Science.gov

Sample records for 5-6 altitude steps

  1. 3,4,5,6-tetramethylphenanthrene 9,10-oxide: a step on the way to the transition state for nucleophilic ring opening of arene oxides

    SciTech Connect

    Darnow, J.N.; Armstrong, R.N.

    1987-05-01

    Force field calculations (MM2) and studies of the parent hydrocarbons suggest that 3,4,5,6-tetramethylphenanthrene 9,10-oxide (TMPO) should exist as two kinetically stable enantiomers. Stereoelectronic considerations indicate that the axial chirality of each enantiomer should direct nucleophilic attack to the diastereotopic oxirane carbon that most closely approaches the geometry of the transition state. The two enantiomers of TMPO can be synthesized from the chiral hydrocarbons by direct oxidation. The half-life for racemization of TMPO is 30 min at 25/sup 0/C. The two enantiomers are found to be substrates for glutathione (GSH) transferase and epoxide hydrolase. Isozyme 4-4 of GSH transferase which normally catalyzes addition of GSH to oxirane carbons of R absolute configuration, catalyzes addition to the oxirane carbon of S configuration in the M-isomer of TMPO and of R configuration in the P-isomer. Analogous results are obtained with the epoxide hydrolase catalyzed addition of water. The results suggest that TMPO should be an interesting stereochemical probe of both spontaneous and enzyme catalyzed ring opening reactions of arene oxides.

  2. Weather Requirements and Procedures for Step 1: High Altitude Long Endurance (HALE) Unmanned Aircraft System (UAS) Flight Operations in the National Air Space (NAS)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2007-01-01

    This cover sheet is for version 2 of the weather requirements document along with Appendix A. The purpose of the requirements document was to identify and to list the weather functional requirements needed to achieve the Access 5 vision of "operating High Altitude, Long Endurance (HALE) Unmanned Aircraft Systems (UAS) routinely, safely, and reliably in the National Airspace System (NAS) for Step 1." A discussion of the Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) references and related policies, procedures, and standards is provided as basis for the recommendations supported within this document. Additional procedures and reference documentation related to weather functional requirements is also provided for background. The functional requirements and related information are to be proposed to the FAA and various standards organizations for consideration and approval. The appendix was designed to show that sources of flight weather information are readily available to UAS pilots conducting missions in the NAS. All weather information for this presentation was obtained from the public internet.

  3. 44 CFR 5.6 - Congressional information.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 44 Emergency Management and Assistance 1 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Congressional information. 5.6 Section 5.6 Emergency Management and Assistance FEDERAL EMERGENCY MANAGEMENT AGENCY, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY GENERAL PRODUCTION OR DISCLOSURE OF INFORMATION General Provisions § 5.6...

  4. 1 CFR 5.6 - Daily publication.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 1 General Provisions 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Daily publication. 5.6 Section 5.6 General Provisions ADMINISTRATIVE COMMITTEE OF THE FEDERAL REGISTER THE FEDERAL REGISTER GENERAL § 5.6 Daily publication. There shall be an edition of the Federal Register published for each official Federal working day....

  5. 1 CFR 5.6 - Daily publication.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 1 General Provisions 1 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Daily publication. 5.6 Section 5.6 General Provisions ADMINISTRATIVE COMMITTEE OF THE FEDERAL REGISTER THE FEDERAL REGISTER GENERAL § 5.6 Daily publication. There shall be an edition of the Federal Register published for each official Federal working day....

  6. 1 CFR 5.6 - Daily publication.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 1 General Provisions 1 2014-01-01 2012-01-01 true Daily publication. 5.6 Section 5.6 General Provisions ADMINISTRATIVE COMMITTEE OF THE FEDERAL REGISTER THE FEDERAL REGISTER GENERAL § 5.6 Daily publication. There shall be an edition of the Federal Register published for each official Federal working day....

  7. 1 CFR 5.6 - Daily publication.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 1 General Provisions 1 2013-01-01 2012-01-01 true Daily publication. 5.6 Section 5.6 General Provisions ADMINISTRATIVE COMMITTEE OF THE FEDERAL REGISTER THE FEDERAL REGISTER GENERAL § 5.6 Daily publication. There shall be an edition of the Federal Register published for each official Federal working day....

  8. 1 CFR 5.6 - Daily publication.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 1 General Provisions 1 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Daily publication. 5.6 Section 5.6 General Provisions ADMINISTRATIVE COMMITTEE OF THE FEDERAL REGISTER THE FEDERAL REGISTER GENERAL § 5.6 Daily publication. There shall be an edition of the Federal Register published for each official Federal working day....

  9. 43 CFR 1610.5-6 - Revision.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 43 Public Lands: Interior 2 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Revision. 1610.5-6 Section 1610.5-6 Public Lands: Interior Regulations Relating to Public Lands (Continued) BUREAU OF LAND MANAGEMENT, DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR GENERAL MANAGEMENT (1000) PLANNING, PROGRAMMING, BUDGETING Resource...

  10. 36 CFR 5.6 - Commercial vehicles.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 36 Parks, Forests, and Public Property 1 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Commercial vehicles. 5.6 Section 5.6 Parks, Forests, and Public Property NATIONAL PARK SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR... other vehicles when used in transporting movable property for a fee or profit, either as a direct...

  11. 36 CFR 5.6 - Commercial vehicles.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 36 Parks, Forests, and Public Property 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Commercial vehicles. 5.6 Section 5.6 Parks, Forests, and Public Property NATIONAL PARK SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR... other vehicles when used in transporting movable property for a fee or profit, either as a direct...

  12. 36 CFR 5.6 - Commercial vehicles.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 36 Parks, Forests, and Public Property 1 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Commercial vehicles. 5.6 Section 5.6 Parks, Forests, and Public Property NATIONAL PARK SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR... other vehicles when used in transporting movable property for a fee or profit, either as a direct...

  13. 36 CFR 5.6 - Commercial vehicles.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 36 Parks, Forests, and Public Property 1 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Commercial vehicles. 5.6... COMMERCIAL AND PRIVATE OPERATIONS § 5.6 Commercial vehicles. (a) The term “Commercial vehicle” as used in... other vehicles when used in transporting movable property for a fee or profit, either as a direct...

  14. 36 CFR 5.6 - Commercial vehicles.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 36 Parks, Forests, and Public Property 1 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Commercial vehicles. 5.6... COMMERCIAL AND PRIVATE OPERATIONS § 5.6 Commercial vehicles. (a) The term “Commercial vehicle” as used in... other vehicles when used in transporting movable property for a fee or profit, either as a direct...

  15. 29 CFR 5.6 - Enforcement.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... WORK HOURS AND SAFETY STANDARDS ACT) Davis-Bacon and Related Acts Provisions and Procedures § 5.6...-Bacon Act, that the contractor has disregarded its obligations to employees and subcontractors),...

  16. 29 CFR 5.6 - Enforcement.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... WORK HOURS AND SAFETY STANDARDS ACT) Davis-Bacon and Related Acts Provisions and Procedures § 5.6...-Bacon Act, that the contractor has disregarded its obligations to employees and subcontractors),...

  17. 29 CFR 5.6 - Enforcement.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... WORK HOURS AND SAFETY STANDARDS ACT) Davis-Bacon and Related Acts Provisions and Procedures § 5.6...-Bacon Act, that the contractor has disregarded its obligations to employees and subcontractors),...

  18. 29 CFR 5.6 - Enforcement.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... WORK HOURS AND SAFETY STANDARDS ACT) Davis-Bacon and Related Acts Provisions and Procedures § 5.6...-Bacon Act, that the contractor has disregarded its obligations to employees and subcontractors),...

  19. 29 CFR 5.6 - Enforcement.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... WORK HOURS AND SAFETY STANDARDS ACT) Davis-Bacon and Related Acts Provisions and Procedures § 5.6...-Bacon Act, that the contractor has disregarded its obligations to employees and subcontractors),...

  20. Diastereoselective synthesis of 2,3,4,5,6-pentafluoroheptanes.

    PubMed

    Farran, Daniel; Slawin, Alexandra M Z; Kirsch, Peer; O'Hagan, David

    2009-09-18

    A stereocontrolled synthesis of alkanes containing five contiguous fluorine atoms is presented. The compounds were prepared by sequential fluorination of diastereoisomeric alcohol-diepoxides. The chemistry involved epoxide ring-opening with HF.NEt(3) and deshydroxyfluorination reactions of free alcohols with Deoxo-Fluor. The fluorination reactions were all highly stereospecific, with all five fluorines being incorporated in three sequential steps. Three different diastereoisomers of the 2,3,4,5,6-pentafluoroheptyl motif were prepared as heptane-1,7-diol derivatives, a structural format amenable for incorporation of the vicinal pentafluoro scaffold into larger molecular architectures.

  1. Re-analysis of protein data reveals the germination pathway and up accumulation mechanism of cell wall hydrolases during the radicle protrusion step of seed germination in Podophyllum hexandrum- a high altitude plant

    PubMed Central

    Dogra, Vivek; Bagler, Ganesh; Sreenivasulu, Yelam

    2015-01-01

    Podophyllum hexandrum Royle is an important high-altitude plant of Himalayas with immense medicinal value. Earlier, it was reported that the cell wall hydrolases were up accumulated during radicle protrusion step of Podophyllum seed germination. In the present study, Podophyllum seed Germination protein interaction Network (PGN) was constructed by using the differentially accumulated protein (DAP) data set of Podophyllum during the radicle protrusion step of seed germination, with reference to Arabidopsis protein–protein interaction network (AtPIN). The developed PGN is comprised of a giant cluster with 1028 proteins having 10,519 interactions and a few small clusters with relevant gene ontological signatures. In this analysis, a germination pathway related cluster which is also central to the topology and information dynamics of PGN was obtained with a set of 60 key proteins. Among these, eight proteins which are known to be involved in signaling, metabolism, protein modification, cell wall modification, and cell cycle regulation processes were found commonly highlighted in both the proteomic and interactome analysis. The systems-level analysis of PGN identified the key proteins involved in radicle protrusion step of seed germination in Podophyllum. PMID:26579141

  2. High-Altitude Illness

    MedlinePlus

    ... high-altitude illness:Acute mountain sicknessHigh-altitude pulmonary edema (also called HAPE), which affects the lungsHigh-altitude cerebral edema (also called HACE), which affects the brainThese illnesses ...

  3. Synthesis of 3-aryl-8-oxo-5,6,7,8-tetrahydroindolizines via a palladium-catalyzed arylation and heteroarylation.

    PubMed

    Gracia, Stéphanie; Cazorla, Clément; Métay, Estelle; Pellet-Rostaing, Stéphane; Lemaire, Marc

    2009-04-17

    A selective palladium-catalyzed arylation and heteroarylation of 8-oxo-5,6,7,8-tetrahydroindolizines has been developed. Mechanistic studies assume an electrophilic substitution pathway for this transformation. This method provides an efficient one-step synthesis of 3-aryl-8-oxo-5,6,7,8-tetrahydroindolizines.

  4. Venus Altitude Cycling Balloon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de Jong, M. L.

    2015-04-01

    A novel balloon concept is demonstrated that uses mechanical compression as altitude control mechanism to sustain long duration balloon probe flight in the cloud level region of Venus’ atmosphere between 45 and 58 km altitude.

  5. Athletes at High Altitude

    PubMed Central

    Khodaee, Morteza; Grothe, Heather L.; Seyfert, Jonathan H.; VanBaak, Karin

    2016-01-01

    Context: Athletes at different skill levels perform strenuous physical activity at high altitude for a variety of reasons. Multiple team and endurance events are held at high altitude and may place athletes at increased risk for developing acute high altitude illness (AHAI). Training at high altitude has been a routine part of preparation for some of the high level athletes for a long time. There is a general belief that altitude training improves athletic performance for competitive and recreational athletes. Evidence Acquisition: A review of relevant publications between 1980 and 2015 was completed using PubMed and Google Scholar. Study Design: Clinical review. Level of Evidence: Level 3. Results: AHAI is a relatively uncommon and potentially serious condition among travelers to altitudes above 2500 m. The broad term AHAI includes several syndromes such as acute mountain sickness (AMS), high altitude pulmonary edema (HAPE), and high altitude cerebral edema (HACE). Athletes may be at higher risk for developing AHAI due to faster ascent and more vigorous exertion compared with nonathletes. Evidence regarding the effects of altitude training on athletic performance is weak. The natural live high, train low altitude training strategy may provide the best protocol for enhancing endurance performance in elite and subelite athletes. High altitude sports are generally safe for recreational athletes, but they should be aware of their individual risks. Conclusion: Individualized and appropriate acclimatization is an essential component of injury and illness prevention. PMID:26863894

  6. Smc5/6 complex regulates Sgs1 recombination functions.

    PubMed

    Bermúdez-López, Marcelino; Aragon, Luis

    2016-09-23

    The family of RecQ helicases is evolutionary conserved from bacteria to humans and play key roles in genome stability. The budding yeast RecQ helicase Sgs1 has been implicated in several key processes during the repair of DNA damage by homologous recombination as part of the STR complex (Sgs1-Top3-Rmi1). Limited information on how is Sgs1 recruited and regulated at sites of damage is available. Recently, we and others have uncover a direct link between the Smc5/6 complex and Sgs1. Most roles of Sgs1 during recombination, including DNA end resection, Holiday junction dissolution, and crossover suppression, are regulated through Mms21-dependent SUMOylation. Smc5/6 first acts as a recruiting platform for STR and then SUMOylates STR components to regulate their function. Importantly, the assembly of STR is totally independent of Smc5/6. Here, we provide a brief overview of STR regulation by Smc5/6.

  7. Effects of the May 5-6, 1973, storm in the Greater Denver area, Colorado

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Hansen, Wallace R.

    1973-01-01

    Rain began falling on the Greater Denver area the evening of Saturday, May 5, 1973, and continued through most of Sunday, May 6. Below about 7,000 feet altitude, the precipitation was mostly rain; above that altitude, it was mostly snow. Although the rate of fall was moderate, at least 4 inches of rain or as much as 4 feet of snow accumulated in some places. Sustained precipitation falling at a moderate rate thoroughly saturated the ground and by midday Sunday sent most of the smaller streams into flood stage. The South Platte River and its major tributaries began to flood by late Sunday evening and early Monday morning. Geologic and hydrologic processes activated by the May 5-6 storm caused extensive damage to lands and to manmade structures in the Greater Denver area. Damage was generally most intense in areas where man had modified the landscape--by channel constrictions, paving, stripping of vegetation and topsoil, and oversteepening of hillslopes. Roads, bridges, culverts, dams, canals, and the like were damaged or destroyed by erosion and sedimentation. Streambanks and structures along them were scoured. Thousands of acres of croplands, pasture, and developed urban lands were coated with mud and sand. Flooding was intensified by inadequate storm sewers, blocked drains, and obstructed drainage courses. Saturation of hillslopes along the Front Range caused rockfalls, landslides, and mudflows as far west as Berthoud Pass. Greater attention to geologic conditions in land-use planning, design, and construction would minimize storm damage in the future.

  8. Altitude and endurance training.

    PubMed

    Rusko, Heikki K; Tikkanen, Heikki O; Peltonen, Juha E

    2004-10-01

    The benefits of living and training at altitude (HiHi) for an improved altitude performance of athletes are clear, but controlled studies for an improved sea-level performance are controversial. The reasons for not having a positive effect of HiHi include: (1) the acclimatization effect may have been insufficient for elite athletes to stimulate an increase in red cell mass/haemoglobin mass because of too low an altitude (< 2000-2200 m) and/or too short an altitude training period (<3-4 weeks); (2) the training effect at altitude may have been compromised due to insufficient training stimuli for enhancing the function of the neuromuscular and cardiovascular systems; and (3) enhanced stress with possible overtraining symptoms and an increased frequency of infections. Moreover, the effects of hypoxia in the brain may influence both training intensity and physiological responses during training at altitude. Thus, interrupting hypoxic exposure by training in normoxia may be a key factor in avoiding or minimizing the noxious effects that are known to occur in chronic hypoxia. When comparing HiHi and HiLo (living high and training low), it is obvious that both can induce a positive acclimatization effect and increase the oxygen transport capacity of blood, at least in 'responders', if certain prerequisites are met. The minimum dose to attain a haematological acclimatization effect is > 12 h a day for at least 3 weeks at an altitude or simulated altitude of 2100-2500 m. Exposure to hypoxia appears to have some positive transfer effects on subsequent training in normoxia during and after HiLo. The increased oxygen transport capacity of blood allows training at higher intensity during and after HiLo in subsequent normoxia, thereby increasing the potential to improve some neuromuscular and cardiovascular determinants of endurance performance. The effects of hypoxic training and intermittent short-term severe hypoxia at rest are not yet clear and they require further study.

  9. Endurance training at altitude.

    PubMed

    Saunders, Philo U; Pyne, David B; Gore, Christopher J

    2009-01-01

    Since the 1968 Olympic Games when the effects of altitude on endurance performance became evident, moderate altitude training ( approximately 2000 to 3000 m) has become popular to improve competition performance both at altitude and sea level. When endurance athletes are exposed acutely to moderate altitude, a number of physiological responses occur that can comprise performance at altitude; these include increased ventilation, increased heart rate, decreased stroke volume, reduced plasma volume, and lower maximal aerobic power ((.)Vo(2max)) by approximately 15% to 20%. Over a period of several weeks, one primary acclimatization response is an increase in the volume of red blood cells and consequently of (.)Vo(2max). Altitudes > approximately 2000 m for >3 weeks and adequate iron stores are required to elicit these responses. However, the primacy of more red blood cells for superior sea-level performance is not clear-cut since the best endurance athletes in the world, from Ethiopia (approximately 2000 to 3000 m), have only marginally elevated hemoglobin concentrations. The substantial reduction in (.)Vo(2max) of athletes at moderate altitude implies that their training should include adequate short-duration (approximately 1 to 2 min), high-intensity efforts with long recoveries to avoid a reduction in race-specific fitness. At the elite level, athlete performance is not dependent solely on (.)Vo(2max), and the "smallest worthwhile change" in performance for improving race results is as little as 0.5%. Consequently, contemporary statistical approaches that utilize the concept of the smallest worthwhile change are likely to be more appropriate than conventional statistical methods when attempting to understand the potential benefits and mechanisms of altitude training.

  10. High Altitude Pilgrimage Medicine

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Abstract Religious pilgrims have been going to high altitude pilgrimages long before trekkers and climbers sojourned in high altitude regions, but the medical literature about high altitude pilgrimage is sparse. Gosainkunda Lake (4300 m) near Kathmandu, Nepal, and Shri Amarnath Yatra (3800 m) in Sri Nagar, Kashmir, India, are the two sites in the Himalayas from where the majority of published reports of high altitude pilgrimage have originated. Almost all travels to high altitude pilgrimages are characterized by very rapid ascents by large congregations, leading to high rates of acute mountain sickness (AMS). In addition, epidemiological studies of pilgrims from Gosainkunda Lake show that some of the important risk factors for AMS in pilgrims are female sex and older age group. Studies based on the Shri Amarnath Yatra pilgrims show that coronary artery disease, complications of diabetes, and peptic ulcer disease are some of the common, important reasons for admission to hospital during the trip. In this review, the studies that have reported these and other relevant findings will be discussed and appropriate suggestions made to improve pilgrims' safety at high altitude. PMID:25330393

  11. CAT altitude avoidance system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gary, B. L. (Inventor)

    1982-01-01

    A method and apparatus are provided for indicating the altitude of the tropopause or of an inversion layer wherein clear air turbulence (CAT) may occur, and the likely severity of any such CAT, includes directing a passive microwave radiometer on the aircraft at different angles with respect to the horizon. The microwave radiation measured at a frequency of about 55 GHz represents the temperature of the air at an ""average'' range of about 3 kilometers, so that the sine of the angle of the radiometer times 3 kilometers equals the approximate altitude of the air whose temperature is measured. A plot of altitude (with respect to the aircraft) versus temperature of the air at that altitude, can indicate when an inversion layer is present and can indicate the altitude of the tropopause or of such an inversion layer. The plot can also indicate the severity of any CAT in an inversion layer. If CAT has been detected in the general area, then the aircraft can be flown at an altitude to avoid the tropopause or inversion layer.

  12. How We Make Energy Work: Grades 4, 5, 6 Science.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    National Science Teachers Association, Washington, DC.

    This packet of units is designed to focus on the technological aspects of energy. Four units are presented, with from 1-4 lessons included in each unit. Units include: (1) basic concepts and applications of energy; (2) steps and processes of energy production and transmission; (3) fuel acquisition; and (4) energy futures and application of…

  13. Altitude Modulates Concussion Incidence

    PubMed Central

    Smith, David W.; Myer, Gregory D.; Currie, Dustin W.; Comstock, R. Dawn; Clark, Joseph F.; Bailes, Julian E.

    2013-01-01

    Background: Recent research indicates that the volume and/or pressure of intracranial fluid, a physiology affected by one’s altitude (ie, elevation above sea level), may be associated with the likelihood and/or severity of a concussion. The objective was to employ an epidemiological field investigation to evaluate the relationship between altitude and concussion rate in high school sports. Hypothesis: Because of the physiologies that occur during acclimatization, including a decline in intracranial compliance (a “tighter fit”), increased altitude may be related to a reduction in concussion rates in high school athletes. Study Design: Cohort study; Level of evidence, 3. Methods: Data on concussions and athlete exposures (AEs) between 2005-2006 and 2011-2012 were obtained from a large national sample of high schools (National High School Sports-Related Injury Surveillance System [High School RIO]) and were used to calculate total, competition, and practice concussion rates for aggregated sports and for football only. Results: Altitude of participating schools ranged from 7 to 6903 ft (median, 600 ft), and a total of 5936 concussions occurred in 20,618,915 exposures (2.88 per 10,000 AEs). When concussion rates were dichotomized by altitude using the median, elevated altitude was associated with a reduction in concussion rates overall (rate ratio [RR], 1.31; P < .001), in competition (RR, 1.31; P < .001), and in practice (RR, 1.29; P < .001). Specifically, high school sports played at higher altitude demonstrated a 31% reduction (95% confidence interval [CI], 25%-38%) in the incidence of total reported concussions. Likewise, concussion rates at increased altitude were reduced 30% for overall exposures, 27% for competition exposures, and 28% for practice exposures in football players (P < .001). Conclusion: The results of this epidemiological investigation indicate increased physiological responses to altitude may be associated with a reduction in sports

  14. High Altitude Medical Problems

    PubMed Central

    Hultgren, Herbert N.

    1979-01-01

    Increased travel to high altitude areas by mountaineers and nonclimbing tourists has emphasized the clinical problems associated with rapid ascent. Acute mountain sickness affects most sojourners at elevations above 10,000 feet. Symptoms are usually worse on the second or third day after arrival. Gradual ascent, spending one to three days at an intermediate altitude, and the use of acetazolamide (Diamox) will prevent or ameliorate symptoms in most instances. Serious and potentially fatal problems, such as high altitude pulmonary edema or cerebral edema, occur in approximately 0.5 percent to 1.0 percent of visitors to elevations above 10,000 feet—especially with heavy physical exertion on arrival, such as climbing or skiing. Early recognition, high flow oxygen therapy and prompt descent are crucially important in management. Our knowledge of the causes of these and other high altitude problems, such as retinal hemorrhage, systemic edema and pulmonary hypertension, is still incomplete. Even less is known of the effect of high altitudes on medical conditions common at sea level or on the action of commonly used drugs. ImagesFigure 2. PMID:483805

  15. Medicine at high altitude.

    PubMed

    Wright, Alex D

    2006-01-01

    Medicine at high altitude provides important insights into the acute and chronic effects of hypoxia. Acute mountain sickness (AMS) is a common syndrome occurring after acute ascent to over 2,500 m and is caused by increased capillary permeability. A number of factors have been identified that increase the risk of AMS, in particular exercise. Avoiding rapid ascent, undue exercise and the use of acetazolamide are useful preventative measures but severe symptoms may require oxygen, dexamethasone and descent. Acute mountain sickness is usually self-limiting but may progress into the serious syndromes of pulmonary and cerebral oedema. Acclimatisation and adaptation are important for workers and residents at high altitude and the improvement seen in maximum exercise has been incorporated into some training schedules for endurance athletes. Chronic and subacute high-altitude diseases largely result from polycythemia and pulmonary hypertension.

  16. Space Station Freedom altitude strategy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mcdonald, Brian M.; Teplitz, Scott B.

    1990-01-01

    The Space Station Freedom (SSF) altitude strategy provides guidelines and assumptions to determine an altitude profile for Freedom. The process for determining an altitude profile incorporates several factors such as where the Space Shuttle will rendezvous with the SSF, when reboosts must occur, and what atmospheric conditions exist causing decay. The altitude strategy has an influence on all areas of SSF development and mission planning. The altitude strategy directly affects the micro-gravity environment for experiments, propulsion and control system sizing, and Space Shuttle delivery manifests. Indirectly the altitude strategy influences almost every system and operation within the Space Station Program. Evolution of the SSF altitude strategy has been a very dynamic process over the past few years. Each altitude strategy in turn has emphasized a different consideration. Examples include a constant Space Shuttle rendezvous altitude for mission planning simplicity, or constant micro-gravity levels with its inherent emphasis on payloads, or lifetime altitudes to provide a safety buffer to loss of control conditions. Currently a new altitude strategy is in development. This altitude strategy will emphasize Space Shuttle delivery optimization. Since propellant is counted against Space Shuttle payload-to-orbit capacity, lowering the rendezvous altitude will not always increase the net payload-to-orbit, since more propellant would be required for reboost. This altitude strategy will also consider altitude biases to account for Space Shuttle launch slips and an unexpected worsening of atmospheric conditions. Safety concerns will define a lower operational altitude limit, while radiation levels will define upper altitude constraints. The evolution of past and current SSF altitude strategies and the development of a new altitude strategy which focuses on operational issues as opposed to design are discussed.

  17. Anaerobic performance at altitude.

    PubMed

    Coudert, J

    1992-10-01

    Anaerobic metabolism is usually evaluated by the determination of the anaerobic capacity and the maximal anaerobic mechanical external power (Wmax). Conflicting results are reported on anaerobic capacity evaluated by maximal oxygen deficit and debt, and maximal blood lactate concentration during acute or chronic hypoxia (acclimatized subjects). Data on muscle biopsies (lactate concentration, changes in ATP, phosphocreatine and glycogen stores, glycolytic enzyme activities) and the few studies on lactate flux give in most cases evidence of a non-alteration of the anaerobic capacity for altitudes up to 5,500 m. No differences are observed in Wmax measured at high altitudes up to 5,200 m during intense short-term exercises: (1) jumps on a force platform which is a good indicator of alactic Wmax, and (2) 7-10 s sprints (i.e. force-velocity test) which solicit alactic metabolism but also lactic pathway. For exercises of duration equal or more than 30 s (i.e. Wingate test), there are conflicting results because a lower participation of aerobic metabolism during this test at high altitude can interfere with anaerobic performance. In conclusion, we can admit that anaerobic performances are not altered by high altitudes up to 5,200 m if the length of exposure does not exceed 5 weeks. After this period, muscle mass begins to decrease.

  18. Cardiovascular medicine at high altitude.

    PubMed

    Whayne, Thomas F

    2014-07-01

    Altitude physiology began with Paul Bert in 1878. Chronic mountain sickness (CMS) was defined by Carlos Monge in the 1940s in the Peruvian Andes as consisting of excess polycythemia. Hurtado et al performed studies in the Peruvian Andes in the 1950s to 1960s which defined acclimatization in healthy altitude natives, including polycythemia, moderate pulmonary hypertension, and low systemic blood pressure (BP). Electrocardiographic changes of right ventricular hypertrophy (RVH) were noted. Acclimatization of newcomers to altitude involves hyperventilation stimulated by hypoxia and is usually benign. Acute mountain sickness (AMS) in travelers to altitude is characterized by hypoxia-induced anorexia, dyspnea, headache, insomnia, and nausea. The extremes of AMS are high-altitude cerebral edema and high-altitude pulmonary edema. The susceptible high-altitude resident can lose their tolerance to altitude and develop CMS, also referred to as Monge disease. The CMS includes extreme polycythemia, severe RVH, excess pulmonary hypertension, low systemic BP, arterial oxygen desaturation, and hypoventilation.

  19. Security: Step by Step

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Svetcov, Eric

    2005-01-01

    This article provides a list of the essential steps to keeping a school's or district's network safe and sound. It describes how to establish a security architecture and approach that will continually evolve as the threat environment changes over time. The article discusses the methodology for implementing this approach and then discusses the…

  20. High Altitude Cerebral Edema

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1986-03-01

    English literature and Hultgren et al (3.1) described four more cases of HAPE within the next year. In 1960, Chiodi (5) first reported on a Peruvian...altitude and treatment with steroids and diuretics, CSF pressure was 85 mm H 0. In 1960, Chiodi .(5) described a patient 2 suffering with HACE who...Biol. Chem., 157, 297-302, 1945. 5. Chiodi H: "Mal de montana a forma cerebral; possible mecanismo etiopathogenico," An. Fac. Med. Lima., 43, 437

  1. High altitude diving depths.

    PubMed

    Paulev, Poul-Erik; Zubieta-Calleja, Gustavo

    2007-01-01

    In order to make any sea level dive table usable during high altitude diving, a new conversion factor is created. We introduce the standardized equivalent sea depth (SESD), which allows conversion of the actual lake diving depth (ALDD) to an equivalent sea dive depth. SESD is defined as the sea depth in meters or feet for a standardized sea dive, equivalent to a mountain lake dive at any altitude, such that [image omitted] [image omitted] [image omitted] Mountain lakes contain fresh water with a relative density that can be standardized to 1,000 kg m(-3), and sea water can likewise be standardized to a relative density of 1,033 kg m(-3), at the general gravity of 9.80665 m s(-2). The water density ratio (1,000/1,033) refers to the fresh lake water and the standardized sea water densities. Following calculation of the SESD factor, we recommend the use of our simplified diving table or any acceptable sea level dive table with two fundamental guidelines: 1. The classical decompression stages (30, 20, and 10 feet or 9, 6, and 3 m) are corrected to the altitude lake level, dividing the stage depth by the SESD factor. 2. Likewise, the lake ascent rate during diving is equal to the sea ascent rate divided by the SESD factor.

  2. Synthesis of Natural Homoisoflavonoids Having Either 5,7-Dihydroxy-6-methoxy or 7-Hydroxy-5,6-dimethoxy Groups

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Hyungjun; Yuan, Yue; Rhee, Inmoo; Corson, Timothy W.; Seo, Seung-Yong

    2016-01-01

    Naturally occurring homoisoflavonoids containing either 5,7-dihydroxy-6-methoxy or 7-hydroxy-5,6-dimethoxy groups such as the antiangiogenic homoisoflavanone, cremastranone, were synthesized via three or four linear steps from the known 4-chromenone. This facile synthesis includes chemoselective 1,4-reduction of 4-chromenone and selective deprotection of 3-benzylidene-4-chromanone a containing C7-benzyloxy group. PMID:27529212

  3. Satellite altitude determination uncertainties

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Siry, J. W.

    1972-01-01

    Satellite altitude determination uncertainties will be discussed from the standpoint of the GEOS-C satellite, from the longer range viewpoint afforded by the Geopause concept. Data are focused on methods for short-arc tracking which are essentially geometric in nature. One uses combinations of lasers and collocated cameras. The other method relies only on lasers, using three or more to obtain the position fix. Two typical locales are looked at, the Caribbean area, and a region associated with tracking sites at Goddard, Bermuda and Canada which encompasses a portion of the Gulf Stream in which meanders develop.

  4. Brain Food at High Altitude.

    PubMed

    Jain, Vishal

    2016-01-01

    Scenic view at high altitude is a pleasure to the eyes, but it has some shortcoming effects as well. High altitude can be divided into different categories, i.e., high altitude (3000-5000 ft), very high altitude (5000-8000 ft), and extreme altitude (above 8000 ft). Much of the population resides at high altitude, and others go there for tourism. Military personnel are also posted there to defend boundaries. As we ascent to high altitude, partial pressure of oxygen reduces, whereas concentration remains the same; this reduces the availability of oxygen to different body parts. This pathophysiological condition is known as hypobaric hypoxia (HH) which leads to oxidative stress and further causes cognitive dysfunction in some cases. Hypoxia causes neurodegeneration in different brain regions; however, the hippocampus is found to be more prone in comparison to other brain regions. As the hippocampus is affected most, therefore, spatial memory is impaired most during such condition. This chapter will give a brief review of the damaging effect of high altitude on cognition and also throw light on possible herbal interventions at high altitude, which can improve cognitive performance as well as provide protection against the deteriorating effect of hypobaric hypoxia at high altitude.

  5. Long-Term Exposure to High Altitude Affects Response Inhibition in the Conflict-monitoring Stage.

    PubMed

    Ma, Hailin; Wang, Yan; Wu, Jianhui; Luo, Ping; Han, Buxin

    2015-09-01

    To investigate the effects of high-altitude exposure on response inhibition, event-related potential (ERP) components N2 and P3 were measured in Go/NoGo task. The participants included an 'immigrant' high-altitude group (who had lived at high altitude for three years but born at low altitude) and a low-altitude group (living in low altitude only). Although the behavioural data showed no significant differences between the two groups, a delayed latency of NoGo-N2 was found in the high-altitude group compared to the low-altitude group. Moreover, larger N2 and smaller P3 amplitudes were found in the high-altitude group compared to the low-altitude group, for both the Go and NoGo conditions. These findings suggest that high-altitude exposure affects response inhibition with regard to processing speed during the conflict monitoring stage. In addition, high altitude generally increases the neural activity in the matching step of information processing and attentional resources. These results may provide some insights into the neurocognitive basis of the effects on high-altitude exposure on response inhibition.

  6. 7 CFR 5.6 - Revision of the parity price of a commodity.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 1 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Revision of the parity price of a commodity. 5.6 Section 5.6 Agriculture Office of the Secretary of Agriculture DETERMINATION OF PARITY PRICES § 5.6 Revision of the parity price of a commodity. (a) Initiation of hearings. The “modernized” parity...

  7. 7 CFR 5.6 - Revision of the parity price of a commodity.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 1 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Revision of the parity price of a commodity. 5.6 Section 5.6 Agriculture Office of the Secretary of Agriculture DETERMINATION OF PARITY PRICES § 5.6 Revision of the parity price of a commodity. (a) Initiation of hearings. The “modernized” parity...

  8. 7 CFR 5.6 - Revision of the parity price of a commodity.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 1 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Revision of the parity price of a commodity. 5.6 Section 5.6 Agriculture Office of the Secretary of Agriculture DETERMINATION OF PARITY PRICES § 5.6 Revision of the parity price of a commodity. (a) Initiation of hearings. The “modernized” parity...

  9. 7 CFR 5.6 - Revision of the parity price of a commodity.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Revision of the parity price of a commodity. 5.6 Section 5.6 Agriculture Office of the Secretary of Agriculture DETERMINATION OF PARITY PRICES § 5.6 Revision of the parity price of a commodity. (a) Initiation of hearings. The “modernized” parity...

  10. 7 CFR 5.6 - Revision of the parity price of a commodity.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 1 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Revision of the parity price of a commodity. 5.6 Section 5.6 Agriculture Office of the Secretary of Agriculture DETERMINATION OF PARITY PRICES § 5.6 Revision of the parity price of a commodity. (a) Initiation of hearings. The “modernized” parity...

  11. Synthesis and study of fluorescence properties of novel pyrazolo[4‧,3‧:5,6]pyrido[2,3-d]pyrimidin-5(6H)-one derivatives

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Quiroga, Jairo; Acosta, Paola; Ortiz, Alejandro; Insuasty, Braulio; Abonia, Rodrigo

    2015-10-01

    New pyrazolo[4‧,3‧:5,6]pyrido[2,3-d]pyrimidin-5(6H)-one derivatives 5 were prepared by cyclocondensation reaction between heterocyclic o-aminonitriles 3 and carboxylic acids 4 in the presence of sulfuric acid as catalyst. This procedure provides the desired compound in good yield with a simple one-step methodology. The obtained products show interesting fluorescence properties in both solution and solid state; in this way several spectra of absorption and emission were measured for selected compounds 5b, 5e, 5g and 5j, showing a broad and intense emission band around of 470 nm. In other to understand the electronic transition processes, theoretical calculations were performed at TD-DFT level, using B3LYP as functional and 6-31(d,p) as basis set, finding a good agreement with experimental measurements.

  12. Infectious Diseases at High Altitude.

    PubMed

    Basnyat, Buddha; Starling, Jennifer M

    2015-08-01

    Travel to elevations above 2,500 m is an increasingly common activity undertaken by a diverse population of individuals. These may be trekkers, climbers, miners in high-altitude sites in South America, and more recently, soldiers deployed for high-altitude duty in remote areas of the world. What is also being increasingly recognized is the plight of the millions of pilgrims, many with comorbidities, who annually ascend to high-altitude sacred areas. There are also 400 million people who reside permanently in high mountain ranges, which cover one-fifth of the Earth's surface. Many of these high-altitude areas are in developing countries, for example, the Himalayan range in South Asia. Although high-altitude areas may not harbor any specific infectious disease agents, it is important to know about the pathogens encountered in the mountains to be better able to help both the ill sojourner and the native high-altitude dweller. Often the same pathogens prevalent in the surrounding lowlands are found at high altitude, but various factors such as immunomodulation, hypoxia, poor physiological adaptation, and harsh environmental stressors at high altitude may enhance susceptibility to these pathogens. Against this background, various gastrointestinal, respiratory, dermatological, neurological, and other infections encountered at high altitude are discussed.

  13. Next Step for STEP

    SciTech Connect

    Wood, Claire; Bremner, Brenda

    2013-08-09

    The Siletz Tribal Energy Program (STEP), housed in the Tribe’s Planning Department, will hire a data entry coordinator to collect, enter, analyze and store all the current and future energy efficiency and renewable energy data pertaining to administrative structures the tribe owns and operates and for homes in which tribal members live. The proposed data entry coordinator will conduct an energy options analysis in collaboration with the rest of the Siletz Tribal Energy Program and Planning Department staff. An energy options analysis will result in a thorough understanding of tribal energy resources and consumption, if energy efficiency and conservation measures being implemented are having the desired effect, analysis of tribal energy loads (current and future energy consumption), and evaluation of local and commercial energy supply options. A literature search will also be conducted. In order to educate additional tribal members about renewable energy, we will send four tribal members to be trained to install and maintain solar panels, solar hot water heaters, wind turbines and/or micro-hydro.

  14. Altitude release mechanism

    DOEpatents

    Kulhanek, Frank C.

    1977-01-01

    An altitude release mechanism for releasing a radiosonde or other measuring instrument from a balloon carrying it up into the atmosphere includes a bottle partially filled with water, a tube sealed into the bottle having one end submerged in the water in the bottle and the free end extending above the top of the bottle and a strip of water-disintegrable paper held within the free end of the tube linking the balloon to the remainder of the package. As the balloon ascends, the lowered atmospheric air pressure causes the air in the bottle to expand, forcing the water in the bottle up the tubing to wet and disintegrate the paper, releasing the package from the balloon.

  15. [Altitude and the cardiovascular system].

    PubMed

    Richalet, Jean-Paul

    2012-06-01

    A stay at high altitude exposes an individual to various environmental changes (cold, exercise, isolation) but the most stressful for the body is hypoxia. However, the cardiovascular system yields some efficient mechanisms of acclimatization to oxygen lack. Hypoxia activates the adrenergic system and induces a tachycardia that decreases during a prolonged stay at altitude. The desensitization of the adrenergic system leads to a decrease in maximal heart rate and a protection of the myocardium against an energy disequilibrium that could be potentially harmful for the heart. Hypoxia induces a peripheral vasodilation and a pulmonary vasoconstriction, leading to few changes in systemic blood pressure and an increase in pulmonary blood pressure (PHT) that can contribute to a high altitude pulmonary edema. Advice to a cardiac patient who plans to go to high altitude should take into account that all diseases aggravated by increased adrenergic activity or associated with a PHT or a hypoxemia (right-to-left shunt) will be aggravated at high altitude. As altitude increases, a patient with a coronary disease will present an ischemic threshold for a lower power output during an EKG exercise test. The only test allowing predicting the tolerance to high altitude is the hypoxia exercise test realized at 30% of maxVO(2)and at an equivalent altitude of 4,800m.

  16. Altitude measurement for model rocketry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Caughey, David A.

    2007-05-01

    The simple, ballistic time-of-flight equation for the maximum altitude of a vertically launched rocket neglects the effects of atmospheric drag. We show that the error introduced by using this equation to estimate the maximum altitude is typically less than 1% because of the effective cancellations of timing errors during the ascent and descent of the rocket.

  17. Surprising unreactivity of cholesterol-5,6-epoxides towards nucleophiles[S

    PubMed Central

    Paillasse, Michael R.; Saffon, Nathalie; Gornitzka, Heinz; Silvente-Poirot, Sandrine; Poirot, Marc; de Medina, Philippe

    2012-01-01

    We recently established that drugs used for the treatment and the prophylaxis of breast cancers, such as tamoxifen, were potent inhibitors of cholesterol-5,6-epoxide hydrolase (ChEH), which led to the accumulation of 5,6α-epoxy-cholesterol (5,6α-EC) and 5,6β-epoxy-cholesterol (5,6β-EC). This could be considered a paradox because epoxides are known as alkylating agents with putative carcinogenic properties. We report here that, as opposed to the carcinogen styrene-oxide, neither of the ECs reacted spontaneously with nucleophiles. Under catalytic conditions, 5,6β-EC remains unreactive whereas 5,6α-EC gives cholestan-3β,5α-diol-6β-substituted compounds. These data showed that 5,6-ECs are stable epoxides and unreactive toward nucleophiles in the absence of a catalyst, which contrasts with the well-known reactivity of aromatic and aliphatic epoxides. These data rule out 5,6-EC acting as spontaneous alkylating agents. In addition, these data support the existence of a stereoselective metabolism of 5,6α-EC. PMID:22285872

  18. Cholesterol-5,6-epoxides: chemistry, biochemistry, metabolic fate and cancer.

    PubMed

    Poirot, Marc; Silvente-Poirot, Sandrine

    2013-03-01

    In the nineteen sixties it was proposed that cholesterol might be involved in the etiology of cancers and cholesterol oxidation products were suspected of being causative agents. Researchers had focused their attention on cholesterol-5,6-epoxides (5,6-ECs) based on several lines of evidence: 1) 5,6-ECs contained an oxirane group that was supposed to confer alkylating properties such as those observed for aliphatic and aromatic epoxides. 2) cholesterol-5,6-epoxide hydrolase (ChEH) was induced in pre-neoplastic lesions of skin from rats exposed to ultraviolet irradiations and ChEH was proposed to be involved in detoxification processes like other epoxide hydrolases. However, 5,6-ECs failed to induce carcinogenicity in rodents which ruled out a potent carcinogenic potential for 5,6-ECs. Meanwhile, clinical studies revealed an anomalous increase in the concentrations of 5,6β-EC in the nipple fluids of patients with pre-neoplastic breast lesions and in the blood of patients with endometrious cancers, suggesting that 5,6-ECs metabolism could be linked with cancer. Paradoxically, ChEH has been recently shown to be totally inhibited by therapeutic concentrations of tamoxifen (Tam), which is one of the main drugs used in the hormonotherapy and the chemoprevention of breast cancers. These data would suggest that the accumulation of 5,6-ECs could represent a risk factor, but we found that 5,6-ECs were involved in the induction of breast cancer cell differentiation and death induced by Tam suggesting a positive role of 5,6-ECs. These observations meant that the biochemistry and the metabolism of 5,6-ECs needed to be extensively studied. We will review the current knowledge and the future direction of 5,6-ECs chemistry, biochemistry, metabolism, and relationship with cancer.

  19. [Classification of altitude decompression sickness].

    PubMed

    Katuntsev, V P

    2000-01-01

    The article is devoted to the discussion of principles of and approaches to classification of altitude decompression sickness (DCS), one of the most methodically formidable aspects of the problem. Based on his own multiyear experience in altitude DCS investigations and critical review of literature, the author reasons his concept of clinical classification of altitude DCS. The author's concept places emphasis on obligatory consideration of three stages in DCS development: A--pre-disease (the premorbid syndrome), B--uncomplicated (light) and C--complicated (severe) forms. The objective sign of the premorbid state is "silent" gas bubbles in organism detectable by ultrasonic devices. Signs of uncomplicated altitude DCS are musculoarticular pains, local edema and skin itching. Complicated altitude DCS is diagnosed by systemic (respiratory, neurological and cardiovascular) disorders.

  20. High altitude reconnaissance aircraft

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yazdo, Renee Anna; Moller, David

    1990-01-01

    At the equator the ozone layer ranges from 65,000 to 130,000 plus feet, which is beyond the capabilities of the ER-2, NASA's current high altitude reconnaissance aircraft. The Universities Space Research Association, in cooperation with NASA, is sponsoring an undergraduate program which is geared to designing an aircraft that can study the ozone layer at the equator. This aircraft must be able to cruise at 130,000 feet for six hours at Mach 0.7, while carrying 3,000 lbs. of payload. In addition, the aircraft must have a minimum range of 6,000 miles. In consideration of the novel nature of this project, the pilot must be able to take control in the event of unforeseen difficulties. Three aircraft configurations were determined to be the most suitable - a joined-wing, a biplane, and a twin-boom conventional airplane. The performance of each configuration was analyzed to investigate the feasibility of the project.

  1. High Altitude Dermatology.

    PubMed

    Singh, Lt Col G K

    2017-01-01

    Approximately, 140 million people worldwide live permanently at high altitudes (HAs) and approximately another 40 million people travel to HA area (HAA) every year for reasons of occupation, sports or recreation. In India, whole of Ladakh region, part of Northwest Kashmir, Northern part of Sikkim and Tenga valley of Arunachal are considered inhabited areas of HAA. The low quantity of oxygen, high exposure of ultraviolet (UV) light, very low humidity, extreme subzero temperature in winter, high wind velocity, make this region difficult for lowlanders as well as for tourists. Acute mountain sickness, HA pulmonary edema, HA cerebral edema, and thromboembolic conditions are known to occur in HA. However, enough knowledge has not been shared on dermatoses peculiar to this region. Xerosis, UV-related skin disorders (tanning, photomelanosis, acute and chronic sunburn, polymorphic light eruption, chronic actinic dermatitis, actinic cheilitis, etc.), cold injuries (frostbite, chilblains, acrocyanosis, erythrocyanosis, etc.) nail changes (koilonychias), airborne contact dermatitis, insect bite reaction, and skin carcinoma (basal cell carcinomas, squamous cell carcinomas, and also rarely malignant melanoma) are the dermatoses seen in HAAs. Early diagnosis and knowledge of HA dermatoses may prevent serious consequences of disease and improve the quality of life for the visitors as well as for native of the place.

  2. High Altitude Dermatology

    PubMed Central

    Singh, Lt. Col. G K

    2017-01-01

    Approximately, 140 million people worldwide live permanently at high altitudes (HAs) and approximately another 40 million people travel to HA area (HAA) every year for reasons of occupation, sports or recreation. In India, whole of Ladakh region, part of Northwest Kashmir, Northern part of Sikkim and Tenga valley of Arunachal are considered inhabited areas of HAA. The low quantity of oxygen, high exposure of ultraviolet (UV) light, very low humidity, extreme subzero temperature in winter, high wind velocity, make this region difficult for lowlanders as well as for tourists. Acute mountain sickness, HA pulmonary edema, HA cerebral edema, and thromboembolic conditions are known to occur in HA. However, enough knowledge has not been shared on dermatoses peculiar to this region. Xerosis, UV-related skin disorders (tanning, photomelanosis, acute and chronic sunburn, polymorphic light eruption, chronic actinic dermatitis, actinic cheilitis, etc.), cold injuries (frostbite, chilblains, acrocyanosis, erythrocyanosis, etc.) nail changes (koilonychias), airborne contact dermatitis, insect bite reaction, and skin carcinoma (basal cell carcinomas, squamous cell carcinomas, and also rarely malignant melanoma) are the dermatoses seen in HAAs. Early diagnosis and knowledge of HA dermatoses may prevent serious consequences of disease and improve the quality of life for the visitors as well as for native of the place. PMID:28216727

  3. The Effects of the Parenting Styles on Social Skills of Children Aged 5-6

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kol, Suat

    2016-01-01

    The purpose of this study is to determine the effects of the parenting styles on social skills of children aged 5-6. The problem sentence of the research is; Do the parenting styles' have any effects on social skills of children aged 5-6?. The sub-problems of the research are in the form as; Does the social skills of children aged 5-6 differs from…

  4. The Effect of Science Activities on Concept Acquisition of Age 5-6 Children Groups

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dogru, Mustafa; Seker, Fatih

    2012-01-01

    Present research aims to determine the effect of science activities on concept development of preschool period age 5-6 children groups. Parallel to research objective, qualitative research pattern has been the selected method. Study group comprises of collectively 48 children from 5-6 age group attending to a private education institution in city…

  5. Resolving complex chromosome structures during meiosis: versatile deployment of Smc5/6.

    PubMed

    Verver, Dideke E; Hwang, Grace H; Jordan, Philip W; Hamer, Geert

    2016-03-01

    The Smc5/6 complex, along with cohesin and condensin, is a member of the structural maintenance of chromosome (SMC) family, large ring-like protein complexes that are essential for chromatin structure and function. Thanks to numerous studies of the mitotic cell cycle, Smc5/6 has been implicated to have roles in homologous recombination, restart of stalled replication forks, maintenance of ribosomal DNA (rDNA) and heterochromatin, telomerase-independent telomere elongation, and regulation of chromosome topology. The nature of these functions implies that the Smc5/6 complex also contributes to the profound chromatin changes, including meiotic recombination, that characterize meiosis. Only recently, studies in diverse model organisms have focused on the potential meiotic roles of the Smc5/6 complex. Indeed, Smc5/6 appears to be essential for meiotic recombination. However, due to both the complexity of the process of meiosis and the versatility of the Smc5/6 complex, many additional meiotic functions have been described. In this review, we provide a clear overview of the multiple functions found so far for the Smc5/6 complex in meiosis. Additionally, we compare these meiotic functions with the known mitotic functions in an attempt to find a common denominator and thereby create clarity in the field of Smc5/6 research.

  6. 43 CFR 5.6 - What type of permit conditions may the agency impose?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 43 Public Lands: Interior 1 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false What type of permit conditions may the agency impose? 5.6 Section 5.6 Public Lands: Interior Office of the Secretary of the Interior COMMERCIAL FILMING AND SIMILAR PROJECTS AND STILL PHOTOGRAPHY ON CERTAIN AREAS UNDER DEPARTMENT JURISDICTION...

  7. 43 CFR 5.6 - What type of permit conditions may the agency impose?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 43 Public Lands: Interior 1 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false What type of permit conditions may the agency impose? 5.6 Section 5.6 Public Lands: Interior Office of the Secretary of the Interior COMMERCIAL FILMING AND SIMILAR PROJECTS AND STILL PHOTOGRAPHY ON CERTAIN AREAS UNDER DEPARTMENT JURISDICTION...

  8. IMMUNOASSAY METHODS FOR MEASURING ATRAZINE AND 3,5,6-TRICHLORO-2-PYRIDINOL IN FOODS

    EPA Science Inventory

    This chapter describes the use of enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) methods for the analysis of two potential environmental contaminants in food sample media, atrazine and 3,5,6-trichloro-2-pyridinol (3,5,6-TCP). Two different immunoassay formats are employed: a magnetic...

  9. Observations of High-altitude Negative Lightning Leaders

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Edens, H. E.

    2011-12-01

    On 20 August 2010 a high-speed video recording was made of a bolt-from-the-blue (BFB) lightning flash where the negative leader exited the cloud near 9 km altitude and could be observed in clear air along most of its path to ground. The observation was augmented by data from Langmuir Laboratory's 3-D Lightning Mapping Array (LMA) as well as slow and fast Delta-E and broadband (up to 100 MHz) electric field waveform recordings. The various data sets are correlated in time and time-correlated LMA data is overlaid on the video frames, yielding a spectacular animation of a negative leader as it propagates from 9 km altitude down into air of increasingly higher pressure, contacting ground at 1.5 km altitude. At 9 km altitude, the tip of the negative leader exhibits impulsive emissions of light and retrograde luminosity waves that are seen to travel backward along the channel, away from the leader tip. As the leader propagates down in altitude the light emissions from the leader tip become more continuous in nature and the leader starts branching profusely. The leader velocity, on the order of 10^5 m/s, did not appear to change significantly. At the same storm, 30 minutes before the BFB flash occurred, a photograph was obtained of another negative leader from an intracloud (IC) flash that exited the cloud near the top, propagated several kilometers upward along a slanted path and terminated in clear air at 11 km altitude. The photograph was made with a Nikon D700 digital camera set at high sensitivity. The individual leader steps, which are on the order of 200 m length, are resolved as relatively straight segments of channel between sharp bends. At each bend (or kink) in the channel, clusters of 5 to 8 blue streamer filaments occur that are on the order of 100 m length. Small branches occur at most of the channel bends. One bend in the channel is accompanied by a space stem with blue streamers at both ends. The positive streamer emanating from the space stem and reaching

  10. Altitude transitions in energy climbs

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Weston, A. R.; Cliff, E. M.; Kelley, H. J.

    1982-01-01

    The aircraft energy-climb trajectory for configurations with a sharp transonic drag rise is well known to possess two branches in the altitude/Mach-number plane. Transition in altitude between the two branches occurs instantaneously, a 'corner' in the minimum-time solution obtained with the energy-state model. If the initial and final values of altitude do not lie on the energy-climb trajectory, then additional jumps (crude approximations to dives and zooms) are required at the initial and terminal points. With a singular-perturbation approach, a 'boundary-layer' correction is obtained for each altitude jump, the transonic jump being a so-called 'internal' boundary layer, different in character from the initial and terminal layers. The determination of this internal boundary layer is examined and some computational results for an example presented.

  11. Ear - blocked at high altitudes

    MedlinePlus

    ... and blocked ears; Flying and blocked ears; Eustachian tube dysfunction - high altitude ... The eustachian tube is a connection between the middle ear (the space deep to the eardrum) and the back of the ...

  12. Synthesis of gamma- and delta-lactones from 1alpha-hydroxy-5,6-trans-vitamin D3 by ring-closing metathesis route and their reduction with metal hydrides.

    PubMed

    Wojtkielewicz, Agnieszka; Morzycki, Jacek W

    2007-06-01

    New synthetic pathway towards 19-functionalized derivatives of 1alpha-hydroxy-5,6-trans-vitamin D3 was described. Ring-closing metathesis (RCM) of 1alpha-hydroxy-5,6-trans-vitamin D3 1-omega-alkenoates was a key-step. Hydride reduction of resulting lactones led to the new vitamin D3 analogues.

  13. A3 Altitude Test Facility

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dulreix, Lionel J.

    2009-01-01

    This slide presentation shows drawings, diagrams and photographs of the A3 Altitude Test Facility. It includes a review of the A3 Facility requirements, and drawings of the various sections of the facility including Engine Deck and Superstructure, Test Cell and Thrust Takeout, Structure and Altitude Support Systems, Chemical Steam generators, and the subscale diffuser. There are also pictures of the construction site, and the facility under construction. A Diagram of the A3 Steam system schematic is also shown

  14. Electrocardiography in people living at high altitude of Nepal

    PubMed Central

    Aryal, Nirmal; Weatherall, Mark; Bhatta, Yadav Kumar Deo; Mann, Stewart

    2017-01-01

    Objective The main objective of this study was to estimate the prevalence of coronary heart disease (CHD) of high-altitude populations in Nepal determined by an ECG recordings and a medical history. Methods We carried out a cross-sectional survey of cardiovascular disease and risk factors among people living at four different altitude levels, all above 2800 m, in the Mustang and Humla districts of Nepal. 12-lead ECGs were recorded on 485 participants. ECG recordings were categorised as definitely abnormal, borderline or normal. Results No participant had Q waves to suggest past Q-wave infarction. Overall, 5.6% (95% CI 3.7 to 8.0) of participants gave a self-report of CHD. The prevalence of abnormal (or borderline abnormal) ECG was 19.6% (95% CI 16.1 to 23.4). The main abnormalities were: right axis deviation in 5.4% (95% CI 3.5 to 7.7) and left ventricular hypertrophy by voltage criteria in 3.5% (95% CI 2.0 to 5.5). ECG abnormalities were mainly on the left side of the heart for Mustang participants (Tibetan origin) and on the right side for Humla participants (Indo-Aryans). There was a moderate association between the probability of abnormal (or borderline abnormal) ECG and altitude when adjusted for potential confounding variables in a multivariate logistic model; with an OR for association per 1000 m elevation of altitude of 2.83 (95% CI 1.07 to 7.45), p=0.03. Conclusions Electrocardiographic evidence suggests that although high-altitude populations do not have a high prevalence of CHD, abnormal ECG findings increase by altitude and risk pattern varies by ethnicity. PMID:28243317

  15. Analysis of Pulsed Airborne Lidar Measurements of Atmospheric CO2 Column Absorption from 3-13 km Altitudes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Abshire, James B.; Weaver, Clark J.; Riris, Haris; Mao, Jianping; Sun, Xiaoli; Allan, Graham R.; Hasselbrack, William; Browell, Edward V.

    2011-01-01

    through thin clouds. The Oklahoma and east coast flights were coordinated with a LaRC/ITT CO2 lidar on the LaRC UC-12 aircraft, and in-situ measurements were made using its CO2 sensor and radiosondes. We have conducted an analysis of the ranging and IPDA lidar measurements from these four flights. Most flights had 5-6 altitude steps with 200-300 seconds of recorded measurements per step. We used a cross-correlation approach to process the laser echo records. This was used to estimate the range to the scattering surface, to define the edges of the laser pulses and to determine echo pulse energy at each wavelength. We used a minimum mean square approach to fit an instrument response function and to solve for the best-fit CO2 absorption line shape. We then calculated the differential optical depth (DOD) of the fitted CO2 line. We computed its statistics at the various altitude steps, and compare them to the DODs calculated from spectroscopy based on HITRAN 2008 and the column conditions calculated from the airborne in-situ readings. The results show the lidar and in-situ measurements have very similar DOD change with altitude and greater than 10 segments per flight where the scatter in the lidar measurements are less than or equal to 1ppm. We also present the results from subsequent CO2 column absorption measurements, which were made with stronger detected signals during three flights on the NASA DC-8 over the southwestern US in during July 2010.

  16. Asteroid airburst altitude vs. strength

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Robertson, Darrel; Wheeler, Lorien; Mathias, Donovan

    2016-10-01

    Small NEO asteroids (<Ø140m) may not be a threat on a national or global level but can still cause a significant amount of local damage as demonstrated by the Chelyabinsk event where there was over $33 million worth of damage (1 billion roubles) and 1500 were injured, mostly due to broken glass. The ground damage from a small asteroid depends strongly on the altitude at which they "burst" where most of the energy is deposited in the atmosphere. The ability to accurately predict ground damage is useful in determining appropriate evacuation or shelter plans and emergency management.Strong asteroids, such as a monolithic boulder, fail and create peak energy deposition close to the altitude at which ram dynamic pressure exceeds the material cohesive strength. Weaker asteroids, such as a rubble pile, structurally fail at higher altitude, but it requires the increased aerodynamic pressure at lower altitude to disrupt and disperse the rubble. Consequently the resulting airbursts have a peak energy deposition at similar altitudes.In this study hydrocode simulations of the entry and break-up of small asteroids were performed to examine the effect of strength, size, composition, entry angle, and speed on the resulting airburst. This presentation will show movies of the simulations, the results of peak burst height, and the comparison to semi-analytical models.

