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Sample records for 5-8 nasa connect

  1. NASA CONNECT: Atmospheric Detectives

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1999-01-01

    'The Measurement of All Things: Atmospheric Detectives' is the second of seven programs in the 1999-2000 NASA CONNECT series. Produced by NASA Langley Research Center's Office of Education, NASA CONNECT is an award-winning series of instructional programs designed to enhance the teaching of math, science and technology concepts in grades 5-8. NASA CONNECT establishes the 'connection' between the mathematics, science, and technology concepts taught in the classroom and NASA research. Each program in the series supports the national mathematics, science, and technology standards; includes a resource-rich teacher guide; and uses a classroom experiment and web-based activity to complement and enhance the math, science, and technology concepts presented in the program. NASA CONNECT is FREE and the programs in the series are in the public domain. Visit our web site and register. http://connect.larc.nasa.gov In 'The Measurement of All Things: Atmospheric Detectives' students will learn how scientists use satellites, lasers, optical detectors, and wavelengths of light to measure the presence of certain gaseous elements, compounds, and aerosols in the Earth's atmosphere.

  2. NASA CONNECT: 'Glow with the Flow'

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1999-01-01

    'Geometry and Algebra: Glow with the Flow' is the second of five programs in the 2000-2001 NASA CONNECT series. Produced by NASA Langley Research Center's Office of Education, NASA CONNECT is an award-winning series of instructional programs designed to enhance the teaching of math, science and technology in grades 5-8. NASA CONNECT establishes teh 'connection' between the mathematics, science, and tehcnology concepts taught in the classroom and NASA research. NASA CONNECT is FREE and the programs in the series are in the public domain. Visit our web site adn register http://connect.larc.nasa.gov In 'Geometry and Algebra: Glow with the Flow', students will learn about the force of drag and how NASA engineers use models and glowing paints to see how air flows over vehicles in a wind tunnel. Students will also discover how the blended wing body(BWB), a concept super jumbo jet that resembles a flying wing, will affect air travelers of the future. Students will observe NASA engineers using geometry and algebra when they measure and design models to be tested in wind tunnels. By conducting classroom and on-line activities, students will make connections between NASA research and the mathematics, science and technology they learn in their classroom.

  3. NASA NASA CONNECT: Special World Space Congress. [Videotape].

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration, Hampton, VA. Langley Research Center.

    NASA CONNECT is an annual series of free integrated mathematics, science, and technology instructional distance learning programs for students in grades 5-8. This video presents the World Space Congress 2002, the meeting of the decade for space professionals. Topics discussed range from the discovery of distant planets to medical advancements,…

  4. NASA Connect: 'Plane Weather'

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1999-01-01

    Excerpt from the NASA Connect show 'Plane Weather' This clip explains how our weather occurs, and why Solar radiation is responsible. Weather affects our daily lives. The elements of weather: rain, wind, fog, ice and snow affect the operation and flight of an airplane. In this program, NASA and FAA researchers will introduce students to math, science, and weather; demonstrate how these elements influence flight; and show how NASA and FAA research is used to limit the effects of these elements on flight. Students will examine: the tools, techniques, and technologies used by engineers and scientists to detect these and other climatological factors affecting aircraft in flight. The lesson and classroom experiment will involve students in the scientific process and emphasizing problem solving, measurement, and reasoning skills.

  5. NASA Connect: 'Plane Weather'

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1999-01-01

    Excerpt from the NASA Connect show 'Plane Weather' This clip explains what high and low pressure weather systems are, and how they form. Weather affects our daily lives. The elements of weather: rain, wind, fog, ice and snow affect the operation and flight of an airplane. In this program, NASA and FAA researchers will introduce students to math, science, and weather; demonstrate how these elements influence flight; and show how NASA and FAA research is used to limit the effects of these elements on flight. Students will examine: the tools, techniques, and technologies used by engineers and scientists to detect these and other climatological factors affecting aircraft in flight. The lesson and classroom experiment will involve students in the scientific process and emphasizing problem solving, measurement, and reasoning skills.

  6. NASA Connect: 'Plane Weather'

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1999-01-01

    Excerpt from the NASA Connect show 'Plane Weather' This clip explains what high and low pressure weather systems are, and how these affect weather patterns. Weather affects our daily lives. The elements of weather: rain, wind, fog, ice and snow affect the operation and flight of an airplane. In this program, NASA and FAA researchers will introduce students to math, science, and weather; demonstrate how these elements influence flight; and show how NASA and FAA research is used to limit the effects of these elements on flight. Students will examine: the tools, techniques, and technologies used by engineers and scientists to detect these and other climatological factors affecting aircraft in flight. The lesson and classroom experiment will involve students in the scientific process and emphasizing problem solving, measurement, and reasoning skills.

  7. NASA CONNECT: The Measurement of All Things

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1999-01-01

    'The Measurement of All Things: Tools of the Aeronautics Trade' is the first of seven programs in the 1999-2000 NASA CONNECT series. Produced by NASA Langley Research Center's Office of Education, NASA CONNECT is an award-winning series of instructional programs designed to enhance the teaching of math, science and technology concepts in grades 5-8. NASA CONNECT establishes the 'connection' between the mathematics, science, and technology concepts taught in the classroom and NASA research. Each program in the series supports the national mathematics, science, and technology standards; includes a resource-rich teacher guide; and uses a classroom experiment and web-based activity to complement and enhance the math, science, and technology concepts presented in the program. NASA CONNECT is FREE and the programs in the series are in the public domain. Visit our web site and register. http://connect.larc.nasa.gov In 'The Measurement of All Things: Tools of the Aeronautics Trade' students will explore the concept of measurement and the tools used in measuring things, while learning 'what' and 'how' engineers and scientists use measurement during the process of developing, designing, and testing airplanes.

  8. NASA CONNECT: Proportionality: Modeling the Future

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2000-01-01

    'Proportionality: Modeling the Future' is the sixth of seven programs in the 1999-2000 NASA CONNECT series. Produced by NASA Langley Research Center's Office of Education, NASA CONNECT is an award-winning series of instructional programs designed to enhance the teaching of math, science and technology concepts in grades 5-8. NASA CONNECT establishes the 'connection' between the mathematics, science, and technology concepts taught in the classroom and NASA research. Each program in the series supports the national mathematics, science, and technology standards; includes a resource-rich teacher guide; and uses a classroom experiment and web-based activity to complement and enhance the math, science, and technology concepts presented in the program. NASA CONNECT is FREE and the programs in the series are in the public domain. Visit our web site and register. http://connect.larc.nasa.gov 'Proportionality: Modeling the Future', students will examine how patterns, measurement, ratios, and proportions are used in the research, development, and production of airplanes.

  9. NASA CONNECT: Proportionality: The X-Plane Generation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2000-01-01

    'Proportionality: The X-Plane Generation' is the fifth of seven programs in the 1999-2000 NASA CONNECT series. Produced by NASA Langley Research Center's Office of Education, NASA CONNECT is an award-winning series of instructional programs designed to enhance the teaching of math, science and technology concepts in grades 5-8. NASA CONNECT establishes the 'connection' between the mathematics, science, and technology concepts taught in the classroom and NASA research. Each program in the series supports the national mathematics, science, and technology standards; includes a resource-rich teacher guide; and uses a classroom experiment and web-based activity to complement and enhance the math, science, and technology concepts presented in the program. NASA CONNECT is FREE and the programs in the series are in the public domain. Visit our web site and register. http://connect.larc.nasa.gov In 'Proportionality: The X-Plane Generation', students will learn why scaling and proportion are important factors in spacecraft design.

  10. NASA CONNECT: Geometry of Exploration: Eyes Over Mars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2000-01-01

    'Geometry of Exploration: Eyes over Mars' is the fourth of seven programs in the 1999-2000 NASA CONNECT series. Produced by NASA Langley Research Center's Office of Education, NASA CONNECT is an award-winning series of instructional programs designed to enhance the teaching of math, science and technology concepts in grades 5-8. NASA CONNECT establishes the 'connection' between the mathematics, science, and technology concepts taught in the classroom and NASA research. Each program in the series supports the national mathematics, science, and technology standards; includes a resource-rich teacher guide; and uses a classroom experiment and web-based activity to complement and enhance the math, science, and technology concepts presented in the program. NASA CONNECT is FREE and the programs in the series are in the public domain. Visit our web site and register. http://connect.larc.nasa.gov In 'Geometry of Exploration: Eyes over Mars', students will learn how engineers and scientists are using geometry and linear and angular measurements to survey the Earth and Mars and how geometric shapes affect navigation.

  11. NASA CONNECT: Algebra: Mirror, Mirror on the Universe

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2000-01-01

    'Algebra: Mirror, Mirror on the Universe' is the last of seven programs in the 1999-2000 NASA CONNECT series. Produced by NASA Langley Research Center's Office of Education, NASA CONNECT is an award-winning series of instructional programs designed to enhance the teaching of math, science and technology concepts in grades 5-8. NASA CONNECT establishes the 'connection' between the mathematics, science, and technology concepts taught in the classroom and NASA research. Each program in the series supports the national mathematics, science, and technology standards; includes a resource-rich teacher guide; and uses a classroom experiment and web-based activity to complement and enhance the math, science, and technology concepts presented in the program. NASA CONNECT is FREE and the programs in the series are in the public domain. Visit our web site and register. http://connect.larc.nasa.gov In 'Algebra: Mirror, Mirror on the Universe', students will learn how algebra is used to explore the universe.

  12. NASA CONNECT: Geometry of Exploration: Water Below Mars?

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1999-01-01

    'Geometry of Exploration: Water Below the Surface of Mars?' is the third of seven programs in the 1999-2000 NASA CONNECT series. Produced by NASA Langley Research Center's Office of Education, NASA CONNECT is an award-winning series of instructional programs designed to enhance the teaching of math, science and technology concepts in grades 5-8. NASA CONNECT establishes the 'connection' between the mathematics, science, and technology concepts taught in the classroom and NASA research. Each program in the series supports the national mathematics, science, and technology standards; includes a resource-rich teacher guide; and uses a classroom experiment and web-based activity to complement and enhance the math, science, and technology concepts presented in the program. NASA CONNECT is FREE and the programs in the series are in the public domain. Visit our web site and register. http://connect.larc.nasa.gov In 'Geometry of Exploration: Water Below the Surface of Mars?' students will learn how engineers and scientists are using geometry and the solar system to navigate spacecraft to Mars.

  13. Video 2 of 7: NASA Connection

    NASA Video Gallery

    This video provides the context for the lesson, including background information on recent Mars explorations showing the connection between this lesson and NASA's research. A variety of NASA scient...

  14. NASA CONNECT: Measurement, Ratios and Graphing: 3,2,1 Crash!

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2000-01-01

    'Measurement, Ratios and Graphing: 3..2..1..Crash!' is the first of five programs in the 2000-2001 NASA CONNECT season. NASA CONNECT is an award-winning series of instructional programs designed to enhance the teaching of math, science and technology concepts in grades 5-8. In this program, students will observe NASA engineers using measurement, ratios and graphs to make predictions and draw conclusions during their extreme tests. NASA CONNECT is free to educators! Visit our web site and register http://connect.larc.nasa.gov

  15. NASA's Sun-Earth Connection Education Forum

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hawkins, I.; Vondrak, R.; Alcorn, K.; Thieman, J.

    1998-05-01

    The Office of Space Science (OSS) recently created a new Education Ecosystem structure to facilitate the participation of OSS scientists in K-14 education and outreach. As part of this Ecosystem, four Education Forums have been established at major institutions active in each of the space science themes: the Structure and Evolution of the Universe; the Astronomical Search for Origins and Planetary Systems; Solar System Exploration; and the Sun-Earth Connection. The University of California at Berkeley and NASA/Goddard Space Flight Center are jointly hosting the Sun-Earth Connection Education Forum (SECEF). The goal of SECEF is to tap SEC NASA science knowledge and mission discoveries to: (a) excite and inspire students of all backgrounds and ages through space and solar physics discoveries in ways that are both tangible and meaningful to their daily lives; (b) achieve significant and sustained enhancement of science, mathematics, and technology education at K-14 (kindergarten through community college) levels; (c) provide tools and assistance to educators; (d) help develop an appreciation of the analytical approach of science; and (e) contribute to the scientific and technological literacy of the general public. We will present an overview of the SECEF, with particular emphasis on how the Ecosystem structure will benefit and assist solar and space physicists in the context of their education outreach efforts. We will also give a summary of high-leverage education and public outreach activities that we've already carried out in partnership with science museums, featuring the science, data, and people of NASA SEC missions. This work has been supported by NASA Cooperative Agreement NCC5-253 between UC Berkeley/Space Sciences Laboratory and NASA/GSFC.

  16. Evaluating the Effectiveness of the 1998-1999 NASA CONNECT Program

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pinelli, Thomas E.; Frank, Kari Lou; House, Patricia L.

    2000-01-01

    NASA CONNECT is a standards-based, integrated mathematics, science, and technology series of 30-minute instructional distance learning (satellite and television) programs for students in grades 5-8. Each of the five programs in the 1998-1999 NASA CONNECT series included a lesson, an educator guide, a student activity or experiment, and a web-based component. In March 1999, a mail (self-reported) survey (booklet) was sent to a randomly selected sample of 1,000 NASA CONNECT registrants. A total of 401 surveys (351 usable) were received by the established cut-off date. Most survey questions employed a 5-point Likert-type response scale. Survey topics included: (1) instructional technology and teaching, (2) instructional programming and technology in the classroom, (3) the NASA CONNECT program, (4) classroom use of computer technology, and (5) demographics. About 68% of the respondents were female, about 88% identified "classroom teacher" as their present professional duty, about 75% worked in a public school, and about 67% held a master's degree or master's equivalency. Regarding NASA CONNECT, respondents reported that: (1) they used the five programs in the 1998-1999 NASA CONNECT series; (2) the stated objectives for each program were met (4.49); (3) the programs were aligned with the national mathematics, science, and technology standards (4.61); (4) program content was developmentally appropriate for grade level (4.25); and (5) the programs in the 1998-1999 NASA CONNECT series enhanced/enriched the teaching of mathematics, science, and technology (4.45).

  17. Measurement, Ratios, and Graphing: Safety First. A Lesson Guide with Activities in Mathematics, Science, and Technology. NASA CONNECT.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration, Hampton, VA. Langley Research Center.

    NASA CONNECT is an annual series of free integrated mathematics, science, and technology instructional distance learning programs for students in grades 5-8. Each program has three components: (1) a 30-minute television broadcast which can be viewed live or taped for later use; (2) an interactive Web activity that allows teachers to integrate…

  18. Measurement, Ratios, and Graphing: Who Added the "Micro" to Gravity? An Educator Guide with Activities in Mathematics, Science, and Technology. NASA CONNECT[TM].

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration, Hampton, VA. Langley Research Center.

    The NASA CONNECT series features 30-minute, instructional videos for students in grades 5-8 and teacher's guides that use aeronautics and space technology as the organizing theme. In this guide and videotape, National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) researchers and scientists use measurement, ratios, and graphing to demonstrate the…

  19. Huntsville Area Students Appear in Episode of NASA CONNECT

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2003-01-01

    Students at Williams Technology Middle School in Huntsville were featured in a new segment of NASA CONNECT, a video series aimed to enhance the teaching of math, science, and technology to middle school students. The segment premiered nationwide May 15, 2003, and helped viewers understand Sir Isaac Newton's first, second, and third laws of gravity and how they relate to NASA's efforts in developing the next generation of space transportation.

  20. NASA CONNECT: Dancing in the Night Sky. [Videotape].

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration, Hampton, VA. Langley Research Center.

    NASA CONNECT is a research and standards-based annual series of integrated mathematics, science, and technology instructional distance learning programs for students in grades 6-8. This program has three components: (1) a 30-minute television broadcast which can be viewed live or taped for later use; (2) a companion educator's guide including a…

  1. NASA Connect: 'Wherever You Go, There You Are'

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1999-01-01

    From NASA Connect: 'Wherever You Go, There You Are' In this clip...Developments in navigational aids for early aviators WHEREVER YOU GO, THERE YOU ARE How do pilots navigate accurately? Pilots require the use of math, science, and geography to get from one destination to another. Global Positioning Satellites (GPS) now make navigation much easier and safer for civil, commercial, and military pilots. NASA researchers will show students how math, science, and geography combine to make navigating safer and easier. The lesson and classroom experiment will involve students in observation and in measuring, and interpreting data to determine exact locations.

  2. NASA Connect: 'Wherever You Go, There You Are'

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1999-01-01

    From NASA Connect: 'Wherever You Go, There You Are' Host Van Hughes outlines this first show of the 98/99 season about navigation. WHEREVER YOU GO, THERE YOU ARE How do pilots navigate accurately? Pilots require the use of math, science, and geography to get from one destination to another. Global Positioning Satellites (GPS) now make navigation much easier and safer for civil, commercial, and military pilots. NASA researchers will show students how math, science, and geography combine to make navigating safer and easier. The lesson and classroom experiment will involve students in observation and in measuring, and interpreting data to determine exact locations.

  3. NASA Connect: 'Wherever You Go, There You Are'

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1999-01-01

    From NASA Connect: 'Wherever You Go, There You Are' This clip examines different methods of navigation used by early sailors, including celestial measurements and 'dead reckoning'. WHEREVER YOU GO, THERE YOU ARE How do pilots navigate accurately? Pilots require the use of math, science, and geography to get from one destination to another. Global Positioning Satellites (GPS) now make navigation much easier and safer for civil, commercial, and military pilots. NASA researchers will show students how math, science, and geography combine to make navigating safer and easier. The lesson and classroom experiment will involve students in observation and in measuring, and interpreting data to determine exact locations.

  4. NASA Connect: 'Wherever You Go, There You Are'

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1999-01-01

    From NASA Connect: 'Wherever You Go, There You Are' In this clip we learn what GPS (Global Positioning System) is, and how it works. WHEREVER YOU GO, THERE YOU ARE How do pilots navigate accurately? Pilots require the use of math, science, and geography to get from one destination to another. Global Positioning Satellites (GPS) now make navigation much easier and safer for civil, commercial, and military pilots. NASA researchers will show students how math, science, and geography combine to make navigating safer and easier. The lesson and classroom experiment will involve students in observation and in measuring, and interpreting data to determine exact locations.

  5. Mission to Mars: Connecting Diverse Student Groups with NASA Experts

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Polsgrove, Tara; Jones, David; Sadowski-Fugitt, Leslie; Kowrach, Nicole

    2012-01-01

    The Museum of Science and Industry in Chicago has formulated an innovative approach to inspiring the next generation to pursue STEM education. Middle school students in Chicago and at nearby Challenger Learning Centers work in teams to design a mission to Mars. Each mission includes real time access to NASA experts through partnerships with Marshall Space Flight Center, Johnson Space Center, and the Jet Propulsion Laboratory. Interactive videoconferencing connects students at the museum with students at a Challenger Learning Center and with NASA experts. This paper describes the approach, the results from the program s first year, and future opportunities for nationwide expansion.

  6. The NASA Sun-Earth Connection Education Forum

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hawkins, I.; Vondrak, R.; Alcorn, K.; Thieman, J.

    1997-12-01

    The Office of Space Science (OSS) recently created a new Education ``Ecosystem'' structure to reach out to the K-14 and general public communities with the wonder and excitement of NASA discoveries. As part of this Ecosystem, four Education Forums are being established at major institutions active in each of the space science themes: the Structure and Evolution of the Universe; the Astronomical Search for Origins and Planetary Systems; Solar System Exploration; and the Sun-Earth Connection. NASA/Goddard Space Flight Center and the University of California at Berkeley have formed an innovative partnership to become the Education Forum for the Sun-Earth Connection (SEC) theme. Our goal is to tap SEC NASA science knowledge and mission discoveries to: (a) excite and inspire students of all backgrounds and ages to the wonders of space and solar physics in ways that are both tangible and meaningful to their daily lives; (b) achieve significant and sustained enhancement of science, mathematics, and technology education at K-14 (kindergarten through community college) levels; (c) provide tools and assistance to educators; (d) help develop an appreciation of the analytical approach of science; and (e) contribute to the scientific and technological literacy of the general public. We will present a summary of the expected scope and timeline of the SEC Forum, with particular emphasis on how the Forum structure will benefit and assist solar and space physicists and other SEC scientists in the context of their education outreach activities.

  7. NASA Connect: 'Wherever You Go, There You Are'

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1999-01-01

    From NASA Connect: 'Wherever You Go, There You Are' How GPS is being employed to improve surface operations at airports, by improving the flow of traffic around runways under low-visibiliy conditions. WHEREVER YOU GO, THERE YOU ARE How do pilots navigate accurately? Pilots require the use of math, science, and geography to get from one destination to another. Global Positioning Satellites (GPS) now make navigation much easier and safer for civil, commercial, and military pilots. NASA researchers will show students how math, science, and geography combine to make navigating safer and easier. The lesson and classroom experiment will involve students in observation and in measuring, and interpreting data to determine exact locations.

  8. NASA's Sun-Earth Connection Theory Program - Recent Science Contributions to Understanding the Connections

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grebowsky, J. M.

    2005-12-01

    NASA's Sun-Earth Connection Theory Program (SECTP) is now at the beginning of a new triennial cycle of funded research, with all the new research awards beginning in 2005. The SECTP, formerly the Space Physics Theory Program (SPTP), was initially established by the (former) Solar Terrestrial Division in 1980 to redress a weakness of support in the theory area. It has been a successful, evolving scientific program for long-term funding of relatively large "critical mass groups" pursuing theory and modeling on a scale larger than that available within the limits of traditional NASA Supporting Research & Technology (SR&T) awards. The results of the last 3 year funding cycle, just ended, carried on in the same successful manner, by contributing to ever more cutting edge theoretical understanding of all parts of the Sun-Earth Connection chain. The advances ranged from the core of the Sun out into the corona, through the solar wind into the Earth's magnetosphere and down to the ionosphere and lower atmosphere with applications to understanding the environments of other solar system bodies. The contributions were not isolated findings but continued to contribute to the planning and implementation of NASA spacecraft missions and to the development of the predictive computer models that have become the workhorses for analyzing satellite and ground-based measurements.

  9. Creating Virtual Labs To Teach Middle School Astronomy Principles: The NASA Connect Education Program Series.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Byers, Al; Halpin, David; Smith, Todd

    This paper presents a case study analyzing the instructional design process and interactive World Wide Web product developed by instructional technology graduate students at Virginia Tech to support the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) CONNECT distance education program. The NASA CONNECT program is described, and the various…

  10. Connecting NASA science and engineering with earth science applications

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The National Research Council (NRC) recently highlighted the dual role of NASA to support both science and applications in planning Earth observations. This Editorial reports the efforts of the NASA Soil Moisture Active Passive (SMAP) mission to integrate applications with science and engineering i...

  11. Connecting NASA Airborne Scientists, Engineers, and Pilots to K-12 Classrooms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schaller, E. L.

    2015-12-01

    The NASA Airborne Science Program (ASP) conducts Earth system science research missions with NASA aircraft all over the world. During ASP missions, NASA scientists, engineers and pilots are deployed to remote parts of the world such as Greenland, Antarctica, Chile, and Guam. These ASP mission personnel often have a strong desire to share the excitement of their mission with local classrooms near their deployment locations as well as classrooms back home in the United States. Here we discuss ongoing efforts to connect NASA scientists, engineers and pilots in the field directly with K-12 classrooms through both in-person interactions and remotely via live web-based chats.

  12. Evaluating the Effectiveness of the 1999-2000 NASA CONNECT Program

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pinelli, Thomas E.; Frank, Kari Lou

    2002-01-01

    NASA CONNECT is a standards-based, integrated mathematics, science, and technology series of 30-minute instructional distance learning (satellite and television) programs for students in grades 6-8. Each of the five programs in the 1999-2000 NASA CONNECT series included a lesson, an educator guide, a student activity or experiment, and a web-based component. In March 2000, a mail (self-reported) survey (booklet) was sent to a randomly selected sample of 1,000 NASA CONNECT registrants. A total of 336 surveys (269 usable) were received by the established cut-off date. Most survey questions employed a 5-point Likert-type response scale. Survey topics included (1) instructional technology and teaching, (2) instructional programming and technology in the classroom, (3) the NASA CONNECT program, (4) classroom use of computer technology, and (5) demographics. About 73% of the respondents were female, about 92% identified "classroom teacher" as their present professional duty, about 90% worked in a public school, and about 62% held a master's degree or master's equivalency. Regarding NASA CONNECT, respondents reported that (1) they used the five programs in the 1999-2000 NASA CONNECT series; (2) the stated objectives for each program were met (4.54); (3) the programs were aligned with the national mathematics, science, and technology standards (4.57); (4) program content was developmentally appropriate for grade level (4.17); and (5) the programs in the 1999-2000 NASA CONNECT series enhanced/enriched the teaching of mathematics, science, and technology (4.51).

  13. Evaluating the Effectiveness of the 2003-2004 NASA CONNECT(trademark)Program

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Caton, Randall H.; Pinelli, Thomas E.; Giersch, Christopher E.; Holmes, Ellen B.; Lambert, Matthew A.

    2005-01-01

    NASA CONNECT is an Emmy-award-winning series of instructional (distance learning) programs for grades 6-8. Produced by the NASA Center for Distance Learning, the nine programs in the 2003-2004 NASA CONNECT series are research-, inquiry-, standards-, teacher-, and technology-based and include a 30-minute program, an educator guide containing a hands-on activity, and a web-based component. The 1,500 randomly selected NASA CONNECT registered users were invited to complete an electronic (self-reported) survey that employed a 5-point Likert-type scale. Regarding NASA CONNECT, respondents reported that the programs (1) enhance the teaching of mathematics, science, and technology (4.53); (2) are aligned with the national mathematics, science, and technology standards (4.52); (3) raise student awareness of careers requiring mathematics, science, and technology (4.48); (4) demonstrate the application of mathematics, science, and technology (4.47); and (5) present women and minorities performing challenging engineering and science tasks (4.50).

  14. Evaluating the Effectiveness of the 2002-2003 NASA CONNECT(TM) Program

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pinelli, Thomas E.; Lambert, Matthew A.; Williams, Amy C.

    2004-01-01

    NASA CONNECT is a research-, inquiry-, and standards-based, integrated mathematics, science, and technology series of 30-minute instructional distance learning (television and web-based) programs for students in grades 6 8. Respondents who evaluated the programs in the 2002 2003 NASA CONNECT series reported that (1) they used the programs in the series; (2) the goals and objectives for the series were met; (3) the programs were aligned with the national mathematics, science, and technology standards; (4) the program content was developmentally appropriate for grade level; and (5) the programs in the series enhanced and enriched the teaching of mathematics, science, and technology.

  15. Evaluating the Effectiveness of the 2001-2002 NASA CONNECT(tm) Program

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pinelli, Thomas E.; Frank, Kari Lou; Lambert, Matthew A.; Williams, Amy C.

    2002-01-01

    NASA CONNECT(tm) is a research and standards-based, integrated mathematics, science, and technology series of 30-minute instructional distance learning (television and web-based) programs for students in grades 6-8. Respondents who evaluated the programs in the 2001-2002 NASA CONNECT(tm) series reported that (1) they used the programs in the series; (2) the goals and objectives for the series were met; (3) the programs were aligned with the national mathematics, science, and technology standards; (4) the program content was developmentally appropriate for grade level; and (5) the programs in the series enhanced and enriched the teaching of mathematics, science, and technology.

  16. Evaluating the Effectiveness of the 2000-2001 NASA CONNECT(TM) Program

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pinelli, Thomas E.; Frank, Kari Lou; Lambert, Matthew A.

    2002-01-01

    This report contains the results of the evaluation conducted for the 2000-2001 NASA CONNECT(TM) program conducted in March 2001. The analysis is based on the results collected from 154 surveys collected from educators registered for the program. Respondents indicated that the objectives for each program were met; the programs were aligned with the national (mathematics, science, and technology) standards; the programs were developmentally (grade level) appropriate; and the programs in the 2000-2001 NASA CONNECT(TM) series enhanced/enriched the teaching of mathematics, science, and technology.

  17. NASA Innovations in Climate Education Connects Audiences Coast-to-Coast for Climate Literacy via the NASA Digital Learning Network

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Murray, B.; Barnes, M. H.; Chambers, L. H.; Pippin, M. R.; Martin, A. M.; Geyer, A. J.; Leber, M.; Joyner, E.; Small, C.; Dublin, D.

    2013-12-01

    The Minority University Research and Education Program (MUREP) NASA Innovations in Climate Education (NICE) project advances NASA's Office of Education's strategic initiative to improve the quality of the nation's Science, Technology, Engineering and Mathematics (STEM) education and enhance literacy about climate and other Earth systems environmental changes. NICE also strategically supports the United States' progressive initiative to enhance the science and technology enterprise for successful competition in the 21st century global community. To extend to wider networks in 2013, MUREP NICE partnered with the NASA Digital Learning Network (DLNTM) in a unique, non-traditional collaborative model to significantly increase the impact and connection with formal and informal educators, curriculum developers, science education specialists, and researchers regarding climate literacy. DLN offers an expansive distance learning capability that bridges presenters with education audiences for interactive, web-based, synchronous and asynchronous Educator Professional Development (EPD). DLN services over 10,000 educators each year. In 3rd quarter FY13 alone DLN totaled 3,361 connections with educators. The DLN allows for cost effective (no travel) engagement of multiple geographically dispersed audiences with presenters from remote locations. This facilitates interactive communication among participants through distance education, allowing them to share local experiences with one another. A comprehensive four-part EPD workshop, featuring several NICE Principal Investigators (PI) and NASA subject matter experts was developed for NICE in April 2013. Topics covered in the workshop progressed from a simple introduction of Earth's energy budget, through explanation of temperature data collection and evidence of temperature rise, impacts on phenology, and finally consequences for bugs and birds. This event was an innovative hybrid workshop, connecting onsite teachers interactively

  18. NASA CONNECT(TradeMark): Space Suit Science in the Classroom

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Williams, William B.; Giersch, Chris; Bensen, William E.; Holland, Susan M.

    2003-01-01

    NASA CONNECT's(TradeMark) program titled Functions and Statistics: Dressed for Space initially aired on Public Broadcasting Stations (PBS) nationwide on May 9, 2002. The program traces the evolution of past space suit technologies in the design of space suits for future flight. It serves as the stage to provide educators, parents, and students "space suit science" in the classroom.

  19. Results of a Telephone Survey of Television Station Managers Concerning the NASA SCI Files(TM) and NASA CONNECT(TM)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pinelli, Thomas E.; Perry, Jeannine

    2004-01-01

    A telephone survey of television station managers concerning 2 instructional television programs, the NASA SCI Files(TM) and NASA CONNECT(TM), offered by the NASA Langley Center for Distance Learning (CDL) was conducted. Using a 4-point scale, with 4 being very satisfied, survey participants reported that they were either very satisfied (77.1 percent) or satisfied (19.9 percent) with the overall (educational and technical) quality of the NASA SCI Files(TM). Using a 4-point scale, with 4 being very satisfied, survey participants reported that they were either very satisfied (77.9 percent) or satisfied (19.1 percent) with the overall (educational and technical) quality of NASA CONNECT(TM) .

  20. NASA's Sun-Earth Connection Theory Program - into 3rd Decade

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grebowsky, J. M.

    2002-12-01

    NASA's Sun-Earth Connection Theory Program (SECTP) is now in its first year of a new triennial cycle of funded research, with all the research awards beginning in 2002. The focus of the current research efforts and the accomplishments of the previous 3-year (1998-2001) cycle of research, just terminating, will be described. The SECTP, formerly the Space Physics Theory Program (SPTP), was initially established by the (former) Solar Terrestrial Division in 1980 to redress a weakness of support in the theory area. It has been a successful evolving scientific program for long-term funding of relatively large "critical mass groups" pursuing theory and modeling on a scale larger than that available within the limits of traditional NASA Supporting Research and Technology (SR&T) awards. The results of the program over the years has contributed to ever more cutting edge theoretical understanding of all parts of the Sun-Earth Connection chain, from the core of the sun out into the corona, through the solar wind into the Earth's magnetosphere and down to the ionosphere and lower atmosphere. In addition, it continues to support the development of more and more realistic computer models that have become the workhorses for analyzing satellite and ground-based measurements and in helping to plan and implement NASA spacecraft missions. The focus of the program and the applications of its research results are viewed in this paper from the perspective of recent program activities.

  1. Data Analysis Measurement: Having a Solar Blast! NASA Connect: Program 7 in the 2001-2002 Video Series. [Videotape].

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration, Hampton, VA. Langley Research Center.

    NASA Connect is an interdisciplinary, instructional distance learning program targeting students in grades 6-8. This videotape explains how engineers and researchers at the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) use data analysis and measurement to predict solar storms, anticipate how they will affect the Earth, and improve…

  2. Geometry and Algebra: The Future Flight Equation. A Lesson Guide with Activities in Mathematics, Science, and Technology. NASA CONNECT.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration, Hampton, VA. Langley Research Center.

    This activity, part of the NASA CONNECT Series, is designed to help students in grades 6-8 learn how NASA engineers develop experimental aircraft. It consists of an overview of the program, details of the hands-on activity, a series of blackline master student worksheets, teacher materials, and a guide to further resources. (MM)

  3. Combining System Safety and Reliability to Ensure NASA CoNNeCT's Success

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Havenhill, Maria; Fernandez, Rene; Zampino, Edward

    2012-01-01

    Hazard Analysis, Failure Modes and Effects Analysis (FMEA), the Limited-Life Items List (LLIL), and the Single Point Failure (SPF) List were applied by System Safety and Reliability engineers on NASA's Communications, Navigation, and Networking reConfigurable Testbed (CoNNeCT) Project. The integrated approach involving cross reviews of these reports by System Safety, Reliability, and Design engineers resulted in the mitigation of all identified hazards. The outcome was that the system met all the safety requirements it was required to meet.

  4. 6 CFR 5.8 - Business information.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... requirements of Executive Order 12600 (3 CFR, 1988 Comp., p. 235); or (4) The designation made by the submitter... 6 Domestic Security 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Business information. 5.8 Section 5.8 Domestic... Freedom of Information Act § 5.8 Business information. (a) In general. Business information obtained...

  5. 6 CFR 5.8 - Business information.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... requirements of Executive Order 12600 (3 CFR, 1988 Comp., p. 235); or (4) The designation made by the submitter... 6 Domestic Security 1 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Business information. 5.8 Section 5.8 Domestic... Freedom of Information Act § 5.8 Business information. (a) In general. Business information obtained...

  6. 6 CFR 5.8 - Business information.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... requirements of Executive Order 12600 (3 CFR, 1988 Comp., p. 235); or (4) The designation made by the submitter... 6 Domestic Security 1 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Business information. 5.8 Section 5.8 Domestic... Freedom of Information Act § 5.8 Business information. (a) In general. Business information obtained...

  7. 6 CFR 5.8 - Business information.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... requirements of Executive Order 12600 (3 CFR, 1988 Comp., p. 235); or (4) The designation made by the submitter... 6 Domestic Security 1 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Business information. 5.8 Section 5.8 Domestic... Freedom of Information Act § 5.8 Business information. (a) In general. Business information obtained...

  8. 6 CFR 5.8 - Business information.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... requirements of Executive Order 12600 (3 CFR, 1988 Comp., p. 235); or (4) The designation made by the submitter... 6 Domestic Security 1 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Business information. 5.8 Section 5.8 Domestic... Freedom of Information Act § 5.8 Business information. (a) In general. Business information obtained...

  9. Precipitation Education: Connecting Students and Teachers with the Science of NASA's GPM Mission

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Weaver, K. L. K.

    2015-12-01

    The Global Precipitation Measurement (GPM) Mission education and communication team is involved in variety of efforts to share the science of GPM via hands-on activities for formal and informal audiences and engaging students in authentic citizen science data collection, as well as connecting students and teachers with scientists and other subject matter experts. This presentation will discuss the various forms of those efforts in relation to best practices as well as lessons learned and evaluation data. Examples include: GPM partnered with the Global Observations to Benefit the Environment (GLOBE) Program to conduct a student precipitation field campaign in early 2015. Students from around the world collected precipitation data and entered it into the GLOBE database, then were invited to develop scientific questions to be answered using ground observations and satellite data available from NASA. Webinars and blogs by scientists and educators throughout the campaign extended students' and teachers' knowledge of ground validation, data analysis, and applications of precipitation data. To prepare teachers to implement the new Next Generation Science Standards, the NASA Goddard Earth science education and outreach group, led by GPM Education Specialists, held the inaugural Summer Watershed Institute in July 2015 for 30 Maryland teachers of 3rd-5th grades. Participants in the week-long in-person workshop met with scientists and engineers at Goddard, learned about NASA Earth science missions, and were trained in seven protocols of the GLOBE program. Teachers worked collaboratively to make connections to their own curricula and plan for how to implement GLOBE with their students. Adding the arts to STEM, GPM is producing a comic book story featuring the winners of an anime character contest held by the mission during 2013. Readers learn content related to the science and technology of the mission as well as applications of the data. The choice of anime/manga as the style

  10. Connecting Teachers and Students with Science Experts: NASA's Expedition Earth and Beyond Program

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Graff, P. V.; Stefanov, W. L.; Willis, K. J.; Runco, S.; McCollum, T.; Baker, M.; Mailhot, M.; Lindgren, C. F.

    2010-12-01

    Classroom teachers are challenged with engaging and preparing today’s students for the future. Activities are driven by state required skills, education standards, and high stakes testing. How can educators teach required standards and motivate students to not only learn essential skills, but also acquire a sense of intrigue to want to learn more? One way is to allow students to take charge of their learning and conduct student-driven research. NASA’s Expedition Earth and Beyond program, based at the NASA Johnson Space Center, is designed to do just that. The program, developed by both educators and scientists, promotes inquiry-based investigations in classrooms (grades 5-14) by using current NASA data. By combining the expertise of teachers, who understand the everyday challenges of working with students, and scientists, who work with the process of science as they conduct their own research, the result is a realistic and useable means in which to promote authentic research in classrooms. NASA’s Expedition Earth and Beyond Program was created with the understanding that there are three important aspects that enable teachers to implement authentic research experiences in the classroom. These aspects are: 1) Standards-aligned, inquiry based curricular resources and an implementation structure to support student-driven research; 2) Professional development opportunities to learn techniques and strategies to ensure seamless implementation of resources; and 3) Ongoing support. Expedition Earth and Beyond provides all three of these aspects and adds two additional and inspiring motivators. One is the opportunity for student research teams to request new data. Data requested and approved would be acquired by astronauts orbiting Earth on the International Space Station. This aspect is part of the process of science structure and provides a powerful way to excite students. The second, and perhaps more significant motivator, is the creation of connections between

  11. NASA Quest.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ashby, Susanne

    2000-01-01

    Introduces NASA Quest as part of NASA's Learning Technologies Project, which connects students to the people of NASA through the various pages at the website where students can glimpse the various types of work performed at different NASA facilities and talk to NASA workers about the type of work they do. (ASK)

  12. 12 CFR 5.8 - Public notice.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 12 Banks and Banking 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Public notice. 5.8 Section 5.8 Banks and Banking COMPTROLLER OF THE CURRENCY, DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY RULES, POLICIES, AND PROCEDURES FOR... explain in the notice how the transactions are related. (e) Joint public notices accepted. Upon...

  13. NASA Sun-Earth Connections Theory Program: The Structure and Dynamics of the Solar Corona and Inner Heliosphere

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mikic, Zoran; Grebowsky, Joseph (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    This report covers technical progress during the first quarter of the second year of NASA Sun-Earth Connections Theory Program (SECTP). SAIC and the University of California, Irvine (UCI) have conducted research into theoretical modeling of active regions, the solar corona, and the inner heliosphere, using the MHD model.

  14. 12 CFR 5.8 - Public notice.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... CORPORATE ACTIVITIES Rules of General Applicability § 5.8 Public notice. (a) General. An applicant shall... transaction, or a series of transactions, to be a single filing for purposes of the publication...

  15. 12 CFR 5.8 - Public notice.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... CORPORATE ACTIVITIES Rules of General Applicability § 5.8 Public notice. (a) General. An applicant shall... transaction, or a series of transactions, to be a single filing for purposes of the publication...

  16. 12 CFR 5.8 - Public notice.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... CORPORATE ACTIVITIES Rules of General Applicability § 5.8 Public notice. (a) General. An applicant shall... transaction, or a series of transactions, to be a single filing for purposes of the publication...

  17. Heat Flux and Wall Temperature Estimates for the NASA Langley HIFiRE Direct Connect Rig

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cuda, Vincent, Jr.; Hass, Neal E.

    2010-01-01

    An objective of the Hypersonic International Flight Research Experimentation (HIFiRE) Program Flight 2 is to provide validation data for high enthalpy scramjet prediction tools through a single flight test and accompanying ground tests of the HIFiRE Direct Connect Rig (HDCR) tested in the NASA LaRC Arc Heated Scramjet Test Facility (AHSTF). The HDCR is a full-scale, copper heat sink structure designed to simulate the isolator entrance conditions and isolator, pilot, and combustor section of the HIFiRE flight test experiment flowpath and is fully instrumented to assess combustion performance over a range of operating conditions simulating flight from Mach 5.5 to 8.5 and for various fueling schemes. As part of the instrumentation package, temperature and heat flux sensors were provided along the flowpath surface and also imbedded in the structure. The purpose of this paper is to demonstrate that the surface heat flux and wall temperature of the Zirconia coated copper wall can be obtained with a water-cooled heat flux gage and a sub-surface temperature measurement. An algorithm was developed which used these two measurements to reconstruct the surface conditions along the flowpath. Determinations of the surface conditions of the Zirconia coating were conducted for a variety of conditions.

  18. NASA Sun-Earth Connections Theory Program: The Structure and Dynamics of the Solar Corona and Inner Heliosphere

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mikic, Zoran; Grebowsky, Joseph M. (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    This report covers technical progress during the fourth quarter of the second year of NASA Sun-Earth Connections Theory Program (SECTP) contract 'The Structure and Dynamics of the Solar Corona and Inner Heliosphere,' NAS5-99188, between NASA and Science Applications International Corporation, and covers the period May 16,2001 to August 15, 2001. Under this contract SAIC and the University of California, Irvine (UCI) have conducted research into theoretical modeling of active regions, the solar corona, and the inner heliosphere, using the MHD model.

  19. TIMED Contributions to the NASA Sun-Solar System Connections Great Observatory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Christensen, A. B.; Kozyra, J.; Paxton, L.; Talaat, E.; Yee, J.

    2005-12-01

    TIMED, the terrestrial anchor of NASA's Sun-Solar System Great Observatory, provides comprehensive global measurements of atmospheric properties required for a quantitative understanding the physical, dynamic, energetic and thermal structure of Earth's mesosphere, thermosphere, and ionosphere. This region, located between 60 and 400 km altitude, is the interface between interplanetary processes above and the stratosphere and lower atmosphere below. Thus it plays a uniquely important role in the scientific study of Sun-Solar System connections and in bridging the programmatic gap between space physics and Earth science. The current SSSC Great Observatory comprises a fleet of widely deployed solar, heliospheric, geospace and planetary spacecraft working together to help understand solar activity and its interaction with planetary systems. It is an evolving set as new spacecraft are added and old spacecraft are removed. To address the fundamental physical processes of the space environment and to understand the SSSC system- wide behavior requires multiple observation posts, rapid access to data, development and application of models, theory, and simulations. We will discuss new scientific insights and discoveries from the TIMED mission to illustrate the manifestations of complex coupling processes and to demonstrate the value of the Great Observatory concept. The topics include: (1) observations of the spatial and temporal extent of severe equatorial ionospheric plasma depletions which occur during superstorms using observations of bubbles from TIMED/GUVI with the DMSP and ROCSAT-1 satellites. (2) Mid-latitude aurora, and (3) global thermospheric/ionospheric coupling and (4) the variability of geospace considering the flow of energy from the sun through to its deposition in the upper atmosphere during large geomagnetic storms.

  20. "Festival of Flight Special": Opening Space for Next Generation Explorers. NASA CONNECT[TM]. [Videotape].

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration, Hampton, VA. Langley Research Center.

    The National Aeronautics and Space Administration's (NASA) Space Launch Initiative (SLI) Program will ultimately move from the explorations of the Mercury, Gemini, Apollo, and Space Shuttle missions to a new period of pioneering in which people and businesses are more routinely traveling, working, and living in space. (Author/NB)

  1. Who uses NASA Earth Science Data? Connecting with Users through the Earthdata website and Social Media

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wong, M. M.; Brennan, J.; Bagwell, R.; Behnke, J.

    2015-12-01

    This poster will introduce and explore the various social media efforts, monthly webinar series and a redesigned website (https://earthdata.nasa.gov) established by National Aeronautics and Space Administration's (NASA) Earth Observing System Data and Information System (EOSDIS) project. EOSDIS is a key core capability in NASA's Earth Science Data Systems Program. It provides end-to-end capabilities for managing NASA's Earth science data from various sources - satellites, aircraft, field measurements, and various other programs. It is comprised of twelve Distributed Active Archive Centers (DAACs), Science Computing Facilities (SCFs), data discovery and service access client (Reverb and Earthdata Search), dataset directory (Global Change Master Directory - GCMD), near real-time data (Land Atmosphere Near real-time Capability for EOS - LANCE), Worldview (an imagery visualization interface), Global Imagery Browse Services, the Earthdata Code Collaborative and a host of other discipline specific data discovery, data access, data subsetting and visualization tools. We have embarked on these efforts to reach out to new audiences and potential new users and to engage our diverse end user communities world-wide. One of the key objectives is to increase awareness of the breadth of Earth science data information, services, and tools that are publicly available while also highlighting how these data and technologies enable scientific research.

  2. Crossroads and Connections: An Evolving Relationship between NASA and the Navajo Nation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Scalice, D.; Carron, A.

    2010-08-01

    Is working with Native Americans business as usual? We live in a project-based world that operates on three-to-five-year grants. A long term commitment can be next to impossible to keep, even if you have the best of intentions. Are there things one "must know" before approaching an indigenous population? How is it best to evaluate projects and programs involving Native Americans? In the NASA and the Navajo Nation project, which will turn five in January, 2010, we have compiled some key lessons learned that we hope will inform and encourage future partnerships between the space science education and Native American communities.

  3. Design and Fabrication of the ISTAR Direct-Connect Combustor Experiment at the NASA Hypersonic Tunnel Facility

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lee, Jin-Ho; Krivanek, Thomas M.

    2005-01-01

    The Integrated Systems Test of an Airbreathing Rocket (ISTAR) project was a flight demonstration project initiated to advance the state of the art in Rocket Based Combined Cycle (RBCC) propulsion development. The primary objective of the ISTAR project was to develop a reusable air breathing vehicle and enabling technologies. This concept incorporated a RBCC propulsion system to enable the vehicle to be air dropped at Mach 0.7 and accelerated up to Mach 7 flight culminating in a demonstration of hydrocarbon scramjet operation. A series of component experiments was planned to reduce the level of risk and to advance the technology base. This paper summarizes the status of a full scale direct connect combustor experiment with heated endothermic hydrocarbon fuels. This is the first use of the NASA GRC Hypersonic Tunnel facility to support a direct-connect test. The technical and mechanical challenges involved with adapting this facility, previously used only in the free-jet configuration, for use in direct connect mode will be also described.

