented by Al(13)Cu(4)Fe(3), contains two very large icosahedral complexes, each of about 4680 atoms, in the body-centered arrangement, with six smaller icosahedral complexes (104 atoms each) in the principal interstices. The second kind, represented by Al(5)Mn, contains four of the very large complexes in the face-centered arrangement (cubic close packing), with four of the smaller clusters in the interstices. The third kind, represented by Al(6)CuLi(3), contains eight icosahedral complexes, each of about 1350 atoms, in the beta-W arrangement. The supporting evidence for these cubic structures is discussed as well as other evidence showing that the simple quasicrystal theory, which states that quasicrystals do not involve any translational identity operations, has to be modified.

  10. The Myth of Time.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hantula, James

    This paper offers a variety of approaches to teaching the concept of time. Many social studies courses traditionally emphasize time as measured by clocks and as useful for recording when events occur in relation to each other. In addition to this approach, the author suggests that students should reflect upon four other modes of time. These are…

  11. America's Family Time Famine.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mattox, Jr., William R.

    1990-01-01

    Parents spend increasingly less time with their children because of the pressures of dual careers and single parenthood. Economic pressures and social values have affected sharing of family time. Studies show both parents and children consider spending time together the most important element in improving family life. (BC)

  12. Time and Society.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kazancigil, Ali, Ed.

    1986-01-01

    The articles in this issue review the history of the sociological study of different societies' conceptions of time. Social time is the way people regard and employ time dependent on economic conditions, the organization of daily life, the cultural setting, and religion. (JDH)

  13. Time for Class

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Christmann, Edwin P.

    2004-01-01

    One of the most abstract concepts that teachers will introduce to students is the concept of time. Usually introduced at the beginning of the school year, the concept of time is taught along with measurements and scientific units such as length, mass, and volume (NRC 1996). However, unlike length, mass, and volume, time can be a very confusing…

  14. Screen time and children

    MedlinePlus

    ... obesity ) Screen time increases your child's risk of obesity because: Sitting and watching a screen is time that is not spent being physically active. TV commercials and other screen ads can lead to unhealthy food choices . Most of the time, the foods in ads ...

  15. Expectancy, Attention, and Time.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Barnes, Ralph; Jones, Mari Riess

    2000-01-01

    Examined the influence of contextual timing manipulations on prospective time judgments through 7 experiments involving a total of 199 college students. Discusses results in terms of various stimulus-based models of prospective time judgments, including those that appeal to attentional periodicities and entrainment. (SLD)

  16. Time Is Money

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Oxley, Diana; Baete, Glenn

    2012-01-01

    One has heard it before: time is money, especially when it comes to adding time for instruction to the school day. When budgets are tight and relief is nowhere in sight, how can schools afford to implement a reform as costly as adding instructional time? It's a daunting task, yet current federal educational priorities tied to federal funding…

  17. The Language of Time.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Friederwitzer, Fredda J.; Berman, Barbara

    1999-01-01

    Presents concrete time-teaching models to teach about making connections to fractions and measurement in which students literally measure time by using Cuisenaire rods on a form of number line to discover the meaning of the language used to describe the passing of time. (ASK)

  18. Time Management for Educators.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Burden, Paul R.

    Time management principles can help teachers become more aware of ways in which time can be used to the greatest advantage. An exploration of personal time perspectives is a step toward establishing effective patterns of behavior. Productivity may be high in the morning and low in the late afternoon, for example, and organizing some activities to…

  19. Parametric Timing Analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Vivancos, E; Healy, C; Mueller, F; Whalley, D

    2001-05-09

    Embedded systems often have real-time constraints. Traditional timing analysis statically determines the maximum execution time of a task or a program in a real-time system. These systems typically depend on the worst-case execution time of tasks in order to make static scheduling decisions so that tasks can meet their deadlines. Static determination of worst-case execution times imposes numerous restrictions on real-time programs, which include that the maximum number of iterations of each loop must be known statically. These restrictions can significantly limit the class of programs that would be suitable for a real-time embedded system. This paper describes work-in-progress that uses static timing analysis to aid in making dynamic scheduling decisions. For instance, different algorithms with varying levels of accuracy may be selected based on the algorithm's predicted worst-case execution time and the time allotted for the task. We represent the worst-case execution time of a function or a loop as a formula, where the unknown values affecting the execution time are parameterized. This parametric timing analysis produces formulas that can then be quickly evaluated at run-time so dynamic scheduling decisions can be made with little overhead. Benefits of this work include expanding the class of applications that can be used in a real-time system, improving the accuracy of dynamic scheduling decisions, and more effective utilization of system resources. This paper describes how static timing analysis can be used to aid in making dynamic scheduling decisions. The WCET of a function or a loop is represented as a formula, where the values affecting the execution time are parameterized. Such formulas can then be quickly evaluated at run-time so dynamic scheduling decisions can be made when scheduling a task or choosing algorithms within a task. Benefits of this parametric timing analysis include expanding the class of applications that can be used in a real-time system

  20. Ureteroscopic surgery: changing times and perspectives.

    PubMed

    Bagley, Demetrius H

    2004-02-01

    Ureteroscopy developed as an extension of cystoscopic techniques into the upper urinary tract with smaller, rigid, and flexible endoscopes. Smaller working instruments have made therapeutic procedures possible. Ureteroscopy has become the technique of choice to diagnose and treat benign essential hematuria and has a major role in treating ureteropelvic junction obstruction, upper tract neoplasms, and calculi. Finally, there is a need for smaller and more effective endoscopes and working devices.