  17. Stroke in ancient times: a reinterpretation of Psalms 137:5,6.

    PubMed

    Resende, Luiz Antonio de Lima; Weber, Silke Anna Theresa; Bertotti, Marcelo Fernando Zeugner; Agapejev, Svetlana

    2008-09-01

    Stroke was probably first described in Psalms 136: 5-6 of the Catholic Bible, and Psalms 137:5-6 of the Evangelical Bible. Based on the Portuguese, Spanish, English, German, Dutch, Russian, Greek, and original Hebrew Bible, the significance of this Psalm is the invocation of a punishment, of which the final result would be a stroke of the left middle cerebral artery, causing motor aphasia and right hemiparesis.

  18. Solar collector with altitude tracking

    DOEpatents

    Barak, Amitzur Z.

    1977-01-01

    A device is provided for turning a solar collector about an east-west horizontal axis so that the collector is tilted toward the sun as the EWV altitude of the sun varies each day. It includes one or more heat responsive elements and a shading means aligned so that within a range of EWV altitudes of the sun during daylight hours the shading means shades the element or elements while during the rest of the daylight hours the elements or elements are heated by the sun to assume heated, stable states. Mechanical linkage between the collector and the element is responsive to the states of the element or elements to tilt the collector in accordance with variations in the EWV altitude of the sun.

  19. PHOEBE - step by step manual

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zasche, P.

    2016-03-01

    An easy step-by-step manual of PHOEBE is presented. It should serve as a starting point for the first time users of PHOEBE analyzing the eclipsing binary light curve. It is demonstrated on one particular detached system also with the downloadable data and the whole procedure is described easily till the final trustworthy fit is being reached.

  20. Altitude preexposure recommendations for inducing acclimatization.

    PubMed

    Muza, Stephen R; Beidleman, Beth A; Fulco, Charles S

    2010-01-01

    For many low-altitude (<1500 m) residents, their travel itineraries may cause them to ascend rapidly to high (>2400 m) altitudes without having the time to develop an adequate degree of altitude acclimatization. Prior to departing on these trips, low-altitude residents can induce some degree of altitude acclimatization by ascending to moderate (>1500 m) or high altitudes during either continuous or intermittent altitude preexposures. Generally, the degree of altitude acclimatization developed is proportional to the altitude attained and the duration of exposure. The available evidence suggests that continuous residence at 2200 m or higher for 1 to 2 days or daily 1.5- to 4-h exposures to >4000 m induce ventilatory acclimatization. Six days at 2200 m substantially decreases acute mountain sickness (AMS) and improves work performance after rapid ascent to 4300 m. There is evidence that 5 or more days above 3000 m within the last 2 months will significantly decrease AMS during a subsequent rapid ascent to 4500 m. Exercise training during the altitude preexposures may augment improvement in physical performance. The persistence of altitude acclimatization after return to low altitude appears to be proportional to the degree of acclimatization developed. The subsequent ascent to high altitude should be scheduled as soon as possible after the last altitude preexposure.

  1. Lidar Altitude Data Read Routine

    Atmospheric Science Data Center

    2013-03-19

    ... Profile products. It is written in Interactive Data Language (IDL) and uses HDF routine calls to read the altitude data which are ... Data Read routine  (1.5 KB) Interactive Data Language (IDL) is available from  Exelis Visual Information Solutions . ...

  2. Altitude Compensating Nozzle Concepts Evaluation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Soni, Bharat

    2000-01-01

    This report contains the summary of work accomplished during summer of 2000 by Mr. Chad Hammons, undergraduate senior student, Mississippi State University/ERC in support of NASA/MSFC mission pertinent to Altitude compensating nozzle concepts evaluations. In particular, the development of automatic grid generator applicable in conducting sensitivity analysis involving Aerospike engine is described.

  3. Development of Aptitude at Altitude

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hogan, Alexandra M.; Virues-Ortega, Javier; Botti, Ana Baya; Bucks, Romola; Holloway, John W.; Rose-Zerilli, Matthew J.; Palmer, Lyle J.; Webster, Rebecca J.; Baldeweg, Torsten; Kirkham, Fenella J.

    2010-01-01

    Millions of people currently live at altitudes in excess of 2500 metres, where oxygen supply is limited, but very little is known about the development of brain and behavioural function under such hypoxic conditions. We describe the physiological, cognitive and behavioural profile of a large cohort of infants (6-12 months), children (6-10 years)…

  4. Alaska High Altitude Photography Program

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Petersen, Earl V.; Knutson, Martin A.; Ekstrand, Robert E.

    1986-01-01

    In 1978, the Alaska High Altitude Photography Program was initiated to obtain simultaneous black and white and color IR aerial photography of Alaska. Dual RC-10 and Zeiss camera systems were used for this program on NASA's U-2 and WB-57F, respectively. Data collection, handling, and distribution are discussed as well as general applications and the current status.

  5. Acetato(1,10-phenanthroline-5,6-dione)silver(I) trihydrate

    PubMed Central

    Onuegbu, Jonathan; Butcher, Ray J.; Hosten, Charles; Udeochu, Uche Charles; Bakare, Oladapo

    2008-01-01

    In the structure of the title compound, [Ag(C2H3O2)(C12H6N2O2)]·3H2O, the AgI atom is coordinated by both 1,10-phenanthroline-5,6-dione N atoms and one O atom from the acetate anion. The three water mol­ecules are involved in extensive hydrogen bonding to each other and to the acetate O and 1,10-phenanthroline-5,6-dione O atoms. In addition, there are weak C—H⋯O inter­actions. PMID:21201351

  6. The Evans Aldol-Prins cyclization: a general and stereoselective method for the synthesis of 2,3,4,5,6-pentasubstituted tetrahydropyrans.

    PubMed

    Álvarez-Méndez, Sergio J; García, Celina; Martín, Víctor S

    2016-02-25

    A general and stereoselective method to synthesize 2,3,4,5,6-pentasubstituted tetrahydropyrans in three steps starting from three different aldehydes is described. Key substrates β,γ-unsaturated N-acyloxazolidin-2-ones were subjected to an "Evans Aldol-Prins" protocol to generate five σ-bonds and five stereocenters in only a one-pot process with yields up to 60% and excellent stereoselectivities.

  7. Facile synthesis of 4,5,6a,7-tetrahydrodibenzo[de,g]chromene heterocycles and their transformation to phenanthrene alkaloids

    PubMed Central

    Kapadia, Nirav; Harding, Wayne

    2013-01-01

    Oxa-Pictet-Spengler cyclization and microwave-assisted C-H arylation have been implemented as key steps in the synthesis of new isochroman heterocycles containing a 4,5,6a,7-tetrahydrodibenzo[de,g]chromene motif. These isochromans may be easily transformed to phenanthrene alkaloids via acidic cleavage of the isochroman ring and standard synthetic manipulations thereafter. The route described is attractive in that it provides access to two biologically interesting scaffolds in simple and high yielding synthetic steps. PMID:24187388

  8. DETERMINATION OF 3,5,6-TRICHLORO-2-PYRIDINOL (TCP) BY ELISA

    EPA Science Inventory

    A sensitive, competitive enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) for 3,5,6-trichloro-2pyridinol (TCP) has been developed to quantitate parts per billion (ppb) amounts of the analyte in urine. TCP is a major metabolite and environmental degradation product of the insecticide c...

  9. Can 5-6 Year Old Children Orientate Themselves in a Cave?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jovignot, Francois

    1995-01-01

    Spatial capacities of 36 children ages 5-6 were tested in 3 experiments involving an electronic maze, map training and testing, and finding the way out of a cave using a map. All subjects could use simple maps; this ability improved with age. However, no subject navigated the cave without help, perhaps because of stress or task complexity. (SV)

  10. Regioselective Glycosylation of 3-, 5-, 6-, and 7-Hydroxyflavones by Cultured Plant Cells.

    PubMed

    Shimoda, Kei; Kubota, Naoji; Uesugi, Daisuke; Fujitaka, Yuuya; Okada, Shouta; Tanigawa, Masato; Hamada, Hiroki

    2015-06-01

    Regioselective glycosylation of 3-, 5-, 6-, and 7-hydroxyflavones was investigated using cultured plant cells of Eucalyptus perriniana and Phytolacca americana as biocatalysts. 3- and 7-Hydroxyflavones were practically glycosylated into the corresponding β-D-glucosides by E. perriniana and P. americana.

  11. The SMC5/6 complex is involved in crucial processes during human spermatogenesis.

    PubMed

    Verver, Dideke E; Langedijk, Nathalia S M; Jordan, Philip W; Repping, Sjoerd; Hamer, Geert

    2014-07-01

    Genome integrity is crucial for safe reproduction. Therefore, chromatin structure and dynamics should be tightly regulated during germ cell development. Chromatin structure and function are in large part determined by the structural maintenance of chromosomes (SMC) protein complexes, of which SMC5/6 recently has been shown to be involved in both spermatogonial differentiation and meiosis during mouse spermatogenesis. We therefore investigated the role of this complex in human spermatogenesis. We found SMC6 to be expressed in the human testis and present in a subset of type Adark and type Apale spermatogonia, all spermatocytes, and round spermatids. During human meiosis, SMC5/6 is located at the synaptonemal complex (SC), the XY body, and at the centromeres during meiotic metaphases. However, in contrast to mouse spermatogenesis, SMC6 is not located at pericentromeric heterochromatin in human spermatogenic cells, indicating subtle but perhaps important differences in not only SMC5/6 function but maybe also in maintenance of genomic integrity at the repetitive pericentromeric regions. Nonetheless, our data clearly indicate that the SMC5/6 complex, as shown in mice, is involved in numerous crucial processes during human spermatogenesis, such as in spermatogonial development, on the SC between synapsed chromosomes, and in DNA double-strand break repair on unsynapsed chromosomes during pachynema.

  12. Early development of Drosophila embryos requires Smc5/6 function during oogenesis.

    PubMed

    Tran, Martin; Tsarouhas, Vasilios; Kegel, Andreas

    2016-07-15

    Mutations in structural maintenance of chromosomes (Smc) proteins are frequently associated with chromosomal abnormalities commonly observed in developmental disorders. However, the role of Smc proteins in development still remains elusive. To investigate Smc5/6 function during early embryogenesis we examined smc5 and smc6 mutants of the fruit fly Drosophila melanogaster using a combination of reverse genetics and microscopy approaches. Smc5/6 exhibited a maternally contributed function in maintaining chromosome stability during early embryo development, which manifested as female subfertility in its absence. Loss of Smc5/6 caused an arrest and a considerable delay in embryo development accompanied by fragmented nuclei and increased anaphase-bridge formation, respectively. Surprisingly, early embryonic arrest was attributable to the absence of Smc5/6 during oogenesis, which resulted in insufficient repair of pre-meiotic and meiotic DNA double-strand breaks. Thus, our findings contribute to the understanding of Smc proteins in higher eukaryotic development by highlighting a maternal function in chromosome maintenance and a link between oogenesis and early embryogenesis.

  13. Specialized interfaces of Smc5/6 control hinge stability and DNA association

    PubMed Central

    Alt, Aaron; Dang, Hung Q.; Wells, Owen S.; Polo, Luis M.; Smith, Matt A.; McGregor, Grant A.; Welte, Thomas; Lehmann, Alan R.; Pearl, Laurence H.; Murray, Johanne M.; Oliver, Antony W.

    2017-01-01

    The Structural Maintenance of Chromosomes (SMC) complexes: cohesin, condensin and Smc5/6 are involved in the organization of higher-order chromosome structure—which is essential for accurate chromosome duplication and segregation. Each complex is scaffolded by a specific SMC protein dimer (heterodimer in eukaryotes) held together via their hinge domains. Here we show that the Smc5/6-hinge, like those of cohesin and condensin, also forms a toroidal structure but with distinctive subunit interfaces absent from the other SMC complexes; an unusual ‘molecular latch' and a functional ‘hub'. Defined mutations in these interfaces cause severe phenotypic effects with sensitivity to DNA-damaging agents in fission yeast and reduced viability in human cells. We show that the Smc5/6-hinge complex binds preferentially to ssDNA and that this interaction is affected by both ‘latch' and ‘hub' mutations, suggesting a key role for these unique features in controlling DNA association by the Smc5/6 complex. PMID:28134253

  14. Viscosity Measurements of Eclogite Melt up to 5.6 GPa and 2000 K

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, H.; Fei, Y.; Han, L.; Kono, Y.; Hou, M.; Zhao, Z.; Du, J.

    2014-12-01

    The melting and rheology of eclogite is critical for understanding the dynamics of the subduction zone and plate tectonic. Viscosity of eclogite melt as a function of depth is a key parameter to model the long-term chemical evolution of the subduction zone and volcanic magma. It also plays an important role in earthquakes and continent formation. However, the viscosity and rheology of eclogite melt remain poorly understood at high pressure and temperature. In this study, we have carried out in-situ falling-sphere viscometry measurements to determine the viscosity of eclogite melt from 1.3 to 5.6 GPa at temperatures between 1500 and 2000 K, using the Paris-Edinburgh cell at the 16-BM-B beamline of the High Pressure Collaborative Access Team (HPCAT) at the Advanced Photon Source. We used a natural eclogite sample with 47.7wt% SiO2. The viscosity (η) was calculated with the Stokes' equation. The viscosity of eclogite melt decreases between 1.3 and 5.6 GPa at 2000K. At 1.4 GPa and 2000K the viscosity is 0.43 Pa·s, whereas at 5.6 GPa and 2000 K it is 0.13Pa·s. No minimum in the viscosity of eclogite was found in the measured pressure range up to 5.6 GPa.

  15. The Effects of Folk Dance Training on 5-6 Years Children's Physical and Social Development

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Biber, Kazim

    2016-01-01

    The purpose of this study is to analyze the effects of folk dance training on 5-6 year old Pre-school children's physical and social development. The experimental design with an experimental and control group was used in accordance with the quantitative research methods in this research. The research has been conducted with the participation of 40…

  16. The structure and properties of 5,6-dinitro-1H-benzotriazole

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Santa María, Dolores; Claramunt, Rosa M.; Torralba, M. Carmen; Torres, M. Rosario; Alkorta, Ibon; Elguero, José

    2016-06-01

    5,6-Dinitro-1H-benzotriazole crystallizes in the monoclinic system, space group P21/c. The asymmetric unit contains the planar 1H-tautomer together with a water molecule of crystallization. Each water molecule is hydrogen bonded to three adjacent 5,6-dinitrobenzotriazoles forming a tape along the b-axis of the crystal. These tapes stack along the c-axis through hydrogen bonds involving the water molecules and one of the nitro groups leading to a bidimensional structure. Solid-state 13C and 15N CPMAS NMR allow to confirm that the tautomer present is the 1H one. In DMSO-d6 solution the results are quite different and, based on GIAO/B3LYP/6-311++G(d,p) calculations, lead us to conclude that the major tautomer is the 5,6-dinitro-2H-benzotriazole, a surprising result that contradicts the rule that the major tautomer in solution coincides with the one present in the crystal. An anhydrous pseudopolymorph of 5,6-dinitro-1H-benzotriazole has been obtained as a non-crystalline form and from solid-state NMR and theoretical calculations, we conclude that it is an 1H-tautomer.

  17. Early development of Drosophila embryos requires Smc5/6 function during oogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Tran, Martin; Tsarouhas, Vasilios

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Mutations in structural maintenance of chromosomes (Smc) proteins are frequently associated with chromosomal abnormalities commonly observed in developmental disorders. However, the role of Smc proteins in development still remains elusive. To investigate Smc5/6 function during early embryogenesis we examined smc5 and smc6 mutants of the fruit fly Drosophila melanogaster using a combination of reverse genetics and microscopy approaches. Smc5/6 exhibited a maternally contributed function in maintaining chromosome stability during early embryo development, which manifested as female subfertility in its absence. Loss of Smc5/6 caused an arrest and a considerable delay in embryo development accompanied by fragmented nuclei and increased anaphase-bridge formation, respectively. Surprisingly, early embryonic arrest was attributable to the absence of Smc5/6 during oogenesis, which resulted in insufficient repair of pre-meiotic and meiotic DNA double-strand breaks. Thus, our findings contribute to the understanding of Smc proteins in higher eukaryotic development by highlighting a maternal function in chromosome maintenance and a link between oogenesis and early embryogenesis. PMID:27288507

  18. Altitude characteristics of selected air quality analyzers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    White, J. H.; Strong, R.; Tommerdahl, J. B.

    1979-01-01

    The effects of altitude (pressure) on the operation and sensitivity of various air quality analyzers frequently flown on aircraft were analyzed. Two ozone analyzers were studied at altitudes from 600 to 7500 m and a nitrogen oxides chemiluminescence detector and a sulfur dioxide flame photometric detector were studied at altitudes from 600 to 3000 m. Calibration curves for altitude corrections to the sensitivity of the instruments are presented along with discussion of observed instrument behavior.

  19. [Children and pregnant women at high altitude].

    PubMed

    Rehakova, P; Rexhaj, E; Farron, F; Duplain, H

    2014-05-07

    Nowadays, high altitude resorts have become popular destinations for family vacations. Based on a limited number of publications and international guidelines, this article summarizes the effects of high altitude on children and pregnant women. Children also suffer from high altitude-related diseases, however their presentation and clinical significance are different from their adult counterparts. Careful planning of the itinerary with respect to altitude of the overnight stays, access to medical services and potential evacuation routes is the cornerstone of a successful vacation.

  20. High Altitude Ozone Research Balloon

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cauthen, Timothy A.; Daniel, Leslie A.; Herrick, Sally C.; Rock, Stacey G.; Varias, Michael A.

    1990-01-01

    In order to create a mission model of the high altitude ozone research balloon (HAORB) several options for flight preparation, altitude control, flight termination, and payload recovery were considered. After the optimal launch date and location for two separate HAORB flights were calculated, a method for reducing the heat transfer from solar and infrared radiation was designed and analytically tested. This provided the most important advantage of the HAORB over conventional balloons, i.e., its improved flight duration. Comparisons of different parachute configurations were made, and a design best suited for the HAORB's needs was determined to provide for payload recovery after flight termination. In an effort to avoid possible payload damage, a landing system was also developed.

  1. Rocket Altitude Test Facilities Register

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1987-03-01

    Classification of Document UNCLASSIFIED 5. Originator Advisory Group for Aerospace Research and Development North Atlantic Treaty Organization...Emphasis was put on facilities capable of performing research and development tests. This AGARDograph was prepared at the request of the Propulsion... RESEARCH & DEVELOPMENT 7RUEANCELLE 92200 NEUILLY SUR SEINE FRANCE AGARDo^raph N0^97 , Rocket Altitude Test Facilities Register /^ri c^ris

  2. Altitude-Related Illness: Advice to Travellers

    PubMed Central

    Crutcher, Rodney A.

    1990-01-01

    Altitude-related medical problems have received much attention in the recent medical literature. Family physicians must be knowledgeable about these problems so that they can give appropriate advice to travellers. The author, a practising family physician, discusses issues arising from both the modest cabin altitudes experienced in modern-day air travel and the greater altitudes experienced by skiers and trekkers, pilots and mountaineers, and lowland adventurers of all sorts. He reviews the process of acclimatization to altitude and the four principal forms of altitude illness. PMID:21233912

  3. Space Operations Center orbit altitude selection strategy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Indrikis, J.; Myers, H. L.

    1982-01-01

    The strategy for the operational altitude selection has to respond to the Space Operation Center's (SOC) maintenance requirements and the logistics demands of the missions to be supported by the SOC. Three orbit strategies are developed: two are constant altitude, and one variable altitude. In order to minimize the effect of atmospheric uncertainty the dynamic altitude method is recommended. In this approach the SOC will operate at the optimum altitude for the prevailing atmospheric conditions and logistics model, provided that mission safety constraints are not violated. Over a typical solar activity cycle this method produces significant savings in the overall logistics cost.

  4. Effects of Altitude on Turbojet Engine Performance

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fleming, William A

    1951-01-01

    Component and over-all performance characteristics of several turbojet engines investigated in the altitude facilities of the NACA Lewis Laboratory during the last several years are summarized to indicate the effects of altitude on turbojet engine performance. Data presented show that failure of turbojet engine performance to generalize for all altitudes can be traced to reductions in compressor efficiency, corrected air flow, and combustion efficiency at altitude. In addition, it is shown that although engines of different design may have equal thrusts at sea level, the thrusts at altitude may vary widely because of differences in compressor performance characteristics from one engine to another.

  5. The Impact of Moderate-Altitude Staging on Pulmonary Arterial Hemodynamics after Ascent to High Altitude

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2010-01-01

    et al., 1956; Sime et al., 1974). The magnitude of the PAP in- crease plays an important role in the development of high altitude pulmonary edema ...implications for travelers to high altitude. High altitude pulmonary edema (HAPE) is an important cause of high altitude morbidity and mortality, and...P., and Oelz O. (1991). Prevention of high-altitude pulmonary edema by nifedipine. N. Engl. J. Med. 325:1284–1289. Beidleman B.A., Fulco C.S., Muza

  6. Conformational Changes in Inositol 1,3,4,5,6-Pentakisphosphate 2-Kinase upon Substrate Binding

    PubMed Central

    Baños-Sanz, José Ignacio; Sanz-Aparicio, Julia; Whitfield, Hayley; Hamilton, Chris; Brearley, Charles A.; González, Beatriz

    2012-01-01

    Inositol 1,3,4,5,6-pentakisphosphate 2-kinase (IP5 2-K) catalyzes the synthesis of inositol 1,2,3,4,5,6-hexakisphosphate from ATP and IP5. Inositol 1,2,3,4,5,6-hexakisphosphate is implicated in crucial processes such as mRNA export, DNA editing, and phosphorus storage in plants. We previously solved the first structure of an IP5 2-K, which shed light on aspects of substrate recognition. However, failure of IP5 2-K to crystallize in the absence of inositide prompted us to study putative conformational changes upon substrate binding. We have made mutations to residues on a region of the protein that produces a clasp over the active site. A W129A mutant allowed us to capture IP5 2-K in its different conformations by crystallography. Thus, the IP5 2-K apo-form structure displays an open conformation, whereas the nucleotide-bound form shows a half-closed conformation, in contrast to the inositide-bound form obtained previously in a closed conformation. Both nucleotide and inositide binding produce large conformational changes that can be understood as two rigid domain movements, although local changes were also observed. Changes in intrinsic fluorescence upon nucleotide and inositide binding are in agreement with the crystallographic findings. Our work suggests that the clasp might be involved in enzyme kinetics, with the N-terminal lobe being essential for inositide binding and subsequent conformational changes. We also show how IP5 2-K discriminates between inositol 1,3,4,5-tetrakisphosphate and 3,4,5,6-tetrakisphosphate enantiomers and that substrate preference can be manipulated by Arg130 mutation. Altogether, these results provide a framework for rational design of specific inhibitors with potential applications as biological tools for in vivo studies, which could assist in the identification of novel roles for IP5 2-K in mammals. PMID:22745128

  7. 5,6-Diphenylpyridazine derivatives as acyl-CoA:cholesterol acyltransferase inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Giovannoni, M P; Piaz, V D; Kwon, B M; Kim, M K; Kim, Y K; Toma, L; Barlocco, D; Bernini, F; Canavesi, M

    2001-11-22

    Alkyl-5,6-diphenylpyridazine derivatives combining several main features of ACAT inhibitors, such as a long alkyl side chain linked to a heterocycle and the o-diphenyl system, were synthesized and tested. Moreover, modeling studies on representative terms were performed. Some compounds displayed ACAT inhibition in the micromolar range, both on the enzyme isolated from rat liver microsomes and in cell-free homogenate of murine macrophages.

  8. The Diaza[5.5.6.6]fenestrane Skeleton-Synthesis of Leuconoxine Alkaloids.

    PubMed

    Pfaffenbach, Magnus; Gaich, Tanja

    2016-03-07

    Among the Aspidosperma-derived monoterpene indole alkaloids, the leuconoxine subgroup has drawn significant attention from the synthetic community during the past few years. This Minireview summarizes the hitherto six completed total syntheses of leuconoxines emphasizing the different strategies for assembling the key structural motif, an unprecedented diaza[5.5.6.6]fenestrane skeleton. In addition, the proposed biogenetic relationships within the group of these alkaloids are described.

  9. The Extracellular Domain of Lrp5/6 Inhibits Noncanonical Wnt Signaling In Vivo

    PubMed Central

    Andersson, Emma R.; Schambony, Alexandra; Esner, Milan; Bryjová, Lenka; Biris, Kristin K.; Hall, Anita C.; Kraft, Bianca; Cajanek, Lukas; Yamaguchi, Terry P.; Buckingham, Margaret

    2009-01-01

    Lrp5/6 are crucial coreceptors for Wnt/β-catenin signaling, a pathway biochemically distinct from noncanonical Wnt signaling pathways. Here, we examined the possible participation of Lrp5/6 in noncanonical Wnt signaling. We found that Lrp6 physically interacts with Wnt5a, but that this does not lead to phosphorylation of Lrp6 or activation of the Wnt/β-catenin pathway. Overexpression of Lrp6 blocks activation of the Wnt5a downstream target Rac1, and this effect is dependent on intact Lrp6 extracellular domains. These results suggested that the extracellular domain of Lrp6 inhibits noncanonical Wnt signaling in vitro. In vivo, Lrp6−/− mice exhibited exencephaly and a heart phenotype. Surprisingly, these defects were rescued by deletion of Wnt5a, indicating that the phenotypes resulted from noncanonical Wnt gain-of-function. Similarly, Lrp5 and Lrp6 antisense morpholino-treated Xenopus embryos exhibited convergent extension and heart phenotypes that were rescued by knockdown of noncanonical XWnt5a and XWnt11. Thus, we provide evidence that the extracellular domains of Lrp5/6 behave as physiologically relevant inhibitors of noncanonical Wnt signaling during Xenopus and mouse development in vivo. PMID:19056682

  10. Pulmonary Adaptation to High Altitude.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1982-08-01

    Fluorometric assays of high energy phosphates in respiratory and limb muscles plus a variety of histochemical techniques to more fully describe the...phenomenon--in the form of the critical level of CO2 required to maintain rhythmic breathing during sleep and explains the effect of acute oxygen therapy on...AD-AR140 51.4 PULMONARY ADAPTATION TO HIGH ALTITUDE(U) WISCONSIN i/i UNIV-MADISON J R DEMPSEY AUG 82 DAMD17-77-C-786 UNCLAS51FIED F/G 619 ML

  11. ALT space shuttle barometric altimeter altitude analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Killen, R.

    1978-01-01

    The accuracy was analyzed of the barometric altimeters onboard the space shuttle orbiter. Altitude estimates from the air data systems including the operational instrumentation and the developmental flight instrumentation were obtained for each of the approach and landing test flights. By comparing the barometric altitude estimates to altitudes derived from radar tracking data filtered through a Kalman filter and fully corrected for atmospheric refraction, the errors in the barometric altitudes were shown to be 4 to 5 percent of the Kalman altitudes. By comparing the altitude determined from the true atmosphere derived from weather balloon data to the altitude determined from the U.S. Standard Atmosphere of 1962, it was determined that the assumption of the Standard Atmosphere equations contributes roughly 75 percent of the total error in the baro estimates. After correcting the barometric altitude estimates using an average summer model atmosphere computed for the average latitude of the space shuttle landing sites, the residual error in the altitude estimates was reduced to less than 373 feet. This corresponds to an error of less than 1.5 percent for altitudes above 4000 feet for all flights.

  12. Altitude Stress During Participation of Medical Congress.

    PubMed

    Kim, Soon Bae; Kim, Jong Sung; Kim, Sang Jun; Cho, Su Hee; Suh, Dae Chul

    2016-09-01

    Medical congresses often held in highlands. We reviewed several medical issues associated with altitude stress especially while physicians have participated medical congress held in high altitude. Altitude stress, also known as an acute mountain sickness (AMS), is caused by acute exposure to low oxygen level at high altitude which is defined as elevations at or above 1,200 m and AMS commonly occurs above 2,500 m. Altitude stress with various symptoms including insomnia can also be experienced in airplane. AMS and drunken state share many common features in symptoms, neurologic manifestations and even show multiple microbleeds in corpus callosum and white matter on MRI. Children are more susceptible to altitude stress than adults. Gradual ascent is the best method for the prevention of altitude stress. Adequate nutrition (mainly carbohydrates) and hydration are recommended. Consumption of alcohol can exacerbate the altitude-induced impairments in judgment and the visual senses and promote psychomotor dysfunction. For prevention or treatment of altitude stress, acetazolamide, phosphodiesterase inhibitors, dexamethasone and erythropoietin are helpful. Altitude stress can be experienced relatively often during participation of medical congress. It is necessary to remind the harmful effect of AMS because it can cause serious permanent organ damage even though the symptoms are negligible in most cases.

  13. Altitude Stress During Participation of Medical Congress

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Soon Bae; Kim, Jong Sung; Kim, Sang Jun; Cho, Su Hee

    2016-01-01

    Medical congresses often held in highlands. We reviewed several medical issues associated with altitude stress especially while physicians have participated medical congress held in high altitude. Altitude stress, also known as an acute mountain sickness (AMS), is caused by acute exposure to low oxygen level at high altitude which is defined as elevations at or above 1,200 m and AMS commonly occurs above 2,500 m. Altitude stress with various symptoms including insomnia can also be experienced in airplane. AMS and drunken state share many common features in symptoms, neurologic manifestations and even show multiple microbleeds in corpus callosum and white matter on MRI. Children are more susceptible to altitude stress than adults. Gradual ascent is the best method for the prevention of altitude stress. Adequate nutrition (mainly carbohydrates) and hydration are recommended. Consumption of alcohol can exacerbate the altitude-induced impairments in judgment and the visual senses and promote psychomotor dysfunction. For prevention or treatment of altitude stress, acetazolamide, phosphodiesterase inhibitors, dexamethasone and erythropoietin are helpful. Altitude stress can be experienced relatively often during participation of medical congress. It is necessary to remind the harmful effect of AMS because it can cause serious permanent organ damage even though the symptoms are negligible in most cases. PMID:27621942

  14. Stepped nozzle

    DOEpatents

    Sutton, George P.

    1998-01-01

    An insert which allows a supersonic nozzle of a rocket propulsion system to operate at two or more different nozzle area ratios. This provides an improved vehicle flight performance or increased payload. The insert has significant advantages over existing devices for increasing nozzle area ratios. The insert is temporarily fastened by a simple retaining mechanism to the aft end of the diverging segment of the nozzle and provides for a multi-step variation of nozzle area ratio. When mounted in place, the insert provides the nozzle with a low nozzle area ratio. During flight, the retaining mechanism is released and the insert ejected thereby providing a high nozzle area ratio in the diverging nozzle segment.

  15. Stepped nozzle

    DOEpatents

    Sutton, G.P.

    1998-07-14

    An insert is described which allows a supersonic nozzle of a rocket propulsion system to operate at two or more different nozzle area ratios. This provides an improved vehicle flight performance or increased payload. The insert has significant advantages over existing devices for increasing nozzle area ratios. The insert is temporarily fastened by a simple retaining mechanism to the aft end of the diverging segment of the nozzle and provides for a multi-step variation of nozzle area ratio. When mounted in place, the insert provides the nozzle with a low nozzle area ratio. During flight, the retaining mechanism is released and the insert ejected thereby providing a high nozzle area ratio in the diverging nozzle segment. 5 figs.

  16. High-altitude reconnaissance aircraft

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yazdi, Renee Anna

    1991-01-01

    At the equator the ozone layer ranges from 65,000 to 130,000+ ft, which is beyond the capabilities of the ER-2, NASA's current high-altitude reconnaissance aircraft. This project is geared to designing an aircraft that can study the ozone layer. The aircraft must be able to satisfy four mission profiles. The first is a polar mission that ranges from Chile to the South Pole and back to Chile, a total range of 6000 n.m. at 100,000 ft with a 2500-lb payload. The second mission is also a polar mission with a decreased altitude and an increased payload. For the third mission, the aircraft will take off at NASA Ames, cruise at 100,000 ft, and land in Chile. The final mission requires the aircraft to make an excursion to 120,000 ft. All four missions require that a subsonic Mach number be maintained because of constraints imposed by the air sampling equipment. Three aircraft configurations were determined to be the most suitable for meeting the requirements. The performance of each is analyzed to investigate the feasibility of the mission requirements.

  17. Rocket Engine Altitude Simulation Technologies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Woods, Jody L.; Lansaw, John

    2010-01-01

    John C. Stennis Space Center is embarking on a very ambitious era in its rocket engine propulsion test history. The first new large rocket engine test stand to be built at Stennis Space Center in over 40 years is under construction. The new A3 Test Stand is designed to test very large (294,000 Ibf thrust) cryogenic propellant rocket engines at a simulated altitude of 100,000 feet. A3 Test Stand will have an engine testing chamber where the engine will be fired after the air in the chamber has been evacuated to a pressure at the simulated altitude of less than 0.16 PSIA. This will result in a very unique environment with extremely low pressures inside a very large chamber and ambient pressures outside this chamber. The test chamber is evacuated of air using a 2-stage diffuser / ejector system powered by 5000 lb/sec of steam produced by 27 chemical steam generators. This large amount of power and flow during an engine test will result in a significant acoustic and vibrational environment in and around A3 Test Stand.

  18. Readiness Review of BWXT for Fabrication of AGR-5/6/7 TRISO Particles

    SciTech Connect

    Marshall, Douglas William; Sharp, Michelle Tracy

    2016-02-01

    INL readiness review assessment of BWXT readiness to commence fabrication of low-enriched TRISO coated fuel particles for the AGR-5/6/7 irradiation experiments. BWXT self-identified equipment issues preventing operation. INL identified two findings. The first was that disposition codes had not been assigned and documented on BWXT forms to ensure that off-specification materials could not be used in the fabrication of TRISO particles. The second was that chemical purity specifications were not reliably passed on to chemical suppliers, which resulted in the receipt of one acetylene cylinder with suspect impurity levels.

  19. Rare-earth plasma extreme ultraviolet sources at 6.5-6.7 nm

    SciTech Connect

    Otsuka, Takamitsu; Higashiguchi, Takeshi; Yugami, Noboru; Yatagai, Toyohiko; Kilbane, Deirdre; White, John; Dunne, Padraig; O'Sullivan, Gerry; Jiang, Weihua; Endo, Akira

    2010-09-13

    We have demonstrated a laser-produced plasma extreme ultraviolet source operating in the 6.5-6.7 nm region based on rare-earth targets of Gd and Tb coupled with a Mo/B{sub 4}C multilayer mirror. Multiply charged ions produce strong resonance emission lines, which combine to yield an intense unresolved transition array. The spectra of these resonant lines around 6.7 nm (in-band: 6.7 nm {+-}1%) suggest that the in-band emission increases with increased plasma volume by suppressing the plasma hydrodynamic expansion loss at an electron temperature of about 50 eV, resulting in maximized emission.

  20. A toxicological study of 5,6,7,8 tetrafluoro- 1,4-benzodioxin

    SciTech Connect

    London, J.E.

    1988-05-01

    The acute oral LD/sub 50/ values for 5,6,7,8 tetrafluro-1,4 benzodioxin for mice and rats are less than 5 gkg. According to classical guidelines, the material is considered slightly toxic in both species. The sensitization study in the guinea pig did not show the material to have potential sensitizing properties. Skin application studies on the rabbit demonstrated that it was cutaneously mildly irritating. This material was very mildly irritating in the rabbit eye application studies. 4 refs., 2 tabs.

  1. Photophysics of poly(2,3,4,5,6-pentafluoro styrene) film

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    O'Connor, Donald B.; Scott, Gary W.; Coulter, Daniel R.; Miskowski, Vincent M.; Yavrouian, Andre

    1990-01-01

    The temperature-dependent steady-state emission, emission polarization anisotropy, and fluorescence-kinetics of poly(2,3,4,5,6-pentafluoro styrene) film are reported. Two interconverting excited-state conformations of the chromophore have been identified. The fluorescence of the higher energy conformation results from excitation on the red edge of the polymer absorption band at temperatures below 180 K. The energy barrier for conversion of the high energy conformer to the lower energy conformer is estimated to be E/hc = 27 + or - 7/cm. Electronic energy migration is not evident in this polymer.

  2. Analysis of a Near Field MIMO Wireless Channel Using 5.6 GHz Dipole Antennas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maricar, Mohamed Ismaeel; Gradoni, Gabriele; Greedy, Steve; Ivrlac, Michel T.; Nossek, Josef A.; Phang, Sendy; Creagh, Stephen C.; Tanner, Gregor; Thomas, David W. P.

    2016-05-01

    Understanding the impact of interference upon the performance of a multiple input multiple output (MIMO) based device is of paramount importance in ensuring a design is both resilient and robust. In this work the effect of element-element interference in the creation of multiple channels of a wireless link approaching the near-field regime is studied. The elements of the 2-antenna transmit- and receive-arrays are chosen to be identical folded dipole antennas operating at 5.6 GHz. We find that two equally strong channels can be created even if the antennas interact at sub-wavelength distances, thus confirming previous theoretical predictions.

  3. Measurement of Altitude in Blind Flying

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brombacher, W G

    1934-01-01

    In this note, instruments for measuring altitude and rate of change of altitude in blind flying and landing of aircraft and their performance are discussed. Of those indicating the altitude above ground level, the sonic altimeter is the most promising. Its present bulk, intermittent operation, and more or less unsatisfactory means of indication are serious drawbacks to its use. The sensitive type aneroid altimeter is also discussed and errors in flying at a pressure level and in landing are discussed in detail.

  4. Hormonal contraceptives and travel to high altitude.

    PubMed

    Keyes, Linda E

    2015-03-01

    Women frequently ask about the safety and efficacy of using hormonal contraception (HC), either oral contraceptive pills (OC) or other forms, when traveling to high altitude locales. What are the risks and benefits of using HC at high altitude? Does HC affect acclimatization, exercise performance, or occurrence of acute mountain sickness? This article reviews current data regarding the risks and benefits of HC at high altitude, both demonstrated and theoretical, with the aim of helping health care providers to advise women traveling above 2500 meters. Most healthy women can safely use HC when traveling to high altitude, but should be aware of the potential risks and inconveniences.

  5. Thermal responses to 5. 6-GHz radiofrequency radiation in anesthetized rats: effect of chlorpromazine

    SciTech Connect

    Jauchem, J.R.; Frei, M.R.; Heinmets, F.

    1988-01-01

    Anesthetized rats were exposed to 5.6-GHz continuous wave radiofrequency radiation at an average power density of 60 mW/cm2 (average specific absorption rate 12 W/kg). Exposure was performed to raise colonic temperature from 38.5 to 39.5 degrees C. Following acute administration of chlorpromazine, body temperature exhibited a faster return to baseline temperature when exposure was discontinued. When exposure was initiated at 38.5 degrees C and continued until lethal temperatures resulted, chlorpromazine-treated animals exhibited significantly shorter survival times than saline-treated animals. Thus, although chlorpromazine enhanced thermo-regulatory efficiency at colonic temperatures below 39.5 degrees C, the drug caused increased susceptibility to terminal radiofrequency radiation exposure. The present results, when compared to previous studies of irradiation at 2.8 GHz, indicate that the effects of chlorpromazine on thermal responses to RFR during intermittent and terminal exposure are similar at both 2.8 and 5.6 GHz.

  6. Thermal responses to 5. 6-GHz radiofrequency radiation in anesthetized rats. Effect of chlorpromazine

    SciTech Connect

    Jauchem, J.R.; Frei, M.R.; Heinmets, F.

    1988-01-01

    Anesthetized rats were exposed to 5.6-GHz continuous-wave radiofrequency radiation (RFR) at an average power density of 60 mW/Sq. cm (average specific absorption rate 12 W/kg). Exposure was performed to raise colonic temperature from 38.5 to 39.5C. Following acute administration of chlorpromazine, body temperature exhibited a faster return to baseline temperature when exposure was discontinued. When exposure was initiated at 38.5C and continued until lethal temperature resulted, chlorpromazine-treated animals exhibited significantly shorter survival times than saline-treated animals. Thus, although chlorpromazine enhanced thermoregulatory efficiency at colonic temperature below 39.5 deg C, the drug caused increased susceptibility to terminal RFR. The present results, when compared with previous studies of irradiation at 2.8 GHz, indicate that the effects of chlorpromazine on thermal response to RFR during intermittent and terminal exposure are similar at both 2.8 and 5.6 GHz.

  7. Smc5/6-Mms21 Prevents and Eliminates Inappropriate Recombination Intermediates in Meiosis

    PubMed Central

    Xaver, Martin; Huang, Lingzhi; Chen, Doris; Klein, Franz

    2013-01-01

    Repairing broken chromosomes via joint molecule (JM) intermediates is hazardous and therefore strictly controlled in most organisms. Also in budding yeast meiosis, where production of enough crossovers via JMs is imperative, only a subset of DNA breaks are repaired via JMs, closely regulated by the ZMM pathway. The other breaks are repaired to non-crossovers, avoiding JM formation, through pathways that require the BLM/Sgs1 helicase. “Rogue” JMs that escape the ZMM pathway and BLM/Sgs1 are eliminated before metaphase by resolvases like Mus81-Mms4 to prevent chromosome nondisjunction. Here, we report the requirement of Smc5/6-Mms21 for antagonizing rogue JMs via two mechanisms; destabilizing early intermediates and resolving JMs. Elimination of the Mms21 SUMO E3-ligase domain leads to transient JM accumulation, depending on Mus81-Mms4 for resolution. Absence of Smc6 leads to persistent rogue JMs accumulation, preventing chromatin separation. We propose that the Smc5/6-Mms21 complex antagonizes toxic JMs by coordinating helicases and resolvases at D-Loops and HJs, respectively. PMID:24385936

  8. Destabilized SMC5/6 complex leads to chromosome breakage syndrome with severe lung disease

    PubMed Central

    van der Crabben, Saskia N.; Hennus, Marije P.; McGregor, Grant A.; Ritter, Deborah I.; Nagamani, Sandesh C.S.; Wells, Owen S.; Harakalova, Magdalena; Chinn, Ivan K.; Alt, Aaron; Vondrova, Lucie; Hochstenbach, Ron; van Montfrans, Joris M.; Terheggen-Lagro, Suzanne W.; van Lieshout, Stef; van Roosmalen, Markus J.; Renkens, Ivo; Duran, Karen; Nijman, Isaac J.; Kloosterman, Wigard P.; Hennekam, Eric; van Hasselt, Peter M.; Wheeler, David A.; Palecek, Jan J.; Lehmann, Alan R.; Oliver, Antony W.; Pearl, Laurence H.; Plon, Sharon E.; Murray, Johanne M.

    2016-01-01

    The structural maintenance of chromosomes (SMC) family of proteins supports mitotic proliferation, meiosis, and DNA repair to control genomic stability. Impairments in chromosome maintenance are linked to rare chromosome breakage disorders. Here, we have identified a chromosome breakage syndrome associated with severe lung disease in early childhood. Four children from two unrelated kindreds died of severe pulmonary disease during infancy following viral pneumonia with evidence of combined T and B cell immunodeficiency. Whole exome sequencing revealed biallelic missense mutations in the NSMCE3 (also known as NDNL2) gene, which encodes a subunit of the SMC5/6 complex that is essential for DNA damage response and chromosome segregation. The NSMCE3 mutations disrupted interactions within the SMC5/6 complex, leading to destabilization of the complex. Patient cells showed chromosome rearrangements, micronuclei, sensitivity to replication stress and DNA damage, and defective homologous recombination. This work associates missense mutations in NSMCE3 with an autosomal recessive chromosome breakage syndrome that leads to defective T and B cell function and acute respiratory distress syndrome in early childhood. PMID:27427983

  9. Fire Fighting from High Altitude

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cobleigh, Brent; Ambrosia, Vince

    2007-01-01

    A viewgraph presentation on high altitude fire fighting is shown. The topics include: 1) Yellowstone Fire - 1988; 2) 2006 Western States Fire Mission Over-View; 3) AMS-Wildfire Scanner; 4) October 24-25 Mission: Yosemite NP and NF; 5) October 24-25 Mission MODIS Overpass; 6) October 24-25 Mission Highlights; 7) October 28-29 Mission Esperanza Fire, California; 8) Response to the Esperanza Fire in Southern California -- Timeline Oct 27-29 2006; 9) October 28-29 Mission Esperanza Fire Altair Flight Routing; 10) October 28-29 Mission Esperanza Fire Altair Over-Flights; 11) October 28-29 Mission Highlights; 12) Results from the Esperanza Fire Response; 13) 2007 Western States Fire Mission; and 14) Western States UAS Fire Mission 2007

  10. Environmental dynamics at orbital altitudes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Karr, G. R.

    1976-01-01

    The influence of real satellite aerodynamics on the determination of upper atmospheric density was investigated. A method of analysis of satellite drag data is presented which includes the effect of satellite lift and the variation in aerodynamic properties around the orbit. The studies indicate that satellite lift may be responsible for the observed orbit precession rather than a super rotation of the upper atmosphere. The influence of simplifying assumptions concerning the aerodynamics of objects in falling sphere analysis were evaluated and an improved method of analysis was developed. Wind tunnel data was used to develop more accurate drag coefficient relationships for studying altitudes between 80 and 120 Km. The improved drag coefficient relationships revealed a considerable error in previous falling sphere drag interpretation. These data were reanalyzed using the more accurate relationships. Theoretical investigations of the drag coefficient in the very low speed ratio region were also conducted.

  11. Treatment of filarial lymphoedema and elephantiasis with 5,6-benzo-alpha-pyrone (coumarin).

    PubMed Central

    Casley-Smith, J R; Wang, C T; Casley-Smith, J R; Zi-hai, C

    1993-01-01

    OBJECTIVE--To study efficacy of treatment of filarial lymphoedema and elephantiasis with 5,6-benzo-alpha-pyrone. DESIGN--Randomised, double blind, placebo controlled study with matching for grade and duration of disease, age, and sex. Treatment was given for 367 days, and subjects were followed up for another year. SETTING--A town in Shandong Province, China. SUBJECTS--104 men and women with chronic unilateral filarial lymphoedema or elephantiasis of the leg: 64 were randomised to benzopyrone and 40 to placebo. By the end of the study 19 patients had dropped out of the treatment group and two out of the placebo group. INTERVENTIONS--Two 200 mg tablets of 5,6-benzo-alpha-pyrone or two placebo tablets given daily. MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES--Volumes of the affected and normal legs estimated every three months, and daily listing of any side effects. RESULTS--Benzopyrone reduced oedema for all grades of lymphoedema during the year of treatment (pW0.001) and the follow up year (p = 0.026). During treatment the mean monthly reductions in leg volume were 0.62% (95% confidence intervals 0.4% to 0.85%), 1.1% (0.71% to 1.6%), and 1.6% (0.89% to 2.3%) of the volume of the normal leg for grades 1, 2, and 3-5 (elephantiasis) of lymphoedema respectively. During follow up the mean monthly reductions were 0.18% (0.01% to 0.35%), 0.54% (0.27% to 0.82%), and 0.87% (0.51% to 1.2%). At the end of the trial the total reduction in oedema was 100%, 95%, and 45% for grades 1, 2, and 3-5. Symptoms and complications were considerably reduced, including attacks of secondary acute inflammation, while side effects were minor and disappeared after one month. In the placebo group there were no changes in the severity of lymphoedema. CONCLUSIONS--5,6-benzo-alpha-pyrone reduces the oedema and many symptoms of filarial lymphoedema and elephantiasis. It has few side effects, and its relatively slow action makes it ideal for use without compression garments. PMID:8251778

  12. A new and practical method for the synthesis of 6-aryl-5,6-dihydropyrido[2,3-[Formula: see text

    PubMed

    Camarasa, Marta; Barnils, Christian; Puig de la Bellacasa, Raimon; Teixidó, Jordi; Borrell, José I

    2013-08-01

    A one step general synthetic methodology for the synthesis of 6-aryl-5,6-dihydropyrido[2,3-d]pyrimidine-4,7(3H,8H)-diones (17{[Formula: see text]} ([Formula: see text]) and 20{[Formula: see text]} ([Formula: see text])) is described. This methodology is based on reacting a 2-aryl-substituted acrylate (16{[Formula: see text]}) with the corresponding 6-aminopyrimidin-4(3[Formula: see text]-one (13 ([Formula: see text]; 19 ([Formula: see text])) in presence of a base under microwave irradiation. The resulting pyrido[2,3-[Formula: see text

  13. Rigid 5'-6-locked phenanthroline-derived nucleosides chelated to ruthenium and europium ions.

    PubMed

    Gislason, Kristmann; Sigurdsson, Snorri Th

    2013-01-01

    We describe complexes of ruthenium and europium with rigid, 5'-6-locked 1,10-phenanthroline-containing nucleosides. Both nucleosides were synthesized from condensation of 5-amino-2'-deoxycytidine with the corresponding diketone. The ruthenium nucleoside displayed fluorescence characteristic of polypyridine ruthenium complexes with a maximum at 616 nm and a quantum yield of 0.011. Binding of europium to the 1,10-phenanthroline-2,9-diacid moiety of the lanthanide binding nucleoside showed formation of a 1:1 complex with emission at 570-630 nm, whose emission was enhanced by addition of two phenanthroline ligands. The lanthanide-binding nucleoside was incorporated into DNA oligonucleotides and shown to selectively bind one equivalent of europium ions.

  14. Sodium 3,5,6-trichloropyridin-2-ol poisoning: report of four cases.

    PubMed

    Niu, Ying-Mei; Hao, Feng-Tong; Xia, Yu-Jing

    2014-06-01

    Sodium 3,5,6-trichloropyridin-2-ol (STCP) is an important intermediate for synthesizing organophosphate insecticide chlorpyrifos. At present, chlorpyrifos is one of the world's largest species of pesticide products. Many studies have focused on the toxicity of chlorpyrifos, but few reports have looked at the toxicity mechanism of STCP. Even fewer studies have looked at STCP poisoning. With increasing production and usage of STCP, the chances of such poisoning will increase. In this study, we present a report on four workers who helped in the industrial manufacture of STCP and who were affected by exposure to it. We hope that these case studies will provide a foundation for further research into STCP.

  15. Sequential Injection/Electrochemical Immunoassay for Quantifying the Pesticide Metabolite 3, 5, 6-Trichloro-2-Pyridinol

    SciTech Connect

    Liu, Guodong; Riechers, Shawn L.; Timchalk, Chuck; Lin, Yuehe

    2005-12-04

    An automated and sensitive sequential injection electrochemical immunoassay was developed to monitor a potential insecticide biomarker, 3, 5, 6-trichloro-2-pyridinol. The current method involved a sequential injection analysis (SIA) system equipped with a thin-layer electrochemical flow cell and permanent magnet, which was used to fix 3,5,6-trichloro-2-pyridinol (TCP) antibody coated magnetic beads (TCP-Ab-MBs) in the reaction zone. After competitive immunoreactions among TCP-Ab-MBs, TCP analyte, and horseradish peroxidase (HRP) labeled TCP, a 3, 3?, 5, 5?-tetramethylbenzidine dihydrochloride and hydrogen peroxide (TMB-H2O2) substrate solution was injected to produce an electroactive enzymatic product. The activity of HRP tracers was monitored by a square wave voltammetric scanning electroactive enzymatic product in the thin-layer flow cell. The voltammetric characteristics of the substrate and the enzymatic product were investigated under batch conditions, and the parameters of the immunoassay were optimized in the SIA system. Under the optimal conditions, the system was used to measure as low as 6 ng L-1 (ppt) TCP, which is around 50-fold lower than the value indicated by the manufacturer of the TCP RaPID Assay? kit (0.25 ug/L, colorimetric detection). The performance of the developed immunoassay system was successfully evaluated on tap water and river water samples spiked with TCP. This technique could be readily used for detecting other environmental contaminants by developing specific antibodies against contaminants and is expected to open new opportunities for environmental and biological monitoring.

  16. Geomechanical modeling of the nucleation process of Australia's 1989 M5.6 Newcastle earthquake

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Klose, Christian D.

    2007-04-01

    Inherent to black-coal mining in New South Wales (Australia) since 1801, the discharge of ground water may have triggered the M5.6 Newcastle earthquake in 1989. 4-dimensional geomechanical model simulations reveal that widespread water removal and coal as deep as a 500 m depth resulted in an unload of the Earth's crust. This unload caused a destabilization process of the pre-existing Newcastle fault in the interior of the crust beneath the Newcastle coal field. In tandem, an increase in shear stress and a decrease in normal stress may have reactivated this reverse fault. Over the course of the last fifty years, elevated levels of lithostatic stress alterations have accelerated. In 1991, based on the modeling of the crust's elastostatic response to the unload, there has been the minimal critical shear stress changes of 0.01 Mega Pascal (0.1 bar) that reached the Newcastle fault at a depth where the 1989 mainshock nucleated. Hence, it can be anticipated that other faults might also be critically stressed in that region for a couple of reasons. First, the size of the area (volume) that is affected by the induced stress changes is larger than the ruptured area of the Newcastle fault. Second, the seismic moment magnitude of the 1989 M5.6 Newcastle earthquake is associated with only a fraction of mass removal (1 of 55), following McGarr's mass-moment relationship. Lastly, these findings confirm ongoing seismicity in the Newcastle region since the beginning of the 19th century after a dormant period of 10,000 years of no seismicity.

  17. High Altitude Illnesses in Hawai‘i

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    High Altitude Headache (HAH), Acute Mountain Sickness (AMS), and High Altitude Cerebral Edema (HACE) are all high altitude related illnesses in order of severity from the mildly symptomatic to the potentially life-threatening. High altitude illnesses occur when travelers ascend to high altitudes too rapidly, which does not allow enough time for the body to adjust. Slow graded ascent to the desired altitude and termination of ascent if AMS symptoms present are keys to illness prevention. Early recognition and rapid intervention of AMS can halt progression to HACE. Pharmacologic prophylaxis with acetazolamide is a proven method of prevention and treatment of high altitude illness. If prevention fails then treatment modalities include supplemental oxygen, supportive therapy, hyperbaric treatment, and dexamethasone. Given the multitude of visitors to the mountains of Hawai‘i, high altitude illness will continue to persist as a prevalent local condition. This paper will emphasize the prevention and early diagnosis of AMS so that the illness does not progress to HACE. PMID:25478293

  18. 77 FR 3091 - IFR Altitudes; Miscellaneous Amendments

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-01-23

    ... Altitudes and Changeover Points Amendment 498 Effective Date February 9, 2012 From To MEA Sec. 95.10 Amber... From To MEA MAA Sec. 95.3000 Low Altitude RNAV Routes Sec. 95.3223 RNAV Route T223 Is Amended To Read... FIX Amott, AK FIX 18000 45000 Total Changeover From/To distance distance Point from Track angle...

  19. 76 FR 59890 - IFR Altitudes; Miscellaneous Amendments

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-09-28

    ... Altitudes and Changeover Points From To MEA MAA Sec. 95.4000 High Altitude RNAV Routes Sec. 95.4037 RNAV Route Q37 Is Added to Read FORT STOCKTON, TX VORTAC CAVRN, TX FIX *25000 45000 *18000--GNSS MEA *DME/DME/IRU MEA CAVRN, TX FIX YORUB, NM FIX *25000 45000 *18000--GNSS MEA *DME/DME/IRU MEA YORUB, NM FIX...

  20. Density Altitude Maps of Iran and Iraq

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1991-05-01

    standard, DA is lower than PA. DA can also be expressed as the altitude in the ICAO standard atmosphere at which a given density occurs. The maps...produced in this study show the altitude in the ICAO standard atmosphere at which surface density occurs.

  1. Strand I: Physical Health. Sensory Perception. Health Curriculum Materials Grades 4, 5, 6.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    New York State Education Dept., Albany. Bureau of Elementary Curriculum Development.

    GRADES OR AGES: Grades 4, 5, and 6. SUBJECT MATTER: Sensory perceptions, the organs involved, and eye and hearing care. ORGANIZATION AND PHYSICAL APPEARANCE: The guide is divided into six different sectional steps organized around a gradual, ascending understanding of the sense organs. OBJECTIVES AND ACTIVITIES: The material is divided into…

  2. Developmental functional adaptation to high altitude: review.

    PubMed

    Frisancho, A Roberto

    2013-01-01

    Various approaches have been used to understand the origins of the functional traits that characterize the Andean high-altitude native. Based on the conceptual framework of developmental functional adaptation which postulates that environmental influences during the period of growth and development have long lasting effects that may be expressed during adulthood, we initiated a series of studies addressed at determining the pattern of physical growth and the contribution of growth and development to the attainment of full functional adaptation to high-altitude of low and high altitude natives living under rural and urban conditions. Current research indicate that: (a) the pattern of growth at high altitude due to limited nutritional resources, physical growth in body size is delayed but growth in lung volumes is accelerated because of hypoxic stress); (b) low-altitude male and female urban natives can attain a full functional adaptation to high altitude by exposure to high-altitude hypoxia during the period of growth and development; (c) both experimental studies on animals and comparative human studies indicate that exposure to high altitude during the period of growth and development results in the attainment of a large residual lung volume; (d) this developmentally acquired enlarged residual lung volume and its associated increase in alveolar area when combined with the increased tissue capillarization and moderate increase in red blood cells and hemoglobin concentration contributes to the successful functional adaptation of the Andean high-altitude native to hypoxia; and (e) any specific genetic traits that are related to the successful functional adaptation of Andean high-altitude natives have yet to be identified.

  3. Diving at altitude: from definition to practice.

    PubMed

    Egi, S Murat; Pieri, Massimo; Marroni, Alessandro

    2014-01-01

    Diving above sea level has different motivations for recreational, military, commercial and scientific activities. Despite the apparently wide practice of inland diving, there are three major discrepancies about diving at altitude: threshold elevation that requires changes in sea level procedures; upper altitude limit of the applicability of these modifications; and independent validation of altitude adaptation methods of decompression algorithms. The first problem is solved by converting the normal fluctuation in barometric pressure to an altitude equivalent. Based on the barometric variations recorded from a meteorological center, it is possible to suggest 600 meters as a threshold for classifying a dive as an "altitude" dive. The second problem is solved by proposing the threshold altitude of aviation (2,400 meters) to classify "high" altitude dives. The DAN (Divers Alert Network) Europe diving database (DB) is analyzed to solve the third problem. The database consists of 65,050 dives collected from different dive computers. A total of 1,467 dives were found to be classified as altitude dives. However, by checking the elevation according to the logged geographical coordinates, 1,284 dives were disqualified because the altitude setting had been used as a conservative setting by the dive computer despite the fact that the dive was made at sea level. Furthermore, according to the description put forward in this manuscript, 72 dives were disqualified because the surface level elevation is lower than 600 meters. The number of field data (111 dives) is still very low to use for the validation of any particular method of altitude adaptation concerning decompression algorithms.

  4. Sleep at high altitude: guesses and facts.

    PubMed

    Bloch, Konrad E; Buenzli, Jana C; Latshang, Tsogyal D; Ulrich, Silvia

    2015-12-15

    Lowlanders commonly report a poor sleep quality during the first few nights after arriving at high altitude. Polysomnographic studies reveal that reductions in slow wave sleep are the most consistent altitude-induced changes in sleep structure identified by visual scoring. Quantitative spectral analyses of the sleep electroencephalogram have confirmed an altitude-related reduction in the low-frequency power (0.8-4.6 Hz). Although some studies suggest an increase in arousals from sleep at high altitude, this is not a consistent finding. Whether sleep instability at high altitude is triggered by periodic breathing or vice versa is still uncertain. Overnight changes in slow wave-derived encephalographic measures of neuronal synchronization in healthy subjects were less pronounced at moderately high (2,590 m) compared with low altitude (490 m), and this was associated with a decline in sleep-related memory consolidation. Correspondingly, exacerbation of breathing and sleep disturbances experienced by lowlanders with obstructive sleep apnea during a stay at 2,590 m was associated with poor performance in driving simulator tests. These findings suggest that altitude-related alterations in sleep may adversely affect daytime performance. Despite recent advances in our understanding of sleep at altitude, further research is required to better establish the role of gender and age in alterations of sleep at different altitudes, to determine the influence of acclimatization and of altitude-related illness, and to uncover the characteristics of sleep in highlanders that may serve as a study paradigm of sleep in patients exposed to chronic hypoxia due to cardiorespiratory disease.