  4. NASA - Beyond Boundaries

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    McMillan, Courtenay

    2016-01-01

    NASA is able to achieve human spaceflight goals in partnership with international and commercial teams by establishing common goals and building connections. Presentation includes photographs from NASA missions - on orbit, in Mission Control, and at other NASA facilities.

  5. Problem Solving: The "Wright" Math. The Centennial of Flight Special Edition. An Educator Guide with Activities in Mathematics, Science, and Technology. NASA CONNECT[TM].

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration, Hampton, VA. Langley Research Center.

    NASA CONNECT is an annual series of integrated mathematics, science, and technology instructional distance learning programs for students in grades 6-8. This program is designed for students to learn about the evolution of flight. The program has three components--television broadcast, Web activity, and lesson guide--which are designed as an…

  6. 1 CFR 5.8 - Form of citation.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 1 General Provisions 1 2014-01-01 2012-01-01 true Form of citation. 5.8 Section 5.8 General Provisions ADMINISTRATIVE COMMITTEE OF THE FEDERAL REGISTER THE FEDERAL REGISTER GENERAL § 5.8 Form of citation. Without prejudice to any other form of citation, Federal Register material may be cited by...

  7. 1 CFR 5.8 - Form of citation.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 1 General Provisions 1 2013-01-01 2012-01-01 true Form of citation. 5.8 Section 5.8 General Provisions ADMINISTRATIVE COMMITTEE OF THE FEDERAL REGISTER THE FEDERAL REGISTER GENERAL § 5.8 Form of citation. Without prejudice to any other form of citation, Federal Register material may be cited by...

  8. 1 CFR 5.8 - Form of citation.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 1 General Provisions 1 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Form of citation. 5.8 Section 5.8 General Provisions ADMINISTRATIVE COMMITTEE OF THE FEDERAL REGISTER THE FEDERAL REGISTER GENERAL § 5.8 Form of citation. Without prejudice to any other form of citation, Federal Register material may be cited by...

  9. 1 CFR 5.8 - Form of citation.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 1 General Provisions 1 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Form of citation. 5.8 Section 5.8 General Provisions ADMINISTRATIVE COMMITTEE OF THE FEDERAL REGISTER THE FEDERAL REGISTER GENERAL § 5.8 Form of citation. Without prejudice to any other form of citation, Federal Register material may be cited by...

  10. 1 CFR 5.8 - Form of citation.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 1 General Provisions 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Form of citation. 5.8 Section 5.8 General Provisions ADMINISTRATIVE COMMITTEE OF THE FEDERAL REGISTER THE FEDERAL REGISTER GENERAL § 5.8 Form of citation. Without prejudice to any other form of citation, Federal Register material may be cited by...

  11. Use of the NASA Giovanni Data System for Geospatial Public Health Research: Example of Weather-Influenza Connection

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Acker, James G.; Soebiyanto, Radina; Kiang, Richard; Kempler, Steve

    2014-01-01

    The NASA Giovanni data analysis system has been recognized as a useful tool to access and analyze many different types of remote sensing data. The variety of environmental data types has allowed the use of Giovanni for different application areas, such as agriculture, hydrology, and air quality research. The use of Giovanni for researching connections between public health issues and Earths environment and climate, potentially exacerbated by anthropogenic influence, has been increasingly demonstrated. In this communication, the pertinence of several different data parameters to public health will be described. This communication also provides a case study of the use of remote sensing data from Giovanni in assessing the associations between seasonal influenza and meteorological parameters. In this study, logistic regression was employed with precipitation, temperature and specific humidity as predictors. Specific humidity was found to be associated (p 0.05) with influenza activity in both temperate and tropical climate. In the two temperate locations studied, specific humidity was negatively correlated with influenza; conversely, in the three tropical locations, specific humidity was positively correlated with influenza. Influenza prediction using the regression models showed good agreement with the observed data (correlation coefficient of 0.50.83).

  12. NASA Science4Girls and Their Families: Connecting Local Libraries with NASA Scientists and Education Programs to Engage Girls in STEM

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bleacher, L. V.; Meinke, B.; Hauck, K.; Soeffing, C.; Spitz, A.

    2014-01-01

    NASA Science4Girls and Their Families (NS4G) partners NASA Science Mission Directorate (SMD) education programs with public libraries to provide hands-on science, technology, engineering, and math (STEM) activities and career information for girls and their families, along with training for librarians, in conjunction with Women's History Month (March). NS4G is a collaboration among education teams within the four NASA SMD education and public outreach (E/PO) Forums: Planetary, Earth, Astrophysics, and Heliophysics. It began in 2012 as an Astrophysics-led program (Astro4Girls) with 9 events around the country. Upon expanding among the four Forums, over 73 events were held in Spring 2013 (Fig. 1), with preparations underway for events in Spring 2014. All events are individually evaluated by both the student participants and participating librarians to assess their effectiveness in addressing audience needs.

  13. Eukaryotic ribosomes that lack a 5.8S RNA

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vossbrinck, C. R.; Woese, C. R.

    1986-01-01

    The 5.8S ribosomal RNA is believed to be a universal eukaryotic characteristic. It has no (size) counterpart among the prokaryotes, although its sequence is homologous with the first 150 or so nucleotides of the prokaryotic large subunit (23S) ribosomal RNA. An exception to this rule is reported here. The microsporidian Vairimorpha necatrix is a eukaryote that has no 5.8S rRNA. As in the prokaryotes, it has a single large subunit rRNA, whose 5-prime region corresponds to the 5.8S rRNA.

  14. Connectivity

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Grush, Mary, Ed.

    2006-01-01

    Connectivity has dramatically changed the landscape of higher education IT. From "on-demand" services for net-gen students and advanced eLearning systems for faculty, to high-performance computing grid resources for researchers, IT now provides more networked services than ever to connect campus constituents to each other and to the world.…

  15. Global Issues in the Intermediate Classroom, Grades 5-8.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Johnson, Jacquelyn; Benegar, John

    This publication contains teacher developed activities for teaching about global issues in grades 5-8. The self-contained activities are organized into three major parts. Part I, "Global Awareness," introduces students to the concept of global education. Students are made aware of the nature of the world and the part they play in it as inhabitants…

  16. 17 CFR 5.8 - Aggregate retail forex assets.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 17 Commodity and Securities Exchanges 1 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Aggregate retail forex assets... FOREIGN CURRENCY TRANSACTIONS § 5.8 Aggregate retail forex assets. (a) Each retail foreign exchange dealer and futures commission merchant offering or engaging in retail forex transactions shall calculate...

  17. Ideas: NCTM Standards-Based Instruction, Grades 5-8.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hynes, Michael C., Ed.

    This document is a collection of activity-based mathematics lessons for grades 5-8 from the "Ideas" department in "Arithmetic Teacher: Mathematics Education through the Middle Grades." Each lesson includes background information, objectives, directions, extensions, and student worksheets. A matrix is included which correlates the titles of the…

  18. Nebraska Earth Science Education Network: Enhancing the NASA, University, and Pre-College Science Teacher Connection with Electronic Communication

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gosselin, David C.

    1997-01-01

    The primary goals of this project were to: 1. Promote and enhance K-12 earth science education; and enhance the access to and exchange of information through the use of digital networks in K-12 institutions. We have achieved these two goals. Through the efforts of many individuals at the University of Nebraska-Lincoln (UNL), Nebraska Earth Science Education Network (NESEN) has become a viable and beneficial interdisciplinary outreach program for K-12 educators in Nebraska. Over the last three years, the NASA grant has provided personnel and equipment to maintain, expand and develop NESEN into a program that is recognized by its membership as a valuable source of information and expertise in earth systems science. Because NASA funding provided a framework upon which to build, other external sources of funding have become available to support NESEN programs.

  19. KOVEC studies of radioisotope thermoelectric generator response (In connection with possible NASA space shuttle accident explosion scenarios)

    SciTech Connect

    Walton, J.; Weston, A.; Lee, E.

    1984-06-26

    The Department of Energy (DOE) commissioned a study leading to a final report (NUS-4543, Report of the Shuttle Transportation System (STS) Explosion Working Group (EWG), June 8, 1984), concerned with PuO/sub 2/ dispersal should the NASA space shuttle explode during the proposed Galileo and ISPN launches planned for 1986. At DOE's request, LLNL furnished appendices that describe hydrocode KOVEC calculations of potential damage to the Radioisotope Thermoelectric Generators, fueled by PuO/sub 2/, should certain explosion scenarios occur. These appendices are contained in this report.

  20. Assessing the Effectiveness of a Mathematics-Focused, Instructional Technology Program for Grades 6-8: A 5-Year Trend Analysis of NASA CONNECT(tm) Evaluation Data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Glassman, Nanci A.; Perry, Jeannine B.; Giersch, Christopher E.; Lambert, Matthew A.; Pinelli, Thomas E.

    2004-01-01

    NASA CONNECT is a research-, inquiry, and standards-based, integrated mathematics, science, and technology series of 30-minute instructional distance learning (television and web-based) programs for students in grades 6 8. Respondents who evaluated the programs in the series over the first five seasons (1998-99 through 2002-03) reported that (1) they used the programs in the series; (2) the goals and objectives for the series were met; (3) the programs were aligned with the national mathematics, science, and technology standards; (4) the program content was developmentally appropriate for the grade level; and (5) the programs in the series enhanced and enriched the teaching of mathematics, science, and technology.

  1. Connecting Satellite Observations with Water Cycle Variables Through Land Data Assimilation: Examples Using the NASA GEOS-5 LDAS

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Reichle, Rolf H.; De Lannoy, Gabrielle J. M.; Forman, Barton A.; Draper, Clara S.; Liu, Qing

    2013-01-01

    A land data assimilation system (LDAS) can merge satellite observations (or retrievals) of land surface hydrological conditions, including soil moisture, snow, and terrestrial water storage (TWS), into a numerical model of land surface processes. In theory, the output from such a system is superior to estimates based on the observations or the model alone, thereby enhancing our ability to understand, monitor, and predict key elements of the terrestrial water cycle. In practice, however, satellite observations do not correspond directly to the water cycle variables of interest. The present paper addresses various aspects of this seeming mismatch using examples drawn from recent research with the ensemble-based NASA GEOS-5 LDAS. These aspects include (1) the assimilation of coarse-scale observations into higher-resolution land surface models, (2) the partitioning of satellite observations (such as TWS retrievals) into their constituent water cycle components, (3) the forward modeling of microwave brightness temperatures over land for radiance-based soil moisture and snow assimilation, and (4) the selection of the most relevant types of observations for the analysis of a specific water cycle variable that is not observed (such as root zone soil moisture). The solution to these challenges involves the careful construction of an observation operator that maps from the land surface model variables of interest to the space of the assimilated observations.

  2. HIFiRE Direct-Connect Rig (HDCR) Phase I Scramjet Test Results from the NASA Langley Arc-Heated Scramjet Test Facility

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cabell, Karen; Hass, Neal; Storch, Andrea; Gruber, Mark

    2011-01-01

    A series of hydrocarbon-fueled direct-connect scramjet ground tests has been completed in the NASA Langley Arc-Heated Scramjet Test Facility (AHSTF) at simulated Mach 8 flight conditions. These experiments were part of an initial test phase to support Flight 2 of the Hypersonic International Flight Research Experimentation (HIFiRE) Program. In this flight experiment, a hydrocarbon-fueled scramjet is intended to demonstrate transition from dual-mode to scramjet-mode operation and verify the scramjet performance prediction and design tools A performance goal is the achievement of a combusted fuel equivalence ratio greater than 0.7 while in scramjet mode. The ground test rig, designated the HIFiRE Direct Connect Rig (HDCR), is a full-scale, heat sink test article that duplicates both the flowpath lines and a majority of the instrumentation layout of the isolator and combustor portion of the flight test hardware. The primary objectives of the HDCR Phase I tests were to verify the operability of the HIFiRE isolator/combustor across the simulated Mach 6-8 flight regime and to establish a fuel distribution schedule to ensure a successful mode transition. Both of these objectives were achieved prior to the HiFIRE Flight 2 payload Critical Design Review. Mach 8 ground test results are presented in this report, including flowpath surface pressure distributions that demonstrate the operation of the flowpath in scramjet-mode over a small range of test conditions around the nominal Mach 8 simulation, as well as over a range of fuel equivalence ratios. Flowpath analysis using ground test data is presented elsewhere; however, limited comparisons with analytical predictions suggest that both scramjet-mode operation and the combustion performance objective are achieved at Mach 8 conditions.

  3. HIFiRE Direct-Connect Rig (HDCR) Phase I Ground Test Results from the NASA Langley Arc-Heated Scramjet Test Facility

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hass, Neal E.; Cabell, Karen F.; Storch, Andrea M.

    2010-01-01

    The initial phase of hydrocarbon-fueled ground tests supporting Flight 2 of the Hypersonic International Flight Research Experiment (HIFiRE) Program has been conducted in the NASA Langley Arc-Heated Scramjet Test Facility (AHSTF). The HIFiRE Program, an Air Force-lead international cooperative program includes eight different flight test experiments designed to target specific challenges of hypersonic flight. The second of the eight planned flight experiments is a hydrocarbon-fueled scramjet flight test intended to demonstrate dual-mode to scramjet-mode operation and verify the scramjet performance prediction and design tools. A performance goal is the achievement of a combusted fuel equivalence ratio greater than 0.7 while in scramjet mode. The ground test rig, designated the HIFiRE Direct Connect Rig (HDCR), is a full-scale, heat sink, direct-connect ground test article that duplicates both the flowpath lines and the instrumentation layout of the isolator and combustor portion of the flight test hardware. The primary objectives of the HDCR Phase I tests are to verify the operability of the HIFiRE isolator/combustor across the Mach 6.0-8.0 flight regime and to establish a fuel distribution schedule to ensure a successful mode transition prior to the HiFIRE payload Critical Design Review. Although the phase I test plans include testing over the Mach 6 to 8 flight simulation range, only Mach 6 testing will be reported in this paper. Experimental results presented here include flowpath surface pressure, temperature, and heat flux distributions that demonstrate the operation of the flowpath over a small range of test conditions around the nominal Mach 6 simulation, as well as a range of fuel equivalence ratios and fuel injection distributions. Both ethylene and a mixture of ethylene and methane (planned for flight) were tested. Maximum back pressure and flameholding limits, as well as a baseline fuel schedule, that covers the Mach 5.84-6.5 test space have been

  4. Snow distribution on Antarctic sea ice: precipitation, accumulation, and connections to sea ice thickness from in situ and NASA IceBridge observations.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maksym, T. L.; Kunz, C.; Kwok, R.; Leonard, K. C.; Singh, H.; Trujillo, E.; Williams, G. D.; White, S.; Wever, N.

    2014-12-01

    Snow plays a dominant role in Antarctic sea ice mass balance and its seasonal evolution. It is a primary control on sea ice thickness and the structure of sea ice ecosystems, it dominates the uncertainty in satellite estimates of ice thickness, and it may significantly modulate the response of sea ice to climate change and variability. Here, we provide an overview of recent surveys of snow distribution (both small and large scale), its temporal evolution, and its connection with the processes that drive it - precipitation, accumulation, blowing snow events, flooding, and the role of ice deformation. We present recent 3-D in situ floe-scale measurements of snow surface topography, snow depth, and ice thickness distribution that allow relationships between surface roughness features, snow accumulation, and ice thickness to be examined in unprecedented detail. These data are compared with estimates of snow depth from the NASA IceBridge radar from spring surveys in the Weddell and Amundsen/Bellingshausen Seas. Both airborne and in situ measurements suggest a significant extent of thick ice with a deep snow cover that is underrepresented in prior surveys. Finally, the seasonal evolution of precipitation, snow depth, and accumulation is examined with data from drifting buoy platforms deployed in several regions of the Antarctic. These observations show that precipitation is not necessarily a good estimator for snow accumulation and that treatment of blowing snow must be included for sea ice models to accurately simulate Antarctic snow and sea ice mass balance. The implications of these results for modeling and satellite measurement of the sea ice thickness distribution are discussed.

  5. Experimental Investigation of the Low-Speed Aerodynamic Characteristics of a 5.8-Percent Scale Hybrid Wing Body Configuration

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gatlin, Gregory M.; Vicroy, Dan D.; Carter, Melissa B.

    2012-01-01

    A low-speed experimental investigation has been conducted on a 5.8-percent scale Hybrid Wing Body configuration in the NASA Langley 14- by 22-Foot Subsonic Tunnel. This Hybrid Wing Body (HWB) configuration was designed with specific intention to support the NASA Environmentally Responsible Aviation (ERA) Project goals of reduced noise, emissions, and fuel burn. This HWB configuration incorporates twin, podded nacelles mounted on the vehicle upper surface between twin vertical tails. Low-speed aerodynamic characteristics were assessed through the acquisition of force and moment, surface pressure, and flow visualization data. Longitudinal and lateral-directional characteristics were investigated on this multi-component model. The effects of a drooped leading edge, longitudinal flow-through nacelle location, vertical tail shape and position, elevon deflection, and rudder deflection have been studied. The basic configuration aerodynamics, as well as the effects of these configuration variations, are presented in this paper.

  6. NASA Tech Briefs, November/December 1986, Special Edition

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1986-01-01

    Topics: Computing: The View from NASA Headquarters; Earth Resources Laboratory Applications Software: Versatile Tool for Data Analysis; The Hypercube: Cost-Effective Supercomputing; Artificial Intelligence: Rendezvous with NASA; NASA's Ada Connection; COSMIC: NASA's Software Treasurehouse; Golden Oldies: Tried and True NASA Software; Computer Technical Briefs; NASA TU Services; Digital Fly-by-Wire.

  7. NASA IYA Programs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hasan, Hashima; Smith, D.

    2009-05-01

    NASA's Science Mission Directorate (SMD) launched a variety of programs to celebrate the International Year of Astronomy (IYA) 2009. A few examples will be presented to demonstrate how the exciting science generated by NASA's missions in astrophysics, planetary science and heliophysics has been given an IYA2009 flavor and made available to students, educators and the public worldwide. NASA participated in the official kickoff of US IYA activities by giving a sneak preview of a multi-wavelength image of M101, and of other images from NASA's space science missions that are now traveling to 40 public libraries around the country. NASA IYA Student Ambassadors represented the USA at the international Opening Ceremony in Paris, and have made strides in connecting with local communities throughout the USA. NASA's Object of the Month activities have generated great interest in the public through IYA Discovery Guides. Images from NASA's Great Observatories are included in the From Earth to the Universe (FETTU) exhibition, which was inaugurated both in the US and internationally. The Hubble Space Telescope Project had a tremendous response to its 100 Days of Astronomy "You Decide” competition. NASA's IYA programs have started a journey into the world of astronomy by the uninitiated and cultivated the continuation of a quest by those already enraptured by the wonders of the sky.

  8. NASA Overview

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sheffner, Edwin J.

    2007-01-01

    The Earth Science Division supports research projects that exploit the observations and measurements acquired by NASA Earth Observing missions and Applied Sciences projects that extend NASA research to the broader user community and address societal needs.

  9. NASA Bioreactor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1998-01-01

    Biotechnology Refrigerator (BTR) holds fixed tissue culture bags at 4 degrees C to preserve them for return to Earth and postflight analysis. The cultures are used in research with the NASA Bioreactor cell science program. The work is sponsored by NASA's Office of Biological and Physical Research. The bioreactor is managed by the Biotechnology Cell Science Program at NASA's Johnson Space Center (JSC).

  10. An Analysis of Large-Scale Writing Assessments in Canada (Grades 5-8)

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Peterson, Shelley Stagg; McClay, Jill; Main, Kristin

    2011-01-01

    This paper reports on an analysis of large-scale assessments of Grades 5-8 students' writing across 10 provinces and 2 territories in Canada. Theory, classroom practice, and the contributions and constraints of large-scale writing assessment are brought together with a focus on Grades 5-8 writing in order to provide both a broad view of…

  11. NASA Network

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Carter, David; Wetzel, Scott

    2000-01-01

    The NASA Network includes nine NASA operated and partner operated stations covering North America, the west coast of South America, the Pacific, and Western Australia . A new station is presently being setup in South Africa and discussions are underway to add another station in Argentina. NASA SLR operations are supported by Honeywell Technical Solutions, Inc (HTSI), formally AlliedSignal Technical Services, The University of Texas, the University of Hawaii and Universidad Nacional de San Agustin.

  12. Innovation @ NASA

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Roman, Juan A.

    2014-01-01

    This presentation provides an overview of the activities National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) is doing to encourage innovation across the agency. All information provided is available publicly.

  13. NASA Solve

    NASA Video Gallery

    NASA Solve lists opportunities available to the general public to contribute to solving tough problems related to NASA’s mission through challenges, prize competitions, and crowdsourcing activities...

  14. Processable, high temperature polymers from 1,4,5,8-tetrahydro-1,4;5,8-diepoxyanthracene and bis-dienes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Meador, Mary Ann B.

    1988-01-01

    1,4,5,8-tetrahydro-1,4;5,8-diepoxyanthracene reacts with various anthracene end-capped polyimide oligomers to form Diels-Alder cycloaddition copolymers. The polymers are soluble in common organic solvents, and have molecular weights of approximately 21,000 to 32,000. These resins exhibit lower weight loss in air than in nitrogen. This is suggested to be due to dehydration (loss of water ranges from 2 to 5 percent) at temperatures of 390 to 400 C to give thermooxidatively stable pentiptycene units along the polymer backbone. Because of their high softening points and good thermooxidative stability, the polymers have potential as processable, matrix resins for high temperature composite applications.

  15. Addition polymers from 1,4,5,8-tetrahydro-1,4;5,8-diepoxyanthracene and Bis-dienes: Processable resins for high temperature application

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Meador, Mary Ann B.

    1987-01-01

    1,4,5,8-Tetrahydro-1,4;5,8-diepoxyanthracene reacts with various anthracene endcapped polyimide oligomers to form Diels-Alder cycloaddition copolymers. The polymers are soluble in common organic solvents, and have molecular weights of approximately 21,000 to 32,000. Interestingly, these resins appear to be more stable in air then in nitrogen. This is shown to be due to a unique dehydration (loss of water ranges from 2 to 5 percent) at temperatures of 390 to 400 C to give thermo-oxidatively stable pentiptycene units along the polymer backbone. Because of their high softening points and good thermo-oxidative stability, the polymers have potential as processible, matrix resins for high temperature composite applications.

  16. Radial collapse and physical mechanism of carbon nanotube with divacancy and 5-8-5 defects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Ya-Ping; Ling, Cui-Cui; Li, Gui-Xia; Zhu, Hai-Feng; Zhang, Meng-Yu

    2015-04-01

    By employing molecular mechanics and molecular dynamics simulations, we investigate the radial collapses and elasticities of different chiral single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWCNTs) with divacancy, and 5-8-5 defects. It is found that divacancy and 5-8-5 defect can reduce the collapse pressure (Pc) of SWCNT (10, 10) while 5-8-5 defect can greatly increase Pc of SWCNT (17, 0). For example, 5-8-5 defect can make Pc of SWCNT (17, 0) increase by 500%. A model is established to understand the effects of chirality, divacancy, and 5-8-5 defect on radial collapse of SWCNTs. The results are particularly of value for understanding the mechanical behavior of SWCNT with divacancy, and the 5-8-5 defect that may be considered as a filler of high loading composites. Project supported by the National Natural Science Foundation of China (Grant No. 11374372), Natural Science Foundation of Shandong Province, China (Grant No. ZR2014EMQ006), the Postdoctoral Science Foundation of China (Grant No. 2014M551983), the Postdoctoral Applied Research Foundation of Qingdao City, China (Grant No. 2014), the Fundamental Research Funds for the Central Universities, China (Grant Nos. 12CX04087A and 14CX02018A), and the Qingdao Science and Technology Program, China (Grant No. 14-2-4-27-jch).

  17. NASA Vision

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fenton, Mary (Editor); Wood, Jennifer (Editor)

    2003-01-01

    This newsletter contains several articles, primarily on International Space Station (ISS) crewmembers and their activities, as well as the activities of NASA administrators. Other subjects covered in the articles include the investigation of the Space Shuttle Columbia accident, activities at NASA centers, Mars exploration, a collision avoidance test on a unmanned aerial vehicle (UAV). The ISS articles cover landing in a Soyuz capsule, photography from the ISS, and the Expedition Seven crew.

  18. Mission Mathematics: Linking Aerospace and the NCTM Standards. Grades 5-8.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    O'Connor, Vincent F., Ed.; Hynes, Michael C., Ed.

    This book is a collaborative project between the National Aeronautics Space Administration (NASA) and the National Council of Teachers of Mathematics (NCTM). It has two complementary goals: to provide classroom-tested lessons that effectively model the vision of the NCTM Standards and to focus on the exciting problems that arise out of NASA's…

  19. Compatibility study of trans-1,4,5,8-tetranitro-1,4,5,8-tetraazadecalin (TNAD) with some energetic components and inert materials.

    PubMed

    Yan, Qi-Long; Xiao-Jiang, Li; La-Ying, Zhang; Ji-Zhen, Li; Hong-Li, Li; Zi-Ru, Liu

    2008-12-30

    The compatibility of trans-1,4,5,8-tetranitro-1,4,5,8-tetraazadecalin (TNAD) with some energetic components and inert materials of solid propellants was studied by using the pressure DSC method where, cyclotetramethylenetetranitroamine (HMX), cyclotrimethylenetrinitramine (RDX), 1,4-dinitropiperazine (DNP), 1.25/1-NC/NG mixture, lead 3-nitro-1,2,4-triazol-5-onate (NTO-Pb), aluminum powder (Al, particle size=13.6microm) and N-nitrodihydroxyethylaminedinitrate (DINA) were used as energetic components and polyethylene glycol (PEG), polyoxytetramethylene-co-oxyethylene (PET), addition product of hexamethylene diisocyanate and water (N-100), 2-nitrodianiline (2-NDPA), 1,3-dimethyl-1,3-diphenyl urea (C2), carbon black (C.B.), aluminum oxide (Al2O3), cupric 2,4-dihydroxy-benzoate (beta-Cu), cupric adipate (AD-Cu) and lead phthalate (phi-Pb) were used as inert materials. It was concluded that the binary systems of TNAD with NTO-Pb, RDX, PET and Al powder are compatible, and systems of TNAD with DINA and HMX are slightly sensitive, and with 2-NDPA, phi-Pb, beta-Cu, AD-Cu and Al2O3 are sensitive, and with PEG, N-100, C2 and C.B. are incompatible. The impact and friction sensitivity data of the TNAD and TNAD in combination with the other energetic materials under present study was also obtained, and there was no consequential affiliation between sensitivity and compatibility.

  20. LDEF polymeric materials: 10 months versus 5.8 years of exposure

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Young, Philip R.; Slemp, Wayne S.; Chang, Alice C.

    1993-01-01

    The chemical characterization of several polymeric materials which received 10 months of exposure and 5.8 years of exposure on a Row 9 Long Duration Exposure Facility (LDEF) experiment (A0134) is reported. Specimens include fluorinated ethylene propylene (FEP) teflon film, polysulfone film, and graphite fiber reinforced epoxy amd polysulfone matrix composites. The responses of these materials to the two LEO exposures are compared. The results of infrared, thermal, x-ray photoelectron, and scanning electron microscope analyses are reported. Solution property measurements of various molecular weight parameters are presented for the thermoplastic polysulfone materials. Molecular level effects attributable to exposure that were present in 10-month exposed specimens were not found in 5.8-year exposed specimens. This result suggests that increased atomic oxygen fluence toward the end of the LDEF mission may have eroded away selected environmentally induced changes in surface chemistry for 5.8-year exposure specimens.

  1. Antiloosening ability of 5/8 inch stainless steel BSW threaded fasteners

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Panja, Bikash; Das, Santanu

    2016-07-01

    Threaded fasteners are popular for temporary joining of different components due to the fact that they retain high clamping force and torque for long. However, they may loosen under vibrating conditions causing failure of the system. In this experimental work, antiloosening ability of various 5/8 inch BSW fastening elements, such as conventional nut and nylock nut with flat washer, spring washer, inside and outside serrated washers is tested with stainless steel (SS) bolts. A hybrid double nut using a simple nut and one nylock nut at the outside and a typical adhesive bonded nut with 5/8 inch BSW bolt are introduced to obtain resistance to loosening. Some hybrid double nut and adhesive bonded nut are recommended for stainless steel 5/8 inch BSW bolts under vibration.

  2. 5. 8 GHz ophthalmic microwave applicator for treatment of choroidal melanoma

    SciTech Connect

    Finger, P.T.; Packer, S.; Svitra, P.; Paglione, R.W.; Albert, D.M.; Chess, J.

    1983-01-01

    We report on the use of a 5.8 GHz microwave applicator to treat choroidal melanoma (Greene) in rabbits. The physical requirements needed to treat these intraocular tumors are quite different from those encountered elsewhere in the body. From a trans-scleral approach the penetration needed is minimal (5 to 10 mm.). The fibrous sclera is the only structure between the heat source and the tumor. The sclera has a relatively low water content when compared to tumor. This fact in addition to the frequency dependent interactions of tissue and electromagnetic radiation, results in an advantage to the use of the 5.8 GHz microwave device in treating intraocular malignancies.

  3. The design and evaluation of a 5.8 ghz laptop-based radar system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Teng, Kevin Chi-Ming

    This project involves design and analysis of a 5.8 GHz laptop-based radar system. The radar system measures Doppler, ranging and forming Synthetic Aperture Radar (SAR) images utilizing Matlab software provided from MIT Open Courseware and performs data acquisition and signal processing. The main purpose of this work is to bring new perspective to the existing radar project by increasing the ISM band frequency from 2.4 GHz to 5.8 GHz and to carry out a series of experiments on the implementation of the radar kit. Demonstrating the radar at higher operating frequency is capable of providing accurate data results in Doppler, ranging and SAR images.

  4. NASA Bioreactor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1996-01-01

    Close-up view of the interior of a NASA Bioreactor shows the plastic plumbing and valves (cylinders at center) to control fluid flow. A fresh nutrient bag is installed at top; a flattened waste bag behind it will fill as the nutrients are consumed during the course of operation. The drive chain and gears for the rotating wall vessel are visible at bottom center center. The NASA Bioreactor provides a low turbulence culture environment which promotes the formation of large, three-dimensional cell clusters. The Bioreactor is rotated to provide gentle mixing of fresh and spent nutrient without inducing shear forces that would damage the cells. Due to their high level of cellular organization and specialization, samples constructed in the bioreactor more closely resemble the original tumor or tissue found in the body. The work is sponsored by NASA's Office of Biological and Physical Research. The bioreactor is managed by the Biotechnology Cell Science Program at NASA's Johnson Space Center (JSC). NASA-sponsored bioreactor research has been instrumental in helping scientists to better understand normal and cancerous tissue development. In cooperation with the medical community, the bioreactor design is being used to prepare better models of human colon, prostate, breast and ovarian tumors. Cartilage, bone marrow, heart muscle, skeletal muscle, pancreatic islet cells, liver and kidney are just a few of the normal tissues being cultured in rotating bioreactors by investigators.

  5. NASA Bioreactor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1996-01-01

    Interior view of the gas supply for the NASA Bioreactor. The NASA Bioreactor provides a low turbulence culture environment which promotes the formation of large, three-dimensional cell clusters. The Bioreactor is rotated to provide gentle mixing of fresh and spent nutrient without inducing shear forces that would damage the cells. Due to their high level of cellular organization and specialization, samples constructed in the bioreactor more closely resemble the original tumor or tissue found in the body. The work is sponsored by NASA's Office of Biological and Physical Research. The bioreactor is managed by the Biotechnology Cell Science Program at NASA's Johnson Space Center (JSC). NASA-sponsored bioreactor research has been instrumental in helping scientists to better understand normal and cancerous tissue development. In cooperation with the medical community, the bioreactor design is being used to prepare better models of human colon, prostate, breast and ovarian tumors. Cartilage, bone marrow, heart muscle, skeletal muscle, pancreatic islet cells, liver and kidney are just a few of the normal tissues being cultured in rotating bioreactors by investigators.

  6. NASA Bioreactor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1996-01-01

    Biotechnology Refrigerator that preserves samples for use in (or after culturing in) the NASA Bioreactor. The unit is shown extracted from a middeck locker shell. The NASA Bioreactor provides a low turbulence culture environment which promotes the formation of large, three-dimensional cell clusters. The Bioreactor is rotated to provide gentle mixing of fresh and spent nutrient without inducing shear forces that would damage the cells. Due to their high level of cellular organization and specialization, samples constructed in the bioreactor more closely resemble the original tumor or tissue found in the body. The work is sponsored by NASA's Office of Biological and Physical Research. The bioreactor is managed by the Biotechnology Cell Science Program at NASA's Johnson Space Center (JSC). NASA-sponsored bioreactor research has been instrumental in helping scientists to better understand normal and cancerous tissue development. In cooperation with the medical community, the bioreactor design is being used to prepare better models of human colon, prostate, breast and ovarian tumors. Cartilage, bone marrow, heart muscle, skeletal muscle, pancreatic islet cells, liver and kidney are just a few of the normal tissues being cultured in rotating bioreactors by investigators.

  7. NASA Bioreactor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1996-01-01

    Exterior view of the NASA Bioreactor Engineering Development Unit flown on Mir. The rotating wall vessel is behind the window on the face of the large module. Control electronics are in the module at left; gas supply and cooling fans are in the module at back. The NASA Bioreactor provides a low turbulence culture environment which promotes the formation of large, three-dimensional cell clusters. The Bioreactor is rotated to provide gentle mixing of fresh and spent nutrient without inducing shear forces that would damage the cells. Due to their high level of cellular organization and specialization, samples constructed in the bioreactor more closely resemble the original tumor or tissue found in the body. The work is sponsored by NASA's Office of Biological and Physical Research. The bioreactor is managed by the Biotechnology Cell Science Program at NASA's Johnson Space Center (JSC). NASA-sponsored bioreactor research has been instrumental in helping scientists to better understand normal and cancerous tissue development. In cooperation with the medical community, the bioreactor design is being used to prepare better models of human colon, prostate, breast and ovarian tumors. Cartilage, bone marrow, heart muscle, skeletal muscle, pancreatic islet cells, liver and kidney are just a few of the normal tissues being cultured in rotating bioreactors by investigators.

  8. NASA Bioreactor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1996-01-01

    Electronics control module for the NASA Bioreactor. The NASA Bioreactor provides a low turbulence culture environment which promotes the formation of large, three-dimensional cell clusters. The Bioreactor is rotated to provide gentle mixing of fresh and spent nutrient without inducing shear forces that would damage the cells. Due to their high level of cellular organization and specialization, samples constructed in the bioreactor more closely resemble the original tumor or tissue found in the body. The work is sponsored by NASA's Office of Biological and Physical Research. The bioreactor is managed by the Biotechnology Cell Science Program at NASA's Johnson Space Center (JSC). NASA-sponsored bioreactor research has been instrumental in helping scientists to better understand normal and cancerous tissue development. In cooperation with the medical community, the bioreactor design is being used to prepare better models of human colon, prostate, breast and ovarian tumors. Cartilage, bone marrow, heart muscle, skeletal muscle, pancreatic islet cells, liver and kidney are just a few of the normal tissues being cultured in rotating bioreactors by investigators.

  9. NASA Bioreactor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1996-01-01

    Interior of a Biotechnology Refrigerator that preserves samples for use in (or after culturing in) the NASA Bioreactor. The unit is shown extracted from a middeck locker shell. The NASA Bioreactor provides a low turbulence culture environment which promotes the formation of large, three-dimensional cell clusters. The Bioreactor is rotated to provide gentle mixing of fresh and spent nutrient without inducing shear forces that would damage the cells. Due to their high level of cellular organization and specialization, samples constructed in the bioreactor more closely resemble the original tumor or tissue found in the body. The work is sponsored by NASA's Office of Biological and Physical Research. The bioreactor is managed by the Biotechnology Cell Science Program at NASA's Johnson Space Center (JSC). NASA-sponsored bioreactor research has been instrumental in helping scientists to better understand normal and cancerous tissue development. In cooperation with the medical community, the bioreactor design is being used to prepare better models of human colon, prostate, breast and ovarian tumors. Cartilage, bone marrow, heart muscle, skeletal muscle, pancreatic islet cells, liver and kidney are just a few of the normal tissues being cultured in rotating bioreactors by investigators.

  10. NASA Bioreactor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1996-01-01

    Biotechnology Refrigerator that preserves samples for use in (or after culturing in) the NASA Bioreactor. The unit is shown extracted from a middeck locker shell and with thermal blankets partially removed. The NASA Bioreactor provides a low turbulence culture environment which promotes the formation of large, three-dimensional cell clusters. The Bioreactor is rotated to provide gentle mixing of fresh and spent nutrient without inducing shear forces that would damage the cells. Due to their high level of cellular organization and specialization, samples constructed in the bioreactor more closely resemble the original tumor or tissue found in the body. The work is sponsored by NASA's Office of Biological and Physical Research. The bioreactor is managed by the Biotechnology Cell Science Program at NASA's Johnson Space Center (JSC). NASA-sponsored bioreactor research has been instrumental in helping scientists to better understand normal and cancerous tissue development. In cooperation with the medical community, the bioreactor design is being used to prepare better models of human colon, prostate, breast and ovarian tumors. Cartilage, bone marrow, heart muscle, skeletal muscle, pancreatic islet cells, liver and kidney are just a few of the normal tissues being cultured in rotating bioreactors by investigators.

  11. NASA Bioreactor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1996-01-01

    Laptop computer sits atop the Experiment Control Computer for a NASA Bioreactor. The flight crew can change operating conditions in the Bioreactor by using the graphical interface on the laptop. The NASA Bioreactor provides a low turbulence culture environment which promotes the formation of large, three-dimensional cell clusters. The Bioreactor is rotated to provide gentle mixing of fresh and spent nutrient without inducing shear forces that would damage the cells. Due to their high level of cellular organization and specialization, samples constructed in the bioreactor more closely resemble the original tumor or tissue found in the body. The work is sponsored by NASA's Office of Biological and Physical Research. The bioreactor is managed by the Biotechnology Cell Science Program at NASA's Johnson Space Center (JSC). NASA-sponsored bioreactor research has been instrumental in helping scientists to better understand normal and cancerous tissue development. In cooperation with the medical community, the bioreactor design is being used to prepare better models of human colon, prostate, breast and ovarian tumors. Cartilage, bone marrow, heart muscle, skeletal muscle, pancreatic islet cells, liver and kidney are just a few of the normal tissues being cultured in rotating bioreactors by investigators.

  12. NASA Bioreactor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1996-01-01

    Close-up view of the interior of a NASA Bioreactor shows the plastic plumbing and valves (cylinders at right center) to control fluid flow. The rotating wall vessel is at top center. The NASA Bioreactor provides a low turbulence culture environment which promotes the formation of large, three-dimensional cell clusters. The Bioreactor is rotated to provide gentle mixing of fresh and spent nutrient without inducing shear forces that would damage the cells. Due to their high level of cellular organization and specialization, samples constructed in the bioreactor more closely resemble the original tumor or tissue found in the body. The work is sponsored by NASA's Office of Biological and Physical Research. The bioreactor is managed by the Biotechnology Cell Science Program at NASA's Johnson Space Center (JSC). NASA-sponsored bioreactor research has been instrumental in helping scientists to better understand normal and cancerous tissue development. In cooperation with the medical community, the bioreactor design is being used to prepare better models of human colon, prostate, breast and ovarian tumors. Cartilage, bone marrow, heart muscle, skeletal muscle, pancreatic islet cells, liver and kidney are just a few of the normal tissues being cultured in rotating bioreactors by investigators.

  13. NASA Bioreactor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1998-01-01

    The heart of the bioreactor is the rotating wall vessel, shown without its support equipment. Volume is about 125 mL. The work is sponsored by NASA's Office of Biological and Physical Research. The bioreactor is managed by the Biotechnology Cell Science Program at NASA's Johnson Space Center (JSC). NASA-sponsored bioreactor research has been instrumental in helping scientists to better understand normal and cancerous tissue development. In cooperation with the medical community, the bioreactor design is being used to prepare better models of human colon, prostate, breast and ovarian tumors. Cartilage, bone marrow, heart muscle, skeletal muscle, pancreatic islet cells, liver and kidney are just a few of the normal tissues being cultured in rotating bioreactors by investigators.

  14. NASA Bioreactor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1998-01-01

    Astronaut John Blaha replaces an exhausted media bag and filled waste bag with fresh bags to continue a bioreactor experiment aboard space station Mir in 1996. NASA-sponsored bioreactor research has been instrumental in helping scientists to better understand normal and cancerous tissue development. In cooperation with the medical community, the bioreactor design is being used to prepare better models of human colon, prostate, breast and ovarian tumors. Cartilage, bone marrow, heart muscle, skeletal muscle, pancreatic islet cells, liver and kidney are just a few of the normal tissues being cultured in rotating bioreactors by investigators. This image is from a video downlink. The work is sponsored by NASA's Office of Biological and Physical Research. The bioreactor is managed by the Biotechnology Cell Science Program at NASA's Johnson Space Center (JSC).

  15. Ground Systems Development and Operations (GSDO): Exploration Begins Here [Grades 5-8

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hill, Trudy

    2012-01-01

    Presentation to inform the non-NASA general public and school students of ground systems development and operations activities at Kennedy Space Center, particularly on what GSDO is and does, in a high level overview.

  16. Into Adolescence: Actions for Wellpower. A Curriculum for Grades 5-8. Contemporary Health Series.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Waters, Mae; Hocker, Anita

    This module on wellness includes eight lessons, and is oriented toward middle school students in grades 5-8. Students choose partners to support them in achieving their goals for improving health in several areas. In lesson 1, health and wellness are defined. Students are introduced to a wellness continuum and the physical, mental/emotional, and…

  17. The Columbia River: Its Future and You. Teacher's Manual for Grades 5-8.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Frost, Marcia

    Designed as a part of a multidisciplinary set of curricula and educational materials on the Columbia River, this teacher's guide focuses on the many uses of the river and the conflicts arising from those uses. This unit's major purpose is to help students in grades 5-8 to start thinking about how the resources of the Columbia River should be…

  18. Diffusion of cis-5,8,11,14,17-eicosapentaenoic acid (1); carbon dioxide (2)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Winkelmann, J.

    This document is part of Subvolume A `Gases in Gases, Liquids and their Mixtures' of Volume 15 `Diffusion in Gases, Liquids and Electrolytes' of Landolt-Börnstein Group IV `Physical Chemistry'. It is part of the chapter of the chapter `Diffusion in Pure Gases' and contains data on diffusion of (1) cis-5,8,11,14,17-eicosapentaenoic acid; (2) carbon dioxide

  19. Earth Science Supplement to the Syllabus, Part 2, Topics 5-8, 1970 Edition. 1974 Reprint.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    New York State Education Dept., Albany. Bureau of Secondary Curriculum Development.

    This document contains investigation topics 5-8 in the earth science course developed by the University of the State of New York for secondary schools. Topics include energy in earth processes, insulation and the earth's surface, energy exchanges in the atmosphere, moisture and energy budgets, and environmental change. Each topic is preceded by…

  20. NASA's Space Science Programming Possibilities for Planetaria

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Adams, M. L.

    2003-01-01

    The relationship between NASA and the planetarium community is an important one. Indeed, NASA's Office of Space Science has invested in a study of the Space Science Media Needs of Science Center Professionals. Some of the findings indicate a need for exposure to space science researchers, workshops for museum educators, 'canned' programs, and access to a speakers bureau. We will discuss some of the programs of NASA's Sun-Earth Connection Education Forum, distribute sample multimedia products, explain the role of NASA's Educator Resource Center, and review our contributions to NASA's Education and Public Outreach effort.

  1. Absorption features in the 5-8 micron spectra of protostars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tielens, A. G. G. M.; Allamandola, L. J.; Bregman, J.; Goebel, J.; Witteborn, F. C.; Dhendecourt, L. B.

    1984-01-01

    High signal-to-noise ratio spectra in the range of 5-8 microns of four sources embedded in molecular clouds are examined using low-temperature laboratory measurements of the 5-8-micron spectra of simple molecules and their mixtures. The absorption, apparent in all four sources, is characterized by highly distinct features ranging from two relatively narrow bands at 6.0 and 6.8 microns in W33A to a broad, shallow, and partially structured feature extending from 5.2 to 7.8 microns in Mon R2-IRS2, BN, and NGC2264. The first feature (W33A) is explained by the OH bending mode in H2O and the CH deformation modes in saturated hydrocarbons; while the second feature (Mon R2-IRS2-type) is explained by the presence of a mixture of saturated and unsaturated hydrocarbons possibly containing strongly electronegative groups.

  2. NASA Astrophysics Technology Needs

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stahl, H. Philip

    2012-01-01

    July 2010, NASA Office of Chief Technologist (OCT) initiated an activity to create and maintain a NASA integrated roadmap for 15 key technology areas which recommend an overall technology investment strategy and prioritize NASA?s technology programs to meet NASA?s strategic goals. Science Instruments, Observatories and Sensor Systems(SIOSS) roadmap addresses technology needs to achieve NASA?s highest priority objectives -- not only for the Science Mission Directorate (SMD), but for all of NASA.

  3. A 5.8S nuclear ribosomal RNA gene sequence database: applications to ecology and evolution

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cullings, K. W.; Vogler, D. R.

    1998-01-01

    We complied a 5.8S nuclear ribosomal gene sequence database for animals, plants, and fungi using both newly generated and GenBank sequences. We demonstrate the utility of this database as an internal check to determine whether the target organism and not a contaminant has been sequenced, as a diagnostic tool for ecologists and evolutionary biologists to determine the placement of asexual fungi within larger taxonomic groups, and as a tool to help identify fungi that form ectomycorrhizae.

  4. Unique SMAD1/5/8 activity at the phalanx-forming region determines digit identity

    PubMed Central

    Suzuki, Takayuki; Hasso, Sean M.; Fallon, John F.