  5. Jupiter's High-Altitude Clouds

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2007-01-01

    The New Horizons Multispectral Visible Imaging Camera (MVIC) snapped this incredibly detailed picture of Jupiter's high-altitude clouds starting at 06:00 Universal Time on February 28, 2007, when the spacecraft was only 2.3 million kilometers (1.4 million miles) from the solar system's largest planet. Features as small as 50 kilometers (30 miles) are visible. The image was taken through a narrow filter centered on a methane absorption band near 890 nanometers, a considerably redder wavelength than what the eye can see. Images taken through this filter preferentially pick out clouds that are relatively high in the sky of this gas giant planet because sunlight at the wavelengths transmitted by the filter is completely absorbed by the methane gas that permeates Jupiter's atmosphere before it can reach the lower clouds.

    The image reveals a range of diverse features. The south pole is capped with a haze of small particles probably created by the precipitation of charged particles into the polar regions during auroral activity. Just north of the cap is a well-formed anticyclonic vortex with rising white thunderheads at its core. Slightly north of the vortex are the tendrils of some rather disorganized storms and more pinpoint-like thunderheads. The dark 'measles' that appear a bit farther north are actually cloud-free regions where light is completely absorbed by the methane gas and essentially disappears from view. The wind action considerably picks up in the equatorial regions where giant plumes are stretched into a long wave pattern. Proceeding north of the equator, cirrus-like clouds are shredded by winds reaching speeds of up to 400 miles per hour, and more pinpoint-like thunderheads are visible. Although some of the famous belt and zone structure of Jupiter's atmosphere is washed out when viewed at this wavelength, the relatively thin North Temperate Belt shows up quite nicely, as does a series of waves just north of the belt. The north polar region of

  6. EVALUATION OF IMMUNOASSAY METHODS FOR DETERMINATION OF 3,5,6-TRICHLORO-2-PYRIDINOL IN MULTIPLE SAMPLE MEDIA

    EPA Science Inventory

    Two enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) methods were evaluated for the determination of 3,5,6-trichloro-2-pyridinol (3,5,6-TCP) in multiple sample media (dust, soil, food, and urine). The dust and soil samples were analyzed by the RaPID (TM) commercial immunoassay testing ...

  7. 17 CFR 5.6 - Maintenance of minimum financial requirements by retail foreign exchange dealers and futures...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... engaging in retail forex transactions. 5.6 Section 5.6 Commodity and Securities Exchanges COMMODITY FUTURES... forex transactions. (a) Each futures commission merchant offering or engaging in retail forex... engage in retail forex transactions and each person registered as a retail foreign exchange dealer or...

  8. 17 CFR 5.6 - Maintenance of minimum financial requirements by retail foreign exchange dealers and futures...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... engaging in retail forex transactions. 5.6 Section 5.6 Commodity and Securities Exchanges COMMODITY FUTURES... forex transactions. (a) Each futures commission merchant offering or engaging in retail forex... engage in retail forex transactions and each person registered as a retail foreign exchange dealer or...

  9. 17 CFR 5.6 - Maintenance of minimum financial requirements by retail foreign exchange dealers and futures...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... engaging in retail forex transactions. 5.6 Section 5.6 Commodity and Securities Exchanges COMMODITY FUTURES... forex transactions. (a) Each futures commission merchant offering or engaging in retail forex... engage in retail forex transactions and each person registered as a retail foreign exchange dealer or...

  10. 17 CFR 5.6 - Maintenance of minimum financial requirements by retail foreign exchange dealers and futures...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... engaging in retail forex transactions. 5.6 Section 5.6 Commodity and Securities Exchanges COMMODITY FUTURES... forex transactions. (a) Each futures commission merchant offering or engaging in retail forex... engage in retail forex transactions and each person registered as a retail foreign exchange dealer or...

  11. Nifty Alleles, a Plethora of Interactions, and Imagination Advance Understanding of Smc5/6's Roles with Chromosomes.

    PubMed

    Langston, Rachel E; Weinert, Ted

    2015-12-17

    The Smc5/6 complex is involved in DNA replication and repair, but why it is essential is less clear. In this issue of Molecular Cell, Menolfi et al. (2015) use cell cycle-specific alleles to link the essential function of Smc5/6 to resolving replication problems that persist into G2.

  12. Study on the metabolism of 5,6-methylenedioxy-2-aminoindane (MDAI) in rats: identification of urinary metabolites.

    PubMed

    Židková, Monika; Linhart, Igor; Balíková, Marie; Himl, Michal; Váňa, Lubomír; Vetýška, Michal; Páleníček, Tomáš; Lhotková, Eva; Dušek, Martin

    2016-07-12

    1. 5,6-Methylenedioxy-2-aminoindane (MDAI) is a member of aminoindane drug family with serotoninergic effect, which appeared on illicit drug market as a substitute for banned stimulating and entactogenic drugs. 2. Metabolism of MDAI, which has been hitherto unexplored, was studied in rats dosed with a subcutaneous dose of 20 mg MDAI.HCl/kg body weight. The urine of rats was collected within 24 h after dosing for analyses by HPLC-ESI-HRMS and GC/MS. 3. The main metabolic pathways proceeding in parallel were found to be oxidative demethylenation followed by O-methylation and N-acetylation. These pathways gave rise to five metabolites, namely, 5,6-dihydroxy-2-aminoindane, 5-hydroxy-6-methoxy-2-aminoindane, N-acetyl-5,6-methylenedioxy-2-aminoindane, N-acetyl-5,6-dihydroxy-2-aminoindane and N-acetyl-5-hydroxy-6-methoxy-2-aminoindane, which were found predominantly in the form of corresponding glucuronides and sulphates. However, the main portion of administered MDAI was excreted unchanged. 4. Minor metabolites formed primarily by hydroxylation at various sites include cis- and trans-1-hydroxy-5,6-methylenedioxy-2-aminoindane, 5,6-methylenedioxyindan-2-ol and 4-hydroxy-5,6-methylenedioxy-2-aminoindane. 5. Identification of all metabolites except for glucuronides, sulphates and tentatively identified 4-hydroxy-5,6-methylenedioxy-2-aminoindane was supported by synthesised reference standards.

  13. Comparing earthquake models for the Corinth rift for Mw>=5.5/6/6.5 (Greece)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boiselet, Aurélien; Scotti, Oona; Lyon-Caen, Hélène; Ford, Mary; Meyer, NIcolas; Bernard, Pascal

    2013-04-01

    The Corinth rift (Greece) is identified as a site of major importance for earthquake studies in Europe, producing one of the highest seismic activity and strain in the Euro-Mediterranean region. It is characterized by an asymmetrical structure, with the most active normal faults dipping north and a north-south extension rate measured by GPS increasing from 0.6 mm/year in the eastern part of the rift to 15 mm/year in the western part. Frequent seismic swarms and destructive earthquakes are observed in this area. The Corinth rift Laboratory (CRL, http://crlab.eu) european project investigates fault mechanics, its relationship with earthquakes, fluid flow and the related hazards in the western part of the rift, covering an area about 50 km by 40 km, between the city of Patras to the west and the city of Aigion to the east. As part of this project, within the CRL-SISCOR group, we construct earthquake forecast models (EFM) for M>=5.5/6/6.5 events of the Corinth rift area based on the in-depth seismotectonic studies available for this region. We first present the methodology used to construct the earthquake and fault databases and to quantify the associated uncertainties. We then propose EFM following two approaches: one based on the definition of seimotectonic areas with similar geologic or strain characteristics, the second one based on the definition of fault sources mapped at the surface as well as blind ones. In order to compute the probability of occurrence for M>=5.5/6/6.5 for seismotectonic areas, we analyse two earthquake catalogues available for Greece (National Observatory of Athens, Thessaloniki), apply two declustering methods (Reasenberg and Gardner) to construct a Poissonian earthquake catalogue and test the influence of the minimal magnitude (3.5; 4.0). We compare the impact of maximum magnitude and corner magnitude (Kagan 1997, 2002) estimations. We then apply the Weichert method to estimate the probability of occurrence of M>=5.5/6/6.5 based on

  14. High altitude syndromes at intermediate altitudes: a pilot study in the Australian Alps.

    PubMed

    Slaney, Graham; Cook, Angus; Weinstein, Philip

    2013-10-01

    Our hypothesis is that symptoms of high altitude syndromes are detectable even at intermediate altitudes, as commonly encountered under Australian conditions (<2500 m above sea level). High altitude medicine has long recognised several syndromes associated with rapid ascent to altitudes above 2500 m, including high altitude pulmonary oedema (HAPE), high altitude cerebral oedema (HACE) and high altitude flatus expulsion (HAFE). Symptoms of high altitude syndromes are of growing concern because of the global trend toward increasing numbers of tourists and workers exposed to both rapid ascent and sustained physical activity at high altitude. However, in Australia, high altitude medicine has almost no profile because of our relatively low altitudes by international standards. Three factors lead us to believe that altitude sickness in Australia deserves more serious consideration: Australia is subject to rapid growth in alpine recreational industries; altitude sickness is highly variable between individuals, and some people do experience symptoms already at 1500 m; and there is potential for an occupational health and safety issue amongst workers. To test this hypothesis we examined the relationship between any high altitude symptoms and a rapid ascent to an intermediate altitude (1800 m) by undertaking an intervention study in a cohort of eight medical clinic staff, conducted during July of the 2012 (Southern Hemisphere) ski season, using self-reporting questionnaires, at Mansfield (316 m above sea level) and at the Ski Resort of Mt Buller (1800 m), Victoria, Australia. The intervention consisted of ascent by car from Mansfield to Mt Buller (approx. 40 min drive). Participants completed a self-reporting questionnaire including demographic data and information on frequency of normal homeostatic processes (fluid intake and output, food intake and output, symptoms including thirst and headaches, and frequency of passing wind or urine). Data were recorded in hourly periods

  15. Effect of altitude on some blood factors and its stability after leaving the altitude.

    PubMed

    Hematy, Yones; Setorki, Mahbubeh; Razavi, Akram; Doudi, Monir

    2014-09-01

    The underlying mechanisms of altitude training are still a matter of controversial discussion. The aim of this study was to compare the hemoglobin concentration, red blood cell count and volume between normal and high altitude situations and their persistence after returning back from higher altitudes. The study population included male students of Ardal Branch, Islamic Azad University. Twelve apparently healthy individual with high level of physical activity, mean age of 22.6 ± 1.50 years were selected through purposive and available sampling method. In this study, blood samples were collected at different time and altitudes in order to compare the changes of Red Blood Cell (RBC), Mean Cell Hemoglobin (MCH), Mean Corpuscular Hemoglobin Concentration (MCHC) and Mean Cell Volume (MCV). The first blood sampling was conducted at the altitude of 1830 m. The subsequent blood samplings were conducted 48 and 72 h after reaching the altitude of 4000 m and 24, 48 and 72 h after returning back to the altitude of 1830 m. The statistical method used in this study was repeated measurement ANOVA. Red Blood Cell (RBC) changes between onset of climbing to 1830 m and 24, 48 and 2 h after sojourn at 1830 m height (after returning from 4000 m altitude) was significant. Mean Cell Hemoglobin (MCH) showed no significant change in any of the altitudes. MCHC changes between onset of moving toward altitude 1830 meters and 24, 48 and 72 h after sojourn at 1830 m height (after returning from 4000 m altitude) was also significant in addition, MCHC showed a significant difference between 24 h staying at 1830 m altitude with 48 and 72 h staying at 4000 m altitude. Mean Cell Volume (MCV) showed no significant difference between 48 and 72 h staying at 4000 m altitude and also between 24, 48 and 72 h staying at 1830 m altitude; however, there was a significant difference between onset of moving toward 1830 m altitude with 24, 48 and 72 h staying at 1830 m altitude and also 48 and 72 h staying at

  16. Postnatal cardiopulmonary adaptations to high altitude.

    PubMed

    Huicho, Luis

    2007-09-30

    Postnatal cardiopulmonary adaptations to high altitude constitute a key component of any set of responses developed to face high altitude hypoxia. Such responses are required ultimately to meet the energy demands necessary for adequate functioning at cell and organism level. After a brief insight on general and cardiopulmonary comparative studies in growing and adult organisms, differences and possible explanations for varying cardiopulmonary pathology, pulmonary artery hypertension, persistent right ventricular predominance and subacute high altitude pulmonary hypertension in different populations of children living at high altitude are discussed. Potential long-term implications of early chronic hypoxic exposure on later diseases are also presented. It is hoped that this review will help the practicing physician working at high altitude to make informed decisions concerning individual pediatric patients, specifically with regard to diagnosis and management of altitude-related cardiopulmonary pathology. Finally, plausibility and the knowledge-base of public health interventions to reduce the risks posed by suboptimal or inadequate postnatal cardiopulmonary responses to high altitude are discussed.

  17. [Sildenafil and exercise performance at altitude].

    PubMed

    Peidro, Roberto M

    2015-01-01

    Barometric pressure and partial oxygen pressure decrease with increasing altitude. Hypobaric hypoxia produced is responsible for altitude-related diseases and it can cause severe decrements in exercise performance. The physiological adaptations to the altitude are multiple and they contribute to alter different athletic qualities. The VO2 worsening could be associated to increased pulmonary vascular resistance and nitric oxide diffusion alteration. Performance impairments at altitude can also be accentuated by hypoxia-induced elevations in pulmonary arterial pressure. Clinical studies have demonstrated the beneficial effects of sildenafil on the treatment of pulmonary hypertension. These effects have led to suggest that its indication for competitions at altitude might improve athletic performance. The investigations demonstrate different results depending on the altitude level and times and intensities of exercise. Some studies show performance improvements, although not in all participants. Individual responses vary widely between different athletes. This presentation examines the effects of altitude on exercise capacity and shows studies about the use of sildenafil to improve sport performance. This text also discusses the possible side effects and implications for the use of sildenafil in athletes, indication that is not the basic one of the drug. The physicians must know in each athlete the individual sildenafil side effects that could arise and that would influence negatively on health and performance.

  18. Carbon monoxide studies at high altitude.

    PubMed

    McGrath, J J

    1988-01-01

    In high altitude areas, ambient carbon monoxide (CO) concentrations are rising because of the increasing number of new residents and tourists, and their concomitant use of motor vehicles and heating appliances. There are, however, comparatively few studies of the acute or chronic physiological effects that may be caused by inhaling CO at high altitude. There are data supporting the concept that the effects of breathing CO at high altitude are additive, and data suggesting that the effects may be more than additive. Visual sensitivity and flicker fusion frequency are reduced in humans inhaling CO at high altitude. One provocative study suggests that the increase in coronary capillarity seen with chronic altitude exposure may be blocked by CO. We exposed male, laboratory rats for 6 weeks to 100 ppm CO, 4676 m (15,000 ft) simulated high altitude (SHA), and CO at SHA. SHA increase hematocrit ratio (Hct) and right ventricle weight, but decreased body weight. CO increased Hct and left ventricle weight. Our results indicate that 100 ppm CO does not exacerbate the effects produced by exposure to 4676 m altitude.

  19. High Altitude Launch for a Practical SSTO

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Landis, Geoffrey A.; Denis, Vincent

    2003-01-01

    Existing engineering materials allow the construction of towers to heights of many kilometers. Orbital launch from a high altitude has significant advantages over sea-level launch due to the reduced atmospheric pressure, resulting in lower atmospheric drag on the vehicle and allowing higher rocket engine performance. high-altitude launch sites are particularly advantageous for single-stage to orbit (SSTO) vehicles, where the payload is typically 2% of the initial launch mass. An earlier paper enumerated some of the advantages of high altitude launch of SSTO vehicles. In this paper, we calculate launch trajectories for a candidate SSTO vehicle, and calculate the advantage of launch at launch altitudes 5 to 25 kilometer altitudes above sea level. The performance increase can be directly translated in to increased payload capability to orbit, ranging from 5 to 20% increase in the mass to orbit. For a candidate vehicle with an initial payload fraction of 2% of gross lift-off weight, this corresponds to 31 % increase in payload (for 5-km launch altitude) to 122% additional payload (for 25-km launch altitude).

  20. High Altitude Launch for a Practical SSTO

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Landis, Geoffrey A.; Denis, Vincent

    2003-01-01

    Existing engineering materials allow the construction of towers to heights of many kilometers. Orbital launch from a high altitude has significant advantages over sea-level launch due to the reduced atmospheric pressure, resulting in lower atmospheric drag on the vehicle and allowing higher rocket engine performance. High-altitude launch sites are particularly advantageous for single-stage to orbit (SSTO) vehicles, where the payload is typically 2 percent of the initial launch mass. An earlier paper enumerated some of the advantages of high altitude launch of SSTO vehicles. In this paper, we calculate launch trajectories for a candidate SSTO vehicle, and calculate the advantage of launch at launch altitudes 5 to 25 kilometer altitudes above sea level. The performance increase can be directly translated into increased payload capability to orbit, ranging from 5 to 20 percent increase in the mass to orbit. For a candidate vehicle with an initial payload fraction of 2 percent of gross lift-off weight, this corresponds to 31 percent increase in payload (for 5-kilometer launch altitude) to 122 percent additional payload (for 25-kilometer launch altitude).

  1. Photophysical Properties of a 1,2,3,4,5,6-Hexasubstituted Fullerene Derivative

    PubMed Central

    Chin, Khin K.; Chuang, Shih-Ching; Hernandez, Billy; Selke, Matthias; Foote, Christopher S.

    2008-01-01

    The photophysical properties of a novel 1,2,3,4,5,6-hexasusbstituted fullerene derivative (1) are examined in this study. In addition to the ground state absorption spectrum of 1 we report its triplet-triplet absorption spectrum and molar extinction coefficient (ΔεT-T), as well as the triplet quantum yield (ΦT), lifetime (τT), and energy (ET). The saturation of a single six-member ring on the fullerene cage results in significant changes in the triplet state properties as compared to that of pristine C60. The triplet-triplet absorption spectrum shows a hypsochromic shift in long wavelength absorption and both the triplet state lifetime and triplet quantum yield are decreased. The triplet energy was found to be similar to that of C60. In addition, the quantum yield (ΦΔ) of singlet oxygen generated by 1 was calculated and is found to be significantly less than in the case of C60. PMID:17181318

  2. Pathways for Excited State Nonradiative Decay of 5,6-Dihydroxyindole, a Building Block of Eumelanin.

    PubMed

    Datar, Avdhoot; Hazra, Anirban

    2017-03-17

    The photophysics of 5,6-dihydroxyindole (DHI) following excitation to its lowest two optically bright states has been investigated using the complete active space self consistent field method with second order perturbative energy corrections. There is a barrierless pathway for the molecule to relax from the second lowest bright state (2(1)ππ*) to the lowest bright state (1(1)ππ*). The 1(1)ππ* state has a conical intersection with the optically dark 1(1)πσ* state, which further intersects with the ground state along the NH and OH stretching coordinates. Moreover, the 1(1)ππ* has out-of-plane conical intersections with the ground state. For accessing the conical intersections with the ground state, there are energy barriers, which are higher than the available energy following vertical excitation to the lowest bright state. The nature of the calculated deactivation pathways helps interpret the experimentally estimated lifetimes of the lowest two bright states of DHI. The relatively long excited state lifetimes suggests that isolated DHI in monomeric form cannot rationalize the ultrafast deactivation property of eumelanin.

  3. The preparation and biological activity of methyl 5,6-epoxy-retinoate

    PubMed Central

    Morgan, B.; Thompson, J. N.

    1966-01-01

    1. Oxidation of methyl retinoate with monoperphthalic acid gave methyl 5,6-epoxyretinoate, obtained as pale-yellow crystals, m.p. 89°. 2. The structure of the epoxide was confirmed by its ultraviolet, infrared, nuclear-magnetic-resonance and mass spectra. 3. The biological properties of the epoxide were investigated in male and female rats, and were found to be qualitatively similar to those of retinoic acid and methyl retinoate. 4. When administered to male rats reared on a vitamin A-free diet, the epoxide permitted growth although it did not maintain good general health. 5. Rats given a vitamin A-free diet and supplements of the epoxide had degenerate testes. 6. Female rats, maintained on a vitamin A-free diet containing retinoic acid and given supplements of the epoxide during pregnancy, resorbed their foetuses and failed to deliver litters. 7. The threshold of the electroretinogram response in male rats reared on a vitamin A-free diet with supplements of the epoxide was elevated above normal and was similar to that of rats maintained with methyl retinoate. 8. The oral administration of the epoxy acid to rats did not result in the accumulation of the corresponding epoxy alcohol in their livers. PMID:16742464

  4. Pillar[5,6]arene-functionalized silicon dioxide: synthesis, characterization, and adsorption of herbicide.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Ting; Song, Nan; Yu, Hao; Yang, Ying-Wei

    2015-02-03

    A layer of synthetic supramolecular macrocycles, that is, perhydroxyl-pillar[5]arene and perhydroxyl-pillar[6]arene, has been covalently attached to hydrophilic silica supports through Si-O-Si linkages with a coverage of up to 250 μmol pillar[5,6]arenes/g to form novel absorbent hybrid materials. Their adsorption toward a typical herbicide, namely, paraquat, from its aqueous solution has been investigated. Kinetic studies disclosed that paraquat adsorption fits a first-order kinetic model. Equilibrium adsorption data could be explained very well by the Langmuir equation. The pillar[6]arene-modified materials showed more obvious adsorption as compared with pillar[5]arene-modified ones and the saturation adsorption quantity reached about 0.20 mmol of paraquat per gram of materials. The entire process of adsorption was endothermic, and significantly an elevated temperature led to an increase in the adsorption quantity. This new type of pillarene-based adsorbent materials can be considered as a potential adsorbent for harmful substances removal from wastewaters.

  5. DNA binding studies of 3, 5, 6-trichloro-2-pyridinol pesticide metabolite.

    PubMed

    Kashanian, Soheila; Shariati, Zohreh; Roshanfekr, Hamideh; Ghobadi, Sirous

    2012-07-01

    3, 5, 6-Trichloro-2-pyridinol (TCP) is a stable metabolite of two major pesticides, Chlopyrifos insecticide and Triclopyr herbicide, which are widely used in the world. The potential health hazard associated with TCP is identified due to its high affinity to the DNA molecule. Therefore, in this study, the interaction of native calf thymus DNA with TCP has been investigated using spectrophotometric, circular dichroism (CD), spectrofluorometric, viscometric and voltametric techniques. It was found that TCP molecules could interact with DNA via a groove-binding mode, as evidenced by hyperchromism, with no red shift in the UV absorption band of TCP, no changes in K(b) values in the presence of salt, no significant changes in the specific viscosity and CD spectra of DNA, and a decrease in peak currents with no shift in the voltamogram. In addition, TCP is able to release Hoechst 33258, a strong groove binder, in the DNA solutions. The results are indicative of the groove-binding mode of TCP to DNA.

  6. Brazilian Red Propolis Attenuates Hypertension and Renal Damage in 5/6 Renal Ablation Model

    PubMed Central

    Teles, Flávio; da Silva, Tarcilo Machado; da Cruz Júnior, Francisco Pessoa; Honorato, Vitor Hugo; de Oliveira Costa, Henrique; Barbosa, Ana Paula Fernandes; de Oliveira, Sabrina Gomes; Porfírio, Zenaldo; Libório, Alexandre Braga; Borges, Raquel Lerner; Fanelli, Camilla

    2015-01-01

    The pathogenic role of inflammation and oxidative stress in chronic kidney disease (CKD) is well known. Anti-inflammatories and antioxidant drugs has demonstrated significant renoprotection in experimental nephropathies. Moreover, the inclusion of natural antioxidants derived from food and herbal extracts (such as polyphenols, curcumin and lycopene) as an adjuvant therapy for slowing CKD progression has been largely tested. Brazilian propolis is a honeybee product, whose anti-inflammatory, antimicrobial and antioxidant effects have been widely shown in models of sepsis, cancer, skin irritation and liver fibrosis. Furthermore, previous studies demonstrated that this compound promotes vasodilation and reduces hypertension. However, potential renoprotective effects of propolis in CKD have never been investigated. The aim of this study was to evaluate the effects of a subtype of Brazilian propolis, the Red Propolis (RP), in the 5/6 renal ablation model (Nx). Adult male Wistar rats underwent Nx and were divided into untreated (Nx) and RP-treated (Nx+RP) groups, after 30 days of surgery; when rats already exhibited marked hypertension and proteinuria. Animals were observed for 90 days from the surgery day, when Nx+RP group showed significant reduction of hypertension, proteinuria, serum creatinine retention, glomerulosclerosis, renal macrophage infiltration and oxidative stress, compared to age-matched untreated Nx rats, which worsened progressively over time. In conclusion, RP treatment attenuated hypertension and structural renal damage in Nx model. Reduction of renal inflammation and oxidative stress could be a plausible mechanism to explain this renoprotection. PMID:25607548

  7. Brazilian red propolis attenuates hypertension and renal damage in 5/6 renal ablation model.

    PubMed

    Teles, Flávio; da Silva, Tarcilo Machado; da Cruz Júnior, Francisco Pessoa; Honorato, Vitor Hugo; de Oliveira Costa, Henrique; Barbosa, Ana Paula Fernandes; de Oliveira, Sabrina Gomes; Porfírio, Zenaldo; Libório, Alexandre Braga; Borges, Raquel Lerner; Fanelli, Camilla

    2015-01-01

    The pathogenic role of inflammation and oxidative stress in chronic kidney disease (CKD) is well known. Anti-inflammatories and antioxidant drugs has demonstrated significant renoprotection in experimental nephropathies. Moreover, the inclusion of natural antioxidants derived from food and herbal extracts (such as polyphenols, curcumin and lycopene) as an adjuvant therapy for slowing CKD progression has been largely tested. Brazilian propolis is a honeybee product, whose anti-inflammatory, antimicrobial and antioxidant effects have been widely shown in models of sepsis, cancer, skin irritation and liver fibrosis. Furthermore, previous studies demonstrated that this compound promotes vasodilation and reduces hypertension. However, potential renoprotective effects of propolis in CKD have never been investigated. The aim of this study was to evaluate the effects of a subtype of Brazilian propolis, the Red Propolis (RP), in the 5/6 renal ablation model (Nx). Adult male Wistar rats underwent Nx and were divided into untreated (Nx) and RP-treated (Nx+RP) groups, after 30 days of surgery; when rats already exhibited marked hypertension and proteinuria. Animals were observed for 90 days from the surgery day, when Nx+RP group showed significant reduction of hypertension, proteinuria, serum creatinine retention, glomerulosclerosis, renal macrophage infiltration and oxidative stress, compared to age-matched untreated Nx rats, which worsened progressively over time. In conclusion, RP treatment attenuated hypertension and structural renal damage in Nx model. Reduction of renal inflammation and oxidative stress could be a plausible mechanism to explain this renoprotection.

  8. Expression of Spgatae, the Strongylocentrotus purpuratus ortholog of vertebrate GATA4/5/6 factors.

    PubMed

    Lee, Pei Yun; Davidson, Eric H

    2004-12-01

    Spgatae is the sea urchin ortholog of the vertebrate gata4/5/6 genes, as confirmed by phylogenetic analysis. The accumulation of Spgatae transcripts during embryonic development and the spatial pattern of expression are reported here. Expression was first detected in the 15 h blastula. The number of Spgatae RNA molecules increases steadily during blastula stages, with expression peaking during gastrulation. After gastrulation is complete, the level of expression decreases until the end of embryogenesis. Whole mount in situ hybridization showed that Spgatae transcripts were first detected in a ring of prospective mesoderm cells in the vegetal plate. Spgatae expression then expands to include the entire vegetal plate at the mesenchyme blastula stage. During gastrulation Spgatae is expressed at the blastopore, and at prism stage strongly in the hindgut and midgut but not foregut, and also in mesoderm cells at the tip of the archenteron. Towards the end of embryogenesis, expression in the hindgut decreases. The terminal pattern of expression is in midgut plus coelomic pouches.

  9. Performance of Portable Ventilators at Altitude

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2015-03-30

    Deploying ventilators that can maintain a consistent tidal volume ( VT ) delivery at various altitudes is imperative for lung protection when...and adult VT (250-750 mL) at 0 and 20 cm H2O positive end expiratory pressure and at inspired oxygen of 0.21 and 1.0. Airway pressure, volume, and...calibrated pneumotachograph connected to a training test lung in an altitude chamber. Set VT and delivered VT and changes in VT at each altitude were

  10. High-Altitude Hydration System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Parazynski, Scott E.; Orndoff, Evelyne; Bue, Grant C.; Schaefbauer, Mark E.; Urban, Kase

    2010-01-01

    Three methods are being developed for keeping water from freezing during high-altitude climbs so that mountaineers can remain hydrated. Three strategies have been developed. At the time of this reporting two needed to be tested in the field and one was conceptual. The first method is Passive Thermal Control Using Aerogels. This involves mounting the fluid reservoir of the climber s canteen to an inner layer of clothing for better heat retention. For the field test, bottles were mounted to the inner fleece layer of clothing, and then aerogel insulation was placed on the outside of the bottle, and circumferentially around the drink straw. When climbers need to drink, they can pull up the insulated straw from underneath the down suit, take a sip, and then put it back into the relative warmth of the suit. For the field test, a data logger assessed the temperatures of the water reservoir, as well as near the tip of the drink straw. The second method is Passive Thermal Control with Copper-Shielded Drink Straw and Aerogels, also mounted to inner layers of clothing for better heat retention. Braided wire emanates from the inside of the fleece jacket layer, and continues up and around the drink straw in order to use body heat to keep the system-critical drink straw warm enough to keep water in the liquid state. For the field test, a data logger will be used to compare this with the above concept. The third, and still conceptual, method is Active Thermal Control with Microcontroller. If the above methods do not work, microcontrollers and tape heaters have been identified that could keep the drink straw warm even under extremely cold conditions. Power requirements are not yet determined because the thermal environment inside the down suit relative to the external environment has not been established. A data logger will be used to track both the external and internal temperatures of the suit on a summit day.

  11. Risk assessment of high altitude free flight commercial aircraft operations

    SciTech Connect

    Kimura, C.Y.; Sandquist, G.M.; Slaughter, D.M.; Sanzo, D.L.

    1998-04-23

    A quantitative model is under development to assess the safety and efficiency of commercial aircraft operations under the Free Flight Program proposed for air traffic control for the US National Airspace System. The major objective of the Free Flight Program is to accommodate the dramatic growth anticipated in air traffic in the US. However, the potential impacts upon aircraft safety from implementing the Program have not been fully explored and evaluated. The model is directed at assessing aircraft operations at high altitude over the continental US airspace since this action is the initial step for Free Flight. Sequential steps with analysis, assessment, evaluation, and iteration will be required to satisfactorily accomplish the complete transition of US commercial aircraft traffic operations.

  12. Essential Roles of the Smc5/6 Complex in Replication through Natural Pausing Sites and Endogenous DNA Damage Tolerance

    PubMed Central

    Menolfi, Demis; Delamarre, Axel; Lengronne, Armelle; Pasero, Philippe; Branzei, Dana

    2015-01-01

    Summary The essential functions of the conserved Smc5/6 complex remain elusive. To uncover its roles in genome maintenance, we established Saccharomyces cerevisiae cell-cycle-regulated alleles that enable restriction of Smc5/6 components to S or G2/M. Unexpectedly, the essential functions of Smc5/6 segregated fully and selectively to G2/M. Genetic screens that became possible with generated alleles identified processes that crucially rely on Smc5/6 specifically in G2/M: metabolism of DNA recombination structures triggered by endogenous replication stress, and replication through natural pausing sites located in late-replicating regions. In the first process, Smc5/6 modulates remodeling of recombination intermediates, cooperating with dissolution activities. In the second, Smc5/6 prevents chromosome fragility and toxic recombination instigated by prolonged pausing and the fork protection complex, Tof1-Csm3. Our results thus dissect Smc5/6 essential roles and reveal that combined defects in DNA damage tolerance and pausing site-replication cause recombination-mediated DNA lesions, which we propose to drive developmental and cancer-prone disorders. PMID:26698660

  13. Smc5/6 Is a Telomere-Associated Complex that Regulates Sir4 Binding and TPE.

    PubMed

    Moradi-Fard, Sarah; Sarthi, Jessica; Tittel-Elmer, Mireille; Lalonde, Maxime; Cusanelli, Emilio; Chartrand, Pascal; Cobb, Jennifer A

    2016-08-01

    SMC proteins constitute the core members of the Smc5/6, cohesin and condensin complexes. We demonstrate that Smc5/6 is present at telomeres throughout the cell cycle and its association with chromosome ends is dependent on Nse3, a subcomponent of the complex. Cells harboring a temperature sensitive mutant, nse3-1, are defective in Smc5/6 localization to telomeres and have slightly shorter telomeres. Nse3 interacts physically and genetically with two Rap1-binding factors, Rif2 and Sir4. Reduction in telomere-associated Smc5/6 leads to defects in telomere clustering, dispersion of the silencing factor, Sir4, and a loss in transcriptional repression for sub-telomeric genes and non-coding telomeric repeat-containing RNA (TERRA). SIR4 recovery at telomeres is reduced in cells lacking Smc5/6 functionality and vice versa. However, nse3-1/ sir4 Δ double mutants show additive defects for telomere shortening and TPE indicating the contribution of Smc5/6 to telomere homeostasis is only in partial overlap with SIR factor silencing. These findings support a role for Smc5/6 in telomere maintenance that is separate from its canonical role(s) in HR-mediated events during replication and telomere elongation.

  14. Smc5/6 Is a Telomere-Associated Complex that Regulates Sir4 Binding and TPE

    PubMed Central

    Chartrand, Pascal; Cobb, Jennifer A.

    2016-01-01

    SMC proteins constitute the core members of the Smc5/6, cohesin and condensin complexes. We demonstrate that Smc5/6 is present at telomeres throughout the cell cycle and its association with chromosome ends is dependent on Nse3, a subcomponent of the complex. Cells harboring a temperature sensitive mutant, nse3-1, are defective in Smc5/6 localization to telomeres and have slightly shorter telomeres. Nse3 interacts physically and genetically with two Rap1-binding factors, Rif2 and Sir4. Reduction in telomere-associated Smc5/6 leads to defects in telomere clustering, dispersion of the silencing factor, Sir4, and a loss in transcriptional repression for sub-telomeric genes and non-coding telomeric repeat-containing RNA (TERRA). SIR4 recovery at telomeres is reduced in cells lacking Smc5/6 functionality and vice versa. However, nse3-1/ sir4 Δ double mutants show additive defects for telomere shortening and TPE indicating the contribution of Smc5/6 to telomere homeostasis is only in partial overlap with SIR factor silencing. These findings support a role for Smc5/6 in telomere maintenance that is separate from its canonical role(s) in HR-mediated events during replication and telomere elongation. PMID:27564449

  15. Smc5/6 Coordinates Formation and Resolution of Joint Molecules with Chromosome Morphology to Ensure Meiotic Divisions

    PubMed Central

    Blitzblau, Hannah G.; Newcombe, Sonya; Chan, Andrew Chi-ho; Newnham, Louise; Li, Zhaobo; Gray, Stephen; Herbert, Alex D.; Arumugam, Prakash; Hochwagen, Andreas; Hunter, Neil; Hoffmann, Eva

    2013-01-01

    During meiosis, Structural Maintenance of Chromosome (SMC) complexes underpin two fundamental features of meiosis: homologous recombination and chromosome segregation. While meiotic functions of the cohesin and condensin complexes have been delineated, the role of the third SMC complex, Smc5/6, remains enigmatic. Here we identify specific, essential meiotic functions for the Smc5/6 complex in homologous recombination and the regulation of cohesin. We show that Smc5/6 is enriched at centromeres and cohesin-association sites where it regulates sister-chromatid cohesion and the timely removal of cohesin from chromosomal arms, respectively. Smc5/6 also localizes to recombination hotspots, where it promotes normal formation and resolution of a subset of joint-molecule intermediates. In this regard, Smc5/6 functions independently of the major crossover pathway defined by the MutLγ complex. Furthermore, we show that Smc5/6 is required for stable chromosomal localization of the XPF-family endonuclease, Mus81-Mms4Eme1. Our data suggest that the Smc5/6 complex is required for specific recombination and chromosomal processes throughout meiosis and that in its absence, attempts at cell division with unresolved joint molecules and residual cohesin lead to severe recombination-induced meiotic catastrophe. PMID:24385939

  16. Non-SMC Element 2 (NSMCE2) of the SMC5/6 Complex Helps to Resolve Topological Stress

    PubMed Central

    Verver, Dideke E.; Zheng, Yi; Speijer, Dave; Hoebe, Ron; Dekker, Henk L.; Repping, Sjoerd; Stap, Jan; Hamer, Geert

    2016-01-01

    The structural maintenance of chromosomes (SMC) protein complexes shape and regulate the structure and dynamics of chromatin, thereby controlling many chromosome-based processes such as cell cycle progression, differentiation, gene transcription and DNA repair. The SMC5/6 complex is previously described to promote DNA double-strand breaks (DSBs) repair by sister chromatid recombination, and found to be essential for resolving recombination intermediates during meiotic recombination. Moreover, in budding yeast, SMC5/6 provides structural organization and topological stress relief during replication in mitotically dividing cells. Despite the essential nature of the SMC5/6 complex, the versatile mechanisms by which SMC5/6 functions and its molecular regulation in mammalian cells remain poorly understood. By using a human osteosarcoma cell line (U2OS), we show that after the CRISPR-Cas9-mediated removal of the SMC5/6 subunit NSMCE2, treatment with the topoisomerase II inhibitor etoposide triggered an increased sensitivity in cells lacking NSMCE2. In contrast, NSMCE2 appeared not essential for a proper DNA damage response or cell survival after DSB induction by ionizing irradiation (IR). Interestingly, by way of immunoprecipitations (IPs) and mass spectrometry, we found that the SMC5/6 complex physically interacts with the DNA topoisomerase II α (TOP2A). We therefore propose that the SMC5/6 complex functions in resolving TOP2A-mediated DSB-repair intermediates generated during replication. PMID:27792189

  17. Decadally resolved quantitative temperature reconstruction spanning 5.6 ka at Kurupa Lake, Arctic Alaska

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boldt, B. R.; Kaufman, D. S.; Briner, J. P.

    2012-12-01

    Pre-instrumental quantitative temperature records, fundamental for placing recent warming in the context of long-term, natural climate variability, are scarce in Arctic Alaska. New non-destructive high-resolution core scanning methods provide a means of constructing downcore inference models for various paleoclimate signals. Here we use visible reflectance spectroscopy (VIS-RS) to measure organic pigment (chlorophyll derivative) concentration in sediments from Kurupa Lake to quantitatively reconstruct air temperature in the north-central Brooks Range, Alaska during the past 5.6 ka. Kurupa Lake (N 68.35°, W -154.61°) is 29.7 km2, 40 m at maximum depth, and is fed by several tributaries, including meltwater from eight rapidly disappearing cirque glaciers. A 6.2-m-long core composed of finely laminated (sub-mm to 5 cm) coarse-grained clays to medium-grained silts was collected in 2010 from the primary depocenter of Kurupa Lake (depth = 34 m). The age model for the core is based on six radiocarbon ages and a Pu profile to capture the 1963 spike and 1953 onset of Pu deposition from atmospheric weapons testing. The split-core face was scanned with a Konica Minolta CM-2600d spectrometer at 2 mm intervals, corresponding to 1-2 years. The relative absorption band depth at 660-670 nm (RABD660-670) was used to quantify total sedimentary organic pigments (primarily diagenetic products of chlorophyll-a) as a proxy for primary productivity. Gridded temperature data from the NCEP reanalysis dataset were used for this study because regional weather stations in the Brooks Range are scarce and records discontinuous. The gridded data perform well in this area and are highly correlated (r = 0.88) with the instrumental record from Barrow. Mean May-through-October (warm half-year) temperature (5-year smoothed) from NCEP reanalysis data (130 years) correlates with inferred organic pigment content from Kurupa Lake (r = 0.76, p < 0.001). We chose k-fold cross-validation (k = 10) to

  18. Advanced Gas Reactor (AGR)-5/6/7 Fuel Irradiation Experiments in the Advanced Test Reactor

    SciTech Connect

    A. Joseph Palmer; David A. Petti; S. Blaine Grover

    2014-04-01

    The United States Department of Energy’s Very High Temperature Reactor (VHTR) Advanced Gas Reactor (AGR) Fuel Development and Qualification Program will be irradiating up to seven separate low enriched uranium (LEU) tri-isotopic (TRISO) particle fuel (in compact form) experiments in the Advanced Test Reactor (ATR) located at the Idaho National Laboratory (INL). These irradiations and fuel development are being accomplished to support development of the next generation reactors in the United States. The goals of the irradiation experiments are to provide irradiation performance data to support fuel process development, to qualify fuel for normal operating conditions, to support development and validation of fuel performance and fission product transport models and codes, and to provide irradiated fuel and materials for post irradiation examination (PIE) and safety testing. The experiments, which each consist of at least five separate capsules, are being irradiated in an inert sweep gas atmosphere with individual on-line temperature monitoring and control of each capsule. The sweep gases also have on-line fission product monitoring the effluent from each capsule to track performance of the fuel during irradiation. The first two experiments (designated AGR-1 and AGR-2), have been completed. The third and fourth experiments have been combined into a single experiment designated AGR-3/4, which started its irradiation in December 2011 and is currently scheduled to be completed in April 2014. The design of the fuel qualification experiment, designated AGR-5/6/7, is well underway and incorporates lessons learned from the three previous experiments. Various design issues will be discussed with particular details related to selection of thermometry.

  19. Surveys of Luminous Quasars in the Post-reionization Universe at z=5-6

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Jinyi; Wu, Xue-Bing; Fan, Xiaohui; Wang, Feige; McGreer, Ian D.; Bian, Fuyan; Green, Richard F.; Yang, Qian; Jiang, Linhua; Wang, Ran; Yi, Weimin; UHS Team

    2017-01-01

    Quasars at z ~ 5 to 6, the post-reionization epoch, are crucial tools to explore the evolution of intergalactic medium (IGM), quasar evolution and the early super-massive black hole growth. The quasar luminosity function (QLF) and its evolution at z >~ 5 is also needed to estimate the contribution of quasars to the ionizing background during and after the reionization epoch. McGreer et al. (2013) provided the first complete measurement of the z ~ 5 QLF. However, their work focused on faint quasars over a small sky area; there were only 8 quasars with M1450 < -27.3. We have carried out a new quasar survey of luminous quasars at 4.7 < z < 5.4 over 14555 deg^2 with high completeness, selected using a combination of SDSS and WISE optical/NIR colors . Using this luminous z ~ 5 quasar sample, we present a new determination of the z ~ 5 QLF and discuss the evolution model of QLF at high redshift. Based on surveys of luminous quasars at z > 4, previous studies have concluded that the number density evolution steepens at high redshift, such that luminous quasars decline as a population more steeply at higher redshift (z ~ 5.5) than from z=4 to 5. However, quasars at redshifts 5.3 < z < 5.7 have been very challenging to select using conventional color selections, due to their similar optical colors to late-type stars, especially M dwarfs, resulting in a glaring redshift gap in quasar redshift distribution. We have developed a new selection technique for z ~ 5.5 quasars based on optical, near- and mid-infrared photometric data. Up to date, we have constructed an uniform luminous z ~ 5.5 quasar sample with 26 new quasars. Our final completed sample of quasars at z=5-6 will be used to study QLF, evolution model and IGM evolution in the post-deionization universe.

  20. 2,5,6,9,10-Pentabromocyclododecanols (PBCDOHs): a new class of HBCD transformation products.

    PubMed

    Heeb, Norbert V; Zindel, Daniel; Schweizer, W Bernd; Lienemann, Peter

    2012-07-01

    Pentabromocyclododecanols (PBCDOHs) are potential environmental transformation products of hexabromocyclododecanes (HBCDs). They are also potential stage one metabolites of biological HBCD transformations. Herein, we present analytical evidence that PBCDOHs are also constituents of technical HBCDs and flame-proofed polystyrenes (FP-PSs). PBCDOHs are possibly formed during the synthesis of technical HBCD, presumably during the bromination of cyclododecatrienes in aqueous isobutanol together with isobutoxypentabromocyclododecanes (iBPBCDs), which have been identified in these materials recently. Of the 64 stereoisomers possible, eight pairs of enantiomers, named α-, β-, γ-, δ-, ε-, ζ-, η-, and θ-PBCDOHs were separated with a combination of normal-, reversed- and chiral-phase LC. Crystal structure analysis revealed the stereochemistry of the α-PBCDOH pair of enantiomers, which was assigned to (1S,2S,5R,6S,9S,10R)-2,5,6,9,10-pentabromocyclododecanol and its enantiomer. Mass spectrometric data are in accordance with the expected isotope patterns. On a C(18)-RP-column, the polar PBCDOHs eluted before the HBCD and iBPBCD classes of compounds. PBCDOHs were also found in FP-PS materials. The stereoisomer patterns varied considerably in these materials like those of HBCDs and iBPBCDs. Expanded polystyrenes were rich in late-eluting stereoisomers, similar to technical HBCD mixtures. Extruded polystyrenes contained more of the polar, faster-eluting isomers. The presented chromatographic and analytical methods allow a stereoisomer-specific search for PBCDOHs in biota samples, which might have experienced metabolic HBCD transformation reactions. Besides this potential source, it has to be recognized that PBCDOHs are by-products in technical HBCDs and in flame-proofed polystyrenes. Therefore, it is likely that PBCDOHs and iBPBCDs are released to the environment together with HBCD-containing plastic materials.

  1. Paul Bikle's Record Altitude Sailplane Flight

    NASA Video Gallery

    On a cold and windy February afternoon 50 years ago, the late Paul Bikle, then director of NASA's Flight Research Center, soared into the stratosphere with one goal in mind - a world altitude recor...

  2. Aeronautic Instruments. Section II : Altitude Instruments

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mears, A H; Henrickson, H B; Brombacher, W G

    1923-01-01

    This report is Section two of a series of reports on aeronautic instruments (Technical Report nos. 125 to 132, inclusive). This section discusses briefly barometric altitude determinations, and describes in detail the principal types of altimeters and barographs used in aeronautics during the recent war. This is followed by a discussion of performance requirements for such instruments and an account of the methods of testing developed by the Bureau of Standards. The report concludes with a brief account of the results of recent investigations. For accurate measurements of altitude, reference must also be made to thermometer readings of atmospheric temperature, since the altitude is not fixed by atmospheric pressure alone. This matter is discussed in connection with barometric altitude determination.

  3. High-altitude cerebral oedema mimicking stroke

    PubMed Central

    Yanamandra, Uday; Gupta, Amul; Patyal, Sagarika; Varma, Prem Prakash

    2014-01-01

    High-altitude cerebral oedema (HACO) is the most fatal high-altitude illness seen by rural physicians practising in high-altitude areas. HACO presents clinically with cerebellar ataxia, features of raised intracranial pressure (ICP) and coma. Early identification is important as delay in diagnosis can be fatal. We present two cases of HACO presenting with focal deficits mimicking stroke. The first patient presented with left-sided hemiplegia associated with the rapid deterioration in the sensorium. Neuroimaging revealed features suggestive of vasogenic oedema. The second patient presented with monoplegia of the lower limb. Neuroimaging revealed perfusion deficit in anterior cerebral artery territory. Both patients were managed with dexamethasone and they improved dramatically. Clinical picture and neuroimaging closely resembled acute ischaemic stroke in both cases. Thrombolysis in these patients would have been disastrous. Recent travel to high altitude, young age, absence of atherosclerotic risk factors and features of raised ICP concomitantly directed the diagnosis to HACO. PMID:24671373

  4. Altitude Testing of Large Liquid Propellant Engines

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Maynard, Bryon; Raines, Nickey

    2008-01-01

    Altitude Testing of the J2-X engine at 100,000 feet (start capability). Chemical Steam Generation for providing vacuum. Project Started Mar 07. Test Stand Activation around Late 2010. J-2X Testing around early 2011.

  5. High altitude medicine for family physicians.

    PubMed Central

    McMurray, S. J.

    1994-01-01

    High altitude medicine deals with a continuum of diseases ranging from a mild discomfort to serious ailments affecting all organ systems, including the lungs, brain, and eyes. Decreased oxygen tension is the primary cause. The main principles of prevention are staging and graded ascent to allow acclimatization. Adventure travel to high altitude destinations is becoming increasingly popular; family physicians should be informed of the medical problems associated with such travel. Images p712-a p715-a p716-a PMID:8199523

  6. 76 FR 11675 - IFR Altitudes; Miscellaneous Amendments

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-03-03

    ... Altitudes and Changeover Points From To MEA Sec. 95.1001 Direct Routes--U.S. Color Routes Sec. 95.516 Green... MEA MAA Sec. 95.3000 Low Altitude RNAV Routes Sec. 95.3278 RNAV Route T278 Is Amended To Read in Part... *5000 *1500--MOCA *2000--GNSS MEA Sec. 95.6020 VOR Federal Airway V20 Is Amended To Read in...

  7. Python Engine Installed in Altitude Wind Tunnel

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1949-01-01

    An engine mechanic checks instrumentation prior to an investigation of engine operating characteristics and thrust control of a large turboprop engine with counter-rotating propellers under high-altitude flight conditions in the 20-foot-dianieter test section of the Altitude Wind Tunnel at the Lewis Flight Propulsion Laboratory of the National Advisory Committee for Aeronautics, Cleveland, Ohio, now known as the John H. Glenn Research Center at Lewis Field.

  8. Cabin cruising altitudes for regular transport aircraft.

    PubMed

    2008-04-01

    The adverse physiological effects of flight, caused by ascent to altitude and its associated reduction in barometric pressure, have been known since the first manned balloon flights in the 19th century. It soon became apparent that the way to protect the occupant of an aircraft from the effects of ascent to altitude was to enclose either the individual, or the cabin, in a sealed or pressurized environment. Of primary concern in commercial airline transport operations is the selection of a suitable cabin pressurization schedule that assures adequate oxygen partial pressures for all intended occupants. For the past several decades, 8000 ft has been accepted as the maximum operational cabin pressure altitude in the airline industry. More recent research findings on the physiological and psycho-physiological effects of mild hypoxia have provided cause for renewed discussion of the "acceptability" of a maximum cabin cruise altitude of 8000 ft; however, we did not find sufficient scientific data to recommend a change in the cabin altitude of transport category aircraft. The Aerospace Medical Association (AsMA) should support further research to evaluate the safety, performance and comfort of occupants at altitudes between 5000 and 10,000 ft.

  9. Early history of high-altitude physiology.

    PubMed

    West, John B

    2016-02-01

    High-altitude physiology can be said to have begun in 1644 when Torricelli described the first mercury barometer and wrote the immortal words "We live submerged at the bottom of an ocean of the element air." Interestingly, the notion of atmospheric pressure had eluded his teacher, the great Galileo. Blaise Pascal was responsible for describing the fall in pressure with increasing altitude, and Otto von Guericke gave a dramatic demonstration of the enormous force that could be developed by atmospheric pressure. Robert Boyle learned of Guericke's experiment and, with Robert Hooke, constructed the first air pump that allowed small animals to be exposed to a low pressure. Hooke also constructed a small low-pressure chamber and exposed himself to a simulated altitude of about 2400 meters. With the advent of ballooning, humans were rapidly exposed to very low pressures, sometimes with tragic results. For example, the French balloon, Zénith, rose to over 8000 m, and two of the three aeronauts succumbed to the hypoxia. Paul Bert was the first person to clearly state that the deleterious effects of high altitude were caused by the low partial pressure of oxygen (PO2), and later research was accelerated by high-altitude stations and expeditions to high altitude.

  10. Curcumin prevents mitochondrial dynamics disturbances in early 5/6 nephrectomy: Relation to oxidative stress and mitochondrial bioenergetics.

    PubMed

    Aparicio-Trejo, Omar Emiliano; Tapia, Edilia; Molina-Jijón, Eduardo; Medina-Campos, Omar Noel; Macías-Ruvalcaba, Norma Angélica; León-Contreras, Juan Carlos; Hernández-Pando, Rogelio; García-Arroyo, Fernando E; Cristóbal, Magdalena; Sánchez-Lozada, Laura Gabriela; Pedraza-Chaverri, José

    2016-11-01

    Five-sixths nephrectomy (5/6NX) is a widely used model to study the mechanisms leading to renal damage in chronic kidney disease (CKD). However, early alterations on renal function, mitochondrial dynamics, and oxidative stress have not been explored yet. Curcumin is an antioxidant that has shown nephroprotection in 5/6NX-induced renal damage. The aim of this study was to explore the effect of curcumin on early mitochondrial alterations induced by 5/6NX in rats. In isolated mitochondria, 5/6NX-induced hydrogen peroxide production was associated with decreased activity of complexes I and V, decreased activity of antioxidant enzymes, alterations in oxygen consumption and increased MDA-protein adducts. In addition, it was found that 5/6NX shifted mitochondrial dynamics to fusion, which was evidenced by increased optic atrophy 1 and mitofusin 1 (Mfn1) and decreased fission 1 and dynamin-related protein 1 expressions. These data were confirmed by morphological analysis and immunoelectron microscopy of Mfn-1. All the above-described mechanisms were prevented by curcumin. Also, it was found that curcumin prevented renal dysfunction by improving renal blood flow and the total antioxidant capacity induced by 5/6NX. Moreover, in glomeruli and proximal tubules 5/6NX-induced superoxide anion production by uncoupled nitric oxide synthase (NOS) and nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide phosphate oxidase (NOX) dependent way, this latter was associated with increased phosphorylation of serine 304 of p47phox subunit of NOX. In conclusion, this study shows that curcumin pretreatment decreases early 5/6NX-induced altered mitochondrial dynamics, bioenergetics, and oxidative stress, which may be associated with the preservation of renal function. © 2016 BioFactors, 00(00):000000, 2016.

  11. Chromatin association of the SMC5/6 complex is dependent on binding of its NSE3 subunit to DNA

    PubMed Central

    Zabrady, Katerina; Adamus, Marek; Vondrova, Lucie; Liao, Chunyan; Skoupilova, Hana; Novakova, Marketa; Jurcisinova, Lenka; Alt, Aaron; Oliver, Antony W.; Lehmann, Alan R.; Palecek, Jan J.

    2016-01-01

    SMC5/6 is a highly conserved protein complex related to cohesin and condensin, which are the key components of higher-order chromatin structures. The SMC5/6 complex is essential for proliferation in yeast and is involved in replication fork stability and processing. However, the precise mechanism of action of SMC5/6 is not known. Here we present evidence that the NSE1/NSE3/NSE4 sub-complex of SMC5/6 binds to double-stranded DNA without any preference for DNA-replication/recombination intermediates. Mutations of key basic residues within the NSE1/NSE3/NSE4 DNA-binding surface reduce binding to DNA in vitro. Their introduction into the Schizosaccharomyces pombe genome results in cell death or hypersensitivity to DNA damaging agents. Chromatin immunoprecipitation analysis of the hypomorphic nse3 DNA-binding mutant shows a reduced association of fission yeast SMC5/6 with chromatin. Based on our results, we propose a model for loading of the SMC5/6 complex onto the chromatin. PMID:26446992

  12. Nitric oxide in adaptation to altitude.

    PubMed

    Beall, Cynthia M; Laskowski, Daniel; Erzurum, Serpil C

    2012-04-01

    This review summarizes published information on the levels of nitric oxide gas (NO) in the lungs and NO-derived liquid-phase molecules in the acclimatization of visitors newly arrived at altitudes of 2500 m or more and adaptation of populations whose ancestors arrived thousands of years ago. Studies of acutely exposed visitors to high altitude focus on the first 24-48 h with just a few extending to days or weeks. Among healthy visitors, NO levels in the lung, plasma, and/or red blood cells fell within 2h, but then returned toward baseline or slightly higher by 48 h and increased above baseline by 5 days. Among visitors ill with high-altitude pulmonary edema at the time of the study or in the past, NO levels were lower than those of their healthy counterparts. As for highland populations, Tibetans had NO levels in the lung, plasma, and red blood cells that were at least double and in some cases orders of magnitude greater than other populations regardless of altitude. Red blood cell-associated nitrogen oxides were more than 200 times higher. Other highland populations had generally higher levels although not to the degree shown by Tibetans. Overall, responses of those acclimatized and those presumed to be adapted are in the same direction, although the Tibetans have much larger responses. Missing are long-term data on lowlanders at altitude showing how similar they become to the Tibetan phenotype. Also missing are data on Tibetans at low altitude to see the extent to which their phenotype is a response to the immediate environment or expressed constitutively. The mechanisms causing the visitors' and the Tibetans' high levels of NO and NO-derived molecules at altitude remain unknown. Limited data suggest processes including hypoxic upregulation of NO synthase gene expression, hemoglobin-NO reactions, and genetic variation. Gains in understanding will require integrating appropriate methods and measurement techniques with indicators of adaptive function under hypoxic

  13. Nitric oxide in adaptation to altitude

    PubMed Central

    Laskowski, Daniel; Erzurum, Serpil C.

    2012-01-01

    This review summarizes published information on levels of nitric oxide gas (NO) in the lungs and NO-derived liquid phase molecules in the acclimatization of visitors newly arrived at altitudes of 2500m or more and adaptation of populations whose ancestors arrived thousands of years ago. Studies of acutely exposed visitors to high altitude focus on the first 24–48 hours with just a few extending to days or weeks. Among healthy visitors, NO levels in the lung, plasma and/or red blood cells fell within three hours, but then returned toward baseline or slightly higher by 48 hours, and increased above baseline by 5 days. Among visitors ill with high-altitude pulmonary edema at the time of the study or in the past, NO levels were lower than their healthy counterparts. As for highland populations, Tibetans had NO levels in the lung, plasma and red blood cells that were at least double and in some cases orders of magnitude greater than other populations regardless of altitude. Red blood cell associated nitrogen oxides were more than two hundred times higher. Other highland populations had generally higher levels although not to the degree showed by Tibetans. Overall, responses of those acclimatized and those presumed to be adapted are in the same direction although the Tibetans have much larger responses. Missing are long-term data on lowlanders at altitude showing how similar they become to the Tibetan phenotype. Also missing are data on Tibetans at low altitude to see the extent to which their phenotype is a response to the immediate environment or expressed constitutively. The mechanisms causing the visitors’ and the Tibetans’ high levels of NO and NO-derived molecules at altitude remain unknown. Limited data suggest processes including hypoxic upregulation of NO synthase gene expression, hemoglobin-NO reactions and genetic variation. Gains in understanding will require integrating appropriate methods and measurement techniques with indicators of adaptive function

  14. Neutral Wind Observations below 200 km altitudes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Watanabe, S.; Abe, T.; Habu, H.; Kakinami, Y.; Larsen, M. F.; Pfaff, R. F., Jr.; Yamamoto, M.

    2015-12-01

    Neutral Wind Observations below 200 km altitudesS. Watanabe1, T. Abe2, H. Habu2, Y. Kakinami3, M. Larsen4, R. Pfaff5, M. Yamamoto6, M-Y. Yamamoto31Hokkaido University/Hokkaido Information University, 2JAXA/ISAS, 3Kochi University of Technology, 4Clemson University, 5NASA/Goddard Space Flight Center, 6Kyoto University, Neutral wind in the thermosphere is one of the key parameters to understand the ionosphere-thermosphere coupling process. JAXA/ISAS successfully launched sounding rockets from Uchinoura Space Center (USC) on September 2, 2007, January 12, 2012, and July 20, 2013, and NASA launched sounding rockets from Kwajalein on May 7, 2013 and from Wallops on July 4, 2013. The rockets installed Lithium and/or TMA canisters as well as instruments for plasma and electric and magnetic fields. The atomic Lithium gases were released at altitudes between 150 km and 300 km in the evening on September 2, 2007, at altitude of ~100 km in the morning on January 12, 2012, at altitude of ~120km in the midnight on July 20, 2013, at altitude between 150 km and 300 km in the evening on May 7, 2013 and at altitude of ~150 km in the noon on July 4, 2013. The Lithium atoms were scattering sunlight by resonance scattering with wavelength of 670nm. However, the Lithium atoms scattered moon light on July 20, 2013. The moon light scattering is the first time to use for thermospheric wind measurement in the midnight. The Lithium clouds/trails and TMA trails showed clearly the neutral wind shears and atmospheric waves at ~150 km altitude in the lower thermosphere for all local time.

  15. Vaccine-Induced Anti-HBs Level in 5-6 Year-Old Malnourished Children

    PubMed Central

    Karimi, Mehran; Raee, Ali; Baghianimoghadam, Behnam; Fallahzadeh, Mohammad Hossein

    2013-01-01

    Background Malnutrition is the most common cause of immune deficiency. It results in reduced secretion of T-cells and B-cell-stimulating factors leading to declining of special immunoglobulins. On the other hand, hepatitis B, as a major world health problem, can be prevented effectively by vaccination. Three doses of hepatitis B virus (HBV) vaccine induce protective levels of anti-hepatitis B surface (anti-HBs) in 95% of healthy children. This level decreases gradually over time. Objectives The goal of this study was to assess anti-HBs in malnourished children, who confronted to some degrees of immune deficiency. Patients and Methods This is a cross-sectional study conducted during May to August 2010 in therapeutic clinics of Yazd, Iran. Samples were selected simply and consecutively among 5-6 year-old children with a history of three doses of HBV vaccine in infancy. On the basis of World Health Organization’s definition on malnutrition, which considers anthropometric measurements, malnourished children entered the study. Totally 83 cases (37 boys and 46 girls) were gathered and classified into three groups of mild, moderate, and severe malnutrition. One milliliter of venous blood was taken and anti-HBs were tested by enzyme linked immunosorbant assay (ELISA). Results Overall, seroprotection rate and geometric mean titer (GMT) of anti-HBs were 60.2% and 15.47 ± 10.92 mIU/mL, respectively. Seroprotection rate was 71.4%, 55.2%, and 72.7% in mild, moderate, and severe malnourished children, respectively. GMT was 30.78 mIU/mL, 12.15 mIU/mL, and 22.95 mIU/mL in these groups, respectively. None of these two indices were significant in these groups (P = 0.471, P = 0.364). Seroprotection rate and GMT were 54.1% and 13.26 ± 11.59 mIU/mL in boys, and 65.2% and 17.5 ± 10.59 mIU/mL in girls, respectively, showing no significant relationship with gender (P = 0.302, P = 0.602). Lowest seroprotection rate was in stunted cases (47.1%) and highest in wasted children (77

  16. 14 CFR 23.1527 - Maximum operating altitude.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Maximum operating altitude. 23.1527 Section... Information § 23.1527 Maximum operating altitude. (a) The maximum altitude up to which operation is allowed... established. (b) A maximum operating altitude limitation of not more than 25,000 feet must be established...

  17. 14 CFR 23.1527 - Maximum operating altitude.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Maximum operating altitude. 23.1527 Section... Information § 23.1527 Maximum operating altitude. (a) The maximum altitude up to which operation is allowed... established. (b) A maximum operating altitude limitation of not more than 25,000 feet must be established...

  18. 14 CFR 23.1527 - Maximum operating altitude.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Maximum operating altitude. 23.1527 Section... Information § 23.1527 Maximum operating altitude. (a) The maximum altitude up to which operation is allowed... established. (b) A maximum operating altitude limitation of not more than 25,000 feet must be established...

  19. 14 CFR 91.119 - Minimum safe altitudes: General.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 2 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Minimum safe altitudes: General. 91.119... § 91.119 Minimum safe altitudes: General. Except when necessary for takeoff or landing, no person may operate an aircraft below the following altitudes: (a) Anywhere. An altitude allowing, if a power...

  20. 14 CFR 91.119 - Minimum safe altitudes: General.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 2 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Minimum safe altitudes: General. 91.119... § 91.119 Minimum safe altitudes: General. Except when necessary for takeoff or landing, no person may operate an aircraft below the following altitudes: (a) Anywhere. An altitude allowing, if a power...

  1. 14 CFR 91.119 - Minimum safe altitudes: General.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 2 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Minimum safe altitudes: General. 91.119... § 91.119 Minimum safe altitudes: General. Except when necessary for takeoff or landing, no person may operate an aircraft below the following altitudes: (a) Anywhere. An altitude allowing, if a power...

  2. 14 CFR 23.1527 - Maximum operating altitude.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Maximum operating altitude. 23.1527 Section... Information § 23.1527 Maximum operating altitude. (a) The maximum altitude up to which operation is allowed... established. (b) A maximum operating altitude limitation of not more than 25,000 feet must be established...

  3. 14 CFR 91.119 - Minimum safe altitudes: General.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 2 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Minimum safe altitudes: General. 91.119... § 91.119 Minimum safe altitudes: General. Except when necessary for takeoff or landing, no person may operate an aircraft below the following altitudes: (a) Anywhere. An altitude allowing, if a power...

  4. 14 CFR 91.119 - Minimum safe altitudes: General.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 2 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Minimum safe altitudes: General. 91.119... § 91.119 Minimum safe altitudes: General. Except when necessary for takeoff or landing, no person may operate an aircraft below the following altitudes: (a) Anywhere. An altitude allowing, if a power...

  5. 14 CFR 23.1527 - Maximum operating altitude.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Maximum operating altitude. 23.1527 Section... Information § 23.1527 Maximum operating altitude. (a) The maximum altitude up to which operation is allowed... established. (b) A maximum operating altitude limitation of not more than 25,000 feet must be established...

  6. Inactivation of endothelial proprotein convertase 5/6 decreases collagen deposition in the cardiovascular system: role of fibroblast autophagy.

    PubMed

    Marchesi, Chiara; Essalmani, Rachid; Lemarié, Catherine A; Leibovitz, Eyal; Ebrahimian, Talin; Paradis, Pierre; Seidah, Nabil G; Schiffrin, Ernesto L; Prat, Annik

    2011-11-01

    Proprotein convertase (PC) 5/6 belongs to a family of secretory proteases involved in proprotein proteolysis. Several studies suggest a role for PC5/6 in cardiovascular disease. Because lethality at birth of mice lacking PC5/6 precluded elucidation of its function in the adult, we generated mice in which the gene of PC5/6 (pcsk5) is specifically inactivated in endothelial cells (ecKO), which are viable and do not exhibit overt abnormalities. In order to uncover the function of PC5/6 in the cardiovascular system, the effect of ecKO was studied in aging mice. In 16 to 18-month-old ecKO mice, the left ventricle (LV) mass, media cross-sectional area of aorta and coronary arteries, and media-to-lumen ratio of mesenteric arteries were decreased. The LV presented decreased diastolic function, and mesenteric arteries showed decreased stiffness. Collagen was decreased in the LV myocardial interstitium and perivascularly in coronary arteries and aorta. Cardiovascular hypotrophy likely develops with aging, since no significant changes were observed in 2-month-old ecKO mice. Fibroblasts, as a source of collagen in myocardium and vasculature, may play a role in the decrease in collagen deposition. Fibroblasts co-cultured with ecKO endothelial cells showed decreased collagen production, decreased insulin-like growth factor (IGF)-1/Akt/mTOR signaling, and enhanced autophagic activation. PC5/6 inactivation in endothelial cells results in cardiovascular hypotrophy associated with decreased collagen deposition, decreased LV diastolic function, and vascular stiffness, suggesting a trophic role of endothelial PC5/6 in the cardiovascular system, likely mediated by IGF-1/Akt/mTOR signaling and control of autophagy.

  7. Responses of the autonomic nervous system in altitude adapted and high altitude pulmonary oedema subjects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mathew, Lazar; Purkayastha, S. S.; Jayashankar, A.; Radhakrishnan, U.; Sen Gupta, J.; Nayar, H. S.

    1985-06-01

    Studies were carried out to ascertain the role of sympatho-parasympathetic responses in the process of adaptation to altitude. The assessment of status of autonomic balance was carried out in a group of 20 young male subjects by recording their resting heart rate, blood pressure, oral temperature, mean skin temperature, extremity temperatures, pupillary diameter, cold pressor response, oxygen consumption, cardioacceleration during orthostasis and urinary excretion of catecholamines; in a thermoneutral laboratory. The same parameters were repeated on day 3 and at weekly intervals for a period of 3 weeks, after exposing them to 3,500 m; and also after return to sea level. At altitude, similar studies were carried out in a group of 10 acclimatized lowlanders, 10 high altitude natives and 6 patients who had recently recovered from high altitude pulmonary oedema. In another phase, similar studies were done in two groups of subjects, one representing 15 subjects who had stayed at altitude (3,500 4,000 m) without any ill effects and the other comprising of 10 subjects who had either suffered from high altitude pulmonary oedema (HAPO) or acute mountain sickness (AMS). The results revealed sympathetic overactivity on acute induction to altitude which showed gradual recovery on prolonged stay, the high altitude natives had preponderance to parasympathetic system. Sympathetic preponderance may not be an essential etiological factor for the causation of maladaptation syndromes.

  8. Altitude Registration of Limb-Scattered Radiation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Moy, Leslie; Bhartia, Pawan K.; Jaross, Glen; Loughman, Robert; Kramarova, Natalya; Chen, Zhong; Taha, Ghassan; Chen, Grace; Xu, Philippe

    2017-01-01

    One of the largest constraints to the retrieval of accurate ozone profiles from UV backscatter limb sounding sensors is altitude registration. Two methods, the Rayleigh scattering attitude sensing (RSAS) and absolute radiance residual method (ARRM), are able to determine altitude registration to the accuracy necessary for long-term ozone monitoring. The methods compare model calculations of radiances to measured radiances and are independent of onboard tracking devices. RSAS determines absolute altitude errors, but, because the method is susceptible to aerosol interference, it is limited to latitudes and time periods with minimal aerosol contamination. ARRM, a new technique introduced in this paper, can be applied across all seasons and altitudes. However, it is only appropriate for relative altitude error estimates. The application of RSAS to Limb Profiler (LP) measurements from the Ozone Mapping and Profiler Suite (OMPS) on board the Suomi NPP (SNPP) satellite indicates tangent height (TH) errors greater than 1 km with an absolute accuracy of +/-200 m. Results using ARRM indicate a approx. 300 to 400m intra-orbital TH change varying seasonally +/-100 m, likely due to either errors in the spacecraft pointing or in the geopotential height (GPH) data that we use in our analysis. ARRM shows a change of approx. 200m over 5 years with a relative accuracy (a long-term accuracy) of 100m outside the polar regions.

  9. High altitude pulmonary edema in mountain climbers.

    PubMed

    Korzeniewski, Krzysztof; Nitsch-Osuch, Aneta; Guzek, Aneta; Juszczak, Dariusz

    2015-04-01

    Every year thousands of ski, trekking or climbing fans travel to the mountains where they stay at the altitude of more than 2500-3000m above sea level or climb mountain peaks, often exceeding 7000-8000m. High mountain climbers are at a serious risk from the effects of adverse environmental conditions prevailing at higher elevations. They may experience health problems resulting from hypotension, hypoxia or exposure to low temperatures; the severity of those conditions is largely dependent on elevation, time of exposure as well as the rate of ascent and descent. A disease which poses a direct threat to the lives of mountain climbers is high altitude pulmonary edema (HAPE). It is a non-cardiogenic pulmonary edema which typically occurs in rapidly climbing unacclimatized lowlanders usually within 2-4 days of ascent above 2500-3000m. It is the most common cause of death resulting from the exposure to high altitude. The risk of HAPE rises with increased altitude and faster ascent. HAPE incidence ranges from an estimated 0.01% to 15.5%. Climbers with a previous history of HAPE, who ascent rapidly above 4500m have a 60% chance of illness recurrence. The aim of this article was to present the relevant details concerning epidemiology, pathophysiology, clinical symptoms, prevention, and treatment of high altitude pulmonary edema among climbers in the mountain environment.

  10. [Effects of high altitude on bronchial asthma].

    PubMed

    Schultze-Werninghaus, G

    2008-03-01

    Sojourns in the high mountains have been recommended to patients with asthma for many decades. It is the aim of this contribution to summarise the published studies about the effects of a stay at > 1500 m above sea level on asthmatic patients. These data from 428 adolescent and adult patients indicate an improvement of asthma symptoms and lung function during sojourns at high altitude. In many patients a reduction of the steroid therapy was achievable. Profound changes in the immune system have been demonstrated at high altitude, with a reduction of B- and T-helper cell activation. Total and mite-specific immunoglobulin E antibodies decrease significantly during longer sojourns. These changes are associated with a reduction of airway inflammation (e. g., reduction of eosinophil activation, NO exhalation and bronchial hyper-responsiveness). The fact that also patients with non-allergic asthma demonstrate a reduction of their airway inflammation at high altitude suggests that the high altitude climate has beneficial effects on asthma beyond the effects of allergen avoidance. High UV exposure and low humidity could be important additional factors, to explain the reductions in asthma severity in the high mountain climate. Larger controlled studies should be performed to prove the positive effects of the high altitude climate on asthma.

  11. Altitude registration of limb-scattered radiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moy, Leslie; Bhartia, Pawan K.; Jaross, Glen; Loughman, Robert; Kramarova, Natalya; Chen, Zhong; Taha, Ghassan; Chen, Grace; Xu, Philippe

    2017-01-01

    One of the largest constraints to the retrieval of accurate ozone profiles from UV backscatter limb sounding sensors is altitude registration. Two methods, the Rayleigh scattering attitude sensing (RSAS) and absolute radiance residual method (ARRM), are able to determine altitude registration to the accuracy necessary for long-term ozone monitoring. The methods compare model calculations of radiances to measured radiances and are independent of onboard tracking devices. RSAS determines absolute altitude errors, but, because the method is susceptible to aerosol interference, it is limited to latitudes and time periods with minimal aerosol contamination. ARRM, a new technique introduced in this paper, can be applied across all seasons and altitudes. However, it is only appropriate for relative altitude error estimates. The application of RSAS to Limb Profiler (LP) measurements from the Ozone Mapping and Profiler Suite (OMPS) on board the Suomi NPP (SNPP) satellite indicates tangent height (TH) errors greater than 1 km with an absolute accuracy of ±200 m. Results using ARRM indicate a ˜ 300 to 400 m intra-orbital TH change varying seasonally ±100 m, likely due to either errors in the spacecraft pointing or in the geopotential height (GPH) data that we use in our analysis. ARRM shows a change of ˜ 200 m over ˜ 5 years with a relative accuracy (a long-term accuracy) of ±100 m outside the polar regions.

  12. Wind study for high altitude platform design

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Strganac, T. W.

    1979-01-01

    An analysis of upper air winds was performed to define the wind environment at potential operating altitudes for high altitude powered platform concepts. Wind conditions of the continental United States, Pacific area (Alaska to Sea of Japan), and European area (Norwegian and Mediterranean Sea) were obtained using a representative network of sites selected based upon adequate high altitude sampling, geographic dispersion, and observed upper wind patterns. A data base of twenty plus years of rawinsonde gathered wind information was used in the analysis. Annual variations from surface to 10 mb pressure altitude were investigated to encompass the practical operating range for the platform concepts. Parametric analysis for the United States and foreign areas was performed to provide a basis for vehicle system design tradeoffs. This analysis of wind magnitudes indicates the feasibility of annual operation at a majority of sites and more selective seasonal operation for the extreme conditions between the pressure altitudes of 100 to 25 mb based upon the assumed design speeds.

  13. Microscale synthesis of isotopically labeled R-[6-xH]N5,N10-methylene-5,6,7,8-tetrahydrofolate as a cofactor for thymidylate synthase.

    PubMed

    Agrawal, Nitish; Mihai, Cornelia; Kohen, Amnon

    2004-05-01

    A one-pot synthesis of isotopically labeled R-[6-xH]N5,N10-methylene-5,6,7,8-tetrahydrofolate (CH2H4F) is presented, where x=1, 2, or 3 represents hydrogen, deuterium, or tritium, respectively. The current procedure offers high-yield, high-purity, and microscale-quantity synthesis. In this procedure, two enzymes were used simultaneously in the reaction mixture. The first was Thermoanaerobium brockii alcohol dehydrogenase, which stereospecifically catalyzed a hydride transfer from C-2-labeled isopropanol to the re face of oxidized nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide phosphate to form R-[4-xH]-labeled reduced nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide phosphate. The second enzyme, Escherichia coli dihydrofolate reductase, used the xH to reduce 7,8-dihydrofolate (H2F) to form S-[6-xH]5,6,7,8-tetrahydrofolate (S-[6-xH]H4F). The enzymatic reactions were followed by chemical trapping of S-[6-xH]H4F with formaldehyde to form the final product. Product purification was carried out in a single step by reverse phase high-pressure liquid chromatography separation followed by lyophilization. Two analytical methods were developed to follow the reaction progress. Finally, the utility of the labeled cofactor in mechanistic studies of thymidylate synthase is demonstrated by measuring the tritium kinetic isotope effect on the enzyme's second order rate constant.

  14. Microwave-Assisted Synthesis of 2-Aryl-2-oxazolines, 5,6-Dihydro-4H-1,3-oxazines, and 4,5,6,7-Tetrahydro-1,3-oxazepines.

    PubMed

    Mollo, María C; Orelli, Liliana R

    2016-12-02

    The first general procedure for the synthesis of 5- to 7-membered cyclic iminoethers by microwave-assisted cyclization of ω-amido alcohols promoted by polyphosphoric acid (PPA) esters is presented. 2-Aryl-2-oxazolines and 5,6-dihydro-4H-1,3-oxazines were efficiently prepared using ethyl polyphosphate/CHCl3. Trimethylsilyl polyphosphate in solvent-free conditions allowed for the synthesis of hitherto-unreported 4,5,6,7-tetrahydro-1,3-oxazepines. The method involves good to excellent yields and short reaction times.The reaction mechanism and the role of PPA esters were investigated in a chiral substrate.

  15. In vivo functions of the proprotein convertase PC5/6 during mouse development: Gdf11 is a likely substrate

    PubMed Central

    Essalmani, Rachid; Zaid, Ahmed; Marcinkiewicz, Jadwiga; Chamberland, Ann; Pasquato, Antonella; Seidah, Nabil G.; Prat, Annik

    2008-01-01

    The proprotein convertase PC5/6 cleaves protein precursors after basic amino acids and is essential for implantation in CD1/129/Sv/C57BL/6 mixed-background mice. Conditional inactivation of Pcsk5 in the epiblast but not in the extraembryonic tissue bypassed early embryonic lethality but resulted in death at birth. PC5/6-deficient embryos exhibited Gdf11-related phenotypes such as altered anteroposterior patterning with extra vertebrae and lack of tail and kidney agenesis. They also exhibited Gdf11-independent phenotypes, such as a smaller size, multiple hemorrhages, collapsed alveoli, and retarded ossification. In situ hybridization revealed overlapping PC5/6 and Gdf11 mRNA expression patterns. In vitro and ex vivo analyses showed that the selectivity of PC5/6 for Gdf11 essentially resides in the presence of a P1′ Asn in the RSRR↓N cleavage motif. This work identifies Gdf11 as a likely in vivo specific substrate of PC5/6 and opens the way to the identification of other key substrates of this convertase. PMID:18378898

  16. Repeated cocaine weakens GABAB-Girk signaling in Layer 5/6 pyramidal neurons in the prelimbic cortex

    PubMed Central

    Hearing, Matthew; Kotecki, Lydia; de Velasco, Ezequiel Marron Fernandez; Fajardo-Serrano, Ana; Luján, Rafael; Wickman, Kevin

    2013-01-01

    Summary Repeated cocaine exposure triggers adaptations in Layer 5/6 glutamatergic neurons in the medial prefrontal cortex (mPFC) that promote behavioral sensitization and drug-seeking behavior. While suppression of metabotropic inhibitory signaling has been implicated in these behaviors, underlying mechanisms are unknown. Here, we show that Girk/KIR3 channels mediate most of the GABAB receptor (GABABR)-dependent inhibition of Layer 5/6 pyramidal neurons in the mPFC and that repeated cocaine suppresses this pathway. This adaptation was selective for GABABR-dependent Girk signaling in Layer 5/6 pyramidal neurons of the prelimbic cortex (PrLC) and involved a D1/5 dopamine receptor- and phosphorylation-dependent internalization of GABABR and Girk channels. Persistent suppression of Girk signaling in Layer 5/6 of the dorsal mPFC enhanced cocaine-induced locomotor activity and occluded behavioral sensitization. Thus, the cocaine-induced suppression of GABABR-Girk signaling in Layer 5/6 pyramidal neurons of the prelimbic cortex appears to represent an early adaptation critical for promoting addiction-related behavior. PMID:24094109

  17. Pulmonary Embolism Masquerading as High Altitude Pulmonary Edema at High Altitude.

    PubMed

    Pandey, Prativa; Lohani, Benu; Murphy, Holly

    2016-12-01

    Pandey, Prativa, Benu Lohani, and Holly Murphy. Pulmonary embolism masquerading as high altitude pulmonary edema at high altitude. High Alt Med Biol. 17:353-358, 2016.-Pulmonary embolism (PE) at high altitude is a rare entity that can masquerade as or occur in conjunction with high altitude pulmonary edema (HAPE) and can complicate the diagnosis and management. When HAPE cases do not improve rapidly with descent, other diagnoses, including PE, ought to be considered. From 2013 to 2015, we identified eight cases of PE among 303 patients with initial diagnosis of HAPE. Upon further evaluation, five had deep vein thrombosis (DVT). One woman had a contraceptive ring and seven patients had no known thrombotic risks. PE can coexist with or mimic HAPE and should be considered in patients presenting with shortness of breath from high altitude regardless of thrombotic risk.

  18. Pulmonary Embolism Masquerading as High Altitude Pulmonary Edema at High Altitude

    PubMed Central

    Lohani, Benu; Murphy, Holly

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Pandey, Prativa, Benu Lohani, and Holly Murphy. Pulmonary embolism masquerading as high altitude pulmonary edema at high altitude. High Alt Med Biol. 17:353–358, 2016.—Pulmonary embolism (PE) at high altitude is a rare entity that can masquerade as or occur in conjunction with high altitude pulmonary edema (HAPE) and can complicate the diagnosis and management. When HAPE cases do not improve rapidly with descent, other diagnoses, including PE, ought to be considered. From 2013 to 2015, we identified eight cases of PE among 303 patients with initial diagnosis of HAPE. Upon further evaluation, five had deep vein thrombosis (DVT). One woman had a contraceptive ring and seven patients had no known thrombotic risks. PE can coexist with or mimic HAPE and should be considered in patients presenting with shortness of breath from high altitude regardless of thrombotic risk. PMID:27768392

  19. Customized altitude-azimuth mount for a raster-scanning Fourier transform spectrometer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Durrenberger, Jed E.; Gutman, William M.; Gammill, Troy D.; Grover, Dennis H.

    1996-10-01

    Applications of the Army Research Laboratory Mobile Atmospheric Spectrometer Remote Sensing Rover required development of a customized computer-controlled mount to satisfy a variety of requirements within a limited budget. The payload was designed to operate atop a military electronics shelter mounted on a 4-wheel drive truck to be above most atmospheric ground turbulence. Pointing orientation in altitude is limited by constraints imposed by use of a liquid nitrogen detector Dewar in the spectrometer. Stepper motor drives and control system are compatible with existing custom software used with other instrumentation for controlled incremental raster stepping. The altitude axis passes close to the center of gravity of the complete payload to minimize load eccentricity and drive torque requirements. Dovetail fixture mounting enables quick service and fine adjustment of balance to minimize stepper/gearbox drive backlash through the limited orientation range in altitude. Initial applications to characterization of remote gas plumes have been successful.

  20. Sonic Thermometer for High-Altitude Balloons

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bognar, John

    2012-01-01

    The sonic thermometer is a specialized application of well-known sonic anemometer technology. Adaptations have been made to the circuit, including the addition of supporting sensors, which enable its use in the high-altitude environment and in non-air gas mixtures. There is a need to measure gas temperatures inside and outside of superpressure balloons that are flown at high altitudes. These measurements will allow the performance of the balloon to be modeled more accurately, leading to better flight performance. Small thermistors (solid-state temperature sensors) have been used for this general purpose, and for temperature measurements on radiosondes. A disadvantage to thermistors and other physical (as distinct from sonic) temperature sensors is that they are subject to solar heating errors when they are exposed to the Sun, and this leads to issues with their use in a very high-altitude environment

  1. Tests of artificial flight at high altitudes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gradenwitz, Arthur

    1920-01-01

    If we wish to form an accurate idea of the extraordinary progress achieved in aeronautics, a comparison must be made of the latest altitude records and the figures regarded as highest attainable limit some ten years ago. It is desirable, for two reasons, that we should be able to define the limit of the altitudes that can be reached without artificial aid. First, to know to what extent the human body can endure the inhalation of rarified air. Second, the mental capacity of the aviator must be tested at high altitudes and the limit known below which he is able to make reliable observations without being artificially supplied with oxygen. A pneumatic chamber was used for the most accurate observations.

  2. Paschen Considerations for High Altitude Airships

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ferguson, D. C.; Hillard, G. B.

    2004-01-01

    Recently, there have been several proposals submitted to funding agencies for long-lived high altitude (about 70,000 feet) airships for communications, surveillance, etc. In order for these airships to remain at altitude, high power, high efficiency, lightweight solar arrays must be used, and high efficiency power management and distribution systems must be employed. The needs for high power and high efficiency imply high voltage systems. However, the air pressure at these extreme altitudes is such that electrical power systems will be near the Paschen discharge minimum over a wide range of electrode separations. In this paper, preliminary calculations are made for acceptable high voltage design practices under ambient, hydrogen and helium gas atmospheres.

  3. Degeneration of monoamine nerves in anterior byssus retractor muscle of Mytilus induced by 5,6-dihydroxytryptamine.

    PubMed

    Sathananthan, A H

    1976-09-20

    Preliminary ultrastructural studies on the effects of 5,6-Dihydroxytryptamine (5,6-DHT) on the anterior byssus retractor muscle (ABRM) of Mytilus show degeneration of 2 types of monoaminergic nerves after 10 days of drug treatment. One type contained large granular vesicles (560-1,680 A) possibly represent serotonergic and dopaminergic nerves, thought to innervate this muscle. Two other types of profiles seemed to be unaffected by the drug. One conforms to cholinergic nerves while the other has a predominance of large opaque vesicles (1,200-2,500 A). The significance of these findings is discussed in the light of recent observations on the neurotoxic effects of 5,6-DHT on vertebrate and molluscan nerves.

  4. Progress on low altitude cloud icing research

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jeck, R. K.

    1981-01-01

    The icing environment at altitudes below 10,000 feet were studied. The following questions are asked, are: (1) existing aircraft certification criteria applicable; (2) too stringent on icing for helos; (3) based on accurate data; (4) appropriate for low (10,000 ft) altitudes? The research plan is outlined: review historical icing data, obtain new measurements, collect modern icing data from other groups, and recommend LWC, OAT, and MVD criteria for helicopters. Estimated accuracies and known sources of error are included. It is concluded that the net effect of possible sources of error of both signs is uncertain.

  5. Control of breathing and the circulation in high-altitude mammals and birds.

    PubMed

    Ivy, Catherine M; Scott, Graham R

    2015-08-01

    Hypoxia is an unremitting stressor at high altitudes that places a premium on oxygen transport by the respiratory and cardiovascular systems. Phenotypic plasticity and genotypic adaptation at various steps in the O2 cascade could help offset the effects of hypoxia on cellular O2 supply in high-altitude natives. In this review, we will discuss the unique mechanisms by which ventilation, cardiac output, and blood flow are controlled in high-altitude mammals and birds. Acclimatization to high altitudes leads to some changes in respiratory and cardiovascular control that increase O2 transport in hypoxia (e.g., ventilatory acclimatization to hypoxia). However, acclimatization or development in hypoxia can also modify cardiorespiratory control in ways that are maladaptive for O2 transport. Hypoxia responses that arose as short-term solutions to O2 deprivation (e.g., peripheral vasoconstriction) or regional variation in O2 levels in the lungs (i.e., hypoxic pulmonary vasoconstriction) are detrimental at in chronic high-altitude hypoxia. Evolved changes in cardiorespiratory control have arisen in many high-altitude taxa, including increases in effective ventilation, attenuation of hypoxic pulmonary vasoconstriction, and changes in catecholamine sensitivity of the heart and systemic vasculature. Parallel evolution of some of these changes in independent highland lineages supports their adaptive significance. Much less is known about the genomic bases and potential interactive effects of adaptation, acclimatization, developmental plasticity, and trans-generational epigenetic transfer on cardiorespiratory control. Future work to understand these various influences on breathing and circulation in high-altitude natives will help elucidate how complex physiological systems can be pushed to their limits to maintain cellular function in hypoxia.

  6. Comparative evaluation of the GP5+/6+, MY09/11 and PGMY09/11 primer sets for HPV detection by PCR in oral squamous cell carcinomas.

    PubMed

    Erhart, Sibele Morais Miyata; Rivero, Elena Riet Correa; Bazzo, Maria Luiza; Onofre, Alexandre Sherlley Casimiro

    2016-02-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the use of GP5+/6+, MY09/11 and PGMY09/11 primer sets for the detection of human papillomavirus (HPV) DNA by single step polymerase chain reaction (PCR) and nested PCR in formalin-fixed and paraffin-embedded (FFPE) tissues from oral squamous cell carcinomas (OSCCs). DNA extracted from FFPE tissues were tested for amplification of the human beta globin gene with PCO3/4 primers. Positive samples for this gene were tested for HPV DNA using single step PCR with GP5+/6+, MY09/11 and PGMY09/11 primer sets. All negative samples at single step PCR with MY09/11 and PGMY09/11 were subjected to a further PCR with GP5+/6+ primers using the non-amplified product in the previously reactions (nested PCR) as samples. Among 26 samples, 23 were positive for the human beta globin gene and were considered viable for HPV DNA detection by PCR. Single step PCR with GP5+/6+ and MY09/11 primers and MY/GP+ nested PCR did not amplify HPV DNA in any samples. PGMY09/11 primers detected HPV DNA in 13.0% of OSCC cases and this rate was raise to 17.4% with the use of PGMY/GP+ nested PCR. According to our results the PGMY/GP+ nested PCR is the most appropriate primer set for the detection of HPV DNA using FFPE samples from OSCC.

  7. Measurement of new particle formation at several altitudes on a 300 m meteorological observation tower

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Park, M.; Yum, S. S.; Kim, N.

    2014-12-01

    Since new particle formation (NPF) affects aerosol number size distribution and subsequently the newly formed particles can grow enough to act as cloud condensation nuclei, understanding NPF mechanism is crucially important as a step towards a better understanding of aerosol life cycle and its effects on cloud microphysical and radiative properties. However, not clearly understood are at what altitudes NPF actually occurs, what the spatial scale of NPF is, and what are the good meteorological conditions that lead to NPF. In this study, we analyze the data that will be obtained from a 300 m meteorological observation tower to have a better understanding of where NPF occurs and the meteorological conditions that lead to NPF. The tower is installed at the National Center for Intensive Observation of severe weather (NCIO) at a southern coastal rural town of Boseong, Korea (34.76N, 127.16E) and is equipped with measurement platforms at 11 altitudes. Aerosol number concentration and size distribution will be measured at 300 m and 10 m altitudes. A complementary aerosol number concentration measurement will also be made at an intermediate altitude. The basic meteorological variables (e.g., air temperature, relative humidity, wind direction and speed) measured at each of the 11 measurement platform altitudes of the tower will be jointly collected. Comprehensive analysis of these continuous and vertically aligned measurement data will give us an opportunity to look at the details of NPF mechanism.

  8. Variability in low altitude astronomical refraction as a function of altitude.

    PubMed

    Sampson, Russell D; Lozowski, Edward P; Fathi-Nejad, Arsha

    2008-12-01

    Low altitude astronomical refraction (LAAR) of the setting Sun was measured over a sea horizon from a coastal location in Barbados, West Indies. The altitude of the upper limb of the Sun and the apparent horizon were determined using a digital video camera (Canon XL2) and a digital SLR camera (Canon EOS 5D). A total of 14 sunsets were measured between 2005 and 2007. From these measurements LAAR variability was estimated at 14 standard altitudes of the refracted Sun between 0 degrees .01 and 4 degrees .5. The relative variability decreases with increasing altitude from +/- 0.0195 of mean refraction at an altitude of 0 degrees .01 to +/- 0.0142 at 4 degrees .5. If extrapolated to an altitude of 15 degrees , a linear fit to the data produces a relative variability of +/- 0.0038 and an absolute variability of +/- 0(").45. Statistical analysis of the relative variability in LAAR appears to support the decreasing trend. However, error propagation analysis further suggests that the observed values of refraction may exceed the accuracy of the measurement system at altitudes higher than 2 degrees .

  9. Passive range estimation for rotorcraft low-altitude flight

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sridhar, B.; Suorsa, R.; Hussien, B.

    1993-01-01

    The automation of rotorcraft low-altitude flight presents challenging problems in control, computer vision and image understanding. A critical element in this problem is the ability to detect and locate obstacles, using on-board sensors, and modify the nominal trajectory. This requirement is also necessary for the safe landing of an autonomous lander on Mars. This paper examines some of the issues in the location of objects using a sequence of images from a passive sensor, and describes a Kalman filter approach to estimate the range to obstacles. The Kalman filter is also used to track features in the images leading to a significant reduction of search effort in the feature extraction step of the algorithm. The method can compute range for both straight line and curvilinear motion of the sensor. A laboratory experiment was designed to acquire a sequence of images along with sensor motion parameters under conditions similar to helicopter flight. Range estimation results using this imagery are presented.

  10. Passive range estimation for rotorcraft low-altitude flight

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sridhar, B.; Suorsa, R.; Hussien, B.

    1991-01-01

    The automation of rotorcraft low-altitude flight presents challenging problems in control, computer vision and image understanding. A critical element in this problem is the ability to detect and locate obstacles, using on-board sensors, and modify the nominal trajectory. This requirement is also necessary for the safe landing of an autonomous lander on Mars. This paper examines some of the issues in the location of objects using a sequence of images from a passive sensor, and describes a Kalman filter approach to estimate the range to obstacles. The Kalman filter is also used to track features in the images leading to a significant reduction of search effort in the feature extraction step of the algorithm. The method can compute range for both straight line and curvilinear motion of the sensor. A laboratory experiment was designed to acquire a sequence of images along with sensor motion parameters under conditions similar to helicopter flight. Range estimation results using this imagery are presented.

  11. Non-Smc element 5 (Nse5) of the Smc5/6 complex interacts with SUMO pathway components.

    PubMed

    Bustard, Denise E; Ball, Lindsay G; Cobb, Jennifer A

    2016-06-15

    The Smc5/6 complex in Saccharomyces cerevisiae contains six essential non-Smc elements, Nse1-6. With the exception of Nse2 (also known as Mms21), which is an E3 small ubiquitin-like modifier (SUMO) ligase, very little is understood about the role of these components or their contribution to Smc5/6 functionality. Our characterization of Nse5 establishes a previously unidentified relationship between the Smc5/6 complex and factors of the SUMO pathway. Nse5 physically associates with the E2 conjugating enzyme, Ubc9, where contacts are stabilized by non-covalent interactions with SUMO. SUMO also mediates the interactions between Nse5 and the two PIAS family E3 SUMO ligases, Siz1 and Siz2. Cells carrying the nse5-ts1 allele or lacking either SIZ1 or SIZ2 exhibit a reduction in Smc5 sumoylation upon MMS treatment and demonstrate functional redundancy for SUMO mediated events in the presence of DNA damage. Overall, given the extensive connection between Nse5 and components of the SUMO pathway, we speculate that one function of the Smc5/6 complex might be as a scaffold center to enable sumoylation events in budding yeast.

  12. Non-Smc element 5 (Nse5) of the Smc5/6 complex interacts with SUMO pathway components

    PubMed Central

    Bustard, Denise E.; Ball, Lindsay G.

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT The Smc5/6 complex in Saccharomyces cerevisiae contains six essential non-Smc elements, Nse1-6. With the exception of Nse2 (also known as Mms21), which is an E3 small ubiquitin-like modifier (SUMO) ligase, very little is understood about the role of these components or their contribution to Smc5/6 functionality. Our characterization of Nse5 establishes a previously unidentified relationship between the Smc5/6 complex and factors of the SUMO pathway. Nse5 physically associates with the E2 conjugating enzyme, Ubc9, where contacts are stabilized by non-covalent interactions with SUMO. SUMO also mediates the interactions between Nse5 and the two PIAS family E3 SUMO ligases, Siz1 and Siz2. Cells carrying the nse5-ts1 allele or lacking either SIZ1 or SIZ2 exhibit a reduction in Smc5 sumoylation upon MMS treatment and demonstrate functional redundancy for SUMO mediated events in the presence of DNA damage. Overall, given the extensive connection between Nse5 and components of the SUMO pathway, we speculate that one function of the Smc5/6 complex might be as a scaffold center to enable sumoylation events in budding yeast. PMID:27215325

  13. Synthesis of myo-inositol 1,3,4,5,6-pentakisphosphate from inositol phosphates generated by receptor activation.

    PubMed Central

    Stephens, L R; Hawkins, P T; Barker, C J; Downes, C P

    1988-01-01

    myo-[3H]Inositol 1,3,4,5,6-pentakisphosphate can be made from myo-[3H]inositol 1,4,5-trisphosphate in a rat brain homogenate or soluble fraction. Although D-myo-inositol 3,4,5,6-tetrakisphosphate can be phosphorylated by a soluble rat brain enzyme to give myo-inositol 1,3,4,5,6-pentakisphosphate, it is not an intermediate in the pathway from myo-inositol 1,4,5-trisphosphate. The intermediates in the above pathway are myo-inositol 1,3,4,5-tetrakisphosphate, myo-inositol 1,3,4-trisphosphate and myo-inositol 1,3,4,6-tetrakisphosphate [Shears, Parry, Tang, Irvine, Michell & Kirk (1987) Biochem. J. 246, 139-147; Balla, Guillemette, Baukal & Catt (1987) J. Biol. Chem. 262, 9952-9955], and it is catalysed by soluble kinase activities of similar anion-exchange mobility and Mr value. Compounds with chromatographic and chemical properties consistent with the structures myo-inositol 1,3,4,5-tetrakisphosphate, myo-inositol 1,3,4,6-tetrakisphosphate and myo-inositol 3,4,5,6-tetrakisphosphate are present in avian erythrocytes, human 1321 N1 astrocytoma cells and primary-cultured murine bone-marrow-derived macrophages. The amounts of these inositol tetrakisphosphates rise upon muscarinic cholinergic stimulation of the astrocytoma cells or stimulation of macrophages with platelet-activating factor. PMID:2845930

  14. Dietary Recommendations for Cyclists during Altitude Training.

    PubMed

    Michalczyk, Małgorzata; Czuba, Miłosz; Zydek, Grzegorz; Zając, Adam; Langfort, Józef

    2016-06-18

    The concept of altitude or hypoxic training is a common practice in cycling. However, several strategies for training regimens have been proposed, like "live high, train high" (LH-TH), "live high, train low" (LH-TL) or "intermittent hypoxic training" (IHT). Each of them combines the effect of acclimatization and different training protocols that require specific nutrition. An appropriate nutrition strategy and adequate hydration can help athletes achieve their fitness and performance goals in this unfriendly environment. In this review, the physiological stress of altitude exposure and training will be discussed, with specific nutrition recommendations for athletes training under such conditions. However, there is little research about the nutrition demands of athletes who train at moderate altitude. Our review considers energetic demands and body mass or body composition changes due to altitude training, including respiratory and urinary water loss under these conditions. Carbohydrate intake recommendations and hydration status are discussed in detail, while iron storage and metabolism is also considered. Last, but not least the risk of increased oxidative stress under hypoxic conditions and antioxidant supplementation suggestions are presented.

  15. High-altitude physiology: lessons from Tibet

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wagner, Peter D.; Simonson, Tatum S.; Wei, Guan; Wagner, Harrieth; Wuren, Tanna; Yan, Ma; Qin, Ga; Ge, Rili

    2013-05-01

    Polycythemia is a universal lowlander response to altitude; healthy Andean high-altitude natives also have elevated [Hb]. While this may enhance O2 transport to tissues, studies have shown that acute isovolumic changes in [Hb] do not affect exercise capacity. Many high-altitude Tibetans have evolved sea-level values of [Hb], providing a natural opportunity to study this issue. In 21 young healthy male Tibetans with [Hb] between 15 and 23 g/dl, we measured VO2MAX and O2 transport capacity at 4200m. VO2MAX was higher when [Hb] was lower (P<0.05), enabled by both higher cardiac output and muscle O2 diffusional conductance, but neither ventilation nor the alveolar-arterial PO2 difference (AaPO2) varied with [Hb]. In contrast, Andean high altitude natives remain polycythemic with larger lungs and higher lung diffusing capacity, a smaller exercising AaPO2, and lower ventilation. The challenges now are (1) to understand the different adaptive pathways used by Andeans and Tibetans, and (2) to determine in Tibetans whether, during evolution, reduced [Hb] appeared first, causing compensatory cardiac and muscle adaptations, or if enhanced cardiac function and muscle O2 transport capacity appeared first, permitting secondary reduction in [Hb]. For (2), further research is necessary to determine the basis of enhanced cardiac function and muscle O2 transport, and identify molecular targets of evolution in heart and muscle. Putative mutations can then be timed and compared to appearance of those affecting [Hb].

  16. Altitude Preexposure Recommendations for Inducing Acclimatization

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2010-01-01

    acetazolamide ( Kronenberg and Cain, 1968). Acute exposure to high altitude increases heart rate and cardiac output to maintain systemic oxygen delivery...emphasizing the regulation of breathing. Physiologist. 11:37–57. Kronenberg R.S., and Cain S.M. (1968). Hastening respiratory acclimatization to

  17. Breathing and sleep at high altitude.

    PubMed

    Ainslie, Philip N; Lucas, Samuel J E; Burgess, Keith R

    2013-09-15

    We provide an updated review on the current understanding of breathing and sleep at high altitude in humans. We conclude that: (1) progressive changes in pH initiated by the respiratory alkalosis do not underlie early (<48 h) ventilatory acclimatization to hypoxia (VAH) because this still proceeds in the absence of such alkalosis; (2) for VAH of longer duration (>48 h), complex cellular and neurochemical re-organization occurs both in the peripheral chemoreceptors as well as within the central nervous system. The latter is likely influenced by central acid-base changes secondary to the extent of the initial respiratory responses to initial exposure to high altitude; (3) sleep at high altitude is disturbed by various factors, but principally by periodic breathing; (4) the extent of periodic breathing during sleep at altitude intensifies with duration and severity of exposure; (5) complex interactions between hypoxic-induced enhancement in peripheral and central chemoreflexes and cerebral blood flow--leading to higher loop gain and breathing instability--underpin this development of periodic breathing during sleep; (6) because periodic breathing may elevate rather than reduce mean SaO2 during sleep, this may represent an adaptive rather than maladaptive response; (7) although oral acetazolamide is an effective means to reduce periodic breathing by 50-80%, recent studies using positive airway pressure devices to increase dead space, hyponotics and theophylline are emerging but appear less practical and effective compared to acetazolamide. Finally, we suggest avenues for future research, and discuss implications for understanding sleep pathology.

  18. High Altitude Plasma Instrument (HAPI) data analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Burch, J. L.

    1994-01-01

    The objectives of the Dynamics Explorer mission are to investigate the coupling of energy, mass, and momentum among the earth's magnetosphere, ionosphere, and upper atmosphere. At launch, on August 3, 1981, DE-1 was placed into an elliptical polar orbit having an apogee of 23,130 km to allow global auroral imaging and crossings of auroral field lines at altitudes of several thousand kilometers. At the same time DE-2 was placed into a polar orbit, coplanar with that of DE-1 but with a perigee altitude low enough (309 km) for neutral measurements and an apogee altitude of 1012 km. The DE-1 High Altitude Plasma Instrument (HAPI) provided data on low and medium energy electrons and ions from August 13, 1981 until December 1, 1981, when a high-voltage failure occured. Analysis of HAPI data for the time period of this contract has produced new results on the source mechanisms for electron conical distributions, particle acceleration phenomena in auroral acceleration regions, Birkeland currents throughout the nightside auroral regions, the source region for auroral kilometric radiation (AKR), and plasma injection phenomena in the polar cusp.

  19. The Power of Aircraft Engines at Altitude

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ragazzi, Paolo

    1939-01-01

    The subject of the present paper is confined to the investigations and methods employed by the Fiat company in their studies on the altitude performance of an air-cooled engine of the production type. The experimental set-up as well as test engine data are provided.

  20. SRB Altitude Switch Assembly Wire Harness Failure

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Blanche, Jim

    2002-01-01

    This paper presents an assessment of two wire harness failures that had occurred in Solid Rocket Booster Altitude Switch Assemblies S/N 200001 and S/N 20002. A list of modifications to EDU #4 and modification of qualification units 2000001 and 2000002 are also presented.

  1. Dietary Recommendations for Cyclists during Altitude Training

    PubMed Central

    Michalczyk, Małgorzata; Czuba, Miłosz; Zydek, Grzegorz; Zając, Adam; Langfort, Józef

    2016-01-01

    The concept of altitude or hypoxic training is a common practice in cycling. However, several strategies for training regimens have been proposed, like “live high, train high” (LH-TH), “live high, train low” (LH-TL) or “intermittent hypoxic training” (IHT). Each of them combines the effect of acclimatization and different training protocols that require specific nutrition. An appropriate nutrition strategy and adequate hydration can help athletes achieve their fitness and performance goals in this unfriendly environment. In this review, the physiological stress of altitude exposure and training will be discussed, with specific nutrition recommendations for athletes training under such conditions. However, there is little research about the nutrition demands of athletes who train at moderate altitude. Our review considers energetic demands and body mass or body composition changes due to altitude training, including respiratory and urinary water loss under these conditions. Carbohydrate intake recommendations and hydration status are discussed in detail, while iron storage and metabolism is also considered. Last, but not least the risk of increased oxidative stress under hypoxic conditions and antioxidant supplementation suggestions are presented. PMID:27322318

  2. The morbid anatomy of high altitude

    PubMed Central

    Heath, Donald

    1979-01-01

    The morbid anatomical changes which take place in man and animals exposed to the chronic hypoxia of residence at high altitude are briefly reviewed. ImagesFig. 1Fig. 2Fig. 3Fig. 5Fig. 4Fig. 6Fig. 7Fig. 8 PMID:493205

  3. Sickle Cell Trait, Exercise, and Altitude.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Eichner, Edward R.

    1986-01-01

    Sickle cell trait is generally benign and does not shorten life, but it may confer some small risk with extremes of exercise or altitude. Research concerning these risks is presented, and it is concluded sickle cell trait is no barrier to outstanding athletic performance. (Author/MT)

  4. Sextant measures spacecraft altitude without gravitational reference

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1966-01-01

    Horizon-sensing sextant measures the altitude of an orbiting spacecraft without gravitational reference by optically measuring the dip angle to the horizon along a line of sight in each of two planes. The sextant scans over a relatively limited field of view.

  5. Altitude Adaptation: A Glimpse Through Various Lenses

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Simonson, Tatum S. Altitude adaptation: A glimpse through various lenses. High Alt Med Biol 16:125–137, 2015.—Recent availability of genome-wide data from highland populations has enabled the identification of adaptive genomic signals. Some of the genomic signals reported thus far among Tibetan, Andean, and Ethiopian are the same, while others appear unique to each population. These genomic findings parallel observations conveyed by decades of physiological research: different continental populations, resident at high altitude for hundreds of generations, exhibit a distinct composite of traits at altitude. The most commonly reported signatures of selection emanate from genomic segments containing hypoxia-inducible factor (HIF) pathway genes. Corroborative evidence for adaptive significance stems from associations between putatively adaptive gene copies and sea-level ranges of hemoglobin concentration in Tibetan and Amhara Ethiopians, birth weights and metabolic factors in Andeans and Tibetans, maternal uterine artery diameter in Andeans, and protection from chronic mountain sickness in Andean males at altitude. While limited reports provide mechanistic insights thus far, efforts to identify and link precise genetic variants to molecular, physiological, and developmental functions are underway, and progress on the genomics front continues to provide unprecedented movement towards these goals. This combination of multiple perspectives is necessary to maximize our understanding of orchestrated biological and evolutionary processes in native highland populations, which will advance our understanding of both adaptive and non-adaptive responses to hypoxia. PMID:26070057

  6. [High altitude anemia: validity of definition criteria].

    PubMed

    Yepez, R; Estevez, E; Galan, P; Chauliac, M; Davila, M; Calle, A; Estrella, R; Masse-Raimbault, A M; Hercberg, S

    1994-01-01

    The effect of iron and folate supplementation on the hemoglobin response and iron status was studied in male and female equatorian medical students: 66 in Quito (2,800 m altitude) and 40 in Guayaquil (sea level). At the end of the supplementation, there was a nearly complete disappearance of biochemical evidence of iron deficiency in the two groups of students. In Quito, 30% of the men and 26% of the women increased their hemoglobin concentration by more than 1 g/dl after one month of supplementation and could be considered as true anemics, compared to 31% of the men and 29% of the women in Guayaquil. This study shows that at sea level, cut-off points defined by WHO for hemoglobin, taking as reference the impact of a supplementation trial, have a specificity of 100% but poor sensitivity (58%). For people living at high altitudes, cut-off limits adjusted for altitude seem unsuitable: the specificity is 98% but the sensitivity is 0%. Studies taking into account all the factors impacting on the hemoglobin level could be useful for defining cut-off points for high-altitude anemia better than those currently recommended.

  7. Performance of portable ventilators at altitude

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2015-04-20

    BirdVSO2 and theLTV- 1000 at ranges of altitudes from sea level to 9,800 ft using lung models of adult respiratory distress syndrome and severe asthma ...Trauma. 2010;69(6):1574Y1577. 11. Tourtier JP, Forsans E, Leclerc T, Libert N, Ramsang S, Tazarourte K, Man M, Borne M. Acute severe asthma : performance

  8. Altitude Adaptation: A Glimpse Through Various Lenses.

    PubMed

    Simonson, Tatum S

    2015-06-01

    Simonson, Tatum S. Altitude adaptation: A glimpse through various lenses. High Alt Med Biol 16:125-137, 2015.--Recent availability of genome-wide data from highland populations has enabled the identification of adaptive genomic signals. Some of the genomic signals reported thus far among Tibetan, Andean, and Ethiopian are the same, while others appear unique to each population. These genomic findings parallel observations conveyed by decades of physiological research: different continental populations, resident at high altitude for hundreds of generations, exhibit a distinct composite of traits at altitude. The most commonly reported signatures of selection emanate from genomic segments containing hypoxia-inducible factor (HIF) pathway genes. Corroborative evidence for adaptive significance stems from associations between putatively adaptive gene copies and sea-level ranges of hemoglobin concentration in Tibetan and Amhara Ethiopians, birth weights and metabolic factors in Andeans and Tibetans, maternal uterine artery diameter in Andeans, and protection from chronic mountain sickness in Andean males at altitude. While limited reports provide mechanistic insights thus far, efforts to identify and link precise genetic variants to molecular, physiological, and developmental functions are underway, and progress on the genomics front continues to provide unprecedented movement towards these goals. This combination of multiple perspectives is necessary to maximize our understanding of orchestrated biological and evolutionary processes in native highland populations, which will advance our understanding of both adaptive and non-adaptive responses to hypoxia.

  9. Safely Enabling Low-Altitude Airspace Operations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kopardekar, Parimal

    2015-01-01

    Near-term Goal: Enable initial low-altitude airspace and UAS operations with demonstrated safety as early as possible, within 5 years. Long-term Goal: Accommodate increased UAS operations with highest safety, efficiency, and capacity as much autonomously as possible (10-15 years).

  10. Step-Growth Polymerization.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stille, J. K.

    1981-01-01

    Following a comparison of chain-growth and step-growth polymerization, focuses on the latter process by describing requirements for high molecular weight, step-growth polymerization kinetics, synthesis and molecular weight distribution of some linear step-growth polymers, and three-dimensional network step-growth polymers. (JN)

  11. Stepping motor controller

    DOEpatents

    Bourret, Steven C.; Swansen, James E.

    1984-01-01

    A stepping motor is microprocessingly controlled by digital circuitry which monitors the output of a shaft encoder adjustably secured to the stepping motor and generates a subsequent stepping pulse only after the preceding step has occurred and a fixed delay has expired. The fixed delay is variable on a real-time basis to provide for smooth and controlled deceleration.

  12. Stepping motor controller

    DOEpatents

    Bourret, S.C.; Swansen, J.E.

    1982-07-02

    A stepping motor is microprocessor controlled by digital circuitry which monitors the output of a shaft encoder adjustably secured to the stepping motor and generates a subsequent stepping pulse only after the preceding step has occurred and a fixed delay has expired. The fixed delay is variable on a real-time basis to provide for smooth and controlled deceleration.

  13. Mini review of high altitude health problems in Ladakh.

    PubMed

    Norboo, T; Saiyed, H N; Angchuk, P T; Tsering, P; Angchuk, S T; Phuntsog, S T; Yahya, M; Wood, Steve; Bruce, N G; Ball, K P

    2004-05-01

    Ladakh is a sparsely populated area of Indian Himalaya lying at 3-4500 m altitude mainly consisting of arid desert. This paper will discuss high altitude health problems in Ladakh under the following headings. 1. Acute altitude illness: acute mountain sickness (AMS), high altitude pulmonary edema (HAPE) and high altitude cerebral edema (HACE). 2. Effects of prolonged and permanent exposure to high altitude: (subacute and chronic mountain sickness). 3. Environmental dust and domestic fire pollution resulting in non-occupational pneumoconiosis and high prevalence of respiratory morbidity.

  14. Is high altitude pulmonary edema relevant to Hawai'i?

    PubMed

    Cornell, Seth Lewis

    2014-11-01

    High altitude clinical syndromes have been described in the medical literature but may be under recognized in the state of Hawai'i. As tourism increases, high altitude injuries may follow given the easy access to high altitude attractions. Visitors and clinicians should be aware of the dangers associated with the rapid ascent to high altitudes in the perceived comfort of a vehicle. This paper will review the basic pathophysiology, prevention, and treatment of the most serious of the high altitude clinical syndromes, high altitude pulmonary edema.

  15. Is High Altitude Pulmonary Edema Relevant to Hawai‘i?

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    High altitude clinical syndromes have been described in the medical literature but may be under recognized in the state of Hawai‘i. As tourism increases, high altitude injuries may follow given the easy access to high altitude attractions. Visitors and clinicians should be aware of the dangers associated with the rapid ascent to high altitudes in the perceived comfort of a vehicle. This paper will review the basic pathophysiology, prevention, and treatment of the most serious of the high altitude clinical syndromes, high altitude pulmonary edema. PMID:25478294

  16. Lithic technological responses to Late Pleistocene glacial cycling at Pinnacle Point Site 5-6, South Africa

    PubMed Central

    Brown, Kyle S.; Oestmo, Simen; Pereira, Telmo; Ranhorn, Kathryn L.; Schoville, Benjamin J.; Marean, Curtis W.

    2017-01-01

    There are multiple hypotheses for human responses to glacial cycling in the Late Pleistocene, including changes in population size, interconnectedness, and mobility. Lithic technological analysis informs us of human responses to environmental change because lithic assemblage characteristics are a reflection of raw material transport, reduction, and discard behaviors that depend on hunter-gatherer social and economic decisions. Pinnacle Point Site 5–6 (PP5-6), Western Cape, South Africa is an ideal locality for examining the influence of glacial cycling on early modern human behaviors because it preserves a long sequence spanning marine isotope stages (MIS) 5, 4, and 3 and is associated with robust records of paleoenvironmental change. The analysis presented here addresses the question, what, if any, lithic assemblage traits at PP5-6 represent changing behavioral responses to the MIS 5-4-3 interglacial-glacial cycle? It statistically evaluates changes in 93 traits with no a priori assumptions about which traits may significantly associate with MIS. In contrast to other studies that claim that there is little relationship between broad-scale patterns of climate change and lithic technology, we identified the following characteristics that are associated with MIS 4: increased use of quartz, increased evidence for outcrop sources of quartzite and silcrete, increased evidence for earlier stages of reduction in silcrete, evidence for increased flaking efficiency in all raw material types, and changes in tool types and function for silcrete. Based on these results, we suggest that foragers responded to MIS 4 glacial environmental conditions at PP5-6 with increased population or group sizes, ‘place provisioning’, longer and/or more intense site occupations, and decreased residential mobility. Several other traits, including silcrete frequency, do not exhibit an association with MIS. Backed pieces, once they appear in the PP5-6 record during MIS 4, persist through MIS

  17. Cinical Significance of Androgen Receptor, CK-5/6, KI-67 and Molecular Subtypes in Breast Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Kayahan, Münire; İdiz, Ufuk Oğuz; Gucin, Zuhal; Erözgen, Fazilet; Memmi, Naim; Müslümanoğlu, Mahmut

    2014-01-01

    Objective To detect the relationship between molecular subtypes of breast cancer with expressions of androgen receptor, cytokeratin 5/6 (CK5/6)and Ki-67. Materials and Methods Expressions of androgen receptor, CK-5/6 and Ki-67 were determined by immunohistochemistry in paraffin-embedded sections obtained from 86 invasive breast cancer cases of stages I/IIa/IIb in 4 molecular subtypes. Patients treated for recurrent disease and locally advanced disease were excluded. Results Forty one luminal A cases, ie. positive estrogen receptor(ER) and/or progesteron receptor (PR) with negative epidermal growth factor receptor (HER2), 14 luminal B, ie. positive ER and/or PR and positive HER2, 14 HER2-enriched (HER2+), ie. negative ER and PR with positive HER2, and 17 triple negative (negative ER and PR and HER2) invasive breast cancers were included. Mean follow-up was 17.46±11.70 mo. Androgen receptor-negativity and CK5/6-positivity were significantly more common in HER2+ and triple negative groups. Ki-67 and histological grade were higher in HER2+ group, significantly. Two deaths were triple negative (P=0.04). Androgen receptor-negativity, CK5/6 and Ki-67 status did not affect survival or systemic metastases, significantly. All groups had local recurrences. Local recurrence was significantly associated with androgen receptor-negativity in luminal A and high Ki-67 value in HER2+ groups. Systemic metastases were significantly more common in triple negative and HER2+ groups. Conclusion Molecular subtypes of breast cancer are prognostic and predictive. Androgen receptor is expressed more commonly in luminal subtypes with better prognosis and androgen receptor negativity is associated with development of local recurrence in luminal A cancers.

  18. Estimation of high altitude Martian dust parameters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pabari, Jayesh; Bhalodi, Pinali

    2016-07-01

    Dust devils are known to occur near the Martian surface mostly during the mid of Southern hemisphere summer and they play vital role in deciding background dust opacity in the atmosphere. The second source of high altitude Martian dust could be due to the secondary ejecta caused by impacts on Martian Moons, Phobos and Deimos. Also, the surfaces of the Moons are charged positively due to ultraviolet rays from the Sun and negatively due to space plasma currents. Such surface charging may cause fine grains to be levitated, which can easily escape the Moons. It is expected that the escaping dust form dust rings within the orbits of the Moons and therefore also around the Mars. One more possible source of high altitude Martian dust is interplanetary in nature. Due to continuous supply of the dust from various sources and also due to a kind of feedback mechanism existing between the ring or tori and the sources, the dust rings or tori can sustain over a period of time. Recently, very high altitude dust at about 1000 km has been found by MAVEN mission and it is expected that the dust may be concentrated at about 150 to 500 km. However, it is mystery how dust has reached to such high altitudes. Estimation of dust parameters before-hand is necessary to design an instrument for the detection of high altitude Martian dust from a future orbiter. In this work, we have studied the dust supply rate responsible primarily for the formation of dust ring or tori, the life time of dust particles around the Mars, the dust number density as well as the effect of solar radiation pressure and Martian oblateness on dust dynamics. The results presented in this paper may be useful to space scientists for understanding the scenario and designing an orbiter based instrument to measure the dust surrounding the Mars for solving the mystery. The further work is underway.