    2008-01-01

    The zone of polarizing activity is the primary signaling center controlling anterior–posterior patterning of the amniote limb bud. The autopodial interdigits (IDs) are secondary signaling centers proposed to determine digit identity by acting on the cells of the digital ray. Here, we focus on events accompanying digital fate determination and define a region of the digital ray that expresses Sox9 and Bmpr1b and is phosphorylated-SMAD1/5/8 (p-SMAD1/5/8) positive. We name this region the phalanx-forming region (PFR), and show that the PFR cells arise from the distal subridge mesenchyme of digital ray. This phalanx-forming cell lineage is subsequently committed to the cartilage lineage; the fate of these cells is initially labile but becomes fixed as they are incorporated into the condensed cartilage of the digit primordium. Using an in vivo reporter assay, we establish that each digital PFR has a unique p-SMAD1/5/8 activity signature. In addition, we show that changes in this activity correlate with the identity of the digit that forms after experimental manipulation, supporting the idea that threshold signaling levels can lead to different developmental outcomes in a morphogenetic field. Our data define the molecular profile of the PFR, and we propose a model for understanding formation and variation of digits during autopodial development. PMID:18334652

  5. NASA Exhibits

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Deardorff, Glenn; Djomehri, M. Jahed; Freeman, Ken; Gambrel, Dave; Green, Bryan; Henze, Chris; Hinke, Thomas; Hood, Robert; Kiris, Cetin; Moran, Patrick; Biegel, Bryan (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    A series of NASA presentations for the Supercomputing 2001 conference are summarized. The topics include: (1) Mars Surveyor Landing Sites "Collaboratory"; (2) Parallel and Distributed CFD for Unsteady Flows with Moving Overset Grids; (3) IP Multicast for Seamless Support of Remote Science; (4) Consolidated Supercomputing Management Office; (5) Growler: A Component-Based Framework for Distributed/Collaborative Scientific Visualization and Computational Steering; (6) Data Mining on the Information Power Grid (IPG); (7) Debugging on the IPG; (8) Debakey Heart Assist Device: (9) Unsteady Turbopump for Reusable Launch Vehicle; (10) Exploratory Computing Environments Component Framework; (11) OVERSET Computational Fluid Dynamics Tools; (12) Control and Observation in Distributed Environments; (13) Multi-Level Parallelism Scaling on NASA's Origin 1024 CPU System; (14) Computing, Information, & Communications Technology; (15) NAS Grid Benchmarks; (16) IPG: A Large-Scale Distributed Computing and Data Management System; and (17) ILab: Parameter Study Creation and Submission on the IPG.

  6. NASA Now: Climate Change: Sea Level Rise

    NASA Video Gallery

    Dr. Josh Willis discusses the connection between oceans and global climate change. Learn why NASA measures greenhouse gases and how we detect ocean levels from space. These are crucial vital signs ...

  7. The Science behind a NASA Poster.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ashby, Susanne

    2002-01-01

    Uses National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) posters and the information behind them as instructional materials to connect real world science to the classroom. Provides a list of resources. (YDS)

  8. Real NASA Inspiration in a Virtual Space

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Petersen, Ruth; Starr, Bob; Anderson, Susan

    2003-01-01

    NASA exemplifies the spirit of exploration of new horizons - from flight in earth's skies to missions in space. As we know from our experience as teachers, one of the best ways to motivate students' interest in mathematics, science, technology, and engineering is to allow them to explore the universe through NASA's rich history of air and space exploration and current missions. But how? It's not really practical for large numbers of students to talk to NASA astronauts, researchers, scientists, and engineers in person. NASA offers tools that make it possible for hundreds of students to visit with NASA through videoconferencing. These visits provide a real-world connection to scientists and their research and support the NASA mission statement: To inspire the next generation of explorers ... as only NASA can.

  9. NASA Bioreactor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1998-01-01

    Biotechnology Specimen Temperature Controller (BSTC) will cultivate cells until their turn in the bioreactor; it can also be used in culturing experiments that do not require the bioreactor. The BSTC comprises four incubation/refrigeration chambers individually set at 4 to 50 deg. C (near-freezing to above body temperature). Each chamber holds three rugged tissue chamber modules (12 total), clear Teflon bags holding 30 ml of growth media, all positioned by a metal frame. Every 7 to 21 days (depending on growth rates), an astronaut uses a shrouded syringe and the bags' needleless injection ports to transfer a few cells to a fresh media bag, and to introduce a fixative so that the cells may be studied after flight. The design also lets the crew sample the media to measure glucose, gas, and pH levels, and to inspect cells with a microscope. The controller is monitored by the flight crew through a 23-cm (9-inch) color computer display on the face of the BSTC. This view shows the BTSC with the front panel open. The work is sponsored by NASA's Office of Biological and Physical Research. The bioreactor is managed by the Biotechnology Cell Science Program at NASA's Johnson Space Center (JSC). NASA-sponsored bioreactor research has been instrumental in helping scientists to better understand normal and cancerous tissue development. In cooperation with the medical community, the bioreactor design is being used to prepare better models of human colon, prostate, breast and ovarian tumors. Cartilage, bone marrow, heart muscle, skeletal muscle, pancreatic islet cells, liver and kidney are just a few of the normal tissues being cultured in rotating bioreactors by investigators.

  10. NASA Bioreactor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1998-01-01

    Bioreactor Demonstration System (BDS) comprises an electronics module, a gas supply module, and the incubator module housing the rotating wall vessel and its support systems. Nutrient media are pumped through an oxygenator and the culture vessel. The shell rotates at 0.5 rpm while the irner filter typically rotates at 11.5 rpm to produce a gentle flow that ensures removal of waste products as fresh media are infused. Periodically, some spent media are pumped into a waste bag and replaced by fresh media. When the waste bag is filled, an astronaut drains the waste bag and refills the supply bag through ports on the face of the incubator. Pinch valves and a perfusion pump ensure that no media are exposed to moving parts. An Experiment Control Computer controls the Bioreactor, records conditions, and alerts the crew when problems occur. The crew operates the system through a laptop computer displaying graphics designed for easy crew training and operation. The work is sponsored by NASA's Office of Biological and Physical Research. The bioreactor is managed by the Biotechnology Cell Science Program at NASA's Johnson Space Center (JSC). NASA-sponsored bioreactor research has been instrumental in helping scientists to better understand normal and cancerous tissue development. In cooperation with the medical community, the bioreactor design is being used to prepare better models of human colon, prostate, breast and ovarian tumors. Cartilage, bone marrow, heart muscle, skeletal muscle, pancreatic islet cells, liver and kidney are just a few of the normal tissues being cultured in rotating bioreactors by investigators. See No. 0101824 for a version with labels, and No. 0103180 for an operational schematic.

  11. NASA Bioreactor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1998-01-01

    Bioreactor Demonstration System (BDS) comprises an electronics module, a gas supply module, and the incubator module housing the rotating wall vessel and its support systems. Nutrient media are pumped through an oxygenator and the culture vessel. The shell rotates at 0.5 rpm while the irner filter typically rotates at 11.5 rpm to produce a gentle flow that ensures removal of waste products as fresh media are infused. Periodically, some spent media are pumped into a waste bag and replaced by fresh media. When the waste bag is filled, an astronaut drains the waste bag and refills the supply bag through ports on the face of the incubator. Pinch valves and a perfusion pump ensure that no media are exposed to moving parts. An Experiment Control Computer controls the Bioreactor, records conditions, and alerts the crew when problems occur. The crew operates the system through a laptop computer displaying graphics designed for easy crew training and operation. The work is sponsored by NASA's Office of Biological and Physical Research. The bioreactor is managed by the Biotechnology Cell Science Program at NASA's Johnson Space Center (JSC). NASA-sponsored bioreactor research has been instrumental in helping scientists to better understand normal and cancerous tissue development. In cooperation with the medical community, the bioreactor design is being used to prepare better models of human colon, prostate, breast and ovarian tumors. Cartilage, bone marrow, heart muscle, skeletal muscle, pancreatic islet cells, liver and kidney are just a few of the normal tissues being cultured in rotating bioreactors by investigators. See No. 0101816 for a version without labels, and No. 0103180 for an operational schematic.

  12. NASA Bioreactor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1998-01-01

    Bioreactor Demonstration System (BDS) comprises an electronics module, a gas supply module, and the incubator module housing the rotating wall vessel and its support systems. Nutrient media are pumped through an oxygenator and the culture vessel. The shell rotates at 0.5 rpm while the irner filter typically rotates at 11.5 rpm to produce a gentle flow that ensures removal of waste products as fresh media are infused. Periodically, some spent media are pumped into a waste bag and replaced by fresh media. When the waste bag is filled, an astronaut drains the waste bag and refills the supply bag through ports on the face of the incubator. Pinch valves and a perfusion pump ensure that no media are exposed to moving parts. An Experiment Control Computer controls the Bioreactor, records conditions, and alerts the crew when problems occur. The crew operates the system through a laptop computer displaying graphics designed for easy crew training and operation. The work is sponsored by NASA's Office of Biological and Physical Research. The bioreactor is managed by the Biotechnology Cell Science Program at NASA's Johnson Space Center (JSC). NASA-sponsored bioreactor research has been instrumental in helping scientists to better understand normal and cancerous tissue development. In cooperation with the medical community, the bioreactor design is being used to prepare better models of human colon, prostate, breast and ovarian tumors. Cartilage, bone marrow, heart muscle, skeletal muscle, pancreatic islet cells, liver and kidney are just a few of the normal tissues being cultured in rotating bioreactors by investigators. See No. 0101823 for a version without labels, and No. 0103180 for an operational schematic.

  13. NASA Bioreactor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1998-01-01

    Bioreactor Demonstration System (BDS) comprises an electronics module, a gas supply module, and the incubator module housing the rotating wall vessel and its support systems. Nutrient media are pumped through an oxygenator and the culture vessel. The shell rotates at 0.5 rpm while the irner filter typically rotates at 11.5 rpm to produce a gentle flow that ensures removal of waste products as fresh media are infused. Periodically, some spent media are pumped into a waste bag and replaced by fresh media. When the waste bag is filled, an astronaut drains the waste bag and refills the supply bag through ports on the face of the incubator. Pinch valves and a perfusion pump ensure that no media are exposed to moving parts. An Experiment Control Computer controls the Bioreactor, records conditions, and alerts the crew when problems occur. The crew operates the system through a laptop computer displaying graphics designed for easy crew training and operation. The work is sponsored by NASA's Office of Biological and Physical Research. The bioreactor is managed by the Biotechnology Cell Science Program at NASA's Johnson Space Center (JSC). NASA-sponsored bioreactor research has been instrumental in helping scientists to better understand normal and cancerous tissue development. In cooperation with the medical community, the bioreactor design is being used to prepare better models of human colon, prostate, breast and ovarian tumors. Cartilage, bone marrow, heart muscle, skeletal muscle, pancreatic islet cells, liver and kidney are just a few of the normal tissues being cultured in rotating bioreactors by investigators. See No. 0101825 for a version with major elements labeled, and No. 0103180 for an operational schematic. 0101816

  14. NASA Bioreactor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1998-01-01

    Biotechnology Specimen Temperature Controller (BSTC) will cultivate cells until their turn in the bioreactor; it can also be used in culturing experiments that do not require the bioreactor. The BSTC comprises four incubation/refrigeration chambers individually set at 4 to 50 degreesC (near-freezing to above body temperature). Each chamber holds three rugged tissue chamber modules (12 total), clear Teflon bags holding 30 ml of growth media, all positioned by a metal frame. Every 7 to 21 days (depending on growth rates), an astronaut uses a shrouded syringe and the bags' needleless injection ports to transfer a few cells to a fresh media bag, and to introduce a fixative so that the cells may be studied after flight. The design also lets the crew sample the media to measure glucose, gas, and pH levels, and to inspect cells with a microscope. The controller is monitored by the flight crew through a 23-cm (9-inch) color computer display on the face of the BSTC. This view shows the BTSC with the front panel open. The work is sponsored by NASA's Office of Biological and Physical Research. The bioreactor is managed by the Biotechnology Cell Science Program at NASA's Johnson Space Center (JSC). NASA-sponsored bioreactor research has been instrumental in helping scientists to better understand normal and cancerous tissue development. In cooperation with the medical community, the bioreactor design is being used to prepare better models of human colon, prostate, breast and ovarian tumors. Cartilage, bone marrow, heart muscle, skeletal muscle, pancreatic islet cells, liver and kidney are just a few of the normal tissues being cultured in rotating bioreactors by investigators.

  15. Measurement of sputtered efflux from 5-, 8-, and 30-cm diameter mercury ion thrusters

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Weigand, A. J.; Mirtich, M. J.

    1975-01-01

    A study was undertaken to investigate the sputtered efflux from 5-, 8-, and 30-cm diameter mercury ion thrusters. Quartz crystal microbalances and fused silica samples were used to analyze the sputtered flux. Spectral transmittance measurements and spectrographic analysis of the samples were made after they were exposed to different thruster effluence by operating the thrusters at various conditions and durations of time. These measurements were used to locate the source of the efflux and determine its accumulated effect at various locations near the thruster. Comparisons of in situ and ex situ transmittance measurements of samples exposed to thruster efflux are also presented.

  16. BMP4 Enhances Foam Cell Formation by BMPR-2/Smad1/5/8 Signaling

    PubMed Central

    Feng, Jun; Gao, Jiangfei; Li, Yuxin; Yang, Yanhua; Dang, Lili; Ye, Yuanpeng; Deng, Jingyuan; Li, Antai

    2014-01-01

    Atherosclerosis and its complications are characterized by lipid-laden foam cell formation. Recently, an obvious up-regulation of BMP4 was observed in atherosclerotic plaque, however, its function and the underlying mechanism remains unknown. In our study, BMP4 pretreatment induced macrophage foam cell formation. Furthermore, a dramatic increase in the ratio of cholesteryl ester (CE) to total cholesterol (TC) was observed in BMP4-treated macrophages, accompanied by the reduction of cholesterol outflow. Importantly, BMP4 stimulation inhibited the expression levels of the two most important cellular cholesterol transporters ABCA1 and ABCG1, indicating that BMP4 may induce formation of foam cells by attenuating transporters expression. Further mechanism analysis showed that BMPR-2, one of the BMP4 receptors, was significantly increased in BMP4 treated macrophage foam cells. That blocking its expression using specific siRNA significantly increased ABCA1 and ABCG1 levels. Additionally, BMP4 treatment triggered the activation of Smad1/5/8 pathway by BMPR-2 signaling. After blocking the Smad1/5/8 with its inhibitor, ABCA1 and ABCG1 expression levels were up-regulated significantly, suggesting that BMP4 inhibited the expression of ABCA1 and ABCG1 through the BMPR-2/Smad1/2/8 signaling pathway. Therefore, our results will provide a new insight about how BMP4 accelerate the progressio of atherosclerosis, and it may become a potential target against atherosclerosis and its complications. PMID:24690996

  17. 5 S and 5.8 S ribosomal RNA sequences and protist phylogenetics.

    PubMed

    Walker, W F

    1985-01-01

    More than 100 5 S 5.8 S rRNA sequences from protists, including fungi, are known. Through a combination of quantitative treeing and special consideration of "signature' nucleotide combinations, the most significant phylogenetic implications of these data are emphasized. Also, limitations of the data for phylogenetic inferences are discussed and other significant data are brought to bear on the inferences obtained. 5 S sequences from red algae are seen as the most isolated among eukaryotics. A 5 S sequence lineage consisting of oomycetes, euglenoids, most protozoa, most slime molds and perhaps dinoflagellates and mesozoa is defined. Such a lineage is not evident from 5.8 S rRNA or cytochrome c sequence data. 5 S sequences from Ascomycota and Basidiomycota are consistent with the proposal that each is derived from a mycelial form with a haploid yeast phase and simple septal pores, probably most resembling present Taphrinales. 5 S sequences from Chytridiomycota and Zygomycota are not clearly distinct from each other and suggest that a major lineage radiation occurred in the early history of each. Qualitative biochemical data clearly supports a dichotomy between an Ascomycota-Basidiomycota lineage and a Zygomycota-Chytridiomycota lineage.

  18. Nutrition education needs and learning preferences of Michigan students in grades 5, 8, and 11.

    PubMed

    Murphy, A S; Youatt, J P; Hoerr, S L; Sawyer, C A; Andrews, S L

    1994-09-01

    An assessment of nutrition education needs and learning preferences of students in grades 5, 8, and 11 was conducted to target instruction toward areas of highest need and strongest interest of students using teaching methods they prefer. This research evaluated students' knowledge, attitudes, and practices related to the Dietary Guidelines for Americans, including knowledge of the new Food Guide Pyramid; attitudes about school lunches and learning about nutrition; nutrition topics of interest; and preferred methods for learning about nutrition. Although results varied across grade level, generally students need to learn about the Food Guide Pyramid; the relationship between dietary fat, weight status, and health; and food sources of fat, salt, and fiber. They want to learn about personal health--how to control weight, improve diet, and prevent disease--using instructional methods that actively involve them. Results provide information relative to students' interest, understanding, and application of the Dietary Guidelines. PMID:7996832

  19. Photoacoustic microscopy with an enhanced axial resolution of 5.8 μm

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Chi; Zhou, Yong; Li, Chiye; Wang, Lihong V.

    2014-03-01

    The axial resolution of photoacoustic microscopy (PAM) can be enhanced by reducing the speed of sound within the imaging region of interest. This principle was demonstrated on a previously-reported PAM system, which utilized a 125 MHz ultrasonic transducer for signal detection and the Wiener deconvolution for signal processing. With sound slowed by silicone oil immersion, we have achieved a finest axial resolution of 5.8 μm for PAM, as validated by phantom experiments. The axial resolution was also enhanced in vivo when mouse ears injected with silicone oil were imaged. After injection of silicone oil, the blood vessels were resolved more clearly. When tissue-compatible low-speed liquids become available, this approach may find applications in PAM as well as in other imaging modalities, such as photoacoustic computed tomography and ultrasound imaging.

  20. Initial assessment of the intensity distribution of the 2011 Mw5.8 Mineral, Virginia, earthquake

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Hough, Susan E.

    2012-01-01

    The intensity data collected by the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) "Did You Feel It?" (DYFI) Website (USGS, DYFI; http://earthquake.usgs.gov/earthquakes/dyfi/events/se/082311a/us/index.html, last accessed Sept 2011) for the Mw5.8 Mineral, Virginia, earthquake, are unprecedented in their spatial richness and geographical extent. More than 133,000 responses were received during the first week following the earthquake. Although intensity data have traditionally been regarded as imprecise and generally suspect (e.g., Hough 2000), there is a growing appreciation for the potential utility of spatially rich, systematically determined DYFI data to address key questions in earthquake ground-motions science (Atkinson and Wald, 2007; Hauksson et al., 2008).

  1. Development of a 14-vane, double-strapped, 5.8-GHz magnetron oscillator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Choi, Jin Joo; Lee, Han Seoul; Jang, Kwang Ho; Sim, Sung Hun; Choi, Heung Sik

    2016-08-01

    Experiments on a 14-vane, double-strapped magnetron oscillator were performed to demonstrate high-power, high-efficiency coherent radiation at 5.8 GHz. The double-strapped magnetron was designed by using the Buneman-Hatree resonance condition, electromagnetic simulations and non-linear three-dimensional particle-in-cell (PIC) simulations. Experiments showed an oscillation output power of 5.3 kW at 5.79 GHz, corresponding to a DC-RF conversion efficiency of 57%. The cathode voltage was 9.2 kV, the collected anode current was 1 A, and the external magnetic field is 7.5 kG. Experimental results for the RF power, oscillation frequency, and efficiency were in good agreement with the corresponding values from non-linear three-dimensional PIC simulations.

  2. NASA ICON mission communications - breaking ground in a new era for NASA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Raftery, C. L.; Immel, T. J.; Hauck, K.; Ruderman, I.; Fox, K.

    2015-12-01

    The Ionospheric Connection Explorer (ICON) mission is the first NASA explorer to develop an exclusive communications plan in lieu of the traditional Education and Public Outreach (E/PO) programs. The ICON mission team will describe the plans for its communication efforts, how they will align with the new NASA objectives, and how partnerships with NASA public relations and communications divisions will evolve as the mission approaches launch.

  3. NASA #801 and NASA 7 on ramp

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1997-01-01

    NASA N801NA and NASA 7 together on the NASA Dryden ramp. The Beechcraft Beech 200 Super KingAir aircraft N7NA, known as NASA 7, has been a support aircraft for many years, flying 'shuttle' missions to Ames Research Center. It once flew from the Jet Propulsion Laboratory and back each day but now (2001) flies between the Dryden Flight Research Center and Ames. A second Beechcraft Beech 200 Super King Air, N701NA, redesignated N801NA, transferred to Dryden on 3 Oct. 1997 and is used for research missions but substitutes for NASA 7 on shuttle missions when NASA 7 is not available.

  4. 31 CFR 5.8 - When will Treasury entities suspend or terminate debt collection on a Treasury debt?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... provisions of 31 CFR part 903 and the Treasury entity's policies and procedures. Legal counsel approval to terminate debt collection activity is required as described in Treasury Directive 34-02 (Credit Management... or terminate debt collection on a Treasury debt? 5.8 Section 5.8 Money and Finance: Treasury...

  5. 18 CFR 5.8 - Notice of commencement of proceeding and scoping document, or of approval to use traditional...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 18 Conservation of Power and Water Resources 1 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Notice of commencement... alternative procedures. 5.8 Section 5.8 Conservation of Power and Water Resources FEDERAL ENERGY REGULATORY... thereunder at 50 CFR part 402, section 305(b) of the Magnuson-Stevens Fishery Conservation and Management...

  6. 18 CFR 5.8 - Notice of commencement of proceeding and scoping document, or of approval to use traditional...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 18 Conservation of Power and Water Resources 1 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Notice of commencement... alternative procedures. 5.8 Section 5.8 Conservation of Power and Water Resources FEDERAL ENERGY REGULATORY COMMISSION, DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY REGULATIONS UNDER THE FEDERAL POWER ACT INTEGRATED LICENSE...

  7. 18 CFR 5.8 - Notice of commencement of proceeding and scoping document, or of approval to use traditional...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 18 Conservation of Power and Water Resources 1 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Notice of commencement... alternative procedures. 5.8 Section 5.8 Conservation of Power and Water Resources FEDERAL ENERGY REGULATORY COMMISSION, DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY REGULATIONS UNDER THE FEDERAL POWER ACT INTEGRATED LICENSE...

  8. NASA Mission: The Universe

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1990-01-01

    This booklet is mainly a recruitment tool for the various NASA Centers. This well illustrated booklet briefly describes NASA's mission and career opportunities on the NASA team. NASA field installations and their missions are briefly noted. NASA's four chief program offices are briefly described. They are: (1) Aeronautics, Exploration, and Space Technology; (2) Space Flight; (3) Space Operations; and (4) Space Science and Applications.

  9. The NASA Astrophysics Program

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zebulum, Ricardo S.

    2011-01-01

    NASA's scientists are enjoying unprecedented access to astronomy data from space, both from missions launched and operated only by NASA, as well as missions led by other space agencies to which NASA contributed instruments or technology. This paper describes the NASA astrophysics program for the next decade, including NASA's response to the ASTRO2010 Decadal Survey.

  10. NASA Worldwide Emergency Medical Assistance

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Martin, George A.; Tipton, David A.; Long, Irene D.

    1997-01-01

    In an effort to maintain employee health and welfare, ensure customer satisfaction, and to deliver high quality emergency medical care when necessary to employees located overseas, NASA has instituted a new contract with International SOS Assistance INC. International SOS Assistance INC. will provide civil servants and contractors engaged in official NASA business with many services upon request during a medical or personal emergency. Through the years, International SOS Assistance INC. has developed the expertise necessary to provide medical service in all remote areas of the world. One phone call connects you to the SOS network of multilingual staff trained to help resolve travel, medical, legal, and security problems. The SOS network of critical care and aeromedical specialists operates 24 hours a day, 365 days a year from SOS Alarm Centers around the world. This exhibit illustrates the details of the NASA-International SOS Assistance INC. agreement.

  11. NASA standard: Trend analysis techniques

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1990-01-01

    Descriptive and analytical techniques for NASA trend analysis applications are presented in this standard. Trend analysis is applicable in all organizational elements of NASA connected with, or supporting, developmental/operational programs. This document should be consulted for any data analysis activity requiring the identification or interpretation of trends. Trend analysis is neither a precise term nor a circumscribed methodology: it generally connotes quantitative analysis of time-series data. For NASA activities, the appropriate and applicable techniques include descriptive and graphical statistics, and the fitting or modeling of data by linear, quadratic, and exponential models. Usually, but not always, the data is time-series in nature. Concepts such as autocorrelation and techniques such as Box-Jenkins time-series analysis would only rarely apply and are not included in this document. The basic ideas needed for qualitative and quantitative assessment of trends along with relevant examples are presented.

  12. Enhancing interoperability in the GFZ ISDC ontology by embedding SKOS transformed NASA's GCMD keywords for describing and connecting entities and VIAF authority data for referencing personal and corporate names

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ritschel, B.; Neher, G.

    2011-12-01

    First scientific results in the realm of Semantic Web based on cooperative educational and research activities between the Helmholtz Centre Potsdam GFZ German Research Centre for Geosciences (GFZ) and the University of Applied Sciences Fachhochschule Potsdam (FHP), Faculty of Information Science are presented in this paper. The GFZ Potsdam runs the GFZ Information System and Data Center (ISDC) portal, which is the access point for all manner of geoscientific geodata, its corresponding metadata, scientific documentation and software tools. The majority of data and information are global satellite based or in-situ geomonitoring products such as geodetic data as well as geomagnetic and atmospheric data. The current technology behind the ISDC portal consists of hard disc archives for data products, relational databases for product related content data and data flow management information as well as conventional FTP and Web services as frontend for data retrieval and data access purposes. New user requirements concerning across domain integration and interoperability of science data and metadata as well as the availability of an applicable technology and appropriate tools in the realm of Semantic Web were the driving forces for the development of the ISDC ontology. Following NASA's GCMD standards the existing metadata have been structured and categorized in five main classes, four additional classes and diverse subclasses so far. The classes as well as associated object and data properties have been modeled using the ontology design tool Protégé. Individuals, which represent main parts of the ISDC data repository as well as use case based class constructs have been added to the model. Both, individuals and additional asserted logical constructs are currently part of the ISDC ontology and the associated OWL-file. A main part of the semantic based connections between the ISDC related classes and the class Geophenomena have been realized by the use of manually into the

  13. Working at NASA

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Harding, Adam

    2010-01-01

    This slide presentation reviews the author's educational and work background prior to working at NASA. It then presents an overview of NASA Dryden, a brief review of the author's projects while working at NASA, and some closing thoughts.

  14. Geotechnical aspects in the epicentral region of the 2011, Mw5.8 Mineral, Virginia earthquake

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Green, Russell A.; Lasley, Samuel; Carter, Mark W.; Munsey, Jeffrey W.; Maurer, Brett W.; Tuttle, Martitia P.

    2015-01-01

    A reconnaissance team documented the geotechnical and geological aspects in the epicentral region of the Mw (moment magnitude) 5.8 Mineral, Virginia (USA), earthquake of 23 August 2011. Tectonically and seismically induced ground deformations, evidence of liquefaction, rock slides, river bank slumps, ground subsidence, performance of earthen dams, damage to public infrastructure and lifelines, and other effects of the earthquake were documented. This moderate earthquake provided the rare opportunity to collect data to help assess current geoengineering practices in the region, as well as to assess seismic performance of the aging infrastructure in the region. Ground failures included two marginal liquefaction sites, a river bank slump, four minor rockfalls, and a ~4-m-wide, ~12-m-long, ~0.3-m-deep subsidence on a residential property. Damage to lifelines included subsidence of the approaches for a bridge and a water main break to a heavily corroded, 5-cm-diameter valve in Mineral, Virginia. Observed damage to dams, landfills, and public-use properties included a small, shallow slide in the temporary (“working”) clay cap of the county landfill, damage to two earthen dams (one in the epicentral region and one further away near Bedford, Virginia), and substantial structural damage to two public school buildings.

  15. Smad1/5/8 are myogenic regulators of murine and human mesoangioblasts

    PubMed Central

    Costamagna, Domiziana; Quattrocelli, Mattia; van Tienen, Florence; Umans, Lieve; de Coo, Irineus F. M.; Zwijsen, An; Huylebroeck, Danny; Sampaolesi, Maurilio

    2016-01-01

    Mesoangioblasts (MABs) are vessel-associated stem cells that express pericyte marker genes and participate in skeletal muscle regeneration. Molecular circuits that regulate the myogenic commitment of MABs are still poorly characterized. The critical role of bone morphogenetic protein (BMP) signalling during proliferation and differentiation of adult myogenic precursors, such as satellite cells, has recently been established. We evaluated whether BMP signalling impacts on the myogenic potential of embryonic and adult MABs both in vitro and in vivo. Addition of BMP inhibited MAB myogenic differentiation, whereas interference with the interactions between BMPs and receptor complexes induced differentiation. Similarly, siRNA-mediated knockdown of Smad8 in Smad1/5-null MABs or inhibition of SMAD1/5/8 phosphorylation with Dorsomorphin (DM) also improved myogenic differentiation, demonstrating a novel role of SMAD8. Moreover, using a transgenic mouse model of Smad8 deletion, we demonstrated that the absence of SMAD8 protein improved MAB myogenic differentiation. Furthermore, once injected into α-Sarcoglycan (Sgca)-null muscles, DM-treated MABs were more efficacious to restore α-sarcoglycan (αSG) protein levels and re-establish functional muscle properties. Similarly, in acute muscle damage, DM-treated MABs displayed a better myogenic potential compared with BMP-treated and untreated cells. Finally, SMADs also control the myogenic commitment of human MABs (hMABs). BMP signalling antagonists are therefore novel candidates to improve the therapeutic effects of hMABs. PMID:26450990

  16. Smad1/5/8 are myogenic regulators of murine and human mesoangioblasts.

    PubMed

    Costamagna, Domiziana; Quattrocelli, Mattia; van Tienen, Florence; Umans, Lieve; de Coo, Irineus F M; Zwijsen, An; Huylebroeck, Danny; Sampaolesi, Maurilio

    2016-02-01

    Mesoangioblasts (MABs) are vessel-associated stem cells that express pericyte marker genes and participate in skeletal muscle regeneration. Molecular circuits that regulate the myogenic commitment of MABs are still poorly characterized. The critical role of bone morphogenetic protein (BMP) signalling during proliferation and differentiation of adult myogenic precursors, such as satellite cells, has recently been established. We evaluated whether BMP signalling impacts on the myogenic potential of embryonic and adult MABs both in vitro and in vivo. Addition of BMP inhibited MAB myogenic differentiation, whereas interference with the interactions between BMPs and receptor complexes induced differentiation. Similarly, siRNA-mediated knockdown of Smad8 in Smad1/5-null MABs or inhibition of SMAD1/5/8 phosphorylation with Dorsomorphin (DM) also improved myogenic differentiation, demonstrating a novel role of SMAD8. Moreover, using a transgenic mouse model of Smad8 deletion, we demonstrated that the absence of SMAD8 protein improved MAB myogenic differentiation. Furthermore, once injected into α-Sarcoglycan (Sgca)-null muscles, DM-treated MABs were more efficacious to restore α-sarcoglycan (αSG) protein levels and re-establish functional muscle properties. Similarly, in acute muscle damage, DM-treated MABs displayed a better myogenic potential compared with BMP-treated and untreated cells. Finally, SMADs also control the myogenic commitment of human MABs (hMABs). BMP signalling antagonists are therefore novel candidates to improve the therapeutic effects of hMABs. PMID:26450990

  17. Human platelets produce 14,15-oxido-5,8,11-eicosatrienoic acid from phosphatidylinositol

    SciTech Connect

    Ballou, L.R.; Lam, B.K.; Wong, P.Y.K.; Cheung, W.Y.

    1987-05-01

    Human platelets contain a soluble enzyme or enzyme system which catalyzes the formation of a compound more polar than arachidonate from 2-arachidonyl-sn-phosphatidylinositol (PtdIns). The C-value and mass spectrum of the compound appears similar to the reported values of 14,15-oxido-5,8,11-eicosatrienoic acid (EET). 2-Arachidonyl-sn-phosphatidylcholine, 2-arachidonyl-sn-phosphatidylethanolamine and arachidonic acid were not substrates for EET production. The reaction was Ca/sup 2 +/-dependent and insensitive to aspirin, mepacrin and indomethacin. EET formation was greatly reduced under nitrogen or carbon monoxide, however, exposure to atmospheric air rapidly restored EET production to a rate comparable to that under air. Further, neither NADPH nor cyanide affected EET formation, suggesting that a cytochrome P-450 system was not involved. Intact platelets prelabeled with (/sup 14/C)arachidonic acid generated at least 0.5 nmole of EET/10/sup 9/ platelets in response to thrombin; other agonists such as collagen, epinephrine, ADP or ionophore A23187 were not effective. Collectively, these data suggest that human platelets possess an enzyme system which appears to catalyze epoxidation of the arachidonyl moiety of PtdIns and its subsequent hydrolysis to yield EET.

  18. Pyruvate Dehydrogenase Kinase 4 Promotes Vascular Calcification via SMAD1/5/8 Phosphorylation.

    PubMed

    Lee, Sun Joo; Jeong, Ji Yun; Oh, Chang Joo; Park, Sungmi; Kim, Joon-Young; Kim, Han-Jong; Doo Kim, Nam; Choi, Young-Keun; Do, Ji-Yeon; Go, Younghoon; Ha, Chae-Myeong; Ha, Chae-Myung; Choi, Je-Yong; Huh, Seung; Ho Jeoung, Nam; Lee, Ki-Up; Choi, Hueng-Sik; Wang, Yu; Park, Keun-Gyu; Harris, Robert A; Lee, In-Kyu

    2015-01-01

    Vascular calcification, a pathologic response to defective calcium and phosphate homeostasis, is strongly associated with cardiovascular mortality and morbidity. In this study, we have observed that pyruvate dehydrogenase kinase 4 (PDK4) is upregulated and pyruvate dehydrogenase complex phosphorylation is increased in calcifying vascular smooth muscle cells (VSMCs) and in calcified vessels of patients with atherosclerosis, suggesting that PDK4 plays an important role in vascular calcification. Both genetic and pharmacological inhibition of PDK4 ameliorated the calcification in phosphate-treated VSMCs and aortic rings and in vitamin D3-treated mice. PDK4 augmented the osteogenic differentiation of VSMCs by phosphorylating SMAD1/5/8 via direct interaction, which enhances BMP2 signaling. Furthermore, increased expression of PDK4 in phosphate-treated VSMCs induced mitochondrial dysfunction followed by apoptosis. Taken together, our results show that upregulation of PDK4 promotes vascular calcification by increasing osteogenic markers with no adverse effect on bone formation, demonstrating that PDK4 is a therapeutic target for vascular calcification. PMID:26560812

  19. Selling to NASA

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1990-01-01

    This handbook is designed to promote a better understanding of NASA's interests and the process of doing business with NASA. The document is divided into the following sections: (1) this is NASA; (2) the procurement process; (3) marketing your capabilities; (4) special assistance programs; (5) NASA field installations; (6) sources of additional help; (7) listing of NASA small/minority business personnel; and (8) NASA organization chart.

  20. NASA electric propulsion technology

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Berkopec, F. D.; Stone, J. R.; Aston, G.

    1985-01-01

    It is pointed out that the requirements for future electric propulsion cover an extremely large range of technical and programmatic characteristics. A NASA program is to provide options for the many potential mission applications, taking into account work on electrostatic, electromagnetic, and electrothermal propulsion systems. The present paper is concerned with developments regarding the three classes of electric propulsion. Studies concerning electrostatic propulsion are concerned with ion propulsion for primary propulsion for planetary and earth-orbit transfer vehicles, stationkeeping for geosynchronous spacecraft, and ion thruster systems. In connection with investigations related to electromagnetic propulsion, attention is given to electromagnetic launchers, the Hall current thruster, and magnetoplasmadynamic thrusters. In a discussion of electrothermal developments, space station resistojets are considered along with high performance resistojets, arcjets, and a laser thruster.

  1. NASA metrication activities

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vlannes, P. N.

    1978-01-01

    NASA's organization and policy for metrification, history from 1964, NASA participation in Federal agency activities, interaction with nongovernmental metrication organizations, and the proposed metrication assessment study are reviewed.

  2. Strategic Plans for the Future of Solar Physics: a community discussion of the NASA Sun-Earth Connection Program Roadmap and the NAS Decadal Survey of Astronomy and Astrophysics (Solar Astronomy section)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schrijver, K.; Knoelker, M.

    1999-05-01

    The NASA Sun-Earth Connections Program is currently revising its Roadmap, the long-range plan for science goals, technology development, and missions between 2000 and 2040. From the interior dynamics of the Sun, to the interactions of plasma, fields, and radiation in the photosphere and solar atmosphere, to the heating and structure of the corona, to the acceleration, structure, and evolution of the solar wind, to the interactions of the heliosphere with the interstellar medium, to the processes of solar, stellar, and solar system evolution - progress in each of these domains will help us understand how the Sun impacts our home in space. The Roadmap Committee is seeking to refine and extend the SEC's vision and identify the milestone missions for the future. During this session, an outline of the current draft Roadmap will be presented, and further community involvement will be solicited to ensure the strongest possible concensus on the revised Roadmap. The National Academy of Sciences' Space Science Board has appointed a committee to perform a Decadal Survey of Astronomy and Astrophysics, which is surveying the field of space- and ground-based astronomy and astrophysics, recommending priorities for the most important new initiatives of the decade 2000-2010. The prioritization delivered by the earlier Decadal Surveys has played an important role in guiding the funding agencies in setting their priorities for astronomy and astrophysics. Therefore it will be of crucial importance for solar physics to contribute a strong case for its own set of future projects to be incorpoprated into the survey. The solar physics of the next decade will be characterized by its increasing societal relevance in the context of the National Space Weather Program and related issues, as well as its classical importance as a ``base" for many astrophysical questions. The presentation and subsequent discussion at the Chicago meeting is intended to solicit further community input, to achieve

  3. Synthesis and biological evaluation of quinoxaline-5,8-diones that inhibit vascular smooth muscle cell proliferation.

    PubMed

    Chung, Hwa-Jin; Jung, Ok-Jai; Chae, Mi Jin; Hong, Sung-Yu; Chung, Kwang-Hoe; Lee, Sang Kook; Ryu, Chung-Kyu

    2005-07-15

    A series of 6-arylamino-2,3-bis(pyridin-2-yl)-7-chloro-quinoxaline-5,8-diones were synthesized and evaluated for their inhibitory activity on the rat aortic smooth muscle cell (RAoSMC) proliferation. The quinoxaline-5,8-diones exhibited a potent antiproliferative activity. Further mechanistic study revealed that the inhibitory effect of one representative quinoxaline-5,8-dione on SMC proliferation was mediated by modulation of the extracellular signal-regulated kinase 1/2 signaling pathway in the RAoSMCs.

  4. Identification by affinity chromatography of the eukaryotic ribosomal proteins that bind to 5.8 S ribosomal ribonucleic acid.

    PubMed

    Ulbrich, N; Lin, A; Wool, I G

    1979-09-10

    The proteins that bind to rat liver 5.8 S ribosomal ribonucleic acid were identified by affinity chromatography. The nucleic acid was oxidized with periodate and coupled by its 3'-terminus to Sepharose 4B through and adipic acid dihydrazide spacer. The ribosomal proteins that associate with the immobilized 5.8 S rRNA were identified by polyacrylamide gel electrophoresiss: they were L19, L8, and L6 from the 60 S subunit; and S13 and S9 from the small subparticle. Small amounts of L14, L17', L18, L27/L27', and L35', and of S11, S15, S23/S24, and S26 also were bound to the affinity column, but whether they associate directly and specifically with 5.8 S rRNA is not known. Escherichia coli ribosomal proteins did not bind to the rat liver 5.8 S rRNA affinity column. PMID:468846

  5. NASA Technologies for Product Identification

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schramm, Fred, Jr.

    2006-01-01

    Since 1975 bar codes on products at the retail counter have been accepted as the standard for entering product identity for price determination. Since the beginning of the 21st century, the Data Matrix symbol has become accepted as the bar code format that is marked directly on a part, assembly or product that is durable enough to identify that item for its lifetime. NASA began the studies for direct part marking Data Matrix symbols on parts during the Return to Flight activities after the Challenger Accident. Over the 20 year period that has elapsed since Challenger, a mountain of studies, analyses and focused problem solutions developed by and for NASA have brought about world changing results. NASA Technical Standard 6002 and NASA Handbook 6003 for Direct Part Marking Data Matrix Symbols on Aerospace Parts have formed the basis for most other standards on part marking internationally. NASA and its commercial partners have developed numerous products and methods that addressed the difficulties of collecting part identification in aerospace operations. These products enabled the marking of Data Matrix symbols in virtually every situation and the reading of symbols at great distances, severe angles, under paint and in the dark without a light. Even unmarkable delicate parts now have a process to apply a chemical mixture called NanocodesTM that can be converted to a Data Matrix. The accompanying intellectual property is protected by 10 patents, several of which are licensed. Direct marking Data Matrix on NASA parts virtually eliminates data entry errors and the number of parts that go through their life cycle unmarked, two major threats to sound configuration management and flight safety. NASA is said to only have people and stuff with information connecting them. Data Matrix is one of the most significant improvements since Challenger to the safety and reliability of that connection. This presentation highlights the accomplishments of NASA in its efforts to develop

  6. The NASA teleconferencing system: An evaluation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Connors, M. M.; Lindsey, G.; Miller, R. H.

    1976-01-01

    The communication requirements of the Apollo project led to the development of a teleconferencing network which linked together, in an audio-fax mode, the several NASA centers and supporting contractors of the Apollo project. The usefulness of this communication linkage for the Apollo project suggested that the system might be extended to include all NASA centers, enabling them to conduct their in-house business more efficiently than by traveling to other centers. A pilot project was run in which seventeen NASA center and subcenters, some with multiple facilities, were connected into the NASA teleconferencing network. During that year, costs were charted and, at the end of the year, an evaluation was made to determine how the system had been used and with what results. The year-end evaluation of the use of NASA teleconferencing system is summarized.

  7. Requirements for soldered electrical connections

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1992-01-01

    This publication is applicable to NASA programs involving solder connections for flight hardware, mission essential support equipment, and elements thereof. This publication sets forth hand and wave soldering requirements for reliable electrical connections. The prime consideration is the physical integrity of solder connections. Special requirements may exist which are not in conformance with the requirements of this publication. Design documentation contains the detail for these requirements, and they take precedence over conflicting portions of this publication when they are approved in writing by the procuring NASA installation.

  8. NASA Strategic Roadmap Summary Report

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wilson, Scott; Bauer, Frank; Stetson, Doug; Robey, Judee; Smith, Eric P.; Capps, Rich; Gould, Dana; Tanner, Mike; Guerra, Lisa; Johnston, Gordon

    2005-01-01

    In response to the Vision, NASA commissioned strategic and capability roadmap teams to develop the pathways for turning the Vision into a reality. The strategic roadmaps were derived from the Vision for Space Exploration and the Aldrich Commission Report dated June 2004. NASA identified 12 strategic areas for roadmapping. The Agency added a thirteenth area on nuclear systems because the topic affects the entire program portfolio. To ensure long-term public visibility and engagement, NASA established a committee for each of the 13 areas. These committees - made up of prominent members of the scientific and aerospace industry communities and senior government personnel - worked under the Federal Advisory Committee Act. A committee was formed for each of the following program areas: 1) Robotic and Human Lunar Exploration; 2) Robotic and Human Exploration of Mars; 3) Solar System Exploration; 4) Search for Earth-Like Planets; 5) Exploration Transportation System; 6) International Space Station; 7) Space Shuttle; 8) Universe Exploration; 9) Earth Science and Applications from Space; 10) Sun-Solar System Connection; 11) Aeronautical Technologies; 12) Education; 13) Nuclear Systems. This document contains roadmap summaries for 10 of these 13 program areas; The International Space Station, Space Shuttle, and Education are excluded. The completed roadmaps for the following committees: Robotic and Human Exploration of Mars; Solar System Exploration; Search for Earth-Like Planets; Universe Exploration; Earth Science and Applications from Space; Sun-Solar System Connection are collected in a separate Strategic Roadmaps volume. This document contains memebership rosters and charters for all 13 committees.

  9. NASA Systems Engineering Handbook

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shishko, Robert; Aster, Robert; Chamberlain, Robert G.; Mcduffee, Patrick; Pieniazek, Les; Rowell, Tom; Bain, Beth; Cox, Renee I.; Mooz, Harold; Polaski, Lou

    1995-01-01

    This handbook brings the fundamental concepts and techniques of systems engineering to NASA personnel in a way that recognizes the nature of NASA systems and environment. It is intended to accompany formal NASA training courses on systems engineering and project management when appropriate, and is designed to be a top-level overview. The concepts were drawn from NASA field center handbooks, NMI's/NHB's, the work of the NASA-wide Systems Engineering Working Group and the Systems Engineering Process Improvement Task team, several non-NASA textbooks and guides, and material from independent systems engineering courses taught to NASA personnel. Five core chapters cover systems engineering fundamentals, the NASA Project Cycle, management issues in systems engineering, systems analysis and modeling, and specialty engineering integration. It is not intended as a directive. Superseded by: NASA/SP-2007-6105 Rev 1 (20080008301).

  10. 2-Aroylquinoline-5,8-diones as potent anticancer agents displaying tubulin and heat shock protein 90 (HSP90) inhibition.

    PubMed

    Nepali, Kunal; Kumar, Sunil; Huang, Hsiang-Ling; Kuo, Fei-Chiao; Lee, Cheng-Hsin; Kuo, Ching-Chuan; Yeh, Teng-Kuang; Li, Yu-Hsuan; Chang, Jang-Yang; Liou, Jing-Ping; Lee, Hsueh-Yun

    2016-01-14

    This study reports the synthesis of a series of 2-aroylquinoline-5,8-diones (11-23) on the basis of scaffold hopping. The presence of a methoxy group at C6 assists the highly regioselective incorporation with various amines, and simplifies the structural identification process. Among the synthetic compounds, 6-dimethylamino-2-(3,4,5-trimethoxybenzoyl)-quinoline-5,8-dione (12) and 7-pyrrolidin-1-yl-2-(3,4,5-trimethoxybenzoyl)-quinoline-5,8-dione (23) exhibit remarkable anti-proliferative activity against the cancer cell lines tested with mean IC50 values of 0.14 and 0.27 μM, respectively. Compound 23 showed moderate inhibitory activity against tubulin polymerization with an IC50 value of 5.9 μM. In a western blot analysis, 23 caused induction of HSP70 and degradation of Akt, revealing that it possesses HSP90 inhibitory activity.

  11. Comparative physical mapping of the 18S-5.8S-26S rDNA in three sorghum species.

    PubMed

    Sang, Y; Liang, G H

    2000-10-01

    The physical locations of the 18S-5.8S-26S rDNA sequences were examined in three sorghum species by fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) using biotin-labeled heterologous 18S-5.8S-26S rDNA probe (pTa71). Each 18S-5.8S-26S rDNA locus occurred at two sites on the chromosomes in Sorghum bicolor (2n = 20) and S. versicolor (2n = 10), but at four sites on the chromosomes of S. halepense (2n = 40) and the tetraploid S. versicolor (2n = 20). Positions of the rDNA loci varied from the interstitial to terminal position among the four accessions of the three sorghum species. The rDNA data are useful for investigation of chromosome evolution and phylogeny. This study excluded S. versicolor as the possible progenitor of S. bicolor.

  12. Intramolecular [2 + 2] photocycloaddition/thermal fragmentation: formally "allowed" and "forbidden"pathways toward 5-8-5 ring systems.