  19. The impact of moderate-altitude staging on pulmonary arterial hemodynamics after ascent to high altitude.

    PubMed

    Baggish, Aaron L; Fulco, Charles S; Muza, Stephen; Rock, Paul B; Beidleman, Beth; Cymerman, Allen; Yared, Kibar; Fagenholz, Peter; Systrom, David; Wood, Malissa J; Weyman, Arthur E; Picard, Michael H; Harris, N Stuart

    2010-01-01

    Staged ascent (SA), temporary residence at moderate altitude en route to high altitude, reduces the incidence and severity of noncardiopulmonary altitude illness such as acute mountain sickness. To date, the impact of SA on pulmonary arterial pressure (PAP) is unknown. We tested the hypothesis that SA would attenuate the PAP increase that occurs during rapid, direct ascent (DA). Transthoracic echocardiography was used to estimate mean PAP in 10 healthy males at sea level (SL, P(B) approximately 760 torr), after DA to simulated high altitude (hypobaric chamber, P(B) approximately 460 torr), and at 2 times points (90 min and 4 days) during exposure to terrestrial high altitude (P(B) approximately 460 torr) after SA (7 days, moderate altitude, P(B) approximately 548 torr). Alveolar oxygen pressure (Pao(2)) and arterial oxygenation saturation (Sao(2)) were measured at each time point. Compared to mean PAP at SL (mean +/- SD, 14 +/- 3 mmHg), mean PAP increased after DA to 37 +/- 8 mmHg (Delta = 24 +/- 10 mmHg, p < 0.001) and was negatively correlated with both Pao(2) (r(2) = 0.57, p = 0.011) and Sao(2) (r(2) = 0.64, p = 0.005). In comparison, estimated mean PAP after SA increased to only 25 +/- 4 mmHg (Delta = 11 +/- 6 mmHg, p < 0.001), remained unchanged after 4 days of high altitude residence (24 +/- 5 mmHg, p = not significant, or NS), and did not correlate with either parameter of oxygenation. SA significantly attenuated the PAP increase associated with continuous direct ascent to high altitude and appeared to uncouple PAP from both alveolar hypoxia and arterial hypoxemia.

  20. Why Are High-Altitude Natives So Strong at Altitude? Maximal Oxygen Transport to the Muscle Cell in Altitude Natives.

    PubMed

    Lundby, Carsten; Calbet, Jose A L

    2016-01-01

    In hypoxia aerobic exercise performance of high-altitude natives is suggested to be superior to that of lowlanders; i.e., for a given altitude natives are reported to have higher maximal oxygen uptake (VO2max). The likely basis for this is a higher pulmonary diffusion capacity, which in turn ensures higher arterial O2 saturation (SaO2) and therefore also potentially a higher delivery of O2 to the exercising muscles. This review focuses on O2 transport in high-altitude Aymara. We have quantified femoral artery O2 delivery, arterial O2 extraction and calculated leg VO2 in Aymara, and compared their values with that of acclimatizing Danish lowlanders. All subjects were studied at 4100 m. At maximal exercise SaO2 dropped tremendously in the lowlanders, but did not change in the Aymara. Therefore arterial O2 content was also higher in the Aymara. At maximal exercise however, fractional O2 extraction was lower in the Aymara, and the a-vO2 difference was similar in both populations. The lower extraction levels in the Aymara were associated with lower muscle O2 conductance (a measure of muscle diffusion capacity). At any given submaximal exercise intensity, leg VO2 was always of similar magnitude in both groups, but at maximal exercise the lowlanders had higher leg blood flow, and hence also higher maximum leg VO2. With the induction of acute normoxia fractional arterial O2 extraction fell in the highlanders, but remained unchanged in the lowlanders. Hence high-altitude natives seem to be more diffusion limited at the muscle level as compared to lowlanders. In conclusion Aymara preserve very high SaO2 during hypoxic exercise (likely due to a higher lung diffusion capacity), but the effect on VO2max is reduced by a lower ability to extract O2 at the muscle level.

  1. Acute high-altitude illness: a clinically orientated review

    PubMed Central

    Smedley, Tom

    2013-01-01

    Acute high-altitude illness is an encompassing term for the range of pathology that the unacclimatised individual can develop at increased altitude. This includes acute mountain sickness, high-altitude cerebral oedema and high-altitude pulmonary oedema. These conditions represent an increasing clinical problem as more individuals are exposed to the hypobaric hypoxic environment of high altitude for both work and leisure. In this review of acute high-altitude illness, the epidemiology, risk factors and pathophysiology are explored, before their prevention and treatment are discussed. Appropriate ascent rate remains the most effective acute high-altitude illness prevention, with pharmacological prophylaxis indicated in selected individuals. Descent is the definitive treatment for acute high-altitude illness, with the adjuncts of oxygen and specific drug therapies. PMID:26516505

  2. Design and Development of a High Altitude Protective Assembly.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    CWU-3/P ANTIGRAVITY SUITS, CWU-12/P ANTIEXPOSURE SUITS, HAPA(HIGH ALTITUDE PROTECTIVE ASSEMBLIES), *HIGH ALTITUDE PROTECTIVE ASSEMBLIES, LPU-3/P LIFE PRESERVERS, MA-3 VENTILATION GARMENTS, PARACHUTE HARNESSES, PARTIAL PRESSURE SUITS.

  3. DETAIL OF VACUUM PIPE OPENING WITHIN ALTITUDE CHAMBER R, FACING ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    DETAIL OF VACUUM PIPE OPENING WITHIN ALTITUDE CHAMBER R, FACING SOUTHEAST - Cape Canaveral Air Force Station, Launch Complex 39, Altitude Chambers, First Street, between Avenue D and Avenue E, Cape Canaveral, Brevard County, FL

  4. INTERIOR OF ALTITUDE CHAMBER L FROM TOP LEVEL OF ACCESS ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    INTERIOR OF ALTITUDE CHAMBER L FROM TOP LEVEL OF ACCESS PLATFORMS, FACING WEST - Cape Canaveral Air Force Station, Launch Complex 39, Altitude Chambers, First Street, between Avenue D and Avenue E, Cape Canaveral, Brevard County, FL

  5. EXTERIOR VIEW OF AIRLOCK FOR ALTITUDE CHAMBER R, FACING SOUTHEAST ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    EXTERIOR VIEW OF AIRLOCK FOR ALTITUDE CHAMBER R, FACING SOUTHEAST - Cape Canaveral Air Force Station, Launch Complex 39, Altitude Chambers, First Street, between Avenue D and Avenue E, Cape Canaveral, Brevard County, FL

  6. UPPER HALF OF THE INTERIOR OF ALTITUDE CHAMBER R, LOOKING ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    UPPER HALF OF THE INTERIOR OF ALTITUDE CHAMBER R, LOOKING UP FROM BOTTOM LEVEL, FACING NORTHEAST - Cape Canaveral Air Force Station, Launch Complex 39, Altitude Chambers, First Street, between Avenue D and Avenue E, Cape Canaveral, Brevard County, FL

  7. INTERIOR OF ALTITUDE CHAMBER L, LOOKING UP FROM BOTTOM LEVEL ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    INTERIOR OF ALTITUDE CHAMBER L, LOOKING UP FROM BOTTOM LEVEL OF INTERNAL PLATFORMS, FACING EAST - Cape Canaveral Air Force Station, Launch Complex 39, Altitude Chambers, First Street, between Avenue D and Avenue E, Cape Canaveral, Brevard County, FL

  8. EXTERIOR OF ALTITUDE CHAMBERS R (TO LEFT) AND L (TO ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    EXTERIOR OF ALTITUDE CHAMBERS R (TO LEFT) AND L (TO RIGHT), FACING NORTHEAST - Cape Canaveral Air Force Station, Launch Complex 39, Altitude Chambers, First Street, between Avenue D and Avenue E, Cape Canaveral, Brevard County, FL

  9. VIEW OF THE CONTROL ROOM FOR THE ALTITUDE CHAMBERS, FACING ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    VIEW OF THE CONTROL ROOM FOR THE ALTITUDE CHAMBERS, FACING SOUTHWEST - Cape Canaveral Air Force Station, Launch Complex 39, Altitude Chambers, First Street, between Avenue D and Avenue E, Cape Canaveral, Brevard County, FL

  10. BOTTOM LEVEL OF ALTITUDE CHAMBER L, FACING SOUTHWEST Cape ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    BOTTOM LEVEL OF ALTITUDE CHAMBER L, FACING SOUTHWEST - Cape Canaveral Air Force Station, Launch Complex 39, Altitude Chambers, First Street, between Avenue D and Avenue E, Cape Canaveral, Brevard County, FL

  11. DETAIL OF DOMED BOTTOM, ALTITUDE CHAMBER R, FACING EAST ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    DETAIL OF DOMED BOTTOM, ALTITUDE CHAMBER R, FACING EAST - Cape Canaveral Air Force Station, Launch Complex 39, Altitude Chambers, First Street, between Avenue D and Avenue E, Cape Canaveral, Brevard County, FL

  12. VIEW OF PUMP ROOM FOR ALTITUDE CHAMBERS, FACING SOUTHWEST ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    VIEW OF PUMP ROOM FOR ALTITUDE CHAMBERS, FACING SOUTHWEST - Cape Canaveral Air Force Station, Launch Complex 39, Altitude Chambers, First Street, between Avenue D and Avenue E, Cape Canaveral, Brevard County, FL

  13. EXTERIOR AND INTERIOR VIEW OF AIRLOCK FOR ALTITUDE CHAMBER R, ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    EXTERIOR AND INTERIOR VIEW OF AIRLOCK FOR ALTITUDE CHAMBER R, FACING SOUTH - Cape Canaveral Air Force Station, Launch Complex 39, Altitude Chambers, First Street, between Avenue D and Avenue E, Cape Canaveral, Brevard County, FL

  14. DETAIL OF REPRESSURIZATION AIR PIPE, ALTITUDE CHAMBER L, FACING SOUTHWEST ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    DETAIL OF RE-PRESSURIZATION AIR PIPE, ALTITUDE CHAMBER L, FACING SOUTHWEST - Cape Canaveral Air Force Station, Launch Complex 39, Altitude Chambers, First Street, between Avenue D and Avenue E, Cape Canaveral, Brevard County, FL

  15. DETAIL OF DOMED BOTTOM, ALTITUDE CHAMBER L, FACING NORTHWEST ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    DETAIL OF DOMED BOTTOM, ALTITUDE CHAMBER L, FACING NORTHWEST - Cape Canaveral Air Force Station, Launch Complex 39, Altitude Chambers, First Street, between Avenue D and Avenue E, Cape Canaveral, Brevard County, FL

  16. DETAIL OF WALLMOUNTED STAIRS ON INTERIOR OF ALTITUDE CHAMBER L, ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    DETAIL OF WALL-MOUNTED STAIRS ON INTERIOR OF ALTITUDE CHAMBER L, FACING SOUTHWEST - Cape Canaveral Air Force Station, Launch Complex 39, Altitude Chambers, First Street, between Avenue D and Avenue E, Cape Canaveral, Brevard County, FL

  17. INTERIOR OF AIRLOCK FROM INTERIOR OF ALTITUDE CHAMBER R, FACING ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    INTERIOR OF AIRLOCK FROM INTERIOR OF ALTITUDE CHAMBER R, FACING NORTHWEST - Cape Canaveral Air Force Station, Launch Complex 39, Altitude Chambers, First Street, between Avenue D and Avenue E, Cape Canaveral, Brevard County, FL

  18. LOWER HALF OF THE INTERIOR OF ALTITUDE CHAMBER R, LOOKING ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    LOWER HALF OF THE INTERIOR OF ALTITUDE CHAMBER R, LOOKING UP FROM BOTTOM LEVEL, FACING NORTHEAST - Cape Canaveral Air Force Station, Launch Complex 39, Altitude Chambers, First Street, between Avenue D and Avenue E, Cape Canaveral, Brevard County, FL

  19. DETAIL OF PLATFORM SUPPORT BRACKET, ALTITUDE CHAMBER L, FACING NORTHWEST ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    DETAIL OF PLATFORM SUPPORT BRACKET, ALTITUDE CHAMBER L, FACING NORTHWEST - Cape Canaveral Air Force Station, Launch Complex 39, Altitude Chambers, First Street, between Avenue D and Avenue E, Cape Canaveral, Brevard County, FL

  20. INTERIOR OF ALTITUDE CHAMBER R, LOOKING DOWN FROM AIRLOCK, FACING ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    INTERIOR OF ALTITUDE CHAMBER R, LOOKING DOWN FROM AIRLOCK, FACING NORTHWEST - Cape Canaveral Air Force Station, Launch Complex 39, Altitude Chambers, First Street, between Avenue D and Avenue E, Cape Canaveral, Brevard County, FL

  1. EXTERIOR OF ALTITUDE CHAMBERS R (TO LEFT) AND L (TO ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    EXTERIOR OF ALTITUDE CHAMBERS R (TO LEFT) AND L (TO RIGHT), FACING NORTHWEST - Cape Canaveral Air Force Station, Launch Complex 39, Altitude Chambers, First Street, between Avenue D and Avenue E, Cape Canaveral, Brevard County, FL

  2. DETAIL OF THE EXTERIOR OF THE DOMED LID, ALTITUDE CHAMBER ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    DETAIL OF THE EXTERIOR OF THE DOMED LID, ALTITUDE CHAMBER R, FACING NORTHWEST - Cape Canaveral Air Force Station, Launch Complex 39, Altitude Chambers, First Street, between Avenue D and Avenue E, Cape Canaveral, Brevard County, FL

  3. DETAIL OF THE INTERIOR OF THE DOMED LID, ALTITUDE CHAMBER ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    DETAIL OF THE INTERIOR OF THE DOMED LID, ALTITUDE CHAMBER R, FACING NORTHWEST - Cape Canaveral Air Force Station, Launch Complex 39, Altitude Chambers, First Street, between Avenue D and Avenue E, Cape Canaveral, Brevard County, FL

  4. Step by Step: Avoiding Spiritual Bypass in 12-Step Work

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cashwell, Craig S.; Clarke, Philip B.; Graves, Elizabeth G.

    2009-01-01

    With spirituality as a cornerstone, 12-step groups serve a vital role in the recovery community. It is important for counselors to be mindful, however, of the potential for clients to be in spiritual bypass, which likely will undermine the recovery process.

  5. Periodic breathing and oxygen supplementation in Chilean miners at high altitude (4200m).

    PubMed

    Moraga, Fernando A; Jiménez, Daniel; Richalet, Jean Paul; Vargas, Manuel; Osorio, Jorge

    2014-11-01

    Our objective was to determine the nocturnal ventilatory pattern and characterize the effect of oxygen enrichment on nocturnal ventilatory pattern and sleep quality in miners exposed to intermittent hypobaric hypoxia at 4200m. A total of 16 acclimatized miners were studied. Nocturnal ventilatory pattern (plethysmographic inductance), arterial oxygen saturation and heart rate (pulse oximetry) were performed in 9/16 subjects. Sleep quality at high altitude was assessed by self-questionnaires in 16/16 subjects. All measurements were performed during at least 7h of sleep. Subjects were studied while sleeping at high altitude without (control, C) and with oxygen supplementation (FiO2=0.25, treated, T). Periodic breathing (%) C: 25±18 vs T: 6.6±5.6 (p<0.05), apneas index (no./h) C: 34.9±24.1 vs T: 8.5±6.8 (p<0.05); and sleep quality C: 17.8±3.4 vs T: 12.1±2.2 (p<0.0001) were evaluated. In conclusion, periodic breathing with apneas was present in miners exposed to high altitude for 1 to 4 years and was reduced by treatment with supplementary oxygen.

  6. Extrusion of microtubule doublet outer dense fibers 5-6 associating with fibrous sheath sliding in mouse sperm flagella.

    PubMed

    Si, Y; Okuno, M

    1995-11-01

    Our previous experiments (Si and Okuno [1993a] Exp. Cell Res., 208:170-174) provided evidence that the fibrous sheath (FS) slid headward to middle piece in the activated mouse sperm flagellum when doublet microtubules together with their outer dense fibers (ODFs) extruded from the axoneme. Of the extruded doublet-ODFs, however, which one was responsible for the FS sliding remained unresolved. The present study demonstrated that the FS sliding and the order of doublet-ODFs extrusion in mouse sperm flagella were trypsin concentration dependent. Under the condition of mild trypsinization (0.1 micrograms/ml), only doublet-ODFs 4, 5-6 (doublet-ODFs 5 and 6 were always paired), and 7 extruded from the axoneme. Furthermore, the extrusion of doublet-ODFs 5-6 was identified to precede doublet-ODFs 4 and 7, and was considered the candidate responsible for FS sliding. In contrast, the high-concentration trypsinization (4 micrograms/ml) led to extrusion of doublet-ODFs 1, 2, and 9 following doublet-ODFs 4, 5-6, and 7. FS sliding, however, did not occur.

  7. Structure and functional properties of Norrin mimic Wnt for signalling with Frizzled4, Lrp5/6, and proteoglycan

    PubMed Central

    Chang, Tao-Hsin; Hsieh, Fu-Lien; Zebisch, Matthias; Harlos, Karl; Elegheert, Jonathan; Jones, E Yvonne

    2015-01-01

    Wnt signalling regulates multiple processes including angiogenesis, inflammation, and tumorigenesis. Norrin (Norrie Disease Protein) is a cystine-knot like growth factor. Although unrelated to Wnt, Norrin activates the Wnt/β-catenin pathway. Signal complex formation involves Frizzled4 (Fz4), low-density lipoprotein receptor related protein 5/6 (Lrp5/6), Tetraspanin-12 and glycosaminoglycans (GAGs). Here, we report crystallographic and small-angle X-ray scattering analyses of Norrin in complex with Fz4 cysteine-rich domain (Fz4CRD), of this complex bound with GAG analogues, and of unliganded Norrin and Fz4CRD. Our structural, biophysical and cellular data, map Fz4 and putative Lrp5/6 binding sites to distinct patches on Norrin, and reveal a GAG binding site spanning Norrin and Fz4CRD. These results explain numerous disease-associated mutations. Comparison with the Xenopus Wnt8–mouse Fz8CRD complex reveals Norrin mimics Wnt for Frizzled recognition. The production and characterization of wild-type and mutant Norrins reported here open new avenues for the development of therapeutics to combat abnormal Norrin/Wnt signalling. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.06554.001 PMID:26158506

  8. High altitude plumes at Mars morning terminator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sanchez-Lavega, A.; Garcia Muñoz, A.; Garcia Melendo, E.; Perez-Hoyos, S.; Gomez Forrellad, J. M.; Pellier, C.; Delcroix, M.; Lopez Valverde, M. A.; González Galindo, F.; Jaeschke, W.; Parker, D.; Phillips, J.; Peach, D.

    2015-10-01

    In March and April 2012 two extremely high altitude plumes were observed at the Martian terminator reaching 200 -250 km or more above the surface[1]. They were located at about 195o West longitude and 45o South latitude (at Terra Cimmeria) and extended ˜500 -1,000 km in both North-South and East- West, and lasted for about 10 days. Both plumes exhibited day-to-day variability, and were seen at the morning terminator but not at the evening limb. Another large plume was captured on Hubble Space Telescope images in May 1997 at 99º West longitude and 3º South latitude, but its altitude cannot be pr ecisely determined.Broad-band photometry was performed of both events in the spectral range 255 nm -1052 nm. Based on the observed properties, we discuss different possible scenarios for the mechanism responsible for the formation of these plumes.

  9. The High Altitude Gamma Ray Observatory, HAWC

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    González, M. M.

    2011-10-01

    The Volcano Sierra Negra in Puebla, Mexico was selected to host HAWC (High Altitude Water Cherenkov), a unique obervatory of wide field of view (2π sr) capable of observing the sky continously at energies from 0.5 TeV to 100 TeV. HAWC is an array of 300 large water tanks (7.3 m diameter × 5 m depth) at an altitude of 4100 m. a. s. l. Each tank is instrumented with three upward-looking photomultipliers tubes. The full array will be capable of observing the most energetic gamma rays from the most violent events in the universe. HAWC will be 15 times more sensitive than its predecesor, Milagro. We present HAWC, the scientific case and capabilities.

  10. [Effect of altitude on iron absorption].

    PubMed

    Pizarro, F; Zavaleta, N; Hertrampf, E; Berlanga, R; Camborda, L; Olivares, M

    1998-03-01

    Iron bioavailability was evaluated in people living in high altitudes. Absorption was estimated from a reference dose of ferrous ascorbate and from a standard diet of wheat flour, using extrinsic tag radioisotope technique of 55Fe and 59Fe. Twenty four volunteers, healthy women, with ages ranging from 28 to 45 years, participated. Of those, eleven lived at 3450 meters above sea level (m.a.s.l.) in Huancayo city-Peru (study group), and 13 lived in Santiago de Chile at 630 m.a.s.l. (control group). Iron absorption from reference dose of ferrous ascorbate was 32.0% and 31.1% in the study and control groups respectively. The geometric mean of iron absorption from the standard diet, corrected to 40% of absorption of reference dose, was 9.0% and 6.9% in the study and control groups respectively (NS). The results suggest that altitude does not produce a high iron absorption in highlander residents.

  11. Dust observations at orbital altitudes surrounding Mars.

    PubMed

    Andersson, L; Weber, T D; Malaspina, D; Crary, F; Ergun, R E; Delory, G T; Fowler, C M; Morooka, M W; McEnulty, T; Eriksson, A I; Andrews, D J; Horanyi, M; Collette, A; Yelle, R; Jakosky, B M

    2015-11-06

    Dust is common close to the martian surface, but no known process can lift appreciable concentrations of particles to altitudes above ~150 kilometers. We present observations of dust at altitudes ranging from 150 to above 1000 kilometers by the Langmuir Probe and Wave instrument on the Mars Atmosphere and Volatile Evolution spacecraft. Based on its distribution, we interpret this dust to be interplanetary in origin. A comparison with laboratory measurements indicates that the dust grain size ranges from 1 to 12 micrometers, assuming a typical grain velocity of ~18 kilometers per second. These direct observations of dust entering the martian atmosphere improve our understanding of the sources, sinks, and transport of interplanetary dust throughout the inner solar system and the associated impacts on Mars's atmosphere.

  12. HAWC - The High Altitude Water Cherenkov Detector

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tepe, Andreas; HAWC Collaboration

    2012-07-01

    The high altitude water Cherenkov observatory (HAWC) is an instrument for the detection of high energy cosmic gamma-rays. Its predecessor Milagro has successfully proven that the water Cherenkov technology for gamma-ray astronomy is a useful technique. HAWC is currently under construction at Sierra Negra in Mexico at an altitude of 4100 m and will include several improvements compared to Milagro. Two complementary DAQ systems of the HAWC detector allow for the observation of a large fraction of the sky with a very high duty cycle and independent of environmental conditions. HAWC will observe the gamma-ray sky from about 100 GeV up to 100 TeV. Also the cosmic ray flux anisotropy on different angular length scales is object of HAWC science. Because of HAWC's large effective area and field of view, we describe its prospects to observe gamma-ray bursts (GRBs) as an example for transient sources.

  13. Development of a high altitude Spin Parachute

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Silbert, M. N.

    1981-01-01

    A specially configured 16.6 foot (5.1 meter) Disc Gap Band (DGB) Spin Parachute has been designed, developed, integrated with a sounding rocket, and qualified by flight testing. Design requirements include (1) stable parachute should successfully deploy in the altitude region of 260,000 feet (80 kilometers) from a Super Arcas launch vehicle; (2) after deployment, parachute and payload spin rate should be greater than three rpm; (3) four electric field sensors should be mounted on parachute shroud lines and have provisions to be electrically connected to the suspended payload; and (4) time above 100,000 feet (30 kilometers) should exceed five minutes. The successful meeting of these requirements provided the first known high-altitude deployment of a Spin Parachute.

  14. 14 CFR 121.661 - Initial approach altitude: Flag operations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 3 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Initial approach altitude: Flag operations... § 121.661 Initial approach altitude: Flag operations. When making an initial approach to a radio navigation facility under IFR, no person may descend below the pertinent minimum altitude for...

  15. 10 CFR 862.6 - Voluntary minimum altitude.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 4 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Voluntary minimum altitude. 862.6 Section 862.6 Energy... § 862.6 Voluntary minimum altitude. In addition to complying with all applicable FAA prohibitions or restrictions, aircraft are requested to maintain a minimum altitude of 2,000 feet above the terrain of...

  16. 14 CFR 29.1527 - Maximum operating altitude.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Maximum operating altitude. 29.1527 Section 29.1527 Aeronautics and Space FEDERAL AVIATION ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION AIRCRAFT... Limitations § 29.1527 Maximum operating altitude. The maximum altitude up to which operation is allowed,...

  17. 14 CFR 121.661 - Initial approach altitude: Flag operations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 3 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Initial approach altitude: Flag operations... § 121.661 Initial approach altitude: Flag operations. When making an initial approach to a radio navigation facility under IFR, no person may descend below the pertinent minimum altitude for...

  18. 10 CFR 862.6 - Voluntary minimum altitude.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 4 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Voluntary minimum altitude. 862.6 Section 862.6 Energy... § 862.6 Voluntary minimum altitude. In addition to complying with all applicable FAA prohibitions or restrictions, aircraft are requested to maintain a minimum altitude of 2,000 feet above the terrain of...

  19. 14 CFR 27.1527 - Maximum operating altitude.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Maximum operating altitude. 27.1527 Section 27.1527 Aeronautics and Space FEDERAL AVIATION ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION AIRCRAFT... § 27.1527 Maximum operating altitude. The maximum altitude up to which operation is allowed, as...

  20. 14 CFR 121.661 - Initial approach altitude: Flag operations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 3 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Initial approach altitude: Flag operations... § 121.661 Initial approach altitude: Flag operations. When making an initial approach to a radio navigation facility under IFR, no person may descend below the pertinent minimum altitude for...

  1. 14 CFR 27.1527 - Maximum operating altitude.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Maximum operating altitude. 27.1527 Section 27.1527 Aeronautics and Space FEDERAL AVIATION ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION AIRCRAFT... § 27.1527 Maximum operating altitude. The maximum altitude up to which operation is allowed, as...

  2. VIEW OF THE TOPS OF ALTITUDE CHAMBER R (TO LEFT) ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    VIEW OF THE TOPS OF ALTITUDE CHAMBER R (TO LEFT) AND ALTITUDE CHAMBER L (TO RIGHT) FROM THE 42’-0” LEVEL OF ACCESS PLATFORMS, FACING NORTHWEST - Cape Canaveral Air Force Station, Launch Complex 39, Altitude Chambers, First Street, between Avenue D and Avenue E, Cape Canaveral, Brevard County, FL

  3. 14 CFR 121.661 - Initial approach altitude: Flag operations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 3 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Initial approach altitude: Flag operations... § 121.661 Initial approach altitude: Flag operations. When making an initial approach to a radio navigation facility under IFR, no person may descend below the pertinent minimum altitude for...

  4. 14 CFR 91.515 - Flight altitude rules.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 2 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Flight altitude rules. 91.515 Section 91... Multiengine Airplanes and Fractional Ownership Program Aircraft § 91.515 Flight altitude rules. (a..., hill, or other obstruction to flight, for day operations; and (2) The altitudes prescribed in §...

  5. 14 CFR 91.515 - Flight altitude rules.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 2 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Flight altitude rules. 91.515 Section 91... Multiengine Airplanes and Fractional Ownership Program Aircraft § 91.515 Flight altitude rules. (a..., hill, or other obstruction to flight, for day operations; and (2) The altitudes prescribed in §...

  6. 14 CFR 91.515 - Flight altitude rules.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 2 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Flight altitude rules. 91.515 Section 91... Multiengine Airplanes and Fractional Ownership Program Aircraft § 91.515 Flight altitude rules. (a..., hill, or other obstruction to flight, for day operations; and (2) The altitudes prescribed in §...

  7. 14 CFR 27.1527 - Maximum operating altitude.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Maximum operating altitude. 27.1527 Section 27.1527 Aeronautics and Space FEDERAL AVIATION ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION AIRCRAFT... § 27.1527 Maximum operating altitude. The maximum altitude up to which operation is allowed, as...

  8. 14 CFR 29.1527 - Maximum operating altitude.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Maximum operating altitude. 29.1527 Section 29.1527 Aeronautics and Space FEDERAL AVIATION ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION AIRCRAFT... Limitations § 29.1527 Maximum operating altitude. The maximum altitude up to which operation is allowed,...

  9. 14 CFR 29.1527 - Maximum operating altitude.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Maximum operating altitude. 29.1527 Section 29.1527 Aeronautics and Space FEDERAL AVIATION ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION AIRCRAFT... Limitations § 29.1527 Maximum operating altitude. The maximum altitude up to which operation is allowed,...

  10. 10 CFR 862.6 - Voluntary minimum altitude.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 4 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Voluntary minimum altitude. 862.6 Section 862.6 Energy... § 862.6 Voluntary minimum altitude. In addition to complying with all applicable FAA prohibitions or restrictions, aircraft are requested to maintain a minimum altitude of 2,000 feet above the terrain of...

  11. 10 CFR 862.6 - Voluntary minimum altitude.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 4 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Voluntary minimum altitude. 862.6 Section 862.6 Energy... § 862.6 Voluntary minimum altitude. In addition to complying with all applicable FAA prohibitions or restrictions, aircraft are requested to maintain a minimum altitude of 2,000 feet above the terrain of...

  12. 14 CFR 27.1527 - Maximum operating altitude.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Maximum operating altitude. 27.1527 Section 27.1527 Aeronautics and Space FEDERAL AVIATION ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION AIRCRAFT... § 27.1527 Maximum operating altitude. The maximum altitude up to which operation is allowed, as...

  13. 14 CFR 29.1527 - Maximum operating altitude.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Maximum operating altitude. 29.1527 Section 29.1527 Aeronautics and Space FEDERAL AVIATION ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION AIRCRAFT... Limitations § 29.1527 Maximum operating altitude. The maximum altitude up to which operation is allowed,...

  14. 14 CFR 91.515 - Flight altitude rules.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 2 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Flight altitude rules. 91.515 Section 91... Multiengine Airplanes and Fractional Ownership Program Aircraft § 91.515 Flight altitude rules. (a..., hill, or other obstruction to flight, for day operations; and (2) The altitudes prescribed in §...

  15. 14 CFR 27.1527 - Maximum operating altitude.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Maximum operating altitude. 27.1527 Section 27.1527 Aeronautics and Space FEDERAL AVIATION ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION AIRCRAFT... § 27.1527 Maximum operating altitude. The maximum altitude up to which operation is allowed, as...

  16. 14 CFR 121.661 - Initial approach altitude: Flag operations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 3 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Initial approach altitude: Flag operations... § 121.661 Initial approach altitude: Flag operations. When making an initial approach to a radio navigation facility under IFR, no person may descend below the pertinent minimum altitude for...

  17. 14 CFR 29.1527 - Maximum operating altitude.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Maximum operating altitude. 29.1527 Section 29.1527 Aeronautics and Space FEDERAL AVIATION ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION AIRCRAFT... Limitations § 29.1527 Maximum operating altitude. The maximum altitude up to which operation is allowed,...

  18. Human Behaviour and Development under High-Altitude Conditions

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Virues-Ortega, Javier; Garrido, Eduardo; Javierre, Casimiro; Kloezeman, Karen C.

    2006-01-01

    Although we are far from a universally accepted pattern of impaired function at altitude, there is evidence indicating motor, perceptual, memory and behavioural deficits in adults. Even relatively low altitudes (2500 m) may delay reaction time, and impair motor function. Extreme altitude exposure (greater than 5000 m) may result in more pronounced…

  19. Tidally Induced Variations of Polar Mesospheric Cloud Altitudes and Ice Water Content using a Data Assimilation System

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2010-01-01

    based horizontal meteor winds observed at 69°N ( Andenes , Norway) and 85 km geometric altitude in Figure 5. In addition, we performed five short term...calculating winds and the Andenes data. 2.2. Ice Particle Trajectories and CARMA [22] As noted earlier, our approach is a two‐step process. We first use

  20. Comparison of the results between two diagnostic criteria by ADA and WHO among subjects with FPG 5.6-7.8 mmol/l in Kin-Hu and Kin-Chen, Kinmen, 1991-94.

    PubMed

    Li, C L; Tsai, S T; Chou, P

    1999-08-01

    The objective of this study was to compare the results between two diagnostic criteria by ADA (1997) and WHO (1985) among those with fasting plasma glucose (FPG) level 5.6-7.8 mmol/l from a community-based survey in Kin-Hu and Kin-Chen, Kinmen conducted in 1991-94. According to official household registry, 10,797 residents aged over 30 were eligible for screening. 7580 had completed FPG screening and 1855 with FPG 5.6-7.8 mmol/l were invited to receive a 75-g oral glucose tolerance test (OGTT). 78.5% (1456/1855) had completed OGTT. The prevalence of impaired fasting glucose (IFG, by ADA) was 15.7%; the prevalence of impaired glucose tolerance (IGT, by WHO) was 22.7%; the prevalence of undiagnosed diabetes was 7.4% by ADA criteria and 10.9% by WHO criteria. It should be noticed that, among subjects with FPG 5.6-7.8 mmol/l, 50.3% of individuals with undiagnosed diabetes and 67.6% of individuals with IGT by WHO criteria would be missed by ADA criteria. Based on the above findings, the two-step screening strategy using FPG as the first line screening and OGTT for high-risk group (FPG 5.6-7.8 mmol/l) only was recommended in epidemiological study and case finding in consideration of feasibility and validity.

  1. Hazards of Altitude Testing at AEDC

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1992-08-01

    12 kbar. Initiation can also take place by XDT (Unknown-to- Detonation - Transition) under conditions less severe than for SDT. This might occur... XDT of approximately 3 kbar. DETONATION REQUIREMENTS AND DISTRIBUTION FUNCTION Ullianl reported the "TNT EquivalentI1 of a series of aborted flights...HAZARDS OF ALTITUDE TESTING AT AEDC Paul K. Salzman TRW San Bernardino, CA ABSTRACT The detonability (explosion) hazards associated with testing

  2. 75 FR 40720 - IFR Altitudes; Miscellaneous Amendments

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-07-14

    ... From To MEA MAA Sec. 95.3000 LOW ALTITUDE RNAV ROUTES Sec. 95.3227 RNAV ROUTE T227 IS AMENDED TO READ... 17500 *1300--MOCA From To MEA Sec. 95.6001 VICTOR ROUTES-U.S. Sec. 95.6001 VOR FEDERAL AIRWAY V1 IS... *2500--MOCA *3000--GNSS MEA Sec. 95.6003 VOR FEDERAL AIRWAY V3 IS AMENDED TO READ IN PART MODENA,...

  3. 77 FR 38477 - IFR Altitudes; Miscellaneous Amendments

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-06-28

    ... & Changeover Points From To MEA MAA Sec. 95.3000 Low Altitude RNAV Routes Sec. 95.3306 RNAV Route T306 is Added... MEA * DME/DME/IRU MEA ROCCY, UT FIX RATTLESNAKE, NM * 22000 45000 VORTAC. * 18000--GNSS MEA * DME/DME/IRU MEA Sec. 95.4148 RNAV Route Q148 is Amended to Read in Part STEVS, WA FIX ZAXUL, WA FIX.. *...

  4. 77 FR 65256 - IFR Altitudes; Miscellaneous Amendments

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-10-26

    ... & Changeover Points From To MEA MAA Sec. 95.4000 HIGH ALTITUDE RNAV ROUTES Sec. 95.4062 RNAV ROUTE Q62 Is... MEA Sec. 95.6001 VICTOR ROUTES--U.S. Sec. 95.6001 VOR FEDERAL AIRWAY V1 Is Amended to Read in Part...--MOCA *2700--GNSS MEA DES MOINES R-105 UNUSABLE, USE OTTUMWA R-287 BUSSY, IA FIX OTTUMWA, IA...

  5. 77 FR 50909 - IFR Altitudes; Miscellaneous Amendments

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-08-23

    ... From To MEA MAA Sec. 95.3000 Low Altitude RNAV Routes Sec. 95.3310 RNAV Route T310 Is Amended To Read... From To MEA Sec. 95.6001 Victor Routes-U.S. Sec. 95.6001 VOR Federal Airway V1 Is Amended To Read in... V10 Is Amended To Read in Part Emporia, KS VORTAC Wetzl, KS FIX *5000 *2600--MOCA *3000--GNSS...

  6. 76 FR 21622 - IFR Altitudes; Miscellaneous Amendments

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-04-18

    ... Changeover Points From To MEA MAA Sec. 95.3000 Low Altitude RNAV Routes Sec. 95.3231 RNAV Route T231 Is... *18000--GNSS MEA DME/DME/IRU MEA ZORUN, NV FIX GALLI, NV FIX *2 45000 4000 *18000--GNSS MEA DME/DME/IRU MEA GALLI, NV FIX BIG PINEY, WY VOR/DME *2 45000 3000 *18000--GNSS MEA DME/DME/IRU MEA BIG PINEY,...

  7. 78 FR 57472 - IFR Altitudes; Miscellaneous Amendments

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-09-19

    ... & Changeover Point From To MEA MAA Sec. 95.3000 Low Altitude RNAV Routes Sec. 95.3212 RNAV Route T212 Is... Is Amended To Read in Part FAREV, KY WP JEDER, KY WP *18000 45000 *18000--GNSS MEA *DME/DME/IRU MEA Sec. 95.4436 RNAV Route Q436 Is Added To Read EMMMA, MI FIX DIXSN, MI WP *18000 45000 *18000--GNSS...

  8. 78 FR 44874 - IFR Altitudes; Miscellaneous Amendments

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-07-25

    ... Point From To MEA MAA Sec. 95.3000 Low Altitude RNAV Routes Sec. 95.3291 RNAV Route T291 Is Added To...--GNSS MEA *DME/DME/IRU MEA KOATA, OR WP KIMBERLY, OR VORTAC *29000 45000 *18000--GNSS MEA *DME/DME/IRU MEA Sec. 95.4068 RNAV Route Q68 Is Added To Read CHARLESTON, WV VORTAC TOMCA, WV WP *18000...

  9. 78 FR 9583 - IFR Altitudes; Miscellaneous Amendments

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-02-11

    ... Changeover Points FROM TO MEA MAA Sec. 95.3000 Low Altitude RNAV Routes Sec. 95.3254 RNAV Route T254 is... 3000 15000 FROM TO MEA MAA --------- Sec. 95.6001 Victor Routes-U.S. Sec. 95.6010 VOR Federal Airway V10 is Amended to Read in Part REVLOC, PA VOR/DME JUNEY, PA FIX........ *5000 *5000--GNSS MEA...

  10. 78 FR 32979 - IFR Altitudes; Miscellaneous Amendments

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-06-03

    ... & Changeover Points Amendment 507 Effective Date June 27, 2013 From To MEA Sec. 95.1001 DIRECT ROUTES--U.S... River, AK NDB..... *7000 *6000-MOCA ] From To MEA MAA Sec. 95.3000 Low Altitude RNAV Routes Sec. 95.3266... *6000-MOCA From To MEA Sec. 95.6001 VICTOR ROUTES--U.S. Sec. 95.6003 VOR Federal Airway V3 Is Amended...

  11. 75 FR 24790 - IFR Altitudes; Miscellaneous Amendments

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-05-06

    ... From To MEA Sec. 95.1001 Direct Routes-U.S. Color Routes Sec. 95.510 GREEN Federal Airway G10 is... Requred Below 8000 From To MEA MAA Sec. 95.3000 Low Altitude RNAV Routes Sec. 95.3254 RNAV Route T254 is... Crepo, TX FIX Lake Charles, LA VORTAC 2200 15000 ] From To MEA Sec. 95.6001 Victor Routes-U.S. Sec....

  12. 75 FR 82228 - IFR Altitudes; Miscellaneous Amendments

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-12-30

    ... From To MEA MAA Sec. 95.3000 Low Altitude RNAV Routes Sec. 95.3227 RNAV Route T227 Is Amended To Read... Route Q8 Is Amended To Read in Part Galena, AK VOR/DME Anchorage, AK VOR/DME 18000 45000 From To MEA Sec..., OH VOR/DME Morow, OH FIX 3100 Morow, OH FIX Hires, OH FIX *5000 *2700--MOCA *3000--GNSS MEA Hires,...

  13. 75 FR 52437 - IFR Altitudes; Miscellaneous Amendments

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-08-26

    ... amended to read as follows: Revisions to IFR Altitudes & Changeover Points From To MEA MAA Sec. 95.3000... Read in Part WALNUT RIDGE, AR VORTAC DEVAC, AL FIX *20000 33000 *18000--GNSS MEA *DME/DME/IRU MEA From To MEA Sec. 95.6001 Victor Routes-U.S. Sec. 95.6003 VOR Federal Airway V3 Is Amended To Read in...

  14. 76 FR 46202 - IFR Altitudes; Miscellaneous Amendments

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-08-02

    ... Amendment 495 Effective Date August 25, 2011 From To MEA MAA Sec. 95.3000 Low Altitude RNAV Routes Sec. 95... 2000 17500 Borke, NJ FIX Banka, NJ FIX 2000 17500 From To MEA Sec. 95.6001 Victor Routes--U.S. Sec. 95... Airway V36 Is Amended To Read in Part Elmira, NY VOR/DME..... Hawly, PA FIX * 4500 * GNSS MEA. Elmira...

  15. 77 FR 14269 - IFR Altitudes; Miscellaneous Amendments

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-03-09

    ... Points From To MEA MAA Sec. 95.3000 Low Altitude RNAV Routes Sec. 95.3223 RNAV Route T223 Is Amended to... 18000 45000 GNSS REQUIRED From To MEA Sec. 95.6001 Victor Routes--U.S. Sec. 95.6002 VOR Federal Airway... Amended to Read in Part SERTS, OK FIX LIONS, OK FIX *4500 *3100--MOCA *3700--GNSS MEA LIONS, OK FIX...

  16. High Altitude Cooking and Food Safety

    MedlinePlus

    ... Administrative Forms Standard Forms Skip Navigation Z7_0Q0619C0JGR010IFST1G5B10H1 Web Content Viewer (JSR 286) Actions ${title} Loading... / Topics / ... High Altitude Cooking and Food Safety Z7_0Q0619C0JGR010IFST1G5B10H3 Web Content Viewer (JSR 286) Actions ${title} Loading... Z7_ ...

  17. Altitude Compensating Nozzle Cold Flow Test Results

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ruf, J. H.; McDaniels, D. M.

    2002-01-01

    A suite of four altitude compensating nozzle (ACN) concepts were evaluated by NASA MSFC in the Nozzle Test Facility. The ACN concepts were a dual bell, a dual expander, an annular plug nozzle and an expansion deflection nozzle. Two reference bell nozzles were also tested. Axial thrust and nozzle wall static pressures were measured for each nozzle over a wide range of nozzle pressure ratios. The nozzle hardware and test program are described. Sample test results are presented.

  18. Guide to Altitude Decompression Sickness Research

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2010-05-01

    altitude exposure ONLY. Subjects were not given a Physiological Training Card (AF Form 1274; orange ) after completion of this training. Successful...remove any user-installed programs such as x-form. 5) Turn on the arm power by rotating the arm power switch to the right. The orange light will...that results of these breath, blood and/or urine tests shall be made available to the Company and its designated employees or agents . THE

  19. Limiting factors for exercise at extreme altitudes.

    PubMed

    West, J B

    1990-05-01

    Man can only survive and do work in the severe oxygen deprivation of great altitudes by an enormous increase in ventilation which has the advantage of defending the alveolar PO2 against the reduced inspired PO2. Nevertheless the arterial PO2 on the summit of Mt Everest at rest is less than 30 Torr, and it decreases with exercise because of diffusion limitation within the lung. One of the consequences of the hyperventilation is that the marked respiratory alkalosis increases the oxygen affinity of the haemoglobin and assists in loading of oxygen by the pulmonary capillary. Although ventilation is greatly increased, it is a paradox that cardiac output for a given work level is the same in acclimatized subjects at high altitude as at sea level. Stroke volume is reduced but not because of impaired myocardial contractility because this is preserved up to extreme altitudes. Indeed the normal myocardium is one of the few tissues whose function is unimpaired by the very severe hypoxia. There is evidence that oxygen delivery to exercising muscle is diffusion limited along the pathway between the peripheral capillary and the mitochondria. At the altitude of Mt Everest, maximal oxygen uptake is reduced to 20-25% of its sea level value, and it is exquisitely sensitive to barometric pressure. Seasonal variations of barometric pressure affect the ability of man to reach the summit without supplementary oxygen. In spite of the greatly reduced aerobic capacity, anaerobiosis is greatly curtailed, and it is predicted that above 7500 m, there is no rise in blood lactate on exercise. The paradoxically low lactate is possibly related to plasma bicarbonate depletion.

  20. Geodetic altitude to a triaxial ellipsoidal planet

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tang, Charles C. H.

    1988-01-01

    An efficient theoretical model for determining geodetic altitudes with better than millimeter accuracy is proposed, with application to the TOPEX/Poseidon project. The triaxial ellipsoidal subsurface point of a satellite is used as the initial trial solution to achieve an efficient and simple iterative solution. It is found that the second-iteration solution is exact to an accuracy of at least 10 to the -9th km.

  1. Geodetic altitude to a triaxial ellipsoidal planet

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tang, Charles C. H.

    1988-09-01

    An efficient theoretical model for determining geodetic altitudes with better than millimeter accuracy is proposed, with application to the TOPEX/Poseidon project. The triaxial ellipsoidal subsurface point of a satellite is used as the initial trial solution to achieve an efficient and simple iterative solution. It is found that the second-iteration solution is exact to an accuracy of at least 10 to the -9th km.

  2. The effect of altitude on welding

    SciTech Connect

    Liu, S.; Olson, D.L.

    1996-12-31

    Welding at high altitude has typically been reported as more difficult, particularly in the aspect of porosity control. As a consequence, welding of a similar assembly in cities of high elevation such as Denver, Colorado (USA) and Mexico City (Mexico) may require different parameters from those selected for welding in Houston, Texas (USA), Kobe (Japan), and Hamburg (Germany). The atmospheric pressures in these locations are different and the solubilities of bases such as hydrogen in the weld metal are also expected to be different. In this work, the formation of hydrogen and carbon monoxide porosity in low carbon steel weld metals was investigated. The thermodynamic conditions of the chemical reactions that occur in the weld poor were examined. The effects of ambient pressure on the H-O and C-O reactions were estimated for a range of pressures that varied from sea level to approximately 10,000 feet elevation. It was determined that the amounts of carbon monoxide and water in the pores varied measurably with altitude. Since the water vapor molecules that are entrapped in a pore react favorably with the iron atoms on the surface of the pore to form hydrogen and iron oxide, the amount of retained carbon monoxide and hydrogen would also vary with altitude. Finally, welds performed at lower ambient pressure (in locations of higher elevation) are expected to exhibit a larger amount of porosity because of reaction thermodynamics and nucleation kinetics.

  3. Use of ultrasound in altitude decompression modeling

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Olson, Robert M.; Pilmanis, Andrew A.

    1993-01-01

    A model that predicts the probability of developing decompression sickness (DCS) with various denitrogenation schedules is being developed by the Armstrong Laboratory, using human data from previous exposures. It was noted that refinements are needed to improve the accuracy and scope of the model. A commercially developed ultrasonic echo imaging system is being used in this model development. Using this technique, bubbles images from a subject at altitude can be seen in the gall bladder, hepatic veins, vena cava, and chambers of the heart. As judged by their motion and appearance in the vena cava, venous bubbles near the heart range in size from 30 to 300 M. The larger bubbles skim along the top, whereas the smaller ones appear as faint images near the bottom of the vessel. Images from growing bubbles in a model altitude chamber indicate that they grow rapidly, going from 20 to 100 M in 3 sec near 30,000 ft altitude. Information such as this is valuable in verifying those aspects of the DCS model dealing with bubble size, their growth rate, and their site of origin.

  4. The High Altitude Water Cherenkov Observatory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mostafa, Miguel; HAWC Collaboration

    2016-03-01

    The High Altitude Water Cherenkov (HAWC) Observatory is a continuously operated, wide field of view experiment comprised of an array of 300 water Cherenkov detectors (WCDs) to study transient and steady emission of TeV gamma and cosmic rays. Each 200000 l WCD is instrumented with 4 PMTs providing charge and timing information. The array covers ~22000 m2 at an altitude of 4100 m a.s.l. inside the Pico de Orizaba national park in Mexico. The high altitude, large active area, and optical isolation of the PMTs allows us to reliably estimate the energy and determine the arrival direction of gamma and cosmic rays with significant sensitivity over energies from several hundred GeV to a hundred TeV. Continuously observing 2 / 3 of the sky every 24 h, HAWC plays a significant role as a survey instrument for multi-wavelength studies. The performance of HAWC makes possible the detection of both transient and steady emissions, the study of diffuse emission and the measurement of the spectra of gamma-ray sources at TeV energies. HAWC is also sensitive to the emission from GRBs above 100 GeV. I will highlight the results from the first year of operation of the full HAWC array, and describe the ongoing site work to expand the array by a factor of 4 to explore the high energy range.

  5. Altitude and arteriolar hyalinosis after kidney transplantation.

    PubMed

    Cippà, Pietro E; Grebe, Scott O; Fehr, Thomas; Wüthrich, Rudolf P; Mueller, Thomas F

    2016-09-01

    The kidney is very susceptible to hypoxic injury. Calcineurin inhibitors (CNIs) induce vasoconstriction and might reduce renal tissue oxygenation. We aimed to investigate if the synergistic deleterious effects of CNI-treatment and hypoxia of high altitude living might accelerate the development of arteriolar hyalinosis in kidney allografts. We stratified all patients who received a kidney graft from 2000 to 2010 in our centre (n = 477) in three groups according to the residential elevation (below 400, between 400 to 600 and above 600 m above sea level) and we retrospectively re-evaluated all transplant biopsies performed during follow-up, specifically looking at the degree of arteriolar hyalinosis, the hallmark of chronic CNI nephrotoxicity. Living at high altitude was markedly associated with a higher degree of arteriolar hyalinosis (P < 0.001). Haemoglobin levels confirmed the functional relevance of different arterial oxygenation among the groups (P = 0.01). Thus, patients living at high altitude seem to be more susceptible to the development of arteriolar hyalinosis after kidney transplantation.

  6. A Step Circuit Program.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Herman, Susan

    1995-01-01

    Aerobics instructors can use step aerobics to motivate students. One creative method is to add the step to the circuit workout. By incorporating the step, aerobic instructors can accommodate various fitness levels. The article explains necessary equipment and procedures, describing sample stations for cardiorespiratory fitness, muscular strength,…

  7. Analysis and Interpretation of Mars Dayglow Altitude Profiles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huestis, David L.; Slanger, T. G.; Sharpee, B. D.; Fox, J. L.

    2009-09-01

    The Mariner 4 (1965), Mariner 6 and 7 (1969), Mariner 9 (1971-72), and Viking 1 and 2 (1976-80) missions provided the first quantitative information about the structure, energetics, and dynamics of the Mars atmosphere. Not until more than 20 years later did new generations of landers and orbiters revisit the planet. The initial Mariner dayglow observations [1] motivated numerous modeling studies and laboratory experiments. The most obvious source reaction is photodissociation and photoionization of ambient CO2, which is known in the laboratory to produce all four dayglow emitting states: (1) hν + CO2 → O(1S), CO(a3Π), CO2+(A2Πu & B2Σu+) If this simplest of models were sufficient, then the high altitude dayglow emissions would all share the same scale height, which would be that of CO2. The few Mariner dayglow observations [1, 2] provided weak statistics [3]. Addition of 4 months of Mars Express dayglow data [4], and including radio occultation and mass spectrometry data from other missions, have made the analyses and conclusions more robust. The CO(a3Π) and CO2+(B2Σu+) altitude profiles are consistent with Reaction (1). In contrast, the O(1S) scale heights are much larger and are consistent with source Reaction (2). (2) O2+ + e- → O(1S) Both sets of scale heights change with respect to solar activity roughly as suggested by modeling studies [5, 6]. Acknowledgements: Supported by NASA Mars Data Analysis grant NNX06AE04G. SRI document MP 09-050. References: [1] Barth C. A. et al. (1971) JGR 76, 2213-2227. [2] Stewart A. I. et al. (1972) Icarus 17, 469. [3] Huestis D. L. et al. (2008) 3rd Workshop on the Mars Atmosphere (Williamsburg, VA). [4] Leblanc F. (private communication). [5] Fox J. L. et al. (1996). Adv. Space Res. 17, (11)203. [6] Krasnopolsky V. A. (2002) JGR 107, doi:10.1029/2001E001809.

  8. Analysis and Interpretation of Mars Dayglow Altitude Profiles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huestis, D. L.; Slanger, T. G.; Sharpee, B.; Fox, J. L.

    2009-12-01

    The Mariner 4 (1965), Mariner 6 and 7 (1969), Mariner 9 (1971-72), and Viking 1 and 2 (1976-80) missions provided the first quantitative information about the structure, energetics, and dynamics of the Mars atmosphere. Not until more than 20 years later did new generations of landers and orbiters revisit the planet. The initial Mariner dayglow observations [1] motivated numerous modeling studies and laboratory experiments. The most obvious source reaction is photodissociation and photoionization of ambient CO2, which is known in the laboratory to produce all four dayglow emitting states:

    (1) hn2 ®1S), CO(a3P2+(A2Pu & B2Su+)

    If this simplest of models were sufficient, then the high altitude dayglow emissions would all share the same scale height, which would be that of CO2. The few Mariner dayglow observations [1, 2] provided weak statistics [3]. Addition of 4 months of Mars Express dayglow data [4], and including radio occultation and mass spectrometry data from other missions, have made the analyses and conclusions more robust. The CO(a3P2+(B2Su+) altitude profiles are consistent with Reaction (1). In contrast, the O(1S) scale heights are much larger and are consistent with source Reaction (2):

    (2) O2+ + e- ®1S)

    Both sets of scale heights change with respect to solar activity roughly as suggested by modeling studies [5, 6].

    Acknowledgements: Supported by NASA Mars Data Analysis grant NNX06AE04G. SRI document MP 09-058.

    References:
    [1] Barth C. A. et al. (1971) JGR 76, 2213-2227.
    [2] Stewart A. I. et al. (1972) Icarus 17, 469.
    [3] Huestis D. L. et al. (2008) 3rd Workshop on the Mars Atmosphere (Williamsburg, VA).
    [4] Leblanc F. (private communication).
    [5] Fox J. L. et al. (1996). Adv. Space Res. 17, (11)203.
    [6] Krasnopolsky V. A. (2002) JGR 107, doi

  9. Growth of Han migrants at high altitude in central Asia.

    PubMed

    Weitz, Charles A; Garruto, Ralph M

    2004-01-01

    Han Chinese of low-altitude descent have been living in Qinghai Province of Western China for at least two millennia. For most of this time they have lived at elevations under 2,500 m. However, during the last four decades an increasing number of Han have moved into high-altitude towns at elevations over 3,000 m, and some above 4,000 m. There are now sufficient numbers of Han descendants who have been born and raised at high altitude to allow a comparison of their morphological and physiological growth patterns with low-altitude Han to detect the effect of hypoxia. The field study reported here was conducted by collaborating Chinese and American researchers over a 6-year period, and included 1,227 Han living at high altitude in Qinghai and at low altitude near Beijing. This study demonstrates that Han born and raised at high altitude are smaller and lighter than those at low altitude-particularly as children and adolescents. Slower growth at high altitude may be a consequence of hypoxia, but it also corresponds to poorer economic conditions in rural Qinghai Province, and thus may reflect nutritional inadequacies. Differences in altitude and/or nutrition do not seem to affect thorax dimensions, since, relative to stature, chest dimensions are similar at both high and low altitudes. Nevertheless, lung volumes are higher among Han at high altitude, possibly reflecting the influence of hypoxia on alveolar growth. The hematological values of Han growing up at 3,200 m are not different from those at low altitude-an unusual finding relative to other low-altitude groups that may reflect population differences in response to hypoxia. At 3,800 m and 4,300 m, however, Han show elevated hemoglobin relative to Han at low altitude.

  10. Global Trends in Glacial Cirque Floor Altitudes and Their Relationships with Climate, Equilibrium Line Altitudes, and Mountain Range Heights

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mitchell, S. G.; Humphries, E.

    2013-12-01

    Glacial erosion at the base of cirque headwalls and the creation of threshold slopes above cirque floors may contribute to the 'glacial buzzsaw' effect in limiting the altitude of some mountain ranges. Since glacial extent and therefore glacial erosion rate depends on the equilibrium line altitude (ELA) of a region, the altitude of cirque formation should be a function of the ELA. Several regional studies have shown that cirque floors form at an altitude approximating average Quaternary ELAs in some mountain ranges, but a global correlation has not yet been demonstrated. We examined the correlation between cirque altitudes and global ELA trends by compiling existing and new cirque altitude and morphometry data from > 30 mountain ranges at a wide range of latitudes. Where available, we calculate or present the average cirque altitude, relief, and latitude. We compared these altitudes to both the global East Pacific ELA and local ELAs where available. For the locations analyzed, the majority of average cirque altitudes fall between the Eastern Pacific modern and LGM ELAs, and mountain range height is typically limited to < 600 m above that altitude. This evidence supports the hypothesis that cirque formation is dependent upon the ELA, and that cirques likely form as a result of average, rather than extreme, glacial conditions. Furthermore, the correlation between cirque altitude and ELA, along with the restricted window of relief, implies that cirque formation is a factor in limiting peak altitude in ranges that rise above the ELA.

  11. High-altitude illnesses: physiology, risk factors, prevention, and treatment.

    PubMed

    Taylor, Andrew T

    2011-01-01

    High-altitude illnesses encompass the pulmonary and cerebral syndromes that occur in non-acclimatized individuals after rapid ascent to high altitude. The most common syndrome is acute mountain sickness (AMS) which usually begins within a few hours of ascent and typically consists of headache variably accompanied by loss of appetite, nausea, vomiting, disturbed sleep, fatigue, and dizziness. With millions of travelers journeying to high altitudes every year and sleeping above 2,500 m, acute mountain sickness is a wide-spread clinical condition. Risk factors include home elevation, maximum altitude, sleeping altitude, rate of ascent, latitude, age, gender, physical condition, intensity of exercise, pre-acclimatization, genetic make-up, and pre-existing diseases. At higher altitudes, sleep disturbances may become more profound, mental performance is impaired, and weight loss may occur. If ascent is rapid, acetazolamide can reduce the risk of developing AMS, although a number of high-altitude travelers taking acetazolamide will still develop symptoms. Ibuprofen can be effective for headache. Symptoms can be rapidly relieved by descent, and descent is mandatory, if at all possible, for the management of the potentially fatal syndromes of high-altitude pulmonary and cerebral edema. The purpose of this review is to combine a discussion of specific risk factors, prevention, and treatment options with a summary of the basic physiologic responses to the hypoxia of altitude to provide a context for managing high-altitude illnesses and advising the non-acclimatized high-altitude traveler.

  12. Preparation and physicochemical characterization of a solid dispersion of (3, 5, 6-trimethylpyrazin-2-yl) methyl 3-methoxy-4-[(3, 5, 6-trimethylpyrazin-2-yl) methoxy] benzoate (VA-T) and polyvinylpyrrolidone.

    PubMed

    Cao, Sa-Li; Hou, Peng; Li, Bin; Fu, Jing; Yin, Xing-Bin; Dang, Xiao-Fang; Yang, Chun-Jing; Zhang, Jin; Zhang, Hui; Lei, Hai-Min; Ni, Jian

    2015-11-01

    Ischemic brain injury is a major disease which threatens human health and safety. (3, 5, 6-trimethylpyrazin-2-yl) methyl 3-methoxy-4-[(3, 5, 6-trimethylpyrazin-2-yl) methoxy] benzoate (VA-T), a newly discovered lead compound, is effective for the treatment of ischemic brain injury and its sequelae. But the poor solubility of VA-T leads to poor dissolution and limited clinical application. In order to improve the dissolution of VA-T, the pharmaceutical technology of solid dispersions was used in the present study. VA-T/polyvinylpyrrolidone (PVP) solid dispersion was prepared by the solvent method. The dissolution studies were carried out and solid state characterization was evaluated by differential scanning calorimetry (DSC), infrared spectroscopy (IR), x-ray diffraction (XRD) and scanning electron microscopy (SEM). The dissolution rate of VA-T was significantly improved by solid dispersion compared to that of the pure drug and physical mixture. The results of DSC and XRD indicated that the VA-T solid dispersion was amorphous. The IR spectra showed the possible interaction between VA-T and PVP was the formulation of hydrogen bonding. The SEM analysis demonstrated that there was no VA-T crystal observed in the solid dispersions. The ideal drug-to-PVP ratio was 1:5. In conclusion, the solid dispersion technique can be successfully used for the improvement of the dissolution profile of VA-T.

  13. Chemical, pulse radiolysis and density functional studies of a new, labile 5,6-indolequinone and its semiquinone.

    PubMed

    Pezzella, Alessandro; Crescenzi, Orlando; Natangelo, Anna; Panzella, Lucia; Napolitano, Alessandra; Navaratnam, Suppiah; Edge, Ruth; Land, Edward J; Barone, Vincenzo; d'Ischia, Marco

    2007-03-02

    The chemical and spectroscopic characterization of 5,6-indolequinones and their semiquinones, key transient intermediates in the oxidative conversion of 5,6-dihydroxyindoles to eumelanin biopolymers, is a most challenging task. In the present paper, we report the characterization of a novel, relatively long-lived 5,6-indolequinone along with its semiquinone using an integrated chemical, pulse radiolytic, and computational approach. The quinone was obtained by oxidation of 5,6-dihydroxy-3-iodoindole (1a) with o-chloranil in cold ethyl acetate or aqueous buffer: it displayed electronic absorption bands around 400 and 600 nm, was reduced to 1a with Na2S2O4, and reacted with o-phenylenediamine to give small amounts of 3-iodo-1H-pyrrolo[2,3-b]phenazine (2). The semiquinone exhibited absorption maxima at 380 nm (sh) and 520 nm and was detected as the initial species produced by pulse radiolytic oxidation of 1a at pH 7.0. DFT investigations indicated the 6-phenoxyl radical and the N-protonated radical anion as the most stable tautomers for the neutral and anion forms of the semiquinone, respectively. Calculated absorption spectra in water gave bands at 350 (sh) and 500 nm for the neutral form and at 310 and 360 (sh) nm for the anion. Disproportionation of the semiquinone with fast second-order kinetics (2k = 1.1 x 1010 M-1 s-1) gave a chromophore with absorption bands resembling those of chemically generated 1a quinone. Computational analysis predicted 1a quinone to exist in vacuo as the quinone-methide tautomer, displaying low energy transitions at 380 and 710 nm, and in water as the o-quinone, with calculated absorption bands around 400 and 820 nm. A strong participation of a p orbital on the iodine atom in the 360-380 nm electronic transitions of the o-quinone and quinone-methide was highlighted. The satisfactory agreement between computational and experimental electronic absorption data would suggest partitioning of 1a quinone between the o-quinone and quinone

  14. Novel selectfluor and deoxo-fluor-mediated rearrangements. New 5(6)-methyl and phenyl methanopyrrolidine alcohols and fluorides.

    PubMed

    Krow, Grant R; Lin, Guoliang; Moore, Keith P; Thomas, Andrew M; DeBrosse, Charles; Ross, Charles W; Ramjit, Harri G

    2004-05-13

    Stereoselective syntheses of novel 5,6-difunctionalized-2-azabicyclo[2.1.1]hexanes containing 5-anti-fluoro or hydroxyl in one methano bridge and a variety of syn- or anti-chloro, fluoro, hydroxy, methyl, or phenyl substituents in the other methano bridge have been effected. Rearrangements of iodides to alcohols were initiated using Selectfluor. Rearrangement of alcohols to fluorides was initiated using Deoxo-Fluor. Ring opening of 2-azabicyclo[2.2.0]hex-5-ene exo-epoxide with organocopper reagents is regioselective at C(5).

  15. Emission spectra and kinetics of copolymer films of styrene and 2,3,4,5,6-pentafluorostyrene

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    O'Connor, Donald B.; Scott, Gary W.; Coulter, Daniel R.; Yavrouian, Andre

    1991-01-01

    The temperature-dependent steady-state emission spectra and fluorescence kinetics of copolymer films of styrene and 2,3,4,5,6-pentafluorostyrene are reported. The polystyrene excimer emission is efficiently quenched in the presence of relatively small amounts of the pentafluorophenyl quencher in spite of the fact that direct energy transfer from the excimer to the quencher chromophores is not possible. The quenching of the polystyrene excimer emission at room temperature and of the polystyrene monomer emission at 13 K is attributed to the interception of the migrating monomer excitation by the quencher. The data suggest that this quenching mechanism is independent of temperature.

  16. Synthesis of Substituted 2,3,5,6-tetraarylbenzo(1,2-b:5,4-b')difurans

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Abdul-Aziz, Mahmoud; Auping, Judith V.; Meador, Michael A.

    1995-01-01

    A series of substituted 2,3,5,6-tetraarylbenzo(l,2-b:5,4-b')difurans 1 was synthesized. This synthesis is based upon the photocyclization of 2,5-dibenzoylresorcinol dibenzyl ethers to the corresponding tetrahydrobenzo(1,2-b:5,4-b')difurans. Treatment of the photoproducts with methanesulfonyl chloride in pyridine afforded 1 in overall yields ranging from 30-72%. A number of these compounds have high fluorescence quantum yields (of phi(sub f) = 0.76-0.90), and their fluorescence spectra exhibit large solvatochromic shifts. These compounds may be suitable for use as fluorescent probes.

  17. Glucose intolerance associated with hypoxia in people living at high altitudes in the Tibetan highland

    PubMed Central

    Okumiya, Kiyohito; Sakamoto, Ryota; Ishimoto, Yasuko; Kimura, Yumi; Fukutomi, Eriko; Ishikawa, Motonao; Suwa, Kuniaki; Imai, Hissei; Chen, Wenling; Kato, Emiko; Nakatsuka, Masahiro; Kasahara, Yoriko; Fujisawa, Michiko; Wada, Taizo; Wang, Hongxin; Dai, Qingxiang; Xu, Huining; Qiao, Haisheng; Ge, Ri-Li; Norboo, Tsering; Tsering, Norboo; Kosaka, Yasuyuki; Nose, Mitsuhiro; Yamaguchi, Takayoshi; Tsukihara, Toshihiro; Ando, Kazuo; Inamura, Tetsuya; Takeda, Shinya; Ishine, Masayuki; Otsuka, Kuniaki; Matsubayashi, Kozo

    2016-01-01

    Objectives To clarify the association between glucose intolerance and high altitudes (2900–4800 m) in a hypoxic environment in Tibetan highlanders and to verify the hypothesis that high altitude dwelling increases vulnerability to diabetes mellitus (DM) accelerated by lifestyle change or ageing. Design Cross-sectional epidemiological study on Tibetan highlanders. Participants We enrolled 1258 participants aged 40–87 years. The rural population comprised farmers in Domkhar (altitude 2900–3800 m) and nomads in Haiyan (3000–3100 m), Ryuho (4400 m) and Changthang (4300–4800 m). Urban area participants were from Leh (3300 m) and Jiegu (3700 m). Main outcome measure Participants were classified into six glucose tolerance-based groups: DM, intermediate hyperglycaemia (IHG), normoglycaemia (NG), fasting DM, fasting IHG and fasting NG. Prevalence of glucose intolerance was compared in farmers, nomads and urban dwellers. Effects of dwelling at high altitude or hypoxia on glucose intolerance were analysed with the confounding factors of age, sex, obesity, lipids, haemoglobin, hypertension and lifestyle, using multiple logistic regression. Results The prevalence of DM (fasting DM)/IHG (fasting IHG) was 8.9% (6.5%)/25.1% (12.7%), respectively, in all participants. This prevalence was higher in urban dwellers (9.5% (7.1%)/28.5% (11.7%)) and in farmers (8.5% (6.1%)/28.5% (18.3%)) compared with nomads (8.2% (5.7%)/15.7% (9.7%)) (p=0.0140/0.0001). Dwelling at high altitude was significantly associated with fasting IHG+fasting DM/fasting DM (ORs for >4500 and 3500–4499 m were 3.59/4.36 and 2.07/1.76 vs <3500 m, respectively). After adjusting for lifestyle change, hypoxaemia and polycythaemia were closely associated with glucose intolerance. Conclusions Socioeconomic factors, hypoxaemia and the effects of altitudes >3500 m play a major role in the high prevalence of glucose intolerance in highlanders. Tibetan highlanders may be vulnerable to glucose

  18. Altitude Testing of Large Liquid Propellant Engines

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Maynard, Bryon T.; Raines, Nickey G.

    2010-01-01

    The National Aeronautics and Space Administration entered a new age on January 14, 2004 with President Bush s announcement of the creation the Vision for Space Exploration that will take mankind back to the Moon and on beyond to Mars. In January, 2006, after two years of hard, dedicated labor, engineers within NASA and its contractor workforce decided that the J2X rocket, based on the heritage of the Apollo J2 engine, would be the new engine for the NASA Constellation Ares upper stage vehicle. This engine and vehicle combination would provide assured access to the International Space Station to replace that role played by the Space Shuttle and additionally, would serve as the Earth Departure Stage, to push the Crew Excursion Vehicle out of Earth Orbit and head it on a path for rendezvous with the Moon. Test as you fly, fly as you test was chosen to be the guiding philosophy and a pre-requisite for the engine design, development, test and evaluation program. An exhaustive survey of national test facility assets proved the required capability to test the J2X engine at high altitude for long durations did not exist so therefore, a high altitude/near space environment testing capability would have to be developed. After several agency concepts the A3 High Altitude Testing Facility proposal was selected by the J2X engine program on March 2, 2007 and later confirmed by a broad panel of NASA senior leadership in May 2007. This facility is to be built at NASA s John C. Stennis Space Center located near Gulfport, Mississippi. 30 plus years of Space Shuttle Main Engine development and flight certification testing makes Stennis uniquely suited to support the Vision For Space Exploration Return to the Moon. Propellant handling infrastructure, engine assembly facilities, a trained and dedicated workforce and a broad and varied technical support base will all ensure that the A3 facility will be built on time to support the schedule needs of the J2X engine and the ultimate flight

  19. Polar Plumes Observed at Extreme Coronal Altitudes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Deforest, C. E.; Plunkett, S. P.

    1999-09-01

    Polar plumes, unipolar high density structures in the polar coronal holes, are key to our understanding of solar wind acceleration and coronal heating. Because unipolar magnetic flux concentrations in the coronal hole account for approximately 50 leaves the coronal hole (DeForest et al., 1996), plumes (which arise from some such concentrations) are tracers of a type of magnetic structure that fills nearly half of the solar system at solar minimum. Plumes have been observed up to altitudes of about 10 solar radii with the LASCO instrument (DeForest et al., 1996), above which they fade into the coronal background. There is some contention (Habbal and Woo, 1997; Paetzold and Bird, 1998) over whether plumes extend into the interplanetary medium or become mixed with the interplume solar wind at altitudes between 10 and 100 solar radii. Several mechanisms, including the Kelvin-Helmholtz two-stream instability and cross-mode resonant wave scattering near the alfvenic point in the wind's acceleration, have been proposed that could break up the structure of the observed plumes. Using the LASCO C-3 instrument aboard SOHO (Brueckner et al, 1995) to accumulate multiple images that we then recombine, we have generated coronal images with effective exposure times in the thousands of seconds and actual durations of less than four hours. These images clearly show polar plumes extending to altitudes of 25 solar radii or more, very close to the outer edge of the C-3 field of view and above the likely alfvenic point of the wind flow.

  20. High altitude balloon experiments at IIA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nayak, Akshata; Sreejith, A. G.; Safonova, Margarita; Murthy, Jayant

    Recent advances in balloon experiments as well as in electronics have made it possible to fly scientific payloads at costs accessible to university departments. We have begun a program of high altitude ballooning at the Indian Institute of Astrophysics, Bengaluru. The primary purpose of this activity is to test low-cost ultraviolet (UV) payloads for eventual space flight, but we will also try scientific exploration of the phenomena occurring in the upper atmosphere, including sprites and meteorite impacts. We present the results of the initial experiments carried out at the CREST campus of IIA, Hosakote, and describe our plans for the future.

  1. Determining the Altitude of Iridium Flares

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Foster, James; Owe, Manfred

    1999-01-01

    Iridium flares have nothing to do with the element iridium. Iridium is also the name of a telecommunications company that has been launching satellites into low orbits around the Earth. These satellites are being used for a new type of wireless phone and paging service. Flares have been observed coming from these satellites. These flares have the potential, especially when the full fleet of satellites is in orbit, to disrupt astronomical observations. The paper reviews using simple trigonometry how to calculate the altitude of one of these satellites.

  2. Regression of altitude-produced cardiac hypertrophy.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sizemore, D. A.; Mcintyre, T. W.; Van Liere, E. J.; Wilson , M. F.

    1973-01-01

    The rate of regression of cardiac hypertrophy with time has been determined in adult male albino rats. The hypertrophy was induced by intermittent exposure to simulated high altitude. The percentage hypertrophy was much greater (46%) in the right ventricle than in the left (16%). The regression could be adequately fitted to a single exponential function with a half-time of 6.73 plus or minus 0.71 days (90% CI). There was no significant difference in the rates of regression for the two ventricles.

  3. Low Altitude Lightning Attachment to an Aircraft.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1987-05-01

    densities measured exceeded 22 Amperes/meter2 (A/m2 ) and 3950 Teslas /sec (T/s), respectively. b) The three lightning attachments that occurred at altitudes...aircraft voltage wire, and a signal channel from the autopilot navigation unit. Figure 12 shows one of the clip-on current probes connected to the...phases of the 400 Hz power signal, and one of the data signals carrying information between the INS and the autopilot unit. A review of the data after

  4. Measurement of low-altitude infrared propagation.

    PubMed

    Zeisse, C R; Nener, B D; Dewees, R V

    2000-02-20

    Infrared propagation at low altitudes is determined by extinction that is due to molecules and aerosol particles and ray bending by refraction, three effects that control the mean value of the signal. Interference causes the signal to fluctuate, or scintillate, about the mean value. We discuss the design, calibration, and limitations of a field instrument for measuring optical propagation inside the midwave and long-wave infrared atmospheric windows. The instrument, which is accurate to ?10%, has been used to investigate aerosol, refractive, and scintillation phenomena in the marine boundary layer.

  5. [Androgen levels, parenting styles and aggressive behavior in 5-6-year-old boys and girls].

    PubMed

    Sánchez-Martín, José R; Azurmendi Imaz, Aitziber; Fano Ardanaz, Eduardo; Braza Lloret, Francisco; Muñoz Sánchez, José M; Carreras de Alba, María R

    2009-02-01

    Androgen levels, parenting styles and aggressive behavior in 5-6-year-old boys and girls. This study explores the relationship between androgen levels, parenting styles, and physical, verbal, and indirect aggression measures in 5-6-year-old children. 129 children (60 boys and 69 girls) were assessed in relation to their aggression levels using a peer-rating technique. Parents completed the Parenting Styles and Dimensions Questionnaire, from which the different parenting styles were obtained. Testosterone, androstenedione and dehydroepiandrosterone (DHEA) were measured using an enzymoimmunoassay technique in saliva samples. A regression analysis indicated that the directive mother-androstenedione interaction at the age of 5 was predictive of physical aggression at the age of 6. In specific terms, the results showed that, in boys with high androstenedione levels, directive maternal behavior is associated with physical aggression. The results are subsequently discussed in light of postulates related to parenting characteristic of developmental psychology and we suggest a potential link of our results with the hypothesis of maternal dominance.

  6. Polarization components in π0 photoproduction at photon energies up to 5.6 GeV

    SciTech Connect

    Luo, W.; Brash, E. J.; Gilman, R.; Jones, M. K.; Meziane, M.; Pentchev, L.; Perdrisat, C. F; Puckett, A. J.R.; Punjabi, V.; Wesselmann, F. R.; Marsh, A.; Matulenko, Y.; Maxwell, J.; Meekins, D.; Melnik, Y.; Miller, J.; Mkrtchyan, A.; Mkrtchyan, H.; Moffit, B.; Moreno, O.; Mulholland, J.; Narayan, A.; Nuruzzaman, .; Nedev, S.; Piasetzky, E.; Pierce, W.; Piskunov, N. M.; Prok, Y.; Ransome, R. D.; Razin, D. S.; Reimer, P. E.; Reinhold, J.; Rondon, O.; Shabestari, M.; Shahinyan, A.; Shestermanov, K.; Sirca, S.; Sitnik, I.; Smykov, L.; Smith, G.; Solovyev, L.; Solvignon, P.; Strakovsky, I. I; Subedi, R.; Suleiman, R.; Tomasi-Gustafsson, E.; Vasiliev, A.; Veilleux, M.; Wood, S.; Ye, Z.; Zanevsky, Y.; Zhang, X.; Zhang, Y.; Zheng, X.; Zhu, L.; Ahmidouch, A.; Albayrak, I.; Aniol, K. A.; Arrington, J.; Asaturyan, A.; Ates, O.; Baghdasaryan, H.; Benmokhtar, F.; Bertozzi, W.; Bimbot, L.; Bosted, P.; Boeglin, W.; Butuceanu, C.; Carter, P.; Chernenko, S.; Christy, M. E.; Commisso, M.; Cornejo, J. C.; Covrig, S.; Danagoulian, S.; Daniel, A.; Davidenko, A.; Day, D.; Dhamija, S.; Dutta, D.; Ent, R.; Frullani, S.; Fenker, H.; Frlez, E.; Garibaldi, F.; Gaskell, D.; Gilad, S.; Goncharenko, Y.; Hafidi, K.; Hamilton, D.; Higinbotham, D. W.; Hinton, W.; Horn, T.; Hu, B.; Huang, J.; Huber, G. M.; Jensen, E.; Kang, H.; Keppel, C.; Khandaker, M.; King, P.; Kirillov, D.; Kohl, M.; Kravtsov, V.; Kumbartzki, G.; Li, Y.; Mamyan, V.; Margaziotis, D. J.; Markowitz, P.

    2012-05-31

    We present new data for the polarization observables of the final state proton in the 1H(→ γ, → p)π0 reaction. These data can be used to test predictions based on hadron helicity conservation (HHC) and perturbative QCD (pQCD). These data have both small statistical and systematic uncertainties, and were obtained with beam energies between 1.8 and 5.6 GeV and for π0 scattering angles larger than 75{sup o} in center-of-mass (c.m.) frame. The data extend the polarization measurements data base for neutral pion photoproduction up to Eγ = 5.6 GeV. The results show non-zero induced polarization above the resonance region. The polarization transfer components vary rapidly with the photon energy and π0 scattering angle in the center-of-mass frame. This indicates that HHC does not hold and that the pQCD limit is still not reached in the energy regime of this experiment.

  7. Differential renal glomerular changes induced by 5/6 nephrectomization between common marmoset monkeys (Callithrix jacchus) and rats.

    PubMed

    Suzuki, Yui; Yamaguchi, Itaru; Onoda, Noriko; Saito, Takashi; Myojo, Kensuke; Imaizumi, Minami; Takada, Chie; Kimoto, Naoya; Takaba, Katsumi; Yamate, Jyoji

    2013-07-01

    We have been investigating the relevance and availability of 5/6 nephrectomized (Nx) common marmoset monkeys (Callithrix jacchus) as a chronic renal failure model. As a part of this investigation, renal glomerular changes in the Nx marmosets were histopathologically and immunohistochemically evaluated, and then compared with those in 5/6 Nx SD rats. In the Nx marmosets, the blood and urine parameters were elevated, excluding urine protein; histopathologically, enlargement of Bowman's capsule and atrophy of the glomeruli were observed in all animals, and other slight changes were also observed in 1 or 2 marmosets. There were no significant changes in the mesangial matrix injury score, vimentin and desmin positivity or the number of WT1 positive cells between the control and Nx marmoset groups. On the other hand, in the Nx rats, the blood and urine parameters were elevated; histopathologically, various changes were observed in the glomeruli, and the mesangial matrix injury score, vimentin and desmin positivity were increased, while the number of WT1 positive cells was decreased; these histopathological impacts on the renal glomerulus at 13 weeks after Nx in rats were more severe than that in the Nx marmosets. Because the glomerular basement membrane (GBM) was much thicker in the marmosets than in the rats in electron microscopy, the weaker pathological changes in the Nx marmosets might be due to the GBM thickness. This study showed for the first time glomerular lesions developed in the Nx marmosets, and the possible pathogenesis of the glomerular lesions was discussed.

  8. Polarization components in π0 photoproduction at photon energies up to 5.6 GeV

    DOE PAGES

    Luo, W.; Brash, E. J.; Gilman, R.; ...

    2012-05-31

    We present new data for the polarization observables of the final state proton in the 1H(→ γ, → p)π0 reaction. These data can be used to test predictions based on hadron helicity conservation (HHC) and perturbative QCD (pQCD). These data have both small statistical and systematic uncertainties, and were obtained with beam energies between 1.8 and 5.6 GeV and for π0 scattering angles larger than 75{sup o} in center-of-mass (c.m.) frame. The data extend the polarization measurements data base for neutral pion photoproduction up to Eγ = 5.6 GeV. The results show non-zero induced polarization above the resonance region. Themore » polarization transfer components vary rapidly with the photon energy and π0 scattering angle in the center-of-mass frame. This indicates that HHC does not hold and that the pQCD limit is still not reached in the energy regime of this experiment.« less

  9. Renal endothelial function is associated with the anti-proteinuric effect of ACE inhibition in 5/6 nephrectomized rats.

    PubMed

    Vettoretti, Simone; Vavrinec, Peter; Ochodnicky, Peter; Deelman, Leo E; De Zeeuw, Dick; Henning, Rob H; Buikema, Hendrik

    2016-05-01

    In healthy rats, the physiological variation of baseline endothelial function of intrarenal arteries correlates with the severity of renal damage in response to a subsequent specific renal injury. However, whether such a variation in endothelial function may also condition or predict the variable response to angiotensin-converting enzyme-inhibiting treatment in these individuals has not been addressed before. To study this, 5/6 nephrectomy was performed to induce renal injury and chronic kidney disease in a group of healthy Wistar rats. At the time of nephrectomy, interlobar arteries were obtained from the extirpated right kidney and studied in vitro for endothelium-dependent relaxation to acetylcholine. Six weeks thereafter, treatment with lisinopril was started (n = 11) and continued for 9 wk. Proteinuria (metabolic cages) and systolic blood pressure (SBP; tail cuff) were evaluated weekly, and these were analyzed in relation to renal endothelial function at baseline. 5/6 Nephrectomy induced an increase in SBP and progressive proteinuria. Treatment with lisinopril reduced SBP and slowed proteinuria, albeit to a variable degree among individuals. The acetylcholine-induced renal artery dilation at baseline negatively correlated with lisinopril-induced reduction of proteinuria (r(2) = 0.648, P = 0.003) and with the decrease in SBP (r(2) = 0.592, P = 0.006). Our data suggest that angiotensin-converting enzyme-inhibitor attenuates the progression of renal damage the most in those individuals with decreased basal renal endothelial-mediated vasodilation.

  10. Several (4,4)- and (5,6,8)-connected lanthanide-organic frameworks: structures, luminescence and magnetic properties.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Xiao-Qing; Liu, Xu-Hui; Zhao, Bin

    2013-10-01

    A series of lanthanide-based organic frameworks with formulas of {[PrL(H2O)2]·2H2O}n () and {[Ln3L3(H2O)2]·2H2O}n (Ln = Eu (), Gd (), Tb (), Dy (), Ho (), Er (); H3L = 4-(carboxymethoxy)isophthalic acid), were hydrothermally synthesized and structurally characterized. It is the first time that 4-(carboxymethoxy)isophthalic acid is employed in producing lanthanide compounds. The seven compounds exhibit two types of structures with the decreasing radius of the lanthanide ions, representing the lanthanide contraction effect. Compound with the large Pr(3+) ion displays a 2D layered structure with a binodal (4,4)-connected topology with the Schläfli symbol of (3(3)6(3))2, whereas compounds with small Ln(3+) ions feature a 3D framework constructed from carboxyl groups with a (5,6,8)-connected topology with the Schläfli symbol of (3(2)4(4)5(4))·(3(4)4(4)5(4)6(3))·(3(4)4(8)5(6)6(9)8). The luminescence and magnetic properties were investigated, and the results indicate that the H3L ligand can sensitize the lanthanide luminescence in compounds , and and makes a contribution to the antiferromagnetic interactions in compound or the uncertain magnetic interactions in compounds . Additionally, the thermal analyses suggest the high thermal stability of compounds .

  11. Seven up acts as a temporal factor during two different stages of neuroblast 5-6 development.

    PubMed

    Benito-Sipos, Jonathan; Ulvklo, Carina; Gabilondo, Hugo; Baumgardt, Magnus; Angel, Anna; Torroja, Laura; Thor, Stefan

    2011-12-01

    Drosophila embryonic neuroblasts generate different cell types at different time points. This is controlled by a temporal cascade of Hb→Kr→Pdm→Cas→Grh, which acts to dictate distinct competence windows sequentially. In addition, Seven up (Svp), a member of the nuclear hormone receptor family, acts early in the temporal cascade, to ensure the transition from Hb to Kr, and has been referred to as a 'switching factor'. However, Svp is also expressed in a second wave within the developing CNS, but here, the possible role of Svp has not been previously addressed. In a genetic screen for mutants affecting the last-born cell in the embryonic NB5-6T lineage, the Ap4/FMRFamide neuron, we have isolated a novel allele of svp. Expression analysis shows that Svp is expressed in two distinct pulses in NB5-6T, and mutant analysis reveals that svp plays two distinct roles. In the first pulse, svp acts to ensure proper downregulation of Hb. In the second pulse, which occurs in a Cas/Grh double-positive window, svp acts to ensure proper sub-division of this window. These studies show that a temporal factor may play dual roles, acting at two different stages during the development of one neural lineage.

  12. Golgi-Cox Staining Step by Step

    PubMed Central

    Zaqout, Sami; Kaindl, Angela M.

    2016-01-01

    Golgi staining remains a key method to study neuronal morphology in vivo. Since most protocols delineating modifications of the original staining method lack details on critical steps, establishing this method in a laboratory can be time-consuming and frustrating. Here, we describe the Golgi-Cox staining in such detail that should turn the staining into an easily feasible method for all scientists working in the neuroscience field. PMID:27065817

  13. Cardiopulmonary and metabolic responses in healthy elderly humans during a 1-week hiking programme at high altitude.

    PubMed

    Burtscher, M; Bachmann, O; Hatzl, T; Hotter, B; Likar, R; Philadelphy, M; Nachbauer, W

    2001-05-01

    Worldwide there are approximately 100 million visitors to high altitude annually and about 15% of those are elderly. Nevertheless, basic information on the cardiopulmonary and metabolic responses to physical activity at high altitude in the elderly is scarce. Therefore, we studied 20 voluntary healthy elderly subjects (55-77 years) who were randomly assigned to a low- (600 m) or a high altitude (2,000 m) group. Both groups increased the duration of their daily hiking from 2.5 to 5 h during a period of 1 week. Pre- and post-hiking cardiopulmonary variables at rest were measured daily. Exercise tests (3 min step test) were performed on days 1, 4 and 7. Of the morning values at rest, only arterial oxygen saturation (SaO2) had decreased after the 1st night at high altitude. After hiking however, SaO2 was diminished on all days at high altitude. Post-hiking heart rates increased from baseline on days 1 and 2 in the low- and on days 1-5 in the high-altitude group. Exercising SaO2 (%) in the three tests was decreased [84.9 (SD 2.8), 88.1 (SD 2.1), 87.2 (SD 2.3)] compared to baseline [93.2 (SD 2.0); P < 0.05] and blood lactate concentrations were increased [3.1 (SD 0.7), 3.4 (SD 0.3), 3.3 (SD 0.2)] compared to baseline [2.7 (SD 0.6); P < 0.05] in all tests at high altitude. The 1-week hiking programme was well tolerated by the healthy elderly at both low and high altitudes. Ventilatory adaptation to high altitude in the elderly seemed to have been completed within the first 2 days during the measurements at rest. However, cardiopulmonary and metabolic responses to exercise were increased and recovery from exercise was delayed during the 1-week hiking programme at high altitude. Heart rate and SaO2 measurements are considered to be highly sensitive in estimating the state of acclimatisation and for monitoring exercise intensity and duration at high altitude.

  14. Preparation for football competition at moderate to high altitude.

    PubMed

    Gore, C J; McSharry, P E; Hewitt, A J; Saunders, P U

    2008-08-01

    Analysis of approximately 100 years of home-and-away South American World Cup matches illustrate that football competition at moderate/high altitude (>2000 m) favors the home team, although this is more than compensated by the likelihood of sea-level teams winning at home against the same opponents who have descended from altitude. Nevertheless, the home team advantage at altitudes above approximately 2000 m may reflect that traditionally, teams from sea level or low altitude have not spent 1-2 weeks acclimatizing at altitude. Despite large differences between individuals, in the first few days at high altitude (e.g. La Paz, 3600 m) some players experience symptoms of acute mountain sickness (AMS) such as headache and disrupted sleep, and their maximum aerobic power (VO2max) is approximately 25% reduced while their ventilation, heart rate and blood lactate during submaximal exercise are elevated. Simulated altitude for a few weeks before competition at altitude can be used to attain partial ventilatory acclimation and ameliorated symptoms of AMS. The variety of simulated altitude exposures usually created with enriched nitrogen mixtures of air include resting or exercising for a few hours per day or sleeping approximately 8 h/night in hypoxia. Preparation for competition at moderate/high altitude by training at altitude is probably superior to simulated exposure; however, the optimal duration at moderate/high altitude is unclear. Preparing for 1-2 weeks at moderate/high altitude is a reasonable compromise between the benefits associated with overcoming AMS and partial restoration of VO2max vs the likelihood of detraining.

  15. Constraints on the Longwave Cloud Altitude Feedback

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zelinka, M. D.; Klein, S. A.

    2011-12-01

    Cloud feedback represents the source of largest spread among global climate model projections of future climate change. Though most studies to date have focused on the large spread in cloud feedback that arises from disparate responses of subtropical low clouds, we show using a new technique for quantifying the contribution to cloud feedback from individual cloud types that a significant spread exists in the response of high clouds, with implications for both longwave and shortwave feedbacks. In this talk, we focus on the inter-model spread in longwave altitude feedback, defined as the impact on top of atmosphere longwave fluxes due solely to changes in the vertical distribution of clouds, holding both the total amount and the optical depth distribution fixed. Among the ten models analyzed, this feedback varies from 0.06 to 0.80 W m-2 K-1. We show that the magnitude of this feedback is dependent on two key variables: the effective high cloud amount in the control climate and the change in mean cloud top pressure under doubling of CO2. The latter component is governed by the degree to which the troposphere deepens under doubling of CO2, suggesting an inverse relationship with the lapse rate feedback. To the extent that realistic bounds can be placed on effective high cloud amount using observations, the range of plausible longwave cloud altitude feedback magnitudes can be further reduced.

  16. High-altitude adaptations in vertebrate hemoglobins.

    PubMed

    Weber, Roy E

    2007-09-30

    Vertebrates at high altitude are subjected to hypoxic conditions that challenge aerobic metabolism. O(2) transport from the respiratory surfaces to tissues requires matching between the O(2) loading and unloading tensions and the O(2)-affinity of blood, which is an integrated function of hemoglobin's intrinsic O(2)-affinity and its allosteric interaction with cellular effectors (organic phosphates, protons and chloride). Whereas short-term altitudinal adaptations predominantly involve adjustments in allosteric interactions, long-term, genetically-coded adaptations typically involve changes in the structure of the haemoglobin molecules. The latter commonly comprise substitutions of amino acid residues at the effector binding sites, the heme-protein contacts, or at intersubunit contacts that stabilize either the low-affinity ('Tense') or the high-affinity ('Relaxed') structures of the molecules. Molecular heterogeneity (multiple isoHbs with differentiated oxygenation properties) can further broaden the range of physico-chemical conditions where Hb functions under altitudinal hypoxia. This treatise reviews the molecular and cellular mechanisms that adapt haemoglobin-oxygen affinities in mammals, birds and ectothermic vertebrates at high altitude.

  17. Information on stepping motors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fongarland, G.

    1982-04-01

    The principles of the stepping motors which are often used in servomechanisms are reviewed. Variable reluctance as well as permanent magnet stepping motors are considered. Their operation is explained which includes permanent rotation, starting, stopping, and resonance effects. Several application examples, drawn from problems in automation, are outlined.

  18. STEP Experiment Requirements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brumfield, M. L. (Compiler)

    1984-01-01

    A plan to develop a space technology experiments platform (STEP) was examined. NASA Langley Research Center held a STEP Experiment Requirements Workshop on June 29 and 30 and July 1, 1983, at which experiment proposers were invited to present more detailed information on their experiment concept and requirements. A feasibility and preliminary definition study was conducted and the preliminary definition of STEP capabilities and experiment concepts and expected requirements for support services are presented. The preliminary definition of STEP capabilities based on detailed review of potential experiment requirements is investigated. Topics discussed include: Shuttle on-orbit dynamics; effects of the space environment on damping materials; erectable beam experiment; technology for development of very large solar array deployers; thermal energy management process experiment; photovoltaic concentrater pointing dynamics and plasma interactions; vibration isolation technology; flight tests of a synthetic aperture radar antenna with use of STEP.

  19. OPTIMUM PLASMA STATES FOR NEXT STEP TOKAMAKS

    SciTech Connect

    LIN-LIU,YR; STAMBAUGH,RD

    2002-11-01

    OAK A271 OPTIMUM PLASMA STATES FOR NEXT STEP TOKAMAKS. The dependence of the ideal ballooning {beta} limit on aspect ratio, A, and elongation {kappa} is systematically explored for nearly 100% bootstrap current driven tokamak equilibria in a wide range of the shape parameters (A = 1.2-7.0, {kappa} = 1.5-6.0 with triangularity {delta} = 0.5). The critical {beta}{sub N} is shown to be optimal at {kappa} = 3.0-4.0 for all A studied and increases as A decreases with a dependence close to A{sup -0.5}. The results obtained can be used as a theoretical basis for the choice of optimum aspect ratio and elongation of next step burning plasma tokamaks or tokamak reactors.

  20. 5,6-EET Is Released upon Neuronal Activity and Induces Mechanical Pain Hypersensitivity via TRPA1 on Central Afferent Terminals

    PubMed Central

    Sisignano, Marco; Park, Chul-Kyu; Angioni, Carlo; Zhang, Dong Dong; von Hehn, Christian; Cobos, Enrique J.; Ghasemlou, Nader; Xu, Zhen-Zhong; Kumaran, Vigneswara; Lu, Ruirui; Grant, Andrew; Fischer, Michael J. M.; Schmidtko, Achim; Reeh, Peter; Ji, Ru-Rong; Woolf, Clifford J.; Geisslinger, Gerd; Scholich, Klaus; Brenneis, Christian

    2012-01-01

    Epoxyeicosatrienoic acids (EETs) are cytochrome P450-epoxygenase-derived metabolites of arachidonic acid that act as endogenous signaling molecules in multiple biological systems. Here we have investigated the specific contribution of 5,6-EET to transient receptor potential (TRP) channel activation in nociceptor neurons and its consequence for nociceptive processing. We found that, during capsaicin-induced nociception, 5,6-EET levels increased in dorsal root ganglia (DRGs) and the dorsal spinal cord, and 5,6-EET is released from activated sensory neurons in vitro. 5,6-EET potently induced a calcium flux (100 nm) in cultured DRG neurons that was completely abolished when TRPA1 was deleted or inhibited. In spinal cord slices, 5,6-EET dose dependently enhanced the frequency, but not the amplitude, of spontaneous EPSCs (sEPSCs) in lamina II neurons that also responded to mustard oil (allyl isothiocyanate), indicating a presynaptic action. Furthermore, 5,6-EET-induced enhancement of sEPSC frequency was abolished in TRPA1-null mice, suggesting that 5,6-EET presynaptically facilitated spinal cord synaptic transmission by TRPA1. Finally, in vivo intrathecal injection of 5,6-EET caused mechanical allodynia in wild-type but not TRPA1-null mice. We conclude that 5,6-EET is synthesized on the acute activation of nociceptors and can produce mechanical hypersensitivity via TRPA1 at central afferent terminals in the spinal cord. PMID:22553041

  1. High-altitude illness induced by tooth root infection

    PubMed Central

    Finsterer, J

    1999-01-01

    High-altitude illness may occur after recent pulmonary infection, but high-altitude illness after root canal therapy has not been described previously. A 44-year-old man is presented who skied to a 3333 m high peak in the Eastern Alps one day after he had undergone root canal therapy because of a tooth root infection. After 4 hours above 3000 m severe symptoms of high-altitude illness, including pulmonary oedema, developed. His condition improved after immediate descent. The next day he presented with local and general signs of infection which were successfully treated with gingival incisions and antibiotics. In conclusion, acute tooth root infection and root canal therapy may induce high-altitude illness at an altitude just above 3000 m.


Keywords: high-altitude illness; pulmonary oedema; root canal therapy; tooth root infection PMID:10715764

  2. Sources of plasma in the high altitude cusp

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peterson, W. K.; Trattner, K. J.

    2012-10-01

    Ambiguities introduced by the inconsistent definitions of the low and high altitude cusp lead to the inconsistency that at low altitudes the region commonly known as the cusp does not include boundary layer plasmas, but at high altitudes it does. Here we examine plasma data from two high altitude cusp intervals where ∼100 keV ionospheric ions were observed. We show that the data are an average over an interval that includes plasma from both boundary layer and newly injected solar wind plasmas. We find that the ∼100 keV ionospheric ions reported in the high altitude cusp are energized by well-known magnetospheric processes bringing energetic ions to the dayside boundary layers. We conclude that there is no need to postulate new processes associated with waves in diamagnetic cavities commonly found in the high altitude cusp to explain the observation of ∼100 keV ionospheric ions found there.

  3. Cardiovascular and renal effects of chronic exposure to high altitude.

    PubMed

    Hurtado, Abdias; Escudero, Elizabeth; Pando, Jackeline; Sharma, Shailendra; Johnson, Richard J

    2012-12-01

    Over 140 million people live at high altitude, defined as living at an altitude of 2400 m or more above sea level. Subjects living under these conditions are continuously living under hypoxic conditions and, depending on the population, various adaptations have developed. Interestingly, subjects living chronically at high altitude appear to have a decreased frequency of obesity, diabetes and coronary artery disease. However, these benefits on health are balanced by the frequent development of systemic and pulmonary hypertension. Recently, it has been recognized that subjects living at high altitude are at risk for developing high-altitude renal syndrome (HARS), which is a syndrome consisting of polycythemia, hyperuricemia, systemic hypertension and microalbuminuria, but with preserved glomerular filtration rate. More studies should be performed to characterize the mechanisms and etiology of HARS; as such studies may be of benefit not only to the high-altitude population, but also to better understanding of the renal consequences of acute and chronic hypoxia.

  4. Bioconcentration of 5,5',6-trichlorobiphenyl and pentachlorophenol in the midge, Chironomus riparius, as measured by a pharmacokinetic model

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Lydy, M.J.; Hayton, W.L.; Staubus, A.E.; Fisher, S.W.

    1994-01-01

    A two compartment pharmacokinetic model was developed which describes the uptake and elimination of 5,5',6-trichlorobiphenyl (TCB) and pentachlorophenol (PCP) in the midge, Chironomus riparius. C. riparius were exposed to nominal TCB (2 ??g L-1) and PCP (9 ??g L-1) concentrations during a 16 h static uptake phase. Depuration was determined over approximately 45 h using a flowthrough system without feeding. The uptake clearance (P) was 330 ?? 61 ml g-1 midge h-1 for TCB and 55 ?? 4 ml g-1 midge h-1 for PCP, while measured bioconcentration factors (BCF) were 35,900 and 458 for TCB and PCP, respectively. Overall, the clearance-volume- based pharmacokinetic model predicted BCF values that were consistent with published values as well as with BCF values obtained from the octanol-water partition coefficient (K(ow)).

  5. Design, synthesis and evaluation of novel 2,5,6-trisubstituted benzimidazoles targeting FtsZ as antitubercular agents.

    PubMed

    Park, Bora; Awasthi, Divya; Chowdhury, Soumya R; Melief, Eduard H; Kumar, Kunal; Knudson, Susan E; Slayden, Richard A; Ojima, Iwao

    2014-05-01

    Filamenting temperature-sensitive protein Z (FtsZ), an essential cell division protein, is a promising target for the drug discovery of new-generation antibacterial agents against various bacterial pathogens. As a part of SAR studies on benzimidazoles, we have synthesized a library of 376 novel 2,5,6-trisubstituted benzimidazoles, bearing ether or thioether linkage at the 6-position. In a preliminary HTP screening against Mtb H37Rv, 108 compounds were identified as hits at a cut off concentration of 5 μg/mL. Among those hits, 10 compounds exhibited MIC values in the range of 0.63-12.5 μg/mL. Light scattering assay and TEM analysis with the most potent compound 5a clearly indicate that its molecular target is Mtb-FtsZ. Also, the Kd of 5a with Mtb-FtsZ was determined to be 1.32 μM.

  6. Novel synthesis of silver nanoparticles using 2,3,5,6-tetrakis-(morpholinomethyl) hydroquinone as reducing agent.

    PubMed

    Manivel, P; Balamurugan, A; Ponpandian, N; Mangalaraj, D; Viswanathan, C

    2012-09-01

    2,3,5,6-Tetrakis-(morpholinomethyl) hydroquinone (TMMH) was used as a reducing agent to synthesize spherical shaped silver nanoparticles in water-ethanol medium without using any stabilizing and capping agents. The reducing agent TMMH is prepared by Mannich-type reaction method and (1)H NMR, (13)C NMR and FT-IR spectroscopy techniques were used to characterize the compound (TMMH). The nature of bonding, structural and optical properties of the final product were analyzed using different techniques such as UV-Vis spectroscopy, X-ray diffraction (XRD), scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and Fourier-transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR). The interaction between silver and reducing agent was confirmed by using FTIR analysis. The final product obtained showed higher crystallinity with cubic structure and an average crystalline size of about 20 nm. The results revealed that it is possible to synthesize crystalline Ag nanoparticles using organic compound as reducing agent.

  7. Kinetics of inhibition by 5,6-dichloro-1-beta-D-ribofuranosylbenzimidazole on calf thymus casein kinase II.

    PubMed

    Zandomeni, R O

    1989-09-01

    The adenosine analogue 5,6-dichloro-1-beta-D-ribofuranosylbenzimidazole (DRB) is a specific inhibitor for RNA polymerase II transcription in vivo and in vitro [Tamm + Sehgal (1978) Adv. Virus Res. 22, 187-258; Zandomeni & Weinmann (1984) J. Biol. Chem. 259, 14804-14811]. The effect on RNA polymerase II-specific transcription seems to be mediated by its inhibition of nuclear casein kinase II [Zandomeni, Carrera-Zandomeni, Shugar & Weinmann (1986) J. Biol. Chem. 261, 3414-3419]. Inhibition studies indicated that DRB acted as a mixed-type inhibitor with respect to casein and as a competitive inhibitor with respect to the nucleotide phosphate donor substrates. The DRB inhibition constant is 7 microM for the calf thymus casein kinase II, with regard to both ATP and GTP.

  8. Novel synthesis of silver nanoparticles using 2,3,5,6-tetrakis-(morpholinomethyl) hydroquinone as reducing agent

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Manivel, P.; Balamurugan, A.; Ponpandian, N.; Mangalaraj, D.; Viswanathan, C.

    2,3,5,6-Tetrakis-(morpholinomethyl) hydroquinone (TMMH) was used as a reducing agent to synthesize spherical shaped silver nanoparticles in water-ethanol medium without using any stabilizing and capping agents. The reducing agent TMMH is prepared by Mannich-type reaction method and 1H NMR, 13C NMR and FT-IR spectroscopy techniques were used to characterize the compound (TMMH). The nature of bonding, structural and optical properties of the final product were analyzed using different techniques such as UV-Vis spectroscopy, X-ray diffraction (XRD), scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and Fourier-transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR). The interaction between silver and reducing agent was confirmed by using FTIR analysis. The final product obtained showed higher crystallinity with cubic structure and an average crystalline size of about 20 nm. The results revealed that it is possible to synthesize crystalline Ag nanoparticles using organic compound as reducing agent.

  9. SAMS Acceleration Measurements on Mir from May 1997 to June 1998 (NASA Increments 5, 6, and 7)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    DeLombard, Richard

    1999-01-01

    During NASA Increments 5, 6, and 7 (May 1997 to June 1998), about eight gigabytes of acceleration data were collected by the Space Acceleration Measurement System (SAMS) onboard the Russian Space Station Mir. The data were recorded on twenty-seven optical disks which were returned to Earth on Orbiter missions STS-86, STS-89, and STS-91. During these increments, SAMS data were collected in the Priroda module to support various microgravity experiments. This report points out some of the salient features of the microgravity acceleration environment to which the experiments were exposed. This report presents an overview of the SAMS acceleration measurements recorded by 10 Hz and 100 Hz sensor heads. The analyses included herein complement those presented in previous Mir increment summary reports prepared by the Principal Investigator Microgravity Services project.

  10. 5(6)-anti-Substituted-2-azabicyclo[2.1.1]hexanes. A Nucleophilic Displacement Route

    PubMed Central

    Krow, Grant R.; Edupuganti, Ram; Gandla, Deepa; Choudhary, Amit; Lin, Guoliang; Sonnet, Philip E.; DeBrosse, Charles; Ross, Charles W.; Cannon, Kevin C.; Raines, Ronald T.

    2012-01-01

    Nucleophilic displacements of 5(6)-anti-bromo substituents in 2-azabicyclo[2.1.1]hexanes (methanopyrrolidines) have been accomplished. These displacements have produced 5-anti-X-6-anti-Y-difunctionalized-2-azabicyclo[2.1.1]hexanes containing bromo, fluoro, acetoxy, hydroxy, azido, imidazole, thiophenyl, and iodo substituents. Such displacements of anti-bromide ions require an amine nitrogen and are a function of the solvent and the choice of metal salt. Reaction rates were faster and product yields were higher in DMSO when compared to DMF and with CsOAc compared to NaOAc. Sodium or lithium salts gave products, except with NaF, where silver fluoride in nitromethane was best for substitution by fluoride. The presence of electron-withdrawing F, OAc, N3, Br, or SPh substituents in the 6-anti-position slows bromide displacements at the 5-anti-position. PMID:19799411

  11. ALMA Reveals Weak [N ii] Emission in "Typical" Galaxies and Intense Starbursts at z = 5-6

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pavesi, Riccardo; Riechers, Dominik A.; Capak, Peter L.; Carilli, Christopher L.; Sharon, Chelsea E.; Stacey, Gordon J.; Karim, Alexander; Scoville, Nicholas Z.; Smolčić, Vernesa

    2016-12-01

    We report interferometric measurements of [N ii] 205 μm fine-structure line emission from a representative sample of three galaxies at z = 5-6 using the Atacama Large (sub)Millimeter Array (ALMA). These galaxies were previously detected in [C ii] and far-infrared continuum emission and span almost two orders of magnitude in star formation rate (SFR). Our results show at least two different regimes of ionized interstellar medium properties for galaxies in the first billion years of cosmic time, separated by their {L}[{{C}{{II}}]}/{L}[{{N}{{II}}]} ratio. We find extremely low [N ii] emission compared to [C ii] ({L}[{{C}{{II}}]}/{L}[{{N}{{II}}]}={68}-28+200) from a “typical” ˜ {L}{UV}* star-forming galaxy, likely directly or indirectly (by its effect on the radiation field) related to low dust abundance and low metallicity. The infrared-luminous modestly star-forming Lyman-break galaxy (LBG) in our sample is characterized by an ionized-gas fraction ({L}[{{C}{{II}}]}/{L}[{{N}{{II}}]}≲ 20) typical of local star-forming galaxies and shows evidence for spatial variations in its ionized-gas fraction across an extended gas reservoir. The extreme SFR, warm and compact dusty starburst AzTEC-3 shows an ionized fraction higher than expected given its SFR surface density ({L}[{{C}{{II}}]}/{L}[{{N}{{II}}]}=22+/- 8) suggesting that [N ii] dominantly traces a diffuse ionized medium rather than star-forming H ii regions in this type of galaxy. This highest redshift sample of [N ii] detections provides some of the first constraints on ionized and neutral gas modeling attempts and on the structure of the interstellar medium at z = 5-6 in “normal” galaxies and starbursts.

  12. Isolation of oligomers of 5,6-dihydroxyindole-2-carboxylic acid from the eye of the catfish

    PubMed Central

    Ito, Shosuke; Nicol, J. A. Colin

    1974-01-01

    The reflecting material of the tapetum lucidum of the sea catfish (Arius felis) was chromatographed on Sephadex LH-20 in methanol–dimethyl sulphoxide–formic acid. Two components were present: one, showing an absorption maximum at 330nm, was tapetal pigment; the other, at 257nm, was an associated nucleoside. The tapetal pigment was extracted in methanol–HCl and isolated by adsorption chromatography on Sephadex LH-20. It yielded a methoxy methyl ester on treatment with diazomethane, and permanganate oxidation gave pyrrole-2,3,5-tricarboxylic acid. From the information provided by u.v. and i.r. spectra of the pigment and its methoxy methyl ester, from elemental analyses and from the oxidation products, we suggest that the tapetal pigment is derived from oxidative coupling of 5,6-dihydroxyindole-2-carboxylic acid. A molecular-weight determination and chromatography of the methoxy methyl ester indicate that the pigment is a mixture of oligomers, among which the tetramers probably predominate. We consider that the monomers are joined mainly by C-C linkages at positions 4 and 7. A synthetic pigment having spectral properties nearly identical with those of the natural pigment was prepared by enzymic oxidation of 5,6-dihydroxyindole-2-carboxylic acid with mushroom tyrosinase. The identity of the tapetal pigment with the synthetic pigment was further confirmed by comparing u.v. and i.r. spectra of their methoxy methyl esters. Formation of the tapetal pigment from tyrosine and relationships of the tapetal pigment to melanin are discussed. PMID:4464851

  13. Histopathological characterization of renal tubular and interstitial changes in 5/6 nephrectomized marmoset monkeys (Callithrix jacchus).

    PubMed

    Suzuki, Yui; Yamaguchi, Itaru; Myojo, Kensuke; Kimoto, Naoya; Imaizumi, Minami; Takada, Chie; Sanada, Hiroko; Takaba, Katsumi; Yamate, Jyoji

    2015-01-01

    Common marmosets (Callithrix jacchus) have become a useful animal model, particularly for development of biopharmaceuticals. While various renal failure models have been established in rodents, there is currently no acceptable model in marmosets. We analyzed the damaged renal tubules and tubulointerstitial changes (inflammation and fibrosis) of 5/6 nephrectomized (Nx) common marmosets by histopathological/immunohistochemical methods, and compared these findings to those in 5/6 Nx SD rats. In Nx marmosets and rats sacrificed at 5 and 13 weeks after Nx, variously dilated and atrophied renal tubules were seen in the cortex in common; however, the epithelial proliferating activity was much less in Nx marmosets. Furthermore, the degrees of inflammation and fibrosis seen in the affected cortex were more severe and massive in Nx marmosets with time-dependent increase. Interestingly, inflammation in Nx marmosets, of which degree was less in Nx rats, consisted of a large number of CD3-positive T cells and CD20-positive B cells (occasionally forming follicles), and a few CD68-positive macrophages. Based on these findings, lymphocytes might contribute to the progressive renal lesions in Nx marmosets. Fibrotic areas in Nx marmosets comprised myofibroblasts expressing vimentin and α-smooth muscle actin (α-SMA), whereas along with vimentin and α-SMA expressions, desmin was expressed in myofibroblasts in Nx rats. This study shows that there are some differences in renal lesions induced by Nx between marmosets and rats, which would provide useful, base-line information for pharmacology and toxicology studies using Nx marmosets.

  14. Mn(II) complexes containing the polypyridylic chiral ligand (-)-pinene[5,6]bipyridine. Catalysts for oxidation reactions.

    PubMed

    Rich, Jordi; Rodríguez, Montserrat; Romero, Isabel; Vaquer, Lydia; Sala, Xavier; Llobet, Antoni; Corbella, Montserrat; Collomb, Marie-Noëlle; Fontrodona, Xavier

    2009-10-14

    A series of mononuclear and dinuclear chiral manganese(II) complexes containing the neutral bidentate chiral nitrogen ligand (-)-pinene[5,6]bipyridine, (-)-L, were prepared from different manganese salts. The chirality in these complexes arises from the pinene ring that has been fused to the 5,6 positions of one pyridine group of the bipyridine ligand. These complexes have been characterized through analytical, spectroscopic (IR, UV/Vis, ESI-MS) and electrochemical techniques (cyclic voltammetry). Single X-ray structure analysis revealed a five-coordinated Mn(II) ion in [{MnCl((-)-L)}2(mu-Cl)2] (2), [{Mn((-)-L)}2(mu-OAc)3](PF6) (3) and [MnCl2(H2O)((-)-L)] (4) and a six-coordinated one in [MnCl2((-)-L)2] (5), [Mn(CF3SO3)2((-)-L)2] (6) and [Mn(NO3)(H2O)((-)-L)2)](NO3) (7). The magnetic properties of the binuclear compounds 2 and 3 have been studied. Both compounds show a weak antiferromagnetic coupling (2, J = -0.22 cm(-1); 3, J = -0.85 cm(-1)). The catalytic activity of the whole set of complexes has been tested with regard to the epoxidation of aromatic alkenes with peracetic acid. In the particular case of styrene, good selectivities and moderate enantioselectivities were obtained. Furthermore, total retention of the initial cis configuration was achieved when epoxidizing cis-beta-methylstyrene with the chloride complexes. In general, the epoxidation activity of these manganese complexes is strongly dependent on the steric encumbrance of the substrates employed.

  15. An X-ray characterization of the central region of the supernova remnant G332.5-5.6

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Suárez, A. E.; Combi, J. A.; Albacete-Colombo, J. F.; Paron, S.; García, F.; Miceli, M.

    2015-11-01

    Aims: We present an X-ray analysis of the central region of supernova remnant (SNR) G332.5-5.6 through an exhaustive analysis of XMM-Netwon observations with complementary infrared observations. We characterize and discuss the origin of the observed X-ray morphology, which presents a peculiar plane edge over the west side of the central region. Methods: The morphology and spectral properties of the X-ray SNR were studied using a single full frame XMM-Newton observation in the 0.3 to 10.0 keV energy band. Archival infrared WISE observations at 8, 12 and 24 μm were also used to investigate the properties of the source and its surroundings at different wavelengths. Results: The results show that the extended X-ray emission is predominantly soft (0.3-1.2 keV) and peaks around 0.5 keV, which shows that it is an extremely soft SNR. X-ray emission correlates very well with central regions of bright radio emission. On the west side the radio/X-ray emission displays a plane-like feature with a terminal wall where strong infrared emission is detected. Our spatially resolved X-ray spectral analysis confirms that the emission is dominated by weak atomic emission lines of N, O, Ne, and Fe, all of them undetected in previous X-ray studies. These characteristics suggest that the X-ray emission is originated in an optically thin thermal plasma, whose radiation is well fitted by a non-equilibrium ionization collisional plasma (VNEI) X-ray emission model. Our study favors a scenario where G332.5-5.6 is expanding in a medium with an abrupt density change (the wall), likely a dense infrared emitting region of dust on the western side of the source.

  16. Localization of a Gene for Keratoconus to a 5.6-Mb Interval on 13q32

    PubMed Central

    Gajecka, Marzena; Radhakrishna, Uppala; Winters, Daniel; Nath, Swapan K.; Rydzanicz, Malgorzata; Ratnamala, Uppala; Ewing, Kimberly; Molinari, Andrea; Pitarque, Jose A.; Lee, Kwanghyuk; Leal, Suzanne M.; Bejjani, Bassem A.

    2009-01-01

    Purpose Keratoconus (KTCN) is a noninflammatory thinning and anterior protrusion of the cornea that results in steepening and distortion of the cornea, altered refractive powers, and reduced visual acuity. Several loci responsible for a familial form of KTCN have been mapped, however; no mutations in any genes have been identified for any of these loci. There is also evidence that VSX1 and SOD1 may be involved in the etiology of KTCN. The purpose of this study was to verify the available data and to identify a new keratoconus susceptibility locus. Methods KTCN without other ocular or systemic features was diagnosed in 18 families. VSX1 and SOD1 sequencing was performed on affected individuals and control subjects. Genomewide linkage analysis was then performed in all families using polymorphic microsatellite markers with an average spacing of 5 cM. Next, single-nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) arrays, fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) analysis, and a comparative genomic hybridization array were used in one family to assess a candidate region on 13q32. Results All previously reported KTCN loci were excluded. VSX1 and SOD1 were sequenced, and no potentially functional variants were found. One KTCN family yielded a maximum multipoint parametric LOD score of 4.1 and multipoint non-parametric linkage (NPL) LOD score of 3.2. Multipoint linkage and haplotype analysis narrowed the locus to a 5.6-Mb region between the SNPs rs9516572 and rs3825523 on 13q32. Conclusions The results exclude VSX1 and SOD1 as potential disease-causing genes in these families and localize a novel gene for keratoconus to a 5.6-Mb interval on 13q32. PMID:19011015

  17. APOLLO 16 COMMANDER JOHN YOUNG ENTERS ALTITUDE CHAMBER FOR TESTS

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1971-01-01

    Apollo 16 commander John W. Young prepares to enter the lunar module in an altitude chamber in the Manned Spacecraft Operations Building at the spaceport prior to an altitude run. During the altitude run, in which Apollo 16 lunar module pilot Charles M. Duke also participated, the chamber was pumped down to simulate pressure at an altitude in excess of 200,000 feet. Young, Duke and command module pilot Thomas K. Mattingly II, are training at the Kennedy Space Center for the Apollo 16 mission. Launch is scheduled from Pad 39A, March 17, 1972.

  18. Exhaled nitric oxide concentration upon acute exposure to moderate altitude.

    PubMed

    Caspersen, C; Stang, J; Thorsen, E; Stensrud, T

    2013-03-01

    The purpose of this study was to assess immediate changes in the partial pressure of nitric oxide (NO) in exhaled gas (PE NO ) in healthy trained subjects who were acutely exposed to moderate altitude. One group of nine and another group of 20 healthy subjects were exposed to an ambient pressure of 728 hPa (546 mmHg) corresponding to an altitude of 2800 m for 5 and 90 min, respectively, in an altitude chamber. PE NO was measured offline by sampling exhaled gas in tight metal foil bags at 5, 30, 60, and 90 min. A correction for increased expiratory flow rate due to gas density effects at altitude was performed (PE NO corr). PE NO was significantly decreased by 13-16%, while the fraction of NO in exhaled gas (FE NO) was increased by 16-19% compared to sea level. There was no significant change in PE NO corr after exposure to altitude for 5, 30, 60, and 90 min. We conclude that there was no change in PENO upon arrival at altitude after correcting for gas density effects on expiratory flow rate. Corrections for altitude effects must be done before comparing measurements performed at different altitudes when using measurements of FENO to monitor athletes who have asthma during training at altitude.