    PubMed

    Bader, Scott J; Snapper, Marc L

    2005-02-01

    The thermal fragmentation of highly functionalized, linear polycyclobutanes with a cis,syn,cis-relative stereochemistry is shown to offer a rapid entry into the dicyclopenta[a,d]cyclooctenyl (5-8-5) ring system. The thermolysis of polyfused cyclobutanes with a cis,syn,cis- or a cis,anti,cis-relationship proceeds in a formally "symmetry-allowed" manner through the intermediacy of a cis,trans-cyclooctadiene. When a bridging tether used to establish the cis,syn,cis-stereochemistry in the intramolecular [2 + 2] photocyclization is present in the thermolysis step, however, the result of a formally "symmetry-forbidden" fragmentation is observed yielding cis,cis-cyclooctadiene-containing 5-8-5 products. In general, the stereochemical observations noted in these fragmentations offer new opportunities for accessing a variety of stereochemical relationships in these 5-8-5 ring systems.

  13. Design of 4x1 microstrip patch antenna array for 5.8 GHz ISM band applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Valjibhai, Gohil Jayesh; Bhatia, Deepak

    2013-01-01

    This paper describes the new design of four element antenna array using corporate feed technique. The proposed antenna array is developed on the Rogers 5880 dielectric material. The antenna array works on 5.8 GHz ISM band. The industrial, scientific and medical (ISM) radio bands are radio bands (portions of the radio spectrum) reserved internationally for the use of radio frequency (RF) energy for industrial, scientific and medical purposes other than communications. The array antennas have VSWR < 1.6 from 5.725 - 5.875 GHz. The simulated return loss characteristic of the antenna array is - 39.3 dB at 5.8 GHz. The gain of the antenna array is 12.3 dB achieved. The directivity of the broadside radiation pattern is 12.7 dBi at the 5.8 GHz operating frequency. The antenna array is simulated using High frequency structure simulation software.

  14. Process for manufacturing bis(2-methoxyethyl)-2,3,6,7-tetracyano-1,4,5,8,9,10-hexazaanthracene

    DOEpatents

    Rasmussen, Paul George; Lawton, Richard Graham

    2014-06-03

    A process to manufacture substituted tetracyano-hexaazatricyclics with the substitutions occurring at the 9 and 10 hydrogens. The process begins with 2,3-dichloro-5,6-dicyanopyrazine, which is reacted to form the desired tetracyano-hexaazatricyclic. Different process embodiments enable different reaction paths to the desired tetracyano-hexaazatricyclic. Different tetracyano-hexaazatricyclic embodiments include bis(2-methoxyethyl)-2,3,6,7-tetracyano-1,4,5,8,9,10-hexazaanthracene and bis(2-methoxyethoxyethyl)-2,3,6,7-tetracyano-1,4,5,8,9,10-hexazaanthracen- e.

  15. NASA systems engineering handbook

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shishko, Robert; Aster, Robert; Chamberlain, Robert G.; McDuffee, Patrick; Pieniazek, Les; Rowell, Tom; Bain, Beth; Cox, Renee I.; Mooz, Harold; Polaski, Lou

    1995-06-01

    This handbook brings the fundamental concepts and techniques of systems engineering to NASA personnel in a way that recognizes the nature of NASA systems and environment. It is intended to accompany formal NASA training courses on systems engineering and project management when appropriate, and is designed to be a top-level overview. The concepts were drawn from NASA field center handbooks, NMI's/NHB's, the work of the NASA-wide Systems Engineering Working Group and the Systems Engineering Process Improvement Task team, several non-NASA textbooks and guides, and material from independent systems engineering courses taught to NASA personnel. Five core chapters cover systems engineering fundamentals, the NASA Project Cycle, management issues in systems engineering, systems analysis and modeling, and specialty engineering integration. It is not intended as a directive.

  16. Chemical Engineering at NASA

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Collins, Jacob

    2008-01-01

    This viewgraph presentation is a review of the career paths for chemicals engineer at NASA (specifically NASA Johnson Space Center.) The author uses his personal experience and history as an example of the possible career options.

  17. NASA Now: Rocket Engineering

    NASA Video Gallery

    What’s the difference between fission and fusion? What are the applications & benefits of nuclear power & propulsion at NASA? How can NASA gain nuclear energy’s benefits for space exploration? ...

  18. NASA Now: Balloon Research

    NASA Video Gallery

    In this NASA Now program, Debbie Fairbrother discusses two types of high-altitude balloons that NASA is using to test scientific instruments and spacecraft. She also talks about the Ideal Gas Law a...

  19. Building 1100--NASA

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1996-01-01

    Building 1100 is the NASA administrative building. Services located in this building include two banks, a post office, barber shop, cafeteria, snack bar, travel agency, dry cleaners, the NASA Exchange retail store and medical facilities for employees.

  20. The NASA Organization

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1994-01-01

    This Handbook, effective 13 September 1994, documents the NASA organization, defines terms, and sets forth the policy and requirements for establishing, modifying, and documenting the NASA organizational structure and for assigning organizational responsibilities.

  1. NASA Geodynamics Program

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1984-01-01

    Activities and achievements for the period of May 1983 to May 1984 for the NASA geodynamics program are summarized. Abstracts of papers presented at the Conference are inlcuded. Current publications associated with the NASA Geodynamics Program are listed.

  2. NASA strategic plan

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1994-01-01

    The NASA Strategic Plan is a living document. It provides far-reaching goals and objectives to create stability for NASA's efforts. The Plan presents NASA's top-level strategy: it articulates what NASA does and for whom; it differentiates between ends and means; it states where NASA is going and what NASA intends to do to get there. This Plan is not a budget document, nor does it present priorities for current or future programs. Rather, it establishes a framework for shaping NASA's activities and developing a balanced set of priorities across the Agency. Such priorities will then be reflected in the NASA budget. The document includes vision, mission, and goals; external environment; conceptual framework; strategic enterprises (Mission to Planet Earth, aeronautics, human exploration and development of space, scientific research, space technology, and synergy); strategic functions (transportation to space, space communications, human resources, and physical resources); values and operating principles; implementing strategy; and senior management team concurrence.

  3. #NASATweetup @NASA_Langley

    NASA Video Gallery

    NASA Langley Research Center's first tweet-up involved a diverse group of more than 40 that included an astronaut's daughter, a physics student from Wisconsin, one of NASA's newest space camp crew ...

  4. NASA fills key positions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Showstack, Randy

    NASA Administrator Sean O'Keefe has named Shannon Lucid, a NASA astronaut and veteran of five Space Shuttle flights, to serve as the agency's chief scientist. Lucid replaces Kathie Olsen, whom President Bush has said he intends to nominate as associate administrator for science in the White Office of Science and Technology Policy.President Bush also has announced his intention to nominate former NASA astronaut and Assistant Deputy Administrator Major General Charles F. Bolden as NASA Deputy Administrator.

  5. NASA Propagation Studies Website

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Angkasa, Krisjani S.

    1996-01-01

    The NASA propagation studies objective is to enable the development of new commercial satellite communication systems and services by providing timely data and models about propagation of satellite radio signals through the intervening environment and to support NASA missions. In partnership with industry and academia, the program leverages unique NASA assets (currently Advanced Communications Technology Satellite) to obtain propagation data. The findings of the study are disseminated through referred journals, NASA reference publications, workshops, electronic media, and direct interface with industry.

  6. The NASA Clinic System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Scarpa, Philip J.; Williams, Richard

    2009-01-01

    NASA maintains on site occupational health clinics at all Centers and major facilities NASA maintains an on-site clinic that offers comprehensive health care to astronauts at the Johnson Space Center NASA deploys limited health care capability to space and extreme environments Focus is always on preventive health care

  7. History at NASA

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1986-01-01

    The efforts of the National Aeronautics and Space Administration to capture and record the events of the past are described, particularly the research accomplishments of NASA's agency-wide history program. A concise guide to the historical research resources available at NASA Headquarters in Washington, D.C., at NASA facilities around the country, and through the federal records systems is given.

  8. NASA's educational programs

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brown, Robert W.

    1990-01-01

    The educational programs of NASA's Educational Affairs Division are examined. The problem of declining numbers of science and engineering students is reviewed. The various NASA educational programs are described, including programs at the elementary and secondary school levels, teacher education programs, and undergraduate, graduate, and university faculty programs. The coordination of aerospace education activities and future plans for increasing NASA educational programs are considered.

  9. The Study of Success of Individuals with Exceptional Needs in Tennessee Virtual Academy in Grades 5-8

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Vernon, Nichole

    2013-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to examine the success of students in Exceptional Education in Tennessee Virtual Academy. Students participating in this study are in grades 5-8, have a diagnosis of Specific Learning Disabilities, residents of Tennessee, currently enrolled in Tennessee Virtual Academy, and received Exceptional Education services.…

  10. Into Adolescence: A Menu for Good Health. A Curriculum for Grades 5-8. Contemporary Health Series.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Laing, Susan J.

    This module, oriented toward middle school students in grades 5-8, includes nine lessons designed to help students synthesize nutritional information and use it to improve their health. In lesson 1, students look at factors that influence food choices. Lesson 2 uses creative expression activities to help students learn about the role of nutrients.…

  11. International Guidelines on Sexuality Education and Their Relevance to a Contemporary Curriculum for Children Aged 5-8 Years

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Goldman, Juliette D. G.

    2013-01-01

    This paper evaluates UNESCO's recommended sexuality educational framework for junior school students aged 5-8 years. It also compares it to an existing state-designed Health and Physical Education curriculum that includes sexual and reproductive health for the same cohort. Based on the universal values of respect and human rights,…

  12. Into Adolescence: Learning about HIV. Curriculum for Grades 5-8. Contemporary Health Series. [Teachers' Guide] Revised Edition. Student Workbook.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Post, Jory; McPherson, Carole

    Through a variety of learning strategies, this curriculum guide provides an age-appropriate Acquired Immune Deficiency Syndrome (AIDS) education for students grades 5-8. An introduction incorporates curriculum objectives, classroom environment, teacher responsibilities, time, instructional strategies, parental involvement and support, and…

  13. Competency-Based Adult Education Classroom Management Guide for Adult Basic Education Curriculum (Level II, 5-8).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Singer, Elizabeth

    This Competency-Based Adult Basic Education (CBABE) Classroom Management Guide was developed to aid the Adult Basic Education (ABE) facilitator in implementing a model CBABE Level 5-8 curriculum. First, introductory material provides background on the CBABE project at Brevard Community College (Florida) and the rationale for the development of the…

  14. Math Around the World: Grades 5-8. Teachers' Guide. Great Explorations in Math and Science (GEMS).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Braxton, Beverly; And Others

    This document is a collection of eight games from four continents. Students use mathematics that is directly relevant to them as they take part in the games. The first five games (NIM, Kalah, Tower of Hanoi, Shongo Networks, and Magic Squares) feature presentation instructions that describe multiple-session classroom activities for grades 5-8.…

  15. NASA Mission Tools Suite for Education

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schaller, E. L.; Duley, A. R.

    2014-12-01

    The NASA Mission Tools Suite for Education (MTSE) is a unique web-based educational tool that allows K-12 classrooms to connect with NASA Airborne Science Program missions around the world in real-time. Since its inception in 2012, over 7000 students in 72 schools in 18 US states, Guam and Chile, have participated in the program. Many NASA Airborne Science field campaigns (Hurricane and Severe Storm Sentinel (HS3), Airborne Tropical Tropopause Experiment (ATTREX), Operation IceBridge, and DISCOVER-AQ) have used MTSE to connect to K-12 classrooms. MTSE supports opportunities for to educators to supplement their core science curriculum by engaging students in dialog with actual mission scientists, pilots, and engineers. By using the tool, students can follow an aircraft's location during a flight, view relevant satellite, RADAR, forecast and modeling products, and ask questions in real time.

  16. Airborne Satcom Terminal Research at NASA Glenn

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hoder, Doug; Zakrajsek, Robert

    2002-01-01

    NASA Glenn has constructed an airborne Ku-band satellite terminal, which provides wideband full-duplex ground-aircraft communications. The terminal makes use of novel electronically-steered phased array antennas and provides IP connectivity to and from the ground. The satcom terminal communications equipment may be easily changed whenever a new configuration is required, enhancing the terminal's versatility.

  17. Video 1 of 8: Overview of MY NASA DATA

    NASA Video Gallery

    MY NASA DATA is Web-based lessons featuring live access data to enlist the interest of the students. By using real data, students see a connection to the real world. This section introduces the web...

  18. Modeling and Simulation of a 5.8kV SiC PiN Diode for Inductive Pulsed Plasma Thruster Applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Toftul, Alexandra; Hudgins, Jerry L.; Polzin, Kurt A.; Martin, Adam K.

    2014-01-01

    Current ringing in an Inductive Pulsed Plasma Thruster (IPPT) can lead to reduced energy efficiency, excess heating, and wear on circuit components such as capacitors and solid state devices. Clamping off the current using a fast turn-off power diode is an effective way to reduce current ringing and increase energy efficiency. A diode with a shorter reverse recovery time will allow the least amount of current to ring back through the circuit, as well as minimize switching losses. The reverse recovery response of a new 5.8 kilovolt SiC PiN diode from Cree, Inc. in the IPPT plasma drive circuit is investigated using a physicsbased Simulink model, and compared with that of a 5SDF 02D6004 5.5 kilovolt fast-switching Si diode from ABB. Parameter extraction was carried out for each diode using both datasheet specifications and experimental waveforms, in order to most accurately adapt the model to the specific device. Further experimental data will be discussed using a flat-plate IPPT developed at NASA Marshall Space Flight Center and used to verify the simulation results. A final quantitative measure of circuit efficiency will be described for both the Si and SiC diode configuration.

  19. NASA Pocket Statistics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1995-01-01

    NASA Pocket Statistics is published for the use of NASA managers and their staff. Included herein is Administrative and Organizational information, summaries of Space Flight Activity including the NASA Major Launch Record, and NASA Procurement, Financial, and Manpower data. The NASA Major Launch Record includes all launches of Scout class and larger vehicles. Vehicle and spacecraft development flights are also included in the Major Launch Record. Shuttle missions are counted as one launch and one payload, where free flying payloads are not involved. Satellites deployed from the cargo bay of the Shuttle and placed in a separate orbit or trajectory are counted as an additional payload.

  20. NASA Thesaurus Data File

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2012-01-01

    The NASA Thesaurus contains the authorized NASA subject terms used to index and retrieve materials in the NASA Aeronautics and Space Database (NA&SD) and NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS). The scope of this controlled vocabulary includes not only aerospace engineering, but all supporting areas of engineering and physics, the natural space sciences (astronomy, astrophysics, planetary science), Earth sciences, and the biological sciences. The NASA Thesaurus Data File contains all valid terms and hierarchical relationships, USE references, and related terms in machine-readable form. The Data File is available in the following formats: RDF/SKOS, RDF/OWL, ZThes-1.0, and CSV/TXT.

  1. NASA Now: Microbes @ NASA: Early Earth Ecosystems

    NASA Video Gallery

    What may look like green slime growing on a pond is what scientists call a microbial mat! Why does NASA care about slime? Microbial mats are living examples of the most ancient biological communiti...

  2. Addition polymers from 1,4,5,8-tetrahydro-1,4;5,8-diepoxyanthracene and Bis-dienes. 2: Evidence for thermal dehydration occurring in the cure process

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Meador, Mary Ann B.; Olshavsky, Michael A.; Meador, Michael A.; Ahn, Myong-Ku

    1988-01-01

    Diels-Alder cycloaddition copolymers from 1,4,5,8-tetrahydro-1,4;5,8-diepoxyanthracene and anthracene end-capped polyimide oligomers appear, by thermogravimetric analysis (TGA), to undergo dehydration at elevated temperatures. This would produce thermally stable pentiptycene units along the polymer backbone, and render the polymers incapable of unzipping through a retro-Diels-Alder pathway. High resolution solid 13C nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) of one formulation of the polymer system before and after heating at elevated temperatures, shows this to indeed be the case. NMR spectra of solid samples of the polymer before and after heating correlated well with those of the parent pentiptycene model compound before and after acid-catalyzed dehydration. Isothermal gravimetric analyses and viscosities of the polymer before and after heat treatment support dehydration as a mechanism for the cure reaction.

  3. NASA's Education Program

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1993-01-01

    NASA's current education programs, which will be examined under its Strategic Plan for Education are presented. It is NASA's first goal to maintain this base - revising, expanding, or eliminating programs as necessary. Through NASA's second goal, new education reform initiatives will be added which specifically address NASA mission requirements, national educational reform, and Federal Coordinating Council for Science, Engineering, and Technology (FCCSET) priorities. The chapters in this publication are divided by educational levels, with additional sections on programs to improve the technological competence of students and on an array of NASA published materials to supplement programs. The resource section lists NASA's national and regional Teacher Resource Centers and introduces the reader to NASA's Central Operation of Resources for Educators (CORE), which distributes materials in audiovisual format.

  4. Technology's Role in NASA's Future

    NASA Video Gallery

    NASA Chief Technologist Bobby Braun talks to NASA managers about the vital role technology research and development will play in NASA's future. Braun discusses how NASA will use new technologies to...

  5. NASA Science Engagement Through "Sky Art"

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bethea, K. L.; Damadeo, K.

    2013-12-01

    Sky Art is a NASA-funded online community where the public can share in the beauty of nature and the science behind it. At the center of Sky Art is a gallery of amateur sky photos submitted by users that are related to NASA Earth science mission research areas. Through their submissions, amateur photographers from around the world are engaged in the process of making observations, or taking pictures, of the sky just like many NASA science instruments. By submitting their pictures and engaging in the online community discussions and interactions with NASA scientists, users make the connection between the beauty of nature and atmospheric science. Sky Art is a gateway for interaction and information aimed at drawing excitement and interest in atmospheric phenomena including sunrises, sunsets, moonrises, moonsets, and aerosols, each of which correlates to a NASA science mission. Educating the public on atmospheric science topics in an informal way is a central goal of Sky Art. NASA science is included in the community through interaction from scientists, NASA images, and blog posts on science concepts derived from the images. Additionally, the website connects educators through the formal education pathway where science concepts are taught through activities and lessons that align with national learning standards. Sky Art was conceived as part of the Education and Public Outreach program of the SAGE III on ISS mission. There are currently three other NASA mission involved with Sky Art: CALIPSO, GPM, and CLARREO. This paper will discuss the process of developing the Sky Art online website, the challenges of growing a community of users, as well as the use of social media and mobile applications in science outreach and education.

  6. Real World Connections Through Videoconferences

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Peterson, Ruth; Lytle, John (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    The Learning Technologies Project (LTP) is a partner in the National Aeronautics and Space Administration's (NASA's) educational technology program unit, an electronic community center that fosters interaction, collaboration, and sharing among educators, learners, and scientists. The goal of the NASA Glenn Research Center's Learning Technologies Project is to increase students' interest and proficiency in mathematics, science, and technology through the use of computing and communications technology and by using NASA's mission in aerospace technology as a theme. The primary components are: (1) Beginner's Guide to Aeronautics, including interactive simulation packages and teacher-created online activities. (2) NASA Virtual Visits, videoconferences (with online pre-post-conference activities) connecting students and teachers to NASA scientists and researchers.

  7. NASA ALLSTAR Project

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Levy, Cesar; Ebadian, M. A.

    1998-01-01

    We finished the material development of Level 1, Level 2 and most of Level 3. We created three new galleries, one of streaming videos enabling the user to select his/her appropriate speed of Internet connectivity for better performance. The second gallery on NASA's X-series aircraft and the third is on F-series aircraft, We also completed the placement and activation of all thirteen kiosks. We added one more kiosk over the number suggested in the proposal at Baker Aviation High School - a Dade County Public School for special aviation programs. We felt that the goals of this school matched ALLSTAR's goals and that the placement of the kiosk would better help the local students become interested in the Aviation and Aeronautics field. We continue to work on the development of our "Teacher Resource Guide to ALLSTAR material" in which we tied our material into the national and Florida State standards. We finished the Florida Sunshine State standards, getting positive feedback from local and other educators who use the material on a regular basis. We had another successful workshop on October 29th, 1997. We introduced the ALLSTAR website and kiosk to about twenty science and history teachers from Dade County Public Schools (DCPS). Most teachers were from middle schools, although we had some from elementary schools also. We provided several demonstrations of the ALLSTAR material to local schools in the Dade County Public Schools (DCPS) system. We used the ALLSTAR material with FIU's summer immersion program for FLAME students. This program includes a high number of minority students interested in science and engineering. We also presented the material at National Science Teachers Association (NSTA) and National Congress on Aviation and Space Education (NCASE) conferences and will be presenting the material at the Southeast Florida Aviation Consortium (SEFAC). We provided two on-site workshops in the NSTA conference with total attended of about 70 teachers. The BBS was

  8. NASA standard: Trend analysis techniques

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1988-01-01

    This Standard presents descriptive and analytical techniques for NASA trend analysis applications. Trend analysis is applicable in all organizational elements of NASA connected with, or supporting, developmental/operational programs. Use of this Standard is not mandatory; however, it should be consulted for any data analysis activity requiring the identification or interpretation of trends. Trend Analysis is neither a precise term nor a circumscribed methodology, but rather connotes, generally, quantitative analysis of time-series data. For NASA activities, the appropriate and applicable techniques include descriptive and graphical statistics, and the fitting or modeling of data by linear, quadratic, and exponential models. Usually, but not always, the data is time-series in nature. Concepts such as autocorrelation and techniques such as Box-Jenkins time-series analysis would only rarely apply and are not included in this Standard. The document presents the basic ideas needed for qualitative and quantitative assessment of trends, together with relevant examples. A list of references provides additional sources of information.

  9. Gallic acid inhibits vascular calcification through the blockade of BMP2-Smad1/5/8 signaling pathway.

    PubMed

    Kee, Hae Jin; Cho, Soo-Na; Kim, Gwi Ran; Choi, Sin Young; Ryu, Yuhee; Kim, In Kyeom; Hong, Young Joon; Park, Hyung Wook; Ahn, Youngkeun; Cho, Jeong Gwan; Park, Jong Chun; Jeong, Myung Ho

    2014-11-01

    Vascular calcification is associated with increased risk of morbidity and mortality in patients with cardiovascular diseases, chronic kidney diseases, and diabetes. Gallic acid, a natural compound found in gallnut and green tea, is known to be antifungal, antioxidant, and anticancer. Here we investigated the effect of gallic acid on vascular smooth muscle cell (VSMC) calcification and the underlying mechanism. Gallic acid inhibited inorganic phosphate-induced osteoblast differentiation markers as well as calcification phenotypes (as determined by calcium deposition, Alizarin Red, and Von Kossa staining). Knockdown of BMP2 or Noggin blocked phosphate-induced calcification. Gallic acid suppressed phosphorylation of Smad1/5/8 protein induced by inorganic phosphate. Taken together, we suggest that gallic acid acts as a novel therapeutic agent of vascular calcification by mediating BMP2-Smad1/5/8 signaling pathway.

  10. An ameliorative protocol for the quantification of purine 5',8-cyclo-2'-deoxynucleosides in oxidized DNA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Terzidis, Michael; Chatgilialoglu, Chryssostomos

    2015-07-01

    5',8-Cyclo-2'-deoxyadenosine (cdA) and 5',8-cyclo-2'-deoxyguanosine (cdG) are lesions resulting from hydroxyl radical (HO•) attack on the 5'H of the nucleoside sugar moiety and exist in both 5'R and 5'S diastereomeric forms. Increased levels of cdA and cdG are linked to Nucleotide Excision Repair mechanism deficiency and mutagenesis. Discrepancies in the damage measurements reported over recent years indicated the weakness of the actual protocols, in particular for ensuring the quantitative release of these lesions from the DNA sample and the appropriate method for their analysis. Herein we report the detailed revision leading to a cost-effective and efficient protocol for the DNA damage measurement, consisting of the nuclease benzonase and nuclease P1 enzymatic combination for DNA digestion followed by liquid chromatography isotope dilution tandem mass spectrometry analysis.

  11. Internal NASA Study: NASAs Protoflight Research Initiative

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Coan, Mary R.; Hirshorn, Steven R.; Moreland, Robert

    2015-01-01

    The NASA Protoflight Research Initiative is an internal NASA study conducted within the Office of the Chief Engineer to better understand the use of Protoflight within NASA. Extensive literature reviews and interviews with key NASA members with experience in both robotic and human spaceflight missions has resulted in three main conclusions and two observations. The first conclusion is that NASA's Protoflight method is not considered to be "prescriptive." The current policies and guidance allows each Program/Project to tailor the Protoflight approach to better meet their needs, goals and objectives. Second, Risk Management plays a key role in implementation of the Protoflight approach. Any deviations from full qualification will be based on the level of acceptable risk with guidance found in NPR 8705.4. Finally, over the past decade (2004 - 2014) only 6% of NASA's Protoflight missions and 6% of NASA's Full qualification missions experienced a publicly disclosed mission failure. In other words, the data indicates that the Protoflight approach, in and of it itself, does not increase the mission risk of in-flight failure. The first observation is that it would be beneficial to document the decision making process on the implementation and use of Protoflight. The second observation is that If a Project/Program chooses to use the Protoflight approach with relevant heritage, it is extremely important that the Program/Project Manager ensures that the current project's requirements falls within the heritage design, component, instrument and/or subsystem's requirements for both the planned and operational use, and that the documentation of the relevant heritage is comprehensive, sufficient and the decision well documented. To further benefit/inform this study, a recommendation to perform a deep dive into 30 missions with accessible data on their testing/verification methodology and decision process to research the differences between Protoflight and Full Qualification

  12. Selective excavation of human carious dentin using the nanosecond pulsed laser in 5.8-μm wavelength range

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kita, Tetsuya; Ishii, Katsunori; Yoshikawa, Kazushi; Yasuo, Kenzo; Yamamoto, Kazuyo; Awazu, Kunio

    Less-invasive treatment of caries has been needed in laser dentistry. Based on the absorption property of dentin substrates, 6 μm wavelength range shows specific absorptions and promising characteristics for the excavation. In our previous study, 5.8 μm wavelength range was found to be effective for selective excavation of carious dentin and restoration treatment using composite resin from the irradiation experiment with bovine sound and demineralized dentin. In this study, the availability of 5.8 μm wavelength range for selective excavation of human carious dentin was investigated for clinical application. A mid-infrared tunable nanosecond pulsed laser by difference-frequency generation was used for revealing the ablation property of human carious dentin. Irradiation experiments indicated that the wavelength of 5.85 μm and the average power density of 30 W/cm2 realized the selective excavation of human carious dentin, but ablation property was different with respect to each sample because of the different caries progression. In conclusion, 5.8 μm wavelength range was found to be effective for selective excavation of human carious dentin.

  13. Science@NASA: Direct to People!

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Koczor, Ronald J.; Adams, Mitzi; Gallagher, Dennis; Whitaker, Ann (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    Science@NASA is a science communication effort sponsored by NASA's Marshall Space Flight Center. It is the result of a four year research project between Marshall, the University of Florida College of Journalism and Communications and the internet communications company, Bishop Web Works. The goals of Science@NASA are to inform, inspire, and involve people in the excitement of NASA science by bringing that science directly to them. We stress not only the reporting of the facts of a particular topic, but also the context and importance of the research. Science@NASA involves several levels of activity from academic communications research to production of content for 6 websites, in an integrated process involving all phases of production. A Science Communications Roundtable Process is in place that includes scientists, managers, writers, editors, and Web technical experts. The close connection between the scientists and the writers/editors assures a high level of scientific accuracy in the finished products. The websites each have unique characters and are aimed at different audience segments: 1. http://science.nasa.gov. (SNG) Carries stories featuring various aspects of NASA science activity. The site carries 2 or 3 new stories each week in written and audio formats for science-attentive adults. 2. http://liftoff.msfc.nasa.gov. Features stories from SNG that are recast for a high school level audience. J-Track and J-Pass applets for tracking satellites are our most popular product. 3. http://kids. msfc.nasa.gov. This is the Nursemaids site and is aimed at a middle school audience. The NASAKids Club is a new feature at the site. 4. http://www.thursdaysclassroom.com . This site features lesson plans and classroom activities for educators centered around one of the science stories carried on SNG. 5. http://www.spaceweather.com. This site gives the status of solar activity and its interactions with the Earth's ionosphere and magnetosphere.

  14. NASA Video Catalog

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2006-01-01

    This issue of the NASA Video Catalog cites video productions listed in the NASA STI database. The videos listed have been developed by the NASA centers, covering Shuttle mission press conferences; fly-bys of planets; aircraft design, testing and performance; environmental pollution; lunar and planetary exploration; and many other categories related to manned and unmanned space exploration. Each entry in the publication consists of a standard bibliographic citation accompanied by an abstract. The Table of Contents shows how the entries are arranged by divisions and categories according to the NASA Scope and Subject Category Guide. For users with specific information, a Title Index is available. A Subject Term Index, based on the NASA Thesaurus, is also included. Guidelines for usage of NASA audio/visual material, ordering information, and order forms are also available.

  15. NASA Hazard Analysis Process

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Deckert, George

    2010-01-01

    This viewgraph presentation reviews The NASA Hazard Analysis process. The contents include: 1) Significant Incidents and Close Calls in Human Spaceflight; 2) Subsystem Safety Engineering Through the Project Life Cycle; 3) The Risk Informed Design Process; 4) Types of NASA Hazard Analysis; 5) Preliminary Hazard Analysis (PHA); 6) Hazard Analysis Process; 7) Identify Hazardous Conditions; 8) Consider All Interfaces; 9) Work a Preliminary Hazard List; 10) NASA Generic Hazards List; and 11) Final Thoughts

  16. NASA commercial programs

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1988-01-01

    An expanded role for the U.S. private sector in America's space future has emerged as a key national objective, and NASA's Office of Commercial Programs is providing a focus for action. The Office supports new high technology commercial space ventures, the commercial application of existing aeronautics and space technology, and expanded commercial access to available NASA capabilities and services. The progress NASA has made in carrying out its new assignment is highlighted.

  17. NASA Exploration Design Challenge

    NASA Video Gallery

    From the International Space Station, astronaut Sunita Williams welcomes participants to the NASA Exploration Design Challenge and explains the uncertainties about the effects of space radiation on...

  18. Selling to NASA

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1986-01-01

    Prospective contractors are acquainted with the organizational structure of NASA, and the major technical program offices and selected staff offices at the Headquarters level are briefly described. The basic procedures for Federal procurement are covered. A primer is presented on how to market to NASA. While the information is specific to NASA, many of the principles are applicable to other agencies as well. Some of the major programs are introduced which are available to small and disadvantaged businesses. The major research programs and fields of interest at individual NASA centers are summarized.

  19. NASA Pocket Statistics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1994-01-01

    Pocket Statistics is published for the use of NASA managers and their staff. Included herein is Administrative and Organizational information, summaries of Space Flight Activity including the NASA Major Launch Record, and NASA Procurement, Financial, and Manpower data. The NASA Major Launch Record includes all launches of Scout class and larger vehicles. Vehicle and spacecraft development flights are also included in the Major Launch Record. Shuttle missions are counted as one launch and one payload, where free flying payloads are not involved. Satellites deployed from the cargo bay of the Shuttle and placed in a separate orbit or trajectory are counted as an additional payload.

  20. NASA agenda for tomorrow

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1988-01-01

    Key elements of national policy, NASA goals and objectives, and other materials that comprise the framework for NASA planning are included. The contents are expressed as they existed through much of 1988; thus they describe the strategic context employed by NASA in planning both the FY 1989 program just underway and the proposed FY 1990 program. NASA planning will continue to evolve in response to national policy requirements, a changing environment, and new opportunities. Agenda for Tomorrow provides a status report as of the time of its publication.

  1. NASA International Environmental Partnerships

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lewis, Pattie; Valek, Susan

    2010-01-01

    For nearly five decades, the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) has been preeminent in space exploration. NASA has landed Americans on the moon, robotic rovers on Mars, and led cooperative scientific endeavors among nations aboard the International Space Station. But as Earth's population increases, the environment is subject to increasing challenges and requires more efficient use of resources. International partnerships give NASA the opportunity to share its scientific and engineering expertise. They also enable NASA to stay aware of continually changing international environmental regulations and global markets for materials that NASA uses to accomplish its mission. Through international partnerships, NASA and this nation have taken the opportunity to look globally for solutions to challenges we face here on Earth. Working with other nations provides NASA with collaborative opportunities with the global science/engineering community to explore ways in which to protect our natural resources, conserve energy, reduce the use of hazardous materials in space and earthly applications, and reduce greenhouse gases that potentially affect all of Earth's inhabitants. NASA is working with an ever-expanding list of international partners including the European Union, the European Space Agency and, especially, the nation of Portugal. Our common goal is to foster a sustainable future in which partners continue to explore the universe while protecting our home planet's resources for future generations. This brochure highlights past, current, and future initiatives in several important areas of international collaboration that can bring environmental, economic, and other benefits to NASA and the wider international space community.

  2. NASA's Flight Opportunities Program

    NASA Video Gallery

    NASA's Flight Opportunities Program is facilitating low-cost access to suborbital space, where researchers can test technologies using commercially developed vehicles. Suborbital flights can quickl...

  3. The NASA master directory: Quick reference guide

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Satin, Karen (Editor); Kanga, Carol (Editor)

    1989-01-01

    This is a quick reference guide to the NASA Master Directory (MD), which is a free, online, multidisciplinary directory of space and Earth science data sets (NASA and non-NASA data) that are of potential interest to the NASA-sponsored research community. The MD contains high-level descriptions of data sets, other data systems and archives, and campaigns and projects. It provides mechanisms for searching for data sets by important criteria such as geophysical parameters, time, and spatial coverage, and provides information on ordering the data. It also provides automatic connections to a number of data systems such as the NASA Climate Data System, the Planetary Data System, the NASA Ocean Data System, the Pilot Land Data System, and others. The MD includes general information about many data systems, data centers, and coordinated data analysis projects, It represents the first major step in the Catalog Interoperability project, whose objective is to enable researchers to quickly and efficiently identify, obtain information about, and get access to space and Earth science data. The guide describes how to access, use, and exit the MD and lists its features.

  4. RRP5 is required for formation of both 18S and 5.8S rRNA in yeast.

    PubMed Central

    Venema, J; Tollervey, D

    1996-01-01

    Three of the four eukaryotic ribosomal RNA molecules (18S, 5.8S and 25-28S) are synthesized as a single precursor which is subsequently processed into the mature rRNAs by a complex series of cleavage and modification reactions. In the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae, the early pre-rRNA cleavages at sites A0, A1 and A2, required for the synthesis of 18S rRNA, are inhibited in strains lacking RNA or protein components of the U3, U14, snR10 and snR30 small nucleolar ribonucleoproteins (snoRNPs). The subsequent cleavage at site A3, required for formation of the major, short form of 5.8S rRNA, is carried out by another ribonucleoprotein, RNase MRP. A screen for mutations showing synthetic lethality with deletion of the non-essential snoRNA, snR10, identified a novel gene, RRP5, which is essential for viability and encodes a 193 kDa nucleolar protein. Genetic depletion of Rrp5p inhibits the synthesis of 18S rRNA and, unexpectedly, also of the major short form of 5.8S rRNA. Pre-rRNA processing is concomitantly impaired at sites A0, A1, A2 and A3. This distinctive phenotype makes Rrp5p the first cellular component simultaneously required for the snoRNP-dependent cleavage at sites A0, A1 and A2 and the RNase MRP-dependent cleavage at A3 and provides evidence for a close interconnection between these processing events. Putative RRP5 homologues from Caenorhabditis elegans and humans were also identified, suggesting that the critical function of Rrp5p is evolutionarily conserved. Images PMID:8896463

  5. NASA and General Aviation. NASA SP-485.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ethell, Jeffrey L.

    A detailed examination of the nature and function of general aviation and a discussion of how the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) helps keep it on the cutting edge of technology are offered in this publication. The intricacies of aerodynamics, energy, and safety as well as the achievements in aeronautical experimentation are…

  6. Oxidation behavior of Mn and Mo alloyed Fe-16Ni-(5-8)Cr-3. 2Si-1. 0Al

    SciTech Connect

    Rawers, J.C.; Oh, J.M.; Dunning, J. )

    1990-02-01

    Oxidation tests were conducted on a master alloy, Fe-16Ni-(5-8)Cr-3Si-1Al, to which (0-4) wt/o pct Mn and/or Mo were added. Tests were conducted at temperatures ranging from 1,073-1,273 K for times up to 1,000 hr. Additions of Mn resulted in formation of a dual oxide structure and decreased oxidation protection. Addition of Mo significantly improved oxidation protection by formation of an intermetallic Fe(Mo)Si precipitate that eventually formed a protective SiO{sub 2} oxide sublayer. The oxidation protection was related to the alloy components and concentration.

  7. ANNUS MIRABILIS. PHYSICS OF OUR DAYS: Geometry and Physics after 100 Years of Einstein's Relativity (5-8 April 2005)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Braginsky, Vladimir B.

    2005-06-01

    As part of the celebration of the World Year of Physics, the Conference "Geometry and Physics after 100 Years of Einstein's Relativity" was held in Golm, near Potsdam, Germany, on April 5-8, 2005. The Conference was organized by the Max Planck Institute for Gravitational Physics (also known as the Albert Einstein Institute), which is celebrating its 10th anniversary in 2005. Conference participants discussed progress made in theoretical and experimental research during the 100 years since the publication of Einstein's famous papers in 1905, the year which has gone down in history as 'Albert Einstein's ANNUS MIRABILIS'.

  8. NASA Engineering Network (NEN)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Topousis, Daria; Trevarthen, Ellie; Yew, Manson

    2008-01-01

    This slide presentation reviews the NASA Engineering Network (NEN). NEN is designed to search documents over multiple repositories, submit and browse NASA Lessons Learned, collaborate and share ideas with other engineers via communities of practice, access resources from one portal, and find subject matter experts via the People, Organizations, Projects, Skills (POPS) locator.

  9. NASA Now: Propulsion

    NASA Video Gallery

    In this episode of NASA Now, you’ll visit NASA’s Spacecraft Propulsion Research Facility, called B-2, at NASA Plum Brook Station. You’ll meet Dr. Louis Povinelli and Brian Jones who explain w...

  10. NASA: what now?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2011-04-01

    This month marks 50 years since Yuri Gagarin first ventured into space in the Vostok 1 mission, and 30 years since NASA's first shuttle flight. As the shuttle Endeavour prepares for its final flight, seven experts outline what NASA's priorities need to be.

  11. NASA Information Summaries.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mar, May 1987, 1988

    1988-01-01

    This document consists of 11 "NASA Information Summaries" grouped together: (1) "Our Planets at a Glance" (PMS-010); (2) "Space Shuttle Mission Summary: 1985-1986" (PMS-005); (3) "Astronaut Selection and Training" (PMS-019); (4) "Space Station" (PMS-008); (5) "Materials Processing in Space" (PMS-026); (6) "Countdown!: NASA Launch Vehicles and…

  12. NASA educational publications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1987-01-01

    This is a catalog of educational and technical publications, sponsored by NASA, that are available to the general public from the Government Printing Office (GPO). The following types of publications are announced: periodicals, educational publications, NASA Facts, posters and wallsheets, other publications of interest to educators, scientific and technical publications, and educational materials from Regional Service Centers.

  13. NASA Facts, Voyager.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration, Washington, DC. Educational Programs Div.

    This document is one of a series of publications of the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) on facts about the exploration of Jupiter and Saturn. This NASA mission consists of two unmanned Voyager spacecrafts launched in August and September of 1977, and due to arrive at Jupiter in 1979. An account of the scientific equipment…

  14. NASA publications manual 1974

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1974-01-01

    The various types of NASA publications are described, including formal series, contributions to external publications, informal papers, and supplementary report material. The physical appearance and reproduction procedures for the format of the NASA formal series are discussed, and samples are provided. Matters relating to organization, content, and general style are also considered.

  15. Selling to NASA

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1981-01-01

    The prospective NASA contractor is provided with information that describes the agency and its procurement practices. Products include ideas, manufacturing capabilities, fabricated components, construction, basic materials, and specialized services. NASA assistance in marketing these and other products is emphasized. Small and minority business enterprises are discussed. The agency's scientific and technical information activities are also discussed.

  16. This is NASA

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1971-01-01

    The organization, operations, functions, and objectives of NASA are outlined. Data include manned space flights, satellite weather observations, orbiting radio relays, and new views of the earth and beyond the earth as observed by satellites. Details of NASA's work in international programs, educational training programs, and adopting space technology to earth uses are also given.

  17. NASA Dryden Status

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jacobson, Steve R.

    2009-01-01

    This slide presentation reviews several projects that NASA Dryden personnel are involved with: Integrated Resilient Aircraft Controls Project (IRAC), NASA G-III Research Aircraft, X-48B Blended Wing Body aircraft, Stratospheric Observatory for Infrared Astronomy (SOFIA), and the Orion CEV Launch Abort Systems Tests.

  18. NASA Technology Plan 1998

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1998-01-01

    This NASA Strategic Plan describes an ambitious, exciting vision for the Agency across all its Strategic Enterprises that addresses a series of fundamental questions of science and research. This vision is so challenging that it literally depends on the success of an aggressive, cutting-edge advanced technology development program. The objective of this plan is to describe the NASA-wide technology program in a manner that provides not only the content of ongoing and planned activities, but also the rationale and justification for these activities in the context of NASA's future needs. The scope of this plan is Agencywide, and it includes technology investments to support all major space and aeronautics program areas, but particular emphasis is placed on longer term strategic technology efforts that will have broad impact across the spectrum of NASA activities and perhaps beyond. Our goal is to broaden the understanding of NASA technology programs and to encourage greater participation from outside the Agency. By relating technology goals to anticipated mission needs, we hope to stimulate additional innovative approaches to technology challenges and promote more cooperative programs with partners outside NASA who share common goals. We also believe that this will increase the transfer of NASA-sponsored technology into nonaerospace applications, resulting in an even greater return on the investment in NASA.

  19. NASA's Getaway Special.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Randal, Judith

    1978-01-01

    The "Getaway Special" is NASA's semiofficial program for low-budget researchers, who can arrange bookings for their own space experiments on regular flights of the space shuttle. Information about arranging for NASA to take individual experiment packages is presented. (LBH)

  20. Zygotic LvBMP5-8 is required for skeletal patterning and for left-right but not dorsal-ventral specification in the sea urchin embryo.

    PubMed

    Piacentino, Michael L; Chung, Oliver; Ramachandran, Janani; Zuch, Daniel T; Yu, Jia; Conaway, Evan A; Reyna, Arlene E; Bradham, Cynthia A

    2016-04-01

    Skeletal patterning in the sea urchin embryo requires coordinated signaling between the pattern-dictating ectoderm and the skeletogenic primary mesenchyme cells (PMCs); recent studies have begun to uncover the molecular basis for this process. Using an unbiased RNA-Seq-based screen, we have previously identified the TGF-ß superfamily ligand, LvBMP5-8, as a skeletal patterning gene in Lytechinus variegatus embryos. This result is surprising, since both BMP5-8 and BMP2/4 ligands have been implicated in sea urchin dorsal-ventral (DV) and left-right (LR) axis specification. Here, we demonstrate that zygotic LvBMP5-8 is required for normal skeletal patterning on the left side, as well as for normal PMC positioning during gastrulation. Zygotic LvBMP5-8 is required for expression of the left-side marker soxE, suggesting that LvBMP5-8 is required for left-side specification. Interestingly, we also find that LvBMP5-8 knockdown suppresses serotonergic neurogenesis on the left side. While LvBMP5-8 overexpression is sufficient to dorsalize embryos, we find that zygotic LvBMP5-8 is not required for normal DV specification or development. In addition, ectopic LvBMP5-8 does not dorsalize LvBMP2/4 morphant embryos, indicating that, in the absence of BMP2/4, BMP5-8 is insufficient to specify dorsal. Taken together, our data demonstrate that zygotic LvBMP5-8 signaling is essential for left-side specification, and for normal left-side skeletal and neural patterning, but not for DV specification. Thus, while both BMP2/4 and BMP5-8 regulate LR axis specification, BMP2/4 but not zygotic BMP5-8 regulates DV axis specification in sea urchin embryos. PMID:26905309

  1. Zygotic LvBMP5-8 is required for skeletal patterning and for left-right but not dorsal-ventral specification in the sea urchin embryo.

    PubMed

    Piacentino, Michael L; Chung, Oliver; Ramachandran, Janani; Zuch, Daniel T; Yu, Jia; Conaway, Evan A; Reyna, Arlene E; Bradham, Cynthia A

    2016-04-01

    Skeletal patterning in the sea urchin embryo requires coordinated signaling between the pattern-dictating ectoderm and the skeletogenic primary mesenchyme cells (PMCs); recent studies have begun to uncover the molecular basis for this process. Using an unbiased RNA-Seq-based screen, we have previously identified the TGF-ß superfamily ligand, LvBMP5-8, as a skeletal patterning gene in Lytechinus variegatus embryos. This result is surprising, since both BMP5-8 and BMP2/4 ligands have been implicated in sea urchin dorsal-ventral (DV) and left-right (LR) axis specification. Here, we demonstrate that zygotic LvBMP5-8 is required for normal skeletal patterning on the left side, as well as for normal PMC positioning during gastrulation. Zygotic LvBMP5-8 is required for expression of the left-side marker soxE, suggesting that LvBMP5-8 is required for left-side specification. Interestingly, we also find that LvBMP5-8 knockdown suppresses serotonergic neurogenesis on the left side. While LvBMP5-8 overexpression is sufficient to dorsalize embryos, we find that zygotic LvBMP5-8 is not required for normal DV specification or development. In addition, ectopic LvBMP5-8 does not dorsalize LvBMP2/4 morphant embryos, indicating that, in the absence of BMP2/4, BMP5-8 is insufficient to specify dorsal. Taken together, our data demonstrate that zygotic LvBMP5-8 signaling is essential for left-side specification, and for normal left-side skeletal and neural patterning, but not for DV specification. Thus, while both BMP2/4 and BMP5-8 regulate LR axis specification, BMP2/4 but not zygotic BMP5-8 regulates DV axis specification in sea urchin embryos.

  2. The NASA astrobiology program.

    PubMed

    Morrison, D

    2001-01-01

    The new discipline of astrobiology addresses fundamental questions about life in the universe: "Where did we come from?" "Are we alone in the universe?" "What is our future beyond the Earth?" Developing capabilities in biotechnology, informatics, and space exploration provide new tools to address these old questions. The U.S. National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) has encouraged this new discipline by organizing workshops and technical meetings, establishing a NASA Astrobiology Institute, providing research funds to individual investigators, ensuring that astrobiology goals are incorporated in NASA flight missions, and initiating a program of public outreach and education. Much of the initial effort by NASA and the research community was focused on determining the technical content of astrobiology. This paper discusses the initial answer to the question "What is astrobiology?" as described in the NASA Astrobiology Roadmap.

  3. Attrition of NASA scientists

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    During the past 3 1/2 years the number of physical scientists employed by the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) has dropped by more than 15%. The number of mathematics personnel also dropped by about 13%. NASA says these figures represent a trend to increase the agency's emphasis on its primary activity—aerospace engineering—that began with the completion of the Apollo missions.For the same period the number of NASA personnel falling into the categories of aero-space engineering and electronic engineering increased slightly—by 1.2% and 3.1%, respectively. The decrease in both total NASA personnel and total scientific work force was about the same; NASA's scientific work force declined about 2.8%, compared with a total agency work force decrease of 2.9% .

  4. NASA Applied Sciences Program

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Estes, Sue M.; Haynes, J. A.

    2009-01-01

    NASA's strategic Goals: a) Develop a balanced overall program of science, exploration, and aeronautics consistent with the redirection of human spaceflight program to focus on exploration. b) Study Earth from space to advance scientific understanding and meet societal needs. NASA's partnership efforts in global modeling and data assimilation over the next decade will shorten the distance from observations to answers for important, leading-edge science questions. NASA's Applied Sciences program will continue the Agency's efforts in benchmarking the assimilation of NASA research results into policy and management decision-support tools that are vital for the Nation's environment, economy, safety, and security. NASA also is working with NOAH and inter-agency forums to transition mature research capabilities to operational systems, primarily the polar and geostationary operational environmental satellites, and to utilize fully those assets for research purposes.

  5. The NASA astrobiology program

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Morrison, D.

    2001-01-01

    The new discipline of astrobiology addresses fundamental questions about life in the universe: "Where did we come from?" "Are we alone in the universe?" "What is our future beyond the Earth?" Developing capabilities in biotechnology, informatics, and space exploration provide new tools to address these old questions. The U.S. National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) has encouraged this new discipline by organizing workshops and technical meetings, establishing a NASA Astrobiology Institute, providing research funds to individual investigators, ensuring that astrobiology goals are incorporated in NASA flight missions, and initiating a program of public outreach and education. Much of the initial effort by NASA and the research community was focused on determining the technical content of astrobiology. This paper discusses the initial answer to the question "What is astrobiology?" as described in the NASA Astrobiology Roadmap.

  6. Connected Traveler

    SciTech Connect

    Schroeder, Alex

    2015-11-01

    The Connected Traveler project is a multi-disciplinary undertaking that seeks to validate potential for transformative transportation system energy savings by incentivizing efficient traveler behavior. This poster outlines various aspects of the Connected Traveler project, including market opportunity, understanding traveler behavior and decision-making, automation and connectivity, and a projected timeline for Connected Traveler's key milestones.

  7. NASA's Coordinated Efforts to Enhance STEM Education: Bringing NASA Science into the Library

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meinke, B. K.; Thomas, C.; Eyermann, S.; Mitchell, S.; LaConte, K.; Hauck, K.

    2015-11-01

    Libraries are community-centered, free-access venues serving learners of all ages and backgrounds. Libraries also recognize the importance of science literacy and strive to include science in their programming portfolio. Scientists and educators can partner with local libraries to advance mutual goals of connecting the public to Earth and Space Science. In this interactive Special Interest Group (SIG) discussion, representatives from the NASA Science Mission Directorate (SMD) Education and Public Outreach (EPO) community's library collaborations discussed the opportunities for partnership with public and school libraries; explored the resources, events, and programs available through libraries; explored NASA science programming and professional development opportunities available for librarians; and strategized about the types of support that librarians require to plan and implement programs that use NASA data and resources. We also shared successes, lessons learned, and future opportunities for incorporating NASA science programming into library settings.

  8. NASA Social: Behind the Scenes at NASA Dryden

    NASA Video Gallery

    More than 50 followers of NASA's social media websites went behind the scenes at NASA's Dryden Flight Research Center during a "NASA Social" on May 4, 2012. The visitors were briefed on what Dryden...

  9. Broadband carbon monoxide laser system operating in the wavelength range of 2.5 - 8.3 {mu}m

    SciTech Connect

    Andreev, Yu M; Ionin, Andrei A; Kinyaevsky, I O; Klimachev, Yu M; Kozlov, A Yu; Kotkov, A A; Lanskii, G V; Shaiduko, A V

    2013-02-28

    A two-cascade frequency conversion of CO-laser radiation is demonstrated in a single sample of a nonlinear ZnGeP{sub 2} crystal. The crystal is pumped by a repetitively pulsed cryogenic lowpressure CO laser operating on {approx}150 vibration - rotational transitions in the wavelength range 5.0 - 7.5 {mu}m, which corresponds to the frequency range of a half octave. In the first conversion cascade, generation of second harmonic and sum frequencies of various pairs of CO-laser radiation give {approx}350 emission lines in the wavelength range 2.5 - 3.7 {mu}m. In the second cascade, by mixing the radiation converted in the first cascade with the residual radiation of the CO laser we have obtained {approx}90 lines in the range 4.3 - 5.0 {mu}m and more than 80 lines in the range 7.5 - 8.3 {mu}m. Thus, using a single sample of the nonlinear ZnGeP{sub 2} crystal pumped by the radiation of a single CO laser we have produced a source of broadband (more than one and a half octaves) laser radiation, simultaneously operating at {approx}670 lines in the wavelength range 2.5 - 8.3 {mu}m. (lasers)

  10. Art and the Cosmic Connection

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cobb, Whitney H.; Aiello, Monica Petty; Macdonald, Reeves; Asplund, Shari

    2014-01-01

    The interdisciplinary unit described in this article utilizes "Art and the Cosmic Connection," a free program conceived of by artists Monica and Tyler Aiello and developed by the artists, scientists, and educators through NASA's Discovery and New Frontiers Programs, to inspire learners to explore mysterious worlds in our solar…

  11. NASA's Software Safety Standard

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ramsay, Christopher M.

    2005-01-01

    NASA (National Aeronautics and Space Administration) relies more and more on software to control, monitor, and verify its safety critical systems, facilities and operations. Since the 1960's there has hardly been a spacecraft (manned or unmanned) launched that did not have a computer on board that provided vital command and control services. Despite this growing dependence on software control and monitoring, there has been no consistent application of software safety practices and methodology to NASA's projects with safety critical software. Led by the NASA Headquarters Office of Safety and Mission Assurance, the NASA Software Safety Standard (STD-18l9.13B) has recently undergone a significant update in an attempt to provide that consistency. This paper will discuss the key features of the new NASA Software Safety Standard. It will start with a brief history of the use and development of software in safety critical applications at NASA. It will then give a brief overview of the NASA Software Working Group and the approach it took to revise the software engineering process across the Agency.

  12. NASA guidelines on report literature

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1978-01-01

    NASA seeks for inclusion in its Scientific and Technical Information System research reports, conference proceedings, meeting papers, monographs, and doctoral and post graduate theses which relate to the NASA mission and objectives. Topics of interest to NASA are presented.

  13. NASA Technical Standards Program Overview

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gill, Paul

    2005-01-01

    Contents include the following: Establish and maintain "NASA Preferred Technical Standard" as a common baseline for NASA programs. Support the use of technical standards on NASA program in the systems requirement process.

  14. NASA replanning efforts continue

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Katzoff, Judith A.

    A task force of the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) is producing new launch schedules for NASA's three remaining space shuttle orbiters, possibly supplemented by expendable launch vehicles. In the wake of the explosion of the space shuttle Challenger on January 28, 1986, the task force is assuming a delay of 12-18 months before resumption of shuttle flights.NASA's Headquarters Replanning Task Force, which meets daily, is separate from the agency's Data and Design Analysis Task Force, which collects and analyzes information about the accident for the use of the investigative commission appointed by President Ronald Reagan.

  15. NASA guest investigators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    The National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) is now seeking guest investigators to participate in the International Sun-Earth Explorer (ISEE) and International Cometary Explorer (ICE) programs. The ISEE/ICE project is a joint NASA/European Space Agency (ESA) venture. A budget of approximately $500,000 to support the ISEE/ICE Guest Investigator Program is expected for fiscal year 1985, and a similar amount is expected for FY 1986.Although NASA welcomes proposals at any time, proposals must be received by mid-October in order to be considered in the initial selection. Those arriving after mid-November may be held for another selection period.

  16. NASA Pocket Statistics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1996-01-01

    This booklet of pocket statistics includes the 1996 NASA Major Launch Record, NASA Procurement, Financial, and Workforce data. The NASA Major Launch Record includes all launches of Scout class and larger vehicles. Vehicle and spacecraft development flights are also included in the Major Luanch Record. Shuttle missions are counted as one launch and one payload, where free flying payloads are not involved. Satellites deployed from the cargo bay of the Shuttle and placed in a separate orbit or trajectory are counted as an additional payload.

  17. NASA strategic plan

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1995-01-01

    NASA's Plan summarizes the Agency's vision, mission, and values. Specific goals are listed for each externally focused Enterprise: Mission to Planet Earth, Aeronautics, Human Exploration and Development of Space, Space Science, and Space Technology. These Enterprises satisfy the needs of customers external to NASA. The Strategic Functions (Space Communications, Human Resources, and Physical Resources) are necessary in order to meet the goals of the Enterprises. The goals of these Functions are also presented. All goals must be met while adhering to the discussed values and operating principles of NASA. A final section outlines the implementing strategy.

  18. NASA's supercomputing experience

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bailey, F. Ron

    1990-01-01

    A brief overview of NASA's recent experience in supercomputing is presented from two perspectives: early systems development and advanced supercomputing applications. NASA's role in supercomputing systems development is illustrated by discussion of activities carried out by the Numerical Aerodynamical Simulation Program. Current capabilities in advanced technology applications are illustrated with examples in turbulence physics, aerodynamics, aerothermodynamics, chemistry, and structural mechanics. Capabilities in science applications are illustrated by examples in astrophysics and atmospheric modeling. Future directions and NASA's new High Performance Computing Program are briefly discussed.

  19. NASA educational briefs

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vogt, G. L.

    1982-01-01

    In response to a large public demand for information, the Educational Services Branch of NASA has undertaken a series of publications designed for use by teachers, titled 'Educational Briefs for the Classroom', which has resulted in six to eight issues each year for the last three years. Typical of the topics to which the series is dedicated have been space suits, manned spaceflight mission summaries, solar cells, planetary encounter data, orbits, and rocketry. The planning committee for Educational Briefs is aided in its selection of topics by the many letters received by NASA. Following the Voyager Saturn flybys, NASA received more than 175,000 letters from both children and adults.

  20. The NASA Exobiology Programme

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    DesMarais, David J.; Chang, Sherwood (Technical Monitor)

    1996-01-01

    NASA will indeed conduct a more active search for life beyond Earth. Research on the Martian meteorites will be augmented by $2 million to be contributed equally by NASA and NSF (National Science Foundation). The science strategy for the NASA Mars Surveyor Program now places a much higher priority on the search for life, particularly fossil evidence. This program features two launches per opportunity (every two years, starting this November). The focus on Exobiology emphasizes high resolution multispectral orbital mapping to locate key aqueous sedimentary minerals, the exploration of ancient terrains by capable rovers, and the need for multiple sample return missions. Additional information is contained within the original extended abstract.

  1. NASA Airborne Science Program: NASA Stratospheric Platforms

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Curry, Robert E.

    2010-01-01

    The National Aeronautics and Space Administration conducts a wide variety of remote sensing projects using several unique aircraft platforms. These vehicles have been selected and modified to provide capabilities that are particularly important for geophysical research, in particular, routine access to very high altitudes, long range, long endurance, precise trajectory control, and the payload capacity to operate multiple, diverse instruments concurrently. While the NASA program has been in operation for over 30 years, new aircraft and technological advances that will expand the capabilities for airborne observation are continually being assessed and implemented. This presentation will review the current state of NASA's science platforms, recent improvements and new missions concepts as well as provide a survey of emerging technologies unmanned aerial vehicles for long duration observations (Global Hawk and Predator). Applications of information technology that allow more efficient use of flight time and the ability to rapidly reconfigure systems for different mission objectives are addressed.

  2. NASA airframe structural integrity program

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Harris, Charles E.

    1990-01-01

    NASA initiated a research program with the long-term objective of supporting the aerospace industry in addressing issues related to the aging of the commercial transport fleet. The program combines advanced fatigue crack growth prediction methodology with innovative nondestructive examination technology with the focus on multi-stage damage (MSD) at rivited connections. A fracture mechanics evaluation of the concept of pressure proof testing the fuselage to screen for MSD was completed. A successful laboratory demonstration of the ability of the thermal flux method to detect disbonds at rivited lap splice joints was conducted. All long-term program elements were initiated, and the plans for the methodology verification program are being coordinated with the airframe manufacturers.

  3. NASA airframe structural integrity program

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Harris, Charles E.

    1991-01-01

    NASA has initiated a research program with the long-term objective of supporting the aerospace industry in addressing issues related to the aging commercial transport fleet. The interdisciplinary program combines advanced fatigue crack growth prediction methodology with innovative nondestructive examination technology with the focus on multi-site damage (MSD) at riveted connections. A fracture mechanics evaluation of the concept of pressure proof testing the fuselage to screen for MSD has been completed. Also, a successful laboratory demonstration of the ability of the thermal flux method to detect disbonds at riveted lap splice joints has been conducted. All long-term program elements have been initiated and the plans for the methodology verification program are being coordinated with the airframe manufacturers.

  4. 1,3,5,8-tetrahydroxyxanthone regulates ANGPTL3-LPL pathway to lessen the ketosis in mice.

    PubMed

    Xiao, Hong-Bo; Sun, Zhi-Liang; Zhou, Nan

    2012-05-12

    Ketosis is a metabolic disorder closely associated with both lipid and carbohydrate metabolism. Recent studies show that angiopoietin-like protein 3 (ANGPTL3) contributes to the development of metabolic disorder. The objective of this study was to explore the inhibitory effect of 1,3,5,8-tetrahydroxyxanthone (Xan), a naturally occurring flavonoid compound, on ketosis and the mechanisms involved in this regulation. After 4weeks, Xan (10 or 30mg/kg, intragastrically) treatment decreased plasma total ketone bodies, malondialdehyde, 8-isoprostane, triglyceride, total cholesterol levels, and hepatic ANGPTL3 expression concomitantly with increased plasma glucose concentration and adipose lipoprotein lipase (LPL) expression in ketosis murine. The present results suggest that Xan regulates ANGPTL3-LPL pathway to lessen the ketosis in mice.

  5. Loop mediated isothermal amplification of 5.8S rDNA for specific detection of Tritrichomonas foetus.

    PubMed

    Oyhenart, Jorge; Martínez, Florencia; Ramírez, Rosana; Fort, Marcelo; Breccia, Javier D

    2013-03-31

    Tritrichomonas foetus is the causative agent of bovine trichomonosis, a sexually transmitted disease leading to infertility and abortion. A test based on loop mediated isothermal amplification (LAMP) targeting the 5.8S rDNA subunit was designed for the specific identification of T. foetus. The LAMP assay was validated using 28 T. foetus and 35 non-T. foetus trichomonads strains. It did not exhibit cross-reaction with closely related parasites commonly found in smegma cultures like Tetratrichomonas spp. and Pentatrichomonas hominis. Bovine smegma did not show interferences for the detection of the parasite and, the sensitivity of the method (4×10(3) CFU/mL, approximately 10 cells/reaction) was slightly higher than that found for PCR amplification with TFR3 and TFR4 primers. The LAMP approach has potential applications for diagnosis and control of T. foetus and, practical use for low skill operators in rural areas.

  6. 5,8,11,14-Eicosatetraynoic acid-induced destruction of mitochondria in human prostate cells (PC-3).

    SciTech Connect

    Anderson, K. M.; Seed, T. M.; Wilson, D. E.; Harris, J. E.; Biological and Medical Research; Rush Medical Coll.

    1992-01-01

    Culturing human prostate PC-3 cells for 4, 24, or 72 h in the presence of 5,8,11,14-eicosatetraynoic acid (ETYA), an inhibitor of arachidonic acid metabolism and cholesterol biosynthesis, markedly altered the morphology and reduced the number of mitochondria in the treated cells. Using quantitative electron microscopic morphometry, we documented changes in the number, form, area, matrix density, and integrity of the cristae and limiting membranes of mitochondria in cells cultured with ETYA. The inhibition of cholesterol synthesis or the substitution of ETYA for polyunsaturated fatty acids in the inner membrane may participate in the disruption of the mitochondria, which resembles the morphologic sequelae of oxidative stress. If sufficiently extensive, these changes could contribute to the inhibition of cellular proliferation by ETYA.

  7. NASA Technology Applications Team

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1979-01-01

    The contributions of NASA to the advancement of the level of the technology base of the United States are highlighted. Technological transfer from preflight programs, the Viking program, the Apollo program, and the Shuttle and Skylab programs is reported.

  8. NASA 2014: Earth

    NASA Video Gallery

    For the first time in more than a decade, five NASA Earth science missions will be launched into space in the same year, opening new and improved remote eyes to monitor our changing planet. The lau...

  9. NASA Now: Glory Launch

    NASA Video Gallery

    In this episode of NASA Now, Dr. Hal Maring joins us to explain why the upcoming launch of the Glory satellite is so important to further our understanding of climate change. He also will speak on ...

  10. NASA Now: Black Holes

    NASA Video Gallery

    In this NASA Now episode, Dr. Daniel Patnaude talks about how his team discovered a baby black hole, why this is important and how black holes create tidal forces. Throughout his discussion, Patnau...

  11. NASA Now: Expedition 26

    NASA Video Gallery

    In this installment of NASA Now, meet associate International Space Station program scientist Tara Ruttley, who talks about the complexity of conducting research from this one-of-a-kind orbiting sc...

  12. NASA budget in Congress

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Richman, Barbara T.

    The House of Representatives has authorized $161.7 million more than President Ronald Reagan proposed for the fiscal 1984 National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) budget. The House NASA authorization bill (H.R. 2065) passed by voice vote on April 26. Five days earlier, the Senate Commerce, Science, and Technology Committee marked up S. 1096, the Senate's NASA authorization bill, and recommended $171.6 million more than the Reagan proposal. The Senate is expected to vote on the bill in mid May, after which time a conference committee will iron out the differences between the House and Senate versions.President Reagan requested a total NASA budget of $7.1065 billion: $5.7085 billion for research and development, $150.5 million for construction of facilities, and $1.2475 billion for research and program management (Eos, February 15, 1983, p. 65).

  13. NASA: Increasing the Awesome

    NASA Video Gallery

    Contemplating the ritual of sending Washington a check every April 15, popular Internet vlogger Hank Green of Vlogbrothers explains why he believes NASA is worth every .45 penny of your hard-earned...

  14. NASA Pocket Statistics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1983-01-01

    The following subject areas are covered: summary of the NASA program goals and objectives; major mission performance; USSR spaceflights; summary comparisons of the USA and USSR space records; and selected technical, financial, and manpower data.

  15. NASA's Arctic Voyage 2010

    NASA Video Gallery

    NASA's first oceanographic research expedition left Alaska on June 15, 2010. The ICESCAPE mission will head into the Arctic to study sea ice and the changing ocean ecosystem. Listen to the scientis...

  16. NASA geodynamics program: Bibliography

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1990-01-01

    The Seventh Geodynamics Program report summarizes program activities and achievements during 1988 and 1989. Included is a 115 page bibliography of the publications associated with the NASA Geodynamics Program since its initiation in 1979.

  17. NASA Archives: UARS

    NASA Video Gallery

    This animation, produced in 1999, shows an artist concept of NASA's Upper Atmosphere Research Satellite, launched in 1991. UARS measured chemical compounds found in the ozone layer, wind and temper...

  18. NASA Now: Extremophiles

    NASA Video Gallery

    NASA research scientists Dr. Margarita Marinova and Dr. Alfonso Davila discuss how scientists study microbes that live in Earth’s extreme environments to better understand places where life might...

  19. NASA Now: Inflatable Structures

    NASA Video Gallery

    NASA senior research engineer Judith Watson is one of a team of engineers at NASA’s Langley Research Center who are studying inflatable structures that might one day be used to establish an outpo...

  20. NASA's Hurricane Hunters

    NASA Video Gallery

    During the 2010 hurricane season, NASA deployed its piloted DC-8 and WB-57, and unmanned Global Hawk aircraft in a massive effort to collect as much data as possible, arming hurricane researchers w...

  1. NASA Now: SLOPE

    NASA Video Gallery

    Welcome to the SLOPE facility at NASA’s Glenn Research Center in Cleveland, Ohio. In this building, NASA engineers experiment with different wheel designs for lunar rovers. They use a simulated c...

  2. NASA Goes to School

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pinelli, Thomas E.

    1975-01-01

    The Educational Programs Division of NASA (National Aeronautics and Space Administration) produces a variety of educational programs and resources: professional educational conferences, teacher services, development of instructional resources, audiovisual media, and career guidance materials. (MW)

  3. NASA Hurricane Mission - GRIP

    NASA Video Gallery

    This is an overview of NASA's hurricane research campaign called Genesis and Rapid Intensification Processes (GRIP). The six-week mission was conducted in coordination with NOAA and the National Sc...

  4. NASA's Mars Landings

    NASA Video Gallery

    This video shows the landing sites of all six NASA spacecraft to reachMars—Viking 1, Viking 2, Pathfinder, Spirit, Opportunity, Phoenix—and thetarget location where Curiosity will touch down ...

  5. NASA Now: Aquarius

    NASA Video Gallery

    During this NASA Now program, Dr. David Le Vine explains how Aquarius will help us better predict our climate and how melting glaciers affect ocean salinity. The Aquarius satellite will scan the en...

  6. NASA and energy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1974-01-01

    NASA technology contributions to create energy sources include direct solar heating and cooling systems, wind generation of electricity, solar thermal energy turbine drives, solar cells, and techniques for locating, producing, and collecting organic materials for conversion into fuel.

  7. NASA Now: Mars Excavation

    NASA Video Gallery

    In this NASA Now episode, you will hear from Kurt Sacksteder, Chief of the Space Environments and Experiments Branch at NASA’s Glenn Research Center in Cleveland, Ohio. Sacksteder talks about the...

  8. NASA's commercial space program

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ott, Richard H.

    1992-01-01

    This paper will review the goals, status and progress of NASA's commercial space development program administered by the Office of Commercial Programs (OCP). The technologies and flight programs underway by NASA's Centers for Commercial Development (CCDS), NASA's field centers, and the NASA/Industry Joint Endeavor Programs will be summarized. A summary of completed and upcoming commercial payload activities on Shuttle, suborbital rockets, and orbital ELV's will be provided. The new commercial infrastructure and transportation initiatives will be discussed including the Wake Shield Facility, Consort and Joust suborbital rocket programs, the COMET orbital and recovery program, and the Commercial Middeck Accommodation Module Program with Spacehab Inc. Finally, the Commercial Space Station Freedom Program planned by OCP will be reviewed.

  9. NASA Now: Got Math?

    NASA Video Gallery

    In this NASA Now program, Jim Garvin, Ph.D, chief scientist at NASA’s Goddard Space Flight Center in Greenbelt, Md., explains how mathematics is a vital tool not only in everything happening at N...

  10. NASA Systems Engineering Handbook

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2007-01-01

    This handbook is intended to provide general guidance and information on systems engineering that will be useful to the NASA community. It provides a generic description of Systems Engineering (SE) as it should be applied throughout NASA. A goal of the handbook is to increase awareness and consistency across the Agency and advance the practice of SE. This handbook provides perspectives relevant to NASA and data particular to NASA. The coverage in this handbook is limited to general concepts and generic descriptions of processes, tools, and techniques. It provides information on systems engineering best practices and pitfalls to avoid. There are many Center-specific handbooks and directives as well as textbooks that can be consulted for in-depth tutorials. This handbook describes systems engineering as it should be applied to the development and implementation of large and small NASA programs and projects. NASA has defined different life cycles that specifically address the major project categories, or product lines, which are: Flight Systems and Ground Support (FS&GS), Research and Technology (R&T), Construction of Facilities (CoF), and Environmental Compliance and Restoration (ECR). The technical content of the handbook provides systems engineering best practices that should be incorporated into all NASA product lines. (Check the NASA On-Line Directives Information System (NODIS) electronic document library for applicable NASA directives on topics such as product lines.) For simplicity this handbook uses the FS&GS product line as an example. The specifics of FS&GS can be seen in the description of the life cycle and the details of the milestone reviews. Each product line will vary in these two areas; therefore, the reader should refer to the applicable NASA procedural requirements for the specific requirements for their life cycle and reviews. The engineering of NASA systems requires a systematic and disciplined set of processes that are applied recursively and

  11. NASA Water Resources Program

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Toll, David L.

    2011-01-01

    With increasing population pressure and water usage coupled with climate variability and change, water issues are being reported by numerous groups as the most critical environmental problems facing us in the 21st century. Competitive uses and the prevalence of river basins and aquifers that extend across boundaries engender political tensions between communities, stakeholders and countries. In addition to the numerous water availability issues, water quality related problems are seriously affecting human health and our environment. The potential crises and conflicts especially arise when water is competed among multiple uses. For example, urban areas, environmental and recreational uses, agriculture, and energy production compete for scarce resources, not only in the Western U.S. but throughout much of the U.S. and also in numerous parts of the world. Mitigating these conflicts and meeting water demands and needs requires using existing water resources more efficiently. The NASA Water Resources Program Element works to use NASA products and technology to address these critical water issues. The primary goal of the Water Resources is to facilitate application of NASA Earth science products as a routine use in integrated water resources management for the sustainable use of water. This also includes the extreme events of drought and floods and the adaptation to the impacts from climate change. NASA satellite and Earth system observations of water and related data provide a huge volume of valuable data in both near-real-time and extended back nearly 50 years about the Earth's land surface conditions such as precipitation, snow, soil moisture, water levels, land cover type, vegetation type, and health. NASA Water Resources Program works closely to use NASA and Earth science data with other U.S. government agencies, universities, and non-profit and private sector organizations both domestically and internationally. The NASA Water Resources Program organizes its

  12. NASA IKONOS Radiometric Characterization

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pagnutti, Mary; Ryan, Robert E.; Kelly, Michelle; Holekamp, Kara; Daehler, Erik; Zanoni, Vicki; Schiller, Stephen; Thome, Kurtis

    2002-01-01

    NASA acquired imagery from the IKONOS satellite as part of its Scientific Data Purchase (SDP) program, which purchases scientific data sets from commercial sources. This viewgraph presentation describes the IKONOS satellite and its sensors, and then gives an overview of characterization efforts undertaken by NASA in cooperation with other government agencies. The characterization included relative radiometric correction, absolute radiometric characterization of data from Lunar Lake Playa, Nevada, and calibration of data from Stennis Space Center, Mississippi.

  13. NASA gateway requirements analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Duncan, Denise R.; Doby, John S.; Shockley, Cynthia W.

    1991-01-01

    NASA devotes approximately 40 percent of its budget to R&D. Twelve NASA Research Centers and their contractors conduct this R&D, which ranges across many disciplines and is fueled by information about previous endeavors. Locating the right information is crucial. While NASA researchers use peer contacts as their primary source of scientific and technical information (STI), on-line bibliographic data bases - both Government-owned and commercial - are also frequently consulted. Once identified, the STI must be delivered in a usable format. This report assesses the appropriateness of developing an intelligent gateway interface for the NASA R&D community as a means of obtaining improved access to relevant STI resources outside of NASA's Remote Console (RECON) on-line bibliographic database. A study was conducted to determine (1) the information requirements of the R&D community, (2) the information sources to meet those requirements, and (3) ways of facilitating access to those information sources. Findings indicate that NASA researchers need more comprehensive STI coverage of disciplines not now represented in the RECON database. This augmented subject coverage should preferably be provided by both domestic and foreign STI sources. It was also found that NASA researchers frequently request rapid delivery of STI, in its original format. Finally, it was found that researchers need a better system for alerting them to recent developments in their areas of interest. A gateway that provides access to domestic and international information sources can also solve several shortcomings in the present STI delivery system. NASA should further test the practicality of a gateway as a mechanism for improved STI access.

  14. NASA Efforts on Nanotechnology

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Miranda, Felix A.

    2003-01-01

    An overview of the field of nanotechnology within the theme of "New efforts in Nanotechnology Research," will be presented. NASA's interest, requirements and current efforts in this emerging field will be discussed. In particular, NASA efforts to develop nanoelectronic devices, fuel cells, and other applications of interest using this novel technology by collaborating with academia will be addressed. Progress on current collaborations in this area with the University of Puerto Rico will be highlighted.

  15. NASA, NOAA administrators nominated

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Richman, Barbara T.

    President Ronald Reagan recently said he intended to nominate James Montgomery Beggs as NASA Administrator and John V. Byrne as NOAA Administrator. These two positions are key scientific posts that have been vacant since the start of the Reagan administration on January 20. The President also said he intends to nominate Hans Mark as NASA Deputy Administrator. At press time, Reagan had not designated his nominee for the director of the Office of Science and Technology Policy.

  16. NASA supported research programs

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Libby, W. F.

    1975-01-01

    A summary of the scientific NASA grants and achievements accomplished by the University of California, Los Angles, is presented. The development of planetary and space sciences as a major curriculum of the University, and statistical data on graduate programs in aerospace sciences are discussed. An interdisciplinary approach to aerospace science education is emphasized. Various research programs and scientific publications that are a direct result of NASA grants are listed.

  17. 2006 NASA Strategic Plan

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2006-01-01

    On January 14, 2004, President George W. Bush announced A Renewed Spirit of Discovery: The President's Vision for U.S. Space Exploration, a new directive for the Nation's space program. The fundamental goal of this directive is "to advance U.S. scientific, security, and economic interests through a robust space exploration program." In issuing it, the President committed the Nation to a journey of exploring the solar system and beyond: returning to the Moon in the next decade, then venturing further into the solar system, ultimately sending humans to Mars and beyond. He challenged NASA to establish new and innovative programs to enhance understanding of the planets, to ask new questions, and to answer questions that are as old as humankind. NASA enthusiastically embraced the challenge of extending a human presence throughout the solar system as the Agency's Vision, and in the NASA Authorization Act of 2005, Congress endorsed the Vision for Space Exploration and provided additional guidance for implementation. NASA is committed to achieving this Vision and to making all changes necessary to ensure success and a smooth transition. These changes will include increasing internal collaboration, leveraging personnel and facilities, developing strong, healthy NASA Centers,a nd fostering a safe environment of respect and open communication for employees at all levels. NASA also will ensure clear accountability and solid program management and reporting practices. Over the next 10 years, NASA will focus on six Strategic Goals to move forward in achieving the Vision for Space Exploration. Each of the six Strategic Goals is clearly defined and supported by multi-year outcomes that will enhance NASA's ability to measure and report Agency accomplishments in this quest.

  18. NASA tech brief evaluations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Workman, Gary L.

    1994-01-01

    A major step in transferring technology is to disseminate information about new developments to the appropriate sector(s). A useful vehicle for transferring technology from the government sector to industry has been demonstrated with the use of periodical and journal announcements to highlight technological achievements which may meet the needs of industries other than the one who developed the innovation. To meet this end, NASA has very successfully pursued the goal of identifying technical innovations through the national circulation publication; NASA Tech Briefs. At one time the Technology Utilization Offices of the various centers coordinated the selection of appropriate technologies through a common channel. In recent years, each NASA field center has undertaken the task of evaluating submittals for Tech Brief publication independently of the others. The University of Alabama in Huntsville was selected to assist MSFC in evaluating technology developed under the various programs managed by the NASA center for publication in the NASA Tech Briefs journal. The primary motivation for the NASA Tech Briefs publication is to bring to the attention of industry the various NASA technologies which, in general, have been developed for a specific aerospace requirement, but has application in other areas. Since there are a number of applications outside of NASA that can benefit from innovative concepts developed within the MSPC programs, the ability to transfer technology to other sectors is very high. In most cases, the innovator(s) are not always knowledgeable about other industries which might potentially benefit from their innovation. The evaluation process can therefore contribute to the list of potential users through a knowledgeable evaluator.

  19. NASA's Technology Utilization Program.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Farley, C. F.

    1972-01-01

    NASA's Technology Utilization Program is described, illustrating how it can be useful in achieving improved productivity, providing more jobs, solving public sector challenges, and strengthening the international competitive situation. Underlying the program is the fact that research and development conducted in NASA's aeronautics and space programs have generated much technical information concerning processes, products, or techniques which may be useful to engineers, doctors, or to others. The program is based on acquisition and publication, working with the user, and applications engineering.

  20. NASA Briefing for Unidata

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lynnes, Christopher

    2016-01-01

    The NASA representative to the Unidata Strategic Committee presented a semiannual update on NASAs work with and use of Unidata technologies. The talk covered the program of cloud computing prototypes being undertaken for the Earth Observing System Data and Information System (EOSDIS). Also discussed were dataset interoperability recommendations ratified via the EOSDIS Standards Office and the HDF Product Designer tool with respect to its possible applicability to data in network Common Data Form (NetCDF) version 4.

  1. NASA Tech House

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1977-01-01

    The NASA Technology Utilization House, called Tech House, was designed and constructed at NASA's Langley Research Center in Hampton, Virginia, to demonstrate new technology that is available or will be available in the next several years and how the application of aerospace technology could help advance the homebuilding industry. Solar energy use, energy and water conservation, safety, security, and cost were major considerations in adapting the aerospace technology to the construction of Tech House.

  2. Nasa's Emerging Productivity Program

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Braunstein, D. R.

    1984-01-01

    The goals, membership, and organizational structure of the NASA Productivity Steering Committee are described as well as steps taken to make NASA a leader in the development and application of productivity and quality concepts at every level of agency management. The overall strategy for the Productivity Improvement and Quality Enhancement (PIQE) Program is through employee involvement, both civil servant and contractor, in all phases of agency-wide activity. Elements of the PIQE program and initial thrusts are examined.

  3. NASA Radiometric Characterization

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Holekamp, Kara

    2006-01-01

    This viewgraph presentation reviews the characterization of radiometric data by NASA. The objective was to perform radiometric vicarious calibrations of imagery and compare with vendor-provided calibration coefficients. The approach was to use multiple, well-characterized sites. These sites are widely used by the NASA science community for radiometric characterization of airborne and space borne sensors. Using the data from these sites, the investigators performed independent characterizations with independent teams. Each team has slightly different measurement techniques and data processing methods.

  4. NASA thesaurus aeronautics vocabulary

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1991-01-01

    The controlled vocabulary used by the NASA Scientific and Technical Information effort to index documents in the area of aeronautics is presented. The terms comprise a subset of the 1988 edition of the NASA Thesaurus and its supplements issued through the end of 1990. The Aeronautics Vocabulary contains over 4700 terms presented in a hierarchical display format. In addition to aeronautics per se, the vocabulary covers supporting terminology from areas such as fluid dynamics, propulsion engineering, and test facilities and instrumentation.

  5. NASA thesaurus: Astronomy vocabulary

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1988-01-01

    A terminology of descriptors used by the NASA Scientific and Technical information effort to index documents in the area of astronomy is presented. The terms are listed in hierarchical format derived from the 1988 edition of the NASA Thesaurus Volume 1 -- Hierarchical Listing. Over 1600 terms are included. In addition to astronomy, space sciences covered include astrophysics, cosmology, lunar flight and exploration, meteors and meteorites, celestial mechanics, planetary flight and exploration, and planetary science.

  6. NASA Propagation Studies Website

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Angkasa, Krisjani S.

    1996-01-01

    This paper describes an Internet website which provides information to enable the development of new commerical satellite systems and services by providing timely data and models about the propagation of satellite radio signals. In partnership with industry and academia, the program leverages NASA assets, currently the Advanced Communications Technology Satellite (ACTS), to obtain propagation data. The findings of the study are disseminated through refereed journals, NASA reference publications, workshops, electronic media, and direct interface with industry.

  7. NASA Performance Report

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2000-01-01

    Introduction NASA's mission is to advance and communicate scientific knowledge and understanding of Earth, the solar system, and the universe; to advance human exploration, use, and development of space; and to research, develop, verify, and transfer advanced aeronautics, space, and related technologies. In support of this mission, NASA has a strategic architecture that consists of four Enterprises supported by four Crosscutting Processes. The Strategic Enterprises are NASA's primary mission areas to include Earth Science, Space Science, Human Exploration and Development of Space, and Aerospace Technology. NASA's Crosscutting Processes are Manage Strategically, Provide Aerospace Products and Capabilities, Generate Knowledge and Communicate Knowledge. The implementation of NASA programs, science, and technology research occurs primarily at our Centers. NASA consists of a Headquarters, nine Centers, and the Jet Propulsion Laboratory, as well as several ancillary installations and offices in the United States and abroad. The nine Centers are as follows: (1) Ames Research Center, (2) Dryden Flight Research Center (DFRC), (3) Glenn Research Center (GRC), (4) Goddard Space Flight Center (GSFC), (5) Johnson Space Center, (6) Kennedy Space Center (KSC), (7) Langley Research Center (LaRC), (8) Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC), and (9) Stennis Space Center (SSC).

  8. International Cooperation at NASA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tawney, Timothy; Feldstein, Karen

    International cooperation is a cornerstone principle of NASA’s activities, especially within the activities of the Science Mission Directorate. Nearly two thirds of the flight missions in which NASA leads or participates involve international cooperation. Numerous ground based activities also rely on international cooperation, whether because of unique expertise, unique geography, or the need for a global response. Going forward, in an era of tighter budgets and a more integrated global perspective, NASA and the rest of the space agencies around the world will be forced to work more closely together, in a broader array of activities than ever before, in order to be able to afford to push the boundaries of space exploration. The goal of this presentation is to provide an overview of NASA’s current international science cooperative activities. It will include a discussion of why NASA conducts international cooperation and look at the mechanisms through which international cooperation can occur at NASA, including peer-to-peer development of relationships. It will also discuss some of the limiting factors of international cooperation, such as export control, and ways in which to manage those constraints. Finally, the presentation would look at some of the present examples where NASA is working to increase international cooperation and improve coordination. Case studies will be used to demonstrate these mechanisms and concepts. For example, NASA continues to participate in international coordination groups such as the International Mars Exploration Working Group (IMEWG) and International Space Exploration Coordination Group (ISECG), but is expanding into new areas as well. NASA is one of the leaders in expanding and improving international coordination in the area of Near-Earth Object detection, characterization, and mitigation. Having participated in the first meetings of such groups as the International Asteroid Warning Network (IAWN) and Space Missions Planning

  9. NASA Wavelength: A Full Spectrum of NASA Resources for Earth and Space Science Education

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smith, D. A.; Schwerin, T. G.; Peticolas, L. M.; Porcello, D.; Kansa, E.; Shipp, S. S.; Bartolone, L.

    2013-12-01

    The NASA Science Education and Public Outreach Forums have developed a digital library--NASAWavelength.org--that enables easy discovery and retrieval of thousands of resources from the NASA Earth and space science education portfolio. The system has been developed based on best practices in the architecture and design of web-based information systems. The design style and philosophy emphasize simple, reusable data and services that facilitate the free flow of data across systems. The primary audiences for NASA Wavelength are STEM educators (K-12, higher education and informal education) as well as scientists, education and public outreach professionals who work with K-12, higher education, and informal education. A NASA Wavelength strandmap service features the 19 AAAS strandmaps that are most relevant to NASA science; the service also generates all of the 103 AAAS strandmaps with content from the Wavelength collection. These maps graphically and interactively provide connections between concepts as well as illustrate how concepts build upon one another across grade levels. New features have been developed for this site based on user feedback, including list-building so that users can create and share individual collections within Wavelength. We will also discuss potential methods for integrating the Next Generation Science Standards (NGSS) into the search and discovery tools on NASA Wavelength.

  10. ZO-1 regulates Erk, Smad1/5/8, Smad2, and RhoA activities to modulate self-renewal and differentiation of mouse embryonic stem cells.

    PubMed

    Xu, Jianliang; Lim, Sophia Beng Hui; Ng, Mei Yong; Ali, Safiah Mohamed; Kausalya, Jaya P; Limviphuvadh, Vachiranee; Maurer-Stroh, Sebastian; Hunziker, Walter

    2012-09-01

    ZO-1/Tjp1 is a cytosolic adaptor that links tight junction (TJ) transmembrane proteins to the actin cytoskeleton and has also been implicated in regulating cell proliferation and differentiation by interacting with transcriptional regulators and signaling proteins. To explore possible roles for ZO-1 in mouse embryonic stem cells (mESCs), we inactivated the ZO-1 locus by homologous recombination. The lack of ZO-1 was found to affect mESC self-renewal and differentiation in the presence of leukemia-inhibiting factor (LIF) and Bmp4 or following removal of the growth factors. Our data suggest that ZO-1 suppresses Stat3 and Smad1/5/8 activities and sustains extracellular-signal-regulated kinase (Erk) activity to promote mESC differentiation. Interestingly, Smad2, critical for human but not mESC self-renewal, was hyperactivated in ZO-1(-/-) mESCs and RhoA protein levels were concomitantly enhanced, suggesting attenuation of the noncanonical transforming growth factor β (Tgfβ)/Activin/Nodal pathway that mediates ubiquitination and degradation of RhoA via the TJ proteins Occludin, Par6, and Smurf1 and activation of the canonical Smad2-dependent pathway. Furthermore, Bmp4-induced differentiation of mESCs in the absence of LIF was suppressed in ZO-1(-/-) mESCs, but differentiation down the neural or cardiac lineages was not disturbed. These findings reveal novel roles for ZO-1 in mESC self-renewal, pluripotency, and differentiation by influencing several signaling networks that regulate these processes. Possible implications for the differing relevance of Smad2 in mESC and human ESC self-renewal and how ZO-1 may connect to the different pathways are discussed.

  11. NASA: Data on the Web.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Galica, Carol

    1997-01-01

    Provides an annotated bibliography of selected NASA Web sites for K-12 math and science teachers: the NASA Lewis Research Center Learning Technologies K-12 Home Page, Spacelink, NASA Quest, Basic Aircraft Design Page, International Space Station, NASA Shuttle Web Site, LIFTOFF to Space Education, Telescopes in Education, and Space Educator's…

  12. NASA Planetary Visualization Tool

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hogan, P.; Kim, R.

    2004-12-01

    NASA World Wind allows one to zoom from satellite altitude into any place on Earth, leveraging the combination of high resolution LandSat imagery and SRTM elevation data to experience Earth in visually rich 3D, just as if they were really there. NASA World Wind combines LandSat 7 imagery with Shuttle Radar Topography Mission (SRTM) elevation data, for a dramatic view of the Earth at eye level. Users can literally fly across the world's terrain from any location in any direction. Particular focus was put into the ease of usability so people of all ages can enjoy World Wind. All one needs to control World Wind is a two button mouse. Additional guides and features can be accessed though a simplified menu. Navigation is automated with single clicks of a mouse as well as the ability to type in any location and automatically zoom to it. NASA World Wind was designed to run on recent PC hardware with the same technology used by today's 3D video games. NASA World Wind delivers the NASA Blue Marble, spectacular true-color imagery of the entire Earth at 1-kilometer-per-pixel. Using NASA World Wind, you can continue to zoom past Blue Marble resolution to seamlessly experience the extremely detailed mosaic of LandSat 7 data at an impressive 15-meters-per-pixel resolution. NASA World Wind also delivers other color bands such as the infrared spectrum. The NASA Scientific Visualization Studio at Goddard Space Flight Center (GSFC) has produced a set of visually intense animations that demonstrate a variety of subjects such as hurricane dynamics and seasonal changes across the globe. NASA World Wind takes these animations and plays them directly on the world. The NASA Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) produces a set of time relevant planetary imagery that's updated every day. MODIS catalogs fires, floods, dust, smoke, storms and volcanic activity. NASA World Wind produces an easily customized view of this information and marks them directly on the globe. When one

  13. NASA Accountability Report

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1997-01-01

    NASA is piloting fiscal year (FY) 1997 Accountability Reports, which streamline and upgrade reporting to Congress and the public. The document presents statements by the NASA administrator, and the Chief Financial Officer, followed by an overview of NASA's organizational structure and the planning and budgeting process. The performance of NASA in four strategic enterprises is reviewed: (1) Space Science, (2) Mission to Planet Earth, (3) Human Exploration and Development of Space, and (4) Aeronautics and Space Transportation Technology. Those areas which support the strategic enterprises are also reviewed in a section called Crosscutting Processes. For each of the four enterprises, there is discussion about the long term goals, the short term objectives and the accomplishments during FY 1997. The Crosscutting Processes section reviews issues and accomplishments relating to human resources, procurement, information technology, physical resources, financial management, small and disadvantaged businesses, and policy and plans. Following the discussion about the individual areas is Management's Discussion and Analysis, about NASA's financial statements. This is followed by a report by an independent commercial auditor and the financial statements.

  14. NASA Software Documentation Standard

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1991-01-01

    The NASA Software Documentation Standard (hereinafter referred to as "Standard") is designed to support the documentation of all software developed for NASA; its goal is to provide a framework and model for recording the essential information needed throughout the development life cycle and maintenance of a software system. The NASA Software Documentation Standard can be applied to the documentation of all NASA software. The Standard is limited to documentation format and content requirements. It does not mandate specific management, engineering, or assurance standards or techniques. This Standard defines the format and content of documentation for software acquisition, development, and sustaining engineering. Format requirements address where information shall be recorded and content requirements address what information shall be recorded. This Standard provides a framework to allow consistency of documentation across NASA and visibility into the completeness of project documentation. The basic framework consists of four major sections (or volumes). The Management Plan contains all planning and business aspects of a software project, including engineering and assurance planning. The Product Specification contains all technical engineering information, including software requirements and design. The Assurance and Test Procedures contains all technical assurance information, including Test, Quality Assurance (QA), and Verification and Validation (V&V). The Management, Engineering, and Assurance Reports is the library and/or listing of all project reports.

  15. NASA Bioreactor Demonstration System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2002-01-01

    Leland W. K. Chung (left), Director, Molecular Urology Therapeutics Program at the Winship Cancer Institute at Emory University, is principal investigator for the NASA bioreactor demonstration system (BDS-05). With him is Dr. Jun Shu, an assistant professor of Orthopedics Surgery from Kuming Medical University China. The NASA Bioreactor provides a low turbulence culture environment which promotes the formation of large, three-dimensional cell clusters. Due to their high level of cellular organization and specialization, samples constructed in the bioreactor more closely resemble the original tumor or tissue found in the body. The Bioreactor is rotated to provide gentle mixing of fresh and spent nutrient without inducing shear forces that would damage the cells. The work is sponsored by NASA's Office of Biological and Physical Research. The bioreactor is managed by the Biotechnology Cell Science Program at NASA's Johnson Space Center (JSC). NASA-sponsored bioreactor research has been instrumental in helping scientists to better understand normal and cancerous tissue development. In cooperation with the medical community, the bioreactor design is being used to prepare better models of human colon, prostate, breast and ovarian tumors. Cartilage, bone marrow, heart muscle, skeletal muscle, pancreatic islet cells, liver and kidney are just a few of the normal tissues being cultured in rotating bioreactors by investigators. Credit: Emory University.