  19. A study of altitude-constrained supersonic cruise transport concepts

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tice, David C.; Martin, Glenn L.

    1992-01-01

    The effect of restricting maximum cruise altitude on the mission performance of two supersonic transport concepts across a selection of cruise Mach numbers is studied. Results indicate that a trapezoidal wing concept can be competitive with an arrow wing depending on the altitude and Mach number constraints imposed. The higher wing loading of trapezoidal wing configurations gives them an appreciably lower average cruise altitude than the lower wing loading of the arrow wing configurations, and this advantage increases as the maximum allowable cruise altitude is reduced.

  20. The pulmonary circulation of some domestic animals at high altitude

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Anand, I.; Heath, D.; Williams, D.; Deen, M.; Ferrari, R.; Bergel, D.; Harris, P.

    1988-03-01

    Pulmonary haemodynamics and the histology of the pulmonary vasculature have been studied at high altitude in the yak, in interbreeds between yaks and cattle, and in domestic goats and sheep indigenous to high altitudes together with crosses between them and low-altitude strains. Cattle at high altitude had a higher pulmonary arterial pressure than cattle at low altitude. The yak and two interbreeds with cattle (dzos and stols) had a low pulmonary arterial pressure compared with cattle, while the medial thickness of the small pulmonary arteries was less than would be expected in cattle, suggesting that the yak has a low capacity for hypoxic pulmonary vasoconstriction and that this characteristic is transmitted genetically. Goats and sheep showed haemodynamic evidence of a limited response of the pulmonary circulation to high altitude, but no evidence that the high altitude breeds had lost this response. There were no measurable differences in the thickness of the media of the small pulmonary arteries between high- and low-altitude breeds of goats and sheep. All these species showed prominent intimal protrusions of muscle into the pulmonary veins but no specific effect of high altitude in this respect.

  1. Access 5 - Step 1: Human Systems Integration Program Plan (HSIPP)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2005-01-01

    This report describes the Human System Interface (HSI) analysis, design and test activities that will be performed to support the development of requirements and design guidelines to facilitate the incorporation of High Altitude Long Endurance (HALE) Remotely Operated Aircraft (ROA) at or above FL400 in the National Airspace System (NAS). These activities are required to support the design and development of safe, effective and reliable ROA operator and ATC interfaces. This plan focuses on the activities to be completed for Step 1 of the ACCESS 5 program. Updates to this document will be made for each of the four ACCESS 5 program steps.

  2. Daytime Aspect Camera for Balloon Altitudes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dietz, Kurt L.; Ramsey, Brian D.; Alexander, Cheryl D.; Apple, Jeff A.; Ghosh, Kajal K.; Swift, Wesley R.

    2002-01-01

    We have designed, built, and flight-tested a new star camera for daytime guiding of pointed balloon-borne experiments at altitudes around 40 km. The camera and lens are commercially available, off-the-shelf components, but require a custom-built baffle to reduce stray light, especially near the sunlit limb of the balloon. This new camera, which operates in the 600- to 1000-nm region of the spectrum, successfully provides daytime aspect information of approx. 10 arcsec resolution for two distinct star fields near the galactic plane. The detected scattered-light backgrounds show good agreement with the Air Force MODTRAN models used to design the camera, but the daytime stellar magnitude limit was lower than expected due to longitudinal chromatic aberration in the lens. Replacing the commercial lens with a custom-built lens should allow the system to track stars in any arbitrary area of the sky during the daytime.

  3. A Daytime Aspect Camera for Balloon Altitudes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dietz, Kurt L.; Ramsey, Brian D.; Alexander, Cheryl D.; Apple, Jeff A.; Ghosh, Kajal K.; Swift, Wesley R.; Six, N. Frank (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    We have designed, built, and flight-tested a new star camera for daytime guiding of pointed balloon-borne experiments at altitudes around 40km. The camera and lens are commercially available, off-the-shelf components, but require a custom-built baffle to reduce stray light, especially near the sunlit limb of the balloon. This new camera, which operates in the 600-1000 nm region of the spectrum, successfully provided daytime aspect information of approximately 10 arcsecond resolution for two distinct star fields near the galactic plane. The detected scattered-light backgrounds show good agreement with the Air Force MODTRAN models, but the daytime stellar magnitude limit was lower than expected due to dispersion of red light by the lens. Replacing the commercial lens with a custom-built lens should allow the system to track stars in any arbitrary area of the sky during the daytime.

  4. Threshold altitude resulting in decompression sickness

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kumar, K. V.; Waligora, James M.; Calkins, Dick S.

    1990-01-01

    A review of case reports, hypobaric chamber training data, and experimental evidence indicated that the threshold for incidence of altitude decompression sickness (DCS) was influenced by various factors such as prior denitrogenation, exercise or rest, and period of exposure, in addition to individual susceptibility. Fitting these data with appropriate statistical models makes it possible to examine the influence of various factors on the threshold for DCS. This approach was illustrated by logistic regression analysis on the incidence of DCS below 9144 m. Estimations using these regressions showed that, under a noprebreathe, 6-h exposure, simulated EVA profile, the threshold for symptoms occurred at approximately 3353 m; while under a noprebreathe, 2-h exposure profile with knee-bends exercise, the threshold occurred at 7925 m.

  5. Aviation fuel property effects on altitude relight

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Venkataramani, K.

    1987-01-01

    The major objective of this experimental program was to investigate the effects of fuel property variation on altitude relight characteristics. Four fuels with widely varying volatility properties (JP-4, Jet A, a blend of Jet A and 2040 Solvent, and Diesel 2) were tested in a five-swirl-cup-sector combustor at inlet temperatures and flows representative of windmilling conditions of turbofan engines. The effects of fuel physical properties on atomization were eliminated by using four sets of pressure-atomizing nozzles designed to give the same spray Sauter mean diameter (50 + or - 10 micron) for each fuel at the same design fuel flow. A second series of tests was run with a set of air-blast nozzles. With comparable atomization levels, fuel volatility assumes only a secondary role for first-swirl-cup lightoff and complete blowout. Full propagation first-cup blowout were independent of fuel volatility and depended only on the combustor operating conditions.

  6. Power Budget Analysis for High Altitude Airships

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Choi, Sang H.; Elliott, James R.; King, Glen C.

    2006-01-01

    The High Altitude Airship (HAA) has various potential applications and mission scenarios that require onboard energy harvesting and power distribution systems. The energy source considered for the HAA s power budget is solar photon energy that allows the use of either photovoltaic (PV) cells or advanced thermoelectric (ATE) converters. Both PV cells and an ATE system utilizing high performance thermoelectric materials were briefly compared to identify the advantages of ATE for HAA applications in this study. The ATE can generate a higher quantity of harvested energy than PV cells by utilizing the cascaded efficiency of a three-staged ATE in a tandem mode configuration. Assuming that each stage of ATE material has the figure of merit of 5, the cascaded efficiency of a three-staged ATE system approaches the overall conversion efficiency greater than 60%. Based on this estimated efficiency, the configuration of a HAA and the power utility modules are defined.

  7. HAWC: The high altitude water Cherenkov observatory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goodman, Jordan A.

    2013-02-01

    The High Altitude Water Cherenkov Observatory (HAWC) is currently being deployed at 4100m above sea level on the Vulcan Sierra Negra near Puebla, Mexico. The HAWC observatory will consist of 250-300 Water Cherenkov Detectors totaling approximately 22,000 m2 of instrumented area. The water Cherenkov technique allows HAWC to have a nearly 100% duty cycle and large field of view, making the HAWC observatory an ideal instrument for the study of transient phenomena. With its large effective area, excellent angular and energy resolutions, and efficient gamma-hadron separation, HAWC will survey the TeV gamma-ray sky, measure spectra of galactic sources from 1 TeV to beyond 100 TeV, and map galactic diffuse gamma ray emission. The science goals, instrument performance and status of the HAWC observatory will be presented.

  8. The Low Altitude Plasma Instrument /LAPI/

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Winningham, J. D.; Burch, J. L.; Eaker, N.; Blevins, V. A.; Hoffman, R. A.

    1981-12-01

    The Low Altitude Plasma Instrument on the Dynamics Explorer-B spacecraft provides high resolution velocity space measurements of positive ions and electrons from 5 eV to 32 keV and a monitor of electrons with energies above 35 keV. It consists of an array of 15 parabolic electrostatic analyzers spanning 180 deg in angle and two Geiger-Mueller counters mounted on a one-degree of freedom scan platform. The platform is controlled by a magnetometer that allows placement of the array to selected angles with respect to the magnetic field. Each parabolic analyzer simultaneously measures electrons and positive ions. The temporal resolution and energy range of the measurements and the detector complement to be sampled are programmable by ground command

  9. Water detection by "turn on" fluorescence of the quinone-containing complexes [Ru(phen)2(1,10-phenanthroline-5,6-dione)2+] and [Ru(phenanthroline-5,6-dione)3]2+.

    PubMed

    Poteet, Steven A; MacDonnell, Frederick M

    2013-10-07

    Addition of water to the quinone functions in [Ru(phen)2(pdn)](2+) (1) and [Ru(pdn)3](2+) (2) (where phen = 1,10-phenanthroline and pdn = 1,10-phenanthroline-5,6-dione) turns on fluorescence at 605 nm, as formation of the geminal diol eliminates the predominant quinone-based non-radiative decay pathway and gives rise to a long-lived (3)MLCT state similar in nature to that seen in [Ru(phen)3](2+). Using NMR, the equilibrium constant for the hydration reaction of 1 in acetonitrile was determined to be 0.0253. From this data and experimental fitting of the luminescent titration data, the equilibrium constant for 2 of 1.62 × 10(-5) and emission yields for hydrated 1 and 2 were determined. Interestingly, all three quinone functions must be hydrated in 2 for luminescence, which is why the equilibrium constants vary so much. The 'turn on' luminescence allows for a very sensitive detection of water in aprotic solvents such as acetonitrile.

  10. Uav Borne Low Altitude Photogrammetry System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lin, Z.; Su, G.; Xie, F.

    2012-07-01

    In this paper,the aforementioned three major aspects related to the Unmanned Aerial Vehicles (UAV) system for low altitude aerial photogrammetry, i.e., flying platform, imaging sensor system and data processing software, are discussed. First of all, according to the technical requirements about the least cruising speed, the shortest taxiing distance, the level of the flight control and the performance of turbulence flying, the performance and suitability of the available UAV platforms (e.g., fixed wing UAVs, the unmanned helicopters and the unmanned airships) are compared and analyzed. Secondly, considering the restrictions on the load weight of a platform and the resolution pertaining to a sensor, together with the exposure equation and the theory of optical information, the principles of designing self-calibration and self-stabilizing combined wide-angle digital cameras (e.g., double-combined camera and four-combined camera) are placed more emphasis on. Finally, a software named MAP-AT, considering the specialty of UAV platforms and sensors, is developed and introduced. Apart from the common functions of aerial image processing, MAP-AT puts more effort on automatic extraction, automatic checking and artificial aided adding of the tie points for images with big tilt angles. Based on the recommended process for low altitude photogrammetry with UAVs in this paper, more than ten aerial photogrammetry missions have been accomplished, the accuracies of Aerial Triangulation, Digital orthophotos(DOM)and Digital Line Graphs(DLG) of which meet the standard requirement of 1:2000, 1:1000 and 1:500 mapping.

  11. High Altitude Supersonic Decelerator Test Vehicle

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cook, Brant T.; Blando, Guillermo; Kennett, Andrew; Von Der Heydt, Max; Wolff, John Luke; Yerdon, Mark

    2013-01-01

    The Low Density Supersonic Decelerator (LDSD) project is tasked by NASA's Office of the Chief Technologist (OCT) to advance the state of the art in Mars entry and descent technology in order to allow for larger payloads to be delivered to Mars at higher altitudes with better accuracy. The project will develop a 33.5 m Do Supersonic Ringsail (SSRS) parachute, 6m attached torus, robotic class Supersonic Inflatable Aerodynamic Decelerator (SIAD-R), and an 8 m attached isotensoid, exploration class Supersonic Inflatable Aerodynamic Decelerator (SIAD-E). The SSRS and SIAD-R should be brought to TRL-6, while the SIAD-E should be brought to TRL-5. As part of the qualification and development program, LDSD must perform a Mach-scaled Supersonic Flight Dynamics Test (SFDT) in order to demonstrate successful free flight dynamic deployments at Mars equivalent altitude, of all three technologies. In order to perform these tests, LDSD must design and build a test vehicle to deliver all technologies to approximately 180,000 ft and Mach 4, deploy a SIAD, free fly to approximately Mach 2, deploy the SSRS, record high-speed and high-resolution imagery of both deployments, as well as record data from an instrumentation suite capable of characterizing the technology induced vehicle dynamics. The vehicle must also be recoverable after splashdown into the ocean under a nominal flight, while guaranteeing forensic data protection in an off nominal catastrophic failure of a test article that could result in a terminal velocity, tumbling water impact.

  12. Cloud altitude determination from infrared spectral radiances

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smith, William L.; Frey, Richard

    1990-01-01

    The CO2 slicing method is generally recognized as the most accurate means of inferring cloud altitude from passive infrared radiance observations. The method is applicable to semi-transparent and broken clouds. During the cirrus FIRE and COHMEX field experiments, CO2 channel radiance data suitable for cloud altitude specification were achieved from moderate spectral resolution satellite sounders (NOAA-TOVS and GOES-VAS) and from a High spectral resolution Interferometer Spectrometer (HIS) flown on the NASA U2/ER2 aircraft. Also aboard the ER2 was a down-looking active lidar unit capable of providing cloud top pressure verifications with high accuracy. A third instrument, the Multispectral Atmospheric Mapping Sensor (MAMS) provided 50 meter resolution infrared window data which is used wtih radiosonde data to verify the heights of middle and low level clouds. Comparisons of lidar and MAMS/radiosonde ground truth cloud heights are made with those determined from: high resolution (0.5/cm) HIS spectra, HIS spectra degraded to the moderate resolution (15/cm) of the VAS/TOVS instruments, and spectrally averaged HIS radiances for individual pairs of VAS spectral channels. The results show that the best results are achieved from high resolution spectra; the RMS difference with the ground truth is 23 mb. The RMS differences between the infrared radiance determination and ground truth increase by 35 percent when the spectral resolution is degraded to the moderate spectral resolution of the VAS/TOVS instruments and by 52 to 183 percent, depending upon channel combinations, when only two spectral channels at VAS/TOVS spectral resolution are used.

  13. The Next Giant Step

    NASA Video Gallery

    Artist Robert McCall painted "The Next Giant Step" in 1979 to commemorate the heroism and courage of spaceflight pioneers. Located in the lobby of Johnson's building 2, the mural depicts America's ...

  14. CEIP Next Steps

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    The Clean Energy Incentive Program (CEIP) next steps document details the EPA’s outreach strategy for stakeholder input on the design and implementation of the CEIP. Additionally, this document lists provisions on the CEIP where stakeholder input is sought

  15. COMPARISON OF IMMUNOASSAY AND GAS CHROMATOGRAPHY/MASS SPECTROMETRY METHODS FOR MEASURING 3,5,6-TRICHLORO-2PYRIDINOL IN MULTIPLE SAMPLE MEDIA

    EPA Science Inventory

    Two enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) methods were evaluated for the determination of 3,5,6-trichloro-2-pyridinol (3,5,6-TCP) in multiple sample media (dust, soil, food, and urine). The dust and soil samples were analyzed by a commercial RaPID immunoassay testing kit. ...

  16. Absolute Locations of Repeating Mw 5.5 - 6.0 Earthquakes on Discovery Transform Fault, EPR

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wolfson, M. L.; Boettcher, M. S.; McGuire, J. J.; Collins, J. A.

    2011-12-01

    Previous studies have shown that seismic cycles on intermediate and fast-slipping oceanic transform faults (OTFs) are remarkably regular [Boettcher and McGuire, 2009; McGuire, 2008]. The largest earthquakes on these OTFs are small compared to total fault area and are separated by rupture barriers [McGuire et al., 2011]. Here we investigate how the rupture patches on Discovery Transform Fault, East Pacific Rise (EPR) correlate with seafloor fault zone structure. We use a surface wave relative relocation technique [McGuire, 2008] to determine absolute locations of the largest earthquakes and compare these locations with high-resolution bathymetric data. Discovery transform fault, located at 4S on the EPR, consists of two sub-parallel fault segments separated by an intra-transform spreading center (ITSC). We used two multibeam bathymetry datasets, a Seabeam 2012 dataset collected in 2006 and an EM300 dataset collected in 2008, to delineate fault structure on a sub-kilometer scale. The western segment fault zone is narrow and well-defined (300-500 m wide) within ~7 km of the ridge crest. To the east the fault zone broadens into a lozenge-shaped valley (~12 km long and ~5 km wide) that is terminated to the east by a 3-km wide ridge that crosscuts the transform domain. East of this ridge, the western segment splays into two sub-parallel linear features that persist to the ITSC, both of which appear to be active fault traces. The eastern segment of Discovery is comprised of one primary fault trace that grades from a relatively narrow (1.5 km) fault zone east of the ITSC into a broad (5 km) nodal basin at the eastern ridge-transform intersection. Previously McGuire [2008] found four distinct groups of repeating Mw 5.5 - 6.0 earthquakes in the region of the Discovery transform fault. The data used were obtained from the global Moment Tensor (CMT) catalog, which has poor location resolution for mid-ocean earthquakes, with errors of up to ~45 km for the events relocated in

  17. Ventilation during simulated altitude, normobaric hypoxia and normoxic hypobaria

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Loeppky, J. A.; Icenogle, M.; Scotto, P.; Robergs, R.; Hinghofer-Szalkay, H.; Roach, R. C.; Leoppky, J. A. (Principal Investigator)

    1997-01-01

    To investigate the possible effect of hypobaria on ventilation (VE) at high altitude, we exposed nine men to three conditions for 10 h in a chamber on separate occasions at least 1 week apart. These three conditions were: altitude (PB = 432, FIO2 = 0.207), normobaric hypoxia (PB = 614, FIO2 = 0.142) and normoxic hypobaria (PB = 434, FIO2 = 0.296). In addition, post-test measurements were made 2 h after returning to ambient conditions at normobaric normoxia (PB = 636, FIO2 = 0.204). In the first hour of exposure VE was increased similarly by altitude and normobaric hypoxia. The was 38% above post-test values and end-tidal CO2 (PET(CO2) was lower by 4 mmHg. After 3, 6 and 9 h, the average VE in normobaric hypoxia was 26% higher than at altitude (p < 0.01), resulting primarily from a decline in VE at altitude. The difference between altitude and normobaric hypoxia was greatest at 3 h (+ 39%). In spite of the higher VE during normobaric hypoxia, the PET(CO2) was higher than at altitude. Changes in VE and PET(CO2) in normoxic hypobaria were minimal relative to normobaric normoxia post-test measurements. One possible explanation for the lower VE at altitude is that CO2 elimination is relatively less at altitude because of a reduction in inspired gas density compared to normobaric hypoxia; this may reduce the work of breathing or alveolar deadspace. The greater VE during the first hour at altitude, relative to subsequent measurements, may be related to the appearance of microbubbles in the pulmonary circulation acting to transiently worsen matching. Results indicate that hypobaria per se effects ventilation under altitude conditions.

  18. Improving oxygenation at high altitude: acclimatization and O2 enrichment.

    PubMed

    West, John B

    2003-01-01

    When lowlanders go to high altitude, the resulting oxygen deprivation impairs mental and physical performance, quality of sleep, and general well-being. This paper compares the effects of ventilatory acclimatization and oxygen enrichment of room air on the improvement of oxygenation as judged by the increase in the alveolar P(O2) and the reduction in equivalent altitude. The results show that, on the average, complete ventilatory acclimatization at an altitude of 5000 m increases the alveolar P(O2) by nearly 8 torr, which corresponds to a reduction in equivalent altitude of about 1000 m, although there is considerable individual variability. By comparison, oxygen enrichment to 27% at 5000 m can easily reduce the equivalent altitude to 3200 m, which is generally well tolerated. Because full ventilatory acclimatization at altitudes up to about 3600 m reduces the equivalent altitude to about 3000 m, oxygen enrichment is not justified for well-acclimatized persons. At an altitude of 4200 m, where several telescopes are located on the summit of Mauna Kea, full acclimatization reduces the equivalent altitude to about 3400 m, but the pattern of commuting probably would not allow this. Therefore, at this altitude, oxygen enrichment would be beneficial but is not essential. At higher altitudes such as 5050 m, where other telescopes are located or planned, the gain in oxygenation from acclimatization is insufficient to produce an adequate mental or physical performance for most work, and oxygen enrichment is highly desirable. Full ventilatory acclimatization requires at least a week of continuous exposure, although much of the improvement is seen in the first 2 days.

  19. Photolytic, thermal, addition, and cycloaddition reactions of 2-diazo-5,6- and -3,8-disubstituted acenaphthenones.

    PubMed

    Blair, Patricia A; Chang, Sou-Jen; Shechter, Harold

    2004-10-15

    Preparation and varied thermal and photolytic reactions of 2-diazo-5,6-(disubstituted)acenaphthenones (11a-d) and 2-diazo-3,8-dimethoxyacenaphthenone (12) are reported. Alcohols react thermally and photolytically with 11a-c with losses of N(2) to yield 2-alkoxynaphthenones (24a,band 47a,b) and acenaphthenones (25 and 48a,b). Aniline and diphenylamine are converted by 11a-c at 180 degrees C to acenaph[1,2-b]indoles (29a,b and 53a,b). Thermolyses of 11a-c at approximately 450 degrees C (0.15 mmHg) yield reduction products 25 and 48a,b, respectively. Wolff rearrangements to 1,8-naphthyleneketenes (15a-d) and/or their derivatives are not observed in the above experiments. Oxygen converts 11a-c thermally to acenaphthenequinones (19a-c) and/or 1,8-naphthalic anhydrides. Insertion, addition, substitution, and/or isomerization reactions occur upon irradiation of 2-diazoacenaphthenones in cyclohexane, benzene, and tetrahydrofuran. Photolysis of 11d in benzene in the presence of O(2) yields the insertion-oxidation product 2-hydroxy-5,6-dinitro-2-phenylacenaphthenone (60). Photolyses of 11a-c in nitriles result in N(2) evolution and dipolar cycloaddition to give acenaph[1,2-d]oxazoles (41 and 61a,b). Acetylenes undergo thermal and photolytic cycloaddition/1,5-sigmatropic rearrangement reactions with 11a-d with N(2) retention to give pyrazolo[5,1-a]quinolin-7-ones (69f-j). 2-Diazoacenaphthenones 1a and 11a react thermally and photolytically with electronegatively-substituted olefins with N(2) expulsion to yield (E)- and (Z)-2-oxospiro[acenaphthylene-1(2H),1'cyclopropanes] 73a-c and 74a-c, respectively. The mechanisms of the reactions of 1a, 11a-d, and 12 reported are discussed.

  20. Application of Subspace Detection to the 6 November 2011 M5.6 Prague, Oklahoma Aftershock Sequence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McMahon, N. D.; Benz, H.; Johnson, C. E.; Aster, R. C.; McNamara, D. E.

    2015-12-01

    Subspace detection is a powerful tool for the identification of small seismic events. Subspace detectors improve upon single-event matched filtering techniques by using multiple orthogonal waveform templates whose linear combinations characterize a range of observed signals from previously identified earthquakes. Subspace detectors running on multiple stations can significantly increasing the number of locatable events, lowering the catalog's magnitude of completeness and thus providing extraordinary detail on the kinematics of the aftershock process. The 6 November 2011 M5.6 earthquake near Prague, Oklahoma is the largest earthquake instrumentally recorded in Oklahoma history and the largest earthquake resultant from deep wastewater injection. A M4.8 foreshock on 5 November 2011 and the M5.6 mainshock triggered tens of thousands of detectable aftershocks along a 20 km splay of the Wilzetta Fault Zone known as the Meeker-Prague fault. In response to this unprecedented earthquake, 21 temporary seismic stations were deployed surrounding the seismic activity. We utilized a catalog of 767 previously located aftershocks to construct subspace detectors for the 21 temporary and 10 closest permanent seismic stations. Subspace detection identified more than 500,000 new arrival-time observations, which associated into more than 20,000 locatable earthquakes. The associated earthquakes were relocated using the Bayesloc multiple-event locator, resulting in ~7,000 earthquakes with hypocentral uncertainties of less than 500 m. The relocated seismicity provides unique insight into the spatio-temporal evolution of the aftershock sequence along the Wilzetta Fault Zone and its associated structures. We find that the crystalline basement and overlying sedimentary Arbuckle formation accommodate the majority of aftershocks. While we observe aftershocks along the entire 20 km length of the Meeker-Prague fault, the vast majority of earthquakes were confined to a 9 km wide by 9 km deep

  1. Novel Gene Clusters and Metabolic Pathway Involved in 3,5,6-Trichloro-2-Pyridinol Degradation by Ralstonia sp. Strain T6

    PubMed Central

    Li, Jingquan; Huang, Yan; Hou, Ying; Li, Xiangmin; Cao, Hui

    2013-01-01

    3,5,6-Trichloro-2-pyridinol (TCP) is a widespread pollutant. Some bacteria and fungi have been reported to degrade TCP, but the gene clusters responsible for TCP biodegradation have not been characterized. In this study, a fragment of the reduced flavin adenine dinucleotide (FADH2)-dependent monooxygenase gene tcpA was amplified from the genomic DNA of Ralstonia sp. strain T6 with degenerate primers. The tcpA disruption mutant strain T6-ΔtcpA could not degrade TCP but could degrade the green intermediate metabolite 3,6-dihydroxypyridine-2,5-dione (DHPD), which was generated during TCP biodegradation by strain T6. The flanking sequences of tcpA were obtained by self-formed adaptor PCR. tcpRXA genes constitute a gene cluster. TcpR and TcpX are closely related to the LysR family transcriptional regulator and flavin reductase, respectively. T6-ΔtcpA-com, the complementation strain for the mutant strain T6-ΔtcpA, recovered the ability to degrade TCP, and the strain Escherichia coli DH10B-tcpRXA, which expressed the tcpRXA gene cluster, had the ability to transform TCP to DHPD, indicating that tcpA is a key gene in the initial step of TCP degradation and that TcpA dechlorinates TCP to DHPD. A library of DHPD degradation-deficient mutants of strain T6 was obtained by random transposon mutagenesis. The fragments flanking the Mariner transposon were amplified and sequenced, and the dhpRIJK gene cluster was cloned. DhpJ could transform DHPD to yield an intermediate product, 5-amino-2,4,5-trioxopentanoic acid (ATOPA), which was further degraded by DhpI. DhpR and DhpK are closely related to the AraC family transcriptional regulator and the MFS family transporter, respectively. PMID:24056464

  2. Observations of corona in triggered dart-stepped leaders

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gamerota, W. R.; Uman, M. A.; Hill, J. D.; Jordan, D. M.

    2015-03-01

    Corona streamers are a critical component of lightning leader step formation and are postulated to produce the very high electric fields at their tips that produce runaway electrons resulting in the observed X-ray bursts associated with leader stepping. Corona emanating from the vicinity of the leader tip between leader steps was analyzed using three sequential high-speed video sequences of dart-stepped leaders in three different triggered lightning flashes during the summers of 2013 and 2014 in northeast Florida. Images were recorded at 648 kiloframes per second (1.16 µs exposure time, 380 ns dead time) at an altitude of 65 m or less. In each image sequence, the leader propagates downward in consecutive frames, with corona streamers observed to fan outward from the bright leader tip in less than the image frame time of about 1.5 µs. In 21 exposures, corona streamers propagate, on average, 9 m below the bright leader tip.

  3. X- and gamma ray observations in high-altitude thunderstorms in Mexico

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kelley, N. A.; Smith, D. M.; Lara, A.

    2014-12-01

    High-energy emission from lightning is more easily measured at high altitudes, close to or within the electric fields accelerating the energetic particles. Gamma rays from long duration glows and x-rays from stepped leaders attenuate with distance. From mountaintops, it may be possible to measure an amplified version of the x-rays commonly seen from stepped leaders. These amplified x-rays could arise from the thunderstorm electric field multiplying the energetic particles via Relativistic Runaway Electron Avalanches (RREA). Amplified stepped leaders may be similar or even the same as terrestrial gamma-ray flashes (TGFs), which need long-range electric fields to produce the intensities seen from space. We deployed two gamma-ray detectors at the High Altitude Water Cherenkov (HAWC) Observatory site on the northeastern slope of the Sierra Negra near Puebla, Mexico at 4100 meters to search for amplified leader events and also for the minutes-long gamma-ray glows observed from thunderstorms by other groups from the ground, balloons, and aircraft. We will also examine the data from HAWC itself, a large array of water tanks viewed by photomultiplier tubes, to look for signals simultaneous with any in our scintillators. In principle, large Cherenkov detectors and small scintillators can give complementary data about the radiation field, emphasizing the total energy content and the number flux of particles, respectively. We will present results from the summer 2014 deployment and talk about future lightning gamma-ray detectors to be deployed at HAWC.

  4. Ultrafast excited state dynamics of 5,6-dihydroxyindole, a key eumelanin building block: nonradiative decay mechanism.

    PubMed

    Gauden, Magdalena; Pezzella, Alessandro; Panzella, Lucia; Napolitano, Alessandra; d'Ischia, Marco; Sundström, Villy

    2009-09-17

    As part of a program designed to elucidate the excited state properties of key eumelanin building blocks, we report herein a study of 5,6-dihydroxyindole (DHI) in phosphate buffer at pH 3 and pH 7 using femtosecond transient absorption spectroscopy. The transient absorption changes following excitation at 266 nm were used to directly monitor relaxation of the excited states. It was found that the initially generated excited state of DHI, exhibiting two main absorption bands at approximately 450 and approximately 550 nm, decays with a time constant of 5-10 ps to the equilibrated singlet excited state characterized by a very similar spectrum. This latter state then decays to the ground state and the triplet state with a characteristic time of approximately 140-180 ps. Concomitant with the singlet excited state decay of DHI, spectral features characteristic of the DHI cation radical (band at approximately 575 nm) and the triplet state (band at 440-450 nm) are detected. These species do not decay further since geminate recombination of the solvated electron and the DHI radical cation, as well as deprotonation of the cation to form the neutral semiquinone radical, occur on a time scale longer than that covered by the present experiments. These results offer novel insights into the mechanisms of nonradiative decay of eumelanin building blocks of possible relevance to the putative photoprotective and phototoxic roles of these biopolymers.

  5. Alkali therapy attenuates the progression of kidney injury via Na/H exchanger inhibition in 5/6 nephrectomized rats.

    PubMed

    Kim, Sejoong; Lee, Jeonghwan; Heo, Nam Ju; Lee, Jae Wook; Han, Jin Suk

    2014-05-01

    Metabolic acidosis is a cause of renal disease progression, and alkali therapy ameliorates its progression. However, there are few reports on the role of renal acid-base transporters during alkali therapy. We evaluated the effect of sodium bicarbonate therapy and the role of acid-base transporters on renal disease progression in rats with a remnant kidney. Sprague-Dawley rats consumed dietary sodium bicarbonate (NaHCO3) or sodium chloride (NaCl) with 20% casein after a 5/6 nephrectomy. After being provided with a casein diet, the NaHCO3-treated group had higher levels of serum bicarbonate than the control group. At week 4, the glomerular filtration rate in the NaHCO3 group was higher than that in the NaCl group, and the difference became prominent at week 10. The glomerulosclerosis and tubulointerstitial damage indices in the NaHCO3 group were less severe compared with controls at week 4 and 10. The expression of the Na/H exchanger (NHE) was decreased, and apical reactivity was decreased in the NaHCO3 group, compared with the NaCl group. Endothelin-1 levels in the kidney were also decreased in the NaHCO3 group. Dietary sodium bicarbonate has the effects of ameliorating renal disease progression, which may be related to the altered expression of NHE in the remaining kidney.

  6. Finite-fault slip model of the 2011 Mw 5.6 Prague, Oklahoma earthquake from regional waveforms

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Sun, Xiaodan; Hartzell, Stephen

    2014-01-01

    The slip model for the 2011 Mw 5.6 Prague, Oklahoma, earthquake is inferred using a linear least squares methodology. Waveforms of six aftershocks recorded at 21 regional stations are used as empirical Green's functions (EGFs). The solution indicates two large slip patches: one located around the hypocenter with a depth range of 3–5.5 km; the other located to the southwest of the epicenter with a depth range from 7.5 to 9.5 km. The total moment of the solution is estimated at 3.37 × 1024 dyne cm (Mw 5.65). The peak slip and average stress drop for the source at the hypocenter are 70 cm and 90 bars, respectively, approximately one half the values for the Mw 5.8 2011 Mineral, Virginia, earthquake. The stress drop averaged over all areas of slip is 16 bars. The relatively low peak slip and stress drop may indicate an induced component in the origin of the Prague earthquake from deep fluid injection.

  7. Rapid and sensitive spectrofluorimetric determination of enrofloxacin, levofloxacin and ofloxacin with 2,3,5,6-tetrachloro- p-benzoquinone

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ulu, Sevgi Tatar

    2009-06-01

    A highly sensitive spectrofluorimetric method was developed for the first time, for the analysis of three fluoroquinolones (FQ) antibacterials, namely enrofloxacin (ENR), levofloxacin (LEV) and ofloxacin (OFL) in pharmaceutical preparations through charge transfer (CT) complex formation with 2,3,5,6-tetrachloro- p-benzoquinone (chloranil,CLA). At the optimum reaction conditions, the FQ-CLA complexes showed excitation maxima ranging from 359 to 363 nm and emission maxima ranging from 442 to 488 nm. Rectilinear calibration graphs were obtained in the concentration range of 50-1000, 50-1000 and 25-500 ng mL -1 for ENR, LEV and OFL, respectively. The detection limit was found to be 17 ng mL -1 for ENR, 17 ng mL -1 for LEV, 8 ng mL -1 for OFL, respectively. Excipients used as additive in commercial formulations did not interfere in the analysis. The method was validated according to the ICH guidelines with respect to specificity, linearity, accuracy, precision and robustness. The proposed method was successfully applied to the analysis of pharmaceutical preparations. The results obtained were in good agreement with those obtained using the official method; no significant difference in the accuracy and precision as revealed by the accepted values of t- and F-tests, respectively.

  8. The 5-6 December 1991 FIRE IFO II jet stream cirrus case study: Possible influences of Volcanic Aerosols

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sassen, Kenneth; Starr, David O'C.; Mace, Gerald G.; Poellot, Michael R.; Melfi, S. H.; Eberhard, Wynn L.; Spinhirne, James D.; Eloranta, E. W.; Hagen, Donald E.; Hallett, John

    1995-01-01

    In presenting an overview of the cirus clouds comprehensively studied by ground-based and airborne sensors from Coffeyville, Kansas, during the 5-6 December 1992 Project First ISCCP Region Experiment (FIRE) Intensive Fields Observation (IFO) II case study period, evidence is provided that volcanic aerosols friom the June 1991 Pinatubo eruptions may have significantly influenced the formation and maintenance of the cirrus. Following the local appearance of a spur of stratospheric volcanic debris from the subtropics, a series of jet streaks subsequently conditioned the troposphere through tropopause foldings with sulfur-based particles that became effective cloud-forming nuclei in cirrus clouds. Aerosol and ozone measurements suggest a complicated history of stratospheric-tropospheric exchanges embedded within the upper-level flow, and cirrus cloud formation was noted to occur locally at the boundaries of stratospheric aerosol-enriched layers that became humidified through diffusion, precipitation, or advective processes. Apparent cirrus cloud alterations include abnormally high ice crystal concentrations (up to approximately 600/L), complex radial ice crystal types, and relatively large haze particles in cirrus uncinus cell heads at temperatures between -40 and -50 C. Implications for volcanic-cirrus cloud climate effects and usual (nonvolcanic aerosol) jet stream cirrus cloud formation are discussed.

  9. The 5-6 December 1991 FIRE IFO 2 jet stream cirrus case study: The influence of volcanic aerosols

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sassen, Kenneth; Mace, Gerald G.; Starr, David; Poellot, Michael R.; Melfi, S. H.; Eberhard, Wynn L.; Spinhirne, James D.; Eloranta, E. W.; Hagen, Donald E.; Hallett, John

    1993-01-01

    In presenting an overview of the cirrus clouds comprehensively studied by ground-based and airborne sensors from Coffeyville, KS, during the 5-6 Dec. 1992 Project FIRE (First International Satellite Cloud Climatology Project Regional Experiment) IFO II case study period, evidence is provided that volcanic aerosols from the June 1991 Pinatubo eruptions significantly influenced the formation and maintenance of the cirrus. Following the local appearance of a spur of stratospheric volcanic debris from the subtropics, a series of jet streaks subsequently conditioned the troposphere through tropopause foldings with sulfur-based particles that became effective cirrus cloud-forming nuclei. Aerosol and ozone measurements suggest a complicated history of stratospheric-tropospheric exchanges embedded within the upper level flow, and cirrus cloud formation was noted to occur locally at the boundaries of stratospheric aerosol-enriched layers that became humidified through diffusion, precipitation, or advective processes. Apparent cirrus cloud alterations include abnormally high ice crystal concentrations (up to approximately 600 l(sup -1), small but complex radial ice crystal types, and relatively large haze particles in cirrus uncinus cell heads at temperatures between -40 to -50 C. Implications for volcanic-cirrus cloud climate effects, and usual (non-volcanic aerosol) jet stream cirrus cloud formation are discussed.

  10. Thermodynamic relationship between structural isomers of the thermochromic compound bis(N-Isopropyl-5,6-benzosalicylideneiminato)nickel(II).

    PubMed

    Wang, Qi; Takeuchi, Akira; Yamamura, Yasuhisa; Saito, Kazuya; Mori, Wasuke; Sorai, Michio

    2008-09-04

    A pair of structural isomers was isolated at room temperature for the thermochromic nickel complex bis( N-isopropyl-5,6-benzosalicylideneiminato)nickel(II); one is a diamagnetic green form with square-planar coordination geometry (G phase), and the other is a paramagnetic brown form with a tetrahedral geometry (B phase). However, a question as to which form is thermodynamically stable was left open. To solve this problem, thermal and magnetic properties of this complex were investigated by adiabatic heat capacity calorimetry in the 6-508 K temperature range and magnetic measurements in the 2-400 K region. In addition to the two forms previously reported, two metastable crystal forms (G' and B' phases) were found. The stable phase sequence was G phase, B phase, and then liquid upon heating. The supercooled B phase gave rise to a small phase transition with nonmagnetic origin at around 50 K. By rapidly cooling the liquid, a glassy liquid state was realized below approximately 290 K. The order of thermodynamic stability at 298.15 K was revealed to be the G, B, G', and then the B' phase. The entropy, enthalpy, and Gibbs energy differences between the B and the G phases at 298.15 K were S degrees (B) - S degrees (G) = 32.8 J K (-1) mol (-1), H degrees (B) - H degrees (G) = 16.0 kJ mol (-1), and G degrees (B) - G degrees (G) = 6.25 kJ mol (-1), respectively.

  11. 5-Fluorouracil catabolism to 5-fluoro-5,6-dihydrouracil is reduced by acute liver impairment in mice

    SciTech Connect

    Innocenti, Federico; Danesi, Romano; Bocci, Guido; Natale, Gianfranco . E-mail: gianfranco.natale@anist.med.unipi.it; Del Tacca, Mario

    2005-03-01

    This study investigated the effect of acute liver damage on the inactivation of 5-fluorouracil (5-FU) to its main catabolite 5-fluoro-5,6-dihydrouracil (5-FUH{sub 2}) in mice. Plasma pharmacokinetics of 5-FU and 5-FUH{sub 2} in mice receiving 5-FU (10, 30, and 90 mg/kg) were compared to those in mice pretreated with carbon tetrachloride and receiving the same 5-FU doses. Carbon tetrachloride-induced hepatic damage was histopathologically examined under light microscopy and serum transaminases and dihydropyrimidine dehydrogenase activities were also measured. Liver histopathology and elevated aminotransferase activity levels confirmed the presence of liver damage. 5-FU C{sub max} and AUC both increased up to 71% in mice with liver damage. This was reflected by decreased 5-FUH{sub 2} production, since 5-FUH{sub 2} C{sub max} and AUC levels decreased up to 47% and 61%, respectively. Metabolic ratios between 5-FUH{sub 2} and 5-FU AUCs were considerably decreased as well, further suggesting that liver damage caused a reduction in 5-FU catabolism. DPD activity was not altered in damaged livers. The present results indicate that 5-FU disposition in mice could be profoundly altered in the presence of severe liver impairment, potentially leading to enhanced anabolic activation of 5-FU. This effect seems to be ascribed to a reduction of viable hepatocytes, rather than to an inactivation of DPD activity.

  12. The 5-6 December 1991 FIRE IFO 2 Jet Stream Cirrus Case Study: Possible Influences of Volcanic Aerosols

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sassen, Kenneth; Starr, David OC.; Mace, Gerald G.; Poellot, Michael R.; Melfi, S. H.; Eberhard, Wynn L.; Spinhirne, James D.; Eloranta, E. W.; Hagen, Donald E.; Hallett, John

    1996-01-01

    In presenting an overview of the cirrus clouds comprehensively studied by ground based and airborne sensors from Coffeyville, Kansas, during the 5-6 December 1992 First ISCCP Regional Experiment (FIRE) intensive field observation (IFO) case study period, evidence is provided that volcanic aerosols from the June 1991 Pinatubo eruptions may have significantly influenced the formation and maintenance of the cirrus. Following the local appearance of a spur of stratospheric volcanic debris from the subtropics, a series of jet streaks subsequently conditioned the troposphere through tropopause foldings with sulfur based particles that became effective cloud forming nuclei in cirrus clouds. Aerosol and ozone measurements suggest a complicated history of stratospheric-tropospheric exchanges embedded with the upper level flow, and cirrus cloud formation was noted to occur locally at the boundaries of stratospheric aerosol enriched layers that became humidified through diffusion, precipitation, or advective processes. Apparent cirrus cloud alterations include abnormally high ice crystal concentrations (up to approximately 600 L(exp. 1)), complex radial ice crystal types, and relatively large haze particles in cirrus uncinus cell heads at temperatures between -40 and -50 degrees C. Implications for volcanic-cirrus cloud climate effects and unusual (nonvolcanic) aerosol jet stream cirrus cloud formation are discussed.

  13. Toxicity of 3,5,6-trichloro-2-pyridinol tested at multiple stages of zebrafish (Danio rerio) development.

    PubMed

    Suvarchala, Gonuguntla; Philip, Gundala Harold

    2016-08-01

    Organophosphate compounds (OP) are widely used throughout the world for pest control. 3,5,6-Trichloro-2-pyridinol (TCP) is a primary metabolite of two OP compounds namely CP and triclopyr. This study is carried out to know whether a metabolite of parent compound is doing well or harm to biota. The potential effect of TCP was evaluated on development as destabilization of any events transpiring during embryogenesis could be deleterious. To determine this, 4-hpf zebrafish embryos were exposed to five concentrations of TCP (200, 400, 600, 800, 1000 μg/L) or 99.5 % acetone (solvent control). Different early life-stage parameters were observed at four different developmental stages, 24, 48, 72 and 96 hpf. TCP-treated embryo/larvae showed increased mortality, delay in hatching time and decrease in percentage of hatched embryos. Reduction in heartbeat rate, blood flow and body and eye pigmentation was noticed in a dose-dependent manner. Pericardial and yolk sac edema were most severe malformations caused by TCP. Along with this crooked spine/notochord, tail deformation was noticed in hatched and unhatched embryos. The malformations observed provide a good starting point for examination of the molecular mechanisms that are affected during development by TCP. Results gain significance as TCP, which is a breakdown product, appears to be more toxic during development compared to parent compound, CP (our earlier publication).

  14. Effect of 5,6,7,8-tetrahydroneopterin on the bovine endothelial cell injury induced by cumene hydroperoxide.

    PubMed

    Kurobane, T; Kojima, S; Yoshimura, M; Icho, T; Kajiwara, Y; Kubota, K

    1995-07-01

    Neopterin is an 2-amino-4-hydroxypteridine derivative and a precursor of biopterin, which is derived from guanosine triphosphate. Previously, we have reported that 5,6,7,8-tetrahydroneopterin (NPH4), a reduced form of neopterin, possesses an antioxidant activity in various systems. In this study, we investigated the activity in more detailed manner and discussed the possible applications of this antioxidant. Analysis by electron spin resonance spectrometry indicated that NPH4 scavenged superoxide anion radicals and hydroxyl radicals as well. Moreover, NPH4 protected the rat brain homogenate from autoxidation. Next, we examined the effect of NPH4 on the cell injury induced by cumene hydroperoxide (CHP) in cultured bovine artery endothelial cells. The activity of lactate dehydrogenase, a marker enzyme of cell injury, was elevated by CHP in a dose-dependent manner, and this elevation was dose-dependently suppressed by NPH4. The elevation of lipid peroxide content was also inhibited by NPH4 in the same fashion. These data suggest that NPH4 would be effective against various diseases whose pathogenesis is active oxygen-related.

  15. Fluorophotometric determination of histone with 3,4,5,6-tetrafluoro-2-carboxyphenylfluorone-manganese(II) complex and its characterization.

    PubMed

    Miyachi, Kanako; Hoshino, Mitsuru; Kadobayashi, Hiroko; Moriyama, Kenzo; Asano, Mamiko; Yamaguchi, Takako; Fujita, Yoshikazu

    2013-01-01

    A simple fluorophotometric method for the determination of histone has been developed. This method involves a fluorescence quenching reaction that results in the formation of a complex of manganese(II), 3,4,5,6-tetrafluoro-2-carboxyphenylfluorone (TFCPF), and histone in a non-ionic surfactant micellar medium. The calibration curve was found to be linear in the range of 0.5 to 2.0 µg/mL. The binding parameters (n, number of binding sites; K, binding constant) and thermodynamic parameters (ΔG(0), change in Gibbs free energy; ΔH(0), change in enthalpy; ΔS(0), change in entropy) were investigated spectrophotometrically for the elucidation of the reaction mechanism. The resulting binding parameters (n=4.08 and K=3.16×10(4) m(-1) at 25°C) and thermodynamic parameters (ΔG=-25.83 kJ/mol, ΔH=-9.83 kJ/mol, and ΔS=53.68 J/(mol K)) suggest that the colored complex in this reaction system is an ion-association complex between manganese(II)-TFCPF and histone.

  16. Acid-coated Textiles (pH 5.5-6.5)--a New Therapeutic Strategy for Atopic Eczema?

    PubMed

    Jaeger, Teresa; Rothmaier, Markus; Zander, Holger; Ring, Johannes; Gutermuth, Jan; Anliker, Mark D

    2015-07-01

    Increased transepidermal water loss (TEWL) and decreased skin capacitance are characteristic features of the disturbed epidermal barrier in atopic eczema (AE). The "acid mantle", which is a slightly acidic film on the surface of the skin has led to the development of acidic emollients for skin care. In this context, the effect of citric acid-coated textiles on atopic skin has not been examined to date. A textile carrier composed of cellulose fibres was coated with a citric acid surface layer by esterification, ensuring a constant pH of 5.5-6.5. Twenty patients with AE or atopic diathesis were enrolled in the study. In a double-blind, half-side experiment, patients had to wear these textiles for 12 h a day for 14 days. On day 0 (baseline), 7 and 14, tolerability (erythema, pruritus, eczema, wearing comfort) and efficacy on skin barrier were assessed by TEWL skin hydration (corneometry/capacitance), pH and clinical scoring of eczema (SCORAD). Citric acid-coated textiles were well tolerated and improved eczema and objective parameters of skin physiology, including barrier function and a reduced skin surface pH, with potential lower pathogenic microbial colonisation.

  17. Dynamic localization of SMC5/6 complex proteins during mammalian meiosis and mitosis suggests functions in distinct chromosome processes.

    PubMed

    Gómez, Rocío; Jordan, Philip W; Viera, Alberto; Alsheimer, Manfred; Fukuda, Tomoyuki; Jessberger, Rolf; Llano, Elena; Pendás, Alberto M; Handel, Mary Ann; Suja, José A

    2013-09-15

    Four members of the structural maintenance of chromosome (SMC) protein family have essential functions in chromosome condensation (SMC2/4) and sister-chromatid cohesion (SMC1/3). The SMC5/6 complex has been implicated in chromosome replication, DNA repair and chromosome segregation in somatic cells, but its possible functions during mammalian meiosis are unknown. Here, we show in mouse spermatocytes that SMC5 and SMC6 are located at the central region of the synaptonemal complex from zygotene until diplotene. During late diplotene both proteins load to the chromocenters, where they colocalize with DNA Topoisomerase IIα, and then accumulate at the inner domain of the centromeres during the first and second meiotic divisions. Interestingly, SMC6 and DNA Topoisomerase IIα colocalize at stretched strands that join kinetochores during the metaphase II to anaphase II transition, and both are observed on stretched lagging chromosomes at anaphase II following treatment with Etoposide. During mitosis, SMC6 and DNA Topoisomerase IIα colocalize at the centromeres and chromatid axes. Our results are consistent with the participation of SMC5 and SMC6 in homologous chromosome synapsis during prophase I, chromosome and centromere structure during meiosis I and mitosis and, with DNA Topoisomerase IIα, in regulating centromere cohesion during meiosis II.

  18. Finite-fault slip model of the 2011 Mw 5.6 Prague, Oklahoma earthquake from regional waveforms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, Xiaodan; Hartzell, Stephen

    2014-06-01

    The slip model for the 2011 Mw 5.6 Prague, Oklahoma, earthquake is inferred using a linear least squares methodology. Waveforms of six aftershocks recorded at 21 regional stations are used as empirical Green's functions (EGFs). The solution indicates two large slip patches: one located around the hypocenter with a depth range of 3-5.5 km; the other located to the southwest of the epicenter with a depth range from 7.5 to 9.5 km. The total moment of the solution is estimated at 3.37 × 1024 dyne cm (Mw 5.65). The peak slip and average stress drop for the source at the hypocenter are 70 cm and 90 bars, respectively, approximately one half the values for the Mw 5.8 2011 Mineral, Virginia, earthquake. The stress drop averaged over all areas of slip is 16 bars. The relatively low peak slip and stress drop may indicate an induced component in the origin of the Prague earthquake from deep fluid injection.

  19. Phosphorylation regulates proteolytic efficiency of TEV protease detected by a 5(6)-carboxyfluorescein-pyrene based fluorescent sensor.

    PubMed

    He, Yao-Hui; Li, Yan-Mei; Chen, Yong-Xiang

    2016-04-01

    TEV protease is of great importance for in vitro and in vivo site-specific cleavage of proteins. The proteolytic efficiency of TEV protease is often regulated by mutation of the substrate, which is irreversible and hard to be modulated. Herein, a facile and reversible method, based on phosphorylation in the substrate, is developed to regulate the cleavage capability of TEV protease. Phosphorylation at P3 tyrosine hinders the recognition of TEV protease to the substrate by using a robust fluorescent protease sensor. Moreover, the phosphate group can be easily removed by alkaline phosphatases for recovering the proteolytic efficiency of TEV protease. Additionally, 5(6)-carboxyfluorescein and pyrene have been used as high-efficiency mutual fluorophore-quencher pair in the peptide-based protease sensor for the first time, which provides a chance to simultaneously monitor the cleavage process in two respective fluorescence channels. Further studies indicated both dynamic and static components contributing to the mutual quenching system. The phosphorylation-regulated TEV protease proteolysis system can be used in conditional cleavage of protein or peptide tag.

  20. Quadrant to Measure the Sun's Altitude

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Windsor, A Morgan, Jr.

    2013-01-01

    The changing altitude of the Sun (either over the course of a day or longer periods) is a phenomenon that students do not normally appreciate. However, the altitude of the Sun affects many topics in disciplines as diverse as astronomy, meteorology, navigation, or horology, such as the basis for seasons, determination of latitude and longitude, or…

  1. Comparative aspects of high-altitude adaptation in human populations.

    PubMed

    Moore, L G; Armaza, F; Villena, M; Vargas, E

    2000-01-01

    The conditions and duration of high-altitude residence differ among high-altitude populations. The Tibetan Plateau is larger, more geographically remote, and appears to have been occupied for a longer period of time than the Andean Altiplano and, certainly, the Rocky Mountain region as judged by archaeological, linguistic, genetic and historical data. In addition, the Tibetan gene pool is less likely to have been constricted by small numbers of initial migrants and/or severe population decline, and to have been less subject to genetic admixture with lowland groups. Comparing Tibetans to other high-altitude residents demonstrates that Tibetans have less intrauterine growth retardation better neonatal oxygenation higher ventilation and hypoxic ventilatory response lower pulmonary arterial pressure and resistance lower hemoglobin concentrations and less susceptibility to CMS These findings are consistent with the conclusion that "adaptation" to high altitude increases with time, considering time in generations of high-altitude exposure. Future research is needed to compare the extent of IUGR and neonatal oxygenation in South American high-altitude residents of Andean vs. European ancestry, controlling for gestational age and other characteristics. Another fruitful line of inquiry is likely to be determining whether persons with CMS or other altitude-associated problems experienced exaggerated hypoxia during prenatal or neonatal life. Finally, the comparison of high-altitude populations with respect to the frequencies of genes involved in oxygen sensing and physiologic response to hypoxia will be useful, once candidate genes have been identified.

  2. [Hemoglobin and testosterone: importance on high altitude acclimatization and adaptation].

    PubMed

    Gonzales, Gustavo F

    2011-03-01

    The different types of response mechanisms that the organism uses when exposed to hypoxia include accommodation, acclimatization and adaptation. Accommodation is the initial response to acute exposure to high altitude hypoxia and is characterized by an increase in ventilation and heart rate. Acclimatization is observed in individuals temporarily exposed to high altitude, and to some extent, it enables them to tolerate the high altitudes. In this phase, erythropoiesis is increased, resulting in higher hemoglobin and hematocrit levels to improve oxygen delivery capacity. Adaptation is the process of natural acclimatization where genetical variations and acclimatization play a role in allowing subjects to live without any difficulties at high altitudes. Testosterone is a hormone that regulates erythropoiesis and ventilation and could be associated to the processes of acclimatization and adaptation to high altitude. Excessive erythrocytosis, which leads to chronic mountain sickness, is caused by low arterial oxygen saturation, ventilatory inefficiency and reduced ventilatory response to hypoxia. Testosterone increases during acute exposure to high altitude and also in natives at high altitude with excessive erythrocytosis. Results of current research allow us to conclude that increase in serum testosterone and hemoglobin is adequate for acclimatization, as they improve oxygen transport, but not for high altitude adaptation, since high serum testosterone levels are associated to excessive erythrocytosis.

  3. Altitude acclimatization. Citations from the International Aerospace Abstracts data base

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mauk, S. C.

    1980-01-01

    This bibliography of citations to the international literature covers aspects of altitude acclimatization. Included are articles concerning high altitude environments, hypoxia, heart function and hemodynamic responses, physical exercise, human tolerances and reactions, physiological responses, and oxygen consumption. This updated bibliography contains 164 citations, 35 of which are new entries to the previous edition.

  4. 14 CFR 91.515 - Flight altitude rules.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 2 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Flight altitude rules. 91.515 Section 91...) AIR TRAFFIC AND GENERAL OPERATING RULES GENERAL OPERATING AND FLIGHT RULES Large and Turbine-Powered Multiengine Airplanes and Fractional Ownership Program Aircraft § 91.515 Flight altitude rules....

  5. MISR Level 3 Cloud Fraction by Altitude Versioning

    Atmospheric Science Data Center

    2016-11-04

    MISR Level 3 Cloud Fraction by Altitude Versioning Cloud Fraction by Altitude Product (CFbA) - Daily, Monthly, Quarterly, Yearly ... consult the product versioning statements for the  TOA/Cloud Classifiers  and  Radiometric Camera-by-camera Cloud Mask  products ...

  6. Visual-Motion Cueing in Altitude and Yaw Control

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Johnson, Walter W.; Schroeder, Jeffery; Statler, Irving C. (Technical Monitor)

    1994-01-01

    Research conducted using the Vertical Motion Simulator at the NASA Ames Research Center examined the contributions of platform motion and visual level-of-detail (LOD) cueing to tasks that required altitude and/or yaw control in a simulated AH-64 Apache helicopter. Within the altitude control tasks the LOD manipulation caused optical density to change across altitudes by a small, moderate, or large amount; while platform motion was either present or absent. The results from these tasks showed that both constant optical density and platform motion improved altitude awareness in an altitude repositioning task, while the presence of platform motion also led to improved performance in a vertical rate control task. The yaw control tasks had pilots'sit 4.5 ft in front of the center of rotation, thus subjecting them to both rotational and lateral motions during a yaw. The pilots were required to regulate their yaw, while the platform motion was manipulated in order to present all combinations of the resulting rotational and lateral motion components. Ratings of simulation fidelity and sensed platform motion showed that the pilots were relatively insensitive to the rotational component, but highly aware of the lateral component. Together these findings show that: 1) platform motion cues are important when speed regulation is required during altitude change; 2) platform motion contributes to the perception of movement amplitude; 3) lateral, but not rotational, motion cues are essential to the perception of vehicle yaw; and 4) LOD management yielding constant optical density across altitudes improves altitude awareness.

  7. 14 CFR 135.203 - VFR: Minimum altitudes.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 3 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false VFR: Minimum altitudes. 135.203 Section 135... Operating Limitations and Weather Requirements § 135.203 VFR: Minimum altitudes. Except when necessary for... above the surface or less than 500 feet horizontally from any obstacle; or (2) At night, at an...

  8. Photocopy of drawing, RIGHT ALTITUDE CHAMBER REACTIVATION. NASA, John F. ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Photocopy of drawing, RIGHT ALTITUDE CHAMBER REACTIVATION. NASA, John F. Kennedy Space Center, Florida. Drawing 82K06032, Boeing, December, 1997. ACCESS PLATFORM INSTALLATION. Sheet S2 - Cape Canaveral Air Force Station, Launch Complex 39, Altitude Chambers, First Street, between Avenue D and Avenue E, Cape Canaveral, Brevard County, FL

  9. 14 CFR 135.203 - VFR: Minimum altitudes.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 3 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false VFR: Minimum altitudes. 135.203 Section 135... Operating Limitations and Weather Requirements § 135.203 VFR: Minimum altitudes. Except when necessary for... above the surface or less than 500 feet horizontally from any obstacle; or (2) At night, at an...

  10. Photocopy of drawing. RIGHT ALTITUDE CHAMBER REACTIVATION. NASA, John F. ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Photocopy of drawing. RIGHT ALTITUDE CHAMBER REACTIVATION. NASA, John F. Kennedy Space Center, Florida. Drawing 82K06032, Boeing, December, 1997. 15 FT LEVEL EQUIPMENT LAYOUT. Sheet E13 - Cape Canaveral Air Force Station, Launch Complex 39, Altitude Chambers, First Street, between Avenue D and Avenue E, Cape Canaveral, Brevard County, FL

  11. 14 CFR 135.203 - VFR: Minimum altitudes.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 3 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false VFR: Minimum altitudes. 135.203 Section 135... Operating Limitations and Weather Requirements § 135.203 VFR: Minimum altitudes. Except when necessary for... above the surface or less than 500 feet horizontally from any obstacle; or (2) At night, at an...

  12. DETAIL OF THE EXTERIOR OF ALTITUDE CHAMBER R FROM THE ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    DETAIL OF THE EXTERIOR OF ALTITUDE CHAMBER R FROM THE 15’-0” LEVEL OF ACCESS PLATFORMS, FACING NORTHWEST - Cape Canaveral Air Force Station, Launch Complex 39, Altitude Chambers, First Street, between Avenue D and Avenue E, Cape Canaveral, Brevard County, FL

  13. 14 CFR 135.203 - VFR: Minimum altitudes.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 3 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false VFR: Minimum altitudes. 135.203 Section 135... Operating Limitations and Weather Requirements § 135.203 VFR: Minimum altitudes. Except when necessary for... above the surface or less than 500 feet horizontally from any obstacle; or (2) At night, at an...

  14. Photocopy of drawing. RIGHT ALTITUDE CHAMBER REACTIVATION. NASA, John F. ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Photocopy of drawing. RIGHT ALTITUDE CHAMBER REACTIVATION. NASA, John F. Kennedy Space Center, Florida. Drawing 82K06032, Boeing, December, 1997. ACCESS PLATFORM DEMOLITION. Sheet S1 - Cape Canaveral Air Force Station, Launch Complex 39, Altitude Chambers, First Street, between Avenue D and Avenue E, Cape Canaveral, Brevard County, FL

  15. 10 CFR 862.6 - Voluntary minimum altitude.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 4 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Voluntary minimum altitude. 862.6 Section 862.6 Energy DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY RESTRICTIONS ON AIRCRAFT LANDING AND AIR DELIVERY AT DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY NUCLEAR SITES § 862.6 Voluntary minimum altitude. In addition to complying with all applicable FAA prohibitions...

  16. Preliminary Transient Performance Data on the J73 Turbojet Engine. 3; Altitude, 45,000 Feet

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    McAulay, John E.; Wallner, Lewis E.

    1953-01-01

    A program was undertaken to determine the J73 turbojet engine compressor stall and surge characteristics and combustor blow-out limits enc ountered during transient engine operation. Data were obtained in the form of oscillograph traces showing the time history of several engi ne parameters with changes in engine fuel flow. The data presented in this report are for step and ramp changes in fuel flow at an altitude of 45,000 feet and flight Mach numbers of 0 and 0.8.

  17. Dynamic response at altitude of a turbojet engine with variable area exhaust nozzle

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Delio, Gene J; Rosenweig, Solomon

    1952-01-01

    The dynamic characteristics of turbojet engine with variable exhaust nozzle area were investigated over a range of altitudes and flight Mach numbers. These characteristics generalize to standard static level condition. Data resulting from approximate step disturbances in either manipulated variable suggested functional relationships from which functions can be derived. The constants of the transfer functions are listed for five combinations of engine speed and exhaust nozzle area. The minimum data needed to completely define the transfer functions were: experimentally determined dynamic characteristics, such as engine time constant and initial rise ratio, resulting from either manipulated variable; static characteristics determined from steady-state performance curves.

  18. Preliminary Transient Performance Data on the J73 Turbojet Engine. II - Altitude, 35,000 Feet

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lubick, Robert J.; Sobolewski, Adam E.

    1953-01-01

    A program was undertaken to determine the J73 turbojet engine compressor stall and surge characteristics and combustor blow-out limits encountered during transient engine operation. Data were obtained in the form of oscillograph traces showing the time history of several engine performance parameters with changes in engine fuel flow. The data presented in this report are for step changes in fuel flow at an altitude of 35,000 feet, at flight Mach numbers of 0.3, 0.8, and 1.2, and at several engine-inlet temperatures,

  19. Understanding controls on cirque floor altitudes: Insights from Kamchatka

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barr, Iestyn D.; Spagnolo, Matteo

    2015-11-01

    Glacial cirques reflect former regions of glacier initiation, and are therefore used as indicators of past climate. One specific way in which palaeoclimatic information is obtained from cirques is by analysing their elevations, on the assumption that cirque floor altitudes are a proxy for climatically controlled equilibrium-line altitudes (ELAs) during former periods of small scale (cirque-type) glaciation. However, specific controls on cirque altitudes are rarely assessed, and the validity of using cirque floor altitudes as a source of palaeoclimatic information remains open to question. In order to address this, here we analyse the distribution of 3520 ice-free cirques on the Kamchatka Peninsula (eastern Russia), and assess various controls on their floor altitudes. In addition, we analyse controls on the mid-altitudes of 503 modern glaciers, currently identifiable on the peninsula, and make comparisons with the cirque altitude data. The main study findings are that cirque floor altitudes increase steeply inland from the Pacific, suggesting that moisture availability (i.e., proximity to the coastline) played a key role in regulating the altitudes at which former (cirque-forming) glaciers were able to initiate. Other factors, such as latitude, aspect, topography, geology, and neo-tectonics seem to have played a limited (but not insignificant) role in regulating cirque floor altitudes, though south-facing cirques are typically higher than their north-facing equivalents, potentially reflecting the impact of prevailing wind directions (from the SSE) and/or variations in solar radiation on the altitudes at which former glaciers were able to initiate. Trends in glacier and cirque altitudes across the peninsula are typically comparable (i.e., values typically rise from both the north and south, inland from the Pacific coastline, and where glaciers/cirques are south-facing), yet the relationship with latitude is stronger for modern glaciers, and the relationship with

  20. The effect of high altitude on olfactory functions.

    PubMed

    Altundağ, Aytuğ; Salihoglu, Murat; Çayönü, Melih; Cingi, Cemal; Tekeli, Hakan; Hummel, Thomas

    2014-03-01

    It is known that high-altitude trips cause nasal congestion, impaired nasal mucociliary transport rate, and increased nasal resistance, due to decreased partial oxygen pressure and dry air. It is also known that olfactory perception is affected by barometric pressure and humidity. The aim of the present study was to investigate whether olfactory function changes in relation to high altitude in a natural setting. The present study included 41 volunteers with no history of chronic rhinosinusitis or nasal polyposis. The study group consisted of 31 men (76 %) and 10 women (24 %); the mean age of the study population was 38 ± 10 years. Olfactory testing was conducted using "Sniffin' Sticks" at a high altitude (2,200 ms) and at sea level. Odor test scores for threshold and identification were significantly better at sea level than at high altitude (p < 0.001). The major finding of this investigation was that olfactory functions are decreased at high altitudes.

  1. Optimal birthweights in Peruvian populations at high and low altitudes.

    PubMed

    Beall, C M

    1981-11-01

    This study tests the hypothesis that optimum birthweight for survival is lower among hospital-born infants in Puno, Peru (altitude 3860 m) than that among their counterparts at low altitude in Tacna, Peru (altitude 600 m). The data are derived from hospital birth records for 1971 and 1972 and municipal death records for 1971 through 1973. Linking these records permits analysis of the patterns of mortality in relation to birthweight. Stabilizing selection upon birthweight is operating in both populations. The high altitude population has a lower mean birthweight and a lower optimal birthweight. The Puno population is closer to its optimal birthweight distribution and, as a result of mortality during infancy, is approaching its optimum birthweight distribution for survival more rapidly than the Tacna population. It appears that the high altitude Puno population may well be adapted to its environment in the sense that there is less selective mortality on birthweight phenotypes.

  2. Efficient red emission from PMMA films doped with 5,6-DTFI europium(III) complexes: synthesis, structure and photophysical properties.

    PubMed

    Li, Weizuo; Yan, Pengfei; Hou, Guangfeng; Li, Hongfeng; Li, Guangming

    2013-08-28

    A new β-diketone, 5,6-dimethoxy-2(2,2,2-trifluoroethyl)-1-indone (5,6-DTFI), has been designed and synthesized. Two series of four 5,6-DTFI Sm(3+) and Eu(3+) complexes, namely, Eu(5,6-DTFI)3(H2O)2 (1), Eu(5,6-DTFI)3(Phen) (2), Sm(5,6-DTFI)3(H2O)2 (3) and Sm(5,6-DTFI)3(Phen) (4) (Phen = 1,10-phenanthroline), have been isolated. X-ray diffraction analysis reveals that all complexes 1-4 are of mononuclear structures. Luminescent and phosphorescent spectra of complexes 1-4 show strong characteristic emissions of the corresponding Eu(3+) and Sm(3+) ions. Upon complexes 1 and 2 were doped into the poly(methylmethacrylate) (PMMA) forming the films, the PMMA polymer matrix acting as a co-sensitizer for Eu(3+) ion enhances the luminescent lifetimes, overall quantum yields and the thermal stability in comparison with the precursor complexes.

  3. Oblique low-altitude image matching using robust perspective invariant features

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    He, Haiqing; Du, Jing; Chen, Xiaoyong; Wang, Yuqian

    2017-01-01

    Compared with vertical photogrammtry, oblique photogrammetry is radically different for images acquired from sensor with big yaw, pitch, and roll angles. Image matching is a vital step and core problem of oblique low-altitude photogrammetric process. Among the most popular oblique images matching methods are currently SIFT/ASIFT and many affine invariant feature-based approaches, which are mainly used in computer vision, while these methods are unsuitable for requiring evenly distributed corresponding points and high efficiency simultaneously in oblique photogrammetry. In this paper, we present an oblique low-altitude images matching approach using robust perspective invariant features. Firstly, the homography matrix is estimated by a few corresponding points obtained from top pyramid images matching in several projective simulation. Then images matching are implemented by sub-pixel Harris corners and descriptors after shape perspective transforming on the basis of homography matrix. Finally, the error or gross error matched points are excluded by epipolar geometry, RANSAC algorithm and back projection constraint. Experimental results show that the proposed approach can achieve more excellent performances in oblique low-altitude images matching than the common methods, including SIFT and SURF. And the proposed approach can significantly improve the computational efficiency compared with ASIFT and Affine-SURF.

  4. Altitude Effects on Thermal Ice Protection System Performance; a Study of an Alternative Approach

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Addy, Harold E., Jr.; Orchard, David; Wright, William B.; Oleskiw, Myron

    2016-01-01

    Research has been conducted to better understand the phenomena involved during operation of an aircraft's thermal ice protection system under running wet icing conditions. In such situations, supercooled water striking a thermally ice-protected surface does not fully evaporate but runs aft to a location where it freezes. The effects of altitude, in terms of air pressure and density, on the processes involved were of particular interest. Initial study results showed that the altitude effects on heat energy transfer were accurately modeled using existing methods, but water mass transport was not. Based upon those results, a new method to account for altitude effects on thermal ice protection system operation was proposed. The method employs a two-step process where heat energy and mass transport are sequentially matched, linked by matched surface temperatures. While not providing exact matching of heat and mass transport to reference conditions, the method produces a better simulation than other methods. Moreover, it does not rely on the application of empirical correction factors, but instead relies on the straightforward application of the primary physics involved. This report describes the method, shows results of testing the method, and discusses its limitations.

  5. Effects of high altitude on sleep and respiratory system and theirs adaptations.

    PubMed

    San, Turhan; Polat, Senol; Cingi, Cemal; Eskiizmir, Gorkem; Oghan, Fatih; Cakir, Burak

    2013-01-01

    High-altitude (HA) environments have adverse effects on the normal functioning body of people accustomed to living at low altitudes because of the change in barometric pressure which causes decrease in the amount of oxygen leading to hypobaric hypoxia. Sustained exposure to hypoxia has adverse effects on body weight, muscle structure and exercise capacity, mental functioning, and sleep quality. The most important step of acclimatization is the hyperventilation which is achieved by hypoxic ventilatory response of the peripheral chemoreceptors. Hyperventilation results in increase in arterial carbon-dioxide concentration. Altitude also affects sleep and cardiac output, which is the other determinant of oxygen delivery. Upon initial exposure to HA, the resting pulse rate increases rapidly, but with acclimatization, heart rate and cardiac output tend to fall. Another important component that leads to decrease in cardiac output is the reduction in the stroke volume with acclimatization. During sleep at HA, the levels of CO2 in the blood can drop very low and this can switch off the drive to breathe. Only after the body senses a further drop in O2 levels breathing is started again. Periodic breathing is thought to result from instability in the control system through the hypoxic drive or the response to CO2.

  6. Magnetospheric plasma studies using data from the dynamics explorer high and low altitude plasma instruments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barfield, J. N.

    1986-02-01

    The reported research focused primarily upon plasma processes in and near the plasma cusp. The following areas were studied: plasma injection and transport in the mid-altitude polar cusp; observations of counterstreaming electrons at high altitudes; observations of upward electron beams and their relationship to region 1 Birkeland currents; observations of the electron population responsible for the 6300A SAR arc emission, polar rain observations; polar wind observations; and observations of ion and electron acceleration events produced by parallel electric fields. The primary observing platform for the research reported here was Dynamic Explorer 1 (DE-1). The DE-1 High Altitude Plasma Instrument (HAPI) consists of five electrostatic analyzers mounted in a fan-shaped angular array at angles of 45, 78, 90, 102, and 135 deg. with respect to the spacecraft spin axis. Each analyzer makes differential measurements of electrons and positive ions over an energy/charge range of 5 eV/e to 32 keV/e. Energy stepping proceeds at commandable rates of up to 64 sec, providing three-dimensional plasma distribution functions at the six second spin rate or DE-1.

  7. Effects of High Altitude on Sleep and Respiratory System and Theirs Adaptations

    PubMed Central

    San, Turhan; Polat, Senol; Cingi, Cemal; Eskiizmir, Gorkem; Oghan, Fatih; Cakir, Burak

    2013-01-01

    High-altitude (HA) environments have adverse effects on the normal functioning body of people accustomed to living at low altitudes because of the change in barometric pressure which causes decrease in the amount of oxygen leading to hypobaric hypoxia. Sustained exposure to hypoxia has adverse effects on body weight, muscle structure and exercise capacity, mental functioning, and sleep quality. The most important step of acclimatization is the hyperventilation which is achieved by hypoxic ventilatory response of the peripheral chemoreceptors. Hyperventilation results in increase in arterial carbondioxide concentration. Altitude also affects sleep and cardiac output, which is the other determinant of oxygen delivery. Upon initial exposure to HA, the resting pulse rate increases rapidly, but with acclimatization, heart rate and cardiac output tend to fall. Another important component that leads to decrease in cardiac output is the reduction in the stroke volume with acclimatization. During sleep at HA, the levels of CO2 in the blood can drop very low and this can switch off the drive to breathe. Only after the body senses a further drop in O2 levels breathing is started again. Periodic breathing is thought to result from instability in the control system through the hypoxic drive or the response to CO2. PMID:23690739

  8. Impact of Altitude on Power Output during Cycling Stage Racing

    PubMed Central

    Garvican-Lewis, Laura A; Clark, Bradley; Martin, David T.; Schumacher, Yorck Olaf; McDonald, Warren; Stephens, Brian; Ma, Fuhai; Thompson, Kevin G.; Gore, Christopher J.; Menaspà, Paolo

    2015-01-01

    Purpose The purpose of this study was to quantify the effects of moderate-high altitude on power output, cadence, speed and heart rate during a multi-day cycling tour. Methods Power output, heart rate, speed and cadence were collected from elite male road cyclists during maximal efforts of 5, 15, 30, 60, 240 and 600 s. The efforts were completed in a laboratory power-profile assessment, and spontaneously during a cycling race simulation near sea-level and an international cycling race at moderate-high altitude. Matched data from the laboratory power-profile and the highest maximal mean power output (MMP) and corresponding speed and heart rate recorded during the cycling race simulation and cycling race at moderate-high altitude were compared using paired t-tests. Additionally, all MMP and corresponding speeds and heart rates were binned per 1000m (<1000m, 1000–2000, 2000–3000 and >3000m) according to the average altitude of each ride. Mixed linear modelling was used to compare cycling performance data from each altitude bin. Results Power output was similar between the laboratory power-profile and the race simulation, however MMPs for 5–600 s and 15, 60, 240 and 600 s were lower (p ≤ 0.005) during the race at altitude compared with the laboratory power-profile and race simulation, respectively. Furthermore, peak power output and all MMPs were lower (≥ 11.7%, p ≤ 0.001) while racing >3000 m compared with rides completed near sea-level. However, speed associated with MMP 60 and 240 s was greater (p < 0.001) during racing at moderate-high altitude compared with the race simulation near sea-level. Conclusion A reduction in oxygen availability as altitude increases leads to attenuation of cycling power output during competition. Decrement in cycling power output at altitude does not seem to affect speed which tended to be greater at higher altitudes. PMID:26629912

  9. Effects of simulated and real altitude exposure in elite swimmers.

    PubMed

    Robertson, Eileen Y; Aughey, Robert J; Anson, Judith M; Hopkins, Will G; Pyne, David B

    2010-02-01

    The effect of repeated exposures to natural and simulated moderate altitude on physiology and competitive performance of elite athletes warrants further investigation. This study quantified changes in hemoglobin mass, performance tests, and competitive performance of elite swimmers undertaking a coach-prescribed program of natural and simulated altitude training. Nine swimmers (age 21.1 +/- 1.4 years, mean +/- SD) completed up to four 2-week blocks of combined living and training at moderate natural altitude (1,350 m) and simulated live high-train low (2,600-600 m) altitude exposure between 2 National Championships. Changes in hemoglobin mass (Hbmass), 4-mM lactate threshold velocity, and 2,000 m time trial were measured. Competition performance of these swimmers was compared with that of 9 similarly trained swimmers (21.1 +/- 4.1 years) who undertook no altitude training. Each 2-week altitude block on average produced the following improvements: Hbmass, 0.9% (90% confidence limits, +/-0.8%); 4-mM lactate threshold velocity, 0.9% (+/-0.8%); and 2,000 m time trial performance, 1.2% (+/-1.6%). The increases in Hbmass had a moderate correlation with time trial performance (r = 0.47; +/-0.41) but an unclear correlation with lactate threshold velocity (r = -0.23; +/-0.48). The altitude group did not swim faster at National Championships compared with swimmers who did not receive any altitude exposure, the difference between the groups was not substantial (-0.5%; +/-1.0%). A coach-prescribed program of repeated altitude training and exposure elicited modest changes in physiology but did not substantially improve competition performance of elite swimmers. Sports should investigate the efficacy of their altitude training program to justify the investment.

  10. Altitude-related illness in two California national parks.

    PubMed

    Weichenthal, L A; Hendey, G

    1998-01-01

    High-altitude illness encompasses a spectrum of disorders related to the hypoxia experienced by individuals at elevation. Altitude-related illness has been well described in the United States, but there are no studies published in the medical literature looking at the occurrence of high-altitude illness within the US National Parks system. The purpose of this study is to describe the incidence, treatment, and outcomes of visitors to Sequoia and Kings Canyon National Parks who presented to emergency medical services (EMS) personnel with signs and symptoms consistent with high-altitude illness. We conducted a retrospective review of all EMS patient care records (PCRs) from Sequoia and Kings Canyon National Parks during the study period of June 1992 to August 1995. There were 23 cases of altitude-related illness identified by EMS personnel in the parks during the 38-month study period, including five cases of high-altitude pulmonary edema and 19 cases of acute mountain sickness. One patient died, nine patients were transported to local hospitals, nine patients were assisted in their descent and then released from medical care, and four patients were treated and then allowed to continue their travels. There was an average of 5.9 cases per year of high-altitude illness and an incidence of one case per 27 EMS contacts. We conclude that altitude-related illness does occur in Sequoia and Kings Canyon National Parks and, although high-altitude illness accounts for only 4% of EMS contacts, caring for these patients uses a significant amount of national park resources. We suggest continued training of emergency medical technicians and park medics in the recognition and treatment of these disorders. We also support education of hikers to reduce or prevent the morbidity associated with altitude-related illness.

  11. Free and total thyroid hormones in humans at extreme altitude

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Basu, Minakshi; Pal, K.; Malhotra, A. S.; Prasad, R.; Sawhney, R. C.

    1995-03-01

    Alterations in circulatory levels of total T4 (TT4), total T3 (TT3), free T4 (FT4), free T3 (FT3), thyrotropin (TSH) and T3 uptake (T3U) were studied in male and female sea-level residents (SLR) at sea level, in Armed forces personnel staying at high altitude (3750 m) for prolonged duration (acclimatized lowlanders, ALL) and in high-altitude natives (HAN). Identical studies were also performed on male ALL who trekked to an extreme altitude of 5080 m and stayed at an altitude of more than 6300 m for about 6 months. The total as well as free thyroid hormones were found to be significantly higher in ALL and HAN as compared to SLR values. Both male as well as female HAN had higher levels of thyroid hormones. The rise in hormone levels in different ALL ethnic groups drawn from amongst the southern and northern parts of the country was more or less identical. In both HAN and ALL a decline in FT3 and FT4 occurred when these subjects trekked at subzero temperatures to extreme altitude of 5080 m but the levels were found to be higher in ALL who stayed at 6300 m for a prolonged duration. Plasma TSH did not show any appreciable change at lower altitudes but was found to be decreased at extreme altitude. The increase in thyroid hormones at high altitude was not due to an increase in hormone binding proteins, since T3U was found to be higher at high altitudes. A decline in TSH and hormone binding proteins and an increase in the free moiety of the hormones is indicative of a subtle degree of tissue hyperthyroidism which may be playing an important role in combating the extreme cold and hypoxic environment of high altitudes.

  12. Accuracy of Handheld Blood Glucose Meters at High Altitude

    PubMed Central

    de Vries, Suzanna T.; Fokkert, Marion J.; Dikkeschei, Bert D.; Rienks, Rienk; Bilo, Karin M.; Bilo, Henk J. G.

    2010-01-01

    Background Due to increasing numbers of people with diabetes taking part in extreme sports (e.g., high-altitude trekking), reliable handheld blood glucose meters (BGMs) are necessary. Accurate blood glucose measurement under extreme conditions is paramount for safe recreation at altitude. Prior studies reported bias in blood glucose measurements using different BGMs at high altitude. We hypothesized that glucose-oxidase based BGMs are more influenced by the lower atmospheric oxygen pressure at altitude than glucose dehydrogenase based BGMs. Methodology/Principal Findings Glucose measurements at simulated altitude of nine BGMs (six glucose dehydrogenase and three glucose oxidase BGMs) were compared to glucose measurement on a similar BGM at sea level and to a laboratory glucose reference method. Venous blood samples of four different glucose levels were used. Moreover, two glucose oxidase and two glucose dehydrogenase based BGMs were evaluated at different altitudes on Mount Kilimanjaro. Accuracy criteria were set at a bias <15% from reference glucose (when >6.5 mmol/L) and <1 mmol/L from reference glucose (when <6.5 mmol/L). No significant difference was observed between measurements at simulated altitude and sea level for either glucose oxidase based BGMs or glucose dehydrogenase based BGMs as a group phenomenon. Two GDH based BGMs did not meet set performance criteria. Most BGMs are generally overestimating true glucose concentration at high altitude. Conclusion At simulated high altitude all tested BGMs, including glucose oxidase based BGMs, did not show influence of low atmospheric oxygen pressure. All BGMs, except for two GDH based BGMs, performed within predefined criteria. At true high altitude one GDH based BGM had best precision and accuracy. PMID:21103399

  13. Microgravity combustion experiment using high altitude balloon.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kan, Yuji

    In JAXA, microgravity experiment system using a high altitude balloon was developed , for good microgravity environment and short turn-around time. In this publication, I give an account of themicrogravity experiment system and a combustion experiment to utilize the system. The balloon operated vehicle (BOV) as a microgravity experiment system was developed from 2004 to 2009. Features of the BOV are (1) BOV has double capsule structure. Outside-capsule and inside-capsule are kept the non-contact state by 3-axis drag-free control. (2) The payload is spherical shape and itsdiameter is about 300 mm. (3) Keep 10-4 G level microgravity environment for about 30 seconds However, BOV’s payload was small, and could not mount large experiment module. In this study, inherits the results of past, we established a new experimental system called “iBOV” in order toaccommodate larger payload. Features of the iBOV are (1) Drag-free control use for only vertical direction. (2) The payload is a cylindrical shape and its size is about 300 mm in diameter and 700 mm in height. (3) Keep 10-3-10-4 G level microgravity environment for about 30 seconds We have "Observation experiment of flame propagation behavior of the droplets column" as experiment using iBOV. This experiment is a theme that was selected first for technical demonstration of iBOV. We are conducting the flame propagation mechanism elucidation study of fuel droplets array was placed at regular intervals. We conducted a microgravity experiments using TEXUS rocket ESA and drop tower. For this microgravity combustion experiment using high altitude balloon, we use the Engineering Model (EM) for TEXUS rocket experiment. The EM (This payload) consists of combustion vessel, droplets supporter, droplets generator, fuel syringe, igniter, digital camera, high-speed camera. And, This payload was improved from the EM as follows. (1) Add a control unit. (2) Add inside batteries for control unit and heater of combustion

  14. Effect of thalidomide on tumour necrosis factor production and anti-tumour activity induced by 5,6-dimethylxanthenone-4-acetic acid.

    PubMed Central

    Ching, L. M.; Xu, Z. F.; Gummer, B. H.; Palmer, B. D.; Joseph, W. R.; Baguley, B. C.

    1995-01-01

    The investigational anti-tumour agent, 5,6-dimethylxanthenone-4-acetic acid (5,6-MeXAA), an analogue of flavone acetic acid (FAA), has been scheduled for clinical evaluation. Like FAA, 5,6-MeXAA exhibits excellent experimental anti-tumour activity and is an efficient inducer of cytokines in mice. We have examined the effect of pharmacological suppression of tumour necrosis factor (TNF) production on the anti-tumour activity of 5,6-MeXAA, taking advantage of previous observations that TNF production in response to endotoxin in vitro is inhibited by thalidomide. Thalidomide at doses of between 8 and 250 mg kg-1 efficiently suppressed serum TNF activity in response to 5,6-MeXAA at its optimal TNF inducing dose of 55 mg kg-1. Suppression was achieved when thalidomide was administered at the same time as, or up to 4 h before, 5,6-MeXAA. Under conditions in which TNF activity was suppressed, the degree of tumour haemorrhagic necrosis and the proportion of cures in the subcutaneous Colon 38 tumour were increased. In mice administered thalidomide (100 mg kg-1) together with 5,6-MeXAA (30 mg kg-1), complete tumour regression was obtained in 100% of mice, as compared with 67% in mice receiving 5,6-MeXAA alone. The results suggest a possible new application for thalidomide and pose new questions about the action of 5,6-MeXAA and related compounds. PMID:7640215

  15. FOCUSING COSMIC TELESCOPES: EXPLORING REDSHIFT z approx 5-6 GALAXIES WITH THE BULLET CLUSTER 1E0657 - 56

    SciTech Connect

    Bradac, Marusa; Treu, Tommaso; Marshall, Phil; Applegate, Douglas; Gonzalez, Anthony H.; Clowe, Douglas; Forman, William; Jones, Christine; Schneider, Peter; Zaritsky, Dennis

    2009-12-01

    The gravitational potential of clusters of galaxies acts as a cosmic telescope allowing us to find and study galaxies at fainter limits than otherwise possible and thus probe closer to the epoch of formation of the first galaxies. We use the Bullet cluster 1E0657 - 56 (z = 0.296) as a case study, because its high mass and merging configuration makes it one of the most efficient cosmic telescopes we know. We develop a new algorithm to reconstruct the gravitational potential of the Bullet cluster based on a non-uniform adaptive grid, combining strong and weak gravitational lensing data derived from deep Hubble Space Telescope/Advanced Camera for Surveys F606W-F775W-F850LP and ground-based imaging. We exploit this improved mass map to study z approx 5-6 Lyman break galaxies (LBGs), which we detect as dropouts. One of the LBGs is multiply imaged, providing a geometric confirmation of its high redshift, and is used to further improve our mass model. We quantify the uncertainties in the magnification map reconstruction in the intrinsic source luminosity, and in the volume surveyed, and show that they are negligible compared to sample variance when determining the luminosity function of high-redshift galaxies. With shallower and comparable magnitude limits to Hubble Ultra Deep Field (HUDF) and Great Observatories Origins Deep Survey (GOODS), the Bullet cluster observations, after correcting for magnification, probe deeper into the luminosity function of the high-redshift galaxies than GOODS and only slightly shallower than HUDF. We conclude that accurately focused cosmic telescopes are the most efficient way to sample the bright end of the luminosity function of high-redshift galaxies and-in case they are multiply imaged-confirm their redshifts.

  16. Spectrophotometric determination of fluoxetine and sertraline using chloranil, 2, 3 dichloro-5, 6 dicyano benzoquinone and iodine.

    PubMed

    Bebawy, L I; El-Kousy, N; Suddik, J K; Shokry, M

    1999-10-01

    Spectrophotometric procedures are presented for the determination of two commonly used antidepressant drugs, fluoxetine (I) and sertraline hydrochloride (II). The methods are based mainly on charge transfer complexation reaction of these drugs with either pi acceptors chloranil and 2, 3 dichloro-5, 6-dicyanoquinone (DDQ) or sigma acceptor iodine. The colored products are quantified spectrophotometrically at 550, 450 and 263 nm for fluoxetine and at 450, 455 and 290 nm for sertraline in chloranil, DDQ and iodine methods, respectively. The molar combining ratio and the optimum assay conditions were studied. The methods determine the cited drugs in concentration ranges of 8-640, 16-112 and 7.5-60 microg/ml with mean percentage recoveries of 99.83, 99.76 and 100.00% and R.S.D. of 1.24, 0.95 and 1.13% in fluoxetine and ranges of 16-160, 15-105 and 6-48 microg/ml with mean percentage recoveries of 100.39, 99.78 and 99.69% and R.S.D. of 1.02, 0.81 and 0.57% in sertraline for chloranil, DDQ and iodine methods, respectively. A more detailed investigation of the complex formed was made with respect to its composition, association constant K(AD)c, molar absorptivity xiAD(A) and free energy change deltaG. The proposed methods were applied successfully to the determination of the cited drugs either in pure or dosage forms with good accuracy and precision. The results were compared statistically with those given by the reported methods.

  17. Inhibition of Bovine Viral Diarrhea Virus RNA Synthesis by Thiosemicarbazone Derived from 5,6-Dimethoxy-1-Indanone▿

    PubMed Central

    Castro, Eliana F.; Fabian, Lucas E.; Caputto, María E.; Gagey, Dolores; Finkielsztein, Liliana M.; Moltrasio, Graciela Y.; Moglioni, Albertina G.; Campos, Rodolfo H.; Cavallaro, Lucía V.

    2011-01-01

    In the present work, we described the activity of the thiosemicarbazone derived from 5,6-dimethoxy-1-indanone (TSC), which we previously characterized as a new compound that inhibits bovine viral diarrhea virus (BVDV) infection. We showed that TSC acts at a point of time that coincides with the onset of viral RNA synthesis and that it inhibits the activity of BVDV replication complexes (RCs). Moreover, we have selected five BVDV mutants that turned out to be highly resistant to TSC but still susceptible to ribavirin (RBV). Four of these resistant mutants carried an N264D mutation in the viral RNA-dependent RNA polymerase (RdRp). The remaining mutant showed an A392E mutation within the same protein. Some of these mutants replicated slower than the wild-type (wt) virus in the absence of TSC, whereas others showed a partial reversion to the wt phenotype over several passages in the absence of the compound. The docking of TSC in the crystal structure of the BVDV RdRp revealed a close contact between the indane ring of the compound and several residues within the fingers domain of the enzyme, some hydrophobic contacts, and hydrogen bonds with the thiosemicarbazone group. Finally, in the mutated RdRp from resistant BVDV, these interactions with TSC could not be achieved. Interestingly, TSC inhibited BVDV replication in cell culture synergistically with RBV. In conclusion, TSC emerges as a new nonnucleoside inhibitor of BVDV RdRp that is synergistic with RBV, a feature that turns it into a potential compound to be evaluated against hepatitis C virus (HCV). PMID:21430053

  18. Multi-Wavelength Observation Results of the C5.6 Limb Flare of 1 August 2003

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Hui; You, Jianqi; Du, Qiusheng; Yu, Xingfeng

    2004-11-01

    We obtained a complete set of Hα, Ca Π 8542 Å and He I 10830 Å spectra and slit-jaw Hα images of the C5.6 limb flare of 1 August 2003 using the Multi-channel Infrared Solar Spectrograph (MISS) at Purple Mountain Observatory. This flare was also observed by the Reuven Ramaty High-Energy Solar Spectroscopic Imager (RHESSI) and partially by the Extreme-ultraviolet Imaging Telescope (EIT) on SOHO. This flare underwent a rapid rising and expanding episode in the impulsive phase. All the Hα, Ca Π 8542 Å and He I 10830 Å profiles of the flare are rather wide and the widest profiles were observed in the middle bright part of the flare instead of at the flare loop top near the flare maximum. The flare manifested obvious rotation in the flare loop and the decrease of the rotation angular speed with time at the loop-top may imply a de-twisting process of the magnetic field. The significant increases of the Doppler widths of these lines in the impulsive phase reflect quick heating of the chromosphere, and rapid rising and expanding of the flare loop. The RHESSI observations give a thermal energy spectrum for this flare, and two thermal sources and no non-thermal source are found in the reconstructed RHESSI images. This presumably indicates that the energy transfer in this flare is mainly by heat conduction. The stronger thermal source is located near the solar limb with its position unchanged in the flare process and spatially coincident with the intense EUV and Hα emissions. The weaker one moved during the flare process and is located in the Hα dark cavities. This flare may support the theory of the magnetic reconnections in the lower solar atmosphere.

  19. Three-dimensional evaluation of facial morphology in children aged 5-6 years with a Class III malocclusion.

    PubMed

    Krneta, Bojana; Primožič, Jasmina; Zhurov, Alexei; Richmond, Stephen; Ovsenik, Maja

    2014-04-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate facial morphology in 25 Class III and 46 non-Class III children aged 5-6 years using three-dimensional (3D) laser imaging; 3D facial images were obtained, two average facial templates were constructed for the non-Class III male and female groups, each individual face was superimposed on the corresponding average template and group comparisons were evaluated (facial height, facial convexity, mandibular position and facial surface morphology). Differences between parameters were evaluated by using an analysis of variance and colour deviation maps. The results showed that Class III children had less mid-face prominence and a concave facial profile when compared to non-Class III children (P = 0.002 and P = 0.018). The position of the pg point in the z-axis just failed to reach statistical significance when comparing the two groups (P = 0.051). A vertical analysis showed no statistical significance between the groups, when evaluating middle (n-sn) and lower (sn-pg) facial height. Coincidence of the Class III faces to normal templates with a tolerance set as 0.5 mm was low (less than 30%). The soft tissue characteristics of a Class III face differ significantly from the non-Class III face in the mid-face region and in the facial profile. A 3D laser imaging method evaluated and identified morphological characteristics of Class III children in deciduous dentition, which could in the future become an important diagnostic tool in small children. The most important clinical advantage of this study is the non-invasiveness of the method.

  20. Synthesis, antimicrobial activity and QSAR studies of new 2,3-disubstituted-3,3a,4,5,6,7-hexahydro-2H-indazoles.

    PubMed

    Minu, Maninder; Thangadurai, Ananda; Wakode, Sharad Ramesh; Agrawal, Shyam Sundar; Narasimhan, Balasubramanian

    2009-06-01

    Antimicrobial activity of synthesized 2,3-disubstituted-3,3a,4,5,6,7-hexahydro-2H-indazole derivatives indicated that 3-(4-chlorophenyl)-2-(4-nitrophenylsulfonyl)-3,3a,4,5,6,7-hexahydro-2H-indazole (6) and 3-(4-fluorophenyl)-2-(4-nitrophenylsulfonyl)-3,3a,4,5,6,7-hexahydro-2H-indazole (20) were the most active compounds. Further, the results of QSAR studies indicated the importance of topological parameters (2)chi and (2)chi(v) in defining the antimicrobial activity of hexahydroindazoles.

  1. NASA/USRA high altitude reconnaissance aircraft

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Richardson, Michael; Gudino, Juan; Chen, Kenny; Luong, Tai; Wilkerson, Dave; Keyvani, Anoosh

    1990-01-01

    At the equator, the ozone layer ranges from approximately 80,000 to 130,000+ feet which is beyond the capabilities of the ER-2, NASA's current high altitude reconnaissance aircraft. This project is geared to designing an aircraft that can study the ozone layer at the equator. This aircraft must be able to cruise at 130,000 lbs. of payload. In addition, the aircraft must have a minimum of a 6,000 mile range. The low Mach number, payload, and long cruising time are all constraints imposed by the air sampling equipment. A pilot must be able to take control in the event of unforseen difficulties. Three aircraft configurations were determined to be the most suitable for meeting the above requirements, a joined-wing, a bi-plane, and a twin-boom conventional airplane. The techniques used have been deemed reasonable within the limits of 1990 technology. The performance of each configuration is analyzed to investigate the feasibility of the project requirements. In the event that a requirement can not be obtained within the given constraints, recommendations for proposal modifications are given.

  2. SHARP: Subsonic High Altitude Research Platform

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Beals, Todd; Burton, Craig; Cabatan, Aileen; Hermano, Christine; Jones, Tom; Lee, Susan; Radloff, Brian

    1991-01-01

    The Universities Space Research Association is sponsoring an undergraduate program which is geared to designing an aircraft that can study the ozone layer at the equator. This aircraft must be able to satisfy four mission profiles. Mission one is a polar mission that ranges from Chile to the South Pole and back to Chile, a total range of 6000 n.mi. at 100,000 ft with a 2500 lb payload. The second mission is also a polar mission, with an altitude of 70,000 ft and an increased payload of 4000 lbs. For the third mission, the aircraft will takeoff at NASA Ames, cruise at 100,000 ft carrying a 2500 lb payload, and land at Puerto Montt, Chile. The final mission requires the aircraft to take off at NASA Ames, cruise at 100,000 ft with a 1000 lb payload, make an excursion to 120,000 ft, and land at Howard AFB, Panama. Three missions require that a subsonic Mach number be maintained due to constraints imposed by the air sampling equipment. The aircraft need not be manned for all four missions. Three aircraft configurations have been determined to be the most suitable for meeting the above requirements. In the event that a requirement cannot be obtained within the given constraints, recommendations for proposal modifications are given.

  3. The High-Altitude Water Cherenkov Observatory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mostafá, Miguel A.

    2014-10-01

    The High-Altitude Water Cherenkov (HAWC) observatory is a large field of view, continuously operated, TeV γ-ray experiment under construction at 4,100 m a.s.l. in Mexico. The HAWC observatory will have an order of magnitude better sensitivity, angular resolution, and background rejection than its predecessor, the Milagro experiment. The improved performance will allow us to detect both the transient and steady emissions, to study the Galactic diffuse emission at TeV energies, and to measure or constrain the TeV spectra of GeV γ-ray sources. In addition, HAWC will be the only ground-based instrument capable of detecting prompt emission from γ-ray bursts above 50 GeV. The HAWC observatory will consist of an array of 300 water Cherenkov detectors (WCDs), each with four photomultiplier tubes. This array is currently under construction on the flanks of the Sierra Negra volcano near the city of Puebla, Mexico. The first 30 WCDs (forming an array approximately the size of Milagro) were deployed in Summer 2012, and 100 WCDs will be taking data by May, 2013. We present in this paper the motivation for constructing the HAWC observatory, the status of the deployment, and the first results from the constantly growing array.

  4. High Altitude Observatory YBJ and ARGO Project

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tan, Y.; ARGO Collaboration

    A 5800 m2 RPC (Resistive Plate Chamber) full coverage air shower array is under construction in the YangBaJing Cosmic Ray Observatory, Tibet of China, by the ChinaItaly ARGO Collaboration. YBJ is a large flat grassland with an area 10 × 70 km2 at 4300m altitude, about 90 north west from Lhasa. Its nearby power station, asphalt road to Lhasa, passing railway (will be constructed during the coming 5 years), optical fiber link to the INTERNET, rare snow and other favourable weather conditions are well suitable for setting an Astrophysical Observatory here. The installation of a large area carpet-like detector in this peculiar site will allow one to perform an all-sky and high duty cycle study of high energy gamma rays from 100GeV to 50 TeV as well as accurate measurements on UHE cosmic rays. To insure the stable and uniform working condition of RPCs, a 104 M2 carpet hall was constructed, the RPC installation have be started in it since last November. The natural distribution and daily variation of temperature in the hall, the data concerning the performances of the installed RPCs, have been measured, the results are presented. ce

  5. The High Altitude Water Cherenkov (HAWC) Observatory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Springer, Wayne

    2014-06-01

    The High Altitude Water Cherenkov (HAWC) observatory is a continuously operated, wide field of view detector based upon a water Cherenkov technology developed by the Milagro experiment. HAWC observes, at an elevation of 4100 m on Sierra Negra Mountain in Mexico, extensive air showers initiated by gamma and cosmic rays. The completed detector will consist of 300 closely spaced water tanks each instrumented with four photomultiplier tubes that provide timing and charge information used to reconstruct energy and arrival direction. HAWC has been optimized to observe transient and steady emission from point as well as diffuse sources of gamma rays in the energy range from several hundred GeV to several hundred TeV. Studies in solar physics as well as the properties of cosmic rays will also be performed. HAWC has been making observations at various stages of deployment since completion of 10% of the array in summer 2012. A discussion of the detector design, science capabilities, current construction/commissioning status, and first results will be presented...

  6. High-altitude aerostats as astronomical platforms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bely, Pierre Y.; Ashford, Robert; Cox, Charles D.

    1995-06-01

    The tropopause, typically at 16 to 18 km altitude at the lower latitudes, dips to 8 km in the polar regions. This makes the cold, dry, and nonturbulent lower stratosphere accessible to tethered aerostats. Tethered aerostats can fly as high as 12 km and are extremely reliable, lasting for many years. In contrast to free-flying balloons, they can stay on station for weeks at a time, and payloads can be safely recovered for maintenance and adjustment and relaunched in a matter of hours. We propose to use such a platform, located first in the Arctic (near Fairbanks, Alaska), and then later in the Antarctic, to operate a new technology 4-meter telescope with diffraction-limited performance in the near-IR. Thanks to the low ambient temperature (200 degrees K), thermal emission from the optics is of the same order as that of the zodiacal light in the 2 to 3 micron band. Since this wavelength interval is the darkest part of the zodiacal light spectrum from optical wavelengths to 100 microns, the combination of high resolution images and a very dark sky make it the spectral region of choice for observing the redshifted light from galaxies and clusters of galaxies at moderate to high redshifts.

  7. Stepped inlet optical panel

    DOEpatents

    Veligdan, James T.

    2001-01-01

    An optical panel includes stacked optical waveguides having stepped inlet facets collectively defining an inlet face for receiving image light, and having beveled outlet faces collectively defining a display screen for displaying the image light channeled through the waveguides by internal reflection.

  8. Reconciling icetexane biosynthetic connections with their chemical synthesis: total synthesis of (+/-)-5,6-dihydro-6alpha-hydroxysalviasperanol, (+/-)-brussonol, and (+/-)-abrotanone.

    PubMed

    Simmons, Eric M; Yen, Jennifer R; Sarpong, Richmond

    2007-07-05

    A unified strategy for the chemical synthesis of the icetexane diterpenoids brussonol and 5,6-dihydro-6alpha-hydroxysalviasperanol has led to a structural revision of the recently isolated natural products abrotandiol and abrotanone.

  9. Height and altitude distribution of large volcanoes on Venus

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Keddie, S. T.; Head, J. W.

    1994-01-01

    Magellan data reveal 156 large volcanoes on Venus (greater than 100 km in diameter) which range in height from 300 m to 5.55 km, with an average height of 1.42 km. On the basis of theory it has been predicted that the development of neutral buoyancy zones (NBZ) on Venus and thus the resulting volcanic deposits are strongly influenced by the altitude-controlled variations in surface pressure. The distribution and height of these large volcanoes as a function of altitude was examined to begin to test these predications. Although large volcanoes are relatively uniformly distributed in altitude, there may be a slight paucity of volcanoes at the lowest elevations and a slight surplus at mid-altitudes. In addition, it is observed that the volcanoes at the highest altitudes tend to be the tallest. The observed distributions at low-mid altitudes is consistent with the prediction of NBZ theory. The high altitude distribution and heights, however, emphasize the necessity of considering other factors, such as tectonic setting, edifice age, magma supply, and thermal gradient, in describing the location and development of large volcanoes on Venus.

  10. Travel to high altitude with pre-existing lung disease.

    PubMed

    Luks, A M; Swenson, E R

    2007-04-01

    The pathophysiology of high-altitude illnesses has been well studied in normal individuals, but little is known about the risks of high-altitude travel in patients with pre-existing lung disease. Although it would seem self-evident that any patient with lung disease might not do well at high altitude, the type and severity of disease will determine the likelihood of difficulty in a high-altitude environment. The present review examines whether these individuals are at risk of developing one of the main forms of acute or chronic high-altitude illness and whether the underlying lung disease itself will get worse at high elevations. Several groups of pulmonary disorders are considered, including obstructive, restrictive, vascular, control of ventilation, pleural and neuromuscular diseases. Attempts will be made to classify the risks faced by each of these groups at high altitude and to provide recommendations regarding evaluation prior to high-altitude travel, advice for or against taking such excursions, and effective prophylactic measures.

  11. Travel to High Altitude Following Solid Organ Transplantation.

    PubMed

    Luks, Andrew M

    2016-09-01

    Luks, Andrew M. Clinician's corner: travel to high altitude following solid organ transplantation. High Alt Med Biol. 17:147-156, 2016.-As they regain active lifestyles following successful organ transplantation, transplant recipients may travel to high altitude for a variety of activities, including skiing, climbing, and trekking. This review is intended to provide information for medical providers who may encounter transplant patients seeking advice before planned high altitude travel or care for medical issues that develop during the actual sojourn. There is currently limited information in the literature about outcomes during high-altitude travel following solid organ transplantation, but the available evidence suggests that the physiologic responses to hypobaric hypoxia are comparable to those seen in nontransplanted individuals and well-selected transplant recipients with no evidence of organ rejection can tolerate ascents as high as 6200 m. All transplant recipients planning high-altitude travel should undergo pretravel assessment and counseling with an emphasis on the recognition, prevention, and treatment of altitude illness, as well as the importance of preventing infection and limiting sun exposure. Transplant recipients can use the standard medications for altitude illness prophylaxis and treatment, but the choice and dose of medication should take into account the patient's preexisting medication regimen and current renal function. With careful attention to these and other details, the healthy transplant recipient can safely experience the rewards of traveling in the mountains.

  12. Mechanical properties of the lungs during acclimatization to altitude.

    PubMed

    Gautier, H; Peslin, R; Grassino, A; Milic-Emili, J; Hannhart, B; Powell, E; Miserocchi, G; Bonora, M; Fischer, J T

    1982-06-01

    Mechanical properties of the lung were studied in nine healthy lowlanders during a 6-day sojourn at an altitude of 3,457 m. In comparison to sea-level values, it was found at altitude that 1) lung volumes measured by plethysmography including total lung capacity, vital capacity, and functional residual capacity (FRC) presented small changes not exceeding 300 ml; 2) static and dynamic lung compliances were not modified but static pressure-volume curves of lungs were shifted progressively to the left (the decrease in lung elastic recoil averaged about 2 cmH2O on days 4-6); and 3) maximal midexpiratory flow, forced expiratory volume in 1 s, and maximal expiratory and inspiratory flows were increased and, conversely, airways and pulmonary flow resistances were decreased on most days at altitude. The unchanged FRC in the face of a decreased lung recoil may be explained by an increase in thoracic blood volume at altitude, but other possible mechanisms are discussed. The decrease in resistances and increase in maximal flows may be partly explained by the decreased air density at altitude, but another contributing factor such as a bronchodilatation is also suggested. It is proposed that changes in lung mechanics at altitude may account for some of the changes in the pattern of breathing and mouth occlusion pressure (P0.1) observed during acclimatization of lowlanders to altitude.

  13. Aging, High Altitude, and Blood Pressure: A Complex Relationship.

    PubMed

    Parati, Gianfranco; Ochoa, Juan Eugenio; Torlasco, Camilla; Salvi, Paolo; Lombardi, Carolina; Bilo, Grzegorz

    2015-06-01

    Parati, Gianfranco, Juan Eugenio Ochoa, Camilla Torlasco, Paolo Salvi, Carolina Lombardi, and Grzegorz Bilo. Aging, high altitude, and blood pressure: A complex relationship. High Alt Biol Med 16:97-109, 2015.--Both aging and high altitude exposure may induce important changes in BP regulation, leading to significant increases in BP levels. By inducing atherosclerotic changes, stiffening of large arteries, renal dysfunction, and arterial baroreflex impairment, advancing age may induce progressive increases in systolic BP levels, promoting development and progression of arterial hypertension. It is also known, although mainly from studies in young or middle-aged subjects, that exposure to high altitude may influence different mechanisms involved in BP regulation (i.e., neural central and reflex control of sympathetic activity), leading to important increases in BP levels. The evidence is less clear, however, on whether and to what extent advancing age may influence the BP response to acute or chronic high altitude exposure. This is a question not only of scientific interest but also of practical relevance given the consistent number of elderly individuals who are exposed for short time periods (either for leisure or work) or live permanently at high altitude, in whom arterial hypertension is frequently observed. This article will review the evidence available on the relationship between aging and blood pressure levels at high altitude, the pathophysiological mechanisms behind this complex association, as well as some questions of practical interest regarding antihypertensive treatment in elderly subjects, and the effects of antihypertensive drugs on blood pressure response during high altitude exposure.

  14. DLR HABLEG- High Altitude Balloon Launched Experimental Glider

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wlach, S.; Schwarzbauch, M.; Laiacker, M.

    2015-09-01

    The group Flying Robots at the DLR Institute of Robotics and Mechatronics in Oberpfaffenhofen conducts research on solar powered high altitude aircrafts. Due to the high altitude and the almost infinite mission duration, these platforms are also denoted as High Altitude Pseudo-Satellites (HAPS). This paper highlights some aspects of the design, building, integration and testing of a flying experimental platform for high altitudes. This unmanned aircraft, with a wingspan of 3 m and a mass of less than 10 kg, is meant to be launched as a glider from a high altitude balloon in 20 km altitude and shall investigate technologies for future large HAPS platforms. The aerodynamic requirements for high altitude flight included the development of a launch method allowing for a safe transition to horizontal flight from free-fall with low control authority. Due to the harsh environmental conditions in the stratosphere, the integration of electronic components in the airframe is a major effort. For regulatory reasons a reliable and situation dependent flight termination system had to be implemented. In May 2015 a flight campaign was conducted. The mission was a full success demonstrating that stratospheric research flights are feasible with rather small aircrafts.

  15. Sleep quality among elderly high-altitude dwellers in Ladakh.

    PubMed

    Sakamoto, Ryota; Okumiya, Kiyohito; Norboo, Tsering; Tsering, Norboo; Yamaguchi, Takayoshi; Nose, Mitsuhiro; Takeda, Shinya; Tsukihara, Toshihiro; Ishikawa, Motonao; Nakajima, Shun; Wada, Taizo; Fujisawa, Michiko; Imai, Hissei; Ishimoto, Yasuko; Kimura, Yumi; Fukutomi, Eriko; Chen, Wenling; Otsuka, Kuniaki; Matsubayashi, Kozo

    2017-03-01

    It has been already known that people who temporarily stay at high altitude may develop insomnia as a symptom of acute mountain sickness. However, much less is known about people living at high altitude. The aim of this study was to determine the effect of high altitude environment on sleep quality for the elderly who have been living at high altitude for their whole lives. A cross-sectional study was conducted in Domkhar valley at altitudes of 2800-4200m, Ladakh. Sleep quality was assessed using Insomnia Severity Index (ISI). Measurement items include body mass index, blood pressure, blood sugar, hemoglobin, timed Up and Go test, oxygen saturation during wakefulness, respiratory function test, Oxford Knee Score (OKS), and Geriatric Depression Scale (GDS), and so on. The participants were Ladakhi older adults aged 60 years or over (n=112) in Domkhar valley. The participation rate was 65.1% (male: female=47:65, mean age: 71.3 years and 67.9 years, respectively). The prevalence of the high score of ISI (8 or more) was 15.2% (17 out of 112). Altitude of residence was significantly correlated with ISI. Stepwise multiple regression analysis showed that OKS and altitude of residence were significantly related with ISI.

  16. Synthesis and antiparasitic and antitumor activity of 2, 4-diamino-6-(arylmethyl)-5,6,7,8-tetrahydroquinazoline analogues of piritrexim.

    PubMed

    Rosowsky, A; Papoulis, A T; Forsch, R A; Queener, S F

    1999-03-25

    Nineteen previously undescribed 2,4-diamino-6-(arylmethyl)-5,6,7, 8-tetrahydroquinazolines (5a-m, 10-12) were synthesized as part of a larger effort to assess the therapeutic potential of lipophilic dihydrofolate reductase (DHFR) inhibitors against opportunistic infections of AIDS. Condensation of appropriately substituted (arylmethyl)triphenylphosphoranes with 4, 4-ethylenedioxycyclohexanone, followed by hydrogenation (H2/Pd-C) and acidolysis, yielded the corresponding 4-(arylmethyl)cyclohexanones, which were then condensed with cyanoguanidine to form the tetrahydroquinazolines. Three simple 2, 4-diamino-6-alkyl-5,6,7,8-tetrahydroquinazoline model compounds (9a-c) were also prepared in one step from commercially available 4-alkylcyclohexanones by this method. Enzyme inhibition assays against rat liver DHFR, Pneumocystis carinii DHFR, and the bifunctional DHFR-TS enzyme from Toxoplasma gondii were carried out, and the selectivity ratios IC50(rat)/IC50(P. carinii) and IC50(rat)/IC50(T. gondii) were compared. The three most potent inhibitors of P. carinii DHFR were the 2,5-dimethoxybenzyl (5j), 3, 4-dimethoxybenzyl (5k), and 3,4,5-trimethoxybenzyl (5l) analogues, with IC50 values of 0.057, 0.10, and 0.091 microM, respectively. The remaining compounds generally had IC50 values in the 0.1-1.0 microM range. However all the compounds were more potent against the rat liver enzyme than the P. carinii enzyme and thus were nonselective. The T. gondii enzyme was always more sensitive than the P. carinii enzyme, with most of the analogues giving IC50 values of 0.01-0.1 microM. Moderate 5-10-fold selectivity for T. gondii versus rat liver DHFR was observed with five compounds, the best combination of potency and selectivity being achieved with the 2-methoxybenzyl analogue 5d, which had an IC50 of 0.014 microM and a selectivity ratio of 8.6. One compound (5l) was tested for antiproliferative activity against P. carinii trophozoites in culture at a concentration of 10 microgram

  17. Comparison of sprite initiation altitudes between observations and models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gamerota, W. R.; Cummer, S. A.; Li, J.; Stenbaek-Nielsen, H. C.; Haaland, R. K.; McHarg, M. G.

    2011-02-01

    Simultaneous analyses of measured sprite initiation altitudes with predicted initiation altitudes from simulations enable an examination of our understanding of the sprite initiation mechanism and the modeling techniques to simulate this mesospheric electrical phenomenon. In this work, we selected a subset of sprites optically observed from Langmuir Laboratory, NM; locations near Las Vegas, NM, in 2007 and near Portales, NM, in 2008; and a Duke University field station. The sprites were observed by high-speed imaging with time resolutions of at least 1 ms and by low light level imagers. Sprite initiation altitudes were determined by triangulation between Langmuir Laboratory and either Portales or Las Vegas, while star field analysis determined the approximate measured initiation altitudes for Duke observations. These video observations were coordinated with electromagnetic field measurements from Yucca Ridge Field Station and Duke University, respectively. With a 2-D finite difference time domain model, we simulated the lightning-driven electric fields and predict the likely altitude of sprite initiation and compare these findings with the measured initiation altitude of each sprite analyzed. Of 20 discrete sprite events analyzed, both the measured and the simulation-predicted initiation altitudes indicate that long-delayed sprites tend to initiate at lower altitude. The average discrepancy between the measurements and the simulation results is 0.35 km with a standard deviation of 3.6 km. This consistency not only confirms previous results about the relationship between sprite initiation altitude and time delay but also helps to develop confidence in the models to reveal the sprite physics.

  18. Application of altitude/hypoxic training by elite athletes.

    PubMed

    Wilber, Randall L

    2007-09-01

    At the Olympic level, differences in performance are typically less than 0.5%. This helps explain why many contemporary elite endurance athletes in summer and winter sport incorporate some form of altitude/hypoxic training within their year-round training plan, believing that it will provide the "competitive edge" to succeed at the Olympic level. The purpose of this paper is to describe the practical application of altitude/hypoxic training as used by elite athletes. Within the general framework of the paper, both anecdotal and scientific evidence will be presented relative to the efficacy of several contemporary altitude/hypoxic training models and devices currently used by Olympic-level athletes for the purpose of legally enhancing performance. These include the three primary altitude/hypoxic training models: 1) live high+train high (LH+TH), 2) live high+train low (LH+TL), and 3) live low+train high (LL+TH). The LH+TL model will be examined in detail and will include its various modifications: natural/terrestrial altitude, simulated altitude via nitrogen dilution or oxygen filtration, and hypobaric normoxia via supplemental oxygen. A somewhat opposite approach to LH+TL is the altitude/hypoxic training strategy of LL+TH, and data regarding its efficacy will be presented. Recently, several of these altitude/hypoxic training strategies and devices underwent critical review by the World Anti-Doping Agency (WADA) for the purpose of potentially banning them as illegal performance-enhancing substances/methods. This paper will conclude with an update on the most recent statement from WADA regarding the use of simulated altitude devices.

  19. The effect of high altitude on nasal nitric oxide levels.

    PubMed

    Altundag, Aytug; Salihoglu, Murat; Cayonu, Melih; Cingi, Cemal; Tekeli, Hakan; Hummel, Thomas

    2014-09-01

    The aim of the present study was to investigate whether nasal nitric oxide (nNO) levels change in relation to high altitude in a natural setting where the weather conditions were favorable. The present study included 41 healthy volunteers without a history of acute rhinosinusitis within 3 weeks and nasal polyposis. The study group consisted of 31 males (76 %) and 10 females (24 %) and the mean age of the study population was 38 ± 10 years. The volunteers encamped for 2 days in a mountain village at an altitude of 1,500 m above sea level (masl) and proceeded to highlands at an altitude of 2,200 masl throughout the day. The measurements of nNO were done randomly, either first at the mountain village or at sea level. Each participant had nNO values both at sea level and at high altitude at the end of the study. The nNO values of sea level and high altitude were compared to investigate the effect of high altitude on nNO levels. The mean of average nNO measurements at the high altitude was 74.2 ± 41 parts-per-billion (ppb) and the mean of the measurements at sea level was 93.4 ± 45 ppb. The change in nNO depending on the altitude level was statistically significant (p < 0.001). The current investigation showed that nNO levels were decreased at high altitude even if the weather conditions were favorable, such as temperature, humidity, and wind.

  20. Long-Term Exposure to High Altitude Affects Conflict Control in the Conflict-Resolving Stage.

    PubMed

    Ma, Hailin; Wang, Yan; Wu, Jianhui; Wang, Baoxi; Guo, Shichun; Luo, Ping; Han, Buxin

    2015-01-01

    The neurocognitive basis of the effect of long-term high altitude exposure on conflict control is unclear. Event related potentials (ERPs) were recorded in a flanker task to investigate the influence of high altitude on conflict control in the high-altitude group (who had lived at high altitude for three years but were born at low altitude) and the low-altitude group (living in low altitude only). Although altitude effect was not significant at the behavioral level, ERPs showed cognitive conflict modulation. The interaction between group and trial type was significant: P3 amplitude was greater in the low-altitude group than in the high-altitude group in the incongruent trial. This result suggests that long-term exposure to high altitude affects conflict control in the conflict-resolving stage, and that attentional resources are decreased to resist the conflict control in the high-altitude group.