  16. Mutant GDF5 enhances ameloblast differentiation via accelerated BMP2-induced Smad1/5/8 phosphorylation.

    PubMed

    Liu, Jia; Saito, Kan; Maruya, Yuriko; Nakamura, Takashi; Yamada, Aya; Fukumoto, Emiko; Ishikawa, Momoko; Iwamoto, Tsutomu; Miyazaki, Kanako; Yoshizaki, Keigo; Ge, Lihong; Fukumoto, Satoshi

    2016-01-01

    Bone morphogenetic proteins (BMPs) regulate hard tissue formation, including bone and tooth. Growth differentiation factor 5 (GDF5), a known BMP, is expressed in cartilage and regulates chondrogenesis, and mutations have been shown to cause osteoarthritis. Notably, GDF5 is also expressed in periodontal ligament tissue; however, its role during tooth development is unclear. Here, we used cell culture and in vivo analyses to determine the role of GDF5 during tooth development. GDF5 and its associated BMP receptors are expressed at the protein and mRNA levels during postnatal tooth development, particularly at a stage associated with enamel formation. Furthermore, whereas BMP2 was observed to induce evidently the differentiation of enamel-forming ameloblasts, excess GDF5 induce mildly this differentiation. A mouse model harbouring a mutation in GDF5 (W408R) showed enhanced enamel formation in both the incisors and molars, but not in the tooth roots. Overexpression of the W408R GDF5 mutant protein was shown to induce BMP2-mediated mRNA expression of enamel matrix proteins and downstream phosphorylation of Smad1/5/8. These results suggest that mutant GDF5 enhances ameloblast differentiation via accelerated BMP2-signalling. PMID:27030100

  17. Mutant GDF5 enhances ameloblast differentiation via accelerated BMP2-induced Smad1/5/8 phosphorylation

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Jia; Saito, Kan; Maruya, Yuriko; Nakamura, Takashi; Yamada, Aya; Fukumoto, Emiko; Ishikawa, Momoko; Iwamoto, Tsutomu; Miyazaki, Kanako; Yoshizaki, Keigo; Ge, Lihong; Fukumoto, Satoshi

    2016-01-01

    Bone morphogenetic proteins (BMPs) regulate hard tissue formation, including bone and tooth. Growth differentiation factor 5 (GDF5), a known BMP, is expressed in cartilage and regulates chondrogenesis, and mutations have been shown to cause osteoarthritis. Notably, GDF5 is also expressed in periodontal ligament tissue; however, its role during tooth development is unclear. Here, we used cell culture and in vivo analyses to determine the role of GDF5 during tooth development. GDF5 and its associated BMP receptors are expressed at the protein and mRNA levels during postnatal tooth development, particularly at a stage associated with enamel formation. Furthermore, whereas BMP2 was observed to induce evidently the differentiation of enamel-forming ameloblasts, excess GDF5 induce mildly this differentiation. A mouse model harbouring a mutation in GDF5 (W408R) showed enhanced enamel formation in both the incisors and molars, but not in the tooth roots. Overexpression of the W408R GDF5 mutant protein was shown to induce BMP2-mediated mRNA expression of enamel matrix proteins and downstream phosphorylation of Smad1/5/8. These results suggest that mutant GDF5 enhances ameloblast differentiation via accelerated BMP2-signalling. PMID:27030100

  18. NASA's Radiation Belt Storm Probe Mission

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sibeck, David G.

    2011-01-01

    NASA's Radiation Belt Storm Probe (RBSP) mission, comprising two identically-instrumented spacecraft, is scheduled for launch in May 2012. In addition to identifying and quantifying the processes responsible for energizing, transporting, and removing energetic particles from the Earth's Van Allen radiation, the mission will determine the characteristics of the ring current and its effect upon the magnetosphere as a whole. The distances separating the two RBSP spacecraft will vary as they move along their 1000 km altitude x 5.8 RE geocentric orbits in order to enable the spacecraft to separate spatial from temporal effects, measure gradients that help identify particle sources, and determine the spatial extent of a wide array of phenomena. This talk explores the scientific objectives of the mission and the manner by which the mission has been tailored to achieve them.

  19. Xenopus Pax-2/5/8 orthologues: novel insights into Pax gene evolution and identification of Pax-8 as the earliest marker for otic and pronephric cell lineages.

    PubMed

    Heller, N; Brändli, A W

    1999-01-01

    Pax genes are a family of transcription factors playing fundamental roles during organogenesis. We have recently demonstrated the expression of Pax-2 during Xenopus embryogenesis [Heller N, Brändli AW (1997): Mech Dev 69: 83-104]. Here we report the cloning and characterization of Xenopus Pax-5 and Pax-8, two orthologues of the Pax-2/5/8 gene family. Molecular phylogenetic analysis indicates that the amphibian Pax-2/5/8 genes are close relatives of their mammalian counterparts and that all vertebrate Pax-2/5/8 genes are derived from a single ancestral gene. Xenopus Pax-2/5/8 genes are expressed in spatially and temporally overlapping patterns during development of at least seven distinct tissues. Most strikingly, Xenopus Pax-8 was identified as the earliest marker of the prospective otic placode and of the intermediate mesoderm, indicating that Pax-8 may play a central role in auditory and excretory system development. Comparison of the expression patterns of fish, amphibian, and mammalian Pax-2/5/8 genes revealed that the tissue specificity of Pax-2/5/8 gene family expression is overall evolutionarily conserved. The expression domains of individual orthologues can however vary in a species-specific manner. For example, the thyroid glands of mammals express Pax-8, while in Xenopus Pax-2 is expressed instead. Our findings indicate that differential silencing of Pax-2/5/8 gene expression may have occurred after the different classes of vertebrates began to evolve separately. PMID:10322629

  20. MONOPTEROS directly activates the auxin-inducible promoter of the Dof5.8 transcription factor gene in Arabidopsis thaliana leaf provascular cells

    PubMed Central

    Konishi, Mineko; Donner, Tyler J.; Scarpella, Enrico; Yanagisawa, Shuichi

    2015-01-01

    MONOPTEROS (MP) is an auxin-responsive transcription factor that is required for primary root formation and vascular development, whereas Dof5.8 is a Dof-class transcription factor whose gene is expressed in embryos as well as the pre- and procambial cells in the leaf primordium in Arabidopsis thaliana. In this study, it is shown that MP directly activates the Dof5.8 promoter. Although no apparent phenotype of the single dof5.8 mutants was found, phenotypic analysis with the mp dof5.8 double mutants revealed that mutations within Dof5.8 enhanced the phenotype of a weak allele of mp, with an increase in the penetrance of the ‘rootless’ phenotype and a reduction in the number of cotyledons. Furthermore, interestingly, although mp mutants showed reduced vascular pattern complexity in cotyledons, the mp dof5.8 double mutants displayed both more simplex and more complex vascular patterns in individual cotyledons. These results imply that the product of Dof5.8 whose expression is regulated by MP at least in part might be involved in multiple processes controlled by MP. PMID:25336688

  1. NASA science committee appointments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zielinski, Sarah

    2006-10-01

    NASA Administrator Michael Griffin has made three new appointments to the NASA Advisory Council's (NAC' Science Committee, NASA announced on 22 September. Edward David, president of EED, Inc., and science advisor to the President from 1970 to 1973, will serve as the committee-s chair. Also appointed to the committee were Owen Garriott, a retired scientist astronaut, and Alan Stern, executive director of the Space Science and Engineering Division of the Southwest Research Institute (San Antonio, Tex.). David, Garriott, and Stern-who are among nine new members of the full advisory committee that were announced on 22 September-will replace three members of the Science Committee who resigned in August: Science Committee Chair Charles Kennel (Scripps Institution of Oceanography), Wesley Huntress (Carnegie Institution of Washington), and Eugene Levy (Rice University). The NAC's next public meeting will be held on 12 October at Goddard Space Flight Center in Greenbelt, Md.

  2. Technological Innovations from NASA

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pellis, Neal R.

    2006-01-01

    The challenge of human space exploration places demands on technology that push concepts and development to the leading edge. In biotechnology and biomedical equipment development, NASA science has been the seed for numerous innovations, many of which are in the commercial arena. The biotechnology effort has led to rational drug design, analytical equipment, and cell culture and tissue engineering strategies. Biomedical research and development has resulted in medical devices that enable diagnosis and treatment advances. NASA Biomedical developments are exemplified in the new laser light scattering analysis for cataracts, the axial flow left ventricular-assist device, non contact electrocardiography, and the guidance system for LASIK surgery. Many more developments are in progress. NASA will continue to advance technologies, incorporating new approaches from basic and applied research, nanotechnology, computational modeling, and database analyses.

  3. NASA Langley Highlights, 1998

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1999-01-01

    Langley's mission is accomplished by performing innovative research relevant to national needs and Agency goals, transferring technology to users in a timely manner, and providing development support to other United States Government Agencies, industry, other NASA Centers, the educational community, and the local community. This report contains highlights of some of the major accomplishments and applications that have been made by Langley researchers and by our university and industry colleagues during the past year. The highlights illustrate the broad range of research and technology activities carried out by NASA Langley Research Center and the contributions of this work toward maintaining United States' leadership in aeronautics and space research. A color electronic version of this report is available at URL http://larcpubs.larc.nasa.gov/randt/1998/.

  4. Type NASA-23

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Binayak, Panda; Jones, Clyde S. (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    NASA-23 alloy has been designed to fulfil NASA's unique need for a high strength, oxidation-and corrosion resistant alloy that is compatible with a high-pressure hydrogen environment. This alloy is a precipitation hardened iron-nickel base alloy with excellent strength and ductility art gaseous hydrogen (GH2), comparable to those of other alloys in its class, Inconel 718 and IN-903. NASA-23 has been designed with a sufficient amount of chromium to provide good corrosion/oxidation resistance. For hydrogen resistance, the alloy maintains a (Ni + Co)/Fe ratio close to 1.26, the same as that of Incoloy 903. Hardening constituents, Nb, Ti, and Al, are optimized for strength and ductility both in air and GH2 atmospheres.

  5. NASA's Space Grant program

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dasch, E. Julius

    1990-01-01

    Program descriptions are provided for both phases of the U.S. NASA Space Grant College and Fellowship Program. While Phase I consisted of the designation of 21 universities and university consortia as Space Grant Colleges/Consortia intended to maintain a balanced program of research, curriculum, and public service, the recently implemented Phase II is designed to broaden participation in the Space Grant Program by targeting states that are currently not as involved in NASA programs as are the states for which Phase one is constructed. The Phase II/Capability Enhancement Grants (CEG) thus provide grants to states with little or no present NASA involvement, with planning grants expected to lead to substantive grant proposals. States are to compete in either the Programs Grants category or the CEG category, with only one proposal accepted from each state. Program Grants, CEGs, and Fellowship requirements are outlined.

  6. NASA Software Safety Standard

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rosenberg, Linda

    1997-01-01

    If software is a critical element in a safety critical system, it is imperative to implement a systematic approach to software safety as an integral part of the overall system safety programs. The NASA-STD-8719.13A, "NASA Software Safety Standard", describes the activities necessary to ensure that safety is designed into software that is acquired or developed by NASA, and that safety is maintained throughout the software life cycle. A PDF version, is available on the WWW from Lewis. A Guidebook that will assist in the implementation of the requirements in the Safety Standard is under development at the Lewis Research Center (LeRC). After completion, it will also be available on the WWW from Lewis.

  7. NASA's space processing program

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bredt, J. H.

    1977-01-01

    The NASA Space Processing Program was initiated to develop uses of space flight that will support research efforts and manufacturing operations on the ground by processing materials in space. It is expected that the unique conditions that are available in space will provide a basis for a wide variety of economically beneficial services to science and industry in fields such as metallurgy, electronic materials, glass technology, fluid physics and chemistry, and in biological material preparation as well. Plans are described for developing payload equipment to implement materials processing experiments on the missions of the space transportation system (STS). This equipment is intended to support a diversified program of NASA-sponsored materials processing experiments by all classes of scientists, as well as pilot activities by non-NASA sponsors.

  8. This is NASA

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1979-01-01

    Highlights of NASA's first 20 years are described including the accomplishments of the National Advisory Committee for Aeronautics from its creation in 1915 until its absorption into NASA in 1958. Current and future activities are assessed in relation to the Federal R&D research plan for FY 1980 and to U.S. civil space policy. A NASA organization chart accompanies descriptions of the responsibilities of Headquarters, its various offices, and field installations. Directions are given for contacting the agency for business activities or contracting purposes; for obtaining educational publications and other media, and for tours. Manpower statistics are included with a list of career opportunities. Special emphasis is given to manned space flight, space launch vehicles, space shuttle, planetary exploration, and investigations of the stars and the solar system.

  9. NASA DEVELOP students

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2008-01-01

    NASA DEVELOP students at Stennis Space Center recently held a midterm review with George Crozier, who serves as a science adviser to the team. The team also was joined by Jamie Favors of the Mobile (Ala.) County Health Department DEVELOP Team; Cheri Miller, the team's NASA adviser; and Kenton Ross, a team science adviser. Students participating in the meeting included: Lauren Childs, Jason Jones, Maddie Brozen, Matt Batina, Jenn Frey, Angie Maki and Aaron Brooks. The primary purpose of the meeting was to update Crozier on the status of the team's work for the summer 2008 term and discuss plans for the fiscal year 2009 project proposal. This included discussion of a possible project to study the effects of hurricanes on the Florida panhandle. DEVELOP is a NASA-sponsored, student-led, student-run program focused on developing projects to help communities.

  10. Exobiology: The NASA program

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rummel, John D.; Harper, Lynn; Andersen, Dale

    1992-01-01

    The goal of NASA's Exobiology Program is to understand the origin, evolution, and distribution of life in the universe. To do this, the Exobiology Program seeks to provide a critical framework and some key research to allow NASA to bear the combined talents and capabilities of the agency and the scientific community, and the unique opportunities afforded by space exploration. To provide structure and direction to the quest for answers, the Exobiology Program has instituted a comprehensive research program divided into four elements which are being implemented at several of NASA's research centers and in the university community. These program elements correspond to the four major epochs in the evolution of living systems: (1) cosmic evolution of the biogenic compounds; (2) prebiotic evolution; (3) origin and early evolution of life; and (4) evolution of advanced life. The overall research program is designed to trace the pathways leading from the origin of the universe through the major epochs in the story of life.

  11. NASA research in aeropropulsion

    SciTech Connect

    Stewart, W.L.; Weber, R.J.

    1981-12-01

    Future advances in aircraft propulsion systems will be aided by the research performed by NASA and its contractors. This paper gives selected examples of recent accomplishments and current activities relevant to the principal classes of civil and military aircraft. Some instances of new emerging technologies with potential high impact on further progress are discussed. NASA research described includes noise abatement and fuel economy measures for commercial subsonic, supersonic, commuter, and general aviation aircraft, aircraft engines of the jet, turboprop, diesel and rotary types, VTOL, X-wing rotocraft, helicopters, and ''stealth'' aircraft. Applications to military aircraft are also discussed.

  12. NASA Applied Sciences Program

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Frederick, Martin

    2006-01-01

    This presentation highlights the NASA Applied Sciences Program. The goal of the program is to extend the results of scientific research and knowledge beyond the science community to contribute to NASA's partners' applications of national priority, such as agricultural efficiency, energy management and Homeland Security. Another purpose of the program's scientific research is to increase knowledge of the Earth-Sun system to enable improved predictions of climate, weather, and natural hazards. The program primarily optimizes benefits for citizens by contributing to partnering on applications that are used by state, local and tribal governments.

  13. NASA's Meteoroid Environment Office

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Suggs, Robert M.; Cooke, William; McNamara, Heather

    2004-01-01

    The Meteoroid Environment Office (MEO) has recently been formed within the Engineering Directorate at NASA's Marshall Space Flight Center. With agency-wide responsibility for defining the meteoroid environments for spacecraft engineering operations purposes, the MEO will distribute a state-of-the-art sporadic meteoroid model as well as meteor shower forecasts for spacecraft operators. To improve these models and forecasts, the MEO will manage an observation and research program. Office responsibilities, products, and plans will be discussed in this paper. The MEO is sponsored by the Office of Safety and Mission Assurance at NASA Headquarters.

  14. NASA Global Hawk Overview

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Naftel, Chris

    2014-01-01

    The NASA Global Hawk Project is supporting Earth Science research customers. These customers include: US Government agencies, civilian organizations, and universities. The combination of the Global Hawks range, endurance, altitude, payload power, payload volume and payload weight capabilities separates the Global Hawk platform from all other platforms available to the science community. This presentation includes an overview of the concept of operations and an overview of the completed science campaigns. In addition, the future science plans, using the NASA Global Hawk System, will be presented.

  15. Origins of NASA names

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wells, H. T.; Whiteley, S. H.; Karegeannes, C. E.

    1976-01-01

    Names are selected for NASA spaceflight projects and programs from various sources. Some have their foundations in mythology and astrology or legend and folklore. Some have historic connotations; others are based on a description of their mission, often resulting in an acronym. Included are names of launch vehicles, spacecraft, manned spaceflight programs, sounding rockets, and NASA field installations. This study is limited to names of approved projects through 1974; it does not include names of numerous projects which have been or are being studied or projects that were canceled or postponed before reaching actual flight.

  16. NASA electric propulsion program

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hudson, W. R.; Finke, R. C.

    1976-01-01

    Major portions of the NASA electric propulsion technology program have attained the level of maturity required to achieve near-term technology readiness for flight missions for primary and auxiliary propulsion application. Advanced electric propulsion program elements addressing less immediate requirements are in more exploratory stages. This paper will discuss the NASA electric propulsion technology program including - planetary and earth orbit raising applications, attitude control and stationkeeping of geosynchronous satellites, and the research support program. Objectives, requirements, and hardware status are presented for each program.

  17. NASA Standard Measures Overview

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Meck, Janice V.

    2008-01-01

    Due to the limited in-flight resources available for human physiological research in the foreseeable future, NASA has increased its reliance on head-down bed rest. NASA has created the Bed Rest Project at the Johnson Space Center, which is implemented on the 6th floor of the Children's Hospital at UTMB. It has been conducted for three years. The overall objective of the Project is to use bed rest to develop and evaluate countermeasures for the ill effects of space flight before flight resources are requested for refinement and final testing.

  18. NASA Langley Highlights, 1997

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1998-01-01

    Langley's mission is accomplished by performing innovative research relevant to national needs and Agency goals, transferring technology to users in a timely manner, and providing development support to other United States Government Agencies, industry, other NASA Centers, the educational community, and the local community. This report contains highlights of some of the major accomplishments and applications that have been made by Langley researchers and by our university and industry colleagues during the past year. The highlights illustrate the broad range of research and technology activities carried out by NASA Langley Research Center and the contributions of this work toward maintaining United States' leadership in aeronautics and space research.

  19. NASA's Heliophysics System Observatory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Clarke, Steven

    2016-04-01

    NASA formulates and implements a national research program for understanding the Sun and its interactions with the Earth and the solar system and how these phenomena impact life and society. This research provides theory, data, and modeling development services to national and international space weather efforts utilizing a coordinated and complementary fleet of spacecraft, called the Heliophysics System Observatory (HSO), to understand the Sun and its interactions with Earth and the solar system, including space weather. This presentation will focus on NASA's role in space weather research and the contributions the agency continues to provide to the science of space weather, leveraging inter-agency and international collaborations for the benefit of society.

  20. NASA Publications Guide

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1982-01-01

    The publication programs and management policies of NASA are described and the details that authors and publication specialists need to know to carry out the agency's mission of disseminating the scientific and technical information derived from its activities are highlighted. Topics covered include the various kinds of NASA formal publications; selection of publication medium; printing and distribution; and requirements concerning style and format standards, copyright transfers, the cover, color, and foldouts. The sections of a report are delineated and editorial and page make-up responsibilities are also discussed.

  1. Heart tissue grown in NASA Bioreactor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2001-01-01

    Lisa Freed and Gordana Vunjak-Novakovic, both of the Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT), have taken the first steps toward engineering heart muscle tissue that could one day be used to patch damaged human hearts. Cells isolated from very young animals are attached to a three-dimensional polymer scaffold, then placed in a NASA bioreactor. The cells do not divide, but after about a week start to cornect to form a functional piece of tissue. Functionally connected heart cells that are capable of transmitting electrical signals are the goal for Freed and Vunjak-Novakovic. Electrophysiological recordings of engineered tissue show spontaneous contractions at a rate of 70 beats per minute (a), and paced contractions at rates of 80, 150, and 200 beats per minute respectively (b, c, and d). The NASA Bioreactor provides a low turbulence culture environment which promotes the formation of large, three-dimensional cell clusters. The Bioreactor is rotated to provide gentle mixing of fresh and spent nutrient without inducing shear forces that would damage the cells. Due to their high level of cellular organization and specialization, samples constructed in the bioreactor more closely resemble the original tumor or tissue found in the body. NASA-sponsored bioreactor research has been instrumental in helping scientists to better understand normal and cancerous tissue development. In cooperation with the medical community, the bioreactor design is being used to prepare better models of human colon, prostate, breast and ovarian tumors. Cartilage, bone marrow, heart muscle, skeletal muscle, pancreatic islet cells, liver and kidney are just a few of the normal tissues being cultured in rotating bioreactors by investigators. The work is sponsored by NASA's Office of Biological and Physical Research. The bioreactor is managed by the Biotechnology Cell Science Program at NASA's Johnson Space Center (JSC). Credit: NASA and MIT.

  2. Status of a NASA Standard and Three NASA Handbooks

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kern, Dennis L.

    2011-01-01

    NASA-STD-7003 Pyroshock Test Criteria, May 18, 1999, has been revised per direction of NASA Headquarters to make it a mandatory standard and to update it for advances in the discipline since it's initial release. NASA-HDBK-7004B Force Limited Vibration Testing, January 31, 2003, and NASA-HDBK-7005 Dynamic Environmental Criteria, March 13, 2001, are being updated to reflect advances in the disciplines since their last release. Additionally, a new NASA handbook, NASA-HDBK-7008 Spacecraft Structural Dynamics Testing is currently being prepared. This paper provides an overview of each document, summarizes the major revisions for the documents undergoing update, and provides the development schedules.

  3. NASA's Software Safety Standard

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ramsay, Christopher M.

    2007-01-01

    NASA relies more and more on software to control, monitor, and verify its safety critical systems, facilities and operations. Since the 1960's there has hardly been a spacecraft launched that does not have a computer on board that will provide command and control services. There have been recent incidents where software has played a role in high-profile mission failures and hazardous incidents. For example, the Mars Orbiter, Mars Polar Lander, the DART (Demonstration of Autonomous Rendezvous Technology), and MER (Mars Exploration Rover) Spirit anomalies were all caused or contributed to by software. The Mission Control Centers for the Shuttle, ISS, and unmanned programs are highly dependant on software for data displays, analysis, and mission planning. Despite this growing dependence on software control and monitoring, there has been little to no consistent application of software safety practices and methodology to NASA's projects with safety critical software. Meanwhile, academia and private industry have been stepping forward with procedures and standards for safety critical systems and software, for example Dr. Nancy Leveson's book Safeware: System Safety and Computers. The NASA Software Safety Standard, originally published in 1997, was widely ignored due to its complexity and poor organization. It also focused on concepts rather than definite procedural requirements organized around a software project lifecycle. Led by NASA Headquarters Office of Safety and Mission Assurance, the NASA Software Safety Standard has recently undergone a significant update. This new standard provides the procedures and guidelines for evaluating a project for safety criticality and then lays out the minimum project lifecycle requirements to assure the software is created, operated, and maintained in the safest possible manner. This update of the standard clearly delineates the minimum set of software safety requirements for a project without detailing the implementation for those

  4. The ANSS response to the Mw 5.8 Central Virginia Seismic Zone earthquake of August 23, 2011

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McNamara, D. E.; Horton, S.; Benz, H.; Earle, P. S.; Withers, M. M.; Hayes, G. P.; Kim, W. Y.; Chapman, M. C.; Herrmann, R. B.; Petersen, M. D.; Williams, R. A.

    2011-12-01

    An Mw 5.8 earthquake (depth=6km) occurred on August 23, 2011 (17:51:04 UTC) near Mineral, Virginia, which was widely felt from Maine to Georgia along the eastern seaboard and west to Chicago and western Tennessee. The USGS tallied nearly 142,000 felt reports submitted to the Did You Feel It (DYFI) internet community intensity system, making it the most widely felt earthquake since the web-site began, and demonstrating that more people felt this earthquake than any other in U.S. history. Significant damage was reported in the epicentral area and as far away as Washington D.C. (135 km away); minor damage was reported in Baltimore (200 km). The reverse faulting earthquake occurred on a northeast-striking plane within a region of diffuse seismicity known as the Central Virginia Seismic Zone. Within the first week, the mainshock was followed by 17 aftershocks with magnitude greater than 2, including Mw 4.5, 4.2, and 3.8 events. In the days following the mainshock, 46 portable seismic stations were deployed by several organizations, making this among the best-recorded aftershock sequence in the eastern U.S. Within 24 hours of the mainshock, 8 portable stations were deployed in time to record the largest aftershock to date (M4.5). We will present the results of our post-earthquake response, including attenuation and site amplification observations using portable aftershock station data, details on the initial USGS NEIC post earthquake response products and an assessment of the seismotectonics of the Central Virginia Seismic Zone based on aftershock locations and source parameter modeling of the larger earthquakes.

  5. NASA's Software Bank (CLIPS)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1991-01-01

    C Language Integrated Production System (CLIPS) is a NASA Johnson Space Center developed software shell for developing expert systems, is used by researchers at Ohio State University to determine solid waste disposal sites to assist in historic preservation. The program has various other applications and has even been included in a widely-used textbook.

  6. NASA's Software Bank (ASAP)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1991-01-01

    The NASA-developed Artificial Satellite Analysis Program (ASAP), was purchased from COSMIC and used to enhance OPNET, a program for developing simulations of communications satellite networks. OPNET's developer, MIL3, applied ASAP to support predictions of low Earth orbit, enabling the company to offer satellite modeling capability to customers earlier than if they had to actually develop the program.

  7. NASA Microgravity Research Program

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Woodard, Dan

    1999-01-01

    The Fiscal Year 1998 Annual Report describes key elements of the NASA Microgravity Research Program. The Program's goals, approach taken to achieve those goals, and program resources are summarized. A review of the Program's status at the end of FY1998 and highlights of the ground- and-flight-based research are provided.

  8. NASA Facts, Space Shuttle.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration, Washington, DC. Educational Programs Div.

    This newsletter from the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) contains a description of the purposes and potentials of the Space Shuttle craft. The illustrated document explains some of the uses for which the shuttle is designed; how the shuttle will be launched from earth, carry out its mission, and land again on earth; and what a…

  9. NASA and Me

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wong, Douglas T.

    2010-01-01

    Topics in this student project report include: biography, NASA history and structure, overview of Johnson Space Center facilities and major projects, and an overview of the Usability Testing and Analysis Facility (UTAF). The UTAF section slides include space habitat evaluations with mockups, crew space vehicle evaluations, and human factors research.

  10. Education News at NASA

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2004-01-01

    NASA s challenging missions provide unique opportunities for engaging and educating America s youth, the next generation of explorers. Led by Chief Education Officer Dr. Adena Williams Loston, the Agency coordinates education programs for students, faculty, and institutions in order to help inspire and motivate the scientists and engineers of the future.

  11. NASA Global Hawk Overview

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2011-01-01

    NASA Global Hawk is operational and supporting Earth science research. 29 Flights were conducted during the first year of operations, with a total of 253 flight hours. Three major science campaigns have been conducted with all objectives met. Two new science campaigns are in the planning stage

  12. NASA Facts, The Countdown.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration, Washington, DC.

    This pamphlet describes the preparations for launching a giant Atlas, Gemini (Titan 11), or Saturn launch vehicle. The material is intended for use in elementary general science. The pamphlet is one of the NASA Facts Science Series (each of which consists of four pages) and is designed to fit in the standard size three-ring notebook. Review…

  13. NASA IKONOS Radiometric Characterization

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pagnutti, Mary; Frisbee, Troy; Zanoni, Vicki; Blonski, Slawek; Daehler, Erik; Grant, Brennan; Holekamp, Kara; Ryan, Robert; Sellers, Richard; Smith, Charles

    2002-01-01

    The objective of this program: Perform radiometric vicarious calibrations of IKQNOS imagery and compare with Space Imaging calibration coefficients The approach taken: utilize multiple well-characterized sites which are widely used by the NASA science community for radiometric characterization of airborne and spaceborne sensors; and to Perform independent characterizations with independent teams. Each team has slightly different measurement techniques and data processing methods.

  14. NASA Ames ATM Research

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Denery, Dallas G.

    2000-01-01

    The NASA Ames research Center, in cooperation with the FAA and the industry, has a series of major research efforts underway that are aimed at : 1) improving the flow of traffic in the national airspace system; and 2) helping to define the future air traffic management system. The purpose of this presentation will be to provide a brief summary of some of these activities.

  15. Doing business with NASA

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1995-01-01

    Because many U.S. businesses and companies want to do business with NASA, the Agency sends out procurement specialists to trade shows and conferences and organizes seminars to educate the business public on how to get on procurement lists to become product and service providers to the federal government.

  16. What's Up at NASA?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Clapp, Betty

    1988-01-01

    The National Aeronautics and Space Administration's (NASA) five-year plan to help elementary school teachers meet mathematics and science curriculum needs includes increasing the availability of instructional materials, providing greater access to teacher resource centers and workshops, and offering new sources of information for teachers and…

  17. NASA lithium cell applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Juvinall, G. L.

    1978-01-01

    The advantages of lithium systems are described and a general summary of their application in present and future NASA programs is presented. Benefits of the lithium systems include an increased payload weight and an increased cost effectiveness to the customer. This also allows for more flexibility in the design of future space transportation systems.

  18. NASA metric transition plan

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1992-01-01

    NASA science publications have used the metric system of measurement since 1970. Although NASA has maintained a metric use policy since 1979, practical constraints have restricted actual use of metric units. In 1988, an amendment to the Metric Conversion Act of 1975 required the Federal Government to adopt the metric system except where impractical. In response to Public Law 100-418 and Executive Order 12770, NASA revised its metric use policy and developed this Metric Transition Plan. NASA's goal is to use the metric system for program development and functional support activities to the greatest practical extent by the end of 1995. The introduction of the metric system into new flight programs will determine the pace of the metric transition. Transition of institutional capabilities and support functions will be phased to enable use of the metric system in flight program development and operations. Externally oriented elements of this plan will introduce and actively support use of the metric system in education, public information, and small business programs. The plan also establishes a procedure for evaluating and approving waivers and exceptions to the required use of the metric system for new programs. Coordination with other Federal agencies and departments (through the Interagency Council on Metric Policy) and industry (directly and through professional societies and interest groups) will identify sources of external support and minimize duplication of effort.

  19. The Road to NASA

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Meyers, Valerie

    2010-01-01

    This slide presentation describes the career path and projects that the author worked on during her internship at NASA. As a Graduate Student Research Program (GSRP) participant the assignments that were given include: Human Mesenchymal Stem Cell Research, Spaceflight toxicology, Lunar Airborne Dust Toxicity Advisory Group (LADTAG) and a special study at Devon Island.

  20. NASA science communications strategy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1995-01-01

    In 1994, the Clinton Administration issued a report, 'Science in the National Interest', which identified new national science goals. Two of the five goals are related to science communications: produce the finest scientists and engineers for the 21st century, and raise scientific and technological literacy of all Americans. In addition to the guidance and goals set forth by the Administration, NASA has been mandated by Congress under the 1958 Space Act to 'provide for the widest practicable and appropriate dissemination concerning its activities and the results thereof'. In addition to addressing eight Goals and Plans which resulted from a January 1994 meeting between NASA and members of the broader scientific, education, and communications community on the Public Communication of NASA's Science, the Science Communications Working Group (SCWG) took a comprehensive look at the way the Agency communicates its science to ensure that any changes the Agency made were long-term improvements. The SCWG developed a Science Communications Strategy for NASA and a plan to implement the Strategy. This report outlines a strategy from which effective science communications programs can be developed and implemented across the agency. Guiding principles and strategic themes for the strategy are provided, with numerous recommendations for improvement discussed within the respective themes of leadership, coordination, integration, participation, leveraging, and evaluation.

  1. NASA highlights, 1986 - 1988

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1990-01-01

    Highlights of NASA research from 1986 to 1988 are discussed. Topics covered include Space Shuttle flights, understanding the Universe and its origins, understanding the Earth and its environment, air and space transportation, using space to make America more competitive, using space technology an Earth, strengthening America's education in science and technology, the space station, and human exploration of the solar system.

  2. NASA Dryden Status

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bosworth, John

    2007-01-01

    A viewgraph presentation on the satus of NASA Dryden's aircraft guidance and control is shown. The topics include: 1) Autonomous Airborne Refueling Demonstration (AARD); 2) Ikhana Project Update; 3) Quiet Spike; 4) F-15 Intelligent Flight Control System; 5) C-20A Precision Autopilot Development; and 6) X-48 Blended Wing Body.

  3. My Career at NASA

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dibley, Ryan P.

    2009-01-01

    This viewgraph presentation reviews the work of the presenter at NASA Dryden Flight Research Center. He describes what he does, the projects that he has worked on and the background that led him to his position. The presentation has many pictures of aircraft in flight

  4. This is NASA.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration, Washington, DC.

    The mission of the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) is space exploration and research in space and aeronautics for peaceful purposes and for the benefit of all mankind. The organization and programs which have been established to carry out this mission are described. Full color illustrations for the book were selected from the…

  5. NASA's Microgravity Research Program

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Woodard, Dan R. (Editor); Henderson, Robin N. (Technical Monitor)

    2000-01-01

    The Fiscal Year 1999 Annual Report describes key elements of the NASA Microgravity Research Program. The Program's goals, approach taken to achieve those goals, and program resources are summarized. A review of the Program's status at the end of FY1999 and highlights of the ground-and-flight research are provided.

  6. NASA Computational Mobility

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2004-01-01

    This blue sky study was conducted in order to study the feasibility and scope of the notion of Computational Mobility to potential NASA applications such as control of multiple robotic platforms. The study was started on July lst, 2003 and concluded on September 30th, 2004. During the course of that period, four meetings were held for the participants to meet and discuss the concept, its viability, and potential applications. The study involved, at various stages, the following personnel: James Allen (IHMC), Albert0 Canas (IHMC), Daniel Cooke (Texas Tech), Kenneth Ford (IHMC - PI), Patrick Hayes (IHMC), Butler Hine (NASA), Robert Morris (NASA), Liam Pedersen (NASA), Jerry Pratt (IHMC), Raul Saavedra (IHMC), Niranjan Suri (IHMC), and Milind Tambe (USC). A white paper describing the notion of a Process Integrated Mechanism (PIM) was generated as a result of this study. The white paper is attached to this report. In addition, a number of presentations were generated during the four meetings, which are included in this report. Finally, an execution platform and a simulation environment were developed, which are available upon request from Niranjan Suri (nsuri@,ihmc.us).

  7. NASA Propagation Information Center

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smith, Ernest K.; Flock, Warren L.

    1989-01-01

    The NASA Propagation Information Center became formally operational in July 1988. It is located in the Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering of the University of Colorado at Boulder. The Center is several things: a communications medium for the propagation with the outside world, a mechanism for internal communication within the program, and an aid to management.

  8. NASA Research Announcement

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chiaramonte, Fran

    2002-01-01

    This paper presents viewgraphs of NASA's strategic and fundamental research program at the Office of Biological and Physical Research (OBPR). The topics include: 1) Colloid-Polymer Samples; 2) Pool Boiling Experiment; 3) The Dynamics of Miscible Interfaces: A Space Flight Experiment (MIDAS); and 4) ISS and Ground-based Facilities.

  9. NASA Facts, Solar Cells.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration, Washington, DC.

    The design and function of solar cells as a source of electrical power for unmanned space vehicles is described in this pamphlet written for high school physical science students. The pamphlet is one of the NASA Facts Science Series (each of which consists of four pages) and is designed to fit in the standard size three-ring notebook. Review…

  10. NASA propagation information center

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smith, Ernest K.; Flock, Warren L.

    1990-07-01

    The NASA Propagation Information Center became formally operational in July 1988. It is located in the Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering of the University of Colorado at Boulder. The center is several things: a communications medium for the propagation with the outside world, a mechanism for internal communication within the program, and an aid to management.

  11. NASA and general aviation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ethell, J. L.

    1986-01-01

    General aviation remains the single most misunderstood sector of aeronautics in the United States. A detailed look at how general aviation functions and how NASA helps keep it on the cutting edge of technology in airfoils, airframes, commuter travel, environmental concerns, engines, propellers, air traffic control, agricultural development, electronics, and safety is given.

  12. NASA Facts: Voyager

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1977-01-01

    A news release on NASA's Voyager project is presented. The spacecraft, science instrumentation, experiments and a mission profile are described. A drawing identifying Voyager's major components and instrumentation was included along with diagrams showing the path of Voyager 1 (JST trajectory) past Jupiter, and the path of Voyager 2 (JXT trajectory) during its encounter with Jupiter. An exercise for student involvement was also provided.

  13. Technology transfer within NASA

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    St.cyr, William

    1992-01-01

    Viewgraphs on technology transfer within NASA are provided. Assessment of technology transfer process, technology being transfered, issues and barriers, and observations and suggestions are addressed. Topics covered include: technology transfer within an organization (and across organization lines/codes) and space science/instrument technology and the role of universities in the technology development/transfer process.

  14. NASA Bioreactor Schematic

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2001-01-01

    The schematic depicts the major elements and flow patterns inside the NASA Bioreactor system. Waste and fresh medium are contained in plastic bags placed side-by-side so the waste bag fills as the fresh medium bag is depleted. The compliance vessel contains a bladder to accommodate pressure transients that might damage the system. A peristolic pump moves fluid by squeezing the plastic tubing, thus avoiding potential contamination. The work is sponsored by NASA's Office of Biological and Physical Research. The bioreactor is managed by the Biotechnology Cell Science Program at NASA's Johnson Space Center (JSC). NASA-sponsored bioreactor research has been instrumental in helping scientists to better understand normal and cancerous tissue development. In cooperation with the medical community, the bioreactor design is being used to prepare better models of human colon, prostate, breast and ovarian tumors. Cartilage, bone marrow, heart muscle, skeletal muscle, pancreatic islet cells, liver and kidney are just a few of the normal tissues being cultured in rotating bioreactors by investigators.

  15. NASA Integrated Services Environment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ing, Sharon

    2005-01-01

    This slide presentation will begin with a discussion on NASA's current distributed environment for directories, identity management and account management. We will follow with information concerning the drivers, design, reviews and implementation of the NISE Project. The final component of the presentation discusses processes used, status and conclusions.

  16. University guide to NASA, 1993

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1992-01-01

    This guide provides brief descriptions of the two NASA Headquarters program offices through which NASA primarily funds universities, the Office of Space Science and Applications and the Office of Aeronautics and Space Technology. It also describes NASA's Office of Commercial Programs, which funds the Centers for the Commercial Development of Space and the Small Business Innovation Research Program. This guide explains the roles played by NASA's eight field centers and the Jet Propulsion Laboratory, and gives a sampling of ongoing NASA-wide educational programs and services. Most importantly, this guide provides practical information in the form of names and telephone numbers of NASA contacts.

  17. NASA Schedule Management Handbook

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2011-01-01

    The purpose of schedule management is to provide the framework for time-phasing, resource planning, coordination, and communicating the necessary tasks within a work effort. The intent is to improve schedule management by providing recommended concepts, processes, and techniques used within the Agency and private industry. The intended function of this handbook is two-fold: first, to provide guidance for meeting the scheduling requirements contained in NPR 7120.5, NASA Space Flight Program and Project Management Requirements, NPR 7120.7, NASA Information Technology and Institutional Infrastructure Program and Project Requirements, NPR 7120.8, NASA Research and Technology Program and Project Management Requirements, and NPD 1000.5, Policy for NASA Acquisition. The second function is to describe the schedule management approach and the recommended best practices for carrying out this project control function. With regards to the above project management requirements documents, it should be noted that those space flight projects previously established and approved under the guidance of prior versions of NPR 7120.5 will continue to comply with those requirements until project completion has been achieved. This handbook will be updated as needed, to enhance efficient and effective schedule management across the Agency. It is acknowledged that most, if not all, external organizations participating in NASA programs/projects will have their own internal schedule management documents. Issues that arise from conflicting schedule guidance will be resolved on a case by case basis as contracts and partnering relationships are established. It is also acknowledged and understood that all projects are not the same and may require different levels of schedule visibility, scrutiny and control. Project type, value, and complexity are factors that typically dictate which schedule management practices should be employed.

  18. Connecting Sun City with Sun-Earth connections

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lopez, R.; Turner, N.; Mammei, J.; Dominguez, O.; Schulte, H.

    Connecting Sun-City with Sun Earth Connections is a space science and education effort at the University of Texas at El Paso, funded by NASA. The goal is to use space science as a motivational tool for science education both in high school and at the un- dergraduate level. Activities include workshops for area teachers, visits by high school students to the university, visits by university faculty to area school, undergraduate re- search in space sciecne-related activities, and undergraduate curriculum development using space science themes. In this paper we will present an overview of the program and lesson learned to date.

  19. NASA | Raymonda Azrelyant Yeh Women@NASA 2015

    NASA Video Gallery

    Raymonda Azrelyant Yeh - Senior Accountant for NASA Goddard Space Flight Center The Women@NASA project is the perfect opportunity to celebrate women from across the agency who contribute to NASA’...

  20. NASA Now: Inspiration and Education: Building a Career at NASA

    NASA Video Gallery

    Be sure not to miss this episode of NASA Now, when three experts who work in very different fields at NASA discuss their jobs, responsibilities and what they enjoy most about their work. They also ...

  1. Making Connections

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Turner, Paul

    2015-01-01

    This article aims to illustrate a process of making connections, not between mathematics and other activities, but within mathematics itself--between diverse parts of the subject. Novel connections are still possible in previously explored mathematics when the material happens to be unfamiliar, as may be the case for a learner at any career stage.…

  2. Reduced expression of the mouse ribosomal protein Rpl17 alters the diversity of mature ribosomes by enhancing production of shortened 5.8S rRNA.

    PubMed

    Wang, Minshi; Parshin, Andrey V; Shcherbik, Natalia; Pestov, Dimitri G

    2015-07-01

    Processing of rRNA during ribosome assembly can proceed through alternative pathways but it is unclear whether this could affect the structure of the ribosome. Here, we demonstrate that shortage of a ribosomal protein can change pre-rRNA processing in a way that over time alters ribosome diversity in the cell. Reducing the amount of Rpl17 in mouse cells led to stalled 60S subunit maturation, causing degradation of most of the synthesized precursors. A fraction of pre-60S subunits, however, were able to complete maturation, but with a 5'-truncated 5.8S rRNA, which we named 5.8SC. The 5' exoribonuclease Xrn2 is involved in the generation of both 5.8S(C) and the canonical long form of 5.8S rRNA. Ribosomes containing 5.8S(C) rRNA are present in various mouse and human cells and engage in translation. These findings uncover a previously undescribed form of mammalian 5.8S rRNA and demonstrate that perturbations in ribosome assembly can be a source of heterogeneity in mature ribosomes.

  3. Reduced expression of the mouse ribosomal protein Rpl17 alters the diversity of mature ribosomes by enhancing production of shortened 5.8S rRNA

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Minshi; Parshin, Andrey V.; Shcherbik, Natalia; Pestov, Dimitri G.

    2015-01-01

    Processing of rRNA during ribosome assembly can proceed through alternative pathways but it is unclear whether this could affect the structure of the ribosome. Here, we demonstrate that shortage of a ribosomal protein can change pre-rRNA processing in a way that over time alters ribosome diversity in the cell. Reducing the amount of Rpl17 in mouse cells led to stalled 60S subunit maturation, causing degradation of most of the synthesized precursors. A fraction of pre-60S subunits, however, were able to complete maturation, but with a 5′-truncated 5.8S rRNA, which we named 5.8SC. The 5′ exoribonuclease Xrn2 is involved in the generation of both 5.8SC and the canonical long form of 5.8S rRNA. Ribosomes containing 5.8SC rRNA are present in various mouse and human cells and engage in translation. These findings uncover a previously undescribed form of mammalian 5.8S rRNA and demonstrate that perturbations in ribosome assembly can be a source of heterogeneity in mature ribosomes. PMID:25995445

  4. Overview of Space Science and Information Research Opportunities at NASA

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Green, James L.

    2000-01-01

    It is not possible to review all the opportunities that NASA provides to support the Space Science Enterprise, in the short amount of time allotted for this presentation. Therefore, only a few key programs will be discussed. The programs that I will discuss will concentrate on research opportunities for faculty, graduate and postdoctoral candidates in Space Science research and information technologies at NASA. One of the most important programs for research opportunities is the NASA Research Announcement or NRA. NASA Headquarters issues NRA's on a regular basis and these cover space science and computer science activities relating to NASA missions and programs. In the Space Sciences, the most important NRA is called the "Research Opportunities in Space Science or the ROSS NRA. The ROSS NRA is composed of multiple announcements in the areas of structure and evolution of the Universe, Solar System exploration, Sun-Earth connections, and applied information systems. Another important opportunity is the Graduate Student Research Program (GSRP). The GSRP is designed to cultivate research ties between a NASA Center and the academic community through the award of fellowships to promising students in science and engineering. This program is unique since it matches the student's area of research interest with existing work being carried out at NASA. This program is for U.S. citizens who are full-time graduate students. Students who are successful have made the match between their research and the NASA employee who will act as their NASA Advisor/ Mentor. In this program, the student's research is primarily accomplished under the supervision of his faculty advisor with periodic or frequent interactions with the NASA Mentor. These interactions typically involve travel to the sponsoring NASA Center on a regular basis. The one-year fellowships are renewable for up to three years and over $20,000 per year. These and other important opportunities will be discussed.

  5. Icariin regulates systemic iron metabolism by increasing hepatic hepcidin expression through Stat3 and Smad1/5/8 signaling.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Miao; Liu, Jing; Guo, Wenli; Liu, Xin; Liu, Sijin; Yin, Huijun

    2016-05-01

    Systemic iron homeostasis is strictly controlled under normal conditions to ensure a balance between the absorption, utilization, storage and recycling of iron. The hepcidin-ferroportin (FPN) axis is of critical importance in the maintenance of iron homeostasis. Hepcidin deficiency gives rise to enhanced dietary iron absorption, as well as to increased iron release from macrophages, and this in turn results in iron accumulation in the plasma and organs, and is associated with a range of tissue pathologies. Low hepcidin levels have been demonstrated in most forms of hereditary hemochromatosis (HH), as well as in β-thalassemia. Therapies that increase hepcidin concentrations may potentially play a role in the treatment of these iron overload-related diseases. To date, natural compounds have not been extensively investigated for this purpose, to the best of our knowledge. Thus, in the present study, we screened natural compounds that have the potential to regulate hepcidin expression. By performing hepcidin promoter-luciferase assay, RT-qPCR and animal experiments, we demonstrated that icariin and berberine were potent stimulators of hepcidin transcription. Mechanistic experiments indicated that icariin and berberine increased hepcidin expression by activating the signal transducer and activator of transcription 3 (Stat3) and Smad1/5/8 signaling pathways. The induction of hepcidin was confirmed in mice following icariin administration, coupled with associated changes in serum and tissue iron concentrations. In support of these findings, the icariin analogues, epimedin A, B and C, also increased hepatic hepcidin expression. However, these changes were not observed in hepcidin-deficient [Hamp1-/- or Hamp1‑knockout (KO)] mice following icariin administration, thereby verifying hepatic hepcidin as the target of icariin. Although berberine exhibited a robust capacity to promote hepcidin expression in vitro, it failed to alter hepcidin expression in mice. Taken together

  6. Rupture process and stress drop of the 2011 Mw 5.8 Virginia earthquake based on seismic waveforms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shao, G.; Crempien, J.; Archuleta, R. J.; Ji, C.

    2011-12-01

    On 23 August 2011, a Mw 5.8 earthquake hit central Virginia. It was reported as the most widely felt earthquake in US history- reflecting, in part, the population density in the eastern US and the low attenuation of this region. We have looked at the rupture process with teleseismic data. We constrain the source rupture process by modeling teleseismic P waves (up to 2Hz) at 43 stations and SH waves (up to 1Hz) at 22 stations. Given the regional trend of the geology we prefer a fault plane that has a strike of 26° and dip of 55° based on the St. Louis regional CMT solution. We use a 9 km x 9 km planar fault plane and a hypocenter depth of 5 km. Maximum slip of our preferred model is 1.05 m, occurring 1-2 km up-dip of the hypocenter. Most of the stress drop (inferred from the slip distribution) is confined to an area that is 5 km down dip and 7 km along strike. The initial results suggest a weak nucleation followed by a relatively slow rupture propagation. The average rupture velocity is ~ 1.9 km/s with almost all of the slip occurring within the 2 s window from 0.6 s to 2.6 s after the origin time. We find a total seismic moment of 5.75x1017 Nm, consistent with the Global CMT solution. Using the slip on the fault we compute an average stress drop of 6.1 MPa, which is consistent with the stress drop from the Eshelby formula for a circular fault of radius 3.4 km and seismic moment of 5.75x1017 Nm. However, analysis of the S wave spectrum from the accelerogram recorded at CBN (Fredericksburg Observatory, Virginia; 58 km epicentral distance) suggests a stress drop on the order of 30 MPa. We plan to present a set of source parameters that are consistent with both the regional and teleseismic data.

  7. Anti-proliferative actions of 2-decylamino-5,8-dimethoxy-1,4-naphthoquinone in vascular smooth muscle cells

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, Jung-Jin; Zhang, Wei-Yun; Yi, Hyoseok; Kim, Yohan; Kim, In-Su; Shen, Gui-Nan; Song, Gyu-Yong; Myung, Chang-Seon

    2011-07-22

    Highlights: {yields} 2-Decylamino-DMNQ inhibited PDGF-BB-induced VSMC proliferation in a dose-dependent manner with no apparent cytotoxicity. {yields} 2-Decylamino-DMNQ inhibited PDGF-BB-induced phosphorylation of Erk1/2 and PLC{gamma}1. {yields} 2-Decylamino-DMNQ arrested a G{sub 0}/G{sub 1} cell cycle progression in association with pRb phosphorylation and PCNA expression. {yields} Both U0126, an Erk inhibitor, and U73122, a PLC{gamma} inhibitor, arrested a G{sub 0}/G{sub 1} phase of the cell cycle. -- Abstract: Naphthoquinone derivatives have been reported to possess various pharmacological activities, such as antiplatelet, anticancer, antifungal, and antiviral properties. In this study, we investigated the effects of a newly-synthesized naphthoquinone derivative, 2-decylamino-5,8-dimethoxy-1,4-naphthoquinone (2-decylamino-DMNQ), on VSMC proliferation and examined the molecular basis of the underlying mechanism. In a dose-dependent manner, 2-decylamino-DMNQ inhibited PDGF-stimulated VSMC proliferation with no apparent cytotoxic effect. While 2-decylamino-DMNQ did not affect PDGF-R{beta} or Akt, it did inhibit the phosphorylation of Erk1/2 and PLC{gamma}1 induced by PDGF. Moreover, 2-decylamino-DMNQ suppressed DNA synthesis through the arrest of cell cycle progression at the G{sub 0}/G{sub 1} phase, including the suppression of pRb phosphorylation and a decrease in PCNA expression, which was related to the downregulation of cell cycle regulatory factors, such as cyclin D1/E and CDK 2/4. It was demonstrated that both U0126, an Erk1/2 inhibitor, and U73122, a PLC{gamma} inhibitor, increased the proportion of cells in the G{sub 0}/G{sub 1} phase of the cell cycle. Thus, these results suggest that 2-decylamino DMNQ has an inhibitory effect on PDGF-induced VSMC proliferation and the mechanism of this action is through cell cycle arrest at the G{sub 0}/G{sub 1} phase. This may be a useful tool for studying interventions for vascular restenosis in coronary

  8. NASA's Plum Brook Station Water Systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Puzak, Robert M.; Kimpton, Arthur

    2006-01-01

    Plum Brook Station's water systems were built in the 1940s to support a World War II ordnance production complex. Because the systems had not been analyzed for current NASA usage, it was unknown if they could meet current requirements and codes or if they were efficient for current use. NASA wanted to determine what improvements would be needed or advisable to support its research projects, so it contracted a hydraulic analysis of the raw and domestic water systems. Burgess and Niple determined current water demands and water flow, developed and calibrated models of the two water systems, and evaluated efficiency improvements and cost-cutting options. They recommended replacing some water mains, installing a new service connection, and removing some high-maintenance items (an underground reservoir, some booster pumps, and a tower).

  9. NASA's Earth Science Research and Environmental Predictions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hilsenrath, E.

    2004-01-01

    NASA Earth Science program began in the 1960s with cloud imaging satellites used for weather observations. A fleet of satellites are now in orbit to investigate the Earth Science System to uncover the connections between land, Oceans and the atmosphere. Satellite systems using an array of active and passive remote sensors are used to search for answers on how is the Earth changing and what are the consequences for life on Earth? The answer to these questions can be used for applications to serve societal needs and contribute to decision support systems for weather, hazard, and air quality predictions and mitigation of adverse effects. Partnerships with operational agencies using NASA's observational capabilities are now being explored. The system of the future will require new technology, data assimilation systems which includes data and models that will be used for forecasts that respond to user needs.

  10. NASA UAS Update

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bauer, Jeffrey Ervin; Mulac, Brenda Lynn

    2010-01-01

    Last year may prove to be a pivotal year for the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) in the Unmanned Aircraft Systems (UAS) arena, especially in relation to routine UAS access to airspace as NASA accepted an invitation to join the UAS Executive Committee (UAS ExCom). The UAS ExCom is a multi-agency, Federal executive-level committee comprised of the Federal Aviation Administration (FAA), Department of Defense (DoD), Department of Homeland Security (DHS), and NASA with the goals to: 1) Coordinate and align efforts between key Federal Government agencies to achieve routine safe federal public UAS operations in the National Airspace System (NAS); 2) Coordinate and prioritize technical, procedural, regulatory, and policy solutions needed to deliver incremental capabilities; 3) Develop a plan to accommodate the larger stakeholder community at the appropriate time; and 4) Resolve conflicts between Federal Government agencies (FAA, DoD, DHS, and NASA), related to the above goals. The committee was formed in recognition of the need of UAS operated by these agencies to access to the National Airspace System (NAS) to support operational, training, development and research requirements. In order to meet that need, technical, procedural, regulatory, and policy solutions are required to deliver incremental capabilities leading to routine access. The formation of the UAS ExCom is significant in that it represents a tangible commitment by FAA senior leadership to address the UAS access challenge. While the focus of the ExCom is government owned and operated UAS, civil UAS operations are bound to benefit by the progress made in achieving routine access for government UAS. As the UAS ExCom was forming, NASA's Aeronautics Research Mission Directorate began to show renewed interest in UAS, particularly in relation to the future state of the air transportation system under the Next Generation Air Transportation System (NextGen). NASA made funding from the American

  11. Discovery External Tank Connection Check

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1999-01-01

    In the Vehicle Assembly Building, Ken Strite, NASA Quality Control, inspects the connection between Space Shuttle Discovery and the external tank that will be used to launch mission STS-103 in early December. This 10 day mission is designed to replace aging parts on the nine year old Hubble Space Telescope and to upgrade some of its functioning systems. During the flight, the astronaut crew will replace all six of the observatory's gyroscopes, a fine guidance sensor, its main computer, and other equipment.

  12. NASA Now: Air Traffic Management

    NASA Video Gallery

    In this episode of NASA Now, you’ll meet aerospace engineer Aisha Bowe, who is helping NASA solve this complex problem. Learn why there is no perfectly designed system and all technological solut...

  13. Commercialization in NASA Space Operations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gilbert, Charlene E.

    1998-01-01

    Various issues associated with commercialization in NASA space operations are presented in viewgraph form. Specific topics include: 1) NASA's financial outlook; 2) Space operations; 3) Space operations technology; and 4) Strategies associated with these operations.

  14. NASA Reveals Most Unusual Planet

    NASA Video Gallery

    In exploring the universe, NASA has uncovered one planet more unusual than all others. This 30 second video shows you which planet that is, and explains that NASA science helps us better understand...

  15. Tissue grown in space in NASA Bioreactor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2001-01-01

    Dr. Lisa E. Freed of the Massachusetts Institute of Technology and her colleagues have reported that initially disc-like specimens tend to become spherical in space, demonstrating that tissues can grow and differentiate into distinct structures in microgravity. The Mir Increment 3 (Sept. 16, 1996 - Jan. 22, 1997) samples were smaller, more spherical, and mechanically weaker than Earth-grown control samples. These results demonstrate the feasibility of microgravity tissue engineering and may have implications for long human space voyages and for treating musculoskeletal disorders on earth. Final samples from Mir and Earth appeared histologically cartilaginous throughout their entire cross sections (5-8 mm thick), with the exception of fibrous outer capsules. Constructs grown on Earth (A) appeared to have a more organized extracellular matrix with more uniform collagen orientation as compared with constructs grown on Mir (B), but the average collagen fiber diameter was similar in the two groups (22 +- 2 nm) and comparable to that previously reported for developing articular cartilage. Randomly oriented collagen in Mir samples would be consistent with previous reports that microgravity disrupts fibrillogenesis. These are transmission electron micrographs of constructs from Mir (A) and Earth (B) groups at magnifications of x3,500 and x120,000 (Inset). The work is sponsored by NASA's Office of Biological and Physical Research. The bioreactor is managed by the Biotechnology Cell Science Program at NASA's Johnson Space Center (JSC). NASA-sponsored bioreactor research has been instrumental in helping scientists to better understand normal and cancerous tissue development. In cooperation with the medical community, the bioreactor design is being used to prepare better models of human colon, prostate, breast and ovarian tumors. Credit: Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences.

  16. NASA New England Outreach Center

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2002-01-01

    The NASA New England Outreach Center in Nashua, New Hampshire was established to serve as a catalyst for heightening regional business awareness of NASA procurement, technology and commercialization opportunities. Emphasis is placed on small business participation, with the highest priority given to small disadvantaged businesses, women-owned businesses, HUBZone businesses, service disabled veteran owned businesses, and historically black colleges and universities and minority institutions. The Center assists firms and organizations to understand NASA requirements and to develop strategies to capture NASA related procurement and technology opportunities. The establishment of the NASA Outreach Center serves to stimulate business in a historically underserved area. NASA direct business awards have traditionally been highly present in the West, Midwest, South, and Southeast areas of the United States. The Center guides and assists businesses and organizations in the northeast to target opportunities within NASA and its prime contractors and capture business and technology opportunities. The Center employs an array of technology access, one-on-one meetings, seminars, site visits, and targeted conferences to acquaint Northeast firms and organizations with representatives from NASA and its prime contractors to learn about and discuss opportunities to do business and access the inventory of NASA technology. This stimulus of interaction also provides firms and organizations the opportunity to propose the use of their developed technology and ideas for current and future requirements at NASA. The Center provides a complement to the NASA Northeast Regional Technology Transfer Center in developing prospects for commercialization of NASA technology. In addition, the Center responds to local requests for assistance and NASA material and documents, and is available to address immediate concerns and needs in assessing opportunities, timely support to interact with NASA Centers on

  17. NASA's Postdoctoral Fellowship Programs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Beichman, Charles A.; Gelino, D. M.; Allen, R. J.; Prestwich, A. H.

    2013-01-01

    The three named fellowships --- the Einstein, Hubble and Sagan programs --- are among the most prestigious postdoctoral positions in astronomy. Their policies are closely coordinated to ensure the highest scientific quality, the broadest possible access to a diverse community of recent PhD graduates, and flexibility in completing the 3 year appointments in light of individual personal circumstances. We will discuss practical details related to "family-friendly" best practices such as no-cost extensions and the ability to transfer the host institution in response to "two body problems." We note, however, that the terms of the NASA fellowships are such that fellows become employees of their host institutions which set specific policies on issues such as parental leave. We look forward to participating in the discussion at this special session and conveying to NASA any suggestions for improving the fellowship program.

  18. NASA Balloon Technology Developments

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fairbrother, D. A.

    2004-01-01

    The National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) Balloon Program has been, and will continue to be, committed to improving the capabilities of balloons to support science missions. Fundamental to vehicle improvement is a program of technology development that will enable improved flight performance throughout the next decade. The program s technology thrust areas include: materials, vehicle design & development, structural analysis, operations & support systems, performance modeling and planetary balloons. Building on the foundations of the 18-year research and development program, a technology roadmap has been generated which identifies specific areas of interest to NASA and the vision of future developments. The major components of the roadmap are: vehicle systems, balloon-craft systems, operational and safety support systems, and planetary vehicles. Current technology activities include nanocomposite balloon films, a new balloon designed to lift 3600 kgs to 36 km, a balloon rotation rate study and Mars pumpkin balloon investigations. The technology roadmap, as well as specific projects and recent advancements, will be presented.

  19. Requirements management at NASA

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rosenburg, L.

    2001-01-01

    Requirements have always been acknowledged as the backbone of any system. However, in many past development efforts, requirements were paid little heed. At NASA, in recent years, the hue and cry for project development has been "Faster, Better, Cheaper and Safer". This has impacted the way we develop software; it has increased the risks to quality, safety and reliability. At NASA, the Software Assurance Technology Center (SATC) is working with projects to emphasize the criticality of requirements throughout development, not just in the initial phases. This emphasis is on requirements relationship to all aspects of quality, including reliability and safety. In this presentation, we will look at some of these relationships through the eyes of quality.

  20. NASA head sworn in

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    James C. Fletcher was sworn in on May 12, 1986, as administrator of the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA). At a news conference after he was sworn in, Fletcher said that NASA would deal with both its technical problems and its procedural problems before the shuttle will fly again. According to press accounts, he stressed that funds should be made available to replace the Challenger orbiter, which was lost in an explosion on January 28.Fletcher, who had also headed the agency from 1971 to 1977, succeeds James M. Beggs, who was indicted in December 1985 for conspiring to defraud the federal government while serving as a senior executive at the General Dynamics Corporation.

  1. NASA balloon technology developments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fairbrother, D. A.

    The National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) Balloon Program has been, and will continue to be, committed to improving the capabilities of balloons to support science missions. Fundamental to vehicle improvement is a program of technology development that will enable improved flight performance throughout the next decade. The program's technology thrust areas include: materials, vehicle design & development, structural analysis, operations & support systems, performance modeling and planetary balloons. Building on the foundations of the 18-year research and development program, a technology roadmap has been generated which identifies specific areas of interest to NASA and the vision of future developments. The major components of the roadmap are: vehicle systems, ballooncraft systems, operational and safety support systems, and planetary vehicles. Current technology activities include nanocomposite balloon films, a new balloon designed to lift 3600 kgs to 36 km, a balloon rotation rate study and Mars pumpkin balloon investigations. The technology roadmap, as well as specific projects and recent advancements, will be presented.

  2. NASA's Microgravity Research Program

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Woodard, Dan

    1998-01-01

    This fiscal year (FY) 1997 annual report describes key elements of the NASA Microgravity Research Program (MRP) as conducted by the Microgravity Research Division (MRD) within NASA's Office of Life and Microgravity, Sciences and Applications. The program's goals, approach taken to achieve those goals, and program resources are summarized. All snapshots of the program's status at the end of FY 1997 and a review of highlights and progress in grounds and flights based research are provided. Also described are major space missions that flew during FY 1997, plans for utilization of the research potential of the International Space Station, the Advanced Technology Development (ATD) Program, and various educational/outreach activities. The MRP supports investigators from academia, industry, and government research communities needing a space environment to study phenomena directly or indirectly affected by gravity.

  3. NASA and Education

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1990-01-01

    President Bush endorsed a package of six goals developed by the governors of the 50 states, among them making the United States first in the world in mathematics and science achievement. The crux of the technical manpower problem is that too few people in the workforce today have the skills required to function in a technologically advanced society. All over the U.S., government, industry and academic organizations, individually and in concert, at the national, state and local levels, are accelerating efforts to find remedies for the educational and training maladies that threaten America's scientific and technological future. NASA is among the leading education promoting organizations and the agency is expanding its effort. In May 1990, NASA and the Department of Energy concluded an agreement for a cooperative program directed at encouraging more U.S. students to pursue careers in science, engineering and mathematics, and at improving the instructional process in those areas at the precollege and university levels.

  4. NASA wake vortex research

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stough, H. P., III; Greene, George C.; Stewart, Eric C.; Stuever, Robert A.; Jordan, Frank L., Jr.; Rivers, Robert A.; Vicroy, Dan D.

    1993-01-01

    NASA is conducting research that will enable safe improvements in the capacity of the nation's air transportation system. The wake-vortex hazard is a factor in establishing the minimum safe spacing between aircraft during landing and takeoff operations and, thus, impacts airport capacity. The ability to accurately model the wake hazard and determine safe separation distances for a wide range of aircraft and operational scenarios may provide the basis for significant increases in airport capacity. Current and planned NASA research is described which is focused on increasing airport capacity by safely reducing wake-hazard-imposed aircraft separations through advances in a number of technologies including vortex motion and decay prediction, vortex encounter modeling, wake-vortex hazard characterization, and in situ flow sensing.

  5. NASA's Exobiology Program.

    PubMed

    DeVincenzi, D L

    1984-01-01

    The goal of NASA's Exobiology Program is to understand the origin, evolution, and distribution of life, and life-related molecules, on Earth and throughout the universe. Emphasis is focused on determining how the rate and direction of these processes were affected by the chemical and physical environment of the evolving planet, as well as by planetary, solar, and astrophysical phenomena. This is accomplished by a multi-disciplinary program of research conducted by over 60 principal investigators in both NASA and university laboratories. Major program thrusts are in the following research areas: biogenic elements; chemical evolution; origin of life; organic geochemistry; evolution of higher life forms; solar system exploration; and the search for extraterrestrial intelligence (SETI).

  6. NASA Benefits Earth

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Robinson, Julie A.

    2009-01-01

    This slide presentation reviews several ways in which NASA research has benefited Earth and made life on Earth better. These innovations include: solar panels, recycled pavement, thermometer pill, invisible braces for straightening teeth, LASIK, aerodynamic helmets and tires for bicycles, cataract detection, technology that was used to remove Anthrax spores from mail handling facilities, study of atomic oxygen erosion of materials has informed the restoration of artwork, macroencapsulation (a potential mechanism to deliver anti cancer drugs to specific sites), and research on a salmonella vaccine. With research on the International Space Station just beginning, there will be opportunities for entrepreneurs and other government agencies to access space for their research and development. As well as NASA continuing its own research on human health and technology development.

  7. NASA's Hypersonic Investment Area

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hueter, Uwe; Hutt, John; McClinton, Charles

    2002-01-01

    NASA has established long term goals for access to space. The third generation launch systems are to be fully reusable and operational around 2025. The goal for third-generation launch systems represents significant reduction in cost and improved safety over the current first generation system. The Advanced Space Transportation Office (ASTP) at NASA s Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC) has the agency lead to develop space transportation technologies. Within ASTP, under the Hypersonic Investment Area (HIA), third generation technologies are being pursued in the areas of propulsion, airframe, integrated vehicle health management (IVHM), avionics, power, operations and system analysis. These technologies are being matured through research and both ground and flight-testing. This paper provides an overview of the HIA program plans and recent accomplishments.

  8. NASA reload program

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Byington, Marshall

    1993-01-01

    Atlantic Research Corporation (ARC) contracted with NASA to manufacture and deliver thirteen small scale Solid Rocket Motors (SRM). These motors, containing five distinct propellant formulations, will be used for plume induced radiation studies. The information contained herein summarizes and documents the program accomplishments and results. Several modifications were made to the scope of work during the course of the program. The effort was on hold from late 1991 through August, 1992 while propellant formulation changes were developed. Modifications to the baseline program were completed in late-August and Modification No. 6 was received by ARC on September 14, 1992. The modifications include changes to the propellant formulation and the nozzle design. The required motor deliveries were completed in late-December, 1992. However, ARC agreed to perform an additional mix and cast effort at no cost to NASA and another motor was delivered in March, 1993.

  9. NASA's Exobiology Program

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Devincenzi, D. L.

    1984-01-01

    The goal of NASA's Exobiology Program is to understand the origin, evolution, and distribution of life, and life-related molecules, on earth and throughout the universe. Emphasis is focused on determining how the rate and direction of these processes were affected by the chemical and physical environment of the evolving planet, as well as by planetary, solar, and astrophysical phenomena. This is accomplished by a multi-disciplinary program of research conducted by over 60 principal investigators in both NASA and university laboratories. Major program thrusts are in the following research areas: biogenic elements; chemical evolution; origin of life; organic geochemistry; evolution of higher life forms; solar system exploration; and the search for extraterrestrial intelligence (SETI).

  10. Development of an Outreach Program for NASA: "NASA Ambassadors"

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lebo, George R.

    1996-01-01

    It is widely known that the average American citizen has either no idea or the wrong impression of what NASA is doing. The most common impression is that NASA's sole mission is to build and launch spacecraft and that the everyday experience of the common citizen would be impacted very little if NASA failed to exist altogether. Some feel that most of NASA's efforts are much too expensive and that the money would be better used on other efforts. Others feel that most of NASA's efforts either fail altogether or fail to meet their original objectives. Yet others feel that NASA is so mired in bureaucracy that it is no longer able to function. The goal of the NASA Ambassadors Program (NAP) is to educate the general populace as to what NASA's mission and goals actually are, to re-excite the "man on the street" with NASA's discoveries and technologies, and to convince him that NASA really does impact his everyday experience and that the economy of the U.S. is very dependent on NASA-type research. Each of the NASA centers currently run a speakers bureau through its Public Affairs Office (PAO). The speakers, NASA employees, are scheduled on an "as available" status and their travel is paid by NASA. However, there are only a limited number of them and their message may be regarded as being somewhat biased as they are paid by NASA. On the other hand, there are many members of NASA's summer programs which come from all areas of the country. Most of them not only believe that NASA's mission is important but are willing and able to articulate it to others. Furthermore, in the eyes of the public, they are probably more effective as ambassadors for NASA than are the NASA employees, as they do not derive their primary funding from it. Therefore it was decided to organize materials for them to use in presentations to general audiences in their home areas. Each person who accepted these materials was to be called a "NASA Ambassador".

  11. NASA Product Peer Review Process

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jenks, Ken

    2009-01-01

    This viewgraph presentation describes NASA's product peer review process. The contents include: 1) Inspection/Peer Review at NASA; 2) Reasons for product peer reviews; 3) Different types of peer reviews; and 4) NASA requirements for peer reviews. This presentation also includes a demonstration of an actual product peer review.

  12. NASA Airborne Lidar July 1991

    Atmospheric Science Data Center

    2016-05-26

    NASA Airborne Lidar July 1991 Data from the 1991 NASA Langley Airborne Lidar flights following the eruption of Pinatubo in July ... and Osborn [1992a, 1992b]. Project Title:  NASA Airborne Lidar Discipline:  Field Campaigns ...

  13. NASA Airborne Lidar May 1992

    Atmospheric Science Data Center

    2016-05-26

    NASA Airborne Lidar May 1992 An airborne Nd:YAG (532 nm) lidar was operated by the NASA Langley Research Center about a year following the June 1991 eruption of ... Osborn [1992a, 1992b].  Project Title:  NASA Airborne Lidar Discipline:  Field Campaigns ...

  14. NASA Space Human Factors Program

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1992-01-01

    This booklet briefly and succinctly treats 23 topics of particular interest to the NASA Space Human Factors Program. Most articles are by different authors who are mainly NASA Johnson or NASA Ames personnel. Representative topics covered include mental workload and performance in space, light effects on Circadian rhythms, human sleep, human reasoning, microgravity effects and automation and crew performance.

  15. NASA Oceanic Processes Program

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1986-01-01

    This, the Sixth Annual Report for NASA's Oceanic Processes Program, provides an overview of recent accomplishments, present activities, and future plans. Although the report was prepared for Fiscal Year 1985 (October 1, 1984 to September 30, 1985), the period covered by the Introduction extends into June 1986. Sections following the Introduction provide summaries of current flight projects and definition studies, brief descriptions of individual research activities, and a bibliography of refereed journal articles appearing within the past two years.

  16. NASA Headquarters training catalog

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1990-01-01

    The NASA Headquarters training catalog is a comprehensive listing of all educational and employee development programs. This course catalog contains descriptions of course content, objectives, target audience, prerequisites, length of course, approximate number of times the course is offered per year, and cost of the course. Curriculum areas include graduate and undergraduate academic study; professional development program; and executive management, senior management, and supervisory development programs. Secretarial/clerical and general computer skills programs are also included.

  17. SETI: The NASA Years

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Billingham, John

    This chapter, on the years of SETI in NASA, was initially prepared in 2000 for the celebration of Frank Drake's 70th birthday, but has never been previously published. All the material in these pages remains as valid today, in 2010, as it was 10 years ago. So it fits well into this volume on SETI Past, Present, and Future, with only minor revisions, and I am delighted that it is now seeing the light of day.

  18. NASA Photo One

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ross, James C.

    2013-01-01

    This is a photographic record of NASA Dryden flight research aircraft, spanning nearly 25 years. The author has served as a Dryden photographer, and now as its chief photographer and airborne photographer. The results are extraordinary images of in-flight aircraft never seen elsewhere, as well as pictures of aircraft from unusual angles on the ground. The collection is the result of the agency required documentation process for its assets.

  19. NASA Dryden Status

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jacobson, Steve

    2012-01-01

    NASA Dryden has been engaged in exciting work that will enable lighter weight and more fuel efficient vehicles through advanced control and dynamics technologies. The main areas of emphasis are Enabling Light-weight Flexible Structures, real time control surface optimization for fuel efficiency and autonomous formation flight. This presentation provides a description of the current and upcoming work in these areas. Additionally, status is provided Dryden's work on HTV-2.

  20. NASA New Virtual Airport

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1995-01-01

    NASA's Virtual Airport Tower is located at the Ames Research Center, Moffett Field, California. The Virtual Airport Tower's two-story structure is a full-scale, highly sophisticated simulation facility that will emulate Level 5 air traffic control towers and the busiest airports. It provides the platform to conduct in-depth human factors studies with quantifiable results using actual air traffic controllers, airline dispatchers and airport managers.

  1. Reshaping NASA's Aeronautics Program

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Liang, Anita D.

    2007-01-01

    We will dedicate ourselves to the mastery and intellectual stewardship of the core competencies of Aeronautics for the Nation in all flight regimes. We will focus our research in areas that are appropriate to NASA's unique capabilities. we will directly address the R&D needs of the Next Generation Air Transportation System (NGATS) in partnership with the member agencies of the Joint Planning and development Office (JPDO).

  2. The NASA Astrobiology Roadmap.

    PubMed

    Des Marais, David J; Allamandola, Louis J; Benner, Steven A; Boss, Alan P; Deamer, David; Falkowski, Paul G; Farmer, Jack D; Hedges, S Blair; Jakosky, Bruce M; Knoll, Andrew H; Liskowsky, David R; Meadows, Victoria S; Meyer, Michael A; Pilcher, Carl B; Nealson, Kenneth H; Spormann, Alfred M; Trent, Jonathan D; Turner, William W; Woolf, Neville J; Yorke, Harold W

    2003-01-01

    The NASA Astrobiology Roadmap provides guidance for research and technology development across the NASA enterprises that encompass the space, Earth, and biological sciences. The ongoing development of astrobiology roadmaps embodies the contributions of diverse scientists and technologists from government, universities, and private institutions. The Roadmap addresses three basic questions: How does life begin and evolve, does life exist elsewhere in the universe, and what is the future of life on Earth and beyond? Seven Science Goals outline the following key domains of investigation: understanding the nature and distribution of habitable environments in the universe, exploring for habitable environments and life in our own solar system, understanding the emergence of life, determining how early life on Earth interacted and evolved with its changing environment, understanding the evolutionary mechanisms and environmental limits of life, determining the principles that will shape life in the future, and recognizing signatures of life on other worlds and on early Earth. For each of these goals, Science Objectives outline more specific high-priority efforts for the next 3-5 years. These 18 objectives are being integrated with NASA strategic planning.

  3. NASA Technical Standards Program

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gill, Paul S.; Vaughan, WIlliam W.

    2003-01-01

    The NASA Technical Standards Program was officially established in 1997 as result of a directive issued by the Administrator. It is responsible for Agency wide technical standards development, adoption (endorsement), and conversion of Center-unique standards for Agency wide use. One major element of the Program is the review of NSA technical standards products and replacement with non-Government Voluntary Consensus Standards in accordance with directions issued by the Office of Management and Budget. As part of the Program s function, it developed a NASA Integrated Technical Standards Initiative that consists of and Agency wide full-text system, standards update notification system, and lessons learned - standards integration system. The Program maintains a "one stop-shop" Website for technical standards ad related information on aerospace materials, etc. This paper provides information on the development, current status, and plans for the NAS Technical Standards Program along with metrics on the utility of the products provided to both users within the nasa.gov Domain and the Public Domain.

  4. NASA Technical Standards Program

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gill, Paul S.; Vaughan, William W.; Parker, Nelson C. (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    The NASA Technical Standards Program was officially established in 1997 as result of a directive issued by the Administrator. It is responsible for Agency wide technical standards development, adoption (endorsement), and conversion of Center-unique standards for Agency wide use. One major element of the Program is the review of NSA technical standards products and replacement with non-Government Voluntary Consensus Standards in accordance with directions issued by the Office of Management and Budget. As part of the Program's function, it developed a NASA Integrated Technical Standards Initiative that consists of and Agency wide full-text system, standards update notification system, and lessons learned-standards integration system. The Program maintains a 'one stop-shop' Website for technical standards ad related information on aerospace materials, etc. This paper provides information on the development, current status, and plans for the NAS Technical Standards Program along with metrics on the utility of the products provided to both users within the nasa.gov Domain and the Public Domain.

  5. The NASA Astrobiology Roadmap.

    PubMed

    Des Marais, David J; Nuth, Joseph A; Allamandola, Louis J; Boss, Alan P; Farmer, Jack D; Hoehler, Tori M; Jakosky, Bruce M; Meadows, Victoria S; Pohorille, Andrew; Runnegar, Bruce; Spormann, Alfred M

    2008-08-01

    The NASA Astrobiology Roadmap provides guidance for research and technology development across the NASA enterprises that encompass the space, Earth, and biological sciences. The ongoing development of astrobiology roadmaps embodies the contributions of diverse scientists and technologists from government, universities, and private institutions. The Roadmap addresses three basic questions: how does life begin and evolve, does life exist elsewhere in the universe, and what is the future of life on Earth and beyond? Seven Science Goals outline the following key domains of investigation: understanding the nature and distribution of habitable environments in the universe, exploring for habitable environments and life in our own Solar System, understanding the emergence of life, determining how early life on Earth interacted and evolved with its changing environment, understanding the evolutionary mechanisms and environmental limits of life, determining the principles that will shape life in the future, and recognizing signatures of life on other worlds and on early Earth. For each of these goals, Science Objectives outline more specific high priority efforts for the next three to five years. These eighteen objectives are being integrated with NASA strategic planning.

  6. The NASA Astrobiology Roadmap

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Des Marais, David J.; Allamandola, Louis J.; Benner, Steven A.; Boss, Alan P.; Deamer, David; Falkowski, Paul G.; Farmer, Jack D.; Hedges, S. Blair; Jakosky, Bruce M.; Knoll, Andrew H.; Liskowsky, David R.; Meadows, Victoria S.; Meyer, Michael A.; Pilcher, Carl B.; Nealson, Kenneth H.; Spormann, Alfred M.; Trent, Jonathan D.; Turner, William W.; Woolf, Neville J.; Yorke, Harold W.

    2003-01-01

    The NASA Astrobiology Roadmap provides guidance for research and technology development across the NASA enterprises that encompass the space, Earth, and biological sciences. The ongoing development of astrobiology roadmaps embodies the contributions of diverse scientists and technologists from government, universities, and private institutions. The Roadmap addresses three basic questions: How does life begin and evolve, does life exist elsewhere in the universe, and what is the future of life on Earth and beyond? Seven Science Goals outline the following key domains of investigation: understanding the nature and distribution of habitable environments in the universe, exploring for habitable environments and life in our own solar system, understanding the emergence of life, determining how early life on Earth interacted and evolved with its changing environment, understanding the evolutionary mechanisms and environmental limits of life, determining the principles that will shape life in the future, and recognizing signatures of life on other worlds and on early Earth. For each of these goals, Science Objectives outline more specific high-priority efforts for the next 3-5 years. These 18 objectives are being integrated with NASA strategic planning.

  7. The NASA CELSS program

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Averner, Maurice M.

    1990-01-01

    The NASA Controlled Ecological Life Support System (CELSS) program was initiated with the premise that NASA's goal would eventually include extended duration missions with sizable crews requiring capabilities beyond the ability of conventional life support technology. Currently, as mission duration and crew size increase, the mass and volume required for consumable life support supplies also increase linearly. Under these circumstances the logistics arrangements and associated costs for life support resupply will adversely affect the ability of NASA to conduct long duration missions. A solution to the problem is to develop technology for the recycling of life support supplies from wastes. The CELSS concept is based upon the integration of biological and physico-chemical processes to construct a system which will produce food, potable water, and a breathable atmosphere from metabolic and other wastes, in a stable and reliable manner. A central feature of a CELSS is the use of green plant photosynthesis to produce food, with the resulting production of oxygen and potable water, and the removal of carbon dioxide.

  8. NASA Bioreactor tissue culture

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1998-01-01

    Dr. Lisa E. Freed of the Massachusetts Institute of Technology and her colleagues have reported that initially disc-like specimens tend to become spherical in space, demonstrating that tissues can grow and differentiate into distinct structures in microgravity. The Mir Increment 3 (Sept. 16, 1996 - Jan. 22, 1997) samples were smaller, more spherical, and mechanically weaker than Earth-grown control samples. These results demonstrate the feasibility of microgravity tissue engineering and may have implications for long human space voyages and for treating musculoskeletal disorders on earth. The work is sponsored by NASA's Office of Biological and Physical Research. The bioreactor is managed by the Biotechnology Cell Science Program at NASA's Johnson Space Center (JSC). NASA-sponsored bioreactor research has been instrumental in helping scientists to better understand normal and cancerous tissue development. In cooperation with the medical community, the bioreactor design is being used to prepare better models of human colon, prostate, breast and ovarian tumors. Cartilage, bone marrow, heart muscle, skeletal muscle, pancreatic islet cells, liver and kidney are just a few of the normal tissues being cultured in rotating bioreactors by investigators.

  9. NASA advanced propeller research

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Groeneweg, John F.; Bober, Lawrence J.

    1988-01-01

    Acoustic and aerodynamic research at NASA Lewis Research Center on advanced propellers is reviewed including analytical and experimental results on both single and counterrotation. Computational tools used to calculate the detailed flow and acoustic fields are described along with wind tunnel tests to obtain data for code verification. Results from two kinds of experiments are reviewed: (1) performance and near field noise at cruise conditions as measured in the NASA Lewis 8- by 6-foot Wind Tunnel; and (2) far field noise and performance for takeoff/approach conditions as measured in the NASA Lewis 9- by 15-foot Anechoic Wind Tunnel. Detailed measurements of steady blade surface pressures are described along with vortex flow phenomena at off-design conditions. Near field noise at cruise is shown to level out or decrease as tip relative Mach number is increased beyond 1.15. Counterrotation interaction noise is shown to be a dominant source at takeoff but a secondary source at cruise. Effects of unequal rotor diameters and rotor-to-rotor spacing on interaction noise are also illustrated. Comparisons of wind tunnel acoustic measurements to flight results are made. Finally, some future directions in advanced propeller research such as swirl recovery vanes, higher sweep, forward sweep, and ducted propellers are discussed.

  10. NASA Advanced Propeller Research

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Groeneweg, John F.; Bober, Lawrence J.

    1988-01-01

    Acoustic and aerodynamic research at NASA Lewis Research Center on advanced propellers is reviewed including analytical and experimental results on both single and counterrotation. Computational tools used to calculate the detailed flow and acoustic i e l d s a r e described along with wind tunnel tests to obtain data for code verification . Results from two kinds of experiments are reviewed: ( 1 ) performance and near field noise at cruise conditions as measured in the NASA Lewis 8-by 6-Foot Wind Tunnel and ( 2 ) farfield noise and performance for takeoff/approach conditions as measured in the NASA Lewis 9-by 15-Font Anechoic Wind Tunnel. Detailed measurements of steady blade surface pressures are described along with vortex flow phenomena at off design conditions . Near field noise at cruise is shown to level out or decrease as tip relative Mach number is increased beyond 1.15. Counterrotation interaction noise is shown to be a dominant source at take off but a secondary source at cruise. Effects of unequal rotor diameters and rotor-to-rotor spacing on interaction noise a real so illustrated. Comparisons of wind tunnel acoustic measurements to flight results are made. Finally, some future directions in advanced propeller research such as swirl recovery vanes, higher sweep, forward sweep, and ducted propellers are discussed.

  11. NASA Records Database

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Callac, Christopher; Lunsford, Michelle

    2005-01-01

    The NASA Records Database, comprising a Web-based application program and a database, is used to administer an archive of paper records at Stennis Space Center. The system begins with an electronic form, into which a user enters information about records that the user is sending to the archive. The form is smart : it provides instructions for entering information correctly and prompts the user to enter all required information. Once complete, the form is digitally signed and submitted to the database. The system determines which storage locations are not in use, assigns the user s boxes of records to some of them, and enters these assignments in the database. Thereafter, the software tracks the boxes and can be used to locate them. By use of search capabilities of the software, specific records can be sought by box storage locations, accession numbers, record dates, submitting organizations, or details of the records themselves. Boxes can be marked with such statuses as checked out, lost, transferred, and destroyed. The system can generate reports showing boxes awaiting destruction or transfer. When boxes are transferred to the National Archives and Records Administration (NARA), the system can automatically fill out NARA records-transfer forms. Currently, several other NASA Centers are considering deploying the NASA Records Database to help automate their records archives.

  12. The NASA Astrobiology Roadmap.

    PubMed

    Des Marais, David J; Nuth, Joseph A; Allamandola, Louis J; Boss, Alan P; Farmer, Jack D; Hoehler, Tori M; Jakosky, Bruce M; Meadows, Victoria S; Pohorille, Andrew; Runnegar, Bruce; Spormann, Alfred M

    2008-08-01

    The NASA Astrobiology Roadmap provides guidance for research and technology development across the NASA enterprises that encompass the space, Earth, and biological sciences. The ongoing development of astrobiology roadmaps embodies the contributions of diverse scientists and technologists from government, universities, and private institutions. The Roadmap addresses three basic questions: how does life begin and evolve, does life exist elsewhere in the universe, and what is the future of life on Earth and beyond? Seven Science Goals outline the following key domains of investigation: understanding the nature and distribution of habitable environments in the universe, exploring for habitable environments and life in our own Solar System, understanding the emergence of life, determining how early life on Earth interacted and evolved with its changing environment, understanding the evolutionary mechanisms and environmental limits of life, determining the principles that will shape life in the future, and recognizing signatures of life on other worlds and on early Earth. For each of these goals, Science Objectives outline more specific high priority efforts for the next three to five years. These eighteen objectives are being integrated with NASA strategic planning. PMID:18793098

  13. The NASA LWS Sentinels Mission

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lin, Robert P.; Science, Sentinels; DefinitionTeam, Technology

    2006-06-01

    One of the primary goals of NASA's Sentinels mission, the heliospheric element of the integrated LWS (Living With a Star) program, is to provide the observations necessary for an understanding of the physics of the Sun/inner heliosphere processes that produce Solar Energetic Particle (SEP) events, so the requirements for eventual predictive capability can be defined. We present the results of the study by the Sentinels Science and Technology Definition Team (STDT) that recommends a combination of the Inner Heliosphere Sentinels (IHS),consisting of four identical spacecraft that utilize Venus gravity assists to achieve 0.25-0.75 AU orbits, primarily for in situ particles and fields measurements; a Near-Earth Sentinel (NES) with a spectroscopic coronagraph to provide the physical conditions in the SEP acceleration region and a wide field (>0.3AU) coronagraph to connect to the HIS measurements, and a Farside Sentinel (FS) with a magnetograph to provide near global photospheric magnetic field measurements for modeling the structure of the inner heliosphere. We show how the combined measurements are designed to lead to an understanding of SEP origin and to improve our predictive capability for large SEP events.

  14. A review of NASA fiber optics tasks

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Johnston, A. R.

    1977-01-01

    The status of on-going NASA tasks involving fiber optic data transmission, and related topics is given. Ground based applications, including a multiplexed wideband 2 km prototype link and a building-to-building video link, are described. In connection with the use of fibers in space, the effects to be expected from the space environment are touched on, particularly radiation darkening of fibers and temperature effects. Laboratory results on performance of fibers at cryogenic temperatures are also presented. Finally, some thoughts on future applications are given.

  15. Only Connect.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    LeMieux, Anne C.

    2000-01-01

    Describes how the author connects with today's adolescent readers by means of laughter and literature. Claims young adult literature can facilitate the growth of empathy and provide an impetus for adolescents to transcend the isolation modern culture engenders. (NH)

  16. DOE/NASA wind turbine data acquisition. Part 1: Equipment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Strock, O. J.

    1980-01-01

    Large quantities of data were collected, stored, and analyzed in connection with research and development programs on wind turbines. The hardware configuration of the wind energy remote data acquisition system is described along with its use on the NASA/DOE Wind Energy Program.

  17. NASA Automatic Information Security Handbook

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1993-01-01

    This handbook details the Automated Information Security (AIS) management process for NASA. Automated information system security is becoming an increasingly important issue for all NASA managers and with rapid advancements in computer and network technologies and the demanding nature of space exploration and space research have made NASA increasingly dependent on automated systems to store, process, and transmit vast amounts of mission support information, hence the need for AIS systems and management. This handbook provides the consistent policies, procedures, and guidance to assure that an aggressive and effective AIS programs is developed, implemented, and sustained at all NASA organizations and NASA support contractors.

  18. NASA Robotics for Space Exploration

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fischer, RIchard T.

    2007-01-01

    This presentation focuses on NASA's use of robotics in support of space exploration. The content was taken from public available websites in an effort to minimize any ITAR or EAR issues. The agenda starts with an introduction to NASA and the "Vision for Space Exploration" followed by NASA's major areas of robotic use: Robotic Explorers, Astronaut Assistants, Space Vehicle, Processing, and In-Space Workhorse (space infrastructure). Pictorials and movies of NASA robots in use by the major NASA programs: Space Shuttle, International Space Station, current Solar Systems Exploration and Mars Exploration, and future Lunar Exploration are throughout the presentation.

  19. Enabling Exploration: NASA's Technology Needs

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Carroll, Carol W.

    2012-01-01

    Deputy Director of Science, Carol W. Carroll has been invited by University of Oregon's Materials Science Institute to give a presentation. Carol's Speech explains NASA's Technologies that are needed where NASA was, what NASA's current capabilities are. Carol will highlight many of NASA's high profile projects and she will explain what NASA needs for its future by focusing on the next steps in space exploration. Carol's audience will be University of Oregon's future scientists and engineer's and their professor's along with various other faculty members.

  20. NASA Metrology and Calibration, 1980

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1981-01-01

    The proceedings of the fourth annual NASA Metrology and Calibration Workshop are presented. This workshop covered (1) review and assessment of NASA metrology and calibration activities by NASA Headquarters, (2) results of audits by the Office of Inspector General, (3) review of a proposed NASA Equipment Management System, (4) current and planned field center activities, (5) National Bureau of Standards (NBS) calibration services for NASA, (6) review of NBS's Precision Measurement and Test Equipment Project activities, (7) NASA instrument loan pool operations at two centers, (8) mobile cart calibration systems at two centers, (9) calibration intervals and decals, (10) NASA Calibration Capabilities Catalog, and (11) development of plans and objectives for FY 1981. Several papers in this proceedings are slide presentations only.

  1. NASA's Global Hawk 871 Takes Off

    NASA Video Gallery

    NASA's Global Hawk 871 departed from a runway at NASA's Wallops Flight Facility, Wallops Island, Va. on Sept. 25, 2013 at the close of the NASA HS3 Hurricane Mission. NASA 871 was returning to home...

  2. C3: A Collaborative Web Framework for NASA Earth Exchange

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Foughty, E.; Fattarsi, C.; Hardoyo, C.; Kluck, D.; Wang, L.; Matthews, B.; Das, K.; Srivastava, A.; Votava, P.; Nemani, R. R.

    2010-12-01

    The NASA Earth Exchange (NEX) is a new collaboration platform for the Earth science community that provides a mechanism for scientific collaboration and knowledge sharing. NEX combines NASA advanced supercomputing resources, Earth system modeling, workflow management, NASA remote sensing data archives, and a collaborative communication platform to deliver a complete work environment in which users can explore and analyze large datasets, run modeling codes, collaborate on new or existing projects, and quickly share results among the Earth science communities. NEX is designed primarily for use by the NASA Earth science community to address scientific grand challenges. The NEX web portal component provides an on-line collaborative environment for sharing of Eearth science models, data, analysis tools and scientific results by researchers. In addition, the NEX portal also serves as a knowledge network that allows researchers to connect and collaborate based on the research they are involved in, specific geographic area of interest, field of study, etc. Features of the NEX web portal include: Member profiles, resource sharing (data sets, algorithms, models, publications), communication tools (commenting, messaging, social tagging), project tools (wikis, blogs) and more. The NEX web portal is built on the proven technologies and policies of DASHlink.arc.nasa.gov, (one of NASA's first science social media websites). The core component of the web portal is a C3 framework, which was built using Django and which is being deployed as a common framework for a number of collaborative sites throughout NASA.

  3. Clastogenic action of hydroperoxy-5,8,11,13-icosatetraenoic acids on the mouse embryo fibroblasts C3H/10T 1/2

    SciTech Connect

    Ochi, T.; Cerutti, P.A.

    1987-02-01

    Phorbol 12-myristate 13-acetate induces the release of a low molecular weight clastogenic factor from monocytes. Hydroperoxy-5,8,11,13-icosatetraenoic acids represent major components of clastogenic factor. The authors report that several isomeric hydroperoxy-5,8,11,13-icosatetraenoic acids efficiently induce DNA strand breakage and/or alkali-labile sites in the mouse embryo fibroblasts C3H/10T 1/2. Fe chelation by desferrioxamine suppresses breakage indicating the participation of Fe-catalyzed radical reactions. An additional 37% inhibition is observed upon addition of the Ca/sup 2 +/ chelators EGTA and quin-2. This result suggests that hydroxy-peroxy-5,8,11,13-icosatetraenoic acid may activate a Ca/sup 2 +/-dependent nuclease. The addition of the antioxidant enzymes CuZn-superoxide dismutase and catalase had no effect, while glutathione peroxidase suppressed strand breakage by 90%.

  4. Development of the aboral domain in Nematostella requires β-catenin and the opposing activities of Six3/6 and Frizzled5/8.

    PubMed

    Leclère, Lucas; Bause, Markus; Sinigaglia, Chiara; Steger, Julia; Rentzsch, Fabian

    2016-05-15

    The development of the oral pole in cnidarians and the posterior pole in bilaterians is regulated by canonical Wnt signaling, whereas a set of transcription factors, including Six3/6 and FoxQ2, controls aboral development in cnidarians and anterior identity in bilaterians. However, it is poorly understood how these two patterning systems are initially set up in order to generate correct patterning along the primary body axis. Investigating the early steps of aboral pole formation in the sea anemone Nematostella vectensis, we found that, at blastula stage, oral genes are expressed before aboral genes and that Nvβ-catenin regulates both oral and aboral development. In the oral hemisphere, Nvβ-catenin specifies all subdomains except the oral-most, NvSnailA-expressing domain, which is expanded upon Nvβ-catenin knockdown. In addition, Nvβ-catenin establishes the aboral patterning system by promoting the expression of NvSix3/6 at the aboral pole and suppressing the Wnt receptor NvFrizzled5/8 at the oral pole. NvFrizzled5/8 expression thereby gets restricted to the aboral domain. At gastrula stage, NvSix3/6 and NvFrizzled5/8 are both expressed in the aboral domain, but they have opposing activities, with NvSix3/6 maintaining and NvFrizzled5/8 restricting the size of the aboral domain. At planula stage, NvFrizzled5/8 is required for patterning within the aboral domain and for regulating the size of the apical organ by modulation of a previously characterized FGF feedback loop. Our findings suggest conserved roles for Six3/6 and Frizzled5/8 in aboral/anterior development and reveal key functions for Nvβ-catenin in the patterning of the entire oral-aboral axis of Nematostella. PMID:26989171

  5. Development of the aboral domain in Nematostella requires β-catenin and the opposing activities of Six3/6 and Frizzled5/8

    PubMed Central

    Leclère, Lucas; Bause, Markus; Sinigaglia, Chiara; Steger, Julia; Rentzsch, Fabian

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT The development of the oral pole in cnidarians and the posterior pole in bilaterians is regulated by canonical Wnt signaling, whereas a set of transcription factors, including Six3/6 and FoxQ2, controls aboral development in cnidarians and anterior identity in bilaterians. However, it is poorly understood how these two patterning systems are initially set up in order to generate correct patterning along the primary body axis. Investigating the early steps of aboral pole formation in the sea anemone Nematostella vectensis, we found that, at blastula stage, oral genes are expressed before aboral genes and that Nvβ-catenin regulates both oral and aboral development. In the oral hemisphere, Nvβ-catenin specifies all subdomains except the oral-most, NvSnailA-expressing domain, which is expanded upon Nvβ-catenin knockdown. In addition, Nvβ-catenin establishes the aboral patterning system by promoting the expression of NvSix3/6 at the aboral pole and suppressing the Wnt receptor NvFrizzled5/8 at the oral pole. NvFrizzled5/8 expression thereby gets restricted to the aboral domain. At gastrula stage, NvSix3/6 and NvFrizzled5/8 are both expressed in the aboral domain, but they have opposing activities, with NvSix3/6 maintaining and NvFrizzled5/8 restricting the size of the aboral domain. At planula stage, NvFrizzled5/8 is required for patterning within the aboral domain and for regulating the size of the apical organ by modulation of a previously characterized FGF feedback loop. Our findings suggest conserved roles for Six3/6 and Frizzled5/8 in aboral/anterior development and reveal key functions for Nvβ-catenin in the patterning of the entire oral-aboral axis of Nematostella. PMID:26989171

  6. Occupant Protection at NASA

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Somers, Jeffrey; Granderson, Brad; Scheuring, Rick

    2010-01-01

    This slide presentation reviews NASA's efforts to arrive at protection of occupants of the ORION space craft on landing. An Abbreviated Injury Scale (AIS) has been developed, it is an anatomically-based, consensus-derived, global severity scoring system that classifies each injury by body region according to its relative importance on a 6-point ordinal scale. It reviews an Operationmally Relevant Injury Scale (ORIS), a classification methodology, and shows charts that detail the results of applying this ORIS to the injury databases. One chart uses NASCAR injury classification. It discusses providing a context for the level of risk inherent in the Orion landings in terms that people understand and have a sense for. For example is the risk of injury during an Orion landing roughly the same, better or worse than: An aircraft carrier landing, a NASCAR crash, or a helicopter crash, etc? The data for NASCAR and Indy Racing league (IRL) racing crash and injury data was reviewed. The risk from the Air Force, Navy, and Army injury data was also reviewed. Past NASA and the Soyuz programs injury risks are also reviewed. The work is an attempt to formulate a recommendation to the Orion Project for an acceptable level of injury risk associated with Nominal and Off-Nominal landing cases. The presentation also discusses the data mining and use of the data to Validate NASA Operationally-Relevant Injury Scale (NORIS) / Military Operationally-Relevant Injury Scale (MORIS), developing injury risk criteria, the types of data that are required, NASCAR modeling techniques and crash data, and comparison with the Brinkley model. The development of injury risk curves for each biodynamic response parameter is discussed. One of the main outcomes of this work is to establish an accurate Automated Test Dummy (ATD) that can be used to measure human tolerances.

  7. On the recent seismic activity in North-Eastern Aegean Sea including the Mw5.8 earthquake on 8 January 2013

    PubMed Central

    SARLIS, Nicholas V.

    2013-01-01

    In the last week of November 2012, we announced that a strong electrotelluric disturbance, which we judged to be a Seismic Electric Signal (SES) activity, was recorded at station Assiros located in Northern Greece. This disturbance was actually followed by an Mw5.8 earthquake on 8 January 2013 in North-Eastern Aegean Sea. Here we show that, by analyzing this SES activity and employing the natural time analysis of subsequent seismicity, we estimated the epicentral location, magnitude and occurrence time which are reasonably compatible with those of the Mw5.8 event. PMID:24213207

  8. NASA program plan

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1980-01-01

    Major facts are given for NASA'S planned FY-1981 through FY-1985 programs in aeronautics, space science, space and terrestrial applications, energy technology, space technology, space transportation systems, space tracking and data systems, and construction of facilities. Competition and cooperation, reimbursable launchings, schedules and milestones, supporting research and technology, mission coverage, and required funding are considered. Tables and graphs summarize new initiatives, significant events, estimates of space shuttle flights, and major missions in astrophysics, planetary exploration, life sciences, environmental and resources observation, and solar terrestrial investigations. The growth in tracking and data systems capabilities is also depicted.

  9. Resources: NASA for entrepreneurs

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jannazo, Mary Ann

    1988-01-01

    The services of NASA's Technology Utilization Program are detailed and highlights of spinoff products in various stages of completion are described. Areas discussed include: Stirling engines for automotive applications, klystron tubes used to reduce power costs at UHF television stations, sports applications of riblet film (e.g., boat racing), reinforced plastic for high-temperature applications, coating technology appropriate for such applications similar to the renovation of the Statue of Liberty, and medical uses of fuel pump technology (e.g., heart pumps).

  10. NASA Lunar Impact Monitoring

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Suggs, Robert M.; Moser, D. E.

    2015-01-01

    The MSFC lunar impact monitoring program began in 2006 in support of environment definition for the Constellation (return to Moon) program. Work continued by the Meteoroid Environment Office after Constellation cancellation. Over 330 impacts have been recorded. A paper published in Icarus reported on the first 5 years of observations and 126 calibrated flashes. Icarus: http://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S0019103514002243; ArXiv: http://arxiv.org/abs/1404.6458 A NASA Technical Memorandum on flash locations is in press

  11. NASA Design Strengthens Welds

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2008-01-01

    Friction Stir Welding (FSW) is a solid-state joining process-a combination of extruding and forging-ideal for use when the original metal characteristics must remain as unchanged as possible. While exploring methods to improve the use of FSW in manufacturing, engineers at Marshall Space Flight Center created technologies to address the method's shortcomings. MTS Systems Corporation, of Eden Prairie, Minnesota, discovered the NASA-developed technology and then signed a co-exclusive license agreement to commercialize Marshall's design for use in high-strength structural alloys. The resulting process offers the added bonuses of being cost-competitive, efficient, and most importantly, versatile.

  12. NASA RFID Applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fink, Patrick, Ph.D.; Kennedy, Timothy, Ph.D; Powers, Anne; Haridi, Yasser; Chu, Andrew; Lin, Greg; Yim, Hester; Byerly, Kent, Ph.D.; Barton, Richard, Ph.D.; Khayat, Michael, Ph.D.; Studor, George; Brocato, Robert; Ngo, Phong; Arndt, G. D., Ph.D.; Gross, Julia; Phan, Chau; Ni, David, Ph.D.; Dusl, John; Dekome, Kent

    2007-01-01

    This viewgraph document reviews some potential uses for Radio Frequency Identification in space missions. One of these is inventory management in space, including the methods used in Apollo, the Space Shuttle, and Space Station. The potential RFID uses in a remote human outpost are reviewed. The use of Ultra-Wideband RFID for tracking are examined such as that used in Sapphire DART The advantages of RFID in passive, wireless sensors in NASA applications are shown such as: Micrometeoroid impact detection and Sensor measurements in environmental facilities The potential for E-textiles for wireless and RFID are also examined.

  13. NASA Flywheel Program

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kaufman, Bradford A.

    1997-01-01

    NASA Lewis Research Center's Electrical Systems Development Branch is leading a program to develop space flywheel energy storage with integrated attitude control systems. The objective of this effort is to develop a flywheel system that will reduce spacecraft infrastructure weight and improve power system efficiency. Additional potential benefits of these systems are their increased life and improved system operation. These potential advantages are due to a flywheel system's very large number of charge/recharge cycles and their known state of charge. Our multifaceted program consists of efforts to develop flywheels, and their components, as well as the facilities to test them.

  14. NASA Earth Science Technology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Komar, G.

    2004-12-01

    Many promising remote sensing technologies and systems of space-based observations will be bringing scientific data and observations to Earth scientists in the next 5 to 10 years. These include instruments such as passive and active microwave and optical sensors for measuring geophysical parameters of the atmosphere, the seas and the land masses. Also, advanced information systems will be storing, processing and transmitting data collected from spaced based sensors so that massive amounts of data will be available for scientists to analyze and include in their models. This talk will describe the direction NASA is taking in instrument and information system technology through its investments.

  15. NASA Earth Science Technology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Komar, G.

    2007-12-01

    Many promising remote sensing technologies and systems of space-based observations will be bringing scientific data and observations to Earth scientists in the next 5 to 10 years. These include instruments such as passive and active microwave and optical sensors for measuring geophysical parameters of the atmosphere, the seas and the land masses. Also, advanced information systems will be storing, processing and transmitting data collected from spaced based sensors so that massive amounts of data will be available for scientists to analyze and include in their models. This talk will describe the direction NASA is taking in instrument and information system technology through its investments.

  16. NASA Enterprise Visual Analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lopez-Tellado, Maria; DiSanto, Brenda; Humeniuk, Robert; Bard, Richard, Jr.; Little, Mia; Edwards, Robert; Ma, Tien-Chi; Hollifield, Kenneith; White, Chuck

    2007-01-01

    NASA Enterprise Visual Analysis (NEVA) is a computer program undergoing development as a successor to Launch Services Analysis Tool (LSAT), formerly known as Payload Carrier Analysis Tool (PCAT). NEVA facilitates analyses of proposed configurations of payloads and packing fixtures (e.g. pallets) in a space shuttle payload bay for transport to the International Space Station. NEVA reduces the need to use physical models, mockups, and full-scale ground support equipment in performing such analyses. Using NEVA, one can take account of such diverse considerations as those of weight distribution, geometry, collision avoidance, power requirements, thermal loads, and mechanical loads.

  17. NASA's Astrophysics Suborbital Programs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Morse, Jon A.

    2009-01-01

    NASA's Suborbital Programs are the primary engines generating new scientists with the hardware and project management skills needed to lead new space missions. They also allow hands-on student participation in hardware development that is crucial to recruiting and training the next generation of scientists and engineers. They play important roles in the difficult process of migrating bench top technologies to space flight readiness levels, as well as quick migration of cutting-edge technologies to enable a space flight instruments. Initial steps already taken to reinvigorate these programs will be discussed, along with some options for maintaining technical and scientific momentum during times of funding stress.

  18. Science Communication at NASA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stofan, Ellen R.

    2015-11-01

    Scientists usually excel in a particular discipline, but generally have a difficult time informing and engaging the public about what we do. From climate science to natural hazards risks, our science does affect people's lives. Within NASA, we have started science communications training, focusing on how to tell a clear story about not just what we do, but why we do it. This not only will help us better communicate to our stakeholders and the public, but also hopefully make for better communications within our diverse teams.

  19. Device Connectivity

    PubMed Central

    Walsh, John; Roberts, Ruth; Morris, Richard

    2015-01-01

    Patients with diabetes have to take numerous factors/data into their therapeutic decisions in daily life. Connecting the devices they are using by feeding the data generated into a database/app is supposed to help patients to optimize their glycemic control. As this is not established in practice, the different roadblocks have to be discussed to open the road. That large telecommunication companies are now entering this market might be a big help in pushing this forward. Smartphones offer an ideal platform for connectivity solutions. PMID:25614015

  20. NASA telerobotics technology highlights

    SciTech Connect

    Weisbin, C.R.; Lavery, D.

    1994-12-31

    The goal of the National Aeronautics and Space Administration`s (NASA`s) Telerobotics Program, part of the over-all research program of the Office of Advanced Concepts and Technology (OACT), is to develop the technology in space-borne systems that enables new space tasks in Earth-orbiting satellite and platform servicing; robotic tending of science payloads and instruments; and planetary surface exploration, scientific sampling, and in situ analysis. Our objective is that by 2004, 50% of the extra-vehicular activity (EVA)-required operations on orbit and on planetary surfaces may be conducted via remote operation. The technologies developed for space have important dual uses for commercial areas such as medical robotics, agriculture, and subsea welding; this synergy is being actively encouraged. Moreover, mutually reciprocal collaboration with international partners (e.g., Japan and Russia) has received increasing attention. The purpose of this paper is to provide an overview of some of the ongoing program activities, which are described briefly.

  1. The NASA SETI program

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Billingham, J.; Brocker, D. H.

    1991-01-01

    In 1959, it was proposed that a sensible way to conduct interstellar communication would be to use radio at or near the frequency of hydrogen. In 1960, the first Search for Extraterrestrial Intelligence (SETI) was conducted using a radiotelescope at Green Bank in West Virginia. Since 1970, NASA has systematically developed a definitive program to conduct a sophisticated search for evidence of extraterrestrial intelligent life. The basic hypothesis is that life may be widespread in the univers, and that in many instances extraterrestrial life may have evolved into technological civilizations. The underlying scientific arguments are based on the continuously improving knowledge of astronomy and astrophysics, especially star system formation, and of planetary science, chemical evolution, and biological evolution. If only one in a million sun-like stars in our galaxy harbors species with cognitive intelligence, then there are 100,000 civilizations in the Milky Way alone. The fields of radioastronomy digital electronic engineering, spectrum analysis, and signal detection have advanced rapidly in the last twenty years and now allow for sophisticated systems to be built in order to attempt the detection of extraterrestrial intelligence signals. In concert with the scientific and engineering communities, NASA has developed, over the last several years, a Microwave Observing Project whose goal is to design, build, and operate SETI systems during the decade of the nineties in pursuit of the goal signal detection. The Microwave Observing Project is now approved and underway. There are two major components in the project: the Target Search Element and the Sky Survey Element.

  2. NASA Data Archive Evaluation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Holley, Daniel C.; Haight, Kyle G.; Lindstrom, Ted

    1997-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to expose a range of naive individuals to the NASA Data Archive and to obtain feedback from them, with the goal of learning how useful people with varied backgrounds would find the Archive for research and other purposes. We processed 36 subjects in four experimental categories, designated in this report as C+R+, C+R-, C-R+ and C-R-, for computer experienced researchers, computer experienced non-researchers, non-computer experienced researchers, and non-computer experienced non-researchers, respectively. This report includes an assessment of general patterns of subject responses to the various aspects of the NASA Data Archive. Some of the aspects examined were interface-oriented, addressing such issues as whether the subject was able to locate information, figure out how to perform desired information retrieval tasks, etc. Other aspects were content-related. In doing these assessments, answers given to different questions were sometimes combined. This practice reflects the tendency of the subjects to provide answers expressing their experiences across question boundaries. Patterns of response are cross-examined by subject category in order to bring out deeper understandings of why subjects reacted the way they did to the archive. After the general assessment, there will be a more extensive summary of the replies received from the test subjects.

  3. NASA Performance Plan

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1999-01-01

    The Government Performance and Results Act (GPRA) passed by Congress and signed by the President in 1993 provides a new tool to improve the efficiency of all Federal agencies. The goals of GPRA are to: Improve citizen confidence in Government performance; Improve Federal program management, effectiveness, and public accountability; and Improve congressional decisionmaking on where to commit the Nation's financial and human resources. The Act directs Executive Branch agencies to develop a customer-focused strategic plan that aligns activities with concrete missions and goals. The first plans were submitted in September 1998 as part of the Fiscal Year 1999 (FY99) budget process. These budget submissions were expected to support the goals expressed in the agency strategic plans. The Act also directs agencies to manage and measure results to justify congressional appropriations and authorizations. Six months after the completion of the fiscal year, agencies will report on the degree of success in achieving the goals and evaluation measures defined in the strategic and performance plans. The plans required by GPRA have been submitted to the Office of Management and Budget (OMB) and to Congress. Copies of NASA plans are available from the Office of Policy and Plans at NASA Headquarters and can be accessed on the i nterinet web sites identified in the Appendix.

  4. NASA Discovery Program Workshop

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1992-01-01

    The purpose of the workshop was to review concepts for Discover-class missions that would follow the first two missions (MESUR-Pathfinder and NEAR) of this new program. The concepts had been generated by scientists involved in NASA's Solar System Exploration Program to carry out scientifically important investigations within strict guidelines -- $150 million cap on development cost and 3 year cap on development schedule. Like the Astrophysics Small Explorers (SMEX), such 'faster and cheaper' missions could provide vitality to solar system exploration research by returning high quality data more frequently and regularly and by involving many more young researchers than normally participate directly in larger missions. An announcement of opportunity (AO) to propose a Discovery mission to NASA is expected to be released in about two years time. One purpose of the workshop was to assist Code SL in deciding how to allocate its advanced programs resources. A second, complimentary purpose was to provide the concept proposers with feedback to allow them to better prepare for the AO.

  5. Replacing NASA's Shuttle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Robertson, Donald F.

    1990-02-01

    The latest NASA Shuttle II proposal for an Advanced Manned Launch System (AMLS) is reviewed. It could achieve total reusability, with a glide-back booster stage and no solid rockets. The propellant load would be divided between the booster and orbiter stages. The AMLS payload of just over nine tons will be limited to crew and 'high-value' cargo, carried in the dorsal pod. Bulky freight and satellites will rely on expendable launchers. AMLS will be a Space Station ferry only and would not be used for on-orbit experiments. The operational history of the Space Shuttle program is shown, as well as its programmed future undertakings. Beyond the proposed Shuttle II, some insight is offered on the conceptual vehicle named Shuttle Z that could be the mainstay of Lunar-Base or Mars expeditions. Needed technologies and key features of a proposed AMLS orbiter are also mentioned. In addition, NASA proposals for a rescue vehicle for Space Station Freedom that will serve to return stranded or injured astronauts to earth is presented. One such proposed crew rescue vehicle would carry four people plus 450 kg of supplies, for a gross mass of 7146 kg.

  6. NASA scientific integrity policy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Showstack, Randy

    On 16 December, NASA became the latest U.S. federal agency to issue a scientific integrity policy. It was issued less than 10 days after the U.S. National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) issued its policy on the same topic (see "NOAA issues scientific integrity policy," Eos Trans. AGU, 92(50), 467, doi:10.1029/2011EO500004, 2011). The agency policies respond to earlier White House memos on the topic issued in 2009 and 2010. NASA is the fifth federal department or agency that has finalized a scientific integrity policy; the Department of the Interior and the National Science Foundation also have finalized their policies. As Eos went to press, 13 other policies were in near-final draft form, including those from the departments of Agriculture and Energy; the Environmental Protection Agency and the Department of Labor had indicated that they expected to submit their policies to the White House Office of Science and Technology Policy (OSTP) soon, OSTP director John Holdren wrote in a 21 December note on the office's Web site.

  7. NASA Classroom Bioreactor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Scully, Robert

    2004-01-01

    Exploration of space provides a compelling need for cell-based research into the basic mechanisms that underlie the profound changes that occur in terrestrial life that is transitioned to low gravity environments. Toward that end, NASA developed a rotating bioreactor in which cells are cultured while continuously suspended in a cylinder in which the culture medium rotates with the cylinder. The randomization of the gravity vector accomplished by the continuous rotation, in a low shear environment, provides an analog of microgravity. Because cultures grown in bioreactors develop structures and functions that are much closer to those exhibited by native tissue than can be achieved with traditional culture methods, bioreactors have contributed substantially to advancing research in the fields of cancer, diabetes, infectious disease modeling for vaccine production, drug efficacy, and tissue engineering. NASA has developed a Classroom Bioreactor (CB) that is built from parts that are easily obtained and assembled, user-friendly and versatile. It can be easily used in simple school settings to examine the effect cultures of seeds or cells. An educational brief provides assembly instructions and lesson plans that describes activities in science, math and technology that explore free fall, microgravity, orbits, bioreactors, structure-function relationships and the scientific method.

  8. The Teacher's Ongoing Role in Creating a Developmentally Appropriate Early Childhood Program: A Self-Study Process for Teachers of Children Ages 5-8.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Connecticut State Dept. of Education, Hartford.

    This self-study instrument is designed to support teachers' efforts to implement an early childhood program for children of 5-8 years of age that reflects the qualities of developmentally appropriate programming described in Connecticut's Guide to Program Development for Kindergarten (1988). The contents, which are presented in checklist format,…

  9. National Association for Research in Science Teaching Annual Meeting, Abstracts of Presented Papers (55th, Lake Geneva, Wisconsin, April 5-8, 1982).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    White, Arthur L., Ed.; Blosser, Patricia E., Ed.

    Abstracts of most of the papers presented at the 55th annual meeting of the National Association for Research in Science Teaching (NARST), held at the Abbey, Lake Geneva, WI, April 5-8, 1982 have been collected in this publication. Papers relate to such topics as teacher education: preservice and inservice, cognitive development, research…

  10. Homemaking--Family Living. Curriculum Planning Guidelines. Level I-II. Middle School, Grades 5-8. Reprint 1978. Home Economics Education, [No. 1].

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    New York State Education Dept., Albany. Bureau of Occupational Education Curriculum Development.

    This curriculum guide for Levels I and II home economics teachers in New York State provides guidelines for developing instructional program content for grades 5-8. An introductory section describes the design of the homemaking-family living curriculum; presents procedures for utilizing modules in planning instruction with an example of plans for…

  11. The New Nation's Westward Expansion. Grade 5 Model Lesson for Standard 5.8. California History-Social Science Course Models.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Zachlod, Michelle, Ed.

    California State Standard 5.8 is delineated in the following way: "Students trace the colonization, immigration, and settlement patterns of the American people from 1789 to the mid-1800s, with emphasis on the role of economic incentives, effects of the physical and political geography, and transportation systems." Students answer six questions…

  12. Mathematics Curriculum Changes in Republic of Serbia for Grades 5-8 After the Break-Up of Socialist Federal Republic of Yugoslavia

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Vlajic, Jovana

    2011-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine the changes in the mathematics curriculum for grades 5-8 in the Republic of Serbia after the break-up of SFRY. In particular, the research sought to identify the changes in the mathematics curriculum in terms of curriculum content and learning objectives, textbooks, and high school entrance examination…

  13. A universal model for the secondary structure of 5.8S ribosomal RNA molecules, their contact sites with 28S ribosomal RNAs, and their prokaryotic equivalent.

    PubMed Central

    Vaughn, J C; Sperbeck, S J; Ramsey, W J; Lawrence, C B

    1984-01-01

    The phylogenetic approach (ref. 1) has been utilized in construction of a universal 5.8S rRNA secondary structure model, in which about 65% of the residues exist in paired structures. Conserved nucleotides primarily occupy unpaired regions. Multiple compensating base changes are demonstrated to be present in each of the five postulated helices, thereby forming a major basis for their proof. The results of chemical and enzymatic probing of 5.8S rRNAs (ref. 13, 32) are fully consistent with, and support, our model. This model differs in several ways from recently proposed 5.8S rRNA models (ref. 3, 4), which are discussed. Each of the helices in our model has been extended to the corresponding bacterial, chloroplast and mitochondrial sequences, which are demonstrated to be positionally conserved by alignment with their eukaryotic counterparts. This extension is also made for the base paired 5.8S/28S contact points, and their prokaryotic and organelle counterparts. The demonstrated identity of secondary structure in these diverse molecules strongly suggests that they perform equivalent functions in prokaryotic and eukaryotic ribosomes. PMID:6208532

  14. NASA Nationwide and the Year of the Solar System (Invited)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ferrari, K.

    2010-12-01

    NASA depends on the efforts of several volunteer networks to help implement its formal and informal education goals, to disseminate its key messages related to space and Earth science missions and to support broad public initiatives such as the upcoming Year of the Solar System (YSS), sponsored by the Planetary Science Education and Public Outreach Forum (SEPOF). These highly leveraged networks include programs such as Solar System Ambassadors, Solar System Educators, Night Sky Network, and NASA Explorer Schools. Founded in June 2008, NASA Nationwide: A Consortium of Formal and Informal Education Networks is a program that brings together these volunteer networks by creating an online community and shared resources which broadens the member networks’ base of support and provides opportunities to coordinate, cooperate, and collaborate with each other. Since its inception, NASA Nationwide has grown to include twelve NASA-funded volunteer networks as members and collaborates with three other NASA networks as affiliates. NASA Nationwide’s support for the Year of the Solar System includes management of several recently completed Solar System Nights kits, which will be made available regionally to collaborative teams of volunteers and affiliates for use in connecting with students in underserved, underrepresented and rural populations. In the latter part of 2010, the program will be further enhanced by the debut of the public NASA Nationwide website to showcase the successful efforts of these volunteers, provide information about member organizations and advertise their upcoming events in support of the Year of the Solar System. Through its broad reach and the dedicated enthusiasm of its members, NASA Nationwide will be an essential factor utilized to help achieve Year of the Solar System goals and ensure the ultimate success of the initiative.

  15. NASA Video Catalog. Supplement 15

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2005-01-01

    This issue of the NASA Video Catalog cites video productions listed in the NASA STI Database. The videos listed have been developed by the NASA centers, covering Shuttle mission press conferences; fly-bys of planets; aircraft design, testing and performance; environmental pollution; lunar and planetary exploration; and many other categories related to manned and unmanned space exploration. Each entry in the publication consists of a standard bibliographic citation accompanied by an abstract. The Table of Contents shows how the entries are arranged by divisions and categories according to the NASA Scope and Coverage Category Guide. For users with specific information, a Title Index is available. A Subject Term Index, based on the NASA Thesaurus, is also included. Guidelines for usage of NASA audio/visual material, ordering information, and order forms are also available.

  16. NASA Video Catalog. Supplement 12

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2002-01-01

    This report lists 1878 video productions from the NASA STI Database. This issue of the NASA Video Catalog cites video productions listed in the NASA STI Database. The videos listed have been developed by the NASA centers, covering Shuttle mission press conferences; fly-bys of planets; aircraft design, testing and performance; environmental pollution; lunar and planetary exploration; and many other categories related to manned and unmanned space exploration. Each entry in the publication consists of a standard bibliographic citation accompanied by an abstract. The listing of the entries is arranged by STAR categories. A complete Table of Contents describes the scope of each category. For users with specific information, a Title Index is available. A Subject Term Index, based on the NASA Thesaurus, is also included. Guidelines for usage of NASA audio/visual material, ordering information, and order forms are also available.

  17. NASA Science Budget Choices Criticized

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zielinski, Sarah

    2006-03-01

    NASA's decision to focus its science efforts on large missions at the expense of smaller missions and research is misguided and will have a long-term negative impact on attracting and retaining scientists and engineers to NASA-related science, several scientists testified at a 2 March hearing. Witnesses at the hearing before the U.S. House of Representatives Science Committee included NASA Associate Administrator for the Science Mission Directorate Mary Cleave and members or chairs of four U.S. National Academy of Sciences (NAS) decadal surveys of various aspects of NASA science. The witnesses discussed cuts and delays to NASA projects proposed in the agency's Fiscal Year 2007 budget request. NASA's science budget would grow by 1.5 percent in FY2007, and then by just one percent per year in 2008-2011 (see Eos 87(9), 2006).

  18. NASA Publications Guide for Authors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1999-01-01

    Publication of scientific and technical information (STI) is one of the responsibilities of NASA as a Government Agency. The National Aeronautics and Space Act of 1958 established a requirement for NASA to provide "the widest practicable and appropriate dissemination of information concerning its activities and the results thereof." Persons engaged in NASA-funded or NASA-sponsored research and development and related efforts are therefore required to publish the results of their work in the NASA STI series or through other externally accessible channels. An Agency-wide committee of publications professionals prepared the standards and conventions presented in this guide for authors. Section 2 of this guide presents descriptions of each type of report in the NASA STI Report Series and briefly discusses the applicable production methods and appropriate dissemination of these reports. Section 3 discusses professional and ethical concerns. Section 4 provides recommended standards for document format, makeup, and organization. Section 5 presents miscellaneous preparation concerns.

  19. NASA Video Catalog. Supplement 13

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2003-01-01

    This issue of the NASA Video Catalog cites video productions listed in the NASA STI Database. The videos listed have been developed by the NASA centers, covering Shuttle mission press conferences; fly-bys of planets; aircraft design, testing and performance; environmental pollution; lunar and planetary exploration; and many other categories related to manned and unmanned space exploration. Each entry in the publication consists of a standard bibliographic citation accompanied by an abstract. The Table of Contents shows how the entries are arranged by divisions and categories according to the NASA Scope and Coverage Category Guide. For users with specific information, a Title Index is available. A Subject Term Index, based on the NASA Thesaurus, is also included. Guidelines for usage of NASA audio/visual material, ordering information, and order forms are also available.

  20. NASA Video Catalog. Supplement 14

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2004-01-01

    This issue of the NASA Video Catalog cites video productions listed in the NASA STI Database. The videos listed have been developed by the NASA centers, covering Shuttle mission press conferences; fly-bys of planets; aircraft design, testing and performance; environmental pollution; lunar and planetary exploration; and many other categories related to manned and unmanned space exploration. Each entry in the publication consists of a standard bibliographic citation accompanied by an abstract. The Table of Contents shows how the entries are arranged by divisions and categories according to the NASA Scope and Coverage Category Guide. For users with specific information, a Title Index is available. A Subject Term Index, based on the NASA Thesaurus, is also included. Guidelines for usage of NASA audio/visual material, ordering information, and order forms are also available.

  1. College Connection

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hewitt, Kimberly Kappler; Scalzo, Mary Jo

    2012-01-01

    This article describes Oakwood City School District's College Connection Study, which is now in its eighth year. The purpose of the study is to help the educators in the district learn how to effectively prepare students for success in the colleges of their choice. Teachers, administrators, and other staff members travel to colleges to conduct…

  2. Connecting Node

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Johnson, Christopher J.; Raboin, Jasen L.; Spexarth, Gary R.

    2009-01-01

    A paper describes the Octanode, a connecting node that facilitates the integration of multiple docking mechanisms, hatches, windows, and internal and external systems with the use of flat surfaces. The Octanode is a 26- faced Great Rhombicuboctahedron Archi medean solid with six octagonshaped panels, eight hexagon-shaped panels, and 12 square panels using three unique, simple, flat shapes to construct a spherical approximation. Each flat shape can be constructed with a variety of material and manufacturing techniques, such as honeycomb composite panels or a pocketed skinstringer configuration, using conventional means. The flat shapes can be connected together and sealed to create a pressurizable volume by the use of any conventional means including welding or fastening devices and sealant. The node can then be connected to other elements to allow transfer between those elements, or it could serve as an airlock. The Octanode can be manufactured on the ground and can be integrated with subsystems including hatches and ports. The node can then be transported to its intended location, whether on orbit or on surface. Any of the flat panels could be replaced by curved ones, turning the node into a copula. Windows may be placed on flat panes with optimal viewing angles that are not blocked by large connecting nodes. The advantage of using flat panels to represent a spherical approximation is that this allows for easier integration of subsystems and design features.

  3. Get Connected

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Horton, Jessica; Hagevik, Rita; Adkinson, Bennett; Parmly, Jilynn

    2013-01-01

    Technology can be both a blessing and a curse in the classroom. Although technology can provide greater access to information and increase student engagement, if screen time replaces time spent outside, then students stand to lose awareness and connectivity to the surrounding natural environment. This article describes how Google Earth can foster…

  4. Making Connections

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Quillen, Ian

    2014-01-01

    "We used to send out books that looked like this," says Barbara Dreyer, as she holds the 500-page volume from one of the first-ever courses offered online by Connections Academy. "You could look at this information online, but, frankly, a lot of people were doing this," she adds, thumbing through the book's pages. Dreyer,…

  5. The NASA Polarimetric Radar (NPOL)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Petersen, Walter A.; Wolff, David B.

    2013-01-01

    Characteristics of the NASA NPOL S-band dual-polarimetric radar are presented including its operating characteristics, field configuration, scanning capabilities and calibration approaches. Examples of precipitation science data collections conducted using various scan types, and associated products, are presented for different convective system types and previous field campaign deployments. Finally, the NASA NPOL radar location is depicted in its home base configuration within the greater Wallops Flight Facility precipitation research array supporting NASA Global Precipitation Measurement Mission ground validation.

  6. NASA and The Semantic Web

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ashish, Naveen

    2005-01-01

    We provide an overview of several ongoing NASA endeavors based on concepts, systems, and technology from the Semantic Web arena. Indeed NASA has been one of the early adopters of Semantic Web Technology and we describe ongoing and completed R&D efforts for several applications ranging from collaborative systems to airspace information management to enterprise search to scientific information gathering and discovery systems at NASA.

  7. The NASA Technical Report Server

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nelson, M. L.; Gottlich, G. L.; Bianco, D. J.; Paulson, S. S.; Binkley, R. L.; Kellogg, Y. D.; Beaumont, C. J.; Schmunk, R. B.; Kurtz, M. J.; Accomazzi, A.; Syed, O.

    The National Aeronautics and Space Act of 1958 established the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) and charged it to "provide for the widest practicable and appropriate dissemination of information concerning...its activities and the results thereof". The search for innovative methods to distribute NASA's information led a grass-roots team to create the NASA Technical Report Server (NTRS), which uses the World Wide Web and other popular Internet-based information systems .

  8. Increased thymidylate synthase in L1210 cells possessing acquired resistance to N10-propargyl-5,8-dideazafolic acid (CB3717): development, characterization, and cross-resistance studies

    SciTech Connect

    Jackman, A.L.; Alison, D.L.; Calvert, A.H.; Harrap, K.R.

    1986-06-01

    The properties are described of a mutant L1210 cell line (L1210:C15) with acquired resistance (greater than 200-fold) to the thymidylate synthase (TS) inhibitor N10-propargyl-5,8-dideazafolic acid. TS was overproduced 45-fold and was accompanied by a small increase in the activity of dihydrofolate reductase (2.6-fold). Both the level of resistance and enzyme activities were maintained in drug-free medium (greater than 300 generations). Failure of N10-propargyl-5,8-dideazafolic acid to suppress the (/sup 3/H)-2'-deoxyuridine incorporation into the acid-precipitable material of the resistant line supported the evidence that TS overproduction was the mechanism of resistance; consequently the L1210:C15 cells were largely cross-resistant to another (but weaker) TS inhibitor, 5,8-dideazafolic acid. Minimal cross-resistance was observed to the dihydrofolate reductase inhibitors methotrexate and 5-methyl-5,8-dideazaaminopterin (5- and 2-fold, respectively). L1210 and L1210:C15 cells were, however, equally sensitive to 5-fluorodeoxyuridine (FdUrd), an unexpected finding since a metabolite, 5-fluorodeoxyuridine monophosphate, is a potent TS inhibitor; however, this cytotoxicity against the L1210:C15 cells was antagonized by coincubation with 5 microM folinic acid although folinic acid potentiated the cytotoxicity of FdUrd to the N10-propargyl-5,8-dideazafolic acid-sensitive L1210 line. Thymidine was much less effective as a FdUrd protecting agent in the L1210:C15 when compared with the L1210 cells; however, a combination of thymidine plus hypoxanthine was without any additional effect (compared with thymidine alone) against the sensitive line but effectively protected L1210:C15 cells.

  9. Physical, morphological and functional differences between ph 5.8 and 7.4 aggregates of the Alzheimer's amyloid peptide Abeta.

    PubMed

    Wood, S J; Maleeff, B; Hart, T; Wetzel, R

    1996-03-15

    The Alzheimer's amyloid peptide Abeta(1-40) generates a turbid, Congo re-binding aggregation reaction product within minutes when incubated in the pH range 5 to 6. At pH 7.4, Abeta forms little or no aggregate in this time frame, requiring hours or days, rather than minutes, to complete fibril formation. The pH 5.8 aggregates are not amyloid fibrils, but rather appear in electron micrographs as a mixture of larger particles of different morphologies. These aggregates differ from classical fibrils by a number of other measures. Per mass of peptide aggregated, the pH 5.8 product binds less Congo red and thioflavin T than does aggregate grow in unstirred reactions at pH 7.4. Both the pH 5.8 and 7.4 aggregates exhibit light scattering at 90 degrees. However, while the pH 5.8 aggregate is visible in suspension by the light microscopy, and exhibits turbidity at 405 nm, the fibrils grown at pH 7.4 in an unstirred reaction are transparent. The two aggregate types do not interconvert in pH shift experiments. Most dramatically, and in contrast to fibrils grown at pH 7.4, the turbid aggregate generated at pH 5.8 is incapable of seeding fibril growth at pH 7.4. Although proteolytic processing of betaAPP to generate Abeta probably takes place in a low pH compartment of the cell, our results suggest that fibril formation is not likely to be initiated in such an environment.

  10. Pax2/5/8 and Pax6 alternative splicing events in basal chordates and vertebrates: a focus on paired box domain

    PubMed Central

    Fabian, Peter; Kozmikova, Iryna; Kozmik, Zbynek; Pantzartzi, Chrysoula N.

    2015-01-01

    Paired box transcription factors play important role in development and tissue morphogenesis. The number of Pax homologs varies among species studied so far, due to genome and gene duplications that have affected PAX family to a great extent. Based on sequence similarity and functional domains, four Pax classes have been identified in chordates, namely Pax1/9, Pax2/5/8, Pax3/7, and Pax4/6. Numerous splicing events have been reported mainly for Pax2/5/8 and Pax6 genes. Of significant interest are those events that lead to Pax proteins with presumed novel properties, such as altered DNA-binding or transcriptional activity. In the current study, a thorough analysis of Pax2/5/8 splicing events from cephalochordates and vertebrates was performed. We focused more on Pax2/5/8 and Pax6 splicing events in which the paired domain is involved. Three new splicing events were identified in Oryzias latipes, one of which seems to be conserved in Acanthomorphata. Using representatives from deuterostome and protostome phyla, a comparative analysis of the Pax6 exon-intron structure of the paired domain was performed, during an attempt to estimate the time of appearance of the Pax6(5a) mRNA isoform. As shown in our analysis, this splicing event is characteristic of Gnathostomata and is absent in the other chordate subphyla. Moreover, expression pattern of alternative spliced variants was compared between cephalochordates and fish species. In summary, our data indicate expansion of alternative mRNA variants in paired box region of Pax2/5/8 and Pax6 genes during the course of vertebrate evolution. PMID:26191073

  11. The NASA Fireball Network

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cooke, William J.

    2013-01-01

    In the summer of 2008, the NASA Meteoroid Environments Office (MEO) began to establish a video fireball network, based on the following objectives: (1) determine the speed distribution of cm size meteoroids, (2) determine the major sources of cm size meteoroids (showers/sporadic sources), (3) characterize meteor showers (numbers, magnitudes, trajectories, orbits), (4) determine the size at which showers dominate the meteor flux, (5) discriminate between re-entering space debris and meteors, and 6) locate meteorite falls. In order to achieve the above with the limited resources available to the MEO, it was necessary that the network function almost fully autonomously, with very little required from humans in the areas of upkeep or analysis. With this in mind, the camera design and, most importantly, the ASGARD meteor detection software were adopted from the University of Western Ontario's Southern Ontario Meteor Network (SOMN), as NASA has a cooperative agreement with Western's Meteor Physics Group. 15 cameras have been built, and the network now consists of 8 operational cameras, with at least 4 more slated for deployment in calendar year 2013. The goal is to have 15 systems, distributed in two or more groups east of automatic analysis; every morning, this server also automatically generates an email and a web page (http://fireballs.ndc.nasa.gov) containing an automated analysis of the previous night's events. This analysis provides the following for each meteor: UTC date and time, speed, start and end locations (longitude, latitude, altitude), radiant, shower identification, light curve (meteor absolute magnitude as a function of time), photometric mass, orbital elements, and Tisserand parameter. Radiant/orbital plots and various histograms (number versus speed, time, etc) are also produced. After more than four years of operation, over 5,000 multi-station fireballs have been observed, 3 of which potentially dropped meteorites. A database containing data on all

  12. NASA Tech Briefs, Spring 1985

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1985-01-01

    Topic include: NASA TU Services; New Product Ideas; Electronic Components and Circuits; Electronic Systems; Physical Sciences; Materials; Life Sciences; Mechanics; Machinery; Fabrication Technology; Mathematics and Information Sciences.

  13. NASA Tech Briefs, Summer 1985

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1985-01-01

    Topics include: NASA TU Services; New Product Ideas; Electronic Components and Circuits; Electronic Systems; Physical Sciences; Materials; Life Sciences; Mechanics; Machinery; Fabrication Technology; Mathematics and Information Sciences.

  14. NASA space biology accomplishments, 1982

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Halstead, T. W.; Pleasant, L. G.

    1983-01-01

    Summaries of NASA's Space Biology Program projects are provided. The goals, objectives, accomplishments, and future plans of each project are described in this publication as individual technical summaries.

  15. NASA Information Technology Implementation Plan

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2000-01-01

    NASA's Information Technology (IT) resources and IT support continue to be a growing and integral part of all NASA missions. Furthermore, the growing IT support requirements are becoming more complex and diverse. The following are a few examples of the growing complexity and diversity of NASA's IT environment. NASA is conducting basic IT research in the Intelligent Synthesis Environment (ISE) and Intelligent Systems (IS) Initiatives. IT security, infrastructure protection, and privacy of data are requiring more and more management attention and an increasing share of the NASA IT budget. Outsourcing of IT support is becoming a key element of NASA's IT strategy as exemplified by Outsourcing Desktop Initiative for NASA (ODIN) and the outsourcing of NASA Integrated Services Network (NISN) support. Finally, technology refresh is helping to provide improved support at lower cost. Recently the NASA Automated Data Processing (ADP) Consolidation Center (NACC) upgraded its bipolar technology computer systems with Complementary Metal Oxide Semiconductor (CMOS) technology systems. This NACC upgrade substantially reduced the hardware maintenance and software licensing costs, significantly increased system speed and capacity, and reduced customer processing costs by 11 percent.

  16. NASA Pocket Statistics: 1997 Edition

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1997-01-01

    POCKET STATISTICS is published by the NATIONAL AERONAUTICS AND SPACE ADMINISTRATION (NASA). Included in each edition is Administrative and Organizational information, summaries of Space Flight Activity including the NASA Major Launch Record, Aeronautics and Space Transportation and NASA Procurement, Financial and Workforce data. The NASA Major Launch Record includes all launches of Scout class and larger vehicles. Vehicle and spacecraft development flights are also included in the Major Launch Record. Shuttle missions are counted as one launch and one payload, where free flying payloads are not involved. All Satellites deployed from the cargo bay of the Shuttle and placed in a separate orbit or trajectory are counted as an additional payload.

  17. 14 CFR 1240.105 - Special procedures-NASA and NASA contractor employees.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 5 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Special procedures-NASA and NASA contractor...—NASA and NASA contractor employees. (a) A NASA Headquarters office, a NASA field installation, or a NASA contractor may submit to the Board an application for an award identifying the originator(s)...

  18. 14 CFR 1240.105 - Special procedures-NASA and NASA contractor employees.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 5 2011-01-01 2010-01-01 true Special procedures-NASA and NASA contractor...—NASA and NASA contractor employees. (a) A NASA Headquarters office, a NASA field installation, or a NASA contractor may submit to the Board an application for an award identifying the originator(s)...

  19. 14 CFR 1240.105 - Special procedures-NASA and NASA contractor employees.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 5 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Special procedures-NASA and NASA contractor...—NASA and NASA contractor employees. (a) A NASA Headquarters office, a NASA field installation, or a NASA contractor may submit to the Board an application for an award identifying the originator(s)...

  20. NASA commercial programs

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1990-01-01

    Highlights of NASA-sponsored and assisted commercial space activities of 1989 are presented. Industrial R and D in space, centers for the commercial development of space, and new cooperative agreements are addressed in the U.S. private sector in space section. In the building U.S. competitiveness through technology section, the following topics are presented: (1) technology utilization as a national priority; (2) an exploration of benefits; and (3) honoring Apollo-Era spinoffs. International and domestic R and D trends, and the space sector are discussed in the section on selected economic indicators. Other subjects included in this report are: (1) small business innovation; (2) budget highlights and trends; (3) commercial programs management; and (4) the commercial programs advisory committee.